WorldWideScience

Sample records for change material slurry

  1. State of the art on phase change material slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A bibliographic study on PCM slurries. ► Clathrate Hydrate slurry, Microencapsulated PCM Slurry, shape-stabilized PCM slurries and Phase Change Material Emulsions. ► Formation, thermo-physical, rheological, heat transfers properties and applications of these four PCS systems. ► The use of thermal energy storage and distribution based on PCM slurries can improve the refrigerating machine performances. - Abstract: The interest in using phase change slurry (PCS) media as thermal storage and heat transfer fluids is increasing and thus leading to an enhancement in the number of articles on the subject. In air-conditioning and refrigeration applications, PCS systems represent a pure benefit resulting in the increase of thermal energy storage capacity, high heat transfer characteristics and positive phase change temperatures which can occur under low pressures. Hence, they allow the increase of energy efficiency and reduce the quantity of thermal fluids. This review describes the formation, thermo-physical, rheological, heat transfer properties and applications of four PCS systems: Clathrate hydrate slurry (CHS), Microencapsulated Phase Change Materials Slurry (MPCMS), shape-stabilized PCM slurries (SPCMSs) and Phase Change Material Emulsions (PCMEs). It regroups a bibliographic summary of important information that can be very helpful when such systems are used. It also gives interesting and valuable insights on the choice of the most suitable PCS media for laboratory and industrial applications.

  2. Analysis of microencapsulated phase change material slurries and phase change material emulsions as heat transfer fluid and thermal storage material

    OpenAIRE

    Delgado Gracia, Mónica; Zalba Nonay, Belen; Lázaro Fernández, Ana

    2013-01-01

    La presente tesis doctoral trata el análisis de suspensiones y emulsiones de materiales de cambio de fase para su uso como fluido caloportador y material de almacenamiento térmico. El interés de la tesis nace de la actual conyuntura energética. Dentro de la línea de búsqueda de un modelo energético sostenible, el almacenamiento térmico de energía contribuye a la utilización eficiente de la energía. Las aplicaciones del almacenamiento térmico de energía mediante cambio de fase sólido-líquido s...

  3. THE RESEARCH OF RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF STOWING SLURRY WITH HIGH-WATER MATERIAL SOLIDIFYING TAILINGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨本生; 刘文永

    1996-01-01

    High-water material, tailings from goldmine and water are mixed into a new slurry.Testing of rheological properties of stowing slurries A and B is made to determine type and rheo-logical parameters of the slurry. The main factors influencing rheological properties of the slurryare analyzed and the rational concentration and empirical resistance calculating formula of pipeline transportation are presented.

  4. Slurry Molding Technologies for Novel Carbon and Graphite Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, T.D.

    2004-06-30

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a slurry molding technology for the manufacture of porous, high surface area, carbon fiber composites molecular sieves, and carbon-carbon composite preforms. Potentially, this technology could be applied to the manufacture of a host of novel carbon materials including porous adsorbent carbons, low-pressure drop adsorbent carbon composites, ultra-fine-grained graphite, and carbon fiber reinforced graphite. New opportunities for high surface carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS) materials are now emerging. Many of these opportunities are driven by increasingly harsh environmental pressures. Traditional granular activated carbon (GAC) is not suitable for many of these applications because of the difficulties encountered with attrition and in forming ''structures'' which have the necessary mechanical and physical properties. In addition, the electrical desorption of adsorbed species is not possible with GAC due to its low bulk electrical conductivity. Activated carbon fibers have been found to be useful in some applications. Work by ORNL has shown, for example, that CFCMS materials are capable of adsorbing various gases and desorbing them under electrical stimulation. For some applications these fibers have to be formed into a structure that can offer the desired mechanical integrity and pressure drop characteristics. To date, the work by ORNL has focused on the use of a single manufacturer's isotropic pitch fibers which, when activated, may be cost prohibitive for many applications. Fine-grained graphite is attractive for many applications including the chemical processing industry where their unique combination of properties--including high strength and chemical inertness, are particularly attractive. However, a lack of toughness can limit their utility in certain applications. The use of ultra-fine powders in conjunction with slurry molding and hot pressing offers the

  5. Materials and design experience in a slurry-fed electric glass melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of a slurry-fed electric gas melter and an examination of the performance and condition of the construction materials were completed. The joule-heated, ceramic-lined melter was constructed to test the applicability of materials and processes for high-level waste vitrification. The developmental Liquid-Fed Ceramic Melter (LFCM) was operated for three years with simulated high-level waste and was subjected to conditions more severe than those expected for a nuclear waste vitrification plant

  6. Materials and design experience in a slurry-fed electric glass melter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, S.M.; Larson, D.E.

    1981-08-01

    The design of a slurry-fed electric gas melter and an examination of the performance and condition of the construction materials were completed. The joule-heated, ceramic-lined melter was constructed to test the applicability of materials and processes for high-level waste vitrification. The developmental Liquid-Fed Ceramic Melter (LFCM) was operated for three years with simulated high-level waste and was subjected to conditions more severe than those expected for a nuclear waste vitrification plant.

  7. Changes of Physico–Chemical Properties of Pig Slurry During Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Mansyur; Hong L Choi

    2011-01-01

    This study was aimed to determine changes of the characteristics of raw pig slurry as liquid organic fertilizer at various storage times. A completely randomized design was used in this research. The treatments were storage times, i.e.: 0, 15, 30, 45, and 60 days. Variables observed were loss of the slurry, degree of acidity (pH), electrical conductivity (EC), total solid (TS), volatile solid (VS), total chemical oxygen demand (tCOD), soluble chemical oxygen demand (sCOD), total nitrogen (TN)...

  8. Application of polymer-powder slurry for fabrication of abrasion resistant coatings on tool materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Matula

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Development of a new generation tool materials on the basis of M2 high speed-steel or 41Cr4 steel covered with the carbides. Application of pressureless forming of powder as a manufacturing method of anti-wear coatings gives the possibility to produce this materials with relative low cost of production.Design/methodology/approach: Powder metallurgy, pressureless forming of powder, sintering, microstructure examination, X-ray dispersive energy examination, hardness examination.Findings: Putting down coatings with this method does not call for using the costly equipment for the physical or chemical deposition of coatings from the gaseous phase. Coating thickness may be easily regulated by applying the powder-binder slurry layer once or several times on the prepared substrate surface. Hardness of coatings in the sintered state is higher compared to the HS6-5-2 and 41Cr4 steels by about 400 and 700 HV respectively. It is expected that hardness of the coatings and substrate will grow after their heat treatment.Practical implications: Application of powder metallurgy and especially pressureless forming of powder to manufacturing of steel covered with anti-wear coatings gives the possibility to obtain tool materials with the relative high ductility characteristic of steel and high hardness and wear resistance typical for cemented carbides.Originality/value: One can state, based on the investigations carried out, that the pressureless forming of the powder may be used for depositing the anti-wear coatings onto the tool materials and other elements in the abrasion wear service conditions.

  9. Examination Of Sulfur Measurements In DWPF Sludge Slurry And SRAT Product Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C. J.; Wiedenman, B. J.

    2012-11-29

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked to re-sample the received SB7b WAPS material for wt. % solids, perform an aqua regia digestion and analyze the digested material by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), as well as re-examine the supernate by ICP-AES. The new analyses were requested in order to provide confidence that the initial analytical subsample was representative of the Tank 40 sample received and to replicate the S results obtained on the initial subsample collected. The ICP-AES analyses for S were examined with both axial and radial detection of the sulfur ICP-AES spectroscopic emission lines to ascertain if there was any significant difference in the reported results. The outcome of this second subsample of the Tank 40 WAPS material is the first subject of this report. After examination of the data from the new subsample of the SB7b WAPS material, a team of DWPF and SRNL staff looked for ways to address the question of whether there was in fact insoluble S that was not being accounted for by ion chromatography (IC) analysis. The question of how much S is reaching the melter was thought best addressed by examining a DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) Product sample, but the significant dilution of sludge material, containing the S species in question, that results from frit addition was believed to add additional uncertainty to the S analysis of SME Product material. At the time of these discussions it was believed that all S present in a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt sample would be converted to sulfate during the course of the SRAT cycle. A SRAT Product sample would not have the S dilution effect resulting from frit addition, and hence, it was decided that a DWPF SRAT Product sample would be obtained and submitted to SRNL for digestion and sample preparation followed by a round-robin analysis of the prepared samples by the DWPF Laboratory, F/H Laboratories, and SRNL for S and sulfate. The

  10. Examination Of Sulfur Measurements In DWPF Sludge Slurry And SRAT Product Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked to re-sample the received SB7b WAPS material for wt. % solids, perform an aqua regia digestion and analyze the digested material by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), as well as re-examine the supernate by ICP-AES. The new analyses were requested in order to provide confidence that the initial analytical subsample was representative of the Tank 40 sample received and to replicate the S results obtained on the initial subsample collected. The ICP-AES analyses for S were examined with both axial and radial detection of the sulfur ICP-AES spectroscopic emission lines to ascertain if there was any significant difference in the reported results. The outcome of this second subsample of the Tank 40 WAPS material is the first subject of this report. After examination of the data from the new subsample of the SB7b WAPS material, a team of DWPF and SRNL staff looked for ways to address the question of whether there was in fact insoluble S that was not being accounted for by ion chromatography (IC) analysis. The question of how much S is reaching the melter was thought best addressed by examining a DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) Product sample, but the significant dilution of sludge material, containing the S species in question, that results from frit addition was believed to add additional uncertainty to the S analysis of SME Product material. At the time of these discussions it was believed that all S present in a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt sample would be converted to sulfate during the course of the SRAT cycle. A SRAT Product sample would not have the S dilution effect resulting from frit addition, and hence, it was decided that a DWPF SRAT Product sample would be obtained and submitted to SRNL for digestion and sample preparation followed by a round-robin analysis of the prepared samples by the DWPF Laboratory, F/H Laboratories, and SRNL for S and sulfate. The

  11. CMP process optimization using alkaline bulk copper slurry on a 300 mm Applied Materials Reflexion LK system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CMP process optimization for bulk copper removal based on alkaline copper slurry was performed on a 300 mm Applied Materials Reflexion LK system. Under the DOE condition, we conclude that as the pressure increases, the removal rate increases and non-uniformity is improved. As the slurry flow rate increases, there is no significant improvement in the material removal rate, but it does slightly reduce the WIWNU and thus improve uniformity. The optimal variables are obtained at a reduced pressure of 1.5 psi and a slurry flow rate of 300 ml/min. Platen/carrier rotary speed is set at a constant value of 97/103 rpm. We obtain optimized CMP characteristics including a removal rate over 6452 Å/min and non-uniformity below 4% on blanket wafer and the step height is reduced by nearly 8000 Å/min in the center of the wafer on eight layers of copper patterned wafer, the surface roughness is reduced to 0.225 nm. (semiconductor technology)

  12. Changes in the chemical and physicochemical properties of the solid fraction of cattle slurry during composting using different aeration strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, Rafaela; Flotats, Xavier; Marfà, Oriol

    2006-01-01

    Replacement of peat as a growing medium by a renewable material, such as an organic waste, is an issue of concern since harvesting of peat has a considerable environmental impact and, actually, it is a non-renewable resource. Cattle manure is a readily available organic waste, which means that once it goes through the composting process, it can be used as an alternative to peat, specifically, the solid fraction obtained from mechanical liquid-solid separation of cattle slurry (SF). Studies have shown it to be suitable for such uses. The purpose of this study was to detect possible changes in the physicochemical and chemical properties of SF when it is composted using different aeration strategies, with an emphasis on the changes that would make it feasible for use as a substrate. With this aim in mind, an experiment was designed with three aeration strategies that would be used during composting. The first consisted of applying air through a static method (forced ventilation). The second involved improving aeration by adding a bulking agent and a dynamic turning method. In the third strategy, aeration was carried out by turning (control). The results show that the different aeration strategies had a clear effect on the evolution of pH, electrical conductivity (EC), nitrate-N, ammonia-N and bicarbonate content. Nitrification was favored under good aeration conditions using the static composting method, probably due to the greater availability of ammonia-N that was transformed into nitrate-N. In general, the low buffering capacity allowed for a reduction of the pH during the curing stage of composting (in conjunction with low temperatures during this period), a characteristic that favors the use of this compost as a growing medium. We also conclude that measuring bicarbonate levels during composting could be used as an indicator of the possible acidification of the material and as a way of evaluating the level of material aeration. PMID:16146687

  13. ICE SLURRY APPLICATIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffeld, M; Wang, M J; Goldstein, V; Kasza, K E

    2010-12-01

    The role of secondary refrigerants is expected to grow as the focus on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions increases. The effectiveness of secondary refrigerants can be improved when phase changing media are introduced in place of single phase media. Operating at temperatures below the freezing point of water, ice slurry facilitates several efficiency improvements such as reductions in pumping energy consumption as well as lowering the required temperature difference in heat exchangers due to the beneficial thermo-physical properties of ice slurry. Research has shown that ice slurry can be engineered to have ideal ice particle characteristics so that it can be easily stored in tanks without agglomeration and then be extractable for pumping at very high ice fraction without plugging. In addition ice slurry can be used in many direct contact food and medical protective cooling applications. This paper provides an overview of the latest developments in ice slurry technology. PMID:21528014

  14. Slurry walls and slurry trenches - construction quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slurry (panel) walls and slurry trenches have become conventional methods for construction of deep underground structures, interceptor trenches and hydraulic (cutoff) barriers. More recently polymers mixed with water are used to stabilize the excavation instead of bentonite slurry. Slurry walls are typically excavated in short panel segments, 2 to 7 m (7 to 23 ft) long, and backfilled with structural materials; whereas slurry trenches are fairly continuous excavations with concurrent backfilling of blended soils, or cement-bentonite mixtures. Slurry trench techniques have also been used to construct interceptor trenches. Currently no national standards exist for the design and/or construction of slurry walls/trenches. Government agencies, private consultants, contractors and trade groups have published specifications for construction of slurry walls/trenches. These specifications vary in complexity and quality of standards. Some place excessive emphasis on the preparation and control of bentonite or polymer slurry used for excavation, with insufficient emphasis placed on quality control of bottom cleaning, tremie concrete, backfill placement or requirements for the finished product. This has led to numerous quality problems, particularly with regard to identification of key depths, bottom sediments and proper backfill placement. This paper will discuss the inspection of slurry wall/trench construction process, identifying those areas which require special scrutiny. New approaches to inspection of slurry stabilized excavations are discussed

  15. The Variation of Interface Formation with Slurry Viscosity Change in Side-By-Side Tape Casting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulatova, Regina; Jabbari, Masoud; Andersen, Kjeld Bøhm; Bahl, Christian

    -bindering and sintering were studied. Solvent and binder concentrations were varied in order to optimize co-casting flow, as well as the drying and sintering shrinkage. Tapes were evaluated in terms of rheological behavior of the slurries, the green and sintered tape microstructure, the quality of the interface...... area, and the mechanical properties of the green tapes...

  16. Methane yields and methanogenic community changes during co-fermentation of cattle slurry with empty fruit bunches of oil palm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Andreas; Franke-Whittle, Ingrid H; Wagner, Andreas O; Insam, Heribert

    2015-01-01

    The biomethane potential and structural changes of the methanogenic community in a solid-state anaerobic digestion process co-digesting cattle slurry and empty fruit bunches were investigated under mesophilic (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions. Phylogenetic microarrays revealed the presence of two hydrogenotrophic genera (Methanoculleus and Methanobrevibacter) and one acetoclastic genus (Methanosarcina). Methanosarcina numbers were found to increase in both mesophilic and thermophilic treatments of empty fruit bunches. Methanobrevibacter, which dominated in the cattle slurry, remained constant during anaerobic digestion (AD) at 37°C and decreased in numbers during digestion at 55°C. Numbers of Methanoculleus remained constant at 37°C and increased during the thermophilic digestion. Physicochemical data revealed non-critical concentrations for important monitoring parameters such as total ammonia nitrogen, free ammonia nitrogen and volatile fatty acids in all treatments after AD. The biomethane potential of empty fruit bunches was higher under thermophilic conditions than under mesophilic conditions. PMID:25453442

  17. Slurry pipeline technology: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Jay P. [Pipeline Systems Incorporated (PSI), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Lima, Rafael; Pinto, Daniel; Vidal, Alisson [Ausenco do Brasil Engenharia Ltda., Nova Lima, MG (Brazil). PSI Div.

    2009-12-19

    Slurry pipelines represent an economical and environmentally friendly transportation means for many solid materials. This paper provides an over-view of the technology, its evolution and current Brazilian activity. Mineral resources are increasingly moving farther away from ports, processing plants and end use points, and slurry pipelines are an important mode of solids transport. Application guidelines are discussed. State-of-the-Art technical solutions such as pipeline system simulation, pipe materials, pumps, valves, automation, telecommunications, and construction techniques that have made the technology successful are presented. A discussion of where long distant slurry pipelines fit in a picture that also includes thickened and paste materials pipe lining is included. (author)

  18. 铝土矿生料浆烘干与烧结特性的试验研究%Test study on the Raw Slurry Baking and Sintering Feature of Aluminate Sodium Sintered Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄春成

    2011-01-01

    Combining with alumina production practice by the alkali - lime sintering process, referring to foreign study achievements, the author studied the law of the viscosity, baking process and sintering feature of the raw slurry in the laboratory conditions. The test results showed that the true calcium ratio change had no effect on the viscosity of the raw slurry at the same moisture, but when the raw slurry moisture was less than 38% , its moisture and temperature increasing had a large effect on its viscosity. The slurry baking temperature in the gas suspension baking oven should be higher than 6001. Sintering temperature, the time of sintering retaining temperature, the cluster particle size and the structure consistency of the sintered material were the key to ensure a high quality of the sintered material.%在试验室条件下,参照国外研究成果,结合我国碱石灰烧结法氧化铝生产实际,从生料浆黏度变化规律、生料浆烘干过程及生料浆烧结特性等方面进行了试验.研究试验结果表明:真钙比的变化对同一水分下生料浆黏度的影响不明显,当生料将水分<38%时,生料浆水分和生料浆温度升高对生料浆黏度值影响较大;气态悬浮干燥器中料浆烘干温度应不低于600℃;熟料的烧成温度、烧结保温时间、料团粒径的大小及结构密实程度是保证熟料烧成质量的关键.

  19. Changes in soil acidity and organic carbon in a sandy typic hapludalf after medium-term pig-slurry and deep-litter application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Brunetto

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Successive applications of liquid swine waste to the soil can increase the contents of total organic carbon and nutrients and change acidity-related soil chemical properties. However, little information is available on the effects of swine waste application in solid form, as of swine deep-litter. The objective of this study was to evaluate alterations of organic carbon and acidity-related properties of a soil after eight years of pig slurry and deep-litter application. In the eighth year of a field experiment established in Braço do Norte, Santa Catarina (SC on a sandy Typic Hapludalf samples were taken (layers 0-2.5; 2.5-5; 5-10; 10-15; 15-20 and 20-30 cm from unfertilized plots and plots with pig slurry or deep-litter applications, providing the simple or double rate of N requirement of Zea mays and Avena strigosa in rotation. Soil total organic carbon, water pH, exchangeable Al, Ca and Mg, and cation exchange capacity (CECeffective and CECpH7.0, H+Al, base saturation, and aluminum saturation were measured. The application of pig slurry and deep-litter for eight years increased total organic carbon and CEC in all soil layers. The pig slurry and deep-litter applications reduced active acidity and aluminum saturation and increased base saturation down to a depth of 30 cm. Eight years of pig slurry application did not affect soil acidity.

  20. Methanogenic community changes, and emissions of methane and other gases, during storage of acidified and untreated pig slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren O; Højberg, Ole; Poulsen, Morten;

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Acidification with concentrated H2SO4 is a novel strategy to reduce NH3 emissions from livestock slurry. It was recently found that also CH4 emissions from acidified slurry are reduced. This study investigated the microbiological basis and temporal stability of these effects. Methods and Re...

  1. Application of polymer-powder slurry for fabrication of abrasion resistant coatings on tool materials

    OpenAIRE

    G. Matula

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Development of a new generation tool materials on the basis of M2 high speed-steel or 41Cr4 steel covered with the carbides. Application of pressureless forming of powder as a manufacturing method of anti-wear coatings gives the possibility to produce this materials with relative low cost of production.Design/methodology/approach: Powder metallurgy, pressureless forming of powder, sintering, microstructure examination, X-ray dispersive energy examination, hardness examination.Finding...

  2. Adsorption of mercury in coal-fired power plants gypsum slurry on TiO2/chitosan composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, P.; Gao, B. B.; Gao, J. Q.; Zhang, K.; Chen, Y. J.; Yang, Y. P.; Chen, H. W.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a simple method was used to prepare a chitosan adsorbent to mix with KI and TiO2. Gravimetric analysis (TG), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to characterize the samples before and after adsorption of Hg2+. A mercury adsorption experiment was also conducted in the gypsum slurry. The results show that using hydrobromic acid as a solvent of adsorbent resulted in a better adsorption effect than using acetic acid alone. Also, the sample (CS-KI/TiO2-HBr) had a maximum mercury adsorption capacity when the pH=5 and the t=50°C. The characterization experiments showed that the thermal stability of composite materials declined and the TiO2 uniformly dispersed in the surface of the samples with a lamellar structure, generating a lot of cracks and recesses that increased the reactive sites. Furthermore, when the TiO2 reacted with CS, it resulted in Ti-C, Ti-O and Ti-N bonds. The Br- can prevent the growth of TiO2 crystal grains and strengthen the ability of I- to remove mercury. The adsorption isotherm and kinetic results indicated that the adsorption behaviour of CS-KI/TiO2-HBr as it removes Hg2+ is an inhomogeneous multilayer adsorption process. The surface adsorption and intraparticle diffusion effects are both important in the Hg2+ adsorption process.

  3. Preparation, characterization, and thermal properties of starch microencapsulated fatty acids as phase change materials thermal energy storage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stable starch-oil composites can be prepared from renewable resources by excess steam jet-cooking aqueous slurries of starch and vegetable oils or other hydrophobic materials. Fatty acids such as stearic acid are promising phase change materials (PCMs) for latent heat thermal energy storage applica...

  4. Hydraulic Behavior and Chemical Characterization of Lapilli as Material for Natural Filtering of Slurry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nereida Falcón-Cardona

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Livestock effluents are a beneficial nutrient supply for crops, whereby their use is critical to ensure the sustainability of the farms global management. However, they can cause serious ecological problems if misused, polluting soils and groundwater. Combining “soft technology” and local materials is a low cost solution in terms of finance and energy. The REAGUA project (REuso AGUA, Water reuse in Spanish analyzes the possibility of using “picon” (lapilli as a material for the treatment of liquid manure from ruminants, for later use in subsurface drip irrigation system to produce forage and biofuels, in which the soil acts as a subsequent advanced treatment. A three-phase system, in which the effluent was poured with a vertical subsurface flow in an unsaturated medium, is designed. In order to determine the management conditions that optimize the filter, it was necessary to characterize the hydraulic behavior of lapilli and its ability to remove substances. Using three lapilli-filled columns, unsaturated flux, and a ruminant effluent, the reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD, biochemical oxygen demand after 5 days (BOD5 and ammonia, phosphorus and suspension solids (SS obtained was over 80%, 90%, and 95% respectively, assumable values for irrigation.

  5. The Changing Materiality of Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Henrik

    A great deal of effort has gone into discussing issues of copyright in relation to the new materialities of the digital distribution of popular music; there has, however, been less focus on the changes that these new developments may invoke with respect to the cultural and social usages of music....... Against the backdrop of recent discussions of popular music as material culture it is argued that emergent usages must be seen in relation to accumulations of different materialities and that such a perspective highlights issues related to both aesthetic reflexivity and agency. Keywords: cultural...... commodity, materiality, reflexivity, music, MP3...

  6. ICE SLURRY APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Kauffeld, M.; Wang, M.J.; Goldstein, V.; Kasza, K.E.

    2010-01-01

    The role of secondary refrigerants is expected to grow as the focus on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions increases. The effectiveness of secondary refrigerants can be improved when phase changing media are introduced in place of single phase media. Operating at temperatures below the freezing point of water, ice slurry facilitates several efficiency improvements such as reductions in pumping energy consumption as well as lowering the required temperature difference in heat exchangers ...

  7. Changes in soil acidity and organic carbon in a sandy typic hapludalf after medium-term pig-slurry and deep-litter application

    OpenAIRE

    Gustavo Brunetto; Jucinei José Comin; Djalma Eugênio Schmitt; Renato Guardini; Célito Pescador Mezzari; Bruno Salvador Oliveira; Marcel Pires de Moraes; Luciano Colpo Gatiboni; Paulo Emilio Lovato; Carlos Alberto Ceretta

    2012-01-01

    Successive applications of liquid swine waste to the soil can increase the contents of total organic carbon and nutrients and change acidity-related soil chemical properties. However, little information is available on the effects of swine waste application in solid form, as of swine deep-litter. The objective of this study was to evaluate alterations of organic carbon and acidity-related properties of a soil after eight years of pig slurry and deep-litter application. In the eighth year of a...

  8. Evaluation of rheological properties of cement slurries doped with fiber of glass wool; Avaliacao das propriedades reologicas e mecanicas de pastas de cimento aditivadas com fibra de la de vidro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva, Luanna Carla Matias; Barros, Marcus Vinicius Cavalcanti; Martinelli, Antonio E.; Freitas, Julio Cezar Oliveira [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (LABCIM/UFRN), RN (Brazil). Lab. de Cimentos; Lima, Cicero S.; Barroso, Carlos Andre Marques; Oliveira, Theogenes S. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), RN (Brazil); Bezerra, Ulisses Targino [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Paraiba (LABEME/IFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Lab. de Ensaio de Materiais e Estruturas

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the results of cement slurry systems using silica-based glass wool fiber as admixture after grinding during 90 s, 180 s, 300 s and 600 s. Scanning electron microscopy images of the fiber depicted the changes in the material as a result of milling. Slurries were formulated with specific mass 15.6 ppg using 2% (BWOC) of the wool fibers. Rheological and mechanical tests were performed. Increasing in milling time improved both the rheological properties and compressive strength of the slurries. Preliminary tests obtained with the fibers revealed the potential application of the material in cement slurries for oil wells. (author)

  9. Preparation of spherical spinel LiCr_(0.04)Mn_(1.96)O_4 cathode materials based on the slurry spray drying method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Qinglai; HU Guorong; PENG Zhongdong; DU Ke; CAO Yanbing; TANG Daichun

    2009-01-01

    Regular spherical chromium doped spinel lithium manganese oxides (LiCr_(0.04)Mn_(1.96)O_4) with an average particle size of about 20 μm were prepared by the slurry spray drying process. The materials were compared with non-spherical LiCr_(0.04)Mn_(1.96)O_4 materials prepared by the common drying process, and all materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), laser parti-cle analyzer and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) specific surface area test. Electrochemical performances of these cathode materials were studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and Li/LiCr_(0.04)Mn_(1.96)O_4 battery test. The results show that the spherical active material is single spinel structure, compact, and with narrow particle size distribution and low BET specific surface area. Compared with the non-spherical material, the spherical material prepared by the spray drying process shows a lower electrochemical impedance, a fewer electrochemical polarization and a better charge/discharge rate capability and capacity retention at elevated temperatures.

  10. Evaluation of slurry characteristics for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Lithium-ion battery slurries are prepared for rechargeable batteries. • The dispersion state of slurry constituents is identified. • Thermal, morphological, rheological, and electrical properties of slurries are analyzed. - Abstract: A multi-component slurry for rechargeable batteries is prepared by dispersing LiCoO2, conductive additives, and polymeric binders in a solvent. The physical properties, including rheological, morphological, electrical, and spectroscopic features of battery slurries are investigated. The relationship between the measured physical properties and the internal structure of the slurry is analyzed. It is found that the rheological behavior of the slurry is determined by the interaction of active materials and binding materials (e.g., network structure) and that the dispersion state of conductive additives (e.g., agglomeration) also depends on the binder–carbon interaction

  11. Experimental study on the mechanism of ethanol/bentonite slurry grouting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To ensure safety and efficiency of construction and operation of repositories, rock fractures need to be grouted where they intersect the facility. Cement-based grouting materials that have been used extensively in the past may, however, react with the groundwater and produce hyperalkaline leachate. A possible solution for this issue is use of alternative material. Ethanol/Bentonite Slurry Grouting is another approach to minimize the long-term permeability of rock fractures. The slurry has high fluidity for the case of the ethanol concentration in the liquid phase being 60%. The viscosity of the slurry with bentonite content of 0.4 Mg/m'3 was measured for conditions of the shear rate ranging from 0.1 to 1000 1/s. The viscosity of the slurry changed dramatically between the ethanol concentrations of 60 to 40%, behaving as a non-Newtonian fluid. In order to investigate when the ethanol content of the slurry becomes low enough to achieve sufficient viscosity in rock fractures, an Ethanol Diffusion Test with experimental openings was carried out in the laboratory. Extrapolation of the measured minimum time for the filled slurry to reach the desirable low concentration of ethanol lead to the estimated minimum time ranging from 0.1 hours to 0.7 hours for a 0.2 mm aperture. These facts suggest that the injected slurry flows through the openings of fractures during the early period of injection and, later, as its ethanol content decreases, slurrys viscosity increases sufficiently so that the openings can be blocked. (author)

  12. Rheology of sludge-slurry grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of rheograms was developed that relates the critical velocity (velocity where flow changes from laminar to turbulent) of a cementitious grout that incorporates a suspended sludge-slurry to the critical velocity of a reference grout made with a simulated waste solution. The sludge that is now in the Gunite waste tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be suspended and pumped to the new waste storage tanks in Melton Valley. The sludge will then be blended with a cement mix base to form a grout which will be injected underground by the shale fracturing process. This report describes the materials, equipment, and techniques used in the laboratory studies to suspend sludges and mix sludge-slurry grouts that have flow properties similar to those of current shale fracturing grouts. Bentonite clay is an effective suspender in dilute NaNO3 solutions; 15 wt % solids can be suspended with 2.0 wt % bentonite in a 0.1 M NaNO3 solution. Other suspending materials were evaluated, but bentonite gave the best results. If a slurry grout becomes too viscous to pump, methods must be available to thin the mixture. A number of thinners, friction reducers, and plasticizers were examined. Q-Broxin, a thinner supplied by Baroid, reduced the velocity of a grout required for turbulent flow in a 5.0-cm (2-in.)-diam tube from 1.76 to 1.20 m/s (5.79 to 3.95 ft/s); FX-32C, a plasticizer supplied by Fox Industries, Inc., reduced the velocity from 1.76 to 0.75 m/s

  13. Studies of coal slurries property; Slurry no seijo ni kansuru kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawabata, M.; Aihara, Y.; Imada, K. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Nogami, Y.; Inokuchi, K. [Mitsui SRC Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Sakaki, T.; Shibata, M.; Hirosue, H. [Kyushu National Industrial Research Institute, Saga (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    It was previously found that the increase of slurry temperature provides a significant effect of slurry viscosity reduction for the coal slurry with high concentration of 50 wt%. To investigate the detailed influence of slurry temperature for the coal slurry with concentration of 50 wt%, influence of temperature on the successive change of apparent viscosity was observed at the constant shear rate. When the concentration of coal was increased from 45 wt% to 50 wt%, viscosity of the slurry was rapidly increased. When heated above 70{degree}C, the apparent viscosity decreased during heating to the given temperature, but it increased successively after reaching to the given temperature. The apparent viscosity showed higher value than that of the initial viscosity. The coal slurry with concentration of 50 wt% showed the fluidity of Newtonian fluid at the lower shear rate region, but showed the fluidity of pseudo-plastic fluid at the higher shear rate region. The slurry having high apparent viscosity by the successive change showed higher apparent viscosity with increasing the higher even by changing the shear rate. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  14. Electrochemical behavior and polishing properties of silicon wafer in alkaline slurry with abrasive CeO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Xiao-lan; XU Da-yu; ZHANG Xiao-wei; SHI Xun-da; JIANG Nan; QIU Guan-zhou

    2008-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of silicon wafer in alkaline slurry with nano-sized CeO2 abrasive was investigated. The variations of corrosion potential (φcorr) and corrosion current density (Jcorr) of the P-type (100) silicon wafer with the slurry pH value and the concentration of abrasive CeO2 were studied by polarization curve technologies. The dependence of the polishing rate on the pH and the concentration of CeO2 in slurries during chemical mechanical polishing(CMP) were also studied. It is discovered that there is a large change of φcorr and Jcorr when slurry pH is altered and the Jcorr reaches the maximum (1.306 μA/cm2) at pH 10.5 when the material removal rate(MRR) comes to the fastest value. The Jcorr increases gradually from 0.994 μA/cm2 with 1% CeO2 to 1.304 μA/cm2 with 3% CeO2 and reaches a plateau with the further increase of CeO2 concentration. There is a considerable MRR in the slurry with 3% CeO2 at pH 10.5. The coherence between Jcorr and MRR elucidates that the research on the electrochemical behavior of silicon wafers in the alkaline slurry could offer theoretic guidance on silicon polishing rate and ensure to adjust optimal components of slurry.

  15. Refinement of primary Si grains in Al-20%Si alloy slurry through serpentine channel pouring process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhi-kai; Mao, Wei-min; Liu, Zhi-yong; Wang, Dong; Yue, Rui

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a serpentine channel pouring process was used to prepare the semi-solid Al-20%Si alloy slurry and refine primary Si grains in the alloy. The effects of the pouring temperature, number of curves in the serpentine channel, and material of the serpentine channel on the size of primary Si grains in the semi-solid Al-20%Si alloy slurry were investigated. The results showed that the pouring temperature, number of the curves, and material of the channel strongly affected the size and distribution of the primary Si grains. The pouring temperature exerted the strongest effect, followed by the number of the curves and then the material of the channel. Under experimental conditions of a four-curve copper channel and a pouring temperature of 701°C, primary Si grains in the semi-solid Al-20%Si alloy slurry were refined to the greatest extent, and the lath-like grains were changed into granular grains. Moreover, the equivalent grain diameter and the average shape coefficient of primary Si grains in the satisfactory semi-solid Al-20%Si alloy slurry were 24.4 μm and 0.89, respectively. Finally, the refinement mechanism and distribution rule of primary Si grains in the slurry prepared through the serpentine channel pouring process were analyzed and discussed.

  16. Methane oxidation in pig and cattle slurry storages, and effects of surface crust moisture and methane availability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, S.O.; Ambus, P.

    2006-01-01

    4, O-2 and CO2 during incubation, while intact subsamples were used to characterize CH4 oxidation as a function of CH4 availability and moisture content. Methane oxidation was observed in all materials except for an expanded clay product (Leca) sampled from a pig slurry storage. Despite significant......Storages with liquid manure (slurry) may develop a surface crust of particulate organic matter, or an artificial crust can be established. Slurry storages are net sources of atmospheric methane (CH4), but a potential for bacterial oxidation of CH4 in surface crusts was recently suggested in a study...... of experimental storages. The present study was conducted to investigate methanotrophic activity under practical storage conditions. Surface crusts from slurry storages at two pig farms and four dairy farms were sampled in late autumn. Mixed samples (0-4 cm depth) were used to determine changes in CH...

  17. Thermoreversible Gelling Slurry for Solid Freeforming Fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct-Ink-writing technique (DIW) can perform solid freeforming fabrication (SFF) to produce on-demand complex ceramic components. In this study, thermally gelling concentrated alumina slurry was prepared as a new ink for the direct-ink-writing technique. By employing the triblock copolymers of poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly (propylene oxide) (PPO), the concentrated alumina slurry showed nearly Newtonian behavior (sol state) at cooled temperature (5 deg. C) and thickened (gel state) at room temperature (30 deg. C). These states were reversible with the temperature change. The thermally-thickened alumina slurry had enough viscoelastic response to perform direct-ink-writing of 3D periodic colloidal structures with feature sizes of around 100μm in air without any clogging. The cooled slurry can be also handled easily on its setting up for DIW due to its low viscosity.

  18. Evaluation of four mathematical models to describe dissipation kinetics of 4-n-nonylphenol and bisphenol-A in groundwater-aquifer material slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmah, Ajit K; Rohan, Maheswaran

    2011-01-01

    The performance of four mathematical models (hockey stick, biexponential, first-order double exponential decay, and first-order two-compartment) was evaluated to describe the dissipation kinetics for 4-n-nonylphenol (4-n-NP) and bisphenol-A (BPA) in groundwater-aquifer material slurry under aerobic and anaerobic conditions conducted under controlled laboratory conditions. The fit of each model to the measured values under both conditions was tested using an array of statistical indices to judge the model's ability to fit the measured datasets. Corresponding 50% (DT(50)) and 90% (DT(90)) dissipation values for each compound were numerically obtained and compared against each model. The model derived DT(50) values in groundwater-aquifer material ranged from 1.06 to 1.24 (4-n-NP) and 0.341 to 0.568 days (BPA) under aerobic condition, while they were 2- to 4-fold higher under anoxic condition. DT(90) values for 4-n-NP ranged anywhere between 2.3 and 4.45 days under both conditions, while DT(90) values for BPA ranged from around 1 day to as high as 12 days under both conditions tested. A visual examination of the measured and fitted plots as well as the statistical indices showed that, with the exception of the hockey stick model, the models performed satisfactorily. Despite having only 3 parameters, the biexponential model could describe the dissipation kinetics very well and this was supported by the statistical indices generated for each case. PMID:21069247

  19. Viscosity Reduction with Self-Assembly of Cationic Surfactant on Tetra-n-butyl Ammonium Bromide Semi-Clathrate Hydrate Aqueous Slurry

    OpenAIRE

    Hashimoto, Shunsuke; Kawamura, Kazushi

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To utilize hydrate slurry for phase change refrigerants, the rheological properties are essential. In the present study, the viscosity characteristics of hydrate slurry are investigated. Additionally, the effect of cationic surfactant on viscosity is also evaluated. Study Design: Experimental and analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Division of Chemical Engineering, Department of Materials Engineering Science, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, between D...

  20. Slurry pipeline design approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betinol, Roy; Navarro R, Luis [Brass Chile S.A., Santiago (Chile)

    2009-12-19

    Compared to other engineering technologies, the design of a commercial long distance Slurry Pipeline design is a relatively new engineering concept which gained more recognition in the mid 1960 's. Slurry pipeline was first introduced to reduce cost in transporting coal to power generating units. Since then this technology has caught-up worldwide to transport other minerals such as limestone, copper, zinc and iron. In South America, the use of pipeline is commonly practiced in the transport of Copper (Chile, Peru and Argentina), Iron (Chile and Brazil), Zinc (Peru) and Bauxite (Brazil). As more mining operations expand and new mine facilities are opened, the design of the long distance slurry pipeline will continuously present a commercially viable option. The intent of this paper is to present the design process and discuss any new techniques and approach used today to ensure a better, safer and economical slurry pipeline. (author)

  1. Effects of digestate from anaerobically digested cattle slurry and plant materials on soil microbial community and emission of CO2 and N2O

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Anders; Carter, Mette Sustmann; Jensen, Erik S.;

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of animal manure and crop residues may be employed to produce biogas as a climate-neutral source of energy and to recycle plant nutrients as fertilizers. However, especially organic farmers are concerned that fertilizing with the digestates may impact the soil microbiota and......) anaerobically digested cattle slurry/grass-clover, or (5) fresh grass-clover was applied to soil at arable realistic rates. Experimental unites were sequentially sampled destructively after 1, 3 and 9 days of incubation and the soil assayed for content of mineral N, available organic C, emission of CO2 and N2O......, microbial phospholipid fatty acids (biomass and community composition) and catabolic response profiling (functional diversity). Fertilizing with the anaerobically digested materials increased the soil concentration of NO3− ca. 30–40% compared to when raw cattle slurry was applied. Grass-clover contributed...

  2. Denitrification in nitric-acid-treated cattle slurry during storage.

    OpenAIRE

    Oenema, O.; G. L. Velthof

    1993-01-01

    Lowering the pH of cattle slurry with HNO3 was used to reduce NH3 volatilization during storage and after application. Incubation studies were carried out to examine possible NO3 losses and N2O emission from HNO3 treated slurry during storage. Batches of cattle slurry were treated with various amounts of HNO3 to obtain a pH range of 6.0 to 3.0. The slurries were stirred once or twice a week and stored for 6 months at 15 degrees C. Changes in pH, Eh, NO3- and NH4 concn, and emissions of N2O, C...

  3. Nitrogen fertiliser value of digested dairy cow slurry, its liquid and solid fractions, and of dairy cow slurry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Cavalli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of crop availability of livestock slurry nitrogen (N is necessary to maximise crop N use efficiency and to minimise environmental losses. Results from field and laboratory incubation experiments suggest that first-year crop availability of slurry N comes mainly from its ammonium fraction because net mineralisation of organic N is often negligible in the short term. A two-year field experiment during 2011 and 2012 in northern Italy was undertaken with several aims: to estimate the N fertiliser value of raw dairy cow slurry, digested dairy cow slurry, and the liquid and solid fractions of the digested slurry, and to verify if applied ammonium recovery was similar both among slurries and between slurries and inorganic N fertiliser (ammonium sulphate. Different fertilisers were applied before silage maize cultivation followed by an unfertilised Italian ryegrass crop. The results showed that ammonium recovery was significantly higher in mineral-fertilised (75% versus slurry-fertilised (30% treatments, except in digested slurry (65%. This indicates that ammonium applied with organic materials is less efficient than when applied with mineral fertiliser. For the digested slurry and its liquid fraction, most of the applied ammonium was available to the maize during its application year (55% due to a low carbon (C/organic N ratio. The apparent N recovery of the raw slurry and digested slurry solid fraction increased substantially between the first (-1.4% and second (20% years, as these materials had high C/organic N ratios; they likely immobilised N for several months post application, producing residual effects during the Italian ryegrass and next maize crops.

  4. The effect of particle-particle interaction forces on the flow properties of silica slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary work has been completed to investigate the effect of particle-particle interaction forces on the flow properties of silica slurries. Classically hydro-transport studies have focused on the flow of coarse granular material in Newtonian fluids. However, with current economical and environmental pressures, the need to increase solid loadings in pipe flow has lead to studies that examine non-Newtonian fluid dynamics. The flow characteristics of non-Newtonian slurries can be greatly influenced through controlling the solution chemistry. Here we present data on an 'ideal' slurry where the particle size and shape is controlled together with the solution chemistry. We have investigated the effect of adsorbed cations on the stability of a suspension, the packing nature of a sediment and the frictional forces to be overcome during re-slurrying. A significant change in the criteria assessed was observed as the electrolyte concentration was increased from 0.1 mM to 1 M. In relation to industrial processes, such delicate control of the slurry chemistry can greatly influence the optimum operating conditions of non-Newtonian pipe flows. (authors)

  5. Runoff- and erosion-driven transport of cattle slurry: linking molecular tracers to hydrological processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, C. E. M.; Michaelides, K.; Chadwick, D. R.; Dungait, J. A. J.; Evershed, R. P.

    2015-10-01

    The addition of cattle slurry to agricultural land is a widespread practise, but if not correctly managed it can pose a contamination risk to aquatic ecosystems. The transport of inorganic and organic components of cattle slurry to watercourses is a major concern, yet little is known about the physical transport mechanisms and associated fluxes and timings of contamination threats. Therefore, the aim of the study was to ascertain the importance of flow pathway partitioning in the transport (fluxes and timing) of dissolved and particulate slurry-derived compounds with implications for off-site contamination. A series of rainfall-runoff and erosion experiments were carried out using the TRACE (Test Rig for Advancing Connectivity Experiments) experimental hillslope facility. The experiments allowed the quantification of the impact of changing slope gradient and rainfall intensity on nutrient transport from cattle slurry applied to the hillslope, via surface, subsurface and vertical percolated flow pathways, as well as particulate transport from erosion. The dissolved components were traced using a combination of ammonium (NH4+) and fluorescence analysis, while the particulate fraction was traced using organic biomarkers, 5β-stanols. Results showed that rainfall events which produced flashy hydrological responses, resulting in large quantities of surface runoff, were likely to move sediment and also flush dissolved components of slurry-derived material from the slope, increasing the contamination risk. Rainfall events which produced slower hydrological responses were dominated by vertical percolated flows removing less sediment-associated material, but produced leachate which could contaminate deeper soil layers, and potentially groundwater, over a more prolonged period. Overall, this research provides new insights into the partitioning of slurry-derived material when applied to an unvegetated slope and the transport mechanisms by which contamination risks are created.

  6. Runoff- and erosion-driven transport of cattle slurry: linking molecular tracers to hydrological processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. M. Lloyd

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The addition of cattle slurry to agricultural land is a widespread practise, but if not correctly managed it can pose a contamination risk to aquatic ecosystems. The transport of inorganic and organic components of cattle slurry to watercourses is a major concern, yet little is known about the physical transport mechanisms and associated fluxes and timings of contamination threats. Therefore, the aim of the study was to ascertain the importance of flow pathway partitioning in the transport (fluxes and timing of dissolved and particulate slurry-derived compounds with implications for off-site contamination. A series of rainfall–runoff and erosion experiments were carried out using the TRACE (Test Rig for Advancing Connectivity Experiments experimental hillslope facility. The experiments allowed the quantification of the impact of changing slope gradient and rainfall intensity on nutrient transport from cattle slurry applied to the hillslope, via surface, subsurface and vertical percolated flow pathways, as well as particulate transport from erosion. The dissolved components were traced using a combination of ammonium (NH4+ and fluorescence analysis, while the particulate fraction was traced using organic biomarkers, 5β-stanols. Results showed that rainfall events which produced flashy hydrological responses, resulting in large quantities of surface runoff, were likely to move sediment and also flush dissolved components of slurry-derived material from the slope, increasing the contamination risk. Rainfall events which produced slower hydrological responses were dominated by vertical percolated flows removing less sediment-associated material, but produced leachate which could contaminate deeper soil layers, and potentially groundwater, over a more prolonged period. Overall, this research provides new insights into the partitioning of slurry-derived material when applied to an unvegetated slope and the transport mechanisms by which

  7. Runoff- and erosion-driven transport of cattle slurry: linking molecular tracers to hydrological processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, C. E. M.; Michaelides, K.; Chadwick, D. R.; Dungait, J. A. J.; Evershed, R. P.

    2016-02-01

    The addition of cattle slurry to agricultural land is a widespread practise, but if not correctly managed it can pose a contamination risk to aquatic ecosystems. The transport of inorganic and organic components of cattle slurry to watercourses is a major concern, yet little is known about the physical transport mechanisms and associated fluxes and timings of contamination threats. Therefore, the aim of the study was to ascertain the importance of flow pathway partitioning in the transport (fluxes and timing) of dissolved and particulate slurry-derived compounds with implications for off-site contamination. A series of rainfall-runoff and erosion experiments were carried out using the TRACE (Test Rig for Advancing Connectivity Experiments) experimental hillslope facility. The experiments allowed the quantification of the impact of changing slope gradient and rainfall intensity on nutrient transport from cattle slurry applied to the hillslope, via surface, subsurface, and vertical percolated flow pathways, as well as particulate transport from erosion. The dissolved components were traced using a combination of ammonium (NH4+) and fluorescence analysis, while the particulate fraction was traced using organic biomarkers, 5β-stanols. Results showed that rainfall events which produced flashy hydrological responses, resulting in large quantities of surface runoff, were likely to move sediment and also flush dissolved components of slurry-derived material from the slope, increasing the contamination risk. Rainfall events which produced slower hydrological responses were dominated by vertical percolated flows removing less sediment-associated material, but produced leachate which could contaminate deeper soil layers, and potentially groundwater, over a more prolonged period. Overall, this research provides new insights into the partitioning of slurry-derived material when applied to an unvegetated slope and the transport mechanisms by which contamination risks are

  8. Mechanically Induced Multicolor Change of Luminescent Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhiyong; Wang, Zhijian; Teng, Mingjun; Xu, Zejun; Jia, Xinru

    2015-06-22

    Mechanofluorochromic or piezochromic fluorescence chemistry involves the switching and tuning of the luminescent properties of solid-state materials induced by exogenous forces, such as grinding, shearing, compression, tension, and so forth. Up until now, most reported mechanochromic systems, including liquid crystals, organic molecules, organometallic compounds, polymers, and dye-doped polymers, have displayed reversible two-color changes, which arise from either supramolecular or chemical structure transformations. However, fluorescent materials that undergo mechanically induced multicolor changes remain rare; this Minireview is focused on such materials. Topics are categorized according to the different applied forces that are required to induce the multicolor change, including mechanical control of either the supramolecular structures or the chemical structures, and mechanical control of both the supramolecular structures and chemical structures. PMID:25965783

  9. Ice slurry accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, K.G.; Kauffeld, M.

    1998-06-01

    More and more refrigeration systems are designed with secondary loops, thus reducing the refrigerant charge of the primary refrigeration plant. In order not to increase energy consumption by introducing a secondary refrigerant, alternatives to the well established single phase coolants (brines) and different concepts of the cooling plant have to be evaluated. Combining the use of ice-slurry - mixture of water, a freezing point depressing agent (antifreeze) and ice particles - as melting secondary refrigerant and the use of a cool storage makes it possible to build plants with secondary loops without increasing the energy consumption and investment. At the same time the operating costs can be kept at a lower level. The accumulation of ice-slurry is compared with other and more traditional storage systems. The method is evaluated and the potential in different applications is estimated. Aspects of practically use of ice-slurry has been examined in the laboratory at the Danish Technological Institute (DTI). This paper will include the final conclusions from this work concerning tank construction, agitator system, inlet, outlet and control. The work at DTI indicates that in some applications systems with ice-slurry and accumulation tanks have a great future. These applications are described by a varying load profile and a process temperature suiting the temperature of ice-slurry (-3 - -8/deg. C). (au)

  10. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Stiebra, L; Cabulis, U; Knite, M

    2014-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) for thermal energy storage (TES) have become an important subject of research in recent years. Using PCMs for thermal energy storage provides a solution to increase the efficiency of the storage and use of energy in many domestic and industrial sectors. Phase change TES systems offer a number of advantages over other systems (e.g. chemical storage systems): particularly small temperature distance between the storage and retrieval cycles, small unit sizes and lo...

  11. SCOPING STUDIES TO DEVELOP A METHOD TO DETERMINE PARTICLE SIZE IN SIMULANT SLUDGE SLURRIES BY SIEVING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A physical separation method (i.e. sieving) was investigated to determine particle size distribution in non-radioactive sludge slurry simulants with the goal of implementation into the SRNL (Savannah River National Laboratory) shielded cells for use with radioactive sludge slurries. The investigation included obtaining the necessary experimental equipment, developing accessory equipment for use with the sieve shaker (to be able to sieve simulant slurries with aqueous solutions), sieving three different simulant slurries through a number of sieves and determining the particle size distribution gravimetrically, and developing a sufficient cleaning protocol of the sieves for re-use. The experimental protocol involved successive sieving of a NIST standard (to check the particle size retention of the sieves) and three non-radioactive slurry simulants (Batch 3 Tank 40 Test 3, Tank 40 Drum 3 and CETL Sludge Batch 2, which had been previously characterized by Microtrac analysis) through smaller and smaller sieves (150 microns x 5 microns) via use of the wet sieving system or by hand. For each of the three slurries, duplicate experiments were carried out using filtered supernate and DI water (to check the accuracy of the method versus Microtrac data) to sieve the slurry. Particle size determinations using the wet sieving system with DI water agree well with Microtrac data on a volume basis and in some cases the sieving data may be more accurate particularly if the material sieved had large particles. A correction factor had to be applied to data obtained from experiments done with supernate due to the dissolved solids which dried upon the sieves in the drying stage of the experiments. Upon subtraction of the correction factors, the experimental results were very similar to those obtained with DI water. It should be noted that approximately 250 mL of each of three simulant slurries was necessary to have enough filtered supernate available to carry out the experiments. The

  12. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production, pipe corrosion and expensive well repairs. Cementing temperature conditions are important because bot-tomhole circulating temperatures affect slurry thickening time, arheology, set time and compressive strength development. Knowing the actual temperature which cement encounters during placement allows the selection of proper cementing materials for a specific application. Slurry design is affected by well depth, bottom hole circulating temperature and static temperature, type or drilling fluid, slurry density, pumping time, quality of mix water, fluid loss control, flow regime, settling and free water, quality of cement, dry or liquid additives, strength development, and quality of the lab cement testing and equipment. Most Portland cements and Class J cement have shown suitable performances in geot-hermal wells. Cement system designs for geothermal wells differ from those for conventional high temperature oil and gas wells in the exclusive use of silica flour instead of silica sand, and the avoidance of fly ash as an extender. In this paper, Portland cement behaviour at high temperatures is described. Cement slurry and set cement properties are also described. Published in literature, the composition of cement slurries which were tested in geothermal conditions and which obtained required compressive strength and water permeability are listed. As a case of our practice geothermal wells Velika Ciglena-1 and Velika Ciglena-la are described.

  13. Rheology of slurries and environmental impacts in the mining industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boger, David V

    2013-01-01

    The world's resource industries are the largest producers of waste. Much of this waste is produced as a fine particle slurry, which is pumped to a storage area, generally at a low concentration, where it behaves like a Newtonian fluid. Simply removing, reusing, and recycling water from the slurry represents a step toward a more sustainable practice in this industry. As the concentration of such a slurry is increased as a result of dewatering, the materials exhibit non-Newtonian behavior, which is characterized by shear thinning, a yield stress, and in some instances thixotropic behavior. Such high-concentration, nonideal (dirty) suspensions in the resource industries have meant that new rheological methods and techniques have been needed to measure and interpret the basic flow properties. Also, some older empirical techniques have needed to be modified and interpreted in a more fundamental way so that the results could be used in design. This article reviews these techniques and illustrates how the industry itself has motivated their development. Understanding and exploiting this rheology has resulted in dramatic improvement in the waste-disposal strategy for some industries, but many have failed to embrace the available technology. The reasons for this are discussed. The article concludes that a greater positive change in waste-management practice will occur in the future, motivated by several factors, including public perception, tighter regulation, and perhaps even commonsense life cycle accounting. PMID:23540291

  14. Thermophilic slurry-phase treatment of petroleum hydrocarbon waste sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemoheterotrophic thermophilic bacteria were used to achieve enhanced hydrocarbon degradation during slurry-phase treatment of oily waste sludges from petroleum refinery operations. Aerobic and anaerobic bacterial cultures were examined under thermophilic conditions to assess the effects of mode of metabolism on the potential for petroleum hydrocarbon degradation. The study determined that both aerobic and anaerobic thermophilic bacteria are capable of growth on petroleum hydrocarbons. Thermophilic methanogenesis is feasible during the degradation of hydrocarbons when a strict anaerobic condition is achieved in a slurry bioreactor. Aerobic thermophilic bacteria achieved the largest apparent reduction in chemical oxygen demand, freon extractable oil, total and volatile solid,s and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) when treating oily waste sludges. The observed shift with time in the molecular weight distribution of hydrocarbon material was more pronounced under aerobic metabolic conditions than under strict anaerobic conditions. The changes in the hydrocarbon molecular weight distribution, infrared spectra, and PAH concentrations during slurry-phase treatment indicate that the aerobic thermophilic bioslurry achieved a higher degree of hydrocarbon degradation than the anaerobic thermophilic bioslurry during the same time period

  15. Phase change material thermal capacitor clothing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An apparatus and method for metabolic cooling and insulation of a user in a cold environment. In its preferred embodiment the apparatus is a highly flexible composite material having a flexible matrix containing a phase change thermal storage material. The apparatus can be made to heat or cool the body or to act as a thermal buffer to protect the wearer from changing environmental conditions. The apparatus may also include an external thermal insulation layer and/or an internal thermal control layer to regulate the rate of heat exchange between the composite and the skin of the wearer. Other embodiments of the apparatus also provide 1) a path for evaporation or direct absorption of perspiration from the skin of the wearer for improved comfort and thermal control, 2) heat conductive pathways within the material for thermal equalization, 3) surface treatments for improved absorption or rejection of heat by the material, and 4) means for quickly regenerating the thermal storage capacity for reuse of the material. Applications of the composite materials are also described which take advantage of the composite's thermal characteristics. The examples described include a diver's wet suit, ski boot liners, thermal socks, gloves and a face mask for cold weather activities, and a metabolic heating or cooling blanket useful for treating hypothermia or fever patients in a medical setting and therapeutic heating or cooling orthopedic joint supports.

  16. Rocketdyne's advanced coal slurry pumping program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, D. E.; Wong, G. S.; Gilman, H. H.

    1977-01-01

    The Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation is conducting a program for the engineering, fabrication, and testing of an experimental/prototype high-capacity, high-pressure centrifugal slurry feed pump for coal liquefaction purposes. The abrasion problems in a centrifugal slurry pump are primarily due to the manner in which the hard, solid particles contained in the slurry are transported through the hydraulic flow passages within the pump. The abrasive particles can create scraping, grinding, cutting, and sandblasting effects on the various exposed parts of the pump. These critical areas involving abrasion and impact erosion wear problems in a centrifugal pump are being addressed by Rocketdyne. The mechanisms of abrasion and erosion are being studied through hydrodynamic analysis, materials evaluation, and advanced design concepts.

  17. Changes in the Material Characteristics of Maize Straw during the Pretreatment Process of Methanation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongzhong Feng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pretreatment technology is important to the direct methanation of straw. This study used fresh water, four bacterium agents (stem rot agent, “result” microbe decomposition agent, straw pretreatment composite bacterium agent, and complex microorganism agent, biogas slurry, and two chemical reagents (sodium hydroxide and urea as pretreatment promoters. Different treatments were performed, and the changes in the straw pH value, temperature, total solid (TS, volatile solid (VS, and carbon-nitrogen ratio (C/N ratio under different pretreatment conditions were analyzed. The results showed that chemical promoters were more efficient than biological promoters in straw maturity. Pretreatment using sodium hydroxide induced the highest degree of straw maturity. However, its C/N ratio had to be reduced during fermentation. In contrast, the C/N ratio of the urea-pretreated straw was low and was easy to regulate when used as anaerobic digestion material. The biogas slurry pretreatment was followed by pretreatments using four different bacterium agents, among which the effect of the complex microorganism agent (BA4 was more efficient than the others. The current study is significant to the direct and efficient methanation of straw.

  18. Slurry reactor design studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, J.M.; Degen, B.D.; Cady, G.; Deslate, F.D.; Summers, R.L. (Bechtel Group, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA)); Akgerman, A. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA)); Smith, J.M. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA))

    1990-06-01

    The objective of these studies was to perform a realistic evaluation of the relative costs of tublar-fixed-bed and slurry reactors for methanol, mixed alcohols and Fischer-Tropsch syntheses under conditions where they would realistically be expected to operate. The slurry Fischer-Tropsch reactor was, therefore, operated at low H{sub 2}/CO ratio on gas directly from a Shell gasifier. The fixed-bed reactor was operated on 2.0 H{sub 2}/CO ratio gas after adjustment by shift and CO{sub 2} removal. Every attempt was made to give each reactor the benefit of its optimum design condition and correlations were developed to extend the models beyond the range of the experimental pilot plant data. For the methanol design, comparisons were made for a recycle plant with high methanol yield, this being the standard design condition. It is recognized that this is not necessarily the optimum application for the slurry reactor, which is being proposed for a once-through operation, coproducing methanol and power. Consideration is also given to the applicability of the slurry reactor to mixed alcohols, based on conditions provided by Lurgi for an Octamix{trademark} plant using their standard tubular-fixed reactor technology. 7 figs., 26 tabs.

  19. Thinning of kaolin slurry

    OpenAIRE

    Vlasák, Pavel

    2002-01-01

    After mixing kaolin with water attractive and repulsive forces between kaolin particles initiate process of coagulation and peptisation, respectively. The coagulation process in the kaolin slurry gives rise to voluminous aggregates of kaolin particles, where a great deal of water is fixed.

  20. Experimental determination of the heat transfer and cold storage characteristics of a microencapsulated phase change material in a horizontal tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Cold storage characteristics in latent and sensible heat storage mediums were studied. • Thermo-physical characterization of the phase change material was carried out. • A non-Newtonian shear thickening behavior of the phase change material was observed. • An energy storage enhancement (53%) was observed in the latent heat storage medium. - Abstract: In the present paper, the performance of a microencapsulated phase change material (in 45% w/w concentration) for low temperature thermal energy storage, suitable for air conditioning applications is studied. The results are compared to a sensible heat storage unit using water. Thermo-physical properties such as the specific heat, enthalpy variation, thermal conductivity and density are also experimentally determined. The non-Newtonian shear-thickening behavior of the phase change material slurry is quantified. Thermal energy performance is experimentally determined for a 100 l horizontal tank. The heat transfer between the heat transfer fluid and the phase change material was provided by a tube-bundle heat exchanger inside the tank. The results show that the amount of energy stored using the phase change material is 53% higher than for water after 10 h of charging, for the same storage tank volume. It was found that the heat transfer coefficient between the phase change material and the tube wall increases during the phase change temperature range, however it remains smaller than the values obtained for water

  1. Method and apparatus for in-situ drying investigation and optimization of slurry drying methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Beth L.; Daniel, Claus; Howe, Jane Y.; Kiggans, Jr, James O.; Sabau, Adrian S.; Wood, III, David L.; Kalnaus, Sergiy

    2016-05-10

    A method of drying casted slurries that includes calculating drying conditions from an experimental model for a cast slurry and forming a cast film. An infrared heating probe is positioned on one side of the casted slurry and a thermal probe is positioned on an opposing side of the casted slurry. The infrared heating probe may control the temperature of the casted slurry during drying. The casted slurry may be observed with an optical microscope, while applying the drying conditions from the experimental model. Observing the casted slurry includes detecting the incidence of micro-structural changes in the casted slurry during drying to determine if the drying conditions from the experimental model are optimal.

  2. The changing role of nuclear materials accounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear materials accounting and accounting systems at what have been DOE Production sites are evolving into management decision support tools. As the sites are moving into the mode of making decisions on how to disposition complex and varied nuclear material holdings, the need for complete and many times different information has never been greater. The artificial boundaries that have historically been established between what belongs in the classic material control and accountability (MC and A) records versus what goes into the financial, radiological control, waste, or decommissioning and decontamination records are being challenged. In addition, the tools historically used to put material into different categories such as scrap codes, composition codes, etc. have been found to be inadequate for the information needs of today. In order to be cost effective and even, more importantly to effectively manage -our inventories, the new information systems the authors design have to have the flexibility to serve many needs. In addition, those tasked with the responsibility of managing the inventories must also expand beyond the same artificial boundaries. This paper addresses some of the things occurring at the Savannah River Site to support the changing role of nuclear materials accounting

  3. Reasons for change - Today's material management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current generation of nuclear power plants is approaching middle age. The industry continues to stabilize and mature as this occurs, which creates new areas of focus. This evolution is placing a much greater emphases on the business aspects of the operation and maintenance functions. One area that can provide a reasonable return to the operating organizations is materials management. Florida Power and Light Company has experienced these reasons for change. A new department was formed as part of the Nuclear Division in 1990. Performance improvement tasks were established using goals and objectives consistent with plant support and business requirements. Two of the primary processes within the materials management area control the largest portion of costs to operating budgets: the procurement process and inventory management

  4. Phase change materials for spacecraft thermal management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objectives of this investigation were to determine the capabilities of certain phase change materials (PCM) in pellet form to buffer heat loads immediately following short term peak thermal input as part of a spacecraft thermal management system (SCTMS). Two types of PCMs demonstrated potential for SCTMS were encapsulated inorganic salt hydrate, calcium chloride hexahydrate, and the form-stable crystalline polymer, high density polyethylene. The PCM properties examined for the design of experimental packed bed heat exchangers included: packed bed porosity, mass density, pellet diameter, melting point, etc

  5. Material Engineering for Phase Change Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, David M.

    As semiconductor devices continue to scale downward, and portable consumer electronics become more prevalent there is a need to develop memory technology that will scale with devices and use less energy, while maintaining performance. One of the leading prototypical memories that is being investigated is phase change memory. Phase change memory (PCM) is a non-volatile memory composed of 1 transistor and 1 resistor. The resistive structure includes a memory material alloy which can change between amorphous and crystalline states repeatedly using current/voltage pulses of different lengths and magnitudes. The most widely studied PCM materials are chalcogenides - Germanium-Antimony-Tellerium (GST) with Ge2Sb2Te3 and Germanium-Tellerium (GeTe) being some of the most popular stochiometries. As these cells are scaled downward, the current/voltage needed to switch these materials becomes comparable to the voltage needed to sense the cell's state. The International Roadmap for Semiconductors aims to raise the threshold field of these devices from 66.6 V/mum to be at least 375 V/mum for the year 2024. These cells are also prone to resistance drift between states, leading to bit corruption and memory loss. Phase change material properties are known to influence PCM device performance such as crystallization temperature having an effect on data retention and litetime, while resistivity values in the amorphous and crystalline phases have an effect on the current/voltage needed to write/erase the cell. Addition of dopants is also known to modify the phase change material parameters. The materials G2S2T5, GeTe, with dopants - nitrogen, silicon, titanium, and aluminum oxide and undoped Gallium-Antimonide (GaSb) are studied for these desired characteristics. Thin films of these compositions are deposited via physical vapor deposition at IBM Watson Research Center. Crystallization temperatures are investigated using time resolved x-ray diffraction at Brookhaven National Laboratory

  6. CFD simulation and experimental analysis of erosion in a slurry tank test rig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart Hans-Jörg

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Erosion occurring in equipment dealing with liquid-solid mixtures such as pipeline parts, slurry pumps, liquid-solid stirred reactors and slurry mixers in various industrial applications results in operational failure and economic costs. A slurry erosion tank test rig is designed and was built to investigate the erosion rates of materials and the influencing parameters such as flow velocity and turbulence, flow angle, solid particle concentration, particles size distribution, hardness and target material properties on the material loss and erosion profiles. In the present study, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD tool is used to simulate the erosion rate of sample plates in the liquid-solid slurry mixture in a cylindrical tank. The predictions were made in a steady state and also transient manner, applying the flow at the room temperature and using water and sand as liquid and solid phases, respectively. The multiple reference frame method (MRF is applied to simulate the flow behavior and liquid-solid interactions in the slurry tank test rig. The MRF method is used since it is less demanding than sliding mesh method (SM and gives satisfactory results. The computational domain is divided into three regions: a rotational or MRF zone containing the mixer, a rotational zone (MRF containing the erosion plates and a static zone (outer liquid zone. It is observed that changing the MRF zone diameter and height causes a very low impact on the results. The simulated results were obtained for two kinds of hard metals namely stainless steel and ST-50 under some various operating conditions and are found in good agreement with the experimental results.

  7. Modelling of slurry droplet drying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadja, M.; Bergeles, G. [National Technical University of Athens, Athens (Greece). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2003-05-01

    Heat, mass and momentum transfer between a slurry droplet and a gas flow are investigated numerically. The developed model can be applied to assess drying and combustion properties of slurries inside spray dryers or combustors and to estimate the time needed to reach ignition of the solid component in slurry fuels. The model was applied to coal water droplet slurries the properties of which are available in the literature but can also be used for study of drying of any other slurry such as that encountered in flue gas desulfurization systems. The parametric study revealed that the most important factor in slurry drying is the ambient temperature and that the injection velocity, the ambient pressure of the flowing medium or the particle initial temperature affect very little the drying rate.

  8. Settlement of tailings slurries by creep compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, J.D.; Chalaturnyk, R.J.; Jeeravipoolvarn, S. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2004-07-01

    Large volumes of sand, silt, clay and small amounts of bitumen are produced from the oil sand mining operations in northern Alberta. A model is being developed to predict the consolidation behaviour of highly thixotrophic tailings slurries. The model incorporates effective stress-void ratio and void ratio-hydraulic conductivity relationships for the material. The thixotrophic strength-time relationship and the void ratio-creep rate relationship is also considered along with the mineralogy, bitumen content and water chemistry. Most analytical predictions of the rate and magnitude tailings settling overestimate how fast pore pressures will dissipate. Field deposits of non-segregating tailings to mature fine tailings demonstrate continued high pore pressures near the surface which deter surface reclamation. A finite strain theory is used in geotechnical analyses which predict the consolidation behavior of soft soils. However, this theory does not predict the full range of sedimentation, consolidation and pore pressure dissipation which occurs in thixotrophic tailings slurries. This new strain consolidation model assumes that the creep rate of the slurry exceeds the pore pressure dissipation rate. The model is useful for rapidly deposited, low permeability thixotrophic slurries where the upwards drainage path increases by several metres a year such as in oil sand tailings ponds and consolidated tailings (CT) deposits. 13 refs., 2 tabs., 12 figs.

  9. International symposium on slurry flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on two-phase slurry flow. Topics considered at the conference included flow models, drag, flow rate, stresses in a fluid-solid mixture, kinetic models, the shear viscosity of dense-phase slurries at varying shear rates, the modeling of particulates based on the Markov process, fluid-particle flows in geothermal drilling applications, two-phase nozzle flow, laminar flow, centrifugal slurry pumps, slurry pipeline flow, and the beneficiation of coal by agglomeration during hydraulic transport

  10. The effect of binders on the rheological properties and the microstructure formation of lithium-ion battery anode slurries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sanghyuk; Kim, Sunhyung; Ahn, Kyung Hyun; Lee, Seung Jong

    2015-12-01

    There have been many efforts to enhance the performance and the stability of Li-ion battery. It is crucial to develop a new material as well as to understand the mechanism of microstructure formation of the electrode in order to enhance the performance of the battery. In this study, the effect of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) on the microstructure formation as well as on the rheological properties in the aqueous anode slurries is investigated. The graphite particles aggregate with each other due to their hydrophobicity and form a gel structure in an aqueous slurry. Both CMC and SBR induce the dispersion of the graphite particles by adsorbing onto the graphite surface. In the graphite/CMC/SBR slurry, the SBR can affect the dispersion of the graphite particles at low CMC concentration, while the microstructure is not changed regardless of added SBR at high CMC concentration because the SBR cannot adsorb on the graphite surface due to the presence of CMC. The microstructure of the slurry is also confirmed by the cryo-SEM images. Understanding the role of the binders on the microstructure formation will be helpful for the effective design of the battery slurries.

  11. Electrical transport in crystalline phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis, the electrical transport properties of crystalline phase change materials are discussed. Phase change materials (PCM) are a special class of semiconducting and metallic thin film alloys, typically with a high amount of the group five element antimony or the group six element tellurium, such as Ge2Sb2Te5. The unique property portfolio of this material class makes it suitable for memory applications. PCMs reveal fast switching between two stable room-temperature phases (amorphous and crystalline) realized by optical laser or electrical current pulses in memory devices. Additionally, a pronounced property contrast in form of optical reflectivity and electrical conductivity between the amorphous and crystalline phase is the characteristic fingerprint of PCMs. The emerging electrical solid state memory PCRAM is a very promising candidate to replace Flash memory in the near future or to even become a universal memory, which is non-volatile and shows the speed and cyclability of DRAM. One of the main technological challenges is the switching process into the amorphous state, which is the most power demanding step. In order to reduce the switching power, the crystalline resistivity needs to be increased at a given voltage. Thus understanding and tayloring of this property is mandatory. In this work, first the technological relevance, i.e. optical and electrical memory concepts based on PCMs are introduced. Subsequently a description of the physical properties of PCMs in four categories is given. Namely, structure, kinetics, optical properties and electrical properties are discussed. Then important recent developments such as the identification of resonant bonding in crystalline PCMs and a property predicting coordination scheme are briefly reviewed. The following chapter deals with the theoretical background of electrical transport, while the next chapter introduces the experimental techniques: Sputtering, XRR, XRD, DSC, thermal annealing, profilometry

  12. Electrical transport in crystalline phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woda, Michael

    2012-01-06

    In this thesis, the electrical transport properties of crystalline phase change materials are discussed. Phase change materials (PCM) are a special class of semiconducting and metallic thin film alloys, typically with a high amount of the group five element antimony or the group six element tellurium, such as Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}. The unique property portfolio of this material class makes it suitable for memory applications. PCMs reveal fast switching between two stable room-temperature phases (amorphous and crystalline) realized by optical laser or electrical current pulses in memory devices. Additionally, a pronounced property contrast in form of optical reflectivity and electrical conductivity between the amorphous and crystalline phase is the characteristic fingerprint of PCMs. The emerging electrical solid state memory PCRAM is a very promising candidate to replace Flash memory in the near future or to even become a universal memory, which is non-volatile and shows the speed and cyclability of DRAM. One of the main technological challenges is the switching process into the amorphous state, which is the most power demanding step. In order to reduce the switching power, the crystalline resistivity needs to be increased at a given voltage. Thus understanding and tayloring of this property is mandatory. In this work, first the technological relevance, i.e. optical and electrical memory concepts based on PCMs are introduced. Subsequently a description of the physical properties of PCMs in four categories is given. Namely, structure, kinetics, optical properties and electrical properties are discussed. Then important recent developments such as the identification of resonant bonding in crystalline PCMs and a property predicting coordination scheme are briefly reviewed. The following chapter deals with the theoretical background of electrical transport, while the next chapter introduces the experimental techniques: Sputtering, XRR, XRD, DSC, thermal annealing

  13. Slurry wear characteristics of zinc-based alloys: Effects of sand content of slurry, silicon addition to alloy system and traversal distance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.K. PRASAD; O.P. MODI

    2009-01-01

    This investigation deals with the observations pertaining to the effects of specimen and slurry compositions as well as traversal distance on the slurry wear response of a zinc-based alloy. The composition of the alloy was altered by adding 4% silicon to it. The slurry composition was varied through changing the concentration of the sand particles in the range of 0-60% that were suspended in the (liquid) electrolyte. The electrolyte contained 4 g sodium chloride and 5 mL concentrated sulphuric acid dissolved in 10 L of water. The slurry wear tests were conducted at a speed of 7.02 m/s over the traversal distance range of 15-500 km. The wear rate increased initially with traversal distance, attained a maximum and decreased thereafter irrespective of the specimen and test environment. However, the wear rate peaks were less prominent in the liquid plus sand environments than the liquid-only medium. Further, the wear rate peak in the liquid-only medium appeared at a shorter traversal distance than the one in the sand containing slurries. Addition of sand particles to the electrolyte reduced the wear rate of the samples to 5%-15% depending on the sand concentration of the slurry. Moreover, intermediate (40%) sand content led to a maximum wear rate when compared with in the liquid plus sand media. However, this maximum was still less than in the liquid-only medium. The silicon containing alloy suffered from higher wear rates than the silicon free alloy samples when tested in the liquid-only medium. On the contrary, the trend reversed in liquid plus 20% and 40% sand environments whereas a mixed response was noted in the slurry containing 60% sand. In the latter case, the presence of silicon proved deleterious initially while an opposite trend was observed at longer traversal distances. The wear response of the samples was discussed in terms of specific features of their microconstituents like silicon and the predominant material removal mechanism in a given set of

  14. Heat protection by different phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different types of phase change materials (PCMs) were compared for the use in heat protective clothing. For that purpose, flexible blister foils containing the PCMs were prepared. The samples were irradiated with a heat flux of 1.5 kW/m2 in order to simulate a typical industrial setting like working in front of a hot oven. The temperature evolution behind the foils indicated the performance of each PCM, which was dependent on the duration of the exposure. For irradiation times up to 9 min, sodium acetate trihydrate lead to the lowest temperature increase and thus the best protection. When irradiating more than 9 min, a zeolite type was found to be more suitable, which lead to a lower temperature increase of up to 36 °C compared to a reference with no PCM. We developed a simple heat transfer model, taking account of the latent heat of the PCM, of the heat capacity of the foil and of the radiant and natural convective heat flow, which could be applied to predict the effect of PCM containing foils and will be used for further optimizations. -- Highlights: ► Comparison of different flame resistant PCMs for heat protection in textiles. ► Prediction of the heat protection of PCMs which have a net phase change temperature. ► Inorganic PCMs were shown to be highly effective for heat protection

  15. Suspended-slurry reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-03-22

    An apparatus for generating a large volume of gas from a liquid stream is disclosed. The apparatus includes a first channel through which the liquid stream passes. The apparatus also includes a layer of catalyst particles suspended in a solid slurry for generating gas from the liquid stream. The apparatus further includes a second channel through which a mixture of converted liquid and generated gas passes. A heat exchange channel heats the liquid stream. A wicking structure located in the second channel separates the gas generated from the converted liquid.

  16. YIELD STRESS REDUCTION OF DWPF MELTER FEED SLURRIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, M; Michael02 Smith, M

    2006-12-28

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site vitrifies High Level Waste for repository internment. The process consists of three major steps: waste pretreatment, vitrification, and canister decontamination/sealing. The HLW consists of insoluble metal hydroxides (primarily iron, aluminum, magnesium, manganese, and uranium) and soluble sodium salts (carbonate, hydroxide, nitrite, nitrate, sulfate). The pretreatment process acidifies the sludge with nitric and formic acids, adds the glass formers as glass frit, then concentrates the resulting slurry to approximately 50 weight percent (wt%) total solids. This slurry is fed to the joule-heated melter where the remaining water is evaporated followed by calcination of the solids and conversion to glass. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is currently assisting DWPF efforts to increase throughput of the melter. As part of this effort, SRNL has investigated methods to increase the solids content of the melter feed to reduce the heat load required to complete the evaporation of water and allow more of the energy available to calcine and vitrify the waste. The process equipment in the facility is fixed and cannot process materials with high yield stresses, therefore increasing the solids content will require that the yield stress of the melter feed slurries be reduced. Changing the glass former added during pretreatment from an irregularly shaped glass frit to nearly spherical beads was evaluated. The evaluation required a systems approach which included evaluations of the effectiveness of beads in reducing the melter feed yield stress as well as evaluations of the processing impacts of changing the frit morphology. Processing impacts of beads include changing the settling rate of the glass former (which effects mixing and sampling of the melter feed slurry and the frit addition equipment) as well as impacts on the melt behavior due to decreased surface area of the beads versus frit

  17. Performance of a Centrifugal Slurry Pump

    OpenAIRE

    Hawas Yahya Bajawi; Basharat Salim; Ziyadh Suhibani

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to experimentally investigate the effect of speed, concentration and size of slurry on the performance of a centrifugal pump. For this purpose a facility was built where the performance of a centrifugal slurry pump was examined using aggregate slurry. Three sizes of slurry with three concentrations and at three impeller speeds were used for the performance investigations of a centrifugal slurry pump. As a reference performance the performance of centrifugal slurry pu...

  18. Development and application demonstration of stemming slurry materials for high-pressure grouting in soft stratum%松软地层高压灌浆封孔浆体研制及应用论证

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张贵金; 曾柳絮; 陈安重; 杨松林; 彭春雷

    2012-01-01

    For the impervious construction in soft stratum, there are various technical problems, such as easy collapse of boreholes, vertical lift induced by difficultly pressed grouting, large waste led by easy grouting leakage, and difficult grouting control. The traditional methods of "sleeve valve pipe grouting", "embedded screen pipe tube" and "orifice closed grouting" are difficult to meet the design requirements in deep soft ground. To reduce cost and to improve efficiency, a new construction method, high pulsating pressure grouting from below with stemming slurry materials, is put forward, and one of the key techniques, slurry sealing technique, is described. For the construction requirements, a kind of lowAntensity, rapidly solidified and hard plastic-like sealing slurry is developed, and its performance parameters are obtained. It is enough to stem grouting and to consume energy by filling slurry materials between grouting pipe and bore hole pipe wall based on the grouting mechanism. The bottom-up pulling force which provides the basis for choosing pulling machines for construction is calculated. In addition, if you turn the grouting pipe continuously during the process of grouting, the work efficiency can be improved and the grouting pipe can be smoothly promoted to avoid locking accidents even in deep borehole cases without pipe drawing machines. Through the tests on the deep soft stratum in the bay area of Tuokou Hydropower Station, the slurry materials achieve the desired effect. Theoretical study and engineering practice show that it's feasible to adopt slurry sealing technology and to implement high-pressure grouting in soft stratum, and that the construction techniques by means of stemming slurry material can meet requirements.%在松软地层进行防渗工程施工时,存在钻孔易塌孔,灌浆难起压易导致垂向挤密抬动,灌浆易漏浆串浆导致耗浆量大,灌浆过程难控制等技术难题。传统的“袖阀

  19. Rheological behavior of Shengli coal-solvent slurry at low-temperatures and atmospheric pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yong-gang; YAN Yan; GUO Xiang-kun; Xu De-ping

    2009-01-01

    We report the results from systematic studies of Shengli lignite coal-solvent slurries. Solvent type, temperature, coal to solvent ratio, particle granularity, shear rate and shear time were investigated. The viscosity of the solvents is time independent. However, the slurries are thixotropic. A change from pseudo-plastic to Newtonian behavior occurs as the temperature, or as the solvent to coal ratio, increases. The solvent used in the slurry affects the point at which the theology changes from pseudo-plastic to Newtonian. The REC slurry changes at 1 : 1.2 coal to solvent ratio and at 40 ℃. The HAR slurry changes at a 1:1.5 ratio and at 60 ℃. The theology of the slurries is pseudo-plastic at low shear rates but Newtonian at high shear rates.

  20. Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Life Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillibridge, Sean; Stephan, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Low Lunar Orbit (LLO) poses unique thermal challenges for the orbiting space craft, particularly regarding the performance of the radiators. The IR environment of the space craft varies drastically from the light side to the dark side of the moon. The result is a situation where a radiator sized for the maximal heat load in the most adverse situation is subject to freezing on the dark side of the orbit. One solution to this problem is to implement Phase Change Material (PCM) Heat Exchangers. PCM Heat Exchangers act as a "thermal capacitor," storing thermal energy when there is too much being produced by the space craft to reject to space, and then feeding that energy back into the thermal loop when conditions are more favorable. Because they do not use an expendable resource, such as the feed water used by sublimators and evaporators, PCM Heat Exchangers are ideal for long duration LLO missions. In order to validate the performance of PCM Heat Exchangers, a life test is being conducted on four n-Pentadecane, carbon filament heat exchangers. Fluid loop performance, repeatability, and measurement of performance degradation over 2500 melt-freeze cycles will be performed.

  1. An investigation on the rheological behavior of metallic semi-solid slurries of Al-6.5 pct Si and semi-solid composite slurries of SiC particulates in an Al-6.5 pct Si alloy matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, H.-K.; Ito, Y.; Cornie, J. A.; Flemings, M. C.

    1993-01-01

    The rheology of SiC particulate/Al-6.5 pct Si composite slurries was explored. The rheological behavior of the composite slurries shows both thixotropic and pseudoplastic behaviors. Isostructural experiments on the composite slurries revealed a Newtonian behavior beyond a high shear rate limit. The rheology of fully molten composite slurries over the low to high shear rate range indicates the existence of a low shear rate Newtonian region, an intermediate pseudoplastic region and a high shear rate Newtonian region. The isostructural studies indicate that the viscosity of a composite slurry depends upon the shearing history of a given volume of material. An unexpected shear thinning was noted for SiC particulate + alpha slurries as compared to semi-solid metallic slurries at the same fraction solid. The implications of these findings for the processing of slurries into cast components is discussed.

  2. Contamination effects of drilling fluid additives on cement slurry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youzhi Zheng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available During the cementation of deep wells, contamination at the contact surface between cement slurry and drilling fluid will present a technical challenge, which may threaten operation safety. To deal with the problem, lab tests and analysis were performed specifically on the compatibility of fluids during cementation in Sichuan and Chongqing gas fields. Impacts of commonly used additives for drilling fluids were determined on fluidity and thickening time of conventional cement slurry. Through the infrared spectrum analysis, SEM and XRD, infrared spectrum data of kalium polyacrylamide (KPAM and bio-viscosifier were obtained, together with infrared spectrum, SEM and XRD data of cement slurry with additives. Contamination mechanisms of the cement slurry by conventional additives for drilling fluid were reviewed. Test results show that both KPAM and bio-viscosifier are such high-molecular materials that the long chains in these materials may easily absorb cement particles in the slurry to form mixed network structures; as a result, cement particles were prone to agglomeration and eventually lost their pumpability. Finally, assessment of and testing methods for the contamination effects of drilling fluid additives on cement slurry were further improved to form standards and codes that may help solve the said problems. This study will provide technological supports for the preparation of drilling fluids with desirable properties prior to cementation, the selection of optimal drilling fluids additives, and the development of innovative drilling fluids additives.

  3. Slurry flow principles and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Shook, C A; Brenner, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Slurry Flow: Principles and Practice describes the basic concepts and methods for understanding and designing slurry flow systems, in-plan installations, and long-distance transportation systems. The goal of this book is to enable the design or plant engineer to derive the maximum benefit from a limited amount of test data and to generalize operating experience to new situations. Design procedures are described in detail and are accompanied by illustrative examples needed by engineers with little or no previous experience in slurry transport.The technical literature in this field is extensive:

  4. Environmental Consequences of Pig Slurry Treatment Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ten Hoeve, Marieke

    compared with a reference scenario. The treatment scenarios were field acidification, in-house acidification, screw press separation with and without composting of the solid fraction, decanter centrifuge separation with and without ammonia stripping of the liquid fraction, and four anaerobic digestion...... scenarios with different co-substrates. These co-substrates were straw that would otherwise have been left on the field, straw that would otherwise have been incinerated, the organic fraction of household waste and the solid fraction of slurry. The impact categories analysed were climate change potential...... occur during manure storage and after field application. The main emissions are ammonia, nitrous oxide, methane, carbon dioxide, nitrate, phosphorus and odour. Slurry treatment technologies have been and are being developed in order to reduce the environmental impacts of manure. However, it is important...

  5. Effects of Main Parameters on Rheological Properties of Oil-Coal Slurry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yong-gang; HAO Li-fang; XIONG Chu-an; SUN Xiu-ying

    2006-01-01

    Oil-coal slurry prepared in coal direct liquefaction is a dispersed solid-liquid suspension system. In this paper, some factors such as solvent properties, solid concentrations and temperatures, which affect viscosity change of oil-coal slurry, were studied. The viscosity of coal slurry was measured using rotary viscometer, and the rheological properties have been investigated. The viscosity and rheological curves were plotted and regressed, respectively. The results show that the coal slurry behaves a pseudoplastic and thixotropic property. The rheological type of coal slurry was ascertained and its rheological equations were educed. The oil-coal slurry changes to non-Newtonian fluid from Newtonian fluid with the increasing of solid concentration.

  6. Nano composite phase change materials microcapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qingwen

    MicroPCMs with nano composite structures (NC-MicroPCMs) have been systematically studied. NC-MicroPCMs were fabricated by the in situ polymerization and addition of silver NPs into core-shell structures. A full factorial experiment was designed, including three factors of core/shell, molar ratio of formaldehyde/melamine and NPs addition. 12 MicroPCMs samples were prepared. The encapsulated efficiency is approximately 80% to 90%. The structural/morphological features of the NC-MicroPCMs were evaluated. The size was in a range of 3.4 mu m to 4.0 mu m. The coarse appearance is attributed to NPs and NPs are distributed on the surface, within the shell and core. The NC-MicroPCMs contain new chemical components and molecular groups, due to the formation of chemical bonds after the pretreatment of NPs. Extra X-ray diffraction peaks of silver were found indicating silver nano-particles were formed into an integral structure with the core/shell structure by means of chemical bonds and physical linkages. Extra functionalities were found, including: (1) enhancement of IR radiation properties; (2) depression of super-cooling, and (3) increase of thermal stabilities. The effects of SERS (Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy) arising from the silver nano-particles were observed. The Raman scattering intensity was magnified more than 100 times. These effects were also exhibited in macroscopic level in the fabric coatings as enhanced IR radiation properties were detected by the "Fabric Infrared Radiation Management Tester" (FRMT). "Degree of Crystallinity" (DOC) was measured and found the three factors have a strong influence on it. DOC is closely related to thermal stability and MicroPCMs with a higher DOC show better temperature resistance. The thermal regulating effects of the MicroPCMs coatings were studied. A "plateau regions" was detected around the temperature of phase change, showing the function of PCMs. Addition of silver nano-particles to the MicroPCMs has a positive

  7. Effect of lapping slurry on critical cutting depth of spinel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Measured spinel wafers’ hardness and crack length in different slurries. • Evaluated the softened layer thickness in different slurries. • Discussed the effect of slurries on critical cutting depth of spinel. - Abstract: The critical cutting depth for lapping process is very important because it influences the mode of material removal. In this paper, a serial of microscopic indentation experiments were carried out for measuring spinel wafers’ hardness and crack length in different lapping slurries. Their critical cutting depth and fracture toughness were calculated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was also employed to study the surface chemical composition and softened layer thickness of wafers in different slurries. Experimental results indicate that the softened layers of spinel wafers are formed due to the corrosion of lapping slurries, which leads to a lower hardness and a larger fracture toughness of samples, and increases the critical cutting depth. Among them, the critical cutting depth in ethylene glycol solution is the largest and up to 21.8 nm. The increase of critical cutting depth is helpful to modify the surface quality of the work-piece being lapped via ductile removal mode instead of brittle fracture mode

  8. Resistance coefficient during ice slurry flow through pipe sudden constriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ł. Mika

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the adverse environmental effects of some commonly-used refrigerants, efforts are still underway to find new cooling mediumsthat would be safer to the ozone layer and would not increase the greenhouse effect. Ice slurry as a new ecological coolant suits theprocesses requiring the preservation of constant and equal temperature in the cooling process of the full section of the cooled solid. Thanks to that, ice slurry can find a wide potential application in such branches of industry, as heat treatment, materials engineering, or foundry. In this paper, flow systems which are commonly used in fittings elements such as diameter’s reductions in ice slurry pipelines, are experimentally investigated. In the study reported in this paper, the consideration was given to the specific features of the slurry flow in which the flow qualities depend mainly on the volume fraction of solid particles. The results of the experimental studies on the flow resistance, presented herein, enabled to determine the resistance coefficient during the ice slurry flow through the pipe sudden constriction. The volume fraction of solid particles in the slurry ranged from 5 to 30%. The recommended and non-recommended range of the Reynolds number for the ice slurry flow through the pipe sudden constriction were presented in this paper. The experimental studies were conducted on a few variants of the most common reductions of copper pipes. Further studies on the determination of the resistance coefficient in the remaining fittings elements of the pipeline were recommended in the paper as well as the further theoretical studies intended to determine the theoretical relations to calculate the resistance coefficient in all the fittings elements in the pipeline (on the basis of the experimental studies and to elaborate the calculation pattern of the entire ice slurry system.

  9. Flow and Heat Transfer in Micro Pin Fin Heat Sinks with Nano-Encapsulated Phase Change Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Rajabifar, Bahram; Zhang, Yuwen; Khanna, Sanjeev K

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a 3D conjugated heat transfer model for Nano-Encapsulated Phase Change Materials (NEPCMs) cooled Micro Pin Fin Heat Sink (MPFHS) is presented. The governing equations of flow and heat transfer are solved using a finite volume method based on collocated grid and the results are validated with the available data reported in the literature. The effect of nanoparticles volume fraction (C = 0.1, 0.2, 0.3), inlet velocity (Vin = 0.015, 0.030, 0.045 m/s), and bottom wall temperature (Twall = 299.15, 303.15, 315.15, 350.15 K) are studied on Nusselt and Euler numbers as well as temperature contours in the system. The results indicate that significant heat transfer enhancement is achieved when using NEPCM slurry as an advanced coolant. The maximum Nusselt number when NEPCM slurry (C = 0.3) with Vin = 0.015, 0.030, 0.045 (m/s) is employed, are 2.27, 1.81, 1.56 times higher than the ones with base fluid, respectively. However, with increasing bottom wall temperature, the Nusselt number first increases then...

  10. Emplacement-related layering in magma slurries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petford, N.

    2009-04-01

    Textures and structures such as layering, grading and foliations preserved in igneous rocks offer a glimpse into the magma emplacement process. However, despite recent advances, a full and proper understanding of the fluid dynamics of congested fluid-particle mixtures during shear remains elusive. This is a shame as without recourse to such fundamental understanding, the interpretation of structural field data in the context of magma flow remains problematic. One way to gain insight into the process is to treat flowing magma as a dynamic material with a rheology similar to sheared, congested slurries. The idea that dense magma equates to a high temperature slurry is an attractive one, and opens up a way to examine the emplacement process that does not rely on equilibrium thermodynamics as a final explanation for commonly observed igneous structures. Using the Basement Sill, Antarctica, as a world class example of a magmatic slurry, shearing at high Peclet (Pe) number where particle diffusion is negligible has the potential to impart a rich diversity of structures including layering, grading and flow segregation. Work to model numerically the flow of the Basement Sill slurry using a range of theoretical and experimentally-derived non-Newtonian magma rheologies will be presented and assessed. A key impilcation is that in addition to more classical explanations such as compaction and gravitational settling, igneous layering can also arise spontaneously during shear associated with the ascent and emplacement of congested magma. A final aspect of the emplacement model considers the irregular geometry of the Basement Sill boundaries. Movement of magma along these boundaries results in the formation of local eddies and fluid swirl/back-flow that add additional complexity to macroscopic flow field.

  11. Comparative testing of slurry monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hylton, T.D.; Bayne, C.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Anderson, M.S. [Ames Lab., IA (United States); Van Essen, D.C. [Advanced Integrated Management Services, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1998-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has millions of gallons of radioactive liquid and sludge wastes that must be retrieved from underground storage tanks, transferred to treatment facilities, and processed to a final waste form. The wastes will be removed from the current storage tanks by mobilizing the sludge wastes and mixing them with the liquid wastes to create slurries. Each slurry would then be transferred by pipeline to the desired destination. To reduce the risk of plugging a pipeline, the transport properties (e.g., density, suspended solids concentration, viscosity, particle size range) of the slurry should be determined to be within acceptable limits prior to transfer. These properties should also be monitored and controlled within specified limits while the slurry transfer is in progress. The DOE issued a call for proposals for developing on-line instrumentation to measure the transport properties of slurries. In response to the call for proposals, several researchers submitted proposals and were funded to develop slurry monitoring instruments. These newly developed DOE instruments are currently in the prototype stage. Before the instruments were installed in a radioactive application, the DOE wanted to evaluate them under nonradioactive conditions to determine if they were accurate, reliable, and dependable. The goal of this project was to test the performance of the newly developed DOE instruments along with several commercially available instruments. The baseline method for comparison utilized the results from grab-sample analyses.

  12. Medical ice slurry production device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasza, Kenneth E.; Oras, John; Son, HyunJin

    2008-06-24

    The present invention relates to an apparatus for producing sterile ice slurries for medical cooling applications. The apparatus is capable of producing highly loaded slurries suitable for delivery to targeted internal organs of a patient, such as the brain, heart, lungs, stomach, kidneys, pancreas, and others, through medical size diameter tubing. The ice slurry production apparatus includes a slurry production reservoir adapted to contain a volume of a saline solution. A flexible membrane crystallization surface is provided within the slurry production reservoir. The crystallization surface is chilled to a temperature below a freezing point of the saline solution within the reservoir such that ice particles form on the crystallization surface. A deflector in the form of a reciprocating member is provided for periodically distorting the crystallization surface and dislodging the ice particles which form on the crystallization surface. Using reservoir mixing the slurry is conditioned for easy pumping directly out of the production reservoir via medical tubing or delivery through other means such as squeeze bottles, squeeze bags, hypodermic syringes, manual hand delivery, and the like.

  13. Comparative testing of slurry monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has millions of gallons of radioactive liquid and sludge wastes that must be retrieved from underground storage tanks, transferred to treatment facilities, and processed to a final waste form. The wastes will be removed from the current storage tanks by mobilizing the sludge wastes and mixing them with the liquid wastes to create slurries. Each slurry would then be transferred by pipeline to the desired destination. To reduce the risk of plugging a pipeline, the transport properties (e.g., density, suspended solids concentration, viscosity, particle size range) of the slurry should be determined to be within acceptable limits prior to transfer. These properties should also be monitored and controlled within specified limits while the slurry transfer is in progress. The DOE issued a call for proposals for developing on-line instrumentation to measure the transport properties of slurries. In response to the call for proposals, several researchers submitted proposals and were funded to develop slurry monitoring instruments. These newly developed DOE instruments are currently in the prototype stage. Before the instruments were installed in a radioactive application, the DOE wanted to evaluate them under nonradioactive conditions to determine if they were accurate, reliable, and dependable. The goal of this project was to test the performance of the newly developed DOE instruments along with several commercially available instruments. The baseline method for comparison utilized the results from grab-sample analyses

  14. Investigation of properties of coal-water slurries produced by electric discharge methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyantuev, S.; Khmelev, A.; Kondratenko, A.; Baldynova, F.

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of research is to obtain high quality coal-water slurry with minimum energy consumption. The paper presents the characteristics of coal-water slurries produced by electric discharge methods. The raw material is coal from different mines (Tugnuisky, Aduun- Chulunsky, etc.). Micrographs of the surface of the coal particles in the slurry and its chemical composition are obtained by scanning electron microscopy. Micrographs showed that the electric discharge treatment resulted in a significant dispersion of the coal particles. Elemental analysis showed a significant reduction of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen. Viscosity of slurries was determined by Brookfield rotational viscometer and corresponds to the standard of GB / T18856.4.

  15. Securing nuclear materials in a changing world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the authors review the present stat of nuclear materials safeguards and how these may be reformed in light of the new circumstances in the world. In Section 2, they review the principles that currently guide the application of safeguards and the international coverage provided by the safeguards. In Section 3, they examine the flows of fissile nuclear materials through the civil nuclear fuel cycle and, prospectively, the flow of fissile materials out of dismantled US and former-Soviet nuclear weapons. They show that a substantial fraction of the plutonium in the world's civil fuel cycles is not now under international safeguards. Finally, in Section 4 and 5, they review the range of technical and institutional options that are being considered for securing fissile materials. A primary goal of reforms in nuclear safeguards should be to make their application to civil fuel cycles universal--that is, applying uniformly to both nuclear weapon states (NWS) and non-nuclear weapon states (NNWS). But safeguards by themselves may not be sufficient in an era when far larger quantities of weapons-usable material are being stored and handled in the civil sector. They discuss the safeguards implications of a range of these plutonium management options. 63 refs

  16. Predicting wear of hydrotransport pipelines in oil sand slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Been, J.; Lu, B.; Wolodko, J. [Alberta Research Council, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Kiel, D. [Coanda Research and Development Corp., Burnaby, BC (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    An overview of erosion and corrosion methods and techniques was presented. Wear to pipelines is influenced by slurry flow and chemistry; solids loading; and electrochemical interactions. While several experimental techniques have been developed to rank the performance of different pipeline materials, experiments do not currently provide accurate quantitative prediction of pipeline wear in the field. Rotating cylinder electrodes (RCE) and jet impingement methods are used to study the effect of flow velocity on corrosion rate. Slurry pot erosion-corrosion testers are used to rank materials for use in more dilute, less turbulent slurries. Coriolois slurry erosion testers are used to rank the erosion resistance of different pipeline materials. A pilot-scale flow loop is now being constructed by the Alberta Research Council (ARC) in order to replicate wet erosion phenomena in oil sands applications. The flow loop will be used to simulate the field conditions of oil sands pipelines and develop predictive wear data and models. Coulombic shear stress and characteristic wall velocities have been determined using a 2-layer model designed to represent flow as 2 distinct layers. To date, the flow loop pilot study has demonstrated that wear rates in smaller diameter flow loops are not significantly different than larger diameter field installations. Preliminary calculations have demonstrated that the flow loop can be used to accurately simulate the hydrodynamics and wear typically experienced in field slurry flows. 67 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs.

  17. Energy efficiency of buildings with phase-change materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukić Predrag

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The construction of energy efficient buildings using innovative building materials such as phase change materials, in addition to improving indoor comfort, energy savings and costs, can be achieved by increasing their market value. Because of its ability to absorb and release energy at predictable temperatures, phase change materials are effective in controlling and maintaining the thermal environment in the building. The use of phase changing materials, materials stored latent energy storage is an effective form of heat. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR36016: Experimental and theoretical investigation of frames and plates with semi-rigid connections from the view of the second order theory and stability analysis

  18. PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS IN FLOOR TILES FOR THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas C. Hittle

    2002-10-01

    Passive solar systems integrated into residential structures significantly reduce heating energy consumption. Taking advantage of latent heat storage has further increased energy savings. This is accomplished by the incorporation of phase change materials into building materials used in passive applications. Trombe walls, ceilings and floors can all be enhanced with phase change materials. Increasing the thermal storage of floor tile by the addition of encapsulated paraffin wax is the proposed topic of research. Latent heat storage of a phase change material (PCM) is obtained during a change in phase. Typical materials use the latent heat released when the material changes from a liquid to a solid. Paraffin wax and salt hydrates are examples of such materials. Other PCMs that have been recently investigated undergo a phase transition from one solid form to another. During this process they will release heat. These are known as solid-state phase change materials. All have large latent heats, which makes them ideal for passive solar applications. Easy incorporation into various building materials is must for these materials. This proposal will address the advantages and disadvantages of using these materials in floor tile. Prototype tile will be made from a mixture of quartz, binder and phase change material. The thermal and structural properties of the prototype tiles will be tested fully. It is expected that with the addition of the phase change material the structural properties will be compromised to some extent. The ratio of phase change material in the tile will have to be varied to determine the best mixture to provide significant thermal storage, while maintaining structural properties that meet the industry standards for floor tile.

  19. Comparative study of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurement using two slurry circulation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental conditions associated with slurry measurements to achieve good precision by using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) are examined. LIBS analysis was applied to a special waste slurry sample that contains 85.4% water, 2.5% ferric oxide Fe2O3, 1.7% alumina Al2O3, and small quantities of oxides of boron and chromium. While liquids add challenge to LIBS measurements, the analysis was successfully performed on iron and aluminum. Two slurry circulation systems were devised to overcome the major technical problems associated with LIBS measurements of slurry samples, namely, sedimentation and change in the lens-to-sample distance during measurement. LIBS slurry measurements using both circulation systems are compared. The results show that the experimental configuration plays a crucial role for online slurry analysis

  20. In-situ study of the thermal properties of hydrate slurry by high pressure DSC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sari, O.; Hu, J.; Brun, F.; Erbeau, N. [Institute of Thermal Engineering, University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland, Yverdon-les-Bains (Switzerland); Homsy, P. [Nestec, Vevey (Switzerland); Logel, J.-C. [Axima Refrigeration, Bischheim (France)

    2008-07-01

    Knowing the enthalpy of hydrate slurry is very essential for energy balance and industrial applications. No direct measurement processes had been developed in this field in the past time. A new experimental method with special device has been developed to carry out on-line measurement of the thermal properties for hydrate slurry under dynamic conditions. With this special device, it is possible to deliver the hydrate slurry to the high pressure DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimetry) directly from the production tank or pipes. Thermal data acquisition will be performed afterwards by DSC. The investigated conditions were at pressure of 30 bar and temperature of {approx}+7 {sup o}C. The dissociation enthalpy of CO{sub 2} hydrate slurry was about 54 kJ/kg, corresponding 10.8% of solid fraction. The on-line measurement results for CO{sub 2} hydrate slurry give a good tendency to apply this phase change slurry to the industrial refrigeration process. (author)

  1. Drag material change in hot runner injection molding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋炳炎; 黄伯云

    2001-01-01

    Quick material change is often encountered for the different colors or kinds of polymer in hot runner injecting molding process. Time-costing and incompleteness of material change process often affects the quality and productivity of products. In the practical production, multi-injection or white material as the transition material is often adopted for quick material change. Based on the rheological behavior of the new and the previous plastic melt, the researches on the related problems were carried out. The concept of drag material change was originally presented. The physical and mathematical model on the simultaneous flow process of the new and the previous plastic melt in hot runner were built up, which can well explain the influence of the injection speed, pressure, viscosity difference, temperature and mold structure on the drag material change efficiency. When temperature in different position in the mold was increased and adjusted, the viscosity difference between the two kinds of melt can be controlled. Therefore the material change ability can be greatly improved during the whole material change process, getting rid of more and more difficult changing in the late stage.

  2. Phase Change Materials in concrete floors. Part 1; Phase Change Materials in betonvloeren. Deel 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Entrop, A.G. [Duurzaam Bouwen, Universiteit Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Reinders, A.H.M.E. [Energie Efficient Ontwerpen, Technische Universiteit Delft TUD, Delft (Netherlands)

    2012-07-15

    Results of research on an innovative use of Phase Change Materials (PCMs) in concrete floors are discussed. The PCMs store thermal solar energy. Temperatures of four concrete floors in closed environments were monitored. A reduction of maximum floor temperatures was achieved up to 16 {+-}2% and an increase of minimum temperatures up to 7 {+-}3%. An integral design is needed in which the thermal resistance of the building shell, the sensible heat capacity of the building and the latent heat capacity of PCMs are considered simultaneously. [Dutch] Er is een experiment uitgevoerd met vier betonnen vloeren in een semi-adiabatische omgeving. Twee vloeren bevatten PCMs en, ter referentie, twee vloeren geen PCMs. De opstelling moest op schaal een woning voorstellen met een raam op het zuiden. De omgevingscondities en de temperatuurontwikkelingen in de vloeren en boxen werden gemonitord. Het experiment moest aantonen in hoeverre PCMs kunnen worden gebruikt voor het passief verwarmen van Nederlandse woningen.

  3. Surface characteristics of ruthenium in periodate-based slurry during chemical mechanical polishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Jie; Wang, Tongqing; Jiang, Liang; Lu, Xinchun, E-mail: xclu@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • The Ru surface chemical and mechanical property varies with KIO{sub 4} slurry pH. • In alkaline slurry, the corrosion proceeds uniformly like a direct dissolution. • In neutral and acidic slurries, Ru exhibits passivation behavior. • MRR is highest in neutral slurry due to inhomogeneous RuO{sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O/RuO{sub 3} passivation. • Weak alkaline slurry is preferred to get good MRR and avoid toxic RuO{sub 4} formation. - Abstract: When the feature size of integrated circuit continues to shrink below 14 nm, ruthenium (Ru) has become one of the most promising candidates for the application of novel barrier layer. To reveal the material removal mechanism of Ru during chemical mechanical polishing (CMP), surface characteristics of Ru in KIO{sub 4}-based slurry were investigated. The corrosion behavior of ruthenium was measured by the surface chemistry and morphology analysis. Then the mechanical properties of the passivated/corroded surface were evaluated by AES and tribocorrosion experiments. CMP experiments were carried out to make clear the effects of surface property during polishing. It was found that the Ru surface chemistry and mechanical properties vary obviously as a function of slurry pH. In neutral slurries, the Ru surface is covered with RuO{sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O/RuO{sub 3} inhomogeneous passivation films, with the highest material removal rate obtained during the CMP process. It could be concluded that the material removal mechanism largely depends on the slurry pH values. In near neutral slurries, Ru is passivated with thick and heterogeneous oxides film, which proves the easiest to be mechanically removed during polishing. The weak alkaline slurry is preferred in order to achieve desirable polishing rate as well as avoid the formation of toxic RuO{sub 4}.

  4. Surface characteristics of ruthenium in periodate-based slurry during chemical mechanical polishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The Ru surface chemical and mechanical property varies with KIO4 slurry pH. • In alkaline slurry, the corrosion proceeds uniformly like a direct dissolution. • In neutral and acidic slurries, Ru exhibits passivation behavior. • MRR is highest in neutral slurry due to inhomogeneous RuO2·2H2O/RuO3 passivation. • Weak alkaline slurry is preferred to get good MRR and avoid toxic RuO4 formation. - Abstract: When the feature size of integrated circuit continues to shrink below 14 nm, ruthenium (Ru) has become one of the most promising candidates for the application of novel barrier layer. To reveal the material removal mechanism of Ru during chemical mechanical polishing (CMP), surface characteristics of Ru in KIO4-based slurry were investigated. The corrosion behavior of ruthenium was measured by the surface chemistry and morphology analysis. Then the mechanical properties of the passivated/corroded surface were evaluated by AES and tribocorrosion experiments. CMP experiments were carried out to make clear the effects of surface property during polishing. It was found that the Ru surface chemistry and mechanical properties vary obviously as a function of slurry pH. In neutral slurries, the Ru surface is covered with RuO2·2H2O/RuO3 inhomogeneous passivation films, with the highest material removal rate obtained during the CMP process. It could be concluded that the material removal mechanism largely depends on the slurry pH values. In near neutral slurries, Ru is passivated with thick and heterogeneous oxides film, which proves the easiest to be mechanically removed during polishing. The weak alkaline slurry is preferred in order to achieve desirable polishing rate as well as avoid the formation of toxic RuO4

  5. A Dynamic System to Manage Changes in Course Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaneldin, Essam K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the popularity of existing course management systems, they do not consider the management of course material changes, particularly courses that require more than one instructor. The main purpose of this study is to instantly communicate course material changes to all instructors teaching the same course and to communicate approved…

  6. Thermal Mass Behaviour of Concrete Panels Incorporating Phase Change Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Niall, Dervilla; West, Roger; MCCORMACK, SARAH; Kinnane, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Phase Change Materials (PCM) have been incorporated into a range of building envelope materials with varied success. This study investigates two different methods of combining concrete and phase change materials to form PCM/concrete composite panels. The first method involves adding microencapsulated paraffin to fresh concrete during the mixing process. The second method involves vacuum impregnating butyl stearate into lightweight aggregate which is then included in the concrete mix design. T...

  7. Development of Latent Heat Storage Phase Change Material Containing Plaster

    OpenAIRE

    Bajare, Diana; Janis KAZJONOVS; Aleksandrs KORJAKINS

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of latent heat storage Phase Change Material (PCM) containing plaster as in passive application. Due to the phase change, these materials can store higher amounts of thermal energy than traditional building materials and can be used to add thermal inertia to lightweight constructions. It was shown that the use of PCMs have advantages stabilizing the room temperature variations during summer days, provided sufficient night ventilation is allowed. Another adva...

  8. Thermo physical and flow properties of CO{sub 2} hydrate slurry - Scientific paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sari, O.; Hu, J.; Eicher, S.; Egolf, P. W. [Institute of Thermal Engineering, University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland, Yverdon-les-Bains (Switzerland); Homsy, P. [Nestec, Vevey (Switzerland)

    2008-07-01

    The apparent viscosity and flow regime of CO{sub 2} hydrate slurry were investigated with a XL7-100 on-line resonant viscometer. Possible reasons for the viscosity changes before and after the nucleation of hydrates are discussed. In addition, super saturation of the CO{sub 2} solution under certain pressure and temperature conditions as well as its density and apparent viscosity were examined. The hydrate's solid fraction and the dissociation enthalpy were evaluated by an on-line Micro DSC system. Real-time coupled multi-electrode array sensor (CMAS) probes were applied to measure the maximal localized corrosion rate of three different materials subjected to CO{sub 2} hydrate slurry and saturated CO{sub 2} solution in the temperature range of 1 to 18 {sup o}C and pressure range of 25 to 30 bar. The density of CO{sub 2} hydrate slurry was also experimentally investigated and the relation between the density and the solid fraction has been established. (author)

  9. Ammonia abatement by slurry acidification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren O.; Hutchings, Nicholas John; Hafner, Sasha;

    2016-01-01

    Livestock production systems can be major sources of trace gases including ammonia (NH3), the greenhouse gases methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), and odorous compounds such as hydrogen sulphide (H2S). Short-term campaigns have indicated that acidification of livestock slurry during in....... The effect of acidification on emissions of H2S differed between experiments. Implications of slurry acidification for subsequent field application, including N and S availability, and soil pH, are discussed....... rates were generally high. It was concluded that the contribution from floors to NH3 emissions was <50%. There was some evidence for reduced CH4 emissions from acidified slurry, but CH4 emissions were generally low and apparently dominated by enteric fermentation. No effect on N2O emissions was observed...

  10. Research on the carbonation laws and mechanism of expansion material iflling slurry%浆体膨胀材料充填体碳化机理及规律研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵龙; 王劼; 刘树江

    2015-01-01

    Based on the carbonization depth determination, researches on carbonation regularity and mechanism of expansion material iflling body, using SEM and XRD analysis to microscopic test on the structure of iflling body, to explore the related carbonization mechanism and rules of expansion slurry filling materials, the results of the study show that:the expansion of concrete carbonation regularity and paste iflling materials body has the very big difference, the free water impedes the carbonation, revealed the mechanism that the iflling body ifrstly lost water and then carbonized, and the mechanism of carbonation reaction of crystal water, also summarized the step carbonization, carbonation pH neutral strength of iflling body and carbonized residue.%通过对碳化深度进行测定,针对浆体膨胀材料充填体的碳化规律及机理展开研究,采用SEM和XRD分析对充填体结构进行微观测试,探究了关于浆体膨胀材料充填体碳化的相关机理与规律,研究结果表明:浆体膨胀材料充填体的碳化规律与混凝土有很大区别,自由水对碳化反而起阻止作用,揭示出充填体先失水后碳化,结晶水碳化的反应机理,也总结出了分步碳化,酸碱度中性化且碳化后充填体强度残留的碳化规律。

  11. The CO{sub 2} hydrate slurry; Le coulis de glace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sari, O.; Hu, J.; Eicher, S.; Brun, F. [Institute of Thermal Engineering, University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland, Yverdon-les-Bains (Switzerland); Sari, O.; Hu, J. [Clean Cooling Solutions, spin off of University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland, Yverdon-les-Bains (Switzerland); Homsy, P. [Nestec Ltd, Vevey (Switzerland); Logel, J.-C. [Axima Refrigeration, Bischheim (France)

    2007-12-15

    A new, very promising refrigerant was developed, which could be used in industrial processes as well as air conditioners: the CO{sub 2} hydrate slurry. Replacing hydrochlorofluorocarbon HCFC refrigerants has a high priority, due to the strong negative environmental impact of these fluids. New refrigerants have to be environment friendly, non-inflammable, cheap and made of natural materials. CO{sub 2} hydrate slurries and/or a mixture of ice slurry and CO{sub 2} hydrate slurry meet these requirements. The University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland in Yverdon, together with industrial partners, investigated the properties of such slurries. The slurries were created using the Coldeco process: the refrigerating fluid is directly injected into the liquid brine. The evaporation of the refrigerating fluid cools the liquid down to its freezing point and homogeneously distributed small crystals appear in the liquid. A test rig was built to measure the physical and chemical properties of the slurries obtained in this way. CO{sub 2} hydrate slurries have a higher energy storage capacitance (500 kJ/kg) than ice slurries (333 kJ/kg). The production of CO{sub 2} hydrate slurries in large quantities in a continuous process was demonstrated. The solid particle concentration was 10%, the pressure amounted to 30 bar and the temperature 2 to 4 {sup o}C. Such slurries can be pumped and circulated in pipe networks. Stainless steel is the appropriate material for such networks. However, the main advantage of the new refrigerant will be, according to the authors, a reduced energy consumption compared to traditional refrigerating cycles: the difference between the temperature required by the user and the refrigerant temperature is reduced, thanks to the use of the latent heat in the new process.

  12. A New Kind of Shape-stabilized Phase Change Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Liguang; DING Rui; SUN Hao; WANG Fujun

    2011-01-01

    Based on the lowest melting point and Schroeder's theoretical calculation formula, nanomodified organic composite phase change materials (PCMs) were prepared. The phase transition temperature and the latent heat of the materials were 24 ℃ and 172 J/g, respectively. A new shape-stabilized phase change materials were prepared, using high density polyethylene as supporting material. The PCM kept the shape when temperature was higher than melting point. Thus, it can directly contact with heat transfer media. The structure,morphology and thermal behavior of PCM were analyzed by FTIR, SEM and DSC.

  13. Erosion Characteristics of Aluminum-based Metal Matrix Composites in Slurry Environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tu Jiangping

    2000-01-01

    The erosion resistance of the Al18B4O33 whisker reinforced AC4C Al composites in water and saline slurry were investigated using a jet-in-slit rig. Erosion tests were performed at slurry velocities between 6.4 m/s to 15.2 m/s and at normal impact angle. The detachment of flake and dislodgement of whisker were identified as the major mechanisms of material removal in slurry environments. The composites showed better erosion resistance due to the protection of the matrix by the whisker at low slurry velocities. Because of reduced fracture strain, the erosion rates of the composites were generally greater than that of the unreinforced alloy at high slurry velocities. Owing to interfacial reaction which resulted in decrease in hardness and fracture strain,the T6 treatment for the composites had a deleterious influence on the erosion resistance. By considering the material removal processes in the water slurry, a simple rationalization of the inverse dependence of slurry erosion rate on Hεf was obtained. In the saline slurry, there exists a strong synergistic effect between erosion and corrosion. The volume loss of the composites was enhanced through cracking of flakes and detaching of whisker induced by stress and corrosion.

  14. Effective Compressibility of a Bubbly Slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, S. I.; Gauglitz, P. A.; Rossen, W. R.

    2001-09-01

    The goal of this study is to fit model parameters to changes in waste level in response to barometric pressure changes in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site. This waste compressibility is a measure of the quantity of gas, typically hydrogen and other flammable gases, that can pose a safety hazard, retained in the waste. A one-dimensional biconical-pore-network model for compressibility of a bubbly slurry is presented in a companion paper. Fitting these results to actual waste level changes in the tanks implies that bubbles in the slurry layer are long and the ratio of pore-body radius to pore-throat radius is close to 1; unfortunately, compressibility can not be quantified unambiguously from the data without additional information on pore geometry. Therefore, determining the quantity of gas in the tanks requires more than just waste-level data. The non-uniqueness of the fit is also found with two other simple models: a capillary-tube model with contact angle hysteresis and a spherical-pore model. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11502128

  15. Concentrated biogas slurry enhanced soil fertility and tomato quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang-Bo Yu; Xi-Ping Luo; Fang-Bo Yu; Xi-Ping Luo; Cheng-Fang Song; Miao-Xian Zhang; Sheng-Dao Shan (Dept. of Environmental Sciences, Inst. of Environmental Technology, Zhejiang Forestry University, Linan (China))

    2010-05-15

    Biogas slurry is a cheap source of plant nutrients and can offer extra benefits to soil fertility and fruit quality. However, its current utilization mode and low content of active ingredients limit its further development. In this paper, a one-growing-season field study was conducted to assess the effects of concentrated biogas slurry on soil property, tomato fruit quality, and composition of microflora in both nonrhizosphere and rhizosphere soils. The results showed that application of concentrated slurry could bring significant changes to tomato cultivation, including increases in organic matter, available N, P, and K, total N and P, electrical conductivity, and fruit contents of amino acids, protein, soluble sugar, beta-carotene, tannins, and vitamin C, together with the R/S ratios and the culturable counts of bacteria, actinomycetes, and fungi in soils. It was concluded that the application is a practicable means in tomato production and will better service the area of sustainable agriculture

  16. Disposal of radioactive wastes by slurry fracture injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slurry fracture injection is used in Saskatchewan and Alberta to dispose of inert, low-toxicity fine-grained oily quartzose sand and oily water. This waste disposal method can be extended to low-level, large-volume radioactive solid wastes with reasonable cost and low environmental risk; all technical factors seem favorable. Some of the geotechnical and monitoring issues related to large-volume emplacement of wastes are discussed in this article. Stress alterations and fracture orientation changes occur during solids injection. Injection processes are monitored using wells and the induced displacement field. Most sedimentary basins have favourable characteristics for implementation of slurry fracture injection; with proper site selection and slurry design, million-year security seems entirely reasonable. (author)

  17. Thermal analysis of metal foam matrix composite phase change material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiange

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, CPCM (Composite Phase Change Material) was manufactured with metal foam matrix used as filling material. The temperature curves were obtained by experiment. The performance of heat transfer was analyzed. The experimental results show that metal foam matrix can improve temperature uniformity in phase change thermal storage material and enhance heat conduction ability. The thermal performance of CPCM is significantly improved. The efficiency of temperature control can be obviously improved by adding metal foam in phase change material. CPCM is in solid-liquid two-phase region when temperature is close to phase change point of paraffin. An approximate plateau appears. The plateau can be considered as the temperature control zone of CPCM. Heat can be transferred from hot source and be uniformly spread in thermal storage material by using metal foam matrix since thermal storage material has the advantage of strong heat storage capacity and disadvantage of poor heat conduction ability. Natural convection promotes the melting of solid-liquid phase change material. Good thermal conductivity of foam metal accelerates heat conduction of solid-liquid phase change material. The interior temperature difference decreases and the whole temperature becomes more uniform. For the same porosity with a metal foam, melting time of solid-liquid phase change material decreases. Heat conduction is enhanced and natural convection is suppressed when pore size of metal foam is smaller. The thermal storage time decreases and heat absorption rate increases when the pore size of metal foam reduces. The research results can be used to guide fabricating the CPCM.

  18. Yield Stress Reduction of DWPF Melter Feed Slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site vitrifies High Level Waste for repository internment. The process consists of three major steps: waste pretreatment, vitrification, and canister decontamination/sealing. The HLW consists of insoluble metal hydroxides and soluble sodium salts. The pretreatment process acidifies the sludge with nitric and formic acids, adds the glass formers as glass frit, then concentrates the resulting slurry to approximately 50 weight percent (wt%) total solids. This slurry is fed to the joule-heated melter where the remaining water is evaporated followed by calcination of the solids and conversion to glass. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is currently assisting DWPF efforts to increase throughput of the melter. As part of this effort, SRNL has investigated methods to increase the solids content of the melter feed to reduce the heat load required to complete the evaporation of water and allow more of the energy available to calcine and vitrify the waste. The process equipment in the facility is fixed and cannot process materials with high yield stresses, therefore increasing the solids content will require that the yield stress of the melter feed slurries be reduced. Changing the glass former added during pretreatment from an irregularly shaped glass frit to nearly spherical beads was evaluated. The evaluation required a systems approach which included evaluations of the effectiveness of beads in reducing the melter feed yield stress as well as evaluations of the processing impacts of changing the frit morphology. Processing impacts of beads include changing the settling rate of the glass former (which effects mixing and sampling of the melter feed slurry and the frit addition equipment) as well as impacts on the melt behavior due to decreased surface area of the beads versus frit. Beads were produced from the DWPF process frit by fire polishing. The frit was allowed to free fall through a flame

  19. Testing of In-Line Slurry Monitors and Pulsair Mixers with Radioactive Slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hylton, T.D.; Bayne, C.K.

    1999-08-01

    Three in-line slurry monitoring instruments were demonstrated, tested, and evaluated for their capability to determine the transport properties of radioactive slurries. The instruments included the Endress + Hauser Promass 63M Coriolis meter for measuring density, the Lasentec M600P for measuring particle size distribution, and a prototype ultrasonic monitor that was developed by Argonne National Laboratory for measuring suspended solids concentration. In addition, the power consumption of the recirculation pump was monitored to determine whether this parameter could be used as a tool for in-line slurry monitoring. The Promass 63M and the M600P were also evaluated as potential indicators of suspended solids concentration. In order to use the Promass 63M as a suspended solids monitor, the densities of the fluid phase and the dry solid particle phase must be known. In addition, the fluid phase density and the dry solids density must remain constant, as any change will affect the correlation between the slurry density and the suspended solids concentration. For the M600P, the particle size distribution would need to remain relatively constant. These instruments were demonstrated and tested at the Gunite and Associated Tanks Remediation Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The testing of the instruments was conducted in parallel with the testing of a Pulsair mixing system, which was used to mix the contents of the selected tank. A total of six tests were performed. A submersible pump was positioned at two depths, while the Pulsair system was operated at three mixing rates.

  20. Oscillating adiabatic temperature change of 2D diamagnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on magnetocaloric effect generally concern ferromagnetic materials, due to their high magnetocaloric potential near phase transitions. Recently, this effect on diamagnetic materials was explored and oscillations on the entropy change observed as a consequence of the crossing of the Landau levels through the Fermi energy. The present paper explores the adiabatic temperature change in graphenes and thin films of non-relativistic diamagnetic materials and then compares the results with those from 3D diamagnets. Applying 10 T of magnetic field, the temperature change of a gold thin film reaches 1 K, while for bulk gold the temperature change is smaller than 6 mK. For graphenes, the temperature change reaches 4 K with a field of ∼1 T. - Highlights: • We studied magnetocaloric properties of 2D diamagnetic materials. • Temperature change of low-dimensional materials exhibits an oscillating behavior. • The effect of scattering from impurity in graphene strongly reduces the temperature change. • We propose an application involving field sensors

  1. 水煤浆加压气化原料用煤更换总结%Sum-Up of Change of Feedstock Coal for Pressure Gasification of Coal-Water Slurry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范立明

    2000-01-01

    Weihe Chemical Fertilizer Plant originally used Huan-gling coal, but due to its high ash content and ash fusion point, it becamean obstacle in the long-term stable operation of the Texaco Gasifier. Afterextensive survey and study and analysis, the feedstock coal has beenchanged to Huating coal, which basically satisfies the requirements forlong-term stable operation of the gasifier. An analysis is given of the rea-sons for changing the feedstock coal, trial operating by using Huating coalas feedstock and results obtained, and demonstrations are presented. Amethod is put forward for further improvement on the slurrying property ofthe coal in future.%渭河化肥厂原采用的黄陵煤由于煤质灰份含量及灰熔点偏高,影响德士古气化炉长周期稳定运行。经广泛调研分析之后,原料煤更换为华亭煤,基本满足了气化炉长周期稳定运行的要求。对原料煤更换的原因、试烧及结果进行了分析论证,指出了今后应进一步提高煤的成浆性能的方法。

  2. Phase change materials and the perception of wetness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kosters, N.D.; Kappers, A.M.L.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) are increasingly incorporated in textiles in order to serve as a thermal buffer when humans change from a hot to a cold environment and the reverse. Due to the absence of wetness sensors in the skin, cooling of the skin may be perceived as a sensation of wetness instead

  3. Synthesis and characterization of cement slurries additives with epoxy resins - kinetics, thermodynamic and calorimetric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cement has been used in the world, presenting a wide versatility. However, due to its chemical nature, it is subject to several types of chemical damages, especially for agents of acidic nature. With the purpose of increase its life-time, new cement slurries have been modified with the addition of specific additives. The objective of this work is to modify cement slurries with epoxy resins, which promote higher resistance of those materials in relation to acid attacks. Three cement slurries were synthesized with epoxy resins and a standard slurries, which was composed by cement and water. After 30 days of hydration, the samples were characterized by XDR, FTIR and thermal analysis (TG and DSC). The hydration processes of the cement slurries were studied by heat-conduction microcalorimetry. A kinetic study of HCl interaction with the new slurries were performed by the batch methodology at 25, 35, 45 e 55 deg C. It was verified that the addition of the polymers delayed the processes of hydration of the slurries, decreasing the flow of heat released as a function of the amount of added resin and, increased the resistance of those slurries to the acid attack. (author)

  4. Temperature reduction due to the application of phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voelker, Conrad; Kornadt, Oliver [Department of Building Physics, Bauhaus-University Weimar, Coudraystrasse 11a, 99423 Weimar (Germany); Ostry, Milan [Faculty of Civil Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Department of Building Structures, Veveri 95, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2008-07-01

    Overheating is a major problem in many modern buildings due to the utilization of lightweight constructions with low heat storing capacity. A possible answer to this problem is the emplacement of phase change materials (PCM), thereby increasing the thermal mass of a building. These materials change their state of aggregation within a defined temperature range. Useful PCM for buildings show a phase transition from solid to liquid and vice versa. The thermal mass of the materials is increased by the latent heat. A modified gypsum plaster and a salt mixture were chosen as two materials for the study of their impact on room temperature reduction. For realistic investigations, test rooms were erected where measurements were carried out under different conditions such as temporary air change, alternate internal heat gains or clouding. The experimental data was finally reproduced by dint of a mathematical model. (author)

  5. Examining of slurries and production of moulds by spraying method in lost wax technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nadolski

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The work presents the results of investigation centred around the selection of a ceramic slurry composition if ceramic fibre is applied as a component of moulding material used for the lost wax technology. Producing a ceramic material of assumed parameters demands for changing the surface properties of the mineral grains. The critical concentration of solid particles or the gel point depends on the size of mineral particles, their shape and ability to aggregate. This ability has been achieved by modifying their surface properties by adding some polymer and the wetting agent (surfactant, which are adsorbed. Using the fibre material has required developing a method of its applying to the pattern set. The technology of multi-layer spraying has been recognised as the most advantageous one. The performed laboratory experiments have allowed for determining both the material composition and the parameters of its applying, such as air pressure, nozzle diameter, and the spraying distance for gravity pneumatic spraying gun.

  6. Thermal energy storage using phase change materials fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Fleischer, Amy S

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the use of solid‐liquid phase change materials to store significant amounts of energy in the latent heat of fusion. The proper selection of materials for different applications is covered in detail, as is the use of high conductivity additives to enhance thermal diffusivity. Dr. Fleischer explores how applications of PCMS have expanded over the past 10 years to include the development of high efficiency building materials to reduce heating and cooling needs, smart material design for clothing, portable electronic systems thermal management, solar thermal power plant design and many others. Additional future research directions and challenges are also discussed.

  7. Vibration damping and heat transfer using material phase changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloucek, Petr (Inventor); Reynolds, Daniel R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method and apparatus wherein phase changes in a material can dampen vibrational energy, dampen noise and facilitate heat transfer. One embodiment includes a method for damping vibrational energy in a body. The method comprises attaching a material to the body, wherein the material comprises a substrate, a shape memory alloy layer, and a plurality of temperature change elements. The method further comprises sensing vibrations in the body. In addition, the method comprises indicating to at least a portion of the temperature change elements to provide a temperature change in the shape memory alloy layer, wherein the temperature change is sufficient to provide a phase change in at least a portion of the shape memory alloy layer, and further wherein the phase change consumes a sufficient amount of kinetic energy to dampen at least a portion of the vibrational energy in the body. In other embodiments, the shape memory alloy layer is a thin film. Additional embodiments include a sensor connected to the material.

  8. Vibration damping and heat transfer using material phase changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloucek, Petr; Reynolds, Daniel R.

    2009-03-24

    A method and apparatus wherein phase changes in a material can dampen vibrational energy, dampen noise and facilitate heat transfer. One embodiment includes a method for damping vibrational energy in a body. The method comprises attaching a material to the body, wherein the material comprises a substrate, a shape memory alloy layer, and a plurality of temperature change elements. The method further comprises sensing vibrations in the body. In addition, the method comprises indicating to at least a portion of the temperature change elements to provide a temperature change in the shape memory alloy layer, wherein the temperature change is sufficient to provide a phase change in at least a portion of the shape memory alloy layer, and further wherein the phase change consumes a sufficient amount of kinetic energy to dampen at least a portion of the vibrational energy in the body. In other embodiments, the shape memory alloy layer is a thin film. Additional embodiments include a sensor connected to the material.

  9. Permeability and compressibility of slurries from seepage-induced consolidation

    OpenAIRE

    Huerta, Antonio; Kriegsmann, Gregory; Krizek, Raymond J.

    1988-01-01

    A one-dimensional mathematical model based on finite-strain theory is developed to solve the problem of seepage-induced consolidation in sedimented slurries or very soft clays. The direct solution employs known or assumed material property relationships to determine the final thickness of a soft sediment subjected to a constant piezometric head. It is useful for predicting the capacity of a disposal area and the time-dependent improvement in material properties. Alternatively, the inver...

  10. Enhanced treatment of refinery soils with open-system slurry reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refinery site cleanups of residual hydrocarbons arising from long-term operations have become a concern. Because contaminated soil has been generated over many years from spills of many types of materials, it is often difficult to identify the actual spilled material. Because many of these materials are weathered, the less degradable fractions can predominate, creating a challenge for bioremedial process solutions. Open-system slurry reactors were run with an aged refinery soil after a 6-month period of field bioremediation in which 23% TPH removal resulted. The open system (a system where the liquid medium was replaced daily and the solids were retained in the reactor for 2 weeks) achieved 60 to 80% total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) removal based on the initial, prefield bioremediation soil concentration. A process concept twice as effective as other bioremediation schemes has been devised that takes advantage of the formation and removal of small black particulate solids in an open or continuous slurry reactor configuration. These small black particles are chemically or biologically produced in the open system and with their small size and low density are easily elutriated from the bioreactor as the liquid medium is changed. A statistically designed experiment has determined optimal values of nutrients, temperature, and mixing

  11. Rheological Characterization of Unusual DWPF Slurry Samples (U)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, D. C.

    2005-09-01

    A study was undertaken to identify and clarify examples of unusual rheological behavior in Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) simulant slurry samples. Identification was accomplished by reviewing sludge, Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) product, and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product simulant rheological results from the prior year. Clarification of unusual rheological behavior was achieved by developing and implementing new measurement techniques. Development of these new methods is covered in a separate report, WSRC-TR-2004-00334. This report includes a review of recent literature on unusual rheological behavior, followed by a summary of the rheological measurement results obtained on a set of unusual simulant samples. Shifts in rheological behavior of slurries as the wt. % total solids changed have been observed in numerous systems. The main finding of the experimental work was that the various unusual DWPF simulant slurry samples exhibit some degree of time dependent behavior. When a given shear rate is applied to a sample, the apparent viscosity of the slurry changes with time rather than remaining constant. These unusual simulant samples are more rheologically complex than Newtonian liquids or more simple slurries, neither of which shows significant time dependence. The study concludes that the unusual rheological behavior that has been observed is being caused by time dependent rheological properties in the slurries being measured. Most of the changes are due to the effect of time under shear, but SB3 SME products were also changing properties while stored in sample bottles. The most likely source of this shear-related time dependence for sludge is in the simulant preparation. More than a single source of time dependence was inferred for the simulant SME product slurries based on the range of phenomena observed. Rheological property changes were observed on the time-scale of a single measurement (minutes) as well as on a time scale of hours

  12. Materials research for passive solar systems: solid-state phase-change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, D.K.; Webb, J.D.; Burrows, R.W.; McFadden, J.D.O.; Christensen, C.

    1985-03-01

    A set of solid-state phase-change materials is being evaluated for possible use in passive solar thermal energy storage systems. The most promising materials are organic solid solutions of pentaerythritol (C/sub 5/H/sub 12/O/sub 4/), pentaglycerinve (C/sub 5/H/sub 12/O/sub 3/), and neopentyl glycol (C/sub 5/H/sub 12/O/sub 2/). Solid solution mixtures of these compounds can be tailored so that they exhibit solid-to-solid phase transformations at any desired temperature betweeen 25/sup 0/C and 188/sup 0/C, and have latent heats of transformation between 20 and 70 cal/g. Transformation temperatures, specific heats, and latent heats of transformation have been measured for a number of these materials. Limited cyclic experiments suggest that the solid solutions are stable. These phase-change materials exhibit large amounts of undercooling; however, the addition of certain nucleating agents as particulate dispersions in the solid phase-change material greatly reduces this effect. Computer simulations suggest that the use of an optimized solid-state phase-change material in a Trombe wall could provide better performance than a concrete Trombe wall four times thicker and nine times heavier. Nevertheless, a higher cost of the phase-change materials (approx. =$0.70 per pound) is likely to limit their applicability in passive solar systems unless their performance can be significantly improved through further research.

  13. Lightweight Phase-Change Material For Solar Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Philip

    1993-01-01

    Lightweight panels containing phase-change materials developed for use as heat-storage elements of compact, lightweight, advanced solar dynamic power system. During high insolation, heat stored in panels via latent heat of fusion of phase-change material; during low insolation, heat withdrawn from panels. Storage elements consist mainly of porous carbon-fiber structures imbued with germanium. Developed for use aboard space station in orbit around Earth, also adapted to lightweight, compact, portable solar-power systems for use on Earth.

  14. Phase-change materials to improve solar panel's performance

    OpenAIRE

    Biwolé, Pascal; Eclachec, Pierre; Kuznik, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    High operating temperatures induce a loss of efficiency in solar photovoltaic and thermal panels. This paper investigates the use of phase-change materials (PCM) to maintain the temperature of the panels close to ambient. The main focus of the study is the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of heat and mass transfers in a system composed of an impure phase change material situated in the back of a solar panel (SP). A variation of the enthalpy method allows simulating the thermo-physi...

  15. Studies on Slurry Design Fundamentals for Advanced CMP Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Basim, G. B.

    2013-06-14

    New developments and device performance requirements in microelectronics industry add to the challenges in chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) process. One of the recently introduced materials is germanium which enables improved performance through better channel mobility in shallow trench isolation (STI) applications. This paper reports on the slurry design alternatives for Ge CMP with surfactant mediation to improve on the silica/germanium selectivity using colloidal silica slurry. In addition to the standard CMP tests to evaluate the material removal rates, atomic force microscopy (AFM) based wear tests were also conducted to evaluate single particle-surface interaction of the polishing system. Furthermore, nature of the surface oxide film of germanium was studied through contact angle measurements and surface roughness tested by AFM. It was observed that the CMP selectivity of the silica/germanium system and defectivity control were possible with a reasonable material removal rate value by using self-assembled structures of cationic surfactants.

  16. The socio-materiality of designing organizational change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stang Våland, Marianne; Georg, Susse

    2014-01-01

    and organizational change in the context of physically relocating an organization to a new office building. Emphasis is given to the socio-materiality of this double design process. Findings – The data suggests that taking a design attitude toward managing organizational change can allow different actors......Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the managerial implications of adopting a design attitude to organizational change. Design/methodology/approach – Based on an ethnographic study of a merger, the paper investigates the intricate interplay between architectural design...... to participate in organizational design processes, releasing management from its traditional role as the keeper of the design solution. Research limitations/implications – Although based on a single case, the paper provides insights into the socio-materiality of organizational change that is relevant in other...

  17. Flexible composite material with phase change thermal storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A highly flexible composite material having a flexible matrix containing a phase change thermal storage material. The composite material can be made to heat or cool the body or to act as a thermal buffer to protect the wearer from changing environmental conditions. The composite may also include an external thermal insulation layer and/or an internal thermal control layer to regulate the rate of heat exchange between the composite and the skin of the wearer. Other embodiments of the PCM composite also provide 1) a path for evaporation or direct absorption of perspiration from the skin of the wearer for improved comfort and thermal control, 2) heat conductive pathways within the material for thermal equalization, 3) surface treatments for improved absorption or rejection of heat by the material, and 4) means for quickly regenerating the thermal storage capacity for reuse of the material. Applications of the composite materials are also described which take advantage of the composite's thermal characteristics. The examples described include a diver's wet suit, ski boot liners, thermal socks, ,gloves and a face mask for cold weather activities, and a metabolic heating or cooling blanket useful for treating hypothermia or fever patients in a medical setting and therapeutic heating or cooling orthopedic joint supports.

  18. Life Cycle Assessment of Slurry Management Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wesnæs, Marianne; Wenzel, Henrik; Petersen, Bjørn Molt

    This report contains the results of Life Cycle Assessments of two slurry management technologies - acidification and decentred incineration. The LCA foundation can be used by the contributing companies for evaluating the environmental sustainability of a specific technology from a holistic Life...... Cycle perspective. Through this the companies can evaluate the environmental benefits and disadvantages of introducing a specific technology for slurry management. From a societal perspective the results can contribute to a clarification of which slurry management technologies (or combination of...

  19. Flow behaviour of sand-water slurries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlasák, Pavel; Chára, Zdeněk

    Cranfield, Bedforshire : BHR Group, 2010 - (Heywood, N.), s. 383-392 ISBN 978-1-85598-119-5. [International Conference on Hydrotransport /18./. Rio de Janeiro (BR), 22.09.2010-24.09.2010] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP105/10/1574 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : sand slurry * sand -kaolin slurry * flow behavior * pressure drop * particle size distribution effect * concentration effect * slurry peptisation Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  20. The texture changes of surface layer during material transfer in tribological pair: carbon material - steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Often in the areas of dry friction and solid lubrication a material transfer occurs. On both surfaces: bearing bush and journal there is formed a transfer film strongly adhering to the substrate. Owing to friction phenomena the structure of subsurface zone is changed. The reflected beam Schulz method measurements revealed that the changes refer to texture of subsurface zone too. (author)

  1. Environmental evaluation of transfer and treatment of excess pig slurry by life cycle assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Ridaura, Santiago; Werf, Hayo van der; Paillat, Jean Marie; Le Bris, Bertrand

    2009-02-01

    Slurry management is a central topic in the agronomic and environmental analysis of intensive livestock production systems. The objective of this study is to compare the environmental performance of two scenarios of collective slurry management for the disposal of excess nitrogen from animal manure. The scenarios are the transfer of slurry and its injection to crop land, and the treatment of slurry in a collective biological treatment station. The study is based on a real case in the West of France, where a group of farmers is developing a collective plan for the disposal of almost 7000 m(3) of excess pig slurry. The evaluation is carried out by Life Cycle Assessment, where emissions and resource consumption are quantified and aggregated into four environmental impact categories: eutrophication, acidification, climate change, and non-renewable energy use. Ammonia emitted is the most important contributor to acidification and eutrophication, while methane contributes most to climate change. Both ammonia and methane are mostly emitted during the storage of slurry and, in the case of the treatment scenario, also during composting the solid fraction of the slurry. The two management strategies are similar with respect to climate change, whereas eutrophication and acidification are twice as large for treatment relative to transfer. Electricity needed for the treatment process is the main contributor to non-renewable energy use for the treatment scenario, while the transfer scenario represents a net energy saving, as energy saved by the reduction of mineral fertiliser use more than compensates for the energy needed for transport and injection of slurry. The overall environmental performance of transfer is better than that of treatment, as it involves less acidification, eutrophication and non-renewable energy use. The method employed and the results obtained in this study can provide elements for a transparent discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of contrasting

  2. Phase change memory materials, composition, structure and properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frumar, M.; Frumarová, Božena; Wágner, T.; Přikryl, J.; Hrdlička, M.

    Darwin : Charles Darwin University, 2006. ID8-ID8. [International Conference on Optical and Optoelectronic Properties of Materials and Applications 2006. 16.06.2006-20.06.2006, Darwin ] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/06/0627 Keywords : phase change memory Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  3. Structure and Non-Stoichiometry in Phase - Change Memory Materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frumar, M.; Wágner, T.; Přikryl, J.; Hromádko, L.; Němec, P.; Frumarová, Božena

    Chandigarh: Department of Physics Panjab University Chandigarh 160014, India , 2011. s. 15. [International Conference on Advances in Condensed and Nano Materials. 23.02.2011-26.02.2011, Chandigarh] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : phase change memeory Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  4. Development of Latent Heat Storage Phase Change Material Containing Plaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana BAJARE

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the development of latent heat storage Phase Change Material (PCM containing plaster as in passive application. Due to the phase change, these materials can store higher amounts of thermal energy than traditional building materials and can be used to add thermal inertia to lightweight constructions. It was shown that the use of PCMs have advantages stabilizing the room temperature variations during summer days, provided sufficient night ventilation is allowed. Another advantage of PCM usage is stabilized indoor temperature on the heating season. The goal of this study is to develop cement and lime based plaster containing microencapsulated PCM. The plaster is expected to be used for passive indoor applications and enhance the thermal properties of building envelope. The plaster was investigated under Scanning Electron Microscope and the mechanical, physical and thermal properties of created plaster samples were determined.

  5. Phase change thermal control materials, method and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method for metabolic cooling and insulation of a user in a cold environment. In its preferred embodiment the apparatus is a highly flexible composite material having a flexible matrix containing a phase change thermal storage material. The apparatus can be made to heat or cool the body or to act as a thermal buffer to protect the wearer from changing environmental conditions. The apparatus may also include an external thermal insulation layer and/or an internal thermal control layer to regulate the rate of heat exchange between the composite and the skin of the wearer. Other embodiments of the apparatus also provide 1) a path for evaporation or direct absorption of perspiration from the skin of the wearer for improved comfort and thermal control, 2) heat conductive pathways within the material for thermal equalization, 3) surface treatments for improved absorption or rejection of heat by the material, and 4) means for quickly regenerating the thermal storage capacity for reuse of the material. Applications of the composite materials are also described which take advantage of the composite's thermal characteristics. The examples described include a diver's wet suit, ski boot liners, thermal socks, gloves and a face mask for cold weather activities, and a metabolic heating or cooling blanket useful for treating hypothermia or fever patients in a medical setting and therapeutic heating or cooling orthopedic joint supports.

  6. Hydrate plugging or slurry flow : effect of key variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dellecase, E.; Geraci, G.; Barrios, L.; Estanga, D.; Domingues, R.; Volk, M. [Tulsa Univ., Tulsa, OK (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Although oil and gas companies have proven design criteria and proper operating procedures to prevent hydrate plugs from forming, hydrates remain the primary issue in flow assurance. The costs associated with hydrate prevention affect project economics, particularly in deepwater pipelines. As such, there is an interest in developing a technology that allows hydrates to be transported as a slurry, while avoiding plugs. The feasibility of managing such hydrate flow was investigated. This study used a hydrate flow loop to investigate the effects of flow conditions on the transportability of a slurry in both steady-state and restart conditions. For most cases, uninhibited steady-state slurry flow conditions above 25 per cent water-cut were marginal, and most likely not feasible at 50 per cent water-cut or above. Liquid loading and velocity appeared to have a marginal effect on plugging tendency. However, minimum velocity may be needed to guarantee slurry transportation. Some of the important parameters and key variables that determine if a plug will form, particularly in restart conditions, include oil-water dispersion properties; oil-water phase segregation on the plugging tendency of model fluids; the location and state of the water; and the flow pattern. It was concluded that the plugging behaviour of oil systems changes with these variables, and with the oil-water chemistry. As such, specific strategies must be developed for each field. 4 refs., 1 tab., 14 figs.

  7. SLURRY FLOW MODELLING BY CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.C. Ghanta

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available An attempt has been made in the present study to develop a generalized slurry flow model using CFD and utilize the model to predict concentration profile. The purpose of the CFD model is to gain better insight into the solid liquid slur¬ry flow in pipelines. Initially a three-dimensional model problem was developed to understand the influence of the particle drag coefficient on the solid concen¬tration profile. The preliminary simulations highlighted the need for correct mo¬delling of the inter phase drag force. The various drag correlations available in the literature were incorporated into a two-fluid model (Euler-Euler along with the standard k- turbulence model with mixture properties to simulate the tur¬bulent solid-liquid flow in a pipeline. The computational model was mapped on to a commercial CFD solver FLUENT6.2 (of Fluent Inc., USA. To push the en¬velope of applicability of the simulation, recent data from Kaushal (2005 (with solid concentration up to 50% was selected to validate the three dimensional simulations. The experimental data consisted of water-glass bead slurry at 125 and 440-micron particle with different flow velocity (from 1 to 5 m/s and overall concentration up to 10 to 50% by volume. The predicted pressure drop and concentration profile were validated by experimental data and showed excel-lent agreement. Interesting findings came out from the parametric study of ve-locity and concentration profiles. The computational model and results discus¬sed in this work would be useful for extending the applications of CFD models for simulating large slurry pipelines.

  8. Aerosols generated by spills of viscous solutions and slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety assessments and environmental impact statements for nuclear fuel cycle facilities require an estimate of potential airborne releases caused by accidents. Aerosols generated by accidents are being investigated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop methods for estimating source terms from these accidents. Experiments were run by spilling viscous solutions and slurries to determine the mass and particle-size distribution of the material made airborne. In all cases, 1 L of solution was spilled from a height of 3 m. Aqueous solutions of sucrose (0 to 56%) gave a range of viscosities from 1.3 to 46 cp. The percent of spill mass made airborne from the spills of these solutions ranged from 0.001 to 0.0001. The mass of particles made airborne decreased as solution viscosity increased. Slurry loading ranged from 25 to 51% total solids. The maximum source airborne (0.0046 wt %) occurred with the slurry that had the lightest loading of soluble solids. The viscosity of the carrying solution also had an impact on the source term from spilling slurries. The effect of surface tension on the source term was examined in two experiments. Surface tension was halved in these spills by adding a surfactant. The maximum weight percent airborne from these spills was 0.0045, compared to 0.003 for spills with twice the surface tension. The aerodynamic mass medium diameters for the aerosols produced by spills of the viscous solutions, slurries, and low surface tension liquids ranged from 0.6 to 8.4 μm, and the geometric standard deviation ranged from 3.8 to 28.0

  9. Portable Thermoelectric Power Generator Coupled with Phase Change Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Chong C.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Solar is the intermittent source of renewable energy and all thermal solar systems having a setback on non-functioning during the night and cloudy environment. This paper presents alternative solution for power generation using thermoelectric which is the direct conversion of temperature gradient of hot side and cold side of thermoelectric material to electric voltage. Phase change material with latent heat effect would help to prolong the temperature gradient across thermoelectric material for power generation. Besides, the concept of portability will enable different power source like solar, wasted heat from air conditioner, refrigerator, stove etc, i.e. to create temperature different on thermoelectric material for power generation. Furthermore, thermoelectric will generate direct current which is used by all the gadgets like Smartphone, tablet, laptop etc. The portable concept of renewable energy will encourage the direct usage of renewable energy for portable gadgets. The working principle and design of portable thermoelectric power generator coupled with phase change material is presented in this paper.

  10. Slurry discharge management-beach profile prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravo, R.; Nawrot, J.R. [Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1996-11-01

    Mine tailings dams are embankments used by the mining industry to retain the tailings products after the mineral preparation process. Based on the acid-waste stereotype that all coal slurry is acid producing, current reclamation requires a four foot soil cover for inactive slurry disposal areas. Compliance with this requirement is both difficult and costly and in some case unnecessary, as not all the slurry, or portions of slurry impoundments are acid producing. Reduced costs and recent popularity of wetland development has prompted many operators to request reclamation variances for slurry impoundments. Waiting to address slurry reclamation until after the impoundment is full, limits the flexibility of reclamation opportunities. This paper outlines a general methodology to predict the formation of the beach profile for mine tailings dams, by the discharge volume and location of the slurry into the impoundment. The review is presented under the perspective of geotechnical engineering and waste disposal management emphasizing the importance of pre-planning slurry disposal land reclamation. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  11. A Gibbs Formulation for Reactive Materials with Phase Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, D. Scott

    2015-11-01

    A large class of applications have pure, condensed phase constituents that come into contact, chemically react and simultaneously undergo phase change. Phase change in a given molecular material has often been considered to be separate from chemical reaction. Continuum modelers of phase change often use a phase field model whereby an indicator function is allowed to change from one value to another in regions of phase change, governed by evolutionary (Ginzburg-Landau) equations, whereas classic chemical kinetics literally count species concentrations and derive kinetics evolution equations based on species mass transport. We argue the latter is fundamental and is the same as the former, if all species, phase or chemical are treated as distinct chemical species. We pose a self-consistent continuum, thermo-mechanical model to account for significant energetic quantities with correct molecular and continuum limits in the mixture. A single stress tensor, and a single temperature is assumed for the mixture with specified Gibbs potentials for all relevant species, and interaction energies. We discuss recent examples of complex reactive material modeling, drawn from thermitic and propellant combustion that use this new model. DSS supported by DTRA, ONR and AFOSR.

  12. Surfactant mediated slurry formulations for Ge CMP applications

    KAUST Repository

    Basim, G. Bahar

    2013-01-01

    In this study, slurry formulations in the presence of self-assembled surfactant structures were investigated for Ge/SiO2 CMP applications in the absence and presence of oxidizers. Both anionic (sodium dodecyl sulfate-SDS) and cationic (cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide-C12TAB) micelles were used in the slurry formulations as a function of pH and oxidizer concentration. CMP performances of Ge and SiO2 wafers were evaluated in terms of material removal rates, selectivity and surface quality. The material removal rate responses were also assessed through AFM wear rate tests to obtain a faster response for preliminary analyses. The surfactant adsorption characteristics were studied through surface wettability responses of the Ge and SiO2 wafers through contact angle measurements. It was observed that the self-assembled surfactant structures can help obtain selectivity on the silica/germanium system at low concentrations of the oxidizer in the slurry. © 2013 Materials Research Society.

  13. Change of the magnetocapacitance ratio in ferromagnetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong Noh; Shim, In-Bo

    2015-06-01

    The magnetostriction effect, the change in the mechanical properties of a magnetic material in an external magnetic field, has been studied for possible technological applications such as actuators. We present the fabrication of a multilayered magnetocapacitor containing magnetic layers of Ni0.98Co0.02Fe2O4 (NCFO) and compare it with our prior magnetocapacitor in which CoFe2O4 (CFO) and CoNiFe (CNF) were used as the magnetic layers. In particular, we measured the surface/interface microstructures and the change in the lattice constant of the BaTiO3 (BTO) film in NCFO/BTO/NCFO, CFO/BTO/CFO, and CNF/BTO/CNF multilayered thin films. Our study suggests that there is a correlation exists between the magnetocapacitance and the lattice constant of BTO, which varies with the type of ferromagnetic (FM) material embedded in the magnetic layer.

  14. Technical Report on NETL's Non Newtonian Multiphase Slurry Workshop: A path forward to understanding non-Newtonian multiphase slurry flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edited by Guenther, Chris; Garg, Rahul

    2013-08-19

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) sponsored a workshop on non-Newtonian multiphase slurry at NETL’s Morgantown campus August 19 and 20, 2013. The objective of this special two-day meeting of 20-30 invited experts from industry, National Labs and academia was to identify and address technical issues associated with handling non-Newtonian multiphase slurries across various facilities managed by DOE. Particular emphasis during this workshop was placed on applications managed by the Office of Environmental Management (EM). The workshop was preceded by two webinars wherein personnel from ORP and NETL provided background information on the Hanford WTP project and discussed the critical design challenges facing this project. In non-Newtonian fluids, viscosity is not constant and exhibits a complex dependence on applied shear stress or deformation. Many applications under EM’s tank farm mission involve non-Newtonian slurries that are multiphase in nature; tank farm storage and handling, slurry transport, and mixing all involve multiphase flow dynamics, which require an improved understanding of the mechanisms responsible for rheological changes in non-Newtonian multiphase slurries (NNMS). To discuss the issues in predicting the behavior of NNMS, the workshop focused on two topic areas: (1) State-of-the-art in non-Newtonian Multiphase Slurry Flow, and (2) Scaling up with Confidence and Ensuring Safe and Reliable Long-Term Operation.

  15. Clay slurry and engineered soils as containment technologies for remediation of contaminated sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, J.R. [Reclamation Technology, Inc., Athens, GA (United States); Dudka, S.; Miller, W.P. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Johnson, D.O. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Clay Slurry and Engineered Soils are containment technologies for remediation of waste disposal sites where leaching, groundwater plumes and surface runoff of contaminants are serious ecological hazards to adjacent environments. This technology is a patent-pending process which involves the use of conditioned clay materials mixed with sand and water to form a readily pourable suspension, a clay slurry, which is either placed into a trench barrier system or allowed to de-water to create Engineered Soils. The Engineered Soil forms a layer impervious to water and air, therefore by inhibiting both water and oxygen from penetrating through the soil the material. This material can be installed in layers and as a vertical barrier to create a surface barrier containment system. The clay percentage in the clay slurry and Engineered Soils varies depending on site characteristics and desired performance standards. For example Engineered Soils with 1-2% of clay (dry wt.) had a hydraulic conductivity (K) of 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -1} cm/sec. Tests of tailing materials from a kyanite and pyrite mine showed that the clay slurry was effective not only in reducing the permeability of the treated tailings, but also in decreasing their acidity due to the inherent alkalinity of the clay. The untreated tailings had pH values in the range of 2.4 - 3.1; whereas, the effluent from clay and tailings mixtures had pH values in a slightly alkaline range (7.7-7.9). Pug-mills and high volume slurry pumps can be readily adapted for use in constructing and placing caps and creating Engineered Soils. Moreover, material on site or from a local sand supply can be used to create clay slurries and engineered soils. Clay materials used in cap construction are likewise readily available commercially. As a result, the clay slurry system is very cost effective compared to other capping systems, including the commonly used High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) liner systems.

  16. Enhanced laminated composite phase change material for energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarises studies undertaken towards the development of a laminated composite aluminium/hexadecane phase change material (PCM) drywall based on previous analytical work. The study also covered the selection and testing of various types of adhesive materials and identified Polyvinyl acetate (PVA) material as a suitable bonding material. For the purpose of comparison pure hexadecane and composite aluminium/hexadecane samples were developed and tested. The test results revealed faster thermal response by the aluminium/hexadecane sample regarding the rate of heat flux and also achieved about 10% and 15% heat transfer enhancements during the charging and discharging periods respectively. Its measured effective thermal conductivity also increased remarkably to 1.25 W/mK as compared with 0.15 W/mK for pure hexadecane. However there was about 5% less total cumulative thermal energy discharged at the end of the test which indicates that its effective thermal capacity was reduced by the presence of the aluminium particles. The study has shown that some of the scientific and technical barriers associated with the development of laminated composite PCM drywall systems can be overcome but further investigations of effects of adhesive materials are needed.

  17. Parametric assessment of climate change impacts of automotive material substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Roland

    2008-09-15

    Quantifying the net climate change impact of automotive material substitution is not a trivial task. It requires the assessment of the mass reduction potential of automotive materials, the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from their production and recycling, and their impact on GHG emissions from vehicle use. The model presented in this paper is based on life cycle assessment (LCA) and completely parameterized, i.e., its computational structure is separated from the required input data, which is not traditionally done in LCAs. The parameterization increases scientific rigor and transparency of the assessment methodology, facilitates sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of the results, and also makes it possible to compare different studies and explain their disparities. The state of the art of the modeling methodology is reviewed and advanced. Assessment of the GHG emission impacts of material recycling through consequential system expansion shows that our understanding of this issue is still incomplete. This is a critical knowledge gap since a case study shows thatfor materials such as aluminum, the GHG emission impacts of material production and recycling are both of the same size as the use phase savings from vehicle mass reduction. PMID:18853818

  18. EPR-based material modelling of soils considering volume changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faramarzi, Asaad; Javadi, Akbar A.; Alani, Amir M.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper an approach is presented for developing material models for soils based on evolutionary polynomial regression (EPR), taking into account its volumetric behaviour. EPR is a recently developed hybrid data mining technique that searches for structured mathematical equations (representing the behaviour of a system) using genetic algorithm and the least squares method. Stress-strain data from triaxial test are used to train and develop EPR-based material models for soil. The developed models are compared with some of the well known conventional material models. In particular, the capability of the developed EPR models in predicting volume change behaviour of soils is illustrated. It is also shown that the developed EPR-based material models can be incorporated in finite element (FE) analysis. Two geotechnical examples are presented to verify the developed EPR-based FE model (EPR-FEM). The results of the EPR-FEM are compared with those of a standard FEM where conventional constitutive models are used to describe the material behaviour. The results show that EPR-FEM can be successfully employed to analyse geotechnical engineering problems. The advantages of the proposed EPR models are highlighted.

  19. Very low conductivity self-hardening slurry for permanent enclosures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attapulgite clay and ground blast furnace slag cement can form a low solids slurry which, after setting and curing, exhibits very low permeability and substantial strength. Compared to better known cement bentonite slurries, the conductivity is 3 orders of magnitude lower and the strength is four times higher at a similar solids content. Coefficients of permeability have been measured in the 10-10 cm/sec. range. As a containment barrier, no chemical compound has had detrimental effects on the integrity of the material. Compatibility with leachates at a pH under 2 has been demonstrated. Compared to leachable Ordinary Portland Cement and to bentonite gel shrinkage in the presence of certain organic compounds, the attapulgite clay and the selected slag cement behave as remarkably inert. A number of successful applications as vertical barriers, trenched and by the vibrated beam method, have been installed at remedial sites. Applications by jet grouting have been implemented under utilities to provide continuity. The potential for placement of such materials to form horizontal barriers by jet grouting or frac-grouting/mud jacking techniques, offers the possibility of creating complete enclosures in soils. The purely mineral nature of these slurries ensures long term chemical stability necessary for permanent containment

  20. Life cycle assessment of pig slurry treatment technologies for nutrient redistribution in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ten Hoeve, Marieke; Hutchings, Nicholas John; Peters, Gregory;

    2014-01-01

    Animal slurry management is associated with a range of impacts on fossil resource use and the environment. The impacts are greatest when large amounts of nutrient-rich slurry from livestock production cannot be adequately utilised on adjacent land. To facilitate nutrient redistribution, a range of...... different technologies are available. This study comprised a life cycle assessment of the environmental impacts from handling 1000. kg of pig slurry ex-animal. Application of untreated pig slurry onto adjacent land was compared with using four different treatment technologies to enable nutrient...... combination of values derived from the literature and simulations with the Farm-N model for Danish agricultural and climatic conditions. The environmental impact categories assessed were climate change, freshwater eutrophication, marine eutrophication, terrestrial acidification, natural resource use, and soil...

  1. Acidification of animal slurry--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangueiro, David; Hjorth, Maibritt; Gioelli, Fabrizio

    2015-02-01

    Ammonia emissions are a major problem associated with animal slurry management, and solutions to overcome this problem are required worldwide by farmers and stakeholders. An obvious way to minimize ammonia emissions from slurry is to decrease slurry pH by addition of acids or other substances. This solution has been used commonly since 2010 in countries such as Denmark, and its efficiency with regard to the minimization of NH3 emissions has been documented in many studies. Nevertheless, the impact of such treatment on other gaseous emissions during storage is not clear, since the studies performed so far have provided different scenarios. Similarly, the impact of the soil application of acidified slurry on plant production and diffuse pollution has been considered in several studies. Also, the impact of acidification upon combination with other slurry treatment technologies (e.g. mechanical separation, anaerobic digestion …) is important to consider. Here, a compilation and critical review of all these studies has been performed in order to fully understand the global impact of slurry acidification and assess the applicability of this treatment for slurry management. PMID:25463570

  2. Performance of a Centrifugal Slurry Pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawas Yahya Bajawi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to experimentally investigate the effect of speed, concentration and size of slurry on the performance of a centrifugal pump. For this purpose a facility was built where the performance of a centrifugal slurry pump was examined using aggregate slurry. Three sizes of slurry with three concentrations and at three impeller speeds were used for the performance investigations of a centrifugal slurry pump. As a reference performance the performance of centrifugal slurry pump was also tested with clean water. The performance of pump has been reported as variations of head, power and efficiency at various flow rates along with the system characteristics of the pump. The results reveal that the pump performance is grossly affected by the type of slurry, its concentration and size. Besides this the variation in speed also affects the performance as is observed in pumps with water. The maximum decrease in the head, with respect to clear water, at the operating point was found to be 47% for aggregate for size 20 mm, 15% concentration and 2600 rpm. The maximum decrement in efficiency at operating point for aggregate was found to be 47% for 4 mm size, 15% concentration and at 2200 rpm. The power increment requirement for aggregate was 9% for 4 mm size, 15% concentration and 2600 rpm.

  3. A methodology to define the flow rate and pressure requirements for transfer of double-shell tank waste slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents an analysis of the pressure drop and flow rate double-shell tank slurries. Experiments to requirements for transport of characterize the transport of double-shell tank slurries through piping networks and to resuspend materials that settle during pump outages are proposed. Reported values of physical properties of double-shell tank slurries were analyzed to evaluate the flow regimes that are likely to occur during transport. The results of these evaluations indicate that the slurry will be pseudohomogeneous during transport and that the slurry rheology is sufficiently non-Newtonian to affect both the pressure drop achieved during transport and the critical Reynolds number. The transport data collected in the non-Newtonian experiment will be used to determine whether a non-Newtonian correlation developed by Hanks (1978) adequately describes the experimental results

  4. Review on phase change materials for building applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia SOCACIU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In nowadays, the Phase Change Material (PCM is a viable alternative for reducing the energy consumption and for increase the thermal comfort in buildings. The use of PCM in building applications provides the potential to increase the indoor thermal comfort for occupants due to the reduced indoor temperature fluctuations and lower global energy consumption. The possibility to incorporate the PCM into the material of construction for cooling and heating the buildings gained the interest of researchers from all the world because the PCM have a high heat of fusion, meaning it is capable to storing and release large amounts of energy in the form of heat during its melting and solidifying process at a specific temperature.

  5. Liquefying of concentrated fine-grained slurries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlasák, Pavel; Chára, Zdeněk

    Jaroslavl: Jaroslavskij Gosudarstvennyj technicheskij Institut, 2007 - (Balakirev, V.), s. 114-121 ISBN 5-230-20704-3. [Mezhdunarodnaja nauchnaja konferencija Matematicheskije Metody v Nauke i Technologijach /20./. Yaroslavl (RU), 29.05.2007-01.06.2007] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200600503; GA MPO FF-P/051 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : fine-grained slurries * drag reduction * kaolin slurry * fluidic ash slurry * laminar/turbulent transition Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering

  6. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Management of IC Packages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Fiala

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the application of phase change materials (PCM for thermal management of integrated circuits as a viable alternative to active forced convection cooling systems. The paper presents an analytical description and solution of heat transfer, melting and freezing process in 1D which is applied to inorganic crystalline salts. There are also results of numerical simulation of a real 3D model. These results were obtained by means of the finite element method (FEM. Results of 3D numerical solutions were verified experimentally.

  7. The study on bentonite slurry grout with ethanol for fractured rock masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to propose the grouting material and method for fractured rock masses. So experimental study is executed in order to grasp that the properties of grouting material is stable and impermeable. In this study, experiments of hydraulic test and grouting injection test are performed on bentonite slurry mixes in the laboratory. From the results of the tests, a mixer of ethanol and bentonite is found to be very suitable for a grouting material. Also, dynamic grouting method is able to inject the concentrated bentonite slurry in the fractured aperture. (author)

  8. Dynamic injection tests of dense slurry into fine rock fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic injection is the technology that efficiently injects with high dense slurry into small rock fractures. This technology may be expected for the improvement of fluidity and a penetration property of grout materials and the prevention of blockade phenomena. On this study, in order to make clear the effect of the dynamic injection method and the condition of pulsation pressure, injection tests with a fine model fractures and rheological tests under a proper vibration were made for high dense and viscosity grout materials. (author)

  9. Post-material values and environmental policy change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, N. (International Inst. for Environmental and Society, Berlin, Germany); Wandesforde-Smith, G.

    Environmental policy may be particularly suited as a vehicle to articulate post-material values in advanced industrial societies, and recognition of this is likely to prove enormously helpful in future comparative and cross-national research into the origins of environmentalism and the causes of environmental policy change. The paper notes the salient characteristics of post-materialism and the overlap of these with the leading indicators of environmentalism. Possible structural causes for this overlap are noted and opposed to the prevailing socialization explanation for the adoption of post-material and environmental values. To help understand the impact of environmentalism on policy, an idealized development of the movement is sketched. This leads to the description of a set of general factors likely to be related to the way environmentalism finds political expressions in various countries. In the final section, the focus is on what we might want to know about the policy process in order to be able to gauge environmentalist influence on policy outputs. 20 references.

  10. Performance Evaluation of Neutron Absorption Materials with Temperature Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hae Sun; Jeong, Hyo Joon; Kim, Eun Han; Han, Moon Hee; Hwang, Won Tae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Some of these facilities are operated at higher than room temperature, thus the neutron absorption material can be directly affected by the surrounding environment where the temperature is not maintained in a constant condition. Meanwhile, a nucleus in an atom is continuously vibrated with the thermal energy, after which there arises a range of relative speeds between a neutron and the nucleus, even for a fixed neutron speed. At higher temperature, the random motion of the nucleus reproduces new resonance with a lower and broader peak, i.e., Doppler broadening of a resonance, and the capture cross section of neutron is revised. Therefore, the performance of neutron absorption materials may vary with a change of temperature. In this study, the absorption abilities of three kinds of neutron absorbers generally used in the reactor core were analyzed at a range of temperatures from 293.6K to 584K. As a result, the neutron absorption abilities for B{sup 4}C and Ag-In-Cd do not vary with the change of temperature, while that for Gd{sup 2}O{sup 3} absorbers was shown to be decreased approximately 3% with reference to that at 293.6K in the temperature range between the 293.6K and 584K. This phenomenon of the Gd{sup 2}O{sup 3} absorber seems to be caused by the Doppler broadening of the neutron absorption cross-section. Therefore, it is expected that the effect of material temperature on the neutron absorption performance is needed to be considered in the design of nuclear reactor and the analysis of radiation shielding.

  11. Electronic transport in amorphous phase-change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luckas, Jennifer Maria

    2012-09-14

    Phase change materials combine a pronounced contrast in resistivity and reflectivity between their disordered amorphous and ordered crystalline state with very fast crystallization kinetics. Due to this exceptional combination of properties phase-change materials find broad application in non-volatile optical memories such as CD, DVD or Bluray Disc. Furthermore, this class of materials demonstrates remarkable electrical transport phenomena in their disordered state, which have shown to be crucial for their application in electronic storage devices. The threshold switching phenomenon denotes the sudden decrease in resistivity beyond a critical electrical threshold field. The threshold switching phenomenon facilitates the phase transitions at practical small voltages. Below this threshold the amorphous state resistivity is thermally activated and is observed to increase with time. This effect known as resistance drift seriously hampers the development of multi-level storage devices. Hence, understanding the physical origins of threshold switching and resistance drift phenomena is crucial to improve non-volatile phase-change memories. Even though both phenomena are often attributed to localized defect states in the band gap, the defect state density in amorphous phase-change materials has remained poorly studied. Starting from a brief introduction of the physics of phase-change materials this thesis summarizes the most important models behind electrical switching and resistance drift with the aim to discuss the role of localized defect states. The centerpiece of this thesis is the investigation of defects state densities in different amorphous phase-change materials and electrical switching chalcogenides. On the basis of Modulated Photo Current (MPC) Experiments and Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy, a sophisticated band model for the disordered phase of the binary phase-change alloy GeTe has been developed. By this direct experimental approach the band-model for a

  12. Electronic transport in amorphous phase-change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phase change materials combine a pronounced contrast in resistivity and reflectivity between their disordered amorphous and ordered crystalline state with very fast crystallization kinetics. Due to this exceptional combination of properties phase-change materials find broad application in non-volatile optical memories such as CD, DVD or Bluray Disc. Furthermore, this class of materials demonstrates remarkable electrical transport phenomena in their disordered state, which have shown to be crucial for their application in electronic storage devices. The threshold switching phenomenon denotes the sudden decrease in resistivity beyond a critical electrical threshold field. The threshold switching phenomenon facilitates the phase transitions at practical small voltages. Below this threshold the amorphous state resistivity is thermally activated and is observed to increase with time. This effect known as resistance drift seriously hampers the development of multi-level storage devices. Hence, understanding the physical origins of threshold switching and resistance drift phenomena is crucial to improve non-volatile phase-change memories. Even though both phenomena are often attributed to localized defect states in the band gap, the defect state density in amorphous phase-change materials has remained poorly studied. Starting from a brief introduction of the physics of phase-change materials this thesis summarizes the most important models behind electrical switching and resistance drift with the aim to discuss the role of localized defect states. The centerpiece of this thesis is the investigation of defects state densities in different amorphous phase-change materials and electrical switching chalcogenides. On the basis of Modulated Photo Current (MPC) Experiments and Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy, a sophisticated band model for the disordered phase of the binary phase-change alloy GeTe has been developed. By this direct experimental approach the band-model for a

  13. Surface Modification of Nickel Foams by a Slurry Aluminizing Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel slurry-based process for aluminizing nickel foams while improving the mechanical properties and conserving the excellent ductility is reported. Cellular unalloyed nickel foams with 92% porosity and uniform pore size and distribution were used as a starting material. Several slurries of different compositions were examined to investigate the possibility of developing an aluminide-nickel intermetallic coating on a Ni foam without considerably degrading the original ductile properties of the foam. The process temperature was varying from 400 to 850 deg. C and the process holding time was ranging between 2h to 6h. Scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and X-Ray diffraction were applied to assess the effectiveness of the aluminizing process and determine both the optimum parameters of the procedure (slurry composition, holding temperature and time) and the concentration profiles across the coating cross-section. The mechanical behavior of the aluminized Ni-foams was evaluated by the conduction of micro-tension tests. The resulting Ni-foams after aluminization retain the pore structure of original Ni-foams and present a thick outer surface layer which consists of a range of aluminide phases. The mechanical properties of the Ni-foams aluminized in low process temperature were insignificantly affected.

  14. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

    OpenAIRE

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec; Davorin Matanović; Gracijan Krklec

    1994-01-01

    During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures) and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production...

  15. Effect of cow slurry amendment on atrazine dissipation and bacterial community structure in an agricultural Andisol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceño, G; Jorquera, M A; Demanet, R; Mora, M L; Durán, N; Palma, G

    2010-06-15

    Atrazine is a commonly used herbicide for maize production in Chile, but it has recently been shown to be ineffective in soils that receive applications of cow slurries generated from the dairy industry. This effect may be caused either by the sorption of the pesticide to organic matter or more rapid degradation in slurry-amended soils. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of cow slurry on atrazine dissipation, the formation of atrazine metabolites and the modification of bacterial community in Andisol. The cow slurry was applied at doses of 100,000-300,000 Lha(-1). After 4 weeks, atrazine was applied to the slurry-amended soils at concentrations of 1-3 mg kg(-1). The amounts of atrazine and its metabolites were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The soil microbial community was monitored by measurement of CO(2) evolution and changes in bacterial community using PCR-DGGE of 16S rRNA genes. The results show that cow slurry applications had no effect on atrazine dissipation, which had a half-life of 15-19 days. The atrazine metabolites were detected after 20 days and were significantly higher in soils amended with the slurry at both 20 and 40 days after application of the herbicide. Respiration rates were elevated after 10 days in all soils with atrazine addition. Both the atrazine and slurry amendments altered the bacterial community structures, indicated by the appearance of specific bands in the DGGE gels after 10 days. Cloning and sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes from the DGGE gels showed that the bands represented various genera of beta-proteobacteria that appeared in response to atrazine. According to our results, further field studies are required to explain the lower effectiveness of atrazine in weed control. These studies may include the effect of dissolved organic carbon on the atrazine mobility. PMID:20388570

  16. Plastic phase change material and articles made therefrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abhari, Ramin

    2016-04-19

    The present invention generally relates to a method for manufacturing phase change material (PCM) pellets. The method includes providing a melt composition, including paraffin and a polymer. The paraffin has a melt point of between about 10.degree. C. and about 50.degree. C., and more preferably between about 18.degree. C. and about 28.degree. C. In one embodiment, the melt composition includes various additives, such as a flame retardant. The method further includes forming the melt composition into PCM pellets. The method further may include the step of cooling the melt to increase the melt viscosity before pelletizing. Further, PCM compounds are provided having an organic PCM and a polymer. Methods are provided to convert the PCM compounds into various form-stable PCMs. A method of coating the PCMs is included to provide PCMs with substantially no paraffin seepage and with ignition resistance properties.

  17. Cooling of mobile electronic devices using phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental study is conducted on the cooling of mobile electronic devices, such as personal digital assistants (PDAs) and wearable computers, using a heat storage unit (HSU) filled with the phase change material (PCM) of n-eicosane inside the device. The high latent heat of n-eicosane in the HSU absorbs the heat dissipation from the chips and can maintain the chip temperature below the allowable service temperature of 50 deg. C for 2 h of transient operations of the PDA. The heat dissipation of the chips inside a PDA and the orientation of the HSU are experimentally investigated in this paper. It was found that different orientation of the HSU inside the PDA could affect significantly the temperature distribution

  18. Phase Change Material Heat Sink for an ISS Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Gregory; Stieber, Jesse; Sheth, Rubik; Ahlstrom, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A flight experiment is being constructed to utilize the persistent microgravity environment of the International Space Station (ISS) to prove out operation of a microgravity compatible phase change material (PCM) heat sink. A PCM heat sink can help to reduce the overall mass and volume of future exploration spacecraft thermal control systems (TCS). The program is characterizing a new PCM heat sink that incorporates a novel phase management approach to prevent high pressures and structural deformation that often occur with PCM heat sinks undergoing cyclic operation in microgravity. The PCM unit was made using brazed aluminum construction with paraffin wax as the fusible material. It is designed to be installed into a propylene glycol and water cooling loop, with scaling consistent with the conceptual designs for the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle. This paper reports on the construction of the PCM heat sink and on initial ground test results conducted at UTC Aerospace Systems prior to delivery to NASA. The prototype will be tested later on the ground and in orbit via a self-contained experiment package developed by NASA Johnson Space Center to operate in an ISS EXPRESS rack.

  19. Water Based Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Scott W.; Sheth, Ribik B.; Atwell, Matt; Cheek, Ann; Agarwal, Muskan; Hong, Steven; Patel, Aashini,; Nguyen, Lisa; Posada, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    In a cyclical heat load environment such as low Lunar orbit, a spacecraft’s radiators are not sized to reject the full heat load requirement. Traditionally, a supplemental heat rejection device (SHReD) such as an evaporator or sublimator is used to act as a “topper” to meet the additional heat rejection demands. Utilizing a Phase Change Material (PCM) heat exchanger (HX) as a SHReD provides an attractive alternative to evaporators and sublimators as PCM HXs do not use a consumable, thereby leading to reduced launch mass and volume requirements. Studies conducted in this paper investigate utilizing water’s high latent heat of formation as a PCM, as opposed to traditional waxes, and corresponding complications surrounding freezing water in an enclosed volume. Work highlighted in this study is primarily visual and includes understanding ice formation, freeze front propagation, and the solidification process of water/ice. Various test coupons were constructed of copper to emulate the interstitial pin configuration (to aid in conduction) of the proposed water PCM HX design. Construction of a prototypic HX was also completed in which a flexible bladder material and interstitial pin configurations were tested. Additionally, a microgravity flight was conducted where three copper test articles were frozen continuously during microgravity and 2-g periods and individual water droplets were frozen during microgravity.

  20. High polishing selectivity ceria slurry for formation of top electrode in spin-transfer torque magnetic random access memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Hao [Advanced Semiconductor Materials and Devices Development Center, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Jae-Hyung [Advanced Semiconductor Materials and Devices Development Center, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nanoscale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin-Hyung [Advanced Semiconductor Materials and Devices Development Center, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jea-Gun, E-mail: parkjgL@hanyang.ac.kr [Advanced Semiconductor Materials and Devices Development Center, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-01

    During the formation of the top electrode (T.E.) in spin-transfer torque magnetic random access memory, a slurry with a high polishing rate of SiO{sub 2} and a low polishing rate of metal (T.E. material) is required in the chemical mechanical planarization application area. We used a ceria-based slurry with a polymeric additive to maintain the high polishing rate of SiO{sub 2} while it suppresses the polishing rate of the T.E. material, tantalum and ruthenium. We found ruthenium showed a significantly higher selectivity than tantalum in the ceria-based slurry. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to investigate the adsorption characteristics of the polymeric additive on the T.E. material. Except for the adsorbed polymeric additive, we found that zeta potential of the T.E. material played a critical role in determining the polishing selectivity of SiO{sub 2}-to-T.E. material. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High selective chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) slurry was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The slurry has a high selectivity of SiO{sub 2}-to-metals like tantalum and ruthenium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spin-transfer-torque magnetic memory requires such high selectivity slurry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface zeta potential was used to explain CMP mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tantalum and ruthenium have different rate-determining steps during CMP.

  1. EVALUATION OF EROSIVE WEAR RESISTANCE OF TiN COATINGS BY A SLURRY JET IMPACT TEST

    OpenAIRE

    Iwai, Y.; Miyajima, T.; Honda, T.; Matsubara, T.; Kanda, K; Hogmark, S

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, it is proposed to use a new type of solid particle impact test (slurry jet) to swiftly evaluate wear properties of thin, single layered or multilayered coatings. By the slurry jet, 1.2 µm alumina particles were impacted at high velocity perpendicular to thin PVD coatings of TiN deposited on high speed steel substrate materials under various substrate temperatures.Since the coatings have a much higher wear resistance than the substrate material, the wear rate increases significa...

  2. Influence of material composition on thermal expansion of graphitic materials and changes under fast neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of the binder coke content and graphitization temperature on thermal expansion of graphite were investigated. Property correlations such as of anisotropy with real density or coefficient of volume thermal expansion have been found. An important part of this paper deals with the irradiation induced changes of thermal expansion. Interpretations of the irradiation behaviour base on the influence of material composition and heat treatment procedure. Measurements of lattice spacings were performed using high temperature X-ray diffractometer equipment in order to calculate the lattice expansion in c-direction for an estimation of its contribution to the expansion of the bulk material. Corresponding measurements were also performed on neutron irradiated graphite specimens. (orig./GSC)

  3. Optical measurement of slurry concentration profile in a concurrent-flow gas-slurry column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An optical technique is described which allows the measurement of steady-state slurry concentration profile in a slender concurrent-flow gas-slurry bubble column. The optically measured profile is compared with that predicted by a previously reported semiempirical dispersion model. Qualitative agreement is observed between them, and the reliability of the technique is supported by additional experimental data

  4. Analysis of wallboard containing a phase change material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, J. J.; Heberle, D. P.

    Phase change materials (PCMs) used on the interior of buildings hold the promise for improved thermal performance by reducing the energy requirements for space conditioning and by improving thermal comfort by reducing temperature swings inside the building. Efforts are underway to develop a gypsum wallboard containing a hydrocarbon PCM. With a phase change temperature in the room temperature range, the PCM wallboard adds substantially to the thermal mass of the building while serving the same architectural function as conventional wallboard. To determine the thermal and economic performance of this PCM wallboard, the Transient Systems Simulation Program (TRNSYS) was modified to accommodate walls that are covered with PCM plasterboard, and to apportion the direct beam solar radiation to interior surfaces of a building. The modified code was used to simulate the performance of conventional and direct-gain passive solar residential-sized buildings with and without PCM wallboard. Space heating energy savings were determined as a function of PCM wallboard characteristics. Thermal comfort improvements in buildings containing the PCM were qualified in terms of energy savings. The report concludes with a present worth economic analysis of these energy savings and arrives at system costs and economic payback based on current costs of PCMs under study for the wallboard application.

  5. Climate changes, raw materials shortage, and economic development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of a climate change being brought about by our national economies has dominated the national and international ecopolitical discussion of the past few years like no other topic. The present study is an attempt at an as comprehensive an examination as possible of this problem. It works from the assumption that examining and solving environmental problems requires the cooperation and creativity of investigators from different disciplines. It accordingly develops a concept permitting an integration of scientific, economic, and ethical questions impinging on the problem of the greenhouse effect. Thus the study contributes to the groundwork of an ecological economics. The interdisciplinary approach to analysing the connections between climate changes, raw materials consumption, and economic development is variously seen to pinpoint the complex temporal structure of the problems. It becomes clear that ecopolitical measures take a long time to actually become effective. Besides shifiting the focus to questions as to the scope and limits of politico-economic action, the temporal strucutre of the problem also reveals the limitations of scientifically founded ecopolitical recommendations. This brings the ethical aspect of analysing and solving environmental problems to the fore. (orig./UA)

  6. Subscale Water Based Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Rubik; Hansen, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Supplemental heat rejection devices are required in many spacecraft as the radiators are not sized to meet the full heat rejection demand. One means of obtaining additional heat rejection is through the use of phase change material heat exchangers (PCM HX's). PCM HX's utilize phase change to store energy in unfavorable thermal environments (melting) and reject the energy in favorable environments (freezing). Traditionally, wax has been used as a PCM on spacecraft. However, water is an attractive alternative because it is capable of storing about 40% more energy per unit mass due to its higher latent heat of fusion. The significant problem in using water as a PCM is its expansion while freezing, leading to structural integrity concerns when housed in an enclosed heat exchanger volume. Significant investigation and development has taken place over the past five years to understand and overcome the problems associated with water PCM HX's. This paper reports on the final efforts by Johnson Space Center's Thermal Systems Branch to develop a water based PCM HX. The test article developed and reported on is a subscale version of the full-scale water-based PCM HX's constructed by Mezzo Technologies. The subscale unit was designed by applying prior research on freeze front propagation and previous full-scale water PCM HX development. Design modifications to the subscale unit included use of urethane bladder, decreased aspect ratio, perforated protection sheet, and use of additional mid-plates. Testing of the subscale unit was successful and 150 cycles were completed without fail.

  7. Magnetic sorbents added to soil slurries lower Cr aqueous concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravantinos, Konstantinos; Isari, Ekavi; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.; Manariotis, Ioannis D.; Werner, David

    2016-04-01

    Activated carbon (AC) acts as a strong binding agent that lowers the pollutant concentration and, thus its toxicity. Another promising sorbent material in environmental applications is biochar (BC) which is obtained from the incomplete combustion of carbon-rich biomass under oxygen-limited conditions. Both of these materials could be used as soil or sediment amendments that would lower the toxicity in the aqueous phase. A draw back of this technique is that although the pollutant will remain non- bioavailable for many years being sorbed into these sorbents, it actually stays into the system. The objective of this study was (a) to synthesize a magnetic powdered activated carbon (AC/Fe) and magnetic powdered biochar (BC/Fe) produced from a commercial AC sample and BC, respectively and (b) to evaluate the potential use of AC/Fe and BC/Fe to lower Cr concentration that desorb from two soils in their soil slurries. The two soil samples originate from the vicinity of a local metal shop. The BC was produced from olive pomace. The surface area, the pore volume, and the average pore size of each sorbent were determined using gas (N2) adsorption-desorption cycles and the Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) equation. Isotherms with 30 adsorption and 20 desorption points were conducted at liquid nitrogen temperature (77K). Open surface area and micropore volume were determined using t-plot method and Harkins & Jura equation. For both AC/Fe, surface area measurements resulted in 66% those of corresponding AC. For BC/Fe, the surface area was 82% that of BC. Our previous studies have shown that both AC/Fe and BC/Fe are effective sorbents for mercury in aqueous solutions but with lower sorption capacity compared to the initial materials (50-75% lower). Batch experiments with all sorbent samples and each soil were conducted at room temperature (25oC) in order to compare the sorption properties of the materials. The soil slurries demonstrated low Cr concentrations (10.9 and 14.6

  8. Research on phase-change material building mass applied in the air-conditioning field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANQuanying

    2003-01-01

    Phase-change material building mass contains phase-change matenals. It can decrease air-conditioning load and indoor temperature fluctuations, and improve comfort degree in summer because of thermal storage property of phase-change material. Thereby, the scale, initial investment and operational cost of air-conditioning system decrease effectively. The indoor surroundings improve. In this paper, suitable phase-change material used in architecture and combination mode between phase change material and architectural material were studied. By considering the properties of materials, such as phase-change temperature, phase-change latent heat, thermal conductivity and expansion coefficient, phase-change materials were selected and evaluated. Combination mode between phase-change material and architectural material were provided. The influence of phase-change material structure on thermal performance in room and energy-saving effect were analyzed and compared with traditional structure without phase-change material. It is proved that phase-change material structure is feasible in the practical engineenng. These provide the basis for developing phase-change material building mass.

  9. Changes in electrical transport and density of states of phase change materials upon resistance drift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phase-change memory technology has become more mature in recent years. But some fundamental problems linked to the electrical transport properties in the amorphous phase of phase-change materials still need to be solved. The increase of resistance over time, called resistance drift, for example, poses a major challenge for the implementation of multilevel storage, which will eventually be necessary to remain competitive in terms of high storage densities. To link structural properties with electrical transport, a broader knowledge of (i) changes in the density of states (DoS) upon structural relaxation and (ii) the influence of defects on electrical transport is required. In this paper, we present temperature-dependent conductivity and photo-conductivity measurements on the archetype phase change material GeTe. It is shown that trap-limited band transport at high temperatures (above 165 K) and variable range hopping at low temperatures are the predominating transport mechanism. Based on measurements of the temperature dependence of the optical band gap, modulated photo-conductivity and photo-thermal deflection spectroscopy, a DoS model for GeTe was proposed. Using this DoS, the temperature dependence of conductivity and photo-conductivity has been simulated. Our work shows how changes in the DoS (band gap and defect distributions) will affect the electrical transport before and after temperature-accelerated drift. The decrease in conductivity upon annealing can be explained entirely by an increase of the band gap by about 12%. However, low-temperature photo-conductivity measurements revealed that a change in the defect density may also play a role

  10. Geochemistry of a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steele, J.D.; Heidari, M. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The highly alkaline residue from the fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) of coal may be an environmentally acceptable material for use in neutralizing acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite in coal slurry solids (CSS). Previous research indicated that FBC residues in mixtures with pyrite-rich CSS neutralized the acid produced by or attenuated the oxidation of pyrite in CSS. In the present research we intend to collect cores of unconsolidation material and sample pore gases from a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. The data gathered will provide background information necessary for the development of a predictive computer model of the generation and migration of acid in a reclaimed coal slurry impoundment. The conceptual model for the oxidation of pyrite at near-neutral conditions has been revised. The model is being built around the method of Morel and Hering (1993) and Westall (1986).

  11. Effective Compressibility of a Bubbly Slurry: I. Theory of the Behavior of Bubbles Trapped in Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kam, Seung I.(PEMEX REFINACION); Gauglitz, Phillip A.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Rossen, William R.(UNKNOWN)

    2000-12-01

    Bubbles trapped within the slurry at the bottom of waste tanks at the Hanford Site expand and contract in response to ambient pressure changes. These bubbles contain hydrogen and other flammable gases that can pose a safety hazard. Determining the effective compressibility of bubbles in the slurry could allow one to make improved estimates of the quantity of gas trapped in the slurry from changes in slurry volume with ambient pressure changes. Numerical calculations based on a one-dimensional biconical-pore-network model show that the effective compressibility of a population of bubbles shows hysteresis with pressure increase and decrease. This hysteresis is caused by the unsteady, impulsive movements of interfaces from pore throat to throat during a pressure decrease and from pore body to body during a pressure increase. Snap-off may occur during these jumps but does not significantly alter the effective compressibility of the population of bubbles.

  12. Field Efficiency of Slurry Applications Involving In-field Transports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bochtis, Dionysis; Sørensen, Claus Aage Grøn; Green, Ole;

    2009-01-01

    Controlled traffic farming can significantly reduce the soil compaction caused from heavy machinery systems. However, using CTF in material handling operations executed by cooperative machines, the significantly increased in-field transports lead to a lower system’s efficiency. Recently, a discrete...... event model for the simulation of CTF operations executed by cooperating machines has been introduced. The use of this model makes it possible to estimate the extent of reduction of the field efficiency. In this paper, a field experiment involving slurry application under the conventional unconstrained...

  13. Rheological properties of defense waste slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major objective of this two-year project has been to obtain refined and reliable experimental data about the rheological properties of melter feeds. The research has involved both experimental studies and model development. Two experimental facilities have been set up to measure viscosity and pressure drop. Mathematical models have been developed as a result of experimental observation and fundamental rheological theory. The model has the capability to predict the viscosity of melter slurries in a range of experimental conditions. The final results of the investigation could be used to enhance the current design base for slurry transportation systems and improve the performance of the slurry mixing process. If successful, the cost of this waste treatment will be reduced, and disposal safety will be increased. The specific objectives for this project included: (1) the design, implementation, and validation of the experimental facility in both batch and continuous operating modes; (2) the identification and preparation of melter feed samples of both the SRS and Hanford waste slurries at multiple solids concentration levels; (3) the measurement and analysis of the melter feeds to determine the effects of the solids concentration, pH value, and other factors on the rheological properties of the slurries; (4) the correlation of the rheological properties as a function of the measured physical and chemical parameters; and (5) transmission of the experimental data and resulting correlation to the DOE site user to guide melter feed preparation and transport equipment design

  14. Static dissolution rate of tungsten film versus chemical adjustments of a reused slurry for chemical mechanical polishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tungsten is widely used as deposited layer for the multi-level interconnection structures of wafers. The chemical composition of abrasive slurry plays an important role in chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process. Removal of tungsten is driven by complex oxidation mechanisms between slurry components. The slurry for tungsten CMP generally contains oxidizer, iron catalyst, complexing agents and stabilizers in a pH adjusted solution of abrasive particles. Interaction between iron complex and H2O2 in the slurry is the main factor governing the chemical mode of material removal, oxidation potencies and kinetics. In this study, we investigate the effects of chemical additives in silica (SiO2)-based slurry on the removal rate of the tungsten film. Experiments were carried out in static batch as a preliminary study to understand and optimize chemical mechanisms in CMP-Tungsten process. Experiment designs were conducted to understand the influence of the chemical additives on the main performances of W-CMP. Used slurry, concentrated and retreated with chemical adjustments, is compared to the original slurry as a reference.

  15. Evaluation of chemical amendments to control phosphorus losses from dairy slurry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, R.B.; Fenton, O.; Rodgers, M.; Healy, M.G. [National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)

    2011-06-15

    Land application of dairy slurry can result in incidental losses of phosphorus (P) to runoff in addition to increased loss of P from soil as a result of a buildup in soil test P (STP). An agitator test was used to identify the most effective amendments to reduce dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) loss from the soil surface after land application of chemically amended dairy cattle slurry. This test involved adding slurry mixed with various amendments (mixed in a beaker using a jar test flocculator at 100 rpm), to intact soil samples at approximate field capacity. Slurry/amended slurry was applied with a spatula, submerged with overlying water and then mixed to simulate overland flow. In order of effectiveness, at optimum application rates, ferric chloride (FeCl{sub 2}) reduced the DRP in overlying water by 88%, aluminium chloride (AlCl{sub 2}) by 87%, alum (Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}{center_dot} nH{sub 2}O) by 83%, lime by 81%, aluminium water treatment residuals (Al-WTR; sieved to < 2 mm) by 77%, flyash by 72%, flue gas desulphurization by-product by 72% and Al-WTR sludge by 71%. Ferric chloride (eurO{sub 4}.82/m{sup 3} treated slurry) was the most cost-effective chemical amendment. However, Al compounds are preferred owing to stability of Al-P compared with Fe-P bonds. Alum is less expensive than AlCl{sub 2} (euro6.67/m{sup 3}), but the risk of effervescence needs further investigation at field-scale. Phosphorus sorbing materials (PSM) were not as efficient as chemicals in reducing DRP in overlying water. The amendments all reduced P loss from dairy slurry, but the feasibility of these amendments may be limited because of the cost of treatment.

  16. Experimental Investigation of Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for spacecraft thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments. Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. This can result in a decreased turndown ratio for the radiator and a reduced system mass. The use of water as a PCM rather than the more traditional paraffin wax has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. A number of ice PCM heat exchangers were fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion were investigated. This paper presents an overview of the results of this investigation from the past three years.

  17. Continued Water-Based Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Scott W.; Sheth, Rubik B.; Poynot, Joe; Giglio, Tony; Ungar, Gene K.

    2015-01-01

    In a cyclical heat load environment such as low Lunar orbit, a spacecraft's radiators are not sized to meet the full heat rejection demands. Traditionally, a supplemental heat rejection device (SHReD) such as an evaporator or sublimator is used to act as a "topper" to meet the additional heat rejection demands. Utilizing a Phase Change Material (PCM) heat exchanger (HX) as a SHReD provides an attractive alternative to evaporators and sublimators as PCM HX's do not use a consumable, thereby leading to reduced launch mass and volume requirements. In continued pursuit of water PCM HX development two full-scale, Orion sized water-based PCM HX's were constructed by Mezzo Technologies. These HX's were designed by applying prior research on freeze front propagation to a full-scale design. Design options considered included bladder restraint and clamping mechanisms, bladder manufacturing, tube patterns, fill/drain methods, manifold dimensions, weight optimization, and midplate designs. Two units, Units A and B, were constructed and differed only in their midplate design. Both units failed multiple times during testing. This report highlights learning outcomes from these tests and are applied to a final sub-scale PCM HX which is slated to be tested on the ISS in early 2017.

  18. Effects of surface oxide species and contents on SiC slurry viscosity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NING Shufan; LI Hongyan; CHEN Wei; LIU Bin; CHEN Shoutian

    2005-01-01

    The disadvantageous effects of colloidal SiO2 layer and micro-content of metal oxide adsorbed on SiC powder surface on SiC slurry stable dispersion were studied, and the novel method to avoid this disadvantage was proposed. By acidwashing, on the one hand, because the maximum Zeta potential of SiC powder increases to 72.49 mV with the decreasing content of metal oxide adsorbed on the SiC powder surface, the repulsion force between SiC powders that dispersed in slurry is enhanced, thus the SiC powder can be fully dispersed in slurry. On the other hand, after HF acidwashing, with the OH- group adsorbed on SiC powder surface destroyed and replaced by the F- ion, the hydrogen bond adsorbed on the OH-group is also destroyed. Therefore, the surface property of the SiC powder is changed from hydrophilic to hydrophobic;H2O that adsorbed on SiC powder surface is released and can flow freely, and it actually increases the content of the effective flow phase in the slurry. These changes of SiC powder surface property can be proved by XPS and FTIR analysis. Fivolume fraction of SiC powder in the slurry is maximized to 61.5 vol.%.

  19. The effect on slurry water as a fresh water replacement in concrete properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Aeslina Abdul; Shahidan, Shahiron; Hai Yee, Lau; Ikhmal Haqeem Hassan, Mohd; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al

    2016-06-01

    Concrete is the most widely used engineering material in the world and one of the largest water consuming industries. Consequently, the concrete manufacturer, ready mixed concrete plant is increased dramatically due to high demand from urban development project. At the same time, slurry water was generated and leading to environmental problems. Thus, this paper is to investigate the effect of using slurry water on concrete properties in term of mechanical properties. The basic wastewater characterization was investigated according to USEPA (Method 150.1 & 300.0) while the mechanical property of concrete with slurry water was compared according to ASTM C1602 and BS EN 1008 standards. In this research, the compressive strength, modulus of elasticity and tensile strength were studied. The percentage of wastewater replaced in concrete mixing was ranging from 0% up to 50%. In addition, the resulted also suggested that the concrete with 20% replacement of slurry water was achieved the highest compressive strength and modulus of elasticity compared to other percentages. Moreover, the results also recommended that concrete with slurry water mix have better compressive strength compared to control mix concrete.

  20. Continuous in-house acidification affecting animal slurry composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Maibritt; Cocolo, Giorgia; Jonassen, Kristoffer;

    2015-01-01

    The emerging slurry acidification technology affects gaseous emissions, fertiliser value, biogas production and solid-liquid separation; however, maximising the advantages is difficult, as the effect of acidification on the slurry characteristics resulting in those observations remains unclarifie...... acidification-induced aggregation. Overall, the acidified slurry was significantly different from untreated slurry; it had higher conductivity, more dissolved inorganic components, fewer small organic compounds, more large dissolved organic compounds, and larger particles....

  1. Crystallization of tetra-n-butyl ammonium bromide clathrate hydrate slurry and the related heat transfer characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Crystallization characteristics of TBAB CHS under different thermal conditions were clarified. • Overall heat transfer coefficients before and during the crystallization were obtained. • The crystallization characteristics of TBAB CHS mainly depend on the status of supercooled solution. • Dropping of TBAB CHS can accelerate the supercooling release and crystallization. - Abstract: Tetra-n-butyl ammonium bromide (TBAB) clathrate hydrate slurry (CHS) is a promising phase change material slurry for cold storage and transport in air-conditioning system. This slurry can be generated from the supercooled TBAB aqueous solution. In the present study, TBAB CHS was generated under different thermal conditions, i.e. different initial mass concentrations of TBAB aqueous solution and different supercooling degrees. The crystallization of TBAB CHS and the overall heat transfer coefficient under different thermal conditions were clarified. It was concluded that the crystallization characteristics of TBAB hydrate crystals mainly depended upon the thermal condition of the supercooled TBAB aqueous solution. In addition, the dropping of pre-produced TBAB CHS into supercooled TBAB aqueous solution could immediately induce the crystallization of TBAB hydrate crystals, and the initial type of TBAB hydrate crystals was only related to the status of the supercooled TBAB aqueous solution regardless of the type of the dropped TBAB CHS. Furthermore, the overall heat transfer coefficients before crystallization and during crystallization were also measured. It was found that more hydrate crystals would adhere to the vessel wall at larger supercooling degree and higher mass concentration of aqueous solution, which would deteriorate the heat transfer significantly. Moreover, images of TBAB hydrate crystals under different thermal conditions were recorded in order to help clarifying the crystallization characteristics

  2. Production process for function-gradient material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A function-gradient material to be used for a heat receiving element and a heat releasing plate of a divertor plate for use in a thermonuclear power plant is produced. Powders of two or more kinds of high-melting point ingredients having different grain size are formed into a slurry. This slurry is cast into a mold to form a molding product of powders having ingredients of high-melting point in which the grain size is gradually increased and the porosity is gradually reduced by the change of the sedimentation velocity. The molding product is sintered to form a skeleton having a structure in which the porosity is continuously changed to one surface. Further, the skeleton is impregnated with ingredients of low melting point under melting to form a function-gradient material. With such procedures, continuously gradient structure can be formed easily without using a powder accumulation device. (T.M.)

  3. Rotary Calciner - Metallic Melter and Slurry - Fed Ceramic Melter for Treatment of High Level Liquid Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotary calciner-metallic melter and slurry-fed ceramic melter are used for treatment of high level liquid waste in the industrial scale. Rotary calciner-metallic melter is operated by induction heating and slurry-fed ceramic melter by Joule heating. Both of melter are compared it’s characteristics of waste-glass composition for process and melter operation, melter materials, life time of melter, treatment of off gas, and power consumption. For melter with Joule heating, electric resistance of waste-glass is 4.8 ohm.cm at temperature 1150 °C. The metal of platinum group is not soluble in the molten waste-glass, so that influence the electric current pass by the molten waste-glass. For melter with induction heating there is not influence of platinum metal group. For melter with Joule heating, the material which contact with waste-glass is monofrax K-3. The outer materials layer i.e MRT-70K, LN-135, AZ-GS, fiber board, and stainless steel 304. The material of melter with induction heating is Inconel-690. The life time of melter with Joule heating is longer than melter with induction heating. From the safety aspect, operation of the both of melter have already successful. Operation cost of slurry-fed ceramic melter is cheaper, but construction and decommissioning cost more expensive than rotary calciner-metallic melter. Based on Indonesia condition, the slurry-fed ceramic melter is more reasonable to be utilized. (author)

  4. Development of a phenomenological model for coal slurry atomization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooher, J.P. [Adelphi Univ., Garden City, NY (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Highly concentrated suspensions of coal particles in water or alternate fluids appear to have a wide range of applications for energy production. For enhanced implementation of coal slurry fuel technology, an understanding of coal slurry atomization as a function coal and slurry properties for specific mechanical configurations of nozzle atomizers should be developed.

  5. Observations on microbial activity in acidified pig slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lars Ditlev Mørck; Poulsen, Henrik Vestergaard; Nielsen, Daniel Aagren; Finster, Kai; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Revsbech, Niels Peter

    2009-01-01

    . Oxygen consumption rate, methanogenesis and sulphate reduction were all reduced by more than 98% in the stored acidified slurry compared to untreated slurry. Despite higher sulphate concentration, the microbial metabolism was greatly compromised or absent in the acidified slurry. This could be explained...

  6. Rested and stressed farmed Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) chilled in ice or slurry and effects on quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digre, Hanne; Erikson, Ulf; Aursand, Ida G; Gallart-Jornet, Lorena; Misimi, Ekrem; Rustad, Turid

    2011-01-01

    The main objectives of this study were to investigate (1) whether rested harvest of farmed cod was better maintained by chilling with slurry rather than by traditional ice storage, (2) whether chilling with slurry would be a feasible chilling method to assure low core temperatures (≤0 °C) at packing of gutted fish, and (3) the effects of superchilling compared with traditional ice on selected quality parameters of cod during storage. In the experiment, seawater slurry at -2.0 ± 0.3 °C was used. Anesthetized (AQUI-S™), percussion stunned, and stressed cod chilled in slurry were compared. Cod stored on ice were used as reference group. The fish were evaluated at the day of slaughter, and after 7 and 14 d of storage according to handling stress (initial muscle pH, muscle twitches, rigor mortis), core temperatures, quality index method, microbial counts, weight changes, salt and water content, water distribution, pH, adenosine triphosphate-degradation products, K-value, water-holding capacity, fillet color, and texture. Chilling cod in slurry was more rapid than chilling in ice. Prechilling (1 d) of cod in slurry before subsequent ice storage resulted in lower quality 7 d postmortem compared with both ice and continuous slurry storage. The potential advantages of superchilling became more prominent after 14 d with lower microbiological activity, better maintenance of freshness (lower total quality index scores and lower K-values) compared with fish stored on ice. A drawback with slurry-stored fish was that cloudy eyes developed earlier, in addition to weight gain and salt uptake compared to ice-stored fish. Practical Application: Chilling is an essential operation in any fish-processing plant. This manuscript addresses different applications of slurry ice in the processing and storage of Atlantic cod. Cod quality was assessed after 7 and 14 d of iced and superchilled storage. PMID:21535722

  7. Evaluation of planarization performance for a novel alkaline copper slurry under a low abrasive concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel alkaline copper slurry that possesses a relatively high planarization performance is investigated under a low abrasive concentration. Based on the action mechanism of CMP, the feasibility of using one type of slurry in copper bulk elimination process and residual copper elimination process, with different process parameters, was analyzed. In addition, we investigated the regular change of abrasive concentration effect on copper and tantalum removal rate and within wafer non-uniformity (WIWNU) in CMP process. When the abrasive concentration is 3 wt%, in bulk elimination process, the copper removal rate achieves 6125 Å/min, while WIWNU is 3.5%, simultaneously. In residual copper elimination process, the copper removal rate is approximately 2700 Å/min, while WIWNU is 2.8%. Nevertheless, the tantalum removal rate is 0 Å/min, which indicates that barrier layer isn't eliminated in residual copper elimination process. The planarization experimental results show that an excellent planarization performance is obtained with a relatively high copper removal rate in bulk elimination process. Meanwhile, after residual copper elimination process, the dishing value increased inconspicuously, in a controllable range, and the wafer surface roughness is only 0.326 nm (sq < 1 nm) after polishing. By comparison, the planarization performance and surface quality of alkaline slurry show almost no major differences with two kinds of commercial acid slurries after polishing. All experimental results are conducive to research and improvement of alkaline slurry in the future. (semiconductor technology)

  8. Potassium sorbate as an inhibitor in copper chemical mechanical planarization slurry. Part I. Elucidating slurry chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagar, Magi; Starosvetsky, David [Department of Materials Engineering, Technion Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Vaes, Jan [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Ein-Eli, Yair, E-mail: eineli@tx.technion.ac.i [Department of Materials Engineering, Technion Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2010-04-01

    The integration of an advanced inhibitor, potassium sorbate (K[CH{sub 3}(CH){sub 4}CO{sub 2}]), in a copper CMP slurry based on hydrogen peroxide and glycine is reported. The first part of the study discusses the slurry chemistry by qualitatively describing the processes involved and proposes a mechanism for a hydrogen peroxide-glycine based slurry having sorbate anion as an inhibitor. For this purpose, the specific role of each chemical constituent in the slurry was elucidated at a fundamental level by electrochemical studies, X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements, all linked to the CMP performance on blanket wafers. Once the polishing mechanism was resolved the influence of the inhibitor was evaluated by CMP processing of patterned wafers.

  9. Potassium sorbate as an inhibitor in copper chemical mechanical planarization slurry. Part I. Elucidating slurry chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The integration of an advanced inhibitor, potassium sorbate (K[CH3(CH)4CO2]), in a copper CMP slurry based on hydrogen peroxide and glycine is reported. The first part of the study discusses the slurry chemistry by qualitatively describing the processes involved and proposes a mechanism for a hydrogen peroxide-glycine based slurry having sorbate anion as an inhibitor. For this purpose, the specific role of each chemical constituent in the slurry was elucidated at a fundamental level by electrochemical studies, X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements, all linked to the CMP performance on blanket wafers. Once the polishing mechanism was resolved the influence of the inhibitor was evaluated by CMP processing of patterned wafers.

  10. Coal slurry combustion and technology. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions of the Coal Slurry Combustion and Technology Symposium: (1) bench-scale testing; (2) pilot testing; (3) combustion; and (4) rheology and characterization. Thirty-three papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (ATT)

  11. Device for continuous radiometric determination of the calcium and iron content in raw slurry for cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristic iron and calcium-K series were excited using a Cd-109 isotope source. In order to determine the calcium and iron content in dry slurry, the Compton-effect scattered radiation of the Cd-109 source in the sample was used. A numerical process was worked out which allowed the elimination of the influence of changing contents of iron and water on the results of the calcium content determinations, and a device for continuous radiometric determination of calcium and iron in raw slurry was designed and constructed. The device was installed in the cement plant 'Przyjazn' under technical measuring conditions and its applicability was tested. (orig./LH)

  12. Design and performance of feed-delivery systems for simulated radioactive waste slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Processes for vitrifying simulated high-level radioactive waste have been developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) over the last several years. Paralleling this effort, several feed systems used to deliver the simulated waste slurry to the melter have been tested. Because there had been little industrial experience in delivering abrasive slurries at feed rates of less than 10 L/min, early experience helped direct the design of more-dependable systems. Also, as feed delivery requirements changed, the feed system was modified to meet these new requirements. The various feed systems discussed in this document are part of this evolutionary process, so they have not been ranked against each other. The four slurry feed systems discussed are: (1) vertical-cantilevered centrifugal pump system; (2) airlift feed systems; (3) pressurized-loop systems; and (4) positive-displacement pump system. 20 figures, 11 tables

  13. The determination of lead in ore slurries by gamma-ray attenuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preferential attenuation of low energy gamma radiation by high atomic number elements has been applied to the determination of the lead content of ore slurries containing up to 50 wt% solids. For ores containing between about 0.16 and 10% lead, a linear relationship was found between lead content and gamma attenuation. The determination of the solids content (density) of the slurries, based on the attenuation of high energy gamma radiation, has also been investigated, and was shown to be effectively independent of the atomic number of the absorber. An equation is given that predicts the effect of changes in density and elemental composition in the slurry on the attenuation of gamma radiation. Also, an analysis of the errors in both gamma-ray attenuation methods is presented. (author)

  14. Investigation of microbial nitrate reduction processes in Boom Clay slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    which 50 mM NaNO3 was added. To one of the reactors, a so-called 'radiolytic degradation product solution', containing molecules produced by the gamma irradiation of inactive Eurobitum (a.o. 25 mM NO2-, 0.15 mM HCOO-, 0.3 mM CH3COO- and 0.04 mM C2O42-) was added as well, to study the effect of other available electron donors or acceptors. Both mixtures were stirred continuously under a N2 atmosphere. During the experiment, the pressure inside the reactor was monitored. After ∼ 3.5 years the gas phase and the composition of the clay water were analysed. To study the bacterial composition in the clay slurries, bacterial analyses (Most Probable Number (MPN) and molecular techniques) were performed on the clay water. Bacterial analyses of the slurries demonstrate that denitrifying bacteria are present in Boom Clay. In both reactors an increase in pressure has been measured due to formation of N2O gas. Moreover, the results from this series of batch reactor tests reveal that the denitrifying activity in the Boom Clay slurries is enhanced by addition of nitrite and certain preferentially used organic carbon sources. Furthermore, in neither reactor a significant change in sulphate concentration could be observed, thereby indicating that no pyrite oxidation had occurred. In a second series of tests, Boom Clay slurries (solid/liquid weight ratio 1/3 g/ml) were mixed continuously during ∼ 3 years in four reactors. To two of them, 0.5 M NaNO3 was added, while the other two served as control reactors to which no NaNO3 was added. To be able to measure a change in N2 concentration, an initial H2 atmosphere was used in this experiment. The same analyses as in the first series of tests were performed. In the reactors with added nitrate, a reduction of nitrate with H2 as the electron donor was observed forming either N2 and NH4+ or NO2- and N2O. This would suggest the presence of nitrate reducing bacteria. Yet, for the clay slurries in these reactors this could not be

  15. Modeling PAH mass transfer in a slurry of contaminated soil or sediment amended with organic sorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sungwoo; Werner, David; Luthy, Richard G

    2008-06-01

    A three-compartment kinetic partitioning model was employed to assess contaminant mass transfer and intraparticle diffusion in systems comprising dense slurries of polluted soil or aquifer sediment with or without sorbent amendments to sequester polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The model was applied to simulate temporal changes in aqueous and particle-bound PAH concentrations comparing different pollution sources (heavy oil or tar sludge) and various sorbent amendments (polyoxymethylene (POM), coke breeze, and activated carbon). For the model evaluation, all the parameters needed were directly measured from a series of experiments, allowing full calibration and verification of model predictions without parameter fitting. The numerical model reproduced two separate laboratory-scale experiments reasonably: PAH uptake in POM beads and PAH uptake by semipermeable membrane devices. PAH mass transfer was then simulated for various scenarios, considering different sorbent doses and mass transfer rates as well as biodegradation. Such model predictions provide a quick assessment tool for identifying mass transfer limitations during washing, stabilization, or bioslurry treatments of polluted soil or sediment in mixed systems. It appears that PAHs would be readily released from materials contaminated by small oil droplets, but not tar decanter sludge. Released PAHs would be sequestered rapidly by activated carbon amendment but to a much lesser extent by coke breeze. If sorbing black carbon is present in the slurries, POM pellets would not be effective as a sequestration amendment. High first-order biodegradation rates in the free aqueous phase, e.g., in the order of 0.001 s(-1) for phenanthrene, would be required to compete effectively with adsorption and mass transfer for strong sorbents. PMID:18456306

  16. Monitoring of slurry fields solutions of aluminium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of annual monitoring of slurry fields solutions of aluminium industrial production of Tajik Aluminium Plant are considered in this work. It is found that in summer period the containing of sulfate, carbonate, hydro carbonate and fluoride salts in slurry fields solutions increase. This is due to intensive evaporation of solvent (water). In autumn-winter period due to air temperature decreasing the precipitation of above mentioned salts is observed. The results of chemical analysis of slurry fields solutions are presented in this work. The slurry fields solutions are analyzed by means of X-ray and thermal analysis. The flowsheet of purification of processed slurry fields solutions from sodium sulphate is proposed.

  17. Discontinuous and Continuous Processing of Low-Solvent Battery Slurries for Lithium Nickel Cobalt Manganese Oxide Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreger, Henning; Bockholt, Henrike; Haselrieder, Wolfgang; Kwade, Arno

    2015-11-01

    Different discontinuously and continuously working dispersing devices were investigated to determine their influence on the structural and electrochemical properties of electrodes made from commercial LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NCM) cathode active material. A laboratory-scale dispersing device was compared with a discontinuously working laboratory kneader and a continuously working extruder, both using 50% less solvent than the dissolver process. Rheological, mechanical, structural, conductive, imaging, and electrochemical analyses (C-rate test, long-term cycling) were carried out. The dispersing method and time were found to have a considerable impact on the structure and electrochemical performance. The continuous extrusion process resulted in good performance with more than 20% higher specific capacity at elevated C-rates compared with the discontinuous process. This can be attributed to better deagglomeration of the carbon black in the slurries, also resulting in 60% higher electrode conductivity. On top of these positive results, the changes in the drying step due to the reduced solvent use led to a 50% decrease in the time required for the constant-drying-rate period. The continuously working extrusion process was found to be most suitable for large-scale, cost-efficient, environmentally friendly production of slurries for lithium-ion battery electrodes.

  18. Elemental analysis of slurry samples with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct analysis of wet slurry samples with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is challenging due to problems of sedimentation, splashing, and surface turbulence. Also, water can quench the laser plasma and suppress the LIBS signal, resulting in poor sensitivity. The effect of water on LIBS spectra from slurries was investigated. As the water content decreased, the LIBS signal was enhanced and the standard deviation was reduced. To improve LIBS slurry analysis, dried slurry samples prepared by applying slurry on PVC coated slides were evaluated. Univariate and multivariate calibration was performed on the LIBS spectra of the dried slurry samples for elemental analysis of Mg, Si, and Fe. Calibration results show that the dried slurry samples give a good correlation between spectral intensity and elemental concentration.

  19. Change of elasticity characteristics of carbon structural materials under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For carbon structural materials differing in the structure and properties, neutron-irradiated materials included, the elasticity modules, determined by three different independent methods: static during compression tests; dynamic in time ultrasound transmission; calculated via material crack resistance, are compared. The change in the Poisson coefficient of carbon materials during irradiation is evaluated

  20. Yield Stress Reduction of Radioactive Waste Slurries by Addition of Surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) and Hanford site are in the process of stabilizing millions of gallons of radioactive waste slurries remaining from production of nuclear materials for the Department of Energy (DOE). The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS is currently vitrifying the waste in borosilicate glass while the facilities at the Hanford site are in the design/construction phase. Both processes utilize slurry-fed joule heated melters to vitrify the waste slurries. The rheological properties of the waste slurries limit the total solids content that can be processed by the remote equipment during the pretreatment and melter feed processes. The use of a surface active agent, or surfactant, to increase the solids loading that can be fed to the melters would increase melt rate by reducing the heat load on the melter required to evaporate the water in the feed. The waste slurries are non-Newtonian fluids with rheological properties that were modeled using the Bingham Plastic mod el (this model is typically used by SRNL when studying the DWPF process1).The results illustrate that altering the surface chemistry of the particulates in the waste slurries can lead to a reduction in the yield stress. Dolapix CE64 is an effective surfactant over a wide range of pH values and was effective for all simulants tested. The effectiveness of the additive increased in DWPF simulants as the concentration of the additive was increased. No maxi main effectiveness was observed. Particle size measurements indicate that the additive acted as a flocculant in the DWPF samples and as a dispersant in the RPP samples

  1. MECHANICAL BEHAVIOUR OF ALUMINA-ZIRCONIA COMPOSITE BY SLURRY METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JYOTI PRAKASH

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Alumina has got some excellent properties like chemical inertness, thermal and mechanical strength against hazardous environment. Alumina is a good ceramic material which is being used for structuralapplications. To enhance the toughness and strength of the body some Zirconia is also used with it. The use of Zirconia in alumina is known as toughening of alumina. One difficulty arises, when alumina and alumina toughened composite are sintered , because the low sinterability of Alumina-Zirconia forced the compact to give very low density body. To overcome this problem alumina and alumina composites are made from slurry method which gives nearly theoretical density. The combined effect of alumina and Zirconia on the phase transformation and microstructure development of heat-treated Alumina-Zirconia composites has been studied. Slurry is prepared by adding water, dispersant, binder and anti-foaming agent. In the present study, Sintering schedule is optimized and kept constant for all samples. After sintering, mechanical behaviour of the composite has been studied.

  2. Photonic non-volatile memories using phase change materials

    OpenAIRE

    Pernice, Wolfram; Bhaskaran, Harish

    2012-01-01

    We propose an all-photonic, non-volatile memory and processing element based on phase-change thin-films deposited onto nanophotonic waveguides. Using photonic microring resonators partially covered with Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) multi-level memory operation in integrated photonic circuits can be achieved. GST provides a dramatic change in refractive index upon transition from the amorphous to crystalline state, which is exploited to reversibly control both the extinction ratio and resonance wavelength ...

  3. High temperature phase change materials based on inorganic salts and carbon nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Tao; Zeng, Liang; Zhou, Cunyu [Tongji Univ., Shanghai (China). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    2010-07-01

    High temperature phase change material is useful for solar thermal power generation, industrial process heat and waste heat recovery. In this paper, inorganic salts and carbon nanomaterials, such as expanded graphite (EG) carbon nanotube and graphene, are used to prepare high temperature phase change material. Inorganic salt/EG/7carbon nanotube/Graphene composites as phase change materials are prepared by aqueous solution method. The influence of EG, carbon nanotube and graphene on the termal conductivity of composites is studied by MDSC. Results show that expanded graphite, carbon nanotube and graphene can significantly increase the thermal conductivity of high temperature phase change materials. (orig.)

  4. Offensive Speech in Educational Materials: Changing Words without Censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGough, Sarah M.

    2007-01-01

    Background/Context: Diane Ravitch has focused on the extensive censorship occurring within the publication of school textbook and testing materials in her book, "The Language Police" (2003). This book, indicative of conservative frustrations with minority special interest groups, raises several key issues echoed throughout the larger educational…

  5. Slurry Erosive Wear Evaluation of HVOF-Spray Cr2O3 Coating on Some Turbine Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Deepak Kumar; Singh, Harpreet; Kumar, Harmesh; Sahni, Varinder

    2012-09-01

    In this study, Cr2O3 coatings were deposited on CF8M and CA6NM turbine steels by high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF)-spray process and analyzed with regard to their performance under slurry erosion conditions. High Speed Erosion Test Rig was used for slurry erosion tests, and the effects of three parameters, namely, average particle size, speed (rpm), and slurry concentration on slurry erosion of these materials were investigated. SEM micrographs on the surface of samples, before and after slurry erosion tests, were taken to study the erosion mechanism. For the uncoated steels, CA6NM steel showed better erosion resistance in comparison with CF8M steel. The HVOF-sprayed Cr2O3-coated CF8M and CA6NM steels showed better slurry erosion resistance in comparison with their uncoated counterparts. It may be due to the higher hardness as a result of HVOF-sprayed Cr2O3 coating in comparison with the uncoated CF8M and CA6NM steels.

  6. Slurry-Based Chemical Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Fuel Cell Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Semelsberger, Troy; Simmons, Kevin L.; Van Hassel, Bart A.

    2014-05-30

    In this paper, the system designs for hydrogen storage using chemical hydrogen materials in an 80 kWe fuel cell, light-duty vehicle are described. Ammonia borane and alane are used for these designs to represent the general classes of exothermic and endothermic materials. The designs are then compared to the USDRIVE/DOE developed set of system level targets for on-board storage. While most of the DOE targets are predicted to be achieved based on the modeling, the system gravimetric and volumetric densities were more challenging and became the focus of this work. The resulting system evaluation determined that the slurry is majority of the system mass. Only modest reductions in the system mass can be expected with improvements in the balance of plant components. Most of the gravimetric improvements will require developing materials with higher inherent storage capacity or by increasing the solids loading of the chemical hydrogen storage material in the slurry.

  7. Application of flexible slurries: an alternative for oil wells subject to cyclic steam injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzart, J. Walter P.; Paiva, Maria D.M.; Cunha, Marcelo C.S. [Halliburton Energy Services (HES), Duncan, OK (United States); Farias, Antonio Carlos [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Oil wells that receive cyclic steam injection are subject to high temperature variations during their life cycle. This causes volumetric expansion of the metallic casing which leads to cracks and channels in the formation of the cement. Studies show that volumetric expansion caused by temperature variation may cause wells to rise up to 20-in. at the surface. This paper presents alternative materials that improve the elastic properties of set cement slurries, focusing on maintaining sufficient resilience to maximize the life of the cement. We compare a set of fourteen formulations, some currently in use, selecting those with high flexibility. Analysis was based on the mechanical properties of the set slurries as well as tests according to standards from ABNT and from API Spec 10B. This work contributes new formulations for wells that under-go cyclic steam injection. These new formulations are presented as alternatives to current flexible slurry technology. We can obtain high-quality, more resilient slurries using materials that are more economical, have better cost-benefit, and are easily available in the market. (author)

  8. Improving profitability through slurry management: a look at the impact of slurry pH on various glass types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Abigail R.; Boffa, Christopher C.; Sarkas, Harry W.; Cureton, Kevin

    2015-08-01

    When building an optical system, optical fabricators and designers meticulously choose the glass types for their application knowing that each one will have different chemical, thermal and mechanical properties. As the requirements for new optical systems have grown more demanding, the range of available glass types has vastly expanded and the specifications on the produced products have grown tighter. In an attempt to simplify processes and streamline consumable purchases, optical polishing houses often rely on one polishing slurry to manage these vast array of glass types. An unforeseen consequence of these practices can be a reduction in productivity by reduced removal rate, poor yields and frequent rework all translating into higher costs and reduced profitability. In this paper, the authors will examine the impact slurry pH has on glass types of different compositions and chemical, thermal and mechanical properties when using a double-sided polishing process. Experiments will use material removal rate, surface quality, and surface figure to provide insight into improving process control for differing glass types. Further guidance will be provided on how simple on-site monitoring and adjustment can deliver improved profitability on challenging substrates.

  9. Security of material. The changing context of the IAEA's programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the IAEA established its programme on the Security of Material about five years ago, the prospect that nuclear or other radioactive materials could fall into the wrong hands was a main concern. Among the major driving forces behind the Agency's action then was an alarming increase in reported cases of illicit nuclear trafficking in the early and mid-1990s, and the recognition that States needed better and more coordinated assistance in their efforts to combat the problem. Today, the dimensions and perceptions of nuclear security are being shaped by additional driving forces, specifically the spectre of nuclear terrorism. The terrorist attacks on the United States in September 2001 have elevated issues of security to unprecedented heights of international concern and they have prompted a broad-based global response. The attacks made it clear that terrorism has new and far-reaching international dimensions and that its aim of inflicting mass casualties is a serious threat for all States. In the nuclear sphere, the IAEA has taken a leading role in international efforts directed at combating nuclear terrorism. Initiatives taken by the Agency aim to upgrade levels of security for nuclear facilities and the protection of nuclear and other radioactive materials. Toward these ends, the IAEA Board of Governors is considering proposed measures for strengthening the Agency's activities relevant to preventing nuclear terrorism. In this new and challenging context, it is worth reviewing some fundamental aspects of the IAEA programme on Security of Material as it has been developed over the years. The programme is part of a wider framework of Agency activities related to nuclear security, safety, and safeguards. In reviewing the programme's evolution, this article principally focuses on the major components and elements of the planned 2002-2003 programme, while pointing to directions ahead in light of additional measures being considered for prevention of nuclear terrorism

  10. Anaerobic fungi induced changes of microbial communities in biowaste material

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrázek, Jakub; Štrosová, Lenka; Procházka, J.; Dolejš, P.; Kopečný, Jan; Fliegerová, Kateřina

    Clermont-Ferrand : INRA, 2012. s. 148-148. [8th INRA-RRI Symposium, Gut Microbiota . 17.06.2012-20.06.2012, Clermont-Ferrand] R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP503/10/P394; GA MZe QI92A286 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : anaerobic fungi * biowaste material Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour https://colloque4.inra.fr/inra_rowett_2012/

  11. Microstructure characterization of multi-phase composites and utilization of phase change materials and recycled rubbers in cementitious materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshgin, Pania

    2011-12-01

    This research focuses on two important subjects: (1) Characterization of heterogeneous microstructure of multi-phase composites and the effect of microstructural features on effective properties of the material. (2) Utilizations of phase change materials and recycled rubber particles from waste tires to improve thermal properties of insulation materials used in building envelopes. Spatial pattern of multi-phase and multidimensional internal structures of most composite materials are highly random. Quantitative description of the spatial distribution should be developed based on proper statistical models, which characterize the morphological features. For a composite material with multi-phases, the volume fraction of the phases as well as the morphological parameters of the phases have very strong influences on the effective property of the composite. These morphological parameters depend on the microstructure of each phase. This study intends to include the effect of higher order morphological details of the microstructure in the composite models. The higher order statistics, called two-point correlation functions characterize various behaviors of the composite at any two points in a stochastic field. Specifically, correlation functions of mosaic patterns are used in the study for characterizing transport properties of composite materials. One of the most effective methods to improve energy efficiency of buildings is to enhance thermal properties of insulation materials. The idea of using phase change materials and recycled rubber particles such as scrap tires in insulation materials for building envelopes has been studied.

  12. Research advances in settling slurry flows

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matoušek, Václav; Vlasák, Pavel

    Tel Aviv, 2015. [The 8th International Conference for Conveying and Handling of Particulate Solids. Tel Aviv (IL), 03.05.2015-07.05.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/09/0383; GA ČR GAP105/10/1574; GA ČR(CZ) GAP105/12/1082 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : slurry flows * flow patterns * turbulent dispersion * collisional dispersion * particle-support mechanisms Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  13. Fischer-Tropsch Slurry Reactor modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soong, Y.; Gamwo, I.K.; Harke, F.W. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    This paper reports experimental and theoretical results on hydrodynamic studies. The experiments were conducted in a hot-pressurized Slurry-Bubble Column Reactor (SBCR). It includes experimental results of Drakeol-10 oil/nitrogen/glass beads hydrodynamic study and the development of an ultrasonic technique for measuring solids concentration. A model to describe the flow behavior in reactors was developed. The hydrodynamic properties in a 10.16 cm diameter bubble column with a perforated-plate gas distributor were studied at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 1.36 MPa, and at temperatures from 20 to 200{degrees}C, using a dual hot-wire probe with nitrogen, glass beads, and Drakeol-10 oil as the gas, solid, and liquid phase, respectively. It was found that the addition of 20 oil wt% glass beads in the system has a slight effect on the average gas holdup and bubble size. A well-posed three-dimensional model for bed dynamics was developed from an ill-posed model. The new model has computed solid holdup distributions consistent with experimental observations with no artificial {open_quotes}fountain{close_quotes} as predicted by the earlier model. The model can be applied to a variety of multiphase flows of practical interest. An ultrasonic technique is being developed to measure solids concentration in a three-phase slurry reactor. Preliminary measurements have been made on slurries consisting of molten paraffin wax, glass beads, and nitrogen bubbles at 180 {degrees}C and 0.1 MPa. The data show that both the sound speed and attenuation are well-defined functions of both the solid and gas concentrations in the slurries. The results suggest possibilities to directly measure solids concentration during the operation of an autoclave reactor containing molten wax.

  14. Photonic non-volatile memories using phase change materials

    CERN Document Server

    Pernice, Wolfram

    2012-01-01

    We propose an all-photonic, non-volatile memory and processing element based on phase-change thin-films deposited onto nanophotonic waveguides. Using photonic microring resonators partially covered with Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) multi-level memory operation in integrated photonic circuits can be achieved. GST provides a dramatic change in refractive index upon transition from the amorphous to crystalline state, which is exploited to reversibly control both the extinction ratio and resonance wavelength of the microcavity with an additional gating port in analogy to optical transistors. Our analysis shows excellent sensitivity to the degree of crystallization inside the GST, thus providing the basis for non-von Neuman neuromorphic computing.

  15. Photonic non-volatile memories using phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernice, Wolfram H. P.; Bhaskaran, Harish

    2012-10-01

    We propose an all-photonic, non-volatile memory, and processing element based on phase-change thin-films deposited onto nanophotonic waveguides. Using photonic microring resonators partially covered with Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) multi-level memory operation in integrated photonic circuits can be achieved. GST provides a dramatic change in refractive index upon transition from the amorphous to crystalline state, which is exploited to reversibly control both the extinction ratio and resonance wavelength of the microcavity with an additional gating port in analogy to optical transistors. Our analysis shows excellent sensitivity to the degree of crystallization inside the GST, thus providing the basis for non-von Neumann neuromorphic computing.

  16. Field test of ethanol/bentonite slurry grouting into rock fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystalline rocks have fractures which may cause unexpected routes of groundwater seepage. Cement grouting is one of the most effective methods to minimize seepage; however, cement materials may not be suitable for the purpose of extra-long durability, because cement is neutralized or degraded by chemical and physical influence of chemical reaction. Natural clay like bentonite is one of the most promising materials for seepage barrier; however, water/bentonite grout is so viscous that enough amount of bentonite can not be grouted into rock fractures. To increase bentonite content in grout with low viscosity, the utilization of ethanol as a mixing liquid was studied. Ethanol suppresses bentonite swelling, and more bentonite can be injected more than that of water/bentonite slurry. In this paper, grouting into in-situ rock mass fracture from the ground surface was tested to investigate the barrier performance and workability of ethanol/bentonite slurry as a grouting material. (author)

  17. Injection of Aqueous Slurry for Making Zirconia Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Shun'ai; LI Maoqiang

    2009-01-01

    Zirconia aqueous slurry was prepared with fine zirconia powder.Injection process for making zirconia fiber was demonstrated,including preparation of aqueous slurry,injection of slurry,fiber setting in acetone,and fiber firing.The principle of the process was discussed.The effects of solid loading in the zirconia slurry,addition of dispersant in the slurry,and ball milling time on the rheological properties of the slurry,especially yield stress,were illustrated.The role of acetone as curing agent was discussed.Zirconia poly-crystalline fber with at 1 530 ℃ for 5 h.Microstructure of the sintered zirconia fiber was investigated.

  18. Testing of subsea gate valves in sand slurry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on three gate valves from different manufacturers that have been performance tested in a test loop. Anticipated production rates on the Statfjord Satellite Fields (SSF) have been simulated. The testing was part of the pre-qualification of the Christmas tree valves for this project. The tests were performed in order to determine the expected cycle life and failure mode while operating in a sand slurry environment. The valve's ability to hold gas liquid pressure was monitored throughout the test. On completion of the tests, the valves were disassembled and inspected for wear and tear, and the gates subjected to a material analysis. Information gained from the tests has proved to be very useful for the development of SSF

  19. Shape forming of ceramics via gelcasting of aqueous particulate slurries

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Dhara; R K Kamboj; M Pradhan; P Bhargava

    2002-11-01

    Gelcasting is a promising technique for shape forming of bulk dense or porous ceramic, metal structures. The process offers a number of advantages over processes such as slip casting, injection molding in forming complex ceramic shapes. It is shown here that the optimization of slurry rheology, choice of mold material, mold design and the drying conditions have a significant role in the overall success of the process. In this process, components of simple or complex shapes can be produced to near net shape by direct casting. If required complex shapes can also be produced by machining the green gelcast bodies. The process of gelcasting also has a lot of potential in forming highly porous ceramic shapes.

  20. Preparation and characterization of a novel polymeric based solid-solid phase change heat storage material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Peng; Cheng, Bowen [Tianjin Municipal Key Lab of Fiber Modification and Functional Fiber, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300160 (China); Gu, Xiaohua [Qiqihar University, 30 Wenhua Road, Qiqihar 161006 (China); CAS Key Laboratory of Engineering Plastics, Joint Laboratory of Polymer Science and Materials, Center for Molecular Science, Institute of Chemistry, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Wang, Yufei [Dalian University Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2009-06-15

    Here we reported a two-step procedure for preparing a novel polymeric based solid-solid phase change heat storage material. Firstly, a copolymer monomer containing a polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether (MPEG) phase change unit and a vinyl unit was synthesized via the modification of hydrogen group of MPEG. Secondly, by copolymerization of the copolymer monomer and phenyl ethylene, a novel polymeric based solid-solid phase change heat storage material was prepared. The composition, structure and properties of the novel polymeric based solid-solid phase change material were characterized by IR, {sup 1}H NMR, DSC, WAXD, and POM, respectively. The results show that the novel polymeric based solid-solid phase change material possesses of excellent crystal properties and high phase change enthalpy. (author)

  1. Preparation and characterization of a novel polymeric based solid-solid phase change heat storage material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi Peng [Tianjin Municipal Key Lab of Fiber Modification and Functional Fiber, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300160 (China); Gu Xiaohua [Qiqihar University, 30 Wenhua Road, Qiqihar 161006 (China); CAS Key Laboratory of Engineering Plastics, Joint Laboratory of Polymer Science and Materials, Center for Molecular Science, Institute of Chemistry, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China)], E-mail: gxh218@yahoo.cn; Cheng Bowen [Tianjin Municipal Key Lab of Fiber Modification and Functional Fiber, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300160 (China); Wang Yufei [Dalian University Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2009-06-15

    Here we reported a two-step procedure for preparing a novel polymeric based solid-solid phase change heat storage material. Firstly, a copolymer monomer containing a polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether (MPEG) phase change unit and a vinyl unit was synthesized via the modification of hydrogen group of MPEG. Secondly, by copolymerization of the copolymer monomer and phenyl ethylene, a novel polymeric based solid-solid phase change heat storage material was prepared. The composition, structure and properties of the novel polymeric based solid-solid phase change material were characterized by IR, {sup 1}H NMR, DSC, WAXD, and POM, respectively. The results show that the novel polymeric based solid-solid phase change material possesses of excellent crystal properties and high phase change enthalpy.

  2. Problems of soil and groundwater pollution in the disposal of ``marble'' slurries in NW Sicily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, G.; D'Agostino, F.; Ercoli, L.

    2008-09-01

    This work deals with disposal of slurries generated during the cutting and polishing processes of slabs of decorative sedimentary carbonate rocks in the north western Sicily. At present, they are used as fillers of dismantled quarries near the sawmills and, as a final step of reclamation, are covered with earth layers. In spite of such inexpensive solution, there is lack of knowledge about the composition of the waste. In order to assess if there is any threat for the environment and to suggest indications for alternative solutions, such as recycling or inactivation processes, the slurries were analysed by XR diffraction, simultaneous thermal analysis, ICP/MS, ionic chromatography, FTIR, UV-Vis, COD and TOC measurements, grain size analysis. Results indicate that the slurries can threaten the groundwater, because of the high chemical oxygen demand; furthermore they can modify the mechanism of groundwater recharge, because of their grain size distribution. Some laboratory tests show that, even in very aggressive conditions, the solid pollutants persist in the waste and slowly release into water the products of their degradation. The slurry therefore should be subjected to inactivation treatment before disposal or, alternatively, recycled as secondary raw material for a suitable process.

  3. Toxicity Evaluation of Pig Slurry Using Luminescent Bacteria and Zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Wenyan Chen; Qiang Cai; Yuan Zhao; Guojuan Zheng; Yuting Liang

    2014-01-01

    Biogas slurry has become a serious pollution problem and anaerobic digestion is widely applied to pig manure treatment for environmental protection and energy recovery. To evaluate environmental risk of the emission of biogas slurry, luminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), larvae and embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio) were used to detect the acute and development toxicity of digested and post-treated slurry. Then the ability of treatment process was evaluated. The results showed that digested...

  4. Ultrasonic measurements in ice slurry generation by direct contact evaporation

    OpenAIRE

    Vuarnoz, Didier; Ata-Caesar, Derrick; Sari, Osmann; Egolf, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Important reductions of refrigerant amounts can be achieved by using secondary refrigeration fluids. Ice slurry is a two-phase fluid and thus, compared to single phase secondary refrigeration fluids, offers the advantage of the latent heat of fusion when the ice phase melts during heat exchange. Therefore, the challenges that the introduction of ice slurry as a common thermal fluid is facing are, in the first place, how to generate ice slurry in an efficient and ecological way. Optimal design...

  5. Survey of state water laws affecting coal slurry pipeline development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogozen, M.B.

    1980-11-01

    This report summarizes state water laws likely to affect the development of coal slurry pipelines. It was prepared as part of a project to analyze environmental issues related to energy transportation systems. Coal slurry pipelines have been proposed as a means to expand the existing transportation system to handle the increasing coal shipments that will be required in the future. The availability of water for use in coal slurry systems in the coal-producing states is an issue of major concern.

  6. Heterogeneous ice slurry flow and concentration distribution in horizontal pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A Mixture CFD model is applied to describe heterogeneous ice slurry flow. • The ice slurry rheological behavior is considered piecewise. • The coupled flow and concentration profiles in heterogeneous slurry flow is acquired. • The current numerical model achieves good balance between precision and universality. -- Abstract: Ice slurry is an energy-intensive solid–liquid mixture fluid which may play an important role in various cooling purposes. Knowing detailed flow information is important from the system design point of view. However, the heterogeneous ice slurry flow makes it difficult to be quantified due to the complex two phase flow characteristic. The present study applies a Mixture computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model based on different rheological behavior to characterize the heterogeneous ice slurry flow. The Mixture CFD model was firstly validated by three different experiments. Then the validated Mixture CFD model was applied to solve the ice slurry isothermal flow by considering the rheological behavior piecewise. Finally, the numerical solutions have displayed the coupled flow information, such as slurry velocity, ice particle concentration and pressure drop distribution. The results show that, the ice slurry flow distribution will appear varying degree of asymmetry under different operating conditions. The rheological behavior will be affected by the asymmetric flow distributions. When mean flow velocity is high, Thomas equation can be appropriate for describing ice slurry viscosity. While with the decreasing of mean flow velocity, the ice slurry behaves Bingham rheology. As compared with experimental pressure drop results, the relative errors of numerical computation are almost within ±15%. The Mixture CFD model is validated to be an effective model for describing heterogeneous ice slurry flow and could supply plentiful flow information

  7. Effect of microencapsulated phase change material in sandwich panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellon, Cecilia; Medrano, Marc; Roca, Joan; Cabeza, Luisa F. [GREA Innovacio Concurrent, Edifici CREA, Universitat de Lleida, Pere de Cabrera s/n, 25001 Lleida (Spain); Navarro, Maria E.; Fernandez, Ana I. [Departamento de Ciencias de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Lazaro, Ana; Zalba, Belen [Instituto de Investigacion en Ingenieria de Aragon, I3A, Grupo de Ingenieria Termica y Sistemas Energeticos (GITSE), Dpto. Ingenieria Mecanica, Area de Maquinas y Motores Termicos, Universidad de Zaragoza, Campus Politecnico Rio Ebro, Edificio ' ' Agustin de Betancourt,' ' Maria de Luna s/n, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    Sandwich panels are a good option as building materials, as they offer excellent characteristics in a modular system. The goal of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using the microencapsulated PCM (Micronal BASF) in sandwich panels to increase their thermal inertia and to reduce the energy demand of the final buildings. In this paper, to manufacture the sandwich panel with microencapsulated PCM three different methods were tested. In case 1, the PCM was added mixing the microencapsulated PCM with one of the components of the polyurethane. In the other two cases, the PCM was added either a step before (case 2) or a step after (case 3) to the addition of the polyurethane to the metal sheets. The results show that in case 1 the effect of PCM was overlapped by a possible increase in thermal conductivity, but an increase of thermal inertia was found in case 3. In case 2, different results were obtained due to the poor distribution of the PCM. Some samples showed the effect of the PCM (higher thermal inertia), and other samples results were similar to the conventional sandwich panel. In both cases (2 and 3), it is required to industrialize the process to improve the results. (author)

  8. Effect of Different Denture Base Materials and Changed Mouth Temperature on Dimensional Stability of Complete Dentures

    OpenAIRE

    Arafa, Khalid A. O.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Type of materials used in fabrication of denture base has an effect on dimension during denture base material processing and other factors related to clinical use. Objective. The study aims were to assess the dimensional stability including thermal changes of three different denture base materials. Methods. Ninety patients were selected to construct complete dentures with different denture base materials. They were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, patients with cobalt ...

  9. Dielectric Characteristics of Microstructural Changes and Property Evolution in Engineered Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Jallisa Janet

    Heterogeneous materials are increasingly used in a wide range of applications such as aerospace, civil infrastructure, fuel cells and many others. The ability to take properties from two or more materials to create a material with properties engineered to needs is always very attractive. Hence heterogeneous materials are evolving into more complex formulations in multiple disciplines. Design of microstructure at multiple scales control the global functional properties of these materials and their structures. However, local microstructural changes do not directly cause a proportional change to the global properties (such as strength and stiffness). Instead, local changes follow an evolution process including significant interactions. Therefore, in order to understand property evolution of engineered materials, microstructural changes need to be effectively captured. Characterizing these changes and representing them by material variables will enable us to further improve our material level understanding. In this work, we will demonstrate how microstructural features of heterogeneous materials can be described quantitatively using broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BbDS). The frequency dependent dielectric properties can capture the change in material microstructure and represent these changes in terms of material variables, such as complex permittivity. These changes in terms of material properties can then be linked to a number of different conditions, such as increasing damage due to impact or fatigue. Two different broadband dielectric spectroscopy scanning modes are presented: bulk measurements and continuous scanning to measure dielectric property change as a function of position across the specimen. In this study, we will focus on ceramic materials and fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites as test bed material systems. In the first part of the thesis, we will present how different micro-structural design of porous ceramic materials can be captured

  10. Utilization of 15N in the sequence of mineral fertilizer - forage - animal - slurry - forage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After systematic application of 15N-ammonium nitrate, the change of the dinuclidic composition and 15N quantity was studied by isotope analysis of several open systems in the sequence mineral fertilizer - (soil) - forage - (animal) - slurry - (soil) - forage. The relative 15N isotope frequency of 50 atom% in the mineral fertilizer declined to 12.2 to 21.4 atom% in the forage (beet, oats, hay) and went down to 3.15 atom% in the slurry of a dairy cow fed on this forage. Silage maize manured with the slurry of the dairy cow only showed 1.98 atom %, green oats grown after the silage maize on the same area was found to have 0.45 atom%. The 15N quantity of 104.5 g N in the fertilizer gradually decreased to 41.6 g N in the forage, 30.5 g N in the slurry and 22.6 g N in the silage maize. The causes discussed are 15N isotope dilution as qualitative factor and productive and unproductive N losses as quantitative factors. (author)

  11. Form transition of sodium during combustion of black liquor coal slurry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAN Ze-quan; CAO Xin-yu; ZHOU Jun-hu; LIU Jian-zhong; CHENG Jun; CEN Ke-fa

    2008-01-01

    Several typical ash samples from a 0.25 MW test furnace fired black liquor coal slurry were selected for investigation. The phases and compounds containing sodium in ash samples were acquired from X-ray diffraction analyses. As well, detailed analyses of the amounts of major mineral elements along thickness gradients of representative ash samples were carried out. The elements, including Na, Si, Al, S and Cl were analyzed by the advanced electron probe microanalyzer equipment, which provid evidence and interpretation for the analytical results of XRD. The findings indicate that the occurrence form of sodium has experi-enced important changes during the combustion of black liquor coal slurry, which translated into nepheline, thenardite, sodium sulfate, sodium chloride, sodium silicoaluminate, hauyne and other phases containing sodium, from NaOH, Na2CO3 and Na2S in raw fuel. Of all the sodium compounds, nepheline, thenardite and sodium sulfate are the most important forms of Na in solid com-bustion residues. Such a transformation of Na during the combustion of black liquor coal slurry resulted in a considerable impact on ash deposition and is not only different from the raw coal and papermaking black liquors, but is also affected by local circum-stances in the combustion furnace. Amounts of Na, S and Cl in ash deposits from low temperature zones were larger than those from high temperature zones. Our findings should provide important theoretical instructions for industrial applications of black liquor coal slurry.

  12. Serial observations after high dose talc slurry in the rabbit model for pleurodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, C; Teixeira, L R; Wang, N; McGovern, J P; Light, R W

    1998-01-01

    The mechanisms leading to a pleurodesis after the intrapleural injection of a sclerosing agent are not completely understood. The purpose of the present study was to make serial observations over 28 days on the pleural fluid findings and the gross and microscopic changes in the pleura after talc slurry administered intrapleurally at a high dose. Sixty-six rabbits received 400 mg/kg talc slurry. Ten to 12 rabbits were sacrificed 1, 2, 4, 7, 14, and 28 days after the intrapleural injection. At sacrifice the pleural fluid was measured and analyzed, and the pleural surfaces were studied grossly and microscopically. The intrapleural injection of 400 mg/kg talc slurry resulted in an acute exudative pleural effusion that persisted for 4 days. There was a progressive increase in the gross and microscopic fibrosis over the 28 days. Talc was present at the time of sacrifice in all animals. At 28 days there was a clinically significant pleurodesis in all rabbits; pleurodesis was not observed before this time. From this study we conclude that the intrapleural injection of 400 mg/kg talc slurry leads to an acute exudative pleural effusion and clinically significant pleurodesis that is present on day 28 but not day 14. It appears that the production of a pleurodesis requires higher doses of talc in rabbits without a chest tube than in humans with a chest tube. PMID:9685526

  13. Life cycle assessment of pig slurry treatment technologies for nutrient redistribution in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Hoeve, Marieke; Hutchings, Nicholas J; Peters, Gregory M; Svanström, Magdalena; Jensen, Lars S; Bruun, Sander

    2014-01-01

    Animal slurry management is associated with a range of impacts on fossil resource use and the environment. The impacts are greatest when large amounts of nutrient-rich slurry from livestock production cannot be adequately utilised on adjacent land. To facilitate nutrient redistribution, a range of different technologies are available. This study comprised a life cycle assessment of the environmental impacts from handling 1000 kg of pig slurry ex-animal. Application of untreated pig slurry onto adjacent land was compared with using four different treatment technologies to enable nutrient redistribution before land application: (a) separation by mechanical screw press, (b) screw press separation with composting of the solid fraction, (c) separation by decanter centrifuge, and (d) decanter centrifuge separation with ammonia stripping of the liquid fraction. Emissions were determined based on a combination of values derived from the literature and simulations with the Farm-N model for Danish agricultural and climatic conditions. The environmental impact categories assessed were climate change, freshwater eutrophication, marine eutrophication, terrestrial acidification, natural resource use, and soil carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus storage. In all separation scenarios, the liquid fraction was applied to land on the pig-producing (donor) farm and the solid fraction transported to a recipient farm and utilised for crop production. Separation, especially by centrifuge, was found to result in a lower environmental impact potential than application of untreated slurry to adjacent land. Composting and ammonia stripping either slightly increased or slightly decreased the environmental impact potential, depending on the impact category considered. The relative ranking of scenarios did not change after a sensitivity analysis in which coefficients for field emissions of nitrous oxide, ammonia and phosphorus were varied within the range cited in the literature. Therefore, the best

  14. Impact of chemically amended pig slurry on greenhouse gas emissions, soil properties and leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O' Flynn, Cornelius J; Healy, Mark G; Lanigan, Gary J; Troy, Shane M; Somers, Cathal; Fenton, Owen

    2013-10-15

    The effectiveness of chemical amendment of pig slurry to ameliorate phosphorus (P) losses in runoff is well studied, but research mainly has concentrated only on the runoff pathway. The aims of this study were to investigate changes to leachate nutrient losses, soil properties and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions due to the chemical amendment of pig slurry spread at 19 kg total phosphorus (TP), 90 kg total nitrogen (TN), and 180 kg total carbon (TC) ha(-1). The amendments examined were: (1) commercial grade liquid alum (8% Al2O3) applied at a rate of 0.88:1 [Al:TP], (2) commercial-grade liquid ferric chloride (38% FeCl3) applied at a rate of 0.89:1 [Fe:TP] and (3) commercial-grade liquid poly-aluminium chloride (PAC) (10% Al2O3) applied at a rate of 0.72:1 [Al:TP]. Columns filled with sieved soil were incubated for 8 mo at 10 °C and were leached with 160 mL (19 mm) distilled water wk(-1). All amendments reduced the Morgan's phosphorus and water extractable P content of the soil to that of the soil-only treatment, indicating that they have the ability to reduce P loss in leachate following slurry application. There were no significant differences between treatments for nitrogen (N) or carbon (C) in leachate or soil, indicating no deleterious impact on reactive N emissions or soil C cycling. Chemical amendment posed no significant change to GHG emissions from pig slurry, and in the cases of alum and PAC, reduced cumulative N2O and CO2 losses. Chemical amendment of land applied pig slurry can reduce P in runoff without any negative impact on nutrient leaching and GHG emissions. Future work must be conducted to ascertain if more significant reductions in GHG emissions are possible with chemical amendments. PMID:23850764

  15. Elimination Of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation In Defense Waste Processing Facility Slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on lab-scale simulations of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) slurry chemistry, the addition of sodium nitrite and sodium hydroxide to waste slurries at concentrations sufficient to take the aqueous phase into the alkaline region (pH > 7) with approximately 500 mg nitrite ion/kg slurry (assuming < 25 wt% total solids, or equivalently 2,000 mg nitrite/kg total solids) is sufficient to effectively deactivate the noble metal catalysts at temperatures between room temperature and boiling. This is a potential strategy for eliminating catalytic hydrogen generation from the list of concerns for sludge carried over into the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) or Recycle Collection Tank (RCT). These conclusions are drawn in large part from the various phases of the DWPF catalytic hydrogen generation program conducted between 2005 and 2009. The findings could apply to various situations, including a solids carry-over from either the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) or Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) into the SMECT with subsequent transfer to the RCT, as well as a spill of formic acid into the sump system and transfer into an RCT that already contains sludge solids. There are other potential mitigating factors for the SMECT and RCT, since these vessels are typically operated at temperatures close to the minimum temperatures that catalytic hydrogen has been observed to occur in either the SRAT or SME (pure slurry case), and these vessels are also likely to be considerably more dilute in both noble metals and formate ion (the two essential components to catalytic hydrogen generation) than the two primary process vessels. Rhodium certainly, and ruthenium likely, are present as metal-ligand complexes that are favored under certain concentrations of the surrounding species. Therefore, in the SMECT or RCT, where a small volume of SRAT or SME material would be significantly diluted, conditions would be less optimal for forming or sustaining the

  16. Elimination Of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation In Defense Waste Processing Facility Slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, D. C.

    2013-01-22

    Based on lab-scale simulations of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) slurry chemistry, the addition of sodium nitrite and sodium hydroxide to waste slurries at concentrations sufficient to take the aqueous phase into the alkaline region (pH > 7) with approximately 500 mg nitrite ion/kg slurry (assuming <25 wt% total solids, or equivalently 2,000 mg nitrite/kg total solids) is sufficient to effectively deactivate the noble metal catalysts at temperatures between room temperature and boiling. This is a potential strategy for eliminating catalytic hydrogen generation from the list of concerns for sludge carried over into the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) or Recycle Collection Tank (RCT). These conclusions are drawn in large part from the various phases of the DWPF catalytic hydrogen generation program conducted between 2005 and 2009. The findings could apply to various situations, including a solids carry-over from either the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) or Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) into the SMECT with subsequent transfer to the RCT, as well as a spill of formic acid into the sump system and transfer into an RCT that already contains sludge solids. There are other potential mitigating factors for the SMECT and RCT, since these vessels are typically operated at temperatures close to the minimum temperatures that catalytic hydrogen has been observed to occur in either the SRAT or SME (pure slurry case), and these vessels are also likely to be considerably more dilute in both noble metals and formate ion (the two essential components to catalytic hydrogen generation) than the two primary process vessels. Rhodium certainly, and ruthenium likely, are present as metal-ligand complexes that are favored under certain concentrations of the surrounding species. Therefore, in the SMECT or RCT, where a small volume of SRAT or SME material would be significantly diluted, conditions would be less optimal for forming or sustaining the

  17. Improvement in mechanical properties of hypereutectic Al-Si-Cu alloys through sono-solidiifed slurry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshiki Tsunekawa; Shinpei Suetsugu; Masahiro Okumiya; Naoki Nishikawa; Yoshikazu Genma

    2014-01-01

    For the wider applications, it is necessary to improve the ductility as wel as the strength and wear-resistance of hypereutectic Al-Si-Cu aloys, which are typical light-weight wear-resistant materials. An increase in the amounts of primary silicon particles causes the modiifed wear-resistance of hypereutectic Al-Si-Cu aloys, but leads to the poor strength and ductility. It is known that dual phase steels composed of hetero-structure have succeeded in bringing contradictory mechanical properties of high strength and ductility concurrently. In order to apply the idea of hetero-structure to hypereutectic Al-Si-Cu alloys for the achievement of high strength and ductility along with wear resistance, ultrasonic irradiation of the molten metal during the solidiifcation, which is caled sono-solidiifcation, was carried out from its molten state to just above the eutectic temperature. The sono-solidiifed Al-17Si-4Cu aloy is composed of hetero-structure, which are, hard primary silicon particles, soft non-equilibriuma-Al phase and the eutectic region. Rheo-casting was performed at just above the eutectic temperature with sono-solidiifed slurry to shape a disk specimen. After the rheo-casting with modiifed sono-solidiifed slurry held for 45 s at 570 ºC, the quantitative optical microscope observation exhibits that the microstructure is composed of 18area% of hard primary silicon particles and 57area% of softa-Al phase. In contrast, there exist only 5 area% of primary silicon particles and noa-Al phase in rheo-cast specimen with normaly solidiifed slurry. Hence the tensile tests of T6 treated rheo-cast specimens with modified sono-solidified slurry exhibit improved strength and 5% of elongation, regardless of having more than 3 times higher amounts of primary silicon particles compared to that of rheo-cast specimen with normaly solidiifed slurry.

  18. Effect of slurries density on the properties of ceramic foam produced via polymer replication method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceramic foams are a class of high porosity materials that are used or being considered for a wide range of technological applications. Ceramic foam was produce by polymer replication method. In this process, commercial polymeric sponge was use as template, dipping with ceramic particles slurry, drying and then sintered to yield a replica of the original foams. The study was focus on the fabrication of different density of ceramic foams by varying the density of ceramic slurries (1.1876, 1.2687, 1.3653 and 1.5295 g/cm?3). Properties of ceramic foam produced such as density was characterized accordingly to ASTM C 271-94 and porosity were characterized using Archimedes methods. Compressive and bending strength was performed accordingly to ASTM C1161-94 and C773-88 (1999), respectively. The morphological study was performed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and EDX. Density of ceramic foams produced was about 0.5588 and 1.1852 g/cm3, where as porosity was around 26.28 and 70.59 %. Compressive and bending strength was increase from strength also increases from 2.60 to 23.07 MPa and 1.20 to 11.10 MPa, respectively, with increasing of slurries density from 1.1876 to 1.3653 g/cm3. The SEM micrographs show that the cells structure become denser as the slurries density increased. EDX proved that the ceramic used is porcelain. As conclusion, increasing in slurries density produced ceramic foams with good mechanical properties such as compressive and bending strength and denser body. (Author)

  19. Acidification of pig slurry before separation to improve slurry management on farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regueiro, Iria; Coutinho, João; Balsari, Paolo; Popovic, Olga; Fangueiro, David

    2016-08-01

    Pig slurry, rich in plant nutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), is generally applied to soil as organic fertilizer. However, costs related to slurry transport may limit its utilization to fields close to the farm, leading to significant N losses, namely ammonia (NH3) emissions. Slurry acidification, to minimize NH3 emissions, is a potential solution to this problem, while solid-liquid separation leads to a solid fraction (SF) - rich in organic matter (OM) and phosphorus - and a liquid fraction (LF) rich in soluble nutrients. We hypothesized that a combination of acidification and separation could affect the quality of the resulting fractions depending on the separation technique used. After acidification, the two most common techniques for separation, centrifugation (CF) and screw-press (SP), were applied. The main characteristics of the slurry fractions in terms of nutrient concentrations and speciation as well as the potential N mineralization (PNM) were analysed. Our results show SFs with improved properties, mostly N and PNM when acidification is performed before separation with both techniques. The PNM was significantly increased in LFs from both techniques after acidification. The [Formula: see text] concentration increased in LFs from SP with acidification; therefore, slurry acidification is recommended to avoid any N losses during the separation process with SP, while CF may not require such pretreatment. Acidification could allow the use of a cheaper technique such as SP relative to CF since it prevents NH3 emissions during the separation process and leads to more equilibrated fractions in terms of nutrient composition. PMID:26695081

  20. Exploring the role of materials in policy change: innovation in low energy housing in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Lovell, Heather

    2007-01-01

    There remains uncertainty in models of the policy process about how and when radical change takes place. Most policy authors focus on explaining incremental change, and yet in practice a pattern of change described as punctuated equilibrium has been observed, with periods of stability interspersed with periods of rapid, abrupt change. It is argued here that the influence of materials and technologies—the substance of policy—must be incorporated into models of the policy process in order to he...

  1. Soil chemical properties and maize yield under application of pig slurry biofertilizer

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelo E. Bócoli; José R. Mantovani; José M. Miranda; Douglas J. Marques; Adriano B. da Silva

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Organic materials subjected to a process of anaerobic digestion in a digester produce biofertilizer that can be used in agriculture as nutrient source. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of pig slurry biofertilizer on soil chemical properties and on corn yield and nutrient concentrations in leaves and kernels. The experiment was conducted in the field from November 2012 to April 2013, and was arranged in a randomized block design with seven treatments and four rep...

  2. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF SLURRY INFILTRATED FIBROUS CONCRETE TWO WAY SLABS SUBJECTED TO FLEXURAL LOADING

    OpenAIRE

    Rajasekhar, K.; Dr.H.Sudarsana Rao; Dr. VAISHALI.G.GHORPADE

    2012-01-01

    Slurry Infiltrate Fibrous Concrete (SIFCON) is a new high performance and advanced material and can be considered as a special type of steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC). This paper describes the development of two – way slab model to predict the non-linear load-displacement behavior of SIFCON slab subjected to pressure loading. Slabs with 8%, 10% and 12% for different edge conditions have been modeled in Finite elements and verified with experimental values. The results of the analysis s...

  3. Combinatorial material synthesis applied to Ge-Sb-Te based phase change materials

    OpenAIRE

    Wöltgens, Han-Willem

    2003-01-01

    The rapidly increasing net amount of digital information requires higher data- storage capacities and transfer rates. Consequently, there is a need for a continuous improvement of the media concept and design. Phase change recording technology offers attractive features for erasable data storage with high density. Digital information can be written, erased and re- written repetitively using optical techniques. They can be characterized by two stable physical structures that exhibit significan...

  4. The Settling and Compaction of Nuclear Waste Slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The settling and compaction of simulated and real nuclear waste slurries were extensively studied. Experiments were carried out with simulated wastes at laboratory and large-scale sizes, and the results compared. A model of settling was derived and a method developed to correlate and scale-up settling data for different slurries and vessel sizes

  5. Sulfur turnover and emissions during storage of cattle slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jørgen; Andersen, Astrid J; Poulsen, Henrik Vestergaard;

    2012-01-01

    Slurry acidification using sulfuric acid reduces ammonia emissions but also affects sulfur (S) cycling. Emission of sulfur is a source of malodor and reduces the sulfur fertilizer value of the slurry. We investigated the effect of sulfate and methionine amendments, alone or in combination with ac...

  6. The Settling and Compaction of Nuclear Waste Slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MACLEAN, G.T.

    1999-11-15

    The settling and compaction of simulated and real nuclear waste slurries were extensively studied. Experiments were carried out with simulated wastes at laboratory and large-scale sizes, and the results compared. A model of settling was derived and a method developed to correlate and scale-up settling data for different slurries and vessel sizes.

  7. Inactivation of Aujeszky's disease virus in slurry at various temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtner, Anette

    Survival of Aujeszky's disease virus in pig slurry was investigated during anaerobic storage at 5, 20, 35, 40, 45, 50 and 55°C using 100-ml laboratory models simulating the conditions in slurry tanks during winter and summer seasons and during anaerobic digestion in batch reactors. The inactivation...

  8. The slurry-column coal beneficiation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, G.F.; Noah, K.S. [Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Biotechnology Dept.

    1997-11-01

    The slurry-column coal beneficiation process is described. It is a second-generation process developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for the beneficiation of fine (60 mesh x 10 {mu}m) coal by a combination of the physical separation of mineral matter and the biooxidation of pyrite. The bioreactor is slurry-type airlift, specifically designed to allow the large liberated inclusions of pyrite and other insoluble minerals to settle out. They are transferred to a similar reactor, called the rougher/propagator, that gives a second stage of physical separation, as well as the longer residence time for the biodegradation of the large pyritic inclusions and the associated bacterial growth. The bioreactors operate in sequencing-batch mode, and also serve as settlers for coal/water separation when the air turned off. This separation allows counter-current flow of coal and water, which minimizes the volumes of water consumed and wastewater generated. The complete flow sheet incorporates two-stage washing to remove sulfate and bacteria from the product coal, and recycle of bacteria into the process to inoculate the feed coal. A description of the process illustrates some general principles applicable to the optimum design of any coal bioprocess. 17 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Bauxite slurry pipeline: start up operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othon, Otilio; Babosa, Eder; Edvan, Francisco; Brittes, Geraldo; Melo, Gerson; Janir, Joao; Favacho, Orlando; Leao, Marcos; Farias, Obadias [Vale, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Goncalves, Nilton [Anglo Ferrous Brazil S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The mine of Miltonia is located in Paragominas-PA, in the north of Brazil. Bauxite slurry pipeline starts at the Mine of Miltonia and finishes in the draining installation of Alunorte refinery at the port of Barcarena-PA, located approximately 244km away from the mine. The pipeline runs over seven cities and passes below four great rivers stream beds. The system was designed for an underground 24 inches OD steel pipe to carry 9.9 million dry metric tonnes per annum (dMTAs) of 50.5% solid concentration bauxite slurry, using only one pumping station. The system is composed by four storage tanks and six piston diaphragm pumps, supplying a flow of 1680 m3/h. There is a cathodic protection system along the pipeline extension to prevent external corrosion and five pressure monitoring stations to control hydraulic conditions, there is also a fiber optic cable interconnection between pump station and terminal station. Pipeline Systems Incorporated (PSI) was the designer and followed the commissioning program of the start up operations. This paper will describe the beginning of the pipeline operations, technical aspects of the project, the operational experiences acquired in these two years, the faced problems and also the future planning. (author)

  10. Improving feed slurry rheology by colloidal techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heath, W.O.; Ternes, R.L.

    1984-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PSN) has investigated three colloidal techniques in the laboratory to improve the sedimentation and flowability of Hanford simulated (nonradioactive) current acid waste (CAW) melter feed slurry: polymer-induced bridging flocculation; manipulating glass former (raw SiO/sub 2/ or frit) particle size; and alteration of nitric acid content. All three methods proved successful in improving the rheology of the simulated CAW feed. This initially had exhibited nearly worst-case flow and clogging properties, but was transformed into a flowable, resuspendable (nonclogging) feed. While each has advantages and disadvantages, the following three specific alternatives proved successful: addition of a polyelectrolyte in 2000 ppM concentration to feed slurry; substitution of a 49 wt % SiO/sub 2/ colloidal suspension (approx. 10-micron particle size) for the -325 mesh (less than or equal to 44-micron particle size) raw-chemical SiO/sub 2/; and increase of nitric acid content from the reference 1.06 M to optimum 1.35 M. The first method, polymer-induced bridging flocculation, results in a high sediment volume, nonclogging CAW feed. The second method, involving the use of colloidal silica particles results in a nonsedimenting feed that when left unagitated forms a gel. The third method, increase in feed acidity, results in a highly resuspendable (nonclogging) melter feed. Further research is therefore required to determine which of the three alternatives is the preferred method of achieving rheological control of CAW melter feeds.

  11. Interactions between Soil Texture and Placement of Dairy Slurry Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glæsner, Nadia; Kjærgaard, Charlotte; Rubæk, Gitte Holton;

    2011-01-01

    Managing phosphorus (P) losses in soil leachate following land application of manure is key to curbing eutrophication in many regions. We compared P leaching from columns of variably textured, intact soils (20 cm diam., 20 cm high) subjected to surface application or injection of dairy cattle (Bos...... retention of particulate P and dissolved organic P, caused by placing slurry away from active flow paths in the fine-textured soil columns, as well as to chemical retention of dissolved inorganic P, caused by better contact between slurry P and soil adsorption sites. Dissolved organic P was less retained in...... soil after slurry application than other P forms. On these soils with low to intermediate P status, slurry injection lowered P leaching losses from clay-rich soil, but not from the sandy soils, highlighting the importance of soil texture in managing P losses following slurry application....

  12. Phase Change Materials (PCMs) for energy storage in architecture. Use with the Magic Box prototype

    OpenAIRE

    Bedoya Frutos, C.; Higueras García, E.; Acha Román, C.; Neila González, F. J.

    2008-01-01

    The article shows an energy-accumulation system in change of phase materials, designed for a prototype dwelling used for building two bioclimatic and self-sufficient buildings. These bulidings have been built in Madrid, Washington and Beijing. The characteristics of these materials, the construction systems into which these materials were incorporated, its comparative valuation with sensitive accumulation systems, and the results of the building monitorization are included.El artículo mu...

  13. Property changes induced by the space environment in polymeric materials on LDEF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitaker, A.F.; Finckenor, M.M.; Kamenetzky, R.R. (NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Property changes that occurred in four groups of polymer-based materials in the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) due to exposure to the outer space environment for 5.8 yrs are examined. Evaluations of contamination and mass loss are presented along with optical, thermal, and electrical analyses and mechanical property evaluations for TFE Teflon, the fluorinated material Halar, the silicone-based material RTV 511, and PEEK resin. 5 refs.

  14. Property changes induced by the space environment in polymeric materials on LDEF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Property changes that occurred in four groups of polymer-based materials in the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) due to exposure to the outer space environment for 5.8 yrs are examined. Evaluations of contamination and mass loss are presented along with optical, thermal, and electrical analyses and mechanical property evaluations for TFE Teflon, the fluorinated material Halar, the silicone-based material RTV 511, and PEEK resin. 5 refs

  15. Property changes induced by the space environment in polymeric materials on LDEF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Ann F.; Finckenor, Miria M.; Kamenetzky, Rachel R.

    1992-01-01

    Property changes that occurred in four groups of polymer-based materials in the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) due to exposure to the outer space environment for 5.8 yrs are examined. Evaluations of contamination and mass loss are presented along with optical, thermal, and electrical analyses and mechanical property evaluations for TFE Teflon, the fluorinated material Halar, the silicone-based material RTV 511, and PEEK resin.

  16. Conceptual Change Text: A Supplementary Material To Facilitate Conceptual Change in Electrochemical Cell Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuruk, Nejla; Geban, Omer

    The main purpose of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of conceptual change text (CCT) oriented instruction over traditionally designed instruction on students' understanding of electrochemical (galvanic and electrolytic) cell concepts. The subjects of the study consisted of 64 students from the two classes of a high school in Turkey.…

  17. Study of dimensional changes during redox cycling of oxygen carrier materials for chemical looping combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fossdal, A.; Darell, O.; Lambert, A.; Schols, E.; Comte, E.; Leenman, R.N.; Blom, R.

    2015-01-01

    Dimensional and phase changes of four candidate oxygen carrier materials for chemical looping combustion are investigated by dilatometry and high-temperature X-ray diffraction during four redox cycles. NiO/Ni2AlO4 does not exhibit significant dimensional changes during cycling, and it is shown that

  18. The use of lipids as phase change materials for thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phase change materials (PCMs) are substances capable of absorbing and releasing large 2 amounts of thermal energy (heat or cold) as latent heat over constant temperature as they 3 undergo a change in state of matter (phase transition), commonly, between solid and 4 liquid phases. Since the late 194...

  19. Investigation on Mercury Reemission from Limestone-Gypsum Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization Slurry

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Secondary atmospheric pollutions may result from wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) systems caused by the reduction of Hg2+ to Hg0 and lead to a damping of the cobenefit mercury removal efficiency by WFGD systems. The experiment on Hg0 reemission from limestone-gypsum WFGD slurry was carried out by changing the operating conditions such as the pH, temperature, Cl− concentrations, and oxygen concentrations. The partitioning behavior of mercury in the solid and liquid byproducts was also discu...

  20. Experimental data showing the thermal behavior of a flat roof with phase change material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuç, Ayça; Başaran, Tahsin; Yesügey, S Cengiz

    2015-12-01

    The selection and configuration of building materials for optimal energy efficiency in a building require some assumptions and models for the thermal behavior of the utilized materials. Although the models for many materials can be considered acceptable for simulation and calculation purposes, the work for modeling the real time behavior of phase change materials is still under development. The data given in this article shows the thermal behavior of a flat roof element with a phase change material (PCM) layer. The temperature and energy given to and taken from the building element are reported. In addition the solid-liquid behavior of the PCM is tracked through images. The resulting thermal behavior of the phase change material is discussed and simulated in [1] A. Tokuç, T. Başaran, S.C. Yesügey, An experimental and numerical investigation on the use of phase change materials in building elements: the case of a flat roof in Istanbul, Build. Energy, vol. 102, 2015, pp. 91-104. PMID:26629490

  1. Experimental data showing the thermal behavior of a flat roof with phase change material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayça Tokuç

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The selection and configuration of building materials for optimal energy efficiency in a building require some assumptions and models for the thermal behavior of the utilized materials. Although the models for many materials can be considered acceptable for simulation and calculation purposes, the work for modeling the real time behavior of phase change materials is still under development. The data given in this article shows the thermal behavior of a flat roof element with a phase change material (PCM layer. The temperature and energy given to and taken from the building element are reported. In addition the solid–liquid behavior of the PCM is tracked through images. The resulting thermal behavior of the phase change material is discussed and simulated in [1] A. Tokuç, T. Başaran, S.C. Yesügey, An experimental and numerical investigation on the use of phase change materials in building elements: the case of a flat roof in Istanbul, Build. Energy, vol. 102, 2015, pp. 91–104.

  2. Performance evaluation of a thermoelectric energy harvesting device using various phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper compares the performance of a group of organic and inorganic phase change materials for a heat storage thermoelectric energy harvesting device. The device consists of thermoelectric generators and a closed container filled with a phase change material. One side of the generators is mounted on the aircraft fuselage and the other to the thermal mass. The group of inorganic and organic phase change materials was tested across two temperature ranges. These ranges are defined as ''positive'' and ''negative'', with the former being a sweep from +35°C to −5°C and the latter being a sweep from +5°C to −35°C. The performance in terms of electrical energy output and power produced is examined in detail for each group of materials

  3. Improved Fischer-Tropsch Slurry Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conversion of synthesis gas to hydrocarbons or alcohols involves highly exothermic reactions. Temperature control is a critical issue in these reactors for a number of reasons. Runaway reactions can be a serious safety issue, even raising the possibility of an explosion. Catalyst deactivation rates tend to increase with temperature, particularly of there are hot spots in the reactor. For alcohol synthesis, temperature control is essential because it has a large effect on the selectivity of the catalysts toward desired products. For example, for molybdenum disulfide catalysts unwanted side products such as methane, ethane, and propane are produced in much greater quantities if the temperature increases outside an ideal range. Slurry reactors are widely regarded as an efficient design for these reactions. In a slurry reactor a solid catalyst is suspended in an inert hydrocarbon liquid, synthesis gas is sparged into the bottom of the reactor, un-reacted synthesis gas and light boiling range products are removed as a gas stream, and heavy boiling range products are removed as a liquid stream. This configuration has several positive effects for synthesis gas reactions including: essentially isothermal operation, small catalyst particles to reduce heat and mass transfer effects, capability to remove heat rapidly through liquid vaporization, and improved flexibility on catalyst design through physical mixtures in addition to use of compositions that cannot be pelletized. Disadvantages include additional mass transfer resistance, potential for significant back-mixing on both the liquid and gas phases, and bubble coalescence. In 2001 a multiyear project was proposed to develop improved FT slurry reactors. The planned focus of the work was to improve the reactors by improving mass transfer while considering heat transfer issues. During the first year of the project the work was started and several concepts were developed to prepare for bench-scale testing. Power

  4. Effective Compressibility of A Bubbly Slurry: II. Fitting Numerical Results to Field Data and Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kam, Seung I.(PEMEX REFINACION); Gauglitz, Phillip A.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Rossen, William R.(UNKNOWN)

    2000-12-01

    The goal of this study is to fit model parameters to changes in waste level in response to barometric pressure changes in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site. This waste compressibility is a measure of the quantity of gas, typically hydrogen and other flammable gases that can pose a safety hazard, retained in the waste. A one-dimensional biconical-pore-network model for compressibility of a bubbly slurry is presented in a companion paper. Fitting these results to actual waste level changes in the tanks implies that bubbles are long in the slurry layer and the ratio of pore-body radius to pore-throat radius is close to one; unfortunately, capillary effects can not be quantified unambiguously from the data without additional information on pore geometry. Therefore determining the quantity of gas in the tanks requires more than just slurry volume data. Similar ambiguity also exists with two other simple models: a capillary-tube model with contact angle hysteresis and spherical-p ore model.

  5. Choosing co-substrates to supplement biogas production from animal slurry - A life cycle assessment of the environmental consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Croxatto Vega, Giovanna Catalina; Ten Hoeve, Marieke; Birkved, Morten;

    2014-01-01

    Biogas production from animal slurry can provide substantial contributions to reach renewable energy targets, yet due to the low methane potential of slurry, biogas plants depend on the addition of co-substrates to make operations profitable. The environmental performance of three underexploited co...... nutrient content and high methane potential, straw yields the lowest impacts for eutrophication and the highest climate change and fossil depletion savings. Co-substrates diverted from incineration to biogas production had fewer environmental benefits, due to the loss of energy production, which is then...

  6. PCB dechlorination in anaerobic soil slurry reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many industrial locations, including the US Department of Energy's, have identified needs for treatment of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) wastes and remediation of PCB-contaminated sites. Biodegradation of PCBs is a potentially effective technology for the treatment of PCB-contaminated soils and sludges, including mixed wastes; however, a practical remediation technology has not yet been demonstrated. In laboratory experiments, soil slurry bioreactors inoculated with microorganisms extracted from PCB-contaminated sediments from the Hudson River have been used to obtain anaerobic dechlorination of PCBS. The onset of dechlorination activity can be accelerated by addition of nutritional amendments and inducers. After 15 weeks of incubation with PCB-contaminated soil and nutrient solution, dechlorination has been observed under several working conditions. The best results show that the average chlorine content steadily dropped from 4.3 to 3.5 chlorines per biphenyl over a 15-week period

  7. Ice slurry cooling development and field testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasza, K.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Hietala, J. [Northern States Power Co., Minneapolis, MN (United States); Wendland, R.D. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Collins, F. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-07-01

    A new advanced cooling technology collaborative program is underway involving Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Northern States Power (NSP) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The program will conduct field tests of an ice slurry distributed load network cooling concept at a Northern States Power utility service center to further develop and prove the technology and to facilitate technology transfer to the private sector. The program will further develop at Argonne National Laboratory through laboratory research key components of hardware needed in the field testing and develop an engineering data base needed to support the implementation of the technology. This program will sharply focus and culminate research and development funded by both the US Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute on advanced cooling and load management technology over the last several years.

  8. Hydrodynamic models for slurry bubble column reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidaspow, D. [IIT Center, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this investigation is to convert a {open_quotes}learning gas-solid-liquid{close_quotes} fluidization model into a predictive design model. This model is capable of predicting local gas, liquid and solids hold-ups and the basic flow regimes: the uniform bubbling, the industrially practical churn-turbulent (bubble coalescence) and the slugging regimes. Current reactor models incorrectly assume that the gas and the particle hold-ups (volume fractions) are uniform in the reactor. They must be given in terms of empirical correlations determined under conditions that radically differ from reactor operation. In the proposed hydrodynamic approach these hold-ups are computed from separate phase momentum balances. Furthermore, the kinetic theory approach computes the high slurry viscosities from collisions of the catalyst particles. Thus particle rheology is not an input into the model.

  9. Desulfurization from Bauxite Water Slurry (BWS) Electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xuzhong; Ge, Lan; Wang, Zhi; Zhuang, Siyuan; Wang, Yuhua; Ren, Lihui; Wang, Mingyong

    2016-02-01

    Feasibility of high-sulfur bauxite electrolysis desulfurization was examined using the electrochemical characterization, XRD, DTA, and FTIR. The cyclic voltammetry curves indicated that bauxite water slurry (BWS) electrolysis in NaOH system was controlled by diffusion. Additionally, the desulfurization effect of NaCl as the electrolyte was significantly better than that of NaOH as an electrolyte. As the stirring rate increased, the desulfurization ratio in NaCl system was not increased obviously, while the desulfurization ratio in NaOH system increased significantly, indicating further that electrolysis desulfurization in NaOH solution was controlled by diffusion. According to XRD, DTA, and FTIR analysis, the characteristic peaks of sulfur-containing phase in bauxite after electrolysis weakened or disappeared, indicating that the pyrite in bauxite was removed from electrolysis. Finally, the electrolytic desulfurization technology of bauxite was proposed based on the characteristics of BWS electrolysis.

  10. Toxicity Evaluation of Pig Slurry Using Luminescent Bacteria and Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyan Chen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Biogas slurry has become a serious pollution problem and anaerobic digestion is widely applied to pig manure treatment for environmental protection and energy recovery. To evaluate environmental risk of the emission of biogas slurry, luminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri, larvae and embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio were used to detect the acute and development toxicity of digested and post-treated slurry. Then the ability of treatment process was evaluated. The results showed that digested slurry displayed strong toxicity to both zebrafish and luminescent bacteria, while the EC50 for luminescent bacteria and the LC50 for larvae were only 6.81% (v/v and 1.95% (v/v respectively, and embryonic development was inhibited at just 1% (v/v. Slurry still maintained a high level of toxicity although it had been treated by membrane bioreactor (MBR, while the LC50 of larvae was 75.23% (v/v and there was a little effect on the development of embryos and V. fischeri; the results also revealed that the zebrafish larvae are more sensitive than embryos and luminescent bacteria to pig slurry. Finally, we also found the toxicity removal rate was higher than 90% after the treatment of MBR according to toxicity tests. In conclusion, further treatment should be used in pig slurry disposal or reused of final effluent.

  11. ORGANIC NITROGEN IN A TYPIC HAPLUDOX FERTILIZED WITH PIG SLURRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco André Grohskopf

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The application of pig slurry may have a different effect on nitrogen dynamics in soil compared to mineral fertilization. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the different forms of organic N in a Latossolo Vermelho distroférrico (Typic Hapludox and their relationship to N uptake by crops in response to 10 years of annual application of pig slurry and mineral fertilizer. The treatments were application rates of 0, 25, 50, 100, and 200 m3 ha-1 of pig slurry, in addition to mineral fertilizer, organized in a randomized block design with four replications. The N contents were determined in the plant tissue and in the forms of total N and acid hydrolyzed fractions: ammonium-N, hexosamine-N, α-amino-N, amide-N, and unidentified-N. Annual application of pig slurry or mineral fertilizer increased the total-N content in the 0-10 cm depth layer. The main fractions of organic N in the soil were α-amino-N when pig slurry was applied and unidentified-N in the case of mineral fertilizers. Pig slurry increased the N fractions considered as labile: α-amino-N, ammonium-N, and amide-N. The increase in these labile organic N fractions in the soil through pig slurry application allows greater N uptake by the maize and oat crops in a no-tillage system.

  12. Toxicity evaluation of pig slurry using luminescent bacteria and zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenyan; Cai, Qiang; Zhao, Yuan; Zheng, Guojuan; Liang, Yuting

    2014-07-01

    Biogas slurry has become a serious pollution problem and anaerobic digestion is widely applied to pig manure treatment for environmental protection and energy recovery. To evaluate environmental risk of the emission of biogas slurry, luminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), larvae and embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio) were used to detect the acute and development toxicity of digested and post-treated slurry. Then the ability of treatment process was evaluated. The results showed that digested slurry displayed strong toxicity to both zebrafish and luminescent bacteria, while the EC50 for luminescent bacteria and the LC50 for larvae were only 6.81% (v/v) and 1.95% (v/v) respectively, and embryonic development was inhibited at just 1% (v/v). Slurry still maintained a high level of toxicity although it had been treated by membrane bioreactor (MBR), while the LC50 of larvae was 75.23% (v/v) and there was a little effect on the development of embryos and V. fischeri; the results also revealed that the zebrafish larvae are more sensitive than embryos and luminescent bacteria to pig slurry. Finally, we also found the toxicity removal rate was higher than 90% after the treatment of MBR according to toxicity tests. In conclusion, further treatment should be used in pig slurry disposal or reused of final effluent. PMID:24995598

  13. Coal-water slurry as utility boiler fuel. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheffee, R.S.; Boyd, T.J.; Rossmeissl, N.P.; McHale, E.T.; Henderson, C.B.; Glenn, R.D.

    1982-03-01

    Coal-water slurries are a potential replacement for heavy fuel oil in utility boilers. Slurries have the major advantages of low cost, ease of handling, and early availability. A program was conducted to characterize the formulation, processing, handling, combustion, and storage of coal-water slurries made from cleaned coals. Acceptable slurries containing between 67 and 70% coal (by weight) were made from two different coals. A selected slurry was burned with good results in the Atlantic Research Corporation's one-million Btu/h experimental furnace. Approximately five tons (4,500 kg) of slurry were prepared on a pilot line for testing in the four-million Btu/h Babcock and Wilcox Basic Combustion Test Unit. A plant flowsheet was developed for a slurry plant designed to process five-million tons (4.5 x 10/sup 9/ kg) of coal a year. Total plant investment is estimated at $104-million (1980). Assuming a delivered coal cost of $50/ton (800 kg), the production costs are estimated to be $58/ton of coal or $2.14/million Btu. This cost compares favorably to a cost of $4.76/million Btu for heavy fuel oil at $30/barrel. These costs exclude certain ancillary costs such as marketing, fees and permits, insurance, interest on capital, profit, local taxes, and corporate income tax.

  14. Determination of Cd and Pb in food slurries by GFAAS using cryogenic grinding for sample preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, D. Jr.; Barbosa, F. Jr.; Tomazelli, A.C.; Krug, F.J. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Piracicaba (Brazil); Nobrega, J.A. [Departamento de Quimica, UFSCar, Sao Carlos (Brazil); Arruda, M.A.Z. [Instituto de Quimica, UNICAMP, Campinas (Brazil)

    2002-06-01

    A simple method combining slurry sampling after cryogenic grinding and the use of a permanent modification of the integrated platform inside the transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA) was proposed for the determination of Cd and Pb in foods. Potentialities of the cryogenic grinding were evaluated for grinding different materials of difficult homogenization such as high fat and high fiber tissues. Animal and vegetal samples were cut into small pieces and ground in liquid nitrogen for 2 min. Slurries were prepared directly in the autosampler cup after cryogenic grinding by transferring an exact amount of homogeneous powdered material (5-20 mg) to the cup, followed by 1.00 mL of 0.2% (v/v) HNO{sub 3} containing 0.04% (v/v) Triton X-100 and sonication for 30 s, before transferring into the platform previously coated with 250 {mu}g W and 200 {mu}g Rh. Use of a tungsten carbide-rhodium permanent modifier combined with NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} conventional modifier improves tube lifetime and increases the pyrolysis temperature for Cd. Homogeneity tests, carried out by comparing the between- and within-batch precision for each kind of sample, showed no significant differences at the 95% confidence level, indicating good homogeneity for 5-20 mg masses. Detection limits were 3.3 ng g{sup -1} Cd and 75 ng g{sup -1} Pb for 1% m/v slurries. Results for determination of Cd and Pb in foods slurries were in agreement with those obtained with digested samples, since no statistical differences were found by the paired t-test at the 95% level. (orig.)

  15. High tolerance of proton irradiation of Ge2Sb2Te5 phase change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •The phase change material Ge2Sb2Te5 was irradiated by 3 MeV proton. •The electrical and mechanical property of Ge2Sb2Te5 film were evaluated. •Monte Carlo Simulation was used to analyze the process of ions transport in the material. •The results showed that GST has excellent proton irradiation tolerance. -- Abstract: A chalcogenide material Ge2Sb2Te5 was irradiated by proton and its radiation performance was investigated. The amorphous to crystalline transformation was studied by transmission electron microscopy observations and resistance measurements before and after irradiation. The results show that the crystallization behavior of the material has no obvious change after irradiation, proton irradiation did not induced transformation between crystalline and as-deposited amorphous state. Monte Carlo Simulation was used to analyze the process of ions transport in the phase change material. The irradiation results show that GST phase change material has excellent proton irradiation tolerance, which makes it attractive for space-based applications

  16. Flow behavior of coarse-grained slurries in pipes

    OpenAIRE

    Vlasák, P.; Chára, Z.; Kysela, B. (Bohuš); Sobota , J.

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the experimental investigation of model coarse-grained slurry on a recirculation pipe loop with smooth stainless steel pipes. Graded pebble gravel and glass balls were used as a model for poly-metallic nodules, and very fine glass beads as a model for fine-grained sand. The investigation was focused on evaluating the effect of slurry velocity and particle concentration on pressure drops and the slurry flow behavior in the turbulent regime. Also the effect of fine-grained p...

  17. Evaluation of plant available nitrogen in concentrated pig slurry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Northeast Spin the expansion of the pig industry has brought as a result the production of vast amounts of pig slurry that exceeds field crops fertilization needs and consequently has contributed to the environmental deterioration of the region particularly ground water with NO3 pollution. Under such circumstances, it is needed to treat and/or export pig slurry. During the last year the implantation of cogeneration plants that take advantage of the surplus of energy to produce concentrate pig slurry by water evaporation that could easily transported. (Author)

  18. ORGANIC NITROGEN IN A TYPIC HAPLUDOX FERTILIZED WITH PIG SLURRY

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The application of pig slurry may have a different effect on nitrogen dynamics in soil compared to mineral fertilization. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the different forms of organic N in a Latossolo Vermelho distroférrico (Typic Hapludox) and their relationship to N uptake by crops in response to 10 years of annual application of pig slurry and mineral fertilizer. The treatments were application rates of 0, 25, 50, 100, and 200 m3 ha-1 of pig slurry, in addition to mineral fer...

  19. Use of radiation-induced polymers in cement slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water loss from cement slurries is reduced by incorporating within a cement slurry a polymer obtained as a product of radiation-induced polymerization of acrylamide and/or methacrylamide and acrylic acid, methacrylic acid, and/or alkali metal salts thereof. The polymerization is preferably carried out in 10-60 percent aqueous monomer solution with gamma radiation. The aqueous monomer solution preferably contains 25-99 percent acrylamide and 75-1 percent sodium acrylate. The polymer can be present in concentration of about 0.001 to about 3.0 weight percent, based on the aqueous phase of the slurry

  20. Use of radiation-induced polymers in cement slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water loss from cement slurries is reduced by incorporating within a cement slurry a polymer obtained as a product of radiation-induced polymerization of acrylamide and/or methacrylamide and acrylic acid, methacrylic acid, and/or alkali metal salts thereof. The polymerization is preferably carried out in 10 to 60 percent aqueous monomer solution with gamma radiation. The aqueous monomer solution preferably contains 25 to 99 percent acrylamide and 75 to 1 percent sodium acrylate. The polymer can be present in concentration of about 0.001 to about 3.0 weight percent, based on the aqueous phase of the slurry. (U.S.)

  1. Development of Syringe/Bottle Hybrids for Sampling Slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A convenient and effective sample bottle system based on simple modifications of disposable plastic syringes and bottles has been devised and tested for slurry samples. Syringe/ bottle hybrids (hereafter referred to as syringe bottles) have the convenience of regular flat-bottom bottles with screw cap closures. In addition, the syringe imparts a sliding and adjustable bottom to the bottle that forces the entire contents from the bottle. The system was designed especially to collect samples for high temperature work-ups of DWPF slurry samples. The syringe bottles together with fixed-bottom sample vial inserts would provide the DWPF with convenient and reliable methods for dealing with slurry samples

  2. Synthesis and characterization of cement slurries additives with epoxy resins - kinetics, thermodynamic and calorimetric analysis; Sintese e caracterizacao de pastas de cimento aditivadas com resinas epoxi - analises cineticas, termodinamicas e calorimetricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, A.M.G.; Andrade Junior, M.A.S.; Cestari, A.R.; Vieira, E.F.S., E-mail: macleybiane@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Cement has been used in the world, presenting a wide versatility. However, due to its chemical nature, it is subject to several types of chemical damages, especially for agents of acidic nature. With the purpose of increase its life-time, new cement slurries have been modified with the addition of specific additives. The objective of this work is to modify cement slurries with epoxy resins, which promote higher resistance of those materials in relation to acid attacks. Three cement slurries were synthesized with epoxy resins and a standard slurries, which was composed by cement and water. After 30 days of hydration, the samples were characterized by XDR, FTIR and thermal analysis (TG and DSC). The hydration processes of the cement slurries were studied by heat-conduction microcalorimetry. A kinetic study of HCl interaction with the new slurries were performed by the batch methodology at 25, 35, 45 e 55 deg C. It was verified that the addition of the polymers delayed the processes of hydration of the slurries, decreasing the flow of heat released as a function of the amount of added resin and, increased the resistance of those slurries to the acid attack. (author)

  3. Microstructure of silicon carbide nano powder-polycarbosilane-solvent mixed slurries and observed shear rate dependence in slurry viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SiC powder, polycarbosilane and xylene mixed slurries were prepared for microstructure observation and viscosity measurement. Slurries with averaged primary SiC size of 270 or 50 nm revealed existence of isolated secondary particles smaller than 1 μm in optical microscope observation. These secondary particles showed a Brownian motion in a xylene-PCS medium. On the other hand, slurry with an averaged primary SiC size of 20 nm revealed existence of large secondary particles in the size of 2-5 μm. The apparent area occupied with these secondary particles was far larger than that occupied by secondary particles of 270 or 50 nm in spite of a low SiC content. It was suggested that the secondary particles observed in the 20 nm slurry possessed small spaces among the primary SiC particles. Viscosity measurement presented that apparent viscosity of the slurry was high in general when the primary SiC particle size was small. In particular, the 20 nm SiC slurries showed quite high viscosity even at a SiC content of 5-6 mass%, which almost corresponded to that of 40 mass% for a SiC 270 nm slurry. Shear thinning effect was also remarkable when the primary SiC particle size was small

  4. Changes in the Optical Properties of Materials Are Observed After 18 Months in Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworske, Donald A.

    1999-01-01

    Materials located on the exterior of spacecraft in low Earth orbit are subjected to a number of environmental threats, including atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling, and micrometeroid and debris impact. Atomic oxygen attacks materials vulnerable to oxidation. Ultraviolet radiation can break chemical bonds and cause undesirable changes in optical properties. Thermal cycling can cause cracking, and micrometeroid and debris impacts can damage protective coatings. Another threat is contamination. The outgassing of volatile chemicals can contaminate nearby surfaces, changing their thermal control properties. Contaminated surfaces may undergo further change as a result of atomic oxygen and ultraviolet radiation exposure. The Passive Optical Sample Assembly (POSA) experiment was designed as a risk mitigation experiment for the International Space Station. Samples were characterized before launch, exposed for 18 months on the exterior of Mir, and characterized upon their return. Lessons learned from POSA about the durability of material properties can be applied to the space station and other long-duration missions.

  5. Design and experiment on system for concentrating biogas slurry with vacuum evaporation%沼液负压蒸发浓缩装置的设计与试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦有宙; 关山月; 李鹏飞; 王少鹏; 贺超; 李刚; 丁攀

    2015-01-01

    Large quantity of residues is produced during the process of biogas fermentation. The biogas slurry can be used as resource after concentration treatment. To better use the slurry in the process of biogas slurry concentration, the method of a vacuum evaporation was used. A vacuum evaporation system of 20 L for concentrating biogas slurry was designed based on the physical and chemical properties of biogas slurry. The parameter design and equipment selection for every part of the system included an evaporator (the main equipment), condenser, circulating cistern and vacuum pump (auxiliary equipment). Also, we used the biogas slurry from Henan Agricultural University as the experimental material to test the efficiency of the vacuum evaporation device. The results showed that, the organic matter content of biogas slurry had no significant change when the evaporation temperature was less than 80℃ while it reduced dramatically when the evaporation temperature was more than 80℃. The change rate of the organic matter content reached 9.4% when the evaporation temperature changed from 80℃ to 100℃. The contents of nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium in the biogas slurry decreased with the increased of evaporation temperature. Especially, the content of nitrogen had the most dramatic change and it decreased 13%. The contents of the organic matter, nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium increased with the rise of vacuum degree for the system. When the vacuum degree of the system was high, the evaporation temperature was low and the evaporation capacity of biogas slurry increased. Under the condition explored in this paper, the absolute vacuum degree (intensity of pressure in evaporation tank) reached at 0.025 MPa and 67℃, and the largest evaporation capacity was 8 324 mL/(m2·h)with the concentrating rate of 28.75%. The evaporation capacity of 7 700 mL/(m2·h) and the concentrating rate of 26% could be reached when the vacuum degree was kept from 0.04 to 0.05 MPa and

  6. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  7. Application of shape changing smart materials in household appliances: A fragmented and inconsistent uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Bin Kassim, A.; Horvath, I.; Gerritsen, B.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    Shape changing smart materials (SCSM) have a wide range of applications, supporting product functions through material features. Surprisingly, their application in consumer durables such as household appliances is not as expected. This phenomenon could be related to a possible SCSM knowledge gap among designers, or unidentified design constraints; literature does not provide a convincing explanation. Our objective is to describe this phenomenon more accurately as a first step towards future a...

  8. Effect of Different Denture Base Materials and Changed Mouth Temperature on Dimensional Stability of Complete Dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid A. O. Arafa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Type of materials used in fabrication of denture base has an effect on dimension during denture base material processing and other factors related to clinical use. Objective. The study aims were to assess the dimensional stability including thermal changes of three different denture base materials. Methods. Ninety patients were selected to construct complete dentures with different denture base materials. They were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, patients with cobalt chrome metallic base; group 2, patients with heat curing acrylic resin fabricated by injection moulding technique; and group 3, patients with denture bases fabricated by conventional heat curing acrylic resin. The dimensional changes were assessed using digital caliper. Results. After the twelfth month, injection moulding acrylic resin had significantly the highest dimensional change followed by the conventional heat curing acrylic resin. There were no significant differences in the dimensions between the three types of denture base materials at normal mouth temperature, while, after hot tea drinking at 45°C, the dimensional change was significantly the highest in cobalt chrome metallic denture base group. Conclusion. Cobalt chrome metallic denture base has stable dimension compared to denture bases fabricated of acrylic resin but it was more affected by altered mouth temperature. The study was registered in the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trials Number (ISRCTN registry with study ID (ISRCTN94238244.

  9. Effect of Different Denture Base Materials and Changed Mouth Temperature on Dimensional Stability of Complete Dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafa, Khalid A O

    2016-01-01

    Background. Type of materials used in fabrication of denture base has an effect on dimension during denture base material processing and other factors related to clinical use. Objective. The study aims were to assess the dimensional stability including thermal changes of three different denture base materials. Methods. Ninety patients were selected to construct complete dentures with different denture base materials. They were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, patients with cobalt chrome metallic base; group 2, patients with heat curing acrylic resin fabricated by injection moulding technique; and group 3, patients with denture bases fabricated by conventional heat curing acrylic resin. The dimensional changes were assessed using digital caliper. Results. After the twelfth month, injection moulding acrylic resin had significantly the highest dimensional change followed by the conventional heat curing acrylic resin. There were no significant differences in the dimensions between the three types of denture base materials at normal mouth temperature, while, after hot tea drinking at 45°C, the dimensional change was significantly the highest in cobalt chrome metallic denture base group. Conclusion. Cobalt chrome metallic denture base has stable dimension compared to denture bases fabricated of acrylic resin but it was more affected by altered mouth temperature. The study was registered in the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trials Number (ISRCTN) registry with study ID (ISRCTN94238244). PMID:27143970

  10. Deposition Velocities of Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Slurries in Pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poloski, Adam P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Adkins, Harold E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Abrefah, John [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Casella, Andrew M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hohimer, Ryan E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Nigl, Franz [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Minette, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Toth, James J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tingey, Joel M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Yokuda, Satoru T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2009-03-01

    correlation used in the WTP design guide has been shown to be inaccurate for Hanford waste feed materials. The use of the Thomas (1979) correlation in the design guide is not conservative—In cases where 100% of the particles are smaller than 74 μm or particles are considered to be homogeneous due to yield stress forces suspending the particles the homogeneous fraction of the slurry can be set to 100%. In such cases, the predicted critical velocity based on the conservative Oroskar and Turian (1980) correlation is reduced to zero and the design guide returns a value from the Thomas (1979) correlation. The measured data in this report show that the Thomas (1979) correlation predictions often fall below that measured experimental values. A non-Newtonian deposition velocity design guide should be developed for the WTP— Since the WTP design guide is limited to Newtonian fluids and the WTP expects to process large quantities of such materials, the existing design guide should be modified address such systems. A central experimental finding of this testing is that the flow velocity required to reach turbulent flow increases with slurry rheological properties due to viscous forces dampening the formation of turbulent eddies. The flow becomes dominated by viscous forces rather than turbulent eddies. Since the turbulent eddies necessary for particle transport are not present, the particles will settle when crossing this boundary called the transitional deposition boundary. This deposition mechanism should be expected and designed for in the WTP.

  11. Model of a thermo-elastic-inelastic process with large deformations and structural changes in material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogovoi, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    The dependence of a scalar measure of the structural changes occurring in a material under plastic deformation on a plastic strain measure and the dependence of a free energy measure on a structural change measure are constructed using experimental data that allow the expended plastic work to be divided into a latent part and a thermal part. The obtained dependences, kinematic relations, a constitutive equation, and a heat-conduction equation that satisfy the principles of thermodynamics and objectivity are used to construct a model of thermo-elastic-inelastic processes in the presence of finite deformations and structural changes in the material. The model is tested on the problem of temperature changes in the process of adiabatic elastic-plastic compression, which has experimental support.

  12. Study of ZrO2 nanopowders based stearic acid phase change materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Desheng Ai; Lizan Su; Zhe Gao; Changsheng Deng; Xiaming Dai

    2010-01-01

    ZrO2 nanopowders based stearic acid phase change materials(PCMs)were prepared by high-energy milling.The concept of heat capacity factor(HCF)was used to analyze the thermal properties of the materials.The heat storage property of PCMs,containing the same content of stearic acid(23% by mass)in the starting materials but synthesized by different technical processes,was investigated by using HCF.It was found that there were vast influences of different dispersants on the heat capacity.The samples prepared with chloroform provided the best heat storage ability in all samples tested.

  13. Effect of Impeller Agitation on Preparation of Tetra-n-Butyl Ammonium Bromide Semiclathrate Hydrate Slurries

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshiro Inoue; Kazunari Ohgaki; Shunsuke Hashimoto; Hiroyuki Ito

    2012-01-01

    The slurries-containing tetra-n-butyl ammonium bromide (TBAB) solution and its semiclathrate hydrate have attracted a lot of interest as latent heat transport media. These hydrate slurries contain some microparticles of crystal, and the size and shape of these hydrate particles could affect the mobility of slurries. Hence, it is essential to investigate the efficient hydrate-slurry preparation methods and the effect of hydrate particles on the fluid property of slurries for the application to...

  14. New-Generation Sealing Slurries For Borehole Injection Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryczek, Stanisław; Gonet, Andrzej; Wiśniowski, Rafał; Złotkowski, Albert

    2015-12-01

    The development of techniques and technologies thanks to which parameters of the ground medium can be modified makes specialists look for new recipes of geopolymers - binders for the reinforcing and sealing of unstable and permeable grounds. The sealing slurries are expected to meet a number of strict requirements, therefore it is important to find new admixtures and additives which could modify the fresh and hardened slurry. Special attention has been recently paid to the fluid ash - a by-product of the combustion of hard coals. However, the use of this additive is associated with the application of appropriate superplastifier. Laboratory analyses of rheological parameters of fresh sealing slurries and the ways of improving their liquidity by a properly selected third-generation superplastifier are presented in the paper. The slurries were based on Portland cement CEM I, milled granulated large-furnace slag and fly ash from fluidized-bed combustion of hard coal.

  15. Environmental Consequences of Future Biogas Technologies based on Separated Slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamelin, Lorie; Wesnæs, Marianne; Wenzel, Henrik;

    2011-01-01

    This consequential life cycle assessment study highlights the key environmental aspects of producing biogas from separated pig and cow slurry, a relatively new but probable scenario for future biogas production, as it avoids the reliance on constrained carbon cosubstrates. Three scenarios involving...... different slurry separation technologies have been assessed and compared to a business-as-usual reference slurry management scenario. The results show that the environmental benefits of such biogas production are highly dependent upon the efficiency of the separation technology used to concentrate the...... volatile solids in the solid fraction. The biogas scenario involving the most efficient separation technology resulted in a dry matter separation efficiency of 87% and allowed a net reduction of the global warming potential of 40%, compared to the reference slurry management. This figure comprises the...

  16. Interactions between Soil Texture and Placement of Dairy Slurry Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glæsner, Nadia; Kjærgaard, Charlotte; Rubæk, Gitte Holton;

    2011-01-01

    soils. We compared leaching of slurry-applied bromide through intact soil columns (20 cm diam., 20 cm high) of differing textures following surface application or injection of slurry. The volumetric fraction of soil pores >30 μm ranged from 43% in a loamy sand to 28% in a sandy loam and 15% in a loam......-textured soil. Smaller active flow volumes and higher proportions of preferential flow were observed with increasing soil clay content. Injection of slurry in the loam soil significantly enhanced diffusion of applied bromide into the large fraction of small pores compared with surface application. The resulting...... physical protection against leaching of bromide was reflected by 60.2% of the bromide tracer was recovered in the effluent after injection, compared with 80.6% recovery after surface application. No effect of slurry injection was observed in the loamy sand and sandy loam soils. Our findings point to soil...

  17. Cost estimate for a coal slurry pipeline in western Sumatra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappelle, H.J.

    1982-08-01

    Contents: Introduction to pipeline slurry transport; Calculation of pressure drop due to friction; Calculation of the total pressure drop; Determination of the type of pumps; Wall thickness and the cost of the pipe; Storage capacity; Dewatering; Grinding; Cost evaluation.

  18. Ice slurry based thermal storage in multifunctional buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M. J.; Kusumoto, N.

    Ice slurry based thermal storage plays an important role in reshaping patterns of electricity use for space cooling and heating. It offers inherent advantages in energy efficiency, operating savings, load follow-up and flexible installation over conventional thermal storage technologies. This paper provides discussions on the generation mechanism and performance of ice slurry, as well as the operation principle of the ice slurry based thermal storage system. Details of the system design, control strategy and operation performance are given through a case study on a recent installation in Herbis Osaka, the largest simple building complex in Japan. An evaluation of different installations with ice slurry thermal storage reveals that it is a rewarding technology that provides significant operating savings for the building air-conditioning and improves energy utilization efficiency in modern society.

  19. A novel kind of TSV slurry with guanidine hydrochloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of a novel alkaline TSV (through-silicon-via) slurry with guanidine hydrochloride (GH) on CMP (chemical mechanical polishing) was investigated. The novel alkaline TSV slurry was free of any inhibitors. During the polishing process, the guanidine hydrochloride serves as an effective surface-complexing agent for TSV CMP applications, the removal rate of barrier (Ti) can be chemically controlled through tuned selectivity with respect to the removal rate of copper and dielectric, which is helpful to modifying the dishing and gaining an excellent topography performance in TSV manufacturing. In this paper, we mainly studied the working mechanism of the components of slurry and the skillful application guanidine hydrochloride in the TSV slurry. (paper)

  20. Dilute acid pretreatment of lignocellulose for whole slurry ethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Young Hoon; Kim, In Jung; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2013-03-01

    Dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) followed by the whole slurry fermentation of the pretreated EFB slurry was investigated. The optimized pretreatment conditions were at 1% (w/v) sulfuric acid with 3 min ramping to 190 °C in a microwave digester. Pretreated and washed EFB exhibited enzymatic digestibility of 88.5% of theoretical glucose yield after 48 h of hydrolysis. When the whole slurry of pretreated and neutralized EFB was used in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) using cellulase and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, sulfuric acid-pretreated EFB resulted in 52.5% of theoretical ethanol yield based on total glucan in the untreated initial EFB after 72 h of SSF. When pretreated EFB slurry was treated with activated carbon before subjecting to SSF, the SSF furnished 87.5% ethanol yield based on the initial glucan content in untreated EFB (after 48 h of SSF). PMID:23395763

  1. FORMATION, STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF HIGHLY ORDERED SUB-30-nm PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS (GST) NANOPARTICLE ARRAYS

    OpenAIRE

    YUANBAO LIAO; JIAJIA WU; LING XU; FEI YANG; WENQING LIU; JUN XU; LIANGCAI WU; ZHONGYUAN MA; KUNJI CHEN

    2010-01-01

    Chalcogenide phase change material Ge1Sb2Te4 (GST) nanoparticle arrays with long-range-order were fabricated by using a monolayer of self-assembled polystyrene (PS) spheres as mask. The morphology of nanoparticle arrays can be controlled via changing RIE processing conditions. Images of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) show that highly uniform GST nanoparticle arrays with particle density around 109 cm-2 were formed. The sizes of nanoparticles can be reduce...

  2. Increasing thermal mass in lightweight dwellings using phase change materials – a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Fraser, Minnie

    2009-01-01

    The number of houses of lightweight timber or steel frame construction being built over recent years has increased significantly. These buildings have low thermal mass and may be subject to large temperature fluctuations and particular overheating during the summer and this problem is set to get worse with the changing climate. Researchers have been investigating the use of PCMs (phase change materials) for improving thermal mass in lightweight buildings and found them to be effective. Howeve...

  3. Upgrading of the Solid Fraction of Pig Slurry as Phosphorus Fertilizer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christel, Wibke

    Improved recycling of the solid fraction of separated pig slurry, which is considerably enriched in the essential plant nutrient phosphorus (P), could balance the P input in differently used agricultural areas and reduce the unsustainable depletion of the limited P rock reserves. By subsequent bi...... materials had a more constant P availability. Due to a significant enrichment of P and considerable reduction in volume, manure-derived char or ash could easily be stored and transported to P-deficient agricultural areas, where it could be applied as slow-release P fertilizer....... pig slurry solid fraction as well as investigating their impact on the applicability of the product as P fertilizer. Special attention was moreover given to the effect of the soil properties on the development of P availability over time. In conclusion, both biological and thermal processing of pig...... slurry solids reduced P availability in the initial phase after soil amendment. Only the solid fraction, had a high initial P availability, which was within the same range as mineral P fertilizer, but P availability decreased significantly within one growing season, whereas the thermally processed...

  4. The aggressiveness of pig slurry to cement mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Massana Guitart, Jordi; Guerrero Bustos, Ana; Antón Fuentes, Rebeca; Garcimartin Molina, Miguel Angel; Sanchez Espinosa, Elvira

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to measure the behaviour of various mortars employed in livestock media in central Spain and to analyse the aggressiveness of pig slurry to cement blended with fly ash mortars. To achieve this, mortar specimens were immersed in ponds storing pig slurry. Mortar specimens, of 40 ? 40 ? 160 mm, were made from four types of cement commonly used and recommended for rural areas. The types were a sulphate-resistant Portland cement and three cements blended in different proportions with ...

  5. A study on the treatment of radioactive slurry liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of anionic flocculants on the dewatering of radioactive slurries has been investigated in a laboratory-scale vacuum filtration unit. Simultaneously the influence of certain surfactants on the dewatering of radioactive slurries with anionic flocculants has also been investigated. Test results show that the flocculated filter cake generally contains higher residual water than the unflocculated cake. The non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100 was effective in reducing the moisture content of the cake

  6. Inductively coupled plasma etching for phase-change material with superlattice-like structure in phase change memory device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phase change material with superlattice-like structure (SLL) is one of the most emerging materials for phase change memory device. A rough etching profile, isotropic, and serious surface damage limit the application of the conventional lift-off process. A well controlled etching process to achieve high etch rate, smooth surface, vertical and nanometer-sized pattern for SLL is required for the mass production of the phase change memory devices. In this study, the etch rates, surface roughness and sidewall angles of SLL GeTe/Sb2Te3 films were investigated by the inductively coupled plasma etching process with various etch parameters including gas ratio, chamber pressure, bias power and coil radio frequency (RF) power. The etch selectivity of SLL to SiO2 and to photo-resist were characterized. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of etched surfaces confirmed the etch mechanism of the SLL films in Cl2/Ar chemistry. 86 nm-sized patterns of SLL were fabricated using optimized etching parameters. In addition, an etched SLL film was integrated into a “T” type PCRAM cell, with a 50 nm feature size. This cell operated successfully and a RESET current of only 145 μA was obtained.

  7. Investigation of aqueous slurries as fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical and experimental studies were carried out to assess the feasibility of using an aqueous slurry, with lithium in its solid component, to meet the tritium breeding, cooling, and shielding requirements of a controlled thermonuclear reactor (CTR). The numerical studies were designed to demonstrate the theoretical ability of a conceptual slurry blanket to breed adequate tritium to sustain the CTR. The experimental studies were designed to show that the tritium retention characteristics of likely solid components for the slurry were conducive to adequate tritium recovery without the need for isotopic separation. The numerical portion of this work consisted in part of using ANISN, a one-dimensional finite difference neutron transport code, to model the neutronic performance of the slurry blanket concept. The parameters governing tritium production and retention in a slurry were computed and used to modify the results of the ANISN computer runs. The numerical work demonstrated that the slurry blanket was only marginally capable of breeding sufficient tritium without the aid of a neutron multiplying region. The experimental portion of this work consisted of several neutron irradiation experiments, which were designed to determine the retention abilities of LiF particles

  8. Distribution of Pb and its chemical fractions in liquid and solid phases of digested pig and dairy slurries%猪、奶牛粪厌氧发酵中Pb的形态转化及其分布特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    靳红梅; 付广青; 常志州; 叶小梅

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion treatment effectively degrades the organic matter and causes obvious variations in physical and chemical properties of digested slurries, such as water content, pH, oxidation reduction potential and microbial activities. These changes may influence the chemical fraction of Pb, which is a critical factor in predicting its toxicity, environmental mobility, bioavailability and optimum removal methods. The speciation and phytotoxic effects of lead from sewage sludge and composted manure have been widely studied. There has been no study about the transfer and distribution of Pb during anaerobic digestion of manure slurries. The aim of the present work was to analyze the distribution of Pb in both liquid and solid phase after anaerobic digestion of pig slurries and dairy slurries, and their chemical speciation in solid fraction of digested residuals. The continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) at condition of medium temperature [(37 ± 2)℃] was operated for 130 d. Lead in liquid and solid phases of raw materials and digested slurries was analyzed by first passing through a 0.45 µm filter paper. The chemical fractions in digested slurry solids were extracted by BCR method. Results showed that total amount of Pb was decreased 70% and 19% in digested pig slurries (DPS) and dairy slurries (DDS), respectively, , compared with raw slurries. The percentages of Pb in liquid fractions of DPS and DDS were 29%and 17%, which decreased by 17%and 58%. The decrease of Pb in DDS was significantly lower than that in DPS. One reason is that 90%of solids in DDS were discharged during the anaerobic digestion. Another reason is that Pb in digested slurries mainly exists as the solid form. Thus the amount of Pb left in the reactor for dairy manure digestion was significantly lower than that for pig manure digest. Due to the high removal efficiency, easy operation and low treatment cost of heavy metals in solid phase, transformation of liquid phase of heavy metals to the

  9. Advanced phase change materials and systems for solar passive heating and cooling of residential buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salyer, I.O.; Sircar, A.K.; Dantiki, S.

    1988-01-01

    During the last three years under the sponsorship of the DOE Solar Passive Division, the University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) has investigated four phase change material (PCM) systems for utility in thermal energy storage for solar passive heating and cooling applications. From this research on the basis of cost, performance, containment, and environmental acceptability, we have selected as our current and most promising series of candidate phase change materials, C-15 to C-24 linear crystalline alkyl hydrocarbons. The major part of the research during this contract period was directed toward the following three objectives. Find, test, and develop low-cost effective phase change materials (PCM) that melt and freeze sharply in the comfort temperature range of 73--77{degree}F for use in solar passive heating and cooling of buildings. Define practical materials and processes for fire retarding plasterboard/PCM building products. Develop cost-effective methods for incorporating PCM into building construction materials (concrete, plasterboard, etc.) which will lead to the commercial manufacture and sale of PCM-containing products resulting in significant energy conservation.

  10. Latent heat storage by silica-coated polymer beads containing organic phase change materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feczkó, T.; Trif, L.; Horák, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 132, July (2016), s. 405-414. ISSN 0038-092X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH14318 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : latent heat storage * phase change materials * porous beads by suspension polymerization Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.469, year: 2014

  11. Porous MgO material with ultrahigh surface area as the matrix for phase change composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Porous MgO material with ultrahigh surface area was synthesized. • A composite PCM was prepared from PEG-1000 and the porous MgO. • The phase change temperatures and enthalpy of the composite were measured. • The composite PCM performed good shape-stabilized property. - Abstract: Mesoporous magnesium oxide (MgO) material was synthesized using an integration of the evaporation-induced surfactant assembly and magnesium nitrate pyrolysis. The as-prepared MgO material is well crystalline, and possesses three-dimensional interconnected mesopores and a surface area as high as 596 m2/g. Using the porous MgO as a matrix and polyethylene glycol (PEG-1000) as the functional phase for heat energy storage, a shape-stabilized phase change composite of PEG/MgO was fabricated by an easy impregnation method. In the composite, mesoporous MgO material provides structural strength and prevents the leakage of the molten PEG during the phase change process. The compositions and microstructures of the PEG/MgO composite were determined by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscope (FT-IR), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electronic microscope (SEM) and thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA), respectively. The phase change properties of the PEG/MgO composite were determined by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The high heat-energy storage capability and good thermal stability of the composite enable it extensive applications in the future

  12. Electromagnetic material changes for remote detection and monitoring: a feasibility study: Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCloy, John S.; Jordan, David V.; Kelly, James F.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Campbell, Luke W.

    2009-09-01

    A new concept for radiation detection is proposed, allowing a decoupling of the sensing medium and the readout. An electromagnetic material, such as a magnetic ceramic ferrite, is placed near a source to be tracked such as a shipping container. The electromagnetic material changes its properties, in this case its magnetic permeability, as a function of radiation. This change is evident as a change in reflection frequency and magnitude when probed using a microwave/millimeter-wave source. This brief report discusses modeling of radiation interaction of various candidate materials using a radiation detector modeling code Geant4, system design considerations for the remote readout, and some theory of the material interaction physics. The theory of radiation change in doped magnetic insulator ferrites such as yttrium iron garnet (YIG) seems well founded based on literature documentation of the photomagnetic effect. The literature also suggests sensitivity of permittivity to neutrons in some ferroelectrics. Research to date indicates that experimental demonstration of these effects in the context of radiation detection is warranted.

  13. Microscale Polymer Bottles Corked with a Phase-Change Material for Temperature-Controlled Release

    OpenAIRE

    Hyun, Dong Choon; Lu, Ping; Choi, Sang Il; Jeong, Unyong; Xia, Younan

    2013-01-01

    Keep your wine chilled! Microscale polymer bottles are loaded with dye molecules and then corked with a phase-change material (PCM). When temperature is raised beyond its melting point, the PCM quickly melt and trigger an instant release of the encapsulated dye. The release profiles can be manipulated by using a binary mixture of PCMs with different melting points.

  14. Thermophysical Properties and Microstructural Changes of Composite Materials at Elevated Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Goodrich, Thomas William

    2009-01-01

    Experimental methods were developed and used to quantify the behavior of composite materials during heating to support development of heat and mass transfer pyrolysis models. Methods were developed to measure specific heat capacity, kinetic parameters, microstructure changes, porosity, and permeability. Specific heat and gravimetric data for kinetic parameters were measured with a simultaneous differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) / thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). Experimental techniques ...

  15. Analysis of Phase Change Material in Glazing Systems in Future Zero-Energy-Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Frederik Vildbrad; Heiselberg, Per; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2016-01-01

    thermal storage capacity of the glazed facade by using phase change material (PCM), in the glazing cavity, reduces the cooling demand. When wanting to use this technology under colder weather conditions, the pane can potentially reduce the heat loss of the pane thereby minimizing energy demand for heating....

  16. Sorption of 17b-Estradiol to Pig Slurry Separates and Soil in the Soil-Slurry Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin, Mostofa; Petersen, Søren O; Lægdsmand, Mette

    2012-01-01

    ) by separation technologies, which may also remove parts of the estrogens and enhance infiltration of the slurry on field application and hence the interaction between estrogens and the soil matrix. This study investigated how 17β-estradiol (E2), a natural estrogen commonly found in pig manure, sorbs...... to agricultural soils, to different size fractions of pig slurry separates, and to soils amended with each size fraction to simulate conditions in the soil–slurry environment. A crude fiber fraction (SS1) was prepared by sieving (<500 μm) the solids removed by an on-farm separation process. Three...... solids used. Sorption of E2 to soil increased with its organic carbon content for both liquid phases. The solid–liquid partition coefficients of slurry separates were 10 to 30 times higher than those of soils, but the organoic carbon normalized partition coefficient values, reflecting sorption per unit...

  17. Estimation of emission factor for odorants released from swine excretion slurries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulejko, Jan E; Kim, Bo-Won; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Lee, Min-Hee; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Jo, Sang-Hee; Kwon, Eilhann; Cho, Sung-Back; Hwang, Ok-Hwa

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the odorant emission rates from excretory wastes collected in sealed containers from a large swine facility were determined offsite in a laboratory using both raw slurry from ([1] windowless pigpen (WP) and [2] open pigpen (OP)) and treated waste samples ([3] composting facility (CF) and [4] slurry treatment facility (SF)). The emission rates of up to 41 volatile odorants were measured for 100g waste samples (of all four types) in a 0.75L impinger with an air change rate of 8h(-1). The initial emission rates (mgkg(-1)·h(-1)) for the most dominant species from each waste type can be summarized as: (1) WP: NH3 (16.3) and H2S (0.54); (2) OP: H2S (1.78), NH3 (1.69), and p-cresol (0.36); (3) CF: NH3 (7.04), CH3SH (0.30), and DMS (0.12); and (4) SF: NH3 (11.7), H2S (11.7), and p-cresol (0.25). Accordingly, the emission factors for the key odorant (mE, kg·pig(-1))) for fattening pigs in the WP and OP facilities of S. Korea were extrapolated as 3.46 (NH3) and 0.38 (H2S), respectively. The emission factors were estimated assuming exponentially decaying emission rates and slurry production rates obtained from the literature. PMID:26888605

  18. Velocity Distribution of Slurry in Horizontal Pipe When Solid Particles Sliding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangShilin; XuZhenliang; Shaolongtan

    2004-01-01

    Based on the laws of momentum conservation and impulse in accelerating process, the distribution on speed of ununiform slurry flow in a horizontal pipe was studied. According to the momentum change of solid particles and conveying liquid of slurry flow during accelerating, and some effect factors, the relationship between the speed of solid particles and the speed of conveying liquid was obtained.When dealing with the friction between sliding solid particles and pipe, it is pivotal to reasonably distribute component of friction to each solid particle. The friction coefficient between solid particles was obtained by forces analysis and theoretic calculation, and can be used to calculate the friction force on every solid particle. The effect of friction on speed of ever), solid particle was investigated through the impulse law. The result is more accurate than that by using uniform friction on solid particles. It is completely new method to use above theory to get solid particles speed distribution, conveying liquid speed distribution and slurry speed distribution.

  19. Nanostructured thin film-based near-infrared tunable perfect absorber using phase-change material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocer, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured thin film absorbers embedded with phase-change thermochromic material can provide a large level of absorption tunability in the near-infrared region. Vanadium dioxide was employed as the phase-change material in the designed structures. The optical absorption properties of the designed structures with respect to the geometric and material parameters were systematically investigated using finite-difference time-domain computations. Absorption level of the resonance wavelength in the near-IR region was tuned from the perfect absorption level to a low level (17%) with a high positive dynamic range of near-infrared absorption intensity tunability (83%). Due to the phase transition of vanadium dioxide, the resonance at the near-infrared region is being turned on and turned off actively and reversibly under the thermal bias, thereby rendering these nanostructures suitable for infrared camouflage, emitters, and sensors.

  20. High-field electrical transport in amorphous phase-change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaes, Matthias; Le Gallo, Manuel; Sebastian, Abu; Salinga, Martin; Krebs, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Electrical transport in chalcogenide-based phase change materials is an active area of research owing to the prominent role played by these materials in the field of information technology. Here, we present transport measurements (IV curves) obtained on line-cells of as-deposited amorphous phase change materials (Ge2Sb2Te5, GeTe, Ag4In3Sb66Te27) over a wide voltage and temperature range (300 K to 160 K). The well defined geometry of our devices enables a description of the transport behavior in terms of conductivity vs. electric field. At higher temperatures (300 K ≥ T ≥ 220 K) and low to intermediate fields (F behavior quantitatively.

  1. Refinement of primary Si grains of A390 alloy slurry through serpentine channel pouring process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-kai Zheng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the serpentine channel pouring process for preparing a semi-solid A390 alloy slurry and refining the primary Si grains of the A390 alloy, was used. The effects of the pouring temperature, the cooling water flow and the number of the curves on the size of the primary Si grains in the semi-solid A390 alloy slurry were investigated. The results show that the pouring temperature, the cooling water flow and the number of the curves have a major effect on the size and the distribution of primary Si grains. Under the experimental condition of the four-curve copper channel whose cooling water flow was 500 L·h-1 and the pouring temperature was 690 ìC, the primary Si grains of the semi-solid A390 alloy slurry were refined to the greatest extent and the lath-like grains were changed into granular ones. Additionally, the equivalent grain diameter and the average shape factor of the primary Si grains of the satisfactory semi-solid A390 alloy slurry are 18.6 レm and 0.8, respectively. Further, the refinement mechanism of the primary Si grains through the serpentine channel pouring process was analyzed and discussed. In summary, the primary Si nuclei could be easily precipitated due to the chilling effect of the channel inner wall, thus the primary Si grains were greatly refined. Meanwhile, the subsequent alloy melt fluid also promoted the separation of primary Si grains from the inner wall, further refining the primary Si grains.

  2. 3D Printed Reversible Shape Changing Components with Stimuli Responsive Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yiqi; Ding, Zhen; Yuan, Chao; Ai, Shigang; Isakov, Michael; Wu, Jiangtao; Wang, Tiejun; Dunn, Martin L.; Qi, H. Jerry

    2016-04-01

    The creation of reversibly-actuating components that alter their shapes in a controllable manner in response to environmental stimuli is a grand challenge in active materials, structures, and robotics. Here we demonstrate a new reversible shape-changing component design concept enabled by 3D printing two stimuli responsive polymers—shape memory polymers and hydrogels—in prescribed 3D architectures. This approach uses the swelling of a hydrogel as the driving force for the shape change, and the temperature-dependent modulus of a shape memory polymer to regulate the time of such shape change. Controlling the temperature and aqueous environment allows switching between two stable configurations – the structures are relatively stiff and can carry load in each – without any mechanical loading and unloading. Specific shape changing scenarios, e.g., based on bending, or twisting in prescribed directions, are enabled via the controlled interplay between the active materials and the 3D printed architectures. The physical phenomena are complex and nonintuitive, and so to help understand the interplay of geometric, material, and environmental stimuli parameters we develop 3D nonlinear finite element models. Finally, we create several 2D and 3D shape changing components that demonstrate the role of key parameters and illustrate the broad application potential of the proposed approach.

  3. 3D Printed Reversible Shape Changing Components with Stimuli Responsive Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yiqi; Ding, Zhen; Yuan, Chao; Ai, Shigang; Isakov, Michael; Wu, Jiangtao; Wang, Tiejun; Dunn, Martin L.; Qi, H. Jerry

    2016-01-01

    The creation of reversibly-actuating components that alter their shapes in a controllable manner in response to environmental stimuli is a grand challenge in active materials, structures, and robotics. Here we demonstrate a new reversible shape-changing component design concept enabled by 3D printing two stimuli responsive polymers—shape memory polymers and hydrogels—in prescribed 3D architectures. This approach uses the swelling of a hydrogel as the driving force for the shape change, and the temperature-dependent modulus of a shape memory polymer to regulate the time of such shape change. Controlling the temperature and aqueous environment allows switching between two stable configurations – the structures are relatively stiff and can carry load in each – without any mechanical loading and unloading. Specific shape changing scenarios, e.g., based on bending, or twisting in prescribed directions, are enabled via the controlled interplay between the active materials and the 3D printed architectures. The physical phenomena are complex and nonintuitive, and so to help understand the interplay of geometric, material, and environmental stimuli parameters we develop 3D nonlinear finite element models. Finally, we create several 2D and 3D shape changing components that demonstrate the role of key parameters and illustrate the broad application potential of the proposed approach. PMID:27109063

  4. 3D Printed Reversible Shape Changing Components with Stimuli Responsive Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yiqi; Ding, Zhen; Yuan, Chao; Ai, Shigang; Isakov, Michael; Wu, Jiangtao; Wang, Tiejun; Dunn, Martin L; Qi, H Jerry

    2016-01-01

    The creation of reversibly-actuating components that alter their shapes in a controllable manner in response to environmental stimuli is a grand challenge in active materials, structures, and robotics. Here we demonstrate a new reversible shape-changing component design concept enabled by 3D printing two stimuli responsive polymers-shape memory polymers and hydrogels-in prescribed 3D architectures. This approach uses the swelling of a hydrogel as the driving force for the shape change, and the temperature-dependent modulus of a shape memory polymer to regulate the time of such shape change. Controlling the temperature and aqueous environment allows switching between two stable configurations - the structures are relatively stiff and can carry load in each - without any mechanical loading and unloading. Specific shape changing scenarios, e.g., based on bending, or twisting in prescribed directions, are enabled via the controlled interplay between the active materials and the 3D printed architectures. The physical phenomena are complex and nonintuitive, and so to help understand the interplay of geometric, material, and environmental stimuli parameters we develop 3D nonlinear finite element models. Finally, we create several 2D and 3D shape changing components that demonstrate the role of key parameters and illustrate the broad application potential of the proposed approach. PMID:27109063

  5. The relationship of compliance changes during fatigue loading to the fracture of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifsnider, K. L.; Highsmith, A.

    1982-01-01

    The study outlined here is based on measurements of the change in engineering stiffness values induced by the development of damage in composite laminates during quasi-static or cyclic (fatigue) loading. These changes are found to be related to the individual details of the damage events in the laminates, as well as to the residual strength and life of the laminates. It is believed that the stiffness changes can also be used to relate composite material behavior under cyclic loading to its behavior under quasi-static loading. Results are presented for both notched and unnotched laminates. Compliance changes are found to be caused by damage events that bring about both global and local redistributions of stress. It is also found that the redistributions of stress determine the residual strength of the laminate. The quantitative link between compliance changes and fracture strength is the mechanics of the internal stress redistributions.

  6. Selection and performance assessment of Phase Change Materials for heating, ventilation and air-conditioning applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Performance evaluation of commercialized Phase Change Materials for building applications. • Selection and assessment by Multiple Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) approach. • Ranking of the commercialized Phase Change Materials (PCMs). • Simulation of top performing PCM using PCMExpress Valentin Energy Software. - Abstract: The rapid commercialization of Phase Change Materials (PCMs) for heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) applications, has paved way for effective utilization of ambient thermal fluctuations. However, given a long list of contemporary candidates, it is crucial to select the best material to obtain maximum efficiency for any given application. This article attempts to extend Multiple Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) approach for ranking and selecting PCMs for domestic HVAC application. Firstly, Ashby approach has been employed for determining two novel figure of merits (FOM) to grade PCMs performance. The FOMs thus obtained were subjected to Pareto Optimality test. The graded materials were ranked using Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS). The relative weights for the different attributes were calculated using Shannon’s entropy method. In order to justify the rankings obtained, the top materials were subjected to a standard simulation study to evaluate their relative performance using PCMExpress with the aim of maintaining human comfort temperature. It was observed that the results obtained by simulation are in good agreement with those obtained using MCDM approach. The candidates with the best ranks showed significant improvement in ameliorating the temperature conditions. Thus it can be concluded that integration of MCDM approach for PCMs selection would prove to an economical and swift alternative technique for ranking and screening of materials

  7. Study on Solidification of Phase Change Material in Fractal Porous Metal Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengbin; Wu, Liangyu; Chen, Yongping

    2015-02-01

    The Sierpinski fractal is introduced to construct the porous metal foam. Based on this fractal description, an unsteady heat transfer model accompanied with solidification phase change in fractal porous metal foam embedded with phase change material (PCM) is developed and numerically analyzed. The heat transfer processes associated with solidification of PCM embedded in fractal structure is investigated and compared with that in single-pore structure. The results indicate that, for the solidification of phase change material in fractal porous metal foam, the PCM is dispersedly distributed in metal foam and the existence of porous metal matrix provides a fast heat flow channel both horizontally and vertically, which induces the enhancement of interstitial heat transfer between the solid matrix and PCM. The solidification performance of the PCM, which is represented by liquid fraction and solidification time, in fractal structure is superior to that in single-pore structure.

  8. Performance improvement of Sb2Te3 phase change material by Al doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al doped Sb2Te3 material was proposed to improve the performance of phase-change memory. Crystallization temperature, activation energy, and electrical resistance of the Al doped Sb2Te3 films increase markedly with the increasing of Al concentration. The additional Al-Sb and Al-Te bonds enhance the amorphous thermal stability of the material. Al0.69Sb2Te3 material has a better data retention (10 years at 110 deg. C) than that of Ge2Sb2Te5 material (10 years at 87 deg. C). With a 100 ns width voltage pulse, SET and RESET voltages of 1.3 and 3.3 V are achieved for the Al0.69Sb2Te3 based device.

  9. Mixing and sampling of sludge-frit-CST slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Thermal Fluids Lab of SRTC designed, built and operated a 1/240th-scale test facility to perform a series of mixing and sampling tests with aqueous and sludge-based slurries of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) resin. Note that the CST-based Ion Exchange (IX) process is one of the two options being assessed as a replacement to the original In-Tank TPB Precipitation Process to remove cesium from the high level waste stream. The particle size of as-received CST resin ranges from 200--800 microns, which is larger than the glass frit size range of 75--175 microns. This raises two technical issues of homogeneity and Hydragardregsign sampling of CST slurries. Seven different test series were conducted to address these issues. The first four tests used two batches of aqueous slurries of 10-wt% CST and the remaining three tests used three different batches of sludge-based slurries. Test results showed that the aqueous slurry of 10-wt% of ''as-received'' CST could not be effectively mixed with an agitator speed representative of DWPF mixing conditions. However, this slurry can easily be re-suspended by agitator. The agitation system could not effectively reduce the CST particle size. However, prolonged (18 hrs) repeated pumping of the slurry through a centrifugal pump broke up 55% of CST particles. The sludge-frit batch was homogeneously mixed under DWPF representative mixing conditions and the Hydragardregsign samples of sludge-frit slurry showed an excellent agreement with process tank grab samples. The sludge-frit reduced CST slurry was also homogeneously mixed under DWPG mixing conditions. However, the Hydragardregsign samples exhibited about 12% frit depletion as compared to grab samples. The CST/sludge ratios showed an excellent agreement with grab samples. Finally, the sludge-frit slurry with ''as-received'' CST repeatedly plugged the Hydrgardregsign sampler and no steady flow conditions were achieved. However, this sludge batch was well mixed in the process tank

  10. Stability for a novel low-pH alkaline slurry during the copper chemical mechanical planarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability of a novel low-pH alkaline slurry (marked as slurry A, pH = 8.5) for copper chemical mechanical planarization was investigated in this paper. First of all, the stability mechanism of the alkaline slurry was studied. Then many parameters have been tested for researching the stability of the slurry through comparing with a traditional alkaline slurry (marked as slurry B, pH = 9.5), such as the pH value, particle size and zeta potential. Apart from this, the stability of the copper removal rate, dishing, erosion and surface roughness were also studied. All the results show that the stability of the novel low-pH alkaline slurry is better than the traditional alkaline slurry. The working-life of the novel low-pH alkaline slurry reaches 48 h. (semiconductor technology)

  11. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  12. An investigation on the effects of phase change material on material components used for high temperature thermal energy storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taeil; Singh, Dileep; Zhao, Weihuan; Yua, Wenhua; France, David M.

    2016-05-01

    The latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems for concentrated solar power (CSP) plants with advanced power cycle require high temperature phase change materials (PCMs), Graphite foams with high thermal conductivity to enhance the poor thermal conductivity of PCMs. Brazing of the graphite foams to the structural metals of the LHTES system could be a method to assemble the system and a method to protect the structural metals from the molten salts. In the present study, the LHTES prototype capsules using MgCl2-graphite foam composites were assembled by brazing and welding, and tested to investigate the corrosion attack of the PCM salt on the BNi-4 braze. The microstructural analysis showed that the BNi-4 braze alloy can be used not only for the joining of structure alloy to graphite foams but also for the protecting of structure alloy from the corrosion by PCM.

  13. Carbon dynamics in an almond orchard soil amended with raw and treated pig slurry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Sara G.; Zornoza, Raúl; Faz, Ángel

    2010-05-01

    In SE Spain, intensive farming is very common which supposes the generation of great amounts of pig slurries. These residues cause many storage problems due to their pollution capacity. A good management of them is necessary to avoid damages to the environment. The use of this effluent as fertilizer is a usual practice that in the correct dose is a good amend and important for sustainable development, but in excess can be a risk of polluting and damaging soil, water and crop conditions. Pig slurry is a source of many nutrients and specially rich in organic matter. The main objective of this study is to determine changes in soil organic carbon dynamics resulting from raw and treated slurry amendments applied in different doses. The experimental area is an almond orchard located in Cartagena (SE Spain). The climate of the area is semiarid Mediterranean with mean annual temperature of 18°C and mean annual rainfall of 275 mm. A total of 10 plots (12 m x 30 m) were designed, one of them being the control without fertilizer. Surface soil samples (0-25 cm) were collected in September 2009. Three different treatments were applied, raw slurry, the effluent obtained after solid-liquid separation and solid manure, all of them in three doses being the first one of 170 kg N/ha, (maximum permitted in nitrates directive 91/676/CEE), and the others two and three times the first one. Soil biochemical parameters are rapid indicators of changes in soil quality. According to this, total organic carbon, soil microbial biomass carbon, soluble carbon, and β-glucosidase, β-galactosidase and arylesterase activities were measured in order to assess some soil biochemical conditions and carbon dynamics in terms of the different treatments. As we expected, the use of these organic fertilizers rich in organic matter, had an effect on soil carbon and soil microbial activity resulting in an increase in most of the parameters; total organic carbon and β-galactosidase activity showed the

  14. Experimental investigation of performances of microcapsule phase change material for thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing (China); Liu, X.; Wu, S. [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing (China); Fang, G.

    2010-02-15

    Performances of microcapsule phase change material (MPCM) for thermal energy storage are investigated. The MPCM for thermal energy storage is prepared by a complex coacervation method with gelatin and acacia as wall materials and paraffin as core material in an emulsion system. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to study the microstructure of the MPCM. In thermal analysis, a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) was employed to determine the melting temperature, melting latent heat, solidification temperature, and solidification latent heat of the MPCM for thermal energy storage. The SEM micrograph indicates that the MPCM has been successfully synthesized and that the particle size of the MPCM is about 81 {mu}m. The DSC output results show that the melting temperature of the MPCM is 52.05 C, the melting latent heat is 141.03 kJ/kg, the solidification temperature is 59.68 C, and the solidification latent heat is 121.59 kJ/kg. The results prove that the MPCM for thermal energy storage has a larger phase change latent heat and suitable phase change temperature, so it can be considered as an efficient thermal energy storage material for heat utilizing systems. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  15. Synthesis of Fe metal precipitated colloidal silica and its application to W chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Young-Jae; Prasad, Y Nagendra; Kim, In-Kwon; Jung, Seok-Jo; Park, Jin-Goo

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to develop a new method of Fe (metal) precipitation on colloidal silica to overcome the stability problem, which would be responsible in producing defects, with commercially available fumed silica slurry containing Fe ions. The slurry was developed by using sodium silicate (Na(2)SiO(3)) as a raw material and the concentration of precipitation of metal was controlled by addition of Fe salt (Fe(NO(3))(3)). To compare the concentration of precipitated Fe with directly added Fe ions in slurry solutions, static electrochemical and peroxide decomposition experiments were performed. Although the performance of the Fe precipitation appeared to be lower than Fe ion addition during these experiments, nearly equal removal rate was observed due to the dynamic condition during polishing. The Fe precipitated colloidal silica particles at the concentration of 52ppm showed the similar W removal rate and selectivity of W to TEOS (tetraethylorthosilicate) to commercially available fumed silica slurry containing externally added Fe ions. The introduction of Fe particle precipitation on colloidal silica particles would result in a longer shelf life time and hence lower defect level in W CMP. PMID:20546766

  16. On-orbit absolute temperature calibration using multiple phase change materials: overview of recent technology advancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Fred A.; Adler, Douglas P.; Pettersen, Claire; Revercomb, Henry E.; Perepezko, John H.

    2010-11-01

    NASA's anticipated plan for a mission dedicated to Climate (CLARREO) will hinge upon the ability to fly SI traceable standards that provide irrefutable absolute measurement accuracy. As an example, instrumentation designed to measure spectrally resolved infrared radiances will require high-emissivity calibration blackbodies that have absolute temperature uncertainties of better than 0.045K (3 sigma). A novel scheme to provide absolute calibration of temperature sensors onorbit, that uses the transient melt signatures from multiple phase change materials, has been demonstrated in the laboratory at the University of Wisconsin and is now undergoing technology advancement under NASA Instrument Incubator Program funding. Using small quantities of phase change material (less than half of a percent of the mass of the cavity), melt temperature accuracies of better than 10 mK have been demonstrated for mercury, water, and gallium (providing calibration from 233K to 303K). Refinements currently underway focus on ensuring that the melt materials in their sealed confinement housings perform as expected in the thermal and microgravity environment of a multi-year spaceflight mission. Thermal soak and cycling tests are underway to demonstrate that there is no dissolution from the housings into the melt materials that could alter melt temperature, and that there is no liquid metal embrittlement of the housings from the metal melt materials. In addition, NASA funding has been recently secured to conduct a demonstration of this scheme in the microgravity environment of the International Space Station.

  17. Numerical simulation of the structures with transparent thermal insulations and phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojanen, T.; Salonvaara, M.

    1992-12-31

    The aim of this research was to analyze the thermal performance of structures having layers of new materials. Applications of transparent thermal insulations and phase change materials were analyzed numerically using the simulation models TCCC2D and TRATMO2, developed at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), in the Laboratory of Heating and Ventilation. The potentials of new materials for reducing the losses through the building envelope were studied. The thermal effects of the transparency of insulation materials, thermal mass and inclination of the structure were analyzed using selected structural cases. The use of phase change materials with transparent layers was also studied. Surface temperatures and monthly and annual heat losses and the heat gains are presented for different cases. The results show that the annual conductive heat losses through sought facing facades can be decreased by about 40-50 % when compared to non-transparent structure with same U-value. During the three winter months transparent insulation acts only as an extra thermal resistance. The heat gains can also be used to compensate the ventilation heat losses or conductive heat losses through the facades. When transparent insulation is used in dynamic walls, the ventilation heat losses can be decreased as well. The reduction in the annual total heat losses through a dynamic structure can up to 40 % due to heat recovery and solar radiation. Phase change materials can be used for increment of the thermal mass in a certain temperature range and to smoothen the daily variations of heat losses and gains. Problems in the use of transparent insulations are high temperatures and heat gains, especially outside heating season.

  18. Numerical simulation of the structures with transparent thermal insulations and phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojanen, T.; Salonvaara, M.

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this research was to analyze the thermal performance of structures having layers of new materials. Applications of transparent thermal insulations and phase change materials were analyzed numerically using the simulation models TCCC2D and TRATMO2, developed at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), in the Laboratory of Heating and Ventilation. The potentials of new materials for reducing the losses through the building envelope were studied. The thermal effects of the transparency of insulation materials, thermal mass and inclination of the structure were analyzed using selected structural cases. The use of phase change materials with transparent layers was also studied. Surface temperatures and monthly and annual heat losses and the heat gains are presented for different cases. The results show that the annual conductive heat losses through sought facing facades can be decreased by about 40-50 % when compared to non-transparent structure with same U-value. During the three winter months transparent insulation acts only as an extra thermal resistance. The heat gains can also be used to compensate the ventilation heat losses or conductive heat losses through the facades. When transparent insulation is used in dynamic walls, the ventilation heat losses can be decreased as well. The reduction in the annual total heat losses through a dynamic structure can up to 40 % due to heat recovery and solar radiation. Phase change materials can be used for increment of the thermal mass in a certain temperature range and to smoothen the daily variations of heat losses and gains. Problems in the use of transparent insulations are high temperatures and heat gains, especially outside heating season.

  19. Energy Saving Potentials of Phase Change Materials Applied to Lightweight Building Envelopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-Bok Seong

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Phase change materials (PCMs have been considered as an innovative technology that can reduce the peak loads and heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC energy consumption in buildings. Basically they are substances capable of storing or releasing thermal energy as latent heat. Because the amount of latent heat absorbed or released is much larger than the sensible heat, the application of PCMs in buildings has significant potential to reduce energy consumption. However, because each PCM has its own phase change temperature, which is the temperature at which latent heat is absorbed or released, it is important to use an appropriate PCM for the purpose of building envelope design. Therefore, this paper aims to investigate the energy saving potentials in buildings when various PCMs with different phase change temperatures are applied to a lightweight building envelope by analyzing the thermal load characteristics. As results, the annual heating load increased at every phase change temperature, but the peak heating load decreased by 3.19% with heptadecane (phase change temperature 21 °C, and the lowest indoor temperature increased by 0.86 °C with heptadecane (phase change temperature 21 °C. The annual cooling load decreased by 1.05% with dodecanol (phase change temperature 24 °C, the peak cooling load decreased by 1.30% with octadecane (phase change temperature 29 °C, and the highest indoor temperature dropped by 0.50 °C with octadecane (phase change temperature 29 °C. When the night ventilation was applied to the building HVAC system for better passive cooling performance, the annual cooling load decreased by 9.28% with dodecanol (phase change temperature 24 °C, the peak load decreased by 11.33% with octadecane (phase change temperature 29 °C, and the highest indoor temperature dropped by 0.85 °C with octadecane (phase change temperature 29 °C.

  20. Composite macrocapsule of phase change materials/expanded graphite for thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three kinds of macro-encapsulated phase change materials (MacroPCMs) were fabricated, i.e., MacroPCMs with a single core–shell structure, MacroPCMs containing microencapsulated phase change materials (MicroPCMs), and composite macrocapsules of MicroPCMs/expanded graphite prepared by suspension-like polymerization followed by a piercing–solidifying incuber process. The morphology, microstructure, phase change property, as well as seal tightness were systematically characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS). The core–shell structured macrocapsules exhibit a homogeneous thickness shell. The interface combination between MicroPCMs and polymer substrate was studied through the cross section micrograph of MacroPCMs containing MicroPCMs. The morphology and seal tightness of MacroPCMs fabricated with expanded graphite absorbing both PCMs and shell-forming monomers, enhanced significantly compared with that of PCMs alone. In addition, the effects of polymer substrate proportion between styrene-maleic anhydride copolymer and sodium alginate on the microstructure and performance of MacroPCMs were discussed as well. - Highlights: • MacroPCMs with single core–shell structure. • MacroPCMs containing acrylic-based copolymer MicroPCMs. • Phase change materials/expanded graphite composite macrocapsule

  1. Changes in the regulations for the safe transport of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper is to describe and to analyze the relevant changes, dealing with the design, operation and administrative requirements, to be introduced in the Revision 1 of the AR 10.16.1 standard 'Transport of radioactive material' that will be put into force on July, 1st 2001 by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (competent authority of Argentina). In that way, the Revision 1 of the mentioned standard will be coincident with the 1996 edition (revised) of the 'Regulations for the safe transport of radioactive material', Safety Standards Series No. TS-R-1 (ST-1, revised) issued by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). (author)

  2. Mathematical Modeling and Simulations of Phase Change Materials in Basic Orthogonal Coordinate Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousse, Daniel; Dutil, Yvan; Ben Salah, Nizar; Lassue, Stephane

    2010-09-15

    Energy storage components improve the energy efficiency of systems by reducing the mismatch between supply and demand. Phase change materials are attractive since they provide a high energy storage density at constant temperatures. Nevertheless, the incorporation of such materials in a particular application often calls for numerical analyses due to the non-linear nature of the problem. The review of the mathematical models will include selected results to enable one to start his/her research with an exhaustive overview of the subject. This overview also stresses the need to match experimental investigations with recent numerical analyses.

  3. Preparation and characterization of phase change material for thermal energy storage in buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Tommy Y.

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents the developing of novel form-stable composite phase change material (PCM) by incorporation of paraffin into lightweight aggregate through vacuum impregnation. The macro-encapsulated Paraffin-lightweight aggregate is a chemical compatible, thermal stable and thermal reliable PCM material for thermal energy storage applications in buildings. The 28 days compressive strength of NWAC using PCM-LWA is 33 - 53 MPa, which has an opportunity for structural purpose. Scanning electronic microscopic images indicated the paraffin can be held inside the porous structure of the aggregate. Thermal performance test showed that the cement paste panel with composite PCM can reduce the indoor temperature.

  4. Melting of Nanoprticle-Enhanced Phase Change Material inside Shell and Tube Heat Exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiyed Mohammad Javad Hosseini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a numerical study of melting of Nanoprticle-Enhanced phase change material (NEPCM inside a shell and tube heat exchanger using RT50 and copper particles as base material and nanoparticle, respectively. In this study, the effects of nanoparticles dispersion (, 0.03, and 0.05 on melting time, liquid fraction, and penetration length are investigated. The results show that the melting time decreases to 14.6% and the penetration length increases to 146% with increasing volume fraction of nanoparticle up to .

  5. A compressed hydrogen gas storage system with an integrated phase change material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea; Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard; Jørgensen, Jens Erik;

    2015-01-01

    A dynamic fueling model is built to simulate the fueling process of a hydrogen tank with an integrated passive cooling system. The study investigates the possibility of absorbing a part of the heat of compression in the high latent-heat material during melting, with the aim of keeping the walls...... change material, mainly occurs after the fueling is completed, resulting in a higher hydrogen peak temperature inside the tank and a lower fuelled mass than a gas-cooled system. Such a mass reduction accounts for 12% with respect to the case of a standard tank system fuelled at -40 °C....

  6. Changes of properties of the materials of spacecraft solar arrays under the action of atomic oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuvalov, V. A.; Kochubei, G. S.; Priimak, A. I.; Pis'mennyi, N. I.; Tokmak, N. A.

    2007-08-01

    A procedure is developed for physical and chemical modeling and investigation of the weight, geometrical, and thermo-optical characteristics of polymer paneling materials of solar arrays and of the electric power of solar cells under the prolonged action of supersonic fluxes of atomic oxygen in orbit. The behavior of changes in the material characteristics as a function of the integral fluence of atomic oxygen is found. It is established that the electric power of solar cells is virtually invariable within the errors of measurements under irradiation by atomic oxygen flux with a fluence of no higher than 5 · 1021 cm-2.

  7. A Super Cooled, Non-toxic, Non-flammable Phase Change Material Thermal Pack for Portable Life Support Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The concept development and test of a water-based, advanced Phase Change Material (PCM) heat sink is proposed. Utilizing a novel material choice for both an...

  8. A Super Cooled, Non-toxic, Non-flammable Phase Change Material Thermal Pack for Portable Life Support Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The continuation of concept development and test of a water-based, advanced Phase Change Material (PCM) heat sink is proposed. Utilizing a novel material choice for...

  9. Si1Sb2Te3 phase change material for chalcogenide random access memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Ting; Song Zhi-Tang; Liu Bo; Liu Wei-Li; Feng Song-Lin; Chen Bomy

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigated phase change Si1Sb2Te3 material for application of chalcogenide random access memory.Current-voltage performance was conducted to determine threshold current of phase change from amorphous phase to polycrystalline phase.The film holds a threshold current about 0.155 mA,which is smaller than the value 0.31 mA of Ge2Sb2Te5 film.Amorphous Si1Sb2Te3 changes to face-centred-cubic structure at~180°C and changes to hexagonal structure at~270°C.Annealing temperature dependent electric resistivity of Si1Sb2Te3 film was studied by four-point probe method.Data retention of the films was characterized as well.

  10. Ultrafast optical manipulation of atomic motion in multilayer Ge-Sb-Te phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, K.; Tominaga, J.; Kolobov, A. V.; Fons, P.; Hase, M.

    2013-03-01

    Phase change random access memory devices have evolved dramatically with the recent development of superlattice structure of Ge-Sb-Te material (GST-SL) in terms of its low power consumption. The phase change in GST-SL is mainly characterized by the displacement of Ge atoms. Here we examine a new phase change method, that is the manipulation of Ge-Te bonds using linearly-polarized femtosecond near-infrared optical pulses. As a result, we found that the p-polarized pump pulse is more effective in inducing the reversible and irreversible displacement of Ge atoms along [111] direction in the local structure. This structural change would be induced by the anisotropic carrier-phonon interaction along the [111] direction created by the p-polarized pulse.

  11. Novel techniques for slurry bubble column hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudukovic, M.P.

    1999-05-14

    The objective of this cooperative research effort between Washington University, Ohio State University and Exxon Research Engineering Company was to improve the knowledge base for scale-up and operation of slurry bubble column reactors for syngas conversion and other coal conversion processes by increased reliance on experimentally verified hydrodynamic models. During the first year (July 1, 1995--June 30, 1996) of this three year program novel experimental tools (computer aided radioactive particle tracking (CARPT), particle image velocimetry (PIV), heat probe, optical fiber probe and gamma ray tomography) were developed and tuned for measurement of pertinent hydrodynamic quantities, such as velocity field, holdup distribution, heat transfer and bubble size. The accomplishments were delineated in the First Technical Annual Report. The second year (July, 1996--June 30, 1997) was spent on further development and tuning of the novel experimental tools (e.g., development of Monte Carlo calibration for CARPT, optical probe development), building up the hydrodynamic data base using these tools and comparison of the two techniques (PIV and CARPT) for determination of liquid velocities. A phenomenological model for gas and liquid backmixing was also developed. All accomplishments were summarized in the Second Annual Technical Report. During the third and final year of the program (July 1, 1997--June 30, 1998) and during the nine months no cost extension, the high pressure facility was completed and a set of data was taken at high pressure conditions. Both PIV, CT and CARPT were used. More fundamental hydrodynamic modeling was also undertaken and model predictions were compared to data. The accomplishments for this period are summarized in this report.

  12. Weight change of various light-cured restorative materials after water immersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwami, Y; Yamamoto, H; Sato, W; Kawai, K; Torii, M; Ebisu, S

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated weight changes of various light-cured glass-ionomer cements and other restorative materials during water immersion and compared findings with those of conventional glass-ionomer cement and light-cured resin composites. Three light-cured glass-ionomer cements, two polyacid-modified composite resins, one conventional glass-ionomer cement, and one light-cured composite resin were evaluated in this study. The weight changes of these specimens after water immersion were measured using an electronic analytical balance and adjusted according to water solubility measured at the same time weight change was measured. The results were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Scheffé's F test at P < 0.05. The weight change of Photac-Fil Aplicap was the largest, and there were significant differences among the materials (P < 0.05). Weight change after 6 weeks' water immersion was noted in the following order: Fuji Ionomer Type II LC, Vitremer, Fuji Ionomer Type II, VariGlass VLC, Geristore V, and Clearfil AP-X. It is suggested that the amount of water sorption of light-cured glass-ionomer cements is greater than that of polyacid-modified composite resins. PMID:9656924

  13. Silver impregnation of Alzheimer's neurofibrillary changes counterstained for basophilic material and lipofuscin pigment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braak, H; Braak, E; Ohm, T; Bohl, J

    1988-07-01

    A method is described in which selective silver staining of Alzheimer's neurofibrillary changes is combined with staining of cell nuclei, Nissl material, and lipofuscin granules. Formalin fixed, paraffin embedded sections of human autopsy tissue are silver stained according to a method proposed by Gallyas. Lipofuscin is stained by crotonaldehyde fuchsin following performic acid oxidation. Nissl substance is visualized by either Darrow red or gallocyanin-chrome alum staining. Architectonic units showing the specific pathology and the neuronal types prone to develop the neurofibrillary changes can be recognized using this technique. PMID:2464205

  14. A Review On Free Cooling Through Heat Pipe by Using Phase Change Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S.Futane ,

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermal energy storage is renewable source of energy to develop energy storage system, which minimize environmental impact such as ozone depletion and global warming. Thermal energy can be stored as latent heat which is latter use when substance changes from one phase to another phase by either freezing or melting. Now a days need of refrigeration and air conditioning has been increased, which can be achieved by free cooling, for this various substances are use, depending upon required temperature. Phase change materials are one of the substances having low temperature of melting and solidification.

  15. Review of Development Survey of Phase Change Material Models in Building Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein J. Akeiber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of phase change materials (PCMs in green buildings has been increasing rapidly. PCM applications in green buildings include several development models. This paper briefly surveys the recent research and development activities of PCM technology in building applications. Firstly, a basic description of phase change and their principles is provided; the classification and applications of PCMs are also included. Secondly, PCM models in buildings are reviewed and discussed according to the wall, roof, floor, and cooling systems. Finally, conclusions are presented based on the collected data.

  16. Coal-water slurries - a low-cost liquid fuel for boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, C.B.; Scheffee, R.S.; McHale, E.T.

    1983-06-01

    A liquid fuel based on a slurry of pulverized coal in water has been developed which has the potential of replacing No. 6 fuel oil in steam boilers and furnaces. The fuel is inexpensive, uses no imported raw materials, is readily transportable, and can be exploited in the near term with very low capital requirements. The principal remaining problems are to determine its effect on the output and efficiency of oil-designed boilers and to determine retrofit costs. Although the fuel, as currently developed, is not transportable by pipeline over long distances, such an objective appears to be attainable with additional technology development. 6 references, 10 figures, 2 tables.

  17. Feasibility of using phase change materials to control the heat of hydration in massive concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won-Chang; Khil, Bae-Soo; Chae, Young-Seok; Liang, Qi-Bo; Yun, Hyun-Do

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results that can be applied to select a possible phase change material (PCM), such as a latent heat material (LHM), to control the hydration heat in mass concrete structures. Five experimental tests (microconduction, simplified adiabatic temperature rise, heat, and compressive strength tests) were conducted to select the most desirable LHM out of seven types of inorganic PCM used in cement mortar and to determine the most suitable mix design. The results of these experimental tests were used to assess the feasibility of using PCM to reduce hydration heat in mass concrete that was examined. The experimental results show that cement mortar containing barium- [Ba(OH)2 · 8H2O] based PCM has the lowest amount of total hydration heat of the cement pastes. The barium-based PCM provides good latent heat properties that help to prevent volume change and microcracks caused by thermal stress in mass concrete. PMID:25133259

  18. Feasibility of Using Phase Change Materials to Control the Heat of Hydration in Massive Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Chang Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental results that can be applied to select a possible phase change material (PCM, such as a latent heat material (LHM, to control the hydration heat in mass concrete structures. Five experimental tests (microconduction, simplified adiabatic temperature rise, heat, and compressive strength tests were conducted to select the most desirable LHM out of seven types of inorganic PCM used in cement mortar and to determine the most suitable mix design. The results of these experimental tests were used to assess the feasibility of using PCM to reduce hydration heat in mass concrete that was examined. The experimental results show that cement mortar containing barium- [Ba(OH2·8H2O] based PCM has the lowest amount of total hydration heat of the cement pastes. The barium-based PCM provides good latent heat properties that help to prevent volume change and microcracks caused by thermal stress in mass concrete.

  19. Thermal Response Of An Aerated Concrete Wall With Micro-Encapsulated Phase Change Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halúzová Dušana

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available For many years Phase Change Materials (PCM have attracted attention due to their ability to store large amounts of thermal energy. This property makes them a candidate for the use of passive heat storage. In many applications, they are used to avoid the overheating of the temperature of an indoor environment. This paper describes the behavior of phase change materials that are inbuilt in aerated concrete blocks. Two building samples of an aerated concrete wall were measured in laboratory equipment called “twin-boxes”. The first box consists of a traditional aerated concrete wall; the second one has additional PCM micro-encapsulated in the wall. The heat flux through the wall was measured and compared to simulation results modeled in the ESP-r program. This experimental measurement provides a foundation for a model that can be used to analyze further building constructions.

  20. Empirical Validation of a Thermal Model of a Complex Roof Including Phase Change Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Guichard, Stéphane; Bigot, Dimitri; Malet-Damour, Bruno; Libelle, Teddy; Boyer, Harry

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with the empirical validation of a building thermal model using a phase change material (PCM) in a complex roof. A mathematical model dedicated to phase change materials based on the heat apparent capacity method was implemented in a multi-zone building simulation code, the aim being to increase understanding of the thermal behavior of the whole building with PCM technologies. To empirically validate the model, the methodology is based both on numerical and experimental studies. A parametric sensitivity analysis was performed and a set of parameters of the thermal model have been identified for optimization. The use of a generic optimization program called GenOpt coupled to the building simulation code enabled to determine the set of adequate parameters. We first present the empirical validation methodology and main results of previous work. We then give an overview of GenOpt and its coupling with the building simulation code. Finally, once the optimization results are obtained, comparisons o...

  1. Using multi-shell phase change materials layers for cooling a lithium-ion battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasehi Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the cooling methods in engineering systems is usage of phase change materials. Phase change materials or PCMs, which have high latent heats, are usually used where high energy absorption in a constant temperature is required. This work presents a numerical analysis of PCMs effects on cooling Li-ion batteries and their decrease in temperature levels during intense discharge. In this study, three PCM shells with different thermo-physical specifications located around a battery pack is examined. The results of each possible arrangement are compared together and the best arrangement leading to the lowest battery temperature during discharge is identified. In addition, the recovery time for the system which is the time required for the PCMs to refreeze is investigated.

  2. Teaching about Climate Change and Energy with Online Materials and Workshops from On the Cutting Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, K. B.; Manduca, C. A.; Myers, J. D.; Loxsom, F.

    2009-12-01

    Global climate change and energy use are among the most relevant and pressing issues in today’s science curriculum, yet they are also complex topics to teach. The underlying science spans multiple disciplines and is quickly evolving. Moreover, a comprehensive treatment of climate change and energy use must also delve into perspectives not typically addressed in geosciences courses, such as public policy and economics. Thus, faculty attempting to address these timely issues face many challenges. To support faculty in teaching these subjects, the On the Cutting Edge faculty development program has created a series of websites and workshop opportunities to provide faculty with information and resources for teaching about climate and energy. A web-based collection of teaching materials was developed in conjunction with the On the Cutting Edge workshops “Teaching about Energy in Geoscience Courses: Current Research and Pedagogy.” The website is designed to provide faculty with examples, references and ideas for either incorporating energy topics into existing geoscience courses or for designing or refining a course about energy. The website contains a collection of over 30 classroom and lab activities contributed by faculty and covering such diverse topics as renewable energy, energy policy and energy conservation. Course descriptions and syllabi for energy courses address audiences ranging from introductory courses to advanced seminars. Other materials available on the website include a collection of visualizations and animations, a catalog of recommended books, presentations and related references from the teaching energy workshops, and ideas for novel approaches or new topics for teaching about energy in the geosciences. The Teaching Climate Change website hosts large collections of teaching materials spanning many different topics within climate change, climatology and meteorology. Classroom activities highlight diverse pedagogic approaches such as role

  3. Fashion and function: challenges faced by textiles incorporated with phase change materials

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Chuansi

    2014-01-01

    Designers focus on fashion and appearance, whereas safety and protection engineers and physiologists emphasize functions in terms of developing functional and protective clothing. Phase change materials (PCMs) have been used in textiles and clothing to achieve cooling or warming function. The objective of this paper was to compare effectiveness of PCM cooling or warming determined by critical factors. Cooling or warming effectiveness and duration were directly dependent on physical activity l...

  4. Field Testing of Low-Cost Bio-Based Phase Change Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL

    2013-03-01

    A test wall built with phase change material (PCM)-enhanced loose-fill cavity insulation was monitored for a period of about a year in the warm-humid climate of Charleston, South Carolina. The test wall was divided into various sections, one of which contained only loose-fill insulation and served as a control for comparing and evaluating the wall sections with the PCM-enhanced insulation. This report summarizes the findings of the field test.

  5. Phase Change Materials: Technology Status and Potential Defence Applications (Review Papers)

    OpenAIRE

    Ravindra Kumar; Manoj Kumar Misra; Rohitash Kumar; Deepak Gupta; P. K. Khatri; B. B. Tak; S. R. Meena

    2011-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) are being utilised world over for energy storage and temperature smoothening applications. Defence Laboratory Jodhpur (DLJ) has initiated a R&D programme to apply PCM in solving many heat related problems being faced by Indian forces during desert operations specially failure of mission-critical components. Under the programme, special organic PCM (Patent application no. 2258/DEL/2007 and low melting metal alloys have been developed well tuned to desert diurna...

  6. Energy Saving Potentials of Phase Change Materials Applied to Lightweight Building Envelopes

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon-Bok Seong; Jae-Han Lim

    2013-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) have been considered as an innovative technology that can reduce the peak loads and heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) energy consumption in buildings. Basically they are substances capable of storing or releasing thermal energy as latent heat. Because the amount of latent heat absorbed or released is much larger than the sensible heat, the application of PCMs in buildings has significant potential to reduce energy consumption. However, because each...

  7. Thermal analysis of SEBS blends with phase change material for injection molding

    OpenAIRE

    Peydro, M. A.; Juárez Varón, David; Pérez Bernabeu, Elena; Sellés Cantó, Miguel Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Thermal analysis: Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Thermogravimetric Analysis (DSC and TGA) of SEBS blends with phase change materials (PCMs) have been studied in this paper. SEBS blends were made using two transparent SEBS commercial grades with extreme hardness values. The first thermal property determined in SEBS blends was the evaluation of the thermal degradation at high temperatures DSC. Another thermal property of the SEBS blends consists in knowing the degradation process of the ...

  8. Comments on Thermal Physical Properties Testing Methods of Phase Change Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Jiaping Liu; Na Cui; Song Pan; Weilun Wang; Yue Li; Jingchao Xie

    2013-01-01

    There is no standard testing method of the thermal physical properties of phase change materials (PCM). This paper has shown advancements in this field. Developments and achievements in thermal physical properties testing methods of PCM were commented, including differential scanning calorimetry, T-history measurement, the water bath method, and differential thermal analysis. Testing principles, advantages and disadvantages, and important points for attention of each method were discussed. A ...

  9. Latent heat storage with tubular-encapsulated phase change materials (PCMs)

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Huili; Degrève, Jan; Caceres, Gustavo; R. Segal; Pitie, Fred; Baeyens, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Heat capture and storage is important in both solar energy projects and in the recovery of waste heat from industrial processes. Whereas heat capture will mostly rely on the use of a heat carrier, the high efficiency heat storage needs to combine sensible and latent heat storage with phase change materials (PCMs) to provide a high energy density storage. The present paper briefly reviews energy developments and storage techniques, with special emphasis on thermal energy storage and the use of...

  10. Competing covalent and ionic bonding in Ge-Sb-Te phase change materials

    OpenAIRE

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Sun, J.; A. Subedi; Siegrist, T.; Singh, D.

    2016-01-01

    Ge2Sb2Te5 and related phase change materials are highly unusual in that they can be readily transformed between amorphous and crystalline states using very fast melt, quench, anneal cycles, although the resulting states are extremely long lived at ambient temperature. These states have remarkably different physical properties including very different optical constants in the visible in strong contrast to common glass formers such as silicates or phosphates. This behavior has been described in...

  11. Changes in morphology of starch-based prothestic thermoplastic material during enzymatic degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Araújo, M. Alberta; Cunha, A.M.; Mota, M

    2004-01-01

    This work evaluates the structural changes of an interpenetrated starch thermoplastic blend withstanding different enzymatic -amylase degradation periods (up to 200 days), and establishes the relationships between the kinetics degradation rate and the structure of the material. It characterises the different stages of the enzymatic degradation process on starch/ethylenevinyl-alcohol blends, based on the attack of the connected starch domains that can be accessed by the enzymatic solution. The...

  12. Phase change material for the thermal protection of ice cream during storage and transportation

    OpenAIRE

    Leducq, D.; Ndoye, F.T.; Alvarez, G

    2015-01-01

    Ice cream is a very temperature sensitive product and temperature variations during the storage and distribution steps may result in a reduction of quality. It is possible to improve the ice cream storage and transportation conditions by using an additional packaging with a low thermal diffusivity. This paper studies a phase change material (PCM) packaging and compares its performance to a polystyrene packaging configuration. The impact on temperature fluctuations and ice crystal size distrib...

  13. Water solar distiller productivity enhancement using concentrating solar water heater and phase change material (PCM)

    OpenAIRE

    Miqdam T. Chaichan; Hussein A Kazem

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates usage of thermal energy storage extracted from concentrating solar heater for water distillation. Paraffin wax selected as a suitable phase change material, and it was used for storing thermal energy in two different insulated treasurers. The paraffin wax is receiving hot water from concentrating solar dish. This solar energy stored in PCM as latent heat energy. Solar energy stored in a day time with a large quantity, and some heat retrieved for later use. Water’s temp...

  14. Characterization of polymers and Microencapsulated Phase Change Materials used for Thermal Energy Storage in buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Giró Paloma, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    [eng] The use of renewable heat decreases the consumption of fossil resources, although its usage is intermittent and usually does not match the demand. A proper thermal energy storage system design can eliminate this problem by reducing the consumption of non-renewable resources and improving energy efficiency where used. In buildings, thermal energy storage using phase change materials (PCM) is a useful tool to achieve reduction in energy consumption. These can be incorporated into passive ...

  15. Structural and mechanical characterization of graphite foam/phase change material composites

    OpenAIRE

    Canseco, Vladimir; Anguy, Yannick; Roa Rovira, Joan Josep; PALOMO, Elena

    2014-01-01

    We consider graphite/phase change material (PCM) composites for energy storage by latent heat in the context of power generation by solar concentration technologies. Based on X-ray computerized tomography 3D data, we calculate the cell-size distribution of polycrystalline highly ordered mesophase pitch-based graphitic foams (KFoam ) and semi-crystalline coalbased graphite foams (CFoam ). Compressive experiments show that the elastic modulus and strength are higher in the z-dire...

  16. Preparation and Characterization of Microencapsulated Phase Change Materials for Use in Building Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Jessica Giro-Paloma; Refat Al-Shannaq; Ana Inés Fernández; Farid, Mohammed M.

    2015-01-01

    A method for preparing and characterizing microencapsulated phase change materials (MPCM) was developed. A comparison with a commercial MPCM is also presented. Both MPCM contained paraffin wax as PCM with acrylic shell. The melting temperature of the PCM was around 21 °C, suitable for building applications. The M-2 (our laboratory made sample) and Micronal® DS 5008 X (BASF) samples were characterized using SEM, DSC, nano-indentation technique, and Gas Chromatography/Mass spectrometry (GC-MS)....

  17. Stability and corrosion testing of a high temperature phase change material for CSP applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Bell, Stuart; Tay, Steven; Will, Geoffrey; Saman, Wasim; Bruno, Frank

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the stability and corrosion testing results of a candidate high temperature phase change material (PCM) for potential use in concentrating solar power applications. The investigated PCM is a eutectic mixture of NaCl and Na2CO3 and both are low cost materials. This PCM has a melting temperature of 635 °C and a relatively high latent heat of fusion of 308.1 J/g. The testing was performed by means of an electric furnace subjected to 150 melt-freeze cycles between 600 °C and 650 °C. The results showed that this PCM candidate has no obvious decomposition up to 650 °C after 150 cycles and stainless steel 316 potentially can be used as the containment material under the minimized oxygen atmosphere.

  18. Ultrastructural changes of cell walls under intense mechanical treatment of selective plant raw material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural changes of cell walls under intense mechanical treatment of corn straw and oil-palm fibers were studied by electron and light microscopy. Differences in the character of destruction of plant biomass were revealed, and the dependence of destruction mechanisms on the structure of cell walls and lignin content was demonstrated. We suggest that the high reactivity of the particles of corn straw (about 18% of lignin) after intense mechanical treatment is related to disordering of cell walls and an increase of the surface area, while in the case of oil palm (10% of lignin) the major contribution into an increase in the reactivity is made by an increase of surface area. -- Highlights: ► Structure of cell walls determines the processes of plant materials' destruction. ► Ultrastructure of highly lignified materials strongly disordering by mechanical action. ► Ultrastructure of low-lignified materials is not disordering by mechanical action.

  19. Matrix changes and side effects induced by electrokinetic treatment of porous and particulate materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Gry

    different types of materials. The overall aim of this PhD-project is to evaluate matrix changes and side effects induced by electrokinetic treatment of porous and particulate materials.During electro-remediation protons are produced at the anode and hydroxyl ions are produced at the cathode. The consequent...... electrodialytic remediation and the impact on the implementation of soil remediation, e.g. concerning the toxicity of residualsoluble Al in the soil matrix.Electrokinetic treatment was carried out as electrodialytic remediation (EDR) of three particulate matrices (soils and clay) and electrochemical desalination......Transport of ions in an applied electric field holds many applications within both civil and environmental engineering, e.g. for removal of chlorides from concrete to hinder reinforcement corrosion, remediation of heavy metals from soils and other waste materials and recently for desalination of...

  20. Integration of phase change materials in compressed hydrogen gas systems: Modelling and parametric analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea; Rothuizen, Erasmus; Jørgensen, Jens-Erik;

    2016-01-01

    A dynamic fueling model is built to simulate the fueling process of a hydrogen tank with an integrated passive cooling system. The study investigates the possibility of absorbing a part of the heat of compression in the high latent-heat material during melting, with the aim of saving the monetary...... the phase change material, mainly occurs after the fueling is completed, resulting in a hydrogen peak temperature higher than 85 C and a lower fueled mass than a gas-cooled system. Such a mass reduction accounts for 12% with respect to the case of a standard tank system fueled at 40 C. A parametric...... analysis that embraces the main thermal properties of the heat-absorbing material as well as the major design parameters is here carried out to determine possible solutions. It is found that the improvement of a single thermal property does not provide any significant benefit and that the most effective...

  1. Carbon dynamics in different soil types amended with pig slurry, pig manure and its biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanardag, Ibrahim H.; Zornoza, Raúl; Faz, Ángel; Büyükkiliç-Yanardaǧ, Asuman; Mermut, Ahmet R.

    2014-05-01

    Determining the structure and components of soil and soil organic matter is very important in terms of sustainable agriculture and forestry and greenhouse gases emissions. Organic management can increase labile C and N in the short-term, and total soil C and N in the long-term, but less is known about how management practices may affect soil organic C (SOC)quality and stability. Methods to improve the management of livestock slurries to reduce the environmental impact and carbon losses are gaining importance. There is a need to find the best wastes treatment which enhances soil fertility but also carbon sequestration, to mitigate the effects of global warming. The objective of this study was to assess the short-term changes in SOC pools, using raw pig slurry, the solid phase of pig slurry, and its biochar as amendment in different soil types (Regosol, Luvisol and Kastanozem). The three different amendments were applied at 5 g C kg-1 soil. An unamended soil for each type was used as control. Soils were incubated in triplicate for 60 days at 25ºC and at 55% of their water holding capacity. Samples were sampled to monitor the evolution of soil organic and inorganic carbon, recalcitrant carbon, soluble carbon, carbon mineralization, SOC thermal distribution (thermogravimetric analysis - differential scanning calorimetry - quadrupole mass spectrometry), and characterization of functional groups (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR)). Results showed that soils amended with raw pig slurry and the solid phase of the slurry showed higher values of soluble carbon, and higher carbon mineralization rates compared to biochar application, which showed values similar to controls. SOC increased at the end of incubation with biochar and the solid phase of the slurry applications in Kastanozem and Regosol. Thermogravimetric results showed an increased weight loss of the Regosol compared to Luvisol and Kastanozem, owing to the higher content of soil carbonates. Luvisol and

  2. Effects of ionizing radiation on plastic food packaging materials: a review. 1. Chemical and physical changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation of prepackaged food causes chemical and physical changes in plastic packaging materials. The effects of ionizing radiation on these materials have been studied for almost 40 years; the respective literature is reviewed to provide the basis for a safety evaluation of plastics for use in food irradiation. Permeability of plastic films is generally not affected; deterioration of mechanical properties, that may occur with certain polymers, can usually be controlled with adequate stabilizers; and changes in infrared and UV/VIS spectra are slight at food irradiation doses. Gaseous radiolysis products include hydrogen, methane, CO2, CO, hydrocarbons, and for chlorine-containing polymers, hydrogen chloride. A range of volatile products, mainly hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, and carboxylic acids, has been characterized for low density polyethylene and polypropylene, other important materials, e.g., polystyrene and poly(vinyl chloride), are less well-investigated. Comparatively little is known on the effect of irradiation on multilayer structures. Radiation-induced changes are shown to depend on the chemical structure of the polymer, on the composition (additives) and processing history of the plastic, and on the irradiation conditions

  3. Examination of a Size-Change Test for Photovoltaic Encapsulation Materials: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Gu, X.; Ji, L.; Kelly, G.; Gu, X.; Nickel, N.; Norum, P.; Shioda, T.; Tamizhmani, G.

    2012-08-01

    We examine a proposed test standard that can be used to evaluate the maximum representative change in linear dimensions of sheet encapsulation products for photovoltaic modules (resulting from their thermal processing). The proposed protocol is part of a series of material-level tests being developed within Working Group 2 of the Technical Committee 82 of the International Electrotechnical Commission. The characterization tests are being developed to aid module design (by identifying the essential characteristics that should be communicated on a datasheet), quality control (via internal material acceptance and process control), and failure analysis. Discovery and interlaboratory experiments were used to select particular parameters for the size-change test. The choice of a sand substrate and aluminum carrier is explored relative to other options. The temperature uniformity of +/- 5C for the substrate was confirmed using thermography. Considerations related to the heating device (hot-plate or oven) are explored. The time duration of 5 minutes was identified from the time-series photographic characterization of material specimens (EVA, ionomer, PVB, TPO, and TPU). The test procedure was revised to account for observed effects of size and edges. The interlaboratory study identified typical size-change characteristics, and also verified the absolute reproducibility of +/- 5% between laboratories.

  4. Preparation and thermal conductivity enhancement of composite phase change materials for electronic thermal management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A kind of composite phase change material board (PCMB) is prepared and tested. • PCMB presents a large thermal storage capacity and enhanced thermal conductivity. • PCMB displays much better cooling effect in comparison to natural air cooling. • PCMB presents different cooling characteristics in comparison to ribbed radiator. - Abstract: A kind of phase change material board (PCMB) was prepared for use in the thermal management of electronics, with paraffin and expanded graphite as the phase change material and matrix, respectively. The as-prepared PCMB presented a large thermal storage capacity of 141.74 J/g and enhanced thermal conductivity of 7.654 W/(m K). As a result, PCMB displayed much better cooling effect in comparison to natural air cooling, i.e., much lower heating rate and better uniformity of temperature distribution. On the other hand, compared with ribbed radiator technology, PCMB also presented different cooling characteristics, demonstrating that they were suitable for different practical application

  5. Thermal management of electronics using phase change material based pin fin heat sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the results of an experimental study carried out to explore the thermal characteristics of phase change material based heat sinks for electronic equipment cooling. The phase change material (PCM) used in this study is n – eicosane. All heat sinks used in the present study are made of aluminium with dimensions of 80 × 62 mm2 base with a height of 25 mm. Pin fins acts as the thermal conductivity enhancer (TCE) to improve the distribution of heat more uniformly as the thermal conductivity of the PCM is very low. A total of three different pin fin heat sink geometries with 33, 72 and 120 pin fins filled with phase change materials giving rise to 4%, 9% and 15% volume fractions of the TCE respectively were experimentally investigated. Baseline comparisons are done with a heat sink filled with PCM, without any fin. Studies are conducted for heat sinks on which a uniform heat load is applied at the bottom for the finned and unfinned cases. The effect of pin fins of different volume fractions with power levels ranging from 4 to 8 W corresponding to a heat flux range of 1. 59 to 3.17 kW/m2, was explored in this paper. The volume fraction of the PCM (PCM volume / (Total volume – fin volume)) is also varied as 0. 3, 0.6 and 1 to determine the effect of PCM volume on the overall performance of the electronic equipment.

  6. Phase change material thermal storage for biofuel preheating in micro trigeneration application: A numerical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Engine exhaust heat driven phase change material thermal storage. • Fuel preheating for direct use of straight plant oil on diesel engine. • CFD aided design of the phase change material thermal storage. • Melting and solidification model considering natural convection. - Abstract: A biofuel micro trigeneration prototype has been developed to utilise local energy crop oils as fuel in rural areas and developing countries. Straight plant oils (SPOs) only leave behind very little carbon footprint during its simply production process compared to commercial biodiesels in refineries, but the high viscosity of SPOs causes difficulties at engine cold starts, which further results in poor fuel atomisation, compromised engine performance and fast engine deterioration. In this study, a phase change material (PCM) thermal storage is designed to recover and store engine exhaust heat to preheat SPOs at cold starts. High temperature commercial paraffin is selected as the PCM to meet the optimal preheating temperature range of 70–90 °C, in terms of the SPO property study. A numerical model of the PCM thermal storage is developed and validated by references. The PCM melting and solidification processes with the consideration of natural convection in liquid zone are simulated in ANSYS-FLUENT to verify the feasibility of the PCM thermal storage as a part of the self-contained biofuel micro trigeneration prototype

  7. Examination of a size-change test for photovoltaic encapsulation materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David C.; Gu, Xiaohong; Ji, Liang; Kelly, George; Nickel, Nichole; Norum, Paul; Shioda, Tsuyoshi; Tamizhmani, Govindasamy; Wohlgemuth, John H.

    2012-10-01

    We examine a proposed test standard that can be used to evaluate the maximum representative change in linear dimensions of sheet encapsulation products for photovoltaic modules (resulting from their thermal processing). The proposed protocol is part of a series of material-level tests being developed within Working Group 2 of the Technical Committee 82 of the International Electrotechnical Commission. The characterization tests are being developed to aid module design (by identifying the essential characteristics that should be communicated on a datasheet), quality control (via internal material acceptance and process control), and failure analysis. Discovery and interlaboratory experiments were used to select particular parameters for the size-change test. The choice of a sand substrate and aluminum carrier is explored relative to other options. The temperature uniformity of +/-5°C for the substrate was confirmed using thermography. Considerations related to the heating device (hot-plate or oven) are explored. The time duration of 5 minutes was identified from the time-series photographic characterization of material specimens (EVA, ionomer, PVB, TPO, and TPU). The test procedure was revised to account for observed effects of size and edges. The interlaboratory study identified typical size-change characteristics, and also verified the absolute reproducibility of +/-5% between laboratories.

  8. Protozoan predation in soil slurries compromises determination of contaminant mineralization potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soil suspensions (slurries) are commonly used to estimate the potential of soil microbial communities to mineralize organic contaminants. The preparation of soil slurries disrupts soil structure, however, potentially affecting both the bacterial populations and their protozoan predators. We studied the importance of this “slurry effect” on mineralization of the herbicide 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA, 14C-labelled), focussing on the effects of protozoan predation. Mineralization of MCPA was studied in “intact” soil and soil slurries differing in soil:water ratio, both in the presence and absence of the protozoan activity inhibitor cycloheximide. Protozoan predation inhibited mineralization in dense slurry of subsoil (soil:water ratio 1:3), but only in the most dilute slurry of topsoil (soil:water ratio 1:100). Our results demonstrate that protozoan predation in soil slurries may compromise quantification of contaminant mineralization potential, especially when the initial density of degrader bacteria is low and their growth is controlled by predation during the incubation period. - Highlights: ► We studied the protozoan impact on MCPA mineralization in soil slurries. ► Cycloheximide was used as protozoan inhibitor. ► Protozoa inhibited MCPA mineralization in dilute topsoil slurry and subsoil slurry. ► Mineralization potentials may be underestimated when using soil slurries. - Protozoan predation may strongly bias the quantification of mineralization potential when performed in soil slurries, especially when the initial density of degrader bacteria is low such as in subsoil or very dilute topsoil slurries.

  9. Developments in organic solid–liquid phase change materials and their applications in thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Review of organic phase change materials for thermal energy storage. • Review of the eutectic mixtures of organic PCMs. • Review of the techniques of PCM encapsulations and enhancing the thermal conductivity. • Applications of low and medium temperature organic PCMs are listed in detail. • Recommendations are made for future applications of organic PCMs. - Abstract: Thermal energy storage as sensible or latent heat is an efficient way to conserve the waste heat and excess energy available such as solar radiation. Storage of latent heat using organic phase change materials (PCMs) offers greater energy storage density over a marginal melting and freezing temperature difference in comparison to inorganic materials. These favorable characteristics of organic PCMs make them suitable in a wide range of applications. These materials and their eutectic mixtures have been successfully tested and implemented in many domestic and commercial applications such as, building, electronic devices, refrigeration and air-conditioning, solar air/water heating, textiles, automobiles, food, and space industries. This review focuses on three aspects: the materials, encapsulation and applications of organic PCMs, and provides an insight on the recent developments in applications of these materials. Organic PCMs have inherent characteristic of low thermal conductivity (0.15–0.35 W/m K), hence, a larger surface area is required to enhance the heat transfer rate. Therefore, attention is also given to the thermal conductivity enhancement of the materials, which helps to keep the area of the system to a minimum. Besides, various available techniques for material characterization have also been discussed. It has been found that a wide range of the applications of organic PCMs in buildings and other low and medium temperature solar energy applications are in abundant use but these materials are not yet popular among space applications and virtual data storage media. In

  10. Sample vial inserts: A better approach for sampling heterogeneous slurry samples in the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A convenient and effective new approach for analyzing DWPF samples involves the use of inserts with volumes of 1.5--3 ml placed in the neck of 14 ml sample vials. The inserts have rims that conform to the rim of the vials so that they sit straight and stable in the vial. The DWPF tank sampling system fills the pre-weighed insert rather than the entire vial, so the vial functions only as the insert holder. The shielded cell operator then removes the vial cap and decants the insert containing the sample into a plastic bottle, crucible, etc., for analysis. Inert materials such as Teflon, plastic, and zirconium are used for the insert so it is unnecessary to separate the insert from the sample for most analyses. The key technique advantage of using inserts to take DWPF samples versus filling sample vials is that it provides a convenient and almost foolproof way of obtaining and handling small volumes of slurry samples in a shielded cell without corrupting the sample. Since the insert allows the entire sample to be analyzed, this approach eliminates the errors inherent with subsampling heterogeneous slurries that comprise DWPF samples. Slurry samples can then be analyzed with confidence. Analysis times are dramatically reduced by eliminating the drying and vitrification steps normally used to produce a homogeneous solid sample. Direct dissolution and elemental analysis of slurry samples are achieved in 8 hours or less compared with 40 hours for analysis of vitrified slurry samples. Comparison of samples taken in inserts versus full vials indicate that the insert does not significantly affect sample composition

  11. Wear surface studies on coal water slurry nozzles in industrial boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, Al2O3/(W,Ti)C ceramic, WC/Co cemented carbide, and 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel were produced to be used as nozzle materials in coal water slurry (CWS) industry boilers. Coal water slurry burning tests with these nozzles were carried out. The wear surface features of the nozzles made from these materials were examined. The results showed that the wear mechanisms of nozzles varied from entry to exit. The material removal of Al2O3/(W,Ti)C ceramic nozzle in CWS atomizing and burning is attributed to a mixed mode damage by brittle fracture, polishing, thermal cracking and chipping. The nozzle entry section appears to be entirely brittle in nature with evidence of large scale-chipping. The centre bore area showed a polishing effect with a very smooth surface. While the exit section exhibits cracking owing to the large thermal shock. Examination of the eroded bore surface of the WC/Co cemented carbide nozzles demonstrated that the wear occurred through preferential removal of the metal binder (Co) followed by pluck-out of the exposed WC grains at the entry zone, while the center and the exit zone showed polishing action. The primary wear mechanisms of 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel nozzle exhibited plastic deformation at the entry zone, and plowing and micro-cutting at the other zones by the eroded particles

  12. Changes in European forest raw material trade: Consequences of implementing the RES2020 Directive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to assess possible changes in the European trade patterns of forest raw material arising from the implementation of the RES2020 Directive. The analysis is done by developing a partial general equilibrium model of the European trade in forest raw materials. The results suggest that the ambitious EU energy policy goal, stimulating the use of forest raw materials, will boost its trade. In the RES2020 scenario the total trade in by-products will increase with 61 percent – from 38 million to 61 million cubic metres solid volume compared to the baseline scenario. For logging residues the amount increases from 50 million to 104 million cubic metres solid volume – or by 110 percent in the RES2020 scenario compared to the baseline. Since the national goals in the RES2020 Directive are mandatory in contrast to the indicative recommendations stated in previous EU energy policies on renewables this study concludes that a more ambitious goal will inevitably affect the input competing industries. This stresses the need to thoroughly account for different aspects when evaluating the consequences of different policies. -- Highlights: ► European forest raw material trade is modelled. ► Implementation of the RES2020 Directive is examined. ► An implementation of the directive will boost forest raw material trade. ► More ambitious goals will affect the input competing industries.

  13. Effects of Slurry Chemistry on the Rate of Agglomeration of Alumina Nanoparticles for Chemical Mechanical Planarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahma, Neil Anjan

    Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) is a polishing process used during the manufacture of microelectronic integrated circuits. During fabrication of multilevel circuitry, excess deposited material must be removed and the wafer surface globally planarized for proper function of devices. This is especially necessary with copper interconnects, thus, copper CMP was the focus of this study. CMP requires the use of a slurry containing nanometer-sized abrasive particles along with a variety of chemical additives. The particles and chemicals act synergistically to mechanically and chemically remove material and provide a near globally planar surface. For optimal CMP performance, the effective abrasive particle size must be controlled. If particles aggregate, CMP performance may diminish and possibly even cause defective devices. The chemistry of the slurry (pH, ions present, etc) can not only affect the mean aggregate size of the abrasive particles, but also growth of aggregate over time. This research investigated the aggregation behavior of suspensions of 150 nm alumina particles in 1mM KNO3 with various additives (glycine, H2O2, benzotriazole, and sodium dodecyl sulfate) used in CMP of copper through effective particle (agglomerate) size versus time and zeta potential measurements. Aggregate size rate data were analyzed to elucidate the mechanism of aggregation, as well its effect on the structure of the resultant aggregate. The effects of temperature of the slurry were also explored. Finally, particle size distribution data collected at various stages of aggregation were incorporated into the Luo and Dornfeld model of CMP to investigate the dynamic nature of the CMP process.

  14. Semisolid Slurry Preparation of Die Steel with High Chromium Content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Wei-min; ZHAO Ai-min; ZHANG Li-juan; ZHONG Xue-you

    2004-01-01

    The semisolid slurry preparation of die steels Cr12 and Cr12MoV with high chromium content was studied. The results show that the semisolid slurry of both steels with solid of 40 %-60 % can be made by electromagnetic stirring method and is easy to be discharged from the bottom little hole of the stirring chamber. The sizes of the spherical primary austenite in the slurry of die steels Cr12 and Cr12MoV are 50-100 μm and 80-150 μm, respectively. The homogeneous temperature field and solute field for both steel melts are obtained. The strong temperature fluctuation in the melt with many fine primary austenite grains occurs and the remelting of the secondary arm roots at the same time is accelerated because of the electromagnetic stirring. These are the most important reasons for deposition of spherical primary austenite grains.

  15. Gas distribution effects on waste properties: Viscosities of bubbly slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The retention and episodic release of flammable gases are critical safety concerns for double-shell tanks that contain waste slurries. The rheological behavior of the waste, particularly of the settled sludge, is critical to characterizing the tendency of the waste to retain gas bubbles. The presence of gas bubbles is expected to affect the rheology of the sludge, but essentially no literature data are available to assess the effect of bubbles. Accordingly, the objectives of this study are to develop models for the effect of gas bubbles on the viscosity of a particulate slurry, develop an experimental method (capillary rheometer), collect data on the viscosity of a bubbly slurry, and develop a theoretical basis for interpreting the experimental data from the capillary rheometer

  16. Selection of design parameters for a slurry injection tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Y; Munkholm, Lars Juhl; Nyord, Tavs

    2013-01-01

    selected through applying the optimization approach. The four sweeps were tested at different working depths (75, 100, and 125 mm below soil surface) in a field with loamy sandy soil. The results showed that draft force and soil cross-sectional area tilled had similar trends as predicted in the...... determined through minimizing the tool draft force with constraints which ensured that the desired amount of slurry can be injected into the soil without slurry being exposed on the soil surface. Four sweeps with different working widths (50, 110, 180, and 250 mm) and a constant rake angle of 15° were...... optimization in terms of the effects of sweep width and working depth. Among all the combinations of sweep width and working depth, the 180 mm sweep working at 100 mm depth had the best performance, as indicated by its lowest draft force and most favorable soil surface profile for covering injected slurry....

  17. The weight change of various light-cured restorative materials stored in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyf, Filiz; Yalçin, Filiz

    2005-05-15

    This study investigated weight changes of seven different light-cured composite restorative materials, one polyacid glass ionomer compomer, and one light-cured glass-ionomer cement following short-term and long-term storage in water. Two packable composites, three universal (hybrid) composites, one microglass composite, one polyacid glass ionomer resin composite (compomer), one microhybrid low-viscosity (flowable) composite, and one light cured glass ionomer composite cement were evaluated in this study. The weight changes of these specimens were measured daily (short-term storage), and they were measured after six weeks (long-term storage) using an electronic analytical balance. A significant difference was found in Ionoliner, Dyract AP, Opticor flow, Charisma, and Solitare 2, but no significant difference was found in the others (Filtek Z 250, Filtek P60, TPH Spectrum, and Valux Plus). Weight change showed a tendency to increase with the time of water storage. The greatest weight change occurred in light-cured glass ionomer composite cement (Ionoliner), which is followed in order by the weight changes in Dyract AP, Opticor Flow, Charisma, Solitare 2, Filtek Z250, Filtek P60, TPH Spectrum; Valux Plus had the least amount of change. PMID:15915206

  18. Impact of toothpaste slurry abrasivity and toothbrush filament stiffness on abrasion of eroded enamel - an in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Wiegand, Annette; Schwerzmann, Martina; Sener, Beatrice; Magalhães, Ana C.; Roos, Malgorzata; Ziebolz, Dirk; Imfeld, Thomas; Attin, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Toothbrush abrasion is significant in the development of tooth wear, particularly when combined with erosion. This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the impact of toothpaste slurry abrasivity and toothbrush filament stiffness on abrasion of eroded enamel. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eroded enamel samples (hydrochloric acid, pH: 2.6, 15 s) were brushed with 40 strokes in an automatic brushing machine using manual toothbrushes with different filament stiffness (filament diameter: 0.15, 0.20...

  19. Development of Alternative Rheological Measurements for DWPF Slurry Samples (U)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, D. c.

    2005-09-01

    Rheological measurements are used to evaluate the fluid dynamic behavior of Defense Waste Processing Facility, DWPF, slurry samples. Measurements are currently made on non-radioactive simulant slurries using two state-of-the-art rheometers located at the Aiken County Technical Laboratory, ACTL. Measurements are made on plant samples using a rheometer in the Savannah River National Laboratory, SRNL, Shielded Cells facility. Low activity simulants or plant samples can be analyzed using a rheometer located in a radioactive hood in SRNL. Variations in the rheology of SB2 simulants impacted the interpretation of results obtained in a number of related studies. A separate rheological study was initiated with the following four goals: (1) Document the variations seen in the simulant slurries, both by a review of recent data, and by a search for similar samples for further study. (2) Attempt to explain the variations in rheological behavior, or, failing that, reduce the number of possible causes. In particular, to empirically check for rheometer-related variations. (3) Exploit the additional capabilities of the rheometers by developing new measurement methods to study the simulant rheological properties in new ways. (4) Formalize the rheological measurement process for DWPF-related samples into a series of protocols. This report focuses on the third and fourth goals. The emphasis of this report is on the development and formalization of rheological measurement methods used to characterize DWPF slurry samples. The organization is by rheological measurement method. Progress on the first two goals was documented in a concurrent technical report, Koopman (2005). That report focused on the types and possible causes of unusual rheological behavior in simulant slurry samples. It was organized by the sample being studied. The experimental portion of this study was performed in the period of March to April 2004. A general rheology protocol for routine DWPF slurry samples, Koopman

  20. Development of Alternative Rheological Measurements for DWPF Slurry Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rheological measurements are used to evaluate the fluid dynamic behavior of Defense Waste Processing Facility, DWPF, slurry samples. Measurements are currently made on non-radioactive simulant slurries using two state-of-the-art rheometers located at the Aiken County Technical Laboratory, ACTL. Measurements are made on plant samples using a rheometer in the Savannah River National Laboratory, SRNL, Shielded Cells facility. Low activity simulants or plant samples can be analyzed using a rheometer located in a radioactive hood in SRNL. Variations in the rheology of SB2 simulants impacted the interpretation of results obtained in a number of related studies. A separate rheological study was initiated with the following four goals: (1) Document the variations seen in the simulant slurries, both by a review of recent data, and by a search for similar samples for further study. (2) Attempt to explain the variations in rheological behavior, or, failing that, reduce the number of possible causes. In particular, to empirically check for rheometer-related variations. (3) Exploit the additional capabilities of the rheometers by developing new measurement methods to study the simulant rheological properties in new ways. (4) Formalize the rheological measurement process for DWPF-related samples into a series of protocols. This report focuses on the third and fourth goals. The emphasis of this report is on the development and formalization of rheological measurement methods used to characterize DWPF slurry samples. The organization is by rheological measurement method. Progress on the first two goals was documented in a concurrent technical report, Koopman (2005). That report focused on the types and possible causes of unusual rheological behavior in simulant slurry samples. It was organized by the sample being studied. The experimental portion of this study was performed in the period of March to April 2004. A general rheology protocol for routine DWPF slurry samples, Koopman

  1. Experimental module for removal of radioactive slurry from Lrw storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report gives information on elaboration and creation of an experimental module for removal radioactive slurry from LRW storage tanks. The main functional features of this experimental module are to suspend radioactive slurry packed in the bottom of a storage tank subjected to cleaning up, to suck the suspended radioactive slurry, to concentrate and separate radioactive slurry in a settling apparatus. The resulting flows from the module are concentrated and preconditioned radioactive slurry and LRW freed from solids. The concentrated and preconditioned radioactive slurry can be further directed for solidification by appropriate methods and LRW freed from solids can be cleaned by commonly used purification methods. The experimental module is supplied with a video-controlling system, which allows supervising the process of slurry removal. The experimental module is currently under testing with non-radioactive slurry therefore, there are no results of its application for real radioactive waste. (authors)

  2. Tin-wall hollow ceramic spheres from slurries. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, A.T.; Cochran, J.K.

    1992-12-31

    The overall objective of this effort was to develop a process for economically fabricating thin-wall hollow ceramic spheres from conventional ceramic powders using dispersions. This process resulted in successful production of monosized spheres in the mm size range which were point contact bonded into foams. Thin-wall hollow ceramic spheres of small (one to five millimeter) diameter have novel applications as high-temperature insulation and light structural materials when bonded into monolithic foams. During Phase 1 of this program the objective as to develop a process for fabricating thin-wall hollow spheres from powder slurries using the coaxial nozzle fabrication method. Based on the success during Phase 1, Phase 2 was revised to emphasize the assessment of the potential structural and insulation applications for the spheres and modeling of the sphere formation process was initiated. As more understanding developed, it was clear that to achieve successful structural application, the spheres had to be bonded into monolithic foams and the effort was further expanded to include both bonding into structures and finite element mechanical modeling which became the basis of Phase 3. Successful bonding techniques and mechanical modeling resulted but thermal conductivities were higher than desired for insulating activities. In addition, considerable interest had been express by industry for the technology. Thus the final Phase 4 concentrated on methods to reduce thermal conductivity by a variety of techniques and technology transfer through individualized visits. This program resulted in three Ph.D. theses and 10 M.S. theses and they are listed in the appropriate technical sections.

  3. Inline calculation tool for the determination of the changeover time for color and material changes in polymer processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgfeld, Michael; Wortberg, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    A change of extruded plastic products into a different material or color is connected to a wasteful process, regarding the loss of material, energy and system availability. Because of this, plastic processing companies want to reduce the required time between the basic and the target product. In the extrusion processes there are two possibilities to change from one material to another. The first option is the manual cleaning of the extruder and extrusion die, which leads to with a production stop and a high personnel effort. The second option is to perform a direct material or color change. The disadvantage of this method are the produced rejects during the change. Further, it is difficult to detect the end of the changing process, based on the product color, without expert knowledge. The LabVIEW inline calculation tool allows to detect the progress of the material change dynamically and to predict the needed time to reach the end of the changing process. Therefore an inline color measurement system ACS 7000 by μEpsilon is used to analyze the continuous change of color of the extrudate. The color information is converted into the numerical L*a*b* -color system and is compared to reference data, which are stored in a material database for different target materials and/or colors. The result of this comparison can be expressed as so-called color distance ΔE, which is necessary to determine the end of the changing process. With increasing changing time, the color distance is decreasing. After reaching a specified color distance ΔE a difference between the extrudate color and the target color is not detectable for the human eye anymore. The color change is finished. By analyzing the measured color changing progress, the tool is also able to predict the needed changing time. The functional capability of the tool is proved by a color change experiment from blue to natural material on a laboratory extruder

  4. Combined pig slurry and mineral fertilization for corn cultivation

    OpenAIRE

    Maritane Prior; Silvio César Sampaio; Lúcia Helena Pereira Nóbrega; Miguel Angel Uribe Opazo; Jonhatan Dieter; Thaisa Pegoraro

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the environmental effects of the use of pig slurry to irrigate the corn crop grown in a typical Red Distroferric Latosol and in leachate composition. Twenty four lysimeters, filled with soil, in a protected environment, received five doses of pig slurry (0; 112.5; 225; 337.5 and 450 m³ ha-1 per growing cycle) combined with two mineral fertilization doses (50 and 75% of the recommended dose - 80 kg ha-1of nitrogen). Corn height and yield were evaluate...

  5. Electrochemical behaviors of silicon wafers in silica slurry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaolan Song; Haiping Yang; Xunda Shi; Xi He; Guanzhou Qiu

    2008-01-01

    The electrochemical behaviors of n-type silicon wafers in silica-based slurry were investigated, and the influences of the pH value and solid content of the slurry on the corrosion of silicon wafers were studied by using electrochemical DC polarization and AC impedance techniques. The results revealed that these factors affected the corrosion behaviors of silicon wafers to different degrees and had their suitable parameters that made the maximum corrosion rate of the wafers. The corrosion potential of (100) surface was lower than that of (111), whereas the current density of (100) was much higher than that of (111).

  6. Separation of phosphorus from pig slurry using chemical additives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Estevez Rodriguez, M.D.; Gomez del Puerto, A.M.; Montealegre Meléndez, M.L.;

    2005-01-01

    Increasing livestock production and regulation of the amount of phosphorus (P) that may be applied to arable land may force livestock farmers to transport animal manure over long distances if plant nutrients in the manure are to be used in a sustainable way. Animal slurry contains large amounts of...... retention of P in a solid fraction. The laboratory studies showed that 98% of the P in slurry was retained in the solid fraction retained on the filter net (12% to 28% retained W:W) after the addition of coagulants and flocculants. Linear cationic polyacrylamide polymers proved to be more efficient at lower...

  7. Drag reduction of concentrated fine-grained slurries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlasák, Pavel; Chára, Zdeněk; Konfršt, Jiří

    Wroclaw : Wydawnictwo Akademii Rolniczej we Wroclawiu, 2006 - (Gochitashvili, T.; Sobota, J.), s. 177-186 ISBN 83-60574-00-6. ISSN 0867-7964. - (Zeszyty Naukowe Akademii Rplniczej we Wroclawiu Nr 542. Konferencje XXXVIII). [International Conference on Transport and Sedimentation of Solid Particles /13./. Tbilisi (GE), 18.09.2006-20.09.2006] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200600503 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : concentrated slurry * kaolin slurry * ash-water mixture * effect of shearing * drag reduction * effect of particle size distribution Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  8. Steam Explosions in Slurry-fed Ceramic Melters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, J.T.

    2001-03-28

    This report assesses the potential and consequences of a steam explosion in Slurry Feed Ceramic Melters (SFCM). The principles that determine if an interaction is realistically probable within a SFCM are established. Also considered are the mitigating effects due to dissolved, non-condensable gas(es) and suspended solids within the slurry feed, radiation, high glass viscosity, and the existence of a cold cap. The report finds that, even if any explosion were to occur, however, it would not be large enough to compromise vessel integrity.

  9. Numerical Model and Analysis of Peak Temperature Reduction in LiFePO4 Battery Packs Using Phase Change Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coman, Paul Tiberiu; Veje, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Numerical model and analysis of peak temperature reduction in LiFePO4 battery packs using phase change materials......Numerical model and analysis of peak temperature reduction in LiFePO4 battery packs using phase change materials...

  10. Review of the use of phase change materials (PCMs in buildings with reinforced concrete structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pons, O.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Phase change materials are capable of storing and releasing energy in the form of heat in determined temperature ranges, so to increase a building’s thermal inertia, stabilize its indoor temperatures and reduce its energetic demand. Therefore, if we used these materials we could have more energetically efficient buildings. Nevertheless, are these materials most appropriate to be used in buildings? Could the incorporation of phase change materials in buildings with concrete structures be generalized? This article aims to carry out a review of these phase change materials from construction professionals’ points of view, study their applications for buildings with reinforced concrete structures and the key points for these applications, draw conclusions and provide recommendations useful for all professionals within the sector who are considering the application of these materials.Los materiales de cambio de fase son capaces de almacenar y liberar energía en forma de calor en un determinando rango de temperaturas, y así aumentar la inercia térmica de un edificio, estabilizar las temperaturas en el interior y reducir la demanda energética. En consecuencia, si utilizáramos estos materiales podríamos tener un parque de edificios más eficientes energéticamente. No obstante, ¿estos materiales son apropiados para usarse en edificios? ¿Se podría generalizar la incorporación de materiales de cambio de fase en edificios con estructuras de hormigón? Este artículo tiene como objetivos hacer una revisión del estado del arte de estos materiales de cambio de fase desde el punto de vista de los profesionales de la construcción, estudiar las aplicaciones en edificios con estructuras de hormigón armado y los puntos clave para estas aplicaciones, extraer conclusiones y recomendaciones útiles para los profesionales del sector que se planteen la utilización de estos materiales.

  11. Consideration Of The Change Of Material Emission Signatures Due To Long-term Emissions For Enhancing Voc Source Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, K. H.; Zhang, J. S.; Knudsen, H. N.; Wargocki, Pawel; Guo, B.

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize the changes of VOC material emission profiles over time and develop a method to account for such changes in order to enhance a source identification technique that is based on the measurements of mixed air samples and the emission signatures of...... individual building materials determined by PTRMS. Source models, including powerlaw model, doubleexponential decay model and mechanistic diffusion model, were employed to track the change of individual material emission signatures by PTRMS over a ninemonth period. Samples of nine typical building materials...

  12. Novel solid – solid phase change material based on polyethylene glycol and cellulose used for temperature stabilisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojda Marta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal management is one of crucial issues in the development of modern electronic devices. In the recent years interest in phase change materials (PCMs as alternative cooling possibility has increased significantly. Preliminary results concerning the research into possibility of the use of solid-solid phase change materials (S-S PCMs for stabilisation temperature of electronic devices has been presented in the paper. Novel solid-solid phase change material based on polyethylene glycol and cellulose has been synthesized. Attempt to improve its thermal conductivity has been taken. Material has been synthesized for the purpose of stabilisation of temperature of electronic devices.

  13. Visualization of IOL Material-Induced Changes in Retinal Color Stimulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperlich, Karsten; Kunert, Martin; Guthoff, Rudolf F.; Stolz, Heinrich; Jünemann, Anselm; Stachs, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Different IOL materials, particularly blue-light filtering materials, have different spectral transmittance characteristics. The color stimuli, which influence retinal receptors objectively, have consequently implications for color perception. We report on the quantitative determination of IOL-specific transmittance characteristics and present a method visualizing the resultant changes in color stimulus. Methods. A setup was realized to quantify IOL-absorption in a range of 390–780 nm. To visualize the influence of the different spectral transmittance characteristics an algorithm was developed, which converts RGB-pixel values of images into spectra, which performs the corresponding transmittance correction, reconverts to RGB, and reconstructs the image. IOLs of hydrophobic acrylate and hydrophilic acrylate with a hydrophobic surface in each case with/without blue-light filter were examined. Results. Assessment of the reference images verifies the suitability of the pipeline. Evaluation of the transmittance spectra reveals differences of material- and manufacturer-specifics, which are capable of inducing considerable changes in color perception, particularly in the blue color range and mixed colors involving blue. Conclusions. The developed technique provides an approach for determining IOL-specific transmittance behavior and subsequently its influence on the retinal color stimulus. Problems of altered color perception are occasionally reported after cataract surgery and these become obvious with the visualization procedure developed here. PMID:27433351

  14. Experimental and Numerical Investigations of Thermal Ignition of a Phase Changing Energetic Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Shukla

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fortuitous exposure to high temperatures initiates reaction in energetic materials and possibilities of such event are of great concern in terms of the safe and controlled usage of explosive devices. Experimental and numerical investigations on time to explosion and location of ignition of a phase changing polymer bonded explosive material (80 per cent RDX and 20 per cent binder, contained in a metallic confinement subjected to controlled temperature build-up on its surface, are presented. An experimental setup was developed in which the polymer bonded explosive material filled in a cylindrical confinement was provided with a precise control of surface heating rate. Temperature at various radial locations was monitored till ignition. A computational model for solving two dimensional unsteady heat transfer with phase change and heat generation due to multi-step chemical reaction was developed. This model was implemented using a custom field function in the framework of a finite volume method based standard commercial solver. Numerical study could simulate the transient heat conduction, the melting pattern of the explosive within the charge and also the thermal runaway. Computed values of temperature evolution at various radial locations and the time to ignition were closely agreeing with those measured in experiment. Results are helpful both in predicting the possibility of thermal ignition during accidents as well as for the design of safety systems.

  15. High-Temperature Phase Change Materials (PCM) Candidates for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    It is clearly understood that lower overall costs are a key factor to make renewable energy technologies competitive with traditional energy sources. Energy storage technology is one path to increase the value and reduce the cost of all renewable energy supplies. Concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies have the ability to dispatch electrical output to match peak demand periods by employing thermal energy storage (TES). Energy storage technologies require efficient materials with high energy density. Latent heat TES systems using phase change material (PCM) are useful because of their ability to charge and discharge a large amount of heat from a small mass at constant temperature during a phase transformation like melting-solidification. PCM technology relies on the energy absorption/liberation of the latent heat during a physical transformation. The main objective of this report is to provide an assessment of molten salts and metallic alloys proposed as candidate PCMs for TES applications, particularly in solar parabolic trough electrical power plants at a temperature range from 300..deg..C to 500..deg.. C. The physical properties most relevant for PCMs service were reviewed from the candidate selection list. Some of the PCM candidates were characterized for: chemical stability with some container materials; phase change transformation temperatures; and latent heats.

  16. Change of the chemical barrier performance of cement materials altered by hydrothermal reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cement has been considered to be a useful material because its chemical property is potentially suitable for immobilization of radioactive waste. In particular, the sorption of radionuclides onto cement material is very important parameter in the TRU waste disposal system containing long-life radionuclides. For the long term, in the disposal environment, cement materials must be altered by dissolution, chemical reaction with ions dissolved in the ground water, and hydrothermal reaction etc. Once the composition or crystallinity of minerals in cement is changed, the chemical properties, especially sorption, might be changed. However, the mechanism of the process of cement alteration and mechanism of radionuclide sorption onto cement are not yet fully understood. In this paper, the hydrothermal alteration process was studied experimentally, and the effect of alteration on the sorption properties of cement was investigated by the bath sorption test for Sr and Se. The results follow: 1) OPC and OPC/BFS-blended cement (hereafter BFS cement) were heated at temperatures up to 70degC in the synthetic cement equilibrated groundwater or distilled water for 1 month. Changes of crystallinity of the minerals were observed. For example, it was observed that the crystallinity of CSH-gel might increase. Ettringite decomposed on heating. For treatment in distilled water, monosulphate was formed only in the case of BFS cement. 2) In the case of Sr (as a representative cation) sorption, the distribution coefficient for hydrothermally altered OPC and BFS cement decreased as the alteration temperature increased. This is mainly caused by the decrease of distribution coefficient for the CSH-gel phase in cement accompanying the change of its crystallinity. In the case of Se(as a model anion, selenite) sorption, the distribution coefficient decreased as the alteration temperature increased for OPC in both distilled water and synthetic ground water, and also for BFS in groundwater. This is

  17. Change in surface of polymer materials upon irradiation of accelerated micro-particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudo, Hisaaki [Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan)]. E-mail: hkudo@utnl.jp; Tadokoro, Masashi [Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Narita, Shintaro [Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Matsuoka, Leo [Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Muroya, Yusa [Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Katsumura, Yosuke [Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    As a new method of use of a particle accelerator (ionizing radiation generator), we irradiated accelerated micro-particles of silver (Ag) onto polymer materials such as polyimides, glass, ceramics and semi-conductors. The particles can be generated at a Van de Graaff electrostatic accelerator operating at 1-3 MV. The velocity was around 1-10 km/s, size of diameter was about 1-10 {mu}m and charge was about 1-2 {mu}C. We investigated the change in surface of materials upon irradiation, by using laser microscope, atomic force microscope and scanning electron microscope. Crater-shaped irradiation spots having limb structure were found, and their diameter and depth were evaluated, ranging in a few micrometers. The planar distribution of the projectile around the irradiation spot was examined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Correlation between size of the irradiation spots and kinetic energy of the accelerated micro-particles was investigated, and compared with an empirical formula and molecular dynamics study. Numerical simulation dealing with dynamic behaviour of elastic structure was carried out based on SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics) method, a kind of (virtual) particle method. The simulation also found that a crater-shaped spot having limb structure is formed upon collision of the accelerated projectile with the target-materials. The results of simulation were compared with the experimental observations. These experiment and simulation are important for the evaluation of damages and resistance of polymer materials used in the space, such as the thermal control material, and cover glass of solar cells etc., towards space debris and dusts. It would be complement the on-ground radiation resistant tests on the materials conducted by using electron and ion beam accelerators.

  18. Formulation Changes Affect Material Properties and Cell Behavior in HA-Based Hydrogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lawyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To develop and optimize new scaffold materials for tissue engineering applications, it is important to understand how changes to the scaffold affect the cells that will interact with that scaffold. In this study, we used a hyaluronic acid- (HA- based hydrogel as a synthetic extracellular matrix, containing modified HA (CMHA-S, modified gelatin (Gtn-S, and a crosslinker (PEGda. By varying the concentrations of these components, we were able to change the gelation time, enzymatic degradation, and compressive modulus of the hydrogel. These changes also affected fibroblast spreading within the hydrogels and differentially affected the proliferation and metabolic activity of fibroblasts and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. In particular, PEGda concentration had the greatest influence on gelation time, compressive modulus, and cell spreading. MSCs appeared to require a longer period of adjustment to the new microenvironment of the hydrogels than fibroblasts. Fibroblasts were able to proliferate in all formulations over the course of two weeks, but MSCs did not. Metabolic activity changed for each cell type during the two weeks depending on the formulation. These results highlight the importance of determining the effect of matrix composition changes on a particular cell type of interest in order to optimize the formulation for a given application.

  19. Competing covalent and ionic bonding in Ge-Sb-Te phase change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Sun, Jifeng; Subedi, Alaska; Siegrist, Theo; Singh, David J

    2016-01-01

    Ge2Sb2Te5 and related phase change materials are highly unusual in that they can be readily transformed between amorphous and crystalline states using very fast melt, quench, anneal cycles, although the resulting states are extremely long lived at ambient temperature. These states have remarkably different physical properties including very different optical constants in the visible in strong contrast to common glass formers such as silicates or phosphates. This behavior has been described in terms of resonant bonding, but puzzles remain, particularly regarding different physical properties of crystalline and amorphous phases. Here we show that there is a strong competition between ionic and covalent bonding in cubic phase providing a link between the chemical basis of phase change memory property and origins of giant responses of piezoelectric materials (PbTiO3, BiFeO3). This has important consequences for dynamical behavior in particular leading to a simultaneous hardening of acoustic modes and softening of high frequency optic modes in crystalline phase relative to amorphous. This different bonding in amorphous and crystalline phases provides a direct explanation for different physical properties and understanding of the combination of long time stability and rapid switching and may be useful in finding new phase change compositions with superior properties. PMID:27193531

  20. Competing covalent and ionic bonding in Ge-Sb-Te phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Sun, Jifeng; Subedi, Alaska; Siegrist, Theo; Singh, David J.

    2016-05-01

    Ge2Sb2Te5 and related phase change materials are highly unusual in that they can be readily transformed between amorphous and crystalline states using very fast melt, quench, anneal cycles, although the resulting states are extremely long lived at ambient temperature. These states have remarkably different physical properties including very different optical constants in the visible in strong contrast to common glass formers such as silicates or phosphates. This behavior has been described in terms of resonant bonding, but puzzles remain, particularly regarding different physical properties of crystalline and amorphous phases. Here we show that there is a strong competition between ionic and covalent bonding in cubic phase providing a link between the chemical basis of phase change memory property and origins of giant responses of piezoelectric materials (PbTiO3, BiFeO3). This has important consequences for dynamical behavior in particular leading to a simultaneous hardening of acoustic modes and softening of high frequency optic modes in crystalline phase relative to amorphous. This different bonding in amorphous and crystalline phases provides a direct explanation for different physical properties and understanding of the combination of long time stability and rapid switching and may be useful in finding new phase change compositions with superior properties.

  1. Change in Properties of Superconducting Magnet Materials by Fusion Neutron Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent researches on fusion reactor show neutron streaming from ports to outside of plasma vacuum vessels and neutron penetration through blanket and a neutron shielding structure. Therefore, superconducting magnet system in a fusion reactor will be irradiated by high energy particles. To evaluate the irradiation effect of fusion neutron on the superconducting magnet materials, a cryo-target system was constructed and installed at Fusion Neutron Source (FNS) Facility in Japan Atomic Energy Agency. The Nb3Sn, Nb3Al samples and copper wires were cooled down to 4.5 K by a GM refrigerator and irradiation tests by 14 MeV neutron at cryogenic temperature were carried out. Change in electric resistance and critical temperatures (Tc) were measured after irradiation. On the outside of the cryostat, GFRP and other sensors were arranged and irradiated at the same time. After the irradiation, the properties of those materials were investigated and the difference was discussed. In the presentation, some irradiation test results will be described, such as Tc change in Nb3Al wire, change in electric resistance of copper, CERNOX sensor performance, Interlaminar share strength of GFRP. (author)

  2. Ice slurry flow and heat transfer during flow through tubes of rectangular and slit cross-sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niezgoda-Żelasko Beata

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of experimental research of pressure drop and heat transfer coefficients of ice slurry during its flow through tubes of rectangular and slit cross-sections. Moreover, the work discusses the influence of solid particles, type of motion and cross-section on the changes in the pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient. The analysis presented in the paper allows for identification of the criterial relations used to calculate the Fanning factor and the Nusselt number for laminar and turbulent flow, taking into account elements such as phase change, which accompanies the heat transfer process. Ice slurry flow is treated as a generalized flow of a non-Newtonian fluid.

  3. Preparation of shape-stabilized phase change materials as temperature-adjusting powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIAO Chunyan; L(U) Gang; YAO Youwei; TANG Guoyi; WENG Duan

    2007-01-01

    The shape-stabilized phase change materials (PCMs)composed of paraffin wax and silica were prepared in O/W emulsion with cetyl trimethylamine bromide as emulsifier and n-pentanol as assist emulsifier.The paraffin wax(with melting temperature of 29℃,crystallizing temperature of 26℃ and latent heat of 142 J/g)served as latent heat storage material and the silica as supporting material,which prevented the leakage of the melted paraffin wax.Silica supporting material was formed in situ via hydrolysis and condensation from low-cost sodium silicate solution with chlorhydric acid and ammonium bicarbonate as neutralizing agent.The thermogravimetry(TG)curves show that the composite has a thermal stability superior to that of paraffin wax and that the content of paraffin wax in the composite is 65wt%.The maximum latent heat and its relevant melting point of composite are 95 J/g and 30℃,respectively.

  4. Consequences of stratospheric ozone depletion and climate change on the use of materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrady, A L; Torikai, A; Redhwi, H H; Pandey, K K; Gies, P

    2015-01-01

    Materials used in the exterior of buildings and in construction are routinely exposed to solar UV radiation. Especially in the case of wood and plastic building materials, the service life is determined by their weather-induced deterioration. Any further increase in ground-level solar UV radiation, UV-B radiation in particular, will therefore reduce the outdoor service life of these products. Any increase in ambient temperature due to climate change will also have the same effect. However, the existing light-stabilizer technologies are likely to be able to mitigate the additional damaging effects due to increased solar UV radiation and maintain the outdoor lifetimes of these materials at the present levels. These mitigation choices invariably increase the lifetime cost of these products. A reliable estimate of what this additional cost might be for different products is not available at the present time. Personal exposure to UV radiation is reduced both by clothing fabrics and glass windows used in buildings and automobiles. This assessment describes how the recent technical advances in degradation and stabilization techniques impact the lifetimes of plastics and wood products routinely exposed to solar UV radiation and the protection to humans offered by materials against solar UV radiation. PMID:25388638

  5. A programmable high voltage electrical switching analyzer for I-V characterization of phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovonic Phase-Change Materials have found a renewed interest in the recent times owing to their applications in Non-Volatile Random Access Memories. In the present work, a cost-effective high voltage electrical switching analyzer has been developed to enable investigations on the I-V characteristics and electrical switching of bulk solids, which are necessary for identifying suitable materials for memory and other applications such as power control. The developed set up mainly consists of a PC based programmable High Voltage DC Power Supply which acts as an excitation source and a high speed Digital Storage Oscilloscope. For flexible control options, a Graphical User Interface has also been developed using LabVIEW-6i to control the excitation source through the analog outputs of a data acquisition card. Options are made in the system to sweep the output voltage from 45 to 1750 V or the output current in the range 0-45 mA with resolutions of 1.5 V and 5 or 50 μA at variable rates. I-V characteristics and switching behavior of the sample material are instantaneously acquired on the storage oscilloscope and transferred to PC for post processing. The system can be used to investigate a broad range of materials and some typical results are presented to illustrate the capability of the system developed. The closed-loop stability of the system has also been confirmed by frequency response plots

  6. Interdisciplinary Climate Change Curriculum Materials based on the Next Generation Science Standards and The Earth Charter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, A.; Robertson, W. H.

    2013-12-01

    In the 2012, the National Research Council (NRC) of the National Academies' reported that one of the major issues associated with the development of climate change curriculum was the lack of interdisciplinary materials that also promoted a correlation between science standards and content. Therefore, in order to respond to this need, our group has developed an interdisciplinary climate change curriculum that has had as its fundamental basis the alignment with the guidelines presented by the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and the ones presented by the international document entitled The Earth Charter. In this regards, while the alignment with NGSS disciplinary core ideas, cross-concepts and students' expectations intended to fulfill the need for the development of climate change curriculum activities that were directly associated with the appropriate set of NGSS guidelines, the alignment with The Earth Charter document intended to reinforce the need the for the integration of sociological, philosophical and intercultural analysis of the theme 'climate change'. Additionally, our curriculum was also developed as part of a collaborative project between climate scientists and engineers, who are responsible for the development of a Regional Arctic Simulation Model (RASM). Hence, another important curriculum constituent was the feedback, suggestions and reviews provided by these professionals, who have also contributed to these pedagogical materials' scientific accuracy by facilitating the integration of datasets and visualizations developed by RASM. Furthermore, our group has developed a climate change curriculum for two types of audience: high school and early undergraduate students. Each curriculum unit is divided into modules and each module contains a set of lesson plans. The topics selected to compose each unit and module were designated according to the surveys conducted with scientists and engineers involved with the development of the climate change

  7. 灌注式路面用水泥胶浆的性能研究%Study on the Performance of Filling Cement Slurry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    农卓松; 黎刚; 谭芳春

    2011-01-01

    文章对水泥胶浆的性能影响因素进行研究,分析不同水灰比、掺加不同渗透剂、聚合物材料对水泥胶浆流动性、强度特性等的影响,确定性能优良的水泥胶浆配比,为工程应用提供参考。%The article studys the factors that affect the performance of cement slurry.It analyzes the effect of different water cement ratio and adds different penetrating agent,polymer material on the fluidity and strength of cement slurry.It then determines the right cement slurry ratio,which provides reference to project application.

  8. Measurement of ion speciation in animal slurries using the Donnan Membrane Technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stelt, van der B.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2005-01-01

    The availability of nutrients in animal slurry for plant uptake depends on the total content as well as on the forms in which these nutrients are present in slurry manure. A DMT-manure cell was developed which can help to determine the speciation of nutrients in animal slurries. The cell consists of

  9. 30 CFR 77.216 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216 Water, sediment, or slurry... structures which impound water, sediment, or slurry shall be required if such an existing or...

  10. Effects of Cattle Slurry Acidification on Ammonia and Methane Evolution during Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren O; Andersen, Astrid; Eriksen, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    . In a third storage experiment, cattle slurry acidified with commercial equipment on two farms was incubated. In the manipulation experiments, effects of acid and sulfate were distinguished by adding hydrochloric acid and potassium sulfate separately or in combination, rather than sulfuric acid. In...... storage of cattle slurry, and that slurry acidification may be a cost-effective greenhouse gas mitigation option....

  11. Raw material changes and their processing parameters in an extrusion cooking process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Hongyuan; Friis, Alan

    In this work, the effects of raw material and process parameters on product expansion in a fish feed extrusion process were investigated. Four different recipes were studied with a pilot-scale twin-screw co-rotating extruder according to a set of pre-defined processing conditions. In the four...... recipes, wheat and protein contents were adjusted and compared with a reference sample. It has been found that a dimensionless equation can well correlate the process parameters and product bulk density for the four different recipe extrusion. The average deviation of the correlation for bulk density is 2.......4%. The experimental data show that product expansion decreases with increase of protein content. Several different methods have been applied to quantitatively correlate the changes of raw material composition with product bulk density....

  12. Opacity of Hot and Dense Stellar Material: Flexible for Changes in Composition and Abundance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王菲鹿; 赵刚; 袁建民

    2003-01-01

    Opacity of stellar materials with the composition and relative abundance specified according to sun has been calculated by using an average-atom scheme, which is designed to treat electronic structures of atoms and ions in a mixture. Different relative abundances of the metallic elements are considered. Comparisons between the present results and those of OPAL are made for the opacity to show that the difference is less than 10% for most cases and less than 30% for the largest point with the density of 1.0g/cm3 and temperatures from 50 to 6000eV.In view of the simplicity of the present approach, it is quite flexible to apply the method to different models of the stellar materials with changes in composition as well as in relative abundance.

  13. Ultrafast broadband tuning of resonant optical nanostructures using phase change materials

    CERN Document Server

    Rudé, Miquel; Cetin, Arif E; Miller, Timothy A; Carrilero, Albert; Wall, Simon; de Abajo, F Javier García; Altug, Hatice; Pruneri, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of extraordinary optical transmission {EOT} through arrays of nanoholes patterned in a metallic film has emerged as a promising tool for a wide range of applications, including photovoltaics, nonlinear optics, and sensing. Designs and methods enabling the dynamic tuning of the optical resonances of these structures are essential to build efficient optical devices, including modulators, switches, filters, and biosensors. However, the efficient combination of EOT and dynamic tuning remains a challenge, mainly because of the lack of materials that can induce modulation over a broad spectral range at high speeds. Here, we demonstrate tuneable resonance wavelength shifts as large as 385 nm - an order of magnitude higher than previously reported - through the combination of phase change materials {PCMs}, which exhibit dramatic variations in optical properties upon transitions between amorphous and crystalline phases, with properly designed subwavelength nanohole metallic arrays. We further find throu...

  14. Design of a Protection Thermal Energy Storage Using Phase Change Material Coupled to a Solar Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdier, D.; Falcoz, Q.; Ferrière, A.

    2014-12-01

    Thermal Energy Storage (TES) is the key for a stable electricity production in future Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plants. This work presents a study on the thermal protection of the central receiver of CSP plant using a tower which is subject to considerable thermal stresses in case of cloudy events. The very high temperatures, 800 °C at design point, impose the use of special materials which are able to resist at high temperature and high mechanical constraints and high level of concentrated solar flux. In this paper we investigate a TES coupling a metallic matrix drilled with tubes of Phase Change Material (PCM) in order to store a large amount of thermal energy and release it in a short time. A numerical model is developed to optimize the arrangement of tubes into the TES. Then a methodology is given, based from the need in terms of thermal capacity, in order to help the choice of the geometry.

  15. High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage Applications: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, J.; Glatzmaier, G. C.; Starace, A.; Turchi, C.; Ortega, J.

    2011-08-01

    To store thermal energy, sensible and latent heat storage materials are widely used. Latent heat thermal energy storage (TES) systems using phase change materials (PCM) are useful because of their ability to charge and discharge a large amount of heat from a small mass at constant temperature during a phase transformation. Molten salt PCM candidates for cascaded PCMs were evaluated for the temperatures near 320 degrees C, 350 degrees C, and 380 degrees C. These temperatures were selected to fill the 300 degrees C to 400 degrees C operating range typical for parabolic trough systems, that is, as one might employ in three-PCM cascaded thermal storage. Based on the results, the best candidate for temperatures near 320 degrees C was the molten salt KNO3-4.5wt%KCl. For the 350 degrees C and 380 degrees C temperatures, the evaluated molten salts are not good candidates because of the corrosiveness and the high vapor pressure of the chlorides.

  16. The Change from Past to Future for Adsorbent Materials in Treatment of Dyeing Wastewaters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Z. Kyzas

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption is one of the most promising decolorization techniques in dyeing wastewater treatment. Adsorption techniques for wastewater treatment have become more popular in recent years owing to their efficiency in the removal of pollutants too stable for biological methods. Dye adsorption is a result of two mechanisms (adsorption and ion exchange and is influenced by many factors as dye/adsorbent interaction, adsorbent’s surface area, particle size, temperature, pH, and contact time. The main advantage of adsorption recently became the use of low-cost materials, which reduces the procedure cost. The present review firstly introduced the technology process, research history and research hotspot of adsorption. Then, the application of adsorption in treatment of dyeing wastewaters in the past decades was summarized, revealing the impressive changes in modes, trends, and conditions. From this review article, the different philosophy of synthesis of adsorbent materials became evident.

  17. Pickering emulsion: A novel template for microencapsulated phase change materials with polymer–silica hybrid shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MePCMs (microencapsulated phase change materials) with covalently bonded SiO2/polymer hybrid as shell were fabricated via Pickering emulsion polymerization stabilized solely by organically-modified SiO2 particles. Morphology and core–shell structure of these microcapsules were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thermal properties of microencapsulated 1-dodecanol were determined using DSC (differential scanning calorimetry) and TGA (thermal gravimetric analysis). The results indicate that mass ratio of St (styrene)/DVB (divinylbenzene)/dodecanol has great effect on the morphology, inner structure, microencapsulation efficiency and durability of resultant MePCMs. When ratio of St/DVB/dodecanol was 5/1/12, dodecanol content of as much as 62.8% is obtained and the utility efficiency of dodecanol reaches 94.2%. The prepared MePCMs present good durability and thermal reliability. 2.2% of core material leached away the microcapsule after suspended in water for 10 days and 5.8% of core material leached after 2000 accelerated thermal cycling. Our study demonstrated that Pickering emulsion polymerization is a simple and robust method for the preparation of MePCMs with polymer–inorganic hybrids as shell. - Highlights: • We fabricated MePCM via surfactant-free Pickering emulsion polymerization. • The shell of MePCM was composed of PS/SiO2 organic–inorganic hybrids. • The phase change enthalpy of MePCM is 125.0 J g−1 and the utility efficiency of 1-dodecanol reached 94.2%. • Only 2.2% and 5.8% of core material lost after durability test and 2000 accelerated thermal cycling respectively

  18. Integration of environmental indicators in the optimization of industrial energy management using phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Phase change materials are a feasible option for energy management. • Net Zero Environmental Metrics Times is defined as an environmental payback time. • Coal, heavy fuel and lignite scenarios show a time around one year. • The potassium nitrate application provides the highest environmental values. - Abstract: This work addresses the potential environmental effects of thermal energy storage using the life cycle assessment to perform an optimal system framework. The study assesses the recovery of waste thermal energy at medium temperatures through the application of phase change materials and the recovered heat use in other industrial processes avoiding the heat production from fossil fuel. To this end, twenty different situations were analysed in terms of energy and environmentally combining four thermal energy storage systems varying the type of phase change material incorporated (potassium nitrate, potassium hydroxide, potassium carbonate/sodium carbonate/lithium carbonate and lithium hydroxide/potassium hydroxide) which were defined as cases and five scenarios were the heat can be released based on the type of fossil fuel consumed (coal, heavy fuel, light fuel, lignite and natural gas). Moreover, a net zero environmental metric time parameter was calculated to assess the time period in which the environmental impacts associated to the thermal energy system were equal to the avoided impacts by the use of the heat recovered. Values that were lower than the thermal energy system lifetime were obtained in more than 40% of the total study situations. Finally, an additional analysis was performed to identify the most significant parameters for the further development of a mathematical model to predict the net zero environmental metric time

  19. Effect of expanded graphite on the phase change materials of high density polyethylene/wax blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Expanded graphite (EG) and low melting point (42.3 °C) wax were added to HDPE to form phase change material. • EG was well dispersed in the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. • EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. • The addition of a relatively small quantity of EG enhances the heat conduction in the composite. • HDPE/40% RT42 that contained up to 15% EG demonstrated excellent mechanical and thermal properties and can be used as PCM. - Abstract: Phase change materials fabricated from high density polyethylene (HDPE) blended with 40 or 50 wt% commercial wax (melting point of 43.08 °C) and up to 15 wt% expanded graphite (EG) were studied. Techniques including scanning electron microscope (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and an experimental device to measure diffusivity and conductivity (DICO) were used to determine the microstructural, mechanical and thermal properties of the composites. The composites possessed good mechanical properties. Additionally, no leaching was observed during material processing or characterization. Although the Young’s modulus increased with the addition of EG, no significant changes in tensile strength were detected. The maximum Young’s modulus achieved was 650 MPa for the HDPE/40% wax composite with 15 wt% EG. The EG was well dispersed within the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. The incorporation of EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. The intensification of thermal conductivity occurred with increasing fractions of EG, which was attributed to the high thermal conductivity of graphite. The maximum quantity of heat stored by latent heat was found for the HDPE/40% wax composite with EG. The addition of a relatively small quantity

  20. Effect of expanded graphite on the phase change materials of high density polyethylene/wax blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AlMaadeed, M.A., E-mail: m.alali@qu.edu.qa [Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, 2713 Doha (Qatar); Labidi, Sami [Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, 2713 Doha (Qatar); Krupa, Igor [QAPCO Polymer Chair, Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, P.O. Box 2713, Doha (Qatar); Karkri, Mustapha [Université Paris-Est CERTES, 61 avenue du Général de Gaulle, 94010 Créteil (France)

    2015-01-20

    Highlights: • Expanded graphite (EG) and low melting point (42.3 °C) wax were added to HDPE to form phase change material. • EG was well dispersed in the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. • EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. • The addition of a relatively small quantity of EG enhances the heat conduction in the composite. • HDPE/40% RT42 that contained up to 15% EG demonstrated excellent mechanical and thermal properties and can be used as PCM. - Abstract: Phase change materials fabricated from high density polyethylene (HDPE) blended with 40 or 50 wt% commercial wax (melting point of 43.08 °C) and up to 15 wt% expanded graphite (EG) were studied. Techniques including scanning electron microscope (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and an experimental device to measure diffusivity and conductivity (DICO) were used to determine the microstructural, mechanical and thermal properties of the composites. The composites possessed good mechanical properties. Additionally, no leaching was observed during material processing or characterization. Although the Young’s modulus increased with the addition of EG, no significant changes in tensile strength were detected. The maximum Young’s modulus achieved was 650 MPa for the HDPE/40% wax composite with 15 wt% EG. The EG was well dispersed within the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. The incorporation of EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. The intensification of thermal conductivity occurred with increasing fractions of EG, which was attributed to the high thermal conductivity of graphite. The maximum quantity of heat stored by latent heat was found for the HDPE/40% wax composite with EG. The addition of a relatively small quantity

  1. Thickening of ultrafine coal-water slurries in a solid-bowl centrifuge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkerton, A.P.; Klima, M.S.; Morrison, J.L.; Miller, B.G.

    1999-07-01

    As part of a study being conducted for the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Upgraded Coal Interest Group (UCIG) to evaluate ultrafine coal dewatering technologies, testing was carried out to investigate the use of a solid-bowl (high-g) centrifuge for thickening ultrafine coalwater slurries. The objective of this study was to increase the solids concentration to a level suitable for use as a coal-water slurry fuel, while maximizing overall solids recovery. Feed material was collected from the combined discharge (centrate) streams from several screen-bowl centrifuges. These devices are currently being used in a commercial coal cleaning facility to dewater the clean coal product from a froth flotation circuit. Current plant practice is to discharge the centrate to settling ponds. The screen bowl centrate averages 5% solids by weight and contains nearly 60% material finer than 10 {mu}m. The current study examined the effects of operating conditions on centrifuge performance. The test conditions included centrifuge bowl and scroll speeds and volumetric feed rate. In addition to thickening, some cleaning was also achieved, because the finest particles (e.g. < 3 {micro}m), which contained a large percentage of liberated clays, were removed with the bulk of the water. The centrifuge products were analyzed for solids concentration, particle size distribution, and ash content. Size selectivity curves were also used to evaluate centrifuge performance.

  2. Phase Change Material for Temperature Control of Imager or Sounder on GOES Type Satellites in GEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses phase change material (PCM) in the scan cavity of an imager or sounder on satellites in geostationary orbit (GEO) to maintain the telescope temperature stable. When sunlight enters the scan aperture, solar heating causes the PCM to melt. When sunlight stops entering the scan aperture, the PCM releases the thermal energy stored to keep the components in the telescope warm. It has no moving parts or bimetallic springs. It reduces heater power required to make up the heat lost by radiation to space through the aperture. It is an attractive thermal control option to a radiator with a louver and a sunshade.

  3. Equivalent circuit for VO2 phase change material film in reconfigurable frequency selective surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed equivalent circuits of phase change materials based on vanadium dioxide (VO2) thin films. These circuits are used to model VO2 thin films for reconfigurable frequency selective surfaces (FSSs). This is important as it provides a way for designing complex structures. A reconfigurable FSS filter using VO2 ON/OFF switches is designed demonstrating −60 dB isolation between the states. This filter is used to provide the transmission and reflection responses of the FSS in the frequency range of 0.1–0.6 THz. The comparison between equivalent circuit and full-wave simulation shows excellent agreement

  4. Experimental Investigation of Thermal Conductivity of Concrete Containing Micro-Encapsulated Phase Change Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pomianowski, Michal Zbigniew; Heiselberg, Per; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2011-01-01

    article utilizes integration of the concrete and the microencapsulated Phase Change Material (PCM). PCM has the ability to absorb and release significant amounts of heat at a specific temperature range. As a consequence of admixing PCM to the concrete, new thermal properties like thermal conductivity and...... specific heat capacity have to be defined. This paper presents results from the measurements of the thermal conductivity of various microencapsulated PCM-concrete and PCM-cement-paste mixes. It was discovered that increase of the amount of PCM decreases the thermal conductivity of the concrete PCM mixture....... Finally, a theoretical calculation methodology of thermal conductivity for PCM-concrete mixes is developed....

  5. Changes in crystal structure and properties of carbon materials under neutron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considered is the neutron radiation effect on the graphite structural characteristics and on its physico-mechanical properties, as well. It is shown that in the result of the irradiation the lattice parameter increases depending on the decrease in the radiation temperature, and the increase in the dose accumulated. The sharp decrease of thermal conductivity is noted as a result of the irradiation. The irradiation changes electrophysical properties of graphite. The dependence of strength properties and creepage rate on fluence and temperature is analyzed. Shown is the complex dependence of parameters, determining creepage on external conditions, and on crystal structure and the strength of carbon materials as well

  6. From rice husk to high performance shape stabilized phase change materials for thermal energy storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehrali, Mohammad; Latibari, Sara Tahan; Rosen, Marc A.;

    2016-01-01

    exhibited exceptional phase change behavior, having a desirable latent heat storage capacity of 175 kJ kg(-1). When exposed to high solar radiation intensities, the composites can absorb and store the thermal energy. An FTIR analysis of the SSPCMs indicated that there was no chemical interaction between the...... and a sodium hydroxide activation procedure. Palmitic acid as a phase change material was impregnated into the porous carbon by a vacuum impregnation technique. Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) were employed as an additive for thermal conductivity enhancement of the SSPCMs. The attained composites...... palmitic acid and the activated carbon with GNPs. The thermal conductivity of the prepared composites improved by more than 97% for the highest loading of GNPs (6 wt%) compared with that of pure palmitic acid. Moreover, the SSPCMs exhibit high thermal stability, with a stable melting-freezing enthalpy and...

  7. Dynamic thermal behavior of building using phase change materials for latent heat storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selka Ghouti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a two-dimensional model with a real size home composed of two-storey (ground and first floor spaces separated by a slab, enveloped by a wall with rectangular section containing phase change material (PCM in order to minimize energy consumption in the buildings. The main objective of the PCM-wall system is to decrease the temperature change from outdoor space before it reaches the indoor space during the daytime. The numerical approach uses effective heat capacity Ceff model with realistic outdoor climatic conditions of Tlemcen city, Algeria. The numerical results showed that by using PCM in wall as energy storage components may reduce the room temperature by about 6 to 7°C of temperature depending on the floor level (first floor spaces or ground floor spaces.

  8. Thermochromic complex compounds in phase change materials. Possible application in an agricultural greenhouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinkovic, M.; Nikolic, R.; Savovic, J. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences `Vinca`, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Gadzuric, S.; Zsigrai, I. [Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad (Yugoslavia)

    1998-02-27

    The possibility to combine two physico-chemical phenomena is studied in this work in order to attain simultaneous control of temperature and light intensity in a greenhouse: (a) isothermal heat storage in phase change materials and (b) thermochromic behavior of complex compounds dissolved in the phase change materials. Two binary mixtures melting near the ambient temperature were studied: (a) 0.925 Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}4.06 H{sub 2}0+0.075 CaCl{sub 2}{center_dot}6.11 H{sub 2}O melting at 35.6C and (b) 0.9 CH{sub 3}CONH{sub 2}+0.1 Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}4 H{sub 2}O, melting at 27.7C. The melting temperature, the enthalpy of fusion and the heat capacity of both mixtures were determined from DSC measurements. Both mixtures showed to be suitable solvents for the formation of consecutive cobalt(II) chloride complexes. The compositions of the complex compounds were adjusted in each mixture so that the absorption spectra in visible spectral range exhibited low absorbance at the melting temperature and a pronounced increase of the absorbance and/or change of color with the increase of temperature in the range relevant for passive solar energy receivers. The combined latent heat storage and the outstanding reversible change of the optical properties of the dissolved complex compounds with temperature is proposed to be applied in solar heated agricultural greenhouses in areas with fluctuating climate conditions. The increase of absorbance with temperature acts as an auto-regulated shading protection from overheating

  9. Improving the Effectiveness of the Bio-slurry Extension Component of National Biodigester Program in Cambodia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, M. F.

    2009-10-15

    This report deals with the escalating challenge Cambodia faces in its agricultural sector for providing sufficient feeding to an increasing population, while also having improper soil management. Based on field visits, interviews, regular meetings, training workshops, and joint analysis it was revealed that farmers used both organic (bio-slurry) and inorganic fertilisers but were unaware of the balance needed and required doses of fertiliser. Further, it appeared that farmers have limited access to improve crop management practices, specifically to fertiliser management. In a response to the problem, the current weaknesses, and further scope of improvement of present organisational setup of slurry extension component of NBP and subsidy system have been analysed in depth. Extensive recommendations are offered on an organisational setup level (e.g. strengthen the linkage between Provincial Biogas Program Office-PBPO and Cambodian Centre for Study and Development in Agriculture-CEDAC by involving CEDAC in the planning process), subsidy (e.g. provide subsidy to attract farmers for construction of standard compost hut, boundaries and shade), planning (e.g. bottom up planning approach is suggested where a seasonal planning meeting should be organized at province by the project director involving CEDAC provincial coordinator), development of training materials (e.g. a national consultant should be hired for developing a training manual on bio-slurry systems), training (e.g. strengthen user training by increasing its number, frequency, topics), farmers participatory action research (e.g. the participatory approach should be replaced by a demonstration one), monitoring and reporting (e.g. monitoring system should be established as desk and field monitoring)

  10. Degradation of chloroanilines in soil slurry by specialized organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microbial degradation of 2-chloro-, 3-chloro-, 4-chloro-, and 3,4-dichloroaniline was examined as single compounds as well as a mixture in soil slurries. At 30 C the degradation of chloroanilines by indigenous soil populations in soil slurries was observed when soil slurry was freshly contaminated or precontaminated to allow binding of chloroanilines to the soil matrix. Within 6 weeks, 3-chloro- and 3,4-dichloroaniline (each 2 mM) were degraded more rapidly (about 50% chloride elimination) than 4-chloro- and 2-chloroaniline, due to stronger adsorption of 4-chloroaniline and greater resistance of 2-chloroaniline. The addition of various supplements such as buffer, mineral salts and acetate only slightly influenced the degradation of chloroanilines by the indigenous soil populations. The mineralization was drastically enhanced when laboratory-selected chloroaniline-degraders (8.106 cells/g) such as Pseudomonas acidovorans strain BN3.1 were supplemented to the soil slurries so that complete elimination of chloride from the chloroanilines occurred within 10 days. (orig.)

  11. Design and construction of a deep slurry trench barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 24 m (80 ft) deep slurry trench surrounding a former chromium manufacturing facility on the Patapsco River in Baltimore, Maryland was constructed in 1995 to contain groundwater and site Soils, and to reduce the volume of groundwater extracted to maintain an inward gradient. In 1992, an embankment made of crushed stone was constructed in the Patapsco River to make land for barrier construction outboard of the bulkheads, and to protect the barrier. Stability of the slurry-supported trench excavation in the embankment required construction from an elevated work platform. An extended reach backhoe was used to excavate the deep slurry trench and to clean the trench bottom. Soil-Bentonite backfill was prepared at a central mixing area and transported by truck to the perimeter barrier. A synthetic membrane was inserted partially into the backfill for connection to a multimedia cap, and for redundancy and erosion control in the tidal zone. Hydraulic testing of the aquitard contained by the barrier demonstrated excellent performance of the barrier and bottom closure. Detailed definition of subsurface conditions and the closure stratum was necessary for the design and successful construction of the barrier, and is recommended for comparable slurry trench construction projects

  12. Bench Scale Test of Absorption Slurry-ice Maker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasao, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Takashi

    Slurry ice system is desirable as cold heat source for air conditioning, because it requires less conveyance power or less pipe size. On the other hand, recently absorption refrigerator is reevaluated because it can utilize various types of waste heat and it does not use fluorocarbon refrigerant. But it had been regarded to be difficult to make ice by absorption refrigerator because the refrigerant is water. However making slurry ice is possible, of cource, if the slurry ice generated by partial freezing of water is continuously taken away from the evaporator. This method was certified experimentally with a bench scale model. For ice making continuously, ice had not to be frozen stiff at water surface or inside wall of the evaporator. Then refrigerant water in the evaporator was raised swirl flow. And inside wall of the evaporator was finished by water repellent coating, and heated from outside wall. This slurry ice was adaptable to hydraulic transportation, because ice was needle crystal with about 5 mm length and ice temperature was 0°C.

  13. Laminar and turbulent transition of fine-grained slurries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlasák, Pavel; Chára, Zdeněk

    Budapest: ORTRA, 2003 - ( Kalman , H.), s. 1245 [International conference for conveying and handling of particulated solids /4./. Budapest (HU), 27.05.2003-30.05.2003] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS2060007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2060917 Keywords : Laminar/turbulent transition * slurry concentrated fine grained * experimental measurement Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  14. NOVEL SLURRY PHASE DIESEL CATALYSTS FOR COAL-DERIVED SYNGAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Dragomir B. Bukur; Dr. Ketil Hanssen; Alec Klinghoffer; Dr. Lech Nowicki; Patricia O' Dowd; Dr. Hien Pham; Jian Xu

    2001-01-07

    This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in novel slurry phase catalysts for converting coal-derived synthesis gas to diesel fuels. The primary objective of this research program is to develop attrition resistant catalysts that exhibit high activities for conversion of coal-derived syngas.

  15. Entrained flow gasification of coal/bio-oil slurries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Ping; Lin, Weigang; Jensen, Peter Arendt;

    2016-01-01

    steam/carbon ratio of 5, the syngas components are similar with that in equilibrium. A synergistic effect exists between coal and bio-oil in coal/bio-oil slurry gasification which might be caused by the catalysis effect of alkali metals and alkaline earth metals in bio-oil....

  16. Chemical aspects of coal liquefaction by oxygen in alkaline slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreozzi, R.; Caprio, V.; Insola, A.

    1988-03-01

    Coal liquefaction by oxygen in alkaline slurries is reviewed from the chemical point of view. Available information is considered in the light of questions relating to coal liquefaction. A lack of chemical knowledge in this area is noted, especially on model compounds. 72 refs.

  17. Overview of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis in Slurry Reactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A brief review of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis specially in slurry reactors ispresented, covering reaction kinetics, activity and selectivity of catalysts, productdistribution, effects of process parameters, mass transfer and solubility of gas. Someimportant aspects of further research are proposed for improving both theories andproduction.

  18. Heat Transfer of Heat Sinking Vest with Phase-change Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Yifen; JIANG Nan; WU Wei; ZHANG Guangwei; XIAO Baoliang

    2011-01-01

    To investigate thermal protection effects of heat sinking vest with phase-change material (PCM),human thermoregulation model is introduced,and a thermal mathematical model of heat transfer with phase change has been developed with the enthalpy method.The uniform energy equation is constructed for the whole domain,and the equation is implicitly discreted by control volume and finite difference method.Then the enthalpy in each node is solved by using chasing method to calculate the tridiagonal equations,and the inner surface temperature of PCM could be obtained.According to the human thermoregulation model of heat sinking vest,the dynamic temperature distribution and sweat of the body are solved.Calculation results indicate that the change of core temperature matches the experimental result,and the sweat difference is small.This thermal mathematical model of heat transfer with phase change is credible and appropriate.Through comparing the dynamic temperature distribution and sweat of the body wearing heat sinking vest to results of the body not wearing this clothing,it is evident that wearing heat sinking vest can reduce the body heat load significantly.

  19. Encapsulation of Phase Change Materials Using Layer-by-Layer Assembled Polyelectrolytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiangying Yi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase change materials absorb the thermal energy when changing their phases (e.g., solid-to-liquid at constant temperatures to achieve the latent heat storage. The major drawbacks such as limited thermal conductivity and leakage prevent the PCMs from wide application in desired areas. In this work, an environmentally friendly and low cost approach, layer-by-layer (LbL assembly technique, was applied to build up ultrathin shells to encapsulate the PCMs and therefore to regulate their changes in volume when the phase change occurs. Generally, the oppositely charged strong polyelectrolytes Poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDADMAC and Poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid sodium salt (PSS were employed to fabricate multilayer shells on emulsified octadecane droplets using either bovine serum albumin (BSA or sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS as surfactant. Specifically, using BSA as the surfactant, polyelectrolyte encapsulated octadecane spheres in size of ∼500 nm were obtained, with good shell integrity, high octadecane content (91.3% by mass, and good thermal stability after cycles of thermal treatments.

  20. Analysis of thermal energy storage material with change-of-phase volumetric effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Space Station Freedom proposed hybrid power system includes photovoltaic arrays with nickel hydrogen batteries for energy storage and solar dynamic collectors driving Brayton heat engines with change-of-phase Thermal Energy Storage (TES) devices. A TES device is comprised of multiple metallic, annular canisters which contain a eutectic composition LiF-CaF2 Phase Change Material (PCM) that melts at 1040 K. A moderately sophisticated LiF-CaF2 PCM computer model is being developed in three stages considering 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D canister geometries, respectively. The 1-D model results indicate that the void has a marked effect on the phase change process due to PCM displacement and dynamic void heat transfer resistance. Equally influential are the effects of different boundary conditions and liquid PCM natural convection. For the second stage, successful numerical techniques used in the 1-D phase change model are extended to a 2-D (r,z) PCM containment canister model. A prototypical PCM containment canister is analyzed and the results are discussed.

  1. Life cycle assessment of biogas from separated slurry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamelin, L.; Wesnaes, M.; Wenzel, H. (Univ. of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark)); Molt Petersen, B. (Aarhus Univ.. Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, Aarhus (Denmark))

    2010-07-01

    The environmental aspects of biogas production based on pre-treated slurry from fattening pigs and dairy cows have been investigated in a life cycle perspective. The pre-treatment consists of concentrating the slurry using a separation technology. Significant environmental benefits, compared to the status quo slurry management, can be obtained for both pig and cow slurry, especially regarding reductions of the contributions to global warming, but the results depend to a large extent on the efficiency of the separation technology. Adding separation after the biogas plant can contribute to a more efficient management of the phosphorus, and this has also been investigated. Based on the results of the study it can be concluded that: 1) The environmental benefits of biogas from separated slurry are very dependent upon the separation efficiency (for carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous). This particularly applies for carbon, as the separation efficiency defines the extent to which the degradable carbon contained in the slurry is transferred to the biogas plant. Efficient separation can be obtained by using polymer, but also by using a suitable separation technology. It could be mentioned that the decanter centrifuge used has a rather high efficiency of transferring volatile solids (VS) to the fibre fraction also without the use of polymer. 2) Biogas production from separated slurry can lead to significant reductions in the contributions to global warming, provided that the 'best available technologies' described in the report are used. That includes, among others: - a covered and short time storage of the fibre fraction before entering the biogas plant, - a 2-step biogas production where the post-digestion tank is covered with air-tight cover, - a covered storage of the degassed fibre fraction The benefits are also highly dependent upon the source of energy substituted by the biogas. 3) Based on evidences from reviewed studies, the cationic polyacrylamide polymer

  2. Fabrication of ZrO2/Mo-Si/Ni Functionally Graded Material by Dip-Coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A slurry dip-coating technique was developed for fabrication of ZrO2/Mo-Si/Ni functionally graded material (FGM)on the stainless steel substrate. The rheological behavior of ZrO2-Ni-ethanol slurry was characterized by viscositytest. The amount of polyvinyl butyral (PVB) additives, which served as the dispersant and binder in ZrO2-Ni-ethanolslurry, was optimized. The results showed that the characters of mixed slurries with added 9 vol. pct (relativelyto total powders) MoSi2 powders prepared by mechanical alloying changed little. The stainless steel substrate wascoated several times by dipping in the slurries, and followed by drying in air every dipping. After debinding in Arin graphite die, the coated FGM plate was finally hot pressed at 1300℃ for 1 h under the pressure of 5 MPa in Arin the same die. Microstructural observations of the sintered FGM specimens revealed that the graded layers wereformed on the stainless steel substrate, in which no cracks were observed.

  3. Effect of process parameters on properties of Al-Si alloys cast by Rapid Slurry Formation (RSF) technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapid slurry formation is a semi-solid metal forming technique, which is based on a so-called solid enthalpy exchange material (EEM). It is a fascinating technology offering the opportunity to manufacture net-shaped metal components of complex geometry in a single forming operation. At the same time, high mechanical properties can be achieved due to the unique microstructure and flow behaviour. The major process parameters used in the RSF process are rotation speed of the EEM, melt superheat, amount of EEM added (determining fs), and holding time. The process parameters can be well controlled with clear effects on the microstructure. There is a lack of theoretical modelling of the morphological evolution in these two-phase slurries.

  4. Energy and economic analysis of a building enclosure outfitted with a phase change material board (PCMB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Phase change material boards (PCMBs) were simulated in building enclosures. • Energy and economic savings for these buildings were estimated. • The buildings were located in five cities with different climatic conditions. • The energy savings ratio was 100% when a cold energy source was used. • A mean electricity savings ratio of 13.1% was obtained. - Abstract: This paper presents energy and economic analyses related to the application of phase change materials boards (PCMBs) in building enclosures during the cooling season. A heat transfer model was developed, which was implemented via a computer program. Simulations were carried out using weather data files from five cities located in five different climate regions in China. Energy savings from using a natural cold source (e.g., outdoor air) and electricity savings from a reduction in electricity by air conditioning systems were evaluated. The energy savings ratio (ESR) and simple payback period (SPP) were used to assess the application of PCMBs in building enclosures. The selection of optimum phase transition temperatures for the PCMs for the various climates was made using indoor and outdoor air temperatures, as well as SPP. For space cooling purposes, it was suggested that phase transition temperatures should be at least 3 °C higher than the mean outdoor air temperature. Simple payback period suggested the possibility of the cost effective use of PCMBs in occupied buildings for moderate temperature climates

  5. Thermoelectric generators incorporating phase-change materials for waste heat recovery from engine exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisner, Gregory P; Yang, Jihui

    2014-02-11

    Thermoelectric devices, intended for placement in the exhaust of a hydrocarbon fuelled combustion device and particularly suited for use in the exhaust gas stream of an internal combustion engine propelling a vehicle, are described. Exhaust gas passing through the device is in thermal communication with one side of a thermoelectric module while the other side of the thermoelectric module is in thermal communication with a lower temperature environment. The heat extracted from the exhaust gasses is converted to electrical energy by the thermoelectric module. The performance of the generator is enhanced by thermally coupling the hot and cold junctions of the thermoelectric modules to phase-change materials which transform at a temperature compatible with the preferred operating temperatures of the thermoelectric modules. In a second embodiment, a plurality of thermoelectric modules, each with a preferred operating temperature and each with a uniquely-matched phase-change material may be used to compensate for the progressive lowering of the exhaust gas temperature as it traverses the length of the exhaust pipe.

  6. The ferroelectric transition in the phase-change material GeTe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phase-change materials can be cycled between the amorphous and the crystalline phase. This transition is accompanied by a significant change of the electrical resistance. The materials on the pseudo binary line between GeTe and Sb2Te3 are particularly suitable for memory devices. The meta-stable crystalline phase of Ge2Sb2Te5 has a cubic symmetry and is characterised by atomic displacements and configurational disorder which leads to a localization of charge carriers and semiconducting properties. Also GeTe in its low temperature α-phase is claimed to have pronounced local distortions. Nevertheless in the literature two scenarios have been presented which can explain the transition to the cubic α-phase. One is based on a displacive transformation (Chattopadhyay et al.; J. Phys. C 20, p.1431, 1987) while the second one (Fons et al.; Phys. Rev. B 82, p.1431, 2010) utilizes an order-disorder phase transition. Therefore we have investigated the phase transition of GeTe whose transition temperature is reported to depend critically on the stoichiometry. We have sputter deposited thin films of approx. 300 nm thickness and obtained Ge53Te47. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns which include information about the thermal and static disorder of the crystal lattice, have been recorded during heating. From these data we obtain important insight on the nature of the phase transition.

  7. Melting of a phase change material in a horizontal annulus with discrete heat sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirzaei Hooshyar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase change materials have found many industrial applications such as cooling of electronic devices and thermal energy storage. This paper investigates numerically the melting process of a phase change material in a two-dimensional horizontal annulus with different arrangements of two discrete heat sources. The sources are positioned on the inner cylinder of the annulus and assumed as constant-temperature boundary conditions. The remaining portion of the inner cylinder wall as well as the outer cylinder wall is considered to be insulated. The emphasis is mainly on the effects of the arrangement of the heat source pair on the fluid flow and heat transfer features. The governing equations are solved on a non-uniform O type mesh using a pressure-based finite volume method with an enthalpy porosity technique to trace the solid and liquid interface. The results are obtained at Ra=104 and presented in terms of streamlines, isotherms, melting phase front, liquid fraction and dimensionless heat flux. It is observed that, depending on the arrangement of heat sources, the liquid fraction increases both linearly and non-linearly with time but will slow down at the end of the melting process. It can also be concluded that proper arrangement of discrete heat sources has the great potential in improving the energy storage system. For instance, the arrangement C3 where the heat sources are located on the bottom part of the inner cylinder wall can expedite the melting process as compared to the other arrangements.

  8. Numerical studies of integrated concrete with a solid-solid phase change material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, D.; Fung, A.S.; Siddiqui, O. [Ryerson Polytechnic Univ., Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

    2007-07-01

    The thermal storage performance of concrete cement integrated with a hypothetical solid-solid phase change material (PCM) was investigated. The thermal storage material was exposed to solar radiation on a sunny winter day in Toronto. The effects of weight ratio of PCM to cement and the thickness of cement were studied. The integrated PCM cement compound was treated as a homogenous mixture with uniform physical and thermal properties. Finite element modelling (FEM) was used to determine the effective heat capacity method. Governing equations for the heat transfer process in the solid-liquid PCMs included Navier-Stokes equations; mass conservation equations; and the energy conservation equation. The energy equation was the only governing equation for the binary solid state PCMs. The enthalpy method was used to apply governing equations of PCMs over the whole fixed domain of interest. The total energy required for the phase change was determined using the enthalpy function. The simulations showed that PCMs can reduce the fluctuation of temperature. Temperature fluctuations on the upper surface varied mainly in amplitude and in time phase due to thermal storage effects. The total amount of solar gain increased when the PCM ratio increased. However, the effect of the PCM ratio on the amount of released energy became less apparent when the thickness of the PCM was increased. It was concluded that a 30 per cent PCM ratio contributed the maximum overall released energy after the radiation gain vanished. 8 refs., 3 tabs., 11 figs.

  9. Technological changes, new materials, and their impact on the demand for minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almost all mineral commodities compete in an international market, and changing technologies and preferences can impact this materials market to either increase or decrease the demand for specific minerals. This paper presents information on the changes we are seeing in materials usage in the United States, some specific examples of market penetration and methods to evaluate this, and some preliminary data on worldwide trends. Traditionally, evaluating the viability of a mineral venture involves the estimation of anticipated costs, production rates, mine life, and discount rates. These estimated costs are then compared with current and expected future prices to see if the necessary return on investment is likely to be generated. Additionally, an examination of the current, and expected future competition in the market is certainly of interest since an assessment of where the operation's costs fall in relation to the total world supply determines how far demand/prices can fall before stronger operations can supply the whole market. Feedstock price has been the traditional measure in the minerals community, and most producers think of themselves as suppliers of particular commodities in competition with other similar suppliers. However, this approach must be altered when we seek to evaluate how individual commodities compete in a market where substitution is expanding

  10. Thermodynamic and thermoeconomic analysis of combined geothermal space heating and thermal storage using phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, V.; Ragnarsson, Á.

    2015-12-01

    The present work discusses the utilization of phase change materials for energy storage in geothermal space heating systems. Thermodynamics and thermoeconomics of the combined heating and thermal storing system were studied to show the scope of energy storage and cost savings. A computational model of the combined space heating and thermal storage system was developed and used to perform thermodynamic studies of the heat storage process and heating system efficiency at different times and ambient temperatures. The basis for these studies is daily variations in heating demand that is higher during the night than during the day. The results show the scope of the utilization of phase change material for low ambient temperature conditions. Under proper conditions a sufficient amount of exergy is stored during the charging period at a low ambient temperature to fulfill the daytime heat load requirement. Under these conditions the cost flow rate of exergy storage is found to be lower than the radiator heating cost flow rate. Thus, the use of exergy storage at low ambient temperatures for heating at higher ambient temperatures makes a significant contribution to cost savings.

  11. A facile method to compare EFTEM maps obtained from materials changing composition over time

    KAUST Repository

    Casu, Alberto

    2015-10-31

    Energy Filtered Transmission Electron Microscopy (EFTEM) is an analytical tool that has been successfully and widely employed in the last two decades for obtaining fast elemental maps in TEM mode. Several studies and efforts have been addressed to investigate limitations and advantages of such technique, as well as to improve the spatial resolution of compositional maps. Usually, EFTEM maps undergo post-acquisition treatments by changing brightness and contrast levels, either via dedicated software or via human elaboration, in order to maximize their signal-to-noise ratio and render them as visible as possible. However, elemental maps forming a single set of EFTEM images are usually subjected to independent map-by-map image treatment. This post-acquisition step becomes crucial when analyzing materials that change composition over time as a consequence of an external stimulus, because the map-by-map approach doesn\\'t take into account how the chemical features of the imaged materials actually progress, in particular when the investigated elements exhibit very low signals. In this article, we present a facile procedure applicable to whole sets of EFTEM maps acquired on a sample that is evolving over time. The main aim is to find a common method to treat the images features, in order to make them as comparable as possible without affecting the information there contained. Microsc. Res. Tech. 78:1090–1097, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Indian Creek-AML: Coal slurry reclamation (Kansas case history)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black and Veatch, assisted by Jack Nawrot, developed conceptual and final designs and provided construction assistance to create grasslands and wetlands in order to reclaim an abandoned coal mine for the state of Kansas. The mine included spoils, a coal refuse dump, and slurry pond in the Indian Creek drainage basin in east central Kansas. The Indian Creek flowed from an off-site abandoned mine and through the coal slurry pond where its waters became more polluted. The intent of the reclamation project was to improve water quality and create a wildlife refuge. The coal refuse was covered and seeded with a diversity of vegetation including several grasses and legume. The slurry pond was developed into a series of large wetland cells to improve water quality. Prior to reclamation, the water leaving the site had a typical pH of 3.3, ranging from 2.4 to 5.6, an iron content which typically over 22 mg/L and ranging over 100 mg/L, and contained large amounts of coal slurry. The acid sediment in the slurry killed fish and caused visible damage to a new large concrete box culvert several miles downstream of the site. Post-reclamation water quality leaving the Indian Creek site showed immediate improvement even before vegetation was reestablished. The existing wetland treatment systems have been successfully treating water for over seven years with the pH of the water leaving the wetlands above 7 and soluble iron content less than 1 mg/L. Fish in the constructed wetlands support waterfowl which now nest onsite

  13. Water solar distiller productivity enhancement using concentrating solar water heater and phase change material (PCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miqdam T. Chaichan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates usage of thermal energy storage extracted from concentrating solar heater for water distillation. Paraffin wax selected as a suitable phase change material, and it was used for storing thermal energy in two different insulated treasurers. The paraffin wax is receiving hot water from concentrating solar dish. This solar energy stored in PCM as latent heat energy. Solar energy stored in a day time with a large quantity, and some heat retrieved for later use. Water’s temperature measured in a definite interval of time. Four cases were studied: using water as storage material with and without solar tracker. Also, PCM was as thermal storage material with and without solar tracker.The system working time was increased to about 5 h with sun tracker by concentrating dish and adding PCM to the system. The system concentrating efficiency, heating efficiency, and system productivity, has increased by about 64.07%, 112.87%, and 307.54%, respectively. The system working time increased to 3 h when PCM added without sun tracker. Also, the system concentrating efficiency increased by about 50.47%, and the system heating efficiency increased by about 41.63%. Moreover, the system productivity increased by about 180%.

  14. Performance of phase change materials on storage capacity of trombe wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two types of phase change materials were used as storage media in a Trombe Wall; namely paraffin wax (N-Eicoseue C20 H42) and Glaubers Salt (Na2SO410H2O). To investigate the performance of these materials, a theoretical model and a simulation programme were developed. The wall temperature, the amount of heat stored, and the optimum wall thickness were calculated for both types. The study found that using two sheets of glass on the outside wall increased the surface wall temperature by around 50 degree C. It also found that Glauber salt was a much better storage material than paraffin wax. For a selected winter day at a location of 32 oN latitude, the storage capacity of the salt was more than twice that of the paraffin wax. The salt storage capacity was 32816 kJ/m3 at an optimum wall thickness of 16 cm. this value for paraffin was 14464 kJ/m3 at 13 cm optimum thickness. The study also concluded that according to this high heating value the wall uses, Glauber salt as a storage medium could supply its heat to the surrounding for a much longer period at night

  15. Performance of phase change materials on storage capacity of trombe wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two types of phase change materials were used at storage media in a Trombe Wall , namely paraffin wax (N-Eicoseue C20H42) and Glauber's Salt (Na2So4.10H2O). To investigate the performance of these materials, a theoretical model and a simulation programme were developed. The wall temperature, the amount of heat stored, and the optimum wall thickness were calculated for both types. The study found that using two sheets of glass on the outside wall increased the surface wall temperature by around 50 degree centigrade. It also found that Glauber's salt was a much better storage materials than paraffin wax. For a selected winter day at a location of 32 deg. N latitude, the storage capacity of the salt was more than twice that of the paraffin wax. The salt storage capacity was 32816 kj/m3 at an optimum wall thickness of 16cm. This value for paraffin wax was 14464 kj/m3 at 13cm optimum thickness. The study also concluded that according to this high heating value the wall uses, Glauber's salt as a storage medium could supply its heat to the surrounding for a much longer period at night.(Author)

  16. Oxygen ion implantation induced microstructural changes and electrical conductivity in Bakelite RPC detector material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K. V. Aneesh; Ranganathaiah, C.; Kumarswamy, G. N.; Ravikumar, H. B.

    2016-05-01

    In order to explore the structural modification induced electrical conductivity, samples of Bakelite Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) detector materials were exposed to 100 keV Oxygen ion in the fluences of 1012, 1013, 1014 and 1015 ions/cm2. Ion implantation induced microstructural changes have been studied using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) techniques. Positron lifetime parameters viz., o-Ps lifetime and its intensity shows the deposition of high energy interior track and chain scission leads to the formation of radicals, secondary ions and electrons at lower ion implantation fluences (1012 to1014 ions/cm2) followed by cross-linking at 1015 ions/cm2 fluence due to the radical reactions. The reduction in electrical conductivity of Bakelite detector material is correlated to the conducting pathways and cross-links in the polymer matrix. The appropriate implantation energy and fluence of Oxygen ion on polymer based Bakelite RPC detector material may reduce the leakage current, improves the efficiency, time resolution and thereby rectify the aging crisis of the RPC detectors.

  17. Phase Change Materials (PCMs for energy storage in architecture. Use with the Magic Box prototype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bedoya Frutos, C.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The article shows an energy-accumulation system in change of phase materials, designed for a prototype dwelling used for building two bioclimatic and self-sufficient buildings. These bulidings have been built in Madrid, Washington and Beijing. The characteristics of these materials, the construction systems into which these materials were incorporated, its comparative valuation with sensitive accumulation systems, and the results of the building monitorization are included.El artículo muestra un sistema de acumulación de energía en Materiales de Cambio de Fase diseñado para un prototipo de vivienda con el que se han construido dos edificios bioclimáticos y autosuficientes. Estos edificios se han realizado en Madrid, Washington y Pekín. Se incluyen las características de estos materiales, de los sistemas constructivos donde se integraron, su valoración comparativa con los sistemas de acumulación sensibles y los resultados de la monitorización del edificio.

  18. Thermal characteristics of manganese (II) nitrate hexahydrate as a phase change material for cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The imbalance of electrical demand in summer due to cooling system demand is a big problem in many countries. One promising solution is shifting peak demand from early afternoon to night by utilizing natural cold energy resources such as cool outside air during night or running a refrigerator driven by midnight power. In these cases, using the thermal energy storage (TES) of phase change material (PCM) which has a melting point from 15 to 25 deg. C is one of the most effective ideas. However, few suitable PCMs for this temperature range are at present commercially available. This study aims to evaluate the potential of Mn(NO3)2 · 6H2O (manganese (II) nitrate hexahydrate) as a new PCM for the TES of cooling systems. First, experiments on the modulation of the melting point of Mn(NO3)2 · 6H2O and reduction of supercooling were made by dissolving small amounts of salts in the material. Consequently, MnCl2 · 4H2O was found to have good performance with regard to both modulation of the melting temperature and the heat of fusion. Next, a thermal response test was carried out by using a small cylindrical vessel. Results showed that the required temperature levels for charging and discharging the heat of this mixture were clarified. In addition, the price and safety of this material as a PCM are discussed

  19. Sensitivity of acoustic nonlinearity parameter to the microstructural changes in cement-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gun; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Kurtis, Kimberly E.; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2015-03-01

    This research experimentally investigates the sensitivity of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter to microcracks in cement-based materials. Based on the second harmonic generation (SHG) technique, an experimental setup using non-contact, air-coupled detection is used to receive the consistent Rayleigh surface waves. To induce variations in the extent of microscale cracking in two types of specimens (concrete and mortar), shrinkage reducing admixture (SRA), is used in one set, while a companion specimen is prepared without SRA. A 50 kHz wedge transducer and a 100 kHz air-coupled transducer are implemented for the generation and detection of nonlinear Rayleigh waves. It is shown that the air-coupled detection method provides more repeatable fundamental and second harmonic amplitudes of the propagating Rayleigh waves. The obtained amplitudes are then used to calculate the relative nonlinearity parameter βre, the ratio of the second harmonic amplitude to the square of the fundamental amplitude. The experimental results clearly demonstrate that the nonlinearity parameter (βre) is highly sensitive to the microstructural changes in cement-based materials than the Rayleigh phase velocity and attenuation and that SRA has great potential to avoid shrinkage cracking in cement-based materials.

  20. Materials and other needs for advanced phase change memory (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, Norma E.

    2015-09-01

    Phase change memory (PCM), with its long history, may now hold its brightest promise to date. This bright future is being fueled by the "push" from big data. PCM is a non-volatile memory technology used to create solid-state random access memory devices that operate based the resistance properties of materials. Employing the electrical resistance differences-as opposed to differences in charge stored-between the amorphous and crystalline phases of the material, PCM can store bits, namely one's and zero's. Indeed, owing to the method of storage, PCM can in fact be designed to hold multiple bits thus leading to a high-density technology twice the storage density and less than half the cost of DRAM, the main kind found in typical personal computers. It has been long known that PCM can fill a need gap that spans 3 decades in performance from DRAM to solid state drive (NAND Flash). Furthermore, PCM devices can lead to performance and reliability improvements essential to enabling significant steps forward to supporting big data centric computing. This talk will focus on the science and challenges of aggressive scaling to realize the density needed, how this scaling challenge is intertwined with materials needs for endurance into the giga-cycles, and the associated forefront research aiming to realizing multi-level functionality into these nanoscale programmable resistor devices.