WorldWideScience

Sample records for change healthy solutions

  1. Leading change to create a healthy and satisfying work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Carolyn L; Krugman, Mary; Schloffman, Danielle H

    2013-01-01

    Nurse executives must take a leadership role in creating a healthy work environment for nurses and all disciplines. Engaging in partnerships and empowering clinical nurses to construct the solutions to barriers that may stand in the way of the goal of a satisfied and healthy workforce are important strategies toward success. This publication outlines many projects a 3-time Magnet-designated academic hospital has implemented, working with our shared leadership councils, to meet the standards for a healthy work environment. These initiatives, from the unit to the hospital level, included standardizing a culture change of uninterrupted meal breaks, the creation of intensive care unit Zen rooms, strategies to better manage increased patient volumes, best practices for facility design, enhancing physician-nurse relations, and a hospital wellness program. Data were benchmarked against national nurse and employee surveys to compare progress and report outcomes. Two important nursing organization structures that have contributed to the success of a healthy and satisfied nursing work environment include UEXCEL, a longstanding clinical nurse professional practice program, and the hospital's 11-year participation in the University HealthSystem Consortium/American Association of Colleges of Nursing National Post-Baccalaureate Nurse Residency Program. A highly engaged, well-educated, and committed nursing workforce, nurtured by a strong leadership team, has created a positive work environment characterized by low turnover and high retention.

  2. Relationships Analysis and Public Perception of the Healthy Plastic as One Solution to Healthy Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartatik; Hartono, R.; Purnomo, A.; Riasti, B. K.; Munawaroh, H.

    2017-02-01

    Direct Plastics are used for various human purposes, ranging from household to industry. Tableware and drink made of plastic is very practical to use, easy to clean, durable and cost far less than tableware made of the other material. However, must also be considered in terms of security in the use of plastic containers for food storage because there are adverse effects. There are seven types of plastic based material used, namely Polyethylene, Terephthalate, High Density Polyethylene, Polyvinyl Chloride or V/PVC, Low Density Polyethylene or LDPE, Polypropylene, Polystyrene, Plastics others including polycarbonate. Experts claims that the plastic code numbers 2, 4 and 5 are used for equipment safely eat/drink because it is more stable and safe if used correctly. In this study will analyze the relationship between the recent education, family income to perception and behavior in the use of plastics in food storage daily as one solution to healthy living. The population of this research is all the people in the Solo area particularly housewife and all the people in the productive age. Data were obtained through a survey with cluster random sampling method. Statistical method used is a parametric method and Chi Square test This method is used as an alternative method of parametric when some assumptions are not met. Based on the results of Chi Square test with α = 15% was concluded that recent education and income related to the behavior of people using plastic products as one of the solutions to Healthy Living.

  3. How to Make a Healthy Change in Your Community Today

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-15

    In this podcast, the speakers will discuss how to create healthy changes that benefit residents and businesses in local communities, as well as provide inspiration for other communities to make healthy living a priority.  Created: 4/15/2012 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 8/28/2012.

  4. Environmental and policy change to support healthy aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Rebecca H; Sykes, Kathy; Lowman, Sarah G; Duncan, Richard; Satariano, William A; Belza, Basia

    2011-10-01

    Given the growing evidence of the influence of the environment on older adult health, the need to design and implement effective environmental policy around healthy and vital aging is urgent. This article describes issues amenable to improvement through policy change, evidence supporting specific policy approaches and outcomes, and promising strategies for implementing those approaches. Key areas of focus are neighborhood design and safety, housing, transportation, and mobility. Strategies to build capacity for policy change are also addressed. Our goals are to foster greater attention to environmental change in support of healthy aging and to illuminate directions for policy change.

  5. Making Health Easier: Healthy Changes Start in Preschool

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-09-19

    This podcast highlights the efforts of one educational organization, Los Angeles Universal Preschool (LAUP), to keep kids healthy at an early age. Childhood obesity now affects about one in six kids and disproportionately affects low-income and minority populations. LAUP teaches kids healthy habits and is incorporating small, healthy changes that can be made in any classroom—like teaching fun dances and providing nutritious snacks.  Created: 9/19/2012 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 10/1/2012.

  6. Design for healthy behavior: design interventions and stages of change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludden, Geke D.S.; Hekkert, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Designers have increasingly used the capacity of design to influence human behavior and consequently to address the challenges that our society faces. One of these challenges is the rise of ‘lifestyle diseases’, such as obesity and diabetes. A change towards a more healthy lifestyle could in many ca

  7. Changes in Healthy Childhood Lifestyle Behaviors in Japanese Rural Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Takahiro; Kasuga, Kosho; Murase, Tomohiko; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Background: Unhealthy lifestyles during childhood constitute a public health problem in Japan. However, current health education in Japan is ineffective in counteracting them. Previous studies contend that healthy lifestyles in children vary by academic grade and sex. This study examined changes throughout childhood suggests some intervention…

  8. The Healthy Ageing Model: health behaviour change for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potempa, Kathleen M; Butterworth, Susan W; Flaherty-Robb, Marna K; Gaynor, William L

    2010-01-01

    Proposed is a model of primary care for older adults with chronic health conditions that focuses on active engagement in health care. The Healthy Ageing Model is anchored in established theory on motivation and health behaviour change. The model draws on empirical and applied clinical underpinnings in such diverse areas as health promotion and education, treatment of addictions or obesity, management of chronic diseases, goal-setting, and coaching techniques. The conceptual foundation for the Healthy Ageing Model is described first, followed by a brief description of the key characteristics of the model. In conclusion, suggestions are offered for the clinical application and for further developing the model.

  9. Sign Changing Solutions of the ()-Laplacian Equation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bin Ge

    2013-11-01

    This paper deals with the variational and Nehari manifold method for the ()-Laplacian equations in a bounded domain or in the whole space. We prove existence of sign changing solutions under certain conditions.

  10. Challenges and solutions for climate change

    CERN Document Server

    Gaast, Wytze

    2012-01-01

    The latest scientific knowledge on climate change indicates that higher greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere through unchecked emissions will provoke severe climate change and ocean acidification threatening environmental structures on which humanity relies. Climate change therefore poses major socio-economic, technical and environmental challenges which will have serious impacts on countries’ pathways towards sustainable development. As a result, climate change and sustainable development have increasingly become interlinked. A changing climate makes achieving Millennium Development Goals more difficult and expensive, so there is every reason to achieve development goals with low greenhouse gas emissions. This leads to the following five challenges discussed by Challenges and Solutions for Climate Change: To place climate negotiations in the wider context of sustainability, equity and social change so that development benefits can be maximised at the same time as decreasing greenhouse gas emissi...

  11. Moderators of noise-induced cognitive change in healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernice AL Wright

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental noise causes cognitive impairment, particularly in executive function and episodic memory domains, in healthy populations. However, the possible moderating influences on this relationship are less clear. This study assessed 54 healthy participants (24 men on a cognitive battery (measuring psychomotor speed, attention, executive function, working memory, and verbal learning and memory under three (quiet, urban, and social noise conditions. IQ, subjective noise sensitivity, sleep, personality, paranoia, depression, anxiety, stress, and schizotypy were assessed on a single occasion. We found significantly slower psychomotor speed (urban, reduced working memory and episodic memory (urban and social, and more cautious decision-making (executive function, urban under noise conditions. There was no effect of sex. Variance in urban noise-induced changes in psychomotor speed, attention, Trail Making B-A (executive function, and immediate recall and social noise-induced changes in verbal fluency (executive function and immediate recall were explained by a combination of baseline cognition and paranoia, noise sensitivity, sleep, or cognitive disorganization. Higher baseline cognition (but not IQ predicted greater impairment under urban and social noise for most cognitive variables. Paranoia predicted psychomotor speed, attention, and executive function impairment. Subjective noise sensitivity predicted executive function and memory impairment. Poor sleep quality predicted less memory impairment. Finally, lower levels of cognitive disorganization predicted slower psychomotor speed and greater memory impairment. The identified moderators should be considered in studies aiming to reduce the detrimental effects of occupational and residential noise. These results highlight the importance of studying noise effects in clinical populations characterized by high levels of the paranoia, sleep disturbances, noise sensitivity, and cognitive

  12. Viscoelastic properties of healthy human artery measured in saline solution by AFM based indentation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundkvist, A.; Lilleodden, E.; Sickhaus, W.; Kinney, J.; Pruitt, L.; Balooch, M.

    1998-02-09

    Using an Atomic Force Microscope with an attachment for indentation, we have measured local, in vitro mechanical properties of healthy femoral artery tissue held in saline solution. The elastic modulus (34. 3 kPa) and viscoelastic response ({tau}sub{epsilon} {equals} 16.9 s and {tau}sub{sigma} {equals} 29.3 s) of the unstretched,intimal vessel wall have been determined using Sneddon theory and a three element model(standard linear solid) for viscoelastic materials. The procedures necessary to employ the indenting attachment to detect elastic moduli in the kPa range in liquid are described.

  13. Diurnal changes of biochemical metabolic markers in healthy young males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennels, Henriette P; Jørgensen, Henrik L; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2015-01-01

    .06 mmol/L) did not show significant oscillations. CONCLUSIONS: When diagnosing and monitoring metabolic disorders compensation for the 24-h variation of the biochemical metabolic markers is needed especially C-peptide, triglyceride and glucose. Furthermore, the stable HbA1c level through 24 h makes......BACKGROUND: To examine whether time of the day has an effect on the circulating levels of metabolism parameters. METHODS: Venous blood samples were obtained under standardized conditions from 24 healthy young men every third hour through 24 hours. The metabolic markers and melatonin were examined...

  14. Climatic change. What solutions?; Le Changement climatique. Quelles solutions?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieillefosse, A

    2009-07-01

    From 1990 to the present day, worldwide greenhouse gas emissions have increased by about 25%. Fighting climatic change has become an urgency: we only have 15 years in front of us to inflect the trajectory of worldwide emissions and to avoid a temperature rise of more than 2 deg. C during this century. Therefore, how is it possible to explain the shift between the need of an urgent action and the apparent inertia of some governing parties? How is it possible to implement a worldwide governance capable to answer the urgency of the fight against climatic change? These are the two questions that this pedagogical and concrete book tries to answer by analysing the different dimensions of climatic change and by making a first status of the building up of the international action, and in particular of the Kyoto protocol. For the post-2012 era, research and negotiations are in progress with the objective of reaching an agreement for the Copenhagen conference of December 2009. Several architectures are possible. This book shades light on the advantages and limitations of each of them with the possible compromises. It supplies a pluri-disciplinary approach of the international negotiations, often considered as complex by the general public. Content: 1 - understanding the climatic change stakes: climatic stakes, the main actors behind the figures, the technical-economical stakes; 2 - understanding the present day architecture of the fight against climatic change: strengths and weaknesses of the Kyoto protocol; encouraging research and technology spreading; the other action means in developing countries; 3 - what structure for a future international agreement?: the Bali negotiation process; the ideal vision: an improved Kyoto protocol; the pragmatic vision: individualized commitments; the negotiation space; preventing a planned fiasco. (J.S.)

  15. Modern banking solutions changing business and people

    OpenAIRE

    Myllynen, Juhani

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of the research was to map out user experiences relating to modern banking services such as electronic invoicing, internet banking, payment cards and payments. Private users and businesses were designed their own survey containing similar topics and questions. The theoretical part of the research explained history of various banking solutions in Finland starting from the late 1970’s. Modern technology and solutions were introduced and explained to give an understanding how differe...

  16. Bioavailability study of dronabinol oral solution versus dronabinol capsules in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikh N

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Neha Parikh,1 William G Kramer,2 Varun Khurana,1 Christina Cognata Smith,1 Santosh Vetticaden,1 1INSYS Therapeutics, Inc., Chandler, AZ, USA; 2Kramer Consulting LLC, North Potomac, MD, USA Background: Dronabinol, a pharmaceutical Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, was originally developed as an oral capsule. This study evaluated the bioavailability of a new formulation, dronabinol oral solution, versus a dronabinol capsule formulation. Methods: In an open-label, four-period, single-dose, crossover study, healthy volunteers were randomly assigned to one of two treatment sequences (T-R-T-R and R-T-R-T; T = dronabinol 4.25 mg oral solution and R = dronabinol 5 mg capsule under fasted conditions, with a minimum 7-day washout period between doses. Analyses were performed on venous blood samples drawn 15 minutes to 48 hours postdose, and dronabinol concentrations were assayed by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Results: Fifty-one of 52 individuals had pharmacokinetic data for analysis. The 90% confidence interval of the geometric mean ratio (oral solution/capsule for dronabinol was within the 80%–125% bioequivalence range for area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC from time zero to last measurable concentration (AUC0–t and AUC from time zero to infinity (AUC0–∞. Maximum plasma concentration was also bioequivalent for the two dronabinol formulations. Intraindividual variability in AUC0–∞ was >60% lower for dronabinol oral solution 4.25 mg versus dronabinol capsule 5 mg. Plasma dronabinol concentrations were detected within 15 minutes postdose in 100% of patients when receiving oral solution and in <25% of patients when receiving capsules. Conclusion: Single-dose dronabinol oral solution 4.25 mg was bioequivalent to dronabinol capsule 5 mg under fasted conditions. Dronabinol oral solution formulation may provide an easy-to-swallow administration option with lower intraindividual variability as well as

  17. Effects of administration of a synthetic low molecular weight/low molar substitution hydroxyethyl starch solution in healthy neonatal foals

    OpenAIRE

    Hepworth-Warren, Kate L.; Wong, David M.; Hay-Kraus, Bonnie L.; Wang,Chong; Sun, Yaxuan

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the effects of IV administration of isotonic fluid therapy and colloidal fluid therapy in healthy neonatal foals. Fifteen healthy neonatal foals were used in a randomized blinded prospective clinical study. Foals were randomly assigned to receive a bolus of 20 mL/kg of tetrastarch (TES) or balanced crystalloid solution. Vital parameters, colloid osmotic pressure (COP), and various clinicopathologic variables were assessed prior to infusion and at various time points up to ...

  18. Hippocampal volume changes in healthy subjects at risk of unipolar depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baaré, William F C; Vinberg, Maj; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2010-01-01

    Unipolar depression is moderately heritable. It is unclear whether structural brain changes associated with unipolar depression are present in healthy persons at risk of the disorder. Here we investigated whether a genetic predisposition to unipolar depression is associated with structural brain...... changes. A priori, hippocampal volume reductions were hypothesized. Using a high-risk study design, magnetic resonance imaging brain scans were obtained from 59 healthy high-risk subjects having a co-twin with unipolar depression, and 53 healthy low-risk subjects without a first-degree family history...

  19. Changing Foundations for Global Business Systems Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slepniov, Dmitrij; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum; Gubi, Ebbe

    2011-01-01

    Companies are actively seeking new competitive advantages by changing the location and ownership of their manufacturing processes. This process results in increasing fragmentation and dispersion of global business systems of companies. The purpose of this paper is to identify how companies may...... improve the integration of such business systems. The paper draws on a case study of a Danish industrial equipment firm. The paper describes and analyzes the company’s operations network configurations, which lay at the foundations of the company’s global business system. It is demonstrated how...... the operations configurations have been changing over time and affecting the overall business system. The paper identifies the key determinants and outcomes of this change. Moreover, it proposes how the design of operations configurations can be improved through the development of a distinct systemic approach...

  20. Healthy Change Processes-A Diary Study of Five Organizational Units. Establishing a Healthy Change Feedback Loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Mathilde; Saksvik, Per Øystein

    2016-10-01

    This paper explores a change process in the Central Norway Regional Health Authority that was brought about by the implementation of a new economics and logistics system. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to understanding of how employees' attitudes towards change develop over time and how attitudes differ between the five health trusts under this authority. In this paper, we argue that a process-oriented focus through a longitudinal diary method, in addition to action research and feedback loops, will provide greater understanding of the evaluation of organizational change and interventions. This is explored through the assumption that different units will have different perspectives and attitudes towards the same intervention over time because of different contextual and time-related factors. The diary method aims to capture the context, events, reflections and interactions when they occur and allows for a nuanced frame of reference for the different phases of the implementation process and how these phases are perceived by employees. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Baltimore City Stores Increased The Availability Of Healthy Food After WIC Policy Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Laura K; Anderson, Cheryl A M; Appel, Lawrence; Jones-Smith, Jessica; Bilal, Usama; Gittelsohn, Joel; Franco, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    As part of a 2009 revision to the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program, the Department of Agriculture required WIC-authorized stores to stock additional varieties of healthy food. The long-term effects of this policy on access to healthy food are unknown. Using surveys conducted in 118 Baltimore City, Maryland, food stores in 2006 and 2012, we examined associations of the change in healthy food availability with store type, neighborhood demographics, and the 2009 WIC policy change. Overall, healthy food availability improved significantly between 2006 and 2012, with the greatest increases in corner stores and in census tracts with more than 60 percent black residents. On an 11-point scale measuring availability of fruit (3 points), vegetables (4 points), bread (2 points), and milk (2 points), the WIC policy change was associated with a 0.72-point increase in WIC-relevant healthy food availability, while joining WIC was associated with a 0.99-point increase. Stores that carry a limited variety of food items may be more receptive to stocking healthier food than previously thought, particularly within neighborhoods with a majority of black residents. Policies targeting healthy food availability have the potential to increase availability and decrease health disparities.

  2. Pregnancy-Induced Changes in Systemic Gene Expression among Healthy Women and Women with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mittal, Anuradha; Pachter, Lior; Nelson, J. Lee;

    2015-01-01

    Background Pregnancy induces drastic biological changes systemically, and has a beneficial effect on some autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, specific systemic changes that occur as a result of pregnancy have not been thoroughly examined in healthy women or women...

  3. Partners for a healthy city: implementing policies and environmental changes within organizations to promote health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyerherm, Laura; Tibbits, Melissa; Wang, Hongmei; Schram, Sarah; Balluff, Mary

    2014-07-01

    Current research has suggested that obesity prevention efforts should promote policy and environmental changes. The Partners for a Healthy City project, implemented in Douglas County, Nebraska, focused on collaborating with local organizations to help them select and implement 1 or more policies that promoted healthy eating and physical activity. Of the 346 organizations participating in the project and completing the follow-up assessment, 92% implemented at least 1 new policy or expanded an existing policy related to healthy food and drink options and physical activity, totaling 952 individual policy changes. Common policies included providing water as the primary beverage and installing bike racks to support active commuting to and from work. These findings suggest widespread support for policy changes that promote community health.

  4. Pharmacokinetics and safety study of posaconazole intravenous solution administered peripherally to healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersemaekers, Wendy M; van Iersel, Thijs; Nassander, Ulla; O'Mara, Edward; Waskin, Hetty; Caceres, Maria; van Iersel, Marlou L P S

    2015-02-01

    This study evaluated the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of a posaconazole i.v. (intravenous) solution. This was a single-center, 2-part, randomized, rising single- and multiple-dose study in healthy adults. In part 1, subjects received 0 (vehicle), 50, 100, 200, 250, or 300 mg posaconazole in a single dose i.v. by 30-min peripheral infusion (6 cohorts of 12 subjects each [9 active and 3 placebo], making a total of 72 subjects). Blood samples were collected until 168 h postdose. In part 2, subjects were to receive 2 peripheral infusions at a 12-h interval on day 1 followed by once-daily infusion for 9 days. However, part 2 was terminated early because of high rates of infusion site reactions with multiple dosing at the same infusion site. The pharmacokinetics results for part 1 (n=45 subjects) showed that the mean posaconazole exposure (area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity [AUC0-∞]) ranged from 4,890 to 46,400 ng · h/ml (range of coefficient of variation values, 26 to 50). The dose-proportionality slope estimate (90% confidence interval) for AUC0-∞ was 1.30 (1.19 to 1.41), indicating a greater-than-dose-proportional increase. The data for safety in part 1 show that 29/72 subjects had ≥1 adverse event. Infusion site reactions were reported in 2/9 vehicle subjects, 0/18 placebo subjects, and 7/45 i.v. posaconazole subjects. The data for safety in part 2 show that infusion site reactions were reported in 1/4 (25%) placebo subjects, 3/9 (33%) vehicle control subjects, and 4/5 (80%) i.v. posaconazole (100 mg) subjects (3 posaconazole recipients subsequently developed thrombophlebitis and were discontinued from treatment). In conclusion, the posaconazole i.v. solution showed a greater-than-dose-proportional increase in exposure, primarily at doses below 200 mg. When administered peripherally at the same infusion site, multiple dosing of i.v. posaconazole led to unacceptably high rates of infusion site reactions. Intravenous

  5. The rate of change in declining steroid hormones: a new parameter of healthy aging in men?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Andreas; Philipp, Michel; Lozza, Niclà; Ehlert, Ulrike

    2016-09-20

    Research on healthy aging in men has increasingly focused on age-related hormonal changes. Testosterone (T) decline is primarily investigated, while age-related changes in other sex steroids (dehydroepiandrosterone [DHEA], estradiol [E2], progesterone [P]) are mostly neglected. An integrated hormone parameter reflecting aging processes in men has yet to be identified. 271 self-reporting healthy men between 40 and 75 provided both psychometric data and saliva samples for hormone analysis. Correlation analysis between age and sex steroids revealed negative associations for the four sex steroids (T, DHEA, E2, and P). Principal component analysis including ten salivary analytes identified a principal component mainly unifying the variance of the four sex steroid hormones. Subsequent principal component analysis including the four sex steroids extracted the principal component of declining steroid hormones (DSH). Moderation analysis of the association between age and DSH revealed significant moderation effects for psychosocial factors such as depression, chronic stress and perceived general health. In conclusion, these results provide further evidence that sex steroids decline in aging men and that the integrated hormone parameter DSH and its rate of change can be used as biomarkers for healthy aging in men. Furthermore, the negative association of age and DSH is moderated by psychosocial factors.

  6. Web 2.0 Solutions to Wicked Climate Change Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alanah Kazlauskas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most pressing ‘wicked problems’ facing humankind is climate change together with its many interrelated environmental concerns. The complexity of this set of problems can be overwhelming as there is such diversity among both the interpretations of the scientific evidence and the viability of possible solutions. Among the social technologies associated with the second generation of the Internet known as Web 2.0, there are tools that allow people to communicate, coordinate and collaborate in ways that reduce their carbon footprint and a potential to become part of the climate change solution. However the way forward is not obvious or easy as Web 2.0, while readily accepted in the chaotic social world, is often treated with suspicion in the more ordered world of business and government. This paper applies a holistic theoretical sense-making framework to research and practice on potential Web 2.0 solutions to climate change problems. The suite of issues, activities and tools involved are viewed as an ecosystem where all elements are dynamic and inter-related. Through such innovative thinking the Information Systems community can make a valuable contribution to a critical global problem and hence find a new relevance as part of the solution.

  7. Reference ranges and age-related changes of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in Chinese healthy adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAO Yang; QIU ZhiFeng; XIE Jing; LI DongJing; LI TaiSheng

    2009-01-01

    This study was performed to build region-specific reference ranges of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets for Chinese healthy adults from the young to the elderly and analyze the trends of changes in lymphocyte subsets for evaluating the impact of age on the values. 151 healthy adults aged 19-86 were recruited based on the SENIEUR protocol. Three sets of reference ranges were finally built applicable for the healthy young (19-44 years), middle-aged (45-64 years) and elder adults (>65). Comparisons in parameters among the three cohorts showed that e statistically significant increase in CD16CD56+ NK cell was observed between the middle-aged and elder cohorts, whereas for the majority of the parameters, a significant decline was observed between the young and the middle-aged cohorts.Further results showed that inverse correlations were observed between the age and CD19+ B, CD3+T,CD3+CD4+1, CD4+CD45RA+CD62L+ naTve T cell and CD4+CD28+/CD4+, while the positive one was identified between the age end the NK cell. These significant changes of the most of immune parameters provided evidence for immunosenescence. Notably, T cell activation markers of CD8+CD38+ and CD8+HLA-DR+ showed reverse trends of association with age, which provides a clue for further researches on the mechanisms underlying the paradoxical clinical presentation of the elder patients.

  8. Forestry solutions for mitigating climate change in China

    OpenAIRE

    Guanglei Gao; Guodong Ding; Yuanyuan Zhao; Yanfeng Bao; Minghan Yu

    2014-01-01

    Aim of study: Forests have vital functions in global carbon cycle, and thus are of prime importance in efforts to curb climate change. This study intends to guide effective forestry solutions to combat climate change in China.Area of study: China, not only a major emitter of greenhouse gases, but also one of the five most-forest richest countries with the largest plantations in the world.Material and methods: We summarize and recommend carbon sequestration forestry by considering two Kyoto Pr...

  9. White matter and memory in healthy adults: Coupled changes over two years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Andrew R; Prindle, John J; Brandmaier, Andreas M; Raz, Naftali

    2016-05-01

    Numerous cross-sectional studies have used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to link age-related differences in white matter (WM) anisotropy and concomitant decrements in cognitive ability. Due to a dearth of longitudinal evidence, the relationship between changes in diffusion properties of WM and cognitive performance remains unclear. Here we examine the relationship between two-year changes in WM organization and cognitive performance in healthy adults (N=96, age range at baseline=18-79 years). We used latent change score models (LCSM) to evaluate changes in age-sensitive cognitive abilities - fluid intelligence and associative memory. WM changes were assessed by fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD) in WM regions that are considered part of established memory networks and exhibited individual differences in change. In modeling change, we postulated reciprocal paths between baseline measures and change factors, within and between WM and cognition domains, and accounted for individual differences in baseline age. Although baseline cross-sectional memory performance was positively associated with FA and negatively with RD, longitudinal effects told an altogether different story. Independent of age, longitudinal improvements in associative memory were significantly associated with linear reductions in FA and increases in RD. The present findings demonstrate the sensitivity of DTI-derived indices to changes in the brain and cognition and affirm the importance of longitudinal models for evaluating brain-cognition relations.

  10. Forestry solutions for mitigating climate change in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanglei Gao

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: Forests have vital functions in global carbon cycle, and thus are of prime importance in efforts to curb climate change. This study intends to guide effective forestry solutions to combat climate change in China.Area of study: China, not only a major emitter of greenhouse gases, but also one of the five most-forest richest countries with the largest plantations in the world.Material and methods: We summarize and recommend carbon sequestration forestry by considering two Kyoto Protocol activities: afforestation/reforestation and forest management.Main results: Afforestation has a top priority of carbon sequestration forestry in China. However, the tree-based solution will reach its limits to growth in a predictable near future. Forest management contributes to break the deadlock. When scientifically and sustainably managed, forests still have a central role in climate change mitigation. Research highlights: China’s efforts on carbon sequestration forestry should shift the focus from afforestation to forest management.Key words: climate change; carbon sequestration forestry; afforestation; forest management.

  11. Women, e-waste, and technological solutions to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Lucy; Magee, Amanda; Hale, Benjamin

    2014-06-14

    In this paper, we argue that a crossover class of climate change solutions (which we term "technological solutions") may disproportionately and adversely impact some populations over others. We begin by situating our discussion in the wider climate discourse, particularly with regard to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and the Basel Convention. We then suggest that many of the most attractive technological solutions to climate change, such as solar energy and electric car batteries, will likely add to the rapidly growing stream of electronic waste ("e-waste"). This e-waste may have negative downstream effects on otherwise disenfranchised populations. We argue that e-waste burdens women unfairly and disproportionately, affecting their mortality/morbidity and fertility, as well as the development of their children. Building on this, we claim that these injustices are more accurately captured as problems of recognition rather than distribution, since women are often institutionally under-acknowledged both in the workplace and in the home. Without institutional support and representation, women and children are deprived of adequate safety equipment, health precautions, and health insurance. Finally, we return to the question of climate justice in the context of the human right to health and argue for greater inclusion and recognition of women waste workers and other disenfranchised groups in forging future climate agreements.

  12. EFFECTS OF GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE ON POVERTY AND SOLUTION SUGGESTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sermin Atak, Melike Erdogan, Asli Yoenten

    2008-09-30

    Most environmental risks including global warming are accepted as ''manufactured risks'' as well. Climate change, as manufactured risk, occurs due to human activities such as energy usage, industrialization, agricultural activities, pollination and forest damage which broke down the combination of global atmosphere in addition to nature sourced climate change which can be stated as external risk. Global climate change, as manufactured risk, has environmental and socio-economic effects in the subjects like water shortage, drought, highness in water levels, decrease in biological diversity, nutrition and food shortage. The effect of global climate change, as manufactured risk, on society's poverty has been classified as horizontal and vertical effect in this study. It's possible to say that horizontal effect of global climate change, as manufactured risk, on poverty will come out in the way ''expansion of poverty''. It's possible to state the vertical effect of global climate change, as manufactured risk, on poverty as the ''deepening of poverty'' and ''intensifying of poverty''. Horizontal and vertical effects of climate change on poverty can not be evaluated interdependently. The multiplier effect and the cross interaction that these two effects form together bring along the process of increasing of poverty and the solution's getting difficult. Global climate change, as manufactured risk, affects all parts but the most powerful effect of it is over the poor. The studies in the direction of decreasing the poverty effect of global climate change necessitate global cooperation. National and international solutions should be considered together. In addition to global cooperation, individual, institutional, domestic and regional applications must have complementary qualities in decreasing the effects of global climate change. Global and individual studies made for

  13. Reference ranges and age-related changes of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in Chinese healthy adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This study was performed to build region-specific reference ranges of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets for Chinese healthy adults from the young to the elderly and analyze the trends of changes in lymphocyte subsets for evaluating the impact of age on the values.151 healthy adults aged 19-86 were recruited based on the SENIEUR protocol.Three sets of reference ranges were finally built applicable for the healthy young(19-44 years),middle-aged(45-64 years) and elder adults(≥65).Comparisons in parameters among the three cohorts showed that a statistically significant increase in CD16CD56+ NK cell was observed between the middle-aged and elder cohorts,whereas for the majority of the parameters,a significant decline was observed between the young and the middle-aged cohorts.Further results showed that inverse correlations were observed between the age and CD19+ B,CD3+ T,CD3+CD4+ T,CD4+CD45RA+CD62L+ nave T cell and CD4+CD28+/CD4+,while the positive one was identified between the age and the NK cell.These significant changes of the most of immune parameters provided evidence for immunosenescence.Notably,T cell activation markers of CD8+CD38+ and CD8+HLA-DR+ showed reverse trends of association with age,which provides a clue for further researches on the mechanisms underlying the paradoxical clinical presentation of the elder patients.

  14. Day-night variation in heart rate variability changes induced by endotoxaemia in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alamili, M.; Rosenberg, J; Gögenur, I

    2015-01-01

    /night variation in endotoxaemia-induced changes in HRV. METHODS: A randomized, crossover study with 12 healthy men (age 18-31) was conducted. Endotoxaemia were induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxin 0.3 ng/kg b.w. in two visits (day visit and night visit). At the day visit, endotoxaemia were induced at 12...... and parasympathetic activity can be estimated by measuring heart rate variability (HRV). Based on the intimate link between ANS and the inflammatory response, we hypothesized, that HRV changes seen during endotoxaemia would be different based on time of the day the endotoxaemia is initiated. We investigated day...... at both night and day resulted in a significant depression in HRV parameters high-frequency power (HF), low-frequency power (LF), standard deviation of normal-to-normal (NN) intervals, root mean square of successive differences and proportion of NN50 divided by total number of NNs (P

  15. Pregnancy-Induced Changes in Systemic Gene Expression among Healthy Women and Women with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Mittal

    Full Text Available Pregnancy induces drastic biological changes systemically, and has a beneficial effect on some autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA. However, specific systemic changes that occur as a result of pregnancy have not been thoroughly examined in healthy women or women with RA. The goal of this study was to identify genes with expression patterns associated with pregnancy, compared to pre-pregnancy as baseline and determine whether those associations are modified by presence of RA.In our RNA sequencing (RNA-seq dataset from 5 healthy women and 20 women with RA, normalized expression levels of 4,710 genes were significantly associated with pregnancy status (pre-pregnancy, first, second and third trimesters over time, irrespective of presence of RA (False Discovery Rate (FDR-adjusted p value<0.05. These genes were enriched in pathways spanning multiple systems, as would be expected during pregnancy. A subset of these genes (n = 256 showed greater than two-fold change in expression during pregnancy compared to baseline levels, with distinct temporal trends through pregnancy. Another 98 genes involved in various biological processes including immune regulation exhibited expression patterns that were differentially associated with pregnancy in the presence or absence of RA.Our findings support the hypothesis that the maternal immune system plays an active role during pregnancy, and also provide insight into other systemic changes that occur in the maternal transcriptome during pregnancy compared to the pre-pregnancy state. Only a small proportion of genes modulated by pregnancy were influenced by presence of RA in our data.

  16. [Correlation of hemogram changes during pregnancy of healthy women with postpartum blood transfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Chen, Lin-Feng; Wang, Shu-Ying; Wang, Yan; Shi, Hong-Mei; Wang, De-Qing

    2012-10-01

    This study was aimed to explore the correlation of hemogram changes during pregnancy of healthy women with postpartum blood transfusion. The outpatient and inpatient information of expectant lying-in women in our hospitals was collected, the route blood test, lever and kidney function and blood coagulation function tests were performed from the 4th to the 10th month of pregnancy. The pregnant women without underlying diseases and non-elderly pregnant women with single fetus were selected as the subjects of study. They were divided into postpartum blood transfusion group and non-blood transfusion group. The white blood cell (WBC) count, hemoglobin (Hb) level, platelet (Plt) count, plateletocrit (PCT), mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW) were compared in 2 groups. The results showed that 68 cases out of 450 expectant lying-in women received blood transfusion, among them 30 cases with complete data of puerperal transfusion were taken as blood transfusion group, the 28 cases of non transfusion puerperal as control group. There was no significant difference of hemogram changes between the two groups. However, there was a slight decline in Plt count and Hb level of late pregnant women. What is more, there was no correlation between Plt count change and the PCT, MPV and PDW. It is concluded that the changes of hemogram during pregnancy has no correlation with postpartum hemorrhage and blood transfusion in healthy pregnant women, the Plt count and Hb level of pregnant women slightly decline. Nevertheless, PCT, MPV and PDW are within the normal range.

  17. U.S. Geological Survey Chesapeake Bay Studies: Scientific Solutions for a Healthy Bay and Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Scott

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the science agency for the Department of Interior (DOI), has the critical role of providing objective science to document and understand ecosystem change in the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed. The human population in the Bay watershed, which grew from 8.1 million in 1950 to almost 16 million in 2000, has resulted in degraded water quality, loss of habitat, and declines in fish and bird populations. USGS scientists are leaders in understanding cause and effect of human activities and natural changes on water quality and the health of the ecosystem. The USGS interacts with resource managers and policy makers to use the science to adapt approaches for implementation, and assess effectiveness of, management actions for ecosystem conservation, restoration, and sustainability.

  18. Changes in cytokine production in healthy subjects practicing Guolin Qigong : a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Brian M

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guolin Qigong is a combination of meditation, controlled breathing and physical movement designed to control the vital energy (qi of the body and consequently to improve spiritual, physical and mental health. Practice of Qigong has been reported to alter immunological function, but there have been few studies of its effects on cytokines, the key regulators of immunity. Methods Numbers of peripheral blood cytokine-secreting cells were determined by ELISPOT in 19 healthy volunteers aged 27 – 55, before they were taught the practice of Qigong and after 3, 7 and 14 weeks of daily practice. The effect of Qigong on blood cortisol was also examined. Results Numbers of IL4 and IL12-secreting cells remained stable. IL6 increased at 7 weeks and TNFα increased in unstimulated cultures at 3 and 7 weeks but decreased at these times in LPS and SAC-stimulated cultures. Of particular interest, IFNγ-secreting cells increased and IL10-secreting cells decreased in PHA-stimulated cultures, resulting in significant increases in the IFNγ:IL10 ratio. Cortisol, a known inhibitor of type 1 cytokine production, was reduced by practicing Qigong. Conclusion These preliminary studies in healthy subjects, although not necessarily representative of a randomized healthy population and not including a separate control group, have indicated that blood levels of the stress-related hormone cortisol may be lowered by short-term practice of Qigong and that there are concomitant changes in numbers of cytokine-secreting cells. Further studies of the effect of Qigong in patients with clinical diseases known to be associated with type 2 cytokine predominance are merited.

  19. Immediate effect of ice bag application to head and spine on cardiovascular changes in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mooventhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objectives: Ice application is one of the treatment procedures used in hydrotherapy. Though its various physiological/therapeutic effects were reported, ice bag application (IBA to head and spine on cardiovascular changes were not reported. Hence, this study aims at evaluating the immediate effect of IBA to head and spine on cardiovascular changes in healthy volunteers. Materials and Methods: Twenty-eight subjects were randomized into three sessions ([i] IBA [ii] tap water bag application [TWBA] and [iii] control and intervention was given in one of the 3-different orders. Systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, and pulse rate (PR was assessed before and after 20-min of each intervention. Pulse pressure, mean pressure (MP, rate pressure product (RPP, and double product (Do-P were derived by standard formula. Statistical analysis was performed by repeated measures of analysis of variance and post-hoc analysis with Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons with the use of Statistical Package for Social Sciences version-16. Results: The results showed no significant difference between sessions in all variables. Within-group analysis showed significant reductions in SBP, PR, RPP, Do-P in IBA and TWBA sessions; Significant reduction in DBP, MP in IBA unlike TWBA; and no significant changes in all the variables of control session. Conclusions: Result of our study suggest that though both IBA and TWBA to head and spine might be considered as having effect on improving cardiovascular function in healthy volunteers, IBA to head and spine could be considered as a better choice than TWBA.

  20. β-Thalassemia Patients Revealed a Significant Change of Untargeted Metabolites in Comparison to Healthy Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Iqbal, Ayesha; Ansari, Saqib Hussain; Parveen, Sadia; Khan, Ishtiaq Ahmad; Siddiqui, Amna Jabbar

    2017-01-01

    β-Thalassemia is one of the most prevalent forms of congenital blood disorders characterized by reduced hemoglobin levels with severe complications, affecting all dimensions of life. The mechanisms underlying the phenotypic heterogeneity of β-thalassemia are still poorly understood. We aimed to work over metabolite biomarkers to improve mechanistic understanding of phenotypic heterogeneity and hence better management of disorder at different levels. Untargeted serum metabolites were analyzed after protein precipitation and SPE (solid phase extraction) from 100 β-thalassemia patients and 61 healthy controls using GC-MS. 40 metabolites were identified having a significance difference between these two groups at probability of 0.05 and fold change >1.5. Out of these 40 metabolites, 17 were up-regulated while 23 were down-regulated. PCA and PLS-DA model was also created that revealed a fine separation with a sensitivity of 70% and specificity of 100% on external validation of samples. Metabolic pathway analysis revealed alteration in multiple pathways including glycolysis, pyruvate, propanoate, glycerophospholipid, galactose, fatty acid, starch and sucrose metabolism along with fatty acid elongation in mitochondria, glycerolipid, glyoxylate and dicarboxylate metabolism pointing towards the shift of metabolism in β-thalassemia patients in comparison to healthy individuals. PMID:28198811

  1. Comparative proteomic changes of differentially expressed whey proteins in clinical mastitis and healthy yak cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Ding, X Z; Wan, Y L; Liu, Y M; Du, G Z

    2014-08-28

    Under the traditional grazing system on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, the amount of milk in domesticated yak (Bos grunniens) with clinical mastitis decreases and the milk composition is altered. To understand the mechanisms of mammary gland secreted milk and disease infection, changes in the protein composition of milk during clinical mastitis were investigated using a proteomic approach. Milk whey from yak with clinical mastitis was compared to whey from healthy animals with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis using a mass spectrometer. Thirteen protein spots were identified to be four differentially expressed proteins. Increases in the concentrations of proteins of blood serum origin, including lactoferrin, were identified in mastitic whey compared to normal whey, while concentrations of the major whey proteins, casocidin-I, a-lactalbumin, and b-lactoglobulin, were downregulated in mastitic whey. These results indicated significant differences in protein expression between healthy yaks and those with clinical mastitis, and they may provide valuable information for finding new regulation markers and potential protein targets for the treatment of mastitis.

  2. Creating a Learning Community for Solutions to Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, A. J.; Benedict, B. A.; Blockstein, D. E.; Hassenzahl, D. M.; Hunter, A.; Jorgensen, A. D.; Pfirman, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    The rapidly evolving and interdisciplinary nature of climate change presents a challenge to colleges and universities as they seek to educate undergraduate students. To address this challenge, the National Council for Science and the Environment (NCSE) with NSF funding is creating a nationwide cyber-enabled learning community called CAMEL (Climate, Adaptation, and Mitigation e-Learning). CAMEL engages experts in science, policy and decision-making, education, and assessment in the production of a virtual toolbox of curricular resources designed for teaching climate change causes, consequences, and solutions. CAMEL is: ? Developing cyberinfrastructure that supports and promotes the creation of materials and community; ? Generating materials for the Encyclopedia of Earth, a site averaging 50,000 views per day; ? Ensuring that materials developed and shared are founded on the best available scientific information and follow the most appropriate educational practices; ? Assisting faculty at institutions of higher education across the United States as they create, improve, test, and share resources for teaching students not only how to diagnose climate change problems, but also to identify and effect solutions; ? Evaluating the determinants of successful community building using cybermedia. The community and resultant content range from general education to upper division courses for students in a variety of majors. At the center of the community are the 160 colleges and universities represented in NCSE's Council of Environmental Deans and Directors. Members of this group represent recognized expertise in virtually all areas of this project. A team with substantial experience with evaluating innovative initiatives in STEM education is administering the evaluation component.

  3. Amino acid metabolism during total parenteral nutrition in healthy volunteers: evaluation of a new amino acid solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berard, M P; Hankard, R; Cynober, L

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the metabolism and the tolerance of a new amino acid (AA) solution administered under conditions mimicking cyclical parenteral nutrition (PN) in humans. Eight healthy volunteers received peripheral PN for 10 h providing 10.5 mg N x kg(-1) x h(-1) and 2.0 kcal x kg(-1) x h(-1) (glucose-to-lipids ratio: 70/30%). For adaptation, a non-protein energy intake was increased progressively for 90 min; thereafter, AA infusion was started and maintained at a constant rate for 10 h. Plasma and urine concentrations of all the AAs were measured before, during and after the PN. For each given AA, the relation between plasma variations at the steady-state and infusion rate, plasma clearance (Cl), renal clearance (Clr), re-absorption rate (Reab) and, retention rate (Reten) were determined. The nitrogen balance (DeltaN) was calculated during the PN period. The results are presented as means+/-sem. All plasma AA concentrations decreased during the starting period of non-protein energy intake. The plasma AA concentrations reached a steady-state within 3 h upon AA infusion, except for glycine and lysine (6 h). At the steady state, the plasma concentrations of the infused AAs were closely correlated to their infusion rate (y= -18.3+1.5x, r(2)=0.92). The plasma glutamine concentration was maintained during the PN, which indicates that the solution might stimulate the de novo synthesis of this AA. When the PN was stopped, plasma levels of the AAs decreased, most of them returning to their basal levels, or significantly below for lysine (Por= 99%, Reten >or=99% and for non-essential AAs: Cl or= 98% except glycine (95+/-1), aspartate (94+/-2) and histidine (94+/-1), Reten >or=97% except histidine (94+/-1), glycine (95+/-3). These results indicate that in healthy subjects, the amounts of AAs provided by the new solution were well balanced for an intravenous administration, and so were well utilized without excessive urinary excretion. The present study

  4. Neural changes associated with semantic processing in healthy aging despite intact behavioral performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, Jacinthe; Jolicoeur, Pierre; Grimault, Stephan; Pineault, Jessica; Joubert, Sven

    2015-10-01

    Semantic memory recruits an extensive neural network including the left inferior prefrontal cortex (IPC) and the left temporoparietal region, which are involved in semantic control processes, as well as the anterior temporal lobe region (ATL) which is considered to be involved in processing semantic information at a central level. However, little is known about the underlying neuronal integrity of the semantic network in normal aging. Young and older healthy adults carried out a semantic judgment task while their cortical activity was recorded using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Despite equivalent behavioral performance, young adults activated the left IPC to a greater extent than older adults, while the latter group recruited the temporoparietal region bilaterally and the left ATL to a greater extent than younger adults. Results indicate that significant neuronal changes occur in normal aging, mainly in regions underlying semantic control processes, despite an apparent stability in performance at the behavioral level.

  5. Age-related changes of muscle and plasma amino acids in healthy children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarqvist, Folke; Angsten, Gertrud; Meurling, Staffan; Andersson, Kerstin; Wernerman, Jan

    2010-07-01

    The aim of the study was to explore if changes in muscle and plasma amino acid concentrations developed during growth and differed from levels seen in adults. The gradient and concentrations of free amino acids in muscle and plasma were investigated in relation to age in metabolic healthy children. Plasma and specimens from the abdominal muscle were obtained during elective surgery. The children were grouped into three groups (group 1: amino acids analysed increased with age, namely taurine, aspartate, threonine, alanine, valine, isoleucine, leucine, histidine, as well as the total sums of branched chain amino acids (BCAA), basic amino acids (BAA) and total sum of amino acids (P amino acids correlated with age (P < 0.05). These results indicate that there is an age dependency of the amino acid pattern in skeletal muscle and plasma during growth.

  6. Dissociation of motor task-induced cortical excitability and pain perception changes in healthy volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena S Volz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is evidence that interventions aiming at modulation of the motor cortex activity lead to pain reduction. In order to understand further the role of the motor cortex on pain modulation, we aimed to compare the behavioral (pressure pain threshold and neurophysiological effects (transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS induced cortical excitability across three different motor tasks. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fifteen healthy male subjects were enrolled in this randomized, controlled, blinded, cross-over designed study. Three different tasks were tested including motor learning with and without visual feedback, and simple hand movements. Cortical excitability was assessed using single and paired-pulse TMS measures such as resting motor threshold (RMT, motor-evoked potential (MEP, intracortical facilitation (ICF, short intracortical inhibition (SICI, and cortical silent period (CSP. All tasks showed significant reduction in pain perception represented by an increase in pressure pain threshold compared to the control condition (untrained hand. ANOVA indicated a difference among the three tasks regarding motor cortex excitability change. There was a significant increase in motor cortex excitability (as indexed by MEP increase and CSP shortening for the simple hand movements. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although different motor tasks involving motor learning with and without visual feedback and simple hand movements appear to change pain perception similarly, it is likely that the neural mechanisms might not be the same as evidenced by differential effects in motor cortex excitability induced by these tasks. In addition, TMS-indexed motor excitability measures are not likely good markers to index the effects of motor-based tasks on pain perception in healthy subjects as other neural networks besides primary motor cortex might be involved with pain modulation during motor training.

  7. Craniofacial changes and symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing in healthy children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Christina Thomé Pacheco

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The main cause of mouth breathing and sleep-disordered breathing (SDB in childhood is associated with upper airway narrowing to varying degrees. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of morphological and functional craniofacial changes and the main clinical symptoms of SDB in healthy children. METHODS: A cross-sectional observational study was conducted. A sample comprising 687 healthy schoolchildren, aged 7-12 years old and attending public schools, was assessed by medical history, clinical medical and dental examination, and respiratory tests. The self-perceived quality of life of mouth breathing children was obtained by a validated questionnaire. RESULTS: Out of the total sample, 520 children were nose breathers (NB while 167 (24.3% were mouth breathers (MB; 32.5% had severe hypertrophy of the palatine tonsils, 18% had a Mallampati score of III or IV, 26.1% had excessive overjet and 17.7% had anterior open bite malocclusion. Among the MB, 53.9% had atresic palate, 35.9% had lip incompetence, 33.5% reported sleepiness during the day, 32.2% often sneezed, 32.2% had a stuffy nose, 19.6% snored, and 9.4% reported having the feeling to stop breathing while asleep. However, the self-perception of their quality of life was considered good. CONCLUSION: High prevalence of facial changes as well as signs and symptoms of mouth breathing were found among health children, requiring early diagnosis and treatment to reduce the risk of SDB.

  8. Sign-changing and multiple solutions for the p-Laplacian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegfried Carl

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We obtain a positive solution, a negative solution, and a sign-changing solution for a class of p-Laplacian problems with jumping nonlinearities using variational and super-subsolution methods.

  9. Phase Changes of Monosulfoaluminate in NaCl Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyoon Yoon

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Monosulfoaluminate (Ca4Al2(SO4(OH12∙6H2O plays an important role in anion binding in Portland cement by exchanging its original interlayer ions (SO42− and OH− with chloride ions. In this study, scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD were used to investigate the phase change of monosulfoaluminate due to its interaction with chloride ions. Pure monosulfoaluminate was synthesized and its powder samples were suspended in 0, 0.1, 1, 3, and 5 M NaCl solutions for seven days. At low chloride concentrations, a partial dissolution of monosulfoaluminate formed ettringite, while, with increasing chloride content, the dissolution process was suppressed. As the NaCl concentration increased, the dominant mechanism of the phase change became ion exchange, resulting in direct phase transformation from monosulfoaluminate to Kuzel’s salt or Friedel’s salt. The phase assemblages of the NaCl-reacted samples were explored using thermodynamic calculations and least-square linear combination (LC fitting of measured XANES spectra. A comprehensive description of the phase change and its dominant mechanism are discussed.

  10. Effect of infusion of equine plasma or 6% hydroxyethyl starch (600/0.75) solution on plasma colloid osmotic pressure in healthy horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Erica C; Esser, Melissa M; McNitt, Sarah E; Payton, Mark E

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the effects of equivalent volumes of equine plasma and 6% hydroxyethyl starch (600/0.75) solution (hetastarch) administered IV on plasma colloid osmotic pressure (pCOP) and commonly monitored clinicopathologic variables in horses. ANIMALS 6 healthy mares. PROCEDURES In a randomized, crossover study, horses were administered hetastarch or plasma (both 10 mL/kg, IV) 18 months apart. The pCOP and variables of interest were measured before (baseline), immediately after, and at intervals up to 96 or 120 hours after infusion. Prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times were measured before and at 2 and 8 hours after each infusion. RESULTS Prior to hetastarch and plasma infusions, mean ± SEM pCOP was 19.4 ± 0.5 mm Hg and 19.4 ± 0.8 mm Hg, respectively. In general, hetastarch and plasma infusions comparably increased pCOP from baseline for 48 hours, with maximum increases of 2.0 and 2.3 mm Hg, respectively. Mean Hct and hemoglobin, total protein, and albumin concentrations were decreased for a period of 72, 96, or 120 hours after hetastarch infusion with maximum decrements of 8.8%, 3.2 g/dL, 1.2 g/dL, and 0.6 g/dL, respectively. Plasma infusion decreased (albeit not always significantly) hemoglobin concentration and Hct for 20 and 24 hours (maximum changes of 1.5 g/dL and 6.6%, respectively) and increased total solids concentration (maximum change of 0.6 g/dL) for 48 hours. Platelet count and coagulation times were minimally affected. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Overall, the hetastarch and plasma infusions comparably increased pCOP in healthy horses for up to 48 hours. Hetastarch induced greater, more persistent perturbations in clinicopathologic variables.

  11. Changing dynamics in the Canadian voluntary sector: challenges in sustaining organizational capacity to support healthy communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steedman, Eric; Rabinowicz, Jane

    2006-11-01

    The voluntary sector is recognized, by citizens, industry and government, as an increasingly vital contributor to healthy communities within Canadian society, called upon to provide front-line service delivery in areas of community support that were in the past often served by government and or religious charity. (The voluntary sector is large, consisting of an estimated 180,000 non-profit organizations [of which 80,000 are registered as charities] and hundreds of thousands more volunteer groups that are not incorporated [Statistics Canada, 2002].) The dynamics of the sector have changed considerably over the past decade, as government has pulled back the level of core organizational funding support and the role of the church has diminished. As community health is directly related to the organizational health of service-providing non-profits and charities, these organizations are looking increasingly towards corporate and individual donors, along with new self-financing approaches that generate revenues. They are also facing challenges in attracting and retaining skilled and motivated volunteers. As the scope of the voluntary sector and its overall influence grows, so do the organizational and financial challenges it faces. This article will address in particular the issue of funding support for healthy communities and examine a number of potential and existing best practices for sustaining community health in Canada. We will also look at the issue of volunteerism and human resource capacity challenges for organizations. This is an area in which the Canadian government has decided to focus as a result of explicit policy decisions taken in the late 1990s.

  12. Mean arterial pressure change associated with cerebral blood flow in healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deverdun, Jeremy; Akbaraly, Tasnime N; Charroud, Celine; Abdennour, Meriem; Brickman, Adam M; Chemouny, Stephane; Steffener, Jason; Portet, Florence; Bonafe, Alain; Stern, Yaakov; Ritchie, Karen; Molino, François; Le Bars, Emmanuelle; Menjot de Champfleur, Nicolas

    2016-10-01

    We investigate over a 12-year period the association between regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cardiovascular risk factors in a prospective cohort of healthy older adults (81.96 ± 3.82 year-old) from the Cognitive REServe and Clinical ENDOphenotype (CRESCENDO) study. Cardiovascular risk factors were measured over 12 years, and gray matter CBF was measured at the end of the study from high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging using arterial spin labeling. The association between cardiovascular risk factors, their long-term change, and CBF was assessed using multivariate linear regression models. Women were observed to have higher CBF than men (p < 0.05). Increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) over the 12-year period was correlated with a low cerebral blood flow (p < 0.05, R(2) = 0.21), whereas no association was detected between CBF and MAP at the time of imaging. High levels of glycemia tended to be associated with low cerebral blood flow values (p < 0.05). Age, alcohol consumption, smoking status, body mass index, history of cardiovascular disease, and hypertension were not associated with CBF. Our main result suggests that change in MAP is the most significant predictor of future CBF in older adults.

  13. Effervescent N-Acetylcysteine Tablets versus Oral Solution N-Acetylcysteine in Fasting Healthy Adults: An Open-Label, Randomized, Single-Dose, Crossover, Relative Bioavailability Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spencer C. Greene, MD, FACEP, FACMT

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Data from this study of a single dose of 11 g oral NAC demonstrated that effervescent NAC tablets and oral solution NAC met the regulatory criteria for bioequivalence in fasting healthy adult subjects. Effervescent NAC tablets appear to be a more palatable alternative for treatment of acetaminophen overdose. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02723669.

  14. Do organic foodservice intervention strategies lead to changes in the availability of healthy options

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Chen; Mikkelsen, Bent Egberg

    2009-01-01

    Obesity and overweight among children and young people is increasing in most countries in Europe and as a result schools are increasingly taking a role in both food provision, in promoting healthy eating, and nutrition education of young people by implementing healthy policies. At the same time...

  15. Effecting Healthy Lifestyle Changes in Overweight and Obese Young Adults with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pett, Marjorie; Clark, Lauren; Eldredge, Alison; Cardell, Beth; Jordan, Kristine; Chambless, Cathy; Burley, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated a 12-week recreation center-based healthy lifestyle intervention for 30 obese home-dwelling young adults (YA) with intellectual disabilities. Three cohorts participated: YA only, YA and parents, and parents only. The YA cohorts received a nutrition/exercise intervention; parents focused on modeling healthy lifestyle behaviors.…

  16. Effects of outdoor temperature on changes in physiological variables before and after lunch in healthy women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Masahiro; Kakehashi, Masayuki

    2014-03-01

    Previous studies of autonomic nervous system responses before and after eating when controlling patient conditions and room temperature have provided inconsistent results. We hypothesized that several physiological parameters reflecting autonomic activity are affected by outdoor temperature before and after a meal. We measured the following physiological variables before and after a fixed meal in 53 healthy Japanese women: skin temperature, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, salivary amylase, blood glucose, heart rate, and heart rate variability. We assessed satiety before and after lunch using a visual analog scale (100 mm). We recorded outdoor temperature, atmospheric pressure, and relative humidity. Skin temperature rose significantly 1 h after eating (greater in cold weather) (P = 0.008). Cold weather markedly influenced changes in diastolic blood pressure before (P = 0.017) and after lunch (P = 0.013). Fasting salivary amylase activity increased significantly in cold weather but fell significantly after lunch (significantly greater in cold weather) (P = 0.007). Salivary amylase was significantly associated with cold weather, low atmospheric pressure, and low relative humidity 30 min after lunch (P parasympathetic activity after lunch. Our results clarify the relationship between environmental factors, food intake, and autonomic system and physiological variables, which helps our understanding of homeostasis and metabolism.

  17. Pomegranate extract induces ellagitannin metabolite formation and changes stool microbiota in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaoping; Henning, Susanne M; Lee, Ru-Po; Lu, Qing-Yi; Summanen, Paula H; Thames, Gail; Corbett, Karen; Downes, Julia; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Finegold, Sydney M; Heber, David

    2015-08-01

    The health benefits of pomegranate (POM) consumption are attributed to ellagitannins and their metabolites, formed and absorbed in the intestine by the microbiota. In this study twenty healthy participants consumed 1000 mg of POM extract daily for four weeks. Based on urinary and fecal content of the POM metabolite urolithin A (UA), we observed three distinct groups: (1) individuals with no baseline UA presence but induction of UA formation by POM extract consumption (n = 9); (2) baseline UA formation which was enhanced by POM extract consumption (N = 5) and (3) no baseline UA production, which was not inducible (N = 6). Compared to baseline the phylum Actinobacteria was increased and Firmicutes decreased significantly in individuals forming UA (producers). Verrucomicrobia (Akkermansia muciniphila) was 33 and 47-fold higher in stool samples of UA producers compared to non-producers at baseline and after 4 weeks, respectively. In UA producers, the genera Butyrivibrio, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Lactobacillus, Prevotella, Serratia and Veillonella were increased and Collinsella decreased significantly at week 4 compared to baseline. The consumption of pomegranate resulted in the formation of its metabolites in some but not all participants. POM extract consumption may induce health benefits secondary to changes in the microbiota.

  18. Changes in joint space width during Kaltenborn traction according to traction grade in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Gui-do; Kim, Tae-Ho; Lim, Jin-Yong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to analyze the joint space width of the humeral head and glenoid fossa during traction under 2 grade conditions (grade 2/grade 3). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 20 healthy male adults who had not experienced any shoulder injury. Three radiographs were obtained with the subjects in the supine position (resting, grades 2 and 3). The glenohumeral joint space was examined on radiography. Joint space width was measured by a radiologist at the points described by Petersson and Redlund-Johnell. A radiologist blinded to the variable "resting" or "traction" performed all radiographic measurements. The joint space widths were compared by using one-way repeated-measures analysis of variance. [Results] The results of this study indicated significant differences in the changes in joint space width according to traction grade. Compared to resting, grades 2 and 3 traction significantly increased joint space width. However, no significant difference in joint space width was found between grades 2 and 3 traction. [Conclusion] Although no significant differences were found between grades 2 and 3 traction during glenohumeral joint traction, the increase in joint space width between the glenoid fossa and humeral head was highest during grade 3 traction.

  19. Microbiome Changes in Healthy Volunteers Treated with GSK1322322, a Novel Antibiotic Targeting Bacterial Peptide Deformylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arat, Seda; Spivak, Aaron; Van Horn, Stephanie; Thomas, Elizabeth; Traini, Christopher; Sathe, Ganesh; Livi, George P.; Ingraham, Karen; Jones, Lori; Aubart, Kelly; Holmes, David J.; Naderer, Odin

    2014-01-01

    GSK1322322 is a novel antibacterial agent under development, and it has known antibacterial activities against multidrug-resistant respiratory and skin pathogens through its inhibition of the bacterial peptide deformylase. Here, we used next-generation sequencing (NGS) of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes from stool samples collected from 61 healthy volunteers at the predosing and end-of-study time points to determine the effects of GSK1322322 on the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota in a phase I, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled study. GSK1322322 was administered either intravenously (i.v.) only or in an oral-i.v. combination in single- and repeat-dose-escalation infusions. Analysis of the 16S rRNA sequence data found no significant changes in the relative abundances of GI operational taxonomic units (OTUs) between the prestudy and end-of-study samples for either the placebo- or i.v.-only-treated subjects. However, oral-i.v. treatment resulted in significant decreases in some bacterial taxa, the Firmicutes and Bacteroidales, and increases in others, the Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bifidobacteriaceae. Microbiome diversity plots clearly differentiated the end-of-study oral-i.v.-dosed samples from all others collected. The changes in genome function as inferred from species composition suggest an increase in bacterial transporter and xenobiotic metabolism pathways in these samples. A phylogenetic analysis of the peptide deformylase protein sequences collected from the published genomes of clinical isolates previously tested for GSK1322322 in vitro susceptibility and GI bacterial reference genomes suggests that antibiotic target homology is one of several factors that influences the response of GI microbiota to this antibiotic. Our study shows that dosing regimen and target class are important factors when considering the impact of antibiotic usage on GI microbiota. (This clinical trial was registered at the GlaxoSmithKline Clinical Study

  20. Sumatriptan does not change calcitonin gene-related peptide in the cephalic and extracephalic circulation in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Møller; Petersen, Jesper; Wienecke, Troels;

    2009-01-01

    not differ between the four vascular compartments (P=0.49). It was found that Sumatriptan did not change the levels of circulating CGRP in the intra or extracerebral circulation in healthy volunteers. This speaks against a direct CGRP-reducing effect of sumatriptan in vivo in humans when the trigemino...

  1. Determination of time delay between blood and interstitial adipose tissue glucose concentration change by microdialysis in healthy volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wientjes, KJC; Schoonen, AJM

    2001-01-01

    For the development and use of subcutaneous glucose sensors it is important to know the time lag between changes in blood glucose and subcutaneous interstitial glucose concentration. To determine the time lag we inserted a microdialysis probe into the abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue of healthy

  2. Examining the relationship between completeness of teachers' implementation of the Krachtvoer healthy diet programme and changes in students' dietary intakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bessems, K.; Assema, P. van; Crutzen, R.; Paulussen, T.W.G.M.; Vries, N.K. de

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goal of the current study was to examine if the completeness of programme implementation and the completeness of implementation of specific programme elements of the Dutch school-based healthy diet promotion programme Krachtvoer are related to short- and longer-term changes in student

  3. The healthy options for nutrition environments in schools (Healthy ONES group randomized trial: using implementation models to change nutrition policy and environments in low income schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coleman Karen J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Healthy Options for Nutrition Environments in Schools (Healthy ONES study was an evidence-based public health (EBPH randomized group trial that adapted the Institute for Healthcare Improvement’s (IHI rapid improvement process model to implement school nutrition policy and environmental change. Methods A low-income school district volunteered for participation in the study. All schools in the district agreed to participate (elementary = 6, middle school = 2 and were randomly assigned within school type to intervention (n = 4 and control (n =4 conditions following a baseline environmental audit year. Intervention goals were to 1 eliminate unhealthy foods and beverages on campus, 2 develop nutrition services as the main source on campus for healthful eating (HE, and 3 promote school staff modeling of HE. Schools were followed across a baseline year and two intervention years. Longitudinal assessment of height and weight was conducted with second, third, and sixth grade children. Behavioral observation of the nutrition environment was used to index the amount of outside foods and beverages on campuses. Observations were made monthly in each targeted school environment and findings were presented as items per child per week. Results From an eligible 827 second, third, and sixth grade students, baseline height and weight were collected for 444 second and third grade and 135 sixth grade students (51% reach. Data were available for 73% of these enrolled students at the end of three years. Intervention school outside food and beverage items per child per week decreased over time and control school outside food and beverage items increased over time. The effects were especially pronounced for unhealthy foods and beverage items. Changes in rates of obesity for intervention school (28% baseline, 27% year 1, 30% year 2 were similar to those seen for control school (22% baseline, 22% year 1, 25% year 2 children

  4. Postnatal changes in blood spot 17-hydroxyprogesterone level in healthy preterm and full-term neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulyok, E; Sólyom, J; Füller, M; Kerekes, L

    Blood spot 17OH-P concentrations were determined in 14 healthy premature (mean birthweight 1439 g, mean gestational age 30 weeks) and full-term newborn infants (mean birthweight 3532 g, mean gestational age 39.2 weeks) during the first five weeks of life to provide reference data for infants with various gestational and postnatal ages. It was demonstrated that with advancing age there was an abrupt fall in 17OH-P from 296.2 +/- 84.1 nmol/l on the first day to 101.2 +/- 19.5 nmol/l on the 7th day (p less than 0.001) and 75.7 +/- 8.7 nmol/l (p less than 0.05) on the 14th day in premature infants. In full-term neonates its initial value is much lower (90.1 +/- 12.5 nmol/l) and its fall during the first week is much less pronounced (51.5 +/- 6.5 nmol/l, p less than 0.01). Comparing the postnatal changes in 17OH-P in the two groups it proved to be significantly higher in premature than in full-term infants at all ages except for the 4th week. When blood spot 17OH-P values were studied as a function of gestational age at the age of 5 days a significant inverse relationship was found between the two parameters. It is assumed that in addition to placental 17OH-P production and perinatal stress, renal salt wasting may also account for the long lasting elevation of 17OH-P plasma level seen in premature infants.

  5. Healthy lifestyle behaviour among Ghanaian adults in the phase of a health policy change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dake Fidelia AA

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many countries have adopted health policies that are targeted at reducing the risk factors for chronic non-communicable diseases. These policies promote a healthy population by encouraging people to adopt healthy lifestyle behaviours. This paper examines healthy lifestyle behaviour among Ghanaian adults by comparing behaviours before and after the introduction of a national health policy. The paper also explores the socio-economic and demographic factors associated with healthy lifestyle behaviour. Method Descriptive, bivariate and multivariate regression techniques were employed on two nationally representative surveys (2003 World Health Survey (Ghana and 2008 Ghana Demographic and Health Survey to arrive at the results. Results While the prevalence of some negative lifestyle behaviours like smoking has reduced others like alcohol consumption has increased. Relatively fewer people adhered to consuming the recommended amount of fruit and vegetable servings per day in 2008 compared to 2003. While more females (7.0% exhibited healthier lifestyles, more males (9.0% exhibited risky lifestyle behaviours after the introduction of the policy. Conclusion The improvement in healthy lifestyle behaviours among female adult Ghanaians will help promote healthy living and potentially lead to a reduction in the prevalence of obesity among Ghanaian women. The increase in risky lifestyle behaviour among adult male Ghanaians even after the introduction of the health policy could lead to an increase in the risk of non-communicable diseases among men and the resultant burden of disease on them and their families will push more people into poverty.

  6. Influence of geomagnetic activity and earth weather changes on heart rate and blood pressure in young and healthy population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozheredov, V. A.; Chibisov, S. M.; Blagonravov, M. L.; Khodorovich, N. A.; Demurov, E. A.; Goryachev, V. A.; Kharlitskaya, E. V.; Eremina, I. S.; Meladze, Z. A.

    2016-11-01

    There are many references in the literature related to connection between the space weather and the state of human organism. The search of external factors influence on humans is a multi-factor problem and it is well known that humans have a meteo-sensitivity. A direct problem of finding the earth weather conditions, under which the space weather manifests itself most strongly, is discussed in the present work for the first time in the helio-biology. From a formal point of view, this problem requires identification of subset (magnetobiotropic region) in three-dimensional earth's weather parameters such as pressure, temperature, and humidity, corresponding to the days when the human body is the most sensitive to changes in the geomagnetic field variations and when it reacts by statistically significant increase (or decrease) of a particular physiological parameter. This formulation defines the optimization of the problem, and the solution of the latter is not possible without the involvement of powerful metaheuristic methods of searching. Using the algorithm of differential evolution, we prove the existence of magnetobiotropic regions in the earth's weather parameters, which exhibit magneto-sensitivity of systolic, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate of healthy young subjects for three weather areas (combinations of atmospheric temperature, pressure, and humidity). The maximum value of the correlation confidence for the measurements attributable to the days of the weather conditions that fall into each of three magnetobiotropic areas is an order of 0.006, that is almost 10 times less than the confidence, equal to 0.05, accepted in many helio-biological researches.

  7. Stereological Changes of Human Placenta in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Compared with Healthy Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Heidari

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic autoimmune disease that can cause changes in the placenta. In this study, quantitative changes of placenta were investigated using stereological methods.Materials and Methods: In this case-control study, 10 placentas from systemic lupus erythematosus pregnancy (antinuclear antibody>10, and 10 placentas from normal uncomplicated pregnancy were obtained from Imam Ali Hospital. Volume of placentas was estimated using Cavalieri's principle. 3 full-thickness columns of each placenta were taken using systematic uniform random sampling (SURS. After fixation in modified Lillie's solution, they were cut into 5 mm slices. 5-7 sections selected from each slice using SURS and stained by Masson’s trichrome. Then stereological analyses were done on 8-10 SURS fields of each section. Placental volume, absolute volume and volume density of chorionic villi, intervillous space, syncytiotrophoblast, fibrin and blood vessels in chorionic villi were estimated in both groups. The Mann Whitney-U test was employed to determine statistically significant differences between the means. Significant level was set at p<0.05.Results: Total volume and volume density of fibrin and total volume and volume density of blood vessels significantly increased in SLE group in comparison with control group (p<0.01. Volume density of syncytiotrophoblast increased 50% in SLE group in comparison with control group, this increase was statistically significant (p<0.01.Conclusion: Results showed that systemic lupus erythematosus disease can cause significant changes in the structure of placenta that may be influential on the evolution and survival of fetus.

  8. Fluid electrolyte changes in physically healthy subjects during prolonged restriction of motor activity and daily hyperhydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorbas, Y G; Ichinose, M N; Sakagamis, M B

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this report was to present some of our results, in a compressed form, obtained from our previous studies on the effect of 364-d hypokinesia (decreased number of steps taken per day by the volunteers) on the following: (1) regulation of fluid volume and osmosis, (2) regulation of electrolytes, and (3) functional condition of the kidneys and its role in the fluid-electrolyte homeostasis on 30 physically healthy male volunteers aged 22-26 years. Prior to their exposure to hypokinesia all subjects were on 13.8 km/day (10,000 running steps/day) and were all well conditioned, with (oxygen uptake capacities (VO2 max 68 ml/kg-min). During the hypokinetic period of 364 days, the 1st group was subjected to pure hypokinesia (HK), that is without the use of physical exercise (PE), the 2nd group was subjected to a set of intensive PE (energy expenditure of 700 kcal/h) and the 3rd group submitted to a set of moderate PE (energy expenditure of 400 kcal/h). All volunteers consumed daily fluid and salt supplementation (FSS) aimed at increasing body hydration level during the hypokinetic period. For the simulation of the hypokinetic effect all volunteers were kept on 2.7 km/day (3000 walking steps per day). All volunteers were on a diet of freshly prepared food, with a daily intake of 2500-2700 kcal, 3340 ml water, 1500 mgs calcium, 500 mgs magnesium, 1200 mgs potassium, 1500 mgs phosphorus, 8.5 gms sodium and 9.8 gms chloride. The amount of fluid and electrolytes consumed and eliminated in urine, as well as their concentrations in the urine and blood plasma were determined. There were also measured urinary volume, osmolality, creatine, and urea changes in urine. During HK the amount of fluid and electrolytes consumed daily decreased while the rate of excretion increased significantly. During post HK the fluid and electrolytes concentrations in urine decreased significantly. The urinary urea, osmolality and creatinine increased significantly during HK. It was concluded

  9. Analytic Solutions of Some Self-Adjoint Equations by Using Variable Change Method and Its Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Mehdi Delkhosh; Mohammad Delkhosh

    2012-01-01

    Many applications of various self-adjoint differential equations, whose solutions are complex, are produced (Arfken, 1985; Gandarias, 2011; and Delkhosh, 2011). In this work we propose a method for the solving some self-adjoint equations with variable change in problem, and then we obtain a analytical solutions. Because this solution, an exact analytical solution can be provided to us, we benefited from the solution of numerical Self-adjoint equations (Mohynl-Din, 2009; Allame and Azal, 2011;...

  10. Attitudes and Acceptability of Behavior Change Techniques to Promote Healthy Food Choices Among Danish Adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørnberg, Trine; Skov, Laurits Rohden; Houlby, Louise

    2016-01-01

    This study addressed attitudes of using nudging-like measures in community schools to promote healthy food choices among Danish adolescents. Data were successfully collected for 408 respondents. The next step was to prepare descriptive statistics and conduct factor analysis and structural equation...... modeling. Respondents were positive toward less intrusive interventions, but they had negative attitudes toward interventions targeting their self-image. Self-reported level of vegetable intake, healthy food habits, and eco-consciousness had the strongest positive association. Respondents considered...

  11. Potassium and magnesium distribution, ECG changes, and ventricular ectopic beats during beta 2-adrenergic stimulation with terbutaline in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tveskov, C; Djurhuus, M S; Klitgaard, N A

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of intravenous (i.v.) terbutaline on potassium (K) and magnesium (Mg) distribution, ECG changes, and prevalence of ventricular ectopic beats in healthy subjects. DESIGN: Randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover. Subjects received either placebo or terbu......OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of intravenous (i.v.) terbutaline on potassium (K) and magnesium (Mg) distribution, ECG changes, and prevalence of ventricular ectopic beats in healthy subjects. DESIGN: Randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover. Subjects received either placebo......-potassium pump number. Urinary excretion of potassium and magnesium. ECG changes (T-wave and QTC interval) and the number of ventricular ectopic beats. MAIN RESULTS: Terbutaline produced an immediate decrease in serum potassium level from 4.17 (4.04 to 4.30) mmol/L to a nadir of 3.32 (3.06 to 3.58) mmol/L (p ... of sodium-potassium pumps. Furthermore, terbutaline induced changes in ECG with a highly significant lengthening of the QTc interval but with an unchanged number of ventricular ectopic beats in healthy subjects....

  12. Using formative research to develop the healthy eating component of the CHANGE! school-based curriculum intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boddy Lynne M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood obesity is a significant public health concern. Many intervention studies have attempted to combat childhood obesity, often in the absence of formative or preparatory work. This study describes the healthy eating component of the formative phase of the Children’s Health Activity and Nutrition: Get Educated! (CHANGE! project. The aim of the present study was to gather qualitative focus group and interview data regarding healthy eating particularly in relation to enabling and influencing factors, barriers and knowledge in children and adults (parents and teachers from schools within the CHANGE! programme to provide population-specific evidence to inform the subsequent intervention design. Methods Semi-structured focus group interviews were conducted with children, parents and teachers across 11 primary schools in the Wigan borough of North West England. Sixty children (N = 24 boys, 33 parents (N = 4 male and 10 teachers (N = 4 male participated in the study. Interview questions were structured around the PRECEDE phases of the PRECEDE-PROCEED model. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using the pen-profiling technique. Results The pen-profiles revealed that children’s knowledge of healthy eating was generally good, specifically many children were aware that fruit and vegetable consumption was ‘healthy’ (N = 46. Adults’ knowledge was also good, including restricting fatty foods, promoting fruit and vegetable intake, and maintaining a balanced diet. The important role parents play in children’s eating behaviours and food intake was evident. The emerging themes relating to barriers to healthy eating showed that external drivers such as advertising, the preferred sensory experience of “unhealthy” foods, and food being used as a reward may play a role in preventing healthy eating. Conclusions Data suggest that; knowledge related to diet composition was not a barrier per se to

  13. Choroidal changes in pre-eclampsia during pregnancy and the postpartum period: comparison with healthy pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necati Duru

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To investigate subfoveal choroidal thickness (SFCT in patients with pre-eclampsia using enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT. Methods: A sample of 73 pregnant women was studied over 28 weeks of gestation. The sample was divided into two groups: one comprising pre-eclamptic pregnant women (n=32, and the other comprising healthy pregnant women (n=41. The SFCT was determined for all patients using EDI-OCT during pregnancy and at the third month of the postpartum period. Results: The SFCTs in pre-eclamptic pregnant women were 351.97 ± 22.44 and 332.28 ± 20.32 µm during the pregnancy and postpartum periods (p<0.001, respectively, whereas these values in healthy pregnant women were 389.73 ± 49.64 and 329.78 ± 22.36 µm (p<0.001, respectively. During pregnancy SFCT in pre-eclamptic pregnant women was significantly thinner than that in healthy pregnant women (p<0.001. However, there was no statistically significant difference during the postpartum period (p=0.623. Conclusions: The results suggest that SFCT is significantly decreased in pre-eclamptic pregnant women than in healthy pregnant women, despite no statistically significant difference in SFCT existing between the groups during the postpartum period.

  14. Regional cerebral blood flow changes associated with clitorally induced orgasm in healthy women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgiadis, Janniko R.; Kortekaas, Rudie; Kuipers, Rutger; Nieuwenburg, Arie; Pruim, Jan; Reinders, A. A. T. Simone; Holstege, Gert

    2006-01-01

    There is a severe lack of knowledge regarding the brain regions involved in human sexual performance in general, and female orgasm in particular. We used [(15)O]-H(2)O positron emission tomography to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in 12 healthy women during a nonsexual resting state, cl

  15. Resistance to change in the nursing profession: creative transdisciplinary solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Carey S

    2013-01-01

    This article offers a definition of the transdisciplinary inquiry approach (Montuori, 2010) and demonstrates how this approach can benefit the nursing profession in our process of shifting our paradigm toward caring, love, and healing. The article provides an example of a transdisciplinary approach to change process in nursing. It considers the phenomenon of resistance to change in nursing academia, which has created obstacles to revising pedagogical processes, resulting in ongoing difficulties in creating change in the practice setting. A model based on transdisciplinary practices for creative change in nursing is described.

  16. Changes in six-minute walking distance during pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with COPD and in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imen Ben Cheikh Rejbi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Imen Ben Cheikh Rejbi1, Yassine Trabelsi1, Afef Chouchene1, Wafa Ben Turkia1, Helmi Ben Saad1, Abdelkarim Zbidi1, Abdelhamid Kerken2, Zouhair Tabka11Department of Physiology and Lung Testing, Faculty of Medicine of Sousse, Tunisia; 2Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine of Monastir, TunisiaBackground: The six-minute walking distance (6MWD test has demonstrated validity and reliability to assess changes in functional capacity following pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease. However, no attempt has been made to establish an iterative measurement of 6MWD during the overall period of pulmonary rehabilitation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a twelve-week rehabilitation program on the iterative weekly measurement of 6MWD in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients and healthy subjects.Methods: Twenty-six patients with COPD and nine age-matched healthy subjects were studied. Measurements were taken at baseline and after twelve weeks except for the 6MWD. The exercise measurements included a six-minute walking test (6MWT and an incremental exercise test. Oxygen saturation, heart rate, and dyspnea will be monitored during all these tests. Results: At baseline there were significant differences between groups, except in age, body mass index, and oxygen saturation. After 12 weeks, there was no significant change in lung function in patients with COPD and healthy subjects. The 6MWD, peak oxygen uptake VO2peak and anaerobic threshold increased significantly after training in both groups (P < 0.01. The averaged trace of the 6MWD of patients with COPD and healthy subjects was followed-up respectively by a logarithmic and linear fitting. 6MWD showed a plateau after eight weeks in patients with COPD, however, it increased continually overall in healthy subjects.Conclusion: Both patients with COPD and healthy subjects demonstrated functional responses to training but with

  17. Comparison of Cognitive Change after Working Memory Training and Logic and Planning Training in Healthy Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goghari, Vina M; Lawlor-Savage, Linette

    2017-01-01

    Recent attention has focused on the benefits of cognitive training in healthy adults. Many commercial cognitive training programs are available given the attraction of not only bettering one's cognitive capacity, but also potentially preventing age-related declines, which is of particular interest to older adults. The issue of whether cognitive training can improve performance within cognitive domains not trained (i.e., far transfer) is controversial, with meta-analyses of cognitive training both supporting and falsifying this claim. More support is present for the near transfer (i.e., transfer in cognitive domain trained) of cognitive training; however, not in all studies. To date, no studies have compared working memory training to training higher-level processes themselves, namely logic and planning. We studied 97 healthy older adults above the age of 65. Healthy older adults completed either an 8-week web-based cognitive training program on working memory or logic and planning. An additional no-training control group completed two assessments 8-weeks apart. Participants were assessed on cognitive measures of near and far transfer, including working memory, planning, reasoning, processing speed, verbal fluency, cognitive flexibility, and creativity. Participants improved on the trained tasks from the first day to last day of training. Bayesian analyses demonstrated no near or far transfer effects after cognitive training. These results support the conclusion that performance-adaptive computerized cognitive training may not enhance cognition in healthy older adults. Our lack of findings could be due to a variety of reasons, including studying a cohort of healthy older adults that were performing near their cognitive ceiling, employing a training protocol that was not sufficient to produce a change, or that no true findings exist. Research suggests numerous study factors that can moderate the results. In addition, the role of psychological variables, such as

  18. A Call for Change: Providing Solutions for Black Male Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casserly, Michael; Lewis, Sharon; Simon, Candace; Uzzell, Renata; Palacios, Moses

    2012-01-01

    In October 2010, the Council of the Great City Schools released a major report on the academic status of African American males, "A Call for Change: The Social and Educational Factors Contributing to the Outcomes of Black Males in Urban Schools." The report was the first phase of the Council's efforts to recommit the energies of the nation's urban…

  19. Meal-induced changes in splanchnic blood flow and oxygen uptake in middle-aged healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan Lysgård; Søndergaard, SB; Møller, Søren

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: For decades, the determination of changes in splanchnic blood flow and oxygen uptake after a meal has been used in the management of patients with suspected chronic intestinal ischaemia. However, little is known about the normal meal-induced responses. The aim of the present study...... was therefore to measure the splanchnic blood flow and oxygen uptake before and after a standardized meal in a group of middle-aged normal volunteers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Splanchnic blood flow and oxygen uptake were determined at baseline and after a 3600-kJ mixed meal in 8 healthy women (50-70 years) and 10...... in middle-aged healthy humans. Our data may be relevant for the evaluation of corresponding data from patients with suspected chronic intestinal ischaemia....

  20. Electrolyte changes and urinalysis pattern in patients with vesicovaginal fistula compared to their healthy controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinwe O. Ewenighi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present work aimed to determine the electrolyte and urinalysis pattern among vesicovaginal fistula (VVF patients admitted into the National Obstetric Fistula Center (NOFC, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria. Method: Twenty VVF patients (mean age 27.65 +/- 5.44 from the VVF Unit of NOFC and twenty apparently healthy controls (mean age 25.85 +/- 1.66 from the Medical Laboratory Science Department, Ebonyi State University, were recruited for the study. Serum concentrations of sodium (Na+, potassium (K+, chloride (Cl and bicarbonate (HCO3 were analyzed by the ion-selective electrode method while urine analysis was done using urinalysis strips. Results: VVF patients indicated significantly higher K+ and Cl levels but lower Na+ level when compared with their controls. Bicarbonate level was found to be insignificantly higher in VVF patients when compared with controls. Urine analysis showed higher but insignificant differences in the frequencies of hematuria, urobilinogenuria, bilirubinuria, proteinuria, nitrite, ascorbic acid and glucosuria between the control group and VVF patients. The presence of cloudy urine was significantly higher in the VVF patients compared to the controls. Conclusion: The present study indicated significantly higher levels of K+, Cl and lower level of Na+ in VVF patients when compared with the healthy controls. Furthermore, there were greater presence of protein, ascorbic acid, blood and glucose in VVF patients when compared with the control but these differences were statistically insignificant. [J Exp Integr Med 2014; 4(4.000: 232-236

  1. Analytic Solutions of Some Self-Adjoint Equations by Using Variable Change Method and Its Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Delkhosh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many applications of various self-adjoint differential equations, whose solutions are complex, are produced (Arfken, 1985; Gandarias, 2011; and Delkhosh, 2011. In this work we propose a method for the solving some self-adjoint equations with variable change in problem, and then we obtain a analytical solutions. Because this solution, an exact analytical solution can be provided to us, we benefited from the solution of numerical Self-adjoint equations (Mohynl-Din, 2009; Allame and Azal, 2011; Borhanifar et al. 2011; Sweilam and Nagy, 2011; Gülsu et al. 2011; Mohyud-Din et al. 2010; and Li et al. 1996.

  2. Changing requirements and solutions for unattended ground sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Gervasio; Johnson, Robert

    2007-10-01

    Unattended Ground Sensors (UGS) were first used to monitor Viet Cong activity along the Ho Chi Minh Trail in the 1960's. In the 1980's, significant improvement in the capabilities of UGS became possible with the development of digital signal processors; this led to their use as fire control devices for smart munitions (for example: the Wide Area Mine) and later to monitor the movements of mobile missile launchers. In these applications, the targets of interest were large military vehicles with strong acoustic, seismic and magnetic signatures. Currently, the requirements imposed by new terrorist threats and illegal border crossings have changed the emphasis to the monitoring of light vehicles and foot traffic. These new requirements have changed the way UGS are used. To improve performance against targets with lower emissions, sensors are used in multi-modal arrangements. Non-imaging sensors (acoustic, seismic, magnetic and passive infrared) are now being used principally as activity sensors to cue imagers and remote cameras. The availability of better imaging technology has made imagers the preferred source of "actionable intelligence". Infrared cameras are now based on un-cooled detector-arrays that have made their application in UGS possible in terms of their cost and power consumption. Visible light imagers are also more sensitive extending their utility well beyond twilight. The imagers are equipped with sophisticated image processing capabilities (image enhancement, moving target detection and tracking, image compression). Various commercial satellite services now provide relatively inexpensive long-range communications and the Internet provides fast worldwide access to the data.

  3. Different response of body weight change according to ketonuria after fasting in the healthy obese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeon-Jeong; Joo, Nam-Seok; Kim, Kwang-Min; Lee, Duck-Joo; Kim, Sang-Man

    2012-03-01

    The relationship between obesity and ketonuria is not well-established. We conducted a retrospective observational study to evaluate whether their body weight reduction response differed by the presence of ketonuria after fasting in the healthy obese. We used the data of 42 subjects, who had medical records of initial urinalysis at routine health check-up and follow-up urinalysis in the out-patient clinic, one week later. All subjects in the initial urinalysis showed no ketonuria. However, according to the follow-up urinalysis after three subsequent meals fasts, the patients were divided into a non-ketonuria group and ketonuria group. We compared the data of conventional low-calorie diet programs for 3 months for both groups. Significantly greater reduction of body weight (-8.6 ± 3.6 kg vs -1.1 ± 2.2 kg, P weight reduction.

  4. Age dependent white matter lesions and brain volume changes in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, P; Larsson, H B; Thomsen, C

    1994-01-01

    The brain of 142 healthy volunteers aged 21 to 80 years were investigated using MR imaging. The number and size of the white matter hyperintensity lesions (WMHL) in the cerebral hemispheres were determined. Furthermore, the volume of the cerebral hemispheres and of the lateral ventricles...... was measured. An almost linear increase in the number of volunteers with WMHL was seen with aging for males and females. With aging a significant decrease in the volume of the cerebral hemispheres was found for males, and a significant increase in the volume of the lateral ventricles was seen for both males...... and females. Our results suggest that with aging central atrophy increases more (relatively) than cortical atrophy. No correlation was found between the decreasing volume of the cerebral hemispheres and the increasing number and size of WMHL, nor between the increasing volume of the lateral ventricles...

  5. Age-related changes in radiation-induced micronuclei among healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Joksic

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to establish the extent of in vitro radioresponse of lymphocytes among 62 healthy adults of both genders and to estimate the distribution of baseline micronuclei and radiosensitivity among individuals of the study population using the cytochalasin block micronucleus test. A younger study group consisted of 10 males (mean age, 22.4 years; range, 21-27 and 12 females (mean age, 24.8 years; range, 20-29, whereas an older study group consisted of 18 males (mean age, 35.1 years; range, 30-44 and 22 females (mean age, 38.5 years; range, 30-48. For evaluation of radiosensitivity blood samples were irradiated in vitro using 60Co g-ray source. The radiation dose employed was 2 Gy, the dose rate 0.45 Gy/min. The study revealed a significant gender effect on baseline micronuclei favoring females (Z = 3.25, P < 0.001, while yields of radiation-induced micronuclei did not differ significantly (Z = 0.56, P < 0.56 between genders. The distribution of baseline micronuclei among the individuals tested followed Poisson distribution in both study groups and in both genders, whereas the distribution of radiosensitivity among individuals of the older study group did not fulfill Poisson expectations (Kolmogorov-Smirnof test, P < 0.01. In contrast to a nonsignificant difference in radiosensitivity between males and females of the same age group (Z = 1.97, P < 0.56, a statistically significant difference in radiosensitivity between younger and older group for both genders was found (Z = 3.03, P < 0.03. Since the individuals tested were healthy, the observed variability in radiation response is considered to be an early effect of ageing.

  6. Age-related changes assessed by peripheral QCT in healthy Italian women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guglielmi, G.; Serio, A. de; Cammisa, M. [Scientific Institute Hospital ' ' Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza' ' , San Giovanni Rotondo (Italy). Dept. of Radiology; Fusilli, S. [Scientific Institute Hospital ' ' Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza' ' , San Giovanni Rotondo (Italy). Dept. of Clinical Pathology; Scillitani, A.; Chiodini, I.; Torlontano, M. [Scientific Institute Hospital ' ' Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza' ' , San Giovanni Rotondo (Italy). Division of Endocrinology

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the normal cross-sectional pattern of radial bone loss associated with aging in healthy women and to generate a normative database using peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Subjects with suspected conditions affecting bone metabolism or receiving any drugs affecting bone mineralization were excluded. The trabecular bone mineral density (BMD) and the total bone density of the ultradistal radius at the nondominant forearm was measured using the Norland-Stratec XCT-960 pQCT scanner in 386 healthy pre-, peri-, and postmenopausal females aged 15-81 years. The long-term in vivo precision error was 1.6% CV (coefficient of variation) for trabecular and 0.8% CV for total BMD measurements. The highest value of trabecular and total BMD measured was observed at the age group 15-39 years. Beyond these ages both trabecular and total BMD showed a linear decline with aging, decreasing by an overall slope of -1.28 and -0.55 mg/cm{sup 3} per year for total and trabecular BMD measurements, respectively. The test of parallelism between the regression slopes of the peri- and postmenopausal women showed a statistically significant difference for total BMD measurement (p=0.003). Measurement of total and trabecular BMD was not influenced by weight, height or body mass index, but it was correlated with natural logarithm of years since menopause. We conclude that pQCT of the ultradistal radius is a precise method for measuring the true volumetric BMD and for detecting age-related bone loss in the trabecular and total bone of female subjects encompassing the adult age range and menopausal status. (orig.)

  7. Changes in hematological indices and lymphocyte subsets in response to whole blood donation in healthy male donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borai, Anwar; Livingstone, Callum; Alsobhi, Enaam; Al Sofyani, Abeer; Balgoon, Dalal; Farzal, Anwar; Almohammadi, Mohammed; Al-Amri, Abdulafattah; Bahijri, Suhad; Alrowaili, Daad; Bassiuni, Wafaa; Saleh, Ayman; Alrowaili, Norah; Abdelaal, Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    Whole blood donation has immunomodulatory effects, and most of these have been observed at short intervals following blood donation. This study aimed to investigate the impact of whole blood donation on lymphocyte subsets over a typical inter-donation interval. Healthy male subjects were recruited to study changes in complete blood count (CBC) (n = 42) and lymphocyte subsets (n = 16) before and at four intervals up to 106 days following blood donation. Repeated measures ANOVA were used to compare quantitative variables between different visits. Following blood donation, changes in CBC and erythropoietin were as expected. The neutrophil count increased by 11.3% at 8 days (p donation, there are transient changes in lymphocyte subsets. The effect of BMI on lymphocyte subsets and the effect of this immunomodulation on the immune response merit further investigation.

  8. Investigating the Effectiveness of an Analogy Activity in Improving Students' Conceptual Change for Solution Chemistry Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calik, Muammer; Ayas, Alipasa; Coll, Richard K.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation on the use of an analogy activity and seeks to provide evidence of whether the activity enables students to change alternative conceptions towards views more in accord with scientific views for aspects of solution chemistry. We were also interested in how robust any change was and whether these changes in…

  9. Geographic Determinants of Healthy Lifestyle Change in a Community-Based Exercise Prescription Delivered in Family Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Petrella

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evidence is unequivocal that exercise training can improve health outcomes. However, despite this evidence, adoption of healthy lifestyles is poor. The physical environment is one possible determinant of successful adoption of healthy lifestyles that could influence outcomes in community-based intervention strategies. We developed a novel exercise prescription delivered in two different cohorts of older sedentary adults—one delivered by family physicians to patients with identified cardiovascular risk factors (CRF and the other delivered at a community exercise facility to a larger cohort of healthy sedentary adults (HSA. We then determined whether the place of residence and proximity to facilities promoting physical activity and healthy or unhealthy eating could influence clinical changes related to these community-based exercise prescriptions.Methods: Two different cohorts of older patients were administered similar exercise prescriptions. The CRF cohort was a sedentary group of 41 older adults with either high-normal blood pressure (120–139 mmHg/85–89 mmHg or impaired glucose tolerance (fasting glucose 6.1–6.9 mmol/l who were prescribed exercise by their family physicians at baseline and followed over 12 months. The HSA cohort consisted of 159 sedentary older adults who were prescribed a similar exercise prescription and then participated in a chronic training program over 5 years at a community-based training facility. Out- comes of interest were change in fitness (VO2max, resting systolic blood pressure (rSBP and body mass index (BMI. GIS-determined shortest distance to local facilities promoting physical activity and healthy versus unhealthy were compared at baseline and follow up using simple logistic regression.Those subjects in CRF group were further identified as responders (exhibited an above average change in VO2max and were then compared to non-responders according to their patterns of proximity to physical

  10. THE POSITIVE SOLUTION OF CLASSICAL GELFAND MODEL WITH COEFFICIENT THAT CHANGE SIGN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚庆六

    2002-01-01

    The existence and iteration of positive solution for classical Gelfand models areconsidered, where the coefficient of nonlinear term is allowed to change sign in [ 0, 1 ]. Byusing the monotone iterative technique, an existence theorem of positive solution isobtained, corresponding iterative process and convergence rate are given. This iterativeprocess starts off with zero function, hence the process is simple, feasible and effective.

  11. Neuropsychological changes after 30-day Ginkgo biloba administration in healthy participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stough, C; Clarke, J; Lloyd, J; Nathan, P J

    2001-06-01

    Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb) from the world's oldest living tree has been reputed to ameliorate cognitive decline in the elderly and slow cognitive deterioration in patients with dementia of the Alzheimer's type. EGb remains as one of the most popular plant extracts to alleviate symptoms associated with a range of cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia and age-related amnesic conditions. EGb is known to contain a range of chemically active components that have antagonistic effects on platelet-activating factor, free-radical scavenging activity and direct effects on the cholinergic neurotransmitter system. Recently there has been much speculation, that EGb may act as a 'smart drug' or nootropic agent in the healthy young to improve intelligence. We conducted a 30-d randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial in which 61 participants were administered a battery of validated neuropsychological tests before and after treatment. Statistical analysis indicated significant improvements in speed of information processing working memory and executive processing attributable to the EGb.

  12. Cytokine Changes following Acute Ethanol Intoxication in Healthy Men: A Crossover Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudan Prasad Neupane

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol is a known modulator of the innate immune system. Owing to the absence of human studies, alcohol’s effect on circulating cytokine profile remains unclear. We investigated the effect of acute high dose alcohol consumption on systemic cytokine release. After an overnight fasting, alcohol-experienced healthy male volunteers (N=20 aged 25–45 years were given oral ethanol in the form of vodka (4.28 mL/kg which they drank over a period of 30 minutes reaching peak blood alcohol concentration of 0.12% (SD 0.028. Blood samples were obtained prior to alcohol intake as well as 2, 7, and 12 hours thereafter. Serum levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-1Ra, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17, IFN-γ, MCP-1, and TNF-α were determined by the multibead-based assay. Baseline cytokine levels were not related to BMI, hepatic parameters, electrolytes, glucose, or morning cortisol levels. Within 2 hours of alcohol intake, levels of IL-1Ra were elevated and remained so throughout the assessment period (p for trend = 0.015. In contrast, the levels of the chemokine MCP-1 dropped acutely followed by steadily increasing levels during the observation period (p<0.001. The impact of sustained elevated levels of MCP-1 even after the clearance of blood alcohol content deserves attention.

  13. Changes in body composition in apparently healthy urban Indian women up to 3 years postpartum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha A Kajale

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dietary and life style practices differ in postpartum (PP and nonpregnant Indian women. Effect of these practices on postpartum weight retention (PPWR and development of cardio-metabolic risk (CMR has been scarcely studied in urban women. Aims of this study were to (i compare anthropometry, biochemical parameters and body composition up to 3 years PP (ii effect of PPWR, dietary fat intake and physical activity on CMR factors. Methods: Design: Cross-sectional, 300-fullterm, apparently healthy primi-parous women (28.6 ± 3.4 years randomly selected. 128 women within 7-day of delivery (Group-A, 88 with 1-2 years (Group-B and 84 with 3-4-year-old-children (Group-C were studied. Anthropometry, sociodemographic status, physical activity, diet, clinical examination, biochemical tests, body composition, at total body (TB, by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (GE-Lunar DPX were collected. Results: Women at 3-year PP showed higher weight retention (6.5[10] kg than at 1-year (3.0[7] kg (median [IQR]. Android fat % (central obesity increased (P 0.1. Conclusion: Postdelivery, low physical activity and higher PPWR may increase CMR in Indian women.

  14. Fatty acid-induced changes in vascular reactivity in healthy adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christon, Raymond; Marette, André; Badeau, Mylène; Bourgoin, Frédéric; Mélançon, Sébastien; Bachelard, Hélène

    2005-12-01

    Dietary fatty acids (FAs) are known to modulate endothelial dysfunction, which is the first stage of atherosclerosis. However, their exact role in this initial phase is still unclear. The effects of isolated or combined (by 2) purified FAs from the main FA families were studied on the vascular response of isolated thoracic aorta in healthy rats to get a better understanding of the mechanisms of action of dietary FAs in regulating vascular endothelial function. Cumulative contraction curves to phenylephrine and relaxation curves to carbachol and then to sodium nitroprusside were obtained in the absence or presence of the FAs studied allowing endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent ability of the smooth muscle to relax to be assessed in each experimental group. The endothelium-dependent vasodilator response to carbachol was lowered by eicosapentaenoic acid, whereas it was not altered either by docosahexaenoic acid alone or by combined eicosapentaenoic acid-docosahexaenoic acid, oleic acid, or stearic acid, and it was increased by linoleic acid (LA). A decreased phenylephrine-induced contraction was observed after incubation with arachidonic acid and with stearic acid. On the other hand, the endothelium-dependent relaxation was reduced by the addition of combined LA-arachidonic acid and LA-oleic acid. In conclusion, these data point out the differential effects of different types of FAs and of FAs alone vs combined on vascular reactivity. The complex nature of these effects could be partially linked to metabolic specificities of endothelial cells and to interactions between some FAs.

  15. Change in the body temperature of healthy term infant over the first 72 hours of life

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李萌霞; 孙革; NEUBAUERHenning

    2004-01-01

    Objective:To determine the range of body temperature in a group of healthy Chinese term neonates over the first 72 hours of life and to assess the influence of body weight, gestational age and route of delivery.Method: All 200 consecutive cases of neonates delivered at our hospital from March to August 2001 were included in this retrospective study.Temperatures were measured immediately after delivery, after 30 minutes, 1 hour, 2 hours, 8 hours and 15 hours and on the 2nd and 3rd day. Axillary temperatures ranging from 36.5℃ to 37℃ were regarded as normal. No cases of maternal fever or systemic infection of the newborns were discovered. All infants were discharged in good general condition. Results:The mean rectal temperature at birth was 37.19℃. The lowest average temperature was reached at 1 hour after delivery (36.54℃) with a significant difference between natural delivery (36.48℃) and section (36.59℃) (P<0.05).Temperature subsequently rose to 36.70℃ at 8 hours and 36.78℃ at 15 hours (P<0.05).Hypothermia was seen in 51.8% and hypothermia in 42.5% of the patients.On the 3rd day after delivery, 96% of all temperatures were in the normal range. A significant relation was found between hypothermia and both low birth weight (P<0.001) and low gestational age (P<0.05).Conclusion: The reference range presently used did not include all physiological temperatures in the first 72 hours of life. Considering other factors,such as birth weight, route of delivery,gestational age and body temperature on the 2nd and 3rd day of life, may help to correctly assess the significance of temperatures beyond the reference range.

  16. Change in the body temperature of healthy term infant over the first 72 hours of life

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Meng-xia (李萌霞); SUN Ge (孙革); NEUBAUER Henning

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the range of body temperature in a group of healthy Chinese term neonates over the first 72 hours of life and to assess the influence of body weight, gestational age and route of delivery. Method: All 200 consecutive cases of neonates delivered at our hospital from March to August 2001 were included in this retrospective study. Temperatures were measured immediately after delivery, after 30 minutes, 1 hour, 2 hours, 8 hours and 15 hours and on the 2nd and 3rd day. Axillary temperatures ranging from 36.5 oC to 37 oC were regarded as normal. No cases of maternal fever or systemic infection of the newborns were discovered. All infants were discharged in good general condition. Results: The mean rectal temperature at birth was 37.19 ℃. The lowest average temperature was reached at 1 hour after delivery (36.54 ℃) with a significant difference between natural delivery (36.48 ℃) and section (36.59 ℃) (P<0.05). Temperature subsequently rose to 36.70 ℃ at 8 hours and 36.78 ℃ at 15 hours (P<0.05). Hypothermia was seen in 51.8% and hypothermia in 42.5% of the patients. On the 3rd day after delivery, 96% of all temperatures were in the normal range. A significant relation was found between hypothermia and both low birth weight (P<0.001) and low gestational age (P<0.05). Conclusion: The reference range presently used did not include all physiological temperatures in the first 72 hours of life. Considering other factors, such as birth weight, route of delivery, gestational age and body temperature on the 2nd and 3rd day of life, may help to correctly assess the significance of temperatures beyond the reference range.

  17. Rates and determinants of repeated participation in a web-based behavior change program for healthy body weight and healthy lifestyle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheijden, M.W.; Jans, M.P.; Hildebrandt, V.H.; Hopman-Rock, M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: In recent years, many tailored lifestyle counseling programs have become available through the Internet. Previous research into such programs has shown selective enrollment of relatively healthy people. However, because of the known dose-response relationship between the intensity and fr

  18. Whole-grain and blood lipid changes in apparently healthy adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollænder, Pernille Lærke Bjørndal; Ross, Alastair B; Kristensen, Mette Bredal

    2015-01-01

    dietary fiber. OBJECTIVE: Using a meta-analytic approach, we assessed the effect of whole-grain compared with non-whole-grain foods on changes in total cholesterol (TC), LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides. DESIGN: We conducted a systematic literature search in selected databases. Studies....../L; 95% CI: -0.08, 0.01; P = 0.10). No association was found between whole-grain dose or baseline TC concentration and any of the outcomes, whereas study duration was positively associated with changes in TC and LDL cholesterol. CONCLUSIONS: Consumption of whole-grain diets lowers LDL cholesterol and TC...

  19. Immobilization induces changes in presynaptic control of group Ia afferents in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Lundbye; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2008-01-01

    maximal voluntary plantar- and dorsiflexion torque (MVC) was significantly reduced and the maximal SOL H-reflex amplitude increased with no changes in Mmax. Decreased presynaptic inhibition of the Ia afferents likely contributed to the increase of the H-reflex size, since we observed a significant...

  20. Psychosocial changes in the Mississippi communities for healthy living (MCHL) nutrition intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the psychosocial changes reported by participants in a nutrition education intervention in the Lower Mississippi Delta. The psychosocial constructs such as decisional balance (DB), self-efficacy (SE), and social support (SS) are correlated with fruit and ve...

  1. SUBCHRONIC INHALATION OF ZINC SULFATE CAUSES CARDIAC CHANGES IN HEALTHY RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinc is a common metal in most ambient particulate matter (PM), and has been proposed to be a causative component in PM-induced adverse cardiovascular health effects. Zinc is also an essential metal and has the potential to induce many physiological and nonphysiological changes. ...

  2. Age-related and sex-related changes in perfusion index in response to noxious electrical stimulation in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishimura T

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Toshiki Nishimura,1 Aya Nakae,2 Masahiko Shibata,3 Takashi Mashimo,4 Yuji Fujino21Osaka University Medical School, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, 3Department of Pain Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Japan; 4Toyonaka Municipal Hospital, Toyonaka, JapanBackground: Even though pain is a subjective phenomenon, its objective evaluation in humans is important because subjects requiring pain evaluation may be unable to describe their pain intensity because of decreased awareness or impaired cognitive function. Previous reports indicate that the perfusion index (PI, which is calculated from pulse oximeter waveforms, has some utility in assessing pain. However, age-associated and sex-associated differences in change of PI have hitherto not been evaluated for assessment of pain. Therefore, we aimed to estimate the utility of age-related differences in PI change among healthy volunteers subjected to electrical stimulation.Methods: We measured PI and pulse rate in 70 healthy volunteers exposed to gradually increasing electrical stimulation. The subjects were classified into four groups, ie, young men, young women, aged men, and aged women. Stimulation was stopped when subjects reached their pain tolerance threshold. The average PI and pulse rate were calculated 10 seconds before and after electrical stimulation and compared across the four groups. Changes in PI and pulse rate were analyzed using the paired t-test.Results: The PI was significantly decreased in response to pain stimulation in young men (P<0.0001, young women (P=0.0002, and aged men (P=0.0158. However, aged women failed to show significant changes in PI before or after stimulation. The pulse rate was not significantly altered in any of the groups.Conclusion: PI may be an independent parameter reflecting the perception of noxious stimuli and could be used for objective evaluation of pain perception in healthy volunteers, except when it

  3. Neonatal care in rural Karnataka: healthy and harmful practices, the potential for change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleland John

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Every year four million babies die in the first month of life and a quarter of these take place in India. A package of essential newborn care practices exists, which has a proven impact on reducing mortality, and can be implemented in low resource settings. However, childbirth and the neonatal period are culturally important times, during which there is strong adherence to traditional practices. Successful implementation of the package therefore requires in-depth knowledge of the local context and tailored behaviour change communication. Methods This study was carried out in rural Karnataka, India. It uses quantitative data from a prospective survey following mothers through their experience of pregnancy and the postnatal period; and qualitative data from in depth interviews and focus group discussions conducted with mothers, grandmothers and birth attendants. It explores local newborn care practices and beliefs, analyses their harmful or beneficial characteristics and elucidates areas of potential resistance to behaviour change and implementation of the essential newborn care package. Results Findings show that many potentially harmful newborn care practices are being carried out in the study area, such as unhygienic cord cutting, delayed breastfeeding and early bathing. Some are more amenable to change than others, depending on the strength of the underlying beliefs, and acceptability of alternative care. However, movement away from traditional practices is already taking place, particularly amongst the more educated and better off, and there is a clear opportunity to broaden, direct and accelerate this process. Conclusion Community education should be a focus of the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM and Integrated Management of Neonatal and Childhood Illness (IMNCI program being implemented in Karnataka. The added capacity of the new Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHAs could enable more women to be reached. With

  4. Rachitic Changes, Demineralization, and Fracture Risk in Healthy Infants and Toddlers with Vitamin D Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Henry A.; Kleinman, Paul K.; Connolly, Susan A.; Fair, Rick A.; Myers, Regina M.; Gordon, Catherine M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine radiographic findings in children with vitamin D deficiency in comparison with biochemical marker levels and prevalence of fractures. Materials and Methods: The parents or guardians of all participants provided written informed consent at the time of enrollment. The institutional review board approved the protocol, and HIPAA guidelines were followed. From a prospective sample of children seen for routine clinical care, 40 children with vitamin D deficiency (25-hydroxyvitamin D [25-OHD] level, ≤20 ng/mL) were identified, and high-detail computed radiographs of the wrists and knees were obtained. The children ranged in age from 8 to 24 months. Radiographs were scored by three readers with use of the 10-point Thacher score for rachitic changes and a five-point scale for demineralization. Serum calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, and parathyroid hormone levels were determined. Fracture history was obtained for 35 of the 40 patients (88%). Results: All readers identified rachitic changes at both readings in two patients (5%) and demineralization in two patients (5%). Interrater agreement was 65% for rachitic changes (κ = 0.33) and 70% for demineralization (κ = 0.37). When the majority of the raters determined that rachitic changes were absent at both readings, alkaline phosphatase levels were lower than those with other assessments (median, 267 vs 515 U/L [4.4589 vs 8.6005 μkat/L]; P = .01). When most raters determined that demineralization was present at both readings, serum 25-OHD levels were lower than those at other assessments (median, 9.0 vs 17.5 ng/mL [22.464 vs 43.68 nmol/L]; P = .02). No fractures were reported or identified radiographically. Conclusion: In infants and toddlers with vitamin D deficiency, rachitic changes and definite demineralization are uncommon and fracture risk is low. © RSNA, 2011 PMID:22106354

  5. Optimal dose of intravenous oxycodone for attenuating hemodynamic changes after endotracheal intubation in healthy patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong-Hee; Lee, Seung-Hyuk; Lee, Oh Haeng; Kang, Hyun; Shin, Hwa-Yong; Baek, Chong-Wha; Jung, Yong Hun; Woo, Young Cheol

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Intravenous oxycodone has been used as an adjunct to anesthetic agents. This study aimed to assess the optimal dose of intravenous oxycodone for the attenuation of the hemodynamic responses to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation. Methods: A prospective, randomized, double-blind study was conducted. Ninety-five patients were randomly divided into 5 groups based on the oxycodone dose: 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, 0.2 mg/kg. After administering the assigned dose of intravenous oxycodone, anesthesia was induced with thiopental. Heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were measured at baseline, before intubation, and 1, 2, and 3 minutes after intubation. The percentage increase of BP was calculated as (highest BP after intubation − baseline BP)/baseline BP × 100 (%). The percentage increase of HR was calculated in same formula as above. Hypertension was defined as a 15% increase of systolic BP from baseline, and probit analysis was conducted. Results: Hemodynamic data from 86 patients were analyzed. The percentage increase of mean arterial pressure after intubation in groups 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, and 0.2 was significantly different from that in the control (P < 0.001). For HR, the percentage increase was lower than control group when oxycodone was same or more than 0.1 mg/kg (P < 0.05). Using probit analysis, the 95% effective dose (ED95) for preventing hypertension was 0.159 mg/kg (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.122–0.243). In addition, ED50 was 0.020 mg/kg (95% CI, −0.037 to 0.049). However, oxycodone was not effective for maintaining the HR in our study dosage. There were no significant differences in the incidence of hypotension during induction between groups. Conclusions: Using 0.1 mg/kg of intravenous oxycodone is sufficient to attenuate the increase of BP and HR during induction period in healthy patients. The ED95, which was 0.159 mg/kg, can be useful to adjust the dosage of IV oxycodone for maintain stable BP

  6. Changes in central retinal artery blood flow after ocular warming and cooling in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamshad M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Retinal perfusion variability impacts ocular disease and physiology. Aim: To evaluate the response of central retinal artery (CRA blood flow to temperature alterations in 20 healthy volunteers. Setting and Design: Non-interventional experimental human study. Materials and Methods: Baseline data recorded: Ocular surface temperature (OST in °C (thermo-anemometer, CRA peak systolic velocity (PSV and end diastolic velocity (EDV in cm/s using Color Doppler. Ocular laterality and temperature alteration (warming by electric lamp/cooling by ice-gel pack were randomly assigned. Primary outcomes recorded were: OST and intraocular pressure (IOP immediately after warming or cooling and ten minutes later; CRA-PSV and EDV at three, six and nine minutes warming or cooling. Statistical Analysis: Repeated measures ANOVA. Results: (n = 20; μ±SD: Pre-warming values were; OST: 34.5±1.02°C, CRA-PSV: 9.3±2.33cm/s, CRA-EDV: 4.6±1.27cm/s. OST significantly increased by 1.96°C (95% CI: 1.54 to 2.37 after warming, but returned to baseline ten minutes later. Only at three minutes, the PSV significantly rose by 1.21cm/s (95% CI: 0.51to1.91. Pre-cooling values were: OST: 34.5±0.96°C, CRA-PSV: 9.7±2.45 cm/s, CRA-EDV: 4.7±1.12cm/s. OST significantly decreased by 2.81°C (95% CI: -2.30 to -3.37 after cooling, and returned to baseline at ten minutes. There was a significant drop in CRA-PSV by 1.10cm/s (95% CI: -2.05 to -0.15 and CRA-EDV by 0.81 (95% CI: -1.47 to -0.14 at three minutes. At six minutes both PSV (95% CI: -1.38 to -0.03 and EDV (95% CI: -1.26 to -0.02 were significantly lower. All values at ten minutes were comparable to baseline. The IOP showed insignificant alteration on warming (95% CI of difference: -0.17 to 1.57mmHg, but was significantly lower after cooling (95% CI: -2.95 to -4.30mmHg. After ten minutes, IOP had returned to baseline. Conclusion : This study confirms that CRA flow significantly increases on warming and decreases on cooling

  7. Effects of a healthy food supply intervention in a military setting: positive changes in cereal, fat and sugar containing foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingham Clarissa ML

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Finland, all men are liable to military service and a clear majority completes service. The increasing prevalence of obesity also among soldiers concerns conscripts’ food choices. Conscripts are served nutritionally planned regular main meals but individual choices take place in free-time eating. This study assesses the effects in conscripts’ eating habits in an intervention targeting the supply of healthy foods available in the military setting. Methods Participants were 604 18-21-year old male conscripts of whom 242 belonged to Control Group and 362 to Intervention Group. Participants of Control Group were historical controls performing military service one year before Intervention Group. The intervention targeted selection, placement, and attractiveness of healthy foods in garrison refectories and soldier’s home cafeterias, the two main food providers in the military. Dietary intake data was collected by self-administered questionnaire at three time points: before/beginning of military service (T0, 8 weeks (T1 and 6 months (T2 of military service. Outcome measures were food consumption frequencies and four dietary indexes (Cereal Index, Fruit and Vegetable Index, Fat Index and Sugar Index developed to characterize the diet. Changes between study groups in outcome variables and in time were analysed by repeated-measures analysis of covariance. Results Significant (p  Conclusions In the military setting, healthier food choices can be promoted by intervening on the main food environments by improving the supply of healthy foods. However, impacting on conscripts’ individual selection as fruit and vegetable consumption is more challenging.

  8. DNA methylation changes separate allergic patients from healthy controls and may reflect altered CD4+ T-cell population structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colm E Nestor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Altered DNA methylation patterns in CD4(+ T-cells indicate the importance of epigenetic mechanisms in inflammatory diseases. However, the identification of these alterations is complicated by the heterogeneity of most inflammatory diseases. Seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR is an optimal disease model for the study of DNA methylation because of its well-defined phenotype and etiology. We generated genome-wide DNA methylation (N(patients = 8, N(controls = 8 and gene expression (N(patients = 9, Ncontrols = 10 profiles of CD4(+ T-cells from SAR patients and healthy controls using Illumina's HumanMethylation450 and HT-12 microarrays, respectively. DNA methylation profiles clearly and robustly distinguished SAR patients from controls, during and outside the pollen season. In agreement with previously published studies, gene expression profiles of the same samples failed to separate patients and controls. Separation by methylation (N(patients = 12, N(controls = 12, but not by gene expression (N(patients = 21, N(controls = 21 was also observed in an in vitro model system in which purified PBMCs from patients and healthy controls were challenged with allergen. We observed changes in the proportions of memory T-cell populations between patients (N(patients = 35 and controls (N(controls = 12, which could explain the observed difference in DNA methylation. Our data highlight the potential of epigenomics in the stratification of immune disease and represents the first successful molecular classification of SAR using CD4(+ T cells.

  9. Changes in metabolic correlates of personality traits in healthy elderly women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Soo; Cho, Sang Soo; Yoon, Eun Jin; Bang, Seong Ae; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Personality traits are generally known to be stable, although the brain changes with aging. Especially women experience striking alterations in the neuroendocrinergic system at menopause, which may cause considerable changes in personality traits and alter their underlying neural substrates. To investigate changes in the neural substrates underlying personality traits, we investigated metabolic correlates of personality traits in women before and after menopause. We obtained FDG PET images from 13 young (24.0{+-}3.1 y) and 11 elderly females (66.8{+-}3.3 y). Three factors of personality traits (novelty seeking (NS), harm avoidance (HA), reward dependence (RD)) were assessed using Cloninger's 240-item Temperament and Characteristic Inventory. Three ANCOVA maps were created in SPM2 (P < 0.01 uncorrected, k = 100), each constructed to assess the metabolic correlates of each temperament factor. In young females NS scores were negatively correlated with glucose metabolism in the right insula and right cingulate; in elderly females, the right cuneus. In young females HA scores were positively correlated with glucose metabolism in the right lingual gyrus; in elderly females, the left anterior cingulate and bilateral hippocampus. Only in elderly females, HA scores were negatively correlated with glucose metabolism in the right orbital gyrus and bilateral frontal gyri. In young females, RD scores were positively correlated with glucose metabolism in the bilateral frontal gyri and bilateral cingulate; in elderly females, the right middle frontal gyrus. In young females, RD scores were negatively correlated with glucose metabolism in the right precuneus; in elderly females, the left insula. We found that neural substrates underlying personality traits in females were dissociable across young and elderly women. These results may provide better understanding of differential prevalence and susceptibility to psychiatric illnesses in young and elderly females.

  10. Influence of short-term changes in sex hormones on serum concentrations of cellular adhesion molecules in young healthy women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Begić

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim To determine if short-term changes in sex hormones (such as cyclic changes within the menstrual cycle can influence the serumconcentration of soluble cell adhesion molecules (CAMs.Methods Sixteen healthy young women with normal cycles participated in this study. Serum levels of sICAM-1, sVCAM-1 and E-selectin were determined in three different phases of the menstrual cycle: a early follicular (EF phase, b ovulatory (O phase and c midluteal (ML phase, by standardized ELISA-based kits. To confirm the exact assessment of menstrual cycle phases, serum levels of estrogen, progesterone, LH and FSH were measured. Results There were significant oscillations in serum female sex hormones concentration over the cycle duration, as expected the level of estrogen (E2 and progesterone (PROG was the lowest in EF phase, the highest E2 appeared in O phase, and both E2 and PROG were present in high concentrations during ML phase. There was a significant positive correlation between E2 and serum soluble ICAM -1 concentrations (p=0,041, correlation coefficient 0,306. However, there was no significant change in other soluble CAMs concentration during the menstrual cycle. Conclusion Results of our study suggest that short-term changes in female sex hormone levels could modulate expression of soluble ICAM-1, but not VCAM -1 or E-selectin in extent that would affect a young woman’s health.

  11. White and grey matter changes in the language network during healthy aging.

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    Yanhui Yang

    Full Text Available Neural structures change with age but there is no consensus on the exact processes involved. This study tested the hypothesis that white and grey matter in the language network changes during aging according to a "last in, first out" process. The fractional anisotropy (FA of white matter and cortical thickness of grey matter were measured in 36 participants whose ages ranged from 55 to 79 years. Within the language network, the dorsal pathway connecting the mid-to-posterior superior temporal cortex (STC and the inferior frontal cortex (IFC was affected more by aging in both FA and thickness than the other dorsal pathway connecting the STC with the premotor cortex and the ventral pathway connecting the mid-to-anterior STC with the ventral IFC. These results were independently validated in a second group of 20 participants whose ages ranged from 50 to 73 years. The pathway that is most affected during aging matures later than the other two pathways (which are present at birth. The results are interpreted as showing that the neural structures which mature later are affected more than those that mature earlier, supporting the "last in, first out" theory.

  12. The impact of climate change on the global wine industry: Challenges & solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Renée Mozell

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the impact of climate change upon the global production of winegrapes and wine. It includes a review of the literature on the cause and effects of climate change, as well as illustrations of the specific challenges global warming may bring to the production of winegrapes and wine. More importantly, this paper provides some practical solutions that industry professionals can take to mitigate and adapt to the coming change in both vineyards and wineries.

  13. Giving offspring a healthy start: parents' experiences of health promotion and lifestyle change during pregnancy and early parenthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edvardsson Kristina

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are good opportunities in Sweden for health promotion targeting expectant parents and parents of young children, as almost all are reached by antenatal and child health care. In 2005, a multisectoral child health promotion programme (the Salut Programme was launched to further strengthen such efforts. Methods Between June and December 2010 twenty-four in-depth interviews were conducted separately with first-time mothers and fathers when their child had reached 18 months of age. The aim was to explore their experiences of health promotion and lifestyle change during pregnancy and early parenthood. Qualitative manifest and latent content analysis was applied. Results Parents reported undertaking lifestyle changes to secure the health of the fetus during pregnancy, and in early parenthood to create a health-promoting environment for the child. Both women and men portrayed themselves as highly receptive to health messages regarding the effect of their lifestyle on fetal health, and they frequently mentioned risks related to tobacco and alcohol, as well as toxins and infectious agents in specific foods. However, health promotion strategies in pregnancy and early parenthood did not seem to influence parents to make lifestyle change primarily to promote their own health; a healthy lifestyle was simply perceived as 'common knowledge'. Although trust in health care was generally high, both women and men described some resistance to what they saw as preaching, or very directive counselling about healthy living and the lack of a holistic approach from health care providers. They also reported insufficient engagement with fathers in antenatal care and child health care. Conclusion Perceptions about risks to the offspring's health appear to be the primary driving force for lifestyle change during pregnancy and early parenthood. However, as parents' motivation to prioritise their own health per se seems to be low during this period

  14. Endocrine determinants of changes in insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion during a weight cycle in healthy men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Karschin

    Full Text Available Changes in insulin sensitivity (IS and insulin secretion occur with perturbations in energy balance and glycemic load (GL of the diet that may precede the development of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia. Determinants of changes in IS and insulin secretion with weight cycling in non-obese healthy subjects remain unclear.In a 6wk controlled 2-stage randomized dietary intervention 32 healthy men (26±4y, BMI: 24±2kg/m2 followed 1wk of overfeeding (OF, 3wks of caloric restriction (CR containing either 50% or 65% carbohydrate (CHO and 2wks of refeeding (RF with the same amount of CHO but either low or high glycaemic index at ±50% energy requirement. Measures of IS (basal: HOMA-index, postprandial: Matsuda-ISI, insulin secretion (early: Stumvoll-index, total: tAUC-insulin/tAUC-glucose and potential endocrine determinants (ghrelin, leptin, adiponectin, thyroid hormone levels, 24h-urinary catecholamine excretion were assessed.IS improved and insulin secretion decreased due to CR and normalized upon RF. Weight loss-induced improvements in basal and postprandial IS were associated with decreases in leptin and increases in ghrelin levels, respectively (r = 0.36 and r = 0.62, p<0.05. Weight regain-induced decrease in postprandial IS correlated with increases in adiponectin, fT3, TSH, GL of the diet and a decrease in ghrelin levels (r-values between -0.40 and 0.83, p<0.05 whereas increases in early and total insulin secretion were associated with a decrease in leptin/adiponectin-ratio (r = -0.52 and r = -0.46, p<0.05 and a decrease in fT4 (r = -0.38, p<0.05 for total insulin secretion only. After controlling for GL associations between RF-induced decrease in postprandial IS and increases in fT3 and TSH levels were no longer significant.Weight cycling induced changes in IS and insulin secretion were associated with changes in all measured hormones, except for catecholamine excretion. While leptin, adiponectin and ghrelin seem to be the major

  15. Effects of short term changes in the blood glucose level on the autofluorescence lifetime of the human retina in healthy volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemm, Matthias; Nagel, Edgar; Schweitzer, Dietrich; Schramm, Stefan; Haueisen, Jens

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (FLIO) provides in vivo metabolic mapping of the ocular fundus. Changes in FLIO have been found in e.g. diabetes patients. The influence of short term metabolic changes caused by blood glucose level changes on is unknown. Aim of this work is the detection of short-term changes in fundus autofluorescence lifetime during an oral glucose tolerance test. Methods: FLIO was performed in 10 healthy volunteers (29+/-4 years, fasting for 12h) using a scanning laser ophthalmoscope (30° fundus, 34μm resolution, excitation with 473nm diode laser with 70 ps pulses at 80 MHz repetition rate, detection in two spectral channels 500-560nm (ch1) and 560-720nm (ch2) using the timecorrelated single photon counting method). The blood glucose level (BGL) was measured by an Accu-Chek® Aviva self-monitoring device. Before and after a glucose drink (300ml solution, containing 75g of glucose (Accu-Chek® Dextrose O.G.T.), BGL and FLIO were measured every 15min. The FLIMX software package was applied to compute the average fluorescence lifetime τ on the inner ring of the ETDRS grid using a modified 3-exponential approach. Results: The results are given as mean +/- standard deviation over all volunteers in ch1. Baseline measurement: BGL: 5.3+/-0.4 mmol/l, τ1: 49+/-6ps. A significant reduction (α=5% Wilcoxon rank-sum test) in τ1 is detected after 15min (BGL: 8.4+/-1.1 mmol/l, τ1: 44+/-5ps) and after 90min (BGL: 6.3+/-1.4 mmol/l, τ1: 41+/-5ps). Results of ch2 show smaller reductions in the fluorescence lifetimes over time.

  16. Changes in soleus H-reflex during walking in middle-aged, healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffalt, Peter C; Alkjær, Tine; Simonsen, Erik B

    2015-01-01

    and tibialis anterior muscles, and EMG/H-reflex gain were measured during 4-km/h treadmill walking. RESULTS: The normalized H-reflex amplitude was lower in the swing phase for the middle-aged group, and there was no difference in muscle activity. EMG/H-reflex gain did not differ between groups. CONCLUSIONS: H......-reflex amplitude during walking was affected by aging, and changes during the swing phase could be seen in the middle-aged subjects. Subdividing the 2 age groups into groups of facilitated or suppressed swing-phase H-reflex revealed that the H-reflex amplitude modulation pattern in the group with facilitated swing......INTRODUCTION: To assess the effect of aging on stretch reflex modulation during walking, soleus H-reflexes obtained in 15 middle-aged (mean age 56.4±6.9 years) and 15 young (mean age 23.7±3.9 years) subjects were compared. METHODS: The H-reflex amplitude, muscle activity (EMG) of the soleus...

  17. Does the application of kinesiotape change scapular kinematics in healthy female handball players?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Herzeele, M; van Cingel, R; Maenhout, A; De Mey, K; Cools, A

    2013-11-01

    Elastic taping is widely used in sports medicine for correcting functional alignment and muscle recruitment. However, evidence regarding its influence on scapular dynamic positioning is scarce. This study aimed to investigate the effect of a specific kinesiotaping method on scapular kinematics in female elite handball players without shoulder complaints. 25 athletes (18.0±1.5 years) active in the highest national division were recruited. All subjects received an elastic adhesive tape (K-active tape©) with the purpose to correct scapular position. 3-dimensional scapular motion measurements were performed (Fastrak®) during humeral elevation in the sagittal, frontal and scapular plane. The results showed that taping has a moderate to large effect (Cohen's d>0.7) towards scapular posterior tilting, in all 3 planes of humeral movement and for all angles of elevation (mean posteriorizing effect of 4.23 °, 3.23 ° and 4.33 ° respectively for elevation in the sagittal, frontal and scapular plane, p0.7). Together these results suggest that kinesiotape application causes positive changes in scapular motion. This could support its use in sports medicine for preventing shoulder problems in overhead athletes.

  18. Environmental change and Rift Valley fever in eastern Africa: projecting beyond HEALTHY FUTURES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, David; Hagenlocher, Michael; Jones, Anne E; Kienberger, Stefan; Leedale, Joseph; Morse, Andrew P

    2016-03-31

    Outbreaks of Rift Valley fever (RVF), a relatively recently emerged zoonosis endemic to large parts of sub-Saharan Africa that has the potential to spread beyond the continent, have profound health and socio-economic impacts, particularly in communities where resilience is already low. Here output from a new, dynamic disease model [the Liverpool RVF (LRVF) model], driven by downscaled, bias-corrected climate change data from an ensemble of global circulation models from the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project run according to two radiative forcing scenarios [representative concentration pathway (RCP)4.5 and RCP8.5], is combined with results of a spatial assessment of social vulnerability to the disease in eastern Africa. The combined approach allowed for analyses of spatial and temporal variations in the risk of RVF to the end of the current century. Results for both scenarios highlight the high-risk of future RVF outbreaks, including in parts of eastern Africa to date unaffected by the disease. The results also highlight the risk of spread from/to countries adjacent to the study area, and possibly farther afield, and the value of considering the geography of future projections of disease risk. Based on the results, there is a clear need to remain vigilant and to invest not only in surveillance and early warning systems, but also in addressing the socio-economic factors that underpin social vulnerability in order to mitigate, effectively, future impacts.

  19. A numerical method for finding sign-changing solutions of superlinear Dirichlet problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuberger, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    In a recent result it was shown via a variational argument that a class of superlinear elliptic boundary value problems has at least three nontrivial solutions, a pair of one sign and one which sign changes exactly once. These three and all other nontrivial solutions are saddle points of an action functional, and are characterized as local minima of that functional restricted to a codimension one submanifold of the Hilbert space H-0-1-2, or an appropriate higher codimension subset of that manifold. In this paper, we present a numerical Sobolev steepest descent algorithm for finding these three solutions.

  20. Longitudinal Changes in Circulating Testosterone Levels Determined by LC-MS/MS and by a Commercially Available Radioimmunoassay in Healthy Girls and Boys during the Pubertal Transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Annette; Søeborg, Tue; Johannsen, Trine Holm;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Accurate and selective assessment of testosterone requires use of a sensitive LC-MS/MS method, especially at low levels as those seen in young children. METHODS: The present longitudinal study of 20 healthy children from the Copenhagen Puberty Study followed every 6 months for 5 years...... testosterone using a selective LC-MS/MS method proved to be more sensitive in predicting early peripubertal changes in healthy children compared to levels determined by immunoassay....

  1. Aging related changes in mixed basal saliva concentration of sodium, potassium and chloride in healthy non medicated humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira, Rui; Navas, Eunice; Duran, Carolina; Pinto, Maria; Gutierrez, Jose; Eblen-Zajjur, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the salivary flow is reduced by aging but ionic composition changes associated to aging have been less evaluated. To measure salivary and plasmatic [Na(+)], [K(+)] and [Cl(-)] and to correlate with age in healthy, non-medicated subjects of any gender, 165 healthy participating subjects (over 15 years old) were asked to give sample of 5 mL mix basal saliva in a plastic vial without any stimulation technique, additionally, 5 mL of venous blood was collected. Samples [Na(+)] and [K(+)] were measured by flame photometry (Corning™ M-405) and [Cl(-)] by voltametric chlorometry (Corning™ M-920). Ionic concentrations were expressed as (X±DE; meq.L⁻¹). All three ionic concentrations progressively increased with age, with the lineal regression equation being: [Na(+)] mEq=17.76 + 0.26(Age); r=+0.42; F=31.5; P=0.00001; [K(+)] mEq=13.2+0.15(Age); r=+0.32; F=16.5; P=0.00001; [Cl(-)] mEq=9.05+0.18(Age); r=+0.35; F=7.8; P=0.0071. Age induced changes in salivary ionic concentrations were not associated to blood ionic changes. However, saliva and blood [Na(+)] and [K(+)] were correlated (r=+0.25; F=4.49; P=0.04 and r=+0.30; F=6.98; P=0.01, respectively). Significant association was found among salivary ions: [Na(+)] mEq=9.14+0.99[K(+)] (r=+0.79; F=95.2; P=0.000001); [Cl(-)] mEq=0.95+0.56[Na(+)] (r=0.79; F=106.6; P=0.000001) and [Cl(-)] mEq=3.45+0.69[K(+)] (r=0.73; F=72.5; P=0.000001). These results confirm and measure the impact of aging over the mixed and resting salivary secretion process and suggest that local changes are not related to blood ionic composition.

  2. Adapted Intervention Mapping: A Strategic Planning Process for Increasing Physical Activity and Healthy Eating Opportunities in Schools via Environment and Policy Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belansky, Elaine S.; Cutforth, Nick; Chavez, Robert; Crane, Lori A.; Waters, Emily; Marshall, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: School environment and policy changes have increased healthy eating and physical activity; however, there has been modest success in translating research ?ndings to practice. The School Environment Project tested whether an adapted version of Intervention Mapping (AIM) resulted in school change. Methods: Using a pair randomized design,…

  3. Relationship between postprandial changes in cardiac left ventricular function, glucose and insulin concentrations, gastric emptying, and satiety in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björgell Ola

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The digestion of food is known to alter the hemodynamics of the body significantly. The purpose of this study was to study the postprandial changes in stroke volume (SV, cardiac output (CO and left ventricular (LV longitudinal systolic and diastolic functions measured with tissue Doppler imaging, in relation to gastric emptying rate (GER, satiety, and glucose and insulin concentrations in healthy subjects. Methods Twenty-three healthy subjects were included in this study. The fasting and postprandial changes at 30 min and 110 min in CO, heart rate (HR and blood pressure were measured. Moreover, tissue Doppler imaging systolic (S', early (E' and late (A' mitral annular diastolic velocities were measured in the septal (s and lateral (l walls. Glucose and insulin concentrations, and satiety were measured before and 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after the start of the meal. The GER was calculated as the percentage change in the antral cross-sectional area 15-90 min after ingestion of the meal. Results This study show that both CO, systolic longitudinal ventricular velocity of the septum (S's and lateral wall (S'l, the early diastolic longitudinal ventricular velocity of the lateral wall (E'l, the late diastolic longitudinal ventricular velocity of the septum (A's and lateral wall (A'l increase significantly, and were concomitant with increased satiety, antral area, glucose and insulin levels. The CO, HR and SV at 30 min were significantly higher, and the diastolic blood pressure was significantly lower, than the fasting. The satiety was correlated to HR and diastolic blood pressure. The insulin level was correlated to HR. Conclusions This study shows that postprandial CO, HR, SV and LV longitudinal systolic and diastolic functions increase concomitantly with increased satiety, antral area, and glucose and insulin levels. Therefore, patients should not eat prior to, or during, cardiac evaluation as the effects of a meal may

  4. Nonlinear population receptive field changes in human area V5/MT+ of healthy subjects with simulated visual field scotomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, Amalia; Keliris, Georgios A; Lee, Sangkyun; Logothetis, Nikos K; Smirnakis, Stelios M

    2015-10-15

    There is extensive controversy over whether the adult visual cortex is able to reorganize following visual field loss (scotoma) as a result of retinal or cortical lesions. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) methods provide a useful tool to study the aggregate receptive field properties and assess the capacity of the human visual cortex to reorganize following injury. However, these methods are prone to biases near the boundaries of the scotoma. Retinotopic changes resembling reorganization have been observed in the early visual cortex of normal subjects when the visual stimulus is masked to simulate retinal or cortical scotomas. It is not known how the receptive fields of higher visual areas, like hV5/MT+, are affected by partial stimulus deprivation. We measured population receptive field (pRF) responses in human area V5/MT+ of 5 healthy participants under full stimulation and compared them with responses obtained from the same area while masking the left superior quadrant of the visual field ("artificial scotoma" or AS). We found that pRF estimations in area hV5/MT+ are nonlinearly affected by the AS. Specifically, pRF centers shift towards the AS, while the pRF amplitude increases and the pRF size decreases near the AS border. The observed pRF changes do not reflect reorganization but reveal important properties of normal visual processing under different test-stimulus conditions.

  5. Solutions for ecosystem-level protection of ocean systems under climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Queirós, Ana M; Huebert, Klaus B; Keyl, Friedemann;

    2016-01-01

    The Paris Conference of Parties (COP21) agreement renewed momentum for action against climate change, creating the space for solutions for conservation of the ocean addressing two of its largest threats: climate change and ocean acidification (CCOA). Recent arguments that ocean policies disregard...... a mature conservation research field, and that protected areas cannot address climate change may be over-simplistic at this time when dynamic solutions for the management of changing oceans are needed. We propose a novel approach, based on spatial meta-analysis of climate impact models, to improve...... the positioning of marine protected areas to limit CCOA impacts. We do this by estimating the vulnerability of ocean ecosystems to CCOA in a spatially-explicit manner, and then co-mapping human activities such as the placement of renewable energy developments and the distribution of marine protected areas. We...

  6. [The sexual peculiarities of aging changes in circannual rhythms of pineal gland, hypophysis, adrenal cortex and thymus functions in healthy subjects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labunets, I F

    2013-01-01

    The interrelations of circannual rhythms of the functional state of pineal gland, hypophysis, adrenal cortex, thymus in healthy women and men from 20 to 79 years were studied. Fluctuations of melatonin, ACTH, cortisol and thymic serum factor, which were exchanged in aging (the season peaks of hormones and its acrophase) were found in blood of healthy 20-29 years old people. The changes of rhythmicity of indices were in male earlier (pineal gland and hypophysis over 30 years, thymus and adrenal cortex over 40 years) and more impressive than in women. The aging changes of pineal gland function's rhythm in healthy subjects have important role for changes of interrelations of circannual rhythms hypophysis, adrenal cortex and thymus.

  7. A Large Conformational Change of a Bridged β-Cyclodextrin Dimer in Aqueous Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Qi ZHENG; Yong Hui WANG; Qing Xiang GUO; Li YANG; You Cheng LIU

    2003-01-01

    A novel bridged β-CD dimer in which two β-cyclodextrins were linked by a naphthalene at positions 2 and 7 has been synthesized. 1H and 13CNMR measurements showed that a large change in the conformation of the dimer occurred in aqueous solution. The dimer interacted with methyl and ethyl orange to form stable inclusion complexes via "induced fit" mechanism.

  8. Conformational changes in human serum albumin induced by sodium perfluorooctanoate in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Paula V; Prieto, Gerardo; Ruso, Juan M; Sarmiento, Félix

    2005-08-18

    Conformational changes in the bulk solution and at the air-aqueous interface of human serum albumin (HSA) induced by changes in concentration of sodium perfluorooctanoate (C(7)F(15)COO(-)Na(+)) were studied by difference spectroscopy, zeta-potential data, and axisymmetric drop shape analysis. zeta-potential was used to monitor the formation of the HSA-C(7)F(15)COO(-)Na(+) complex and the surface charge of the complex. The conformational transition of HSA in the bulk solution was followed as a function of denaturant concentration by absorbance measurements at 280 nm. The data were analyzed to obtain values for the Gibbs energies of the transition in water (DeltaG(0)(W)) and in a hydrophobic environment (DeltaG(0)(hc)) pertaining to saturated protein-surfactant complexes. The conformational changes that surfactants induce in HSA molecules alter its absorption behavior at the air-water interface. Dynamic surface measurements were used to evaluate this behavior. At low [C(7)F(15)COO(-)Na(+)], proteins present three adsorption regimes: induction time, monolayer saturation, and interfacial gelation. When surfactant concentration increases and conformational changes in the bulk solution occur, the adsorption regimes disappear. HSA molecules in an intermediate conformational state migrate to the air-water interface and form a unique monolayer. At high [C(7)F(15)COO(-)Na(+)], the adsorption of denatured molecules exhibits a behavior analogous to that of dilute solutions.

  9. Climate Change Science, Impacts, Solutions - A Senior Science Course for Post-Secondary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, J. M.; Little, L. J.; Barnes, C. C.; Mirmasoudi, S.; Mansouri Kouhestani, F.; Reiger, C.; Rodriguez Bueno, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The role of humanity in warming the global climate is well defined. The research community has predicted and documented many of the early impacts of climate change. The research literature has extensive assessments of future impacts on environment, cities, agriculture, human health, infrastructure, social and political changes, and the risks of military conflict. Society is facing massive infrastructure redevelopment, protection and possible abandonment due to increasing weather extremes. We have reached the point where science consensus is obvious and the population over much of the developed and developing world understands the urgency - humanity is changing the climate. The challenge is helping people help themselves. People understand there are consequences - they want to know how to minimize those consequences, and how to adapt to minimize the impacts. There is a dire need for a senior level course that addresses the key issues across disciplines. This course should cover a range of topics across many disciplinary boundaries, including: an introduction to the science, politics, health and well-being challenges of climate change; likely changes to personal and community lifestyles; consumption of energy and other resources. Population migration due to climate change impacts is a critical topic. Most important, the course must address the solutions to climate change. The population is demanding the power to address this massive challenge. This course will provide a multimedia curriculum on the impacts and solutions to our climate change dilemma.

  10. Healthy shiftwork, healthy shiftworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogi, K

    2001-12-01

    Reflecting diversifying shift systems, extensive effort is put into managing shiftwork and reducing safety and health risks. It is accepted that shiftworkers are exposed to particular risks inherent in their irregular work schedules. This raises the question of how and to what extent we can ensure healthy work life for shiftworkers. In answering the question, we need to identify effective measures to improve both shiftworking conditions and the health of shiftworkers. Based on recent experiences in managing shiftwork, we note three directions of such measures: (a) comprehensive action to avoid risk-enhancing conditions based on general guidelines, (b) risk control as to workload, worksite ergonomics and risk reduction, and (c) support for flexible and restful working life. International standards are obviously relevant to these three aspects. Our own experiences in applying a set of ergonomic checkpoints to plant maintenance shiftwork demonstrate the usefulness of focusing on flexible work schedules and on multiple job-related factors such as night workload, ergonomic environment, resting conditions and training. There is a strong need for participatory planning and implementation of multi-area improvements as well as for relying on flexible schedules and autonomic teamwork. We may conclude that healthy shiftwork and healthy shiftworkers are compatible with each other only when certain conditions are met. In achieving this end, we need to combine (a) comprehensive measures to improve work schedules and job life, (b) strict risk management and (c) locally adjusted participatory steps for continual improvement.

  11. Policy change to create supportive environments for physical activity and healthy eating: which options are the most realistic for local government?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allender, Steven; Gleeson, Erin; Crammond, Brad; Sacks, Gary; Lawrence, Mark; Peeters, Anna; Loff, Bebe; Swinburn, Boyd

    2012-06-01

    The objective is to identify and test regulatory options for creating supportive environments for physical activity and healthy eating among local governments in Victoria, Australia. A literature review identified nine potential areas for policy intervention at local government level, including the walking environment and food policy. Discussion documents were drafted which summarized the public health evidence and legal framework for change in each area. Levels of support for particular interventions were identified through semi-structured interviews conducted with key informants from local government. We conducted 11 key informant interviews and found support for policy intervention to create environments supportive of physical activity but little support for policy changes to promote healthy eating. Participants reported lack of relevance and competing priorities as reasons for not supporting particular interventions. Promoting healthy eating environments was not considered a priority for local government above food safety. There is a real opportunity for action to prevent obesity at local government level (e.g. mandate the promotion of healthy eating environments). For local government to have a role in the promotion of healthy food environments, regulatory change and suitable funding are required.

  12. Does a Nutrition Education Programme Change the Knowledge and Practice of Healthy Diets among High School Adolescents in Chennai, India?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, M. Anitha; Shriraam, Vanishree; Zachariah, Rony; Harries, Anthony D.; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Tetali, Shailaja; Anchala, Raghupathy; Muthukumar, Diviya; Sathiyasekaran, B. W. C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Nutrition education is used as a way of promoting lifelong healthy eating practices among school adolescents. There is limited published information on the impact of nutrition education programmes in India. Objectives: To assess the knowledge and practices of high school students with respect to healthy diets before and after a…

  13. [Chemical form changes of exogenous water solution fluoride and bioavailability in tea garden soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hui-Mei; Peng, Chuan-Yi; Chen, Jing; Hou, Ru-Yan; Wan, Xiao-Chun

    2013-11-01

    Pot experiments and the sequential extraction method were conducted to study the chemical form changes of exogenous water solution fluoride in tea garden soil and their contribution to fluoride accumulation of tea plant. The results showed that the background concentration of all chemical forms of fluoride had little changes with time treatment, which was in a relatively stable state. The exogenous water solution fluoride adding to the soils was rapidly transformed to other fractions. Under the 10 mg x kg(-1) fluoride treatment, the concentration of water solution fluoride increased firstly and then decreased with time treatment, the concentration of organic matter fluoride and Fe/Mn oxides fluoride decreased, the concentration of exchangeable fluoride was not different before and after the treatment (P > 0.05), and the concentration of residual fluoride was in a relatively stable state; under the 200 mg x kg(-1) fluoride treatment, the concentration of water solution fluoride, Fe/Mn oxides fluoride and organic matter fluoride decreased with time treatment, the concentration of exchangeable fluoride increased firstly and then decreased, showed no difference before and after the treatment (P > 0.05), and the concentration of residual fluoride increased, with some differences compared with 10 mg x kg(-1) fluoride treatment. The concentration of total fluoride in root, stem and leaf had significant differences under 0-10 mg x kg(-1) fluoride treatment (P treatment (P > 0.05). Step regression analysis suggested the contribution of all chemical forms of fluoride to the concentration of water solution fluoride and total fluoride of root, stem and leaf had some differences, there was a remarkable regression relationship among the content of total fluoride in leaf and water solution fluoride, organic matter fluoride, Fe/Mn oxides fluoride and residual fluoride in soil, however, no significant difference for water solution fluoride of leaf was found.

  14. Pyrosequencing Analysis Reveals Changes in Intestinal Microbiota of Healthy Adults Who Received a Daily Dose of Immunomodulatory Probiotic Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Plaza-Díaz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The colon microbiota plays a crucial role in human gastrointestinal health. Current attempts to manipulate the colon microbiota composition are aimed at finding remedies for various diseases. We have recently described the immunomodulatory effects of three probiotic strains (Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-4036, Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, and Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035. The goal of the present study was to analyze the compositions of the fecal microbiota of healthy adults who received one of these strains using high-throughput 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Bacteroides was the most abundant genus in the groups that received L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036 or L. paracasei CNCM I-4034. The Shannon indices were significantly increased in these two groups. Our results also revealed a significant increase in the Lactobacillus genus after the intervention with L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036. The initially different colon microbiota became homogeneous in the subjects who received L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036. While some orders that were initially present disappeared after the administration of L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036, other orders, such as Sphingobacteriales, Nitrospirales, Desulfobacterales, Thiotrichales, and Synergistetes, were detected after the intervention. In summary, our results show that the intake of these three bacterial strains induced changes in the colon microbiota.

  15. Alterations in gait speed and age do not fully explain the changes in gait mechanics associated with healthy older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcock, L; Vanicek, N; O'Brien, T D

    2013-04-01

    Older adults exhibit modified gait patterns compared to the young, adopting movement strategies in response to changes in musculoskeletal function. Investigating the functional mobility of older women is particularly important because of their increased life expectancy and greater falls risk compared to men. We explored the relationships between gait parameters and age in healthy older women whilst accounting for declining gait speeds. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected from thirty-nine women (60-83 years) whilst walking at a comfortable cadence. Regression analysis assessed the capacity of gait speed and age to explain the variance in gait associated with older age. Speed explained the majority of variance in many gait parameters. By including age in the regression, the total explained variance (R2) for foot clearance (70%), ankle plantarflexion angle (30%), peak ankle plantarflexor moment (58%), and hip power generation (56%) were significantly (pgait mechanics associated with older age and other contributing factors must exist. Losses of 1.2%/year in gait speed were predicted by age, exceeding previous predictions of -0.7%/year. Furthermore, the accumulation of apparently small decreases of 0.2 cm/year in peak foot-to-ground clearance has clinical implications and offers insight into the mechanisms by which gait becomes hazardous in older age.

  16. Time dependent quantum harmonic oscillator subject to a sudden change of mass: continuous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moya C, H. [INAOE, Coordinacion de Optica, AP 51 y 216, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Fernandez G, M. [Depto. de Fisica, CBI, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana - Iztapalapa, 09340, Mexico, D.F. AP 55-534 (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    We show that a harmonic oscillator subject to a sudden change of mass produces squeezed states. Our study is based on an approximate analytic solution to the time-dependent harmonic oscillator equation with a sub period function parameter. This continuous treatment differs from former studies that involve the matching of two time-independent solutions at the discontinuity. This formalism requires an ad hoc transformation of the original differential equation and is also applicable for rapid, although not necessarily instantaneous, mass variations. (Author)

  17. Electrolyte and Haemogram changes post large volume liposuction comparing two different tumescent solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Vivek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most common definitions of large volume liposuction refer to total 5 l volume aspiration during a single procedure (fat plus wetting solution. Profound haemodynamic and metabolic alterations can accompany large volume liposuction. Due to paucity of literature on the effect of different tumescent solutions on the electrolyte balance and haematological changes during large volume liposuction, we carried out this study using two different wetting solutions to study the same. Materials and Methods: Total 30 patients presenting with varying degrees of localized lipodystrophy in different body regions were enrolled for the study. Prospective randomized controlled trial was conducted by Department of Plastic and Cosmetic Surgery, Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, New Delhi from January 2011 to June 2012. Patients were randomized into two groups of 15 patients each by using computer generated random numbers. Tumescent formula used for Group A (normal saline [NS] was our modification of Klein′s Formula and Tumescent formula used for Group B (ringer lactate [RL] was our modification of Hunstadt′s formula. Serum electrolytes and hematocrit levels were done at preinduction, immediate postoperative period and postoperative day 1. Result: Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software version 15.0. Which showed statistically significant electrolytes and hematocrit changes occur during large volume liposuction. Conclusion: Statistically significant electrolytes and hematocrit changes occur during large volume liposuction and patients should be kept under observation of anaesthesist for at least 24 h. Patients require strict monitoring of vital parameters and usually Intensive Care Unit is not required. There was no statistical difference in the electrolyte changes using NS or RL as tumescent solution and both solutions were found safe for large volume liposuction.

  18. THE RELATION BETWEEN SIGN-CHANGING SOLUTION AND POSITIVE-NEGATIVE SOLUTIONS FOR NONLINEAR OPERATOR EQUATIONS AND ITS APPLICATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张克梅; 孙经先

    2004-01-01

    By fixed point index theory and a result obtained by Amann, existence of the solution for a class of nonlinear operator equations x = Ax is discussed. Under suitable conditions, a couple of positive and negative solutions are obtained. Finally, the abstract result is applied to nonlinear Sturm-Liouville boundary value problem, and at least four distinct solutions are obtained.

  19. Empowering Pre-College Students To Engage In Climate Change Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haine, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Developing and implementing solutions to environmental challenges, such as climate change, depend upon the cultivation of STEM knowledge and skills among today's youth. Furthermore, STEM instruction enhances learning by providing tools to investigate and analyze environmental issues, making the issue real and tangible to students. That said, educators engaged in the climate literacy movement are aware that possession of knowledge about Earth's climate and the causes and consequences of climate change is not sufficient to empower individuals to contribute to solutions that promote a sustainable future. By framing the issue of climate change in the context of energy, by utilizing STEM instructional strategies and by showcasing scientists and others working on solutions to address climate change, the Climate Leadership and Energy Awareness Program (Climate LEAP) at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill is cultivating a network of youth who are not only informed about society's use of energy and the implication for Earth's climate but also empowered to be part of the solution as society shifts to a low carbon economy. During this year-long science enrichment program, 9th-12thgraders learn about our fossil fuel based economy, meet scientists who are working to expand the use of renewable energy sources, and develop communication and leadership skills. Experienced educators with UNC's Institute for the Environment, the Morehead Planetarium and Science Center and the Alliance for Climate Education partner with scientists to implement Climate LEAP. In addition to increasing knowledge of climate science and of the solutions proposed to address climate change, program participants are invited to engage members of their community through implementation of a solutions-oriented community outreach project. Now in its fifth year, 168 students have completed Climate LEAP, with approximately 2/3 completing at least one community outreach project. A survey of program

  20. Effects of the Oxygen-Carrying Solution OxyVita C on the Cerebral Microcirculation and Systemic Blood Pressures in Healthy Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania Abutarboush

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOC as oxygen delivering therapies during hypoxic states has been hindered by vasoconstrictive side effects caused by depletion of nitric oxide (NO. OxyVita C is a promising oxygen-carrying solution that consists of a zero-linked hemoglobin polymer with a high molecular weight (~17 MDa. The large molecular weight is believed to prevent extravasation and limit NO scavenging and vasoconstriction. The aim of this study was to assess vasoactive effects of OxyVita C on systemic blood pressures and cerebral pial arteriole diameters. Anesthetized healthy rats received four intravenous (IV infusions of an increasing dose of OxyVita C (2, 25, 50, 100 mg/kg and hemodynamic parameters and pial arteriolar diameters were measured pre- and post-infusion. Normal saline was used as a volume-matched control. Systemic blood pressures increased (P ≤ 0.05 with increasing doses of OxyVita C, but not with saline. There was no vasoconstriction in small (<50 µm and medium-sized (50–100 µm pial arterioles in the OxyVita C group. In contrast, small and medium-sized pial arterioles vasoconstricted in the control group. Compared to saline, OxyVita C showed no cerebral vasoconstriction after any of the four doses evaluated in this rat model despite increases in blood pressure.

  1. Seasonal Changes in Endotoxin Exposure and Its Relationship to Exhaled Nitric Oxide and Exhaled Breath Condensate pH Levels in Atopic and Healthy Children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwo-Hwa Wan

    Full Text Available Endotoxin, a component of the cell walls of gram-negative bacteria, is a contaminant in organic dusts (house dust and aerosols. In humans, small amounts of endotoxin may cause a local inflammatory response. Exhaled nitric oxide (eNO levels, an inflammation indicator, are associated with the pH values of exhaled breath condensate (EBC. This study evaluated seasonal changes on indoor endotoxin concentrations in homes and the relationships between endotoxin exposure and eNO/EBC pH levels for healthy children and children with allergy-related respiratory diseases. In total, 34 children with allergy-related respiratory diseases and 24 healthy children were enrolled. Indoor air quality measurements and dust sample analysis for endotoxin were conducted once each season inside 58 surveyed homes. The eNO, EBC pH levels, and pulmonary function of the children were also determined. The highest endotoxin concentrations were on kitchen floors of homes of children with allergy-related respiratory diseases and healthy children, and on bedroom floors of homes of asthmatic children and healthy children. Seasonal changes existed in endotoxin concentrations in dust samples from homes of children with allergic rhinitis, with or without asthma, and in EBC pH values among healthy children and those with allergy-related respiratory diseases. Strong relationships existed between endotoxin exposure and EBC pH values in children with allergic rhinitis.

  2. Predicting Developmental Change in Healthy Eating and Regular Exercise among Adolescents in China and the United States: The Role of Psychosocial and Behavioral Protection and Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessor, Richard; Turbin, Mark S.; Costa, Frances M.

    2010-01-01

    This article reports a cross-national study of developmental change in health-enhancing behavior--healthy eating and regular exercise--among adolescents in China and the United States. The application of a conceptual framework comprising psychosocial and behavioral protective and risk factors--both proximal and distal and at both the individual…

  3. Blood-retinal barrier glycerol permeability in diabetic macular edema and healthy eyes: estimations from macular volume changes after peroral glycerol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thornit, Dorte Nellemann; Vinten, Carl Martin; Sander, Birgit;

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the changes in macular volume (MV) between healthy subjects and patients with diabetic macular edema (DME) after an osmotic load and to determine the glycerol permeability (P(gly)) of the blood-retinal barrier (BRB). METHODS: In this unmasked study, 13 patients with DME and 5...

  4. Effect of Nutrition Changes on Foods Selected by Students in a Middle School-Based Diabetes Prevention Intervention Program: The HEALTHY Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Connie C.; Stadler, Diane D.; Staten, Myrlene A.; El Ghormli, Laure; Gillis, Bonnie; Hartstein, Jill; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Virus, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Background: The HEALTHY primary prevention trial developed an integrated multicomponent intervention program to moderate risk factors for type 2 diabetes in middle schools. The nutrition component aimed to improve the quality of foods and beverages served to students. Changes in the School Breakfast Program (SBP), National School Lunch Program…

  5. Using skin carotenoids to assess dietary changes in students after one academic year of participating in the shaping healthy choices program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: To determine whether 4th-grade students participating in the Shaping Healthy Choices Program (SHCP), a school-based nutrition intervention, change vegetable intake Design: quasi-experimental single group pre-test, post-test with a self-selected, convenience sample of students recruited at...

  6. Changes in medical treatment six months after risk stratification with HeartScore and coronary artery calcification scanning of healthy middle-aged subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette Hjortdal; Gerke, Oke; Lambrechtsen, Jess;

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim was to examine and compare the impact of HeartScore and coronary artery calcification (CAC) score on subsequent changes in the use of medication. Methods: A total of 1156 healthy men and women, aged 50 or 60, had a baseline medical examination and a coronary artery CT-scan as ...

  7. SOLUTIONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Hoyos Guajardo, Ph.D. Candidate, M.Sc., B.Eng.

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The theory that is presented below aims to conceptualise how a group of undergraduate students tackle non-routine mathematical problems during a problem-solving course. The aim of the course is to allow students to experience mathematics as a creative process and to reflect on their own experience. During the course, students are required to produce a written ‘rubric’ of their work, i.e., to document their thoughts as they occur as well as their emotionsduring the process. These ‘rubrics’ were used as the main source of data.Students’ problem-solving processes can be explained as a three-stage process that has been called ‘solutioning’. This process is presented in the six sections below. The first three refer to a common area of concern that can be called‘generating knowledge’. In this way, generating knowledge also includes issues related to ‘key ideas’ and ‘gaining understanding’. The third and the fourth sections refer to ‘generating’ and ‘validating a solution’, respectively. Finally, once solutions are generated and validated, students usually try to improve them further before presenting them as final results. Thus, the last section deals with‘improving a solution’. Although not all students go through all of the stages, it may be said that ‘solutioning’ considers students’ main concerns as they tackle non-routine mathematical problems.

  8. Comparison between conformational change and inactivation rates of aminoacylase during denaturation in urea solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王洪睿; 王希成; 张彤; 周海梦

    1995-01-01

    The kinetic method of the substrate reaction in the presence of mactivator previously described by Tsou has been applied to the determination of inactivation rates of aminoacylase during denaturation in urea solutions. The protective effect of substrate on the inactivation of aminoacylase by urea has been investigated. Simultaneously, the comparison between conformational change and inactivation rates of enzyme in the urea solutions of different concentrations has been studied. Results obtained show that the inactivation rate constants of the enzyme are larger than the rate constants of conformational changes. The present results show that the active site of metal enzyme-aminoacylase is also located in a limited and flexible region of the molecule that is more sensitive to denaturants than the enzyme as a whole.

  9. Employee participation in knowledge sharing and change solutions through enterprise social media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mona Agerholm; Agerdal-Hjermind, Annette; Valentini, Chiara

    Purpose - This paper explores the relationship between the participative style of the immediate manager and employees’ motivation to participate on enterprise social media both in daily knowledge sharing activities and in relation to organizational change solutions. Methodology - This project.......046). Findings - The data shows a positive relationship between the participative style of the immediate manager and the employees’ motivation to participate on enterprise social media both in daily knowledge sharing activities and in creating and discussing change solutions. Key words: Internal social media...... is based on a quantitative study in a global Danish company with approximately 18,000 employees worldwide. The company has a strategic focus on implementing social collaboration platforms to create a global working culture. An online survey was conducted globally and a total of 1.046 employees replied (n=1...

  10. Solutions from boundary condition changing operators in open string field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kiermaier, Michael; Soler, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    We construct analytic solutions of open string field theory using boundary condition changing (bcc) operators. We focus on bcc operators with vanishing conformal weight such as those for regular marginal deformations of the background. For any Fock space state phi, the component string field of the solution Psi exhibits a remarkable factorization property: it is given by the matter three-point function of phi with a pair of bcc operators, multiplied by a universal function that only depends on the conformal weight of phi. This universal function is given by a simple integral expression that can be computed once and for all. The three-point functions with bcc operators are thus the only needed physical input of the particular open string background described by the solution. We illustrate our solution with the example of the rolling tachyon profile, for which we prove convergence analytically. The form of our solution, which involves bcc operators instead of explicit insertions of the marginal operator, can b...

  11. Bifurcation analysis and control of periodic solutions changing into invariant tori in Langford system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Su-Hua; Tang Jia-Shi; Qin Jin-Qi; Yin Xiao-Bo

    2008-01-01

    Bifurcation characteristics of the Langford system in a general form are systematically analysed,and nonlinear controls of periodic solutions changing into invariant tori in this system are achieved.Analytical relationship between control gain and bifurcation parameter is obtained.Bifurcation diagrams are drawn,showing the results of control for secondary Hopf bifurcation and sequences of bifurcations route to chaos.Numerical simulations of quasi-periodic tori validate analytic predictions.

  12. Existence of Sign-changing Solution for Three-point Boundary Value Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chun-yan; SU Ya-juan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,by using the fixed-point index theory,we study the existence of sign-changing solution of some three-point boundary value problems {y″(t) + f(y) =0, t ∈ [0,1],y′(0) =0, y( 1 ) =αy(η),where 0 < a < 1,0 < η < 1,f:R → R is continuous,strictly increasing and f(0) =0.

  13. Changes of autonomic nervous system function in healthy young men during initial phase at acute high-altitude exposure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Jun; Huang Lan; Tian Kaixin; Yu Shiyong; Yu Yang; Long Min

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes of autonomic nervous system (ANS) function during the initial phase at acute high-altitude exposure. Methods: Ninety-nine healthy sea-level male residents were studied in Chengdu plain and then Tibet plateau. Heart rate variability (HRV), cold pressor test (CPT), resting heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were measured at baseline (560 m altitude) and in 2 to 4 d after arriving at Tibet plateau (3 675 m altitude) to assess the ANS function. Results: Compared with baseline, on day 2 in Tibet the standard deviation of normal to normal intervals (SDNN), high-frequency (HF) power, total power (TP), root mean square of delta RR (rMSSD), percentage of delta RR>50 ms (PNN50), normalized high-frequency (Hfnu) and fractal dimension (FD) decreased significantly (SDNN, HF,TP P<0.01, rMSSD, PNNs0, Hfnu, FD P<0.05), while the normalized low-frequency (Lfnu) and LF/HF increased significantly (P<0.01). During day 3-4 in Tibet, SDNN, rMSSD, HF, TP and Hfnu tended to rebound while Lfnu and LF/HF decreased towards baseline day by day. In addition, in Tibet the increase in systolic pressure (SP) and diastolic pressure (DP) during CPT decreased significantly (P<0.01, 0.05), but resting HR increased compared with baseline (P<0.01). Conclusion: ANS modulation is generally blunted, and the relatively predominant sympathetic control is enhanced originally, then it reverts to the sea level states gradually during the initial days of acute high-altitude exposure.

  14. Conserved DNA methylation patterns in healthy blood cells and extensive changes in leukemia measured by a new quantitative technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinek, Jaroslav; Liang, Shoudan; Lu, Yue; He, Rong; Ramagli, Louis S; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Estecio, Marcos R H; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2012-12-01

    Genome wide analysis of DNA methylation provides important information in a variety of diseases, including cancer. Here, we describe a simple method, Digital Restriction Enzyme Analysis of Methylation (DREAM), based on next generation sequencing analysis of methylation-specific signatures created by sequential digestion of genomic DNA with SmaI and XmaI enzymes. DREAM provides information on 150,000 unique CpG sites, of which 39,000 are in CpG islands and 30,000 are at transcription start sites of 13,000 RefSeq genes. We analyzed DNA methylation in healthy white blood cells and found methylation patterns to be remarkably uniform. Inter individual differences > 30% were observed only at 227 of 28,331 (0.8%) of autosomal CpG sites. Similarly, > 30% differences were observed at only 59 sites when we comparing the cord and adult blood. These conserved methylation patterns contrasted with extensive changes affecting 18-40% of CpG sites in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia and in two leukemia cell lines. The method is cost effective, quantitative (r ( 2) = 0.93 when compared with bisulfite pyrosequencing) and reproducible (r ( 2) = 0.997). Using 100-fold coverage, DREAM can detect differences in methylation greater than 10% or 30% with a false positive rate below 0.05 or 0.001, respectively. DREAM can be useful in quantifying epigenetic effects of environment and nutrition, correlating developmental epigenetic variation with phenotypes, understanding epigenetics of cancer and chronic diseases, measuring the effects of drugs on DNA methylation or deriving new biological insights into mammalian genomes.

  15. The Effectiveness of Healthy Behavior Training Program in Changing Attitude of Students towards Substance Abuse and Reduction of Addiction Vulnerability Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsar Khalili S

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was developing the healthy behavior to change the attitude of students in order to decrease their tendency towards substance abuse and Reduction of Addiction Vulnerability Level. Method: This research was carried out by two methods of descriptive-analytic and quasi experimental design. First, 60 students of Shahid Beheshti University were selected randomly (of 2000 students from the University dormitory. Then, half of the students received the developing healthy behavior training program. The efficacy of this program was evaluated by the scales of “attitude towards substance abuse” and "addiction vulnerability". The data was analyzed by Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA. Results: The result showed significant difference attitude towards substance abuse total scores and addiction vulnerability subscales between experiential and control group. Conclusion: The result of this research indicated that healthy behavior training program develops the negative attitude towards substance abuse and Reduce the Addiction Vulnerability Level.

  16. a Solution to Low Rfm Fitting Precision of Planetary Orbiter Images Caused by Exposure Time Changing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, B.; Xu, B.; Di, K.; Jia, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a new solution to the low RFM fitting precision caused by exposure time changing using sensor correction. First, we establish a new rigorous geometric model, with the same ephemerides, attitudes and sensor design parameters of Chang'E-2 and HRSC images, using an equal exposure time of each scan line. The original rigorous geometric model is also established. With a given height, we can establish the correspondence between the two rigorous models. Then we generate a sensor corrected image by resampling the original image using an average elevation or a digital elevation model. We found that the sensor corrected images can be used for topographic mapping which maintains almost the same precision of the original images under certain conditions. And RFM can fit rigorous geometric model of the sensor corrected image very well. Preliminary experimental results show that the RMS residual error of the RFM fitting can reach to 1/100 pixel level too. Using the proposed solution, sensors with changing exposure time can be precisely modelled by the generic RFM.

  17. The numerical solution of thawing process in phase change slab using variable space grid technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serttikul, C.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the numerical analysis of melting process in phase change material which considers the moving boundary as the main parameter. In this study, pure ice slab and saturated porous packed bed are considered as the phase change material. The formulation of partial differential equations is performed consisting heat conduction equations in each phase and moving boundary equation (Stefan equation. The variable space grid method is then applied to these equations. The transient heat conduction equations and the Stefan condition are solved by using the finite difference method. A one-dimensional melting model is then validated against the available analytical solution. The effect of constant temperature heat source on melting rate and location of melting front at various times is studied in detail.It is found that the nonlinearity of melting rate occurs for a short time. The successful comparison with numerical solution and analytical solution should give confidence in the proposed mathematical treatment, and encourage the acceptance of this method as useful tool for exploring practical problems such as forming materials process, ice melting process, food preservation process and tissue preservation process.

  18. The influence of gender and self-efficacy on healthy eating in a low-income urban population affected by structural changes to the food environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Brenda; Smith, Lisa V; Ponce, Mirna; Piron, Jennifer; Kuo, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Although U.S. obesity prevention efforts have begun to implement a variety of system and environmental change strategies to address the underlying socioecological barriers to healthy eating, factors which can impede or facilitate community acceptance of such interventions are often poorly understood. This is due, in part, to the paucity of subpopulation health data that are available to help guide local planning and decision-making. We contribute to this gap in practice by examining area-specific health data for a population targeted by federally funded nutrition interventions in Los Angeles County. Using data from a local health assessment that collected information on sociodemographics, self-reported health behaviors, and objectively measured height, weight, and blood pressure for a subset of low-income adults (n = 720), we compared health risks and predictors of healthy eating across at-risk groups using multivariable modeling analyses. Our main findings indicate being a woman and having high self-efficacy in reading Nutrition Facts labels were strong predictors of healthy eating (P healthy eating through public education and/or by other means can help prime at-risk groups to accept and take advantage of these food environment changes.

  19. Dietary Interventions and Changes in Cardio-Metabolic Parameters in Metabolically Healthy Obese Subjects: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Stelmach-Mardas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this systematic review was to assess the effect of diet on changes in parameters describing the body size phenotype of metabolically healthy obese subjects. The databases Medline, Scopus, Web of Knowledge and Embase were searched for clinical studies carried out between 1958 and June 2016 that reported the effect of dietary intervention on BMI, blood pressure, concentration of fasting triglyceride (TG, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, fasting glucose level, the homoeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and high sensitivity C-Reactive Protein (hsCRP in metabolically healthy, obese subjects. Twelve clinical studies met inclusion criteria. The combined analyzed population consists of 1827 subjects aged 34.4 to 61.1 with a BMI > 30 kg/m2. Time of intervention ranged from eight to 104 weeks. The baseline characteristics related to lipid profile were more favorable for metabolically healthy obese than for metabolically unhealthy obese. The meta-analyses revealed a significant associations between restricted energy diet and BMI (95% confidence interval (CI: −0.88, −0.19, blood pressure (systolic blood pressure (SBP: −4.73 mmHg; 95% CI: −7.12, −2.33; and diastolic blood pressure (DBP: −2.75 mmHg; 95% CI: −4.30, −1.21 and TG (−0.11 mmol/l; 95% CI: −0.16, −0.06. Changes in fasting glucose, HOMA-IR and hsCRP did not show significant changes. Sufficient evidence was not found to support the use of specific diets in metabolically healthy obese subjects. This analysis suggests that the effect of caloric restriction exerts its effects through a reduction in BMI, blood pressure and triglycerides in metabolically healthy obese (MHO patients.

  20. Activity and Structure Changes of Arginine Kinase from Shrimp Feneropenaeus chinensis Muscle in Trifluoroethanol Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于振行; 高丹; 潘继承; 陆捷; 周海梦

    2003-01-01

    Trifluoroethanol has often been used in protein folding studies.The changes in activity and unfolding of arginine kinase from shrimp Feneropenaeus chinensis muscle during denaturation in different concentrations of trifuoroethanol were investigated using far-ultraviolet circular dichroism and fluorescence emission spectra.Arginine kinase was inactivated in trifluoroethanol solutions.The tertiary and secondary structures of arginine kinase were also destroyed in the trifluoroethanol solutions.The unfolding and inactivation courses were measured and compared.Inactivation occurred prior to unfolding, which suggests that the arginine kinase active site is more easily damaged by the denaturant than the enzyme as a whole.The result also indicates that the arginine kinase active site is situated in a limited and flexible region of the enzyme molecule.

  1. Healthy Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Wellness Policy Opportunities to create and support a healthy school environment. More Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child A collaborative approach to learning and health Healthy Schools School Nutrition Environment Childhood Nutrition Facts Energy Drinks Obesity Prevention Youth ...

  2. The Association between Baseline Subjective Anxiety Rating and Changes in Cardiac Autonomic Nervous Activity in Response to Tryptophan Depletion in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Chih Yin; Tsai, Hsin Chun; Chi, Mei Hung; Chen, Kao Chin; Chen, Po See; Lee, I Hui; Yeh, Tzung Lieh; Yang, Yen Kuang

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of serotonin on anxiety and autonomic nervous system (ANS) function; the correlation between subjective anxiety rating and changes of ANS function following tryptophan depletion (TD) in healthy volunteers was examined. Twenty-eight healthy participants, consisting of 15 females and 13 males, with an average age of 33.3 years, were recruited.Baseline Chinese Symptom Checklist-90-Revised and ANS function measurements were taken. TD was carried out on the testing day, and participants provided blood samples right before and 5 hours after TD. ANS function, somatic symptoms, and Visual Analogue Scales (VASs) were determined after TD. Wilcoxon signed rank test and Spearman ρ correlation were adapted for analyses of the results.The TD procedure reduced total and free plasma tryptophan effectively. After TD, the sympathetic nervous activity increased and parasympathetic nervous activity decreased. Baseline anxiety ratings positively correlated with post-TD changes in sympathetic nervous activity, VAS ratings, and physical symptoms. However, a negative correlation with post-TD changes in parasympathetic nervous activity was found.The change in ANS function after TD was associated with the severity of anxiety in healthy volunteers. This supports the fact that the effect of anxiety on heart rate variability is related to serotonin vulnerability. Furthermore, it also shows that the subjective anxiety rating has a biological basis related to serotonin.

  3. Polar organic solvent added to an aqueous solution changes hydrolytic property of lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, Wakako; Ue, Akemi; Nagao, Akihiko

    2003-08-01

    For developing further uses of lipase as a biocatalyst, its hydrolytic activity toward some esters was investigated in a miscible solution composed of a buffer and a polar organic solvent. Twenty percent dimethylformamide, 35% dimethylsulfoxide, 15% 1,4-dioxane, 15% dimethoxyethane, and 2% diethoxyethane promoted the hydrolysis by a lipase from Rhizomucor miehei toward some hydrophobic substrates, 4-methylumbelliferyl oleate, 4-methylumbelliferyl palmitate, and monoolein. While hydrolysis by this lipase toward the substrates with a relatively weak hydrophobicity (4-metylumbelliferyl heptanoate and 4-methylumbelliferyl nanoate) was suppressed by these solvents. A fluorometric analysis showed that the polar organic solvent in the buffer induced some conformational change around a tryptophan residue of R. miehei lipase. In addition to the influence of the miscible solvent on the solubility of the substrates, the conformational change of the protein induced by the miscible solvent would also affect the reactive properties of the lipase. Adding a polar organic solvent to an aqueous solution will be an efficient method for changing hydrolytic performance of lipases.

  4. Meal-induced changes in splanchnic blood flow and oxygen uptake in middle-aged healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan L; Søndergaard, Susanne B; Møller, Søren

    2006-01-01

    healthy men (52-76 years). Splanchnic blood flow was measured during hepatic vein catheterization by indirect Fick principle with indocyanine green as the indicator. Splanchnic oxygen uptake was calculated from splanchnic blood flow and the arteriovenous oxygen difference. RESULTS: The meal induced...

  5. Solutions for ecosystem-level protection of ocean systems under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queirós, Ana M; Huebert, Klaus B; Keyl, Friedemann; Fernandes, Jose A; Stolte, Willem; Maar, Marie; Kay, Susan; Jones, Miranda C; Hamon, Katell G; Hendriksen, Gerrit; Vermard, Youen; Marchal, Paul; Teal, Lorna R; Somerfield, Paul J; Austen, Melanie C; Barange, Manuel; Sell, Anne F; Allen, Icarus; Peck, Myron A

    2016-12-01

    The Paris Conference of Parties (COP21) agreement renewed momentum for action against climate change, creating the space for solutions for conservation of the ocean addressing two of its largest threats: climate change and ocean acidification (CCOA). Recent arguments that ocean policies disregard a mature conservation research field and that protected areas cannot address climate change may be oversimplistic at this time when dynamic solutions for the management of changing oceans are needed. We propose a novel approach, based on spatial meta-analysis of climate impact models, to improve the positioning of marine protected areas to limit CCOA impacts. We do this by estimating the vulnerability of ocean ecosystems to CCOA in a spatially explicit manner and then co-mapping human activities such as the placement of renewable energy developments and the distribution of marine protected areas. We test this approach in the NE Atlantic considering also how CCOA impacts the base of the food web which supports protected species, an aspect often neglected in conservation studies. We found that, in this case, current regional conservation plans protect areas with low ecosystem-level vulnerability to CCOA, but disregard how species may redistribute to new, suitable and productive habitats. Under current plans, these areas remain open to commercial extraction and other uses. Here, and worldwide, ocean conservation strategies under CCOA must recognize the long-term importance of these habitat refuges, and studies such as this one are needed to identify them. Protecting these areas creates adaptive, climate-ready and ecosystem-level policy options for conservation, suitable for changing oceans.

  6. Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy: a tool to identify gross chemical changes from healthy to yellow band disease tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Mayamarú; López, Maria Antonieta; Estéves, Ivan; Zubillaga, Ainhoa L; Cróquer, Aldo

    2014-01-16

    Yellow band disease (YBD) is a common and wide-spread Caribbean syndrome that affects the genus Orbicella, a group of species that constitute the framework of Caribbean coral reefs. Previous studies have shown that the structure and function of bacterial assemblages vary between healthy tissues and YBD lesions; however, how the molecular composition of tissues varies as tissues transition from healthy to YBD has not been determined before. The present study provides the first survey of macromolecules found from healthy (H), apparently healthy (AH), transition (TR) and YBD tissues of Orbicella faveolata. For this, we used Fourier-transformed mid-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to compare absorption profiles as a proxy for the gross molecular composition of decalcified H, AH and YBD tissues. We found a significantly higher level of infrared absorption for bands assigned to lipids in H tissues compared to YBD tissues, suggesting that lipid compounds are more abundant in compromised tissues in relation to other macromolecules. We also found a lower level of intensity of bands assigned to carbohydrates and proteins in YBD tissues, compared to H and AH tissues. A similar pattern was observed for phospholipidic compounds in relation to fatty acids. This study is the first to show that healthy and YBD-compromised tissues have different infrared absorption profiles, suggesting that alterations in the biochemical composition occur during pathogenesis. Future studies should focus on determining the actual concentration of these compounds in H, AH, TR and YBD tissues and on testing the role of translocation of photoassimilates from H tissues and/or from endolithic algae to YBD tissues.

  7. Land system change and food security: towards multi-scale land system solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verburg, Peter H; Mertz, Ole; Erb, Karl-Heinz; Haberl, Helmut; Wu, Wenbin

    2013-10-01

    Land system changes are central to the food security challenge. Land system science can contribute to sustainable solutions by an integrated analysis of land availability and the assessment of the tradeoffs associated with agricultural expansion and land use intensification. A land system perspective requires local studies of production systems to be contextualised in a regional and global context, while global assessments should be confronted with local realities. Understanding of land governance structures will help to support the development of land use policies and tenure systems that assist in designing more sustainable ways of intensification. Novel land systems should be designed that are adapted to the local context and framed within the global socio-ecological system. Such land systems should explicitly account for the role of land governance as a primary driver of land system change and food production.

  8. Changes in body composition and cardiovascular risk indicators in healthy Spanish adolescents after lamb- (Ternasco de Aragón or chicken-based diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Isabel Mesana Graffe

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the effect of lamb consumption (Protected Geographical Indication (PGI, Ternasco de Aragón on health indicators including body composition and cardiovascular risk indicators of healthy young Spanish students living in the area of Aragón, Spain. Methodology: A randomized-controlled and cross-over trial (two periods of 8 weeks duration assessing changes on body composition (body mass index and skinfold thicknesses and cardiovascular risk indicators of 50 participants randomly assigned to follow a normocaloric diet with lamb (Ternasco de Aragón or chicken. Body composition and serum cardiovascular risk profiles were measured both at baseline and follow-up. Results: Healthy men (n = 22 and women (n = 28, aged 19.43 ± 0.85 years were studied. Suprailiac skinfold thickness and waist circumference significantly decreased (p < 0.05 in the lamb-consumption group compared to the chicken based diet group. No significant changes were observed in the rest of the variables in either group. Tryacilglicerol and insulin serum concentrations significantly decreased (p < 0.05 in the lamb-consumption group compared to the chicken based diet group. Conclusions: The results suggest that regular consumption of lamb (Ternasco de Aragón can be integrated into a healthy, varied and well-balanced diet, as body composition and cardiovascular risk profile changes are similar or even healthier to those observed following chicken consumption.

  9. Effect of Nutrition Changes on Foods Selected by Students in a Middle School-based Diabetes Prevention Intervention Program; the HEALTHY Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Connie C.; Stadler, Diane D.; Staten, Myrlene A; ghormli, Laure El; Gillis, Bonnie; Hartstein, Jill; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Virus, Amy

    2011-01-01

    BACKGOUND The HEALTHY primary prevention trial developed an integrated multi-component intervention program to moderate risk factors for type 2 diabetes in middle schools. The nutrition component aimed to improve the quality of foods and beverages served to students. Changes in the School Breakfast Program (SBP), National School Lunch Program (NSLP), and a la carte venues are compared to the experience of control schools. METHODS The intervention was implemented in 21 middle schools from winter 2007 through spring 2009 (following a cohort of students from sixth through eighth grades); 21 schools acted as observed controls. The nutrition component targeted school food service environmental change. Data identifying foods and nutrients served (selected by students for consumption) were collected over a 20-day period at baseline and end of study. Analysis compared end of study values for intervention versus control schools. RESULTS Intervention schools more successfully limited dessert and snack food portion size in NSLP and a la carte and lowered fat content of foods served. Servings of high fiber grain-based foods and/or legumes were improved in SBP but not NSLP. Intervention and control schools eliminated >1% fat milk and sugar added beverages in SBP, but intervention schools were more successful in NSLP and a la carte. CONCLUSION The HEALTHY program demonstrated significant changes in the nutritional quality of foods and beverages served in the SBP, NSLP, and a la carte venues, as part of an effort to decrease childhood obesity and support beneficial effects in some secondary HEALTHY study outcomes. PMID:22239133

  10. Dynamic changes of the respiratory microbiota and its relationship to fecal and blood microbiota in healthy young cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vientós-Plotts, Aida I; Ericsson, Aaron C; Rindt, Hansjorg; Grobman, Megan E; Graham, Amber; Bishop, Kaitlin; Cohn, Leah A; Reinero, Carol R

    2017-01-01

    Advances in the field of metagenomics using culture-independent methods of microbial identification have allowed characterization of rich and diverse communities of bacteria in the lungs of healthy humans, mice, dogs, sheep and pigs. These data challenge the long held belief that the lungs are sterile and microbial colonization is synonymous with pathology. Studies in humans and animals demonstrate differences in the composition of airway microbiota in health versus disease suggesting respiratory dysbiosis occurs. Using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of DNA extracted from rectal and oropharyngeal (OP) swabs, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and blood, our objective was to characterize the fecal, OP, blood, and lower airway microbiota over time in healthy cats. This work in healthy cats, a species in which a respiratory microbiota has not yet been characterized, sets the stage for future studies in feline asthma in which cats serve as a comparative and translational model for humans. Fecal, OP and BALF samples were collected from six healthy research cats at day 0, week 2, and week 10; blood was collected at week 10. DNA was extracted, amplified via PCR, and sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq platform. Representative operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified and microbial richness and diversity were assessed. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to visualize relatedness of samples and PERMANOVA was used to test for significant differences in microbial community composition. Fecal and OP swabs provided abundant DNA yielding a mean±SEM of 65,653±6,145 and 20,6323±4,360 sequences per sample, respectively while BALF and blood samples had lower coverage (1,489±430 and 269±18 sequences per sample, respectively). Oropharyngeal and fecal swabs were significantly richer than BALF (mean number OTUs 93, 88 and 36, respectively; p airways. In comparison, blood had an apparent compositional similarity with BALF with regard to a few dominant taxa, but

  11. Dynamic changes of the respiratory microbiota and its relationship to fecal and blood microbiota in healthy young cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindt, Hansjorg; Grobman, Megan E.; Graham, Amber; Bishop, Kaitlin; Cohn, Leah A.; Reinero, Carol R.

    2017-01-01

    Advances in the field of metagenomics using culture-independent methods of microbial identification have allowed characterization of rich and diverse communities of bacteria in the lungs of healthy humans, mice, dogs, sheep and pigs. These data challenge the long held belief that the lungs are sterile and microbial colonization is synonymous with pathology. Studies in humans and animals demonstrate differences in the composition of airway microbiota in health versus disease suggesting respiratory dysbiosis occurs. Using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of DNA extracted from rectal and oropharyngeal (OP) swabs, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and blood, our objective was to characterize the fecal, OP, blood, and lower airway microbiota over time in healthy cats. This work in healthy cats, a species in which a respiratory microbiota has not yet been characterized, sets the stage for future studies in feline asthma in which cats serve as a comparative and translational model for humans. Fecal, OP and BALF samples were collected from six healthy research cats at day 0, week 2, and week 10; blood was collected at week 10. DNA was extracted, amplified via PCR, and sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq platform. Representative operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified and microbial richness and diversity were assessed. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to visualize relatedness of samples and PERMANOVA was used to test for significant differences in microbial community composition. Fecal and OP swabs provided abundant DNA yielding a mean±SEM of 65,653±6,145 and 20,6323±4,360 sequences per sample, respectively while BALF and blood samples had lower coverage (1,489±430 and 269±18 sequences per sample, respectively). Oropharyngeal and fecal swabs were significantly richer than BALF (mean number OTUs 93, 88 and 36, respectively; p cats have a rich and distinct lower airway microbiome with dynamic bacterial populations. The microbiome is likely to be

  12. Global Change and Helminth Infections in Grazing Ruminants in Europe: Impacts, Trends and Sustainable Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubertus Hertzberg

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Infections with parasitic helminths (nematodes and trematodes represent a significant economic and welfare burden to the global ruminant livestock industry. The increasing prevalence of anthelmintic resistance means that current control programmes are costly and unsustainable in the long term. Recent changes in the epidemiology, seasonality and geographic distribution of helminth infections have been attributed to climate change. However, other changes in environment (e.g., land use and in livestock farming, such as intensification and altered management practices, will also have an impact on helminth infections. Sustainable control of helminth infections in a changing world requires detailed knowledge of these interactions. In particular, there is a need to devise new, sustainable strategies for the effective control of ruminant helminthoses in the face of global change. In this paper, we consider the impact of helminth infections in grazing ruminants, taking a European perspective, and identify scientific and applied priorities to mitigate these impacts. These include the development and deployment of efficient, high-throughput diagnostic tests to support targeted intervention, modelling of geographic and seasonal trends in infection, more thorough economic data and analysis of the impact of helminth infections and greater translation and involvement of end-users in devising and disseminating best practices. Complex changes in helminth epidemiology will require innovative solutions. By developing and using new technologies and models, the use of anthelmintics can be optimised to limit the development and spread of drug resistance and to reduce the overall economic impact of helminth infections. This will be essential to the continued productivity and profitability of livestock farming in Europe and its contribution to regional and global food security.

  13. Multiple positive solutions for quasilinear elliptic equations of p(x-Laplacian type with sign-changing nonlinearity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ky Ho

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We establish sufficient conditions for the existence of multiple positive solutions to nonautonomous quasilinear elliptic equations with p(x-Laplacian and sign-changing nonlinearity. For solving the Dirichlet boundary-value problem we use variational and topological methods. The nonexistence of positive solutions is also studied.

  14. Exact analytical solutions for a diffusion problem coupled with a precipitation-dissolution reaction and feedback of porosity change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayek, Mohamed; Kosakowski, Georg; Churakov, Sergey

    2011-07-01

    We present exact analytical solutions for a one-dimensional diffusion problem coupled with the precipitation-dissolution reaction ? and feedback of porosity change. The solutions are obtained in the form of traveling waves and describe spatial and temporal evolutions of solute concentration, porosity, and mineral distribution for a set of initial and boundary conditions. The form of the solutions limits the choice of admissible boundary conditions, which might be difficult to adapt in natural systems, and thus, the solutions are of limited use for such a system. The main application of the derived solutions is therefore the benchmarking of numerical reactive transport codes for systems with strong porosity change. To test the performance of numerical codes, numerical solutions obtained by using a global implicit finite volume technique are compared to the analytical solutions. Good agreement is obtained between the analytical solutions and the numerical solutions when a sufficient spatial discretization resolves the spatial concentration gradients at any time. In the limit of fast kinetics (local equilibrium), steep concentration fronts cannot be resolved in a numerical discretization schema.

  15. A MODEL TO ESTIMATE VOLUME CHANGE DUE TO RADIOLYTIC GAS BUBBLES AND THERMAL EXPANSION IN SOLUTION REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. SOUTO; A HEGER

    2001-02-01

    Aqueous homogeneous solution reactors have been proposed for the production of medical isotopes. However, the reactivity effects of fuel solution volume change, due to formation of radiolytic gas bubbles and thermal expansion, have to be mitigated to allow steady-state operation of solution reactors. The results of the free run experiments analyzed indicate that the proposed model to estimate the void volume due to radiolytic gas bubbles and thermal expansion in solution reactors can accurately describe the observed behavior during the experiments. This void volume due to radiolytic gas bubbles and fuel solution thermal expansion can then be used in the investigation of reactivity effects in fissile solutions. In addition, these experiments confirm that the radiolytic gas bubbles are formed at a higher temperature than the fuel solution temperature. These experiments also indicate that the mole-weighted average for the radiolytic gas bubbles in uranyl fluoride solutions is about 1 {micro}m. Finally, it should be noted that another model, currently under development, would simulate the power behavior during the transient given the initial fuel solution level and density. The model is based on Monte Carlo simulation with the MCNP computer code [Briesmeister, 1997] to obtain the reactor reactivity as a function of the fuel solution density, which, in turn, changes due to thermal expansion and radiolytic gas bubble formation.

  16. Changes occurring in compositions and antioxidant properties of healthy soybean seeds [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] and soybean seeds diseased by Phomopsis longicolla and Cercospora kikuchii fungal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Hwan; Hwang, Seung-Ryul; Lee, Yeon-Hee; Kim, Kyun; Cho, Kye Man; Lee, Yong Bok

    2015-10-15

    Changes in the compositions (isoflavone, protein, oil, and fatty acid) and antioxidant properties were evaluated in healthy soybeans and soybeans diseased by Phomopsis longicolla and Cercospora kikuchii. The total isoflavone content (1491.3 μg/g) of healthy seeds was observed to be considerably different than that of diseased seeds (P. longicolla: 292.6, C. kikuchii: 727.2 μg/g), with malonlygenistin exhibiting the greatest decrease (726.1 → 57.1, 351.9 μg/g). Significantly, three isoflavones exhibited a slight increase, and their structures were confirmed as daidzein, glycitein, and genistein, based on their molecular ions at m/z 253.1, 283.0, and 269.1 using the negative mode of HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS. The remaining compositions showed slight variations. The effects against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) radicals in healthy seeds were stronger than the diseased soybeans, depending upon the isoflavone level. Our results may be useful in evaluating the relationship between composition and antioxidant activity as a result of changes caused by soybean fungal pathogens.

  17. Changes in insulin sensitivity precede changes in body composition during 14 days of step reduction combined with overfeeding in healthy young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Sine Haugaard; Hansen, Louise Seier; Pedersen, Maria

    2012-01-01

    A lifestyle characterized by inactivity and a high-calorie diet is a known risk factor for impaired insulin sensitivity and development of Type 2 diabetes mellitus. To investigate possible links, nine young healthy men (24 ± 3 yr; body mass index of 21.6 ± 2.5 kg/m(2)) completed 14 days of step...

  18. Tracing of γ-radiation-induced electrical conductivity and pH change of hexamethylenetetramine aqueous solutions and its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sife-Eldeen, Kh A

    2013-04-01

    The interest in studying γ-radiation effects on hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) is due to its importance in nuclear fuel technology. The current study indicates that γ-radiation induces electrical conductivity (RIC) and pH changes in HMTA aqueous solutions. The effects of HMTA concentration, absorbed radiation dose, absorbed dose rate and storage time on RIC and pH changes were studied. HMTA aqueous solutions could be considered as a promising γ-radiation dosimeter, in both technical and medical fields.

  19. Implementation and Change of Processual Administrative Legislation Through an Innovative Web 2.0 Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polona KOVAČ

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Various extensive public sector reforms have been carried out across the world with the clear aim of making the services concerned more efficient and responsive to the needs of their users, such as the citizens, political authorities, and administrative bodies covering other public administration fields. The ever advancing information technology has frequently been used to support such reforms. Over the last years, the public phenomenon of Web 2.0 has even attracted some attention within e-government because of its vast success in the general civic environment. The paper investigates the possibilities of implementing such a Web 2.0 solution for the case of application of legislation and management of changes made into it through the example of the Slovenian General Administrative Procedure Act – a law that is subsidiarily used by practically all administrative bodies and therefore has to be applied in different fields, coping with sectoral legislation more or less coherent with it. To present the potential, patterns and risks (such as the limited role of public administration in interpreting law of such activities of using Web 2.0, the paper employs theory research, actual cases from different segments of the public sector, and a real example of a solution currently in the beta stage of development – the so-called Administrative Consultation Wiki, a project run by the Slovenian Faculty of Administration and the Ministry of Public Administration of the Republic of Slovenia. The findings suggest a major potential of this kind of solutions, and point to the possibilities as well as warn of the risks involved.

  20. A model to estimate volume change due to radiolytic gas bubbles and thermal expansion in solution reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souto, F.J. [NIS-6: Advanced Nuclear Technology, Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Heger, A.S. [ESA-EA: Engineering Sciences and Application, Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2001-07-01

    To investigate the effects of radiolytic gas bubbles and thermal expansion on the steady-state operation of solution reactors at the power level required for the production of medical isotopes, a calculational model has been developed. To validate this model, including its principal hypotheses, specific experiments at the Los Alamos National Laboratory SHEBA uranyl fluoride solution reactor were conducted. The following sections describe radiolytic gas generation in solution reactors, the equations to estimate the fuel solution volume change due to radiolytic gas bubbles and thermal expansion, the experiments conducted at SHEBA, and the comparison of experimental results and model calculations. (author)

  1. Influence of technology of formation of skills of healthy lifestyle on changes of physical activity of students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Shchur

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to define influence of technology of formation of skills of healthy lifestyle on physical activity of students. Material & Methods: 90 students of the III course of the specialty "Fine and decorative and applied arts" of Lviv national academy of arts took part in the research. The following methods were used: theoretical analysis and synthesis of data of scientific and methodical literature, sociological methods (questioning, methods of mathematico-statistical data processing. Results: it is revealed that the optimization of process of formation of skills of healthy lifestyle is possible on condition of logical combination in the program of physical education of theoretical, methodical and practical components; it is found out that the content of the discipline "Physical education" in higher educational institutions of the art direction has to promote the formation of the corresponding skills which will promote the correct physical self-improvement of students. It is defined that students of the experimental group had positive shifts according to all characteristics which were studied. Conclusions: it is proved that the created technology of healthcare education is more effective, than traditional for students of the specialty "Fine and decorative and applied arts".

  2. Property Changes in Aqueous Solutions due to Surfactant Treatment of PCE: Implications to Geophysical Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werkema, D. D.

    2007-12-01

    Select physicochemical properties of aqueous solutions composed of surfactants, dye, and perchloroethylene (PCE) were evaluated through a response surface quadratic design model of experiment. Nine surfactants, which are conventionally used in the remediation of PCE, were evaluated with varying concentrations of PCE and indicator dyes in aqueous solutions. Two hundred forty experiments were performed using PCE as a numerical factor (coded A) from 0 to 200 parts per million (ppm), dye type (coded B) as a 3-level categorical factor, and surfactant type (coded C) as a 10-level categorical factor. Five responses were measured: temperature (°C), pH, conductivity (μS/cm), dissolved oxygen (DO, mg/L), and density (g/mL). Diagnostics proved a normally distributed predictable response for all measured responses except pH. The Box-Cox plot for transforms recommended a power transform for the conductivity response with lambda (λ) = 0.50, and for the DO response, λ =2.2. The overall mean of the temperature response proved to be a better predictor than the linear model. The conductivity response is best fitted with a linear model using significant coded terms B and C. Both DO and density also showed a linear model with coded terms A, B, and C for DO; and terms A and C for density. Some of the surfactant treatments of PCE significantly alter the conductivity, DO, and density of the aqueous solution. However, the magnitude of the density response is so small that it does not exceed the instrument tolerance. Results for the conductivity and DO responses provide predictive models for the surfactant treatment of PCE and may be useful in determining the potential for geophysically monitoring surfactant enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) of PCE. As the aqueous physicochemical properties change due to surfactant remediation efforts, so will the properties of the subsurface pore water which are influential factors in geophysical measurements. Geoelectrical methods are potentially

  3. Changes in the color, chemical stability and antioxidant capacity of thermally treated anthocyanin aqueous solution over storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Xiaonan; Bary, Solène; Zhou, Weibiao

    2016-02-01

    Many anthocyanin-containing foods are thermally processed to ensure their safety, and stored for some time before being consumed. However, the combination of thermal processing and subsequent storage has a significant impact on anthocyanins. This study aimed to investigate the color, chemical stability, and antioxidant capacity of thermally treated anthocyanin aqueous solutions during storage at 4, 25, 45, and 65 °C, respectively. Anthocyanin aqueous solutions were thermally treated before storage. Results showed that the degradation rate of anthocyanins in aqueous solutions was much faster than those in real food. The color of the anthocyanin aqueous solutions changed dramatically during storage. The anthocyanin aqueous solutions stored at 4 °C showed the best chemical stability. Interestingly, the antioxidant capacity of the anthocyanin aqueous solutions stored at lower temperatures remained the same; however, the antioxidant capacity of those thermally treated at 120 or 140 °C and stored at 45 or 65 °C significantly decreased.

  4. Face to the climatic change: to opt for the best solutions; Face au changement climatique: opter pour les meilleures solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2009-03-15

    In the arsenal of potential actions to take in the face of climate change, some options are better than others. The most complete possible assessment of their health impact must guide decision-making. This procedure is complex but can lead to important health benefits. (author)

  5. Can sleep quality and wellbeing be improved by changing the indoor lighting in the homes of healthy, elderly citizens?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Birgit; Markvart, Jakob; Kessel, Line

    2015-01-01

    of each light epoch measured by diary. Sleep quality was assessed using Pittsburg sleep questionnaire index (PSQI). Circadian rhythm was measured by Morningness-Eveningness questionnaire (MEscore), chromatic pupillometry and melatonin sampling. Actiwatches were used to monitor light exposure and activity......The study investigated the effect of bright blue-enriched versus blue-deprived indoor light on sleep and wellbeing of healthy participants over 65 years. Twenty-nine participants in 20 private houses in a uniform settlement in Copenhagen were exposed over 3 weeks to blue-enriched (280 Lux) and 3...... weeks to blue-deprived (240 Lux) indoor light from 8 to 13 pm in a randomized cross-over design. The two light epochs were separated by one week neutral indoor light. Participants were examined at baseline and at the end of each light epoch. The primary endpoint was sleep duration during the last week...

  6. Cardiac MRI. Estimation of changes in normalized myocardial gadolinium accumulation over time after contrast injection in patients with acute myocarditis and healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuckmann, F.; Buhr, C. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Internal Medicine II; Maderwald, S. [Duisburg-Essen Univ. (Germany). Erwin L. Hahn Inst. for Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Bruder, O. [Elisabeth Hospital Essen (Germany). Dept. of Cardiology and Angiology; Schlosser, T.; Nassenstein, K. [University Hospital Essen (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology; Erbel, R. [University Hospital Essen (Germany). West German Heart Center Essen; Barkhausen, J. [University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein (Germany). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine

    2011-10-15

    An increased normalized gadolinium accumulation (NGA) in the myocardium during early washout has been used for the diagnosis of acute myocarditis (AM). Due to the fact that the pharmacokinetics of contrast agents are complex, time-related changes in NGA after contrast injection are likely. Because knowledge about time-related changes of NGA may improve the diagnostic accuracy of MR, our study aimed to estimate the time course of NGA after contrast injection in patients as well as in healthy volunteers. An ECG-triggered inversion recovery SSFP sequence with incrementally increasing inversion times was repetitively acquired over the 15 minutes after injection of 0.2 Gd-DTPA per kg body weight in a 4-chamber view in 15 patients with AM and 20 volunteers. The T 1relaxation times and the longitudinal relaxation rates (R1) of the myocardium and skeletal musculature were calculated for each point in time after contrast injection. The time course of NGA was estimated based on the linear relationship between R 1 and tissue Gd concentration. NGA decreased over time in the form of a negative power function in patients with AM and in healthy controls. NGA in AM tended to be higher than in controls (p > 0.05). NGA rapidly changes after contrast injection, which must be considered when measuring NGA. Although we observed a trend towards higher NGA values in patients with AM with a maximum difference one minute after contrast injection, NGA did not allow us to differentiate patients with AM from healthy volunteers, because the observed differences did not reach a level of significance. (orig.)

  7. Putting Children’s Sleep Problems to Bed: Using Behavior Change Theory to Increase the Success of Children’s Sleep Education Programs and Contribute to Healthy Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Blunden

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is critical for the healthy development of children, yet most children simply don’t get enough. Whilst school based sleep education programs have been developed for parents and their children, they have had mixed success. We consider how existing school-based sleep education programs can be improved by applying a broader model to behaviour change theory. We find that the mixed success of school-based sleep education programs may be due to a plausible but misleading assumption that simply increasing information about the importance of sleep and the risks of insufficient and/or inefficient sleep, will necessarily result in improved sleep behaviours. We identify the potential benefits of using a more inclusive behavior change theory in the development of sleep education programs with a particular need for theories that incorporate the multiple biological, environmental and social impacts on children’s sleep. Bronfenbrenner’s Bioecological model is presented to illustrate how one such inclusive behavior change theory could significantly improve the success of sleep education programs and ultimately support the healthy development of children.

  8. A Metabolic–Epidemiological Microsimulation Model to Estimate the Changes in Energy Intake and Physical Activity Necessary to Meet the Healthy People 2020 Obesity Objective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Hilary; Winkleby, Marilyn

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We combined a metabolic and an epidemiological model of obesity to estimate changes in calorie intake and physical activity necessary to achieve the Healthy People 2020 objective of reducing adult obesity prevalence from 33.9% to 30.5%. Methods. We used the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999–2010) to construct and validate a microsimulation model of the US population aged 10 years and older, for 2010 to 2020. Results. Obesity prevalence is expected to shift toward older adults, and disparities are expected to widen between White, higher-income groups and minority, lower-income groups if recent calorie consumption and expenditure trends continue into the future. Although a less than 10% reduction in daily calorie intake or increase in physical activity would in theory achieve the Healthy People 2020 objective, no single population-level intervention is likely to achieve the target alone, and individual weight-loss attempts are even more unlikely to achieve the target. Conclusions. Changes in calorie intake and physical activity portend rising inequalities in obesity prevalence. These changes require multiple simultaneous population interventions. PMID:24832140

  9. Putting Children’s Sleep Problems to Bed: Using Behavior Change Theory to Increase the Success of Children’s Sleep Education Programs and Contribute to Healthy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunden, Sarah; Benveniste, Tessa; Thompson, Kirrilly

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is critical for the healthy development of children, yet most children simply don’t get enough. Whilst school based sleep education programs have been developed for parents and their children, they have had mixed success. We consider how existing school-based sleep education programs can be improved by applying a broader model to behaviour change theory. We find that the mixed success of school-based sleep education programs may be due to a plausible but misleading assumption that simply increasing information about the importance of sleep and the risks of insufficient and/or inefficient sleep, will necessarily result in improved sleep behaviours. We identify the potential benefits of using a more inclusive behavior change theory in the development of sleep education programs with a particular need for theories that incorporate the multiple biological, environmental and social impacts on children’s sleep. Bronfenbrenner’s Bioecological model is presented to illustrate how one such inclusive behavior change theory could significantly improve the success of sleep education programs and ultimately support the healthy development of children. PMID:27417249

  10. Addressing Student Misconceptions Concerning Electron Flow in Aqueous Solutions with Instruction Including Computer Animations and Conceptual Change Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanger, Michael J.; Greenbowe, Thomas J.

    2000-01-01

    Investigates the effects of both computer animations of microscopic chemical processes occurring in a galvanic cell and conceptual-change instruction based on chemical demonstrations on students' conceptions of current flow in electrolyte solutions. Finds that conceptual change instruction was effective at dispelling student misconceptions but…

  11. Action plan for healthy agriculture, healthy nutrition, healthy people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artemis P. Simopoulos

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In October 2010, the World Council on Genetics, Nutrition and Fitness for Health promoted a scientific meeting in Ancient Olympia, Greece, on the theme Healthy Agriculture, Healthy Nutrition, Healthy People. The meeting focused on evolutionary aspects of human diet through the life cycle in terms of genetic predisposition, overall health, prevention of disease and of unhealthy behaviors, such as poor physical activity, and dietary changes caused by the introduction of modern agriculture, from the Agribusiness to systems of food production, from climate changes to the needs imposed by urban agriculture and architecture. Nutritional medical (mostly cardiological and political aspects of disease prevention through healthy dietary habits and physical activity have always been seen in isolation. The meeting, the first of its kind, treated such aspects together, recognizing the importance of integrating and initiating a dialogue between these disciplines. The meeting gathered together experts in cardiovascular prevention, nutrition, as well as politicians, for a global discussion of these themes. A summary statement was then compiled, focusing on the main themes on which a consensus had been reached. I strongly believe that such themes have great relevance for public health, raising the need for disseminating them as widely as possible. I am thankful to the Editor of the Italian Journal of Medicine for allowing this summary document to be made available for the first time in Italy.Raffaele De Caterina

  12. Healthy Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... los Ojos Cómo hablarle a su oculista Healthy Eyes Having a comprehensive dilated eye exam is one ... or contact lenses. What is a comprehensive dilated eye exam? A comprehensive dilated eye exam is a ...

  13. Age- and Sex-Associated Changes in Cerebral Glucose Metabolism in Normal Healthy Subjects: Statistical Parametric Mapping Analysis of F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose Brain Positron Emission Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In-Ju; Kim, Seong-Jang; Kim, Yong-Ki (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Pusan National Univ. Hospital, Busan (Korea); Medical Research Institute, Pusan National Univ., Busan (Korea)). e-mail: growthkim@daum.net/growthkim@pusan.ac.kr)

    2009-12-15

    Background: The age- and sex-associated changes of brain development are unclear and controversial. Several previous studies showed conflicting results of a specific pattern of cerebral glucose metabolism or no differences of cerebral glucose metabolism in association with normal aging process and sex. Purpose: To investigate the effects of age and sex on changes in cerebral glucose metabolism in healthy subjects using fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) brain positron emission tomography (PET) and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis. Material and Methods: Seventy-eight healthy subjects (32 males, mean age 46.6+-18.2 years; 46 females, mean age 40.6+-19.8 years) underwent F-18 FDG brain PET. Using SPM, age- and sex-associated changes in cerebral glucose metabolism were investigated. Results: In males, a negative correlation existed in several gray matter areas, including the right temporopolar (Brodmann area [BA] 38), right orbitofrontal (BA 47), left orbitofrontal gyrus (BA 10), left dorsolateral frontal gyrus (BA 8), and left insula (BA 13) areas. A positive relationship existed in the left claustrum and left thalamus. In females, negative changes existed in the left caudate body, left temporopolar area (BA 38), right orbitofrontal gyri (BA 47 and BA 10), and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 46). A positive association was demonstrated in the left subthalamic nucleus and the left superior frontal gyrus. In white matter, an age-associated decrease in FDG uptake in males was shown in the left insula, and increased FDG uptake was found in the left corpus callosum. The female group had an age-associated negative correlation of FDG uptake only in the right corpus callosum. Conclusion: Using SPM, we found not only similar areas of brain, but also sex-specific cerebral areas of age-associated changes of FDG uptake

  14. Significant grey matter changes in a region of the orbitofrontal cortex in healthy participants predicts emotional dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Predrag; Ekman, Carl Johan; Klahr, Johanna; Tigerström, Lars; Rydén, Göran; Johansson, Anette G M; Sellgren, Carl; Golkar, Armita; Olsson, Andreas; Öhman, Arne; Ingvar, Martin; Landén, Mikael

    2016-07-01

    The traditional concept of 'categorical' psychiatric disorders has been challenged as many of the symptoms display a continuous distribution in the general population. We suggest that this is the case for emotional dysregulation, a key component in several categorical psychiatric disorder constructs. We used voxel-based magnetic resonance imaging morphometry in healthy human subjects (n = 87) to study how self-reported subclinical symptoms associated with emotional dysregulation relate to brain regions assumed to be critical for emotion regulation. To measure a pure emotional dysregulation, we also corrected for subclinical symptoms of non-emotional attentional dysregulation. We show that such subclinical emotional symptoms correlate negatively with the grey matter volume of lateral orbitofrontal cortex bilaterally-a region assumed to be critical for emotion regulation and dysfunctional in psychiatric disorders involving emotional dysregulation. Importantly, this effect is mediated both by a decrease in volume associated with emotional dysregulation and an increase in volume due to non-emotional attentional dysregulation. Exploratory analysis suggests that other regions involved in emotional processing such as insula and ventral striatum also show a similar reduction in grey matter volume mirroring clinical disorders associated with emotional dysregulation. Our findings support the concept of continuous properties in psychiatric symptomatology.

  15. POSITIVE SOLUTIONS TO A SINGULAR nTH ORDER THREE-POINT BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEM WITH SIGN CHANGING NONLINEARITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a singular nth order three-point boundary value problem with sign changing nonlinearity. By the method of lower solution and topology degree theorem, we investigate the existence of positive solutions to the above problem. Moreover, the associated Green’s function for the above problem is also given. The results of this paper are new and extend the previous known results.

  16. Gastric Mucosal Changes Caused by Lugol's Iodine Solution Spray: Endoscopic Features of 64 Cases on Screening Esophagogastroduodenoscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Daisuke Tsurumaru; Takashi Utsunomiya; Shuji Matsuura; Masahiro Komori; Satoshi Kawanami; Tatsuyuki Ishibashi; Hiroshi Honda

    2010-01-01

    Aim. To clarify the endoscopic mucosal change of the stomach caused by Lugol's iodine solution spray on screening esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). Methods. Sixty-four consecutive patients who underwent EGD for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma screening were included in this study. The records for these patients included gastric mucosa findings before and after Lugol's iodine solution was sprayed. The endoscopic findings of the greater curvature of the gastric body were retrospectively anal...

  17. The Challenge of Fostering Healthy Organizations: An Empirical Study on the Role of Workplace Relational Civility in Acceptance of Change and Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fabio, Annamaria; Giannini, Marco; Loscalzo, Yura; Palazzeschi, Letizia; Bucci, Ornella; Guazzini, Andrea; Gori, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    The world of work in the twenty-first century is characterized by globalization, instability, and unavoidable change. Organizations need to develop a positive relational environment in the workplace thereby enabling workers to enhance their personal resources in order to face with on-going changes in the sphere of work for promoting their well-being. Against this background, the aim of this research was to examine the relationship between workplace relational civility and both acceptance of change and well-being (hedonic well-being as well as eudaimonic well-being) beyond the effect of personality traits. The following instruments were administered to 261 Italian workers: the Ten Item Personality Inventory (TIPI), the Acceptance of Change Scale (ACS), the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS), and the Meaningful Life Measure (MLM). The results of hierarchical regression analyses revealed that workplace relational civility explained a percentage of incremental variance beyond personality traits in relation to acceptance of change, life satisfaction, and meaning in life. These results underscore the positive relationship between workplace relational civility and acceptance of change, hedonic well-being, and eudaimonic well-being, offering new research and intervention opportunities to meet the challenge of fostering healthy organizations. PMID:27917131

  18. Effects of a healthy Nordic diet on gene expression changes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to an oral glucose tolerance test in subjects with metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leder, Lena; Kolehmainen, Marjukka; Narverud, Ingunn;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diet has a great impact on the risk of developing features of metabolic syndrome (MetS), type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). We evaluated whether a long-term healthy Nordic diet (ND) can modify the expression of inflammation and lipid metabolism...... protocol. In this sub-study, we included subjects (n = 89) from three Nordic centers: Kuopio (n = 26), Lund (n = 30), and Oulu (n = 33) with a maximum weight change of ±4 kg, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration ≤10 mg L(-1), and baseline body mass index ..., and the mRNA gene expression analysis was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). We analyzed the mRNA expression changes of 44 genes before and after a 2hOGTT at the beginning and the end of the intervention. RESULTS: The healthy ND significantly down-regulated the expression...

  19. A longitudinal study of the relationship between personality traits and the annual rate of volume changes in regional gray matter in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taki, Yasuyuki; Thyreau, Benjamin; Kinomura, Shigeo; Sato, Kazunori; Goto, Ryoi; Wu, Kai; Kawashima, Ryuta; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    To investigate whether personality traits affect the rate of decline of gray matter volume, we analyzed the relationships between personality traits and the annual rate of changes of gray matter volume in 274 healthy community dwelling subjects with a large age range by applying a longitudinal design over 6 years, using brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) and the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R) at baseline. Brain MRI data were processed using voxel-based morphometry with a custom template by applying the DARTEL diffeomorphic registration tool. For each subject, we used NEO-PI-R to evaluate the five major personality traits, including neuroticism, extraversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness. The results show that the annual rate of change in regional gray matter volume in the right inferior parietal lobule was correlated significantly and negatively with a personality of openness, which is known to be related to intellect, intellectual curiosity, and creativity adjusting for age, gender, and intracranial volume. This result indicates that subjects with a personality trait of less openness have an accelerated loss of gray matter volume in the right inferior parietal lobule, compared with subjects with a personality trait of more openness. Because the right inferior parietal lobule is involved in higher cognitive function such as working memory and creativity, a personality trait of openness is thought to be important for preserving gray matter volume and cognitive function of the right inferior parietal lobule in healthy adults.

  20. Crosslinking with transglutaminase does not change metabolic effects of sodium caseinate in model beverage in healthy young individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juvonen Kristiina R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postprandial metabolic and appetitive responses of proteins are dependent on protein source and processing technique prior to ingestion. Studies on the postprandial effects of enzymatic crosslinking of milk proteins are sparse. Our aim was to study the effect of transglutaminase (TG-induced crosslinking of sodium caseinate on postprandial metabolic and appetite responses. Whey protein was included as reference protein. Methods Thirteen healthy individuals (23.3 ± 1.1 y, BMI 21.7 ± 0.4 kg/m2 participated in a single-blind crossover design experiment in which the subjects consumed three different isovolumic (500 g pourable beverages containing either sodium caseinate (Cas, 29 g, TG-treated sodium caseinate (Cas-TG, 29 g or whey protein (Wh, 30 g in a randomized order. Blood samples were collected at baseline and for 4 h postprandially for the determination of plasma glucose, insulin and amino acid (AA concentrations. Gastric emptying (GE was measured using the 13 C-breath test method. Appetite was assessed using visual analogue scales. Results All examined postprandial responses were comparable with Cas and Cas-TG. The protein type used in the beverages was reflected as differences in plasma AA concentrations between Wh and Cas, but there were no differences in plasma glucose or insulin responses. A tendency for faster GE rate after Wh was detected. Appetite ratings or subsequent energy intake did not differ among the protein beverages. Conclusions Our results indicate that the metabolic responses of enzymatically crosslinked and native sodium caseinate in a liquid matrix are comparable, suggesting similar digestion and absorption rates and first pass metabolism despite the structural modification of Cas-TG.

  1. Changes in Circulating ProAMH and Total AMH during Healthy Pregnancy and Post-Partum: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarek, Judith; Laskin, Carl A.

    2016-01-01

    Circulating Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) is derived from the gonads, and is a mixture of the prohormone (proAMH), which does not bind to AMH receptors, and receptor-competent AMH. The functions of a hormone are partially defined by the factors that control its levels. Ovarian reserve accounts for 55~75% of the woman-to-woman variation in AMH level, leaving over 25% of the biological variation to be explained. Pregnancy has been reported to decrease circulating AMH levels, but the observations are inconsistent, with the effect of pregnancy on the bioactivity of AMH being unknown. We have therefore undertaken a longitudinal study of circulating proAMH and total AMH during pregnancy. Serum samples were drawn at 6–8 gestational time-points (first trimester to post-partum) from 25 healthy women with prior uneventful pregnancies. The total AMH and proAMH levels were measured at each time-point using ELISA. The level of circulating total AMH progressively decreased during pregnancy, in all women (p<0.001). On average, the percentage decline between the first trimester and 36–39 weeks’ gestation was 61.5%, with a standard deviation of 13.0% (range 30.4–81.2%). The percentage decline in total AMH levels associated with maternal age (R = -0.53, p = 0.024), but not with the women’s first trimester AMH level. The postpartum total AMH levels showed no consistent relationship to the woman’s first trimester values (range 31–273%). This raises the possibility that a fundamental determinant of circulating AMH levels is reset during pregnancy. The ratio of proAMH to total AMH levels exhibited little or no variation during pregnancy, indicating that the control of the cleavage/activation of AMH is distinct from the mechanisms that control the total level of AMH. PMID:27612037

  2. Reproducibility of heart rate variability parameters measured in healthy subjects at rest and after a postural change maneuver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.M. Dantas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability (HRV provides important information about cardiac autonomic modulation. Since it is a noninvasive and inexpensive method, HRV has been used to evaluate several parameters of cardiovascular health. However, the internal reproducibility of this method has been challenged in some studies. Our aim was to determine the intra-individual reproducibility of HRV parameters in short-term recordings obtained in supine and orthostatic positions. Electrocardiographic (ECG recordings were obtained from 30 healthy subjects (20-49 years, 14 men using a digital apparatus (sampling ratio = 250 Hz. ECG was recorded for 10 min in the supine position and for 10 min in the orthostatic position. The procedure was repeated 2-3 h later. Time and frequency domain analyses were performed. Frequency domain included low (LF, 0.04-0.15 Hz and high frequency (HF, 0.15-0.4 Hz bands. Power spectral analysis was performed by the autoregressive method and model order was set at 16. Intra-subject agreement was assessed by linear regression analysis, test of difference in variances and limits of agreement. Most HRV measures (pNN50, RMSSD, LF, HF, and LF/HF ratio were reproducible independent of body position. Better correlation indexes (r > 0.6 were obtained in the orthostatic position. Bland-Altman plots revealed that most values were inside the agreement limits, indicating concordance between measures. Only SDNN and NNv in the supine position were not reproducible. Our results showed reproducibility of HRV parameters when recorded in the same individual with a short time between two exams. The increased sympathetic activity occurring in the orthostatic position probably facilitates reproducibility of the HRV indexes.

  3. The association between social resources and cognitive change in older adults: evidence from the Charlotte County Healthy Aging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Tiffany F; Andel, Ross; Small, Brent J; Borenstein, Amy R; Mortimer, James A

    2008-07-01

    We examined associations between multiple aspects of social resources and 5-year change in performance on different domains of cognitive function. Results indicated that lower satisfaction with support was associated with decline in episodic memory performance over 5 years. We also found significant interactions between age and social networks of family and friends and satisfaction with support for the separate cognitive domains. The results suggest that social resources may be differentially important for cognitive change but that different cognitive domains respond in a similar pattern to social resources.

  4. Soils as a Solution: The Potential of Rangelands to Contribute to Climate Change Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, W. L.; Ryals, R.; DeLonge, M. S.; Owen, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    The majority of soil-related climate change research has focused on describing the problem - estimating rates of carbon (C) losses and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from natural and managed ecosystems. More research is needed to explore potential solutions to climate change through mitigation and adaptation. Here we report on an integrated set of studies aimed at critically evaluating the biogeochemical potential of rangeland soils to help mitigate climate change, while improving the sustainability and productivity of food production systems. We explored direct effects through enhanced net primary production (NPP) and soil C sequestration, and indirect effects through diversion of high emitting sources to lower emitting organic matter dynamics. We used a combination of long- and short-term field experiments, modeling, laboratory assays, life cycle assessment (LCA), and meta-analyses in consultation with a diverse group of stakeholders from both the private and public sectors. We found that organic matter amendments held particularly strong potential. Compost amendments increased soil C storage by 0.5-1.0 Mg C ha-1 y-1 in surface soils over 5 y, and increased NPP and water holding capacity. We measured 1.0 Mg of new C ha-1 y-1 over 3 y. Long-term amendment of cattle manure increased surface soil C by 19.0±7.3 Mg C ha-1 relative to unmanured fields. However, field and modeling experiments suggested that manure amendments lead to large nitrous oxide emissions that eventually eliminated CO2e benefits, whereas compost amendments continued to benefit climate for decades longer. An LCA identified a broader range of climate impacts. When scaled to an area of 25% of California's rangelands, new C sequestered following compost amendments (21 million Mg CO2e) exceeded emissions from cattle (15 million Mg CO2e); diverting organics from waste streams to amendments led to additional GHG savings. In collaboration with our partners, our research contributed to the development of

  5. Changes of water solution properties under the processes of their ultrasonic atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akopyan, V. B.; Bambura, M. V.; Davidov, E. R.; Stupin, A. Yu.; Chubatova, O. I.

    2009-10-01

    Transformation of diluted water solutions of medicines into medicinal aerosols in ultrasonic inhalers leads to variation of concentration ratios for solution components in an aerosol and appearance of new substances synthesized usually in the process of cavitation in water solutions. It is demonstrated that for the characteristic concentrations of solution components intended for aerosol therapy the effect of concentration of its surface-active components is most significant in the process of ultrasonic dispersion into an aerosol. This effect must be taken into account in medical practice.

  6. Healthy Places

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-04-10

    Every person has a stake in environmental public health. As the environment deteriorates, so does the physical and mental health of the people within it. Healthy places are those designed and built to improve the quality of life for all people who live, work, worship, learn, and play within their borders -- where every person is free to make choices amid a variety of healthy, available, accessible, and affordable options. The CDC recognizes significant health issues and places that are vital in developing the Healthy Places program and provides examples in this report.  Created: 4/10/2007 by CDC National Center for Environmental Health.   Date Released: 4/13/2007.

  7. Consumption of canned citrus fruit meals increases human plasma β-cryptoxanthin concentration, whereas lycopene and β-carotene concentrations did not change in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chenghao H; Gertz, Erik R; Cai, Yimeng; Burri, Betty J

    2016-07-01

    Several studies suggest that β-cryptoxanthin has a greater plasma response from its common food sources than other carotenoids such as β-carotene and lycopene. The hypothesis of this study is that changes in plasma β-cryptoxanthin concentrations will be greater than changes in plasma β-carotene or lycopene concentrations even if these carotenoids are fed in a similar food matrix, such as citrus fruit. We tested this hypothesis by measuring changes in plasma concentrations of β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, and β-carotene after feeding measured amounts of canned tangerines and pink grapefruit to healthy nonsmoking adult humans. Volunteers served as their own controls and received both citrus fruit treatments randomly. In the first study, 8 subjects ate single meals of 234-304g of tangerines or 60-540g of pink grapefruit. The second study compared changes in plasma carotenoid concentration caused by feeding 234g of tangerines or 540g of pink grapefruit to 11 subjects. Blood was collected 5 times within 24hours after each citrus meal. Carotenoid concentrations were analyzed by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Plasma β-cryptoxanthin concentrations increased within 5hours and then stabilized, remaining high throughout the 24hours measured. Plasma concentrations of lycopene and β-carotene did not change. These results show that β-cryptoxanthin concentrations increased after a citrus fruit meal, but lycopene and β-carotene concentrations did not change after a similar citrus fruit meal. These results support our hypothesis that changes in plasma β-cryptoxanthin are greater than changes in plasma lycopene or β-carotene, even when these carotenoids are fed in a similar food matrix.

  8. Can the KTP laser change the cementum surface of healthy and diseased teeth providing an acceptable root surface for fibroblast attachment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailhot, Jason M.; Garnick, Jerry J.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of our research is to determine the effects of KTP laser on root cementum and fibroblast attachment. Initial work has been completed in testing the effect of different energy levels on root surfaces. From these studies optimal energy levels were determined. In subsequent studies the working distance and exposure time required to obtain significant fibroblast attachment to healthy cementum surfaces were investigated. Results showed that lased cemental surfaces exhibited changes in surface topography which ranged from a melted surface to an apparent slight fusion of the surface of the covering smear layer. When the optimal energy level was used, fibroblasts demonstrate attachment on the specimens, resulting in the presence of a monolayer of cells on the control surfaces as well as on the surfaces lased with this energy level. The present study investigates the treatment of pathological root surfaces and calculus with a KTP laser utilizing these optimal parameters determine previously. Thirty single rooted teeth with advanced periodontal disease and ten healthy teeth were obtained, crowns were sectioned and roots split longitudinally. Forty test specimens were assigned into 1 of 4 groups; pathologic root--not lased, pathologic root--lased, root planed root and health root planed root. Human gingival fibroblasts were seeded on specimens and cultured for 24 hours. Specimens were processed for SEM. The findings suggest that with the KTP laser using a predetermined energy level applied to pathological root surfaces, the lased surfaces provided an unacceptable surface for fibroblast attachment. However, the procedural control using healthy root planed surfaces did demonstrate fibroblast attachment.

  9. Assessment of dermal exposure and histopathologic changes of different sized nano-silver in healthy adult rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koohi, Mohammad kazem; Hejazy, Marzie [Toxicology division, Basic science department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tehran, Qareeb Street, Azadi Av. PO Box: 14155-6453, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Asadi, Farzad [Biochemistry division, Basic science department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tehran, Qareeb Street, Azadi Av. PO Box: 14155-6453, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Asadian, Peyman, E-mail: mkkoohi@ut.ac.ir [Clinical pathology department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Khorramabad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-07-06

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dermal toxicity (Irritation/Corrosion) of three sizes of nanosilver particles (10, 20 and 30 nm) during 3 min, 1 and 4 hours according to the OECD/OCDE guideline Histopathological effects in secondary organs from liver, kidney, heart, spleen and brain 14 day post dermal administration are also reported. 10 and 20 nm Ag nanoparticles treated group showed well defined dermal erythema and oedema. Histopathological findings of 10 and 20 nm (4 hours exposure) on 14-day post dermal administration showed hyperkeratosis, acanthosis, hair-filled follicles and papillomatosis in an irregular epidermis, fibrosis, hyperemia, erythema, intracellular oedema and hyalinisation of collagen in dermis of skin. Liver revealed midzonal and periacinar necrosis, portal mononuclear infiltration, liver fatty change, liver congestion and hyperemic central vein. Splenic red pulp congestion and white pulp hyperreactivity, splenic trabeculae and sinusoidal congestion and hyaline change were found in spleen. Fatty degeneration in some cardiovascular cells and subendocardial hemorrhage without inflammation was perceived. Picnotic appearance of pyramidal neurons in the brain cortex, gliosis and mild perineuronal oedema ischemic cell change and hyperemic meninges was observed in brain. Our research concluded that dermal exposure to lesser sizes of silver nanoparticles is more disastrous than greater ones.

  10. Pulmonary intravascular blood volume changes through the cardiac cycle in healthy volunteers studied by cardiovascular magnetic resonance measurements of arterial and venous flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arheden Hakan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aims to present a novel method for using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR to non-invasively quantify the variation in pulmonary blood volume throughout the cardiac cycle in humans. Methods 10 healthy volunteers (7 males, 3 female, age range 21-32 years were studied. The blood flow in the pulmonary artery and all pulmonary veins was quantified during free breathing using phase contrast velocity encoded CMR. The difference in flow between the pulmonary artery and the pulmonary veins was integrated to calculate the change in pulmonary blood volume throughout the cardiac cycle. Results The stroke volumes in the pulmonary artery and the sum of the pulmonary veins were (mean ± SEM 103 ± 6 ml and 95 ± 6 ml, respectively. The pulmonary blood volume variation (PBVV was 48 ± 5 ml, and the PBVV expressed as percent of the pulmonary artery stroke volume was 46 ± 3%. The maximum increase in pulmonary blood volume occurred 310 ± 12 ms after the R-wave from the ECG (32 ± 2% of the cardiac cycle. PBVV did not correlate to change in cross-sectional area in the pulmonary artery (R2 = 0.03, p = 0.66. Conclusion It is feasible to non-invasively quantify the change in pulmonary blood volume during the cardiac cycle in humans using CMR. The average pulmonary blood volume variation in healthy volunteers was approximately 50 ml and this was approximately 50% of the stroke volume. Further studies are needed to assess the utility of the pulmonary blood volume variation as a measure for identifying cardiac and pulmonary vascular disease.

  11. POSITIVE SOLUTIONS TO SINGULAR SECOND ORDER PERIODIC BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEM WITH SIGN-CHANGING NONLINEARITIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shanying Zhu

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the existence of positive solutions to the singular second-order periodic boundary value problem, We obtain the existence results of positive solutions by the fixed point index theory. The results obtained extend and complement some known results.

  12. If Sport's the Solution Then What's the Problem? The Social Significance of Sport in the Moral Governing of "Good" and "Healthy" Citizens in Sweden, 1922-1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Österlind, Malin; Wright, Jan

    2014-01-01

    All over the westernised world, sport has been promoted as a "solution" to many of the social "problems" and challenges that face modern societies. This study draw on Foucault's concept of governmentality to examine the ways in which Swedish Government Official Reports on sport, from 1922 to 1998, define social problems and…

  13. Beta Oscillatory Changes and Retention of Motor Skills during Practice in Healthy Subjects and in Patients with Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Aaron B.; Moisello, Clara; Lin, Jing; Panday, Priya; Ricci, Serena; Canessa, Andrea; Di Rocco, Alessandro; Quartarone, Angelo; Frazzitta, Giuseppe; Isaias, Ioannis U.; Tononi, Giulio; Cirelli, Chiara; Ghilardi, M. Felice

    2017-01-01

    Recently we found that modulation depth of beta power during movement increases with practice over sensory-motor areas in normal subjects but not in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). As such changes might reflect use-dependent modifications, we concluded that reduction of beta enhancement in PD represents saturation of cortical plasticity. A few questions remained open: What is the relation between these EEG changes and retention of motor skills? Would a second task exposure restore beta modulation enhancement in PD? Do practice-induced increases of beta modulation occur within each block? We thus recorded EEG in patients with PD and age-matched controls in two consecutive days during a 40-min reaching task divided in fifteen blocks of 56 movements each. The results confirmed that, with practice, beta modulation depth over the contralateral sensory-motor area significantly increased across blocks in controls but not in PD, while performance improved in both groups without significant correlations between behavioral and EEG data. The same changes were seen the following day in both groups. Also, beta modulation increased within each block with similar values in both groups and such increases were partially transferred to the successive block in controls, but not in PD. Retention of performance improvement was present in the controls but not in the patients and correlated with the increase in day 1 modulation depth. Therefore, the lack of practice-related increase beta modulation in PD is likely due to deficient potentiation mechanisms that permit between-block saving of beta power enhancement and trigger mechanisms of memory formation. PMID:28326029

  14. Within-person changes in mindfulness and self-compassion predict enhanced emotional well-being in healthy, but stressed adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galla, Brian M

    2016-06-01

    Meditation training programs for adolescents are predicated on the assumptions that mindfulness and self-compassion can be directly cultivated, and further, that doing so is beneficial for emotional well-being. Yet, very little research with adolescents has tested these assumptions directly. In the current study, I examined longitudinal relationships between changes in mindfulness and self-compassion and changes in emotional well-being among healthy, but stressed adolescents who participated in five-day, intensive meditation retreats. Immediately before and after the retreats, and then three months later, 132 adolescents (Mage = 16.76 years, 61% female) completed questionnaires measuring mindfulness, self-compassion, and emotional well-being. Repeated measures ANOVA showed adolescents improved in mindfulness, self-compassion, and all indices of emotional well-being immediately following the retreat (Cohen's d = |0.39-1.19|), and many of these improvements were maintained three months later (Cohen's d = |0.04-0.68|). Further, multilevel growth curve analyses with time-varying covariates indicated within-person changes in self-compassion predicted enhanced emotional well-being more consistently than within-person changes in mindfulness. Specifically, increases in self-compassion predicted reductions in perceived stress, rumination, depressive symptoms, and negative affect, and conversely, increases in positive affect and life satisfaction (pseudo-R(2) variance explained = 5.9% and 15.8%, ps < 0.01).

  15. Age-Dependent Changes in Resting Energy Expenditure (REE: Insights from Detailed Body Composition Analysis in Normal and Overweight Healthy Caucasians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Geisler

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Age-related changes in organ and tissue masses may add to changes in the relationship between resting energy expenditure (REE and fat free mass (FFM in normal and overweight healthy Caucasians. Secondary analysis using cross-sectional data of 714 healthy normal and overweight Caucasian subjects (age 18–83 years with comprehensive information on FFM, organ and tissue masses (as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, body density (as assessed by Air Displacement Plethysmography (ADP and hydration (as assessed by deuterium dilution (D2O and REE (as assessed by indirect calorimetry. High metabolic rate organs (HMR summarized brain, heart, liver and kidney masses. Ratios of HMR organs and muscle mass (MM in relation to FFM were considered. REE was calculated (REEc using organ and tissue masses times their specific metabolic rates. REE, FFM, specific metabolic rates, the REE-FFM relationship, HOMA, CRP, and thyroid hormone levels change with age. The age-related decrease in FFM explained 59.7% of decreases in REE. Mean residuals of the REE-FFM association were positive in young adults but became negative in older subjects. When compared to young adults, proportions of MM to FFM decreased with age, whereas contributions of liver and heart did not differ between age groups. HOMA, TSH and inflammation (plasma CRP-levels explained 4.2%, 2.0% and 1.4% of the variance in the REE-FFM residuals, but age and plasma T3-levels had no effects. HMR to FFM and MM to FFM ratios together added 11.8% on to the variance of REE-FFM residuals. Differences between REE and REEc increased with age, suggesting age-related changes in specific metabolic rates of organs and tissues. This bias was partly explained by plasmaT3-levels. Age-related changes in REE are explained by (i decreases in fat free mass; (ii a decrease in the contributions of organ and muscle masses to FFM; and (iii decreases in specific organ and tissue metabolic rates. Age-dependent changes in the

  16. Structural brain changes after traditional and robot-assisted multi-domain cognitive training in community-dwelling healthy elderly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geon Ha Kim

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate if multi-domain cognitive training, especially robot-assisted training, alters cortical thickness in the brains of elderly participants. A controlled trial was conducted with 85 volunteers without cognitive impairment who were 60 years old or older. Participants were first randomized into two groups. One group consisted of 48 participants who would receive cognitive training and 37 who would not receive training. The cognitive training group was randomly divided into two groups, 24 who received traditional cognitive training and 24 who received robot-assisted cognitive training. The training for both groups consisted of daily 90-min-session, five days a week for a total of 12 weeks. The primary outcome was the changes in cortical thickness. When compared to the control group, both groups who underwent cognitive training demonstrated attenuation of age related cortical thinning in the frontotemporal association cortices. When the robot and the traditional interventions were directly compared, the robot group showed less cortical thinning in the anterior cingulate cortices. Our results suggest that cognitive training can mitigate age-associated structural brain changes in the elderly.ClnicalTrials.gov NCT01596205.

  17. Serum Proteome Changes in Healthy Subjects with Different Genotypes of NOS1AP in the Chinese Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Feng; Wang, Congrong; Li, Rongxia; Sheng, Quanhu; Hu, Cheng; Zhang, Rong; Fang, Qichen; Bao, Yuqian; Xiang, Kunsan; Zeng, Rong; Jia, Weiping

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes and its chronic complications have become a worldwide epidemic nowadays. However, its molecular mechanism is still unknown. We have previously identified a novel variant rs12742393 of NOS1AP for type 2 diabetes susceptibility in the Chinese population. In this study, we analyzed the total serum profiling among three genotypes of rs12742393 to discover potential crosstalk under the variant and the disease through proteomic analyses for the first time. We used OFFGEL peptide fractionation, LC-MS/MS analysis, and label-free quantification to profile the fasting human serum samples of the genotypes in rs12742393 (n = 4, for CC, AC, and AA, resp.). Four proteins were identified, including apoA4, alpha1-ACT, HABP2, and keratin 10, with blood levels changed significantly between CC and AA homozygotes of rs12742393. Compared with AA group, the levels of apoA4 increased (P = 0.000265), whereas the concentration of alpha1-ACT, HABP2, and keratin 10 decreased in CC group (P = 0.011116, 0.021175, and 0.015661, resp.). Then we selected additional fasting serum samples for ELISA and western blot validation. However, no significant differences were identified by neither ELISA nor western blot (P > 0.05). The protein profiling changes between the genotypes of rs12742393 indicated that this SNP might play a role in the development of type 2 diabetes.

  18. Serum Proteome Changes in Healthy Subjects with Different Genotypes of NOS1AP in the Chinese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes and its chronic complications have become a worldwide epidemic nowadays. However, its molecular mechanism is still unknown. We have previously identified a novel variant rs12742393 of NOS1AP for type 2 diabetes susceptibility in the Chinese population. In this study, we analyzed the total serum profiling among three genotypes of rs12742393 to discover potential crosstalk under the variant and the disease through proteomic analyses for the first time. We used OFFGEL peptide fractionation, LC-MS/MS analysis, and label-free quantification to profile the fasting human serum samples of the genotypes in rs12742393 (n=4, for CC, AC, and AA, resp.. Four proteins were identified, including apoA4, alpha1-ACT, HABP2, and keratin 10, with blood levels changed significantly between CC and AA homozygotes of rs12742393. Compared with AA group, the levels of apoA4 increased (P=0.000265, whereas the concentration of alpha1-ACT, HABP2, and keratin 10 decreased in CC group (P=0.011116, 0.021175, and 0.015661, resp.. Then we selected additional fasting serum samples for ELISA and western blot validation. However, no significant differences were identified by neither ELISA nor western blot (P>0.05. The protein profiling changes between the genotypes of rs12742393 indicated that this SNP might play a role in the development of type 2 diabetes.

  19. Healthy Dragon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙继山

    2005-01-01

    The Chinese economic dragon is healthy and dynamic. The dragorthead,Shanghai, is developing at a pace never before seen in world history, The dragon's body is also doing well, not least because there is tremendous competition across the country. Thus, four cities along the central Yangtze River Region are trying to strengthen their competitiveness.

  20. Healthy Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Mike

    2003-01-01

    Offers ten suggestions for schools and universities to help maintain a healthy indoor environment: proper flooring, sanitary washrooms, consistent maintenance, indoor air quality, preventing mold, daylighting, good acoustics, avoiding volatile organic compounds (VOCs), ergonomic furniture, and well-maintained roofs. (EV)

  1. SUCCESSIVELY ITERATIVE TECHNIQUE OF SIGN-CHANGING SOLUTION TO A NONLINEAR THIRD-ORDER BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The iterative technique of sign-changing solution is studied for a nonlinear third-order two-point boundary value problem, where the nonlinear term has the time sin-gularity. By applying the monotonically iterative technique, an existence theorem is established and two useful iterative schemes are obtained.

  2. Changes in the bacterial flora of skin of processed broiler chickens washed in solutions of salicylic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changes in the number of bacteria recovered from the skin of processed broilers after each of five consecutive washings in salicylic acid (SA) solutions was examined. Skin samples from commercially processed broiler carcasses were divided into 3 groups and washed in distilled water (control), 10% S...

  3. Changes in cardiovascular function induced by verapamil in healthy subjects and in patients with ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincenzi, M; Morlino, T; Allegri, P; Barbieri, E; Cappelletti, F; De Lio, U; Ometto, R; Maiolino, P

    1981-01-01

    Alterations in cardiovascular function induced by the acute intravenous administration of verapamil (5 or 10 mg) in 52 patients (29 with ischemic heart disease and 23 without heart disease) were evaluated with use of invasive techniques (right and left heart catheterization, left ventricular cineangiography, and coronary arteriography). The most significant changes were represented by a decrease in systemic vascular resistance and systemic arterial pressure, and an increase in heart rate and cardiac output. Contractility indexes were not depressed in either group, and altered ventricular wall motion tended to improve to a slightly smaller degree than in patients treated with nitroglycerin. The use of verapamil in patients with ischemic heart disease appears to be safe, and concern about the negative inotropic influences in humans no longer seems justified.

  4. Positive solutions with changing sign energy to a nonhomogeneous elliptic problem of fourth order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Talbi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the existence for two positive solutions toa nonhomogeneous elliptic equation of fourth order with a parameter lambda such tha 0 < lambda < lambda^. The first solution has a negative energy while the energy of the second one is positive for 0 < lambda < lambda_0 and negative for lambda_0 < lambda < lambda^. The values lambda_0 and lambda^ are given under variational form and we show that every corresponding critical point is solution of the nonlinear elliptic problem (with a suitable multiplicative term.

  5. Cardiorespiratory biomarker responses in healthy young adults to drastic air quality changes surrounding the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junfeng; Zhu, Tong; Kipen, Howard; Wang, Guangfa; Huang, Wei; Rich, David; Zhu, Ping; Wang, Yuedan; Lu, Shou-En; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Diehl, Scott; Hu, Min; Tong, Jian; Gong, Jicheng; Thomas, Duncan

    2013-02-01

    Associations between air pollution and cardiorespiratory mortality and morbidity have been well established, but data to support biologic mechanisms underlying these associations are limited. We designed this study to examine several prominently hypothesized mechanisms by assessing Beijing residents' biologic responses, at the biomarker level, to drastic changes in air quality brought about by unprecedented air pollution control measures implemented during the 2008 Beijing Olympics. To test the hypothesis that changes in air pollution levels are associated with changes in biomarker levels reflecting inflammation, hemostasis, oxidative stress, and autonomic tone, we recruited and retained 125 nonsmoking adults (19 to 33 years old) free of cardiorespiratory and other chronic diseases. Using the combination of a quasi-experimental design and a panel-study approach, we measured biomarkers of autonomic dysfunction (heart rate [HR*] and heart rate variability [HRV]), of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress (plasma C-reactive protein [CRP], fibrinogen, blood cell counts and differentials, and urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine [8-OHdG]), of pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress (fractional exhaled nitric oxide [FeNO], exhaled breath condensate [EBC] pH, EBC nitrate, EBC nitrite, EBC nitrite+nitrate [sum of the concentrations of nitrite and nitrate], and EBC 8-isoprostane), of hemostasis (platelet activation [plasma sCD62P and sCD40L], platelet aggregation, and von Willebrand factor [vWF]), and of blood pressure (systolic blood pressure [SBP] and diastolic blood pressure [DBP]). These biomarkers were measured on each subject twice before, twice during, and twice after the Beijing Olympics. For each subject, repeated measurements were separated by at least one week to avoid potential residual effects from a prior measurement. We measured a large suite of air pollutants (PM2.5 [particulate matter Olympics periods). We used mixed-effects models to assess changes

  6. Assessment of age-related morphometric changes of subcortical structures in healthy people using ultra-high field 7 tesla magnetic resonance imaging

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    Xueyuan Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the age-related morphometric changes of subcortical structures in healthy people.Material and Methods: Ultra-high field 7 tesla magnetic resonance imaging in humans was used to visualize the subcortical structures of healthy young, middle-aged, and elderly participants. Using the magnetization-prepared two rapid acquisition gradient echoes sequence, we assessed the visibility of the margins of the thalamus and white matter in the thalamus, as well as the anterior commissure (AC and posterior commissure (PC length, the maximal height of the thalamus, the half width of third ventricle, and the distance between the AC and the center of the mammillothalamic tract at the level of the AC-PC plane. All quantitative data were statistically evaluated.Results: The AC-PC length did not differ significantly among the three groups. The maximal height of the thalamus decreased with age (rs(53=-0.719, p<0.001. The half width of the third ventricle (rs(53=0.705, p<0.001 and the distance between the AC and the center of the mammillothalamic tract (MTT (rs(53=0.485, p<0.001 increased with age. The distance between the AC and the center of the MTT of the young and the elderly participants differed significantly (p=0.007.Conclusion: The AC-PC length is not a good candidate for proportional correction during atlas-to-patient registration. The maximal height of the thalamus and the half width of the third ventricle correlated strongly with age, and the MTT position in relation to the AC shifted posteriorly as age increased. These age-related morphometric changes of subcortical structures should be considered in targeting for functional neurosurgery.

  7. Changes in cardiovascular performance, biochemistry, gastric motility and muscle temperature induced by acute exercise on a treadmill in healthy military dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, R W; Silva, V L; Rocha, D R; Costa, D S; Turco, S H N; Silva, M T B; Santos, A A; Oliveira, M B L; Pereira, A S R; Palheta-Junior, R C

    2016-12-29

    Changes in physiological parameters that are induced by acute exercise on a treadmill in healthy military dogs have not been thoroughly investigated, especially with regard to age. This study investigated the effects of acute exercise on a treadmill on cardiovascular function, biochemical parameters and gastric antral motility in military dogs. Thermography was used to assess variations in superficial hindlimb muscle temperature. Nine healthy dogs were distributed into three groups according to their age (Group I: 25 ± 7 months; Group II: 51 ± 12 months; Group III: 95 ± 10 months) and sequentially subjected to running exercise on a treadmill for 12 min (3.2 km/h at 0° incline for 4 min, 6.4 km/h at 0° incline for 4 min and 6.4 km/h at 10° incline for 4 min). Heart rate, systolic and diastolic arterial pressure (DAP), gastric motility, haematocrit and biochemical analyses were performed at rest and after each session of treadmill exercise. Infrared thermographic images of muscles in the pelvic member were taken. Exercise decreased DAP in Group I, increased systolic arterial pressure in Groups II and III and increased mean arterial pressure in Group III (all p exercise protocol, plasma creatine kinase and aspartate aminotransferase levels increased only in Group I (p Exercise increased heart rate and decreased the gastric motility of a solid meal at 180 min in all groups (all p Exercise also elevated temperature in the femoral biceps muscles in Group I compared with the older dogs. The results indicate that acute exercise decreased gastric motility in dogs, regardless of age, and caused more pronounced cardiovascular changes in older dogs than in younger dogs. Acute exercise also altered biochemical parameters and superficial hindlimb muscle temperature in younger military dogs.

  8. Evaluation and Interpretation of Laboratory Methods Effectiveness in Blood Parameters for Diagnosis of Invasive Fungal Pulmonary Disease and Comparison of Changes in Healthy Persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roghayeh Babaei

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Complete blood count (CBC, important information about the volume, number of cells and components of blood cells could diagnose of many diseases provided. In patients Infected with invasive pulmonary fungal disease (IFD some of the changes in them occurs, blood index somewhat warning and of them can be used to diagnose the treatment of disease.The study was cross-sectional. In this study, 26 patients with pulmonary IFD has had an underlying medical condition referring to Shariati Hospital in Tehran during the period a year were admitted due to respiratory failure. In the control group of 26 healthy volunteers who agreed to cooperate were studied. Blood samples to count test, RBC, WBC, hematocrit and hemoglobin was performed by the Sysmex device,then calculated and compared. The data were analyzed using the software SPSS v20.The average RBC, WBC, in patients with pulmonary IFD, respectively, 3.7, 4.4 thousand per milliliter of bloods naturally, the average of hematocrit and hemoglobin 27.8% and 10.6% was calculated. But the average index in healthy people, 4.6, 8.2 thousand per milliliter of blood naturally, 43.6% and the 14.2% were calculated. However, the interpretation of this indicator is the best sensitivity (90% and specificity (7/85%, were calculated.The study showed that changes in the other blood factors, may be an effective tool to show IFD lung in patients with underlying conditions should be considered, even though more studies to accurately assess the quantities of other blood components and the amount of sediment blood cells for many of the abnormalities is necessary.

  9. Changes in the vitamin D endocrine system and bone turnover after oral vitamin D3 supplementation in healthy adults: results of a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holvik Kristin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is uncertainty as to which intake of vitamin D is needed to suppress PTH and maintain normal bone metabolism throughout winter at northern latitudes. We aimed to investigate whether four weeks’ daily supplementation with 10 μg vitamin D3 from fish oil produced a greater change in serum vitamin D metabolites, parathyroid hormone, and bone turnover in healthy adults compared with solid multivitamin tablets. Furthermore, it was studied whether age, gender, ethnic background, body mass index, or serum concentrations at baseline predicted the magnitude of change in these parameters. Methods Healthy adults aged 19–48 years living in Oslo, Norway (59°N were randomised to receive a daily dose of 10 μg vitamin D3 given as fish oil capsules or multivitamin tablets during four weeks in late winter. Serum samples from baseline and after 28 days were analysed for 25-hydroxyvitamin D (s-25(OHD, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (s-1,25(OH2D, intact parathyroid hormone (s-iPTH, and osteoclast-specific tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (s-TRACP. Fifty-five eligible participants completed the intervention (74% of those randomised. Results S-25(OHD increased by mean 34.1 (SD 13.1 nmol/l, p 2D increased by mean 13 (SD 48 pmol/l, p = 0.057; and s-TRACP increased by mean 0.38 (SD 0.33 U/l, p  Conclusions Four weeks of daily supplementation with 10 μg vitamin D3 decreased mean s-iPTH and increased s-TRACP concentration, and this did not differ by mode of administration. Our results suggest an increased bone resorption following vitamin D supplementation in young individuals, despite a decrease in parathyroid hormone levels. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01482689

  10. Intervention Based Exclusively on Stage-Matched Printed Educational Materials Regarding Healthy Eating Does Not Result in Changes to Adolescents’ Dietary Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natacha Toral

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess the impact of a six-month stage-based intervention on fruit and vegetable intake, regarding perceived benefits and barriers, and self-efficacy among adolescents. Design. Randomized treatment-control, pre-post design. Subjects/Setting. Schools were randomized between control and experimental groups. 860 adolescents from ten public schools in Brasília, Federal District, Brazil were evaluated at baseline; 771 (81% completed the study. Intervention. Experimental group received monthly magazines and newsletters aimed at promotion of healthy eating. Measures. Self-reported fruit and vegetable intake, stages of change, self-efficacy and decisional balance scores were evaluated at baseline and post-intervention in both groups. Analysis. The effectiveness of the intervention was evaluated using the analysis of covariance model (ANCOVA and repeated measurement analysis by means of weighted least squares. Comparison between the proportions of adolescents who advanced through the stages during the intervention was performed using the Mantel-Haenszel chi-square test. Results. After adjusting for sex and age, study variables showed no modifications through the proposed intervention. There was no statistical difference in participant mobility in the intervention and control groups between the stages of change, throughout the study. Conclusion. A nutritional intervention based exclusively on distribution of stage-matched printed educational materials was insufficient to change adolescents’ dietary behavior.

  11. Exact analytical solution to three-dimensional phase change heat transfer problems in biological tissues subject to freezing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang-fang LI; Jing LIU; Kai YUE

    2009-01-01

    Analytically solving a three-dimensional (3-D) bioheat transfer problem with phase change during a freezing process is extremely difficult but theoretically important. The moving heat source model and the Green function method are introduced to deal with the cryopreservation process of in vitro biomaterials. Exact solutions for the 3-D temper-ature transients of tissues under various boundary conditions, such as totally convective cooling, totally fixed temperature cooling and a hybrid between them on tissue surfaces, are obtained. Furthermore, the cryosurgical process in living tissues subject to freezing by a single or multiple cryoprobes is also analytically solved. A closed-form analytical solution to the bioheat phase change process is derived by considering contributions from blood perfusion heat transfer, metabolic heat generation, and heat sink of a cryoprobe. The present method is expected to have significant value for analytically solving complex bioheat transfer problems with phase change.

  12. Large time behavior for solutions of nonlinear parabolic problems with sign-changing measure data

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    Francesco Petitta

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Let $Omegasubseteq mathbb{R}^N$ a bounded open set, $Ngeq 2$, and let $p>1$; in this paper we study the asymptotic behavior with respect to the time variable $t$ of the entropy solution of nonlinear parabolic problems whose model is $$displaylines{ u_{t}(x,t-Delta_{p} u(x,t=mu quad hbox{in } Omegaimes(0,infty,cr u(x,0=u_{0}(x quad hbox{in } Omega, }$$ where $u_0 in L^{1}(Omega$, and $muin mathcal{M}_{0}(Q$ is a measure with bounded variation over $Q=Omegaimes(0,infty$ which does not charge the sets of zero $p$-capacity; moreover we consider $mu$ that does not depend on time. In particular, we prove that solutions of such problems converge to stationary solutions.

  13. Stability and color changes of thermally treated betanin, phyllocactin, and hylocerenin solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbach, Kirsten M; Stintzing, Florian C; Carle, Reinhold

    2006-01-25

    Thermal degradation of betanin, phyllocactin (malonyl-betanin), and hylocerenin (3' '-hydroxy-3' '-methyl-glutaryl-betanin) solutions isolated from purple pitaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus [Weber] Britton and Rose) was monitored by spectrophotometric and high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) analyses. For betanin and phyllocactin solutions, the color shift upon thermal treatment was found to be nearly identical, while hylocerenin samples exhibited an intelligibly higher chromatic steadiness. Betanin proved to be the most stable individual pigment structure, while the enhanced tinctorial stability of the integral phyllocactin and especially hylocerenin solutions was due to the formation of red degradation products exhibiting improved color retention as opposed to their respective genuine pigments. Individual structure-related stability characteristics can exclusively be assessed by HPLC-DAD analyses and may not be noticed by mere spectrophotometric assessment of color and tinctorial strength.

  14. Student Misconceptions about Newtonian Mechanics: Origins and Solutions through Changes to Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adair, Aaron Michael

    experience of force; students claim to feel a force in the direction of relative motion even when the actual force is in the opposite direction. The interview process also showed how students had both their intuitive sense of physics as well as Newtonian concepts from instruction, and how each model was activated could be influenced by questions from the interviewer. In order to investigate how changes to instructional method and pedagogy may affect students' ability to overcome their non-Newtonian intuitions, an experimental lecturing series was devised that used individual voting machines ("clickers") to increase class participation and dialog in a fashion that was more student-centered. The experimental section also had video recordings of the lectures as well as concept-based video homework solutions. The initial availability of the videos hindered early use, and overall students rarely used these additions. The clicker system also had technical issues due to the volume of students and an interface that was not streamlined. Nonetheless, the results showed the experimental section to have significantly greater learning gains (d > 0.5, p ˜ 0.01), and we determined that this was most likely due to the clicker system.

  15. Vitamin D3 supplementation in healthy adults: a comparison between capsule and oral spray solution as a method of delivery in a wintertime, randomised, open-label, cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Joshua J; McSorley, Emeir M; Pourshahidi, L Kirsty; Madigan, Sharon M; Laird, Eamon; Healy, Martin; Magee, Pamela J

    2016-10-01

    Vitamin D is typically supplied in capsule form, both in trials and in clinical practice. However, little is known regarding the efficacy of vitamin D administered via oral sprays - a method that primarily bypasses the gastrointestinal absorption route. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of vitamin D3 liquid capsules and oral spray solution in increasing wintertime total 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations. In this randomised, open-label, cross-over trial, healthy adults (n 22) received 3000 IU (75 µg) vitamin D3 daily for 4 weeks in either capsule or oral spray form. Following a 10-week washout phase, participants received the opposite treatment for a final 4 weeks. Anthropometrics and fasted blood samples were obtained before and after supplementation, with samples analysed for total 25(OH)D, creatinine, intact parathyroid hormone and adjusted Ca concentrations. At baseline, vitamin D sufficiency (total 25(OH)D>50 nmol/l), insufficiency (31-49 nmol/l) and clinical deficiency (capsule supplementation methods (26·15 (sd 17·85) v. 30·38 (sd 17·91) nmol/l, respectively; F=1·044, adjusted r 2 0·493, P=0·313). Oral spray vitamin D3 is an equally effective alternative to capsule supplementation in healthy adults.

  16. Sea level changes from monthly solutions of ice sheet mass balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barletta, Valentina Roberta; Sørensen, Louise Sandberg; Forsberg, René

    We present mass change time series at basin scale for both Greenland and Antarctica, de-rived from GRACE data, and use these data to find the associated global sea level changes. We use two independent methods for GRACE ice mass loss estimation, including use of different GIA models and estimation...... also compare our GRACE derived regional estimates with independent mass change results based on altimetry data from NASA’s Ice Cloud and land Elevation Satellite. From the estimated Greenland and Antarctica mass changes we compute the gravitationally self-consistent sea-level changes and its associated...... uncertainties, and show results of the impact of Earth model uncertainties in the global sea level change and its regional “fingerprints”....

  17. 谱圣康口服液单次给药在中国健康人体药代动力学研究%Pharmacokinetics of single dose of Picika oral solution in Chinese healthy volunteers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱珍真; 魏振满; 段锋; 毕京峰; 陈贞; 王敏; 张丽; 姬慧; 郎丽巍; 陈本超

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the pharmacokinetic changes of Picika oral solution in healthy subjects after single dose.Methods This study taken random , three cross experiment design , 12 subjects were randomly divided into 6 groups, each group was 2 cases, then they were respec-tively given single oral doseof Picika oral solution (60, 90, 120 mL) in each cycle.Before and after administration , biological samples were col-lected for detection of blood drug concentration and urine drug concentra-tion, furthermore, calculation of blood and urine drug pharmacokinetic parameters.Results After single oral dose of 60, 90, 120 mL Picika oral solution, the main pharmacokinetic parameters of plasma CKL -A03, Cmax were (3.08 ±0.92), (3.63 ±0.75), (4.29 ±1.00)μg· L-1, tmax were (57.50 ±17.90 ), (52.50 ±20.73 ), (56.25 ±19.32 ) min, t1/2 were (197.51 ±106.35 ), (233.86 ±196.75 ), (141.34 ±65.16 ) min, AUC0-t were ( 383.28 ± 86.42 ) , ( 479.00 ± 136.25 ) , (540.59 ±102.87)μg · L-1 · min, AUC0-∞ were (710.06 ±233.03 ), (916.59 ±378.62 ), (782.65 ±130.40 )μg· L-1 · min, respectively. The main pharmacokinetic parameters of urine CKL -A03, t1/2 were (1.29 ±0.33), (1.23 ±0.20), (1.11 ±0.11) h, total urine discharge rates were (0.28 ±0.22)%, (0.20 ±0.11)%, (0.18 ±0.09)%, urine discharge amount were (74486.02 ±57923.42 ), (80015.14 ±43379.01 ), (93017.33 ±46658.61 ) mg.Conclusion The maximum oral absorption amount of Picika oral solution is possible 90 mL.And there is no apparent proportional relationship between the total urine discharge rate , urine discharge amount and the increased doses.%目的:评价谱圣康口服液单次给药在健康受试者体内的药代动力学变化。方法用随机、三交叉试验设计。将12例受试者随机分为6组,每组2例,分别于3个周期口服谱圣康口服液60,90,120 mL各1次,洗脱期为1周。给药前后按时间点采集生物样本以检测血药浓度和尿药浓度,并计算血药

  18. Oral epithelial atypical changes in apparently healthy oral mucosa exposed to smoking, alcohol, peppers and hot meals, using the AgNOR and Papanicolaou staining techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Hussain Gadelkarim; Ebnoof, Syda Omer M Ali; Hussein, Mohmmed Omer M; Gbreel, Afra Yousif A

    2010-07-01

    To evaluate cytological atypical changes in apparently healthy oral mucosa exposed to smoking, alcohol, hot meals, and peppers using the AgNOR and Papanicolaou methods. A total of 180 individuals were evaluated, of which 60 were smokers, 34 were alcohol users, 52 were habitual peppers and hot meal (exposed) consumers, 24 were non-exposed, and 10 were patients with Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC), as an internal control. Cytological materials were obtained by brushing of buccal mucosa, on the border of the tongue and on the floor of the mouth, and participants underwent the Papanicolaou test for cytological changes and AgNOR staining for evaluation of the mean number of AgNOR dots per nucleus. SPSS program was used to perform the Pearson chi-square test. The 95% confidence level, Odds Ratio (OR), and the 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) were used. The features of cytological atypia were verified among 10 individuals, including 5 smokers, 2 alcohol users, 2 hot meals and peppers consumers, and one non-exposed. For atypia among tobacco smokers, the adjusted Odds Ratio (OR) and the 95% CI were found to be 2 (0.246-16.24). Increased keratinization was detected among 27 (45%) of the smokers (P cytological atypia were identified with 6 +/- 2 AgNOR mean count. The increase of the variables suggests that the evaluation of epithelial atypical changes in individuals exposed to smoking and alcohol carcinogens may be a useful screening tool. While hot meals and peppers did not seem to be a risk for oral mucosal proliferation, they increased the potency of keratinization and infection.

  19. Getting Decision Makers to the Table: Digestible Facts, a Few Good Friends and Sharing Recipes for Solutions to Climate Change Impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudrias, M. A.; Estrada, M.; Gershunov, A.; Silva-Send, N. J.; Young, E.

    2014-12-01

    Decision makers and community leaders are key audiences to engage in our efforts to improve climate literacy. Climate Education Partners has been working with business leaders, elected officials, tribal leaders, and other Key Influentials in the San Diego Region to enhance the channels of communication outside traditional settings. Over the past year we have interviewed over 90 Key Influential San Diego leaders asking them about their knowledge of climate change and their personal and professional efforts to adapt to and/or mitigate the impacts of climate change. We also engaged them directly in the creation of an innovative educational resource called "San Diego, 2050 is Calling. How will we answer?" Results of the interviews indicate that 90% of these leaders are concerned about climate change, more than 50% are already doing something about the impacts, and the majority of them want more information, greater dialogue and examples of actions taken by other community leaders. We found that repeated engagement of leaders at the San Diego County Water Authority went from basic collaboration in our water tours, to greater participation of their top leaders in a water tour for top decision makers from the City of San Diego, finally culminating with full support of and participation in the 2050 report. The 2050 report represents an integrated approach blending local climate change science, social science education theory and presentation of a suite of solution-driven opportunities for local leaders. The report includes science infographics that illustrate rigorous scientific facts, statements from expert scientists and direct quotes from decision makers, and examples of successful climate change adaptation actions from companies, government groups and others. The video and photography sessions for the 2050 report led to many unexpected discussion among leaders with differing opinions on climate change, greater enthusiasm to participate in outreach activities with other

  20. Adapting crop management practices to climate change: Modeling optimal solutions at the field scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann, N.; Finger, R.; Klein, T.; Calanca, P.; Walter, A.

    2013-01-01

    Climate change will alter the environmental conditions for crop growth and require adjustments in management practices at the field scale. In this paper, we analyzed the impacts of two different climate change scenarios on optimal field management practices in winterwheat and grain maize production

  1. Assessment of the tolerability profile of an ophthalmic solution of 5% glycyrrhizin and copolymer PEG/PPG on healthy volunteers and evaluation of its efficacy in the treatment of moderate to severe blepharitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mencucci R

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Rita Mencucci, Eleonora Favuzza, Ugo MenchiniDepartment of Surgery and Translational Medicine – Eye Clinic, University of Florence, Florence, ItalyPurpose: To evaluate the tolerability on healthy volunteers and the efficacy on subjects affected by chronic moderate/severe blepharitis of a 5% glycyrrhizin and copolymer poly(ethylene glycol/poly(propylene glycol(PEG/PPG ophthalmic solution.Methods: The study was a randomized, controlled, open label, intra-patient monocentric study. It consisted of two different phases, the assessment of tolerability phase on 20 healthy volunteers, and the evaluation of the efficacy on 21 subjects affected by chronic moderate/severe blepharitis; the treatment period was 2 weeks, followed by 1-week of follow-up. In the efficacy phase, in both eyes, eyelid hygiene was also performed. At day 0, 3, 7, 14, and 21 a complete ophthalmological examination was performed. In the tolerability phase, signs of clinical toxicity were recorded and subject-reported symptoms were collected using a questionnaire. In the efficacy phase, global signs and symptoms of blepharitis scores were collected using standardized photographic scales and questionnaire. The statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: No ocular signs of drug toxicity were reported. During the treatment period for tolerability phase, there were statistically significant higher scores of tearing and ocular discomfort in the tolerability study group versus the tolerability control group. In the efficacy phase, differences between global scores of the two groups were statistically significant at day 0 (score of the efficacy study group was higher than the efficacy control group; P = 0.005 and at day 21 (score of the efficacy study group was lower than the efficacy control group (P ≤ 0.001.The difference of global scores at day 3, 7, 14, and 21 versus day 0 was statistically significant in both groups. No serious adverse events

  2. Age-associated changes in pulmonary function: a comparison of pulmonary function parameters in healthy young adults and the elderly living in Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Wei-ying; LI Li; ZHAO Rong-ya; ZHU Lei

    2012-01-01

    Background The respiratory system changes with age and a better understanding of the changes contribute to detect and prevent respiratory dysfunctions in old population.The purpose of this study was to observe age-associated changes of pulmonary function parameters in healthy young adults and the elderly.Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 600 male and female subjects aged 19 to 92 years.The subjects were divided into three groups by age:young adult (19-39 years),middle-aged adult (40-59 years),and the elderly (≥60 years).The pulmonary function was measured with routine examination methods and 13 parameters including vital capacity (VC),residual volume (RV),functional residual capacity (FRC),total lung capacity (TLC),RV/TLC,forced vital capacity (FVC),forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1),FEV1/FVC,peak expiratory flow (PEF),forced expiratory flow at 25% of FVC exhaled (FEF25),forced expiratory flow at 50% of FVC exhaled (FEF50),diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO),and specific diffusion capacity of CO (KCO) were collected and analyzed.Changes in pulmonary function parameters among the pre-elderly and elderly subjects,especially the aging influence on FEV1/FVC and RV were studied further.Results Ten pulmonary function parameters including VC,FVC,FEV1,FEV1/FVC,PEF,FEF25,FEF50,TLC,DLCO and KCO decreased significantly with age in both male and female subjects (P <0.01).RV and RV/TLC were increased with age (P <0.01).FRC remained stable during aging.Except FRC,the linear relationship was significant between age and other pulmonary function parameters.In the pre-elderly and elderly subjects,RV had a non-significantly increasing tendency with age (P >0.05),and FEV1/FVC did not change significantly with age (P >0.05).Conclusion Total pulmonary function was declined with advancing age,but FRC was stable,and the increasing tendency of RV and decreasing tendency of FEV1/FVC obviously slowed down in the pre-elderly and

  3. Fucik spectrum,sign-changing and multiple solutions for semilinear elliptic boundary value problems with jumping nonlinearities at zero and infinity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper,Fucik spectrum,ordinary differential equation theory of Banach spaces and Morse theory are used to study semilinear elliptic boundary value problems with jumping nonlinearities at zero or infinity,and some new results on the existence of nontrivial solutions,multiple solutions and sign-changing solutions are obtained.In one case seven nontrivial solutions are got.The techniques have independent interest.

  4. Effects of a healthy Nordic diet on gene expression changes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to an oral glucose tolerance test in subjects with metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leder, Lena; Kolehmainen, Marjukka; Narverud, Ingunn;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diet has a great impact on the risk of developing features of metabolic syndrome (MetS), type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). We evaluated whether a long-term healthy Nordic diet (ND) can modify the expression of inflammation and lipid metabolism......-related genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) during a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in individuals with MetS. METHODS: A Nordic multicenter randomized dietary study included subjects (n = 213) with MetS, randomized to a ND group or a control diet (CD) group applying an isocaloric study...... protocol. In this sub-study, we included subjects (n = 89) from three Nordic centers: Kuopio (n = 26), Lund (n = 30), and Oulu (n = 33) with a maximum weight change of ±4 kg, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration ≤10 mg L(-1), and baseline body mass index

  5. Assessing Vulnerability to Climate Change in Dryland Livelihood Systems: Conceptual Challenges and Interdisciplinary Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan D. G. Fraser

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Over 40% of the earth's land surface are drylands that are home to approximately 2.5 billion people. Livelihood sustainability in drylands is threatened by a complex and interrelated range of social, economic, political, and environmental changes that present significant challenges to researchers, policy makers, and, above all, rural land users. Dynamic ecological and environmental change models suggest that climate change induced drought events may push dryland systems to cross biophysical thresholds, causing a long-term drop in agricultural productivity. Therefore, research is needed to explore how development strategies and other socioeconomic changes help livelihoods become more resilient and robust at a time of growing climatic risk and uncertainty. As a result, the overarching goal of this special feature is to conduct a structured comparison of how livelihood systems in different dryland regions are affected by drought, thereby making methodological, empirical, and theoretical contributions to our understanding of how these types of social-ecological systems may be vulnerable to climate change. In introducing these issues, the purpose of this editorial is to provide an overview of the two main intellectual challenges of this work, namely: (1 how to conceptualize vulnerability to climate change in coupled social-ecological systems; and (2 the methodological challenges of anticipating trends in vulnerability in dynamic environments.

  6. Impact of climate change on water and agriculture: Challenges and possible solutions for the Nile Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabrouk, Badr; Arafa, Salah; Farahat, Hany; Badr, Marmar; Gampe, David; Ludwig, Ralf

    2013-04-01

    The Nile-Delta is subjected to continuous changes; including shoreline changes either erosion or accretion, subsidence of the delta, as well as sea level rise due to climate change. The impacts of climate change on the Nile Delta have been addressed on local and international level as the Nile Delta coastal zones are vulnerable to sea level rise. The poster presents recent research activities and findings from the CLIMB project in the Nile Delta and costal zones of Egypt. Lots of field data have been collected such as aquifer geometry data, soil properties data, well data and contamination sources. All of these data support a coupled modeling approach of the land surface hydrological model WASIM-ETH and the hydrological model MOD-Flow to simulate and project the future impact translation of climate projections into hydrological impacts. Results confirm intensified threads to water security. Increasing potential evaporation (in response to increasing temperature) in combination with decreasing water levels in the Nile river, reduced precipitation and groundwater recharge and deteriorating groundwater quality, imposes great challenges to ensure the supply of drinking water and irrigation. Current irrigation strategies are highly inefficient and must be replaced by new and adapted systems. Based on the results of the coupled modeling approach, various scenarios can be evaluated. The vision is to develop a road map for climate change and green economy that maximizes wellbeing of the Egyptian citizens, operates with environmental limits, and is capable of adapting to global environmental change.

  7. Influence of training habits on exercise-induced changes in plasma atrial and brain natriuretic peptide and urinary excretion of aquaporin-2 in healthy man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentzen, H; Pedersen, R S; Nyvad, O; Pedersen, E B

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the influence of training habits on the changes in plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and urine aquaporin-2 (u-AQP2) during exercise by studying trained and untrained healthy subjects. Eleven trained subjects (7 males, 4 females) and 10 untrained subjects (8 males, 2 females) performed a maximal aerobic exercise test. ANP and BNP were determined every 3 min and at maximum exercise by radioimmunoassay (RIA), and u-AQP2 was determined before and after the exercise test by RIA. The absolute increase in ANP during exercise was higher in the trained subjects (trained subjects: 5.6 pmol/L; untrained subjects: 2.4 pmol/L, p exercise was the same in the two groups (trained subjects: 0.5 pmol/L; untrained subjects: 0.6 pmol/L, NS) and tended to correlate positively with resting BNP in the trained subjects (p = 0.07). Exercise did not change u-AQP2 excretion in either trained subjects (rest: 372 ng/mmol creatinine; exercise: 314 ng/mmol creatinine, NS) or untrained subjects (rest: 263 ng/mmol creatinine; exercise: 338 ng/mmol creatinine, NS). The absolute increase in ANP during exercise was higher in trained subjects than in untrained subjects and was positively correlated to ANP at rest. This might reflect the normal cardiovascular adaptation to exercise. The increase in BNP during exercise was unrelated to training habits. Training habits did not affect the u-AQP2 excretion during exercise.

  8. Postural-induced changes in intracranial pressure evaluated non-invasively using the MMS-10 tympanic displacement analyser in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, N; Walsted, A

    2000-01-01

    Inner ear pressure reflects intracranial pressure (ICP) primarily because of the direct communication of perilymph and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) through the cochlear aqueduct (CA). The MMS-10 tympanic displacement analyser (TDA) is a relatively new device for measuring perilymphatic pressure non-invasively, and thereby also indirectly measuring intracranial pressure. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of the TDA in a daily clinical setting. Other aims were to investigate changes in perilymphatic pressure from sitting to lying position in healthy volunteers in two age groups (mean age: 33 years and 50 years) and to compare the patency of the CA in these groups using the MMS-10 TDA. Tympanic membrane displacement (TMD) analyses were performed in the test subjects initially twice in sitting position (test-retest) and then in sitting and supine positions. We found that the MMS-10 TDA is easy to use, and that it gives reproducible values in repeated tests, but with large inter-subject differences. The TMD test showed curves, which, in the whole test group, were more negative in supine position, in accordance with an increasing intracranial and inner ear pressure when lying down. The change from sitting to lying position was larger in the younger group than in the older group. In 11% of the younger group (males) and in 30% of the older group (females), the CA was considered to be non-patent, although the difference was not statistically significant. However, the finding is in keeping with the hypothesis of a greater proportion of patent CA in younger than in older individuals.

  9. Application of a MRI based index to longitudinal atrophy change in Alzheimer disease, mild cognitive impairment and healthy older individuals in the AddNeuroMed cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Carlos; Muehlboeck, J-Sebastian; Mecocci, Patrizia; Vellas, Bruno; Tsolaki, Magda; Kloszewska, Iwona; Soininen, Hilkka; Lovestone, Simon; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Simmons, Andrew; Westman, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Cross sectional studies of patients at risk of developing Alzheimer disease (AD) have identified several brain regions known to be prone to degeneration suitable as biomarkers, including hippocampal, ventricular, and whole brain volume. The aim of this study was to longitudinally evaluate an index based on morphometric measures derived from MRI data that could be used for classification of AD and healthy control subjects, as well as prediction of conversion from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to AD. Patients originated from the AddNeuroMed project at baseline (119 AD, 119 MCI, 110 controls (CTL)) and 1-year follow-up (62 AD, 73 MCI, 79 CTL). Data consisted of 3D T1-weighted MR images, demographics, MMSE, ADAS-Cog, CERAD and CDR scores, and APOE e4 status. We computed an index using a multivariate classification model (AD vs. CTL), using orthogonal partial least squares to latent structures (OPLS). Sensitivity, specificity and AUC were determined. Performance of the classifier (AD vs. CTL) was high at baseline (10-fold cross-validation, 84% sensitivity, 91% specificity, 0.93 AUC) and at 1-year follow-up (92% sensitivity, 74% specificity, 0.93 AUC). Predictions of conversion from MCI to AD were good at baseline (77% of MCI converters) and at follow-up (91% of MCI converters). MCI carriers of the APOE e4 allele manifested more atrophy and presented a faster cognitive decline when compared to non-carriers. The derived index demonstrated a steady increase in atrophy over time, yielding higher accuracy in prediction at the time of clinical conversion. Neuropsychological tests appeared less sensitive to changes over time. However, taking the average of the two time points yielded better correlation between the index and cognitive scores as opposed to using cross-sectional data only. Thus, multivariate classification seemed to detect patterns of AD changes before conversion from MCI to AD and including longitudinal information is of great importance.

  10. Blowing Up of Sign-Changing Solutions to an Elliptic Subcritical Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GHOUDI Rabeh

    2012-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the following non linear elliptic problem involving nearly critical exponent (Pkε):(-△)ku =K(x)|u|(4k/(n-2k))-εu ir Ω,△k-1u =…=△u =u =0 on (6)Ω,where Ω is a bounded smooth domain in Rn,IRn,n ≥ 2k + 2,k ≥ 1,ε is a small positive parameter and K is a smooth positive function in (-Ω).We construct signchanging solutions of (Pεk) having two bubbles and blowing up either at two different critical points of K with the same speed or at the same critical point.

  11. UV-induced changes in antioxidant capacities of selected carotenoids toward lecithin in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvetkovic, Dragan [Faculty of Technology, University of Nish, Bulevar oslobodjenja 124, 16000 Leskovac (Serbia); Markovic, Dejan [Faculty of Technology, University of Nish, Bulevar oslobodjenja 124, 16000 Leskovac (Serbia)], E-mail: markovic57@info-net.co.yu

    2008-01-15

    Antioxidant action of four selected carotenoids (two carotenes, {beta}-carotene and lycopene, and two xanthophylls, lutein and neoxanthin) on UV-induced lecithin lipid peroxidation in aqueous solution has been studied by thiobarbituric acid (TBA) test. TBA test is based on absorbance measurements of complex formed between malondialdehyde, secondary product of lipid peroxidation and thiobarbituric acid, at 532 nm. The antioxidant capacities of investigated carotenoids appeared to be strongly affected by UV-action. High energy input of the involved UV-photons plays major governing role, though a certain impact of the carotenoid structures cannot be neglected. The results suggest a minor remained contribution of selected carotenoids to prevention of lecithin peroxidation in the studied system as a result of UV-irradiation.

  12. Morphology changes upon scaling a high-efficiency, solution-processed solar cell

    KAUST Repository

    Ro, Hyun Wook

    2016-08-02

    Solution processing via roll-to-roll (R2R) coating promises a low cost, low thermal budget, sustainable revolution for the production of solar cells. Poly[(5,6-difluoro-2,1,3-benzothiadiazol-4,7-diyl)-alt-(3,3′′′-di(2-octyldodecyl)-2,2′;5′,2′′;5′′,2′′′-quaterthiophen-5,5-diyl)], PffBT4T-2OD, has recently been shown to achieve high power conversion efficiency (>10%) paired with multiple acceptors when thick films are spun-coat from hot solutions. We present detailed morphology studies of PffBT4T-2OD based bulk heterojunction films deposited by the volume manufacturing compatible techniques of blade-coating and slot-die coating. Significant aspects of the film morphology, the average crystal domain orientation and the distribution of the characteristic phase separation length scales, are remarkably different when deposited by the scalable techniques vs. spun-coat. Yet, we find that optimized blade-coated devices achieve PCE > 9.5%, nearly the same as spun-coat. These results challenge some widely accepted propositions regarding what is an optimal BHJ morphology and suggest the hypothesis that diversity in the morphology that supports high performance may be a characteristic of manufacturable systems, those that maintain performance when coated thicker than ≈200 nm. In situ measurements reveal the key differences in the solidification routes for spin- and blade-coating leading to the distinct film structures. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  13. Changes in Soil Solution Cu and Zn Follogwing Application of Alkaline Stabilised Sewage Sludge and Gamma-Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    A glasshouse pot experiment was conducted to study study changes in the solubility of copper and zinc in the soil-plant system follwing heavy application of sewage sludge and partial sterilisation of the sludge/soil mixture,A silghtly acid sandy loam was mixed with alkaline stabilised and composted urban sewage sludge solids ('Agri-Soil',180 t hm-2),and the soil/sludge mixture was γ-irradiated( 10 kGy).The contrasts without the application of sewage sludge and γ-irradiation were also included in the experiment.Perennial ryegrass(Lolium perenne,cv.Magella) was grown on irradiated and unirradiated soils for 50 days. Soil solution samples were obtained using soil suction samplers immediately before plant transplantation and every ten days thereafter.The soil solution smmples were used directly for determination of Cu and Zn,together with pH,electrical conductivity(EC) and absorbance at wavelength 360 nm(A360).Application of Agri-Soil led to a substantial increase in dissolved Cu and a significant derease in dissolved Zn in the soil solution and thess effect were accompanied by increased soil solution pH ,EC and A360 ,The alkaline sludge product(Agri-Soil) in combination with γ-irradiation also led to pronounced elevtion of Cu and A360 but a marked decline in EC, indicatig an increase in dissolvedorganic compounds and a decrease in the ionic strength of the soil solution ,The dissolved Cu and Zn,EC and A360 usually decreased while the ph increased fter plant growth for 50 days.

  14. [Aluminum dissolution and changes of pH in soil solution during sorption of copper by aggregates of paddy soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hai-Bo; Zhao, Dao-Yuan; Qin, Chao; Li, Yu-Jiao; Dong, Chang-Xun

    2014-01-01

    Size fractions of soil aggregates in Lake Tai region were collected by the low-energy ultrasonic dispersion and the freeze-desiccation methods. The dissolution of aluminum and changes of pH in soil solution during sorption of Cu2+ and changes of the dissolution of aluminum at different pH in the solution of Cu2+ by aggregates were studied by the equilibrium sorption method. The results showed that in the process of Cu2+ sorption by aggregates, the aluminum was dissoluted and the pH decreased. The elution amount of aluminum and the decrease of pH changed with the sorption of Cu2+, both increasing with the increase of Cu2+ sorption. Under the same conditions, the dissolution of aluminum and the decrease of pH were in the order of coarse silt fraction > silt fraction > sand fraction > clay fraction, which was negatively correlated with the amount of iron oxide, aluminum and organic matter. It suggested that iron oxide, aluminum and organic matters had inhibitory and buffering effect on the aluminum dissolution and the decrease of pH during the sorption of Cu2+.

  15. Identification of Water Scarcity and Providing Solutions for Adapting to Climate Changes in the Heihe River Basin of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangzheng Deng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In ecologically fragile areas with arid climate, such as the Heihe River Basin in northwestern China, sustainable social and economic development depends largely on the availability and sustainable uses of water resource. However, there is more and more serious water resource shortage and decrease of water productivity in Heihe River Basin under the influence of climate change and human activities. This paper attempts to identify the severe water scarcity under climate change and presents possible solutions for sustainable development in Heihe River Basin. Three problems that intervened land use changes, water resource, the relevant policies and institutions in Heihe River basin were identified, including (1 water scarcity along with serious contradiction between water supply and demand, (2 irrational water consumption structure along with low efficiency, and (3 deficient systems and institutions of water resource management along with unreasonable water allocation scheme. In this sense, we focused on reviewing the state of knowledge, institutions, and successful practices to cope with water scarcity at a regional extent. Possible solutions for dealing with water scarcity are explored and presented from three perspectives: (1 scientific researches needed by scientists, (2 management and institution formulation needed by governments, and (3 water resource optimal allocation by the manager at all administrative levels.

  16. Thermal emissions and climate change: a nuclear problem and a photovoltaic solution?

    CERN Document Server

    Cowern, Nick E B

    2008-01-01

    Global warming is a consequence of 'temperature forcing', a net imbalance between energy fluxes entering and leaving the global climate system and energy generation within this system. Humanity introduces positive forcings through greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, agriculture, and increasingly thermal emissions - heat released as a result of energy generation and use. Up to now, climate change projections have neglected thermal emissions, and typically assume a peak in forcing due to GHG emissions around the middle of this century [1,2]. Here we show that, if humanity's future energy use grows at just 1% per year, slower than in recent history, and if thermal emissions are not controlled through changes in technology, the total forcing due to all emissions will not peak and decline significantly as currently predicted, but after a slight dip will continue to rise. This problem can be combated by geoengineering [3] and mitigated by renewable energy sources that minimize waste heat. Such approaches could be combi...

  17. Chemical Changes at the Interface Between Low Carbon Steel and an Al-Si Alloy During Solution Heat Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    International audience; The aim of this work was to characterize the chemical changes during solid state solution heat treatment of a metallurgically bonded steel/Al-Si interface. For this purpose, low carbon steel plates covered with the A-S7G03 aluminium alloy (7wt%Si, 0.3wt%Mg analogous to A356) were prepared by dip coating, water-quenching to room temperature and reheating in the solid state at 480-560°C for 3 to 160 hours. Upon reheating at 535 °C, a reaction layer was observed to grow a...

  18. Gastric Mucosal Changes Caused by Lugol's Iodine Solution Spray: Endoscopic Features of 64 Cases on Screening Esophagogastroduodenoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Tsurumaru

    2010-01-01

    findings: fold thickening, exudates, ulcers, and hemorrhage. Results. Mucosal changes occurred after Lugol's solution spray totally in 51 patients (80%. Fold thickening was observed in all 51 patients (80%, and a reticular pattern of white lines was found on the surface of the thickened gastric folds found in 28 of the patients (44%. Exudates were observed in 6 patients (9%. Conclusion. The gastric mucosa could be affected by Lugol's iodine; the most frequent endoscopic finding of this effect is gastric fold thickening, which should not be misdiagnosed as a severe gastric disease.

  19. Bellagio report on Healthy agriculture, healthy nutrition, healthy people⋆

    OpenAIRE

    Simopoulos Artemis P.; Bourne Peter G.; Faergeman Ole

    2013-01-01

    The Bellagio Report on Healthy agriculture, healthy nutrition, healthy people is the result of the meeting held at the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center in Lake Como, Italy, 29 October–2 November 2012. The meeting was science-based but policy-oriented. The role and amount of healthy and unhealthy fats, with attention to the relative content of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, sugar, and particularly fructose in foods that m...

  20. The role of interactions in a world implementing adaptation and mitigation solutions to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Rachel

    2011-01-13

    The papers in this volume discuss projections of climate change impacts upon humans and ecosystems under a global mean temperature rise of 4°C above preindustrial levels. Like most studies, they are mainly single-sector or single-region-based assessments. Even the multi-sector or multi-region approaches generally consider impacts in sectors and regions independently, ignoring interactions. Extreme weather and adaptation processes are often poorly represented and losses of ecosystem services induced by climate change or human adaptation are generally omitted. This paper addresses this gap by reviewing some potential interactions in a 4°C world, and also makes a comparison with a 2°C world. In a 4°C world, major shifts in agricultural land use and increased drought are projected, and an increased human population might increasingly be concentrated in areas remaining wet enough for economic prosperity. Ecosystem services that enable prosperity would be declining, with carbon cycle feedbacks and fire causing forest losses. There is an urgent need for integrated assessments considering the synergy of impacts and limits to adaptation in multiple sectors and regions in a 4°C world. By contrast, a 2°C world is projected to experience about one-half of the climate change impacts, with concomitantly smaller challenges for adaptation. Ecosystem services, including the carbon sink provided by the Earth's forests, would be expected to be largely preserved, with much less potential for interaction processes to increase challenges to adaptation. However, demands for land and water for biofuel cropping could reduce the availability of these resources for agricultural and natural systems. Hence, a whole system approach to mitigation and adaptation, considering interactions, potential human and species migration, allocation of land and water resources and ecosystem services, will be important in either a 2°C or a 4°C world.

  1. Solute changes during aquifer storage recovery testing in a limestone/clastic aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirecki, J.E.; Campbell, B.G.; Conlon, K.J.; Petkewich, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    Aquifer storage recovery (ASR) was tested in the Santee Limestone/Black Mingo Aquifer near Charleston, South Carolina, to assess the feasibility for subsurface storage of treated drinking water. Water quality data obtained during two representative ASR tests were interpreted to show three things: (1) recovery efficiency of ASR in this geological setting; (2) possible changes in physical characteristics of the aquifer during ASR testing; and (3) water quality changes and potability of recovered water during short (one- and six-day) storage durations in the predominantly carbonate aquifer. Recovery efficiency for both ASR tests reported here was 54%. Successive ASR tests increased aquifer permeability of the Santee Limestone/Black Mingo Aquifer. It is likely that aquifer permeability increased during short storage periods due to dissolution of carbonate minerals and amorphous silica in aquifer material by treated drinking water. Dissolution resulted in an estimated 0.3% increase in pore volume of the permeable zones. Ground water composition generally evolved from a sodium-calcium bicarbonate water to a sodium chloride water during storage and recovery. After short duration, stored water can exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant level (MCL) for chloride (250 mg/L). However, sulfate, fluoride, and trihalomethane concentrations remained below MCLs during storage and recovery.Aquifer storage recovery (ASR) was tested in the Santee Limestone/Black Mingo Aquifer near Charleston, South Carolina, to assess the feasibility for subsurface storage of treated drinking water. Water quality data obtained during two representative ASR tests were interpreted to show three things: (1) recovery efficiency of ASR in this geological setting; (2) possible changes in physical characteristics of the aquifer during ASR testing; and (3) water quality changes and potability of recovered water during short (one- and six-day) storage durations in the predominantly

  2. Healthy Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as difficulty adjusting to glare, and distinguishing some colors, particularly shades of blue and green. Some common vision problems require glasses or contacts to see clearly and up close. However, these changes can be easily corrected and won’t lead ...

  3. Morphological changes of olivine grains reacted with amino acid solutions by impact process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Yuhei; Takase, Atsushi; Fukunaga, Nao; Sekine, Toshimori; Kobayashi, Takamichi; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2017-03-01

    Early oceans on Earth might have contained certain amounts of biomolecules such as amino acids, and they were subjected to meteorite impacts, especially during the late heavy bombardment. We performed shock recovery experiments by using a propellant gun in order to simulate shock reactions among olivine as a representative meteorite component, water and biomolecules in oceans in the process of marine meteorite impacts. In the present study, recovered solid samples were analyzed by using X-ray powder diffraction method, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The analytical results on shocked products in the recovered sample showed (1) morphological changes of olivine to fiber- and bamboo shoot-like crystals, and to pulverized grains; and features of lumpy surfaces affected by hot water, (2) the formation of carbon-rich substances derived from amino acids, and (3) the incorporation of metals from container into samples. According to the present results, fine-grained olivine in meteorites might have morphologically changed and shock-induced chemical reactions might have been enhanced so that amino acids related to the origin of life may have transformed to carbon-rich substances by impacts.

  4. Morphological changes of olivine grains reacted with amino acid solutions by impact process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Yuhei; Takase, Atsushi; Fukunaga, Nao; Sekine, Toshimori; Kobayashi, Takamichi; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2016-10-01

    Early oceans on Earth might have contained certain amounts of biomolecules such as amino acids, and they were subjected to meteorite impacts, especially during the late heavy bombardment. We performed shock recovery experiments by using a propellant gun in order to simulate shock reactions among olivine as a representative meteorite component, water and biomolecules in oceans in the process of marine meteorite impacts. In the present study, recovered solid samples were analyzed by using X-ray powder diffraction method, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The analytical results on shocked products in the recovered sample showed (1) morphological changes of olivine to fiber- and bamboo shoot-like crystals, and to pulverized grains; and features of lumpy surfaces affected by hot water, (2) the formation of carbon-rich substances derived from amino acids, and (3) the incorporation of metals from container into samples. According to the present results, fine-grained olivine in meteorites might have morphologically changed and shock-induced chemical reactions might have been enhanced so that amino acids related to the origin of life may have transformed to carbon-rich substances by impacts.

  5. Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power Phase 1 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Songgang

    2013-05-15

    The primary purpose of this project is to develop and validate an innovative, scalable phase change salt thermal energy storage (TES) system that can interface with Infinia’s family of free-piston Stirling engines (FPSE). This TES technology is also appropriate for Rankine and Brayton power converters. Solar TES systems based on latent heat of fusion rather than molten salt temperature differences, have many advantages that include up to an order of magnitude higher energy storage density, much higher temperature operation, and elimination of pumped loops for most of Infinia’s design options. DOE has funded four different concepts for solar phase change TES, including one other Infinia awarded project using heat pipes to transfer heat to and from the salt. The unique innovation in this project is an integrated TES/pool boiler heat transfer system that is the simplest approach identified to date and arguably has the best potential for minimizing the levelized cost of energy (LCOE). The Phase 1 objectives are to design, build and test a 1-hour TES proof-of-concept lab demonstrator integrated with an Infinia 3 kW Stirling engine, and to conduct a preliminary design of a 12-hour TES on-sun prototype.

  6. Advances in sensor adaptation to changes in ambient light: a bio-inspired solution - biomed 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Brian; Wright, Cameron H G; Barrett, Stephen F

    2010-01-01

    Fly-inspired sensors have been shown to have many interesting qualities such as hyperacuity (or an ability to achieve movement resolution beyond the theoretical limit), extreme sensitivity to motion, and (through software simulation) image edge extraction, motion detection, and orientation and location of a line. Many of these qualities are beyond the ability of traditional computer vision sensors such as charge-coupled device (CCD) arrays. To obtain these characteristics, a prototype fly-inspired sensor has been built and tested in a laboratory environment and shows promise. Any sophisticated visual system, whether man made or natural, must adequately adapt to lighting conditions; therefore, light adaptation is a vital milestone in getting the fly eye vision sensor prototype working in real-world conditions. A design based on the common house fly, Musca domestica, was suggested in a paper presented to RMBS 2009 and showed an ability to remove 72-86% of effects due to ambient light changes. In this paper, a more advanced version of this design is discussed. This new design is able to remove 97-99% of the effects due to changes in ambient light, by more accurately approximating the light adaptation process used by the common house fly.

  7. Effectiveness of Australia’s Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service®: maintenance of self-reported anthropometric and behavioural changes after program completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service® (GHS) is a population-wide telephone-based program aimed at assisting adults to implement lifestyle improvements. It is a relatively uncommon example of the translation of efficacious trials to up-scaled real-world application. GHS participants who completed the 6-month coaching program made significant initial improvements to their weight, waist circumference, Body Mass Index (BMI), physical activity and nutrition behaviours. This study examines the maintenance of anthropometric and behaviour change improvements 6-months after program completion. Methods GHS coaching participants (n=1088) were recruited between February 2009 and June 2011. Participants were eligible if they completed the 6-month coaching program and had available data at 12-month follow-up (n=277). Weight, waist circumference, BMI, fruit and vegetable consumption and physical activity were collected at baseline and 6-months by GHS coaches and 12-months (6-months post program) by independent evaluators. Matched pair t-tests, mixed linear regression and logistic regression analyses were performed to assess maintenance of program effects. Results Improvements in weight (−2.9 kg, 95% CI: -3.6, -2.1), waist circumference (−5.4 cm, 95% CI: -6.7, -4.1), BMI (−1.1units, 95% CI: -1.5, -0.8), and fruit (+0.3 serves per day, 95% CI: 0.2, 0.3) and vegetable (+0.5 serves per day 95% CI: 0.3, 0.6) consumption were observed from baseline to 12-months. Apart from vegetable consumption, there were no significant differences between 6-month and 12-month changes from baseline, indicating these risk factor improvements were maintained from the end of the coaching program. There were also improvements in the proportion of participants undertaking recommended levels of physical activity from baseline to 12-months (increase of 5.2%), however the improvements made at end of the coaching program were not maintained at the 6-month follow up. Conclusions

  8. Feeding healthy beagles medium-chain triglycerides, fish oil, and carnitine offsets age-related changes in serum fatty acids and carnitine metabolites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean A Hall

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine if feeding dogs medium-chain triglycerides (MCT, fish oil, and L-carnitine enriched foods offsets age-associated changes in serum fatty acids (FA and carnitine metabolites. Forty-one healthy Beagles, mean age 9.9 years (range 3.1 to 14.8, were fed control or one of two treatment foods for 6 months. All foods were complete and balanced and met the nutrient requirements for adult dogs, and had similar concentrations of moisture, protein, and fat (approx. 7.4%, 14.0%, and 18.1%, respectively. The treatment diets both contained added L-carnitine (300 mg/kg and 0.6% (treatment food 1 or 1.5% (treatment food 2 added fish oil. Treatment food 2 also had increased MCT from coconut oil, added corn oil, and reduced animal fat. Composition of serum FA was determined by gas chromatography of FA methyl esters. Metabolomic profiles of serum samples were determined from extracted supernatants that were split and run on GC/MS and LC/MS/MS platforms, for identification and relative quantification of small metabolites. Body composition was determined by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Among dog groups, there was no change in total-lean-body weight, or in serum total protein and serum albumin concentrations, based on time or dietary treatment. Serum concentrations of carnitine metabolites were decreased in geriatric (>7 years vs. mature adult (≤ 7 years dogs, and supplementation with L-carnitine attenuated the effects of aging. The ratio of PUFA to SFA was significantly greater in mature dogs at baseline (P ≤ 0.05. Serum concentrations of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic FA increased in a dose-dependent manner. Dogs consuming treatment food 2 also had increased serum concentrations of lauric and myristic FA, and decreased concentrations of SFA, MUFA, and arachidonate (all P ≤ 0.05 and their PUFA to SFA ratio increased. In summary, dietary MCT, fish oil, and L-carnitine counterbalanced the effects of aging on

  9. Change of the layout of an office of a metallurgical company: simple projects, big solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Luiz Carlos da Silva; Eckhardt, Moacir; da Motta, Giordano Paulo

    2012-01-01

    The posture, a good organization and the proper layout of the environment and workplaces have a positive influence on the income of an employee. To develop the work it is used a methodology that addressed the study phases of the theory involving the subject, description of the current situation, preparation of conceptions, choice of design, implementation and reporting of results. Through the project of "Change of the layout of an office of a metallurgical company" there was an intervention in these reported aspects providing improvements in the office, regarding ergonomic, layout, workplace and lighting issues, bringing welfare to the official, with the intent to improve its performance within the company and facilitating its actions, as the company's customer service. The results provided improvements in layout, in the workplace and especially in comfort for the human resources that perform their activities.

  10. On the JWKB solution of the uniformly lengthening pendulum via change of independent variable in the Bessel’s equation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CO¸SKUN DENIZ

    2017-01-01

    Common recipe for the lengthening pendulum (LP) involves some change of variables to give a relationship with the Bessel’s equation. In this work, conventional semiclassical JWKB solution (named after Jeffreys, Wentzel, Kramers and Brillouin) of the LP is being obtained by first transforming the related Bessel’s equation into the normal form ‘via the suggested change of independent variable’. JWKB approximation of the first-order Bessel functions $(ν = 1)$ of both types along with their zeros are being obtained analytically with a very good accuracy as a result of the appropriately chosen associated initial values and they are extended to the neighbouring orders $(ν = 0$ and $2)$ by the recursion relations. The required initial values are also being studied anda quantization rule regarding the experimental LP parameters is being determined. Although common numerical methods given in the literature require adiabatic LP systems where the lengthening rate is slow, JWKB solution presented here can safely be used for higher lengthening rates and a criterion for its validity is determined by the JWKB applicability criterion given in the literature. As a result, the semiclassical JWKB method which is normallyused for the quantum mechanical and optical waveguide systems is applied to the classical LP system successfully.

  11. On the JWKB solution of the uniformly lengthening pendulum via change of independent variable in the Bessel's equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, Coşkun

    2017-01-01

    Common recipe for the lengthening pendulum (LP) involves some change of variables to give a relationship with the Bessel's equation. In this work, conventional semiclassical JWKB solution (named after Jeffreys, Wentzel, Kramers and Brillouin) of the LP is being obtained by first transforming the related Bessel's equation into the normal form `via the suggested change of independent variable'. JWKB approximation of the first-order Bessel functions ( ν=1) of both types along with their zeros are being obtained analytically with a very good accuracy as a result of the appropriately chosen associated initial values and they are extended to the neighbouring orders ( ν=0 and 2) by the recursion relations. The required initial values are also being studied and a quantization rule regarding the experimental LP parameters is being determined. Although common numerical methods given in the literature require adiabatic LP systems where the lengthening rate is slow, JWKB solution presented here can safely be used for higher lengthening rates and a criterion for its validity is determined by the JWKB applicability criterion given in the literature. As a result, the semiclassical JWKB method which is normally used for the quantum mechanical and optical waveguide systems is applied to the classical LP system successfully.

  12. pH-Dependent retention changes during membrane filtration of aluminum-coagulated solutions and the effect of precentrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérubé, Denis; Dorea, Caetano

    2013-03-19

    During jar tests on alum-based drinking water treatment, dissolved Al determinations on solutions coagulated at pH ≥ 6.5 were not reproducible. These determinations were performed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after syringe filtration (0.45 μm polyethersulfone membrane). In order to better define these anomalies, the filtrates were collected in sequential fractions of 7.5 mL. At coagulation pHs of 6.5 and 7.0, retention changes were demonstrated by large filtrate concentration reductions at all temperatures tested (0.1, 5.0, and 17.0 °C). In all cases, the concentrations converged to levels low range of the minimum solubility domain, at pHs 5.5 and 6.0. The retention changes were also eliminated by precentrifugation (7000 g for 45 min; pH 6.5-7.2). At weaker precentrifugation conditions, as well as by varying membrane surface area or membrane fouling, the filtrate concentrations behaved according to a barrier buildup at the membrane-solution interface by unsettled flocculation residuals. The influence of flocculation time and temperature emphasized the importance of reaction rates, which could be enhanced at the interface by concentration polarization effects. These phenomena have implications on analytical protocols and on filtration in full-scale treatment.

  13. Healthy ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, Adrian Paul; Brüggemann, Dagmar Adeline; Bartels, Else Marie;

    2009-01-01

    The study employed mechanical stretching in vitro of sections of abdominal aorta of elderly mice to investigate any benefits of oral treatment with alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) on arterial elasticity. Eighteen female mice (50-weeks-old) were assigned to a control (2% w/v) Na2-AKG or (2% w/v) a Ca...... a 93% (P elderly mice, a change that occurred despite an increase in total collagen content. Alpha-ketoglutarate warrants further...

  14. Investigating the Structural Change in Protein Aqueous Solution using Temperature-Dependent Near-Infrared Spectroscopy and Continuous Wavelet Transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Mengli; Cai, Wensheng; Shao, Xueguang

    2016-09-20

    The circulatory protein, human serum albumin (HSA), is widely used as a model protein for the study of protein structure. In this work, the structures of human serum albumin in aqueous solutions are studied using temperature-dependent near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy with the aid of continuous wavelet transform (CWT). Near-infrared spectra of human serum albumin solutions with different concentrations were measured over a temperature range of 30-85 ℃. Then, continuous wavelet transform was performed on the spectra to enhance the resolution. As a result of the resolution enhancement, spectral bands around 4361, 4521, 4600 and 4260 cm(-1) were extracted from the overlapping low-resolution signals. The four bands can be assigned to the protein structures of α-helix, β-sheet, an intermediate state and side chains, respectively. The variations in intensity of the bands around 4361 and 4521 cm(-1) with temperature show that the increase of temperature leads to the loss of α-helical structure but the formation of β-sheet, and the denaturation temperature of human serum albumin is about 55 ℃. The variation of the band around 4600 cm(-1) indicates that the temperature-induced unfolding process of human serum albumin occurs through a stable intermediate state, and a significant change in the microenvironment of the side chains about 63 ℃ is observed from the variation of the band around 4260 cm(-1) On the other hand, the transformed spectra in the region of 8000-5600 cm(-1) provide an explicit evidence for the structural changes of water during the process of protein denaturation, and the unfolding process of HSA can be reflected by these changes.

  15. INTERFACIAL FREE-ENERGY CHANGES OCCURRING DURING BSA ADSORPTION IN SOLUTION DROPLETS ON FEP-TEFLON SURFACES AS MEASURED BY ADSA-P

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BUSSCHER, HJ; VANDERVEGT, W; SCHAKENRAAD, JM; VANDERMEI, HC

    1991-01-01

    Axisymmetric drop shape analysis by profile (ADSA-P) was employed to determine the interfacial free energy changes occurring during bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption from solution droplets on fluoroethylenepropylene-Teflon (FEP-Teflon). 100-mu-l droplets of BSA solutions on FEP-Teflon were follo

  16. Healthy Family 2009: Assuring Healthy Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Healthy Family 2009 Assuring Healthy Aging Past Issues / Winter 2009 ... for steady, modest loss. Seek emotional support from family and friends. Expect setbacks; forgive yourself. Make physical ...

  17. Mobile Health Applications to Promote Active and Healthy Ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbostad, Jorunn L; Vereijken, Beatrix; Becker, Clemens; Todd, Chris; Taraldsen, Kristin; Pijnappels, Mirjam; Aminian, Kamiar; Mellone, Sabato

    2017-03-18

    The European population is ageing, and there is a need for health solutions that keep older adults independent longer. With increasing access to mobile technology, such as smartphones and smartwatches, the development and use of mobile health applications is rapidly growing. To meet the societal challenge of changing demography, mobile health solutions are warranted that support older adults to stay healthy and active and that can prevent or delay functional decline. This paper reviews the literature on mobile technology, in particular wearable technology, such as smartphones, smartwatches, and wristbands, presenting new ideas on how this technology can be used to encourage an active lifestyle, and discusses the way forward in order further to advance development and practice in the field of mobile technology for active, healthy ageing.

  18. Mobile Health Applications to Promote Active and Healthy Ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbostad, Jorunn L.; Vereijken, Beatrix; Becker, Clemens; Todd, Chris; Taraldsen, Kristin; Pijnappels, Mirjam; Aminian, Kamiar; Mellone, Sabato

    2017-01-01

    The European population is ageing, and there is a need for health solutions that keep older adults independent longer. With increasing access to mobile technology, such as smartphones and smartwatches, the development and use of mobile health applications is rapidly growing. To meet the societal challenge of changing demography, mobile health solutions are warranted that support older adults to stay healthy and active and that can prevent or delay functional decline. This paper reviews the literature on mobile technology, in particular wearable technology, such as smartphones, smartwatches, and wristbands, presenting new ideas on how this technology can be used to encourage an active lifestyle, and discusses the way forward in order further to advance development and practice in the field of mobile technology for active, healthy ageing. PMID:28335475

  19. Changes in glomerular filtration rate, lithium clearance and plasma protein clearances in the early phase after unilateral nephrectomy in living healthy renal transplant donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandgaard, S; Kamper, A; Skaarup, P;

    1988-01-01

    1. Glomerular and tubular function was studied before and 2 months after unilateral nephrectomy in 14 healthy kidney donors by measurement of the clearances of 51Cr-labelled ethylenediaminetetra-acetate, lithium, beta 2-microglobulin, albumin and immunoglobulin G. 2. The glomerular filtration rate...

  20. Students’ beliefs and behaviour regarding low-calorie beverages, sweets or snacks: are they affected by lessons on healthy food and by changes to school vending machines?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kocken, P.L.; Kesteren, N.M.C. van; Buijs, G.; Snel, J.; Dusseldorp, E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of school lessons about healthy food on adolescents’ self-reported beliefs and behaviour regarding the purchase and consumption of soft drinks, water and extra foods, including sweets and snacks. The lessons were combined with the introduction of lower-calorie foods, f

  1. Having a Healthy Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Having a Healthy Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Teens > Having a Healthy Pregnancy A ... or she can help you to get treatment. Pregnancy Discomforts Pregnancy can cause some uncomfortable side effects. ...

  2. Healthy Dining Hall Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Healthy Dining Hall Eating KidsHealth > For Teens > Healthy Dining Hall Eating ... likely to eat. previous continue Overcoming Common Dining Hall Mistakes Even the most attentive diners can still ...

  3. Healthy food trends -- quinoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy food trends - goosefoot; Healthy snacks - quinoa; Weight loss - quinoa; Healthy diet - quinoa; Wellness - quinoa ... Quinoa is rich in protein . It has almost twice the amount of protein found in oats, and ...

  4. Keeping Your Voice Healthy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Keeping Your Voice Healthy Keeping Your Voice Healthy Patient Health Information ... heavily voice-related. Key Steps for Keeping Your Voice Healthy Drink plenty of water. Moisture is good ...

  5. Healthy food trends -- kale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy food trends - borecole; Healthy snacks - kale; Weight loss - kale; Healthy diet - kale; Wellness - kale ... drugs), you may need to limit vitamin K foods. Vitamin K can affect how these medicines work. ...

  6. Healthy Vision Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NEI for Kids > Healthy Vision Tips All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series ... Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables Healthy Vision Tips Healthy vision starts with you! Use these ...

  7. Healthy Lifestyle: Children's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Children's health You want your child to eat healthy foods, but do you know which nutrients ... 16, 2016 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/childrens-health/in-depth/nutrition-for-kids/art- ...

  8. Healthy Sleep Habits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sleep Apnea Testing CPAP Healthy Sleep Habits Healthy Sleep Habits Your behaviors during the day, and especially ... team at an AASM accredited sleep center . Quick Sleep Tips Follow these tips to establish healthy sleep ...

  9. Positive Solutions of a Third-Order Three-Point BVP with Sign-Changing Green’s Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Juan Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We are concerned with the following third-order three-point boundary value problem: u′′′t=ft, ut,   t∈0, 1,   u′0=u1=0 and  u′′η-αu′1=0, where α∈0, 1 and η∈(14+α/(24-3α,1. Although the corresponding Green’s function is sign-changing, we still obtain the existence of at least two positive and decreasing solutions under some suitable conditions on f by using the two-fixed-point theorem due to Avery and Henderson.

  10. Bellagio Report on Healthy Agriculture, Healthy Nutrition, Healthy People

    OpenAIRE

    Ole Faergeman; Simopoulos, Artemis P.; Peter G. Bourne

    2013-01-01

    The Bellagio Report on Healthy Agriculture, Healthy Nutrition, Healthy People is the result of the meeting held at the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center in Lake Como, Italy, 29 October–2 November 2012. The meeting was science-based but policy-oriented. The role and amount of healthy and unhealthy fats, with attention to the relative content of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, sugar, and particularly fructose in foods that may underlie the epidemics of non-communicable diseases (NCD’s) wo...

  11. Benchmarking of numerical codes against analytical solutions for multidimensional multicomponent diffusive transport coupled with precipitation-dissolution reactions and porosity changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayek, M.; Kosakowski, G.; Jakob, A.; Churakov, S.

    2012-04-01

    Numerical computer codes dealing with precipitation-dissolution reactions and porosity changes in multidimensional reactive transport problems are important tools in geoscience. Recent typical applications are related to CO2 sequestration, shallow and deep geothermal energy, remediation of contaminated sites or the safe underground storage of chemotoxic and radioactive waste. Although the agreement between codes using the same models and similar numerical algorithms is satisfactory, it is known that the numerical methods used in solving the transport equation, as well as different coupling schemes between transport and chemistry, may lead to systematic discrepancies. Moreover, due to their inability to describe subgrid pore space changes correctly, the numerical approaches predict discretization-dependent values of porosity changes and clogging times. In this context, analytical solutions become an essential tool to verify numerical simulations. We present a benchmark study where we compare a two-dimensional analytical solution for diffusive transport of two solutes coupled with a precipitation-dissolution reaction causing porosity changes with numerical solutions obtained with the COMSOL Multiphysics code and with the reactive transport code OpenGeoSys-GEMS. The analytical solution describes the spatio-temporal evolution of solutes and solid concentrations and porosity. We show that both numerical codes reproduce the analytical solution very well, although distinct differences in accuracy can be traced back to specific numerical implementations.

  12. Structure induced Yb valence changes in the solid solution Yb(x)Ca(1-x)C2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Pascal; Glatzel, Pieter; Kvashnina, Kristina; Trots, Dmytro M; Smith, Ronald I; Ruschewitz, Uwe

    2013-06-17

    The solid solution Yb(x)Ca(1-x)C2 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) was synthesized by reaction of the elements at 1323 K. The crystal structures within this solid solution, as elucidated from synchrotron powder diffraction data, depend on x and exhibit some interesting features that point to a structure dependent valence state of Yb. Compounds with x ≥ 0.75 crystallize in the tetragonal CaC2 type structure (I4/mmm, Z = 2) and obey Vegard's law; for x ≤ 0.75 the monoclinic ThC2 type structure (C2/c, Z = 4) is found, which coexists with the monoclinic CaC2-III type structure (C2/m, Z = 4) for x ≤ 0.25. The monoclinic modifications show a strong deviation from Vegard's law. Their unit cell volumes are remarkably larger than expected for a typical Vegard system. HERFD-XANES spectroscopic investigations reveal that different Yb valence states are responsible for the observed volume anomalies. While all tetragonal compounds contain mixed-valent Yb with ∼75% Yb(3+) (similar to pure YbC2), all monoclinic modifications contain exclusively Yb(2+). Therefore, Yb(x)Ca(1-x)C2 is a very rare example of a Yb containing compound showing a strong structure dependence of the Yb valence state. Moreover, temperature dependent synchrotron powder diffraction, neutron TOF powder diffraction, and HERFD-XANES spectroscopy experiments reveal significant Yb valence changes in some compounds of the Yb(x)Ca(1-x)C2 series that are induced by temperature dependent phase transitions. Transitions from the tetragonal CaC2 type structure to the monoclinic ThC2 or the cubic CaC2-IV type structure (Fm3m, Z = 4) are accompanied by drastic changes of the mean Yb valence from ∼2.70 to 2.0 in compounds with x = 0.75 and x = 0.91. Finally, the determination of lattice strain arising inside the modifications with ordered dumbbells (ThC2 and CaC2 type structures) by DSC measurements corroborated our results concerning the close relationship between crystal structure and Yb valence in the solid solution Yb(x)Ca(1-x

  13. ‘You need a support. When you don’t have that . . . chocolate looks real good’. Barriers to and facilitators of behavioural changes among participants of a Healthy Living Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Holly Ann

    2013-01-01

    Background. Health behavioural change is complex, especially for underserved patients who have higher rates of obesity and physical inactivity. Behavioural change interventions that show high efficacy in clinical trials may be difficult to disseminate and may not be effective in the office. Objective. We sought to identify factors that facilitate or hinder behavioural change among past participants of a healthy lifestyle intervention in an urban underserved health centre. Methods. Between March and October 2011, we conducted five focus group sessions with a total of 23 past participants. The focus group transcripts were analysed with a framework approach using the Social Ecological Model as a coding structure. Results. We found four interconnected levels of social contexts: individual, interpersonal, programmatic and community levels. Themes of social support and the importance of relationships for making and maintaining behavioural changes were found at all levels. Conclusion. Social support and relatedness were key facilitators of healthy lifestyle changes and influenced individual motivation and perseverance. Harnessing the power of social support and motivation may be a way for future behavioural change interventions to bridge the gap between efficacy and effectiveness. PMID:23515375

  14. [Examination of the cause of changing solution color by mixing aminophylline and dopamine, the compatibility of which was indicated by the supplier].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Kawahara, Masami

    2014-01-01

    A case in which aminophylline solution was administered to a patient with congestive heart failure is reported and the problems caused by administration were solved by subsequent experiments. Dopamine solution was added from the side route using a mechanical pump, and mixed with aminophylline solution in the main route. Furosemide was administered after clamping and flushing the main route according to the supplier's information that indicated the compatibility of dopamine and aminophylline. However, the aminophylline solution turned black in color 3 h after furosemide administration. Several examinations were carried out to clarify the cause of the incompatibility in this case. The results showed that solutions with all possible combinations, including aminophylline and dopamine, turned black at 24 h after mixing, and the UV absorption at 430 nm increased from 0 to 0.28. UV absorption of the mixed solution increased in a dopamine dose-dependent manner in the range of 1.5-12 mg. When aminophylline was added to physiological saline or hypotonic electrolyte solution, the pH of each solution increased. These results suggested that degradation of dopamine to a melanin-like polymer under alkaline conditions caused the change in color of the solution. It is presumed that dopamine was inappropriately injected into aminophylline solution as the route was clamped tightly to shut out furosemide contamination. Aminophylline and dopamine are often co-administered to patients in critical condition. Thus, even if compatibility of aminophylline with dopamine is indicated by the supplier, they should be administered through separate routes.

  15. A closed-form solution for moving source localization using LBI changing rate of phase difference only

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Min

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the deficiencies in the conventional multiple-receiver localization systems based on direction of arrival (DOA such as system complexity of interferometer or array and amplitude/phase unbalance between multiple receiving channels and constraint on antenna configuration, a new radiated source localization method using the changing rate of phase difference (CRPD measured by a long baseline interferometer (LBI only is studied. To solve the strictly nonlinear problem, a two-stage closed-form solution is proposed. In the first stage, the DOA and its changing rate are estimated from the CRPD of each observer by the pseudolinear least square (PLS method, and then in the second stage, the source position and velocity are found by another PLS minimization. The bias of the algorithm caused by the correlation between the measurement matrix and the noise in the second stage is analyzed. To reduce this bias, an instrumental variable (IV method is derived. A weighted IV estimator is given in order to reduce the estimation variance. The proposed method does not need any initial guess and the computation is small. The Cramer–Rao lower bound (CRLB and mean square error (MSE are also analyzed. Simulation results show that the proposed method can be close to the CRLB with moderate Gaussian measurement noise.

  16. Aluminum-induced changes in properties and fouling propensity of DOM solutions revealed by UV-vis absorbance spectral parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Minghao; Meng, Fangang

    2016-04-15

    The integration of pre-coagulation with ultrafiltration (UF) is expected to not only reduce membrane fouling but also improve natural organic matter (NOM) removal. However, it is difficult to determine the proper coagulant dosage for different water qualities. The objective of this study was to probe the potential of UV-vis spectroscopic analysis to reveal the coagulant-induced changes in the fouling potentials of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and to determine the optimal coagulant dosage. The Zeta potentials (ZPs) and average particle size of the four DOM solutions (Aldrich humic acid (AHA), AHA-sodium alginate (SA), AHA-bovine serum albumin (BSA) and AHA-dextran (DEX)) coagulated with aluminum chloride (AlCl3) were measured. Results showed that increasing the aluminum coagulant dosage induced the aggregation of DOM. Meanwhile, the addition of aluminum coagulant resulted in an increase in DSlope(325-375) (the slope of the log-transformed absorbance spectra from 325 to 375 nm) and a decrease in S(275-295) (the slope of the log-transformed absorption coefficient from 275 to 295 nm) and SR (the ratio of Slope(275-295) and Slope(350-400)). The variations of these spectral parameters (i.e., DSlope(325-375), S(275-295) and SR) correlated well with the aluminum-caused changes in ZPs and average particle size. This implies that spectral parameters have the potential to indicate DOM aggregation. In addition, good correlations of spectral parameters and membrane fouling behaviors (i.e., unified membrane fouling index (UMFI)) suggest that the changes in DSlope(325-375), S(275-295) and SR were indicative of the aluminum-caused alterations of fouling potentials of all DOM solutions. Interestingly, the optimal dosage of aluminum (40 μM for AHA, AHA-BSA, and AHA-DEX) was obtained based on the relation between spectral parameters and fouling behaviors. Overall, the spectroscopic analysis, particularly for the utilization of spectral parameters, provided a convenient approach

  17. Nature-based solutions to climate change mitigation and adaptation in urban areas: Perspectives on indicators, knowledge gaps, barriers, and opportunities for action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Kabisch (Nadja); N. Frantzeskaki (Niki); S. Pauleit (Stephan); Naumann, S. (Sandra); Davis, M. (McKenna); M. Artmann (Martina); D. Haase (Dagmar); Knapp, S. (Sonja); Korn, H. (Horst); Stadler, J. (Jutta); Zaunberger, K. (Karin); Bonn, A. (Aletta)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractNature-based solutions promoting green and blue urban areas have significant potential to decrease the vulnerability and enhance the resilience of cities in light of climatic change. They can thereby help to mitigate climate change-induced impacts and serve as proactive adaptation option

  18. 慢性吸烟者的认知功能调查%Cognitive function changes between smokers and healthy controls and the way to improve it

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩洪瀛; 廖艳辉; 唐劲松; 刘铁桥; 郝伟; 陈晓岗

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the differences of cognitive function between chronic smokers and healthy controls . Methods Digit Symbol Test, Trail Making Test and The Stroop Color-Word Test were used to measure the differences of cognitive function in chronic smokers and nonsmoker healthy volunteers. Results Compared with healthy controls, smokers had significant lower scores in Digit Symbol Test, Trail Making Test and The Stroop Word Test. However, it showed no differences between smokers and nonsmokers in The Stroop Colo Test. Conclusions The findings showed cognitive impairment in chronic cigarette smokers.%目的 了解吸烟者和正常对照者的认知功能差异及提出改善办法.方法 采用认知功能测试量表(包括:数字符号测验、连线测试A和stroop色词测验)对两组人群进行认知功能测试.结果 吸烟者在数字符号测验、连线测试A和stroop词测验方面得分都较正常对照者低,而两组的stroop颜色测验没有差异.结论 本测试结果显示吸烟者可能存在轻度的认知功能损害.

  19. Nature-based solutions to climate change mitigation and adaptation in urban areas: perspectives on indicators, knowledge gaps, barriers, and opportunities for action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Kabisch

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nature-based solutions promoting green and blue urban areas have significant potential to decrease the vulnerability and enhance the resilience of cities in light of climatic change. They can thereby help to mitigate climate change-induced impacts and serve as proactive adaptation options for municipalities. We explore the various contexts in which nature-based solutions are relevant for climate mitigation and adaptation in urban areas, identify indicators for assessing the effectiveness of nature-based solutions and related knowledge gaps. In addition, we explore existing barriers and potential opportunities for increasing the scale and effectiveness of nature-based solution implementation. The results were derived from an inter- and transdisciplinary workshop with experts from research, municipalities, policy, and society. As an outcome of the workshop discussions and building on existing evidence, we highlight three main needs for future science and policy agendas when dealing with nature-based solutions: (i produce stronger evidence on nature-based solutions for climate change adaptation and mitigation and raise awareness by increasing implementation; (ii adapt for governance challenges in implementing nature-based solutions by using reflexive approaches, which implies bringing together new networks of society, nature-based solution ambassadors, and practitioners; (iii consider socio-environmental justice and social cohesion when implementing nature-based solutions by using integrated governance approaches that take into account an integrative and transdisciplinary participation of diverse actors. Taking these needs into account, nature-based solutions can serve as climate mitigation and adaptation tools that produce additional cobenefits for societal well-being, thereby serving as strong investment options for sustainable urban planning.

  20. Climate change threats to population health and well-being: the imperative of protective solutions that will last

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tord Kjellstrom

    2013-04-01

    strategy is, of course, climate change mitigation by significantly reducing global greenhouse gas emissions, especially long-acting carbon dioxide (CO2, and by increasing the uptake of CO2 at the earth's surface. This involves urgent shifts in energy production from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources, energy conservation in building design and urban planning, and reduced waste of energy for transport, building heating/cooling, and agriculture. It would also involve shifts in agricultural production and food systems to reduce energy and water use particularly in meat production. There is also potential for prevention via mitigation, adaptation, or resilience building actions, but for the large populations in tropical countries, mitigation of climate change is required to achieve health protection solutions that will last.

  1. Climate change threats to population health and well-being: the imperative of protective solutions that will last

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellstrom, Tord; McMichael, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    , climate change mitigation by significantly reducing global greenhouse gas emissions, especially long-acting carbon dioxide (CO2), and by increasing the uptake of CO2 at the earth's surface. This involves urgent shifts in energy production from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources, energy conservation in building design and urban planning, and reduced waste of energy for transport, building heating/cooling, and agriculture. It would also involve shifts in agricultural production and food systems to reduce energy and water use particularly in meat production. There is also potential for prevention via mitigation, adaptation, or resilience building actions, but for the large populations in tropical countries, mitigation of climate change is required to achieve health protection solutions that will last. PMID:23561024

  2. Effect of stretching-induced changes in hydrodynamic screening on coil-stretch hysteresis of unentangled polymer solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Ranganathan; Sasmal, Chandi; Nguyen, Duc At; Sridhar, Tam; Prakash, J. Ravi

    2017-01-01

    Extensional rheometry and Brownian dynamics simulations of flexible polymer solutions confirm predictions based on blob concepts that coil-stretch hysteresis in extensional flows increases with concentration, reaching a maximum at the critical overlap concentration c* before progressively vanishing in the semidilute regime. These observations demonstrate that chain stretching strengthens intermolecular hydrodynamic screening in dilute solutions, but weakens it in semidilute solutions. Flow can thus strongly modify the concentration dependence of viscoelastic properties of polymer solutions.

  3. Three-month stability of the CogState brief battery in healthy older adults, mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease: results from the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers, and Lifestyle-rate of change substudy (AIBL-ROCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yen Ying; Jaeger, Judith; Harrington, Karra; Ashwood, Tim; Ellis, Kathryn A; Stöffler, Albrecht; Szoeke, Cassandra; Lachovitzki, Rebecca; Martins, Ralph N; Villemagne, Victor L; Bush, Ashley; Masters, Colin L; Rowe, Christopher C; Ames, David; Darby, David; Maruff, Paul

    2013-06-01

    Large prospective studies of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have sought to understand the pathological evolution of AD and factors that may influence the rate of disease progression. Estimates of rates of cognitive change are available for 12 or 24 months, but not for shorter time frames (e.g., 3 or 6 months). Most clinical drug trials seeking to reduce or modify AD symptoms have been conducted over 12- or 24-week periods. As such, we aimed to characterize the performance of a group of healthy older adults, adults with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), and adults with AD on the CogState battery of tests over short test-retest intervals. This study recruited 105 healthy older adults, 48 adults with aMCI, and 42 adults with AD from the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers, and Lifestyle study and administered the CogState battery monthly over 3 months. The CogState battery of tests showed high test-retest reliability and stability in all clinical groups when participants were assessed over 3 months. When considered at baseline, the CogState battery of tests was able to detect AD-related cognitive impairment. The data provide important estimates of the reliability, stability, and variability of each cognitive test in healthy older adults, adults with aMCI, and adults with AD. This may potentially be used to inform future estimates of cognitive change in clinical trials.

  4. Climate change sheet no. 01. The nuclear: a solution for the greenhouse effect?; Fiche changement climatique no. 01. Le nucleaire: une solution a l'effet de serre?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-01-01

    The electric power production by the nuclear energy is often proposed as a solution to the climatic change problem. This document takes stock on this option with a state of the art, a technical and economical analysis. It concludes that the nuclear energy is not the energy of the sustainable development. (A.L.B.)

  5. Six-month color change and water sorption of 9 new-generation flowable composites in 6 staining solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria ARREGUI

    Full Text Available Abstract Color match and water sorption are two factors that affect restorative materials. Discoloration is essential in the lifespan of restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate color change and water sorption of nine flowable composites at multiple time points over 6 months. 60 samples of each composite were divided into two groups (Color Change and Water Sorption/Solubility. Each Color Change group was divided into six subgroups, which were immersed in distilled water (DW, coffee (CF, Coca-Cola (CC, red wine (RW, tea (TE and orange juice (OJ. The color was measured at the baseline, 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks, and 3 and 6 months and color change values (ΔE were calculated. Each Water Sorption [WS]/Solubility [WL] group was tested according to ISO 4049:2009. The data were evaluated using two-way ANOVA, Fisher’s post-hoc test and Pearson’s correlation test. The composite with the lowest ΔE differed for each solution: Filtek™ Bulk Fill in DW (∆E = 0.73 (0.17–1.759; Vertise Flow in CF (∆E = 14.75 (7.91–27.41, in TE (∆E = 7.27 (2.81–24.81 and OJ (∆E = 3.17 (0.87–9.92; Tetric EvoFlow® in CC (∆E = 1.27 (0.45–4.02; and Filtek™ Supreme XTE in RW (∆E = 8.88 (5.23–19.59. RW caused the most discoloration (∆E = 23.62 (4.93–51.36. Vertise Flow showed the highest water sorption (WS = 69.10 ± 7.19. The Pearson test showed statistically significant positive correlations between water sorption and solubility and between water sorption and ∆E; the positive solubility-∆E correlation was not statistically significant. The findings suggest that water sorption is one factor associated with the ability of composites to discolor; however, discoloration is a multifactorial problem.

  6. Intake of up to 3 Eggs per Day Is Associated with Changes in HDL Function and Increased Plasma Antioxidants in Healthy, Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMarco, Diana M; Norris, Gregory H; Millar, Courtney L; Blesso, Christopher N; Fernandez, Maria Luz

    2017-03-01

    Background: HDL function may be more important than HDL concentration in determining risk for cardiovascular disease. In addition, HDL is a carrier of carotenoids and antioxidant enzymes, which protect HDL and LDL particles against oxidation.Objective: The goal of this study was to determine the impact of consuming 0-3 eggs/d on LDL and HDL particle size, HDL function, and plasma antioxidants in a young, healthy population.Methods: Thirty-eight healthy men and women [age 18-30 y, body mass index (in kg/m(2)) 18.5-29.9] participated in this 14-wk crossover intervention. Subjects underwent a 2-wk washout (0 eggs/d) followed by sequentially increasing intake of 1, 2, and 3 eggs/d for 4 wk each. After each period, fasting blood was collected for analysis of lipoprotein subfractions, plasma apolipoprotein (apo) concentration, lutein and zeaxanthin concentration, and activities of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase, cholesteryl ester transfer protein, and paraoxonase-1.Results: Compared with intake of 0 eggs/d, consuming 1-3 eggs/d resulted in increased large-LDL (21-37%) and large-HDL (6-13%) particle concentrations, plasma apoAI (9-15%), and lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase activity (5-15%) (P HDL function and large-LDL particle concentration; however, intake of 2-3 eggs/d supported greater improvements in HDL function as well as increased plasma carotenoids. Overall, intake of ≤3 eggs/d favored a less atherogenic LDL particle profile, improved HDL function, and increased plasma antioxidants in young, healthy adults. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02531958.

  7. Semisolid meal enriched in oat bran decreases plasma glucose and insulin levels, but does not change gastrointestinal peptide responses or short-term appetite in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juvonen, Kristiina R.; Salmenkallio-Marttila, Marjatta; Lyly, Marika

    2011-01-01

    types and amounts of DF exert are still poorly understood. METHODS AND RESULTS: We investigated the effects of wheat and oat brans alone and as combination in semisolid food matrix on postprandial appetite profile and gastrointestinal (GI) hormonal responses. Twenty healthy, normal-weight subjects (5...... including 5 g wheat bran DF + 5 g oat bran DF. Blood samples were drawn before and 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120 and 180 min after the test meals to determine plasma glucose, ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY) and serum insulin concentrations. Subjective profiles of appetite were assessed using visual analogue scales (VAS...

  8. Light Curve Solutions of an Eclipsing Binary OGLE-GD-ECL-04451 with a Dramatic Change in Amplitude

    CERN Document Server

    Gang, Li; jianning, Fu

    2016-01-01

    We present light curve solutions of the W UMa-type eclipsing binary OGLE-GD-ECL-04451, observed by both the \\emph{Optical Gravitational Lensing Ex-periment} (\\emph{OGLE}) program in 2006 and the \\emph{Antarctica Survey Telescope} (\\emph{AST3-1}) in 2012 at Dome A. We analyzed this binary system with the Wilson-Devinney(W-D) method 2013 version and derived the mass ratio $q=2.91 \\pm 0.07$, the inclination $i=76.86^\\circ \\pm 0.23^\\circ$, and the light variattion amplitud was $0^m.51$ based on the \\emph{OGLE} data. From the \\emph{AST3-1}'s data, we find that the amplitude dropped to $0^m.44$(2012) and the difference of magnitudes of the two light maxima is $0^m.03$. A hot spot was then added on the surface of the secondary to demonstrate the amplitude change and O'Conell effect of the binary system.

  9. Evaluating Maori community initiatives to promote healthy eating, healthy action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamerton, Heather; Mercer, Christine; Riini, Denise; McPherson, Brighid; Morrison, Laurie

    2014-03-01

    Māori, the indigenous people of Aotearoa New Zealand, experience poorer health than non-Māori across a range of health measures. Interventions focused at an individual level have proved largely ineffective; 'bottom-up' approaches where communities determine their own priorities may be more sustainable than 'top-down' approaches where goals are determined by health authorities. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate an innovative health promotion programme aimed at improving Māori health and to discuss the importance of ownership and control of health initiatives by Māori. Evaluators conducted a comprehensive evaluation of a Healthy Eating Healthy Action programme in six small Māori health agencies, gathering information from programme managers and co-ordinators, participants and wider community members about what changes were occurring at individual, family and community levels. Effective interventions built on cultural values and practices and were delivered by Māori with close connections to the community. Changes in nutrition and physical activity made by participants also benefitted their wider families and community. The changes demonstrated subtle but important shifts in thinking about healthy eating and healthy activity that in the longer term could lead to more measurable change towards improved quality of life for people within communities.

  10. Associations of lipoprotein lipase gene rs326 with changes of lipid profiles after a high-carbohydrate and low-fat diet in healthy Chinese Han youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xing-chun; Lin, Jia; Wang, Qian; Liu, Hui; Qiu, Li; Fang, Ding-zhi

    2014-04-23

    To investigate the effects of a high-carbohydrate and low-fat (HC/LF) diet on plasma lipids and apolipoproteins (Apos) of healthy Chinese Han youth with different genotypes of lipoprotein lipase gene (LPL) rs326, 56 subjects were given a washout diet of 30.1% fat and 54.1% carbohydrate for seven days, followed by the HC/LF diet of 13.8% fat and 70.1% carbohydrate for six days, with no total energy restriction. Plasma glucose, triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), Apo B-100 and Apo A-I were analyzed at baseline and before and after the HC/LF diet. The results show that, when compared with before the HC/LF diet, only the male G carriers experienced increased HDL-C (p = 0.008) and Apo A-I (p = 0.005) after the HC/LF diet. Decreased TC in both males and females and increased TG in females were found regardless of the genotype after the HC/LF diet. LDL-C decreased in all the subjects although the decrease was not significant in the female G carriers. These results demonstrate that the G allele of LPL rs326 associates with the elevated levels of HDL-C and Apo A-I after the HC/LF diet in males of the healthy Chinese Han Youth.

  11. Associations of Lipoprotein Lipase Gene rs326 with Changes of Lipid Profiles after a High-Carbohydrate and Low-Fat Diet in Healthy Chinese Han Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-chun Zhu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effects of a high-carbohydrate and low-fat (HC/LF diet on plasma lipids and apolipoproteins (Apos of healthy Chinese Han youth with different genotypes of lipoprotein lipase gene (LPL rs326, 56 subjects were given a washout diet of 30.1% fat and 54.1% carbohydrate for seven days, followed by the HC/LF diet of 13.8% fat and 70.1% carbohydrate for six days, with no total energy restriction. Plasma glucose, triglyceride (TG, total cholesterol (TC, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, Apo B-100 and Apo A-I were analyzed at baseline and before and after the HC/LF diet. The results show that, when compared with before the HC/LF diet, only the male G carriers experienced increased HDL-C (p = 0.008 and Apo A-I (p = 0.005 after the HC/LF diet. Decreased TC in both males and females and increased TG in females were found regardless of the genotype after the HC/LF diet. LDL-C decreased in all the subjects although the decrease was not significant in the female G carriers. These results demonstrate that the G allele of LPL rs326 associates with the elevated levels of HDL-C and Apo A-I after the HC/LF diet in males of the healthy Chinese Han Youth.

  12. A class of analytical solutions for multidimensional multispecies diffusive transport coupled with precipitation-dissolution reactions and porosity changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayek, Mohamed; Kosakowski, Georg; Jakob, Andreas; Churakov, Sergey V.

    2012-03-01

    One of the challenging problems in mathematical geosciences is the determination of analytical solutions of nonlinear partial differential equations describing transport processes in porous media. We are interested in diffusive transport coupled with precipitation-dissolution reactions. Several numerical computer codes that simulate such systems have been developed. Analytical solutions, if they exist, represent an important tool for verification of numerical solutions. We present a methodology for deriving such analytical solutions that are exact and explicit in space and time variables. They describe transport of several aqueous species coupled to precipitation and dissolution of a single mineral in one, two, and three dimensions. As an application, we consider explicit analytical solutions for systems containing one or two solute species that describe the evolution of solutes and solid concentrations as well as porosity. We use one of the proposed analytical solutions to test numerical solutions obtained from two conceptually different reactive transport codes. Both numerical implementations could be verified with the help of the analytical solutions and show good agreement in terms of spatial and temporal evolution of concentrations and porosities.

  13. Comprehensive analysis of changes in clinically significant divalent serum cation levels during automated plateletpheresis in healthy donors in a tertiary care center in North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Solanki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adverse effects due to apheresis are unusual. The most common apheresis-specific reaction is hypocalcemia due to citrate anticoagulation and induces ionized hypocalcemia and hypomagnesemia by chelating effect during the plateletpheresis; generally transient and self-limiting but has the potential of severely injuring donor. We have investigated total calcium (tCa ++ and magnesium (tMg ++ levels in sixty healthy plateletpheresis donors at different intervals during the procedure and 30 min post-procedure. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 procedures were performed on healthy donors. Blood samples were obtained from sterile diversion pouch placed on apheresis circuit. 5 ml sample in plain vials was obtained at different intervals during each procedure and 30 min after the end of the procedure. Samples were used for measurement of tCa ++ and tMg ++ levels. Results: There is continuous decrease in mean tCa ++ from baseline levels (9.83 ± 0.64 mg/dl till end of procedure (8.33 ± 0.78 mg/dl, but after 30 min, levels again reached near their respective baseline values (9.42 ± 0.54 mg/dl. Similarly, mean tMg ++ fell from baseline levels (2.36 ± 0.3 mg/dl till the end of procedure (1.39 ± 0.40 mg/dl. After 30 min, levels were again increased, their respective baseline values (2.25 ± 0.25 mg/dl. Conclusion: There is continuous, gradual, and significant fall (P < 0.05 in mean tCa ++ and mean tMg ++ from baseline levels to till the end of procedure but after 30 min of completion of procedure, levels again reached near their respective baseline values.

  14. GH administration changes myosin heavy chain isoforms in skeletal muscle but does not augment muscle strength or hypertrophy, either alone or combined with resistance exercise training in healthy elderly men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Kai Henrik Wiborg; Andersen, Jesper Løvind; Beyer, Nina

    2002-01-01

    alone, and this may be regarded as a change into a more youthful MHC composition, possibly induced by the rejuvenating of systemic IGF-I levels. RT + placebo caused substantial increases in quadriceps isokinetic strength, power, and CSA; but these RT induced improvements were not further augmented......GH administration, either alone or combined with resistance exercise training (RT), has attracted interest as a means of increasing muscle mass and strength in the elderly. In the present study, 31 healthy, elderly men [age, 74 +/- 1 yr (mean +/- SEM)] were assigned to either RT [3 sessions/wk, 3...... by additional GH administration. In the RT + GH group, there was a significant decrease in MHC 1 and 2X isoforms, whereas MHC 2A increased. RT, therefore, seems to overrule the changes in MHC composition induced by GH administration alone. Changes in body composition confirmed previous reports of decreased fat...

  15. "Comparative Study Of The Profiles Of Th1 And Th2 Cytokines In Patients With Sputum Smear- Positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis And PPD–Positive Healthy Persons And Their Changes During Treatment "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hajiabdolbaghi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The better understanding of immunopathologic mechanism of tuberculosis (TB is necessary for the production of new vaccines and adjunctive immunomodulator drugs. Intended to this object, the following study including the measurement of serum concentrations of Th1 (Interferon (IFN-y and interkeukin (IL-2 and Th2 cytokines(IL-4AND IL-10 in patients with sputum smear-positive pulmonary TB and comparisons of them with PPpositive healthy persons, was designed. Materials and Methods: The HIV-negative patients that had sputum smear-positive pulmonary TB as defined WHO criteria and hospitalized in the infectious diseases ward of Imam Khomeini hospital or referred to health care centers in the south of Tehran, were included in the study. The PPD-positive healthy persons who were close contacts with pulmonary TB patients, were considered as control group. Results: In this research 34 active pulmonary TB patients (including17men and 17 womanand 23 healthy persons with PPD skin test results  or = 10mm (including 12men and 11 woman were studied. The mean ages of the patients and the healthy persons were 73 and 41 years and 74 and 27 years, respectively. The mean serum IFN-Y concentration was significantly higher in TB patients but the mean serum IL-2 IL-4and IL-10 concentrations were significantly higher in healthy persons. The com parison of the mean serum levels of these cytokines before and during treatment (about 2 months after starting treatment showed that the amounts of IFN-y and IL4 were increased and the amounts of IL2 and IL-10 were decreased but only the changes of IL-10 were statistically significant. There were no effect on the cytokine changes before and during treatment by age and gender of the patients. Conclusion: The results of the study of serum Th1 and Th2 cytokines in pulmonary TB patients were different in comparison with the results of the studies of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs stimulated with

  16. Ceramides and barrier function in healthy skin

    OpenAIRE

    Jungerstedt, J; Hellgren, Lars; Drachmann, Tue; Høgh, Julie Kaae; Jemec, GBE; Agner, T

    2010-01-01

    Lipids in the stratum corneum are key components in the barrier function of the skin. Changes in lipid composition related to eczematous diseases are well known, but limited data are available on variations within healthy skin. The objective of the present study was to compare ceramide subgroups and ceramide/cholesterol ratios in young, old, male and female healthy skin. A total of 55 participants with healthy skin was included in the study. Lipid profiles were correlated with transepidermal ...

  17. Eating Healthy Ethnic Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... We Can! ) Health Professional Resources Tipsheet: Eating Healthy Ethnic Food Trying different ethnic cuisines to give yourself a ... of different choices, take a taste adventure with ethnic foods. Here's a sample of healthy food choices (lower ...

  18. Keep Your Kidneys Healthy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Moments Radio Broadcast Health tips from Dr. Griffin Rodgers, Director of the NIDDK Clinical Trials Current ... 2,300 milligrams of sodium each day. Choose foods that are healthy for your heart: fresh fruits, ...

  19. Expect Respect: Healthy Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pediatrician Ages & Stages Prenatal Baby Toddler Preschool Gradeschool Teen Dating & Sex Fitness Nutrition Driving Safety School Substance Abuse Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Teen > Dating & Sex > Expect Respect: Healthy Relationships Ages & Stages Listen Español ...

  20. Healthy Environments for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OUTSIDE, THEY NEED CARE AND AFFECTION IN A HEALTHY ENVIRONMENT! ...AT SCHOOL... 2 ...AT HOME... ...EVEN IN THEIR ... CAN WE DO? HOW CAN WE GUARANTEE A HEALTHY FUTURE FOR ... PROTECTING THE ENVIRONMENT, ESPECIALLY RIVERS AND FORESTS, WE CAN IMPROVE THE ...

  1. Fucik spectrum,sign-changing and multiple solutions for semilinear elliptic boundary value problems with jumping nonlinearities at zero and infinity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Shujie

    2001-01-01

    [1]Martin Schecher,The Fucik spectrum,Indiana University Mathematics Journal,1994,43(4):1139-1157.[2]Dancer,E.N.,Remarks on jumping nonlinearities,in Topics in Nonlinear Analysis (eds.Escher,Simonett),Basel:Birkhauser,1999,101-116.[3]Dancer,E.N.,Du Yihong,Existence of changing sign solutions for semilinear problems with jumping nonlinearities at zero,Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh,1994,124A:1165-1176.[4]Dancer,E.N.,Du Yihong,Multiple solutions of some semilinear elliptic equations via generalized conley index,Journal of Mathematical Analysis and Applications,1995,189:848-871.[5]Li Shujie,Zhang Zhitao,Sign-changing solutions and multiple solutions theorems for semilinear elliptic boundary value problems with jumping nonlinearities,Acta Mathematica Sinica,2000,16(1):113-122.[6]Chang Kung-ching,Li Shujie,Liu Jiaquan,Remarks on multiple solutions for asymptotically linear elliptic boundary value problems.Topological methods for Nonlinear Analysis,Journal of the Juliusz Schauder Center,1994,3:179-187.[7]Alfonso Castro,Jorge Cossio,Multiple solutions for a nonlinear Dirichlet problem,SIAM J.Math.Anal.,1994,25(6):1554-1561.[8]Alfonso Castro,Jorge Cossio,John M.Neuberger,A sign-changing solution for a superlinear Dirichlet problem,Rocky Mountain J.M.,1997,27:1041-1053.[9]Alfonso Castro,Jorge Cossio,John M.Neuberger,A minimax principle,index of the critical point,and existence of sign-changing solutions to Elliptic boundary value problems,E.J.Diff.Eqn.,1998 (2):1-18.[10]Thomas Bartsch,Wang Zhiqiang,On the existence of sign-changing solutions for semilinear Dirichlet problems,Topological Methods in Nonlinear Analysis,Journal of the Juliusz Schauder Center,1996,(7):115-131.[11]Li Shujie,Zhang Zhitao,Multiple solutions theorems for semilinear elliptic boundary value problems with resonance at infinity,Discrete and Continuous Dynamical System,1999,5(3):489-493.[12]Mawhin,J.,Willem,M.,Critical Point Theory and

  2. [Bellagio Report on Healthy Agriculture, Healthy Nutrition, Healthy People].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simopoulos, Artemis P; Bourne, Peter G; Faergeman, Ole

    2013-11-01

    The Bellagio Report on Healthy Agriculture, Healthy Nutrition, Healthy People is the result of the meeting held at the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center in Lake Como, Italy, 29 October-2 November 2012. The meeting was science-based but policy-oriented. The role and amount of healthy and unhealthy fats, with attention to the relative content of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, sugar, and particularly fructose in foods that may underlie the epidemics of non-communicable diseases (NCD's) worldwide were extensively discussed. The report concludes that sugar consumption, especially in the form of high energy fructose in soft drinks, poses a major and insidious health threat, especially in children, and most diets, although with regional differences, are deficient in omega-3 fatty acids and too high in omega-6 fatty acids. Gene-nutrient interactions in growth and development and in disease prevention are fundamental to health, therefore regional Centers on Genetics, Nutrition and Fitness for Health should be established worldwide. Heads of state and government must elevate, as a matter of urgency, Nutrition as a national priority, that access to a healthy diet should be considered a human right and that the lead responsibility for Nutrition should be placed in Ministries of Health rather than agriculture so that the health requirements drive agricultural priorities, not vice versa. Nutritional security should be given the same priority as food security.

  3. Bellagio report on Healthy agriculture, healthy nutrition, healthy people⋆

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simopoulos Artemis P.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Bellagio Report on Healthy agriculture, healthy nutrition, healthy people is the result of the meeting held at the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center in Lake Como, Italy, 29 October–2 November 2012. The meeting was science-based but policy-oriented. The role and amount of healthy and unhealthy fats, with attention to the relative content of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, sugar, and particularly fructose in foods that may underlie the epidemics of non-communicable diseases (NCD’s worldwide were extensively discussed. The report concludes that sugar consumption, especially in the form of high energy fructose in soft drinks, poses a major and insidious health threat, especially in children, and most diets, although with regional differences, are deficient in omega-3 fatty acids and too high in omega-6 fatty acids. Gene-nutrient interactions in growth and development and in disease prevention are fundamental to health, therefore regional Centers on Genetics, Nutrition and Fitness for Health should be established worldwide. Heads of state and government must elevate, as a matter of urgency, Nutrition as a national priority, that access to a healthy diet should be considered a human right and that the lead responsibility for Nutrition should be placed in Ministries of Health rather than agriculture so that the health requirements drive agricultural priorities, not vice versa. Nutritional security should be given the same priority as food security.

  4. Bellagio Report on Healthy Agriculture, Healthy Nutrition, Healthy People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Faergeman

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The Bellagio Report on Healthy Agriculture, Healthy Nutrition, Healthy People is the result of the meeting held at the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center in Lake Como, Italy, 29 October–2 November 2012. The meeting was science-based but policy-oriented. The role and amount of healthy and unhealthy fats, with attention to the relative content of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, sugar, and particularly fructose in foods that may underlie the epidemics of non-communicable diseases (NCD’s worldwide were extensively discussed. The report concludes that sugar consumption, especially in the form of high energy fructose in soft drinks, poses a major and insidious health threat, especially in children, and most diets, although with regional differences, are deficient in omega-3 fatty acids and too high in omega-6 fatty acids. Gene-nutrient interactions in growth and development and in disease prevention are fundamental to health, therefore regional Centers on Genetics, Nutrition and Fitness for Health should be established worldwide. Heads of state and government must elevate, as a matter of urgency, Nutrition as a national priority, that access to a healthy diet should be considered a human right and that the lead responsibility for Nutrition should be placed in Ministries of Health rather than agriculture so that the health requirements drive agricultural priorities, not vice versa. Nutritional security should be given the same priority as food security.

  5. Bellagio report on healthy agriculture, healthy nutrition, healthy people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simopoulos, Artemis P; Bourne, Peter G; Faergeman, Ole

    2013-02-05

    The Bellagio Report on Healthy Agriculture, Healthy Nutrition, Healthy People is the result of the meeting held at the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center in Lake Como, Italy, 29 October-2 November 2012. The meeting was science-based but policy-oriented. The role and amount of healthy and unhealthy fats, with attention to the relative content of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, sugar, and particularly fructose in foods that may underlie the epidemics of non-communicable diseases (NCD's) worldwide were extensively discussed. The report concludes that sugar consumption, especially in the form of high energy fructose in soft drinks, poses a major and insidious health threat, especially in children, and most diets, although with regional differences, are deficient in omega-3 fatty acids and too high in omega-6 fatty acids. Gene-nutrient interactions in growth and development and in disease prevention are fundamental to health, therefore regional Centers on Genetics, Nutrition and Fitness for Health should be established worldwide. Heads of state and government must elevate, as a matter of urgency, Nutrition as a national priority, that access to a healthy diet should be considered a human right and that the lead responsibility for Nutrition should be placed in Ministries of Health rather than agriculture so that the health requirements drive agricultural priorities, not vice versa. Nutritional security should be given the same priority as food security.

  6. Free Energy and Equilibrium: The Basis of Change in G Degrees = -RT In K for Reactions in Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Gordon M.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the derivation of a thermodynamic relation. The relation is derived, for reactants in solution, from a treatment of the free energy of the reducing system as a function of the degree of advancement of the solution. Includes microcomputer figures/diagrams produced by programs developed to simulate this study. (JN)

  7. [Electric conductivity changes in salt-free solutions in connection with the formation of polyriboadenylic and polyribouridylic acid complexes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, S M; Vorontsova, O V; Kuznetsov, I A

    1984-01-01

    Conductometric and spectrophotometric investigations of concentrated salt-free solutions of poly(A) -- poly(U) demonstrated the 1:1 complex formation. It was accomplished by the increase of solution conductivity in contrast to the situation when DNA redenaturation takes place.

  8. Solvent Property Induced Morphological Changes of ABA Amphiphilic Triblock Copolymer Micelles in Dilute Solution: A Self-consistent Field Simulation Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan-juan Fan; Yuan-yuan Han; Jie Cui

    2014-01-01

    The morphological changes of ABA amphiphilic triblock copolymer micelles in dilute solution were systematically studied by tuning the solvent property using self-consistent field simulation.The solvent property was tuned by changing the Flory-Huggins interaction parameters between each type of blocks and solvent,respectively.The simulation results show that by changing the solvent properties,a series of micelle morphologies such as vesicle,cage-like,ring-shaped,rod-like and spherical micelle morphologies can be obtained.Variations of the free energy of the solution system and the surface area of micelles with the Flory-Huggins interaction parameters were calculated to better understand the effect of solvent property on micelle morphologies.In addition,a phase diagram showing the morphological changes of micelles with the Flory-Huggins interaction parameters is provided.

  9. Reaching Out Beyond The "Usual Suspects" And Traditional Media: Re-Branding Climate Change As A Problem With Feasible Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines-Stiles, G.; Akuginow, E.; Alley, R. B.

    2012-12-01

    "Earth: The Operators' Manual" (ETOM) was an experiment, funded by NSF, to see how combining PBS TV broadcasts, online resources including both website and social media, plus on-site events at science centers could engage and inform large public audiences about both the science of climate change and renewable energy solutions. ETOM was structured to address the findings of social science researchers indicating that scaring audiences into changed behavior through doom and gloom scenarios was unlikely to work. While the three primetime broadcasts were relatively traditional in approach—classic public TV hours presented by noted geoscientist, Richard Alley—focus groups tested the impact of introducing him as a "church-going, registered Republican." Findings indicated this would engage a wider audience. Alley's key science arguments were also repackaged into a series of nine "How to Talk to an Ostrich" videos, complete with actual ostrich sounds, and encouraging viewers to ASK ETOM further questions about common misperceptions. The ClimateBite blog said, "Simply the best short videos on climate. Ever… each segment a clear, concise and compelling climate story, in everyday language, with great visuals." In addition, web-exclusive videos profiled diverse "Energy Heroes" such as West Texas rancher Steve Oatman, Fort Worth solar enthusiast, German Vasquez, and Baltimore "Energy Captain," Robbyn Lewis. Understanding that who says what is as important as what is said, ETOM featured an unusual and diverse set of "messengers." Houston's Mayor, Annise Parker, explained why she wanted her city to be America's renewable energy capital, and Marine Brigadier General Bob Hedelund argued that cutting back on fossil fuel could save soldiers' lives. West Texas cotton farmer Cliff Etheredge participated in outreach events in Washington DC, and high-ranking former military men were part of MILITARY GOES GREEN events in Raleigh NC and San Diego. Surveys and focus groups showed

  10. Evaluation of effect of highly standardized aqueous extract of roots and leaves of Withania somnifera on cold pressor test induced cardiovascular changes in healthy human subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raveendranath Pilli

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: Withania somnifera extract showed a significant decrease in cold pressor stress test induced changes on aortic wave reflections, suggesting its beneficial effects in reducing stress induced cardiovascular changes. However, further clinical studies are warranted to evaluate these effects in patients with cardiovascular and other associated diseases. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(3.000: 873-878

  11. 一类四阶边值问题的变号解%Sign-changing Solutions to Fourth-order Boundary Value Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宇华

    2011-01-01

    The problem U(4) (t) = f (t ,U) , t ∈ (o, 1) with the boundary value conditions u″ (0) = u″ (1) = O ,u (O)=u(l) =O is studied by using topological degree and Morse theory. Under some conditions, we obtain this problem has at least six solutions,including two positive solutions, two negative solutions and two sign-changing solutions.%利用拓扑度理论和Morse理论研究方程u(4)(t)=f(t,u),t∈(0,1),且带有边界条件u"(0)=u"(1)=0,u(0)=u(1)=0.在一定条件下,得到此问题有六个解,其中两个正解,两个负解,两个变号解.

  12. Healthy,Happy trees

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Healthy trees are important to us all. Trees provide shade, beauty, and homes for wildlife. Trees give us products like paper and wood. Trees can give us all this only if they are healthy.They must be well cared for to remain healthy.

  13. Thalassemia: Healthy Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thalassemia” More What can a person living with thalassemia do to stay healthy? A healthy lifestyle is ... disorder”, as well as making healthy choices. Managing Thalassemia Thalassemia is a treatable disorder that can be ...

  14. Healthy Weights for Healthy Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1 2 3 4 5 Choose Healthy Fats Eating Disorders also Affect Boys and Men Which Is Best: ... Info CPE Opportunities Member Updates Connect with Us Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Youtube True © 2017 eatright.org. ...

  15. Healthy cities and healthy urban design

    OpenAIRE

    Drevland, Ingvill S.

    2016-01-01

    As an occupational therapist, I have always found the interaction between humans, their environment and their activities interesting, and how the environment can influence what we do and our occupational patterns is something that fascinates me. As my interest for urban health and healthy cities has grown during this master program, I have chosen to use the experience and knowledge I have from my field of expertise and put it in the context of healthy urban planning. This maste...

  16. Natural gas: clearly part of the solution to global climate change; Gaz naturel: un element de la solution au changement de climat de la planete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soper, W. [Westcoast Energy Inc. (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    While scientific data may be incomplete, there remains little doubt that much of the negative impact on the global climate arises from our use of fossil fuels. Equally there seems little reason to believe that our reliance on fossil fuels will diminish over the short term. World demand for energy continues to grow and alternatives to fossil fuels, such as solar, have yet to assume their full rote. For example, OECD studies released late in 1999 note that renewable account for only two percent of electricity generation in developed countries, while fossil fuels continue to account for some 60 percent. Conservation holds promise but all too often gains are offset by shifting consumer preferences: the widespread popularity of sports utility vehicles and light trucks in North America is playing havoc with the automotive industry's fuel efficiency gains of recent years. For corporations, for governments and for the public at large, the challenge remains to find solutions that are both possible and practical for a problem that has no single cure, nor a certain outcome. But during the transition period to new energy sources, natural gas is destined to play a leading role, as the least carbon intensive of the fossil fuels. (author)

  17. A metered intake of milk following exercise and thermal dehydration restores whole-body net fluid balance better than a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution or water in healthy young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seery, Suzanne; Jakeman, Philip

    2016-09-01

    Appropriate rehydration and nutrient intake in recovery is a key component of exercise performance. This study investigated whether the recovery of body net fluid balance (NFB) following exercise and thermal dehydration to -2 % of body mass (BM) was enhanced by a metered rate of ingestion of milk (M) compared with a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CE) or water (W). In randomised order, seven active men (aged 26·2 (sd 6·1) years) undertook exercise and thermal dehydration to -2 % of BM on three occasions. A metered replacement volume of M, CE or W equivalent to 150 % of the BM loss was then consumed within 2-3 h. NFB was subsequently measured for 5 h from commencement of rehydration. A higher overall NFB in M than CE (P=0·001) and W (P=0·006) was observed, with no difference between CE and W (P=0·69). After 5 h, NFB in M remained positive (+117 (sd 122) ml) compared with basal, and it was greater than W (-539 (sd 390) ml, P=0·011) but not CE (-381 (sd 460) ml, P=0·077, d=1·6). Plasma osmolality (Posm) and K remained elevated above basal in M compared with CE and W. The change in Posm was associated with circulating pre-provasopressin (r s 0·348, Pdehydration.

  18. Effect of beta-blockade on low-dose dobutamine-induced changes in left ventricular function in healthy volunteers: assessment by gated SPET myocardial perfusion scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everaert, H.; Vanhove, C.; Franken, P.R. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Free University of Brussels (AZ VUB), Brussels (Belgium)

    2000-04-01

    Viability studies are often performed in patients receiving beta-blocking agents. However, the intake of beta-blocking agents could influence the identification of viable myocardium when low-dose dobutamine is used to demonstrate inotropic reserve. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of beta-blockade on global and regional left ventricular function in healthy volunteers using low-dose dobutamine gated single-photon emission tomographic (SPET) myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. Ten subjects were studied once ''on'' and once ''off'' beta-blocker therapy (metoprolol succinate, 100 mg day{sup -1}). On each occasion four consecutive gated SPET acquisitions (of 7 min duration) were recorded after injection of 925 MBq technetium-99m tetrofosmin on a triple-headed camera equipped with focussing (Cardiofocal) collimators. Acquisitions were made at rest (baseline 1 and 2) and 5 min after the beginning of the infusion of 5 and 10 {mu}g kg{sup -1} min{sup -1} dobutamine. Wall thickening (WT) was quantified using a method based on circumferential profile analysis. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was obtained using the Cedars-Sinai algorithm. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded at the end of each acquisition. At baseline LVEF, WT and systolic BP values under beta-blockade were not significantly different from those obtained in the non-beta-blocked state. The mean HR and diastolic BP at baseline were lower under beta-blockade. Dobutamine administration (at 5 and 10 {mu}g kg{sup -1} min{sup -1}) induced a significant increase in WT, LVEF and systolic BP in all subjects both on and off beta-blockade. The increases in WT, LVEF and systolic BP in the beta-blocked state were less pronounced but not significantly different. HR increased significantly at 10 {mu}g kg{sup -1} min{sup -1} dobutamine without beta-blocker administration, while no increase in HR was observed in the beta-blocked state. Beta

  19. Changes in the Healthy Beverage Index in Response to an Intervention Targeting a Reduction in Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption as Compared to an Intervention Targeting Improvements in Physical Activity: Results from the Talking Health Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrick, Valisa E; Davy, Brenda M; Myers, Emily A; You, Wen; Zoellner, Jamie M

    2015-12-04

    The recently developed Healthy Beverage Index (HBI) was designed to evaluate overall beverage intake quality (including total fluid consumption and beverage calories), yet no known intervention studies have assessed longitudinal changes to the HBI. The objective of this investigation was to assess changes in HBI scores in response to a sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) reduction trial as compared to a physical activity comparison group. Participants were enrolled into a six-month, community-based, controlled behavioral trial and randomized into either a SSB reduction group (SIPsmartER) or a physical activity group (MoveMore). Correlations and multilevel mixed-effects linear regression with intention-to-treat analyses are presented. Total HBI score significantly increased for SIPsmartER (n = 149) (mean increase = 7.5 points (5.4, 9.7), p ≤ 0.001) and MoveMore (n = 143) (mean increase = 3.4 points (1.6, 5.2), p ≤ 0.001) participants, with a significant between group effect (p ≤ 0.05), over the six-month intervention. Other significant changes in HBI components for SIPsmartER included increased SSB and total beverage calorie scores, and decreased low-fat milk and diet soda scores. Changes in total HBI scores were significantly correlated with changes in total Healthy Eating Index-2010 scores (r = 0.15, p ≤ 0.01). Our findings suggest that individual HBI component scores, beyond the SSB component, are influenced by intervention strategies that primarily focus on SSB reduction.

  20. Changes in the Healthy Beverage Index in Response to an Intervention Targeting a Reduction in Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption as Compared to an Intervention Targeting Improvements in Physical Activity: Results from the Talking Health Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valisa E. Hedrick

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The recently developed Healthy Beverage Index (HBI was designed to evaluate overall beverage intake quality (including total fluid consumption and beverage calories, yet no known intervention studies have assessed longitudinal changes to the HBI. The objective of this investigation was to assess changes in HBI scores in response to a sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB reduction trial as compared to a physical activity comparison group. Participants were enrolled into a six-month, community-based, controlled behavioral trial and randomized into either a SSB reduction group (SIPsmartER or a physical activity group (MoveMore. Correlations and multilevel mixed-effects linear regression with intention-to-treat analyses are presented. Total HBI score significantly increased for SIPsmartER (n = 149 (mean increase = 7.5 points (5.4, 9.7, p ≤ 0.001 and MoveMore (n = 143 (mean increase = 3.4 points (1.6, 5.2, p ≤ 0.001 participants, with a significant between group effect (p ≤ 0.05, over the six-month intervention. Other significant changes in HBI components for SIPsmartER included increased SSB and total beverage calorie scores, and decreased low-fat milk and diet soda scores. Changes in total HBI scores were significantly correlated with changes in total Healthy Eating Index-2010 scores (r = 0.15, p ≤ 0.01. Our findings suggest that individual HBI component scores, beyond the SSB component, are influenced by intervention strategies that primarily focus on SSB reduction.

  1. Comparison of age-related changes in anti-Müllerian hormone levels and other ovarian reserve tests between healthy fertile and infertile population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Banu; Erdem, Mehmet; Mutlu, Mehmet Firat; Erdem, Ahmet; Guler, Ismail; Mutlu, Ilknur; Oktem, Mesut

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine whether anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels vary between fertile and infertile populations and compare them with basal follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels and antral follicle count (AFC). This was a prospective study that included 177 primarily infertile patients who underwent IVF treatment and 162 healthy fertile patients admitted to our clinic for benign diseases. FSH and AMH levels and the AFC of the infertile and fertile populations were compared between the age categories age were evaluated. AFC and AMH levels did not differ between the fertile and infertile groups in all age categories. AMH was inversely correlated with age in both the fertile and infertile populations. However, AFC revealed a stronger correlation with age in both the fertile and infertile populations compared with basal FSH and AMH. Age was positively correlated with basal FSH and inversely correlated with AMH and AFC. In conclusion, there was no significant difference between the fertile and infertile populations in terms of AMH or AFC. The decrease in ovarian reserve in infertile patients is directly related to age, not infertility.

  2. The Association of Unintentional Changes in Weight, Body Composition, and Homeostasis Model Assessment Index with Glycemic Progression in Non-Diabetic Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Jung Rhee

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWe performed a retrospective longitudinal study on the effects of changes in weight, body composition, and homeostasis model assessment (HOMA indices on glycemic progression in subjects without diabetes during a four-year follow-up period in a community cohort without intentional intervention.MethodsFrom 28,440 non-diabetic subjects who participated in a medical check-up program in 2004, data on anthropometric and metabolic parameters were obtained after four years in 2008. Body composition analyses were performed with a bioelectrical impedance analyzer. Skeletal muscle index (SMI, % was calculated with lean mass/weight×100. Subjects were divided into three groups according to weight change status in four years: weight loss (≤-5.0%, stable weight (-5.0 to 5.0%, weight gain (≥5.0%. Progressors were defined as the subjects who progressed to impaired fasting glucose or diabetes.ResultsProgressors showed worse baseline metabolic profiles compared with non-progressors. In logistic regression analyses, the increase in changes of HOMA-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR in four years presented higher odds ratios for glycemic progression compared with other changes during that period. Among the components of body composition, a change in waist-hip ratio was the strongest predictor, and SMI change in four years was a significant negative predictor for glycemic progression. Changes in HOMA β-cell function in four years was a negative predictor for glycemic progression.ConclusionIncreased interval changes in HOMA-IR, weight gain and waist-hip ratio was associated with glycemic progression during a four-year period without intentional intervention in non-diabetic Korean subjects.

  3. Policymaking in European healthy cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leeuw, Evelyne; Green, Geoff; Spanswick, Lucy; Palmer, Nicola

    2015-06-01

    This paper assesses policy development in, with and for Healthy Cities in the European Region of the World Health Organization. Materials for the assessment were sourced through case studies, a questionnaire and statistical databases. They were compiled in a realist synthesis methodology, applying theory-based evaluation principles. Non-response analyses were applied to ascertain the degree of representatives of the high response rates for the entire network of Healthy Cities in Europe. Further measures of reliability and validity were applied, and it was found that our material was indicative of the entire network. European Healthy Cities are successful in developing local health policy across many sectors within and outside government. They were also successful in addressing 'wicked' problems around equity, governance and participation in themes such as Healthy Urban Planning. It appears that strong local leadership for policy change is driven by international collaboration and the stewardship of the World Health Organization. The processes enacted by WHO, structuring membership of the Healthy City Network (designation) and the guidance on particular themes, are identified as being important for the success of local policy development.

  4. Changes in the decontamination factor of cesium iodide on evaporation of a scrubbing solution in the Filtered Containment Venting System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Young Su; Ha, Kwang Soon; Kim, Sungil; Cho, Song-Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    When the pressure in the containment building approaches a setting value, the FCVS(Filtered Containment Venting System) operates. The amount of steam and gas mixtures generated during a severe accident can be released into the FCVS. Non-condensable gases and fine aerosols can pass a scrubbing solution and the filters in the FCVS vessel. The decontaminated gases are finally discharged from the FCVS to the outside environment. Previous study observed that a scrubbing solution in the FCVS vessel was constantly evaporating owing to high-temperature steam released continuously from the containment building. A scrubbing solution in the FCVS vessel was completely evaporated at about 31 hours after the FCVS operation. Pool evaporation in the FCVS vessel can negatively affect the decontamination feature of the FCVS because it reduces the scrubbing depth for fission products in an aerosol form. This study carefully evaluated the decontamination factor of metal iodide aerosols especially cesium iodide (CsI), on a scrubbing solution in the FCVS. This paper summarizes the calculated results on the decontamination factor of CsI in the FCVS vessel, which was presented at the international OECD-NEA/NUGENIA-SARNET workshop. This study estimated the decontamination factor of CsI on a scrubbing solution in the FCVS. The MELCOR computer code simulated that an SBO occurred in the OPR 1000. The FCVS consists of a cylindrical vessel with a 3 m diameter and 6.5 m height, and it includes a scrubbing solution of 21 tons. Accumulated mass of CsI aerosol was calculated in a scrubbing solution and the atmosphere in the FCVS vessel and the outside environment. In the early FCVS operation, the decontamination factor of CsI aerosol rapidly increased owing to steam condensation in a scrubbing solution. When the temperature of a pool approached its saturation temperature, the decontamination factor of CsI aerosol started to decrease.

  5. Quantitative assessment of global and regional air trappings using non-rigid registration and regional specific volume change of inspiratory/expiratory CT scans: Studies on healthy volunteers and asthmatics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Sol; Seo, Joon Beom; Lee, Hyun Joo; Chae, Eun Jin; Lee, Sang Min; Oh, Sang Young; Kim, Nam Kug [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare air trapping in healthy volunteers with asthmatics using pulmonary function test and quantitative data, such as specific volume change from paired inspiratory CT and registered expiratory CT. Sixteen healthy volunteers and 9 asthmatics underwent paired inspiratory/expiratory CT. DeltaSV, which represents the ratio of air fraction released after exhalation, was measured with paired inspiratory and anatomically registered expiratory CT scans. Air trapping indexes, DeltaSV0.4 and DeltaSV0.5, were defined as volume fraction of lung below 0.4 and 0.5 DeltaSV, respectively. To assess the gravity effect of air-trapping, DeltaSV values of anterior and posterior lung at three different levels were measured and DeltaSV ratio of anterior lung to posterior lung was calculated. Color-coded DeltaSV map of the whole lung was generated and visually assessed. Mean DeltaSV, DeltaSV0.4, and DeltaSV0.5 were compared between healthy volunteers and asthmatics. In asthmatics, correlation between air trapping indexes and clinical parameters were assessed. Mean DeltaSV, DeltaSV0.4, and DeltaSV0.5 in asthmatics were significantly higher than those in healthy volunteer group (all p < 0.05). DeltaSV values in posterior lung in asthmatics were significantly higher than those in healthy volunteer group (p = 0.049). In asthmatics, air trapping indexes, such as DeltaSV0.5 and DeltaSV0.4, showed negative strong correlation with FEF25-75, FEV1, and FEV1/FVC. DeltaSV map of asthmatics showed abnormal geographic pattern in 5 patients (55.6%) and disappearance of anterior-posterior gradient in 3 patients (33.3%). Quantitative assessment of DeltaSV (the ratio of air fraction released after exhalation) shows the difference in extent of air trapping between health volunteers and asthmatics.

  6. GH administration changes myosin heavy chain isoforms in skeletal muscle but does not augment muscle strength or hypertrophy, either alone or combined with resistance exercise training in healthy elderly men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Kai Henrik Wiborg; Andersen, Jesper Løvind; Beyer, Nina

    2002-01-01

    ) quadriceps muscle power; 3) quadriceps muscle fiber type, size, and myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition; 4) quadriceps cross-sectional area (CSA) [nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI)]; 5) body composition (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scanning); and 6) GH-related serum markers were performed......GH administration, either alone or combined with resistance exercise training (RT), has attracted interest as a means of increasing muscle mass and strength in the elderly. In the present study, 31 healthy, elderly men [age, 74 +/- 1 yr (mean +/- SEM)] were assigned to either RT [3 sessions/wk, 3...... by additional GH administration. In the RT + GH group, there was a significant decrease in MHC 1 and 2X isoforms, whereas MHC 2A increased. RT, therefore, seems to overrule the changes in MHC composition induced by GH administration alone. Changes in body composition confirmed previous reports of decreased fat...

  7. Analytic 1D pn junction diode photocurrent solutions following ionizing radiation and including time-dependent changes in the carrier lifetime.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axness, Carl L.; Keiter, Eric Richard; Kerr, Bert (New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM)

    2011-04-01

    Circuit simulation tools (e.g., SPICE) have become invaluable in the development and design of electronic circuits in radiation environments. These codes are often employed to study the effect of many thousands of devices under transient current conditions. Device-scale simulation tools (e.g., MEDICI) are commonly used in the design of individual semiconductor components, but require computing resources that make their incorporation into a circuit code impossible for large-scale circuits. Analytic solutions to the ambipolar diffusion equation, an approximation to the carrier transport equations, may be used to characterize the transient currents at nodes within a circuit simulator. We present new transient 1D excess carrier density and photocurrent density solutions to the ambipolar diffusion equation for low-level radiation pulses that take into account a finite device geometry, ohmic fields outside the depleted region, and an arbitrary change in the carrier lifetime due to neutron irradiation or other effects. The solutions are specifically evaluated for the case of an abrupt change in the carrier lifetime during or after, a step, square, or piecewise linear radiation pulse. Noting slow convergence of the raw Fourier series for certain parameter sets, we use closed-form formulas for some of the infinite sums to produce 'partial closed-form' solutions for the above three cases. These 'partial closed-form' solutions converge with only a few tens of terms, which enables efficient large-scale circuit simulations.

  8. Cognitive training-induced short-term functional and long-term structural plastic change is related to gains in global cognition in healthy older adults: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampit, Amit; Hallock, Harry; Suo, Chao; Naismith, Sharon L; Valenzuela, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Computerized cognitive training (CCT) is a safe and inexpensive intervention to enhance cognitive performance in the elderly. However, the neural underpinning of CCT-induced effects and the timecourse by which such neural changes occur are unknown. Here, we report on results from a pilot study of healthy older adults who underwent three 1-h weekly sessions of either multidomain CCT program (n = 7) or an active control intervention (n = 5) over 12 weeks. Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and cognitive assessments were performed at baseline and after 9 and 36 h of training. Voxel-based structural analysis revealed a significant Group × Time interaction in the right post-central gyrus indicating increased gray matter density in the CCT group compared to active control at both follow-ups. Across the entire sample, there were significant positive correlations between changes in the post-central gyrus and change in global cognition after 36 h of training. A post-hoc vertex-based analysis found a significant between-group difference in rate of thickness change between baseline and post-training in the left fusiform gyrus, as well as a large cluster in the right parietal lobe covering the supramarginal and post-central gyri. Resting-state functional connectivity between the posterior cingulate and the superior frontal gyrus, and between the right hippocampus and the superior temporal gyrus significantly differed between the two groups after 9 h of training and correlated with cognitive change post-training. No significant interactions were found for any of the spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging data. Though preliminary, our results suggest that functional change may precede structural and cognitive change, and that about one-half of the structural change occurs within the first 9 h of training. Future studies are required to determine the role of these brain changes in the mechanisms underlying CCT-induced cognitive effects.

  9. Cognitive training-induced short-term functional and long-term structural plastic change is related to gains in global cognition in healthy older adults: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit eLampit

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Computerized cognitive training (CCT is a safe and inexpensive intervention to enhance cognitive performance in the elderly. However, the neural underpinning of CCT-induced effects and the timecourse by which such neural changes occur are unknown. Here, we report on results from a pilot study of healthy older adults who underwent three 1-hour weekly sessions of either multidomain CCT program (n = 7 or an active control intervention (n = 5 over 12 weeks. Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scans and cognitive assessments were performed at baseline and after 9 and 36 hours of training. Voxel-based structural analysis revealed a significant Group × Time interaction in the right postcentral gyrus indicating increased gray matter density in the CCT group compared to active control at both follow-ups. Across the entire sample, there were significant positive correlations between changes in the postcentral gyrus and change in global cognition after 36 hours of training. A post-hoc vertex-based analysis found a significant between-group difference in rate of thickness change between baseline and post-training in the left fusiform gyrus, as well as a large cluster in the right parietal lobe covering the supramarginal and postcentral gyri. Resting-state functional connectivity between the posterior cingulate and the superior frontal gyrus, and between the right hippocampus and the superior temporal gyrus significantly differed between the two groups after 9 hours of training and correlated with cognitive change post-training. No significant interactions were found for any of the spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging data. Though preliminary, our results suggest that functional change may precede structural and cognitive change, and that about one-half of the structural change occurs within the first nine hours of training. Future studies are required to determine the role of these brain changes in the mechanisms underlying CCT

  10. Cognitive training-induced short-term functional and long-term structural plastic change is related to gains in global cognition in healthy older adults: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampit, Amit; Hallock, Harry; Suo, Chao; Naismith, Sharon L.; Valenzuela, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Computerized cognitive training (CCT) is a safe and inexpensive intervention to enhance cognitive performance in the elderly. However, the neural underpinning of CCT-induced effects and the timecourse by which such neural changes occur are unknown. Here, we report on results from a pilot study of healthy older adults who underwent three 1-h weekly sessions of either multidomain CCT program (n = 7) or an active control intervention (n = 5) over 12 weeks. Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and cognitive assessments were performed at baseline and after 9 and 36 h of training. Voxel-based structural analysis revealed a significant Group × Time interaction in the right post-central gyrus indicating increased gray matter density in the CCT group compared to active control at both follow-ups. Across the entire sample, there were significant positive correlations between changes in the post-central gyrus and change in global cognition after 36 h of training. A post-hoc vertex-based analysis found a significant between-group difference in rate of thickness change between baseline and post-training in the left fusiform gyrus, as well as a large cluster in the right parietal lobe covering the supramarginal and post-central gyri. Resting-state functional connectivity between the posterior cingulate and the superior frontal gyrus, and between the right hippocampus and the superior temporal gyrus significantly differed between the two groups after 9 h of training and correlated with cognitive change post-training. No significant interactions were found for any of the spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging data. Though preliminary, our results suggest that functional change may precede structural and cognitive change, and that about one-half of the structural change occurs within the first 9 h of training. Future studies are required to determine the role of these brain changes in the mechanisms underlying CCT-induced cognitive effects. PMID:25805989

  11. Proposed general solution for initial value problem for vacuum GR in Chang--Soo/CDJ variables in anisotropic minisuperspace: preview into inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Ita, Eyo

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we illustrate the dynamics of the Chang--Soo/CDJ variables in the description of vacuum GR in anisotropic minisuperspace, uncovering a new class of general solutions in both the degenerate and the nondegenerate sectors. One result of these new variables is the existence of an unbridgable gap between these sectors. The gravitational dynamics self-consistently hold down to arbitrarily small times, implying a semiclassical-quantum correspondence as well as an elimination of the big bang singularity in the nondegenerate sector. We also present an algorithm for constructing general solutions for the spacetimes labelling a general quantum state in these variables.

  12. Governing for a Healthy Population: Towards an Understanding of How Decision-Making Will Determine Our Global Health in a Changing Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. McMichael

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing the adaptive capacity of individuals, communities, institutions and nations is pivotal to protecting and improving human health and well-being in the face of systemic social inequity plus dangerous climate change. However, research on the determinants of adaptive capacity in relation to health, particularly concerning the role of governance, is in its infancy. This paper highlights the intersections between global health, climate change and governance. It presents an overview of these key concerns, their relation to each other, and the potential that a greater understanding of governance may present opportunities to strengthen policy and action responses to the health effects of climate change. Important parallels between addressing health inequities and sustainable development practices in the face of global environmental change are also highlighted. We propose that governance can be investigated through two key lenses within the earth system governance theoretical framework; agency and architecture. These two governance concepts can be evaluated using methods of social network research and policy analysis using case studies and is the subject of further research.

  13. Making Healthy Behaviors the Easy Choice for Employees: A Review of the Literature on Environmental and Policy Changes in Worksite Health Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn-Marshall, Jennifer L.; Gallant, Mary P.

    2012-01-01

    As employers look for ways to reduce rising health care costs, worksite health promotion interventions are increasingly being used to improve employee health behaviors. An alternative approach to traditional worksite health promotion programs is the implementation of environmental and/or policy changes to encourage employees to adopt healthier…

  14. Role of microRNAs in the age-related changes in skeletal muscle and diet or exercise interventions to promote healthy aging in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Robin A; Poppitt, Sally D; Cameron-Smith, David

    2014-09-01

    Progressive age-related changes in skeletal muscle mass and composition, underpin decreases in muscle function, which can inturn lead to impaired mobility and quality of life in older adults. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression in skeletal muscle and are associated with aging. Accumulating evidence suggests that miRNAs play an important role in the age-related changes in skeletal muscle mass, composition and function. At the cellular level, miRNAs have been demonstrated to regulate muscle cell proliferation and differentiation. Furthermore, miRNAs are involved in the transitioning of muscle stem cells from a quiescent, to either an activated or senescence state. Evidence from animal and human studies has shown miRNAs are modulated in muscle atrophy and hypertrophy. In addition, miRNAs have been implicated in changes in muscle fiber composition, fat infiltration and insulin resistance. Both exercise and dietary interventions can combat age-related changes in muscle mass, composition and function, which may be mediated by miRNA modulation in skeletal muscle. Circulating miRNA species derived from myogenic cell populations represent potential biomarkers of aging muscle and the molecular responses to exercise or diet interventions, but larger validation studies are required. In future therapeutic approaches targeting miRNAs, either through exercise, diet or drugs may be able to slow down or prevent the age-related changes in skeletal muscle mass, composition, function, hence help maintain mobility and quality of life in old age.

  15. Change in organic molecule adhesion on α-alumina (Sapphire) with change in NaCl and CaCl2 solution salinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Klaus; Bovet, Nicolas Emile; Hassenkam, Tue

    2014-01-01

    protonated surface. The results demonstrate that the alumina surface at pH 3 has a higher affinity for inorganic cations than for -COO(H) or -C5H5N(H+), in spite of the known positive surface charge of α-alumina {0001} wafers. These results demonstrate that solution salinity plays an important role...

  16. Effects of 16-week high-intensity interval training using upper and lower body ergometers on aerobic fitness and morphological changes in healthy men: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osawa Y

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Yusuke Osawa,1,2,* Koichiro Azuma,3,* Shogo Tabata,3 Fuminori Katsukawa,2 Hiroyuki Ishida,2 Yuko Oguma,2 Toshihide Kawai,4 Hiroshi Itoh,4 Shigeo Okuda,5 Hideo Matsumoto3 1Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; 2Sports Medicine Research Center, Keio University, Kanagawa, Japan; 3Institute for Integrated Sports Medicine, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan; 4Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan; 5Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan *Yusuke Osawa and Koichiro Azuma are co-first authors of this article Abstract: It is unclear whether combined leg and arm high-intensity interval training (HIIT improves fitness and morphological characteristics equal to those of leg-based HIIT programs. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of HIIT using leg-cycling (LC and arm-cranking (AC ergometers with an HIIT program using only LC. Effects on aerobic capacity and skeletal muscle were analyzed. Twelve healthy male subjects were assigned into two groups. One performed LC-HIIT (n=7 and the other LC- and AC-HIIT (n=5 twice weekly for 16 weeks. The training programs consisted of eight to 12 sets of >90% VO2 (the oxygen uptake that can be utilized in one minute peak for 60 seconds with a 60-second active rest period. VO2 peak, watt peak, and heart rate were measured during an LC incremental exercise test. The cross-sectional area (CSA of trunk and thigh muscles as well as bone-free lean body mass were measured using magnetic resonance imaging and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The watt peak increased from baseline in both the LC (23%±38%; P<0.05 and the LC–AC groups (11%±9%; P<0.05. The CSA of the quadriceps femoris muscles also increased from baseline in both the LC (11%±4%; P<0.05 and the LC–AC groups (5%±5%; P<0.05. In contrast, increases were observed in the CSA of

  17. The Healthy Eating Index–2005 Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Healthy Eating Index (HEI)–2005 is a measure of diet quality that can be used to assess compliance with the US Dietary Guidelines for Americans and monitor changes in dietary patterns nationwide.

  18. 健康妊娠妇女阴道乳酸杆菌及pH变化的研究%The change of vaginal Lactobacilli and pH value in vaginal secretion of healthy women before and after pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙文平; 罗红; 陈晨; 綦霞; 杨光; 赵春艳

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究健康妊娠妇女阴道乳酸菌数量及pH的变化与妊娠时间的关系.方法 选择20例健康非妊娠妇女,60例健康妊娠妇女(其中早期妊娠、中期妊娠及晚期妊娠各20例)阴道分泌物进行乳酸杆菌数量检测及pH测定,并对乳酸杆菌产生过氧化氢的情况进行检测.结果 随着妊娠时间的增加,乳酸杆菌的数量明显增高,伴随阴道分泌物的pH逐渐降低.结论 乳酸杆菌与健康妊娠妇女阴道的生物屏障和酸性环境的维持有重要关系.%Objective To study the relationship between pregnancy time and the changes of the number of vaginal lactic acid bacteria and pH value in vaginal secretions. Method 20 healthy non-pregnant women, 60 healthy pregnant women ( including early pregnancy, mid-pregnancy and late pregnancy, each 20 cases) were selected. The number of vaginal lactobacilli and pH value in vaginal secretions were detected, and the production of hydrogen peroxide by Lactobacillus were detected. Result With the time of pregnancy increasing, the number of lactobacilli increased significantly, while the pH value of vaginal secretion decreased. Conclusion Lactobacilli in vaginal secretions of healthy pregnant women are the biological barriers which maintein the acidic vaginal environment.

  19. Healthy eating at school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruselius-Jensen, Maria Louisa; Egberg Mikkelsen, Bent

    Unhealthy eating are common among adolescents and the school is a well suited setting for promoting healthy eating. For the school to play a role here, however an environment must be created, in which the school and the students develop a sense of ownership for a healthy food and nutrition "regime....... Therefore in designing school meal programs aiming at being supportive for healthy eating, it is necessary to try to integrate the food provision in the life of the school....

  20. ADOLESCENTS’ HEALTHY EATING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne

    expectations. No previous studies have included all these factors in the same analysis. The implications of the study are that (1) healthy eating interventions should aim at strengthening self-efficacy and positive outcome expectations among adolescents, (2) the family context should be included when...... implementing healthy eating interventions, and (3) parents’ awareness of their influence on adolescents’ healthy eating should be reinforced. The third research question is answered in research paper 3. The paper investigated the effects of a healthy eating intervention by employing feedback via text messaging...

  1. Longitudinal imaging pattern analysis (SPARE-CD index) detects early structural and functional changes before cognitive decline in healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Vanessa H; Resnick, Susan M; Doshi, Jimit; Beason-Held, Lori L; Zhou, Yun; Ferrucci, Luigi; Wong, Dean F; Kraut, Michael A; Davatzikos, Christos

    2012-12-01

    This article investigates longitudinal imaging characteristics of early cognitive decline during normal aging, leveraging on high-dimensional imaging pattern classification methods for the development of early biomarkers of cognitive decline. By combining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and resting positron emission tomography (PET) cerebral blood flow (CBF) images, an individualized score is generated using high-dimensional pattern classification, which predicts subsequent cognitive decline in cognitively normal older adults of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. The resulting score, termed SPARE-CD (Spatial Pattern of Abnormality for Recognition of Early Cognitive Decline), analyzed longitudinally for 143 cognitively normal subjects over 8 years, shows functional and structural changes well before (2.3-2.9 years) changes in neurocognitive testing (California Verbal Learning Test [CVLT] scores) can be measured. Additionally, this score is found to be correlated to the [(11)C] Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET mean distribution volume ratio at a later time. This work indicates that MRI and PET images, combined with advanced pattern recognition methods, may be useful for very early detection of cognitive decline.

  2. What do most erectile dysfunction guidelines have in common? No evidence-based discussion or recommendation of heart-healthy lifestyle changes and/or Panax ginseng

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark A Moyad; Kwangsung Park

    2012-01-01

    Sexual health or erectile dysfunction (ED) state of the art guidelines provide a thorough overview of conventional prescription or other notable extrinsic treatment options.Yet,over the past 10-15 years,a plethora of international researchers have established that individual and comprehensive lifestyle changes can prevent and potentially improve ED.We review the lifestyle evidence that should equate to grade A or level 1 evidence recommendations for ED.We also review the evidence for Panax ginseng,an over-the-counter (OTC) dietary supplement with a 35-year history of laboratory investigations,multiple positive randomized trials over approximately 15 years and several independent meta-analyses and systematic reviews.Perhaps it is time to at least discuss and even emphasize lifestyle and other non-conventional interventions in ED guidelines so that patients can explore a diversity of potentially synergistic choices with their physicians and can improve their quality and quantity of life.Ignoring the consistent,positive data on lifestyle modifications in ED guidelines,for example,is tantamount to ignoring diet and lifestyle changes to reduce the risk of or ameliorate cardiovascular diseases.

  3. The study of changes of biophysical properties of red blood cells in storage in erythrocyte-containing solutions using atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Lamzin I.M.; Khayrullin R.М.

    2014-01-01

    Currently the departments of quality control of blood centers evaluate the suitability for clinical use of erythrocyte-containing solutions indirectly by routine methods of the determination of hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit level, or hemolysis at the end of the period of storing. These methods can not directly characterize the state of membranes of preserved erythrocytes. The aim of the work is to study the changes of elasticity and surface potential of membranes of red blood cells of ...

  4. Changes in the passive layer of corrugated austenitic stainless steel of low nickel content due to exposure to simulated pore solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bautista, A. [Departamento de Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales e Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda Universidad no. 30, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: mbautist@ing.uc3m.es; Blanco, G.; Velasco, F. [Departamento de Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales e Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda Universidad no. 30, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Gutierrez, A.; Soriano, L. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolas Cabrera, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Palomares, F.J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Takenouti, H. [UPR-15 du CNRS, UPMC, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2009-04-15

    In this work, changes undergone at the passive layer of a new type of corrugated austenitic stainless steel (low Ni, high Mn 204Cu type) when exposed to solutions simulating that contained in the pores of concrete have been studied. Changes in the nature of the passive layer have been characterized by X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Particular focus has been put on the influence of the presence of chlorides and/or carbonation in the solution. Changes in the passive layer due to the passivation treatment that is often applied to corrugated stainless steels during manufacturing processes have also been considered. The results obtained on the 204Cu type steel have been compared with those obtained on more traditional, high Ni, austenitic AISI 304 grade and duplex SAF 2205 grade. During the immersion in simulated pore solutions, 204Cu type suffers more intense redox processes than other studied stainless steels. Moreover, it shows less Cr-rich protective passive layers in these media.

  5. Changes in soil toxicity by phosphate-aided soil washing: effect of soil characteristics, chemical forms of arsenic, and cations in washing solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jho, Eun Hea; Im, Jinwoo; Yang, Kyung; Kim, Young-Jin; Nam, Kyoungphile

    2015-01-01

    This study was set to investigate the changes in the toxicity of arsenic (As)-contaminated soils after washing with phosphate solutions. The soil samples collected from two locations (A: rice paddy and B: forest land) of a former smelter site were contaminated with a similar level of As. Soil washing (0.5 M phosphate solution for 2 h) removed 24.5% As, on average, in soil from both locations. Regardless of soil washing, Location A soil toxicities, determined using Microtox, were greater than that of Location B and this could be largely attributed to different soil particle size distribution. With soils from both locations, the changes in As chemical forms resulted in either similar or greater toxicities after washing. This emphasizes the importance of considering ecotoxicological aspects, which are likely to differ depending on soil particle size distribution and changes in As chemical forms, in addition to the total concentration based remedial goals, in producing ecotoxicologically-sound soils for reuse. In addition, calcium phosphate used as the washing solution seemed to contribute more on the toxic effects of the washed soils than potassium phosphate and ammonium phosphate. Therefore, it would be more appropriate to use potassium or ammonium phosphate than calcium phosphate for phosphate-aided soil washing of the As-contaminated soils.

  6. Whole grain and body weight changes in apparently healthy adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled studies123

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pol, Korrie; Christensen, Robin; Bartels, Else M;

    2013-01-01

    Background: Whole grains have received increased attention for their potential role in weight regulation. A high intake has been associated with smaller weight gain in prospective cohort studies, whereas the evidence from randomized controlled studies has been less consistent. Objective: We...... assessed the effects of whole-grain compared with non–whole-grain foods on changes in body weight, percentage of body fat, and waist circumference by using a meta-analytic approach. Design: We conducted a systematic literature search in selected databases. Studies were included in the review if they were...... randomized controlled studies of whole-grain compared with a non–whole-grain control in adults. A total of 2516 articles were screened for eligibility, and relevant data were extracted from 26 studies. Weighted mean differences were calculated, and a metaregression analysis was performed by using the whole...

  7. Active and Healthy Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Stephen; Kovarik, Jessica; Leidy, Heather

    2015-01-01

    The Active and Healthy School Program (AHS) can be used to alter the culture and environment of a school to help children make healthier choices. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of AHS to increase physical activity while decreasing total screen time, increase healthy food choices, and improve knowledge about physical…

  8. Healthy human gut phageome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manrique, Pilar; Bolduc, Benjamin; Walk, Seth T.; Oost, van der John; Vos, de Willem M.; Young, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    The role of bacteriophages in influencing the structure and function of the healthy human gut microbiome is unknown. With few exceptions, previous studies have found a high level of heterogeneity in bacteriophages from healthy individuals. To better estimate and identify the shared phageome of hu

  9. "Healthy" Human Development Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineer, Merwan; Roy, Nilanjana; Fink, Sari

    2010-01-01

    In the Human Development Index (HDI), life expectancy is the only indicator used in modeling the dimension "a long and healthy life". Whereas life expectancy is a direct measure of quantity of life, it is only an indirect measure of healthy years lived. In this paper we attempt to remedy this omission by introducing into the HDI the morbidity…

  10. Automated sample-changing robot for solution scattering experiments at the EMBL Hamburg SAXS station X33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Round, A. R.; Franke, D.; Moritz, S.; Huchler, R.; Fritsche, M.; Malthan, D.; Klaering, R.; Svergun, D. I.; Roessle, M.

    2008-01-01

    There is a rapidly increasing interest in the use of synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) for large-scale studies of biological macromolecules in solution, and this requires an adequate means of automating the experiment. A prototype has been developed of an automated sample changer for solution SAXS, where the solutions are kept in thermostatically controlled well plates allowing for operation with up to 192 samples. The measuring protocol involves controlled loading of protein solutions and matching buffers, followed by cleaning and drying of the cell between measurements. The system was installed and tested at the X33 beamline of the EMBL, at the storage ring DORIS-III (DESY, Hamburg), where it was used by over 50 external groups during 2007. At X33, a throughput of approximately 12 samples per hour, with a failure rate of sample loading of less than 0.5%, was observed. The feedback from users indicates that the ease of use and reliability of the user operation at the beamline were greatly improved compared with the manual filling mode. The changer is controlled by a client–server-based network protocol, locally and remotely. During the testing phase, the changer was operated in an attended mode to assess its reliability and convenience. Full integration with the beamline control software, allowing for automated data collection of all samples loaded into the machine with remote control from the user, is presently being implemented. The approach reported is not limited to synchrotron-based SAXS but can also be used on laboratory and neutron sources. PMID:25484841

  11. Global healthy backpack initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaratne, Kapila; Jacobs, Karen; Fernando, Dulitha

    2012-01-01

    Schoolbag use by children is a global common concern.. Children carry school books and other amenities in their school bags. Global evidence indicates that daily load carried by school children may have negative health implications. Backpack as a school bag model, is the healthiest way of load carriage for school children. Several initiatives have been launched world over to minimize unhealthy consequences resulting from schoolbags. Based on a situation analysis, Sri Lanka implemented a national healthy schoolbag campaign by joint efforts of Ministries of Health and Education. Actions were contemplated on; strategies for bag weight reduction, introduction of an ergonomically modeled schoolbag and bag behaviour change. New strategies were introduced with awareness campaigns to policy makers, bag manufacturers, parents, teachers and children. Four million schoolchildren benefitted. In 2000, the backpack strategy of "Pack it Light, Wear it Right" was started as a public health initiative in the United States by the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA). Over the last eleven years, thousands of occupational therapy practitioners and students participated in educational programs and outreach activities. In 2004, modeled after the success AOTA initiative, the Icelandic Occupational Therapy Association launched a national backpack awareness initiative. This article shares examples of practices that could be implemented in any context to the promote health of children.

  12. HEALTHY LIVING WITH NUTRACEUTICALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Singh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Now a day every person wants to live the healthy life. Synthetic medicines are having some certain drawbacks. So nutraceuticals will definitely play promising and unique way of safer medicines. Nature is one of the most important resources of human foods and medicines. Rapidly increasing knowledge on nutrition, medicine, and plant has fortunately changed the concepts about food, health and, brought in a revolution on them. Nutritional therapy and phototherapy have emerged as new concepts of safer medicine. These systems have quickly and widely spread in recent years. Strong recommendations for consumption of nutraceuticals, natural plant foods, and the use of nutritional therapy and phototherapy have become progressively popular to improve health, and to prevent and treat diseases. Nutraceuticals used in various diseases, Alzheimer’s disease, cardiovascular disease, obesity, cancer, eye cycle, diabetes. The use of the dietary fiber, omega 3 fatty acid, antioxidant, probiotic, for the better human life possible. This review attempts to display and remark on these aspects. It summarizes the progress made on nutraceuticals, utritional therapy, health benefits, regulation and their promising approach. It also covers development stages of nutraceuticals.

  13. Change management and partnership: achieving a solution to provide peritoneal dialysis in a long-term care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Charlie; Campbell, Jill

    2009-01-01

    Health care organizations must respond quickly to today's volatile and changing environment. This article describes how St. Michael's Hospital (acute care hospital) and the Drs. Paul and John Rekai Centre (long-term care facility) collaborated to use an innovative approach to address pressures of change affecting peritoneal dialysis (PD) care delivery for the elderly. The collaborative applied Galpin's (1996) nine-stage Change Management Model to implement the organizational change. Both organizations generated a shared vision to improve timely access to nursing homes for patients requiring both placement and ongoing peritoneal dialysis. They analyzed their current status and committed resources for the collaboration. Both organizations generated general and detailed recommendations for PD care delivery processes. A pilot was implemented and refinement of the collaboration occurred prior to formal roll out. This application of a change management model to establish organizational partnership may be of interest to those seeking to establish similar collaborations.

  14. Effect of pH Changes on Antioxidant Capacity and the Content of Betalain Pigments During the Heating of a Solution of Red Beet Betalains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikołajczyk-Bator Katarzyna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Red beets and their products are mainly consumed after processing. In this study, the effect of pH on changes in antioxidant capacity (AC and the content of betalain pigments were analysed during the heating of a betalain preparation solution. With pH ranging from 4 to 9 during the heat-treatment, the content of red pigments decreased depending on the pH level of the sample. The losses of red pigments in the investigated betalain preparation solution increased along with rising pH levels of the heated solution. The greatest losses were recorded at pH of 9.0. An opposite correlation was observed for yellow pigments. The content of yellow pigments in the heated betalain preparation solution was increasing along with increasing pH. The most pronounced increase in the content of yellow pigments was found at pH of 6.5 and 7.0. At the same time, the heated betalain preparation solution was shown to exhibit a higher antioxidant capacity at pH of 6.0 (14.9 μmol Trolox/mL than at pH of 4.0 (12.6 μmol Trolox/mL. It was observed that the increase in the antioxidant capacity in heated betalain preparation solutions with pH in the 6.0–6.5 range occurred as a result of increased concentrations of neobetanin, assessed by HPLC, within the pH range from 5.0 to 6.5.

  15. Advancing Health Equity and Climate Change Solutions in California Through Integration of Public Health in Regional Planning

    OpenAIRE

    Gould, Solange M.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is a significant public health danger, with a disproportionate impact on low-income and communities of color that threatens to increase health inequities. Many important social determinants of health are at stake in California climate change policy-making and planning, and the distribution of these will further impact health inequities. Not only are these communities the most vulnerable to future health impacts due to the cumulative impacts of unequal environmental exposures a...

  16. Growing Healthy Kids: A School Enrichment Nutrition Education Program to Promote Healthy Behaviors for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierregger, Alyssa; Hall, Johnna; Sehi, Natalie; Abbott, Mary; Wobig, Karen; Albrecht, Julie A.; Anderson-Knott, Mindy; Koszewski, Wanda

    2015-01-01

    The Growing Healthy Kids Program is a school-based nutrition education program that teaches students in Kindergarten through 2nd grade about healthy eating, physical activity, and how their body uses food. Pre- and post-knowledge data is collected from the students to measure changes in nutrition knowledge. In the first 2 years of the program,…

  17. A smart DNA tetrahedron that isothermally assembles or dissociates in response to the solution pH value changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiyu; Li, Yingmei; Tian, Cheng; Mao, Chengde

    2013-06-10

    This communication reports a DNA tetrahedron whose self-assembly is triggered by an acidic environment. The key element is the formation/dissociation of a short, cytosine (C)-containing, DNA triplex. As the solution pH value oscillates between 5.0 and 8.0, the DNA triplex will form and dissociate that, in turn, leads to assembly or disassembly of the DNA tetrahedron, which has been demonstrated by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). We believe that such environment-responsive behavior will be important for potential applications of DNA nanocages such as on-demand drug release.

  18. Memory function in opioid-dependent patients treated with methadone or buprenorphine along with benzodiazepine: longitudinal change in comparison to healthy individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapeli Pekka

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Opioid-substitution treatment (OST for opioid dependence (OD has proven effective in retaining patients in treatment and reducing illegal opiate abuse and crime. Consequently, the World Health Organization (WHO has listed the opioid agonists methadone and buprenorphine as essential drugs for OD that should be available worldwide. In many areas of the world, OD is often associated with concomitant benzodiazepine (BZD dependence and abuse, which complicates treatment. However, possible changes in the cognitive functioning of these patients are not well-known. The present study is the first to examine longitudinal stability of memory function in OST patients with BZD use, thus providing a new tool for health policy authorities in evaluating the usefulness of OST. Methods Within the first two months (T1 and between 6–9 months (T2 after OST admission, we followed the working memory, immediate verbal memory, and memory consolidation of 13 methadone- and 15 buprenorphine- or buprenorphine/naloxone-treated patients with BZD dependence or abuse disorder. The results were compared to those of fifteen normal comparison participants. All participants also completed a self-reported memory complaint questionnaire on both occasions. Results Both patient groups performed statistically significantly worse than normal comparison participants in working memory at time points T1 and T2. In immediate verbal memory, as measured by list learning at T1, patients scored lower than normal comparison participants. Both patient groups reported significantly more subjective memory problems than normal comparison participants. Patients with more memory complaints recalled fewer items at T2 from the verbal list they had learned at T1 than those patients with fewer memory complaints. The significance of the main analyses remained nearly the same when the statistical tests were performed without buprenorphine-only patients leaving 12 patients to

  19. Study of recent changes of weathering dynamic in soils based on Sr and U isotope ratios in soil solutions (Strengbach catchment- Vosges, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prunier, Jonathan; Chabaux, François; Stille, Peter; Pierret, Marie-Claire; Viville, Daniel; Gangloff, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    Major and trace element concentrations along with U and Sr isotopic ratios of the main components of the water-soil-plant system of two experimental plots in a forested silicate catchment were determined to characterize the day-present weathering processes within the surface soil levels and to identify the nature of minerals which control the lithogenic flux of the soil solutions. This study allows recognition of a lithogenic origin of the dissolved U in the surface soil solutions, even in the most superficial ones, implying that the colloidal U is a U secondarily associated with organic matter or organo-metallic complexes. This flux significantly varies in the upper meter of the soil and between the two sites, due to their slightly different bedrock lithologies and likely also to their different vegetation covers. A long-time monitoring during the past 15 years was achieved to evaluate the response of this ecosystem to recent environmental changes. A clear decrease of the Ca and K fluxes exported by the soil solutions between 1992 and 2006 at the spruce site was observed, while this decrease is much smaller for the beech plot. In addition, the Sr isotope ratios of soil solutions vary significantly between 1998 and 2004, with once again a much more important change for the spruce site than for the beech site. It demonstrates that the source of elements in soil solutions has changed over this time period due to a modification of the weathering reactions occurring within the weathering profile. The origin of the weathering modification could be the consequence of the acid rains on weathering granitic bedrock or a consequence of forest exploitation incompatible with the nutriment reserve of soils with recent plantations of conifer, which impoverish soils. All together, these data suggest that the forest ecosystem at the spruce plot is in a transient state of functioning marked by a possible recent modification of weathering reactions. This study shows the potential of

  20. Approximate Analytical Solution for One-Dimensional Solidification Problem of a Finite Superheating Phase Change Material Including the Effects of Wall and Thermal Contact Resistances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid El Qarnia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work reports an analytical solution for the solidification of a superheating phase change material (PCM contained in a rectangular enclosure with a finite height. The analytical solution has been obtained by solving nondimensional energy equations by using the perturbation method for a small perturbation parameter: the Stefan number, ε. This analytical solution, which takes into account the effects of the superheating of PCM, finite height of the enclosure, thickness of the wall, and wall-solid shell interfacial thermal resistances, was expressed in terms of nondimensional temperature distributions of the bottom wall of the enclosure and both PCM phases, and the dimensionless solid-liquid interface position and its dimensionless speed. The developed solution was firstly compared with that existing in the literature for the case of nonsuperheating PCM. The predicted results agreed well with those published in the literature. Next, a parametric study was carried out in order to study the impacts of the dimensionless control parameters on the dimensionless temperature distributions of the wall, the solid shell, and liquid phase of the PCM, as well as the solid-liquid interface position and its dimensionless speed.

  1. Structural and phase transition changes of sodium dodecyl sulfate micellar solution in alcohols probed by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putra, Edy Giri Rachman [Neutron Scattering Laboratory, National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (BATAN), Gedung 40 BATAN, Kawasan Puspiptek Serpong, Tangerang 15314 (Indonesia); Patriati, Arum [Neutron Scattering Laboratory, National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (BATAN), Gedung 40 BATAN, Kawasan Puspiptek Serpong, Tangerang 15314 (Indonesia); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Gadjah Mada, Bulaksumur, Yogyakarta 55281, Indonesia giri@batan.go.id (Indonesia)

    2015-04-16

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements on 0.3M sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micellar solutions have been performed in the presence of n-alcohols, from ethanol to decanol at different alcohol concentrations, 2–10 wt%. The ellipsoid micellar structure which occurred in the 0.3M SDS in aqueous solution with the size range of 30–50 Å has different behavior at various hydrocarbon chain length and concentration of alcohols. At low concentration and short chain-length of alcohols, such as ethanol, propanol, and butanol, the size of micelles reduced and had a spherical-like structure. The opposite effect occurred as medium to long chain alcohols, such as hexanol, octanol and decanol was added into the 0.3M SDS micellar solutions. The micelles structure changed to be more elongated in major axis and then crossed the critical phase transition from micellar solution into liquid crystal phase as lamellar structure emerged by further addition of alcohols. The inter-lamellar distances were also depending on the hydrocarbon chain length and concentration of alcohols. In the meantime, the persistent micellar structures occurred in addition of medium chain of n-alcohol, pentanol at all concentrations.

  2. If Sport's the Solution Then What's the Problem? The Social Significance of Sport in the Moral Governing of "Good" and "Healthy" Citizens in Sweden, 1922-1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Österlind, Malin; Wright, Jan

    2014-01-01

    All over the westernised world, sport has been promoted as a "solution" to many of the social "problems" and challenges that face modern societies. This study draw on Foucault's concept of governmentality to examine the ways in which Swedish Government Official Reports on sport, from 1922 to 1998, define social problems…

  3. Investigation and solution of low yield problem for phase change memory with lateral fully-confined structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaling, Zhou; Xiaofeng, Wang; Yingchun, Fu; Xiaodong, Wang; Fuhua, Yang

    2016-08-01

    This paper mainly focuses on solving the low yield problem for lateral phase change random access memory with a fully confined phase change material node. Improper over-etching and bad step-coverage of physical vapor deposition were the main reasons for the poor contact quality, which leads to the low yield problem. Process improvement was carried out to better control over-etching within 10 nm. Atomic layer deposition process was used to replace physical vapor deposition to guarantee good step coverage. Contrasting cross-sectional photos taken by scanning electron microscopy showed great improvement in contact quality. The atom layer deposition process was demonstrated to have good prospects in nano-contact for phase change memory application. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2011CB922103), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61376420, 61404126, A040203), and the Science and Technology Project of Shenzhen (No. JCYJ20140509172609175).

  4. Planning For a Healthy School Year: Healthy Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Planning For A Healthy School Year Healthy Eating Past ... are one of the first items. Read More "Planning For A Healthy School Year" Articles Back to ...

  5. Healthy Ride Trip Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — A dataset that shows trips taken using the Healthy Ride system by quarter. The dataset includes bike number, membership type, trip start and end timestamp, and...

  6. Healthy Joints Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... my joints more healthy? Definitions What can go wrong? Although you might think arthritis affects only older ... Discovery Into Health ® Home | Health Information | Research | Funding | News & Events | About Us | Portal en español | Asian-Language ...

  7. Healthy Cooking Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... By using healthy-cooking techniques, you can cut saturated fats. Consider, for instance, that many of the fats ... such as butter and lard — are high in saturated fats. Adults should limit calories from saturated fat to ...

  8. Healthy Watersheds Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jump to main content US EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Healthy Watersheds Protection (HWP) Share ... live in a watershed — thus watershed condition is important to everyone. Watersheds exist at different geographic scales, ...

  9. Healthy Eating and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation Emotional Well- ...

  10. Getting Healthy Scientifically

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Recently,Zhao Zhixin,a Beijing-based instructor on scientific bodybuilding and public sport,was interviewed by China Youth Daily,sharing his views on how to get healthy scientifically.Edited excerpts follow:

  11. Healthy Living after Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Stroke Heroes Among Us Healthy Living After Stroke Nutrition Good nutrition is one way to reduce ... look to maintain health and wellness. Subscribe to Stroke Connection Get quarterly digital issues plus our monthly ...

  12. Using Minimax Regret Optimization to Search for Multi-Stakeholder Solutions to Deeply Uncertain Flood Hazards under Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshen, P. H.; Hecht, J. S.; Vogel, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Prescribing long-term urban floodplain management plans under the deep uncertainty of climate change is a challenging endeavor. To address this, we have implemented and tested with stakeholders a parsimonious multi-stage mixed integer programming (MIP) model that identifies the optimal time period(s) for implementing publicly and privately financed adaptation measures. Publicly funded measures include reach-scale flood barriers, flood insurance, and buyout programs to encourage property owners in flood-prone areas to retreat from the floodplain. Measures privately funded by property owners consist of property-scale floodproofing options, such as raising building foundations, as well as investments in flood insurance or retreat from flood-prone areas. The objective function to minimize the sum of flood control and damage costs in all planning stages for different property types during floods of different severities. There are constraints over time for flow mass balances, construction of flood management alternatives and their cumulative implementation, budget allocations, and binary decisions. Damages are adjusted for flood control investments. In recognition of the deep uncertainty of GCM-derived climate change scenarios, we employ the minimax regret criterion to identify adaptation portfolios robust to different climate change trajectories. As an example, we identify publicly and privately funded adaptation measures for a stylized community based on the estuarine community of Exeter, New Hampshire, USA. We explore the sensitivity of recommended portfolios to different ranges of climate changes, and costs associated with economies of scale and flexible infrastructure design as well as different municipal budget constraints.

  13. Existence and Uniqueness of Solution to Nonlinear Boundary Value Problems with Sign-Changing Green’s Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiguo Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available By using the cone theory and the Banach contraction mapping principle, the existence and uniqueness results are established for nonlinear higher-order differential equation boundary value problems with sign-changing Green’s function. The theorems obtained are very general and complement previous known results.

  14. Dynamic changes of left ventricular performance and left atrial volume induced by the mueller maneuver in healthy young adults and implications for obstructive sleep apnea, atrial fibrillation, and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orban, Marek; Bruce, Charles J; Pressman, Gregg S; Leinveber, Pavel; Romero-Corral, Abel; Korinek, Josef; Konecny, Tomas; Villarraga, Hector R; Kara, Tomas; Caples, Sean M; Somers, Virend K

    2008-12-01

    Using the Mueller maneuver (MM) to simulate obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), our aim was to investigate acute changes in left-sided cardiac morphologic characteristics and function which might develop with apneas occurring during sleep. Strong evidence supports a relation between OSA and both atrial fibrillation and heart failure. However, acute effects of airway obstruction on cardiac structure and function have not been well defined. In addition, it is unclear how OSA might contribute to the development of atrial fibrillation and heart failure. Echocardiography was used in healthy young adults to measure various parameters of cardiac structure and function. Subjects were studied at baseline, during, and immediately after performance of the MM and after a 10-minute recovery. Continuous heart rate, blood pressure, and pulse oximetry measurements were made. During the MM, left atrial (LA) volume index markedly decreased. Left ventricular (LV) end-systolic dimension increased in association with a decrease in LV ejection fraction. On release of the maneuver, there was a compensatory increase in blood flow to the left side of the heart, with stroke volume, ejection fraction, and cardiac output exceeding baseline. After 10 minutes of recovery, all parameters returned to baseline. In conclusion, sudden imposition of severe negative intrathoracic pressure led to an abrupt decrease in LA volume and a decrease in LV systolic performance. These changes reflected an increase in LV afterload. Repeated swings in afterload burden and chamber volumes may have implications for the future development of atrial fibrillation and heart failure.

  15. Healthy Lean Through HRD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Frances

    2008-01-01

    The paper reports on findings from the initial, exploratory phase of a longitudinal research study aimed at developing a framework for implementing lean while ensuring employee well-being. Data from observations and in-depth dialogues with persons involved in lean implementation, along...... with relevant theory, are used to construct a tentative framework for implementing "healthy lean". The role of HRD in facilitating implementation of healthy lean is central to the framework, which is presented and discussed....

  16. Ceramides and barrier function in healthy skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungerstedt, J; Hellgren, Lars; Drachmann, Tue;

    2010-01-01

    Lipids in the stratum corneum are key components in the barrier function of the skin. Changes in lipid composition related to eczematous diseases are well known, but limited data are available on variations within healthy skin. The objective of the present study was to compare ceramide subgroups...... and ceramide/cholesterol ratios in young, old, male and female healthy skin. A total of 55 participants with healthy skin was included in the study. Lipid profiles were correlated with transepidermal water loss and with information on dry skin from a questionnaire including 16 people. No statistically...

  17. Changes in the SF-8 scores among healthy non-smoking school teachers after the enforcement of a smoke-free school policy: a comparison by passive smoke status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsumoto Yoshitaka

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of the enforcement of a smoke-free workplace policy on health-related quality of life (HRQOL among a healthy population are poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to examine the effects of the enforcement of a smoke-free school policy on HRQOL among healthy non-smoking schoolteachers with respect to their exposure to passive smoke. Methods Two self-reported questionnaire surveys were conducted, the first before and the second after the enforcement of a total smoke-free public school policy in Nara City. A total of 1534 teachers were invited from 62 schools, and their HRQOL was assessed using six domains extracted from the Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form-8 questionnaire (SF-8: general health perception (GH, role functioning-physical (RP, vitality (VT, social functioning (SF, mental health (MH, and role functioning-emotional (RE. The participants were divided into two groups according to their exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS at baseline: participants not exposed to ETS at school (non-smokers, and participants exposed to ETS at school (passive smokers. Changes in each SF-8 score were evaluated using paired t-tests for each group, and their inter-group differences were evaluated using multiple linear regression analyses adjusted for sex, age, school type, managerial position, and attitude towards a smoke-free policy. Results After ineligible subjects were excluded, 689 teachers were included in the analyses. The number of non-smokers and passive smokers was 447 and 242, respectively. Significant changes in SF-8 scores were observed for MH (0.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.2-1.5 and RE (0.7; 95% CI, 0.0-1.3 in non-smokers, and GH (2.2; 95% CI, 1.2-3.1, VT (1.8; 95% CI, 0.9-2.7, SF (2.7; 95% CI, 1.6-3.8, MH (2.0; 95% CI, 1.0-2.9, and RE (2.0; 95% CI, 1.2-2.8 in passive smokers. In the multiple linear regression analyses, the net changes in the category scores of GH (1.8; 95% CI, 0

  18. Smart Substitutions for Healthy Cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recognition & Awards Healthy Workplace Food and Beverage Toolkit Smart Substitutions Updated:Dec 16,2016 Healthy eating doesn’ ... mean giving up all the foods you love! Smart substitutions can help you maintain an overall healthy ...

  19. Study of the crystallographic phase change on copper (I) selenide thin films prepared through chemical bath deposition by varying the pH of the solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval-Paz, M. G.; Rodríguez, C. A.; Porcile-Saavedra, P. F.; Trejo-Cruz, C.

    2016-07-01

    Copper (I) selenide thin films with orthorhombic and cubic structure were deposited on glass substrates by using the chemical bath deposition technique. The effects of the solution pH on the films growth and subsequently the structural, optical and electrical properties of the films were studied. Films with orthorhombic structure were obtained from baths wherein both metal complex and hydroxide coexist; while films with cubic structure were obtained from baths where the metal hydroxide there is no present. The structural modifications are accompanied by changes in bandgap energy, morphology and electrical resistivity of the films.

  20. Preservative solution for skeletal muscle biopsy samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Yasemin Gulcan; Kurt, Bulent; Ozcan, Omer; Topal, Turgut; Kilic, Abdullah; Muftuoglu, Tuba; Acikel, Cengizhan; Sener, Kenan; Sahiner, Fatih; Yigit, Nuri; Aydin, Ibrahim; Alay, Semih; Ekinci, Safak

    2015-01-01

    Context: Muscle biopsy samples must be frozen with liquid nitrogen immediately after excision and maintained at -80°C until analysis. Because of this requirement for tissue processing, patients with neuromuscular diseases often have to travel to centers with on-site muscle pathology laboratories for muscle biopsy sample excision to ensure that samples are properly preserved. Aim: Here, we developed a preservative solution and examined its protectiveness on striated muscle tissues for a minimum of the length of time that would be required to reach a specific muscle pathology laboratory. Materials and Methods: A preservative solution called Kurt-Ozcan (KO) solution was prepared. Eight healthy Sprague-Dawley rats were sacrificed; striated muscle tissue samples were collected and divided into six different groups. Muscle tissue samples were separated into groups for morphological, enzyme histochemical, molecular, and biochemical analysis. Statistical method used: Chi-square and Kruskal Wallis tests. Results: Samples kept in the KO and University of Wisconsin (UW) solutions exhibited very good morphological scores at 3, 6, and 18 hours, but artificial changes were observed at 24 hours. Similar findings were observed for the evaluated enzyme activities. There were no differences between the control group and the samples kept in the KO or UW solution at 3, 6, and 18 hours for morphological, enzyme histochemical, and biochemical features. The messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) of β-actin gene was protected up to 6 hours in the KO and UW solutions. Conclusion: The KO solution protects the morphological, enzyme histochemical, and biochemical features of striated muscle tissue of healthy rats for 18 hours and preserves the mRNA for 6 hours. PMID:26019417

  1. Preservative solution for skeletal muscle biopsy samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin Gulcan Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context : Muscle biopsy samples must be frozen with liquid nitrogen immediately after excision and maintained at -80 o C until analysis. Because of this requirement for tissue processing, patients with neuromuscular diseases often have to travel to centers with on-site muscle pathology laboratories for muscle biopsy sample excision to ensure that samples are properly preserved. Aim: Here, we developed a preservative solution and examined its protectiveness on striated muscle tissues for a minimum of the length of time that would be required to reach a specific muscle pathology laboratory. Materials and Methods: A preservative solution called Kurt-Ozcan (KO solution was prepared. Eight healthy Sprague-Dawley rats were sacrificed; striated muscle tissue samples were collected and divided into six different groups. Muscle tissue samples were separated into groups for morphological, enzyme histochemical, molecular, and biochemical analysis. Statistical method used: Chi-square and Kruskal Wallis tests. Results: Samples kept in the KO and University of Wisconsin (UW solutions exhibited very good morphological scores at 3, 6, and 18 hours, but artificial changes were observed at 24 hours. Similar findings were observed for the evaluated enzyme activities. There were no differences between the control group and the samples kept in the KO or UW solution at 3, 6, and 18 hours for morphological, enzyme histochemical, and biochemical features. The messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA of β-actin gene was protected up to 6 hours in the KO and UW solutions. Conclusion: The KO solution protects the morphological, enzyme histochemical, and biochemical features of striated muscle tissue of healthy rats for 18 hours and preserves the mRNA for 6 hours.

  2. 不同人格特质的健康女性月经周期性激素变化趋势%Associations between Hormones Changes and Personality Traits of Healthy Women with Regular Menstrual Cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙天琳; 刘雁峰; 黄羚; 苗爽; 赵燕; 王庆国

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To illustrate the change tendency of female sex hormones during the menstrual cycle of healthy women with different personality traits.Methods:Eighty healthy women with regular menstrual cycle were recruited and evaluated by Revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Short Scale for Chinese (EPQ-RSC).According to the score of different aspects in EPQ-RSC, such as Neuroticism (N),Psychoticism (P)and Extraversion (E),the subjects were divided into high group and low group.Then blood were taken from both groups during the period (day 2 to 4),the late follicular phase (day 1 1 -1 3)and the late luteal phase (day 22-24)for three consecutive menstrual cycles.Estrogen (E2),follicle stimulating hormone (FSH),luteinizing hormone (LH),progesterone (Prog),testosterone (T)and prolactin (PRL)were tested.Results:On the Neuroticism there was no signifi-cant difference between the two groups (P >0.05).However,on the Psychoticism the high-P-group showed significant increasing of the FSH in the period,late follicular phase,late luteal phase and the LH in the period and late follicular phase comparing with the low-P-group (P <0.05).There was also significant difference in the reduction of T in M3 period.On the Extraversion,the high-E-group showed significant increase of the E2 in M2 period,the Prog in M3 period,and the FSH in M1 period than the low-E-group (P <0.05).But in M3 the LH of low-E-group was clearly significantly higher than that of high-E-group.The T in M2 /M3 period of the low-E-group also obviously significant higher than the high-E-group.Conclusion:Different personality characteristics may af-fect the change of the sex hormones of healthy women.%目的:探讨不同人格特质的健康女性月经周期性激素的变化趋势。方法:选取月经周期规律的健康女性并按照EPQ -RSC 量表的三个维度即 N(神经质)、P(精神质)、E(内外向)进行分组,连续三个月经周期分别于受试者的月经期、卵泡晚期

  3. The study of changes of biophysical properties of red blood cells in storage in erythrocyte-containing solutions using atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamzin I.M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently the departments of quality control of blood centers evaluate the suitability for clinical use of erythrocyte-containing solutions indirectly by routine methods of the determination of hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit level, or hemolysis at the end of the period of storing. These methods can not directly characterize the state of membranes of preserved erythrocytes. The aim of the work is to study the changes of elasticity and surface potential of membranes of red blood cells of erythrocyte-containing solutions in storage for 35 days. Material and Methods. Two series of dry cytological preparations (smears of erythrocytes have been investigated. The first group consisted of 8 samples of erythrocyte-containing solutions prepared on the day of preservation, and the second group included 20 samples prepared after the long term storage for 35 days at t=+4°C. Blood was stored in bags of «Baxter» company (USA conserving with «CPDA-1». For atomic force microscopy five typical erythrocytes were selected and their elasticity was measured at 9 points of the membrane of each erythrocyte. Total number of measurements was 1296. Results. Average value of Young's modulus of the first group of samples was 1,81±0,02 (M±m KPa. The second group showed 3,22±0,02 KPa statistically higher (p<0,001. The increase of the surface potential of erythrocyte membranes over the storage period was found. Conclusion. A statistically significant increase of the average value of Young's modulus of erythrocytes indicated the decrease in the elasticity of the cell membrane during their storage in erythrocyte-containing solutions under standard temperature conditions and could be used as a criterion for quality assessment.

  4. Characterization of air-formed surface oxide film on a Co-Ni-Cr-Mo alloy (MP35N) and its change in Hanks' solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagai, Akiko, E-mail: nag-bcr@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Inorganic Materials, Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10 Kanda-surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan); Tsutsumi, Yusuke [Department of Metals, Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10 Kanda-surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan); Suzuki, Yuta [Department of Inorganic Materials, Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10 Kanda-surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan); Faculty of Engineering, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Katayama, Keiichi [Faculty of Engineering, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Hanawa, Takao [Department of Metals, Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10 Kanda-surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan); Yamashita, Kimihiro [Department of Inorganic Materials, Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10 Kanda-surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan)

    2012-05-01

    The air-formed surface oxide films used for stents were characterized to determine their composition and chemical state on a Co-Ni-Cr-Mo alloy. The change of the films in Hanks' solution was used to estimate the reconstruction of the film in the human body. Angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize the composition of the film and substrate, as well as the film's thickness. The surface oxide film on the Co-Ni-Cr-Mo alloy (when mechanically polished) consists of oxide species of cobalt, nickel, chromium, and molybdenum, contains a large amount of OH{sup -}, and has a thickness of approximately 2.5 nm. Cations exist in the oxide as Co{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 3+}, Mo{sup 4+}, Mo{sup 5+}, and Mo{sup 6+}. Chromium is enriched and cobalt and nickel are depleted in the oxide; however, nickel is enriched and cobalt is depleted in the substrate alloy just under the surface oxide film. Concentration of chromium was low and that of nickel was high at small take-off angles. This indicates that distribution of chromium is greater in the inner layer, but nickel is distributed more in the outer layer of the surface oxide film. During immersion in Hanks' solution, cobalt and nickel dissolved, and the film composition changed to mostly chromium oxide (Cr{sup 3+}), along with small amounts of cobalt, nickel, and molybdenum oxides, and calcium phosphate containing magnesium, potassium, and carbonate. After immersion in Hanks' solution, the thickness of the surface layer containing calcium phosphate increased to more than 4 nm, while the amount of OH{sup -} increased. The amount of cobalt and nickel in the surface oxide film and in the substrate alloy just below the oxide decreased during immersion.

  5. Changes in weight, length, head circumference, and ponderal index at birth of healthy term newborns in nine cities in China during the period of rapid social development 1985-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya-qin; Li, Hui

    2015-12-01

    The changes in the anthropometric parameters at birth of healthy singleton term newborns in nine cities in China were analyzed by means of the data collected in three large-scale cross-sectional physical growth surveys in 1985, 1995, and 2005 (n=6660, 7109 and 6144). Between 1985 and 2005, average increases in body weight (BW), body length (BL), ponderal index (PI), and head circumference (HC) of newborns were statistically significant: 107g, 0.2cm, 0.6kg/m(3) and 0.4cm, respectively. The relative increase in BW was more than that in BL (3.4% vs 0.4%) in the last two decades, leading to an increase in PI. The distribution of birth size shifted slightly to the right, and the proportion of macrosomia increased from 3.2% in 1985 to 3.4% in 1995 and to 4.3% in 2005. The increases in BW and PI and the increase in rate of macrosomia are concerns from public health perspectives.

  6. Correlation of Hemogram Changes During Pregnancy of Healthy Women with Postpartum Blood Transfusion%孕期血像的变化与产后输血的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李卉; 陈麟凤; 王淑英; 王彦; 师红梅; 汪德清

    2012-01-01

    This study was aimed to explore the correlation of hemogram changes during pregnancy of healthy women with postpartum blood transfusion. The outpatient and inpatient information of expectant lying-in women in our hospitals was collected, the route blood test, lever and kidney function and blood coagulation function tests were performed from the 4th to the 10th month of pregnancy. The pregnant women without underlying diseases and non-eldery pregnant women with single fetus were selected as the subjects of study. They were divided into pospartum blood transfusion group and non-blood transfusion group. The white blood cell (WBC) count, hemoglobin (Hb) level, platelet (Pit) count, plateletocrit (PCT) , mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width ( PDW) were compared in 2 groups. The results showed that 68 cases out of 450 expectant lying-in women received blood transfusion, among them 30 cases with complete data of puerperal transfusion were taken as blood transfusion group, the 28 cases of non transfusion puerperal as control group. There was no significant difference of hemogram changes between the two groups. However, there was a slight decline in Pit count and Hb level of late pregnant women. What is more, there was no correlation between Pit count change and the PCT, MPV and PDW. It is concluded that the changes of hemogram during pregnancy has no correlation with postpartum hemorrhage and blood transfusion in healthy pregnant women, the Pit count and Hb level of pregnant women slightly decline. Nevertheless, PCT, MPV and PDW are within the normal range.%本研究旨在探讨健康孕妇孕期血像的变化与产后输血的相关性.收集2008年在我院待产孕妇的门诊信息和住院信息,追踪孕妇从怀孕第4个月到第10个月每月的血常规检查结果,产前肝肾功能、凝血功能.筛选产前无基础疾病且非高龄单胎孕妇作为研究对象,将其分为产后输血组与非输血组,研究孕期白细胞( WBC)计数

  7. Application of a MRI Based Severity Index to Longitudinal Atrophy Change in Alzheimer’s Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment and Healthy Older Individuals in the AddNeuroMed cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos eAguilar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cross sectional studies of patients at risk of developing Alzheimer disease (AD have identified several brain regions known to be prone to degeneration suitable as biomarkers, including hippocampal, ventricular and whole brain volume. The aim of this study was to longitudinally evaluate an index based on morphometric measures derived from MRI data that could be used for classification of AD and healthy control subjects, as well as prediction of conversion from mild cognitive impairment (MCI to AD. Patients originated from the AddNeuroMed project at baseline (119 AD, 119 MCI, 110 controls (CTL and one-year follow-up (62 AD, 73 MCI, 79 CTL. Data consisted of 3D T1-weighted MR images, demographics, MMSE, ADAS-Cog, CERAD and CDR scores, and APOE e4 status. We computed an index using a multivariate classification model (AD vs. CTL, using orthogonal partial least squares to latent structures (OPLS. Sensitivity, specificity and AUC were determined. Performance of the classifier (AD vs. CTL was high at baseline (10-fold cross-validation, 84% sensitivity, 91% specificity, 0.93 AUC and at one-year follow-up (92% sensitivity, 74% specificity, 0.93 AUC. Predictions of conversion from MCI to AD were good at baseline (77% of MCI converters and at follow-up (91% of MCI converters. MCI carriers of the APOE e4 allele manifested more atrophy and presented a faster cognitive decline when compared to non-carriers. The derived index displayed a steady increase in atrophy over time, yielding higher accuracy in prediction at the time of clinical conversion. Neuropsychological tests appeared less sensitive to changes over time. However, taking the average of the two time points yielded better correlation between the index and cognitive scores as opposed to using cross-sectional data only. Thus, classification of whole-brain MR data seemed to detect patterns of AD changes before conversion from MCI to AD.

  8. Healthy narcissism and ego state therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, Shirley

    2008-01-01

    The term narcissism is often pejorative and associated with the diagnosis of narcissistic personality disorder. However, some degree of narcissism can be viewed as essential when considering the ingredients of a healthy personality. The ego state literature contains references to the maturation of ego states, the creation of helpful ego states, transformation of the function of ego states, and the strengthening of healthy ego states as components of the development of a "harmonious family of self." For an individual to develop healthy narcissism and eventually self-esteem, it's assumed that these ego state interventions are involved and produce changes in internal psychic structure. This article explores theories and therapy regarding the development of healthy narcissism, self-esteem, and a well-functioning sense of entitlement. Case material is summarized to illustrate how ego state therapy can be an important part of this process.

  9. Making Health Easier: Healthy Schools in Philadelphia, PA PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-06-07

    A middle school student is making healthy changes in his life, like eating less junk food, thanks to healthy changes at his school.  Created: 6/7/2013 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 6/7/2013.

  10. Rapid calcitonin response to experimental hypercalcemia in healthy horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rourke, K M; Kohn, C W; Levine, A L; Rosol, T J; Toribio, R E

    2009-05-01

    Calcium has important physiological functions, and disorders of calcium homeostasis are frequent in horses. We have made important progress understanding equine calcium homeostasis; however, limited information on equine calcitonin (CT) is available, in part because of the lack of validated CT assays. To determine the CT response to high ionized calcium (Ca(2+)) concentrations in healthy horses, we induced hypercalcemia in 10 healthy horses using a calcium gluconate 23% solution (5mg/kg; 120 mL/500 kg horse) infused over 4 min. Four horses were infused with 120 mL of 0.9% NaCl and used as controls. We validated a human-specific CT radioimmunoassay for use in horses. Serum Ca(2+) concentrations increased from 6.2+/-0.3mg/dL to 9.9+/-0.5mg/dL (4 min; Pequine thyroid gland C-cell responds quickly to changes in extracellular Ca(2+) concentrations by secreting large quantities of CT into the systemic circulation, indicating that CT is important in equine calcium homeostasis. The human CT radioimmunoassay can be used to measure changes in equine CT.

  11. Tips for Healthy Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... social interaction as well as for most people’s occupation. Proper care and use of your voice will give you the best chance for having a healthy voice for your entire lifetime. Hoarseness or roughness in your voice is often ...

  12. Getting Healthy Scientifically

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Zhixin

    2010-01-01

    @@ Recently, Zhao Zhixin, a Beijing-based instructor on scientific bodybuiiding and public sport,was interviewed by China Youth Daily, sharing his views on how to get healthy scientifically.Edited excerpts follow: China Youth Daily: What do you think about food therapy as a regimen?

  13. The Healthy Eating Pyramid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jimmy; Lin

    2007-01-01

    Experts from the Harvard School of Public Health created the Healthy Eating Pyramid.The pyramid is about the links between diet and health and offers useable information to help people make better choices about what to eat. Remember:its base is daily exercise and weight control.

  14. Some like it healthy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Contini, Caterina; Casini, Leonardo; Stancu, Violeta

    2015-01-01

    Authorising new health claims in Europe will favour the diffusion on the market of a greater number of foods with health claims. This scenario presents new opportunities to promote healthy food choices and launches new challenges to define strategies aimed at promoting products on the market. The...

  15. Making Healthy Sexual Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... including your partner) ? Is your decision to have sex based on the right reasons? (It shouldn’t be based on peer ... re ready! Tags: birth control , condoms , contraception , healthy sex , peer ... Contraception (EC) Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity: General Information How do I ...

  16. Stem cells and healthy aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodell, Margaret A; Rando, Thomas A

    2015-12-04

    Research into stem cells and aging aims to understand how stem cells maintain tissue health, what mechanisms ultimately lead to decline in stem cell function with age, and how the regenerative capacity of somatic stem cells can be enhanced to promote healthy aging. Here, we explore the effects of aging on stem cells in different tissues. Recent research has focused on the ways that genetic mutations, epigenetic changes, and the extrinsic environmental milieu influence stem cell functionality over time. We describe each of these three factors, the ways in which they interact, and how these interactions decrease stem cell health over time. We are optimistic that a better understanding of these changes will uncover potential strategies to enhance stem cell function and increase tissue resiliency into old age.

  17. Oscillatory Changes of the Heterogeneous Reactive Layer Detected with the Motional Resistance during the Galvanostatic Deposition of Copper in Sulfuric Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, Alejandro; Agrisuelas, Jerónimo; García-Jareño, José J; Vicente, Francisco

    2015-11-24

    Metallic copper was galvanostatically deposited on quartz|gold resonant electrodes by applying a constant current in a 0.5 M CuSO4/0.1 M H2SO4 aqueous solution. Galvanostatic copper deposition is one of the best methodologies to calibrate the electrochemical quartz crystal microbalances (EQCM), a gravimetric sensor to evaluate changes in mass during the electrochemical reactions through the Sauerbrey equation. The simultaneous measurement of mass, current density, and motional resistance by an EQCM with motional resistance monitoring allows us to characterize the processes occurring on the electrode surface and at the interfacial regions with unprecedented detail. During the galvanostatic copper deposition, Cu(H2O)4(OH)2 is accumulated close to the copper surface, generating a passive layer. This passive layer can act as Cu(2+) reservoir for the Cu(2+) → Cu process since the copper deposition is not affected. The analysis of motional resistance evolution in different experimental conditions reveals that the passive layer is formed by the reaction of oxidizing agents generated at the counter electrode with the metallic copper surface. The simplistic Cu(2+) → Cu process is completed with a more detailed mechanism, which includes the passive layer formation/dissolution and the transport of species from the counter electrode surface (Pt) to the working electrode surface. The results further support the calibration procedure of EQCM by the galvanostatic deposition of copper in sulfuric solutions. However, we suggest applying high current densities, separating the counter electrode and quartz|gold resonant electrode about 0.5 cm, and keeping oxygen in solution for the EQCM calibration. Moreover, the better interval time to calculate the Sauerbrey's constant from charge and resonant frequency data is between 150 and 300 s.

  18. Fluorescence, Decay Time, and Structural Change of Laser Dye Cresyl Violet in Solution due to Microwave Irradiation at GSM 900/1800 Mobile Phone Frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuat Bayrakceken

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Microwave irradiation at GSM 900/1800 MHz mobile phone frequencies affects the electronic structure of cresyl violet in solution. These changes are important because laser-dye cresyl violet strongly bonds to DNA- and RNA-rich cell compounds in nerve tissues. The irradiation effects on the electronic structure of cresyl violet and its fluorescence data were all obtained experimentally at room temperature. For most laser dyes, this is not a trivial task because laser dye molecules possess a relatively complex structure. They usually consist of an extended system of conjugated double or aromatic π-bonds with attached auxochromic (electron donating groups shifting the absorption band further towards longer wavelength. Because of the intrinsically high degree of conjugation, the vibrational modes of the molecular units couple strongly with each other. We found that the fluorescence quantum yield was increased from to due to intramolecular energy hopping of cresyl violet in solution which is exposed to microwave irradiation at mobile phone frequencies, and the photonic product cannot be used as a laser dye anymore.

  19. Radially Symmetric Solutions of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. Troy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate solutions of and focus on the regime and . Our advance is to develop a technique to efficiently classify the behavior of solutions on , their maximal positive interval of existence. Our approach is to transform the nonautonomous equation into an autonomous ODE. This reduces the problem to analyzing the phase plane of the autonomous equation. We prove the existence of new families of solutions of the equation and describe their asymptotic behavior. In the subcritical case there is a well-known closed-form singular solution, , such that as and as . Our advance is to prove the existence of a family of solutions of the subcritical case which satisfies for infinitely many values . At the critical value there is a continuum of positive singular solutions, and a continuum of sign changing singular solutions. In the supercritical regime we prove the existence of a family of “super singular” sign changing singular solutions.

  20. Healthy Maternal Ambivalence

    OpenAIRE

    Raphael-Leff, Joan

    2010-01-01

    This paper critically reviews the psychoanalytic omission in theorizing maternal subjectivity and the subsequent idealisation of the early mother-baby bond that excludes negative maternal feelings. It suggests that painful maternal experiences of resentment, persecution and hatred remain under-explored. Perhaps, even more alarming, this exclusion compels mothers to hide conflictual and shameful feelings from professionals – and from themselves. The paper suggests that healthy maternal ambival...

  1. Many Healthy Returns

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-02-08

    International travel is usually very safe but there are things you should do to stay safe and healthy. Experts show you how to avoid problems when visiting developing nations. This includes being cautious about the food you eat and the water you drink, and to be aware of vehicles and road conditions to prevent problems.  Created: 2/8/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Disease (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/8/2010.

  2. Selfies, Healthies, Usies, Felfies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fausing, Bent

    2014-01-01

    Spejlet hører til en af de skelsættende nyopfindelser, der udbredes i renæssancen og sætter selvet og subjektet i centrum. Det samme gør den såkaldte selfie, der siden den for alvor blev populær i løbet af sidste halvdel af 2013 har udmøntet sig i adskillige underkategorier: Healthies, Usies...

  3. A Healthy Person

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevald Høye

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate how nursing students in Indonesia and Scandinavia characterize a healthy person. Two hundred thirty-two nursing students from Indonesia, 50 students from Sweden, and 119 students from Norway participated by answering an open-ended question. Qualitative content analysis was used to identify patterns of health in a cultural and national context. The characteristics of a healthy person were summarized in the theme “external and inner balance,” which are intertwined because of the wholeness of self-image and appearance. The subcategories were having a strong and positive body image, feeling well and having inner harmony, following the rules of life, coping with challenges, and acting in unison with the environment. There were more similarities than differences between the Indonesian and Scandinavian nursing students’ understanding of being a healthy person. The difference is that the Scandinavian students mentioned individuality, whereas the Indonesian students referred to collective values.

  4. Hypoxyradiotherapy - changes in selected physiological parameters of healthy tissue during breathing of hypoxic gas-mixture; Hypoxie-Radiotherapie: Veraenderungen ausgewaehlter physiologischer Parameter des gesunden Gewebes bei Atmung eines hypoxischen Gasgemisches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strnad, V. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Grebmeier, J. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Abt. Kernspintomographie; Riepl, M. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Kirschner, M. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Sauer, R. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie

    1994-10-01

    This study investigates changes in selected physiological parameters in vivo during acute aerogen hypoxia. In 31 persons (group A) we documented changes in blood-gas-analysis, ECG-parameters, blood pressure and pulse during acute hypoxia lasting 5 minutes. During 30 minutes of acute hypoxia we determined in another 10 persons (group B) in relations between different phosphoryl-metabolites by means of {sup 31}phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 31}P-MRS). The {sup 31}P-MRS of the Musculus triceps surae was performed on our 1,5 T imaging system (Magnetom, Siemens) using a 8 cm diameter surface coil. To achieve the hypoxic condition in the persons tested, a gas-mixture with 8.2% O{sub 2} was used. In group A the acute hypoxia led to significant changes in O{sub 2}-pressure, the blood O{sub 2}-saturation and pulse frequency. The pO{sub 2}-values drop in the 5th minute to about 50% of the inital value. Concerning group B the relations of the phosphoryl metabolities show no significant changes during acute hypoxia. The results show an excellent tolerability of breathing of the hypoxic gas-mixture, and confirm that this mixture containing 8.2% of O{sub 2} ensures a decrease in the pO{sub 2}-levels of more than 50%. This is necessary to achieve a dose modifying factor (DMF) of at least 1.15 to 1.2. The changes in relations of phosphoryl metabolites seem to reflect the ability of healthy tissue to adapt to hypoxic conditions starting after 10 minutes and leading to the loss of the radioprotective effect after 30 minutes. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die vorliegende Arbeit untersucht Veraenderungen ausgewaehlter physiologischer Parameter in vivo waehrend Hypoxie. Bei 31 Patienten (Gruppe A) habe wir waehrend akuter aerogener Hypoxie von fuenf Minuten Dauer Veraenderungen in der Blutgasanalyse, von EKG-Parametern, Blutdruck und Puls untersucht. Bei zehn Personen (Gruppe B) wurden waehrend akuter Hypoxie ueber 30 Minuten Veraenderungen der Phosphorylmetaboliten mit Hilfe der

  5. Empowering a healthy practice environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Jodi; Ruffin, Tasha

    2015-03-01

    This article provides frontline nurses a tool kit so they can advocate a healthy practice environment. The healthy nurse, healthy work hours, job satisfaction, adequate sleep, power naps at work, and balancing family/work are discussed. The overweight nurse, nurse fatigue, compassion fatigue, shift work sleep disorder, and role strain are discussed as barriers to a healthy practice environment. Case reports with analysis and recommendations are discussed to overcome these barriers. Resources are presented for frontline nurses to develop a tool kit for transforming their environment to a healthy practice environment and to empower them to become healthy nurses.

  6. What Makes a Healthy Pregnancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of an inherited disorder, such as sickle cell anemia, thalassemia, or Tay-Sachs disease; to screen for common genetic disorders, such as spina bifida and Down syndrome. Read More "Healthy Pregnancy" Articles What Makes a Healthy Pregnancy? / Always Meant ...

  7. Healthy Swimming/Recreational Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Now Available! Q&A with Missy Franklin: Olympic Gold Medalist and Healthy Swimming Champion New Report on ... enter your email address: Enter Email Address Submit Button What's this? Healthy Swimming Swimmers Health Benefits of ...

  8. Vitamin Supplements: Healthy or Hoax?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recognition & Awards Healthy Workplace Food and Beverage Toolkit Vitamin Supplements: Healthy or Hoax? Updated:Jun 12,2015 Can vitamin and mineral supplements really make you healthier? Overwhelmed ...

  9. Pain perception in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janum, Susanne; Nielsen, Signe T; Werner, Mads U;

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to study the relationship between pain perception and cytokine release during systemic inflammation. We present a randomized crossover trial in healthy volunteers (n = 17) in 37 individual trials. Systemic inflammation was induced by an i.v. bolus of Escherichia coli LPS (2 ng/kg) on two...... separate trial days, with or without a nicotine patch applied 10 h previously. Pain perception at baseline, and 2 and 6 h after LPS was assessed by pressure algometry and tonic heat stimulation at an increasing temperature (45-48℃) during both trials. Compared with baseline, pain pressure threshold...... was reduced 2 and 6 h after LPS, while heat pain perception was accentuated at all testing temperatures after 2 but not 6 h. The magnitude of changes in pain perception did not correlate to cytokine release. No effect of transdermal nicotine or training status was observed. In conclusion, LPS administration...

  10. Making Healthy Choices Easier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pelle Guldborg; Skov, Laurits Rohden; Skov, Katrine Lund

    2016-01-01

    this character and its ethical implication with a special emphasis on the compatibility of nudging with traditional regulation, special domains of experience, and the need for a more nuanced approach to the ethical debate. The aim is to advance readers understanding and give guidance to those who consider....... However, integration and testing of the nudge approach as part of more comprehensive public health strategies aimed at making healthy choices easier is being threatened by inadequate understandings of its scientific character, relationship with regulation and its ethical implications. This article reviews...

  11. [Food additives and healthiness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects.

  12. Making Healthy Choices Easier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldborg Hansen, Pelle; Skov, Laurits Rohden; Lund Skov, Katrine

    2016-01-01

    . However, integration and testing of the nudge approach as part of more comprehensive public health strategies aimed at making healthy choices easier is being threatened by inadequate understandings of its scientific character, relationship with regulation and its ethical implications. This article reviews...... this character and its ethical implication with a special emphasis on the compatibility of nudging with traditional regulation, special domains of experience, and the need for a more nuanced approach to the ethical debate. The aim is to advance readers understanding and give guidance to those who consider...

  13. Healthy eating at schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabinsky, Marianne

    . The present PhD thesis is based on evaluation of the dietary effect of this project. There is room for improvement of the dietary habits of Danish children. Dietary habits are influenced by multiple factors across different contexts. The school setting is known as a suitable arena for promotion of healthy...... into account the multiple factors and environments which affect the dietary habits of children. The focus of such an intervention could be implementation of a sustainable school food programme. Another focus could be improvement of the packed lunches brought from home with the purpose to contribute...

  14. Healthy Smile for Your Baby

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your baby’s gums or brush your baby’s teeth, give your baby healthy foods, and take your baby to the dentist by the time ... they have teeth, you should clean their gums. Give your baby a healthy start! Here are tips ... healthy. Take Care of Your Baby’s Mouth m Clean your ...

  15. 早期健全人格培养对儿童气质变化影响的研究%Study on the change in children's temperament by early cultivation of healthy personality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎宁真; 李红辉; 刘萍; 温源

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] To explore the influence of early cultivation of healthy personality on children's temperament, and to learn about the gap in children's temperament dimension between the treatment group and control group and thus provide a scientific basis for guiding Children's early integrated development. [Methods] 192 parent-child members with age from 0 to 3 years old from the early integrated development of Children's Health Department during 2009-2011 were selected as the treatment group for the study on the early cultivation of healthy personality. 212 children from the outpatient physical examination were selected randomly as the control group. Analysis had been carried out with the testing software for children's temperament by dividing them into 1 - 4 months,5~ 11 months and 1~3 years old group according to ages. [Results] There was a slight difference in children's temperament type between the treatment and control group in the 1 - 4 months and from the 5-11 months, while there was a great difference from 1~3 years old, with the treatment group tending to be raised easily. As for the difference in the temperament dimension of different ages between the treatment and control group,there was a difference in rhythmicity,phobotaxis,adaptability and quality of mood with increase in age,while with the extension in intervening time, temperament characteristics appeared after the intervention, such as low activity level, good rhythmicity, active mood, undispersed attention, low adaptability, decreasing perseverance and high reaction threshold. [Conclusions] Though temperament is a relatively stable individual mental characteristic,it will be changed in some degree under the influence from the later living environment and education. There is a great significance in cultivating infants' healthy personality from learning about the variability in the development of temperament.%[目的] 探讨早期健全人格培养对儿童气质变化的影响,了解干预组与对

  16. Implementation of a change management solution based on a product lifecycle management system for a large international project; Einfuehrung eines Product-Lifecycle-Management-gestuetzten Aenderungsprozesses in einem internationalen Grossprojekt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luehr, Anneke

    2011-10-15

    This Thesis describes the implementation of a Change Management solution based on a Product Lifecycle Management System (PLM System) for a large international project. The objective of Change Management is to ensure a systematic line of action for approving and implementing changes in the project. The Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY is one of the world's leading accelerator centres with locations in Hamburg and Zeuthen. Currently, DESY participates in the realization of the international research facility European X-Ray Free-Electron Laser (XFEL) at the Hamburg site. DESY was responsible for the planning of the XFEL. When the project entered the construction phase it was internationalized and now comprises project groups in 12 countries. Thus the requirements on Change Management have changed, as participants from several labs at many different locations are now involved. First the project scope is described and then a target process for the Change Management solution is developed by a requirement analysis. Afterwards the technical implementation of this process in DESY's PLM System is described and the Change Management solution is tested. The process is visualized using the Unified Modeling Language (UML). Finally a description is given of how to transfer the solution to the project environment. (orig.)

  17. Effect of nonabsorbed amounts of a fructose-sorbitol mixture on small intestinal transit in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan L; Linnet, Jan; Rumessen, Jüri J

    2006-01-01

    Although malabsorption of small amounts of fructose-sorbitol mixtures occurs frequently in healthy humans, insights into their effects on gastrointestinal motility are poor. The present study addresses the hypothesis that malabsorption of a fructose-sorbitol challenge changes the small intestinal...... transit rate. Eleven healthy volunteers participated in a double-blind crossover investigation. In random order, the subjects ingested 30 g glucose or a mixture of 25 g fructose and 5 g sorbitol as 10% solutions. As a radiolabeled marker, (99m)Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid was added to each test...... solution. Breath hydrogen and methane concentrations and gastrointestinal progress of the radiolabeled marker were followed for the next 6-hr period. Malabsorption of small amounts of the fructose-sorbitol mixture was evident in all subjects. The area under the gastric radioactivity-time curve after...

  18. Effect of nonabsorbed amounts of a fructose-sorbitol mixture on small intestinal transit in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan L; Linnet, Jan; Rumessen, Jüri J

    2006-01-01

    transit rate. Eleven healthy volunteers participated in a double-blind crossover investigation. In random order, the subjects ingested 30 g glucose or a mixture of 25 g fructose and 5 g sorbitol as 10% solutions. As a radiolabeled marker, (99m)Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid was added to each test...... solution. Breath hydrogen and methane concentrations and gastrointestinal progress of the radiolabeled marker were followed for the next 6-hr period. Malabsorption of small amounts of the fructose-sorbitol mixture was evident in all subjects. The area under the gastric radioactivity-time curve after......Although malabsorption of small amounts of fructose-sorbitol mixtures occurs frequently in healthy humans, insights into their effects on gastrointestinal motility are poor. The present study addresses the hypothesis that malabsorption of a fructose-sorbitol challenge changes the small intestinal...

  19. Wagging ETOM's Long Tail: MOOCs, Hangouts on Air, and Formal and Informal Undergraduate Experiences with Climate Change Science and Clean Energy Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines-Stiles, G.; Alley, R. B.; Akuginow, E.; McNeal, K.; Blockstein, D.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change can reasonably be described as a "wicked problem" meaning that it is complex, difficult and multi-faceted, although critical to equitable development and the sustainability of human civilization. But while the Wikipedia definition says such problems are "impossible" to solve, not even to try will lead to certain failure. "Earth: The Operators' Manual" (ETOM) was an NSF-funded informal science education project with 3 hour-long TV programs appearing on PBS in 2011 and 2012, along with live presentations by series host, Penn State's Richard Alley, and others at 5 major science centers. Uniquely among climate change programming, ETOM gave equal time to identifying solutions along with climate science, and made all its materials freely available via YouTube. Formal and informal science educators can register to download HD videos for classroom and outreach use, and signups have ranged from middle schools to 4-year colleges. Building on the success of the series and Alley's companion tradebook of the same name, Penn State working with Coursera invited Alley to develop a MOOC entitled "Energy, The Environment and Our Future" that similarly combined the essential science along with clean energy solutions. The course reached more than 30,000 students in the first semester of 2014. More recently the ETOM team has partnered with the National Council for Science and the Environment (NCSE) to develop "READ for the EARTH," an NSF EAGER project, offering campuses the opportunity to adopt Alley's book, the ETOM videos (including "How To Talk To An Ostrich"), NCSE's www.CAMELclimatechange.org web site and other resources for both formal and informal uses. Some campuses have used the book with honors classes, and some are exploring adapting ETOM as a first year reading experience for all freshman. Our presentation will share reactions to the MOOC, to the pilot phases of "READ for the EARTH" and present both qualitative and quantitative results. Some of the most

  20. Ceramides and barrier function in healthy skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutanu Jungersted, Jakob; Hellgren, Lars; Høgh, Julie Kaae

    2010-01-01

    Lipids in the stratum corneum are key components in the barrier function of the skin. Changes in lipid composition related to eczematous diseases are well known, but limited data are available on variations within healthy skin. The objective of the present study was to compare ceramide subgroups...... and ceramide/cholesterol ratios in young, old, male and female healthy skin. A total of 55 participants with healthy skin was included in the study. Lipid profiles were correlated with transepidermal water loss and with information on dry skin from a questionnaire including 16 people. No statistically...... significant differences were found between young and old skin for ceramide subgroups or ceramide/cholesterol ratios, and there was no statistically significant correlation between answers about dry skin and ceramide levels. Interestingly, a statistically significant higher ceramide/cholesterol ratio was found...

  1. Ceramides and barrier function in healthy skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutanu Jungersted, Jakob; Hellgren, Lars I; Høgh, Julie K; Drachmann, T; Jemec, Gregor B E; Agner, Tove

    2010-07-01

    Lipids in the stratum corneum are key components in the barrier function of the skin. Changes in lipid composition related to eczematous diseases are well known, but limited data are available on variations within healthy skin. The objective of the present study was to compare ceramide subgroups and ceramide/cholesterol ratios in young, old, male and female healthy skin. A total of 55 participants with healthy skin was included in the study. Lipid profiles were correlated with transepidermal water loss and with information on dry skin from a questionnaire including 16 people. No statistically significant differences were found between young and old skin for ceramide subgroups or ceramide/cholesterol ratios, and there was no statistically significant correlation between answers about dry skin and ceramide levels. Interestingly, a statistically significant higher ceramide/cholesterol ratio was found for men than for women (p = 0.02).

  2. Healthy eating behaviour - a social marketing perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazbare, Laura

    at population levels. Therefore, there is a call for additional research in order to identify the alternative ways of changing dietary behaviours. Healthy eating is a target behaviour of social marketing, which is a knowledge discipline and a practice that applies commercial marketing principles to achieve...... a voluntary behavioural change for personal welfare and/or the benefit of society. Even though social marketing is considered the most advanced framework for diet-related interventions, it has been criticised for a number of problems that can be grouped into: 1) lack of consumer orientation and research, 2......) lack of availability and application of theories that explain the process of specific behavioural change, 3) predominance of "downstream" approaches, and 4) ethical issues. The overall aim of this dissertation is to provide insights into healthy eating behaviour using the social marketing approach...

  3. Down Syndrome in Adults: Staying Healthy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Shortfall Questionnaire Home Prevention and Wellness Staying Healthy Down Syndrome in Adults: Staying Healthy Down Syndrome in Adults: Staying Healthy Family HealthPrevention and WellnessStaying ...

  4. Healthy and productive workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammendolia, Carlo; Côté, Pierre; Cancelliere, Carol

    2016-01-01

    and stakeholder experience. This was then systematically operationalized into a program using discussion groups and consensus among experts and stakeholders. RESULTS: The top health problem impacting our workplace partner was mental health. Depression and stress were the first and second highest cause...... of productivity loss respectively. A multi-pronged program with detailed action steps was developed and directed at key stakeholders and health conditions. For mental health, regular sharing focus groups, social networking, monthly personal stories from leadership using webinars and multi-media communications......, expert-led workshops, lunch and learn sessions and manager and employee training were part of a comprehensive program. Comprehensive, specific and multi-pronged strategies were developed and aimed at encouraging healthy behaviours that impact presenteeism such as regular exercise, proper nutrition...

  5. Promoting healthy aging by confronting ageism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Todd D

    2016-01-01

    Negative stereotypes about older people are discussed with specific regard to their negative influence on the mental and physical health of older people. Much research has demonstrated a clear, direct threat to the cognition of older persons when older individuals believe in the truth of these negative stereotypes. For example, the will to live is decreased, memory is impaired, and the individual is less interested in engaging in healthy preventive behaviors. Negative age stereotypes also have significant negative effects on the physical well-being of older persons. Recovery from illness is impaired, cardiovascular reactivity to stress is increased, and longevity is decreased. Impediments to addressing this issue are presented, along with several specific and evidence-based recommendations for solutions to this problem. The healthy aging of older adults can be greatly enhanced with the concerted efforts of politicians, educators, physicians, mental health professionals, and other health care workers working to implement these recommendations. (PsycINFO Database Record

  6. The age-related changes of cerebral gray matter volume in healthy adults%健康成人大脑灰质体积年龄相关性变化的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭飞; 耿左军; 朱青峰; 宋振虎; 王亚

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨正常脑老化过程灰质体积年龄相关性的改变规律。方法应用MR采集124例健康志愿者全脑T1WI图像,利用VBM技术获得全脑灰质体积。采用双因素方差分析不同性别及年龄组间灰质体积的差异性。结果每2个年龄组间均存在显著的年龄主效应( P <0 V.05,FDR校正)。其中中年组与青年组比较,存在明显萎缩的脑区位于两侧额上回、两侧额下回三角部、右侧额下回眶部、双侧丘脑、双侧颞中回、右侧额上回眶面、右侧颞中极、右侧岛叶、右侧尾状核及右侧顶叶。老年组与中年组比较存在明显萎缩的脑区位于右侧颞中极、杏仁核、扣带回后部、两侧枕叶舌回、两侧海马/海马旁回及两侧颞下极。老年组与青年组比较,除枕叶外,老年组全脑灰质体积存在广泛下降。当不采用多重对比校正时,观察到青年组与中年组之间部分脑区,如右侧颞中回、右侧颞上回、左侧角回、右侧枕叶中部、左侧扣带回中部、右额下回三角部,存在年龄×性别交互效应( P <0.01,未校正)。结论在正常老化过程中,全脑灰质体积与年龄呈现为负相关性改变,不同脑区存在不同的萎缩模式,一般遵循“先进后出”的规律,其中额叶最易受年龄的影响;并且在部分脑区中,女性灰质萎缩进程较男性缓慢。%Objective To explore the age-related changes of cerebral grey matter volume in healthy adults .Methods The 3D brain MRI was used to get T1WI image in 124 healthy volunteers.The VBM (Voxel-based morphometry) technique was applied to detect cerebral gray matter volume .The differences of cerebral grey matter volume in different sex groups and age groups were compared by Two-way analysis of variance .Results There were significant main effect of age between every two groups ( P <0.05,FDR correction).As compared with youth group,the middle age group

  7. Overview & Background of The Healthy Eating Index–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI) is a measure of diet quality, independent of quantity, that can be used to assess compliance with the US Dietary Guidelines for Americans and monitor changes in dietary patterns.

  8. Healthy Diet, Exercise May Help Keep Alzheimer's At Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 160477.html Healthy Diet, Exercise May Help Keep Alzheimer's at Bay Study finds people who are active ... your brain free of changes that lead to Alzheimer's disease, a small study suggests. Researchers studied 44 ...

  9. Adolescents' Perceptions of Healthy Eating and Communication about Healthy Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kara; Prendergast, Gerard; Gronhoj, Alice; Bech-Larsen, Tino

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore Chinese adolescents' perceptions of healthy eating, their perceptions of various socializing agents shaping their eating habits, and their opinions about various regulatory measures which might be imposed to encourage healthy eating. Design/methodology/approach: Four focus group interview sessions…

  10. [Aspects of healthy humans' response to hyperthermia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, L I; Bannikov, A V; Goranchuk, V V

    1999-01-01

    Single-shot hyperthermia of healthy young men in climate chamber up to rectal temperature of 39.5 degrees C over 75-110 minutes revealed variable heat resistance. Individuals with prevalent sympathetic vegetative regulation were more resistant to overheating, if compared to those with prevalent parasympathetic one. Endocrine group peculiarities were observed, the examinees with prevalent parasympathetic vegetative regulation demonstrated more drastic changes of some biochemical parameters.

  11. Healthy Eating and Academic Achievement

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-12-09

    This podcast highlights the evidence that supports the link between healthy eating and improved academic achievement. It also identifies a few actions to support a healthy school nutrition environment to improve academic achievement.  Created: 12/9/2014 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/9/2014.

  12. Comparative optimism about healthy eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproesser, Gudrun; Klusmann, Verena; Schupp, Harald T; Renner, Britta

    2015-07-01

    The present study investigated people's perception of their own as compared to their peers' healthy eating and related these perceptions to actual healthy eating, BMI, and subsequent healthy eating behavior. Data were collected within the framework of the longitudinal cohort study Konstanz Life Study (T1: N = 770; T2: N = 510). Our results demonstrated an optimistic bias on the group level. Specifically, people rated their own eating behavior as healthier on average than that of their average peers. This comparative optimism occurred even when actual healthy eating was unfavorable and BMI was high. However, it increased with actual healthy eating behavior. Importantly, optimistic perceptions were positively related to the intention to eat healthily and healthy eating six months later. Hence, the results suggest that an optimistic comparative view of one's own healthy eating is grounded in reality and boosts rather than deters subsequent health behavior. This implies that there might not be a need to reduce optimistic perceptions of healthy eating behavior.

  13. Prepare Healthy Foods with Toddlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi-Taylor, Satomi; Rike, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    Toddlers--from about 16 to 36 months--can learn a variety of skills as they prepare food and follow recipes in developmentally appropriate ways. Early childhood teachers are encouraged to support young children's healthy eating habits by offering simple food preparation experiences. When toddlers--and preschoolers--safely prepare healthy snacks,…

  14. Healthy Bones at Every Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    .org Healthy Bones at Every Age Page ( 1 ) Bone health is important at every age and stage of life. The skeleton is our body’s storage bank for ... are many things we can do at every age to keep our bones strong and healthy. Peak ...

  15. Brain energy metabolism and blood flow differences in healthy aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanerud, Joel; Borghammer, Per; Chakravarty, M Mallar

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO(2)), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) are important indices of healthy aging of the brain. Although a frequent topic of study, changes of CBF and CMRO(2) during normal aging are still controversial, as some authors...... find decreases of both CBF and CMRO(2) but increased OEF, while others find no change, and yet other find divergent changes. In this reanalysis of previously published results from positron emission tomography of healthy volunteers, we determined CMRO(2) and CBF in 66 healthy volunteers aged 21 to 81......, and in the temporal cortex. Because of the inverse relation between OEF and capillary oxygen tension, increased OEF can compromise oxygen delivery to neurons, with possible perturbation of energy turnover. The results establish a possible mechanism of progression from healthy to unhealthy brain aging, as the regions...

  16. Creating healthy and just bioregions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzoli, Keith; Leiter, Robert Allen

    2016-03-01

    Dramatic changes taking place locally, regionally, globally, demand that we rethink strategies to improve public health, especially in disadvantaged communities where the cumulative impacts of toxicant exposure and other environmental and social stressors are most damaging. The emergent field of Sustainability Science, including a new bioregionalism for the 21st Century, is giving rise to promising place-based (territorially rooted) approaches. Embedded in this bioregional approach is an integrated planning framework (IPF) that enables people to map and develop plans and strategies that cut across various scales (e.g. from regional to citywide to neighborhood scale) and various topical areas (e.g. urban land use planning, water resource planning, food systems planning and "green infrastructure" planning) with the specific intent of reducing the impacts of toxicants to public health and the natural environment. This paper describes a case of bioregionally inspired integrated planning in San Diego, California (USA). The paper highlights food-water-energy linkages and the importance of "rooted" community-university partnerships and knowledge-action collaboratives in creating healthy and just bioregions.

  17. Having a Healthy Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the same reason. Other skin changes caused by pregnancy hormones may include brownish or yellowish patches on the face called chloasma and a dark line on the midline of the lower abdomen, known ... you had prior to pregnancy may become bigger and darker. Even the areola , ...

  18. Healthy ageing at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Marlon; Jolij, Jacob; Lorist, Monicque

    2016-01-01

    Demographic ageing in the Western world means that the average age of the working population is increasing. This has major consequences for the labour process. Growing older is linked to physical and cognitive changes that can influence the performance of tasks. We are faced with an important challe

  19. Healthy ageing at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Marlon; Jolij, Jacob; Lorist, Monicque

    2016-01-01

    Background Demographic ageing in the Western world means that the average age of the working population is increasing. This has major consequences for the labour process. Growing older is linked to physical and cognitive changes that can influence the performance of tasks. We are faced with an impor

  20. Healthy ageing at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Marlon; Jolij, Jacob; Lorist, Monicque

    2015-01-01

    Demographic ageing in the Western world means that the average age of the working population is increasing. This has major consequences for the labour process. Growing older is linked to physical and cognitive changes which can influence performance of tasks. We are faced with an important challenge

  1. "EARTH: The Operators' Manual" - a hybrid model (TV+online+in-person) to effectively communicate climate change science alongside sustainable energy solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines-stiles, G.; Alley, R. B.; Akuginow, E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent public opinion surveys have found that Americans underestimate the degree of agreement by climate scientists about global warming and climate change, and - despite growing evidence of ice sheet loss, ocean acidification, sea level rise and extreme weather events - believe less in warming trends in 2011 than they did earlier. The issue has become politicized and controversial. "EARTH: The Operators' Manual" is an informal science education project supported by NSF, the National Science Foundation. Its ambitious goal is to use a hybrid mix of broadcast programs appearing on public television and hosted by Penn State geoscientist, Richard Alley, together with on-site outreach events and online resources and tools, to present core climate science in engaging ways, and to combine that presentation of objective research with an overview of sustainable energy solutions. The project's content and communication strategies have been shaped in response to analyses of public opinion such as the SIX AMERICAS study and aim to address common "skeptic" arguments and share essential climate science. Social science research has also found that audiences seem more open to scientific information where the possibility of a positive response is also offered. The first hour-long PBS program aired nationally in April 2011, has since been re-broadcast, and is also available online. Two more programs will air in 2012, and the presentation at the Fall AGU Conference will preview segments from both programs. Five regionally-diverse science centers (in San Diego, Raleigh NC, St. Paul MN, Fort Worth TX and Portland OR) have hosted outreach events, with Richard Alley and other project participants, and will continue with additional activities through summer 2012. The project's website includes video clips, case studies of energy-saving initiatives world-wide and across the USA, plus an interactive "Energy Gauge" inviting users to assess their current Home, Travel, Food, and Goods and

  2. The pharmacokinetics of taurolidine metabolites in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Li; Greenberg, Howard E; Perhach, James L; Waldman, Scott A; Kraft, Walter K

    2007-06-01

    Taurolidine is an experimental antibacterial and antiendotoxic compound whose clinical utility as an antitumor agent is being investigated in human clinical trials. Taurolidine in aqueous solution exists in equilibrium with taurultam. Taurultam is subsequently transformed to taurinamide. The pharmacokinetic profiles of these metabolites are not well established. In this study, 18 healthy volunteers were administered 5.0 g of taurolidine in 250 mL of 5% polyvinylpyrrolidone in water over 2, 1, or 0.5 hours by intravenous infusion in a parallel-group design. All subjects noted discomfort at the infusion site, although there were no serious adverse events. t(max) generally occurred at the end of infusion for taurinamide, whereas that of taurultam was reached before completion of infusion. The taurolidine metabolite taurultam demonstrated a shorter half-life and lower systemic exposure than taurinamide. Shortening of infusion duration increased the C(max) and AUC of taurultam. Changes in infusion rate did not substantially change the pharmacokinetic parameters of taurinamide.

  3. Comparison of changes of intestinal microecology between different age groups in the healthy people%不同年龄健康人群肠道微生态差异比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李素军; 徐哲荣; 鲁海峰; 杨云梅

    2011-01-01

    目的 分析不同年龄健康人群肠道微生态的差异,探讨年龄与肠道菌群组成变化的相关性.方法 收集少年组、成年组和老年组健康人群的粪样,对其主要菌群进行细菌培养和计数,采用荧光定量PCR技术分析其主要菌群在属水平上的定性和定量变化,计算其反映肠道定植抗力的指标B/E值(双歧杆菌与肠杆菌数值比).结果 粪便细菌培养结果显示,成年组和老年组的双歧杆菌数量较少年组明显减少(均P<0.01),乳酸菌数量也明显减少(分别为P<0.01、P<0.05);老年组类杆菌和肠杆菌数量较少年组和成年组均显著增加(均P<0.01);成年组和老年组肠球菌数量较少年组明显增加(分别为P<0.05、P<0.01),老年组与成年组比较也明显增加(P<0.05);老年组的B/E值(0.88±0.13),较少年组(1.15±0.15)和成年组(1.01±0.20)显著减少(均P<0.05).用荧光定量PCR检测双歧杆菌、类杆菌、肠杆菌数量及B/E值结果差异同细菌培养结果相符;荧光定量PCR检测少年组与老年组的乳酸菌数量差异、少年组与成年组的肠球菌数量差异较培养结果更为显著(定量PCR结果P<0.01;培养结果P<0.05).结论 随着年龄的增长,肠道双歧杆菌和乳酸菌数量明显减少,类杆菌、肠杆菌、肠球菌数量显著增加,肠道定植抗力也不断下降.%Objective To analyze the diversity of intestinal microecology in different healthy age groups and explore the relationship between age and the composition of intestinal microflora.Methods Fecal samples were collected from the children,adult and elderly groups.The main intestinal microflora were cultured and quantified,and the qualitative and quantitative changes in the level of category were determined by fluorescence quantitative PCR.The Bifidobacteria/Enterobacteriaceae (B/E) ratio reflexing intestinal colonization resistance was also calculated.Results The germiculture of fecal samples

  4. Healthy Children, Healthy Minds: Creating a Brighter Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Lebrun

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Children struggle with life today. Being children in the 21st century is both taxing and exciting and yet trying to cope with all of the technology and media that surrounds them. How do we as adults provide good models? Mindfulness, exercise, focus and attention, healthy living strategies need to play a role in shaping healthy children. Educators need to become well versed in strategies that both teach short and long term behaviors that will sustain healthy living and healthy minds. Children are the future and what kind of adult do we want running our countries and the world. The article provides many strategies for educators and parents to guide children in making choices that are both empowering and allow them the flexibility to be children.

  5. Healthy meals on the menu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thunström, Linda; Nordström, Leif Jonas; Shogren, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Menu labelling of meals prepared away from home is a policy designed to help consumers make healthier food choices. In this paper we use a field experiment in Sweden to examine if a restaurant benefits from introducing a meal labelled as healthy on its menu by experiencing an overall increase...... in sales. We cannot reject the hypothesis that sales are the same before and after the introduction of a meal labelled as healthy on the menu, i.e. our data does not support the idea that restaurants increase their sales from supplying a meal labelled as healthy....

  6. The perceived healthiness of functional foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Larsen, Tino; Grunert, Klaus G.

    2003-01-01

    Functional foods presumably enable the consumer to lead a healthier life without changing eating habits. Whether consumers accept this proposition or not is potentially influenced by their perceptions of the healthiness of the processing methods, enrichment components, food-types, and health claims...... foods, whereas the use of different health claims, processing methods, enrichments, product types, and especially the interactions between the two latter, are important determinants of consumers' perceptions of the healthiness of functional foods. Udgivelsesdato: FEB...... used in the production and marketing of functional foods. Because consumers may perceive functional enrichment as interfering with nature, cultural values pertaining to man's manipulation of nature may also influence consumer acceptance of functional foods. The purpose of the study described here...

  7. Healthy Diet in Children: Facts and Keys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Hasan Khodaee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Consuming a healthy diet throughout the lifecourse helps prevent malnutrition in all its forms as well as a range of Non-communicable diseases (NCDs and conditions. But the increased production of processed food, rapid urbanization and changing lifestyles have led to a shift in dietary patterns. People are now consuming more foods high in energy, fats, free sugars or salt/sodium, and many do not eat enough fruit, vegetables and dietary fibre such as whole grains. In the first 2 years of a child’s life, optimal nutrition fosters healthy growth and improves cognitive development. It also reduces the risk of becoming overweight or obese and developing NCDs later in life. Nutrition for kids is based on the same principles as nutrition for adults. Everyone needs the same types of nutrients; such as vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates, protein and fat. Children, however, need different amounts of specific nutrients at different ages

  8. Cardiovascular Disease Self-Management: Pilot Testing of an mHealth Healthy Eating Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Pfaeffli Dale

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac rehabilitation (CR is crucial in the management of cardiovascular disease (CVD, yet attendance is poor. Mobile technology (mHealth offers a potential solution to increase reach of CR. This paper presents two development studies to determine mobile phone usage in adults with CVD and to evaluate the acceptability of an mHealth healthy eating CR program. Methods: CR attendees were surveyed to determine mobile phone usage rates. A second single-subject pilot study investigated perceptions of a 4-week theory-based healthy eating mHealth program and explored pre-post changes in self-efficacy. Results: 74 adults with CVD completed the survey (50/74 male; mean age 63 ± 10. Nearly all had mobile phones (70/74; 95% and used the Internet (69/74; 93%, and most were interested in receiving CR by text message (57/74; 77%. 20 participants took part in the healthy eating pilot study. Participants read all/most of the text messages, and most (19/20 thought using mobile technology was a good way to deliver the program. The website was not widely used as visiting the website was reported to be time consuming. Exploratory t-tests revealed an increase in heart healthy eating self-efficacy post program, in particular the environmental self-efficacy subset (Mean = 0.62, SD = 0.74, p = 0.001. Conclusions: Text messaging was seen as a simple and acceptable way to deliver nutrition information and behavior change strategies; however, future research is needed to determine the effectiveness of such programs.

  9. Photo-induced valence change of the sulfur atom in an L-cysteine thin film grown on a silver metal substrate in a saliva-emulated aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujibayashi, Toru [Department of Physics, Osaka Dental University, 8-1 Kuzuha-hanazono, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1121 (Japan); Azuma, Junpei; Yamamoto, Isamu; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Kamada, Masao [Synchrotron Light Application Center, Saga University, 1 Honjo, Saga, Saga 840-8502 (Japan)

    2015-04-27

    A thin film of L-cysteine (HSCH{sub 2}CH(NH{sub 2})COOH) is grown on a silver substrate in saliva-emulated aqueous solution. X-ray photoemission spectroscopic measurements have revealed that the sulfur atom shows valence change under IR laser irradiation at 825 nm. The valence change maintains for about a minute at room temperature and more than an hour between 110 and 250 K after stopping the laser irradiation. It is not observed at all at temperatures lower than 110 K. This temperature-dependent behavior indicates that the photo-excited electronic change should be accompanied by a conformational change in the L-cysteine molecule. It is strongly suggested that the reversible valence change of the sulfur atom is applicable to a memory used around room temperature.

  10. Photo-induced valence change of the sulfur atom in an L-cysteine thin film grown on a silver metal substrate in a saliva-emulated aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujibayashi, Toru; Azuma, Junpei; Yamamoto, Isamu; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Kamada, Masao

    2015-04-01

    A thin film of L-cysteine (HSCH2CH(NH2)COOH) is grown on a silver substrate in saliva-emulated aqueous solution. X-ray photoemission spectroscopic measurements have revealed that the sulfur atom shows valence change under IR laser irradiation at 825 nm. The valence change maintains for about a minute at room temperature and more than an hour between 110 and 250 K after stopping the laser irradiation. It is not observed at all at temperatures lower than 110 K. This temperature-dependent behavior indicates that the photo-excited electronic change should be accompanied by a conformational change in the L-cysteine molecule. It is strongly suggested that the reversible valence change of the sulfur atom is applicable to a memory used around room temperature.

  11. Nutrition and the Malaysian Healthy Lifestyle Programme: challenges in implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, T S; Siong, T E

    1998-12-01

    There are significant differences in the food consumption patterns of countries. In the lower income countries, most of the energy intake is derived from cereals and starchy roots. On the other hand, the intake of these carbohydrate foods is much lower in the economically developed countries and more of the energy is derived from added fats, alcohol, meat, dairy products and sweeteners. The contribution of energy from various food groups has changed markedly over the past three decades. With increasing national wealth there is a general tendency for the consumption of cereal foods to decline, whereas the consumption of added fats, alcohol, meat and dairy products has increased over the years. Similar changes have also been observed for Malaysia. These dietary alterations, as well as other lifestyle changes, have brought about a new nutrition scenario in many developing countries. These countries are now faced with the twin problems of malnutrition, that is, undernutrition among some segments of the population and diet-related chronic diseases in other groups; for example, obesity, hypertension, coronary heart disease, diabetes and various cancers. In Malaysia, deaths due to diseases of the circulatory system and neoplasms have been on the rise since the 1960s. The former has been the most important cause of death in the country for more than 15 years, with cancer ranking third for almost 10 years. Epidemiological data collected from different community groups showed increased prevalences of various risk factors amongst Malaysians. In view of the changed nutrition scenario in the country, intervention programmes have been reviewed accordingly. The Healthy Lifestyle (HLS) Programme was launched in 1991 as a comprehensive, long-term approach to combating the emerging diet-related chronic diseases. For six consecutive years one thematic campaign per year was carried out; namely, coronary heart disease (1991), sexually transmitted diseases (1992), food safety (1993

  12. Research on Healthy City Index System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yuan; DING Hui; WEI Ren-min

    2015-01-01

    "Healthy City"was introduced to China in 1990s,the nature of which is an organic integration of healthy people, healthy environment and healthy society. It is neces ary to build a set of scientific and logical evaluation index sysem for the development of healthy city.

  13. Communicating healthy eating to adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Kara; Prendergast, Gerard; Grønhøj, Alice

    2009-01-01

    at a regular time were the most important attributes of healthy eating. In terms of situational influences on their consumption, respondents most likely ate unhealthy food at parties, when eating out or with friends. They most likely ate healthy food at home and when they were sick. Looking at socializing......Purpose - This study explores perceptions of healthy/unhealthy eating, and perceptions of various socializing agents encouraging healthy eating, amongst Chinese adolescents. Design/methodology/approach - A survey was conducted of 152 seven, eighth and ninth grade Hong Kong students. A structured...... questionnaire with closed-ended questions was distributed in three public secondary schools. Findings - Results showed that respondents frequently ate out with friends and frequently consumed a range of relatively unhealthy food (candies, chips, and soft drinks). They perceived that a balanced diet and eating...

  14. Aim For a Healthy Weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about your BMI. What Factors Contribute To a Healthy Weight? Many factors can contribute to a person’s weight. These factors include environment, family history and genetics, metabolism (the way your ...

  15. Dietary Recommendations for Healthy Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Restaurant Deciphering the Menu Ordering Your Meal Eating Fast Food Dining Out Tips by Cuisine Physical Activity Fitness ... Food and Beverage Toolkit Dietary Recommendations for Healthy Children Updated:Jul 22,2016 The American Heart Association ...

  16. Making Health Easier: Healthy Eating in Los Angeles, CA

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-03-05

    Childhood obesity now affects about one in six kids and disproportionately affects low-income and minority populations. This podcast highlights one preschool teacher who teaches kids about healthy eating and is incorporating small, healthy changes that can be made in any classroom—like planting a classroom garden and eating healthy snacks.  Created: 3/5/2013 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 3/5/2013.

  17. Utilizing Technology to Encourage Healthy Lifestyles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Shuster

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In our fast paced world, using technology allows us to connect with people and assist them in developing healthier lifestyles within their time limits due to families, work, and other responsibilities. The goal of our project was the development of online, technology-based, nutrition, health, and fitness education challenges using social media as a means of helping consumers develop healthy lifestyle changes. Participants completed preassessments and postassessments to determine overall program impact and to self-report perceptions of knowledge gained and practice/behavior change. Results from the challenges indicated participants gained knowledge on nutrition, health and fitness topics while making strides towards lifestyle changes and adoption of healthy habits. Results revealed healthier eating habits were developed and physical activity was increased with many participants losing weight. Ease of participating was the most reported reason for participating in the challenges. To determine “best practice,” varying lengths of time for the challenges from four, seven, and thirteen weeks allowed the educators to derive implications for future programming, including branding, length of the challenge, frequency, and participant behavior change. To remain relevant and reach a greater diversity of populations, educators need to continue to explore and utilize various social media tools.

  18. 二阶具变号位势的离散Hamilton系统的次调和解%Subharmonic Solutions for Second Order Discrete Hamiltonian Systems with Potential Changing Sign

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓小青; 罗智明

    2011-01-01

    Hie existence of subharmonic solutions of a class of second order discrete Hamiltonian systems with potential changing sign is studied by using Linking theorem, and a series of new theorems are obtained by changing the existence of subharmonic solutions into the existence of critical points of the corresponding functional on suitable function space.%利用环绕定理研究一类二阶具变号位势的离散Hamilton系统的次调和解的存在性.首先将该类离散Hamilton系统的次调和解的存在性转化为适当函数空间上对应泛函的临界点的存在性,然后用环绕定理证得临界点的存在性,得到一系列存在性定理.

  19. NOAA seeks healthy budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Susan

    The small, crowded room of the House side of the U.S. Capitol building belied the large budget of $1,611,991,000 requested for Fiscal Year 1992 by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. John A. Knauss, Undersecretary for Oceans and Atmosphere, U.S. Department of Commerce, delivered his testimony on February 28 before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary and Related Agencies. He told the subcommittee that the budget “attempts to balance the two goals of maintaining NOAA's position as an important science agency and addressing the serious budget problems that the government continues to face.”Climate and global change, modernization of the National Weather Service, and the Coastal Ocean Science program are NOAA's three ongoing, high-priority initiatives that the budget addresses. Also, three additional initiatives—a NOAA-wide program to improve environmental data management, President Bush's multiagency Coastal America initiative, and a seafood safety program administered jointly by NOAA and the Food and Drug Administration—are addressed.

  20. Effect of solution pH value changes on fluorescence intensity of magnetic-luminescent Fe3O4@Gd2O3:Eu3+ nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴拓; 潘桦滟; 陈如标; 罗东; 张宏; 沈晔; 李旸晖; 王乐

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, bifunctional Fe3O4@Gd2O3:Eu3+ core-shell nanoparticles with both magnetic and fluorescent properties were synthesized through a urea homogeneous precipitation (UHP) method. Particular emphasis was placed on investigating the influence of the solution pH value on the photoluminescence of the core-shell nanocomposites. It showed that the samples treated at the solution of pH=3.0 had the highest luminescence due to the enhanced crystallinity and size uniformity of nanoparticles. The Fe3O4@Gd2O3:Eu3+ nanocomposites exhibited an almost spherical shape with a mean diameter of 60 nm, and had strong red emis-sions of Eu3+ at 612 nm as well as good magnetization with the saturation magnetization of 1.29 emu/g. It thus indicated that the core-shell nanocomposites investigated has great potential in biomedical applications.

  1. The design of an analog module for sensor adaptation to changes in ambient light: a bio-inspired solution - biomed 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Brian; Wright, Cameron H G; Barrett, Steven F

    2009-01-01

    Fly inspired vision sensors have been shown to have many interesting qualities such as hyperacuity (or an ability to achieve movement resolution beyond the theoretical limit), extreme sensitivity to motion, and (through software simulation) image edge extraction, motion detection, and orientation and location of a line. Many of these qualities are beyond the ability of traditional computer vision sensors such as charge-coupled device (CCD) arrays. To obtain these characteristics, a prototype fly inspired sensor has been built and tested in a laboratory environment and shows promise. Any sophisticated visual system, whether man made or natural, must adequately adapt to lighting conditions, therefore light adaptation is a vital milestone in getting the afore mentioned prototype working in real-world conditions. By studying how the common house fly, Musca domestica, achieves this adaptation it was possible to design an analog solution to this problem. The solution utilizes instrumentation amplifiers and an additional sensor to sense the ambient light. This paper will examine this circuitry in greater detail and will explore the characterization and limitations of this solution.

  2. Principles for Framing a Healthy Food System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Michael W

    2009-07-01

    Wicked problems are most simply defined as ones that are impossible to solve. In other words, the range of complex interacting influences and effects; the influence of human values in all their range; and the constantly changing conditions in which the problem exists guarantee that what we strive to do is improve the situation rather than solve the wicked problem. This does not mean that we cannot move a long way toward resolving the problem but simply that there is no clean endpoint. This commentary outlines principles that could be used in moving us toward a healthy food system within the framework of it presenting as a wicked problem.

  3. Genetics of healthy aging and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks-Wilson, Angela R

    2013-12-01

    Longevity and healthy aging are among the most complex phenotypes studied to date. The heritability of age at death in adulthood is approximately 25 %. Studies of exceptionally long-lived individuals show that heritability is greatest at the oldest ages. Linkage studies of exceptionally long-lived families now support a longevity locus on chromosome 3; other putative longevity loci differ between studies. Candidate gene studies have identified variants at APOE and FOXO3A associated with longevity; other genes show inconsistent results. Genome-wide association scans (GWAS) of centenarians vs. younger controls reveal only APOE as achieving genome-wide significance (GWS); however, analyses of combinations of SNPs or genes represented among associations that do not reach GWS have identified pathways and signatures that converge upon genes and biological processes related to aging. The impact of these SNPs, which may exert joint effects, may be obscured by gene-environment interactions or inter-ethnic differences. GWAS and whole genome sequencing data both show that the risk alleles defined by GWAS of common complex diseases are, perhaps surprisingly, found in long-lived individuals, who may tolerate them by means of protective genetic factors. Such protective factors may 'buffer' the effects of specific risk alleles. Rare alleles are also likely to contribute to healthy aging and longevity. Epigenetics is quickly emerging as a critical aspect of aging and longevity. Centenarians delay age-related methylation changes, and they can pass this methylation preservation ability on to their offspring. Non-genetic factors, particularly lifestyle, clearly affect the development of age-related diseases and affect health and lifespan in the general population. To fully understand the desirable phenotypes of healthy aging and longevity, it will be necessary to examine whole genome data from large numbers of healthy long-lived individuals to look simultaneously at both common and

  4. 血小板膜糖蛋白表达变化在出血性血小板病患者与健康人之间的差异%Comparison of the changes in platelet membrane glycoproteins between patients with hemorrhagic thrombopathy and healthy people

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈霖; 卢芙蓉; 沈迪

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been confirmed that platelet aggregation defect presents in patients with hemorrhagic thrombopathy, and platelet membrane glycoproteins play a significant role in the process of platelet aggregation.OBJECTIVE: To observe the expression changes of platelet membrane glycoproteins between patients with hemorrhagic thrombopathy and healthy people.DESIGN: Case-control analysis.SETTING: Department of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College,Huazhong University of Science and Technology.PARTICIPANTS :① Seventy-nine patients with hemorrhagic thrombopathy who received treatment from January 2001 to March 2003 in the Department of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology were enrolled in this study. The patients, including 31 male and48 femlae, averaged (35.76±14.14)years old. They all agreed to participate in this study and met with the diagnosis of hemorrhagic thrombopathy revised in 1996. Informed consents were obtained from all the patients and their relatives.The course of multiple bleeding symptoms was 1 to 14 years. And the bleeding sites were totally 167: extremity petechia was found in 64 cases, rhinorrhagia in 33 cases, hypermenorrhea (more than 150 mL in each cycle) in 29 cases, gingival bleeding in 28 cases, ocular fundus bleeding in 8 cases and conjunctival hemorrhage in 5 cases.②lnclusive criteria: All the cases presented clinical manifestation of multiple focal bleeding; The laboratory tests including platelet counts,bleeding time and coagulation profiles were examined with no marked abnormal changes; According to hemorrhage sites, the patients were examined by specialists of internal medicine,otorhinolaryngology, gynecology, stomatology and ophthalmology, and no specific diagnostic focuses of infection were found; They had normal blood pressure and heart rate, and those with

  5. [Healthy eating according to teenagers: perceptions, barriers, and expected characteristics of teaching materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toral, Natacha; Conti, Maria Aparecida; Slater, Betzabeth

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate perceptions, barriers, and characteristics of teaching materials to promote healthy eating, as described by teenagers. Four focus groups were conducted with 25 adolescents, including questions on: perceptions regarding diet and motivations to change; concepts of (and barriers to) healthy eating; and characteristics needed for teaching materials to promote healthy eating. The teens were often undecided when attempting to classify a diet as healthy. They generally reported feeling insecure about making dietary changes, but showed adequate notions of healthy eating. The main barriers involved personal and social characteristics: temptation, food flavors, parental influence, and lack of time and options for healthy snacks at school. According to these teenagers, educational materials for promotion of healthy eating should emphasize the immediate benefits and emphasize high-impact messages on the health risks of unhealthy diet.

  6. Solution to enterprise resource planning; ERP solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, M.; Okajima, E. [Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-05-10

    The environment around enterprises has greatly changed in sluggish Japanese economy since the bubble burst. To make the total enterprise activity efficient and speedy and to flexibly meet changes in enterprise environments and diversified customer needs, enterprises are planning to shift the existing methods to enterprise resource planning (ERP) as the infrastructure of strategic enterprise management. This paper describes the solution to ERP which is package software for the key system, the core of enterprise basic business, and also an application example, giving guideline for restructuring the basic business. (author)

  7. Energy Innovations for Healthy Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogucz, Edward A. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States)

    2016-09-23

    Healthy buildings provide high indoor environmental quality for occupants while simultaneously reducing energy consumption. This project advanced the development and marketability of envisioned healthy, energy-efficient buildings through studies that evaluated the use of emerging technologies in commercial and residential buildings. The project also provided resources required for homebuilders to participate in DOE’s Builders Challenge, concomitant with the goal to reduce energy consumption in homes by at least 30% as a first step toward achieving envisioned widespread availability of net-zero energy homes by 2030. In addition, the project included outreach and education concerning energy efficiency in buildings.

  8. Addressing inequities in healthy eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friel, Sharon; Hattersley, Libby; Ford, Laura; O'Rourke, Kerryn

    2015-09-01

    What, when, where and how much people eat is influenced by a complex mix of factors at societal, community and individual levels. These influences operate both directly through the food system and indirectly through political, economic, social and cultural pathways that cause social stratification and influence the quality of conditions in which people live their lives. These factors are the social determinants of inequities in healthy eating. This paper provides an overview of the current evidence base for addressing these determinants and for the promotion of equity in healthy eating.

  9. Brainmining emotive lateral solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Scaltsas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BrainMining is a theory of creative thinking that shows how we should exploit the mind’s spontaneous natural disposition to use old solutions to address new problems – our Anchoring Cognitive Bias. BrainMining develops a simple and straightforward method to transform recalcitrant problems into types of problems which we have solved before, and then apply an old type of solution to them. The transformation makes the thinking lateral by matching up disparate types of problem and solution. It emphasises the role of emotive judgements that the agent makes, when she discerns whether a change of the values or the emotions and feelings in a situation, which would expand the space of solutions available for the problem at hand, would be acceptable or appropriate in the situation. A lateral solution for an intractable problem is thus spontaneously brainmined from the agent’s old solutions, to solve a transformed version of the intractable problem, possibly involving changes in the value system or the emotional profile of the situation, which the agent judges, emotively, will be acceptable, and even appropriate in the circumstances.

  10. Wave Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Christov, Ivan C

    2012-01-01

    In classical continuum physics, a wave is a mechanical disturbance. Whether the disturbance is stationary or traveling and whether it is caused by the motion of atoms and molecules or the vibration of a lattice structure, a wave can be understood as a specific type of solution of an appropriate mathematical equation modeling the underlying physics. Typical models consist of partial differential equations that exhibit certain general properties, e.g., hyperbolicity. This, in turn, leads to the possibility of wave solutions. Various analytical techniques (integral transforms, complex variables, reduction to ordinary differential equations, etc.) are available to find wave solutions of linear partial differential equations. Furthermore, linear hyperbolic equations with higher-order derivatives provide the mathematical underpinning of the phenomenon of dispersion, i.e., the dependence of a wave's phase speed on its wavenumber. For systems of nonlinear first-order hyperbolic equations, there also exists a general ...

  11. Program Review: Raising Healthy Eaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfrich, Christine M.; Fetsch, Robert J.; Benavente, Janet C.

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of overweight children and adults has been increasing steadily over the past three decades. Behaviors related to diet and nutrition are often established in early childhood. Toddlers most often develop healthy eating habits through parent modeling. Due to the steady increase in obesity in children, there is a clear need for…

  12. Microglial activation in healthy aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuitemaker, Alie; van der Doef, Thalia F; Boellaard, Ronald; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Yaqub, Maqsood; Windhorst, Albert D; Barkhof, Frederik; Jonker, Cees; Kloet, Reina W; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Scheltens, Philip; van Berckel, Bart N M

    2012-06-01

    Healthy brain aging is characterized by neuronal loss and decline of cognitive function. Neuronal loss is closely associated with microglial activation and postmortem studies have indeed suggested that activated microglia may be present in the aging brain. Microglial activation can be quantified in vivo using (R)-[(11)C]PK11195 and positron emission tomography. The purpose of this study was to measure specific binding of (R)-[(11)C]PK11195 in healthy subjects over a wide age range. Thirty-five healthy subjects (age range 19-79 years) were included. In all subjects 60-minute dynamic (R)-[(11)C]PK11195 scans were acquired. Specific binding of (R)-[(11)C]PK11195 was calculated using receptor parametric mapping in combination with supervised cluster analysis to extract the reference tissue input function. Increased binding of (R)-[(11)C]PK11195 with aging was found in frontal lobe, anterior and posterior cingulate cortex, medial inferior temporal lobe, insula, hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, thalamus, parietal and occipital lobes, and cerebellum. This indicates that activated microglia appear in several cortical and subcortical areas during healthy aging, suggesting widespread neuronal loss.

  13. Virtual coaches for healthy lifestyle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akker, op den H.J.A.; Klaassen, R.; Nijholt, A.; Esposito, Anna; Jain, Lakhmi C.

    2016-01-01

    Since the introduction of the idea of the software interface agent the question recurs whether these agents should be personified and graphically visualized in the interface. In this chapter we look at the use of virtual humans in the interface of healthy lifestyle coaching systems. Based on theory

  14. An Inexpensive Solution Calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Emma; Mindel, Sam; Robertson, Giles; Hughes, D. E. Peter

    2008-01-01

    We describe the construction of a simple solution calorimeter, using a miniature bead thermistor as a temperature-sensing element. This has a response time of a few seconds and made it possible to carry out a thermometric reaction in under a minute, which led to minimal heat losses. Small temperature changes of 1 K associated with enthalpies of…

  15. Determination of the Temperature Change by Means of an Outcoming Signal of Electric Resistance in an Isoperibolic Calorimetric Cell. Obtainment of Heat Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Moreno-Piraján

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available An isoperibolic calorimetric cell is built with glass surrounded by plastic insulation. Thecell has a lid on which a thermistor thermometer, an electric resistance to provide the cell with definitequantities of electric work and a container for a glass ampoule, are placed. For measuring the thermalchanges, an NTC thermistor, which provides an electric resistance signal that varies with temperature,is used. Calibration curves of the thermistor and of the stabilization of the system signal in thermalequilibrium are shown, which enable the observation of a good insulation. The calorific capacity of thesystem with water, with a value of 206.7 ± 0.7 J °C-1 is determined; the solution enthalpy for propanolwaterand KCl-water systems is obtained, which shows the behavior of the cell before exothermic andendothermic effects, respectively.

  16. Effect of calcium chelators on heat coagulation and heat-induced changes of concentrated micellar casein solutions: The role of calcium-ion activity and micellar integrity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kort, de E.J.P.; Minor, M.; Snoeren, T.A.L.; Hooijdonk, van A.C.M.; Linden, van der E.

    2012-01-01

    There is general consensus that calcium chelators enhance heat stability in milk. However, they increase the heat stability to considerably different extents. For this reason, the effect of various calcium chelators on heat coagulation and heat-induced changes of concentrated micellar casein solutio

  17. Soil Solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, C.; Voogt, W.

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of the soil solution in the root environment in the greenhouse industry differ much from those for field grown crops. This is caused firstly by the growing conditions in the greenhouse, which strongly differ from those in the field and secondly the function attributed to the soil

  18. Plugging solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomashevskiy, L.P.; Boldin, V.M.; Borovikov, P.A.; Fedorova, G.G.; Koshelova, I.F.; Krivoshchekova, N.P.; Prokhorevich, L.D.; Prudnikova, N.N.; Vin, L.R.

    1982-01-01

    This solution is designed to quickly harden in a cool environment. Phenoformaldyhyde tar is used as a hardening agent along with a modified diethyleneglycol in the amounts of (part by weight): phenoformaldyhyde tar and diethyleneglycol=1oo; acidic hardener=8-16; water=2-4.

  19. Podcast solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Geoghegan, Michael W

    2005-01-01

    Podcasting is the art of recording radio show style audio tracks, then distributing them to listeners on the Web via podcasting software such as iPodder. From downloading podcasts to producing a track for fun or profit, ""Podcast Solutions"" covers the entire world of podcasting with insight, humor, and the unmatched wisdom of experience.

  20. PACSPLUS Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza A Zoroofi

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Medal Electronic (ME Engineering Company provides high quality systems, software and services in medical image management, processing and visualization. We assist health care professionals to improve and extend the efficiency of their practices with cost effective solutions. ME is the developer of several medical software including MEDAL-PACS, 3D-Sonosoft, Analytical-Electrophoresis, CBONE and Rhino-Plus. ME is also the exclusive distributor of PACSPLUS in Iran. PACSPLUS is an international, standard, scalable and enterprise PACS solution. PACSPLUS is of ISO, CE and FDA-510 approvals. It is now operational in more than 1000 clinical environment throughout the globe. We discuss about the key features of PACSPLUS system for dealing with real world challenge in PACS as well as the PACS solu-tions needed to fulfill the demands of the clinicians in Iran. Our experience in developing high-end medical software confirms our capability in providing the PACSPLUS as an ultimate PACS solution in Iran.