WorldWideScience

Sample records for change detection analysis

  1. Change Detection Analysis With Spectral Thermal Imagery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Behrens, Richard

    1998-01-01

    ... (LWIR) region. This study used analysis techniques of differencing, histograms, and principal components analysis to detect spectral changes and investigate the utility of spectral change detection...

  2. Kernel principal component analysis for change detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Morton, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) is often used to detect change over time in remotely sensed images. A commonly used technique consists of finding the projections along the two eigenvectors for data consisting of two variables which represent the same spectral band covering the same geographical...... region acquired at two different time points. If change over time does not dominate the scene, the projection of the original two bands onto the second eigenvector will show change over time. In this paper a kernel version of PCA is used to carry out the analysis. Unlike ordinary PCA, kernel PCA...

  3. Trend analysis and change point detection of annual and seasonal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2005; Partal and Kahya 2006;. Keywords. Climate change; temperature; precipitation; trend analysis; change point detection; southwest Iran. J. Earth Syst. Sci. 123, No. 2, March 2014, pp. 281–295 ...... level are indicated by shaded triangles and hollow triangles indicate insignificant trends. Figure 7. Sequential values of the ...

  4. Trend analysis and change point detection of annual and seasonal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    temperature and precipitation series have been investigated by many researchers throughout the world (Serra et al. 2001; Turkes and Sumer 2004;. Zer Lin et al. 2005; Partal and Kahya 2006;. Keywords. Climate change; temperature; precipitation; trend analysis; change point detection; southwest Iran. J. Earth Syst. Sci.

  5. Sparse principal component analysis in hyperspectral change detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Larsen, Rasmus; Vestergaard, Jacob Schack

    2011-01-01

    This contribution deals with change detection by means of sparse principal component analysis (PCA) of simple differences of calibrated, bi-temporal HyMap data. Results show that if we retain only 15 nonzero loadings (out of 126) in the sparse PCA the resulting change scores appear visually very...... similar although the loadings are very different from their usual non-sparse counterparts. The choice of three wavelength regions as being most important for change detection demonstrates the feature selection capability of sparse PCA....

  6. Trend analysis and change point detection of annual and seasonal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 123; Issue 2. Trend analysis and change point detection of annual and seasonal precipitation and ... Department of Geography, University of Pune, Pune 411 007, India. Centre for Advanced Training, Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Pune 411 008, India.

  7. Impact of LANDSAT MSS Sensor Differences on Change Detection Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likens, W. C.; Wrigley, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    Change detection techniques were used to pinpoint differences in the multispectral band scanners on LANDSAT 2, 3, and 4 satellites. The method of analysis was to co-register 512 by 512 pixel subwindows for all data pairs followed by scattergram generation and analysis. In all cases, the LANDSAT-4 data were used as the base to which other images were registered. There appear to be no major problems preventing use of LANDSAT-4 MSS with previous MSS sensors for charge detection, provided the interference noise can be removed or minimized. This noise may result in detection of spurious changes, as well as affect other uses of the data, including image classification. Analysis of dark (water and forests), rather than light features will be most impacted because the noise will form a higher percentage of the total response at low DN values. Any data normalizations for change detection should be based upon the data, rather than solely upon calibration information. While the observed relative radiometric transfer function between LANDSAT 3 and 4 was approximately as predicted, there were still significant deviations. Normalizing based upon data content also can have the advantage of allowing simultaneous normalization of the atmosphere as well as the radiometry.

  8. Growth Curve Analysis and Change-Points Detection in Extremes

    KAUST Repository

    Meng, Rui

    2016-05-15

    The thesis consists of two coherent projects. The first project presents the results of evaluating salinity tolerance in barley using growth curve analysis where different growth trajectories are observed within barley families. The study of salinity tolerance in plants is crucial to understanding plant growth and productivity. Because fully-automated smarthouses with conveyor systems allow non-destructive and high-throughput phenotyping of large number of plants, it is now possible to apply advanced statistical tools to analyze daily measurements and to study salinity tolerance. To compare different growth patterns of barley variates, we use functional data analysis techniques to analyze the daily projected shoot areas. In particular, we apply the curve registration method to align all the curves from the same barley family in order to summarize the family-wise features. We also illustrate how to use statistical modeling to account for spatial variation in microclimate in smarthouses and for temporal variation across runs, which is crucial for identifying traits of the barley variates. In our analysis, we show that the concentrations of sodium and potassium in leaves are negatively correlated, and their interactions are associated with the degree of salinity tolerance. The second project studies change-points detection methods in extremes when multiple time series data are available. Motived by the scientific question of whether the chances to experience extreme weather are different in different seasons of a year, we develop a change-points detection model to study changes in extremes or in the tail of a distribution. Most of existing models identify seasons from multiple yearly time series assuming a season or a change-point location remains exactly the same across years. In this work, we propose a random effect model that allows the change-point to vary from year to year, following a given distribution. Both parametric and nonparametric methods are developed

  9. Fast Change Point Detection for Electricity Market Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkeley, UC; Gu, William; Choi, Jaesik; Gu, Ming; Simon, Horst; Wu, Kesheng

    2013-08-25

    Electricity is a vital part of our daily life; therefore it is important to avoid irregularities such as the California Electricity Crisis of 2000 and 2001. In this work, we seek to predict anomalies using advanced machine learning algorithms. These algorithms are effective, but computationally expensive, especially if we plan to apply them on hourly electricity market data covering a number of years. To address this challenge, we significantly accelerate the computation of the Gaussian Process (GP) for time series data. In the context of a Change Point Detection (CPD) algorithm, we reduce its computational complexity from O($n^{5}$) to O($n^{2}$). Our efficient algorithm makes it possible to compute the Change Points using the hourly price data from the California Electricity Crisis. By comparing the detected Change Points with known events, we show that the Change Point Detection algorithm is indeed effective in detecting signals preceding major events.

  10. Unsupervised land cover change detection: meaningful sequential time series analysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Salmon, BP

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available An automated land cover change detection method is proposed that uses coarse spatial resolution hyper-temporal earth observation satellite time series data. The study compared three different unsupervised clustering approaches that operate on short...

  11. Interval change analysis to improve computer aided detection in mammography.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timp, S.; Karssemeijer, N.

    2006-01-01

    We are developing computer aided diagnosis (CAD) techniques to study interval changes between two consecutive mammographic screening rounds. We have previously developed methods for the detection of malignant masses based on features extracted from single mammographic views. The goal of the present

  12. Trend Analysis and Detection of Changes in the Stratospheric Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman, Luke; Douglass, A. R.; Rodriquez, J. M.; Stolarski, R. S.; Waugh, D. W.

    2010-01-01

    Increases in the circulation of the stratosphere appear to be a robust result of climate change in chemistry-climate models over decadal time scales. To date observations have yet to show a significant change in this circulation. It is important for the design of future observational missions to identify suitable atmospheric constituents and to determine the accuracy and length of record needed to identify a significant trend that can be attributed to circulation change. First, we determine what atmospheric variables can be used as proxies for stratospheric circulation changes. A few examples are changes in tropical lower stratospheric ozone, phase lag of the water vapor tape recorder, CO2, and SF6. Then, using both the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model (GEOS CCM) and observations from satellites and balloon soundings, we calculate the number of years needed to detect a significant trend, taking into account observational uncertainty. Model simulations will be evaluated to see how well they represent observed variability. In addition, the impacts of autocorrelation among the output or data and gaps in the observational record will be discussed.

  13. Changing change detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyllingsbæk, Søren; Bundesen, Claus

    2009-01-01

    The change detection paradigm is a popular way of measuring visual short-term memory capacity. Using the paradigm, researchers have found evidence for a capacity of about four independent visual objects, confirming classic estimates that were based on the number of items that could be reported...

  14. Change detection and classification in brain MR images using Change Vector Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopes Simoes, Rita; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2011-01-01

    The automatic detection of longitudinal changes in brain images is valuable in the assessment of disease evolution and treatment efficacy. Most existing change detection methods that are currently used in clinical research to monitor patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases—such as

  15. Computer-Aided Interval Change Analysis of Microcalifications on Management for Breast Cancer Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    of Microcalcifications on Mammograms for Breast Cancer Detection PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Lubomir Hadjiiski, Ph.D...Computer-Aided Interval Change Analysis of Microcalcifications on Mammograms for 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Breast Cancer Detection 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17...CAD(p=0.04). 15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast Cancer , Computer-aided diagnosis, Screening, Classification, Image Analysis 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  16. Independent component analysis for detection of condition changes in large diesels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Niels Henrik; Larsen, Jan; Fog, Torben L.

    2003-01-01

    . The framework is evaluated on measured AE signals in an experiment where the operational condition varies. In particular, we compare the performance of mean field ICA, information-maximization ICA, and Principal Component Analysis. For detection of changes the performance is also compared to standard methods, e......Automatic detection and classification of operation conditions in large diesel engines is of significant importance. This paper investigates an independent component analysis (ICA) framework for unsupervised detection of changes in and possibly classification of operation conditions...

  17. Object-Based Analysis of Airborne LiDAR Data for Building Change Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyan Pang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Building change detection is useful for land management, disaster assessment, illegal building identification, urban growth monitoring, and geographic information database updating. This study proposes an automatic method that applies object-based analysis to multi-temporal point cloud data to detect building changes. The aim of this building change detection method is to identify areas that have changed and to obtain from-to information. In this method, the data are first preprocessed to generate two sets of digital surface models (DSMs, digital elevation models, and normalized DSMs from registered old and new point cloud data. Thereafter, on the basis of differential DSM, candidates for changed building objects are identified from the points in the smooth areas by using a connected component analysis technique. The random sample consensus fitting algorithm is then used to distinguish the true changed buildings from trees. The changed building objects are classified as “newly built”, “taller”, “demolished” or “lower” by using rule-based analysis. Finally, a test data set consisting of many buildings of different types in an 8.5 km2 area is selected for the experiment. In the test data set, the method correctly detects 97.8% of buildings larger than 50 m2. The accuracy of the method is 91.2%. Furthermore, to decrease the workload of subsequent manual checking of the result, the confidence index for each changed object is computed on the basis of object features.

  18. CEST ANALYSIS: AUTOMATED CHANGE DETECTION FROM VERY-HIGH-RESOLUTION REMOTE SENSING IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ehlers

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A fast detection, visualization and assessment of change in areas of crisis or catastrophes are important requirements for coordination and planning of help. Through the availability of new satellites and/or airborne sensors with very high spatial resolutions (e.g., WorldView, GeoEye new remote sensing data are available for a better detection, delineation and visualization of change. For automated change detection, a large number of algorithms has been proposed and developed. From previous studies, however, it is evident that to-date no single algorithm has the potential for being a reliable change detector for all possible scenarios. This paper introduces the Combined Edge Segment Texture (CEST analysis, a decision-tree based cooperative suite of algorithms for automated change detection that is especially designed for the generation of new satellites with very high spatial resolution. The method incorporates frequency based filtering, texture analysis, and image segmentation techniques. For the frequency analysis, different band pass filters can be applied to identify the relevant frequency information for change detection. After transforming the multitemporal images via a fast Fourier transform (FFT and applying the most suitable band pass filter, different methods are available to extract changed structures: differencing and correlation in the frequency domain and correlation and edge detection in the spatial domain. Best results are obtained using edge extraction. For the texture analysis, different 'Haralick' parameters can be calculated (e.g., energy, correlation, contrast, inverse distance moment with 'energy' so far providing the most accurate results. These algorithms are combined with a prior segmentation of the image data as well as with morphological operations for a final binary change result. A rule-based combination (CEST of the change algorithms is applied to calculate the probability of change for a particular location. CEST

  19. Building Change Detection from LIDAR Point Cloud Data Based on Connected Component Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awrangjeb, M.; Fraser, C. S.; Lu, G.

    2015-08-01

    Building data are one of the important data types in a topographic database. Building change detection after a period of time is necessary for many applications, such as identification of informal settlements. Based on the detected changes, the database has to be updated to ensure its usefulness. This paper proposes an improved building detection technique, which is a prerequisite for many building change detection techniques. The improved technique examines the gap between neighbouring buildings in the building mask in order to avoid under segmentation errors. Then, a new building change detection technique from LIDAR point cloud data is proposed. Buildings which are totally new or demolished are directly added to the change detection output. However, for demolished or extended building parts, a connected component analysis algorithm is applied and for each connected component its area, width and height are estimated in order to ascertain if it can be considered as a demolished or new building part. Finally, a graphical user interface (GUI) has been developed to update detected changes to the existing building map. Experimental results show that the improved building detection technique can offer not only higher performance in terms of completeness and correctness, but also a lower number of undersegmentation errors as compared to its original counterpart. The proposed change detection technique produces no omission errors and thus it can be exploited for enhanced automated building information updating within a topographic database. Using the developed GUI, the user can quickly examine each suggested change and indicate his/her decision with a minimum number of mouse clicks.

  20. Soil Carbon Variability and Change Detection in the Forest Inventory Analysis Database of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, A. M.; Nater, E. A.; Dalzell, B. J.; Perry, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    The USDA Forest Service's Forest Inventory Analysis (FIA) program is a national effort assessing current forest resources to ensure sustainable management practices, to assist planning activities, and to report critical status and trends. For example, estimates of carbon stocks and stock change in FIA are reported as the official United States submission to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. While the main effort in FIA has been focused on aboveground biomass, soil is a critical component of this system. FIA sampled forest soils in the early 2000s and has remeasurement now underway. However, soil sampling is repeated on a 10-year interval (or longer), and it is uncertain what magnitude of changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) may be detectable with the current sampling protocol. We aim to identify the sensitivity and variability of SOC in the FIA database, and to determine the amount of SOC change that can be detected with the current sampling scheme. For this analysis, we attempt to answer the following questions: 1) What is the sensitivity (power) of SOC data in the current FIA database? 2) How does the minimum detectable change in forest SOC respond to changes in sampling intervals and/or sample point density? Soil samples in the FIA database represent 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm depth increments with a 10-year sampling interval. We are investigating the variability of SOC and its change over time for composite soil data in each FIA region (Pacific Northwest, Interior West, Northern, and Southern). To guide future sampling efforts, we are employing statistical power analysis to examine the minimum detectable change in SOC storage. We are also investigating the sensitivity of SOC storage changes under various scenarios of sample size and/or sample frequency. This research will inform the design of future FIA soil sampling schemes and improve the information available to international policy makers, university and industry partners, and the public.

  1. Trend analysis and change point detection of annual and seasonal temperature series in Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhaila, Jamaludin; Yusop, Zulkifli

    2017-06-01

    Most of the trend analysis that has been conducted has not considered the existence of a change point in the time series analysis. If these occurred, then the trend analysis will not be able to detect an obvious increasing or decreasing trend over certain parts of the time series. Furthermore, the lack of discussion on the possible factors that influenced either the decreasing or the increasing trend in the series needs to be addressed in any trend analysis. Hence, this study proposes to investigate the trends, and change point detection of mean, maximum and minimum temperature series, both annually and seasonally in Peninsular Malaysia and determine the possible factors that could contribute to the significance trends. In this study, Pettitt and sequential Mann-Kendall (SQ-MK) tests were used to examine the occurrence of any abrupt climate changes in the independent series. The analyses of the abrupt changes in temperature series suggested that most of the change points in Peninsular Malaysia were detected during the years 1996, 1997 and 1998. These detection points captured by Pettitt and SQ-MK tests are possibly related to climatic factors, such as El Niño and La Niña events. The findings also showed that the majority of the significant change points that exist in the series are related to the significant trend of the stations. Significant increasing trends of annual and seasonal mean, maximum and minimum temperatures in Peninsular Malaysia were found with a range of 2-5 °C/100 years during the last 32 years. It was observed that the magnitudes of the increasing trend in minimum temperatures were larger than the maximum temperatures for most of the studied stations, particularly at the urban stations. These increases are suspected to be linked with the effect of urban heat island other than El Niño event.

  2. Change detection of medical images using dictionary learning techniques and principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nika, Varvara; Babyn, Paul; Zhu, Hongmei

    2014-07-01

    Automatic change detection methods for identifying the changes of serial MR images taken at different times are of great interest to radiologists. The majority of existing change detection methods in medical imaging, and those of brain images in particular, include many preprocessing steps and rely mostly on statistical analysis of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Although most methods utilize registration software, tissue classification remains a difficult and overwhelming task. Recently, dictionary learning techniques are being used in many areas of image processing, such as image surveillance, face recognition, remote sensing, and medical imaging. We present an improved version of the EigenBlockCD algorithm, named the EigenBlockCD-2. The EigenBlockCD-2 algorithm performs an initial global registration and identifies the changes between serial MR images of the brain. Blocks of pixels from a baseline scan are used to train local dictionaries to detect changes in the follow-up scan. We use PCA to reduce the dimensionality of the local dictionaries and the redundancy of data. Choosing the appropriate distance measure significantly affects the performance of our algorithm. We examine the differences between [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] norms as two possible similarity measures in the improved EigenBlockCD-2 algorithm. We show the advantages of the [Formula: see text] norm over the [Formula: see text] norm both theoretically and numerically. We also demonstrate the performance of the new EigenBlockCD-2 algorithm for detecting changes of MR images and compare our results with those provided in the recent literature. Experimental results with both simulated and real MRI scans show that our improved EigenBlockCD-2 algorithm outperforms the previous methods. It detects clinical changes while ignoring the changes due to the patient's position and other acquisition artifacts.

  3. Opportunity for verbalization does not improve visual change detection performance: A state-trace analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sense, Florian; Morey, Candice C; Prince, Melissa; Heathcote, Andrew; Morey, Richard D

    2017-06-01

    Evidence suggests that there is a tendency to verbally recode visually-presented information, and that in some cases verbal recoding can boost memory performance. According to multi-component models of working memory, memory performance is increased because task-relevant information is simultaneously maintained in two codes. The possibility of dual encoding is problematic if the goal is to measure capacity for visual information exclusively. To counteract this possibility, articulatory suppression is frequently used with visual change detection tasks specifically to prevent verbalization of visual stimuli. But is this precaution always necessary? There is little reason to believe that concurrent articulation affects performance in typical visual change detection tasks, suggesting that verbal recoding might not be likely to occur in this paradigm, and if not, precautionary articulatory suppression would not always be necessary. We present evidence confirming that articulatory suppression has no discernible effect on performance in a typical visual change-detection task in which abstract patterns are briefly presented. A comprehensive analysis using both descriptive statistics and Bayesian state-trace analysis revealed no evidence for any complex relationship between articulatory suppression and performance that would be consistent with a verbal recoding explanation. Instead, the evidence favors the simpler explanation that verbal strategies were either not deployed in the task or, if they were, were not effective in improving performance, and thus have no influence on visual working memory as measured during visual change detection. We conclude that in visual change detection experiments in which abstract visual stimuli are briefly presented, pre-cautionary articulatory suppression is unnecessary.

  4. Social Network Change Detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McCulloh, Ian A; Carley, Kathleen M

    2008-01-01

    ... between group members. The ability to systematically, statistically, effectively and efficiently detect these changes has the potential to enable the anticipation of change, provide early warning of change, and enable...

  5. Evaluating fuzzy operators of an object-based image analysis for detecting landslides and their changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizizadeh, Bakhtiar; Blaschke, Thomas; Tiede, Dirk; Moghaddam, Mohammad Hossein Rezaei

    2017-09-01

    This article presents a method of object-based image analysis (OBIA) for landslide delineation and landslide-related change detection from multi-temporal satellite images. It uses both spatial and spectral information on landslides, through spectral analysis, shape analysis, textural measurements using a gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), and fuzzy logic membership functionality. Following an initial segmentation step, particular combinations of various information layers were investigated to generate objects. This was achieved by applying multi-resolution segmentation to IRS-1D, SPOT-5, and ALOS satellite imagery in sequential steps of feature selection and object classification, and using slope and flow direction derivatives from a digital elevation model together with topographically-oriented gray level co-occurrence matrices. Fuzzy membership values were calculated for 11 different membership functions using 20 landslide objects from a landslide training data. Six fuzzy operators were used for the final classification and the accuracies of the resulting landslide maps were compared. A Fuzzy Synthetic Evaluation (FSE) approach was adapted for validation of the results and for an accuracy assessment using the landslide inventory database. The FSE approach revealed that the AND operator performed best with an accuracy of 93.87% for 2005 and 94.74% for 2011, closely followed by the MEAN Arithmetic operator, while the OR and AND (*) operators yielded relatively low accuracies. An object-based change detection was then applied to monitor landslide-related changes that occurred in northern Iran between 2005 and 2011. Knowledge rules to detect possible landslide-related changes were developed by evaluating all possible landslide-related objects for both time steps.

  6. Class imbalance in unsupervised change detection - A diagnostic analysis from urban remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichtle, Tobias; Geiß, Christian; Lakes, Tobia; Taubenböck, Hannes

    2017-08-01

    Automatic monitoring of changes on the Earth's surface is an intrinsic capability and simultaneously a persistent methodological challenge in remote sensing, especially regarding imagery with very-high spatial resolution (VHR) and complex urban environments. In order to enable a high level of automatization, the change detection problem is solved in an unsupervised way to alleviate efforts associated with collection of properly encoded prior knowledge. In this context, this paper systematically investigates the nature and effects of class distribution and class imbalance in an unsupervised binary change detection application based on VHR imagery over urban areas. For this purpose, a diagnostic framework for sensitivity analysis of a large range of possible degrees of class imbalance is presented, which is of particular importance with respect to unsupervised approaches where the content of images and thus the occurrence and the distribution of classes are generally unknown a priori. Furthermore, this framework can serve as a general technique to evaluate model transferability in any two-class classification problem. The applied change detection approach is based on object-based difference features calculated from VHR imagery and subsequent unsupervised two-class clustering using k-means, genetic k-means and self-organizing map (SOM) clustering. The results from two test sites with different structural characteristics of the built environment demonstrated that classification performance is generally worse in imbalanced class distribution settings while best results were reached in balanced or close to balanced situations. Regarding suitable accuracy measures for evaluating model performance in imbalanced settings, this study revealed that the Kappa statistics show significant response to class distribution while the true skill statistic was widely insensitive to imbalanced classes. In general, the genetic k-means clustering algorithm achieved the most robust results

  7. Recent advances using electron beam analysis to detect cuticular changes induced by air pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, C.R.

    1994-01-01

    Invisible or ''hidden injury'', terms from the earliest air quality literature, expressed the diagnostician's frustration in identifying abiotic disease symptoms. Direct visualization was not technically possible until the advent of electron beam analysis (EBA) hardware and software. Electron beam analysis, a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA), and computer-controlled image processing (CCIP) is useful for detecting changes in the cuticle and adjacent cells due to common phytotoxicants. Artifacts, caused by improper specimen preparation, inherent in the high vacuum of SEM and use of hydrated plant samples, fill the literature. Unique methodologies are necessary to interpret the minute changes to plant surfaces caused by a variety of environmental stresses such as sulfur dioxide, ozone, acidic deposition, pesticide residues, NACl, etc. EBA was used to show: the progression of surface alterations that occur to stomata of hybrid poplar (Populus spp.) following exposure to SO 2 and O 3 ; between SO 2 -sensitive and SO 2 -tolerant clones of eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.). CCIP was especially useful in determining that acidified rain or mist and O 3 do not physically erode existing epicuticular wax of red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) as previous literature stated. EBA was used to correlate field and laboratory data showing similar injury to epistomatal wax of red spruce. Improved field emission microscopy and EDXA that offer increased resolution with little sample preparation can provide opportunities to observe cuticular modifications not previously available. (orig.)

  8. Change Detection Analysis of Water Pollution in Coimbatore Region using Different Color Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiji, G. Wiselin; Devi, R. Naveena

    2017-12-01

    The data acquired through remote sensing satellites furnish facts about the land and water at varying resolutions and has been widely used for several change detection studies. Apart from the existence of many change detection methodologies and techniques, emergence of new ones continues to subsist. Existing change detection techniques exploit images that are either in gray scale or RGB color model. In this paper we introduced color models for performing change detection for water pollution. Here the polluted lakes are classified and post-classification change detection techniques are applied to RGB images and results obtained are analysed for changes to exist or not. Furthermore RGB images obtained after classification when converted to any of the two color models YCbCr and YIQ is found to produce the same results as that of the RGB model images. Thus it can be concluded that other color models like YCbCr, YIQ can be used as substitution to RGB color model for analysing change detection with regard to water pollution.

  9. Ten Years of Land Cover Change on the California Coast Detected using Landsat Satellite Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Christopher S.

    2013-01-01

    Landsat satellite imagery was analyzed to generate a detailed record of 10 years of vegetation disturbance and regrowth for Pacific coastal areas of Marin and San Francisco Counties. The Landsat Ecosystem Disturbance Adaptive Processing System (LEDAPS) methodology, a transformation of Tasseled-Cap data space, was applied to detected changes in perennial coastal shrubland, woodland, and forest cover from 1999 to 2009. Results showed several principal points of interest, within which extensive contiguous areas of similar LEDAPS vegetation change (either disturbed or restored) were detected. Regrowth areas were delineated as burned forest areas in the Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS) from the 1995 Vision Fire. LEDAPS-detected disturbance patterns on Inverness Ridge, PRNS in areas observed with dieback of tanoak and bay laurel trees was consistent with defoliation by sudden oak death (Phytophthora ramorum). LEDAPS regrowth pixels were detected over much of the predominantly grassland/herbaceous cover of the Olema Valley ranchland near PRNS. Extensive restoration of perennial vegetation cover on Crissy Field, Baker Beach and Lobos Creek dunes in San Francisco was identified. Based on these examples, the LEDAPS methodology will be capable of fulfilling much of the need for continual, low-cost monitoring of emerging changes to coastal ecosystems.

  10. Ten Years of Forest Cover Change in the Sierra Nevada Detected Using Landsat Satellite Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Christopher S.

    2014-01-01

    A detailed geographic record of recent vegetation regrowth and disturbance patterns in forests of the Sierra Nevada remains a gap that can be filled with remote sensing data. Landsat (TM) imagery was analyzed to detect 10 years of recent changes (between 2000 and 2009) in forest vegetation cover for areas burned by wildfires between years of 1995 to 1999 in the region. Results confirmed the prevalence of regrowing forest vegetation during the period 2000 and 2009 over 17% of the combined burned areas.

  11. Change detection for soil carbon in the forest inventory and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    An-Min Wu; Edward A. Nater; Charles H. Perry; Brent J. Dalzell; Barry T. Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Estimates of carbon stocks and stock changes in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service’s Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program are reported as the official United States submission to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. Soil, as a critical component of the forest carbon stocks, has been sampled in about 10-year intervals in FIA with the re-...

  12. Ten Years of Vegetation Change in Northern California Marshlands Detected using Landsat Satellite Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The Landsat Ecosystem Disturbance Adaptive Processing System (LEDAPS) methodology was applied to detected changes in perennial vegetation cover at marshland sites in Northern California reported to have undergone restoration between 1999 and 2009. Results showed extensive contiguous areas of restored marshland plant cover at 10 of the 14 sites selected. Gains in either woody shrub cover and/or from recovery of herbaceous cover that remains productive and evergreen on a year-round basis could be mapped out from the image results. However, LEDAPS may not be highly sensitive changes in wetlands that have been restored mainly with seasonal herbaceous cover (e.g., vernal pools), due to the ephemeral nature of the plant greenness signal. Based on this evaluation, the LEDAPS methodology would be capable of fulfilling a pressing need for consistent, continual, low-cost monitoring of changes in marshland ecosystems of the Pacific Flyway.

  13. Change detection: training and transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, John G; Neider, Mark B; Simons, Daniel J; McCarley, Jason S; Kramer, Arthur F

    2013-01-01

    Observers often fail to notice even dramatic changes to their environment, a phenomenon known as change blindness. If training could enhance change detection performance in general, then it might help to remedy some real-world consequences of change blindness (e.g. failing to detect hazards while driving). We examined whether adaptive training on a simple change detection task could improve the ability to detect changes in untrained tasks for young and older adults. Consistent with an effective training procedure, both young and older adults were better able to detect changes to trained objects following training. However, neither group showed differential improvement on untrained change detection tasks when compared to active control groups. Change detection training led to improvements on the trained task but did not generalize to other change detection tasks.

  14. Land Cover/Land Use Classification and Change Detection Analysis with Astronaut Photography and Geographic Object-Based Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollier, Andi B.; Jagge, Amy M.; Stefanov, William L.; Vanderbloemen, Lisa A.

    2017-01-01

    For over fifty years, NASA astronauts have taken exceptional photographs of the Earth from the unique vantage point of low Earth orbit (as well as from lunar orbit and surface of the Moon). The Crew Earth Observations (CEO) Facility is the NASA ISS payload supporting astronaut photography of the Earth surface and atmosphere. From aurora to mountain ranges, deltas, and cities, there are over two million images of the Earth's surface dating back to the Mercury missions in the early 1960s. The Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth website (eol.jsc.nasa.gov) provides a publically accessible platform to query and download these images at a variety of spatial resolutions and perform scientific research at no cost to the end user. As a demonstration to the science, application, and education user communities we examine astronaut photography of the Washington D.C. metropolitan area for three time steps between 1998 and 2016 using Geographic Object-Based Image Analysis (GEOBIA) to classify and quantify land cover/land use and provide a template for future change detection studies with astronaut photography.

  15. Early changes of abdominal adiposity detected with weekly dual bioelectrical impedance analysis during calorie restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, Midori; Hirata, Masakazu; Odori, Shinji; Mori, Eisaku; Kondo, Eri; Fujikura, Junji; Kusakabe, Toru; Ebihara, Ken; Hosoda, Kiminori; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2013-09-01

    To elucidate early change of intra-abdominal fat in response to calorie restriction in patients with obesity by weekly evaluation using a dual bioelectrical impedance analysis (Dual BIA) instrument. For 67 Japanese patients with obesity, diabetes, or metabolic syndrome, intra-abdominal fat area (IAFA), initially with both Dual BIA and computed tomography (CT), and in subsequent weeks of calorie restriction, with Dual BIA were measured. IAFA by Dual BIA (Dual BIA-IAFA) correlated well with IAFA by CT (CT-IAFA) in obese patients (r = 0.821, P obese patients and demonstrated a substantially larger change of IAFA compared with changes of BW and WC in early weeks. This observation corroborates the significance of evaluating IAFA as a biomarker for obesity, and indicates the clinical usefulness of the Dual BIA instrument. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  16. Stereometric parameters change vs. Topographic Change Analysis (TCA) agreement in Heidelberg Retina Tomography III (HRT-3) early detection of clinical significant glaucoma progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dascalu, A M; Cherecheanu, A P; Stana, D; Voinea, L; Ciuluvica, R; Savlovschi, C; Serban, D

    2014-01-01

    to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of the stereometric parameters change analysis vs. Topographic Change Analysis in early detection of glaucoma progression. 81 patients with POAG were monitored for 4 years (GAT monthly, SAP at every 6 months, optic disc photographs and HRT3 yearly). The exclusion criteria were other optic disc or retinal pathology; topographic standard deviation (TSD>30; inter-test variation of reference height>25 μm. The criterion for structural progression was the following: at least 20 adjacent super-pixels with a clinically significant decrease in height (>5%). 16 patients of the total 81 presented structural progression on TCA. The most useful stereometric parameters for the early detection of glaucoma progression were the following: Rim Area change (sensitivity 100%, specificity 74.2% for a "cut-off " value of -0.05), C/D Area change (sensitivity 85.7%, specificity 71.5% for a "cut off " value of 0.02), C/D linear change (sensitivity 85.7%, specificity 71.5% for a "cut-off " value of 0.02), Rim Volume change (sensitivity 71.4%, specificity 88.8% for a "cut-off " value of -0.04). RNFL Thickness change (<0) was highly sensitive (82%), but less specific for glaucoma progression (45,2%). Changes of the other stereometric parameters have a limited diagnostic value for the early detection of glaucoma progression. TCA is a valuable tool for the assessment of the structural progression in glaucoma patients and its inter-test variability is low. On long-term, the quantitative analysis according to stereometric parameters change is also very important. The most relevant parameters to detect progression are RA, C/D Area, Linear C/D and RV.

  17. Change Detection of Phragmites Australis Distribution in the Detroit Wildlife Refuge Based on an Iterative Intersection Analysis Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haixin Liu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Satellite data have been widely used in the detection of vegetation area changes, however, the lack of historical training samples seriously limits detection accuracy. In this research, an iterative intersection analysis algorithm (IIAA is proposed to solve this problem, and employed to improve the change detection accuracy of Phragmites area in the Detroit River International Wildlife Refuge between 2001 and 2010. Training samples for 2001, 2005, and 2010 were constructed based on NAIP, DOQQ high-resolution imagery and ground-truth data; for 2002–2004 and 2006–2009, because of the shortage of training samples, the IIAA was employed to supply additional training samples. This method included three steps: first, the NDVI image for each year (2002–2004, 2006–2009 was calculated with Landsat TM images; secondly, rough patches of the land-cover were acquired by density slicing using suitable thresholds; thirdly, a GIS overlay analysis method was used to acquire the Phragmites information in common throughout the ten years and to obtain training patches. In the combination with training samples of other land cover types, supervised classifications were employed to detect the changes of Phragmites area. In the experiment, we analyzed the variation of Phragmites area from 2001 to 2010, and the result showed that its distribution areas increased from 5156 acres to 6817 acres during this period, which illustrated that the invasion of Phragmites remains a serious problem for the protection of biodiversity.

  18. Ten Years of Forest Cover Change in the Sierra Nevada Detected Using Landsat Satellite Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Christopher S.

    2014-01-01

    The Landsat Ecosystem Disturbance Adaptive Processing System (LEDAPS) methodology was applied to detected changes in forest vegetation cover for areas burned by wildfires in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California between the periods of 1975- 79 and 1995-1999. Results for areas burned by wildfire between 1995 and 1999 confirmed the importance of regrowing forest vegetation over 17% of the combined burned areas. A notable fraction (12%) of the entire 5-km (unburned) buffer area outside the 1995-199 fires perimeters showed decline in forest cover, and not nearly as many regrowing forest areas, covering only 3% of all the 1995-1999 buffer areas combined. Areas burned by wildfire between 1975 and 1979 confirmed the importance of disturbed (or declining evergreen) vegetation covering 13% of the combined 1975- 1979 burned areas. Based on comparison of these results to ground-based survey data, the LEDAPS methodology should be capable of fulfilling much of the need for consistent, low-cost monitoring of changes due to climate and biological factors in western forest regrowth following stand-replacing disturbances.

  19. Building Change Detection from Historical Aerial Photographs Using Dense Image Matching and Object-Based Image Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Nebiker

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A successful application of dense image matching algorithms to historical aerial photographs would offer a great potential for detailed reconstructions of historical landscapes in three dimensions, allowing for the efficient monitoring of various landscape changes over the last 50+ years. In this paper we propose the combination of image-based dense DSM (digital surface model reconstruction from historical aerial imagery with object-based image analysis for the detection of individual buildings and the subsequent analysis of settlement change. Our proposed methodology is evaluated using historical greyscale and color aerial photographs and numerous reference data sets of Andermatt, a historical town and tourism destination in the Swiss Alps. In our paper, we first investigate the DSM generation performance of different sparse and dense image matching algorithms. They demonstrate the superiority of dense matching algorithms and of the resulting historical DSMs with root mean square error values of 1–1.5 GSD (ground sampling distance and yield point densities comparable to those of recent airborne LiDAR DSMs. In the second part, we present an object-based building detection workflow mainly based on the historical DSMs and the historical imagery itself. Additional inputs are a current digital terrain model and a cadastral building database. For the case of densely matched DSMs, the evaluation yields building detection rates of 92% for grayscale and 94% for color imagery.

  20. No detectable major changes in gait analysis after soft tissue release in DDH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omeroğlu, Hakan; Yavuzer, Güneş; Biçimoğlu, Ali; Ağuş, Haluk; Tümer, Yücel

    2008-04-01

    The iliopsoas and adductor tendons are often soft tissue barriers obstructing relocation of the femoral head into the acetabulum and are frequently released to obtain reduction. We assessed whether posteromedial soft tissue release including sectioning of the adductor longus and iliopsoas tendons would lead to alterations in joint angles and moments of the hip joint or other major changes in the gait pattern. We conducted 3-D quantitative gait analysis of 10 patients (mean age, 8.1 years) who had unilateral and surgically treated DDH before the age of 18 months. The mean single support time was shorter in the unaffected side of the patients than in the healthy control group. Mean pelvic excursions in both frontal and sagittal planes and maximum knee extension at stance of the affected and unaffected sides were higher in the patients than in the control group. Peak hip flexion moment during swing phase was somewhat reduced, and the hip moment crossover point from extension to flexion was slightly delayed in both the affected and unaffected sides. We could not identify an explanation for the slight deviations due to limited data. However, sectioning of the adductor longus and iliopsoas tendons in DDH patients under 18 months old did not appear to lead to major objective clinical gait alterations. Level II, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  1. Adaptive filtering and change detection

    CERN Document Server

    Gustafsson, Fredrik

    2003-01-01

    Adaptive filtering is a classical branch of digital signal processing (DSP). Industrial interest in adaptive filtering grows continuously with the increase in computer performance that allows ever more conplex algorithms to be run in real-time. Change detection is a type of adaptive filtering for non-stationary signals and is also the basic tool in fault detection and diagnosis. Often considered as separate subjects Adaptive Filtering and Change Detection bridges a gap in the literature with a unified treatment of these areas, emphasizing that change detection is a natural extensi

  2. Change detection in bi-temporal data by canonical information analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Vestergaard, Jacob Schack

    2015-01-01

    combinations with the information theoretical measure mutual information (MI). We term this type of analysis canonical information analysis (CIA). MI allows for the actual joint distribution of the variables involved and not just second order statistics. Where CCA is ideal for Gaussian data, CIA facilitates...

  3. Land use/cover change detection and urban sprawl analysis in Bandar Abbas city, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadras, Mohsen; Shafri, Helmi Zulhaidi Mohd; Ahmad, Noordin; Pradhan, Biswajeet; Safarpour, Sahabeh

    2014-01-01

    The process of land use change and urban sprawl has been considered as a prominent characteristic of urban development. This study aims to investigate urban growth process in Bandar Abbas city, Iran, focusing on urban sprawl and land use change during 1956-2012. To calculate urban sprawl and land use changes, aerial photos and satellite images are utilized in different time spans. The results demonstrate that urban region area has changed from 403.77 to 4959.59 hectares between 1956 and 2012. Moreover, the population has increased more than 30 times in last six decades. The major part of population growth is related to migration from other parts the country to Bandar Abbas city. Considering the speed of urban sprawl growth rate, the scale and the role of the city have changed from medium and regional to large scale and transregional. Due to natural and structural limitations, more than 80% of barren lands, stone cliffs, beach zone, and agricultural lands are occupied by built-up areas. Our results revealed that the irregular expansion of Bandar Abbas city must be controlled so that sustainable development could be achieved.

  4. Object-oriented image analysis and change detection of land-use on Tenerife related to socio-economic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Simone; Siegmund, Alexander

    2004-10-01

    The island Tenerife is characterized by an increasing tourism, which causes an enormous change of the socio-economic situation and a rural exodus. This development leads - beside for example sociocultural issues - to fallow land, decreasing settlements, land wasting etc., as well as to an economic and ecological problem. This causes to a growing interest in geoecological aspects and to an increasing demand for an adequate monitoring database. In order to study the change of land use and land cover, the technology of remote sensing (LANDSAT 3 MSS and 7 ETM+, orthophotos) and geographical information systems were used to analyze the spatial pattern and its spatial temporal changes of land use from end of the 70s to the present in different scales. Because of the heterogeneous landscape and the unsatisfactory experience with pixel-based classification of the same area, object-oriented image analysis techniques have been applied to classify the remote sensed data. A post-classification application was implemented to detect spatial and categorical land use and land cover changes, which have been clipped with the socio-economic data within GIS to derive the driving forces of the changes and their variability in time and space.

  5. Damage detection in multi-span beams based on the analysis of frequency changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillich, G R; Ntakpe, J L; Praisach, Z I; Mimis, M C; Abdel Wahab, M

    2017-01-01

    Crack identification in multi-span beams is performed to determine whether the structure is healthy or not. Among all crack identification methods, these based on measured natural frequency changes present the advantage of simplicity and easy to use in practical engineering. To accurately identify the cracks characteristics for multi-span beam structure, a mathematical model is established, which can predict frequency changes for any boundary conditions, the intermediate supports being hinges. This relation is based on the modal strain energy concept. Since frequency changes are relative small, to obtain natural frequencies with high resolution, a signal processing algorithm based on superposing of numerous spectra is also proposed, which overcomes the disadvantage of Fast Fourier Transform in the aspect of frequency resolution. Based on above-mentioned mathematical model and signal processing algorithm, the method of identifying cracks on multi-span beams is presented. To verify the accuracy of this identification method, experimental examples are conducted on a two-span structure. The results demonstrate that the method proposed in this paper can accurately identify the crack position and depth. (paper)

  6. Network based statistical analysis detects changes induced by continuous theta burst stimulation on brain activity at rest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara eMastropasqua

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We combined continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS and resting state (RS -fMRI approaches to investigate changes in functional connectivity (FC induced by right dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC cTBS at rest in a group of healthy subjects. Seed based fMRI analysis revealed a specific pattern of correlation between the right prefrontal cortex and several brain regions: based on these results, we defined a 29-node network to assess changes in each network connection before and after, respectively, DLPFC-cTBS and sham sessions. A decrease of correlation between the right prefrontal cortex and right parietal cortex (Brodmann areas 46 and 40 respectively was detected after cTBS, while no significant result was found when analyzing sham-session data. To our knowledge, this is the first study that demonstrates within-subject changes in FC induced by cTBS applied on prefrontal area. The possibility to induce selective changes in a specific region without interfering with functionally correlated area could have several implications for the study of functional properties of the brain, and for the emerging therapeutic strategies based on transcranial stimulation.

  7. Test-retest reliability and minimal detectable change of three-dimensional gait analysis in chronic low back pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Rita; Armada-da-Silva, Paulo; Pool-Goudzwaard, Annelies L; Moniz-Pereira, Vera; Veloso, António P

    2015-10-01

    Three-dimensional gait analysis (3DGA) can provide detailed data on gait impairment in chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients. However, data about reliability and measurement error of 3DGA in this population is lacking. The aim of this study is to investigate test-retest reliability and minimal detectable change of 3DGA in a sample of CLBP patients. A test-retest study was conducted with a sample of 14 CLBP patients that underwent two biomechanical gait assessments with an interval of 7.6 ± 1.8 days. Anthropometric and time-distance parameters, as well as peak values for lower limb and trunk joint angles and moments, were computed. Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC3,k) and their 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Standard error of measurement (SEM), minimal detectable change (MDC) and limits of agreement (LOA) were also estimated. The obtained ICC values demonstrate high test-retest reliability for most joint angles, with low SEM ( 0.86). The results of this study show high test-retest reliability for lower limb and trunk joint angles, and time-distance parameters during gait in CLBP individuals, together with a low measurement error. These results also support the use of this method in clinical assessments of CLBP patients' gait patterns. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A detection of microevolutionary changes by the analysis of qualitative dermatoglyphic traits: an example of Albanians from Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temaj, Gazmend; Petranović, Matea Zajc; Skarić-Jurić, Tatjana; Behluli, Ibrahim; Narancić, Nina Smolej; Xharra, Shefki; Sopi, Ramadan; Milicić, Jasna

    2012-01-01

    In this study we analyzed the qualitative dermatoglyphic traits in the Albanians from three Kosovo distinct regions. We aimed to detect possible microevolutionary changes, which could have happened as a consequence of geographical and cultural isolation. The dermatoglyphic traits were analyzed for total 641 Albanians of both sexes. The analysis included 4 variables on fingers, 8 on palms and terminations of A, B, C, D and T main-lines. The differences in patterns incidence were tested using the chi-square test. The frequencies of several pattern types varied to a great extent between distinct groups with statistically significant difference in most of the cases. Our results indicated that the Albanians from South Morava valley and from Kosovo plain were genetically close, and the population from Dukagjini valley is less close to any of them. The analysis of qualitative dermatoglyphic patterns may be utilized effectively to track the microevolutionary changes. This is especially useful in a developing country like Kosovo, since it is an inexpensive and effective tool for screening and studying the patterns influenced by the divergence of population.

  9. Detection and Analysis of Coastline and Landuse Change from 1960 to 2012 in Pearl River Delta, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wang; Cao, Wenfang; Wu, Zhifeng; Tarolli, Paolo; Jia, Peng

    2017-04-01

    Coastline is the sea-land demarcation line in coastal regions. The position and shape of coastline depends on various natural and anthropogenic factors. The change of coastline exerts obvious influence on environment and economy in coastal regions. Therefore, it is important to detect and analysis the change of coastline and landuse for coastal environment and sustainable development. Pearl River Delta (PRD) is one of the most prosperous and fastest growing regions in China. The coastline and landuse in PRD have changed remarkably and continuously during the past decades. In this research, the change of coastline and landuse during 1960 to 2012 was detected with RS and GIS. Furthermore, coastline characteristics of temporal and spatial variation were analyzed with quantitative and spatial approach. And the relationship between the changes of coastline and landuse was explored. Therefore, the impact that urban expansion brought to landscape in coastal zone could be quantitatively analyzed. Finally, local government management on coastal wetland was discussed. The main outcomes of this research are summarized in the following points: (1) The length of coastline in PRD increased from 1134.95km to 1508.02km with annul increasing speed of 7.17km/a. Relatively, the coastline changed more obvious in three period (2004 2006, 2006 2008 and 2008 2010).The annual average change rate of coastline in the three period were -3.45%, 2.85% and 2.98%, respectively. After 2010, the speed of coastline change in PRD became lower. (2) The coastline had a greater increasing amount in the cities of Zhuhai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen, where the length of coastline increased 60.81%, 22.00%and 19.71%, respectively. (3) Nansha in Guangzhou, south Zhuhai and Qianhai in Shenzhen gained more newly-added land than any other area in PRD. Their land area increased from 172.34km2 to 303.22km2, 344.70km2 to 603.29km2 and89.62km2 to 145.49km2, respectively. (4) In PRD, construction land expanded 33 times

  10. Change detection using Landsat images and an analysis of the linkages between the change and property tax values in the Istanbul Province of Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canaz, Sibel; Aliefendioğlu, Yeşim; Tanrıvermiş, Harun

    2017-09-15

    In this study, the Istanbul Province was monitored using Landsat 5 TM, MSS, Landsat 7 ETM+, and Landsat 8 OLI imagery from the years 1986, 2000, 2009, 2011, 2013, and 2015 in order to assess land cover changes in the province. The aim of the study was to classify manmade structures, land, green, and water areas, and to observe the changes in the province using satellite images. After classification, the images were compared in selected years to observe land cover. Moreover, these changes were correlated with the property tax values of Istanbul by years. The findings of the study showed that manmade structure areas increased while vegetation areas decreased due to rapid population growth, urbanization, and industrial and commercial development in Istanbul. These changes also explain the transformation of land from rural and natural areas to residential use, and serve as a tool with which to assess land value increments. Land value capturing is critical for the analysis of the linkages between the changes in land cover, and for assessing land transformation and urban growth. Due to inadequate market data, real estate tax values were used to analyze the linkages between detection changes, land cover, and taxation. In fact, the declared tax values of land owners are generally lower than the actual market values and therefore it is not possible to transfer the value increasing of land in urban areas by using property taxation from the owner to local and central governments. The research results also show that the integration of remote sensing results with real estate market data give us to determine the tax base values of real estate more realistically. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Activation analysis. Detection limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revel, G.

    1999-01-01

    Numerical data and limits of detection related to the four irradiation modes, often used in activation analysis (reactor neutrons, 14 MeV neutrons, photon gamma and charged particles) are presented here. The technical presentation of the activation analysis is detailed in the paper P 2565 of Techniques de l'Ingenieur. (A.L.B.)

  12. Land Cover Change Detection Using Autocorrelation Analysis on MODIS Time-Series Data: Detection of New Human Settlements in the Gauteng Province of South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kleynhans, Waldo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available -change and change datasets. The sensitivity of the method to band 4 (green band) could be expected as the conse- quent removal of vegetation would typically reduce reflectance in the green band resulting in a non-stationary effect on the band 4 time..., and Karen C. Steenkamp Abstract—Human settlement expansion is one of the most perva- sive forms of land cover change in the Gauteng province of South Africa. A method for detecting new settlement developments in areas that are typically covered by natural...

  13. Change Detection Analysis in Urban and Suburban Areas Using Landsat Thematic Mapper data: Case of Huntsville, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Dana; Fahsi, A.; Steinfeld S.; Coleman, T.

    1998-01-01

    Two Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images, from July 1984 and July 1992, were used to identify land use/cover changes in the urban and suburban fringe of the city of Huntsville, Alabama. Image difference was the technique used to quantify the change between the two dates. The eight-year period showed a 16% change, mainly from agricultural lands to urban areas generated by the settlement of industrial, commercial, and residential areas. Visual analysis of the change map (i.e., difference image) supported this phenomenon by showing that most changes were occurring in the vicinity of the major roads and highways across the city.

  14. Orthogonal transformations for change detection, Matlab code

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2005-01-01

    Matlab code to do multivariate alteration detection (MAD) analysis, maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) analysis, canonical correlation analysis (CCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) on image data.

  15. On Radar Resolution in Coherent Change Detection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bickel, Douglas L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    It is commonly observed that resolution plays a role in coherent change detection. Although this is the case, the relationship of the resolution in coherent change detection is not yet defined . In this document, we present an analytical method of evaluating this relationship using detection theory. Specifically we examine the effect of resolution on receiver operating characteristic curves for coherent change detection.

  16. Barrier Island Dynamics Using Mass Center Analysis: A New Way to Detect and Track Large-Scale Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Paris

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A geographic information system (GIS was used to introduce and test a new method for quantitatively characterizing topographic change. Borrowing from classic Newtonian mechanics, the concept of a body’s center of mass is applied to the geomorphic landscape, and the barrier island environment in particular, to evaluate the metric’s potential as a proxy for detecting, tracking and visualizing change. Two barrier islands along North Carolina’s Outer Banks are used to test this idea: Core Banks, uninhabited and largely-undeveloped, and Hatteras Island, altered by the presence of a protective dune system. Findings indicate that for Core Banks, the alongshore change in the center of mass is in accord with dominate littoral transport and wind conditions. Cross-shore change agrees with independent estimates for the island migration rates. This lends credence to our assertion that the mass center metric has the potential to be a viable proxy for describing wholesale barrier migration and would be a valuable addition to the already-established ocean shoreline and subaerial volume metrics. More research is, however, required to demonstrate efficacy.

  17. Scene change detection based on multimodal integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yingying; Zhou, Dongru

    2003-09-01

    Scene change detection is an essential step to automatic and content-based video indexing, retrieval and browsing. In this paper, a robust scene change detection and classification approach is presented, which analyzes audio, visual and textual sources and accounts for their inter-relations and coincidence to semantically identify and classify video scenes. Audio analysis focuses on the segmentation of audio stream into four types of semantic data such as silence, speech, music and environmental sound. Further processing on speech segments aims at locating speaker changes. Video analysis partitions visual stream into shots. Text analysis can provide a supplemental source of clues for scene classification and indexing information. We integrate the video and audio analysis results to identify video scenes and use the text information detected by the video OCR technology or derived from transcripts available to refine scene classification. Results from single source segmentation are in some cases suboptimal. By combining visual, aural features adn the accessorial text information, the scence extraction accuracy is enhanced, and more semantic segmentations are developed. Experimental results are proven to rather promising.

  18. Orthogonal transformations for change detection, Matlab code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    Matlab code to do multivariate alteration detection (MAD) analysis, maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) analysis, canonical correlation analysis (CCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) on image data.......Matlab code to do multivariate alteration detection (MAD) analysis, maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) analysis, canonical correlation analysis (CCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) on image data....

  19. Multisensor Fusion for Change Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, T.; Csatho, B.

    2005-12-01

    with detecting surface elevation changes on the Byrd Glacier, Antarctica, with aerial imagery from 1980s and ICESat laser altimetry data from 2003-05. Change detection from such disparate data sets is an intricate fusion problem, beginning with sensor alignment, and on to reasoning with spatial information as to where changes occurred and to what extent.

  20. Total least squares for anomalous change detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiler, James; Matsekh, Anna M.

    2010-04-01

    A family of subtraction-based anomalous change detection algorithms is derived from a total least squares (TLSQ) framework. This provides an alternative to the well-known chronochrome algorithm, which is derived from ordinary least squares. In both cases, the most anomalous changes are identified with the pixels that exhibit the largest residuals with respect to the regression of the two images against each other. The family of TLSQbased anomalous change detectors is shown to be equivalent to the subspace RX formulation for straight anomaly detection, but applied to the stacked space. However, this family is not invariant to linear coordinate transforms. On the other hand, whitened TLSQ is coordinate invariant, and special cases of it are equivalent to canonical correlation analysis and optimized covariance equalization. What whitened TLSQ offers is a generalization of these algorithms with the potential for better performance.

  1. OBJECT-ORIENTED ANALYSIS OF SATELLITE IMAGES USING ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS FOR POST-EARTHQUAKE BUILDINGS CHANGE DETECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Khodaverdi zahraee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Earthquake is one of the most divesting natural events that threaten human life during history. After the earthquake, having information about the damaged area, the amount and type of damage can be a great help in the relief and reconstruction for disaster managers. It is very important that these measures should be taken immediately after the earthquake because any negligence could be more criminal losses. The purpose of this paper is to propose and implement an automatic approach for mapping destructed buildings after an earthquake using pre- and post-event high resolution satellite images. In the proposed method after preprocessing, segmentation of both images is performed using multi-resolution segmentation technique. Then, the segmentation results are intersected with ArcGIS to obtain equal image objects on both images. After that, appropriate textural features, which make a better difference between changed or unchanged areas, are calculated for all the image objects. Finally, subtracting the extracted textural features from pre- and post-event images, obtained values are applied as an input feature vector in an artificial neural network for classifying the area into two classes of changed and unchanged areas. The proposed method was evaluated using WorldView2 satellite images, acquired before and after the 2010 Haiti earthquake. The reported overall accuracy of 93% proved the ability of the proposed method for post-earthquake buildings change detection.

  2. Object-Oriented Analysis of Satellite Images Using Artificial Neural Networks for Post-Earthquake Buildings Change Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodaverdi zahraee, N.; Rastiveis, H.

    2017-09-01

    Earthquake is one of the most divesting natural events that threaten human life during history. After the earthquake, having information about the damaged area, the amount and type of damage can be a great help in the relief and reconstruction for disaster managers. It is very important that these measures should be taken immediately after the earthquake because any negligence could be more criminal losses. The purpose of this paper is to propose and implement an automatic approach for mapping destructed buildings after an earthquake using pre- and post-event high resolution satellite images. In the proposed method after preprocessing, segmentation of both images is performed using multi-resolution segmentation technique. Then, the segmentation results are intersected with ArcGIS to obtain equal image objects on both images. After that, appropriate textural features, which make a better difference between changed or unchanged areas, are calculated for all the image objects. Finally, subtracting the extracted textural features from pre- and post-event images, obtained values are applied as an input feature vector in an artificial neural network for classifying the area into two classes of changed and unchanged areas. The proposed method was evaluated using WorldView2 satellite images, acquired before and after the 2010 Haiti earthquake. The reported overall accuracy of 93% proved the ability of the proposed method for post-earthquake buildings change detection.

  3. SAR change detection techniques and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Change detection, the comparison of remote sensing images from different moments in time, is an important technique in environmental earth observation and security. SAR change detection is useful when weather and light conditions are unfavourable. Five methods of SAR change detection are

  4. Land and Forest Management by Land Use/ Land Cover Analysis and Change Detection Using Remote Sensing and GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing and Geographical Information System (GIS are the most effective tools in spatial data analysis. Natural resources like land, forest and water, these techniques have proved a valuable source of information generation as well as in the management and planning purposes. This study aims to suggest possible land and forest management strategies in Chakia tahsil based on land use and land cover analysis and the changing pattern observed during the last ten years. The population of Chakia tahsil is mainly rural in nature. The study has revealed that the northern part of the region, which offers for the settlement and all the agricultural practices constitutes nearly 23.48% and is a dead level plain, whereas the southern part, which constitute nearly 76.6% of the region is characterized by plateau and is covered with forest. The southern plateau rises abruptly from the northern alluvial plain with a number of escarpments. The contour line of 100 m mainly demarcates the boundary between plateau and plain. The plateau zone is deeply dissected and highly rugged terrain. The resultant topography comprises of a number of mesas and isolated hillocks showing elevation differences from 150 m to 385 m above mean sea level. Being rugged terrain in the southern part, nowadays human encroachment are taking place for more land for the cultivation. The changes were well observed in the land use and land cover in the study region. A large part of fallow land and open forest were converted into cultivated land.

  5. Malware detection and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Ken; Lloyd, Levi; Crussell, Jonathan; Sanders, Benjamin; Erickson, Jeremy Lee; Fritz, David Jakob

    2016-03-22

    Embodiments of the invention describe systems and methods for malicious software detection and analysis. A binary executable comprising obfuscated malware on a host device may be received, and incident data indicating a time when the binary executable was received and identifying processes operating on the host device may be recorded. The binary executable is analyzed via a scalable plurality of execution environments, including one or more non-virtual execution environments and one or more virtual execution environments, to generate runtime data and deobfuscation data attributable to the binary executable. At least some of the runtime data and deobfuscation data attributable to the binary executable is stored in a shared database, while at least some of the incident data is stored in a private, non-shared database.

  6. MONITORING TREE POPULATION DYNAMICS IN ARID ZONE THROUGH MULTIPLE TEMPORAL SCALES: INTEGRATION OF SPATIAL ANALYSIS, CHANGE DETECTION AND FIELD LONG TERM MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Isaacson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available High mortality rates and lack of recruitment in the acacia populations throughout the Negev Desert and the Arava rift valley of Israel have been reported in previous studies. However, it is difficult to determine whether these reports can be evidence to a significant decline trend of the trees populations. This is because of the slow dynamic processes of acaia tree populations and the lack of long term continuous monitoring data. We suggest a new data analysis technique that expands the time scope of the field long term monitoring of trees in arid environments. This will enables us to improve our understanding of the spatial and temporal changes of these populations. We implemented two different approaches in order to expand the time scope of the acacia population field survey: (1 individual based tree change detection using Corona satellite images and (2 spatial analysis of trees population, converting spatial data into temporal data. The next step was to integrate the results of the two analysis techniques (change detection and spatial analysis with field monitoring. This technique can be implemented to other tree populations in arid environments to help assess the vegetation conditions and dynamics of those ecosystems.

  7. Urinary Metabolomic Analysis to Detect Changes After Intravenous, Non-ionic, Low Osmolar Iodinated Radiocontrast for Computerized Tomographic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah B Diercks

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Contrast-induced nephropathy is a result of injury to the proximal tubules caused by oxidative stress and ischemia. Metabolomics is a novel technique that has been used to identify renal damage from drug toxicities. The objective of this study is to analyze the metabolic changes in the urine after dosing with intravenous (IV contrast for computed tomograph (CT of the chest Methods: A convenience sample of patients undergoing a chest CT with IV contrast who had at least one of the following: age ≥50 years, diabetes, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, coronary artery disease, or diastolic blood pressure >90 mmHg -- were eligible for enrollment. Urine samples were collected prior to imaging and 4-6 hours post imaging. Samples underwent gas chromography/mass spectrometry profiling. We measured peak metabolite values and log transformed data. Paired T tests were calculated. We used significance analysis of microarrays (SAM to determine the most significant metabolites. Results: The cohort comprised 14 patients with matched samples; 9 /14 (64.3 were males, and the median age was 61 years (IQR 50-68. A total of 158 metabolites were identified. Using SAM we identified 9 metabolites that were identified as significant using a delta of 1.6. Conclusion: Changes in urinary metabolites are present soon after contrast administration. This change in urinary metabolites may be potential early identifiers of contrast-induced nephropathy and could identify patients at high-risk for developing this condition. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(2:152–157.

  8. An autocorrelation analysis approach to detecting land cover change using hyper-temporal time-series data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kleynhans, W

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available time-series satellite data is proposed. The method is a per pixel change alarm that uses the temporal autocorrelation to infer a change metric which yields a change or no-change decision after thresholding. Simulated change data was generated and used...

  9. An analysis of the North Rainier Elk Herd area, Washington: Change detection and habitat modeling with remote sensing and GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, Joshua J.

    The North Rainier Elk Herd (NREH) is one of ten designated herds in Washington State, all managed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). To aid in the management of the herd, the WDFW has decided to implement a spatial ecosystem analysis. This thesis partially undertakes this analysis through the use of a suite of software tools, the Westside Elk Nutrition and Habitat Use Models (WENHUM). This model analyzes four covariates that have a strong correlation to elk habitat selection: dietary digestible energy (DDE); distance to roads open to the public; mean slope; and distance to cover-forage edge and returns areas of likely elk habitation or use. This thesis includes an update of the base vegetation layer from 2006 data to 2011, a series of clear cuts were identified as areas of change and fed into the WENHUM models. The addition of these clear cuts created improvements in the higher quality DDE levels and when the updated data is compared to the original, predictions of elk use are higher. The presence of open or closed roads was simulated by creating an area of possible closures, selecting candidate roads within that area and then modeling them as either "all open" or "all closed". The simulation of the road closures produced increases in the higher levels of predicted use.

  10. Unsupervised Condition Change Detection In Large Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Niels Henrik; Larsen, Jan

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for unsupervised change detection which combines independent component modeling and probabilistic outlier etection. The method further provides a compact data representation, which is amenable to interpretation, i.e., the detected condition changes can be investig...... be investigated further. The method is successfully applied to unsupervised condition change detection in large diesel engines from acoustical emission sensor signal and compared to more classical techniques based on principal component analysis and Gaussian mixture models....

  11. Anxiety, conscious awareness and change detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Sally M; Lambert, Anthony

    2012-03-01

    Attentional scanning was studied in anxious and non-anxious participants, using a modified change detection paradigm. Participants detected changes in pairs of emotional scenes separated by two task irrelevant slides, which contained an emotionally valenced scene (the 'distractor scene') and a visual mask. In agreement with attentional control theory, change detection latencies were slower overall for anxious participants. Change detection in anxious, but not non-anxious, participants was influenced by the emotional valence and exposure duration of distractor scenes. When negative distractor scenes were presented at subliminal exposure durations, anxious participants detected changes more rapidly than when supraliminal negative scenes or subliminal positive scenes were presented. We propose that for anxious participants, subliminal presentation of emotionally negative distractor scenes stimulated attention into a dynamic state in the absence of attentional engagement. Presentation of the same scenes at longer exposure times was accompanied by conscious awareness, attentional engagement, and slower change detection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Digital shoreline analysis system-based change detection along the highly eroding Krishna-Godavari delta front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallepalli, Akhil; Kakani, Nageswara Rao; James, David B.; Richardson, Mark A.

    2017-07-01

    Coastal regions are highly vulnerable to rising sea levels due to global warming. Previous Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (2013) predictions of 26 to 82 cm global sea level rise are now considered conservative. Subsequent investigations predict much higher levels which would displace 10% of the world's population living less than 10 m above sea level. Remote sensing and GIS technologies form the mainstay of models on coastal retreat and inundation to future sea-level rise. This study estimates the varying trends along the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) delta region. The rate of shoreline shift along the 330-km long K-G delta coast was estimated using satellite images between 1977 and 2008. With reference to a selected baseline from along an inland position, end point rate and net shoreline movement were calculated using a GIS-based digital shoreline analysis system. The results indicated a net loss of about 42.1 km2 area during this 31-year period, which is in agreement with previous literature. Considering the nature of landforms and EPR, the future hazard line (or coastline) is predicted for the area; the predication indicates a net erosion of about 57.6 km2 along the K-G delta coast by 2050 AD.

  13. Anomalous change detection in imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiler, James P [Los Alamos, NM; Perkins, Simon J [Santa Fe, NM

    2011-05-31

    A distribution-based anomaly detection platform is described that identifies a non-flat background that is specified in terms of the distribution of the data. A resampling approach is also disclosed employing scrambled resampling of the original data with one class specified by the data and the other by the explicit distribution, and solving using binary classification.

  14. Time series change detection: Algorithms for land cover change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boriah, Shyam

    can be used for decision making and policy planning purposes. In particular, previous change detection studies have primarily relied on examining differences between two or more satellite images acquired on different dates. Thus, a technological solution that detects global land cover change using high temporal resolution time series data will represent a paradigm-shift in the field of land cover change studies. To realize these ambitious goals, a number of computational challenges in spatio-temporal data mining need to be addressed. Specifically, analysis and discovery approaches need to be cognizant of climate and ecosystem data characteristics such as seasonality, non-stationarity/inter-region variability, multi-scale nature, spatio-temporal autocorrelation, high-dimensionality and massive data size. This dissertation, a step in that direction, translates earth science challenges to computer science problems, and provides computational solutions to address these problems. In particular, three key technical capabilities are developed: (1) Algorithms for time series change detection that are effective and can scale up to handle the large size of earth science data; (2) Change detection algorithms that can handle large numbers of missing and noisy values present in satellite data sets; and (3) Spatio-temporal analysis techniques to identify the scale and scope of disturbance events.

  15. Nationwide Hybrid Change Detection of Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hron, V.; Halounova, L.

    2016-06-01

    The Fundamental Base of Geographic Data of the Czech Republic (hereinafter FBGD) is a national 2D geodatabase at a 1:10,000 scale with more than 100 geographic objects. This paper describes the design of the permanent updating mechanism of buildings in FBGD. The proposed procedure belongs to the category of hybrid change detection (HCD) techniques which combine pixel-based and object-based evaluation. The main sources of information for HCD are cadastral information and bi-temporal vertical digital aerial photographs. These photographs have great information potential because they contain multispectral, position and also elevation information. Elevation information represents a digital surface model (DSM) which can be obtained using the image matching technique. Pixel-based evaluation of bi-temporal DSMs enables fast localization of places with potential building changes. These coarse results are subsequently classified through the object-based image analysis (OBIA) using spectral, textural and contextual features and GIS tools. The advantage of the two-stage evaluation is the pre-selection of locations where image segmentation (a computationally demanding part of OBIA) is performed. It is not necessary to apply image segmentation to the entire scene, but only to the surroundings of detected changes, which contributes to significantly faster processing and lower hardware requirements. The created technology is based on open-source software solutions that allow easy portability on multiple computers and parallelization of processing. This leads to significant savings of financial resources which can be expended on the further development of FBGD.

  16. Automated Change Detection for Synthetic Aperture Sonar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Automated Change Detection for Synthetic Aperture Sonar...R. Azimi-Sadjadi and S. Srinivasan, “Coherent Change Detection and Classification in Synthetic Aper - ture Radar Imagery Using Canonical Correlation

  17. Adaptively detecting changes in Autonomic Grid Computing

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiangliang

    2010-10-01

    Detecting the changes is the common issue in many application fields due to the non-stationary distribution of the applicative data, e.g., sensor network signals, web logs and gridrunning logs. Toward Autonomic Grid Computing, adaptively detecting the changes in a grid system can help to alarm the anomalies, clean the noises, and report the new patterns. In this paper, we proposed an approach of self-adaptive change detection based on the Page-Hinkley statistic test. It handles the non-stationary distribution without the assumption of data distribution and the empirical setting of parameters. We validate the approach on the EGEE streaming jobs, and report its better performance on achieving higher accuracy comparing to the other change detection methods. Meanwhile this change detection process could help to discover the device fault which was not claimed in the system logs. © 2010 IEEE.

  18. Multiratio fusion change detection with adaptive thresholding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hytla, Patrick C.; Balster, Eric J.; Vasquez, Juan R.; Neuroth, Robert M.

    2017-04-01

    A ratio-based change detection method known as multiratio fusion (MRF) is proposed and tested. The MRF framework builds on other change detection components proposed in this work: dual ratio (DR) and multiratio (MR). The DR method involves two ratios coupled with adaptive thresholds to maximize detected changes and minimize false alarms. The use of two ratios is shown to outperform the single ratio case when the means of the image pairs are not equal. MR change detection builds on the DR method by including negative imagery to produce four total ratios with adaptive thresholds. Inclusion of negative imagery is shown to improve detection sensitivity and to boost detection performance in certain target and background cases. MRF further expands this concept by fusing together the ratio outputs using a routine in which detections must be verified by two or more ratios to be classified as a true changed pixel. The proposed method is tested with synthetically generated test imagery and real datasets with results compared to other methods found in the literature. DR is shown to significantly outperform the standard single ratio method. MRF produces excellent change detection results that exhibit up to a 22% performance improvement over other methods from the literature at low false-alarm rates.

  19. Detecting past changes of effective population size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, Natacha; Chevalet, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and predicting population abundance is a major challenge confronting scientists. Several genetic models have been developed using microsatellite markers to estimate the present and ancestral effective population sizes. However, to get an overview on the evolution of population requires that past fluctuation of population size be traceable. To address the question, we developed a new model estimating the past changes of effective population size from microsatellite by resolving coalescence theory and using approximate likelihoods in a Monte Carlo Markov Chain approach. The efficiency of the model and its sensitivity to gene flow and to assumptions on the mutational process were checked using simulated data and analysis. The model was found especially useful to provide evidence of transient changes of population size in the past. The times at which some past demographic events cannot be detected because they are too ancient and the risk that gene flow may suggest the false detection of a bottleneck are discussed considering the distribution of coalescence times. The method was applied on real data sets from several Atlantic salmon populations. The method called VarEff (Variation of Effective size) was implemented in the R package VarEff and is made available at https://qgsp.jouy.inra.fr and at http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/VarEff. PMID:25067949

  20. Detecting past changes of effective population size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, Natacha; Chevalet, Claude

    2014-06-01

    Understanding and predicting population abundance is a major challenge confronting scientists. Several genetic models have been developed using microsatellite markers to estimate the present and ancestral effective population sizes. However, to get an overview on the evolution of population requires that past fluctuation of population size be traceable. To address the question, we developed a new model estimating the past changes of effective population size from microsatellite by resolving coalescence theory and using approximate likelihoods in a Monte Carlo Markov Chain approach. The efficiency of the model and its sensitivity to gene flow and to assumptions on the mutational process were checked using simulated data and analysis. The model was found especially useful to provide evidence of transient changes of population size in the past. The times at which some past demographic events cannot be detected because they are too ancient and the risk that gene flow may suggest the false detection of a bottleneck are discussed considering the distribution of coalescence times. The method was applied on real data sets from several Atlantic salmon populations. The method called VarEff (Variation of Effective size) was implemented in the R package VarEff and is made available at https://qgsp.jouy.inra.fr and at http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/VarEff.

  1. Indigenous people's detection of rapid ecological change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswani, Shankar; Lauer, Matthew

    2014-06-01

    When sudden catastrophic events occur, it becomes critical for coastal communities to detect and respond to environmental transformations because failure to do so may undermine overall ecosystem resilience and threaten people's livelihoods. We therefore asked how capable of detecting rapid ecological change following massive environmental disruptions local, indigenous people are. We assessed the direction and periodicity of experimental learning of people in the Western Solomon Islands after a tsunami in 2007. We compared the results of marine science surveys with local ecological knowledge of the benthos across 3 affected villages and 3 periods before and after the tsunami. We sought to determine how people recognize biophysical changes in the environment before and after catastrophic events such as earthquakes and tsunamis and whether people have the ability to detect ecological changes over short time scales or need longer time scales to recognize changes. Indigenous people were able to detect changes in the benthos over time. Detection levels differed between marine science surveys and local ecological knowledge sources over time, but overall patterns of statistically significant detection of change were evident for various habitats. Our findings have implications for marine conservation, coastal management policies, and disaster-relief efforts because when people are able to detect ecological changes, this, in turn, affects how they exploit and manage their marine resources. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  2. Interpreting the change detection error matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, van P.A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Two different matrices are commonly reported in assessment of change detection accuracy: (1) single date error matrices and (2) binary change/no change error matrices. The third, less common form of reporting, is the transition error matrix. This paper discuses the relation between these matrices.

  3. Test-retest reliability and minimal detectable change of three-dimensional gait analysis in chronic low back pain patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, R.; Armada-da-Silva, P.; Pool-Goudzwaard, A.; Moniz-Pereira, V.; Veloso, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim: Three-dimensional gait analysis (3DGA) can provide detailed data on gait impairment in chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients. However, data about reliability and measurement error of 3DGA in this population is lacking. The aim of this study is to investigate test-retest

  4. Graph-theoretic analysis of discrete-phase-space states for condition change detection and quantification of information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hively, Lee M.

    2014-09-16

    Data collected from devices and human condition may be used to forewarn of critical events such as machine/structural failure or events from brain/heart wave data stroke. By monitoring the data, and determining what values are indicative of a failure forewarning, one can provide adequate notice of the impending failure in order to take preventive measures. This disclosure teaches a computer-based method to convert dynamical numeric data representing physical objects (unstructured data) into discrete-phase-space states, and hence into a graph (structured data) for extraction of condition change.

  5. Single-molecule analysis of lead(II)-binding aptamer conformational changes in an α-hemolysin nanopore, and sensitive detection of lead(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hai-Yan; Song, Ze-Yang; Zhang, Hui-Sheng; Chen, Si-Ping

    2016-01-01

    The α-hemolysin (αHL) nanopore is capable of analyzing DNA duplex and DNA aptamer as they can be electrophoretically driven into the vestibule from the cis entrance. The current study describes the competitive interaction induced by Pb 2+ that changes the secondary structure of DNA duplex in asymmetrical electrolyte solution. DNA duplex formed by the partial complementary DNA and DNA aptamer sequence produced unzipping blockages with the dwell unzipping time lasting 2.84 ± 0.7 ms. By cation-DNA interaction with Pb 2+ , the DNA duplex will unwind and then form Pb 2+ -stabilized-DNA aptamer, which will be captured and unfolded in vestibule. The pore conductance were reduced to 54 % and 94 % with mean dwell unfolding times of 165 ± 12 ms. The competitive behavior between Pb 2+ and single-strand DNA was further utilized to detect Pb 2+ in solution with a detection limit of 0.5 nM. This nanopore platform also provides a powerful tool for studying the cation-DNA interactions in DNA aptamer conformational changes. Thus, the results drawn from these studies provide insights into the applications of α-hemolysin nanopore as a molecular sieve to different DNA secondary structure in future application of nanopore analysis. (author)

  6. NATIONWIDE HYBRID CHANGE DETECTION OF BUILDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Hron

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Fundamental Base of Geographic Data of the Czech Republic (hereinafter FBGD is a national 2D geodatabase at a 1:10,000 scale with more than 100 geographic objects. This paper describes the design of the permanent updating mechanism of buildings in FBGD. The proposed procedure belongs to the category of hybrid change detection (HCD techniques which combine pixel-based and object-based evaluation. The main sources of information for HCD are cadastral information and bi-temporal vertical digital aerial photographs. These photographs have great information potential because they contain multispectral, position and also elevation information. Elevation information represents a digital surface model (DSM which can be obtained using the image matching technique. Pixel-based evaluation of bi-temporal DSMs enables fast localization of places with potential building changes. These coarse results are subsequently classified through the object-based image analysis (OBIA using spectral, textural and contextual features and GIS tools. The advantage of the two-stage evaluation is the pre-selection of locations where image segmentation (a computationally demanding part of OBIA is performed. It is not necessary to apply image segmentation to the entire scene, but only to the surroundings of detected changes, which contributes to significantly faster processing and lower hardware requirements. The created technology is based on open-source software solutions that allow easy portability on multiple computers and parallelization of processing. This leads to significant savings of financial resources which can be expended on the further development of FBGD.

  7. Change Detection Experiments Using Low Cost UAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Michael J.; Vranas, Thomas L.; Motter, Mark; Hines, Glenn D.; Rahman, Zia-ur

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the progress in the development of a low-cost change-detection system. This system is being developed to provide users with the ability to use a low-cost unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and image processing system that can detect changes in specific fixed ground locations using video provided by an autonomous UAV. The results of field experiments conducted with the US Army at Ft. A.P.Hill are presented.

  8. Detecting change-points in extremes

    KAUST Repository

    Dupuis, D. J.

    2015-01-01

    Even though most work on change-point estimation focuses on changes in the mean, changes in the variance or in the tail distribution can lead to more extreme events. In this paper, we develop a new method of detecting and estimating the change-points in the tail of multiple time series data. In addition, we adapt existing tail change-point detection methods to our specific problem and conduct a thorough comparison of different methods in terms of performance on the estimation of change-points and computational time. We also examine three locations on the U.S. northeast coast and demonstrate that the methods are useful for identifying changes in seasonally extreme warm temperatures.

  9. Change Detection Analysis of Costal Habitat Using Remote Sensing Technologies in the Western Arabian Gulf (Saudi Arabian Coast) over a Thirty-Year Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Askary, H. M.; Idris, N.; Johnson, S. H.; Qurban, M. A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Many factors can severely affect the growth and abundance of the marine ecosystems. For example, due to anthropogenic and natural forces, benthic habitats including but not limited to mangroves, sea grass, salt marshes, macro algae, and coral reefs have been experiencing high levels of declination. Furthermore, aerosols and their propellants are suspected contributors to marine habitat degradation. Although several studies reveal that the Arabian Gulf habitats have suffered deleterious impacts after the Gulf War and the following six month off-shore oil spill, limited research exists to track the changes in benthic habitats over the past three decades using remote sensing. Document changes in costal habitats over the past thirty years were better observed with the use of multispectral remote sensors such as Landsat-5, Landsat-7, and Landsat8 (OLI). Change detection analysis was performed on the three Landsat images (Landsat-5 for the 1987 image, Landsat-7 for the 2000, and Landsat-8 for the 2013 image). The images were then modified, masked off from open water and land. An unsupervised classification was performed which cluster similar classes together. The supervised classification displayed the seven following classes: coral reefs, macro algae, sea grass, salt marshes, mangroves, water, and land. Compared to 1987 image to 2000 scene, there was a noticeable increase in the extensiveness of salt marsh and macro algae habitats. However, a significant decrease in salt marsh habitats were apparent in the 2013 scene.

  10. MULTI-TEMPORAL SAR CHANGE DETECTION AND MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hachicha

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Multitemporal SAR images are a very useful source of information for a large amount of applications, especially for change detection and monitoring. In this paper, a new SAR change detection and monitoring approach is proposed through the analysis of a time series of SAR images covering the same region. The first step of the method is the SAR filtering preprocessing step using an extension of the spatial NL-means filter to the temporal domain. Then, the Rayleigh Kullback Leibler and the Rayleigh Distribution Ratio measures are combined to detect the changes between a reference image and each SAR image of the time series at both local and global scale. These measures are combined using the Dezert-Smarandache theory which takes into account conflicts between sources and thus enhances the dual change detection results. Finally, a pixel based temporal classification is applied starting from the obtained change maps in order to describe the temporal behaviour of the covered regions.

  11. Video change detection for fixed wing UAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelsen, Jan; Müller, Thomas; Ring, Jochen; Mück, Klaus; Brüstle, Stefan; Erdnüß, Bastian; Lutz, Bastian; Herbst, Theresa

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we proceed the work of Bartelsen et al.1 We present the draft of a process chain for an image based change detection which is designed for videos acquired by fixed wing unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). From our point of view, automatic video change detection for aerial images can be useful to recognize functional activities which are typically caused by the deployment of improvised explosive devices (IEDs), e.g. excavations, skid marks, footprints, left-behind tooling equipment, and marker stones. Furthermore, in case of natural disasters, like flooding, imminent danger can be recognized quickly. Due to the necessary flight range, we concentrate on fixed wing UAVs. Automatic change detection can be reduced to a comparatively simple photogrammetric problem when the perspective change between the "before" and "after" image sets is kept as small as possible. Therefore, the aerial image acquisition demands a mission planning with a clear purpose including flight path and sensor configuration. While the latter can be enabled simply by a fixed and meaningful adjustment of the camera, ensuring a small perspective change for "before" and "after" videos acquired by fixed wing UAVs is a challenging problem. Concerning this matter, we have performed tests with an advanced commercial off the shelf (COTS) system which comprises a differential GPS and autopilot system estimating the repetition accuracy of its trajectory. Although several similar approaches have been presented,23 as far as we are able to judge, the limits for this important issue are not estimated so far. Furthermore, we design a process chain to enable the practical utilization of video change detection. It consists of a front-end of a database to handle large amounts of video data, an image processing and change detection implementation, and the visualization of the results. We apply our process chain on the real video data acquired by the advanced COTS fixed wing UAV and synthetic data. For the

  12. Specific bioelectrical impedance vector analysis (BIVA) is more accurate than classic BIVA to detect changes in body composition and in nutritional status in institutionalised elderly with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camina Martín, M Alicia; de Mateo Silleras, Beatriz; Barrera Ortega, Sara; Domínguez Rodríguez, Luis; Redondo del Río, M Paz

    2014-09-01

    A new analytical variation of bioelectrical impedance vector analysis (BIVA), called specific BIVA, has shown to be more accurate in detecting changes in fat mass than classic BIVA. To compare classic and specific BIVA in order to identify which is more strongly associated with psycho-functional and nutritional indicators in a group of institutionalised elderly patients with dementia. Cross-sectional study. Fifty-four patients (34 women, 20 men) with dementia in moderately severe to very severe stages and aged 60-95years underwent geriatric nutritional assessment, including body mass index calculations, the Mini Nutritional Assessment, the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index, and whole body composition analysis. With specific BIVA (unlike with classic BIVA), significant differences were found between women with moderately severe and very severe dementia. In the BIVA conducted for body mass index, the confidence ellipses produced with the classic BIVA approach were highly overlapping; but with specific BIVA, significant differences were observed between the women in different nutritional categories (malnutrition, risk of malnutrition, normal weight and obesity). On the other hand, both approaches distinguished malnourished women from those who were at risk of malnutrition, according to the Mini Nutritional Assessment; and men with a moderate-high risk of malnutrition from men with no risk, on the basis of the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index. Overall, the findings of the present study suggest that specific BIVA is more effective than classic BIVA in identifying bioelectrical changes associated with psycho-functional and nutritional indicators in institutionalised elderly with dementia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Parametric probability distributions for anomalous change detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theiler, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Foy, Bernard R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wohlberg, Brendt E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scovel, James C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The problem of anomalous change detection arises when two (or possibly more) images are taken of the same scene, but at different times. The aim is to discount the 'pervasive differences' that occur thoughout the imagery, due to the inevitably different conditions under which the images were taken (caused, for instance, by differences in illumination, atmospheric conditions, sensor calibration, or misregistration), and to focus instead on the 'anomalous changes' that actually take place in the scene. In general, anomalous change detection algorithms attempt to model these normal or pervasive differences, based on data taken directly from the imagery, and then identify as anomalous those pixels for which the model does not hold. For many algorithms, these models are expressed in terms of probability distributions, and there is a class of such algorithms that assume the distributions are Gaussian. By considering a broader class of distributions, however, a new class of anomalous change detection algorithms can be developed. We consider several parametric families of such distributions, derive the associated change detection algorithms, and compare the performance with standard algorithms that are based on Gaussian distributions. We find that it is often possible to significantly outperform these standard algorithms, even using relatively simple non-Gaussian models.

  14. AERIAL IMAGES AND LIDAR DATA FUSION FOR DISASTER CHANGE DETECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Trinder

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Potential applications of airborne LiDAR for disaster monitoring include flood prediction and assessment, monitoring of the growth of volcanoes and assistance in the prediction of eruptions, assessment of crustal elevation changes due to earthquakes, and monitoring of structural damage after earthquakes. Change detection in buildings is an important task in the context of disaster monitoring, especially after earthquakes. Traditionally, change detection is usually done by using multi-temporal images through spectral analyses. This provides two-dimensional spectral information without including heights. This paper will describe the capability of aerial images and LiDAR data fusion for rapid change detection in elevations, and methods of assessment of damage in made-made structures. In order to detect and evaluate changes in buildings, LiDAR-derived DEMs and aerial images from two epochs were used, showing changes in urban buildings due to construction and demolition. The proposed modelling scheme comprises three steps, namely, data pre-processing, change detection, and validation. In the first step for data pre-processing, data registration was carried out based on the multi-source data. In the second step, changes were detected by combining change detection techniques such as image differencing (ID, principal components analysis (PCA, minimum noise fraction (MNF and post-classification comparison (P-C based on support vector machines (SVM, each of which performs differently, based on simple majority vote. In the third step and to meet the objectives, the detected changes were compared against reference data that was generated manually. The comparison is based on two criteria: overall accuracy; and commission and omission errors. The results showed that the average detection accuracies were: 78.9%, 81.4%, 82.7% and 82.8% for post-classification, image differencing, PCA and MNF respectively. On the other hand, the commission and omission errors of

  15. Aerial Images and LIDAR Data Fusion for Disaster Change Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinder, J. C.; Salah, M.

    2012-07-01

    Potential applications of airborne LiDAR for disaster monitoring include flood prediction and assessment, monitoring of the growth of volcanoes and assistance in the prediction of eruptions, assessment of crustal elevation changes due to earthquakes, and monitoring of structural damage after earthquakes. Change detection in buildings is an important task in the context of disaster monitoring, especially after earthquakes. Traditionally, change detection is usually done by using multi-temporal images through spectral analyses. This provides two-dimensional spectral information without including heights. This paper will describe the capability of aerial images and LiDAR data fusion for rapid change detection in elevations, and methods of assessment of damage in made-made structures. In order to detect and evaluate changes in buildings, LiDAR-derived DEMs and aerial images from two epochs were used, showing changes in urban buildings due to construction and demolition. The proposed modelling scheme comprises three steps, namely, data pre-processing, change detection, and validation. In the first step for data pre-processing, data registration was carried out based on the multi-source data. In the second step, changes were detected by combining change detection techniques such as image differencing (ID), principal components analysis (PCA), minimum noise fraction (MNF) and post-classification comparison (P-C) based on support vector machines (SVM), each of which performs differently, based on simple majority vote. In the third step and to meet the objectives, the detected changes were compared against reference data that was generated manually. The comparison is based on two criteria: overall accuracy; and commission and omission errors. The results showed that the average detection accuracies were: 78.9%, 81.4%, 82.7% and 82.8% for post-classification, image differencing, PCA and MNF respectively. On the other hand, the commission and omission errors of the results

  16. Statistička analiza termovizijske i televizijske slike i prag detekcije pokreta na sceni / Statistical analysis of television and thermo vision image and change detection thresholding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žarko Barbarić

    2006-04-01

    statistical properties of two types of images of the same scene. We used this f act (data for change detection thresholding with the same procedure.

  17. Detecting abrupt dynamic change based on changes in the fractal properties of spatial images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qunqun; He, Wenping; Gu, Bin; Jiang, Yundi

    2017-10-01

    Many abrupt climate change events often cannot be detected timely by conventional abrupt detection methods until a few years after these events have occurred. The reason for this lag in detection is that abundant and long-term observational data are required for accurate abrupt change detection by these methods, especially for the detection of a regime shift. So, these methods cannot help us understand and forecast the evolution of the climate system in a timely manner. Obviously, spatial images, generated by a coupled spatiotemporal dynamical model, contain more information about a dynamic system than a single time series, and we find that spatial images show the fractal properties. The fractal properties of spatial images can be quantitatively characterized by the Hurst exponent, which can be estimated by two-dimensional detrended fluctuation analysis (TD-DFA). Based on this, TD-DFA is used to detect an abrupt dynamic change of a coupled spatiotemporal model. The results show that the TD-DFA method can effectively detect abrupt parameter changes in the coupled model by monitoring the changing in the fractal properties of spatial images. The present method provides a new way for abrupt dynamic change detection, which can achieve timely and efficient abrupt change detection results.

  18. Total least squares for anomalous change detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theiler, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Matsekh, Anna M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    A family of difference-based anomalous change detection algorithms is derived from a total least squares (TLSQ) framework. This provides an alternative to the well-known chronochrome algorithm, which is derived from ordinary least squares. In both cases, the most anomalous changes are identified with the pixels that exhibit the largest residuals with respect to the regression of the two images against each other. The family of TLSQ-based anomalous change detectors is shown to be equivalent to the subspace RX formulation for straight anomaly detection, but applied to the stacked space. However, this family is not invariant to linear coordinate transforms. On the other hand, whitened TLSQ is coordinate invariant, and furthermore it is shown to be equivalent to the optimized covariance equalization algorithm. What whitened TLSQ offers, in addition to connecting with a common language the derivations of two of the most popular anomalous change detection algorithms - chronochrome and covariance equalization - is a generalization of these algorithms with the potential for better performance.

  19. Sensitive change detection for remote sensing monitoring of nuclear treaties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canty, Morton J.; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Schlittenhardt, Jörg

    2005-01-01

    Triggered in part by the advent of high resolution commercial optical satellites, the analysis of open-source satellite imagery has now established itself as an important tool for monitoring nuclear activities throughout the world (Chitumbo et al 2001). Whereas detection of land cover and land use...... or uninteresting changes, see e.g. (Canty and Schlittenhardt 2001). In our contribution we focus attention on the use of conventional multispectral earth observation satellite platforms with moderate ground resolution (Landsat TM, ASTER, SPOT) to detect changes over wide areas which are relevant to nuclear non...

  20. Using adversary text to detect adversary phase changes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speed, Ann Elizabeth; Doser, Adele Beatrice; Warrender, Christina E.

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to help develop a research roadmap and small proof ofconcept for addressing key problems and gaps from the perspective of using text analysis methods as a primary tool for detecting when a group is undergoing a phase change. Self- rganizing map (SOM) techniques were used to analyze text data obtained from the tworld-wide web. Statistical studies indicate that it may be possible to predict phase changes, as well as detect whether or not an example of writing can be attributed to a group of interest.

  1. Detection of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wigley, T.M.L.; Jones, P.D.

    1992-01-01

    The aims of the US Department of Energy's Carbon Dioxide Research Program are to improve assessments of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change and to define and reduce uncertainties through selected research. This project will address: The regional and seasonal details of the expected climatic changes; how rapidly will these changes occur; how and when will the climatic effects of CO 2 and other greenhouse gases be first detected; and the relationships between greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change and changes caused by other external and internal factors. The present project addresses all of these questions. Many of the diverse facets of greenhouse-gas-related climate research can be grouped under three interlinked subject areas: modeling, first detection and supporting data. This project will include the analysis of climate forcing factors, the development and refinement of transient response climate models, and the use of instrumental data in validating General Circulation Models (GCMs)

  2. Imaging, object detection, and change detection with a polarized multistatic GPR array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, N. Reginald; Paglieroni, David W.

    2015-07-21

    A polarized detection system performs imaging, object detection, and change detection factoring in the orientation of an object relative to the orientation of transceivers. The polarized detection system may operate on one of several modes of operation based on whether the imaging, object detection, or change detection is performed separately for each transceiver orientation. In combined change mode, the polarized detection system performs imaging, object detection, and change detection separately for each transceiver orientation, and then combines changes across polarizations. In combined object mode, the polarized detection system performs imaging and object detection separately for each transceiver orientation, and then combines objects across polarizations and performs change detection on the result. In combined image mode, the polarized detection system performs imaging separately for each transceiver orientation, and then combines images across polarizations and performs object detection followed by change detection on the result.

  3. Immunohistochemical Detection of Changes in Tumor Hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, James; Carlin, Sean; Burke, Sean A.; Wen Bixiu; Yang, Kwang Mo; Ling, C. Clifton

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Although hypoxia is a known prognostic factor, its effect will be modified by the rate of reoxygenation and the extent to which the cells are acutely hypoxic. We tested the ability of exogenous and endogenous markers to detect reoxygenation in a xenograft model. Our technique might be applicable to stored patient samples. Methods and Materials: The human colorectal carcinoma line, HT29, was grown in nude mice. Changes in tumor hypoxia were examined by injection of pimonidazole, followed 24 hours later by EF5. Cryosections were stained for these markers and for carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α). Tumor hypoxia was artificially manipulated by carbogen exposure. Results: In unstressed tumors, all four markers showed very similar spatial distributions. After carbogen treatment, pimonidazole and EF5 could detect decreased hypoxia. HIF1α staining was also decreased relative to CAIX, although the effect was less pronounced than for EF5. Control tumors displayed small regions that had undergone spontaneous changes in tumor hypoxia, as judged by pimonidazole relative to EF5; most of these changes were reflected by CAIX and HIF1α. Conclusion: HIF1α can be compared with either CAIX or a previously administered nitroimidazole to provide an estimate of reoxygenation

  4. Pigeons (Columba livia) show change blindness in a color-change detection task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbranson, Walter T; Jeffers, Jacob S

    2017-07-01

    Change blindness is a phenomenon whereby changes to a stimulus are more likely go unnoticed under certain circumstances. Pigeons learned a change detection task, in which they observed sequential stimulus displays consisting of individual colors back-projected onto three response keys. The color of one response key changed during each sequence and pecks to the key that displayed the change were reinforced. Pigeons showed a change blindness effect, in that change detection accuracy was worse when there was an inter-stimulus interval interrupting the transition between consecutive stimulus displays. Birds successfully transferred to stimulus displays involving novel colors, indicating that pigeons learned a general change detection rule. Furthermore, analysis of responses to specific color combinations showed that pigeons could detect changes involving both spectral and non-spectral colors and that accuracy was better for changes involving greater differences in wavelength. These results build upon previous investigations of change blindness in both humans and pigeons and suggest that change blindness may be a general consequence of selective visual attention relevant to multiple species and stimulus dimensions.

  5. Detecting significant changes in protein abundance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Kammers

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We review and demonstrate how an empirical Bayes method, shrinking a protein's sample variance towards a pooled estimate, leads to far more powerful and stable inference to detect significant changes in protein abundance compared to ordinary t-tests. Using examples from isobaric mass labelled proteomic experiments we show how to analyze data from multiple experiments simultaneously, and discuss the effects of missing data on the inference. We also present easy to use open source software for normalization of mass spectrometry data and inference based on moderated test statistics.

  6. Linear and kernel methods for multivariate change detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canty, Morton J.; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2012-01-01

    The iteratively reweighted multivariate alteration detection (IR-MAD) algorithm may be used both for unsupervised change detection in multi- and hyperspectral remote sensing imagery and for automatic radiometric normalization of multitemporal image sequences. Principal components analysis (PCA......), as well as maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) and minimum noise fraction (MNF) analyses of IR-MAD images, both linear and kernel-based (nonlinear), may further enhance change signals relative to no-change background. IDL (Interactive Data Language) implementations of IR-MAD, automatic radiometric...... normalization, and kernel PCA/MAF/MNF transformations are presented that function as transparent and fully integrated extensions of the ENVI remote sensing image analysis environment. The train/test approach to kernel PCA is evaluated against a Hebbian learning procedure. Matlab code is also available...

  7. Cortical dynamics of visual change detection based on sensory memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urakawa, Tomokazu; Inui, Koji; Yamashiro, Koya; Tanaka, Emi; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2010-08-01

    Detecting a visual change was suggested to relate closely to the visual sensory memory formed by visual stimuli before the occurrence of the change, because change detection involves identifying a difference between ongoing and preceding sensory conditions. Previous neuroimaging studies showed that an abrupt visual change activates the middle occipital gyrus (MOG). However, it still remains to be elucidated whether the MOG is related to visual change detection based on sensory memory. Here we tried to settle this issue using a new method of stimulation with blue and red LEDs to emphasize a memory-based change detection process. There were two stimuli, a standard trial stimulus and a deviant trial stimulus. The former was a red light lasting 500 ms, and the latter was a red light lasting 250 ms immediately followed by a blue light lasting 250 ms. Effects of the trial-trial interval, 250 approximately 2000 ms, were investigated to know how cortical responses to the abrupt change (from red to blue) were affected by preceding conditions. The brain response to the deviant trial stimulus was recorded by magnetoencephalography. Results of a multi-dipole analysis showed that the activity in the MOG, peaking at around 150 ms after the change onset, decreased in amplitude as the interval increased, but the earlier activity in BA 17/18 was not affected by the interval. These results suggested that the MOG is an important cortical area relating to the sensory memory-based visual change-detecting system. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Towards a Framework for Change Detection in Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, Mirko; Nauck, Detlef; Ruta, Dymitr; Spott, Martin

    Since the world with its markets, innovations and customers is changing faster than ever before, the key to survival for businesses is the ability to detect, assess and respond to changing conditions rapidly and intelligently. Discovering changes and reacting to or acting upon them before others do has therefore become a strategical issue for many companies. However, existing data analysis techniques are insufflent for this task since they typically assume that the domain under consideration is stable over time. This paper presents a framework that detects changes within a data set at virtually any level of granularity. The underlying idea is to derive a rule-based description of the data set at different points in time and to subsequently analyse how these rules change. Nevertheless, further techniques are required to assist the data analyst in interpreting and assessing their changes. Therefore the framework also contains methods to discard rules that are non-drivers for change and to assess the interestingness of detected changes.

  9. AN INVESTIGATION OF AUTOMATIC CHANGE DETECTION FOR TOPOGRAPHIC MAP UPDATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Duncan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Changes to the landscape are constantly occurring and it is essential for geospatial and mapping organisations that these changes are regularly detected and captured, so that map databases can be updated to reflect the current status of the landscape. The Chief Directorate of National Geospatial Information (CD: NGI, South Africa's national mapping agency, currently relies on manual methods of detecting changes and capturing these changes. These manual methods are time consuming and labour intensive, and rely on the skills and interpretation of the operator. It is therefore necessary to move towards more automated methods in the production process at CD: NGI. The aim of this research is to do an investigation into a methodology for automatic or semi-automatic change detection for the purpose of updating topographic databases. The method investigated for detecting changes is through image classification as well as spatial analysis and is focussed on urban landscapes. The major data input into this study is high resolution aerial imagery and existing topographic vector data. Initial results indicate the traditional pixel-based image classification approaches are unsatisfactory for large scale land-use mapping and that object-orientated approaches hold more promise. Even in the instance of object-oriented image classification generalization of techniques on a broad-scale has provided inconsistent results. A solution may lie with a hybrid approach of pixel and object-oriented techniques.

  10. Exploring the association of the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources' satellite-detected change with the Forest Inventory and Analysis system of observed removals and mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale D. Gormanson; Timothy J. Aunan; Mark H. Hansen; Michael Hoppus

    2009-01-01

    Since 2001, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MN-DNR) has mapped forest change annually by comparison of Landsat satellite image pairs. Over the same timeframe, 1,761 U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) plots in Minnesota have been remeasured on a 5-year cycle, providing field data on growth, removals, and...

  11. Kernel based orthogonalization for change detection in hyperspectral images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    matrix only. In the kernel version the inner products are replaced by inner products between nonlinear mappings into higher dimensional feature space of the original data. Via kernel substitution also known as the kernel trick these inner products between the mappings are in turn replaced by a kernel...... function and all quantities needed in the analysis are expressed in terms of this kernel function. This means that we need not know the nonlinear mappings explicitly. Kernel PCA and MNF analyses handle nonlinearities by implicitly transforming data into high (even infinite) dimensional feature space via...... the kernel function and then performing a linear analysis in that space. An example shows the successful application of (kernel PCA and) kernel MNF analysis to change detection in HyMap data covering a small agricultural area near Lake Waging-Taching, Bavaria, in Southern Germany. In the change detection...

  12. A comparative study on change vector analysis based change ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Geographic Information System (GIS) enables such research activities to be carried out through change detection analysis. From this viewpoint ... Department of Electronics Engineering, Punjab Technical University, Kapurthala 144 601, India; Chandigarh Group of Colleges, College of Engineering, Landran 140 307, India ...

  13. Integrated Landsat Image Analysis and Hydrologic Modeling to Detect Impacts of 25-Year Land-Cover Change on Surface Runoff in a Philippine Watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Paringit

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Landsat MSS and ETM+ images were analyzed to detect 25-year land-cover change (1976–2001 in the critical Taguibo Watershed in Mindanao Island, Southern Philippines. This watershed has experienced historical modifications of its land-cover due to the presence of logging industries in the 1950s, and continuous deforestation due to illegal logging and slash-and-burn agriculture in the present time. To estimate the impacts of land-cover change on watershed runoff, land-cover information derived from the Landsat images was utilized to parameterize a GIS-based hydrologic model. The model was then calibrated with field-measured discharge data and used to simulate the responses of the watershed in its year 2001 and year 1976 land-cover conditions. The availability of land-cover information on the most recent state of the watershed from the Landsat ETM+ image made it possible to locate areas for rehabilitation such as barren and logged-over areas. We then created a “rehabilitated” land-cover condition map of the watershed (re-forestation of logged-over areas and agro-forestation of barren areas and used it to parameterize the model and predict the runoff responses of the watershed. Model results showed that changes in land-cover from 1976 to 2001 were directly related to the significant increase in surface runoff. Runoff predictions showed that a full rehabilitation of the watershed, especially in barren and logged-over areas, will be likely to reduce the generation of a huge volume of runoff during rainfall events. The results of this study have demonstrated the usefulness of multi-temporal Landsat images in detecting land-cover change, in identifying areas for rehabilitation, and in evaluating rehabilitation strategies for management of tropical watersheds through its use in hydrologic modeling.

  14. Attribute and topology based change detection in a constellation of previously detected objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglieroni, David W.; Beer, Reginald N.

    2016-01-19

    A system that applies attribute and topology based change detection to networks of objects that were detected on previous scans of a structure, roadway, or area of interest. The attributes capture properties or characteristics of the previously detected objects, such as location, time of detection, size, elongation, orientation, etc. The topology of the network of previously detected objects is maintained in a constellation database that stores attributes of previously detected objects and implicitly captures the geometrical structure of the network. A change detection system detects change by comparing the attributes and topology of new objects detected on the latest scan to the constellation database of previously detected objects.

  15. Detection of Land Use/Land Cover Changes and Urban Sprawl in Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia: An Analysis of Multi-Temporal Remote Sensing Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Tauhidur Rahman

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available While several studies examined land use and land cover changes in the central and western parts of Saudi Arabia, this study is the first to use remote sensing data to examine the decadal land cover changes in Saudi Arabia’s eastern coastal city of Al-Khobar between 1990 and 2013. Specifically, it utilized ISODATA classification method to classify Landsat TM, ETM+, and OLI data collected from 1990, 2001, and 2013 and then detected changes in the land cover within the study area. It then measured urban sprawl by calculating the relative Shannon’s entropy index values for the three years. With overall classification accuracies greater than 85%, the results show that urban built-up areas increased by 117% between 1990 and 2001 and 43.51% from 2001 to 2013. Vegetation increased by 110% from 1990 to 2001 and by 52% between 2001 and 2013. The entropy index values of 0.700 (1990, 0.779 (2001, and 0.840 (2013 indicates a high rate of urban sprawl and the city dispersing near the outskirts and towards the neighboring cities of Dhahran and Dammam. Future studies should examine the current challenges faced by the city’s residents due to urban expansion and attempt to find ways to resolve them in the near future.

  16. Linear and kernel methods for multi- and hypervariate change detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Canty, Morton J.

    2010-01-01

    The iteratively re-weighted multivariate alteration detection (IR-MAD) algorithm may be used both for unsuper- vised change detection in multi- and hyperspectral remote sensing imagery as well as for automatic radiometric normalization of multi- or hypervariate multitemporal image sequences...... code exists which allows for fast data exploration and experimentation with smaller datasets. Computationally demanding kernelization of test data with training data and kernel image projections have been programmed to run on massively parallel CUDA-enabled graphics processors, when available, giving....... Principal component analysis (PCA) as well as maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) and minimum noise fraction (MNF) analyses of IR-MAD images, both linear and kernel-based (which are nonlinear), may further enhance change signals relative to no-change background. The kernel versions are based on a dual...

  17. Anthropogenic climate change detected in European renewable freshwater resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, Lukas; Seneviratne, Sonia I.; Zhang, Xuebin

    2017-11-01

    Although there is overwhelming evidence showing that human emissions are affecting a wide range of atmospheric variables, it is not clear whether anthropogenic climate change is detectable in continental-scale freshwater resources. Owing to the complexity of terrestrial hydro-systems there is to date only limited evidence suggesting that climate change has altered river discharge in specific regions. Here we show that it is likely that anthropogenic emissions have left a detectable fingerprint in renewable freshwater resources in Europe. We use the detection and attribution approach to compare river-flow observations with state-of-the-art climate model simulations. The analysis shows that the previously observed amplification of the south (dry)-north (wet) contrast in pan-European river flow is captured by climate models only if human emissions are accounted for, although the models significantly underestimate the response. A regional analysis highlights that a strong and significant decrease is observed in the Mediterranean, generally along with a weak increase in northern Europe, whereas there is little change in transitional central Europe. As river and streamflow are indicators for renewable freshwater resources, the results highlight the necessity of raising awareness on climate change projections that indicate increasing water scarcity in southern Europe.

  18. Change detection in a series of Sentinel-1 SAR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Conradsen, Knut; Skriver, Henning

    2017-01-01

    Based on an omnibus likelihood ratio test statistic for the equality of several variance-covariance matrices following the complex Wishart distribution with an associated p-value and a factorization of this test statistic, change analysis in a time series of seven multilook, dual polarization Sen...... Sentinel-1 SAR data in the covariance matrix representation (with diagonal elements only) is carried out. The omnibus test statistic and its factorization detect if and when change occurs. http://www.imm.dtu.dk/pubdb/p.php?6982....

  19. Discontinuity Detection for Analysis of Telerobot Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Kiwon; Ellis, Stephen R.; Adelstein, Bernard D.

    2013-01-01

    To identify spatial and temporal discontinuities in telerobot movement in order to describe the shift in operators control and error correction strategies from continuous control to move-and-wait strategies. This shift was studied under conditions of simulated increasingly time-delayed teleoperation. The ultimate goal is to determine if the time delay associated with the shift is invariant with independently imposed control difficulty. We expect this shift to manifest itself as changes in the number of discontinuity of movement path. We proposed an approach to spatial and temporal discontinuity detection algorithm for analysis of teleoperated trajectory in three dimensional space. The algorithm provides a simple and potentially objective method for detecting the discontinuity during telerobot operation and evaluating the difficulty of rotational coordinate condition in teleoperation.

  20. Potential fire detection based on Kalman-driven change detection

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Den Bergh, F

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A new active fire event detection algorithm for data collected with the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) sensor, based on the extended Kalman filter, is introduced. Instead of using the observed temperatures of the spatial...

  1. Detecting changes in real-time data: a user's guide to optimal detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P; Moriarty, J; Peskir, G

    2017-08-13

    The real-time detection of changes in a noisily observed signal is an important problem in applied science and engineering. The study of parametric optimal detection theory began in the 1930s, motivated by applications in production and defence. Today this theory, which aims to minimize a given measure of detection delay under accuracy constraints, finds applications in domains including radar, sonar, seismic activity, global positioning, psychological testing, quality control, communications and power systems engineering. This paper reviews developments in optimal detection theory and sequential analysis, including sequential hypothesis testing and change-point detection, in both Bayesian and classical (non-Bayesian) settings. For clarity of exposition, we work in discrete time and provide a brief discussion of the continuous time setting, including recent developments using stochastic calculus. Different measures of detection delay are presented, together with the corresponding optimal solutions. We emphasize the important role of the signal-to-noise ratio and discuss both the underlying assumptions and some typical applications for each formulation.This article is part of the themed issue 'Energy management: flexibility, risk and optimization'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  2. Global scene layout modulates contextual learning in change detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conci, Markus; Müller, Hermann J

    2014-01-01

    Change in the visual scene often goes unnoticed - a phenomenon referred to as "change blindness." This study examined whether the hierarchical structure, i.e., the global-local layout of a scene can influence performance in a one-shot change detection paradigm. To this end, natural scenes of a laid breakfast table were presented, and observers were asked to locate the onset of a new local object. Importantly, the global structure of the scene was manipulated by varying the relations among objects in the scene layouts. The very same items were either presented as global-congruent (typical) layouts or as global-incongruent (random) arrangements. Change blindness was less severe for congruent than for incongruent displays, and this congruency benefit increased with the duration of the experiment. These findings show that global layouts are learned, supporting detection of local changes with enhanced efficiency. However, performance was not affected by scene congruency in a subsequent control experiment that required observers to localize a static discontinuity (i.e., an object that was missing from the repeated layouts). Our results thus show that learning of the global layout is particularly linked to the local objects. Taken together, our results reveal an effect of "global precedence" in natural scenes. We suggest that relational properties within the hierarchy of a natural scene are governed, in particular, by global image analysis, reducing change blindness for local objects through scene learning.

  3. Change point analysis and assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Sabine; Neergaard, Helle; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to develop an analytical framework for studying processes such as continuous innovation and business development in high-tech SME clusters that transcends the traditional qualitative-quantitative divide. It integrates four existing and well-recognized approaches to stud...... to studying events, processes and change, mamely change-point analysis, event-history analysis, critical-incident technique and sequence analysis....

  4. LU/LC Change Detection and Forest Degradation Analysis in Dalma Wildlife Sanctuary Using 3S Technology: A Case Study in Jamshedpur-India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Kumar Ranjan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Geo-informatics technology has dynamic role in mapping, monitoring and management of forest resources. The transformation of forest cover and its analysis on the earth’s surface are essential for understanding the associations and interactions between natural phenomena and living organism, especially human. Also deforestation is a major reason for global warming and one of the origin keys for the enhancement of greenhouse effect and climate change. The present study is grounded on the 3S technology in assessment of LU/LC changes within the forest cover area in Dalma Wildlife Sanctuary (DWLS Jamshedpur-Jharkhand, India. The movement of forest-cover variation over the years 2009, 2011, 2013, 2015 and 2016 is precisely studied using high resolution Satellite Data (SD. It is noted that, due to shifting cultivation, forest fire, and conversion of forest cover into crop land/bare land and settlement encroachments in forest region by villagers are rapidly increasing; as a result deforestation is taking place. It is predicted that the study would demonstrate the effectiveness of 3S technology in forest renovation, planning and management.

  5. Statistical Similarity Based Change Detection for Multitemporal Remote Sensing Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumu Aktar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Change detection (CD of any surface using multitemporal remote sensing images is an important research topic since up-to-date information about earth surface is of great value. Abrupt changes are occurring in different earth surfaces due to natural disasters or man-made activities which cause damage to that place. Therefore, it is necessary to observe the changes for taking necessary steps to recover the subsequent damage. This paper is concerned with this issue and analyzes statistical similarity measure to perform CD using remote sensing images of the same scene taken at two different dates. A variation of normalized mutual information (NMI as a similarity measure has been developed here using sliding window of different sizes. In sliding window approach, pixels’ local neighborhood plays a significant role in computing the similarity compared to the whole image. Thus the insignificant global characteristics containing noise and sparse samples can be avoided when evaluating the probability density function. Therefore, NMI with different window sizes is proposed here to identify changes using multitemporal data. Experiments have been carried out using two separate multitemporal remote sensing images captured one year apart and one month apart, respectively. Experimental analysis reveals that the proposed technique can detect up to 97.71% of changes which outperforms the traditional approaches.

  6. A structural framework for anomalous change detection and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Lakshman [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Theiler, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We present a spatially adaptive scheme for automatically searching a pair of images of a scene for unusual and interesting changes. Our motivation is to bring into play structural aspects of image features alongside the spectral attributes used for anomalous change detection (ACD). We leverage a small but informative subset of pixels, namely edge pixels of the images, as anchor points of a Delaunay triangulation to jointly decompose the images into a set of triangular regions, called trixels, which are spectrally uniform. Such decomposition helps in image regularization by simple-function approximation on a feature-adaptive grid. Applying ACD to this trixel grid instead of pixels offers several advantages. It allows: (1) edge-preserving smoothing of images, (2) speed-up of spatial computations by significantly reducing the representation of the images, and (3) the easy recovery of structure of the detected anomalous changes by associating anomalous trixels with polygonal image features. The latter facility further enables the application of shape-theoretic criteria and algorithms to characterize the changes and recognize them as interesting or not. This incorporation of spatial information has the potential to filter out some spurious changes, such as due to parallax, shadows, and misregistration, by identifying and filtering out those that are structurally similar and spatially pervasive. Our framework supports the joint spatial and spectral analysis of images, potentially enabling the design of more robust ACD algorithms.

  7. Minimal changes in health status questionnaires: distinction between minimally detectable change and minimally important change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knol Dirk L

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Changes in scores on health status questionnaires are difficult to interpret. Several methods to determine minimally important changes (MICs have been proposed which can broadly be divided in distribution-based and anchor-based methods. Comparisons of these methods have led to insight into essential differences between these approaches. Some authors have tried to come to a uniform measure for the MIC, such as 0.5 standard deviation and the value of one standard error of measurement (SEM. Others have emphasized the diversity of MIC values, depending on the type of anchor, the definition of minimal importance on the anchor, and characteristics of the disease under study. A closer look makes clear that some distribution-based methods have been merely focused on minimally detectable changes. For assessing minimally important changes, anchor-based methods are preferred, as they include a definition of what is minimally important. Acknowledging the distinction between minimally detectable and minimally important changes is useful, not only to avoid confusion among MIC methods, but also to gain information on two important benchmarks on the scale of a health status measurement instrument. Appreciating the distinction, it becomes possible to judge whether the minimally detectable change of a measurement instrument is sufficiently small to detect minimally important changes.

  8. Detecting holocene changes in thermohaline circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keigwin, L D; Boyle, E A

    2000-02-15

    Throughout the last glacial cycle, reorganizations of deep ocean water masses were coincident with rapid millennial-scale changes in climate. Climate changes have been less severe during the present interglacial, but evidence for concurrent deep ocean circulation change is ambiguous.

  9. Vibration-based monitoring to detect mass changes in satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Arup; Vernon, Breck

    2012-04-01

    Vibration-based structural health monitoring could be a useful form of determining the health and safety of space structures. A particular concern is the possibility of a foreign object that attaches itself to a satellite in orbit for adverse reasons. A frequency response analysis was used to determine the changes in mass and moment of inertia of the space structure based on a change in the natural frequencies of the structure or components of the structure. Feasibility studies were first conducted on a 7 in x 19 in aluminum plate with various boundary conditions. Effect of environmental conditions on the frequency response was determined. The baseline frequency response for the plate was then used as the basis for detection of the addition, and possibly the location, of added masses on the plate. The test results were compared to both analytical solutions and finite element models created in SAP2000. The testing was subsequently expanded to aluminum alloy satellite panels and a mock satellite with dummy payloads. Statistical analysis was conducted on variations of frequency due to added mass and thermal changes to determine the threshold of added mass that can be detected.

  10. Detecting impossible changes in infancy: a three-system account

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Su-hua; Baillargeon, Renée

    2012-01-01

    Can infants detect that an object has magically disappeared, broken apart or changed color while briefly hidden? Recent research suggests that infants detect some but not other ‘impossible’ changes; and that various contextual manipulations can induce infants to detect changes they would not otherwise detect. We present an account that includes three systems: a physical-reasoning, an object-tracking, and an object-representation system. What impossible changes infants detect depends on what object information is included in the physical-reasoning system; this information becomes subject to a principle of persistence, which states that objects can undergo no spontaneous or uncaused change. What contextual manipulations induce infants to detect impossible changes depends on complex interplays between the physical-reasoning system and the object-tracking and object-representation systems. PMID:18078778

  11. Traffic sign detection and analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelmose, Andreas; Trivedi, Mohan M.; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    Traffic sign recognition (TSR) is a research field that has seen much activity in the recent decade. This paper introduces the problem and presents 4 recent papers on traffic sign detection and 4 recent papers on traffic sign classification. It attempts to extract recent trends in the field and t...

  12. Detection and analysis of CRISPRs of Shigella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiangjiao; Wang, Yingfang; Duan, Guangcai; Xue, Zerun; Wang, Linlin; Wang, Pengfei; Qiu, Shaofu; Xi, Yuanlin; Yang, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    The recently discovered CRISPRs (Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) and Cas (CRISPR-associated) proteins are a novel genetic barrier that limits horizontal gene transfer in prokaryotes and the CRISPR loci provide a historical view of the exposure of prokaryotes to a variety of foreign genetic elements. The aim of study was to investigate the occurrence and distribution of the CRISPRs in Shigella. A collection of 61 strains of Shigella were screened for the existence of CRISPRs. Three CRISPR loci were identified among 61 shigella strains. CRISPR1/cas loci are detected in 49 strains of shigella. Yet, IS elements were detected in cas gene in some strains. In the remaining 12 Shigella flexneri strains, the CRISPR1/cas locus is deleted and only a cas3' pseudo gene and a repeat sequence are present. The presence of CRISPR2 is frequently accompanied by the emergence of CRISPR1. CRISPR3 loci were present in almost all strains (52/61). The length of CRISPR arrays varied from 1 to 9 spacers. Sequence analysis of the CRISPR arrays revealed that few spacers had matches in the GenBank databases. However, one spacer in CRISPR3 loci matches the cognate cas3 genes and no cas gene was present around CRISPR3 region. Analysis of CRISPR sequences show that CRISPR have little change which makes CRISPR poor genotyping markers. The present study is the first attempt to determine and analyze CRISPRs of shigella isolated from clinical patients.

  13. A robust anomaly based change detection method for time-series remote sensing images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoujing, Yin; Qiao, Wang; Chuanqing, Wu; Xiaoling, Chen; Wandong, Ma; Huiqin, Mao

    2014-03-01

    Time-series remote sensing images record changes happening on the earth surface, which include not only abnormal changes like human activities and emergencies (e.g. fire, drought, insect pest etc.), but also changes caused by vegetation phenology and climate changes. Yet, challenges occur in analyzing global environment changes and even the internal forces. This paper proposes a robust Anomaly Based Change Detection method (ABCD) for time-series images analysis by detecting abnormal points in data sets, which do not need to follow a normal distribution. With ABCD we can detect when and where changes occur, which is the prerequisite condition of global change studies. ABCD was tested initially with 10-day SPOT VGT NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) times series tracking land cover type changes, seasonality and noise, then validated to real data in a large area in Jiangxi, south of China. Initial results show that ABCD can precisely detect spatial and temporal changes from long time series images rapidly.

  14. A robust anomaly based change detection method for time-series remote sensing images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoujing, Yin; Qiao, Wang; Chuanqing, Wu; Wandong, Ma; Huiqin, Mao; Xiaoling, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Time-series remote sensing images record changes happening on the earth surface, which include not only abnormal changes like human activities and emergencies (e.g. fire, drought, insect pest etc.), but also changes caused by vegetation phenology and climate changes. Yet, challenges occur in analyzing global environment changes and even the internal forces. This paper proposes a robust Anomaly Based Change Detection method (ABCD) for time-series images analysis by detecting abnormal points in data sets, which do not need to follow a normal distribution. With ABCD we can detect when and where changes occur, which is the prerequisite condition of global change studies. ABCD was tested initially with 10-day SPOT VGT NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) times series tracking land cover type changes, seasonality and noise, then validated to real data in a large area in Jiangxi, south of China. Initial results show that ABCD can precisely detect spatial and temporal changes from long time series images rapidly

  15. Towards Operational Detection of Forest Ecosystem Changes in Protected Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Tarantino

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the application of the Cross-Correlation Analysis (CCA technique to multi-spatial resolution Earth Observation (EO data for detecting and quantifying changes in forest ecosystems in two different protected areas, located in Southern Italy and Southern India. The input data for CCA investigation were elaborated from the forest layer extracted from an existing Land Cover/Land Use (LC/LU map (time T1 and a more recent (T2, with T2 > T1 single date image. The latter consist of a High Resolution (HR Landsat 8 OLI image and a Very High Resolution (VHR Worldview-2 image, which were analysed separately. For the Italian site, the forest layer (1:5000 was first compared to the HR Landsat 8 OLI image and then to the VHR Worldview-2 image. For the Indian site, the forest layer (1:50,000 was compared to the Landsat 8 OLI image then the changes were interpreted using Worldview-2. The changes detected through CCA, at HR only, were compared against those detected by applying a traditional NDVI image differencing technique of two Landsat scenes at T1 and T2. The accuracy assessment, concerning the change maps of the multi-spatial resolution outputs, was based on stratified random sampling. The CCA technique allowed an increase in the value of the overall accuracy: from 52% to 68% for the Italian site and from 63% to 82% for the Indian site. In addition, a significant reduction of the error affecting the stratified changed area estimation for both sites was obtained. For the Italian site, the error reduction became significant at VHR (±2 ha in respect to HR (±32 ha even though both techniques had comparable overall accuracy (82% and stratified changed area estimation. The findings obtained support the conclusions that CCA technique can be a useful tool to detect and quantify changes in forest areas due to both legal and illegal interventions, including relatively inaccessible sites (e.g., tropical forest with costs remaining rather low. The

  16. Occupancy change detection system and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruemmer, David J [Idaho Falls, ID; Few, Douglas A [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-01

    A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller. The system controller executes instructions for producing an occupancy grid map of an environment around the robot, scanning the environment to generate a current obstacle map relative to a current robot position, and converting the current obstacle map to a current occupancy grid map. The instructions also include processing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map. Within the processing of each grid cell, the instructions include comparing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map to a corresponding grid cell in the current occupancy grid map. For grid cells with a difference, the instructions include defining a change vector for each changed grid cell, wherein the change vector includes a direction from the robot to the changed grid cell and a range from the robot to the changed grid cell.

  17. Leading change: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson-Brantley, Heather V; Ford, Debra J

    2017-04-01

    To report an analysis of the concept of leading change. Nurses have been called to lead change to advance the health of individuals, populations, and systems. Conceptual clarity about leading change in the context of nursing and healthcare systems provides an empirical direction for future research and theory development that can advance the science of leadership studies in nursing. Concept analysis. CINAHL, PubMed, PsycINFO, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection, Health Business Elite and Business Source Premier databases were searched using the terms: leading change, transformation, reform, leadership and change. Literature published in English from 2001 - 2015 in the fields of nursing, medicine, organizational studies, business, education, psychology or sociology were included. Walker and Avant's method was used to identify descriptions, antecedents, consequences and empirical referents of the concept. Model, related and contrary cases were developed. Five defining attributes of leading change were identified: (a) individual and collective leadership; (b) operational support; (c) fostering relationships; (d) organizational learning; and (e) balance. Antecedents were external or internal driving forces and organizational readiness. The consequences of leading change included improved organizational performance and outcomes and new organizational culture and values. A theoretical definition and conceptual model of leading change were developed. Future studies that use and test the model may contribute to the refinement of a middle-range theory to advance nursing leadership research and education. From this, empirically derived interventions that prepare and enable nurses to lead change to advance health may be realized. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Explicit behavioral detection of visual changes develops without their implicit neurophysiological detectability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pessi eLyyra

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Change blindness is a failure of explicitly detecting changes between consecutively presented images when separated, e.g., by a brief blank screen. There is a growing body of evidence of implicit detection of even explicitly undetectable changes, pointing to the possibility of the implicit change detection as a prerequisite for its explicit counterpart. We recorded event-related potentials (ERPs of the electroencephalography in adults during an oddball-variant of change blindness flicker paradigm. In this variant, rare pictures with a change were interspersed with frequent pictures with no change. In separate stimulus blocks, the blank screen between the change and no-change picture was either of 100 ms or 500 ms in duration. In both stimulus conditions the participants eventually explicitly detect the changed pictures, the blank screen of the longer duration only requiring in average 10 % longer exposure to the picture series until the ability emerged. However, during the change blindness, ERPs were displaced towards negative polarity at 200–260 ms after the stimulus onset (visual mismatch negativity only with the blank screens of the shorter ISI. Our finding of ‘implicit change blindness’ for pictorial material that, nevertheless, successfully prepares the visual system for explicit change detection suggests that implicit change detection may not be a necessary condition for explicit change detection and that they may recruit at least partially distinct memory mechanisms.

  19. Change Detection Algorithm for the Production of Land Cover Change Maps over the European Union Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Aleksandrowicz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary satellite Earth Observation systems provide growing amounts of very high spatial resolution data that can be used in various applications. An increasing number of sensors make it possible to monitor selected areas in great detail. However, in order to handle the volume of data, a high level of automation is required. The semi-automatic change detection methodology described in this paper was developed to annually update land cover maps prepared in the context of the Geoland2. The proposed algorithm was tailored to work with different very high spatial resolution images acquired over different European landscapes. The methodology is a fusion of various change detection methods ranging from: (1 layer arithmetic; (2 vegetation indices (NDVI differentiating; (3 texture calculation; and methods based on (4 canonical correlation analysis (multivariate alteration detection (MAD. User intervention during the production of the change map is limited to the selection of the input data, the size of initial segments and the threshold for texture classification (optionally. To achieve a high level of automation, statistical thresholds were applied in most of the processing steps. Tests showed an overall change recognition accuracy of 89%, and the change type classification methodology can accurately classify transitions between classes.

  20. Landuse and Landcover Change Detection in the Kainji Lake Basin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The two main methods of change detection that were used were area calculations (trends, rates and proportion), and overlay for the nature and the location of the changes. The study revealed that about 71.92% of the area has been subjected to changes, while, 28.08% had not been subjected to any changes. Within the ...

  1. Stochastic Change Detection based on an Active Fault Diagnosis Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2007-01-01

    The focus in this paper is on stochastic change detection applied in connection with active fault diagnosis (AFD). An auxiliary input signal is applied in AFD. This signal injection in the system will in general allow to obtain a fast change detection/isolation by considering the output or an error...

  2. Hyperspectral Data, Change Detection and the MAD Transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Müller, Andreas; Dorigo, Wouter

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with the application of the MAD transformation to change detection in bi-tempotal hyperspectral data. Several processing schemes are proposed in order to facilitate both the actual change detection, the many variables involved and the spatial nature of the data....

  3. Geocentric position preliminary detection from the extreme ultraviolet images of Chang'E-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chen; Ping, Jinsong; Wang, Mingyuan; Li, Wenxiao

    2015-08-01

    An Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) Camera was installed onboard the Chinese lunar surface landing mission, the Chang'E-3 lander, as a useful method to observe the Earth plasmasphere. This EUV optical payload obtained more than 600 moon-based Earth plasmasphere images since December 14, 2013. However, due to errors of unknown size and origin in the platform attitude control of the lander and in the EUV telescope pointing control during the mission operating periods, the geocentric coordinates in these EUV images are not fixed in the same position of CCD pixel. Before adequately calibrating, these positioning offsets will introduce extra errors into the analysis of the plasmaspheric structure. With only a little insufficient telemetry information, an effective calibrating method of circle-based differential algorithm is suggested and demonstrated, for automatically and precisely detecting the geocentric position in each EUV image of Chang'E-3 mission. In each EUV image, the tested method uses the outline of a circle as the basic unit to capture the contour for the bright region based on the spectral characteristic. Then, the center of the extracted circle is adopted as the geocentric position for the image. The preliminary analysis shows that this method can effectively detect the geocentric position being always consistent with the recognition result by the basic hand labor method. It is found that the radius of the circles varies from month to month from December, 2013 to May, 2014. The monthly averages of radius show relative notable positive correlation and negative correlation with the changes of both Zenith angle of the Earth at the landing area of Chang'E-3 lander, and the Earth-moon distance, respectively. This method and results here will benefit the Chang'E-3 EUV study.

  4. Elastic recoil detection analysis of ferroelectric films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stannard, W.B.; Johnston, P.N.; Walker, S.R.; Bubb, I.F. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia); Scott, J.F. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia); Cohen, D.D.; Dytlewski, N. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    There has been considerable progress in developing SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} (SBT) and Ba{sub O.7}Sr{sub O.3}TiO{sub 3} (BST) ferroelectric films for use as nonvolatile memory chips and for capacitors in dynamic random access memories (DRAMs). Ferroelectric materials have a very large dielectric constant ( {approx} 1000), approximately one hundred times greater than that of silicon dioxide. Devices made from these materials have been known to experience breakdown after a repeated voltage pulsing. It has been suggested that this is related to stoichiometric changes within the material. To accurately characterise these materials Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) is being developed. This technique employs a high energy heavy ion beam to eject nuclei from the target and uses a time of flight and energy dispersive (ToF-E) detector telescope to detect these nuclei. The recoil nuclei carry both energy and mass information which enables the determination of separate energy spectra for individual elements or for small groups of elements In this work ERDA employing 77 MeV {sup 127}I ions has been used to analyse Strontium Bismuth Tantalate thin films at the heavy ion recoil facility at ANSTO, Lucas Heights. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  5. GNSS Spoofing Detection Based on Signal Power Measurements: Statistical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Dehghanian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A threat to GNSS receivers is posed by a spoofing transmitter that emulates authentic signals but with randomized code phase and Doppler values over a small range. Such spoofing signals can result in large navigational solution errors that are passed onto the unsuspecting user with potentially dire consequences. An effective spoofing detection technique is developed in this paper, based on signal power measurements and that can be readily applied to present consumer grade GNSS receivers with minimal firmware changes. An extensive statistical analysis is carried out based on formulating a multihypothesis detection problem. Expressions are developed to devise a set of thresholds required for signal detection and identification. The detection processing methods developed are further manipulated to exploit incidental antenna motion arising from user interaction with a GNSS handheld receiver to further enhance the detection performance of the proposed algorithm. The statistical analysis supports the effectiveness of the proposed spoofing detection technique under various multipath conditions.

  6. The Data Analysis in Gravitational Wave Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-ge; Lebigot, Eric; Du, Zhi-hui; Cao, Jun-wei; Wang, Yun-yong; Zhang, Fan; Cai, Yong-zhi; Li, Mu-zi; Zhu, Zong-hong; Qian, Jin; Yin, Cong; Wang, Jian-bo; Zhao, Wen; Zhang, Yang; Blair, David; Ju, Li; Zhao, Chun-nong; Wen, Lin-qing

    2017-01-01

    Gravitational wave (GW) astronomy based on the GW detection is a rising interdisciplinary field, and a new window for humanity to observe the universe, followed after the traditional astronomy with the electromagnetic waves as the detection means, it has a quite important significance for studying the origin and evolution of the universe, and for extending the astronomical research field. The appearance of laser interferometer GW detector has opened a new era of GW detection, and the data processing and analysis of GWs have already been developed quickly around the world, to provide a sharp weapon for the GW astronomy. This paper introduces systematically the tool software that commonly used for the data analysis of GWs, and discusses in detail the basic methods used in the data analysis of GWs, such as the time-frequency analysis, composite analysis, pulsar timing analysis, matched filter, template, χ2 test, and Monte-Carlo simulation, etc.

  7. Initial Analyses of Change Detection Capabilities and Data Redundancies in the Long Term Resource Monitoring Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lubinski, Kenneth

    2001-01-01

    ... in six trend analysis areas. Initial emphasis was placed on evaluating statistical power to detect change from one year or sampling interval to the next, and on determining what spatial, methodological, or target variable...

  8. Regularisation in multi- and hyperspectral remote sensing change detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2005-01-01

    Change detection methods for multi- and hypervariate data look for differences in data acquired over the same area at different points in time. These differences may be due to noise or differences in (atmospheric etc.) conditions at the two acquisition time points. To prevent a change detection...... method from detecting uninteresting change due to noise or arbitrary spurious differences the application of regularisation also known as penalisation is considered to be important. Two types of regularisation in change detected by the multivariate alteration detection (MAD) transformation are considered......: 1) ridge regression type and smoothing operators applied to the estimated weights in the MAD transform; and 2) pre-processing (before applying the MAD transformation) by noise reducing orthogonal transformations where the number of retained transformed variables can be considered a regularisation...

  9. Crack Detection with Lamb Wave Wavenumber Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Rogge, Matt; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we present our study of Lamb wave crack detection using wavenumber analysis. The aim is to demonstrate the application of wavenumber analysis to 3D Lamb wave data to enable damage detection. The 3D wavefields (including vx, vy and vz components) in time-space domain contain a wealth of information regarding the propagating waves in a damaged plate. For crack detection, three wavenumber analysis techniques are used: (i) two dimensional Fourier transform (2D-FT) which can transform the time-space wavefield into frequency-wavenumber representation while losing the spatial information; (ii) short space 2D-FT which can obtain the frequency-wavenumber spectra at various spatial locations, resulting in a space-frequency-wavenumber representation; (iii) local wavenumber analysis which can provide the distribution of the effective wavenumbers at different locations. All of these concepts are demonstrated through a numerical simulation example of an aluminum plate with a crack. The 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) was used to obtain the 3D wavefields, of which the vz (out-of-plane) wave component is compared with the experimental measurement obtained from a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) for verification purposes. The experimental and simulated results are found to be in close agreement. The application of wavenumber analysis on 3D EFIT simulation data shows the effectiveness of the analysis for crack detection. Keywords: : Lamb wave, crack detection, wavenumber analysis, EFIT modeling

  10. Change Point Detection with Robust Control Chart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng Kooi Huat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring a process over time using a control chart allows quick detection of unusual states. In phase I, some historical process data, assumed to come from an in-control process, are used to construct the control limits. In Phase II, the process is monitored for an ongoing basis using control limits from Phase I. In Phase II, observations falling outside the control limits or unusual patterns of observations signal that the process has shifted from in-control process settings. Such signals trigger a search for assignable cause and, if the cause is found, corrective action will be implemented to prevent its recurrence. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new methodology appropriate for constructing a robust control chart when a nonnormal or a contaminated data that may arise in phase I state. Through extensive Monte Carlo simulations, we examine the behaviors and performances of the proposed MM robust control chart when there is a process shift in mean.

  11. Automatic change detection and quantification of dermatological diseases with an application to psoriasis images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomez, David Delgado; Butakoff, C.; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2007-01-01

    Change monitoring in skin lesion analysis has proven to be a useful adjunct in their assessment. This article presents a comparative study of the available change detection techniques applied to change visualization and quantification in bi-temporal psoriasis images. The chosen methods are evalua...

  12. Diagnosis of Wing Icing Through Lift and Drag Coefficient Change Detection for Small Unmanned Aircraft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kim Lynge; Blanke, Mogens; Johansen, Tor Arne

    2015-01-01

    This paper address the issue of structural change, caused by ice accretion, on UAVs by utilising a Neyman Pearson (NP) based statistical change detection approach, for the identification of structural changes of fixed wing UAV airfoils. A structural analysis is performed on the nonlinear aircraft...

  13. [Microvolt T-wave alternans as a novel method of analysis of changes of repolarization phase and detection of latent electrical instability of the myocardium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatarinova, A A; Treshkur, T V; Parmon, E V

    2011-01-01

    This review considers of modern concepts of microvolt T-wave alternans (TWA): its pathophysiological basis at cellular level, particulars of quantitative analysis of TWA, modulating effects of autonomic nervous system and drugs, prognostic efficacy in predicting susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmia in comparison with other modern prognostic factors of sudden cardiac death.

  14. Improved change detection with local co-registration adjustments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohlberg, Brendt E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Theiler, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a simple approach for compensating for residual misregistration error on the performance of anomalous change detection algorithms. Using real data with a simulation framework for anomalous change and with a real anomalous change, we illustrate the approach and investigate its effectiveness.

  15. Detecting Forest Cover and Ecosystem Service Change Using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    change detection process. The primary goal of data transformation is to help reveal changes in surface reflectance and results from this step are used to map change. The techniques used in this study included; pre-classification image processing, and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index. (NDVI) differencing.

  16. Perspective Effects during Reading: Evidence from Text Change-Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohan, Jason; Filik, Ruth

    2018-01-01

    We report two text change-detection studies in which we investigate the influence of reading perspective on text memory. In Experiment 1 participants read from the perspective of one of two characters in a series of short stories, and word changes were either semantically close or distant. Participants correctly reported more changes to…

  17. Measurement Bias Detection through Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barendse, M. T.; Oort, F. J.; Werner, C. S.; Ligtvoet, R.; Schermelleh-Engel, K.

    2012-01-01

    Measurement bias is defined as a violation of measurement invariance, which can be investigated through multigroup factor analysis (MGFA), by testing across-group differences in intercepts (uniform bias) and factor loadings (nonuniform bias). Restricted factor analysis (RFA) can also be used to detect measurement bias. To also enable nonuniform…

  18. Spatiotemporal Change Detection Using Landsat Imagery: the Case Study of Karacabey Flooded Forest, Bursa, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, A. E.; Gencal, B.; Taş, İ.

    2017-11-01

    This short paper aims to detect spatiotemporal detection of land use/land cover change within Karacabey Flooded Forest region. Change detection analysis applied to Landsat 5 TM images representing July 2000 and a Landsat 8 OLI representing June 2017. Various image processing tools were implemented using ERDAS 9.2, ArcGIS 10.4.1, and ENVI programs to conduct spatiotemporal change detection over these two images such as band selection, corrections, subset, classification, recoding, accuracy assessment, and change detection analysis. Image classification revealed that there are five significant land use/land cover types, including forest, flooded forest, swamp, water, and other lands (i.e. agriculture, sand, roads, settlement, and open areas). The results indicated that there was increase in flooded forest, water, and other lands, while the cover of forest and swamp decreased.

  19. Social network analysis community detection and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Missaoui, Rokia

    2015-01-01

    This book is devoted to recent progress in social network analysis with a high focus on community detection and evolution. The eleven chapters cover the identification of cohesive groups, core components and key players either in static or dynamic networks of different kinds and levels of heterogeneity. Other important topics in social network analysis such as influential detection and maximization, information propagation, user behavior analysis, as well as network modeling and visualization are also presented. Many studies are validated through real social networks such as Twitter. This edit

  20. Multitemporal analysis of Landsat images to detect land use land cover changes for monitoring soil sealing in the Nola area (Naples, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Giglio, Michaela; Allocca, Maria; Franci, Francesca

    2016-10-01

    Land Use Land Cover Changes (LULCC) data provide objective information to support environmental policy, urban planning purposes and sustainable land development. Understanding of past land use/cover practices and current landscape patterns is critical to assess the effects of LULCC on the Earth system. Within the framework of soil sealing in Italy, the present study aims to assess the LULCC of the Nola area (Naples metropolitan area, Italy), relating to a thirty year period from 1984 to 2015. The urban sprawl affects this area causing the impervious surface increase, the loss in rural areas and landscape fragmentation. Located near Vesuvio volcano and crossed by artificial filled rivers, the study area is subject to landslide, hydraulic and volcanic risks. Landsat time series has been processed by means of the supervised per-pixel classification in order to produce multitemporal Land Use Land Cover maps. Then, post-classification comparison approach has been applied to quantify the changes occurring between 1984 and 2015, also analyzing the intermediate variations in 1999, namely every fifteen years. The results confirm the urban sprawl. The increase of the built-up areas mainly causes the habitat fragmentation and the agricultural land conversion of the Nola area that is already damaged by unauthorized disposal of urban waste. Moreover, considering the local risk maps, it was verified that some of the new urban areas were built over known hazardous sites. In order to limit the soil sealing, urgent measures and sustainable urban planning are required.

  1. Regional climate change mitigation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowlands, Ian H. [UNEP Collaborating Centre on Energy and Environment, and Univ. of Waterloo (Canada)

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore some of the key methodological issues that arise from an analysis of regional climate change mitigation options. The rationale for any analysis of regional mitigation activities, emphasising both the theoretical attractiveness and the existing political encouragement and the methodology that has been developed are reviewed. The differences arising from the fact that mitigation analyses have been taken from the level of the national - where the majority of the work has been completed to date - to the level of the international - that is, the `regional` - will be especially highlighted. (EG)

  2. Regional climate change mitigation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowlands, Ian H.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore some of the key methodological issues that arise from an analysis of regional climate change mitigation options. The rationale for any analysis of regional mitigation activities, emphasising both the theoretical attractiveness and the existing political encouragement and the methodology that has been developed are reviewed. The differences arising from the fact that mitigation analyses have been taken from the level of the national - where the majority of the work has been completed to date - to the level of the international - that is, the 'regional' - will be especially highlighted. (EG)

  3. Segment-based change detection for polarimetric SAR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Henning; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Conradsen, Knut

    2006-01-01

    single-channel SAR images but multi-channel algorithms have also been described. Different approaches have been used for image segmentation. Edge detection combined with region growing is one approach, where segments are created by growing regions from a previously edge detected and edge thinned image....... This method relies primarily on a robust edge detector, which preferably provides a constant false alarm rate. For single-channel SAR images this is fulfilled by the ratio edge detector, and for polarimetric SAR data, an edge detector based on the above mentioned test statistic fulfils this. Another approach......, wetlands, lakes, and urban areas. Also, other test sites over for instance urban areas have been used to assess the improvement by the segment-based change detection method. In the paper, results from pixel-based change detection, i.e. without segmentation, and from segment-based change detection, where...

  4. Parametric statistical change point analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Jie

    2000-01-01

    This work is an in-depth study of the change point problem from a general point of view and a further examination of change point analysis of the most commonly used statistical models Change point problems are encountered in such disciplines as economics, finance, medicine, psychology, signal processing, and geology, to mention only several The exposition is clear and systematic, with a great deal of introductory material included Different models are presented in each chapter, including gamma and exponential models, rarely examined thus far in the literature Other models covered in detail are the multivariate normal, univariate normal, regression, and discrete models Extensive examples throughout the text emphasize key concepts and different methodologies are used, namely the likelihood ratio criterion, and the Bayesian and information criterion approaches A comprehensive bibliography and two indices complete the study

  5. Detecting and Attributing Health Burdens to Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebi, Kristie L; Ogden, Nicholas H; Semenza, Jan C; Woodward, Alistair

    2017-08-07

    Detection and attribution of health impacts caused by climate change uses formal methods to determine a ) whether the occurrence of adverse health outcomes has changed, and b ) the extent to which that change could be attributed to climate change. There have been limited efforts to undertake detection and attribution analyses in health. Our goal was to show a range of approaches for conducting detection and attribution analyses. Case studies for heatwaves, Lyme disease in Canada, and Vibrio emergence in northern Europe highlight evidence that climate change is adversely affecting human health. Changes in rates and geographic distribution of adverse health outcomes were detected, and, in each instance, a proportion of the observed changes could, in our judgment, be attributed to changes in weather patterns associated with climate change. The results of detection and attribution studies can inform evidence-based risk management to reduce current, and plan for future, changes in health risks associated with climate change. Gaining a better understanding of the size, timing, and distribution of the climate change burden of disease and injury requires reliable long-term data sets, more knowledge about the factors that confound and modify the effects of climate on health, and refinement of analytic techniques for detection and attribution. At the same time, significant advances are possible in the absence of complete data and statistical certainty: there is a place for well-informed judgments, based on understanding of underlying processes and matching of patterns of health, climate, and other determinants of human well-being. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1509.

  6. External phenome analysis enables a rational federated query strategy to detect changing rates of treatment-related complications associated with multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Jeremy L; Alterovitz, Gil; Bodio, Kelly; Joyce, Robin M

    2013-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) are increasingly useful for health services research. For relatively uncommon conditions, such as multiple myeloma (MM) and its treatment-related complications, a combination of multiple EHR sources is essential for such research. The Shared Health Research Information Network (SHRINE) enables queries for aggregate results across participating institutions. Development of a rational search strategy in SHRINE may be augmented through analysis of pre-existing databases. We developed a SHRINE query for likely non-infectious treatment-related complications of MM, based upon an analysis of the Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care (MIMIC II) database. Using this query strategy, we found that the rate of likely treatment-related complications significantly increased from 2001 to 2007, by an average of 6% a year (p=0.01), across the participating SHRINE institutions. This finding is in keeping with increasingly aggressive strategies in the treatment of MM. This proof of concept demonstrates that a staged approach to federated queries, using external EHR data, can yield potentially clinically meaningful results.

  7. Mars Surface Change Detection from Multi-temporal Orbital Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di, Kaichang; Liu, Yiliang; Hu, Wenmin; Yue, Zongyu; Liu, Zhaoqin

    2014-01-01

    A vast amount of Mars images have been acquired by orbital missions in recent years. With the increase of spatial resolution to metre and decimetre levels, fine-scale geological features can be identified, and surface change detection is possible because of multi-temporal images. This study briefly reviews detectable changes on the Mars surface, including new impact craters, gullies, dark slope streaks, dust devil tracks and ice caps. To facilitate fast and efficient change detection for subsequent scientific investigations, a featured-based change detection method is developed based on automatic image registration, surface feature extraction and difference information statistics. Experimental results which use multi-temporal images demonstrate the promising potential of the proposed method

  8. Change detection in polarimetric SAR data over several time points

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Knut; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Skriver, Henning

    2014-01-01

    A test statistic for the equality of several variance-covariance matrices following the complex Wishart distribution is introduced. The test statistic is applied successfully to detect change in C-band EMISAR polarimetric SAR data over four time points....

  9. Acoustic change detection algorithm using an FM radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Geoffrey H.; Wolfe, Owen

    2012-06-01

    The U.S. Army is interested in developing low-cost, low-power, non-line-of-sight sensors for monitoring human activity. One modality that is often overlooked is active acoustics using sources of opportunity such as speech or music. Active acoustics can be used to detect human activity by generating acoustic images of an area at different times, then testing for changes among the imagery. A change detection algorithm was developed to detect physical changes in a building, such as a door changing positions or a large box being moved using acoustics sources of opportunity. The algorithm is based on cross correlating the acoustic signal measured from two microphones. The performance of the algorithm was shown using data generated with a hand-held FM radio as a sound source and two microphones. The algorithm could detect a door being opened in a hallway.

  10. Detection of Greenhouse-Gas-Induced Climatic Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, P.D.; Wigley, T.M.L.

    1998-05-26

    The objective of this report is to assemble and analyze instrumental climate data and to develop and apply climate models as a basis for (1) detecting greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change, and (2) validation of General Circulation Models.

  11. Network Anomaly Detection Based on Wavelet Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali A. Ghorbani

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Signal processing techniques have been applied recently for analyzing and detecting network anomalies due to their potential to find novel or unknown intrusions. In this paper, we propose a new network signal modelling technique for detecting network anomalies, combining the wavelet approximation and system identification theory. In order to characterize network traffic behaviors, we present fifteen features and use them as the input signals in our system. We then evaluate our approach with the 1999 DARPA intrusion detection dataset and conduct a comprehensive analysis of the intrusions in the dataset. Evaluation results show that the approach achieves high-detection rates in terms of both attack instances and attack types. Furthermore, we conduct a full day's evaluation in a real large-scale WiFi ISP network where five attack types are successfully detected from over 30 millions flows.

  12. Examining change detection approaches for tropical mangrove monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Soe W.; Franklin, Janet; Buenemann, Michaela; Kim, Won; Giri, Chandra

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of different band combinations and classifiers (unsupervised, supervised, object-oriented nearest neighbor, and object-oriented decision rule) for quantifying mangrove forest change using multitemporal Landsat data. A discriminant analysis using spectra of different vegetation types determined that bands 2 (0.52 to 0.6 μm), 5 (1.55 to 1.75 μm), and 7 (2.08 to 2.35 μm) were the most effective bands for differentiating mangrove forests from surrounding land cover types. A ranking of thirty-six change maps, produced by comparing the classification accuracy of twelve change detection approaches, was used. The object-based Nearest Neighbor classifier produced the highest mean overall accuracy (84 percent) regardless of band combinations. The automated decision rule-based approach (mean overall accuracy of 88 percent) as well as a composite of bands 2, 5, and 7 used with the unsupervised classifier and the same composite or all band difference with the object-oriented Nearest Neighbor classifier were the most effective approaches.

  13. Opportunities of detection of climatic change in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapin, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this contribution possibilities of detection of climatic change on the territory of the Slovak Republic are presented. It has a big significance at developing of scenarios of climatic changes in 21 st century, it helps at evaluation of possible consequences of climatic changes and at preparation of adaptive measures for moderation of negative consequences of climatic changes. Final exploitation is especially in agriculture, forestry and water services

  14. Changing habits, changing climate : a foundation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enright, W.

    2001-03-01

    If Canada intends to meet its greenhouse gas reduction target of 6 per cent below 1990 levels, a fundamental shift in energy use by Canadians is required. The health sector will also be required to change. Global climate change is expected to affect regions differently, some might get wetter, some might get warmer, and others still might get colder. Climate changes will influence a number of health determinants: the geographical range of disease organisms and vectors; temperature extremes and violent weather events; air, food and water quality; the stability of ecosystems. There is a requirement to strongly regulate the emissions of carbon dioxide, methane and other greenhouse gases to limit health risks. Increased air pollution could negatively affect large numbers of people, especially asthma sufferers and people suffering from chronic respiratory ailments and cardiovascular diseases. Changes in precipitation and temperature could increase insect-borne diseases. Water sources could be badly affected by drought, flooding or increased glacial runoff. The thinning of the ozone layer could result in additional skin cancers, impaired vision and other diseases. The document explores the various impacts resulting from climate change. A chapter is devoted to each topic: air pollution, temperature extremes, extreme weather events, vector borne diseases, drought and increased evaporation, food supply and ecosystem range, sea level rise, stratospheric ozone depletion and describes the health impacts. In addition, a chapter deals with aboriginal communities. The topic of environmental refugees is discussed, followed by an historical perspective into climate change policy in Canada. The author concludes with adaptation measures. Further emphasis must be placed on priority topics such as the estimation of future emissions and modelling of climate processes. refs., tabs., figs

  15. Deteksi Perubahan Citra Pada Video Menggunakan Illumination Invariant Change Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adri Priadana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There is still a lot of juvenile delinquency in the middle of the community, especially people in urban areas, in the modern era. Juvenile delinquency may be fights, wild racing, gambling, and graffiti on the walls without permission. Vandalized wall is usually done on walls of office buildings and on public or private property. Results from vandalized walls can be seen from the image of the change between the initial image with the image after a motion. This study develops a image change detection system in video to detect the action of graffiti on the wall via a Closed-Circuit Television camera (CCTV which is done by simulation using the webcam camera. Motion detection process with Accumulative Differences Images (ADI method and image change detection process with Illumination Invariant Change Detection method coupled with image cropping method which carried out a comparison between the a reference image or image before any movement with the image after there is movement. Detection system testing one by different times variations, ie in the morning, noon, afternoon, and evening. The proposed method for image change detection in video give results with an accuracy rate of 92.86%.

  16. Influence analysis in quantitative trait loci detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Xiaoling; Kuriki, Satoshi; Maeno, Akiteru; Takada, Toyoyuki; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents systematic methods for the detection of influential individuals that affect the log odds (LOD) score curve. We derive general formulas of influence functions for profile likelihoods and introduce them into two standard quantitative trait locus detection methods-the interval mapping method and single marker analysis. Besides influence analysis on specific LOD scores, we also develop influence analysis methods on the shape of the LOD score curves. A simulation-based method is proposed to assess the significance of the influence of the individuals. These methods are shown useful in the influence analysis of a real dataset of an experimental population from an F2 mouse cross. By receiver operating characteristic analysis, we confirm that the proposed methods show better performance than existing diagnostics. © 2014 The Author. Biometrical Journal published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Cropping Pattern Detection and Change Analysis in Central Luzon, Philippines Using Multi-Temporal MODIS Imagery and Artificial Neural Network Classifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    dela Torre, D. M.; Perez, G. J. P.

    2016-12-01

    Cropping practices in the Philippines has been intensifying with greater demand for food and agricultural supplies in view of an increasing population and advanced technologies for farming. This has not been monitored regularly using traditional methods but alternative methods using remote sensing has been promising yet underutilized. This study employed multi-temporal data from MODIS and neural network classifier to map annual land use in agricultural areas from 2001-2014 in Central Luzon, the primary rice growing area of the Philippines. Land use statistics derived from these maps were compared with historical El Nino events to examine how land area is affected by drought events. Fourteen maps of agricultural land use was produced, with the primary classes being single-cropping, double-cropping and perennial crops with secondary classes of forests, urban, bare, water and other classes. Primary classes were produced from the neural network classifier while secondary classes were derived from NDVI threshold masks. The overall accuracy for the 2014 map was 62.05% and a kappa statistic of 0.45. 155.56% increase in single-cropping systems from 2001 to 2014 was observed while double cropping systems decreased by 14.83%. Perennials increased by 76.21% while built-up areas decreased by 12.22% within the 14-year interval. There are several sources of error including mixed-pixels, scale-conversion problems and limited ground reference data. An analysis including El Niño events in 2004 and 2010 demonstrated that marginally irrigated areas that usually planted twice in a year resorted to single cropping, indicating that scarcity of water limited the intensification allowable in the area. Findings from this study can be used to predict future use of agricultural land in the country and also examine how farmlands have responded to climatic factors and stressors.

  18. Change Detection by Fusing Advantages of Threshold and Clustering Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, M.; Hao, M.

    2017-09-01

    In change detection (CD) of medium-resolution remote sensing images, the threshold and clustering methods are two kinds of the most popular ones. It is found that the threshold method of the expectation maximum (EM) algorithm usually generates a CD map including many false alarms but almost detecting all changes, and the fuzzy local information c-means algorithm (FLICM) obtains a homogeneous CD map but with some missed detections. Therefore, we aim to design a framework to improve CD results by fusing the advantages of threshold and clustering methods. Experimental results indicate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. CHANGE DETECTION BY FUSING ADVANTAGES OF THRESHOLD AND CLUSTERING METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In change detection (CD of medium-resolution remote sensing images, the threshold and clustering methods are two kinds of the most popular ones. It is found that the threshold method of the expectation maximum (EM algorithm usually generates a CD map including many false alarms but almost detecting all changes, and the fuzzy local information c-means algorithm (FLICM obtains a homogeneous CD map but with some missed detections. Therefore, we aim to design a framework to improve CD results by fusing the advantages of threshold and clustering methods. Experimental results indicate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  20. Automated baseline change detection phase I. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    The Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD) project is supported by the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) as part of its ER ampersand WM cross-cutting technology program in robotics. Phase 1 of the Automated Baseline Change Detection project is summarized in this topical report. The primary objective of this project is to apply robotic and optical sensor technology to the operational inspection of mixed toxic and radioactive waste stored in barrels, using Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD), based on image subtraction. Absolute change detection is based on detecting any visible physical changes, regardless of cause, between a current inspection image of a barrel and an archived baseline image of the same barrel. Thus, in addition to rust, the ABCD system can also detect corrosion, leaks, dents, and bulges. The ABCD approach and method rely on precise camera positioning and repositioning relative to the barrel and on feature recognition in images. In support of this primary objective, there are secondary objectives to determine DOE operational inspection requirements and DOE system fielding requirements

  1. Automatic change detection to facial expressions in adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Tongran; Xiao, Tong; Jiannong, Shi

    2016-01-01

    Adolescence is a critical period for the neurodevelopment of social-emotional processing, wherein the automatic detection of changes in facial expressions is crucial for the development of interpersonal communication. Two groups of participants (an adolescent group and an adult group) were...... automatic processing on fearful faces than happy faces. The present study indicated that adolescent’s posses stronger automatic detection of changes in emotional expression relative to adults, and sheds light on the neurodevelopment of automatic processes concerning social-emotional information....... recruited to complete an emotional oddball task featuring on happy and one fearful condition. The measurement of event-related potential was carried out via electroencephalography and electrooculography recording, to detect visual mismatch negativity (vMMN) with regard to the automatic detection of changes...

  2. Application of remote sensing technique in biomass change detection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Application of remote sensing technique in biomass change detection: a case study of Bromley and Chihota, Zimbabwe. ... There are various field methods used worldwide to determine density of forest resources but have several limitations because of the nature of factors influencing biomass change. These include ...

  3. Detection and Attribution of Anthropogenic Climate Change Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, Cynthia; Neofotis, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Human-influenced climate change is an observed phenomenon affecting physical and biological systems across the globe. The majority of observed impacts are related to temperature changes and are located in the northern high- and midlatitudes. However, new evidence is emerging that demonstrates that impacts are related to precipitation changes as well as temperature, and that climate change is impacting systems and sectors beyond the Northern Hemisphere. In this paper, we highlight some of this new evidence-focusing on regions and sectors that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report (IPCC AR4) noted as under-represented-in the context of observed climate change impacts, direct and indirect drivers of change (including carbon dioxide itself), and methods of detection. We also present methods and studies attributing observed impacts to anthropogenic forcing. We argue that the expansion of methods of detection (in terms of a broader array of climate variables and data sources, inclusion of the major modes of climate variability, and incorporation of other drivers of change) is key to discerning the climate sensitivities of sectors and systems in regions where the impacts of climate change currently remain elusive. Attributing such changes to human forcing of the climate system, where possible, is important for development of effective mitigation and adaptation. Current challenges in documenting adaptation and the role of indigenous knowledge in detection and attribution are described.

  4. Generating functional analysis of CDMA detection dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mimura, Kazushi [Faculty of Information Sciences, Hiroshima City University, Hiroshima 731-3194 (Japan); Okada, Masato [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-5861 (Japan); Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)

    2005-11-18

    We investigate the detection dynamics of the parallel interference canceller (PIC) for code-division multiple-access (CDMA) multiuser detection, applied to a randomly spread, fully synchronous base-band uncoded CDMA channel model with additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) under perfect power control in the large-system limit. It is known that the predictions of the density evolution (DE) can fairly explain the detection dynamics only in the case where the detection dynamics converge. At transients, though, the predictions of DE systematically deviate from computer simulation results. Furthermore, when the detection dynamics fail to converge, the deviation of the predictions of DE from the results of numerical experiments becomes large. As an alternative, generating functional analysis (GFA) can take into account the effect of the Onsager reaction term exactly and does not need the Gaussian assumption of the local field. We present GFA to evaluate the detection dynamics of PIC for CDMA multiuser detection. The predictions of GFA exhibit good consistency with the computer simulation result for any condition, even if the dynamics fail to converge.

  5. UNSUPERVISED CHANGE DETECTION IN SAR IMAGES USING GAUSSIAN MIXTURE MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kiana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a method for unsupervised change detection in Remote Sensing Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR images. This method is based on the mixture modelling of the histogram of difference image. In this process, the difference image is classified into three classes; negative change class, positive change class and no change class. However the SAR images suffer from speckle noise, the proposed method is able to map the changes without speckle filtering. To evaluate the performance of this method, two dates of SAR data acquired by Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic from an agriculture area are used. Change detection results show better efficiency when compared to the state-of-the-art methods.

  6. Automated Change Detection for Validation and Update of Geodata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Brian Pilemann; Knudsen, Thomas

    Traditionally, different manual, labour intensive and hence costly methods have been used for change detection. Conducting field inspections, comparing the map contents with the real world "on location" is onemethod. In another method two neighbouring images from a flight campaign are used...... to newer (raster based) remote sensing images in order to detect changes in objects. In this paper an automatic change detection method considering changes in the building theme and based on colourinfrared (CIR) aerial photographs in combination with height information (LIDAR, digital photogrammetry...... and a stereo model generated. The digital map database is superimposed (in3D) on the stereo model, and a stereo-operator locates the differences. Automating the update process for a topographic map database is, however, non-trivial, as itinvolves the comparison of the existing (vector based) map database...

  7. Short-term change detection for UAV video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saur, Günter; Krüger, Wolfgang

    2012-11-01

    In the last years, there has been an increased use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) for video reconnaissance and surveillance. An important application in this context is change detection in UAV video data. Here we address short-term change detection, in which the time between observations ranges from several minutes to a few hours. We distinguish this task from video motion detection (shorter time scale) and from long-term change detection, based on time series of still images taken between several days, weeks, or even years. Examples for relevant changes we are looking for are recently parked or moved vehicles. As a pre-requisite, a precise image-to-image registration is needed. Images are selected on the basis of the geo-coordinates of the sensor's footprint and with respect to a certain minimal overlap. The automatic imagebased fine-registration adjusts the image pair to a common geometry by using a robust matching approach to handle outliers. The change detection algorithm has to distinguish between relevant and non-relevant changes. Examples for non-relevant changes are stereo disparity at 3D structures of the scene, changed length of shadows, and compression or transmission artifacts. To detect changes in image pairs we analyzed image differencing, local image correlation, and a transformation-based approach (multivariate alteration detection). As input we used color and gradient magnitude images. To cope with local misalignment of image structures we extended the approaches by a local neighborhood search. The algorithms are applied to several examples covering both urban and rural scenes. The local neighborhood search in combination with intensity and gradient magnitude differencing clearly improved the results. Extended image differencing performed better than both the correlation based approach and the multivariate alternation detection. The algorithms are adapted to be used in semi-automatic workflows for the ABUL video exploitation system of Fraunhofer

  8. a Landsat Time-Series Stacks Model for Detection of Cropland Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Chen, J.; Zhang, J.

    2017-09-01

    Global, timely, accurate and cost-effective cropland monitoring with a fine spatial resolution will dramatically improve our understanding of the effects of agriculture on greenhouse gases emissions, food safety, and human health. Time-series remote sensing imagery have been shown particularly potential to describe land cover dynamics. The traditional change detection techniques are often not capable of detecting land cover changes within time series that are severely influenced by seasonal difference, which are more likely to generate pseuso changes. Here,we introduced and tested LTSM ( Landsat time-series stacks model), an improved Continuous Change Detection and Classification (CCDC) proposed previously approach to extract spectral trajectories of land surface change using a dense Landsat time-series stacks (LTS). The method is expected to eliminate pseudo changes caused by phenology driven by seasonal patterns. The main idea of the method is that using all available Landsat 8 images within a year, LTSM consisting of two term harmonic function are estimated iteratively for each pixel in each spectral band .LTSM can defines change area by differencing the predicted and observed Landsat images. The LTSM approach was compared with change vector analysis (CVA) method. The results indicated that the LTSM method correctly detected the "true change" without overestimating the "false" one, while CVA pointed out "true change" pixels with a large number of "false changes". The detection of change areas achieved an overall accuracy of 92.37 %, with a kappa coefficient of 0.676.

  9. No evidence for an item limit in change detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaiyan Keshvari

    Full Text Available Change detection is a classic paradigm that has been used for decades to argue that working memory can hold no more than a fixed number of items ("item-limit models". Recent findings force us to consider the alternative view that working memory is limited by the precision in stimulus encoding, with mean precision decreasing with increasing set size ("continuous-resource models". Most previous studies that used the change detection paradigm have ignored effects of limited encoding precision by using highly discriminable stimuli and only large changes. We conducted two change detection experiments (orientation and color in which change magnitudes were drawn from a wide range, including small changes. In a rigorous comparison of five models, we found no evidence of an item limit. Instead, human change detection performance was best explained by a continuous-resource model in which encoding precision is variable across items and trials even at a given set size. This model accounts for comparison errors in a principled, probabilistic manner. Our findings sharply challenge the theoretical basis for most neural studies of working memory capacity.

  10. Change Detection Method for High Resolution Remote Sensing Images Using Deep Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Xinlong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel change detection method is proposed based on deep learning to improve the accuracy of change detection in very high spatial resolution remote sensing images. On the base of image pre-processing, spectral and texture changes are extracted by modified change vector analysis and grey level co-occurrence matrix respectively, both concerning spatial-contextual information. Most likely changed and unchanged pixel-pairs are obtained by an adaptive threshold for selecting the labeled samples. The proposed model based on Gaussian-Bernoulli deep Boltzmann machines with a label layer is built to learn high-level features and is trained for determining the change areas. Experimental results on WorldView-3 and Pléiades-1 show that the proposed method out performs the compared methods in the accuracy of change detection.

  11. Change detection in very high resolution multisensor optical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano Correa, Yady T.; Bovolo, Francesca; Bruzzone, Lorenzo

    2014-10-01

    This work aims at developing an approach to the detection of changes in multisensor multitemporal VHR optical images. The main steps of the proposed method are: i) multisensor data homogenization; and ii) change detection in multisensor multitemporal VHR optical images. The proposed approach takes advantage of: the conversion to physical quantities suggested by Pacifici et. al.1 , the framework for the design of systems for change detection in VHR images presented by Bruzzone and Bovolo2 and the framework for unsupervised change detection presented by Bovolo and Bruzzone3. Multisensor data homogenization is achieved during pre-processing by taking into account differences in both radiometric and geometric dimensions. Whereas change detection was approached by extracting proper features from multisensor images such that they result to be comparable (at a given level of abstraction) even if extracted from images acquired by different sensors. In order to illustrate the results, a data set made up of a QuickBird and a WorldView-2 images - acquired in 2006 and 2010 respectively - over an area located in the Trentino region of Italy were used. However, the proposed approach is thought to be exportable to multitemporal images coming from passive sensors other than the two mentioned above. The experimental results obtained on the QuickBird and WorlView-2 image pair are accurate. Thus opening to further experiments on multitemporal images acquired by other sensors.

  12. Detecting changes in rainfall pattern and seasonality index vis-à-vis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 122; Issue 3. Detecting changes in rainfall pattern and seasonality index vis-à-vis increasing water scarcity in Maharashtra ... Significant long term changes in monthly rainfall in the district scale are identified by trend analysis of rainfall time series. The seasonality ...

  13. BUILDING CHANGE DETECTION BY COMBINING LiDAR DATA AND ORTHO IMAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Peng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The elevation information is not considered in the traditional building change detection methods. This paper presents an algorithm of combining LiDAR data and ortho image for 3D building change detection. The advantages of the proposed approach lie in the fusion of the height and spectral information by thematic segmentation. Furthermore, the proposed method also combines the advantages of pixel-level and object-level change detection by image differencing and object analysis. Firstly, two periods of LiDAR data are filtered and interpolated to generate their corresponding DSMs. Secondly, a binary image of the changed areas is generated by means of differencing and filtering the two DSMs, and then thematic layer is generated and projected onto the DSMs and DOMs. Thirdly, geometric and spectral features of the changed area are calculated, which is followed by decision tree classification for the purpose of extracting the changed building areas. Finally, the statistics of the elevation and area change information as well as the change type of the changed buildings are done for building change analysis. Experimental results show that the completeness and correctness of building change detection are close to 81.8% and 85.7% respectively when the building area is larger than 80 m2, which are increased about 10% when compared with using ortho image alone.

  14. Molecular sieves analysis by elastic recoil detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salah, H.; Azzouz, A.

    1992-01-01

    The opportunity of water determination in zeolites via hydrogen detection using the elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) was investigated. The radiation effect upon the desorption rate of hydrogen in miscellaneous types of zeolites, e.g. Y-Faujasite, ZSM-5, SK, etc. and in a natural clay, e.g. an Algerian bentonite was discussed. Quantitative measurements were carried out in order to determine the amount and distribution shape of hydrogen in each material. Various explanations dealing with hydration and constitution water in such a crystalline framework were proposed. The experimental results are in a good agreement with the corresponding theoretical values

  15. REGION BASED FOREST CHANGE DETECTION FROM CARTOSAT-1 STEREO IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tian

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tree height is a fundamental parameter for describing the forest situation and changes. The latest development of automatic Digital Surface Model (DSM generation techniques allows new approaches of forest change detection from satellite stereo imagery. This paper shows how DSMs can support the change detection in forest area. A novel region based forest change detection method is proposed using single-channel CARTOSAT-1 stereo imagery. In the first step, DSMs from two dates are generated based on automatic matching technology. After co-registration and normalising by using LiDAR data, the mean-shift segmentation is applied to the original pan images, and the images of both dates are classified to forest and non-forest areas by analysing their histograms and height differences. In the second step, a rough forest change detection map is generated based on the comparison of the two forest map. Then the GLCM texture from the nDSM and the Cartosat-1 images of the resulting regions are analyzed and compared, the real changes are extracted by SVM based classification.

  16. Extended image differencing for change detection in UAV video mosaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saur, Günter; Krüger, Wolfgang; Schumann, Arne

    2014-03-01

    Change detection is one of the most important tasks when using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) for video reconnaissance and surveillance. We address changes of short time scale, i.e. the observations are taken in time distances from several minutes up to a few hours. Each observation is a short video sequence acquired by the UAV in near-nadir view and the relevant changes are, e.g., recently parked or moved vehicles. In this paper we extend our previous approach of image differencing for single video frames to video mosaics. A precise image-to-image registration combined with a robust matching approach is needed to stitch the video frames to a mosaic. Additionally, this matching algorithm is applied to mosaic pairs in order to align them to a common geometry. The resulting registered video mosaic pairs are the input of the change detection procedure based on extended image differencing. A change mask is generated by an adaptive threshold applied to a linear combination of difference images of intensity and gradient magnitude. The change detection algorithm has to distinguish between relevant and non-relevant changes. Examples for non-relevant changes are stereo disparity at 3D structures of the scene, changed size of shadows, and compression or transmission artifacts. The special effects of video mosaicking such as geometric distortions and artifacts at moving objects have to be considered, too. In our experiments we analyze the influence of these effects on the change detection results by considering several scenes. The results show that for video mosaics this task is more difficult than for single video frames. Therefore, we extended the image registration by estimating an elastic transformation using a thin plate spline approach. The results for mosaics are comparable to that of single video frames and are useful for interactive image exploitation due to a larger scene coverage.

  17. Incrementally Detecting Change Types of Spatial Area Object: A Hierarchical Matching Method Considering Change Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhui Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Detecting and extracting the change types of spatial area objects can track area objects’ spatiotemporal change pattern and provide the change backtracking mechanism for incrementally updating spatial datasets. To respond to the problems of high complexity of detection methods, high redundancy rate of detection factors, and the low automation degree during incrementally update process, we take into account the change process of area objects in an integrated way and propose a hierarchical matching method to detect the nine types of changes of area objects, while minimizing the complexity of the algorithm and the redundancy rate of detection factors. We illustrate in details the identification, extraction, and database entry of change types, and how we achieve a close connection and organic coupling of incremental information extraction and object type-of-change detection so as to characterize the whole change process. The experimental results show that this method can successfully detect incremental information about area objects in practical applications, with the overall accuracy reaching above 90%, which is much higher than the existing weighted matching method, making it quite feasible and applicable. It helps establish the corresponding relation between new-version and old-version objects, and facilitate the linked update processing and quality control of spatial data.

  18. Reconstruction of interrupted SAR imagery for persistent surveillance change detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanovic, Ivana; Karl, W. C.; Novak, Les

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we apply a sparse signal recovery technique for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image formation from interrupted phase history data. Timeline constraints imposed on multi-function modern radars result in interrupted SAR data collection, which in turn leads to corrupted imagery that degrades reliable change detection. In this paper we extrapolate the missing data by applying the basis pursuit denoising algorithm (BPDN) in the image formation step, effectively, modeling the SAR scene as sparse. We investigate the effects of regular and random interruptions on the SAR point spread function (PSF), as well as on the quality of both coherent (CCD) and non-coherent (NCCD) change detection. We contrast the sparse reconstruction to the matched filter (MF) method, implemented via Fourier processing with missing data set to zero. To illustrate the capabilities of the gap-filling sparse reconstruction algorithm, we evaluate change detection performance using a pair of images from the GOTCHA data set.

  19. Detecting regional patterns of changing CO2 flux in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parazoo, Nicholas C.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Koven, Charles D.; Sweeney, Colm; Lawrence, David M.; Lindaas, Jakob; Chang, Rachel Y.-W.; Miller, Charles E.

    2016-01-01

    With rapid changes in climate and the seasonal amplitude of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the Arctic, it is critical that we detect and quantify the underlying processes controlling the changing amplitude of CO2 to better predict carbon cycle feedbacks in the Arctic climate system. We use satellite and airborne observations of atmospheric CO2 with climatically forced CO2 flux simulations to assess the detectability of Alaskan carbon cycle signals as future warming evolves. We find that current satellite remote sensing technologies can detect changing uptake accurately during the growing season but lack sufficient cold season coverage and near-surface sensitivity to constrain annual carbon balance changes at regional scale. Airborne strategies that target regular vertical profile measurements within continental interiors are more sensitive to regional flux deeper into the cold season but currently lack sufficient spatial coverage throughout the entire cold season. Thus, the current CO2 observing network is unlikely to detect potentially large CO2 sources associated with deep permafrost thaw and cold season respiration expected over the next 50 y. Although continuity of current observations is vital, strategies and technologies focused on cold season measurements (active remote sensing, aircraft, and tall towers) and systematic sampling of vertical profiles across continental interiors over the full annual cycle are required to detect the onset of carbon release from thawing permafrost. PMID:27354511

  20. Anterior prefrontal involvement in implicit contextual change detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Pollmann

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Anterior prefrontal cortex is usually associated with high level executive functions. Here, we show that the frontal pole, specifically left lateral frontopolar cortex, is involved in signaling change in implicitly learned spatial contexts, in the absence of conscious change detection. In a variant of the contextual cueing paradigm, participants first learned implicitly contingencies between distractor contexts and target locations. After learning, repeated distractor contexts were paired with new target locations. Left lateral frontopolar (BA10 and superior frontal (BA9 cortices showed selective signal increase for this target location change in repeated displays in an event-related fMRI experiment, which was most pronounced in participants with high contextual facilitation before the change. The data support the view that left lateral frontopolar cortex is involved in signaling contextual change to posterior brain areas as a precondition for adaptive changes of attentional resource allocation. This signaling occurs in the absence of awareness of learned contingencies or contextual change.

  1. Detection of cardiac activity changes from human speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovarek, Jaromir; Partila, Pavol; Voznak, Miroslav; Mikulec, Martin; Mehic, Miralem

    2015-05-01

    Impact of changes in blood pressure and pulse from human speech is disclosed in this article. The symptoms of increased physical activity are pulse, systolic and diastolic pressure. There are many methods of measuring and indicating these parameters. The measurements must be carried out using devices which are not used in everyday life. In most cases, the measurement of blood pressure and pulse following health problems or other adverse feelings. Nowadays, research teams are trying to design and implement modern methods in ordinary human activities. The main objective of the proposal is to reduce the delay between detecting the adverse pressure and to the mentioned warning signs and feelings. Common and frequent activity of man is speaking, while it is known that the function of the vocal tract can be affected by the change in heart activity. Therefore, it can be a useful parameter for detecting physiological changes. A method for detecting human physiological changes by speech processing and artificial neural network classification is described in this article. The pulse and blood pressure changes was induced by physical exercises in this experiment. The set of measured subjects was formed by ten healthy volunteers of both sexes. None of the subjects was a professional athlete. The process of the experiment was divided into phases before, during and after physical training. Pulse, systolic, diastolic pressure was measured and voice activity was recorded after each of them. The results of this experiment describe a method for detecting increased cardiac activity from human speech using artificial neural network.

  2. Hyperspectral Analysis for Standoff Detection of Dimethyl ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal Article Detecting organophosphates in indoor settings requires more efficient and faster methods of surveying large surface areas than conventional approaches, which sample small surface areas followed by extraction and analysis. This study examined a standoff detection technique utilizing hyperspectral imaging for analysis of building materials in near-real time. In this proof-of-concept study, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) was applied to stainless steel and laminate coupons and spectra were collected during active illumination. Absorbance bands at approximately 1275 cm-1 and 1050 cm-1 were associated with phosphorus-oxygen double bond (P=O) and phosphorus-oxygen-carbon (P-O-C) bond stretches of DMMP, respectively. The magnitude of these bands increased linearly (r2 = 0.93) with DMMP across the full absorbance spectrum, between ν1 = 877 cm-1 to ν2 = 1262 cm-1. Comparisons between bare and contaminated surfaces on stainless steel using the spectral contrast angle technique indicated that the bare samples showed no sign of contamination, with large uniformly distributed contrast angles of 45˚-55˚, while the contaminated samples had smaller spectral contact angles of 40° in the uncontaminated region. The laminate contaminated region exhibited contact angles of detect DMMP on building materials, with detection levels similar to c

  3. Multiple support vector machines for land cover change detection: An application for mapping urban extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemmour, Hassiba; Chibani, Youcef

    The reliability of support vector machines for classifying hyper-spectral images of remote sensing has been proven in various studies. In this paper, we investigate their applicability for land cover change detection. First, SVM-based change detection is presented and performed for mapping urban growth in the Algerian capital. Different performance indicators, as well as a comparison with artificial neural networks, are used to support our experimental analysis. In a second step, a combination framework is proposed to improve change detection accuracy. Two combination rules, namely, Fuzzy Integral and Attractor Dynamics, are implemented and evaluated with respect to individual SVMs. Recognition rates achieved by individual SVMs, compared to neural networks, confirm their efficiency for land cover change detection. Furthermore, the relevance of SVM combination is highlighted.

  4. Distributed Sensing for Quickest Change Detection of Point Radiation Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    paper, we consider an architecture in which each sensor node makes a local binary decision based on current observations only, binary decisions are...quickest change-point detection using a sensor network. They consider non- parametric CUSUM tests at each sensor node without an explicit statistical model of...post-change distribution is unknown and modeled as member of parametric family, one can follow a generalized likelihood ratio based approach [8] or a

  5. Study on Method of Geohazard Change Detection Based on Integrating Remote Sensing and GIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Zhenzhen; Yan, Qin; Liu, Zhengjun; Luo, Chengfeng

    2014-01-01

    Following a comprehensive literature review, this paper looks at analysis of geohazard using remote sensing information. This paper compares the basic types and methods of change detection, explores the basic principle of common methods and makes an respective analysis of the characteristics and shortcomings of the commonly used methods in the application of geohazard. Using the earthquake in JieGu as a case study, this paper proposes a geohazard change detection method integrating RS and GIS. When detecting the pre-earthquake and post-earthquake remote sensing images at different phases, it is crucial to set an appropriate threshold. The method adopts a self-adapting determination algorithm for threshold. We select a training region which is obtained after pixel information comparison and set a threshold value. The threshold value separates the changed pixel maximum. Then we apply the threshold value to the entire image, which could also make change detection accuracy maximum. Finally, we output the result to the GIS system to make change analysis. The experimental results show that this method of geohazard change detection based on integrating remote sensing and GIS information has higher accuracy with obvious advantages compared with the traditional methods

  6. Does facial processing prioritize change detection?: change blindness illustrates costs and benefits of holistic processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilford, Miko M; Wells, Gary L

    2010-11-01

    There is broad consensus among researchers both that faces are processed more holistically than other objects and that this type of processing is beneficial. We predicted that holistic processing of faces also involves a cost, namely, a diminished ability to localize change. This study (N = 150) utilized a modified change-blindness paradigm in which some trials involved a change in one feature of an image (nose, chin, mouth, hair, or eyes for faces; chimney, porch, window, roof, or door for houses), whereas other trials involved no change. People were better able to detect the occurrence of a change for faces than for houses, but were better able to localize which feature had changed for houses than for faces. Half the trials used inverted images, a manipulation that disrupts holistic processing. With inverted images, the critical interaction between image type (faces vs. houses) and task (change detection vs. change localization) disappeared. The results suggest that holistic processing reduces change-localization abilities.

  7. A method for unsupervised change detection and automatic radiometric normalization in multispectral data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Canty, Morton John

    2011-01-01

    Based on canonical correlation analysis the iteratively re-weighted multivariate alteration detection (MAD) method is used to successfully perform unsupervised change detection in bi-temporal Landsat ETM+ images covering an area with villages, woods, agricultural fields and open pit mines in North...... Rhine- Westphalia, Germany. A link to an example with ASTER data to detect change with the same method after the 2005 Kashmir earthquake is given. The method is also used to automatically normalize multitemporal, multispectral Landsat ETM+ data radiometrically. IDL/ENVI, Python and Matlab software...

  8. Detecting Changes in Terrain Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Zia-ur; Hines, Glenn D.; Logan, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have been used for more than the thrill they bring to model airplane enthusiasts. Their flexibility and low cost have made them a viable option for low-altitude reconnaissance. In a recent effort, we acquired video data from a small UAV during several passes over the same flight path. The objective of the exercise was to determine if objects had been added to the terrain along the flight path between flight passes. Several issues accrue to this simple-sounding problem: (1) lighting variations may cause false detection of objects because of changes in shadow orientation and strength between passes; (2) variations in the flight path due to wind-speed, and heading change may cause misalignment of gross features making the task of detecting changes between the frames very difficult; and (3) changes in the aircraft orientation and altitude lead to a change in size of the features from frame-to-frame making a comparison difficult. In this paper, we discuss our efforts to perform this change detection, and the lessons that we learned from this exercise.

  9. Use of an Infrared Thermometer with Laser Targeting in Morphological Scene Change Detection for Fire Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tickle, Andrew J.; Singh, Harjap; Grindley, Josef E.

    2013-06-01

    Morphological Scene Change Detection (MSCD) is a process typically tasked at detecting relevant changes in a guarded environment for security applications. This can be implemented on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) by a combination of binary differences based around exclusive-OR (XOR) gates, mathematical morphology and a crucial threshold setting. This is a robust technique and can be applied many areas from leak detection to movement tracking, and further augmented to perform additional functions such as watermarking and facial detection. Fire is a severe problem, and in areas where traditional fire alarm systems are not installed or feasible, it may not be detected until it is too late. Shown here is a way of adapting the traditional Morphological Scene Change Detector (MSCD) with a temperature sensor so if both the temperature sensor and scene change detector are triggered, there is a high likelihood of fire present. Such a system would allow integration into autonomous mobile robots so that not only security patrols could be undertaken, but also fire detection.

  10. Continuous Fraud Detection in Enterprise Systems through Audit Trail Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Best

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Enterprise systems, real time recording and real time reporting pose new and significant challenges to the accounting and auditing professions. This includes developing methods and tools for continuous assurance and fraud detection. In this paper we propose a methodology for continuous fraud detection that exploits security audit logs, changes in master records and accounting audit trails in enterprise systems. The steps in this process are: (1 threat monitoring-surveillance of security audit logs for ‘red flags’, (2 automated extraction and analysis of data from audit trails, and (3 using forensic investigation techniques to determine whether a fraud has actually occurred. We demonstrate how mySAP, an enterprise system, can be used for audit trail analysis in detecting financial frauds; afterwards we use a case study of a suspected fraud to illustrate how to implement the methodology.

  11. Real-time change detection in data streams with FPGAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, J., E-mail: jesus.vega@ciemat.es [Asociación EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusión, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Dormido-Canto, S.; Cruz, T. [Departamento de Informática y Automática, UNED, Madrid (Spain); Ruiz, M.; Barrera, E. [Grupo de Investigación en Instrumentación y Acústica Aplicada, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Castro, R. [Asociación EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusión, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Murari, A. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA per la Fusione, Consorzio RFX, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Ochando, M. [Asociación EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusión, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-05-15

    Highlights: • Automatic recognition of changes in data streams of multidimensional signals. • Detection algorithm based on testing exchangeability on-line. • Real-time and off-line applicability. • Real-time implementation in FPGAs. - Abstract: The automatic recognition of changes in data streams is useful in both real-time and off-line data analyses. This article shows several effective change-detecting algorithms (based on martingales) and describes their real-time applicability in the data acquisition systems through the use of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA). The automatic event recognition system is absolutely general and it does not depend on either the particular event to detect or the specific data representation (waveforms, images or multidimensional signals). The developed approach provides good results for change detection in both the temporal evolution of profiles and the two-dimensional spatial distribution of volume emission intensity. The average computation time in the FPGA is 210 μs per profile.

  12. Data mining algorithms for land cover change detection: a review

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sangram Panigrahi

    2017-11-24

    Nov 24, 2017 ... Abstract. Land cover change detection has been a topic of active research in the remote sensing community. Due to enormous amount of data available from satellites, it has attracted the attention of data mining researchers to search a new direction for solution. The Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging ...

  13. Fundamental differences in change detection between vision and audition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demany, Laurent; Semal, Catherine; Cazalets, Jean-René; Pressnitzer, Daniel

    2010-06-01

    We compared auditory change detection to visual change detection using closely matched stimuli and tasks in the two modalities. On each trial, participants were presented with a test stimulus consisting of ten elements: pure tones with various frequencies for audition, or dots with various spatial positions for vision. The test stimulus was preceded or followed by a probe stimulus consisting of a single element, and two change-detection tasks were performed. In the "present/absent" task, the probe either matched one randomly selected element of the test stimulus or none of them; participants reported present or absent. In the "direction-judgment" task, the probe was always slightly shifted relative to one randomly selected element of the test stimulus; participants reported the direction of the shift. Whereas visual performance was systematically better in the present/absent task than in the direction-judgment task, the opposite was true for auditory performance. Moreover, whereas visual performance was strongly dependent on selective attention and on the time interval separating the probe from the test stimulus, this was not the case for auditory performance. Our results show that small auditory changes can be detected automatically across relatively long temporal gaps, using an implicit memory system that seems to have no similar counterpart in the visual domain.

  14. Efficient Incorporation of Markov Random Fields in Change Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanæs, Henrik; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Carstensen, Jens Michael

    2009-01-01

    of noise, implying that the pixel-wise classifier is also noisy. There is thus a need for incorporating local homogeneity constraints into such a change detection framework. For this modelling task Markov Random Fields are suitable. Markov Random Fields have, however, previously been plagued by lack...

  15. Monitoring to detect change on rangelands: physical, social and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Monitoring to detect change on rangelands: physical, social and economic /policy drivers. ... Social drivers include attitudes and values of land mangers and the public. ... Risk assessments, adaptive management analyses, or management by hypothesis require understanding linkages between environmental drivers and ...

  16. Data mining algorithms for land cover change detection: a review

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Land cover change detection has been a topic of active research in the remote sensing community. Due to enormous amount of data available from satellites, it has attracted the attention of data mining researchers to search a new direction for solution. The Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer(MODIS) ...

  17. Scientific Uncertainties in Climate Change Detection and Attribution Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santer, B. D.

    2017-12-01

    It has been claimed that the treatment and discussion of key uncertainties in climate science is "confined to hushed sidebar conversations at scientific conferences". This claim is demonstrably incorrect. Climate change detection and attribution studies routinely consider key uncertainties in observational climate data, as well as uncertainties in model-based estimates of natural variability and the "fingerprints" in response to different external forcings. The goal is to determine whether such uncertainties preclude robust identification of a human-caused climate change fingerprint. It is also routine to investigate the impact of applying different fingerprint identification strategies, and to assess how detection and attribution results are impacted by differences in the ability of current models to capture important aspects of present-day climate. The exploration of the uncertainties mentioned above will be illustrated using examples from detection and attribution studies with atmospheric temperature and moisture.

  18. A PCA-Based Change Detection Framework for Multidimensional Data Streams

    KAUST Repository

    Qahtan, Abdulhakim Ali Ali

    2015-08-10

    Detecting changes in multidimensional data streams is an important and challenging task. In unsupervised change detection, changes are usually detected by comparing the distribution in a current (test) window with a reference window. It is thus essential to design divergence metrics and density estimators for comparing the data distributions, which are mostly done for univariate data. Detecting changes in multidimensional data streams brings difficulties to the density estimation and comparisons. In this paper, we propose a framework for detecting changes in multidimensional data streams based on principal component analysis, which is used for projecting data into a lower dimensional space, thus facilitating density estimation and change-score calculations. The proposed framework also has advantages over existing approaches by reducing computational costs with an efficient density estimator, promoting the change-score calculation by introducing effective divergence metrics, and by minimizing the efforts required from users on the threshold parameter setting by using the Page-Hinkley test. The evaluation results on synthetic and real data show that our framework outperforms two baseline methods in terms of both detection accuracy and computational costs.

  19. Considerations and methods for the changes detection using satellite images in the Municipality of Paipa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riano M, Orlando

    2002-01-01

    In this article the considerations and methods are presented for the changes detection in the earth covering, using two images Landsat TM of different dates for an area of the municipality of Paipa, Boyaca. The changes detection has become an important application of the multi-spectral data and multi-temporal of the satellites programs for studies of natural resources Landsat, TM and Spot, in such a way that is possible to determine the types and extension of the changes that are given in the environment. To carry out this process some digital techniques they have been used for changes detection, such as: images superposition, differences between images and analysis of main components. These techniques allowed to observe and to analyze changes in the use and covering of the earth in this municipality

  20. Region-Based Building Rooftop Extraction and Change Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, J.; Metzlaff, L.; d'Angelo, P.; Reinartz, P.

    2017-09-01

    Automatic extraction of building changes is important for many applications like disaster monitoring and city planning. Although a lot of research work is available based on 2D as well as 3D data, an improvement in accuracy and efficiency is still needed. The introducing of digital surface models (DSMs) to building change detection has strongly improved the resulting accuracy. In this paper, a post-classification approach is proposed for building change detection using satellite stereo imagery. Firstly, DSMs are generated from satellite stereo imagery and further refined by using a segmentation result obtained from the Sobel gradients of the panchromatic image. Besides the refined DSMs, the panchromatic image and the pansharpened multispectral image are used as input features for mean-shift segmentation. The DSM is used to calculate the nDSM, out of which the initial building candidate regions are extracted. The candidate mask is further refined by morphological filtering and by excluding shadow regions. Following this, all segments that overlap with a building candidate region are determined. A building oriented segments merging procedure is introduced to generate a final building rooftop mask. As the last step, object based change detection is performed by directly comparing the building rooftops extracted from the pre- and after-event imagery and by fusing the change indicators with the roof-top region map. A quantitative and qualitative assessment of the proposed approach is provided by using WorldView-2 satellite data from Istanbul, Turkey.

  1. Water Feature Extraction and Change Detection Using Multitemporal Landsat Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komeil Rokni

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Lake Urmia is the 20th largest lake and the second largest hyper saline lake (before September 2010 in the world. It is also the largest inland body of salt water in the Middle East. Nevertheless, the lake has been in a critical situation in recent years due to decreasing surface water and increasing salinity. This study modeled the spatiotemporal changes of Lake Urmia in the period 2000–2013 using the multi-temporal Landsat 5-TM, 7-ETM+ and 8-OLI images. In doing so, the applicability of different satellite-derived indexes including Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI, Modified NDWI (MNDWI, Normalized Difference Moisture Index (NDMI, Water Ratio Index (WRI, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, and Automated Water Extraction Index (AWEI were investigated for the extraction of surface water from Landsat data. Overall, the NDWI was found superior to other indexes and hence it was used to model the spatiotemporal changes of the lake. In addition, a new approach based on Principal Components of multi-temporal NDWI (NDWI-PCs was proposed and evaluated for surface water change detection. The results indicate an intense decreasing trend in Lake Urmia surface area in the period 2000–2013, especially between 2010 and 2013 when the lake lost about one third of its surface area compared to the year 2000. The results illustrate the effectiveness of the NDWI-PCs approach for surface water change detection, especially in detecting the changes between two and three different times, simultaneously.

  2. REGION-BASED BUILDING ROOFTOP EXTRACTION AND CHANGE DETECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tian

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Automatic extraction of building changes is important for many applications like disaster monitoring and city planning. Although a lot of research work is available based on 2D as well as 3D data, an improvement in accuracy and efficiency is still needed. The introducing of digital surface models (DSMs to building change detection has strongly improved the resulting accuracy. In this paper, a post-classification approach is proposed for building change detection using satellite stereo imagery. Firstly, DSMs are generated from satellite stereo imagery and further refined by using a segmentation result obtained from the Sobel gradients of the panchromatic image. Besides the refined DSMs, the panchromatic image and the pansharpened multispectral image are used as input features for mean-shift segmentation. The DSM is used to calculate the nDSM, out of which the initial building candidate regions are extracted. The candidate mask is further refined by morphological filtering and by excluding shadow regions. Following this, all segments that overlap with a building candidate region are determined. A building oriented segments merging procedure is introduced to generate a final building rooftop mask. As the last step, object based change detection is performed by directly comparing the building rooftops extracted from the pre- and after-event imagery and by fusing the change indicators with the roof-top region map. A quantitative and qualitative assessment of the proposed approach is provided by using WorldView-2 satellite data from Istanbul, Turkey.

  3. Detecting anthropogenic climate change with an optimal fingerprint method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegerl, G.C.; Storch, H. von; Hasselmann, K.; Santer, B.D.; Jones, P.D.

    1994-01-01

    We propose a general fingerprint strategy to detect anthropogenic climate change and present application to near surface temperature trends. An expected time-space-variable pattern of anthropogenic climate change (the 'signal') is identified through application of an appropriate optimally matched space-time filter (the 'fingerprint') to the observations. The signal and the fingerprint are represented in a space with sufficient observed and simulated data. The signal pattern is derived from a model-generated prediction of anthropogenic climate change. Application of the fingerprint filter to the data yields a scalar detection variable. The statistically optimal fingerprint is obtained by weighting the model-predicted pattern towards low-noise directions. A combination of model output and observations is used to estimate the noise characteristics of the detection variable, arising from the natural variability of climate in the absence of external forcing. We test then the null hypothesis that the observed climate change is part of natural climate variability. We conclude that a statistically significant externally induced warming has been observed, with the caveat of a possibly inadequate estimate of the internal climate variability. In order to attribute this warming uniquely to anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing, more information on the climate's response to other forcing mechanisms (e.g. changes in solar radiation, volcanic or anthropogenic aerosols) and their interaction is needed. (orig./KW)

  4. Graph-based structural change detection for rotating machinery monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guoliang; Liu, Jie; Yan, Peng

    2018-01-01

    Detection of structural changes is critically important in operational monitoring of a rotating machine. This paper presents a novel framework for this purpose, where a graph model for data modeling is adopted to represent/capture statistical dynamics in machine operations. Meanwhile we develop a numerical method for computing temporal anomalies in the constructed graphs. The martingale-test method is employed for the change detection when making decisions on possible structural changes, where excellent performance is demonstrated outperforming exciting results such as the autoregressive-integrated-moving average (ARIMA) model. Comprehensive experimental results indicate good potentials of the proposed algorithm in various engineering applications. This work is an extension of a recent result (Lu et al., 2017).

  5. Applications of Graph-Theoretic Tests to Online Change Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-09

    Biosurveillance . Health officials want to anticipate (and possibly deter) disease outbreaks. These situations represent significant changes from the...approach to other real-world scenarios. Areas such as image analysis, machine health diagnosis and prognosis, biosurveillance , and quality control

  6. Guided Wave Delamination Detection and Quantification With Wavefield Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Campbell Leckey, Cara A.; Seebo, Jeffrey P.; Yu, Lingyu

    2014-01-01

    Unexpected damage can occur in aerospace composites due to impact events or material stress during off-nominal loading events. In particular, laminated composites are susceptible to delamination damage due to weak transverse tensile and inter-laminar shear strengths. Developments of reliable and quantitative techniques to detect delamination damage in laminated composites are imperative for safe and functional optimally-designed next-generation composite structures. In this paper, we investigate guided wave interactions with delamination damage and develop quantification algorithms by using wavefield data analysis. The trapped guided waves in the delamination region are observed from the wavefield data and further quantitatively interpreted by using different wavenumber analysis methods. The frequency-wavenumber representation of the wavefield shows that new wavenumbers are present and correlate to trapped waves in the damage region. These new wavenumbers are used to detect and quantify the delamination damage through the wavenumber analysis, which can show how the wavenumber changes as a function of wave propagation distance. The location and spatial duration of the new wavenumbers can be identified, providing a useful means not only for detecting the presence of delamination damage but also allowing for estimation of the delamination size. Our method has been applied to detect and quantify real delamination damage with complex geometry (grown using a quasi-static indentation technique). The detection and quantification results show the location, size, and shape of the delamination damage.

  7. Adaptive Change Detection for Long-Term Machinery Monitoring Using Incremental Sliding-Window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Teng; Lu, Guo-Liang; Liu, Jie; Yan, Peng

    2017-11-01

    Detection of structural changes from an operational process is a major goal in machine condition monitoring. Existing methods for this purpose are mainly based on retrospective analysis, resulting in a large detection delay that limits their usages in real applications. This paper presents a new adaptive real-time change detection algorithm, an extension of the recent research by combining with an incremental sliding-window strategy, to handle the multi-change detection in long-term monitoring of machine operations. In particular, in the framework, Hilbert space embedding of distribution is used to map the original data into the Re-producing Kernel Hilbert Space (RKHS) for change detection; then, a new adaptive threshold strategy can be developed when making change decision, in which a global factor (used to control the coarse-to-fine level of detection) is introduced to replace the fixed value of threshold. Through experiments on a range of real testing data which was collected from an experimental rotating machinery system, the excellent detection performances of the algorithm for engineering applications were demonstrated. Compared with state-of-the-art methods, the proposed algorithm can be more suitable for long-term machinery condition monitoring without any manual re-calibration, thus is promising in modern industries.

  8. Detection of kinetic change points in piece-wise linear single molecule motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Flynn R.; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Duderstadt, Karl E.

    2018-03-01

    Single-molecule approaches present a powerful way to obtain detailed kinetic information at the molecular level. However, the identification of small rate changes is often hindered by the considerable noise present in such single-molecule kinetic data. We present a general method to detect such kinetic change points in trajectories of motion of processive single molecules having Gaussian noise, with a minimum number of parameters and without the need of an assumed kinetic model beyond piece-wise linearity of motion. Kinetic change points are detected using a likelihood ratio test in which the probability of no change is compared to the probability of a change occurring, given the experimental noise. A predetermined confidence interval minimizes the occurrence of false detections. Applying the method recursively to all sub-regions of a single molecule trajectory ensures that all kinetic change points are located. The algorithm presented allows rigorous and quantitative determination of kinetic change points in noisy single molecule observations without the need for filtering or binning, which reduce temporal resolution and obscure dynamics. The statistical framework for the approach and implementation details are discussed. The detection power of the algorithm is assessed using simulations with both single kinetic changes and multiple kinetic changes that typically arise in observations of single-molecule DNA-replication reactions. Implementations of the algorithm are provided in ImageJ plugin format written in Java and in the Julia language for numeric computing, with accompanying Jupyter Notebooks to allow reproduction of the analysis presented here.

  9. EXOPLANETARY DETECTION BY MULTIFRACTAL SPECTRAL ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Sahil; Wettlaufer, John S. [Program in Applied Mathematics, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Sordo, Fabio Del [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Owing to technological advances, the number of exoplanets discovered has risen dramatically in the last few years. However, when trying to observe Earth analogs, it is often difficult to test the veracity of detection. We have developed a new approach to the analysis of exoplanetary spectral observations based on temporal multifractality, which identifies timescales that characterize planetary orbital motion around the host star and those that arise from stellar features such as spots. Without fitting stellar models to spectral data, we show how the planetary signal can be robustly detected from noisy data using noise amplitude as a source of information. For observation of transiting planets, combining this method with simple geometry allows us to relate the timescales obtained to primary and secondary eclipse of the exoplanets. Making use of data obtained with ground-based and space-based observations we have tested our approach on HD 189733b. Moreover, we have investigated the use of this technique in measuring planetary orbital motion via Doppler shift detection. Finally, we have analyzed synthetic spectra obtained using the SOAP 2.0 tool, which simulates a stellar spectrum and the influence of the presence of a planet or a spot on that spectrum over one orbital period. We have demonstrated that, so long as the signal-to-noise-ratio ≥ 75, our approach reconstructs the planetary orbital period, as well as the rotation period of a spot on the stellar surface.

  10. Theory of optimal weighting of data to detect climatic change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, T. L.

    1986-01-01

    A search for climatic change predicted by climate models can easily yield unconvincing results because of 'climatic noise,' the inherent, unpredictable variability of time-average atmospheric data. A weighted average of data that maximizes the probability of detecting predicted climatic change is presented. To obtain the optimal weights, an estimate of the covariance matrix of the data from a prior data set is needed. This introduces additional sampling error into the method. This is presently taken into account. A form of the weighted average is found whose probability distribution is independent of the true (but unknown) covariance statistics of the data and of the climate model prediction.

  11. Change detection in a time series of polarimetric SAR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Knut; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Skriver, Henning

    2014-01-01

    A test statistic for the equality of several variance-covariance matrices following the complex Wishart distribution with an associated probability of finding a smaller value of the test statistic is introduced. Unlike tests based on pairwise comparisons between all temporally consecutive acquisi...... acquisitions the new omnibus test statistic and the probability measure successfully detects change in two short series of L- and C-band polarimetric EMISAR data....

  12. Detecting settlement expansion in South Africa using a hyper-temporal SAR change detection approach

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kleynhans, W

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available holdings, the feasibility of using a SAR time-series based change detection approach is becoming increasingly more attractive. 13 [1] P. Snoeij, E. Attema, M. Davidson, B. Duesmann, N. Floury, G. Lev- rini, B. Rommen, B. Rosich, Sentinel-1 radar mission...

  13. Detecting the effects of forest harvesting on streamflow using hydrologic model change detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas P. Zegre; Nicholas A. Som

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the effects of forest management on hydrology primarily comes from paired-catchment study experiments. This approach has contributed fundamental knowledge of the effects of forest management on hydrology, but results from these studies lack insight into catchment processes. Outlined in this study is an alternative method of change detection that uses a...

  14. A comparative study on change vector analysis based change ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    classes of change detection techniques such as algebraic techniques, transformation, classifica- tion, progressive .... Digital number (DN) or raw satellite imagery represents the energy reflected by Earth that ..... In this algorithm. (figure 3d), Kauth–Thomas tasseled cap transformation has been used to extract greenness-.

  15. Early detection of foot ulcers through asymmetry analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaabouch, Naima; Chen, Yi; Hu, Wen-Chen; Anderson, Julie; Ames, Forrest; Paulson, Rolf

    2009-02-01

    Foot ulcers affect millions of Americans annually. Areas that are likely to ulcerate have been associated with increased local skin temperatures due to inflammation and enzymatic autolysis of tissue. Conventional methods to assess skin, including inspection and palpation, may be valuable approaches, but usually they do not detect changes in skin integrity until an ulcer has already developed. Conversely, infrared imaging is a technology able to assess the integrity of the skin and its many layers, thus having the potential to index the cascade of physiological events in the prevention, assessment, and management of foot ulcers. In this paper, we propose a technique, asymmetry analysis, to automatically analyze the infrared images in order to detect inflammation. Preliminary results show that the proposed technique can be reliable and efficient to detect inflammation and, hence, predict potential ulceration.

  16. Online Malicious Behavior Detection in Collaborative Spectrum Sensing: A Change Detection Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Yao

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Intelligent attackers in collaborative spectrum sensing system could act as honest users to conceal themselves and start malicious behavior abruptly since an unpredictable time slot. Affected by honest behavior before attacking time, traditional malicious behavior detection (MBD algorithms are not agile enough to identify the abrupt change of behavior. To alleviate this challenge, in this paper, we propose the Rao test-based malicious behavior detection (RT-MBD algorithm, which could detect the malicious behavior with unknown parameter and unknown starting time. The proposed RT-MBD is not affected by honest behavior before attacking time and has a shorter detection delay with constraint of a certain false alarm rate than conventional algorithms. Performance of RT-MBD is validated by both mathematical proof and numerical experiments.

  17. Urban change detection of integrating remote sensing and GIS: taking Tianjin City for example

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dan; Cai, Jianming; Zhou, Jing; Wang, Zhihua

    2008-12-01

    One Landsat5 TM image of 1993/6/15 and one Landsat7 ETM+ image of 2001/5/12 about Tianjin whose path/row are both122/33 have been used for this study. An integrated RS and GIS approach is presented for change detection. Based on summarizing the methods of change detection and analyzing the disadvantages of traditional approaches, multivariate alteration detection based on the canonical correlation analysis is introduced. Firstly, canonical transform is adopted for the preprocessed images. Then, the sixth component containing the maximal change message is processed and the change message is extractd. Moreover, the binary image is vectorized and the vectorized maps are overlapped with the original images separately. So the change about two time phases is compared. Subsequently, the database is established based on the basic space data such as road maps and maps showing present condition of land utilization and urban planning maps as well as humane and socio-economic data. The results rooting in the image change detection are entered into GIS by vectorization and spatial overlay analyzed with already existent data. Finally, the urban built-up area is extracted and the validated precision is high. The urban expansion areas and dynamic change characteristic and reasons in Tianjin from 1993 to 2001 have been revealed and discussed. Comparing with the Tianjin city master planning (1996-2010), it shows that urban expansion change is coincident with urban planning implementation.

  18. Building Change Detection from Harvey using Unmanned Aerial System (UAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, A.; Yeom, J.; Jung, J.; Choi, I.

    2017-12-01

    Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) is getting to be the most important technique in recent days since the fine spatial and high temporal resolution data previously unobtainable from traditional remote sensing platforms. Advanced UAS data can provide a great opportunity for disaster monitoring. Especially, building change detection is the one of the most important topics for damage assessment and recovery from disasters. This study is proposing a method to monitor building change with UAS data for Holiday Beach in Texas, where was directly hit by Harvey on 25 August 2017. This study adopted 3D change detection to monitor building damage and recovery levels with building height as well as natural color information. We used a rotorcraft UAS to collect RGB data twice on 9 September and 18 October 2017 after the hurricane. The UAS data was processed using Agisoft Photoscan Pro Software to generate super high resolution dataset including orthomosaic, DSM (Digital Surface Model), and 3D point cloud. We compared the processed dataset with an airborne image considerable as before-hurricane data, which was acquired on January 2016. Building damage and recovery levels were determined by height and color change. The result will show that UAS data is useful to assess building damage and recovery for affected area by the natural disaster such as Harvey.

  19. Automated baseline change detection -- Phases 1 and 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byler, E.

    1997-10-31

    The primary objective of this project is to apply robotic and optical sensor technology to the operational inspection of mixed toxic and radioactive waste stored in barrels, using Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD), based on image subtraction. Absolute change detection is based on detecting any visible physical changes, regardless of cause, between a current inspection image of a barrel and an archived baseline image of the same barrel. Thus, in addition to rust, the ABCD system can also detect corrosion, leaks, dents, and bulges. The ABCD approach and method rely on precise camera positioning and repositioning relative to the barrel and on feature recognition in images. The ABCD image processing software was installed on a robotic vehicle developed under a related DOE/FETC contract DE-AC21-92MC29112 Intelligent Mobile Sensor System (IMSS) and integrated with the electronics and software. This vehicle was designed especially to navigate in DOE Waste Storage Facilities. Initial system testing was performed at Fernald in June 1996. After some further development and more extensive integration the prototype integrated system was installed and tested at the Radioactive Waste Management Facility (RWMC) at INEEL beginning in April 1997 through the present (November 1997). The integrated system, composed of ABCD imaging software and IMSS mobility base, is called MISS EVE (Mobile Intelligent Sensor System--Environmental Validation Expert). Evaluation of the integrated system in RWMC Building 628, containing approximately 10,000 drums, demonstrated an easy to use system with the ability to properly navigate through the facility, image all the defined drums, and process the results into a report delivered to the operator on a GUI interface and on hard copy. Further work is needed to make the brassboard system more operationally robust.

  20. Automated baseline change detection - Phases 1 and 2. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byler, E.

    1997-01-01

    The primary objective of this project is to apply robotic and optical sensor technology to the operational inspection of mixed toxic and radioactive waste stored in barrels, using Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD), based on image subtraction. Absolute change detection is based on detecting any visible physical changes, regardless of cause, between a current inspection image of a barrel and an archived baseline image of the same barrel. Thus, in addition to rust, the ABCD system can also detect corrosion, leaks, dents, and bulges. The ABCD approach and method rely on precise camera positioning and repositioning relative to the barrel and on feature recognition in images. The ABCD image processing software was installed on a robotic vehicle developed under a related DOE/FETC contract DE-AC21-92MC29112 Intelligent Mobile Sensor System (IMSS) and integrated with the electronics and software. This vehicle was designed especially to navigate in DOE Waste Storage Facilities. Initial system testing was performed at Fernald in June 1996. After some further development and more extensive integration the prototype integrated system was installed and tested at the Radioactive Waste Management Facility (RWMC) at INEEL beginning in April 1997 through the present (November 1997). The integrated system, composed of ABCD imaging software and IMSS mobility base, is called MISS EVE (Mobile Intelligent Sensor System--Environmental Validation Expert). Evaluation of the integrated system in RWMC Building 628, containing approximately 10,000 drums, demonstrated an easy to use system with the ability to properly navigate through the facility, image all the defined drums, and process the results into a report delivered to the operator on a GUI interface and on hard copy. Further work is needed to make the brassboard system more operationally robust

  1. Non-linear laws of echoic memory and auditory change detection in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Inui, Koji; Urakawa, Tomokazu; Yamashiro, Koya; Otsuru, Naofumi; Nishihara, Makoto; Takeshima, Yasuyuki; Keceli, Sumru; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The detection of any abrupt change in the environment is important to survival. Since memory of preceding sensory conditions is necessary for detecting changes, such a change-detection system relates closely to the memory system. Here we used an auditory change-related N1 subcomponent (change-N1) of event-related brain potentials to investigate cortical mechanisms underlying change detection and echoic memory. Results Change-N1 was elicited by a simple paradigm with two to...

  2. VEHICLE LOCALIZATION BY LIDAR POINT CORRELATION IMPROVED BY CHANGE DETECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schlichting

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available LiDAR sensors are proven sensors for accurate vehicle localization. Instead of detecting and matching features in the LiDAR data, we want to use the entire information provided by the scanners. As dynamic objects, like cars, pedestrians or even construction sites could lead to wrong localization results, we use a change detection algorithm to detect these objects in the reference data. If an object occurs in a certain number of measurements at the same position, we mark it and every containing point as static. In the next step, we merge the data of the single measurement epochs to one reference dataset, whereby we only use static points. Further, we also use a classification algorithm to detect trees. For the online localization of the vehicle, we use simulated data of a vertical aligned automotive LiDAR sensor. As we only want to use static objects in this case as well, we use a random forest classifier to detect dynamic scan points online. Since the automotive data is derived from the LiDAR Mobile Mapping System, we are able to use the labelled objects from the reference data generation step to create the training data and further to detect dynamic objects online. The localization then can be done by a point to image correlation method using only static objects. We achieved a localization standard deviation of about 5 cm (position and 0.06° (heading, and were able to successfully localize the vehicle in about 93 % of the cases along a trajectory of 13 km in Hannover, Germany.

  3. Differential thermal analysis microsystem for explosive detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Jesper K.; Greve, Anders; Senesac, L.; Thundat, T.; Boisen, A.

    2011-06-01

    A micro differential thermal analysis (DTA) system is used for detection of trace explosive particles. The DTA system consists of two silicon micro chips with integrated heaters and temperature sensors. One chip is used for reference and one for the measurement sample. The sensor is constructed as a small silicon nitride membrane incorporating heater elements and a temperature measurement resistor. In this manuscript the DTA system is described and tested by measuring calorimetric response of 3 different kinds of explosives (TNT, RDX and PETN). This project is carried out under the framework of the Xsense project at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) which combines four independent sensing techniques, these micro DNT sensors will be included in handheld explosives detectors with applications in homeland security and landmine clearance.

  4. Wavelet coherence analysis of change blindness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memon, I.; Kalhoro, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Change blindness is the incapability of the brain to detect substantial visual changes in the presence of other visual interruption. The objectives of this study are to examine the EEG (Electroencephalographic) based changes in functional connectivity of the brain due to the change blindness. The functional connectivity was estimated using the wavelet-based MSC (Magnitude Square Coherence) function of ERPs (Event Related Potentials). The ERPs of 30 subjects were used and were recorded using the visual attention experiment in which subjects were instructed to detect changes in visual stimulus presented before them through the computer monitor. The two-way ANOVA statistical test revealed significant increase in both gamma and theta band MSCs, and significant decrease in beta band MSC for change detection trials. These findings imply that change blindness might be associated to the lack of functional connectivity in gamma and theta bands and increase of functional connectivity in beta band. Since gamma, theta, and beta frequency bands reflect different functions of cognitive process such as maintenance, encoding, retrieval, and matching and work load of VSTM (Visual Short Term Memory), the change in functional connectivity might be correlated to these cognitive processes during change blindness. (author)

  5. Development of vibrational analysis for detection of antisymmetric shells

    CERN Document Server

    Esmailzadeh-Khadem, S; Rezaee, M

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, vibrational behavior of bodies of revolution with different types of structural faults is studied. Since vibrational characteristics of structures are natural properties of system, the existence of any structural faults causes measurable changes in these properties. Here, this matter is demonstrated. In other words, vibrational behavior of a body of revolution with no structural faults is analyzed by two methods of I) numerical analysis using super sap software, II) Experimental model analysis, and natural frequencies and mode shapes are obtained. Then, different types of cracks are introduced in the structure, and analysis is repeated and the results are compared. Based on this study, one may perform crack detection by measuring the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the samples and comparing with reference information obtained from the vibration analysis of the original structure with no fault.

  6. Development of vibrational analysis for detection of antisymmetric shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esmailzadeh Khadem, S.; Mahmoodi, M.; Rezaee, M.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, vibrational behavior of bodies of revolution with different types of structural faults is studied. Since vibrational characteristics of structures are natural properties of system, the existence of any structural faults causes measurable changes in these properties. Here, this matter is demonstrated. In other words, vibrational behavior of a body of revolution with no structural faults is analyzed by two methods of I) numerical analysis using super sap software, II) Experimental model analysis, and natural frequencies and mode shapes are obtained. Then, different types of cracks are introduced in the structure, and analysis is repeated and the results are compared. Based on this study, one may perform crack detection by measuring the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the samples and comparing with reference information obtained from the vibration analysis of the original structure with no fault

  7. Infrared landmine detection and thermal model analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwering, P.B.W.; Kokonozi, A.; Carter, L.J.; Lensen, H.A.; Franken, E.M.

    2001-01-01

    Infrared imagers are capable of the detection of surface laid mines. Several sensor fused land mine detection systems make use of metal detectors, ground penetrating radar and infrared imagers. Infrared detection systems are sensitive to apparent temperature contrasts and their detection

  8. Abrupt change point detection of annual maximum precipitation using fused lasso

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jong-June; Sung, Jang Hyun; Chung, Eun-Sung

    2016-07-01

    Because the widely used Bayesian change point analysis (BCPA) is generally applied to the normal distribution, it cannot be freely used to the annual maximum precipitations (AMP) in South Korea. Therefore, this study proposed the fused lasso penalty function to detect the change point of AMP which can be generally fitted by using the Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution in South Korea. First, four numerical experiments are conducted to compare the detection performances between BCPA and fused lasso method. As a result, fused lasso shows the superiority of the data generated by GEV distribution having skewness. The fused lasso method is applied to 63 weather stations in South Korea and then 17 stations having any change points from BCPA and the GEV fused lasso are analyzed. Similar to the numerical analyses, the GEV fused lasso method can delicately detect the change point of AMPs. After the change point, the means of AMPs did not go back to the previous. Alternately, BCPA can be stated to find variation points not change points because the means returned to their original values as time progressed. Therefore, it can be concluded that the GEV fused lasso method detects the change points of non-stationary AMPs of South Korea. This study can be extended to more extreme distributions for various meteorological variables.

  9. Sequential Change-Point Detection via Online Convex Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Cao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Sequential change-point detection when the distribution parameters are unknown is a fundamental problem in statistics and machine learning. When the post-change parameters are unknown, we consider a set of detection procedures based on sequential likelihood ratios with non-anticipating estimators constructed using online convex optimization algorithms such as online mirror descent, which provides a more versatile approach to tackling complex situations where recursive maximum likelihood estimators cannot be found. When the underlying distributions belong to a exponential family and the estimators satisfy the logarithm regret property, we show that this approach is nearly second-order asymptotically optimal. This means that the upper bound for the false alarm rate of the algorithm (measured by the average-run-length meets the lower bound asymptotically up to a log-log factor when the threshold tends to infinity. Our proof is achieved by making a connection between sequential change-point and online convex optimization and leveraging the logarithmic regret bound property of online mirror descent algorithm. Numerical and real data examples validate our theory.

  10. Advances in face detection and facial image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Celebi, M; Smolka, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the state-of-the-art in face detection and analysis. It outlines new research directions, including in particular psychology-based facial dynamics recognition, aimed at various applications such as behavior analysis, deception detection, and diagnosis of various psychological disorders. Topics of interest include face and facial landmark detection, face recognition, facial expression and emotion analysis, facial dynamics analysis, face classification, identification, and clustering, and gaze direction and head pose estimation, as well as applications of face analysis.

  11. Street-side vehicle detection, classification and change detection using mobile laser scanning data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wen; Vallet, Bruno; Schindler, Konrad; Paparoditis, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Statistics on street-side car parks, e.g. occupancy rates, parked vehicle types, parking durations, are of great importance for urban planning and policy making. Related studies, e.g. vehicle detection and classification, mostly focus on static images or video. Whereas mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems are increasingly utilized for urban street environment perception due to their direct 3D information acquisition, high accuracy and movability. In this paper, we design a complete system for car park monitoring, including vehicle recognition, localization, classification and change detection, from laser scanning point clouds. The experimental data are acquired by an MLS system using high frequency laser scanner which scans the streets vertically along the system's moving trajectory. The point clouds are firstly classified as ground, building façade, and street objects which are then segmented using state-of-the-art methods. Each segment is treated as an object hypothesis, and its geometric features are extracted. Moreover, a deformable vehicle model is fitted to each object. By fitting an explicit model to the vehicle points, detailed information, such as precise position and orientation, can be obtained. The model parameters are also treated as vehicle features. Together with the geometric features, they are applied to a supervised learning procedure for vehicle or non-vehicle recognition. The classes of detected vehicles are also investigated. Whether vehicles have changed across two datasets acquired at different times is detected to estimate the durations. Here, vehicles are trained pair-wisely. Two same or different vehicles are paired up as training samples. As a result, the vehicle recognition, classification and change detection accuracies are 95.9%, 86.0% and 98.7%, respectively. Vehicle modelling improves not only the recognition rate, but also the localization precision compared to bounding boxes.

  12. Early detection of structual changes in random signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Yoshiteru; Yokota, Katsuhiro

    1981-01-01

    Early detection of structual changes in observed random signal is very important from the point of system diagnosis. In this paper, the following procedures are applied to this problem and the results are compared. (1) auto-regressive model to random signal to calculate the prediction error, i.e., the defference between observed and predicted values. (2) auto-regressive method to caluculate the sum of the prediction error. (3) a method is based on AIC (Akaike Information Criterion). Simulation is made of these procedures, indicating their merits and demerits as a diagostic tools. (author)

  13. Image change detection systems, methods, and articles of manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, James L.; Lassahn, Gordon D.; Lancaster, Gregory D.

    2010-01-05

    Aspects of the invention relate to image change detection systems, methods, and articles of manufacture. According to one aspect, a method of identifying differences between a plurality of images is described. The method includes loading a source image and a target image into memory of a computer, constructing source and target edge images from the source and target images to enable processing of multiband images, displaying the source and target images on a display device of the computer, aligning the source and target edge images, switching displaying of the source image and the target image on the display device, to enable identification of differences between the source image and the target image.

  14. Neural Network Combination by Fuzzy Integral for Robust Change Detection in Remotely Sensed Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youcef Chibani

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Combining multiple neural networks has been used to improve the decision accuracy in many application fields including pattern recognition and classification. In this paper, we investigate the potential of this approach for land cover change detection. In a first step, we perform many experiments in order to find the optimal individual networks in terms of architecture and training rule. In the second step, different neural network change detectors are combined using a method based on the notion of fuzzy integral. This method combines objective evidences in the form of network outputs, with subjective measures of their performances. Various forms of the fuzzy integral, which are, namely, Choquet integral, Sugeno integral, and two extensions of Sugeno integral with ordered weighted averaging operators, are implemented. Experimental analysis using error matrices and Kappa analysis showed that the fuzzy integral outperforms individual networks and constitutes an appropriate strategy to increase the accuracy of change detection.

  15. A Bayesian hierarchical model for climate change detection and attribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzfuss, Matthias; Hammerling, Dorit; Smith, Richard L.

    2017-06-01

    Regression-based detection and attribution methods continue to take a central role in the study of climate change and its causes. Here we propose a novel Bayesian hierarchical approach to this problem, which allows us to address several open methodological questions. Specifically, we take into account the uncertainties in the true temperature change due to imperfect measurements, the uncertainty in the true climate signal under different forcing scenarios due to the availability of only a small number of climate model simulations, and the uncertainty associated with estimating the climate variability covariance matrix, including the truncation of the number of empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) in this covariance matrix. We apply Bayesian model averaging to assign optimal probabilistic weights to different possible truncations and incorporate all uncertainties into the inference on the regression coefficients. We provide an efficient implementation of our method in a software package and illustrate its use with a realistic application.

  16. Validation and comparison of intensity based methods for change detection in serial brain images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesjak, Žiga; Špiclin, Žiga; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo

    2014-03-01

    Detection of longitudinal changes in brain structures is a common clinical task when assessing the progress of cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, which manifest in appearing and disappearing white matter lesions (WMLs). Changes of WMLs are usually quanti ed by their manual outlines and compared across longi- tudinal, serial magnetic resonance (MR) brain images. Since manual outlining in 3D MR images is subjective and inaccurate, several automated methods were proposed so as to enhance the sensitivity, reliability and re- peatability of change detection of WMLs. However, the absence of publicly available synthetic or clinical MR image databases with corresponding ground truth of changes renders the validation and comparison of any new and existing automated methods highly subjective. In this paper, we focus on the validation and comparison of three state-of-the-art intensity based methods for detection of longitudinal changes of WMLs. To objectively assess the three methods we created several synthetic MR image databases using a generative lesion model, which was trained on manually outlined patches of WMLs in a clinical MR image database of 22 patients. Val- idation was also performed on clinical MR image database of MS patients. Performances of the three change detection methods were evaluated by computing the similarity index and sensitivity between the obtained and the ground truth binary change map. The obtained similarity indices were in the range of 0.40-0.77, which should be improved for clinical use, while the comparison of methods revealed that the intensity subtraction method achieved similar performance as the change vector analysis method, which employed two MR sequences for change detection. Third method was based on local steering kernels and exhibited stable performance both on synthetic and clinical MR image databases.

  17. Video Traffic Analysis for Abnormal Event Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    We propose the use of video imaging sensors for the detection and classification of abnormal events to be used primarily for mitigation of traffic congestion. Successful detection of such events will allow for new road guidelines; for rapid deploymen...

  18. Video traffic analysis for abnormal event detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    We propose the use of video imaging sensors for the detection and classification of abnormal events to : be used primarily for mitigation of traffic congestion. Successful detection of such events will allow for : new road guidelines; for rapid deplo...

  19. Detecting deforestation with a spectral change detection approach using multitemporal Landsat data: a case study of Kinabalu Park, Sabah, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phua, Mui-How; Tsuyuki, Satoshi; Furuya, Naoyuki; Lee, Jung Soo

    2008-09-01

    Tropical deforestation is occurring at an alarming rate, threatening the ecological integrity of protected areas. This makes it vital to regularly assess protected areas to confirm the efficacy of measures that protect that area from clearing. Satellite remote sensing offers a systematic and objective means for detecting and monitoring deforestation. This paper examines a spectral change approach to detect deforestation using pattern decomposition (PD) coefficients from multitemporal Landsat data. Our results show that the PD coefficients for soil and vegetation can be used to detect deforestation using change vector analysis (CVA). CVA analysis demonstrates that deforestation in the Kinabalu area, Sabah, Malaysia has significantly slowed from 1.2% in period 1 (1973 and 1991) to 0.1% in period 2 (1991 and 1996). A comparison of deforestation both inside and outside Kinabalu Park has highlighted the effectiveness of the park in protecting the tropical forest against clearing. However, the park is still facing pressure from the area immediately surrounding the park (the 1 km buffer zone) where the deforestation rate has remained unchanged.

  20. Modal Analysis for Crack Detection in Small Wind Turbine Blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulriksen, Martin Dalgaard; Skov, Jonas falk; Dickow, Kristoffer Ahrens

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to evaluate structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques based on modal analysis for crack detection in small wind turbine blades. A finite element (FE) model calibrated to measured modal parameters will be introduced to cracks with different sizes along one edge...... of the blade. Changes in modal parameters from the FE model are compared with data obtained from experimental tests. These comparisons will be used to validate the FE model and subsequently discuss the usability of SHM techniques based on modal parameters for condition monitoring of wind turbine blades....

  1. Erosion and Deposition Monitoring Using High-Density Aerial Lidar and Geomorphic Change Detection Software Analysis at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos New Mexico, LA-UR-17-26743

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, T.; Kostrubala, T. L.; Muggleton, S. R.; Veenis, S.; Reid, K. D.; White, A. B.

    2017-12-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory storm water program installed sediment transport mitigation structures to reduce the migration of contaminants within the Los Alamos and Pueblo (LA/P) watershed in Los Alamos, NM. The goals of these structures are to minimize storm water runoff and erosion, enhance deposition, and reduce mobility of contaminated sediments. Previous geomorphological monitoring used GPS surveyed cross-sections on a reach scale to interpolate annual geomorphic change in sediment volumes. While monitoring has confirmed the LA/P watershed structures are performing as designed, the cross-section method proved difficult to estimate uncertainty and the coverage area was limited. A new method, using the Geomorphic Change Detection (GCD) plugin for ESRI ArcGIS developed by Wheaton et al. (2010), with high-density aerial lidar data, has been used to provide high confidence uncertainty estimates and greater areal coverage. Following the 2014 monsoon season, airborne lidar data has been collected annually and the resulting DEMs processed using the GCD method. Additionally, a more accurate characterization of low-amplitude geomorphic changes, typical of low-flow/low-rainfall monsoon years, has been documented by applying a spatially variable error to volume change calculations using the GCD based fuzzy inference system (FIS). The FIS method allows for the calculation of uncertainty based on data set quality and density e.g. point cloud density, ground slope, and degree of surface roughness. At the 95% confidence level, propagated uncertainty estimates of the 2015 and 2016 lidar DEM comparisons yielded detectable changes greater than 0.3 m - 0.46 m. Geomorphic processes identified and verified in the field are typified by low-amplitude, within-channel aggradation and incision and out of channel bank collapse that over the course of a monsoon season result in localized and dectetable change. While the resulting reach scale volume change from 2015 - 2016 was often

  2. Patch-Based Forest Change Detection from Landsat Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Joseph Hughes

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the species-rich and structurally complex forests of the Eastern United States, disturbance events are often partial and therefore difficult to detect using remote sensing methods. Here we present a set of new algorithms, collectively called Vegetation Regeneration and Disturbance Estimates through Time (VeRDET, which employ a novel patch-based approach to detect periods of vegetation disturbance, stability, and growth from the historical Landsat image records. VeRDET generates a yearly clear-sky composite from satellite imagery, calculates a spectral vegetation index for each pixel in that composite, spatially segments the vegetation index image into patches, temporally divides the time series into differently sloped segments, and then labels those segments as disturbed, stable, or regenerating. Segmentation at both the spatial and temporal steps are performed using total variation regularization, an algorithm originally designed for signal denoising. This study explores VeRDET’s effectiveness in detecting forest change using four vegetation indices and two parameters controlling the spatial and temporal scales of segmentation within a calibration region. We then evaluate algorithm effectiveness within a 386,000 km2 area in the Eastern United States where VeRDET has overall error of 23% and omission error across disturbances ranging from 22% to 78% depending on agent.

  3. Onboard Data Processor for Change-Detection Radar Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Yunling; Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Chien, Steve A.; Saatchi, Sasan S.; Clark, Duane

    2008-01-01

    A computer system denoted a change-detection onboard processor (CDOP) is being developed as a means of processing the digitized output of a synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) apparatus aboard an aircraft or spacecraft to generate images showing changes that have occurred in the terrain below between repeat passes of the aircraft or spacecraft over the terrain. When fully developed, the CDOP is intended to be capable of generating SAR images and/or SAR differential interferograms in nearly real time. The CDOP is expected to be especially useful for understanding some large-scale natural phenomena and/or mitigating natural hazards: For example, it could be used for near-real-time observation of surface changes caused by floods, landslides, forest fires, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, glaciers, and sea ice movements. It could also be used to observe such longer-term surface changes as those associated with growth of vegetation (relevant to estimation of wildfire fuel loads). The CDOP is, essentially, an interferometric SAR processor designed to operate aboard a radar platform.

  4. Detection of Wind Turbine Power Performance Abnormalities Using Eigenvalue Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrimpas, Georgios Alexandros; Sweeney, Christian Walsted; Marhadi, Kun Saptohartyadi

    2014-01-01

    Condition monitoring of wind turbines is a field of continu- ous research and development as new turbine configurations enter into the market and new failure modes appear. Systems utilising well established techniques from the energy and in- dustry sector, such as vibration analysis......, are commercially available and functioning successfully in fixed speed and vari- able speed turbines. Power performance analysis is a method specifically applicable to wind turbines for the detection of power generation changes due to external factors, such as ic- ing, internal factors, such as controller...... malfunction, or delib- erate actions, such as power de-rating. In this paper, power performance analysis is performed by sliding a time-power window and calculating the two eigenvalues corresponding to the two dimensional wind speed - power generation dis- tribution. The power is classified into five bins...

  5. A New Maximum-Likelihood Change Estimator for Two-Pass SAR Coherent Change Detection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, Daniel E.; Yocky, David A.; Jakowatz, Charles V,

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we derive a new optimal change metric to be used in synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) coherent change detection (CCD). Previous CCD methods tend to produce false alarm states (showing change when there is none) in areas of the image that have a low clutter-to-noise power ratio (CNR). The new estimator does not suffer from this shortcoming. It is a surprisingly simple expression, easy to implement, and is optimal in the maximum-likelihood (ML) sense. The estimator produces very impressive results on the CCD collects that we have tested.

  6. Multivariate Alteration Detection (MAD) and MAF Postprocessing in Multispectral, Bitemporal Image Data: New Approaches to Change Detection Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Conradsen, Knut; Simpson, James J.

    1998-01-01

    type analyses of simple difference images. Case studies with AHVRR and Landsat MSS data using simple linear stretching and masking of the change images show the usefulness of the new MAD and MAF/MAD change detection schemes. Ground truth observations confirm the detected changes. A simple simulation...

  7. Change Detection and Updating by Using Map Overlay for Buildings on Multi-scale Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Min

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to develop a method of change detection and updating for urban building features at smaller-scale maps from updated larger-scale maps. Firstly, an in-deeper and comprehensive analysis of changes between maps at different times and scales was discussed. Then, a technical framework of change extraction and updating was proposed based on the functions of map overlap and data enrichment. Finally, real-life data were used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, and results also showed that our method is flexible and suitable for layer-level updates.

  8. Sensitive and reliable detection of genomic imbalances in human neuroblastomas using comparative genomic hybridisation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gele, M.; van Roy, N.; Jauch, A.; Laureys, G.; Benoit, Y.; Schelfhout, V.; de Potter, C. R.; Brock, P.; Uyttebroeck, A.; Sciot, R.; Schuuring, E.; Versteeg, R.; Speleman, F.

    1997-01-01

    Deletions of the short arm of chromosome 1, extra copies of chromosome 17q and MYCN amplification are the most frequently encountered genetic changes in neuroblastomas. Standard techniques for detection of one or more of these genetic changes are karyotyping, FISH analysis and LOH analysis by

  9. Detection and Attribution of temperature changes in the mountainous western United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfils, C.; Santer, B. D.; Pierce, D. W.; Bala, G.; Barnett, T. P.; Hidalgo, H. G.; Wood, A. W.; Dettinger, M.; Cayan, D. R.; Mirin, A.; Das, T.

    2007-12-01

    Under climate change, one of the major challenges that water managers face in the western United States is adequately meeting the water demand while minimizing the flood risk. It has been shown that, in the second half of the 20th century, winters and springs have warmed, the partition of precipitations has changed, the snow pack melts earlier and that the timing of streamflows has shifted towards the winter. A better understanding of the primary causes of these changes are crucial to reliably project future water availability. Hydrological changes can be driven by temperature or by precipitation changes, or a combination of the two. In this study, which is part of a more integrated analysis focusing on the detection and attribution of changes in the hydrological cycle, we raise the following questions: What are the causes of temperatures changes in the mountainous regions in the second half of the 20th century? Can we verify whether the observed earlier melting of snow is driven by human-induced temperature changes, rather than by changes in precipitation or natural internal climate variability? To address these questions, we conduct a detection and attribution analysis based on daily minimum and maximum temperatures, and on temperature variables that are more relevant to a potential shift in snowmelt (number of frost days and number of degree-days below 0C). We find that natural internal climate variability alone cannot explain the increase in temperature, the reduction of frost days and the decline in degree-days below 0C. External forcings agents such as the solar variability and volcanic eruptions cannot explain those changes either. Instead, we find a positive detection when the influence of anthropogenic greenhouse gases and sulphate aerosols effects are included in the climate forcings.

  10. Detection and Classification of Changes in Buildings from Airborne Laser Scanning Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudan Xu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The difficulty associated with the Lidar data change detection method is lack of data, which is mainly caused by occlusion or pulse absorption by the surface material, e.g., water. To address this challenge, we present a new strategy for detecting buildings that are “changed”, “unchanged”, or “unknown”, and quantifying the changes. The designation “unknown” is applied to locations where, due to lack of data in at least one of the epochs, it is not possible to reliably detect changes in the structure. The process starts with classified data sets in which buildings are extracted. Next, a point-to-plane surface difference map is generated by merging and comparing the two data sets. Context rules are applied to the difference map to distinguish between “changed”, “unchanged”, and “unknown”. Rules are defined to solve problems caused by the lack of data. Further, points labelled as “changed” are re-classified into changes to roofs, walls, dormers, cars, constructions above the roof line, and undefined objects. Next, all the classified changes are organized as changed building objects, and the geometric indices are calculated from their 3D minimum bounding boxes. Performance analysis showed that 80%–90% of real changes are found, of which approximately 50% are considered relevant.

  11. LAND COVER CHANGE DETECTION BASED ON GENETICALLY FEATURE AELECTION AND IMAGE ALGEBRA USING HYPERION HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. T. Seydi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Earth has always been under the influence of population growth and human activities. This process causes the changes in land use. Thus, for optimal management of the use of resources, it is necessary to be aware of these changes. Satellite remote sensing has several advantages for monitoring land use/cover resources, especially for large geographic areas. Change detection and attribution of cultivation area over time present additional challenges for correctly analyzing remote sensing imagery. In this regards, for better identifying change in multi temporal images we use hyperspectral images. Hyperspectral images due to high spectral resolution created special placed in many of field. Nevertheless, selecting suitable and adequate features/bands from this data is crucial for any analysis and especially for the change detection algorithms. This research aims to automatically feature selection for detect land use changes are introduced. In this study, the optimal band images using hyperspectral sensor using Hyperion hyperspectral images by using genetic algorithms and Ratio bands, we select the optimal band. In addition, the results reveal the superiority of the implemented method to extract change map with overall accuracy by a margin of nearly 79% using multi temporal hyperspectral imagery.

  12. Detecting changes in insect herbivore communities along a pollution gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eatough Jones, Michele; Paine, Timothy D.

    2006-01-01

    The forests surrounding the urban areas of the Los Angeles basin are impacted by ozone and nitrogen pollutants arising from urban areas. We examined changes in the herbivore communities of three prominent plant species (ponderosa pine, California black oak and bracken fern) at six sites along an air pollution gradient. Insects were extracted from foliage samples collected in spring, as foliage reached full expansion. Community differences were evaluated using total herbivore abundance, richness, Shannon-Weiner diversity, and discriminant function analysis. Even without conspicuous changes in total numbers, diversity or richness of herbivores, herbivore groups showed patterns of change that followed the air pollution gradient that were apparent through discriminant function analysis. For bracken fern and oak, chewing insects were more dominant at high pollution sites. Oak herbivore communities showed the strongest effect. These changes in herbivore communities may affect nutrient cycling in forest systems. - Differences in insect herbivore communities were associated with an ambient air pollution gradient in the mixed conifer forest outside the Los Angeles area

  13. Computerized Analysis and Detection of Missed Cancer in Screening Mammogram

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Lihua

    2004-01-01

    This project is to explore an innovative CAD strategy for improving early detection of breast cancer in screening mammograms by focusing on computerized analysis and detection of cancers missed by radiologists...

  14. Computer Analysis and Detection of Missed Cancer in Screening Mammogram

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Lihua

    2006-01-01

    This project is to explore an innovative CAD strategy for improving early detection of breast cancer in screening mammograms by focusing on computerized analysis and detection of cancers missed by radiologists...

  15. Computerized Analysis and Detection of Missed Cancer in Screening Mammogram

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Lihua

    2007-01-01

    This project is to explore an innovative CAD strategy for improving early detection of breast cancer in screening mammograms by focusing on computerized analysis and detection of cancers missed by radiologists...

  16. Computerized Analysis and Detection of Missed Cancer in Screening Mammogram

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Lihua

    2005-01-01

    This project is to explore an innovative CAD strategy for improving early detection of breast cancer in screening mammograms by focusing on computerized analysis and detection of cancers missed by radiologists...

  17. Decadal Detectability of Anthropogenic Hydroclimate Changes over North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.; Delworth, T. L.

    2017-12-01

    Future hydroclimate changes consist of shifts in mean state resulting from anthropogenic forcing and contributions from natural climate variability. Considering the inherently limited predictability of natural climate variability, our confidence in projections of future hydroclimate changes relies on a robust assessment of anthropogenic shifts in mean state. Assessment of anthropogenic shifts in near-term projections is challenging because the "signal" of anthropogenic changes is modest compared to the "noise" of natural variability; however, this "signal to noise" ratio can be greatly improved in a large model ensemble that contains the same "signal" but different "noise". Here using multiple large ensembles from two state-of-the-art climate models, we assess the decadal shifts in precipitation-minus-evaporation (PmE) mean state caused by anthropogenic forcing, focusing on North America during 2000 2050. Anthropogenic forcing is projected to cause significant (against internal climate variability) shifts in PmE mean state relative to the 1950 1999 climatology over 50 70% of North America by 2050. The earliest detectable signals include, during November-April, a moistening over northeastern North America and a drying over southwestern North America and, during May-October, a drying over central North America. The central drying is largely attributable to anthropogenic warming. Changes in submonthly transient eddies account for the northeastern moistening and central drying while monthly atmospheric circulation changes explain the southwestern drying. Despite these significant anthropogenic shifts in PmE mean state, large irreducible uncertainties, caused primarily by atmosphere/land internal dynamics, remain in individual projections and are of substantial relevance for policy planning.

  18. Optimal Regulatory Circuit Topologies for Fold-Change Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Miri; Szekely, Pablo; Mayo, Avi; Alon, Uri

    2017-02-22

    Evolution repeatedly converges on only a few regulatory circuit designs that achieve a given function. This simplicity helps us understand biological networks. However, why so few circuits are rediscovered by evolution is unclear. We address this question for the case of fold-change detection (FCD): a response to relative changes of input rather than absolute changes. Two types of FCD circuits recur in biological systems-the incoherent feedforward and non-linear integral-feedback loops. We performed an analytical screen of all three-node circuits in a class comprising ∼500,000 topologies. We find that FCD is rare, but still there are hundreds of FCD topologies. The two experimentally observed circuits are among the very few minimal circuits that optimally trade off speed, noise resistance, and response amplitude. This suggests a way to understand why evolution converges on only few topologies for a given function and provides FCD designs for synthetic construction and future discovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Robust real-time change detection in high jitter.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonson, Katherine Mary; Ma, Tian J.

    2009-08-01

    A new method is introduced for real-time detection of transient change in scenes observed by staring sensors that are subject to platform jitter, pixel defects, variable focus, and other real-world challenges. The approach uses flexible statistical models for the scene background and its variability, which are continually updated to track gradual drift in the sensor's performance and the scene under observation. Two separate models represent temporal and spatial variations in pixel intensity. For the temporal model, each new frame is projected into a low-dimensional subspace designed to capture the behavior of the frame data over a recent observation window. Per-pixel temporal standard deviation estimates are based on projection residuals. The second approach employs a simple representation of jitter to generate pixelwise moment estimates from a single frame. These estimates rely on spatial characteristics of the scene, and are used gauge each pixel's susceptibility to jitter. The temporal model handles pixels that are naturally variable due to sensor noise or moving scene elements, along with jitter displacements comparable to those observed in the recent past. The spatial model captures jitter-induced changes that may not have been seen previously. Change is declared in pixels whose current values are inconsistent with both models.

  20. Combining voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging to detect age-related brain changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmbeck, Jan T; Brassen, Stefanie; Weber-Fahr, Wolfgang; Braus, Dieter F

    2006-04-03

    The present study combined optimized voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging to detect age-related brain changes. We compared grey matter density maps (grey matter voxel-based morphometry) and white matter fractional anisotropy maps (diffusion tensor imaging-voxel-based morphometry) between two groups of 17 younger and 17 older women. Older women exhibited reduced white matter fractional anisotropy as well as decreased grey matter density most prominently in the frontal, limbic, parietal and temporal lobes. A discriminant analysis identified four frontal and limbic grey and white matter areas that separated the two groups most effectively. We conclude that grey matter voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging voxel-based morphometry are well suited for the detection of age-related changes and their combination provides high accuracy when detecting the neural correlates of aging.

  1. Prairie Change Analysis 1991-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This dataset displays the results of a prairie/savanna change analysis study completed in May 2010. The area reviewed consists of 1,521 sites identified by Minnesota...

  2. Automatic Change Detection for Real-Time Monitoring of EEG Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Gao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, automatic change detection for real-time monitoring of electroencephalogram (EEG signals has attracted widespread interest with a large number of clinical applications. However, it is still a challenging problem. This paper presents a novel framework for this task where joint time-domain features are firstly computed to extract temporal fluctuations of a given EEG data stream; and then, an auto-regressive (AR linear model is adopted to model the data and temporal anomalies are subsequently calculated from that model to reflect the possibilities that a change occurs; a non-parametric statistical test based on Randomized Power Martingale (RPM is last performed for making change decision from the resulting anomaly scores. We conducted experiments on the publicly-available Bern-Barcelona EEG database where promising results for terms of detection precision (96.97%, detection recall (97.66% as well as computational efficiency have been achieved. Meanwhile, we also evaluated the proposed method for real detection of seizures occurrence for a monitoring epilepsy patient. The results of experiments by using both the testing database and real application demonstrated the effectiveness and feasibility of the method for the purpose of change detection in EEG signals. The proposed framework has two additional properties: (1 it uses a pre-defined AR model for modeling of the past observed data so that it can be operated in an unsupervised manner, and (2 it uses an adjustable threshold to achieve a scalable decision making so that a coarse-to-fine detection strategy can be developed for quick detection or further analysis purposes.

  3. A comprehensive change detection method for updating the National Land Cover Database to circa 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Suming; Yang, Limin; Danielson, Patrick; Homer, Collin G.; Fry, Joyce; Xian, George

    2013-01-01

    The importance of characterizing, quantifying, and monitoring land cover, land use, and their changes has been widely recognized by global and environmental change studies. Since the early 1990s, three U.S. National Land Cover Database (NLCD) products (circa 1992, 2001, and 2006) have been released as free downloads for users. The NLCD 2006 also provides land cover change products between 2001 and 2006. To continue providing updated national land cover and change datasets, a new initiative in developing NLCD 2011 is currently underway. We present a new Comprehensive Change Detection Method (CCDM) designed as a key component for the development of NLCD 2011 and the research results from two exemplar studies. The CCDM integrates spectral-based change detection algorithms including a Multi-Index Integrated Change Analysis (MIICA) model and a novel change model called Zone, which extracts change information from two Landsat image pairs. The MIICA model is the core module of the change detection strategy and uses four spectral indices (CV, RCVMAX, dNBR, and dNDVI) to obtain the changes that occurred between two image dates. The CCDM also includes a knowledge-based system, which uses critical information on historical and current land cover conditions and trends and the likelihood of land cover change, to combine the changes from MIICA and Zone. For NLCD 2011, the improved and enhanced change products obtained from the CCDM provide critical information on location, magnitude, and direction of potential change areas and serve as a basis for further characterizing land cover changes for the nation. An accuracy assessment from the two study areas show 100% agreement between CCDM mapped no-change class with reference dataset, and 18% and 82% disagreement for the change class for WRS path/row p22r39 and p33r33, respectively. The strength of the CCDM is that the method is simple, easy to operate, widely applicable, and capable of capturing a variety of natural and

  4. Experiences in Traceroute and Bandwidth Change Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logg, C

    2004-06-23

    SLAC has been studying end-to-end WAN bandwidth availability and achievability for 2.5 years via IEPM-BW [1]. IEPM-BW performs network intensive tests every 90 minutes. Based on that experience we have also developed a light weight available bandwidth (ABwE [2]) measurement tool that can make a measurement within a second. We are now extending this to a WAN measurement and detection system (IEPM-LITE) aimed at more quickly detecting and troubleshooting network performance problems and also to be more friendly on lower performance paths. IEPM-LITE uses ping, forward traceroutes, and ABwE sensors to monitor, in close to real-time, Round Trip Times (RTT), changes in available bandwidth and routes to and from target hosts. This paper discusses the experiences, techniques and algorithms used to detect and report on significant traceroute and bandwidth changes. The ultimate aim is to develop a lightweight WAN network performance monitoring system that can detect, in near real time, significant changes and generate alerts.

  5. Experiences in Traceroute and Bandwidth Change Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logg, C

    2004-01-01

    SLAC has been studying end-to-end WAN bandwidth availability and achievability for 2.5 years via IEPM-BW [1]. IEPM-BW performs network intensive tests every 90 minutes. Based on that experience we have also developed a light weight available bandwidth (ABwE [2]) measurement tool that can make a measurement within a second. We are now extending this to a WAN measurement and detection system (IEPM-LITE) aimed at more quickly detecting and troubleshooting network performance problems and also to be more friendly on lower performance paths. IEPM-LITE uses ping, forward traceroutes, and ABwE sensors to monitor, in close to real-time, Round Trip Times (RTT), changes in available bandwidth and routes to and from target hosts. This paper discusses the experiences, techniques and algorithms used to detect and report on significant traceroute and bandwidth changes. The ultimate aim is to develop a lightweight WAN network performance monitoring system that can detect, in near real time, significant changes and generate alerts

  6. Geospatial Image Stream Processing: Models, techniques, and applications in remote sensing change detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Velasquez, Carlos Alberto

    Detection of changes in environmental phenomena using remotely sensed data is a major requirement in the Earth sciences, especially in natural disaster related scenarios where real-time detection plays a crucial role in the saving of human lives and the preservation of natural resources. Although various approaches formulated to model multidimensional data can in principle be applied to the inherent complexity of remotely sensed geospatial data, there are still challenging peculiarities that demand a precise characterization in the context of change detection, particularly in scenarios of fast changes. In the same vein, geospatial image streams do not fit appropriately in the standard Data Stream Management System (DSMS) approach because these systems mainly deal with tuple-based streams. Recognizing the necessity for a systematic effort to address the above issues, the work presented in this thesis is a concrete step toward the foundation and construction of an integrated Geospatial Image Stream Processing framework, GISP. First, we present a data and metadata model for remotely sensed image streams. We introduce a precise characterization of images and image streams in the context of remotely sensed geospatial data. On this foundation, we define spatially-aware temporal operators with a consistent semantics for change analysis tasks. We address the change detection problem in settings where multiple image stream sources are available, and thus we introduce an architectural design for the processing of geospatial image streams from multiple sources. With the aim of targeting collaborative scientific environments, we construct a realization of our architecture based on Kepler, a robust and widely used scientific workflow management system, as the underlying computational support; and open data and Web interface standards, as a means to facilitate the interoperability of GISP instances with other processing infrastructures and client applications. We demonstrate our

  7. Detection of anthropogenic climate change in satellite records of ocean chlorophyll and productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Henson

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Global climate change is predicted to alter the ocean's biological productivity. But how will we recognise the impacts of climate change on ocean productivity? The most comprehensive information available on its global distribution comes from satellite ocean colour data. Now that over ten years of satellite-derived chlorophyll and productivity data have accumulated, can we begin to detect and attribute climate change-driven trends in productivity? Here we compare recent trends in satellite ocean colour data to longer-term time series from three biogeochemical models (GFDL, IPSL and NCAR. We find that detection of climate change-driven trends in the satellite data is confounded by the relatively short time series and large interannual and decadal variability in productivity. Thus, recent observed changes in chlorophyll, primary production and the size of the oligotrophic gyres cannot be unequivocally attributed to the impact of global climate change. Instead, our analyses suggest that a time series of ~40 years length is needed to distinguish a global warming trend from natural variability. In some regions, notably equatorial regions, detection times are predicted to be shorter (~20–30 years. Analysis of modelled chlorophyll and primary production from 2001–2100 suggests that, on average, the climate change-driven trend will not be unambiguously separable from decadal variability until ~2055. Because the magnitude of natural variability in chlorophyll and primary production is larger than, or similar to, the global warming trend, a consistent, decades-long data record must be established if the impact of climate change on ocean productivity is to be definitively detected.

  8. Detection of changes in flow regime of rivers in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wrzesiński Dariusz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to detect changes in flow regime of rivers in Poland. On the basis of daily discharges recorded in 1951-2010 at 159 gauging stations located on 94 rivers regularities in the variability of the river flow characteristics in the multi-year period and in the annual cycle were identified and also their spatial uniformity was examined. In order to identify changes in the characteristics of river regime, similarities of empirical distribution functions of the 5-day sets (pentads of discharges were analyzed and the percent shares of similar and dissimilar distributions of the 5-day discharge frequencies in the successive 20-year sub-periods were compared with the average values of discharges recorded in 1951-2010. Three alternative methods of river classification were employed and in the classification procedure use was made of the Ward’s hierarchical clustering method. This resulted in identification of groups of rivers different in terms of the degree of transformation of their hydrological regimes in the multi-year and annual patterns.

  9. The Decay of Motor Memories Is Independent of Context Change Detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew E Brennan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available When the error signals that guide human motor learning are withheld following training, recently-learned motor memories systematically regress toward untrained performance. It has previously been hypothesized that this regression results from an intrinsic volatility in these memories, resulting in an inevitable decay in the absence of ongoing error signals. However, a recently-proposed alternative posits that even recently-acquired motor memories are intrinsically stable, decaying only if a change in context is detected. This new theory, the context-dependent decay hypothesis, makes two key predictions: (1 after error signals are withheld, decay onset should be systematically delayed until the context change is detected; and (2 manipulations that impair detection by masking context changes should result in prolonged delays in decay onset and reduced decay amplitude at any given time. Here we examine the decay of motor adaptation following the learning of novel environmental dynamics in order to carefully evaluate this hypothesis. To account for potential issues in previous work that supported the context-dependent decay hypothesis, we measured decay using a balanced and baseline-referenced experimental design that allowed for direct comparisons between analogous masked and unmasked context changes. Using both an unbiased variant of the previous decay onset analysis and a novel highly-powered group-level version of this analysis, we found no evidence for systematically delayed decay onset nor for the masked context change affecting decay amplitude or its onset time. We further show how previous estimates of decay onset latency can be substantially biased in the presence of noise, and even more so with correlated noise, explaining the discrepancy between the previous results and our findings. Our results suggest that the decay of motor memories is an intrinsic feature of error-based learning that does not depend on context change detection.

  10. The Decay of Motor Memories Is Independent of Context Change Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Andrew E.; Smith, Maurice A.

    2015-01-01

    When the error signals that guide human motor learning are withheld following training, recently-learned motor memories systematically regress toward untrained performance. It has previously been hypothesized that this regression results from an intrinsic volatility in these memories, resulting in an inevitable decay in the absence of ongoing error signals. However, a recently-proposed alternative posits that even recently-acquired motor memories are intrinsically stable, decaying only if a change in context is detected. This new theory, the context-dependent decay hypothesis, makes two key predictions: (1) after error signals are withheld, decay onset should be systematically delayed until the context change is detected; and (2) manipulations that impair detection by masking context changes should result in prolonged delays in decay onset and reduced decay amplitude at any given time. Here we examine the decay of motor adaptation following the learning of novel environmental dynamics in order to carefully evaluate this hypothesis. To account for potential issues in previous work that supported the context-dependent decay hypothesis, we measured decay using a balanced and baseline-referenced experimental design that allowed for direct comparisons between analogous masked and unmasked context changes. Using both an unbiased variant of the previous decay onset analysis and a novel highly-powered group-level version of this analysis, we found no evidence for systematically delayed decay onset nor for the masked context change affecting decay amplitude or its onset time. We further show how previous estimates of decay onset latency can be substantially biased in the presence of noise, and even more so with correlated noise, explaining the discrepancy between the previous results and our findings. Our results suggest that the decay of motor memories is an intrinsic feature of error-based learning that does not depend on context change detection. PMID:26111244

  11. Obtaining Accurate Change Detection Results from High-Resolution Satellite Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, N.; Bunch, W.; Fretz, R.; Kim, P.; Logan, T.; Smyth, M.; Zobrist, A.

    2012-01-01

    Multi-date acquisitions of high-resolution imaging satellites (e.g. GeoEye and WorldView), can display local changes of current economic interest. However, their large data volume precludes effective manual analysis, requiring image co-registration followed by image-to-image change detection, preferably with minimal analyst attention. We have recently developed an automatic change detection procedure that minimizes false-positives. The processing steps include: (a) Conversion of both the pre- and post- images to reflectance values (this step is of critical importance when different sensors are involved); reflectance values can be either top-of-atmosphere units or have full aerosol optical depth calibration applied using bi-directional reflectance knowledge. (b) Panchromatic band image-to-image co-registration, using an orthorectified base reference image (e.g. Digital Orthophoto Quadrangle) and a digital elevation model; this step can be improved if a stereo-pair of images have been acquired on one of the image dates. (c) Pan-sharpening of the multispectral data to assure recognition of change objects at the highest resolution. (d) Characterization of multispectral data in the post-image ( i.e. the background) using unsupervised cluster analysis. (e) Band ratio selection in the post-image to separate surface materials of interest from the background. (f) Preparing a pre-to-post change image. (g) Identifying locations where change has occurred involving materials of interest.

  12. Sequential Analysis: Hypothesis Testing and Changepoint Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-11

    ones are the P-wave and the S-wave. The P-wave is polarized in the source-to-receiver direction, namely from the epicenter of the earth - quake to the...a bound on the average frequency of false alarms. The theoretical study of quickest changepoint detection has been initiated in two different direc...detection techniques to run at high speeds and with low delay, combined with the generally low frequency of intrusion attempts, presents an interesting

  13. Change detection on LOD 2 building models with very high resolution spaceborne stereo imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Rongjun

    2014-10-01

    Due to the fast development of the urban environment, the need for efficient maintenance and updating of 3D building models is ever increasing. Change detection is an essential step to spot the changed area for data (map/3D models) updating and urban monitoring. Traditional methods based on 2D images are no longer suitable for change detection in building scale, owing to the increased spectral variability of the building roofs and larger perspective distortion of the very high resolution (VHR) imagery. Change detection in 3D is increasingly being investigated using airborne laser scanning data or matched Digital Surface Models (DSM), but rare study has been conducted regarding to change detection on 3D city models with VHR images, which is more informative but meanwhile more complicated. This is due to the fact that the 3D models are abstracted geometric representation of the urban reality, while the VHR images record everything. In this paper, a novel method is proposed to detect changes directly on LOD (Level of Detail) 2 building models with VHR spaceborne stereo images from a different date, with particular focus on addressing the special characteristics of the 3D models. In the first step, the 3D building models are projected onto a raster grid, encoded with building object, terrain object, and planar faces. The DSM is extracted from the stereo imagery by hierarchical semi-global matching (SGM). In the second step, a multi-channel change indicator is extracted between the 3D models and stereo images, considering the inherent geometric consistency (IGC), height difference, and texture similarity for each planar face. Each channel of the indicator is then clustered with the Self-organizing Map (SOM), with "change", "non-change" and "uncertain change" status labeled through a voting strategy. The "uncertain changes" are then determined with a Markov Random Field (MRF) analysis considering the geometric relationship between faces. In the third step, buildings are

  14. Remote Sensing Image Change Detection Based on NSCT-HMT Model and Its Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengyun Chen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditional image change detection based on a non-subsampled contourlet transform always ignores the neighborhood information’s relationship to the non-subsampled contourlet coefficients, and the detection results are susceptible to noise interference. To address these disadvantages, we propose a denoising method based on the non-subsampled contourlet transform domain that uses the Hidden Markov Tree model (NSCT-HMT for change detection of remote sensing images. First, the ENVI software is used to calibrate the original remote sensing images. After that, the mean-ratio operation is adopted to obtain the difference image that will be denoised by the NSCT-HMT model. Then, using the Fuzzy Local Information C-means (FLICM algorithm, the difference image is divided into the change area and unchanged area. The proposed algorithm is applied to a real remote sensing data set. The application results show that the proposed algorithm can effectively suppress clutter noise, and retain more detailed information from the original images. The proposed algorithm has higher detection accuracy than the Markov Random Field-Fuzzy C-means (MRF-FCM, the non-subsampled contourlet transform-Fuzzy C-means clustering (NSCT-FCM, the pointwise approach and graph theory (PA-GT, and the Principal Component Analysis-Nonlocal Means (PCA-NLM denosing algorithm. Finally, the five algorithms are used to detect the southern boundary of the Gurbantunggut Desert in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China, and the results show that the proposed algorithm has the best effect on real remote sensing image change detection.

  15. Remote Sensing Image Change Detection Based on NSCT-HMT Model and Its Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pengyun; Zhang, Yichen; Jia, Zhenhong; Yang, Jie; Kasabov, Nikola

    2017-06-06

    Traditional image change detection based on a non-subsampled contourlet transform always ignores the neighborhood information's relationship to the non-subsampled contourlet coefficients, and the detection results are susceptible to noise interference. To address these disadvantages, we propose a denoising method based on the non-subsampled contourlet transform domain that uses the Hidden Markov Tree model (NSCT-HMT) for change detection of remote sensing images. First, the ENVI software is used to calibrate the original remote sensing images. After that, the mean-ratio operation is adopted to obtain the difference image that will be denoised by the NSCT-HMT model. Then, using the Fuzzy Local Information C-means (FLICM) algorithm, the difference image is divided into the change area and unchanged area. The proposed algorithm is applied to a real remote sensing data set. The application results show that the proposed algorithm can effectively suppress clutter noise, and retain more detailed information from the original images. The proposed algorithm has higher detection accuracy than the Markov Random Field-Fuzzy C-means (MRF-FCM), the non-subsampled contourlet transform-Fuzzy C-means clustering (NSCT-FCM), the pointwise approach and graph theory (PA-GT), and the Principal Component Analysis-Nonlocal Means (PCA-NLM) denosing algorithm. Finally, the five algorithms are used to detect the southern boundary of the Gurbantunggut Desert in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China, and the results show that the proposed algorithm has the best effect on real remote sensing image change detection.

  16. Detection Of Alterations In Audio Files Using Spectrograph Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anandha Krishnan G

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The corresponding study was carried out to detect changes in audio file using spectrograph. An audio file format is a file format for storing digital audio data on a computer system. A sound spectrograph is a laboratory instrument that displays a graphical representation of the strengths of the various component frequencies of a sound as time passes. The objectives of the study were to find the changes in spectrograph of audio after altering them to compare altering changes with spectrograph of original files and to check for similarity and difference in mp3 and wav. Five different alterations were carried out on each audio file to analyze the differences between the original and the altered file. For altering the audio file MP3 or WAV by cutcopy the file was opened in Audacity. A different audio was then pasted to the audio file. This new file was analyzed to view the differences. By adjusting the necessary parameters the noise was reduced. The differences between the new file and the original file were analyzed. By adjusting the parameters from the dialog box the necessary changes were made. The edited audio file was opened in the software named spek where after analyzing a graph is obtained of that particular file which is saved for further analysis. The original audio graph received was combined with the edited audio file graph to see the alterations.

  17. Kernel principal component and maximum autocorrelation factor analyses for change detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Canty, Morton John

    2009-01-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) has often been used to detect change over time in remotely sensed images. A commonly used technique consists of finding the projections along the eigenvectors for data consisting of pair-wise (perhaps generalized) differences between corresponding spectral bands...... in Nevada acquired on successive passes of the Landsat-5 satellite in August-September 1991. The six-band images (the thermal band is omitted) with 1,000 by 1,000 28.5 m pixels were first processed with the iteratively re-weighted MAD (IR-MAD) algorithm in order to discriminate change. Then the MAD image...... was post-processed with both ordinary and kernel versions of PCA and MAF analysis. Kernel MAF suppresses the noisy no-change background much more successfully than ordinary MAF. The ratio between variances of the ordinary MAF 1 and the kernel MAF 1 (both scaled to unit variance) calculated in a no...

  18. Multi- and hyperspectral remote sensing change detection with generalized difference images by the IR-MAD method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Canty, Morton J.

    2005-01-01

    This contribution focuses on construction of more general difference images than simple differences in multivariate change detection. This is done via an iterated version of the canonical correlation analysis (CCA) based multivariate alteration detection (MAD) method combined with an EM-based met......This contribution focuses on construction of more general difference images than simple differences in multivariate change detection. This is done via an iterated version of the canonical correlation analysis (CCA) based multivariate alteration detection (MAD) method combined with an EM......-based method for determining thresholds for differentiating between change and no-change in the difference images, and for estimating the variance of the no-change observations. This variance is used to establish a single change/no-change image based on the general multivariate difference image. The resulting....../no-change image can be used to establish both change regions and to extract observations based on which a fully automated orthogonal regression analysis based normalization of the multivariate data between the two points in time can be developed. Also, regularization issues typically important in connection...

  19. A Universal High-Performance Correlation Analysis Detection Model and Algorithm for Network Intrusion Detection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongliang Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In big data era, the single detection techniques have already not met the demand of complex network attacks and advanced persistent threats, but there is no uniform standard to make different correlation analysis detection be performed efficiently and accurately. In this paper, we put forward a universal correlation analysis detection model and algorithm by introducing state transition diagram. Based on analyzing and comparing the current correlation detection modes, we formalize the correlation patterns and propose a framework according to data packet timing and behavior qualities and then design a new universal algorithm to implement the method. Finally, experiment, which sets up a lightweight intrusion detection system using KDD1999 dataset, shows that the correlation detection model and algorithm can improve the performance and guarantee high detection rates.

  20. Dynamic Changes Analysis and Hotspots Detection of Land Use in the Central Core Functional Area of Jing-Jin-Ji from 2000 to 2015 Based on Remote Sensing Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yafei Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article uses GIS spatial analysis and grid technologies to study the dynamic changes, hotspot regions, and driving forces in land use of the central core functional area of Jing-Jin-Ji. The research results are as follows: from 2000 to 2015, the main types of land use in the central core functional area of Jing-Jin-Ji are cultivated land, woodland, and built-up land. In the period of 2005–2010, the transfer between built-up land and cultivated land was frequent. The dynamic degree of single land use in unused land was highest. It also finds out that the dynamic degree of the integrated land use from 2005 to 2010 was higher. The center of gravity transfer of the dynamic degree of integrated land use was concentrated in research area. As for the hotspots, their number and scope are increasing, and the positions located in the edge of original main urban area and developed transportation network. The main characteristics of land use dynamic change in the study area are the rapid decrease of cultivated land area and rapid growth of built-up land. The spatial agglomeration of economic factors caused by human activities has an important influence on the spatial and temporal dynamic changes of land use.

  1. Visualization of and Software for Omnibus Test Based Change Detected in a Time Series of Polarimetric SAR Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Conradsen, Knut; Skriver, Henning

    2017-01-01

    Based on an omnibus likelihood ratio test statistic for the equality of several variance-covariance matrices following the complex Wishart distribution and a factorization of this test statistic with associated p-values, change analysis in a time series of multilook polarimetric SAR data...... in the covariance matrix representation is carried out. The omnibus test statistic and its factorization detect if and when change occurs. Using airborne EMISAR and spaceborne RADARSAT-2 data this paper focuses on change detection based on the p-values, on visualization of change at pixel as well as segment level......, and on computer software....

  2. INCREMENTAL PRINCIPAL COMPONENT ANALYSIS BASED OUTLIER DETECTION METHODS FOR SPATIOTEMPORAL DATA STREAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bhushan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we address outliers in spatiotemporal data streams obtained from sensors placed across geographically distributed locations. Outliers may appear in such sensor data due to various reasons such as instrumental error and environmental change. Real-time detection of these outliers is essential to prevent propagation of errors in subsequent analyses and results. Incremental Principal Component Analysis (IPCA is one possible approach for detecting outliers in such type of spatiotemporal data streams. IPCA has been widely used in many real-time applications such as credit card fraud detection, pattern recognition, and image analysis. However, the suitability of applying IPCA for outlier detection in spatiotemporal data streams is unknown and needs to be investigated. To fill this research gap, this paper contributes by presenting two new IPCA-based outlier detection methods and performing a comparative analysis with the existing IPCA-based outlier detection methods to assess their suitability for spatiotemporal sensor data streams.

  3. Empirical likelihood based detection procedure for change point in mean residual life functions under random censorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Ju; Ning, Wei; Gupta, Arjun K

    2016-05-01

    The mean residual life (MRL) function is one of the basic parameters of interest in survival analysis that describes the expected remaining time of an individual after a certain age. The study of changes in the MRL function is practical and interesting because it may help us to identify some factors such as age and gender that may influence the remaining lifetimes of patients after receiving a certain surgery. In this paper, we propose a detection procedure based on the empirical likelihood for the changes in MRL functions with right censored data. Two real examples are also given: Veterans' administration lung cancer study and Stanford heart transplant to illustrate the detecting procedure. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Analysis and Detection of Malicious Insiders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maybury, Mark; Chase, Penny; Cheikes, Brant; Brackney, Dick; Matzner, Sara; Hetherington, Tom; Wood, Brad; Sibley, Conner; Marin, Jack; Longstaff, Tom

    2005-01-01

    ...) actions, and associated observables. The paper outlines several prototype techniques developed to provide early warning of insider activity, including novel algorithms for structured analysis and data fusion...

  5. Analysis and Detection of Malicious Insiders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maybury, Mark; Chase, Penny; Cheikes, Brant; Brackney, Dick; Matzner, Sara; Hetherington, Tom; Wood, Brad; Sibley, Conner; Marin, Jack; Longstaff, Tom

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes a collaborative, six month ARDA NRRC challenge workshop to characterize and create analysis methods to counter sophisticated malicious insiders in the United States Intelligence Community...

  6. Detecting aroma changes of local flavored green tea (Camellia sinensis) using electronic nose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralisnawati, D.; Sukartiko, A. C.; Suryandono, A.; Triyana, K.

    2018-03-01

    Indonesia is currently the sixth largest tea producer in the world. However, consumption of the product in the country was considered low. Besides tea, the country also has various local flavor ingredients that are potential to be developed. The addition of local flavored ingredients such as ginger, lemon grass, and lime leaves on green tea products is gaining acceptance from consumers and producers. The aroma of local flavored green tea was suspected to changes during storage, while its sensory testing has some limitations. Therefore, the study aimed to detect aroma changes of local flavors added in green tea using electronic nose (e-nose), an instrument developed to mimic the function of the human nose. The test was performed on a four-gram sample. The data was collected with 120 seconds of sensing time and 60 seconds of blowing time. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to find out the aroma changes of local flavored green tea during storage. We observed that electronic nose could detect aroma changes of ginger flavored green tea from day 0 to day 6 with variance percentage 99.6%. Variance proportion of aroma changes of lemon grass flavored green tea from day 0 to day 6 was 99.3%. Variance proportion of aroma changes of lime leaves flavored green tea from day 0 to day 6 was 99.4%.

  7. Detection of hypoglycemia associated EEG changes during sleep in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snogdal, Lena Sønder; Folkestad, Lars; Elsborg, Rasmus; Remvig, Line Sofie; Beck-Nielsen, Henning; Thorsteinsson, Birger; Jennum, Poul; Gjerstad, Michaela; Juhl, Claus B

    2012-10-01

    Nocturnal hypoglycemia is a feared complication to insulin treated diabetes. Impaired awareness of hypoglycemia (IAH) increases the risk of severe hypoglycemia. EEG changes are demonstrated during daytime hypoglycemia. In this explorative study, we test the hypothesis that specific hypoglycemia-associated EEG-changes occur during sleep and are detectable in time for the patient to take action. Ten patients with type 1 diabetes (duration 23.7 years) with IAH were exposed to insulin-induced hypoglycemia during the daytime and during sleep. EEG was recorded and analyzed real-time by an automated multi-parameter algorithm. Participants received an auditory alarm when EEG changes met a predefined threshold, and were instructed to consume a meal. Seven out of eight participants developed hypoglycemia-associated EEG changes during daytime. During sleep, nine out of ten developed EEG changes (mean BG 2.0 mmol/l). Eight were awakened by the alarm. Four corrected hypoglycemia (mean BG 2.2 mmol/l), while four (mean BG 1.9 mmol/l) received glucose infusion. Two had false alarms. EEG-changes occurred irrespective of sleep stage. Post hoc improvement indicates the possibility of earlier detection of hypoglycemia. Continuous EEG monitoring and automated real-time analysis may constitute a novel technique for a hypoglycemia alarm in patients with IAH. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Detecting DNS Tunnels Using Character Frequency Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Born, Kenton; Gustafson, David

    2010-01-01

    High-bandwidth covert channels pose significant risks to sensitive and proprietary information inside company networks. Domain Name System (DNS) tunnels provide a means to covertly infiltrate and exfiltrate large amounts of information passed network boundaries. This paper explores the possibility of detecting DNS tunnels by analyzing the unigram, bigram, and trigram character frequencies of domains in DNS queries and responses. It is empirically shown how domains follow Zipf's law in a simil...

  9. Rapid detection of new and expanding human settlements in the Limpopo province of South Africa using a spatio-temporal change detection method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleynhans, W.; Salmon, B. P.; Wessels, K. J.; Olivier, J. C.

    2015-08-01

    Recent development has identified the benefits of using hyper-temporal satellite time series data for land cover change detection and classification in South Africa. In particular, the monitoring of human settlement expansion in the Limpopo province is of relevance as it is the one of the most pervasive forms of land-cover change in this province which covers an area of roughly 125 000 km2. In this paper, a spatio-temporal autocorrelation change detection (STACD) method is developed to improve the performance of a pixel based temporal Autocorrelation change detection (TACD) method previously proposed. The objective is to apply the algorithm to large areas to detect the conversion of natural vegetation to settlement which is then validated by an operator using additional data (such as high resolution imagery). Importantly, as the objective of the method is to indicate areas of potential change to operators for further analysis, a low false alarm rate is required while achieving an acceptable probability of detection. Results indicate that detection accuracies of 70% of new settlement instances are achievable at a false alarm rate of less than 1% with the STACD method, an improvement of up to 17% compared to the original TACD formulation.

  10. Detection and monitoring of neurotransmitters--a spectroscopic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manciu, Felicia S; Lee, Kendall H; Durrer, William G; Bennet, Kevin E

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that confocal Raman mapping spectroscopy provides rapid, detailed, and accurate neurotransmitter analysis, enabling millisecond time resolution monitoring of biochemical dynamics. As a prototypical demonstration of the power of the method, we present real-time in vitro serotonin, adenosine, and dopamine detection, and dopamine diffusion in an inhomogeneous organic gel, which was used as a substitute for neurologic tissue.  Dopamine, adenosine, and serotonin were used to prepare neurotransmitter solutions in distilled water. The solutions were applied to the surfaces of glass slides, where they interdiffused. Raman mapping was achieved by detecting nonoverlapping spectral signatures characteristic of the neurotransmitters with an alpha 300 WITec confocal Raman system, using 532 nm neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser excitation. Every local Raman spectrum was recorded in milliseconds and complete Raman mapping in a few seconds.  Without damage, dyeing, or preferential sample preparation, confocal Raman mapping provided positive detection of each neurotransmitter, allowing association of the high-resolution spectra with specific microscale image regions. Such information is particularly important for complex, heterogeneous samples, where changes in composition can influence neurotransmission processes. We also report an estimated dopamine diffusion coefficient two orders of magnitude smaller than that calculated by the flow-injection method.  Accurate nondestructive characterization for real-time detection of neurotransmitters in inhomogeneous environments without the requirement of sample labeling is a key issue in neuroscience. Our work demonstrates the capabilities of Raman spectroscopy in biological applications, possibly providing a new tool for elucidating the mechanism and kinetics of deep brain stimulation. © 2012 International Neuromodulation Society.

  11. Detecting Different Types of Directional Land Cover Changes Using MODIS NDVI Time Series Dataset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Xu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study proposed a multi-target hierarchical detection (MTHD method to simultaneously and automatically detect multiple directional land cover changes. MTHD used a hierarchical strategy to detect both abrupt and trend land cover changes successively. First, Grubbs’ test eliminated short-lived changes by considering them outliers. Then, the Brown-Forsythe test and the combination of Tomé’s method and the Chow test were applied to determine abrupt changes. Finally, Sen’s slope estimation coordinated with the Mann-Kendall test detection method was used to detect trend changes. Results demonstrated that both abrupt and trend land cover changes could be detected accurately and automatically. The overall accuracy of abrupt land cover changes was 87.0% and the kappa index was 0.74. Detected trends of land cover change indicated high consistency between NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, change trends from LTS (Landsat Thematic Mapper and Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus time series dataset, and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer time series datasets with the percentage of samples indicating consistency of 100%. For cropland, trends of millet yield per unit and average NDVI of cropland indicated high consistency with a linear regression determination coefficient of 0.94 (p < 0.01. Compared with other multi-target change detection methods, the changes detected by the MTHD could be related closely with specific ecosystem changes, reducing the risk of false changes in the area with frequent and strong interannual fluctuations.

  12. Using a forehead reflectance pulse oximeter to detect changes in sympathetic tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendelken, Suzanne M; McGrath, Susan P; Akay, Metin; Blike, George T

    2004-01-01

    The extreme conditions of combat and multi-casualty rescue often make field triage difficult and put the medic or first responder at risk. In an effort to improve field triage, we have developed an automated remote triage system called ARTEMIS (automated remote triage and emergency management information system) for use in the battlefield or disaster zone. Common to field injuries is a sudden change in arterial pressure resulting from massive blood loss or shock. In effort to stabilize the arterial pressure, the sympathetic system is strongly activated and sympathetic tone is increased. This preliminary research seeks to empirically demonstrate that a forehead reflectance pulse oximeter is a viable sensor for detecting sudden changes in sympathetic tone. We performed the classic supine-standing experiment and collected the raw waveform, the photoplethysmogram (PPG), continuously using a forehead reflectance pulse oximeter. The resulting waveform was processed in Matlab using various spectral analysis techniques (FFT and AR). Our preliminary results show that a relative ratio analysis (low frequency power/high frequency power) for both the raw PPG signal and its derived pulse statistics (height, beat-to-beat interval) is a useful technique for detecting change in sympathetic tone resulting from positional change.

  13. A Political Analysis of Curriculum Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf-Wilets, Vivian C.; Nugent, L. Catherine

    1979-01-01

    Presents an analysis of faculty dynamics in nursing curriculum situations based on the social theories of conflict, community power, and interest-group to form a political model representing stages in policy development. These stages are applied to curriculum change examples to show how social conflict and power plays cause problems. (MF)

  14. Orthogonal transformations for change detection, Matlab code (ENVI-like headers)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    Matlab code to do (iteratively reweighted) multivariate alteration detection (MAD) analysis, maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) analysis, canonical correlation analysis (CCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) on image data; accommodates ENVI (like) header files.......Matlab code to do (iteratively reweighted) multivariate alteration detection (MAD) analysis, maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) analysis, canonical correlation analysis (CCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) on image data; accommodates ENVI (like) header files....

  15. Pattern Detection and Extreme Value Analysis on Large Climate Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhat, M.; Byna, S.; Paciorek, C.; Weber, G.; Wu, K.; Yopes, T.; Wehner, M. F.; Ostrouchov, G.; Pugmire, D.; Strelitz, R.; Collins, W.; Bethel, W.

    2011-12-01

    We consider several challenging problems in climate that require quantitative analysis of very large data volumes generated by modern climate simulations. We demonstrate new software capable of addressing these challenges that is designed to exploit petascale platforms using state-of-the-art methods in high performance computing. Atmospheric rivers and Hurricanes are important classes of extreme weather phenomena. Developing analysis tools that can automatically detect these events in large climate datasets can provide us with invaluable information about the frequency of these events. Application of these tools to different climate model outputs can provide us with quality metrics that evaluate whether models produce this important class of phenomena and how the statistics of these events will likely vary in the future. In this work, we present an automatic technique for detecting atmospheric rivers. We use techniques from image processing and topological analysis to extract these features. We implement this technique in a massively parallel fashion on modern supercomputing platforms, and apply the resulting software to both observational data and various models from the CMIP-3 archive. We have successfully completed atmospheric river detections on 1TB of data on 10000 hopper cores in 10 seconds. For hurricane tracking, we have adapted code from GFDL to run in parallel on large datasets. We present results from the application of this code to some recent high resolution CAM5 simulations. Our code is capable of processing 1TB of data in 10 seconds. Extreme value analysis involves statistical techniques for estimating the probability of extreme events and variations in the probabilities over time and space. Because of their rarity, there is a high degree of uncertainty when estimating the behavior of extremes from data at any one location. We are developing a local likelihood approach to borrow strength from multiple locations, with uncertainty estimated using the

  16. Development Context Driven Change Awareness and Analysis Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Anita; Branchaud, Josh; Dwyer, Matthew B.; Person, Suzette; Rungta, Neha; Wang, Yurong; Elbaum, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Recent work on workspace monitoring allows conflict prediction early in the development process, however, these approaches mostly use syntactic differencing techniques to compare different program versions. In contrast, traditional change-impact analysis techniques analyze related versions of the program only after the code has been checked into the master repository. We propose a novel approach, DeCAF (Development Context Analysis Framework), that leverages the development context to scope a change impact analysis technique. The goal is to characterize the impact of each developer on other developers in the team. There are various client applications such as task prioritization, early conflict detection, and providing advice on testing that can benefit from such a characterization. The DeCAF framework leverages information from the development context to bound the iDiSE change impact analysis technique to analyze only the parts of the code base that are of interest. Bounding the analysis can enable DeCAF to efficiently compute the impact of changes using a combination of program dependence and symbolic execution based approaches.

  17. Outlier Detection with Space Transformation and Spectral Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dang, Xuan-Hong; Micenková, Barbora; Assent, Ira

    2013-01-01

    Detecting a small number of outliers from a set of data observations is always challenging. In this paper, we present an approach that exploits space transformation and uses spectral analysis in the newly transformed space for outlier detection. Unlike most existing techniques in the literature w...

  18. Analysis of Exhaled Breath for Disease Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Anton; Miekisch, Wolfram; Schubert, Jochen; Buszewski, Bogusław; Ligor, Tomasz; Jezierski, Tadeusz; Pleil, Joachim; Risby, Terence

    2014-06-01

    Breath analysis is a young field of research with great clinical potential. As a result of this interest, researchers have developed new analytical techniques that permit real-time analysis of exhaled breath with breath-to-breath resolution in addition to the conventional central laboratory methods using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Breath tests are based on endogenously produced volatiles, metabolites of ingested precursors, metabolites produced by bacteria in the gut or the airways, or volatiles appearing after environmental exposure. The composition of exhaled breath may contain valuable information for patients presenting with asthma, renal and liver diseases, lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, inflammatory lung disease, or metabolic disorders. In addition, oxidative stress status may be monitored via volatile products of lipid peroxidation. Measurement of enzyme activity provides phenotypic information important in personalized medicine, whereas breath measurements provide insight into perturbations of the human exposome and can be interpreted as preclinical signals of adverse outcome pathways.

  19. Signal subspace change detection in averaged multi-look SAR imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranney, Kenneth; Soumekh, Mehrdad

    2005-05-01

    Modern Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) signal processing algorithms could retrieve accurate and subtle information regarding a scene that is being interrogated by an airborne radar system. An important reconnaissance problem that is being studied via the use of SAR systems and their sophisticated signal processing methods involves detecting changes in an imaged scene. In these problems, the user interrogates a scene with a SAR system at two different time points (e.g. different days); the resultant two SAR databases that we refer to as reference and test data, are used to determine where targets have entered or left the imaged scene between the two data acquisitions. For instance, X band SAR systems have the potential to become a potent tool to determine whether mines have been recently placed in an area. This paper describes an algorithm for detecting changes in averaged multi-look SAR imagery. Averaged multi-look SAR images are preferable to full aperture SAR reconstructions when the imaging algorithm is approximation based (e.g. polar format processing), or motion data are not accurate over a long full aperture. We study the application of a SAR detection method, known as Signal Subspace Processing, that is based on the principles of 2D adaptive filtering. We identify the change detection problem as a binary hypothesis-testing problem, and identify an error signal and its normalized version to determine whether i) there is no change in the imaged scene; or ii) a target has been added to the imaged scene. A statistical analysis of the error signal is provided to show its properties and merits. Results are provided for data collected by an X band SAR platform and processed to form non-coherently look-averaged SAR images.

  20. Instrumental Analysis in Environmental Chemistry - Gas Phase Detection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stedman, Donald H.; Meyers, Philip A.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses advances made in chemical analysis instrumentation used in environmental monitoring. This first of two articles is concerned with analytical instrumentation in which detection and dispersion depend ultimately on the properties of gaseous molecules. (JR)

  1. Wide area change detection with satellite imagery for locating underground nuclear testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canty, M.J.; Jasani, B.; Schlittenhardt, J.

    2001-01-01

    nicest aspects of the MAD method: It sorts different categories of change into different image components. Another very important characteristic of the MAD transformation is that it is invariant to linear transformations of the data. This means that if for example the sensors used for the two images have different gains, or if atmospheric haze attenuates the reflectance measurement in one of the images but not in the other, the results of the analysis will be unaffected. A Bayesian model of the probability distribution of the MAD components intensities is applied to determine automatically the decision thresholds for change and no change. The prerequisite image-to-image registration is carried out automatically with the help contour and comer matching to determine ground control points, followed by nearest-neighbor resampling. The inclusion of higher resolution panchromatic information into the procedure without loss of spectral discrimination is accomplished via wavelet fusion with the multispectral channels. A computer program CDSAT (Change Detection with SATellite imagery), which implements a user-friendly graphical environment for performing the various steps involved, is described briefly. The technique has been applied successfully to detect the exact position of an underground nuclear test in Rajasthan in 1998. In the present paper we discuss further results for tests carried out in Lop Nor, China in the 1990's and at the Nevada test site in the 1980's. Historical LANDSAT TM satellite images are used for change detection. Results are correlated with seismic and ground truth data and conclusions are drawn regarding the applicability of wide area change detection to complement seismic verification of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty

  2. Distinct frontal and amygdala correlates of change detection for facial identity and expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achaibou, Amal; Loth, Eva; Bishop, Sonia J

    2016-02-01

    Recruitment of 'top-down' frontal attentional mechanisms is held to support detection of changes in task-relevant stimuli. Fluctuations in intrinsic frontal activity have been shown to impact task performance more generally. Meanwhile, the amygdala has been implicated in 'bottom-up' attentional capture by threat. Here, 22 adult human participants took part in a functional magnetic resonance change detection study aimed at investigating the correlates of successful (vs failed) detection of changes in facial identity vs expression. For identity changes, we expected prefrontal recruitment to differentiate 'hit' from 'miss' trials, in line with previous reports. Meanwhile, we postulated that a different mechanism would support detection of emotionally salient changes. Specifically, elevated amygdala activation was predicted to be associated with successful detection of threat-related changes in expression, over-riding the influence of fluctuations in top-down attention. Our findings revealed that fusiform activity tracked change detection across conditions. Ventrolateral prefrontal cortical activity was uniquely linked to detection of changes in identity not expression, and amygdala activity to detection of changes from neutral to fearful expressions. These results are consistent with distinct mechanisms supporting detection of changes in face identity vs expression, the former potentially reflecting top-down attention, the latter bottom-up attentional capture by stimulus emotional salience. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press.

  3. Design and implementation of network attack analysis and detect system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Zhigang; Wu Huan; Liu Baoxu

    2007-01-01

    This paper first analyzes the present research state of IDS (intrusion detection system), classifies and compares existing methods. According to the problems existing in IDS, such as false-positives, false-negatives and low information visualization, this paper suggests a system named NAADS which supports multi data sources. Through a series of methods such as clustering analysis, association analysis and visualization, rate of detection and usability of NAADS are increased. (authors)

  4. Detection of molecular changes induced by antibiotics in Escherichia coli using vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan Nguyen, N. T.; Sarter, Samira; Hai Nguyen, N.; Daniel, Philippe

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to test Raman (400-1800 cm- 1) and Infra-red (1900-500 cm- 1) spectroscopies followed by statistical analysis (principal component analysis) to detect molecular changes induced by antibiotics (ampicillin, cefotaxime - cell wall synthesis inhibitors, tetracycline - protein synthesis inhibitor, ciprofloxacin - DNA synthesis inhibitor) against Escherichia coli TOP10. In case of ampicillin and cefotaxime, a decrease in protein bands in both Raman (1240, 1660 cm- 1), and IR spectra (1230, 1530, 1630 cm- 1), and an increase in carbohydrate bands (1150, 1020 cm- 1) in IR spectra were observed. Tetracycline addition caused an increase in nucleic acid bands (775, 1478, 1578 cm- 1), a sharp decrease in phenylalanine (995 cm- 1) in Raman spectra and the amide I and amide II bands (1630, 1530 cm- 1) in IR spectra, an increase in DNA in both Raman (1083 cm- 1) and IR spectra (1080 cm- 1). Regarding ciprofloxacin, an increase in nucleic acids (775, 1478, 1578 cm- 1) in Raman spectra and in protein bands (1230, 1520, 1630 cm- 1), in DNA (1080 cm- 1) in IR spectra were detected. Clear discrimination of antibiotic-treated samples compared to the control was recorded, showing that Raman and IR spectroscopies, coupled to principal component analysis for data, could be used to detect molecular modifications in bacteria exposed to different classes of antibiotics. These findings contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms of action of antibiotics in bacteria.

  5. Object-based change detection using semivariogram indices derived from NDVI images: The environmental disaster in Mariana, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduarda Martiniano de Oliveira Silveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Object-based change detection is a powerful analysis tool for remote sensing data, but few studies consider the potential of temporal semivariogram indices for mapping land-cover changes using object-based approaches. In this study, we explored and evaluated the performance of semivariogram indices calculated from remote sensing imagery, using the Normalized Differential Vegetation Index (NDVI to detect changes in spatial features related to land cover caused by a disastrous 2015 dam failure in Brazil’s Mariana district. We calculated the NDVI from Landsat 8 images acquired before and after the disaster, then created objects by multiresolution segmentation analysis based on post-disaster images. Experimental semivariograms were computed within the image objects and semivariogram indices were calculated and selected by principal component analysis. We used the selected indices as input data to a support vector machine algorithm for classifying change and no-change classes. The selected semivariogram indices showed their effectiveness as input data for object-based change detection analysis, producing highly accurate maps of areas affected by post-dam-failure flooding in the region. This approach can be used in many other contexts for rapid and accurate assessment of such land-cover changes.

  6. Detecting and taking into account possible impacts of climate change on hydrological extremes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renard, B.

    2008-01-01

    Climate change is widely considered as a reality by scientists. Nevertheless, impacts on hydrological extremes are more difficult to observe and to forecast. The aim of this thesis is to answer the following questions: How to detect changes in hydro-climatic series? What are the observed changes for extreme discharges in France? How to take into account possible changes in frequency analysis? These objectives refer to both local and regional scales. This paper describes the developments related to the third question. In a first step, the concept of return period is revisited in a non-stationary context. Frequency analysis methods are then updated in order to account for evolutions in time. This is achieved by modelling trends affecting the distribution parameters. Parameter estimation uses the Bayesian formalism, which is a convenient tool for quantifying the uncertainty related to the stationarity hypothesis. This approach can be generalized at the regional scale, by means of non-stationary regional models. Such models are more general than the model underlying the index flood method. However, results of such a regional analysis are affected by the spatial dependence existing between studied sites. Impacts of this dependence on quantile estimates are highlighted, and a first approach is proposed in order to explicitly model spatial dependence. (author)

  7. Population Data for Climate Change Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Dao, Quoc-Hy

    2009-01-01

    As Hy Dao and Jaap van Woerden point out in Chapter 14, United Nations support of improved data streams and technical assistance is essential to this kind of research. The authors also underscore the myriad challenges of defi nitional issues in climate-change analysis, including problems of scale—global, regional, national and ommunity—defi nitions of coastlines, boundaries and expanses, omissions in the production and dissemination of data and measurement of onsumptionbased versus supply-bas...

  8. Basic Characteristics of a Macroscopic Measure for Detecting Abnormal Changes in a Multiagent System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo Kinoshita

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Multiagent application systems must deal with various changes in both the system and the system environment at runtime. Generally, such changes have undesirable negative effects on the system. To manage and control the system, it is important to observe and detect negative effects using an appropriate observation function of the system’s behavior. This paper focuses on the design of this function and proposes a new macroscopic measure with which to observe behavioral characteristics of a runtime multiagent system. The proposed measure is designed as the variance of fluctuation of a macroscopic activity factor of the whole system, based on theoretical analysis of the macroscopic behavioral model of a multiagent system. Experiments are conducted to investigate basic characteristics of the proposed measure, using a test bed system. The results of experiments show that the proposed measure reacts quickly and increases drastically in response to abnormal changes in the system. Hence, the proposed measure is considered a measure that can be used to detect undesirable changes in a multiagent system.

  9. Change Detection in SAR Images Based on Deep Semi-NMF and SVD Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Gao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available With the development of Earth observation programs, more and more multi-temporal synthetic aperture radar (SAR data are available from remote sensing platforms. Therefore, it is demanding to develop unsupervised methods for SAR image change detection. Recently, deep learning-based methods have displayed promising performance for remote sensing image analysis. However, these methods can only provide excellent performance when the number of training samples is sufficiently large. In this paper, a novel simple method for SAR image change detection is proposed. The proposed method uses two singular value decomposition (SVD analyses to learn the non-linear relations between multi-temporal images. By this means, the proposed method can generate more representative feature expressions with fewer samples. Therefore, it provides a simple yet effective way to be designed and trained easily. Firstly, deep semi-nonnegative matrix factorization (Deep Semi-NMF is utilized to select pixels that have a high probability of being changed or unchanged as samples. Next, image patches centered at these sample pixels are generated from the input multi-temporal SAR images. Then, we build SVD networks, which are comprised of two SVD convolutional layers and one histogram feature generation layer. Finally, pixels in both multi-temporal SAR images are classified by the SVD networks, and then the final change map can be obtained. The experimental results of three SAR datasets have demonstrated the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method.

  10. Feature learning and change feature classification based on deep learning for ternary change detection in SAR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Maoguo; Yang, Hailun; Zhang, Puzhao

    2017-07-01

    Ternary change detection aims to detect changes and group the changes into positive change and negative change. It is of great significance in the joint interpretation of spatial-temporal synthetic aperture radar images. In this study, sparse autoencoder, convolutional neural networks (CNN) and unsupervised clustering are combined to solve ternary change detection problem without any supervison. Firstly, sparse autoencoder is used to transform log-ratio difference image into a suitable feature space for extracting key changes and suppressing outliers and noise. And then the learned features are clustered into three classes, which are taken as the pseudo labels for training a CNN model as change feature classifier. The reliable training samples for CNN are selected from the feature maps learned by sparse autoencoder with certain selection rules. Having training samples and the corresponding pseudo labels, the CNN model can be trained by using back propagation with stochastic gradient descent. During its training procedure, CNN is driven to learn the concept of change, and more powerful model is established to distinguish different types of changes. Unlike the traditional methods, the proposed framework integrates the merits of sparse autoencoder and CNN to learn more robust difference representations and the concept of change for ternary change detection. Experimental results on real datasets validate the effectiveness and superiority of the proposed framework.

  11. Multivariate alteration detection (MAD) in multispectral, bi-temporal image data: A new approach to change detction studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Conradsen, Knut

    1988 covering a forested region in northern Sweden show the usefulness of these new concepts. Because of their ability to detect change in many channels simultaneously, the MAD transformation and the MAF post-processing are expected to be even more useful when applied to image data with more bands....... for the definition of the MAD transformation is proven. As opposed to traditional univariate change detection schemes our scheme transforms two sets of multivariate observations (e.g. two multispectral satellite images covering the same geographical area acquired at different points in time) into a difference...... only, our method can be applied to any spatial and/or spectral subset of the full data set to direct the analysis in any desired manner. In order to obtain a spatially more coherent representation of the detected change as obtained from the MAD analysis, post-processing by means of a minimum...

  12. Detection Capability Evaluation on Chang'e-5 Lunar Mineralogical Spectrometer (LMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Ren, Xin; Yan, Wei; Xu, Xuesen; Cai, Tingni; Liu, Dawei; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Chunlai

    2016-04-01

    The Chang'e-5 (CE-5) lunar sample return mission is scheduled to launch in 2017 to bring back lunar regolith and drill samples. The Chang'e-5 Lunar Mineralogical Spectrometer (LMS), as one of the three sets of scientific payload installed on the lander, is used to collect in-situ spectrum and analyze the mineralogical composition of the sampling site. It can also help to select the sampling site , and to compare the measured laboratory spectrum of returned sample with in-situ data. LMS employs acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTFs) and is composed of a VIS/NIR module (0.48μm-1.45μm) and an IR module (1.4μm -3.2μm). It has spectral resolution ranging from 3 to 25 nm, with a field of view (FOV) of 4.24°×4.24°. Unlike Chang'e-3 VIS/NIR Imaging Spectrometer (VNIS), the spectral coverage of LMS is extended from 2.4μm to 3.2μm, which has capability to identify H2O/OH absorption features around 2.7μm. An aluminum plate and an Infragold plate are fixed in the dust cover, being used as calibration targets in the VIS/NIR and IR spectral range respectively when the dust cover is open. Before launch, a ground verification test of LMS needs to be conducted in order to: 1) test and verify the detection capability of LMS through evaluation on the quality of image and spectral data collected for the simulated lunar samples; and 2) evaluate the accuracy of data processing methods by the simulation of instrument working on the moon. The ground verification test will be conducted both in the lab and field. The spectra of simulated lunar regolith/mineral samples will be collected simultaneously by the LMS and two calibrated spectrometers: a FTIR spectrometer (Model 102F) and an ASD FieldSpec 4 Hi-Res spectrometer. In this study, the results of the LMS ground verification test will be reported including the evaluation on the LMS spectral and image data quality, mineral identification and inversion ability, accuracy of calibration and geometric positioning .

  13. Optimizing detection and analysis of slow waves in sleep EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensen, Armand; Riedner, Brady; Tononi, Giulio

    2016-12-01

    Analysis of individual slow waves in EEG recording during sleep provides both greater sensitivity and specificity compared to spectral power measures. However, parameters for detection and analysis have not been widely explored and validated. We present a new, open-source, Matlab based, toolbox for the automatic detection and analysis of slow waves; with adjustable parameter settings, as well as manual correction and exploration of the results using a multi-faceted visualization tool. We explore a large search space of parameter settings for slow wave detection and measure their effects on a selection of outcome parameters. Every choice of parameter setting had some effect on at least one outcome parameter. In general, the largest effect sizes were found when choosing the EEG reference, type of canonical waveform, and amplitude thresholding. Previously published methods accurately detect large, global waves but are conservative and miss the detection of smaller amplitude, local slow waves. The toolbox has additional benefits in terms of speed, user-interface, and visualization options to compare and contrast slow waves. The exploration of parameter settings in the toolbox highlights the importance of careful selection of detection METHODS: The sensitivity and specificity of the automated detection can be improved by manually adding or deleting entire waves and or specific channels using the toolbox visualization functions. The toolbox standardizes the detection procedure, sets the stage for reliable results and comparisons and is easy to use without previous programming experience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of computed tomography and radiography for detecting changes induced by malignant nasal neoplasia in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, R.D.; Beck, E.R.; LeCouteur, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    The ability of computed tomography and radiography to detect changes associated with nasal neoplasia was compared in dogs. Eighteen areas or anatomic structures were evaluated in 21 dogs for changes indicative of neoplasia. Computed tomography was superior (P < or = 0.05) to radiography for detecting changes in 14 of 18 areas. Radiography was not superior for detecting changes in any structure or area. Computed tomography reveals vital information not always detected radiographically to assist in providing a prognosis and in planning treatment for nasal neoplasms in dogs

  15. Scalable Distributed Change Detection from Astronomy Data Streams using Local, Asynchronous Eigen Monitoring Algorithms

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper considers the problem of change detection using local distributed eigen monitoring algorithms for next generation of astronomy petascale data pipelines...

  16. SCALABLE TIME SERIES CHANGE DETECTION FOR BIOMASS MONITORING USING GAUSSIAN PROCESS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SCALABLE TIME SERIES CHANGE DETECTION FOR BIOMASS MONITORING USING GAUSSIAN PROCESS VARUN CHANDOLA AND RANGA RAJU VATSAVAI Abstract. Biomass monitoring,...

  17. Data analysis of inertial sensor for train positioning detection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Jin; Park, Sung Soo; Lee, Jae Ho; Kang, Dong Hoon [Korea Railroad Research Institute, Uiwang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Train positioning detection information is fundamental for high-speed railroad inspection, making it possible to simultaneously determine the status and evaluate the integrity of railroad equipment. This paper presents the results of measurements and an analysis of an inertial measurement unit (IMU) used as a positioning detection sensors. Acceleration and angular rate measurements from the IMU were analyzed in the amplitude and frequency domains, with a discussion on vibration and train motions. Using these results and GPS information, the positioning detection of a Korean tilting train express was performed from Naju station to Illo station on the Honam-line. The results of a synchronized analysis of sensor measurements and train motion can help in the design of a train location detection system and improve the positioning detection performance.

  18. Electrophysiological Correlates of Change Detection during Delayed Matching Task: A Comparison of Different References

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tengfei Liang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Detecting the changed information between memory representation and incoming sensory inputs is a fundamental cognitive ability. By offering the promise of excellent temporal resolution, event-related potential (ERP technique has served as a primary tool for studying this process with reference of the linked mastoid (LM. However, given that LM may distort the ERP signals, it is still undetermined whether LM is the best reference choice. The goal of the current study was to systematically compare LM, reference electrode standardization technique (REST and average reference (AR for assessing the ERP correlates of change detection during a delayed matching task. Colored shapes were adopted as materials while both the task-relevant shape feature and -irrelevant color feature could be changed. The results of the ERP amplitude showed that both of the task-relevant and -conjunction feature changes elicited significantly more positive posterior P2 in REST and AR, but not in LM. Besides, significantly increased N270 was observed in task-relevant and -conjunction feature changes in both the REST and LM, but in the conjunction feature change in AR. Only the REST-obtained N270 revealed a significant increment in task-irrelevant feature change, which was compatible with the delayed behavioral performance. Statistical parametric scalp mapping (SPSM results showed a left posterior distribution for AR, an anterior distribution for LM, and both the anterior and left posterior distributions for REST. These results indicate that different types of references may provide distinct cognitive interpretations. Interestingly, only the SPSM of REST was consistent with previous fMRI findings. Combined with the evidence of simulation studies and the current observations, we take the REST-based results as the objective one, and recommend using REST technology in the future ERP data analysis.

  19. Documentation and Detection of Colour Changes of Bas Relieves Using Close Range Photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinverni, E. S.; Pierdicca, R.; Sturari, M.; Colosi, F.; Orazi, R.

    2017-05-01

    The digitization of complex buildings, findings or bas relieves can strongly facilitate the work of archaeologists, mainly for in depth analysis tasks. Notwithstanding, whether new visualization techniques ease the study phase, a classical naked-eye approach for determining changes or surface alteration could bring towards several drawbacks. The research work described in these pages is aimed at providing experts with a workflow for the evaluation of alterations (e.g. color decay or surface alterations), allowing a more rapid and objective monitoring of monuments. More in deep, a pipeline of work has been tested in order to evaluate the color variation between surfaces acquired at different époques. The introduction of reliable tools of change detection in the archaeological domain is needful; in fact, the most widespread practice, among archaeologists and practitioners, is to perform a traditional monitoring of surfaces that is made of three main steps: production of a hand-made map based on a subjective analysis, selection of a sub-set of regions of interest, removal of small portion of surface for in depth analysis conducted in laboratory. To overcome this risky and time consuming process, digital automatic change detection procedure represents a turning point. To do so, automatic classification has been carried out according to two approaches: a pixel-based and an object-based method. Pixel-based classification aims to identify the classes by means of the spectral information provided by each pixel belonging to the original bands. The object-based approach operates on sets of pixels (objects/regions) grouped together by means of an image segmentation technique. The methodology was tested by studying the bas-relieves of a temple located in Peru, named Huaca de la Luna. Despite the data sources were collected with unplanned surveys, the workflow proved to be a valuable solution useful to understand which are the main changes over time.

  20. Unsupervised Change Detection for Geological and Ecological Monitoring via Remote Sensing: Application on a Volcanic Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, N.; Pedersen, G. B. M.; Vilmunandardóttir, O. K.; Belart, J. M. M. C.; Sigurmundsson, F. S.; Benediktsson, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    The project "Environmental Mapping and Monitoring of Iceland by Remote Sensing (EMMIRS)" aims at providing fast and reliable mapping and monitoring techniques on a big spatial scale with a high temporal resolution of the Icelandic landscape. Such mapping and monitoring will be crucial to both mitigate and understand the scale of processes and their often complex interlinked feedback mechanisms.In the EMMIRS project, the Hekla volcano area is one of the main sites under study, where the volcanic eruptions, extreme weather and human activities had an extensive impact on the landscape degradation. The development of innovative remote sensing approaches to compute earth observation variables as automatically as possible is one of the main tasks of the EMMIRS project. Furthermore, a temporal remote sensing archive is created and composed by images acquired by different sensors (Landsat, RapidEye, ASTER and SPOT5). Moreover, historical aerial stereo photos allowed decadal reconstruction of the landscape by reconstruction of digital elevation models. Here, we propose a novel architecture for automatic unsupervised change detection analysis able to ingest multi-source data in order to detect landscape changes in the Hekla area. The change detection analysis is based on multi-scale analysis, which allows the identification of changes at different level of abstraction, from pixel-level to region-level. For this purpose, operators defined in mathematical morphology framework are implemented to model the contextual information, represented by the neighbour system of a pixel, allowing the identification of changes related to both geometrical and spectral domains. Automatic radiometric normalization strategy is also implemented as pre-processing step, aiming at minimizing the effect of different acquisition conditions. The proposed architecture is tested on multi-temporal data sets acquired over different time periods coinciding with the last three eruptions (1980-1981, 1991

  1. Diagnosis of UAV Pitot Tube Defects Using Statistical Change Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren; Blanke, Mogens; Adrian, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles need a large degree of tolerance to faults. One of the most important steps towards this is the ability to detect and isolate faults in sensors and actuators in real time and make remedial actions to avoid that faults develop to failure. This paper analyses...... the possibilities of detecting faults in the pitot tube of a small unmanned aerial vehicle, a fault that easily causes a crash if not diagnosed and handled in time. Using as redundant information the velocity measured from an onboard GPS receiver, the air-speed estimated from engine throttle and the pitot tube...

  2. A Novel Method to Detect 3D Mandibular Changes Related to Soft-Diet Feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kana Kono

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Craniofacial morphology varies among individuals, which is regulated by the interaction between genes and the environment. Soft-diet feeding is a widely-used experimental model for studying the association between the skeletal morphology and muscle-related loading on the bone. Traditionally, these studies have been based on linear and angular measurements provided on two-dimensional (2D radiographs in the lateral view. However, 2D observation is based on simplification of the anatomical structures and cannot detect three-dimensional (3D changes in detail. In this study, we newly developed a modified surface-based analysis with micro-3D computed tomography (CT to examine and detect the 3D changes in the mandible associated with soft-diet feeding. Mice at 3 weeks of age were fed a powdered soft-diet (SD or hard-diet (HD of regular rodent pellets until 9 weeks of age. Micro-CT images were taken at age 9 weeks to reconstruct the anatomical architecture images. A computer-generated averaged mandible was superimposed to directly visualize the morphological phenotypes. Gross observation revealed the apparent changes at the posterior body of the mandible, the angular process and the condyle between HD and SD mice. Significant differences in the mapping indicated the regions of significant displacement in the SD mice over the averaged 3D image of the HD mice. This map revealed that vertical displacement was most evident in 3D changes. We also noted a combination of vertical, transverse and anteroposterior directions of displacement in the condylar growth, resulting in complicated shape changes in the whole condylar process in SD mice. In contrast, transverse displacement was more significant in the coronoid process. The map analysis further showed the significant outward displacement of the inner surface of the alveolar process, which consequently resulted in thinning of the alveolar process.

  3. Multiple Sclerosis: Identification of Temporal Changes in Brain Lesions with Computer-Assisted Detection Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilello, M.; Arkuszewski, M.; Nucifora, P.; Nasrallah, I.; Melhem, E.R.; Cirillo, L.; Krejza, J.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease with a progressing and evolving course. Serial imaging with MRI is the mainstay in monitoring and managing MS patients. In this work we demonstrate the performance of a locally developed computer-assisted detection (CAD) software used to track temporal changes in brain MS lesions. CAD tracks changes in T2-bright MS lesions between two time points on a 3D high-resolution isotropic FLAIR MR sequence of the brain acquired at 3 Tesla. The program consists of an image-processing pipeline, and displays scrollable difference maps used as an aid to the neuroradiologist for assessing lesional change. To assess the value of the software we have compared diagnostic accuracy and duration of interpretation of the CAD-assisted and routine clinical interpretations in 98 randomly chosen, paired MR examinations from 88 patients (68 women, 20 men, mean age 43.5, age range 21–75) with a diagnosis of definite MS. The ground truth was determined by a three-expert panel. In case-wise analysis, CAD interpretation showed higher sensitivity than a clinical report (87% vs 77%, respectively). Lesion-wise analysis demonstrated improved sensitivity of CAD over a routine clinical interpretation of 40%–48%. Mean software-assisted interpretation time was 2.7 min. Our study demonstrates the potential of including CAD software in the workflow of neuroradiology practice for the detection of MS lesional change. Automated quantification of temporal change in MS lesion load may also be used in clinical research, e.g., in drug trials. PMID:23859235

  4. Drillstring Washout Diagnosis Using Friction Estimation and Statistical Change Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willersrud, Anders; Blanke, Mogens; Imsland, Lars

    2015-01-01

    washout diagnosis, this paper employs an adaptive observer to estimate friction parameters in the nonlinear pro- cess. Non-Gaussian noise is a nuisance in the parameter estimates, and dedicated generalized likelihood tests are developed to make efficient washout detection with the multivariate t...

  5. Detecting Hacked Twitter Accounts based on Behavioural Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, Meike; Habib, Mena Badieh; van Keulen, Maurice

    Social media accounts are valuable for hackers for spreading phishing links, malware and spam. Furthermore, some people deliberately hack an acquaintance to damage his or her image. This paper describes a classification for detecting hacked Twitter accounts. The model is mainly based on features

  6. PRESENTATION ON--LAND-COVER CHANGE DETECTION USING MULTI-TEMPORAL MODIS NDVI DATA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monitoring the locations and distributions of land-cover changes is important for establishing linkages between policy decisions, regulatory actions and subsequent landuse activities. Past efforts incorporating two-date change detection using moderate resolution data (e.g., Lands...

  7. High Performance and Accurate Change Detection System for HyspIRI Missions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose novel and high performance change detection algorithms to process HyspIRI data, which have been used for monitoring changes in vegetation, climate,...

  8. OBJECT-ORIENTED CHANGE DETECTION BASED ON MULTI-SCALE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Jia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The change detection of remote sensing images means analysing the change information quantitatively and recognizing the change types of the surface coverage data in different time phases. With the appearance of high resolution remote sensing image, object-oriented change detection method arises at this historic moment. In this paper, we research multi-scale approach for high resolution images, which includes multi-scale segmentation, multi-scale feature selection and multi-scale classification. Experimental results show that this method has a stronger advantage than the traditional single-scale method of high resolution remote sensing image change detection.

  9. Digital Printing Quality Detection and Analysis Technology Based on CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ming; Zheng, Liping

    2017-12-01

    With the help of CCD digital printing quality detection and analysis technology, it can carry out rapid evaluation and objective detection of printing quality, and can play a certain control effect on printing quality. It can be said CDD digital printing quality testing and analysis of the rational application of technology, its digital printing and printing materials for a variety of printing equipments to improve the quality of a very positive role. In this paper, we do an in-depth study and discussion based on the CCD digital print quality testing and analysis technology.

  10. Measurement error in the assessment of radiographic progression in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) clinical trials: the smallest detectable change (SDC) revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navarro-Compán, V.; van der Heijde, D.; Ahmad, Harris A.; Miller, Colin G.; Wolterbeek, R.; Landewé, R.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate if the mean smallest detectable change (SDC) of multiple time intervals using the Bland & Altman (B&A) levels of agreement (LoA) method is an appropriate surrogate for the generalisability analysis method for estimating the overall SDC of radiological progression in rheumatoid arthritis

  11. Applications of the automatic change detection for disaster monitoring by the knowledge-based framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadono, T.; Hashimoto, S.; Onosato, M.; Hori, M.

    2012-11-01

    Change detection is a fundamental approach in utilization of satellite remote sensing image, especially in multi-temporal analysis that involves for example extracting damaged areas by a natural disaster. Recently, the amount of data obtained by Earth observation satellites has increased significantly owing to the increasing number and types of observing sensors, the enhancement of their spatial resolution, and improvements in their data processing systems. In applications for disaster monitoring, in particular, fast and accurate analysis of broad geographical areas is required to facilitate efficient rescue efforts. It is expected that robust automatic image interpretation is necessary. Several algorithms have been proposed in the field of automatic change detection in past, however they are still lack of robustness for multi purposes, an instrument independency, and accuracy better than a manual interpretation. We are trying to develop a framework for automatic image interpretation using ontology-based knowledge representation. This framework permits the description, accumulation, and use of knowledge drawn from image interpretation. Local relationships among certain concepts defined in the ontology are described as knowledge modules and are collected in the knowledge base. The knowledge representation uses a Bayesian network as a tool to describe various types of knowledge in a uniform manner. Knowledge modules are synthesized and used for target-specified inference. The results applied to two types of disasters by the framework without any modification and tuning are shown in this paper.

  12. Change detection using landsat time series: A review of frequencies, preprocessing, algorithms, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhe

    2017-08-01

    The free and open access to all archived Landsat images in 2008 has completely changed the way of using Landsat data. Many novel change detection algorithms based on Landsat time series have been developed We present a comprehensive review of four important aspects of change detection studies based on Landsat time series, including frequencies, preprocessing, algorithms, and applications. We observed the trend that the more recent the study, the higher the frequency of Landsat time series used. We reviewed a series of image preprocessing steps, including atmospheric correction, cloud and cloud shadow detection, and composite/fusion/metrics techniques. We divided all change detection algorithms into six categories, including thresholding, differencing, segmentation, trajectory classification, statistical boundary, and regression. Within each category, six major characteristics of different algorithms, such as frequency, change index, univariate/multivariate, online/offline, abrupt/gradual change, and sub-pixel/pixel/spatial were analyzed. Moreover, some of the widely-used change detection algorithms were also discussed. Finally, we reviewed different change detection applications by dividing these applications into two categories, change target and change agent detection.

  13. Change detection based on features invariant to monotonic transforms and spatially constrained matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Marco Túlio A. N.; Balbino de Mesquita, Daniel; Nascimento, Erickson R.; Schwartz, William Robson

    2016-01-01

    In several image processing applications, discovering regions that have changed in a set of images acquired from a scene at different times and possibly from different viewpoints plays a very important role. Remote sensing, visual surveillance, medical diagnosis, civil infrastructure, and underwater sensing are examples of such applications that operate in dynamic environments. We propose an approach to detect such changes automatically by using image analysis techniques and segmentation based on superpixels in two stages: (1) the tuning stage, which is focused on adjusting the parameters; and (2) the unsupervised stage that is executed in real scenarios without an appropriate ground truth. Unlike most common approaches, which are pixel-based, our approach combines superpixel extraction, hierarchical clustering, and segment matching. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach compared to a remote sensing technique and a background subtraction technique, demonstrating the robustness of our algorithm against illumination variations.

  14. An ensemble classification approach for improved Land use/cover change detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellasamy, M.; Ferré, T. P. A.; Humlekrog Greve, M.; Larsen, R.; Chinnasamy, U.

    2014-11-01

    Change Detection (CD) methods based on post-classification comparison approaches are claimed to provide potentially reliable results. They are considered to be most obvious quantitative method in the analysis of Land Use Land Cover (LULC) changes which provides from - to change information. But, the performance of post-classification comparison approaches highly depends on the accuracy of classification of individual images used for comparison. Hence, we present a classification approach that produce accurate classified results which aids to obtain improved change detection results. Machine learning is a part of broader framework in change detection, where neural networks have drawn much attention. Neural network algorithms adaptively estimate continuous functions from input data without mathematical representation of output dependence on input. A common practice for classification is to use Multi-Layer-Perceptron (MLP) neural network with backpropogation learning algorithm for prediction. To increase the ability of learning and prediction, multiple inputs (spectral, texture, topography, and multi-temporal information) are generally stacked to incorporate diversity of information. On the other hand literatures claims backpropagation algorithm to exhibit weak and unstable learning in use of multiple inputs, while dealing with complex datasets characterized by mixed uncertainty levels. To address the problem of learning complex information, we propose an ensemble classification technique that incorporates multiple inputs for classification unlike traditional stacking of multiple input data. In this paper, we present an Endorsement Theory based ensemble classification that integrates multiple information, in terms of prediction probabilities, to produce final classification results. Three different input datasets are used in this study: spectral, texture and indices, from SPOT-4 multispectral imagery captured on 1998 and 2003. Each SPOT image is classified

  15. Fusion of remote sensing images and GIS data for land use/cover change detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongyan; Liu, Yaolin; Liu, Gang; Chen, Dan; Lan, Zeying; Liu, Dianfeng

    2009-10-01

    Recently land use/cover change detection (LUCC) has become an important aspect in nature resource and environment monitoring and protection. A data fusion method for LUCC is presented concerning the situation that there are only the remote sensing (RS) images of updated period and the land use/cover maps of original period. Firstly, multi-spectral and panchromatic images of SPOT-5 are fused by using principle component analysis (PCA) algorithm on Erdas Imagine platform. Then, after the co-registration of the land use/cover map and RS image, the RS image of the updated period is classified by K-means algorithm and the precise classification chart of the land use/cover is obtained. The land use/cover map is transformed from vector to raster format and the land class code is used as each pixel's value of the transformed raster image. Finally, land use/cover changes are found by comparing the corresponding land class codes. The study area is located in Huangpi District of Wuhan City, and experiments demonstrate the proposed data fusion method for land use/cover change detection is a feasible resolution.

  16. Automatic Detection of Decadal Shoreline Change on Northern Coastal of Gresik, East Java - Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuad, M. A. Z.; A, M. Fais D.

    2017-12-01

    The Coastal zone is a dynamic region that has high environmental and economic values. This present research focuses on the analyzing the rate of shoreline change using multi-temporal Landsat Imagery and Digital Shoreline Analysis Systems (DSAS) along the northern part of Gresik coastal area, East Java Indonesia. Five village were selected for analysis; Campurejo, Dalegan, Prupuh, Ngemboh, and Banyuurip. Erosion and Accretion were observed and detected on Multi-temporal satellite Images along the area of interest from 1972 - 2016. Landsat Images were radiometrically and geometrically corrected before using for analysis. Coastline delineation for each Landsat image was performed by MNDWI method before digitized for quantitative shoreline change analysis. DSAS was performed for quantitative analysis of Net Shoreline Movement (NSM) and End Point Rate (EPR). The results indicate that in the study area accretion and abrasion was occurred, but overall abrasion was dominated than accretion. The remarkable shoreline changes were observed in the entire region. The highest abrasion area was occurred in Ngemboh village. From 1972 to 2016, coastline was retreat 242.56 meter to the land and the rate of movement was -5.54m/yr. In contrast, Campurejo area was relatively stable due to the introduction of manmade structure, i.e. Jetty and Groin. The Shoreline movement and the rate of movement in this area were -6.11m and -0.12 m/yr respectively. The research represents an important step in understanding the dynamics of coastal area in this area. By identification and analysis of coastline evolution, the stake holder could perform a scenario for reducing the risk of coastal erosion and minimize the social and economic lost.

  17. URBAN DETECTION, DELIMITATION AND MORPHOLOGY: COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF SELECTIVE "MEGACITIES"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Alhaddad

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 50 years, the world has faced an impressive growth of urban population. The walled city, close to the outside, an "island"for economic activities and population density within the rural land, has led to the spread of urban life and urban networks in almost all the territory. There was, as said Margalef (1999, "a topological inversion of the landscape". The "urban" has gone from being an island in the ocean of rural land vastness, to represent the totally of the space in which are inserted natural and rural "systems". New phenomena such as the fall of the fordist model of production, the spread of urbanization known as urban sprawl, and the change of scale of the metropolis, covering increasingly large regions, called "megalopolis" (Gottmann, 1961, have characterized the century. However there are no rigorous databases capable of measuring and evaluating the phenomenon of megacities and in general the process of urbanization in the contemporary world. The aim of this paper is to detect, identify and analyze the morphology of the megacities through remote sensing instruments as well as various indicators of landscape. To understand the structure of these heterogeneous landscapes called megacities, land consumption and spatial complexity needs to be quantified accurately. Remote sensing might be helpful in evaluating how the different land covers shape urban megaregions. The morphological landscape analysis allows establishing the analogies and the differences between patterns of cities and studying the symmetry, growth direction, linearity, complexity and compactness of the urban form. The main objective of this paper is to develop a new methodology to detect urbanized land of some megacities around the world (Tokyo, Mexico, Chicago, New York, London, Moscow, Sao Paulo and Shanghai using Landsat 7 images.

  18. Dental non-linear image registration and collection method with 3D reconstruction and change detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmes, Mark; Fagan, Dean; Lemieux, George

    2017-03-01

    The capability of a software algorithm to automatically align same-patient dental bitewing and panoramic x-rays over time is complicated by differences in collection perspectives. We successfully used image correlation with an affine transform for each pixel to discover common image borders, followed by a non-linear homography perspective adjustment to closely align the images. However, significant improvements in image registration could be realized if images were collected from the same perspective, thus facilitating change analysis. The perspective differences due to current dental image collection devices are so significant that straightforward change analysis is not possible. To address this, a new custom dental tray could be used to provide the standard reference needed for consistent positioning of a patient's mouth. Similar to sports mouth guards, the dental tray could be fabricated in standard sizes from plastic and use integrated electronics that have been miniaturized. In addition, the x-ray source needs to be consistently positioned in order to collect images with similar angles and scales. Solving this pose correction is similar to solving for collection angle in aerial imagery for change detection. A standard collection system would provide a method for consistent source positioning using real-time sensor position feedback from a digital x-ray image reference. Automated, robotic sensor positioning could replace manual adjustments. Given an image set from a standard collection, a disparity map between images can be created using parallax from overlapping viewpoints to enable change detection. This perspective data can be rectified and used to create a three-dimensional dental model reconstruction.

  19. Detection and categorization of bacteria habitats using shallow linguistic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadeniz, İlknur; Özgür, Arzucan

    2015-01-01

    Information regarding bacteria biotopes is important for several research areas including health sciences, microbiology, and food processing and preservation. One of the challenges for scientists in these domains is the huge amount of information buried in the text of electronic resources. Developing methods to automatically extract bacteria habitat relations from the text of these electronic resources is crucial for facilitating research in these areas. We introduce a linguistically motivated rule-based approach for recognizing and normalizing names of bacteria habitats in biomedical text by using an ontology. Our approach is based on the shallow syntactic analysis of the text that include sentence segmentation, part-of-speech (POS) tagging, partial parsing, and lemmatization. In addition, we propose two methods for identifying bacteria habitat localization relations. The underlying assumption for the first method is that discourse changes with a new paragraph. Therefore, it operates on a paragraph-basis. The second method performs a more fine-grained analysis of the text and operates on a sentence-basis. We also develop a novel anaphora resolution method for bacteria coreferences and incorporate it with the sentence-based relation extraction approach. We participated in the Bacteria Biotope (BB) Task of the BioNLP Shared Task 2013. Our system (Boun) achieved the second best performance with 68% Slot Error Rate (SER) in Sub-task 1 (Entity Detection and Categorization), and ranked third with an F-score of 27% in Sub-task 2 (Localization Event Extraction). This paper reports the system that is implemented for the shared task, including the novel methods developed and the improvements obtained after the official evaluation. The extensions include the expansion of the OntoBiotope ontology using the training set for Sub-task 1, and the novel sentence-based relation extraction method incorporated with anaphora resolution for Sub-task 2. These extensions resulted in

  20. Comparison of feature extraction methods within a spatio-temporal land cover change detection framework

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kleynhans, W

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a change detection accuracy comparison is made between a recently proposed EKF method and a sliding window. Fast Fourier Transform(FFT) alternative within a spatio-temporal change detection framework. Both methods produce a mean...

  1. Flow analysis with chemiluminescence detection: Recent advances and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeeva, Irina I; Vakh, Christina S; Bulatov, Andrey V; Worsfold, Paul J

    2018-03-01

    This article highlights the most important developments in flow analysis with chemiluminescence (CL) detection, describing different flow systems that are compatible with CL detection, detector designs, commonly applied CL reactions and approaches to sample treatment. Recent applications of flow analysis with CL detection (focusing on outputs published since 2010) are also presented. Applications are classified by sample matrix, covering foods and beverages, environmental matrices, pharmaceuticals and biological fluids. Comprehensive tables are provided for each area, listing the specific sample matrix, CL reaction used, linear range, limit of detection and sample treatment for each analyte. Finally, recent and emerging trends in the field are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Steam leak detection method in pipeline using histogram analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Se Oh; Jeon, Hyeong Seop; Son, Ki Sung; Chae, Gyung Sun; Park, Jong Won

    2015-01-01

    Leak detection in a pipeline usually involves acoustic emission sensors such as contact type sensors. These contact type sensors pose difficulties for installation and cannot operate in areas having high temperature and radiation. Therefore, recently, many researchers have studied the leak detection phenomenon by using a camera. Leak detection by using a camera has the advantages of long distance monitoring and wide area surveillance. However, the conventional leak detection method by using difference images often mistakes the vibration of a structure for a leak. In this paper, we propose a method for steam leakage detection by using the moving average of difference images and histogram analysis. The proposed method can separate the leakage and the vibration of a structure. The working performance of the proposed method is verified by comparing with experimental results

  3. Detecting fire in video stream using statistical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koplík Karel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The real time fire detection in video stream is one of the most interesting problems in computer vision. In fact, in most cases it would be nice to have fire detection algorithm implemented in usual industrial cameras and/or to have possibility to replace standard industrial cameras with one implementing the fire detection algorithm. In this paper, we present new algorithm for detecting fire in video. The algorithm is based on tracking suspicious regions in time with statistical analysis of their trajectory. False alarms are minimized by combining multiple detection criteria: pixel brightness, trajectories of suspicious regions for evaluating characteristic fire flickering and persistence of alarm state in sequence of frames. The resulting implementation is fast and therefore can run on wide range of affordable hardware.

  4. Detection of Abrupt Changes in Runoff in the Weihe River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanling Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Climate change and human activities are two major driving factors for variations in hydrological patterns globally, and it is of significant importance to distinguish their effects on the change of hydrological regime in order to formulate robust water management strategies. Hilbert-Huang transform-based time-frequency analysis is employed in this study to detect abrupt changes and periods of the runoff at five hydrological stations in the Weihe River Basin, China, from 1951 to 2010. The key part of the method is the empirical decomposition mode with which any complicated data set can be decomposed into small number of intrinsic mode functions that admit well adaptive Hilbert transforms. Moreover, an attempt has been made to find out the specific reason for the abrupt point at the five hydrological stations in the Weihe River Basin. The results are presented as follows: (1 annual runoff significantly declined in the basin in intervals of 8~15 years; (2 abrupt changes occurred in 1971, 1982, and 1994 at Huaxian, 1972 and 1982 at Xianyang, 1992 at Zhangjiashan, 1990 at Zhuangtou, and 1984 at Beidao; (3 changes were more frequent and complex in the mainstream and downstream reaches than in tributaries and upstream reaches, respectively.

  5. Land use change detection with LANDSAT-2 data for monitoring and predicting regional water quality degradation. [Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, H.; Steele, K. (Principal Investigator); Waite, W.; Rice, R.; Shinn, M.; Dillard, T.; Petersen, C.

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Comparison between LANDSAT 1 and 2 imagery of Arkansas provided evidence of significant land use changes during the 1972-75 time period. Analysis of Arkansas historical water quality information has shown conclusively that whereas point source pollution generally can be detected by use of water quality data collected by state and federal agencies, sampling methodologies for nonpoint source contamination attributable to surface runoff are totally inadequate. The expensive undertaking of monitoring all nonpoint sources for numerous watersheds can be lessened by implementing LANDSAT change detection analyses.

  6. Ability of the Masimo pulse CO-Oximeter to detect changes in hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colquhoun, Douglas A; Forkin, Katherine T; Durieux, Marcel E; Thiele, Robert H

    2012-04-01

    The decision to administer blood products is complex and multifactorial. Accurate assessment of the concentration of hemoglobin [Hgb] is a key component of this evaluation. Recently a noninvasive method of continuously measuring hemoglobin (SpHb) has become available with multi-wavelength Pulse CO-Oximetry. The accuracy of this device is well documented, but the trending ability of this monitor has not been previously described. Twenty patients undergoing major thoracic and lumbar spine surgery were recruited. All patients received radial arterial lines. On the contralateral index finger, a R1 25 sensor (Rev E) was applied and connected to a Radical-7 Pulse CO-Oximeter (both Masimo Corp, Irvine, CA). Blood samples were drawn intermittently at the anesthesia provider's discretion and were analyzed by the operating room satellite laboratory CO-Oximeter. The value of Hgb and SpHb at that time point was compared. Trend analysis was performed by the four quadrant plot technique, testing directionality of change, and Critchley's polar plot method testing both directionality and magnitude of the change in values. Eighty-eight samples recorded at times of sufficient signal quality were available for analysis. Four quadrant plot analysis revealed 94% of data within the quadrants associated with the correct direction change, and 90% of data points lay within the analysis bounds proposed by Critchley. Pulse CO-Oximetry offers an acceptable trend monitor in patients undergoing major spine surgery. Future work should explore the ability of this device to detect large changes in hemoglobin, as well as its applicability in additional surgical and non-surgical patient populations.

  7. Quantitative analysis of retinal changes in hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giansanti, Roberto; Boemi, Massimo; Fumelli, Paolo; Passerini, Giorgio; Zingaretti, Primo

    1995-05-01

    Arterial hypertension is a high prevalence disease in Western countries and it is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular accidents. Retinal vessel changes are common findings in patients suffering from long-standing hypertensive disease. Morphological evaluations of the fundus oculi represent a fundamental tool for the clinical approach to the patient with hypertension. A qualitative analysis of the retinal lesions is usually performed and this implies severe limitations both in the classification of the different degrees of the pathology and in the follow-up of the disease. A diagnostic system based on a quantitative analysis of the retinal changes could overcome these problems. Our computerized approach was intended for this scope. The paper concentrates on the results and the implications of a computerized approach to the automatic extraction of numerical indexes describing morphological details of the fundus oculi. A previously developed image processing and recognition system, documented elsewhere and briefly described here, was successfully tested in pre-clinical experiments and applied in the evaluation of normal as well as of pathological fundus. The software system was developed to extract indexes such as caliber and path of vessels, local tortuosity of arteries and arterioles, positions and angles of crossings between two vessels. The reliability of the results, justified by their low variability, makes feasible the standardization of quantitative parameters to be used both in the diagnosis and in the prognosis of hypertension, and also allows prospective studies based upon them.

  8. Geomorphological change detection of fluvial processes of lower Siret channel using LIDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niculita, Mihai; Obreja, Florin; Boca, Bogdan

    2015-04-01

    :121-134. Lague D., Brodu N., Leroux J., 2013. Accurate 3D comparison of complex topography with terrestrial laser scanner: application to the Rangitikei canyon (N-Z), ISPRS journal of Photogrammmetry and Remote Sensing, 80:10-26. James L.A., Hodgson M.E., Ghoshal S., Latiolais M.M., 2012. Geomorphic change detection using historic maps and DEM differencing: the temporal dimension of geospatial analysis. Geomorphology, 137:181-198. Nedelcu G., Borcan M., Branescu E., Petre C., Teleanu B., Preda A., Murafa R., 2011. Exceptional floods from the years 2008 and 2010 in Siret river basin, Proceedings of the Annual Scientific Conference of National Romanian Institute of Hydrology and Water Administration, 1-3 November 2011. (in Romanian) Olariu P., Obreja F., Obreja I., 2009. Some aspects regarding the sediment transit from Trotus catchment and lower sector of Siret river during the exceptional floods from 1991 and 2005, Annals of Stefan cel Mare University of Suceava, XVIII:93-104.(in Romanian) Serbu M., Obreja F., Olariu P., 2009. The 2008 floods from upper Siret catchment. Causes, effects, evaluation, Hidrotechnics, 54(12):1-38. (in Romanian) Wheaton J.M., Brasington J., Darby S., Sear D., 2009. Accounting for uncertainty in DEMs from repeat topographic surveys: improved sediment budgets. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 35(2):136-156.

  9. Data mining algorithms for land cover change detection: a review

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sangram Panigrahi

    2017-11-24

    Nov 24, 2017 ... vegetation trends spanning over multiple years in time. The gradual changes represent plantation, forest ..... Compute the L1 (Manhattan) distance of each point in the data set from each of the centroids ..... Another filtering is performed by removing the EVI value less than 0.1 and above 0.9, suggested by ...

  10. Detecting changing emotions in human speech by machine and humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, C.N.; Kowalczyk, W.

    2013-01-01

    The goals of this research were: (1) to develop a system that will automatically measure changes in the emotional state of a speaker by analyzing his/her voice, (2) to validate this system with a controlled experiment and (3) to visualize the results to the speaker in 2-d space. Natural (non-acted)

  11. Detecting forest cover and ecosystem service change using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Natural forests in Uganda have experienced both spatial and temporal modifications from different drivers which need to be monitored to assess the impacts of such changes on ecosystems and prevent related risks of reduction in ecosystem service benefits. Ground investigations may be complex because of dual ...

  12. Detecting areal changes in tidal flats after sea dike construction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The main objective of this study was to estimate changes in the area of tidal flats that occurred after sea dike construction on the western coast of South Korea using Landsat-TM images. Applying the ISODATA method of unsupervised classification for Landsat-TM images, the tidal flats were identified, and the resulting areas ...

  13. Detecting Forest Cover and Ecosystem Service Change Using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Mitigation of climate change impacts on ecosystem services requires more attention and monitoring of forest cover ... degradation of natural forests is accompanied by decline in supply of many ecosystem service benefits ... and resource managers are those that are linked to human activities such as deforestation and land.

  14. ECG Signal Analysis and Arrhythmia Detection using Wavelet Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Inderbir; Rajni, Rajni; Marwaha, Anupma

    2016-12-01

    Electrocardiogram (ECG) is used to record the electrical activity of the heart. The ECG signal being non-stationary in nature, makes the analysis and interpretation of the signal very difficult. Hence accurate analysis of ECG signal with a powerful tool like discrete wavelet transform (DWT) becomes imperative. In this paper, ECG signal is denoised to remove the artifacts and analyzed using Wavelet Transform to detect the QRS complex and arrhythmia. This work is implemented in MATLAB software for MIT/BIH Arrhythmia database and yields the sensitivity of 99.85 %, positive predictivity of 99.92 % and detection error rate of 0.221 % with wavelet transform. It is also inferred that DWT outperforms principle component analysis technique in detection of ECG signal.

  15. An intercomparison of different topography effects on discrimination performance of fuzzy change vector analysis algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sartajvir; Talwar, Rajneesh

    2018-02-01

    Detection of snow cover changes is vital for avalanche hazard analysis and flood flashes that arise due to variation in temperature. Hence, multitemporal change detection is one of the practical mean to estimate the snow cover changes over larger area using remotely sensed data. There have been some previous studies that examined how accuracy of change detection analysis is affected by different topography effects over Northwestern Indian Himalayas. The present work emphases on the intercomparison of different topography effects on discrimination performance of fuzzy based change vector analysis (FCVA) as change detection algorithm that includes extraction of change-magnitude and change-direction from a specific pixel belongs multiple or partial membership. The qualitative and quantitative analysis of the proposed FCVA algorithm is performed under topographic conditions and topographic correction conditions. The experimental outcomes confirmed that in change category discrimination procedure, FCVA with topographic correction achieved 86.8% overall accuracy and 4.8% decay (82% of overall accuracy) is found in FCVA without topographic correction. This study suggests that by incorporating the topographic correction model over mountainous region satellite imagery, performance of FCVA algorithm can be significantly improved up to great extent in terms of determining actual change categories.

  16. Detecting geomorphic processes and change with high resolution topographic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudd, Simon; Hurst, Martin; Grieve, Stuart; Clubb, Fiona; Milodowski, David; Attal, Mikael

    2016-04-01

    The first global topographic dataset was released in 1996, with 1 km grid spacing. It is astonishing that in only 20 years we now have access to tens of thousands of square kilometres of LiDAR data at point densities greater than 5 points per square meter. This data represents a treasure trove of information that our geomorphic predecessors could only dream of. But what are we to do with this data? Here we explore the potential of high resolution topographic data to dig deeper into geomorphic processes across a wider range of landscapes and using much larger spatial coverage than previously possible. We show how this data can be used to constrain sediment flux relationships using relief and hillslope length, and how this data can be used to detect landscape transience. We show how the nonlinear sediment flux law, proposed for upland, soil mantled landscapes by Roering et al. (1999) is consistent with a number of topographic tests. This flux law allows us to predict how landscapes will respond to tectonic forcing, and we show how these predictions can be used to detect erosion rate perturbations across a range of tectonic settings.

  17. Automatic Detection of Changes on Mars Surface from High-Resolution Orbital Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidiropoulos, Panagiotis; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2017-04-01

    Over the last 40 years Mars has been extensively mapped by several NASA and ESA orbital missions, generating a large image dataset comprised of approximately 500,000 high-resolution images (of human resources, which is very difficult to achieve when dealing with a rapidly increasing volume of data. Although citizen science can be employed for training and verification it is unsuitable for planetwide systematic change detection. In this work, we introduce a novel approach in planetary image change detection, which involves a batch-mode automatic change detection pipeline that identifies regions that have changed. This is tested in anger, on tens of thousands of high-resolution images over the MC11 quadrangle [5], acquired by CTX, HRSC, THEMIS-VIS and MOC-NA instruments [1]. We will present results which indicate a substantial level of activity in this region of Mars, including instances of dynamic natural phenomena that haven't been cataloged in the planetary science literature before. We will demonstrate the potential and usefulness of such an automatic approach in planetary science change detection. Acknowledgments: The research leading to these results has received funding from the STFC "MSSL Consolidated Grant" ST/K000977/1 and partial support from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under iMars grant agreement n° 607379. References: [1] P. Sidiropoulos and J. - P. Muller (2015) On the status of orbital high-resolution repeat imaging of Mars for the observation of dynamic surface processes. Planetary and Space Science, 117: 207-222. [2] O. Aharonson, et al. (2003) Slope streak formation and dust deposition rates on Mars. Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, 108(E12):5138 [3] A. McEwen, et al. (2011) Seasonal flows on warm martian slopes. Science, 333 (6043): 740-743. [4] S. Byrne, et al. (2009) Distribution of mid-latitude ground ice on mars from new impact craters. Science, 325(5948):1674-1676. [5] K. Gwinner, et al (2016) The

  18. Family involvement in timely detection of changes in health of nursing homes residents: A qualitative exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Catherine; Blighe, Alan; Froggatt, Katherine; McCormack, Brendan; Woodward-Carlton, Barbara; Young, John; Robinson, Louise; Downs, Murna

    2018-01-01

    To explore family perspectives on their involvement in the timely detection of changes in their relatives' health in UK nursing homes. Increasingly, policy attention is being paid to the need to reduce hospitalisations for conditions that, if detected and treated in time, could be managed in the community. We know that family continue to be involved in the care of their family members once they have moved into a nursing home. Little is known, however, about family involvement in the timely detection of changes in health in nursing home residents. Qualitative exploratory study with thematic analysis. A purposive sampling strategy was applied. Fourteen semi-structured one-to-one interviews with family members of people living in 13 different UK nursing homes. Data were collected from November 2015-March 2016. Families were involved in the timely detection of changes in health in three key ways: noticing signs of changes in health, informing care staff about what they noticed and educating care staff about their family members' changes in health. Families suggested they could be supported to detect timely changes in health by developing effective working practices with care staff. Families can provide a special contribution to the process of timely detection in nursing homes. Their involvement needs to be negotiated, better supported, as well as given more legitimacy and structure within the nursing home. Families could provide much needed support to nursing home nurses, care assistants and managers in timely detection of changes in health. This may be achieved through communication about their preferred involvement on a case-by-case basis as well as providing appropriate support or services. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Clinical Nursing Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Multicriteria Similarity-Based Anomaly Detection Using Pareto Depth Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Ko-Jen; Xu, Kevin S; Calder, Jeff; Hero, Alfred O

    2016-06-01

    We consider the problem of identifying patterns in a data set that exhibits anomalous behavior, often referred to as anomaly detection. Similarity-based anomaly detection algorithms detect abnormally large amounts of similarity or dissimilarity, e.g., as measured by the nearest neighbor Euclidean distances between a test sample and the training samples. In many application domains, there may not exist a single dissimilarity measure that captures all possible anomalous patterns. In such cases, multiple dissimilarity measures can be defined, including nonmetric measures, and one can test for anomalies by scalarizing using a nonnegative linear combination of them. If the relative importance of the different dissimilarity measures are not known in advance, as in many anomaly detection applications, the anomaly detection algorithm may need to be executed multiple times with different choices of weights in the linear combination. In this paper, we propose a method for similarity-based anomaly detection using a novel multicriteria dissimilarity measure, the Pareto depth. The proposed Pareto depth analysis (PDA) anomaly detection algorithm uses the concept of Pareto optimality to detect anomalies under multiple criteria without having to run an algorithm multiple times with different choices of weights. The proposed PDA approach is provably better than using linear combinations of the criteria, and shows superior performance on experiments with synthetic and real data sets.

  20. A New Study of Two Divergence Metrics for Change Detection in Data Streams

    KAUST Repository

    Qahtan, Abdulhakim Ali Ali

    2014-08-01

    Streaming data are dynamic in nature with frequent changes. To detect such changes, most methods measure the difference between the data distributions in a current time window and a reference window. Divergence metrics and density estimation are required to measure the difference between the data distributions. Our study shows that the Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence, the most popular metric for comparing distributions, fails to detect certain changes due to its asymmetric property and its dependence on the variance of the data. We thus consider two metrics for detecting changes in univariate data streams: a symmetric KL-divergence and a divergence metric measuring the intersection area of two distributions. The experimental results show that these two metrics lead to more accurate results in change detection than baseline methods such as Change Finder and using conventional KL-divergence.

  1. Landscape-scale geomorphic change detection: Quantifying spatially variable uncertainty and circumventing legacy data issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffrath, Keelin R.; Belmont, Patrick; Wheaton, Joseph M.

    2015-12-01

    Repeat surveys of high-resolution topographic data enable analysis of geomorphic change through digital elevation model (DEM) differencing. Such analyses are becoming increasingly common. However, techniques for developing robust estimates of spatially variable uncertainty in DEM differencing estimates have been slow to develop and are underutilized. Further, issues often arise when comparing recent to older data sets, because of differences in data quality. Airborne lidar data were collected in 2005 and 2012 in Blue Earth County, Minnesota (1980 km2) and the occurrence of an extreme flood in 2010 produced geomorphic change clearly observed in the field, providing an opportunity to estimate landscape-scale geomorphic change. Initial assessments of the lidar-derived digital elevation models (DEMs) indicated both a vertical bias attributed to different geoid models and localized offset strips in the DEM of difference from poor coregistration of the flightlines. We applied corrections for both issues and describe the methods we used to discern those issues and correct them. We then compare different threshold models to quantify uncertainty. Poor quantification of uncertainty can erroneously over- or underestimate real change. We show that application of a uniform threshold, often called a minimum level of detection, overestimates change in areas where change would not be expected, such as stable hillslopes, and underestimates change in areas where it is expected and has been observed, such as channel banks. We describe a spatially variable DEM error model that combines the influence of slope, point density, and vegetation in a fuzzy inference system. Vegetation is represented with a metric referred to as the cloud point density ratio that assesses the complete point cloud to describe the density of above ground features that may hinder bare-earth returns. We compare the significance of spatially variable versus spatially uniform DEM errors on change detection by

  2. Bioclim Deliverable D1: environmental change analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The BIOCLIM project on modelling sequential Biosphere systems under Climate change for radioactive waste disposal is part of the EURATOM fifth European framework programme. The project was launched in October 2000 for a three-year period. The project aims at providing a scientific basis and practical methodology for assessing the possible long term impacts on the safety of radioactive waste repositories in deep formations due to climate and environmental change. The project brings together a number of representatives from both European radioactive waste management organisations which have national responsibilities for the safe disposal of radioactive waste, either as disposers or regulators, and several highly experienced climate research teams. In particular, BIOCLIM aims to address the important objective of how to represent the development of future biosphere systems by addressing both how to model long-term climate change, the relevant environmental consequences of such changes and the implementation of a sequential approach to such changes. The results from the development of this sophisticated approach will be of great benefit for improving long term radiological impact calculations and the information presented in a safety case. Simulations will be conducted to represent the time series of long-term climate in three European areas within which disposal sites may be established (i.e. Central/Southern Spain, Northeast of France and Central Britain). Two complementary strategies will provide representations of future climate predictions together with associated vegetation patterns using either an analysis of distinct climate states or a continuous climate simulation over at least one glacial-interglacial cycle and possibly for other selected periods over the next 1,000,000 years. These results will be used to derive the characteristics of possible future human environments (i.e. biosphere systems) through which radionuclides, emerging from the repository, may

  3. Microstructuring of piezoresistive cantilevers for gas detection and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarov, Y.; Sarova, V.; Bitterlich, Ch.; Richter, O.; Guliyev, E.; Zoellner, J.-P.; Rangelow, I. W.; Andok, R.; Bencurova, A.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we report on a design and fabrication of cantilevers for gas detection and analysis. The cantilevers have expanded area of interaction with the gas, while the signal transduction is realized by an integrated piezoresistive deflection sensor, placed at the narrowed cantilever base with highest stress along the cantilever. Moreover, the cantilevers have integrated bimorph micro-actuator detection in a static and dynamic mode. The cantilevers are feasible as pressure, temperature and flow sensors and under chemical functionalization - for gas recognition, tracing and composition analysis. (authors)

  4. Detecting changes in forced climate attractors with Wasserstein distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Yoann; Yiou, Pascal; Naveau, Philippe

    2017-07-01

    The climate system can been described by a dynamical system and its associated attractor. The dynamics of this attractor depends on the external forcings that influence the climate. Such forcings can affect the mean values or variances, but regions of the attractor that are seldom visited can also be affected. It is an important challenge to measure how the climate attractor responds to different forcings. Currently, the Euclidean distance or similar measures like the Mahalanobis distance have been favored to measure discrepancies between two climatic situations. Those distances do not have a natural building mechanism to take into account the attractor dynamics. In this paper, we argue that a Wasserstein distance, stemming from optimal transport theory, offers an efficient and practical way to discriminate between dynamical systems. After treating a toy example, we explore how the Wasserstein distance can be applied and interpreted to detect non-autonomous dynamics from a Lorenz system driven by seasonal cycles and a warming trend.

  5. Analysis of Android Device-Based Solutions for Fall Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casilari, Eduardo; Luque, Rafael; Morón, María-José

    2015-07-23

    Falls are a major cause of health and psychological problems as well as hospitalization costs among older adults. Thus, the investigation on automatic Fall Detection Systems (FDSs) has received special attention from the research community during the last decade. In this area, the widespread popularity, decreasing price, computing capabilities, built-in sensors and multiplicity of wireless interfaces of Android-based devices (especially smartphones) have fostered the adoption of this technology to deploy wearable and inexpensive architectures for fall detection. This paper presents a critical and thorough analysis of those existing fall detection systems that are based on Android devices. The review systematically classifies and compares the proposals of the literature taking into account different criteria such as the system architecture, the employed sensors, the detection algorithm or the response in case of a fall alarms. The study emphasizes the analysis of the evaluation methods that are employed to assess the effectiveness of the detection process. The review reveals the complete lack of a reference framework to validate and compare the proposals. In addition, the study also shows that most research works do not evaluate the actual applicability of the Android devices (with limited battery and computing resources) to fall detection solutions.

  6. Information Foraging and Change Detection for Automated Science Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, P. Michael; Dille, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new algorithm for autonomous on-line exploration in unknown environments. The objective is to free remote scientists from possibly-infeasible extensive preliminary site investigation prior to sending robotic agents. We simulate a common exploration task for an autonomous robot sampling the environment at various locations and compare performance against simpler control strategies. An extension is proposed and evaluated that further permits operation in the presence of environmental variability in which the robot encounters a change in the distribution underlying sampling targets. Experimental results indicate a strong improvement in performance across varied parameter choices for the scenario.

  7. Transfer Entropy Estimation and Directional Coupling Change Detection in Biomedical Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Joon

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The detection of change in magnitude of directional coupling between two non-linear time series is a common subject of interest in the biomedical domain, including studies involving the respiratory chemoreflex system. Although transfer entropy is a useful tool in this avenue, no study to date has investigated how different transfer entropy estimation methods perform in typical biomedical applications featuring small sample size and presence of outliers. Methods With respect to detection of increased coupling strength, we compared three transfer entropy estimation techniques using both simulated time series and respiratory recordings from lambs. The following estimation methods were analyzed: fixed-binning with ranking, kernel density estimation (KDE, and the Darbellay-Vajda (D-V adaptive partitioning algorithm extended to three dimensions. In the simulated experiment, sample size was varied from 50 to 200, while coupling strength was increased. In order to introduce outliers, the heavy-tailed Laplace distribution was utilized. In the lamb experiment, the objective was to detect increased respiratory-related chemosensitivity to O2 and CO2 induced by a drug, domperidone. Specifically, the separate influence of end-tidal PO2 and PCO2 on minute ventilation (V˙E before and after administration of domperidone was analyzed. Results In the simulation, KDE detected increased coupling strength at the lowest SNR among the three methods. In the lamb experiment, D-V partitioning resulted in the statistically strongest increase in transfer entropy post-domperidone for PO2→V˙E. In addition, D-V partitioning was the only method that could detect an increase in transfer entropy for PCO2→V˙E, in agreement with experimental findings. Conclusions Transfer entropy is capable of detecting directional coupling changes in non-linear biomedical time series analysis featuring a small number of observations and presence of outliers. The results

  8. Automatic Detection of Optic Disc in Retinal Image by Using Keypoint Detection, Texture Analysis, and Visual Dictionary Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Akyol

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advances in the computer field, methods and techniques in automatic image processing and analysis provide the opportunity to detect automatically the change and degeneration in retinal images. Localization of the optic disc is extremely important for determining the hard exudate lesions or neovascularization, which is the later phase of diabetic retinopathy, in computer aided eye disease diagnosis systems. Whereas optic disc detection is fairly an easy process in normal retinal images, detecting this region in the retinal image which is diabetic retinopathy disease may be difficult. Sometimes information related to optic disc and hard exudate information may be the same in terms of machine learning. We presented a novel approach for efficient and accurate localization of optic disc in retinal images having noise and other lesions. This approach is comprised of five main steps which are image processing, keypoint extraction, texture analysis, visual dictionary, and classifier techniques. We tested our proposed technique on 3 public datasets and obtained quantitative results. Experimental results show that an average optic disc detection accuracy of 94.38%, 95.00%, and 90.00% is achieved, respectively, on the following public datasets: DIARETDB1, DRIVE, and ROC.

  9. Quantitative analysis of hindered amine light stabilizers by CZE with UV detection and quadrupole TOF mass spectrometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintersteiner, Ingrid; Schmid, Thomas; Himmelsbach, Markus; Klampfl, Christian W; Buchberger, Wolfgang W

    2014-10-01

    The current work describes the development of a CZE method with quadrupole QTOF-MS detection and UV detection for the quantitation of Cyasorb 3529, a common hindered amine light stabilizer (HALS), in polymer materials. Analysis of real polymer samples revealed that the oligomer composition of Cyasorb 3529 changes during processing, a fact hampering the development of a straightforward method for quantitation based on calibration with a Cyasorb 3529 standard. To overcome this obstacle in-depth investigations of the oligomer composition of this HALS using QTOF-MS and QTOF-MS/MS had to be performed whereby 22 new oligomer structures, in addition to the ten structures already described, were identified. Finally, a CZE method for quantitative analysis of this HALS was developed starting with a comprehensive characterization of a Cyasorb 3529 standard using CZE-QTOF-MS, subsequently allowing the correct assignment of most Cyasorb 3529 oligomers in an electropherogram with UV detection. Employing the latter detection technique and hexamethyl-melamine as internal standard, peak areas obtained for the melamine could be correlated with those from the triazine ring, the UV-absorbing unit present in the HALS. This approach finally allowed proper quantitation of the single oligomers of Cyasorb 3529, an imperative for the quantitative assessment of this HALS in real polymer samples. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Detecting Land-Use Change and On-Farm Investments at the Plot Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burney, J. A.; Goldblatt, R.; Amezaga, K. Y.; Sanford, L.; Nichols, M. M.

    2017-12-01

    The ability to remotely monitor agro-ecosystems over large spatial scales, at high spatial and temporal resolution, promises to open new and previously un-tractable lines of inquiry about the relationships between management practices, welfare, and resilience in coupled human-natural systems. We use several sources of remotely sensed data (from vegetation indices to synthetic aperture radar) and new analysis methods to infer when and where land-use and management changes take place at the farm level, including processes leading to degradation, like overgrazing or tree removal, as well as processes intended to boost resilience, like irrigation and conservation agriculture. Here, we first show how ecosystem health metrics can be used as indicators of both poverty and vulnerability. This is especially important because many other remotely-sensed economic proxies exhibit hysteresis in one direction; that is, they may respond quickly to positive income shocks (e.g., a change in income may rapidly lead to more construction and an expansion of the urban environment), but little if at all to negative shocks (a drop in income does not lead to deconstruction of buildings). We then present results from three field projects that show how these techniques can be used to detect management changes — reflecting changes in household welfare — in both field and quasi/natural experiments.

  11. Detecting long-term changes to vegetation in northern Canada using the Landsat satellite image archive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, R H; Olthof, I; Carrière, M; Deschamps, A; Pouliot, D

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of coarse resolution (∼1 km) satellite imagery has provided evidence of vegetation changes in arctic regions since the mid-1980s that may be attributable to climate warming. Here we investigate finer-scale changes to northern vegetation over the same period using stacks of 30 m resolution Landsat TM and ETM + satellite images. Linear trends in the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and tasseled cap indices are derived for four widely spaced national parks in northern Canada. The trends are related to predicted changes in fractional shrub and other vegetation covers using regression tree classifiers trained with plot measurements and high resolution imagery. We find a consistent pattern of greening (6.1–25.5% of areas increasing) and predicted increases in vascular vegetation in all four parks that is associated with positive temperature trends. Coarse resolution (3 km) NDVI trends were not detected in two of the parks that had less intense greening. A range of independent studies and observations corroborate many of the major changes observed.

  12. Inland wetland change detection using aircraft MSS [multispectral scanner] data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, J.R.; Ramsey, E.W.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.; Sharitz, R.R.; Christensen, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    Nontidal wetlands in a portion of the Savannah River swamp forest affected by reactor cooling water discharges were mapped using March 31, 1981 and April 29, 1985 high-resolution aircraft multispectral scanner (MSS) data. Due to the inherent distortion in the aircraft MSS data and the complex spectral characteristics of the wetland vegetation, it was necessary to implement multiple techniques in the registration and classification of the MSS imagery of the Pen Branch Delta on each date. In particular, it was necessary to use a piecewise-linear registration process over relatively small regions to perform image-to-image registration. When performing unsupervised classification, an iterative ''cluster busting'' technique was used, which simplified the cluster labeling process. These procedures allowed important wetland vegetation categories to be identified on each date. The multiple-date classification maps were then evaluated using a post-classification comparison technique yielding change classes that were of value in determining the extent of inland wetland change in this region

  13. Responsible corporate change: detecting and managing employee stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, D I; Lovelock, K; Dirks, K N; Welch, D; Shepherd, D

    2015-04-01

    All 120 health and safety inspectors employed by the New Zealand regulatory agency had their jobs disestablished during a restructuring process and were required to undergo an assessment process with tight time frames. To report on psychological morbidity during the transition to change. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) questionnaire was emailed to all 120 current inspectors to measure levels of anxiety (HAD-A) and depression (HAD-D). A score of 11 is indicative of a clinical disorder. Replies were received from 36% (43) of the inspectors. Of the 40 usable responses, 47% (19) and 55% (22), respectively, had HAD-A and HAD-D scores greater than the case cut-off. Only 28% (11) and 15% (6), respectively, had scores that would be considered normal. The high scores evident in this sample are comparable to those found in patients with serious psychopathology. Change managers should recognize that the onus for primary prevention lies with the organization, in this case designing an assessment process that takes place over a reasonable time frame. They should also realize the requirement for the active monitoring of stress. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Coastal change analysis program implemented in Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Elijah W.; Nelson, G.A.; Sapkota, S.K.

    2001-01-01

    Landsat Thematic Mapper images from 1990 to 1996 and collateral data sources were used to classify the land cover of the Mermentau River Basin (MRB) within the Chenier Plain of coastal Louisiana. Landcover classes followed the definition of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Coastal Change Analysis Program; however, classification methods had to be developed as part of this study for attainment of these national classification standards. Classification method developments were especially important when classes were spectrally inseparable, when classes were part of spatial and spectral continuums, when the spatial resolution of the sensor included more than one landcover type, and when human activities caused abnormal transitions in the landscape. Most classification problems were overcome by using one or a combination of techniques, such as separating the MRB into subregions of commonality, applying masks to specific land mixtures, and highlighting class transitions between years that were highly unlikely. Overall, 1990, 1993, and 1996 classification accuracy percentages (associated kappa statistics) were 80% (0.79), 78% (0.76), and 86% (0.84), respectively. Most classification errors were associated with confusion between managed (cultivated land) and unmanaged grassland classes; scrub shrub, grasslands and forest classes; water, unconsolidated shore and bare land classes; and especially in 1993, between water and floating vegetation classes. Combining cultivated land and grassland classes and water and floating vegetation classes into single classes accuracies for 1990, 1993, and 1996 increased to 82%, 83%, and 90%, respectively. To improve the interpretation of landcover change, three indicators of landcover class stability were formulated. Location stability was defined as the percentage of a landcover class that remained as the same class in the same location at the beginning and the end of the monitoring period. Residence stability was

  15. Trend Change Detection in NDVI Time Series: Effects of Inter-Annual Variability and Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkel, Matthias; Carvalhais, Nuno; Verbesselt, Jan; Mahecha, Miguel D.; Neigh, Christopher S.R.; Reichstein, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Changing trends in ecosystem productivity can be quantified using satellite observations of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). However, the estimation of trends from NDVI time series differs substantially depending on analyzed satellite dataset, the corresponding spatiotemporal resolution, and the applied statistical method. Here we compare the performance of a wide range of trend estimation methods and demonstrate that performance decreases with increasing inter-annual variability in the NDVI time series. Trend slope estimates based on annual aggregated time series or based on a seasonal-trend model show better performances than methods that remove the seasonal cycle of the time series. A breakpoint detection analysis reveals that an overestimation of breakpoints in NDVI trends can result in wrong or even opposite trend estimates. Based on our results, we give practical recommendations for the application of trend methods on long-term NDVI time series. Particularly, we apply and compare different methods on NDVI time series in Alaska, where both greening and browning trends have been previously observed. Here, the multi-method uncertainty of NDVI trends is quantified through the application of the different trend estimation methods. Our results indicate that greening NDVI trends in Alaska are more spatially and temporally prevalent than browning trends. We also show that detected breakpoints in NDVI trends tend to coincide with large fires. Overall, our analyses demonstrate that seasonal trend methods need to be improved against inter-annual variability to quantify changing trends in ecosystem productivity with higher accuracy.

  16. Detection of charged particles through a photodiode: design and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angoli, A.; Quirino, L.L.; Hernandez, V.M.; Lopez del R, H.; Mireles, F.; Davila, J.I.; Rios, C.; Pinedo, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    This project develops and construct an charge particle detector mean a pin photodiode array, design and analysis using a silicon pin Fotodiodo that generally is used to detect visible light, its good efficiency, size compact and reduced cost specifically allows to its use in the radiation monitoring and alpha particle detection. Here, so much, appears the design of the system of detection like its characterization for alpha particles where one is reported as alpha energy resolution and detection efficiency. The equipment used in the development of work consists of alpha particle a triple source composed of Am-241, Pu-239 and Cm-244 with 5,55 KBq as total activity, Maestro 32 software made by ORTEC, a multi-channel card Triumph from ORTEC and one low activity electroplated uranium sample. (Author)

  17. Change Detection for Remote Monitoring of Underground Nuclear Testing: Comparison with Seismic and Associated Explosion Source Phenomenological Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canty, M.; Jahnke, G.; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2005-01-01

    The analysis of open-source satellite imagery is in process of establishing itself as an important tool for monitoring nuclear activities throughout the world which are relevant to disarmament treaties, like e. g. the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). However, the detection of anthrop......The analysis of open-source satellite imagery is in process of establishing itself as an important tool for monitoring nuclear activities throughout the world which are relevant to disarmament treaties, like e. g. the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). However, the detection...... of conventional multispectral satellite platforms with moderate ground resolution (Landsat TM, ASTER) to detect changes over wide areas.We chose the Nevada Test Site (NTS), USA, for a case study because of the large amount of available ground truth information. The analysis is based on the multivariate alteration...

  18. Epigenetic change detection and pattern recognition via Bayesian hierarchical hidden Markov models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinlei; Zang, Miao; Xiao, Guanghua

    2013-06-15

    Epigenetics is the study of changes to the genome that can switch genes on or off and determine which proteins are transcribed without altering the DNA sequence. Recently, epigenetic changes have been linked to the development and progression of disease such as psychiatric disorders. High-throughput epigenetic experiments have enabled researchers to measure genome-wide epigenetic profiles and yield data consisting of intensity ratios of immunoprecipitation versus reference samples. The intensity ratios can provide a view of genomic regions where protein binding occur under one experimental condition and further allow us to detect epigenetic alterations through comparison between two different conditions. However, such experiments can be expensive, with only a few replicates available. Moreover, epigenetic data are often spatially correlated with high noise levels. In this paper, we develop a Bayesian hierarchical model, combined with hidden Markov processes with four states for modeling spatial dependence, to detect genomic sites with epigenetic changes from two-sample experiments with paired internal control. One attractive feature of the proposed method is that the four states of the hidden Markov process have well-defined biological meanings and allow us to directly call the change patterns based on the corresponding posterior probabilities. In contrast, none of existing methods can offer this advantage. In addition, the proposed method offers great power in statistical inference by spatial smoothing (via hidden Markov modeling) and information pooling (via hierarchical modeling). Both simulation studies and real data analysis in a cocaine addiction study illustrate the reliability and success of this method. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Enhanced change detection index for disaster response, recovery assessment and monitoring of accessibility and open spaces (camp sites)

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Alwis Pitts, Dilkushi A.; So, Emily

    2017-05-01

    The availability of Very High Resolution (VHR) optical sensors and a growing image archive that is frequently updated, allows the use of change detection in post-disaster recovery and monitoring for robust and rapid results. The proposed semi-automated GIS object-based method uses readily available pre-disaster GIS data and adds existing knowledge into the processing to enhance change detection. It also allows targeting specific types of changes pertaining to similar man-made objects. This change detection method is based on pre/post normalized index, gradient of intensity, texture and edge similarity filters within the object and a set of training data. Once the change is quantified, based on training data, the method can be used automatically to detect change in order to observe recovery over time in large areas. Analysis over time can also contribute to obtaining a full picture of the recovery and development after disaster, thereby giving managers a better understanding of productive management practices.

  20. Elastic recoil detection analysis of hydrogen in polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winzell, T.R.H.; Whitlow, H.J. [Lund Univ. (Sweden); Bubb, I.F.; Short, R.; Johnston, P.N. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) of hydrogen in thick polymeric films has been performed using 2.5 MeV He{sup 2+} ions from the tandem accelerator at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology. The technique enables the use of the same equipment as in Rutherford backscattering analysis, but instead of detecting the incident backscattered ion, the lighter recoiled ion is detected at a small forward angle. The purpose of this work is to investigate how selected polymers react when irradiated by helium ions. The polymers are to be evaluated for their suitability as reference standards for hydrogen depth profiling. Films investigated were Du Pont`s Kapton and Mylar, and polystyrene. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  1. A wavelet-based approach to detect climate change on the coherent and turbulent component of the atmospheric circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faranda, Davide; Defrance, Dimitri

    2016-06-01

    The modifications of atmospheric circulation induced by anthropogenic effects are difficult to capture because wind fields feature a complex spectrum where the signal of large-scale coherent structures (planetary, baroclinic waves and other long-term oscillations) is mixed up with turbulence. Our purpose is to study the effects of climate changes on these two components separately by applying a wavelet analysis to the 700 hPa wind fields obtained in climate simulations for different forcing scenarios. We study the coherent component of the signal via a correlation analysis to detect the persistence of large-scale or long-lasting structures, whereas we use the theory of autoregressive moving-average stochastic processes to measure the spectral complexity of the turbulent component. Under strong anthropogenic forcing, we detect a significant climate change signal. The analysis suggests that coherent structures will play a dominant role in future climate, whereas turbulent spectra will approach a classical Kolmogorov behaviour.

  2. Change Detection and Sustainable Policies of Mangrove Forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malik, Abdul

    and the environmental and socioeconomic consequences of the observed changes for communities living around mangrove areas. In this connection, the effects of mangrove exploitation on biodiversity and ecosystem services, including forestry and fishery products, are explored. Finally, the total economic value...... still provide a wide range of ecosystem services, such as fishery products (fish, crabs, and shrimps) and forestry products (firewood, charcoal, and Nypa palm leaves for crafting), to the communities in the area. The TEV (Total Economic Value) of mangroves was in the range of 4,370 thousand USD (k...... beneficial value than the DUV (Direct Use Value; the benefit value of fishery and forestry products) and OV (Option Value; benefit value of medicines) of mangroves and the financial returns from converting mangroves into commercial aquaculture seem reasonable. However, when the IUV of mangroves is included...

  3. cDNA cloning, structural analysis, SNP detection and tissue ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 96; Issue 2. cDNA cloning, structural analysis, SNP detection and tissue ... Abstract. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) plays an important role in growth, reproduction, foetal development and cell proliferation. The present study was conducted to clone and sequence the ...

  4. cDNA cloning, structural analysis, SNP detection and tissue ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    THOMAS NAICY

    [Naicy T., Venkatachalapathy T., Aravindakshan T., Raghavan K. C., Mini M. and Shyama K. 2017 cDNA cloning, structural analysis, SNP detection and tissue expression profile of the IGF1 gene in Malabari and Attappady Black goats of India. J. Genet. 96, xx–xx]. Introduction. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), an important ...

  5. Gravitational wave detection and data analysis for pulsar timing arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasteren, Rutger van

    2011-01-01

    Long-term precise timing of Galactic millisecond pulsars holds great promise for measuring long-period (months-to-years) astrophysical gravitational waves. In this work we develop a Bayesian data analysis method for projects called pulsar timing arrays; projects aimed to detect these gravitational

  6. Spiral analysis-improved clinical utility with center detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongzhi; Yu, Qiping; Kurtis, Mónica M; Floyd, Alicia G; Smith, Whitney A; Pullman, Seth L

    2008-06-30

    Spiral analysis is a computerized method that measures human motor performance from handwritten Archimedean spirals. It quantifies normal motor activity, and detects early disease as well as dysfunction in patients with movement disorders. The clinical utility of spiral analysis is based on kinematic and dynamic indices derived from the original spiral trace, which must be detected and transformed into mathematical expressions with great precision. Accurately determining the center of the spiral and reducing spurious low frequency noise caused by center selection error is important to the analysis. Handwritten spirals do not all start at the same point, even when marked on paper, and drawing artifacts are not easily filtered without distortion of the spiral data and corruption of the performance indices. In this report, we describe a method for detecting the optimal spiral center and reducing the unwanted drawing artifacts. To demonstrate overall improvement to spiral analysis, we study the impact of the optimal spiral center detection in different frequency domains separately and find that it notably improves the clinical spiral measurement accuracy in low frequency domains.

  7. Use of Sparse Principal Component Analysis (SPCA) for Fault Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gajjar, Shriram; Kulahci, Murat; Palazoglu, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) has been widely used for data dimension reduction and process fault detection. However, interpreting the principal components and the outcomes of PCA-based monitoring techniques is a challenging task since each principal component is a linear combination of the ...

  8. Trajectory-based change detection for automated characterization of forest disturbance dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Kennedy; Warren B. Cohen; Todd A. Schroeder

    2007-01-01

    Satellite sensors are well suited to monitoring changes on the Earth's surface through provision of consistent and repeatable measurements at a spatial scale appropriate for many processes causing change on the land surface. Here, we describe and test a new conceptual approach to change detection of forests using a dense temporal stack of Landsat Thematic Mapper (...

  9. Non-linear laws of echoic memory and auditory change detection in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Koji; Urakawa, Tomokazu; Yamashiro, Koya; Otsuru, Naofumi; Nishihara, Makoto; Takeshima, Yasuyuki; Keceli, Sumru; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2010-07-03

    The detection of any abrupt change in the environment is important to survival. Since memory of preceding sensory conditions is necessary for detecting changes, such a change-detection system relates closely to the memory system. Here we used an auditory change-related N1 subcomponent (change-N1) of event-related brain potentials to investigate cortical mechanisms underlying change detection and echoic memory. Change-N1 was elicited by a simple paradigm with two tones, a standard followed by a deviant, while subjects watched a silent movie. The amplitude of change-N1 elicited by a fixed sound pressure deviance (70 dB vs. 75 dB) was negatively correlated with the logarithm of the interval between the standard sound and deviant sound (1, 10, 100, or 1000 ms), while positively correlated with the logarithm of the duration of the standard sound (25, 100, 500, or 1000 ms). The amplitude of change-N1 elicited by a deviance in sound pressure, sound frequency, and sound location was correlated with the logarithm of the magnitude of physical differences between the standard and deviant sounds. The present findings suggest that temporal representation of echoic memory is non-linear and Weber-Fechner law holds for the automatic cortical response to sound changes within a suprathreshold range. Since the present results show that the behavior of echoic memory can be understood through change-N1, change-N1 would be a useful tool to investigate memory systems.

  10. Cardiac arrhythmia detection using combination of heart rate variability analyses and PUCK analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahananto, Faizal; Igasaki, Tomohiko; Murayama, Nobuki

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents cardiac arrhythmia detection using the combination of a heart rate variability (HRV) analysis and a "potential of unbalanced complex kinetics" (PUCK) analysis. Detection performance was improved by adding features extracted from the PUCK analysis. Initially, R-R interval data were extracted from the original electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings and were cut into small segments and marked as either normal or arrhythmia. HRV analyses then were conducted using the segmented R-R interval data, including a time-domain analysis, frequency-domain analysis, and nonlinear analysis. In addition to the HRV analysis, PUCK analysis, which has been implemented successfully in a foreign exchange market series to characterize change, was employed. A decision-tree algorithm was applied to all of the obtained features for classification. The proposed method was tested using the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database and had an overall classification accuracy of 91.73%. After combining features obtained from the PUCK analysis, the overall accuracy increased to 92.91%. Therefore, we suggest that the use of a PUCK analysis in conjunction with HRV analysis might improve performance accuracy for the detection of cardiac arrhythmia.

  11. Detection and localization of changes in two-dimensional temperature distributions by electrical resistance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashetnia, Reza; Hallaji, Milad; Smyl, Danny; Seppänen, Aku; Pour-Ghaz, Mohammad

    2017-11-01

    This paper studies the feasibility of applying electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to detect changes in two-dimensional (2D) temperature distributions with potential applications in sensor development. The proposed sensor consists of a thin layer of porous metal film manufactured by spraying colloidal copper paint to a solid surface. A change of the temperature distribution on the surface changes the 2D distributed electrical conductivity of the metal film. The change of the electrical conductivity is localized and quantified with ERT, and further, to convert the estimated conductivity change of the sensor to temperature change, an experimentally developed model is used. The proposed temperature sensor is evaluated experimentally by applying it to a polymeric substrate, and exposing it to known temperature changes using heat sources of different shapes. The results demonstrate that the proposed sensor is capable of detecting and localizing temperature changes, and provides at least qualitative information on the magnitude of the temperature change.

  12. Citation-based plagiarism detection detecting disguised and cross-language plagiarism using citation pattern analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Gipp, Bela

    2014-01-01

    Plagiarism is a problem with far-reaching consequences for the sciences. However, even today's best software-based systems can only reliably identify copy & paste plagiarism. Disguised plagiarism forms, including paraphrased text, cross-language plagiarism, as well as structural and idea plagiarism often remain undetected. This weakness of current systems results in a large percentage of scientific plagiarism going undetected. Bela Gipp provides an overview of the state-of-the art in plagiarism detection and an analysis of why these approaches fail to detect disguised plagiarism forms. The aut

  13. Detecting climate-change responses of plants and soil organic matter using isotopomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleucher, Jürgen; Ehlers, Ina; Segura, Javier; Haei, Mahsa; Augusti, Angela; Köhler, Iris; Zuidema, Pieter; Nilsson, Mats; Öquist, Mats

    2015-04-01

    Responses of vegetation and soils to environmental changes will strongly influence future climate, and responses on century time scales are most important for feedbacks on the carbon cycle, climate models, prediction of crop productivity, and for adaptation to climate change. That plants respond to increasing CO2 on century time scales has been proven by changes in stomatal index, but very little is known beyond this. In soil, the complexity of soil organic matter (SOM) has hampered a sufficient understanding of the temperature sensitivity of SOM turnover. Here we present new stable isotope methodology that allows detecting shifts in metabolism on long time scales, and elucidating SOM turnover on the molecular level. Compound-specific isotope analysis measures isotope ratios of defined metabolites, but as average of the entire molecule. Here we demonstrate how much more detailed information can be obtained from analyses of intramolecular distributions of stable isotopes, so-called isotopomer abundances. As key tool, we use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, which allows detecting isotope abundance with intramolecular resolution and without risk for isotope fractionation during analysis. Enzyme isotope fractionations create non-random isotopomer patterns in biochemical metabolites. At natural isotope abundance, these patterns continuously store metabolic information. We present a strategy how these patterns can be used as to extract signals on plant physiology, climate variables, and their interactions. Applied in retrospective analyses to herbarium samples and tree-ring series, we detect century-time-scale metabolic changes in response to increasing atmospheric CO2, with no evidence for acclimatory reactions by the plants. In trees, the increase in photosynthesis expected from increasing CO2 ("CO2 fertilization) was diminished by increasing temperatures, which resolves the discrepancy between expected increases in photosynthesis and commonly observed

  14. INTERACTIVE CHANGE DETECTION USING HIGH RESOLUTION REMOTE SENSING IMAGES BASED ON ACTIVE LEARNING WITH GAUSSIAN PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ru

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Although there have been many studies for change detection, the effective and efficient use of high resolution remote sensing images is still a problem. Conventional supervised methods need lots of annotations to classify the land cover categories and detect their changes. Besides, the training set in supervised methods often has lots of redundant samples without any essential information. In this study, we present a method for interactive change detection using high resolution remote sensing images with active learning to overcome the shortages of existing remote sensing image change detection techniques. In our method, there is no annotation of actual land cover category at the beginning. First, we find a certain number of the most representative objects in unsupervised way. Then, we can detect the change areas from multi-temporal high resolution remote sensing images by active learning with Gaussian processes in an interactive way gradually until the detection results do not change notably. The artificial labelling can be reduced substantially, and a desirable detection result can be obtained in a few iterations. The experiments on Geo-Eye1 and WorldView2 remote sensing images demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed method.

  15. Change detection and change monitoring of natural and man-made features in multispectral and hyperspectral satellite imagery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, Daniela Irina

    2018-04-17

    An approach for land cover classification, seasonal and yearly change detection and monitoring, and identification of changes in man-made features may use a clustering of sparse approximations (CoSA) on sparse representations in learned dictionaries. A Hebbian learning rule may be used to build multispectral or hyperspectral, multiresolution dictionaries that are adapted to regional satellite image data. Sparse image representations of pixel patches over the learned dictionaries may be used to perform unsupervised k-means clustering into land cover categories. The clustering process behaves as a classifier in detecting real variability. This approach may combine spectral and spatial textural characteristics to detect geologic, vegetative, hydrologic, and man-made features, as well as changes in these features over time.

  16. Conceptual risk assessment framework for global change risk analysis SRP

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Elphinstone, CD

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This report is submitted as a deliverable of the SRP project Global Change Risk Analysis which aims at applying risk analysis as a unifying notion for quantifying and communicating threats to ecosystem services originating from global change...

  17. Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Phillip B [Idaho Falls, ID; Novascone, Stephen R [Idaho Falls, ID; Wright, Jerry P [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-09-27

    Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

  18. Hurricane Isaac: observations and analysis of coastal change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Kristy K.; Stockdon, Hilary F.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Doran, Kara S.; Morgan, Karen L.M.

    2013-01-01

    , airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) topographic surveys, and ground-based topographic surveys. This report documents data-collection efforts and presents qualitative and quantitative descriptions of hurricane-induced changes to the shoreline, beaches, dunes, and infrastructure in the region that was heavily impacted by Hurricane Isaac. The report is divided into the following sections: Section 1: Introduction Section 2: Storm Overview, presents a synopsis of the storm, including meteorological evolution, wind speed impact area, wind-wave generation, and storm-surge extent and magnitudes. Section 3: Coastal-Change Observations, describes data-collection missions, including acquisition of oblique aerial photography and airborne lidar topographic surveys, in response to Hurricane Isaac. Section 4: Coastal-Change Analysis, describes data-analysis methods and observations of coastal change.

  19. Image enhancement and color constancy for a vehicle-mounted change detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tektonidis, Marco; Monnin, David

    2016-10-01

    Vehicle-mounted change detection systems allow to improve situational awareness on outdoor itineraries of inter- est. Since the visibility of acquired images is often affected by illumination effects (e.g., shadows) it is important to enhance local contrast. For the analysis and comparison of color images depicting the same scene at different time points it is required to compensate color and lightness inconsistencies caused by the different illumination conditions. We have developed an approach for image enhancement and color constancy based on the center/surround Retinex model and the Gray World hypothesis. The combination of the two methods using a color processing function improves color rendition, compared to both methods. The use of stacked integral images (SII) allows to efficiently perform local image processing. Our combined Retinex/Gray World approach has been successfully applied to image sequences acquired on outdoor itineraries at different time points and a comparison with previous Retinex-based approaches has been carried out.

  20. Self-adaptive change detection in streaming data with non-stationary distribution

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiangliang

    2010-01-01

    Non-stationary distribution, in which the data distribution evolves over time, is a common issue in many application fields, e.g., intrusion detection and grid computing. Detecting the changes in massive streaming data with a non-stationary distribution helps to alarm the anomalies, to clean the noises, and to report the new patterns. In this paper, we employ a novel approach for detecting changes in streaming data with the purpose of improving the quality of modeling the data streams. Through observing the outliers, this approach of change detection uses a weighted standard deviation to monitor the evolution of the distribution of data streams. A cumulative statistical test, Page-Hinkley, is employed to collect the evidence of changes in distribution. The parameter used for reporting the changes is self-adaptively adjusted according to the distribution of data streams, rather than set by a fixed empirical value. The self-adaptability of the novel approach enhances the effectiveness of modeling data streams by timely catching the changes of distributions. We validated the approach on an online clustering framework with a benchmark KDDcup 1999 intrusion detection data set as well as with a real-world grid data set. The validation results demonstrate its better performance on achieving higher accuracy and lower percentage of outliers comparing to the other change detection approaches. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  1. Change Detection in Synthetic Aperture Radar Images Using a Multiscale-Driven Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaniyi A. Ajadi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the significant progress that was achieved throughout the recent years, to this day, automatic change detection and classification from synthetic aperture radar (SAR images remains a difficult task. This is, in large part, due to (a the high level of speckle noise that is inherent to SAR data; (b the complex scattering response of SAR even for rather homogeneous targets; (c the low temporal sampling that is often achieved with SAR systems, since sequential images do not always have the same radar geometry (incident angle, orbit path, etc.; and (d the typically limited performance of SAR in delineating the exact boundary of changed regions. With this paper we present a promising change detection method that utilizes SAR images and provides solutions for these previously mentioned difficulties. We will show that the presented approach enables automatic and high-performance change detection across a wide range of spatial scales (resolution levels. The developed method follows a three-step approach of (i initial pre-processing; (ii data enhancement/filtering; and (iii wavelet-based, multi-scale change detection. The stand-alone property of our approach is the high flexibility in applying the change detection approach to a wide range of change detection problems. The performance of the developed approach is demonstrated using synthetic data as well as a real-data application to wildfire progression near Fairbanks, Alaska.

  2. Impact analysis of input parameter for damage detection code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venglar Michal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary aim of the article is to analyse impact of appropriate values of input parameter for an effective solution of the self-developed code used for damage detection. The code was prepared to determine the change of bending stiffness in Microsoft Office Excel Visual Basic for Applications. The code used non-destructive vibration based method, i.e. the FE model updating method. A steel bar was assumed for numerical calculation. Time consumption of calculation, precision of identification and degree of possible damage detection were investigated. The values of computation time depend on the input values, the desired limit of the accepted error. Then, data from a laboratory experiment was analysed. The damage detection was done in accordance with the suitable input data from a parametric study of the steel bar.

  3. Band Selection-Based Dimensionality Reduction for Change Detection in Multi-Temporal Hyperspectral Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sicong Liu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes to use band selection-based dimensionality reduction (BS-DR technique in addressing a challenging multi-temporal hyperspectral images change detection (HSI-CD problem. The aim of this work is to analyze and evaluate in detail the CD performance by selecting the most informative band subset from the original high-dimensional data space. In particular, for cases where ground reference data are available or unavailable, either supervised or unsupervised CD approaches are designed. The following sub-problems in HSI-CD are investigated, including: (1 the estimated number of multi-class changes; (2 the binary CD; (3 the multiple CD; (4 the estimated optimal number of selected bands; and (5 computational efficiency. The main contribution of this paper is to provide for the first time a thorough analysis of the impacts of band selection on the HSI-CD problem, thus to fix the gap in the state-of-the-art techniques either by simply utilizing the full dimensionality of the data or exploring a complex hierarchical change analysis. It is applicable to CD problems in multispectral or PolSAR images when the feature space is expanded for discriminant feature extraction. Two real multi-temporal hyperspectral Hyperion datasets are used to validate the proposed approaches. Quantitative and qualitative experimental results demonstrated that by selecting a subset of the most informative and distinct spectral bands, the proposed approaches offered better CD performance than the state-of-the-art techniques using original full bands, without losing the change representative and discriminable capabilities of a detector.

  4. Stochastic adaptation and fold-change detection: from single-cell to population behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leier André

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In cell signaling terminology, adaptation refers to a system's capability of returning to its equilibrium upon a transient response. To achieve this, a network has to be both sensitive and precise. Namely, the system must display a significant output response upon stimulation, and later on return to pre-stimulation levels. If the system settles at the exact same equilibrium, adaptation is said to be 'perfect'. Examples of adaptation mechanisms include temperature regulation, calcium regulation and bacterial chemotaxis. Results We present models of the simplest adaptation architecture, a two-state protein system, in a stochastic setting. Furthermore, we consider differences between individual and collective adaptive behavior, and show how our system displays fold-change detection properties. Our analysis and simulations highlight why adaptation needs to be understood in terms of probability, and not in strict numbers of molecules. Most importantly, selection of appropriate parameters in this simple linear setting may yield populations of cells displaying adaptation, while single cells do not. Conclusions Single cell behavior cannot be inferred from population measurements and, sometimes, collective behavior cannot be determined from the individuals. By consequence, adaptation can many times be considered a purely emergent property of the collective system. This is a clear example where biological ergodicity cannot be assumed, just as is also the case when cell replication rates are not homogeneous, or depend on the cell state. Our analysis shows, for the first time, how ergodicity cannot be taken for granted in simple linear examples either. The latter holds even when cells are considered isolated and devoid of replication capabilities (cell-cycle arrested. We also show how a simple linear adaptation scheme displays fold-change detection properties, and how rupture of ergodicity prevails in scenarios where transitions between

  5. Corpus analysis and automatic detection of emotion-including keywords

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bo; He, Xiangqing; Liu, Ying

    2013-12-01

    Emotion words play a vital role in many sentiment analysis tasks. Previous research uses sentiment dictionary to detect the subjectivity or polarity of words. In this paper, we dive into Emotion-Inducing Keywords (EIK), which refers to the words in use that convey emotion. We first analyze an emotion corpus to explore the pragmatic aspects of EIK. Then we design an effective framework for automatically detecting EIK in sentences by utilizing linguistic features and context information. Our system outperforms traditional dictionary-based methods dramatically in increasing Precision, Recall and F1-score.

  6. Beauty hinders attention switch in change detection: the role of facial attractiveness and distinctiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenfeng; Liu, Chang Hong; Nakabayashi, Kazuyo

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has shown that the presence of a task-irrelevant attractive face can induce a transient diversion of attention from a perceptual task that requires covert deployment of attention to one of the two locations. However, it is not known whether this spontaneous appraisal for facial beauty also modulates attention in change detection among multiple locations, where a slower, and more controlled search process is simultaneously affected by the magnitude of a change and the facial distinctiveness. Using the flicker paradigm, this study examines how spontaneous appraisal for facial beauty affects the detection of identity change among multiple faces. Participants viewed a display consisting of two alternating frames of four faces separated by a blank frame. In half of the trials, one of the faces (target face) changed to a different person. The task of the participant was to indicate whether a change of face identity had occurred. The results showed that (1) observers were less efficient at detecting identity change among multiple attractive faces relative to unattractive faces when the target and distractor faces were not highly distinctive from one another; and (2) it is difficult to detect a change if the new face is similar to the old. The findings suggest that attractive faces may interfere with the attention-switch process in change detection. The results also show that attention in change detection was strongly modulated by physical similarity between the alternating faces. Although facial beauty is a powerful stimulus that has well-demonstrated priority, its influence on change detection is easily superseded by low-level image similarity. The visual system appears to take a different approach to facial beauty when a task requires resource-demanding feature comparisons.

  7. Detecting changes in the nutritional value and elemental composition of transgenic sorghum grain

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ndimba, R

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available . In the present study, the effect of this targeted kafirin suppression on other grain quality parameters was investigated. Several significant changes in the proximate composition, amino acid profile and the bulk mineral content were detected. Importantly...

  8. Automated land cover change detection: the quest for meaningful high temporal time series extraction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Salmon, BP

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available An automated land cover change detection method is proposed that uses coarse resolution hyper-temporal satellite time series data. The study compared two different unsupervised clustering approaches that operate on the short term Fourier transform...

  9. Precise Automatic Image Coregistration Tools to Enable Pixel-Level Change Detection, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Automated detection of land cover changes between multitemporal images (i.e., images captured at different times) has long been a goal of the remote sensing...

  10. A spatio-temporal autocorrelation change detection approach using hyper-temporal satellite data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kleynhans, W

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available There has been recent developments in the use of hypertemporal satellite time series data for land cover change detection and classification in South Africa and in particular, the monitoring of human settlement expansion is of relevance...

  11. Quest for automated land cover change detection using satellite time series data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Salmon, BP

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows that a feedforward Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) operating over a temporal sliding window of multispectral time series MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite data is able to detect land cover change...

  12. Precise automatic image coregistration tools to enable pixel-level change detection, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Automated detection of land cover changes between multitemporal images has long been a goal of the remote sensing discipline. Most research in this area has focused...

  13. Eyewear Equipped with a Triaxial Accelerometer Detects Age-Related Changes in Ambulatory Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeyuki Ikeda

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aging is known as a risk factor for gait disorders, which lead to reduced quality of life. Gait disorders can potentially be a sign of a preclinical phase of neurological diseases. Therefore, routine monitoring of changes in ambulatory activity with age can lead to early detection of such disorders. JINS MEME is eyewear equipped with a triaxial accelerometer (mediolateral, anteroposterior, and vertical and capable of measuring acceleration signals during gait. To validate effectiveness of JINS MEME in routinely monitoring age-related changes in ambulatory activity, the present study tested three hypotheses: (1 the frequency of mediolateral body sway during gait increases with age, (2 the variability of gait speed (anteroposterior increases with age, and (3 the frequency of vertical body sway during gait increases with age. The present study included 118 subjects aged 25–69 years. The acceleration signals were measured by JINS MEME while each subject walked down a barrier-free 20-meter-long level corridor at a natural pace. Triaxial variances known for reflecting gait stability, were calculated from the acceleration signals during gait. An association between each of the triaxial variances and age was assessed by multiple linear robust regression analysis including sex as a nuisance covariate. We found significant positive correlations between the anteroposterior variance and age and between the vertical variance and age. The results supported our second and third hypotheses and raised an intriguing possibility that the triaxial accelerometer of JINS MEME is capable of detecting age-related changes in ambulatory activity.

  14. Automated image analysis of microstructure changes in metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Mohammed E.; Ford, Ralph M.; Roth, John T.

    2005-02-01

    The ability to identify and quantify changes in the microstructure of metal alloys is valuable in metal cutting and shaping applications. For example, certain metals, after being cryogenically and electrically treated, have shown large increases in their tool life when used in manufacturing cutting and shaping processes. However, the mechanisms of microstructure changes in alloys under various treatments, which cause them to behave differently, are not yet fully understood. The changes are currently evaluated in a semi-quantitative manner by visual inspection of images of the microstructure. This research applies pattern recognition technology to quantitatively measure the changes in microstructure and to validate the initial assertion of increased tool life under certain treatments. Heterogeneous images of aluminum and tungsten carbide of various categories were analyzed using a process including background correction, adaptive thresholding, edge detection and other algorithms for automated analysis of microstructures. The algorithms are robust across a variety of operating conditions. This research not only facilitates better understanding of the effects of electric and cryogenic treatment of these materials, but also their impact on tooling and metal-cutting processes.

  15. The diagnostic value of sacroiliac CT for detecting early changes of ankylosing spondylitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ju Hyun; Park, Ji Seon; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Jin, Wook

    2007-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate the diagnostic value of the various findings on sacroiliac CT for detecting the early changes of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Between April 2005 and March 2006, 51 sacroiliac CT images with the clinical suspicion of AS, but no definite evidence of AS on the plain radiograph only, were retrospectively reviewed. Finally, 36 patients (mean age: 28.6 years; 34 males and 2 females), who were clinically diagnosed as AS (AS group, n = 26) or they had no evidence of AS (non-AS group, n = 10), were evaluated. Two musculoskeletal radiologists analyzed the presence of marginal irregularity, bony erosion and subchondral sclerosis. A statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the incidence, sensitivity and specificity of each finding. Marginal irregularity was seen in 21 of 26 AS subjects, and in 8 of 10 non-AS subjects. Bony erosion was only seen in 13 of 26 AS subjects. Subchondral sclerosis was observed in 19 of 26 AS subjects and in 8 of 10 non-AS subjects. The sensitivity/specificity for each findings were 72.4%/28.6%, 100%/43.5% and 70.4%/22.2%, respectively. Except for bony erosions, these results showed no statistical significance (ρ = .006). Bony erosion on CT is a very sensitive finding for the early changes of AS, whereas marginal irregularity or subchondral sclerosis is not so helpful in differentiating AS from non-AS. Attention to these results may further enhance the accurate diagnosis of the early changes in AS

  16. Detection of Malignancy Associated Changes in Cervical Cell Nuclei Using Feed-Forward Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger A. Kemp

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal cells in the presence of a precancerous lesion undergo subtle changes of their DNA distribution when observed by visible microscopy. These changes have been termed Malignancy Associated Changes (MACs. Using statistical models such as neural networks and discriminant functions it is possible to design classifiers that can separate these objects from truly normal cells. The correct classification rate using feed‐forward neural networks is compared to linear discriminant analysis when applied to detecting MACs. Classifiers were designed using 53 nuclear features calculated from images for each of 25,360 normal appearing cells taken from 344 slides diagnosed as normal or containing severe dysplasia. A linear discriminant function achieved a correct classification rate of 61.6% on the test data while neural networks scored as high as 72.5% on a cell‐by‐cell basis. The cell classifiers were applied to a library of 93,494 cells from 395 slides, and the results were jackknifed using a single slide feature. The discriminant function achieved a correct classification rate of 67.6% while the neural networks managed as high as 76.2%.

  17. Changing Diagnostic Methods and Increased Detection of Verotoxigenic Escherichia coli, Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Rice, Thomas; Quinn, Noreen; Sleator, Roy D.; Lucey, Brigid

    2016-01-01

    The recent paradigm shift in infectious disease diagnosis from culture-based to molecular-based approaches is exemplified in the findings of a national study assessing the detection of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli infections in Ireland. The methodologic changes have been accompanied by a dramatic increase in detections of non-O157 verotoxigenic E. coli serotypes.

  18. Change Detection Using High Resolution Remote Sensing Images Based on Active Learning and Markov Random Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai Yu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Change detection has been widely used in remote sensing, such as for disaster assessment and urban expansion detection. Although it is convenient to use unsupervised methods to detect changes from multi-temporal images, the results could be further improved. In supervised methods, heavy data labelling tasks are needed, and the sample annotation process with real categories is tedious and costly. To relieve the burden of labelling and to obtain satisfactory results, we propose an interactive change detection framework based on active learning and Markov random field (MRF. More specifically, a limited number of representative objects are found in an unsupervised way at the beginning. Then, the very limited samples are labelled as “change” or “no change” to train a simple binary classification model, i.e., a Gaussian process model. By using this model, we then select and label the most informative samples by “the easiest” sample selection strategy to update the former weak classification model until the detection results do not change notably. Finally, the maximum a posteriori (MAP change detection is efficiently computed via the min-cut-based integer optimization algorithm. The time consuming and laborious manual labelling process can be reduced substantially, and a desirable detection result can be obtained. The experiments on several WorldView-2 images demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Building Change Detection Using Old Aerial Images and New LiDAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouji Du

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Building change detection is important for urban area monitoring, disaster assessment and updating geo-database. 3D information derived from image dense matching or airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR is very effective for building change detection. However, combining 3D data from different sources is challenging, and so far few studies have focused on building change detection using both images and LiDAR data. This study proposes an automatic method to detect building changes in urban areas using aerial images and LiDAR data. First, dense image matching is carried out to obtain dense point clouds and then co-registered LiDAR point clouds using the iterative closest point (ICP algorithm. The registered point clouds are further resampled to a raster DSM (Digital Surface Models. In a second step, height difference and grey-scale similarity are calculated as change indicators and the graph cuts method is employed to determine changes considering the contexture information. Finally, the detected results are refined by removing the non-building changes, in which a novel method based on variance of normal direction of LiDAR points is proposed to remove vegetated areas for positive building changes (newly building or taller and nEGI (normalized Excessive Green Index is used for negative building changes (demolish building or lower. To evaluate the proposed method, a test area covering approximately 2.1 km2 and consisting of many different types of buildings is used for the experiment. Results indicate 93% completeness with correctness of 90.2% for positive changes, while 94% completeness with correctness of 94.1% for negative changes, which demonstrate the promising performance of the proposed method.

  20. Detectability of past changes in the vertical distribution of ozone with twelve limb sounders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, D.; Verhoelst, T.; Vandenbussche, S.; Granville, J.; Pieroux, D.; Lambert, J.-C.

    2012-04-01

    Recent international efforts like the SPARC/IO3C/WMO-IGACO Initiative on Past Changes in the Vertical Distribution of Ozone (SI2N) and ESA's Climate Change Initiative (CCI), aim at a better exploitation of existing atmospheric data records for trend assessments and for studies of the interactions between atmospheric composition change and climate change. In particular, the vertical distribution of atmospheric ozone has been measured from space since the mid-1980s by various types of spectrometers measuring in different spectral ranges the solar and/or atmospheric radiation emitted, scattered and/or attenuated through the atmospheric limb. A prerequisite to the synergistic use of these nearly thirty years of observations is their mutual consistency and long-term stability lying within the limits required by trend and climate studies. In support of the aforementioned projects we present the systematic analysis of drifts and biases of ozone profile data records acquired by twelve major satellite missions: ERBS SAGE-II, UARS HALOE, SPOT-3 POAM-II, SPOT-4 POAM-III, Odin OSIRIS and SMR, Envisat GOMOS, MIPAS and SCIAMACHY, SCISAT-1 ACE-FTS and ACE-MAESTRO, and EOS-Aura MLS. The ground-based data acquired by ozonesonde and lidar networks affiliated with NDACC and WMO's GAW are used as a reference and as a standard transfer between not contiguous satellite missions. Besides conclusions on drifts and biases as a function of latitude and altitude, we also present the meridian structure of the threshold altitude for each satellite data record, i.e. the altitude below which the statistical data quality degrades rapidly. The suitability of current satellite data sets for the detection of past changes in the ozone profile is discussed.

  1. Multiscale-Driven approach to detecting change in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gens, R.; Hogenson, K.; Ajadi, O. A.; Meyer, F. J.; Myers, A.; Logan, T. A.; Arnoult, K., Jr.

    2017-12-01

    Detecting changes between Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images can be a useful but challenging exercise. SAR with its all-weather capabilities can be an important resource in identifying and estimating the expanse of events such as flooding, river ice breakup, earthquake damage, oil spills, and forest growth, as it can overcome shortcomings of optical methods related to cloud cover. However, detecting change in SAR imagery can be impeded by many factors including speckle, complex scattering responses, low temporal sampling, and difficulty delineating boundaries. In this presentation we use a change detection method based on a multiscale-driven approach. By using information at different resolution levels, we attempt to obtain more accurate change detection maps in both heterogeneous and homogeneous regions. Integrated within the processing flow are processes that 1) improve classification performance by combining Expectation-Maximization algorithms with mathematical morphology, 2) achieve high accuracy in preserving boundaries using measurement level fusion techniques, and 3) combine modern non-local filtering and 2D-discrete stationary wavelet transform to provide robustness against noise. This multiscale-driven approach to change detection has recently been incorporated into the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) Hybrid Pluggable Processing Pipeline (HyP3) using radiometrically terrain corrected SAR images. Examples primarily from natural hazards are presented to illustrate the capabilities and limitations of the change detection method.

  2. Reliability analysis for the quench detection in the LHC machine

    CERN Document Server

    Denz, R; Vergara-Fernández, A

    2002-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will incorporate a large amount of superconducting elements that require protection in case of a quench. Key elements in the quench protection system are the electronic quench detectors. Their reliability will have an important impact on the down time as well as on the operational cost of the collider. The expected rates of both false and missed quenches have been computed for several redundant detection schemes. The developed model takes account of the maintainability of the system to optimise the frequency of foreseen checks, and evaluate their influence on the performance of different detection topologies. Seen the uncertainty of the failure rate of the components combined with the LHC tunnel environment, the study has been completed with a sensitivity analysis of the results. The chosen detection scheme and the maintainability strategy for each detector family are given.

  3. Analysis of accelerants and fire debris using aroma detection technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barshick, S.A.

    1997-01-17

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the utility of electronic aroma detection technologies for the detection and identification of accelerant residues in suspected arson debris. Through the analysis of known accelerant residues, a trained neural network was developed for classifying suspected arson samples. Three unknown fire debris samples were classified using this neural network. The item corresponding to diesel fuel was correctly identified every time. For the other two items, wide variations in sample concentration and excessive water content, producing high sample humidities, were shown to influence the sensor response. Sorbent sampling prior to aroma detection was demonstrated to reduce these problems and to allow proper neural network classification of the remaining items corresponding to kerosene and gasoline.

  4. SNIa detection in the SNLS photometric analysis using Morphological Component Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Möller, A.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Neveu, J.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Lanusse, F.; Starck, J.-L.

    2015-01-01

    Detection of supernovae (SNe) and, more generally, of transient events in large surveys can provide numerous false detections. In the case of a deferred processing of survey images, this implies reconstructing complete light curves for all detections, requiring sizable processing time and resources. Optimizing the detection of transient events is thus an important issue for both present and future surveys. We present here the optimization done in the SuperNova Legacy Survey (SNLS) for the 5-year data deferred photometric analysis. In this analysis, detections are derived from stacks of subtracted images with one stack per lunation. The 3-year analysis provided 300,000 detections dominated by signals of bright objects that were not perfectly subtracted. Allowing these artifacts to be detected leads not only to a waste of resources but also to possible signal coordinate contamination. We developed a subtracted image stack treatment to reduce the number of non SN-like events using morphological component analysis. This technique exploits the morphological diversity of objects to be detected to extract the signal of interest. At the level of our subtraction stacks, SN-like events are rather circular objects while most spurious detections exhibit different shapes. A two-step procedure was necessary to have a proper evaluation of the noise in the subtracted image stacks and thus a reliable signal extraction. We also set up a new detection strategy to obtain coordinates with good resolution for the extracted signal. SNIa Monte-Carlo (MC) generated images were used to study detection efficiency and coordinate resolution. When tested on SNLS 3-year data this procedure decreases the number of detections by a factor of two, while losing only 10% of SN-like events, almost all faint ones. MC results show that SNIa detection efficiency is equivalent to that of the original method for bright events, while the coordinate resolution is improved

  5. A martingale framework for detecting changes in data streams by testing exchangeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Shen-Shyang; Wechsler, Harry

    2010-12-01

    In a data streaming setting, data points are observed sequentially. The data generating model may change as the data are streaming. In this paper, we propose detecting this change in data streams by testing the exchangeability property of the observed data. Our martingale approach is an efficient, nonparametric, one-pass algorithm that is effective on the classification, cluster, and regression data generating models. Experimental results show the feasibility and effectiveness of the martingale methodology in detecting changes in the data generating model for time-varying data streams. Moreover, we also show that: 1) An adaptive support vector machine (SVM) utilizing the martingale methodology compares favorably against an adaptive SVM utilizing a sliding window, and 2) a multiple martingale video-shot change detector compares favorably against standard shot-change detection algorithms.

  6. Automatic detection of adverse events to predict drug label changes using text and data mining techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurulingappa, Harsha; Toldo, Luca; Rajput, Abdul Mateen; Kors, Jan A; Taweel, Adel; Tayrouz, Yorki

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of automatically detected adverse event signals from text and open-source data on the prediction of drug label changes. Open-source adverse effect data were collected from FAERS, Yellow Cards and SIDER databases. A shallow linguistic relation extraction system (JSRE) was applied for extraction of adverse effects from MEDLINE case reports. Statistical approach was applied on the extracted datasets for signal detection and subsequent prediction of label changes issued for 29 drugs by the UK Regulatory Authority in 2009. 76% of drug label changes were automatically predicted. Out of these, 6% of drug label changes were detected only by text mining. JSRE enabled precise identification of four adverse drug events from MEDLINE that were undetectable otherwise. Changes in drug labels can be predicted automatically using data and text mining techniques. Text mining technology is mature and well-placed to support the pharmacovigilance tasks. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Applications of TOPS Anomaly Detection Framework to Amazon Drought Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votava, P.; Nemani, R. R.; Ganguly, S.; Michaelis, A.; Hashimoto, H.

    2011-12-01

    Terrestrial Observation and Prediction System (TOPS) is a flexible modeling software system that integrates ecosystem models with frequent satellite and surface weather observations to produce ecosystem nowcasts (assessments of current conditions) and forecasts useful in natural resources management, public health and disaster management. We have been extending the Terrestrial Observation and Prediction System (TOPS) to include capability for automated anomaly detection and analysis of both on-line (streaming) and off-line data. While there are large numbers of anomaly detection algorithms for multivariate datasets, we are extending this capability beyond the anomaly detection itself and towards an automated analysis that would discover the possible causes of the anomalies. In order to best capture the knowledge about data hierarchies, Earth science models and implied dependencies between anomalies and occurrences of observable events such as urbanization, deforestation, or fires, we have developed an ontology to serve as a knowledge base. The knowledge is captured using OWL ontology language, where connections are defined in a schema that is later extended by including specific instances of datasets and models. We have integrated this knowledge base with a framework for deploying an ensemble of anomaly detection algorithms on large volumes of Earth science datasets and applied it to specific scientific applications that support research conducted by our group. In one early application, we were able to process large number of MODIS, TRMM, CERES data along with ground-based weather and river flow observations to detect the evolution of 2010 drought in the Amazon, identify the affected area, and publish the results in three weeks. A similar analysis of the 2005 drought using the same data sets took nearly 2 years, highlighting the potential contribution of our anomaly framework in accelerating scientific discoveries.

  8. Temporal Forest Change Detection and Forest Health Assessment using Remote Sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ya'acob, Norsuzila; Azize, Aziean Binti Mohd; Mahmon, Nur Anis; Yusof, Azita Laily; Azmi, Nor Farhana; Mustafa, Norfazira

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the detection of Angsi and Berembun Reserve Forest change for years 1996 and 2013. Forest is an important part of our ecosystem. The main function is to absorb carbon oxide and produce oxygen in their cycle of photosynthesis to maintain a balance and healthy atmosphere. However, forest changes as time changes. Some changes are necessary as to give way for economic growth. Nevertheless, it is important to monitor forest change so that deforestation and development can be planned and the balance of ecosystem is still preserved. It is important because there are number of unfavorable effects of deforestation that include environmental and economic such as erosion of soil, loss of biodiversity and climate change. The forest change detection can be studied with reference of several satellite images using remote sensing application. Forest change detection is best done with remote sensing due to large and remote study area. The objective of this project is to detect forest change over time and to compare forest health indicated by Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) using remote sensing and image processing. The forest under study shows depletion of forest area by 12% and 100% increment of deforestation activities. The NDVI value which is associated with the forest health also shows 13% of reduction

  9. Detecting Land Cover Change by Trend and Seasonality of Remote Sensing Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, J. C.; Epiphanio, J. N.; Mello, M. P.

    2013-05-01

    Natural resource managers demand knowledge of information on the spatiotemporal dynamics of land use and land cover change, and detection and characteristics change over time is an initial step for the understanding of the mechanism of change. The propose of this research is the use the approach BFAST (Breaks For Additive Seasonal and Trend) for detects trend and seasonal changes within Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) time series. BFAST integrates the decomposition of time series into trend, seasonal, and noise components with methods for detecting change within time series without the need to select a reference period, set a threshold, or define a change trajectory. BFAST iteratively estimates the time and number of changes, and characterizes change by its magnitude and direction. The general model is of the form Yt = Tt + St + et (t= 1,2,3,…, n) where Yt is the observed data at time t, Tt is the trend component, St is the seasonal component, and et is the remainder component. In this study was used MODIS NDVI time series datasets (MOD13Q1) over 11 years (2000 - 2010) on an intensive agricultural area in Mato Grosso - Brazil. At first it was applied a filter for noise reduction (4253H twice) over spectral curve of each MODIS pixel, and subsequently each time series was decomposed into seasonal, trend, and remainder components by BFAST. Were detected one abrupt change from a single pixel of forest and two abrupt changes on trend component to a pixel of the agricultural area. Figure 1 shows the number of phonological change with base in seasonal component for study area. This paper demonstrated the ability of the BFAST to detect long-term phenological change by analyzing time series while accounting for abrupt and gradual changes. The algorithm iteratively estimates the dates and number of changes occurring within seasonal and trend components, and characterizes changes by extracting the magnitude and direction of change. Changes occurring in the

  10. Detecting Evidence of Climate Change in the Forests of the Eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John W.; Osborne, Jesse D.

    2008-01-01

    Changes in land use or disturbances such as defoliation by insects, disease, or fire all affect the composition and amount of tree canopy in a forest. These changes are easy to detect. Noticing and understanding the complex ways that global or regional-scale climate change combines with these disturbances to affect forest growth patterns and succession is difficult. This is particularly true for regions where changes in climate are not the most extreme, such as the mid-latitude forests of the Eastern United States. If land and water resources are to be managed responsibly, it is important to know how well the impacts of climate change on these forests can be measured in order to provide the best information possible to respond to any future changes. The goal of this study is to test whether climate-induced changes in forests in the Eastern United States can be detected and characterized using satellite imagery.

  11. Building change detection via a combination of CNNs using only RGB aerial imageries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoto, Keisuke; Hamaguchi, Ryuhei; Sato, Masakazu; Fujita, Aito; Imaizumi, Tomoyuki; Hikosaka, Shuhei

    2017-10-01

    Building change information extracted from remote sensing imageries is important for various applications such as urban management and marketing planning. The goal of this work is to develop a methodology for automatically capturing building changes from remote sensing imageries. Recent studies have addressed this goal by exploiting 3-D information as a proxy for building height. In contrast, because in practice it is expensive or impossible to prepare 3-D information, we do not rely on 3-D data but focus on using only RGB aerial imageries. Instead, we employ deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) to extract effective features, and improve change detection accuracy in RGB remote sensing imageries. We consider two aspects of building change detection, building detection and subsequent change detection. Our proposed methodology was tested on several areas, which has some differences such as dominant building characteristics and varying brightness values. On all over the tested areas, the proposed method provides good results for changed objects, with recall values over 75 % with a strict overlap requirement of over 50% in intersection-over-union (IoU). When the IoU threshold was relaxed to over 10%, resulting recall values were over 81%. We conclude that use of CNNs enables accurate detection of building changes without employing 3-D information.

  12. Leak detection in pipelines through spectral analysis of pressure signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza A.L.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The development and test of a technique for leak detection in pipelines is presented. The technique is based on the spectral analysis of pressure signals measured in pipeline sections where the formation of stationary waves is favoured, allowing leakage detection during the start/stop of pumps. Experimental tests were performed in a 1250 m long pipeline for various operational conditions of the pipeline (liquid flow rate and leakage configuration. Pressure transients were obtained by four transducers connected to a PC computer. The obtained results show that the spectral analysis of pressure transients, together with the knowledge of reflection points provide a simple and efficient way of identifying leaks during the start/stop of pumps in pipelines.

  13. Change detection in multitemporal synthetic aperture radar images using dual-channel convolutional neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Li, Ying; Cao, Ying; Shen, Qiang

    2017-10-01

    This paper proposes a model of dual-channel convolutional neural network (CNN) that is designed for change detection in SAR images, in an effort to acquire higher detection accuracy and lower misclassification rate. This network model contains two parallel CNN channels, which can extract deep features from two multitemporal SAR images. For comparison and validation, the proposed method is tested along with other change detection algorithms on both simulated SAR images and real-world SAR images captured by different sensors. The experimental results demonstrate that the presented method outperforms the state-of-the-art techniques by a considerable margin.

  14. Fault Detection via Stability Analysis for the Hybrid Control Unit of HEVs

    OpenAIRE

    Kyogun Chang; Yoon Bok Lee

    2011-01-01

    Fault detection determines faultexistence and detecting time. This paper discusses two layered fault detection methods to enhance the reliability and safety. Two layered fault detection methods consist of fault detection methods of component level controllers and system level controllers. Component level controllers detect faults by using limit checking, model-based detection, and data-driven detection and system level controllers execute detection by stability analysis w...

  15. Distance Based Root Cause Analysis and Change Impact Analysis of Performance Regressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junzan Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Performance regression testing is applied to uncover both performance and functional problems of software releases. A performance problem revealed by performance testing can be high response time, low throughput, or even being out of service. Mature performance testing process helps systematically detect software performance problems. However, it is difficult to identify the root cause and evaluate the potential change impact. In this paper, we present an approach leveraging server side logs for identifying root causes of performance problems. Firstly, server side logs are used to recover call tree of each business transaction. We define a novel distance based metric computed from call trees for root cause analysis and apply inverted index from methods to business transactions for change impact analysis. Empirical studies show that our approach can effectively and efficiently help developers diagnose root cause of performance problems.

  16. Detecting Data Concealment Programs Using Passive File System Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mark; Kennedy, Richard; Pyles, Kristina; Strickler, Amanda; Shenoi, Sujeet

    Individuals who wish to avoid leaving evidence on computers and networks often use programs that conceal data from conventional digital forensic tools. This paper discusses the application of passive file system analysis techniques to detect trace evidence left by data concealment programs. In addition, it describes the design and operation of Seraph, a tool that determines whether certain encryption, steganography and erasing programs were used to hide or destroy data.

  17. Detecting errors in micro and trace analysis by using statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, K.

    1993-01-01

    By assigning a standard deviation to each step in an analytical method it is possible to predict the standard deviation of each analytical result obtained by this method. If the actual variability of replicate analytical results agrees with the expected, the analytical method is said...... to results for chlorine in freshwater from BCR certification analyses by highly competent analytical laboratories in the EC. Titration showed systematic errors of several percent, while radiochemical neutron activation analysis produced results without detectable bias....

  18. Subspace-based damage detection under changes in the ambient excitation statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döhler, Michael; Mevel, Laurent; Hille, Falk

    2014-03-01

    In the last ten years, monitoring the integrity of the civil infrastructure has been an active research topic, including in connected areas as automatic control. It is common practice to perform damage detection by detecting changes in the modal parameters between a reference state and the current (possibly damaged) state from measured vibration data. Subspace methods enjoy some popularity in structural engineering, where large model orders have to be considered. In the context of detecting changes in the structural properties and the modal parameters linked to them, a subspace-based fault detection residual has been recently proposed and applied successfully, where the estimation of the modal parameters in the possibly damaged state is avoided. However, most works assume that the unmeasured ambient excitation properties during measurements of the structure in the reference and possibly damaged condition stay constant, which is hardly satisfied by any application. This paper addresses the problem of robustness of such fault detection methods. It is explained why current algorithms from literature fail when the excitation covariance changes and how they can be modified. Then, an efficient and fast subspace-based damage detection test is derived that is robust to changes in the excitation covariance but also to numerical instabilities that can arise easily in the computations. Three numerical applications show the efficiency of the new approach to better detect and separate different levels of damage even using a relatively low sample length.

  19. High Spatial resolution remote sensing for salt marsh change detection on Fire Island National Seashore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A.; Wang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Salt marshes are under increasing pressure due to anthropogenic stressors including sea level rise, nutrient enrichment, herbivory and disturbances. Salt marsh losses risk the important ecosystem services they provide including biodiversity, water filtration, wave attenuation, and carbon sequestration. This study determines salt marsh change on Fire Island National Seashore, a barrier island along the south shore of Long Island, New York. Object-based image analysis was used to classifying Worldview-2, high resolution satellite, and topobathymetric LiDAR. The site was impacted by Hurricane Sandy in October of 2012 causing a breach in the Barrier Island and extensive overwash. In situ training data from vegetation plots were used to train the Random Forest classifier. The object-based Worldview-2 classification achieved an overall classification accuracy of 92.75. Salt marsh change for the study site was determined by comparing the 2015 classification with a 1997 classification. The study found a shift from high marsh to low marsh and a reduction in Phragmites on Fire Island. Vegetation losses were observed along the edge of the marsh and in the marsh interior. The analysis agreed with many of the trends found throughout the region including the reduction of high marsh and decline of salt marsh. The reduction in Phragmites could be due to the species shrinking niche between rising seas and dune vegetation on barrier islands. The complex management issues facing salt marsh across the United States including sea level rise and eutrophication necessitate very high resolution classification and change detection of salt marsh to inform management decisions such as restoration, salt marsh migration, and nutrient inputs.

  20. Establishment of analysis method for methane detection by gas chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinyuan; Yang, Jie; Ye, Tianyi; Han, Zeyu

    2018-02-01

    The study focused on the establishment of analysis method for methane determination by gas chromatography. Methane was detected by hydrogen flame ionization detector, and the quantitative relationship was determined by working curve of y=2041.2x+2187 with correlation coefficient of 0.9979. The relative standard deviation of 2.60-6.33% and the recovery rate of 96.36%∼105.89% were obtained during the parallel determination of standard gas. This method was not quite suitable for biogas content analysis because methane content in biogas would be over the measurement range in this method.

  1. Dimensionality reduction using Principal Component Analysis for network intrusion detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Keerthi Vasan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Intrusion detection is the identification of malicious activities in a given network by analyzing its traffic. Data mining techniques used for this analysis study the traffic traces and identify hostile flows in the traffic. Dimensionality reduction in data mining focuses on representing data with minimum number of dimensions such that its properties are not lost and hence reducing the underlying complexity in processing the data. Principal Component Analysis (PCA is one of the prominent dimensionality reduction techniques widely used in network traffic analysis. In this paper, we focus on the efficiency of PCA for intrusion detection and determine its Reduction Ratio (RR, ideal number of Principal Components needed for intrusion detection and the impact of noisy data on PCA. We carried out experiments with PCA using various classifier algorithms on two benchmark datasets namely, KDD CUP and UNB ISCX. Experiments show that the first 10 Principal Components are effective for classification. The classification accuracy for 10 Principal Components is about 99.7% and 98.8%, nearly same as the accuracy obtained using original 41 features for KDD and 28 features for ISCX, respectively.

  2. Change analysis at Stuttgart airport using TerraSAR-X imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldt, Markus; Thiele, Antje; Cadario, Erich; Schulz, Karsten; Hinz, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    Change detection based on remote sensing imagery is a topic highly on demand with various fields of application. Probably, disaster management is the best known, where it is crucial to get fast and reliable results to enable a suitable supply of the affected region. Another important issue, for example in city or land-use planning, is the regular monitoring of specific regions of interest. For both scenarios, it would be significant to have information about the type or category of the detected changes. Since High-Resolution (HR) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is in opposite to optical sensors an active technique, it is well-capable for all change detection topics where a regular monitoring is intended. SAR sensors illuminate the investigated scene by their own microwave radiation and most applied microwave wavelengths make SAR nearly independent from atmospheric effects like dust, fog, and clouds. Moreover, the time of day makes no difference using SAR sensors. Acquired in HR SpotLight mode 300 (HS300) by the German satellite TerraSAR-X (TSX), images have a resolution of better than one meter, which allows to separate small objects placed close together. In this paper, a concept of change analysis focusing on small-sized areas is presented. Those change areas can be caused by man-made objects (e.g. vehicles, small construction sites) or natural events like phenologically based changes of the vegetation. Since the presented change analysis concept deals with the analysis of time series imagery, other seasonal also man-made caused changes (e.g. agriculture) can be detected. Furthermore, the concept comprises the categorization of the detected changes, which separates it from many of the existing change detection approaches. It includes five central components given by the change detection itself, the pre-categorization of change pixels, the feature extraction for change blobs, the analysis of their spatial context, and the final decision making forming a

  3. A new method of real-time detection of changes in periodic data stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Chen; Lu, Guoliang; Cheng, Bin; Zheng, Xiangwei

    2017-07-01

    The change point detection in periodic time series is much desirable in many practical usages. We present a novel algorithm for this task, which includes two phases: 1) anomaly measure- on the basis of a typical regression model, we propose a new computation method to measure anomalies in time series which does not require any reference data from other measurement(s); 2) change detection- we introduce a new martingale test for detection which can be operated in an unsupervised and nonparametric way. We have conducted extensive experiments to systematically test our algorithm. The results make us believe that our algorithm can be directly applicable in many real-world change-point-detection applications.

  4. Power Load Event Detection and Classification Based on Edge Symbol Analysis and Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy signature analysis of power appliance is the core of nonintrusive load monitoring (NILM where the detailed data of the appliances used in houses are obtained by analyzing changes in the voltage and current. This paper focuses on developing an automatic power load event detection and appliance classification based on machine learning. In power load event detection, the paper presents a new transient detection algorithm. By turn-on and turn-off transient waveforms analysis, it can accurately detect the edge point when a device is switched on or switched off. The proposed load classification technique can identify different power appliances with improved recognition accuracy and computational speed. The load classification method is composed of two processes including frequency feature analysis and support vector machine. The experimental results indicated that the incorporation of the new edge detection and turn-on and turn-off transient signature analysis into NILM revealed more information than traditional NILM methods. The load classification method has achieved more than ninety percent recognition rate.

  5. Detecting land cover change using an extended Kalman filter on MODIS NDVI time-series data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kleynhans, W

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A method for detecting land cover change using NDVI time-series data derived from 500-m MODIS satellite data is proposed. The algorithm acts as a per-pixel change alarm and takes the NDVI time series of a 3 × 3 grid of MODIS pixels as the input...

  6. Land-Cover Change Detection Using Multi-Temporal MODIS NDVI Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monitoring the locations and distributions of land-cover change is important for establishing linkages between policy decisions, regulatory actions and subsequent land-use activities. Past studies incorporating two-date change detection using Landsat data have tended to be perfor...

  7. Detection of hypoglycemia associated EEG changes during sleep in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snogdal, Lena Sønder; Folkestad, Lars; Elsborg, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    Nocturnal hypoglycemia is a feared complication to insulin treated diabetes. Impaired awareness of hypoglycemia (IAH) increases the risk of severe hypoglycemia. EEG changes are demonstrated during daytime hypoglycemia. In this explorative study, we test the hypothesis that specific hypoglycemia......-associated EEG-changes occur during sleep and are detectable in time for the patient to take action....

  8. Change detection in a short time sequence of polarimetric C-band SAR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Conradsen, Knut; Skriver, Henning

    2016-01-01

    in the covariance matrix representation is carried out. The omnibus test statistic and its factorization detect if and when change(s) occur. The technique is demonstrated on airborne EMISAR C-band data but may be applied to ALOS, COSMO-SkyMed, RadarSat-2 Sentinel-1, TerraSAR-X, and Yaogan data also....

  9. Omnibus test for change detection in a time sequence of polarimetric SAR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Conradsen, Knut; Skriver, Henning

    2016-01-01

    in the covariance matrix representation is carried out. The omnibus test statistic and its factorization detect if and when change(s) occur. The technique is demonstrated on airborne EMISAR C-band data but may be applied to ALOS, COSMO-SkyMed, RadarSat-2, Sentinel-1, TerraSAR-X, and Yoagan or other dual- and quad...

  10. Normality Analysis for RFI Detection in Microwave Radiometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Camps

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Radio-frequency interference (RFI present in microwave radiometry measurements leads to erroneous radiometric results. Sources of RFI include spurious signals and harmonics from lower frequency bands, spread-spectrum signals overlapping the “protected” band of operation, or out-of-band emissions not properly rejected by the pre-detection filters due to its finite rejection. The presence of RFI in the radiometric signal modifies the detected power and therefore the estimated antenna temperature from which the geophysical parameters will be retrieved. In recent years, techniques to detect the presence of RFI in radiometric measurements have been developed. They include time- and/or frequency domain analyses, or time and/or frequency domain statistical analysis of the received signal which, in the absence of RFI, must be a zero-mean Gaussian process. Statistical analyses performed to date include the calculation of the Kurtosis, and the Shapiro-Wilk normality test of the received signal. Nevertheless, statistical analysis of the received signal could be more extensive, as reported in the Statistics literature. The objective of this work is the study of the performance of a number of normality tests encountered in the Statistics literature when applied to the detection of the presence of RFI in the radiometric signal, which is Gaussian by nature. A description of the normality tests and the RFI detection results for different kinds of RFI are presented in view of determining an omnibus test that can deal with the blind spots of the currently used methods.

  11. Symbolic time series analysis of ultrasonic data for early detection of fatigue damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shalabh; Ray, Asok; Keller, Eric

    2007-02-01

    This paper presents a novel analytical tool for early detection of fatigue damage in polycrystalline alloys that are commonly used in mechanical structures. Time series data of ultrasonic sensors have been used for anomaly detection in the statistical behaviour of structural materials, where the analysis is based on the principles of symbolic dynamics and automata theory. The performance of the proposed method has been evaluated relative to existing pattern recognition tools, such as neural networks and principal component analysis, for detection of small changes in the statistical characteristics of the observed data sequences. This concept is experimentally validated on a special-purpose test apparatus for 7075-T6 aluminium alloy specimens, where the anomalies accrue from small fatigue crack growth.

  12. Radiographic caries detection: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendicke, Falk; Tzschoppe, Markus; Paris, Sebastian

    2015-08-01

    This systematic review aimed at evaluating the accuracy of radiographic caries detection for different lesions at different locations. Studies reporting on the accuracy (sensitivity/specificity) of radiographic detection of natural primary caries lesions under clinical or in vitro conditions were included. Risk of bias was assessed using QUADAS-2. Pooled sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic odds ratios (DORs) were calculated using random-effects meta-analysis. Analyses were performed separately for occlusal and proximal lesions, with further discrimination between any kind of lesions, dentine lesions, and cavitated lesions. Electronic databases (Medline, Embase, Cochrane Central) and grey literature were systematically searched, complemented by cross-referencing from bibliographies. From 947 identified articles, 442 were analyzed full-text. 117 studies (13,375 teeth, 19,108 surfaces) were included, the majority of them reporting on permanent teeth and having high risk of bias. The detection of any kind (i.e. also initial) lesions had low sensitivities (pooled DOR [95% CI]: 0.24 [0.21/0.26] to 0.42 [0.31/0.34]), but moderate to high specificities (0.70 [0.76/0.84] to 0.97 [0.95/0.98]). For dentine lesions, sensitivities were higher (from 0.36 [0.24/0.49] for proximal to 0.56 [0.53/0.59] for occlusal lesions), and specificities ranged between 0.87 [0.85/0.89] and 0.95 [0.94/0.96]. No studies reported on cavitated occlusal lesions, whilst for cavitated proximal lesions, sensitivities increased above 0.60, whilst sensitivities remained high (above 0.90). Radiographic caries detection is highly accurate for cavitated proximal lesions, and seems also suitable to detect dentine caries lesions. For detecting initial lesions, more sensitive methods could be considered in population with high caries risk and prevalence. Radiographic caries detection is especially suitable for detecting more advanced caries lesions, and has limited risks for false positive diagnoses. For

  13. Monitoring gypsy moth defoliation by applying change detection techniques to Landsat imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. L.; Stauffer, M. L.

    1978-01-01

    The overall objective of a research effort at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is to develop and evaluate digital image processing techniques that will facilitate the assessment of the intensity and spatial distribution of forest insect damage in Northeastern U.S. forests using remotely sensed data from Landsats 1, 2 and C. Automated change detection techniques are presently being investigated as a method of isolating the areas of change in the forest canopy resulting from pest outbreaks. In order to follow the change detection approach, Landsat scene correction and overlay capabilities are utilized to provide multispectral/multitemporal image files of 'defoliation' and 'nondefoliation' forest stand conditions.

  14. Change point analysis of mean annual air temperature in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirvani, A.

    2015-06-01

    The existence of change point in the mean of air temperature is an important indicator of climate change. In this study, Student's t parametric and Mann-Whitney nonparametric Change Point Models (CPMs) were applied to test whether a change point has occurred in the mean of annual Air Temperature Anomalies Time Series (ATATS) of 27 synoptic stations in different regions of Iran for the period 1956-2010. The Likelihood Ratio Test (LRT) was also applied to evaluate the detected change points. The ATATS of all stations except Bandar Anzali and Gorgan stations, which were serially correlated, were transformed to produce an uncorrelated pre-whitened time series as an input file for the CPMs and LRT. Both the Student's t and Mann-Whitney CPMs detected the change point in the ATATS of (a) Tehran Mehrabad, Abadan, Kermanshah, Khoramabad and Yazd in 1992, (b) Mashhad and Tabriz in 1993, (c) Bandar Anzali, Babolsar and Ramsar in 1994, (d) Kerman and Zahedan in 1996 at 5% significance level. The likelihood ratio test shows that the ATATS before and after detected change points in these 12 stations are normally distributed with different means. The Student's t and Mann-Whitney CPMs suggested different change points for individual stations in Bushehr, Bam, Shahroud, and Gorgan. However, the LRT confirmed the change points in these four stations as 1997, 1996, 1993, and 1996, respectively. No change points were detected in the remaining 11 stations.

  15. Detection and localization of change points in temporal networks with the aid of stochastic block models

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ridder, Simon; Vandermarliere, Benjamin; Ryckebusch, Jan

    2016-11-01

    A framework based on generalized hierarchical random graphs (GHRGs) for the detection of change points in the structure of temporal networks has recently been developed by Peel and Clauset (2015 Proc. 29th AAAI Conf. on Artificial Intelligence). We build on this methodology and extend it to also include the versatile stochastic block models (SBMs) as a parametric family for reconstructing the empirical networks. We use five different techniques for change point detection on prototypical temporal networks, including empirical and synthetic ones. We find that none of the considered methods can consistently outperform the others when it comes to detecting and locating the expected change points in empirical temporal networks. With respect to the precision and the recall of the results of the change points, we find that the method based on a degree-corrected SBM has better recall properties than other dedicated methods, especially for sparse networks and smaller sliding time window widths.

  16. Contribution to the detection of changes in multi-modal 3D MRI sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosc, Marcel

    2003-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of automatic techniques for the detection of changes in image sequences of brain magnetic resonance imagery (MRI), and more particularly the study of localised intensity changes occurring during pathological evolutions such as evolutions of lesions into multiple sclerosis. Thus, this work focused on the development of image processing tools allowing to decide whether changes are statistically significant or not. The author developed automatic techniques of identification and correction of the main artefacts (position, deformations, intensity variation, and so on), and proposes an original technique for cortex segmentation which introduced anatomic information for an improved automatic detection. The developed change detection system has been assessed within the frame of the study of the evolution of lesions of multiple sclerosis. Performance have been determined on a large number of multi-modal images, and the automatic system has shown better performance than a human expert [fr

  17. Detecting and Attributing the Effects of Climate Change on the Distributions of Snake Species Over the Past 50 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear whether the distributions of snakes have changed in association with climate change over the past years. We detected the distribution changes of snakes over the past 50 years and determined whether the changes could be attributed to recent climate change in China. Long-term records of the distribution of nine snake species in China, grey relationship analysis, fuzzy sets classification techniques, the consistency index, and attributed methods were used. Over the past 50 years, the distributions of snake species have changed in multiple directions, primarily shifting northwards, and most of the changes were related to the thermal index. Driven by climatic factors over the past 50 years, the distribution boundary and distribution centers of some species changed with the fluctuations. The observed and predicted changes in distribution were highly consistent for some snake species. The changes in the northern limits of distributions of nearly half of the species, as well as the southern and eastern limits, and the distribution centers of some snake species can be attributed to climate change.

  18. Climate change policies analysis of sectoral changes in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbier, C.; Baron, R.; Colombier, M.; Boemare, C.

    2004-01-01

    This study addresses the following question, at the core of Europe's climate policy: Beyond the question of the European Union's ability to meet its emissions commitments under the Kyoto Protocol, are sectoral emissions trends displaying structural changes deemed necessary to reduce emissions, and to attain levels that are consistent with the UNFCCC greenhouse gas concentration stabilisation objectives? What lessons can we draw from emissions trends for the EU future climate policy? Greenhouse gas emissions have been stable for the last decade, but mostly due to events and policy developments unrelated to climate policy, and unlikely to be reproduced in other countries: Germany's reunification, substitution from coal to gas in the United Kingdom driven by power market reform. We should not expect changes of such magnitude in the near future. The issue of our future climate policy hence requires a closer look at underlying trends. Industry's direct emissions decreased thanks to constant improvements in energy efficiency and to the substitution of electricity to direct fossil fuel use. In spite of efficiency gains in the residential sector, increasing floor space and level of equipment entail growing energy consumption. Smaller-size households are now spreading to Southern European countries and should be expected in new Member states as well. Turning to the tertiary/services sector, we find that value added and floor space grew significantly over the decade - 35% and 32% respectively in the EU-15. There again, energy efficiency improvements do not compensate for growing floor spaces. Transport's growth, especially freight, has been significant in all countries. The highest rates of traffic growth per unit of gross domestic product are in Spain and Portugal, two countries where rail infrastructure is fairly limited. CO 2 emissions from transport grew by 18% in the EU between 1990 and 2000. Power generation's CO 2 emissions have decreased slightly in spite of strong

  19. Design and analysis for detection monitoring of forest health

    Science.gov (United States)

    F. A. Roesch

    1995-01-01

    An analysis procedure is proposed for the sample design of the Forest Health Monitoring Program (FHM) in the United States. The procedure is intended to provide increased sensitivity to localized but potentially important changes in forest health by explicitly accounting for the spatial relationships between plots in the FHM design. After a series of median sweeps...

  20. Automated Topographic Change Detection via Dem Differencing at Large Scales Using The Arcticdem Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, S. G.; Howat, I.; Noh, M. J.; Porter, C. C.; Morin, P. J.

    2016-12-01

    In the last decade, high resolution satellite imagery has become an increasingly accessible tool for geoscientists to quantify changes in the Arctic land surface due to geophysical, ecological and anthropomorphic processes. However, the trade off between spatial coverage and spatial-temporal resolution has limited detailed, process-level change detection over large (i.e. continental) scales. The ArcticDEM project utilized over 300,000 Worldview image pairs to produce a nearly 100% coverage elevation model (above 60°N) offering the first polar, high spatial - high resolution (2-8m by region) dataset, often with multiple repeats in areas of particular interest to geo-scientists. A dataset of this size (nearly 250 TB) offers endless new avenues of scientific inquiry, but quickly becomes unmanageable computationally and logistically for the computing resources available to the average scientist. Here we present TopoDiff, a framework for a generalized. automated workflow that requires minimal input from the end user about a study site, and utilizes cloud computing resources to provide a temporally sorted and differenced dataset, ready for geostatistical analysis. This hands-off approach allows the end user to focus on the science, without having to manage thousands of files, or petabytes of data. At the same time, TopoDiff provides a consistent and accurate workflow for image sorting, selection, and co-registration enabling cross-comparisons between research projects.

  1. Detection of Matrix Crack Density of CFRP using an Electrical Potential Change Method with Multiple Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todoroki, Akira; Omagari, Kazuomi

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) laminates are adopted for fuel tank structures of next generation space rockets or automobiles. Matrix cracks may cause fuel leak or trigger fatigue damage. A monitoring system of the matrix crack density is required. The authors have developed an electrical resistance change method for the monitoring of delamination cracks in CFRP laminates. Reinforcement fibers are used as a self-sensing system. In the present study, the electric potential method is adopted for matrix crack density monitoring. Finite element analysis (FEA) was performed to investigate the possibility of monitoring matrix crack density using multiple electrodes mounted on a single surface of a specimen. The FEA reveals the matrix crack density increases electrical resistance for a target segment between electrodes. Experimental confirmation was also performed using cross-ply laminates. Eight electrodes were mounted on a single surface of a specimen using silver paste after polishing of the specimen surface with sandpaper. The two outermost electrodes applied electrical current, and the inner electrodes measured electric voltage changes. The slope of electrical resistance during reloading is revealed to be an appropriate index for the detection of matrix crack density.

  2. Non-linear laws of echoic memory and auditory change detection in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshima Yasuyuki

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The detection of any abrupt change in the environment is important to survival. Since memory of preceding sensory conditions is necessary for detecting changes, such a change-detection system relates closely to the memory system. Here we used an auditory change-related N1 subcomponent (change-N1 of event-related brain potentials to investigate cortical mechanisms underlying change detection and echoic memory. Results Change-N1 was elicited by a simple paradigm with two tones, a standard followed by a deviant, while subjects watched a silent movie. The amplitude of change-N1 elicited by a fixed sound pressure deviance (70 dB vs. 75 dB was negatively correlated with the logarithm of the interval between the standard sound and deviant sound (1, 10, 100, or 1000 ms, while positively correlated with the logarithm of the duration of the standard sound (25, 100, 500, or 1000 ms. The amplitude of change-N1 elicited by a deviance in sound pressure, sound frequency, and sound location was correlated with the logarithm of the magnitude of physical differences between the standard and deviant sounds. Conclusions The present findings suggest that temporal representation of echoic memory is non-linear and Weber-Fechner law holds for the automatic cortical response to sound changes within a suprathreshold range. Since the present results show that the behavior of echoic memory can be understood through change-N1, change-N1 would be a useful tool to investigate memory systems.

  3. Robust Mean Change-Point Detecting through Laplace Linear Regression Using EM Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengkai Yang

    2014-01-01

    normal distribution, we developed the expectation maximization (EM algorithm to estimate the position of mean change-point. We investigated the performance of the algorithm through different simulations, finding that our methods is robust to the distributions of errors and is effective to estimate the position of mean change-point. Finally, we applied our method to the classical Holbert data and detected a change-point.

  4. Detecting changes in extreme precipitation and extreme streamflow in the Dongjiang River Basin in southern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Wang

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Extreme hydro-meteorological events have become the focus of more and more studies in the last decade. Due to the complexity of the spatial pattern of changes in precipitation processes, it is still hard to establish a clear view of how precipitation has changed and how it will change in the future. In the present study, changes in extreme precipitation and streamflow processes in the Dongjiang River Basin in southern China are investigated with several nonparametric methods, including one method (Mann-Kendall test for detecting trend, and three methods (Kolmogorov–Smirnov test, Levene's test and quantile test for detecting changes in probability distribution. It was shown that little change is observed in annual extreme precipitation in terms of various indices, but some significant changes are found in the precipitation processes on a monthly basis, which indicates that when detecting climate changes, besides annual indices, seasonal variations in extreme events should be considered as well. Despite of little change in annual extreme precipitation series, significant changes are detected in several annual extreme flood flow and low-flow series, mainly at the stations along the main channel of Dongjiang River, which are affected significantly by the operation of several major reservoirs. To assess the reliability of the results, the power of three non-parametric methods are assessed by Monte Carlo simulation. The simulation results show that, while all three methods work well for detecting changes in two groups of data with large sample size (e.g., over 200 points in each group and large differences in distribution parameters (e.g., over 100% increase of scale parameter in Gamma distribution, none of them are powerful enough for small data sets (e.g., less than 100 points and small distribution parameter difference (e.g., 50% increase of scale parameter in Gamma distribution. The result of the present study raises the concern of the

  5. Change Impact Analysis of Enterprise Architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.S. de Boer (Frank); M.M. Bonsangue (Marcello); L.P.J. Groenewegen; A. Stam; S. Stevens; L.W.N. van der Torre (Leon)

    2005-01-01

    htmlabstractAn enterprise architecture is a high-level description intended to capture the vision of an enterprise integrating all its dimensions: organization structure, business processes, and infrastructure. Every single part of an enterprise is subject to change, and each change may have

  6. Emotion has no impact on attention in a change detection flicker task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Colin Alan Bendall

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Past research provides conflicting findings regarding the influence of emotion on visual attention. Early studies suggested a broadening of attentional resources in relation to positive mood. However, more recent evidence indicates that positive emotions may not have a beneficial impact on attention, and that the relationship between emotion and attention may be mitigated by factors such as task demand or stimulus valence. The current study explored the effect of emotion on attention using the change detection flicker paradigm. Participants were induced into positive, neutral, and negative mood states and then completed a change detection task. A series of neutral scenes were presented and participants had to identify the location of a disappearing item in each scene. The change was made to the centre or the periphery of each scene and it was predicted that peripheral changes would be detected quicker in the positive mood condition and slower in the negative mood condition, compared to the neutral condition. In contrast to previous findings emotion had no influence on attention and whilst central changes were detected faster than peripheral changes, change blindness was not affected by mood. The findings suggest that the relationship between emotion and visual attention is influenced by the characteristics of a task, and any beneficial impact of positive emotion may be related to processing style rather than a broadening of attentional resources.

  7. Change Detection Processing Chain Dedicated to Sentinel Data Time Series. Application to Forest and Water Bodies Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Saavedra, L.-M.; Mercier, G.; Yesou, H.; Liege, F.; Pasero, G.

    2016-08-01

    The Copernicus program of ESA and European commission (6 Sentinels Missions, among them Sentinel-1 with Synthetic Aperture Radar sensor and Sentinel-2 with 13-band 10 to 60 meter resolution optical sensors), offers a new opportunity to Earth Observation with high temporal acquisition capability ( 12 days repetitiveness and 5 days in some geographic areas of the world) with high spatial resolution.Due to these high temporal and spatial resolutions, it opens new challenges in several fields such as image processing, new algorithms for Time Series and big data analysis. In addition, these missions will be able to analyze several topics of earth temporal evolution such as crop vegetation, water bodies, Land use and Land Cover (LULC), sea and ice information, etc. This is particularly useful for end users and policy makers to detect early signs of damages, vegetation illness, flooding areas, etc.From the state of the art, one can find algorithms and methods that use a bi-date comparison for change detection [1-3] or time series analysis. Actually, these methods are essentially used for target detection or for abrupt change detection that requires 2 observations only.A Hölder means-based change detection technique has been proposed in [2,3] for high resolution radar images. This so-called MIMOSA technique has been mainly dedicated to man-made change detection in urban areas and CARABAS - II project by using a couple of SAR images. An extension to multitemporal change detection technique has been investigated but its application to land use and cover changes still has to be validated.The Hölder Hp is a Time Series pixel by pixel feature extraction and is defined by:H𝑝[X]=[1/n∑ⁿᵢ₌1 Xᴾᵢ]1/p p∈R Hp[X] : N images * S Bandes * t datesn is the number of images in the time series. N > 2Hp (X) is continuous and monotonic increasing in p for - ∞ < p < ∞

  8. RADIA: RNA and DNA integrated analysis for somatic mutation detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amie J Radenbaugh

    Full Text Available The detection of somatic single nucleotide variants is a crucial component to the characterization of the cancer genome. Mutation calling algorithms thus far have focused on comparing the normal and tumor genomes from the same individual. In recent years, it has become routine for projects like The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA to also sequence the tumor RNA. Here we present RADIA (RNA and DNA Integrated Analysis, a novel computational method combining the patient-matched normal and tumor DNA with the tumor RNA to detect somatic mutations. The inclusion of the RNA increases the power to detect somatic mutations, especially at low DNA allelic frequencies. By integrating an individual's DNA and RNA, we are able to detect mutations that would otherwise be missed by traditional algorithms that examine only the DNA. We demonstrate high sensitivity (84% and very high precision (98% and 99% for RADIA in patient data from endometrial carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma from TCGA. Mutations with both high DNA and RNA read support have the highest validation rate of over 99%. We also introduce a simulation package that spikes in artificial mutations to patient data, rather than simulating sequencing data from a reference genome. We evaluate sensitivity on the simulation data and demonstrate our ability to rescue back mutations at low DNA allelic frequencies by including the RNA. Finally, we highlight mutations in important cancer genes that were rescued due to the incorporation of the RNA.

  9. Hyperspectral imaging and quantitative analysis for prostate cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Hamed; Halig, Luma V.; Schuster, David M.; Osunkoya, Adeboye; Master, Viraj; Nieh, Peter T.; Chen, Georgia Z.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an emerging modality for various medical applications. Its spectroscopic data might be able to be used to noninvasively detect cancer. Quantitative analysis is often necessary in order to differentiate healthy from diseased tissue. We propose the use of an advanced image processing and classification method in order to analyze hyperspectral image data for prostate cancer detection. The spectral signatures were extracted and evaluated in both cancerous and normal tissue. Least squares support vector machines were developed and evaluated for classifying hyperspectral data in order to enhance the detection of cancer tissue. This method was used to detect prostate cancer in tumor-bearing mice and on pathology slides. Spatially resolved images were created to highlight the differences of the reflectance properties of cancer versus those of normal tissue. Preliminary results with 11 mice showed that the sensitivity and specificity of the hyperspectral image classification method are 92.8% to 2.0% and 96.9% to 1.3%, respectively. Therefore, this imaging method may be able to help physicians to dissect malignant regions with a safe margin and to evaluate the tumor bed after resection. This pilot study may lead to advances in the optical diagnosis of prostate cancer using HSI technology. PMID:22894488

  10. Sensor Failure Detection of FASSIP System using Principal Component Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarno; Juarsa, Mulya; Santosa, Kussigit; Deswandri; Sunaryo, Geni Rina

    2018-02-01

    In the nuclear reactor accident of Fukushima Daiichi in Japan, the damages of core and pressure vessel were caused by the failure of its active cooling system (diesel generator was inundated by tsunami). Thus researches on passive cooling system for Nuclear Power Plant are performed to improve the safety aspects of nuclear reactors. The FASSIP system (Passive System Simulation Facility) is an installation used to study the characteristics of passive cooling systems at nuclear power plants. The accuracy of sensor measurement of FASSIP system is essential, because as the basis for determining the characteristics of a passive cooling system. In this research, a sensor failure detection method for FASSIP system is developed, so the indication of sensor failures can be detected early. The method used is Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to reduce the dimension of the sensor, with the Squarred Prediction Error (SPE) and statistic Hotteling criteria for detecting sensor failure indication. The results shows that PCA method is capable to detect the occurrence of a failure at any sensor.

  11. Analysis of the theoretical bias in dark matter direct detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catena, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Fitting the model ''A'' to dark matter direct detection data, when the model that underlies the data is ''B'', introduces a theoretical bias in the fit. We perform a quantitative study of the theoretical bias in dark matter direct detection, with a focus on assumptions regarding the dark matter interactions, and velocity distribution. We address this problem within the effective theory of isoscalar dark matter-nucleon interactions mediated by a heavy spin-1 or spin-0 particle. We analyze 24 benchmark points in the parameter space of the theory, using frequentist and Bayesian statistical methods. First, we simulate the data of future direct detection experiments assuming a momentum/velocity dependent dark matter-nucleon interaction, and an anisotropic dark matter velocity distribution. Then, we fit a constant scattering cross section, and an isotropic Maxwell-Boltzmann velocity distribution to the simulated data, thereby introducing a bias in the analysis. The best fit values of the dark matter particle mass differ from their benchmark values up to 2 standard deviations. The best fit values of the dark matter-nucleon coupling constant differ from their benchmark values up to several standard deviations. We conclude that common assumptions in dark matter direct detection are a source of potentially significant bias

  12. Detection of irradiated chicken by 2-alkylcyclobutanone analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanabe, Hiroko; Goto, Michiko [Tokyo Metropolitan Industrial Technology Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan); Miyahara, Makoto [National Institute of Health Sciences, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    Chicken meat irradiated at 0.5 kGy or higher doses were identified by GC/MS method analyzing 2-dodecylcyclobutanone (2-DCB) and 2-tetradecylcyclobutanone (2-TCB), which are formed from palmitic acid and stearic acid respectively, and isolated using extraction procedures of soxhlet-florisil chromatography. Many fat-containing foods have oleic acid in abundance as parent fatty acid, and chicken meat contains palmitoleic acid to the amount as much as stearic acid. In this study, we detected 2-tetradec-5'-enylcyclobutanone (2-TeCB) and 2-dodec-5'-enylcyclobutanone (2-DeCB) in chicken meat, which are formed from oleic acid and palmitoleic acid by irradiation respectively, using GC/MS method. Sensitivity in detection of both 2-TeCB and 2-DeCB were lower than that of 2-DCB. However, at least 0.57 {mu}g/g/fat of 2-TeCB was detected in chicken meat irradiated at 0.5 kGy, so 2-TeCB seems to be a useful marker for the identification of irradiated foods containing fat. On the contrary, 2-DeCB was not detected clearly at low doses. This suggests that 2-DeCB may be a useful marker for irradiated fat in the food having enough amount of palmitoleic acid needed to analysis. In addition, 2-tetradecadienylcyclobutanone, which is formed from linoleic acid was also found in chicken meat. (author)

  13. Phishing Detection: Analysis of Visual Similarity Based Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Kumar Jain

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Phishing is one of the major problems faced by cyber-world and leads to financial losses for both industries and individuals. Detection of phishing attack with high accuracy has always been a challenging issue. At present, visual similarities based techniques are very useful for detecting phishing websites efficiently. Phishing website looks very similar in appearance to its corresponding legitimate website to deceive users into believing that they are browsing the correct website. Visual similarity based phishing detection techniques utilise the feature set like text content, text format, HTML tags, Cascading Style Sheet (CSS, image, and so forth, to make the decision. These approaches compare the suspicious website with the corresponding legitimate website by using various features and if the similarity is greater than the predefined threshold value then it is declared phishing. This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of phishing attacks, their exploitation, some of the recent visual similarity based approaches for phishing detection, and its comparative study. Our survey provides a better understanding of the problem, current solution space, and scope of future research to deal with phishing attacks efficiently using visual similarity based approaches.

  14. A Signal Detection Analysis of the Effects of Alcohol on Visual Contrast Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timney, Brian; Ferreira, Melissa; Matson, Steven

    2016-07-06

    Numerous studies have shown that acute ethanol consumption can reduce visual contrast sensitivity when measured using traditional psychophysical methods. However, no consideration has been given to whether nonsensory factors may also play a role. The present study used both traditional techniques and signal detection procedures to evaluate this possibility. In three within-subject experiments, 41 observers (19 Females and 22 Males) were presented with faint, contrast-modulated, visual patterns and asked to say if they had seen them. In Experiment 1, contrast thresholds were measured using a randomly interleaved staircase procedure, and the data confirmed an increase in threshold following alcohol. In Experiment 2, using similar stimuli, but applying a signal detection analysis, we found that sensitivity, as reflected in d', did not change following alcohol. However, participants became more conservative in their response criterion. The third experiment was designed to allow thresholds to be measured directly with a conventional psychophysical procedure while permitting a signal detection analysis to be performed on the same data. The conventional psychophysical task showed an increase in contrast threshold, while the signal detection analysis showed no change in sensitivity, but a shift to a more conservative criterion. These data highlight the importance of taking into account alcohol's effects on cognitive processes, even when assessing basic sensory function. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Change detection in children with autism: an auditory event-related fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomot, Marie; Bernard, Frédéric A; Davis, Matthew H; Belmonte, Matthew K; Ashwin, Chris; Bullmore, Edward T; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2006-01-15

    Autism involves impairments in communication and social interaction, as well as high levels of repetitive, stereotypic, and ritualistic behaviours, and extreme resistance to change. This latter dimension, whilst required for a diagnosis, has received less research attention. We hypothesise that this extreme resistance to change in autism is rooted in atypical processing of unexpected stimuli. We tested this using auditory event-related fMRI to determine regional brain activity associated with passive detection of infrequently occurring frequency-deviant and complex novel sounds in a no-task condition. Participants were twelve 10- to 15-year-old children with autism and a group of 12 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. During deviance detection, significant activation common to both groups was located in the superior temporal and inferior frontal gyri. During 'novelty detection', both groups showed activity in the superior temporal gyrus, the temporo-parietal junction, the superior and inferior frontal gyri, and the cingulate gyrus. Children with autism showed reduced activation of the left anterior cingulate cortex during both deviance and novelty detection. During novelty detection, children with autism also showed reduced activation in the bilateral temporo-parietal region and in the right inferior and middle frontal areas. This study confirms previous evidence from ERP studies of atypical brain function related to automatic change detection in autism. Abnormalities involved a cortical network known to have a role in attention switching and attentional resource distribution. These results throw light on the neurophysiological processes underlying autistic 'resistance to change'.

  16. Using Open data in analyzing urban growth: urban density and change detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    murgante, Beniamino; Nolè, Gabriele; Lasaponara, Rosa; Lanorte, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    In recent years a great attention has been paid to the evolution and the use of spatial data. Internet technologies accelerated such a process, allowing more direct access to spatial information. It is estimated that more than 600 million people have been connected to the Internet at least once to display maps on the web. Consequently, there is an irreversible process which considers geographical dimension as a fundamental attribute for the management of information flows. Furthermore, the great activity produced by open data movement leads to an easier and clearer access to geospatial information. This trend concerns, in a less evident way, also satellite data, which are increasingly accessible through the web. Spatial planning, geography and other regional sciences find it difficult to build knowledge related to spatial transformation. These problems can be significantly reduced due to a large data availability, producing significant opportunities to capture knowledge useful for a better territorial governance. This study has been developed in a heavily anthropized area in southern Italy, Apulia region, using free spatial data and free multispectral and multitemporal satellite data (Apulia region was one of the first regions in Italy to adopt open data policies). The analysis concerns urban growth, which, in recent decades, showed a rapid increase. In a first step the evolution in time and change detection of urban areas has been analyzed paying particular attention to soil consumption. In the second step Kernel Density has been adopted in order to assess development pressures. KDE (Kernel Density Estimation) function is a technique that provides the density of a phenomenon based on point data. A mobile three dimensional surface has been produced from a set of points distributed over a region of space, which weighs the events within its sphere of influence, depending on their distance from the point from which intensity is estimated. It produces, considering as

  17. Automated analysis for detecting beams in laser wakefield simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushizima, Daniela M.; Rubel, Oliver; Prabhat, Mr.; Weber, Gunther H.; Bethel, E. Wes; Aragon, Cecilia R.; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Hamann, Bernd; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Laser wakefield particle accelerators have shown the potential to generate electric fields thousands of times higher than those of conventional accelerators. The resulting extremely short particle acceleration distance could yield a potential new compact source of energetic electrons and radiation, with wide applications from medicine to physics. Physicists investigate laser-plasma internal dynamics by running particle-in-cell simulations; however, this generates a large dataset that requires time-consuming, manual inspection by experts in order to detect key features such as beam formation. This paper describes a framework to automate the data analysis and classification of simulation data. First, we propose a new method to identify locations with high density of particles in the space-time domain, based on maximum extremum point detection on the particle distribution. We analyze high density electron regions using a lifetime diagram by organizing and pruning the maximum extrema as nodes in a minimum spanning tree. Second, we partition the multivariate data using fuzzy clustering to detect time steps in a experiment that may contain a high quality electron beam. Finally, we combine results from fuzzy clustering and bunch lifetime analysis to estimate spatially confined beams. We demonstrate our algorithms successfully on four different simulation datasets

  18. Detection and Analysis of Threats to the Energy Sector: DATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfonso Valdes

    2010-03-31

    This report summarizes Detection and Analysis of Threats to the Energy Sector (DATES), a project sponsored by the United States Department of Energy and performed by a team led by SRI International, with collaboration from Sandia National Laboratories, ArcSight, Inc., and Invensys Process Systems. DATES sought to advance the state of the practice in intrusion detection and situational awareness with respect to cyber attacks in energy systems. This was achieved through adaptation of detection algorithms for process systems as well as development of novel anomaly detection techniques suited for such systems into a detection suite. These detection components, together with third-party commercial security systems, were interfaced with the commercial Security Information Event Management (SIEM) solution from ArcSight. The efficacy of the integrated solution was demonstrated on two testbeds, one based on a Distributed Control System (DCS) from Invensys, and the other based on the Virtual Control System Environment (VCSE) from Sandia. These achievements advance the DOE Cybersecurity Roadmap [DOE2006] goals in the area of security monitoring. The project ran from October 2007 until March 2010, with the final six months focused on experimentation. In the validation phase, team members from SRI and Sandia coupled the two test environments and carried out a number of distributed and cross-site attacks against various points in one or both testbeds. Alert messages from the distributed, heterogeneous detection components were correlated using the ArcSight SIEM platform, providing within-site and cross-site views of the attacks. In particular, the team demonstrated detection and visualization of network zone traversal and denial-of-service attacks. These capabilities were presented to the DistribuTech Conference and Exhibition in March 2010. The project was hampered by interruption of funding due to continuing resolution issues and agreement on cost share for four months in 2008

  19. A factor analysis to detect factors influencing building national brand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Azad

    Full Text Available Developing a national brand is one of the most important issues for development of a brand. In this study, we present factor analysis to detect the most important factors in building a national brand. The proposed study uses factor analysis to extract the most influencing factors and the sample size has been chosen from two major auto makers in Iran called Iran Khodro and Saipa. The questionnaire was designed in Likert scale and distributed among 235 experts. Cronbach alpha is calculated as 84%, which is well above the minimum desirable limit of 0.70. The implementation of factor analysis provides six factors including “cultural image of customers”, “exciting characteristics”, “competitive pricing strategies”, “perception image” and “previous perceptions”.

  20. A Gaussian Process Based Online Change Detection Algorithm for Monitoring Periodic Time Series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandola, Varun [ORNL; Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Online time series change detection is a critical component of many monitoring systems, such as space and air-borne remote sensing instruments, cardiac monitors, and network traffic profilers, which continuously analyze observations recorded by sensors. Data collected by such sensors typically has a periodic (seasonal) component. Most existing time series change detection methods are not directly applicable to handle such data, either because they are not designed to handle periodic time series or because they cannot operate in an online mode. We propose an online change detection algorithm which can handle periodic time series. The algorithm uses a Gaussian process based non-parametric time series prediction model and monitors the difference between the predictions and actual observations within a statistically principled control chart framework to identify changes. A key challenge in using Gaussian process in an online mode is the need to solve a large system of equations involving the associated covariance matrix which grows with every time step. The proposed algorithm exploits the special structure of the covariance matrix and can analyze a time series of length T in O(T^2) time while maintaining a O(T) memory footprint, compared to O(T^4) time and O(T^2) memory requirement of standard matrix manipulation methods. We experimentally demonstrate the superiority of the proposed algorithm over several existing time series change detection algorithms on a set of synthetic and real time series. Finally, we illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm for identifying land use land cover changes using Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data collected for an agricultural region in Iowa state, USA. Our algorithm is able to detect different types of changes in a NDVI validation data set (with ~80% accuracy) which occur due to crop type changes as well as disruptive changes (e.g., natural disasters).