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Sample records for chang human hepatocytes

  1. Immortalized hepatocytes using human artificial chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masahiro; Ito, Ryoutaro; Yoshihara, Daisuke; Ikeno, Masashi; Kamiya, Megumi; Suzuki, Nobutaka; Horiguchi, Akihiko; Nagata, Hideo; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Naoya; Fox, Ira J; Okazaki, Tsuneko; Miyakama, Syuichi

    2008-01-01

    The shortage of organ donors has impeded the development of human hepatocyte transplantation. Immortalized hepatocytes could provide an unlimited supply of transplantable cells. To determine whether immortalized hepatocytes could provide global metabolic support in end-stage liver disease, rat hepatocyte clones were developed by transduction with the gene encoding the Simian virus 40 T antigen (SVT) using the human artificial minichromosome (HAC). The SVLT sequence was excised by FRT recombination. Following HAC infusion, the transduced hepatocytes express SVT, blasticidine resistance (BS), and the PGK promoter TK gene. Forty-six cell clones were obtained and at least partially characterized, as previously described, for albumin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), dipeptidylpeptidase 4 (Dpp4), gamma-glutamyltransferase 1 (Ggt), SVT, and beta-actin expression using RT-PCR. Clones were also assessed for albumin secretion into the culture medium using ELISA. All of the cell line secreted approximately 10 mg/dl of albumin, which is equivalent to the amount secreted by primary hepatocytes. In further experiments, this cell line will be used for transplantable cells or artificial organ using HAC. These results represent an important step toward the development of immortalized hepatocytes.

  2. Regulation of hepatocyte-specific gene expression in cultures of human embryonic hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roon, M. A.; Zonneveld, D.; de Boer, P. A.; Moorman, A. F.; Charles, R.; Lamers, W. H.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this study was to see whether the rat embryo can serve as a model system for hepatocyte-specific gene expression in the human embryo. Carbamoylphosphate synthetase was used as a hepatocyte-specific marker molecule. Despite the earlier developmental appearance of this enzyme in human than

  3. Modulation of nuclear T3 binding by T3 in a human hepatocyte cell-line (Chang-liver) - T3 stimulation of cell growth but not of malic enzyme, glucose-6-phosphatdehydrogenase or 6-phosphogluconate-dehydrogenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, L E; Kristensen, S R; Kvetny, J

    1991-01-01

    The T3 modulation of nuclear T3 binding (NBT3), the T3 effect on cell growth, and the T3 and insulin effects on malic enzyme (ME), glucose-6-phosphat-dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconat-dehydrogenase (G6PD) were studied in a human hepatocyte cell-line (Chang-liver). T3 was bound to a high...... modulation of NBT3 associated to receptor saturation; 2) stimulation of cell growth; 3) contrary to the findings in rat hepatocytes no stimulation of ME, G6PD or 6PGD. Insulin enhanced ME and 6PGD....

  4. Toxicogenomics directory of chemically exposed human hepatocytes.

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    Grinberg, Marianna; Stöber, Regina M; Edlund, Karolina; Rempel, Eugen; Godoy, Patricio; Reif, Raymond; Widera, Agata; Madjar, Katrin; Schmidt-Heck, Wolfgang; Marchan, Rosemarie; Sachinidis, Agapios; Spitkovsky, Dimitry; Hescheler, Jürgen; Carmo, Helena; Arbo, Marcelo D; van de Water, Bob; Wink, Steven; Vinken, Mathieu; Rogiers, Vera; Escher, Sylvia; Hardy, Barry; Mitic, Dragana; Myatt, Glenn; Waldmann, Tanja; Mardinoglu, Adil; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Nüssler, Andreas; Weiss, Thomas S; Oberemm, Axel; Lampen, Alfons; Schaap, Mirjam M; Luijten, Mirjam; van Steeg, Harry; Thasler, Wolfgang E; Kleinjans, Jos C S; Stierum, Rob H; Leist, Marcel; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Hengstler, Jan G

    2014-12-01

    A long-term goal of numerous research projects is to identify biomarkers for in vitro systems predicting toxicity in vivo. Often, transcriptomics data are used to identify candidates for further evaluation. However, a systematic directory summarizing key features of chemically influenced genes in human hepatocytes is not yet available. To bridge this gap, we used the Open TG-GATES database with Affymetrix files of cultivated human hepatocytes incubated with chemicals, further sets of gene array data with hepatocytes from human donors generated in this study, and publicly available genome-wide datasets of human liver tissue from patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis, and hepatocellular cancer (HCC). After a curation procedure, expression data of 143 chemicals were included into a comprehensive biostatistical analysis. The results are summarized in the publicly available toxicotranscriptomics directory ( http://wiki.toxbank.net/toxicogenomics-map/ ) which provides information for all genes whether they are up- or downregulated by chemicals and, if yes, by which compounds. The directory also informs about the following key features of chemically influenced genes: (1) Stereotypical stress response. When chemicals induce strong expression alterations, this usually includes a complex but highly reproducible pattern named 'stereotypical response.' On the other hand, more specific expression responses exist that are induced only by individual compounds or small numbers of compounds. The directory differentiates if the gene is part of the stereotypical stress response or if it represents a more specific reaction. (2) Liver disease-associated genes. Approximately 20 % of the genes influenced by chemicals are up- or downregulated, also in liver disease. Liver disease genes deregulated in cirrhosis, HCC, and NASH that overlap with genes of the aforementioned stereotypical chemical stress response include CYP3A7, normally expressed in fetal liver; the

  5. Hepatocyte specific expression of human cloned genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortese, R.

    1986-01-01

    A large number of proteins are specifically synthesized in the hepatocyte. Only the adult liver expresses the complete repertoire of functions which are required at various stages during development. There is therefore a complex series of regulatory mechanisms responsible for the maintenance of the differentiated state and for the developmental and physiological variations in the pattern of gene expression. Human hepatoma cell lines HepG2 and Hep3B display a pattern of gene expression similar to adult and fetal liver, respectively; in contrast, cultured fibroblasts or HeLa cells do not express most of the liver specific genes. They have used these cell lines for transfection experiments with cloned human liver specific genes. DNA segments coding for alpha1-antitrypsin and retinol binding protein (two proteins synthesized both in fetal and adult liver) are expressed in the hepatoma cell lines HepG2 and Hep3B, but not in HeLa cells or fibroblasts. A DNA segment coding for haptoglobin (a protein synthesized only after birth) is only expressed in the hepatoma cell line HepG2 but not in Hep3B nor in non hepatic cell lines. The information for tissue specific expression is located in the 5' flanking region of all three genes. In vivo competition experiments show that these DNA segments bind to a common, apparently limiting, transacting factor. Conventional techniques (Bal deletions, site directed mutagenesis, etc.) have been used to precisely identify the DNA sequences responsible for these effects. The emerging picture is complex: they have identified multiple, separate transcriptional signals, essential for maximal promoter activation and tissue specific expression. Some of these signals show a negative effect on transcription in fibroblast cell lines.

  6. Comparative gene expression profiles induced by PPARγ and PPARα/γ agonists in human hepatocytes.

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    Alexandra Rogue

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several glitazones (PPARγ agonists and glitazars (dual PPARα/γ agonists have been developed to treat hyperglycemia and, simultaneously, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia, respectively. However, most have caused idiosyncratic hepatic or extrahepatic toxicities through mechanisms that remain largely unknown. Since the liver plays a key role in lipid metabolism, we analyzed changes in gene expression profiles induced by these two types of PPAR agonists in human hepatocytes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Primary human hepatocytes and the well-differentiated human hepatoma HepaRG cells were exposed to different concentrations of two PPARγ (troglitazone and rosiglitazone and two PPARα/γ (muraglitazar and tesaglitazar agonists for 24 h and their transcriptomes were analyzed using human pangenomic Agilent microarrays. Principal Component Analysis, hierarchical clustering and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis® revealed large inter-individual variability in the response of the human hepatocyte populations to the different compounds. Many genes involved in lipid, carbohydrate, xenobiotic and cholesterol metabolism, as well as inflammation and immunity, were regulated by both PPARγ and PPARα/γ agonists in at least a number of human hepatocyte populations and/or HepaRG cells. Only a few genes were selectively deregulated by glitazars when compared to glitazones, indicating that PPARγ and PPARα/γ agonists share most of their target genes. Moreover, some target genes thought to be regulated only in mouse or to be expressed in Kupffer cells were also found to be responsive in human hepatocytes and HepaRG cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This first comprehensive analysis of gene regulation by PPARγ and PPARα/γ agonists favor the conclusion that glitazones and glitazars share most of their target genes and induce large differential changes in gene profiles in human hepatocytes depending on hepatocyte donor, the compound class and/or individual

  7. Modulation of nuclear T3 binding by T3 in a human hepatocyte cell-line (Chang-liver) - T3 stimulation of cell growth but not of malic enzyme, glucose-6-phosphatdehydrogenase or 6-phosphogluconate-dehydrogenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, L E; Kristensen, S R; Kvetny, J

    1991-01-01

    The T3 modulation of nuclear T3 binding (NBT3), the T3 effect on cell growth, and the T3 and insulin effects on malic enzyme (ME), glucose-6-phosphat-dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconat-dehydrogenase (G6PD) were studied in a human hepatocyte cell-line (Chang-liver). T3 was bound to a high...... was unchanged. T3 stimulated cell growth (p G6PD, and 6PGD. Insulin (1 mumol/l) enhanced the activities of ME (p ... modulation of NBT3 associated to receptor saturation; 2) stimulation of cell growth; 3) contrary to the findings in rat hepatocytes no stimulation of ME, G6PD or 6PGD. Insulin enhanced ME and 6PGD....

  8. Influence of platelet lysate on the recovery and metabolic performance of cryopreserved human hepatocytes upon thawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolosa, Laia; Bonora-Centelles, Ana; Donato, M Teresa; Mirabet, Vicente; Pareja, Eugenia; Negro, Alejandro; López, Silvia; Castell, José V; Gómez-Lechón, M José

    2011-06-27

    Storage of human hepatocytes is essential for their use in research and liver cell transplantation. However, cryopreservation and thawing (C/T) procedures have detrimental effects on the viability and functionality compared with fresh cells. The aim of this study was to upgrade the standard C/T methodology to obtain better quality hepatocytes for cell transplantation to improve the overall clinical outcome. Human hepatocytes isolated from donor livers were cryopreserved in University of Wisconsin solution with 10% dimethyl sulfoxide (standard medium), which was supplemented with 10% or 20% of platelet lysate. Thawing media supplemented with up to 30 mM glucose was also investigated. The effects on cell viability, adhesion proteins (e-cadherin, β-catenin, and β1-integrin) expression, attachment efficiency, apoptotic indicators, Akt signaling, ATP levels, and cytochrome P450 activities have been evaluated. The results indicate that the hepatocytes cryopreserved in a medium supplemented with platelet lysate show better recovery than those preserved in the standard medium: higher expression of adhesion molecules, higher attachment efficiency and cell survival; decreased number of apoptotic nuclei and caspase-3 activation; maintenance of ATP levels; and drug biotransformation capability close to those in fresh hepatocytes. Supplementation of thawing media with glucose led to a significant decrease in caspase-3 activation and to increased adhesion molecules preservation and Akt signal transduction after C/T. Minor nonsignificant changes in cell viability and attachment efficiency were observed. These promising results could lead to a new cryopreservation procedure to improve human hepatocyte cryopreservation outcome.

  9. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4A improves hepatic differentiation of immortalized adult human hepatocytes and improves liver function and survival.

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    Hang, Hua-Lian; Liu, Xin-Yu; Wang, Hai-Tian; Xu, Ning; Bian, Jian-Min; Zhang, Jian-Jun; Xia, Lei; Xia, Qiang

    2017-11-15

    Immortalized human hepatocytes (IHH) could provide an unlimited supply of hepatocytes, but insufficient differentiation and phenotypic instability restrict their clinical application. This study aimed to determine the role of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4A (HNF4A) in hepatic differentiation of IHH, and whether encapsulation of IHH overexpressing HNF4A could improve liver function and survival in rats with acute liver failure (ALF). Primary human hepatocytes were transduced with lentivirus-mediated catalytic subunit of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) to establish IHH. Cells were analyzed for telomerase activity, proliferative capacity, hepatocyte markers, and tumorigenicity (c-myc) expression. Hepatocyte markers, hepatocellular functions, and morphology were studied in the HNF4A-overexpressing IHH. Hepatocyte markers and karyotype analysis were completed in the primary hepatocytes using shRNA knockdown of HNF4A. Nuclear translocation of β-catenin was assessed. Rat models of ALF were treated with encapsulated IHH or HNF4A-overexpressing IHH. A HNF4A-positive IHH line was established, which was non-tumorigenic and conserved properties of primary hepatocytes. HNF4A overexpression significantly enhanced mRNA levels of genes related to hepatic differentiation in IHH. Urea levels were increased by the overexpression of HNF4A, as measured 24h after ammonium chloride addition, similar to that of primary hepatocytes. Chromosomal abnormalities were observed in primary hepatocytes transfected with HNF4A shRNA. HNF4α overexpression could significantly promote β-catenin activation. Transplantation of HNF4A overexpressing IHH resulted in better liver function and survival of rats with ALF compared with IHH. HNF4A improved hepatic differentiation of IHH. Transplantation of HNF4A-overexpressing IHH could improve the liver function and survival in a rat model of ALF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A simple isolation and cryopreservation method for adult human hepatocytes.

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    Hang, Hualian; Shi, Xiaolei; Gu, Guangxiang; Wu, Yafu; Ding, Yitao

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this study was to establish a stable method of isolation, culture and cryopreservation of adult primary hepatocytes to provide potential hepatocyte resources for the treatment of acute and chronic liver diseases by hepatocyte transplantation and bioartificial liver support systems, and for the use of hepatocytes as an in vitro model of the liver. Adult hepatocytes of 20 separate donors were isolated with a two-step extracoporeal collagenase perfusion technique. Seven preincubation time points (2h, 6h, 12h, 24h, 36h, 48h and 72h) were selected, then the hepatocytes were transferred to HepatoZYME-SFM medium containing 10% FBS and 10% DMSO, and were immediately put into an isopropanol progressive freezing container at -80 degrees C overnight and immersed in liquid nitrogen the next day. During the postthawing culture period, viability, plating efficiency, albumin secretion and urea synthesis were analyzed. The viability and plating efficiency of hepatocytes after partial hepatectomy using two-step extracorporeal collagenase perfusion technique were 75.0+/-4.6% and 72.0+/-6.0% respectively. Preincubation at 4? for 12 hours or 24 hours proved to be the optimal time at which the albumin secretion was higher than at other time points (p<0.05). Compared to the immediate cryopreservation groups (IC), we also found significant improvement in viability (61.4+/-4.8%/62.0+/-5.6% vs. 53.4+/-4.2%, p<0.05), plating efficiency (63.2+/-5.8%/62.6+/-3.6% vs. 55.2+/-4.6%, p<0.05), albumin secretion and urea synthesis (p<0.05) at these time points. The two-step extracorporeal collagenase perfusion technique after partial hepatectomy provides a novel, simple, and reliable method for hepatocyte isolation. The results of the present study suggest that recovery of human hepatocytes after isolation preincubation at 4 degrees C for 12 hours to 24 hours prior to cryopreservation can obtain hepatocytes ideal for use in pharmacotoxicology, bioartificial liver and cell therapy

  11. 3D Cultivation Techniques for Primary Human Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Bachmann

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the main challenges in drug development is the prediction of in vivo toxicity based on in vitro data. The standard cultivation system for primary human hepatocytes is based on monolayer cultures, even if it is known that these conditions result in a loss of hepatocyte morphology and of liver-specific functions, such as drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. As it has been demonstrated that hepatocytes embedded between two sheets of collagen maintain their function, various hydrogels and scaffolds for the 3D cultivation of hepatocytes have been developed. To further improve or maintain hepatic functions, 3D cultivation has been combined with perfusion. In this manuscript, we discuss the benefits and drawbacks of different 3D microfluidic devices. For most systems that are currently available, the main issues are the requirement of large cell numbers, the low throughput, and expensive equipment, which render these devices unattractive for research and the drug-developing industry. A higher acceptance of these devices could be achieved by their simplification and their compatibility with high-throughput, as both aspects are of major importance for a user-friendly device.

  12. Alginate Encapsulation of Human Hepatocytes and Assessment of Microbeads.

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    Mitry, Ragai R; Jitraruch, Suttiruk; Iansante, Valeria; Dhawan, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Alginate encapsulation of cells is an attractive technique in which alginate becomes polymerized entrapping the cells. The structure of formed microbeads/microcapsules is semipermeable as it allows oxygen and nutrients to go in, and waste products and other materials produced by the cells to go out. Here, we describe basic protocols for alginate encapsulation of human hepatocytes and methods for assessing the microbeads produced.

  13. Aneuploidy is permissive for hepatocyte-like cell differentiation from human induced pluripotent stem cells

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    2014-01-01

    Background The characterization of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) routinely includes analyses of chromosomal integrity. The belief is that pluripotent stem cells best suited to the generation of differentiated derivatives should display a euploid karyotype; although, this does not appear to have been formally tested. While aneuploidy is commonly associated with cell transformation, several types of somatic cells, including hepatocytes, are frequently aneuploid and variation in chromosomal content does not contribute to a transformed phenotype. This insight has led to the proposal that dynamic changes in the chromosomal environment may be important to establish genetic diversity within the hepatocyte population and such diversity may facilitate an adaptive response by the liver to various insults. Such a positive contribution of aneuploidy to liver function raises the possibility that, in contrast to existing dogma, aneuploid iPSCs may be capable of generating hepatocyte-like cells that display hepatic activities. Results We examined whether a human iPSC line that had multiple chromosomal aberrations was competent to differentiate into hepatocytes and found that loss of normal chromosomal content had little impact on the production of hepatocyte-like cells from iPSCs. Conclusions iPSCs that harbor an abnormal chromosomal content retain the capacity to generate hepatocyte–like cells with high efficiency. PMID:25002137

  14. Possibility of Undifferentiated Human Thigh Adipose Stem Cells Differentiating into Functional Hepatocytes

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    Jong Hoon Lee

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThis study aimed to investigate the possibility of isolating mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from human thigh adipose tissue and the ability of human thigh adipose stem cells (HTASCs to differentiate into hepatocytes.MethodsThe adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs were isolated from thigh adipose tissue. Growth factors, cytokines, and hormones were added to the collagen coated dishes to induce the undifferentiated HTASCs to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells. To confirm the experimental results, the expression of hepatocyte-specific markers on undifferentiated and differentiated HTASCs was analyzed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemical staining. Differentiation efficiency was evaluated using functional tests such as periodic acid schiff (PAS staining and detection of the albumin secretion level using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA.ResultsThe majority of the undifferentiated HTASCs were changed into a more polygonal shape showing tight interactions between the cells. The differentiated HTASCs up-regulated mRNA of hepatocyte markers. Immunocytochemical analysis showed that they were intensely stained with anti-albumin antibody compared with undifferentiated HTASCs. PAS staining showed that HTASCs submitted to the hepatocyte differentiation protocol were able to more specifically store glycogen than undifferentiated HTASCs, displaying a purple color in the cytoplasm of the differentiated HTASCs. ELISA analyses showed that differentiated HTASCs could secrete albumin, which is one of the hepatocyte markers.ConclusionsMSCs were islolated from human thigh adipose tissue differentiate to heapatocytes. The source of ADSCs is not only abundant abdominal adipose tissue, but also thigh adipose tissue for cell therapy in liver regeneration and tissue regeneration.

  15. Generation of functional hepatocyte-like cells from human deciduous periodontal ligament stem cells

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    Vasanthan, Punitha; Jayaraman, Pukana; Kunasekaran, Wijenthiran; Lawrence, Anthony; Gnanasegaran, Nareshwaran; Govindasamy, Vijayendran; Musa, Sabri; Kasim, Noor Hayaty Abu

    2016-08-01

    Human deciduous periodontal ligament stem cells have been introduced for as an easily accessible source of stem cells from dental origin. Although recent studies have revealed the ability of these stem cells in multipotential attribute, their efficiency of hepatic lineage differentiation has not been addressed so far. The aim of this study is to investigate hepatic lineage fate competence of periodontal ligament stem cells through direct media induction. Differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells was conducted by the exposure of two phase media induction. First phase was performed in the presence of hepatocyte growth factors to induce a definitive endoderm formation. In the subsequent phase, the cells were treated with oncostatin M and dexamethosone followed by insulin and transferrin to generate hepatocyte-like cells. Hepatic-related characters of the generated hepatocyte-like cells were determined at both mRNA and protein level followed by functional assays. Foremost changes observed in the generation of hepatocyte-like cells were the morphological features in which these cells were transformed from fibroblastic shape to polygonal shape. Temporal expression of hepatic markers ranging from early endodermal up to late markers were detected in the hepatocyte-like cells. Crucial hepatic markers such as glycogen storage, albumin, and urea secretion were also shown. These findings exhibited the ability of periodontal ligament stem cells of dental origin to be directed into hepatic lineage fate. These cells can be regarded as an alternative autologous source in the usage of stem cell-based treatment for liver diseases.

  16. Human hepatocyte functions in a crossed hollow fiber membrane bioreactor.

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    De Bartolo, Loredana; Salerno, Simona; Curcio, Efrem; Piscioneri, Antonella; Rende, Maria; Morelli, Sabrina; Tasselli, Franco; Bader, Augustinus; Drioli, Enrico

    2009-05-01

    An important challenge in liver tissue engineering is the development of bioartificial systems that are able to favour the liver reconstruction and to modulate liver cell behaviour. A crossed hollow fiber membrane bioreactor was developed to support the long-term maintenance and differentiation of human hepatocytes. The bioreactor consists of two types of hollow fiber (HF) membranes with different molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) and physico-chemical properties cross-assembled in alternating manner: modified polyetheretherketone (PEEK-WC) and polyethersulfone (PES), used for the medium inflow and outflow, respectively. The combination of these two fiber set produces an extracapillary network for the adhesion of cells and a high mass exchange through the cross-flow of culture medium. The transport of liver specific products such as albumin and urea together with the transport of drug such as diazepam was modelled and compared with the experimental metabolic data. The theoretical metabolite concentration differed 7.5% for albumin and 5% for urea with respect to experimental data. The optimised perfusion conditions of the bioreactor allowed the maintenance of liver functions in terms of urea synthesis, albumin secretion and diazepam biotransformation up to 18 days of culture. In particular the good performance of the bioreactor was confirmed by the high rate of urea synthesis (28.7 microg/h 10(6) cells) and diazepam biotransformation. In the bioreactor human hepatocytes expressed at high levels the individual cytochrome P450 isoenzymes involved in the diazepam metabolism. The results demonstrated that crossed HF membrane bioreactor is able to support the maintenance of primary human hepatocytes preserving their liver specific functions for all investigated period. This device may be a potential tool in the liver tissue engineering for drug metabolism/toxicity testing and study of disease pathogenesis alternatively to animal experimentation.

  17. A novel mouse model for stable engraftment of a human immune system and human hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Strick-Marchand

    Full Text Available Hepatic infections by hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV and Plasmodium parasites leading to acute or chronic diseases constitute a global health challenge. The species tropism of these hepatotropic pathogens is restricted to chimpanzees and humans, thus model systems to study their pathological mechanisms are severely limited. Although these pathogens infect hepatocytes, disease pathology is intimately related to the degree and quality of the immune response. As a first step to decipher the immune response to infected hepatocytes, we developed an animal model harboring both a human immune system (HIS and human hepatocytes (HUHEP in BALB/c Rag2-/- IL-2Rγc-/- NOD.sirpa uPAtg/tg mice. The extent and kinetics of human hepatocyte engraftment were similar between HUHEP and HIS-HUHEP mice. Transplanted human hepatocytes were polarized and mature in vivo, resulting in 20-50% liver chimerism in these models. Human myeloid and lymphoid cell lineages developed at similar frequencies in HIS and HIS-HUHEP mice, and splenic and hepatic compartments were humanized with mature B cells, NK cells and naïve T cells, as well as monocytes and dendritic cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that HIS-HUHEP mice can be stably (> 5 months and robustly engrafted with a humanized immune system and chimeric human liver. This novel HIS-HUHEP model provides a platform to investigate human immune responses against hepatotropic pathogens and to test novel drug strategies or vaccine candidates.

  18. HUMAN LIVER SLICES EXPRESS THE SAME LIDOCAINE BIOTRANSFORMATION RATE AS ISOLATED HUMAN HEPATOCYTES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OLINGA, P; MEIJER, DKF; SLOOFF, MJH; GROOTHUIS, GMM; Merema, M.T.

    1993-01-01

    In order to investigate whether liver slices are a valuable tool for the assessment of drug metabolism in human liver, we compared the phase I metabolism of lidocaine in human liver slices and hepatocytes prepared from three human livers. Lidocaine is mainly metabolised to monoethylglycinexylidide

  19. Maintenance of Hepatic Functions in Primary Human Hepatocytes Cultured on Xeno-Free and Chemical Defined Human Recombinant Laminins.

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    Watanabe, Masaaki; Zemack, Helen; Johansson, Helene; Hagbard, Louise; Jorns, Carl; Li, Meng; Ellis, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Refined methods for maintaining specific functions of isolated hepatocytes under xeno-free and chemical defined conditions is of great importance for the development of hepatocyte research and regenerative therapy. Laminins, a large family of heterotrimeric basement membrane adhesion proteins, are highly cell and tissue type specific components of the extracellular matrix and strongly influence the behavior and function of associated cells and/or tissues. However, detailed biological functions of many laminin isoforms are still to be evaluated. In this study, we determined the distribution of laminin isoforms in human liver tissue and isolated primary human hepatocytes by western blot analysis, and investigated the efficacy of different human recombinant laminin isoforms on hepatic functions during culture. Protein expressions of laminin-chain α2, α3, α4, β1, β3, γ1, and γ2 were detected in both isolated human hepatocytes and liver tissue. No α1 and α5 expression could be detected in liver tissue or hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were isolated from five different individual livers, and cultured on human recombinant laminin isoforms -111, -211, -221, -332, -411, -421, -511, and -521 (Biolamina AB), matrigel (extracted from Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm sarcoma), or collagen type IV (Collagen). Hepatocytes cultured on laminin showed characteristic hexagonal shape in a flat cell monolayer. Viability, double stranded DNA concentration, and Ki67 expression for hepatocytes cultured for six days on laminin were comparable to those cultured on EHS and Collagen. Hepatocytes cultured on laminin also displayed production of human albumin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, bile acids, and gene expression of liver-enriched factors, such as hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha, glucose-6-phosphate, cytochrome P450 3A4, and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2. We conclude that all forms of human recombinant laminin tested maintain cell viability and liver-specific functions of primary human

  20. Reprogramming factors involved in hybrids and cybrids of human embryonic stem cells fused with hepatocytes.

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    Guo, Jitong; Tecirlioglu, R Tayfur; Nguyen, Linh; Koh, Karen; Jenkin, Graham; Trounson, Alan

    2010-10-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have the potential to reprogram somatic cells into ESC-like cells through cell fusion. In the present study, the potential of human (h)ESC cytoplasts and karyoplasts to reprogram human hepatocytes was evaluated. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) transfected hESCs (ENVY cells) were fused with SNARF-1 (CellTracker)-labeled human hepatocytes using polyethylene glycol (PEG) and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to produce hESC-hepatocyte hybrids. Immunocytochemical analysis of ESC markers showed that the hybrids expressed OCT4, TRA-1-60, TRA-1-81, SSEA-4, and GCTM-2. However, SSEA-1, which is typically low or absent on hESCs, was detected on hESC–hepatocyte hybrids. Moreover, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed that alpha-fetoprotein, which is highly expressed in hepatocytes, was erased in the hybrids. These results indicated that hESCs have the potential to reprogram hepatocyte phenotype to a relatively undifferentiated state, but such hybrid cells are not identical to hESCs. Although hESC–hepatocyte hybrids were aneuploid, they were able to differentiate into embryoid bodies and some types of somatic cells. Furthermore, cybrids of enucleated hESCs and hepatocytes were produced by cell fusion, but the cybrids were unable to self-renew in the same way as hESCs. Presumably, the reprogramming factors are associated with the karyoplast and not the cytoplast of hESCs.

  1. DIFFERENTIAL-EFFECTS OF EICOSAPENTAENOIC ACID ON GLYCEROLIPID AND APOLIPOPROTEIN-B METABOLISM IN PRIMARY HUMAN HEPATOCYTES COMPARED TO HEPG2 CELLS AND PRIMARY RAT HEPATOCYTES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LIN, YG; SMIT, MJ; HAVINGA, R; VERKADE, HJ; VONK, RJ; KUIPERS, F

    1995-01-01

    We compared the effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and oleic acid (OA) on glycerolipid and apolipoprotein B (apoB) metabolism in primary human hepatocytes, HepG2 cells and primary rat hepatocytes. Cells were incubated for 1 to 5 h with 0.25 mM bovine serum albumin in the absence (control) or

  2. Treatment of nonalbumin rats by transplantation of immortalized hepatocytes using artificial human chromosome.

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    Ito, M; Ikeno, M; Nagata, H; Yamamoto, T; Hiroguchi, A; Fox, I J; Miyakawa, S

    2009-01-01

    The shortage of organ donors has impeded the development of human hepatocyte transplantation. Immortalized hepatocytes, however, could provide an unlimited supply of transplantable cells. To determine whether immortalized hepatocytes could provide global metabolic support in end-stage liver disease, rat hepatocyte clones were developed by transduction with the gene encoding the simian virus 40 T antigen (SVLT) using the new technique of human artificial mini chromosome (HAC). Immortalized rat hepatocyte clones were developed by transduction with the gene encoding the SV40 using HAC. Many clones were obtained using this technique. From comparison of the properties of all these clones using the normal hepatocytes and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the characteristics of the cell clones (at least partially characterized, and assayed for albumin, glucose-6-phosphate and dipeptidyl peptidase-4, gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase, SVLT and beta-actin expression by RT-PCR) showed no differences other than the immortalization. We compared the albumin bands of the first-day (0-day) and 30-day cells by RT-PCR, showing conditions to be stable for at least 1 month. Three experimental animal model groups were used for albumin analysis: nonalbumin rats with 2/3 hepatectomy only (R-NARs; n = 4); R-NARs with intrasplenic transplantation of 3 x 10(7) primary hepatocytes (pHTx; n = 4); and R-NARs with intrasplenic transplantation of 3 x 10(7) immortalized hepatocytes (iHTx; n = 4). All HTx groups produced albumin, but the immortalized hepatocyte group did not generate significantly elevated albumin levels compared with primary hepatocytes. The results presented herein have demonstrated an initial step toward the development of immortalized hepatocytes for transplantable cells or artificial organs using HAC technology.

  3. Bile acid-induced necrosis in primary human hepatocytes and in patients with obstructive cholestasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolbright, Benjamin L.; Dorko, Kenneth [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Antoine, Daniel J.; Clarke, Joanna I. [MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Gholami, Parviz [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Li, Feng [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson [Department of Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Fan, Fang [Department of Pathology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Park, B. Kevin [MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Hagenbuch, Bruno [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Olyaee, Mojtaba [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of bile acids is a major mediator of cholestatic liver injury. Recent studies indicate bile acid composition between humans and rodents is dramatically different, as humans have a higher percent of glycine conjugated bile acids and increased chenodeoxycholate content, which increases the hydrophobicity index of bile acids. This increase may lead to direct toxicity that kills hepatocytes, and promotes inflammation. To address this issue, this study assessed how pathophysiological concentrations of bile acids measured in cholestatic patients affected primary human hepatocytes. Individual bile acid levels were determined in serum and bile by UPLC/QTOFMS in patients with extrahepatic cholestasis with, or without, concurrent increases in serum transaminases. Bile acid levels increased in serum of patients with liver injury, while biliary levels decreased, implicating infarction of the biliary tracts. To assess bile acid-induced toxicity in man, primary human hepatocytes were treated with relevant concentrations, derived from patient data, of the model bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC). Treatment with GCDC resulted in necrosis with no increase in apoptotic parameters. This was recapitulated by treatment with biliary bile acid concentrations, but not serum concentrations. Marked elevations in serum full-length cytokeratin-18, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), and acetylated HMGB1 confirmed inflammatory necrosis in injured patients; only modest elevations in caspase-cleaved cytokeratin-18 were observed. These data suggest human hepatocytes are more resistant to human-relevant bile acids than rodent hepatocytes, and die through necrosis when exposed to bile acids. These mechanisms of cholestasis in humans are fundamentally different to mechanisms observed in rodent models. - Highlights: • Cholestatic liver injury is due to cytoplasmic bile acid accumulation in hepatocytes. • Primary human hepatocytes are resistant to BA-induced injury

  4. Identification of interspecies difference in efflux transporters of hepatocytes from dog, rat, monkey and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Yuan, Haodan; Li, Na; Song, Guotao; Zheng, Yi; Baratta, Mike; Hua, Fengmei; Thurston, Archie; Wang, Joanne; Lai, Yurong

    2008-09-02

    The large interspecies differences of hepatobiliary transport present a challenge for the allometric prediction of human biliary excretion for drug candidates primarily cleared via hepatobiliary secretion. In the present study, we determined the metabolic stabilities of common fluorescent substrates of hepatobiliary efflux transporters and developed a rapid efflux assay to determine the functional activities of MRP/Mrp, BCRP/Bcrp and P-gp in hepatocytes of four species. The specificities of transporter-mediated dye efflux were confirmed by selective transporter inhibitors. Among tested species, transporter-specific dye efflux kinetics was consistent between freshly isolated and cryopreserved hepatocytes. Hepatocyte elimination half-lives of MRP/Mrp substrates GS-MF and calcein were observed in the rank order of human>monkey>dog>rat. The fourfold higher MRP/Mrp substrate efflux rate of rat hepatocytes compared to human is likely due to the species-specific functional differences of MRP2/Mrp2 expressed on the canalicular membrane. We also observed efficient BCRP-mediated pheophorbide A (PhA) efflux by human and dog hepatocytes, while PhA extrusion in monkey and rat hepatocytes appeared limited. P-gp function measured by DiOC2(3) efflux was minimal in hepatocytes of all origins and no significant species differences were detected. Our results demonstrated marked differences in hepatocyte MRP/Mrp and BCRP/Bcrp activities across species, indicating that they may contribute to the species differences of in vivo hepatobiliary excretion. These results also suggest the potential utility of primary hepatocytes, either fresh or cryopreserved, as an in vitro model to predict interspecies differences in the biliary transport of MRP/Mrp and BCRP/Bcrp substrates.

  5. Nuclear lactate dehydrogenase modulates histone modification in human hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castonguay, Zachary; Auger, Christopher; Thomas, Sean C.; Chahma, M’hamed; Appanna, Vasu D., E-mail: vappanna@laurentian.ca

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Nuclear LDH is up-regulated under oxidative stress. • SIRT1 is co-immunoprecipitated bound to nuclear LDH. • Nuclear LDH is involved in histone deacetylation and epigenetics. - Abstract: It is becoming increasingly apparent that the nucleus harbors metabolic enzymes that affect genetic transforming events. Here, we describe a nuclear isoform of lactate dehydrogenase (nLDH) and its ability to orchestrate histone deacetylation by controlling the availability of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}), a key ingredient of the sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) deacetylase system. There was an increase in the expression of nLDH concomitant with the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in the culture medium. Under oxidative stress, the NAD{sup +} generated by nLDH resulted in the enhanced deacetylation of histones compared to the control hepatocytes despite no discernable change in the levels of SIRT1. There appeared to be an intimate association between nLDH and SIRT1 as these two enzymes co-immunoprecipitated. The ability of nLDH to regulate epigenetic modifications by manipulating NAD{sup +} reveals an intricate link between metabolism and the processing of genetic information.

  6. Activated human neutrophils release hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCourt, M

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Hepatocyte growth factor or scatter factor (HGF\\/SF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that has potent angiogenic properties. We have previously demonstrated that neutrophils (PMN) are directly angiogenic by releasing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We hypothesized that the acute inflammatory response can stimulate PMN to release HGF. AIMS: To examine the effects of inflammatory mediators on PMN HGF release and the effect of recombinant human HGF (rhHGF) on PMN adhesion receptor expression and PMN VEGF release. METHODS: In the first experiment, PMN were isolated from healthy volunteers and stimulated with tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP). Culture supernatants were assayed for HGF using ELISA. In the second experiment, PMN were lysed to measure total HGF release and HGF expression in the PMN was detected by Western immunoblotting. Finally, PMN were stimulated with rhHGF. PMN CD 11a, CD 11b, and CD 18 receptor expression and VEGF release was measured using flow cytometry and ELISA respectively. RESULTS: TNF-alpha, LPS and fMLP stimulation resulted in significantly increased release of PMN HGF (755+\\/-216, 484+\\/-221 and 565+\\/-278 pg\\/ml, respectively) compared to controls (118+\\/-42 pg\\/ml). IL-8 had no effect. Total HGF release following cell lysis and Western blot suggests that HGF is released from intracellular stores. Recombinant human HGF did not alter PMN adhesion receptor expression and had no effect on PMN VEGF release. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that pro-inflammatory mediators can stimulate HGF release from a PMN intracellular store and that activated PMN in addition to secreting VEGF have further angiogenic potential by releasing HGF.

  7. A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yannam, Govardhana Rao [Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Han, Bing [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi (China); Setoyama, Kentaro [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Yamamoto, Toshiyuki [Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Guzman-Lepe, Jorge [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Galambos, Csaba [Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Fong, Jason V. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Yamanouchi, Kosho [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Marion Bessin Liver Research Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro [Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); and others

    2014-02-01

    Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ≥40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury.

  8. Insulin infusion reduces hepatocyte growth factor in lean humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Courten, Barbora; de Courten, Maximilian; Dougherty, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Plasma Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) is significantly elevated in obesity and may contribute to vascular disease, metabolic syndrome or cancer in obese individuals. The current studies were done to determine if hyperinsulinemia increases plasma HGF. MATERIALS/METHODS: Twenty-two parti...

  9. Human hepatocytes derived from pluripotent stem cells: a promising cell model for drug hepatotoxicity screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Lechón, María José; Tolosa, Laia

    2016-09-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a frequent cause of failure in both clinical and post-approval stages of drug development, and poses a key challenge to the pharmaceutical industry. Current animal models offer poor prediction of human DILI. Although several human cell-based models have been proposed for the detection of human DILI, human primary hepatocytes remain the gold standard for preclinical toxicological screening. However, their use is hindered by their limited availability, variability and phenotypic instability. In contrast, pluripotent stem cells, which include embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), proliferate extensively in vitro and can be differentiated into hepatocytes by the addition of soluble factors. This provides a stable source of hepatocytes for multiple applications, including early preclinical hepatotoxicity screening. In addition, iPSCs also have the potential to establish genotype-specific cells from different individuals, which would increase the predictivity of toxicity assays allowing more successful clinical trials. Therefore, the generation of human hepatocyte-like cells derived from pluripotent stem cells seems to be promising for overcoming limitations of hepatocyte preparations, and it is expected to have a substantial repercussion in preclinical hepatotoxicity risk assessment in early drug development stages.

  10. Characterization of Liver-Specific Functions of Human Fetal Hepatocytes in Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnici, Cinzia Maria; Timoneri, Francesca; Amico, Giandomenico; Pietrosi, Giada; Vizzini, Giovanni; Spada, Marco; Pagano, Duilio; Gridelli, Bruno; Conaldi, Pier Giulio

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to assess liver-specific functions of human fetal liver cells proposed as a potential source for hepatocyte transplantation. Fetal liver cells were isolated from livers of different gestational ages (16-22 weeks), and the functions of cell preparations were evaluated by establishing primary cultures. We observed that 20- to 22-week-gestation fetal liver cell cultures contained a predominance of cells with hepatocytic traits that did not divide in vitro but were functionally competent. Fetal hepatocytes performed liver-specific functions at levels comparable to those of their adult counterpart. Moreover, exposure to dexamethasone in combination with oncostatin M promptly induced further maturation of the cells through the acquisition of additional functions (i.e., ability to store glycogen and uptake of indocyanine green). In some cases, particularly in cultures obtained from fetuses of earlier gestational ages (16-18 weeks gestation), cells with mature hepatocytic traits proved to be sporadic, and the primary cultures were mainly populated by clusters of proliferating cells. Consequently, the values of liver-specific functions detected in these cultures were low. We observed that a low cell density culture system rapidly prompted loss of the mature hepatocytic phenotype with downregulations of all the liver-specific functions. We found that human fetal liver cells can be cryopreserved without significant loss of viability and function and evaluated up to 1 year in storage in liquid nitrogen. They might, therefore, be suitable for cell banking and allow for the transplantation of large numbers of cells, thus improving clinical outcomes. Overall, our results indicate that fetal hepatocytes could be used as a cell source for hepatocyte transplantation. Fetal liver cells have been used so far to treat end-stage liver disease. Additional studies are needed to include these cells in cell-based therapies aimed to treat liver failure and inborn

  11. Application of a Micropatterned Cocultured Hepatocyte System To Predict Preclinical and Human-Specific Drug Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, T Eric; Wang, Shuai; Cox, Loretta M; Moen, Mark A; Krzyzewski, Stacy; Ukairo, Okechukwu; Obach, R Scott

    2016-02-01

    Laboratory animal models are the industry standard for preclinical risk assessment of drug candidates. Thus, it is important that these species possess profiles of drug metabolites that are similar to those anticipated in human, since metabolites also could be responsible for biologic activities or unanticipated toxicity. Under most circumstances, preclinical species reflect human in vivo metabolites well; however, there have been several notable exceptions, and understanding and predicting these exceptions with an in vitro system would be very useful. Human micropatterned cocultured (MPCC) hepatocytes have been shown to recapitulate human in vivo qualitative metabolic profiles, but the same demonstration has not been performed yet for laboratory animal species. In this study, we investigated several compounds that are known to produce human-unique metabolites through CYP2C9, UGT1A4, aldehyde oxidase (AO), or N-acetyltransferase that were poorly covered or not detected at all in the selected preclinical species. To perform our investigation we used 24-well MPCC hepatocyte plates having three individual human donors and a single donor each of monkey, dog, and rat to study drug metabolism at four time points per species. Through the use of the multispecies MPCC hepatocyte system, the metabolite profiles of the selected compounds in human donors effectively captured the qualitative in vivo metabolite profile with respect to the human metabolite of interest. Human-unique metabolites that were not detected in vivo in certain preclinical species (normally dog and rat) were also not generated in the corresponding species in vitro, confirming that the MPCC hepatocytes can provide an assessment of preclinical species metabolism. From these results, we conclude that multispecies MPCC hepatocyte plates could be used as an effective in vitro tool for preclinical understanding of species metabolism relative to humans and aid in the choice of appropriate preclinical models

  12. High Content Analysis of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Hepatocytes Reveals Drug Induced Steatosis and Phospholipidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Pradip

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatotoxicity is one of the most cited reasons for withdrawal of approved drugs from the market. The use of nonclinically relevant in vitro and in vivo testing systems contributes to the high attrition rates. Recent advances in differentiating human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs into pure cultures of hepatocyte-like cells expressing functional drug metabolizing enzymes open up possibilities for novel, more relevant human cell based toxicity models. The present study aimed to investigate the use of hiPSC derived hepatocytes for conducting mechanistic toxicity testing by image based high content analysis (HCA. The hiPSC derived hepatocytes were exposed to drugs known to cause hepatotoxicity through steatosis and phospholipidosis, measuring several endpoints representing different mechanisms involved in drug induced hepatotoxicity. The hiPSC derived hepatocytes were benchmarked to the HepG2 cell line and generated robust HCA data with low imprecision between plates and batches. The different parameters measured were detected at subcytotoxic concentrations and the order of which the compounds were categorized (as severe, moderate, mild, or nontoxic based on the degree of injury at isomolar concentration corresponded to previously published data. Taken together, the present study shows how hiPSC derived hepatocytes can be used as a platform for screening drug induced hepatotoxicity by HCA.

  13. Effect of butylated hydroxytoluene, curcumin, propyl gallate and thiabendazole on cytochrome P450 forms in cultured human hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Price, R.J.; Scott, M.P.; Giddings, A.M.; Walters, D.G.; Stierum, R.H.; Meredith, C.; Lake, B.G.

    2008-01-01

    1. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of four food chemicals, namely butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), curcumin (CC), propyl gallate (PG) and thiabendazole (TB), on cytochrome P450 (CYP) forms in cultured human hepatocytes. 2. Treatment of human hepatocytes for 72 h with 2-200

  14. Xenobiotic-Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes Modulated by Toxcast Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primary human hepatocyte cultures are useful in vitro model systems of human liver because when cultured under appropriate conditions the hepatocytes retain liver-like functionality such as metabolism, transport, and cell signaling. This model system was used to characterize the ...

  15. DNA modification and repair by 2-nitropropane is extensive in hepatocytes of rats compared to those of humans and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J E; Mynett, K; Gescher, A; Chipman, J K

    1993-06-01

    Hepatocytes from rats, mice or humans were exposed to either 2-nitropropane or propane 2-nitronate and the extent of unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) was measured. At a concentration of 2-nitropropane (0.1 mM) that produced a marked induction of UDS in rat hepatocytes, a negative or minimal response was seen in hepatocytes from mice and humans. A 10-fold higher concentration of 2-nitropropane was required in mouse hepatocytes for an equivalent UDS response to that seen in rat-liver cells. All three species showed UDS after exposure of hepatocytes to propane 2-nitronate at 0.1 mM although the effect in human cells was variable. In rat hepatocytes the induction of UDS by 2-nitropropane was not inhibited by the antioxidant dimethyl sulphoxide (1%). In these cells, 2-nitropropane produced an electrochemically active modified deoxynucleoside, similar to that reported to be formed in livers of rats which had received 2-nitropropane in vivo. A smaller but significant production of this altered deoxynucleoside was found in mouse hepatocytes but not in human hepatocytes treated identically. The level of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydrode-oxyguanosine was not increased in hepatocytes from any of the three species exposed to 2-NP under the same conditions. It is suggested that the UDS caused by 2-nitropropane may be in response to damage other than that produced by oxygen radicals.

  16. Side Population Cells Derived from Adult Human Liver Generate Hepatocyte-like Cells In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    HUSSAIN, SUNNY ZAHEED; STROM, STEPHEN C.; KIRBY, MARTHA R.; BURNS, SEAN; LANGEMEIJER, SASKIA; UEDA, TAKAHIRO; HSIEH, MATTHEW; TISDALE, JOHN F.

    2009-01-01

    We sought to determine whether hepatic side population (SP) cells derived from adult human liver possess the potential of a novel candidate hepatic stem cell. Human cadaveric donor liver was subjected to collagenase perfusion and hepatocytes were separated from nonparenchymal cells by differential centrifugation. SP cells were isolated from the nonparenchymal portion after Hoechst 33342 staining. Since CD45 is a panleukocyte antigen, CD45-negative SP cells were separated from the vast majority of CD45-positive SP cells (90%), and hepatic growth medium was used to culture both groups. Both CD45-negative and CD45-positive hepatic SP cells generated colonies in the hepatic growth medium in 2–3 weeks. The colonies yielded large cells morphologically consistent with human hepatocytes, demonstrating granule-rich cytoplasm, dense, often double nuclei, and intracellular lipofuscin pigment. The cultured cells from both sources were positive for markers of human hepatocytes: HepPar, cytokeratin 8 (CK8), and human albumin. Reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) performed on both groups demonstrated positivity for additional liver markers including human albumin, CK18, α-1 anti-trypsin, and the human cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP2B6. Double immunostaining (CD45 and HepPar) and RT-PCR confirmed that the hepatocyte-like cells derived from the CD45-negative SP cells acquired HepPar positivity but had no detectable CD45 antigen expression. In contrast, the cultured cells derived from the CD45-positive SP cells also acquired HepPar positivity, but only a minimal fraction expressed the CD45 antigen. We conclude that hepatic SP cells derived from the nonparenchymal portion of human liver are a potential source of human hepatocytes irrespective of their CD45 status, and further animal studies will be required to assess their regenerative potential. PMID:16187169

  17. Enhancing Survival of Human Hepatocytes by Neonatal Thymectomy and Partial Hepatectomy in Micro-miniature Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, H C; Enosawa, S; Yamazaki, T; Tohyama, S; Fujita, J; Fukuda, K; Kobayashi, E

    With the goal of in vivo cultivation of human hepatocytes that have not been sufficient in full differentiation in vitro, the advantage of neonatal thymectomy was verified on expansion of xenogeneic human hepatocyte in the micro-miniature pig (MMP). The thymus was excised immediately after the birth of the MMPs via cesarean section. Newborns were fed by artificial feeding under specific pathogen-free conditions. The thymectomized and nonthymectomized littermates were transplanted with human hepatocytes via a portal vein with or without partial hepatectomy at the MMP adult stage. The growth of thymectomized MMPs and the sham operated littermates was not significantly different; the former weighed 1.98 ± 0.30 kg (average ± standard deviation, n = 4) and the latter weighed 2.28 ± 0.39 kg (n = 4) at 1 month of age, and 17.48 ± 1.92 kg and 16.75 ± 2.68 kg at 12 months of age. Blood thymosin α1 concentrations in the thymectomy group were significantly lower than in the control group (0.22 ± 0.05 ng/mL vs 0.46 ± 0.16 ng/mL; n = 4, 12 months old, P = .029). After human hepatocyte transplantation, human albumin levels were detectable on day 28 in the peripheral blood of the thymectomy plus hepatectomy group (14.3 ± 4.9 ng/mL [± range, n = 2]) but were not detectable even on day 21 in the control group. Neonatal thymectomy was successfully achieved in infantile MMPs born via cesarean section. These pigs were considered to be an ideal in vivo bioreactor for human hepatocytes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. In vitro metabolism of beta-lapachone (ARQ 501) in mammalian hepatocytes and cultured human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xiu-Sheng; Zhong, Caiyun; Wang, Yunxia; Savage, Ronald E; Yang, Rui-Yang; Kizer, Darin; Volckova, Erika; Ashwell, Mark A; Chan, Thomas C K

    2009-01-01

    ARQ 501 (3,4-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-2H-naphthol[1,2-b]pyran-5,6-dione, beta-lapachone) is an anticancer agent, currently in multiple phase II clinical trials as monotherapy and in combination with other cytotoxic drugs. This study focuses on in vitro metabolism in cryopreserved hepatocytes from mice, rats, dogs and humans using [(14)C]-labeled ARQ 501. Metabolite profiles were characterized using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry combined with an accurate radioactivity counter. Ion trap mass spectrometry was employed for further structural elucidation. A total of twelve metabolites were detected in the mammalian hepatocytes studied; all of which but one were generated from phase II conjugation reactions. Ten of the observed metabolites were produced by conjugations occurring at the reduced ortho-quinone carbonyl groups of ARQ 501. The metabolite profiles revealed that glucuronidation was the major biotransformation pathway in mouse and human hepatocytes. Monosulfation was the major pathway in dog, while, in rat, it appears glucuronidation and sulfation pathways contributed equally. Three major metabolites were found in rats: monoglucuronide M1, monosulfate M6, and glucuronide-sulfate M9. Two types of diconjugation metabolites were formed by attachment of the second glycone to an adjacent hydroxyl or to an existing glycone. Of the diconjugation metabolites, glucosylsulfate M10, diglucuronide M5, and glucuronide-glucoside M11 represent rarely observed phase II metabolites in mammals. The only unconjugated metabolite was generated through hydrolysis and was observed in rat, dog and human hepatocytes. ARQ 501 appeared less stable in human hepatocytes than in those of other species. To further elucidate the metabolism of ARQ 501 in extrahepatic sites, its metabolism in human kidney, lung and intestine cells was also studied, and only monoglucuronide M1 was observed in all the cell types examined. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Resveratrol differentially regulates NAMPT and SIRT1 in Hepatocarcinoma cells and primary human hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Schuster

    Full Text Available Resveratrol is reported to possess chemotherapeutic properties in several cancers. In this study, we wanted to investigate the molecular mechanisms of resveratrol-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis as well as the impact of resveratrol on NAMPT and SIRT1 protein function and asked whether there are differences in hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2, Hep3B cells and non-cancerous primary human hepatocytes. We found a lower basal NAMPT mRNA and protein expression in hepatocarcinoma cells compared to primary hepatocytes. In contrast, SIRT1 was significantly higher expressed in hepatocarcinoma cells than in primary hepatocytes. Resveratrol induced cell cycle arrest in the S- and G2/M- phase and apoptosis was mediated by activation of p53 and caspase-3 in HepG2 cells. In contrast to primary hepatocytes, resveratrol treated HepG2 cells showed a reduction of NAMPT enzymatic activity and increased p53 acetylation (K382. Resveratrol induced NAMPT release from HepG2 cells which was associated with increased NAMPT mRNA expression. This effect was absent in primary hepatocytes where resveratrol was shown to function as NAMPT and SIRT1 activator. SIRT1 inhibition by EX527 resembled resveratrol effects on HepG2 cells. Furthermore, a SIRT1 overexpression significantly decreased both p53 hyperacetylation and resveratrol-induced NAMPT release as well as S-phase arrest in HepG2 cells. We could show that NAMPT and SIRT1 are differentially regulated by resveratrol in hepatocarcinoma cells and primary hepatocytes and that resveratrol did not act as a SIRT1 activator in hepatocarcinoma cells.

  20. Resveratrol Differentially Regulates NAMPT and SIRT1 in Hepatocarcinoma Cells and Primary Human Hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Susanne; Penke, Melanie; Gorski, Theresa; Petzold-Quinque, Stefanie; Damm, Georg; Gebhardt, Rolf; Kiess, Wieland; Garten, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol is reported to possess chemotherapeutic properties in several cancers. In this study, we wanted to investigate the molecular mechanisms of resveratrol-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis as well as the impact of resveratrol on NAMPT and SIRT1 protein function and asked whether there are differences in hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2, Hep3B cells) and non-cancerous primary human hepatocytes. We found a lower basal NAMPT mRNA and protein expression in hepatocarcinoma cells compared to primary hepatocytes. In contrast, SIRT1 was significantly higher expressed in hepatocarcinoma cells than in primary hepatocytes. Resveratrol induced cell cycle arrest in the S- and G2/M- phase and apoptosis was mediated by activation of p53 and caspase-3 in HepG2 cells. In contrast to primary hepatocytes, resveratrol treated HepG2 cells showed a reduction of NAMPT enzymatic activity and increased p53 acetylation (K382). Resveratrol induced NAMPT release from HepG2 cells which was associated with increased NAMPT mRNA expression. This effect was absent in primary hepatocytes where resveratrol was shown to function as NAMPT and SIRT1 activator. SIRT1 inhibition by EX527 resembled resveratrol effects on HepG2 cells. Furthermore, a SIRT1 overexpression significantly decreased both p53 hyperacetylation and resveratrol-induced NAMPT release as well as S-phase arrest in HepG2 cells. We could show that NAMPT and SIRT1 are differentially regulated by resveratrol in hepatocarcinoma cells and primary hepatocytes and that resveratrol did not act as a SIRT1 activator in hepatocarcinoma cells. PMID:24603648

  1. A Human Hepatocyte-Bearing Mouse: An Animal Model to Predict Drug Metabolism and Effectiveness in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsutoshi Yoshizato

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical studies to predict the efficacy and safety of drugs have conventionally been conducted almost exclusively in mice and rats as rodents, despite the differences in drug metabolism between humans and rodents. Furthermore, human (ℎ viruses such as hepatitis viruses do not infect the rodent liver. A mouse bearing a liver in which the hepatocytes have been largely repopulated with ℎ-hepatocytes would overcome some of these disadvantages. We have established a practical, efficient, and large-scale production system for such mice. Accumulated evidence has demonstrated that these hepatocyte-humanized mice are a useful and reliable animal model, exhibiting ℎ-type responses in a series of in vivo drug processing (adsorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion experiments and in the infection and propagation of hepatic viruses. In this review, we present the current status of studies on chimeric mice and describe their usefulness in the study of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors.

  2. Side Population Cells Derived from Adult Human Liver Generate Hepatocyte-like Cells In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    HUSSAIN, SUNNY ZAHEED; Strom, Stephen C.; Kirby, Martha R.; Burns, Sean; Langemeijer, Saskia; Ueda, Takahiro; HSIEH, MATTHEW; Tisdale, John F.

    2005-01-01

    We sought to determine whether hepatic side population (SP) cells derived from adult human liver possess the potential of a novel candidate hepatic stem cell. Human cadaveric donor liver was subjected to collagenase perfusion and hepatocytes were separated from nonparenchymal cells by differential centrifugation. SP cells were isolated from the nonparenchymal portion after Hoechst 33342 staining. Since CD45 is a panleukocyte antigen, CD45-negative SP cells were separated from the vast majorit...

  3. Transcriptome-Wide Analysis of Hepatitis B Virus-Mediated Changes to Normal Hepatocyte Gene Expression.

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    Jason Lamontagne

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Globally, a chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection remains the leading cause of primary liver cancer. The mechanisms leading to the development of HBV-associated liver cancer remain incompletely understood. In part, this is because studies have been limited by the lack of effective model systems that are both readily available and mimic the cellular environment of a normal hepatocyte. Additionally, many studies have focused on single, specific factors or pathways that may be affected by HBV, without addressing cell physiology as a whole. Here, we apply RNA-seq technology to investigate transcriptome-wide, HBV-mediated changes in gene expression to identify single factors and pathways as well as networks of genes and pathways that are affected in the context of HBV replication. Importantly, these studies were conducted in an ex vivo model of cultured primary hepatocytes, allowing for the transcriptomic characterization of this model system and an investigation of early HBV-mediated effects in a biologically relevant context. We analyzed differential gene expression within the context of time-mediated gene-expression changes and show that in the context of HBV replication a number of genes and cellular pathways are altered, including those associated with metabolism, cell cycle regulation, and lipid biosynthesis. Multiple analysis pipelines, as well as qRT-PCR and an independent, replicate RNA-seq analysis, were used to identify and confirm differentially expressed genes. HBV-mediated alterations to the transcriptome that we identified likely represent early changes to hepatocytes following an HBV infection, suggesting potential targets for early therapeutic intervention. Overall, these studies have produced a valuable resource that can be used to expand our understanding of the complex network of host-virus interactions and the impact of HBV-mediated changes to normal hepatocyte physiology on viral replication.

  4. Transdifferentiation of human male germline stem cells to hepatocytes in vivo via the transplantation under renal capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zheng; Niu, Minghui; Sun, Min; Yuan, Qingqing; Yao, Chencheng; Hou, Jingmei; Wang, Hong; Wen, Liping; Fu, Hongyong; Zhou, Fan; Li, Zheng; He, Zuping

    2017-02-28

    Here we proposed a new concept that human spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) can transdifferentiate into hepatocytes in vivo. We first established liver injury model of mice by carbon tetrachloride to provide proper environment for human SSC transplantation. Liver mesenchymal cells were isolated from mice and identified phenotypically. Human SSC line was recombined with liver mesenchymal cells, and they were transplanted under renal capsules of nude mice with liver injury. The grafts expressed hepatocyte hallmarks, including ALB, AAT, CK18, and CYP1A2, whereas germ cell and SSC markers VASA and GPR125 were undetected in these cells, implicating that human SSCs were converted to hepatocytes. Furthermore, Western blots revealed high levels of PCNA, AFP, and ALB, indicating that human SSCs-derived hepatocytes had strong proliferation potential and features of hepatocytes. In addition, ALB-, CK8-, and CYP1A2- positive cells were detected in liver tissues of recipient mice. Significantly, no obvious lesion or teratomas was observed in several important organs and tissues of recipient mice, reflecting that transplantation of human SSCs was safe and feasible. Collectively, we have for the first time demonstrated that human SSCs can be transdifferentiated to hepatocyte in vivo. This study provides a novel approach for curing liver diseases using human SSC transplantation.

  5. [The effect of the implantation of the human apo A-I gene on the function of the hepatocyte plasma membrane in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frol'kis, V V; Kordium, V A; Novikova, S N; Irodov, D V; Kul'chitskiĭ, O K; Sabko, V E; Kobzar', A L; Potapenko, R I; Bogatskaia, L N; Muradian, Kh K

    1996-01-01

    Evidences are given that implantation of human apo A-I gene to experimental animals induces essential changes in the functional state of hepatocyte plasmatic phospholipid composition, hyperpolarization development, as well as changes in the Na, K-ATPase and adenylate cyclase activities. The presence of generalized cell reaction is evidenced from the fact than biosynthesis of summary proteins gets enhanced during the above changes.

  6. Localization of actin in normal human hepatocytes using fluorescent phallotoxins and immunohistochemical amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkoel, L; Brisse, J; Capo, C; Benoliel, A M; Bongrand, P; Garcia, T; Chamlian, A

    1992-07-01

    Two different methods, fluorescent phallotoxins and immunohistochemical amplification systems were used to visualize actin in normal human hepatocytes. With fluorescent phallotoxins (NBD-phallacidin or rhodamine phalloidin), F-actin was distributed along the plasma membranes and at the bile canaliculi. With immunohistochemical methods (biotin-avidin, biotin-streptavidin, silver enhancement), actin was found at the same level, however a cytoplasmic staining was observed and discussed as G-actin localization.

  7. Hepatocytic Differentiation Potential of Human Fetal Liver Mesenchymal Stem Cells: In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation

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    Hoda El-Kehdy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In line with the search of effective stem cell population that would progress liver cell therapy and because the rate and differentiation potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC decreases with age, the current study investigates the hepatogenic differentiation potential of human fetal liver MSCs (FL-MSCs. After isolation from 11-12 gestational weeks’ human fetal livers, FL-MSCs were shown to express characteristic markers such as CD73, CD90, and CD146 and to display adipocytic and osteoblastic differentiation potential. Thereafter, we explored their hepatocytic differentiation potential using the hepatogenic protocol applied for adult human liver mesenchymal cells. FL-MSCs differentiated in this way displayed significant features of hepatocyte-like cells as demonstrated in vitro by the upregulated expression of specific hepatocytic markers and the induction of metabolic functions including CYP3A4 activity, indocyanine green uptake/release, and glucose 6-phosphatase activity. Following transplantation, naive and differentiated FL-MSC were engrafted into the hepatic parenchyma of newborn immunodeficient mice and differentiated in situ. Hence, FL-MSCs appeared to be interesting candidates to investigate the liver development at the mesenchymal compartment level. Standardization of their isolation, expansion, and differentiation may also support their use for liver cell-based therapy development.

  8. CRISPR-Cas9 Targeting of PCSK9 in Human Hepatocytes In Vivo-Brief Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Raghavan, Avanthi; Chen, Tao; Qiao, Lyon; Zhang, Yongxian; Ding, Qiurong; Musunuru, Kiran

    2016-05-01

    Although early proof-of-concept studies of somatic in vivo genome editing of the mouse ortholog of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (Pcsk9) in mice have established its therapeutic potential for the prevention of cardiovascular disease, the unique nature of genome-editing technology-permanent alteration of genomic DNA sequences-mandates that it be tested in vivo against human genes in normal human cells with human genomes to give reliable preclinical insights into the efficacy (on-target mutagenesis) and safety (lack of off-target mutagenesis) of genome-editing therapy before it can be used in patients. We used a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated (Cas) 9 genome-editing system to target the human PCSK9 gene in chimeric liver-humanized mice bearing human hepatocytes. We demonstrated high on-target mutagenesis (approaching 50%), greatly reduced blood levels of human PCSK9 protein, and minimal off-target mutagenesis. This work yields important information on the efficacy and safety of CRISPR-Cas9 therapy targeting the human PCSK9 gene in human hepatocytes in vivo, and it establishes humanized mice as a useful platform for the preclinical assessment of applications of somatic in vivo genome editing. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Genome-wide binding and transcriptome analysis of human farnesoid X receptor in primary human hepatocytes.

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    Le Zhan

    Full Text Available Farnesoid X receptor (FXR, NR1H4 is a ligand-activated transcription factor, belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily. FXR is highly expressed in the liver and is essential in regulating bile acid homeostasis. FXR deficiency is implicated in numerous liver diseases and mice with modulation of FXR have been used as animal models to study liver physiology and pathology. We have reported genome-wide binding of FXR in mice by chromatin immunoprecipitation - deep sequencing (ChIP-seq, with results indicating that FXR may be involved in regulating diverse pathways in liver. However, limited information exists for the functions of human FXR and the suitability of using murine models to study human FXR functions.In the current study, we performed ChIP-seq in primary human hepatocytes (PHHs treated with a synthetic FXR agonist, GW4064 or DMSO control. In parallel, RNA deep sequencing (RNA-seq and RNA microarray were performed for GW4064 or control treated PHHs and wild type mouse livers, respectively.ChIP-seq showed similar profiles of genome-wide FXR binding in humans and mice in terms of motif analysis and pathway prediction. However, RNA-seq and microarray showed more different transcriptome profiles between PHHs and mouse livers upon GW4064 treatment.In summary, we have established genome-wide human FXR binding and transcriptome profiles. These results will aid in determining the human FXR functions, as well as judging to what level the mouse models could be used to study human FXR functions.

  10. Effect of honokiol on the induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes in human hepatocytes

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    Cho YY

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Yong-Yeon Cho,1 Hyeon-Uk Jeong,1 Jeong-Han Kim,2 Hye Suk Lee1 1College of Pharmacy, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon, Korea; 2Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea Abstract: Honokiol, 2-(4-hydroxy-3-prop-2-enyl-phenyl-4-prop-2-enyl-phenol, an active component of Magnolia officinalis and Magnolia grandiflora, exerts various pharmacological activities such as antitumorigenic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, neurotrophic, and antithrombotic effects. To investigate whether honokiol acts as a perpetrator in drug interactions, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA levels of phase I and II drug-metabolizing enzymes, including cytochrome P450 (CYP, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT, and sulfotransferase 2A1 (SULT2A1, were analyzed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction following 48-hour honokiol exposure in three independent cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. Honokiol treatment at the highest concentration tested (50 µM increased the CYP2B6 mRNA level and CYP2B6-catalyzed bupropion hydroxylase activity more than two-fold in three different hepatocyte cultures, indicating that honokiol induces CYP2B6 at higher concentrations. However, honokiol treatment (0.5–50 µM did not significantly alter the mRNA levels of phase I enzymes (CYP1A2, CYP3A4, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19 or phase II enzymes (UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT1A9, UGT2B7, and SULT2A1 in cryopreserved human hepatocyte cultures. CYP1A2-catalyzed phenacetin O-deethylase and CYP3A4-catalyzed midazolam 1'-hydroxylase activities were not affected by 48-hour honokiol treatment in cryopreserved human hepatocytes. These results indicate that honokiol is a weak CYP2B6 inducer and is unlikely to increase the metabolism of concomitant CYP2B6 substrates and cause pharmacokinetic-based drug interactions in humans. Keywords: honokiol, human hepatocytes, drug interactions, cytochrome P450, UDP-glucuronosyltransferases

  11. Reduction of Oxidative Stress Attenuates Lipoapoptosis Exacerbated by Hypoxia in Human Hepatocytes

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    Sang Youn Hwang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronic intermittent hypoxia, a characteristic of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, is associated with the progression of simple hepatic steatosis to necroinflammatory hepatitis. We determined whether inhibition of a hypoxia-induced signaling pathway could attenuate hypoxia-exacerbated lipoapoptosis in human hepatocytes. The human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2 was used in this study. Palmitic acid (PA-treated groups were used for two environmental conditions: Hypoxia (1% O2 and normoxia (20% O2. Following the treatment, the cell viability was determined by the 3,4-(5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl-2-(4-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium salt (MTS assay, and the mechanism of lipoapoptosis was evaluated by Western blotting. Hypoxia exacerbated the suppression of hepatocyte growth induced by palmitic acid via activation of mitochondrial apoptotic pathways as a result of endoplasmic reticulum (ER and oxidative stresses. Ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, a scavenger of reactive oxygen species, attenuated the hypoxia-exacerbated lipoapoptosis in hepatocytes, whereas glycerol, which reduces ER stress, did not. This may have been because inhibition of oxidative stress decreases the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins, such as caspase 9 and cytochrome c. These results suggested that modulation of apoptotic signaling pathways activated by oxidative stress can aid in identifying novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH with OSA. Further in vivo studies are necessary to understand the pathophysiologic mechanism of NASH with OSA and to prove the therapeutic effect of the modulation of the signaling pathways.

  12. Activation-dependent mitochondrial translocation of Foxp3 in human hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas, Joselyn; Teran-Angel, Guillermo; Barbosa, Luisa [Instituto de Inmunología Clínica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Peterson, Darrell L. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Berrueta, Lisbeth, E-mail: lberruet@ula.ve [Instituto de Inmunología Clínica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Salmen, Siham, E-mail: sihamsa@ula.ve [Instituto de Inmunología Clínica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2016-05-01

    Foxp3 is considered to be the master regulator for the development and function of regulatory T cells (Treg). Recently Foxp3, has been detected in extra lymphoid tissue, and in hepatocytes and has been associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), although its role has not been defined. Since it is expected that there is a relationship between protein localization, activity and cellular function, the aim of this study was to explore the subcellular localization of Foxp3 in resting and stimulated human hepatocytes. Foxp3 expression was measured by flow cytometry, subcellular fractioning, and immunofluorescence, and this data was used to track the shuttling of Foxp3 in different subcellular compartments in hepatocytes (HepG2 cell line), stimulated by using the PKC activators (PMA), core and preS1/2 antigen from hepatitis B virus (HBV). Our data shows that besides the nuclear location, mitochondrial translocation was detected after stimulation with PMA and at to a lesser extent, with preS1/2. In addition, Foxp3 is localizes at outer mitochondrial membrane. These results suggest a non-canonical role of Foxp3 in the mitochondrial compartment in human hepatocytes, and opens a new field about their role in liver damages during HBV infection. - Highlights: • The expression and subcellular distribution of Foxp3, is modulated by PMA and preS1/2. • PMA and preS1/2 increase Foxp3 expression on HepG2. • PMA and preS1/2 induce foxp3 enrichment at mitochondrial, microsomal and nuclear compartments. • Results suggest a non-canonical function of Foxp3 or a mitochondrial transcriptional activity.

  13. The ERK1/2-Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4α Axis Regulates Human ABCC6 Gene Expression in Hepatocytes*

    OpenAIRE

    de Boussac, Hugues; Ratajewski, Marcin; Sachrajda, Iwona; Köblös, Gabriella; Tordai, Attila; Pulaski, Lukasz; Buday, László; Váradi, András; Arányi, Tamás

    2010-01-01

    ABCC6 mutations are responsible for the development of pseudoxanthoma elasticum, a rare recessive disease characterized by calcification of elastic fibers. Although ABCC6 is mainly expressed in the liver the disease has dermatologic, ocular, and cardiovascular symptoms. We investigated the transcriptional regulation of the gene and observed that hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) inhibits its expression in HepG2 cells via the activation of ERK1/2. Similarly, other factors activating the cascade a...

  14. Identification of early target genes of aflatoxin B1 in human hepatocytes, inter-individual variability and comparison with other genotoxic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josse, Rozenn; Dumont, Julie; Fautrel, Alain; Robin, Marie-Anne; Guillouzo, André, E-mail: andre.guillouzo@univ-rennes1.fr

    2012-01-15

    Gene expression profiling has recently emerged as a promising approach to identify early target genes and discriminate genotoxic carcinogens from non-genotoxic carcinogens and non-carcinogens. However, early gene changes induced by genotoxic compounds in human liver remain largely unknown. Primary human hepatocytes and differentiated HepaRG cells were exposed to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) that induces DNA damage following enzyme-mediated bioactivation. Gene expression profile changes induced by a 24 h exposure of these hepatocyte models to 0.05 and 0.25 μM AFB1 were analyzed by using oligonucleotide pangenomic microarrays. The main altered signaling pathway was the p53 pathway and related functions such as cell cycle, apoptosis and DNA repair. Direct involvement of the p53 protein in response to AFB1 was verified by using siRNA directed against p53. Among the 83 well-annotated genes commonly modulated in two pools of three human hepatocyte populations and HepaRG cells, several genes were identified as altered by AFB1 for the first time. In addition, a subset of 10 AFB1-altered genes, selected upon basis of their function or tumor suppressor role, was tested in four human hepatocyte populations and in response to other chemicals. Although they exhibited large variable inter-donor fold-changes, several of these genes, particularly FHIT, BCAS3 and SMYD3, were found to be altered by various direct and other indirect genotoxic compounds and unaffected by non-genotoxic compounds. Overall, this comprehensive analysis of early gene expression changes induced by AFB1 in human hepatocytes identified a gene subset that included several genes representing potential biomarkers of genotoxic compounds. -- Highlights: ► Gene expression profile changes induced by aflatoxin B1 in human hepatocytes. ► AFB1 modulates various genes including tumor suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes. ► Important inter-individual variations in the response to AFB1. ► Some genes also altered by other

  15. Differential Expression Profile of lncRNAs from Primary Human Hepatocytes Following DEET and Fipronil Exposure

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    Robert D. Mitchell III

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available While the synthesis and use of new chemical compounds is at an all-time high, the study of their potential impact on human health is quickly falling behind, and new methods are needed to assess their impact. We chose to examine the effects of two common environmental chemicals, the insect repellent N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET and the insecticide fluocyanobenpyrazole (fipronil, on transcript levels of long non-protein coding RNAs (lncRNAs in primary human hepatocytes using a global RNA-Seq approach. While lncRNAs are believed to play a critical role in numerous important biological processes, many still remain uncharacterized, and their functions and modes of action remain largely unclear, especially in relation to environmental chemicals. RNA-Seq showed that 100 µM DEET significantly increased transcript levels for 2 lncRNAs and lowered transcript levels for 18 lncRNAs, while fipronil at 10 µM increased transcript levels for 76 lncRNAs and decreased levels for 193 lncRNAs. A mixture of 100 µM DEET and 10 µM fipronil increased transcript levels for 75 lncRNAs and lowered transcript levels for 258 lncRNAs. This indicates a more-than-additive effect on lncRNA transcript expression when the two chemicals were presented in combination versus each chemical alone. Differentially expressed lncRNA genes were mapped to chromosomes, analyzed by proximity to neighboring protein-coding genes, and functionally characterized via gene ontology and molecular mapping algorithms. While further testing is required to assess the organismal impact of changes in transcript levels, this initial analysis links several of the dysregulated lncRNAs to processes and pathways critical to proper cellular function, such as the innate and adaptive immune response and the p53 signaling pathway.

  16. Differential Expression Profile of lncRNAs from Primary Human Hepatocytes Following DEET and Fipronil Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell Iii, Robert D; Wallace, Andrew D; Hodgson, Ernest; Roe, R Michael

    2017-10-07

    While the synthesis and use of new chemical compounds is at an all-time high, the study of their potential impact on human health is quickly falling behind, and new methods are needed to assess their impact. We chose to examine the effects of two common environmental chemicals, the insect repellent N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET) and the insecticide fluocyanobenpyrazole (fipronil), on transcript levels of long non-protein coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in primary human hepatocytes using a global RNA-Seq approach. While lncRNAs are believed to play a critical role in numerous important biological processes, many still remain uncharacterized, and their functions and modes of action remain largely unclear, especially in relation to environmental chemicals. RNA-Seq showed that 100 µM DEET significantly increased transcript levels for 2 lncRNAs and lowered transcript levels for 18 lncRNAs, while fipronil at 10 µM increased transcript levels for 76 lncRNAs and decreased levels for 193 lncRNAs. A mixture of 100 µM DEET and 10 µM fipronil increased transcript levels for 75 lncRNAs and lowered transcript levels for 258 lncRNAs. This indicates a more-than-additive effect on lncRNA transcript expression when the two chemicals were presented in combination versus each chemical alone. Differentially expressed lncRNA genes were mapped to chromosomes, analyzed by proximity to neighboring protein-coding genes, and functionally characterized via gene ontology and molecular mapping algorithms. While further testing is required to assess the organismal impact of changes in transcript levels, this initial analysis links several of the dysregulated lncRNAs to processes and pathways critical to proper cellular function, such as the innate and adaptive immune response and the p53 signaling pathway.

  17. Arsenite Effects on Mitochondrial Bioenergetics in Human and Mouse Primary Hepatocytes Follow a Nonlinear Dose Response

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    Hemantkumar Chavan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenite is a known carcinogen and its exposure has been implicated in a variety of noncarcinogenic health concerns. Increased oxidative stress is thought to be the primary cause of arsenite toxicity and the toxic effect is thought to be linear with detrimental effects reported at all concentrations of arsenite. But the paradigm of linear dose response in arsenite toxicity is shifting. In the present study we demonstrate that arsenite effects on mitochondrial respiration in primary hepatocytes follow a nonlinear dose response. In vitro exposure of primary hepatocytes to an environmentally relevant, moderate level of arsenite results in increased oxidant production that appears to arise from changes in the expression and activity of respiratory Complex I of the mitochondrial proton circuit. In primary hepatocytes the excess oxidant production appears to elicit adaptive responses that promote resistance to oxidative stress and a propensity to increased proliferation. Taken together, these results suggest a nonlinear dose-response characteristic of arsenite with low-dose arsenite promoting adaptive responses in a process known as mitohormesis, with transient increase in ROS levels acting as transducers of arsenite-induced mitohormesis.

  18. Genetic heterogeneity among slow acetylator N-acetyltransferase 2 phenotypes in cryopreserved human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Mark A; Hein, David W

    2017-07-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in human N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) modify the metabolism of numerous drugs and carcinogens. These genetic polymorphisms modify both drug efficacy and toxicity and cancer risk associated with carcinogen exposure. Previous studies have suggested phenotypic heterogeneity among different NAT2 slow acetylator genotypes. NAT2 phenotype was investigated in vitro and in situ in samples of human hepatocytes obtained from various NAT2 slow and intermediate NAT2 acetylator genotypes. NAT2 gene dose response (NAT2*5B/*5B > NAT2*5B/*6A > NAT2*6A/*6A) was observed towards the N-acetylation of the NAT2-specific drug sulfamethazine by human hepatocytes both in vitro and in situ. N-acetylation of 4-aminobiphenyl, an arylamine carcinogen substrate for both N-acetyltransferase 1 and NAT2, showed the same trend both in vitro and in situ although the differences were not significant (p > 0.05). The N-acetylation of the N-acetyltransferase 1-specific substrate p-aminobenzoic acid did not follow this trend. In comparisons of NAT2 intermediate acetylator genotypes, differences in N-acetylation between NAT2*4/*5B and NAT2*4/*6B hepatocytes were not observed in vitro or in situ towards any of these substrates. These results further support phenotypic heterogeneity among NAT2 slow acetylator genotypes, consistent with differential risks of drug failure or toxicity and cancer associated with carcinogen exposure.

  19. Absence of oncogenic transformation despite acquisition of cytogenetic aberrations in long-term cultured telomerase-immortalized human fetal hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haker, Björn; Fuchs, Sigrid; Dierlamm, Judith; Brümmendorf, Tim H; Wege, Henning

    2007-10-18

    As a culture model to study hepatocarcinogenesis, telomerase-immortalized human fetal hepatocytes were monitored for karyotype changes evolving in long-term culture and development of functional defects in DNA damage response. G-banding revealed acquisition of characteristic karyotype abnormalities, e.g., trisomy 7 and monosomy X, in two independently immortalized and cultured populations after 80-100 population doublings. Interestingly, the detected aneuploidies resemble some of the genetic events observed in hepatocellular cancer. However, these genetic changes were not sufficient to induce oncogenic transformation reflected by absence of anchorage-independent growth. Furthermore, long-term cultured telomerase-immortalized cells preserved p53 expression levels and effective p53-mediated damage response.

  20. Activation of the Nrf2 Pathway by Inorganic Arsenic in Human Hepatocytes and the Role of Transcriptional Repressor Bach1

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    Dan Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have proved that the environmental toxicant, inorganic arsenic, activates nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 pathway in many different cell types. This study tried to explore the hepatic Nrf2 pathway upon arsenic treatment comprehensively, since liver is one of the major target organs of arsenical toxicity. Our results showed that inorganic arsenic significantly induced Nrf2 protein and mRNA expression in Chang human hepatocytes. We also observed a dose-dependent increase of antioxidant response element- (ARE- luciferase activity. Both the mRNA and protein levels of NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 were all upregulated dramatically. On the other hand, entry and accumulation of Nrf2 protein in the nucleus, while exportting the transcriptional repressor BTB and CNC homology 1 (Bach1 from nucleus to cytoplasm, were also confirmed by western blot and immunofluorescence assay. Our results therefore confirmed the arsenic-induced Nrf2 pathway activation in hepatocytes and also suggested that the translocation of Bach1 was associated with the regulation of Nrf2 pathway by arsenic. Hepatic Nrf2 pathway plays indispensable roles for cellular defenses against arsenic hepatotoxicity, and the interplay of Bach1 and Nrf2 may be helpful to understand the self-defensive responses and the diverse biological effects of arsenicals.

  1. Activation of the Nrf2 Pathway by Inorganic Arsenic in Human Hepatocytes and the Role of Transcriptional Repressor Bach1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Duan, Xiaoxu; Dong, Dandan; Bai, Caijun; Li, Xin; Sun, Guifan; Li, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have proved that the environmental toxicant, inorganic arsenic, activates nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway in many different cell types. This study tried to explore the hepatic Nrf2 pathway upon arsenic treatment comprehensively, since liver is one of the major target organs of arsenical toxicity. Our results showed that inorganic arsenic significantly induced Nrf2 protein and mRNA expression in Chang human hepatocytes. We also observed a dose-dependent increase of antioxidant response element- (ARE-) luciferase activity. Both the mRNA and protein levels of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were all upregulated dramatically. On the other hand, entry and accumulation of Nrf2 protein in the nucleus, while exportting the transcriptional repressor BTB and CNC homology 1 (Bach1) from nucleus to cytoplasm, were also confirmed by western blot and immunofluorescence assay. Our results therefore confirmed the arsenic-induced Nrf2 pathway activation in hepatocytes and also suggested that the translocation of Bach1 was associated with the regulation of Nrf2 pathway by arsenic. Hepatic Nrf2 pathway plays indispensable roles for cellular defenses against arsenic hepatotoxicity, and the interplay of Bach1 and Nrf2 may be helpful to understand the self-defensive responses and the diverse biological effects of arsenicals. PMID:23738048

  2. Metabolism of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) to 2-oxo-3-hydroxy LSD (O-H-LSD) in human liver microsomes and cryopreserved human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klette, K L; Anderson, C J; Poch, G K; Nimrod, A C; ElSohly, M A

    2000-10-01

    The metabolism of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) to 2-oxo-3-hydroxy lysergic acid diethylamide (O-H-LSD) was investigated in liver microsomes and cyropreserved hepatocytes from humans. Previous studies have demonstrated that O-H-LSD is present in human urine at concentrations 16-43 times greater than LSD, the parent compound. Additionally, these studies have determined that O-H-LSD is not generated during the specimen extraction and analytical processes or due to parent compound degradation in aqueous urine samples. However, these studies have not been conclusive in demonstrating that O-H-LSD is uniquely produced during in vivo metabolism. Phase I drug metabolism was investigated by incubating human liver microsomes and cryopreserved human hepatocytes with LSD. The reaction was quenched at various time points, and the aliquots were extracted using liquid partitioning and analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. O-H-LSD was positively identified in all human liver microsomal and human hepatocyte fractions incubated with LSD. In addition, O-H-LSD was not detected in any microsomal or hepatocyte fraction not treated with LSD nor in LSD specimens devoid of microsomes or hepatocytes. This study provides definitive evidence that O-H-LSD is produced as a metabolic product following incubation of human liver microsomes and hepatocytes with LSD.

  3. Enhanced metabolic function of human hepatocytes cryopreserved with low concentration me2so and polyol additives at -80C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, B; Liu, B L; Zhou, X L; Shen, L; Huang, D H

    2013-01-01

    The metabolic function of cryopreserved cells, in addition to cell viability after thawing, is an important parameter in any successful cryopreservation protocol. Dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO) is known to affect the differentiation of recovered cells. In this study, we report that sugars and sugar alcohols increases cell recovery, and also improves the metabolic function of human hepatocytes that are cryopreserved using low concentration Me2SO (5%). Three sugars (glucose, sucrose, and trehalose) and three sugar alcohols (xylitol, maltol, and sorbitol) have been tested. Cell viability after thaw and 24-h post-thaw attachment rate of cryopreserved human hepatocytes were assessed. Post-thaw metabolic activities (albumin, glucose, urea content) were measured, and cell proliferation was observed with inverted microscope. Cell viability, post-thaw attachment rate and metabolic activity of cryopreserved hepatocytes are enhanced by the addition of 0.4M sorbitol into 5% Me2SO solution. The study concludes that 5% Me2SO + 0.4M sorbitol can replace the 10% Me2SO method for cryopreservation of human hepatocytes at -80C freezer. The new solution may reduce the side effects on the patients and improve the safety of using cryopreserved hepatocytes.

  4. Mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced cell death in primary human hepatocytes

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    Xie, Yuchao; McGill, Mitchell R.; Dorko, Kenneth [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Forster, Jameson [Department of Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most prevalent cause of drug-induced liver injury in western countries. Numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of injury after APAP overdose in various animal models; however, the importance of these mechanisms for humans remains unclear. Here we investigated APAP hepatotoxicity using freshly isolated primary human hepatocytes (PHH) from either donor livers or liver resections. PHH were exposed to 5 mM, 10 mM or 20 mM APAP over a period of 48 h and multiple parameters were assessed. APAP dose-dependently induced significant hepatocyte necrosis starting from 24 h, which correlated with the clinical onset of human liver injury after APAP overdose. Interestingly, cellular glutathione was depleted rapidly during the first 3 h. APAP also resulted in early formation of APAP-protein adducts (measured in whole cell lysate and in mitochondria) and mitochondrial dysfunction, indicated by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential after 12 h. Furthermore, APAP time-dependently triggered c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in the cytosol and translocation of phospho-JNK to the mitochondria. Both co-treatment and post-treatment (3 h) with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 reduced JNK activation and significantly attenuated cell death at 24 h and 48 h after APAP. The clinical antidote N-acetylcysteine offered almost complete protection even if administered 6 h after APAP and a partial protection when given at 15 h. Conclusion: These data highlight important mechanistic events in APAP toxicity in PHH and indicate a critical role of JNK in the progression of injury after APAP in humans. The JNK pathway may represent a therapeutic target in the clinic. - Highlights: • APAP reproducibly causes cell death in freshly isolated primary human hepatocytes. • APAP induces adduct formation, JNK activation and mitochondrial dysfunction in PHH. • Mitochondrial adducts and JNK translocation are delayed in PHH compared to

  5. Amelioration of Hyperbilirubinemia in Gunn Rats after Transplantation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocytes

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    Yong Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocyte transplantation has the potential to cure inherited liver diseases, but its application is impeded by a scarcity of donor livers. Therefore, we explored whether transplantation of hepatocyte-like cells (iHeps differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs could ameliorate inherited liver diseases. iPSCs reprogrammed from human skin fibroblasts were differentiated to iHeps, which were transplanted into livers of uridinediphosphoglucuronate glucuronosyltransferase-1 (UGT1A1-deficient Gunn rats, a model of Crigler-Najjar syndrome 1 (CN1, where elevated unconjugated bilirubin causes brain injury and death. To promote iHep proliferation, 30% of the recipient liver was X-irradiated before transplantation, and hepatocyte growth factor was expressed. After transplantation, UGT1A1+ iHep clusters constituted 2.5%–7.5% of the preconditioned liver lobe. A decline of serum bilirubin by 30%–60% and biliary excretion of bilirubin glucuronides indicated that transplanted iHeps expressed UGT1A1 activity, a postnatal function of hepatocytes. Therefore, iHeps warrant further exploration as a renewable source of hepatocytes for treating inherited liver diseases.

  6. Three-dimensional culture and cAMP signaling promote the maturation of human pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes

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    Ogawa, Shinichiro; Surapisitchat, James; Virtanen, Carl; Ogawa, Mina; Niapour, Maryam; Sugamori, Kim S.; Wang, Shuang; Tamblyn, Laura; Guillemette, Chantal; Hoffmann, Ewa; Zhao, Bin; Strom, Stephen; Laposa, Rebecca R.; Tyndale, Rachel F.; Grant, Denis M.; Keller, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) represent a novel source of hepatocytes for drug metabolism studies and cell-based therapy for the treatment of liver diseases. These applications are, however, dependent on the ability to generate mature metabolically functional cells from the hPSCs. Reproducible and efficient generation of such cells has been challenging to date, owing to the fact that the regulatory pathways that control hepatocyte maturation are poorly understood. Here, we show that the combination of three-dimensional cell aggregation and cAMP signaling enhance the maturation of hPSC-derived hepatoblasts to a hepatocyte-like population that displays expression profiles and metabolic enzyme levels comparable to those of primary human hepatocytes. Importantly, we also demonstrate that generation of the hepatoblast population capable of responding to cAMP is dependent on appropriate activin/nodal signaling in the definitive endoderm at early stages of differentiation. Together, these findings provide new insights into the pathways that regulate maturation of hPSC-derived hepatocytes and in doing so provide a simple and reproducible approach for generating metabolically functional cell populations. PMID:23861064

  7. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes for toxicology testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, David A

    2015-01-01

    The need for more predictive in vitro toxicity models is a critical deficit in current preclinical pipeline safety evaluations. Current models employing tumor-derived cancer cell lines and isolated primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) afford an approximation of overt cytotoxicity but do not provide hepatotoxicity prediction owing to liabilities in metabolic activity along with phenotypic variability and instability in culture. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes (iPSC-HCs) offer a long-term solution to accessing liver tissue from representative diverse as well as idiosyncratic patient populations and can be sourced indefinitely. iPSC-HCs are currently being evaluated as potential replacements for the existing cell models, but they have yet to prove superiority. It is acknowledged that iPSC-HCs are not functionally equivalent to PHHs and are somewhat mixed in terms of their gene expression profile, simultaneously displaying mature and immature markers in vitro. Combining iPSC-HCs with organotypic culture systems affords an opportunity to maximize the potential of both technologies where the cells benefit from more complex culture conditions while unlocking the potential of the culture systems by affording stability and reproducibility to provide the future of predictive in vitro toxicity models.

  8. Metabolism of oxycodone in human hepatocytes from different age groups and prediction of hepatic plasma clearance

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    Timo eKorjamo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxycodone is commonly used to treat severe pain in adults and children. It is extensively metabolized in the liver in adults, but the maturation of metabolism is not well understood. Our aim was to study the metabolism of oxycodone in cryopreserved human hepatocytes from different age groups (3 days, 2 and 5 months, 4 years, adult pool and predict hepatic plasma clearance of oxycodone using these data. Oxycodone (0.1, 1 and 10 µM was incubated with hepatocytes for 4 hours, and 1 µM oxycodone also with CYP3A inhibitor ketoconazole (1 µM. Oxycodone and noroxycodone concentrations were determined at several time points with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. In vitro clearance of oxycodone was used to predict hepatic plasma clearance, using the well-stirred model and published physiological parameters. Noroxycodone was the major metabolite in all batches and ketoconazole inhibited the metabolism markedly in most cases. A clear correlation between in vitro oxycodone clearance and CYP3A4 activity was observed. The predicted hepatic plasma clearances were typically much lower than the published median total plasma clearance from pharmacokinetic studies. In general, this in vitro to in vivo extrapolation method provides valuable information on the maturation of oxycodone metabolism that can be utilized in the design of clinical pharmacokinetic studies in infants and young children.

  9. Formation of Δ(1) and Δ(6) testosterone metabolites by human hepatocytes.

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    Fabregat, Andreu; Marcos, Josep; Ventura, Rosa; Casals, Gregori; Jimenez, Wladimiro; Reichenbach, Vedrana; Segura, Jordi; Pozo, Oscar J

    2015-03-01

    The existence of urinary testosterone (T) metabolites conjugated with cysteine has been recently reported. The formation of a ring double bond by a phase I metabolic transformation and the subsequent nucleophilic conjugation with glutathione was proposed as a putative metabolic pathway for the occurrence of these metabolites in urine. The main goal of the present study was to confirm the first step of the postulated pathway. For that purpose, human hepatocyte cells systems were incubated with a pure T standard. The cell culture supernatants were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry using a selected reaction monitoring method. Major T metabolites such as androsterone and 4-androstene-3,17-dione, together with the recently reported Δ(1) and Δ(6) metabolites were simultaneously quantified. The formation of 1,4-androstadien-3,17-dione, 4,6-androstadien-3,17-dione, 17β-hydroxy-4,6-androstadien-3-one and 17β-hydroxy-1,4-androstadien-3-one (boldenone) after incubation of T in hepatocyte cell cultures was demonstrated by comparing the retention times and the ion ratios of the metabolites with those obtained by analysis of commercial standards. Thus, the formation of double bonds Δ(1) and Δ(6) by hepatic phase I metabolism of T was confirmed. Analogously to T, this pathway might also be present in other steroids, opening the possibility of targeting additional biomarkers. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Porphyromonas gingivalis attenuates the insulin-induced phosphorylation and translocation of forkhead box protein O1 in human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, Haruna; Yoshida, Kaya; Okamura, Hirohiko; Fujiwara, Natsumi; Ozaki, Kazumi

    2016-09-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) is a pathogen involved in periodontal disease. Recently, periodontal disease has been demonstrated to increase the risk of developing diabetes mellitus, although the molecular mechanism is not fully understood. Forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1) is a transcriptional factor that regulates gluconeogenesis in the liver. Gluconeogenesis is a key process in the induction of diabetes mellitus; however, little is known regarding the relationship between periodontal disease and gluconeogenesis. In this study, to investigate whether periodontal disease influences hepatic gluconeogenesis, we examined the effects of P. gingivalis on the phosphorylation and translocation of FoxO1 in insulin-induced human hepatocytes. The human hepatocyte HepG2 was treated with insulin and Akt and FoxO1 phosphorylation was detected by western blot analysis. The localization of phosphorylated FoxO1 was detected by immunocytochemistry and western blot analysis. HepG2 cells were treated with SNAP26b-tagged P. gingivalis (SNAP-P.g.) before insulin stimulation, and then the changes in Akt and FoxO1 were determined by western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. Insulin (100nM) induced FoxO1 phosphorylation 60min after treatment in HepG2 cells. Phosphorylated FoxO1 translocated to the cytoplasm. SNAP-P.g. internalized into HepG2 cells and decreased Akt and FoxO1 phosphorylation induced by insulin. The effect of insulin on FoxO1 translocation was also attenuated by SNAP-P.g. Our study shows that P. gingivalis decreases the phosphorylation and translocation of FoxO induced by insulin in HepG2 cells. Our results suggest that periodontal disease may increase hepatic gluconeogenesis by reducing the effects of insulin on FoxO1. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Adenoviral-mediated correction of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase deficiency in murine fibroblasts and human hepatocytes

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    Korson Mark

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methylmalonic acidemia (MMA, a common organic aciduria, is caused by deficiency of the mitochondrial localized, 5'deoxyadenosylcobalamin dependent enzyme, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MUT. Liver transplantation in the absence of gross hepatic dysfunction provides supportive therapy and metabolic stability in severely affected patients, which invites the concept of using cell and gene delivery as future treatments for this condition. Methods To assess the effectiveness of gene delivery to restore the defective metabolism in this disorder, adenoviral correction experiments were performed using murine Mut embryonic fibroblasts and primary human methylmalonyl-CoA mutase deficient hepatocytes derived from a patient who harbored two early truncating mutations, E224X and R228X, in the MUT gene. Enzymatic and expression studies were used to assess the extent of functional correction. Results Primary hepatocytes, isolated from the native liver after removal subsequent to a combined liver-kidney transplantation procedure, or Mut murine fibroblasts were infected with a second generation recombinant adenoviral vector that expressed the murine methylmalonyl-CoA mutase as well as eGFP from distinct promoters. After transduction, [1-14C] propionate macromolecular incorporation studies and Western analysis demonstrated complete correction of the enzymatic defect in both cell types. Viral reconstitution of enzymatic expression in the human methylmalonyl-CoA mutase deficient hepatocytes exceeded that seen in fibroblasts or control hepatocytes. Conclusion These experiments provide proof of principle for viral correction in methylmalonic acidemia and suggest that hepatocyte-directed gene delivery will be an effective therapeutic treatment strategy in both murine models and in human patients. Primary hepatocytes from a liver that was unsuitable for transplantation provided an important resource for these studies.

  12. Selective insulin resistance in hepatocyte senescence

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    Aravinthan, Aloysious [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Challis, Benjamin [Institute of Metabolic Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Shannon, Nicholas [Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hoare, Matthew [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Heaney, Judith [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Foundation for Liver Research, Institute of Hepatology, London (United Kingdom); Alexander, Graeme J.M., E-mail: gja1000@doctors.org.uk [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-01

    Insulin resistance has been described in association with chronic liver disease for decades. Hepatocyte senescence has been demonstrated in chronic liver disease and as many as 80% of hepatocytes show a senescent phenotype in advanced liver disease. The aim of this study was to understand the role of hepatocyte senescence in the development of insulin resistance. Senescence was induced in HepG2 cells via oxidative stress. The insulin metabolic pathway was studied in control and senescent cells following insulin stimulation. GLUT2 and GLUT4 expressions were studied in HepG2 cells and human liver tissue. Further, GLUT2 and GLUT4 expressions were studied in three independent chronic liver disease cohorts. Signalling impairment distal to Akt in phosphorylation of AS160 and FoxO1 was evident in senescent HepG2 cells. Persistent nuclear localisation of FoxO1 was demonstrated in senescent cells despite insulin stimulation. Increased GLUT4 and decreased GLUT2 expressions were evident in senescent cells, human cirrhotic liver tissue and publically available liver disease datasets. Changes in GLUT expressions were associated with a poor clinical prognosis. In conclusion, selective insulin resistance is evident in senescent HepG2 cells and changes in GLUT expressions can be used as surrogate markers of hepatocyte senescence. - Highlights: • Senescent hepatocytes demonstrate selective insulin resistance. • GLUT changes act as markers of hepatocyte senescence and have prognostic value. • Study offers insight into long noticed intimacy of cirrhosis and insulin resistance.

  13. Sex differences in liver toxicity-do female and male human primary hepatocytes react differently to toxicants in vitro?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Mennecozzi

    Full Text Available There is increasing amount of evidence for sex variation in drug efficiency and toxicity profiles. Women are more susceptible than men to acute liver injury from xenobiotics. In general, this is attributed to sex differences at a physiological level as well as differences in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, but neither of these can give a sufficient explanation for the diverse responses to xenobiotics. Existing data are mainly based on animal models and limited data exist on in vitro sex differences relevant to humans. To date, male and female human hepatocytes have not yet been compared in terms of their responses to hepatotoxic drugs. We investigated whether sex-specific differences in acute hepatotoxicity can be observed in vitro by comparing hepatotoxic drug effects in male and female primary human hepatocytes. Significant sex-related differences were found for certain parameters and individual drugs, showing an overall higher sensitivity of female primary hepatocytes to hepatotoxicants. Moreover, our work demonstrated that high content screening is feasible with pooled primary human hepatocytes in suspension.

  14. DIFFERENCES IN PROPIONATE-INDUCED INHIBITION OF CHOLESTEROL AND TRIACYLGLYCEROL SYNTHESIS BETWEEN HUMAN AND RAT HEPATOCYTES IN PRIMARY CULTURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LIN, YG; VONK, RJ; SLOOFF, MJH; KUIPERS, F; SMIT, MJ

    Propionate is a short-chain fatty acid formed in the colon and supposedly involved in the cholesterol-lowering effect of soluble fibre. To explore the underlying mechanism(s) of this fibre action, we have used human hepatocytes in primary culture to study the effects of propionate on hepatic lipid

  15. Hepatocyte and keratinocyte growth factors and their receptors in human lung emphysema

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    Marchal Joëlle

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatocyte and keratinocyte growth factors are key growth factors in the process of alveolar repair. We hypothesized that excessive alveolar destruction observed in lung emphysema involves impaired expression of hepatocyte and keratinocyte growth factors or their respective receptors, c-met and keratinocyte growth factor receptor. The aim of our study was to compare the expression of hepatocyte and keratinocyte growth factors and their receptors in lung samples from 3 groups of patients: emphysema; smokers without emphysema and non-smokers without emphysema. Methods Hepatocyte and keratinocyte growth factor proteins were analysed by immunoassay and western blot; mRNA expression was measured by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results Hepatocyte and keratinocyte growth factors, c-met and keratinocyte growth factor receptor mRNA levels were similar in emphysema and non-emphysema patients. Hepatocyte growth factor mRNA correlated negatively with FEV1 and the FEV1/FVC ratio both in emphysema patients and in smokers with or without emphysema. Hepatocyte and keratinocyte growth factor protein concentrations were similar in all patients' groups. Conclusion The expression of hepatocyte and keratinocyte growth factors and their receptors is preserved in patients with lung emphysema as compared to patients without emphysema. Hepatocyte growth factor mRNA correlates with the severity of airflow obstruction in smokers.

  16. Targeting Nuclear Receptors with Lentivirus-Delivered Small RNAs in Primary Human Hepatocytes

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    Maria Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: RNA interference (RNAi has tremendous potential for investigating gene function and for developing new therapies. Primary human hepatocytes (PHH are the “gold standard” for studying the regulation of hepatic metabolism in vitro. However, application of RNAi in PHH has some technical hurdles. The objective of this study was to develop effective and robust protocol for transduction of PHH with lentiviral vectors. Methods: We used lentiviral vectors to transduce PHH for introduction of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs targeting constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα, and microRNA, miR-143. Infection efficiency was quantitatively analyzed by flow cytometry and microscopy. Target gene expression was assessed using quantitative real-time (qRT-PCR method. Results: Lentiviral vector transduction resulted in ≥95% of infected cells at low multiplicity of infection (MOI of 3, which did not impair cellular viability. We demonstrated the feasibility of this technique in studies on targeting nuclear receptors, PPARα and CAR, with shRNAs as well as in lentivirus-mediated overexpression and knock-down of miRNA-143 experiments. Conclusions: We developed an efficient and robust protocol with standardized procedures for virus production, method of titer determination, and infection procedure for RNAi in primary human hepatocytes based on delivery of shRNAs, microRNAs or anti-microRNAs in different laboratory settings. This approach should be useful to study not only the regulation via nuclear receptors but also other biological, pharmacological, and toxicological aspects of drug metabolism.

  17. A pump-free microfluidic 3D perfusion platform for the efficient differentiation of human hepatocyte-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Louis Jun Ye; Chong, Lor Huai; Jin, Lin; Singh, Pawan Kumar; Lee, Poh Seng; Yu, Hanry; Ananthanarayanan, Abhishek; Leo, Hwa Liang; Toh, Yi-Chin

    2017-10-01

    The practical application of microfluidic liver models for in vitro drug testing is partly hampered by their reliance on human primary hepatocytes, which are limited in number and have batch-to-batch variation. Human stem cell-derived hepatocytes offer an attractive alternative cell source, although their 3D differentiation and maturation in a microfluidic platform have not yet been demonstrated. We develop a pump-free microfluidic 3D perfusion platform to achieve long-term and efficient differentiation of human liver progenitor cells into hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). The device contains a micropillar array to immobilize cells three-dimensionally in a central cell culture compartment flanked by two side perfusion channels. Constant pump-free medium perfusion is accomplished by controlling the differential heights of horizontally orientated inlet and outlet media reservoirs. Computational fluid dynamic simulation is used to estimate the hydrostatic pressure heads required to achieve different perfusion flow rates, which are experimentally validated by micro-particle image velocimetry, as well as viability and functional assessments in a primary rat hepatocyte model. We perform on-chip differentiation of HepaRG, a human bipotent progenitor cell, and discover that 3D microperfusion greatly enhances the hepatocyte differentiation efficiency over static 2D and 3D cultures. However, HepaRG progenitor cells are highly sensitive to the time-point at which microperfusion is applied. Isolated HepaRG cells that are primed as static 3D spheroids before being subjected to microperfusion yield a significantly higher proportion of HLCs (92%) than direct microperfusion of isolated HepaRG cells (62%). This platform potentially offers a simple and efficient means to develop highly functional microfluidic liver models incorporating human stem cell-derived HLCs. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 2360-2370. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Measurement of Blood Coagulation Factor Synthesis in Cultures of Human Hepatocytes.

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    Heinz, Stefan; Braspenning, Joris

    2015-01-01

    An important function of the liver is the synthesis and secretion of blood coagulation factors. Within the liver, hepatocytes are involved in the synthesis of most blood coagulation factors, such as fibrinogen, prothrombin, factor V, VII, IX, X, XI, XII, as well as protein C and S, and antithrombin, whereas liver sinusoidal endothelial cells produce factor VIII and von Willebrand factor. Here, we describe methods for the detection and quantification of most blood coagulation factors in hepatocytes in vitro. Hepatocyte cultures indeed provide a valuable tool to study blood coagulation factors. In addition, the generation and expansion of hepatocytes or hepatocyte-like cells may be used in future for cell-based therapies of liver diseases, including blood coagulation factor deficiencies.

  19. Activation of CD40 with platelet derived CD154 promotes reactive oxygen species dependent death of human hepatocytes during hypoxia and reoxygenation.

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    Ricky H Bhogal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypoxia and hypoxia-reoxygenation (H-R are pathogenic factors in many liver diseases that lead to hepatocyte death as a result of reactive oxygen species (ROS accumulation. The tumor necrosis factor super-family member CD154 can also induce hepatocyte apoptosis via activation of its receptor CD40 and induction of autocrine/paracrine Fas Ligand/CD178 but the relationship between CD40 activation, ROS generation and apoptosis is poorly understood. We hypothesised that CD40 activation and ROS accumulation act synergistically to drive human hepatocyte apoptosis. METHODS: Human hepatocytes were isolated from liver tissue and exposed to an in vitro model of hypoxia and H-R in the presence or absence of CD154 and/or various inhibitors. Hepatocyte ROS production, apoptosis and necrosis were determined by labelling cells with 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin, Annexin-V and 7-AAD respectively in a three-colour reporter flow cytometry assay. RESULTS: Exposure of human hepatocytes to recombinant CD154 or platelet-derived soluble CD154 augments ROS accumulation during H-R resulting in NADPH oxidase-dependent apoptosis and necrosis. The inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal Kinase and p38 attenuated CD154-mediated apoptosis but not necrosis. CONCLUSIONS: CD154-mediated apoptosis of hepatocytes involves ROS generation that is amplified during hypoxia-reoxygenation. This finding provides a molecular mechanism to explain the role of platelets in hepatocyte death during ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  20. Activation of CD40 with platelet derived CD154 promotes reactive oxygen species dependent death of human hepatocytes during hypoxia and reoxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhogal, Ricky H; Weston, Christopher J; Curbishley, Stuart M; Adams, David H; Afford, Simon C

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia and hypoxia-reoxygenation (H-R) are pathogenic factors in many liver diseases that lead to hepatocyte death as a result of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. The tumor necrosis factor super-family member CD154 can also induce hepatocyte apoptosis via activation of its receptor CD40 and induction of autocrine/paracrine Fas Ligand/CD178 but the relationship between CD40 activation, ROS generation and apoptosis is poorly understood. We hypothesised that CD40 activation and ROS accumulation act synergistically to drive human hepatocyte apoptosis. Human hepatocytes were isolated from liver tissue and exposed to an in vitro model of hypoxia and H-R in the presence or absence of CD154 and/or various inhibitors. Hepatocyte ROS production, apoptosis and necrosis were determined by labelling cells with 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin, Annexin-V and 7-AAD respectively in a three-colour reporter flow cytometry assay. Exposure of human hepatocytes to recombinant CD154 or platelet-derived soluble CD154 augments ROS accumulation during H-R resulting in NADPH oxidase-dependent apoptosis and necrosis. The inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal Kinase and p38 attenuated CD154-mediated apoptosis but not necrosis. CD154-mediated apoptosis of hepatocytes involves ROS generation that is amplified during hypoxia-reoxygenation. This finding provides a molecular mechanism to explain the role of platelets in hepatocyte death during ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  1. High glucose augments angiotensinogen in human renal proximal tubular cells through hepatocyte nuclear factor-5.

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    Juan Wang

    Full Text Available High glucose has been demonstrated to induce angiotensinogen (AGT synthesis in the renal proximal tubular cells (RPTCs of rats, which may further activate the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS and contribute to diabetic nephropathy. This study aimed to investigate the effects of high glucose on AGT in the RPTCs of human origin and identify the glucose-responsive transcriptional factor(s that bind(s to the DNA sequences of AGT promoter in human RPTCs. Human kidney (HK-2 cells were treated with normal glucose (5.5 mM and high glucose (15.0 mM, respectively. Levels of AGT mRNA and AGT secretion of HK-2 cells were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, respectively. Consecutive 5'-end deletion mutant constructs and different site-directed mutagenesis products of human AGT promoter sequences were respectively transfected into HK-2 cells, followed by AGT promoter activity measurement through dual luciferase assay. High glucose significantly augmented the levels of AGT mRNA and AGT secretion of HK-2 cells, compared with normal glucose treatment. High glucose also significantly augmented AGT promoter activity in HK-2 cells transfected with the constructs of human AGT promoter sequences, compared with normal glucose treatment. Hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF-5 was found to be one of the glucose-responsive transcriptional factors of AGT in human RPTCs, since the mutation of its binding sites within AGT promoter sequences abolished the above effects of high glucose on AGT promoter activity as well as levels of AGT mRNA and its secretion. The present study has demonstrated, for the first time, that high glucose augments AGT in human RPTCs through HNF-5, which provides a potential therapeutic target for diabetic nephropathy.

  2. Intracellular changes in rat hepatocytes after intratracheal administration of highly dispersed silicon dioxide and uridine effects on these changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebkova, N P; Baranov, V I

    2006-05-01

    Rat hepatocytes were examined under electron microscope at early terms after intratracheal administration of highly dispersed silicon dioxide powder against the background of uridine treatment. Penetration of powder particles into hepatocyte cytoplasm, nuclei, mitochondria, and peroxisomes and development of bacteria in these cells were observed. Uridine reduced the destructive effect of powder on the organelles, increased glycogen content in hepatocytes, and inhibited the formation of capsulated bacterial forms in these cells.

  3. Histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid promotes the differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells.

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    Yuki Kondo

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to elucidate the effects and mechanism of action of valproic acid on hepatic differentiation from human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatic progenitor cells. Human induced pluripotent stem cells were differentiated into endodermal cells in the presence of activin A and then into hepatic progenitor cells using dimethyl sulfoxide. Hepatic progenitor cells were matured in the presence of hepatocyte growth factor, oncostatin M, and dexamethasone with valproic acid that was added during the maturation process. After 25 days of differentiation, cells expressed hepatic marker genes and drug-metabolizing enzymes and exhibited drug-metabolizing enzyme activities. These expression levels and activities were increased by treatment with valproic acid, the timing and duration of which were important parameters to promote differentiation from human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatic progenitor cells into hepatocytes. Valproic acid inhibited histone deacetylase activity during differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells, and other histone deacetylase inhibitors also enhanced differentiation into hepatocytes. In conclusion, histone deacetylase inhibitors such as valproic acid can be used to promote hepatic differentiation from human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatic progenitor cells.

  4. Protective role of Urtica dioica L. (Urticaceae) extract on hepatocytes morphometric changes in STZ diabetic Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golalipour, Mohammad Jafar; Ghafari, Soraya; Afshar, Mohammad

    2010-09-01

    The present investigation was carried out to evaluate the protective effect of the hydroalcoholic extract of Urtica dioica leaves on the quantitative morphometric changes in the liver of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Thirty male Wistar rats were divided into control (G1), diabetic (G2), diabetic + Urtica dioica (G3) groups. The control group received only sham injections of intraperitoneal saline; the diabetic group received intraperitoneal saline for 5 days followed by streptozotocin (80 mg/kg) on the 6th day; and the diabetic + Urtica dioica group received 100 mg/kg Urtica dioica intraperitoneal (7) injections for 5 days and streptozotocin injection on the 6th day. After five weeks, the animals were sacrificed and whole livers removed. Liver specimens were used for quantitative morphometric analysis after hematoxylin and eosin staining. All data were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA and expressed as the mean with standard error of means. In the G3 (diabetic + Urtica diocia) group, the mean surface area of hepatocytes in the periportal zone (Z1) was greater than in G2 (diabetic) and G1 (control) groups, but this difference was not significant. No alteration was observed in the surface area of hepatocytes in the perivenous zone (Z3) in the diabetic + Urtica dioica (G3) group compared to the diabetic (G2) group. The mean nuclear area of hepatocytes of the rats in the diabetic + Urtica dioica (G3) group was higher in Z1 and lower in Z3 than that of rats in the diabetic (G2) group. The mean diameter of hepatocyte nuclei in the diabetic + Urtica dioica (G3) group was lower than that of diabetic (G2) and control (G1) groups in both Z1 and Z3. This study revealed that the administration of extract of Urtica dioica leaves before induction of diabetic with streptozotocin has a protective effect on the morphometric alterations of hepatocytes in the periportal and perivenous zones of the liver lobule in rats.

  5. Metabolism of the synthetic cannabinoid 5F-PY-PICA by human and rat hepatocytes and identification of biliary analytical targets by directional efflux in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes using UHPLC-HR-MS/MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardal, Marie; Annaert, Pieter; Noble, Carolina

    2018-01-01

    Analytical strategies for detecting drugs in biological samples rely on information on metabolism and elimination. 5F-PY-PICA belongs to the group of synthetic cannabinoids that are known to undergo excretion into the bile. The aims of this study were the in vitro identification of metabolites of 5......F-PY-PICA and to determine which analytical targets are excreted into the bile and urine. Metabolites identified after incubation of 5F-PY-PICA with pooled human liver microsomes (pHLM), pooled human hepatocytes (pHH), or suspended and sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes (SCRH). Rat hepatocytes were...... harvested following a two-step perfusion protocol and the SCRH were prepared between layers of rat-tail collagen. The biliary efflux of 5F-PY-PICA and its metabolites was determined in three-day–cultured SCRH by differential efflux into either standard buffer from intact bile canaliculi or standard buffer...

  6. Measuring Changes in Cytosolic Calcium Levels in HBV- and HBx-Expressing Cultured Primary Hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciano, Jessica C; Bouchard, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) remains a major worldwide health concern and is the leading cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The HBV X protein (HBx) is the only regulatory protein encoded in the HBV genome; HBx stimulates HBV replication in vivo and in vitro. HBx also regulates cytosolic Ca(2+) signaling, and altered Ca(2+) signaling is associated with the development of many diseases, including HCC. Importantly, many HBx functions, including HBx modulation of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and transcription pathways, have been linked to changes in cytosolic Ca(2+) signaling. Additionally, several stages of HBV replication, including capsid formation and activation of the HBV polymerase, are dependent on intracellular Ca(2+). Consequently, defining the molecular mechanism that underlies HBV and HBx modulation of cytosolic Ca(2+) levels is important for understanding HBV pathogenesis and the role of HBx in HBV replication. Here, we describe a single-cell Ca(2+)-imaging protocol that we use to investigate HBV and HBx effects on the level of cytosolic Ca(2+). We specifically outline two methods that we use to evaluate HBV and HBx regulation of cytosolic Ca(2+) levels in cultured primary hepatocytes. This protocol can also be adapted for use in liver cell lines.

  7. A New Approach in Applying Systems Engineering Tools and Analysis to Determine Hepatocyte Toxicogenomics Risk Levels to Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigrich, James; Sarkani, Shahryar; Holzer, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    There is an increasing backlog of potentially toxic compounds that cannot be evaluated with current animal-based approaches in a cost-effective and expeditious manner, thus putting human health at risk. Extrapolation of animal-based test results for human risk assessment often leads to different physiological outcomes. This article introduces the use of quantitative tools and methods from systems engineering to evaluate the risk of toxic compounds by the analysis of the amount of stress that human hepatocytes undergo in vitro when metabolizing GW7647 1 over extended times and concentrations. Hepatocytes are exceedingly connected systems that make it challenging to understand the highly varied dimensional genomics data to determine risk of exposure. Gene expression data of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) 2 binding was measured over multiple concentrations and varied times of GW7647 exposure and leveraging mahalanombis distance to establish toxicity threshold risk levels. The application of these novel systems engineering tools provides new insight into the intricate workings of human hepatocytes to determine risk threshold levels from exposure. This approach is beneficial to decision makers and scientists, and it can help reduce the backlog of untested chemical compounds due to the high cost and inefficiency of animal-based models.

  8. Stem Cells from Cryopreserved Human Dental Pulp Tissues Sequentially Differentiate into Definitive Endoderm and Hepatocyte-Like Cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Young-Jin; Kang, Young-Hoon; Shivakumar, Sarath Belame; Bharti, Dinesh; Son, Young-Bum; Choi, Yong-Ho; Park, Won-Uk; Byun, June-Ho; Rho, Gyu-Jin; Park, Bong-Wook

    2017-01-01

    We previously described a novel tissue cryopreservation protocol to enable the safe preservation of various autologous stem cell sources. The present study characterized the stem cells derived from long-term cryopreserved dental pulp tissues (hDPSCs-cryo) and analyzed their differentiation into definitive endoderm (DE) and hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) in vitro. Human dental pulp tissues from extracted wisdom teeth were cryopreserved as per a slow freezing tissue cryopreservation protocol for at least a year. Characteristics of hDPSCs-cryo were compared to those of stem cells from fresh dental pulps (hDPSCs-fresh). hDPSCs-cryo were differentiated into DE cells in vitro with Activin A as per the Wnt3a protocol for 6 days. These cells were further differentiated into HLCs in the presence of growth factors until day 30. hDPSCs-fresh and hDPSCs-cryo displayed similar cell growth morphology, cell proliferation rates, and mesenchymal stem cell character. During differentiation into DE and HLCs in vitro, the cells flattened and became polygonal in shape, and finally adopted a hepatocyte-like shape. The differentiated DE cells at day 6 and HLCs at day 30 displayed significantly increased DE- and hepatocyte-specific markers at the mRNA and protein level, respectively. In addition, the differentiated HLCs showed detoxification and glycogen storage capacities, indicating they could share multiple functions with real hepatocytes. These data conclusively show that hPDSCs-cryo derived from long-term cryopreserved dental pulp tissues can be successfully differentiated into DE and functional hepatocytes in vitro. Thus, preservation of dental tissues could provide a valuable source of autologous stem cells for tissue engineering. PMID:29200956

  9. Stem Cells from Cryopreserved Human Dental Pulp Tissues Sequentially Differentiate into Definitive Endoderm and Hepatocyte-Like Cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Young-Jin; Kang, Young-Hoon; Shivakumar, Sarath Belame; Bharti, Dinesh; Son, Young-Bum; Choi, Yong-Ho; Park, Won-Uk; Byun, June-Ho; Rho, Gyu-Jin; Park, Bong-Wook

    2017-01-01

    We previously described a novel tissue cryopreservation protocol to enable the safe preservation of various autologous stem cell sources. The present study characterized the stem cells derived from long-term cryopreserved dental pulp tissues (hDPSCs-cryo) and analyzed their differentiation into definitive endoderm (DE) and hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) in vitro. Human dental pulp tissues from extracted wisdom teeth were cryopreserved as per a slow freezing tissue cryopreservation protocol for at least a year. Characteristics of hDPSCs-cryo were compared to those of stem cells from fresh dental pulps (hDPSCs-fresh). hDPSCs-cryo were differentiated into DE cells in vitro with Activin A as per the Wnt3a protocol for 6 days. These cells were further differentiated into HLCs in the presence of growth factors until day 30. hDPSCs-fresh and hDPSCs-cryo displayed similar cell growth morphology, cell proliferation rates, and mesenchymal stem cell character. During differentiation into DE and HLCs in vitro, the cells flattened and became polygonal in shape, and finally adopted a hepatocyte-like shape. The differentiated DE cells at day 6 and HLCs at day 30 displayed significantly increased DE- and hepatocyte-specific markers at the mRNA and protein level, respectively. In addition, the differentiated HLCs showed detoxification and glycogen storage capacities, indicating they could share multiple functions with real hepatocytes. These data conclusively show that hPDSCs-cryo derived from long-term cryopreserved dental pulp tissues can be successfully differentiated into DE and functional hepatocytes in vitro. Thus, preservation of dental tissues could provide a valuable source of autologous stem cells for tissue engineering.

  10. Effect of isoliquiritigenin on viability and differentiated functions of human hepatocytes maintained on PEEK-WC-polyurethane membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bartolo, Loredana; Morelli, Sabrina; Gallo, Maria Carmela; Campana, Carla; Statti, Giancarlo; Rende, Maria; Salerno, Simona; Drioli, Enrico

    2005-11-01

    In this study, we tested the ability of microporous membranes synthesised from a polymeric blend of modified polyetheretherketone (PEEK-WC) and polyurethane (PU) to support long-term maintenance and differentiation of human liver cells. The effect of isoliquiritigenin (ISL), which is a component of liquorice extract, exhibiting growth stimulatory and antiproliferative dose-dependent effect was investigated by comparing cultures treated with ISL with those untreated. To this purpose, flat-sheet membranes were prepared by a blend of PEEK-WC and PU polymers by phase inverse technique. The morphological and physico-chemical properties were characterised, respectively, by scanning electron microscopy and water contact angle measurements. Human hepatocytes cultured on PEEK-WC-PU membranes were constant up to 1 month albumin production and urea synthesis as well as the synthesis of total proteins. The liver-specific functions were expressed at high levels when cells were cultured on membranes with respect to collagen. Also the biotransformation functions were maintained for all culture periods: the ISL elimination rate increased during the culture time and high values were measured up to 22 days. Thereafter, a decrease was observed. ISL stimulated the proliferation of hepatocytes cultured on both substrata but did not affect their liver-specific functions. Hepatocytes cultured on PEEK-WC-PU membranes responded very well to ISL and expressed high levels of P450 cytochrome. These results demonstrated that long-term maintenance of human liver differentiation can be achieved on PEEK-WC-PU membranes. The incubation with ISL at the investigated concentration could stimulate the proliferation of human hepatocytes in biohybrid systems.

  11. Evidence of a DHA Signature in the Lipidome and Metabolome of Human Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Ghini

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell supplementation with bioactive molecules often causes a perturbation in the whole intracellular environment. Omics techniques can be applied for the assessment of this perturbation. In this study, the overall effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA supplementation on cultured human hepatocyte lipidome and metabolome has been investigated using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR in combination with traditional techniques. The effect of two additional bioactives sharing with DHA the lipid-lowering effect—propionic acid (PRO and protocatechuic acid (PCA—has also been evaluated in the context of possible synergism. NMR analysis of the cell lipid extracts showed that DHA supplementation, alone or in combination with PCA or PRO, strongly altered the cell lipid profile. The perfect discrimination between cells receiving DHA (alone or in combination and the other cells reinforced the idea of a global rearrangement of the lipid environment induced by DHA. Notably, gas chromatography and fluorimetric analyses confirmed the strong discrimination obtained by NMR. The DHA signature was evidenced not only in the cell lipidome, but also in the metabolome. Results reported herein indicate that NMR, combined with other techniques, represents a fundamental approach to studying the effect of bioactive supplementation, particularly in the case of molecules with a broad spectrum of mechanisms of action.

  12. Drug-induced cholestasis risk assessment in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oorts, Marlies; Baze, Audrey; Bachellier, Philippe; Heyd, Bruno; Zacharias, Thomas; Annaert, Pieter; Richert, Lysiane

    2016-08-01

    Drug-induced cholestasis (DIC) is recognized as one of the prime mechanisms for DILI. Hence, earlier detection of drug candidates with cholestatic signature is crucial. Recently, we introduced an in vitro model for DIC and evaluated its performance with several cholestatic drugs. We presently expand on the validation of this model by 14 training compounds (TCs) of the EU-EFPIA IMI project MIP-DILI. Several batches of human hepatocytes in sandwich-culture were qualified for DIC assessment by verifying the bile acid-dependent increase in sensitivity to the toxic effects of cyclosporin A. The cholestatic potential of the TCs was expressed by determining the drug-induced cholestasis index (DICI). A safety margin (SM) was calculated as the ratio of the lowest TC concentration with a DICI≤0.80 to the Cmax,total. Nefazodone, bosentan, perhexiline and troglitazone were flagged for cholestasis (SMdrug candidates with cholestasis risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Featured Article: Isolation, characterization, and cultivation of human hepatocytes and non-parenchymal liver cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Elisa; Kegel, Victoria; Zeilinger, Katrin; Hengstler, Jan G; Nüssler, Andreas K; Seehofer, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are considered to be the gold standard for in vitro testing of xenobiotic metabolism and hepatotoxicity. However, PHH cultivation in 2D mono-cultures leads to dedifferentiation and a loss of function. It is well known that hepatic non-parenchymal cells (NPC), such as Kupffer cells (KC), liver endothelial cells (LEC), and hepatic stellate cells (HSC), play a central role in the maintenance of PHH functions. The aims of the present study were to establish a protocol for the simultaneous isolation of human PHH and NPC from the same tissue specimen and to test their suitability for in vitro co-culture. Human PHH and NPC were isolated from tissue obtained by partial liver resection by a two-step EDTA/collagenase perfusion technique. The obtained cell fractions were purified by Percoll density gradient centrifugation. KC, LEC, and HSC contained in the NPC fraction were separated using specific adherence properties and magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS®). Identified NPC revealed a yield of 1.9 × 106 KC, 2.7 × 105 LEC and 4.7 × 105 HSC per gram liver tissue, showing viabilities >90%. Characterization of these NPC showed that all populations went through an activation process, which influenced the cell fate. The activation of KC strongly depended on the tissue quality and donor anamnesis. KC became activated in culture in association with a loss of viability within 4–5 days. LEC lost specific features during culture, while HSC went through a transformation process into myofibroblasts. The testing of different culture conditions for HSC demonstrated that they can attenuate, but not prevent dedifferentiation in vitro. In conclusion, the method described allows the isolation and separation of PHH and NPC in high quality and quantity from the same donor. PMID:25394621

  14. Nonviral Retrograde Gene Transfer of Human Hepatocyte Growth Factor Improves Neuropathic Pain-related Phenomena in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchihara, Toyokazu; Ogata, Sho; Nemoto, Koichi; Okabayashi, Takatoshi; Nakanishi, Kuniaki; Kato, Naoki; Morishita, Ryuichi; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Uenoyama, Maki; Suzuki, Shinya; Amako, Masatoshi; Kawai, Toshiaki; Arino, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury occasionally causes chronic neuropathic pain with hyperalgesia and allodynia. However, its treatment is difficult. Here, we used a chronic constriction injury (CCI) model in rats to investigate the effects on experimental neuropathic pain of the human hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) gene delivered into the nervous system by retrograde axonal transport following its repeated intramuscular transfer, using liposomes containing the hemagglutinating virus of Japan (HVJ). CCI (control) rats exhibited marked mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, and decreased blood flow in sciatic nerve and hind paw. All these changes were significantly reversed by HGF gene transfer. In the sciatic nerve in HGF-treated rats, the size-frequency distributions for myelinated and unmyelinated axons each showed a rightward shift, the number of myelinated axons >5 µm in diameter was significantly increased, and the mean diameter of unmyelinated axons was significantly increased (versus CCI rats). Levels of P2X3, P2X4, and P2Y1 receptor mRNAs, and of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) mRNAs, were elevated in the ipsilateral dorsal root ganglia and/or sciatic nerve by CCI, and these levels were decreased by HGF gene transfer. These results may point toward a potential new treatment strategy for chronic neuropathic pain in this model. PMID:18941443

  15. Effect of Remifentanil on Mitochondrial Oxygen Consumption of Cultured Human Hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djafarzadeh, Siamak; Vuda, Madhusudanarao; Takala, Jukka; Jakob, Stephan M.

    2012-01-01

    increases cellular respiration of human hepatocytes and prevents TNF-α-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. The results were not explained by uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration. PMID:23028840

  16. Effect of remifentanil on mitochondrial oxygen consumption of cultured human hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siamak Djafarzadeh

    remifentanil increases cellular respiration of human hepatocytes and prevents TNF-α-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. The results were not explained by uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration.

  17. Metformin action in human hepatocytes: coactivation of atypical protein kinase C alters 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase effects on lipogenic and gluconeogenic enzyme expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajan, Mini P; Ivey, Robert A; Farese, Robert V

    2013-11-01

    Atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) levels and activity are elevated in hepatocytes of individuals with type 2 diabetes and cause excessive increases in the levels of lipogenic and gluconeogenic enzymes; aPKC inhibitors largely correct these aberrations. Metformin improves hepatic gluconeogenesis by activating 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). However, metformin also activates aPKC in certain tissues; in the liver, this activation could amplify diabetic aberrations and offset the positive effects of AMPK. In this study, we examined whether metformin activates aPKC in human hepatocytes and the metabolic consequences of any such activation. We compared protein kinase activities and alterations in lipogenic and gluconeogenic enzyme levels during activity of the AMPK activators metformin and AICAR, relative to those of an aPKC-ι inhibitor, in hepatocytes from non-diabetic and type 2 diabetic human organ donors. Metformin and 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-4-ribofuranoside (AICAR) activated aPKC at concentrations comparable with those required for AMPK activation. Moreover, both agents increased lipogenic enzyme levels by an aPKC-dependent mechanism. Thus, whereas insulin- and diabetes-dependent increases in lipogenic enzyme levels were reversed by aPKC inhibition, such levels were increased in hepatocytes from non-diabetic donors and remained elevated in hepatocytes from diabetic donors following metformin and AICAR treatment. In addition, whereas aPKC inhibition diminished gluconeogenic enzyme levels in the absence and presence of insulin in hepatocytes from both non-diabetic and diabetic donors, metformin and AICAR increased gluconeogenic enzyme levels in hepatocytes from non-diabetic individuals, but nevertheless diminished gluconeogenic enzyme levels in insulin-treated hepatocytes from diabetic donors. Metformin and AICAR activate aPKC together with AMPK in human hepatocytes. Activation of aPKC increases lipogenic enzyme levels and alters gluconeogenic

  18. Pharmacokinetics and effects on serum cholinesterase activities of organophosphorus pesticides acephate and chlorpyrifos in chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suemizu, Hiroshi; Sota, Shigeto; Kuronuma, Miyuki; Shimizu, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Organophosphorus pesticides acephate and chlorpyrifos in foods have potential to impact human health. The aim of the current study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of acephate and chlorpyrifos orally administered at lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level doses in chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes. Absorbed acephate and its metabolite methamidophos were detected in serum from wild type mice and chimeric mice orally administered 150mg/kg. Approximately 70% inhibition of cholinesterase was evident in plasma of chimeric mice with humanized liver (which have higher serum cholinesterase activities than wild type mice) 1day after oral administrations of acephate. Adjusted animal biomonitoring equivalents from chimeric mice studies were scaled to human biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Estimated plasma concentrations of acephate and chlorpyrifos in humans were consistent with reported concentrations. Acephate cleared similarly in humans and chimeric mice but accidental/incidental overdose levels of chlorpyrifos cleared (dependent on liver metabolism) more slowly from plasma in humans than it did in mice. The data presented here illustrate how chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes in combination with a simple PBPK model can assist evaluations of toxicological potential of organophosphorus pesticides. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Transcriptional regulation of the human Liver X Receptor α gene by Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4α

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theofilatos, Dimitris; Anestis, Aristomenis [University of Crete Medical School and Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Foundation for Research and Technology of Hellas, Heraklion, 71003, Crete (Greece); Hashimoto, Koshi [Department of Preemptive Medicine and Metabolism, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-city, Tokyo, 113-8510 (Japan); Kardassis, Dimitris, E-mail: kardasis@imbb.forth.gr [University of Crete Medical School and Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Foundation for Research and Technology of Hellas, Heraklion, 71003, Crete (Greece)

    2016-01-15

    Liver X Receptors (LXRs) are sterol-activated transcription factors that play major roles in cellular cholesterol homeostasis, HDL biogenesis and reverse cholesterol transport. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms that control the expression of the human LXRα gene in hepatic cells. A series of reporter plasmids containing consecutive 5′ deletions of the hLXRα promoter upstream of the luciferase gene were constructed and the activity of each construct was measured in HepG2 cells. This analysis showed that the activity of the human LXRα promoter was significantly reduced by deleting the −111 to −42 region suggesting the presence of positive regulatory elements in this short proximal fragment. Bioinformatics data including motif search and ChIP-Seq revealed the presence of a potential binding motif for Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 α (HNF-4α) in this area. Overexpression of HNF-4α in HEK 293T cells increased the expression of all LXRα promoter constructs except −42/+384. In line, silencing the expression of endogenous HNF-4α in HepG2 cells was associated with reduced LXRα protein levels and reduced activity of the −111/+384 LXRα promoter but not of the −42/+384 promoter. Using ChiP assays in HepG2 cells combined with DNAP assays we mapped the novel HNF-4α specific binding motif (H4-SBM) in the −50 to −40 region of the human LXRα promoter. A triple mutation in this H4-SBM abolished HNF-4α binding and reduced the activity of the promoter to 65% relative to the wild type. Furthermore, the mutant promoter could not be transactivated by HNF-4α. In conclusion, our data indicate that HNF-4α may have a wider role in cell and plasma cholesterol homeostasis by controlling the expression of LXRα in hepatic cells. - Highlights: • The human LXRα promoter contains a HNF-4α specific binding motif in the proximal −50/−40 region. • Mutations in this motif abolished HNF4α binding and transactivation of the h

  20. Utility of human hepatocyte spheroids without feeder cells for evaluation of hepatotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogihara, Takuo; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Jomura, Tomoko; Idota, Yoko; Koyama, Satoshi; Yano, Kentaro; Kojima, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the utility of three-dimensionally cultured hepatocytes (spheroids) without feeder cells (Sph(f-)) for the prediction of drug-induced liver injury (DILI) in humans. Sph(f-) and spheroids cultured on feeder cells (Sph(f+)) were exposed to the hepatotoxic drugs flutamide, diclofenac, isoniazid and chlorpromazine at various concentrations for 14 days, and albumin secretion and cumulative leakages of toxicity marker enzymes, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GTP), were measured. The cumulative AST, LDH or γ-GTP leakages from Sph(f-) were similar to or greater than those from Sph(f+) for all drugs tested, although ALT leakages showed no consistent difference between Sph(f+) and Sph(f-). In the case of Sph(f-), significant correlations among all the toxicity markers except for γ-GTP were observed. As regards the drug concentrations causing 1.2-fold elevation of enzyme leakage (F1.2), no consistent difference between Sph(f+) and Sph(f-) was found, although several F1.2 values were undetermined, especially in Sph(f+). The IC50 of albumin secretion and F1.2 of AST leakage from Sph(f-) were equal to or lower than those of Sph(f+) for all the tested drugs. These results indicate that feeder cells might contribute to resistance to hepatotoxicity, suggesting DILI could be evaluated more accurately by using Sph(f-). We suggest that long-term exposure of Sph(f-) to drugs might be a versatile method to predict and reproduce clinical chronic toxicity, especially in response to repeated drug administration.

  1. Biochemical characterization of AMG 102: a neutralizing, fully human monoclonal antibody to human and nonhuman primate hepatocyte growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Teresa L; Sun, Jan; Meyer, Susanne; Tsuruda, Trace S; Sun, Jilin; Elliott, Gary; Chen, Qing; Haniu, Mitsuru; Barron, Will F; Juan, Todd; Zhang, Ke; Coxon, Angela; Kendall, Richard L

    2010-02-01

    AMG 102 is a fully human monoclonal antibody that selectively targets and neutralizes hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF). A detailed biochemical and functional characterization of AMG 102 was done to support its clinical development for the treatment of cancers dependent on signaling through the HGF/SF:c-Met pathway. In competitive equilibrium binding experiments, AMG 102 bound to human and cynomolgus monkey HGF with affinities of approximately 19 pmol/L and 41 pmol/L, respectively. However, AMG 102 did not detect mouse or rabbit HGF on immunoblots. Immunoprecipitation experiments showed that AMG 102 preferentially bound to the mature, active form of HGF, and incubation of AMG 102/HGF complexes with kallikrein protease indicated that AMG 102 had no apparent effect on proteolytic processing of the inactive HGF precursor. AMG 102 inhibited human and cynomolgus monkey HGF-induced c-Met autophosphorylation in PC3 cells with IC(50) values of 0.12 nmol/L and 0.24 nmol/L, respectively. AMG 102 also inhibited cynomolgus monkey HGF-induced migration of human MDA-MB-435 cells but not rat HGF-induced migration of mouse 4T1 cells. Epitope-mapping studies of recombinant HGF molecules comprising human/mouse chimeras and human-to-mouse amino acid substitutions showed that amino acid residues near the NH(2)-terminus of the beta-chain are critical for AMG 102 binding. Bound AMG 102 protected one trypsin protease cleavage site near the NH(2)-terminus of the beta-chain of human HGF, further substantiating the importance of this region for AMG 102 binding. Currently, AMG 102 is in phase II clinical trials in a variety of solid tumor indications. Mol Cancer Ther; 9(2); 400-9.

  2. Human Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-Mediated Acute Liver Failure and Rescue by Immunoglobulin in Human Hepatocyte Transplant TK-NOG Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Takuro; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Imamura, Michio; Tsuge, Masataka; Abe, Hiromi; Hayes, C Nelson; Aikata, Hiroshi; Ishida, Yuji; Tateno, Chise; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Ohdan, Hideki; Murakami, Kazunari; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2015-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are critical in eliminating infection. We developed an animal model in which HBV-infected human hepatocytes are targeted by HBV-specific CTLs. After HBV inoculation in human hepatocyte-transplanted herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase-NOG mice, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were administered, and albumin, HBV DNA, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and cytokine levels were analyzed. Histopathological and flow-cytometric analysis of infiltrating human immune cells were performed, and the efficacy of CTL-associated antigen-4 immunoglobulin (CTLA4Ig) against liver damage was evaluated. PBMC treatment resulted in massive hepatocyte damage with elevation of ALT, granzyme A, and gamma interferon and decrease in albumin and HBV DNA. The number of liver-infiltrating human lymphocytes and CD8-positive cells was significantly higher in HBV-infected mice. HBV-specific CTLs were detected by core and polymerase peptide-major histocompatibility complex-tetramer, and the population of regulatory T cells was significantly decreased in HBV-infected mice. Serum hepatitis B surface (HBs) antigen became negative, and HBs antibody appeared. CTLA4Ig treatment strongly inhibited infiltration of mononuclear cells. CTLA4Ig treatment will be used to treat patients who develop severe acute hepatitis B to prevent liver transplantation or lethality. This animal model is useful for virological and immunological analysis of HBV infection and to develop new therapies for severe acute hepatitis B. Without liver transplantation, some HBV-infected patients will die from severe liver damage due to acute overreaction of the immune system. No effective treatment exists, due in part to the lack of a suitable animal model. An animal model is necessary to investigate the mechanism of hepatitis and to develop therapeutic strategies to prevent acute liver failure in HBV infection. We developed an animal model in which

  3. Elimination of Mycoplasma Contamination from Infected Human Hepatocyte C3A Cells by Intraperitoneal Injection in BALB/c Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Jun; Li, Yang; Cai, Lei; Li, Ting; Peng, Gongze; Fu, Chaoyi; Han, Xu; Li, Haiyan; Jiang, Zesheng; Zhang, Zhi; Du, Jiang; Peng, Qing; Gao, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims: The use of antibiotics to eliminate Mycoplasma contamination has some serious limitations. Mycoplasma contamination can be eliminated by intraperitoneal injection of BALB/c mice with contaminated cells combined with screening monoclonal cells. However, in vivo passage in mice after injection with contaminated cells requires a long duration (20-54 days). Furthermore, it is important to monitor for cross-contamination of mouse and human cells, xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) infection, and altered cell function after the in vivo treatment. The present study aimed to validate a reliable and simplified method to eliminate mycoplasma contamination from human hepatocytes. BALB/c mice were injected with paraffin oil prior to injection with cells, in order to shorten duration of intraperitoneal passage. Cross-contamination of mouse and human cells, XMRV infection and cell function-related genes and proteins were also evaluated. Methods: PCR and DNA sequencing were used to confirm Mycoplasma hyorhinis (M. hyorhinis) contamination in human hepatocyte C3A cells. Five BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally injected with 0.5 ml paraffin oil 1 week before injection of the cells. The mice were then intraperitoneally injected with C3A hepatocytes (5.0 × 10(6)/ml) contaminated with M. hyorhinis (6.2 ± 2.2 × 10(8) CFU/ml). Ascites were collected for monoclonal cell screening on the 14th day after injection of contaminated cells. Elimination of mycoplasma from cells was determined by PCR and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Human-mouse cell and XMRV contamination were also detected by PCR. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR and western blotting were used to compare the expression of genes and proteins among treated cells, non-treated infected cells, and uninfected cells. Results: Fourteen days after injection with cells, 4 of the 5 mice had ascites. Hepatocyte colonies extracted from the ascites of four mice were all mycoplasma

  4. Gene disruption of Plasmodium falciparum p52 results in attenuation of malaria liver stage development in cultured primary human hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben C L van Schaijk

    Full Text Available Difficulties with inducing sterile and long lasting protective immunity against malaria with subunit vaccines has renewed interest in vaccinations with attenuated Plasmodium parasites. Immunizations with sporozoites that are attenuated by radiation (RAS can induce strong protective immunity both in humans and rodent models of malaria. Recently, in rodent parasites it has been shown that through the deletion of a single gene, sporozoites can also become attenuated in liver stage development and, importantly, immunization with these sporozoites results in immune responses identical to RAS. The promise of vaccination using these genetically attenuated sporozoites (GAS depends on translating the results in rodent malaria models to human malaria. In this study, we perform the first essential step in this transition by disrupting, p52, in P. falciparum an ortholog of the rodent parasite gene, p36p, which we had previously shown can confer long lasting protective immunity in mice. These P. falciparum P52 deficient sporozoites demonstrate gliding motility, cell traversal and an invasion rate into primary human hepatocytes in vitro that is comparable to wild type sporozoites. However, inside the host hepatocyte development is arrested very soon after invasion. This study reveals, for the first time, that disrupting the equivalent gene in both P. falciparum and rodent malaria Plasmodium species generates parasites that become similarly arrested during liver stage development and these results pave the way for further development of GAS for human use.

  5. Rapid generation of mature hepatocyte-like cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells by an efficient three-step protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Fan; Tseng, Chien-Yu; Wang, Hsei-Wei; Kuo, Hung-Chih; Yang, Vincent W; Lee, Oscar K

    2012-04-01

    Liver transplantation is the only definitive treatment for end-stage cirrhosis and fulminant liver failure, but the lack of available donor livers is a major obstacle to liver transplantation. Recently, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from the reprogramming of somatic fibroblasts, have been shown to resemble embryonic stem (ES) cells in that they have pluripotent properties and the potential to differentiate into all cell lineages in vitro, including hepatocytes. Thus, iPSCs could serve as a favorable cell source for a wide range of applications, including drug toxicity testing, cell transplantation, and patient-specific disease modeling. Here, we describe an efficient and rapid three-step protocol that is able to rapidly generate hepatocyte-like cells from human iPSCs. This occurs because the endodermal induction step allows for more efficient and definitive endoderm cell formation. We show that hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), which synergizes with activin A and Wnt3a, elevates the expression of the endodermal marker Foxa2 (forkhead box a2) by 39.3% compared to when HGF is absent (14.2%) during the endodermal induction step. In addition, iPSC-derived hepatocytes had a similar gene expression profile to mature hepatocytes. Importantly, the hepatocyte-like cells exhibited cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) enzyme activity, secreted urea, uptake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and possessed the ability to store glycogen. Moreover, the hepatocyte-like cells rescued lethal fulminant hepatic failure in a nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient mouse model. We have established a rapid and efficient differentiation protocol that is able to generate functional hepatocyte-like cells from human iPSCs. This may offer an alternative option for treatment of liver diseases. Copyright © 2011 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  6. Differences in metabolism and isomerization of all-trans-retinoic acid and 9-cis-retinoic acid between human endothelial cells and hepatocytes.

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    Lansink, M; van Bennekum, A M; Blaner, W S; Kooistra, T

    1997-07-15

    Retinoic acid stimulates the expression of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) in vascular endothelial cells in vitro and enhances t-PA levels in plasma and tissues in vivo. Compared with the in vivo situation, high retinoic acid concentrations are required to induce optimally t-PA expression in vitro. These findings led us to study retinoic acid metabolism in cultured human endothelial cells. For comparison, these studies were also performed in the human hepatoma cell line, HepG2, and key experiments were repeated with human primary hepatocytes. Both hepatocyte cultures gave very similar results. Human endothelial cells were shown to possess an active retinoic acid metabolizing capacity, which is quantitatively comparable to that of hepatocytes, but different from that of hepatocytes in several qualitative aspects. Our results demonstrate that all-trans-retinoic acid is quickly metabolized by both endothelial cells and hepatocytes. All-trans-retinoic acid induces its own metabolism in endothelial cells but not in hepatocytes. 9-cis-Retinoic acid is degraded slowly by endothelial cells, whereas hepatocytes metabolize 9-cis-retinoic acid very quickly. Furthermore, our data show that hepatocytes, but not endothelial cells, detectably isomerise all-trans-retinoic acid to 9-cis-retinoic acid and vice versa. In both endothelial cells and hepatocytes all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism was inhibitable by the cytochrome P-450 inhibitors liarozole (10 microM) and ketoconazole (10 microM), albeit to different extents and with different specificities. In the presence of the most potent retinoic acid metabolism inhibitor in endothelial cells, liarozole, at least 10-fold lower all-trans-retinoic acid concentrations were required than in the absence of the inhibitor to obtain the same induction of t-PA. In conclusion, our results clearly demonstrate that all-trans-retinoic acid and 9-cis retinoic acid are actively but differently metabolized and isomerised by human

  7. Predictivity of dog co-culture model, primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells for the detection of hepatotoxic drugs in humans

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    Atienzar, Franck A., E-mail: franck.atienzar@ucb.com [UCB Pharma SA, Non-Clinical Development, Chemin du Foriest, 1420 Braine-l' Alleud (Belgium); Novik, Eric I. [H mu rel Corporation, 675 U.S. Highway 1, North Brunswick, NJ 08902 (United States); Gerets, Helga H. [UCB Pharma SA, Non-Clinical Development, Chemin du Foriest, 1420 Braine-l' Alleud (Belgium); Parekh, Amit [H mu rel Corporation, 675 U.S. Highway 1, North Brunswick, NJ 08902 (United States); Delatour, Claude; Cardenas, Alvaro [UCB Pharma SA, Non-Clinical Development, Chemin du Foriest, 1420 Braine-l' Alleud (Belgium); MacDonald, James [Chrysalis Pharma Consulting, LLC, 385 Route 24, Suite 1G, Chester, NJ 07930 (United States); Yarmush, Martin L. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Dhalluin, Stéphane [UCB Pharma SA, Non-Clinical Development, Chemin du Foriest, 1420 Braine-l' Alleud (Belgium)

    2014-02-15

    Drug Induced Liver Injury (DILI) is a major cause of attrition during early and late stage drug development. Consequently, there is a need to develop better in vitro primary hepatocyte models from different species for predicting hepatotoxicity in both animals and humans early in drug development. Dog is often chosen as the non-rodent species for toxicology studies. Unfortunately, dog in vitro models allowing long term cultures are not available. The objective of the present manuscript is to describe the development of a co-culture dog model for predicting hepatotoxic drugs in humans and to compare the predictivity of the canine model along with primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. After rigorous optimization, the dog co-culture model displayed metabolic capacities that were maintained up to 2 weeks which indicates that such model could be also used for long term metabolism studies. Most of the human hepatotoxic drugs were detected with a sensitivity of approximately 80% (n = 40) for the three cellular models. Nevertheless, the specificity was low approximately 40% for the HepG2 cells and hepatocytes compared to 72.7% for the canine model (n = 11). Furthermore, the dog co-culture model showed a higher superiority for the classification of 5 pairs of close structural analogs with different DILI concerns in comparison to both human cellular models. Finally, the reproducibility of the canine system was also satisfactory with a coefficient of correlation of 75.2% (n = 14). Overall, the present manuscript indicates that the dog co-culture model may represent a relevant tool to perform chronic hepatotoxicity and metabolism studies. - Highlights: • Importance of species differences in drug development. • Relevance of dog co-culture model for metabolism and toxicology studies. • Hepatotoxicity: higher predictivity of dog co-culture vs HepG2 and human hepatocytes.

  8. A systems biology approach to dynamic modeling and inter-subject variability of statin pharmacokinetics in human hepatocytes

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    Thasler Wolfgang E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The individual character of pharmacokinetics is of great importance in the risk assessment of new drug leads in pharmacological research. Amongst others, it is severely influenced by the properties and inter-individual variability of the enzymes and transporters of the drug detoxification system of the liver. Predicting individual drug biotransformation capacity requires quantitative and detailed models. Results In this contribution we present the de novo deterministic modeling of atorvastatin biotransformation based on comprehensive published knowledge on involved metabolic and transport pathways as well as physicochemical properties. The model was evaluated on primary human hepatocytes and parameter identifiability analysis was performed under multiple experimental constraints. Dynamic simulations of atorvastatin biotransformation considering the inter-individual variability of the two major involved enzymes CYP3A4 and UGT1A3 based on quantitative protein expression data in a large human liver bank (n = 150 highlighted the variability in the individual biotransformation profiles and therefore also points to the individuality of pharmacokinetics. Conclusions A dynamic model for the biotransformation of atorvastatin has been developed using quantitative metabolite measurements in primary human hepatocytes. The model comprises kinetics for transport processes and metabolic enzymes as well as population liver expression data allowing us to assess the impact of inter-individual variability of concentrations of key proteins. Application of computational tools for parameter sensitivity analysis enabled us to considerably improve the validity of the model and to create a consistent framework for precise computer-aided simulations in toxicology.

  9. Inhibition of hepatitis B viral entry by nucleic acid polymers in HepaRG cells and primary human hepatocytes.

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    Clément Guillot

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection remains a major public health concern worldwide with 240 million individuals chronically infected and at risk of developing cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Current treatments rarely cure chronic hepatitis B infection, highlighting the need for new anti-HBV drugs. Nucleic acid polymers (NAPs are phosphorothioated oligonucleotides that have demonstrated a great potential to inhibit infection with several viruses. In chronically infected human patients, NAPs administration lead to a decline of blood HBsAg and HBV DNA and to HBsAg seroconversion, the expected signs of functional cure. NAPs have also been shown to prevent infection of duck hepatocytes with the Avihepadnavirus duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV and to exert an antiviral activity against established DHBV infection in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we investigated the specific anti-HBV antiviral activity of NAPs in the HepaRG human hepatoma cell line and primary cultures of human hepatocytes. NAPs with different chemical features (phosphorothioation, 2'O-methyl ribose, 5-methylcytidine were assessed for antiviral activity when provided at the time of HBV inoculation or post-inoculation. NAPs dose-dependently inhibited HBV entry in a phosphorothioation-dependent, sequence-independent and size-dependent manner. This inhibition of HBV entry by NAPs was impaired by 2'O-methyl ribose modification. NAP treatment after viral inoculation did not elicit any antiviral activity.

  10. Prediction of interindividual differences in hepatic functions and drug sensitivity by using human iPS-derived hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Kazuo; Morisaki, Yuta; Kuno, Shuichi; Nagamoto, Yasuhito; Harada, Kazuo; Furukawa, Norihisa; Ohtaka, Manami; Nishimura, Ken; Imagawa, Kazuo; Sakurai, Fuminori; Tachibana, Masashi; Sumazaki, Ryo; Noguchi, Emiko; Nakanishi, Mahito; Hirata, Kazumasa; Kawabata, Kenji; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2014-11-25

    Interindividual differences in hepatic metabolism, which are mainly due to genetic polymorphism in its gene, have a large influence on individual drug efficacy and adverse reaction. Hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have the potential to predict interindividual differences in drug metabolism capacity and drug response. However, it remains uncertain whether human iPSC-derived HLCs can reproduce the interindividual difference in hepatic metabolism and drug response. We found that cytochrome P450 (CYP) metabolism capacity and drug responsiveness of the primary human hepatocytes (PHH)-iPS-HLCs were highly correlated with those of PHHs, suggesting that the PHH-iPS-HLCs retained donor-specific CYP metabolism capacity and drug responsiveness. We also demonstrated that the interindividual differences, which are due to the diversity of individual SNPs in the CYP gene, could also be reproduced in PHH-iPS-HLCs. We succeeded in establishing, to our knowledge, the first PHH-iPS-HLC panel that reflects the interindividual differences of hepatic drug-metabolizing capacity and drug responsiveness.

  11. A systems biology approach to dynamic modeling and inter-subject variability of statin pharmacokinetics in human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Joachim; Riedmaier, Stephan; Schnabel, Anke; Marcus, Katrin; Vacun, Gabriele; Weiss, Thomas S; Thasler, Wolfgang E; Nüssler, Andreas K; Zanger, Ulrich M; Reuss, Matthias

    2011-05-06

    The individual character of pharmacokinetics is of great importance in the risk assessment of new drug leads in pharmacological research. Amongst others, it is severely influenced by the properties and inter-individual variability of the enzymes and transporters of the drug detoxification system of the liver. Predicting individual drug biotransformation capacity requires quantitative and detailed models. In this contribution we present the de novo deterministic modeling of atorvastatin biotransformation based on comprehensive published knowledge on involved metabolic and transport pathways as well as physicochemical properties. The model was evaluated on primary human hepatocytes and parameter identifiability analysis was performed under multiple experimental constraints. Dynamic simulations of atorvastatin biotransformation considering the inter-individual variability of the two major involved enzymes CYP3A4 and UGT1A3 based on quantitative protein expression data in a large human liver bank (n = 150) highlighted the variability in the individual biotransformation profiles and therefore also points to the individuality of pharmacokinetics. A dynamic model for the biotransformation of atorvastatin has been developed using quantitative metabolite measurements in primary human hepatocytes. The model comprises kinetics for transport processes and metabolic enzymes as well as population liver expression data allowing us to assess the impact of inter-individual variability of concentrations of key proteins. Application of computational tools for parameter sensitivity analysis enabled us to considerably improve the validity of the model and to create a consistent framework for precise computer-aided simulations in toxicology.

  12. Comparative transcriptional network modeling of three PPAR-α/γ co-agonists reveals distinct metabolic gene signatures in primary human hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renée Deehan

    Full Text Available To compare the molecular and biologic signatures of a balanced dual peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-α/γ agonist, aleglitazar, with tesaglitazar (a dual PPAR-α/γ agonist or a combination of pioglitazone (Pio; PPAR-γ agonist and fenofibrate (Feno; PPAR-α agonist in human hepatocytes.Gene expression microarray profiles were obtained from primary human hepatocytes treated with EC(50-aligned low, medium and high concentrations of the three treatments. A systems biology approach, Causal Network Modeling, was used to model the data to infer upstream molecular mechanisms that may explain the observed changes in gene expression. Aleglitazar, tesaglitazar and Pio/Feno each induced unique transcriptional signatures, despite comparable core PPAR signaling. Although all treatments inferred qualitatively similar PPAR-α signaling, aleglitazar was inferred to have greater effects on high- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels than tesaglitazar and Pio/Feno, due to a greater number of gene expression changes in pathways related to high-density and low-density lipoprotein metabolism. Distinct transcriptional and biologic signatures were also inferred for stress responses, which appeared to be less affected by aleglitazar than the comparators. In particular, Pio/Feno was inferred to increase NFE2L2 activity, a key component of the stress response pathway, while aleglitazar had no significant effect. All treatments were inferred to decrease proliferative signaling.Aleglitazar induces transcriptional signatures related to lipid parameters and stress responses that are unique from other dual PPAR-α/γ treatments. This may underlie observed favorable changes in lipid profiles in animal and clinical studies with aleglitazar and suggests a differentiated gene profile compared with other dual PPAR-α/γ agonist treatments.

  13. Efavirenz and 8-hydroxyefavirenz induce cell death via a JNK- and BimEL-dependent mechanism in primary human hepatocytes

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    Bumpus, Namandje N., E-mail: nbumpus1@jhmi.edu

    2011-12-15

    Chronic use of efavirenz (EFV) has been linked to incidences of hepatotoxicity in patients receiving EFV to treat HIV-1. While recent studies have demonstrated that EFV stimulates hepatic cell death a role for the metabolites of efavirenz in this process has yet to be examined. In the present study, incubation of primary human hepatocytes with synthetic 8-hydroxyEFV (8-OHEFV), which is the primary metabolite of EFV, resulted in cell death, caspase-3 activation and reactive oxygen species formation. The metabolite exerted these effects at earlier time points and using lower concentrations than were required for the parent compound. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of cytochrome P450-dependent metabolism of EFV using 1-aminobenzotriazole markedly decreased reactive oxygen species formation and cell death. Treatment of primary human hepatocytes with EFV and 8-OHEFV also stimulated phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) as well as phosphorylation of the JNK substrate c-Jun. Further, the mRNA and protein expression of an isoform of Bim (Bcl-2 interacting mediator of cell death) denoted as BimEL, which is proapoptotic and has been shown to be modulated by JNK, was increased. Inhibition of JNK using SP600125 prevented the EFV- and 8-OHEFV-mediated cell death. Silencing of Bim using siRNA transfected into hepatocytes also prevented cell death resulting from 8-OHEFV-treatment. These data suggest that the oxidative metabolite 8-OHEFV is a more potent inducer of hepatic cell death than the parent compound EFV. Further, activation of the JNK signaling pathway and BimEL mRNA expression appear to be required for EFV- and 8-OHEFV-mediated hepatocyte death. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 8-Hydroxyefavirenz is a more potent stimulator of cell death than efavirenz. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Efavirenz and 8-hydroxyefavirenz increase JNK activity and BimEL mRNA expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JNK and Bim are required for efavirenz- and 8

  14. The right choice of antihypertensives protects primary human hepatocytes from ethanol- and recombinant human TGF-β1-induced cellular damage

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    Ehnert S

    2013-03-01

    damage, except for furosemide, which had no effect. As a common mechanism, all antihypertensives increased heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1 expression, and inhibition of HO-1 activity reversed the protective effect of the drugs. Interestingly, Smad3/4 signaling was reduced by all compounds except furosemide, which even enhanced this profibrotic signaling. This effect was mediated by expressional changes of Smad3 and/or Smad4.Conclusions: Our results suggest that antihypertensives may both positively and negatively influence chronic liver disease progression. Therefore, we propose that in future patients with ALD and high blood pressure, they could benefit from an adjusted antihypertensive therapy with additional antifibrotic effects.Keywords: primary human hepatocytes, alcoholic liver disease, ethanol, TGF-β1, antihypertensives

  15. Metabolite profiling of RCS-4, a novel synthetic cannabinoid designer drug, using human hepatocyte metabolism and TOF-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Adarsh S; Zhu, Mingshe; Pang, Shaokun; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2014-01-01

    Background Since 2009, scheduling legislation of synthetic cannabinoids prompted new compound emergence to circumvent legal restrictions. 2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1-(1-pentyl-indol-3-yl)methanone (RCS-4) is a potent cannabinoid receptor agonist sold in herbal smoking blends. Absence of parent synthetic cannabinoids in urine suggests the importance of metabolite identification for detecting RCS-4 consumption in clinical and forensic investigations. Materials & methods & Results With 1 h human hepatocyte incubation and TOF high-resolution MS, we identified 18 RCS-4 metabolites, many not yet reported. Most metabolites were hydroxylated with or without demethylation, carboxylation and dealkylation followed by glucuronidation. One additional sulfated metabolite was also observed. O-demethylation was the most common biotransformation and generated the major metabolite. Conclusion For the first time, we present a metabolic scheme of RCS-4 obtained from human hepatocytes, including Phase I and II metabolites. Metabolite structural information and associated high-resolution mass spectra can be employed for developing clinical and forensic laboratory RCS-4 urine screening methods. PMID:25046048

  16. Metabolism of the synthetic cannabinoid 5F-PY-PICA by human and rat hepatocytes and identification of biliary analytical targets by directional efflux in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes using UHPLC-HR-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardal, Marie; Annaert, Pieter; Noble, Carolina; Oorts, Marlies; Linnet, Kristian

    2017-11-07

    Analytical strategies for detecting drugs in biological samples rely on information on metabolism and elimination. 5F-PY-PICA belongs to the group of synthetic cannabinoids that are known to undergo excretion into the bile. The aims of this study were the in vitro identification of metabolites of 5F-PY-PICA and to determine which analytical targets are excreted into the bile and urine. Metabolites identified after incubation of 5F-PY-PICA with pooled human liver microsomes (pHLM), pooled human hepatocytes (pHH), or suspended and sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes (SCRH). Rat hepatocytes were harvested following a two-step perfusion protocol and the SCRH were prepared between layers of rat-tail collagen. The biliary efflux of 5F-PY-PICA and its metabolites was determined in three-day-cultured SCRH by differential efflux into either standard buffer from intact bile canaliculi or standard buffer without divalent cations, which disrupts the bile canaliculi. The metabolites were identified using liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-HR-MS/MS). The main metabolites were the COOH-ω-metabolite (M4) in pHH, the defluoro-HO-ω-metabolite (M3) in pHLM, and the COOH-pyrrolidine-metabolite (M6) in rat hepatocytes. Efflux into standard buffer without divalent cations was significantly higher (pPICA, M4, and the HO-indole-glucuronide-metabolite (M22). M6 did not undergo significant biliary efflux, indicating that basolateral efflux dominates for this metabolite. 5F-PY-PICA, M4, and M22 are proposed as analytical targets for bile analysis in forensic screening protocols, whereas M6 should be one of the main urinary targets for 5F-PY-PICA analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Protocol for Isolation of Primary Human Hepatocytes and Corresponding Major Populations of Non-parenchymal Liver Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Victoria; Deharde, Daniela; Pfeiffer, Elisa; Zeilinger, Katrin; Seehofer, Daniel; Damm, Georg

    2016-03-30

    Beside parenchymal hepatocytes, the liver consists of non-parenchymal cells (NPC) namely Kupffer cells (KC), liver endothelial cells (LEC) and hepatic Stellate cells (HSC). Two-dimensional (2D) culture of primary human hepatocyte (PHH) is still considered as the "gold standard" for in vitro testing of drug metabolism and hepatotoxicity. It is well-known that the 2D monoculture of PHH suffers from dedifferentiation and loss of function. Recently it was shown that hepatic NPC play a central role in liver (patho-) physiology and the maintenance of PHH functions. Current research focuses on the reconstruction of in vivo tissue architecture by 3D- and co-culture models to overcome the limitations of 2D monocultures. Previously we published a method to isolate human liver cells and investigated the suitability of these cells for their use in cell cultures in Experimental Biology and Medicine(1). Based on the broad interest in this technique the aim of this article was to provide a more detailed protocol for the liver cell isolation process including a video, which will allow an easy reproduction of this technique. Human liver cells were isolated from human liver tissue samples of surgical interventions by a two-step EGTA/collagenase P perfusion technique. PHH were separated from the NPC by an initial centrifugation at 50 x g. Density gradient centrifugation steps were used for removal of dead cells. Individual liver cell populations were isolated from the enriched NPC fraction using specific cell properties and cell sorting procedures. Beside the PHH isolation we were able to separate KC, LEC and HSC for further cultivation. Taken together, the presented protocol allows the isolation of PHH and NPC in high quality and quantity from one donor tissue sample. The access to purified liver cell populations could allow the creation of in vivo like human liver models.

  18. Foxa1 reduces lipid accumulation in human hepatocytes and is down-regulated in nonalcoholic fatty liver.

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    Marta Moya

    Full Text Available Triglyceride accumulation in nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL results from unbalanced lipid metabolism which, in the liver, is controlled by several transcription factors. The Foxa subfamily of winged helix/forkhead box (Fox transcription factors comprises three members which play important roles in controlling both metabolism and homeostasis through the regulation of multiple target genes in the liver, pancreas and adipose tissue. In the mouse liver, Foxa2 is repressed by insulin and mediates fasting responses. Unlike Foxa2 however, the role of Foxa1 in the liver has not yet been investigated in detail. In this study, we evaluate the role of Foxa1 in two human liver cell models, primary cultured hepatocytes and HepG2 cells, by adenoviral infection. Moreover, human and rat livers were analyzed to determine Foxa1 regulation in NAFL. Results demonstrate that Foxa1 is a potent inhibitor of hepatic triglyceride synthesis, accumulation and secretion by repressing the expression of multiple target genes of these pathways (e.g., GPAM, DGAT2, MTP, APOB. Moreover, Foxa1 represses the fatty acid transporter protein FATP2 and lowers fatty acid uptake. Foxa1 also increases the breakdown of fatty acids by inducing peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation and ketone body synthesis. Finally, Foxa1 is able to largely up-regulate UCP1, thereby dissipating energy and consistently decreasing the mitochondria membrane potential. We also report that human and rat NAFL have a reduced Foxa1 expression, possibly through a protein kinase C-dependent pathway. We conclude that Foxa1 is an antisteatotic factor that coordinately tunes several lipid metabolic pathways to block triglyceride accumulation in hepatocytes. However, Foxa1 is down-regulated in human and rat NAFL and, therefore, increasing Foxa1 levels could protect from steatosis. Altogether, we suggest that Foxa1 could be a novel therapeutic target for NAFL disease and insulin resistance.

  19. A new splice variant of the major subunit of human asialoglycoprotein receptor encodes a secreted form in hepatocytes.

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    Jia Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR is composed of two polypeptides, designated H1 and H2. While variants of H2 have been known for decades, the existence of H1 variants has never been reported. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified two splice variants of ASGPR H1 transcripts, designated H1a and H1b, in human liver tissues and hepatoma cells. Molecular cloning of ASGPR H1 variants revealed that they differ by a 117 nucleotide segment corresponding to exon 2 in the ASGPR genomic sequence. Thus, ASGPR variant H1b transcript encodes a protein lacking the transmembrane domain. Using an H1b-specific antibody, H1b protein and a functional soluble ASGPR (sASGPR composed of H1b and H2 in human sera and in hepatoma cell culture supernatant were identified. The expression of ASGPR H1a and H1b in Hela cells demonstrated the different cellular loctions of H1a and H1b proteins at cellular membranes and in intracellular compartments, respectively. In vitro binding assays using fluorescence-labeled sASGPR or the substract ASOR revealed that the presence of sASGPR reduced the binding of ASOR to cells. However, ASOR itself was able to enhance the binding of sASGPR to cells expressing membrane-bound ASGPR. Further, H1b expression is reduced in liver tissues from patients with viral hepatitis. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that two naturally occurring ASGPR H1 splice variants are produced in human hepatocytes. A hetero-oligomeric complex sASGPR consists of the secreted form of H1 and H2 and may bind to free substrates in circulation and carry them to liver tissue for uptake by ASGPR-expressing hepatocytes.

  20. Improved Survival and Initiation of Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Hepatocyte-Like Cells upon Culture in William's E Medium followed by Hepatocyte Differentiation Inducer Treatment.

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    Minoru Tomizawa

    Full Text Available Hepatocyte differentiation inducer (HDI lacks both glucose and arginine, but is supplemented with galactose and ornithine, and is added together with other reagents such as apoptosis inhibitor and oncostatin M. Although human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells initiate hepatocyte differentiation, most die within 7 days. In this study, we investigated both HDI and conventional media for their potential to improve cell survival.201B7 iPS cells were cultured in conventional media. This consisted of three cycles of 5-day culture in William's E (WE medium, followed by a 2-day culture in HDI.Expression levels of α-feto protein (AFP were higher in cells cultured in WE and in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium/Nutrient F-12 Ham (DF12. 201B7 cells expressed the highest AFP and albumin (ALB when cultured in HDI for 2 days following 7-day culture in WE. After three cycles of 5-day culture in WE followed by 2 days in HDI, 201B7 cells expressed AFP and ALB 54 ± 2.3 (average ± standard deviation and 73 ± 15.1 times higher, respectively, than those cultured in ReproFF (feeder-free condition.201B7 cells survived culture in WE for 7 days followed HDI for 2 days. After three cycles of culture under these conditions, hepatocyte differentiation was enhanced, as evidenced by increased AFP and ALB expression.

  1. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells and derived hepatocyte-like cells exhibit similar therapeutic effects on an acute liver failure mouse model.

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    Ruiping Zhou

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have exhibited therapeutic effects in multiple animal models so that are promising liver substitute for transplantation treatment of end-stage liver diseases. However, it has been shown that over-manipulation of these cells increased their tumorigenic potential, and that reducing the in vitro culture time could minimize the risk. In this study, we used a D-galactosamine plus lipopolysaccharide (Gal/LPS-induced acute liver failure mouse model, which caused death of about 50% of the mice with necrosis of more than 50% hepatocytes, to compare the therapeutic effects of human umbilical cord MSCs (hUCMSCs before and after induction of differentiation into hepatocyte (i-Heps. Induction of hUCMSCs to become i-Heps was achieved by treatment of the cells with a group of growth factors within 4 weeks. The resulted i-Heps exhibited a panel of human hepatocyte biomarkers including cytokeratin (hCK-18, α-fetoprotein (hAFP, albumin (hALB, and hepatocyte-specific functions glycogen storage and urea metabolism. We demonstrated that transplantation of both cell types through tail vein injection rescued almost all of the Gal/LPS-intoxicated mice. Although both cell types exhibited similar ability in homing at the mouse livers, the populations of the hUCMSCs-derived cells, as judged by expressing hAFP, hCK-18 and human hepatocyte growth factor (hHGF, were small. These observations let us to conclude that the hUCMSCs was as effective as the i-Heps in treatment of the mouse acute liver failure, and that the therapeutic effects of hUCMSCs were mediated largely via stimulation of host hepatocyte regeneration, and that delivery of the cells through intravenous injection was effective.

  2. [Effect of microRNA on proliferation caused by mutant HBx in human hepatocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiao-yu; Tan, De-ming; Hou, Zhou-hua; Hu, Zhi-liang; Liu, Guo-zhen; Ouyang, Yi; Liu, Fei

    2012-08-01

    To study the effect of micro (mi)RNA on cellular proliferation induced by hepatitis B x protein, HBx, in human liver cells and to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism of this cancer-related effect. The human L02 hepatocyte cell line was stably transfected with HBx (L02/HBx) or an HBx mutant (L02/HBx-d382) that induces higher levels of cellular proliferation. The differential miRNA expression profiles were determined by microarray analysis and confirmed by real-time PCR. Two miRNAs, miR-338-3p and miR-551b, that were found to be significantly down-regulated in the L02/HBx-d382 cells were selected for further study and transfected individually into cells using the lipofectamine procedure. The cell survival rate was analyzed by MTT assay, and cell cycles were assessed by flow cytometry. Expressions of cyclinD1, cyclinG1, and E2F1 were assessed by real-time PCR and Western blotting. Compared with the microarray miRNA profile of L02/pcDNA3.0 cells, six miRNAs were up-regulated and five miRNAs were down-regulated in the L02/HBx-d382 cells, while four miRNAs were up-regulated and 12 were down-regulated in the L02/HBx cells. The microarray results were consistent with real-time PCR results. Transfection of miR-338-3p and miR-551b significantly inhibited the cell survival rates (P less than 0.001) and induced G0/G1 phase cycle arrest. According to MTT results: for L02/HBx-d382 cells, compared with lipofectamine or non-transfected (NC) controls, the t value of miR-338-3p was 10.402, 9.133 and the t value of miR-551b was 8.763, 7.403; for L02/HBx cells, compared with lipofectamine or NC controls, the t value of miR-338-3p was 9.105, 8.074 and the t value of miR-551b was 7.673, 7.52. According to flow cytometry results: for L02/HBx-d382 cells, compared with lipofectamine or NC controls, the t value of miR-338-3p was 12.173, 11.107 and the t value of miR-551b was 15.364, 13.377; for L02/HBx cells, compared with lipofectamine or NC controls, the t value of miR-338-3p

  3. Phthalazinone Pyrazole Enhances the Hepatic Functions of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocyte-Like Cells via Suppression of the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young-Jun; Kim, Hyemin; Kim, Ji-Woo; Song, Chang-Woo; Kim, Dae-Sung; Yoon, Seokjoo; Park, Han-Jin

    2017-12-13

    During liver development, nonpolarized hepatic progenitor cells differentiate into mature hepatocytes with distinct polarity. This polarity is essential for maintaining the intrinsic properties of hepatocytes. The balance between the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) plays a decisive role in differentiation of polarized hepatocytes. In this study, we found that phthalazinone pyrazole (PP), a selective inhibitor of Aurora-A kinase (Aurora-A), suppressed the EMT during the differentiation of hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) from human embryonic stem cells. The differentiated HLCs treated with PP at the hepatoblast stage showed enhanced hepatic morphology and functions, particularly with regard to the expression of drug metabolizing enzymes. Moreover, we found that these effects were mediated though suppression of the AKT pathway, which is involved in induction of the EMT, and upregulation of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α expression rather than Aurora-A inhibition. In conclusion, these findings provided insights into the regulatory role of the EMT on in vitro hepatic maturation, suggesting that inhibition of the EMT may drive transformation of hepatoblast cells into mature and polarized HLCs.

  4. Species, sex and inter-individual differences in DNA repair induced by nine sex steroids in primary cultures of rat and human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Antonietta; Mattioli, Francesca; Angiola, Marianna; Reimann, Roland; Brambilla, Giovanni

    2003-04-20

    Sex steroids, due to the generally negative responses observed in routinely employed standard genotoxicity assays, are considered epigenetic carcinogens. Some doubts on this conviction are raised by the results of recent studies providing evidence that cyproterone acetate and two structural analogues, chlormadinone acetate and megestrol acetate, are genotoxic in female rats but only for the liver, and in primary human hepatocytes from donors of both genders. The experimental evidence suggests that the metabolic activation of these molecules to reactive species and the consequent formation of DNA adducts occur only in the intact hepatocyte. Since the possibility that other sex steroids cause a liver-specific genotoxic effect cannot be ruled out a priori, we investigated nine drugs of this family for their ability to induce DNA repair synthesis in primary cultures of rat and human hepatocytes. Each steroid was tested in cultures from at least two male and two female donors of each species. Hepatocytes were exposed for 20h to sub-toxic concentrations ranging from 1 to 50 micro M, and DNA repair induction was measured by quantitative autoradiography. In primary rat hepatocytes, induction of DNA repair indicative of a frankly positive response was detected in cultures from: 2/2 males and 3/3 females with drospirenone, 2/2 males and 1/2 females with ethinylestradiol, 1/2 males and 1/2 females with oxymetholone, 1/2 males with norethisterone, 1/4 females with progesterone, and 1/4 males with methyltestosterone. Consistent negative responses were obtained with testosterone and stanozolol. A few inconclusive responses were observed in rat hepatocytes exposed to progesterone, medroxyprogesterone, norethisterone, methyltestosterone and oxymetholone. In contrast, under the same experimental conditions the nine sex steroids provided frankly negative responses in the large majority of cultures of primary hepatocytes from both male and female human donors; the only exceptions

  5. Expression of human factor IX in rabbit hepatocytes by retrovirus-mediated gene transfer: Potential for gene therapy of hemophilia B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, A.R. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA) Puget Sound Blood Center, Seattle, WA (USA)); Darlington, G. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA)); Armentano, D.; Woo, S.L.C.

    1990-08-01

    Hemophilia B (Christmas disease) is a chromosome X-linked blood clotting disorder which results when factor IX is deficient or functionally defective. The enzyme is synthesized in the liver, and the existence of animal models for this genetic disease will permit the development of somatic gene therapy protocols aimed at transfer of the functional gene into the liver. The authors report the construction of an N2-based recombinant retroviral vector, NCMVFIX, for efficient transfer and expression of human factor IX cDNA in primary rabbit hepatocytes. In this construct the human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter directs the expression of factor IX. Hepatocytes were isolated from 3-week-old New Zealand White rabbits, infected with the recombinant virus, and analyzed for secretion of active factor IX. The infected rabbit hepatocytes produced human factor IX that is indistinguishable from enzyme derived from normal human plasma. The recombinant protein is sufficiently {gamma}-carboxylated and is functionally active in clotting assays. These results establish the feasibility of using infected hepatocytes for the expression of this protein and are a step toward the goal of correcting hemophilia B by hepatic gene transfer.

  6. Hepatitis C virus-induced innate immune responses in human iPS cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Fuminori; Kunito, Takemaru; Takayama, Kazuo; Hashimoto, Rina; Tachibana, Masashi; Sakamoto, Naoya; Wakita, Takaji; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2017-10-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality. In order to develop effective remedies for hepatitis C, it is important to understand the HCV infection profile and host-HCV interaction. HCV-induced innate immune responses play a crucial role in spontaneous HCV clearance; however, HCV-induced innate immune responses have not been fully evaluated in hepatocytes, partly because there are few in vitro models of HCV-induced innate immunity. Recently, human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have received much attention as an in vitro model of infection with various pathogens, including HCV. We previously established highly functional hepatocyte-like cells differentiated from human iPS cells (iPS-HLCs). Here, we examined the potential of iPS-HLCs as an in vitro HCV infection model, especially for evaluation of the relationship between HCV infection levels and HCV-induced innate immunity. Significant expressions of type I and III interferons (IFNs) and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) were induced following transfection with HCV genomic replicon RNA in iPS-HLCs. Following inoculation with the HCV JFH-1 strain in iPS-HLCs, peaks of HCV genome replication and HCV protein expression were observed on day 2, and then both the HCV genome and protein levels gradually declined, while the mRNA levels of type III IFNs and ISGs peaked at day 2 following inoculation. These results suggest that the HCV genome efficiently replicates in iPS-HLCs, resulting in HCV genome-induced up-regulation of IFNs and ISGs, and thereafter, HCV genome-induced up-regulation of IFNs and ISGs mediates a reduction in the HCV genome and protein levels in iPS-HLCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Determination of Acute Lethal and Chronic Lethal Thresholds of Valproic Acid using 3D Spheroids Constructed from the Immortal Human Hepatocyte Cell Line Hepg2/C3A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fey, S. J.; Wrzesinski, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    describe here a culture system based on 3D spheroid culture of immortal hepatocytes which can determine the toxicity of valproic acid (or structurally or functionally related molecules) in vitro. The spheroids were used to follow changes in ATP production, glucose uptake and adenylate kinase following...

  8. Impairment of type I but not type III IFN signaling by hepatitis C virus infection influences antiviral responses in primary human hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Friborg

    Full Text Available Peginterferon lambda-1a (Lambda, a type III interferon (IFN, acts through a unique receptor complex with limited cellular expression outside the liver which may result in a differentiated tolerability profile compared to peginterferon alfa (alfa. In Phase 2b clinical studies, Lambda administered in combination with ribavirin (RBV was efficacious in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV infection representing genotypes 1 through 4, and was associated with more rapid declines in HCV RNA compared to alfa plus RBV. To gain insights into potential mechanisms for this finding, we investigated the effects of HCV replication on IFN signaling in primary human hepatocytes (PHH and in induced hepatocyte-like cells (iHLCs. HCV infection resulted in rapid down-regulation of the type I IFN-α receptor subunit 1 (IFNAR1 transcript in hepatocytes while the transcriptional level of the unique IFN-λ receptor subunit IL28RA was transiently increased. In line with this observation, IFN signaling was selectively impaired in infected cells upon stimulation with alfa but not in response to Lambda. Importantly, in contrast to alfa, Lambda was able to induce IFN-stimulated gene (ISG expression in HCV-infected hepatocytes, reflecting the onset of innate responses. Moreover, global transcriptome analysis in hepatocytes indicated that Lambda stimulation prolonged the expression of various ISGs that are potentially beneficial to antiviral defense mechanisms. Collectively, these observed effects of HCV infection on IFN receptor expression and signaling within infected hepatocytes provide a possible explanation for the more pronounced early virologic responses observed in patients treated with Lambda compared to alfa.

  9. The right choice of antihypertensives protects primary human hepatocytes from ethanol- and recombinant human TGF-β1-induced cellular damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehnert, Sabrina; Lukoschek, Teresa; Bachmann, Anastasia; Martínez Sánchez, Juan J; Damm, Georg; Nussler, Natascha C; Pscherer, Stefan; Stöckle, Ulrich; Dooley, Steven; Mueller, Sebastian; Nussler, Andreas K

    2013-01-01

    Patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD) often suffer from high blood pressure and rely on antihypertensive treatment. Certain antihypertensives may influence progression of chronic liver disease. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the impact of the commonly used antihypertensives amlodipine, captopril, furosemide, metoprolol, propranolol, and spironolactone on alcohol-induced damage toward human hepatocytes (hHeps). hHeps were isolated by collagenase perfusion. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured by fluorescence-based assays. Cellular damage was determined by lactate-dehydrogenase (LDH)-leakage. Expression analysis was performed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling was investigated by a Smad3/4-responsive luciferase-reporter assay. Ethanol and TGF-β1 rapidly increased ROS in hHeps, causing a release of 40%-60% of total LDH after 72 hours. All antihypertensives dose dependently reduced ethanol-mediated oxidative stress and cellular damage. Similar results were observed for TGF-β1-dependent damage, except for furosemide, which had no effect. As a common mechanism, all antihypertensives increased heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression, and inhibition of HO-1 activity reversed the protective effect of the drugs. Interestingly, Smad3/4 signaling was reduced by all compounds except furosemide, which even enhanced this profibrotic signaling. This effect was mediated by expressional changes of Smad3 and/or Smad4. Our results suggest that antihypertensives may both positively and negatively influence chronic liver disease progression. Therefore, we propose that in future patients with ALD and high blood pressure, they could benefit from an adjusted antihypertensive therapy with additional antifibrotic effects.

  10. Production of human mutant biologically active hepatocyte growth factor in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongsheng; Wan, Aini; Peng, Lin; Chen, Yun; He, Yang; Yang, Jianfeng; Jin, Jian

    2017-05-28

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a potent multifunctional cytokine that affects proliferation, migration, and morphogenesis of various cells. HGF is secreted as an inactive single-chain precursor protein and activated by the cleavage of serine proteases to form heterodimers. In our current study, the cleavage site of HGF was blocked by replaced Arg 494 of Glu (R494E) that resulted in the single-chain HGF (R494E) unable to be cleaved by serine proteases. We established Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells overexpressing HGF (R494E), the expression of HGF (R494E) achieved 12 mg/L and was similar to a previously reported study. The recombinant protein was then purified from culture medium using a two-step chromatographic procedure that resulted in about a 40% recovery rate. The purified HGF (R494E) was obtained as a single-chain active protein. It concluded that HGF (R494E) exhibited a biologically active protein and the overexpressing CHO cell line supplied sufficient material for future studies. The R494E replacement of the cleavage site would be beneficial to the utility of other similar therapeutic proteins.

  11. ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter A1 Deficiency in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocytes Abrogates HDL Biogenesis and Enhances Triglyceride Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Bi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the recognized role of the ATP-binding Cassette Transporter A1 (ABCA1 in high-density lipoprotein (HDL metabolism, our understanding of ABCA1 deficiency in human hepatocytes is limited. To define the functional effects of human hepatocyte ABCA1 deficiency, we generated induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC-derived hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs from Tangier disease (TD and matched control subjects. Control HLCs exhibited robust cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I and formed nascent HDL particles. ABCA1-deficient HLCs failed to mediate lipid efflux or nascent HDL formation, but had elevated triglyceride (TG secretion. Global transcriptome analysis revealed significantly increased ANGPTL3 expression in ABCA1-deficient HLCs. Angiopoietin-related protein 3 (ANGPTL3 was enriched in plasma of TD relative to control subjects. These results highlight the required role of ABCA1 in cholesterol efflux and nascent HDL formation by hepatocytes. Furthermore, our results suggest that hepatic ABCA1 deficiency results in increased hepatic TG and ANGPTL3 secretion, potentially underlying the elevated plasma TG levels in TD patients.

  12. Human induced hepatic lineage-oriented stem cells: autonomous specification of human iPS cells toward hepatocyte-like cells without any exogenous differentiation factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Ishikawa

    Full Text Available Preparing targeted cells for medical applications from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs using growth factors, compounds, or gene transfer has been challenging. Here, we report that human induced hepatic lineage-oriented stem cells (hiHSCs were generated and expanded as a new type of hiPSC under non-typical coculture with feeder cells in a chemically defined hiPSC medium at a very high density. Self-renewing hiHSCs expressed markers of both human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and hepatocytes. Those cells were highly expandable, markedly enhancing gene expression of serum hepatic proteins and cytochrome P450 enzymes with the omission of FGF-2 from an undefined hiPSC medium. The hepatic specification of hiHSCs was not attributable to the genetic and epigenetic backgrounds of the starting cells, as they were established from distinct donors and different types of cells. Approximately 90% of hiHSCs autonomously differentiated to hepatocyte-like cells, even in a defined minimum medium without any of the exogenous growth factors necessary for hepatic specification. After 12 days of this culture, the differentiated cells significantly enhanced gene expression of serum hepatic proteins (ALB, SERPINA1, TTR, TF, FABP1, FGG, AGT, RBP4, and AHSG, conjugating enzymes (UGT2B4, UGT2B7, UGT2B10, GSTA2, and GSTA5, transporters (SULT2A1, SLC13A5, and SLCO2B1, and urea cycle-related enzymes (ARG1 and CPS1. In addition, the hepatocyte-like cells performed key functions of urea synthesis, albumin secretion, glycogen storage, indocyanine green uptake, and low-density lipoprotein uptake. The autonomous hepatic specification of hiHSCs was due to their culture conditions (coculture with feeder cells in a defined hiPSC medium at a very high density in self-renewal rather than in differentiation. These results suggest the feasibility of preparing large quantities of hepatocytes as a convenient and inexpensive hiPSC differentiation. Our study also suggests the

  13. HCV Induces Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase, Increases Its Catalytic Activity, and Promotes Caspase Degradation in Infected Human Hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhaowen; Tran, Huy; Mathahs, M. Meleah; Moninger, Thomas O.; Schmidt, Warren N.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Telomerase repairs the telomeric ends of chromosomes and is active in nearly all malignant cells. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is known to be oncogenic and potential interactions with the telomerase system require further study. We determined the effects of HCV infection on human telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) expression and enzyme activity in primary human hepatocytes and continuous cell lines. Results Primary human hepatocytes and Huh-7.5 hepatoma cells showed early de novo TERT protein expression 2–4 days after infection and these events coincided with increased TERT promoter activation, TERT mRNA, and telomerase activity. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that NS3-4A protease-helicase, in contrast to core or NS5A, specifically bound to the C-terminal region of TERT through interactions between helicase domain 2 and protease sequences. Increased telomerase activity was noted when NS3-4A was transfected into cells, when added to reconstituted mixtures of TERT and telomerase RNA, and when incubated with high molecular weight telomerase ‘holoenzyme’ complexes. The NS3-4A catalytic effect on telomerase was inhibited with primuline or danoprevir, agents that are known to inhibit NS3 helicase and protease activities respectively. In HCV infected cells, NS3-4A could be specifically recovered with telomerase holoenzyme complexes in contrast to NS5A or core protein. HCV infection also activated the effector caspase 7 which is known to target TERT. Activation coincided with the appearance of lower molecular weight carboxy-terminal fragment(s) of TERT, chiefly sized at 45 kD, which could be inhibited with pancaspase or caspase 7 inhibitors. Conclusions HCV infection induces TERT expression and stimulates telomerase activity in addition to triggering Caspase activity that leads to increased TERT degradation. These activities suggest multiple points whereby the virus can influence neoplasia. The NS3-4A protease-helicase can directly bind to TERT

  14. Activation of the constitutive androstane receptor inhibits gluconeogenesis without affecting lipogenesis or fatty acid synthesis in human hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, Caitlin; Pan, Yongmei; Li, Linhao [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Heyward, Scott; Moeller, Timothy [Bioreclamation In Vitro Technologies, Baltimore, MD 21227 (United States); Swaan, Peter W. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Wang, Hongbing, E-mail: hwang@rx.umaryland.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Objective: Accumulating evidence suggests that activation of mouse constitutive androstane receptor (mCAR) alleviates type 2 diabetes and obesity by inhibiting hepatic gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis, and fatty acid synthesis. However, the role of human (h) CAR in energy metabolism is largely unknown. The present study aims to investigate the effects of selective hCAR activators on hepatic energy metabolism in human primary hepatocytes (HPH). Methods: Ligand-based structure–activity models were used for virtual screening of the Specs database ( (www.specs.net)) followed by biological validation in cell-based luciferase assays. The effects of two novel hCAR activators (UM104 and UM145) on hepatic energy metabolism were evaluated in HPH. Results: Real-time PCR and Western blotting analyses reveal that activation of hCAR by UM104 and UM145 significantly repressed the expression of glucose-6-phosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, two pivotal gluconeogenic enzymes, while exerting negligible effects on the expression of genes associated with lipogenesis and fatty acid synthesis. Functional experiments show that UM104 and UM145 markedly inhibit hepatic synthesis of glucose but not triglycerides in HPH. In contrast, activation of mCAR by 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene, a selective mCAR activator, repressed the expression of genes associated with gluconeogenesis, lipogenesis, and fatty acid synthesis in mouse primary hepatocytes, which were consistent with previous observations in mouse model in vivo. Conclusion: Our findings uncover an important species difference between hCAR and mCAR in hepatic energy metabolism, where hCAR selectively inhibits gluconeogenesis without suppressing fatty acid synthesis. Implications: Such species selectivity should be considered when exploring CAR as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders. - Highlights: • Novel hCAR activators were identified by computational and biological approaches. • The role

  15. Effects of artificial sweeteners on the AhR- and GR-dependent CYP1A1 expression in primary human hepatocytes and human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenickova, Alzbeta; Pecova, Michaela; Bachleda, Petr; Dvorak, Zdenek

    2013-12-01

    Food constituents may cause a phenomenon of food-drug interactions. In the current study, we examined the effects of artificial sweeteners (aspartame, acesulfame, cyclamate, saccharin) on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent expression of CYP1A1 in human hepatocytes, hepatic HepG2 and intestinal LS174T cancer cell lines. Sweeteners were tested in concentrations up to those occurring in non-alcoholic beverages. Basal and ligand-inducible AhR- and GR-dependent reporter gene activation in stably transfected HepG2 and HeLa cells, respectively, were not affected by either of the sweeteners tested after 24h of incubation. The expression of CYP1A1 mRNA and protein in primary cultures of human hepatocytes and in LS174T and HepG2 cells was not induced by any of the tested sweeteners. Overall, aspartame, acesulfame, saccharin and cyclamate had no effects on CYP1A1 expression and transcriptional activities of AhR and GR. These data imply the safety of artificial sweeteners in terms of interference with AhR, GR and CYP1A1. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Human CB1 Receptor Isoforms, present in Hepatocytes and β-cells, are Involved in Regulating Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Mariscal, Isabel; Krzysik-Walker, Susan M; Doyle, Máire E; Liu, Qing-Rong; Cimbro, Raffaello; Santa-Cruz Calvo, Sara; Ghosh, Soumita; Cieśla, Łukasz; Moaddel, Ruin; Carlson, Olga D; Witek, Rafal P; O'Connell, Jennifer F; Egan, Josephine M

    2016-09-19

    Therapeutics aimed at blocking the cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor for treatment of obesity resulted in significant improvements in liver function, glucose uptake and pancreatic β-cell function independent of weight loss or CB1 receptor blockade in the brain, suggesting that peripherally-acting only CB1 receptor blockers may be useful therapeutic agents. Neuropsychiatric side effects and lack of tissue specificity precluded clinical use of first-generation, centrally acting CB1 receptor blockers. In this study we specifically analyzed the potential relevance to diabetes of human CB1 receptor isoforms in extraneural tissues involved in glucose metabolism. We identified an isoform of the human CB1 receptor (CB1b) that is highly expressed in β-cells and hepatocytes but not in the brain. Importantly, CB1b shows stronger affinity for the inverse agonist JD-5037 than for rimonabant compared to CB1 full length. Most relevant to the field, CB1b is a potent regulator of adenylyl cyclase activity in peripheral metabolic tissues. CB1b blockade by JD-5037 results in stronger adenylyl cyclase activation compared to rimonabant and it is a better enhancer of insulin secretion in β-cells. We propose this isoform as a principal pharmacological target for the treatment of metabolic disorders involving glucose metabolism.

  17. Omeprazole and lansoprazole enantiomers induce CYP3A4 in human hepatocytes and cell lines via glucocorticoid receptor and pregnane X receptor axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotna, Aneta; Dvorak, Zdenek

    2014-01-01

    Benzimidazole drugs lansoprazole and omeprazole are used for treatment of various gastrointestinal pathologies. Both compounds cause drug-drug interactions because they activate aryl hydrocarbon receptor and induce CYP1A genes. In the current paper, we examined the effects of lansoprazole and omeprazole enantiomers on the expression of key drug-metabolizing enzyme CYP3A4 in human hepatocytes and human cancer cell lines. Lansoprazole enantiomers, but not omeprazole, were equipotent inducers of CYP3A4 mRNA in HepG2 cells. All forms (S-, R-, rac-) of lansoprazole and omeprazole induced CYP3A4 mRNA and protein in human hepatocytes. The quantitative profiles of CYP3A4 induction by individual forms of lansoprazole and omeprazole exerted enantiospecific patterns. Lansoprazole dose-dependently activated pregnane X receptor PXR in gene reporter assays, and slightly modulated rifampicin-inducible PXR activity, with similar potency for each enantiomer. Omeprazole dose-dependently activated PXR and inhibited rifampicin-inducible PXR activity. The effects of S-omeprazole were much stronger as compared to those of R-omeprazole. All forms of lansoprazole, but not omeprazole, slightly activated glucocorticoid receptor and augmented dexamethasone-induced GR transcriptional activity. Omeprazole and lansoprazole influenced basal and ligand inducible expression of tyrosine aminotransferase, a GR-target gene, in HepG2 cells and human hepatocytes. Overall, we demonstrate here that omeprazole and lansoprazole enantiomers induce CYP3A4 in HepG2 cells and human hepatocytes. The induction comprises differential interactions of omeprazole and lansoprazole with transcriptional regulators PXR and GR, and some of the effects were enantiospecific. The data presented here might be of toxicological and clinical importance, since the effects occurred in therapeutically relevant concentrations.

  18. Functional activity of isolated pig hepatocytes attached to different extracellular matrix substrates. Implication for application of pig hepatocytes in a bioartificial liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Velde, A. A.; Ladiges, N. C.; Flendrig, L. M.; Chamuleau, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    For the manufacture of a bioartificial liver for human application, large amounts of viable and active hepatocytes are needed. Pig hepatocytes are considered to be the best alternative to scarce human hepatocytes. In vitro hepatocyte functions have so far been tested under different circumstances,

  19. Long-term exposure to abnormal glucose levels alters drug metabolism pathways and insulin sensitivity in primary human hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Matthew D.; Ballinger, Kimberly R.; Khetani, Salman R.

    2016-06-01

    Hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus has been linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can progress to inflammation, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding how chronic hyperglycemia affects primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) can facilitate the development of therapeutics for these diseases. Conversely, elucidating the effects of hypoglycemia on PHHs may provide insights into how the liver adapts to fasting, adverse diabetes drug reactions, and cancer. In contrast to declining PHH monocultures, micropatterned co-cultures (MPCCs) of PHHs and 3T3-J2 murine embryonic fibroblasts maintain insulin-sensitive glucose metabolism for several weeks. Here, we exposed MPCCs to hypo-, normo- and hyperglycemic culture media for ~3 weeks. While albumin and urea secretion were not affected by glucose level, hypoglycemic MPCCs upregulated CYP3A4 enzyme activity as compared to other glycemic states. In contrast, hyperglycemic MPCCs displayed significant hepatic lipid accumulation in the presence of insulin, while also showing decreased sensitivity to insulin-mediated inhibition of glucose output relative to a normoglycemic control. In conclusion, we show for the first time that PHHs exposed to hypo- and hyperglycemia can remain highly functional, but display increased CYP3A4 activity and selective insulin resistance, respectively. In the future, MPCCs under glycemic states can aid in novel drug discovery and mechanistic investigations.

  20. A modeling approach to evaluate the balance between bioactivation and detoxification of MeIQx in human hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victorien Delannée

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAA are environmental and food contaminants that are potentially carcinogenic for humans. 2-Amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx is one of the most abundant HAA formed in cooked meat. MeIQx is metabolized by cytochrome P450 1A2 in the human liver into detoxificated and bioactivated products. Once bioactivated, MeIQx metabolites can lead to DNA adduct formation responsible for further genome instability. Methods Using a computational approach, we developed a numerical model for MeIQx metabolism in the liver that predicts the MeIQx biotransformation into detoxification or bioactivation pathways according to the concentration of MeIQx. Results Our results demonstrate that (1 the detoxification pathway predominates, (2 the ratio between detoxification and bioactivation pathways is not linear and shows a maximum at 10 µM of MeIQx in hepatocyte cell models, and (3 CYP1A2 is a key enzyme in the system that regulates the balance between bioactivation and detoxification. Our analysis suggests that such a ratio could be considered as an indicator of MeIQx genotoxicity at a low concentration of MeIQx. Conclusions Our model permits the investigation of the balance between bioactivation (i.e., DNA adduct formation pathway through the prediction of potential genotoxic compounds and detoxification of MeIQx in order to predict the behaviour of this environmental contaminant in the human liver. It highlights the importance of complex regulations of enzyme competitions that should be taken into account in any further multi-organ models.

  1. Transcription Factors and Medium Suitable for Initiating the Differentiation of Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to the Hepatocyte Lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2016-09-01

    Transcription factors and culture media were investigated to determine the condition to initiate the differentiation of human-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells most efficiently. The expression of genes in human adult liver was compared with that in 201B7 cells (iPS cells) using cDNA microarray analysis. Episomal plasmids expressing transcription factors were constructed. 201B7 cells were transfected with the episomal plasmids and cultured in ReproFF (feeder-free media maintaining pluripotency), Leibovitz-15 (L15), William's E (WE), or Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium/Nutrient F-12 Ham (DF12) for 7 days. RNA was isolated and subjected to real-time quantitative PCR to analyze the expression of alpha-feto protein (AFP) and albumin. cDNA microarray analysis revealed 16 transcription factors that were upregulated in human adult liver relative to that in 201B7 cells. Episomal plasmids expressing these 16 genes were transfected into 201B7 cells. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (CEBPA), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (CEBPB), forkhead box A1 (FOXA1), and forkhead box A3 (FOXA3) up-regulated AFP and down-regulated Nanog. These four genes were further analyzed. The expression of AFP and albumin was the highest in 201B7 cells transfected with the combination of CEBPA, CEBPB, FOXA1, and FOXA3 and cultured in WE. The combination of CEBPA, CEBPB, FOXA1, and FOXA3 was suitable for 201B7 cells to initiate differentiation to the hepatocyte lineage and WE was the most suitable medium for culture after transfection. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2001-2009, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. A study of the mechanism of in vitro cytotoxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles using catfish primary hepatocytes and human HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yonggang; Aker, Winfred G; Hwang, Huey-min; Yedjou, Clement G; Yu, Hongtao; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2011-10-15

    Nanoparticles (NPs), including nanometal oxides, are being used in diverse applications such as medicine, clothing, cosmetics and food. In order to promote the safe development of nanotechnology, it is essential to assess the potential adverse health consequences associated with human exposure. The liver is a target site for NP toxicity, due to NP accumulation within it after ingestion, inhalation or absorption. The toxicity of nano-ZnO, TiO(2), CuO and Co(3)O(4) was investigated using a primary culture of channel catfish hepatocytes and human HepG2 cells as in vitro model systems for assessing the impact of metal oxide NPs on human and environmental health. Some mechanisms of nanotoxicity were determined by using phase contrast inverted microscopy, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays, reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays, and flow cytometric assays. Nano-CuO and ZnO showed significant toxicity in both HepG2 cells and catfish primary hepatocytes. The results demonstrate that HepG2 cells are more sensitive than catfish primary hepatocytes to the toxicity of metal oxide NPs. The overall ranking of the toxicity of metal oxides to the test cells is as follows: TiO(2)toxicity is due not only to ROS-induced cell death, but also to damages to cell and mitochondrial membranes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. In vitro evaluation of major in vivo drug metabolic pathways using primary human hepatocytes and HepaRG cells in suspension and a dynamic three-dimensional bioreactor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnell, Malin; Ulvestad, Maria; Ellis, Ewa; Weidolf, Lars; Andersson, Tommy B

    2012-10-01

    Major human specific metabolites, not detected during in vivo and in vitro preclinical studies, may cause unexpected drug interactions and toxicity in human and delays in clinical programs. Thus, reliable preclinical tools for the detection of major human metabolites are of high importance. The aim of this study was to compare major drug metabolic pathways in HepaRG cells, a human hepatoma cell line, to fresh human hepatocytes, cryopreserved human hepatocytes, and human in vivo data. Furthermore, the maintenance of cytochrome P450 (P450) and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activities in a dynamic three-dimensional (3D) bioreactor were evaluated over time by using HepaRG cells and human hepatocytes. (14)C-diclofenac and a candidate from AstraZeneca's drug development program, (14)C-AZD6610, which are metabolized by P450 and UGT in vivo, were used as model substrates. The proportion of relevant biotransformation pathways of the investigated drug was clearly different in the various cell systems. The hydroxylation route was favored in primary human hepatocytes, whereas the glucuronidation route was favored in HepaRG cells. The human in vivo metabolite profile of AZD6610 was best represented by human hepatocytes, whereas all major diclofenac metabolites were detected in HepaRG cells. Moreover, the metabolite profiles in cryopreserved and fresh human hepatocytes were essentially the same. The liver bioreactor using both fresh human hepatocytes and HepaRG cells retained biotransformation capacity over 1 week. Thus, the incubation time can be increased from a few hours in suspension to several days in 3D cultures, which opens up for detection of metabolites from slowly metabolized drugs.

  4. Effects of anthocyanins on the AhR-CYP1A1 signaling pathway in human hepatocytes and human cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenickova, Alzbeta; Anzenbacherova, Eva; Pavek, Petr; Soshilov, Anatoly A; Denison, Michael S; Zapletalova, Michaela; Anzenbacher, Pavel; Dvorak, Zdenek

    2013-07-31

    Anthocyanins are plant pigments occurring in flowers and berry fruits. Since a phenomenon of food-drug interactions is increasingly emerging, we examined the effects of 21 major anthocyanins and the extracts from 3 food supplements containing anthocyanins on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-cytochrome P450 CYP1A1 signaling pathway in human hepatocytes and human hepatic HepG2 and intestinal LS174T cancer cells. Pelargonidin-3-O-rutinoside (PEL-2) and cyanidin-3,5-O-diglucoside (CYA-3) dose-dependently activated AhR, as revealed by gene reporter assay. PEL-2 and CYA-3 induced CYP1A1 mRNA but not protein in HepG2 and LS174T cells. Neither compounds induced CYP1A1 mRNA and protein in four different primary human hepatocytes cultures. The effects of PEL-2 and CYA-3 on AhR occurred by ligand-dependent and ligand-independent mechanisms, respectively, as demonstrated by ligand binding assay. In a direct enzyme inhibition assay, none of the antocyanins tested inhibited the CYP1A1 marker activity to less than 50% even at 100 μM concentration. PEL-2 and CYA-3 at 100 μM inhibited CYP1A1 to 79% and 65%, respectively. In conclusion, with exception of PEL-2 and CYA-3, there were no effects of 19 major anthocyanins and 3 food supplements containing anthocyanins on AhR-CYP1A1 signaling, implying zero potential of these compounds for food-drug interactions with respect to AhR-CYP1A1 pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Differential Effects of Omeprazole and Lansoprazole Enantiomers on Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor in Human Hepatocytes and Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotna, Aneta; Srovnalova, Alzbeta; Svecarova, Michaela; Korhonova, Martina; Bartonkova, Iveta; Dvorak, Zdenek

    2014-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors omeprazole and lansoprazole contain chiral sulfur atom and they are administered as a racemate, i.e. equimolar mixture of S- and R-enantiomers. The enantiopure drugs esomeprazole and dexlansoprazole have been developed and introduced to clinical practice due to their improved clinical and therapeutic properties. Since omeprazole and lansoprazole are activators of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and inducers of CYP1A genes, we examined their enantiospecific effects on AhR-CYP1A pathway in human cancer cells and primary human hepatocytes. We performed gene reporter assays for transcriptional activity of AhR, RT-PCR analyses for CYP1A1/2 mRNAs, western blots for CYP1A1/2 proteins and EROD assay for CYP1A1/2 catalytic activity. Lansoprazole and omeprazole enantiomers displayed differential effects on AhR-CYP1A1/2 pathway. In general, S-enantiomers were stronger activators of AhR and inducers of CYP1A genes as compared to R-enantiomers in lower concentrations, i.e. 1–10 µM for lansoprazole and 10–100 µM for omeprazole. In contrast, R-enantiomers were stronger AhR activators and CYP1A inducers than S-enantiomers in higher concentrations, i.e. 100 µM for lansoprazole and 250 µM for omeprazole. In conclusion, we provide the first evidence of enantiospecific effects of omeprazole and lansoprazole on AhR signaling pathway. PMID:24887303

  6. Differential effects of omeprazole and lansoprazole enantiomers on aryl hydrocarbon receptor in human hepatocytes and cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotna, Aneta; Srovnalova, Alzbeta; Svecarova, Michaela; Korhonova, Martina; Bartonkova, Iveta; Dvorak, Zdenek

    2014-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors omeprazole and lansoprazole contain chiral sulfur atom and they are administered as a racemate, i.e. equimolar mixture of S- and R-enantiomers. The enantiopure drugs esomeprazole and dexlansoprazole have been developed and introduced to clinical practice due to their improved clinical and therapeutic properties. Since omeprazole and lansoprazole are activators of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and inducers of CYP1A genes, we examined their enantiospecific effects on AhR-CYP1A pathway in human cancer cells and primary human hepatocytes. We performed gene reporter assays for transcriptional activity of AhR, RT-PCR analyses for CYP1A1/2 mRNAs, western blots for CYP1A1/2 proteins and EROD assay for CYP1A1/2 catalytic activity. Lansoprazole and omeprazole enantiomers displayed differential effects on AhR-CYP1A1/2 pathway. In general, S-enantiomers were stronger activators of AhR and inducers of CYP1A genes as compared to R-enantiomers in lower concentrations, i.e. 1-10 µM for lansoprazole and 10-100 µM for omeprazole. In contrast, R-enantiomers were stronger AhR activators and CYP1A inducers than S-enantiomers in higher concentrations, i.e. 100 µM for lansoprazole and 250 µM for omeprazole. In conclusion, we provide the first evidence of enantiospecific effects of omeprazole and lansoprazole on AhR signaling pathway.

  7. [Construction and application of a lentiviral vector of single-chain variable fragment antibody against human hepatocyte growth factor receptor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yonghua; Guo, Jia; Yin, Yanxin; Jiang, Ming; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhang, Guodong; Li, Bingyu

    2014-09-01

    To construct a lentiviral expression vector carrying the single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody against human hepatocyte growth factor receptor (HGFR), express it in transfected HEK293 cells, and observe its biological function of specific binding to antigen. The variable regions of the heavy chain (VH) and light chain (VL) genes were amplified directly from the cDNA of hybridoma cell line 8E8 secreting mouse anti-human HGFR antibody and assembled using the splice overlap extension-PCR (SOE-PCR). The constructed HGFR-scFv gene with the signal peptide SP-VH-linker-VL was ligated into the cloning vector pCR-Blunt. After cut off from pCR-Blunt using enzyme digestion, HGFR-scFv gene was subcloned into the lentiviral transfer vector pRRL-CMV, which was identified by the restriction enzyme digestion and sequencing. The lentiviral expression vector pRRL HGFR-scFv was then tansfected together with the packaging plasmids into HEK293T cells to obtain virus particles, and green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression was detected under a fluorescent microscope. Then the virus particles were used to infect HEK293 cells. The scFv expression was detected by RT-PCR and its biological affinity as antibody was measured by ELISA. The lentiviral expression vector pRRL HGFR-scFv was constructed correctly. After HEK293T cells were transfected with the pRRL HGFR-scFv plasmid, the GFP was visible. After HEK293 cells were infected with virus particles, the scFv antibody expressed could bind to HGFR specifically. The lentiviral expression vector of HGFR-scFv was constructed successfully, which would help to study the important role of HGFR in following experiments.

  8. Hepatic maturation of human iPS cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells by ATF5, c/EBPα, and PROX1 transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamori, Daiki; Takayama, Kazuo; Nagamoto, Yasuhito; Mitani, Seiji; Sakurai, Fuminori; Tachibana, Masashi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-15

    Hepatocyte-like cells differentiated from human iPS cells (human iPS-HLCs) are expected to be utilized in drug development and research. However, recent hepatic characterization of human iPS-HLCs showed that these cells resemble fetal hepatocytes rather than adult hepatocytes. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to develop a method to enhance the hepatic function of human iPS-HLCs. Because the gene expression levels of the hepatic transcription factors (activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (c/EBPα), and prospero homeobox protein 1 (PROX1)) in adult liver were significantly higher than those in human iPS-HLCs and fetal liver, we expected that the hepatic functions of human iPS-HLCs could be enhanced by adenovirus (Ad) vector-mediated ATF5, c/EBPα, and PROX1 transduction. The gene expression levels of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C9, 2E1, alpha-1 antitrypsin, transthyretin, Na+/taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide, and uridine diphosphate glucuronosyl transferase 1A1 and protein expression levels of CYP2C9 and CYP2E1 were upregulated by ATF5, c/EBPα, and PROX1 transduction. These results suggest that the hepatic functions of the human iPS-HLCs could be enhanced by ATF5, c/EBPα, and PROX1 transduction. Our findings would be useful for the hepatic maturation of human iPS-HLCs. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Antioxidative and apoptotic properties of polyphenolic extracts from edible part of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) on cultured rat hepatocytes and on human hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccadei, Stefania; Di Venere, Donato; Cardinali, Angela; Romano, Ferdinando; Durazzo, Alessandra; Foddai, Maria Stella; Fraioli, Rocco; Mobarhan, Sohrab; Maiani, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Cultured rat hepatocytes and human hepatoma HepG2 cells were used to evaluate the hepatoprotective properties of polyphenolic extracts from the edible part of artichoke (AE). The hepatocytes were exposed to H2O2generated in situ by glucose oxidase and were treated with either AE, or pure chlorogenic acid (ChA) or with the well known antioxidant, N, N'-diphenyl-p-phenilenediamine (DPPD). Addition of glucose oxidase to the culture medium caused depletion of intracellular glutathione (GSH) content, accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA) in the cultures, as a lipid peroxidation indicator, and cell death. These results demonstrated that AE protected cells from the oxidative stress caused by glucose oxidase, comparable to DPPD. Furthermore, AE, as well as ChA, prevented the loss of total GSH and the accumulation of MDA. Treatment of HepG2 cells for 24 h with AE reduced cell viability in a dose-dependent manner, however, ChA had no prominent effects on the cell death rate. Similarly, AE rather than ChA induced apoptosis, measured by flow cytometric analysis of annexin and by activation of caspase-3, in HepG2 cells. Our findings indicate that AE had a marked antioxidative potential that protects hepatocytes from an oxidative stress. Furthermore, AE reduced cell viability and had an apoptotic activity on a human liver cancer cell line.

  10. The pore-forming toxin listeriolysin O mediates a novel entry pathway of L. monocytogenes into human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadia, Stephen; Arnett, Eusondia; Haghighat, Anne-Cécile; Wilson-Kubalek, Elisabeth M; Tweten, Rodney K; Seveau, Stephanie

    2011-11-01

    Intracellular pathogens have evolved diverse strategies to invade and survive within host cells. Among the most studied facultative intracellular pathogens, Listeria monocytogenes is known to express two invasins-InlA and InlB-that induce bacterial internalization into nonphagocytic cells. The pore-forming toxin listeriolysin O (LLO) facilitates bacterial escape from the internalization vesicle into the cytoplasm, where bacteria divide and undergo cell-to-cell spreading via actin-based motility. In the present study we demonstrate that in addition to InlA and InlB, LLO is required for efficient internalization of L. monocytogenes into human hepatocytes (HepG2). Surprisingly, LLO is an invasion factor sufficient to induce the internalization of noninvasive Listeria innocua or polystyrene beads into host cells in a dose-dependent fashion and at the concentrations produced by L. monocytogenes. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying LLO-induced bacterial entry, we constructed novel LLO derivatives locked at different stages of the toxin assembly on host membranes. We found that LLO-induced bacterial or bead entry only occurs upon LLO pore formation. Scanning electron and fluorescence microscopy studies show that LLO-coated beads stimulate the formation of membrane extensions that ingest the beads into an early endosomal compartment. This LLO-induced internalization pathway is dynamin-and F-actin-dependent, and clathrin-independent. Interestingly, further linking pore formation to bacteria/bead uptake, LLO induces F-actin polymerization in a tyrosine kinase-and pore-dependent fashion. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that a bacterial pathogen perforates the host cell plasma membrane as a strategy to activate the endocytic machinery and gain entry into the host cell.

  11. The pore-forming toxin listeriolysin O mediates a novel entry pathway of L. monocytogenes into human hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Vadia

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular pathogens have evolved diverse strategies to invade and survive within host cells. Among the most studied facultative intracellular pathogens, Listeria monocytogenes is known to express two invasins-InlA and InlB-that induce bacterial internalization into nonphagocytic cells. The pore-forming toxin listeriolysin O (LLO facilitates bacterial escape from the internalization vesicle into the cytoplasm, where bacteria divide and undergo cell-to-cell spreading via actin-based motility. In the present study we demonstrate that in addition to InlA and InlB, LLO is required for efficient internalization of L. monocytogenes into human hepatocytes (HepG2. Surprisingly, LLO is an invasion factor sufficient to induce the internalization of noninvasive Listeria innocua or polystyrene beads into host cells in a dose-dependent fashion and at the concentrations produced by L. monocytogenes. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying LLO-induced bacterial entry, we constructed novel LLO derivatives locked at different stages of the toxin assembly on host membranes. We found that LLO-induced bacterial or bead entry only occurs upon LLO pore formation. Scanning electron and fluorescence microscopy studies show that LLO-coated beads stimulate the formation of membrane extensions that ingest the beads into an early endosomal compartment. This LLO-induced internalization pathway is dynamin-and F-actin-dependent, and clathrin-independent. Interestingly, further linking pore formation to bacteria/bead uptake, LLO induces F-actin polymerization in a tyrosine kinase-and pore-dependent fashion. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that a bacterial pathogen perforates the host cell plasma membrane as a strategy to activate the endocytic machinery and gain entry into the host cell.

  12. 25C-NBOMe and 25I-NBOMe metabolite studies in human hepatocytes, in vivo mouse and human urine with high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfarth, Ariane; Roman, Markus; Andersson, Mikael; Kugelberg, Fredrik C; Diao, Xingxing; Carlier, Jeremy; Eriksson, Caroline; Wu, Xiongyu; Konradsson, Peter; Josefsson, Martin; Huestis, Marilyn A; Kronstrand, Robert

    2017-05-01

    25C-NBOMe and 25I-NBOMe are potent hallucinogenic drugs that recently emerged as new psychoactive substances. To date, a few metabolism studies were conducted for 25I-NBOMe, whereas 25C-NBOMe metabolism data are scarce. Therefore, we investigated the metabolic profile of these compounds in human hepatocytes, an in vivo mouse model and authentic human urine samples from forensic cases. Cryopreserved human hepatocytes were incubated for 3 h with 10 μM 25C-NBOMe and 25I-NBOMe; samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) on an Accucore C18 column with a Thermo QExactive; data analysis was performed with Compound Discoverer software (Thermo Scientific). Mice were administered 1.0 mg drug/kg body weight intraperitoneally, urine was collected for 24 h and analyzed (with or without hydrolysis) by LC-HRMS on an Acquity HSS T3 column with an Agilent 6550 QTOF; data were analyzed manually and with WebMetabase software (Molecular Discovery). Human urine samples were analyzed similarly. In vitro and in vivo results matched well. 25C-NBOMe and 25I-NBOMe were predominantly metabolized by O-demethylation, followed by O-di-demethylation and hydroxylation. All methoxy groups could be demethylated; hydroxylation preferably occurred at the NBOMe ring. Phase I metabolites were extensively conjugated in human urine with glucuronic acid and sulfate. Based on these data and a comparison with synthesized reference standards for potential metabolites, specific and abundant 25C-NBOMe urine targets are 5'-desmethyl 25C-NBOMe, 25C-NBOMe and 5-hydroxy 25C-NBOMe, and for 25I-NBOMe 2' and 5'-desmethyl 25I-NBOMe and hydroxy 25I-NBOMe. These data will help clinical and forensic laboratories to develop analytical methods and to interpret results. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Serum-free culture of primary human hepatocytes in a miniaturized hollow-fibre membrane bioreactor for pharmacological in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lübberstedt, Marc; Müller-Vieira, Ursula; Biemel, Klaus M; Darnell, Malin; Hoffmann, Stefan A; Knöspel, Fanny; Wönne, Eva C; Knobeloch, Daniel; Nüssler, Andreas K; Gerlach, Jörg C; Andersson, Tommy B; Zeilinger, Katrin

    2015-09-01

    Primary human hepatocytes represent an important cell source for in vitro investigation of hepatic drug metabolism and disposition. In this study, a multi-compartment capillary membrane-based bioreactor technology for three-dimensional (3D) perfusion culture was further developed and miniaturized to a volume of less than 0.5 ml to reduce demand for cells. The miniaturized bioreactor was composed of two capillary layers, each made of alternately arranged oxygen and medium capillaries serving as a 3D culture for the cells. Metabolic activity and stability of primary human hepatocytes was studied in this bioreactor in the presence of 2.5% fetal calf serum (FCS) under serum-free conditions over a culture period of 10 days. The miniaturized bioreactor showed functions comparable to previously reported data for larger variants. Glucose and lactate metabolism, urea production, albumin synthesis and release of intracellular enzymes (AST, ALT, GLDH) showed no significant differences between serum-free and serum-supplemented bioreactors. Activities of human-relevant cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes (CYP1A2, CYP3A4/5, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, CYP2B6) analyzed by determination of product formation rates from selective probe substrates were also comparable in both groups. Gene expression analysis showed moderately higher expression in the majority of CYP enzymes, transport proteins and enzymes of Phase II metabolism in the serum-free bioreactors compared to those maintained with FCS. In conclusion, the miniaturized bioreactor maintained stable function over the investigated period and thus provides a suitable system for pharmacological studies on primary human hepatocytes under defined serum-free conditions. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Pegylated interferons Lambda-1a and alfa-2a display different gene induction and cytokine and chemokine release profiles in whole blood, human hepatocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, J; Baglino, S; Friborg, J; Kraft, Z; Gray, T; Hill, M; McPhee, F; Hillson, J; Lopez-Talavera, J C; Wind-Rotolo, M

    2014-06-01

    Pegylated interferon-lambda-1a (Lambda), a type III interferon (IFN) in clinical development for the treatment of chronic HCV infection, has shown comparable efficacy and an improved safety profile to a regimen based on pegylated IFN alfa-2a (alfa). To establish a mechanistic context for this improved profile, we investigated the ex vivo effects of Lambda and alfa on cytokine and chemokine release, and on expression of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) in primary human hepatocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy subjects. Our findings were further compared with changes observed in blood analysed from HCV-infected patients treated with Lambda or alfa in clinical studies. mRNA transcript and protein expression of the IFN-λ-limiting receptor subunit was lower compared with IFN-α receptor subunits in all cell types. Upon stimulation, alfa and Lambda induced ISG expression in hepatocytes and PBMCs, although in PBMCs Lambda-induced ISG expression was modest. Furthermore, alfa and Lambda induced release of cytokines and chemokines from hepatocytes and PBMCs, although differences in their kinetics of induction were observed. In HCV-infected patients, alfa treatment induced ISG expression in whole blood after single and repeat dosing. Lambda treatment induced modest ISG expression after single dosing and showed no induction after repeat dosing. Alfa and Lambda treatment increased IP-10, iTAC, IL-6, MCP-1 and MIP-1β levels in serum, with alfa inducing higher levels of all mediators compared with Lambda. Overall, ex vivo and in vivo induction profiles reported in this analysis strongly correlate with clinical observations of fewer related adverse events for Lambda vs those typically associated with alfa. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Human and rat hepatocyte toxicity and protein phosphatase 1 and 2A inhibitory activity of naturally occurring desmethyl-microcystins and nodularins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufelmann, Helena; Krüger, Thomas; Luckas, Bernd; Schrenk, Dieter

    2012-03-11

    Contamination of water, foods and food supplements by various genera of cyanobacteria is a serious health problem worldwide for humans and animals, largely due to the toxic effects of microcystins (MCs) and nodularin (NOD), a group of hepatotoxic cyclic peptides. The toxins occur in variable structures resulting in more than 90 different MCs and 8 different NODs, many of them not having been investigated for their toxic potency. Potent MCs such as MC-LR have been shown to elicit their hepatotoxic potency via inhibition of hepatic protein phosphatases (PP) 1 and 2A leading to over-phosphorylation of vital cellular proteins. This mechanism of action is also thought to be responsible for the long term tumor promoting action of certain MCs and NOD in the liver. Here, we report on the isolation of certain MCs and NOD as well as a number of their desmethylated derivatives from algae bloom. Subsequently, we determined the cytotoxicity of these compounds in isolated primary human and rat hepatocytes in culture. In parallel experiments, we analyzed the inhibitory potency of these congeners on PP1 and 2A using commercially available enzymes. We found in primary rat hepatocytes that MC-LR, -YR and NOD were cytotoxic, namely in the 10 to >50 nM range, while MC-RR was not. The desmethylated congeners of MC-LR, -YR, and NOD were equally or more-toxic as/than their fully methylated counterparts. In primary human hepatocytes we could show that MC-LR, NOD and the desmethylated variants [³Asp]MC-LR, [⁷Dha]MC-LR and [¹Asp]NOD were cytotoxic in the 20 to >600 nM range. Inhibition data with human, bovine and rabbit protein phosphatases 1 and 2A were roughly in accordance with the cytotoxicity findings in human and rat hepatocytes, i.e. desmethylation had no pronounced effects on the inhibitory potencies. Thus, a variety of naturally occurring desmethylated MC and NOD congeners have to be considered as being at least as toxic as the corresponding fully methylated derivatives

  16. Synergy between sulforaphane and selenium in the up-regulation of thioredoxin reductase and protection against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death in human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Wang, Wei; Shan, Yujuan; Barrera, Lawrence N; Howie, Alexander F; Beckett, Geoffrey J; Wu, Kun; Bao, Yongping

    2012-07-15

    Dietary isothiocyanates and selenium are chemopreventive agents and potent inducers of antioxidant enzymes. It has been previously shown that sulforaphane and selenium have a synergistic effect on the upregulation of thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR-1) in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. In this paper, further evidence is presented to show that sulforaphane and selenium synergistically induce TrxR-1 expression in immortalised human hepatocytes. Sulforaphane was found to be more toxic toward hepatocytes than HepG2 cells with IC50=25.1 and 56.4 μM, respectively. Sulforaphane can protect against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death and this protection was enhanced by co-treatment with selenium. Using siRNA to knock down TrxR-1 or Nrf2, sulforaphane (5 μM)-protected cell viability was reduced from 73% to 46% and 34%, respectively, suggesting that TrxR-1 is an important enzyme in protection against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death. Sulforaphane-induced TrxR-1 expression was positively associated with significant levels of Nrf2 translocation into the nucleus, but co-treatment with selenium showed no significant increase in Nrf2 translocation. Moreover, MAPK (ERK, JNK and p38) and PI3K/Akt signalling pathways were found to play no significant role in sulforaphane-induced Nrf2 translocation into the nucleus. However, blocking ERK and JNK signalling pathways decreased sulforaphane-induced TrxR-1 mRNA by about 20%; whereas blocking p38 and PI3K/AKT increased TrxR-1 transcription. In summary, a combination of sulforaphane and selenium resulted in a synergistic upregulation of TrxR-1 that contributed to the enhanced protection against free radical-mediated oxidative damage in human hepatocytes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of L-carnitine against oxidative stress in human hepatocytes: involvement of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jin-Lian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation have been demonstrated to play important roles in the production of liver damage. L-carnitine is a natural substance and acts as a carrier for fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane for subsequent beta-oxidation. It is also an antioxidant that reduces metabolic stress in the cells. Recent years L-carnitine has been proposed for treatment of various kinds of disease, including liver injury. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effect of L-carnitine against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-induced cytotoxicity in a normal human hepatocyte cell line, HL7702. Methods We analyzed cytotoxicity using MTT assay and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release. Antioxidant activity and lipid peroxidation were estimated by reactive oxygen species (ROS levels, activities and protein expressions of superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT, and malondialdehyde (MDA formation. Expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-alpha and its target genes were evaluated by RT-PCR or western blotting. The role of PPAR-alpha in L-carnitine-enhanced expression of SOD and CAT was also explored. Statistical analysis was performed by a one-way analysis of variance, and its significance was assessed by Dennett's post-hoc test. Results The results showed that L-carnitine protected HL7702 cells against cytotoxity induced by H2O2. This protection was related to the scavenging of ROS, the promotion of SOD and CAT activity and expression, and the prevention of lipid peroxidation in cultured HL7702 cells. The decreased expressions of PPAR-alpha, carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT1 and acyl-CoA oxidase (ACOX induced by H2O2 can be attenuated by L-carnitine. Besides, we also found that the promotion of SOD and CAT protein expression induced by L-carnitine was blocked by PPAR-alpha inhibitor MK886. Conclusions Taken together, our findings suggest that L-carnitine could protect HL

  18. Effects of L-carnitine against oxidative stress in human hepatocytes: involvement of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Excessive oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation have been demonstrated to play important roles in the production of liver damage. L-carnitine is a natural substance and acts as a carrier for fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane for subsequent beta-oxidation. It is also an antioxidant that reduces metabolic stress in the cells. Recent years L-carnitine has been proposed for treatment of various kinds of disease, including liver injury. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effect of L-carnitine against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cytotoxicity in a normal human hepatocyte cell line, HL7702. Methods We analyzed cytotoxicity using MTT assay and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Antioxidant activity and lipid peroxidation were estimated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, activities and protein expressions of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), and malondialdehyde (MDA) formation. Expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-alpha and its target genes were evaluated by RT-PCR or western blotting. The role of PPAR-alpha in L-carnitine-enhanced expression of SOD and CAT was also explored. Statistical analysis was performed by a one-way analysis of variance, and its significance was assessed by Dennett's post-hoc test. Results The results showed that L-carnitine protected HL7702 cells against cytotoxity induced by H2O2. This protection was related to the scavenging of ROS, the promotion of SOD and CAT activity and expression, and the prevention of lipid peroxidation in cultured HL7702 cells. The decreased expressions of PPAR-alpha, carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT1) and acyl-CoA oxidase (ACOX) induced by H2O2 can be attenuated by L-carnitine. Besides, we also found that the promotion of SOD and CAT protein expression induced by L-carnitine was blocked by PPAR-alpha inhibitor MK886. Conclusions Taken together, our findings suggest that L-carnitine could protect HL7702 cells against

  19. Effectiveness of Intracavernous Delivery of Recombinant Human Hepatocyte Growth Factor on Erectile Function in the Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Nando Dulal; Yin, Guo Nan; Choi, Min Ji; Song, Kang-Moon; Park, Jin-Mi; Limanjaya, Anita; Ghatak, Kalyan; Minh, Nguyen Nhat; Ock, Jiyeon; Park, Soo-Hwan; Kim, Ho Min; Ryu, Ji-Kan; Suh, Jun-Kyu

    2016-11-01

    Diabetic erectile dysfunction is a disease mostly of vascular origin and men with diabetic erectile dysfunction respond poorly to oral phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a pleiotropic factor that plays an essential role in the regulation of cell proliferation, survival, and angiogenesis. To determine the effectiveness of recombinant human (rh)-HGF in restoring erectile function in diabetic mice. Four groups of mice were used: control non-diabetic mice and streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice receiving two successive intracavernous injections of phosphate buffered saline (days -3 and 0), a single intracavernous injection of rh-HGF (day 0), or two successive intracavernous injections of rh-HGF (days -3 and 0). We also examined the effect of rh-HGF in primary cultured mouse cavernous endothelial cells and in major pelvic ganglion culture in vitro, which was incubated under a normal-glucose (5 mmol/L) or a high-glucose (30 mmol/L) condition. Two weeks after treatment, we measured erectile function by electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve and the penis was harvested for histologic studies. Repeated intracavernous injections of rh-HGF protein induced significant restoration of erectile function in diabetic mice (89-100% of control values), whereas a single intracavernous injection of rh-HGF protein elicited modest improvement. Rh-HGF significantly induced phosphorylation of its receptor c-Met, increased the content of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells, and decreased the generation of reactive oxygen species (superoxide anion and peroxynitrite) and extravasation of oxidized low-density lipoprotein in diabetic mice. Under the high-glucose condition, rh-HGF protein also promoted tube formation in mouse cavernous endothelial cells and enhanced neurite sprouting in major pelvic ganglion culture in vitro. The dual angiogenic and neurotrophic effects of HGF could open a new avenue through which diabetic erectile dysfunction

  20. Monoacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 1 is regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ in human hepatocytes and increases lipid accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jung Hwan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Integrated Genomic Research Center for Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Genetic Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 PLUS Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yoo Jeong [Division of Metabolic Disease, Center for Biomedical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Cheongwon-gun, Chungbuk 363-951 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyo Jung; Choi, Hyeonjin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Integrated Genomic Research Center for Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Genetic Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yoonjeong; Seok, Jo Woon [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Integrated Genomic Research Center for Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Genetic Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 PLUS Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-woo, E-mail: japol13@yuhs.ac [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Integrated Genomic Research Center for Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Genetic Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 PLUS Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Severance Biomedical Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-08

    Monoacylglycerol O-acyltransferase (MGAT) is an enzyme that is involved in triglyceride synthesis by catalyzing the formation of diacylglycerol from monoacylglycerol and fatty acyl CoAs. Recently, we reported that MGAT1 has a critical role in hepatic TG accumulation and that its suppression ameliorates hepatic steatosis in a mouse model. However, the function of MGAT enzymes in hepatic lipid accumulation has not been investigated in humans. Unlike in rodents, MGAT3 as well as MGAT1 and MGAT2 are present in humans. In this study, we evaluated the differences between MGAT subtypes and their association with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a regulator of mouse MGAT1 expression. In human primary hepatocytes, basal expression of MGAT1 was lower than that of MGAT2 or MGAT3, but was strongly induced by PPARγ overexpression. A luciferase assay as well as an electromobility shift assay revealed that human MGAT1 promoter activity is driven by PPARγ by direct binding to at least two regions of the promoter in 293T and HepG2 cells. Moreover, siRNA-mediated suppression of MGAT1 expression significantly attenuated lipid accumulation by PPARγ overexpression in HepG2 cells, as evidenced by oil-red-O staining. These results suggest that human MGAT1 has an important role in fatty liver formation as a target gene of PPARγ, and blocking MGAT1 activity could be an efficient therapeutic way to reduce nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases in humans. - Highlights: • PPARγ promotes MGAT1 expression in human primary hepatocytes. • PPARγ directly regulates MGAT1 promoter activity. • Human MGAT1 promoter has at least two PPARγ-binding elements. • Inhibition of MGAT1 expression attenuates hepatic lipid accumulation in humans.

  1. X protein variants of the autochthonous Latin American hepatitis B virus F genotype promotes human hepatocyte death by the induction of apoptosis and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizalde, María Mercedes; Campos, Rodolfo Héctor; Barbini, Luciana

    2017-10-15

    The hepatitis B virus X protein (HBV-X) is a multifunctional regulatory protein associated with the pathogenesis of liver disease in chronic HBV infection. Basal core promoter mutations (BCP), associated with the clinical course of chronic HBV infection, affect HBV-X at 130-131 positions. The role of these mutations on HBV-X biological activity remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of the presence of different amino acids at 130-131 positions of HBV-X on the biological activity of the protein. Transient expression of wild type and mutant F1b and F4 HBV-X increased cell mortality by the induction of apoptosis in human hepatoma cells. The wild type and mutant HBV-X differentially modulate the expression of pro-apoptotic (Bax) and anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2 and Bcl-X) regulatory proteins of the Bcl-2 family. Furthermore, the expression of HBV-X variants of both subgenotypes induced autophagy of human tumoral hepatocytes. In conclusion, HBV-X variants of the Latin American HBV F genotype promotes human hepatocytes death by the induction of apoptosis and autophagy. The results of this work describe some of the molecular mechanisms by which HBV-X variants contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases in the infected liver and help to the biological characterization of genotype F, responsible of the majority of HBV infections in Argentina. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Biokinetics of chlorpromazine in primary rat and human hepatocytes and human HepaRG cells after repeated exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeders, Jessica J W; Parmentier, Céline; Truisi, Germaine L; Jossé, Rozenn; Alexandre, Eliane; Savary, Camille C; Hewitt, Philip G; Mueller, Stefan O; Guillouzo, André; Richert, Lysiane; van Eijkeren, Jan C H; Hermens, Joop L M; Blaauboer, Bas J

    2015-01-01

    Since drug induced liver injury is difficult to predict in animal models, more representative tests are needed to better evaluate these effects in humans. Existing in vitro systems hold great potential to detect hepatotoxicity of pharmaceuticals. In this study, the in vitro biokinetics of the model

  3. Tumorigenesis induced by coexpression of human hepatocyte growth factor and the human met protooncogene leads to high levels of expression of the ligand and receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, S; Oskarsson, M; Faletto, D; Tsarfaty, I; Resau, J H; Nakamura, T; Rosen, E; Hopkins, R F; Vande Woude, G F

    1993-07-01

    We have previously shown that, in mouse NIH/3T3 cells, it is necessary to coexpress the gene for human hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SFhu) with its receptor, the human met protooncogene (methu), to activate the transforming activity of the receptor (S. Rong, M. Bodescot, D. Blair, T. Nakamura, K. Mizuno, M. Park, A. Chan, S. Aaronson, and G. F. Vande Woude, Mol. Cell. Biol., 12: 5152-5158, 1992). In this study, we report that exceptionally high levels of the ligand and its receptor are expressed in tumor cell explants after several tumor passages through nude mice. Confluent tumor cells explanted after the second passage in nude mice can express 1700 units/ml/10(6) cells/72 h of scatter activity as determined in Madin-Darby canine kidney cell scatter assays. The motogenic factor produced by these cells is easily purified by heparin-Sepharose chromatography, and the purified factor efficiently induces tyrosine phosphorylation of Methu in YaOvBix2NMA human ovarian carcinoma cells. To account for the unusually high level of HGF/SFhu and Methu expression, we propose that normal levels of Methu receptor are inefficient at transducing the signal(s) required for transformation of mouse cells. Therefore, high levels of Methu receptor are required for tumorigenesis, and corresponding high levels of the ligand are required to induce the signal. Consistent with this model, endogenous mouse scatter factor is not detected in conditioned medium from cells transformed by overexpression of the Metmu receptor.

  4. Met-Independent Hepatocyte Growth Factor-mediated regulation of cell adhesion in human prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Rodney

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer cells communicate reciprocally with the stromal cells surrounding them, inside the prostate, and after metastasis, within the bone. Each tissue secretes factors for interpretation by the other. One stromally-derived factor, Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF, was found twenty years ago to regulate invasion and growth of carcinoma cells. Working with the LNCaP prostate cancer progression model, we found that these cells could respond to HGF stimulation, even in the absence of Met, the only known HGF receptor. The new HGF binding partner we find on the cell surface may help to clarify conflicts in the past literature about Met expression and HGF response in cancer cells. Methods We searched for Met or any HGF binding partner on the cells of the PC3 and LNCaP prostate cancer cell models, using HGF immobilized on agarose beads. By using mass spectrometry analyses and sequencing we have identified nucleolin protein as a novel HGF binding partner. Antibodies against nucleolin (or HGF were able to ameliorate the stimulatory effects of HGF on met-negative prostate cancer cells. Western blots, RT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry were used to assess nucleolin levels during prostate cancer progression in both LNCaP and PC3 models. Results We have identified HGF as a major signaling component of prostate stromal-conditioned media (SCM and have implicated the protein nucleolin in HGF signal reception by the LNCaP model prostate cancer cells. Antibodies that silence either HGF (in SCM or nucleolin (on the cell surfaces eliminate the adhesion-stimulatory effects of the SCM. Likewise, addition of purified HGF to control media mimics the action of SCM. C4-2, an LNCaP lineage-derived, androgen-independent human prostate cancer cell line, responds to HGF in a concentration-dependent manner by increasing its adhesion and reducing its migration on laminin substratum. These HGF effects are not due to shifts in the expression levels of

  5. Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Are Resistant to HBV Infection during Differentiation into Hepatocytes in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic methods for chronic hepatitis B are limited. The shortage of organ donors and hepatitis B virus (HBV reinfection obstruct the clinical application of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT. In the present study, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs were isolated from chronic hepatitis B patients and characterized for morphology, growth potency, surface phenotype and the differentiation potential. The results showed that both MSCs had adipogenic, osteogenic and neuron differentiation potential, and nearly all MSCs expressed CD105, CD44 and CD29. Compared with AD-MSCs, BM-MSCs of chronic hepatitis B patients proliferated defectively. In addition, the ability of AD-MSCs to differentiate into hepatocyte was evaluated and the susceptibility to HBV infection were assessed. AD-MSCs could differentiate into functional hepatocyte-like cells. These cells express the hepatic-specific markers and have glycogen production and albumin secretion function. AD-MSCs and hepatic differentiation AD-MSCs were not susceptible to infection by HBV in vitro. Compared with BM-MSCs, AD-MSCs may be alternative stem cells for chronic hepatitis B patients.

  6. Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth differentiate into functional hepatocyte-like cells by herbal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wen-Ta; Chen, Xiao-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) are mesenchymal stem cells isolated from the exfoliated human deciduous incisor that can differentiate into a many cell types. In this study, we evaluated the effect of liquorice or angelica extracts on the hepatic differentiation potential of SHEDs cells. SHEDs cells cultured in medium containing liquorice extracts were analyzed for 1) changes in cellular morphology, 2) changes in hepatic gene expression, AFP (Alpha-fetoprotein) and ALB (Albumin), and 3) albumin secretion and urea synthesis activity. Our data show that the hepatic differentiation potential of SHEDs cells is enhanced by the presence of liquorice or angelica extracts in the culture medium. Our findings present new therapeutic possibilities for liver damage repair.

  7. Bioprinting of human pluripotent stem cells and their directed differentiation into hepatocyte-like cells for the generation of mini-livers in 3D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner-Jones, Alan; Fyfe, Catherine; Cornelissen, Dirk-Jan; Gardner, John; King, Jason; Courtney, Aidan; Shu, Wenmiao

    2015-10-21

    We report the first investigation into the bioprinting of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), their response to a valve-based printing process as well as their post-printing differentiation into hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). HLCs differentiated from both hiPSCs and human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) sources were bioprinted and examined for the presence of hepatic markers to further validate the compatibility of the valve-based bioprinting process with fragile cell transfer. Examined cells were positive for nuclear factor 4 alpha and were demonstrated to secrete albumin and have morphology that was also found to be similar to that of hepatocytes. Both hESC and hiPSC lines were tested for post-printing viability and pluripotency and were found to have negligible difference in terms of viability and pluripotency between the printed and non-printed cells. hESC-derived HLCs were 3D printed using alginate hydrogel matrix and tested for viability and albumin secretion during the remaining differentiation and were found to be hepatic in nature. 3D printed with 40-layer of HLC-containing alginate structures reached peak albumin secretion at day 21 of the differentiation protocol. This work demonstrates that the valve-based printing process is gentle enough to print human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) (both hESCs and hiPSCs) while either maintaining their pluripotency or directing their differentiation into specific lineages. The ability to bioprint hPSCs will pave the way for producing organs or tissues on demand from patient specific cells which could be used for animal-free drug development and personalized medicine.

  8. Endogenous and xenobiotic metabolic stability of primary human hepatocytes in long-term 3D spheroid cultures revealed by a combination of targeted and untargeted metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorrink, Sabine U; Ullah, Shahid; Schmidt, Staffan; Nandania, Jatin; Velagapudi, Vidya; Beck, Olof; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Lauschke, Volker M

    2017-06-01

    Adverse reactions or lack of response to medications are important concerns for drug development programs. However, faithful predictions of drug metabolism and toxicity are difficult because animal models show only limited translatability to humans. Furthermore, current in vitro systems, such as hepatic cell lines or primary human hepatocyte (PHH) 2-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures, can be used only for acute toxicity tests because of their immature phenotypes and inherent instability. Therefore, the migration to novel phenotypically stable models is of prime importance for the pharmaceutical industry. Novel 3-dimensional (3D) culture systems have been shown to accurately mimic in vivo hepatic phenotypes on transcriptomic and proteomic level, but information about their metabolic stability is lacking. Using a combination of targeted and untargeted high-resolution mass spectrometry, we found that PHHs in 3D spheroid cultures remained metabolically stable for multiple weeks, whereas metabolic patterns of PHHs from the same donors cultured as conventional 2D monolayers rapidly deteriorated. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic differences between donors were maintained in 3D spheroid cultures, enabling studies of interindividual variability in drug metabolism and toxicity. We conclude that the 3D spheroid system is metabolically stable and constitutes a suitable model for in vitro studies of long-term drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics.-Vorrink, S. U., Ullah, S., Schmid, S., Nandania, J., Velagapudi, V., Beck, O., Ingelman-Sundberg, M., Lauschke, V. M. Endogenous and xenobiotic metabolic stability of primary human hepatocytes in long-term 3D spheroid cultures revealed by a combination of targeted and untargeted metabolomics. © The Author(s).

  9. Is human fecundity changing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smarr, Melissa M; Sapra, Katherine J; Gemmill, Alison

    2017-01-01

    Fecundity, the biologic capacity to reproduce, is essential for the health of individuals and is, therefore, fundamental for understanding human health at the population level. Given the absence of a population (bio)marker, fecundity is assessed indirectly by various individual-based (e.g. semen ...

  10. Genomics and proteomics analysis of cultured primary rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigel, Juergen; Fella, Kerstin; Kramer, Peter-Juergen; Kroeger, Michaela; Hewitt, Philip

    2008-02-01

    The use of animal models in pharmaceutical research is a costly and sometimes misleading method of generating toxicity data and hence predicting human safety. Therefore, in vitro test systems, such as primary rat hepatocytes, and the developing genomics and proteomics technologies, are playing an increasingly important role in toxicological research. Gene and protein expression analysis were investigated in a time series (up to 5 days) of primary rat hepatocytes cultured on collagen coated dishes. Especially after 24h, a significant down-regulation of many important Phase I and Phase II enzymes (e.g., cytochrome P450's, glutathione-S-transferases, sulfotransferases) involved in xenobiotic metabolism, and antioxidative enzymes (e.g., catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase) was observed. Acute-phase-response enzymes were frequently up-regulated (e.g., LPS binding protein, alpha-2-macro-globulin, ferritin, serine proteinase inhibitor B, haptoglobin), which is likely to be a result of cellular stress caused by the cell isolation procedure (perfusion) itself. A parallel observation was the increased expression of several structural genes (e.g., beta-actin, alpha-tubulin, vimentin), possibly caused by other proliferating cell types in the culture, such as fibroblasts or alternatively by hepatocyte dedifferentiation. In conclusion, the careful interpretation of data derived from this in vitro system indicates that primary hepatocytes can be successfully used for short-term toxicity studies up to 24h. However, culturing conditions need to be further optimized to reduce the massive changes of gene and protein expression of long-term cultured hepatocytes to allow practical applications as a long-term toxicity test system.

  11. Elimination of HCV via a non-ISG-mediated mechanism by vaniprevir and BMS-788329 combination therapy in human hepatocyte chimeric mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Takuro; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Imamura, Michio; Yoshimi, Satoshi; Kan, Hiromi; Miyaki, Eisuke; Tsuge, Masataka; Abe, Hiromi; Hayes, C Nelson; Aikata, Hiroshi; Ishida, Yuji; Tateno, Chise; Ellis, Joan D; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2016-02-02

    We previously reported that interferon (IFN)-free direct-acting antiviral combination treatment succeeded in eradicating genotype 1b hepatitis C virus (HCV) in human hepatocyte chimeric mice. In this study, we examined the effect of vaniprevir (MK7009, NS3/4A protease inhibitor) and BMS-788329 (NS5A inhibitor) combination treatment on HCV genotype 1b and the expression of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) using a subgenomic replicon system and the same animal model. Combination treatment with vaniprevir and BMS-788329 significantly reduced HCV replication compared to vaniprevir monotherapy in HCV replicon cells (Huh7/Rep-Feo cells). HCV genotype 1b-infected human hepatocyte chimeric mice were treated with vaniprevir alone or in combination with BMS-788329 for four weeks. Vaniprevir monotherapy reduced serum HCV RNA titers in mice, but viral breakthrough was observed in mice with high HCV titers. Ultra-deep sequence analysis revealed a predominant replacement by drug-resistant substitutions at 168 in HCV NS3 region in these mice. Conversely, in mice with low HCV titers, HCV was eradicated by vaniprevir monotherapy without viral breakthrough. In contrast to monotherapy, combination treatment with vaniprevir and BMS-788329 succeeded in completely eradicating HCV regardless of serum viral titer. IFN-alpha treatment significantly increased ISG expression; however, vaniprevir and BMS-788329 combination treatment caused no increase in ISG expression both in cultured cells and in mouse livers. Therefore, combination treatment with vaniprevir and BMS-788329 eliminated HCV via a non-ISG-mediated mechanism. This oral treatment might offer an alternative DAA combination therapy for patients with chronic hepatitis C. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Establishment of In Silico Prediction Models for CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 Induction in Human Hepatocytes by Multiple Regression Analysis Using Azole Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Mika; Konno, Yoshihiro; Satsukawa, Masahiro; Yamashita, Shinji; Yoshinari, Kouichi

    2016-08-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) via cytochrome P450 (P450) induction are one clinical problem leading to increased risk of adverse effects and the need for dosage adjustments and additional therapeutic monitoring. In silico models for predicting P450 induction are useful for avoiding DDI risk. In this study, we have established regression models for CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 induction in human hepatocytes using several physicochemical parameters for a set of azole compounds with different P450 induction as characteristics as model compounds. To obtain a well-correlated regression model, the compounds for CYP3A4 or CYP2B6 induction were independently selected from the tested azole compounds using principal component analysis with fold-induction data. Both of the multiple linear regression models obtained for CYP3A4 and CYP2B6 induction are represented by different sets of physicochemical parameters. The adjusted coefficients of determination for these models were of 0.8 and 0.9, respectively. The fold-induction of the validation compounds, another set of 12 azole-containing compounds, were predicted within twofold limits for both CYP3A4 and CYP2B6. The concordance for the prediction of CYP3A4 induction was 87% with another validation set, 23 marketed drugs. However, the prediction of CYP2B6 induction tended to be overestimated for these marketed drugs. The regression models show that lipophilicity mostly contributes to CYP3A4 induction, whereas not only the lipophilicity but also the molecular polarity is important for CYP2B6 induction. Our regression models, especially that for CYP3A4 induction, might provide useful methods to avoid potent CYP3A4 or CYP2B6 inducers during the lead optimization stage without performing induction assays in human hepatocytes. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  13. Determination of acute lethal and chronic lethal dose thresholds of valproic acid using 3D spheroids constructed from the immortal human hepatocyte cell line HepG2/C3A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fey, S. J.; Wrzesinski, K.

    2013-01-01

    describe here a culture system based on 3D spheroid culture of immortal hepatocytes which can determine the toxicity of valproic acid (or structurally or functionally related molecules) in vitro. The spheroids were used to follow changes in ATP production, glucose uptake and adenylate kinase following...

  14. New IVIVE method for the prediction of total human clearance and relative elimination pathway contributions from in vitro hepatocyte and microsome data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riede, Julia; Poller, Birk; Umehara, Ken-ichi; Huwyler, Jörg; Camenisch, Gian

    2016-04-30

    Total human clearance is a key determinant for the pharmacokinetic behavior of drug candidates. Our group recently introduced the Extended Clearance Model (ECM) as an accurate in vitro-in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) method for the prediction of hepatic clearance. Yet, knowledge about relative elimination pathway contributions is needed in order to predict the total human clearance of drug candidates. In the present work, a training set of 18 drug compounds was used to describe the affiliations between in vitro sinusoidal uptake clearance and the fractional contributions of hepatic (metabolic and biliary) or renal clearance to overall in vivo elimination. By means of these quantitative relationships and using a validation set of 10 diverse drug molecules covering different (sub)classes of the Extended Clearance Concept Classification System (ECCCS), the relative contributions of elimination pathways were calculated and demonstrated to well correlate with human reference data. Likewise, ECM- and pathway-based predictions of total clearances from both data sets demonstrated a strong correlation with the observed clinical values with 26 out of 28 compounds within a three-fold deviation. Hence, total human clearance and relative contributions of elimination pathways were successfully predicted by the presented method using solely hepatocyte and microsome in vitro data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. GLOBAL CHANGE AND HUMAN MOBILITY

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andrei Schvab

    2016-01-01

    ... to better understand this process. The 35 authors wrote 17 chapters, elegantly covering the wide spectrum of human mobility, ranging from theoretical aspects, changes in the paradigm, causes and effects on diverse actors...

  16. Recombinant human hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), but not rat HGF, elicits glomerular injury and albuminuria in normal rats via an immune complex-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Shinya; Ikebuchi, Fumie; Fukuta, Kazuhiro; Kato, Takashi; Matsumoto, Kunio; Adachi, Kiichi; Abe, Tetsushi; Nakamura, Toshikazu

    2011-03-01

    1. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has the therapeutic potential to improve renal fibrosis and proteinuria in rodents with chronic kidney disease. In contrast, long-term administration of human HGF to normal rats reportedly elicits proteinuria. Thus, the role of HGF during proteinuria remains contentious. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate that human HGF is antigenic to rodents and that immune complex formation causes proteinuria. 2. We administered either human or rat HGF to normal rats for 28 days. Albuminuria was evaluated by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The renal phenotypes of the two HGF treatments were examined using histological techniques. 3. Administration of human HGF (1 mg/kg per day, i.v.) to rats led to severe albuminuria and glomerular hypertrophy in association with increased blood levels of anti-human HGF IgG and IgG deposition in mesangial areas. Furthermore, an immune complex between human HGF and anti-human HGF IgG stimulated the production of proteinuric cytokines (including transforming growth factor-β) in rat cultured mesangial cells. In contrast, treatment of healthy rats with rat HGF for 4 weeks caused neither mesangial IgG deposition nor elevated anti-HGF IgG in the blood. Overall, rat HGF did not provoke albuminuria. 4. We conclude that human HGF produces pseudotoxic effects in normal rat kidneys via an immune complex-mediated pathway, whereas syngenic HGF is safe due to less deposition of glomerular IgG. Our results affirm the safety of the repeated use of syngenic HGF for the treatment of chronic organ diseases, such as renal fibrosis and liver cirrhosis. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Development of a UGT1A1 reporter gene assay for induction studies: correlation between reporter gene data and regulation of UGT1A1 in human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoru-Eta, Julius; Yengi, Lilian G; He, Xiaoyang; Kubik, Joseph; Kao, John; Scatina, Joann

    2010-01-01

    The present manuscript describes the development of a cell-based reporter transcriptional activation assay for evaluating induction of UGT1A1. A reporter construct (pGL-UGT1A1-Luc) encompassing the proximal promoter (nucleotide -254 to +38) and distal enhancer (-3483 to -3194) regions of the human UGT1A1 gene was generated by PCR cloning, and co-transfected with a previously generated PXR construct (pSG5-PXR) into HepG2 cells. The system was then validated using known ligands of PXR, rifampicin (RIF), clotrimazole (CLOT) sulfinpyrazone (SPZ) and phenobarbital (PB), which produced dose dependent induction of UGT1A1 luciferase activity by 4.4, 5.3, 4.7 and 3.7 fold, respectively, relative to the vehicle control, 0.1 % dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands a-naphthoflavone (a-Naph), b-naphthoflavone (b-Naph) and 3-methylchloranthene (3-MC) increased UGT1A1 luciferase activity in a concentration dependent manner resulting in 17.2, 11.3 and 6.1 fold, respectively, at their highest concentrations, suggesting that endogenous AhR is also involved in the regulation of the UGT1A1 reporter construct in HepG2 cells. For comparison with transcriptional regulation of endogenous UGT1A1, 10 mM RIF, 50 mM SPZ, 10 mM CLOT, 4 mM 3-MC, 10 mM b-Naph and 25 mM a-Naph also induced UGT1A1 mRNA in human primary hepatocytes by 2.5, 2.8, 3.2, 3.7, 3.9 and 4.3 fold, respectively. In summary, by co-transfecting the UGT1A1 reporter and PXR constructs into HepG2 cells, we have developed a cellular model for evaluating induction of UGT1A1. Data from the reporter gene assay correlated with that generated in human primary hepatocytes. Based on these data, we suggest that this reporter gene assay can be used as a screening tool in the early stages of drug discovery, to evaluate potential induction of UGT1A1 by new chemical entities and to aid in lead selection and optimization.

  18. Design of a Vitronectin-Based Recombinant Protein as a Defined Substrate for Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells into Hepatocyte-Like Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Nagaoka

    Full Text Available Maintenance and differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs usually requires culture on a substrate for cell adhesion. A commonly used substratum is Matrigel purified from Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm sarcoma cells, and consists of a complex mixture of extracellular matrix proteins, proteoglycans, and growth factors. Several studies have successfully induced differentiation of hepatocyte-like cells from hPSCs. However, most of these studies have used Matrigel as a cell adhesion substrate, which is not a defined culture condition. In an attempt to generate a substratum that supports undifferentiated properties and differentiation into hepatic lineage cells, we designed novel substrates consisting of vitronectin fragments fused to the IgG Fc domain. hPSCs adhered to these substrates via interactions between integrins and the RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp motif, and the cells maintained their undifferentiated phenotypes. Using a previously established differentiation protocol, hPSCs were efficiently differentiated into mesendodermal and hepatic lineage cells on a vitronectin fragment-containing substrate. We found that full-length vitronectin did not support stable cell adhesion during the specification stage. Furthermore, the vitronectin fragment with the minimal RGD-containing domain was sufficient for differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells into hepatic lineage cells under completely defined conditions that facilitate the clinical application of cells differentiated from hPSCs.

  19. Development of an embryoid body-based screening strategy for assessing the hepatocyte differentiation potential of human embryonic stem cells following single-cell dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhough, Sebastian; Bradburn, Helen; Gardner, John; Hay, David C

    2013-02-01

    We have devised an embryoid body-based screening method for the selection of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines capable of forming functional hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) after single-cell dissociation. The screening method highlighted one cell line from a panel of five that produced albumin-positive cells during embryoid body (EB) formation. Cell lines that did not produce albumin-positive cells during EB formation were shown to respond less well to directed differentiation following single-cell replating. Additionally, the seeding density of the pluripotent populations prior to differentiation was shown to exert a significant effect on the hepatic function of the final population of cells. In summary, we have developed a simple procedure that facilitates the identification of human hESC lines that tolerate single-cell replating and are capable of differentiating to HLCs. Although the hepatic function of cells produced by this method is ∼10-fold lower than our current gold standard stem cell-derived models, we believe that these findings represent an incremental step toward producing HLCs at scale.

  20. Early morphological and functional alterations in canine hepatocytes due to alpha-amanitin, a major toxin of Amanita phalloides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdalan, Jan; Ostrowska, Alina; Podhorska-Okołów, Marzena; Piotrowska, Aleksandra; Izykowska, Ilona; Nowak, Marcin; Dolińska-Krajewska, Barbara; Zabel, Maciej; Szelag, Adam; Dziegiel, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    The toadstool death cap (Amanita phalloides) and its subspecies, destroying angel (A. virosa) and death angel (A. verna) are responsible for nearly 95% of all fatal mushroom poisonings. High mortality rate in A. phalloides intoxications is principally a result of the acute liver failure following significant hepatocyte damage due to hepatocellular uptake of amanitins, the major toxins of this mushroom. This study evaluated early morphological and functional alterations in hepatocytes exposed to different concentrations of alpha-amanitin (alpha-AMA). All experiments were performed on cultured canine hepatocytes since intoxicated with A. phalloides dogs have clinical course and pathological findings similar to those seen in humans. The overall functional integrity and viability of cultured hepatocytes were assessed using the MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay and by measurements of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), total protein, and urea levels. Our results showed that the course of alpha-AMA toxicity in cultured dog hepatocytes is divided into two phases. The first phase comprises functional cell impairments expressed by significant increase of LDH activity and inhibition of protein and urea synthesis when compared with the control group. This is followed by discrete changes in hepatocyte ultrastructure, including marginalization and condensation of nuclear chromatin, as well as formation of the foamlike cytoplasm. The second stage is lethal and is characterized by ongoing necrosis, and/or apoptosis. This may be related to dose of toxin and time of exposure.

  1. The human mucin MUC4 is transcriptionally regulated by caudal-related homeobox, hepatocyte nuclear factors, forkhead box A, and GATA endodermal transcription factors in epithelial cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonckheere, Nicolas; Vincent, Audrey; Perrais, Michaël; Ducourouble, Marie-Paule; Male, Anita Korteland-van; Aubert, Jean-Pierre; Pigny, Pascal; Carraway, Kermit L; Freund, Jean-Noël; Renes, Ingrid B; Van Seuningen, Isabelle

    2007-08-03

    The human gene MUC4 encodes a large transmembrane mucin that is developmentally regulated and expressed along the undifferentiated pseudostratified epithelium, as early as 6.5 weeks during fetal development. Immunohistochemical analysis of Muc4 expression in developing mouse lung and gastrointestinal tract showed a different spatio-temporal pattern of expression before and after cytodifferentiation. The molecular mechanisms governing MUC4 expression during development are, however, unknown. Hepatocyte nuclear factors (HNF), forkhead box A (FOXA), GATA, and caudal-related homeobox transcription factors (TFs) are known to control cell differentiation of gut endoderm derived-tissues during embryonic development. They also control the expression of cell- and tissue-specific genes and may thus control MUC4 expression. To test this hypothesis, we studied and deciphered the molecular mechanisms responsible for MUC4 transcriptional regulation by these TFs. Experiments using small interfering RNA, cell co-transfection, and site-directed mutagenesis indicated that MUC4 is regulated at the transcriptional level by CDX-1 and -2, HNF-1 alpha and -1 beta, FOXA1/A2, HNF-4 alpha and -4 gamma, and GATA-4, -5, and -6 factors in a cell-specific manner. Binding of TFs was assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation, and gel-shift assays. Altogether, these results demonstrate that MUC4 is a target gene of endodermal TFs and thus point out an important role for these TFs in regulating MUC4 expression during epithelial differentiation during development, cancer, and repair.

  2. Combined Toxic Effects of Polar and Nonpolar Chemicals on Human Hepatocytes (HepG2) Cells by Quantitative Property-Activity Relationship Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Woong; Won, Yong Lim; Park, Dong Jin; Kim, Young Sun; Jin, Eun Sil; Lee, Sung Kwang

    2016-10-01

    We determined the toxicity of mixtures of ethyl acetate (EA), isopropyl alcohol (IPA), methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), toluene (TOL) and xylene (XYL) with half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) values obtained using human hepatocytes cells. According to these data, quantitative property-activity relationships (QPAR) models were successfully proposed to predict the toxicity of mixtures by multiple linear regressions (MLR). The leave-one-out cross validation method was used to find the best subsets of descriptors in the learning methods. Significant differences in physico-chemical properties such as boiling point (BP), specific gravity (SG), Reid vapor pressure (rVP) and flash point (FP) were observed between the single substances and the mixtures. The EC50 of the mixture of EA and IPA was significantly lower than that of contained TOL and XYL. The mixture toxicity was related to the mixing ratio of MEK, TOL and XYL (MLR equation EC50 = 3.3081 - 2.5018 × TOL - 3.2595 × XYL - 12.6596 × MEK × XYL), as well as to BP, SG, VP and FP (MLR equation EC50 = 1.3424 + 6.2250 × FP - 7.1198 × SG × FP - 0.03013 × rVP × FP). These results suggest that QPAR-based models could accurately predict the toxicity of polar and nonpolar mixtures used in rotogravure printing industries.

  3. Curcumin Ameliorates Furazolidone-Induced DNA Damage and Apoptosis in Human Hepatocyte L02 Cells by Inhibiting ROS Production and Mitochondrial Pathway

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    Chongshan Dai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Furazolidone (FZD, a synthetic nitrofuran derivative, has been widely used as an antibacterial and antiprotozoal agent. Recently, the potential toxicity of FZD has raised concerns, but its mechanism is still unclear. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of curcumin on FZD-induced cytotoxicity and the underlying mechanism in human hepatocyte L02 cells. The results showed that curcumin pre-treatment significantly ameliorated FZD-induced oxidative stress, characterized by decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS and malondialdehyde formation, and increased superoxide dismutase, catalase activities and glutathione contents. In addition, curcumin pre-treatment significantly ameliorated the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, the activations of caspase-9 and -3, and apoptosis caused by FZD. Alkaline comet assay showed that curcumin markedly reduced FZD-induced DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner. Curcumin pre-treatment consistently and markedly down-regulated the mRNA expression levels of p53, Bax, caspase-9 and -3 and up-regulated the mRNA expression level of Bcl-2. Taken together, these results reveal that curcumin protects against FZD-induced DNA damage and apoptosis by inhibiting oxidative stress and mitochondrial pathway. Our study indicated that curcumin may be a promising combiner with FZD to reduce FZD-related toxicity in clinical applications.

  4. The roles of endoplasmic reticulum overload response induced by HCV and NS4B protein in human hepatocyte viability and virus replication.

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    Lingbao Kong

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV replication is associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER and its infection triggers ER stress. In response to ER stress, ER overload response (EOR can be activated, which involves the release of Ca2+ from ER, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB. We have previously reported that HCV NS4B expression activates NF-κB via EOR-Ca2+-ROS pathway. Here, we showed that NS4B expression and HCV infection activated cancer-related NF-κB signaling pathway and induced the expression of cancer-related NF-κB target genes via EOR-Ca2+-ROS pathway. Moreover, we found that HCV-activated EOR-Ca2+-ROS pathway had profound effects on host cell viability and HCV replication. HCV infection induced human hepatocyte death by EOR-Ca2+-ROS pathway, whereas activation of EOR-Ca2+-ROS-NF-κB pathway increased the cell viability. Meanwhile, EOR-Ca2+-ROS-NF-κB pathway inhibited acute HCV replication, which could alleviate the detrimental effect of HCV on cell viability and enhance chronic HCV infection. Together, our findings provide new insights into the functions of EOR-Ca2+-ROS-NF-κB pathway in natural HCV replication and pathogenesis.

  5. Hepatocyte Growth Factor Effects on Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Human Arteries: A Novel Strategy to Accelerate Vascular Ulcer Wound Healing

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    Sabrina Valente

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular ulcers are a serious complication of peripheral vascular disease, especially in diabetics. Several approaches to treat the wounds are proposed but they show poor outcomes and require long healing times. Hepatocyte Growth Factor/Scatter Factor (HGF/SF is a pleiotropic cytokine exerting many biological activities through the c-Met receptor. This study was aimed at verifying whether HGF/SF influences proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis on mesenchymal stem cells isolated from human arteries (hVW-MSCs. hVW-MSCs were exposed to NIBSC HGF/SF (2.5, 5, 10, and 70 ng/mL from 6 hrs to 7 days. HGF and c-MET mRNA and protein expression, cell proliferation (Alamar Blue and Ki–67 assay, migration (scratch and transwell assays, and angiogenesis (Matrigel were investigated. hVW-MSCs displayed stemness features and expressed HGF and c-MET. HGF/SF did not increase hVW-MSC proliferation, whereas it enhanced the cell migration, the formation of capillary-like structures, and the expression of angiogenic markers (vWF, CD31, and KDR. The HGF/SF effects on hVW-MSC migration and angiogenic potential are of great interest to accelerate wound healing process. Local delivery of HGF/SF could therefore improve the healing of unresponsive vascular ulcers.

  6. The human hepatocyte cell lines IHH and HepaRG : models to study glucose, lipid and lipoprotein metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samanez, Carolina Huaman; Caron, Sandrine; Briand, Olivier; Dehondt, Helene; Duplan, Isabelle; Kuipers, Folkert; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Clavey, Veronique; Staels, Bart

    Metabolic diseases reach epidemic proportions. A better knowledge of the associated alterations in the metabolic pathways in the liver is necessary. These studies need in vitro human cell models. Several human hepatoma models are used, but the response of many metabolic pathways to physiological

  7. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of hepatocyte growth factor gene to human dental pulp stem cells under good manufacturing practice improves their potential for periodontal regeneration in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yu; Liu, Zhenhai; Xie, Yilin; Hu, Jingchao; Wang, Hua; Fan, Zhipeng; Zhang, Chunmei; Wang, Jingsong; Wu, Chu-Tse; Wang, Songlin

    2015-12-15

    Periodontitis is one of the most widespread infectious diseases in humans. We previously promoted significant periodontal tissue regeneration in swine models with the transplantation of autologous periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and PDLSC sheet. We also promoted periodontal tissue regeneration in a rat model with a local injection of allogeneic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the roles of the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) in periodontal tissue regeneration in swine. In the present study, we transferred an adenovirus that carried HGF gene into human DPSCs (HGF-hDPSCs) under good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions. These cells were then transplanted into a swine model for periodontal regeneration. Twenty miniature pigs were used to generate periodontitis with bone defect of 5 mm in width, 7 mm in length, and 3 mm in depth. After 12 weeks, clinical, radiological, quantitative and histological assessment of regenerated periodontal tissues was performed to compare periodontal regeneration in swine treated with cell implantation. Our study showed that injecting HGF-hDPSCs into this large animal model could significantly improve periodontal bone regeneration and soft tissue healing. A hDPSC or HGF-hDPSC sheet showed superior periodontal tissue regeneration compared to the injection of dissociated cells. However, the sheets required surgical placement; thus, they were suitable for surgically-managed periodontitis treatments. The adenovirus-mediated transfer of the HGF gene markedly decreased hDPSC apoptosis in a hypoxic environment or in serum-free medium, and it increased blood vessel regeneration. This study indicated that HGF-hDPSCs produced under GMP conditions significantly improved periodontal bone regeneration in swine; thus, this method represents a potential clinical application for periodontal regeneration.

  8. AGE WISE HISTOMORPHOLOGICAL CHANGES IN HUMAN LIVER

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    Tribeni

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Hepato cellular carcinoma (HCC results in between 2.5 lakhs to 1million deaths globally per annum. Liver transplantation nowadays is a well accepted treatment option for end-stage liver disease and acute liver failure. AIMS: Keeping this concept in view, a study was conducted in the Guwahati Zone of Northeast India, to compare the histomorphological features of the human liver in different age groups. SETTING AND DESIGN: Apparently healthy livers were obtained from 21 subjects on whom medicolegal post-mortems had been performed. Their ages varied from newborn to 90 years. Subjects were divided into 3 groups. 7 specimens were taken from each group. (1 Pediatric (2 Adult (3 Old age. METHODS AND MATERIALS: In all the above age groups, immediately after removal of the livers, they were washed in normal saline, dried with blotting paper and weighed in an electronic weighing machine. Sections of liver were fixed, processed, cut and stained with Harris Haematoxylin and Eosin stain. RESULTS: The liver loses weight from 50 years onwards. There appears to be racial and environmental differences in the change in liver weight in old age. Autopsy studies show a diminution of nearly 46% in liver weight between the 3rd and 10th decades of life. The liver decreases in size with age. The hepatocytes are radially disposed in the liver lobule. They are piled up, forming a layer one cell thick (except in young children in a fashion similar to the bricks of a wall. These plates are directed from the periphery of the lobule to its centre and anastomose freely forming a complex labyrinthine and sponge-like structure. CONCLUSIONS: From the findings in the present study it can be concluded that: 1. Nowadays, the measurement of liver volume has gained practical use in relation to liver transplantation. 2. We have compared the histomorphology of adult liver with a child. The findings in both the groups are very similar. This feature is important, since in

  9. Diffuse glomerular nodular lesions in diabetic pigs carrying a dominant-negative mutant hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-alpha, an inheritant diabetic gene in humans.

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    Satoshi Hara

    Full Text Available Glomerular nodular lesions, known as Kimmelstiel-Wilson nodules, are a pathological hallmark of progressive human diabetic nephropathy. We have induced severe diabetes in pigs carrying a dominant-negative mutant hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-alpha (HNF1α P291fsinsC, a maturity-onset diabetes of the young type-3 (MODY3 gene in humans. In this model, glomerular pathology revealed that formation of diffuse glomerular nodules commenced as young as 1 month of age and increased in size and incidence until the age of 10 months, the end of the study period. Immunohistochemistry showed that the nodules consisted of various collagen types (I, III, IV, V and VI with advanced glycation end-product (AGE and Nε-carboxymethyl-lysine (CML deposition, similar to those in human diabetic nodules, except for collagen type I. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β was also expressed exclusively in the nodules. The ultrastructure of the nodules comprised predominant interstitial-type collagen deposition arising from the mesangial matrices. Curiously, these nodules were found predominantly in the deep cortex. However, diabetic pigs failed to show any of the features characteristic of human diabetic nephropathy; e.g., proteinuria, glomerular basement membrane thickening, exudative lesions, mesangiolysis, tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis, and vascular hyalinosis. The pigs showed only Armanni-Ebstein lesions, a characteristic tubular manifestation in human diabetes. RT-PCR analysis showed that glomeruli in wild-type pigs did not express endogenous HNF1α and HNF1β, indicating that mutant HNF1α did not directly contribute to glomerular nodular formation in diabetic pigs. In conclusion, pigs harboring the dominant-negative mutant human MODY3 gene showed reproducible and distinct glomerular nodules, possibly due to AGE- and CML-based collagen accumulation. Although the pathology differed in several respects from that of human glomerular nodular lesions, the

  10. Simple Evaluation Method for CYP3A4 Induction from Human Hepatocytes: The Relative Factor Approach with an Induction Detection Limit Concentration Based on the Emax Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramoto, Shino; Kato, Motohiro; Shindoh, Hidetoshi; Kaneko, Akihisa; Ishigai, Masaki; Miyauchi, Seiji

    2017-11-01

    We investigated the robustness and utility of the relative factor (RF) approach based on the maximum induction effect (Emax) model, using the mRNA induction data of 10 typical CYP3A4 inducers in cryopreserved human hepatocytes. The RF value is designated as the ratio of the induction detection limit concentration (IDLC) for a standard inducer, such as rifampicin (RIF) or phenobarbital (PB), to that for the compound (e.g., RFRIF is IDLCRIF/IDLCcpd; RFPB is IDLCPB/IDLCcpd). An important feature of the RF approach is that the profiles of the induction response curves on the logarithmic scale remain unchanged irrespective of inducers but are shifted parallel depending on the EC50 values. A key step in the RF approach is to convert the induction response curve by finding the IDLC of a standard inducer. The relative induction score was estimated not only from Emax and EC50 values but also from those calculated by the RF approach. These values showed good correlation, with a correlation coefficient of more than 0.974, which revealed the RF approach to be a robust analysis irrespective of its simplicity. Furthermore, the relationship between RFRIF or RFPB multiplied by the steady-state unbound plasma concentration and the in vivo induction ratio plotted using 10 typical inducers gives adequate thresholds for CYP3A4 drug-drug interaction risk assessment. In light of these findings, the simple RF approach using the IDLC value could be a useful method to adequately assess the risk of CYP3A4 induction in humans during drug discovery and development without evaluation of Emax and EC50. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  11. In vitro oxidative metabolism of cajaninstilbene Acid by human liver microsomes and hepatocytes: involvement of cytochrome p450 reaction phenotyping, inhibition, and induction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xin; Peng, Xiao; Tan, Shengnan; Li, Chunying; Wang, Wei; Luo, Meng; Fu, Yujie; Zu, Yuangang; Smyth, Hugh

    2014-10-29

    Cajaninstilbene acid (CSA, 3-hydroxy-4-prenyl-5-methoxystilbene-2-carboxylic acid), an active constituent of pigeonpea leaves, an important tropical crop, is known for its clinical effects in the treatment of diabetes, hepatitis, and measles and its potential antitumor effect. In this study, the effect of the cytochrome P450 isozymes on the activity of CSA was investigated. Two hydroxylation metabolites were identified in the study. The reaction phenotype study showed that CYP3A4, CYP2C9, and CYP1A2 were the major cytochrome P450 isozymes in the metabolism of CSA. The metabolic food-drug interaction potential was also evaluated in vitro. The effect of CSA inhibition/induction of enzymatic activities of seven drug-metabolizing CYP450 isozymes in vitro was estimated by high-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analytical techniques. CSA showed different inhibitory effects on different isozymes. CSA reversibly inhibited CYP3A4 and CYP2C9 activities in human liver microsomes with IC50 values of 28.3 and 31.3 μM, respectively, but exhibited no inhibition activities to CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP2E1. CSA showed a weak effect on CYP450 enzymes in a time-dependent manner. CSA did not substantially induce CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2B6, CYP2E1, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, or CYP3A4 at concentrations up to 30 μM in primary human hepatocytes. The results of our experiments may be helpful to predict clinically significant food-drug interactions when other drugs are administered in combination with CSA.

  12. In vitro human metabolism of permethrin isomers alone or as a mixture and the formation of the major metabolites in cryopreserved primary hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemin, M-E; Kadar, A; de Sousa, G; Leclerc, E; Rahmani, R; Brochot, C

    2015-06-01

    In vitro metabolism of permethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide, was assessed in primary human hepatocytes. In vitro kinetic experiments were performed to estimate the Michaelis-Menten parameters and the clearances or formation rates of the permethrin isomers (cis- and trans-) and three metabolites, cis- and trans-3-(2,2 dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethyl-(1-cyclopropane) carboxylic acid (cis- and trans-DCCA) and 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA). Non-specific binding and the activity of the enzymes involved in permethrin's metabolism (cytochromes P450 and carboxylesterases) were quantified. Trans-permethrin was cleared more rapidly than cis-permethrin with a 2.6-factor (25.7±0.6 and 10.1±0.3 μL/min/10(6) cells respectively). A 3-factor was observed between the formation rates of DCCA and 3-PBA obtained from trans- and cis-permethrin. For both isomers, the rate of formation of DCCA was higher than the one of 3-PBA. The metabolism of the isomers in mixture was also quantified. The co-incubation of isomers at different ratios showed the low inhibitory potential of cis- and trans-permethrin on each other. The estimates of the clearances and the formation rates in the co-incubation condition did not differ from the estimates obtained with a separate incubation. These metabolic parameters may be integrated in physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to predict the fate of permethrin and metabolites in the human body. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A long-term hepatitis B viremia model generated by transplanting nontumorigenic immortalized human hepatocytes in Rag-2-deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parashar, B; Moshage, H; Tanaka, KE; Engelhardt, D; Rabbani, E; Roy-Chowdhury, N; Roy-Chowdhury, J

    Development of new therapies for human hepatitis B virus infection (HBV) would be greatly facilitated by the availability of a suitable small-animal model for HBV virus production in vivo. To develop a murine model for HBV production, we established an immortalized, cloned liver cell line by

  14. Interaction of ApoA-IV with NR4A1 and NR1D1 Represses G6Pase and PEPCK Transcription: Nuclear Receptor-Mediated Downregulation of Hepatic Gluconeogenesis in Mice and a Human Hepatocyte Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoming; Xu, Min; Wang, Fei; Ji, Yong; DavidsoN, W Sean; Li, Zongfang; Tso, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that the nuclear receptor, NR1D1, is a cofactor in ApoA-IV-mediated downregulation of gluconeogenesis. Nuclear receptor, NR4A1, is involved in the transcriptional regulation of various genes involved in inflammation, apoptosis, and glucose metabolism. We investigated whether NR4A1 influences the effect of ApoA-IV on hepatic glucose metabolism. Our in situ proximity ligation assays and coimmunoprecipitation experiments indicated that ApoA-IV colocalized with NR4A1 in human liver (HepG2) and kidney (HEK-293) cell lines. The chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments and luciferase reporter assays indicated that the ApoA-IV and NR4A1 colocalized at the RORα response element of the human G6Pase promoter, reducing its transcriptional activity. Our RNA interference experiments showed that knocking down the expression of NR4A1 in primary mouse hepatocytes treated with ApoA-IV increased the expression of NR1D1, G6Pase, and PEPCK, and that knocking down NR1D1 expression increased the level of NR4A1. We also found that ApoA-IV induced the expression of endogenous NR4A1 in both cultured primary mouse hepatocytes and in the mouse liver, and decreased glucose production in primary mouse hepatocytes. Our findings showed that ApoA-IV colocalizes with NR4A1, which suppresses G6Pase and PEPCK gene expression at the transcriptional level, reducing hepatic glucose output and lowering blood glucose. The ApoA-IV-induced increase in NR4A1 expression in hepatocytes mediates further repression of gluconeogenesis. Our findings suggest that NR1D1 and NR4A1 serve similar or complementary functions in the ApoA-IV-mediated regulation of gluconeogenesis.

  15. Definition of metabolism-dependent xenobiotic toxicity with co-cultures of human hepatocytes and mouse 3T3 fibroblasts in the novel integrated discrete multiple organ co-culture (IdMOC) experimental system: results with model toxicants aflatoxin B1, cyclophosphamide and tamoxifen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Albert P; Uzgare, Aarti; LaForge, Yumiko S

    2012-07-30

    The integrated discrete multiple organ co-culture system (IdMOC) allows the co-culturing of multiple cell types as physically separated cells interconnected by a common overlying medium. We report here the application of IdMOC with two cell types: the metabolically competent primary human hepatocytes, and a metabolically incompetent cell line, mouse 3T3 fibroblasts, in the definition of the role of hepatic metabolism on the cytotoxicity of three model toxicants: cyclophosphamide (CPA), aflatoxin B1 (AFB) and tamoxifen (TMX). The presence of hepatic metabolism in IdMOC with human hepatocytes was demonstrated by the metabolism of the P450 isoform 3A4 substrate, luciferin-IPA. The three model toxicants showed three distinct patterns of cytotoxic profile: TMX was cytotoxic to 3T3 cells in the absence of hepatocytes, with slightly lower cytotoxicity towards both 3T3 cells and hepatocytes in the IdMOC. AFB was selective toxic towards the human hepatocytes and relatively noncytotoxic towards 3T3 cells both in the presence and absence of the hepatocytes. CPA cytotoxicity to the 3T3 cells was found to be significantly enhanced by the presence of the hepatocytes, with the cytotoxicity dependent of the number of hepatocytes, and with the cytotoxicity attenuated by the presence of a non-specific P450 inhibitor, 1-aminobenzotriazole. We propose here the following classification of toxicants based on the role of hepatic metabolism as defined by the human hepatocyte-3T3 cell IdMOC assay: type I: direct-acting cytotoxicants represented by TMX as indicated by cytotoxicity in 3T3 cells in the absence of hepatocytes; type II: metabolism-dependent cytotoxicity represented by AFB1 with effects localized within the site of metabolic activation (i. e. hepatocytes); and type III: metabolism-dependent cytotoxicity with metabolites that can diffuse out of the hepatocytes to cause toxicity in cells distal from the site of metabolism, as exemplified by CPA. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland

  16. Property of hepatitis B virus replication in Tupaia belangeri hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanada, Takahiro [Department of Microbiology and Cell Biology, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, 2-1-6, Kamikitazawa, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko, E-mail: kkohara@vet.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Transboundary Animal Diseases Centre, Joint Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24, Korimoto, Kagoshima-city, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Laboratory of Animal Hygiene, Joint Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24, Korimoto, Kagoshima, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Yamamoto, Naoki [Department of Microbiology and Cell Biology, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, 2-1-6, Kamikitazawa, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Ezzikouri, Sayeh; Benjelloun, Soumaya [Viral Hepatitis Laboratory, Virology Unit, Institut Pasteur du Maroc, 1, Louis Pasteur, Casablanca 20360 (Morocco); Murakami, Shuko; Tanaka, Yasuhito [Department of Virology and Liver Unit, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kawasumi 1, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 467-8601 (Japan); Tateno, Chise [PhoenixBio Co. Ltd., 3-4-1, Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan); Kohara, Michinori, E-mail: kohara-mc@igakuken.or.jp [Department of Microbiology and Cell Biology, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, 2-1-6, Kamikitazawa, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan)

    2016-01-08

    The northern treeshrew (Tupaia belangeri) has been reported to be an effective candidate for animal infection model with hepatitis B virus (HBV). The objective of our study was to analyze the growth characteristics of HBV in tupaia hepatocytes and the host response to HBV infection. We established primary tupaia hepatocytes (3–6-week old tupaia) and infected them with HBV genotypes A, B and C, and all the genotypes proliferated as well as those in human primary hepatocytes (>10{sup 5} copies/ml in culture supernatant). We next generated a chimeric mouse with tupaia liver by transplantation of tupaia primary hepatocytes to urokinase-type plasminogen activator cDNA (cDNA-uPA)/severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice and the replacement ratio with tupaia hepatocytes was found to be more than 95%. Infection of chimeric mice with HBV (genotypes B, C, and D) resulted in HBV-DNA level of 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} copies/ml after 8 weeks of infection, which were almost similar to that in humanized chimeric mouse. In contrast, serum HBV level in adult tupaia (1-year-old tupaia) was quite low (<10{sup 3} copies/ml). Understanding the differences in the response to HBV infection in primary tupaia hepatocytes, chimeric mouse, and adult tupaia will contribute to elucidating the mechanism of persistent HBV infection and viral eradication. Thus, T. belangeri was found to be efficient for studying the host response to HBV infection, thereby providing novel insight into the pathogenesis of HBV. - Highlights: • Primary hepatocytes were established from tupaia that is a novel HBV infection model. • Tupaia primary hepatocytes were susceptible for HBV infection. • The immunodeficient chimeric mice with tupaia hepatocytes were established. • The chimeric mice with tupaia hepatocytes were susceptible for HBV infection.

  17. Environmental Change and Human Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Mesić

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The 30th anniversary of the journal Migration and Ethnic Themes (MET is an occasion to announce a new key issue in the modern world’s future, which, in the authors’ opinion, is becoming the central theme within multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary field of migration studies. This concerns the displacement of people in the local and national context as well as migration across national borders, at the regional and global level, which are directly or indirectly caused by environmental change. The recent genetic studies on the origins and development of the human race further confirm that the human ecological migrations are the first and the oldest type of migrations at all. In addition, as archaeological and other findings suggest, just this type of migration sometimes played a key role in the emergence, decay and changing of ancient civilizations. It seems that the early researchers of migration studies had a lot in mind considering changes in natural environment as an important determinant of human spatial movements. The interest for this topic in the social sciences had trailed off until the re-emergence in the second half of the 1980s. The authors accept the classification on the causal categories of “environmental migration” as: a “natural” disasters; b “urban-industrial” disasters, and c exploitation and degradation of resources. Further, they deal with the definition of basic concepts, first of all with disputes about the definition of “environmental refugees” as opposed to “environmental migrants”. Finally, the authors systematize two major competing approaches to migration and migrants caused by environmental change. The first one is “the alarmist” and the second one “the sceptic” approach. Luckily, the Sceptics are able (for now to prove that deterrent worse-case scenarios on increasingly powerful and unstoppable “waves” of environmental migrants (refugees have not been achieved. This serves them as

  18. Human Wharton’s jelly-derived mesenchymal stromal cells reduce renal fibrosis through induction of native and foreign hepatocyte growth factor synthesis in injured tubular epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Based on some well-documented reports, we attempted to clarify the antifibrotic mechanisms of human Wharton’s-jelly-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (WJ-MSCs) from the perspective of induction of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) expression in tubular epithelial cells (TECs). Methods A rat model of acute kidney injury (AKI) was established through unilateral renal ischemia for 1 hour. Two days later, a single intravenous cell or vehicle injection, or contralateral nephrectomy, was performed. Rats were sacrificed at 1 day, 1 week, 4 weeks, or 6 weeks after the intervention. Renal fibrosis was evaluated by Masson trichrome staining and Sircol collagen assay. The upregulation of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) versus E-cadherin expression was adopted as an indicator of tubular epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Gene and protein expression of HGF or transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1) was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot, respectively. HGF expression in TECs was detected with immunostaining. In vitro, rat TECs subjected to hypoxia injury were incubated with or without conditioned medium (CM) from WJ-MSCs for 1, 3, 24, or 48 hours. Rat or human HGF synthesis in TECs was assessed with immunostaining, RT-PCR, or ELISA. Results Cell delivery or nephrectomy led to abrogation of renal scarring. At the incipient period of AKI, through induction of HGF expression, either of them remarkably promoted the upregulation of HGF versus TGF-β1 expression in damaged kidney. Rat TECs were not only the principal cells expressing HGF but also exhibited human HGF expression after cell infusion. During fibrogenesis, the downregulation of HGF versus TGF-β1 expression was greatly prevented by WJ-MSCs or kidney removal, thereby resulting in tubular EMT delay. In vitro, after 24 or 48 hours of incubation, CM not only robustly induced the upregulation of rat HGF gene expression in TECs but substantially amplified the release

  19. l-carnitine protects human hepatocytes from oxidative stress-induced toxicity through Akt-mediated activation of Nrf2 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinlian; Zhang, Yanli; Luan, Haiyun; Chen, Xuehong; Han, Yantao; Wang, Chunbo

    2016-05-01

    In our previous study, l-carnitine was shown to have cytoprotective effect against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced injury in human normal HL7702 hepatocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the protective effect of l-carnitine was associated with the nuclear factor erythroid 2 (NFE2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway. Our results showed that pretreatment with l-carnitine augmented Nrf2 nuclear translocation, DNA binding activity and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in H2O2-treated HL7702 cells, although l-carnitine treatment alone had no effect on them. Analysis using Nrf2 siRNA demonstrated that Nrf2 activation was involved in l-carnitine-induced HO-1 expression. In addition, l-carnitine-mediated protection against H2O2 toxicity was abrogated by Nrf2 siRNA, indicating the important role of Nrf2 in l-carnitine-induced cytoprotection. Further experiments revealed that l-carnitine pretreatment enhanced the phosphorylation of Akt in H2O2-treated cells. Blocking Akt pathway with inhibitor partly abrogated the protective effect of l-carnitine. Moreover, our finding demonstrated that the induction of Nrf2 translocation and HO-1 expression by l-carnitine directly correlated with the Akt pathway because Akt inhibitor showed inhibitory effects on the Nrf2 translocation and HO-1 expression. Altogether, these results demonstrate that l-carnitine protects HL7702 cells against H2O2-induced cell damage through Akt-mediated activation of Nrf2 signaling pathway.

  20. Toxicogenomics applied to cultures of human hepatocytes enabled an identification of novel petasites hybridus extracts for the treatment of migraine with improved hepatobiliary safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Nora; Meier, Tatjana; Borlak, Jürgen

    2009-12-01

    Butterbur extracts (Petasites hybridus) are recommended for the prevention of migraine, but pharmacovigilance reports may be suggestive of rare hepatobiliary toxicity. To evaluate its hepatotoxic potential, a series of in vivo and in vitro studies were carried out. Essentially, there were no signs of hepatocellular toxicity at estimated therapeutic C(max) levels of 60 ng/ml. Nonetheless, in a 28-day toxicity study at approximately 200-fold of therapeutic doses, induced liver transaminases and bilirubin elevations were observed. In a subsequent 6-month chronic toxicity study, the initial hepatobiliary effects were reproduced, but at the end of the study, liver function recovered and returned to normal as evidenced by clinical chemistry measurements. To identify possible mechanisms of hepatotoxicity, we investigated liver function in vitro at > 170-fold of therapeutic C(max) levels, including cytotoxicity (lactate dehydrogenase, MTT, and ATP), transaminase activities (alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase), albumin synthesis, urea and testosterone metabolism to assay for cytochrome P450 monooxygenase activity. Only with extracts rich in petasin (37% petasin) and at high and well above therapeutic doses, liver toxicity was observed. A toxicogenomic approach applied to hepatocyte cultures enabled hypothesis generation and was highly suggestive for extracts high in petasin content to impair bile acid transport and lipid and protein metabolism. Importantly, neither chronic rat in vivo nor rat in vitro studies predicted reliably hepatotoxicity, therefore reemphasizing the utility of human-based in vitro investigations for the development of safe medicinal products. Finally, toxicogenomics enabled the characterization of a novel butterbur extract with no signals for hepatotoxicity.

  1. Metformin stimulates FGF21 expression in primary hepatocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Eva B; Vienberg, Sara G; Ørskov, Cathrine

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a novel metabolic regulator of glucose and lipid metabolism; however, the exact mechanism of action and regulation of FGF21 is not fully understood. Metabolic status plays an important role in the regulation of FGF21, and we therefore examined whether...... metformin, an indirect AMPK-activator, regulates FGF21 expression in hepatocytes. FGF21 mRNA and protein expression were determined after incubation of primary cultured rat and human hepatocytes with metformin for 24 hours. To study the role of AMPK in the putative regulation of FGF21, hepatocytes were...... incubated with Compound C (an AMPK inhibitor) in the presence of metformin. A strong dose-dependent increase in FGF21 expression was observed in both rat and human hepatocytes treated with metformin. This effect was blocked by addition of the AMPK-inhibitor Compound C. The study shows that metformin...

  2. Hepatocyte transplantation in the Long Evans Cinnamon rat model of Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seon Mee; Vo, Kim; Lallier, Michel; Cloutier, Alexis-Simon; Brochu, Pierre; Alvarez, Fernando; Martin, Steven R

    2006-01-01

    Wilson's disease (WD), caused by a mutation in the P-type copper transporting ATPase (Atp7b) gene, results in excessive accumulation of copper in the liver. Long Evans Cinnamon rats (LEC) bear a mutation in the atp7b gene and share clinical characteristics of human WD. To explore hepatocyte transplantation (HT) as therapy for metabolic liver diseases, 8-week-old LEC rats (n = 12) were transplanted by intrasplenic injection of hepatocytes from donor Long Evans (LE) rats. Immunosuppression was maintained with intraperitoneal tacrolimus. The success of HT was monitored at 24 weeks of life. Serum aminotransferases and bilirubin peaked at 14-21 weeks in both HT rats and nontransplanted controls, but at 24 weeks, survival was 97% in LEC-HT versus 63% in controls. All transplanted rats showed restored biliary copper excretion and reduced liver iron concentration associated with increased ceruloplasmin oxidase activity. Liver tissue expressed atp7b mRNA (11.9 +/- 13.6%) indicative of engraftment of normal cells in 7 of 12 HT rats, associated with a reduced liver copper concentration compared to untreated LEC rats. Periportal islets of normal appearing hepatocytes, recognized by atp7b antibody, were observed in transplanted livers while lobular host cells showed persistent pleomorphic changes and inflammatory infiltrates. In conclusion, transplantation of normal hepatocytes prevented fulminant hepatitis, reduces chronic inflammation, and improved 6-month survival in LEC rats. Engraftment of transplanted cells, which express atp7b mRNA, repopulated the recipient liver with normal functional capacity.

  3. Aflatoxin B1 invokes apoptosis via death receptor pathway in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughal, Muhammad Jameel; Xi, Peng; Yi, Zhou; Jing, Fang

    2017-01-31

    The fungal metabolites produced by Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus cause detrimental health effects on humans and animals. Particularly aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is the most studied and a well-known global carcinogen, producing hepatotoxic, genotoxic and immunotoxic effects in multiple species. AFB1 is shown to provoke liver dysfunctioning by causing hepatocytes apoptosis and disturbing cellular enzymatic activities. In liver, AFB1 causes apoptosis via extrinsic mechanism because of high expression of death receptor pathway. The detailed mechanism of AFB1 induced hepatocytes apoptosis, via death receptor pathway still remains elusive. So the present study was conducted to explore apoptotic mechanism initiated by death receptors and associated genes in aflatoxin B1 induced liver apoptosis in chickens fed with AFB1 for 3 weeks. Results from the present study displayed histopathological and ultrastructural changes in liver such as hydropic degeneration, fatty vacuolar degeneration and proliferation of bile duct in hepatocytes in AFB1 group, along with imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant defense system upon AFB1 ingestion. Moreover, AFB1 intoxicated chickens showed upregulation of death receptors FAS, TNFR1 and associated genes and downregulation of inhibitory apoptotic proteins XIAP and BCL-2. The results obtained from this novel and comprehensive study including histopathological, ultrastructural, flow cytometrical and death receptor pathway gene expression profiles, will facilitate better understanding of mechanisms and involvement of death receptor pathway in hepatocytes apoptosis induced by AFB1 and ultimately may be helpful in bringing down the toxigenic potential of AFB1.

  4. Benzodiazepines medazepam and midazolam are activators of pregnane X receptor and weak inducers of CYP3A4: investigation in primary cultures of human hepatocytes and hepatocarcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrzal, Radim; Kubesova, Katerina; Pavek, Petr; Dvorak, Zdenek

    2010-03-15

    Benzodiazepines have wide-spread used in pharmacotherapy for their anxiolytic, myorelaxant, hypnotic, amnesic and anticonvulsive properties. Despite benzodiazepines are used in clinics over 50 years, they have not been surprisingly tested for capability to induce major drug-metabolizing cytochromes P450. In the current study, we have examined the potency of Alprazolam, Bromazepam, Chlordiazepoxide, Clonazepam, Diazepam, Lorazepam, Medazepam, Midazolam, Nitrazepam, Oxazepam, Tetrazepam and Triazolam to induce CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 in primary cultures of human hepatocytes. Benzodiazepines were tested in therapeutic concentrations and in concentrations corresponding to their plasma levels in intoxicated patients. We found weak but significant induction of CYP3A4 mRNA by Midazolam and Medazepam, while other benzodiazepines did not induce CYP3A4 expression. None of the tested compounds induced CYP1A2 mRNA in three independent human hepatocytes cultures. In addition, employing gene reporter assays with transiently transfected hepatocarcinoma cells, we found that tested benzodiazepines did not activate aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), whereas Midazolam and Medazepam slightly activated pregnane X receptor (PXR). Consistently, two-hybrid mammalian assay using hybrid fusion plasmids GAL4-PXR ligand-binding domain (LBD) and VP16-SRC-1-receptor-interacting domain (RID) confirmed PXR activation by Midazolam and Medazepam. In conclusion, Alprazolam, Bromazepam, Chlordiazepoxide, Clonazepam, Diazepam, Lorazepam, Nitrazepam, Oxazepam, Tetrazepam and Triazolam can be considered as safe drugs in term of their inability to induce PXR- and AhR-dependent cytochrome P450 enzymes CYP1A2 and CYP3A4. Medazepam and Midazolam slightly activated pregnane X receptor and displayed weak potency to induce CYP3A4 mRNA in human hepatocytes. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Defense mechanisms of hepatocytes against Burkholderia pseudomallei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje eBast

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The gram-negative facultative intracellular rod Burkholderia pseudomallei causes melioidosis, an infectious disease with a wide range of clinical presentations. Among the observed visceral abscesses, the liver is commonly affected. However, neither this organotropism of B. pseudomallei nor local hepatic defense mechanisms have been thoroughly investigated so far. Own previous studies using electron microscopy of the murine liver after systemic infection of mice indicated that hepatocytes might be capable of killing B. pseudomallei. Therefore, the aim of this study was to further elucidate the interaction of B. pseudomallei with these cells and to analyse the role of hepatocytes in anti-B. pseudomallei host defense. In vitro studies using the human hepatocyte cell line HepG2 revealed that B. pseudomallei can invade these cells. Subsequently, B. pseudomallei is able to escape from the vacuole, to replicate within the cytosol of HepG2 cells involving its type 3 and type 6 secretion systems, and to induce actin tail formation. Furthermore, stimulation of HepG2 cells showed that IFNgamma can restrict growth of B. pseudomallei in the early and late phase of infection whereas the combination of IFNgamma, IL-1beta and TNFalpha is required for the maximal antibacterial activity. This anti-B. pseudomallei defense of HepG2 cells did not seem to be mediated by iNOS-derived nitric oxide or NADPH oxidase-derived superoxide. In summary, this is the first study describing B. pseudomallei intracellular life cycle characteristics in hepatocytes and showing that IFNgamma-mediated, but nitric oxide- and reactive oxygen species-independent, effector mechanisms are important in anti-B. pseudomallei host defense of hepatocytes.

  6. Decrease in Dengue virus-2 infection and reduction of cytokine/chemokine production by Uncaria guianensis in human hepatocyte cell line Huh-7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia da Silva Mello

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Dengue fever may present hemorrhages and cavitary effusions as result of exacerbated immune responses. We investigated hydro-alcoholic extracts from leaves (UGL and bark (UGB of the medicinal species Uncaria guinanensis with respect to antiviral effects in Dengue virus (DENV infection and in immunological parameters associated with in vivo physiopathological features. METHODS Chemical profiles from UGB or UGL were compared in thin layer chromatography and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance using flavonoid compounds and a pentacyclic oxindole alkaloid-enriched fraction as references. DENV-2-infected hepatocytes (Huh-7 were treated with extracts. Cell viability, DENV antigens and immunological factors were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA or flow cytometry. FINDINGS The UGL mainly differed from UGB by selectively containing the flavonoid kaempferitrin. UGB and UGL improved hepatocyte viability. Both extracts reduced intracellular viral antigen and inhibited the secretion of viral non-structural protein (NS1, which is indicative of viral replication. Reduction in secretion of macrophage migration inhibitory factor was achieved by UGB, of interleukin-6 by UGL, and of interleukin-8 by both UGB and UGL. MAIN CONCLUSIONS The U. guianensis extracts presented, antiviral and immunomodulatory effects for DENV and possibly a hepatocyte-protective activity. Further studies may be performed to consider these products as potential candidates for the development of an herbal product for the future treatment of dengue.

  7. Culture, Urbanism and Changing Human Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, L M

    2014-04-03

    Anthropologists have long known that human activity driven by culture changes the environment. This is apparent in the archaeological record and through the study of the modern environment. Perhaps the largest change since the paleolithic era is the organization of human populations in cities. New environments can reshape human biology through evolution as shown by the evolution of the hominid lineage. Evolution is not the only process capable of reshaping our biology. Some changes in our human biology are adaptive and evolutionary while others are pathological. What changes in human biology may be wrought by the modern urban environment? One significant new change in the environment is the introduction of pollutants largely through urbanization. Pollutants can affect human biology in myriad ways. Evidence shows that human growth, reproduction, and cognitive functioning can be altered by some pollutants, and altered in different ways depending on the pollutant. Thus, pollutants have significance for human biologists and anthropologists generally. Further, they illustrate the bio-cultural interaction characterizing human change. Humans adapt by changing the environment, a cultural process, and then change biologically to adjust to that new environment. This ongoing, interactive process is a fundamental characteristic of human change over the millennia.

  8. Culture, Urbanism and Changing Human Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Schell, L.M.

    2014-01-01

    Anthropologists have long known that human activity driven by culture changes the environment. This is apparent in the archaeological record and through the study of the modern environment. Perhaps the largest change since the paleolithic era is the organization of human populations in cities. New environments can reshape human biology through evolution as shown by the evolution of the hominid lineage. Evolution is not the only process capable of reshaping our biology. Some changes in our hum...

  9. Climate change and human health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warren, John A; Berner, James E; Curtis, Tine

    2005-01-01

    In northern regions, climate change can include changes in precipitation magnitude and frequency, reductions in sea ice extent and thickness, and climate warming and cooling. These changes can increase the frequency and severity of storms, flooding, or erosion; other changes may include drought...... or degradation of permafrost. Climate change can result in damage to sanitation infrastructure resulting in the spread of disease or threatening a community's ability to maintain its economy, geographic location and cultural tradition, leading to mental stress. Through monitoring of some basic indicators...... communities can begin to develop a response to climate change. With this information, planners, engineers, health care professionals and governments can begin to develop approaches to address the challenges related to climate change....

  10. Humans in changing shrubland ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemary L. Pendleton; Stanley G. Kitchen; Andres F. Cibils

    2014-01-01

    Emerging arid-land research and management approaches are increasingly shaped by the recognition of the fact that humans are an integral part of ecosystems. The thrust to study the coupled natural-human dynamics of such systems1 and the growing awareness of the social-ecological nature of rangeland ecosystems2 are prompting a shift in the way we think about current and...

  11. Factor VIIa binding and internalization in hepatocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortoe, G; Sorensen, B B; Petersen, L C

    2005-01-01

    The liver is believed to be the primary clearance organ for coagulation proteases, including factor VIIa (FVIIa). However, at present, clearance mechanisms for FVIIa in liver are unknown. To obtain information on the FVIIa clearance mechanism, we investigated the binding and internalization...... of FVIIa in liver cells using a human hepatoma cell line (HEPG2), and primary rat and human hepatocytes as cell models. 125I-FVIIa bound to HEPG2 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Anti-tissue factor antibodies reduced the binding by about 25%, whereas 50-fold molar excess of unlabeled FVIIa had...

  12. Hepatocyte MyD88 affects bile acids, gut microbiota and metabolome contributing to regulate glucose and lipid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duparc, Thibaut; Plovier, Hubert; Marrachelli, Vannina G; Van Hul, Matthias; Essaghir, Ahmed; Ståhlman, Marcus; Matamoros, Sébastien; Geurts, Lucie; Pardo-Tendero, Mercedes M; Druart, Céline; Delzenne, Nathalie M; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste; van der Merwe, Schalk W; van Pelt, Jos; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Monleon, Daniel; Everard, Amandine; Cani, Patrice D

    2017-01-01

    Objective To examine the role of hepatocyte myeloid differentiation primary-response gene 88 (MyD88) on glucose and lipid metabolism. Design To study the impact of the innate immune system at the level of the hepatocyte and metabolism, we generated mice harbouring hepatocyte-specific deletion of MyD88. We investigated the impact of the deletion on metabolism by feeding mice with a normal control diet or a high-fat diet for 8 weeks. We evaluated body weight, fat mass gain (using time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance), glucose metabolism and energy homeostasis (using metabolic chambers). We performed microarrays and quantitative PCRs in the liver. In addition, we investigated the gut microbiota composition, bile acid profile and both liver and plasma metabolome. We analysed the expression pattern of genes in the liver of obese humans developing non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Results Hepatocyte-specific deletion of MyD88 predisposes to glucose intolerance, inflammation and hepatic insulin resistance independently of body weight and adiposity. These phenotypic differences were partially attributed to differences in gene expression, transcriptional factor activity (ie, peroxisome proliferator activator receptor-α, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), liver X receptors and STAT3) and bile acid profiles involved in glucose, lipid metabolism and inflammation. In addition to these alterations, the genetic deletion of MyD88 in hepatocytes changes the gut microbiota composition and their metabolomes, resembling those observed during diet-induced obesity. Finally, obese humans with NASH displayed a decreased expression of different cytochromes P450 involved in bioactive lipid synthesis. Conclusions Our study identifies a new link between innate immunity and hepatic synthesis of bile acids and bioactive lipids. This dialogue appears to be involved in the susceptibility to alterations associated with obesity such as type 2 diabetes and NASH, both in mice and humans. PMID

  13. Microvesicles derived from human Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells promote human renal cancer cell growth and aggressiveness through induction of hepatocyte growth factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Du

    Full Text Available In our previous study, microvesicles (MVs released from human Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells (hWJ-MSCs retard the growth of bladder cancer cells. We would like to know if MVs have a similar effect on human renal cell carcinoma (RCC. By use of cell culture and the BALB/c nu/nu mice xeno-graft model, the influence of MVs upon the growth and aggressiveness of RCC (786-0 was assessed. Cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8 assay, incidence of tumor, tumor size, Ki-67 or TUNEL staining was used to evaluate tumor cell growth in vitro or in vivo. Flow cytometry assay (in vitro or examination of cyclin D1 expression (in vivo was carried out to determine the alteration of cell cycle. The aggressiveness was analyzed by Wound Healing Assay (in vitro or MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression (in vivo. AKT/p-AKT, ERK1/2/p-ERK1/2 or HGF/c-MET expression was detected by real-time PCR or western blot. Our data demonstrated that MVs promote the growth and aggressiveness of RCC both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, MVs facilitated the progression of cell cycle from G0/1 to S. HGF expression in RCC was greatly induced by MVs, associated with activation of AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. RNase pre-treatment abrogated all effects of MVs. In summary, induction of HGF synthesis via RNA transferred by MVs activating AKT and ERK1/2 signaling is one of crucial contributors to the pro-tumor effect.

  14. Is climate change human induced?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    India is considered highly vulnerable to climate change, not only because of high ... Central Plateau, the Western and Eastern Ghats and the oceans surrounding the .... shares border with China (Tibet) in the North and Nepal in the East and ...

  15. Development of Hepatocyte-like Cell Derived from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem cell as a Host for Clinically Isolated Hepatitis C Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa-Ngiamsuntorn, Khanit; Hongeng, Suradej; Wongkajornsilp, Adisak

    2017-08-14

    This unit describes protocols to develop hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) starting from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as a natural host for hepatitis C virus (HCV). These include the preparation of MSCs from bone marrow, the reprogramming of MSCs into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and the differentiation of iPSCs into HLCs. This unit also incorporates the characterization of the resulting cells at each stage. Another section entails the preparations of HCV. The sources of HCV are either the clinically isolated HCV (HCVser) and the conventional JFH-1 genotype. The last section is the infection protocol coupled with the measurement of viral titer. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. The human rights approach to climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Kristian Høyer

    2013-01-01

    are instrumentally applied as a solution to what could be called the “justice problem” in climate negotiations. In order to assess the degree to which human rights could be a useful approach to the justice problem with regard to to climate change, four major issues need to be examined. First......, there is the distinction between human rights as protection against climate change versus the right to emit greenhouse gases. Both understandings are found in the debate on climate justice, but they are often not made explicit. Second, the “human rights as protection” approach with a focus on (a) right holders, both......It is often argued that concerns about the equity of a global climate agreement might appropriately be addressed in the language of human rights. The human rights approach has been promoted by a number of international political actors, including the UN Human Rights Council. As such, human rights...

  17. The impact of changing human environment and climate change on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    health infrastructure, and drug resistance. The impact of human-induced climate change through industrialization with the consequent depletion of the ozone layer of the environment is now observed to compromise the sustainability of human development as it threatens the ecological support system on which life depends ...

  18. Poly (Ethylene Glycol-Block-Brush Poly (L-Lysine Copolymer as an Efficient Nanocarrier for Human Hepatocyte Growth Factor with Enhanced Bioavailability and Anti-Ischemia Reperfusion Injury Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Tong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of human hepatocyte growth factor (hHGF-loaded poly (ethylene glycol-b-brush poly (l-lysine (PEG-b-P(ELG-g-PLL copolymer on ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury to different organs. Methods: The isoelectric point (pI of hHGF is 5.5, and hHGF combined with PEG-b-P(ELG-g-PLL copolymer via electrostatic interactions at pH 7.4. The synthesized PEG-b-P(ELG-g-PLL copolymer was analyzed using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR and gel permeation chromatography (GPC. The hHGF/PEG-b-P(ELG-g-PLL complex was evaluated using a nanoparticle size instrument and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. In addition, vivo performance of hHGF/PEG-b-P(ELG-g-PLL complex was evaluated using plasma hHGF concentration and different organs ischemia reperfusion injury in rats. Results: An in vitro investigation showed that PEG-b-P(ELG-g-PLL could serve as a potential hHGF nanocarrier with efficient encapsulation and sustained release. An additional in vivo investigation revealed that the hHGF/PEG-b-P(ELG-g-PLL complex could prolong increases in plasma hHGF concentration and protect different organs (the brain, heart and kidney against I/R injury. Conclusion: Poly (ethylene glycol-block-brush poly (l-lysine copolymer as an efficient nanocarrier for human hepatocyte growth factor with enhanced bioavailability and anti-ischemia reperfusion injury efficacy.

  19. Safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of AMG 102, a fully human hepatocyte growth factor-neutralizing monoclonal antibody, in a first-in-human study of patients with advanced solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michael S; Sweeney, Christopher S; Mendelson, David S; Eckhardt, S Gail; Anderson, Abraham; Beaupre, Darrin M; Branstetter, Daniel; Burgess, Teresa L; Coxon, Angela; Deng, Hongjie; Kaplan-Lefko, Paula; Leitch, Ian M; Oliner, Kelly S; Yan, Lucy; Zhu, Min; Gore, Lia

    2010-01-15

    The aims were to assess the safety, pharmacokinetics, maximum tolerated dose, and antitumor activity of AMG 102, a fully human hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF)-neutralizing monoclonal antibody, in patients with solid tumors. Patients (N = 40) with refractory advanced solid tumors were enrolled into six sequential dose-escalation cohorts (0.5, 1, 3, 5, 10, or 20 mg/kg AMG 102 i.v. every 2 weeks) and a dose-expansion cohort (20 mg/kg AMG 102 every 2 weeks). Safety, anti-AMG 102 antibody formation, pharmacokinetics, tumor response, and exploratory biomarkers were assessed. AMG 102 was well tolerated up to the planned maximum dose of 20 mg/kg, and the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. Treatment-related adverse events were generally mild and included fatigue (13%), constipation (8%), nausea (8%), vomiting (5%), anorexia (5%), myalgia (5%), and hypertension (5%). Two patients experienced dose-limiting toxicities: one patient (0.5 mg/kg cohort) experienced grade 3 hypoxia and grade 3 dyspnea and one patient (1 mg/kg cohort) experienced grade 3 upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. No anti-AMG 102 antibodies were detected, and AMG 102 had linear pharmacokinetics within the dose range investigated. Sixteen of 23 (70%) evaluable patients had a best response of stable disease with progression-free survival ranging from 7.9 to 40 weeks. Circulating levels of the biomarker HGF/SF (bound and unbound) increased in a dose-dependent manner, whereas soluble c-Met concentrations were generally similar across doses. AMG 102 is safe and well tolerated, has a favorable pharmacokinetic profile, and will be further investigated as a monotherapy and in combination with other agents.

  20. Climate change, ethics and human security

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Brien, Karen L; St. Clair, Asuncion Lera; Kristoffersen, Berit; Cohen, Stewart J

    2010-01-01

    "Presenting human security perspectives on climate change, this volume raises issues of equity, ethics and environmental justice, as well as our capacity to respond to what is increasingly considered...

  1. miRNA-122 Protects Mice and Human Hepatocytes from Acetaminophen Toxicity by Regulating Cytochrome P450 Family 1 Subfamily A Member 2 and Family 2 Subfamily E Member 1 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhary, Vivek; Teng, Kun-Yu; Thakral, Sharda; Zhang, Bo; Lin, Cho-Hao; Wani, Nissar; Bruschweiler-Li, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoli; James, Laura; Yang, Dakai; Junge, Norman; Brüschweiler, Rafael; Lee, William M; Ghoshal, Kalpana

    2017-12-01

    Acetaminophen toxicity is a leading cause of acute liver failure (ALF). We found that miRNA-122 (miR-122) is down-regulated in liver biopsy specimens of patients with ALF and in acetaminophen-treated mice. A marked decrease in the primary miR-122 expression occurs in mice on acetaminophen overdose because of suppression of its key transactivators, hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-4α and HNF6. More importantly, the mortality rates of male and female liver-specific miR-122 knockout (LKO) mice were significantly higher than control mice when injected i.p. with an acetaminophen dose not lethal to the control. LKO livers exhibited higher basal expression of cytochrome P450 family 2 subfamily E member 1 (CYP2E1) and cytochrome P450 family 1 subfamily A member 2 (CYP1A2) that convert acetaminophen to highly reactive N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine. Upregulation of Cyp1a2 primary transcript and mRNA in LKO mice correlated with the elevation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and mediator 1 (MED1), two transactivators of Cyp1a2. Analysis of ChIP-seq data in the ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Element) database identified association of CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) with Ahr promoter in mouse livers. Both MED1 and CTCF are validated conserved miR-122 targets. Furthermore, depletion of Ahr, Med1, or Ctcf in Mir122 -/- hepatocytes reduced Cyp1a2 expression. Pulse-chase studies found that CYP2E1 protein level is upregulated in LKO hepatocytes. Notably, miR-122 depletion sensitized differentiated human HepaRG cells to acetaminophen toxicity that correlated with upregulation of AHR, MED1, and CYP1A2 expression. Collectively, these results reveal a critical role of miR-122 in acetaminophen detoxification and implicate its therapeutic potential in patients with ALF. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Lymphocyte traffic through sinusoidal endothelial cells is regulated by hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Sarah; Lalor, Patricia F; Nash, Gerard B; Rainger, G Ed; Adams, David H

    2005-03-01

    Crosstalk between hepatic sinusoidal ECs and closely juxtaposed hepatocytes via vascular endothelial growth factor is essential for the maintenance of sinusoidal endothelial growth and differentiation. We propose that paracrine interactions between endothelial cells and hepatocytes also may be responsible for the unique complement of adhesion receptors expressed on sinusoidal endothelium that regulate the recruitment of lymphocytes into the liver. To address this hypothesis, we developed an in vitro model of the hepatic sinusoid in which flowing lymphocytes could interact with hepatic endothelium conditioned by the presence of hepatocytes. Human hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells cocultured with hepatocytes were activated so that they supported the adhesion of lymphocytes at levels equivalent to those seen on endothelium stimulated with the inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor-beta. Lymphocyte adhesion was supported by intracellular adhesion molecule 1, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and E-selectin, with an additional contribution from the novel adhesion receptor VAP-1. In conclusion, we show that interactions between hepatocytes and endothelial cells amplify leukocyte recruitment through the sinusoids by regulating the expression and function of endothelial adhesion molecules. These paracrine interactions may be responsible for the induction of the adhesion molecules that support constitutive lymphocyte recruitment to the liver as well as contributing significantly to the patterns of leukocyte adhesion seen during episodes of hepatic inflammation.

  3. Hepatocyte growth factor increases vascular endothelial growth factor-A production in human synovial fibroblasts through c-Met receptor pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Min Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Angiogenesis is essential for the progression of osteoarthritis (OA. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF is an angiogenic mediator, and it shows elevated levels in regions of OA. However, the relationship between HGF and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A in OA synovial fibroblasts (OASFs is mostly unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we found that stimulation of OASFs with HGF induced concentration- and time-dependent increases in VEGF-A expression. Pretreatment with PI3K inhibitor (Ly294002, Akt inhibitor, or mTORC1 inhibitor (rapamycin blocked the HGF-induced VEGF-A production. Treatment of cells with HGF also increased PI3K, Akt, and mTORC1 phosphorylation. Furthermore, HGF increased the stability and activity of HIF-1 protein. Moreover, the use of pharmacological inhibitors or genetic inhibition revealed that c-Met, PI3K, Akt, and mTORC1 signaling pathways were potentially required for HGF-induced HIF-1α activation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our results provide evidence that HGF enhances VEGF-A expression in OASFs by an HIF-1α-dependent mechanism involving the activation of c-Met/PI3K/Akt and mTORC1 pathways.

  4. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Provide Protection against Radiation-Induced Liver Injury by Antioxidative Process, Vasculature Protection, Hepatocyte Differentiation, and Trophic Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Francois

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the potential therapeutic effect of the infusion of hMSCs for the correction of liver injuries, we performed total body radiation exposure of NOD/SCID mice. After irradiation, mir-27b level decreases in liver, increasing the directional migration of hMSCs by upregulating SDF1α. A significant increase in plasmatic transaminases levels, apoptosis process in the liver vascular system, and in oxidative stress were observed. hMSC injection induced a decrease in transaminases levels and oxidative stress, a disappearance of apoptotic cells, and an increase in Nrf2, SOD gene expression, which might reduce ROS production in the injured liver. Engrafted hMSCs expressed cytokeratin CK18 and CK19 and AFP genes indicating possible hepatocyte differentiation. The presence of hMSCs expressing VEGF and Ang-1 in the perivascular region, associated with an increased expression of VEGFr1, r2 in the liver, can confer a role of secreting cells to hMSCs in order to maintain the endothelial function. To explain the benefits to the liver of hMSC engraftment, we find that hMSCs secreted NGF, HGF, and anti-inflammatory molecules IL-10, IL1-RA contributing to prevention of apoptosis, increasing cell proliferation in the liver which might correct liver dysfunction. MSCs are potent candidates to repair and protect healthy tissues against radiation damages.

  5. Early membrane depressions in hepatocytes cultured on Primaria supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, B J; Evans, P J

    2001-01-01

    The topography of spreading hepatocytes on positively charged Primaria plates was examined using scanning electron microscopy. The cells acquired a uniform morphology within 2 h. The spreading was rapid and the surface of the cells showed early prominent depressions or dips. The hepatocytes had either one or two of these structures which corresponded to the frequency of mononuclear and binuclear cells, respectively. The nuclear origin of the dips was strengthened after 6 h. They contained solid structures, whose number, size and shape were the same as nucleoli. The membrane dipping was independent of cell density and took place under conditions where phenotypic changes can occur. Kidney proximal tubule cells had no dips. Co-cultures of hepatocytes and kidney proximal tubule cells showed that the cell types behave differently.

  6. Disappearance of GFP-positive hepatocytes transplanted into the liver of syngeneic wild-type rats pretreated with retrorsine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Hiromichi; Shigoka, Masatoshi; Wang, Yongchun; Fu, Yingxin; Wesson, Russell N; Lin, Qing; Montgomery, Robert A; Enzan, Hideaki; Sun, Zhaoli

    2014-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a widely used molecular tag to trace transplanted cells in rodent liver injury models. The differing results from various previously reported studies using GFP could be attributed to the immunogenicity of GFP. Hepatocytes were obtained from GFP-expressing transgenic (Tg) Lewis rats and were transplanted into the livers of wild-type Lewis rats after they had undergone a partial hepatectomy. The proliferation of endogenous hepatocytes in recipient rats was inhibited by pretreatment with retrorsine to enhance the proliferation of the transplanted hepatocytes. Transplantation of wild-type hepatocytes into GFP-Tg rat liver was also performed for comparison. All biopsy specimens taken seven days after transplantation showed engraftment of transplanted hepatocytes, with the numbers of transplanted hepatocytes increasing until day 14. GFP-positive hepatocytes in wild-type rat livers were decreased by day 28 and could not be detected on day 42, whereas the number of wild-type hepatocytes steadily increased in GFP-Tg rat liver. Histological examination showed degenerative change of GFP-positive hepatocytes and the accumulation of infiltrating cells on day 28. PCR analysis for the GFP transgene suggested that transplanted hepatocytes were eliminated rather than being retained along with the loss of GFP expression. Both modification of the immunological response using tacrolimus and bone marrow transplantation prolonged the survival of GFP-positive hepatocytes. In contrast, host immunization with GFP-positive hepatocytes led to complete loss of GFP-positive hepatocytes by day 14. GFP-positive hepatocytes isolated from GFP-Tg Lewis rats did not survive long term in the livers of retrorsine-pretreated wild-type Lewis rats. The mechanism underlying this phenomenon most likely involves an immunological reaction against GFP. The influence of GFP immunogenicity on cell transplantation models should be considered in planning in vivo experiments

  7. Nonviral HVJ (hemagglutinating virus of Japan) liposome-mediated retrograde gene transfer of human hepatocyte growth factor into rat nervous system promotes functional and histological recovery of the crushed nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Naoki; Nemoto, Koichi; Nakanishi, Kuniaki; Morishita, Ryuichi; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Uenoyama, Maki; Ikeda, Tomosumi; Fujikawa, Kyosuke

    2005-08-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is well known to be involved in many biological functions, such as organ regeneration and angiogenesis, and to exert neurotrophic effects on motor, sensory, and parasympathetic neurons. In this study, we gave repeated intramuscular injections of the human HGF gene, using nonviral HVJ (hemagglutinating virus of Japan) liposome method, to examine whether transfection of the rat nervous system with this gene is able to exert neurotrophic effects facilitating recovery of a crushed nerve. The expression of HGF protein and HGF mRNA indicated that gene transfer into the nervous system did occur via retrograde axonal transport. At 4 weeks after crush, electrophysiological examination of the crushed nerve showed a significantly shorter mean latency and a significantly greater mean maximum M-wave amplitude with repeated injections of HGF gene. Furthermore, histological findings showed that the mean diameter of the axons, the axon number and the axon population were significantly larger in the group with repeated injections of HGF gene. The above results show that repeated human HGF gene transfer into the rat nervous system is able to promote crushed-nerve recovery, both electrophysiologically and histologically, and suggest that HGF gene transfer has potential for the treatment of crushed nerve.

  8. Co-operation of the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor-4 with Sp1 or Sp3 leads to transcriptional activation of the human haem oxygenase-1 gene promoter in a hepatoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shigeru; Matsuura, Naomi; Kurokawa, Takako; Takahashi, Yuji; Miura, Takashi

    2002-11-01

    We reported previously that the 5'-flanking region (nucleotides -1976 to -1655) of the human haem oxygenase-1 ( hHO-1 ) gene enhances hHO-1 promoter activity in human hepatoma HepG2 cells, but not in HeLa cells [Takahashi, Takahashi, Ito, Nagano, Shibahara and Miura (1999) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1447, 231-235]. To define more precisely the regulatory elements involved, in the present study we have functionally dissected this region and localized the enhancer to a 50 bp fragment (-1793 to -1744). Site-direct mutagenesis analysis revealed that two regions were responsible for this enhancer activity, i.e. a hepatocyte nuclear factor-4 (HNF-4) homologous region and a GC box motif homologous region. Mutation in either region alone moderately decreased enhancer activity. However, mutations in both regions reduced promoter activity to the basal level. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays demonstrated that the P5-2 fragment (-1793 to -1744) interacted with at least two nuclear factors, i.e. HNF-4 and Sp1/Sp3. Co-transfection experiments using Drosophila SL2 cells revealed that HNF-4 and Sp1/Sp3 synergistically stimulated the enhancer activity of the P5-2 fragment. These results indicate that co-operation of HNF-4 with Sp1 or Sp3 leads to the activation of hHO-1 gene expression in hepatoma cells.

  9. Climate change, human health, and epidemiological transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Bruce; Charles, Joel W; Temte, Jonathan L

    2015-01-01

    The health of populations depends on the availability of clean air, water, food, and sanitation, exposure to pathogens, toxins and environmental hazards, and numerous genetic, behavioral and social factors. For many thousands of years, human life expectancy was low, and population growth was slow. The development of technology-based civilizations facilitated what Abdel Omran called "epidemiological transition," with increasing life expectancy and rapid population growth. To a large extent, the spectacular growth of human populations during the past two centuries was made possible by the energy extracted from fossil fuels. We have now learned, however, that greenhouse gases from fossil fuel combustion are warming the planet's surface, causing changes in oceanic and atmospheric systems, and disrupting weather and hydrological patterns. Climate change poses unprecedented threats to human health by impacts on food and water security, heat waves and droughts, violent storms, infectious disease, and rising sea levels. Whether or not humanity can reduce greenhouse gas emissions quickly enough to slow climate change to a rate that will allow societies to successfully adapt is not yet known. This essay reviews the current state of relevant knowledge, and points in a few directions that those interested in human health may wish to consider. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Haematological Changes in Human immunodeficiency Virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haematological Changes in Human immunodeficiency Virus Infected Pregnant Women in Benin City, Nigeria. ... A differential leucocyte count was also done by the thin blood film method, stained with Leishman stain and examined microscopically. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was carried out using the

  11. THE CHANGING FACE OF HUMAN ANATOMY PRACTICE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Contemporary practice of Human Anatomy should combine historical practices and current advances in technology. The history of Anatomy has changed dramatically over the years. It was not until the Grecian Period that people began to accept anatomy as a science. Originally nobody knew anything about anatomy and its.

  12. Global environmental change: understanding the human dimensions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stern, Paul C; Young, Oran R; Druckman, Daniel

    ... on the Human Dimensions of Global Change Commission on the Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education National Research Council NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. 1992 Copyrightthe cannot be not from book, paper however, version for formatting, original authoritative the typesetting-specific the as from created publication files ...

  13. Metformin Stimulates FGF21 Expression in Primary Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva B. Nygaard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 is a novel metabolic regulator of glucose and lipid metabolism; however, the exact mechanism of action and regulation of FGF21 is not fully understood. Metabolic status plays an important role in the regulation of FGF21, and we therefore examined whether metformin, an indirect AMPK-activator, regulates FGF21 expression in hepatocytes. FGF21 mRNA and protein expression were determined after incubation of primary cultured rat and human hepatocytes with metformin for 24 hours. To study the role of AMPK in the putative regulation of FGF21, hepatocytes were incubated with Compound C (an AMPK inhibitor in the presence of metformin. A strong dose-dependent increase in FGF21 expression was observed in both rat and human hepatocytes treated with metformin. This effect was blocked by addition of the AMPK-inhibitor Compound C. The study shows that metformin is a potent inducer of hepatic FGF21 expression and that the effect of metformin seems to be mediated through AMPK activation. As FGF21 therapy normalizes blood glucose in animal models of type 2 diabetes, the induction of hepatic FGF21 by metformin might play an important role in metformin’s antidiabetic effect.

  14. No evidence for protective erythropoietin alpha signalling in rat hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frede Stilla

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant human erythropoietin alpha (rHu-EPO has been reported to protect the liver of rats and mice from ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, direct protective effects of rHu-EPO on hepatocytes and the responsible signalling pathways have not yet been described. The aim of the present work was to study the protective effect of rHu-EPO on warm hypoxia-reoxygenation and cold-induced injury to hepatocytes and the rHu-EPO-dependent signalling involved. Methods Loss of viability of isolated rat hepatocytes subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation or incubated at 4°C followed by rewarming was determined from released lactate dehydrogenase activity in the absence and presence of rHu-EPO (0.2–100 U/ml. Apoptotic nuclear morphology was assessed by fluorescence microscopy using the nuclear fluorophores H33342 and propidium iodide. Erythropoietin receptor (EPOR, EPO and Bcl-2 mRNAs were quantified by real time PCR. Activation of JAK-2, STAT-3 and STAT-5 in hepatocytes and rat livers perfused in situ was assessed by Western blotting. Results In contrast to previous in vivo studies on ischemia-reperfusion injury to the liver, rHu-EPO was without any protective effect on hypoxic injury, hypoxia-reoxygenation injury and cold-induced apoptosis to isolated cultured rat hepatocytes. EPOR mRNA was identified in these cells but specific detection of the EPO receptor protein was not possible due to the lack of antibody specificity. Both, in the cultured rat hepatocytes (10 U/ml for 15 minutes and in the rat liver perfused in situ with rHu-EPO (8.9 U/ml for 15 minutes no evidence for EPO-dependent signalling was found as indicated by missing effects of rHu-EPO on phosphorylation of JAK-2, STAT-3 and STAT-5 and on the induction of Bcl-2 mRNA. Conclusion Together, these results indicate the absence of any protective EPO signalling in rat hepatocytes. This implies that the protection provided by rHu-EPO in vivo against ischemia-reperfusion and

  15. Changing domains in human capital measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pharny D. Chrysler-Fox

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The management context is dynamic; this is especially evident in human capital as the primary source of value creation as opposed to physical and natural resources. In response, measurement methodologies have moved from a transactional approach (strategy implementation to a transformational approach (human capital contribution paradigm, as well as diverging into different purposes. To date, there has been little overlap on recent domains to consider in managing and measuring the contribution of the human resource function and employees, and how to unlock and add value.Research purpose: The aim of the study was to explore and describe changing domains within human capital management to be managed and measured.Motivation for the study: The motivation was to advance the understanding of changing measurement domains to aid practitioners to manage and measure the contribution of the human resource function and employees, in order to unlock and add value and ultimately contribute to the success of an organisation.Research design, approach and method: Unstructured, in-depth interview data of purposively selected cases from a selected panel of human resource practitioners specialising in human capital measurement was thematically analysed in this exploratory-descriptive investigation.Main findings: Findings suggested that seven domains should be managed and measured. These domains highlight new areas of impact and levels of management. In addition, crossdomain relationships in measurement allow for an understanding of the impact and potential value on which to capitalise.Practical/managerial implications: New domains to manage and measure focus the attention of practitioners beyond the transactional performance management paradigm to a transformational approach to influence the business strategy. Higher education institutions need to develop students’ cognitive skills to facilitate systems thinking.Contribution: This study suggests a new

  16. The human role in changing river channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, K. J.

    2006-09-01

    Direct consequences of the human role, where human activity affects river channels through engineering works including channelization, dam construction, diversion and culverting, have been long recognised [Marsh, G.P., 1864. Man and Nature or Physical Geography as Modified by Human Action. Charles Scribner, New York; Thomas Jr., W.L., (ed.) 1956. Man's Role in Changing the Face of the Earth. Chicago, University of Chicago Press, Chicago.]. The less obvious indirect effects of point and reach changes occurring downstream and throughout the basin, however, are much more recently appreciated, dating from key contributions by Strahler [Strahler, A.N., 1956. The nature of induced erosion and aggradation. In W. L. Thomas (Ed.), Man's Role in Changing the Face of the Earth. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 621-638.], Wolman [Wolman, M.G., 1967. A cycle of sedimentation and erosion in urban river channels. Geografiska Annaler 49A, 385-95.], Schumm [Schumm, S.A., 1969. River metamorphosis. Proceedings American Society of Civil Engineers, Journal Hydraulics Division 95, 255-73.], and Graf [Graf, W.L., 1977. The rate law in fluvial geomorphology. American Journal of Science, 277, 178-191.]. These are complemented by effects of alterations of land use, such as deforestation, intensive agriculture and incidence of fire, with the most extreme effects produced by building activity and urbanisation. Changing river channels are most evident in the channel cross-section where changes of size, shape and composition are now well-established, with up to tenfold increases or decreases illustrated by results from more than 200 world studies. In addition the overall channel planform, the network and the ecology have changed. Specific terms have become associated with changing river channels including enlargement, shrinkage and metamorphosis. Although the scope of adjustment has been established, it has not always been possible to predict what will happen in a particular location

  17. Different preparations of natural and recombinant human interleukin-6 (IFN-beta 2, BSF-2) similarly stimulate acute phase protein synthesis and uptake of alpha-aminoisobutyric acid by cultured rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereta, J; Kurdowska, A; Koj, A; Hirano, T; Kishimoto, T; Content, J; Fiers, W; Van Damme, J; Gauldie, J

    1989-01-01

    1. Rat hepatocytes were cultured for 2 days in Williams E medium containing 1 microM insulin and dexamethasone. 2. Production of five plasma proteins was determined by electroimmunoassay in the media, and amino acid uptake was measured by [alpha-14C]aminoisobutyric acid accumulation in hepatocytes. 3. Supernatants from rat peritoneal macrophages and IL-6/IFN-beta 2/BSF-2 obtained from four different laboratories similarly stimulated synthesis of fibrinogen, alpha 1-cysteine proteinase inhibitor and alpha 2-macroglobulin, as well as [14C]-accumulation in cultured hepatocytes. 4. It is concluded that IL-6 is the principal hepatocyte stimulating factor responsible for typical features of the acute phase response of liver cells.

  18. Bile acids initiate cholestatic liver injury by triggering a hepatocyte-specific inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shi-Ying; Ouyang, Xinshou; Chen, Yonglin; Soroka, Carol J; Wang, Juxian; Mennone, Albert; Wang, Yucheng; Mehal, Wajahat Z; Jain, Dhanpat; Boyer, James L

    2017-03-09

    Mechanisms of bile acid-induced (BA-induced) liver injury in cholestasis are controversial, limiting development of new therapies. We examined how BAs initiate liver injury using isolated liver cells from humans and mice and in-vivo mouse models. At pathophysiologic concentrations, BAs induced proinflammatory cytokine expression in mouse and human hepatocytes, but not in nonparenchymal cells or cholangiocytes. These hepatocyte-specific cytokines stimulated neutrophil chemotaxis. Inflammatory injury was mitigated in Ccl2(-/-) mice treated with BA or after bile duct ligation, where less hepatic infiltration of neutrophils was detected. Neutrophils in periportal areas of livers from cholestatic patients also correlated with elevations in their serum aminotransferases. This liver-specific inflammatory response required BA entry into hepatocytes via basolateral transporter Ntcp. Pathophysiologic levels of BAs induced markers of ER stress and mitochondrial damage in mouse hepatocytes. Chemokine induction by BAs was reduced in hepatocytes from Tlr9(-/-) mice, while liver injury was diminished both in conventional and hepatocyte-specific Tlr9(-/-) mice, confirming a role for Tlr9 in BA-induced liver injury. These findings reveal potentially novel mechanisms whereby BAs elicit a hepatocyte-specific cytokine-induced inflammatory liver injury that involves innate immunity and point to likely novel pathways for treating cholestatic liver disease.

  19. Human land-use and soil change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Skye A.; Williams, Candiss O.; Duniway, Michael C.; Veenstra, Jessica; Seybold, Cathy; Pressley, DeAnn

    2017-01-01

    Soil change refers to the alteration of soil and soil properties over time in one location, as opposed to soil variability across space. Although soils change with pedogensis, this chapter focuses on human caused soil change. Soil change can occur with human use and management over long or short time periods and small or large scales. While change can be negative or positive; often soil change is observed when short-term or narrow goals overshadow the other soil’s ecosystem services. Many soils have been changed in their chemical, physical or biological properties through agricultural activities, including cultivation, tillage, weeding, terracing, subsoiling, deep plowing, manure and fertilizer addition, liming, draining, and irrigation. Assessing soil change depends upon the ecosystem services and soil functions being evaluated. The interaction of soil properties with the type and intensity of management and disturbance determines the changes that will be observed. Tillage of cropland disrupts aggregates and decreases soil organic carbon content which can lead to decreased infiltration, increased erosion, and reduced biological function. Improved agricultural management systems can increase soil functions including crop productivity and sustainability. Forest management is most intensive during harvesting and seedling establishment. Most active management in forests causes disturbance of the soil surface which may include loss of forest floor organic materials, increases in bulk density, and increased risk of erosion. In grazing lands, pasture management often includes periods of biological, chemical and physical disturbance in addition to the grazing management imposed on rangelands. Grazing animals have both direct and indirect impacts on soil change. Hoof action can lead to the disturbance of biological crusts and other surface features impairing the soil’s physical, biological and hydrological function. There are clear feedbacks between vegetative systems

  20. Donor-Dependent and Other Nondefined Factors Have Greater Influence on the Hepatic Phenotype Than the Starting Cell Type in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Hepatocyte-Like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, James A; Kia, Richard; Pridgeon, Christopher S; Sison-Young, Rowena L; Liloglou, Triantafillos; Elmasry, Mohamed; Fenwick, Stephen W; Mills, John S; Kitteringham, Neil R; Goldring, Chris E; Park, Bong K

    2017-05-01

    Drug-induced liver injury is the greatest cause of post-marketing drug withdrawal; therefore, substantial resources are directed toward triaging potentially dangerous new compounds at all stages of drug development. One of the major factors preventing effective screening of new compounds is the lack of a predictive in vitro model of hepatotoxicity. Primary human hepatocytes offer a metabolically relevant model for which the molecular initiating events of hepatotoxicity can be examined; however, these cells vary greatly between donors and dedifferentiate rapidly in culture. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) offer a reproducible, physiologically relevant and genotypically normal model cell; however, current differentiation protocols produce HLCs with a relatively immature phenotype. During the reprogramming of somatic cells, the epigenome undergoes dramatic changes; however, this "resetting" is a gradual process, resulting in an altered differentiation propensity, skewed toward the lineage of origin, particularly in early passage cultures. We, therefore, performed a comparison of human hepatocyte- and dermal fibroblast-derived iPSCs, assessing the impact of epigenetic memory at all stages of HLC differentiation. These results provide the first isogenic assessment of the starting cell type in human iPSC-derived HLCs. Despite a trend toward improvement in hepatic phenotype in albumin secretion and gene expression, few significant differences in hepatic differentiation capacity were found between hepatocyte and fibroblast-derived iPSCs. We conclude that the donor and inter-clonal differences have a greater influence on the hepatocyte phenotypic maturity than the starting cell type. Therefore, it is not necessary to use human hepatocytes for generating iPSC-derived HLCs. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1321-1331. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Alpha

  1. Ethanol stimulates phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C in rat hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, R.; Thomas, A.; Hoek, J.B.

    1986-05-01

    Ethanol (50-300 mM) causes a transient mobilization of calcium from hormone-sensitive pools in rat hepatocytes. They have studied the action of ethanol on polyphosphoinositide and inositol phosphate levels in these cells. Addition of ethanol to isolated hepatocytes prelabelled with /sup 32/Pi resulted in a small (3-5%) decrease in the level of (/sup 32/P)-phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and a 10-15% increase in (/sup 32/P) phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and (/sup 32/P) phosphatidic acid. Maximal changes were seen within 30 sec after ethanol. (/sup 32/P) phosphatidylcholine was unaffected. The changes were concentration dependent over a range of 50-500 mM ethanol. Phorbol esters, which inhibit ethanol-induced calcium mobilization, also inhibited these effects of ethanol on polyphosphoinositides. In intact hepatocytes labeled with myo-(2-/sup 3/H)inositol a significant ethanol-induced increase in (/sup 3/H)inositol phosphates could not be detected. After permeabilization of the cells with digitonin, however, ethanol caused a time and concentration dependent release of (/sup 3/H) inositol trisphosphate and (/sup 3/H)inositol bisphosphate. These results indicate that ethanol-induced calcium mobilization in hepatocytes is due to the activation by ethanol of the phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C.

  2. Climate Change, Human Rights, and Social Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Barry S; Patz, Jonathan A

    2015-01-01

    The environmental and health consequences of climate change, which disproportionately affect low-income countries and poor people in high-income countries, profoundly affect human rights and social justice. Environmental consequences include increased temperature, excess precipitation in some areas and droughts in others, extreme weather events, and increased sea level. These consequences adversely affect agricultural production, access to safe water, and worker productivity, and, by inundating land or making land uninhabitable and uncultivatable, will force many people to become environmental refugees. Adverse health effects caused by climate change include heat-related disorders, vector-borne diseases, foodborne and waterborne diseases, respiratory and allergic disorders, malnutrition, collective violence, and mental health problems. These environmental and health consequences threaten civil and political rights and economic, social, and cultural rights, including rights to life, access to safe food and water, health, security, shelter, and culture. On a national or local level, those people who are most vulnerable to the adverse environmental and health consequences of climate change include poor people, members of minority groups, women, children, older people, people with chronic diseases and disabilities, those residing in areas with a high prevalence of climate-related diseases, and workers exposed to extreme heat or increased weather variability. On a global level, there is much inequity, with low-income countries, which produce the least greenhouse gases (GHGs), being more adversely affected by climate change than high-income countries, which produce substantially higher amounts of GHGs yet are less immediately affected. In addition, low-income countries have far less capability to adapt to climate change than high-income countries. Adaptation and mitigation measures to address climate change needed to protect human society must also be planned to protect

  3. New psychoactive substances: Studies on the metabolism of XLR-11, AB-PINACA, FUB-PB-22, 4-methoxy-α-PVP, 25-I-NBOMe, and meclonazepam using human liver preparations in comparison to primary human hepatocytes, and human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Lilian H J; Maurer, Hans H; Meyer, Markus R

    2017-10-05

    New psychoactive substances (NPS) are an increasing problem in clinical and forensic toxicology. The knowledge of their metabolism is important for toxicological risk assessment and for developing toxicological urine screenings. Considering the huge numbers of NPS annually appearing on the market, metabolism studies should be realized in a fast, simple, cost efficient, and reliable way. Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) were recommended to be the gold standard for in vitro metabolism studies as they are expected to contain natural enzyme clusters, co-substrates, and drug transporters. In addition, they were already successfully used for metabolism studies of NPS. However, they also have disadvantages such as high costs and limited applicability without special equipment. The aims of the present study were therefore first to investigate exemplarily the phase I and phase II metabolism of six NPS (XLR-11, AB-PINACA, FUB-PB-22, 4-methoxy-α-PVP, 25-I-NBOMe, and meclonazepam) from different drug classes using pooled human S9 fraction (pS9) or pooled human liver microsomes combined with cytosol (pHLM/pHLC) after addition of the co-substrates for the main metabolic phase I and II reactions. Second to compare results to published data generated using primary human hepatocytes and human urine samples. Results of the incubations with pS9 or pHLM/pHLC were comparable in number and abundance of metabolites. Formation of metabolites, particularly after multi-step reactions needed a longer incubation time. However, incubations using human liver preparations resulted in a lower number of total detected metabolites compared to PHH, but they were still able to allow the identification of the main human urinary excretion products. Human liver preparations and particularly the pooled S9 fraction could be shown to be a sufficient and more cost-efficient alternative in context of metabolism studies also for developing toxicological urine screenings. It might be recommended to use the

  4. Climatic Change and Humanity: A Permanent Conflict?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Serrat

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Climate change has occurred, whether due to human activity or not, throughout the history of the Earth to a greater or lesser traumatic degree. We must use our great technological capacity to prevent its effects so as not to allow the change to lead to a catastrophe. The real problem derives from a social and consumeristic model which, given the current energy resources, can not be made sustainable for the world population. Demographic control, hand in hand with research into and the use of new energy models are absolutely necessary if we are to avoid a final catastrophe.

  5. International human resources management challenges and changes

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the issues related to human resource management (HRM) in an international context. It gives perspectives and future direction in International HRM research. The chapters explore the models, tools and processes used by international organizations in order to assist international managers to better face the challenges and changes in HRM. It is suitable to HR managers, engineers, entrepreneurs, practitioners, academics and researchers in the field.

  6. Aniline Induces Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis of Primary Cultured Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The toxicity and carcinogenicity of aniline in humans and animals have been well documented. However, the molecular mechanism involved in aniline-induced liver toxicity and carcinogenesis remains unclear. In our research, primary cultured hepatocytes were exposed to aniline (0, 1.25, 2.50, 5.0 and 10.0 μg/mL for 24 h in the presence or absence of N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC. Levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS, malondialdehyde (MDA, and glutathione (GSH, activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT, mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA damage, cell viability, and apoptosis were detected. Levels of ROS and MDA were significantly increased and levels of GSH and CAT, activity of SOD, and mitochondrial membrane potential in hepatocytes were significantly decreased by aniline compared with the negative control group. The tail moment and DNA content of the tail in exposed groups were significantly higher than those in the negative control group. Cell viability was reduced and apoptotic death was induced by aniline in a concentration-dependent manner. The phenomena of ROS generation, oxidative damage, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA damage and apoptosis could be prevented if ROS inhibitor NAC was added. ROS generation is involved in the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA injury, which may play a role in aniline-induced apoptosis in hepatocytes. Our study provides insight into the mechanism of aniline-induced toxicity and apoptosis of hepatocytes.

  7. Aniline Induces Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis of Primary Cultured Hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Gao, Hong; Na, Xiao-Lin; Dong, Shu-Ying; Dong, Hong-Wei; Yu, Jia; Jia, Li; Wu, Yong-Hui

    2016-11-30

    The toxicity and carcinogenicity of aniline in humans and animals have been well documented. However, the molecular mechanism involved in aniline-induced liver toxicity and carcinogenesis remains unclear. In our research, primary cultured hepatocytes were exposed to aniline (0, 1.25, 2.50, 5.0 and 10.0 μg/mL) for 24 h in the presence or absence of N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC). Levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH), activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA damage, cell viability, and apoptosis were detected. Levels of ROS and MDA were significantly increased and levels of GSH and CAT, activity of SOD, and mitochondrial membrane potential in hepatocytes were significantly decreased by aniline compared with the negative control group. The tail moment and DNA content of the tail in exposed groups were significantly higher than those in the negative control group. Cell viability was reduced and apoptotic death was induced by aniline in a concentration-dependent manner. The phenomena of ROS generation, oxidative damage, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA damage and apoptosis could be prevented if ROS inhibitor NAC was added. ROS generation is involved in the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA injury, which may play a role in aniline-induced apoptosis in hepatocytes. Our study provides insight into the mechanism of aniline-induced toxicity and apoptosis of hepatocytes.

  8. Climate change studies and the human sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Poul; Winiwarter, Verena

    2017-09-01

    Policy makers have made repeated calls for integration of human and natural sciences in the field of climate change. Serious multidisciplinary attempts began already in the 1950s. Progress has certainly been made in understanding the role of humans in the planetary system. New perspectives have clarified policy advice, and three insights are singled out in the paper: the critique of historicism, the distinction between benign and wicked problems, and the cultural critique of the 'myths of nature'. Nevertheless, analysis of the IPCC Assessment Reports indicates that integration is skewed towards a particular dimension of human sciences (economics) and major insights from cultural theory and historical analysis have not made it into climate science. A number of relevant disciplines are almost absent in the composition of authorship. Nevertheless, selective assumptions and arguments are made about e.g. historical findings in key documents. In conclusion, we suggest to seek remedies for the lack of historical scholarship in the IPCC reports. More effort at science-policy exchange is needed, and an Integrated Platform to channel humanities and social science expertise for climate change research might be one promising way.

  9. In vitro Differentiation of Human Cord Blood-Derived Unrestricted Somatic Stem Cells into Hepatocyte-Like Cells on Poly(ε-Caprolactone) Nanofiber Scaffolds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hashemi, Seyed Mahmoud; Soleimani, Masoud; Zargarian, Seyed Shahrooz; Haddadi-Asl, Vahid; Ahmadbeigi, Naser; Soudi, Sara; Gheisari, Yousof; Hajarizadeh, Athena; Mohammadi, Yousef

    2009-01-01

    .... In this study, we tested the ability of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofiber scaffold to support and maintain hepatic differentiation of human cord blood-derived unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs) in vitro...

  10. Effects on 2,2’,4,4’-Tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 47) on Thyroxine Metabolism and Transport in Primary Rat and Human Hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), a major class of brominated flame retardants, are used in consumer products including furniture, electronics, textiles, and plastics. PBDEs bioaccumulate in wildlife and humans; BDE 47 is the predominant PBDE congener detected and typicall...

  11. Age changes in human bone: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpe, W.D.

    1977-12-03

    The human skeleton steadily changes structure and mass during life because of a variety of internal and external factors. Extracellular substance and bone cells get old, characteristic structural remodeling occurs with age and these age-related changes are important in the discrimination between pathological and physiological changes. Perhaps 20 percent of the bone mass is lost between the fourth and the ninth decades, osteoblasts function less efficiently and gradual loss of bone substance is enhanced by delayed mineralization of an increased surface area of thin and relatively less active osteoid seams. After the fifth decade, osteoclasia and the number of Howship's lacunae increase, and with age, the number of large osteolytic osteocytes increases as the number of small osteocytes declines and empty osteocyte lacunae become more common. The result is greater liability to fracture and diminished healing or replacement of injured bone.

  12. Impact on human health of climate changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchini, Massimo; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that climate is rapidly changing. These changes, which are mainly driven by the dramatic increase of greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic activities, have the potential to affect human health in several ways. These include a global rise in average temperature, an increased frequency of heat waves, of weather events such as hurricanes, cyclones and drought periods, plus an altered distribution of allergens and vector-borne infectious diseases. The cardiopulmonary system and the gastrointestinal tract are particularly vulnerable to the adverse effects of global warming. Moreover, some infectious diseases and their animal vectors are influenced by climate changes, resulting in higher risk of typhus, cholera, malaria, dengue and West Nile virus infection. On the other hand, at mid latitudes warming may reduce the rate of diseases related to cold temperatures (such as pneumonia, bronchitis and arthritis), but these benefits are unlikely to rebalance the risks associated to warming. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. RNAi screening in primary human hepatocytes of genes implicated in genome-wide association studies for roles in type 2 diabetes identifies roles for CAMK1D and CDKAL1, among others, in hepatic glucose regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Haney

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association (GWA studies have described a large number of new candidate genes that contribute to of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D. In some cases, small clusters of genes are implicated, rather than a single gene, and in all cases, the genetic contribution is not defined through the effects on a specific organ, such as the pancreas or liver. There is a significant need to develop and use human cell-based models to examine the effects these genes may have on glucose regulation. We describe the development of a primary human hepatocyte model that adjusts glucose disposition according to hormonal signals. This model was used to determine whether candidate genes identified in GWA studies regulate hepatic glucose disposition through siRNAs corresponding to the list of identified genes. We find that several genes affect the storage of glucose as glycogen (glycolytic response and/or affect the utilization of pyruvate, the critical step in gluconeogenesis. Of the genes that affect both of these processes, CAMK1D, TSPAN8 and KIF11 affect the localization of a mediator of both gluconeogenesis and glycolysis regulation, CRTC2, to the nucleus in response to glucagon. In addition, the gene CDKAL1 was observed to affect glycogen storage, and molecular experiments using mutant forms of CDK5, a putative target of CDKAL1, in HepG2 cells show that this is mediated by coordinate regulation of CDK5 and PKA on MEK, which ultimately regulates the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6, a critical step in the insulin signaling pathway.

  14. Functional involvement of proteins, interacting with sphingolipids, in sphingolipid transport to the canalicular membrane in the human hepatocytic cell line, HepG2?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, MMP; Zaal, KJM; Hoekstra, D

    A photoreactive sphingolipid precursor was used to investigate the potential involvement of protein-lipid interactions that may convey specificity to sphingolipid transport in the human hepatoma cell line, HepG2, A I-125-labeled, photoreactive ceramide, I-125-N-3-Cer, was incubated with the cells

  15. High expression of MDR1, MRP1, and MRP3 in the hepatic progenitor cell compartment and hepatocytes in severe human liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ros, Jenny E.; Libbrecht, Louis; Geuken, Mariska; Jansen, Peter L. M.; Roskams, Tania A. D.

    2003-01-01

    An increase in bile ductular structures is observed in diverse human liver diseases. These structures harbour the progenitor cell compartment of the liver. Since ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters may have a cytoprotective role in liver disease, an immunohistochemical study was performed on

  16. Human IgA as a heterovalent ligand: switching from the asialoglycoprotein receptor to secretory component during transport across the rat hepatocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, J M; Fisher, M M; Jones, A L; Underdown, B J

    1986-03-01

    Asialoglycoproteins are taken up by the rat liver for degradation; rat polymeric IgA is taken up via a separate receptor, secretory component (SC), for quantitative delivery to bile. There is negligible uptake of these ligands by the converse receptor, and only a low level of missorting of ligands to opposite destinations. The two pathways are not cross-inhibitable and operate independently (Schiff, J.M., M. M. Fisher, and B. J. Underdown, 1984, J. Cell Biol., 98:79-89). We report here that when human IgA is presented as a ligand in the rat, it is processed using elements of both pathways. To study this in detail, different IgA fractions were prepared using two radiolabeling methods that provide separate probes for degradation or re-secretion. Behavior of intravenously injected human polymeric IgA in the rat depended on its binding properties. If deprived of SC binding activity by affinity adsorption or by reduction and alkylation, greater than 80% of human IgA was degraded in hepatic lysosomes; radioactive catabolites were released into bile by a leupeptin-inhibitable process. If prevented from binding to the asialoglycoprotein receptor by competition or by treatment with galactose oxidase, human IgA was cleared and transported to bile directly via SC, but its uptake was about fivefold slower than rat IgA. Untreated human IgA was taken up rapidly by the asialoglycoprotein receptor, but depended on SC binding to get to bile: the proportion secreted correlated 1:1 with SC binding activity determined in vitro, and the IgA was released into bile with SC still attached. These results demonstrate that human IgA is normally heterovalent: it is first captured from blood by the asialoglycoprotein receptor, but escapes the usual fate of asialoglycoproteins by switching to SC during transport. Since the biliary transit times of native human and rat IgA are the same, it is probable that the receptor switching event occurs en route. This implies that the two receptors briefly

  17. Circadian rhythms of Per2::Luc in individual primary mouse hepatocytes and cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey J Guenthner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hepatocytes, the parenchymal cells of the liver, express core clock genes, such as Period2 and Cryptochrome2, which are involved in the transcriptional/translational feedback loop of the circadian clock. Whether or not the liver is capable of sustaining rhythms independent of a central pacemaker is controversial. Whether and how circadian information may be shared among cells in the liver in order to sustain oscillations is currently unknown. RESULTS: In this study we isolated primary hepatocytes from transgenic Per2(Luc mice and used bioluminescence as a read-out of the state of the circadian clock. Hepatocytes cultured in a collagen gel sandwich configuration exhibited persistent circadian rhythms for several weeks. The amplitude of the rhythms damped, but medium changes consistently reset the phase and amplitude of the cultures. Cry2(-/- Per2(Luc cells oscillated robustly and expressed a longer period. Co-culturing with wildtype cells did not significantly shorten the period, indicating that coupling among hepatocytes is insufficient to synchronize cells with significantly differing periods. However, spatial patterns revealed by cellular imaging of wildtype cultures provided evidence of weak local coupling among the hepatocytes. CONCLUSIONS: Our results with primary hepatocyte cultures demonstrate that cultured hepatocytes are weakly coupled. While this coupling is not sufficient to sustain global synchrony, it does increase local synchrony, which may stabilize the circadian rhythms of peripheral oscillators, such as the liver, against noise in the entraining signals.

  18. Promotion of mitochondrial energy metabolism during hepatocyte apoptosis in a rat model of acute liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Yan; Yang, Baoshan; Zhou, Li; Ren, Feng; Duan, Zhong-Ping; Ma, Ying-Ji

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocyte apoptosis and energy metabolism in mitochondria have an important role in the mechanism of acute liver failure (ALF). However, data on the association between apoptosis and the energy metabolism of hepatocytes are lacking. The current study assessed the activity of several key enzymes in mitochondria during ALF, including citrate synthase (CS), carnitine palmitoyltransferase‑1 (CPT‑1) and cytochrome c oxidase (COX), which are involved in hepatocyte energy metabolism. A total of 40 male Sprague‑Dawley rats were divided into five groups and administered D‑galactosamine and lipopolysaccharide to induce ALF. Hepatic pathology and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase‑mediated dUTP nick end labeling examinations indicated that hepatocyte apoptosis was observed at 4 h and increased 8 h after ALF. Hepatocyte necrosis appeared at 12 h and was significantly higher at 24 h with inflammatory cell invasion. The results measured by electron microscopy indicated that ultrastructural changes in mitochondria began at 4 h and the mitochondrial outer membrane was completely disrupted at 24 h resulting in mitochondrial collapse. The expression of CS, CPT‑1 and COX was measured and analyzed using assay kits. The activity and protein expression of CS, CPT‑1 and COX began to increase at 4 h, reached a peak at 8 h and decreased at 12 h during ALF. The activities of CS, CPT‑1 and COX were enhanced during hepatocyte apoptosis suggesting that these enzymes are involved in the initiation and development of ALF. Therefore, these results demonstrated that energy metabolism is important in hepatocyte apoptosis during ALF and hepatocyte apoptosis is an active and energy‑consuming procedure. The current study on how hepatocyte energy metabolism affects the transmission of death signals may provide a basis for the early diagnosis and development of an improved therapeutic strategy for ALF.

  19. Hepatocyte MyD88 affects bile acids, gut microbiota and metabolome contributing to regulate glucose and lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duparc, Thibaut; Plovier, Hubert; Marrachelli, Vannina G; Van Hul, Matthias; Essaghir, Ahmed; Ståhlman, Marcus; Matamoros, Sébastien; Geurts, Lucie; Pardo-Tendero, Mercedes M; Druart, Céline; Delzenne, Nathalie M; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste; van der Merwe, Schalk W; van Pelt, Jos; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Monleon, Daniel; Everard, Amandine; Cani, Patrice D

    2017-04-01

    To examine the role of hepatocyte myeloid differentiation primary-response gene 88 (MyD88) on glucose and lipid metabolism. To study the impact of the innate immune system at the level of the hepatocyte and metabolism, we generated mice harbouring hepatocyte-specific deletion of MyD88 . We investigated the impact of the deletion on metabolism by feeding mice with a normal control diet or a high-fat diet for 8 weeks. We evaluated body weight, fat mass gain (using time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance), glucose metabolism and energy homeostasis (using metabolic chambers). We performed microarrays and quantitative PCRs in the liver. In addition, we investigated the gut microbiota composition, bile acid profile and both liver and plasma metabolome. We analysed the expression pattern of genes in the liver of obese humans developing non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Hepatocyte-specific deletion of MyD88 predisposes to glucose intolerance, inflammation and hepatic insulin resistance independently of body weight and adiposity. These phenotypic differences were partially attributed to differences in gene expression, transcriptional factor activity (ie, peroxisome proliferator activator receptor-α, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), liver X receptors and STAT3) and bile acid profiles involved in glucose, lipid metabolism and inflammation. In addition to these alterations, the genetic deletion of MyD88 in hepatocytes changes the gut microbiota composition and their metabolomes, resembling those observed during diet-induced obesity. Finally, obese humans with NASH displayed a decreased expression of different cytochromes P450 involved in bioactive lipid synthesis. Our study identifies a new link between innate immunity and hepatic synthesis of bile acids and bioactive lipids. This dialogue appears to be involved in the susceptibility to alterations associated with obesity such as type 2 diabetes and NASH, both in mice and humans. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited

  20. Measurement of thyroxine uptake from serum by cultured human hepatocytes as an index of thyroid status: reduced thyroxine uptake from serum of patients with nonthyroidal illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarne, D H; Refetoff, S

    1985-12-01

    The uptake of T4 from human serum by cultured human hepatoma cells, Hep G2, was compared with the free T4 estimates by equilibrium dialysis (DT4) and a resin uptake method (FT4I). The cellular uptake of T4 (CT4) was highly correlated with DT4 values (r = 0.97; P less than 0.0005) and FT4I values (r = 0.99; P less than 0.0005) in sera from euthyroid subjects and hypothyroid and thyrotoxic patients. In patients with abnormal levels of serum T4-binding globulin, the fractional uptake of T4 decreased as the TBG level increased, and the CT4 value remained within the normal range. Addition of increasing amounts of T4 to serum from a hypothyroid patient did not alter the relationships between CT4 and FT4I and between CT4 and DT4. DT4 and CT4 measurements were compared in sera from 13 patients with severe nonthyroidal illness (NTI). Six samples had DT4 values that clearly overestimated the cellular uptake, 2 patients had DT4 values in the thyrotoxic range but normal CT4 values, and 2 patients had DT4 values in the midnormal range and CT4 values below normal. When FT4I and CT4 values were compared in 19 NTI patients, 5 had FT4I values below the normal range and normal CT4 values. Overall, among patients with NTI, FT4I was low in 11 (58%), normal in 8 (42%), and high in 0; CT4 was low in 6 (32%), normal in 13 (68%), and high in 0, and DT4 was low in 2 (15%), normal in 9 (69%), and high in 2 (15%). In patients with NTI, the results of in vitro estimations of free T4 do not always correlate with the transfer of T4 to tissues, as assessed by T4 uptake in human hepatoma cells. In patients with NTI, equilibrium dialysis may overestimate and resin uptake measurements may underestimate the amount of T4 taken up by tissues. In some patients with severe NTI, tissue uptake of T4 is reduced.

  1. Hepatocyte isolation from resected benign tissues: Results of a 5-year experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fan-Ying; Liu, Li; Liu, Jun; Li, Chun-You; Wang, Jian-Ping; Yang, Feng-Hui; Chen, Zhi-Shui; Zhou, Ping

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyze retrospectively a 5-year experience of human hepatocyte isolation from resected liver tissues with benign disease. METHODS We established a method of modified four-step retrograde perfusion to isolate primary human hepatocytes. Samples were collected from the resected livers of patients with intrahepatic duct calculi (n = 7) and liver hemangioma (n = 17). Only the samples weighing ≥ 15 g were considered suitable for hepatocyte isolation. By using the standard trypan blue exclusion technique, hepatocyte viability and yield were immediately determined after isolation. RESULTS Twenty-four liver specimens, weighing 15-42 g, were immediately taken from the margin of the removed samples and transferred to the laboratory for hepatocyte isolation. Warm ischemia time was 5-35 min and cold ischemia time was 15-45 min. For the 7 samples of intrahepatic duct calculi, the method resulted in a hepatocyte yield of 3.49 ± 2.31 × 106 hepatocytes/g liver, with 76.4% ± 10.7% viability. The 17 samples of liver hemangioma had significantly higher yield of cells (5.4 ± 1.71 × 106 cells/g vs 3.49 ± 2.31 × 106 cells/g, P 0.05). We obtained a cell yield of 5.31 ± 1.87 × 106 hepatocytes/g liver when the samples weighed > 20 g. However, for the tissues weighing ≤ 20 g, a reduction in yield was found (3.08 ± 1.86 × 106 cells/g vs 5.31 ± 1.87 × 106 cells/g, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Benign diseased livers are valuable sources for large-number hepatocyte isolation. Our study represents the largest number of primary human hepatocytes isolated from resected specimens from patients with benign liver disease. We evaluated the effect of donor liver characteristics on cell isolation, and we found that samples of liver hemangioma can provide better results than intrahepatic duct calculi, in terms of cell yield. Furthermore, the size of the tissues can affect the outcome of hepatocyte isolation. PMID:27688659

  2. Hepatocyte MyD88 affects bile acids, gut microbiota and metabolome contributing to regulate glucose and lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duparc, Thibaut; Plovier, Hubert; Marrachelli, Vannina G

    2017-01-01

    performed microarrays and quantitative PCRs in the liver. In addition, we investigated the gut microbiota composition, bile acid profile and both liver and plasma metabolome. We analysed the expression pattern of genes in the liver of obese humans developing non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). RESULTS...... proliferator activator receptor-α, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), liver X receptors and STAT3) and bile acid profiles involved in glucose, lipid metabolism and inflammation. In addition to these alterations, the genetic deletion of MyD88 in hepatocytes changes the gut microbiota composition and their metabolomes...

  3. Nonrandom chromosomal changes in human malignant cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J D

    1977-01-01

    The role of chromosomal changes in human malignant cells has been the subject of much debate. The observation of nonrandom chromosomal changes has become well recognized in chronic myelogenous leukemia, and more recently in acute myelogenous leukemia. In the present report, data are presented on the sites of duplication of chromosome No. 1 in hematologic disorders. Trisomy for region lq25 to lq32 was observed in every one of 34 patients whose cells showed duplication of some part of chromosome No. 1. Adjacent regions lq21 to lq25, and lq32 to lqter, also were trisomic in the majority of patients. Two patients had deletions, one of lq32 to qter, and the other, of lp32 to pter. The sites of chromosomal breaks leading to trisomy differ from those involved in balanced reciprocal translocations. Some of these sites are sometimes, but not always, vulnerable in constitutional chromosomal abnormalities. The nature of the proliferative advantage conferred on myeloid cells by these chromosomal changes is unknown.

  4. Transcriptional profiling of the effects of 25-hydroxycholesterol on human hepatocyte metabolism and the antiviral state it conveys against the hepatitis C virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouleau Yanouchka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a global health problem. A number of studies have implicated a direct role of cellular lipid metabolism in the HCV life cycle and inhibitors of the mevalonate pathway have been demonstrated to result in an antiviral state within the host cell. Transcriptome profiling was conducted on Huh-7 human hepatoma cells bearing subgenomic HCV replicons with and without treatment with 25-hydroxycholesterol (25-HC, an inhibitor of the mevalonate pathway that alters lipid metabolism, to assess metabolic determinants of pro- and antiviral states within the host cell. These data were compared with gene expression profiles from HCV-infected chimpanzees. Results Transcriptome profiling of Huh-7 cells treated with 25-HC gave 47 downregulated genes, 16 of which are clearly related to the mevalonate pathway. Fewer genes were observed to be upregulated (22 in the presence of 25-HC and 5 genes were uniquely upregulated in the HCV replicon bearing cells. Comparison of these gene expression profiles with data collected during the initial rise in viremia in 4 previously characterized HCV-infected chimpanzees yielded 54 overlapping genes, 4 of which showed interesting differential regulation at the mRNA level in both systems. These genes are PROX1, INSIG-1, NK4, and UBD. The expression of these genes was perturbed with siRNAs and with overexpression vectors in HCV replicon cells, and the effect on HCV replication and translation was assessed. Both PROX1 and NK4 regulated HCV replication in conjunction with an antiviral state induced by 25-hydroxycholesterol. Conclusion Treatment of Huh-7 cells bearing HCV replicons with 25-HC leads to the downregulation of many key genes involved in the mevalonate pathway leading to an antiviral state within the host cell. Furthermore, dysregulation of a larger subset of genes not directly related to the mevalonate pathway occurs both in 25-HC-treated HCV replicon harbouring cells

  5. Malaria parasite liver stages render host hepatocytes susceptible to mitochondria-initiated apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushansky, A; Metzger, P G; Douglass, A N; Mikolajczak, S A; Lakshmanan, V; Kain, H S; Kappe, S Hi

    2013-08-08

    Intracellular eukaryotic parasites and their host cells constitute complex, coevolved cellular interaction systems that frequently cause disease. Among them, Plasmodium parasites cause a significant health burden in humans, killing up to one million people annually. To succeed in the mammalian host after transmission by mosquitoes, Plasmodium parasites must complete intracellular replication within hepatocytes and then release new infectious forms into the blood. Using Plasmodium yoelii rodent malaria parasites, we show that some liver stage (LS)-infected hepatocytes undergo apoptosis without external triggers, but the majority of infected cells do not, and can also resist Fas-mediated apoptosis. In contrast, apoptosis is dramatically increased in hepatocytes infected with attenuated parasites. Furthermore, we find that blocking total or mitochondria-initiated host cell apoptosis increases LS parasite burden in mice, suggesting that an anti-apoptotic host environment fosters parasite survival. Strikingly, although LS infection confers strong resistance to extrinsic host hepatocyte apoptosis, infected hepatocytes lose their ability to resist apoptosis when anti-apoptotic mitochondrial proteins are inhibited. This is demonstrated by our finding that B-cell lymphoma 2 family inhibitors preferentially induce apoptosis in LS-infected hepatocytes and significantly reduce LS parasite burden in mice. Thus, targeting critical points of susceptibility in the LS-infected host cell might provide new avenues for malaria prophylaxis.

  6. YAP Inhibition Restores Hepatocyte Differentiation in Advanced HCC, Leading to Tumor Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Fitamant

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Defective Hippo/YAP signaling in the liver results in tissue overgrowth and development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Here, we uncover mechanisms of YAP-mediated hepatocyte reprogramming and HCC pathogenesis. YAP functions as a rheostat in maintaining metabolic specialization, differentiation, and quiescence within the hepatocyte compartment. Increased or decreased YAP activity reprograms subsets of hepatocytes to different fates associated with deregulation of the HNF4A, CTNNB1, and E2F transcriptional programs that control hepatocyte quiescence and differentiation. Importantly, treatment with small interfering RNA-lipid nanoparticles (siRNA-LNPs targeting YAP restores hepatocyte differentiation and causes pronounced tumor regression in a genetically engineered mouse HCC model. Furthermore, YAP targets are enriched in an aggressive human HCC subtype characterized by a proliferative signature and absence of CTNNB1 mutations. Thus, our work reveals Hippo signaling as a key regulator of the positional identity of hepatocytes, supports targeting of YAP using siRNA-LNPs as a paradigm of differentiation-based therapy, and identifies an HCC subtype that is potentially responsive to this approach.

  7. The ultrastructural characteristics of porcine hepatocytes donated after cardiac death and preserved with warm machine perfusion preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochimoto, Hiroki; Matsuno, Naoto; Ishihara, Yo; Shonaka, Tatsuya; Koga, Daisuke; Hira, Yoshiki; Nishikawa, Yuji; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    The effects of warm machine perfusion preservation of liver grafts donated after cardiac death on the intracellular three-dimensional ultrastructure of the organelles in hepatocytes remain unclear. Here we analyzed comparatively the ultrastructure of the endomembrane systems in porcine hepatocytes under warm ischemia and successive hypothermic and midthermic machine perfusion preservation, a type of the warm machine perfusion. Porcine liver grafts which had a warm ischemia time of 60 minutes were perfused for 4 hours with modified University of Wisconsin gluconate solution. Group A grafts were preserved with hypothermic machine perfusion preservation at 8°C constantly for 4 hours. Group B grafts were preserved with rewarming up to 22°C by warm machine perfusion preservation for 4 hours. An analysis of hepatocytes after 60 minutes of warm ischemia by scanning electron microscope revealed the appearance of abnormal vacuoles and invagination of mitochondria. In the hepatocytes preserved by subsequent hypothermic machine perfusion preservation, strongly swollen mitochondria were observed. In contrast, the warm machine perfusion preservation could preserve the functional appearance of mitochondria in hepatocytes. Furthermore, abundant vacuoles and membranous structures sequestrating cellular organelles like autophagic vacuoles were frequently observed in hepatocytes after warm machine perfusion preservation. In conclusion, the ultrastructure of the endomembrane systems in the hepatocytes of liver grafts changed in accordance with the temperature conditions of machine perfusion preservation. In addition, temperature condition of the machine perfusion preservation may also affect the condition of the hepatic graft attributed to autophagy systems, and consequently alleviate the damage of the hepatocytes.

  8. Direct lineage conversion of terminally differentiated hepatocytes to functional neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marro, Samuele; Pang, Zhiping P; Yang, Nan; Tsai, Miao-Chih; Qu, Kun; Chang, Howard Y; Südhof, Thomas C; Wernig, Marius

    2011-10-04

    Several recent studies have showed that mouse and human fibroblasts can be directly reprogrammed into induced neuronal (iN) cells, bypassing a pluripotent intermediate state. However, fibroblasts represent heterogeneous mesenchymal progenitor cells that potentially contain neural crest lineages, and the cell of origin remained undefined. This raises the fundamental question of whether lineage reprogramming is possible between cell types derived from different germ layers. Here, we demonstrate that terminally differentiated hepatocytes can be directly converted into functional iN cells. Importantly, single-cell and genome-wide expression analyses showed that fibroblast- and hepatocyte-derived iN cells not only induced a neuronal transcriptional program, but also silenced their donor transcriptome. The remaining donor signature decreased over time and could not support functional hepatocyte properties. Thus, the reprogramming factors lead to a binary lineage switch decision rather than an induction of hybrid phenotypes, but iN cells retain a small but detectable epigenetic memory of their donor cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cold storage of rat hepatocyte spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongling; Yu, Yue; Glorioso, Jaime; Mao, Shennen; Rodysil, Brian; Amiot, Bruce P; Rinaldo, Piero; Nyberg, Scott L

    2014-01-01

    Cell-based therapies for liver disease rely on a high-quality supply of hepatocytes and a means for storage during transportation from site of isolation to site of usage. Unfortunately, frozen cryopreservation is associated with unacceptable loss of hepatocyte viability after thawing. The purpose of this study was to optimize conditions for cold storage of rat hepatocyte spheroids without freezing. Rat hepatocytes were isolated by a two-step perfusion method; hepatocyte spheroids were formed during 48 h of rocked culture in serum-free medium (SFM). Spheroids were then maintained in rocked culture at 37 °C (control condition) or cold stored at 4 °C for 24 or 48 h in six different cold storage solutions: SFM alone; SFM + 1 mM deferoxamine (Def); SFM + 1 μM cyclosporin A (CsA); SFM + 1 mM Def + 1 μM CsA, University of Wisconsin (UW) solution alone, UW + 1 mM Def. Performance metrics after cold storage included viability, gene expression, albumin production, and functional activity of cytochrome P450 enzymes and urea cycle proteins. We observed that cold-induced injury was reduced significantly by the addition of the iron chelator (Def) to both SFM and UW solution. Performance metrics (ammonia detoxification, albumin production) of rat hepatocyte spheroids stored in SFM + Def for 24 h were significantly increased from SFM alone and approached those in control conditions, while performance metrics after cold storage in SFM alone or cold storage for 48 h were both significantly reduced. A serum-free medium supplemented with Def allowed hepatocyte spheroids to tolerate 24 h of cold storage with less than 10% loss in viability and functionality. Further research is warranted to optimize a solution for extended cold storage of hepatocyte spheroids.

  10. Fetal liver-derived mesenchymal stromal cells augment engraftment of transplanted hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Meghnad; B Patil, Pradeep; He, Zhong; Holgersson, Jan; Olausson, Michael; Sumitran-Holgersson, Suchitra

    2012-07-01

    One important problem commonly encountered after hepatocyte transplantation is the low numbers of transplanted cells found in the graft. If hepatocyte transplantation is to be a viable therapeutic approach, significant liver parenchyma repopulation is required. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) produce high levels of various growth factors, cytokines and metalloproteinases, and have immunomodulatory effects. We therefore hypothesized that co-transplantation of MSC with human fetal hepatocytes (hFH) could augment in vivo expansion after transplantation. We investigated the ability of human fetal liver MSC (hFLMSC) to augment expansion of phenotypically and functionally well-characterized hFH. Two million hFH (passage 6) were either transplanted alone or together (1:1 ratio) with green fluorescence protein-expressing hFLMSC into the spleen of C57BL/6 nude mice with retrorsine-induced liver injury. After 4 weeks, engraftment of cells was detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization using a human-specific DNA probe. Significantly higher numbers of cells expressing human cytokeratin (CK)8, CK18, CK19, Cysteine-rich MNNG HOS Transforming gene (c-Met), alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), human nuclear antigen, mitochondrial antigen, hepatocyte-specific antigen and albumin (ALB) were present in the livers of recipient animals co-transplanted with hFLMSC compared with those without. Furthermore, expression of human hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-4α and HNF-1β, and cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A7 mRNA was demonstrated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in these animals. In addition, significantly increased amounts of human ALB were detected. Importantly, hFLMSC did not transdifferentiate into hepatocytes. Our study reports the use of a novel strategy for enhanced liver repopulation and thereby advances this experimental procedure closer to clinical liver cell therapy.

  11. Human Papillomavirus Laboratory Testing: the Changing Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause essentially all cervical cancers, most anal and oropharyngeal cancers, and some vaginal, vulvar, and penile cancers. Improved understanding of the pathogenesis of infection and the availability of newer tests are changing the approach to screening and diagnosis. Molecular tests to detect DNA from the most common high-risk HPVs are FDA approved for use in conjunction with cytology in cervical cancer screening programs. More-specific tests that detect RNA from high-risk HPV types are now also available. The use of molecular tests as the primary screening tests is being adopted in some areas. Genotyping to identify HPV16 and -18 has a recommended role in triaging patients for colposcopy who are high-risk HPV positive but have normal cytology. There are currently no recommended screening methods for anal, vulvar, vaginal, penile, or oropharyngeal HPV infections. HPV testing has limited utility in patients at high risk for anal cancer, but p16 immunohistochemistry is recommended to clarify lesions in tissue biopsy specimens that show moderate dysplasia or precancer mimics. HPV testing is recommended for oropharyngeal squamous cell tumors as a prognostic indicator. Ongoing research will help to improve the content of future guidelines for screening and diagnostic testing. PMID:26912568

  12. Hepatic heme catabolism in cultured hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lincoln, B.C.; Bonkovsky, H.L.

    1987-05-01

    Uncertainty persists concerning the role and importance of heme oxygenase in the catabolism of heme by hepatocytes. The products of heme oxygenase catalyzed heme catabolism are equimolar amounts of biliverdin IX..cap alpha.., CO, and iron. Previous reports from studies with rodent hepatocyte cultures have suggested the possibility that non-heme oxygenase pathway(s) predominate in the breakdown of hepatic hemoprotein heme. The authors have studied this question in cultured chick embryo hepatocytes, which retain normal regulation of heme metabolism and levels of cytochromes P-450 as in intact animals. Exogenous heme added to the culture medium with control chick embryo hepatocyte cultures was quantitatively converted to biliverdin IX..cap alpha... To study endogenous heme breakdown, cellular heme was labelled by exposing cultured cells to (5-/sup 14/C) 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). The hepatocytes were also treated with mephenytoin that increases cytochrome P-450, total hepatic heme and heme oxygenase. At various times after labelling heme, biliverdin, and CO were isolated and counted. For at least 8 hrs, the increase in CO radioactivity corresponded to the loss of radioactivity in heme. Beyond 1 h biliverdin was unstable in culture medium, but for 1 h after labelling (dpm BVIX..cap alpha.. + dpm CO) ..delta..dpm heme. All BV detected was the ..cap alpha.. isomer. They conclude that heme oxygenase accounts for both endogenous and exogenous heme breakdown by hepatocytes.

  13. Human Behavioral Contributions to Climate Change: Psychological and Contextual Drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swim, Janet K.; Clayton, Susan; Howard, George S.

    2011-01-01

    We are facing rapid changes in the global climate, and these changes are attributable to human behavior. Humans produce this global impact through our use of natural resources, multiplied by the vast increase in population seen in the past 50 to 100 years. Our goal in this article is to examine the underlying psychosocial causes of human impact,…

  14. Hepatitis B virus evades innate immunity of hepatocytes but activates cytokine production by macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaoming; Xia, Yuchen; Serti, Elisavet; Block, Peter Daniel; Chung, Michelle; Chayama, Kazuaki; Rehermann, Barbara; Liang, T Jake

    2017-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infects hepatocytes specifically and causes immune-mediated liver damage. How HBV interacts with the innate immunity at the early phase of infection, either with hepatocytes or other cells in the liver, remains controversial. To address this question, we utilized various human cell-culture models and humanized Alb-uPA/SCID mice. All these models were unable to mount an interferon (IFN) response despite robust HBV replication. To elucidate the mechanisms involved in the lack of IFN response, we examined whether HBV actively inhibits innate immune functions of hepatocytes. By treating HBV-infected cells with known inducers of the IFN signaling pathway, we observed no alteration of either sensing or downstream IFN response by HBV. We showed that the DNA innate sensing pathways are poorly active in hepatocytes, consistent with muted innate immune recognition of HBV. Upon exposure to high-level HBV, human macrophages could be activated with increased inflammatory cytokine expressions. HBV behaves like a "stealth" virus and is not sensed by, nor actively interferes with, the intrinsic innate immunity of infected hepatocytes. Macrophages are capable of sensing HBV, but require exposure to high HBV titers, potentially explaining the long "window period" during acute infection and HBV's propensity to chronic infection. (Hepatology 2017;66:1779-1793). © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. This article has been contributed to by U.S. Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. Alloxan-Induced Diabetes Causes Morphological and Ultrastructural Changes in Rat Liver that Resemble the Natural History of Chronic Fatty Liver Disease in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Natália Lucchesi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study evaluated the long-term effects of alloxan-induced diabetes in rat liver. Methods. Thirty nondiabetic control rats (NC and 30 untreated diabetic (UD rats were divided into three subgroups sacrificed after 6, 14, or 26 weeks. Clinical and laboratory parameters were assessed. Fresh liver weight and its relationship with body weight were obtained, and liver tissue was analyzed. Results. UD rats showed sustained hyperglycemia, high glycosylated hemoglobin, and low plasma insulin. High serum levels of AST and ALT were observed in UD rats after 2 weeks, but only ALT remained elevated throughout the experiment. Fresh liver weight was equal between NC and UD rats, but the fresh liver weight/body weight ratio was significantly higher in UD rats after 14 and 26 weeks. UD rats showed liver morphological changes characterized by hepatic sinusoidal enlargement and micro- and macrovesicular hepatocyte fatty degeneration with progressive liver structure loss, steatohepatitis, and periportal fibrosis. Ultrastructural changes of hepatocytes, such as a decrease in the number of intracytoplasmic organelles and degeneration of mitochondria, rough endoplasmic reticulum, and nuclei, were also observed. Conclusion. Alloxan-induced diabetes triggered liver morphological and ultrastructural changes that closely resembled human disease, ranging from steatosis to steatohepatitis and liver fibrosis.

  16. Perceptions of Human Services Students about Social Change Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzberg, Judith T.

    2010-01-01

    Human services educators and scholars maintain that they are teaching social change theory and skills that will allow students to engage in large-scale social change. A review of the literature, from a critical theory perspective, offered little evidence that social change is being taught in human services programs. In this collective case study,…

  17. Transformational change: creating a safe operating space for humanity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McAlpine, Clive A; Seabrook, Leonie M; Ryan, Justin G; Feeney, Brian J; Ripple, William J; Ehrlich, Anne H; Ehrlich, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Many ecologists and environmental scientists witnessing the scale of current environmental change are becoming increasingly alarmed about how humanity is pushing the boundaries of the Earth's systems...

  18. Dynamic regulation of EZH2 from HPSc to hepatocyte-like cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistoni, Mariaelena; Helsen, Nicky; Vanhove, Jolien; Boon, Ruben; Xu, Zhuofei; Ordovas, Laura; Verfaillie, Catherine M

    2017-01-01

    Currently, drug metabolization and toxicity studies rely on the use of primary human hepatocytes and hepatoma cell lines, which both have conceivable limitations. Human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) are an alternative and valuable source of hepatocytes that can overcome these limitations. EZH2 (enhancer of zeste homolog 2), a transcriptional repressor of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), may play an important role in hepatocyte development, but its role during in vitro hPSC-HLC differentiation has not yet been assessed. We here demonstrate dynamic regulation of EZH2 during hepatic differentiation of hPSC. To enhance EZH2 expression, we inducibly overexpressed EZH2 between d0 and d8, demonstrating a significant improvement in definitive endoderm formation, and improved generation of HLCs. Despite induction of EZH2 overexpression until d8, EZH2 transcript and protein levels decreased from d4 onwards, which might be caused by expression of microRNAs predicted to inhibit EZH2 expression. In conclusion, our studies demonstrate that EZH2 plays a role in endoderm formation and hepatocyte differentiation, but its expression is tightly post-transcriptionally regulated during this process.

  19. Three different hepatocyte transplantation techniques for enzyme deficiency disease and acute hepatic failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Velde, A. A.; Bosman, D. K.; Oldenburg, J.; Sala, M.; Maas, M. A.; Chamuleau, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of three different techniques of hepatocyte transplantation were investigated: transplantation of free hepatocytes into the spleen and intraperitoneal transplantation of microcarrier-attached hepatocytes or of microencapsulated hepatocytes. The liver-supportive functions of these

  20. Nuclear Translocation of b-Catenin during Mesenchymal Stem Cells Differentiation into Hepatocytes Is Associated with a Tumoral Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Herencia, Carmen; Martínez-Moreno, Julio M.; Herrera, Concepción; Corrales, Fernando J.; Santiago-Mora, Raquel; Espejo, Isabel; Barcos, Montserrat; Almadén Peña, Yolanda; Mata, Manuel de la; Rodríguez-Ariza, Antonio; Muñoz-Castañeda, Juan R.

    2012-01-01

    Wnt/b-catenin pathway controls biochemical processes related to cell differentiation. In committed cells the alteration of this pathway has been associated with tumors as hepatocellular carcinoma or hepatoblastoma. The present study evaluated the role of Wnt/b-catenin activation during human mesenchymal stem cells differentiation into hepatocytes. The differentiation to hepatocytes was achieved by the addition of two different conditioned media. In one of them, b-catenin nuclear t...

  1. Evolutionary change in physiological phenotypes along the human lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vining, Alexander Q; Nunn, Charles L

    2016-01-01

    Research in evolutionary medicine provides many examples of how evolution has shaped human susceptibility to disease. Traits undergoing rapid evolutionary change may result in associated costs or reduce the energy available to other traits. We hypothesize that humans have experienced more such changes than other primates as a result of major evolutionary change along the human lineage. We investigated 41 physiological traits across 50 primate species to identify traits that have undergone marked evolutionary change along the human lineage. We analysed the data using two Bayesian phylogenetic comparative methods. One approach models trait covariation in non-human primates and predicts human phenotypes to identify whether humans are evolutionary outliers. The other approach models adaptive shifts under an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model of evolution to assess whether inferred shifts are more common on the human branch than on other primate lineages. We identified four traits with strong evidence for an evolutionary increase on the human lineage (amylase, haematocrit, phosphorus and monocytes) and one trait with strong evidence for decrease (neutrophilic bands). Humans exhibited more cases of distinct evolutionary change than other primates. Human physiology has undergone increased evolutionary change compared to other primates. Long distance running may have contributed to increases in haematocrit and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration, while dietary changes are likely related to increases in amylase. In accordance with the pathogen load hypothesis, human monocyte levels were increased, but many other immune-related measures were not. Determining the mechanisms underlying conspicuous evolutionary change in these traits may provide new insights into human disease. The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Foundation for Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health.

  2. effect of climate change on human health and some adaptive

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. The impact of human-induced climate change and ozone depletion are now observed to compromise the sustainability of human development as it threatens the ecological support system on which life depends. Evidences abound to show that there is climate change and ozone layer depletion in the last 2-4 ...

  3. Effect of climate change on human health and some adaptive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The impact of human-induced climate change and ozone depletion are now observed to compromise the sustainability of human development as it threatens the ecological support system on which life depends. Evidences abound to show that there is climate change and ozone layer depletion in the last 2-4 decades.

  4. Assessing the response of runoff to climate change and human ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    34

    Hydrological cycle and water resources are commonly influenced by climate change and human activities (Vorosmarty et al., 2000; Beven, 2001; Kezer and Matsuyama, 2006;. IPCC, 2007; Zhang et al., 2007). Human activities such as Land Use/Cover Change. (LUCC), alters vegetation retention, soil water infiltration, and ...

  5. Climate Change and Human Occupation in Denmark and Syria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Niels; Jensen, Gitte; Limborg, Magnus

    2007-01-01

    the main changes in human activities in the areas. It also confirms that the climatic histories of the sites are closely correlated - with strong ties to global causes of climate change. The NAO (North Atlantic Oscillation) caused contrasting rainfall conditions in Denmark and Levant. Over a period of one....... The changes in human occupation in Syria and in Denmark both seems to correlate with the proxies of climate change esp. the change from Atlantic to Subboreal around 4000BC, the change from Subboreal to Subatlantic around 500 BC are marked in as well the climate record and archaeological records (monsoon...

  6. Differential gene expression analysis of in vitro duck hepatitis B virus infected primary duck hepatocyte cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issac Aneesh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human hepatitis B virus (HBV, a member of the hepadna viridae, causes acute or chronic hepatitis B, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. The duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV infection, a dependable and reproducible model for hepadna viral studies, does not result in HCC unlike chronic HBV infection. Information on differential gene expression in DHBV infection might help to compare corresponding changes during HBV infection, and to delineate the reasons for this difference. Findings A subtractive hybridization cDNA library screening of in vitro DHBV infected, cultured primary duck hepatocytes (PDH identified cDNAs of 42 up-regulated and 36 down-regulated genes coding for proteins associated with signal transduction, cellular respiration, transcription, translation, ubiquitin/proteasome pathway, apoptosis, and membrane and cytoskeletal organization. Those coding for both novel as well as previously reported proteins in HBV/DHBV infection were present in the library. An inverse modulation of the cDNAs of ten proteins, reported to play role in human HCC, such as that of Y-box binding protein1, Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase isoform 1B, ribosomal protein L35a, Ferritin, α-enolase, Acid α-glucosidase and Caspase 3, copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD, Filamin and Pyruvate dehydrogenase, was also observed in this in vitro study. Conclusions The present study identified cDNAs of a number of genes that are differentially modulated in in vitro DHBV infection of primary duck hepatocytes. Further correlation of this differential gene expression in in vivo infection models would be valuable to understand the little known aspects of the hepadnavirus biology.

  7. IMPLICATIONS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON HUMAN COMFORT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prince Acheampong

    temperature and humidity levels constitutes a potential hazard to health and human comfort and accelerates many degradation processes and material damage. Subsequently, the amount of energy needed to maintain the condition of air in spaces at comfort levels keep increasing. It is therefore imperative that landlords ...

  8. Upregulation of hemoglobin expression by oxidative stress in hepatocytes and its implication in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wensheng; Baker, Susan S; Baker, Robert D; Nowak, Norma J; Zhu, Lixin

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies revealed that hemoglobin is expressed in some non-erythrocytes and it suppresses oxidative stress when overexpressed. Oxidative stress plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). This study was designed to investigate whether hemoglobin is expressed in hepatocytes and how it is related to oxidative stress in NASH patients. Analysis of microarray gene expression data revealed a significant increase in the expression of hemoglobin alpha (HBA1) and beta (HBB) in liver biopsies from NASH patients. Increased hemoglobin expression in NASH was validated by quantitative real time PCR. However, the expression of hematopoietic transcriptional factors and erythrocyte specific marker genes were not increased, indicating that increased hemoglobin expression in NASH was not from erythropoiesis, but could result from increased expression in hepatocytes. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated positive HBA1 and HBB expression in the hepatocytes of NASH livers. Hemoglobin expression was also observed in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cell line. Furthermore, treatment with hydrogen peroxide, a known oxidative stress inducer, increased HBA1 and HBB expression in HepG2 and HEK293 cells. Importantly, hemoglobin overexpression suppressed oxidative stress in HepG2 cells. We concluded that hemoglobin is expressed by hepatocytes and oxidative stress upregulates its expression. Suppression of oxidative stress by hemoglobin could be a mechanism to protect hepatocytes from oxidative damage in NASH.

  9. Upregulation of hemoglobin expression by oxidative stress in hepatocytes and its implication in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wensheng Liu

    Full Text Available Recent studies revealed that hemoglobin is expressed in some non-erythrocytes and it suppresses oxidative stress when overexpressed. Oxidative stress plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. This study was designed to investigate whether hemoglobin is expressed in hepatocytes and how it is related to oxidative stress in NASH patients. Analysis of microarray gene expression data revealed a significant increase in the expression of hemoglobin alpha (HBA1 and beta (HBB in liver biopsies from NASH patients. Increased hemoglobin expression in NASH was validated by quantitative real time PCR. However, the expression of hematopoietic transcriptional factors and erythrocyte specific marker genes were not increased, indicating that increased hemoglobin expression in NASH was not from erythropoiesis, but could result from increased expression in hepatocytes. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated positive HBA1 and HBB expression in the hepatocytes of NASH livers. Hemoglobin expression was also observed in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cell line. Furthermore, treatment with hydrogen peroxide, a known oxidative stress inducer, increased HBA1 and HBB expression in HepG2 and HEK293 cells. Importantly, hemoglobin overexpression suppressed oxidative stress in HepG2 cells. We concluded that hemoglobin is expressed by hepatocytes and oxidative stress upregulates its expression. Suppression of oxidative stress by hemoglobin could be a mechanism to protect hepatocytes from oxidative damage in NASH.

  10. Electron microscopical investigation on aldrin-induced hepatocyte pathology in Rana catesbeiana, with special emphasis on peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brito-Gitirana, L; Miguel, N C

    2000-08-01

    We examined the effect of aldrin on hepatocyte ultrastructure in liver of Rana catesbeiana. The frogs were experimentally exposed to chemical substance and liver fragments processed for routine transmission electron microscopy. Hepatic peroxisomes were visualized after incubation with alkaline 3,3'-diaminobezidine (DAB) method. Ultrastructural analysis revealed progressive hepatocyte changes induced by this drug. After 2-weeks, in the hepatocytes the nuclear envelop and the cisternae of both smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum (SER und RER, respectively) were unusually enlarged. Reduction of glycogen granules associated with an increased frequency of lysosomes was observed. Normal appearing peroxisomes were present in clusters. Lipid droplets were also visualuzed. After 4-weeks, there was a new increase of glcogen associated with a great number of mitochondria and peroxisomes. Moreover, SER und RER were still dilated. Intracellular lipid inclusions became more abundant. These results suggest that the aldrin 250 induces ultrastructural changes in the hepatocyte of Rana catesbeiana.

  11. [Climate change, food production and human health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faergeman, Ole; Østergaard, Lars

    2009-10-26

    Production of livestock accounts for 18% of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. Although livestock products can alleviate malnutrition in poor countries, they are associated with diseases of affluence in wealthy countries. Red meat (pork, beef, sheep and goat), especially, is associated with higher rates of death due to cardiovascular disease and cancer. A policy of reducing consumption of red meat in wealthy countries and encouraging a limited consumption increase in poor countries would benefit the climate as well as human health.

  12. Climate change in the age of humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Curt. Stager

    2014-01-01

    The Anthropocene epoch presents a mix of old and new challenges for the world’s forests. Climatic instability has typified most of the Cenozoic Era but today’s situation is unique due to the presence of billions of humans on the planet. The potential rate and magnitude of future warming driven by continued fossil fuel combustion could be unprecedented during the last...

  13. Detecting changing emotions in human speech by machine and humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, C.N.; Kowalczyk, W.

    2013-01-01

    The goals of this research were: (1) to develop a system that will automatically measure changes in the emotional state of a speaker by analyzing his/her voice, (2) to validate this system with a controlled experiment and (3) to visualize the results to the speaker in 2-d space. Natural (non-acted)

  14. Four waves of hepatocyte proliferation linked with three waves of hepatic fat accumulation during partial hepatectomy-induced liver regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhong Zou

    Full Text Available Partial hepatectomy (PH triggers hepatocyte proliferation-mediated liver repair and is widely used to study the mechanisms governing liver regeneration in mice. However, the dynamics of the hepatocyte proliferative response to PH remain unclear. We found that PH-induced mouse liver regrowth was driven by four consecutive waves of hepatocyte replication. The first wave exhibited the highest magnitude followed by two moderate waves and one minor wave. Underlying this continuous hepatocyte replication was persistent activation of cell cycle components throughout the period of liver regeneration. Hepatocyte mitotic activity in the first three proliferative cycles showed a circadian rhythm manifested by three corresponding mitosis peaks, which were always observed at Zeitgeber time 0. The Bmal1-Clock/Wee1/Cdc2 pathway has been proposed by others to govern the circadian rhythm of hepatocyte mitosis during liver regeneration. However, we did not observe the correlations in the expression or phosphorylation of these proteins in regenerating livers. Notably, Bmal1 protein displayed frequent changes in hepatic distribution and cellular localization as the liver regrowth progressed. Further, three waves of hepatic fat accumulation occurred during hepatic regeneration. The first started before and lasted through the first round of hepatocyte proliferation, whereas the second and third occurred concomitantly with the second and third mitotic peaks, respectively.PH-induced liver regeneration consists of four continuous waves of hepatocyte proliferation coupled with three waves of hepatic fat accumulation. Bmal1, Wee1, and Cdc2 may not form a pathway regulating the circadian rhythm of hepatocyte mitosis during liver regeneration.

  15. The in Vitro Assessment of Biochemical Factors in Hepatocyte like Cells Derived from Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A KHoramroodi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Umbilical cord blood (UCB is a source of Hematopoietic Stem Cells (HSC and progenitor cells that can reconstitute the hematopoietic system in patients with malignant and nonmalignant disorders. Mesenchymal stem cell-derived from umbilical cord blood (UCB have been differentiated to some kind of cells, such as osteobblast, adipoblast and chondroblast in Vitro. This study examined the differentiation of Umbilical Cord Blood (UCB derived stem cells to functional hepatocytes. Materials & Methods: The present study was an experimental study which was carried out in the Payam-e-Noor University of Tehran in cooperation with Hamedan University of Medical Sciences in 2008. Umbilical cord blood (UCB was obtained from Fatemieh hospital (Hamadan, Iran. Stem cells were isolated from the cord blood by combining density gradient centrifugation with plastic adherence. When the isolated cells reached 80% confluence, they differentiated to hepatocyte like cells. The medium which was used was consists of DMEM and 10% Fetal Bovine Serum (FBS supplemented with 20 ng/mL Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF, 10 ng/mL basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF and 20 ng/mL Oncostatin M (OSM.The medium was changed every 3 days and stored for Albumin (ALB, Alpha Fetoprotein (AFP, Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP, and urea assay. Finally PAS stain was done to study Glycogen storage in the differentiated cell. Results: Measurement of biochemical factors in different days showed that concentration of albumin (ALB, alpha fetoprotein (AFP, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, and Urea gradually increased. Also, PAS staining showed the storage of glycogen in these cells. Conclusion: Stem cell-derived from human umbilical cord blood (HUCB is a new source of cell types for cell transplantation therapy of hepatic diseases and under certain conditions these cells can differentiate into liver cells.

  16. Cultural Change, Human Activity, and Cognitive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauvain, Mary; Munroe, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Differential cognitive performance across cultural contexts has been a standard result in comparative research. Here we discuss how societal changes occurring when a small-scale traditional community incorporates elements from industrialized society may contribute to cognitive development, and we illustrate this with an analysis of the cognitive…

  17. Ultrastructural hepatocytic alterations induced by silver nanoparticle toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almansour, Mansour; Sajti, Laszlo; Melhim, Walid; Jarrar, Bashir M

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (SNPs) are widely used in nanomedicine and consuming products with potential risk to human health. While considerable work was carried out on the molecular, biochemical, and physiological alterations induced by these particles, little is known of the ultrastructural pathological alterations that might be induced by nanosilver materials. The aim of the present work is to investigate the hepatocyte ultrastructural alterations that might be induced by SNP exposure. Male rats were subjected to a daily single dose (2 mg/kg) of SNPs (15-35 nm diameter) for 21 days. Liver biopsies from all rats under study were processed for transmission electron microscopy examination. The following hepatic ultrastructural alterations were demonstrated: mitochondria swelling and crystolysis, endoplasmic reticulum disruption, cytoplasmic vacuolization, lipid droplets accumulation, glycogen depletion, karyopyknosis, apoptosis, sinusoidal dilatation, Kupffer cells activation, and myelin figures formation. The current findings may indicate that SNPs can induce hepatocyte organelles alteration, leading to cellular damage that may affect the function of the liver. These findings might indicate that SNPs potentially trigger heptocyte ultrastructural alterations that may affect the function of the liver with potential risk on human health in relation to numerous applications of these particles. More work is needed to elucidate probable ultrastructural alterations in the vital organs that might result from nanosilver toxicity.

  18. Hepatocyte Growth Factor Reduces Free Cholesterol-Mediated Lipotoxicity in Primary Hepatocytes by Countering Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Domínguez-Pérez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol overload in the liver has shown toxic effects by inducing the aggravation of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease to steatohepatitis and sensitizing to damage. Although the mechanism of damage is complex, it has been demonstrated that oxidative stress plays a prominent role in the process. In addition, we have proved that hepatocyte growth factor induces an antioxidant response in hepatic cells; in the present work we aimed to figure out the protective effect of this growth factor in hepatocytes overloaded with free cholesterol. Hepatocytes from mice fed with a high-cholesterol diet were treated or not with HGF, reactive oxygen species present in cholesterol overloaded hepatocytes significantly decreased, and this effect was particularly associated with the increase in glutathione and related enzymes, such as γ-gamma glutamyl cysteine synthetase, GSH peroxidase, and GSH-S-transferase. Our data clearly indicate that HGF displays an antioxidant response by inducing the glutathione-related protection system.

  19. Global water resources affected by human interventions and climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haddeland, I.; Heinke, J.; Biemans, H.; Eisner, S.; Flörke, M.; Hanasaki, N.; Konzmann, M.; Ludwig, F.; Masaki, Y.; Schewe, J.; Stacke, T.; Tessler, Z.; Wada, Y.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341387819; Wisser, D.

    2014-01-01

    Humans directly change the dynamics of the water cycle through dams constructed for water storage, and through water withdrawals for industrial, agricultural, or domestic purposes. Climate change is expected to additionally affect water supply and demand. Here, analyses of climate change and direct

  20. Global water resources affected by human interventionss and climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haddeland, I.; Heinke, J.; Biemans, H.; Eisner, S.; Florke, M.F.; Hanasaki, N.; Konzmann, M.; Ludwig, F.

    2014-01-01

    Humans directly change the dynamics of the water cycle through dams constructed for water storage, and through water withdrawals for industrial, agricultural, or domestic purposes. Climate change is expected to additionally affect water supply and demand. Here, analyses of climate change and direct

  1. Swelling of rat hepatocytes stimulates glycogen synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baquet, A.; Hue, L.; Meijer, A. J.; van Woerkom, G. M.; Plomp, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    In hepatocytes from fasted rats, several amino acids are known to stimulate glycogen synthesis via activation of glycogen synthase. The hypothesis that an increase in cell volume resulting from amino acid uptake may be involved in the stimulation of glycogen synthesis is supported by the following

  2. Climate change and human health: Indian context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Poonam K; Dhiman, Ramesh C

    2012-06-01

    The article reviews the issue of climate change and health in the Indian context. The importance of climate change leading to estimated loss of above 2.5 million DALYs in southeast Asia, mortality due to heat waves, and the importance of air quality related respiratory diseases, disasters due to excessive floods, malnutrition due to reduction in rice, maize and sorghum crops etc. Latest work undertaken in India, vis-a-vis current scenario and need for further work has been discussed. There is felt need of further studies on assessing the impact on dengue and chikungunya as the transmission dynamics of these diseases involve water availability, storage and life style, etc. Uncertainties and knowledge gaps identified in the studies undertaken so far have also been highlighted. As regards to vector borne diseases, there is a need to concentrate in the areas which are presently free from malaria and with use of best available tools of interventions in already disease endemic areas like northeastern states, the risk of climate change impacts can be minimized.

  3. Hepatocellular Carcinomas Originate Predominantly from Hepatocytes and Benign Lesions from Hepatic Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna S. Tummala

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is an aggressive primary liver cancer. However, its origin remains a debated question. Using human data and various hepatocarcinogenesis mouse models, we show that, in early stages, transformed hepatocytes, independent of their proliferation status, activate hepatic progenitor cell (HPC expansion. Genetic lineage tracing of HPCs and hepatocytes reveals that, in all models, HCC originates from hepatocytes. However, whereas in various models tumors do not emanate from HPCs, tracking of progenitors in a model mimicking human hepatocarcinogenesis indicates that HPCs can generate benign lesions (regenerative nodules and adenomas and aggressive HCCs. Mechanistically, galectin-3 and α-ketoglutarate paracrine signals emanating from oncogene-expressing hepatocytes instruct HPCs toward HCCs. α-Ketoglutarate preserves an HPC undifferentiated state, and galectin-3 maintains HPC stemness, expansion, and aggressiveness. Pharmacological or genetic blockage of galectin-3 reduces HCC, and its expression in human HCC correlates with poor survival. Our findings may have clinical implications for liver regeneration and HCC therapy.

  4. Effects of ethanol on antioxidant capacity in isolated rat hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sien-Sing; Huang, Chi-Chang; Chen, Jiun-Rong; Chiu, Che-Lin; Shieh, Ming-Jer; Lin, Su-Jiun; Yang, Suh-Ching

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate dose-response and time-course of the effects of ethanol on the cell viability and antioxidant capacity in isolated rat hepatocytes. METHODS: Hepatocytes were isolated from male adult Wistar rats and seeded into 100-mm dishes. Hepatocytes were treated with ethanol at concentrations between 0 (C), 10 (E10), 50 (E50), and 100 (E100) mmol/L (dose response) for 12, 24, and 36 h (time course). Then, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage, malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration, glutathione (GSH) level, and activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GRD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) were measured. RESULTS: Our data revealed that LDH leakage was significantly increased by about 30% in group E100 over those in groups C and E10 at 24 and 36 h, The MDA concentration in groups C, E10 and E50 were significantly lower than that in group E100 at 36 h. Furthermore, the concentration of MDA in group E100 at 36 h was significantly higher by 4.5- and 1.7-fold, respectively, than that at 12 and 24 h. On the other hand, the GSH level in group E100 at 24 and 36 h was significantly decreased, by 32% and 28%, respectively, compared to that at 12 h. The activities of GRD and CAT in group E100 at 36 h were significantly less than those in groups C and E10. However, The GPX and SOD activities showed no significant change in each group. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that long-time incubation with higher concentration of ethanol (100 mmol/L) decreased the cell viability by means of reducing GRD and CAT activities and increasing lipid peroxidation. PMID:16437627

  5. Hepatocytes cocultured with Sertoli cells in bioreactor favors Sertoli barrier tightness in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, P; Legendre, A; Jacques, S; Fleury, M J; Gilard, F; Tcherkez, G; Leclerc, E

    2017-03-01

    The lack of a reliable in vitro system to assess reprotoxicity is an emerging problem in the context of European law for Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH, 2007), as it requires a reduction in animal utilization for testing. Furthermore, in vitro reprotoxicological tests would be more relevant and greatly improved by integrating both hepatic metabolism and the blood-testis barrier. Here, we took advantage of an integrated insert in a dynamic microfluidic platform (IIDMP) to co-cultivate hepatocytes in biochip and Sertoli cells in the bicameral chamber. This microfluidic tool has been previously demonstrated to be helpful in cell function and/or quality improvement. We demonstrate that permeability of the Sertoli barrier is reduced by dynamic coculture in our system. Exometabolomics analysis reveals that interactions between hepatocytes and Sertoli cells may have been mediated by the polyamines increase and/or mid-chain fatty acid decrease in the circulating medium. These metabolic changes may be involved in permeability reduction by contributing to modifying junction protein quantity and localization. The present study gives an example of IIDMP as an in vitro partitioning/transport model for cell culture and toxicological testing. Further, based on both our previous results using an intestinal-hepatic cell coculture and the present study, IIDMP seems to be well-suited for (i) assessing the dose-response effect of chemicals within the rodent or human male reproductive tract, and (ii) improving the quality of reprotoxicological assays by including hepatic metabolism. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Human-induced geomorphic change across environmental gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanacker, V.; Molina, A.; Bellin, N.; Christl, M.

    2016-12-01

    Human-induced land cover changes are causing important adverse effects on the ecological services rendered by mountain ecosystems, and the number of case-studies of the impact of humans on soil erosion and sediment yield has mounted rapidly. Anthropogenic disturbance of natural vegetation can profoundly alter the physical, chemical and biological processes within soils. Rapid removal of topsoil during intense farming can result in an imbalance between soil production through chemical weathering and physical soil erosion, with direct implications on nutrient cycling, soil fertility and agricultural production. In this study, we present a conceptual model for assessing human-induced erosion for a wide variety of environmental settings and pose that human-induced geomorphic change cannot be assessed solely based on modern erosion rates as natural or baseline erosion rates can be important in e.g. mountainous terrain. As such, we assess the vulnerability of a given ecosystem to human-induced land cover change by quantifying the change in catchment-wide erosion rates resulting from anthropogenic changes in vegetation cover. Human-induced erosion is here approximated by the ratio of the total specific sediment yield to the natural erosional mass flux, and is dimensionless. The conceptual model is applied to three contrasting environmental settings where data on soil production, physical soil erosion and long-term denudation are available: the tropical Andes, subtropical southern Brazil, and semi-arid Spanish Cordillera. The magnitude of human-induced geomorphic change strongly differs between the three regions. The data suggest that the sensitivity to human-induced erosion is ecosystem dependent, and related to soil erosivity and potential vegetation cover disturbances as a result of human impact. It may therefore be expected that the potential for erosion regulation is larger in well-vegetated ecosystem where strong differences may exist in vegetation cover between

  7. Human relations with soil are changing rapidly: SSSA's new Work Group on Soil Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humanity has rapidly become Earth’s chief agent of soil change, and geologists have named the epoch in which we live the Anthropocene, due to the global scale of human impact on the environment, including soil. In response to the increasing influence of humans on soil processes, the disciplines of ...

  8. Comparative analysis of preparation of human hepatocytes by the ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid and collagenase technique Estudo comparativo da obtenção de hepatócitos humanos pela técnica ácido etilenodiaminotetracético e da colegenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Crema

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare the viability of human hepatocytes dissociated by the ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and collagenase techniques. METHODS: Hepatocytes were prepared by dissociation of liver fragments obtained from hepatectomies performed for therapeutic purposes at the Service of Digestive Tract Surgery, Federal University of Triângulo Mineiro. RESULTS: During the first 4 days of the experiment, 70% of the cells presented birefringent membranes and were not stained with 2% erythrosine, and were therefore considered to be viable. During the first 3 days, hepatocyte viability was on average 71% in the EDTA group and 76% in the collagenase group, with no significant difference between groups. No significant difference was observed between groups at any time. The secretion of albumin by the cultured hepatocytes was preserved up to the seventh day. Mean albumin secretion during the first 3 days was 50 µg/ml in the two groups and a reduction of albumin production was observed from the fourth to the seventh day. Again, no significant difference was observed between groups at any time. CONCLUSION: Cell viability and preservation of albumin secretion by hepatocytes are similar for the EDTA and collagenase techniques.OBJETIVO: Comparar a viabilidade dos hepatócitos humanos dissociados pelas técnicas do ácido etilenodiaminotetracético e da colagenase. MÉTODOS: Hepatócitos foram preparados pela dissociação de fragmentos de fígado, provenientes de hepatectomias realizadas com o objetivo terapêutico no Serviço de Cirurgia do Aparelho Digestivo da Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro. RESULTADOS: Detectou-se que nos quatro primeiros dias de experimento 70% das células estavam com suas membranas biorrefringentes e não se coravam pela eritrosina a 2% portanto foram consideradas viáveis. Observou-se que nos três primeiros dias a viabilidade dos hepatócitos foi em média 71% no grupo EDTA e 76% na colagenase, diferença esta sem

  9. Building resilient human settlements in a climate of change

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this chapter is to 1) note the impacts of climate change on human settlements and vice versa, and 2) propose design and institutional strategies to improve the resilience of human settlements to withstand these impacts...

  10. Climate change and the language of human security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe language of ‘human security’ arose in the 1990s, including from UN work on ‘human development’. What contributions can it make, if any, to the understanding and especially the valuation of and response to the impacts of climate change? How does it compare and relate to other

  11. Human emotions track changes in the acoustic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Weiyi; Thompson, William Forde

    2015-11-24

    Emotional responses to biologically significant events are essential for human survival. Do human emotions lawfully track changes in the acoustic environment? Here we report that changes in acoustic attributes that are well known to interact with human emotions in speech and music also trigger systematic emotional responses when they occur in environmental sounds, including sounds of human actions, animal calls, machinery, or natural phenomena, such as wind and rain. Three changes in acoustic attributes known to signal emotional states in speech and music were imposed upon 24 environmental sounds. Evaluations of stimuli indicated that human emotions track such changes in environmental sounds just as they do for speech and music. Such changes not only influenced evaluations of the sounds themselves, they also affected the way accompanying facial expressions were interpreted emotionally. The findings illustrate that human emotions are highly attuned to changes in the acoustic environment, and reignite a discussion of Charles Darwin's hypothesis that speech and music originated from a common emotional signal system based on the imitation and modification of environmental sounds.

  12. Climate change as a business and human rights issue?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Kristian Høyer

    for this void in the research literature by questioning backward- looking and forward-looking responsibilities of the issue BHR and climate change (cf. Shue 2017): 1) That certain corporations (the carbon majors) do have a human right based responsibility, being liable, to remedy victims of climate change...... Rights includes business corporations on a par with states as duty-carriers in regard to the issue of climate change (OHCHR 2015), expands business responsibilities beyond the Guiding Principles restriction to ‘respect’. Also, considering recent research revealing that the carbon majors (e.g. Shell, BP...... due to harms caused by climate change. Examples such as these suggest that corporations are increasingly assigned human rights duties related to climate change. Even though the issue of business and human rights is much researched (Buhmann and Wettstein 2017; Wettstein 2009, 2012, 2015; Santoro 2015...

  13. Recapitulation of metabolic defects in a model of propionic acidemia using patient-derived primary hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Kimberly A; Collado, Maria S; Figler, Robert A; Hoang, Stephen A; Armstrong, Allison J; Cui, Wanxing; Purdy, Michael; Simmers, Michael B; Yazigi, Nada A; Summar, Marshall L; Wamhoff, Brian R; Dash, Ajit

    2016-03-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is a disorder of intermediary metabolism with defects in the alpha or beta subunits of propionyl CoA carboxylase (PCCA and PCCB respectively) enzyme. We previously described a liver culture system that uses liver-derived hemodynamic blood flow and transport parameters to restore and maintain primary human hepatocyte biology and metabolism utilizing physiologically relevant milieu concentrations. In this study, primary hepatocytes isolated from the explanted liver of an 8-year-old PA patient were cultured in the liver system for 10 days and evaluated for retention of differentiated polarized morphology. The expression of PCCA and PCCB was assessed at a gene and protein level relative to healthy donor controls. Ammonia and urea levels were measured in the presence and absence of amino acid supplements to assess the metabolic consequences of branched-chain amino acid metabolism in this disease. Primary hepatocytes from the PA patient maintained a differentiated polarized morphology (peripheral actin staining) over 10 days of culture in the system. We noted lower levels of PCCA and PCCB relative to normal healthy controls at the mRNA and protein level. Supplementation of branched-chain amino acids, isoleucine (5mM) and valine (5mM) in the medium, resulted in increased ammonia and decreased urea in the PA patient hepatocyte system, but no such response was seen in healthy hepatocytes or patient-derived fibroblasts. We demonstrate for the first time the successful culture of PA patient-derived primary hepatocytes in a differentiated state, that stably retain the PCCA and PCCB enzyme defects at a gene and protein level. Phenotypic response of the system to an increased load of branched-chain amino acids, not possible with fibroblasts, underscores the utility of this system in the better understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of PA and examining the effectiveness of potential therapeutic agents in the most relevant tissue. Copyright © 2015

  14. Enhanced Antioxidant Capacity of Dental Pulp-Derived iPSC-Differentiated Hepatocytes and Liver Regeneration by Injectable HGF-Releasing Hydrogel in Fulminant Hepatic Failure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chiang, Chih-Hung; Wu, Wai-Wah; Li, Hsin-Yang; Chien, Yueh; Sun, Cho-Chin; Peng, Chi-Hsien; Lin, Alex Tong-Long; Huang, Chi-Shuan; Lai, Ying-Hsiu; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Hung, Shuen-Iu; Chang, Yuh-Lih; Lan, Yuan-Tzu; Liu, Dean-Mo; Chien, Chian-Shiu; Huo, Teh-Ia; Lee, Shou-Dong; Wang, Chien-Ying

    2015-01-01

    .... In this study, we reprogrammed human dental pulp-derived fibroblasts into iPSCs, which exhibited pluripotency and the capacity to differentiate into tridermal lineages, including hepatocyte-like cells (iPSC-Heps...

  15. Pioglitazone inhibits mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism and glucose production in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Christopher E; Daniele, Giuseppe; Galindo, Cynthia; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad A; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Norton, Luke

    2017-02-01

    Pioglitazone is used globally for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and is one of the most effective therapies for improving glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance in T2DM patients. However, its mechanism of action in the tissues and pathways that regulate glucose metabolism are incompletely defined. Here we investigated the direct effects of pioglitazone on hepatocellular pyruvate metabolism and the dependency of these observations on the purported regulators of mitochondrial pyruvate transport, MPC1 and MPC2. In cultured H4IIE hepatocytes, pioglitazone inhibited [2-14 C]-pyruvate oxidation and pyruvate-driven oxygen consumption and, in mitochondria isolated from both hepatocytes and human skeletal muscle, pioglitazone selectively and dose-dependently inhibited pyruvate-driven ATP synthesis. Pioglitazone also suppressed hepatocellular glucose production (HGP), without influencing the mRNA expression of key HGP regulatory genes. Targeted siRNA silencing of MPC1 and 2 caused a modest inhibition of pyruvate oxidation and pyruvate-driven ATP synthesis, but did not alter pyruvate-driven HGP and, importantly, it did not influence the actions of pioglitazone on either pathway. In summary, these findings outline a novel mode of action of pioglitazone relevant to the pathogenesis of T2DM and suggest that targeting pyruvate metabolism may lead to the development of effective new T2DM therapies. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  16. Impacts of Climate Change on Human Health in the United ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climate change threatens human health and well-being in the United States. To address this growing threat, the Interagency Group on Climate Change and Human Health (CCHHG), a working group of the U.S. Global Change Research Program’s (USGCRP), has developed this assessment as part of the ongoing efforts of the USGCRP’s National Climate Assessment (NCA) and as called for under the President’s Climate Action Plan. The authors of this assessment have compiled and assessed current research on human health impacts of climate change and summarized the current “state of the science” for a number of key impact areas. This assessment provides a comprehensive update to the most recent detailed technical assessment for the health impacts of climate change, 2008 Synthesis and Assessment Product 4.6 (SAP 4.6) Analyses of the Effects of Global Change on Human Health and Welfare and Human Systems (CCSP 2008). It also updates and builds upon the health chapter of the third NCA (Melillo et al. 2014). The lead and coordinating Federal agencies for the USGCRP Climate and Health Assessment are the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Institute of Health (NIH), and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Available at https://health2016.globalchange.gov/ The interagency U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) has developed this assessment as part of the ongoing efforts of their National C

  17. Endothelial cell-derived matrix promotes the metabolic functional maturation of hepatocyte via integrin-Src signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xinyue; Li, Weihong; Ma, Minghui; Lu, Xin; Zhang, Haiyan

    2017-11-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironment is involved in the regulation of hepatocyte phenotype and function. Recently, the cell-derived extracellular matrix has been proposed to represent the bioactive and biocompatible materials of the native ECM. Here, we show that the endothelial cell-derived matrix (EC matrix) promotes the metabolic maturation of human adipose stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells (hASC-HLCs) through the activation of the transcription factor forkhead box protein A2 (FOXA2) and the nuclear receptors hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α) and pregnane X receptor (PXR). Reducing the fibronectin content in the EC matrix or silencing the expression of α5 integrin in the hASC-HLCs inhibited the effect of the EC matrix on Src phosphorylation and hepatocyte maturation. The inhibition of Src phosphorylation using the inhibitor PP2 or silencing the expression of Src in hASC-HLCs also attenuated the up-regulation of the metabolic function of hASC-HLCs in a nuclear receptor-dependent manner. These data elucidate integrin-Src signalling linking the extrinsic EC matrix signals and metabolic functional maturation of hepatocyte. This study provides a model for studying the interaction between hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cell-derived matrix. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  18. Usage of adenovirus expressing thymidine kinase mediated hepatocellular damage for enabling mouse liver repopulation with allogenic or xenogenic hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Moreno

    Full Text Available It has been shown that the liver of immunodeficient mice can be efficiently repopulated with human hepatocytes when subjected to chronic hepatocellular damage. Mice with such chimeric livers represent useful reagents for medical and clinical studies. However all previously reported models of humanized livers are difficult to implement as they involve cross-breeding of immunodeficient mice with mice exhibiting genetic alterations causing sustained hepatic injury. In this paper we attempted to create chimeric livers by inducing persistent hepatocellular damage in immunodeficient Rag2(-/- γc(-/- mice using an adenovirus encoding herpes virus thymidine kinase (AdTk and two consecutive doses of ganciclovir (GCV. We found that this treatment resulted in hepatocellular damage persisting for at least 10 weeks and enabled efficient engraftment and proliferation within the liver of either human or allogenic hepatocytes. Interestingly, while the nodules generated from the transplanted mouse hepatocytes were well vascularized, the human hepatocytes experienced progressive depolarization and exhibited reduced numbers of murine endothelial cells inside the nodules. In conclusion, AdTk/GCV-induced liver damage licenses the liver of immunodeficient mice for allogenic and xenogenic hepatocyte repopulation. This approach represents a simple alternative strategy for chimeric liver generation using immunodeficient mice without additional genetic manipulation of the germ line.

  19. The Physiology and Physical Changes of Human Aging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ageing is associated with a decline in body functions, an accompanying change in structure, loss of lean mass and a relative increase in fat mass over time. This article looked into the physiology and physical changes associated with human ageing through journal and book review. Research over the past several decades ...

  20. Climate Change and Human Health in Accra, Ghana | CRDI - Centre ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Climate Change and Human Health in Accra, Ghana. Climate change constitutes a real threat to the livelihood and well-being of the Ghanaian population. Deterioration of the rural environment contributes noticeably to the influx of migrants that arrive in the cities every day. These new arrivals gather in slums lacking ...

  1. Hyperinsulinemia is associated with increased soluble insulin receptors release from hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia eHiriart

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been generally assumed that insulin circulates freely in blood. However it can also interact with plasma proteins. Insulin receptors are located in the membrane of target cells and consist of an alpha and beta subunits with a tyrosine kinase cytoplasmic domain. The ectodomain, called soluble insulin receptor (SIR has been found elevated in patients with diabetes mellitus. We explored if insulin binds to SIRs in circulation under physiological conditions and hypothesize that this SIR may be released by hepatocytes in response to high insulin concentrations. The presence of SIR in rat and human plasmas and the culture medium of hepatocytes was explored using Western blot analysis. A purification protocol was performed to isolated SIR using affinity, gel filtration and ion exchange chromatographies. A modified reverse hemolytic plaque assay was used to measure SIR release from cultured hepatocytes. Incubation with 1 nmol l-1 insulin induces the release of the insulin receptor ectodomains from normal rat hepatocytes. This effect can be partially prevented by blocking protease activity. Furthermore, plasma levels of SIR were higher in a model of metabolic syndrome, where rats are hyperinsulinemic. We also found increased SIR levels in hyperinsulinemic humans. SIR may be an important regulator of the amount of free insulin in circulation. In hyperinsulinemia the amount of this soluble receptor increases, this could lead to higher amounts of insulin bound to this receptor, rather than free insulin, which is the biologically active form of the hormone. This observation could enlighten the mechanisms of insulin resistance.

  2. Ecosystem Services Connect Environmental Change to Human Health Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayles, Brett R.; Brauman, Kate A.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Allan, Brian F.; Ellis, Alicia M.; Goldberg, Tony L.; Golden, Christopher D.; Grigsby-Toussaint, Diana S.; Myers, Samuel S.; Ofosky, Steven A.; Ricketts, Taylor H.; Ristaino, Jean B.

    2016-06-29

    Global environmental change, driven in large part by human activities, profoundly impacts the structure and functioning of Earth’s ecosystems (Millennium Ecosystem Assessment 2005). We are beginning to push beyond planetary boundaries (Steffan et al. 2015), and the consequences for human health remain largely unknown (Myers et al. 2013). Growing evidence suggests that ecological transformations can dramatically affect human health in ways that are both obvious and obscure (Myers and Patz 2009; Myers et al. 2013). The framework of ecosystem services, designed to evaluate the benefits that people derive from ecosystem products and processes, provides a compelling framework for integrating the many factors that influence the human health response to global change, as well as for integrating health impacts into broader analyses of the impacts of this change

  3. Climate change as a business and human rights issue?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Kristian Høyer

    This paper questions whether human rights are relevant to framing corporate responsibility in regard to climate change. Expanding the holders of human rights duties to also include private actors such as business corporations is becoming widely accepted due to the success of John Ruggie’s UN...... Guiding Principles (2008, 2011). However, the scope of corporate responsibilities is constrained to merely ‘respecting’ human rights. Moreover, it is unclear how, if at all, climate change can be considered part of the concern of the Guiding Principles. The fact that the UN High Commissioner on Human...... Rights includes business corporations on a par with states as duty-carriers in regard to the issue of climate change (OHCHR 2015), expands business responsibilities beyond the Guiding Principles restriction to ‘respect’. Also, considering recent research revealing that the carbon majors (e.g. Shell, BP...

  4. Geomorphic and human influence on large-scale coastal change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Kratzmann, Meredith G.; Himmelstoss, Emily A.

    2013-01-01

    An increasing need exists for regional-scale measurements of shoreline change to aid in management and planning decisions over a broad portion of the coast and to inform assessments of coastal vulnerabilities and hazards. A recent dataset of regional shoreline change, covering a large portion of the U.S. East coast (New England and Mid-Atlantic), provides rates of shoreline change over historical (~ 150 years) and recent (25–30 years) time periods making it ideal for a broad assessment of the regional variation of shoreline change, and the natural and human-induced influences on coastal behavior. The variable coastal landforms of the region provide an opportunity to investigate how specific geomorphic landforms relate to the spatial variability of shoreline change. In addition to natural influences on the rates of change, we examine the effects that development and human modifications to the coastline have on the measurements of regional shoreline change.Regional variation in the rates of shoreline change is a function of the dominant type and distribution of coastal landform as well as the relative amount of human development. Our results indicate that geomorphology has measurable influence on shoreline change rates. Anthropogenic impacts are found to be greater along the more densely developed and modified portion of the coast where jetties at engineered inlets impound large volumes of sediment resulting in extreme but discrete progradation updrift of jetties. This produces a shift in averaged values of rates that may mask the natural long-term record. Additionally, a strong correlation is found to exist between rates of shoreline change and relative level of human development. Using a geomorphic characterization of the types of coastal landform as a guide for expected relative rates of change, we found that the shoreline appears to be changing naturally only along sparsely developed coasts. Even modest amounts of development influence the rates of change

  5. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Trigger Loss of Function and Perturbation of Mitochondrial Dynamics in Primary Hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishaali Natarajan

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanoparticles are one of the most highly manufactured and employed nanomaterials in the world with applications in copious industrial and consumer products. The liver is a major accumulation site for many nanoparticles, including TiO2, directly through intentional exposure or indirectly through unintentional ingestion via water, food or animals and increased environmental contamination. Growing concerns over the current usage of TiO2 coupled with the lack of mechanistic understanding of its potential health risk is the motivation for this study. Here we determined the toxic effect of three different TiO2 nanoparticles (commercially available rutile, anatase and P25 on primary rat hepatocytes. Specifically, we evaluated events related to hepatocyte functions and mitochondrial dynamics: (1 urea and albumin synthesis using colorimetric and ELISA assays, respectively; (2 redox signaling mechanisms by measuring reactive oxygen species (ROS production, manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD activity and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; (3 OPA1 and Mfn-1 expression that mediates the mitochondrial dynamics by PCR; and (4 mitochondrial morphology by MitoTracker Green FM staining. All three TiO2 nanoparticles induced a significant loss (p < 0.05 in hepatocyte functions even at concentrations as low as 50 ppm with commercially used P25 causing maximum damage. TiO2 nanoparticles induced a strong oxidative stress in primary hepatocytes. TiO2 nanoparticles exposure also resulted in morphological changes in mitochondria and substantial loss in the fusion process, thus impairing the mitochondrial dynamics. Although this study demonstrated that TiO2 nanoparticles exposure resulted in substantial damage to primary hepatocytes, more in vitro and in vivo studies are required to determine the complete toxicological mechanism in primary hepatocytes and subsequently liver function.

  6. Urbanization Impact on Temperature Change in China with Emphasis on Land Cover Change and Human Activity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Yan; Zhu, Lijuan; Zhao, Xinyi; Li, Shuangcheng; Yan, Yan

    2013-01-01

    ... in the study area have been converted from nonurban to urban stations as a result of land cover change associated with urban expansion. It was determined that both land cover change and human activity play important roles in temperature change and contribute to the observed warming, particularly in urbanized stations, where the highest amount of war...

  7. Regulation of hepatocyte identity and quiescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berasain, Carmen; Avila, Matías A

    2015-10-01

    The liver is a highly differentiated organ with a central role in metabolism, detoxification and systemic homeostasis. To perform its multiple tasks, liver parenchymal cells, the hepatocytes, express a large complement of enabling genes defining their complex phenotype. This phenotype is progressively acquired during fetal development and needs to be maintained in adulthood to guarantee the individual's survival. Upon injury or loss of functional mass, the liver displays an extraordinary regenerative response, mainly based on the proliferation of hepatocytes which otherwise are long-lived quiescent cells. Increasing observations suggest that loss of hepatocellular differentiation and quiescence underlie liver malfunction in chronic liver disease and pave the way for hepatocellular carcinoma development. Here, we briefly review the essential mechanisms leading to the acquisition of liver maturity. We also identify the key molecular factors involved in the preservation of hepatocellular homeostasis and finally discuss potential strategies to preserve liver identity and function.

  8. Metformin protects rat hepatocytes against bile acid-induced apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titia E Woudenberg-Vrenken

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Metformin is used in the treatment of Diabetes Mellitus type II and improves liver function in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Metformin activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, the cellular energy sensor that is sensitive to changes in the AMP/ATP-ratio. AMPK is an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR. Both AMPK and mTOR are able to modulate cell death. AIM: To evaluate the effects of metformin on hepatocyte cell death. METHODS: Apoptotic cell death was induced in primary rat hepatocytes using either the bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA or TNFα in combination with actinomycin D (actD. AMPK, mTOR and phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K/Akt were inhibited using pharmacological inhibitors. Apoptosis and necrosis were quantified by caspase activation, acridine orange staining and Sytox green staining respectively. RESULTS: Metformin dose-dependently reduces GCDCA-induced apoptosis, even when added 2 hours after GCDCA, without increasing necrotic cell death. Metformin does not protect against TNFα/ActD-induced apoptosis. The protective effect of metformin is dependent on an intact PI3-kinase/Akt pathway, but does not require AMPK/mTOR-signaling. Metformin does not inhibit NF-κB activation. CONCLUSION: Metformin protects against bile acid-induced apoptosis and could be considered in the treatment of chronic liver diseases accompanied by inflammation.

  9. Metformin Protects Rat Hepatocytes against Bile Acid-Induced Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woudenberg-Vrenken, Titia E.; Conde de la Rosa, Laura; Buist-Homan, Manon; Faber, Klaas Nico; Moshage, Han

    2013-01-01

    Background Metformin is used in the treatment of Diabetes Mellitus type II and improves liver function in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Metformin activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), the cellular energy sensor that is sensitive to changes in the AMP/ATP-ratio. AMPK is an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Both AMPK and mTOR are able to modulate cell death. Aim To evaluate the effects of metformin on hepatocyte cell death. Methods Apoptotic cell death was induced in primary rat hepatocytes using either the bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA) or TNFα in combination with actinomycin D (actD). AMPK, mTOR and phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt were inhibited using pharmacological inhibitors. Apoptosis and necrosis were quantified by caspase activation, acridine orange staining and Sytox green staining respectively. Results Metformin dose-dependently reduces GCDCA-induced apoptosis, even when added 2 hours after GCDCA, without increasing necrotic cell death. Metformin does not protect against TNFα/ActD-induced apoptosis. The protective effect of metformin is dependent on an intact PI3-kinase/Akt pathway, but does not require AMPK/mTOR-signaling. Metformin does not inhibit NF-κB activation. Conclusion Metformin protects against bile acid-induced apoptosis and could be considered in the treatment of chronic liver diseases accompanied by inflammation. PMID:23951244

  10. Lipid-Induced Signaling Causes Release of Inflammatory Extracellular Vesicles From Hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsova, Petra; Ibrahim, Samar H; Krishnan, Anuradha; Verma, Vikas K; Bronk, Steven F; Werneburg, Nathan W; Charlton, Michael R; Shah, Vijay H; Malhi, Harmeet; Gores, Gregory J

    2016-04-01

    Hepatocyte cellular dysfunction and death induced by lipids and macrophage-associated inflammation are characteristics of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The fatty acid palmitate can activate death receptor 5 (DR5) on hepatocytes, leading to their death, but little is known about how this process contributes to macrophage-associated inflammation. We investigated whether lipid-induced DR5 signaling results in the release of extracellular vesicles (EVs) from hepatocytes, and whether these can induce an inflammatory macrophage phenotype. Primary mouse and human hepatocytes and Huh7 cells were incubated with palmitate, its metabolite lysophosphatidylcholine, or diluent (control). The released EV were isolated, characterized, quantified, and applied to macrophages. C57BL/6 mice were placed on chow or a diet high in fat, fructose, and cholesterol to induce NASH. Some mice also were given the ROCK1 inhibitor fasudil; 2 weeks later, serum EVs were isolated and characterized by immunoblot and nanoparticle-tracking analyses. Livers were collected and analyzed by histology, immunohistochemistry, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Incubation of primary hepatocytes and Huh7 cells with palmitate or lysophosphatidylcholine increased their release of EVs, compared with control cells. This release was reduced by inactivating mediators of the DR5 signaling pathway or rho-associated, coiled-coil-containing protein kinase 1 (ROCK1) inhibition. Hepatocyte-derived EVs contained tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand and induced expression of interleukin 1β and interleukin 6 messenger RNAs in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages. Activation of macrophages required DR5 and receptor-interacting protein kinase 1. Administration of the ROCK1 inhibitor fasudil to mice with NASH reduced serum levels of EVs; this reduction was associated with decreased liver injury, inflammation, and fibrosis. Lipids, which stimulate DR5, induce release of hepatocyte EVs, which

  11. Hepatocyte-based in vitro model for assessment of drug-induced cholestasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Sagnik, E-mail: Sagnik.Chatterjee@pharm.kuleuven.be [Drug Delivery and Disposition, KU Leuven Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, O and N2, Herestraat 49 — bus 921, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Richert, Lysiane, E-mail: l.richert@kaly-cell.com [KaLy-Cell, 20A rue du Général Leclerc, 67115 Plobsheim (France); Augustijns, Patrick, E-mail: Patrick.Augustijns@pharm.kuleuven.be [Drug Delivery and Disposition, KU Leuven Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, O and N2, Herestraat 49 — bus 921, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Annaert, Pieter, E-mail: Pieter.Annaert@pharm.kuleuven.be [Drug Delivery and Disposition, KU Leuven Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, O and N2, Herestraat 49 — bus 921, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of drug-induced cholestasis remains a challenge during drug development. We have developed and validated a biorelevant sandwich-cultured hepatocytes- (SCH) based model that can identify compounds causing cholestasis by altering bile acid disposition. Human and rat SCH were exposed (24–48 h) to known cholestatic and/or hepatotoxic compounds, in the presence or in the absence of a concentrated mixture of bile acids (BAs). Urea assay was used to assess (compromised) hepatocyte functionality at the end of the incubations. The cholestatic potential of the compounds was expressed by calculating a drug-induced cholestasis index (DICI), reflecting the relative residual urea formation by hepatocytes co-incubated with BAs and test compound as compared to hepatocytes treated with test compound alone. Compounds with clinical reports of cholestasis, including cyclosporin A, troglitazone, chlorpromazine, bosentan, ticlopidine, ritonavir, and midecamycin showed enhanced toxicity in the presence of BAs (DICI ≤ 0.8) for at least one of the tested concentrations. In contrast, the in vitro toxicity of compounds causing hepatotoxicity by other mechanisms (including diclofenac, valproic acid, amiodarone and acetaminophen), remained unchanged in the presence of BAs. A safety margin (SM) for drug-induced cholestasis was calculated as the ratio of lowest in vitro concentration for which was DICI ≤ 0.8, to the reported mean peak therapeutic plasma concentration. SM values obtained in human SCH correlated well with reported % incidence of clinical drug-induced cholestasis, while no correlation was observed in rat SCH. This in vitro model enables early identification of drug candidates causing cholestasis by disturbed BA handling. - Highlights: • Novel in vitro assay to detect drug-induced cholestasis • Rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) as in vitro models • Cholestatic compounds sensitize SCH to toxic effects of accumulating bile acids • Drug

  12. Contribution of human and climate change impacts to changes in streamflow of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xuezhi; Gan, Thian Yew

    2015-12-04

    Climate change exerts great influence on streamflow by changing precipitation, temperature, snowpack and potential evapotranspiration (PET), while human activities in a watershed can directly alter the runoff production and indirectly through affecting climatic variables. However, to separate contribution of anthropogenic and natural drivers to observed changes in streamflow is non-trivial. Here we estimated the direct influence of human activities and climate change effect to changes of the mean annual streamflow (MAS) of 96 Canadian watersheds based on the elasticity of streamflow in relation to precipitation, PET and human impacts such as land use and cover change. Elasticities of streamflow for each watershed are analytically derived using the Budyko Framework. We found that climate change generally caused an increase in MAS, while human impacts generally a decrease in MAS and such impact tends to become more severe with time, even though there are exceptions. Higher proportions of human contribution, compared to that of climate change contribution, resulted in generally decreased streamflow of Canada observed in recent decades. Furthermore, if without contributions from retreating glaciers to streamflow, human impact would have resulted in a more severe decrease in Canadian streamflow.

  13. The ultrastructural characteristics of porcine hepatocytes donated after cardiac death and preserved with warm machine perfusion preservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Bochimoto

    Full Text Available The effects of warm machine perfusion preservation of liver grafts donated after cardiac death on the intracellular three-dimensional ultrastructure of the organelles in hepatocytes remain unclear. Here we analyzed comparatively the ultrastructure of the endomembrane systems in porcine hepatocytes under warm ischemia and successive hypothermic and midthermic machine perfusion preservation, a type of the warm machine perfusion. Porcine liver grafts which had a warm ischemia time of 60 minutes were perfused for 4 hours with modified University of Wisconsin gluconate solution. Group A grafts were preserved with hypothermic machine perfusion preservation at 8°C constantly for 4 hours. Group B grafts were preserved with rewarming up to 22°C by warm machine perfusion preservation for 4 hours. An analysis of hepatocytes after 60 minutes of warm ischemia by scanning electron microscope revealed the appearance of abnormal vacuoles and invagination of mitochondria. In the hepatocytes preserved by subsequent hypothermic machine perfusion preservation, strongly swollen mitochondria were observed. In contrast, the warm machine perfusion preservation could preserve the functional appearance of mitochondria in hepatocytes. Furthermore, abundant vacuoles and membranous structures sequestrating cellular organelles like autophagic vacuoles were frequently observed in hepatocytes after warm machine perfusion preservation. In conclusion, the ultrastructure of the endomembrane systems in the hepatocytes of liver grafts changed in accordance with the temperature conditions of machine perfusion preservation. In addition, temperature condition of the machine perfusion preservation may also affect the condition of the hepatic graft attributed to autophagy systems, and consequently alleviate the damage of the hepatocytes.

  14. The impact of hepatocyte phase imaging from infancy to young adulthood in patients with a known or suspected liver lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolbe, Amy B. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Podberesky, Daniel J.; Towbin, Alexander J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Zhang, Bin [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Hepatocyte-specific contrast agents are used to help characterize liver lesions. However, there are no studies evaluating the utility of these agents in detecting or diagnosing pediatric liver lesions. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of the hepatocyte phase of imaging on lesion detection, tumor staging and diagnostic confidence. All patients undergoing an MRI between September 2010 and August 2012 using gadoxetate disodium as the contrast agent were included in this study. Each exam was duplicated so that one copy contained all sequences, including the hepatocyte phase of imaging, and the other copy contained all sequences except the hepatocyte phase of imaging. One reviewer evaluated all exams in a blinded, random fashion. Data tracked included imaging diagnosis, confidence in diagnosis, number of lesions and PRETEXT grade. The imaging diagnosis was compared to histopathology, when available. Data were analyzed for the study population as well as the subset of patients diagnosed with focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH). There were 112 patients (56 male; mean age: 9.25 years) included in this study. A total of 33 patients had a malignant tumor and the remainder had either a benign lesion or no lesion. The addition of the hepatocyte phase of imaging significantly improved the diagnostic confidence for all patients (P < 0.0001) as well as specifically for patients diagnosed with FNH (P = 0.003). In nearly a quarter of patients, the hepatocyte phase of imaging allowed the reviewer to detect additional lesions (P = 0.005). In the patients with a malignant tumor, the addition of the hepatocyte phase of imaging changed the PRETEXT grade in 7/30 patients although the results were not significant (P = 0.161). The addition of the hepatocyte phase of imaging helps to improve lesion detection and increase the diagnostic confidence for all liver tumors, as well as for FNH in particular. (orig.)

  15. Rapid changes in the gut microbiome during human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Andrew H; Li, Yingying; Mpoudi Ngole, Eitel; Ahuka-Mundeke, Steve; Lonsdorf, Elizabeth V; Pusey, Anne E; Peeters, Martine; Hahn, Beatrice H; Ochman, Howard

    2014-11-18

    Humans are ecosystems containing trillions of microorganisms, but the evolutionary history of this microbiome is obscured by a lack of knowledge about microbiomes of African apes. We sequenced the gut communities of hundreds of chimpanzees, bonobos, and gorillas and developed a phylogenetic approach to reconstruct how present-day human microbiomes have diverged from those of ancestral populations. Compositional change in the microbiome was slow and clock-like during African ape diversification, but human microbiomes have deviated from the ancestral state at an accelerated rate. Relative to the microbiomes of wild apes, human microbiomes have lost ancestral microbial diversity while becoming specialized for animal-based diets. Individual wild apes cultivate more phyla, classes, orders, families, genera, and species of bacteria than do individual humans across a range of societies. These results indicate that humanity has experienced a depletion of the gut flora since diverging from Pan.

  16. Association of interleukin-6 and estradiol with hepatocyte growth factor in peritoneal fluid of women with endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Khaleque Newaz; Masuzaki, Hideaki; Fujishita, Akira; Hamasaki, Tetsushi; Kitajima, Michio; Hasuo, Atsuko; Miyamura, Yasutake; Ishimaru, Tadayuki

    2002-08-01

    Different cytokines and ovarian steroid hormones have been reported to regulate the growth and maintenance of endometriosis. We determined the relationship between peritoneal fluid concentrations of interleukin-6, ovarian steroids and hepatocyte growth factor in different revised American Fertility Society (AFS) staging and morphologic appearances of endometriosis. Peritoneal fluid was collected from 30 women with endometriosis and 20 women without endometriosis during laparoscopy, and hepatocyte growth factor, interleukin(IL)-6 and ovarian steroids were measured in peritoneal fluid. The concentrations of hepatocyte growth factor and IL-6 in peritoneal fluid were measured by ELISA, and that of estradiol and progesterone by using the immulyze-enzyme amplified luminescence system. Changes in peritoneal fluid concentrations of hepatocyte growth factor, IL-6, estradiol and progesterone in different stages and morphologic appearances of endometriosis were examined to demonstrate their differences in early and advanced endometriosis. Peritoneal fluid levels of hepatocyte growth factor in women with stage I-II endometriosis were significantly higher than in both women with stage III-IV endometriosis and without endometriosis. A similar significant increase in stage I-II endometriosis was also observed for IL-6 and estradiol. When we divided the women according to different morphologic appearances of endometriosis, we found significantly higher concentrations of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), IL-6, estradiol and progesterone in women containing red lesions compared with other pigments or without endometriosis. A positive correlation was observed between peritoneal fluid levels of IL-6 and hepatocyte growth factor only but not between other markers. Although estradiol levels in peritoneal fluid showed an increased tendency to elevate in the proliferative phase of endometriosis women, hepatocyte growth factor and progesterone displayed higher concentrations in the secretory

  17. Human land-use change impacts rainfall seasonality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang-Erlandsson, Lan; van der Ent, Ruud; Fetzer, Ingo; Keys, Patrick; Savenije, Hubert; Gordon, Line

    2017-04-01

    Anthropogenic land-use change has profoundly changed the Earth's terrestrial water cycle. Studies of how land-use change induced modifications in terrestrial evaporation alters atmospheric moisture content and subsequent precipitation (i.e.., moisture recycling) have primarily focussed on the annual mean impacts. However, the functioning of agriculture and ecosystems are often dependent on the onset, length, and magnitude of the growing season rainfall. Hence, rainfall seasonality is of crucial importance. Here, we (1) analyse how humans have altered rainfall seasonality through land-use change induced modification of moisture recycling, (2) investigate the mechanisms for the rainfall seasonality changes, and (3) discuss how downwind regions may be affected by rainfall seasonality changes. We model human land-use change effects (including irrigation) on evaporation using the global hydrological model STEAM and trace precipitation changes using the atmospheric moisture tracking scheme WAM-2layers. We find that changes in rainfall seasonality is considerably stronger than changes to mean annual precipitation, and is accentuated in locations downwind to significant land-use changes. In particular, we associate sustained rainfall season downwind with land-use types that favour transpiration. This effect is explained by the long residence time of transpiration in both the unsaturated zone and the atmosphere, in contrast to interception and soil evaporation. Our results shed light on the human influence of hydrological systems both locally and at large distances, and which may have crucial implications for agricultural production and ecosystem functioning. These insights are important in a time of both rapid land-use and climate change.

  18. The role of the intralysosomal pH in the control of autophagic proteolytic flux in rat hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiken, J. J.; Aerts, J. M.; Meijer, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    Current methods to estimate changes in intralysosomal pH in hepatocytes do not discriminate between lysosomes and other intracellular acidic compartments. To obtain selective information on the change in lysosomal function in response to a change in lysosomal pH we have used the liberation of

  19. RAR-Related Orphan Receptor Gamma (ROR-γ) Mediates Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Of Hepatocytes During Hepatic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Min; Choi, Jung Eun; Hur, Wonhee; Kim, Jung-Hee; Hong, Sung Woo; Lee, Eun Byul; Lee, Joon Ho; Li, Tian Zhu; Sung, Pil Soo; Yoon, Seung Kew

    2017-08-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is involved in many different types of cellular behavior, including liver fibrosis. In this report, we studied a novel function of RAR-related orphan receptor gamma (ROR-γ) in hepatocyte EMT during liver fibrosis. To induce EMT in vitro, primary hepatocytes and FL83B cells were treated with TGF-β1. Expression of ROR-γ was analyzed by Western blot in the fibrotic mouse livers and human livers with cirrhosis. To verify the role of ROR-γ in hepatocyte EMT, we silenced ROR-γ in FL83B cells using a lentiviral short hairpin RNA (shRNA) vector. The therapeutic effect of ROR-γ silencing was investigated in a mouse model of TAA-induced fibrosis by hydrodynamic injection of plasmids. ROR-γ expression was elevated in hepatocyte cells treated with TGF-β1, and ROR-γ protein levels were elevated in the fibrotic mouse livers and human livers with cirrhosis. Knockdown of ROR-γ resulted in the attenuation of TGF-β1-induced EMT in hepatocytes. Strikingly, ROR-γ bound to ROR-specific DNA response elements (ROREs) in the promoter region of TGF-β type I receptor (Tgfbr1) and Smad2, resulting in the downregulation of Tgfbr1 and Smad2 after silencing of ROR-γ. Therapeutic delivery of shRNA against ROR-γ attenuated hepatocyte EMT and ameliorated liver fibrosis in a mouse model of TAA-induced liver fibrosis. Overall, our results suggest that ROR-γ regulates TGF-β-induced EMT in hepatocytes during liver fibrosis. We suggest that ROR-γ may become a potential therapeutic target in treating liver fibrosis. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 2026-2036, 2017. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals Inc.

  20. Lipid-induced toxicity stimulates hepatocytes to release angiogenic microparticles that require Vanin-1 for uptake by endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povero, Davide; Eguchi, Akiko; Niesman, Ingrid R.; Andronikou, Nektaria; de Mollerat du Jeu, Xavier; Mulya, Anny; Berk, Michael; Lazic, Milos; Thapaliya, Samjana; Parola, Maurizio; Patel, Hemal H.; Feldstein, Ariel E.

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a key pathological feature of experimental and human steatohepatitis, a common chronic liver disease that is associated with obesity. We demonstrated that hepatocytes generated a type of membrane-bound vesicle, microparticles, in response to conditions that mimicked the lipid accumulation that occurs in the liver in some forms of steatohepatitis and that these microparticles promoted angiogenesis. When applied to an endothelial cell line, medium conditioned by murine hepatocytes or a human hepatocyte cell line exposed to saturated free fatty acids induced migration and tube formation, two processes required for angiogenesis. Medium from hepatocytes in which caspase 3 was inhibited or medium in which the microparticles were removed by ultracentrifugation lacked proangiogenic activity. Isolated hepatocyte-derived microparticles induced migration and tube formation of an endothelial cell line in vitro and angiogenesis in mice, processes that depended on internalization of microparticles. Microparticle internalization required the interaction of the ectoenzyme Vanin-1 (VNN1), an abundant surface protein on the microparticles, with lipid raft domains of endothelial cells. Large quantities of hepatocyte-derived microparticles were detected in the blood of mice with diet-induced steatohepatitis, and microparticle quantity correlated with disease severity. Genetic ablation of caspase 3 or RNA interference directed against VNN1 protected mice from steatohepatitis-induced pathological angiogenesis in the liver and resulted in a loss of the proangiogenic effects of microparticles. Our data identify hepatocyte-derived microparticles as critical signals that contribute to angiogenesis and liver damage in steatohepatitis and suggest a therapeutic target for this condition. PMID:24106341

  1. Characteristics and modalities of changes in Human Technology Relationship models

    OpenAIRE

    ADELE, Sonia; Brangier, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Technology adoption research has distinguished several models of human-technology relationships such as resistance or rejection, acceptance (Davis, 1985) and technosymbiosis (Licklider, 1960; Brangier & Hammes, 2006, 2007, 2011), the latter considers human-technology relationships through the ideas of co-evolution, capabilities extension and mutual dependence. This paper aims to show that those models are not stable over time; people change their model or transform it. With questionnaires com...

  2. Rapid changes in the gut microbiome during human evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Moeller, Andrew H.; Li, Yingying; Mpoudi Ngole, Eitel; Ahuka-Mundeke, Steve; Lonsdorf, Elizabeth V.; Pusey, Anne E.; Peeters, Martine; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Ochman, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Humans are ecosystems containing trillions of microorganisms, but the evolutionary history of this microbiome is obscured by a lack of knowledge about microbiomes of African apes. We sequenced the gut communities of hundreds of chimpanzees, bonobos, and gorillas and developed a phylogenetic approach to reconstruct how present-day human microbiomes have diverged from those of ancestral populations. Compositional change in the microbiome was slow and clock-like during African ape diversificatio...

  3. Impact of climate change on human infectious diseases: Empirical evidence and human adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoxu; Lu, Yongmei; Zhou, Sen; Chen, Lifan; Xu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Climate change refers to long-term shifts in weather conditions and patterns of extreme weather events. It may lead to changes in health threat to human beings, multiplying existing health problems. This review examines the scientific evidences on the impact of climate change on human infectious diseases. It identifies research progress and gaps on how human society may respond to, adapt to, and prepare for the related changes. Based on a survey of related publications between 1990 and 2015, the terms used for literature selection reflect three aspects--the components of infectious diseases, climate variables, and selected infectious diseases. Humans' vulnerability to the potential health impacts by climate change is evident in literature. As an active agent, human beings may control the related health effects that may be effectively controlled through adopting proactive measures, including better understanding of the climate change patterns and of the compound disease-specific health effects, and effective allocation of technologies and resources to promote healthy lifestyles and public awareness. The following adaptation measures are recommended: 1) to go beyond empirical observations of the association between climate change and infectious diseases and develop more scientific explanations, 2) to improve the prediction of spatial-temporal process of climate change and the associated shifts in infectious diseases at various spatial and temporal scales, and 3) to establish locally effective early warning systems for the health effects of predicated climate change. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Choline dehydrogenase polymorphism rs12676 is a functional variation and is associated with changes in human sperm cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy R Johnson

    Full Text Available Approximately 15% of couples are affected by infertility and up to half of these cases arise from male factor infertility. Unidentified genetic aberrations such as chromosomal deletions, translocations and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs may be the underlying cause of many cases of idiopathic male infertility. Deletion of the choline dehydrogenase (Chdh gene in mice results in decreased male fertility due to diminished sperm motility; sperm from Chdh(-/- males have decreased ATP concentrations likely stemming from abnormal sperm mitochondrial morphology and function in these cells. Several SNPs have been identified in the human CHDH gene that may result in altered CHDH enzymatic activity. rs12676 (G233T, a non-synonymous SNP located in the CHDH coding region, is associated with increased susceptibility to dietary choline deficiency and risk of breast cancer. We now report evidence that this SNP is also associated with altered sperm motility patterns and dysmorphic mitochondrial structure in sperm. Sperm produced by men who are GT or TT for rs12676 have 40% and 73% lower ATP concentrations, respectively, in their sperm. rs12676 is associated with decreased CHDH protein in sperm and hepatocytes. A second SNP located in the coding region of IL17BR, rs1025689, is linked to altered sperm motility characteristics and changes in choline metabolite concentrations in sperm.

  5. Climate change in the oceans: Human impacts and responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Edward H; Bassett, Hannah R

    2015-11-13

    Although it has far-reaching consequences for humanity, attention to climate change impacts on the ocean lags behind concern for impacts on the atmosphere and land. Understanding these impacts, as well as society's diverse perspectives and multiscale responses to the changing oceans, requires a correspondingly diverse body of scholarship in the physical, biological, and social sciences and humanities. This can ensure that a plurality of values and viewpoints is reflected in the research that informs climate policy and may enable the concerns of maritime societies and economic sectors to be heard in key adaptation and mitigation discussions. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. The Expression of the Hepatocyte SLAMF3 (CD229) Receptor Enhances the Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartier, Flora; Marcq, Ingrid; Douam, Florian; Ossart, Christèle; Regnier, Aline; Debuysscher, Véronique; Lavillette, Dimitri; Bouhlal, Hicham

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a leading cause of cirrhosis and liver cancer worldwide. We recently characterized for the first time the expression of Signaling Lymphocyte Activating Molecule 3 (SLAMF3) in human hepatocytes and here, we report that SLAMF3 interacts with the HCV viral protein E2 and is implicated in HCV entry process. We found a strong correlation between SLAMF3 expression level and hepatocyte susceptibility to HCV infection. The use of specific siRNAs to down-modulate SLAMF3 expression and SLAMF3-blocking antibodies both decreased the hepatocytes susceptibility to HCV infection. Moreover, SLAMF3 over-expression significantly increased susceptibility to HCV infection. Interestingly, experiments with peptides derived from each SLAMF3 domain showed that the first N-terminal extracellular domain is essential for interaction with HCV particles. Finally, we showed that recombinant HCV envelop protein E2 can bind SLAMF3 and that anti-SLAMF3 antibodies inhibited specifically this interaction. Overall, our results revealed that SLAMF3 plays a role during HCV entry, likely by enhancing entry of viral particle within hepatocytes. PMID:24927415

  7. The expression of the hepatocyte SLAMF3 (CD229 receptor enhances the hepatitis C virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora Cartier

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is a leading cause of cirrhosis and liver cancer worldwide. We recently characterized for the first time the expression of Signaling Lymphocyte Activating Molecule 3 (SLAMF3 in human hepatocytes and here, we report that SLAMF3 interacts with the HCV viral protein E2 and is implicated in HCV entry process. We found a strong correlation between SLAMF3 expression level and hepatocyte susceptibility to HCV infection. The use of specific siRNAs to down-modulate SLAMF3 expression and SLAMF3-blocking antibodies both decreased the hepatocytes susceptibility to HCV infection. Moreover, SLAMF3 over-expression significantly increased susceptibility to HCV infection. Interestingly, experiments with peptides derived from each SLAMF3 domain showed that the first N-terminal extracellular domain is essential for interaction with HCV particles. Finally, we showed that recombinant HCV envelop protein E2 can bind SLAMF3 and that anti-SLAMF3 antibodies inhibited specifically this interaction. Overall, our results revealed that SLAMF3 plays a role during HCV entry, likely by enhancing entry of viral particle within hepatocytes.

  8. Role of hepatocytes and bile duct cells in preservation-reperfusion injury of liver grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukan, M; Haddad, P S

    2001-05-01

    In liver transplantation, it is currently hypothesized that nonparenchymal cell damage and/or activation is the major cause of preservation-related graft injury. Because parenchymal cells (hepatocytes) appear morphologically well preserved even after extended cold preservation, their injury after warm reperfusion is ascribed to the consequences of nonparenchymal cell damage and/or activation. However, accumulating evidence over the past decade indicated that the current hypothesis cannot fully explain preservation-related liver graft injury. We review data obtained in animal and human liver transplantation and isolated perfused animal livers, as well as isolated cell models to highlight growing evidence of the importance of hepatocyte disturbances in the pathogenesis of normal and fatty graft injury. Particular attention is given to preservation time-dependent decreases in high-energy adenine nucleotide levels in liver cells, a circumstance that (1) sensitizes hepatocytes to various stimuli and insults, (2) correlates well with graft function after liver transplantation, and (3) may also underlie the preservation time-dependent increase in endothelial cell damage. We also review damage to bile duct cells, which is increasingly being recognized as important in the long-lasting phase of reperfusion injury. The role of hydrophobic bile salts in that context is particularly assessed. Finally, a number of avenues aimed at preserving hepatocyte and bile duct cell integrity are discussed in the context of liver transplantation therapy as a complement to reducing nonparenchymal cell damage and/or activation.

  9. Detection of cardiac activity changes from human speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovarek, Jaromir; Partila, Pavol; Voznak, Miroslav; Mikulec, Martin; Mehic, Miralem

    2015-05-01

    Impact of changes in blood pressure and pulse from human speech is disclosed in this article. The symptoms of increased physical activity are pulse, systolic and diastolic pressure. There are many methods of measuring and indicating these parameters. The measurements must be carried out using devices which are not used in everyday life. In most cases, the measurement of blood pressure and pulse following health problems or other adverse feelings. Nowadays, research teams are trying to design and implement modern methods in ordinary human activities. The main objective of the proposal is to reduce the delay between detecting the adverse pressure and to the mentioned warning signs and feelings. Common and frequent activity of man is speaking, while it is known that the function of the vocal tract can be affected by the change in heart activity. Therefore, it can be a useful parameter for detecting physiological changes. A method for detecting human physiological changes by speech processing and artificial neural network classification is described in this article. The pulse and blood pressure changes was induced by physical exercises in this experiment. The set of measured subjects was formed by ten healthy volunteers of both sexes. None of the subjects was a professional athlete. The process of the experiment was divided into phases before, during and after physical training. Pulse, systolic, diastolic pressure was measured and voice activity was recorded after each of them. The results of this experiment describe a method for detecting increased cardiac activity from human speech using artificial neural network.

  10. Engraftment and Repopulation Potential of Late Gestation Fetal Rat Hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, Joan M; Francois-Vaughan, Heather; Gruppuso, Philip A; Sanders, Jennifer A

    2017-10-01

    The limited availability of donor organs has led to a search for alternatives to liver transplantation to restore liver function and bridge patients to transplantation. We have shown that the proliferation of late gestation (embryonic day 19) fetal rat hepatocytes is mitogen-independent and that mechanisms regulating mRNA translation, cell cycle progression, and gene expression differ from those of adult rat hepatocytes. In the present study, we investigated whether E19 fetal hepatocytes can engraft and repopulate an injured adult liver. Fetal hepatocytes were isolated using a monoclonal antibody against a hepatic surface protein, leucine amino peptidase (LAP). LAP+ and LAP- fractions were analyzed by immunofluorescence and microarray. Immunopurified E19 liver cells from DPPIV+ rats were transplanted via splenic injection into partial hepatectomized DPPIV- rats that had been pretreated with mitomycin C. More than a third of LAP+ fetal hepatocytes expressed ductal markers. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that these dual-expressing cells represent a population of less well-differentiated hepatocytes. Upon transplantation, LAP+ late gestation fetal hepatocytes formed hepatic, endothelial, and ductal colonies within 1 month. By 10 months, colonies derived from LAP+ cells increased so that up to 35% of the liver was repopulated by donor-derived cells. Late gestation fetal hepatocytes, despite being far along in the differentiation process, possess the capacity for extensive liver repopulation. This is likely related to the unexpected presence of a significant proportion of hepatocyte marker-positive cells maintaining a less well-differentiated phenotype.

  11. What Can Human Geography Offer Climate Change Modelling?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    2014-01-01

    The discipline of Geography may be one of the most prominent and oldest disciplines in the conceptualization of human–environment interactions that integrates elements from both natural and social sciences. Yet, much research on society–environment interactions on climate change reduces human...... conceptual modelling of climate change adaption and mitigation. In other words, geographical representations do matter. In the following we will first reflect upon what I shall call spatio-temporal tides and waves of the human environment theme to examine the methodological grounds on which climate change...... regularities, rationalities, and pre-analytic assumptions. Lastly we discuss challenges of constructing nature(s) and how we better understand the (geo) politics of climate change modeling....

  12. Cellular and molecular etiology of hepatocyte injury in a murine model of environmentally induced liver abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Griw, M A; Alghazeer, R O; Al-Azreg, S A; Bennour, E M

    2016-01-01

    Exposures to a wide variety of environmental substances are negatively associated with many biological cell systems both in humans and rodents. Trichloroethane (TCE), a ubiquitous environmental toxicant, is used in large quantities as a dissolvent, metal degreaser, chemical intermediate, and component of consumer products. This increases the likelihood of human exposure to these compounds through dermal, inhalation and oral routes. The present in vivo study was aimed to investigate the possible cellular and molecular etiology of liver abnormality induced by early exposure to TCE using a murine model. The results showed a significant increase in liver weight. Histopathological examination revealed a TCE-induced hepatotoxicity which appeared as heavily congested central vein and blood sinusoids as well as leukocytic infiltration. Mitotic figures and apoptotic changes such as chromatin condensation and nuclear fragments were also identified. Cell death analysis demonstrates hepatocellular apoptosis was evident in the treated mice compared to control. TCE was also found to induce oxidative stress as indicated by an increase in the levels of lipid peroxidation, an oxidative stress marker. There was also a significant decrease in the DNA content of the hepatocytes of the treated groups compared to control. Agarose gel electrophoresis also provided further biochemical evidence of apoptosis by showing internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in the liver cells, indicating oxidative stress as the cause of DNA damage. These results suggest the need for a complete risk assessment of any new chemical prior to its arrival into the consumer market.

  13. Cellular and molecular etiology of hepatocyte injury in a murine model of environmentally induced liver abnormality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Al-Griw

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Exposures to a wide variety of environmental substances are negatively associated with many biological cell systems both in humans and rodents. Trichloroethane (TCE, a ubiquitous environmental toxicant, is used in large quantities as a dissolvent, metal degreaser, chemical intermediate, and component of consumer products. This increases the likelihood of human exposure to these compounds through dermal, inhalation and oral routes. The present in vivo study was aimed to investigate the possible cellular and molecular etiology of liver abnormality induced by early exposure to TCE using a murine model. The results showed a significant increase in liver weight. Histopathological examination revealed a TCE-induced hepatotoxicity which appeared as heavily congested central vein and blood sinusoids as well as leukocytic infiltration. Mitotic figures and apoptotic changes such as chromatin condensation and nuclear fragments were also identified. Cell death analysis demonstrates hepatocellular apoptosis was evident in the treated mice compared to control. TCE was also found to induce oxidative stress as indicated by an increase in the levels of lipid peroxidation, an oxidative stress marker. There was also a significant decrease in the DNA content of the hepatocytes of the treated groups compared to control. Agarose gel electrophoresis also provided further biochemical evidence of apoptosis by showing internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in the liver cells, indicating oxidative stress as the cause of DNA damage. These results suggest the need for a complete risk assessment of any new chemical prior to its arrival into the consumer market.

  14. Developing Climate Change Literacy With the Humanities: A Narrative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siperstein, S.

    2015-12-01

    Teaching the science and policy of climate change is necessary but insufficient for helping students to develop a robust climate literacy. Climate change educators must also teach students how to evaluate historical trends, to unpack the assumptions in shared cultural narratives, to grapple with ethical dilemmas, and more generally to traverse the turbulence of feeling that is a hallmark of living in a time of global climate chaos. In short, climate literacy must include the skills and strategies of the humanities, and specifically literary and cultural studies. After providing an overview of how literary and cultural studies scholars from around the world are developing innovative pedagogical methods for addressing climate change (drawing on the presenter's experience editing the forthcoming volume Teaching Climate Change in the Humanities), the presentation will then report on a specific Literary Genres course taught at the University of Oregon. The course, offered to undergraduate non-majors who entered the class with little or no knowledge of climate change, constituted a case study of action research into the transdisciplinary teaching of climate change. The presentation will thus draw on quantitative course assessments, student coursework, and the instructor's own experiences in arguing that three key narratives underpin the work we do as multidisciplinary climate change educators: narratives of observation, narratives of speculation, and narratives of conversion. That is, we guide students through the processes of witnessing climate change, imagining more just and sustainable futures, and by so doing, transforming themselves and their communities. In the particular Literary Genres course under consideration, students used the tools of literary and cultural studies first to analyze existing versions of these narratives and then to compose their own versions of these narratives based on their local communities and ecologies. In the context of multidisciplinary

  15. Soyasaponin Bb Protects Rat Hepatocytes from Alcohol-Induced Oxidative Stress by Inducing Heme Oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lijie, Zhu; Ranran, Fu; Xiuying, Liu; Yutang, He; Bo, Wang; Tao, Ma

    2016-01-01

    It has been known that oxidative stress induced by alcohol played a crucial role in the formation of alcoholic liver disease. Although the formation mechanisms underlying liver injury induced by alcohol still remained largely unknown, it has been considered that oxidative stress played a core role in the pathogenesis of hepatocyte damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of soyasaponin Bb (Ss-Bb) on oxidative stress in alcohol-induced rat hepatocyte injury. It has been shown that the administration of Ss-Bb could significantly restore antioxidant activity in BRL 3A cells. Moreover, the impaired liver function and morphology changes resulting from ethanol exposure were improved by Ss-Bb treatment. Treatment with a pharmacological inhibitor of haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1) indicated a critical role of HO-1 in mediating the protective role. Finally, we found that pretreatment with Ss-Bb to ethanol exposure cells increased the expression level of HO-1. It was suggested that Ss-Bb may protect against alcohol-induced hepatocyte injury through ameliorating oxidative stress, and the induction of HO-1 was an important protective mechanism. Effects of soyasaponin Bb was investigated on oxidative stress in rat hepatocytesCell viability and antioxidant capacities were evaluated to determine the effectsThe expression level of HO-1 was measured to reveal the proptective mechanisms.

  16. Long-term culture of functional hepatocytes on chemically modified collagen gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimbara, N; Atawa, R; Takashina, M; Tanaka, K; Ichihara, A

    1996-01-01

    For long-term maintenance of functional hepatocytes in primary culture, a new culture system with chemically modified type-I collagen gel was developed. Isolated hepatocytes spread as flat cells and rapidly lost their viability and functions when cultured on native collagen gel. In contrast, they survived for several weeks when cultured on collagen gels that had been modified by treatment with sodium-borohydride (NaBH(4)) or by digestion with pepsin, which resulted in destruction of crosslinking of collagen fibers and marked decrease in meachanical strength of the gels. These long-lived cells were round and aggregated and maintained high levels of various differentiated liver functions including albumin secretion and activities of tyrosine aminotransferase and P450. Moreover on collagen gels modified by treatment with NaBH(4) or pepsin, the cell showed less DNA synthesis in response to mitogenic stimulation than cells cultures on gel containing native collagen. Interestingly, crosslinking of these chemically modified gels with D-ribose resulted in changes in various phenotypes of hepatocytes cultures on them including shape, longevity, and functions expressed when the cells were cultured on native collagen gel, suggesting that the effect of modification of the collagen gel is reversible. Thus the structure of collagen gels, probably due to the degree of crosslinking, seems to affect the morphology, maintenance of differentiated functions, and growth of primary cultured hepatocytes.

  17. Effects of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) on glucose metabolism in isolated hepatocytes from Zucker rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finan, A.; Cleary, M.P.

    1986-03-05

    DHEA has been shown to competitively inhibit the pentose phosphate shunt (PPS) enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) when added in vitro to supernatants or homogenates prepared from mammalian tissues. However, no consistent effect on G6PD activity has been determined in tissue removed from DHEA-treated rats. To explore the effects of DHEA on PPS, glucose utilization was measured in hepatocytes from lean and obese male Zucker rats (8 wks of age) following 1 wk of DHEA treatment (0.6% in diet). Incubation of isolated hepatocytes from treated lean Zucker rats with either (1-/sup 14/C) glucose or (6-/sup 14/C) glucose resulted in significant decreases in CO/sub 2/ production and total glucose utilization. DHEA-lean rats also had lowered fat pad weights. In obese rats, there was no effect of 1 wk of treatment on either glucose metabolism or fat pad weight. The calculated percent contribution of the PPS to glucose metabolism in hepatocytes was not changed for either DHEA-lean or obese rats when compared to control rats. In conclusion, 1 wk of DHEA treatment lowered overall glucose metabolism in hepatocytes of lean Zucker rats, but did not selectively affect the PPS. The lack of an effect of short-term treatment in obese rats may be due to differences in their metabolism or storage/release of DHEA in tissues in comparison to lean rats.

  18. Expert elicitation on uncertainty, climate change and human health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wardekker, J.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/306644398; de Jong, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/326795960; van der Sluijs, J.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073427489

    2010-01-01

    Climate change may have a range of diverse effects on human health, ranging from increased heat-related disease and mortality to effects on vector-borne diseases and allergic disorders such as hay fever. Assessments for the Netherlands have indicated a number of effects that are considered relevant

  19. Human-mediated drivers of change — impacts on coastal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A growing body of evidence indicates that local air and sea temperatures, wind patterns, ocean current speed and upwelling regimes are all being affected by human-mediated climate change. In addition, anthropogenic activities, such as shipping (introducing coastal bioinvasives), exploitation of coastal marine resources, ...

  20. Implications of climate change on human comfort in buildings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A rise in temperature and humidity levels constitutes a potential hazard to health and human comfort and accelerates many degradation processes and material damage. Subsequently, the amount of energy needed to ... Keywords: climate change, greenhouse-effect, comfort zone. Journal of Science and Technology Vol.

  1. Global water resources affected by human interventions and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddeland, Ingjerd; Heinke, Jens; Biemans, Hester; Eisner, Stephanie; Flörke, Martina; Hanasaki, Naota; Konzmann, Markus; Ludwig, Fulco; Masaki, Yoshimitsu; Schewe, Jacob; Stacke, Tobias; Tessler, Zachary D.; Wada, Yoshihide; Wisser, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    Humans directly change the dynamics of the water cycle through dams constructed for water storage, and through water withdrawals for industrial, agricultural, or domestic purposes. Climate change is expected to additionally affect water supply and demand. Here, analyses of climate change and direct human impacts on the terrestrial water cycle are presented and compared using a multimodel approach. Seven global hydrological models have been forced with multiple climate projections, and with and without taking into account impacts of human interventions such as dams and water withdrawals on the hydrological cycle. Model results are analyzed for different levels of global warming, allowing for analyses in line with temperature targets for climate change mitigation. The results indicate that direct human impacts on the water cycle in some regions, e.g., parts of Asia and in the western United States, are of the same order of magnitude, or even exceed impacts to be expected for moderate levels of global warming (+2 K). Despite some spread in model projections, irrigation water consumption is generally projected to increase with higher global mean temperatures. Irrigation water scarcity is particularly large in parts of southern and eastern Asia, and is expected to become even larger in the future. PMID:24344275

  2. Changes in channel morphology over human time scales [Chapter 32

    Science.gov (United States)

    John M. Buffington

    2012-01-01

    Rivers are exposed to changing environmental conditions over multiple spatial and temporal scales, with the imposed environmental conditions and response potential of the river modulated to varying degrees by human activity and our exploitation of natural resources. Watershed features that control river morphology include topography (valley slope and channel...

  3. Environmental change and human mobility in the digital age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boas, Ingrid

    2017-01-01

    This intervention argues for the need of research to examine how information and communication technologies (ICTs) shape human mobility in the context of environmental change. ICTs are becoming increasingly central in the daily lives of migrants and communities at risk of environmental events.

  4. Angiotensin II Induces C-Reactive Protein Expression via AT1-ROS-MAPK-NF-κB Signal Pathway in Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Zhao

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: C-reactive protein (CRP participates in development of inflammatory diseases. Hepatocytes are a major contributor of circulating CRP. Although angiotensin II (Ang II is known to evoke inflammatory response, it remains unknown whether Ang II induces CRP expression in hepatocytes. The present study observed effect of Ang II on CRP expression and the related signal pathway in hepatocytes. Methods: mRNA and protein expressions in human hepatocytes were determined with RT-PCR and Western blot respectively. Reactive oxygen species (ROS was measured using a fluorescence probe. CRP in liver and serum of rats was determined by immunohistochemistry and ELISA respectively. Results: Ang II induced mRNA and protein expression of CRP in hepatocytes and increased CRP production in liver and CRP level in serum. Losartan reduced Ang II- induced CRP expression in hepatocytes. Losartan and thenoyltrifluoroacetone decreased Ang II-stimulated ROS production. N-acetylcysteine antagonized Ang II-induced CRP expression. Losartan and N-acetylcysteine inhibited Ang II-activated ERK1/2. Unlike ERK1/2, only losartan inhibited Ang II-activated JNK. Furthermore, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate abolished Ang II-induced CRP expression. Conclusion: Ang II has ability to induce CRP expression in hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo through AT1 receptor followed by ROS, MAPK and NF-κB signal pathway.

  5. Climate change as a driver for future human migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M.; Ricke, K.; Caldeira, K.

    2016-12-01

    Human migration is driven by a multitude of factors, both socioeconomic and environmental. However, as impacts of anthropogenic climate change emerge and grow, it is widely conjectured that climate change will induce migration of human populations from areas that are adversely affected by climate change to areas that are less adversely or positively affected by climate change. Both low- and high-frequency climate changes have been empirically linked to migration in areas across the globe, but there has been little global-scale quantitative analysis projecting the scale and geography of climate-motivated migration. Considering temperature and precipitation in isolation from all other factors, here we project climate-driven impacts on the areal-density of human population. From this, we infer potential destinations and origins for the climate-motivated migration. Our results indicate that tropical and sub-tropical countries are the largest likely sources of migrants, with India being the country with the greatest number of potential climate emigrants. Global warming has the potential to motivate hundreds of millions of people to migrate in the coming decades, largely from warm tropical and subtropical countries to cooler temperate countries. Migration decisions will depend on many factors beyond climate; nevertheless our work establishes a foundation for quantifying future climate-motivated migration that can act as a starting point of more comprehensive assessments. The large number of potential climate migrants indicated by our analyses provides additional incentive to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, take adaptive measures, and carefully consider migration policy.

  6. Adaptive changes in human memory: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Laura Sabiniewicz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains a review of the literature concerning memory abilities and human senses performance under different environmental circumstances. A number of studies indicated that environment has a significant impact on human senses functioning. It can affect it in a mechanical way, by a chronic exposure to potentially harmful substances or processes in different work environments. Also, some cognitive abilities that have evolved to perform evolutionary essential functions lost their importance because of the change of environment impact. Moreover, training can be a source of improvement of both human senses and cognitive abilities, as well. That might suggest that, while using, under different environmental circumstances different cognitive abilities develop. We take into a particular consideration human memory and its role, show current studies in this field and suggest new research directions.

  7. Functional hepatocyte clusters on bioactive blend silk matrices towards generating bioartificial liver constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janani, G; Nandi, Samit K; Mandal, Biman B

    2017-12-06

    The creation of in vitro functional hepatic tissue simulating micro-environmental niche of native liver is a keen area of research due to its demand in bioartificial liver (BAL) and cell-based tissue engineering. Here, we investigated the potential of novel blend (BA) silk scaffold fabricated by blending mulberry (Bombyx mori, BM) silk fibroin with cell adhesion motif (RGD) rich non-mulberry (Antheraea assamensis, AA) silk fibroin, in generating a functional liver construct. Three-dimensional (3D) porous silk scaffolds (BM, AA and BA) were physico-chemically characterized and functionally evaluated using human hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2) and primary neonatal rat hepatocytes. The growth and distribution of hepatocytes within the scaffolds were tracked by FESEM, alamar blue proliferation assay and live/dead staining. Hemocompatible BA scaffolds supported the formation of high density hepatocyte clusters, facilitating cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions. Blend scaffolds evinced enhanced liver-specific functions of cultured hepatocytes in terms of albumin synthesis, urea synthesis and cytochrome P450 enzyme activity over 21 days. Subcutaneous implantation of scaffolds demonstrated minimal macrophage infiltration in blend scaffolds. These findings substantiate that the integral property of blend (BA) scaffold offers a befitting environment by influencing spheroidal growth of hepatocytes with enhanced biological activity. Collectively, the present study provides a new 3D bio-matrix niche for growing functional liver cells that would have future prospects in BAL as well as regenerative medicine. An end stage liver disease called cirrhosis perturbs the self-healing ability and physiological functions of liver. Due to the scarcity of healthy donors, a functional in vitro hepatic construct retaining the liver-specific functions is in great demand for its prospects in bioartificial liver (BAL) and cell-based tissue engineering. Physicochemical attributes of a matrix

  8. Measuring Entropy Change in a Human Physiological System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Boregowda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a novel approach involving the use of Maxwell relations to combine multiple physiological measures to provide a measure of entropy change. The physiological measures included blood pressure (BP, heart rate (HR, skin temperature (ST, electromyogram (EMG, and electrodermal response (EDR. The multiple time-series physiological data were collected from eight subjects in an experimental pilot study conducted at the Human Engineering Laboratory of NASA Langley Research Center. The methodology included data collection during a relaxation period of eighteen minutes followed by a sixty-minute cognitive task. Two types of entropy change were computed: (a entropy change (ΔSBP due to blood pressure, heart rate, and skin temperature and (b entropy change (ΔSEMG due to electromyogram, electrodermal response, and skin temperature. The results demonstrate that entropy change provides a valuable composite measure of individual physiological response to various stressors that could be valuable in the areas of medical research, diagnosis, and clinical practice.

  9. Characterization and chronological changes of preterm human milk gangliosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Shin-ichi; Sekiguchi, Kazuhito; Akaishi, Mutsumi; Anan, Aki; Maeda, Tomoki; Izumi, Tatsuro

    2011-10-01

    Gangliosides are present in high concentrations in the nervous tissue, and some are observed in small amounts in many extraneural tissues and body fluids. Human milk may play important roles in energy supplementation, prophylaxis of infection, and brain development. For preterm infants, human milk gangliosides are also very important substances during the early lactation stage. However, there are no data on human milk gangliosides from mothers at preterm delivery. We investigated the characterization of gangliosides and chronologic changes in human preterm milk earlier than 30 wk of gestation from 1 to 60 d after birth. Forty-one samples were analyzed by high-performance thin-layer chromatography and a microtechnique using 1 mL of milk from each lactation and compared with 61 full-term human milk samples. Total lipid-bound sialic acid of human milk gangliosides after preterm delivery showed a peak concentration at 2 to 3 d postpartum and then remained at a high concentration until approximately 10 d. GD3 was the major ganglioside in the colostrum until approximately 7 to 10 d postpartum. GM3 was scarcely detected until 7 d postpartum and then increased gradually. There was no difference in the GD3 concentration per 1 mL of human milk between preterm and full-term human milk until approximately 5 to 8 d postpartum. After that time, the GD3 concentration decreased sharply. In contrast, the total concentrations of GM3 per 1 mL of human milk from mothers after preterm delivery were lower than those from mothers after full-term delivery throughout the entire period examined. This finding is essential to elucidate the composition of human milk gangliosides after preterm delivery, which may contribute to the analysis of the physiologic composition and formulation appropriate preterm infant nutrition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. RNAi in murine hepatocytes: the agony of choice--a study of the influence of lipid-based transfection reagents on hepatocyte metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, Jan; Arnold, Katrin; Thiel, Carlo; Rennert, Christiane; Aleithe, Susanne; Hofmann, Ute; Vlaic, Sebastian; Sales, Susanne; Shevchenko, Andrej; Matz-Soja, Madlen

    2015-09-01

    Primary hepatocyte cell cultures are widely used for studying hepatic diseases with alterations in hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism, such as diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Therefore, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) provide a potent and specific tool to elucidate the signaling pathways and gene functions involved in these pathologies. Although RNA interference (RNAi) in vitro is frequently used in these investigations, the metabolic alterations elucidated by different siRNA delivery strategies have hardly been investigated in transfected hepatocytes. To elucidate the influence of the most commonly used lipid-based transfection reagents on cultured primary hepatocytes, we studied the cytotoxic effects and transfection efficiencies of INTERFERin(®), Lipofectamine(®)RNAiMAX, and HiPerFect(®). All of these transfection agents displayed low cytotoxicity (5.6-9.0 ± 1.3-3.4%), normal cell viability, and high transfection efficiency (fold change 0.08-0.13 ± 0.03-0.05), and they also favored the satisfactory down-regulation of target gene expression. However, when effects on the metabolome and lipidome were studied, considerable differences were observed among the transfection reagents. Cellular triacylglycerides levels were either up- or down-regulated [maximum fold change: INTERFERin(®) (48 h) 2.55 ± 0.34, HiPerFect(®) (24 h) 0.79 ± 0.08, Lipofectamine(®)RNAiMAX (48 h) 1.48 ± 0.21], and mRNA levels of genes associated with lipid metabolism were differentially affected. Likewise, metabolic functions such as amino acid utilization from were perturbed (alanine, arginine, glycine, ornithine, and pyruvate). In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that the choice of non-viral siRNA delivery agent is critical in hepatocytes. This should be remembered, especially if RNA silencing is used for studying hepatic lipid homeostasis and its regulation.

  11. Liver regeneration studies with rat hepatocytes in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalopoulos, G; Cianciulli, H D; Novotny, A R; Kligerman, A D; Strom, S C; Jirtle, R L

    1982-11-01

    Adult rat parenchymal hepatocytes in primary culture can be induced to enter into DNA synthesis and mitosis. The optimal conditions for hepatocyte replication are low plating density (less than 10,000 cells/sq cm) and 50% serum from two-thirds partially hepatectomized rats (48 hr after hepatectomy). Approximately 80% of the hepatocytes enter the cell cycle, and most of these cells go through mitosis. The replicating hepatocytes remain positive for glucose-6-phosphatase and negative for gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, and they accumulate fat, in analogy to regenerating liver. Most of the replicating hepatocytes enter into multiple consecutive rounds of DNA synthesis. Dose-response studies between control animal serum and hepatocyte labeling index indicate that in unoperated animals the serum contains substances stimulatory as well as inhibitory for hepatic growth, with the inhibitory effect prevailing at high concentrations. After partial hepatectomy, the inhibitory activity disappears whereas the hepatopoietin activity reaches almost 90% of maximal biological effectiveness at 25% serum concentration. Addition of hormones to the system shows that the hepatopoietin activity is not identical to epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, thyroxine, glucagon, or hydrocortisone. Norepinephrine abolishes the difference between control and hepatectomized serum but does not restore hepatopoietin activity when added to heat-inactivated serum. The results show that this system of replicating hepatocytes can be used to investigate the trophic factors that control growth of normal and neoplastic hepatocytes.

  12. Cell swelling and glycogen metabolism in hepatocytes from fasted rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gustafson, L. A.; Jumelle-Laclau, M. N.; van Woerkom, G. M.; van Kuilenburg, A. B.; Meijer, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    Cell swelling is known to increase net glycogen production from glucose in hepatocytes from fasted rats by activating glycogen synthase. Since both active glycogen synthase and phosphorylase are present in hepatocytes, suppression of flux through phosphorylase may also contribute to the net increase

  13. Downregulation of mPGES-1 Expression via EGR1 Plays an Important Role in Inhibition of Caffeine on PGE2 Synthesis of HBx(+) Hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan; Wang, Xiaoqian; Tang, Nanhong

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the mechanism of caffeine in influencing HBx(+) hepatocytes to synthesize PGE2. The inhibitory effect of caffeine on hepatocyte proliferation increased with increasing caffeine concentrations (200-800 μM) and treatment times (1-7 days), which was first observed at the second test time point (caffeine treatment for 4 days). The inhibition of caffeine on the growth of HL7702-HBx and HepG2-HBx cells was most obvious at 800 μM caffeine and at caffeine treatment for 7 days. The PGE2 secretion and the expression of mPGES-1 and EGR1 were downregulated, whereas PPARγ expression was upregulated. The mPGES-1 promoter activity of HBx(+) hepatocytes decreased more significantly than that of HBx(-) hepatocytes. Moreover, the expression of EGR1 and PPARγ changed more significantly in HBx(+) hepatocytes cultured for 12 to 24 hours in the presence of 5 mM caffeine. This limited success may be attributed to caffeine releasing the binding of HBx and PPARγ and furthermore affecting the mPGES-1 expression by EGR1 in HBx(+) hepatocytes. The results indicate that caffeine could effectively reduce PGE2 synthesis in HBx(+) hepatocytes by specifically blocking the PPARγ-EGR1-mPGES-1 pathway, thereby providing a new evidence of molecular biology for the hypothesis that drinking coffee is beneficial to HBV-infected patients.

  14. Downregulation of mPGES-1 Expression via EGR1 Plays an Important Role in Inhibition of Caffeine on PGE2 Synthesis of HBx(+ Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the mechanism of caffeine in influencing HBx(+ hepatocytes to synthesize PGE2. The inhibitory effect of caffeine on hepatocyte proliferation increased with increasing caffeine concentrations (200–800 μM and treatment times (1–7 days, which was first observed at the second test time point (caffeine treatment for 4 days. The inhibition of caffeine on the growth of HL7702-HBx and HepG2-HBx cells was most obvious at 800 μM caffeine and at caffeine treatment for 7 days. The PGE2 secretion and the expression of mPGES-1 and EGR1 were downregulated, whereas PPARγ expression was upregulated. The mPGES-1 promoter activity of HBx(+ hepatocytes decreased more significantly than that of HBx(− hepatocytes. Moreover, the expression of EGR1 and PPARγ changed more significantly in HBx(+ hepatocytes cultured for 12 to 24 hours in the presence of 5 mM caffeine. This limited success may be attributed to caffeine releasing the binding of HBx and PPARγ and furthermore affecting the mPGES-1 expression by EGR1 in HBx(+ hepatocytes. The results indicate that caffeine could effectively reduce PGE2 synthesis in HBx(+ hepatocytes by specifically blocking the PPARγ-EGR1-mPGES-1 pathway, thereby providing a new evidence of molecular biology for the hypothesis that drinking coffee is beneficial to HBV-infected patients.

  15. Acrolein cytotoxicity in hepatocytes involves endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammad, Mohammad K. [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); Avila, Diana [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); Zhang, Jingwen [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); Barve, Shirish [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); Arteel, Gavin [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); McClain, Craig [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); Robley Rex VAMC, Louisville, KY (United States); Joshi-Barve, Swati, E-mail: s0josh01@louisville.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Acrolein is a common environmental, food and water pollutant and a major component of cigarette smoke. Also, it is produced endogenously via lipid peroxidation and cellular metabolism of certain amino acids and drugs. Acrolein is cytotoxic to many cell types including hepatocytes; however the mechanisms are not fully understood. We examined the molecular mechanisms underlying acrolein hepatotoxicity in primary human hepatocytes and hepatoma cells. Acrolein, at pathophysiological concentrations, caused a dose-dependent loss of viability of hepatocytes. The death was apoptotic at moderate and necrotic at high concentrations of acrolein. Acrolein exposure rapidly and dramatically decreased intracellular glutathione and overall antioxidant capacity, and activated the stress-signaling MAP-kinases JNK, p42/44 and p38. Our data demonstrate for the first time in human hepatocytes, that acrolein triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activated eIF2α, ATF-3 and -4, and Gadd153/CHOP, resulting in cell death. Notably, the protective/adaptive component of ER stress was not activated, and acrolein failed to up-regulate the protective ER-chaperones, GRP78 and GRP94. Additionally, exposure to acrolein disrupted mitochondrial integrity/function, and led to the release of pro-apoptotic proteins and ATP depletion. Acrolein-induced cell death was attenuated by N-acetyl cysteine, phenyl-butyric acid, and caspase and JNK inhibitors. Our data demonstrate that exposure to acrolein induces a variety of stress responses in hepatocytes, including GSH depletion, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress (without ER-protective responses) which together contribute to acrolein toxicity. Our study defines basic mechanisms underlying liver injury caused by reactive aldehyde pollutants such as acrolein. -- Highlights: ► Human primary hepatocytes and cultured cell lines are used. ► Multiple cell death signaling pathways are activated by acrolein. ► Novel finding of

  16. Technical energy savings versus changes in human behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen

    1996-01-01

    Energy savings seems to be the most environmentally benign element in an energy policy. The paper is a reflection on the work on saving energy both by improving technology and by adapting human daily behaviour. A simple model is suggested for the energy chain which converts the primary energy all...... the way into human satisfaction via energy services. Results of various analyses and field experiments show saving potentials for electricity of 50 - 80 per cents. Barriers for implementing these technical saving options are discussed. Also the necessity and potentials for changing behavioural or life...

  17. Human-experienced temperature changes exceed global average climate changes for all income groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiang, S. M.; Parshall, L.

    2009-12-01

    Global climate change alters local climates everywhere. Many climate change impacts, such as those affecting health, agriculture and labor productivity, depend on these local climatic changes, not global mean change. Traditional, spatially averaged climate change estimates are strongly influenced by the response of icecaps and oceans, providing limited information on human-experienced climatic changes. If used improperly by decision-makers, these estimates distort estimated costs of climate change. We overlay the IPCC’s 20 GCM simulations on the global population distribution to estimate local climatic changes experienced by the world population in the 21st century. The A1B scenario leads to a well-known rise in global average surface temperature of +2.0°C between the periods 2011-2030 and 2080-2099. Projected on the global population distribution in 2000, the median human will experience an annual average rise of +2.3°C (4.1°F) and the average human will experience a rise of +2.4°C (4.3°F). Less than 1% of the population will experience changes smaller than +1.0°C (1.8°F), while 25% and 10% of the population will experience changes greater than +2.9°C (5.2°F) and +3.5°C (6.2°F) respectively. 67% of the world population experiences temperature changes greater than the area-weighted average change of +2.0°C (3.6°F). Using two approaches to characterize the spatial distribution of income, we show that the wealthiest, middle and poorest thirds of the global population experience similar changes, with no group dominating the global average. Calculations for precipitation indicate that there is little change in average precipitation, but redistributions of precipitation occur in all income groups. These results suggest that economists and policy-makers using spatially averaged estimates of climate change to approximate local changes will systematically and significantly underestimate the impacts of climate change on the 21st century population. Top: The

  18. Dose response of endotoxin on hepatocyte and muscle mitochondrial respiration in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeger, Victor; Brandt, Sebastian; Porta, Francesca; Jakob, Stephan M; Takala, Jukka; Djafarzadeh, Siamak

    2015-01-01

    Results on mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis are controversial. We aimed to assess effects of LPS at wide dose and time ranges on hepatocytes and isolated skeletal muscle mitochondria. Human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) were exposed to placebo or LPS (0.1, 1, and 10 μg/mL) for 4, 8, 16, and 24 hours and primary human hepatocytes to 1 μg/mL LPS or placebo (4, 8, and 16 hours). Mitochondria from porcine skeletal muscle samples were exposed to increasing doses of LPS (0.1-100 μg/mg) for 2 and 4 hours. Respiration rates of intact and permeabilized cells and isolated mitochondria were measured by high-resolution respirometry. In HepG2 cells, LPS reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and cellular ATP content but did not modify basal respiration. Stimulated complex II respiration was reduced time-dependently using 1 μg/mL LPS. In primary human hepatocytes, stimulated mitochondrial complex II respiration was reduced time-dependently using 1 μg/mL LPS. In isolated porcine skeletal muscle mitochondria, stimulated respiration decreased at high doses (50 and 100 μg/mL LPS). LPS reduced cellular ATP content of HepG2 cells, most likely as a result of the induced decrease in membrane potential. LPS decreased cellular and isolated mitochondrial respiration in a time-dependent, dose-dependent and complex-dependent manner.

  19. Accumulation of histone variant H3.3 with age is associated with profound changes in the histone methylation landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvardovskiy, Andrey; Schwämmle, Veit; Kempf, Stefan J

    2017-01-01

    a causal relationship between H3 variant replacement and age-dependent changes in H3 methylation. Furthermore, the H3.3 level is drastically reduced in human hepatocarcinoma cells as compared to nontumoral hepatocytes, suggesting the potential utility of the H3.3 relative abundance as a biomarker...

  20. Changes in corticostriatal connectivity during reinforcement learning in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horga, Guillermo; Maia, Tiago V; Marsh, Rachel; Hao, Xuejun; Xu, Dongrong; Duan, Yunsuo; Tau, Gregory Z; Graniello, Barbara; Wang, Zhishun; Kangarlu, Alayar; Martinez, Diana; Packard, Mark G; Peterson, Bradley S

    2015-02-01

    Many computational models assume that reinforcement learning relies on changes in synaptic efficacy between cortical regions representing stimuli and striatal regions involved in response selection, but this assumption has thus far lacked empirical support in humans. We recorded hemodynamic signals with fMRI while participants navigated a virtual maze to find hidden rewards. We fitted a reinforcement-learning algorithm to participants' choice behavior and evaluated the neural activity and the changes in functional connectivity related to trial-by-trial learning variables. Activity in the posterior putamen during choice periods increased progressively during learning. Furthermore, the functional connections between the sensorimotor cortex and the posterior putamen strengthened progressively as participants learned the task. These changes in corticostriatal connectivity differentiated participants who learned the task from those who did not. These findings provide a direct link between changes in corticostriatal connectivity and learning, thereby supporting a central assumption common to several computational models of reinforcement learning. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Himalayan Glacier Disasters: Changing Geomorphological Process Landscape, or a Changing Human Landscape?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargel, J. S.; Leonard, G. J.

    2012-12-01

    Recent deadly glacier-related disasters in the Himalayan-Karakoram region—the Attabad landslide and formation of glacier meltwater-fed Lake Gojal, the Gayari ice avalanche/landslide and burial of a Pakistani Army base, and the Seti River outburst disaster—beg the question of whether disasters may be on the rise. Science is not yet ready to offer a full answer, but it is an important one to resolve, because future land-use planning and mitigative measures may be affected. Natural disasters have been commonplace throughout the long human history of the Himalaya-Karakoram region. The broad outlines of the changing natural process, natural hazard, and risk environment may be established. The risk is rising rapidly primarily due to increased human presence in these once-forbidding mountains. Risk is shifting also because climate change is modifying the land surface process system. Rapidly changing glaciers cause a destabilization of the landscape. Glaciers are fundamentally a mestastable phenomenon put in motion by the high gravitational potential energies of the components of glacial systems: snow, ice, water, and debris. Any change in the climate-land-glacier system MUST result in a change in the land process system, with hazards and risks rising or falling or changing location or type. Most commonly, glacier-related disasters include a natural process cascade; as the factors affecting land surface processes and the frequency or magnitude of any one of the elements of the process cascade changes, the net hazard and risk to people changes. Otherwise similar glaciers and glacierized basins have differing sets of hazardous conditions and processes depending on whether the glacier is stable, advancing or retreating. The consequences for the overall risk to people will depend on the details of a specific glacier near a particular village or bridge or railroad. One size does not fit all. Generalizations about trends in natural hazards as related to climate change

  2. The Green Sahara: Climate Change, Hydrologic History and Human Occupation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Ronald G.; Farr, Tom G.; Feynmann, Joan; Ruzmaikin, Alexander; Paillou, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Archaeology can provide insight into interactions of climate change and human activities in sensitive areas such as the Sahara, to the benefit of both disciplines. Such analyses can help set bounds on climate change projections, perhaps identify elements of tipping points, and provide constraints on models. The opportunity exists to more precisely constrain the relationship of natural solar and climate interactions, improving understanding of present and future anthropogenic forcing. We are beginning to explore the relationship of human occupation of the Sahara and long-term solar irradiance variations synergetic with changes in atmospheric-ocean circulation patterns. Archaeological and climate records for the last 12 K years are gaining adequate precision to make such comparisons possible. We employ a range of climate records taken over the globe (e.g. Antarctica, Greenland, Cariaco Basin, West African Ocean cores, records from caves) to identify the timing and spatial patterns affecting Saharan climate to compare with archaeological records. We see correlation in changing ocean temperature patterns approx. contemporaneous with drying of the Sahara approx. 6K years BP. The role of radar images and other remote sensing in this work includes providing a geographically comprehensive geomorphic overview of this key area. Such coverage is becoming available from the Japanese PALSAR radar system, which can guide field work to collect archaeological and climatic data to further constrain the climate change chronology and link to models. Our initial remote sensing efforts concentrate on the Gilf Kebir area of Egypt.

  3. From nature-dominated to human-dominated environmental changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerli, Bruno; Grosjean, Martin; Hofer, Thomas; Núñez, Lautaro; Pfister, Christian

    2000-01-01

    To what extent is it realistic and useful to view human history as a sequence of changes from highly vulnerable societies of hunters and gatherers through periods with less vulnerable, well buffered and highly productive agrarian-urban societies to a world with regions of extreme overpopulation and overuse of life support systems, so that vulnerability to climatic-environmental changes and extreme events is again increasing? This question cannot be fully answered in our present state of knowledge, but at least we can try to illustrate, with three case studies from different continents, time periods and ecosystems, some fundamental changes in the relationship between natural processes and human activities that occur, as we pass from a nature-dominated to a human dominated environment. 1. Early-mid Holocene: Nature dominated environment — human adaptation, mitigation, and migration. In the central Andes, the Holocene climate changed from humid (10,800-8000 BP) to extreme arid (8000-3600 BP) conditions. Over the same period, prehistoric hunting communities adopted a more sedentary pattern of resource use by settling close to the few perennial water bodies, where they began the process of domesticating camelids around 5000 BP and irrigation from about 3100 BP. 2. Historical period: An agrarian society in transition from an "enduring" to an innovative human response. Detailed documentary evidence from Western Europe may be used to reconstruct quite precisely the impacts of climatic variations on agrarian societies. The period considered spans a major transition from an apparently passive response to the vagaries of the environment during the 16th century to an active and innovative attitude from the onset of the agrarian revolution in the late 18th century through to the present day. The associated changes in technology and in agricultural practices helped to create a society better able to survive the impact of climatic extremes. 3. The present day: A human dominated

  4. Climate Change in the US: Potential Consequences for Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. National Assessment identified five major areas of consequences of climate change in the United States: temperature-related illnesses and deaths, health effects related to extreme weather events, air pollution-related health effects, water- and food-borne diseases, and insect-, tick-, and rodent-borne diseases. The U.S. National Assessment final conclusions about these potential health effects will be described. In addition, a summary of some of the new tools for studying human health aspects of climate change as well as environment-health linkages through remotely sensed data and observations will be provided.

  5. Expression of hepatocyte growth factor and the proto-oncogenic receptor c-Met in canine osteosarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fieten, H; Spee, B; Ijzer, J; Kik, M J; Penning, L C; Kirpensteijn, J

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and the proto-oncogenic receptor c-Met are implicated in growth, invasion, and metastasis in human cancer. Little information is available on the expression and role of both gene products in canine osteosarcoma. We hypothesized that the expression of c-Met is

  6. Clouds and Climate Change. Understanding Global Change: Earth Science and Human Impacts. Global Change Instruction Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Glenn E.

    The Global Change Instruction Program was designed by college professors to fill a need for interdisciplinary materials on the emerging science of global change. This instructional module introduces the basic features and classifications of clouds and cloud cover, and explains how clouds form, what they are made of, what roles they play in…

  7. Climate Change, Human Rights and the International Legal Order: The Role of the UN Human Rights Council

    OpenAIRE

    Margaretha Wewerinke

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses recent developments related to recognition of the link between human rights and climate change in international human rights forums. It focuses on the main human rights body of the United Nations, the Human Rights Council, which has addressed climate change in three resolutions, two panel discussions and at its annual Social Forum. The analysis shows that the main challenge faced by the Human Rights Council as it seeks to address climate change is getting to grips with ...

  8. Hepatocyte growth factor enhances death receptor-induced apoptosis by up-regulating DR5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodwin C Rory

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF and its receptor c-MET are commonly expressed in malignant gliomas and embryonic neuroectodermal tumors including medulloblastoma and appear to play an important role in the growth and dissemination of these malignancies. Dependent on cell context and the involvement of specific downstream effectors, both pro- and anti-apoptotic effects of HGF have been reported. Methods Human medulloblastoma cells were treated with HGF for 24–72 hours followed by death receptor ligand TRAIL (Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand for 24 hours. Cell death was measured by MTT and Annexin-V/PI flow cytometric analysis. Changes in expression levels of targets of interest were measured by Northern blot analysis, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, Western blot analysis as well as immunoprecipitation. Results In this study, we show that HGF promotes medulloblastoma cell death induced by TRAIL. TRAIL alone triggered apoptosis in DAOY cells and death was enhanced by pre-treating the cells with HGF for 24–72 h prior to the addition of TRAIL. HGF (100 ng/ml enhanced TRAIL (10 ng/ml induced cell death by 36% (P Conclusion Taken together, these and previous findings indicate that HGF:c-Met pathway either promotes or inhibits medulloblastoma cell death via pathway and context specific mechanisms.

  9. Structural change of human hair induced by mercury exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xueqing; Du, Rong; Li, Yufeng; Li, Bai; Cai, Quan; Mo, Guang; Gong, Yu; Chen, Zhongjun; Wu, Zhonghua

    2013-10-01

    Mercury is one of the most hazardous pollutants in the environment. In this paper, the structural change of human hair induced by mercury exposure was studied. Human hair samples were, respectively, collected from the normal Beijing area and the Hg-contaminated Wanshan area of the Guizhou Province, China. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy was used to detect the element contents. A small angle X-ray scattering technique was used to probe the structural change. Three reflections with 8.8, 6.7, and 4.5 nm spacing were compared between the normal and the Hg-contaminated hair samples. The results confirm that the 4.5 nm reflection is from the ordered fibrillar structure of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) in proteoglycan (PG) that composes the matrix around the intermediate filaments. The increase of Ca content makes the regular oriented fibrillar structure of GAG transform to a random oriented one, broadening the angular extent of the reflection with 4.5 nm spacing. However, overdose Hg makes the core proteins where the ordered fibrils of GAG are attached become coiled, which destroys the ordered arrangements of fibrillar GAG in PG, resulting in the disappearance of the reflections with 4.5 nm spacing. The disappearance of the 4.5 nm reflection can be used as a bioindicator of overdose Hg contamination to the human body. A supercoiled-coil model of hair nanoscale structure and a possible mechanism of mercury effect in human hair are proposed in this paper.

  10. Augmenter of liver regeneration causes different kinetics of ERK1/2 and Akt/PKB phosphorylation than EGF and induces hepatocyte proliferation in an EGF receptor independent and liver specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilowski, Maren; Putz, Christine; Weiss, Thomas S; Brand, Stephan; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Hengstler, Jan G; Thasler, Wolfgang Erwin

    2010-04-16

    Augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) is a potent growth factor which supports liver regeneration in experimental animals. The aim of this study was to compare proliferation as well as the kinetics of ERK1/2 and Akt/PKB phosphorylation by recombinant human ALR (rhALR) and EGF in human hepatocytes and extrahepatic cells. Kinetics of ERK1/2 and Akt/PKB phosphorylation were determined in primary human hepatocytes (phh) after stimulation with rhALR and EGF. Induction of proliferation was analyzed in phh and several cell lines of hepatic and extrahepatic origin by the MTT and [(3)H]-thymidine assay. The kinetics of ERK phosphorylation showed clear differences, whereby rhALR caused a transient and EGF a permanent increase during the observation period of 60 min. For both, Akt and ERK phosphorylation, EGF caused a faster effect with maximal levels observed already after 2 min, whereas rhALR caused maximal phosphorylation between 10 and 15 min. Using the EGF receptor inhibitor AG1478 we provide evidence of an EGF receptor independent induction of proliferation by rhALR. Furthermore, rhALR induced proliferation only in phh and the human liver derived cell lines HepG2 and Chang. In contrast, EGF enhanced proliferation in all analyzed cell types including cell lines of colon, bronchial, pancreatic and gastric origin (SW480, BC1, L36PL and GC1). rhALR and EGF induce different kinetics of ERK and Akt phosphorylation in human hepatocytes. The mitogenic effect of rhALR is liver specific and seems to be at least partially independent from EGF receptor mediated signaling. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Inhibitory effect of TNF-α on malaria pre-erythrocytic stage development: influence of host hepatocyte/parasite combinations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadya Depinay

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The liver stages of malaria parasites are inhibited by cytokines such as interferon-γ or Interleukin (IL-6. Binding of these cytokines to their receptors at the surface of the infected hepatocytes leads to the production of nitric oxide (NO and radical oxygen intermediates (ROI, which kill hepatic parasites. However, conflicting results were obtained with TNF-α possibly because of differences in the models used. We have reassessed the role of TNF-α in the different cellular systems used to study the Plasmodium pre-erythrocytic stages. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Human or mouse TNF-α were tested against human and rodent malaria parasites grown in vitro in human or rodent primary hepatocytes, or in hepatoma cell lines. Our data demonstrated that TNF-α treatment prevents the development of malaria pre-erythrocytic stages. This inhibitory effect however varies with the infecting parasite species and with the nature and origin of the cytokine and hepatocytes. Inhibition was only observed for all parasite species tested when hepatocytes were pre-incubated 24 or 48 hrs before infection and activity was directed only against early hepatic parasite. We further showed that TNF-α inhibition was mediated by a soluble factor present in the supernatant of TNF-α stimulated hepatocytes but it was not related to NO or ROI. Treatment TNF-α prevents the development of human and rodent malaria pre-erythrocytic stages through the activity of a mediator that remains to be identified. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment TNF-α prevents the development of human and rodent malaria pre-erythrocytic stages through the activity of a mediator that remains to be identified. However, the nature of the cytokine-host cell-parasite combination must be carefully considered for extrapolation to the human infection.

  12. Transcriptional changes common to human cocaine, cannabis and phencyclidine abuse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elin Lehrmann

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A major goal of drug abuse research is to identify and understand drug-induced changes in brain function that are common to many or all drugs of abuse. As these may underlie drug dependence and addiction, the purpose of the present study was to examine if different drugs of abuse effect changes in gene expression that converge in common molecular pathways. Microarray analysis was employed to assay brain gene expression in postmortem anterior prefrontal cortex (aPFC from 42 human cocaine, cannabis and/or phencyclidine abuse cases and 30 control cases, which were characterized by toxicology and drug abuse history. Common transcriptional changes were demonstrated for a majority of drug abuse cases (N = 34, representing a number of consistently changed functional classes: Calmodulin-related transcripts (CALM1, CALM2, CAMK2B were decreased, while transcripts related to cholesterol biosynthesis and trafficking (FDFT1, APOL2, SCARB1, and Golgi/endoplasmic reticulum (ER functions (SEMA3B, GCC1 were all increased. Quantitative PCR validated decreases in calmodulin 2 (CALM2 mRNA and increases in apolipoprotein L, 2 (APOL2 and semaphorin 3B (SEMA3B mRNA for individual cases. A comparison between control cases with and without cardiovascular disease and elevated body mass index indicated that these changes were not due to general cellular and metabolic stress, but appeared specific to the use of drugs. Therefore, humans who abused cocaine, cannabis and/or phencyclidine share a decrease in transcription of calmodulin-related genes and increased transcription related to lipid/cholesterol and Golgi/ER function. These changes represent common molecular features of drug abuse, which may underlie changes in synaptic function and plasticity that could have important ramifications for decision-making capabilities in drug abusers.

  13. Hepatic Stellate Cell-Derived Microvesicles Prevent Hepatocytes from Injury Induced by APAP/H2O2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renwei Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs, previously described for liver-specific mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, appear to contribute to liver regeneration. Microvesicles (MVs are nanoscale membrane fragments, which can regulate target cell function by transferring contents from their parent cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of HSC-derived MVs on xenobiotic-induced liver injury. Rat and human hepatocytes, BRL-3A and HL-7702, were used to build hepatocytes injury models by n-acetyl-p-aminophenol n-(APAP or H2O2 treatment. MVs were prepared from human and rat HSCs, LX-2, and HST-T6 and, respectively, added to injured BRL-3A and HL-7702 hepatocytes. MTT assay was utilized to determine cell proliferation. Cell apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry and hoechst33258 staining. Western blot was used for analyzing the expression of activated caspase-3. Liver injury indicators, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH in culture medium were also assessed. Results showed that (1 HSC-MVs derived from LX-2 and HST-T6 were positive to CD90 and annexin V surface markers; (2 HSC-MVs dose-dependently improved the viability of hepatocytes in both injury models; (3 HSC-MVs dose-dependently inhibited the APAP/H2O2 induced hepatocytes apoptosis and activated caspase-3 expression and leakage of LDH, ALT, and AST. Our results demonstrate that HSC-derived MVs protect hepatocytes from toxicant-induced injury.

  14. Functional polymer-dependent 3D culture accelerates the differentiation of HepaRG cells into mature hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Yichiro; Kawai, Kenji; Kanaki, Tatsuro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Chesné, Christophe; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane; Suemizu, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    The hepatoma-derived cell line HepaRG is regarded as an in vitro model of drug metabolism because fully differentiated HepaRG cells demonstrate functional metabolic responses comparable to those of primary human hepatocytes. Recently, it was demonstrated that the 3D culture of HepaRG cells enhanced their metabolic functions and toxicological responses. We approached the mechanisms underlying these enhancement effects. We compared 2D-cultured HepaRG cells with 3D-cultured HepaRG spheroids in the gene expression patterns and the metabolic functions. In the present study, we performed 3D culture of HepaRG cells using functional polymers (FP). To reveal the in vivo differentiation ability, we transplanted the 3D-cultured HepaRG spheroids into TK-NOG mice. A comparison between 2D and 3D cultures revealed that 3D-cultured HepaRG spheroids demonstrated reductions in bile duct marker expression, accelerated expression of cytochrome P450 3A4, and increases in the ratio of albumin-expressing hepatocytes. Furthermore, catalytic activities of cytochrome P450 3A4 were modified by omeprazole and rifampicin in the 3D-cultured HepaRG spheroids. Transplantation analysis revealed that 3D-cultured HepaRG spheroids formed hepatocyte-like colonies rather than cholangiocytes in vivo. Our results indicated that the enhancement of hepatic functions in 3D-cultured HepaRG cells was induced by selective hepatocyte differentiation and accelerated hepatocyte maturation. HepaRG spheroids reproduced the metabolic responses of human hepatocytes. Therefore, FP-dependent 3D-cultured HepaRG cells may serve as an excellent in vitro model for evaluating the hepatic metabolism and toxicity. © 2016 The Authors. Hepatology Research published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japan Society of Hepatology.

  15. GLP-1 analogs reduce hepatocyte steatosis and improve survival by enhancing the unfolded protein response and promoting macroautophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shvetank Sharma

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a known outcome of hepatosteatosis. Free fatty acids (FFA induce the unfolded protein response (UPR or endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress that may induce apoptosis. Recent data indicate ER stress to be a major player in the progression of fatty liver to more aggressive lesions. Autophagy on the other hand has been demonstrated to be protective against ER stress-induced cell death. We hypothesized that exendin-4 (GLP-1 analog treatment of fat loaded hepatocytes can reduce steatosis by autophagy which leads to reduced ER stress-related hepatocyte apoptosis.Primary human hepatocytes were loaded with saturated, cis- and trans-unsaturated fatty acids (palmitic, oleic and elaidic acid respectively. Steatosis, induced with all three fatty acids, was significantly resolved after exendin-4 treatment. Exendin-4 sustained levels of GRP78 expression in fat-loaded cells when compared to untreated fat-loaded cells alone. In contrast, CHOP (C/EBP homologous protein; the penultimate protein that leads to ER stress-related cell death was significantly decreased by exendin-4 in hepatocytes loaded with fatty acids. Finally, exendin-4 in fat loaded hepatocytes clearly promoted gene products associated with macroautophagy as measured by enhanced production of both Beclin-1 and LC3B-II, markers for autophagy; and visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Similar observations were made in mouse liver lysates after mice were fed with high fat high fructose diet and treated with a long acting GLP-1 receptor agonist, liraglutide.GLP-1 proteins appear to protect hepatocytes from fatty acid-related death by prohibition of a dysfunctional ER stress response; and reduce fatty acid accumulation, by activation of both macro-and chaperone-mediated autophagy. These findings provide a novel role for GLP-1 proteins in halting the progression of more aggressive lesions from underlying steatosis in humans afflicted with NAFLD.

  16. The extracellular redox state modulates mitochondrial function, gluconeogenesis, and glycogen synthesis in murine hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Nocito

    Full Text Available Circulating redox state changes, determined by the ratio of reduced/oxidized pairs of different metabolites, have been associated with metabolic diseases. However, the pathogenic contribution of these changes and whether they modulate normal tissue function is unclear. As alterations in hepatic gluconeogenesis and glycogen metabolism are hallmarks that characterize insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, we tested whether imposed changes in the extracellular redox state could modulate these processes. Thus, primary hepatocytes were treated with different ratios of the following physiological extracellular redox couples: β-hydroxybutyrate (βOHB/acetoacetate (Acoc, reduced glutathione (GSH/oxidized glutathione (GSSG, and cysteine/cystine. Exposure to a more oxidized ratio via extracellular βOHB/Acoc, GSH/GSSG, and cysteine/cystine in hepatocytes from fed mice increased intracellular hydrogen peroxide without causing oxidative damage. On the other hand, addition of more reduced ratios of extracellular βOHB/Acoc led to increased NAD(PH and maximal mitochondrial respiratory capacity in hepatocytes. Greater βOHB/Acoc ratios were also associated with decreased β-oxidation, as expected with enhanced lipogenesis. In hepatocytes from fasted mice, a more extracellular reduced state of βOHB/Acoc led to increased alanine-stimulated gluconeogenesis and enhanced glycogen synthesis capacity from added glucose. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that the extracellular redox state regulates the major metabolic functions of the liver and involves changes in intracellular NADH, hydrogen peroxide, and mitochondrial respiration. Because redox state in the blood can be communicated to all metabolically sensitive tissues, this work confirms the hypothesis that circulating redox state may be an important regulator of whole body metabolism and contribute to alterations associated with metabolic diseases.

  17. The influence of hypoxia-hypercapnia on the structural state of cellular membranes of rat hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Світлана Володимирівна Хижняк

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The structural and dynamic state of cellular membranes of rat hepatocytes under the influence of hypoxia, hypercapnia and hypothermia factors (artificial hypobiosis was investigated using the method of fluorescent probes. The diverse changes of the structure and physical properties of these membranes (especially of inner mitochondrial membrane were shown. The structural reorganization of the membrane surface area, the decrease of the lipid structural orderliness and conformational modification of proteins occur during artificial hypobiosis

  18. Human Interventions versus Climate Change: Impacts on Water Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, M. R.; Acharya, K.

    2009-12-01

    Water availability and occurrence of water induced disasters are impacted by both natural and human centric drivers. Climate change is considered to be one of the noted drivers in this regard. Human interventions through land use/land cover change, stream and floodplain regulations via dams, weirs, and embankments could be other equally important group of drivers. Unlike developed countries that have both resources and capabilities to adapt and mitigate the impact of such drivers, developing countries are increasingly at more risk. Identifying roles of such drivers are fundamental to the formulation of any adaptation and mitigation plans for their impacts for developing countries. In this study, we present a few examples from three regions of Nepal- a developing country in South Asia generally considered as a water rich country. Through results of modeling and statistical analyses, we show which driver is in control in different watersheds. Preliminary results show that climate change impact appears to be more prominent in large snow-fed river basins. In the smaller non-snow-fed watersheds originating from the middle hill, the impacts are not explicit despite perception of local people about changes in the water availability. In the southern belt bordering India, the impacts of river regulation on downstream areas are found to be the principal cause of flooding/inundation.

  19. Climate change may affect human migration in Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakinuma, K.; Puma, M. J.; Kanae, S.

    2016-12-01

    Assessments of risks to climate changes are one of the most important issues in the world. It has become apparent that migration has a central role in adaptation measures for climate changes. Migration creates risk as well as benefits for migrants and sending and receiving regions. However, multiple drivers affect migration and it is difficult to estimate patterns of human migration under climate changes. Here we examined effects of climatic factors (such as temperature and precipitation in summer and winter season) on peoples' migration in Mongolia. Mongolia, where is located in central Asia, has a long history of pastoralism. There are concerned the increase of temperature and the decrease of precipitation in the future. We used migration data and climate data for all of prefectures during 1983-2015. We demonstrated generalized linear model and used migration data as a response variable, climate data as explanatory variables. As a result, some climatic conditions (few summer precipitation and hot temperature) affected people's migration at western and southern part of Mongolia. These areas were reported that heat waves have been increased since 1990. Such climatic conditions may become trigger to human migration. We showed empirical evidences that climatic factors may affect migration in some regions. These results suggested that future climate changes may cause people's migration in Mongolia.

  20. Catecholamine responses to changes in posture during human pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, P G; Gerrard, J; Lind, T

    1985-06-01

    Human pregnancy may induce changes in the sensitivity of the cardiovascular system to endogenous catecholamines. This was investigated in multigravid women with little likelihood of unsuspected vascular disease. The responses of blood pressure, pulse rate, plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline to a change in posture from semi-recumbency to standing were assessed in six normotensive women at 36 weeks gestation and in six non-pregnant control subjects. Standing for 10 min caused a surge in blood pressure, pulse rate and plasma noradrenaline in non-pregnant women. The pregnant women, whose basal levels of noradrenaline were higher than those in non-pregnant women, showed a slower noradrenergic response to postural change, and this response had less effect upon the cardiovascular indices. Blood pressure dropped immediately on standing and pulse rate remained unaffected throughout. It is suggested that some women may maintain a non-pregnant level of pressor sensitivity during pregnancy and thereby become hypertensive.

  1. Recovery of important physiological functions in 3D culture of immortal hepatocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wrzesinski, Krzysztof; Fey, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    to grow human liver cells in ‘3 dimensional’ cultures so that they behave very similar to the liver in our bodies. By growing the immortal hepatocytes in specially designed bioreactors they form small pieces of ‘pseudotissue’ which exhibit several of the functions seen in the adult liver. We have grown......It is widely expected that cells grown in 3D environments (in suspension, on scaffolds etc.) will be superior to growing cells in classical 2D culture flasks. These expectations include the belief that cells grown in 3D culture will possess physiological characteristics that resemble more closely...... and glycogen granules. In other words, the cells grown in the classical 2D growth conditions were proliferating rapidly and showing little sign of the differentiated phenotype that hepatocytes in liver tissue show. Conversely the same cells grown as spheroids were proliferating very slowly but were...

  2. Emergence of hepatitis C virus NS5A L31V plus Y93H variant upon treatment failure of daclatasvir and asunaprevir is relatively resistant to ledipasvir and NS5B polymerase nucleotide inhibitor GS-558093 in human hepatocyte chimeric mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Yugo; Hikita, Hayato; Tatsumi, Tomohide; Nakabori, Tasuku; Saito, Yoshinobu; Morishita, Naoki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Nawa, Takatoshi; Oze, Tsugiko; Sakamori, Ryotaro; Yakushijin, Takayuki; Hiramatsu, Naoki; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Takehara, Tetsuo

    2015-11-01

    Resistance-associated variants (RAVs) emerge at multiple positions spanning hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3/4A and NS5A regions upon failure of asunaprevir/daclatasvir combination therapy. It has not been determined whether the emergence of such RAVs have an impact on re-treatment by a combination of ledipasvir and sofosbuvir, a potent regimen for HCV genotype 1 infection. TK-NOG human hepatocyte chimeric mice were inoculated with sera from a patient with treatment failure of asunaprevir/daclatasvir therapy. They developed persistent HCV infection with triple variants of NS3/4A D168V, NS5A L31V plus Y93H. Administration of ledipasvir/GS-558093 (a NS5B nucleotide analog) in these mice failed to achieve end-of-treatment response or sustained virologic response, which was in sharp contrast to the results in mice with wild-type virus infection. The administration of telaprevir/GS-558093 successfully achieved it in those mice. Treatment failure with asunaprevir/daclatasvir may limit further treatment options. This population may represent a growing unmet medical need.

  3. Isolation and Primary Culture of Rat Hepatocytes Using Kiwifruit Actinidin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Shirvani Farsani

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Isolation of cells from different tissues rely on proteolytic enzymes mainly collagenases that selectively digest collagen fibers of extra-cellular matrix. It is important to find new and proper collagenases from plant sources. In the present research actinidin, a cysteine protease abundant in Kiwifruit, was used to isolate and culture of rat hepatocytes. Materials & Methods: Different concentrations of actinidin was used to isolate rat hepatocytes by one or two-step perfusion method. The viability of the separated cells was examined by the trypan blue test. The isolated rat hepatocytes were cultured on collagen coated plates in William´s E medium. The morphology of hepatocytes was examined microscopically after staining with the Papanicolaou method.Results: Actinidin in the concentration of 0.4 mg/ml in two-step perfusion method properly isolated hepatocytes from rat liver. The viability of isolated hepatocytes that successfully cultured in collagen coated plates was 90-95 percent.Conclusion: These results showed that actinidin is a proper protease for isolation of hepatocytes. In addition, purification of this enzyme is simpler than the collagenases.

  4. [The influence of finely-ground vivarium feed on structural and functional condition of the liver hepatocytes in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, T I; Khaĭrullin, R M; Sych, V F; Tsyganova, N A

    2010-01-01

    It was determined that a long-lasting consumption of a finely-growing feed vivarium even in the early postnatal period (60 days) causes certain changes in liver hepatocytes in rats. There takes place nucleous area and cell cytoplasm diminishing, accompanied by a decrease of albumines' synthesis level. In the later postnatal period (120 days) the hepatocytes' nucleus and cytoplasm area drastically increases, which is accompanied by the increase of albumine content in blood up to reference values. During the following period of the natal development (120-180 days) the levels as on the 128th day of the animals' development. In such a case the nucleous area slightly diminishes.

  5. Hepatitis B Virus Activates Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 Supporting Hepatocyte Survival and Virus ReplicationSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Hösel

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: The human hepatitis B virus (HBV is a major cause of chronic hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma, but molecular mechanisms driving liver disease and carcinogenesis are largely unknown. We therefore studied cellular pathways altered by HBV infection. Methods: We performed gene expression profiling of primary human hepatocytes infected with HBV and proved the results in HBV-replicating cell lines and human liver tissue using real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT3 was examined in HBV-replicating human hepatocytes, HBV-replicating mice, and liver tissue from HBV-infected individuals using Western blotting, STAT3-luciferase reporter assay, and immunohistochemistry. The consequences of STAT3 activation on HBV infection and cell survival were studied by chemical inhibition of STAT3 phosphorylation and small interfering RNA–mediated knockdown of STAT3. Results: Gene expression profiling of HBV-infected primary human hepatocytes detected no interferon response, while genes encoding for acute phase and antiapoptotic proteins were up-regulated. This gene regulation was confirmed in liver tissue samples of patients with chronic HBV infection and in HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma. Pathway analysis revealed activation of STAT3 to be the major regulator. Interleukin-6–dependent and –independent activation of STAT3 was detected in HBV-replicating hepatocytes in cell culture and in vivo. Prevention of STAT3 activation by inhibition of Janus tyrosine kinases as well as small interfering RNA–mediated knockdown of STAT3-induced apoptosis and reduced HBV replication and gene expression. Conclusions: HBV activates STAT3 signaling in hepatocytes to foster its own replication but also to prevent apoptosis of infected cells. This very likely supports HBV-related carcinogenesis. Keywords: Hepatitis B Virus Infection, STAT3 Signaling

  6. Ploidy reductions in murine fusion-derived hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W Duncan

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We previously showed that fusion between hepatocytes lacking a crucial liver enzyme, fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH, and wild-type blood cells resulted in hepatocyte reprogramming. FAH expression was restored in hybrid hepatocytes and, upon in vivo expansion, ameliorated the effects of FAH deficiency. Here, we show that fusion-derived polyploid hepatocytes can undergo ploidy reductions to generate daughter cells with one-half chromosomal content. Fusion hybrids are, by definition, at least tetraploid. We demonstrate reduction to diploid chromosome content by multiple methods. First, cytogenetic analysis of fusion-derived hepatocytes reveals a population of diploid cells. Secondly, we demonstrate marker segregation using ss-galactosidase and the Y-chromosome. Approximately 2-5% of fusion-derived FAH-positive nodules were negative for one or more markers, as expected during ploidy reduction. Next, using a reporter system in which ss-galactosidase is expressed exclusively in fusion-derived hepatocytes, we identify a subpopulation of diploid cells expressing ss-galactosidase and FAH. Finally, we track marker segregation specifically in fusion-derived hepatocytes with diploid DNA content. Hemizygous markers were lost by >or=50% of Fah-positive cells. Since fusion-derived hepatocytes are minimally tetraploid, the existence of diploid hepatocytes demonstrates that fusion-derived cells can undergo ploidy reduction. Moreover, the high degree of marker loss in diploid daughter cells suggests that chromosomes/markers are lost in a non-random fashion. Thus, we propose that ploidy reductions lead to the generation of genetically diverse daughter cells with about 50% reduction in nuclear content. The generation of such daughter cells increases liver diversity, which may increase the likelihood of oncogenesis.

  7. Flux balance analysis predicts Warburg-like effects of mouse hepatocyte deficient in miR-122a.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Qing Wu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The liver is a vital organ involving in various major metabolic functions in human body. MicroRNA-122 (miR-122 plays an important role in the regulation of liver metabolism, but its intrinsic physiological functions require further clarification. This study integrated the genome-scale metabolic model of hepatocytes and mouse experimental data with germline deletion of Mir122a (Mir122a-/- to infer Warburg-like effects. Elevated expression of MiR-122a target genes in Mir122a-/-mice, especially those encoding for metabolic enzymes, was applied to analyze the flux distributions of the genome-scale metabolic model in normal and deficient states. By definition of the similarity ratio, we compared the flux fold change of the genome-scale metabolic model computational results and metabolomic profiling data measured through a liquid-chromatography with mass spectrometer, respectively, for hepatocytes of 2-month-old mice in normal and deficient states. The Ddc gene demonstrated the highest similarity ratio of 95% to the biological hypothesis of the Warburg effect, and similarity of 75% to the experimental observation. We also used 2, 6, and 11 months of mir-122 knockout mice liver cell to examined the expression pattern of DDC in the knockout mice livers to show upregulated profiles of DDC from the data. Furthermore, through a bioinformatics (LINCS program prediction, BTK inhibitors and withaferin A could downregulate DDC expression, suggesting that such drugs could potentially alter the early events of metabolomics of liver cancer cells.

  8. Ultrastructural Changes in Human Trabecular Meshwork Tissue after Laser Trabeculoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey R. SooHoo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare morphologic changes in human trabecular meshwork (TM after selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT and argon laser trabeculoplasty (ALT. Design. Laboratory evaluation of ex vivo human eye TM after laser trabeculoplasty. Methods. Corneoscleral rims from human cadaver eyes were sectioned and treated with varying powers of either SLT or ALT. Specimens were examined using light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Results. TEM of SLT at all powers resulted in disrupted TM cells with cracked and extracellular pigment granules. SEM of SLT samples treated at high power revealed tissue destruction with scrolling of trabecular beams. SEM of ALT-treated tissue showed increasing destruction with exposure to higher power. The presence or absence of “champagne” bubbles during SLT did not alter the histologic findings. Conclusions. SLT-treated human TM revealed disruption of TM cells with cracked, extracellular pigment granules, particularly at higher treatment powers. Tissue scrolling was noted at very high SLT energy levels. ALT-treated tissue showed significant damage to both the superficial and deeper TM tissues in a dose-dependent fashion. Further studies are needed to guide titration of treatment power to maximize the IOP-lowering effect while minimizing both energy delivered and damage to target tissues.

  9. Age-Dependent Changes in Pb Concentration in Human Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Agnieszka; Wiechuła, Danuta

    2016-09-01

    The result of exposure to Pb is its accumulation in mineralized tissues. In human body, they constitute a reservoir of approx. 90 % of the Pb reserve. The conducted research aimed at determining the accumulation of Pb in calcified tissues of permanent teeth. The concentration of Pb in 390 samples of teeth taken from a selected group of Polish people was determined using the AAS method. Average concentration of Pb in teeth amounted to 14.3 ± 8.18 μg/g, range of changes: 2.21-54.8 μgPb/g. Accumulation of Pb in human body was determined based on changes in Pb concentration in teeth of subjects aged 13-84 years. It was found that in calcified tissues of teeth, the increase in concentration of Pb that occurs with age is a statistically significant process (p = 0.02, the ANOVA Kruskal-Wallis test). It was determined that the annual increase in concentration of Pb in tissues of teeth is approx. 0.1 μg/g. Moreover, a different course of changes in Pb concentration in tissues of teeth in people born in different years was observed. The level of Pb concentration in teeth of the oldest subjects (>60 years) decreased for those born in the 1930s compared to those in the 1950s. Teeth from younger persons (teeth can occur.

  10. Changes in cognitive state alter human functional brain networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malaak Nasser Moussa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of the brain as a whole system can be accomplished using network theory principles. Research has shown that human functional brain networks during a resting state exhibit small-world properties and high degree nodes, or hubs, localized to brain areas consistent with the default mode network (DMN. However, the study of brain networks across different tasks and or cognitive states has been inconclusive. Research in this field is important because the underpinnings of behavioral output are inherently dependent on whether or not brain networks are dynamic. This is the first comprehensive study to evaluate multiple network metrics at a voxel-wise resolution in the human brain at both the whole brain and regional level under various conditions: resting state, visual stimulation, and multisensory (auditory and visual stimulation. Our results show that despite global network stability, functional brain networks exhibit considerable task-induced changes in connectivity, efficiency, and community structure at the regional level.

  11. In a Time of Change: Integrating the Arts and Humanities with Climate Change Science in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, M.; Golux, S.; Franzen, K.

    2011-12-01

    The arts and humanities have a powerful capacity to create lines of communication between the public, policy and scientific spheres. A growing network of visual and performing artists, writers and scientists has been actively working together since 2007 to integrate scientific and artistic perspectives on climate change in interior Alaska. These efforts have involved field workshops and collaborative creative processes culminating in public performances and a visual art exhibit. The most recent multimedia event was entitled In a Time of Change: Envisioning the Future, and challenged artists and scientists to consider future scenarios of climate change. This event included a public performance featuring original theatre, modern dance, Alaska Native Dance, poetry and music that was presented concurrently with an art exhibit featuring original works by 24 Alaskan visual artists. A related effort targeted K12 students, through an early college course entitled Climate Change and Creative Expression, which was offered to high school students at a predominantly Alaska Native charter school and integrated climate change science, creative writing, theatre and dance. Our program at Bonanza Creek Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site is just one of many successful efforts to integrate arts and humanities with science within and beyond the NSF LTER Program. The efforts of various LTER sites to engage the arts and humanities with science, the public and policymakers have successfully generated excitement, facilitated mutual understanding, and promoted meaningful dialogue on issues facing science and society. The future outlook for integration of arts and humanities with science appears promising, with increasing interest from artists, scientists and scientific funding agencies.

  12. Influence of isoniazid on the metabolism of rifampicin on rat hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fasich Fasich

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Research on the influence of isoniazid on rifampicin metabolism using rat hepatocytes has been done. As the system metabolism, hepatocytes suspension was prepared by perfusion in the calcium binding media containing EDTA, citrate and glycine was used. In the experiment, combination of rifampicin and INH on various doses was incubated in those metabolism system at 30oC from 0 and up to 180 minutes duration. Then, analysis was done by thin layer chromathography and densitomeric method for each incubation intervals. Result calculated on the base of variation of rifampicin AUC-value beginning from 0 up to 180 minutes showed that isoniazid with concentration 5 µl, 10 µl, 15 µl, and 20 µl did not influence the metabolism of rifampicin (10 µl/ml as showed by no significance changes of AUC value of rifampicin for α = 0.05.

  13. Seasonal changes in human immune responses to malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L; Theander, T G

    1993-01-01

    Cellular as well as humorol immune responses to malaria antigens fluctuate in time in individuals living in molono-endemic areas, particularly where malaria transmission is seasonal. The most pronounced changes are seen in association with clinical attacks, but osymptomatic infection can also lead...... to apparent immune depression. However, recent data have shown that seasonal variation in cellular immune responses may occur even in the absence of detectable porositaemia. Here, Lars Hviid and Thor G. Theonder review the seasonal variation in human immune responses to malaria, and discuss its possible...... causes and implications....

  14. [Causes of climatic changes and their consequences on human health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuskin, Eugenija; Sarić, Marko; Vadić, Vladimira; Mustajbegović, Jadranka; Doko-Jelinic, Jagoda; Pucarin-Cvetković, Jasna; Milosević, Milan

    2008-07-01

    Environmental disasters are common phenomena caused by human factors. Disaster episodes may be the result of climatic changes such as global warming, which can lead to floods or drought. Greenhouse gases, and especially the ozone, represent a special problem. Atmospheric pollutions are the result of fire, storm dusts, winds, acid rain, etc. Underwater earthquakes very often end in tsunami with waves of up to 30 meters. Disasters described in the territory of Croatia include atmospheric pollutions, fires, floods, and droughts. All disasters affect the health of the population, particularly of the elderly. This most often includes the cardiovascular and respiratory systems, allergic reactions, and carcinogenic effects, resulting in increased mortality.

  15. Statins, PCSK9 inhibitors and cholesterol homeostasis: a view from within the hepatocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sniderman, Allan D; Kiss, Robert Scott; Reid, Thomas; Thanassoulis, George; Watts, Gerald F

    2017-05-01

    Statins and PCSK9 inhibitors dramatically lower plasma LDL levels and dramatically increase LDL receptor number within hepatocyte cell membranes. It seems self-evident that total clearance of LDL particles from plasma and total delivery of cholesterol to the liver must increase in consequence. However, based on the results of stable isotope tracer studies, this analysis demonstrates the contrary to be the case. Statins do not change the production rate of LDL particles. Accordingly, at steady state, the clearance rate cannot change. Because LDL particles contain less cholesterol on statin therapy, the delivery of cholesterol to the liver must, therefore, be reduced. PCSK9 inhibitors reduce the production of LDL particles and this further reduces cholesterol delivery to the liver. With both agents, a larger fraction of a smaller pool is removed per unit time. These findings are inconsistent with the conventional model of cholesterol homeostasis within the liver, but are consistent with a new model of regulation, the multi-channel model, which postulates that different lipoprotein particles enter the hepatocyte by different routes and have different metabolic fates within the hepatocyte. The multi-channel model, but not the conventional model, may explain how statins and PCSK9 inhibitors can produce sustained increases in LDL receptor number. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  16. How Changing Human Lifestyles are Shaping Europe's Regional Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee, L. D.; Lowe, C. D.; Langmead, O.; McQuatters-Gollop, A.; Attrill, M.; Cooper, P.; Gilbert, A.; Knudsen, S.; Garnacho, E.

    2007-05-01

    European society is experiencing unprecedented changes triggered by expansion of the European Union, the fall of Communism, economic growth and the onset of globalisation. Europe's regional seas, the Baltic, Black Sea, Mediterranean and North-East Atlantic (including the North Sea), provide key goods and services to the human population but have suffered from severe degradation in past decades. Their integrity as coupled social and ecological systems depends on how humanity will anticipate potential problems and deal with its ecological footprint in the future. We report the outcome of an EU-funded 15-country, 28 institution project entitled European Lifestyles and Marine Ecosystems (ELME). Our studies were designed to inform new EU policy and legislation that incorporates Ecosystem-Based Management. ELME has modelled the key relationships between economic and social drivers (D), environmental pressures (P) and changes in the state of the environment (S) in Europe's regional seas. We examined four key issues in each sea: habitat change, eutrophication, chemical pollution and fisheries. We developed conceptual models for each regional sea and employed a novel stochastic modelling technique to examine the interrelationship between key components of the conceptual models. We used the models to examine 2-3 decade projections of current trends in D, P and S and how a number of alternative development scenarios might modify these trends. These simulations demonstrate the vulnerability of Europe's seas to human pressure. As affluence increases in countries acceding to the EU, so does the demand for marine goods and services. There are `winners' and `losers' amongst marine species; the winners are often species that are opportunistic invaders or those with low economic value. In the case of eutrophication, semi-enclosed seas such as the Baltic or Black Sea are already affected by the `legacy of the past'; nutrients that have accumulated in soils, ground waters and

  17. Postnatal hyperoxia exposure differentially affects hepatocytes and liver haemopoietic cells in newborn rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guya Diletta Marconi

    Full Text Available Premature newborns are frequently exposed to hyperoxic conditions and experimental data indicate modulation of liver metabolism by hyperoxia in the first postnatal period. Conversely, nothing is known about possible modulation of growth factors and signaling molecules involved in other hyperoxic responses and no data are available about the effects of hyperoxia in postnatal liver haematopoiesis. The aim of the study was to analyse the effects of hyperoxia in the liver tissue (hepatocytes and haemopoietic cells and to investigate possible changes in the expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF, Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9, Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α (HIF-1α, endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS, and Nuclear Factor-kB (NF-kB. Experimental design of the study involved exposure of newborn rats to room air (controls, 60% O2 (moderate hyperoxia, or 95% O2 (severe hyperoxia for the first two postnatal weeks. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses were performed. Severe hyperoxia increased hepatocyte apoptosis and MMP-9 expression and decreased VEGF expression. Reduced content in reticular fibers was found in moderate and severe hyperoxia. Some other changes were specifically produced in hepatocytes by moderate hyperoxia, i.e., upregulation of HIF-1α and downregulation of eNOS and NF-kB. Postnatal severe hyperoxia exposure increased liver haemopoiesis and upregulated the expression of VEGF (both moderate and severe hyperoxia and eNOS (severe hyperoxia in haemopoietic cells. In conclusion, our study showed different effects of hyperoxia on hepatocytes and haemopoietic cells and differential involvement of the above factors. The involvement of VEGF and eNOS in the liver haemopoietic response to hyperoxia may be hypothesized.

  18. Transformational change: creating a safe operating space for humanity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive A. McAlpine

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Many ecologists and environmental scientists witnessing the scale of current environmental change are becoming increasingly alarmed about how humanity is pushing the boundaries of the Earth's systems beyond sustainable levels. The world urgently needs global society to redirect itself toward a more sustainable future: one that moves intergenerational equity and environmental sustainability to the top of the political agenda, and to the core of personal and societal belief systems. Scientific and technological innovations are not enough: the global community, individuals, civil society, corporations, and governments, need to adjust their values and beliefs to one in which sustainability becomes the new global paradigm society. We argue that the solution requires transformational change, driven by a realignment of societal values, where individuals act ethically as an integral part of an interconnected society and biosphere. Transition management provides a framework for achieving transformational change, by giving special attention to reflective learning, interaction, integration, and experimentation at the level of society, thereby identifying the system conditions and type of changes necessary for enabling sustainable transformation.

  19. Human health impacts in a changing South African climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, C Y; Garland, R M; Norval, M; Vogel, C

    2014-08-01

    Climate change is projected to lead to warmer temperatures, especially in southern Africa, where the warming is predicted to be 2°C higher than the global increase. Given the high burden of disease already associated with environmental factors in this region, this temperature increase may lead to grave challenges for human health and quality of life. HIV/AIDS, poverty, food and water insecurity together with inequality and unemployment will further complicate the manner in which we will need to address the challenges of a changing climate. The health impacts are direct, such as increased temperatures leading to heat exhaustion, and indirect, such as likely increases in infectious diseases from contaminated water and changes in the distribution and/or magnitude of vector-borne diseases. The most effective measures for adapting to climate change to ensure healthy populations are to implement basic public health systems and services. These range from a continuous supply of clean water to adequate primary healthcare services. Support for required interventions is required not only from government, but also from healthcare professionals and communities. The need for disease surveillance, data capturing and more focused research is paramount.

  20. IRF-1 promotes liver transplant ischemia/reperfusion injury via hepatocyte IL-15/IL-15Rα production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Shinichiro; Yoshida, Osamu; Dou, Lei; Spadaro, Anthony V.; Isse, Kumiko; Ross, Mark A.; Stolz, Donna B.; Kimura, Shoko; Du, Qiang; Demetris, Anthony J.; Thomson, Angus W.; Geller, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury following liver transplantation (LTx) is an important problem that significantly impacts clinical outcomes. Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) is a nuclear transcription factor that plays a critical role in liver injury. Our objective was to determine the immunomodulatory role of IRF-1 during I/R injury following allogeneic LTx. IRF-1 was induced in liver grafts immediately after reperfusion in both human and mouse LTx. IRF-1 contributed significantly to I/R injury as IRF-1 KO grafts displayed much less damage assessed by serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and histology. In vitro, IRF-1 regulated both constitutive and induced expression of IL-15, as well as IL-15Rα mRNA expression in murine hepatocytes and liver dendritic cells (DC). Specific knockdown of IRF-1 in human primary hepatocytes gave similar results. In addition, we identified hepatocytes as the major producer of soluble IL-15/IL-15Rα complexes in the liver. IRF-1 KO livers had significantly reduced NK, NKT and CD8+T cell numbers, while rIL-15/IL-15Rα restored these immune cells, augmented cytotoxic effector molecules, promoted systemic inflammatory responses, and exacerbated liver injury in IRF-1 KO graft recipients. These results indicate that IRF-1 promotes LTx I/R injury via hepatocyte IL-15/IL-15Rα production and suggest that targeting IRF-1 and IL-15/IL-15Rα may be effective in reducing I/R injury associated with LTx. PMID:25964490

  1. Hepatocyte TRAF3 promotes liver steatosis and systemic insulin resistance through targeting TAK1-dependent signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pi-Xiao; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Luo, Pengcheng; Jiang, Xi; Zhang, Peng; Guo, Junhong; Zhao, Guang-Nian; Zhu, Xueyong; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Sijun; Li, Hongliang

    2016-02-17

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by hepatic steatosis, insulin resistance and a systemic pro-inflammatory response. Here we show that tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) is upregulated in mouse and human livers with hepatic steatosis. After 24 weeks on a high-fat diet (HFD), obesity, insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis and inflammatory responses are significantly ameliorated in liver-specific TRAF3-knockout mice, but exacerbated in transgenic mice overexpressing TRAF3 in hepatocytes. The detrimental effects of TRAF3 on hepatic steatosis and related pathologies are confirmed in ob/ob mice. We further show that in response to HFD, hepatocyte TRAF3 binds to TGF-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) to induce TAK1 ubiquitination and subsequent autophosphorylation, thereby enhancing the activation of downstream IKKβ-NF-κB and MKK-JNK-IRS1(307) signalling cascades, while disrupting AKT-GSK3β/FOXO1 signalling. The TRAF3-TAK1 interaction and TAK1 ubiquitination are indispensable for TRAF3-regulated hepatic steatosis. In conclusion, hepatocyte TRAF3 promotes HFD-induced or genetic hepatic steatosis in a TAK1-dependent manner.

  2. Mutant IDH inhibits HNF-4α to block hepatocyte differentiation and promote biliary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Supriya K; Parachoniak, Christine A; Ghanta, Krishna S; Fitamant, Julien; Ross, Kenneth N; Najem, Mortada S; Gurumurthy, Sushma; Akbay, Esra A; Sia, Daniela; Cornella, Helena; Miltiadous, Oriana; Walesky, Chad; Deshpande, Vikram; Zhu, Andrew X; Hezel, Aram F; Yen, Katharine E; Straley, Kimberly S; Travins, Jeremy; Popovici-Muller, Janeta; Gliser, Camelia; Ferrone, Cristina R; Apte, Udayan; Llovet, Josep M; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Bardeesy, Nabeel

    2014-09-04

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 are among the most common genetic alterations in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IHCC), a deadly liver cancer. Mutant IDH proteins in IHCC and other malignancies acquire an abnormal enzymatic activity allowing them to convert α-ketoglutarate (αKG) to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG), which inhibits the activity of multiple αKG-dependent dioxygenases, and results in alterations in cell differentiation, survival, and extracellular matrix maturation. However, the molecular pathways by which IDH mutations lead to tumour formation remain unclear. Here we show that mutant IDH blocks liver progenitor cells from undergoing hepatocyte differentiation through the production of 2HG and suppression of HNF-4α, a master regulator of hepatocyte identity and quiescence. Correspondingly, genetically engineered mouse models expressing mutant IDH in the adult liver show an aberrant response to hepatic injury, characterized by HNF-4α silencing, impaired hepatocyte differentiation, and markedly elevated levels of cell proliferation. Moreover, IDH and Kras mutations, genetic alterations that co-exist in a subset of human IHCCs, cooperate to drive the expansion of liver progenitor cells, development of premalignant biliary lesions, and progression to metastatic IHCC. These studies provide a functional link between IDH mutations, hepatic cell fate, and IHCC pathogenesis, and present a novel genetically engineered mouse model of IDH-driven malignancy.

  3. Primary liver tumour of intermediate (hepatocyte-bile duct cell) phenotype: a progenitor cell tumour?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robrechts, C; De Vos, R; Van den Heuvel, M; Van Cutsem, E; Van Damme, B; Desmet, V; Roskams, T

    1998-08-01

    A 57-year-old female patient presented with painless obstructive jaundice and mild mesogastric pain; she was in good general condition on admission. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed diffuse tumoral invasion of the liver, suggesting diffuse metastases. A liver biopsy showed a tumour with a trabecular growth pattern, composed of uniform relatively small cells, very suggestive of an endocrine carcinoma. Additional immunohistochemical stains, however, did not show any endocrine differentiation, but showed positivity for both hepatocyte-type cytokeratins (cytokeratin 8 and 18) and bile duct-type cytokeratins (cytokeratin 7 and 19). In addition, parathyroid hormone-related peptide, shown to be a good marker for cholangiocarcinoma, was immunoreactive. Electron microscopy revealed tumour cells with an intermediate phenotype: the cells clearly showed hepatocyte features on one hand and bile duct cell features on the other hand. Nine days after admission, the patient died due to liver failure and hepatic encephalopathy. Autopsy excluded another primary tumour site. Overall, this tumour was a primary liver tumour with an intermediate phenotype and with a very rapid clinical course. The intermediate (between hepatocyte and bile duct cell) phenotype suggests an immature progenitor cell origin, which is concordant with a rapid clinical course. This type of tumour has not been described previously and provides additional evidence for the existence of progenitor cells in human liver.

  4. Cholesterol crystallization within hepatocyte lipid droplets and its role in murine NASH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannou, George N; Subramanian, Savitha; Chait, Alan; Haigh, W Geoffrey; Yeh, Matthew M; Farrell, Geoffrey C; Lee, Sum P; Savard, Christopher

    2017-06-01

    We recently reported that cholesterol crystals form in hepatocyte lipid droplets (LDs) in human and experimental nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Herein, we assigned WT C57BL/6J mice to a high-fat (15%) diet for 6 months, supplemented with 0%, 0.25%, 0.5%, 0.75%, or 1% dietary cholesterol. Increasing dietary cholesterol led to cholesterol loading of the liver, but not of adipose tissue, resulting in fibrosing steatohepatitis at a dietary cholesterol concentration of ≥0.5%, whereas mice on lower-cholesterol diets developed only simple steatosis. Hepatic cholesterol crystals and crown-like structures also developed at a dietary cholesterol concentration ≥0.5%. Crown-like structures consisted of activated Kupffer cells (KCs) staining positive for NLRP3 and activated caspase 1, which surrounded and processed cholesterol crystal-containing remnant LDs of dead hepatocytes. The KCs processed LDs at the center of crown-like structures in the extracellular space by lysosomal enzymes, ultimately transforming into lipid-laden foam cells. When HepG2 cells were exposed to LDL cholesterol, they developed cholesterol crystals in LD membranes, which caused activation of THP1 cells (macrophages) grown in coculture; upregulation of TNF-alpha , NLRP3, and interleukin 1beta ( IL1β ) mRNA; and secretion of IL-1beta. In conclusion, cholesterol crystals form on the LD membrane of hepatocytes and cause activation and cholesterol loading of KCs that surround and process these LDs by lysosomal enzymes.

  5. Emergence of human resilience in coastal ecosystems under environmental change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilufar Matin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Resilience has been studied in a number of disciplines, predominantly in psychosocial and ecological sciences. Although there are striking similarities in their approaches, the psychosocial tradition has centered on the family and its immediate surroundings, whereas the social-ecological approach has focused on macrosystems that stop at the family level. Recently, the need for bridging these gaps has been echoed by researchers from both these traditions, particularly for promoting resilience of individuals and their wider environment in the context of natural disasters and climate change. However, a new synthesis of social-ecological and behavioral theories integrating multiple dynamic systems that interact across levels is strikingly rare. We addressed some of these issues in the context of complex coastal ecosystems in the Sundarbans region in southwest Bangladesh soon after the Cyclone Aila, which hit the coast in May 2009. The devastation that followed tested the endurance and resilience of people and nature alike. We used an integrated method that combined Antonovsky's sense of coherence scale with narrative inquiry for assessing human resilience. The quantitative analysis was able to address gender, educational, and livelihood dimensions of individual resilience. Life history narratives were found particularly useful in bringing out the underlying contexts and processes that embody individual social-ecological interactions that influence the construct of human resilience. These exercises show that the emergence of human resilience must be understood as a holistic and dynamic process because the variables that contribute to its emergence interact in complex ways.

  6. Gadoxetate-enhanced MR imaging and compartmental modelling to assess hepatocyte bidirectional transport function in rats with advanced liver fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraudeau, Celine; Leporq, Benjamin; Doblas, Sabrina [University Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Hopital Beaujon, Laboratory of Imaging Biomarkers, UMR1149 Inserm, Clichy (France); Lagadec, Matthieu; Daire, Jean-Luc; Van Beers, Bernard E. [University Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Hopital Beaujon, Laboratory of Imaging Biomarkers, UMR1149 Inserm, Clichy (France); Beaujon University Hospital Paris Nord, Department of Radiology, Clichy (France); Pastor, Catherine M. [University Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Hopital Beaujon, Laboratory of Imaging Biomarkers, UMR1149 Inserm, Clichy (France); Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Departement d' Imagerie et des Sciences de l' Information Medicale, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2017-05-15

    Changes in the expression of hepatocyte membrane transporters in advanced fibrosis decrease the hepatic transport function of organic anions. The aim of our study was to assess if these changes can be evaluated with pharmacokinetic analysis of the hepatobiliary transport of the MR contrast agent gadoxetate. Dynamic gadoxetate-enhanced MRI was performed in 17 rats with advanced fibrosis and 8 normal rats. After deconvolution, hepatocyte three-compartmental analysis was performed to calculate the hepatocyte influx, biliary efflux and sinusoidal backflux rates. The expression of Oatp1a1, Mrp2 and Mrp3 organic anion membrane transporters was assessed with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In the rats with advanced fibrosis, the influx and efflux rates of gadoxetate decreased and the backflux rate increased significantly (p = 0.003, 0.041 and 0.010, respectively). Significant correlations were found between influx and Oatp1a1 expression (r = 0.78, p < 0.001), biliary efflux and Mrp2 (r = 0.50, p = 0.016) and sinusoidal backflux and Mrp3 (r = 0.61, p = 0.002). These results show that changes in the bidirectional organic anion hepatocyte transport function in rats with advanced liver fibrosis can be assessed with compartmental analysis of gadoxetate-enhanced MRI. (orig.)

  7. Correction: Magnetic Cell Labeling of Primary and Stem Cell-Derived Pig Hepatocytes for MRI-Based Cell Tracking of Hepatocyte Transplantation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dwayne R Roach; Wesley M Garrett; Glenn Welch; Dorela D Shuboni-Mulligan; Thomas J Caperna; Neil C Talbot; Erik M Shapiro

    2017-01-01

    Roach DR, Garrett WM, Welch G, Caperna TJ, Talbot NC, Shapiro EM (2015) Magnetic Cell Labeling of Primary and Stem Cell-Derived Pig Hepatocytes for MRI-Based Cell Tracking of Hepatocyte Transplantation. (2017) Correction...

  8. Comparative Transcriptomic Analysis of Primary Duck Hepatocytes Provides Insight into Differential Susceptibility to DHBV Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Yan

    Full Text Available Primary duck hepatocytes (PDH displays differential susceptibility to duck hepatitis B virus when maintained in the media supplemented with fetal bovine serum or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO which has been widely used for the maintenance of hepatocytes, and prolonging susceptibility to hepadnavirus. However the mechanism underlying maintenance of susceptibility to hepadnavirus by DMSO treatment remains unclear. In this study, a global transcriptome analysis of PDHs under different culture conditions was conducted for investigating the effects of DMSO on maintenance of susceptibility of PDH to DHBV in vitro. The 384 differential expressed genes (DEGs were identified by comparisons between each library pair (PDHs cultured with or without DMSO or fresh isolated PDH. We analyzed canonical pathways in which the DEGs were enriched in Hepatic Fibrosis / Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation, Bile Acid Biosynthesis and Tight Junction signaling. After re-annotation against human genome data, the 384 DEGs were pooled together with proteins belonging to hepatitis B pathway to construct a protein-protein interaction network. The combination of decreased expression of liver-specific genes (CYP3A4, CYP1E1, CFI, RELN and GSTA1 et al with increased expression of hepatocyte-dedifferentiation-associated genes (PLA2G4A and PLCG1 suggested that in vitro culture conditions results in the fading of hepatocyte phenotype in PDHs. The expression of seven DEGs associated with tight junction formation (JAM3, PPP2R2B, PRKAR1B, PPP2R2C, MAGI2, ACTA2 and ACTG2 was up-regulated after short-term culture in vitro, which was attenuated in the presence of DMSO. Those results could shed light on DHBV infection associated molecular events affected by DMSO.

  9. alpha-Amanitin induced apoptosis in primary cultured dog hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Szelag

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Amatoxin poisoning is caused by mushroom species belonging to the genera Amanita, Galerina and Lepiota with the majority of lethal mushroom exposures attributable to Amanita phalloides. High mortality rate in intoxications with these mushrooms is principally a result of the acute liver failure following significant hepatocyte damage due to hepatocellular uptake of amatoxins. A wide variety of amatoxins have been isolated; however, alpha-amanitin (alpha-AMA appears to be the primary toxin. Studies in vitro and in vivo suggest that alpha-AMA does not only cause hepatocyte necrosis, but also may lead to apoptotic cell death. The objective of this study was to evaluate the complex hepatocyte apoptosis in alpha-AMA cytotoxicity. All experiments were performed on primary cultured canine hepatocytes. The cells were incubated for 12 h with alpha-AMA at a final concentration of 1, 5, 10 and 20 microM. Viability test (MTT assay, apoptosis evaluation (TUNEL reaction, detection of DNA laddering and electron microscopy were performed at 6 and 12 h of exposure to alpha-AMA. There was a clear correlation between hepatocyte viability, concentration of alpha-AMA and time of exposure to this toxin. The decline in cultured dog hepatocyte viability during the exposure to alpha-AMA is most likely preceded by enhanced cellular apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that apoptosis might contribute to pathogenesis of the severe liver injury in the course of amanitin intoxication, particularly during the early phase of poisoning.

  10. Biomechanics and functionality of hepatocytes in liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shan; Song, Zhenyuan; Cotler, Scott J; Cho, Michael

    2014-06-27

    Cirrhosis is a life-threatening condition that is generally attributed to overproduction of collagen fibers in the extracellular matrix that mechanically stiffens the liver. Chronic liver injury due to causes including viral hepatitis, inherited and metabolic liver diseases and external factors such as alcohol abuse can result in the development of cirrhosis. Progression of cirrhosis leads to hepatocellular dysfunction. While extensive studies to understand the complexity underlying liver fibrosis have led to potential application of anti-fibrotic drugs, no such FDA-approved drugs are currently available. Additional studies of hepatic fibrogenesis and cirrhosis primarily have focused on the extracellular matrix, while hepatocyte biomechanics has received limited attention. The role of hepatocyte biomechanics in liver cirrhosis remains elusive, and how the cell stiffness is correlated with biological functions of hepatocytes is also unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that the biomechanical properties of hepatocytes are correlated with their functions (e.g., glucose metabolism), and that hepatic dysfunction can be restored through modulation of the cellular biomechanics. Furthermore, our results indicate the hepatocyte functionality appears to be regulated through a crosstalk between the Rho and Akt signaling. These novel findings may lead to biomechanical intervention of hepatocytes and the development of innovative tissue engineering for clinical treatment to target liver cells rather than exclusively focusing on the extracellular matrix alone in liver cirrhosis. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Climate change, humans, and the extinction of the woolly mammoth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Nogués-Bravo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Woolly mammoths inhabited Eurasia and North America from late Middle Pleistocene (300 ky BP [300,000 years before present], surviving through different climatic cycles until they vanished in the Holocene (3.6 ky BP. The debate about why the Late Quaternary extinctions occurred has centred upon environmental and human-induced effects, or a combination of both. However, testing these two hypotheses-climatic and anthropogenic-has been hampered by the difficulty of generating quantitative estimates of the relationship between the contraction of the mammoth's geographical range and each of the two hypotheses. We combined climate envelope models and a population model with explicit treatment of woolly mammoth-human interactions to measure the extent to which a combination of climate changes and increased human pressures might have led to the extinction of the species in Eurasia. Climate conditions for woolly mammoths were measured across different time periods: 126 ky BP, 42 ky BP, 30 ky BP, 21 ky BP, and 6 ky BP. We show that suitable climate conditions for the mammoth reduced drastically between the Late Pleistocene and the Holocene, and 90% of its geographical range disappeared between 42 ky BP and 6 ky BP, with the remaining suitable areas in the mid-Holocene being mainly restricted to Arctic Siberia, which is where the latest records of woolly mammoths in continental Asia have been found. Results of the population models also show that the collapse of the climatic niche of the mammoth caused a significant drop in their population size, making woolly mammoths more vulnerable to the increasing hunting pressure from human populations. The coincidence of the disappearance of climatically suitable areas for woolly mammoths and the increase in anthropogenic impacts in the Holocene, the coup de grâce, likely set the place and time for the extinction of the woolly mammoth.

  12. Climate Change, Humans, and the Extinction of the Woolly Mammoth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogués-Bravo, David; Rodríguez, Jesús; Hortal, Joaquín; Batra, Persaram; Araújo, Miguel B

    2008-01-01

    Woolly mammoths inhabited Eurasia and North America from late Middle Pleistocene (300 ky BP [300,000 years before present]), surviving through different climatic cycles until they vanished in the Holocene (3.6 ky BP). The debate about why the Late Quaternary extinctions occurred has centred upon environmental and human-induced effects, or a combination of both. However, testing these two hypotheses—climatic and anthropogenic—has been hampered by the difficulty of generating quantitative estimates of the relationship between the contraction of the mammoth's geographical range and each of the two hypotheses. We combined climate envelope models and a population model with explicit treatment of woolly mammoth–human interactions to measure the extent to which a combination of climate changes and increased human pressures might have led to the extinction of the species in Eurasia. Climate conditions for woolly mammoths were measured across different time periods: 126 ky BP, 42 ky BP, 30 ky BP, 21 ky BP, and 6 ky BP. We show that suitable climate conditions for the mammoth reduced drastically between the Late Pleistocene and the Holocene, and 90% of its geographical range disappeared between 42 ky BP and 6 ky BP, with the remaining suitable areas in the mid-Holocene being mainly restricted to Arctic Siberia, which is where the latest records of woolly mammoths in continental Asia have been found. Results of the population models also show that the collapse of the climatic niche of the mammoth caused a significant drop in their population size, making woolly mammoths more vulnerable to the increasing hunting pressure from human populations. The coincidence of the disappearance of climatically suitable areas for woolly mammoths and the increase in anthropogenic impacts in the Holocene, the coup de grâce, likely set the place and time for the extinction of the woolly mammoth. PMID:18384234

  13. Changes in spinal inhibitory networks induced by furosemide in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klomjai, Wanalee; Lackmy-Vallée, Alexandra; Katz, Rose; Bussel, Bernard; Bensmail, Djamel; Lamy, Jean-Charles; Roche, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    During neural development in animals, GABAergic and glycinergic neurons are first excitatory, and then become inhibitory in the mature state. This developmental shift is due mainly to strong expression of the cation-chloride K–Cl cotransporter 2 (KCC2) and down-regulation of Na–K–Cl cotransporter 1 (NKCC1) during maturation. The down-regulation of co-transporter KCC2 after spinal cord transection in animals leads to the depolarising (excitatory) action of GABA and glycine and thus results in a reduction of inhibitory synaptic efficiency. Furosemide, a loop diuretic, has been shown to selectively and reversibly block inhibitory postsynaptic potentials without affecting excitatory postsynaptic potentials in animal spinal neurons. Moreover, this diuretic has been also demonstrated to block the cation-chloride co-transporters. Here, we used furosemide to demonstrate changes in spinal inhibitory networks in healthy human subjects. Non-invasive electrophysiological techniques were used to assess presynaptic inhibition, postsynaptic inhibition and the efficacy of synaptic transmission between muscle afferent terminals and soleus motoneurons in the spinal cord. Orally administered furosemide, at doses commonly used in the clinic (40 mg), significantly reduced spinal inhibitory interneuronal activity for at least 70 min from intake compared to control experiments in the same subjects while no changes were observed in the efficacy of synaptic transmission between muscle afferent terminals and soleus motoneurons. The reduction of inhibition was dose-dependent. Our results provide indirect evidence that reversible changes in the cation-chloride transport system induce modulations of inhibitory neuronal activity at spinal cord level in humans. PMID:24835171

  14. Mechanisms of Hepatocyte Growth Factor Activation in Cancer Tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, Makiko; Kataoka, Hiroaki, E-mail: mejina@med.miyazaki-u.ac.jp [Section of Oncopathology and Regenerative Biology, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan)

    2014-09-29

    Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) plays critical roles in cancer progression through its specific receptor, MET. HGF/SF is usually synthesized and secreted as an inactive proform (pro-HGF/SF) by stromal cells, such as fibroblasts. Several serine proteases are reported to convert pro-HGF/SF to mature HGF/SF and among these, HGF activator (HGFA) and matriptase are the most potent activators. Increased activities of both proteases have been observed in various cancers. HGFA is synthesized mainly by the liver and secreted as an inactive pro-form. In cancer tissues, pro-HGFA is likely activated by thrombin and/or human kallikrein 1-related peptidase (KLK)-4 and KLK-5. Matriptase is a type II transmembrane serine protease that is expressed by most epithelial cells and is also synthesized as an inactive zymogen. Matriptase activation is likely to be mediated by autoactivation or by other trypsin-like proteases. Recent studies revealed that matriptase autoactivation is promoted by an acidic environment. Given the mildly acidic extracellular environment of solid tumors, matriptase activation may, thus, be accelerated in the tumor microenvironment. HGFA and matriptase activities are regulated by HGFA inhibitor (HAI)-1 (HAI-1) and/or HAI-2 in the pericellular microenvironment. HAIs may have an important role in cancer cell biology by regulating HGF/SF-activating proteases.

  15. Human behaviour towards climatic change during the 4th millennium BC in the Swiss Alpine forelands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karg, Sabine

    Human behaviour towards climatic change during the 4th millennium BC in the Swiss Alpine forelands.......Human behaviour towards climatic change during the 4th millennium BC in the Swiss Alpine forelands....

  16. Force spectroscopy of hepatocytic extracellular matrix components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongsunthon, R., E-mail: YongsuntR@Corning.com [Corning Incorporated, SP-FR-01, R1S32D, Corning, NY 14831 (United States); Baker, W.A.; Bryhan, M.D.; Baker, D.E.; Chang, T.; Petzold, O.N.; Walczak, W.J.; Liu, J.; Faris, R.A.; Senaratne, W.; Seeley, L.A.; Youngman, R.E. [Corning Incorporated, SP-FR-01, R1S32D, Corning, NY 14831 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    We present atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy data of live hepatocytes (HEPG2/C3A liver cell line) grown in Eagle's Minimum Essential Medium, a complex solution of salts and amino acids commonly used for cell culture. Contact-mode imaging and force spectroscopy of this system allowed correlation of cell morphology and extracellular matrix (ECM) properties with substrate properties. Force spectroscopy analysis of cellular 'footprints' indicated that the cells secrete large polymers (e.g., 3.5 {mu}m contour length and estimated MW 1000 kDa) onto their substrate surface. Although definitive identification of the polymers has not yet been achieved, fluorescent-labeled antibody staining has specified the presence of ECM proteins such as collagen and laminin in the cellular footprints. The stretched polymers appear to be much larger than single molecules of known ECM components, such as collagen and heparan sulfate proteoglycan, thus suggesting that the cells create larger entangled, macromolecular structures from smaller components. There is strong evidence which suggests that the composition of the ECM is greatly influenced by the hydrophobicity of the substrate surface, with preferential production and/or adsorption of larger macromolecules on hydrophobic surfaces.

  17. Antiglucocorticoid activity of hepatocyte nuclear factor-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierreux, C E; Stafford, J; Demonte, D; Scott, D K; Vandenhaute, J; O'Brien, R M; Granner, D K; Rousseau, G G; Lemaigre, F P

    1999-08-03

    Glucocorticoids exert their effects on gene transcription through ubiquitous receptors that bind to regulatory sequences present in many genes. These glucocorticoid receptors are present in all cell types, yet glucocorticoid action is controlled in a tissue-specific way. One mechanism for this control relies on tissue-specific transcriptional activators that bind in the vicinity of the glucocorticoid receptor and are required for receptor action. We now describe a gene-specific and tissue-specific inhibitory mechanism through which glucocorticoid action is repressed by a tissue-restricted transcription factor, hepatocyte nuclear factor-6 (HNF-6). HNF-6 inhibits the glucocorticoid-induced stimulation of two genes coding for enzymes of liver glucose metabolism, namely 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Binding of HNF-6 to DNA is required for inhibition of glucocorticoid receptor activity. In vitro and in vivo experiments suggest that this inhibition is mediated by a direct HNF-6/glucocorticoid receptor interaction involving the amino-terminal domain of HNF-6 and the DNA-binding domain of the receptor. Thus, in addition to its known property of stimulating transcription of liver-expressed genes, HNF-6 can antagonize glucocorticoid-stimulated gene transcription.

  18. Emerging and Reemeriging Human Bunyavirus Infections and Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Laura J.; Anyamba, Assaf; LaBeaud, A. Desiree

    2013-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae family includes a growing number of viruses that have contributed to the burden of emerging and reemerging infectious diseases around the globe. Many of these viruses cause severe clinical outcomes in human and animal populations, the results of which can be detrimental to public health and the economies of affected communities. The threat to endemic and non-native regions is particularly high, and national and international public health agencies are often on alert. Many of the bunyaviruses cause severe clinical disease including hemorrhage, organ failure, and death leading to their high-risk classification. Hantaviruses and Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) (genus Phlebovirus) are National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Category A priority pathogens in the United States. Viral hemorrhagic fevers, a classification that includes many bunyaviruses, are immediately notifiable in the European Union. The emergence of new and reemerging bunyaviruses has resulted in numerous human and animal fatalities. Outbreaks of Rift Valley fever (RVF) in East Africa (1997/1998, 2006/2007), Sudan (2007), Southern Africa (2008-2010), Kenya (1997/1998, 2006/2007) (Anyamba et al., 2009, 2010; Breiman et al., 2010; Grobbelaar et al., 2011; Woods et al., 2002) and Saudi Arabia & Yemen (2000, 2010) (Food and Agriculture Organization, 2000; Hjelle and Glass, 2000; Madani et al., 2003) and the emergence of Sin Nombre virus (1993) (Hjelle and Glass, 2000) and most recently Schmallenberg virus (2011) (DEFRA, 2012) are prime examples of the devastating and worldwide toll bunyaviruses have on health and economies. Climate variability (precipitation and temperature in particular) greatly influence the ecological conditions that drive arboviral disease outbreaks across the globe. Several human and animal disease outbreaks have been influenced by changes in climate associated with the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon including the bunyaviruses RVFV and Sin

  19. Pseudopregnancy induces the expression of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1 beta and its target gene aminopeptidase N in rabbit endometrium via the epithelial promoter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Classen-Linke, I; Sjöström, H; Norén, O

    1995-01-01

    APN promoter and is increased in human-choriogonadotropin-induced pseudopregnancy. Cloning and sequencing of the rabbit APN epithelial promoter revealed conservation of the upstream footprint (UF), hepatocyte nuclear factor-1 (HNF1) and Sp1 elements known to be present in the pig and human promoters...

  20. Interactions of Climate Change, Air Pollution, and Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Patrick L

    2018-02-07

    I review literature on the impacts of climate change on air quality and human health, with a focus on articles published from 2013 on ozone and airborne particles. Selected previous literature is discussed where relevant in tracing the origins of our current knowledge. Climate and weather have strong influences on the spatial and temporal distribution of air pollution concentrations. Emissions of ozone and PM 2.5 precursors increase at higher ambient temperatures. The reactions that form ozone occur faster with greater sunlight and higher temperatures. Weather systems influence the movement and dispersion of air pollutants in the atmosphere through the action of winds, vertical mixing, and precipitation, all of which are likely to alter in a changing climate. Recent studies indicate that, holding anthropogenic air pollution emissions constant, ozone concentrations in populated regions will tend to increase in future climate scenarios. For the USA, the climate impact on ozone is most consistently seen in north-central and north-eastern states, with the potential for many thousands of additional ozone-related deaths. The sensitivity of anthropogenic PM 2.5 to climate is more variable across studies and regions, owing