WorldWideScience

Sample records for chandra x-ray sources

  1. Automated classification of Chandra X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehm, Derek; Kargaltsev, O.; Rangelov, B.; Volkov, I.; Pavlov, G. G.

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of the latest generation X-ray telescopes there has been a major influx of data associated with the detection of hundreds of thousands X-ray sources. As one can rarely tell a source type from its X-ray properties alone, the full potential of the X-ray catalogs can only be unlocked by correlating multiwavelength (MW) properties via cross-identification with other surveys. However, one would spend an enormous amount of time classifying these objects by their physical nature if the classification was to be done on a source-by-source basis by humans. Therefore, we are using a supervised learning algorithm to classify sources detected by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The classifications are based on a training dataset which currently includes about 7,000 X-ray sources of known nature (main sequence stars, Wolf-Rayet stars, young stars, active galactic nuclei, low mass X-ray binaries, high mass x-ray binaries, and neutron stars). For each source, the training dataset includes up to 24 multiwavelength properties. The efficiency and accuracy of the classification is verified by dividing the training dataset in two and performing cross-validation. The results are also inspected by plotting source properties in 2D slices of the parameter space. As an application of our automated procedure we classified unidentified sources in the supernova remnant (SNR) G352.7-0.1, in the field of HESS J1809-193, and in part of the Chandra Source Catalog 1.0. We present the results of the verification tests and the classification results. This research was partially supported by NASA/SAO grant AR3-14017X.

  2. Chandra Multiwavelength Project X-ray Point Source Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, M; Wilkes, B J; Green, P J; Kim, E; Anderson, C S; Barkhouse, W A; Evans, N R; Ivezic, Z; Karovska, M; Kashyap, V L; Lee, M G; Maksym, P; Mossman, A E; Silverman, J D; Tananbaum, H D; Kim, Minsun; Kim, Dong-Woo; Wilkes, Belinda J.; Green, Paul J.; Kim, Eunhyeuk; Anderson, Craig S.; Barkhouse, Wayne A.; Evans, Nancy R.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Karovska, Margarita; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Maksym, Peter; Mossman, Amy E.; Silverman, John D.; Tananbaum, Harvey D.

    2006-01-01

    We present the Chandra Multiwavelength Project (ChaMP) X-ray point source catalog with ~6,800 X-ray sources detected in 149 Chandra observations covering \\~10 deg^2. The full ChaMP catalog sample is seven times larger than the initial published ChaMP catalog. The exposure time of the fields in our sample ranges from 0.9 to 124 ksec, corresponding to a deepest X-ray flux limit of f_{0.5-8.0} = 9 x 10^{-16} erg/cm2/sec. The ChaMP X-ray data have been uniformly reduced and analyzed with ChaMP-specific pipelines, and then carefully validated by visual inspection. The ChaMP catalog includes X-ray photometric data in 8 different energy bands as well as X-ray spectral hardness ratios and colors. To best utilize the ChaMP catalog, we also present the source reliability, detection probability and positional uncertainty. To quantitatively assess those parameters, we performed extensive simulations. In particular, we present a set of empirical equations: the flux limit as a function of effective exposure time, and the p...

  3. Stellar X-ray sources in the Chandra COSMOS survey

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Nicholas J; Civano, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of the X-ray properties of a sample of solar- and late-type field stars identified in the Chandra Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS), a deep (160ks) and wide (0.9 deg2) extragalactic survey. The sample of 60 sources was identified using both morphological and photometric star/galaxy separation methods. We determine X-ray count rates, extract spectra and light curves and perform spectral fits to determine fluxes and plasma temperatures. Complementary optical and near-IR photometry is also presented and combined with spectroscopy for 48 of the sources to determine spectral types and distances for the sample. We find distances ranging from 30pc to ~12kpc, including a number of the most distant and highly active stellar X-ray sources ever detected. This stellar sample extends the known coverage of the L_X-distance plane to greater distances and higher luminosities, but we do not detect as many intrinsically faint X-ray sources compared to previous surveys. Overall the sample is typically more...

  4. Chandra Resolves Cosmic X-ray Glow and Finds Mysterious New Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    While taking a giant leap towards solving one of the greatest mysteries of X-ray astronomy, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory also may have revealed the most distant objects ever seen in the universe and discovered two puzzling new types of cosmic objects. Not bad for being on the job only five months. Chandra has resolved most of the X-ray background, a pervasive glow of X-rays throughout the universe, first discovered in the early days of space exploration. Before now, scientists have not been able to discern the background's origin, because no X-ray telescope until Chandra has had both the angular resolution and sensitivity to resolve it. "This is a major discovery," said Dr. Alan Bunner, Director of NASA's Structure andEvolution of the universe science theme. "Since it was first observed thirty-seven years ago, understanding the source of the X-ray background has been aHoly Grail of X-ray astronomy. Now, it is within reach." The results of the observation will be discussed today at the 195th national meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Atlanta, Georgia. An article describing this work has been submitted to the journal Nature by Dr. Richard Mushotzky, of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., Drs. Lennox Cowie and Amy Barger at the University of Hawaii, Honolulu, and Dr. Keith Arnaud of the University of Maryland, College Park. "We are all very excited by this finding," said Mushotzky. "The resolution of most of the hard X-ray background during the first few months of the Chandra mission is a tribute to the power of this observatory and bodes extremely well for its scientific future," Scientists have known about the X-ray glow, called the X-ray background, since the dawn of X-ray astronomy in the early 1960s. They have been unable to discern its origin, however, for no X-ray telescope until Chandra has had both the angular resolution and sensitivity to resolve it. The German-led ROSAT mission, now completed, resolved much of the lower

  5. X-rays beware: the deepest Chandra catalogue of point sources in M31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulic, N.; Gallagher, S. C.; Barmby, P.

    2016-10-01

    This study represents the most sensitive Chandra X-ray point source catalogue of M31. Using 133 publicly available Chandra ACIS-I/S observations totalling ˜1 Ms, we detected 795 X-ray sources in the bulge, north-east, and south-west fields of M31, covering an area of ≈0.6 deg2, to a limiting unabsorbed 0.5-8.0 keV luminosity of ˜1034 erg s-1. In the inner bulge, where exposure is approximately constant, X-ray fluxes represent average values because they were determined from many observations over a long period of time. Similarly, our catalogue is more complete in the bulge fields since monitoring allowed more transient sources to be detected. The catalogue was cross-correlated with a previous XMM-Newton catalogue of M31's D25 isophote consisting of 1948 X-ray sources, with only 979 within the field of view of our survey. We found 387 (49 per cent) of our Chandra sources (352 or 44 per cent unique sources) matched to within 5 arcsec of 352 XMM-Newton sources. Combining this result with matching done to previous Chandra X-ray sources we detected 259. new sources in our catalogue. We created X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) in the soft (0.5-2.0 keV) and hard (2.0-8.0 keV) bands that are the most sensitive for any large galaxy based on our detection limits. Completeness-corrected XLFs show a break around ≈1.3 × 1037 erg s-1, consistent with previous work. As in past surveys, we find that the bulge XLFs are flatter than the disc, indicating a lack of bright high-mass X-ray binaries in the disc and an aging population of low-mass X-ray binaries in the bulge.

  6. The Chandra Local Volume Survey: The X-ray Point Source Catalog of NGC 300

    CERN Document Server

    Binder, Breanna; Eracleous, Michael; Gaetz, Terrance J; Plucinsky, Paul P; Skillman, Evan D; Dalcanton, Julianne J; Anderson, Scott F; Weisz, Daniel R; Kong, Albert K H

    2012-01-01

    We present the source catalog of a new Chandra ACIS-I observation of NGC 300 obtained as part of the Chandra Local Volume Survey. Our 63 ks exposure covers ~88% of the D25 isophote (R~6.3 kpc) and yields a catalog of 95 X-ray point sources detected at high significance to a limiting unabsorbed 0.35-8 keV luminosity of ~10^36 erg s^-1. Sources were cross-correlated with a previous XMM-Newton catalog, and we find 75 "X-ray transient candidate" sources that were detected by one observatory, but not the other. We derive an X-ray scale length of 1.7+/-0.2 kpc and a recent star formation rate of 0.12 Msun yr^-1, in excellent agreement with optical observations. Deep, multi-color imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope, covering ~32% of our Chandra field, was used to search for optical counterparts to the X-ray sources, and we have developed a new source classification scheme to determine which sources are likely X-ray binaries, supernova remnants, and background AGN candidates. Finally, we present the X-ray luminos...

  7. THE CHANDRA LOCAL VOLUME SURVEY: THE X-RAY POINT-SOURCE CATALOG OF NGC 300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binder, B.; Williams, B. F.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Anderson, S. F.; Weisz, D. R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Eracleous, M. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Gaetz, T. J.; Plucinsky, P. P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Skillman, E. D. [Astronomy Department, University of Minnesota, 116 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Kong, A. K. H. [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2012-10-10

    We present the source catalog of a new Chandra ACIS-I observation of NGC 300 obtained as part of the Chandra Local Volume Survey. Our 63 ks exposure covers {approx}88% of the D{sub 25} isophote (R Almost-Equal-To 6.3 kpc) and yields a catalog of 95 X-ray point sources detected at high significance to a limiting unabsorbed 0.35-8 keV luminosity of {approx}10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}. Sources were cross-correlated with a previous XMM-Newton catalog, and we find 75 'X-ray transient candidate' sources that were detected by one observatory, but not the other. We derive an X-ray scale length of 1.7 {+-} 0.2 kpc and a recent star formation rate of 0.12 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} in excellent agreement with optical observations. Deep, multi-color imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope, covering {approx}32% of our Chandra field, was used to search for optical counterparts to the X-ray sources, and we have developed a new source classification scheme to determine which sources are likely X-ray binaries, supernova remnants, and background active galactic nucleus candidates. Finally, we present the X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) at different X-ray energies, and we find the total NGC 300 X-ray point-source population to be consistent with other late-type galaxies hosting young stellar populations ({approx}< 50 Myr). We find that XLF of sources associated with older stellar populations has a steeper slope than the XLF of X-ray sources coinciding with young stellar populations, consistent with theoretical predictions.

  8. Near-infrared counterparts of Chandra X-ray sources toward the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    DeWitt, Curtis; Eikenberry, Stephen S; Blum, Robert; Olsen, Knut; Sellgren, Kris; Sarajedini, Ata

    2010-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory has now discovered nearly 10,000 X-ray point sources in the 2 x 0.8 degree region around the Galactic Center (Muno 2009). The sources are likely to be a population of accreting binaries in the Galactic Center, but little else is known of their nature. We obtained JHKs imaging of the 17'x 17' region around Sgr A*, an area containing 4339 of these X-ray sources, with the ISPI camera on the CTIO 4-m telescope. We cross-correlate the Chandra and ISPI catalogs to find potential IR counterparts to the X-ray sources. The extreme IR source crowding in the field means that it is not possible to establish the authenticity of the matches with astrometry and photometry alone. We find 2137 IR/X-ray astrometrically matched sources: statistically we estimate that our catalog contains 289 +/- 13 true matches to soft X-ray sources and 154 +/- 39 matches to hard X-ray sources. However, the fraction of true counterparts to candidate counterparts for hard sources is just 11 %, compared to 60 % for s...

  9. Infrared Counterparts to Chandra X-Ray Sources in the Antennae

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, D M; Brandl, B R; Wilson, J C; Carson, J C; Henderson, C P; Hayward, T L; Barry, D J; Ptak, A F; Colbert, E J M

    2006-01-01

    We use deep J and Ks images of the Antennae (NGC 4038/9) obtained with WIRC on the Palomar 200-inch telescope, together with the Chandra X-ray source list of Zezas et al. (2002a), to search for IR counterparts to X-ray point sources. We establish an X-ray/IR astrometric frame tie with 0.5" rms residuals over a \\~4.3' field. We find 13 ``strong'' IR counterparts brighter than Ks = 17.8 mag and < 1.0" from X-ray sources, and an additional 6 ``possible'' IR counterparts between 1.0" and 1.5" from X-ray sources. The surface density of IR sources near the X-ray sources suggests only ~2 of the ``strong'' counterparts and ~3 of the ``possible'' counterparts are chance superpositions of unrelated objects. Comparing both strong and possible IR counterparts to our photometric study of ~220 Antennae, IR clusters, we find the IR counterparts to X-ray sources are \\~1.2 mag more luminous in Ks than average non-X-ray clusters. We also note that the X-ray/IR matches are concentrated in the spiral arms and ``overlap'' regi...

  10. Chandra ACIS Survey of X-ray Point Sources in Nearby Galaxies. II. X-ray Luminosity Functions and Ultraluminous X-ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Song; Liu, Jifeng; Bregman, Joel N

    2016-01-01

    Based on the recently completed {\\it Chandra}/ACIS survey of X-ray point sources in nearby galaxies, we study the X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) for X-ray point sources in different types of galaxies and the statistical properties of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs). Uniform procedures are developed to compute the detection threshold, to estimate the foreground/background contamination, and to calculate the XLFs for individual galaxies and groups of galaxies, resulting in an XLF library for 343 galaxies of different types. With the large number of surveyed galaxies, we have studied the XLFs and ULX properties across different host galaxy types, and confirm with good statistics that the XLF slope flattens from lenticular ($\\alpha\\sim1.50\\pm0.07$) to elliptical ($\\sim1.21\\pm0.02$), to spirals ($\\sim0.80\\pm0.02$), to peculiars ($\\sim0.55\\pm0.30$), and to irregulars ($\\sim0.26\\pm0.10$). The XLF break dividing the neutron star and black hole binaries is also confirmed, albeit at quite different break luminosi...

  11. The Chandra Local Volume Survey: The X-ray Point Source Population of NGC 404

    CERN Document Server

    Binder, B; Eracleous, M; Gaetz, T J; Kong, A K H; Skillman, E D; Weisz, D R

    2012-01-01

    We present a comprehensive X-ray point source catalog of NGC 404 obtained as part of the Chandra Local Volume Survey. A new, 97 ks Chandra ACIS-S observation of NGC 404 was combined with archival observations for a total exposure of ~123 ks. Our survey yields 74 highly significant X-ray point sources and is sensitive to a limiting unabsorbed luminosity of ~6x10^35 erg s^-1 in the 0.35-8 keV band. To constrain the nature of each X-ray source, cross-correlations with multi-wavelength data were generated. We searched overlapping HST observations for optical counterparts to our X-ray detections, but find only two X-ray sources with candidate optical counterparts. We find 21 likely low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), although this number is a lower limit due to the difficulties in separating LMXBs from background AGN. The X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) in both the soft and hard energy bands are presented. The XLFs in the soft band (0.5-2 keV) and the hard band (2-8 keV) have a limiting luminosity at the 90% comple...

  12. Chandra ACIS Survey of X-ray Point Sources: The Source Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Song; Qiu, Yanli; Bai, Yu; Yang, Huiqin; Guo, Jincheng; Zhang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The $Chandra$ archival data is a valuable resource for various studies on different topics of X-ray astronomy. In this paper, we utilize this wealth and present a uniformly processed data set, which can be used to address a wide range of scientific questions. The data analysis procedures are applied to 10,029 ACIS observations, which produces 363,530 source detections, belonging to 217,828 distinct X-ray sources. This number is twice the size of the $Chandra$ Source Catalog (Version 1.1). The catalogs in this paper provide abundant estimates of the detected X-ray source properties, including source positions, counts, colors, fluxes, luminosities, variability statistics, etc. Cross-correlation of these objects with galaxies shows 17,828 sources are located within the $D_{25}$ isophotes of 1110 galaxies, and 7504 sources are located between the $D_{25}$ and 2$D_{25}$ isophotes of 910 galaxies. Contamination analysis with the log$N$--log$S$ relation indicates that 51.3\\% of objects within 2$D_{25}$ isophotes are...

  13. THE CHANDRA LOCAL VOLUME SURVEY: THE X-RAY POINT-SOURCE POPULATION OF NGC 404

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binder, B.; Williams, B. F.; Weisz, D. R. [University of Washington, Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Eracleous, M. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Center for Gravitational Wave Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Gaetz, T. J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kong, A. K. H. [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Skillman, E. D. [University of Minnesota, Astronomy Department, 116 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    We present a comprehensive X-ray point-source catalog of NGC 404 obtained as part of the Chandra Local Volume Survey. A new 97 ks Chandra ACIS-S observation of NGC 404 was combined with archival observations for a total exposure of {approx}123 ks. Our survey yields 74 highly significant X-ray point sources and is sensitive to a limiting unabsorbed luminosity of {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 35} erg s{sup -1} in the 0.35-8 keV band. To constrain the nature of each X-ray source, cross-correlations with multi-wavelength data were generated. We searched overlapping Hubble Space Telescope observations for optical counterparts to our X-ray detections, but find only two X-ray sources with candidate optical counterparts. We find 21 likely low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), although this number is a lower limit due to the difficulties in separating LMXBs from background active galactic nuclei. The X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) in both the soft and hard energy bands are presented. The XLFs in the soft band (0.5-2 keV) and the hard band (2-8 keV) have a limiting luminosity at the 90% completeness limit of 10{sup 35} erg s{sup -1} and 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}, respectively, significantly lower than previous X-ray studies of NGC 404. We find the XLFs to be consistent with those of other X-ray populations dominated by LMXBs. However, the number of luminous (>10{sup 37} erg s{sup -1}) X-ray sources per unit stellar mass in NGC 404 is lower than is observed for other galaxies. The relative lack of luminous XRBs may be due to a population of LMXBs with main-sequence companions formed during an epoch of elevated star formation {approx}0.5 Gyr ago.

  14. CHANDRA ACIS Survey of X-Ray Point Sources: The Source Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Song; Liu, Jifeng; Qiu, Yanli; Bai, Yu; Yang, Huiqin; Guo, Jincheng; Zhang, Peng

    2016-06-01

    The Chandra archival data is a valuable resource for various studies on different X-ray astronomy topics. In this paper, we utilize this wealth of information and present a uniformly processed data set, which can be used to address a wide range of scientific questions. The data analysis procedures are applied to 10,029 Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer observations, which produces 363,530 source detections belonging to 217,828 distinct X-ray sources. This number is twice the size of the Chandra Source Catalog (Version 1.1). The catalogs in this paper provide abundant estimates of the detected X-ray source properties, including source positions, counts, colors, fluxes, luminosities, variability statistics, etc. Cross-correlation of these objects with galaxies shows that 17,828 sources are located within the D 25 isophotes of 1110 galaxies, and 7504 sources are located between the D 25 and 2D 25 isophotes of 910 galaxies. Contamination analysis with the log N-log S relation indicates that 51.3% of objects within 2D 25 isophotes are truly relevant to galaxies, and the “net” source fraction increases to 58.9%, 67.3%, and 69.1% for sources with luminosities above 1037, 1038, and 1039 erg s-1, respectively. Among the possible scientific uses of this catalog, we discuss the possibility of studying intra-observation variability, inter-observation variability, and supersoft sources (SSSs). About 17,092 detected sources above 10 counts are classified as variable in individual observation with the Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) criterion (P K-S < 0.01). There are 99,647 sources observed more than once and 11,843 sources observed 10 times or more, offering us a wealth of data with which to explore the long-term variability. There are 1638 individual objects (˜2350 detections) classified as SSSs. As a quite interesting subclass, detailed studies on X-ray spectra and optical spectroscopic follow-up are needed to categorize these SSSs and pinpoint their properties. In addition

  15. X-Rays Beware: The Deepest Chandra Catalogue of Point Sources in M31

    CERN Document Server

    Vulic, N; Barmby, P

    2016-01-01

    This study represents the most sensitive Chandra X-ray point source catalogue of M31. Using 133 publicly available Chandra ACIS-I/S observations totalling ~1 Ms, we detected 795 X-ray sources in the bulge, northeast, and southwest fields of M31, covering an area of approximately 0.6 deg$^{2}$, to a limiting unabsorbed 0.5-8.0 keV luminosity of $10^{34}$ erg/s. In the inner bulge, where exposure is approximately constant, X-ray fluxes represent average values because they were determined from many observations over a long period of time. Similarly, our catalogue is more complete in the bulge fields since monitoring allowed more transient sources to be detected. The catalogue was cross-correlated with a previous XMM-Newton catalogue of M31's $D_{25}$ isophote consisting of 1948 X-ray sources, with only 979 within the field of view of our survey. We found 387 (49%) of our Chandra sources (352 or 44% unique sources) matched to within 5 arcsec of 352 XMM-Newton sources. Combining this result with matching done to ...

  16. X-ray Sources in the Hubble Deep Field Detected by Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Hornschemeier, A E; Garmire, G P; Schneider, D P; Broos, P S; Townsley, L K; Bautz, M W; Burrows, D N; Chartas, G; Feigelson, E D; Griffiths, R; Lumb, D H; Nousek, J A; Sargent, W L W

    2000-01-01

    We present first results from an X-ray study of the Hubble Deep Field North (HDF-N) and its environs obtained using 166 ks of data collected by the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory. This is the deepest X-ray observation ever reported, and in the HDF-N itself we detect six X-ray sources down to a 0.5--8 keV flux limit of 4E-16 erg cm^-2 s^-1. Comparing these sources with objects seen in multiwavelength HDF-N studies shows positional coincidences with the extremely red object NICMOS J123651.74 +621221.4, an active galactic nucleus (AGN), three elliptical galaxies, and one nearby spiral galaxy. The X-ray emission from the ellipticals is consistent with that expected from a hot interstellar medium, and the spiral galaxy emission may arise from a `super-Eddington' X-ray binary or ultraluminous supernova remnant. Four of the X-ray sources have been detected at radio wavelengths. We also place X-ray upper limits on AGN candidates found in the HDF-N, and we present the t...

  17. Chandra Studies of Unidentified X-ray Sources in the Galactic Bulge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Hideyuki

    2013-09-01

    We propose to study a complete X-ray sample in the luminosity range of > 10^34 erg s^-1 in the Galactic bulge, including 5 unidentified sources detected in the ROSAT All Sky Survey. Our goal is to obtain a clear picture about X-ray populations in the bulge, by utilizing the excellent Chandra position accuracy leading to unique optical identification together with the X-ray spectral properties. This is a new step toward understanding the formation history of the bulge. Furthermore, because the luminosity range we observe corresponds to a ``missing link'' region ever studied for a neutron star or blackhole X-ray binary, our results are also unique to test accretion disk theories at intermediate mass accretion rates.

  18. The Chandra COSMOS Survey: III. Optical and Infrared Identification of X-ray Point Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Civano, F; Brusa, M; Comastri, A; Salvato, M; Zamorani, G; Aldcroft, T; Bongiorno, A; Capak, P; Cappelluti, N; Cisternas, M; Fiore, F; Fruscione, A; Hao, H; Kartaltepe, J; Koekemoer, A; Gilli, R; Impey, C D; Lanzuisi, G; Lusso, E; Mainieri, V; Miyaji, T; Lilly, S; Masters, D; Puccetti, S; Schawinski, K; Scoville, N Z; Silverman, J; Trump, J; Urry, M; Vignali, C; Wright, N J

    2012-01-01

    The Chandra COSMOS Survey (C-COSMOS) is a large, 1.8 Ms, Chandra program that has imaged the central 0.9 deg^2 of the COSMOS field down to limiting depths of 1.9 10^-16 erg cm^-2 s-1 in the 0.5-2 keV band, 7.3 10^-16 erg cm^-2 s^-1 in the 2-10 keV band, and 5.7 10^-16 erg cm^-2 s-1 in the 0.5-10 keV band. In this paper we report the i, K and 3.6micron identifications of the 1761 X-ray point sources. We use the likelihood ratio technique to derive the association of optical/infrared counterparts for 97% of the X-ray sources. For most of the remaining 3%, the presence of multiple counterparts or the faintness of the possible counterpart prevented a unique association. For only 10 X-ray sources we were not able to associate a counterpart, mostly due to the presence of a very bright field source close by. Only 2 sources are truly empty fields. Making use of the large number of X-ray sources, we update the "classic locus" of AGN and define a new locus containing 90% of the AGN in the survey with full band luminosi...

  19. Finding Rare AGN: X-ray Number Counts of Chandra Sources in Stripe 82

    CERN Document Server

    LaMassa, Stephanie M; Glikman, Eilat; Cappelluti, Nico; Civano, Francesca; Comastri, Andrea; Treister, Ezequiel; Arifin,; Boehringer, Hans; Cardamone, Carie; Chon, Gayoung; Kephart, Miranda; Murray, Stephen S; Richards, Gordon; Ross, Nic; Rozner, Joshua S; Schawinski, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    We present the first results of a wide area X-ray survey within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82, a 300 deg$^2$ region of the sky with a substantial investment in multi-wavelength coverage. We analyzed archival {\\it Chandra} observations that cover 7.5 deg$^2$ within Stripe 82 ("Stripe 82 ACX"), reaching 4.5$\\sigma$ flux limits of 7.9$\\times10^{-16}$, 3.4$\\times10^{-15}$ and 1.8$\\times10^{-15}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ in the soft (0.5-2 keV), hard (2-7 keV) and full (0.5-7 keV) bands, to find 774, 239 and 1118 X-ray sources, respectively. Three hundred twenty-one sources are detected only in the full band and 9 sources are detected solely in the soft band. Utilizing data products from the {\\it Chandra} Source Catalog, we construct independent Log$N$-Log$S$ relationships, detailing the number density of X-ray sources as a function of flux, which show general agreement with previous {\\it Chandra} surveys. We compare the luminosity distribution of Stripe 82 ACX with the smaller, deeper CDF-S + E-CDFS...

  20. Chandra Observation of the X-Ray Source Population of NGC 6946

    CERN Document Server

    Holt, S S; Hwang, U; Petre, R

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of a study of discrete X-ray sources in NGC 6946 using a deep Chandra ACIS observation. Based on the slope of the log N-log S distribution and the general correlation of sources with the spiral arms, we infer that the overall discrete source sample in NGC 6946 is dominated by high mass X-ray binaries, in contrast to the source distributions in M31 and the Milky Way. This is consistent with the higher star formation rate in NGC 6946 than in those galaxies. We find that the strong X-ray sources in the region of the galactic center do not correlate in detail with images of the region in the near-IR, although one of them may be coincident with the galactic center. The non-central ultra-luminous X-ray source in NGC 6946, previously identified with a supernova remnant, has an X-ray spectrum and luminosity that is inconsistent with either a traditional pulsar wind nebula or a blast wave remnant.

  1. The Chandra Cygnus OB2 Legacy Survey: Design and X-ray Point Source Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Nicholas J; Guarcello, Mario G; Aldcroft, Tom L; Kashyap, Vinay L; Damiani, Francesco; DePasquale, Joe; Fruscione, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    The Cygnus OB2 association is the largest concentration of young and massive stars within 2 kpc of the Sun, including an estimated 65 O-type stars and hundreds of OB stars. The Chandra Cygnus OB2 Legacy Survey is a large imaging program undertaken with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The survey has imaged the central 0.5 deg^2 of the Cyg OB2 association with an effective exposure of 120ks and an outer 0.35 deg^2 area with an exposure of 60ks. Here we describe the survey design and observations, the data reduction and source detection, and present a catalog of 8,000 X-ray point sources. The survey design employs a grid of 36 heavily (~50%) overlapping pointings, a method that overcomes Chandra's low off-axis sensitivity and produces a highly uniform exposure over the inner 0.5 deg^2. The full X-ray catalog is described here and is made available online.

  2. Groups of Galaxies in AEGIS: The 200 ksec Chandra Extended X-ray Source catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Jeltema, Tesla E; Laird, Elise S; Willmer, Christopher N A; Coil, Alison L; Cooper, Michael C; Davis, Marc; Nandra, Kirpal; Newman, Jeffrey A

    2009-01-01

    We present the discovery of seven X-ray emitting groups of galaxies selected as extended X-ray sources in the 200 ksec Chandra coverage of the All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS). In addition, we report on AGN activity associated to these systems. Using the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey coverage, we identify optical counterparts and determine velocity dispersions. In particular, we find three massive high-redshift groups at z>0.7, one of which is at z=1.13, the first X-ray detections of spectroscopically selected DEEP2 groups. We also present a first look at the the L_X-T, L_X-sigma, and sigma-T scaling relations for high-redshift massive groups. We find that the properties of these X-ray selected systems agree well with the scaling relations of similar systems at low redshift, although there are X-ray undetected groups in the DEEP2 catalogue with similar velocity dispersions. The other three X-ray groups with identified redshifts are associated with lower mass groups at z~0.07 and...

  3. Chandra Observations of the X-ray Point Source Population in NGC 4636

    CERN Document Server

    Posson-Brown, J; Forman, W; Donnelly, R H; Jones, C; Posson-Brown, Jennifer; Raychaudhury, Somak; Forman, William; Jones, Christine

    2006-01-01

    We present an analysis of the X-ray point source population in the nearby Virgo elliptical galaxy NGC 4636 from four Chandra X-ray observations. These ACIS observations, totaling ~210 ks, were taken over a three year period. Using a wavelet decomposition detection algorithm, we detect 336 individual point sources. For our analysis, we use a subset of the 245 detections with >10 cts (a limiting luminosity of approximately 1E37 erg/s in the 0.5-2 keV band, outside the 1.5' bright galaxy core). Of these sources, ~120 are likely members of the galaxy. We examine, for the first time, variability over a period of years for X-ray point sources in an elliptical galaxy. We present a luminosity function for the point sources in NGC 4636, fit by a power-law with gamma= -1.24 +/- 0.04, as well as a radial source density profile, hardness ratios for the sources, and lightcurves for bright sources which display short-term variability. We find an upper limit to the current X-ray luminosity of the historical supernova SN1939...

  4. The Chandra COSMOS-Legacy survey: Source X-ray spectral properties

    CERN Document Server

    Marchesi, S; Civano, F; Iwasawa, K; Suh, H; Comastri, A; Zamorani, G; Allevato, V; Griffiths, R; Miyaji, T; Ranalli, P; Salvato, M; Schawinski, K; Silverman, J; Treister, E; Urry, C M; Vignali, C

    2016-01-01

    We present the X-ray spectral analysis of the 1855 extragalactic sources in the Chandra COSMOS-Legacy survey catalog having more than 30 net counts in the 0.5-7 keV band. 38% of the sources are optically classified Type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGN), 60% are Type 2 AGN and 2% are passive, low-redshift galaxies. We study the distribution of AGN photon index and of the intrinsic absorption N(H,z) based on the sources optical classification: Type 1 have a slightly steeper mean photon index than Type 2 AGN, which on the other hand have average intrinsic absorption ~3 times higher than Type 1 AGN. We find that ~15% of Type 1 AGN have N(H,z)>1E22 cm^(-2), i.e., are obscured according to the X-ray spectral fitting; the vast majority of these sources have L(2-10keV)>$1E44 erg/s. The existence of these objects suggests that optical and X-ray obscuration can be caused by different phenomena, the X-ray obscuration being for example caused by dust-free material surrounding the inner part of the nuclei. ~18% of Type 2 AG...

  5. Simulating the sensitivity to stellar point sources of Chandra X-ray observations

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Nicholas J; Guarcello, Mario G; Kashyap, Vinay L; Zezas, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The Chandra Cygnus OB2 Legacy Survey is a wide and deep X-ray survey of the nearby and massive Cygnus OB2 association. The survey has detected ~8,000 X-ray sources, the majority of which are pre-main sequence X-ray emitting young stars in the association itself. To facilitate quantitative scientific studies of these sources as well as the underlying OB association it is important to understand the sensitivity of the observations and the level of completeness the observations have obtained. Here we describe the use of a hierarchical Monte Carlo simulation to achieve this goal by combining the empirical properties of the observations, analytic estimates of the source verification process, and an extensive set of source detection simulations. We find that our survey reaches a 90% completeness level for a pre-main-sequence population at the distance of Cyg OB2 at an X-ray luminosity of 4 x 10^30 ergs/s and a stellar mass of 1.3 Msun for a randomly distributed population. For a spatially clustered population such ...

  6. The Chandra Survey of Extragalactic Sources in the 3CR Catalog: X-ray Emission from Nuclei, Jets, and Hotspots in the Chandra Archival Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Massaro, F; Liuzzo, E; Orienti, M; Paladino, R; Paggi, A; Tremblay, G R; Wilkes, B J; Kuraszkiewicz, J; Baum, S A; O'Dea, C P

    2016-01-01

    As part of our program to build a complete radio and X-ray database of all the 3CR extragalactic radio sources, we present an analysis of 93 sources for which Chandra archival data are available. Most of these sources have been already published. Here we provide a uniform re-analysis and present nuclear X-ray fluxes and X-ray emission associated with radio jet knots and hotspots using both publicly available radio images and new radio images that have been constructed from data available in the VLA archive. For about 1/3 of the sources in the selected sample a comparison between the Chandra and the radio observations was not reported in the literature: we find X-ray detections of 2 new radio jet knots and 17 hotspots. We also report the X-ray detection of extended emission from the intergalactic medium of 15 galaxy clusters, two of which were most likely unknown previously.

  7. X-ray Sources with Periodic Variability in a Deep Chandra Image of the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Muno, M P; Bautz, M W; Brandt, W N; Garmire, G P; Ricker, G R

    2003-01-01

    We report the discovery of eight X-ray sources with periodic variability in 487 ks of observations of the Galactic center with Chandra. The sources are identified from a sample of 285 objects detected with 100-4200 net counts. Their periods range from 300 s to 4.5 h with amplitudes between 40% and 70% rms. They have luminosities of (1 - 5) \\times 10^{32} erg/sec (2--8 keV at 8 kpc). The spectra of seven of the eight sources are consistent with Gamma = 0 power laws absorbed by gas and dust with a column density equal to or higher than that toward the Galactic Center (6 times 10^{22} cm^{-2}). Four of these sources also exhibit emission lines near 6.7 keV from He-like Fe, with equivalent widths of 600-1000 eV. These properties are consistent with both magnetically accreting cataclysmic variables and wind-accreting neutron stars in high-mass X-ray binaries. The eighth source has an absorbing column of 5 \\times 10^{21} cm^{-2} that places it in the foreground. Its spectrum is consistent with either a Gamma = 1.4 ...

  8. HST/ACS Imaging of Omega Centauri: Optical Counterparts of Chandra X-Ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Cool, Adrienne M; Arias, Tersi; Brochmann, Michelle; Dorfman, Jason; Gafford, April; White, Vivian; Anderson, Jay

    2012-01-01

    We present results of a search for optical counterparts of X-ray sources in and toward the globular cluster Omega Centauri (NGC 5139) using the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. The ACS data consist of a mosaic of Wide Field Channel (WFC) images obtained using F625W, F435W, and F658N filters; with 9 pointings we cover the central ~10'x10' of the cluster and encompass 109 known Chandra sources. We find promising optical counterparts for 59 of the sources, ~40 of which are likely to be associated with the cluster. These include 27 candidate cataclysmic variables (CVs), 24 of which are reported here for the first time. Fourteen of the CV candidates are very faint, with absolute magnitudes in the range M_625 = 10.4 - 12.6, making them comparable in brightness to field CVs near the period minimum discovered in the SDSS (Gansicke et al. 2009). Additional optical counterparts include three BY Dra candidates, a possible blue straggler, and a previously-reported quiescent low-mass X-ray ...

  9. HST/ACS IMAGING OF OMEGA CENTAURI: OPTICAL COUNTERPARTS OF CHANDRA X-RAY SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cool, Adrienne M.; Arias, Tersi; Brochmann, Michelle; Dorfman, Jason; Gafford, April; White, Vivian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94132 (United States); Haggard, Daryl [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics, Physics and Astronomy Department, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Anderson, Jay, E-mail: cool@sfsu.edu, E-mail: dhaggard@northwestern.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    We present results of a search for optical counterparts of X-ray sources in and toward the globular cluster Omega Centauri (NGC 5139) using the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. The ACS data consist of a mosaic of Wide Field Channel images obtained using F625W, F435W, and F658N filters; with nine pointings we cover the central {approx}10' Multiplication-Sign 10' of the cluster and encompass 109 known Chandra sources. We find promising optical counterparts for 59 of the sources, {approx}40 of which are likely to be associated with the cluster. These include 27 candidate cataclysmic variables (CVs), 24 of which are reported here for the first time. Fourteen of the CV candidates are very faint, with absolute magnitudes in the range M {sub 625} =10.4-12.6, making them comparable in brightness to field CVs near the period minimum discovered in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Additional optical counterparts include three BY Dra candidates, a possible blue straggler, and a previously reported quiescent low-mass X-ray binary. We also identify 3 foreground stars and 11 probable active galactic nuclei. Finally, we report the discovery of a group of seven stars whose X-ray properties are suggestive of magnetically active binaries, and whose optical counterparts lie on or very near the metal-rich anomalous giant and subgiant branches in {omega} Cen. If the apparent association between these seven stars and the RGB/SGB-a stars is real, then the frequency of X-ray sources in this metal-rich population is enhanced by a factor of at least five relative to the other giant and subgiant populations in the cluster. If these stars are not members of the metal-rich population, then they bring the total number of red stragglers (also known as sub-subgiants) that have been identified in {omega} to Cen 20, the largest number yet known in any globular cluster.

  10. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey: optical catalogue and point-source counterparts to X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wevers, T.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Jonker, P. G.; Bassa, C.; Nelemans, G.; van Grunsven, T.; Gonzalez-Solares, E. A.; Torres, M. A. P.; Heinke, C.; Steeghs, D.; Maccarone, T. J.; Britt, C.; Hynes, R. I.; Johnson, C.; Wu, Jianfeng

    2016-06-01

    As part of the Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS), we present a catalogue of optical sources in the GBS footprint. This consists of two regions centred at Galactic latitude b = 1.5° above and below the Galactic Centre, spanning (l × b) = (6° × 1°). The catalogue consists of two or more epochs of observations for each line of sight in r', i' and H α filters. The catalogue is complete down to r' = 20.2 and i' = 19.2 mag; the mean 5σ depth is r' = 22.5 and i' = 21.1 mag. The mean root-mean-square residuals of the astrometric solutions is 0.04 arcsec. We cross-correlate this optical catalogue with the 1640 unique X-ray sources detected in Chandra observations of the GBS area, and find candidate optical counterparts to 1480 X-ray sources. We use a false alarm probability analysis to estimate the contamination by interlopers, and expect ˜10 per cent of optical counterparts to be chance alignments. To determine the most likely counterpart for each X-ray source, we compute the likelihood ratio for all optical sources within the 4σ X-ray error circle. This analysis yields 1480 potential counterparts (˜90 per cent of the sample). 584 counterparts have saturated photometry (r' ≤ 17, i' ≤ 16), indicating these objects are likely foreground sources and the real counterparts. 171 candidate counterparts are detected only in the i' band. These sources are good qLMXB and CV candidates as they are X-ray bright and likely located in the Bulge.

  11. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey: optical catalogue and point-source counterparts to X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Wevers, T; Jonker, P G; Bassa, C; Nelemans, G; van Grunsven, T; Gonzalez-Solares, E A; Torres, M A P; Heinke, C; Steeghs, D; Maccarone, T J; Britt, C; Hynes, R I; Johnson, C; Wu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    As part of the Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS), we present a catalogue of optical sources in the GBS footprint. This consists of two regions centered at Galactic latitude b = 1.5 degrees above and below the Galactic Centre, spanning (l x b) = (6x1) degrees. The catalogue consists of 2 or more epochs of observations for each line of sight in r', i' and H{\\alpha} filters. It is complete down to r' = 20.2 and i' = 19.2 mag; the mean 5{\\sigma} depth is r' = 22.5 and i' = 21.1 mag. The mean root-mean-square residuals of the astrometric solutions is 0.04 arcsec. We cross-correlate this optical catalogue with the 1640 unique X-ray sources detected in Chandra observations of the GBS area, and find candidate optical counterparts to 1480 X-ray sources. We use a false alarm probability analysis to estimate the contamination by interlopers, and expect ~ 10 per cent of optical counterparts to be chance alignments. To determine the most likely counterpart for each X-ray source, we compute the likelihood ratio for all o...

  12. Multiwavelength Study of Chandra X-Ray Sources in the Antennae

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, D M; Brandl, B R; Wilson, J C; Carson, J C; Henderson, C P; Hayward, T L; Barry, D J; Ptak, A F; Colbert, E J M

    2010-01-01

    We use WIRC, IR images of the Antennae (NGC 4038/4039) together with the extensive catalogue of 120 X-ray point sources (Zezas et al. 2006) to search for counterpart candidates. Using our proven frame-tie technique, we find 38 X-ray sources with IR counterparts, almost doubling the number of IR counterparts to X-ray sources first identified in Clark et al. (2007). In our photometric analysis, we consider the 35 IR counterparts that are confirmed star clusters. We show that the clusters with X-ray sources tend to be brighter, K_s ~16 mag, with (J-K_s) = 1.1 mag. We then use archival HST images of the Antennae to search for optical counterparts to the X-ray point sources. We employ our previous IR-to-X-ray frame-tie as an intermediary to establish a precise optical-to-X-ray frame-tie with <0.6 arcsec rms positional uncertainty. Due to the high optical source density near the X-ray sources, we determine that we cannot reliably identify counterparts. Comparing the HST positions to the 35 identified IR star clu...

  13. Near-Infrared Properties of Faint X-rays Sources from NICMOS Imaging in the Chandra Deep Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Colbert, J W; Yan, L; Malkan, M A; McCarthy, P; Colbert, James W.; Teplitz, Harry; Yan, Lin; Malkan, Matthew; Carthy, Patrick Mc

    2004-01-01

    We measure the near-infrared properties of 42 X-ray detected sources from the Chandra Deep Fields North and South, the majority of which lie within the NICMOS Hubble Deep Field North and Ultra Deep Field. We detect all 42 Chandra sources with NICMOS, with 95% brighter than H = 24.5. We find that X-ray sources are most often in the brightest and most massive galaxies. Neither the X-ray fluxes nor hardness ratios of the sample show any correlation with near-infrared flux, color or morphology. This lack of correlation indicates there is little connection between the two emission mechanisms and is consistent with the near-infrared emission being dominated by starlight rather than a Seyfert non-stellar continuum. Near-infrared X-ray sources make up roughly half of all extremely red (J-H > 1.4) objects brighter than H > 24.5. These red X-ray sources have a range of hardness ratios similar to the rest of the sample, decreasing the likelihood of dust-obscured AGN activity as the sole explanation for their red color. ...

  14. Symbiotic Stars in X-rays. II. Faint Sources Detected with XMM-Newton and Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, N. E.; Luna, G. J. M.; Pillitteri, I.; Mukai, K.

    2014-01-01

    We report the detection from four symbiotic stars that were not known to be X-ray sources. These four object show a ß-type X-ray spectrum, that is, their spectra can be modeled with an absorbed optically thin thermal emission with temperatures of a few million degrees. Photometric series obtained with the Optical Monitor on board XMM-Newton from V2416 Sgr and NSV 25735 support the proposed scenario where the X-ray emission is produced in a shock-heated region inside the symbiotic nebulae.

  15. Chandra observation of an ultraluminous X-ray source from the Galaxy NGC 12911

    CERN Document Server

    Luna, Juan C

    2009-01-01

    I report the analysis of an ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) located in the galaxy NGC 1291. This X-ray point source is denominated IXO6 in the Catalog of Candidate IXO (Colbert & Ptak). An Intermediate-luminosity X-ray Object (IXO) is defined as an off-nuclear, compact object with luminosity Lx [2-10keV] >= 1039 erg s-1. The cutoff Lx is defined as a value greater than the Eddington luminosity of a 1.4 Mo black hole (10 38.3 erg s-1). IXO is an early denomination of what is call now a ULX point source. The Catalog was derived from a ROSAT survey and represents 87 IXOS in 54 galaxies. IXO6 was selected because of being positioned in the outer disk of the galaxy, with no near X-ray source neighbors. The study of this ULX pretends to confirm certain assumptions related to this class of objects (Roberts et al.)

  16. Optical and infrared counterparts of the X-ray sources detected in the Chandra Cygnus OB2 Legacy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Guarcello, M G; Wright, N J; Naylor, T; Flaccomio, E; Kashyap, V L; Garcia-Alvarez, D

    2015-01-01

    The young massive OB association Cygnus OB2, in the Cygnus X complex, is the closest (1400 pc) star forming region to the Sun hosting thousands of young low mass stars and up to 1000 OB stars, among which are some of the most massive stars known in our Galaxy. This region holds great importance for several fields of modern astrophysics, such as the study of the physical properties of massive and young low-mass stars and the feedback provided by massive stars on star and planet formation process. Cygnus OB2 has been recently observed with Chandra/ACIS-I as part of the 1.08Msec Chandra Cygnus OB2 Legacy Project. This survey detected 7924 X-ray sources in a square degree area centered on Cyg OB2. Since a proper classification and study of the observed X-ray sources also requires the analysis of their optical and infrared counterparts, we combined a large and deep set of optical and infrared catalogs available for this region with our new X-ray catalog. In this paper we describe the matching procedure and present...

  17. X-raying Galaxies: A Chandra Legacy

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Q Daniel

    2010-01-01

    This presentation reviews Chandra's major contribution to the understanding of nearby galaxies. After a brief summary on significant advances in characterizing various types of discrete X-ray sources, the presentation focuses on the global hot gas in and around galaxies, especially normal ones like our own. The hot gas is a product of stellar and AGN feedback -- the least understood part in theories of galaxy formation and evolution. Chandra observations have led to the first characterization of the spatial, thermal, chemical, and kinetic properties of the gas in our Galaxy. The gas is concentrated around the Galactic bulge and disk on scales of a few kpc. The column density of chemically-enriched hot gas on larger scales is at least an order magnitude smaller, indicating that it may not account for the bulk of the missing baryon matter predicted for the Galactic halo according to the standard cosmology. Similar results have also been obtained for other nearby galaxies. The X-ray emission from hot gas is well...

  18. X-ray spectroscopy of the ADC source X1822-371 with Chandra and XMM-Newton

    CERN Document Server

    Iaria, R; D'Aì, A; Burderi, L; Mineo, T; Riggio, A; Papitto, A; Robba, N R

    2012-01-01

    The eclipsing low-mass X-ray binary X1822-371 is the prototype of the accretion disc corona (ADC) sources. We analyse two Chandra observations and one XMM-Newton observation to study the discrete features and their variation as a function of the orbital phase, deriving constraints on the temperature, density, and location of the plasma responsible for emission lines. The HETGS and XMM/Epic-pn observed X1822-371 for 140 and 50 ks, respectively. We extracted an averaged spectrum and five spectra from five selected orbital-phase intervals that are 0.04-0.25, 0.25-0.50, 0.50-0.75, 0.75-0.95, and, finally, 0.95-1.04; the orbital phase zero corresponds to the eclipse time. All spectra cover the energy band between 0.35 and 12 keV. We confirm the presence of local neutral matter that partially covers the X-ray emitting region; the equivalent hydrogen column is $5 \\times 10^{22}$ cm$ ^{-2}$ and the covered fraction is about 60-65%. We identify emission lines from highly ionised elements, and a prominent fluorescence ...

  19. X-ray Sources in the Magellanic Clouds: analysis of 15 Years of XMM-Newton and Chandra Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J.; Laycock, S.; Christodoulou, D.; Drake, J.; Fingerman, S.; Hong, J.; Zezas, A.; Antoniou, V.; Coe, M.; Ho, W.

    2016-06-01

    Using ˜160 XMM-Newton, ˜180 Chandra, and all weekly RXTE observations, we have generated a comprehensive library of the known pulsars in the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds (SMC, LMC). We classify various pulsar properties in the range of log L_{X}=32-38 erg s^{-1} and incorporate related parameters in theoretical models. With the high time-resolution data of the EPIC and Chandra cameras and the latest calibration files and software, our 15 year pipeline generates a suite of useful products for each pulsar detection: event lists, high time-resolution light curves, periodograms, spectra, and complete histories of the dot{P}, the pulse fraction, etc., in the broad, soft (0.2-2 keV), and hard (2-12 keV) energy bands. After combining the observations from these telescopes, we found that 15 pulsars are clearly spinning up and another 15 pulsars are distinctly spinning down. We also used the faintest and brightest sources to map out the propeller line and the Eddington line, respectively. We compared the observed pulse profiles to geometric models of X-ray emission in order to constrain the physical parameters of the pulsars. We are preparing a public release of this library so that it can be used by other groups as well.

  20. Beyond Chandra - the X-ray Surveyor

    CERN Document Server

    Weisskopf, Martin C; Tananbaum, Harvey; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 16 years, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has provided an unparalleled means for exploring the universe with its half-arcsecond angular resolution. Chandra studies have deepened our understanding of galaxy clusters, active galactic nuclei, galaxies, supernova remnants, planets, and solar system objects addressing almost all areas of current interest in astronomy and astrophysics. As we look beyond Chandra, it is clear that comparable or even better angular resolution with greatly increased photon throughput is essential to address even more demanding science questions, such as the formation and subsequent growth of black hole seeds at very high redshift; the emergence of the first galaxy groups; and details of feedback over a large range of scales from galaxies to galaxy clusters. Recently, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, together with the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, has initiated a concept study for such a mission named the X-ray Surveyor. This study starts with a baseline payloa...

  1. Chandra-SDSS Normal and Star-Forming Galaxies I: X-ray Source Properties of Galaxies Detected by Chandra in SDSS DR2

    CERN Document Server

    Hornschemeier, A E; Ptak, A F; Tremonti, C A; Colbert, E J M

    2004-01-01

    We have cross-correlated X-ray catalogs derived from archival Chandra ACIS observations with a Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 2 (DR2) galaxy catalog to form a sample of 42 serendipitously X-ray detected galaxies over the redshift interval 0.03 < z < 0.25. This pilot study will help fill in the "redshift gap" between local X-ray-studied samples of normal galaxies and those in the deepest X-ray surveys. Our chief purpose is to compare optical spectroscopic diagnostics of activity (both star-formation and accretion) with X-ray properties of galaxies. Our work supports a normalization value of the X-ray-star-formation-rate (X-ray-SFR) correlation consistent with the lower values published in the literature. The difference is in the allocation of X-ray emission to high-mass X-ray binaries relative to other components such as hot gas, low-mass X-ray binaries, and/or AGN. We are able to quantify a few pitfalls in the use of lower-resolution, lower signal-to-noise optical spectroscopy to identify ...

  2. The Chandra Local Volume Survey I: The X-ray Point Source Populations of NGC 55, NGC 2403, and NGC 4214

    CERN Document Server

    Binder, B; Eracleous, M; Plucinsky, P P; Gaetz, T J; Anderson, S F; Skillman, E D; Dalcanton, J J; Kong, A K H; Weisz, D R

    2015-01-01

    We present comprehensive X-ray point source catalogs of NGC~55, NGC~2403, and NGC~4214 as part of the Chandra Local Volume Survey. The combined archival observations have effective exposure times of 56.5 ks, 190 ks, and 79 ks for NGC~55, NGC~2403, and NGC~4214, respectively. When combined with our published catalogs for NGC 300 and NGC 404, our survey contains 629 X-ray sources total down to a limiting unabsorbed luminosity of $\\sim5\\times10^{35}$ erg s$^{-1}$ in the 0.35-8 keV band in each of the five galaxies. We present X-ray hardness ratios, spectral analysis, radial source distributions, and an analysis of the temporal variability for the X-ray sources detected at high significance. To constrain the nature of each X-ray source, we carried out cross-correlations with multi-wavelength data sets. We searched overlapping Hubble Space Telescope observations for optical counterparts to our X-ray detections to provide preliminary classifications for each X-ray source as a likely X-ray binary, background AGN, su...

  3. Near-infrared counterparts to Chandra X-ray sources toward the Galactic Center. II. Discovery of Wolf-Rayet stars and O supergiants

    CERN Document Server

    Mauerhan, Jon C; Morris, Mark R; Stolovy, Susan R; Cotera, Angela S

    2009-01-01

    We present new identifications of infrared counterparts to the population of hard X-ray sources near the Galactic center detected by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We have confirmed 16 new massive stellar counterparts to the X-ray population, including nitrogen-type (WN) and carbon-type (WC) Wolf-Rayet stars, and O supergiants. For the majority of these sources, the X-ray photometry is consistent with thermal emission from plasma having temperatures in the range of kT=1-8 keV or non-thermal emission having power-law indices in the range of -1X-ray luminosities in the range of Lx~1e32-1e34 erg/s. Several sources have exhibited X-ray variability of several factors between separate observations. The X-ray properties are not a ubiquitous feature of single massive stars but are typical of massive binaries, in which the high-energy emission is generated by the collision of supersonic winds, or by accretion onto a compact companion. However, the possibility of intrinsic hard X-ray generation from...

  4. A Chandra/ACIS Study of 30 Doradus II. X-ray Point Sources in the Massive Star Cluster R136 and Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Townsley, L K; Feigelson, E D; Garmire, G P; Getman, K V

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the X-ray point source population of the 30 Doradus star-forming complex in the Large Magellanic Cloud using high-spatial-resolution X-ray images and spatially-resolved spectra obtained with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Here we describe the X-ray sources in a 17' x 17' field centered on R136, the massive star cluster at the center of the main 30 Dor nebula. We detect 20 of the 32 Wolf-Rayet stars in the ACIS field. R136 is resolved at the subarcsecond level into almost 100 X-ray sources, including many typical O3--O5 stars as well as a few bright X-ray sources previously reported. Over two orders of magnitude of scatter in L_X is seen among R136 O stars, suggesting that X-ray emission in the most massive stars depends critically on the details of wind properties and binarity of each system, rather than reflecting the widely-reported characteristic value L_X/L_bol ~ 10^{-7}. Such a canonical ratio may exist for single massive stars in R136, ...

  5. Highlights and Discoveries from the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Tananbaum, H; Tucker, W; Wilkes, B; Edmonds, P

    2014-01-01

    Within 40 years of the detection of the first extrasolar X-ray source in 1962,NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has achieved an increase in sensitivity of 10 orders of magnitude, comparable to the gain in going from naked-eye observations to the most powerful optical telescopes over the past 400 years. Chandra is unique in its capabilities for producing sub-arcsecond X-ray images with 100-200 eV energy resolution for energies in the range 0.08X-ray sources to high precision, detecting extremely faint sources, and obtaining high resolution spectra of selected cosmic phenomena. The extended Chandra mission provides a long observing baseline with stable and well-calibrated instruments, enabling temporal studies over time-scales from milliseconds to years. In this report we present a selection of highlights that illustrate how observations using Chandra, sometimes alone, but often in conjunction with other telescopes, have deepened, and in some instances revolutionized, our understanding ...

  6. A Chandra study of X-ray sources in the field of the z=2.16 radio galaxy MRC 1138-262

    CERN Document Server

    Pentericci, L; Carilli, C L; Harris, D E; Miley, G K; Röttgering, H J A

    2002-01-01

    We present results from a Chandra X-ray Observatory study of the field X-ray source population in the vicinity of the radio galaxy MRC 1138-262. Many serendipitous X-ray sources are detected in an area of 8'x8' around the radio source and 90% are identified in our deep VLT images. The space density of such sources is higher than expected on the basis of the statistics of ROSAT and Chandra deep surveys. The most likely explanation is in terms of a concentration of AGN associated with the protocluster at z=2.16 which was found around the radio galaxy in previous studies. Two sources have a confirmed spectroscopic redshift close to that of the radio galaxy, and for three more sources other observations suggest that they are associated with the protocluster. Four of these five X-ray sources form, together with the radio galaxy, a filament in the plane of the sky. The direction of the filament is similar to that of the radio source axis, the large scale distribution of the other protocluster members, the 150 kpc-s...

  7. Highlights and discoveries from the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tananbaum, H; Weisskopf, M C; Tucker, W; Wilkes, B; Edmonds, P

    2014-06-01

    Within 40 years of the detection of the first extra-solar x-ray source in 1962, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has achieved an increase in sensitivity of 10 orders of magnitude, comparable to the gain in going from naked-eye observations to the most powerful optical telescopes over the past 400 years. Chandra is unique in its capabilities for producing sub-arcsecond x-ray images with 100-200 eV energy resolution for energies in the range 0.08 black holes; the growth of supermassive black holes and their role in the regulation of star formation and growth of galaxies; impacts of collisions, mergers, and feedback on growth and evolution of groups and clusters of galaxies; and properties of dark matter and dark energy.

  8. XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray follow-up observations of the VHE gamma-ray source HESS J1507-622

    CERN Document Server

    Tibolla, O; Kosack, K

    2014-01-01

    Context. The discovery of the unique source HESS J1507-622 in the very high energy (VHE) range (100 GeV-100 TeV) opened new possibilities to study the parent population of ultra-relativistic particles found in astrophysical sources and underlined the possibility of new scenarios/mechanisms crucial for understanding the underlying astrophysical processes in nonthermal sources. Aims. The follow-up X-ray (0.2 - 10 keV) observations on HESS J1507-622 are reported, and possibilities regarding the nature of the VHE source and that of the newly discovered X-ray sources are investigated. Methods.We obtained bservations with the X-ray satellites XMM-Newton and Chandra. Background corrections were applied to the data to search for extended diffuse emission. Since HESS J1507-622 covers a large part of the field of view of these instruments, blank-sky background fields were used. Results. The discovery of several new X-ray sources and a new, faint, extended X-ray source with a flux of ~6e-14 erg cm^-2 s^-1 is reported. I...

  9. Chandra Observations of a 1.9 kpc Separation Double X-ray Source in a Candidate Dual AGN Galaxy at z=0.16

    CERN Document Server

    Comerford, Julia M; Gerke, Brian F; Madejski, Greg M

    2011-01-01

    We report Chandra observations of a double X-ray source in the z=0.1569 galaxy SDSS J171544.05+600835.7. The galaxy was initially identified as a dual AGN candidate based on the double-peaked [O III] emission lines, with a line-of-sight velocity separation of 350 km/s, in its Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrum. We used the Kast Spectrograph at Lick Observatory to obtain two longslit spectra of the galaxy at two different position angles, which reveal that the two AGN emission components have not only a velocity offset, but also a projected spatial offset of 1.9 kpc/h70 on the sky. Chandra/ACIS observations of two X-ray sources with the same spatial offset and orientation as the optical emission suggest the galaxy most likely contains Compton-thick dual AGN, although the observations could also be explained by AGN jets. Deeper X-ray observations that reveal Fe K lines, if present, would distinguish between the two scenarios. The observations of a double X-ray source in SDSS J171544.05+600835.7 are a proof of co...

  10. Revealing the heavily obscured AGN population of High Redshift 3CRR Sources with Chandra X-ray Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkes, Belinda J; Haas, Martin; Barthel, Peter; Leipski, Christian; Willner, S P; Worrall, D M; Birkinshaw, Mark; Antonucci, Robert; Ashby, M L N; Chini, Rolf; Fazio, G G; Lawrence, Charles; Ogle, Patrick; Schulz, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Chandra observations of a complete, flux-limited sample of 38 high-redshift (10) indicating obscuration (log N_H ~ 22-24 cm^-2). These properties and the correlation between obscuration and radio core-fraction are consistent with orientation-dependent obscuration as in Unification models. About half the NLRGs have soft X-ray hardness ratios and/or high [OIII] emission line to X-ray luminosity ratio suggesting obscuration by Compton thick (CT) material so that scattered nuclear or extended X-ray emission dominates (as in NGC1068). The ratios of unobscured to Compton-thin (10^{22} 1.5 x 10^{24} cm^-2) is 2.5:1.4:1 in this high luminosity, radio-selected sample. The obscured fraction is 0.5, higher than is typically reported for AGN at comparable luminosities from multi-wavelength surveys (0.1-0.3). Assuming random nuclear orientation, the unobscured half-opening angle of the disk/wind/torus structure is ~ 60deg and the obscuring material covers 30deg of which ~ 12deg is Compton thick. The multi-wavelength prope...

  11. Highlights and discoveries from the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tananbaum, H.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Tucker, W.; Wilkes, B.; Edmonds, P.

    2014-06-01

    Within 40 years of the detection of the first extra-solar x-ray source in 1962, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has achieved an increase in sensitivity of 10 orders of magnitude, comparable to the gain in going from naked-eye observations to the most powerful optical telescopes over the past 400 years. Chandra is unique in its capabilities for producing sub-arcsecond x-ray images with 100-200 eV energy resolution for energies in the range 0.08 cosmic phenomena. The extended Chandra mission provides a long observing baseline with stable and well-calibrated instruments, enabling temporal studies over timescales from milliseconds to years. In this report we present a selection of highlights that illustrate how observations using Chandra, sometimes alone, but often in conjunction with other telescopes, have deepened, and in some instances revolutionized, our understanding of topics as diverse as protoplanetary nebulae; massive stars; supernova explosions; pulsar wind nebulae; the superfluid interior of neutron stars; accretion flows around black holes; the growth of supermassive black holes and their role in the regulation of star formation and growth of galaxies; impacts of collisions, mergers, and feedback on growth and evolution of groups and clusters of galaxies; and properties of dark matter and dark energy.

  12. The Extended Chandra Deep Field-South Survey: Optical spectroscopy of faint X-ray sources with the VLT and Keck

    CERN Document Server

    Silverman, J D; Salvato, M; Hasinger, G; Bergeron, J; Capak, P; Szokoly, G; Finoguenov, A; Gilli, R; Rosati, P; Tozzi, P; Vignali, C; Alexander, D M; Brandt, W N; Lehmer, B D; Luo, B; Rafferty, D; Xue, Y Q; Balestra, I; Bauer, F E; Brusa, M; Comastri, A; Kartaltepe, J; Koekemoer, A M; Miyaji, T; Schneider, D P; Treister, E; Wisotski, L; Schramm, M

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of a program to acquire high-quality optical spectra of X-ray sources detected in the E-CDF-S and its central area. New spectroscopic redshifts are measured for 283 counterparts to Chandra sources with deep exposures (t~2-9 hr per pointing) using multi-slit facilities on both the VLT and Keck thus bringing the total number of spectroscopically-identified X-ray sources to over 500 in this survey field. We provide a comprehensive catalog of X-ray sources detected in the E-CDF-S including the optical and near-infrared counterparts, and redshifts (both spectroscopic and photometric) that incorporate published spectroscopic catalogs thus resulting in a final sample with a high fraction (80%) of X-ray sources having secure identifications. We demonstrate the remarkable coverage of the Lx-z plane now accessible from our data while emphasizing the detection of AGNs that contribute to the faint end of the luminosity function at 1.5

  13. The discovery of lensed radio and X-ray sources behind the Frontier Fields cluster MACS J0717.5+3745 with the JVLA and Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    van Weeren, R J; Jones, C; Forman, W R; Andrade-Santos, F; Bonafede, A; Brüggen, M; Bulbul, E; Clarke, T E; Churazov, E; David, L; Dawson, W A; Donahue, M; Goulding, A; Kraft, R P; Mason, B; Merten, J; Mroczkowski, T; Murray, S S; Nulsen, P E J; Rosati, P; Roediger, E; Randall, S W; Sayers, J; Umetsu, K; Vikhlinin, A; Zitrin, A

    2015-01-01

    We report on high-resolution JVLA and Chandra observations of the HST Frontier Cluster MACS J0717.5+3745. MACS J0717.5+3745 offers the largest contiguous magnified area of any known cluster, making it a promising target to search for lensed radio and X-ray sources. With the high-resolution 1.0-6.5 GHz JVLA imaging in A and B configuration, we detect a total of 51 compact radio sources within the area covered by the HST imaging. Within this sample we find 7 lensed sources with amplification factors larger than $2$. None of these sources are identified as multiply-lensed. Based on the radio luminosities, the majority of these sources are likely star forming galaxies with star formation rates of 10-50 M$_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ located at $1 \\lesssim z \\lesssim 2$. Two of the lensed radio sources are also detected in the Chandra image of the cluster. These two sources are likely AGN, given their $2-10$ keV X-ray luminosities of $\\sim 10^{43-44}$ erg s$^{-1}$. From the derived radio luminosity function, we find evidence...

  14. The statistical uncertainties on X-ray flux and spectral parameters from Chandra ACIS-I observations of faint sources: Application to the Cygnus OB2 Association

    CERN Document Server

    Albacete-Colombo, J F; Drake, J J; Wright, N J; Guarcello, M; Kashyap, V

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the uncertainties of fitted X-ray model parameters and fluxes for relatively faint Chandra ACIS-I source spectra. Monte-Carlo (MC) simulations are employed to construct a large set of 150,000 fake X-ray spectra in the low photon count statistics regime (from 20 to 350 net counts) using the XSPEC spectral model fitting package. The simulations employed both absorbed thermal (APEC) and non-thermal (power-law) models, in concert with the Chandra ACIS-I instrument response and interstellar absorption. Simulated X-ray spectra were fit assuming a wide set of different input parameters and C-statistic minimization criteria to avoid numerical artifacts in the accepted solutions. Results provide an error estimate for each parameter (absorption, NH, plasma temperature, kT, or power-law slope, Gamma, and flux, and for different background contamination levels. The distributions of these errors are studied as a function of the 1 sigma quantiles and we show how these correlate with different model parameter...

  15. Chandra X-ray Observatory Optical Axis and Aimpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Chandra X-ray Observatory revolutionized the X-ray astronomy as being the first, and so far the only, X-ray telescope achieving sub-arcsecond resolution. Chandra comprises of three principal elements: the High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA), Pointing Control and Aspect Determination (PCAD) system, and the Science Instrument Module (SIM). To achieve and retain the unprecedented imaging quality, it is critical that these three principal elements stay rigid and stable for the entire life time of the Chandra operation. Tracking the Chandra optical axis and aimpoint with respect to detector positions is the most relevant measurement for understanding telescope stability. The study shows that both the optical axis and the aimpoint has been drifting since Chandra launch. I will discuss the telescope focal-point, optical axis, aimpoint, their positiondrifts during the mission, the impact to Chandra operations, and the permanent default aimpoint, to be implemented in Chandra cycle 18.

  16. Deep Chandra observations of NGC 7457, the X-ray point source populations of a low mass early-type galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Mark B.; Zepf, Stephen E.; Kundu, Arunav; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Lehmer, Bret D.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Maraston, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    We present the X-ray point source population of NGC 7457 based on 124 ks of Chandra observations. Previous deep Chandra observations of low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) in early-type galaxies have typically targeted the large populations of massive galaxies. NGC 7457 is a nearby, early-type galaxy with a stellar luminosity of 1.7× 10^{10} {L_{K⊙}}, allowing us to investigate the populations in a relatively low mass galaxy. We classify the detected X-ray sources into field LMXBs, globular cluster LMXBs, and background AGN based on identifying optical counterparts in new HST/ACS images. We detect 10 field LMXBs within the rext ellipse of NGC 7457 (with semi-major axis ˜ 9.1 kpc, ellipticity = 0.55). The corresponding number of LMXBs with {Lx} > 2 × 10^{37} {{erg s^{-1}}} per stellar luminosity is consistent with that observed in more massive galaxies, ˜7 per 10^{10} {L_{K⊙}}. We detect a small globular cluster population in these HST data and show that its colour distribution is likely bimodal and that its specific frequency is similar to that of other early type galaxies. However, no X-ray emission is detected from any of these clusters. Using published data for other galaxies, we show that this non-detection is consistent with the small stellar mass of these clusters. We estimate that 0.11 (and 0.03) LMXBs are expected per 106 {M_{⊙}} in metal-rich (and metal-poor) globular clusters. This corresponds to 1100 (and 330) LMXBs per 10^{10} {L_{K⊙}}, highlighting the enhanced formation efficiency of LMXBs in globular clusters. A nuclear X-ray source is detected with Lx varying from 2.8-6.8× 10^{38} {{erg s^{-1}}}. Combining this Lx with a published dynamical mass estimate for the central SMBH in NGC 7457, we find that {Lx}/L_{Edd} varies from 0.5 - 1.3 × 10-6.

  17. Obscuring Supersoft X-ray Sources in Stellar Winds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mikkel Thomas Bøje; Dominik, Carsten; Nelemans, Gijs

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of obscuring supersoft X-ray sources in the winds of companion stars. We derive limits on the amount of circumstellar material needed to fully obscure a 'canonical' supersoft X-ray source in the Large Magellanic Cloud, as observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory....

  18. The Chandra Deep Field-North Survey and the Cosmic X-ray Background

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, W N; Bauer, F E; Hornschemeier, A E

    2002-01-01

    Chandra has performed a 1.4 Ms survey centred on the Hubble Deep Field-North (HDF-N), probing the X-ray Universe 55-550 times deeper than was possible with pre-Chandra missions. We describe the detected point and extended X-ray sources and discuss their overall multiwavelength (optical, infrared, submillimeter, and radio) properties. Special attention is paid to the HDF-N X-ray sources, luminous infrared starburst galaxies, optically faint X-ray sources, and high-to-extreme redshift AGN. We also describe how stacking analyses have been used to probe the average X-ray emission properties of normal and starburst galaxies at cosmologically interesting distances. Finally, we discuss plans to extend the survey and argue that a 5-10 Ms Chandra survey would lay key groundwork for future missions such as XEUS and Generation-X.

  19. The Chandra Source Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Ian N; Glotfelty, Kenny J; Anderson, Craig S; Bonaventura, Nina R; Chen, Judy C; Davis, John E; Doe, Stephen M; Evans, Janet D; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Galle, Elizabeth C; Gibbs, Danny G; Grier, John D; Hain, Roger M; Hall, Diane M; Harbo, Peter N; Xiangqun,; He,; Houck, John C; Karovska, Margarita; Kashyap, Vinay L; Lauer, Jennifer; McCollough, Michael L; McDowell, Jonathan C; Miller, Joseph B; Mitschang, Arik W; Morgan, Douglas L; Mossman, Amy E; Nichols, Joy S; Nowak, Michael A; Plummer, David A; Refsdal, Brian L; Rots, Arnold H; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Sundheim, Beth A; Tibbetts, Michael S; Van Stone, David W; Winkelman, Sherry L; Zografou, Panagoula

    2010-01-01

    The Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) is a general purpose virtual X-ray astrophysics facility that provides access to a carefully selected set of generally useful quantities for individual X-ray sources, and is designed to satisfy the needs of a broad-based group of scientists, including those who may be less familiar with astronomical data analysis in the X-ray regime. The first release of the CSC includes information about 94,676 distinct X-ray sources detected in a subset of public ACIS imaging observations from roughly the first eight years of the Chandra mission. This release of the catalog includes point and compact sources with observed spatial extents <~ 30''. The catalog (1) provides access to the best estimates of the X-ray source properties for detected sources, with good scientific fidelity, and directly supports scientific analysis using the individual source data; (2) facilitates analysis of a wide range of statistical properties for classes of X-ray sources; and (3) provides efficient access to ...

  20. Chandra Survey in the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole Deep Field. I. X-ray Data, Point-like Source Catalog, Sensitivity Maps, and Number Counts

    CERN Document Server

    Krumpe, M; Brunner, H; Hanami, H; Ishigaki, T; Takagi, T; Markowitz, A G; Goto, T; Malkan, M A; Matsuhara, H; Pearson, C; Ueda, Y; Wada, T

    2014-01-01

    We present data products from the 300 ks Chandra survey in the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) deep field. This field has a unique set of 9-band infrared photometry covering 2-24 micron from the AKARI Infrared Camera, including mid-infrared (MIR) bands not covered by Spitzer. The survey is one of the deepest ever achieved at ~15 micron, and is by far the widest among those with similar depths in the MIR. This makes this field unique for the MIR-selection of AGN at z~1. We design a source detection procedure, which performs joint Maximum Likelihood PSF fits on all of our 15 mosaicked Chandra pointings covering an area of 0.34 square degree. The procedure has been highly optimized and tested by simulations. We provide a point source catalog with photometry and Bayesian-based 90 per cent confidence upper limits in the 0.5-7, 0.5-2, 2-7, 2-4, and 4-7 keV bands. The catalog contains 457 X-ray sources and the spurious fraction is estimated to be ~1.7 per cent. Sensitivity and 90 per cent confidence upper flux limit...

  1. Globular cluster x-ray sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooley, David

    2010-04-20

    Globular clusters and x-ray astronomy have a long and fruitful history. Uhuru and OSO-7 revealed highly luminous (> 10(36) ergs(-1)) x-ray sources in globular clusters, and Einstein and ROSAT revealed a larger population of low-luminosity (luminosity sources were low-mass x-ray binaries in outburst and that they were orders of magnitude more abundant per unit mass in globular clusters than in the rest of the galaxy. However, the low-luminosity sources proved difficult to classify. Many ideas were put forth--low-mass x-ray binaries in quiescence (qLMXBs), cataclysmic variables (CVs), active main-sequence binaries (ABs), and millisecond pulsars (MSPs)--but secure identifications were scarce. In ROSAT observations of 55 clusters, about 25 low-luminosity sources were found. Chandra has now observed over 80 Galactic globular clusters, and these observations have revealed over 1,500 x-ray sources. The superb angular resolution has allowed for many counterpart identifications, providing clues to the nature of this population. It is a heterogeneous mix of qLMXBs, CVs, ABs, and MSPs, and it has been shown that the qLMXBs and CVs are both, in part, overabundant like the luminous LMXBs. The number of x-ray sources in a cluster correlates very well with its encounter frequency. This points to dynamical formation scenarios for the x-ray sources and shows them to be excellent tracers of the complicated internal dynamics. The relation between the encounter frequency and the number of x-ray sources has been used to suggest that we have misunderstood the dynamical states of globular clusters.

  2. Globular cluster x-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooley, David

    2010-01-01

    Globular clusters and x-ray astronomy have a long and fruitful history. Uhuru and OSO-7 revealed highly luminous (> 1036 ergs-1) x-ray sources in globular clusters, and Einstein and ROSAT revealed a larger population of low-luminosity (luminosity sources were low-mass x-ray binaries in outburst and that they were orders of magnitude more abundant per unit mass in globular clusters than in the rest of the galaxy. However, the low-luminosity sources proved difficult to classify. Many ideas were put forth—low-mass x-ray binaries in quiescence (qLMXBs), cataclysmic variables (CVs), active main-sequence binaries (ABs), and millisecond pulsars (MSPs)—but secure identifications were scarce. In ROSAT observations of 55 clusters, about 25 low-luminosity sources were found. Chandra has now observed over 80 Galactic globular clusters, and these observations have revealed over 1,500 x-ray sources. The superb angular resolution has allowed for many counterpart identifications, providing clues to the nature of this population. It is a heterogeneous mix of qLMXBs, CVs, ABs, and MSPs, and it has been shown that the qLMXBs and CVs are both, in part, overabundant like the luminous LMXBs. The number of x-ray sources in a cluster correlates very well with its encounter frequency. This points to dynamical formation scenarios for the x-ray sources and shows them to be excellent tracers of the complicated internal dynamics. The relation between the encounter frequency and the number of x-ray sources has been used to suggest that we have misunderstood the dynamical states of globular clusters. PMID:20404204

  3. CELESTIAL X-RAY SOURCES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    sources, (4) the physical conditions in the pulsating x-ray source in the Crab Nebula , and (5) miscellaneous related topics. A bibliography of all work performed under the contract is given. (Author)

  4. An Extensive Census of Hubble Space Telescope Counterparts to Chandra X-Ray Sources in the Globular Cluster 47 Tucanae. II. Time Series and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Peter D.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Heinke, Craig O.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    2003-10-01

    We report time series and variability information for the optical identifications of X-ray sources in 47 Tucanae reported in Paper I (at least 22 cataclysmic variables [CVs] and 29 active binaries). The radial distribution of the CVs is indistinguishable from that of the millisecond pulsars (MSPs) detected by Freire et al. A study of the eight CVs with secure orbital periods (two obtained from the Chandra study of Grindlay et al.) shows that the 47 Tuc CVs have fainter accretion disks, in the V band, than field CVs with similar periods. These faint disks and the faint absolute magnitudes (MV) of the 47 Tuc CVs suggests they have low accretion rates. One possible explanation is that the 47 Tuc objects may be a more representative sample of CVs, down to our detection threshold, than the CVs found in the field (where many low accretion rate systems are believed to be undiscovered), showing the advantages of deep globular cluster observations. The median FX/Fopt value for the 47 Tuc CVs is higher than that of all known classes of field CV, partly because of the faint MV values and partly because of the relatively high X-ray luminosities (LX). The latter are only seen in DQ Her systems in the field, but the 47 Tuc CVs are much fainter optically than most field DQ Her's. Previous work by Edmonds et al. has shown that the four brightest CVs in NGC 6397 have optical spectra and broadband colors that are consistent with DQ Her's having lower than average accretion rates. Some combination of magnetic behavior and low accretion rates may be able to explain our observations, but the results at present are ambiguous, since no class of field CV has distributions of both LX and MV that are consistent with those of the 47 Tuc CVs. The radial distribution of the X-ray detected active binaries is indistinguishable from that of the much larger sample of optical variables (eclipsing and contact binaries and BY Dra variables) detected in previous Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2

  5. Identification of Faint Chandra X-ray Sources in the Core-Collapsed Globular Cluster NGC 6397: Evidence for a Bimodal Cataclysmic Variable Population

    CERN Document Server

    Cohn, Haldan N; Couch, Sean M; Anderson, Jay; Cool, Adrienne M; Berg, Maureen van den; Bogdanov, Slavko; Heinke, Craig O; Grindlay, Jonathan E; 10.1088/0004-637X/722/1/20

    2011-01-01

    We have searched for optical identifications for 79 Chandra X-ray sources that lie within the half-mass radius of the nearby, core-collapsed globular cluster NGC 6397, using deep Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys Wide Field Channel imaging in H-alpha, R, and B. Photometry of these images allows us to classify candidate counterparts based on color-magnitude diagram location. In addition to recovering nine previously detected cataclysmic variables (CVs), we have identified six additional faint CV candidates, a total of 42 active binaries (ABs), two millisecond pulsars (MSPs), one candidate active galactic nucleus, and one candidate interacting galaxy pair. Of the 79 sources, 69 have a plausible optical counterpart. The 15 likely and possible CVs in NGC 6397 mostly fall into two groups: a brighter group of six for which the optical emission is dominated by contributions from the secondary and accretion disk, and a fainter group of seven for which the white dwarf dominates the optical emission. T...

  6. The Chandra ACIS Timing Survey Project: glimpsing a sample of faint X-ray pulsators

    CERN Document Server

    Israel, Gian Luca; Castillo, Guillermo Andres Rodriguez; Sidoli, Lara

    2016-01-01

    We report on the discovery of 41 new pulsating sources in the data of the Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, which is sensitive to X-ray photons in the 0.3-10 keV band. The archival data of the first 15 years of Chandra observations were retrieved and analysed by means of fast Fourier transforms, employing a peak-detection algorithm able to screen candidate signals in an automatic fashion. We carried out the search for new X-ray pulsators in light curves with more than 50 photons, for a total of about 190,000 lightcurves out of about 430,000 extracted. With these numbers, the ChAndra Timing Survey at Brera And Roma astronomical observatories (CATS@BAR) - as we called the project - represents the largest ever systematic search for coherent signals in the classic X-ray band. More than 50 per cent of the signals were confirmed by further Chandra (for those sources with two or more pointings), XMM-Newton or ROSAT data. The period distribution of the new X-ray pulsators above about 2,000s resembles that of...

  7. Chandra X-ray Detection of the Enigmatic Field Star BP Psc

    CERN Document Server

    Kastner, Joel H; Rodriguez, David; Grosso, Nicolas; Zuckerman, B; Perrin, Marshall D; Forveille, Thierry; Graham, James R

    2010-01-01

    BP Psc is a remarkable emission-line field star that is orbited by a dusty disk and drives a parsec-scale system of jets. We report the detection by the Chandra X-ray Observatory of a weak X-ray point source coincident with the centroids of optical/IR and submillimeter continuum emission at BP Psc. As the star's photosphere is obscured throughout the visible and near-infrared, the Chandra X-ray source likely represents the first detection of BP Psc itself. The X-rays most likely originate with magnetic activity at BP Psc and hence can be attributed either to a stellar corona or to star-disk interactions. The log of the ratio of X-ray to bolometric luminosity (log(L_X/L_{bol}) lies in the range -5.8 to -4.2. This is smaller than log(L_X/L_{bol}) ratios typical of low-mass, pre-main sequence stars, but is well within the log(L_X/L_{bol}) range observed for rapidly-rotating (FK Com-type) G giant stars. Hence, the Chandra results favor an exotic model wherein the disk/jet system of BP Psc is the result of its ver...

  8. Chandra reveals a black-hole X-ray binary within the ultraluminous supernova remnant MF 16

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, T P

    2003-01-01

    We present evidence, based on Chandra ACIS-S observations of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 6946, that the extraodinary X-ray luminosity of the MF 16 supernova remnant actually arises in a black-hole X-ray binary. This conclusion is drawn from the point-like nature of the X-ray source, its X-ray spectrum closely resembling the spectrum of other ultraluminous X-ray sources thought to be black-hole X-ray binary systems, and the detection of rapid hard X-ray variability from the source. We briefly discuss the nature of the hard X-ray variability, and the origin of the extreme radio and optical luminosity of MF 16 in light of this identification.

  9. PROBING WOLF–RAYET WINDS: CHANDRA/HETG X-RAY SPECTRA OF WR 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huenemoerder, David P.; Schulz, N. S. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 70 Vassar St., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Gayley, K. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Hamann, W.-R.; Oskinova, L.; Shenar, T. [Institut für Physik und Astronomie, Universität Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24/25, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Ignace, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614 (United States); Nichols, J. S. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., MS 34, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Pollock, A. M. T., E-mail: dph@space.mit.edu, E-mail: ken.gayley@gmail.com, E-mail: wrh@astro.physik.uni-potsdam.de, E-mail: lida@astro.physik.uni-potsdam.de, E-mail: shtomer@astro.physik.uni-potsdam.de, E-mail: ignace@mail.etsu.edu, E-mail: jnichols@cfa.harvard.edu [European Space Agency, ESAC, Apartado 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Cañada (Spain)

    2015-12-10

    With a deep Chandra/HETGS exposure of WR 6, we have resolved emission lines whose profiles show that the X-rays originate from a uniformly expanding spherical wind of high X-ray-continuum optical depth. The presence of strong helium-like forbidden lines places the source of X-ray emission at tens to hundreds of stellar radii from the photosphere. Variability was present in X-rays and simultaneous optical photometry, but neither were correlated with the known period of the system or with each other. An enhanced abundance of sodium revealed nuclear-processed material, a quantity related to the evolutionary state of the star. The characterization of the extent and nature of the hot plasma in WR 6 will help to pave the way to a more fundamental theoretical understanding of the winds and evolution of massive stars.

  10. Invisible Giant: Chandra's Limits on X-rays from Betelgeuse

    CERN Document Server

    Posson-Brown, J; Pease, D O; Drake, J J; Posson-Brown, Jennifer; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Pease, Deron O.; Drake, Jeremy J.

    2006-01-01

    We have analyzed Chandra calibration observations of Betelgeuse ($\\alpha$ Ori, M2 Iab, $m_{V} = 0.58$, 131 pc) obtained at the aimpoint locations of the HRC-I (8 ks), HRC-S (8 ks), and ACIS-I (5 ks). Betelgeuse is undetected in all the individual observations as well as cumulatively. We derive $3\\sigma$ upper limits to its X-ray count rates and compute the corresponding X-ray flux upper limits for isothermal coronal plasma over a range of temperatures, $T=0.3-10$~MK. We place a flux limit at the telescope of $\\fx\\approx4\\times10^{-15}$~ergs~s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ at T=1~MK. The upper limit is lowered by a factor of $\\approx3$ at higher temperatures, roughly an order of magnitude lower than that obtained previously. Assuming that the entire stellar surface is active, these fluxes correspond to a surface flux limit that ranges from 30-7000~ergs~s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ at T=1~MK, to $\\approx 1$~ergs~s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ at higher temperatures, five orders of magnitude lower than the quiet Sun X-ray surface flux. We discuss...

  11. The Chandra ACIS Timing Survey Project: glimpsing a sample of faint X-ray pulsators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, G. L.; Esposito, P.; Rodríguez Castillo, G. A.; Sidoli, L.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the discovery of 41 new pulsating sources in the data of the Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, which is sensitive to X-ray photons in the 0.3-10 keV band. The archival data of the first 15 yr of Chandra observations were retrieved and analysed by means of fast Fourier transforms, employing a peak-detection algorithm able to screen candidate signals in an automatic fashion. We carried out the search for new X-ray pulsators in light curves with more than 50 photons, for a total of about 190 000 light curves out of about 430 000 extracted. With these numbers, the ChAndra Timing Survey at Brera And Roma astronomical observatories (CATS @ BAR) - as we called the project - represents the largest ever systematic search for coherent signals in the classic X-ray band. More than 50 per cent of the signals were confirmed by further Chandra (for those sources with two or more pointings), XMM-Newton or ROSAT data. The period distribution of the new X-ray pulsators above ˜2000 s resembles that of cataclysmic variables, while there is a paucity of sources with shorter period and low fluxes. Since there is not an obvious bias against these detections, a possible interpretation is in terms of a magnetic gating mechanism in accreting neutron stars. Finally, we note that CATS @ BAR is a living project and the detection algorithm will continue to be routinely applied to the new Chandra data as they become public. Based on the results obtained so far, we expect to discover about three new pulsators every year.

  12. An X-ray Tour of Massive Star-forming Regions with Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Townsley, L K

    2006-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory is providing fascinating new views of massive star-forming regions, revealing all stages in the life cycles of massive stars and their effects on their surroundings. I present a Chandra tour of some of the most famous of these regions: M17, NGC 3576, W3, Tr14 in Carina, and 30 Doradus. Chandra highlights the physical processes that characterize the lives of these clusters, from the ionizing sources of ultracompact HII regions (W3) to superbubbles so large that they shape our views of galaxies (30 Dor). X-ray observations usually reveal hundreds of pre-main sequence (lower-mass) stars accompanying the OB stars that power these great HII region complexes, although in one case (W3 North) this population is mysteriously absent. The most massive stars themselves are often anomalously hard X-ray emitters; this may be a new indicator of close binarity. These complexes are sometimes suffused by soft diffuse X-rays (M17, NGC 3576), signatures of multi-million-degree plasmas created by fas...

  13. X-ray observations of dust obscured galaxies in the Chandra Deep Field South

    CERN Document Server

    Corral, A; Comastri, A; Ranalli, P; Akylas, A; Salvato, M; Lanzuisi, G; Vignali, C; Koutoulidis, L

    2016-01-01

    We present the properties of X-ray detected dust obscured galaxies (DOGs) in the Chandra Deep Field South. In recent years, it has been proposed that a significant percentage of the elusive Compton-thick (CT) active galactic nuclei (AGN) could be hidden among DOGs. In a previous work, we presented the properties of X-ray detected DOGs by making use of the deepest X-ray observations available at that time, the 2Ms observations of the Chandra deep fields. In that work, we only found a moderate percentage ($<$ 50%) of CT AGN among the DOGs sample, but we were limited by poor photon statistics. In this paper, we use not only a deeper 6 Ms Chandra survey of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S), but combine these data with the 3 Ms XMM-Newton survey of the CDF-S. We also take advantage of the great coverage of the CDF-S region from the UV to the far-IR to fit the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of our sources. Out of the 14 AGN composing our sample, 9 are highly absorbed (but only 3 could be CT AGN), wherea...

  14. The Chandra planetary nebula survey (CHANPLANS). II. X-ray emission from compact planetary nebulae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, M.; Kastner, J. H. [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Montez, R. Jr. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Balick, B. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Frew, D. J.; De Marco, O.; Parker, Q. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Macquarie Research Centre for Astronomy, Astrophysics and Astrophotonics, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Jones, D. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Atacama, Copayapu 485, Copiapó (Chile); Miszalski, B. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory, 7935 (South Africa); Sahai, R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, MS 183-900, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Blackman, E.; Frank, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Chu, Y.-H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States); Guerrero, M. A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, IAA-CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, Granada, E-18008 (Spain); Lopez, J. A. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Ensenada, Apdo. Postal 22860, Ensenada, B. C. (Mexico); Zijlstra, A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Bujarrabal, V. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Corradi, R. L. M. [Departamento de Astrofísica, Universidad de La Laguna, E-38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Nordhaus, J. [NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Fellow, Center for Computational Relativity and Gravitation, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); and others

    2014-10-20

    We present results from the most recent set of observations obtained as part of the Chandra X-ray observatory Planetary Nebula Survey (CHANPLANS), the first comprehensive X-ray survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood (i.e., within ∼1.5 kpc of the Sun). The survey is designed to place constraints on the frequency of appearance and range of X-ray spectral characteristics of X-ray-emitting PN central stars and the evolutionary timescales of wind-shock-heated bubbles within PNe. CHANPLANS began with a combined Cycle 12 and archive Chandra survey of 35 PNe. CHANPLANS continued via a Chandra Cycle 14 Large Program which targeted all (24) remaining known compact (R {sub neb} ≲ 0.4 pc), young PNe that lie within ∼1.5 kpc. Results from these Cycle 14 observations include first-time X-ray detections of hot bubbles within NGC 1501, 3918, 6153, and 6369, and point sources in HbDs 1, NGC 6337, and Sp 1. The addition of the Cycle 14 results brings the overall CHANPLANS diffuse X-ray detection rate to ∼27% and the point source detection rate to ∼36%. It has become clearer that diffuse X-ray emission is associated with young (≲ 5 × 10{sup 3} yr), and likewise compact (R {sub neb} ≲ 0.15 pc), PNe with closed structures and high central electron densities (n{sub e} ≳ 1000 cm{sup –3}), and is rarely associated with PNe that show H{sub 2} emission and/or pronounced butterfly structures. Hb 5 is one such exception of a PN with a butterfly structure that hosts diffuse X-ray emission. Additionally, two of the five new diffuse X-ray detections (NGC 1501 and NGC 6369) host [WR]-type central stars, supporting the hypothesis that PNe with central stars of [WR]-type are likely to display diffuse X-ray emission.

  15. CHANDRA DETECTION OF X-RAY EMISSION FROM ULTRACOMPACT DWARF GALAXIES AND EXTENDED STAR CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Meicun; Li, Zhiyuan, E-mail: lizy@nju.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China)

    2016-03-10

    We have conducted a systematic study of X-ray emission from ultracompact dwarf (UCD) galaxies and extended star clusters (ESCs), based on archival Chandra observations. Among a sample of 511 UCDs and ESCs complied from the literature, 17 X-ray counterparts with 0.5–8 keV luminosities above ∼5 × 10{sup 36} erg s{sup −1} are identified, which are distributed in eight early-type host galaxies. To facilitate comparison, we also identify X-ray counterparts of 360 globular clusters (GCs) distributed in four of the eight galaxies. The X-ray properties of the UCDs and ESCs are found to be broadly similar to those of the GCs. The incidence rate of X-ray-detected UCDs and ESCs, 3.3% ± 0.8%, while lower than that of the X-ray-detected GCs (7.0% ± 0.4%), is substantially higher than expected from the field populations of external galaxies. A stacking analysis of the individually undetected UCDs/ESCs further reveals significant X-ray signals, which corresponds to an equivalent 0.5–8 keV luminosity of ∼4 × 10{sup 35} erg s{sup −1} per source. Taken together, these provide strong evidence that the X-ray emission from UCDs and ESCs is dominated by low-mass X-ray binaries having formed from stellar dynamical interactions, consistent with the stellar populations in these dense systems being predominantly old. For the most massive UCDs, there remains the possibility that a putative central massive black hole gives rise to the observed X-ray emission.

  16. The Chandra X-ray Survey of Planetary Nebulae (ChanPlaNS): Probing Binarity, Magnetic Fields, and Wind Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Kastner, J H; Balick, B; Frew, D J; Miszalski, B; Sahai, R; Blackman, E; Chu, Y -H; De Marco, O; Frank, A; Guerrero, M A; Lopez, J A; Rapson, V; Zijlstra, A; Behar, E; Bujarrabal, V; Corradi, R L M; Nordhaus, J; Parker, Q; Sandin, C; Schönberner, D; Soker, N; Sokoloski, J L; Steffen, M; Ueta, T; Villaver, E

    2012-01-01

    We present an overview of the initial results from the Chandra Planetary Nebula Survey (ChanPlaNS), the first systematic (volume-limited) Chandra X-ray Observatory survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood. The first phase of ChanPlaNS targeted 21 mostly high-excitation PNe within ~1.5 kpc of Earth, yielding 3 detections of diffuse X-ray emission and 9 detections of X-ray-luminous point sources at the central stars (CSPNe) of these objects. Combining these results with those obtained from Chandra archival data for all (14) other PNe within ~1.5 kpc that have been observed to date, we find an overall X-ray detection rate of 68%. Roughly 50% of the PNe observed by Chandra harbor X-ray-luminous CSPNe, while soft, diffuse X-ray emission tracing shocks formed by energetic wind collisions is detected in ~30%; five objects display both diffuse and point-like emission components. The presence of X-ray sources appears correlated with PN density structure, in that molecule-poor, elliptical nebulae are...

  17. X-ray Mass Profiles from Chandra Galaxy Atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paggi, Alessandro; Kim, Dong-Woo; Anderson, Craig; Burke, Douglas J.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Fruscione, Antonella; Lauer, Jennifer L.; McCollough, Michael L.; Morgan, Douglas; Mossman, Amy; O'Sullivan, Ewan; Trinchieri, Ginevra

    2016-04-01

    We present preliminary results of a Chandra/XMM-Newton joint analysis on a sample of three Early Type Galaxies (ETGs, namely NGC4649, NGC4636 and NGC5846). X-ray observations of the hot ISM is used to measure the total enclosed mass assuming hydrostatic equilibrium, and compasion with mass distributions obtained through optical kinematics data of globular clusters and planetary nebulae yields informations about disturbances in the ISM distribution due to nuclear activity, merging history, etc. Our analysis makes use of the Chandra Galaxy Atlas (CGA) data products - exploiting the unmatched spatial resolution of the ACIS detectors to reveal fine ISM features and disturbances in the inner galactic regions - and XMM-Newton data - relying on the large field of view of EPIC detector to extend the mass profiles to larger radii. We then measured the mass profiles in various pie sectors to separate different gas features (e.g., discontinuity and extended tail) and compared them with GCs/PNe based mass profiles. The X-ray mass profiles of NGC4649 show a generally relaxed morphology and, in agreement with previous analysis, the comparison with the optical mass profiles shows a significant deviations on parsec scale likely due to non-thermal pressure linked to nuclear activity. In significantly disturbed cases (NGC4648 and NGC5846) where we found discontinuities and extended tails, we found that the mass profiles are over-estimated toward the compressed discontinuity and under-estimated toward the extended tails, similar to inflow and outflow cases. These preliminary results are promising toward an extended analysis of the whole CGA sample in order to study the distribution of gas temperature and metal abundances in the ISM, and to investigate scaling relations between ETG global quantities like ISM temperature, luminosity and total mass.

  18. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Image of Crab Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    After barely 2 months in space, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO) took this sturning image of the Crab Nebula, the spectacular remains of a stellar explosion, revealing something never seen before, a brilliant ring around the nebula's heart. The image shows the central pulsar surrounded by tilted rings of high-energy particles that appear to have been flung outward over a distance of more than a light-year from the pulsar. Perpendicular to the rings, jet-like structures produced by high-energy particles blast away from the pulsar. Hubble Space Telescope images have shown moving knots and wisps around the neutron star, and previous x-ray images have shown the outer parts of the jet and hinted at the ring structure. With CXO's exceptional resolution, the jet can be traced all the way in to the neutron star, and the ring pattern clearly appears. The image was made with CXO's Advanced Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) and High Energy Transmission Grating. The Crab Nebula, easily the most intensively studied object beyond our solar system, has been observed using virtually every astronomical instrument that could see that part of the sky

  19. A Deep Chandra X-ray Limit on the Putative IMBH in Omega Centauri

    CERN Document Server

    Haggard, Daryl; Heinke, Craig O; van der Marel, Roeland; Cohn, Haldan N; Lugger, Phyllis M; Anderson, Jay

    2013-01-01

    We report a sensitive X-ray search for the proposed intermediate mass black hole (IMBH) in the massive Galactic cluster, Omega Centauri (NGC 5139). Combining Chandra X-ray Observatory data from Cycles 1 and 13, we obtain a deep (~291 ks) exposure of the central regions of the cluster. We find no evidence for an X-ray point source near any of the cluster's proposed dynamical centers, and place an upper limit on the X-ray flux from a central source of f_X(0.5-7.0 keV) <= 5.0x10^-16 erg cm^-2 s^-1, after correcting for absorption. This corresponds to an unabsorbed X-ray luminosity of L_X(0.5-7.0 keV) <= 1.6x10^30 erg s^-1, for a cluster distance of 5.2 kpc, Galactic column density N_H = 1.2x10^21 cm^-2, and powerlaw spectrum with Gamma = 2.3. If a ~10^4 M_sun IMBH resides in the cluster's core, as suggested by some stellar dynamical studies, its Eddington luminosity would be L_Edd ~10^42 erg s^-1. The new X-ray limit would then establish an Eddington ratio of L_X/L_Edd <~ 10^-12, a factor of ~10 lower t...

  20. The Chandra X-ray Observatory is prepped for solar panel deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    In the Vertical Processing Facility, a TRW technician checks the attachment of the solar panel array (out of sight to the right) to the Chandra X-ray Observatory, at left. Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93.

  1. Chandra Smells a RRAT: X-ray Detection of a Rotating Radio Transient

    CERN Document Server

    Gaensler, B M; Reynolds, S; Borkowski, K; Rea, N; Possenti, A; Israel, G; Burgay, M; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Krämer, M; Lyne, A; Stairs, I

    2006-01-01

    "Rotating RAdio Transients" (RRATs) are a newly discovered astronomical phenomenon, characterised by occasional brief radio bursts, with average intervals between bursts ranging from minutes to hours. The burst spacings allow identification of periodicities, which fall in the range 0.4 to 7 seconds. The RRATs thus seem to be rotating neutron stars, albeit with properties very different from the rest of the population. We here present the serendipitous detection with the Chandra X-ray Observatory of a bright point-like X-ray source coincident with one of the RRATs. We discuss the temporal and spectral properties of this X-ray emission, consider counterparts in other wavebands, and interpret these results in the context of possible explanations for the RRAT population.

  2. THE CHANDRA X-RAY SURVEY OF PLANETARY NEBULAE (CHANPLANS): PROBING BINARITY, MAGNETIC FIELDS, AND WIND COLLISIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kastner, J. H.; Montez, R. Jr.; Rapson, V. [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Balick, B. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Frew, D. J.; De Marco, O.; Parker, Q. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Macquarie Research Centre for Astronomy, Astrophysics and Astrophotonics, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Miszalski, B. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory, 7935 (South Africa); Sahai, R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, MS 183-900, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Blackman, E.; Frank, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Chu, Y.-H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, Champagne-Urbana, IL (United States); Guerrero, M. A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Astronomia, Glorieta de la Astronomia s/n, Granada 18008 (Spain); Lopez, J. A. [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Ensenada, Apdo. Postal 22860, Ensenada, B. C. (Mexico); Zijlstra, A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Behar, E. [Department of Physics, Technion (Israel); Bujarrabal, V. [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional, Apartado 112, E-28803, Alcala de Henares (Spain); Corradi, R. L. M. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Nordhaus, J. [Center for Computational Relativity and Gravitation, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Sandin, C., E-mail: jhk@cis.rit.edu, E-mail: soker@physics.technion.ac.il, E-mail: eva.villaver@uam.es [Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); and others

    2012-08-15

    We present an overview of the initial results from the Chandra Planetary Nebula Survey (CHANPLANS), the first systematic (volume-limited) Chandra X-Ray Observatory survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood. The first phase of CHANPLANS targeted 21 mostly high-excitation PNe within {approx}1.5 kpc of Earth, yielding four detections of diffuse X-ray emission and nine detections of X-ray-luminous point sources at the central stars (CSPNe) of these objects. Combining these results with those obtained from Chandra archival data for all (14) other PNe within {approx}1.5 kpc that have been observed to date, we find an overall X-ray detection rate of {approx}70% for the 35 sample objects. Roughly 50% of the PNe observed by Chandra harbor X-ray-luminous CSPNe, while soft, diffuse X-ray emission tracing shocks-in most cases, 'hot bubbles'-formed by energetic wind collisions is detected in {approx}30%; five objects display both diffuse and point-like emission components. The presence (or absence) of X-ray sources appears correlated with PN density structure, in that molecule-poor, elliptical nebulae are more likely to display X-ray emission (either point-like or diffuse) than molecule-rich, bipolar, or Ring-like nebulae. All but one of the point-like CSPNe X-ray sources display X-ray spectra that are harder than expected from hot ({approx}100 kK) central stars emitting as simple blackbodies; the lone apparent exception is the central star of the Dumbbell nebula, NGC 6853. These hard X-ray excesses may suggest a high frequency of binary companions to CSPNe. Other potential explanations include self-shocking winds or PN mass fallback. Most PNe detected as diffuse X-ray sources are elliptical nebulae that display a nested shell/halo structure and bright ansae; the diffuse X-ray emission regions are confined within inner, sharp-rimmed shells. All sample PNe that display diffuse X-ray emission have inner shell dynamical ages {approx}< 5 Multiplication

  3. A Synoptic X-ray Study of M31 with the Chandra-HRC

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, B F; Kong, A K H; Primini, F A; King, A R; Murray, S S; Williams, Benjamin F.; Garcia, Michael R.; Kong, Albert K. H.; Primini, Frank A.; Murray, Stephen S.

    2003-01-01

    We have obtained 17 epochs of Chandra High Resolution Camera (HRC) snapshot images, each covering most of the M31 disk. The data cover a baseline of ~2.5 years and contain a mean effective exposure of 17 ks. We have measured the mean fluxes and long-term lightcurves for 173 objects detected in these data. The cumulative luminosity function of the disk sources is a power-law, while that of the bulge is more complex. Bright disk sources tend to lie in the southwestern half of the disk. At least 25% of the sources show significant variability. We cross-correlate all of our sources with published X-ray, optical and radio catalogs, as well as new optical data, finding counterpart candidates for 53 sources. In addition, 17 sources are likely X-ray transients. We analyze follow-up HST WFPC2 data of two X-ray transients, finding U band counterparts. In both cases, the counterparts are variable. In one case, the optical counterpart is transient with U = 22.3+/-0.1. The X-ray and optical properties of this object are c...

  4. Luminous Binary Supersoft X-Ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor); DiStefano, Roseanne

    2005-01-01

    One of the key accomplishments of the two preceding years was our development of an algorithm to select SSSs in external galaxies which have been observed by Chandra or XMM-Newton. By applying this algorithm to data from a number of galaxies, we discovered an extension of the class of SSSs to sources that are somewhat harder (100 - 300 eV, instead of tens of eV), but which are nevertheless much softer than canonical X-ray sources. We call these new sources quasisoft sources (QSSs). During this past year, we have built on and extended this work. We have (1) continued to identify SSSs and QSSs in external galaxies, (2) worked on models for the sources and find that black hole models seem promising for a subset of them, and (3) have studied individual systems, especially M101-ULX1. This special system has been observed as an SSS in its high &ate, with a luminosity in excess of 10(exp 41) erg/s. It has also been observed as a QSS when it is less luminous, and as a hard source in its low state. It is one of the best candidates to be an accreting intermediate-mass black hole. We have several papers in preparation. Below we list papers which are complete, including only new work and papers whose status has changed (e.g., been accepted for publication) since our last report. In addition, our work on QSSs has received some publicity. It was the subject of a Chandra press release and was picked up by several media outlets.

  5. Accelerator x-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Talman, Richard

    2007-01-01

    This first book to cover in-depth the generation of x-rays in particle accelerators focuses on electron beams produced by means of the novel Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) technology. The resulting highly brilliant x-rays are at the centre of this monograph, which continues where other books on the market stop. Written primarily for general, high energy and radiation physicists, the systematic treatment adopted by the work makes it equally suitable as an advanced textbook for young researchers.

  6. Deep Chandra Observations of the Compact Starburst Galaxy Henize 2-10: X-rays from the Massive Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Reines, Amy; Miller, Jon; Sivakoff, Gregory; Greene, Jenny; Hickox, Ryan; Johnson, Kelsey

    2016-01-01

    We present follow-up X-ray observations of the candidate massive black hole (BH) in the nucleus of the low-mass, compact starburst galaxy Henize 2-10. Using new high-resolution observations from the Chandra X-ray Observatory totaling 200 ks in duration, as well as archival Chandra observations from 2001, we demonstrate the presence of a previously unidentified X-ray point source that is spatially coincident with the known nuclear radio source in Henize 2-10 (i.e., the massive BH). We show that the hard X-ray emission previously identified in the 2001 observation is dominated by a source that is distinct from the nucleus, with the properties expected for a high-mass X-ray binary. The X-ray luminosity of the nuclear source suggests the massive BH is radiating significantly below its Eddington limit (~10^-6 L_Edd), and the soft spectrum resembles other weakly accreting massive BHs including Sagittarius A*. Analysis of the X-ray light curve of the nucleus reveals the tentative detection of a ~9-hour periodicity, ...

  7. NuSTAR Hard X-ray Survey of the Galactic Center Region II: X-ray Point Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, JaeSub; Hailey, Charles J; Nynka, Melania; Zhang, Shuo; Gotthelf, Eric; Fornasini, Francesca M; Krivonos, Roman; Bauer, Franz; Perez, Kerstin; Tomsick, John A; Bodaghee, Arash; Chiu, Jeng-Lun; Clavel, Maïca; Stern, Daniel; Grindlay, Jonathan E; Alexander, David M; Aramaki, Tsuguo; Baganoff, Frederick K; Barret, David; Barrière, Nicolas; Boggs, Steven E; Canipe, Alicia M; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Desai, Meera A; Forster, Karl; Giommi, Paolo; Grefenstette, Brian W; Harrison, Fiona A; Hong, Dooran; Hornstrup, Allan; Kitaguchi, Takao; Koglin, Jason E; Madsen, Kristen K; Mao, Peter H; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Perri, Matteo; Pivovaroff, Michael J; Puccetti, Simonetta; Rana, Vikram; Westergaard, Niels J; Zhang, William W; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We present the first survey results of hard X-ray point sources in the Galactic Center (GC) region by NuSTAR. We have discovered 70 hard (3-79 keV) X-ray point sources in a 0.6 deg^2 region around Sgr A* with a total exposure of 1.7 Ms, and 7 sources in the Sgr B2 field with 300 ks. We identify clear Chandra counterparts for 58 NuSTAR sources and assign candidate counterparts for the remaining 19. The NuSTAR survey reaches X-ray luminosities of ~4 x and ~8 x 10^32 erg s^-1 at the GC (8 kpc) in the 3-10 and 10-40 keV bands, respectively. The source list includes three persistent luminous X-ray binaries and the likely run-away pulsar called the Cannonball. New source-detection significance maps reveal a cluster of hard (>10 keV) X-ray sources near the Sgr A diffuse complex with no clear soft X-ray counterparts. The severe extinction observed in the Chandra spectra indicates that all the NuSTAR sources are in the central bulge or are of extragalactic origin. Spectral analysis of relatively bright NuSTAR sources ...

  8. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of Faint Discrete X-ray Point Sources Constituting the Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Morihana, Kumiko; Dubath, Pierre; Yoshida, Tessei; Suzuki, Kensuke; Ebisawa, Ken

    2016-01-01

    The Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE) is apparently extended X-ray emission along the Galactic Plane. The X-ray spectrum is characterized by hard continuum with a strong Fe K emission feature in the 6-7 keV band. A substantial fraction (~80%) of the GRXE in the Fe band was resolved into point sources by deep Chandra imaging observations, thus GRXE is mostly composed of dim Galactic X-ray point sources at least in this energy band. To investigate the populations of these dim X-ray point sources, we carried out Near-Infrared (NIR) follow-up spectroscopic observations in two deep Chandra fields located in the Galactic plane at (l,b)=(0.1{\\arcdeg}, -1.4{\\arcdeg}) and (28.5{\\arcdeg}, 0.0{\\arcdeg}) using NTT/SofI and Subaru/MOIRCS. We obtained well-exposed NIR spectra from 65 objects and found that there are three main classes of Galactic sources based on the X-ray color and NIR spectral features: those having (A) hard X-ray spectra and NIR emission features such as HI(Br{\\gamma}), HeI, and HeII (2 objects), (B)...

  9. X-ray sources in globular clusters of other galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lewin, W H G; Lewin, Walter H.G.; Verbunt, Frank

    2005-01-01

    A large number of X-ray sources in globular clusters of galaxies other than the Milky Way has been found with Chandra. We discuss three issues relating to these sources. The X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of the sources in globular clusters of M31 is marginally compatible with the XLF of globular clusters of the Milky Way. The individual XLFs of a dozen elliptical galaxies, after correction for incompleteness, are compatible with one another and show no break; however, the XLF found by adding the individual XLFs of elliptical galaxies has a break at L_x about 5x10(38) ergs/s. For the moment there is no evidence for a difference between the XLFs of sources inside and outside globular clusters of elliptical galaxies. It is not (yet?) possible to decide which fraction of low-mass X-ray binaries in elliptical galaxies outside globular clusters have formed inside globular clusters.

  10. The Making of the Chandra X-ray Observatory: the Project Scientist's Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Weisskopf, Martin C

    2010-01-01

    We review the history of the development of the Chandra X-ray Observatory from our personal perspective. This review is necessarily biased and limited by space since it attempts to cover a time span approaching 5 decades.

  11. Chandra Observations of the Faintest Low-Mass X-ray Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, C A; Kouveliotou, C; Jonker, P G; Van der Klis, M; Lewin, W H G; Belloni, T; Méndez, M; Wilson, Colleen. A.; Patel, Sandeep K.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Jonker, Peter G.; Klis, Michiel van der; Lewin, Walter H.G; Belloni, Tomaso; Mendez, Mariano

    2003-01-01

    There exists a group of persistently faint galactic X-ray sources that, based on their location in the galaxy, high L_x/L_opt, association with X-ray bursts, and absence of low frequency X-ray pulsations, are thought to be low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). We present results from Chandra observations for eight of these systems: 4U 1708-408, 2S 1711-339, KS 1739-304, SLX 1735-269, GRS 1736-297, SLX 1746-331, 1E 1746.7-3224, and 4U 1812-12. Locations for all sources, excluding GRS 1736-297, SLX 1746-331, and KS 1739-304 (which were not detected) were improved to 0.6" error circles (90% confidence). Our observations support earlier findings of transient behavior of GRS 1736-297, KS 1739-304, SLX 1746-331, and 2S 1711-339 (which we detect in one of two observations). Energy spectra for 4U 1708-408, 2S 1711-339, SLX 1735-269, 1E 1746.7-3224, and 4U 1812-12 are hard, with power law indices typically 1.4-2.1, which are consistent with typical faint LMXB spectra.

  12. Globular Cluster X-ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Verbunt, F

    2004-01-01

    After a brief historical overview we discuss the luminous X-ray sources in globular clusters of our Galaxy. This is followed by an overview of the very luminous X-ray sources studied in globular clusters of 14 other galaxies, and a discussion of their formation and the relation to X-ray sources outside globular clusters. We describe the discovery and classification of low-luminosity X-ray sources, and end the review with some remarks on the formation and evolution of X-ray sources in globular clusters. Observational results are summarized in three tables. Comments are very welcome. Please send them to F.W.M.Verbunt@astro.uu.nl and lewin@mit.edu.

  13. Accelerator-driven X-ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-09

    After an introduction which mentions x-ray tubes and storage rings and gives a brief review of special relativity, the subject is treated under the following topics and subtopics: synchrotron radiation (bending magnet radiation, wiggler radiation, undulator radiation, brightness and brilliance definition, synchrotron radiation facilities), x-ray free-electron lasers (linac-driven X-ray FEL, FEL interactions, self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), SASE self-seeding, fourth-generation light source facilities), and other X-ray sources (energy recovery linacs, Inverse Compton scattering, laser wakefield accelerator driven X-ray sources. In summary, accelerator-based light sources cover the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Synchrotron radiation (bending magnet, wiggler and undulator radiation) has unique properties that can be tailored to the users’ needs: bending magnet and wiggler radiation is broadband, undulator radiation has narrow spectral lines. X-ray FELs are the brightest coherent X-ray sources with high photon flux, femtosecond pulses, full transverse coherence, partial temporal coherence (SASE), and narrow spectral lines with seeding techniques. New developments in electron accelerators and radiation production can potentially lead to more compact sources of coherent X-rays.

  14. Real Time Space Weather Support for Chandra X-Ray Observatory Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Minow, Joseph I.; Miller, J. Scott; Wolk, Scott J.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Spitzbart, Bradley D.; Swartz. Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    NASA launched the Chandra X-ray Observatory in July 1999. Soon after first light in August 1999, however, degradation in the energy resolution and charge transfer efficiency of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) x-ray detectors was observed. The source of the degradation was quickly identified as radiation damage in the charge-transfer channel of the front-illuminated CCDs, by weakly penetrating ( soft , 100 500 keV) protons as Chandra passed through the Earth s radiation belts and ring currents. As soft protons were not considered a risk to spacecraft health before launch, the only on-board radiation monitoring system is the Electron, Proton, and Helium Instrument (EPHIN) which was included on Chandra with the primary purpose of monitoring energetic solar particle events. Further damage to the ACIS detector has been successfully mitigated through a combination of careful mission planning, autonomous on-board radiation protection, and manual intervention based upon real-time monitoring of the soft-proton environment. The AE-8 and AP-8 trapped radiation models and Chandra Radiation Models are used to schedule science operations in regions of low proton flux. EPHIN has been used as the primary autonomous in-situ radiation trigger; but, it is not sensitive to the soft protons that damage the front-illuminated CCDs. Monitoring of near-real-time space weather data sources provides critical information on the proton environment outside the Earth s magnetosphere due to solar proton events and other phenomena. The operations team uses data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) to provide near-real-time monitoring of the proton environment; however, these data do not give a representative measure of the soft-proton (Space Weather Prediction Center. This presentation describes the radiation mitigation strategies to minimize the proton damage in the ACIS CCD detectors and the importance of real-time data sources that are used to protect

  15. The jet and counterjet of 3C 270 (NGC 4261) viewed in the X-ray with Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Worrall, D M; O'Sullivan, E; Zezas, A; Wolter, A; Trinchieri, G; Fabbiano, G

    2010-01-01

    The radio source 3C 270, hosted by NGC 4261, is the brightest known example of counterjet X-ray emission from a low-power radio galaxy. We report on the X-ray emission of the jet and counterjet from 130 ks of Chandra data. We argue that the X-ray emission is synchrotron radiation and that the internal properties of the jet and counterjet are remarkably similar. We find a smooth connection in X-ray hardness and X-ray to radio ratio between the jet and one of the X-ray components within the core spectrum. We observe wedge-like depressions in diffuse X-ray surface brightness surrounding the jets, and interpret them as regions where an aged population of electrons provides pressure to balance the interstellar medium of NGC 4261. About 20% of the mass of the interstellar medium has been displaced by the radio source. Treating 3C 270 as a twin-jet system, we find an interesting agreement between the ratio of jet-to-counterjet length in X-rays and that expected if X-rays are observed over the distance that an outflo...

  16. Finding Supernova Ia Progenitors with the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mikkel T. B.; Nelemans, Gijs; Voss, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    We examine pre-supernova Chandra images to find X-ray luminosities of type Ia supernova progenitors. At present, we have one possible direct detection and upper limits for the X-ray luminosities of a number of other supernova progenitors. The method has also yielded a possible detection of a X...

  17. A Chandra X-Ray observation of the binary millisecond pulsar PSR J1023+0038

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogdanov, S.; Archibald, A.M.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Kaspi, V.M.; Lorimer, D.; McLaughlin, M.A.; Ransom, S.M.; Stairs, I.H.

    2011-01-01

    We present a Chandra X-Ray Observatory ACIS-S variability, spectroscopy, and imaging study of the peculiar binary containing the millisecond pulsar J1023+0038. The X-ray emission from the system exhibits highly significant (12.5σ) large-amplitude (factor of two to three) orbital variability over the

  18. Chandra observations of the peculiar X-ray transient IGR J16358-4726

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, S.K.; Kouveliotou, C.; Tennant, A.; Woods, P.M.; Finger, M.; King, A.; Ubertini, P.; Winkler, C.; Courvoisier, T.J.-L.; Klis, M. van der; Wachter, S

    2004-06-01

    The new transient IGR J16358-4726 was discovered on 2003 March 19 with INTEGRAL. We detected the source serendipitously during our 2003 March 24 observation of SGR 1627 - 41 with the CHANDRA X-ray Observatory at the 1.7 x 10{sup -10} ergs s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} flux level (2-10 keV) with a very high absorption column (N{sub H}=3.3x10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}) and a hard power law spectrum of photon index 0.5(1). We discovered a very strong flux modulation with a period of 5880(50) s and peak-to-peak pulse fraction of 70(6) % (2-10 keV), clearly visible in the x-ray data. The nature, however, of IGR 16357-4726 remains unresolved. Most likely, we are looking at a galactic binary neutron star system as evidenced by the detection of rest frame fluorescence line emission from neutral Fe K (6.4 keV) in the Chandra spectrum. If the detected modulation is a spin period, this transient is a new kind of object, belonging to a class of very hard transients recently revealed with the unique INTEGRAL capabilities. The only neutron star systems known with similar spin periods are low luminosity persistent wind-fed pulsars, which exhibit very soft X-ray spectra. If this is an orbital period, then the system could be a compact Low Mass X-ray Binary.

  19. NASA's High Energy Vision: Chandra and the X-Ray Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mais, D. E.; Stencel, R. E.; Richards, D.

    2004-05-01

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory is the most sophisticated X-ray observatory launched by NASA. Chandra is designed to observe X-rays from high-energy regions of the universe, such as the remnants of supernovae explosions, col- liding galaxies, black holes, pulsars, neutron stars, quasars, and X-ray bi- nary stars. The spectacular results from the first five years of Chandra ob- servations are changing and redefining theories with each observation. Every exciting new image shows glimpses of such exotic phenomena as super-massive black holes, surprising black hole activity in old galaxies, rivers of grav- ity that define the cosmic landscape, unexpected x-ray activity in proto- stars and failed stars, puzzling distributions of elements in supernovae remnants, the sound waves from a super-massive black hole, and the even the tantalizing possibility of an entirely new form of matter - the strange quark star. On September 14, 2000, triggered by alerts from amateur astron- omers worldwide, Chandra observed the outburst of the brightest northern dwarf nova SS Cygni. The cooperation of hundreds of amateur variable star astronomers and the Chandra X-Ray scientists and spacecraft specialists pro- vided proof that the collaboration of amateur and professional astronomers is a powerful tool to study cosmic phenomena.

  20. Deep Chandra X-ray Imaging of a Nearby Radio Galaxy 4C+29.30: X-ray/Radio Connection

    CERN Document Server

    Siemiginowska, Aneta; Cheung, Chi C; Aldcroft, Thomas L; Bechtold, Jill; Burke, D J; Evans, Daniel; Holt, Joanna; Jamrozy, Marek; Migliori, Giulia; .,

    2012-01-01

    We report results from our deep Chandra X-ray observations of a nearby radio galaxy, 4C+29.30 (z=0.0647). The Chandra image resolves structures on sub-arcsec to arcsec scales, revealing complex X-ray morphology and detecting the main radio features: the nucleus, a jet, hotspots, and lobes. The nucleus is absorbed (N(H)=3.95 (+0.27/-0.33)x10^23 atoms/cm^2) with an unabsorbed luminosity of L(2-10 keV) ~ (5.08 +/-0.52) 10^43 erg/s characteristic of Type 2 AGN. Regions of soft (<2 keV) X-ray emission that trace the hot interstellar medium (ISM) are correlated with radio structures along the main radio axis indicating a strong relation between the two. The X-ray emission beyond the radio source correlates with the morphology of optical line-emitting regions. We measured the ISM temperature in several regions across the galaxy to be kT ~ 0.5 with slightly higher temperatures (of a few keV) in the center and in the vicinity of the radio hotspots. Assuming these regions were heated by weak shocks driven by the exp...

  1. Measurements of Variability of Low Mass X-ray Binary Candidates in the Early-Type Galaxy NGC 4697 from Multi-Epoch Chandra X-ray Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Sivakoff, Gregory R; Juett, Adrienne M; Sarazin, Craig L; Irwin, Jimmy A

    2008-01-01

    Multi-epoch Chandra X-ray observations of nearby massive early-type galaxies open up the study of an important regime of low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) behavior -- long term variability. In a companion paper, we report on the detection of 158 X-ray sources down to a detection/completeness limit of 0.6/1.4 x 10^{37} ergs/s using five Chandra observations of NGC 4697, one of the nearest (11.3 Mpc), optically luminous (M_B < -20), elliptical (E6) galaxy. In this paper, we report on the variability of LMXB candidates measured on timescales from seconds to years. At timescales of seconds to hours, we detect five sources with significant variability. Approximately 7% of sources show variability between any two observations, and 16+/-4% of sources do not have a constant luminosity over all five observations. Among variable sources, we identify eleven transient candidates, with which we estimate that if all LMXBs in NGC 4697 are long-term transients then they are on for ~ 100 yr and have a 7% duty cycle. These numbe...

  2. Chandra Observations of the Gamma-ray Binary LSI+61303: Extended X-ray Structure?

    CERN Document Server

    Paredes, J M; Bosch-Ramon, V; West, J R; Butt, Y M; Torres, D F; Martí, J

    2007-01-01

    We present a 50 ks observation of the gamma-ray binary LSI+61303 carried out with the ACIS-I array aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory. This is the highest resolution X-ray observation of the source conducted so far. Possible evidence of an extended structure at a distance between 5 and 12 arcsec towards the North of LSI+61303 have been found at a significance level of 3.2 sigma. The asymmetry of the extended emission excludes an interpretation in the context of a dust-scattered halo, suggesting an intrinsic nature. On the other hand, while the obtained source flux, of F_{0.3-10 keV}=7.1^{+1.8}_{-1.4} x 10^{-12} ergs/cm^2/s, and hydrogen column density, N_{H}=0.70+/-0.06 x 10^{22} cm^{-2}, are compatible with previous results, the photon index Gamma=1.25+/-0.09 is the hardest ever found. In light of these new results, we briefly discuss the physics behind the X-ray emission, the location of the emitter, and the possible origin of the extended emission ~0.1 pc away from LSI+61303.

  3. The Norma Arm Region Chandra Survey: X-ray Populations in the Spiral Arms

    CERN Document Server

    Fornasini, Francesca M; Bodaghee, Arash; Krivonos, Roman A; An, Hongjun; Rahoui, Farid; Gotthelf, Eric V; Bauer, Franz E; Stern, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We present a catalog of 1415 X-ray sources identified in the Norma arm region Chandra survey (NARCS), which covers a 2 deg x 0.8 deg region in the direction of the Norma spiral arm to a depth of $\\approx$20 ks. Of these sources, 1130 are point-like sources detected with $\\geq3\\sigma$ confidence in at least one of three energy bands (0.5-10, 0.5-2, and 2-10 keV), five have extended emission, and the remainder are detected at low significance. Since most sources have too few counts to permit individual classification, they are divided into five spectral groups defined by their quantile properties. We analyze stacked spectra of X-ray sources within each group, in conjunction with their fluxes, variability, and infrared counterparts, to identify the dominant populations in our survey. We find that $\\sim$50% of our sources are foreground sources located within 1-2 kpc, which is consistent with expectations from previous surveys. Approximately 20% of sources are likely located in the proximity of the Scutum-Crux an...

  4. Chandra Reveals Twin X-ray Jets in the Powerful FR-II Radio Galaxy 3C353

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kataoka, J.; Stawarz, L.; Harris, D.E.; Siemiginowska, A.; Ostrowski, M.; Swain, M.R.; Hardcastle, M.J.; Goodger, J.L.; Iwasawa, K.; Edwards, P.G.

    2008-06-13

    We report X-ray imaging of the powerful FR II radio galaxy 3C 353 using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. 3C 353's two 4-inch wide and 2-feet long jets allow us to study in detail the internal structure of the large-scale relativistic outflows at both radio and X-ray photon energies with the sub-arcsecond spatial resolution provided by the VLA and Chandra instruments. In a 90 ks Chandra observation, we have detected X-ray emission from most radio structures in 3C 353, including the nucleus, the jet and the counterjet, the terminal jet regions (hotspots), and one radio lobe. We show that the detection of the X-ray emission associated with the radio knots and counterknots, which is most likely non-thermal in origin, puts several crucial constraints on the X-ray emission mechanisms in powerful large-scale jets of quasars and FR II sources. In particular, we show that this detection is inconsistent with the inverse-Compton model proposed in the literature, and instead implies a synchrotron origin of the X-ray jet photons. We also find that the width of the X-ray counterjet is possibly narrower than that measured in radio bands, that the radio-to-X-ray flux ratio decreases systematically downstream along the jets, and that there are substantial (kpc-scale) offsets between the positions of the X-ray and radio intensity maxima within each knot, whose magnitudes increase away from the nucleus. We discuss all these findings in the wider context of the physics of extragalactic jets, proposing some particular though not definitive solutions or interpretations for each problem. In general, we find that the synchrotron X-ray emission of extragalactic large-scale jets is not only shaped by the global hydrodynamical configuration of the outflows, but is also likely to be very sensitive to the microscopic parameters of the jet plasma. A complete, self-consistent model for the X-ray emission of extragalactic jets still remains elusive.

  5. Chandra & XMM-Newton Observations of NGC5253. Analysis of the X-ray Emission from a Dwarf Starburst Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Summers, L K; Strickland, D K; Heckman, T M; Summers, Lesley K.; Stevens, Ian R.; Strickland, David K.; Heckman, Timothy M.

    2004-01-01

    We present Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray data of NGC5253, a local starbursting dwarf elliptical galaxy, in the early stages of a starburst episode. Contributions to the X-ray emission come from discrete point sources and extended diffuse emission, in the form of what appear to be multiple superbubbles, and smaller bubbles probably associated with individual star clusters. Chandra detects 17 sources within the optical extent of NGC5253 down to a completeness level corresponding to a luminosity of 1.5E37 erg/s.The slope of the point source X-ray luminosity function is -0.54, similar to that of other nearby dwarf starburst galaxies. Several different types of source are detected within the galaxy, including X-ray binaries and the emission associated with star-clusters. Comparison of the diffuse X-ray emission with the observed Halpha emission shows similarities in their extent. The best spectral fit to the diffuse emission is obtained with an absorbed, two temperature model giving temperatures for the two gas com...

  6. The Norma arm region Chandra survey catalog: X-ray populations in the spiral arms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornasini, Francesca M. [Astronomy Department, University of California, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Tomsick, John A.; Bodaghee, Arash; Krivonos, Roman A. [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); An, Hongjun [Department of Physics, McGill University, Rutherford Physics Building, 3600 University Street, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Rahoui, Farid [European Southern Observatory, Karl Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Gotthelf, Eric V. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Bauer, Franz E. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Stern, Daniel, E-mail: f.fornasini@berkeley.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, MS 169-506, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    We present a catalog of 1415 X-ray sources identified in the Norma Arm Region Chandra Survey (NARCS), which covers a 2° × 0.°8 region in the direction of the Norma spiral arm to a depth of ≈20 ks. Of these sources, 1130 are point-like sources detected with ≥3σ confidence in at least one of three energy bands (0.5-10, 0.5-2, and 2-10 keV), five have extended emission, and the remainder are detected at low significance. Since most sources have too few counts to permit individual classification, they are divided into five spectral groups defined by their quantile properties. We analyze stacked spectra of X-ray sources within each group, in conjunction with their fluxes, variability, and infrared counterparts, to identify the dominant populations in our survey. We find that ∼50% of our sources are foreground sources located within 1-2 kpc, which is consistent with expectations from previous surveys. Approximately 20% of sources are likely located in the proximity of the Scutum-Crux and near Norma arm, while 30% are more distant, in the proximity of the far Norma arm or beyond. We argue that a mixture of magnetic and nonmagnetic cataclysmic variables dominates the Scutum-Crux and near Norma arms, while intermediate polars and high-mass stars (isolated or in binaries) dominate the far Norma arm. We also present the cumulative number count distribution for sources in our survey that are detected in the hard energy band. A population of very hard sources in the vicinity of the far Norma arm and active galactic nuclei dominate the hard X-ray emission down to f{sub X} ≈ 10{sup –14} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}, but the distribution curve flattens at fainter fluxes. We find good agreement between the observed distribution and predictions based on other surveys.

  7. Too Young to Shine? Chandra analysis of X-ray emission in nearby primordial galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu-Zych, Antara; Henry, Alaina L.; Yukita, Mihoko; Fragos, Tassos; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Lehmer, Bret; Ptak, Andrew; Zezas, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The 2—10 keV X-ray emission in star-forming galaxies traces the population of high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) and is a function of both the star formation rate (SFR) and metallicity, according to several studies. Theoretical studies predict that stars retain more mass over their lifetimes due to weaker stellar winds in lower metallicity environments, and therefore, produce more luminous and numerous HMXBs. We present Chandra analysis for a local sample of primordial galaxies, Hα emitters (HAEs). Our selection is based on large Hα equivalent widths (EW(Hα)>500Å, suggestive of bursts of star formation within 6 Myr), SFR >1 M⊙/yr and low metallicities (Z extreme youth (young stellar age) of the galaxies, where HMXBs may not have fully formed. Our investigation of HMXB formation as a function of stellar age, metallicity and SFR offers important refinements to the X-ray emission from the first galaxies and on predictions of black hole binaries, which are precursors of gravitational wave sources.

  8. Recovery of the Historical SN1957D in X-rays with Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Long, Knox S; Godfrey, L E H; Kuntz, K D; Plucinsky, Paul P; Soria, Roberto; Stockdale, Christopher J; Whitmore, Bradley C; Winkler, P Frank

    2012-01-01

    SN1957D, located in one of the spiral arms of M83, is one of the small number of extragalactic supernovae that has remained detectable at radio and optical wavelengths during the decades after its explosion. Here we report the first detection of SN1957D in X-rays, as part of a 729 ks observation of M83 with \\chandra. The X-ray luminosity (0.3 - 8 keV) is 1.7 (+2.4,-0.3) 10**37 ergs/s. The spectrum is hard and highly self-absorbed compared to most sources in M83 and to other young supernova remnants, suggesting that the system is dominated at X-ray wavelengths by an energetic pulsar and its pulsar wind nebula. The high column density may be due to absorption within the SN ejecta. HST WFC3 images resolve the supernova remnant from the surrounding emission and the local star field. Photometry of stars around SN1957D, using WFC3 images, indicates an age of less than 10**7 years and a main sequence turnoff mass more than 17 solar masses. New spectra obtained with Gemini-South show that the optical spectrum continu...

  9. Contributions of the "Great" X-Ray Observatories (XMM-Newton and Chandra) to Astronomy and Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin

    2011-01-01

    NASA s Chandra X-ray Observatory and ESA s XMM-Newton made their first observations over a decade ago. The unprecedented and complementary capabilities of these observatories to detect, image, and measure the energy of cosmic X-rays, achieved less than 50 years after the first detection of an extra-solar X-ray source, represent an increase in sensitivity comparable in going from naked-eye observations to the most powerful optical telescopes over the past 400 years. In this presentation we highlight some of the many discoveries made using these powerful X-ray observatories that have transformed 21st century astronomy. We briefly discuss future prospects for this truly exciting field.

  10. X-ray source for mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Clinton M.

    1994-01-01

    An x-ray source utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms.

  11. Chandra x-ray results on v426 ophiuchi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Homer

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available De las observaciones de 45 ks de Chandra de V426 Oph hemos obtenido espectros de rayos X de alta resoluci on con relaci on se~nal-a-ruido moderada, y una curva de luz no interrumpida de buena calidad. Los espectros se adaptan razonablemente a un modelo de ujo de enfriamiento, similar a EX Hya y U Gem. Nuestro an alisis de las curvas de luz de Chandra y las adicionales de rayos X/ optico revela una modulaci on persistente a 4.2 hr desde 1988 hasta 2003, probablemente el per odo de giro de la enana blanca, indicando una naturaleza polar intermedia para V426 Oph.

  12. A DEEP CHANDRA X-RAY LIMIT ON THE PUTATIVE IMBH IN OMEGA CENTAURI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggard, Daryl [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics, Physics and Astronomy Department, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Cool, Adrienne M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway Ave., San Francisco, CA 94132 (United States); Heinke, Craig O. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Room 238 CEB, Edmonton, AB T6G 2G7 (Canada); Van der Marel, Roeland; Anderson, Jay [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Cohn, Haldan N.; Lugger, Phyllis M., E-mail: dhaggard@northwestern.edu, E-mail: cool@sfsu.edu [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, 727 E. Third St., Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)

    2013-08-20

    We report a sensitive X-ray search for the proposed intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) in the massive Galactic cluster, {omega} Centauri (NGC 5139). Combining Chandra X-ray Observatory data from Cycles 1 and 13, we obtain a deep ({approx}291 ks) exposure of the central regions of the cluster. We find no evidence for an X-ray point source near any of the cluster's proposed dynamical centers, and place an upper limit on the X-ray flux from a central source of f{sub X}(0.5-7.0 keV) {<=}5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -16} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, after correcting for absorption. This corresponds to an unabsorbed X-ray luminosity of L{sub X}(0.5-7.0 keV) {<=}1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg s{sup -1}, for a cluster distance of 5.2 kpc, Galactic column density N{sub H} = 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}, and power-law spectrum with {Gamma} = 2.3. If a {approx}10{sup 4} M{sub sun} IMBH resides in the cluster's core, as suggested by some stellar dynamical studies, its Eddington luminosity would be L{sub Edd} {approx}10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. The new X-ray limit would then establish an Eddington ratio of L{sub X}/L{sub Edd} {approx}< 10{sup -12}, a factor of {approx}10 lower than even the quiescent state of our Galaxy's notoriously inefficient supermassive black hole Sgr A*, and imply accretion efficiencies as low as {eta} {approx}< 10{sup -6}-10{sup -8}. This study leaves open three possibilities: either {omega} Cen does not harbor an IMBH or, if an IMBH does exist, it must experience very little or very inefficient accretion.

  13. The Chandra X-Ray Observatory Radiation Environmental Model Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, William C.; Minow, Joseph I.; ODell, Stephen L.; Cameron, Robert A.; Virani, Shanil N.

    2003-01-01

    CRMFLX (Chandra Radiation Model of ion FLUX) is a radiation environment risk mitigation tool for use as a decision aid in planning the operation times for Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) detector. The accurate prediction of the proton flux environment with energies of 100 - 200 keV is needed in order to protect the ACIS detector against proton degradation. Unfortunately, protons of this energy are abundant in the region of space where Chandra must operate. In addition, on-board particle detectors do not measure proton flux levels of the required energy range. CRMFLX is an engineering environment model developed to predict the proton flux in the solar wind, magnetosheath, and magnetosphere phenomenological regions of geospace. This paper describes the upgrades to the ion flux databases for the magnetosphere, magnetosheath, and solar wind regions. These data files were created by using Geotail and Polar spacecraft flux measurements only when the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft's 0.14 MeV particle flux was below a threshold value. This new database allows for CRMFLX output to be correlated with both the geomagnetic activity level, as represented by the Kp index, as well as with solar proton events. Also, reported in this paper are results of analysis leading to a change in Chandra operations that successfully mitigates the false trigger rate for autonomous radiation events caused by relativistic electron flux contamination of proton channels.

  14. NASA Chandra X-ray Observatory Selected as Editor's Choice in 2000 Discover Magazine Awards for Technological Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory, NASA's newest and most powerful X-ray space telescope, has been selected as the winner of the Editor's Choice category of the 2000 Discover Magazine Awards for Technological Innovation. The team of government, industry, university and research institutions that designed, built and deployed Chandra for NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala, will be formally recognized June 24 at a gala awards celebration at Epcot at the Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando, Fl. Dr. Harvey Tananbaum, director of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's Chandra X-ray Science Center, Cambridge, Mass., which conducts the Chandra science mission for NASA, will receive the award on behalf of the team. "Chandra has opened a new window for astronomers into the universe of high-energy cosmic events such as pulsars, supernova remnants and black holes," said Tananbaum. "We're now able to create spectacularly detailed images of celestial phenomena whose mere existence we could only hypothesize before." Among Chandra's most significant discoveries to date, he lists the detection of a giant ring around the heart of the Crab Nebula, details of the shock wave created by an exploding star and resolution of the high-energy X-ray "glow" in the universe into millions of specific light sources. "The successful launch, deployment and on-orbit operations of NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory is a testament to the solid partnership between TRW, NASA and the science community that has been enabling NASA's most important space science missions for the past 40 years," said Timothy W. Hannemann, executive vice president and general manager, TRW Space & Electronics Group. "The extraordinary images that Chandra is delivering daily speaks loudly not only to the quality of the science instruments on board, but also to the engineering talents and dedication to mission success exhibited by every member of NASA's Chandra mission team." Chandra, named in honor of Nobel

  15. Chandra X-ray Observations of the Young Stellar Cluster NGC 6193 in the Ara OB1 Association

    CERN Document Server

    Skinner, S L; Palla, F; Barbosa, C L D R

    2005-01-01

    A 90 ks Chandra HETG observation of the young stellar cluster NGC 6193 in the southern Ara OB1 association detected 43 X-ray sources in a 2' x 2' core region centered on the young O stars HD 150135 (O6.5V) and HD 150136 (O3+O6V). The cluster is dominated by exceptionally bright X-ray emission from the two O stars, which are separated by only 10 arcsecs. The X-ray luminosity of HD 150136 is log Lx = 33.39 (ergs/s), making it one of the most luminous O-star X-ray sources known. All of the fainter X-ray sources in the core region have near-IR counterparts, but JHK photometry provides little evidence for near-IR excesses. These core sources have typical mean photon energies of 2 keV and about one-third are variable. It is likely that some are young low-mass stars in the cluster, but cluster membership remains to be determined. Grating spectra show that the X-ray properties of HD 150135 and HD 150136 are similar, but not identical. Both have moderately broadened unshifted emission lines and their emission is domin...

  16. The Origin of T Tauri X-ray Emission: New Insights from the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project

    CERN Document Server

    Preibisch, T; Favata, F; Feigelson, E D; Flaccomio, E; Getman, K; Micela, G; Sciortino, S; Stassun, K G; Stelzer, B; Zinnecker, H; Preibisch, Thomas; Kim, Yong -Cheol; Favata, Fabio; Feigelson, Eric D.; Flaccomio, Ettore; Getman, Konstantin; Micela, Giusi; Sciortino, Salvatore; Stassun, Keivan; Stelzer, Beate; Zinnecker, Hans

    2005-01-01

    We use the data of the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP) to study the nearly 600 X-ray sources that can be reliably identified with optically well characterized T Tauri stars (TTS) in the Orion Nebula Cluster. We detect X-ray emission from more than 97% of the optically visible late-type (spectral types F to M) cluster stars. This proofs that there is no ``X-ray quiet'' population of late-type stars with suppressed magnetic activity. All TTS with known rotation periods lie in the saturated or super-saturated regime of the relation between activity and Rossby numbers seen for main-sequence (MS) stars, but the TTS show a much larger scatter in X-ray activity than seen for the MS stars. Strong near-linear relations between X-ray luminosities, bolometric luminosities and mass are present. We also find that the fractional X-ray luminosity rises slowly with mass over the 0.1 - 2 M_sun range. The plasma temperatures determined from the X-ray spectra of the TTS are much hotter than in MS stars, but seem to follo...

  17. Historical Remembrances of the Chandra X-ray Observatory: How Partnerships Created Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Robert

    2009-09-01

    As the astronomy community plans for new ventures in space, we're forced to find creative solutions to operate within the ever increasing fiscal constraints of the current economic environment. The Chandra X-ray Observatory program offers an example of how missions can be successfully developed within manageable budget constraints. The ten year anniversary offers us the chance to look back at the Chandra team's special partnership between scientists, managers, and industry that led to our success.Chandra experienced many of the challenges common to major observatories: state-of-the-art technical requirements, budget-induced slips, and restructurings. Yet the Chandra team achieved excellent performance for dramatically lower cost. In fact, Chandra completed its prime mission for billions of dollars less than originally planned. In 1992, NASA MSFC and Northrop Grumman (then TRW) together led a major restructure that saved approximately 3.4B in program cost, while we improved the imaging capability and observing efficiency of Chandra. This was accomplished by a combination of team-work, systems engineering, advanced technology insertion, and effective approaches for program implementation, combined with a high performance culture that aligned goals and focused on mission success. Northrop Grumman is proud of our role in supporting the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and our academic partners in advancing the frontiers of x-ray astronomy and scientific discovery with Chandra. As Chandra continues its extended mission, the observatory continues to provide superb scientific performance.

  18. X-ray emission from the blazar AO 0235+16: the XMM-Newton and Chandra point of view

    CERN Document Server

    Raiteri, C M; Kadler, M; Krichbaum, T P; Böttcher, M; Fuhrmann, L; Orio, M

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we analyse five observations of the BL Lac object AO 0235+16 performed with the Chandra and XMM-Newton satellites during the years 2000-2005. In the February 2002 observation the source is found in a bright state and presents a steep X-ray spectrum, while in all the other epochs it is faint and the spectrum is hard. The soft X-ray spectrum appears to be strongly absorbed, likely by the intervening system at z=0.524, which also absorbs the optical-UV radiation. We find that models that consider spectral curvature are superior to single power law ones in fitting the X-ray spectrum. In particular, we favour a double power law model, which agrees with the assumption of a superposition of two different components in the X-ray domain. Both in the Chandra and in one of the XMM-Newton observations, a tentative detection of the redshifted Fe Kalpha emission line may suggest its origin from the inner part of an accretion disc. Thermal emission from this accretion disc might explain the UV-soft-X-ray bump ...

  19. Modeling Contamination Migration on the Chandra X-Ray Observatory - III

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tice, Neil W.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Grant, Catherine E.; Marshall, Herman L.; Vikhlinin, Alexy A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Dahmer, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    During its first 16 years of operation, the cold (about -60 C) optical blocking filter of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory, has accumulated a growing layer of molecular contamination that attenuates low-energy x rays. Over the past few years, the accumulation rate, spatial distribution, and composition have changed. This evolution has motivated further analysis of contamination migration within and near the ACIS cavity, in part to evaluate potential bake-out scenarios intended to reduce the level of contamination. Keywords: X-ray astronomy, CCDs, contamination, modeling and simulation, spacecraft operations

  20. A Comprehensive Archival Chandra Search for X-ray Emission from Ultracompact Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pandya, Viraj; Greene, Jenny E

    2016-01-01

    We present the first comprehensive archival study of the X-ray properties of ultracompact dwarf (UCD) galaxies, with the goal of identifying weakly-accreting central black holes in UCDs. Our study spans 578 UCDs distributed across thirteen different host systems, including clusters, groups, fossil groups, and isolated galaxies. Of the 336 spectroscopically-confirmed UCDs with usable archival Chandra imaging observations, 21 are X-ray-detected. Imposing a completeness limit of $L_X>2\\times10^{38}$ erg s$^{-1}$, the global X-ray detection fraction for the UCD population is $\\sim3\\%$. Of the 21 X-ray-detected UCDs, seven show evidence of long-term X-ray time variability on the order of months to years. X-ray-detected UCDs tend to be more compact than non-X-ray-detected UCDs, and we find tentative evidence that the X-ray detection fraction increases with surface luminosity density and global stellar velocity dispersion. The X-ray emission of UCDs is fully consistent with arising from a population of low-mass X-ra...

  1. A Chandra X-ray Study of Cygnus A. 2; The Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Andrew J.; Wilson, Andrew; Terashima, Yuichi; Arnaud, Keith A.; Smith, David A.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We report Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer and quasi-simultaneous Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the nearby, powerful radio galaxy Cygnus A, with the present paper focusing on the properties of the active nucleus. In the Chandra observation, the hard (less than a few keV) X-ray emission is spatially unresolved with a size is approximately 1" (1.5 kpc, H(sub 0) = 50 km/s/Mpc) and coincides with the radio and near-infrared nuclei. In contrast, the soft (less than 2 keV) emission exhibits a bipolar nebulosity that aligns with the optical bipolar continuum and emission-line structures and approximately with the radio jet. In particular, the soft X-ray emission corresponds very well with the [O III] (lambda)5007 and H(alpha) + [N II] lambda(lambda)6548, 6583 nebulosity imaged with Hubble Space Telescope. At the location of the nucleus, there is only weak soft X-ray emission, an effect that may be intrinsic or result from a dust lane that crosses the nucleus perpendicular to the source axis. The spectra of the various X-ray components have been obtained by simultaneous fits to the six detectors. The compact nucleus is detected to 100 keV and is well described by a heavily absorbed power-law spectrum with Gamma(sub h) = 1.52(sup + 0.12, sub -0.12) (similar to other 0.12 narrow-line radio galaxies) and equivalent hydrogen column N(sub H)(nuc) = 2.0(sup +0.1, sub -0.1) x 10(exp 23)/sq cm. This 0.2 column is compatible with the dust obscuration to the near-infrared source for a normal gas-to-dust ratio. The soft (less than 2 keV) emission from the nucleus may be described by a power-law spectrum with the same index (i.e., Gamma(sub l) = Gamma(sub h), although direct fits suggest a slightly larger value for Gamma(sub l). Narrow emission lines from highly ionized neon and silicon, as well as a "neutral" Fe K(alpha) line, are detected in the nucleus and its vicinity (r approximately less than 2 kpc). The equivalent width (EW) of the Fe K(alpha) line

  2. CHANDRA/ACIS-I STUDY OF THE X-RAY PROPERTIES OF THE NGC 6611 AND M16 STELLAR POPULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guarcello, M. G.; Drake, J. J. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, MS-67, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Caramazza, M.; Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.; Prisinzano, L. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, 90134 Palermo (Italy)

    2012-07-10

    Mechanisms regulating the origin of X-rays in young stellar objects and the correlation with their evolutionary stage are under debate. Studies of the X-ray properties in young clusters allow us to understand these mechanisms. One ideal target for this analysis is the Eagle Nebula (M16), with its central cluster NGC 6611. At 1750 pc from the Sun, it harbors 93 OB stars, together with a population of low-mass stars from embedded protostars to disk-less Class III objects, with age {<=}3 Myr. We study an archival 78 ks Chandra/ACIS-I observation of NGC 6611 and two new 80 ks observations of the outer region of M16, one centered on the Column V and the other on a region of the molecular cloud with ongoing star formation. We detect 1755 point sources with 1183 candidate cluster members (219 disk-bearing and 964 disk-less). We study the global X-ray properties of M16 and compare them with those of the Orion Nebula Cluster. We also compare the level of X-ray emission of Class II and Class III stars and analyze the X-ray spectral properties of OB stars. Our study supports the lower level of X-ray activity for the disk-bearing stars with respect to the disk-less members. The X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of M16 is similar to that of Orion, supporting the universality of the XLF in young clusters. Eighty-five percent of the O stars of NGC 6611 have been detected in X-rays. With only one possible exception, they show soft spectra with no hard components, indicating that mechanisms for the production of hard X-ray emission in O stars are not operating in NGC 6611.

  3. Around 200 new X-ray binary IDs from 13 years of Chandra observations of the M31 center

    CERN Document Server

    Barnard, R; Primini, F; Li, Z; Baganoff, F; Murray, S S

    2013-01-01

    We have created 0.3--10 keV, 13 year, unabsorbed luminosity lightcurves for 528 X-ray sources in the central 20' of M31. We have 174 Chandra observations spaced at ~1 month intervals thanks to our transient monitoring program, deeper observations of the M31 nucleus, and some public data from other surveys. We created 0.5--4.5 keV structure functions (SFs) for each source, for comparison with the ensemble structure function of AGN. We find 220 X-ray sources with luminosities > ~1E+35 erg/s that have SFs with significantly more variability than the ensemble AGN SF, and are likely X-ray binaries (XBs). A further 30 X-ray sources were identified as XBs using other methods. We therefore have 250 probable XBs in total, including ~200 new identifications. This result represents great progress over the ~50 XBs and ~40 XB candidates previously identified out of the ~2000 X-ray sources within the D_25 region of M31; it also demonstrates the power of SF analysis for identifying XBs in external galaxies. We also identify...

  4. The X-ray Spectra of Black Hole X-ray Novae in Quiescence as Measured by Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, A K H; García, M R; Murray, S S; Barret, D

    2002-01-01

    We present Chandra observations of black hole X-ray novae V404 Cyg, A0620-00, GRO J1655-40 and XTE J1550-564 in quiescence. Their quiescent spectra can be well fitted by a power-law model with slope $\\alpha \\sim 2$. While a coronal (Raymond-Smith) model is also a statistically acceptable representation of the spectra, the best fit temperatures of these models is $\\sim 5$ times higher than that seen in active stellar coronae. These four spectra of quiescent X-ray novae are all consistent with that expected for accretion via an advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) and inconsistent with that expected from a stellar corona. This evidence for continued accretion in quiescence further strengthens the case for the existence of event horizons in black holes. Both A0620-00 and GRO J1655-40 were fainter than in previous observations, while V404 Cyg was more luminous and varied by a factor of 2 in a few ksec. A reanalysis of the X-ray data for XTE J1550-564 shows that (like V404 Cyg and A0620-00) its luminosity exc...

  5. An Overview of the Performance of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Weisskopf, M C; Bautz, M; Cameron, R A; Dewey, D; Drake, J J; Grant, C E; Marshall, H L; Murray, S S

    2003-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory is the X-ray component of NASA's Great Observatory Program which includes the recently launched Spitzer Infrared Telescope, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) for observations in the visible, and the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) which, after providing years of useful data has reentered the atmosphere. All these facilities provide, or provided, scientific data to the international astronomical community in response to peer-reviewed proposals for their use. The Chandra X-ray Observatory was the result of the efforts of many academic, commercial, and government organizations primarily in the United States but also in Europe. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) manages the Project and provides Project Science; Northrop Grumman Space Technology (NGST -- formerly TRW) served as prime contractor responsible for providing the spacecraft, the telescope, and assembling and testing the Observatory; and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) provides technical support a...

  6. Observations of the Crab Nebula with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2012-01-01

    The Crab Nebula and its pulsar has been the subject of a number of detailed observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The superb angular resolution of Chandra s high-resolution telescope has made possible numerous remarkable results. Here we describe a number of specific studies of the Crab that I and my colleagues have undertaken. We discuss the geometry of the system, which indicates that the "inner X-ray ring", typically identified with the termination shock of the pulsar s particle wind, is most likely not in the equatorial plane of the pulsar. Other topics are the northern wisps and their evolution with time; the characterization of features in the jet to the southeast; pulse-phase spectroscopy and possible correlations with the features at other wavelengths, particularly the optical polarization; and a search for correlations of the X-ray flux with the recently-discovered gamma -ray flares.

  7. Modeling Contamination Migration on the Chandra X-ray Observatory II

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Steve; Swartz, Doug; Tice, Neil; Plucinsky, Paul; Grant, Catherine; Marshall, Herman; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    During its first 14 years of operation, the cold (about -60degC) optical blocking filter of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory, has accumulated a growing layer of molecular contamination that attenuates low-energy x rays. Over the past few years, the accumulation rate, spatial distribution, and composition may have changed, perhaps partially related to changes in the operating temperature of the ACIS housing. This evolution of the accumulation of the molecular contamination has motivated further analysis of contamination migration on the Chandra X-ray Observatory, particularly within and near the ACIS cavity. To this end, the current study employs a higher-fidelity geometric model of the ACIS cavity, detailed thermal modeling based upon monitored temperature data, and an accordingly refined model of the molecular transport.

  8. The Chandra X-ray Observatory is prepped for solar panel deployment copy form; photos beginning with

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    TRW workers in the Vertical Processing Facility check equipment after deployment of the solar panel array above them, attached to the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93.

  9. The End of Days -- Chandra Catches X-ray Glow From Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Through a combination of serendipity and skill, scientists have used NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory to capture a rare glimpse of X-radiation from the early phases of a supernova, one of the most violent events in nature. Although more than a thousand supernovas have been observed by optical astronomers, the early X-ray glow from the explosions has been detected in less than a dozen cases. The Chandra observations were made under the direction of a team of scientists from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, led by Walter Lewin and his graduate student, Derek Fox. When combined with simultaneous observations by radio and optical telescopes, the X-ray observations tell about the thickness of the shell that was blown off, its density, its speed, and how much material was shed by the star before it exploded. Chandra observed an X-ray glow from SN1999em with the total power of 50,000 suns. Ten days later it observed the supernova for another nine hours, and found that the X rays had faded to half their previous intensity. The optical luminosity, which had the brightness of 200 million suns, had faded somewhat less. No radio emission was detected at any time. With this information, the MIT group and their colleagues are already piecing together a picture of the catastrophic explosion. Observations by optical astronomers showed that SN1999em was a Type II supernova produced by the collapse of the core of a star ten or more times as massive as the Sun. The intense heat generated in the collapse produces a cataclysmic rebound that sends high speed debris flying outward at speeds in excess of 20 million miles per hour. The debris crashes into matter shed by the former star before the explosion. This awesome collision generates shock waves that heat expanding debris to three million degrees. The X-ray glow from this hot gas was detected by Chandra and gives astrophysicists a better understanding of the dynamics of the explosion, as well as the

  10. X-ray properties of radio-selected star forming galaxies in the Chandra-COSMOS survey

    CERN Document Server

    Ranalli, P; Zamorani, G; Cappelluti, N; Civano, F; Georgantopoulos, I; Gilli, R; Schinnerer, E; Smolcic, V; Vignali, C

    2012-01-01

    X-ray surveys contain sizable numbers of star forming galaxies, beyond the AGN which usually make the majority of detections. Many methods to separate the two populations are used in the literature, based on X-ray and multiwavelength properties. We aim at a detailed test of the classification schemes and to study the X-ray properties of the resulting samples. We build on a sample of galaxies selected at 1.4 GHz in the VLA-COSMOS survey, classified by Smolcic et al. (2008) according to their optical colours and observed with Chandra. A similarly selected control sample of AGN is also used for comparison. We review some X-ray based classification criteria and check how they affect the sample composition. The efficiency of the classification scheme devised by Smolcic et al. (2008) is such that ~30% of composite/misclassified objects are expected because of the higher X-ray brightness of AGN with respect to galaxies. The latter fraction is actually 50% in the X-ray detected sources, while it is expected to be muc...

  11. Using ACIS on the Chandra X-ray Observatory as a particle radiation monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Grant, C E; Bautz, M W; O'Dell, S L

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) is one of two focal-plane instruments on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. During initial radiation-belt passes, the exposed ACIS suffered significant radiation damage from trapped soft protons scattering off the x-ray telescope's mirrors. The primary effect of this damage was to increase the charge-transfer inefficiency (CTI) of the ACIS 8 front-illuminated CCDs. Subsequently, the Chandra team implemented procedures to remove the ACIS from the telescope's focus during high-radiation events: planned protection during radiation-belt transits; autonomous protection triggered by an on-board radiation monitor; and manual intervention based upon assessment of space-weather conditions. However, as Chandra's multilayer insulation ages, elevated temperatures have reduced the effectiveness of the on-board radiation monitor for autonomous protection. Here we investigate using the ACIS CCDs themselves as a radiation monitor. We explore the 10-year database to evaluate the CCDs' ...

  12. The Restless Universe - Understanding X-Ray Astronomy in the Age of Chandra and Newton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Eric M.

    2002-10-01

    Carl Sagan once noted that there is only one generation that gets to see things for the first time. We are in the midst of such a time right now, standing on the threshold of discovery in the young and remarkable field of X-ray astronomy. In The Restless Universe , astronomer Eric Schlegel offers readers an informative survey of this cutting-edge science. Two major space observatories launched in the last few years--NASA's Chandra and the European Newton --are now orbiting the Earth, sending back a gold mine of data on the X-ray universe. Schlegel, who has worked on the Chandra project for seven years, describes the building and launching of this space-based X-ray observatory. But the book goes far beyond the story of Chandra . What Schlegel provides here is the background a nonscientist would need to grasp the present and follow the future of X-ray astronomy. He looks at the relatively brief history of the field, the hardware used to detect X-rays, the satellites--past, present, and future--that have been or will be flown to collect the data, the way astronomers interpret this data, and, perhaps most important, the insights we have already learned as well as speculations about what we may soon discover. And throughout the book, Schlegel conveys the excitement of looking at the universe from the perspective brought by these new observatories and the sharper view they deliver. Drawing on observations obtained from Chandra, Newton , and previous X-ray observatories, The Restless Universe gives a first look at an exciting field which significantly enriches our understanding of the universe.

  13. A bright thermonuclear X-ray burst simultaneously observed with Chandra and RXTE

    CERN Document Server

    Zand, J J M in t; Marshall, H L; Ballantyne, D R; Jonker, P G; Paerels, F B S; Palmer, D M; Patruno, A; Weinberg, N N

    2013-01-01

    The prototypical accretion-powered millisecond pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658 was observed simultaneously with Chandra-LETGS and RXTE-PCA near the peak of a transient outburst in November 2011. A single thermonuclear (type-I) burst was detected, the brightest yet observed by Chandra from any source, and the second-brightest observed by RXTE. We found no evidence for discrete spectral features during the burst; absorption edges have been predicted to be present in such bursts, but may require a greater degree of photospheric expansion than the rather moderate expansion seen in this event (a factor of a few). These observations provide a unique data set to study an X-ray burst over a broad bandpass and at high spectral resolution (lambda/delta-lambda=200-400). We find a significant excess of photons at high and low energies compared to the standard black body spectrum. This excess is well described by a 20-fold increase of the persistent flux during the burst. We speculate that this results from burst photons being sc...

  14. Chandra Image Gives First Look at Mars Emitted X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Giving scientists their first look, Chandra observed x-rays produced by fluorescent radiation from oxygen atoms of the Sun in the sparse upper atmosphere of Mars, about 120 kilometers (75 miles) above its surface. The x-ray power detected from the Martian atmosphere is very small, amounting to only 4 megawatts, comparable to the x-ray power of about ten thousand medical x-ray machines. At the time of the Chandra observation, a huge dust storm developed on Mars that covered about one hemisphere, later to cover the entire planet. This hemisphere rotated out of view over the 9-hour observation, but no change was observed in the x-ray intensity indicating that the dust storm did not affect the upper atmosphere. Scientists also observed a halo of x-rays extending out to 7,000 kilometers above the surface of Mars believed to be produced by collisions of ions racing away from the Sun (the solar wind).

  15. Chandra observation of the fast X-ray transient IGR J17544-2619: evidence for a neutron star?

    CERN Document Server

    in 't Zand, J J M

    2005-01-01

    IGR J17544-2619 belongs to a distinct group of at least seven fast X-ray transients that cannot readily be associated with nearby flare stars or pre-main sequence stars and most probably are X-ray binaries with wind accretion. Sofar, the nature of the accretor has been determined in only one case (SAX J1819.3-2525/V4641 Sgr). We carried out a 20 ks Chandra ACIS-S observation of IGR J17544-2619 which shows the source in quiescence going into outburst. The Chandra position confirms the previous tentative identification of the optical counterpart, a blue O9Ib supergiant at 3 to 4 kpc (Pellizza, Chaty & Negueruela, in prep.). This is the first detection of a fast X-ray transient in quiescence. The quiescent spectrum is very soft. The photon index of 5.9+/-1.2 (90% confidence error margin) is much softer than 6 quiescent black hole candidates that were observed with Chandra ACIS-S (Kong et al. 2002; Tomsick et al. 2003). Assuming that a significant fraction of the quiescent photons comes from the accretor and ...

  16. A Chandra X-ray observation of the globular cluster Terzan 1

    CERN Document Server

    Cackett, E M; Heinke, C O; Pooley, D; Lewin, W H G; Grindlay, J E; Edmonds, P D; Jonker, P G; Miller, J M

    2005-01-01

    We present a 19 ks Chandra ACIS-S observation of the globular cluster Terzan 1. Fourteen sources are detected within 1.4 arcmin of the cluster center with 2 of these sources predicted to be not associated with the cluster (background AGN or foreground objects). The neutron star X-ray transient, X1732-304, has previously been observed in outburst within this globular cluster with the outburst seen to last for at least 12 years. Here we find 4 sources that are consistent with the ROSAT position for this transient, but none of the sources are fully consistent with the position of a radio source detected with the VLA that is likely associated with the transient. The most likely candidate for the quiescent counterpart of the transient has a relatively soft spectrum and an unabsorbed 0.5-10 keV luminosity of 2.6E32 ergs/s, quite typical of other quiescent neutron stars. Assuming standard core cooling, from the quiescent flux of this source we predict long (>400 yr) quiescent episodes to allow the neutron star to co...

  17. Deep Chandra X-ray Observations of Low Mass X-ray Binary Candidates in the Early-Type Galaxy NGC 4697

    CERN Document Server

    Sivakoff, Gregory R; Juett, Adrienne M; Sarazin, Craig L; Irwin, Jimmy A

    2008-01-01

    Chandra X-ray observations routinely resolve tens to hundreds of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) per galaxy in nearby massive early-type galaxies. These studies have raised important issues regarding the behavior of this population of remnants of the once massive stars in early-type galaxies, namely the connection between LMXBs and globular clusters (GCs) and the nature of the LMXB luminosity function (LF). In this paper, we combine five epochs of Chandra observations and one central field Hubble Space Telescope Advance Camera for Surveys observation of NGC 4697, one of the nearest, optically luminous elliptical (E6) galaxies, to probe the GC-LMXB connection and LMXB-LF down to a detection/completeness limit of (0.6/1.4) x 10^{37} ergs/s. We detect 158 sources, present their luminosities and hardness ratios, and associate 34 LMXBs with GCs. We confirm that GCs with higher encounter rates (\\Gamma_h) and redder colors (higher metallicity Z) are more likely to contain GCs, and find that the expected number of LM...

  18. The MOJAVE Chandra Sample: A Correlation Study of Blazars and Radio Galaxies in X-ray and Radio Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Brandon Scott

    2011-05-01

    The Chandra X-ray observatory has increased the quality and number of detections the X-ray regime since its launch in 1999. It is an important tool for studying the jets which are associated with Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and their possible emission mechanisms. The MOJAVE Chandra Sample (MCS) is a sample of 27 AGN which have been selected from the radio flux-limited MOJAVE (Monitoring of Jets in AGN with VLBA Experiments) sample. The objects contained in the MOJAVE sample are traditionally associated with relativistically beamed jets that have small viewing angles. The MCS was created to study the correlation of X-ray and radio emission on kiloparsec scales. The complete sample is made up of all MOJAVE Fanaroff & Riley type II objects which have over 100 mJy of extended radio emission at 1.4 GHz and a radio structure of at least 3" in extent. Chandra observations have revealed X-ray and radio correlation in 21 of the 27 jets, bringing the detection rate to ˜78%. The selection criteria provides a quantitative method of discovering new X-ray jets associated with AGN from radio observations. The X-ray morphologies are usually well correlated with the radio emission, except for the sources which show extreme bending on the kiloparsec scale. The emission mechanism for these relativistically beamed quasars and radio galaxies can be interpreted as inverse Compton scattering off of the cosmic microwave background by the electrons in the jets (IC/CMB). The emission mechanism is reinforced by spectral energy distributions (SED) which model the emission mechanisms for sources with sufficient X-ray, optical, and radio data available. I have explored the effects of jet bending and jet deceleration in conjunction with the inverse Compton emission model and used different scenarios to derive best fit viewing angles and bulk Lorentz factors, which were calculated by using the superluminal speeds along with parameters that were derived from the IC/CMB model. The range of

  19. Chandra and XMM Monitoring of the Black Hole X-ray Binary IC 10 X-1

    OpenAIRE

    Laycock, Silas G. T.; Cappallo, Rigel C.; Moro, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    The massive black hole + Wolf-Rayet binary IC10 X-1 was observed in a series of 10 Chandra and 2 XMM-Newton observations spanning 2003-2012, showing consistent variability around 7 x10^37 erg/s, with a spectral hardening event in 2009. We phase-connected the entire light-curve by folding the photon arrival times on a series of trial periods spanning the known orbital period and its uncertainty, refining the X-ray period to P = 1.45175(1)d. The duration of minimum-flux in the X-ray eclipse is ...

  20. Modeling Contamination Migration on the Chandra X-ray Observatory - II

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tice, Neil W.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Grant, Catherine E.; Marshall, Herman L.; Vikhlinin, Alexey A.; Tennant, Allyn F.

    2013-01-01

    During its first 14 years of operation, the cold (about -60C) optical blocking filter of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory, has accumulated a growing layer of molecular contamination that attenuates low-energy x rays. Over the past few years, the accumulation rate, spatial distribution, and composition have changed. This evolution has motivated further analysis of contamination migration within and near the ACIS cavity. To this end, the current study employs a higher-fidelity geometric model of the ACIS cavity, detailed thermal modeling based upon temperature data, and a refined model of the molecular transport.

  1. Matching microlensing events with X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Sartore, N

    2011-01-01

    The detection of old neutron stars and black holes in isolation is one of the cornerstones of compact object astrophysics. Microlensing surveys may help on this purpose since the lensing mechanism is independent of the emission properties of the lens. Indeed, several black hole candidates deriving through microlensing observations have been reported in the literature. The identification of counterparts, especially in the X-rays, would be a strong argument in favor of the compact nature of these lenses. We perform a cross-correlation between the catalogs of microlensing events by the OGLE, MACHO and MOA teams, and those of X-rays sources from XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites. Based on our previous work, we select only microlensing events longer than 100 days, which should contain a large fraction of lenses as compact objects. Our matching criterion takes into account the positional coincidence in the sky. We find a single match between a microlensing event OGLE 2004-BLG-81 and the X-ray source 2XMM J180540.5-...

  2. Two eclipsing ultraluminous X-ray sources in M 51

    CERN Document Server

    Urquhart, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    We present the discovery, from archival Chandra and XMM-Newton data, of X-ray eclipses in two ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), located in the same region of the galaxy M 51: CXOM51 J132940.0$+$471237 (ULX-1, for simplicity) and CXOM51 J132939.5$+$471244 (ULX-2). Three eclipses were detected for ULX-1, two for ULX-2. The presence of eclipses puts strong constraints on the viewing angle, suggesting that both ULXs are seen almost edge-on and are certainly not beamed towards us. Despite the similar viewing angles and luminosities ($L_{\\rm X} \\approx 2 \\times 10^{39}$ erg s$^{-1}$ in the $0.3$-$8$ keV band for both sources), their X-ray properties are different. ULX-1 has a soft spectrum, well fitted by Comptonization emission from a medium with electron temperature $kT_e \\approx 1$ keV. ULX-2 is harder, well fitted by a slim disk with $kT_{\\rm in} \\approx 1.5$-$1.8$ keV and normalization consistent with a $\\sim 10 M_{\\odot}$ black hole. ULX-1 has a significant contribution from multi-temperature thermal plasma...

  3. Chandra/ACIS-I study of the X-ray properties of the NGC 6611 and M16 stellar population

    CERN Document Server

    Guarcello, M G; Micela, G; Sciortino, S; Drake, J J; Prisinzano, L

    2012-01-01

    Mechanisms regulating the origin of X-rays in YSOs and the correlation with their evolutionary stage are under debate. Studies of the X-ray properties in young clusters allow to understand these mechanisms. One ideal target for this analysis is the Eagle Nebula (M16), with its central cluster NGC6611. At 1750 pc from the Sun, it harbors 93 OB stars, together with a population of low-mass stars from embedded protostars to disk-less Class III objects, with age <= 3Myrs. We study an archival 78 ksec Chandra/ACIS-I observation of NGC6611, and two new 80ksec observations of the outer region of M16, one centered on the Column V, and one on a region of the molecular cloud with ongoing star-formation. We detect 1755 point sources, with 1183 candidate cluster members (219 disk-bearing and 964 disk-less). We study the global X-ray properties of M16 and compare them with those of the Orion Nebula Cluster. We also compare the level of X-ray emission of Class II and Class III stars, and analyze the X-ray spectral prope...

  4. THREE NEW GALACTIC CENTER X-RAY SOURCES IDENTIFIED WITH NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeWitt, Curtis [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Bandyopadhyay, Reba M.; Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Sarajedini, Ata [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Center, P.O. Box 112055, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Sellgren, Kris [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Blum, Robert; Olsen, Knut [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Bauer, Franz E., E-mail: curtis.n.dewitt@nasa.gov [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile)

    2013-11-01

    We have conducted a near-infrared spectroscopic survey of 47 candidate counterparts to X-ray sources discovered by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory near the Galactic center (GC). Though a significant number of these astrometric matches are likely to be spurious, we sought out spectral characteristics of active stars and interacting binaries, such as hot, massive spectral types or emission lines, in order to corroborate the X-ray activity and certify the authenticity of the match. We present three new spectroscopic identifications, including a Be high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) or a γ Cassiopeiae (Cas) system, a symbiotic X-ray binary, and an O-type star of unknown luminosity class. The Be HMXB/γ Cas system and the symbiotic X-ray binary are the first of their classes to be spectroscopically identified in the GC region.

  5. Laser-based X-ray and electron source for X-ray fluorescence studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle Brozas, F.; Crego, A.; Roso, L.; Peralta Conde, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we present a modification to conventional X-rays fluorescence using electrons as excitation source and compare it with the traditional X-ray excitation for the study of pigments. For this purpose, we have constructed a laser-based source capable to produce X-rays as well as electrons. Because of the large penetration depth of X-rays, the collected fluorescence signal is a combination of several material layers of the artwork under study. However, electrons are stopped in the first layers, allowing a more superficial analysis. We show that the combination of both excitation sources can provide extremely valuable information about the structure of the artwork.

  6. First Images From Chandra X-Ray Observatory to be Released

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-08-01

    The first images from the world's most powerful X-ray telescope, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, will be unveiled at a media briefing at 1 p.m. EDT, Thursday, Aug. 26. The briefing will be held in the James E. Webb Auditorium at NASA Headquarters, 300 E St. SW, Washington, DC. The images include the spectacular remnants of a supernova and other astronomical objects. Panelists will be: - Dr. Edward Weiler, Associate Administrator for Space Science, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC; - Dr. Harvey Tananbaum, Director of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's Chandra X-ray Center, Cambridge, MA; - Dr. Martin Weisskopf, NASA's Chandra Project Scientist, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL; and - Dr. Robert Kirshner, astrophysicist, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. The event will be carried live on NASA Television with question-and-answer capability for reporters covering the briefing from participating NASA centers and from the Chandra Operations Control Center in Cambridge. NASA Television is available on transponder 9C, satellite GE-2 at 85 degrees West longitude, vertical polarization, frequency 3880 MHz, audio of 6.8 MHz. Chandra has been undergoing activation and checkout since it was placed into orbit during Space Shuttle mission STS-93 in July. Chandra will examine exploding stars, black holes, colliding galaxies and other high-energy cosmic phenomena to help scientists gain a better understanding of the structure and evolution of the universe. Chandra images and additional information will be available following the briefing on the Internet at: http://chandra.nasa.gov and http://chandra.harvard.edu NASA press releases and other information are available automatically by sending an Internet electronic mail message to domo@hq.nasa.gov. In the body of the message (not the subject line) users should type the words "subscribe press-release" (no quotes). The system will reply with a confirmation via E-mail of each subscription. A second

  7. Shelter from the Storm: Protecting the Chandra X-ray Observatory from Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Robert A.; Morris, David C.; Virani, Shanil N.; Wolk, Scott J.; Blackwell, William C.; Minow, Joseph I.; O'dell, Stephen L.

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory was launched in July 1999, and the first images were recorded by the ACIS x-ray detector in August 1999. Shortly after first light, degradation of the energy resolution and charge transfer efficiency in the ACIS CCD detectors was observed, and this was quickly attributed to cumulative particle radiation damage in the CCD's, in particular from 100 keV to 200 keV protons. Since the onset of this radiation damage to ACIS, several improvements have been made to autonomous Chandra operation and ground-based operations and mission planning, to limit the effects of radiation while preserving optimum observing efficiency for the Observatory. These changes include implementing an automatic science instrument radiation protection system on Chandra, implementing a real-time radiation monitoring and alert system by the Science Operations Team, and improving the radiation prediction models used in mission planning for the Observatory. These satellite- and ground-based systems provide protection for Chandra from passages through the Earth's trapped radiation belts and outer magnetosphere and from flares and coronal mass ejections from the Sun. We describe the design and performance of the automatic on-board radiation protection system on Chandra, and the ground-based software systems and data products for real-time radiation monitoring. We also describe the development and characterize the performance of the Chandra Radiation Model (CRM), which provides predictions of the solar wind and magnetospheric proton fluxes along Chandra's orbit, indexed by the geomagnetic activity index, Kp. We compare the observed and predicted damage rates to ACIS based on net mission proton fluence, and outline planned enhancements to the CRM.

  8. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  9. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Miaja-Avila

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  10. Deep X-ray and UV Surveys of Galaxies with Chandra, XMM-Newton, and GALEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornschemeier, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Only with the deepest Chandra surveys has X-ray emission from normal and star forming galaxies (as opposed to AGN, which dominate the X-ray sky) been accessible at cosmologically interesting distances. The X-ray emission from accreting binaries provide a critical glimpse into the binary phase of stellar evolution and studies of the hot gas reservoir constrain past star formation. UV studies provide important, sensitive diagnostics of the young star forming populations and provide the most mature means for studying galaxies at 2 luminosity function of galaxies and important constraints on star formation scaling relations such as the X-ray-Star Formation Rate correlation and the X-ray/Stellar Mass correlation. We will discuss what we learn from these deep observations of Coma, including the recently established suppression of the X-ray emission from galaxies in the Coma outskirts that is likely associated with lower levels of past star formation and/or the results of tidal gas stripping.

  11. Contemporaneous Chandra HETG and Suzaku X-ray observations of NGC 4051

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobban, A. P.; Reeves, J. N.; Miller, L.; Turner, T. J.; Braito, V.; Kraemer, S. B.; Crenshaw, D. M.

    2011-07-01

    We present the results of a deep 300 ks Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) observation of the highly variable narrow-line Seyfert Type 1 galaxy NGC 4051. The HETG spectrum reveals 28 significant soft X-ray ionized lines in either emission or absorption; primarily originating from H-like and He-like K-shell transitions of O, Ne, Mg and Si (including higher order lines and strong forbidden emission lines from O VII and Ne IX) plus high-ionization L-shell transitions from Fe XVII to Fe XXII and lower ionization inner-shell lines (e.g. O VI). Modelling the data with XSTAR requires four distinct ionization zones for the gas, all outflowing with velocities log ξ= 4.1+0.2-0.1; vout˜-0.02c) which potentially may have a significant effect on the host galaxy environment via feedback. Finally, we also simultaneously model the broad-band 2008 XIS+HXD (Hard X-ray Detector) Suzaku data with archival Suzaku data from 2005 when the source was observed to have entered an extended period of low flux in an attempt to analyse the cause of the long-term spectral variability. We find that we can account for this by allowing for large variations in the normalization of the intrinsic power-law component which may be interpreted as being due to significant changes in the covering fraction of a Compton-thick partial-coverer obscuring the central continuum emission.

  12. A Chandra observation of the accretion-driven millisecond X-ray pulsar XTE J0929-314 in quiescence

    CERN Document Server

    Wijnands, R; Heinke, C O; Miller, J M; Lewin, W H G; Wijnands, Rudy; Homan, Jeroen; Heinke, Craig O.; Miller, Jon M.; Lewin, Walter H. G.

    2004-01-01

    We observed the accretion-driven millisecond X-ray pulsar XTE J0929-314 in its quiescent state using Chandra. XTE J0929-314 is the second such source to be observed in quiescence, after SAX J1808.4-3658. We detected 22 source photons (in the energy range 0.3-8 keV) in ~24.4 ksec, resulting in a background-corrected count rate of 9+/-2 x 10^{-4} counts s^{-1}. This small number of photons detected did not allow for a detailed spectral analysis of the quiescent spectrum, but we can demonstrate that the spectrum is harder than simple thermal emission which is usually presumed to arise from a cooling neutron star that has been heated during the outbursts. Assuming a power-law model for the X-ray spectrum, we obtain a power-law index of 2.2+/-0.6 and an unabsorbed X-ray flux of 6.5^{+2.8}_{-2.1} x 10^{-15} ergs s^{-1} cm^{-2} (for the energy range 0.5-10 keV), resulting in a 0.5-10 keV X-ray luminosity of 8+/-3 x 10^{31} (d/10 kpc)^2 ergs s^{-1}, with d the distance toward the source in kpc. No thermal component c...

  13. The outer regions of galaxy clusters: Chandra constraints on the X-ray surface brightness

    CERN Document Server

    Ettori, S

    2008-01-01

    (Abridged version) We study the properties of the X-ray surface brightness profiles in a sample of galaxy clusters that are observed with Chandra and have emission detectable with a signal-to-noise ratio larger than 2 at a radius beyond R500 ~ 0.7 R200. Our study aims at measuring the slopes of the X-ray surface brightness and of the gas density profiles in the outskirts of massive clusters. These constraints are then compared to similar results obtained from observations and numerical simulations of the temperature and dark matter density profiles with the intention to present a consistent picture of the outer regions of galaxy clusters. We extract the surface brightness profiles S_b(r) from X-ray exposures obtained with Chandra of 52 X-ray luminous galaxy clusters at z>0.3. We estimate R200 both using a beta-model to reproduce the surface brightness profile and scaling relations from the literature, showing that the two methods converge to comparable values. We evaluate then the radius, R_S2N, at which the ...

  14. THE CHANDRA MULTI-WAVELENGTH PROJECT: OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY AND THE BROADBAND SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF X-RAY-SELECTED AGNs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trichas, Markos; Green, Paul J.; Aldcroft, Tom; Kim, Dong-Woo; Mossman, Amy [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Silverman, John D. [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha 5-1-5, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Barkhouse, Wayne [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202 (United States); Cameron, Robert A. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Constantin, Anca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, James Madison University, PHCH, Harrisonburg, VA 22807 (United States); Ellison, Sara L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8P 1A1 (Canada); Foltz, Craig [Division of Astronomical Sciences, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22230 (United States); Haggard, Daryl [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Jannuzi, Buell T. [NOAO, Kitt Peak National Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); Marshall, Herman L. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Perez, Laura M. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Romero-Colmenero, Encarni [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory, 7935 (South Africa); Ruiz, Angel [Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera-INAF, Milan (Italy); Smith, Malcolm G., E-mail: mtrichas@cfa.harvard.edu [Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory, La Serena (Chile); and others

    2012-06-01

    From optical spectroscopy of X-ray sources observed as part of the Chandra Multi-wavelength Project (ChaMP), we present redshifts and classifications for a total of 1569 Chandra sources from our targeted spectroscopic follow-up using the FLWO/1.5 m, SAAO/1.9 m, WIYN 3.5 m, CTIO/4 m, KPNO/4 m, Magellan/6.5 m, MMT/6.5 m, and Gemini/8 m telescopes, and from archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopy. We classify the optical counterparts as 50% broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs), 16% emission line galaxies, 14% absorption line galaxies, and 20% stars. We detect QSOs out to z {approx} 5.5 and galaxies out to z {approx} 3. We have compiled extensive photometry, including X-ray (ChaMP), ultraviolet (GALEX), optical (SDSS and ChaMP-NOAO/MOSAIC follow-up), near-infrared (UKIDSS, Two Micron All Sky Survey, and ChaMP-CTIO/ISPI follow-up), mid-infrared (WISE), and radio (FIRST and NVSS) bands. Together with our spectroscopic information, this enables us to derive detailed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for our extragalactic sources. We fit a variety of template SEDs to determine bolometric luminosities, and to constrain AGNs and starburst components where both are present. While {approx}58% of X-ray Seyferts (10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} < L{sub 2-10keV} <10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) require a starburst event (>5% starburst contribution to bolometric luminosity) to fit observed photometry only 26% of the X-ray QSO (L{sub 2-10keV} >10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) population appear to have some kind of star formation contribution. This is significantly lower than for the Seyferts, especially if we take into account torus contamination at z > 1 where the majority of our X-ray QSOs lie. In addition, we observe a rapid drop of the percentage of starburst contribution as X-ray luminosity increases. This is consistent with the quenching of star formation by powerful QSOs, as predicted by the merger model, or with a time lag between the peak of star formation and QSO

  15. Managing radiation degradation of CCDs on the Chandra X-ray Observatory II

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Bissell, Bradley A.; Blackwell, William C.; Cameron, Robert A.; Chappell, Jon II.; DePasquale, Joseph M.; Gage, Kenneth R.; Grant, Catherine E.; Harbison, Christine F.

    2005-01-01

    The CCDs on the Chandra X-ray Observatory are vulnerable to radiation damage from low-energy protons scattered off the telescope's mirrors onto the focal plane. Following unexpected damage incurred early in the mission, the Chandra Team developed, implemented, and maintains a radiation-protection program. This program - involving scheduled radiation safing during radiation-belt passes, intervention based upon real-time space-weather conditions and radiation-environment modeling, and on-board radiation monitoring with autonomous radiation safing - has successfully managed the radiation damage to the CCDs. Since implementing the program, the charge-transfer inefficiency (CTI) has increased at an average annual rate of only 2.9x10^-6 (2.3%) for the front- illuminated CCDs and 0.95x10^-6 (6.5%) for the back-illuminated CCDs. This paper describes the current status of Chandra radiation-management program.

  16. X-ray Sources and their Optical Counterparts in the Globular Cluster M4

    CERN Document Server

    Bassa, C; Homer, L; Verbunt, F; Gaensler, B M; Lewin, W H G; Anderson, S F; Margon, B; Kaspi, V M; Van der Klis, M; Bassa, Cees; Pooley, David; Homer, Lee; Verbunt, Frank; Gaensler, Bryan M.; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Anderson, Scott F.; Margon, Bruce; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Klis, Michiel van der

    2004-01-01

    We report on the Chandra X-ray Observatory ACIS-S3 imaging observation of the Galactic globular cluster M4 (NGC 6121). We detect 12 X-ray sources inside the core and 19 more within the cluster half-mass radius. The limiting luminosity of this observation is Lx~10e29 erg/sec for sources associated with the cluster, the deepest X-ray observation of a globular cluster to date. We identify 6 X-ray sources with known objects and use ROSAT observations to show that the brightest X-ray source is variable. Archival data from the Hubble Space Telescope allow us to identify optical counterparts to 16 X-ray sources. Based on the X-ray and optical properties of the identifications and the information from the literature, we classify two (possibly three) sources as cataclysmic variables, one X-ray source as a millisecond pulsar and 12 sources as chromospherically active binaries. Comparison of M4 with 47 Tuc and NGC 6397 suggests a scaling of the number of active binaries in these clusters with the cluster (core) mass.

  17. Chandra Reveals The X-Ray Glint In The Cat's Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    SAN DIEGO -- Scientists have discovered a glowing bubble of hot gas and an unexpected X-ray bright central star within the planetary nebula known as the Cat's Eye using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. The new results, presented today at the American Astronomical Society meeting, provide insight into the ways that stars like our Sun end their lives. Scientists believe they are witnessing the expulsion of material from a star that is in the last stages of its existence as a normal star. Material shed by the star is flying away at a speed of about 4 million miles per hour, and the star itself is expected to collapse to become a white dwarf star in a few million years. The X-ray data from the Cat's Eye Nebula, also known as NGC 6543, clearly show a bright central star surrounded by a cloud of multimillion-degree gas. By comparing the Chandra data with those from the Hubble Space Telescope, researchers are able to see where the hotter, X-ray emitting gas appears in relation to the cooler material seen in optical wavelengths by Hubble. "Despite the complex optical appearance of the nebula, the X-ray emission illustrates unambiguously that the hot gas in the central bubble is driving the expansion of the optical nebula," said You-Hua Chu of the University of Illinois and lead author of the paper submitted to the Astrophysical Journal. "The Chandra data will help us to better understand how stars similar to our Sun produce planetary nebulas and evolve into white dwarfs as they grow old." With Chandra, astronomers measured the temperature of the central bubble of X-ray emitting material, and this presents a new puzzle. Though still incredibly energetic and hot enough to emit X-rays, this hot gas is cooler than scientists would have expected from the stellar wind that has come to stagnation from the initial high speed of 4 million miles per hour. At first, the researchers thought that the cooler, outer shell might have mixed with the energetic material closer to the

  18. The X-ray Flux Distribution of Sagittarius A* as Seen by Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Neilsen, J; Nowak, M A; Dexter, J; Witzel, G; Barrière, N; Li, Y; Baganoff, F K; Degenaar, N; Fragile, P C; Gammie, C; Goldwurm, A; Grosso, N; Haggard, D

    2014-01-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the X-ray flux distribution of Sgr A* from the Chandra X-ray Observatory's 3 Ms Sgr A* X-ray Visionary Project (XVP) in 2012. Our analysis indicates that the observed X-ray flux distribution can be decomposed into a steady quiescent component, represented by a Poisson process with rate $Q=(5.24\\pm0.08)\\times10^{-3}$ cts s$^{-1},$ and a variable component, represented by a power law process ($dN/dF\\propto F^{-\\xi},$ $\\xi=1.92_{-0.02}^{+0.03}$). This slope matches our recently-reported distribution of flare luminosities. The variability may also be described by a log-normal process with a median unabsorbed 2-8 keV flux of $1.8^{+0.9}_{-0.6}\\times10^{-14}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ and a shape parameter $\\sigma=2.4\\pm0.2,$ but the power law provides a superior description of the data. In this decomposition of the flux distribution, all of the intrinsic X-ray variability of Sgr A* (spanning at least three orders of magnitude in flux) can be attributed to flaring activity, likely ...

  19. Chandra X-ray Observations of 12 Millisecond Pulsars in the Globular Cluster M28

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Servillat, Mathieu; Heinke, Craig O; Grindlay, Jonathan E; Stairs, Ingrid H; Ransom, Scott M; Freire, Paulo C C; Bégin, Steve; Becker, Werner

    2011-01-01

    We present a Chandra X-ray Observatory investigation of the millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in the globular cluster M28 (NGC 6626). In what is one of the deepest X-ray observations of a globular cluster, we firmly detect seven and possibly detect two of the twelve known M28 pulsars. With the exception of PSRs B1821-24 and J1824-2452H, the detected pulsars have relatively soft spectra, with X-ray luminosities 10^30-31 ergs s^-1 (0.3-8 keV),similar to most "recycled" pulsars in 47 Tucanae and the field of the Galaxy, implying thermal emission from the pulsar magnetic polar caps. We present the most detailed X-ray spectrum to date of the energetic PSR B1821-24. It is well described by a purely non-thermal spectrum with spectral photon index 1.23 and luminosity 1.4x10^33Theta(D/5.5 kpc)^2 ergs s^-1 (0.3-8 keV), where Theta is the fraction of the sky covered by the X-ray emission beam(s). We find no evidence for the previously reported line emission feature around 3.3 keV, most likely as a consequence of improvements i...

  20. The Effect of Variability on X-Ray Binary Luminosity Functions: Multiple-epoch Observations of NGC 300 with Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, B.; Gross, J.; Williams, B. F.; Eracleous, M.; Gaetz, T. J.; Plucinsky, P. P.; Skillman, E. D.

    2017-01-01

    We have obtained three epochs of Chandra ACIS-I observations (totaling ∼184 ks) of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 300 to study the logN–logS distributions of its X-ray point-source population down to ∼2 × 10‑15 erg s‑1 cm‑2 in the 0.35–8 keV band (equivalent to ∼1036 erg s‑1). The individual epoch logN–logS distributions are best described as the sum of a background active galactic nucleus (AGN) component, a simple power law, and a broken power law, with the shape of the logN–logS distributions sometimes varying between observations. The simple power law and AGN components produce a good fit for “persistent” sources (i.e., with fluxes that remain constant within a factor of ∼2). The differential power-law index of ∼1.2 and high fluxes suggest that the persistent sources intrinsic to NGC 300 are dominated by Roche-lobe-overflowing low-mass X-ray binaries. The variable X-ray sources are described by a broken power law, with a faint-end power-law index of ∼1.7, a bright-end index of ∼2.8–4.9, and a break flux of ∼ 8× {10}-15 erg s‑1 cm‑2 (∼4 × 1036 erg s‑1), suggesting that they are mostly outbursting, wind-fed high-mass X-ray binaries, although the logN–logS distribution of variable sources likely also contains low-mass X-ray binaries. We generate model logN–logS distributions for synthetic X-ray binaries and constrain the distribution of maximum X-ray fluxes attained during outburst. Our observations suggest that the majority of outbursting X-ray binaries occur at sub-Eddington luminosities, where mass transfer likely occurs through direct wind accretion at ∼1%–3% of the Eddington rate.

  1. Nanomaterial-based x-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Matthew T.; Parmee, R. J.; Milne, William I.

    2016-02-01

    Following the recent global excitement and investment in the emerging, and rapidly growing, classes of one and two-dimensional nanomaterials, we here present a perspective on one of the viable applications of such materials: field electron emission based x-ray sources. These devices, which have a notable history in medicine, security, industry and research, to date have almost exclusively incorporated thermionic electron sources. Since the middle of the last century, field emission based cathodes were demonstrated, but it is only recently that they have become practicable. We outline some of the technological achievements of the past two decades, and describe a number of the seminal contributions. We explore the foremost market hurdles hindering their roll-out and broader industrial adoption and summarise the recent progress in miniaturised, pulsed and multi-source devices.

  2. Compact X-ray Sources in Nearby Galaxy Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Colbert, E J M

    1998-01-01

    We have found compact, near-nuclear X-ray sources in 21 (54\\%) of a complete sample of 39 nearby face-on spiral and elliptical galaxies with available ROSAT HRI data. ROSAT X-ray luminosities (0.2 $-$ 2.4 keV) of these compact X-ray sources are $\\sim$10$^{37}

  3. THE CHANDRA PLANETARY NEBULA SURVEY (ChanPlaNS). III. X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE CENTRAL STARS OF PLANETARY NEBULAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montez, R. Jr. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37212 (United States); Kastner, J. H.; Freeman, M. [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); and others

    2015-02-10

    We present X-ray spectral analysis of 20 point-like X-ray sources detected in Chandra Planetary Nebula Survey observations of 59 planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood. Most of these 20 detections are associated with luminous central stars within relatively young, compact nebulae. The vast majority of these point-like X-ray-emitting sources at PN cores display relatively ''hard'' (≥0.5 keV) X-ray emission components that are unlikely to be due to photospheric emission from the hot central stars (CSPN). Instead, we demonstrate that these sources are well modeled by optically thin thermal plasmas. From the plasma properties, we identify two classes of CSPN X-ray emission: (1) high-temperature plasmas with X-ray luminosities, L {sub X}, that appear uncorrelated with the CSPN bolometric luminosity, L {sub bol} and (2) lower-temperature plasmas with L {sub X}/L {sub bol} ∼ 10{sup –7}. We suggest these two classes correspond to the physical processes of magnetically active binary companions and self-shocking stellar winds, respectively. In many cases this conclusion is supported by corroborative multiwavelength evidence for the wind and binary properties of the PN central stars. By thus honing in on the origins of X-ray emission from PN central stars, we enhance the ability of CSPN X-ray sources to constrain models of PN shaping that invoke wind interactions and binarity.

  4. The Chandra X-Ray Observatory's Radiation Environment and the AP-8/AE-8 Model

    CERN Document Server

    Virani, S N; Plucinsky, P P; Butt, Y M; Virani, Shanil N.; Mueller-Mellin, Reinhold; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Butt, Yousaf M.

    2000-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) was launched on July 23, 1999 and reached its final orbit on August 7, 1999. The CXO is in a highly elliptical orbit, approximately 140,000 km x 10,000 km, and has a period of approximately 63.5 hours (~ 2.65 days). It transits the Earth's Van Allen belts once per orbit during which no science observations can be performed due to the high radiation environment. The Chandra X-ray Observatory Center (CXC) currently uses the National Space Science Data Center's ``near Earth'' AP-8/AE-8 radiation belt model to predict the start and end times of passage through the radiation belts. However, our scheduling software uses only a simple dipole model of the Earth's magnetic field. The resulting B, L magnetic coordinates, do not always give sufficiently accurate predictions of the start and end times of transit of the Van Allen belts. We show this by comparing to the data from Chandra's on-board radiation monitor, the EPHIN (Electron, Proton, Helium Instrument particle detector) instr...

  5. The Effect of Variability on X-Ray Binary Luminosity Functions: Multiple Epoch Observations of NGC 300 with Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Binder, Breanna; Williams, Benjamin F; Eracleous, Michael; Gaetz, Terrance J; Plucinsky, Paul P; Skillman, Evan D

    2016-01-01

    We have obtained three epochs of Chandra ACIS-I observations (totaling $\\sim$184 ks) of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC~300 to study the logN-logS distributions of its X-ray point source population down to $\\sim$2$\\times$10$^{-15}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ in the 0.35-8 keV band (equivalent to $\\sim$10$^{36}$ erg s$^{-1}$). The individual epoch logN-logS distributions are best described as the sum of a background AGN component, a simple power law, and a broken power law, with the shape of the logN-logS distributions sometimes varying between observations. The simple power law and AGN components produce a good fit for "persistent" sources (i.e., with fluxes that remain constant within a factor of $\\sim$2). The differential power law index of $\\sim$1.2 and high fluxes suggest that the persistent sources intrinsic to NGC~300 are dominated by Roche lobe overflowing low mass X-ray binaries. The variable X-ray sources are described by a broken power law, with a faint-end power law index of $\\sim$1.7, a bright-end index ...

  6. A Chandra observation of the neutron star X-ray transient and eclipsing binary MXB 1659-29 in quiescence

    CERN Document Server

    Wijnands, R; Miller, J M; Homan, J; Wachter, S; Lewin, W H G; Wijnands, Rudy; Nowak, Mike; Miller, Jon M.; Homan, Jeroen; Wachter, Stefanie; Lewin, Walter H. G.

    2003-01-01

    After almost 2.5 years of actively accreting, the neutron star X-ray transient and eclipsing binary MXB 1659-29 returned to quiescence in 2001 September. We report on a Chandra observation of this source taken a little over a month after this transition. The source was detected at an unabsorbed 0.5-10 keV flux of only (2.7 - 3.6) x 10^{-13} erg cm^-2 s^-1, which implies a 0.5-10 keV X-ray luminosity of approximately (3.2 - 4.3) x 10^{33} (d/10 kpc)^2 erg s^-1, with d is the distance to the source in kpc. Its spectrum had a thermal shape and could be well fitted by either a blackbody with a temperature kT of ~0.3 keV or with a neutron star atmosphere model with a kT of ~0.1 keV. The luminosity and spectral shape of MXB 1659-29 are very similar to those observed of the other neutron star X-ray transients when they are in their quiescent state. The source was variable during our observation, exhibiting a complete eclipse of the inner part of the system by the companion star. Dipping behavior was observed before ...

  7. A search for iron emission lines in the Chandra X-ray spectra of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Cackett, E M; Homan, J; Van der Klis, M; Lewin, W H G; Méndez, M; Raymond, J; Steeghs, D; Wijnands, R

    2008-01-01

    While iron emission lines are well studied in black hole systems, both in X-ray binaries and Active Galactic Nuclei, there has been less of a focus on these lines in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). However, recent observations with Suzaku and XMM-Newton have revealed broad asymmetric iron line profiles in 4 neutron star LMXBs, confirming an inner disk origin for these lines in neutron star systems. Here, we present a search for iron lines in 6 neutron star LMXBs. For each object we have simultaneous Chandra and RXTE observations at 2 separate epochs, allowing for both a high resolution spectrum, as well as broadband spectral coverage. Out of the six objects in the survey, we only find significant iron lines in two of the objects, GX 17+2 and GX 349+2. However, we cannot rule out that there are weak, broad lines present in the other sources. The equivalent width of the line in GX 17+2 is consistent between the 2 epochs, while in GX 349+2 the line equivalent width increases by a factor of ~3 betwe...

  8. Chandra and Swift X-ray Observations of the X-ray Pulsar SMC X-2 During the Outburst of 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Li, K L; Lin, L C C; Kong, Albert K H

    2016-01-01

    We report the Chandra/HRC-S and Swift/XRT observations for the 2015 outburst of the high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) pulsar in the Small Magellanic Cloud, SMC X-2. While previous studies suggested that either an O star or a Be star in the field is the high-mass companion of SMC X-2, our Chandra/HRC-S image unambiguously confirms the O-type star as the true optical counterpart. Using the Swift/XRT observations, we extracted accurate orbital parameters of the pulsar binary through a time of arrivals (TOAs) analysis. In addition, there were two X-ray dips near the inferior conjunction, which are possibly caused by eclipses or an ionized high-density shadow wind near the companion's surface. Finally, we propose that an outflow driven by the radiation pressure from day ~10 played an important role in the X-ray/optical evolution of the outburst.

  9. X-Ray Scattering Applications Using Pulsed X-Ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, B.C.

    1999-05-23

    Pulsed x-ray sources have been used in transient structural phenomena investigations for over fifty years; however, until the advent of synchrotrons sources and the development of table-top picosecond lasers, general access to ligh temporal resolution x-ray diffraction was relatively limited. Advances in diffraction techniques, sample excitation schemes, and detector systems, in addition to IncEased access to pulsed sources, have ld tO what is now a diverse and growing array of pulsed-source measurement applications. A survey of time-resolved investigations using pulsed x-ray sources is presented and research opportunities using both present and planned pulsed x-ray sources are discussed.

  10. Statistical Characterization of the Chandra Source Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Primini, Francis A; Davis, John E; Nowak, Michael A; Evans, Ian N; Glotfelty, Kenny J; Anderson, Craig S; Bonaventura, Nina R; Chen, Judy C; Doe, Stephen M; Evans, Janet D; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Galle, Elizabeth C; Gibbs, Danny G; Grier, John D; Hain, Roger M; Hall, Diane M; Harbo, Peter N; Xiangqun,; He,; Karovska, Margarita; Kashyap, Vinay L; Lauer, Jennifer; McCollough, Michael L; McDowell, Jonathan C; Miller, Joseph B; Mitschang, Arik W; Morgan, Douglas L; Mossman, Amy E; Nichols, Joy S; Plummer, David A; Refsdal, Brian L; Rots, Arnold H; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Sundheim, Beth A; Tibbetts, Michael S; Van Stone, David W; Winkelman, Sherry L; Zografou, Panagoula

    2011-01-01

    The first release of the Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) contains ~95,000 X-ray sources in a total area of ~0.75% of the entire sky, using data from ~3,900 separate ACIS observations of a multitude of different types of X-ray sources. In order to maximize the scientific benefit of such a large, heterogeneous data-set, careful characterization of the statistical properties of the catalog, i.e., completeness, sensitivity, false source rate, and accuracy of source properties, is required. Characterization efforts of other, large Chandra catalogs, such as the ChaMP Point Source Catalog (Kim et al. 2007) or the 2 Mega-second Deep Field Surveys (Alexander et al. 2003), while informative, cannot serve this purpose, since the CSC analysis procedures are significantly different and the range of allowable data is much less restrictive. We describe here the characterization process for the CSC. This process includes both a comparison of real CSC results with those of other, deeper Chandra catalogs of the same targets and e...

  11. Chandra Discovers the X-ray Signature of a Powerful Wind from a Galactic Microquasar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-11-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has detected, for the first time in X rays, a stellar fingerprint known as a P Cygni profile--the distinctive spectral signature of a powerful wind produced by an object in space. The discovery reveals a 4.5-million-mile-per-hour wind coming from a highly compact pair of stars in our galaxy, report researchers from Penn State and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in a paper they will present on 8 November 2000 during a meeting of the High-Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomical Society in Honolulu, Hawaii. The paper also has been accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal Letters. "To our knowledge, these are the first P Cygni profiles reported in X rays," say researchers Niel Brandt, assistant professor of astronomy and astrophysics at Penn State, and Norbert S. Schulz, research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The team made the discovery during their first observation of a binary-star system with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which was launched into space in July 1999. The system, known as Circinus X-1, is located about 20,000 light years from Earth in the constellation Circinus near the Southern Cross. It contains a super-dense neutron star in orbit around a normal fusion-burning star like our Sun. Although Circinus X-1 was discovered in 1971, many properties of this system remain mysterious because Circinus X-1 lies in the galactic plane where obscuring dust and gas have blocked its effective study in many wavelengths. The P Cygni spectral profile, previously detected primarily at ultraviolet and optical wavelengths but never before in X rays, is the textbook tool astronomers rely on for probing stellar winds. The profile looks like the outline of a roller coaster, with one really big hill and valley in the middle, on a data plot with velocity on one axis and the flow rate of photons per second on the other. It is named after the famous star P Cygni, in which such

  12. Lessons from the development and operation of the Chandra x-ray observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Daniel A.

    2014-07-01

    Genuine teamwork was a key ingredient of the success of the Chandra x-ray observatory mission. Examples are the science center personnel working as part of the instrument principal investigators (IPI) teams during pre-launch development, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) supporting NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) by directly working with the prime contractor, TRW (now Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems), and TRW acceptance of outside scientists performing the data reduction and analysis for qualification of the aspect camera. An end-to-end thread was defined early on, based on the MSFC/SAO operation of the Einstein observatory x-ray telescope, and covered the cycle from solicitation and peer review of observation proposals through scheduling to data processing and delivery. An open science working group chaired by MSFC included instrument principal investigators and interdisciplinary scientists spanning diverse astrophysical and instrumental expertise.

  13. Chandra X-ray Observations of NGC 4258: Iron Absorption Lines from the Nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Young, A J

    2004-01-01

    We report sub-arcsecond resolution X-ray imaging spectroscopy of the low luminosity active galactic nucleus of NGC 4258 and its immediate surroundings with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. NGC 4258 was observed four times, with the first two observations separated by one month, followed over a year later by two consecutive observations. The spectrum of the nucleus is well described by a heavily absorbed, hard X-ray power law of variable luminosity, plus a constant, thermal soft X-ray component. We do not detect an iron K alpha emission line with the upper limit to the equivalent width of a narrow, neutral iron line ranging between 94 and 887 eV (90% confidence) for the different observations. During the second observation on 2000-04-17, two narrow absorption features are seen with >99.5% confidence at ~6.4 keV and ~6.9 keV, which we identify as resonant absorption lines of Fe XVIII - Fe XIX K alpha and Fe XXVI K alpha, respectively. In addition, the 6.9 keV absorption line is probably variable on a timescale of...

  14. Chandra Phase-Resolved X-ray Spectroscopy of the Crab Pulsar II

    CERN Document Server

    Weisskopf, Martin C; Yakovlev, Dmitry G; Harding, Alice; Zavlin, Vyacheslav E; O'Dell, Stephen L; Elsner, Ronald F; Becker, Werner

    2011-01-01

    We present a new study of the X-ray spectral properties of the Crab Pulsar. The superb angular resolution of the Chandra X-ray Observatory enables distinguishing the pulsar from the surrounding nebulosity. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase allows the least-biased measure of interstellar X-ray extinction due primarily to photoelectric absorption and secondarily to scattering by dust grains in the direction of the Crab Nebula. We modify previous findings that the line-of-sight to the Crab is under-abundant in oxygen and provide measurements with improved accuracy and less bias. Using the abundances and cross sections from Wilms, Allen & McCray (2000) we find [O/H] = $(5.28 \\pm 0.28)\\times10^{-4}$ ($4.9 \\times10^{-4}$ is solar abundance). We also measure for the first time the impact of scattering of flux out of the image by interstellar grains. We find $\\tau_{\\rm scat} = 0.147 \\pm 0.043$. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase also measures the X-ray spectral index even at...

  15. Chandra Discovers X-Ray Ring Around Cosmic Powerhouse in Crab Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    After barely two months in space, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has taken a stunning image of the Crab Nebula, the spectacular remains of a stellar explosion, and has revealed something never seen before: a brilliant ring around the nebula's heart. Combined with observations from the Hubble Space Telescope, the image provides important clues to the puzzle of how the cosmic "generator," a pulsing neutron star, energizes the nebula, which still glows brightly almost 1,000 years after the explosion. "The inner ring is unique," said Professor Jeff Hester of Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ. "It has never been seen before, and it should tell us a lot about how the energy from the pulsar gets into the nebula. It's like finding the transmission lines between the power plant and the light bulb." Professor Mal Ruderman of Columbia University, New York, NY, agreed. "The X-rays Chandra sees are the best tracer of where the energy is. With images such as these, we can directly diagnose what is going on." What is going on, according to Dr. Martin Weisskopf, Chandra Project Scientist from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, is awesome. "The Crab pulsar is accelerating particles up to the speed of light and flinging them out into interstellar space at an incredible rate." The image shows tilted rings or waves of high-energy particles that appear to have been flung outward over the distance of a light year from the central star, and high-energy jets of particles blasting away from the neutron star in a direction perpendicular to the spiral. Hubble Space Telescope images have shown moving knots and wisps around the neutron star, and previous X-ray images have shown the outer parts of the jet and hinted at the ring structure. With Chandra's exceptional resolution, the jet can be traced all the way in to the neutron star, and the ring pattern clearly appears. The image was made with Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer and High Energy Transmission

  16. The 3 Ms Chandra Campaign on Sgr A*: A Census of X-ray Flaring Activity from the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Neilsen, J; Gammie, C; Dexter, J; Markoff, S; Haggard, D; Nayakshin, S; Wang, Q D; Grosso, N; Porquet, D; Tomsick, J A; Degenaar, N; Fragile, P C; Houck, J C; Wijnands, R; Miller, J M; Baganoff, F K

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, X-ray observations of Sgr A* have revealed a black hole in a deep sleep, punctuated roughly once per day by brief flares. The extreme X-ray faintness of this supermassive black hole has been a long-standing puzzle in black hole accretion. To study the accretion processes in the Galactic Center, Chandra (in concert with numerous ground- and space-based observatories) undertook a 3 Ms campaign on Sgr A* in 2012. With its excellent observing cadence, sensitivity, and spectral resolution, this Chandra X-ray Visionary Project (XVP) provides an unprecedented opportunity to study the behavior of the closest supermassive black hole. We present a progress report from our ongoing study of X-ray flares, including the brightest flare ever seen from Sgr A*. Focusing on the statistics of the flares and the quiescent emission, we discuss the physical implications of X-ray variability in the Galactic Center.

  17. The Chandra Source Catalog: Processing and Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Janet; Evans, Ian N.; Glotfelty, Kenny J.; Hain, Roger; Hall, Diane M.; Miller, Joseph B.; Plummer, David A.; Zografou, Panagoula; Primini, Francis A.; Anderson, Craig S.; Bonaventura, Nina R.; Chen, Judy C.; Davis, John E.; Doe, Stephen M.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Galle, Elizabeth C.; Gibbs, Danny G., II; Grier, John D.; Harbo, Peter N.; He, Xiang Qun (Helen); Houck, John C.; Karovska, Margarita; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Lauer, Jennifer; McCollough, Michael L.; McDowell, Jonathan C.; Mitschang, Arik W.; Morgan, Douglas L.; Mossman, Amy E.; Nichols, Joy S.; Nowak, Michael A.; Refsdal, Brian L.; Rots, Arnold H.; Siemiginowska, Aneta L.; Sundheim, Beth A.; Tibbetts, Michael S.; van Stone, David W.; Winkelman, Sherry L.

    2009-09-01

    Chandra Source Catalog processing recalibrates each observation using the latest available calibration data, and employs a wavelet-based source detection algorithm to identify all the X-ray sources in the field of view. Source properties are then extracted from each detected source that is a candidate for inclusion in the catalog. Catalog processing is completed by matching sources across multiple observations, merging common detections, and applying quality assurance checks. The Chandra Source Catalog processing system shares a common processing infrastructure and utilizes much of the functionality that is built into the Standard Data Processing (SDP) pipeline system that provides calibrated Chandra data to end-users. Other key components of the catalog processing system have been assembled from the portable CIAO data analysis package. Minimal new software tool development has been required to support the science algorithms needed for catalog production. Since processing pipelines must be instantiated for each detected source, the number of pipelines that are run during catalog construction is a factor of order 100 times larger than for SDP. The increased computational load, and inherent parallel nature of the processing, is handled by distributing the workload across a multi-node Beowulf cluster. Modifications to the SDP automated processing application to support catalog processing, and extensions to Chandra Data Archive software to ingest and retrieve catalog products, complete the upgrades to the infrastructure to support catalog processing.

  18. Galaxy Cluster Scaling Relations between Bolocam Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect and Chandra X-ray Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Czakon, N G; Mantz, A; Golwala, S R; Downes, T P; Koch, P M; Lin, K -Y; Molnar, S M; Moustakas, L A; Mroczkowski, T; Pierpaoli, E; Shitanishi, J A; Siegel, S; Umetsu, K

    2014-01-01

    We present scaling relations between the integrated Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) signal, $Y_{\\rm SZ}$, its X-ray analogue, $Y_{\\rm X}$$\\equiv$$M_{\\rm gas}$$T_{\\rm X}$, and total mass, $M_{\\rm tot}$, for the 45 galaxy clusters in the Bolocam X-ray-SZ (BOXSZ) sample. All parameters are integrated within $r_{2500}$. $Y_{2500}$ values are measured using SZE data collected with Bolocam, operating at 140 GHz at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). The temperature, $T_{\\rm X}$, and mass, $M_{\\rm gas,2500}$, of the intracluster medium are determined using X-ray data collected with \\emph{Chandra}, and $M_{\\rm tot}$ is derived from $M_{\\rm gas}$ using a constant gas mass fraction. Our analysis accounts for several potential sources of bias, including: selection effects, contamination from radio point sources, and the loss of SZE signal due to noise filtering and beam-smoothing effects. We measure the $Y_{2500}$-$Y_{\\rm X}$ scaling to have a logarithmic slope of $0.84\\pm0.07$, and a fractional intrinsic scatt...

  19. A CHANDRA OBSERVATION OF THE BURSTING MILLISECOND X-RAY PULSAR IGR J17511-3057

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paizis, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, INAF-IASF, Via Bassini 15, 20133 Milano (Italy); Nowak, M. A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Rodriguez, J.; Chaty, S. [Astrophysique, Instrumentation et Modelisation (AIM, UMR-E 9005 CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot) Irfu/Service d' Astrophysique, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Wilms, J. [Dr. Karl Remeis-Sternwarte and Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Sternwartstr. 7, 96049 Bamberg (Germany); Del Santo, M.; Ubertini, P., E-mail: ada@iasf-milano.inaf.it, E-mail: mnowak@space.mit.edu [IAPS, INAF, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2012-08-10

    IGR J17511-3057 is a low-mass X-ray binary hosting a neutron star and is one of the few accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars with X-ray bursts. We report on a 20 ks Chandra grating observation of IGR J17511-3057, performed on 2009 September 22. We determine the most accurate X-ray position of IGR J17511-3057, {alpha}{sub J2000} = 17{sup h}51{sup m}08.{sup s}66, {delta}{sub J2000} = -30 Degree-Sign 57'41.''0 (90% uncertainty of 0.''6). During the observation, a {approx}54 s long type-I X-ray burst is detected. The persistent (non-burst) emission has an absorbed 0.5-8 keV luminosity of 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1} (at 6.9 kpc) and can be well described by a thermal Comptonization model of soft, {approx}0.6 keV, seed photons upscattered by a hot corona. The type-I X-ray burst spectrum, with average luminosity over the 54 s duration L{sub 0.5-8{sub keV}} = 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 37} erg s{sup -1}, can be well described by a blackbody with kT{sub bb} {approx} 1.6 keV and R{sub bb} {approx} 5 km. While an evolution in temperature of the blackbody can be appreciated throughout the burst (average peak kT{sub bb} = 2.5{sup +0.8}{sub -0.4} keV to tail kT{sub bb} = 1.3{sup +0.2}{sub -0.1} keV), the relative emitting surface shows no evolution. The overall persistent and type-I burst properties observed during the Chandra observation are consistent with what was previously reported during the 2009 outburst of IGR J17511-3057.

  20. Laser-based X-ray and electron source for X-ray fluorescence studies

    CERN Document Server

    Brozas, F Valle; Roso, L; Conde, A Peralta

    2016-01-01

    In this work we present a modification to conventional X-rays fluorescence using electrons as excitation source, and compare it with the traditional X-ray excitation for the study of pigments. For this purpose we have constructed a laser-based source capable to produce X-rays as well as electrons. Because of the large penetration depth of X-rays, the collected fluorescence signal is a combination of several material layers of the artwork under study. However electrons are stopped in the first layers allowing therefore a more superficial analysis. We show that the combination of both excitation sources can provide extremely valuable information about the structure of the artwork.

  1. First X-ray observations of Low-Power Compact Steep Spectrum Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Kunert-Bajraszewska, M; Siemiginowska, A; Guainazzi, M

    2013-01-01

    We report first X-ray Chandra observations of a sample of seven low luminosity compact (LLC) sources. They belong to a class of young compact steep spectrum (CSS) radio sources. Four of them have been detected, the other three have upper limit estimations for X-ray flux, one CSS galaxy is associated with an X-ray cluster. We have used the new observations together with the observational data for known strong CSS and gigahertz-peaked spectrum (GPS) objects and large scale FRIs and FRIIs to study the relation between morphology, X-ray properties and excitation modes in radio-loud AGNs. We found that: (1) The low power objects fit well to the already established X-ray - radio luminosity correlation for AGNs and occupy the space among, weaker in the X-rays, FRI objects. (2) The high excitation galaxies (HEG) and low excitation galaxies (LEG) occupy distinct locus in the radio/X-ray luminosity plane, notwithstanding their evolutionary stage. This is in agreement with the postulated different origin of the X-ray em...

  2. Chandra X-ray observations of the hyper-luminous infrared galaxy IRAS F15307+3252

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Gandhi, P.; Hogan, M. T.; Gendron-Marsolais, M.-L.; Edge, A. C.; Fabian, A. C.; Russell, H. R.; Iwasawa, K.; Mezcua, M.

    2017-01-01

    Hyper-luminous infrared galaxies (HyLIRGs) lie at the extreme luminosity end of the IR galaxy population with LIR > 1013 L⊙. They are thought to be closer counterparts of the more distant sub-millimeter galaxies, and should therefore be optimal targets to study the most massive systems in formation. We present deep Chandra observations of IRAS F15307+3252 (100 ks), a classical HyLIRG located at z = 0.93 and hosting a radio-loud AGN (L1.4 GHz ˜ 3.5 × 1025 W Hz-1). The Chandra images reveal the presence of extended (r = 160 kpc), asymmetric X-ray emission in the soft 0.3-2.0 keV band that has no radio counterpart. We therefore argue that the emission is of thermal origin originating from a hot intragroup or intracluster medium virializing in the potential. We find that the temperature (˜2 keV) and bolometric X-ray luminosity (˜3 × 1043 erg s-1) of the gas follow the expected LX-ray-T correlation for groups and clusters, and that the gas has a remarkably short cooling time of 1.2 Gyr. In addition, VLA radio observations reveal that the galaxy hosts an unresolved compact steep-spectrum (CSS) source, most likely indicating the presence of a young radio source similar to 3C186. We also confirm that the nucleus is dominated by a redshifted 6.4 keV Fe Kα line, strongly suggesting that the AGN is Compton-thick. Finally, Hubble images reveal an overdensity of galaxies and sub-structure in the galaxy that correlates with soft X-ray emission. This could be a snapshot view of on-going groupings expected in a growing cluster environment. IRAS F15307+3252 might therefore be a rare example of a group in the process of transforming into a cluster.

  3. Line-Source Based X-Ray Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Bharkhada

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Current computed tomography (CT scanners, including micro-CT scanners, utilize a point x-ray source. As we target higher and higher spatial resolutions, the reduced x-ray focal spot size limits the temporal and contrast resolutions achievable. To overcome this limitation, in this paper we propose to use a line-shaped x-ray source so that many more photons can be generated, given a data acquisition interval. In reference to the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART algorithm for image reconstruction from projection data generated by an x-ray point source, here we develop a generalized SART algorithm for image reconstruction from projection data generated by an x-ray line source. Our numerical simulation results demonstrate the feasibility of our novel line-source based x-ray CT approach and the proposed generalized SART algorithm.

  4. Low-luminosity X-ray sources and the Galactic ridge X-ray emission

    CERN Document Server

    Warwick, R S

    2014-01-01

    Using the XMM-Newton Slew Survey, we construct a hard-band selected sample of low-luminosity Galactic X-ray sources. Two source populations are represented, namely coronally-active stars and binaries (ASBs) and cataclysmic variables (CVs), with X-ray luminosities collectively spanning the range 10^(28-34) erg/s (2-10 keV). We derive the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity function (XLF) and volume emissivity of each population. Scaled to the local stellar mass density, the latter is found to be 1.08 +/- 0.16 x 10^28 erg/s/M and 2.5 +/- 0.6 x 10^27 erg/s/M, for the ASBs and CVs respectively, which in total is a factor 2 higher than previous estimates. We employ the new XLFs to predict the X-ray source counts on the Galactic plane at l = 28.5 deg and show that the result is consistent with current observational constraints. The X-ray emission of faint, unresolved ASBs and CVs can account for a substantial fraction of the Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). We discuss a model in which roughly 80 per cent of the 6-10 keV...

  5. X-Ray Spectroscopy of diffuse Galactic Interstellar Matter with Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Norbert S.; Paerels, Frits

    One of the expectations with the advent of the High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) spectrometer onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory was to measure precise photoelectric edges of major cosmic elements such as O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe. Early studies revealed complex absorption structures around the O K, Fe L, and Ne K edges which were identified with absorption from the various phases of the interstellar medium and which could place limits on ionization fractions in these phases. The dust content in interstellar matter as well as, for example, the fraction of how much oxygen is locked into dust are issues of importance and here resolved X-ray edges can determine significant limits. I will review predictions made by cross-sections and depletion factors and compare with current observations specifically with respect to silicon absorption in the interstellar medium. Dust grain models and in conjunction with laboratory measurements are now used to improve current interstellar X-ray absorption models.

  6. The X-ray spectrum of delta Orionis observed by LETGS aboard Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Raassen, A J J

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the high-resolution X-ray spectrum of the supergiant O-star delta Orionis (O9.5II) with line ratios of He-like ions and a thermal plasma model, and we examine its variability. The O-supergiant delta Ori was observed in the wavelength range 5-175 Angstrom by the X-ray detector HRC-S in combination with the grating LETG aboard Chandra. We studied the He-like ions in combination with the UV-radiation field to determine local plasma temperatures and to establish the distance of the X-ray emitting ions to the stellar surface. We measured individual lines by means of Gaussian profiles, folded through the response matrix, to obtain wavelengths, line fluxes, half widths at half maximum (HWHM) and line shifts to characterize the plasma. We consider multitemperature models in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) to determine temperatures, emission measures, and abundances. Analysis of the He-like triplets extended to N VI and C V implies ionization stratification with the hottest plasma to be found withi...

  7. X-ray spectral variability of seven LINER nuclei with XMM-Newton and Chandra data

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández-García, L; Márquez, I; Masegosa, J

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important features in active galactic nuclei (AGN) is the variability of their emission. Variability has been discovered at X-ray, UV, and radio frequencies on time scales from hours to years. Among the AGN family and according to theoretical studies, Low-Ionization Nuclear Emission Line Region (LINER) nuclei would be variable objects on long time scales. Our purpose is to investigate spectral X-ray variability in LINERs and to understand the nature of these kinds of objects, as well as their accretion mechanism. Chandra and XMM-Newton public archives were used to compile X-ray spectra of seven LINER nuclei at different epochs with time scales of years. To search for variability we fit all the spectra from the same object with a set of models, in order to identify the parameters responsible for the variability pattern. We also analyzed the light curves in order to search for short time scale (from hours to days) variability. Whenever possible, UV variability was also studied. We found spectral...

  8. Interactions between radio sources and X-ray gas at the centers of cooling core clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarazin, C. L.; Blanton, E. L.; Clarke, T. E.

    Recent Chandra and XMM observations of the interaction of central radio sources and cooling cores in clusters of galaxies will be presented. The clusters studied include A262, A2052, A2626, A113, A2029, A2597, and A4059. The radio sources blow "bubbles" in the X-ray gas, displacing the gas and compressing it into shells around the radio lobes. At the same time, the radio sources are confined by the X-ray gas. At larger radii, "ghost bubbles" are seen which are weak in radio emission except at low frequencies. These may be evidence of previous eruptions of the radio sources. In some cases, buoyantly rising bubbles may entrain cooler X-ray gas from the centers of the cooling cores. Some radio sources previously classified as cluster merger radio relics may actually be displaced radio bubbles from the central radio sources. The relation between the radio bubbles, and cooler gas (10 keV).

  9. Chandra Phase-Resolved X-ray Spectroscopy of the Crab Pulsar II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Yakovlev, Dimitry G.; Harding, Alice; Zavlin, Vyacheslav E.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Becker, Werner

    2012-01-01

    We present a new study of the X-ray spectral properties of the Crab Pulsar. The superb angular resolution of the Chandra X-ray Observatory enables distinguishing the pulsar from the surrounding nebulosity. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase allows the least-biased measure of interstellar X-ray extinction due primarily to photoelectric absorption and secondarily to scattering by dust grains in the direction of the Crab Nebula. We modify previous findings that the line-of-sight to the Crab is under-abundant in oxygen and provide measurements with improved accuracy and less bias. Using the abundances and cross sections from Wilms, Allen & McCray (2000) we find [O/H] = (5.28+\\-0.28) x 10(exp -4) (4.9 x 10(exp -4) is solar abundance). \\rVe also measure for the first time the impact of scattering of flux out of the image by interstellar grains. \\rYe find T(sub scat) = 0.147+/-0.043. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase also measures the X-ray spectral index even at pulse minimum - albeit with increasing statistical uncertainty. The spectral variations are, by and large, consistent with a sinusoidal variation. The only significant variation from the sinusoid occurs over the same phase range as some rather abrupt behavior in the optical polarization magnitude and position angle. We compare these spectral variations to those observed in Gamma-rays and conclude that our measurements are both a challenge and a guide to future modeling and will thus eventually help us understand pair cascade processes in pulsar magnetospheres. The data were also used to set new. and less biased, upper limits to the surface temperature of the neutron star for different models of the neutron star atmosphere.

  10. Chandra and XMM monitoring of the black hole X-ray binary IC 10 X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laycock, Silas G. T.; Cappallo, Rigel C.; Moro, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    The massive black hole (BH)+Wolf-Rayet (WR) binary IC 10 X-1 was observed in a series of 10 Chandra and two XMM-Newton observations spanning 2003-2012, showing consistent variability around 7 × 1037 erg s-1, with a spectral hardening event in 2009. We phase connected the entire light curve by folding the photon arrival times on a series of trial periods spanning the known orbital period and its uncertainty, refining the X-ray period to P = 1.45175(1) d. The duration of minimum flux in the X-ray eclipse is ˜5 h which together with the optical radial velocity (RV) curve for the companion yields a radius for the eclipsing body of 8-10 R⊙ for the allowed range of masses. The orbital separation (a1 + a2) = 18.5-22 R⊙ then provides a limiting inclination i > 63° for total eclipses to occur. The eclipses are asymmetric (egress duration ˜0.9 h) and show energy dependence, suggestive of an accretion disc hotspot and corona. The eclipse is much (˜5×) wider than the 1.5-2 R⊙ WR star, pointing to absorption/scattering in the dense wind of the WR star. The same is true of the close analog NGC 300 X-1. RV measurements of the He II [λλ4686] line from the literature show a phase shift with respect to the X-ray ephemeris such that the velocity does not pass through zero at mid-eclipse. The X-ray eclipse leads inferior conjunction of the RV curve by ˜90°, so either the BH is being eclipsed by a trailing shock/plume, or the He II line does not directly trace the motion of the WR star and instead originates in a shadowed partially ionized region of the stellar wind.

  11. X-Ray Localization of the Intermediate-Mass Black Hole in the Globular Cluster G1 with Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, A K H; Di Stefano, R; Barmby, P; Lewin, W H G; Primini, F A

    2009-01-01

    We report the most accurate X-ray position of the giant globular cluster G1 in M31 by using the Chandra X-ray Observatory, Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). G1 is clearly detected with Chandra and by cross-registering with HST and CFHT images, we derive a 1sigma error radius of 0.15", significantly smaller than the previous measurement by XMM-Newton. We conclude that the X-ray emission of G1 comes from within the core radius of the cluster. There are two possibilities for the origin of the X-ray emission: it could be due to either accretion of a central intermediate-mass black hole, or ordinary low-mass X-ray binaries. Based on the ratio of X-ray to the Eddington luminosity, an intermediate-mass black hole accreting from the cluster gas seems unlikely and we suggest that the X-rays are due to accretion from a companion. We also find that the X-ray emission may be offset from the radio emission. Future high-resolution and high-sensitivity radio imaging observations will r...

  12. NuSTAR Hard X-Ray Survey of the Galactic Center Region. II. X-Ray Point Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, JaeSub; Mori, Kaya; Hailey, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    clear Chandra counterparts for 58 NuSTAR sources and assign candidate counterparts for the remaining 19. The NuSTAR survey reaches X-ray luminosities of similar to 4x and similar to 8 x 1032 erg s-1 at the GC (8 kpc) in the 3-10 and 10-40 keV bands, respectively. The source list includes three...

  13. Precise Localization of the Soft Gamma Repeater SGR 1627-41 with Chandra and the Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar AXP 1E1841-045 with Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Stefanie; Patel, Sandeep K.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Bouchet, Patrice; Ozel, Feryal; Tennant, Allyn F.; Woods, Peter M.; Hurley, Kevin; Becker, Werner; Slane, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    We present precise localizations of AXP 1E184-045 and SGR 1627-41 with Chandra. We obtained new infrared observations of SGR 1627-41 and reanalyzed archival observations of AXP 1E1841-045 in order to refine their positions and search for infrared counterparts. A faint source is detected inside the error circle of AXP 1E1841-045. In the case of SGR 1627-41, several sources are located within the error radius of the X-ray position, and we discuss the likelihood of one of them being the counterpart. We compare the properties of our candidates to those of other known anomalous X-ray pulsar (AXP) and soft gamma repeater (SGR) counterparts. We find that the counterpart candidates for SGR 1627-41 and SGR 1806-20 would have to be intrinsically much brighter than AXPs in order to have counterparts detectable with the observational limits currently available for these sources. To confirm the reported counterpart of SGR 1806-20, we obtained new infrared observations during the 2003 July burst activation of the source. No brightening of the suggested counterpart is detected, implying that the counterpart of SGR 1806-20 remains yet to be identified.

  14. Compact Optical Counterparts of Ultraluminous X-ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Tao, Lian; Grise, Fabien; Kaaret, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Using archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging data, we report the multiband photometric properties of 13 ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) that have a unique compact optical counterpart. Both magnitude and color variation are detected at time scales of days to years. The optical color, variability, and X-ray to optical flux ratio indicate that the optical emission of most ULXs is dominated by X-ray reprocessing on the disk, similar to that of low mass X-ray binaries. For most sources, the optical spectrum is a power-law, $F_{\

  15. Integral field spectroscopy of the ultraluminous X-ray source Holmberg II X-1

    CERN Document Server

    Lehmann, I; Fabrika, S; Roth, M; Miyaji, T; Afanasiev, V; Sholukhova, O; Sánchez, S F; Greiner, J; Hasinger, G; Costantini, E; Surkov, A; Burenkov, A

    2004-01-01

    We present optical integral field observations of the H II region containing the ultraluminous X-ray source Holmberg II X-1. We confirm the existence of an X-ray ionized nebula as the counterpart of the source due to the detection of an extended He II (4686A) region (21 x 47 pc) at the Chandra ACIS-S position. An extended blue objects with a size of 11 x 14 pc is coincident with the X-ray/He II region, which could indicate either a young stellar complex or a cluster. We have derived an X-ray to optical luminosity ratio of Lx/Lb>170, and presumable it is Lx/Lb~300-400 using the recent HST ACS data. We find a complex velocity dispersion at the position of the ULX. In addition, there is a radial velocity variation in the X-ray ionized region found in the He II emission of +-50 km/s on spatial scales of 2-3 arcsec. We believe that the putative black hole not only ionizes the surrounding HII gas, but also perturbs it dynamically (via jets or the accretion disk wind). The spatial analysis of the public Chandra ACIS...

  16. The Chandra Planetary Nebula Survey (ChanPlaNS). II. X-ray Emission from Compact Planetary Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Freeman, M; Montez, R; Balick, B; Frew, D J; Jones, D; Miszalski, B; Sahai, R; Blackman, E; Chu, Y -H; De Marco, O; Frank, A; Guerrero, M A; Lopez, J A; Zijlstra, A; Bujarrabal, V; Corradi, R L M; Nordhaus, J; Parker, Q A; Sandin, C; Schönberner, D; Soker, N; Sokoloski, J L; Steffen, M; Toalá, J A; Ueta, T; Villaver, E

    2014-01-01

    We present results from the most recent set of observations obtained as part of the Chandra X-ray observatory Planetary Nebula Survey (ChanPlaNS), the first comprehensive X-ray survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood (i.e., within ~1.5 kpc of the Sun). The survey is designed to place constraints on the frequency of appearance and range of X-ray spectral characteristics of X-ray-emitting PN central stars and the evolutionary timescales of wind-shock-heated bubbles within PNe. ChanPlaNS began with a combined Cycle 12 and archive Chandra survey of 35 PNe. ChanPlaNS continued via a Chandra Cycle 14 Large Program which targeted all (24) remaining known compact (R_neb ~1000 cm^-3), and rarely associated with PNe that show H_2 emission and/or pronounced butterfly structures. Hb 5 is one such exception of a PN with a butterfly structure that hosts diffuse X-ray emission. Additionally, of the five new diffuse X-ray detections, two host [WR]-type CSPNe, NGC 1501 and NGC 6369, supporting the hypothes...

  17. Luminous X-ray sources in spiral and star-forming galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Martin

    2002-09-15

    For studies of discrete X-ray source populations in nearby galaxies, high spatial resolution is a key to making progress. Now, for the first time, using the Chandra X-ray observatory, we are able to study these source populations in detail for galaxies beyond M31 and our local group galaxies. Analysis of accretion-driven and supernova-related discrete sources provides a new perspective on the evolution of galactic stellar populations, as well as giving insights into the physical mechanisms operating in individual cases. A particularly intriguing area, which we are only just beginning to address, is the nature of the most X-ray-luminous sources that are being discovered in many spiral and star-forming galaxies.

  18. Transient X-ray source population in the Magellanic-type galaxy NGC 55

    CERN Document Server

    Jithesh, V

    2016-01-01

    We present the spectral and temporal properties of 15 candidate transient X-ray sources detected in archival {\\it XMM-Newton} and {\\it Chandra} observations of the nearby Magellanic-type, SB(s)m galaxy NGC 55. On the basis of an X-ray color classification scheme, the majority of the sources may be identified as X-ray binaries (XRBs), and six sources are soft, including a likely supernova remnant. We perform a detailed spectral and variability analysis of the data for two bright candidate XRBs. Both sources displayed strong short-term X-ray variability, and their X-ray spectra and hardness ratios are consistent with those of XRBs. These results, combined with their high X-ray luminosities ($\\sim 10^{38}~\\rm erg~s^{-1}$), strongly suggest that they are black hole (BH) binaries. Seven less luminous sources have spectral properties consistent with those of neutron star or BH XRBs in both normal and high-rate accretion modes, but one of them is the likely counterpart to a background galaxy (because of positional c...

  19. Faint X-ray Sources in the Globular Cluster Terzan 5

    CERN Document Server

    Heinke, C O; Cohn, H N; Lugger, P M; Grindlay, J E; Pooley, D; Lewin, W H G

    2006-01-01

    We report our analysis of a Chandra X-ray observation of the rich globular cluster Terzan 5, in which we detect 50 sources to a limiting 1.0-6 keV X-ray luminosity of 3*10^{31} ergs/s within the half-mass radius of the cluster. Thirty-three of these have L_X>10^{32} ergs/s, the largest number yet seen in any globular cluster. In addition to the quiescent low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB, identified by Wijnands et al.), another 12 relatively soft sources may be quiescent LMXBs. We compare the X-ray colors of the harder sources in Terzan 5 to the Galactic Center sources studied by Muno and collaborators, and find the Galactic Center sources to have harder X-ray colors, indicating a possible difference in the populations. We cannot clearly identify a metallicity dependence in the production of low-luminosity X-ray binaries in Galactic globular clusters, but a metallicity dependence of the form suggested by Jordan et al. for extragalactic LMXBs is consistent with our data.

  20. An ALMA Survey of Submillimeter Galaxies in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South: The AGN Fraction and X-ray Properties of Submillimeter Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, S X; Luo, B; Smail, I; Alexander, D M; Danielson, A L R; Hodge, J A; Karim, A; Lehmer, B D; Simpson, J M; Swinbank, A M; Walter, F; Wardlow, J L; Xue, Y Q; Chapman, S C; Coppin, K E K; Dannerbauer, H; De Breuck, C; Menten, K M; van der Werf, P

    2013-01-01

    The large gas and dust reservoirs of submm galaxies (SMGs) could potentially provide ample fuel to trigger an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN), but previous studies of the AGN fraction in SMGs have been controversial largely due to the inhomogeneity and limited angular resolution of the available submillimeter surveys. Here we set improved constraints on the AGN fraction and X-ray properties of the SMGs with ALMA and Chandra observations in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (E-CDF-S). This study is the first among similar works to have unambiguously identified the X-ray counterparts of SMGs; this is accomplished using the fully submm-identified, statistically reliable SMG catalog with 99 SMGs from the ALMA LABOCA E-CDF-S Submillimeter Survey (ALESS). We found 10 X-ray sources associated with SMGs (median redshift z = 2.3), of which 8 were identified as AGNs using several techniques that enable cross-checking. The other 2 X-ray detected SMGs have levels of X-ray emission that can be plausibly explained by the...

  1. The Chandra Planetary Nebulae Survey (ChanPlaNS): III. X-ray Emission from the Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Montez, R; Balick, B; Behar, E; Blackman, E; Bujarrabal, V; Chu, Y -H; Corradi, R L M; De Marco, O; Frank, A; Freeman, M; Frew, D J; Guerrero, M A; Jones, D; Lopez, J A; Miszalski, B; Nordhaus, J; Parker, Q A; Sahai, R; Sandin, C; Schonberner, D; Soker, N; Sokoloski, J L; Steffen, M; Toalá, J A; Ueta, T; Villaver, E; Zijlstra, A

    2014-01-01

    We present X-ray spectral analysis of 20 point-like X-ray sources detected in Chandra Planetary Nebula Survey (ChanPlaNS) observations of 59 planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood. Most of these 20 detections are associated with luminous central stars within relatively young, compact nebulae. The vast majority of these point-like X-ray-emitting sources at PN cores display relatively "hard" ($\\geq0.5$~keV) X-ray emission components that are unlikely to be due to photospheric emission from the hot central stars (CSPN). Instead, we demonstrate that these sources are well modeled by optically-thin thermal plasmas. From the plasma properties, we identify two classes of CSPN X-ray emission: (1) high-temperature plasmas with X-ray luminosities, $L_{\\rm X}$, that appear uncorrelated with the CSPN bolometric luminosity, $L_{\\rm bol}$; and (2) lower-temperature plasmas with $L_{\\rm X}/L_{\\rm bol}\\sim10^{-7}$. We suggest these two classes correspond to the physical processes of magnetically active binary comp...

  2. Unifying X-ray winds in radio galaxies with Chandra HETG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombesi, Francesco

    2013-09-01

    X-ray winds are routinely observed in the spectra of Seyfert galaxies. They can be classified as warm absorbers (WAs), with v~100-1,000km/s, and ultra-fast outflows (UFOs), with v>10,000km/s. In stark contrast, the lack of sensitive enough observations allowed the detection of WAs or UFOs only in very few radio galaxies. Therefore, we propose to observe a small sample of three radio galaxies with the Chandra HETG - 3C111 for 150ks, 3C390.3 for 150ks and 3C120 for 200ks - to detect and study in detail their WAs. We will quantify the importance of mechanical feedback from winds in radio galaxies and compare them to the radio jet power. We will also test whether WAs and UFOs can be unified in a single, multi-phase and multi-scale outflow, as recently reported for Seyferts.

  3. A Narrow Band Chandra X-ray Analysis of SNR 3C 391

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Su; Yang Chen

    2005-01-01

    We present narrow-band and equivalent width (EW) images of the thermal composite supernova remnant (SNR) 3C 391 in the X-ray emission lines of Mg, Si and S using the Chandra ACIS Observational data. The EW images re veal the spatial distribution of the emission of the metal species Mg, Si and S in the remnant. They have a clumpy structure similar to that seen in the broadband diffuse emission, suggesting that they are largely of interstellar origin. We find an interesting finger-like feature protruding outside the southwestern radio border of the remnant, somewhat similar to the jet-like Si structure found in the famous SNR Cas A. This feature may possibly be the debris of the jet of ejecta from an asymmetrical supernova explosion of a massive progenitor star.

  4. Chandra X-ray Spectroscopy of Kes75, its Young Pulsar, and its Synchrotron Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, B F; Helfand, D J

    2001-01-01

    We have observed the young Galactic supernova remnant Kes 75 with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. This object is one of an increasing number of examples of a shell-type remnant with a central extended radio core harboring a pulsar. Here we present a preliminary spatially resolved spectroscopic analysis of the Kes~75 system. We find that the spectrum of the pulsar is significantly harder than that of the wind nebula, and both of these components can be isolated from the diffuse thermal emission that seems to follow the same distribution as the extended radio shell. When we characterize the thermal emission with a model of an under-ionized plasma and non-solar elemental abundances, we require a significant diffuse high energy component, which we model as a power-law with a photon index similar to that of the synchrotron nebula.

  5. Impacts of Chandra X-ray Observatory Public Communications and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcand, Kimberly K.; Watzke, Megan; Lestition, Kathleen; Edmonds, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory Center runs a multifaceted Public Communications & Engagement program encompassing press relations, public engagement, and education. Our goals include reaching a large and diverse audience of national and international scope, establishing direct connections and working relationships with the scientists whose research forms the basis for all products, creating peer-reviewed materials and activities that evolve from an integrated pipeline design and encourage users toward deeper engagement, and developing materials that target underserved audiences such as women, Spanish speakers, and the sight and hearing impaired. This talk will highlight some of the key features of our program, from the high quality curated digital presence to the cycle of research and evaluation that informs our practice at all points of the program creation. We will also discuss the main impacts of the program, from the tens of millions of participants reached through the establishment and sustainability of a network of science 'volunpeers.'

  6. Annealing bounds to prevent further Charge Transfer Inefficiency increase of the Chandra X-ray CCDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monmeyran, Corentin; Patel, Neil S.; Bautz, Mark W.; Grant, Catherine E.; Prigozhin, Gregory Y.; Agarwal, Anuradha; Kimerling, Lionel C.

    2016-12-01

    After the front-illuminated CCDs on board the X-ray telescope Chandra were damaged by radiation after launch, it was decided to anneal them in an effort to remove the defects introduced by the irradiation. The annealing led to an unexpected increase of the Charge Transfer Inefficiency (CTI). The performance degradation is attributed to point defect interactions in the devices. Specifically, the annealing at 30 °C activated the diffusion of the main interstitial defect in the device, the carbon interstitial, which led to its association with a substitutional impurity, ultimately resulting in a stable and electrically active defect state. Because the formation reaction of this carbon interstitial and substitutional impurity associate is diffusion limited, we recommend a higher upper bound for the annealing temperature and duration of any future CCD anneals, that of -50 °C for one day or -60 °C for a week, to prevent further CTI increase.

  7. TRANSIENT X-RAY SOURCE POPULATION IN THE MAGELLANIC-TYPE GALAXY NGC 55

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jithesh, V.; Wang, Zhongxiang, E-mail: jithesh@shao.ac.cn [Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2016-04-10

    We present the spectral and temporal properties of 15 candidate transient X-ray sources detected in archival XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of the nearby Magellanic-type, SB(s)m galaxy NGC 55. Based on an X-ray color classification scheme, the majority of the sources may be identified as X-ray binaries (XRBs), and six sources are soft, including a likely supernova remnant. We perform a detailed spectral and variability analysis of the data for two bright candidate XRBs. Both sources displayed strong short-term X-ray variability, and their X-ray spectra and hardness ratios are consistent with those of XRBs. These results, combined with their high X-ray luminosities (∼10{sup 38} erg s{sup −1}), strongly suggest that they are black hole (BH) binaries. Seven less luminous sources have spectral properties consistent with those of neutron star or BH XRBs in both normal and high-rate accretion modes, but one of them is the likely counterpart to a background galaxy (because of positional coincidence). From our spectral analysis, we find that the six soft sources are candidate super soft sources (SSSs) with dominant emission in the soft (0.3–2 keV) X-ray band. Archival Hubble Space Telescope optical images for seven sources are available, and the data suggest that most of them are likely to be high-mass XRBs. Our analysis has revealed the heterogeneous nature of the transient population in NGC 55 (six high-mass XRBs, one low-mass XRBs, six SSSs, one active galactic nucleus), helping establish the similarity of the X-ray properties of this galaxy to those of other Magellanic-type galaxies.

  8. Spectral variability of ultraluminous X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Kajava, Jari J E

    2008-01-01

    We study spectral variability of 11 ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULX) using archived XMM-Newton and Chandra observations. We use three models to describe the observed spectra; a power-law, a multi-colour disk (MCD) and a combination of these two models. We find that out of the 11 ULXs in our sample, 7 ULXs show a correlation between the luminosity and the photon index Gamma (hereafter L-Gamma correlation). Furthermore, out of the 7 ULXs that have the L-Gamma correlation, 4 ULXs also show spectral pivoting in the observed energy band. We also find that two ULXs show an L-Gamma anti-correlation. The spectra of 4 ULXs in the sample can be adequately fitted with a MCD model. We compare these sources to known black hole binaries (BHB) and find that they follow similar paths in their luminosity-temperature (hereafter L-T) diagrams. Finally we show that the 'soft excess' reported for many of these ULXs at 0.2 keV seem to follow a trend L \\propto T^{-4} when modeled with a power-law plus a 'cool' MCD model. This is c...

  9. Spectral variability of ultraluminous X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Kajava, Jari J E

    2009-01-01

    We study spectral variability of 11 ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULX) using archived XMM-Newton and Chandra observations. We use three models to describe the observed spectra: a power-law, a multi-colour disc (MCD) and a combination of these two models. We find that 7 ULXs show a correlation between the luminosity Lx and the photon index Gamma. Furthermore, 4 out of these 7 ULXs also show spectral pivoting in the observed energy band. We also find that two ULXs show an Lx-Gamma anti-correlation. The spectra of 4 ULXs in the sample can be adequately fitted with a MCD model. We compare these sources to known black hole binaries (BHB) and find that they follow similar paths in their luminosity-temperature diagrams. Finally we show that the `soft excess' reported for many of these ULXs at about 0.2 keV seems to roughly follow a trend Lsoft \\propto T^{-3.5} when modelled with a power-law plus a `cool' MCD model. This is contrary to the L \\propto T^4 relation that is expected from theory and what is seen for many a...

  10. The X-ray Binary Population of the Nearby Dwarf Starburst Galaxy IC 10: Variable and Transient X-ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Laycock, Silas G T; Williams, Benjamin F; Prestwich, Andrea; Binder, Breanna; Christodoulou, Dimitris M

    2016-01-01

    We have monitored the Cassiopeia dwarf galaxy (IC 10) in a series of 10 Chandra ACIS-S observations to capture its variable and transient X-ray source population, which is expected to be dominated by High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs). We present a sample of 21 X-ray sources that are variable between observations at the 3 sigma level, from a catalog of 110 unique point sources. We find 4 transients (flux variability ratio greater than 10) and a further 8 objects with ratio > 5. The observations span years 2003 - 2010 and reach a limiting luminosity of >10$^{35}$ erg/s, providing sensitivity to X-ray binaries in IC 10 as well as flare stars in the foreground Milky Way. The nature of the variable sources is investigated from light-curves, X-ray spectra, energy quantiles, and optical counterparts. The purpose of this study is to discover the composition of the X-ray binary population in a young starburst environment. IC 10 provides a sharp contrast in stellar population age (<10 My) when compared to the Magella...

  11. Chandra Observation of an X-ray Flare at Saturn: Evidence for Direct Solar Control on Saturn's Disk X-ray Emissions

    CERN Document Server

    Bhardwaj, A; Elsner, R F; Ford, P G; Gladstone, G R; Bhardwaj, Anil; Cravens, Thomas E.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Ford, Peter G.

    2005-01-01

    Saturn was observed by Chandra ACIS-S on 20 and 26-27 January 2004 for one full Saturn rotation (10.7 hr) at each epoch. We report here the first observation of an X-ray flare from Saturn's non-auroral (low-latitude) disk, which is seen in direct response to an M6-class flare emanating from a sunspot that was clearly visible from both Saturn and Earth. Saturn's disk X-ray emissions are found to be variable on time scales of hours to weeks to months, and correlated with solar F10.7 cm flux. Unlike Jupiter, X-rays from Saturn's polar (auroral) region have characteristics similar to those from its disk. This report, combined with earlier studies, establishes that disk X-ray emissions of the giant planets Saturn and Jupiter are directly regulated by processes happening on the Sun. We suggest that these emissions could be monitored to study X-ray flaring from solar active regions when they are on the far side and not visible to Near-Earth space weather satellites.

  12. Chandra X-ray Grating Spectrometry of Eta Carinae near X-ray Minimum: I. Variability of the Sulfur and Silicon Emission Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Henley, D B; Pittard, J M; Stevens, I R; Hamaguchi, K; Gull, T R

    2008-01-01

    We report on variations in important X-ray emission lines in a series of Chandra grating spectra of the supermassive colliding wind binary star Eta Carinae, including key phases around the X-ray minimum/periastron passage in 2003.5. The X-rays arise from the collision of the slow, dense wind of Eta Car with the fast, low-density wind of an otherwise hidden companion star. The X-ray emission lines provide the only direct measure of the flow dynamics of the companion's wind along the wind-wind collision zone. We concentrate here on the silicon and sulfur lines, which are the strongest and best resolved lines in the X-ray spectra. Most of the line profiles can be adequately fit with symmetric Gaussians with little significant skewness. Both the silicon and sulfur lines show significant velocity shifts and correlated increases in line widths through the observations. The R = forbidden-to-intercombination ratio from the Si XIII and S XV triplets is near or above the low-density limit in all observations, suggestin...

  13. High Spatial Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of Cas A with Chandra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Juan Yang; Fang-Jun Lu; Li Chen

    2008-01-01

    We present high spatial resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A with the Chandra observations. The X-ray emitting region of this remnant was divided into 38 × 34 pixels of 10″× 10″ each. Spectra of 960 pixels were created and fitted with an absorbed two component non-equilibrium ionization model. From the results of the spectral analysis we obtained maps of absorbing column density, temperatures, ionization ages, and the abundances of Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ca and Fe. The Si, S and possibly Ca abundance maps show obvious jet structures, while Fe does not follow the jet but seems to be distributed perpendicular to it. The abundances of Si, S and Ca show tight correlations between one another over a range of about two dex. This suggests that they are ejecta from explosive Oburning and incomplete Si-buming. Meanwhile, the Ne abundance is well correlated with that of Mg, indicating them to be the ashes of explosive C/Ne burning. The Fe abundance is positively correlated with that of Si when the latter is lower than 3 times the solar value, and is negatively correlated when higher. We suggest that such a two phase correlation is due to the different ways in which Fe was synthesized.

  14. Chandra and XMM Monitoring of the Black Hole X-ray Binary IC 10 X-1

    CERN Document Server

    Laycock, Silas G T; Moro, Matthew J

    2014-01-01

    The massive black hole + Wolf-Rayet binary IC10 X-1 was observed in a series of 10 Chandra and 2 XMM-Newton observations spanning 2003-2012, showing consistent variability around 7 x10^37 erg/s, with a spectral hardening event in 2009. We phase-connected the entire light-curve by folding the photon arrival times on a series of trial periods spanning the known orbital period and its uncertainty, refining the X-ray period to P = 1.45175(1)d. The duration of minimum-flux in the X-ray eclipse is 5 hr which together with the optical radial velocity curve for the companion yields a radius for the eclipsing body of 8-10 Rsun for the allowed range of masses. The orbital separation of 18.5-22 Rsun then provides a limiting inclination i>63 degrees for total eclipses to occur. The eclipses are asymmetric (egress duration 0.9 hr) and show energy dependence, suggestive of an accretion-disk hotspot and corona. The eclipse is much (5X) wider than the 1.5-2 Rsun WR star, pointing to absorption/scattering in the dense wind of...

  15. A Systematic Chandra study of Sgr A$^{\\star}$: I. X-ray flare detection

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Daily X-ray flaring represents an enigmatic phenomenon of Sgr A$^{\\star}$ --- the supermassive black hole at the center of our Galaxy. We report initial results from a systematic X-ray study of this phenomenon, based on extensive {\\it Chandra} observations obtained from 1999 to 2012, totaling about 4.5 Ms. We detect flares, using a combination of the maximum likelihood and Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods, which allow for a direct accounting for the pile-up effect in the modeling of the flare lightcurves and an optimal use of the data, as well as the measurements of flare parameters, including their uncertainties. A total of 82 flares are detected. About one third of them are relatively faint, which were not detected previously. The observation-to-observation variation of the quiescent emission has an average root-mean-square of $6\\%-14\\%$, including the Poisson statistical fluctuation of faint flares below our detection limits. We find no significant long-term variation in the quiescent emission and the flar...

  16. Chandra X-Ray Observations of Nineteen Millisecond Pulsars in the Globular Cluster 47 Tucanae

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanov, S; Heinke, C O; Camilo, F; Freire, P C C; Becker, W; Bogdanov, Slavko; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Heinke, Craig O.; Camilo, Fernando; Freire, Paulo C. C.; Becker, Werner

    2006-01-01

    We present spectral and long-timescale variability analyses of \\textit{Chandra} ACIS-S observations of the 19 millisecond pulsars (MSPs) with precisely known positions in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae. The X-ray emission of the majority of these MSPs is well described by a thermal (blackbody or neutron star hydrogen atmosphere) spectrum with a temperature $T_{\\rm eff}\\sim(1-3)\\times10^6$ K, emission radius $R_{\\rm eff}\\sim0.1-3$ km, and luminosity $L_{X}\\sim10^{30-31}$ ergs s$^{-1}$. For several MSPs, there is indication that a second thermal component is required, similar to what is seen in some nearby field MSPs. The radio-eclipsing binary MSPs 47 Tuc J, O, and W show a significant non-thermal component, with photon index $\\Gamma\\sim 1-1.5$, which may originate in an shock formed due to interaction between the relativistic pulsar wind and matter from the stellar companion. We re-examine the X-ray--spindown luminosity relation ($L_{X}-\\dot{E}$) and find that due to the large uncertainties in both parameter...

  17. A Chandra X-ray study of the young star cluster NGC 6231: low-mass population and initial mass function

    CERN Document Server

    Damiani, F; Sciortino, S

    2016-01-01

    NGC6231 is a massive young star cluster, near the center of the Sco OB1 association. While its OB members are well studied, its low-mass population has received little attention. We present high-spatial resolution Chandra ACIS-I X-ray data, where we detect 1613 point X-ray sources. Our main aim is to clarify global properties of NGC6231 down to low masses through a detailed membership assessment, and to study the cluster stars' spatial distribution, the origin of their X-ray emission, the cluster age and formation history, and initial mass function. We use X-ray data, complemented by optical/IR data, to establish cluster membership. The spatial distribution of different stellar subgroups also provides highly significant constraints on cluster membership, as does the distribution of X-ray hardness. We perform spectral modeling of group-stacked X-ray source spectra. We find a large cluster population down to ~0.3 Msun (complete to ~1 Msun), with minimal non-member contamination, with a definite age spread (1-8 ...

  18. The Lack of Very Ultraluminous X-ray Sources in Early-type Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, J A; Athey, A E; Irwin, Jimmy A.; Bregman, Joel N.; Athey, Alex E.

    2004-01-01

    We have searched for ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) in a sample of 28 elliptical and S0 galaxies observed with Chandra. We find that the number of X-ray sources detected at a flux level that would correspond to a 0.3-10 keV X-ray luminosity of ~2 x 10^39 ergs/s or greater (for which we have used the designation very ultraluminous X-ray sources; VULXs) at the distance of each galaxy is equal to the number of expected foreground/background objects. In addition, the VULXs are uniformly distributed over the Chandra field of view rather than distributed like the optical light of the galaxies, strengthening the argument that the high flux sources are unassociated with the galaxies. We have also taken the VULX candidate list of Colbert and Ptak and determined the spatial distribution of VULXs in early-type galaxies and late-type galaxies separately. While the spiral galaxy VULXs are clearly concentrated toward the centers of the galaxies, the early-type galaxy VULXs are distributed randomly over the ROSAT HRI fi...

  19. X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Extended X-Ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitter, Manfred L.; Fraekel, Benjamin; Gorman, James L.; Hill, Kenneth W.; Roquemore, Lane A.; Stodiek, Wolfgang; Goeler, Schweickhard von

    1999-05-01

    Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokamak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters such as ion temperature, toroidal and poloidal rotation, electron temperature, impurity ion charge-state distributions, and impurity transport. The imaging properties of these spherically or toroidally curved crystals provide both spectrally and spatially resolved X-ray data from the plasma using only one small spherically or toroidally curved crystal, thus eliminating the requirement for a large array of crystal spectrometers and the need to cross-calibrate the various crystals.

  20. Shuttle and Transfer Orbit Thermal Analysis and Testing of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory CCD Imaging Spectrometer Radiator Shades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, John R.

    2001-01-01

    Contents include the following: (1) Introduction: Chandra X-ray observatory. Advanced CCD imaging spectrometer. (2) LEO and transfer orbit analyses: Geometric modeling in TSS w/specularity. Low earth orbital heating calculations. (3) Thermal testing and LMAC. (4) Problem solving. (5) VDA overcoat analyses. (6) VDA overcoat testing and MSFC. (7) Post-MSFC test evaluation.

  1. X-ray Radio Correlation In Black Hole Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, A R

    2006-01-01

    We examine the X-ray - radio correlation in Galactic black hole sources. We highlight some of the results which extend the flux-flux relations to sources with very high accretion rates. Some of the recent results indicate that the synchrotron process is unlikely to be the mechanism responsible for the X-ray emission, particularly at high accretion rates. We present a truncated accretion disk scenario and argue that accretion rate and accretion disk geometry ultimately act as a driver of the X-ray - radio correlation. We stress the importance of wide-band X-ray spectral measurements to understand the disk-jet connection and briefly outline some attempts made in the Indian context to build instruments for wide-band X-ray spectroscopy.

  2. Old and Young X-ray Point Source Populations in Nearby Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Colbert, E; Ptak, A; Strickland, D K

    2004-01-01

    We analyzed 1441 Chandra X-ray point sources in 32 nearby galaxies. The total point-source X-ray luminosity L_XP is well correlated with B, K, and FIR+UV luminosities of spiral host galaxies, and with the B and K luminosities for ellipticals. This suggests an intimate connection between L_XP and both the old and young stellar populations, for which K and FIR+UV luminosities are proxies for the galaxy mass M and star-formation rate SFR. We derive proportionality constants 1.3E29 erg/s/Msol and 0.7E39 erg/s/(Msol/yr), which can be used to estimate the old and young components from M and SFR, respectively. The cumulative X-ray luminosity functions for the point sources have quite different slopes for the spirals (gamma ~= 0.5-0.8) and ellipticals (gamma ~= 1.4), implying *the most luminous point sources dominate L_XP* for the spirals. Most of the point sources have X-ray colors that are consistent with either LMXBs or Ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs a.k.a. IXOs) and we rule out classical HMXBs (e.g. neutron-st...

  3. Chandra Phase-resolved X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Crab Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Yakovlev, Dmitry G.; Harding, Alice; Zavlin, Vyacheslav E.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Becker, Werner

    2011-12-01

    We present a new study of the X-ray spectral properties of the Crab Pulsar. The superb angular resolution of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory enables distinguishing the pulsar from the surrounding nebulosity. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase allows the least-biased measure of interstellar X-ray extinction due primarily to photoelectric absorption and secondarily to scattering by dust grains in the direction of the Crab Nebula. We modify previous findings that the line of sight to the Crab is underabundant in oxygen and provide measurements with improved accuracy and less bias. Using the abundances and cross sections from Wilms et al. we find [O/H] = (5.28 ± 0.28) × 10-4 (4.9 × 10-4 is solar abundance). We also measure for the first time the impact of scattering of flux out of the image by interstellar grains. We find τscat = 0.147 ± 0.043. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase also measures the X-ray spectral index even at pulse minimum—albeit with increasing statistical uncertainty. The spectral variations are, by and large, consistent with a sinusoidal variation. The only significant variation from the sinusoid occurs over the same phase range as some rather abrupt behavior in the optical polarization magnitude and position angle. We also compare these spectral variations to those observed in gamma-rays and conclude that our measurements are both a challenge and a guide to future modeling and will thus eventually help us understand pair cascade processes in pulsar magnetospheres. The data are also used to set new, and less biased, upper limits to the surface temperature of the neutron star for different models of the neutron star atmosphere. We discuss how such data are best connected to theoretical models of neutron star cooling and neutron star interiors. The data restrict the neutrino emission rate in the pulsar core and the amount of light elements in the heat-blanketing envelope. The observations allow the pulsar

  4. Chandra and ASCA X-ray Observations of the Radio Supernova SN1979C IN NGC 4321

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, A; Schlegel, E M

    2001-01-01

    We report on the X-ray observation of the radio selected supernova SN1979C carried out with ASCA in 1997 December and serendipitously available from a Chandra Guaranteed Time Observation in 1999 November. The supernova, of type SN II-Linear (SN IIL), was first observed in the optical and occurred in the weakly barred, almost face on spiral galaxy NGC 4321 (M100). The galaxy, a member of the Virgo S cluster, is at a distance of 17.1 Mpc, and contains at least three other supernovae discovered in this century. The useful exposure time was ~25 ks for the Solid-State Imaging Spectrometer (SIS), ~28 ks for the Gas Scintillation Imaging Spectrometer (GIS), and ~2.5 ks for Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS). No point source was detected at the radio position of SN1979C in a 3' diameter half power response circle in the ASCA data. The background and galaxy subtracted SN signal had a 3sigma upper limit to the flux of 6.3x10^-14 ergs/s/cm^-2 in the full ASCA SIS band (0.4-10.0 keV) and a 3sigma upper li...

  5. Extended X-ray Monitoring of Gravitational Lenses with Chandra and Joint Constraints on X-ray Emission Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Guerras, Eduardo; Steele, Shaun; Liu, Ang; Kochanek, Christopher S; Chartas, George; Morgan, Christopher W; Chen, Bin

    2016-01-01

    We present an X-ray photometric analysis of six gravitationally lensed quasars spanning from 5 to 14 years, measuring the total (0.83-21.8 keV restframe), soft (0.83-3.6 keV), and hard (3.6-21.8 keV) band image flux ratios for each epoch. Using the ratios of the model-predicted macro-magnifications as baselines, we build differential microlensing curves and obtain joint likelihood functions for the average X-ray emission region sizes. Our analysis yields a Probability Distribution Function for the average half-light radius of the X-Ray emission region in the sample that peaks slightly above 1 gravitational radius, and yields nearly indistinguishable 68 % confidence (one-sided) upper limits of 17.8 (18.9) gravitational radii for the soft (hard) X-ray emitting region, assuming a mean stellar mass of 0.3 solar masses. We see hints of energy dependent microlensing between the soft and hard bands in two of the objects. In a separate analysis on the root-mean-square (RMS) of the microlensing variability, we find si...

  6. Chandra X-ray Grating Spectrometry of Eta Carinae near X-ray Minimum: I. Variability of the Sulfur and Silicon Emission Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, D. B.; Corcoran, M. F.; Pittard, J. M.; Stevens, I. R.; Hamaguchi, K.; Gull, T. R.

    2008-01-01

    We report on variations in important X-ray emission lines in a series of Chandra grating spectra of the supermassive colliding wind binary star eta Car, including key phases around the X-ray minimum/periastron passage in 2003.5. The X-rays arise from the collision of the slow, dense wind of eta Car with the fast, low-density wind of an otherwise hidden companion star. The X-ray emission lines provide the only direct measure of the flow dynamics of the companion's wind along the wind-wind collision zone. We concentrate here on the silicon and sulfur lines, which are the strongest and best resolved lines in the X-ray spectra. Most of the line profiles can be adequately fit with symmetric Gaussians with little significant skewness. Both the silicon and sulfur lines show significant velocity shifts and correlated increases in line widths through the observations. The R = forbidden-to-intercombination ratio from the Si XIII and S XV triplets is near or above the low-density limit in all observations, suggesting that the line-forming region is > 1.6 stellar radii from the companion star, and that the emitting plasma may be in a non-equilibrium state. We show that simple geometrical models cannot simultaneously fit both the observed centroid variations and changes in line width as a function of phase. We show that the observed profiles can be fitted with synthetic profiles with a reasonable model of the emissivity along the wind-wind collision boundary. We use this analysis to help constrain the line formation region as a function of orbital phase, and the orbital geometry. Subject headings: X-rays: stars -stars: early-type-stars: individual (q Car)

  7. High-Resolution {\\it Chandra} Spectroscopy of tau Scorpii A Narrow-Line X-ray Spectrum From a Hot Star

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, D H; MacFarlane, J J; Miller, N A; Cassinelli, J P; Owocki, S P; Liedahl, D A; Cohen, David H.; Messi\\`{e}res, Genevi\\`{e}ve E. de; Farlane, Joseph J. Mac; Miller, Nathan A.; Cassinelli, Joseph P.; Owocki, Stanley P.; Liedahl, Duane A.

    2003-01-01

    Long known to be an unusual early-type star by virtue of its hard and strong X-ray emission, tau Scorpii poses a severe challenge to the standard picture of O star wind-shock X-ray emission. The Chandra HETGS spectrum now provides significant direct evidence that this B0.2 star does not fit this standard wind-shock framework. The many emission lines detected with the Chandra gratings are significantly narrower than what would be expected from a star with the known wind properties of tau Sco, although they are broader than the corresponding lines seen in late-type coronal sources. While line ratios are consistent with the hot plasma on this star being within a few stellar radii of the photosphere, from at least one He-like complex there is evidence that the X-ray emitting plasma is located more than a stellar radius above the photosphere. The Chandra spectrum of tau Sco is harder and more variable than those of other hot stars, with the exception of the young magnetized O star theta Ori C. We discuss these new...

  8. X-ray bursters and the X-ray sources of the galactic bulge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, W. H. G.; Joss, P. C.

    1981-01-01

    An attempt is made to distill from observational and theoretical information on the galactic bulge X-ray sources in general, and on the X-ray burst sources in particular, those aspects which seem to have the greatest relevance to the understanding of these sources. Galactic bulge sources appear to be collapsed objects of roughly solar mass, in most cases neutron stars, which are accreting matter from low-mass stellar companions. Type I bursts seem to result from thermonuclear flashes in the surface layers of some of these neutron stars, while the type II bursts from the Rapid Burster are almost certainly due to an instability in the accretion flow onto a neutron star. It is concluded that the studies cited offer a new and powerful observational handle on the fundamental properties of neutron stars and of the interacting binary systems in which they are often contained.

  9. Discrete X-Ray Source Populations and Star-Formation History in Nearby Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zezas, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    This program aims in understanding the connection between the discrete X-ray source populations observed in nearby galaxies and the history of star-formation in these galaxies. The ultimate goal is to use this knowledge in order to constrain X-ray binary evolution channels. For this reason although the program is primarily observational it has a significant modeling component. During the first year of this study we focused on the definition of a pilot sample of galaxies with well know star-formation histories. A small part of this sample has already been observed and we performed initial analysis of the data. However, the majority of the objects in our sample either have not been observed at all, or the detection limit of the existing observations is not low enough to probe the bulk of their young X-ray binary populations. For this reason we successfully proposed for additional Chandra observations of three targets in Cycle-5. These observations are currently being performed. The analysis of the (limited) archival data for this sample indicated that the X-ray luminosity functions (XLF) of the discrete sources in these galaxies may not have the same shape as is widely suggested. However, any solid conclusions are hampered by the small number of detected sources. For this reason during the second year of this study, we will try to extend the sample in order to include more objects in each evolutionary stage. In addition we are completing the analysis of the Chandra monitoring observations of the Antennae galaxies. The results from this work, apart from important clues on the nature of the most luminous sources (Ultra-luminous X-ray sources; ULXs) provide evidence that source spectral and/or temporal variability does not significantly affect the shape of their X-ray luminosity functions. This is particularly important for comparisons between the XLFs of different galaxies and comparisons with predictions from theoretical models. Results from this work have been

  10. Chandra Discovery of 10 New X-Ray Jets Associated With FR II Radio Core-Selected AGNs in the MOJAVE Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Hogan, Brandon; Kharb, Preeti; Marshall, Herman; Cooper, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray observatory has proven to be a vital tool for studying high-energy emission processes in jets associated with Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN).We have compiled a sample of 27 AGN selected from the radio flux-limited MOJAVE (Monitoring of Jets in AGN with VLBA Experiments) sample of highly relativistically beamed jets to look for correlations between X-ray and radio emission on kiloparsec scales. The sample consists of all MOJAVE quasars which have over 100 mJy of extended radio emission at 1.4 GHz and a radio structure of at least 3" in size. Previous Chandra observations have revealed X-ray jets in 11 of 14 members of the sample, and we have carried out new observations of the remaining 13 sources. Of the latter, 10 have Xray jets, bringing the overall detection rate to ~ 78%. Our selection criteria, which is based on highly compact, relativistically beamed jet emission and large extended radio flux, thus provides an effective method of discovering new X-ray jets associated with AGN. The detect...

  11. Chandra observation of an unusually long and intense X-ray flare from a young solar-like star in M78

    CERN Document Server

    Grosso, N; Feigelson, E D; Forbes, T G

    2004-01-01

    LkHA312 has been observed serendipitously with the ACIS-I detector on board Chandra with 26h continuous exposure. This H_alpha emission line star belongs to the star-forming region M78 (NGC2068). From the optical and NIR data, we show that it is a pre-main sequence (PMS) low-mass star with a weak NIR excess. This genuine T Tauri star displayed an X-ray flare with an unusual long rise phase (~8h). The X-ray emission was nearly constant during the first 18h of the observation, and then increased by a factor of 13 during a fast rise phase (~2h), and reached a factor of 16 above the quiescent X-ray level at the end of a gradual phase (~6h) showing a slower rise. To our knowledge this flare, with \\~0.4-~0.5 cts/s, has the highest count rate observed so far with Chandra from a PMS low-mass star. By chance, the source position, 8.2' off-axis, protected this observation from pile-up. We make a spectral analysis of the X-ray emission versus time, showing that the plasma temperature of the quiescent phase and the flare...

  12. Miniature X-ray Source for Planetary Exploration Instruments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the proposed work is to develop a rugged, low power, passively cooled X-Ray source that is compatible with miniaturized XRD systems. The XRD...

  13. Chandra Observations of Eight Sources Discovered by INTEGRAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsick, John A.; Krivonos, Roman; Wang, Qinan; Bodaghee, Arash; Chaty, Sylvain; Rahoui, Farid; Rodriguez, Jerome; Fornasini, Francesca M.

    2016-01-01

    We report on 0.3-10 keV observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory of eight hard X-ray sources discovered within 8° of the Galactic plane by the International Gamma-ray Astrophysics Laboratory satellite. The short (˜5 ks) Chandra observations of the IGR source fields have yielded very likely identifications of X-ray counterparts for three of the IGR sources: IGR J14091-6108, IGR J18088-2741, and IGR J18381-0924. The first two have very hard spectra in the Chandra band that can be described by a power law with photon indices of Γ = 0.6 ± 0.4 and -{0.7}-0.3+0.4, respectively (90% confidence errors are given), and both have a unique near-IR counterpart consistent with the Chandra position. IGR J14091-6108 also displays a strong iron line and a relatively low X-ray luminosity, and we argue that the most likely source type is a cataclysmic variable (CV), although we do not completely rule out the possibility of a high mass X-ray binary. IGR J18088-2741 has an optical counterpart with a previously measured 6.84 hr periodicity, which may be the binary orbital period. We also detect five cycles of a possible 800-950 s period in the Chandra light curve, which may be the compact object spin period. We suggest that IGR J18088-2741 is also most likely a CV. For IGR J18381-0924, the spectrum is intrinsically softer with {{Γ }}={1.5}-0.4+0.5, and it is moderately absorbed, NH = (4 ± 1) × 1022 cm-2. There are two near-IR sources consistent with the Chandra position, and they are both classified as galaxies, making it likely that IGR J18381-0924 is an active galactic nucleus. For the other five IGR sources, we provide lists of nearby Chandra sources, which may be used along with further observations to identify the correct counterparts, and we discuss the implications of the low inferred Chandra count rates for these five sources.

  14. Discovery of Extremely Embedded X-ray Sources in the R Coronae Australis Star Forming Core

    CERN Document Server

    Hamaguchi, K; Petre, R; White, N E; Stelzer, B; Nedachi, K; Kobayashi, N; Tokunaga, A T; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, Michael F.; Petre, Rob; White, Nicholas E.; Stelzer, Beate; Nedachi, Ko; Kobayashi, Naoto; Tokunaga, Alan T.

    2005-01-01

    With the XMM-Newton and Chandra observatories, we detected two extremely embedded X-ray sources in the R Corona Australis (R CrA) star forming core, near IRS 7. These sources, designated as XB and XA, have X-ray absorption columns of ~3e23 cm-2 equivalent to AV ~180 mag. They are associated with the VLA centimeter radio sources 10E and 10W, respectively. XA is the counterpart of the near-infrared source IRS 7, whereas XB has no K-band counterpart above 19.4 mag. This indicates that XB is younger than typical Class I protostars, probably a Class 0 protostar or in an intermediate phase between Class 0 and Class I. The X-ray luminosity of XB varied between 29X-ray brightness by a factor of two in 30 ksec during an XMM-Newton observation. The XMM-Newton spectra indicate emission from a hot plasma with kT ~3-4 keV and also show fluorescent emission from cold iron. Though the X-ray spectrum from XB is similar to flare ...

  15. Fine-structure of nonthermal X-rays in the Chandra image of SNR RX J1713.7-3946

    CERN Document Server

    Uchiyama, Y; Takahashi, T

    2003-01-01

    We present morphological and spectroscopic studies of the northwest rim of the supernova remnant RX J1713.7-3946 based on observations by the Chandra X-ray observatory. We found a complex network of nonthermal (synchrotron) X-ray filaments, as well as a 'void' type structure -- a dim region of a circular shape -- in the northwest rim. It is remarkable that despite distinct brightness variations, the X-ray spectra everywhere in this region can be well fitted with a power-law model with photon index around 2.3. We briefly discuss some implications of these results and argue that the resolved X-ray features in the northwest rim may challenge the perceptions of standard (diffusive shock-acceleration) models concerning the production, propagation and radiation of relativistic particles in supernova remnants.

  16. X-ray Measurements of Black Hole X-ray Binary Source GRS 1915+105 and the Evolution of Hard X-ray Spectrum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. K. Manchanda

    2000-06-01

    We report the spectral measurement of GRS 1915+105 in the hard X-ray energy band of 20-140keV. The observations were made on March 30th, 1997 during a quiescent phase of the source. We discuss the mechanism of emission of hard X-ray photons and the evolution of the spectrum by comparing the data with earlier measurements and an axiomatic model for the X-ray source.

  17. The X-Ray Binary Population of the Nearby Dwarf Starburst Galaxy IC 10: Variable and Transient X-Ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laycock, Silas; Cappallo, Rigel; Williams, Benjamin F.; Prestwich, Andrea; Binder, Breanna; Christodoulou, Dimitris M.

    2017-02-01

    We have monitored the Cassiopeia dwarf galaxy (IC 10) in a series of 10 Chandra ACIS-S observations to capture its variable and transient X-ray source population, which is expected to be dominated by High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs). We present a sample of 21 X-ray sources that are variable between observations at the 3σ level, from a catalog of 110 unique point sources. We find four transients (flux variability ratio greater than 10) and a further eight objects with ratios >5. The observations span the years 2003–2010 and reach a limiting luminosity of >1035 erg s‑1, providing sensitivity to X-ray binaries in IC 10 as well as flare stars in the foreground Milky Way. The nature of the variable sources is investigated from light curves, X-ray spectra, energy quantiles, and optical counterparts. The purpose of this study is to discover the composition of the X-ray binary population in a young starburst environment. IC 10 provides a sharp contrast in stellar population age (<10 My) when compared to the Magellanic Clouds (40–200 My) where most of the known HMXBs reside. We find 10 strong HMXB candidates, 2 probable background Active Galactic Nuclei, 4 foreground flare-stars or active binaries, and 5 not yet classifiable sources. Complete classification of the sample requires optical spectroscopy for radial velocity analysis and deeper X-ray observations to obtain higher S/N spectra and search for pulsations. A catalog and supporting data set are provided.

  18. Non-Nuclear Hyper/Ultraluminous X-Ray Sources in the Starbursting Cartwheel Ring Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Y; Appleton, P N; Lucas, R A; Gao, Yu; Lucas, Ray A.

    2003-01-01

    We report the Chandra/ACIS-S detection of more than 20 ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs, L_{0.5-10 keV} >~ 3 x 10^{39} ergs/sec) in the Cartwheel collisional ring galaxy system, of which over a dozen are located in the outer active star-forming ring. A remarkable hyperluminous X-ray source (HLX, L_{0.5-10 keV} >~ 10^{41} ergs/sec assuming isotropic radiation), which dominates the X-ray emission from the Cartwheel ring, is located in the same segment of the ring as most ULXs. These powerful H/ULXs appear to be coincident with giant HII region complexes, young star clusters, and radio and mid-infrared hot-spots: all strong indicators of recent massive star formation. The X-ray spectra show that H/ULXs have similar properties as those of the {\\it most luminous} ULXs found in the nearest starbursts and galaxy mergers such as the Antennae galaxies and M82. The close association between the X-ray sources and the starbursting ring strongly suggests that the H/ULXs are intimately associated with the production and r...

  19. What is the nature of the high energy X-ray sources in the galaxy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuturilo, Sophie; Tomsick, John; Clavel, Maica; Lansbury, George B.

    2017-01-01

    Finding sources of high energy “hard” X-rays allow us to probe the most extreme conditions in the Universe. Such sources include accreting black holes and neutron stars, where we find the strongest gravitational and magnetic fields, as well as pulsars and supernova remnants, where particles are accelerated to produce the hard X-rays. Over the past decade, the INTEGRAL satellite ahs been discovering new high energy sources, and this has allowed us to understand the population of bright hard X-ray sources. Over the past few years, the NuSTAR satellite, with much better sensitivity than INTEGRAL, has been allowing us to find even more hard X-ray sources, and we will present results from studies of sources discovered in the NuSTAR serendipitous source survey. We analyzed seven different potential sources looking for counterparts using NuSTAR, Chandra and ground based optical/NIR observations. Of the seven, two have confirmed counterparts and five need either an optical/NIR detection or further spectroscopy.

  20. Measuring redshift through X-ray spectroscopy of galaxy clusters: results from Chandra data and future prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Heng; Borgani, Stefano; Rosati, Piero; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2011-01-01

    The ubiquitous presence of the Fe line complex in the X-ray spectra of galaxy clusters offers the possibility of measuring their redshift without resorting to spectroscopic follow-up observations. In this paper we assess the accuracy with which the redshift of galaxy clusters can be recovered from X-ray spectral analysis of Chandra archival data. This study indicates a strategy to build large surveys of clusters whose identification and redshift measurement are both based on X-ray data alone. We apply a blind search for K--shell and L--shell Fe line complex in X-ray cluster spectra using Chandra archival observations of galaxy clusters. The presence of the Fe line in the ICM spectra can be detected by simply analyzing the C-statistics variation $\\Delta C_{stat}$ as a function of the redshift parameter. We repeat the measurement under different conditions, and compare the X-ray derived redshift $z_X$ with the one obtained through optical spectroscopy $z_o$. We explore also how a number of priors on metallicity...

  1. Chandra Counterparts of CANDELS GOODS-S Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelluti, N.; Comastri, A.; Fontana, A.; Zamorani, G.; Amorin, R.; Castellano, M.; Merlin, E.; Santini, P.; Elbaz, D.; Schreiber, C.; Shu, X.; Wang, T.; Dunlop, J. S.; Bourne, N.; Bruce, V. A.; Buitrago, F.; Michałowski, Michał J.; Derriere, S.; Ferguson, H. C.; Faber, S. M.; Vito, F.

    2016-06-01

    Improving the capabilities of detecting faint X-ray sources is fundamental for increasing the statistics on faint high-z active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and star-forming galaxies (SFGs). We performed a simultaneous maximum likelihood point-spread function fit in the [0.5-2] keV and [2-7] keV energy bands of the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS) data at the position of the 34,930 CANDELS H-band selected galaxies. For each detected source we provide X-ray photometry and optical counterpart validation. We validated this technique by means of a ray-tracing simulation. We detected a total of 698 X-ray point sources with a likelihood { L }\\gt 4.98 (i.e., >2.7σ). We show that prior knowledge of a deep sample of optical-NIR galaxies leads to a significant increase in the detection of faint (i.e., ˜10-17 cgs in the [0.5-2] keV band) sources with respect to “blind” X-ray detections. By including previous X-ray catalogs, this work increases the total number of X-ray sources detected in the 4 Ms CDFS, CANDELS area to 793, which represents the largest sample of extremely faint X-ray sources assembled to date. Our results suggest that a large fraction of the optical counterparts of our X-ray sources determined by likelihood ratio actually coincides with the priors used for the source detection. Most of the new detected sources are likely SFGs or faint, absorbed AGNs. We identified a few sources with putative photometric redshift z > 4. Despite the low number statistics and the uncertainties on the photo z, this sample significantly increases the number of X-ray-selected candidate high-z AGNs.

  2. Contemporaneous Chandra HETG and Suzaku X-ray Observations of NGC 4051

    CERN Document Server

    Lobban, A P; Miller, L; Turner, T J; Braito, V; Kraemer, S B; Crenshaw, D M

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a deep 300 ks Chandra HETG observation of the highly variable narrow-line Seyfert Type 1 galaxy NGC 4051. The HETG spectrum reveals 28 significant soft X-ray ionised lines in either emission or absorption; primarily originating from H-like and He-like K-shell transitions of O, Ne, Mg and Si (including higher order lines and strong forbidden emission lines from O VII and Ne IX) plus high ionisation L-shell transitions from Fe XVII to Fe XXII and lower ionisation inner-shell lines (e.g. O VI). Modelling the data with XSTAR requires four distinct ionisation zones for the gas, all outflowing with velocities < 1000 km/s. A selection of the strongest emission/absorption lines appear to be resolved with FWHM of ~600 km/s. We also present the results from a quasi-simultaneous 350 ks Suzaku observation of NGC 4051 where the XIS spectrum reveals strong evidence for blueshifted absorption lines at ~6.8 and ~7.1 keV, consistent with previous findings. Modelling with XSTAR suggests that this i...

  3. Soft X-ray Spectroscopy of NGC 1068 with XMM-Newton RGS and Chandra LETGS

    CERN Document Server

    Kinkhabwala, A; Behar, E; Kahn, S M; Paerels, F B S; Brinkman, A C; Kaastra, J S; Van der Meer, R L J; Gu, M F; Liedahl, D A

    2002-01-01

    We present high-resolution soft-X-ray spectra of the prototypical Seyfert 2 galaxy, NGC 1068, taken with XMM-Newton RGS and Chandra LETGS. Its rich emission-line spectrum is dominated by recombination in a warm plasma (bright, narrow radiative recombination continua provide the ``smoking gun''), which is photoionized by the inferred nuclear power-law continuum. Radiative decay following photoexcitation of resonant transitions is also significant. A self-consistent model of an irradiated cone of gas is capable of reproducing the hydrogenic/heliumlike ionic line series in detail. The radial ionic column densities we infer are consistent with absorption measurements (the ``warm absorber'') in Seyfert 1 galaxies. This strongly suggests that the emission spectrum we observe from NGC 1068 emanates from its ``warm absorber.'' The observed extent of the ionization-cone/''warm absorber'' in NGC 1068 of 500 pc implies that a large fraction of the gas associated with generic ``warm absorbers'' may typically exist on the...

  4. The Chandra COSMOS Legacy Survey: Energy Spectrum of the Cosmic X-Ray Background and Constraints on Undetected Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelluti, Nico; Li, Yanxia; Ricarte, Angelo; Agarwal, Bhaskar; Allevato, Viola; Tasnim Ananna, Tonima; Ajello, Marco; Civano, Francesca; Comastri, Andrea; Elvis, Martin; Finoguenov, Alexis; Gilli, Roberto; Hasinger, Günther; Marchesi, Stefano; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Pacucci, Fabio; Treister, E.; Urry, C. Megan

    2017-03-01

    Using Chandra observations in the 2.15 deg2 COSMOS-legacy field, we present one of the most accurate measurements of the Cosmic X-ray Background (CXB) spectrum to date in the [0.3–7] keV energy band. The CXB has three distinct components: contributions from two Galactic collisional thermal plasmas at kT ∼ 0.27 and 0.07 keV and an extragalactic power law with a photon spectral index Γ = 1.45 ± 0.02. The 1 keV normalization of the extragalactic component is 10.91 ± 0.16 keV cm‑2 s‑1 sr‑1 keV‑1. Removing all X-ray-detected sources, the remaining unresolved CXB is best fit by a power law with normalization 4.18 ± 0.26 keV cm‑2 s‑1 sr‑1 keV‑1 and photon spectral index Γ = 1.57 ± 0.10. Removing faint galaxies down to {i}{AB}∼ 27{--}28 leaves a hard spectrum with {{Γ }}∼ 1.25 and a 1 keV normalization of ∼1.37 keV cm‑2 s‑1 sr‑1 keV‑1. This means that ∼91% of the observed CXB is resolved into detected X-ray sources and undetected galaxies. Unresolved sources that contribute ∼8%–9% of the total CXB show marginal evidence of being harder and possibly more obscured than resolved sources. Another ∼1% of the CXB can be attributed to still undetected star-forming galaxies and absorbed active galactic nuclei. According to these limits, we investigate a scenario where early black holes totally account for non-source CXB fraction and constrain some of their properties. In order to not exceed the remaining CXB and the z∼ 6 accreted mass density, such a population of black holes must grow in Compton-thick envelopes with {N}H > 1.6 × 1025 cm‑2 and form in extremely low-metallicity environments ({Z}ȯ )∼ {10}-3.

  5. Results from the Daresbury Compton backscattering X-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laundy, D. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Priebe, G. [Max Born Institute, Max-Born-Strasse 2A, 12489 Berlin, DE (Germany); Jamison, S.P. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Graham, D.M. [The Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Phillips, P.J. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Smith, S.L.; Saveliev, Y. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Vassilev, S. [The University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Seddon, E.A., E-mail: elaine.seddon@stfc.ac.uk [The Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-11

    The Daresbury Compton Backscattering X-ray Source uses a high power Ti Sapphire laser interacting in head on geometry with electron bunches in the ALICE energy recovery linear accelerator. X-ray photons with peak energy of 21 keV were generated with the accelerator operating at an energy of 29.6 MeV. The spatial profile of the X-rays emitted near the electron beam axis was measured. The characteristics of the X-ray yield measured as a function of relative timing between the laser pulse and the interacting electron bunch was found to be consistent with the modelled intensity behaviour using measured electron and laser beam parameters.

  6. Evolution of temperature-dependent charge transfer inefficiency correction for ACIS on the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Catherine E.; Bautz, Marshall W.; Durham, R. Nick; Plucinsky, Paul P.

    2016-07-01

    As ACIS on the Chandra X-ray Observatory enters its seventeenth year of operation, it continues to perform well and produce spectacular scientific results. The response of ACIS has evolved over the lifetime of the observatory due to radiation damage and aging of the spacecraft. The ACIS instrument team developed a software tool which applies a correction to each X-ray event and mitigates charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) and spectral resolution degradation. The behavior of the charge traps that cause CTI are temperature dependent, however, and warmer temperatures reduce the effectiveness of the correction algorithm. As the radiator surfaces on Chandra age, ACIS cooling has become less efficient and temperatures can increase by a few degrees. A temperature-dependent component was added to the CTI correction algorithm in 2010. We present an evaluation of the effectiveness of this algorithm as the radiation damage and thermal environment continue to evolve and suggest updates to improve the calibration fidelity.

  7. Development of a new X-ray source using backscattered X-ray with the use of a cold cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanizawa, Keisuke; Sekiya, Tetsuo; Ohshio, Shigeo; Akasaka, Hiroki; Saitoh, Hidetoshi

    2011-02-01

    The development of an intense X-ray source using backscattered X-ray produced using an advanced electrode configuration is described. The electrodes were composed of field emitters deposited on a wire mounted on a perforated plate as the cathode and a copper plate as the anode. Electrons from these emitters collided with the copper plate and X-ray was generated at collision points. The backscattered X-ray in the direction normal to the electron trajectory through a hole in the anode escaped from the vacuum chamber through a beryllium window. Continuous and characteristic X-rays were detected at an applied voltage lower than that of a conventional X-ray source from 3.0 to 9.4 kV, respectively. Moreover, the X-ray dosage measured with a survey meter reached 0.95 mSv/h at 5.0 kV of applied voltage. The transmission images of three types of material used as an X-ray source for the X-ray imaging system indicate three advantages; low power consumption, focal point controllable by adjusting applied voltage, and photographable motion picture of X-ray transmission.

  8. Optical Counterparts of Ultra Luminous X-ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Gutíerrez, C M

    2006-01-01

    We present optical identification and characterization of counterparts of four objects previously catalogued as ultra-luminous X-ray sources. The objects were selected from the Colbert & Ptak (2002) catalogue. The optical counterparts are identified as point-like objects with magnitudes in the range \\~17-19. The optical spectra of three of the sources (IXO 32, 37 and 40) show the presence of emission lines typical of quasars. The position of these lines allows a precise estimation of their redshifts (2.769, 0.567 and 0.789 for IXO 32, 37 and 40 respectively). The fourth X-ray source, IXO35, is associated with a red object that has a spectrum typical of an M star in our Galaxy. These identifications are useful for building clean samples of ULX sources, selecting suitable targets for future observations and performing statistical studies on the different populations of X-ray sources.

  9. Optimized Volumetric Scanning for X-Ray Array Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, S K; Foudray, A M; Wang, A; Kallman, J S; Martz, H

    2009-09-29

    Non-destructive evaluation (NDE) is the science and technology of determining non-invasively the internal structure of manufactured parts, objects, and materials. NDE application areas include medicine, industrial manufacturing, military, homeland security, and airport luggage screening. X-ray measurement systems are most widely used because of their ability to image through a wide range of material densities (from human tissue in medical applications to the dense materials of weapon components). Traditional x-ray systems involve a single source and detector system that rotate and/or translate about the object under evaluation. At each angular location, the source projects x-rays through the object. The rays undergo attenuation proportional to the density of the object's constitutive material. The detector records a measure of the attenuation. Mathematical algorithms are used to invert the forward attenuated ray projection process to form images of the object. This is known as computed tomography (CT). In recent years, the single-source x-ray NDE systems have been generalized to arrays of x-ray sources. Array sources permit multiple views of the object with fewer rotations and translations of the source/detector system. The spatially diverse nature of x-ray array sources has the potential of reducing data collection time, reducing imaging artifacts, and increasing the resolution of the resultant images. Most of the existing CT algorithms were not derived from array source models with a spatially diverse set of viewing perspectives. Single-source x-ray CT data collection, processing, and imaging methods and algorithms are not applicable when the source location is expanded from one dimension (a rotating and/or translating point source) to two (a rotating and/or translating array). They must be reformulated. The goal of this project is to determine the applicability of x-ray array sources to problems of interest to LLNL and its customers. It is believed array

  10. X-ray Optics for BES Light Source Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Dennis [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Padmore, Howard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lessner, Eliane [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science

    2013-03-27

    Each new generation of synchrotron radiation sources has delivered an increase in average brightness 2 to 3 orders of magnitude over the previous generation. The next evolution toward diffraction-limited storage rings will deliver another 3 orders of magnitude increase. For ultrafast experiments, free electron lasers (FELs) deliver 10 orders of magnitude higher peak brightness than storage rings. Our ability to utilize these ultrabright sources, however, is limited by our ability to focus, monochromate, and manipulate these beams with X-ray optics. X-ray optics technology unfortunately lags behind source technology and limits our ability to maximally utilize even today’s X-ray sources. With ever more powerful X-ray sources on the horizon, a new generation of X-ray optics must be developed that will allow us to fully utilize these beams of unprecedented brightness. The increasing brightness of X-ray sources will enable a new generation of measurements that could have revolutionary impact across a broad area of science, if optical systems necessary for transporting and analyzing X-rays can be perfected. The high coherent flux will facilitate new science utilizing techniques in imaging, dynamics, and ultrahigh-resolution spectroscopy. For example, zone-plate-based hard X-ray microscopes are presently used to look deeply into materials, but today’s resolution and contrast are restricted by limitations of the current lithography used to manufacture nanodiffractive optics. The large penetration length, combined in principle with very high spatial resolution, is an ideal probe of hierarchically ordered mesoscale materials, if zone-plate focusing systems can be improved. Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) probes a wide range of excitations in materials, from charge-transfer processes to the very soft excitations that cause the collective phenomena in correlated electronic systems. However, although RIXS can probe high-energy excitations, the most exciting and

  11. X-ray Optics for BES Light Source Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Dennis [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Padmore, Howard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lessner, Eliane [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science

    2013-03-27

    Each new generation of synchrotron radiation sources has delivered an increase in average brightness 2 to 3 orders of magnitude over the previous generation. The next evolution toward diffraction-limited storage rings will deliver another 3 orders of magnitude increase. For ultrafast experiments, free electron lasers (FELs) deliver 10 orders of magnitude higher peak brightness than storage rings. Our ability to utilize these ultrabright sources, however, is limited by our ability to focus, monochromate, and manipulate these beams with X-ray optics. X-ray optics technology unfortunately lags behind source technology and limits our ability to maximally utilize even today’s X-ray sources. With ever more powerful X-ray sources on the horizon, a new generation of X-ray optics must be developed that will allow us to fully utilize these beams of unprecedented brightness. The increasing brightness of X-ray sources will enable a new generation of measurements that could have revolutionary impact across a broad area of science, if optical systems necessary for transporting and analyzing X-rays can be perfected. The high coherent flux will facilitate new science utilizing techniques in imaging, dynamics, and ultrahigh-resolution spectroscopy. For example, zone-plate-based hard X-ray microscopes are presently used to look deeply into materials, but today’s resolution and contrast are restricted by limitations of the current lithography used to manufacture nanodiffractive optics. The large penetration length, combined in principle with very high spatial resolution, is an ideal probe of hierarchically ordered mesoscale materials, if zone-plate focusing systems can be improved. Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) probes a wide range of excitations in materials, from charge-transfer processes to the very soft excitations that cause the collective phenomena in correlated electronic systems. However, although RIXS can probe high-energy excitations, the most exciting and

  12. Thermodynamic perturbations in the X-ray halo of 33 clusters of galaxies observed with Chandra ACIS

    CERN Document Server

    Hofmann, F; Nandra, K; Clerc, N; Gaspari, M

    2016-01-01

    In high-resolution X-ray observations of the hot plasma in clusters of galaxies significant structures caused by AGN feedback, mergers, and turbulence can be detected. Many clusters have been observed by Chandra in great depth and at high resolution. Using archival data taken with the Chandra ACIS instrument the aim was to study thermodynamic perturbations of the X-ray emitting plasma and to apply this to better understand the thermodynamic and dynamic state of the intra cluster medium (ICM). We analysed deep observations for a sample of 33 clusters with more than 100 ks of Chandra exposure each at distances between redshift 0.025 and 0.45. The combined exposure of the sample is 8 Ms. Fitting emission models to different regions of the extended X-ray emission we searched for perturbations in density, temperature, pressure, and entropy of the hot plasma. For individual clusters we mapped the thermodynamic properties of the ICM and measured their spread in circular concentric annuli. Comparing the spread of dif...

  13. X-rays from Saturn: A study with XMM-Newton and Chandra over the years 2002-05

    CERN Document Server

    Branduardi-Raymont, G; Elsner, R F; Rodriguez, P

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of the two most recent (2005) XMM-Newton observations of Saturn together with the re-analysis of an earlier (2002) observation from the XMM-Newton archive and of three Chandra observations in 2003 and 2004. While the XMM-Newton telescope resolution does not enable us to resolve spatially the contributions of the planet's disk and rings to the X-ray flux, we can estimate their strengths and their evolution over the years from spectral analysis, and compare them with those observed with Chandra. The spectrum of the X-ray emission is well fitted by an optically thin coronal model with an average temperature of 0.5 keV. The addition of a fluorescent oxygen emission line at ~0.53 keV improves the fits significantly. In accordance with earlier reports, we interpret the coronal component as emission from the planetary disk, produced by the scattering of solar X-rays in Saturn's upper atmosphere, and the line as originating from the Saturnian rings. The strength of the disk X-ray emission is se...

  14. Markov Chain Monte Carlo Joint Analysis of Chandra X-Ray Imaging Spectroscopy and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonamente, Massimillano; Joy, Marshall K.; Carlstrom, John E.; Reese, Erik D.; LaRoque, Samuel J.

    2004-01-01

    X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect data can be combined to determine the distance to galaxy clusters. High-resolution X-ray data are now available from Chandra, which provides both spatial and spectral information, and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect data were obtained from the BIMA and Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) arrays. We introduce a Markov Chain Monte Carlo procedure for the joint analysis of X-ray and Sunyaev- Zel'dovich effect data. The advantages of this method are the high computational efficiency and the ability to measure simultaneously the probability distribution of all parameters of interest, such as the spatial and spectral properties of the cluster gas and also for derivative quantities such as the distance to the cluster. We demonstrate this technique by applying it to the Chandra X-ray data and the OVRO radio data for the galaxy cluster A611. Comparisons with traditional likelihood ratio methods reveal the robustness of the method. This method will be used in follow-up paper to determine the distances to a large sample of galaxy cluster.

  15. The restless universe understanding X-ray astronomy in the age of Chandra and Newton

    CERN Document Server

    Schlegel, Eric M

    2002-01-01

    This title tells the story of the development and launch of a major space-based telescope, and explains the discoveries of the nature of the universe in the X-ray spectre. The author looks at the brief history of X-ray astronomy to explore what can and has been learnt by using X-ray.

  16. X-Ray/Ultraviolet Observing Campaign of the Markarian 279 Active Galactic Nucleus Outflow: a close look at the absorbing/emitting gas with Chandra-LETGS

    CERN Document Server

    Costantini, E; Arav, N; Kriss, G A; Steenbrugge, K C; Gabel, J R; Verbunt, F; Behar, E; Gaskell, C M; Korista, K T; Proga, D; Quijano, J K; Scott, J E; Klimek, E S; Hedrick, C H

    2006-01-01

    We present a Chandra-LETGS observation of the Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 279. This observation was carried out simultaneously with HST-STIS and FUSE, in the context of a multiwavelength study of this source. The Chandra pointings were spread over ten days for a total exposure time of ~360 ks. The spectrum of Mrk279 shows evidence of broad emission features, especially at the wavelength of the OVII triplet. We quantitatively explore the possibility that this emission is produced in the broad line region (BLR). We modeled the broad UV emission lines seen in the FUSE and HST-STIS spectra following the ``locally optimally emitting cloud" approach. We find that the X-ray lines luminosity derived from the best fit BLR model can match the X-ray features, suggesting that the gas producing the UV lines is sufficient to account also for the X-ray emission. The spectrum is absorbed by ionized gas whose total column density is ~5x10^{20} cm^{-2}. The absorption spectrum can be modeled by two distinct gas components (log xi ~ 0...

  17. Stellar X-ray Sources in the Rosette Nebula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W. P. Chen; P. S. Chiang; J. Z. Li

    2004-01-01

    We present optical photometric and spectroscopic studies of ROSAT X-ray stellar sources in the Rosette Nebula star-forming region. The brightest Xray sources are either massive stars or active T Tauri stars associated with the open cluster NGC 2244, or are foreground stars. Some of the spectra of the young stars newly identified in the region are presented.

  18. A JEM-X catalog of X-ray sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Niels Jørgen Stenfeldt; Chenevez, Jerome; Lund, Niels;

    2007-01-01

    The JEM-X catalog of X-ray sources presented here is based on detections in individual science windows with a sensitivity limit of about 10 mCrab (5-15 keV). It contains 127 sources and only those that can be identified from the existing reference catalog. The input data are taken from the, up...

  19. New flaring of an ultraluminous X-ray source in NGC 1365

    CERN Document Server

    Soria, R; Risaliti, G; Fabbiano, G; King, A R; La Parola, V; Zezas, A

    2007-01-01

    We have studied a highly variable ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) in the Fornax galaxy NGC 1365, with a series of 12 Chandra and XMM-Newton observations between 2002 and 2006. In 2006 April, the source peaked at a luminosity ~ 3 x 10^{40} erg/s in the 0.3-10 keV band (similar to the maximum luminosity found by ASCA in 1995), and declined on an e-folding timescale ~ 3 days. The X-ray spectrum is always dominated by a broad power-law-like component. When the source is seen at X-ray luminosities ~ 10^{40} erg/s, an additional soft thermal component (which we interpret as emission from the accretion disk) contributes ~ 1/4 of the X-ray flux; when the luminosity is higher, ~ 3 x 10^{40} erg/s, the thermal component is not detected and must contribute < 10% of the flux. At the beginning of the decline, ionized absorption is detected around 0.5-2 keV; it is a possible signature of a massive outflow. The power-law is always hard, with a photon index Gamma ~ 1.7 (and even flatter at times), as is generally the cas...

  20. EXPLORING X-RAY BINARY POPULATIONS IN COMPACT GROUP GALAXIES WITH CHANDRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzanavaris, P.; Hornschemeier, A. E. [Laboratory for X-ray Astrophysics, NASA/Goddard Spaceflight Center, Mail Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gallagher, S. C.; Lenkić, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Centre for Planetary and Space Exploration, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Desjardins, T. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 177 Chem.-Phys. Building, University of Kentucky, 505 Rose Street, Lexington KY 40506-0055202 (United States); Walker, L. M. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Johnson, K. E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Mulchaey, J. S. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    We obtain total galaxy X-ray luminosities, L{sub X}, originating from individually detected point sources in a sample of 47 galaxies in 15 compact groups of galaxies (CGs). For the great majority of our galaxies, we find that the detected point sources most likely are local to their associated galaxy, and are thus extragalactic X-ray binaries (XRBs) or nuclear active galactic nuclei (AGNs). For spiral and irregular galaxies, we find that, after accounting for AGNs and nuclear sources, most CG galaxies are either within the ±1σ scatter of the Mineo et al. L{sub X}–star formation rate (SFR) correlation or have higher L{sub X} than predicted by this correlation for their SFR. We discuss how these “excesses” may be due to low metallicities and high interaction levels. For elliptical and S0 galaxies, after accounting for AGNs and nuclear sources, most CG galaxies are consistent with the Boroson et al. L{sub X}–stellar mass correlation for low-mass XRBs, with larger scatter, likely due to residual effects such as AGN activity or hot gas. Assuming non-nuclear sources are low- or high-mass XRBs, we use appropriate XRB luminosity functions to estimate the probability that stochastic effects can lead to such extreme L{sub X} values. We find that, although stochastic effects do not in general appear to be important, for some galaxies there is a significant probability that high L{sub X} values can be observed due to strong XRB variability.

  1. X-ray Counterparts of Infrared Faint Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schartel, Norbert

    2011-10-01

    Infrared Faint Radio Sources (IFRS) are radio sources with extremely faint or even absent infrared emission in deep Spitzer Surveys. Models of their spectral energy distributions, the ratios of radio to infrared flux densities and their steep radio spectra strongly suggest that IFRS are AGN at high redshifts (2IFRS, but if confirmed, the increased AGN numbers at these redshifts will account for the unresolved part of the X-ray background. The identification of X-ray counterparts of IFRS is considered to be the smoking gun for this hypothesis. We propose to observe 8 IFRS using 30ks pointed observations. X-ray detections of IFRS with different ratios of radio-to-infrared fluxes, will constrain the class-specific SED.

  2. Movable anode x-ray source with enhanced anode cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, C.R.; Rockett, P.D.

    1987-08-04

    An x-ray source is disclosed having a cathode and a disc-shaped anode with a peripheral surface at constant radius from the anode axis opposed to the cathode. The anode has stub axle sections rotatably carried in heat conducting bearing plates which are mounted by thermoelectric coolers to bellows which normally bias the bearing plates to a retracted position spaced from opposing anode side faces. The bellows cooperate with the x-ray source mounting structure for forming closed passages for heat transport fluid. Flow of such fluid under pressure expands the bellows and brings the bearing plates into heat conducting contact with the anode side faces. A worm gear is mounted on a shaft and engages serrations in the anode periphery for rotating the anode when flow of coolant is terminated between x-ray emission events. 5 figs.

  3. Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of the first quasars X-rays from the age of cosmic enlightenment

    CERN Document Server

    Vignali, C; Schneider, D P; Anderson, S F; Fan, X; Gunn, J E; Kaspi, S; Richards, G T; Strauss, M A; Strauss, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    We report on Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of a sample of 13 quasars at z~4.7-5.4 mostly taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The present sample complements previous X-ray studies of z>4 quasars, in which the majority of the objects are optically more luminous and at lower redshifts. All but two of our quasars have been detected in the X-ray band, thus doubling the number of z>4.8 X-ray detected quasars. The two non-detections are likely to be due to a short exposure time and to the presence of intrinsic absorption. We confirm and extend to the highest redshifts the presence of a correlation between AB1450(1+z) magnitude and soft X-ray flux for z>4 quasars, and the presence of a steeper optical-to-X-ray spectral energy distribution (parameterized by aox) for high-luminosity, high-redshift quasars than for lower-luminosity, lower-redshift quasars. The second effect is likely due to the known anti-correlation between aox and rest-frame 2500 Angstrom luminosity, whose significance is confirmed v...

  4. Understanding X-ray reflection emissivity profiles in AGN: Locating the X-ray source

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkins, D R

    2012-01-01

    The illumination pattern (or emissivity profile) of the accretion disc due to the reflection of X-rays in AGN can be understood in terms of relativistic effects on the rays propagating from a source in a corona surrounding the central black hole, both on their trajectories and on the accretion disc itself. Theoretical emissivity profiles due to isotropic point sources as well as simple extended geometries are computed in general relativistic ray tracing simulations performed on graphics processing units (GPUs). Such simulations assuming only general relativity naturally explain the accretion disc emissivity profiles determined from relativistically broadened emission lines which fall off steeply (with power law indices of between 6 and 8) over the inner regions of the disc, then flattening off to almost a constant before tending to a constant power law of index 3 over the outer disc. Simulations for a variety of source locations, extents and geometries show how the emissivity profiles depend on these properti...

  5. The First Chandra Field

    OpenAIRE

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Cameron, Robert A.; Gandhi, Poshak; Foellmi, Cédric; Elsner, Ronald F.; Patel, Sandeep K.; Wu, Kinwah; O'Dell, Stephen L.

    2005-01-01

    Before the official first-light images, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory obtained an X-ray image of the field to which its focal plane was first exposed. We describe this historic observation and report our study of the first Chandra field. Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) detected 15 X-ray sources, the brightest being dubbed ``Leon X-1'' to honor the Chandra Telescope Scientist, Leon Van Speybroeck. Based upon our analysis of the X-ray data and spectroscopy at the European Sou...

  6. A multipurpose tunable source of monochromatic X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chesta, M.A.; Plivelic, T.S.; Mainardi, R.T. E-mail: mainardi@mail.famaf.unc.edu.ar

    2002-02-01

    The emission of characteristic X-rays from any chemical element induced by beta particles of high energy (10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} eV) is much higher than photon excitation, with the possible exception of selective excitation. This work describes the properties of a variable energy X-ray generator that uses {sup 90}Sr as a source of beta particles and a multitarget array in a transparent source geometry. This compact device provides, through suitable selection of the target material, over 30 monoenergetic lines spread uniformly in the energy range of between 6 and 100 keV. The X-ray photon flux thus generated has an intensity of between 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} per MBq of the beta source activity. With this single beta source, the X-ray yield is higher as compared with generators using {sup 241}Am or other X- or gamma-ray sources with the same activity, and the line's intensity changes by less than a factor of three over the whole energy range.

  7. X-RAY SOURCES IN THE DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY DRACO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonbas, E. [University of Adiyaman, Department of Physics, 02040 Adiyaman (Turkey); Rangelov, B.; Kargaltsev, O.; Dhuga, K. S.; Hare, J.; Volkov, I., E-mail: edasonbas@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2016-04-10

    We present the spectral analysis of an 87 ks XMM-Newton observation of Draco, a nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Of the approximately 35 robust X-ray source detections, we focus our attention on the brightest of these sources, for which we report X-ray and multiwavelength parameters. While most of the sources exhibit properties consistent with active galactic nuclei, few of them possess the characteristics of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and cataclysmic variable (CVs). Our analysis places constraints on the population of X-ray sources with L{sub X} > 3 × 10{sup 33} erg s{sup −1} in Draco, suggesting that there are no actively accreting black hole and neutron star binaries. However, we find four sources that could be quiescent state LMXBs/CVs associated with Draco. We also place constraints on the central black hole luminosity and on a dark matter decay signal around 3.5 keV.

  8. Compact X-ray Light Source Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Evans, James E.; Terminello, Louis J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Manke, Kristin L.; Plata, Charity

    2012-12-01

    This report, produced jointly by EMSL and FCSD, is the result of a workshop held in September 2011 that examined the utility of a compact x-ray light source (CXLS) in addressing many scientific challenges critical to advancing energy science and technology.

  9. Characterization of X-Ray Diffraction System with a Microfocus X-Ray Source and a Polycapillary Optic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Marshall, Joy K.; Ciszak, Ewa; Ponomarev, Igor

    2000-01-01

    We present here an optimized microfocus x-ray source and polycapillary optic system designed for diffraction of small protein crystals. The x-ray beam is formed by a 5.5mm focal length capillary collimator coupled with a 40 micron x-ray source operating at 46Watts. Measurements of the x-ray flux, the divergence and the spectral characteristics of the beam are presented, This optimized system provides a seven fold greater flux than our recently reported configuration [M. Gubarev, et al., J. of Applied Crystallography (2000) 33, in press]. We now make a comparison with a 5kWatts rotating anode generator (Rigaku) coupled with confocal multilayer focusing mirrors (Osmic, CMF12- 38Cu6). The microfocus x-ray source and polycapillary collimator system delivers 60% of the x-ray flux from the rotating anode system. Additional ways to improve our microfocus x-ray system, and thus increase the x-ray flux will be discussed.

  10. The O VII X-Ray Forest toward Markarian 421: Consistency between XMM-Newton and Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaastra, J. S.; Werner, N.; Herder, J. W. A. den; Paerels, F. B. S.; de Plaa, J.; Rasmussen, A. P.; de Vries, C. P.

    2006-11-01

    Recently, the first detections of highly ionized gas associated with two warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) filaments have been reported. The evidence is based on X-ray absorption lines due to O VII and other ions observed by Chandra toward the bright blazar Mrk 421. We investigate the robustness of this detection by a reanalysis of the original Chandra LETGS spectra, the analysis of a large set of XMM-Newton RGS spectra of Mrk 421, and additional Chandra observations. We address the reliability of individual spectral features belonging to the absorption components, and assess the significance of the detection of these components. We also use Monte Carlo simulations of spectra. We confirm the apparent strength of several features in the Chandra spectra, but demonstrate that they are statistically not significant. This decreased significance is due to the number of redshift trials that are made and that are not taken into account in the original discovery paper. Therefore, these features must be attributed to statistical fluctuations. This is confirmed by the RGS spectra, which have a higher signal-to-noise ratio than the Chandra spectra, but do not show features at the same wavelengths. Finally, we show that the possible association with a Lyα absorption system also lacks sufficient statistical evidence. We conclude that there is insufficient observational proof for the existence of the two proposed WHIM filaments toward Mrk 421, the brightest X-ray blazar in the sky. Therefore, the highly ionized component of the WHIM still remains to be discovered.

  11. Chandra measurements of non-thermal X-ray emission from massive, merging, radio-halo clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Million, E T

    2008-01-01

    We report the discovery of spatially-extended, non-thermal or hot, quasi-thermal emission components in Chandra X-ray spectra for five of a sample of seven massive, merging galaxy clusters with powerful radio halos: Abell 665, 2163, 2255, 2319, and 1E0657-56. The emission components can be fitted by power-law models with mean photon indices in the range 1.4 20 keV. A control sample of regular, dynamically relaxed clusters without radio halos but with comparable thermal temperatures and luminosities shows no evidence for similar components in their Chandra spectra. Detailed X-ray spectral mapping reveals the complex thermodynamic states of the radio halo clusters. We report the discovery of a clear, large-scale shock front in Abell 2219. Our deepest observations, of the Bullet Cluster 1E0657-56, demonstrate a spatial correlation between the strongest power law X-ray emission, highest thermal pressure, and brightest 1.34GHz radio halo emission in this cluster. The integrated flux and mean spectral index of the...

  12. Ultrafast outflows in ultraluminous X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Pinto, Ciro; Middleton, Matthew; Walton, Dom

    2016-01-01

    Ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are bright extragalactic sources with X-ray luminosities above 10^39 erg/s powered by accretion onto compact objects. According to the first studies performed with XMM-Newton ULXs seemed to be excellent candidates to host intermediate-mass black holes (10^2-4 solar masses). However, in the last years the interpretation of super-Eddington accretion onto stellar-mass black holes or neutron stars for most ULXs has gained a strong consensus. One critical missing piece to confirm the super-Eddington scenario was the direct detection of the massive, radiatively-driven winds expected as atomic emission/absorption lines in ULX spectra. The first evidence for winds was found as residuals in the soft X-ray spectra of ULXs. Most recently we have been able to resolve these residuals into rest-frame emission and blueshifted (~0.2c) absorption lines arising from highly ionized gas in the deep high-resolution XMM-Newton spectra of two ultraluminous X-ray sources. The compact object is ther...

  13. Ultra-Luminous X-Ray Sources in the Most Metal Poor Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Prestwich, A H; Zezas, A; Jackson, F E; Roberts, T P; Foltz, R; Linden, T; Kalogera, V

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-Luminous X-ray sources (ULX) are X-ray binaries with Lx>1E^39 ergs/s. The most spectacular examples of ULX occur in starburst galaxies and are now understood to be young, luminous High Mass X-ray Binaries. The conditions under which ULX form are poorly understood, but recent evidence suggests they may be more common in low metallicity systems. Here we investigate the hypothesis that ULX form preferentially in low metallicity galaxies by searching for ULX in a sample of Extremely Metal Poor Galaxies (XMPG) observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. XMPG are defined as galaxies with log(O/H)+12<7.65, or less than 5% solar. These are the most metal-deficient galaxies known, and a logical place to find ULX if they favor metal poor systems. We compare the number of ULX (corrected for background contamination) per unit of star formation (Nulx) in the XMPG sample with Nulx in a comparison sample of galaxies with higher metallicities taken from the Spitzer Infrared Galaxy Sample (SINGS). We find that ULX o...

  14. Hard X-ray Sources for the Mexican Synchrotron Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Herrera, Juan

    2016-10-01

    One of the principal tasks for the design of the Mexican synchrotron was to define the storage ring energy. The main criteria for choosing the energy come from studying the electromagnetic spectrum that can be obtained from the synchrotron, because the energy range of the spectrum that can be obtained will determine the applications available to the users of the future light source. Since there is a public demand of hard X-rays for the experiments in the synchrotron community users from Mexico, in this work we studied the emission spectra from some hard X-ray sources which could be the best options for the parameters of the present Mexican synchrotron design. The calculations of the flux and the brightness for one Bending Magnet and four Insertion Devices are presented; specifically, for a Superconducting Bending Magnet (SBM), a Superconducting Wiggler (SCW), an In Vacuum Short Period Undulator (IV-SPU), a Superconducting Undulator (SCU) and for a Cryogenic Permanent Magnet Undulator (CPMU). Two commonly available synchrotron radiation programs were used for the computation (XOP and SRW). From the results, it can be concluded that the particle beam energy from the current design is enough to have one or more sources of hard X-rays. Furthermore, a wide range of hard X-ray region can be covered by the analyzed sources, and the choice of each type should be based on the specific characteristics of the X-ray beam to perform the experiments at the involved beamline. This work was done within the project Fomix Conacyt-Morelos ”Plan Estrategico para la construccion y operación de un Sincrotron en Morelos” (224392).

  15. Chandra counterparts of CANDELS GOODS-S sources

    CERN Document Server

    Cappelluti, N; Fontana, A; Zamorani, G; Amorin, R; Castellano, M; Merlin, E; Santini, P; Elbaz, D; Schreiber, C; Shu, X; Wang, T; Dunlop, J S; Bourne, N; Bruce, V A; Buitrago, F; Michałowski, Michał J; Derriere, S; Ferguson, H C; Faber, S M; Vito, F

    2015-01-01

    Improving the capabilities of detecting faint X-ray sources is fundamental to increase the statistics on faint high-z AGN and star-forming galaxies.We performed a simultaneous Maximum Likelihood PSF fit in the [0.5-2] keV and [2-7] keV energy bands of the 4 Ms {\\em Chandra} Deep Field South (CDFS) data at the position of the 34930 CANDELS H-band selected galaxies. For each detected source we provide X-ray photometry and optical counterpart validation. We validated this technique by means of a raytracing simulation. We detected a total of 698 X-ray point-sources with a likelihood $\\mathcal{L}$$>$4.98 (i.e. $>$2.7$\\sigma$). We show that the prior knowledge of a deep sample of Optical-NIR galaxies leads to a significant increase of the detection of faint (i.e. $\\sim$10$^{-17}$ cgs in the [0.5-2] keV band) sources with respect to "blind" X-ray detections. By including previous catalogs, this work increases the total number of X-ray sources detected in the 4 Ms CDFS, CANDELS area to 793, which represents the large...

  16. AGN content of X-ray, IR and radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Paronyan, G. M.; Abrahamyan, H. V.; Gyulzadyan, M. V.; Mikayelyan, G. A.

    2016-09-01

    We have carried out a number of surveys and identification works related to X-ray, IR and radio sources and searched for extragalactic ones. Among them, most interesting are Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and Starburst (SB) Galaxies. Some 4500 AGN have been revealed from ROSAT BSC and FSC sources, and many more are hidden ones; those showing evidence of activity but with no emission lines in optical wavelengths. We estimated AGN content of X-ray sources as 52.9%. IR sources contain thousands of SBs, and most important are those having signs of interaction and/or merging. We have carried out optical identifications of IRAS point sources, and 1278 IR galaxies have been revealed, including LIRGs and ULIRGs. We have also combined IRAS PSC and FSC catalogs and compiled its extragalactic sample, which allowed to estimate AGN content among IR sources as 23.7%. Extragalactic radio sources contain bright galaxies, AGN and SBs. We have studied the border between AGN and normal galaxies by radio/optical flux ratios to establish which objects may be attributed to AGN based on radio properties. Interestingly, absolute majority of objects associated with both X-ray and radio sources are AGN.

  17. Automatic classification of time-variable X-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Kitty K.; Farrell, Sean; Murphy, Tara; Gaensler, B. M. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2014-05-01

    To maximize the discovery potential of future synoptic surveys, especially in the field of transient science, it will be necessary to use automatic classification to identify some of the astronomical sources. The data mining technique of supervised classification is suitable for this problem. Here, we present a supervised learning method to automatically classify variable X-ray sources in the Second XMM-Newton Serendipitous Source Catalog (2XMMi-DR2). Random Forest is our classifier of choice since it is one of the most accurate learning algorithms available. Our training set consists of 873 variable sources and their features are derived from time series, spectra, and other multi-wavelength contextual information. The 10 fold cross validation accuracy of the training data is ∼97% on a 7 class data set. We applied the trained classification model to 411 unknown variable 2XMM sources to produce a probabilistically classified catalog. Using the classification margin and the Random Forest derived outlier measure, we identified 12 anomalous sources, of which 2XMM J180658.7–500250 appears to be the most unusual source in the sample. Its X-ray spectra is suggestive of a ultraluminous X-ray source but its variability makes it highly unusual. Machine-learned classification and anomaly detection will facilitate scientific discoveries in the era of all-sky surveys.

  18. High power bremsstrahlung X-ray source for radiation processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yotsumoto, K.; Sunaga, H.; Tanaka, S.; Kanazawa, T.; Agematsu, T.; Tanaka, R.; Yoshida, K.; Taniguchi, S.; Sakamoto, I.; Tamura, N.

    The high power X-ray irradiation facility designed for the sterilization of medical appliances is described. The X-ray source consists of the 5 MeV, 300 kW Cockcroft Walton type of electron accelerator and the water cooled tantalum target. Conditions necessary for designing the X-ray target are conversion efficiency from electron beam to X-ray, thermal conductivity, readiness for machining and cost of the material. The conversion efficiency was determined through the Monte Carlo type calculation and obtained as 10.8 % for 3.667 g/cm 2 thickness (1 csda range) of tantalum target. In order to obtain the data on the source design, experiments have been carried out at the JAERI TAKASAKI 2 MeV, 60 kW Cockcroft-Walton type of electron accelerator equipped with a tantalum target. The size of package and the speed of conveyor was determined through the calculation of the absorbed dose distribution in the irradiated medium and the utilization efficiency.

  19. X-ray Sources and Their Optical Counterparts in the Galactic Globular Cluster M12 (NGC 6218)

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Ting-Ni; Bassa, Cees; Verbunt, Frank; Lewin, Walter H G; Anderson, Scott F; Pooley, David

    2009-01-01

    We study a Chandra X-ray Observatory ACIS-S observation of the Galactic globular cluster M12. With a 26 ks exposure time, we detect 6 X-ray sources inside the half-mass radius (2'.16) and two of them are inside the core radius (0'.72) of the cluster. If we assume these sources are all within the globular cluster M12, the luminosity Lx among these sources between 0.3-7.0 keV varies roughly from 10^30 to 10^32 ergs s^-1. For identification, we also analyzed the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) data and identified the optical counterparts to five X-ray sources inside the HST field of view. According to the X-ray and optical features, we found 2-5 candidate active binaries (ABs) or cataclysmic variables (CVs) and 0-3 background galaxies within the HST ACS field of view. Based on the assumption that the number of X-ray sources scales with the encounter rate and the mass of the globular cluster, we expect 2 X-ray source inside M12, and the expectation is consistent with our observation...

  20. Chandra and HST Imaging of the Quasars PKS B0106+013 and 3C 345: Inverse Compton X-Rays and Magnetized Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharb, P.; Lister, M. L.; Marshall, H. L.; Hogan, B. S.

    2012-04-01

    We present results from deep (~70 ks) Chandra/ACIS observations and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys F475W observations of two highly optically polarized quasars belonging to the MOJAVE blazar sample, viz., PKS B0106+013 and 1641+399 (3C 345). These observations reveal X-ray and optical emissions from the jets in both sources. X-ray emission is detected from the entire length of the 0106+013 radio jet, which shows clear bends or wiggles—the X-ray emission is brightest at the first prominent kiloparsec jet bend. A picture of a helical kiloparsec jet with the first kiloparsec-scale bend representing a jet segment moving close(r) to our line of sight, and getting Doppler boosted at both radio and X-ray frequencies, is consistent with these observations. The X-ray emission from the jet end, however, peaks at about 0farcs4 (~3.4 kpc) upstream of the radio hot spot. Optical emission is detected both at the X-ray jet termination peak and at the radio hot spot. The X-ray jet termination peak is found upstream of the radio hot spot by around 0farcs2 (~1.3 kpc) in the short projected jet of 3C 345. HST optical emission is seen in an arc-like structure coincident with the bright radio hot spot, which we propose is a sharp (apparent) jet bend instead of a terminal point, that crosses our line of sight and consequently has a higher Doppler beaming factor. A weak radio hot spot is indeed observed less than 1'' downstream of the bright radio hot spot, but has no optical or X-ray counterpart. By making use of the parsec-scale radio and the kiloparsec-scale radio/X-ray data, we derive constraints on the jet Lorentz factors (Γjet) and inclination angles (θ): for a constant jet speed from parsec to kiloparsec scales, we obtain a Γjet of ~70 for 0106+013 and ~40 for 3C 345. On relaxing this assumption, we derive a Γjet of ~2.5 for both the sources. Upper limits on θ of ~13° are obtained for the two quasars. Broadband (radio-optical-X-ray) spectral

  1. Chandra Characterization of X-ray Emission in the Young F-Star Binary System HD 113766

    CERN Document Server

    Lisse, C M; Wolk, S J; Günther, H M; Chen, C H; Grady, C A

    2016-01-01

    Using Chandra we have obtained imaging X-ray spectroscopy of the 10 to 16 Myr old F-star binary HD 113766. We individually resolve the binary components for the first time in the X-ray and find a total 0.3 to 2.0 keV luminosity of 2.2e29 erg/sec, consistent with previous RASS estimates. We find emission from the easternmost, infrared-bright, dusty member HD 113766A to be only 10% that of the western, infrared-faint member HD 113766B. There is no evidence for a 3rd late-type stellar or sub-stellar member of HD113766 with Lx > 6e25 erg s-1 within 2 arcmin of the binary pair. The ratio of the two stars Xray luminosity is consistent with their assignments as F2V and F6V by Pecaut et al. (2012). The emission is soft for both stars, kTApec = 0.30 to 0.50 keV, suggesting X-rays produced by stellar rotation and/or convection in young dynamos, but not accretion or outflow shocks which we rule out. A possible 2.8 +/- 0.15 (2{\\sigma}) hr modulation in the HD 113766B X-ray emission is seen, but at very low confidence and...

  2. Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray Observations of the Hyperactive T Tauri Star RY Tau

    CERN Document Server

    Skinner, Stephen L; Guedel, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    We present results of pointed X-ray observations of the accreting jet-driving T Tauri star RY Tau using Chandra and XMM-Newton. We obtained high-resolution grating spectra and excellent-quality CCD spectra and light curves with the objective of identifying the physical mechanisms underlying RY Tau's bright X-ray emission. Grating spectra reveal numerous emission lines spanning a broad range of temperature superimposed on a hot continuum. The X-ray emission measure distribution is dominated by very hot plasma at T_hot ~ 50 MK but higher temperatures were present during flares. A weaker cool plasma component is also present as revealed by low-temperature lines such as O VIII. X-ray light curves show complex variability consisting of short-duration (~hours) superhot flares accompanied by fluorescent Fe emission at 6.4 keV superimposed on a slowly-varying (~one day) component that may be tied to stellar rotation. The hot flaring component is undoubtedly of magnetic (e.g. coronal) origin. Soft and hard-band light ...

  3. High-Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy of SNR 1987A: Chandra LETG and HETG Observations in 2007

    CERN Document Server

    Zhekov, Svetozar A; Dewey, Daniel; Canizares, Claude R; Borkowski, Kazimierz J; Burrows, David N; Park, Sangwook

    2008-01-01

    We present an extended analysis of the deep Chandra LETG and HETG observations of the supernova remnant 1987A (SNR 1987A) carried out in 2007. The global fits to the grating spectra show that the temperature of the X-ray emitting plasma in the slower shocks in this system has remained stable for the last three years, while that in the faster shocks has decreased. This temperature evolution is confirmed by the first light curves of strong X-ray emission lines and their ratios. On the other hand, bulk gas velocities inferred from the X-ray line profiles are too low to account for the post-shock plasma temperatures inferred from spectral fits. This suggests that the X-ray emission comes from gas that has been shocked twice, first by the blast wave and again by shocks reflected from the inner ring of SNR 1987A. A new model that takes these considerations into account gives support to this physical picture.

  4. ISO investigates the nature of extremely-red hard X-ray sources responsible for the X-ray background

    CERN Document Server

    Franceschini, A; Césarsky, C J; Elbaz, D; Flores, H; Granato, G L; Franceschini, Alberto; Fadda, Dario; Cesarsky, Catherine; Elbaz, David; Flores, Hector; Granato, Gian Luigi

    2001-01-01

    We analyse very deep X-ray and mid-IR surveys in common areas of the Lockman Hole and the HDF North to study the sources of the X-ray background (XRB) and to test the standard obscured accretion paradigm. We detect with ISO a rich population of X-ray luminous sources with red optical colours, including a fraction identified with Extremely Red Objects (R-K > 5) and galaxies with SEDs typical of normal massive ellipticals or spirals at z ~ 1. The high 0.5-10 keV X-ray luminosities of these objects (1E43-1E45 erg/s) indicate that the ultimate energy source is gravitational accretion, while the X-ray to IR flux ratios and the X-ray spectral hardness show evidence of photoelectric absorption at low X-ray energies. An important hint on the physics comes from the mid-IR data at 6.7 and 15 um, well reproduced by model spectra of completely obscured quasars under standard assumptions and l.o.s. optical depths tau ~ 30-40. Other predictions of the standard XRB picture, like the distributions of intrinsic bolometric lum...

  5. High duty cycle inverse Compton scattering X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovodenko, A.; Agustsson, R.; Babzien, M.; Campese, T.; Fedurin, M.; Murokh, A.; Pogorelsky, I.; Polyanskiy, M.; Rosenzweig, J.; Sakai, Y.; Shaftan, T.; Swinson, C.

    2016-12-01

    Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) is an emerging compact X-ray source technology, where the small source size and high spectral brightness are of interest for multitude of applications. However, to satisfy the practical flux requirements, a high-repetition-rate ICS system needs to be developed. To this end, this paper reports the experimental demonstration of a high peak brightness ICS source operating in a burst mode at 40 MHz. A pulse train interaction has been achieved by recirculating a picosecond CO2 laser pulse inside an active optical cavity synchronized to the electron beam. The pulse train ICS performance has been characterized at 5- and 15- pulses per train and compared to a single pulse operation under the same operating conditions. With the observed near-linear X-ray photon yield gain due to recirculation, as well as noticeably higher operational reliability, the burst-mode ICS offers a great potential for practical scalability towards high duty cycles.

  6. Gravitational waves from remnants of ultraluminous X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Hopman, C; Hopman, Clovis; Zwart, Simon Portegies

    2005-01-01

    Ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) with X-ray luminosities larger than the Eddington luminosity of stellar mass objects may be powered by intermediate mass black holes (IBHs) of masses Mbh~10^3Msun. If IBHs form in young dense stellar clusters, they can be fed by Roche lobe overflow from a tidally captured massive (Ms>10Msun) stellar companion. After the donor leaves the main sequence it forms a compact remnant, which spirals in due to gravitational wave (GW) emission. We show that space based detectors such as the Light Interferometer Space Antenna are likely to detect several of these sources. GW sources stemming from this scenario have small eccentricities which give distinct GW signals. Detection of such a GW signal will unambiguously prove the existence of IBHs, and support the hypothesis that some ULXs are powered by IBHs with captured companions.

  7. The O VII X-ray forest toward Markarian 421: Consistency between XMM-Newton and Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Kaastra, J S; Den Herder, J W A; Paerels, F B S; De Plaa, J; Rasmussen, A P; De Vries, C P

    2006-01-01

    Recently the first detections of highly ionised gas associated with two Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM) filaments have been reported. The evidence is based on X-ray absorption lines due to O VII and other ions observed by Chandra towards the bright blazar Mrk 421. We investigate the robustness of this detection by a re-analysis of the original Chandra LETGS spectra, the analysis of a large set of XMM-Newton RGS spectra of Mrk 421, and additional Chandra observations. We address the reliability of individual spectral features belonging to the absorption components, and assess the significance of the detection of these components. We also use Monte Carlo simulations of spectra. We confirm the apparent strength of several features in the Chandra spectra, but demonstrate that they are statistically not significant. This decreased significance is due to the number of redshift trials that are made and that are not taken into account in the original discovery paper. Therefore these features must be attributed t...

  8. The Puzzling Detection of X-rays From Pluto by Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Lisse, C M; Wolk, S J; Bagenal, F; Stern, S A; Gladstone, G R; Cravens, T E; Hill, M E; Kollmann, P; Weaver, H A; Strobel, D F; Elliott, H A; McComas, D J; Binzel, R P; Snios, B T; Bhardwaj, A; Chutjian, A; Young, L A; Olkin, C B; Ennico, K A

    2016-01-01

    Using Chandra ACIS-S, we have obtained imaging Xray spectrophotometry of the Pluto system in support of the New Horizons flyby on 14 July 2015. 174 ksec of observations were obtained on 4 visits in Feb 2014 to Aug 2015. We measured a net signal of 6.8 counts and a noise level of 1.2 counts in a comoving 11 x 11 pixel box (100 x 100 R_Pluto) in the 0.31 to 0.60 keV passband for a detection at > 99.95 C.L. The Pluto photons do not match the background spectrum, are coincident with a 90% flux aperture comoving with Pluto, and are not sky source confused. The mean 0.31 to 0.60 keV Xray power from Pluto is 200 MW, in the midrange of Xray power levels seen for known solar system emission sources: auroral precipitation, solar Xray scattering, and charge exchange (CXE) between solar wind (SW) ions & atmospheric neutrals. We eliminate auroral effects as a source, as Pluto has no known magnetic field & the New Horizons Alice UV spectrometer detected no airglow from Pluto during the flyby. Nano-scale atmospheric...

  9. The Ultraluminous X-ray Sources near the Center of M82

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, A K H; Hsieh, P -Y; Mak, D S Y; Pun, C S J

    2007-01-01

    We report the discovery of a recurrent ultraluminous X-ray source(ULX), a background AGN, and a young supernova remnant near the center of the starburst galaxy M82. From a series of Chandra observations taken from 1999 to 2005, we found that the ULX first appeared in 1999 October. The source turned off in 2000 January, but later reappeared and has been active since then. The X-ray luminosity of this source varies from below the detection level (~ 2.5e38 erg/s) to its active state in between ~8e39 erg/s and 1.3e40 erg/s (in the 0.5-10 keV energy band) and shows unusual spectral changes. The X-ray spectra are best fitted with an absorbed power-law model with photon index ranging from 1.3 to 1.7. The spectra are similar to those Galactic black hole binary candidates seen in the low/hard state except that a very hard spectrum was seen in one of the observations. By comparing with near infrared images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope, the ULX is found to be located within a young star cluster. Radio imaging i...

  10. A Chandra observation of the long-duration X-ray transient KS 1731-260 in quiescence too cold a neutron star?

    CERN Document Server

    Wijnands, R; Markwardt, C B; Lewin, W H G; Van der Klis, M; Wijnands, Rudy; Miller, Jon M.; Markwardt, Craig; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Klis, Michiel van der

    2001-01-01

    After more than a decade of actively accreting at about a tenth of the Eddington critical mass accretion rate, the neutron-star X-ray transient KS 1731-260 returned to quiescence in early 2001. We present a Chandra/ACIS-S observation taken several months after this transition. We detected the source at an unabsorbed flux of ~2 x 10^{-13} erg/s/cm^2 (0.5-10 keV). For a distance of 7 kpc, this results in a 0.5-10 keV luminosity of ~1 x 10^{33} erg/s and a bolometric luminosity approximately twice that. The quiescent luminosity of KS 1731-260 is very similar to that of the other quiescent neutron star systems. However, if this quiescent X-ray luminosity is due to the cooling of the neutron star, this low luminosity may indicate that the source spends several hundreds of years in quiescence in between outbursts for the neutron star to cool. If true, then it might be the first such X-ray transient to be identified and a class of several hundred similar systems might be present in the Galaxy. Alternatively, enhance...

  11. Chandra and XMM-Newton Observations of the First Quasars: X-Rays from the Age of Cosmic Enlightenment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignali, C.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, D. P.; Anderson, S. F.; Fan, X.; Gunn, J. E.; Kaspi, S.; Richards, G. T.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2003-06-01

    We report on Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of a sample of 13 quasars at z~4.7-5.4 mostly taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The present sample complements previous X-ray studies of z>=4 quasars, in which the majority of the objects are optically more luminous and at lower redshifts. All but two of our quasars have been detected in the X-ray band, thus doubling the number of z>=4.8 X-ray-detected quasars. The two nondetections are likely to be due to a short exposure time (SDSSp J033829.31+002156.3) and to the presence of intrinsic absorption (SDSSp J173744.87+582829.5). We confirm and extend to the highest redshifts the presence of a correlation between AB1450(1+z) magnitude and soft X-ray flux for z>=4 quasars and the presence of a steeper optical-to-X-ray spectral energy distribution (parameterized by αox) for high-luminosity, high-redshift quasars than for lower luminosity, lower redshift quasars. The second effect is likely due to the known anticorrelation between αox and rest-frame 2500 Å luminosity, whose significance is confirmed via partial correlation analysis. The joint ~2.5-36 keV rest-frame spectrum of the z>4.8 SDSS quasars observed thus far by Chandra is well parameterized by a power law with photon index Γ=1.84+0.31-0.30; this photon index is consistent with those of z~0-3 quasars and that obtained from joint spectral fitting of z~4.1-4.5 optically luminous Palomar Digital Sky Survey quasars. No evidence for widespread intrinsic X-ray absorption has been found (NH<~4.0×1022 cm-2 on average at 90% confidence). We also obtained Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) photometric observations for eight of our target quasars. None of these shows significant (greater than 30%) optical variability over the time interval of a few years (in the observed frame) between the SDSS and HET observations.

  12. Laser-driven soft-X-ray undulator source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, Matthias

    2010-08-04

    The experimental results described in this thesis demonstrate the successful synergy between the research fields described above: the development of an undulator source driven by laser-plasma accelerated electron beams. First efforts in this new field have led to the production of radiation in the visible to infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum [Schlenvoigt et al., 2008]. In contrast to these early achievements, the experiment described here shows the successful production of laser-driven undulator radiation in the soft-X-ray range with a remarkable reproducibility. The source produced tunable, collimated beams with a wavelength of {proportional_to}17 nm from a compact setup. Undulator spectra were detected in {proportional_to}70% of consecutive driver-laser shots, which is a remarkable reproducibility for a first proof-of-concept demonstration using ultra-high intensity laser systems. This can be attributed to a stable electron acceleration scheme as well as to the first application of miniature magnetic quadrupole lenses with laseraccelerated beams. The lenses significantly reduce the electron beam divergence and its angular shot-to-shot fluctuations The setup of this experiment is the foundation of potential university-laboratory-sized, highly-brilliant hard X-ray sources. By increasing the electron energy to about 1 GeV, X-ray pulses with an expected duration of {proportional_to}10 fs and a photon energy of 1 keV could be produced in an almost identical arrangement. It can also be used as a testbed for the development of a free-electron laser of significantly smaller dimension than facilities based on conventional accelerators [Gruener et al., 2007]. Such compact sources have the potential for application in many fields of science. In addition, these developments could lead to ideal sources for ultrafast pump-probe experiments due to the perfect synchronization of the X-ray beam to the driver laser. (orig.)

  13. The Polarimeter for Relativistic Astrophysical X-ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahoda, Keith; Kallman, Timothy R.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Angelini, Lorella; Black, J. Kevin; Hill, Joanne E.; Jaeger, Theodore; Kaaret, Philip E.; Markwardt, Craig B.; Okajima, Takashi; Petre, Robert; Schnittman, Jeremy; Soong, Yang; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Tamagawa, Toru; Tawara, Yuzuru

    2016-07-01

    The Polarimeter for Relativistic Astrophysical X-ray Sources (PRAXyS) is one of three Small Explorer (SMEX) missions selected by NASA for Phase A study, with a launch date in 2020. The PRAXyS Observatory exploits grazing incidence X-ray mirrors and Time Projection Chamber Polarimeters capable of measuring the linear polarization of cosmic X-ray sources in the 2-10 keV band. PRAXyS combines well-characterized instruments with spacecraft rotation to ensure low systematic errors. The PRAXyS payload is developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center with the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Iowa, and RIKEN (JAXA) collaborating on the Polarimeter Assembly. The LEOStar-2 spacecraft bus is developed by Orbital ATK, which also supplies the extendable optical bench that enables the Observatory to be compatible with a Pegasus class launch vehicle. A nine month primary mission will provide sensitive observations of multiple black hole and neutron star sources, where theory predicts polarization is a strong diagnostic, as well as exploratory observations of other high energy sources. The primary mission data will be released to the community rapidly and a Guest Observer extended mission will be vigorously proposed.

  14. Kinematics of Compton backscattering x-ray source for angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumberg, L.N.

    1992-05-01

    Calculations of X-Ray production rates, energy spread, and spectrum of Compton-backscattered photons from a Free Electron Laser on an electron beam in a low energy (136-MeV) compact (8.5-m circumference) storage ring indicate that an X-Ray intensity of 34.6 10{sup 7} X-Ray photons per 0.5-mm {times} 0.5-mm pixel for Coronary Angiography near the 33.169-keV iodine K-absorption edge can be achieved in a 4-msec pulse within a scattering cone of 1-mrad half angle. This intensity, at 10-m from the photon-electron interaction point to the patient is about a factor of 10 larger than presently achieved from a 4.5-T superconducting wiggler source in the NSLS 2.5-GeV storage ring and over an area about 5 times larger. The 2.2-keV energy spread of the Compton-backscattered beam is, however, much larger than the 70-eV spread presently attained form the wiggler source and use of a monochromator. The beam spot at the 10-m interaction point-to-patient distance is 20-mm diameter; larger spots are attainable at larger distances but with a corresponding reduction in X-Ray flux. Such a facility could be an inexpensive clinical alternative to present methods of non-invasive Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA), small enough to be deployed in an urban medical center, and could have other medical, industrial and aerospace applications. Problems with the Compton backscattering source include laser beam heating of the mirror in the FEL oscillator optical cavity, achieving a large enough X-Ray beam spot at the patient, and obtaining radiation damping of the transverse oscillations and longitudinal emittance dilution of the storage ring electron beam resulting from photon-electron collisions without going to higher electron energy where the X-Ray energy spread becomes excessive for DSA. 38 refs.

  15. First Search for an X-ray -- Optical Reverberation Signal in an Ultraluminous X-ray Source

    CERN Document Server

    Pasham, Dheeraj R; Cenko, S Bradley; Trippe, Margaret L; Mushotzky, Richard F; Gandhi, Poshak

    2016-01-01

    Using simultaneous optical (VLT/FORS2) and X-ray (XMM-Newton) data of NGC 5408, we present the first ever attempt to search for a reverberation signal in an ultraluminous X-ray source (NGC 5408 X-1). The idea is similar to AGN broad line reverberation mapping where a lag measurement between the X-ray and the optical flux combined with a Keplerian velocity estimate should enable us to weigh the central compact object. We find that although NGC 5408 X-1's X-rays are variable on a timescale of a few hundred seconds (RMS of 9.0$\\pm$0.5%), the optical emission does not show any statistically significant variations. We set a 3$\\sigma$ upper limit on the RMS optical variability of 3.3%. The ratio of the X-ray to the optical variability is an indicator of X-ray reprocessing efficiency. In X-ray binaries, this ratio is roughly 5. Assuming a similar ratio for NGC 5408 X-1, the expected RMS optical variability is $\\approx$2% which is still a factor of roughly two lower than what was possible with the VLT observations in...

  16. A Flaring X-ray Source with an Halpha-bright Counterpart toward the SMC

    CERN Document Server

    Laycock, Silas

    2008-01-01

    We report the discovery of a flaring X-ray source with an optical counterpart with Halpha emission and red-excess, in the direction of the SMC. A 100 ksec X-ray observation with Chandra detected a flare lasting 6 ksec in the source CXO J005428.9-723107. The X-ray spectrum during the flare was consistent with a thermal plasma of temperature kT=2.5 keV. In quiescence following the flare the spectrum was softer (kT= 0.4 keV). Timing analysis did not reveal any significant periodicities or QPOs. Optical images taken with the Magellan-Baade 6.5m telescope show a single star in the (0.9") error circle. This star has apparent magnitude V=19.17, exhibits enhanced Halpha emission (Halpha - r = -0.88), and has a large proper motion. Alternative explanations are explored, leading to identification as a relatively nearby (Galactic) coronally active star of the BY Draconis class.

  17. The optical counterpart of the supersoft X-ray source r3-8 in M31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orio, M.; Luna, G. J. M.; Kotulla, R.; Gallagher, J. S. G.

    2015-10-01

    On behalf of a larger collaboration we announce that we have obtained spectra of the M31 supersoft X-ray source defined as r3-8 in the Chandra catalogs (see Chiosi et al. 2014, MNRAS 443, 1821, and references therein) using GMOS and the B600 grating at Gemini North, in the 4150-7100 Angstrom range, on 2015/9/9.

  18. A Joint Chandra and Swift View of the 2015 X-Ray Dust Scattering Echo of V404 Cygni

    CERN Document Server

    Heinz, S; Smith, R; Brandt, W N; Jonker, P G; Plotkin, R M; Neilsen, J

    2016-01-01

    We present a combined analysis of the Chandra and Swift observations of the 2015 X-ray echo of V404 Cygni. Using stacking analysis, we identify eight separate rings in the echo. We reconstruct the soft X-ray lightcurve of the June 2015 outburst using the high-resolution Chandra images and cross-correlations of the radial intensity profiles, indicating that about 70% of the outburst fluence occurred during the bright flare at the end of the outburst on MJD 57199.8.By deconvolving the intensity profiles with the reconstructed outburst lightcurve, we show that the rings correspond to eight separate dust concentrations with precise distance determinations. We further show that the column density of the clouds varies significantly across the field of view, with the centroid of most of the clouds shifted toward the Galactic plane, relative to the position of V404 Cyg, invalidating the assumption of uniform cloud column typically made in attempts to constrain dust properties from light echoes. We present a new XSPEC...

  19. The Hot Interstellar Medium of Normal Elliptical Galaxies. I. A Chandra Gas Gallery and Comparison of X-ray and Optical Morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Diehl, S; Diehl, Steven; Statler, Thomas S.

    2006-01-01

    We present an X-ray analysis of 54 normal elliptical galaxies in the Chandra archive and isolate their hot gas component from the contaminating point source emission. This makes it possible to conduct, for the first time, a complete morphological analysis on the gas alone. A comparison with optical DSS images and published optical photometry shows that the hot gas morphology has surprisingly little in common with the shape of the stellar distribution. In particular, we observe no correlation between optical and X-ray ellipticity, as would be expected if the gas had settled into hydrostatic equilibrium with the underlying gravitational potential. In fact, the observed X-ray ellipticity exceeds the optical ellipticity in many cases. We exclude rotational support as the dominant factor to produce these high ellipticities. Instead, we find that the gas appears to be very disturbed and that the general perception of normal elliptical galaxies hosting calm, hydrostatic gas has to be revised. We conclude that, even ...

  20. Ultraluminous X-ray Sources in Interacting Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Swartz, Douglas A

    2009-01-01

    I give a brief review of how X-rays from nearby galaxies are used as direct tracers of recent star formation. This leads to the conclusion that it is the most luminous point-like sources that are associated with star formation and that the majority of these are high-mass X-ray binaries.I then discuss a recent study that shows that ULXs are preferentially found in regions as young as or younger than typical HII regions in their host galaxies. Finally, I describe a new study that attempts to determine the maximum luminosity of ULXs in the local universe by searching for them in interacting galaxies where the star formation rate is high.

  1. Reionization by UV or X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Baek, S; Di Matteo, P; Revaz, Y; Combes, F

    2010-01-01

    We present simulations of the 21-cm signal during the Epoch of reionization. We focus on modeling properly the absorption regime in the presence of inhomogeneous Wouthuysen-Field effect and X-ray heating. We have run radiative transfer simulations for three bands in the source spectrum (Lyman, UV and X-ray) in order to fully account for these processes. We find that the brightness temperature fluctuation of the 21 cm signal has an amplitude larger than 100 mK during the early reionization, up to 10 times higher than the typical amplitude of a few 10 mK obtained during the later emission phase. More importantly, we find that even a rather high contribution from QSO-like sources only damps the absorption regime without erasing it. Heating the IGM with X-ray takes time. Our results show that observations of the early reionization will probably benefit from a higher signal-to-noise value than during later stages. Analyzing the statistical properties of the signal (power spectrum and PDF) we found three diagnostic...

  2. Chandra Characterization of X-Ray Emission in the Young F-Star Binary System HD 113766

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, C. M.; Christian, D. J.; Wolk, S. J.; Günther, H. M.; Chen, C. H.; Grady, C. A.

    2017-02-01

    Using Chandra, we have obtained imaging X-ray spectroscopy of the 10–16 Myr old F-star binary HD 113766. We individually resolve the 1.″4 separation binary components for the first time in the X-ray and find a total 0.3–2.0 keV luminosity of 2.2 × 1029 erg s‑1, consistent with previous RASS estimates. We find emission from the easternmost, infrared-bright, dusty member HD 113766A to be only ∼10% that of the western, infrared-faint member HD 113766B. There is no evidence for a 3rd late-type stellar or substellar member of HD 113766 with Lx > 6 × 1025 erg s‑1 within 2‧ of the binary pair. The ratio of the two stars’ X-ray luminosity is consistent with their assignments as F2V and F6V by Pecaut et al. The emission is soft for both stars, kTApec = 0.30–0.50 keV, suggesting X-rays produced by stellar rotation and/or convection in young dynamos, but not accretion or outflow shocks, which we rule out. A possible 2.8 ± 0.15 (2σ) hr modulation in the HD 113766B X-ray emission is seen, but at very low confidence and of unknown provenance. Stellar wind drag models corresponding to Lx ∼ 2 × 1029 erg s‑1 argue for a 1 mm dust particle lifetime around HD 113766B of only ∼90,0000 years, suggesting that dust around HD 113766B is quickly removed, whereas 1 mm sized dust around HD 113766A can survive for >1.5 × 106 years. At 1028–1029 erg s‑1 X-ray luminosity, astrobiologically important effects, like dust warming and X-ray photolytic organic synthesis, are likely for any circumstellar material in the HD 113766 systems.

  3. X-ray outflows of active galactic nuclei warm absorbers: A 900 ks Chandra simulated spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Ramirez-Velasquez, J M

    2016-01-01

    We report on the performance of the statistical, X-ray absorption lines identification procedure XLINE-ID. As illustration, it is used to estimate the time averaged gas density $n_H(r)$ of a representative AGN's warm absorber ($T\\approx 10^5$~K) X-ray simulated spectrum. The method relies on three key ingredients: (1) a well established emission continuum level; (2) a robust grid of photoionisation models spanning several orders of magnitude in gas density ($n_H$), plasma column density ($N_H$), and in ionization states; (3) theoretical curves of growth for a large set of atomic lines. By comparing theoretical and observed equivalent widths of a large set of lines, spanning highly ionized charge states from O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar, and the Fe L-shell and K-shell, we are able to infer the location of the X-ray warm absorber.

  4. Cross-matching within the Chandra Source Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rots, Arnold H.; Burke, Douglas J.; Civano, Francesca; Hain, Roger; Nguyen, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Cross-matching among overlapping source detections in the development of the Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) presents considerable challenges, since the Point Spread Function (PSF) of the Chandra X-ray Observatory varies significantly over the field of view. For the production of the second release of the CSC we have developed a cross-match tool that is based on the Bayesian algorithms by Budavari, Heinis, and Szalay (ApJ 679, 301 and 705, 739), making use of the error ellipses for the derived positions of the detections.However, calculating match probabilities only on the basis of error ellipses breaks down when the PSFs are significantly different. This is an issue that is not commonly addressed in cross-match tools. We have applied a satisfactory modification to the algorithm that, although not perfect, ameliorates the issue for the vast majority of such cases.A separate issue is that as the number of overlapping detections increases, the number of matches to be considered increases at an alarming rate, requiring procedural adjustments to ensure that the cross-matching finishes within a Hubble time.We intend to make the tool available as a general purpose cross-match engine for calculating match probabilities between sources in multiple catalogs simultaneously.This work has been supported by NASA under contract NAS 8-03060 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for operation of the Chandra X-ray Center.

  5. The spatial distribution of X-ray selected AGN in the Chandra deep fields: a theoretical perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Marulli, Federico; Branchini, Enzo; Gilli, Roberto; Moscardini, Lauro; Springel, Volker

    2009-01-01

    We study the spatial distribution of X-ray selected AGN in the framework of hierarchical co-evolution of supermassive black holes and their host galaxies and dark matter haloes. To this end, we have applied the model developed by Croton et al.(2006), De Lucia & Blaizot(2007) and Marulli et al.(2008) to the output of the Millennium Run and obtained hundreds of realizations of past light-cones from which we have extracted realistic mock AGN catalogues that mimic the Chandra deep fields. We find that the model AGN number counts are in fair agreement with observations, except at fluxes <1e-15 erg/cm^2/s. The spatial two-point correlation function predicted by the model is well described by a power-law relation out to 20 Mpc/h, in close agreement with observations. Our model matches the correlation length r_0 of AGN in the Chandra Deep Field North but underestimates it in the Chandra Deep Field South. When fixing the slope to gamma = 1.4, as in Gilli et al. (2005), the statistical significance of the mismat...

  6. Deterministic Chaos in the X-ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzedzielski, M.; Sukova, P.; Janiuk, A.

    2015-12-01

    Hardly any of the observed black hole accretion disks in X-ray binaries and active galaxies shows constant flux. When the local stochastic variations of the disk occur at specific regions where a resonant behaviour takes place, there appear the quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). If the global structure of the flow and its non-linear hydrodynamics affects the fluctuations, the variability is chaotic in the sense of deterministic chaos. Our aim is to solve a problem of the stochastic versus deterministic nature of the black hole binary variabilities. We use both observational and analytic methods. We use the recurrence analysis and we study the occurence of long diagonal lines in the recurrence plot of observed data series and compare it to the surrogate series. We analyze here the data of two X-ray binaries - XTE J1550-564 and GX 339-4 observed by Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. In these sources, the non-linear variability is expected because of the global conditions (such as the mean accretion rate) leading to the possible instability of an accretion disk. The thermal-viscous instability and fluctuations around the fixed-point solution occurs at high accretion rate, when the radiation pressure gives dominant contribution to the stress tensor.

  7. Deterministic chaos in the X-Ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Grzedzielski, M; Janiuk, A

    2015-01-01

    Hardly any of the observed black hole accretion disks in X-Ray binaries and active galaxies shows constant flux. When the local stochastic variations of the disk occur at specific regions where a resonant behaviour takes place, there appear the Quasi-Periodic Oscillations (QPOs). If the global structure of the flow and its non-linear hydrodynamics affects the fluctuations, the variability is chaotic in the sense of deterministic chaos. Our aim is to solve a problem of the stochastic versus deterministic nature of the black hole binaries vari- ability. We use both observational and analytic methods. We use the recurrence analysis and we study the occurence of long diagonal lines in the recurrence plot of observed data series and compare it to the sur- rogate series. We analyze here the data of two X-Ray binaries - XTE J1550-564, and GX 339-4 observed by Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. In these sources, the non-linear variability is expected because of the global conditions (such as the mean accretion rate) leadin...

  8. Compact X-ray source based on Compton backscattering

    CERN Document Server

    Bulyak, E V; Zelinsky, A; Karnaukhov, I; Kononenko, S; Lapshin, V G; Mytsykov, A; Telegin, Yu P; Khodyachikh, A; Shcherbakov, A; Molodkin, V; Nemoshkalenko, V; Shpak, A

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility study of an intense X-ray source based on the interaction between the electron beam in a compact storage ring and the laser pulse accumulated in an optical resonator is carried out. We propose to reconstruct the 160 MeV electron storage ring N-100, which was shutdown several years ago. A new magnetic lattice will provide a transverse of electron beam size of approx 35 mu m at the point of electron beam-laser beam interaction. The proposed facility is to generate X-ray beams of intensity approx 2.6x10 sup 1 sup 4 s sup - sup 1 and spectral brightness approx 10 sup 1 sup 2 phot/0.1%bw/s/mm sup 2 /mrad sup 2 in the energy range from 10 keV up to 0.5 MeV. These X-ray beam parameters meet the requirements for most of technological and scientific applications. Besides, we plan to use the new facility for studying the laser cooling effect.

  9. An Observational Diagnostic for Ultraluminous X-Ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Kalogera, V; Ivanova, N; King, A R

    2004-01-01

    We consider observational tests for the nature of Ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs). These must distinguish between thermal-timescale mass transfer on to stellar-mass black holes leading to anisotropic X-ray emission, and accretion on to intermediate-mass black holes. We suggest that long-term transient behavior via the thermal-viscous disk instability could discriminate between these two possibilities for ULXs in regions of young stellar populations. Thermal-timescale mass transfer generally produces stable disks and persistent X-ray emission. In contrast, mass transfer from massive stars to black holes produces unstable disks and thus transient behavior, provided that the black hole mass exceeds some minimum value. This minimum mass depends primarily on the donor mass and evolutionary state. We show that it exceeds 50 solar masses for a large fraction (greater than 90%) of the mass-transfer lifetime for the most likely donors in young clusters. Thus if long-term monitoring reveals a large transient fractio...

  10. Deeper Chandra Follow-up of Cygnus TeV Source Perpetuates Mystery

    CERN Document Server

    Butt, Y; Benaglia, P; Combi, J; Dame, T; Miniati, F; Romero, G; Butt, Yousaf; Drake, Jeremy; Benaglia, Paula; Combi, Jorge; Dame, Thomas; Miniati, Francesco; Romero, Gustavo

    2005-01-01

    A 50 ksec Chandra observation of the unidentified TeV source in Cygnus reported by the HEGRA collaboration reveals no obvious X-ray counterpart(s). 220 Point-like X-ray sources are detected within or nearby the extended TeV J2032+4130 source region, of which at least 30 are massive stars and 6 are known radio emitters. Based on the low X-ray and radio emissivity we favor a nucleonic rather than electronic origin of the very high energy gamma-ray flux and suspect it is related to the very massive and extremely powerful Cygnus OB2 stellar association.

  11. Properties and Applications of Laser Generated X-Ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R F; Key, M H

    2002-02-25

    The rapid development of laser technology and related progress in research using lasers is shifting the boundaries where laser based sources are preferred over other light sources particularly in the XUV and x-ray spectral region. Laser based sources have exceptional capability for short pulse and high brightness and with improvements in high repetition rate pulsed operation, such sources are also becoming more interesting for their average power capability. This study presents an evaluation of the current capabilities and near term future potential of laser based light sources and summarizes, for the purpose of comparison, the characteristics and near term prospects of sources based on synchrotron radiation and free electron lasers. Conclusions are drawn on areas where the development of laser based sources is most promising and competitive in terms of applications potential.

  12. Uhuru observations of 4U 1608-52 - The 'steady' X-ray source associated with the X-ray burst source in Norma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tananbaum, H.; Chaisson, L. J.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.; Matilsky, T. A.

    1976-01-01

    Data are presented for the X-ray source 4U 1608-52, summarizing its light curve, location, and spectral parameters. Evidence is presented showing that this source is the 'steady' X-ray counterpart of the X-ray burst source in Norma. The spectrum of the 'steady' source is compared with the spectrum observed during two bursts, and it is noted that there is substantially more low-energy absorption during the bursts. The 'steady' source spectral data are used to examine the optical data, and it is concluded that if the X-ray spectrum is thermal, then a globular-cluster counterpart probably would have been detected (whereas none has been). Further X-ray and optical observations are suggested for this source, since an optical identification may be central in determining whether all X-ray bursts have a common origin and if this origin requires a globular-cluster environment.

  13. A Compact X-ray Source in the Radio PWN G141.2+5.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Stephen P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.

    2015-08-01

    We report the results of a 50 ks Chandra observation of the recently discovered radio object G141.2+5.0, presumed to be a pulsar-wind nebula (PWN) (Kothes et al. 2014). We find a faint unresolved X-ray source coincident with the central peak of radio emission. Spectral fits to the 241 counts show that an absorbed power-law describes the data well, with absorbing column NH = 4.8 (2.6, 7.3) x 1021 cm-2 and photon index Γ = 1.6 (1.2, 2.1). (A black-body fit is slightly less favored statistically, and has an implausibly high temperature, kT = 0.9 keV.) For a distance of 4 kpc, the unabsorbed luminosity between 0.5 and 8 keV is 1.8 (1.1, 3.0) x 1032 erg s-1. No extended emission is seen; a very conservative upper limit to Lx (nebula) is about the same luminosity as that observed from the point source. The radio luminosity is about 3 x 1030 erg s-1 the X-ray upper limit then gives Lx/Lr < 700, satisfied by almost all pulsar-wind nebulae. Both Lx and Γ are quite typical of pulsars in PWNe. The steep radio spectrum (α ~ -0.7), if continued to the X-ray without a break, predicts Lx (nebula) ~ 1 x 1033 erg s-1, so additional spectral steepening between radio and X-rays is required, as is true of all known PWNe. The high Galactic latitude gives a z-distance of 350 pc above the Galactic plane, quite unusual for a Population I object.

  14. Chandra Cluster Cosmology Project. II. Samples and X-Ray Data Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikhlinin, A.; Burenin, R. A.; Ebeling, H.;

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the measurements of the galaxy cluster mass functions at z ≈ 0.05 and z ≈ 0.5 using high-quality Chandra observations of samples derived from the ROSAT PSPC All-Sky and 400 deg2 surveys. We provide a full reference for the data analysis procedures, present updated calibration of relati...

  15. The Long-term Variability of the X-Ray Sources in NGC 6946 and NGC 4485/4490

    CERN Document Server

    Fridriksson, Joel K; Lewin, Walter H G; Kong, Albert K H; Pooley, David

    2008-01-01

    We analyze data from five Chandra observations of the spiral galaxy NGC 6946, and from three Chandra observations of the irregular/spiral interacting galaxy pair NGC 4485/4490, with an emphasis on investigating the long-term variability exhibited by the source populations. We detect 90 point sources coincident with NGC 6946 down to luminosities of a few times 10^36 erg/s, and 38 sources coincident with NGC 4485/90 down to a luminosity of ~1x10^37 erg/s. Twenty-five (fifteen) sources in NGC 6946 (NGC 4485/90) exhibit long-term (i.e., weeks to years) variability in luminosity; eleven (four) are transient candidates. The single ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) in NGC 6946 and all but one of the eight ULXs in NGC 4485/90 exhibit long-term flux variability. Two of the ULXs in NGC 4485/90 have not been identified before as ultraluminous sources. The widespread variability in both systems is indicative of the populations being dominated by X-ray binaries, and this is supported by the X-ray colors of the sources. The...

  16. Automatic classification of time-variable X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Lo, Kitty K; Murphy, Tara; Gaensler, B M

    2014-01-01

    To maximize the discovery potential of future synoptic surveys, especially in the field of transient science, it will be necessary to use automatic classification to identify some of the astronomical sources. The data mining technique of supervised classification is suitable for this problem. Here, we present a supervised learning method to automatically classify variable X-ray sources in the second \\textit{XMM-Newton} serendipitous source catalog (2XMMi-DR2). Random Forest is our classifier of choice since it is one of the most accurate learning algorithms available. Our training set consists of 873 variable sources and their features are derived from time series, spectra, and other multi-wavelength contextual information. The 10-fold cross validation accuracy of the training data is ${\\sim}$97% on a seven-class data set. We applied the trained classification model to 411 unknown variable 2XMM sources to produce a probabilistically classified catalog. Using the classification margin and the Random Forest der...

  17. Flat Field Anomalies in an X-ray CCD Camera Measured Using a Manson X-ray Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. J. Haugh and M. B. Schneider

    2008-10-31

    The Static X-ray Imager (SXI) is a diagnostic used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the position of the X-rays produced by lasers hitting a gold foil target. The intensity distribution taken by the SXI camera during a NIF shot is used to determine how accurately NIF can aim laser beams. This is critical to proper NIF operation. Imagers are located at the top and the bottom of the NIF target chamber. The CCD chip is an X-ray sensitive silicon sensor, with a large format array (2k x 2k), 24 μm square pixels, and 15 μm thick. A multi-anode Manson X-ray source, operating up to 10kV and 10W, was used to characterize and calibrate the imagers. The output beam is heavily filtered to narrow the spectral beam width, giving a typical resolution E/ΔE≈10. The X-ray beam intensity was measured using an absolute photodiode that has accuracy better than 1% up to the Si K edge and better than 5% at higher energies. The X-ray beam provides full CCD illumination and is flat, within ±1% maximum to minimum. The spectral efficiency was measured at 10 energy bands ranging from 930 eV to 8470 eV. We observed an energy dependent pixel sensitivity variation that showed continuous change over a large portion of the CCD. The maximum sensitivity variation occurred at 8470 eV. The geometric pattern did not change at lower energies, but the maximum contrast decreased and was not observable below 4 keV. We were also able to observe debris, damage, and surface defects on the CCD chip. The Manson source is a powerful tool for characterizing the imaging errors of an X-ray CCD imager. These errors are quite different from those found in a visible CCD imager.

  18. Another intermediate mass black hole in a starburst galaxy? The luminous X-ray source in NGC 3628 reappears

    CERN Document Server

    Strickland, D K; Heckman, T M; Weaver, K A; Dahlem, M; Stevens, I R

    2001-01-01

    In a 52 ks-long Chandra ACIS-S observation of the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 3628, obtained to study the starburst-driven outflow from this galaxy, we have detected a very luminous (L_X = 1.1e40 erg/s in the 0.3-8.0 keV energy band) point source located at least 20 arcsec (~970 pc) from the nucleus of the galaxy. No radio, optical or near-IR counterpart to this source has been found. This is most probably the reappearance of the strongly-variable X-ray-luminous source discovered by Dahlem et al (1995), which faded by a factor >27 between December 1991 and March 1994 (at which point it had faded below the detection limit in a ROSAT HRI observation). This source is clearly a member of an enigmatic class of X-ray sources that are considerably more luminous than conventional X-ray binaries but less luminous than AGN, and which are not found at the dynamical center of the host galaxy. The Chandra spectrum is best-fit by an absorbed power law model with a photon index of Gamma = 1.8+/-0.2, similar to that seen in ...

  19. Patchy Accretion Disks in Ultraluminous X-ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, J M; Barret, D; Harrison, F A; Fabian, A C; Webb, N A; Walton, D J; Rana, V

    2014-01-01

    The X-ray spectra of the most extreme ultra-luminous X-ray sources -- those with L > 1 E+40 erg/s -- remain something of a mystery. Spectral roll-over in the 5-10 keV band was originally detected in in the deepest XMM-Newton observations of the brightest sources; this is confirmed in subsequent NuSTAR spectra. This emission can be modeled via Comptonization, but with low electron temperatures (kT_e ~ 2 keV) and high optical depths (tau ~ 10) that pose numerous difficulties. Moreover, evidence of cooler thermal emission that can be fit with thin disk models persists, even in fits to joint XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observations. Using NGC 1313 X-1 as a test case, we show that a patchy disk with a multiple temperature profile may provide an excellent description of such spectra. In principle, a number of patches within a cool disk might emit over a range of temperatures, but the data only require a two-temperature profile plus standard Comptonization, or three distinct blackbody components. A mechanism such as the p...

  20. NuSTAR Observations of the Compton-Thick Active Galactic Nucleus and Ultraluminous X-Ray Source Candidate in NGC 5643

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Annuar, A.; Gandhi, P.; Alexander, D. M.;

    2015-01-01

    We present two Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) observations of the local Seyfert 2 active galactic nucleus (AGN) and an ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) candidate in NGC 5643. Together with archival data from Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Swift-BAT, we perform a high-quality broadband s...

  1. Two-dimensional X-ray focusing by off-axis grazing incidence phase Fresnel zone plate on the laboratory X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, Maxim; Fakhrtdinov, Rashid; Irzhak, Dmitry; Firsov, Alexander; Firsov, Anatoly; Svintsov, Alexander; Erko, Alexey; Roshchupkin, Dmitry

    2017-02-01

    The results of studying a two-dimensional X-ray focusing by an off-axis grazing incidence phase Fresnel zone plate on the laboratory X-ray source are presented. This optics enables obtaining a focal spot of 2 μm on the laboratory X-ray source with a focusing efficiency of 30% at a high signal/noise ratio.

  2. X-ray calibration of SZ scaling relations with the ACCEPT catalogue of galaxy clusters observed by Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Comis, B; Conte, A; Lamagna, L; De Gregori, S

    2011-01-01

    We explore the scaling relation between the flux of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect and the total mass of galaxy clusters using already reduced Chandra X-ray data present in the ACCEPT (Archive of Chandra Cluster Entropy Profile Tables) catalogue. The analysis is conducted over a sample of 226 objects, examining the relatively small scale corresponding to a cluster overdensity equal to 2500 times the critical density of the background universe, at which the total masses have been calculated exploiting the hydrostatic equilibrium hypothesis. Core entropy (K0) is strongly correlated with the central cooling time, and is therefore used to identify cooling-core (CC) objects in our sample. Our results confirm the self-similarity of the scaling relation between the integrated Comptonization parameter (Y) and the cluster mass, for both CC and NCC (non-cooling-core) clusters. The consistency of our calibration with recent ones has been checked, with further support for Y as a good mass proxy. We also investigate t...

  3. Chandra Survey of Nearby Highly-Inclined Disk Galaxies I: X-ray Measurements of Galactic Coronae

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jiang-Tao

    2012-01-01

    We present a systematical analysis of the Chandra observations of 53 nearby highly-inclined (i>60 degree) disk galaxies to study the coronae around them. This sample covers a broad range of galaxy properties: e.g., about three orders of magnitude in the SFR and more than two orders of magnitude in the stellar mass. The Chandra observations of the diffuse soft X-ray emission from 20 of these galaxies are presented for the first time. The data are reduced in a uniform manner, including the excision/subtraction of both resolved and unresolved stellar contributions. Various coronal properties, such as the scale height and luminosity, are characterized for all the sample galaxies. For galaxies with high enough counting statistics, we also examine the thermal and chemical states of the coronal gas. We note on galaxies with distinct multi-wavelength characteristics which may affect the coronal properties. The uniformly processed images, spectra, and brightness profiles, as well as the inferred hot gas parameters, fo...

  4. Modification of the TASMIP x-ray spectral model for the simulation of microfocus x-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisniega, A.; Vaquero, J. J., E-mail: juanjose.vaquero@uc3m.es [Departamento de Bioingeniería e Ingeniería Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Madrid ES28911 (Spain); Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón, Madrid ES28007 (Spain); Desco, M. [Departamento de Bioingeniería e Ingeniería Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Madrid ES28911 (Spain); Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón, Madrid ES28007 (Spain); Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental (CIBERSAM), Madrid ES28029 (Spain)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The availability of accurate and simple models for the estimation of x-ray spectra is of great importance for system simulation, optimization, or inclusion of photon energy information into data processing. There is a variety of publicly available tools for estimation of x-ray spectra in radiology and mammography. However, most of these models cannot be used directly for modeling microfocus x-ray sources due to differences in inherent filtration, energy range and/or anode material. For this reason the authors propose in this work a new model for the simulation of microfocus spectra based on existing models for mammography and radiology, modified to compensate for the effects of inherent filtration and energy range. Methods: The authors used the radiology and mammography versions of an existing empirical model [tungsten anode spectral model interpolating polynomials (TASMIP)] as the basis of the microfocus model. First, the authors estimated the inherent filtration included in the radiology model by comparing the shape of the spectra with spectra from the mammography model. Afterwards, the authors built a unified spectra dataset by combining both models and, finally, they estimated the parameters of the new version of TASMIP for microfocus sources by calibrating against experimental exposure data from a microfocus x-ray source. The model was validated by comparing estimated and experimental exposure and attenuation data for different attenuating materials and x-ray beam peak energy values, using two different x-ray tubes. Results: Inherent filtration for the radiology spectra from TASMIP was found to be equivalent to 1.68 mm Al, as compared to spectra obtained from the mammography model. To match the experimentally measured exposure data the combined dataset required to apply a negative filtration of about 0.21 mm Al and an anode roughness of 0.003 mm W. The validation of the model against real acquired data showed errors in exposure and attenuation in

  5. Different types of ultraluminous X-ray sources in NGC 4631

    CERN Document Server

    Soria, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    We have re-examined the most luminous X-ray sources in the starburst galaxy NGC 4631, using XMM-Newton, Chandra and ROSAT data. The most interesting source is a highly variable supersoft ULX. We suggest that its bolometric luminosity ~ a few 10^{39} erg/s in the high/supersoft state: this is an order of magnitude lower than estimated in previous studies, thus reducing the need for extreme or exotic scenarios. Moreover, we find that this source was in a non-canonical low/soft (kT ~ 0.1-0.3 keV) state during the Chandra observation. By comparing the high and low state, we argue that the spectral properties may not be consistent with the expected behaviour of an accreting intermediate-mass black hole. We suggest that recurrent super-Eddington outbursts with photospheric expansion from a massive white dwarf (M_{wd} >~ 1.3 M_{sun}), powered by non-steady nuclear burning, may be a viable possibility, in alternative to the previously proposed scenario of a super-Eddington outflow from an accreting stellar-mass black...

  6. LIGHT SOURCE: Spot size diagnostics for flash radiographic X-ray sources at LAPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng-Gang; Li, Qin; Shi, Jin-Shui; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2009-06-01

    Spot size is one of the parameters to characterize the performance of a radiographic X-ray source. It determines the degree of blurring due to magnification directly. In recent years, a variety of measurement methods have been used to diagnose X-ray spot size at Laboratory of Accelerator Physics and Application (LAPA). Computer simulations and experiments showed that using a rolled-edge to measure the spot size are more accurate, and the intensity distribution of X-ray source was obtained by a device with a square aperture. Experimental and simulation results on a flash X-ray source at our laboratory are presented and discussed in this paper. In addition, a new method for time resolved diagnostics of X-ray spot size is introduced too.

  7. Chilled disks in ultraluminous X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Roberto; Kuncic, Zdenka; Gonçalves, Anabela C.

    2007-04-01

    The "soft-excess" component fitted to the X-ray spectra of many ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) remains a controversial finding, which may reveal fundamental information either on the black hole (BH) mass or on the state of the accretion flow. In the simplest model, it was explained as thermal emission from a cool accretion disk around an intermediate-mass BH (about 1000 solar masses). We argue that this scenario is highly implausible, and discuss and compare the two most likely alternatives. 1) The soft-excess does come from a cool disk; however, the temperature is low not because of a high BH mass but because most of the accretion power is drained from the inner disk via magnetic torques, and channelled into jets and outflows ("chilled disk" scenario). Using a phenomenological model, we infer that ULXs contain BHs of about 50 solar masses accreting gas at about 10 times their Eddington rate. 2) The soft excess is in fact a soft deficit, if the power-law continuum is properly fitted. Such broad absorption features are caused by smeared absorption lines in fast, highly ionized outflows. This scenario has already been successfully applied to the soft excess in AGN. If so, this spectral feature reveals details of disk outflows,but is unrelated to the BH mass.

  8. X-ray detectors at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaj, Gabriel; Caragiulo, Pietro; Carini, Gabriella; Carron, Sebastian; Dragone, Angelo; Freytag, Dietrich; Haller, Gunther; Hart, Philip; Hasi, Jasmine; Herbst, Ryan; Herrmann, Sven; Kenney, Chris; Markovic, Bojan; Nishimura, Kurtis; Osier, Shawn; Pines, Jack; Reese, Benjamin; Segal, Julie; Tomada, Astrid; Weaver, Matt

    2015-05-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) present new challenges for camera development compared with conventional light sources. At SLAC a variety of technologies are being used to match the demands of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and to support a wide range of scientific applications. In this paper an overview of X-ray detector design requirements at FELs is presented and the various cameras in use at SLAC are described for the benefit of users planning experiments or analysts looking at data. Features and operation of the CSPAD camera, which is currently deployed at LCLS, are discussed, and the ePix family, a new generation of cameras under development at SLAC, is introduced.

  9. X-ray Lighthouses of the High-Redshift Universe. II. Further Snapshot Observations of the Most Luminous z>4 Quasars with Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Vignali, C; Schneider, D P; Kaspi, S

    2005-01-01

    We report on Chandra observations of a sample of 11 optically luminous (Mb4 quasars known and hence represent ideal witnesses of the end of the "dark age ''. Nine quasars are detected by Chandra, with ~2-57 counts in the observed 0.5-8 keV band. These detections increase the number of X-ray detected AGN at z>4 to ~90; overall, Chandra has detected ~85% of the high-redshift quasars observed with snapshot (few kilosecond) observations. PSS 1506+5220, one of the two X-ray undetected quasars, displays a number of notable features in its rest-frame ultraviolet spectrum, the most prominent being broad, deep SiIV and CIV absorption lines. The average optical-to-X-ray spectral index for the present sample (=-1.88+/-0.05) is steeper than that typically found for z>4 quasars but consistent with the expected value from the known dependence of this spectral index on quasar luminosity. We present joint X-ray spectral fitting for a sample of 48 radio-quiet quasars in the redshift range 3.99-6.28 for which Chandra observati...

  10. Time Variability and Luminosity of X-ray Sources of Face-on Spiral Galaxy NGC 1232

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantua, Oscar; Rucas, Tyler; Singh, Pranjal; Schlegel, Eric M.

    2017-01-01

    The ACIS detector (Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer) onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory has imaged the face-on spiral NGC 1232 over six epochs for a total exposure of ~250 ksec. We describe each observation as well as the merged data set. Each exposure contains ~50 individual sources. We focus on the time variability and luminosity distributions of the sources. We also describe our search for diffuse emission as well as our search for evidence for a reported collision with a dwarf galaxy. Finally, we compare the merged data set and the detected sources with other wavebands.

  11. Sharp Chandra View of ROSAT All-Sky Survey Bright Sources: I. Improvement of Positional Accuracy

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Shuang; Liu, Jifeng

    2016-01-01

    The ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) represents one of the most complete and sensitive soft X-ray all-sky surveys to date. However, the deficient positional accuracy of the RASS Bright Source Catalog (BSC) and subsequent lack of firm optical identifications affect the multi-wavelength studies of X-ray sources. The widely used positional errors $\\sigma_{pos}$ based on the Tycho Stars Catalog (Tycho-1) have previously been applied for identifying objects in the optical band. The considerably sharper Chandra view covers a fraction of RASS sources, whose $\\sigma_{pos}$ could be improved by utilizing the sub-arcsec positional accuracy of Chandra observations. We cross-match X-ray objects between the BSC and \\emph{Chandra} sources extracted from the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) archival observations. A combined counterparts list (BSCxACIS) with \\emph{Chandra} spatial positions weighted by the X-ray flux of multi-counterparts is employed to evaluate and improve the former identifications of BSC with the other...

  12. Chandra Observations of Dying Radio Sources in Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgia, M.; Markevitch, M.; Govoni, F.; Parma, P.; Fanti, R.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Mack, K.-H.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The dying radio sources represent a very interesting and largely unexplored stage of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) evolution. They are considered to be very rare, and almost all of the few known ones were found in galaxy clusters. However, considering the small number detected so far, it has not been possible to draw any firm conclusions about their X-ray environment. Aims. We present X-ray observations performed with the Chandra satellite of the three galaxy clusters Abell 2276, ZwCl 1829.3+6912, and RX J1852.1+5711, which harbor at their center a dying radio source with an ultra-steep spectrum that we recently discovered. Methods. We analyzed the physical properties of the X-ray emitting gas surrounding these elusive radio sources. We determined the global X-ray properties of the clusters, derived the azimuthally averaged profiles of metal abundance, gas temperature, density, and pressure. Furthermore, we estimated the total mass profiles. Results. The large-scale X-ray emission is regular and spherical, suggesting a relaxed state for these systems. Indeed, we found that the three clusters are also characterized by significant enhancements in the metal abundance and declining temperature profiles toward the central region. For all these reasons, we classified RX J1852.1+5711, Abell 2276, and ZwCl 1829.3+6912 as cool-core galaxy clusters. Conclusions. We calculated the non-thermal pressure of the radio lobes assuming that the radio sources are in the minimum energy condition. For all dying sources we found that this is on average about one to two orders of magnitude lower than that of the external gas, as found for many other radio sources at the center of galaxy groups and clusters. We found marginal evidence for the presence of X-ray surface brightness depressions coincident with the fossil radio lobes of the dying sources in A2276 and ZwCl 1829.3+691. We estimated the outburst age and energy output for these two dying sources. The energy power from

  13. X-ray emission as a diagnostic from pseudospark-sourced electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowes, D., E-mail: david.bowes@strath.ac.uk [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Yin, H.; He, W.; Zhang, L.; Cross, A.W.; Ronald, K.; Phelps, A.D.R. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Chen, D.; Zhang, P. [Computed Tomography Lab, School of Mathematical Sciences, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048 (China); Chen, X.; Li, D. [Department of Electronic Engineering, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    X-ray emission has been achieved using an electron beam generated by a pseudospark low-pressure discharge and utilised as a diagnostic for beam detection. A 300 A, 34 kV PS-sourced electron beam pulse of 3 mm diameter impacting on a 0.1 mm-thick molybdenum target generated X-rays which were detected via the use of a small, portable X-ray detector. Clear X-ray images of a micro-sized object were captured using an X-ray photodetector. This demonstrates the inducement of proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) not only as an indicator of beam presence but also as a future X-ray source for small-spot X-ray imaging of materials.

  14. An X-Ray Point Source and Synchrotron Nebula Candidate in the Supernova Remnant G292.0+1.8

    CERN Document Server

    Olbert, C M; Olbert, Charles M.; Keohane, Jonathan W.

    2001-01-01

    We present archival data from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory that reveal a bright point source to the southeast of the center of the young supernova remnant G292.0+1.8 that is coincident with the peak of highest radio surface brightness. The mostly featureless spectrum of the point source at coordinates (J2000) RA = 11 24 39.2, DEC = -59 16 19.8 is well fit by a three-parameter absorbed model with one power-law and two blackbody components. We also argue that the neutron star is surrounded by a synchrotron wind nebula based off of the source's hard emission and high radio and X-ray luminosities, each corresponding to a canonical wind nebula spin-down power, dE/dt ~ 10^36 erg/s.

  15. Synchrotron x-ray sources and new opportunities in the soil and environmental sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, D. (Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (USA)); Anderson, S. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (USA)); Mattigod, S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1990-07-01

    This report contains the following papers: characteristics of the advanced photon source and comparison with existing synchrotron facilities; x-ray absorption spectroscopy: EXAFS and XANES -- A versatile tool to study the atomic and electronic structure of materials; applications of x-ray spectroscopy and anomalous scattering experiments in the soil and environmental sciences; X-ray fluorescence microprobe and microtomography.

  16. A study of diffuse radio sources and X-ray emission in six massive clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Parekh, Viral; Kale, Ruta; Intema, Huib

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the present study is to extend our current knowledge of the diffuse radio source (halo and relic) populations to $z$ $>$ 0.3. Here we report GMRT and EVLA radio observations of six galaxy clusters taken from the MAssive Cluster Survey (MACS) catalogue to detect diffuse radio emission. We used archival GMRT (150, 235 and 610 MHz) and EVLA (L band) data and made images at multiple radio frequencies of the following six clusters - MACSJ0417.5-1154, MACSJ1131.8-1955, MACSJ0308.9+2645, MACSJ2243.3-0935, MACSJ2228.5+2036 and MACSJ0358.8-2955. We detect diffuse radio emission (halo or relic or both) in the first four clusters. In the last two clusters we do not detect any diffuse radio emission but we put stringent upper-limits on their radio powers. We also use archival {\\it Chandra} X-ray data to carry out morphology and substructure analysis of these clusters. We find that based on X-ray data, these MACS clusters are non-relaxed and show substructures in their temperature distribution. The radio power...

  17. Discovery of X-Ray Pulsations from the INTEGRAL Source IGR J11014-6103

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, J. P.; Tomsick, J. A.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Camilo, F.; Ng, C.-Y.; Bodaghee, A.; Rodriguez, J.; Chaty, S.; Rahoui, F.

    2014-11-01

    We report the discovery of PSR J1101-6101, a 62.8 ms pulsar in IGR J11014-6103, a hard X-ray source with a jet and a cometary tail that strongly suggests it is moving away from the center of the supernova remnant (SNR) MSH 11-61A at v > 1000 km s-1. Two XMM-Newton observations were obtained with the EPIC pn in small window mode, resulting in the measurement of its spin-down luminosity \\dot{E}=1.36× 1036 erg s-1, characteristic age τ c = 116 kyr, and surface magnetic field strength Bs = 7.4 × 1011 G. In comparison to τ c , the 10-30 kyr age estimated for MSH 11-61A suggests that the pulsar was born in the SNR with initial period in the range 54 <= P 0 <= 60 ms. PSR J1101-6101 is the least energetic of the 15 rotation-powered pulsars detected by INTEGRAL, and has a high efficiency of hard X-ray radiation and jet power. We examine the shape of the cometary nebula in a Chandra image, which is roughly consistent with a bow shock at the velocity inferred from the SNR age and the pulsar's \\dot{E}. However, its structure differs in detail from the classic bow shock, and we explore possible reasons for this.

  18. THE SLIM-DISK STATE OF THE ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCE IN M83

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soria, Roberto [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Kuntz, K. D.; Blair, William P. [The Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Long, Knox S. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Plucinsky, Paul P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Winkler, P. Frank, E-mail: roberto.soria@curtin.edu.au [Department of Physics, Middlebury College, Middlebury, VT 05753 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The transient ULX in M83 that went into outburst in, or shortly before, 2010 is still active. Our new XMM-Newton spectra show that it has a curved spectrum typical of the upper end of the high/soft state or slim-disk state. It appears to be spanning the gap between Galactic stellar-mass black holes (BHs) and the ultraluminous state, at X-ray luminosities of ≈1-3 × 10{sup 39} erg s{sup –1} (a factor of two lower than in the 2010 and 2011 Chandra observations). From its broadened disk-like spectral shape at that luminosity, and from the fitted inner-disk radius and temperature, we argue that the accreting object is an ordinary stellar-mass BH with M ∼ 10-20 M {sub ☉}. We suggest that in the 2010 and 2011 Chandra observations, the source was seen at a higher accretion rate, resulting in a power-law-dominated spectrum with a soft excess at large radii.

  19. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascali, David, E-mail: davidmascali@lns.infn.it; Castro, Giuseppe; Celona, Luigi; Neri, Lorenzo; Gammino, Santo [INFN–Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Biri, Sándor; Rácz, Richárd; Pálinkás, József [Institute for Nuclear Research (Atomki), Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Bem tér 18/c, H-4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Caliri, Claudia [INFN–Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dip.to di Fisica e Astronomia, via Santa Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Romano, Francesco Paolo [INFN–Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); CNR, Istituto per i Beni Archeologici e Monumentali, Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); Torrisi, Giuseppe [INFN–Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Università Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, DIIES, Via Graziella, I-89100 Reggio Calabria (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma X-ray emission has been recently carried out at the ECRISs—Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources laboratory of Atomki based on a collaboration between the Debrecen and Catania ECR teams. In a first series, the X-ray spectroscopy was performed through silicon drift detectors and high purity germanium detectors, characterizing the volumetric plasma emission. The on-purpose developed collimation system was suitable for direct plasma density evaluation, performed “on-line” during beam extraction and charge state distribution characterization. A campaign for correlating the plasma density and temperature with the output charge states and the beam intensity for different pumping wave frequencies, different magnetic field profiles, and single-gas/gas-mixing configurations was carried out. The results reveal a surprisingly very good agreement between warm-electron density fluctuations, output beam currents, and the calculated electromagnetic modal density of the plasma chamber. A charge-coupled device camera coupled to a small pin-hole allowing X-ray imaging was installed and numerous X-ray photos were taken in order to study the peculiarities of the ECRIS plasma structure.

  20. Multiple station beamline at an undulator x-ray source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, J.; Freund, A.K.; Grübel, G.

    1994-01-01

    -ray transparent monochromator crystals. Diamond in particular is an attractive monochromator as it is rather X-ray transparent and can be fabricated to a high degree of crystal perfection. Moreover, it has a very high heat conductivity and a rather small thermal expansion so the beam X-ray heat load problem...

  1. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction with accelerator- and laser-plasma-based X-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicoul, Matthieu

    2010-09-01

    Femtosecond X-ray pulses are a powerful tool to investigate atomic motions triggered by femtosecond pump pulses. This thesis is dedicated to the production of such pulses and their use in optical pump - X-ray probe measurement. This thesis describes the laser-plasma-based sources available at the University of Duisburg-Essen. Part of it consists of the description of the design, built-up and characterization of a new ''modular'' X-ray source dedicated to optimize the X-ray flux onto the sample under investigation. The acoustic wave generation in femtosecond optically excited semiconductor (gallium arsenide) and metal (gold) was performed using the sources of the University of Duisburg-Essen. The physical answer of the material was modeled by a simple strain model for the semiconductor, pressure model for the metal, in order to gain information on the interplay of the electronic and thermal pressures rising after excitation. Whereas no reliable information could be obtain in gallium arsenide (principally due to the use of a bulk), the model for gold achieved very good agreement, providing useful information. The relaxation time of the electron to lattice energy was found to be (5.0{+-}0.3) ps, and the ratio of the Grueneisen parameters was found to be {gamma}{sub e} / {gamma}{sub i} = (0.5{+-}0.1). This thesis also describes the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) which existed at the (formally) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, an accelerator-based X-ray source, and two measurements performed with it. The first one is the detailed investigation of the phonon softening of the A{sub 1g} mode launch in bismuth upon fluence excitation. Detailed information concerning the new equilibrium position and phonon frequency were obtained over extended laser pump fluences. The second measurement concerned the study of the liquid phase dynamics in a newly formed liquid phase following ultrafast melting in indium antimonide. The formation of the liquid phase

  2. The High Resolution X-ray Spectrum of SS 433 using the Chandra HETGS

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, H L; Schulz, N S; Marshall, Herman L.; Canizares, Claude R.; Schulz, Norbert S.

    2001-01-01

    We present observations of SS 433 using the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer. Many emission lines of highly ionized elements are detected with the relativistic blue and red Doppler shifts. The lines are measurably broadened to 1700 km/s (FWHM) and the widths do not depend significantly on the characteristic emission temperature, suggesting that the emission occurs in a freely expanding region of constant collimation with opening angle of 1.23 +/- 0.06 deg. The blue shifts of lines from low temperature gas are the same as those of high temperature gas within our uncertainties, again indicating that the hottest gas we observe to emit emission lines is already at terminal velocity. Fits to the emission line fluxes give a range of temperatures in the jet from 5e6 to 1e8 K. We derive the emission measure as a function of temperature for a four component model that fits the line flux data. Using the density sensitive Si XIII triplet, the characteristic electron density is 1e14 cm^{-3}, where th...

  3. The X-ray Spectrum of the Rapid Burster using the Chandra HETGS

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, H L; Fox, D; Miller, J M; Guerriero, R; Morgan, E; Van der Klis, M; Bildsten, L; Dotani, T; Lewin, W H G

    2001-01-01

    We present observations of the Rapid Burster (RB, also known as MXB 1730-335) using the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer. The average interval between type II (accretion) bursts was about 40 s. There was one type I (thermonuclear flash) burst and about 20 "mini-bursts" which are probably type II bursts whose peak flux is 10-40% of the average peak flux of the other type II bursts. The time averaged spectra of the type II bursts are well fit by a blackbody with a temperature of kT = 1.6 keV, a radius of 8.9 km for a distance of 8.6 kpc, and an interstellar column density of 1.7e22 per sq. cm. No narrow emission or absorption lines were clearly detected. The 3 sigma upper limits to the equivalent widths of any features are < 10 eV in the 1.1-7.0 keV band and as small as 1.5 eV near 1.7 keV. We suggest that Comptonization destroys absorption features such as the resonance line of Fe XXVI.

  4. Chandra Studies of the X-ray Gas Properties of Fossil Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Zhenzhen

    2015-01-01

    We study ten galaxy groups and clusters suggested in the literature to be "fossil system (FS)" based on \\chandra\\ observations. According to the $M_{500}-T$ and $L_{\\rm X}-T$ relations, the gas properties of FSs are not physically distinct from ordinary galaxy groups or clusters. We also first study the $f_{\\rm gas,~2500}-T$ relation and find that the FS exhibits same as ordinary systems. The gas densities of FSs within $0.1r_{200}$, are $\\sim 10^{-3}$ cm$^{-3}$, which is the same order as galaxy clusters. The entropies within $0.1r_{200}$ ($S_{0.1r_{200}}$) of FSs are systematically lower than those in ordinary galaxy groups which is consistent with previous report, but we find their $S_{0.1r_{200}}-T$ relation is more similar to galaxy clusters. The derived mass profiles of FSs are consistent with the Navarro, Frenk, \\& White model in $(0.1-1)r_{200}$, and the relation between scale radius $r_{\\rm s}$ and characteristic mass density $ta_{\\rm c}$ indicates the self-similarity of dark matter halos of FSs....

  5. Chandra Studies of the X-ray gas properties of fossil systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhen-Zhen

    2016-03-01

    We study ten galaxy groups and clusters suggested in the literature to be “fossil systems (FSs)” based on Chandra observations. According to the M500 - T and LX - T relations, the gas properties of FSs are not physically distinct from ordinary galaxy groups or clusters. We also first study the fgas, 2500 - T relation and find that the FSs exhibit the same trend as ordinary systems. The gas densities of FSs within 0.1r200 are ˜ 10-3 cm-3, which is the same order of magnitude as galaxy clusters. The entropies within 01r200 (S0.1r200) of FSs are systematically lower than those inordinary galaxy groups, which is consistent with previous reports, but we find their S0.1r200 - T relation is more similar to galaxy clusters. The derived mass profiles of FSs are consistent with the Navarro, Frenk and White model in (0.1 - 1)r200, and the relation between scale radius rs and characteristic mass density δc indicates self-similarity of dark matter halos of FSs. The ranges of rs and δc for FSs are also close to those of galaxy clusters. Therefore, FSs share more common characteristics with galaxy clusters. The special birth place of the FS makes it a distinct type of galaxy system.

  6. MOG Weak Field Approximation: A Modified Gravity Compatible with Chandra X-ray Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Moffat, J W

    2013-01-01

    We use the covariant Scalar-Vector-Tensor theory of gravity (so-called MOG), in the weak field approximation limit to study the dynamics of clusters of galaxies. The ionized gas density and the temperature profile of the clusters are our observables, which have been measured by the Chandra telescope for the nearby clusters. The MOG effective gravitational potential in the weak field approximation is composed of attractive Newtonian and repulsive Yukawa terms. Two parameters $\\alpha$ and $\\mu$ in the effective potential determine the asymptotic gravitational constant and the mass of the vector field, respectively. These parameters have been fixed by fitting MOG dynamics to the rotation curves of galaxies. Our analysis shows that the internal dynamics of clusters can be well explained within $1\\sigma$ with a virial theorem in the framework of MOG, such that the best fit for the ratio of the dynamical mass to the baryonic mass is: $M_{\\rm dyn}/M_{\\rm b} = 0.98^{+0.02}_{-0.02}$. This result means that MOG is a th...

  7. Chandra X-Ray Observations of Young Clusters. III. NGC 2264 and the Orion Flanking Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Rebull, L M; Micela, G; Ramírez, S V; Sciortino, S; Stauffer, J R; Strom, S E; Wolff, S C

    2006-01-01

    Chandra observations of solar-like pre-main sequence (PMS) stars in the Orion Flanking Fields (age ~1 Myr) and NGC 2264 (~3 Myr) are compared with the results of the COUP survey of similar objects in the ONC (~0.5 Myr). The correlations between log Lx and mass found for PMS stars on convective tracks in these clusters are consistent with the relationships found for the ONC, indicating little change in the median values of either log Lx or log Lx/Lbol during the first ~3-5 Myr of evolution down convective tracks. The fraction of stars with extreme values of Lx, more than 10 times higher than the average for a given Lbol or with log Lx/Lbol greater than the canonical saturation value of -2.9, is however larger by a factor of two in the younger ONC when compared with the Orion FF and NGC 2264. PMS stars in NGC 2264 on radiative tracks have Lx/Lbol values that are systematically lower by a factor of ~10 times than those found for stars of similar mass on convective tracks. The dramatic decrease in flux from conve...

  8. The Field X-ray AGN Fraction to z=0.7 from the Chandra Multiwavelength Project and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Haggard, Daryl; Anderson, Scott F; Constantin, Anca; Aldcroft, Tom L; Kim, Dong-Woo; Barkhouse, Wayne A

    2010-01-01

    We employ the Chandra Multiwavelength Project (ChaMP) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to study the fraction of X-ray-active galaxies in the field out to z = 0.7. We utilize spectroscopic redshifts from SDSS and ChaMP, as well as photometric redshifts from several SDSS catalogs, to compile a parent sample of more than 100,000 SDSS galaxies and nearly 1,600 Chandra X-ray detections. Detailed ChaMP volume completeness maps allow us to investigate the local fraction of active galactic nuclei (AGN), defined as those objects having broad-band X-ray luminosities L_X (0.5-8 keV) > 10^42 erg s^-1, as a function of absolute optical magnitude, X-ray luminosity, redshift, mass, and host color/morphological type. In five independent samples complete in redshift and i-band absolute magnitude, we determine the field AGN fraction to be between 0.16 +/- 0.06% (for z M_i > -20) and 3.80 +/- 0.92% (for z < 0.7 and M_i < -23). We find striking agreement between our ChaMP/SDSS field AGN fraction and the Chandra clu...

  9. LIGHT SOURCE: A simulation study of Tsinghua Thomson scattering X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chuan-Xiang; Li, Ren-Kai; Huang, Wen-Hui; Chen, Huai-Bi; Du, Ying-Chao; Du, Qiang; Du, Tai-Bin; He, Xiao-Zhong; Hua, Jian-Fei; Lin, Yu-Zhen; Qian, Hou-Jun; Shi, Jia-Ru; Xiang, Dao; Yan, Li-Xin; Yu, Pei-Cheng

    2009-06-01

    Thomson scattering X-ray sources are compact and affordable facilities that produce short duration, high brightness X-ray pulses enabling new experimental capacities in ultra-fast science studies, and also medical and industrial applications. Such a facility has been built at the Accelerator Laboratory of Tsinghua University, and upgrade is in progress. In this paper, we present a proposed layout of the upgrade with design parameters by simulation, aiming at high X-ray pulses flux and brightness, and also enabling advanced dynamics studies and applications of the electron beam. Design and construction status of main subsystems are also presented.

  10. A proposal for a collecting mirror assembly for large divergence x-ray sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichimaru, Satoshi; Hatayama, Masatoshi; Ohchi, Tadayuki; Oku, Satoshi

    2014-11-01

    We propose a new type of collecting mirror assembly (CMA) for x rays, which will enable us to build a powerful optical system for collecting x rays from large divergence sources. The CMA consists of several mirror sections connected in series. The angle of each section is designed so that the x rays reflected from it are parallel to the x rays directly incident on the following sections. A simplified CMA structure is designed and applied to the Al-Kα emission line. It is estimated that by using the CMA the number of x rays detected could be increased by a factor of about 2.5.

  11. A Chandra Perspective On Galaxy-Wide X-ray Binary Emission And Its Correlation With Star Formation Rate And Stellar Mass: New Results From Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Lehmer, B D; Bauer, F E; Brandt, W N; Goulding, A D; Jenkins, L P; Ptak, A; Roberts, T P

    2010-01-01

    We present new Chandra observations that complete a sample of seventeen (17) luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) with D < 60 Mpc and low Galactic column densities of N_H < 5 X 10^20 cm^-2. The LIRGs in our sample have total infrared (8-1000um) luminosities in the range of L_IR ~ (1-8) X 10^11 L_sol. The high-resolution imaging and X-ray spectral information from our Chandra observations allow us to measure separately X-ray contributions from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and normal galaxy processes (e.g., X-ray binaries and hot gas). We utilized total infrared plus UV luminosities to estimate star-formation rates (SFRs) and K-band luminosities and optical colors to estimate stellar masses (M*) for the sample. Under the assumption that the galaxy-wide 2-10 keV luminosity (LX) traces the combined emission from high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) and low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), and that the power output from these components are linearly correlated with SFR and M*, respectively, we constrain the relation ...

  12. The evolution of a jet ejection of the ultraluminous X-ray source Holmberg II X-1

    CERN Document Server

    Cseh, D; Jonker, P G; Grise, F; Paragi, Z; Corbel, S; Falcke, H; Frey, S; Kaaret, P; Koerding, E

    2015-01-01

    We present quasi-simultaneous, multi-epoch radio and X-ray measurements of Holmberg II X-1 using the European VLBI Network (EVN), the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), and the Chandra and Swift X-ray telescopes. The X-ray data show apparently hard spectra with steady X-ray luminosities 4 months apart from each other. In the high-resolution EVN radio observations, we have detected an extended milli-arcsecond scale source with unboosted radio emission. The source emits non-thermal, likely optically thin synchrotron emission and its morphology is consistent with a jet ejection. The 9-GHz VLA data show an arcsecond-scale triple structure of Holmberg II X-1 similar to that seen at lower frequencies. However, we find that the central ejection has faded by at least a factor of 7.3 over 1.5 years. We estimate the dynamical age of the ejection to be higher than 2.1 years. We show that such a rapid cooling can be explained with simple adiabatic expansion losses. These properties of Holmberg II X-1 imply that ULX r...

  13. Performance of the Cygnus X-ray Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, John R.; Carlson, Randolph; Fulton, Robert D.; Altes, R.; Carboni, V.; Chavez, Jacob R.; Corcoran, P.; Coulter, William L.; Douglas, J.; Droemer, D.; Gibson, William A.; Helvin, Thomas B.; Henderson, David J.; Johnson, David L.; Maenchen, John E.; Mitton, Charlas V.; Molina, Isidro; Nishimoto, H.; Ormond, Eugene C.; Ortega, Paul A.; Quicksilver, Robert J.; Ridlon, Rae N.; Rose, Evan A.; Scholfield, David W.; Smith, I.; Valerio, Antonio R.; White, R.

    2002-12-01

    Cygnus is a radiographic x-ray source developed for support of the Sub-Critical Experiments Program at the Nevada Test Site. Major requirements for this application are: a dramatically reduced spot size as compared to both Government Laboratory and existing commercial alternatives, layout flexibility, and reliability. Cygnus incorporates proven pulsed power technology (Marx Generator, Pulse Forming Line, Water Transmission Line, and Inductive Voltage Adder sub-components) to drive a high voltage vacuum diode. In the case of Cygnus, a relatively new approach (the rod pinch diode [1]) is employed to achieve a small source diameter. Design specifications are: 2.25 MeV endpoint energy, 3 rads dose at 1 meter. The pulsed power and system architecture design plan has been previously presented [2]. The first set of Cygnus shots were geared to verification of electrical parameters and, therefore, used a large area diode configuration offering increased shot rate as compared to that of the rod pinch diode. In this paper we present results of initial rod pinch operation in terms of electrical and radiation parameters.

  14. Nature of the Extreme Ultraluminous X-ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Wiktorowicz, Grzegorz; Sadowski, Aleksander; Belczynski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    In this proof-of-concept study we demonstrate how a binary system can easily form an extreme ULX source with the X-ray luminosity of L_x > 10^42 erg/s. Formation efficiencies and lifetimes of such objects are high enough to potentially explain all observed extreme ULXs. These systems are not only limited to binaries with stellar-origin black hole accretors. Noteworthy, we have also identified such objects with neutron stars. Typically, a 10 Msun black hole is fed by a massive (~10 Msun) Hertzsprung gap donor with Roche lobe overflow rate of ~10^-3 Msun/yr (~2600 Mdot_Edd). For neutron star systems the typical donors are evolved low-mass (~2 Msun) helium stars with Roche lobe overflow rate of ~10^-2 Msun/yr. We base our study purely on the available Roche lobe overflow rate in a binary system and show that if only even a small fraction (>10^-3) of the overflow reaches the BH, the source will be super-Eddington. Our study does not prove that any particular extreme ULX (e.g., HLX-1) is a regular binary system wi...

  15. Sub-Picosecond Tunable Hard X-Ray Undulator Source for Laser/X-Ray Pump-Probe Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingold, G.; Beaud, P.; Johnson, S.; Streun, A.; Schmidt, T.; Abela, R.; Al-Adwan, A.; Abramsohn, D.; Böge, M.; Grolimund, D.; Keller, A.; Krasniqi, F.; Rivkin, L.; Rohrer, M.; Schilcher, T.; Schmidt, T.; Schlott, V.; Schulz, L.; van der Veen, F.; Zimoch, D.

    2007-01-01

    The FEMTO source under construction at the μXAS beamline is designed to enable tunable time-resolved laser/x-ray absorption and diffraction experiments in photochemistry and condensed matter with ps- and sub-ps resolution. The design takes advantage of (1) the highly stable operation of the SLS storage ring, (2) the reliable high harmonic operation of small gap, short period undulators to generate hard x-rays with energy 3-18 keV at 2.4 GeV beam energy, and (3) the progress in high power, high repetition rate fs solid-state laser technology to employ laser/e-beam `slicing' to reach a time resolution of ultimately 100 fs. The source will profit from the inherently synchronized pump (laser I: 100 fs, 2 mJ, 1 kHz) and probe (sliced X-rays, laser II: 50 fs, 5 mJ, 1 kHz) pulses, and from the excellent stability of the SLS storage ring which is operated in top-up mode and controlled by a fast orbit feedback (FOFB). Coherent radiation emitted at THz frequencies by the sliced 100 fs electron bunches will be monitored as on-line cross-correlation signal to keep the laser-electron beam interaction at optimum. The source is designed to provide at 8 keV (100 fs) a monochromized flux of 104 ph/s/0.01% bw (Si crystal monochromator) and 106 ph/s/1.5% bw (multilayer monochromator) at the sample. It is operated in parasitic mode using a hybrid bunch filling pattern. Because of the low intensity measurements are carried out repetitively over many shots using refreshing samples and gated detectors. `Diffraction gating' experiments will be used to characterize the sub-ps X-ray pulses.

  16. Tabletop Ultrabright Kiloelectronvolt X-Ray Sources from Xe and Kr Hollow Atom States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Poopalasingam

    Albert Einstein, the father of relativity, once said, "Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better". Today available higher resolution tabletop tool to look deep into matters and living thing is an x-ray source. Although the available tabletop x-rays sources of the 20th century, such as the ones used for medical or dental x-rays are tremendously useful for medical diagnostics and industry, a major disadvantage is that they have low quality skillful brightness, which limits its resolution and accuracy. In the other hand, x-ray free-electrons laser (XFEL) and synchrotron radiation sources provided extreme bright x-rays. However, number of applications of XFEL and synchrotron such as medical and industrials, has been hampered by their size, complexity, and cost. This has set a goal of demonstrating x-ray source with enough brightness for potential applications in an often-called tabletop compact x-ray source that could be operated in university laboratory or hospitals. We have developed two tabletop ultrabright keV x-ray sources, one from a Xe hollow-atom states and the other one from Kr hollow-atom stares with a unique characteristic that makes them complementary to currently-available extreme-light sources; XFEL, and synchrotron x-ray source. Upgraded tabletop ultra-fast KrF* pump-laser interacts with target rare-gas clusters and produces hollow-atom states, which later coherently collapse to the empty inner-shell and thereby generate keV x-ray radiation. The KrF* pump-laser beam is self-focused and forms a self-channel to guide the generated x-ray radiation in the direction of the pump-laser beam to produce directed x-ray beam. Xe (M) x-ray source operates at 1.2-1.6 nm wavelength while the Kr(L) x-ray source operates in 600-800 pm wavelength. System is mounted upon 3 optical-tables (5´x12´) with two KrF amplifiers at a repetition rate of 0.1 Hz. A lower bound for brightness value for both Xe and Kr x-ray sources is 1026 photons s-1mm-2

  17. Monitoring the Health and Safety of the ACIS Instrument On-Board the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Virani, S N; De Pasquale, J M; Plucinsky, P P; Virani, Shanil N.; Ford, Peter G.; Pasquale, Joseph M. De; Plucinsky, Paul P.

    2002-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO), NASA's latest ``Great Observatory'', was launched on July 23, 1999 and reached its final orbit on August 7, 1999. The CXO is in a highly elliptical orbit, approximately 140,000 km x 10,000 km, and has a period of approximately 63.5 hours (~2.65 days). Communication with the CXO nominally consists of 1-hour contacts spaced 8-hours apart. Thus, once a communication link has been established, it is very important that the health and safety status of the scientific instruments as well as the Observatory itself be determined as quickly as possible. In this paper, we focus exclusively on the automated health and safety monitoring scripts developed for the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) to use during those 1-hour contacts. ACIS is one of the two focal plane instruments on-board the CXO. We present an overview of the real-time ACIS Engineering Data Web Page and the alert schemes developed for monitoring the instrument status during each communication contact. A suite of ...

  18. Cosmic Ray Acceleration at the Forward Shock in Tycho's Supernova Remnant: Evidence from Chandra X-ray Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, J S; Badenes, C; Ghavamian, P; McKee, C F; Moffett, D; Plucinsky, P P; Rakowski, C; Reynoso, E; Slane, P O

    2005-01-01

    We present evidence for cosmic ray acceleration at the forward shock in Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR) from three X-ray observables: (1) the proximity of the contact discontinuity to the forward shock, or blast wave, (2) the morphology of the emission from the rim of Tycho, and (3) the spectral nature of the rim emission. We determine the locations of the blast wave (BW), contact discontinuity (CD), and reverse shock (RS) around the rim of Tycho's supernova remnant using a principal component analysis and other methods applied to new Chandra data. The azimuthal-angle-averaged radius of the BW is 251". For the CD and RS we find average radii of 241" and 183", respectively. Taking account of projection effects, we find ratios of 1:0.93:0.70 (BW:CD:RS). We show these values to be inconsistent with adiabatic hydrodynamical models of SNR evolution. The CD:BW ratio can be explained if cosmic ray acceleration of ions is occurring at the forward shock. The RS:BW ratio, as well as the strong Fe Ka emission from the T...

  19. Chandra X-ray Observations of the 0.6 < z < 1.1 Red-Sequence Cluster Survey Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Hicks, Amalia K; Bautz, Mark; Cain, Benjamin; Gilbank, David; Gladders, M D; Hoekstra, Henk; Yee, Howard; Garmire, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of Chandra observations of 13 optically-selected clusters with 0.63; though 3 were not observed long enough to support detailed analysis. Surface brightness profiles are fit to beta-models. Integrated spectra are extracted within R(2500), and Tx and Lx information is obtained. We derive gas and total masses within R(2500) and R(500). Cosmologically corrected scaling relations are investigated, and we find the RCS clusters to be consistent with self-similar scaling expectations. However discrepancies exist between the RCS sample and lower-z X-ray selected samples for relationships involving Lx, with the higher-z RCS clusters having lower Lx for a given Tx. In addition, we find that gas mass fractions within R(2500) for the high-z RCS sample are lower than expected by a factor of ~2. This suggests that the central entropy of these high-z objects has been elevated by processes such as pre-heating, mergers, and/or AGN outbursts, that their gas is still infalling, or that they contain compar...

  20. Miniature X-ray Source for Planetary Exploration Instruments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the proposed work is to develop a design model for a CNT cold cathode, low power, passively cooled, and grounded-anode X-ray tube that is compatible...

  1. X-ray imaging detectors for synchrotron and XFEL sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaki Hatsui

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Current trends for X-ray imaging detectors based on hybrid and monolithic detector technologies are reviewed. Hybrid detectors with photon-counting pixels have proven to be very powerful tools at synchrotrons. Recent developments continue to improve their performance, especially for higher spatial resolution at higher count rates with higher frame rates. Recent developments for X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL experiments provide high-frame-rate integrating detectors with both high sensitivity and high peak signal. Similar performance improvements are sought in monolithic detectors. The monolithic approach also offers a lower noise floor, which is required for the detection of soft X-ray photons. The link between technology development and detector performance is described briefly in the context of potential future capabilities for X-ray imaging detectors.

  2. X-ray imaging detectors for synchrotron and XFEL sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatsui, Takaki; Graafsma, Heinz

    2015-05-01

    Current trends for X-ray imaging detectors based on hybrid and monolithic detector technologies are reviewed. Hybrid detectors with photon-counting pixels have proven to be very powerful tools at synchrotrons. Recent developments continue to improve their performance, especially for higher spatial resolution at higher count rates with higher frame rates. Recent developments for X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) experiments provide high-frame-rate integrating detectors with both high sensitivity and high peak signal. Similar performance improvements are sought in monolithic detectors. The monolithic approach also offers a lower noise floor, which is required for the detection of soft X-ray photons. The link between technology development and detector performance is described briefly in the context of potential future capabilities for X-ray imaging detectors.

  3. X-ray imaging detectors for synchrotron and XFEL sources

    OpenAIRE

    Takaki Hatsui; Heinz Graafsma

    2015-01-01

    Current trends for X-ray imaging detectors based on hybrid and monolithic detector technologies are reviewed. Hybrid detectors with photon-counting pixels have proven to be very powerful tools at synchrotrons. Recent developments continue to improve their performance, especially for higher spatial resolution at higher count rates with higher frame rates. Recent developments for X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) experiments provide high-frame-rate integrating detectors with both high sensitivit...

  4. The BeppoSAX High Energy Large Area Survey. IV. On the soft X-ray properties of the hard X-ray-selected HELLAS sources

    CERN Document Server

    Vignali, C; Fiore, F; La Franca, F

    2001-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the soft X-ray properties of the BeppoSAX High-Energy Large Area Survey (HELLAS) sources. A large fraction (about 2/3) of the hard X-ray selected sources is detected by ROSAT. The soft X-ray colors for many of these objects, along with the 0.5-2 keV flux upper limits for those undetected in the ROSAT band, do imply the presence of absorption. The comparison with the ROSAT Deep Survey sources indicates that a larger fraction of absorbed objects among the HELLAS sources is present, in agreement with their hard X-ray selection and the predictions of the X-ray background synthesis models. Another striking result is the presence of a soft (additional) X-ray component in a significant fraction of absorbed objects.

  5. A radio monitoring survey of ultra-luminous X-ray sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Körding, E.; Colbert, E.; Falcke, H.D.E.

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of a radio monitoring campaign to search for radio emission from nearby ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs). These sources are bright off-nuclear X-ray point sources with luminosities exceeding LX > 1039 erg s-1. A well-defined sample of the 9

  6. The scaling of X-ray variability with luminosity in Ultra-luminous X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Martin, O; Reig, P; Zezas, A

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between the X-ray variability amplitude and X-ray luminosity for a sample of 14 bright Ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs) with XMM-Newton/EPIC data, and compare it with the well established similar relationship for Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). We computed the normalised excess variance in the 2-10 keV light curves of these objects and their 2-10 keV band intrinsic luminosity. We also determined model "variability-luminosity" relationships for AGN, under several assumptions regarding their power-spectral shape. We compared these model predictions at low luminosities with the ULX data. The variability amplitude of the ULXs is significantly smaller than that expected from a simple extrapolation of the AGN "variability-luminosity" relationship at low luminosities. We also find evidence for an anti-correlation between the variability amplitude and L(2-10 keV) for ULXs. The shape of this relationship is consistent with the AGN data but only if the ULXs data are shifted by four ord...

  7. The X-ray eclipse geometry of the super-soft X-ray source CAL 87

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, T.; Lopes de Oliveira, R. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Av. Marechal Rondon s/n, 49100-000 São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Borges, B. W., E-mail: tribeiro@ufs.br, E-mail: rlopes@ufs.br, E-mail: bernardo@astro.ufsc.br [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Araranguá, 88905-120 Araranguá, SC (Brazil)

    2014-09-01

    We explore XMM-Newton observations of the eclipsing super-soft X-ray source CAL 87 in order to map the accretion structures of the system. Indirect imaging techniques were applied in X-ray light curves to provide eclipse maps. The surface brightness distribution exhibits an extended and symmetric emission, and a feature is revealed from the hardest X-rays that is likely due to a bright spot. A rate of P-dot =(+6±2)×10{sup −10} for changes in the orbital period of the system was derived from the eclipses. There is no significant variation of the emission lines even during eclipses, arguing that the lines are formed in an extended region. The continuum emission dominates the decrease in flux that is observed during eclipses. The O VIII Lyα line reveals a broadening velocity that is estimated to be 365{sub −69}{sup +65} km s{sup –1} (at 1σ), marginal evidence for asymmetry in its profile, and sometimes shows evidence of double-peaked emission. Together, the results support that the wind-driven mass transfer scenario is running in CAL 87.

  8. The spatial, spectral and polarization properties of solar flare X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffrey, Natasha L S

    2014-01-01

    X-rays are a valuable diagnostic tool for the study of high energy accelerated electrons. Bremsstrahlung X-rays produced by, and directly related to, high energy electrons accelerated during a flare, provide a powerful diagnostic tool for determining both the properties of the accelerated electron distribution, and of the flaring coronal and chromospheric plasmas. This thesis is specifically concerned with the study of spatial, spectral and polarization properties of solar flare X-ray sources via both modelling and X-ray observations using the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). Firstly, a new model is presented, accounting for finite temperature, pitch angle scattering and initial pitch angle injection. This is developed to accurately infer the properties of the acceleration region from the observations of dense coronal X-ray sources. Moreover, examining how the spatial properties of dense coronal X-ray sources change in time, interesting trends in length, width, position, number density ...

  9. The Evolution of Normal Galaxy X-ray Emission Through Cosmic History: Constraints from the 6 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South

    CERN Document Server

    Lehmer, B D; Mineo, S; Brandt, W N; Eufrasio, R T; Fragos, T; Hornschemeier, A E; Luo, B; Xue, Y Q; Bauer, F E; Gilfanov, M; Ranalli, P; Schneider, D P; Shemmer, O; Tozzi, P; Trump, J R; Vignali, C; Wang, J -X; Yukita, M; Zezas, A

    2016-01-01

    We present measurements of the evolution of normal-galaxy X-ray emission from $z \\approx$ 0-7 using local galaxies and galaxy samples in the 6 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) survey. The majority of the CDF-S galaxies are observed at rest-frame energies above 2 keV, where the emission is expected to be dominated by X-ray binary (XRB) populations; however, hot gas is expected to provide small contributions to the observed- frame < 1 keV emission at $z < 1$. We show that a single scaling relation between X-ray luminosity ($L_{\\rm X}$) and star-formation rate (SFR) is insufficient for characterizing the average X-ray emission at all redshifts. We establish that scaling relations involving not only SFR, but also stellar mass ($M_\\star$) and redshift, provide significantly improved characterizations of the average X-ray emission from normal galaxy populations at $z \\approx$ 0-7. We further provide the first empirical constraints on the redshift evolution of X-ray emission from both low-mass XRB (LMXB) an...

  10. A SEARCH FOR HYPERLUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES IN THE XMM-NEWTON SOURCE CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolotukhin, I.; Webb, N. A.; Godet, O.; Barret, D. [CNRS, IRAP, 9 av. Colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Bachetti, M., E-mail: ivan.zolotukhin@irap.omp.eu [INAF/Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, via della Scienza 5, I-09047 Selargius (Italy)

    2016-02-01

    We present a new method to identify luminous off-nuclear X-ray sources in the outskirts of galaxies from large public redshift surveys, distinguishing them from foreground and background interlopers. Using the 3XMM-DR5 catalog of X-ray sources and the SDSS DR12 spectroscopic sample of galaxies, with the help of this off-nuclear cross-matching technique, we selected 98 sources with inferred X-ray luminosities in the range 10{sup 41} < L{sub X} < 10{sup 44} erg s{sup −1}, compatible with hyperluminous X-ray objects (HLX). To validate the method, we verify that it allowed us to recover known HLX candidates such as ESO 243–49 HLX–1 and M82 X–1. From a statistical study, we conservatively estimate that up to 71 ± 11 of these sources may be foreground- or background sources, statistically leaving at least 16 that are likely to be HLXs, thus providing support for the existence of the HLX population. We identify two good HLX candidates and using other publicly available data sets, in particular the VLA FIRST in radio, UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey in the near-infrared, GALEX in the ultraviolet and Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope Megacam archive in the optical, we present evidence that these objects are unlikely to be foreground or background X-ray objects of conventional types, e.g., active galactic nuclei, BL Lac objects, Galactic X-ray binaries, or nearby stars. However, additional dedicated X-ray and optical observations are needed to confirm their association with the assumed host galaxies and thus secure their HLX classification.

  11. New Constraints on Dark Energy from Chandra X-rayObservations of the Largest Relaxed Galaxy Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, S.W.; Rapetti, D.A.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Schmidt, R.W.; /Heidelberg, Astron. Rechen Inst.; Ebeling, H.; /Inst. Astron., Honolulu; Morris, G.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Fabian, A.C.; /Cambridge U., Inst. of Astron.

    2007-06-06

    We present constraints on the mean matter density, {Omega}{sub m}, dark energy density, {Omega}{sub DE}, and the dark energy equation of state parameter, w, using Chandra measurements of the X-ray gas mass fraction (fgas) in 42 hot (kT > 5keV), X-ray luminous, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters spanning the redshift range 0.05 < z < 1.1. Using only the fgas data for the 6 lowest redshift clusters at z < 0.15, for which dark energy has a negligible effect on the measurements, we measure {Omega}{sub m}=0.28{+-}0.06 (68% confidence, using standard priors on the Hubble Constant, H{sub 0}, and mean baryon density, {Omega}{sub b}h{sup 2}). Analyzing the data for all 42 clusters, employing only weak priors on H{sub 0} and {Omega}{sub b}h{sup 2}, we obtain a similar result on {Omega}{sub m} and detect the effects of dark energy on the distances to the clusters at {approx}99.99% confidence, with {Omega}{sub DE}=0.86{+-}0.21 for a non-flat LCDM model. The detection of dark energy is comparable in significance to recent SNIa studies and represents strong, independent evidence for cosmic acceleration. Systematic scatter remains undetected in the f{sub gas} data, despite a weighted mean statistical scatter in the distance measurements of only {approx}5%. For a flat cosmology with constant w, we measure {Omega}{sub m}=0.28{+-}0.06 and w=-1.14{+-}0.31. Combining the fgas data with independent constraints from CMB and SNIa studies removes the need for priors on {Omega}{sub b}h{sup 2} and H{sub 0} and leads to tighter constraints: {Omega}{sub m}=0.253{+-}0.021 and w=-0.98{+-}0.07 for the same constant-w model. More general analyses in which we relax the assumption of flatness and/or allow evolution in w remain consistent with the cosmological constant paradigm. Our analysis includes conservative allowances for systematic uncertainties. The small systematic scatter and tight constraints bode well for future dark energy studies using the f{sub gas} method.

  12. Optical Identification of Multiple Faint X-ray Sources in the Globular Cluster NGC 6752 Evidence for Numerous Cataclysmic Variables

    CERN Document Server

    Pooley, D; Homer, L; Verbunt, F; Anderson, S F; Gaensler, B M; Margon, B; Miller, J; Fox, D W; Kaspi, V M; Van der Klis, M

    2002-01-01

    We report on the Chandra ACIS-S3 imaging observation of the globular cluster NGC 6752. We detect 6 X-ray sources within the 10.5" core radius and 13 more within the 115" half-mass radius down to a limiting luminosity of Lx approx 10^{30} erg/s for cluster sources. We reanalyze archival data from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Australia Telescope Compact Array and make 12 optical identifications and one radio identification. Based on X-ray and optical properties of the identifications, we find 10 likely cataclysmic variables (CVs), 1-3 likely RS CVn or BY Dra systems, and 1 or 2 possible background objects. Of the 7 sources for which no optical identifications were made, we expect that ~2-4 are background objects and that the rest are either CVs or some or all of the 5 millisecond pulsars whose radio positions are not yet accurately known. These and other Chandra results on globular clusters indicate that the dozens of CVs per cluster expected by theoretical arguments are finally being found. The findings ...

  13. The Radiation Dose Determination of the Pulsed X-ray Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloichikova, I.; Stuchebrov, S.; Zhaksybayeva, G.; Wagner, A.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper the radiation dose measurement technique of the pulsed X-ray source RAP-160-5 is described. The dose rate measurement results from the pulsed X-ray beams at the different distance between the pulsed X-ray source focus and the detector obtained with the help of the thermoluminescent detectors DTL-02, the universal dosimeter UNIDOS E equipped with the plane-parallel ionization chamber type 23342, the dosimeter-radiometer DKS-96 and the radiation dosimeter AT 1123 are demonstrated. The recommendations for the dosimetry measurements of the pulsed X-ray generator RAP-160-5 under different radiation conditions are proposed.

  14. LUX - A recirculating linac-based ultrafast X-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corlett, J.N.; Barletta, W.A.; DeSantis, S.; Doolittle, L.; Fawley, W.M.; Green, M.A.; Heimann, P.; Leone, S.R.; Lidia, S.; Li, D.; Parmigiani, F.; Ratti, A.; Robinson, K.; Schoenlein, R.; Staples, J.; Wan, W.; Wells, R.; Wilcox, R.; Wolski, A.; Zholents, A.

    2003-08-01

    We describe the design of a proposed source of ultra-fast synchrotron radiation x-ray pulses based on a recirculating superconducting linac, with an integrated array of ultrafast laser systems. The source produces x-ray pulses with duration of 10-50 fs at a 10 kHz repetition rate, with tunability from EUV to hard x-ray regimes, and optimized for the study of ultra-fast dynamics. A high-brightness rf photocathode provides electron bunches. An injector linac accelerates the beam to the 100 MeV range, and is followed by four passes through a 700 MeV recirculating linac. Ultrafast hard x-ray pulses are obtained by a combination of electron bunch manipulation, transverse temporal correlation of the electrons, and x-ray pulse compression. EUV and soft x-ray pulses as short as 10 fs are generated in a harmonic-cascade free electron laser scheme.

  15. Chandra X-ray Observatory Arcsecond Imaging of the Young, Oxygen-rich Supernova Remnant 1E0102.2-7219

    CERN Document Server

    Gaetz, T J; Edgar, R J; Eriksen, K A; Plucinsky, P P; Schlegel, E M; Smith, R K; Butt, Yousaf M.; Edgar, Richard J.; Eriksen, Kristoffer A.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Schlegel, Eric M.; Smith, Randall K.

    2000-01-01

    We present observations of the young, Oxygen-rich supernova remnant 1E0102.2-7219 taken by the Chandra X-ray Observatory during Chandra's Orbital Activation and Checkout phase. The boundary of the blast wave shock is clearly seen for the first time, allowing the diameter of the remnant and the mean blast wave velocity to be accurately determined. The prominent X-ray bright ring of material may be the result of the reverse shock encountering ejecta; the radial variation of O VII vs. O VIII emission indicates an ionizing shock propagating inwards, possibly through a strong density gradient in the ejecta. We compare the X-ray emission to Australia Telescope Compact Array 6 cm radio observations (Amy and Ball 1993) and to archival Hubble Space Telescope [O III] observations. The ring of radio emission is predominantly inwards of the outer blast wave, consistent with an interpretation as synchrotron radiation originating behind the blast wave, but outwards of the bright X-ray ring of emission. Many (but not all) o...

  16. Beyond Chandra (towards the X-ray Surveyor mission): possible solutions for the implementation of very high angular resolution X-ray telescopes in the new millennium based on fused silica segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareschi, G.; Basso, S.; Civitani, M. M.; Ghigo, M.; Parodi, G.; Pelliciari, C.; Salmaso, B.; Spiga, D.; Vecchi, G.

    2016-07-01

    An important challenge for the X-ray astronomy of the new millennium is represented by the implementation of an Xray telescope able to maintain the exquisite angular resolution of Chandra (with a sub-arcsec HEW, on-axis) but, at the same time, being characterized by a much larger throughput and grasp. A mission with similar characteristics is represented by the X-ray Surveyor Mission. The project has been recently proposed in USA and is being currently studied by NASA. It will host an X-ray telescope with an effective area of more than 2 square meters at 1 keV (i.e. 30 times greater than Chandra) and a 15-arcminutes field-of-view, with 1-arcsecond or better half-power diameter (versus the 4 arcmin diameter of Chandra). While the scientific reasons for implementing a similar mission are clear, being related to compelling problems like e.g. the formation and subsequent growth of black hole seeds at very high redshift or the identification of the first galaxy groups and proto-clusters, the realization of a grazing-angle optics system able to fulfil these specs remain highly challenging. Different technologies are being envisaged, like e.g. the use of adjustable segmented mirrors (with use of piezoelectric or magneto-restrictive film actuators on the back surface) or the direct polishing of a variety of thin substrates or the use of innovative correction methods like e.g. differential deposition, ionfiguring or the correction of the profile via controlled stress films. In this paper we present a possible approach based on the direct polishing (with final ion figuring correction of the profile) of thin SiO2 segmented substrates (typically 2 mm thick), discussing different aspects of the technology under implementation and presenting some preliminary results.

  17. RF Phase Stability and Electron Beam Characterization for the PLEIADES Thomson X-Ray Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, W J; Hartemann, F V; Tremaine, A M; Springer, P T; Le Sage, G P; Barty, C P J; Rosenzweig, J B; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D N; Gibson, D J; Slaughter, D R; Anderson, S

    2002-10-16

    We report on the performance of an S-band RF photocathode electron gun and accelerator for operation with the PLEIADES Thomson x-ray source at LLNL. To produce picosecond, high brightness x-ray pulses, picosecond timing, terahertz bandwidth diagnostics, and RF phase control are required. Planned optical, RF, x-ray and electron beam measurements to characterize the dependence of electron beam parameters and synchronization on RF phase stability are presented.

  18. Cosmic-Ray Acceleration at the Forward Shock in Tycho's Supernova Remnant: Evidence from Chandra X-Ray Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jessica S.; Hughes, John P.; Badenes, Carles; Ghavamian, Parviz; McKee, Christopher F.; Moffett, David; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Rakowski, Cara; Reynoso, Estela; Slane, Patrick

    2005-11-01

    We present evidence for cosmic-ray acceleration at the forward shock in Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR) from three X-ray observables: (1) the proximity of the contact discontinuity to the forward shock, or blast wave, (2) the morphology of the emission from the rim of Tycho, and (3) the spectral nature of the rim emission. We determine the locations of the blast wave (BW), contact discontinuity (CD), and reverse shock (RS) around the rim of Tycho's supernova remnant using a principal component analysis and other methods applied to new Chandra data. The azimuthal-angle-averaged radius of the BW is 251". For the CD and RS we find average radii of 241" and 183", respectively. Taking account of projection effects, we find ratios of 1:0.93:0.70 (BW:CD:RS). We show these values to be inconsistent with adiabatic hydrodynamic models of SNR evolution. The CD:BW ratio can be explained if cosmic-ray acceleration of ions is occurring at the forward shock. The RS:BW ratio, as well as the strong Fe Kα emission from the Tycho ejecta, imply that the RS is not accelerating cosmic rays. We also extract radial profiles from ~34% of the rim of Tycho and compare them to models of surface brightness profiles behind the BW for a purely thermal plasma with an adiabatic shock. The observed morphology of the rim is much more strongly peaked than predicted by the model, indicating that such thermal emission is implausible here. Spectral analysis also implies that the rim emission is nonthermal in nature, lending further support to the idea that Tycho's forward shock is accelerating cosmic rays.

  19. Transmission type flat-panel X-ray source using ZnO nanowire field emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Daokun; Song, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Zhipeng; Chen, Jun, E-mail: stscjun@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Display Material and Technology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Li, Ziping [The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Display Material and Technology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); School of Microelectronics, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2015-12-14

    A transmission type flat-panel X-ray source in diode structure was fabricated. Large-scale patterned ZnO nanowires grown on a glass substrate by thermal oxidation were utilized as field emitters, and tungsten thin film coated on silica glass was used as the transmission anode. Uniform distribution of X-ray generation was achieved, which benefited from the uniform electron emission from ZnO nanowires. Self-ballasting effect induced by the intrinsic resistance of ZnO nanowire and decreasing of screening effect caused by patterned emitters account for the uniform emission. Characteristic X-ray peaks of W-L lines and bremsstrahlung X-rays have been observed under anode voltages at a range of 18–20 kV, the latter of which were the dominant X-ray signals. High-resolution X-ray images with spatial resolution less than 25 μm were obtained by the flat-panel X-ray source. The high resolution was attributed to the small divergence angle of the emitted X-rays from the transmission X-ray source.

  20. A study of diffuse radio sources and X-ray emission in six massive clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, V.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; Kale, R.; Intema, H.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study is to extend our current knowledge of the diffuse radio source (halo and relic) populations to z > 0.3. Here, we report GMRT and EVLA radio observations of six galaxy clusters taken from the MAssive Cluster Survey (MACS) catalogue to detect diffuse radio emission. We used archival GMRT (150, 235, and 610 MHz) and EVLA (L band) data and made images at multiple radio frequencies of the following six clusters - MACSJ0417.5-1154, MACSJ1131.8-1955, MACSJ0308.9+2645, MACSJ2243.3-0935, MACSJ2228.5+2036, and MACSJ0358.8-2955. We detect diffuse radio emission (halo or relic, or both) in the first four clusters. In the last two clusters, we do not detect any diffuse radio emission but we put stringent upper limits on their radio powers. We also use archival Chandra X-ray data to carry out morphology and substructure analysis of these clusters. We find that based on X-ray data, these MACS clusters are non-relaxed and show substructures in their temperature distribution. The radio powers of the first four MACS clusters are consistent with their expected values in the LX-P1.4 GHz plot. However, we found ultrasteep spectrum radio halo in the MACSJ0417.5-1154 cluster whose rest-frame cut-off frequency is at ˜900 MHz. The remaining two clusters whose radio powers are ˜11 times below the expected values are most likely to be in the `off-state' as has been postulated in some of the models of radio halo formation.

  1. DISCOVERY OF X-RAY PULSATIONS FROM THE INTEGRAL SOURCE IGR J11014–6103

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halpern, J. P.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Tomsick, J. A. [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Ng, C.-Y. [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Bodaghee, A. [Georgia College and State University, CBX 82, Milledgeville, GA 31061 (United States); Rodriguez, J.; Chaty, S. [Laboratoire AIM (UMR-E 9005 CEA/DSM-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot), Irfu/Service d' Astrophysique, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Rahoui, F., E-mail: jules@astro.columbia.edu [European Southern Observatory, Karl Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany)

    2014-11-10

    We report the discovery of PSR J1101–6101, a 62.8 ms pulsar in IGR J11014–6103, a hard X-ray source with a jet and a cometary tail that strongly suggests it is moving away from the center of the supernova remnant (SNR) MSH 11–61A at v > 1000 km s{sup –1}. Two XMM-Newton observations were obtained with the EPIC pn in small window mode, resulting in the measurement of its spin-down luminosity E-dot =1.36×10{sup 36} erg s{sup –1}, characteristic age τ {sub c} = 116 kyr, and surface magnetic field strength B{sub s} = 7.4 × 10{sup 11} G. In comparison to τ {sub c}, the 10-30 kyr age estimated for MSH 11–61A suggests that the pulsar was born in the SNR with initial period in the range 54 ≤ P {sub 0} ≤ 60 ms. PSR J1101–6101 is the least energetic of the 15 rotation-powered pulsars detected by INTEGRAL, and has a high efficiency of hard X-ray radiation and jet power. We examine the shape of the cometary nebula in a Chandra image, which is roughly consistent with a bow shock at the velocity inferred from the SNR age and the pulsar's E-dot . However, its structure differs in detail from the classic bow shock, and we explore possible reasons for this.

  2. The 31 Deg$^2$ Release of the Stripe 82 X-ray Survey: The Point Source Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    LaMassa, Stephanie M; Cappelluti, Nico; Boehringer, Hans; Comastri, Andrea; Glikman, Eilat; Richards, Gordon; Ananna, Tonima; Brusa, Marcella; Cardamone, Carie; Chon, Gayoung; Civano, Francesca; Farrah, Duncan; Gilfanov, Marat; Green, Paul; Komossa, S; Lira, Paulina; Makler, Martin; Marchesi, Stefano; Pecoraro, Robert; Ranalli, Piero; Salvato, Mara; Schawinski, Kevin; Stern, Daniel; Treister, Ezequiel; Viero, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We release the next installment of the Stripe 82 X-ray survey point-source catalog, which currently covers 31.3 deg$^2$ of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 Legacy field. In total, 6181 unique X-ray sources are significantly detected with {\\it XMM-Newton} ($>5\\sigma$) and {\\it Chandra} ($>4.5\\sigma$). This catalog release includes data from {\\it XMM-Newton} cycle AO 13, which approximately doubled the Stripe 82X survey area. The flux limits of the Stripe 82X survey are $8.7\\times10^{-16}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$, $4.7\\times10^{-15}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$, and $2.1\\times10^{-15}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ in the soft (0.5-2 keV), hard (2-10 keV), and full bands (0.5-10 keV), respectively, with approximate half-area survey flux limits of $5.4\\times10^{-15}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$, $2.9\\times10^{-14}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$, and $1.7\\times10^{-14}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$. We matched the X-ray source lists to available multi-wavelength catalogs, including updated matches to the previous release of the St...

  3. A Bow Shock Nebula Around a Compact X-Ray Source in the Supernova Remnant IC443

    CERN Document Server

    Olbert, C M; Williams, N E; Keohane, J W; Frail, D A

    2001-01-01

    We present spectra and high resolution images of the hard X-ray feature along the southern edge of the supernova remnant IC443. Data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory reveal a comet-shaped nebula of hard emission, which contains a softer point source at its apex. We also present 20cm, 6cm, and 3.5cm images from the Very Large Array that clearly show the cometary nebula. Based on the radio and X-ray morphology and spectrum, and the radio polarization properties, we argue that this object is a synchrotron nebula powered by the compact source that is physically associated with IC443. The spectrum of the soft point source is adequately but not uniquely fit by a black body model (kT=0.71 +/- 0.08 keV, L=(6.5 +/- 0.9) * 10^31 erg/s). The cometary morphology of the nebula is the result of the supersonic motion of the neutron star (V_NS=250 +/- 50 km/s), which causes the relativistic wind of the pulsar to terminate in a bow shock and trail behind as a synchrotron tail. This velocity is consistent with an age of 30,0...

  4. Tracing the Mass-Dependent Star Formation History of Late-Type Galaxies using X-ray Emission: Results from the CHANDRA Deep Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmer, B.D; Brandt, W.N.; Schneider, D.P.; Steffen, A.T.; Alexander, D.M.; Bell, E.F.; Hornschemeier, A.E.; McIntosh, D.H.; Bauer, F.E.; Gilli, R.; Mainieri, V.; Silverman, J.D.; Tozzi, P.; Wolf, C.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the X-ray evolution over the last approx.9 Gyr of cosmic history (i.e., since z = 1.4) of late-type galaxy populations in the Chandra Deep Field-North and Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-N and E-CDF-S. respectively; jointly CDFs) survey fields. Our late-type galaxy sample consists of 2568 galaxies. which were identified using rest-frame optical colors and HST morphologies. We utilized X-ray stacking analyses to investigate the X-ray emission from these galaxies, emphasizing the contributions from normal galaxies that are not dominated by active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Over this redshift range, we find significant increases (factors of approx. 5-10) in the X-ray-to-optical mean luminosity ratio (L(sub x)/L(sub B)) and the X-ray-to-stellar-mass mean ratio (L(sub x)/M(sub *)) for galaxy populations selected by L(sub B) and M(sub *), respectively. When analyzing galaxy samples selected via SFR, we find that the mean X-ray-to-SFR ratio (L(sub x)/SFR) is consistent with being constant over the entire redshift range for galaxies with SFR = 1-100 Solar Mass/yr, thus demonstrating that X-ray emission can be used as a robust indicator of star-formation activity out to z approx. 1.4. We find that the star-formation activity (as traced by X-ray luminosity) per unit stellar mass in a given redshift bin increases with decreasing stellar mass over the redshift range z = 0.2-1, which is consistent with previous studies of how star-formation activity depends on stellar mass. Finally, we extend our X-ray analyses to Lyman break galaxies at z approx. 3 and estimate that L(sub x)/L(sub B) at z approx. 3 is similar to its value at z = 1.4.

  5. The ultraluminous X-ray source population of NGC 4485/4490

    CERN Document Server

    Gladstone, J C

    2009-01-01

    We report the results of spectral and temporal variability studies of the ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) contained within the interacting pair of galaxies NGC 4485/4490, combining Chandra and XMM-Newton observations. Each of the four separate observations provide at least modest quality spectra and light curves for each of the six previously identified ULXs in this system; we also note the presence of a new transient ULX in the most recent observation. No short-term variability was observed for any ULX within our sample, but three out of five sources show correlated flux/spectral changes over longer timescales, with two others remaining stable in spectrum and luminosity over a period of at least five years. We model the spectra with simple power-law and multi-colour disc black body models. Although the data is insufficient to statistically distinguish models in each epoch, those better modelled (in terms of their chi^2 fit) by a multi-colour disc black body appear to show a disc-like correlation between l...

  6. Stereoscopic observations of a solar flare hard X-ray source in the high corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, S. R.; Mctiernan, J.; Loran, J.; Fenimore, E. E.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    The vertical structure of the impulsive and gradual hard X-ray sources in high coronae and the characteristics of the impulsive soft X-ray emission are investigated on the basis of PVE, ICE, and GOES observations of the energetic flare on February 16, 1984. The average photon spectra observed by these instruments during the impulsive and gradual hard X-ray bursts are summarized. A comparison of these unocculted and partially occulted spectra shows that the sources of the impulsive hard X-ray (greater than about 25 keV) and impulsive soft X-ray (2-5 keV) emissions in this flare extended to coronal altitudes greater than about 200,000 km above the photosphere. At about 100 keV, the ratio of the coronal source brightness to the total source brightness was 0.001 during the impulsive phase and less than about 0.01 during the gradual hard X-ray burst. The sources of the gradual hard X-ray burst and gradual soft X-ray burst were almost completely occulted, indicating that these sources were located at heights less than 200,000 km above the photosphere.

  7. Source effects in analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast imaging with conventional sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoennicke, M. G. [Universidade Federal da Integracao Latino-Americana, 85867-970 Foz do Iguacu, PR (Brazil); Manica, J. [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana, 85867-970 Foz do Iguacu, PR (Brazil); Mazzaro, I.; Cusatis, C. [LORXI, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Parana, Caixa Postal 19091, 81531-990 Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Huang, X.-R. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Several recent papers have shown the implementation of analyzer based X-ray phase contrast imaging (ABI) with conventional X-ray sources. The high flux is always a requirement to make the technique useful for bio-medical applications. Here, we present and discuss three important parameters, which need to be taken into account, when searching for the high flux ABI: anisotropic magnification, double image, and source size spread due to intrinsic dispersive diffraction by asymmetrically cut crystals. These parameters, if not well optimized, may cause important features in the acquired images which can mislead the interpretation. A few ways to minimize these effects are implemented and discussed, including some experimental results.

  8. Development of a multilayer mirror for high-intensity monochromatic x-ray using lab-based x-ray source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh-hai; Song, Seonggeun; Jung, Jin-Ho; Jeon, Insu

    2012-09-15

    A parabolic, multilayer x-ray mirror, which can be used with a general lab-based x-ray source, was designed and fabricated. A glass substrate for the mirror was fabricated. Its surface was determined by following the rotation of a parabolic curve and was polished precisely. On the substrate surface, six W/Al bilayers were deposited to form the multilayer mirror. The effects of the mirror on x-ray images were investigated based on the calculated modulation transfer function (MTF) and image intensity values. Higher MTF and intensity values of an x-ray image were obtained using the mirror.

  9. Time-resolved Rocking Curve Measurement Method using Laboratory X-ray Source

    OpenAIRE

    林, 雄二郎; 佐藤, 真伸; 古賀, 三井; 佃, 昇; 蔵元, 英一

    2005-01-01

    Fast x-ray detectors and fast signal processing devices have enabled to measure time dependence of x-ray diffraction intensity. Using a fast x-ray detection system, we have developed a time-resolved measurement method of rocking curves with a laboratory x-ray source. The method has been demonstrated for time-resolved rocking curves from an ultrasound-vibrated silicon crystal in MHz range. The measured rocking curves have been consistent with simulated curves based on the dynamical diffraction...

  10. S-band linac-based X-ray source with {pi}/2-mode electron linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, Abhay, E-mail: abhay@post.kek.jp [Department of Accelerator Science, School of High Energy Accelerator Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Shonan International Village, Hayama, Miura, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); Society for Applied Microwave Electronic Engineering and Research (SAMEER), R and D Laboratory of the Government of India, IIT Campus, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India); Araki, Sakae [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Dixit, Tanuja [Society for Applied Microwave Electronic Engineering and Research (SAMEER), R and D Laboratory of the Government of India, IIT Campus, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India); Fukuda, Masafumi [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Krishnan, R; Pethe, Sanjay [Society for Applied Microwave Electronic Engineering and Research (SAMEER), R and D Laboratory of the Government of India, IIT Campus, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India); Sakaue, Kazuyuki [Waseda University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Urakawa, Junji [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Washio, Masakazu [Waseda University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2011-05-01

    The activities with the compact X-ray source are attracting more attention, particularly for the applications of the source in medical fields. We propose the fabrication of a compact X-ray source using the SAMEER electron linear accelerator and the KEK laser undulator X-ray source (LUCX) technologies. The linac developed at SAMEER is a standing wave side-coupled S-band linac operating in the {pi}/2 mode. In the proposed system, a photocathode RF gun will inject bunches of electrons in the linac to accelerate and achieve a high-energy, low-emittance beam. This beam will then interact with the laser in the laser cavity to produce X-rays of a type well suited for various applications. The side-coupled structure will make the system more compact, and the {pi}/2 mode of operation will enable a high repetition rate operation, which will help to increase the X-ray yield.

  11. A broadband X-ray spectral study of the intermediate-mass black hole candidate M82 X-1 with NuSTAR, Chandra and Swift

    CERN Document Server

    Brightman, Murray; Barret, Didier; Davis, Shane W; Fürst, Felix; Madsen, Kristin K; Middleton, Matthew; Miller, Jon M; Stern, Daniel; Tao, Lian; Walton, Dominic J

    2016-01-01

    M82 X-1 is one of the brightest ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) known, which, assuming Eddington-limited accretion and other considerations, makes it one of the best intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) candidates. However, the ULX may still be explained by super-Eddington accretion onto a stellar-remnant black hole. We present simultaneous NuSTAR, Chandra and Swift/XRT observations during the peak of a flaring episode with the aim of modeling the emission of M82 X-1 and yielding insights into its nature. We find that thin-accretion disk models all require accretion rates at or above the Eddington limit in order to reproduce the spectral shape, given a range of black hole masses and spins. Since at these high Eddington ratios the thin-disk model breaks down due to radial advection in the disk, we discard the results of the thin-disk models as unphysical. We find that the temperature profile as a function of disk radius ($T(r)\\propto r^{-p}$) is significantly flatter ($p=0.55^{+ 0.07}_{- 0.04}$) than expecte...

  12. On the black hole masses in ultra-luminous X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin-Lin

    2015-05-01

    Ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are off-nuclear X-ray sources in nearby galaxies with X-ray luminosities ⩾ 1039 erg s-1. The measurement of the black hole (BH) masses of ULXs is a long-standing problem. Here we estimate BH masses in a sample of ULXs with XMM-Newton observations using two different mass indicators, the X-ray photon index and X-ray variability amplitude based on the correlations established for active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The BH masses estimated from the two methods are compared and discussed. We find that some extreme high-luminosity (LX > 5 ×1040 erg s-1) ULXs contain the BH of 104-105 M⊙ . The results from X-ray variability amplitude are in conflict with those from X-ray photon indices for ULXs with lower luminosities. This suggests that these ULXs generally accrete at rates different from those of X-ray luminous AGNs, or they have different power spectral densities of X-ray variability. We conclude that most of ULXs accrete at super-Eddington rate, thus harbor stellar-mass BH.

  13. The X-ray spectral evolution of the ultraluminous X-ray source Holmberg IX X-1

    CERN Document Server

    Luangtip, W; Done, C

    2016-01-01

    We present a new analysis of X-ray spectra of the archetypal ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) Holmberg IX X-1 obtained by the Swift, XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observatories. This ULX is a persistent source, with a typical luminosity of ~10^40 erg s^-1, that varied by a factor of 4 - 5 over eight years. We find that its spectra tend to evolve from relatively flat or two-component spectra in the medium energy band (1-6 keV), at lower luminosities, to a spectrum that is distinctly curved and disc-like at the highest luminosities, with the peak energy in the curved spectrum tending to decrease with increased luminosity. We argue that the spectral evolution of the ULX can be explained by super-Eddington accretion models, where in this case we view the ULX down the evacuated funnel along its rotation axis, bounded by its massive radiatively driven wind. The spectral changes then originate in enhanced geometric beaming as the accretion rate increases and wind funnel narrows, causing the scattered flux from the central r...

  14. Studies of Supersoft X-ray Sources (SSS) and Quasisoft X-ray Sources (QSS) in the Milky Way and Magellanic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, Chun-Shing J.; Li, K.; Kong, A. K. H.; DiStefano, R.

    2010-03-01

    Quasisoft X-ray sources (QSSs) are luminous (L > 1036 erg s-1, kT between 120eV and 350eV) X-ray sources emitting few or no photons at energy above 2 keV yet clearly emitting at above 1.1 keV. While their spectra are harder than luminous supersoft X-ray sources (SSSs), which have characteristic temperatures of tens of eV, QSSs are significantly softer than most canonical X-ray sources. They have been identified in elliptical galaxies, spiral galaxies (in both spiral arms and halos), and globular clusters. We report here on the progress of a comprehensive and systematic search of SSSs and QSSs in the Milky Way and in the Magellanic Clouds using archival X-ray data. Our focus is to conduct an optimized search to identify all candidates in order to differentiate between the different natures of SSSs and QSSs. The candidates collected would be checked for counterparts in other wavelengths, which could possibly help us to determine the fundamental nature of these sources, including the properties, if present, of the accretors and the accretion disks. This work is supported by a Hong Kong SAR Research Grants Council General Research Fund and by a NASA ADP grant.

  15. Development of low-energy x-ray fluorescence micro-distribution analysis using a laser plasma x-ray source and multilayer optics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuik, R.; Shmaenok, L. A.; Fledderus, H.; Andreev, S. S.; Shamov, E. A.; Zuev, S. Y.; Salashchenko, N. N.; F. Bijkerk,

    1999-01-01

    A new technique is presented for low-energy X-ray fluorescence micro-distribution analysis of low-Z elements at micrometer spatial resolutions. The technique is based on the use of a laser plasma X-ray source and spherically curved multilayer optics. A large collimator is used to focus the light fro

  16. Soft-X-Ray Projection Lithography Using a High-Repetition-Rate Laser-Induced X-Ray Source for Sub-100 Nanometer Lithography Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Louis,; F. Bijkerk,; Shmaenok, L.; Voorma, H. J.; van der Wiel, M. J.; Schlatmann, R.; Verhoeven, J.; van der Drift, E. W. J. M.; Romijn, J.; Rousseeuw, B. A. C.; Voss, F.; Desor, R.; Nikolaus, B.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we present the status of a joint development programme on soft x-ray projection lithography (SXPL) integrating work on high brightness laser plasma sources. fabrication of multilayer x-ray mirrors. and patterning of reflection masks. We are in the process of optimization of a laser-pla

  17. Broadband X-ray spectra of the ultraluminous x-ray source Holmberg IX X-1 observed with NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walton, D. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Grefenstette, B. W.;

    2014-01-01

    We present results from the coordinated broadband X-ray observations of the extreme ultraluminous X-ray source Holmberg IX X-1 performed by NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku in late 2012. These observations provide the first high-quality spectra of Holmberg IX X-1 above 10 keV to date, extending the X...

  18. A hard X-ray study of the ultraluminous X-ray source NGC 5204 X-1 with NuSTAR and XMM-Newton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mukherjee, E. S.; Walton, D. J.; Bachetti, M.;

    2015-01-01

    We present the results from coordinated X-ray observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source NGC 5204 X-1 performed by the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array and XMM-Newton in early 2013. These observations provide the first detection of NGC 5204 X-1 above 10 keV, extending the broadband...

  19. Shielded radiography with a laser-driven MeV-energy X-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shouyuan; Golovin, Grigory [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Miller, Cameron [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Haden, Daniel; Banerjee, Sudeep; Zhang, Ping; Liu, Cheng; Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Baozhen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Clarke, Shaun; Pozzi, Sara [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Umstadter, Donald, E-mail: donald.umstadter@unl.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of experimental and numerical-simulation studies of shielded radiography using narrowband MeV-energy X-rays from a compact all-laser-driven inverse-Compton-scattering X-ray light source. This recently developed X-ray light source is based on a laser-wakefield accelerator with ultra-high-field gradient (GeV/cm). We demonstrate experimentally high-quality radiographic imaging (image contrast of 0.4 and signal-to-noise ratio of 2:1) of a target composed of 8-mm thick depleted uranium shielded by 80-mm thick steel, using a 6-MeV X-ray beam with a spread of 45% (FWHM) and 10{sup 7} photons in a single shot. The corresponding dose of the X-ray pulse measured in front of the target is ∼100 nGy/pulse. Simulations performed using the Monte-Carlo code MCNPX accurately reproduce the experimental results. These simulations also demonstrate that the narrow bandwidth of the Compton X-ray source operating at 6 and 9 MeV leads to a reduction of deposited dose as compared to broadband bremsstrahlung sources with the same end-point energy. The X-ray beam’s inherently low-divergence angle (∼mrad) is advantageous and effective for interrogation at standoff distance. These results demonstrate significant benefits of all-laser driven Compton X-rays for shielded radiography.

  20. Laser-Plasma Sources for Soft-X-Ray Projection Lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Bijkerk,; Shmaenok, L.; Vanhonk, A.; Bastiaensen, R.; Platonov, Y. Y.; Shevelko, A. P.; Mitrofanov, A. V.; Voss, F.; Desor, R.; Frowein, H.; Nikolaus, B.

    1994-01-01

    Results are reported concerning high-repetition-rate excimer lasers with average powers up to 415 W and their usage for generating laser-plasma soft X-ray sources. A conversion efficiency of laser light into monochromatized soft X-ray radiation of 0.7% at 13.5 nm (2% bandwidth) was achieved using an

  1. Monitoring the activity variations of galactic X-ray sources with WATCH on EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, N.

    1995-01-01

    sources the observation periods extended over more than 100 days. A number of X-ray transients with durations between one and five days were discovered, and, additionally two long duration X-ray transients (GRS 1915+10 and GRO J0422+32) were active and could be monitored. Towards the end of the mission...

  2. Pile-up corrections in laser-driven pulsed x-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    A formalism for treating the pile-up produced in laser-driven pulsed x-ray sources has been developed. It allows the direct use of x-ray spectroscopy without artificially decreasing the number of counts in the detector. The influence of the pile-up on the overestimation of temperature parameters is shown up.

  3. Spot size diagnostics for flash radiographic X-ray sources at LAPA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Cheng-Gang; LI Qin; SHI Jin-Shui; DENG Jian-Jun

    2009-01-01

    Spot size is one of the parameters to characterize the performance of a radiographic X-ray source.It determines the degree of blurring due to magnification directly.In recent years,a variety of measurement methods have been used to diagnose X-ray spot size at Laboratory of Accelerator Physics and Application (LAPA).Computer simulations and experiments showed that using a rolled-edge to measure the spot size are more accurate,and the intensity distribution of X-ray source was obtained by a device with a square aperture.Experimental and simulation results on a flash X-ray source at our laboratory are presented and discussed in this paper.In addition,a new method for time resolved diagnostics of X-ray spot size is introduced too.

  4. Hard X-ray sources from miniature plasma focus devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raspa, V. [Buenos Aires Univ., PLADEMA, CONICET and INFIP (Argentina); Silva, P.; Moreno, J.; Zambra, M.; Soto, L. [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago (Chile)

    2004-07-01

    As first stage of a program to design a repetitive pulsed radiation generator for industrial applications, two miniature plasma foci have been designed and constructed at the Chilean commission of nuclear energy. The devices operate at an energy level of the order of tens of joules (PF-50 J, 160 nF capacitor bank, 20-35 kV, 32-100 J, {approx} 150 ns time to peak current) and hundred of joules (PF-400 J, 880 nF, 20-35 kV, 176-539 J, {approx} 300 ns time to peak current). Hard X-rays are being studied in these devices operating with hydrogen. Images of metallic plates with different thickness were obtained on commercial radiographic film, Agfa Curix ST-G2, in order to characterize the energy of the hard X-ray outside of the discharge chamber of PF-400 J. An effective energy of the order of 90 keV was measured under those conditions. X ray images of different metallic objects also have been obtained. (authors)

  5. Small-animal tomography with a liquid-metal-jet x-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, D. H.; Lundström, U.; Westermark, U.; Takman, P. A. C.; Burvall, A.; Arsenian Henriksson, M.; Hertz, H. M.

    2012-03-01

    X-ray tomography of small animals is an important tool for medical research. For high-resolution x-ray imaging of few-cm-thick samples such as, e.g., mice, high-brightness x-ray sources with energies in the few-10-keV range are required. In this paper we perform the first small-animal imaging and tomography experiments using liquid-metal-jet-anode x-ray sources. This type of source shows promise to increase the brightness of microfocus x-ray systems, but present sources are typically optimized for an energy of 9 keV. Here we describe the details of a high-brightness 24-keV electron-impact laboratory microfocus x-ray source based on continuous operation of a heated liquid-In/Ga-jet anode. The source normally operates with 40 W of electron-beam power focused onto the metal jet, producing a 7×7 μm2 FWHM x-ray spot. The peak spectral brightness is 4 × 109 photons / ( s × mm2 × mrad2 × 0.1%BW) at the 24.2 keV In Kα line. We use the new In/Ga source and an existing Ga/In/Sn source for high-resolution imaging and tomography of mice.

  6. A search for hyperluminous X-ray sources in the XMM-Newton source catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Zolotukhin, Ivan; Godet, Olivier; Bachetti, Matteo; Barret, Didier

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method to identify luminous off-nuclear X-ray sources in the outskirts of galaxies from large public redshift surveys, distinguishing them from foreground and background interlopers. Using the 3XMM-DR5 catalog of X-ray sources and the SDSS DR12 spectroscopic sample of galaxies, with the help of this off-nuclear cross-matching technique, we selected 98 sources with inferred X-ray luminosities in the range $10^{41} < L_{\\rm X} < 10^{44}\\,{\\rm erg\\,s}^{-1}$, compatible with hyperluminous X-ray objects (HLX). To validate the method, we verify that it allowed us to recover known HLX candidates such as ESO 243$-$49 HLX$-$1 and M82 X$-$1. From a statistical study, we conservatively estimate that up to $71 \\pm 11$ of these sources may be fore- or background sources, statistically leaving at least 16 that are likely to be HLXs, thus providing support for the existence of the HLX population. We identify two good HLX candidates and using other publicly available datasets, in particular the VLA FIR...

  7. X-ray sources and their optical counterparts in the globular cluster M 22

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, N A; Gendre, B; Barret, D; Lasota, J P; Rizzi, L

    2004-01-01

    Using XMM-Newton EPIC imaging data, we have detected 50 low-luminosity X-ray sources in the field of view of M 22, where 5 +/- 3 of these sources are likely to be related to the cluster. Using differential optical photometry, we have identified probable counterparts to those sources belonging to the cluster. Using X-ray spectroscopic and timing studies, supported by the optical colours, we propose that the most central X-ray sources in the cluster are cataclysmic variables, millisecond pulsars, active binaries and a blue straggler. We also identify a cluster of galaxies behind this globular cluster.

  8. A Compact X-Ray Source in the Radio Pulsar-wind Nebula G141.2+5.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Stephen P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of a 50 ks Chandra observation of the recently discovered radio object G141.2+5.0, presumed to be a pulsar-wind nebula. We find a moderately bright unresolved X-ray source that we designate CXOU J033712.8 615302 coincident with the central peak radio emission. An absorbed power-law fit to the 241 counts describes the data well, with absorbing column {N}H=6.7(4.0,9.7)× {10}21 cm-2 and photon index {{Γ }}=1.8(1.4,2.2). For a distance of 4 kpc, the unabsorbed luminosity between 0.5 and 8 keV is {1.7}-0.3+0.4× {10}32 erg s-1 (90% confidence intervals). Both LX and Γ are quite typical of pulsars in PWNe. No extended emission is seen; we estimate a conservative 3σ upper limit to the surface brightness of any X-ray PWN near the point source to be 3× {10}-17 erg cm-2 s-1 arcsec-2 between 0.5 and 8 keV, assuming the same spectrum as the point source; for a nebula of diameter 13\\prime\\prime , the flux limit is 6% of the flux of the point source. The steep radio spectrum of the PWN (α ˜ -0.7), if continued to the X-ray without a break, predicts {L}{{X}} {{(nebula)}}˜ 1× {10}33 erg s-1, so additional spectral steepening between radio and X-rays is required, as is true of all known PWNe. The high Galactic latitude gives a z-distance of 350 pc above the Galactic plane, quite unusual for a Population I object.

  9. Performance as Promised: How the Chandra X-ray Observatory Accomplished One of Nasa's Most Challenging Missions for Billions of Dollars Less than Originally Planned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Greg; Hefner, Keith

    2004-01-01

    As the nation looks toward bold new ventures in space, the Chandra X-ray Observatory program offers an example of how billion-dollar missions can be successfully developed within tightening fiscal constraints. Chandra experienced many of challenges facing bold space programs (state-of-the-art technical requirements and budget-induced slips and restructurings), and yet the Chandra team achieved nearly all the originally envisioned performance for dramatically lower cost. This was accomplished by a combination of team- work, systems engineering, advanced technology insertion, and effective approaches for program implementation. A thorough tradeoff of science utility vs. cost led to the selection of a highly elliptical orbit with uncrewed robotic delivery, deployment, and maintenance. Progressive, focused technology demonstrations were accomplished prior to commitment of major resources to critical elements of the system design, such as the high resolution mirror assembly (HRMA). Pathfinder hardware was developed to reduce risks. A variety of schedule risk reduction measures were implemented and resulted in the X-ray calibration taking place exactly within five days of its originally planned date after after five years of development. The team worked together in an effective manner to contain requirements creep. reductions such as the ACIS-2 chip device. It is estimated that the above combination of measures achieved the avoidance of over $4B in costs, while enabling a highly successful mission.

  10. A CHANDRA-VLA INVESTIGATION OF THE X-RAY CAVITY SYSTEM AND RADIO MINI-HALO IN THE GALAXY CLUSTER RBS 797

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doria, Alberto [Argelander-Institut fuer Astronomie, Auf dem Huegel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Gitti, Myriam; Brighenti, Fabrizio [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, Bologna 40127 (Italy); Ettori, Stefano [Astronomical Observatory of Bologna-INAF, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Nulsen, Paul E. J.; McNamara, Brian R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    We present a study of the cavity system in the galaxy cluster RBS 797 based on Chandra and Very Large Array (VLA) data. RBS 797 (z = 0.35) is one of the most distant galaxy clusters in which two pronounced X-ray cavities have been discovered. The Chandra data confirm the presence of a cool core and indicate a higher metallicity along the cavity directions. This is likely due to the active galactic nucleus outburst, which lifts cool metal-rich gas from the center along the cavities, as seen in other systems. We find indications that the cavities are hotter than the surrounding gas. Moreover, the new Chandra images show bright rims contrasting with the deep, X-ray deficient cavities. The likely cause is that the expanding 1.4 GHz radio lobes have displaced the gas, compressing it into a shell that appears as bright cool arms. Finally, we show that the large-scale radio emission detected with our VLA observations may be classified as a radio mini-halo, powered by the cooling flow, as it nicely follows the trend P{sub radio} versus P{sub CF} predicted by the reacceleration model.

  11. Electron Heating and Cosmic Rays at a Supernova Shock from Chandra X-ray Observations of E0102.2-7219

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, J P; Decourchelle, A; Hughes, John P.; Rakowski, Cara E.; Decourchelle, Anne

    2000-01-01

    In this Letter we use the unprecedented spatial resolution of the Chandra X-ray Observatory to carry out, for the first time, a measurement of the post-shock electron temperature and proper motion of a young SNR, specifically to address questions about the post-shock partition of energy among electrons, ions, and cosmic rays. The expansion rate, 0.100 +/- 0.025 percent per yr, and inferred age, ~1000 yr, of E0102.2-7219, from a comparison of X-ray observations spanning 20 years, are fully consistent with previous estimates based on studies of high velocity oxygen-rich optical filaments in the remnant. With a radius of 6.4 pc for the blast wave estimated from the Chandra image, our expansion rate implies a blast wave velocity of ~6000 km/s and a range of electron temperatures 2.5 - 45 keV, dependent on the degree of collisionless electron heating. Analysis of the Chandra ACIS spectrum of the immediate post-shock region reveals a thermal plasma with abundances and column density typical of the Small Magellanic ...

  12. A Chandra - VLA Investigation of the X-ray Cavity System and Radio Mini-Halo in the Galaxy Cluster RBS 797

    CERN Document Server

    Doria, Alberto; Ettori, Stefano; Brighenti, Fabrizio; Nulsen, Paul E J; McNamara, Brian R

    2012-01-01

    We present a study of the cavity system in the galaxy cluster RBS 797 based on Chandra and VLA data. RBS 797 (z = 0.35), is one of the most distant galaxy clusters in which two pronounced X-ray cavities have been discovered. The Chandra data confirm the presence of a cool core and indicate an higher metallicity along the cavity directions. This is likely due to the AGN outburst, which lifts cool metal-rich gas from the center along the cavities, as seen in other systems. We find indications that the cavities are hotter than the surrounding gas. Moreover, the new Chandra images show bright rims contrasting with the deep, X-ray deficient cavities. The likely cause is that the expanding 1.4 GHz radio lobes have displaced the gas, compressing it into a shell that appears as bright cool arms. Finally we show that the large-scale radio emission detected with our VLA observations may be classified as a radio mini-halo, powered by the cooling flow (CF), as it nicely follows the trend P_radio vs. P_CF predicted by the...

  13. Monitoring Chandra observations of the quasi-persistent neutron-star X-ray transient MXB 1659-29 in quiescence: the cooling curve of the heated neutron-star crust

    CERN Document Server

    Wijnands, R; Miller, J M; Lewin, W H G; Wijnands, Rudy; Homan, Jeroen; Miller, Jon M.; Lewin, Walter H. G.

    2004-01-01

    We have observed the quasi-persistent neutron-star X-ray transient and eclipsing binary MXB 1659-29 in quiescence on three occasions with Chandra. The purpose of our observations was to monitor the quiescent behavior of the source after its last prolonged (~2.5 years) outburst which ended in September 2001. The X-ray spectra of the source are consistent with thermal radiation from the neutron-star surface. We found that the bolometric flux of the source decreased by a factor of 7-9 over the time-span of 1.5 years between our first and last Chandra observations. The effective temperature also decreased, but by a factor of 1.6-1.7. The decrease in time of the bolometric flux and effective temperature can be described using exponential decay functions, with e-folding times of ~0.7 and ~3 years, respectively. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that we observed a cooling neutron-star crust which was heated considerably during the prolonged accretion event and which is still out of thermal equilibrium w...

  14. Burst-only sources: probing type I X-ray bursters at low persistent luminosities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelisse, R.; Zand, J.J.M. in ' t; Kuulkers, E.; Heise, J.; Verbunt, F.; Cocchi, M.; Bazzano, A.; Natalucci, L.; Ubertini, P

    2004-06-01

    The Wide Field Cameras onboard BeppoSAX observed 9 type I X-ray bursters without detectable persistent emission around the burst. According to the standard theory of X-ray bursts these sources should be in the lowest mass-accretion regime, opening the possibility to study this regime for the first time. We compare the sources with the burst theory, and show that the evidence of a new sub-class of low mass X-ray binaries, the burst-only source, is still meagre.

  15. Anti-correlated hard X-ray time lags in Galactic black hole sources

    CERN Document Server

    Sriram, K; Pendharkar, J K; Rao, A R; Pendharkar, Jayant K.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the accretion disk geometry in Galactic black hole sources by measuring the time delay between soft and hard X-ray emissions. Similar to the recent discoveries of anti-correlated hard X-ray time lags in Cyg X-3 and GRS 1915+105, we find that the hard X-rays are anti-correlated with soft X-rays with a significant lag in another source: XTE J1550-564. We also find the existence of pivoting in the model independent X-ray spectrum during these observations. We investigate time-resolved X-ray spectral parameters and find that the variation in these parameters is consistent with the idea of a truncated accretion disk. The QPO frequency, which is a measure of the size of truncated accretion disk, too changes indicating that the geometric size of the hard X-ray emitting region changes along with the spectral pivoting and soft X-ray flux. Similar kind of delay is also noticed in 4U 1630-47.

  16. The X-ray spectral evolution of the ultraluminous X-ray source Holmberg IX X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luangtip, Wasutep; Roberts, Timothy P.; Done, Chris

    2016-08-01

    We present a new analysis of X-ray spectra of the archetypal ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) Holmberg IX X-1 obtained by the Swift, XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observatories. This ULX is a persistent source, with a typical luminosity of ˜1040 erg s-1, that varied by a factor of 4-5 over eight years. We find that its spectra tend to evolve from relatively flat or two-component spectra in the medium energy band (1-6 keV), at lower luminosities, to a spectrum that is distinctly curved and disc-like at the highest luminosities, with the peak energy in the curved spectrum tending to decrease with increased luminosity. We argue that the spectral evolution of the ULX can be explained by super-Eddington accretion models, where in this case we view the ULX down the evacuated funnel along its rotation axis, bounded by its massive radiatively driven wind. The spectral changes then originate in enhanced geometric beaming as the accretion rate increases and wind funnel narrows, causing the scattered flux from the central regions of the supercritical flow to brighten faster than the isotropic thermal emission from the wind, and so the curved hard spectral component to dominate at the highest luminosities. The wind also Compton down-scatters photons at the edge of the funnel, resulting in the peak energy of the spectrum decreasing. We also confirm that Holmberg IX X-1 displays spectral degeneracy with luminosity, and suggest that the observed differences are naturally explained by precession of the black hole rotation axis for the suggested wind geometry.

  17. Low Energy Plasma Focus as an Intense X-ray Source for Radiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Hussain; M. Zakaullah; Shujaat Ali; A. Waheed

    2004-01-01

    Study on X-ray emission from a low energy (1.8 k J) plasma focus device powered by a 9 μF capacitor bank, charged at 20 kV and giving peak discharge current of about 175 kA by using a lead-inserted copper-tapered anode is reported. The X-ray yield in different energy windows is measured as a function of hydrogen filling pressure. The maximum yield in 4π-geometry is found to be (27.3±1.1) J and corresponding wall plug efficiency for X-ray generation is 1.52 ±0.06%. X-ray emission, presumably due to bombarding activity of electrons in current sheath at the anode tip was dominant, which is confirmed by the pinhole images. The feasibility of the device as an intense X-ray source for radiography is demonstrated.

  18. Catalytic action of β source on x-ray emission from plasma focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S.; Sadiq, Mehboob; Hussain, S.; Shafiq, M.; Zakaullah, M.; Waheed, A.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of preionization around the insulator sleeve by a mesh-type β source (Ni6328) for the x-ray emission from a (2.3-3.9 kJ) plasma focus device is investigated. Quantrad Si p-i-n diodes along with suitable filters are employed as time-resolved x-ray detectors and a multipinhole camera with absorption filters is used for time-integrated analysis. X-ray emission in 4π geometry is measured as a function of argon and hydrogen gas filling pressures with and without β source at different charging voltages. It is found that the pressure range for the x-ray emission is broadened, x-ray emission is enhanced, and shot to shot reproducibility is improved with the β source. With argon, the CuKα emission is estimated to be 27.14 J with an efficiency of 0.7% for β source and 21.5 J with an efficiency of 0.55% without β source. The maximum x-ray yield in 4π geometry is found to be about 68.90 J with an efficiency of 1.8% for β source and 54.58 J with an efficiency of 1.4% without β source. With hydrogen, CuKα emission is 11.82 J with an efficiency of 0.32% for β source and 10.07 J with an efficiency of 0.27% without β source. The maximum x-ray yield in 4π geometry is found to be 30.20 J with an efficiency of 0.77% for β source and 25.58 J with an efficiency of 0.6% without β source. The x-ray emission with Pb insert at the anode tip without β source is also investigated and found to be reproducible and significantly high. The maximum x-ray yield is estimated to be 46.6 J in 4π geometry with an efficiency of 1.4% at 23 kV charging voltage. However, degradation of x-ray yield is observed when charging voltage exceeds 23 kV for Pb insert. From pinhole images it is observed that the x-ray emission due to the bombardment of electrons at the anode tip is dominant in both with and without β source.

  19. Omega Dante Soft X-Ray Power Diagnostic Component Calibration at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, K; Weber, F; Dewald, E; Glenzer, S; Landen, O; Turner, R; Waide, P

    2004-04-15

    The Dante soft x-ray spectrometer installed on the Omega laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester is a twelve-channel filter-edge defined x-ray power diagnostic. It is used to measure the absolute flux from direct drive, indirect drive (hohlraums) and other plasma sources. Calibration efforts using two beam lines, U3C (50eV-1keV) and X8A (1keV-6keV) at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) have been implemented to insure the accuracy of these measurements. We have calibrated vacuum x-ray diodes, mirrors and filters.

  20. Omega Dante soft x-ray power diagnostic component calibration at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, K. M.; Weber, F. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Landen, O. L.; Turner, R. E.; Waide, P. A.

    2004-10-01

    The Dante soft x-ray spectrometer, installed on the Omega laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, is a 12-channel filter-edge defined soft x-ray power diagnostic. It is used to measure the spectrally resolved, absolute flux from direct drive, indirect drive (hohlraums) and other plasma sources. Dante component calibration efforts using two beam lines, U3C (50 eV-1 keV) and X8A (1-6 keV) at the National Synchrotron Light Source have been implemented to improve the accuracy of these measurements. We have calibrated metallic vacuum x-ray diodes, mirrors and filters.

  1. Interstellar X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Oxygen, Neon, and Iron with the Chandra LETGS Spectrum of X0614+091

    CERN Document Server

    Paerels, F B S; Van der Meer, R L J; Kaastra, J S; Kuulkers, E; Den Boggende, A J F; Predehl, P; Drake, J J; Kahn, S M; Savin, D W; McLaughlin, B M; Paerels, Frits; Drake, Jeremy J.; Kahn, Steven M.; Savin, Daniel W.; Laughlin, Brendan M. Mc

    2000-01-01

    We find resolved interstellar O K, Ne K, and Fe L absorption spectra in the Chandra Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer spectrum of the low mass X-ray binary X0614+091. We measure the column densities in O and Ne, and find direct spectroscopic constraints on the chemical state of the interstellar O. These measurements probably probe a low-density line of sight through the Galaxy and we discuss the results in the context of our knowledge of the properties of interstellar matter in regions between the spiral arms.

  2. Observations of the Crab Nebula with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory During the Gamma-Ray Flare of 2011 April

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, using the AGILE and Fermi satellites, gamma-ray flares have been discovered from the direction of the Crab Nebula (Tavani et al. 2011, Abdo et al. 2011). We have been using the Chandra X-Ray observatory to monitor the Crab on a monthly cadence since just after the 2010 September gamma-ray flare. We were fortunate to trigger series of pre-planned target of opportunity observations during the 2011 April flare. We present the results of these observations and address some implications both for now and for the future.

  3. X-ray properties of radio-selected star forming galaxies in the Chandra-COSMOS survey

    OpenAIRE

    Ranalli, P.; Comastri, A.; Zamorani, G.; Cappelluti, N.; Civano, F.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Gilli, R.; Schinnerer, E.; Smolcic, V.; Vignali, C.

    2012-01-01

    X-ray surveys contain sizable numbers of star forming galaxies, beyond the AGN which usually make the majority of detections. Many methods to separate the two populations are used in the literature, based on X-ray and multiwavelength properties. We aim at a detailed test of the classification schemes and to study the X-ray properties of the resulting samples. We build on a sample of galaxies selected at 1.4 GHz in the VLA-COSMOS survey, classified by Smolcic et al. (2008) according to their o...

  4. The ROSAT deep survey; 5, X-rays Sources and Optical Identifications in the Marano Field

    CERN Document Server

    Zamorani, G; Hasinger, G; Burg, R; Giacconi, R; Schmidt, M; Trümper, J E; Ciliegi, P; Gruppioni, C; Marano, B

    1999-01-01

    We present the X-ray data and the optical identifications for a deep ROSAT PSPC observation in the "Marano field". In the inner region of the ROSAT field (15' radius) we detected 50 X-ray sources with Sx >= 3.7x10^(-15) erg/cm^2/s. When corrected for the different sensitivity over the field, the estimated observed surface density at Sx >= 4x10^(-15) erg/cm^2/s is 272+/-40 sources/sq.deg. Four X-ray sources, corresponding to 8% of the total sample, have been detected in radio images with a flux limit of about 0.2 mJy. Careful statistical analysis of multicolour CCD data in the error boxes of the 50 X-ray sources has led to the identification of 42 sources, corresponding to 84% of the X-ray sample. These 42 reliable identifications are 33 AGNs (including two radio galaxies and one BL Lac candidate; 79% of the identified sources), 2 galaxies, 3 groups or clusters of galaxies and 4 stars. We also show that it is likely that a few of the 8 unidentified sources are such because the derived X-ray positions may be of...

  5. Optical technologies for extreme-ultraviolet and soft X-ray coherent sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canova, Federico [Amplitude Technologies, Evry (France); Poletto, Luca (ed.) [National Research Council, Padova (Italy). Inst. of Photonics and Nanotechnology

    2015-07-01

    The book reviews the most recent achievements in optical technologies for XUV and X-ray coherent sources. Particular attention is given to free-electron-laser facilities, but also to other sources available at present, such as synchrotrons, high-order laser harmonics and X-ray lasers. The optical technologies relevant to each type of source are discussed. In addition, the main technologies used for photon handling and conditioning, namely multilayer mirrors, adaptive optics, crystals and gratings are explained. Experiments using coherent light received during the last decades a lot of attention for the X-ray regime. Strong efforts were taken for the realization of almost fully coherent sources, e.g. the free-electron lasers, both as independent sources in the femtosecond and attosecond regimes and as seeding sources for free-electron-lasers and X-ray gas lasers. In parallel to the development of sources, optical technologies for photon handling and conditioning of such coherent and intense X-ray beams advanced. New problems were faced for the realization of optical components of beamlines demanding to manage coherent X-ray photons, e.g. the preservation of coherence and time structure of ultra short pulses.

  6. Convertible source system of thermal neutron and X-ray at Hokkaido University electron linac facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiyama, T.; Hara, K. Y.; Taira, H.; Sato, H.

    2016-11-01

    The convertible source system for the neutron and the X-ray imagings was installed in the 45MeV electron linear accelerator facility at Hokkaido University. The source system is very useful for a complementary imaging. The imaging measurements for a sample were performed with both beams by using a vacuum tube type image intensifier. The enhanced contrast was obtained from the dataset of the radiograms measured with the neutron and X-ray beams.

  7. JOINT ANALYSIS OF CLUSTER OBSERVATIONS. II. CHANDRA/XMM-NEWTON X-RAY AND WEAK LENSING SCALING RELATIONS FOR A SAMPLE OF 50 RICH CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahdavi, Andisheh [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA 94131 (United States); Hoekstra, Henk [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, NL-2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Babul, Arif; Bildfell, Chris [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Jeltema, Tesla [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, UC Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Henry, J. Patrick [Institute for Astronomy, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2013-04-20

    We present a study of multiwavelength X-ray and weak lensing scaling relations for a sample of 50 clusters of galaxies. Our analysis combines Chandra and XMM-Newton data using an energy-dependent cross-calibration. After considering a number of scaling relations, we find that gas mass is the most robust estimator of weak lensing mass, yielding 15% {+-} 6% intrinsic scatter at r{sub 500}{sup WL} (the pseudo-pressure Y{sub X} yields a consistent scatter of 22% {+-} 5%). The scatter does not change when measured within a fixed physical radius of 1 Mpc. Clusters with small brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) to X-ray peak offsets constitute a very regular population whose members have the same gas mass fractions and whose even smaller (<10%) deviations from regularity can be ascribed to line of sight geometrical effects alone. Cool-core clusters, while a somewhat different population, also show the same (<10%) scatter in the gas mass-lensing mass relation. There is a good correlation and a hint of bimodality in the plane defined by BCG offset and central entropy (or central cooling time). The pseudo-pressure Y{sub X} does not discriminate between the more relaxed and less relaxed populations, making it perhaps the more even-handed mass proxy for surveys. Overall, hydrostatic masses underestimate weak lensing masses by 10% on the average at r{sub 500}{sup WL}; but cool-core clusters are consistent with no bias, while non-cool-core clusters have a large and constant 15%-20% bias between r{sub 2500}{sup WL} and r{sub 500}{sup WL}, in agreement with N-body simulations incorporating unthermalized gas. For non-cool-core clusters, the bias correlates well with BCG ellipticity. We also examine centroid shift variance and power ratios to quantify substructure; these quantities do not correlate with residuals in the scaling relations. Individual clusters have for the most part forgotten the source of their departures from self-similarity.

  8. Detection of X-ray Emission from the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium through the Angular Autocorrelation Function with Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Huffenberger, Kevin; Ursino, Eugenio

    2012-01-01

    We have used the angular Autocorrelation Function (AcF) on the angular scale of a few arcminutes to detect and characterize the emission from the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM) in a pointing with Chandra's ACIS-S instrument. We focused our attention on the energy bands 0.4-0.6 keV, where the WHIM emission is expected to be strongest, due to the redshifted O VII and O VIII lines, and 0.7-0.9 keV, where the WHIM emission is expected to be significantly smaller. After removing identified point sources, and any spurious signal due to detector background and unidentified point sources, in the lower energy band we found a clear AcF signal that we attribute to the WHIM, with a statistical significance of several sigmas (chi2=129, N=31). The attribution of the signal to the WHIM (and not to other spurious emissions, such as unresolved point sources) is confirmed by the higher energy band where the signal is compatible with zero.

  9. [Experimental investigation of laser plasma soft X-ray source with gas target].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Qi-liang; Gong, Yan; Lin, Jing-quan; Chen, Bo; Cao, Jian-lin

    2003-02-01

    This paper describes a debris-free laser plasma soft X-ray source with a gas target, which has high operating frequency and can produce strong soft X-ray radiation. The valve of this light source is drived by a piezoelectrical ceramic whose operating frequency is up to 400 Hz. In comparison with laser plasma soft X-ray sources using metal target, the light source is debris-free. And it has higher operating frequency than gas target soft X-ray sources whose nozzle is controlled by a solenoid valve. A channel electron multiplier (CEM) operating in analog mode is used to detect the soft X-ray generated by the laser plasma source, and the CEM's output is fed to to a charge-sensitive preamplifier for further amplification purpose. Output charges from the CEM are proportional to the amplitude of the preamplifier's output voltage. Spectra of CO2, Xe and Kr at 8-14 nm wavelength which can be used for soft X-ray projection lithography are measured. The spectrum for CO2 consists of separate spectral lines originate mainly from the transitions in Li-like and Be-like ions. The Xe spectrum originating mainly from 4d-5f, 4d-4f, 4d-6p and 4d-5p transitions in multiply charged xenon ions. The spectrum for Kr consists of separate spectral lines and continuous broad spectra originating mainly from the transitions in Cu-, Ni-, Co- and Fe-like ions.

  10. Characterisation and application of a laser-based hard x-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graetz, M

    1998-11-01

    Hard X-rays are generated by focusing 110 fs laser pulses with intensities of about 1017 W/cm{sup 2} onto solid metal targets. Characteristic properties of this X-ray source are the small source size, the short pulse duration and the high peak flux. The aim of the present work was to characterise this X-ray source and to demonstrate possible applications. A comparison with other X-ray sources and conventional imaging techniques is made. Characterising measurements were performed, including source size, emission spectrum, temporal behaviour, source stability and the influence of various laser parameters. The emission spectrum was measured using both energy-dispersive solid-state detectors and wavelength-dispersive crystal spectroscopy. The conversion efficiency from laser light to X-ray radiation was measured for different target materials. The laser ablation from different targets was studied. The feasibility of special imaging techniques, e.g. differential imaging and time-gated imaging, was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Differential imaging allows for selective imaging of contrast agents, while time-gated imaging can reduce the influence of scattered radiation in X-ray imaging. Time-gated imaging was demonstrated in different imaging geometries, both for planar imaging and computed tomography imaging. Reasonable agreement between theoretically calculated values and experimental results was obtained 120 refs, figs, tabs

  11. Miniature, low-power X-ray tube using a microchannel electron generator electron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elam, Wm. Timothy (Inventor); Kelliher, Warren C. (Inventor); Hershyn, William (Inventor); DeLong, David P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Embodiments of the invention provide a novel, low-power X-ray tube and X-ray generating system. Embodiments of the invention use a multichannel electron generator as the electron source, thereby increasing reliability and decreasing power consumption of the X-ray tube. Unlike tubes using a conventional filament that must be heated by a current power source, embodiments of the invention require only a voltage power source, use very little current, and have no cooling requirements. The microchannel electron generator comprises one or more microchannel plates (MCPs), Each MCP comprises a honeycomb assembly of a plurality of annular components, which may be stacked to increase electron intensity. The multichannel electron generator used enables directional control of electron flow. In addition, the multichannel electron generator used is more robust than conventional filaments, making the resulting X-ray tube very shock and vibration resistant.

  12. Proper motions of ROSAT discovered isolated neutron stars measured with Chandra: First X-ray measurement of the large proper motion of RX J1308.6+2127/RBS 1223

    CERN Document Server

    Motch, C; Haberl, F; Schwope, A; Zavlin, V E

    2007-01-01

    The unprecedented spatial resolution of the Chandra observatory opens the possibility to detect with relatively high accuracy proper motions at X-ray wavelengths. We have conducted an astrometric study of three of the "Magnificent Seven", the thermally emitting radio quiet isolated neutron stars (INSs) discovered by ROSAT. These three INSs (RX J0420.0-5022, RX J0806.4-4123 and RX J1308.6+2127/RBS 1223) either lack an optical counterpart or have one too faint to be used for astrometric purposes. We obtained ACIS observations 3 to 5 years apart to constrain or measure the displacement of the sources on the X-ray sky using as reference the background of extragalactic or remote galactic X-ray sources. Upper limits of 138 mas/yr and 76 mas/yr on the proper motion of RX J0420.0-5022 and RX J0806.4-4123, respectively, have already been presented in Motch et al. (2007). Here we report the very significant measurement (~ 10 sigma) of the proper motion of the third INS of our program, RX J1308.6+2127/RBS1223. Comparing...

  13. Testing the Paradigm that Ultra-Luminous X-ray Sources as a Class Represent Accreting Intermediate-Mass Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Berghea, C T; Colbert, E J M; Roberts, T P

    2008-01-01

    To test the idea that ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) in external galaxies represent a class of accreting Intermediate-Mass Black Holes (IMBHs), we have undertaken a program to identify ULXs and a lower luminosity X-ray comparison sample with the highest quality data in the {\\it Chandra} archive. We establish a general property of ULXs that the most X-ray luminous objects possess the flattest X-ray spectra (in the {\\it Chandra} band pass). No prior sample studies have established the general hardening of ULX spectra with luminosity. This hardening occurs at the highest luminosities (absorbed luminosity $\\geq5\\times10^{39}$ erg s$^{-1}$) and is in line with recent models arguing that ULXs are actually stellar-mass black holes. From spectral modeling, we show that the evidence originally taken to mean that ULXs are IMBHs - i.e., the ``simple IMBH model'' - is nowhere near as compelling when a large sample of ULXs is looked at properly. During the last couple of years, {\\it XMM-Newton} spectroscopy of ULXs ha...

  14. X-Ray Sources and High-Throughput Data Collection Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snell, Gyorgy

    2012-03-15

    X-ray diffraction experiments on protein crystals are at the core of the structure determination process. An overview of X-ray sources and data collection methods to support structure-based drug design (SBDD) efforts is presented in this chapter. First, methods of generating and manipulating X-rays for the purpose of protein crystallography, as well as the components of the diffraction experiment setup are discussed. SBDD requires the determination of numerous protein-ligand complex structures in a timely manner, and the second part of this chapter describes how to perform diffraction experiments efficiently on a large number of crystals, including crystal screening and data collection.

  15. Calibration of a time-resolved hard-x-ray detector using radioactive sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Regan, S. P.; Romanofsky, M. H.

    2016-11-01

    A four-channel, time-resolved, hard x-ray detector (HXRD) has been operating at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics for more than a decade. The slope temperature of the hot-electron population in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments is inferred by recording the hard x-ray radiation generated in the interaction of the electrons with the target. Measuring the energy deposited by hot electrons requires an absolute calibration of the hard x-ray detector. A novel method to obtain an absolute calibration of the HXRD using single photons from radioactive sources was developed, which uses a thermoelectrically cooled, low-noise, charge-sensitive amplifier.

  16. A simulation study of Tsinghua Thomson scattering X-ray source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Chuan-Xiang; LI Ren-Kai; HUANG Wen-Hui; CHEN Huai-Bi; DU Ying-Chao; DU Qiang; DU Tai-Bin; HE Xiao-Zhong; HUA Jian-Fei; LIN Yu-Zhen; QIAN Hou-Jun; SHI Jia-Ru; XIANG Dao; YAN Li-Xin; Yu Pei-Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Thomson scattering X-ray sources are compact and afrordable facifities that produce short duration,high brightness X-ray pulses enabling new experimental capacities in ultra-fast science studies,and also medical and industrial applications.Such a facility has been built at the Accelerator Laboratory of Tsinghua University,and upgrade is in progress.In this paper,we present a proposed layout of the upgrade with design parameters by simulation,aiming at high X-ray pulses flux and brightness,and also enabling advanced dynamics studies and applications of the electron beam.Design and construction status of main subsystems are also presented.

  17. The Coherent X-ray Imaging instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Mengning; Williams, Garth J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Montanez, Paul A.; Hayes, Matt; Milathianaki, Despina; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; Koglin, Jason E.; Schafer, Donald W.; Guillet, Serge; Busse, Armin; Bergan, Robert; Olson, William; Fox, Kay; Stewart, Nathaniel; Curtis, Robin; Miahnahri, Alireza Alan; Boutet, Sébastien, E-mail: sboutet@slac.stanford.edu [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Description of the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Recent scientific highlights illustrate the femtosecond crystallography, high power density and extreme matter capabilities of the CXI instrument. The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument specializes in hard X-ray, in-vacuum, high power density experiments in all areas of science. Two main sample chambers, one containing a 100 nm focus and one a 1 µm focus, are available, each with multiple diagnostics, sample injection, pump–probe and detector capabilities. The flexibility of CXI has enabled it to host a diverse range of experiments, from biological to extreme matter.

  18. The Soft X-ray Research instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dakovski, Georgi L., E-mail: dakovski@slac.stanford.edu; Heimann, Philip; Holmes, Michael [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Krupin, Oleg [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); European XFEL, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Minitti, Michael P.; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan; Rowen, Michael; Schlotter, William F.; Turner, Joshua J. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2015-04-02

    A description of the Soft X-ray Research instrument (SXR) at the Linac Coherent Light Source is given. Recent scientific highlights illustrate the wide variety of experiments and detectors that can be accommodated at SXR. The Soft X-ray Research instrument provides intense ultrashort X-ray pulses in the energy range 280–2000 eV. A diverse set of experimental stations may be installed to investigate a broad range of scientific topics such as ultrafast chemistry, highly correlated materials, magnetism, surface science, and matter under extreme conditions. A brief description of the main instrument components will be given, followed by some selected scientific highlights.

  19. Development of a Novel Tunable X-Ray Source for the RPI-LINAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Danon; R.C. Block

    2004-11-30

    This document summarizes the results of a three year effort to develop a parametric x-ray (PXR) source. The emphasis of this research was to demonstrate production of high yield monoenergetic x-rays. Production of PXR is accomplished by placing a crystal in a relativistic electron beam. The process was first demonstrated in 1985 in Russia. Numerous papers were written about the characteristics of PXR from both experimental and theoretical perspectives. The advantage of PXR over other monoenergetic x-ray sources is that it is produced at large angle relative to the electron beam and at high intensity. None of the previous work described in the literature capitalized on this effect to study what is required in order to generate an effective monoenergetic x-ray source that can be used for practical applications. The work summarized here describes the process done in order to optimize the PXR production process by selecting an appropriate crystal and the optimal conditions. The research focused on production of 18 keV x-rays which are suitable for mammography however the results are not limited to this application or energy range. We are the first group to demonstrate x-ray imaging using PXR. Such sources can improve current medical imaging modalities. More research is required in order to design a prototype of a compact source.

  20. Identifications of Four INTEGRAL Sources in the Galactic Plane via Chandra Localizations

    CERN Document Server

    Tomsick, J A; Foschini, L; Kaaret, Philip; Rodríguez, J; Walter, R; Chaty, Sylvain; Foschini, Luigi; Kaaret, Philip; Rodriguez, Jerome; Tomsick, John A.; Walter, Roland

    2006-01-01

    Hard X-ray imaging of the Galactic plane by the INTEGRAL satellite is uncovering many new 20-100 keV sources. A significant fraction of these sources are High-Mass X-Ray Binaries (HMXBs) containing neutron stars. In this work, we present results from INTEGRAL, Chandra, optical, and IR observations of 4 of the IGR sources: IGR J16195-4945, IGR J16207-5129, IGR J16167-4957, and IGR J17195-4100. In all four cases, one relatively bright Chandra source is seen in the INTEGRAL error circle, and these are all likely to be counterparts of the IGR sources. The sources have hard 0.3-10 keV spectra with power-law photon indices of 0.5-1.1. The Chandra positions along with optical and IR sky survey catalogs as well as our own photometry have allowed us to obtain optical and IR identifications for all 4 sources. The J-band magnitudes are in the range 14.9-10.4, and we have used the optical/IR spectral energy distributions to constrain the nature of the sources. Blackbody components with temperature lower limits of >9400 K...

  1. The BMW-Chandra Serendipitous Source Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, P.; Campana, S.; Mignani, R. P.; Moretti, A.; Mottini, M.; Panzera, M. R.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2004-08-01

    We present the BMW-Chandra source catalog drawn from all Chandra ACIS-I pointed observations with an exposure time in excess of 10 ks public as of March 2003 (136 observations). Using the wavelet detection algorithm developed by Lazzati et al. (1999) and Campana et al. (1999), which can characterize point-like as well as extended sources, we identified 21325 sources. Among them, 16758 are serendipitous, i.e. not associated with the targets of the pointings, and do not require a non-automated analysis. This makes our catalog the largest compilation of Chandra sources to date. The 0.5--10 keV absorption corrected fluxes of these sources range from ˜ 3× 10-16 to 9×10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 with a median of 7× 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. The catalog consists of count rates and relative errors in three energy bands (total, 0.5--7 keV; soft, 0.5--2 keV; and hard band, 2--7 keV), and source positions relative to the highest signal-to-noise detection among the three bands. The wavelet algorithm also provides an estimate of the extension of the source which we refined with a σ -clipping method. We report on the main properties of the sources in our catalog, such as sky coverage ( ˜ 8 deg2 at a limiting flux of ˜ 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1) and cosmological log N--log S for a subset at high Galactic latitude (∣ b ∣ > 20o) for a flux as low as ˜ 1.5 × 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. Support for this work was provided by the Italian MIUR.

  2. Derivation of total filtration thickness for diagnostic x-ray source assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekimoto, Michiharu; Katoh, Yoh

    2016-08-01

    The method defined by the IEC 60522 for determining the inherent filtration of an x-ray source device is applicable only for a limited range of tube voltage. Because the users cannot legally remove the x-ray movable diaphragm of the x-ray source device, total filtration, which is the sum of the additional filtration diaphragm movable for specific filtration and x-ray, cannot be measured. We develop a method for simply obtaining the total filtration for different tube voltage values. Total filtration can be estimated from a ratio R‧ of the air kerma Kx+T\\prime , which is measured with an Al plate with thickness T, and Kx\\prime measured without an Al plate. The conditions of the target material of the x-ray source device are then entered into the Report 78 Spectrum Processor to calculate the air kerma K x and K x+T for Al thicknesses x and (x  +  T), respectively, to obtain R. The minimum value of x, which is the difference between the R and R‧, is the total filtration of the x-ray source device. The total filtration calculated using the industrial x-ray source device was within  ±1% in the 40-120 kV range. This method can calculate the total filtration using air kerma measurements with and without the Al plate. Therefore, the load on the x-ray tube can be reduced, and preparation of multiple Al plates is not necessary. Furthermore, for the 40-120 kV tube voltage range, the user can easily measure the total filtration.

  3. A Compact X-ray Source in the Radio Pulsar-Wind Nebula G141.2+5.0

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of a 50 ks Chandra observation of the recently discovered radio object G141.2+5.0, presumed to be a pulsar-wind nebula. We find a moderately bright unresolved X-ray source which we designate CXOU J033712.8 615302 coincident with the central peak radio emission. An absorbed power-law fit to the 241 counts describes the data well, with absorbing column $N_H = 6.7 (4.0, 9.7) \\times 10^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$ and photon index $\\Gamma = 1.8 (1.4, 2.2)$. For a distance of 4 kpc, the unabsorbed luminosity between 0.5 and 8 keV is $ 1.7^{+0.4}_{-0.3} \\times 10^{32}$ erg s$^{-1}$ (90\\% confidence intervals). Both $L_X$ and $\\Gamma$ are quite typical of pulsars in PWNe. No extended emission is seen; we estimate a conservative $3 \\sigma$ upper limit to the surface brightness of any X-ray PWN near the point source to be $3 \\times 10^{-17}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ arcsec$^{-2}$ between 0.5 and 8 keV, assuming the same spectrum as the point source; for a nebula of diameter $13"$, the flux limit is 6\\% of the f...

  4. Optical Synchronization Systems for Femtosecond X-Ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Wilcox, Russell; Staples, John W

    2005-01-01

    In femtosecond pump/probe experiments using short x-ray and optical pulses, precise synchronization must be maintained between widely separated lasers in a synchrotron or FEL facility. We are developing synchronization systems using optical signals for applications requiring different ranges of timing error. For the sub-100fs range we use an amplitude modulated CW laser at 1GHz to transmit RF phase information, and control the delay through a 100m fiber by observing the retroreflected signal. Initial results show 40fs peak-to-peak error above 10Hz, and 200fs long term drift, mainly due to amplitude sensitivity in the analog mixers. For the sub-10fs range we will lock two single-frequency lasers separated by several teraHertz to a master modelocked fiber laser, transmit the two frequencies over fiber, and lock two comb lines of a slave laser to these frequencies, thus synchronizing the two modelocked laser envelopes. For attosecond synchronization we propose a stabilized, free space link using bulk lens wavegu...

  5. Optical Synchronization Systems for Femtosecond X-raySources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, Russell; Staples, John W.; Holzwarth, Ronald

    2004-05-09

    In femtosecond pump/probe experiments using short X-Ray and optical pulses, precise synchronization must be maintained between widely separated lasers in a synchrotron or FEL facility. We are developing synchronization systems using optical signals for applications requiring different ranges of timing error over 100 meter of glass fiber. For stabilization in the hundred femtosecond range a CW laser is amplitude modulated at 1 10 GHz, the signal retroreflected from the far end, and the relative phase used to correct the transit time with a piezoelectric phase modulator. For the sub-10 fsec range the laser frequency itself is upshifted 55 MHz with an acousto-optical modulator, retroreflected, upshifted again and phase compared at the sending end to a 110 MHz reference. Initial experiments indicate less than 1 fsec timing jitter. To lock lasers in the sub-10 fs range we will lock two single-frequency lasers separated by several tera Hertz to a master modelocked fiber laser, transmit the two frequencies over fiber, and lock two comb lines of a slave laser to these frequencies, thus synchronizing the two modelocked laser envelopes.

  6. Optical Identifications of Companion Soft X-ray Sources of Mrk 231

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We present optical identification results for four ROSAT PSPC soft X-ray companions of Mrk 231 based on the deep BATC 6660 A-band image and the optical spectra obtained by the 60/90cm Schmidt telescope and the 2.16mtelescope at the Xinglong Station, NAOC. Three optical counterparts are quasarswith redshifts z > 1 and the remaining X-ray source is probably a background galaxycluster. Therefore, none of these soft X-ray companions are physically connectedwith the central X-ray source Mrk 231. Incorporating the previous results of Arp 220and Mrk 273 (Xia et al. 1998, 1999), we suggest that the apparent soft X-rayassociations with ULIRGs are chance coincidence in most cases.

  7. Fourth-generation X-ray sources: some possible applications to biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doniach, S

    2000-05-01

    The term 'fourth generation X-ray sources' has come to mean X-ray free-electron lasers which use multi-GeV electron beams from linear accelerators to generate X-rays by self-amplified stimulated emission when fired into long undulators. Properties of the radiation expected from such sources are reviewed briefly and two possible applications of the resulting pulsed highly collimated X-radiation to problems in biology are discussed: use of X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy to measure time correlations of atoms in protein crystals, and use of Mössbauer radiation extracted from the photon beams by resonant Bragg diffraction from (57)Fe-containing crystals, for MAD phasing of very large unit-cell biomolecular crystals and possibly for photon echo measurements.

  8. Laboratory source based full-field x-ray microscopy at 9 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fella, C.; Balles, A.; Wiest, W. [Lehrstuhl für Röntgenmikroskopie, Julius-Maximilians-Universität, 97074 Würzburg (Germany); Zabler, S.; Hanke, R. [Lehrstuhl für Röntgenmikroskopie, Julius-Maximilians-Universität, 97074 Würzburg (Germany); Fraunhofer Development Center X-Ray Technology (EZRT), Flugplatzstrasse 75, 90768 Fürth (Germany)

    2016-01-28

    In the past decade, hard x-ray transmission microscopy experienced tremendous developments. With the avail-ability of efficient Fresnel zone plates, even set-ups utilizing laboratory sources were developed [1]. In order to improve the performance of these x-ray microscopes, novel approaches to fabricate optical elements [2] and brighter x-ray tubes [3] are promising candidates. We are currently building a laboratory transmission x-ray microscope for 9.25 keV, using an electron impact liquid-metal-jet anode source. Up to now, the further elements of our setup are: a polycapillary condenser, a tungsten zone plate, and a scintillator which is optically coupled to a CMOS camera. However, further variations in terms of optical elements are intended. Here we present the current status of our work, as well as first experimental results.

  9. Evidence for Quasi-periodic X-Ray Dips from an Ultraluminous X-Ray Source: Implications for the Binary Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Pasham, Dheeraj R

    2013-01-01

    We report results from long-term (approximately 1240 days) X-ray (0.3-8.0 keV) monitoring of the ultraluminous X-ray source NGC 5408 X-1 with the Swift/X-Ray Telescope. Here we expand on earlier work by Strohmayer (2009) who used only a part of the present data set. Our primary results are: (1) the discovery of sharp, quasi-periodic, energy-independent dips in the X-ray intensity that recur on average every 243 days, (2) the detection of an energy-dependent (variability amplitude decreases with increasing energy), quasi-sinusoidal X-ray modulation with a period of 112.6+-4 days the amplitude of which weakens during the second half of the light curve and (3) spectral evidence for an increase in photoelectric absorption during the last continuous segment of the data. We interpret the X-ray modulations within the context of binary motion in analogy to that seen in high-inclination accreting X-ray binaries. If correct, this implies that NGC 5408 X-1 is in a binary with an orbital period of 243+-23 days, in contra...

  10. Ultraviolet spectroscopy of the supersoft X-ray source RX J0439.8-6809

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Teeseling, Andre

    1997-07-01

    Observationally, supersoft X-ray sources are classified as near-Eddington stellar objects with almost all emission at energies blue star in the LMC. A 3sigma upper limit to the peak-to-peak optical variability is 0.07 mag. Of all optically identified supersoft X-ray sources, RX J0439.8-6809 has the lowest optical-to-X-ray flux ratio. The nature of RX J0439.8-6809 is still unknown. It might be the hottest known pre-white dwarf, suffering a late helium shell flash. Alternatively, RX J0439.8-6809 could be an accreting binary, in which case it might be the first known double-degenerate supersoft X-ray source with a predicted orbital period of only a few minutes. An ultraviolet spectrum is essential to distinguish between these two spectacular possibilities, and to bridge the gap between the X-ray and optical observations. Such a spectrum can only be obtained with the HST STIS. Therefore, we propose to obtain two ultraviolet spectra, which will test the assumption that the optical spectrum is the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of the soft X-ray component, which will determine the spectral energy distribution, and which may provide the first direct evidence for accretion in this source by detecting an excess in the ultraviolet or ultraviolet emission lines like N V Lambda 1240.

  11. X-ray phase imaging with a laboratory source using selective reflection from a mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Paganin, David M

    2013-04-22

    A novel approach for hard x-ray phase contrast imaging with a laboratory source is reported. The technique is based on total external reflection from the edge of a mirror, aligned to intercept only half of the incident beam. The mirror edge thus produces two beams. The refraction x-rays undergo when interacting with a sample placed before the mirror, causes relative intensity variations between direct and reflected beams. Quantitative phase contrast and pure absorption imaging are demonstrated using this method.

  12. A KPC-scale X-ray jet in the BL LAC Source S5 2007+777

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambruna, Rita; Maraschi, Laura; Tavecchio, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    The BL Lac S3 2007++777, a classical radio-selected BL Lac from the sample of Stirkel et al. exhibiting an extended (19") radio jet. was observed with Chandra revealing an X-ray jet with simi1ar morphology. The hard X-ray spectrum and broad band SED is consistent with an IC/CMB origin for the X-ray emission, implying a highly relativistic flow at small angle to the line of sight with an unusually large deprojected length, 300 kpc. A structured jet consisting of a fast spine and slow wall is consistent with the observations.

  13. Optical Counterparts of Ultra-Luminous X-ray Sources identified from Archival Hubble Space Telescope/WFPC2

    CERN Document Server

    Ptak, A; Van der Marel, R; Roye, E; Heckman, T; Towne, B

    2006-01-01

    We present a systematic analysis of archival HST WFPC2 ``Association'' data sets that correlate with the Chandra positions of a set of 44 ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs) of nearby galaxies. We have improved the Chandra-HST relative astrometry whenever possible. Disparate numbers of potential ULX counterparts are found, and in some cases none are found. The lack of or low number of counterparts in some cases may be due to insufficient depth in the WFPC2 images. Particularly in late-type galaxies, the HST image in the ULX region was often complex or crowded. We therefore address various scenarios for the nature of the ULX since it is not known which, if any, of the sources found are true counterparts. The optical luminosities of the sources are typically in the range 10^4-6 L_sun. In several cases color information is available, with the colors roughly tending to be more red in early-type galaxies. This suggests that, in general, the (potential) counterparts found in early-type galaxies are likely to be old...

  14. Populations of Bright X-ray Sources in the Starburst Galaxies NGC 4038/4039

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Wei Liu; Xiang-Dong Li

    2007-01-01

    Assuming a naive star formation history,we construct synthetic X-ray source populations.using a population synthesis code,for comparison with the observed X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of the interacting galaxies NGC 4038/4039.We have included highand intermediate-mass X-ray binaries.young rotation-powered pulsars and fallback disk-fed black holes in modeling the bright X-ray sources detected.We find that the majority of the X-ray sources are likely to be intermediate-mass X-ray binaries.but for typical binary evolution parameters.the predicted XLF seems to be steeper than observed.We note that the shape of the XLFs depends critically on the existence of XLF break for young populations.and suggest super-Eddington accretion luminosities or the existence of intermediate-mass black holes to account for the high luminosity end and the slope of the XLF in NGC 4038/4039.

  15. Optical technologies for extreme-ultraviolet and soft X-ray coherent sources

    CERN Document Server

    Poletto, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The book reviews the most recent achievements in optical technologies for XUV and X-ray coherent sources. Particular attention is given to free-electron-laser facilities, but also to other sources available at present, such as synchrotrons, high-order laser harmonics and X-ray lasers. The optical technologies relevant to each type of source are discussed. In addition, the main technologies used for photon handling and conditioning, namely multilayer mirrors, adaptive optics, crystals and gratings are explained. Experiments using coherent light received during the last decades a lot of attention for the X-ray regime. Strong efforts were taken for the realization of almost fully coherent sources, e.g. the free-electron lasers, both as independent sources in the femtosecond and attosecond regimes and as seeding sources for free-electron-lasers and X-ray gas lasers. In parallel to the development of sources, optical technologies for photon handling and conditioning of such coherent and intense X-ray beams advance...

  16. The unusual X-ray morphology of NGC4636 revealed by deep Chandra observations: cavities and shocks created by past AGN outbursts

    CERN Document Server

    Baldi, A; Jones, C; Kraft, R; Nulsen, P; Churazov, E; David, L; Giacintucci, S

    2009-01-01

    We present Chandra ACIS-I and ACIS-S observations ($\\sim$200 ks in total) of the X-ray luminous elliptical galaxy NGC 4636, located in the outskirts of the Virgo cluster. A soft band (0.5-2 keV) image shows the presence of a bright core in the center surrounded by an extended X-ray corona and two pronounced quasi-symmetric, 8 kpc long, arm-like features. Each of this features defines the rimof an ellipsoidal bubble. An additional bubble-like feature, whose northern rim is located $\\sim2$ kpc south of the north-eastern arm, is detected as well. We present surface brightness and temperature profiles across the rims of the bubbles, showing that their edges are sharp and characterized by temperature jumps of about 20-25%. Through a comparison of the observed profiles with theoretical shock models, we demonstrate that a scenario where the bubbles were produced by shocks, probably driven by energy deposited off-center by jets, is the most viable explanation to the X-ray morphology observed in the central part of NG...

  17. The Megasecond Chandra X-Ray Visionary Project Observation of NGC 3115 (III): luminosity functions of LMXBs and dependence on stellar environments

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Dacheng; Wong, Ka-wah; Jennings, Zachary G; Homan, Jeroen; Romanowsky, Aaron J; Strader, Jay; Brodie, Jean P; Sivakoff, Gregory R; Remillard, Ronald A

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) in the nearby lenticular galaxy NGC 3115, using the Megasecond Chandra X-Ray Visionary Project Observation. With a total exposure time of ~1.1 Ms, we constructed the XLF down to a limiting luminosity of ~10^36 erg/s, much deeper than typically reached for other early-type galaxies. We found significant flattening of the overall LMXB XLF from dN/dL \\propto L^{-2.2\\pm0.4} above 5.5x10^37 erg/s to dN/dL \\propto L^{-1.0\\pm0.1} below it, though we could not rule out a fit with a higher break at ~1.6x10^38 erg/s. We also found evidence that the XLF of LMXBs in globular clusters (GCs) is overall flatter than that of field LMXBs. Thus our results for this galaxy do not support the idea that all LMXBs are formed in GCs. The XLF of field LMXBs seems to show spatial variation, with the XLF in the inner region of the galaxy being flatter than that in the outer region, probably due to contamination of LMXBs from undetected and/or disrup...

  18. Laboratory-size three-dimensional x-ray microscope with Wolter type I mirror optics and an electron-impact water window x-ray source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsuka, Shinji; Ohba, Akira; Onoda, Shinobu; Nakamoto, Katsuhiro; Nakano, Tomoyasu; Miyoshi, Motosuke; Soda, Keita; Hamakubo, Takao

    2014-09-01

    We constructed a laboratory-size three-dimensional water window x-ray microscope that combines wide-field transmission x-ray microscopy with tomographic reconstruction techniques, and observed bio-medical samples to evaluate its applicability to life science research fields. It consists of a condenser and an objective grazing incidence Wolter type I mirror, an electron-impact type oxygen Kα x-ray source, and a back-illuminated CCD for x-ray imaging. A spatial resolution limit of around 1.0 line pairs per micrometer was obtained for two-dimensional transmission images, and 1-μm scale three-dimensional fine structures were resolved.

  19. A CCD area detector for X-ray diffraction under high pressure for rotating anode source

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amar Sinha; Alka B Garg; V Vijayakumar; B K Godwal; S K Sikka

    2000-04-01

    Details of a two-dimensional X-ray area detector developed using a charge coupled device, a image intensifier and a fibre optic taper are given. The detector system is especially optimized for angle dispersive X-ray diffraction set up using rotating anode generator as X-ray source. The performance of this detector was tested by successfully carrying out powder X-ray diffraction measurements on various materials such as intermetallics AuIn2, AuGa2, high material Pd and low scatterer adamantane (C10H16) at ambient conditions. Its utility for quick detection of phase transitions at high pressures with diamond anvil cell is demonstrated by reproducing the known pressure induced structural transitions in RbI, KI and a new structural phase transition in AuGa2 above 10 GPa. Various softwares have also been developed to analyze data from this detector.

  20. Soft x-ray source for nanostructure imaging using femtosecond-laser-irradiated clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Y.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T.; Kando, M.; Kotaki, H.; Daito, I.; Ma, J.; Chen, L. M.; Homma, T.; Kawase, K.; Kameshima, T.; Kawachi, T.; Daido, H.; Kimura, T.; Tajima, T.; Kato, Y.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2008-03-01

    The intense soft x-ray light source using the supersonic expansion of the mixed gas of He and CO2, when irradiated by a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser pulse, is observed to enhance the radiation of soft x-rays from the CO2 clusters. Using this soft x-ray emissions, nanostructure images of 100-nm-thick Mo foils in a wide field of view (mm2 scale) with high spatial resolution (800nm ) are obtained with high dynamic range LiF crystal detectors. The local inhomogeneities of soft x-ray absorption by the nanometer-thick foils is measured with an accuracy of less than ±3%.

  1. Calibration Of A KrF Laser-Plasma Source For X-Ray Microscopy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcu, I. C. E.; O'Neill, F.; Zammit, U.; Al-Hadithi, Y.; Eason, R. W.; Rogayski, A. M.; Hills, C. P. B.; Michette, A. G.

    1988-02-01

    Plasma X-ray sources for biological microscopy in the water-window have been produced by focusing tige 200 3, 50 ns Sprit q KrF laser onto carbon targets at irradiance between 2.2 x 10" W/cm4 and 3.7 x 10i3W/cm. Absolute measurements of X-ray production have been made using a calibrated, vacuum X-ray diode detector. A peak conversion efficiency . 10% is measured from KrF laseri)Tight tcto wate-window X-rays at 280 eV < hv < 530 eV for a target irradiance . 1 x x 10 W/cm'. Some measurements with gold and tungsten targets give conversion efficiencies 2$25% at a similar laser irradiance.

  2. Luminosity Functions and Point Source Properties from Multiple Chandra Observations of M81

    CERN Document Server

    Sell, P H; Zezas, A; Heinz, S; Homan, J; Lewin, W H G

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of 15 Chandra observations of the nearby spiral galaxy M81 taken over the course of six weeks in May--July 2005. Each observation reaches a sensitivity of ~10^37 erg/s. With these observations and one previous deeper Chandra observation, we compile a master source list of 265 point sources, extract and fit their spectra, and differentiate basic populations of sources through their colors. We also carry out variability analyses of individual point sources and of X-ray luminosity functions in multiple regions of M81 on timescales of days, months, and years. We find that, despite measuring significant variability in a considerable fraction of sources, snapshot observations provide a consistent determination of the X-ray luminosity function of M81. We also fit the X-ray luminosity functions for multiple regions of M81 and, using common parametrizations, compare these luminosity functions to those of two other spiral galaxies, M31 and the Milky Way.

  3. Development and characterization of a tunable ultrafast X-ray source via inverse-Compton-scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jochmann, Axel

    2014-07-01

    Ultrashort, nearly monochromatic hard X-ray pulses enrich the understanding of the dynamics and function of matter, e.g., the motion of atomic structures associated with ultrafast phase transitions, structural dynamics and (bio)chemical reactions. Inverse Compton backscattering of intense laser pulses from relativistic electrons not only allows for the generation of bright X-ray pulses which can be used in a pump-probe experiment, but also for the investigation of the electron beam dynamics at the interaction point. The focus of this PhD work lies on the detailed understanding of the kinematics during the interaction of the relativistic electron bunch and the laser pulse in order to quantify the influence of various experiment parameters on the emitted X-ray radiation. The experiment was conducted at the ELBE center for high power radiation sources using the ELBE superconducting linear accelerator and the DRACO Ti:sapphire laser system. The combination of both these state-of-the-art apparatuses guaranteed the control and stability of the interacting beam parameters throughout the measurement. The emitted X-ray spectra were detected with a pixelated detector of 1024 by 256 elements (each 26μm by 26μm) to achieve an unprecedented spatial and energy resolution for a full characterization of the emitted spectrum to reveal parameter influences and correlations of both interacting beams. In this work the influence of the electron beam energy, electron beam emittance, the laser bandwidth and the energy-anglecorrelation on the spectra of the backscattered X-rays is quantified. A rigorous statistical analysis comparing experimental data to ab-initio 3D simulations enabled, e.g., the extraction of the angular distribution of electrons with 1.5% accuracy and, in total, provides predictive capability for the future high brightness hard X-ray source PHOENIX (Photon electron collider for Narrow bandwidth Intense X-rays) and potential all optical gamma-ray sources. The results

  4. Upgrade of X-band thermionic cathode RF gun for Compton scattering X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yoshihiro; Sakamoto, Fumito; Natsui, Takuya; Yamamoto, Tomohiko; Hashimoto, Eiko; Lee, KiWoo; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Higo, Toshiyasu; Fukuda, Shigeki; Akemoto, Mitsuo

    2009-09-01

    A Compton scattering X-ray source consisting of an X-band (11.424 GHz) electron linear accelerator (linac) and Q-switched Nd: YAG laser is currently under development at the University of Tokyo. Monochromatic X-rays are required for a variety of medical and biological applications. The X-ray source produces monochromatic X-rays via collision between a 35-MeV multi-bunch (104 bunches in a 1 μs RF pulse) electron beam and 1.4 J/10 ns (532 nm) Nd: YAG laser pulse. The linac uses an X-band 3.5-cell thermionic cathode RF gun and an alpha magnet as an injector. Until now, electron beam generation (2 MeV, 1 pC/bunch at the exit of the injector), beam acceleration, and X-ray generation have been verified. In order to increase X-ray energy and intensity, we have completed the design and construction of a new RF gun with relevant modifications in some structures. In this paper, we describe the details of the concepts of designing a new RF gun and discuss future works.

  5. A radio survey of supersoft, persistent and transient X-ray sources in the Magellanic Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Fender, R P; Tzioumis, A K

    1998-01-01

    We present a radio survey of X-ray sources in the Large and Small Magellanic clouds with the Australia Telescope Compact Array at 6.3 and 3.5 cm. Specifically, we have observed the fields of five LMC and two SMC supersoft X-ray sources, the X-ray binaries LMC X-1, X-2, X-3 & X-4, the X-ray transient Nova SMC 1992, and the soft gamma-ray repeater SGR 0525-66. None of the targets are detected as point sources at their catalogued positions. In particular, the proposed supersoft jet source RXJ 0513-69 is not detected, placing constraints on its radio luminosity compared to Galactic jet sources. Limits on emission from the black hole candidate systems LMC X-1 and X-3 are consistent with the radio behaviour of persistent Galactic black hole X-ray binaries, and a previous possible radio detection of LMC X-1 is found to almost certainly be due to nearby field sources. The SNR N49 in the field of SGR 0525-66 is mapped at higher resolution than previously, but there is still no evidence for any enhanced emission or...

  6. Compact source of narrowband and tunable X-rays for radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Sudeep, E-mail: sbanejee2@unl.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68516 (United States); Chen, Shouyuan; Powers, Nathan; Haden, Daniel; Liu, Cheng; Golovin, G.; Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Baozhen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68516 (United States); Clarke, S.; Pozzi, S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Silano, J.; Karwowski, H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Umstadter, Donald [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68516 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    We discuss the development of a compact X-ray source based on inverse-Compton scattering with a laser-driven electron beam. This source produces a beam of high-energy X-rays in a narrow cone angle (5–10 mrad), at a rate of 10{sup 8} photons-s{sup −1}. Tunable operation of the source over a large energy range, with energy spread of ∼50%, has also been demonstrated. Photon energies >10 MeV have been obtained. The narrowband nature of the source is advantageous for radiography with low dose, low noise, and minimal shielding.

  7. A JEM-X Catalog of X-ray Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Niels Jørgen Stenfeldt

    2009-01-01

    . A search for weaker, persistent, sources has been done in deep mosaic images that have been produced with all available observations for a large number of sky regions. The two resulting catalogs hold 158 and 179 sources respectively, but the combined catalog consists of 209 sources. This catalog can...... be downloaded as a FITS binary table file with source information such as names, positions, and fluxes at the PoS web page for the conference....

  8. Common-source TLD and RADFET characterization of Co-60, Cs-137, and x-ray irradiation sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simons, M. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Pease, R.L. [RLP Research, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fleetwood, D.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-06-01

    Dose enhancement and dose rate were measured in more than a dozen gamma sources using pMOS RADFETs and TLDs from two independent sources. ARACOR X-ray dose rates were calibrated using single- and dual-dielectric RADFETs.

  9. Analysis of coronal and chromospheric hard X-ray sources in an eruptive solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimovets, Ivan; Golovin, Dmitry; Livshits, Moisey; Vybornov, Vadim; Sadykov, Viacheslav; Mitrofanov, Igor

    We have analyzed hard X-ray emission of an eruptive solar flare on 3 November 2010. The entire flare region was observed by the STEREO-B spacecraft. This gave us an information that chromospheric footpoints of flare magnetic loops were behind the east solar limb for an earth observer. Hard X-ray emission from the entire flare region was detected by the High Energy Neutron Detector (HEND) onboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft while hard X-rays from the coronal part of the flare region were detected by the RHESSI. This rare situation has allowed us to investigate both coronal and chromospheric sources of hard X-ray emission separately. Flare impulsive phase was accompanied by eruption of a magnetic flux rope and formation of a plasmoid detected by the AIA/SDO in the EUV range. Two coronal hard X-ray sources (S_{1} and S_{2}) were detected by the RHESSI. The upper source S_{1} coincided with the plasmoid and the lower source S_{2} was near the tops of the underlying flare loops that is in accordance with the standard model of eruptive flares. Imaging spectroscopy with the RHESSI has allowed to measure energetic spectra of hard X-ray emission from the S_{1} and S_{2} sources. At the impulsive phase peak they have power-law shape above ≈ 15 keV with spectral slopes gamma_{S_{1}}=3.46 ± 1.58 and gamma_{S_{2}}=4.64 ± 0.12. Subtracting spatially integrated spectrum of coronal hard X-ray emission measured by the RHESSI from the spectrum measured by the HEND we found spectrum of hard X-rays emitted from the footpoints of the flare loops (source S_{0}). This spectrum has a power-law shape with gamma_{S_{0}}=2.21 ± 0.57. It is shown that it is not possible to explain the measured spectra of the S_{2} and S_{0} sources in frames of the thin and thick target models respectively if we assume that electrons were accelerated in the energy release site situated below the plasmoid and above the flare loops as suggested by the standard flare model. To resolve the contradiction

  10. SIGMA discovery of a transient hard X-ray source in the galactic center region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, M.; Goldwurm, A.; Paul, J.; Denis, M.; Borrel, V.; Bouchet, L.; Roques, J. P.; Jourdain, E.; Trudolyubov, S.; Gilfanov, M.; Churazov, E.; Sunyaev, R.; Khavenson, N.; Dyachkov, A.; Novikov, B.; Chulkov, I.

    1996-09-01

    A new X-ray transient source, GRS 1730-312 (=KS 1730-312), was discovered by the hard X-ray/soft γ-ray coded mask telescope SIGMA/GRANAT in the Galactic Center region during observations performed in September 1994. The flare started on September 22 and lasted approximately 3days, during which the source became the brightest object of the region at energies above 35keV. The average 35-200keV spectrum can be described by a power law with photon index of -2.5 or by a thermal bremsstrahlung model with kT_e_=~70keV. SIGMA data have been found consistent with the spectral shape and with the spectral evolution observed by the TTM/Mir-Kvant telescope at lower energies. This new source belongs to the population of hard X-ray sources already detected by SIGMA in the direction of the Galactic Bulge region.

  11. Developing small vacuum spark as an x-ray source for calibration of an x-ray focusing crystal spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghomeishi, Mostafa; Karami, Mohammad; Adikan, Faisal Rafiq Mahamd

    2012-10-01

    A new technique of x-ray focusing crystal spectrometers' calibration is the desired result. For this purpose the spectrometer is designed to register radiated copper Kα and Kβ lines by using a flat α-quartz crystal. This experiment uses pre-breakdown x-ray emissions in low vacuum of about 2.5-3 mbar. At this pressure the pinch will not form so the plasma will not radiate. The anode material is copper and the capacity of the capacitor bank is 22.6 nF. This experiment designed and mounted a repetitive triggering system to save the operator time making hundreds of shots. This emission amount is good for calibration and geometrical adjustment of an optical crystal x-ray focusing spectrometer.

  12. Developing small vacuum spark as an x-ray source for calibration of an x-ray focusing crystal spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghomeishi, Mostafa; Adikan, Faisal Rafiq Mahamd [Photonic Research Group, Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Karami, Mohammad [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2012-10-15

    A new technique of x-ray focusing crystal spectrometers' calibration is the desired result. For this purpose the spectrometer is designed to register radiated copper K{alpha} and K{beta} lines by using a flat {alpha}-quartz crystal. This experiment uses pre-breakdown x-ray emissions in low vacuum of about 2.5-3 mbar. At this pressure the pinch will not form so the plasma will not radiate. The anode material is copper and the capacity of the capacitor bank is 22.6 nF. This experiment designed and mounted a repetitive triggering system to save the operator time making hundreds of shots. This emission amount is good for calibration and geometrical adjustment of an optical crystal x-ray focusing spectrometer.

  13. The Chandra COSMOS Legacy survey: overview and point source catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Civano, F; Comastri, A; Urry, M C; Elvis, M; Cappelluti, N; Puccetti, S; Brusa, M; Zamorani, G; Hasinger, G; Aldcroft, T; Alexander, D M; Allevato, V; Brunner, H; Capak, P; Finoguenov, A; Fiore, F; Fruscione, A; Gilli, R; Glotfelty, K; Griffiths, R E; Hao, H; Harrison, F A; Jahnke, K; Kartaltepe, J; Karim, A; LaMassa, S M; Lanzuisi, G; Miyaji, T; Ranalli, P; Salvato, M; Sargent, M; Scoville, N J; Schawinski, K; Schinnerer, E; Silverman, J; Smolcic, V; Stern, D; Toft, S; Trakhenbrot, B; Treister, E; Vignali, C

    2016-01-01

    The COSMOS-Legacy survey is a 4.6 Ms Chandra program that has imaged 2.2 deg$^2$ of the COSMOS field with an effective exposure of $\\simeq$160 ks over the central 1.5 deg$^2$ and of $\\simeq$80 ks in the remaining area. The survey is the combination of 56 new observations, obtained as an X-ray Visionary Project, with the previous C-COSMOS survey. We describe the reduction and analysis of the new observations and the properties of 2273 point sources detected above a spurious probability of 2$\\times 10^{-5}$. We also present the updated properties of the C-COSMOS sources detected in the new data. The whole survey includes 4016 point sources (3814, 2920 and 2440 in the full, soft and hard band). The limiting depths are 2.2 $\\times$ 10$^{-16}$, 1.5 $\\times$ 10$^{-15}$ and 8.9$\\times$ 10$^{-16}$ ${\\rm erg~cm}^{-2}~{\\rm s}^{-1}$ in the 0.5-2, 2-10 and 0.5-10 keV bands, respectively. The observed fraction of obscured AGN with column density $> 10^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$ from the hardness ratio (HR) is $\\sim$50$^{+17}_{-16}$%...

  14. A POPULATION OF ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES WITH AN ACCRETING NEUTRON STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Yong; Li, Xiang-Dong, E-mail: lixd@nju.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China)

    2015-04-01

    Most ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are believed to be X-ray binary systems, but previous observational and theoretical studies tend to prefer a black hole rather than a neutron star (NS) accretor. The recent discovery of 1.37 s pulsations from the ULX M82 X-2 has established its nature as a magnetized NS. In this work we model the formation history of NS ULXs in an M82- or Milky Way (MW)-like Galaxy, by use of both binary population synthesis and detailed binary evolution calculations. We find that the birth rate is around 10{sup −4} yr{sup −1} for the incipient X-ray binaries in both cases. We demonstrate the distribution of the ULX population in the donor mass–orbital period plane. Our results suggest that, compared with black hole X-ray binaries, NS X-ray binaries may significantly contribute to the ULX population, and high-mass and intermediate-mass X-ray binaries dominate the NS ULX population in M82- and MW-like Galaxies, respectively.

  15. Quantitative X-Ray Phase-Contrast Microtomography from a Compact Laser Driven Betatron Source

    CERN Document Server

    Wenz, J; Khrennikov, K; Bech, M; Thibault, P; Heigoldt, M; Pfeiffer, F; Karsch, S

    2014-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has recently led to a revolution in resolving power and tissue contrast in biomedical imaging, microscopy and materials science. The necessary high spatial coherence is currently provided by either large-scale synchrotron facilities with limited beamtime access or by microfocus X-ray tubes with rather limited flux. X-rays radiated by relativistic electrons driven by well-controlled high-power lasers offer a promising route to a proliferation of this powerful imaging technology. A laser-driven plasma wave accelerates and wiggles electrons, giving rise to brilliant keV X-ray emission. This so-called Betatron radiation is emitted in a collimated beam with excellent spatial coherence and remarkable spectral stability. Here we present the first phase-contrast micro-tomogram revealing quantitative electron density values of a biological sample using betatron X-rays, and a comprehensive source characterization. Our results suggest that laser-based X-ray technology offers the potential fo...

  16. Development of a microfocus x-ray tube with multiple excitation sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeo, Shuji; Krämer, Markus; Taniguchi, Kazuo

    2009-03-01

    A microfocus x-ray tube with multiple targets and an electron gun with a focal spot size of 10 μm in diameter has been developed. The electron gun contains a LaB6 cathode and an Einzel lens. The x-ray tube can be operated at 50 W (50 kV, 1 mA) and has three targets, namely, Cr, W, and Rh on the anode that can be selected completely by moving the anode position. A focal spot size of 10 μm in diameter can be achieved at 0.5 mA current. As demonstration of the usability of a multiexcitation x-ray tube, the fluorescence x-rays have been measured using a powder specimen mixed of TiO2, Co, and Zr of the same quantity. The differences of excitation efficiency have clearly appeared according to the change in excitation source. From the results discussed here, it can be expected that the presented x-ray tube will be a powerful tool in microx-ray fluorescence spectrometers and various x-ray instruments.

  17. Solving X-ray protein structures without a crystal: using X-ray Free Electron Laser, the fourth generation synchrotron light sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Huang

    2010-01-01

    @@ A synchrotron light source is a source of electromagnetic radiation artificially produced by specialized electron accelerators. Compared to the commonly used in-house X-ray sources, it is wavelength adjustable, much stronger and more focused. In the last two decades, synchrotron usage has become the mainstream for X-ray protein structure determination. Taking the advantage of micro-focus light beams of the third generation synchrotron, the size of a usable protein crystal for data collection decreases to micron level, which increases the rate of macromolecular structure determination to about 10 new protein data bank entries per day.

  18. The spectral and temporal properties of an Ultra-Luminous X-ray source in NGC 6946

    CERN Document Server

    Devi, A Senorita; Shanthi, K; Singh, K Y

    2008-01-01

    We report variability of the X-ray source, X-7, in NGC 6946, during a 60 ksec Chandra observation when the count rate decreased by a factor of ~1.5 in ~5000 secs. Spectral fitting of the high and low count rate segments of the light curve reveal that the simplest and most probable interpretation is that the X-ray spectra are due to disk black body emission with an absorbing hydrogen column density equal to the Galactic value of 2.1 X 10^{21} cm^{-2}. During the variation, the inner disk temperature decreased from ~0.29 to ~0.26 keV while the inner disk radius remained constant at ~6 X 10^8 cm. This translates into a luminosity variation from 3.8 to 2.8 X 10^{39} ergs cm^{-2} sec^{-1} and a black hole mass of ~400 solar masses. More complicated models like assuming intrinsic absorption and/or the addition of a power-law component imply a higher luminosity and a larger black hole mass. Even if the emission is beamed by a factor of ~5, the size of the emitting region would be > 2.7 X 10^8 cm implying a black hol...

  19. Microfocus x-ray imaging of traceable pointlike {sup 22}Na sources for quality control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, T.; Oda, K.; Sato, Y.; Ito, H.; Masuda, S.; Yamada, T.; Matsumoto, M.; Murayama, H.; Takei, H. [Allied Health Sciences, Kitasato University Kitasato 1-15-1, Minami-ku, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa 252-0373 (Japan); Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology Sakaecho 35-2, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0015 (Japan); Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Kanagawa Industrial Technology Center (KITC) Shimoimazumi 705-1, Ebina-shi, Kanagawa 243-0435 (Japan); Japan Radioisotope Association (JRIA) Komagome 2-28-45, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8941 (Japan); Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kitasato University Kitasato 1-15-1, Minami-ku, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa 252-0373 (Japan)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to propose a microfocus x-ray imaging technique for observing the internal structure of small radioactive sources and evaluating geometrical errors quantitatively, and to apply this technique to traceable pointlike {sup 22}Na sources, which were designed for positron emission tomography calibration, for the purpose of quality control of the pointlike sources. Methods: A microfocus x-ray imaging system with a focus size of 0.001 mm was used to obtain projection x-ray images and x-ray CT images of five pointlike source samples, which were manufactured during 2009-2012. The obtained projection and tomographic images were used to observe the internal structure and evaluate geometrical errors quantitatively. Monte Carlo simulation was used to evaluate the effect of possible geometrical errors on the intensity and uniformity of 0.511 MeV annihilation photon pairs emitted from the sources. Results: Geometrical errors were evaluated with sufficient precision using projection x-ray images. CT images were used for observing the internal structure intuitively. As a result, four of the five examined samples were within the tolerance to maintain the total uncertainty below {+-}0.5%, given the source radioactivity; however, one sample was found to be defective. Conclusions: This quality control procedure is crucial and offers an important basis for using the pointlike {sup 22}Na source as a basic calibration tool. The microfocus x-ray imaging approach is a promising technique for visual and quantitative evaluation of the internal geometry of small radioactive sources.

  20. A Bright Spatially-Coherent Compact X-ray Synchrotron Source

    CERN Document Server

    Kneip, S; Martins, J L; Martins, S F; Bellei, C; Chvykov, V; Dollar, F; Fonseca, R; Huntington, C; Kalintchenko, G; Maksimchuk, A; Mangles, S P D; Matsuoka, T; Nagel, S R; Palmer, C; Schreiber, J; Phuoc, K Ta; Thomas, A G R; Yanovsky, V; Silva, L O; Krushelnick, K; Najmudin, Z

    2009-01-01

    Each successive generation of x-ray machines has opened up new frontiers in science, such as the first radiographs and the determination of the structure of DNA. State-of-the-art x-ray sources can now produce coherent high brightness keV x-rays and promise a new revolution in imaging complex systems on nanometre and femtosecond scales. Despite the demand, only a few dedicated synchrotron facilities exist worldwide, partially due the size and cost of conventional (accelerator) technology. Here we demonstrate the use of a recently developed compact laser-plasma accelerator to produce a well-collimated, spatially-coherent, intrinsically ultrafast source of hard x-rays. This method reduces the size of the synchrotron source from the tens of metres to centimetre scale, accelerating and wiggling a high electron charge simultaneously. This leads to a narrow-energy spread electron beam and x-ray source that is >1000 times brighter than previously reported plasma wiggler and thus has the potential to facilitate a myri...

  1. Tunable, all-optical quasi-monochromatic Thomson X-ray source

    CERN Document Server

    Khrennikov, K; Buck, A; Xu, J; Heigoldt, M; Veisz, L; Karsch, S

    2014-01-01

    Brilliant X-ray sources are of great interest for many research fields from biology via medicine to material research. The quest for a cost-effective, brilliant source with unprecedented temporal resolution has led to the recent realization of various high-intensity-laser-driven X-ray beam sources. Here we demonstrate the first all-laser-driven, energy-tunable and quasi-monochromatic X-ray source based on Thomson backscattering. This is a decisive step beyond previous results, where the emitted radiation exhibited an uncontrolled broad energy distribution. In the experiment, one part of the laser beam was used to drive a few-fs bunch of quasi-monoenergetic electrons from a Laser-Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA), while the remainder was scattered off the bunch in a near-counter-propagating geometry. When the electron energy was tuned from 10-50 MeV, narrow-bandwidth X-ray spectra peaking at 5-35keV were directly measured, limited in photon energy by the sensitivity curve of our X-ray detector. Due to the ultrashor...

  2. On the origin of two unidentified radio/X-ray sources discovered with XMM-Newton

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Federico; Combi, Jorge A.; Medina, María C.; Romero, Gustavo E.

    2015-12-01

    Aims: We aim at clarifying the nature of the emission of two spatially related unidentified X-ray sources detected with XMM-Newton telescope at intermediate-low Galactic latitude Methods: We use the imaging and spectral capabilities of XMM-Newton to study the X-ray properties of these two sources. In addition, we complement our study with radio data obtained at different frequencies to analyze a possible physical association between the sources. Results: Observations reveal a point-like source aligned with elongated diffuse emission. The X-ray spectra of these sources is best-fitted by an absorbed power law with photon index Γ ~ 1.7 for the point-like source and ~2.0 for the extended source. Both sources show nonthermal radio-continuum counterparts that might indicate a physical association. In addition, from the available data, we did not detect variability on the point-like source in several timescales. Two possible scenarios are analyzed: one Galactic and one extra-Galactic. First, based on HI line absorption, assuming a Galactic origin, we infer a distance upper bound of ≲2 kpc, which poses a constraint on the height over the Galactic plane of ≲200 pc and on the linear size of the system of ≲2.3 pc. In this case, the X-ray luminosities are ≳1032 erg s-1 and ≳7.5 × 1032 erg s-1, for the point-like and extended sources, respectively. Second, an extra-Galactic nature is discussed, where the point-like source might be the core of a radio galaxy and the extended source its lobe. In this case, we compare derived fluxes, spectral indices, and spatial correlation with those typical from the radio galaxy population, showing the feasibility of this alternative astrophysical scenario. Conclusions: From the available observational evidence, we suggest that the most promising scenario to explain the nature of these sources is a system consisting of a one-sided radio galaxy, where the point-like source is an active galactic nucleus and the extended source

  3. The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Caronna, Chiara; Chollet, Matthieu; Curtis, Robin; Damiani, Daniel S.; Defever, Jim; Feng, Yiping; Flath, Daniel L.; Glownia, James M. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Lee, Sooheyong [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Hasylab at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Lemke, Henrik T.; Nelson, Silke; Bong, Eric; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Srinivasan, Venkat; Stefanescu, Daniel; Zhu, Diling; Robert, Aymeric, E-mail: aymeric@slac.stanford.edu [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2015-04-14

    A description of the X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source is presented. Recent highlights illustrate the coherence properties of the source as well as some recent dynamics measurements and future directions. The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument is dedicated to the study of dynamics in condensed matter systems using the unique coherence properties of free-electron lasers. It covers a photon energy range of 4–25 keV. The intrinsic temporal characteristics of the Linac Coherent Light Source, in particular the 120 Hz repetition rate, allow for the investigation of slow dynamics (milliseconds) by means of X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Double-pulse schemes could probe dynamics on the picosecond timescale. A description of the instrument capabilities and recent achievements is presented.

  4. The Antennae Ultraluminous X-Ray Source, X-37, Is A Background Quasar

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, D M; Eikenberry, S S; Brandl, B R; Wilson, J C; Carson, J C; Henderson, C P; Hayward, T L; Barry, J; Ptak, A F; Colbert, E J M

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we report that a bright, X-ray source in the Antennae galaxies (NGC 4038/9), previously identified as an ultra-luminous X-ray source, is in fact a background quasar. We identify an isolated infrared and optical counterpart within 0.3+/-0.5 arcseconds the X-ray source X-37. After acquiring an optical spectrum of its counterpart, we use the narrow [OIII] and broad H_alpha emission lines to identify X-37 as a quasar at a redshift of z=0.26. Through a U, V, and K_s photometric analysis, we demonstrate that most of the observable light along this line of sight is from the quasar. We discuss the implications of this discovery and the importance of acquiring spectra for optical and IR counterparts to ULXs.

  5. Generating Picosecond X-Ray Pulses with Beam Manipulation in Synchrotron Light Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Weiming; Harkay, Katherine C; Sajaev, Vadim; Yang Bing Xin

    2005-01-01

    The length of x-ray pulses generated by storage ring light sources is usually tens of picoseconds. For example, the value is 40 ps rms at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Methods of x-ray pulse compression are of great interest at the APS. One possible method, per Zholents et al., is to tilt the electron bunch with deflecting rf cavities.* Alternately, we found that the electron bunch can develop a tilt after application of a vertical kick in the presence of nonzero chromaticity. After slicing, the x-ray pulse length is determined by the tilt angle and the vertical beam size. In principal, sub-picosecond pulses can be obtained at APS. To date we have observed 6 ps rms visible light pulses with a streak camera. Efforts are underway to attempt further compression of the x-ray pulse and to increase the brilliance. This method can be easily applied to any storage ring light sources to generate x-ray pulses up to two orders of magnitude shorter than the electron bunch length. In this paper, we will present the th...

  6. Flat Field Anomalies in an X-ray CCD Camera Measured Using a Manson X-ray Source (HTPD 08 paper)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haugh, M; Schneider, M B

    2008-04-28

    The Static X-ray Imager (SXI) is a diagnostic used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the position of the X-rays produced by lasers hitting a gold foil target. The intensity distribution taken by the SXI camera during a NIF shot is used to determine how accurately NIF can aim laser beams. This is critical to proper NIF operation. Imagers are located at the top and the bottom of the NIF target chamber. The CCD chip is an X-ray sensitive silicon sensor, with a large format array (2k x 2k), 24 {micro}m square pixels, and 15 {micro}m thick. A multi-anode Manson X-ray source, operating up to 10kV and 10W, was used to characterize and calibrate the imagers. The output beam is heavily filtered to narrow the spectral beam width, giving a typical resolution E/{Delta}E {approx} 10. The X-ray beam intensity was measured using an absolute photodiode that has accuracy better than 1% up to the Si K edge and better than 5% at higher energies. The X-ray beam provides full CCD illumination and is flat, within {+-}1% maximum to minimum. The spectral efficiency was measured at 10 energy bands ranging from 930 eV to 8470 eV. We observed an energy dependent pixel sensitivity variation that showed continuous change over a large portion of the CCD. The maximum sensitivity variation occurred at 8470 eV. The geometric pattern did not change at lower energies, but the maximum contrast decreased and was not observable below 4 keV. We were also able to observe debris, damage, and surface defects on the CCD chip. The Manson source is a powerful tool for characterizing the imaging errors of an X-ray CCD imager. These errors are quite different from those found in a visible CCD imager.

  7. Imaging ultrafast excited state pathways in transition metal complexes by X-ray transient absorption and scattering using X-ray free electron laser source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Lin X; Shelby, Megan L; Lestrange, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    This report will describe our recent studies of transition metal complex structural dynamics on the fs and ps time scales using an X-ray free electron laser source, Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Ultrafast XANES spectra at the Ni K-edge of nickel(ii) tetramesitylporphyrin (NiTMP) were measur...

  8. Measuring x-ray spectra of flash radiographic sources [PowerPoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehring, Amanda Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Espy, Michelle A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Haines, Todd Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mendez, Jacob [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moir, David C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sedillo, Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Shurter, Roger P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Volegov, Petr Lvovich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Webb, Timothy J [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-02

    The x-ray spectra of flash radiographic sources are difficult to measure. The sources measured were Radiographic Integrated Test Stand-6 (370 rad at 1 m; 50 ns pulse) and Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT) (550 rad at 1 m; 50 ns pulse). Features of the Compton spectrometer are described, and spectra are shown. Additional slides present data on instrumental calibration.

  9. Short Pulse High Brightness X-ray Production with the PLEIADES Thomson Scattering Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, S G; Barty, C P J; Betts, S M; Brown, W J; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D N; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Kuba, J; LaSage, G P; Rosenzweig, J B; Slaughter, D R; Springer, P T; Tremaine, A M

    2003-07-01

    We describe PLEIADES, a compact, tunable, high-brightness, ultra-short pulse, Thomson x-ray source. The peak brightness of the source is expected to exceed 10{sup 20} photons/s/0.1% bandwidth/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}. Initial results are reported and compared to theoretical calculations.

  10. Attenuation of super-soft X-ray sources by circumstellar material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mikkel; Gilfanov, Marat

    2015-01-01

    of the circumbinary material photo-ionised by the radiation of the central source. Our results show that the circumstellar mass-loss rates required for obcuration of super-soft X-ray sources is about an order of magnitude larger than those reported in earlier studies, for comparable model parameters. While this does...

  11. Electron-based EUV and ultrashort hard-x-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbert, A.; Mader, B.; Tkachenko, B.; Chichkov, B. N.

    2002-11-01

    A brief review of our progress in the realization of femtosecond laser-driven ultrashort hard-x-ray sources is given. New results on the development of electron-based compact EUV sources for "at-wavelength" metrology and next generation lithography are presented. AIP Conference Proceedings.

  12. LIGHT SOURCE: TW Laser system for Thomson scattering X-ray light source at Tsinghua University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Li-Xm; Du, Ying-Chao; Du, Qiang; Li, Ren-Kai; Hua, Jian-Fei; Huang, Wen-Hui; Tang, Chuan-Xiang

    2009-06-01

    A TW (Tera Watt) laser system based on Ti:sapphire mainly for the Tsinghua Thomson scattering X-ray light source (TTX) is being built. Both UV (ultraviolet) laser pulse for driving the photocathode radio-frequency (RF) gun and the IR (infrared) laser pulse as the electron-beam-scattered-light are provided by the system. Efforts have also been made in laser pulse shaping and laser beam transport to optimize the high-brightness electron beam production by the photocathode RF gun.

  13. A Chandra X-ray analysis of Abell 1664: cooling, feedback, and star formation in the central cluster galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirkpatrick, C.C.; McNamara, B.R.; Rafferty, D.A.; Nulsen, P.E.J.; Bîrzan, L.; Kazemzadeh, F.; Wise, M.W.; Gitti, M.; Cavagnolo, K.W.

    2009-01-01

    The brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in the Abell 1664 cluster is unusually blue and is forming stars at a rate of similar to 23 M-circle dot yr(-1). The BCG is located within 5 kpc of the X-ray peak, where the cooling time of 3.5 x 10(8) yr and entropy of 10.4 keV cm(2) are consistent with other star

  14. A Chandra X-ray Analysis of Abell 1664: Cooling, Feedback and Star Formation in the Central Cluster Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkpatrick, C C; Rafferty, D A; Nulsen, P E J; Birzan, L; Kazemzadeh, F; Wise, M W; Gitti, M; Cavagnolo, K W

    2009-01-01

    The brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in the Abell 1664 cluster is unusually blue and is forming stars at a rate of ~ 23 M_{\\sun} yr^{-1}. The BCG is located within 5 kpc of the X-ray peak, where the cooling time of 3.5x10^8 yr and entropy of 10.4 keV cm^2 are consistent with other star-forming BCGs in cooling flow clusters. The center of A1664 has an elongated, "bar-like" X-ray structure whose mass is comparable to the mass of molecular hydrogen, ~ 10^{10} M_{\\sun} in the BCG. We show that this gas is unlikely to have been stripped from interloping galaxies. The cooling rate in this region is roughly consistent with the star formation rate, suggesting that the hot gas is condensing onto the BCG. We use the scaling relations of Birzan et al. 2008 to show that the AGN is underpowered compared to the central X-ray cooling luminosity by roughly a factor of three. We suggest that A1664 is experiencing rapid cooling and star formation during a low-state of an AGN feedback cycle that regulates the rates of cooling and...

  15. Dual color x-rays from Thomson or Compton sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrillo, V.; Bacci, A.; Curatolo, C.; Ferrario, M.; Maroli, C.; Rau, J. V.; Ronsivalle, C.; Serafini, L.; Vaccarezza, C.; Venturelli, M.

    2015-05-01

    We analyze the possibility of producing two color X or γ radiation by Thomson/Compton back-scattering between a high intensity laser pulse and a two-energy level electron beam, constituted by a couple of beamlets separated in time and/or energy obtained by a photoinjector with comb laser techniques and linac velocity bunching. The parameters of the Thomson source at SPARC_LAB have been simulated, proposing a set of values for a realistic experiments.

  16. Dual color x rays from Thomson or Compton sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrillo, V.; Bacci, A.; Curatolo, C.; Ferrario, M.; Gatti, G.; Maroli, C.; Rau, J. V.; Ronsivalle, C.; Serafini, L.; Vaccarezza, C.; Venturelli, M.

    2014-02-01

    We analyze the possibility of producing two-color x or γ radiation by Thomson/Compton backscattering between a high intensity laser pulse and a two-energy level electron beam, constituted by a couple of beamlets separated in time and/or energy obtained by a photoinjector with comb laser techniques and linac velocity bunching. The parameters of the Thomson source at SPARC_LAB have been simulated, proposing a set of realistic experiments.

  17. X-ray illumination of globular cluster puzzles. [globular cluster X ray sources as clues to Milky Way Galaxy age and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightman, A. P.; Grindlay, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Globular clusters are thought to be among the oldest objects in the Galaxy, and provide, in this connection, important clues for determining the age and process of formation of the Galaxy. The present investigation is concerned with puzzles relating to the X-ray emission of globular clusters, taking into account questions regarding the location of X-ray emitting clusters (XEGC) unusually near the galactic plane and/or galactic center. An adopted model is discussed for the nature, formation, and lifetime of X-ray sources in globular clusters. An analysis of the available data is conducted in connection with a search for correlations between binary formation time scales, central relaxation times, galactic locations, and X-ray emission. The positive correlation found between distance from galactic center and two-body binary formation time for globular clusters, explanations for this correlation, and the hypothesis that X-ray sources in globular clusters require binary star systems provide a possible explanation of the considered puzzles.

  18. Development of Compact Soft X-ray Source Based on Laser Undulator

    CERN Document Server

    Kuroda, Ryunosuke; Minamiguchi, S; Saitô, T; Ueyama, D; Washio, Masakazu

    2004-01-01

    A compact soft X-ray source is required in various research fields such as material and biological science. The laser undulator based on backward Compton scattering has been developed as a compact soft X-ray source for the biological observation at Waseda University. It is performed in a water window region (250eV - 500 eV) using the interaction between 1047 nm Nd:YLF laser and 4 MeV high quality electron beam generated from rf gun system. The range of energy in the water window region has K-shell absorption edges of Oxygen, Carbon and Nitrogen, which mainly constitute of living body. Since the absorption coefficient of water is much smaller than the protein’s coefficient in this range, a dehydration of the specimens is not necessary. As a preliminary experiment, about 300 eV X-ray generation was carried out. As next step, soft X-ray optics with zone plate was proposed for Soft X-ray microscopy. In this conference, we will report details and results of the experiment.

  19. At-wavelength metrology of x-ray optics at Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongchang; Berujon, Sebastien; Sutter, John; Alcock, Simon G.; Sawhney, Kawal

    2014-09-01

    Modern, third-generation synchrotron radiation sources provide coherent and extremely bright beams of X-ray radiation. The successful exploitation of such beams depends to a significant extent on imperfections and misalignment of the optics employed on the beamlines. This issue becomes even more critical with the increasing use of active optics, and the desire to achieve diffraction-limited and coherence-preserving X-ray beams. In recent years, significant progress has been made to improve optic testing and optimization techniques, especially those using X-rays for so-called atwavelength metrology. These in-situ and at-wavelength metrology methods can be used not only to optimize the performance of X-ray optics, but also to correct and minimize the collective distortions of upstream beamline optics, including monochromators, and transmission windows. An overview of at-wavelength metrology techniques implemented at Diamond Light Source is presented, including grating interferometry and X-ray near-field speckle based techniques. Representative examples of the application of these techniques are also given, including in-situ and atwavelength calibration and optimization of: active, piezo bimorph mirrors; Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors; and refractive optics such as compound refractive lenses.

  20. A long-period, violently variable X-ray source in a young supernova remnant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, A; Caraveo, P A; Mereghetti, S; Tiengo, A; Bignami, G F

    2006-08-11

    Observations with the Newton X-ray Multimirror Mission satellite show a strong periodic modulation at 6.67 +/- 0.03 hours of the x-ray source at the center of the 2000-year-old supernova remnant RCW 103. No fast pulsations are visible. If genetically tied to the supernova remnant, the source could either be an x-ray binary, composed of a compact object and a low-mass star in an eccentric orbit, or an isolated neutron star. In the latter case, the combination of its age and period would indicate that it is a peculiar magnetar, dramatically slowed down, possibly by a supernova debris disc. Both scenarios require nonstandard assumptions about the formation and evolution of compact objects in supernova explosions.