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Sample records for chandra selected active

  1. Spatial Correlation Function of the Chandra Selected Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Barger, A. J.; Cowie, L. L.

    2006-01-01

    We present the spatial correlation function analysis of non-stellar X-ray point sources in the Chandra Large Area Synoptic X-ray Survey of Lockman Hole Northwest (CLASXS). Our 9 ACIS-I fields cover a contiguous solid angle of 0.4 deg(exp 2) and reach a depth of 3 x 10(exp -15) erg/square cm/s in the 2-8 keV band. We supplement our analysis with data from the Chandra Deep Field North (CDFN). The addition of this field allows better probe of the correlation function at small scales. A total of 233 and 252 sources with spectroscopic information are used in the study of the CLASXS and CDFN fields respectively. We calculate both redshift-space and projected correlation functions in co-moving coordinates, averaged over the redshift range of 0.1 tau(sub 0 = 8.1(sup +1.2 sub -2.2) Mpc, and gamma = 2.1 +/- 0.5 for the CLASXS field, and tau(sub 0) = 5.8(sup +.1.0 sub -1.5) Mpc, gamma = 1.38(sup +0.12 sub -0.14 for the CDFN field. By comparing the real- and redshift-space correlation functions in the combined CLASXS and CDFN samples, we are able to estimate the redshift distortion parameter Beta = 0.4 +/- 0.2 at an effective redshift z = 0.94. We compare the correlation functions for hard and soft spectra sources in the CLASXS field and find no significant difference between the two groups. We have also found that the correlation between X-ray luminosity and clustering amplitude is weak, which, however, is fully consistent with the expectation using the simplest relations between X-ray luminosity, black hole mass, and dark halo mass. We study the evolution of the AGN clustering by dividing the samples into 4 redshift bins over 0.1 Mpcestimate the evolution of the bias, and find that the bias increases rapidly with redshift (b(z = 0.45) = 0.95 +/- 0.15 and b(z = 2.07) = 3.03 +/- 0.83): The typical mass of the dark matter halo derived from the bias estimates show little change with redshift. The average halo mass is found to be log (M(sub halo)/M(sun))approximates 12.1. Subject

  2. Variability Selected Low-Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei in the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, M.; Brandt, W. N.; Xue, Y. Q.; Paolillo, D. M.; Alexander, F. E.; Bauer, F. E.; Lehmer, B. D.; Luo, B.; Shemmer, O.; Schneider, D. P.; Vignail, C.

    2012-01-01

    The 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) and other deep X-ray surveys have been highly effective at selecting active galactic nuclei (AGN). However, cosmologically distant low-luminosity AGN (LLAGN) have remained a challenge to identify due to significant contribution from the host galaxy. We identify long-term X ray variability (approx. month years, observed frame) in 20 of 92 CDF-S galaxies spanning redshifts approx equals 00.8 - 1.02 that do not meet other AGN selection criteria. We show that the observed variability cannot be explained by X-ray binary populations or ultraluminous X-ray sources, so the variability is most likely caused by accretion onto a supermassive black hole. The variable galaxies are not heavily obscured in general, with a stacked effective power-law photon index of Gamma(sub Stack) approx equals 1.93 +/- 0.13, and arc therefore likely LLAGN. The LLAGN tend to lie it factor of approx equal 6-89 below the extrapolated linear variability-luminosity relation measured for luminous AGN. This may he explained by their lower accretion rates. Variability-independent black-hole mass and accretion-rate estimates for variable galaxies show that they sample a significantly different black hole mass-accretion-rate space, with masses a factor of 2.4 lower and accretion rates a factor of 22.5 lower than variable luminous AGNs at the same redshift. We find that an empirical model based on a universal broken power-law power spectral density function, where the break frequency depends on SMBH mass and accretion rate, roughly reproduces the shape, but not the normalization, of the variability-luminosity trends measured for variable galaxies and more luminous AGNs.

  3. Chandra X-ray and Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of Optically Selected Kiloparsec-Scale Binary Active Galactic Nuclei II: Host Galaxy Morphology and AGN Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Shangguan, Jinyi; Ho, Luis C; Shen, Yue; Peng, Chien Y; Greene, Jenny E; Strauss, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs) provide clues to how gas-rich mergers trigger and fuel AGNs and how supermassive black hole (SMBH) pairs evolve in a gas-rich environment. While significant effort has been invested in their identification, the detailed properties of binary AGNs and their host galaxies are still poorly constrained. In a companion paper, we examined the nature of ionizing sources in the double nuclei of four kpc-scale binary AGNs with redshifts between 0.1~0.2. Here, we present their host galaxy morphology based on F336W (U-band) and F105W (Y-band) images taken by the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. Our targets have double-peaked narrow emission lines and were confirmed to host binary AGNs with follow up observations. We find that kpc-scale binary AGNs occur in galaxy mergers with diverse morphological types. There are three major mergers with intermediate morphologies and a minor merger with a dominant disk component. We estimate the masses of the SMBHs from ...

  4. Chandra Finds Surprising Black Hole Activity In Galaxy Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Scientists at the Carnegie Observatories in Pasadena, California, have uncovered six times the expected number of active, supermassive black holes in a single viewing of a cluster of galaxies, a finding that has profound implications for theories as to how old galaxies fuel the growth of their central black holes. The finding suggests that voracious, central black holes might be as common in old, red galaxies as they are in younger, blue galaxies, a surprise to many astronomers. The team made this discovery with NASA'S Chandra X-ray Observatory. They also used Carnegie's 6.5-meter Walter Baade Telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile for follow-up optical observations. "This changes our view of galaxy clusters as the retirement homes for old and quiet black holes," said Dr. Paul Martini, lead author on a paper describing the results that appears in the September 10 issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters. "The question now is, how do these black holes produce bright X-ray sources, similar to what we see from much younger galaxies?" Typical of the black hole phenomenon, the cores of these active galaxies are luminous in X-ray radiation. Yet, they are obscured, and thus essentially undetectable in the radio, infrared and optical wavebands. "X rays can penetrate obscuring gas and dust as easily as they penetrate the soft tissue of the human body to look for broken bones," said co-author Dr. Dan Kelson. "So, with Chandra, we can peer through the dust and we have found that even ancient galaxies with 10-billion-year-old stars can have central black holes still actively pulling in copious amounts of interstellar gas. This activity has simply been hidden from us all this time. This means these galaxies aren't over the hill after all and our theories need to be revised." Scientists say that supermassive black holes -- having the mass of millions to billions of suns squeezed into a region about the size of our Solar System -- are the engines in the cores of

  5. AGN Activity in Nucleated Galaxies as Measured by Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foord, Adi; Gallo, Elena; Hodges-Kluck, Edmund; Miller, Brendan P.; Baldassare, Vivienne F.; Gültekin, Kayhan; Gnedin, Oleg Y.

    2017-05-01

    Motivated by theoretical expectations that nuclear star clusters (NSCs) in galactic centers may provide a favorable environment for supermassive black holes to form and/or efficiently grow, we set out to measure the fraction of nearby nucleated galaxies that also host an active galactic nucleus. We targeted a distance-limited sample of 98 objects with the Chandra X-ray Telescope, down to a uniform X-ray luminosity threshold of ˜1038 erg s-1. The sample is composed of 47 late-types and 51 early-types, enabling us to further investigate the active fraction as a function of galactic morphology. After correcting for contamination to the nuclear X-ray signal from bright X-ray binaries, we measure an active fraction f=11.2{ % }-4.9+7.4 (1σ C.L.) across the whole sample, in agreement with previous estimates based on a heterogeneous combination of optical, X-ray, and radio diagnostics, by Seth et al. After accounting for the different stellar mass distributions in our samples, we find no statistically significant difference in the active fraction of early- versus late-type nucleated galaxies, with f=10.6{ % }-4.9+11.9 and 10.8{ % }-6.3+11.3, respectively. For the early-type nucleated galaxies, we are able to carry out a controlled comparison with a parent sample of non-nucleated galaxies covering the same stellar mass range, again finding no statistically significant difference in the active fraction. Taken at face value, our findings suggest that the presence of an NSC does not facilitate or enhance accretion-powered emission from a nuclear supermassive black hole. This is true even for late-type nucleated galaxies, home to bluer NSCs and arguably larger gas reservoirs.

  6. CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF GALAXY ZOO MERGERS: FREQUENCY OF BINARY ACTIVE NUCLEI IN MASSIVE MERGERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, Stacy H. [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Schawinski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Bonning, Erin W. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Darg, Dan W.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Lintott, Chris J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Oh, Kyuseok [Department of Astronomy, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Cardamone, Carolin N. [Harriet W. Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning, Brown University, P.O. Box 1912, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Keel, William C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 206 Gallalee Hall, 514 University Boulevard, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-034 (United States); Simmons, Brooke D. [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208121, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Treister, Ezequiel, E-mail: stacy.h.teng@nasa.gov [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile)

    2012-07-10

    We present the results from a Chandra pilot study of 12 massive galaxy mergers selected from Galaxy Zoo. The sample includes major mergers down to a host galaxy mass of 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} that already have optical active galactic nucleus (AGN) signatures in at least one of the progenitors. We find that the coincidences of optically selected active nuclei with mildly obscured (N{sub H} {approx}< 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}) X-ray nuclei are relatively common (8/12), but the detections are too faint (<40 counts per nucleus; f{sub 2-10keV} {approx}< 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -13} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}) to reliably separate starburst and nuclear activity as the origin of the X-ray emission. Only one merger is found to have confirmed binary X-ray nuclei, though the X-ray emission from its southern nucleus could be due solely to star formation. Thus, the occurrences of binary AGNs in these mergers are rare (0%-8%), unless most merger-induced active nuclei are very heavily obscured or Compton thick.

  7. Chandra Observations of Galaxy Zoo Mergers: Frequency of Binary Active Nuclei in Massive Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Schawinski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Darg, Dan W.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Oh, Kyuseok; Bonning, Erin W.; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Keel, William C.; Lintott, Chris J.; Simmons, Brooke D.; Treister, Ezequiel

    2012-01-01

    We present the results from a Chandra pilot study of 12 massive galaxy mergers selected from Galaxy Zoo. The sample includes major mergers down to a host galaxy mass of 1011 M that already have optical AGN signatures in at least one of the progenitors. We find that the coincidences of optically selected active nuclei with mildly obscured (N(sub H) approx < 1.1 10(exp 22)/sq cm) X-ray nuclei are relatively common (8/12), but the detections are too faint (< 40 counts per nucleus; (sub -10) keV approx < 1.2 10(exp -13) erg/s/sq cm) to reliably separate starburst and nuclear activity as the origin of the X-ray emission. Only one merger is found to have confirmed binary X-ray nuclei, though the X-ray emission from its southern nucleus could be due solely to star formation. Thus, the occurrences of binary AGN in these mergers are rare (0-8%), unless most merger-induced active nuclei are very heavily obscured or Compton thick.

  8. NASA Chandra X-ray Observatory Selected as Editor's Choice in 2000 Discover Magazine Awards for Technological Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory, NASA's newest and most powerful X-ray space telescope, has been selected as the winner of the Editor's Choice category of the 2000 Discover Magazine Awards for Technological Innovation. The team of government, industry, university and research institutions that designed, built and deployed Chandra for NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala, will be formally recognized June 24 at a gala awards celebration at Epcot at the Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando, Fl. Dr. Harvey Tananbaum, director of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's Chandra X-ray Science Center, Cambridge, Mass., which conducts the Chandra science mission for NASA, will receive the award on behalf of the team. "Chandra has opened a new window for astronomers into the universe of high-energy cosmic events such as pulsars, supernova remnants and black holes," said Tananbaum. "We're now able to create spectacularly detailed images of celestial phenomena whose mere existence we could only hypothesize before." Among Chandra's most significant discoveries to date, he lists the detection of a giant ring around the heart of the Crab Nebula, details of the shock wave created by an exploding star and resolution of the high-energy X-ray "glow" in the universe into millions of specific light sources. "The successful launch, deployment and on-orbit operations of NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory is a testament to the solid partnership between TRW, NASA and the science community that has been enabling NASA's most important space science missions for the past 40 years," said Timothy W. Hannemann, executive vice president and general manager, TRW Space & Electronics Group. "The extraordinary images that Chandra is delivering daily speaks loudly not only to the quality of the science instruments on board, but also to the engineering talents and dedication to mission success exhibited by every member of NASA's Chandra mission team." Chandra, named in honor of Nobel

  9. Selected First Results from the 7 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, W. Niel; Chandra Deep Field-South Team

    2017-01-01

    The exposure on the Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) has recently been increased to 7 Ms, making it the most sensitive extragalactic X-ray survey by a wide margin. About 1050 X-ray sources have been detected, primarily distant active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and starburst/normal galaxies. The unmatched deep multiwavelength coverage for these sources allows superb follow-up investigations; e.g., 98.4% of the X-ray sources have multiwavelength counterparts, and 97.8% have spectroscopic/photometric redshifts. I will briefly describe the source catalog for the 7 Ms CDF-S and some exciting first science results. The latter will likely include (1) constraints on SMBH growth in the first galaxies as revealed by direct detection and stacking; (2) long-term variability studies of the AGNs producing most of cosmic accretion power; (3) AGN/galaxy interactions as investigated via the host properties of X-ray AGNs; and (4) measurements of the evolving X-ray binary populations of normal and starburst galaxies.

  10. The spatial distribution of X-ray selected AGN in the Chandra deep fields: a theoretical perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Marulli, Federico; Branchini, Enzo; Gilli, Roberto; Moscardini, Lauro; Springel, Volker

    2009-01-01

    We study the spatial distribution of X-ray selected AGN in the framework of hierarchical co-evolution of supermassive black holes and their host galaxies and dark matter haloes. To this end, we have applied the model developed by Croton et al.(2006), De Lucia & Blaizot(2007) and Marulli et al.(2008) to the output of the Millennium Run and obtained hundreds of realizations of past light-cones from which we have extracted realistic mock AGN catalogues that mimic the Chandra deep fields. We find that the model AGN number counts are in fair agreement with observations, except at fluxes <1e-15 erg/cm^2/s. The spatial two-point correlation function predicted by the model is well described by a power-law relation out to 20 Mpc/h, in close agreement with observations. Our model matches the correlation length r_0 of AGN in the Chandra Deep Field North but underestimates it in the Chandra Deep Field South. When fixing the slope to gamma = 1.4, as in Gilli et al. (2005), the statistical significance of the mismat...

  11. Chandra Discovery of 10 New X-Ray Jets Associated With FR II Radio Core-Selected AGNs in the MOJAVE Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Hogan, Brandon; Kharb, Preeti; Marshall, Herman; Cooper, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray observatory has proven to be a vital tool for studying high-energy emission processes in jets associated with Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN).We have compiled a sample of 27 AGN selected from the radio flux-limited MOJAVE (Monitoring of Jets in AGN with VLBA Experiments) sample of highly relativistically beamed jets to look for correlations between X-ray and radio emission on kiloparsec scales. The sample consists of all MOJAVE quasars which have over 100 mJy of extended radio emission at 1.4 GHz and a radio structure of at least 3" in size. Previous Chandra observations have revealed X-ray jets in 11 of 14 members of the sample, and we have carried out new observations of the remaining 13 sources. Of the latter, 10 have Xray jets, bringing the overall detection rate to ~ 78%. Our selection criteria, which is based on highly compact, relativistically beamed jet emission and large extended radio flux, thus provides an effective method of discovering new X-ray jets associated with AGN. The detect...

  12. Deep Chandra observations of HCG 16. I. Active nuclei, star formation, and galactic winds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Sullivan, E.; Zezas, A.; Vrtilek, J. M.; David, L. P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Giacintucci, S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Trevisan, M. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Av. dos Astronautas 1758, 12227-010, São José dos Campos (Brazil); Ponman, T. J.; Raychaudhury, S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Mamon, G. A., E-mail: eosullivan@cfa.harvard.edu [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris (UMR 7095 CNRS and UMPC), 98 bis Bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2014-10-01

    We present new, deep Chandra X-ray and Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope 610 MHz observations of the spiral-galaxy-rich compact group HCG 16, which we use to examine nuclear activity, star formation, and high-luminosity X-ray binary populations in the major galaxies. We confirm the presence of obscured active nuclei in NGC 833 and NGC 835, and identify a previously unrecognized nuclear source in NGC 838. All three nuclei are variable on timescales of months to years, and for NGC 833 and NGC 835 this is most likely caused by changes in accretion rate. The deep Chandra observations allow us to detect for the first time an Fe Kα emission line in the spectrum of the Seyfert 2 nucleus of NGC 835. We find that NGC 838 and NGC 839 are both starburst-dominated systems, with only weak nuclear activity, in agreement with previous optical studies. We estimate the star formation rates in the two galaxies from their X-ray and radio emission, and compare these results with estimates from the infrared and ultraviolet bands to confirm that star formation in both galaxies is probably declining after galaxy-wide starbursts were triggered ∼400-500 Myr ago. We examine the physical properties of their galactic superwinds, and find that both have temperatures of ∼0.8 keV. We also examine the X-ray and radio properties of NGC 848, the fifth largest galaxy in the group, and show that it is dominated by emission from its starburst.

  13. Deep Chandra Observations of HCG 16. I. Active Nuclei, Star Formation, and Galactic Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, E.; Zezas, A.; Vrtilek, J. M.; Giacintucci, S.; Trevisan, M.; David, L. P.; Ponman, T. J.; Mamon, G. A.; Raychaudhury, S.

    2014-10-01

    We present new, deep Chandra X-ray and Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope 610 MHz observations of the spiral-galaxy-rich compact group HCG 16, which we use to examine nuclear activity, star formation, and high-luminosity X-ray binary populations in the major galaxies. We confirm the presence of obscured active nuclei in NGC 833 and NGC 835, and identify a previously unrecognized nuclear source in NGC 838. All three nuclei are variable on timescales of months to years, and for NGC 833 and NGC 835 this is most likely caused by changes in accretion rate. The deep Chandra observations allow us to detect for the first time an Fe Kα emission line in the spectrum of the Seyfert 2 nucleus of NGC 835. We find that NGC 838 and NGC 839 are both starburst-dominated systems, with only weak nuclear activity, in agreement with previous optical studies. We estimate the star formation rates in the two galaxies from their X-ray and radio emission, and compare these results with estimates from the infrared and ultraviolet bands to confirm that star formation in both galaxies is probably declining after galaxy-wide starbursts were triggered ~400-500 Myr ago. We examine the physical properties of their galactic superwinds, and find that both have temperatures of ~0.8 keV. We also examine the X-ray and radio properties of NGC 848, the fifth largest galaxy in the group, and show that it is dominated by emission from its starburst.

  14. Supermassive Black-Hole Growth Over Cosmic Time: Active Galaxy Demography, Physics, and Ecology from Chandra Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, W N

    2010-01-01

    Extragalactic X-ray surveys over the past decade have dramatically improved understanding of the majority populations of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) over most of the history of the Universe. Here we briefly highlight some of the exciting discoveries about AGN demography, physics, and ecology with a focus on results from Chandra. We also discuss some key unresolved questions and future prospects.

  15. THE CHANDRA MULTI-WAVELENGTH PROJECT: OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY AND THE BROADBAND SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF X-RAY-SELECTED AGNs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trichas, Markos; Green, Paul J.; Aldcroft, Tom; Kim, Dong-Woo; Mossman, Amy [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Silverman, John D. [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha 5-1-5, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Barkhouse, Wayne [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202 (United States); Cameron, Robert A. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Constantin, Anca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, James Madison University, PHCH, Harrisonburg, VA 22807 (United States); Ellison, Sara L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8P 1A1 (Canada); Foltz, Craig [Division of Astronomical Sciences, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22230 (United States); Haggard, Daryl [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Jannuzi, Buell T. [NOAO, Kitt Peak National Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); Marshall, Herman L. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Perez, Laura M. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Romero-Colmenero, Encarni [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory, 7935 (South Africa); Ruiz, Angel [Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera-INAF, Milan (Italy); Smith, Malcolm G., E-mail: mtrichas@cfa.harvard.edu [Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory, La Serena (Chile); and others

    2012-06-01

    From optical spectroscopy of X-ray sources observed as part of the Chandra Multi-wavelength Project (ChaMP), we present redshifts and classifications for a total of 1569 Chandra sources from our targeted spectroscopic follow-up using the FLWO/1.5 m, SAAO/1.9 m, WIYN 3.5 m, CTIO/4 m, KPNO/4 m, Magellan/6.5 m, MMT/6.5 m, and Gemini/8 m telescopes, and from archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopy. We classify the optical counterparts as 50% broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs), 16% emission line galaxies, 14% absorption line galaxies, and 20% stars. We detect QSOs out to z {approx} 5.5 and galaxies out to z {approx} 3. We have compiled extensive photometry, including X-ray (ChaMP), ultraviolet (GALEX), optical (SDSS and ChaMP-NOAO/MOSAIC follow-up), near-infrared (UKIDSS, Two Micron All Sky Survey, and ChaMP-CTIO/ISPI follow-up), mid-infrared (WISE), and radio (FIRST and NVSS) bands. Together with our spectroscopic information, this enables us to derive detailed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for our extragalactic sources. We fit a variety of template SEDs to determine bolometric luminosities, and to constrain AGNs and starburst components where both are present. While {approx}58% of X-ray Seyferts (10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} < L{sub 2-10keV} <10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) require a starburst event (>5% starburst contribution to bolometric luminosity) to fit observed photometry only 26% of the X-ray QSO (L{sub 2-10keV} >10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) population appear to have some kind of star formation contribution. This is significantly lower than for the Seyferts, especially if we take into account torus contamination at z > 1 where the majority of our X-ray QSOs lie. In addition, we observe a rapid drop of the percentage of starburst contribution as X-ray luminosity increases. This is consistent with the quenching of star formation by powerful QSOs, as predicted by the merger model, or with a time lag between the peak of star formation and QSO

  16. The black hole - bulge mass relation of Active Galactic Nuclei in the Extended Chandra Deep Field - South Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Schramm, Malte

    2012-01-01

    We present results from a study to determine whether relations, established in the local Universe, between the mass of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies are in place at higher redshifts. We establish a well-constructed sample of 18 X-ray-selected, broad-line Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South - Survey with 0.5 < z < 1.2. This redshift range is chosen to ensure that HST imaging is available with at least two filters that bracket the 4000 Angstrom break thus providing reliable stellar mass estimates of the host galaxy by accounting for both young and old stellar populations. We compute single-epoch, virial black hole masses from optical spectra using the broad MgII emission line. For essentially all galaxies in our sample, their total stellar mass content agrees remarkably well, given their BH masses, with local relations of inactive galaxies and active SMBHs. We further decompose the total stellar mass into bulge and disk components separately wit...

  17. Linking Stellar Coronal Activity and Rotation at 500 Myr: A Deep Chandra Observation of M37

    CERN Document Server

    Núñez, Alejandro; Covey, Kevin R; Hartman, Joel D; Kraus, Adam L; Bowsher, Emily C; Douglas, Stephanie T; López-Morales, Mercedes; Pooley, David A; Posselt, Bettina; Saar, Steven H; West, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    Empirical calibrations of the stellar age-rotation-activity relation (ARAR) rely on observations of the co-eval populations of stars in open clusters. We used the Chandra X-ray Observatory to study M37, a 500-Myr-old open cluster that has been extensively surveyed for rotation periods ($P_{\\rm rot}$). M37 was observed almost continuously for five days, for a total of 440.5 ksec, to measure stellar X-ray luminosities ($L_{\\mathrm{X}}$), a proxy for coronal activity, across a wide range of masses. The cluster's membership catalog was revisited to calculate updated membership probabilities from photometric data and each star's distance to the cluster center. The result is a comprehensive sample of 1699 M37 members: 426 with $P_{\\rm rot}$, 278 with X-ray detections, and 76 with both. We calculate Rossby numbers, $R_o = P_{\\rm rot}/\\tau$, where $\\tau$ is the convective turnover time, and ratios of the X-ray-to-bolometric luminosity, $L_{\\rm X}/L_{\\rm bol}$, to minimize mass dependencies in our characterization of ...

  18. X-ray properties of radio-selected star forming galaxies in the Chandra-COSMOS survey

    CERN Document Server

    Ranalli, P; Zamorani, G; Cappelluti, N; Civano, F; Georgantopoulos, I; Gilli, R; Schinnerer, E; Smolcic, V; Vignali, C

    2012-01-01

    X-ray surveys contain sizable numbers of star forming galaxies, beyond the AGN which usually make the majority of detections. Many methods to separate the two populations are used in the literature, based on X-ray and multiwavelength properties. We aim at a detailed test of the classification schemes and to study the X-ray properties of the resulting samples. We build on a sample of galaxies selected at 1.4 GHz in the VLA-COSMOS survey, classified by Smolcic et al. (2008) according to their optical colours and observed with Chandra. A similarly selected control sample of AGN is also used for comparison. We review some X-ray based classification criteria and check how they affect the sample composition. The efficiency of the classification scheme devised by Smolcic et al. (2008) is such that ~30% of composite/misclassified objects are expected because of the higher X-ray brightness of AGN with respect to galaxies. The latter fraction is actually 50% in the X-ray detected sources, while it is expected to be muc...

  19. Dissecting Photometric Redshift for Active Galactic Nucleus Using XMM- and Chandra-COSMOS Samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salvato, M.; Ilbert, O.; Hasinger, G.; Rau, A.; Civano, F.; Zamorani, G.; Brusa, M.; Elvis, M.; Vignali, C.; Aussel, H.; Comastri, A.; Fiore, F.; Le Floc'h, E.; Mainieri, V.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Capak, P.; Caputi, K.; Cappelluti, N.; Carollo, C. M.; Contini, T.; Garilli, B.; Iovino, A.; Fotopoulou, S.; Fruscione, A.; Gilli, R.; Halliday, C.; Kneib, J. -P.; Kakazu, Y.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Kovac, K.; Ideue, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Impey, C. D.; Le Fevre, O.; Lamareille, F.; Lanzuisi, G.; Le Borgne, J. -F.; Le Brun, V.; Lilly, S.; Maier, C.; Manohar, S.; Masters, D.; McCracken, H.; Messias, H.; Mignoli, M.; Mobasher, B.; Nagao, T.; Pello, R.; Puccetti, S.; Perez-Montero, E.; Renzini, A.; Sargent, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Scodeggio, M.; Scoville, N.; Shopbell, P.; Silvermann, J.; Taniguchi, Y.; Tasca, L.; Tresse, L.; Trump, J. R.; Zucca, E.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we release accurate photometric redshifts for 1692 counterparts to Chandra sources in the central square degree of the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field. The availability of a large training set of spectroscopic redshifts that extends to faint magnitudes enabled photometric redsh

  20. Dissecting Photometric Redshift for Active Galactic Nucleus Using XMM- and Chandra-COSMOS Samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salvato, M.; Ilbert, O.; Hasinger, G.; Rau, A.; Civano, F.; Zamorani, G.; Brusa, M.; Elvis, M.; Vignali, C.; Aussel, H.; Comastri, A.; Fiore, F.; Le Floc'h, E.; Mainieri, V.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Capak, P.; Caputi, K.; Cappelluti, N.; Carollo, C. M.; Contini, T.; Garilli, B.; Iovino, A.; Fotopoulou, S.; Fruscione, A.; Gilli, R.; Halliday, C.; Kneib, J. -P.; Kakazu, Y.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Kovac, K.; Ideue, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Impey, C. D.; Le Fevre, O.; Lamareille, F.; Lanzuisi, G.; Le Borgne, J. -F.; Le Brun, V.; Lilly, S.; Maier, C.; Manohar, S.; Masters, D.; McCracken, H.; Messias, H.; Mignoli, M.; Mobasher, B.; Nagao, T.; Pello, R.; Puccetti, S.; Perez-Montero, E.; Renzini, A.; Sargent, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Scodeggio, M.; Scoville, N.; Shopbell, P.; Silvermann, J.; Taniguchi, Y.; Tasca, L.; Tresse, L.; Trump, J. R.; Zucca, E.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we release accurate photometric redshifts for 1692 counterparts to Chandra sources in the central square degree of the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field. The availability of a large training set of spectroscopic redshifts that extends to faint magnitudes enabled photometric redsh

  1. Dissecting Photometric Redshift for Active Galactic Nucleus Using XMM- and Chandra-COSMOS Samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salvato, M.; Ilbert, O.; Hasinger, G.; Rau, A.; Civano, F.; Zamorani, G.; Brusa, M.; Elvis, M.; Vignali, C.; Aussel, H.; Comastri, A.; Fiore, F.; Le Floc'h, E.; Mainieri, V.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Capak, P.; Caputi, K.; Cappelluti, N.; Carollo, C. M.; Contini, T.; Garilli, B.; Iovino, A.; Fotopoulou, S.; Fruscione, A.; Gilli, R.; Halliday, C.; Kneib, J. -P.; Kakazu, Y.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Kovac, K.; Ideue, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Impey, C. D.; Le Fevre, O.; Lamareille, F.; Lanzuisi, G.; Le Borgne, J. -F.; Le Brun, V.; Lilly, S.; Maier, C.; Manohar, S.; Masters, D.; McCracken, H.; Messias, H.; Mignoli, M.; Mobasher, B.; Nagao, T.; Pello, R.; Puccetti, S.; Perez-Montero, E.; Renzini, A.; Sargent, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Scodeggio, M.; Scoville, N.; Shopbell, P.; Silvermann, J.; Taniguchi, Y.; Tasca, L.; Tresse, L.; Trump, J. R.; Zucca, E.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we release accurate photometric redshifts for 1692 counterparts to Chandra sources in the central square degree of the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field. The availability of a large training set of spectroscopic redshifts that extends to faint magnitudes enabled photometric

  2. Linking Stellar Coronal Activity and Rotation at 500 Myr: A Deep Chandra Observation of M37

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Alejandro; Agüeros, Marcel A.; Covey, Kevin R.; Hartman, Joel D.; Kraus, Adam L.; Bowsher, Emily C.; Douglas, Stephanie T.; López-Morales, Mercedes; Pooley, David A.; Posselt, Bettina; Saar, Steven H.; West, Andrew A.

    2015-08-01

    Empirical calibrations of the stellar age-rotation-activity relation (ARAR) rely on observations of the co-eval populations of stars in open clusters. We used the Chandra X-ray Observatory to study M37, a 500-Myr-old open cluster that has been extensively surveyed for rotation periods ({P}{rot}). M37 was observed almost continuously for five days, for a total of 440.5 ks, to measure stellar X-ray luminosities ({L}{{X}}), a proxy for coronal activity, across a wide range of masses. The cluster’s membership catalog was revisited to calculate updated membership probabilities from photometric data and each star’s distance to the cluster center. The result is a comprehensive sample of 1699 M37 members: 426 with {P}{rot}, 278 with X-ray detections, and 76 with both. We calculate Rossby numbers, {R}o= {P}{rot}/τ , where τ is the convective turnover time, and ratios of the X-ray-to-bolometric luminosity, {L}{{X}}/{L}{bol}, to minimize mass dependencies in our characterization of the rotation-coronal activity relation at 500 Myr. We find that fast rotators, for which {R}o\\lt 0.09+/- 0.01, show saturated levels of activity, with log({L}{{X}}/{L}{bol})=\\-3.06+/- 0.04. For {R}o≥slant 0.09+/- 0.01, activity is unsaturated and follows a power law of the form {R}oβ , where β = -{2.03}-0.14+0.17. This is the largest sample available for analyzing the dependence of coronal emission on rotation for a single-aged population, covering stellar masses in the range 0.4-1.3 {M}⊙ , {P}{rot} in the range 0.4-12.8 days, and {L}{{X}} in the range {10}28.4-30.5 {erg} {{{s}}}-1. Our results make M37 a new benchmark open cluster for calibrating the ARAR at ages of ≈ 500 Myr.

  3. The First Chandra Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; /NASA, Marshall; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Cameron, Robert A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /SLAC; Gandhi,; Foellmi, Cedric; /European Southern Obs., Chile; Elsner, Ronald F.; /NASA, Marshall; Patel, Sandeep K.; /USRA, Huntsville; Wu, Kinwah; /Mullard Space Sci. Lab.; O' Dell, Stephen; /NASA, Marshall

    2005-09-09

    Before the official first-light images, the Chandra X-ray Observatory obtained an X-ray image of the field to which its focal plane was first exposed. We describe this historic observation and report our study of the first Chandra field. Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) detected 15 X-ray sources, the brightest being dubbed ''Leon X-1'' to honor the Chandra Telescope Scientist, Leon Van Speybroeck. Based upon our analysis of the X-ray data and spectroscopy at the European Southern Observatory (ESO; La Silla, Chile), we find that Leon X-1 is a Type-1 (unobscured) active galactic nucleus (AGN) at a redshift z = 0.3207. Leon X-1 exhibits strong Fe II emission and a broad-line Balmer decrement that is unusually flat for an AGN. Within the context of the Eigenvector-1 correlation space, these properties suggest that Leon X-1 may be a massive ({ge} 10{sup 9} M{sub {circle_dot}}) black hole, accreting at a rate approaching its Eddington limit.

  4. Maintaining Software for Active Missions: A Case Study of Chandra's Instrumentation Over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, D. G., II; Chen, J. C.; Glotfelty, K. J.; Allen, G. E.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Primini, F. A.

    2011-07-01

    During eleven plus years of operation, ample knowledge has been gained regarding the Chandra X-ray Observatory's scientific instruments and how they are performing over time. In this paper we will summarize the significant software changes related to the performance and knowledge gained about the observatory's instrumentation specifically targeting the last five years of the mission. With this knowledge, numerous upgrades to the Chandra processing software have taken place to correct issues that have developed on orbit (ACIS CTI effects, LETG/ACIS rotation), to correct for hardware issues (HRC timing), and for our better understanding of the evolution of the instrumentation (temporal gain shifts in both instruments). In addition, we will discuss the challenges in maintaining software when the calibrations for different operating modes are incrementally made available. This includes challenges in maintaining an archive with a mixture of data products with different calibrations applied. This paper roughly covers the era of the 3rd reprocessing of the Chandra archive (Repro-3).

  5. Revealing the Heavily Obscured Active Galactic Nucleus Population of High-redshift 3CRR Sources with Chandra X-Ray Observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; Kuraszkiewicz, Joanna; Haas, Martin; Barthel, Peter; Leipski, Christian; Willner, S. P.; Worrall, D. M.; Birkinshaw, Mark; Antonucci, Robert; Ashby, M. L. N.; Chini, Rolf; Fazio, G. G.; Lawrence, Charles; Ogle, Patrick; Schulz, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Chandra observations of a complete, flux-limited sample of 38 high-redshift (1 selected (and so unbiased in orientation) 3CRR radio sources are reported. The sample includes 21 quasars (=broad-line radio galaxies) and 17 narrow-line radio galaxies (NLRGs) with matched 178 MHz

  6. Dissecting Photometric redshift for Active Galactic Nuclei using XMM- and Chandra-COSMOS samples

    CERN Document Server

    Salvato, M; Hasinger, G; Rau, A; Civano, F; Zamorani, G; Brusa, M; Elvis, M; Vignali, C; Aussel, H; Comastri, A; Fiore, F; Floc'h, E Le; Mainieri, V; Bardelli, S; Bolzonella, M; Bongiorno, A; Capak, P; Caputi, K; Cappelluti, N; Carollo, C M; Contini, T; Garilli, B; Iovino, A; Fotopoulou, S; Fruscione, A; Gilli, R; Halliday, C; Kneib, J-P; Kakazu, Y; Kartaltepe, J S; Koekemoer, A M; Kovac, K; Ideue, Y; Ikeda, H; Impey, C D; Fevre, O Le; Lamareille, F; Lanzuisi, G; Borgne, J-F Le; Brun, V Le; Lilly, S J; Maier, C; Manohar, S; Masters, D; McCracken, H; Messias, H; Mignoli, M; Mobasher, B; Nagao, T; Pello, R; Puccetti, S; Renzini, E Perez Montero A; Sargent, M; Sanders, D B; Scodeggio, M; Scoville, N; Shopbell, P; Silvermann, J; Taniguchi, Y; Tasca, L; Tresse, L; Trump, J R; Zucca, E

    2011-01-01

    With this paper, we release accurate photometric redshifts for 1692 counterparts to Chandra sources in the central square degree of the COSMOS field. The availability of a large training set of spectroscopic redshifts that extends to faint magnitudes enabled photometric redshifts comparable to the highest quality results presently available for normal galaxies. We demonstrate that morphologically extended, faint X-ray sources without optical variability are more accurately described by a library of normal galaxies (corrected for emission lines) than by AGN-dominated templates, even if these sources have AGN-like X-ray luminosities. Preselecting the library on the bases of the source properties allowed us to reach an accuracy sigma_(Delta z/(1+z_spec)) \\sim0.015 with a fraction of outliers of 5.8% for the entire Chandra-COSMOS sample. In addition, we release revised photometric redshifts for the 1735 optical counterparts of the XMM-detected sources over the entire 2 sq. deg.of COSMOS. For 248 sources, our upda...

  7. Merger-driven Fueling of Active Galactic Nuclei: Six Dual and Offset Active Galactic Nuclei Discovered with Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Comerford, Julia M; Barrows, R Scott; Greene, Jenny E; Zakamska, Nadia L; Madejski, Greg M; Cooper, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Dual active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and offset AGNs are kpc-scale separation supermassive black holes pairs created during galaxy mergers, where both or one of the black holes are AGNs, respectively. These dual and offset AGNs are valuable probes of the link between mergers and AGNs but are challenging to identify. Here we present Chandra/ACIS observations of 12 optically-selected dual AGN candidates at z < 0.34, where we use the X-rays to identify AGNs. We also present HST/WFC3 observations of 10 of these candidates, which reveal any stellar bulges accompanying the AGNs. We discover a dual AGN system with separation of 2.2 kpc, where the two stellar bulges have coincident [O III] and X-ray sources. This system is an extremely minor merger (460:1) that may include a dwarf galaxy hosting an intermediate mass black hole. We also find six single AGNs, and five systems that are either dual or offset AGNs with separations < 10 kpc. Four of the six dual AGNs and dual/offset AGNs are in ongoing major mergers, a...

  8. The Chandra Source Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Ian N; Glotfelty, Kenny J; Anderson, Craig S; Bonaventura, Nina R; Chen, Judy C; Davis, John E; Doe, Stephen M; Evans, Janet D; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Galle, Elizabeth C; Gibbs, Danny G; Grier, John D; Hain, Roger M; Hall, Diane M; Harbo, Peter N; Xiangqun,; He,; Houck, John C; Karovska, Margarita; Kashyap, Vinay L; Lauer, Jennifer; McCollough, Michael L; McDowell, Jonathan C; Miller, Joseph B; Mitschang, Arik W; Morgan, Douglas L; Mossman, Amy E; Nichols, Joy S; Nowak, Michael A; Plummer, David A; Refsdal, Brian L; Rots, Arnold H; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Sundheim, Beth A; Tibbetts, Michael S; Van Stone, David W; Winkelman, Sherry L; Zografou, Panagoula

    2010-01-01

    The Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) is a general purpose virtual X-ray astrophysics facility that provides access to a carefully selected set of generally useful quantities for individual X-ray sources, and is designed to satisfy the needs of a broad-based group of scientists, including those who may be less familiar with astronomical data analysis in the X-ray regime. The first release of the CSC includes information about 94,676 distinct X-ray sources detected in a subset of public ACIS imaging observations from roughly the first eight years of the Chandra mission. This release of the catalog includes point and compact sources with observed spatial extents <~ 30''. The catalog (1) provides access to the best estimates of the X-ray source properties for detected sources, with good scientific fidelity, and directly supports scientific analysis using the individual source data; (2) facilitates analysis of a wide range of statistical properties for classes of X-ray sources; and (3) provides efficient access to ...

  9. "Revealing a Population of Heavily Obscured Active Galactic Nuclei at z=0.5-1 in the Chandra Deep Field-South

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, B; Xue, Y Q; Alexander, D M; Brusa, M; Bauer, F E; Comastri, A; Fabian, A C; Gilli, R; Lehmer, B D; Rafferty, D A; Schneider, D P; Vignali, C

    2011-01-01

    (abridged) We identify a numerically significant population of heavily obscured AGNs at z~0.5-1 in the Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) and Extended Chandra Deep Field-South by selecting 242 X-ray undetected objects with infrared-based star formation rates (SFRs) substantially higher (a factor of 3.2 or more) than their SFRs determined from the UV after correcting for dust extinction. An X-ray stacking analysis of 23 candidates in the central CDF-S region using the 4 Ms Chandra data reveals a hard X-ray signal with an effective power-law photon index of Gamma=0.6_{-0.4}^{+0.3}, indicating a significant contribution from obscured AGNs. Based on Monte Carlo simulations, we conclude that 74+-25% of the selected galaxies host obscured AGNs, within which ~95% are heavily obscured and ~80% are Compton-thick (CT; NH>1.5x10^{24} cm^{-2}). The heavily obscured objects in our sample are of moderate intrinsic X-ray luminosity [ ~ (0.9-4)x10^{42} erg/s in the 2-10 keV band]. The space density of the CT AGNs is (1.6+-0.5)...

  10. New Results from Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Forman, W; Jones, C; Vikhlinin, A A; Churazov, E

    2001-01-01

    We discuss two themes from Chandra observations of galaxies and clusters. First, we describe the effects of radio-emitting plasmas or ``bubbles'', inflated by active galactic nuclei, on the hot X-ray emitting gaseous atmospheres in galaxies and clusters. We describe the interaction of the ``bubbles'' and the X-ray emitting gas as the buoyant bubbles rise through the hot gas. Second, we describe sharp, edge-like surface brightness structures in clusters. Chandra observations show that these features are not shock fronts as was originally thought, but ``cold fronts'', most likely the boundaries of the remaining cores of merger components. Finally, we present recent observations of M86 and NGC507 which show similar sharp features around galaxies. For M86, the sharp edge is the boundary between the galaxy's X-ray corona and the Virgo cluster gas. The structures around NGC507, the central galaxy in a group, could be relics of galaxy formation or may reflect the motion of NGC507 in the larger potential of the group...

  11. Chandra and MMT observations of low-mass black hole active galactic nuclei accreting at low rates in dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, W; Dou, L; Dong, X -B; Fan, X; Wang, T -G

    2014-01-01

    We report on Chandra X-ray observations of four candidate low-mass black hole (<10^6Msun) active galactic nuclei (AGNs) that have the estimated Eddington ratios among the lowest (~10^(-2)) found for this class. The aims are to validate the nature of their AGNs and to confirm the low Eddington ratios that are derived from the broad H_alpha line, and to explore this poorly studied regime in the AGN parameter space. Among them, two objects with the lowest significance of the broad lines are also observed with Multi-Mirror Telescope, and the high-quality optical spectra taken confirm them as Seyfert 1 AGNs and as having small black hole masses. X-ray emission is detected from the nuclei of two of the galaxies, which is variable on timescales of 10^3s, whereas no significant (or only marginal at best) detection is found for the remaining two. The X-ray luminosities are on the order of 10^(41) ergs/s or even lower, on the order of 10^(40) ergs/s for non-detections, which are among the lowest regimes ever probed ...

  12. The First Chandra Field

    OpenAIRE

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Cameron, Robert A.; Gandhi, Poshak; Foellmi, Cédric; Elsner, Ronald F.; Patel, Sandeep K.; Wu, Kinwah; O'Dell, Stephen L.

    2005-01-01

    Before the official first-light images, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory obtained an X-ray image of the field to which its focal plane was first exposed. We describe this historic observation and report our study of the first Chandra field. Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) detected 15 X-ray sources, the brightest being dubbed ``Leon X-1'' to honor the Chandra Telescope Scientist, Leon Van Speybroeck. Based upon our analysis of the X-ray data and spectroscopy at the European Sou...

  13. Environment of 1 ≤ z ≤ 2 MIR selected obscured and unobscured AGNs in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornancini, Carlos Guillermo; Taormina, Mónica Silvia; Lambas, Diego García

    2017-08-01

    Context. In unified models, different types of active galaxy nuclei (AGN) correspond to a single class of objects, where their observed differences are solely due to the different orientations of the obscuring material around the central inner regions. Recent studies also show that this obscuring material can even extend at galactic scales due to debris from galaxy interactions and/or mergers. In standard unified models the different AGN types are expected to show similar galaxy environments. Aims: We aim to investigate properties and environment of obscured and unobscured AGNs selected from mid-infrared (MIR) bands from the Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC), in order to test the unified model and evolutionary scenarios. Methods: The sample of AGNs was selected from images obtained with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) mounted on the Spitzer Space Telescope, based on their MIR colors centered at wavelengths [3.6], [4.5], [5.8] and [8.0] microns. We selected two samples of AGNs with redshifts in the range 1 ≤ z ≤ 2 and rest-frame absolute magnitudes Mv ≤ -21: obscured and unobscured AGNs by means of a simple optical-MIR color cut criterion (R- [4.5] = 3.05.) Results: We find that obscured AGNs are intrinsically optically faint in the R band, suggesting that luminous IR-selected AGNs have a significant dust extinction. From a cross-correlation with several X-ray surveys, we find that the majority of the AGNs in our sample have X-ray luminosities similar to those found in Seyfert-like galaxies. We study the properties of galaxies surrounding these two samples. Neighbouring galaxies located close to ( 200 kpc) obscured AGNs tend to have redder colors, compared to the local environment of unobscured AGNs. Results obtained from a KS test show that the two color distributions are different at 95% confidence level. We find that obscured AGNs are located in denser local galaxy environments compared to the unobscured AGN sample. Conclusions: Our results

  14. Simultaneous Chandra, CSO and VLA Observations of Sgr A*: The Nature of Flaring Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Yusef-Zadeh, F; Heinke, C; Dowell, C D; Roberts, D; Baganoff, F K; Bower, G C

    2007-01-01

    Sgr A*, the massive black hole at the center of the Galaxy, varies in radio through X-ray emission on hourly time scales. The flare activity is thought to arise from the innermost region of an accretion flow onto Sgr A*. We present simultaneous light curves of Sgr A* in radio, sub-mm and X-rays that show a possible time delay of 110$\\pm17$ minutes between X-ray and 850 $\\mu$m suggesting that the sub-mm flare emission is optically thick. At radio wavelengths, we detect time lags of of $20.4\\pm6.8, 30\\pm12$ and 20$\\pm6$ minutes between the flare peaks observed at 13 and 7 mm in three different epochs using the VLA. Linear polarization of 1$\\pm0.2$% and 0.7$\\pm0.1$% is detected at 7 and 13 mm, respectively, when averaged over the entire observation on 2006 July 17. A simple picture of an expanding bubble of synchrotron emitting hot plasma can explain the time delay between various wavelengths, the asymmetric shape of the light curves, and the observed polarization of the flare emission at 43 and 22 GHz. The deri...

  15. The 3 Ms Chandra Campaign on Sgr A*: A Census of X-ray Flaring Activity from the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Neilsen, J; Gammie, C; Dexter, J; Markoff, S; Haggard, D; Nayakshin, S; Wang, Q D; Grosso, N; Porquet, D; Tomsick, J A; Degenaar, N; Fragile, P C; Houck, J C; Wijnands, R; Miller, J M; Baganoff, F K

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, X-ray observations of Sgr A* have revealed a black hole in a deep sleep, punctuated roughly once per day by brief flares. The extreme X-ray faintness of this supermassive black hole has been a long-standing puzzle in black hole accretion. To study the accretion processes in the Galactic Center, Chandra (in concert with numerous ground- and space-based observatories) undertook a 3 Ms campaign on Sgr A* in 2012. With its excellent observing cadence, sensitivity, and spectral resolution, this Chandra X-ray Visionary Project (XVP) provides an unprecedented opportunity to study the behavior of the closest supermassive black hole. We present a progress report from our ongoing study of X-ray flares, including the brightest flare ever seen from Sgr A*. Focusing on the statistics of the flares and the quiescent emission, we discuss the physical implications of X-ray variability in the Galactic Center.

  16. A Public, K-Selected, Optical-to-Near-Infrared Catalog of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS) from the MUltiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC)

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Edward N; van Dokkum, Pieter G; Quadri, Ryan F; Gawiser, Eric; Bell, Eric F; Barrientos, L Felipe; Blanc, Guillermo A; Castander, Francisco J; Damen, Maaike; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Hall, Patrick B; Herrera, David; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Kriek, Mariska; Labbé, Ivo; Lira, Paulina; Maza, José; Rudnick, Gregory; Treister, Ezequiel; Urry, C Megan; Willis, Jon P; Wuyts, Stijn

    2009-01-01

    We present a new K-selected, optical-to-near-infrared photometric catalog of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS), making it publicly available to the astronomical community. The dataset is founded on publicly available imaging, supplemented by original zJK imaging data obtained as part of the MUltiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC). The final photometric catalog consists of photometry derived from nine band U-K imaging covering the full 0.5x0.5 sq. deg. of the ECDFS, plus H band data for approximately 80% of the field. The 5sigma flux limit for point-sources is K = 22.0 (AB). This is also the nominal completeness and reliability limit of the catalog: the empirical completeness for 21.75 < K < 22.00 is 85+%. We have verified the quality of the catalog through both internal consistency checks, and comparisons to other existing and publicly available catalogs. As well as the photometric catalog, we also present catalogs of photometric redshifts and restframe photometry derived from the ten b...

  17. REVEALING THE HEAVILY OBSCURED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS POPULATION OF HIGH-REDSHIFT 3CRR SOURCES WITH CHANDRA X-RAY OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; Kuraszkiewicz, Joanna; Willner, S. P.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Fazio, G. G. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Haas, Martin; Chini, Rolf [Astronomisches Institut, Ruhr-University, D-44801 Bochum (Germany); Barthel, Peter [Kapteyn Institute, University of Groningen, 9747 AD Groningen (Netherlands); Leipski, Christian [MPIA, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Worrall, D. M.; Birkinshaw, Mark [H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Antonucci, Robert [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Lawrence, Charles [JPL, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Ogle, Patrick [Spitzer Science Center, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Schulz, Bernhard [IPAC, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-08-10

    Chandra observations of a complete, flux-limited sample of 38 high-redshift (1 < z < 2), low-frequency-selected (and so unbiased in orientation) 3CRR radio sources are reported. The sample includes 21 quasars (=broad-line radio galaxies) and 17 narrow-line radio galaxies (NLRGs) with matched 178 MHz radio luminosity (log L{sub R}(5 GHz) {approx}44-45). The quasars have high radio core fraction, high X-ray luminosities (log L{sub X} {approx}45-46), and soft X-ray hardness ratios (HR {approx}-0.5) indicating low obscuration. The NLRGs have lower core fraction, lower apparent X-ray luminosities (log L{sub X} {approx}43-45), and mostly hard X-ray hardness ratios (HR >0) indicating obscuration (N{sub H} {approx}10{sup 22}-10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}). These properties and the correlation between obscuration and radio core fraction are consistent with orientation-dependent obscuration as in unification models. About half the NLRGs have soft X-ray hardness ratios and/or a high [O III] emission line to X-ray luminosity ratio suggesting obscuration by Compton thick (CT) material so that scattered nuclear or extended X-ray emission dominates (as in NGC 1068). The ratios of unobscured to Compton-thin (10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} < N{sub H}(int) <1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}) to CT (N{sub H}(int) >1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}) is 2.5:1.4:1 in this high-luminosity, radio-selected sample. The obscured fraction is 0.5, higher than is typically reported for active galactic nuclei at comparable luminosities from multi-wavelength surveys (0.1-0.3). Assuming random nuclear orientation, the unobscured half-opening angle of the disk/wind/torus structure is {approx}60 Degree-Sign and the obscuring material covers 30 Degree-Sign , {approx}12 Degree-Sign of which is CT. The multi-wavelength properties reveal that many NLRGs have intrinsic absorption 10-1000 Multiplication-Sign higher than indicated by their X-ray hardness ratios, and their true L{sub X} values are

  18. X-ray properties of radio-selected star forming galaxies in the Chandra-COSMOS survey

    OpenAIRE

    Ranalli, P.; Comastri, A.; Zamorani, G.; Cappelluti, N.; Civano, F.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Gilli, R.; Schinnerer, E.; Smolcic, V.; Vignali, C.

    2012-01-01

    X-ray surveys contain sizable numbers of star forming galaxies, beyond the AGN which usually make the majority of detections. Many methods to separate the two populations are used in the literature, based on X-ray and multiwavelength properties. We aim at a detailed test of the classification schemes and to study the X-ray properties of the resulting samples. We build on a sample of galaxies selected at 1.4 GHz in the VLA-COSMOS survey, classified by Smolcic et al. (2008) according to their o...

  19. The 2-79 keV X-ray spectrum of the circinus galaxy with NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Chandra: a fully compton-thick active galactic nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arévalo, P.; Bauer, F. E.; Puccetti, S.;

    2014-01-01

    The Circinus galaxy is one of the closest obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs), making it an ideal target for detailed study. Combining archival Chandra and XMM-Newton data with new NuSTAR observations, we model the 2-79 keV spectrum to constrain the primary AGN continuum and to derive physical...

  20. Beyond Chandra - the X-ray Surveyor

    CERN Document Server

    Weisskopf, Martin C; Tananbaum, Harvey; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 16 years, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has provided an unparalleled means for exploring the universe with its half-arcsecond angular resolution. Chandra studies have deepened our understanding of galaxy clusters, active galactic nuclei, galaxies, supernova remnants, planets, and solar system objects addressing almost all areas of current interest in astronomy and astrophysics. As we look beyond Chandra, it is clear that comparable or even better angular resolution with greatly increased photon throughput is essential to address even more demanding science questions, such as the formation and subsequent growth of black hole seeds at very high redshift; the emergence of the first galaxy groups; and details of feedback over a large range of scales from galaxies to galaxy clusters. Recently, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, together with the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, has initiated a concept study for such a mission named the X-ray Surveyor. This study starts with a baseline payloa...

  1. Chandra Publication Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Rots, Arnold H; Becker, Glenn

    2011-01-01

    In this study we develop and propose publication metrics, based on an analysis of data from the Chandra bibliographic database, that are more meaningful and less sensitive to observatory-specific characteristics than the traditional metrics. They fall in three main categories: speed of publication; fraction of observing time published; and archival usage. Citation of results is a fourth category, but lends itself less well to definite statements. For Chandra, the median time from observation to publication is 2.36 years; after about 7 years 90% of the observing time is published; and the total annual publication output of the mission is 60-70% of the cumulative observing time available, assuming a two year lag between data retrieval and publication.

  2. A Chandra Study of Sgr A East A Supernova Remnant Regulating The Activity Of Our Galactic Center?

    CERN Document Server

    Maeda, Y; Feigelson, E D; Morris, M; Bautz, M W; Brandt, W N; Burrows, D N; Doty, J P; Garmire, G P; Pravdo, S H; Ricker, G R; Townsley, L K

    2001-01-01

    We report on the X-ray emission from the shell-like, non-thermal radio source Sgr A East located in the inner few parsecs of the Galaxy based on observations made with the ACIS detector on board Chandra. This is the first time Sgr A East has been clearly resolved from other complex structures in the region. The X-ray emitting region is concentrated within the central $\\simeq 2$ pc of the larger radio shell. The spectrum shows strong K$\\alpha$ lines from highly ionized ions of S, Ar, Ca, and Fe. A simple isothermal plasma model gives electron temperature $\\sim 2$ keV, absorption column $\\sim 1 \\times 10^{23}$ H/cm^2, luminosity $\\sim 8 \\times 10^{34}$ ergs/s in the 2--10 keV band, and gas mass $\\sim 2\\eta^{1/2}$ M$_{\\odot}$ with a filling factor $\\eta$. The plasma appears to be rich in heavy elements, over-abundant by roughly a factor of four with respect to solar abundances, and shows a spatial gradient of elemental abundance: the spatial distribution of iron is more compact than that of the lighter elements....

  3. NASA's Chandra Finds Black Holes Are "Green"

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-01

    the cavities. "If a car was as fuel-efficient as these black holes, it could theoretically travel over a billion miles on a gallon of gas," said coauthor Christopher Reynolds of the University of Maryland, College Park. New details are given about how black hole engines achieve this extreme efficiency. Some of the gas first attracted to the black holes may be blown away by the energetic activity before it gets too near the black hole, but a significant fraction must eventually approach the event horizon where it is used with high efficiency to power the jets. The study also implies that matter flows towards the black holes at a steady rate for several million years. Chandra X-ray Images of Elliptical Galaxies Chandra X-ray Images of Elliptical Galaxies "These black holes are very efficient, but it also takes a very long time to refuel them," said Steve Allen who receives funding from the Office of Science of the Department of Energy. This new study shows that black holes are green in another important way. The energy transferred to the hot gas by the jets should keep hot gas from cooling, thereby preventing billions of new stars from forming. This will place limits on the growth of the largest galaxies, and prevent galactic sprawl from taking over the neighborhood. These results will appear in an upcoming issue of the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for the agency's Science Mission Directorate. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations from the Chandra X-ray Center, Cambridge, Mass. Additional information and images can be found at: http://chandra.harvard.edu and http://chandra.nasa.gov For information about NASA and agency programs on the Web, visit: http://www.nasa.gov

  4. Ten Years of Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2009-01-01

    We celebrated the 10-th anniversary of the Launch of the Chandra X-ray Observatory on July 13, 2009. During these 10 years data from this Great Observatory have had a profound impact on 21st century astrophysics. With its unrivaled capability to produce sub-arcsecond images, the Observatory has enabled astronomers to make new discoveries in topics as diverse as comets and cosmology. We shall review some of the highlights, discuss the current status, and future plans.

  5. The Chandra Bibliography Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rots, A. H.; Winkelman, S. L.; Paltani, S.; Blecksmith, S. E.; Bright, J. D.

    2004-07-01

    Early in the mission, the Chandra Data Archive started the development of a bibliography database, tracking publications in refereed journals and on-line conference proceedings that are based on Chandra observations, allowing our users to link directly to articles in the ADS from our archive, and to link to the relevant data in the archive from the ADS entries. Subsequently, we have been working closely with the ADS and other data centers, in the context of the ADEC-ITWG, on standardizing the literature-data linking. We have also extended our bibliography database to include all Chandra-related articles and we are also keeping track of the number of citations of each paper. Obviously, in addition to providing valuable services to our users, this database allows us to extract a wide variety of statistical information. The project comprises five components: the bibliography database-proper, a maintenance database, an interactive maintenance tool, a user browsing interface, and a web services component for exchanging information with the ADS. All of these elements are nearly mission-independent and we intend make the package as a whole available for use by other data centers. The capabilities thus provided represent support for an essential component of the Virtual Observatory.

  6. Chandra Looks Back At The Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    In an unusual observation, a team of scientists has scanned the northern polar region of Earth with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. The results show that the aurora borealis, or "northern lights," also dance in X-ray light, creating changing bright arcs of X-ray energy above the Earth's surface. While other satellite observations had previously detected high-energy X-rays from the Earth auroras, the latest Chandra observations reveal low-energy X-rays generated during auroral activity for the first time. The researchers, led by Dr. Ron Elsner of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., used Chandra to observe the Earth 10 times over a four-month period in 2004. The images were created from approximately 20-minute scans during which Chandra was aimed at a fixed point in the sky and the Earth's motion carried the auroral regions through Chandra's field of view. From the ground, the aurora are well known to change dramatically over time and this is the case in X-ray light as well. The X-rays in this sample of the Chandra observations, which have been superimposed on a simulated image of the Earth, are seen here at four different epochs. Illlustration of Earth's Magnetosphere and Auroras Illlustration of Earth's Magnetosphere and Auroras Auroras are produced by solar storms that eject clouds of energetic charged particles. These particles are deflected when they encounter the Earth�s magnetic field, but in the process large electric voltages are created. Electrons trapped in the Earth�s magnetic field are accelerated by these voltages and spiral along the magnetic field into the polar regions. There they collide with atoms high in the atmosphere and emit X-rays. Chandra has also observed dramatic auroral activity on Jupiter. Dr. Anil Bhardwaj of Vikram Sarabhai Space Center in Trivandrum, India, is the lead author on a paper describing these results in the Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics. Dr. Bhardwaj was a co

  7. Chandra Discovers Cosmic Cannonball

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    One of the fastest moving stars ever seen has been discovered with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This cosmic cannonball is challenging theories to explain its blistering speed. Astronomers used Chandra to observe a neutron star, known as RX J0822-4300, over a period of about five years. During that span, three Chandra observations clearly show the neutron star moving away from the center of the Puppis A supernova remnant. This remnant is the stellar debris field created during the same explosion in which the neutron star was created about 3700 years ago. Chandra X-ray Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A Chandra X-ray Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A By combining how far it has moved across the sky with its distance from Earth, astronomers determined the neutron star is moving at over 3 million miles per hour. At this rate, RX J0822-4300 is destined to escape from the Milky Way after millions of years, even though it has only traveled about 20 light years so far. "This star is moving at 3 million miles an hour, but it's so far away that the apparent motion we see in five years is less than the height of the numerals in the date on a penny, seen from the length of a football field," said Frank Winkler of Middlebury College in Vermont. "It's remarkable, and a real testament to the power of Chandra, that such a tiny motion can be measured." Labeled Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A Labeled Image of RX J0822-4300 in Puppis A "Just after it was born, this neutron star got a one-way ticket out of the Galaxy," said co-author Robert Petre of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. "Astronomers have seen other stars being flung out of the Milky Way, but few as fast as this." So-called hypervelocity stars have been previously discovered shooting out of the Milky Way with speeds around one million miles per hour. One key difference between RX J0822-4300 and these other reported galactic escapees is the source of their speed. The hypervelocity stars are

  8. Galaxy Clusters with Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Forman, W; Markevitch, M L; Vikhlinin, A A; Churazov, E

    2002-01-01

    We discuss Chandra results related to 1) cluster mergers and cold fronts and 2) interactions between relativistic plasma and hot cluster atmospheres. We describe the properties of cold fronts using NGC1404 in the Fornax cluster and A3667 as examples. We discuss multiple surface brightness discontinuities in the cooling flow cluster ZW3146. We review the supersonic merger underway in CL0657. Finally, we summarize the interaction between plasma bubbles produced by AGN and hot gas using M87 and NGC507 as examples.

  9. Lunar Prospecting With Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    Observations of the bright side of the Moon with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory have detected oxygen, magnesium, aluminum and silicon over a large area of the lunar surface. The abundance and distribution of those elements will help to determine how the Moon was formed. "We see X-rays from these elements directly, independent of assumptions about the mineralogy and other complications," said Jeremy Drake of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass., at a press conference at the "Four Years with Chandra" symposium in Huntsville, Alabama. "We have Moon samples from the six widely-space Apollo landing sites, but remote sensing with Chandra can cover a much wider area," continued Drake. "It's the next best thing to being there, and it's very fast and cost-effective." The lunar X-rays are caused by fluorescence, a process similar to the way that light is produced in fluorescent lamps. Solar X-rays bombard the surface of the Moon, knock electrons out of the inner parts of the atoms, putting them in a highly unstable state. Almost immediately, other electrons rush to fill the gaps, and in the process convert their energy into the fluorescent X-rays seen by Chandra. According to the currently popular "giant impact" theory for the formation of the Moon, a body about the size of Mars collided with the Earth about 4.5 billion years ago. This impact flung molten debris from the mantle of both the Earth and the impactor into orbit around the Earth. Over the course of tens of millions of years, the debris stuck together to form the Moon. By measuring the amounts of aluminum and other elements over a wide area of the Moon and comparing them to the Earth's mantle, Drake and his colleagues plan to help test the giant impact hypothesis. "One early result," quipped Drake, "is that there is no evidence for large amounts of calcium, so cheese is not a major constituent of the Moon." Illustration of Earth's Geocorona Illustration of Earth's Geocorona The same

  10. The Chandra COSMOS Legacy Survey: Clustering of X-ray selected AGN at 2.9

    CERN Document Server

    Allevato, V; Finoguenov, A; Marchesi, S; Zamorani, G; Hasinger, G; Salvato, M; Miyaji, T; Gilli, R; Cappelluti, N; Brusa, M; Suh, H; Lanzuisi, G; Trakhtenbrot, B; Griffiths, R; Vignali, C; Schawinski, K; Karim, A

    2016-01-01

    We present the measurement of the projected and redshift space 2-point correlation function (2pcf) of the new catalog of Chandra COSMOS-Legacy AGN at 2.9$\\leq$z$\\leq$5.5 ($\\langle L_{bol} \\rangle \\sim$10$^{46}$ erg/s) using the generalized clustering estimator based on phot-z probability distribution functions (Pdfs) in addition to any available spec-z. We model the projected 2pcf estimated using $\\pi_{max}$ = 200 h$^{-1}$ Mpc with the 2-halo term and we derive a bias at z$\\sim$3.4 equal to b = 6.6$^{+0.60}_{-0.55}$, which corresponds to a typical mass of the hosting halos of log M$_h$ = 12.83$^{+0.12}_{-0.11}$ h$^{-1}$ M$_{\\odot}$. A similar bias is derived using the redshift-space 2pcf, modelled including the typical phot-z error $\\sigma_z$ = 0.052 of our sample at z$\\geq$2.9. Once we integrate the projected 2pcf up to $\\pi_{max}$ = 200 h$^{-1}$ Mpc, the bias of XMM and \\textit{Chandra} COSMOS at z=2.8 used in Allevato et al. (2014) is consistent with our results at higher redshift. The results suggest only...

  11. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, C. T.; Hynes, R. I.; Jonker, P. G.; Maccarone, T.; Torres, M. A. P.; Steeghs, D.; Nelemans, G.; Johnson, C.; Greiss, S.

    2015-05-01

    The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a multi-wavelength survey of two 6×1 degree strips above and below the Galactic plane, including deep r' and i' imaging and time domain photometry from CTIO and shallow, wide-field X-ray imaging with Chandra. Targeting fields above |b|=1 avoids most of the copious extinction along the Galactic plane while maintaining high source density. This results in targets that are accessible to follow up in optical and NIR wavelengths. The X-ray observations are shallow to maximize the number of quiescent Low Mass X-ray Binaries (LMXBs) relative to Cataclysmic Variables (CVs). The goals of the GBS are to conduct a census of Low Mass X-ray Binaries in the Milky Way in order to constrain models of binary evolution, the common envelope phase in particular, and to expand the number of known LMXBs for optical follow up. Mass measurements in particular will help constrain the black hole (BH) mass distribution and the equation of state for neutron stars (NS). Constraining the BH mass distribution will constrain models of their formation in supernovae. The current population of Galactic BHs suffers from selection effects, which the GBS avoids by finding new objects while still in quiescence. We expect to find qLMXBs, magnetic CVs, RS CVn stars, and smaller numbers of other types of sources. After removing duplicates, there are 1640 unique X-ray sources in the 12 square degree survey area, which closely matches the predicted number of 1648. We are currently matching X-ray sources to counterparts in other wavelengths using new photometric and spectroscopic observations as well as in archival data where it exists, and searching for variability and periodicity in the counterparts in photometric data. So far, we have spectroscopically identified 27 interacting binaries including promising candidates for quiescent black holes.

  12. Spatially Offset Active Galactic Nuclei I: Selection and Spectroscopic Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Barrows, R Scott; Greene, Jenny E; Pooley, David

    2016-01-01

    We present a sample of 18 optically-selected and X-ray detected spatially offset active galactic nuclei (AGN) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). In 9 systems, the X-ray AGN is spatially offset from the galactic stellar core that is located within the 3'' diameter SDSS spectroscopic fiber. In 11 systems, the X-ray AGN is spatially offset from a stellar core that is located outside the fiber, with an overlap of 2. To build the sample, we cross-matched Type II AGN selected from the SDSS galaxy catalogue with archival Chandra imaging and employed our custom astrometric and registration procedure. The projected angular (physical) offsets span a range of 0."6 (0.8 kpc) to 17."4 (19.4 kpc), with a median value of 2."7 (4.6 kpc). The offset nature of an AGN is an unambiguous signature of a galaxy merger, and these systems can be used to study the properties of AGN in galaxy mergers without the biases introduced by morphological merger selection techniques. In this paper (Paper I), we use our sample to assess t...

  13. The Chandra HelpDesk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galle, Elizabeth C.

    2008-03-01

    The Chandra X-ray Center (CXC) HelpDesk has answered hundreds of user questions over the course of the Chandra mission, ranging from basic syntax errors to advanced analysis questions. This talk gives an introduction to the HelpDesk system and staff, presents a sample of recent HelpDesk requests, and discusses how user-submitted questions improve the software and documentation.

  14. Spatially Offset Active Galactic Nuclei. I. Selection and Spectroscopic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, R. Scott; Comerford, Julia M.; Greene, Jenny E.; Pooley, David

    2016-09-01

    We present a sample of 18 optically selected and X-ray-detected spatially offset active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). In nine systems, the X-ray active galactic nucleus (AGN) is spatially offset from the galactic stellar core that is located within the 3″ diameter SDSS spectroscopic fiber. In 11 systems, the X-ray AGN is spatially offset from a stellar core that is located outside the fiber, with an overlap of two. To build the sample, we cross-matched Type II AGNs selected from the SDSS galaxy catalog with archival Chandra imaging and employed our custom astrometric and registration procedure. The projected angular (physical) offsets span a range of 0.″6 (0.8 kpc) to 17.″4 (19.4 kpc), with a median value of 2.″7 (4.6 kpc). The offset nature of an AGN is an unambiguous signature of a galaxy merger, and these systems can be used to study the properties of AGNs in galaxy mergers without the biases introduced by morphological merger selection techniques. In this paper (Paper I), we use our sample to assess the kinematics of AGN photoionized gas in galaxy mergers. We find that spectroscopic offset AGN selection may be up to {89}-16+7% incomplete due to small projected velocity offsets. We also find that the magnitude of the velocity offsets are generally larger than expected if our spatial selection introduces a bias toward face-on orbits, suggesting the presence of complex kinematics in the emission line gas of AGNs in galaxy mergers.

  15. Environment of $1\\le z \\le 2$ mid-IR selected obscured and unobscured AGNs in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South

    CERN Document Server

    Bornancini, Carlos Guillermo; Lambas, Diego García

    2016-01-01

    In unified models, different types of Active Galaxy Nuclei correspond to a single class of objects, where their observed differences are solely due to the different orientations of the obscuring material around the central inner regions. Recent studies show that this obscuring material can even extend at galactic scales due to debris from galaxy interactions or mergers. In standard unified models the different AGN types are expected to show similar galaxy environments. We investigate properties and environment of obscured and unobscured AGNs selected from mid-infrared from the MUSYC survey, in order to test the unified model and evolutionary scenarios. The sample of AGNs was selected from images obtained with the IRAC camera mounted on the Spitzer Space Telescope, based on their mid-infrared colors. We select two samples of AGNs with redshifts in the range $1\\le z \\le 2$ and absolute magnitudes $M_v\\leq -$21: obscured and unobscured AGNs by means of a simple color cut criterion at $R -[4.5] = 3.05$. We find t...

  16. Selective electrophilic activation of alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, J.; Bukala, J. (Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France))

    1993-07-01

    One major drawback for the direct use of alkanes as chemicals is their chemical inertness toward most of the usual reagents. For this reason, costly, large-scale refinery operations such as catalytic reforming and vapocracking are needed, which necessitate the use of noble metal catalysts and/or high temperature to activate the strong C-H and C-C bonds and yield the primary chemical building blocks such as ethylene, propylene, butadiene, benzene, toluene, and xylene. In response to the challenge to use more economically a larger share of alkanes, and increasing number of research groups are working on the activation functionalization processes of the saturated hydrocarbon C-H bond. The goal is to overcome smoothly and selectively the chemical inertness of the starting (paraffinic) material. A book and special issue have been published recently on this subject. Protonated alkanes are reaction intermediates in superacid-catalyzed protolysis. Protonation occurs on all C-C and C-H [sigma]-bonds independently of the further reactivity of the protonated alkane as confirmed by using [sup 2]H labeled superacids. Direct and selective C-H bond protolysis is limited to tertiary alkanes whereas linear alkanes undergo less selective C-C bond cleavage. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Chandra: Ten Years of Amazing Science with a Great Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2009-01-01

    We review briefly review the history of the development of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, highlighting certain details that many attendees of this Conference might not be aware of. We then present a selection of scientific highlights of the first 10 years of this remarkable and unique mission.

  18. Dark Energy, Black Holes and Exploding Stars: NASA's Chandra Observatory Marks Five Years of Scientific Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    detected by Chandra, may be the long-sought X-ray emission from a known supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy. (January 14, 2000) * Chandra finds the most distant X-ray cluster. Using the Chandra Observatory, astronomers find the most distant X-ray cluster of galaxies yet. Approximately 10 billion light-years from Earth, the cluster 3C294 is 40 percent farther than the next most distant X-ray galaxy cluster. (Feb. 20, 2001) * Chandra discovers X-rays from Jupiter. Using Chandra, astronomers discover a pulsating hot spot of X-rays in the polar regions of the planet's upper atmosphere and uncover evidence the X-ray source is not arising from the region of Jupiter where previously believed. (Aug. 29, 2002) * Chandra makes first I.D. of a binary black hole. By revealing two active black holes in the nucleus of the extraordinarily bright galaxy NGC 6240, a Chandra image proves for the first time that two supermassive black holes can co-exist in the same galaxy. (Nov. 11, 2002) * Chandra makes deepest X-ray exposure. A Chandra image, Deep Field North, captures for 23 days an area of the sky one-fifth the size of the full moon. Even though the faintest sources detected produced only one X-ray photon every four days, Chandra finds more than 600 X-ray sources, most of them supermassive black holes in galaxy centers. (June 19, 2003) * Chandra sheds new light on the Vela Pulsar. Chandra offers new insight into pulsars, small and extremely dense stars. Created from a series of Chandra observations, an X-ray movie of the Vela pulsar reveals a spectacularly erratic jet that varies in a way never before seen, whipping about like an untended fire hose at about half the speed of light. (June 30, 2003) * Chandra 'hears' a black hole. Using the Chandra Observatory, astronomers for the first time detect sound waves from a supermassive black hole. Coming from a black hole 250 million light years from Earth, the "note" is the deepest ever detected from an object in the Universe

  19. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hynes, Robert I.; Jonker, P.G.; Bassa, C. G.; Dieball, A.; Greiss, S.; Maccarone, T. J.; Nelemans, G.; Steeghs, D.; Torres, M. A. P.; Britt, C. T.; Clem, J. L.; Gossen, L.; Grindlay, J. E.; Groot, P.J.; Kuiper, L.; Kuulkers, E.; Mendez, M.; Mikles, V. J.; Ratti, E. M.; Rea, N.; van Haaften, L.; Wijnands, R.; in't Zand, J. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (CGBS) is a shallow but wide survey of two approximately 6x1 degree strips of the Galactic Bulge about a degree above and below the plane. The survey by design targets regions where extinction and crowding are manageable and optical counterparts are accessible to de

  20. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hynes, Robert I.; Jonker, P. G.; Bassa, C. G.; Nelemans, G.; Steeghs, D.; Torres, M. A. P.; Maccarone, T. J.; Greiss, S.; Clem, J.; Dieball, A.; Mikles, V. J.; Britt, C. T.; Gossen, L.; Collazzi, A. C.; Wijnands, R.; In't Zand, J. J. M.; Mendez, M.; Rea, N.; Kuulkers, E.; Ratti, E. M.; van Haaften, L. M.; Heinke, C.; Ozel, F.; Groot, P. J.; Verbunt, F.

    2012-01-01

    The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a shallow but wide survey of two approximately 6x1 degree strips of the Galactic Bulge about a degree above and below the plane. The survey by design targets regions where extinction and crowding are manageable and optical counterparts are accessible to det

  1. X-Ray/Ultraviolet Observing Campaign of the Markarian 279 Active Galactic Nucleus Outflow: a close look at the absorbing/emitting gas with Chandra-LETGS

    CERN Document Server

    Costantini, E; Arav, N; Kriss, G A; Steenbrugge, K C; Gabel, J R; Verbunt, F; Behar, E; Gaskell, C M; Korista, K T; Proga, D; Quijano, J K; Scott, J E; Klimek, E S; Hedrick, C H

    2006-01-01

    We present a Chandra-LETGS observation of the Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 279. This observation was carried out simultaneously with HST-STIS and FUSE, in the context of a multiwavelength study of this source. The Chandra pointings were spread over ten days for a total exposure time of ~360 ks. The spectrum of Mrk279 shows evidence of broad emission features, especially at the wavelength of the OVII triplet. We quantitatively explore the possibility that this emission is produced in the broad line region (BLR). We modeled the broad UV emission lines seen in the FUSE and HST-STIS spectra following the ``locally optimally emitting cloud" approach. We find that the X-ray lines luminosity derived from the best fit BLR model can match the X-ray features, suggesting that the gas producing the UV lines is sufficient to account also for the X-ray emission. The spectrum is absorbed by ionized gas whose total column density is ~5x10^{20} cm^{-2}. The absorption spectrum can be modeled by two distinct gas components (log xi ~ 0...

  2. Highlights and Discoveries from the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Tananbaum, H; Tucker, W; Wilkes, B; Edmonds, P

    2014-01-01

    Within 40 years of the detection of the first extrasolar X-ray source in 1962,NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has achieved an increase in sensitivity of 10 orders of magnitude, comparable to the gain in going from naked-eye observations to the most powerful optical telescopes over the past 400 years. Chandra is unique in its capabilities for producing sub-arcsecond X-ray images with 100-200 eV energy resolution for energies in the range 0.08selected cosmic phenomena. The extended Chandra mission provides a long observing baseline with stable and well-calibrated instruments, enabling temporal studies over time-scales from milliseconds to years. In this report we present a selection of highlights that illustrate how observations using Chandra, sometimes alone, but often in conjunction with other telescopes, have deepened, and in some instances revolutionized, our understanding ...

  3. Chandra Early Type Galaxy Atals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Woo; Anderson, Craig; Burke, Douglas J.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Fruscione, Antonella; Lauer, Jennifer; McCollough, Michael; Morgan, Douglas; Mossman, Amy; O'Sullivan, Ewan; Paggi, Alessandro; Vrtilek, Saeqa Dil; Trinchieri, Ginevra

    2017-08-01

    The hot gas in early type galaxies (ETGs) plays a crucial role in understanding their formation and evolution. As the hot gas is often extended to the outskirts beyond the optical size, the large scale structural features identified by Chandra (including jets, cavities, cold fronts, filaments and tails) point to key evolutionary mechanisms, e.g., AGN feedback, merging history, accretion, stripping and star formation and its quenching. We have systematically analyzed the archival Chandra data of ~100 ETGs to study the hot ISM. We produce the uniformly derived data products with spatially resolved spectral information and will make them accessible via a public web site. With 2D spectral infomation, we further discuss gas morphology, scaling relations, X-ray based mass profiles and their implications related to various physical mechanisms (e.g., stellar and AGN feedback).

  4. CIAO: Chandra's data analysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruscione, Antonella; McDowell, Jonathan C.; Allen, Glenn E.; Brickhouse, Nancy S.; Burke, Douglas J.; Davis, John E.; Durham, Nick; Elvis, Martin; Galle, Elizabeth C.; Harris, Daniel E.; Huenemoerder, David P.; Houck, John C.; Ishibashi, Bish; Karovska, Margarita; Nicastro, Fabrizio; Noble, Michael S.; Nowak, Michael A.; Primini, Frank A.; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Smith, Randall K.; Wise, Michael

    2006-06-01

    The CIAO (Chandra Interactive Analysis of Observations) software package was first released in 1999 following the launch of the Chandra X-ray Observatory and is used by astronomers across the world to analyze Chandra data as well as data from other telescopes. From the earliest design discussions, CIAO was planned as a general-purpose scientific data analysis system optimized for X-ray astronomy, and consists mainly of command line tools (allowing easy pipelining and scripting) with a parameter-based interface layered on a flexible data manipulation I/O library. The same code is used for the standard Chandra archive pipeline, allowing users to recalibrate their data in a consistent way. We will discuss the lessons learned from the first six years of the software's evolution. Our initial approach to documentation evolved to concentrate on recipe-based "threads" which have proved very successful. A multi-dimensional abstract approach to data analysis has allowed new capabilities to be added while retaining existing interfaces. A key requirement for our community was interoperability with other data analysis systems, leading us to adopt standard file formats and an architecture which was as robust as possible to the input of foreign data files, as well as re-using a number of external libraries. We support users who are comfortable with coding themselves via a flexible user scripting paradigm, while the availability of tightly constrained pipeline programs are of benefit to less computationally-advanced users. As with other analysis systems, we have found that infrastructure maintenance and re-engineering is a necessary and significant ongoing effort and needs to be planned in to any long-lived astronomy software.

  5. A Deep Chandra Observation of A2052

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, E. L.; Douglass, E. M.; Sarazin, C. L.; Clarke, T. E.; McNamara, B. R.

    We present initial results from a long (125 ksec) Chandra observation of Abell 2052. A2052 is a bright, nearby, cooling core cluster at a redshift of z=0.0348. It was previously observed for 36 ksec with Chandra [3,4]. The longer observation reveals ripples in the surface brightness, similar to what has been seen in e.g., the Perseus cluster [5] and M87/Virgo [6]. The southern cavity now appears to be split into two cavities with the southernmost cavity likely representing a ghost bubble from earlier radio activity. There also appears to be a ghost bubble present to the NW of the cluster center. Bright emission in the X-ray corresponds very well with optical line emission, and the correlated X-ray emission is seen to continue from the N bubble edge closer to the AGN in this longer exposure, tracking the H-α emission. The energy deposited by the radio source, as determined by measuring the pressure in the bright, X-ray shells, averaged over the repetition rate of the radio source (determined from either the ripple separation or the ghost cavity distances) can easily offset the cooling in the core of the cluster.

  6. Chandra Observations of Eight Sources Discovered by INTEGRAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsick, John A.; Krivonos, Roman; Wang, Qinan; Bodaghee, Arash; Chaty, Sylvain; Rahoui, Farid; Rodriguez, Jerome; Fornasini, Francesca M.

    2016-01-01

    We report on 0.3-10 keV observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory of eight hard X-ray sources discovered within 8° of the Galactic plane by the International Gamma-ray Astrophysics Laboratory satellite. The short (˜5 ks) Chandra observations of the IGR source fields have yielded very likely identifications of X-ray counterparts for three of the IGR sources: IGR J14091-6108, IGR J18088-2741, and IGR J18381-0924. The first two have very hard spectra in the Chandra band that can be described by a power law with photon indices of Γ = 0.6 ± 0.4 and -{0.7}-0.3+0.4, respectively (90% confidence errors are given), and both have a unique near-IR counterpart consistent with the Chandra position. IGR J14091-6108 also displays a strong iron line and a relatively low X-ray luminosity, and we argue that the most likely source type is a cataclysmic variable (CV), although we do not completely rule out the possibility of a high mass X-ray binary. IGR J18088-2741 has an optical counterpart with a previously measured 6.84 hr periodicity, which may be the binary orbital period. We also detect five cycles of a possible 800-950 s period in the Chandra light curve, which may be the compact object spin period. We suggest that IGR J18088-2741 is also most likely a CV. For IGR J18381-0924, the spectrum is intrinsically softer with {{Γ }}={1.5}-0.4+0.5, and it is moderately absorbed, NH = (4 ± 1) × 1022 cm-2. There are two near-IR sources consistent with the Chandra position, and they are both classified as galaxies, making it likely that IGR J18381-0924 is an active galactic nucleus. For the other five IGR sources, we provide lists of nearby Chandra sources, which may be used along with further observations to identify the correct counterparts, and we discuss the implications of the low inferred Chandra count rates for these five sources.

  7. Highlights and discoveries from the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tananbaum, H.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Tucker, W.; Wilkes, B.; Edmonds, P.

    2014-06-01

    Within 40 years of the detection of the first extra-solar x-ray source in 1962, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has achieved an increase in sensitivity of 10 orders of magnitude, comparable to the gain in going from naked-eye observations to the most powerful optical telescopes over the past 400 years. Chandra is unique in its capabilities for producing sub-arcsecond x-ray images with 100-200 eV energy resolution for energies in the range 0.08 cosmic phenomena. The extended Chandra mission provides a long observing baseline with stable and well-calibrated instruments, enabling temporal studies over timescales from milliseconds to years. In this report we present a selection of highlights that illustrate how observations using Chandra, sometimes alone, but often in conjunction with other telescopes, have deepened, and in some instances revolutionized, our understanding of topics as diverse as protoplanetary nebulae; massive stars; supernova explosions; pulsar wind nebulae; the superfluid interior of neutron stars; accretion flows around black holes; the growth of supermassive black holes and their role in the regulation of star formation and growth of galaxies; impacts of collisions, mergers, and feedback on growth and evolution of groups and clusters of galaxies; and properties of dark matter and dark energy.

  8. A Chandra Observation of the Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxy IRAS 19254-7245 (The Superantennae): X-Ray Emission from the Compton-Thick Active Galactic Nucleus and the Diffuse Starburst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jianjun; Ptak, Andrew; Heckman, Timothy M.; Braito, Valentina; Reeves, James

    2012-01-01

    We present a Chandra observation of IRAS 19254-7245, a nearby ultraluminous infrared galaxy also known as the Superantennae. The high spatial resolution of Chandra allows us to disentangle for the first time the diffuse starburst (SB) emission from the embedded Compton-thick active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the southern nucleus. No AGN activity is detected in the northern nucleus. The 2-10 keV spectrum of the AGN emission is fitted by a flat power law (TAU = 1.3) and an He-like Fe Kalpha line with equivalent width 1.5 keV, consistent with previous observations. The Fe K line profile could be resolved as a blend of a neutral 6.4 keV line and an ionized 6.7 keV (He-like) or 6.9 keV (H-like) line. Variability of the neutral line is detected compared with the previous XMM-Newton and Suzaku observations, demonstrating the compact size of the iron line emission. The spectrum of the galaxy-scale extended emission excluding the AGN and other bright point sources is fitted with a thermal component with a best-fit kT of approximately 0.8 keV. The 2-10 keV luminosity of the extended emission is about one order of magnitude lower than that of the AGN. The basic physical and structural properties of the extended emission are fully consistent with a galactic wind being driven by the SB. A candidate ultraluminous X-ray source is detected 8 south of the southern nucleus. The 0.3 - 10 keV luminosity of this off-nuclear point source is approximately 6 x 10(exp 40) erg per second if the emission is isotropic and the source is associated with the Superantennae.

  9. The Chandra X-Ray Observatory Radiation Environmental Model Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, William C.; Minow, Joseph I.; ODell, Stephen L.; Cameron, Robert A.; Virani, Shanil N.

    2003-01-01

    CRMFLX (Chandra Radiation Model of ion FLUX) is a radiation environment risk mitigation tool for use as a decision aid in planning the operation times for Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) detector. The accurate prediction of the proton flux environment with energies of 100 - 200 keV is needed in order to protect the ACIS detector against proton degradation. Unfortunately, protons of this energy are abundant in the region of space where Chandra must operate. In addition, on-board particle detectors do not measure proton flux levels of the required energy range. CRMFLX is an engineering environment model developed to predict the proton flux in the solar wind, magnetosheath, and magnetosphere phenomenological regions of geospace. This paper describes the upgrades to the ion flux databases for the magnetosphere, magnetosheath, and solar wind regions. These data files were created by using Geotail and Polar spacecraft flux measurements only when the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft's 0.14 MeV particle flux was below a threshold value. This new database allows for CRMFLX output to be correlated with both the geomagnetic activity level, as represented by the Kp index, as well as with solar proton events. Also, reported in this paper are results of analysis leading to a change in Chandra operations that successfully mitigates the false trigger rate for autonomous radiation events caused by relativistic electron flux contamination of proton channels.

  10. The 2-79 keV X-ray spectrum of the Circinus galaxy with NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Chandra: a fully Compton-thick active galactic nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arévalo, P.; Bauer, F. E. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Puccetti, S. [ASDC-ASI, Via del Politecnico, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Walton, D. J.; Fuerst, F.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Harrison, F. A.; Madsen, K. K. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Koss, M. [Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Brandt, W. N.; Luo, B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Brightman, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748, Garching bei München (Germany); Christensen, F. E. [Danish Technical University, Lyngby (Denmark); Comastri, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Gandhi, P. [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Hailey, C. J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory and Department of Physics, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Madejski, G. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, 2575 Sand Hill Road M/S 29, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Marinucci, A. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università degli Studi Roma Tre, via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Roma (Italy); and others

    2014-08-20

    The Circinus galaxy is one of the closest obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs), making it an ideal target for detailed study. Combining archival Chandra and XMM-Newton data with new NuSTAR observations, we model the 2-79 keV spectrum to constrain the primary AGN continuum and to derive physical parameters for the obscuring material. Chandra's high angular resolution allows a separation of nuclear and off-nuclear galactic emission. In the off-nuclear diffuse emission, we find signatures of strong cold reflection, including high equivalent-width neutral Fe lines. This Compton-scattered off-nuclear emission amounts to 18% of the nuclear flux in the Fe line region, but becomes comparable to the nuclear emission above 30 keV. The new analysis no longer supports a prominent transmitted AGN component in the observed band. We find that the nuclear spectrum is consistent with Compton scattering by an optically thick torus, where the intrinsic spectrum is a power law of photon index Γ = 2.2-2.4, the torus has an equatorial column density of N {sub H} = (6-10) × 10{sup 24} cm{sup –2}, and the intrinsic AGN 2-10 keV luminosity is (2.3-5.1) × 10{sup 42} erg s{sup –1}. These values place Circinus along the same relations as unobscured AGNs in accretion rate versus Γ and L{sub X} versus L {sub IR} phase space. NuSTAR's high sensitivity and low background allow us to study the short timescale variability of Circinus at X-ray energies above 10 keV for the first time. The lack of detected variability favors a Compton-thick absorber, in line with the spectral fitting results.

  11. Maximising the mileage from the Chandra podcasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcand, K. K.; Watzke, M.

    2008-06-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory captures X-ray images and measures spectra of many highenergy cosmic phenomena. There is a constant challenge to devise new and appropriate means to bring these potentially esoteric science results and concepts in a digestible way to the public. One of the ideas to address this challenge became the Chandra podcast.

  12. Optimization methods for activities selection problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahad, Nor Faradilah; Alias, Suriana; Yaakop, Siti Zulaika; Arshad, Norul Amanina Mohd; Mazni, Elis Sofia

    2017-08-01

    Co-curriculum activities must be joined by every student in Malaysia and these activities bring a lot of benefits to the students. By joining these activities, the students can learn about the time management and they can developing many useful skills. This project focuses on the selection of co-curriculum activities in secondary school using the optimization methods which are the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) and Zero-One Goal Programming (ZOGP). A secondary school in Negeri Sembilan, Malaysia was chosen as a case study. A set of questionnaires were distributed randomly to calculate the weighted for each activity based on the 3 chosen criteria which are soft skills, interesting activities and performances. The weighted was calculated by using AHP and the results showed that the most important criteria is soft skills. Then, the ZOGP model will be analyzed by using LINGO Software version 15.0. There are two priorities to be considered. The first priority which is to minimize the budget for the activities is achieved since the total budget can be reduced by RM233.00. Therefore, the total budget to implement the selected activities is RM11,195.00. The second priority which is to select the co-curriculum activities is also achieved. The results showed that 9 out of 15 activities were selected. Thus, it can concluded that AHP and ZOGP approach can be used as the optimization methods for activities selection problem.

  13. Chandra Survey of Nearby Galaxies: The Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Rui; Ho, Luis C.; Feng, Hua

    2017-02-01

    We searched the public archive of the Chandra X-ray Observatory as of 2016 March and assembled a sample of 719 galaxies within 50 Mpc with available Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer observations. By cross-correlation with the optical or near-infrared nuclei of these galaxies, 314 of them are identified to have an X-ray active galactic nucleus (AGN). The majority of them are low-luminosity AGNs and are unlikely X-ray binaries based upon their spatial distribution and luminosity functions. The AGN fraction is around 60% for elliptical galaxies and early-type spirals, but drops to roughly 20% for Sc and later types, consistent with previous findings in the optical. However, the X-ray survey is more powerful in finding weak AGNs, especially from regions with active star formation that may mask the optical AGN signature. For example, 31% of the H ii nuclei are found to harbor an X-ray AGN. For most objects, a single power-law model subject to interstellar absorption is adequate to fit the spectrum, and the typical photon index is found to be around 1.8. For galaxies with a non-detection, their stacked Chandra image shows an X-ray excess with a luminosity of a few times 1037 erg s‑1 on average around the nuclear region, possibly composed of faint X-ray binaries. This paper reports on the technique and results of the survey; in-depth analysis and discussion of the results will be reported in forthcoming papers.

  14. Chandra Observations of Starburst Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestwich, Andrea; Lavoie, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present early X-ray results from Chandra for two starburst galaxies, M82 and NGC3256, obtained using AXAF CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS-I) and the HRC. For M82 the arcsecond spatial resolution enables us to separate the point source component from the extended emission for the first time. Astrometry reveals that most of the X-ray sources are not coincident with the family of compact radio sources believed to be Super Nova Remnants (SNRs). In addition, based on three epoch Chandra observations, several of the X-ray sources are clearly variable indicating that they are binaries. When we deconvolve the extended and point source components detected in the hard X-ray band, we find that 50 percent arises from the extended component. This fact, together with its morphology, constrains the various models proposed to explain the hard X-ray emission. For NGC3256 we resolve two closely separated nuclei. These new data support a pure starburst origin for the total X-ray emission rather than a composite AGN/starburst, thereby making NGC3256 one of the most X-ray luminous starburst galaxies known.

  15. Automated Selection of Active Orbital Spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Stein, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    One of the key challenges of quantum-chemical multi-configuration methods is the necessity to manually select orbitals for the active space. This selection requires both expertise and experience and can therefore impose severe limitations on the applicability of this most general class of ab initio methods. A poor choice of the active orbital space may yield even qualitatively wrong results. This is obviously a severe problem, especially for wave function methods that are designed to be systematically improvable. Here, we show how the iterative nature of the density matrix renormalization group combined with its capability to include up to about one hundred orbitals in the active space can be exploited for a systematic assessment and selection of active orbitals. These benefits allow us to implement an automated approach for active orbital space selection, which can turn multi-configuration models into black box approaches.

  16. A Full Year's Chandra Exposure on SDSS Quasars from the Chandra Multiwavelength Project

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Paul J; Richards, G T; Barkhouse, W A; Constantin, A; Haggard, D; Karovska, M; Kim, D -W; Kim, M; Vikhlinin, A; Mossman, A; Silverman, J D; Anderson, S F; Kashyap, V; Wilkes, B J; Tananbaum, H

    2008-01-01

    We study the spectral energy distributions and evolution of a large sample of optically selected quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) that were observed in 323 Chandra images analyzed by the Chandra Multiwavelength Project (ChaMP). Our highest-confidence matched sample includes 1135 X-ray detected quasars in the redshift range 0.23 QSOs detected, we find no evidence for evolution out to z~5 for either the X-ray photon index Gamma or for the ratio of optical/UV to X-ray flux alpha_ox. About 10% of detected QSOs are obscured (Nh>1E22), but the fraction might reach ~1/3 if most non-detections are absorbed. We confirm a significant correlation between alpha_ox and optical luminosity, but it flattens or disappears for fainter AGN alone. Gamma hardens significantly both towards higher X-ray luminosity, and for relatively X-ray loud quasars. These trends may represent a relative increase in non-thermal X-ray emission, and our findings thereby strengthen analogies between Galactic black hole binaries and ...

  17. A Chandra Study of Temperature Distributions of the Intracluster Medium in 50 Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhenghao; Xu, Haiguang; Wang, Jingying; Gu, Junhua; Li, Weitian; Hu, Dan; Zhang, Chenhao; Gu, Liyi; An, Tao; Liu, Chengze; Zhang, Zhongli; Zhu, Jie; Wu, Xiang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the spatial distribution of the intracluster medium temperature in galaxy clusters in a quantitative way and probe the physics behind it, we analyze the X-ray spectra from a sample of 50 clusters that were observed with the Chandra ACIS instrument over the past 15 years and measure the radial temperature profiles out to 0.45r500. We construct a physical model that takes into consideration the effects of gravitational heating, thermal history (such as radiative cooling, active galactic nucleus feedback, and thermal conduction), and work done via gas compression, and use it to fit the observed temperature profiles by running Bayesian regressions. The results show that in all cases our model provides an acceptable fit at the 68% confidence level. For further validation, we select nine clusters that have been observed with both Chandra (out to ≳0.3r500) and Suzaku (out to ≳1.5r500) and fit their Chandra spectra with our model. We then compare the extrapolation of the best fits with the Suzaku measurements and find that the model profiles agree with the Suzaku results very well in seven clusters. In the remaining two clusters the difference between the model and the observation is possibly caused by local thermal substructures. Our study also implies that for most of the clusters the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium is safe out to at least 0.5r500 and the non-gravitational interactions between dark matter and its luminous counterparts is consistent with zero.

  18. Variability of Optical Counterparts in the Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Britt, Christopher T; Johnson, C B; Baldwin, A; Jonker, P G; Nelemans, G; Torres, M A P; Maccarone, T; Steeghs, D; Greiss, S; Heinke, C; Bassa, C G; Collazzi, A; Villar, A; Gabb, M; Gossen, L

    2014-01-01

    We present optical lightcurves of variable stars consistent with the positions of X-ray sources identified with the Chandra X-ray Observatory for the Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey. Using data from the Mosaic-II instrument on the Blanco 4m Telescope at CTIO, we gathered time-resolved photometric data on timescales from $\\sim2$ hr to 8 days over the $\\frac{3}{4}$ of the X-ray survey containing sources from the initial GBS catalog. Among the lightcurve morphologies we identify are flickering in interacting binaries, eclipsing sources, dwarf nova outbursts, ellipsoidal variations, long period variables, spotted stars, and flare stars. $87\\%$ of X-ray sources have at least one potential optical counterpart. $24\\%$ of these candidate counterparts are detectably variable; a much greater fraction than expected for randomly selected field stars, which suggests that most of these variables are real counterparts. We discuss individual sources of interest, provide variability information on candidate counterparts, and di...

  19. Unveiling obscured accretion in the Chandra Deep Field South

    CERN Document Server

    Fiore, F; Santini, P; Puccetti, S; Brusa, M; Feruglio, C; Fontana, A; Giallongo, E; Comastri, A; Gruppioni, C; Pozzi, F; Zamorani, G; Vignali, C

    2007-01-01

    A large population of heavily obscured, Compton Thick AGNs is predicted by models of galaxy formation, models of Cosmic X-ray Background and by the ``relic'' super-massive black-hole mass function measured from local bulges. However, so far only a handful of Compton thick AGNs have been possibly detected using even the deepest Chandra and XMM surveys. Compton-thick AGNs can be recovered thanks to the reprocessing of the AGN UV emission in the infrared by selecting sources with AGN luminosity's in the mid-infrared and faint near-infrared and optical emission. To this purpose, we make use of deep HST, VLT, Spitzer and Chandra data on the Chandra Deep Field South to constrain the number of Compton thick AGN in this field. We show that sources with high 24micron to optical flux ratios and red colors form a distinct source population, and that their infrared luminosity is dominated by AGN emission. Analysis of the X-ray properties of these extreme sources shows that most of them are indeed likely to be highly obsc...

  20. Nylon-3 polymers with selective antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Runhui; Chen, Xinyu; Hayouka, Zvi; Chakraborty, Saswata; Falk, Shaun P; Weisblum, Bernard; Masters, Kristyn S; Gellman, Samuel H

    2013-04-10

    Host-defense peptides inhibit bacterial growth but show little toxicity toward mammalian cells. A variety of synthetic polymers have been reported to mimic this antibacterial selectivity; however, achieving comparable selectivity for fungi is more difficult because these pathogens are eukaryotes. Here we report nylon-3 polymers based on a novel subunit that display potent antifungal activity (MIC = 3.1 μg/mL for Candida albicans ) and favorable selectivity (IC10 > 400 μg/mL for 3T3 fibroblast toxicity; HC10 > 400 μg/mL for hemolysis).

  1. Studying the Evolving Universe with XMM-Newton and Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Hasinger, G

    2003-01-01

    First indications of the warm/hot intergalactic medium, tracing out the large scale structure of the universe, have been obtained in sensitive Chandra and XMM-Newton high resolution absorption line spectroscopy of bright blazars. High resolution X-ray spectroscopy and imaging also provides important new constraints on the physical condition of the cooling matter in the centers of clusters, requiring major modifications to the standard cooling flow models. XMM-Newton and Chandra low resolution spectroscopy detected significant Fe K_alpha absorption features in the spectrum of the ultraluminous, high redshift lensed broad absorption line QSO APM 08279+5255, yielding new insights in the outflow geometry indicating a supersolar Fe/O ratio. Chandra high resolution imaging spectroscopy of the nearby ULIRG/obscured QSO NGC 6240 for the first time gave evidence of two active supermassive black holes in the same galaxy, likely bound to coalesce in the course of the ongoing major merger in this galaxy. Deep X-ray surve...

  2. Dark Matter Reality Check: Chandra Casts Cloud On Alternative Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-10-01

    has successfully distinguished dark matter from MOND. The researchers also found that the Chandra data fit predictions of the cold dark matter theories, according to which dark matter consists of slowly moving particles, which interact with each other and "normal" matter only through gravity. Other forms of dark matter, such as self-interacting dark matter, and cold molecular dark matter, are not consistent with the observation in that they require a dark matter halo that is too round or too flat, respectively. "Chandra's ability to precisely identify and locate the point-like sources contaminating the diffuse emission in the X-ray image was absolutely essential," said Buote. "Only then could we make accurate measurements of the shape and orientation of the X-ray image contours." The conclusion from the Chandra data that NGC 720 possesses a dark matter halo assumes that the hot gas cloud has not been unduly disturbed by collisions or mergers with other galaxies in the last 100 million years. The lack of evidence of such activity indicates that this assumption is valid. Chandra observed NGC 720, which is about 80 million light years from Earth, for 11 hours with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS). Other members of the team include Tesla Jeltema and Claude Canizares of Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, and Gordon Garmire of Pennsylvania State University in University Park. Penn State and MIT developed the instrument for NASA. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program, and TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, Calif., is the prime contractor for the spacecraft. The Smithsonian's Chandra X-ray Center controls science and flight operations from Cambridge, Mass.

  3. Chandra Counterparts of CANDELS GOODS-S Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelluti, N.; Comastri, A.; Fontana, A.; Zamorani, G.; Amorin, R.; Castellano, M.; Merlin, E.; Santini, P.; Elbaz, D.; Schreiber, C.; Shu, X.; Wang, T.; Dunlop, J. S.; Bourne, N.; Bruce, V. A.; Buitrago, F.; Michałowski, Michał J.; Derriere, S.; Ferguson, H. C.; Faber, S. M.; Vito, F.

    2016-06-01

    Improving the capabilities of detecting faint X-ray sources is fundamental for increasing the statistics on faint high-z active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and star-forming galaxies (SFGs). We performed a simultaneous maximum likelihood point-spread function fit in the [0.5-2] keV and [2-7] keV energy bands of the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS) data at the position of the 34,930 CANDELS H-band selected galaxies. For each detected source we provide X-ray photometry and optical counterpart validation. We validated this technique by means of a ray-tracing simulation. We detected a total of 698 X-ray point sources with a likelihood { L }\\gt 4.98 (i.e., >2.7σ). We show that prior knowledge of a deep sample of optical-NIR galaxies leads to a significant increase in the detection of faint (i.e., ˜10-17 cgs in the [0.5-2] keV band) sources with respect to “blind” X-ray detections. By including previous X-ray catalogs, this work increases the total number of X-ray sources detected in the 4 Ms CDFS, CANDELS area to 793, which represents the largest sample of extremely faint X-ray sources assembled to date. Our results suggest that a large fraction of the optical counterparts of our X-ray sources determined by likelihood ratio actually coincides with the priors used for the source detection. Most of the new detected sources are likely SFGs or faint, absorbed AGNs. We identified a few sources with putative photometric redshift z > 4. Despite the low number statistics and the uncertainties on the photo z, this sample significantly increases the number of X-ray-selected candidate high-z AGNs.

  4. IDENTIFYING LUMINOUS ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN DEEP SURVEYS: REVISED IRAC SELECTION CRITERIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donley, J. L.; Koekemoer, A. M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Brusa, M.; Salvato, M. [Max Planck Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Capak, P. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MC 220-6, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cardamone, C. N. [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Civano, F. [Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ilbert, O. [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille (UMR 6110), CNRS-Universite de Provence, 38 rue Frederic Joliot-Curie, 13388 Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Impey, C. D. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Kartaltepe, J. S. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Miyaji, T. [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico); Sanders, D. B. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Trump, J. R. [UCO/Lick, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Zamorani, G., E-mail: donley@stsci.edu [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2012-04-01

    Spitzer/IRAC selection is a powerful tool for identifying luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs). For deep IRAC data, however, the AGN selection wedges currently in use are heavily contaminated by star-forming galaxies, especially at high redshift. Using the large samples of luminous AGNs and high-redshift star-forming galaxies in COSMOS, we redefine the AGN selection criteria for use in deep IRAC surveys. The new IRAC criteria are designed to be both highly complete and reliable, and incorporate the best aspects of the current AGN selection wedges and of infrared power-law selection while excluding high-redshift star-forming galaxies selected via the BzK, distant red galaxy, Lyman-break galaxy, and submillimeter galaxy criteria. At QSO luminosities of log L{sub 2-10keV}(erg s{sup -1}) {>=}44, the new IRAC criteria recover 75% of the hard X-ray and IRAC-detected XMM-COSMOS sample, yet only 38% of the IRAC AGN candidates have X-ray counterparts, a fraction that rises to 52% in regions with Chandra exposures of 50-160 ks. X-ray stacking of the individually X-ray non-detected AGN candidates leads to a hard X-ray signal indicative of heavily obscured to mildly Compton-thick obscuration (log N{sub H} (cm{sup -2}) = 23.5 {+-} 0.4). While IRAC selection recovers a substantial fraction of luminous unobscured and obscured AGNs, it is incomplete to low-luminosity and host-dominated AGNs.

  5. Mode Selection in Compressible Active Flow Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrow, Aden; Woodhouse, Francis G.; Dunkel, Jörn

    2017-07-01

    Coherent, large-scale dynamics in many nonequilibrium physical, biological, or information transport networks are driven by small-scale local energy input. Here, we introduce and explore an analytically tractable nonlinear model for compressible active flow networks. In contrast to thermally driven systems, we find that active friction selects discrete states with a limited number of oscillation modes activated at distinct fixed amplitudes. Using perturbation theory, we systematically predict the stationary states of noisy networks and find good agreement with a Bayesian state estimation based on a hidden Markov model applied to simulated time series data. Our results suggest that the macroscopic response of active network structures, from actomyosin force networks to cytoplasmic flows, can be dominated by a significantly reduced number of modes, in contrast to energy equipartition in thermal equilibrium. The model is also well suited to study topological sound modes and spectral band gaps in active matter.

  6. Stochastic cycle selection in active flow networks

    CERN Document Server

    Woodhouse, Francis G; Fawcett, Joanna B; Dunkel, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    Active biological flow networks pervade nature and span a wide range of scales, from arterial blood vessels and bronchial mucus transport in humans to bacterial flow through porous media or plasmodial shuttle streaming in slime molds. Despite their ubiquity, little is known about the self-organization principles that govern flow statistics in such non-equilibrium networks. Here we connect concepts from lattice field theory, graph theory, and transition rate theory to understand how topology controls dynamics in a generic model for actively driven flow on a network. Our combined theoretical and numerical analysis identifies symmetry-based rules that make it possible to classify and predict the selection statistics of complex flow cycles from the network topology. The conceptual framework developed here is applicable to a broad class of non-biological far-from-equilibrium networks, including actively controlled information flows, and establishes a new correspondence between active flow networks and generalized ...

  7. Stochastic cycle selection in active flow networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Francis; Forrow, Aden; Fawcett, Joanna; Dunkel, Jorn

    2016-11-01

    Active biological flow networks pervade nature and span a wide range of scales, from arterial blood vessels and bronchial mucus transport in humans to bacterial flow through porous media or plasmodial shuttle streaming in slime molds. Despite their ubiquity, little is known about the self-organization principles that govern flow statistics in such non-equilibrium networks. By connecting concepts from lattice field theory, graph theory and transition rate theory, we show how topology controls dynamics in a generic model for actively driven flow on a network. Through theoretical and numerical analysis we identify symmetry-based rules to classify and predict the selection statistics of complex flow cycles from the network topology. Our conceptual framework is applicable to a broad class of biological and non-biological far-from-equilibrium networks, including actively controlled information flows, and establishes a new correspondence between active flow networks and generalized ice-type models.

  8. INFLUENCE OF SELECTED PHARMACEUTICALS ON ACTIVATED SLUDGE DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Tomska

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of selected antibiotics - sulfanilamide and erythromycin on activated sludge dehydrogenase activity with use of trifenyltetrazolinum chloride (TTC test. Dehydrogenases activity is an indicator of biochemical activity of microorganisms present in activated sludge or the ability to degrade organic compounds in waste water. TTC test is particularly useful for the regularity of the course of treatment, in which the presence of inhibitors of biochemical reactions and toxic compounds are present. It was observed that the dehydrogenase activity decreases with the increase of a antibiotics concentration. The lowest value of the dehydrogenase activity equal to 32.4 μmol TF / gMLSS obtained at sulfanilamide concentration 150mg / l. For this sample, an inhibition of dehydrogenase activity was 31%.

  9. 15 Years of Chandra Observations of Capella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Vinay

    2014-11-01

    Capella is the strongest coronal line source accessible to Chandra. It has been cumulatively observed with gratings for over 1.2 Ms. The accumulated spectrum represents astrophysical ground truth for atomic physics calculations that is unprecedented in quality. We analyze co-added spectra to generate a comprehensive list of detectable lines and their locations, spanning two orders of magnitude in photon energy. We compare the locations of identifiable lines with locations from atomic databases ATOMDB and Chianti and characterize the uncertainties in the databases. The full line lists and comparisons will be made available at the Dataverse at http://dx.doi.org/10.7910/DVN/27084 This work is supported by Chandra grant AR0-11001X and NASA Contract NAS8-03060 to the Chandra X-Ray Center.

  10. Yes, High School Students Can Analyze Chandra Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keohane, J. W.; Clearfield, C. R.; Olbert, C. M.

    2002-12-01

    For the past two years, high school students at the North Carolina School of Science and Math (NCSSM) have worked with new and archival Chandra data, and have produced interesting scientific results. These results have included one refereed paper in the Ap.J., and about a dozen presentations at scientific meetings (including three at this meeting). The students were selected, based on interest, from the junior class at NCSSM, to stay on campus and work intensively for 2 to 4 weeks over the summer. Each team of students selected an object with public Chandra ACIS data, and were taught how to produce data products such as images and spectra, as well as conduct a literature search. In most cases, a paper had already been published using those data, and the students were usually able to reproduce the results. As the students waded through the literature, they would search for a theory to test or an interesting new phenomenon. Often the students would request an image in another wavelength to compare in detail to the Chandra data. After the summer, many students continued to work throughout the following fall semester, producing a paper for submission to the Siemens Westinghouse Science and Technology Competition by the beginning of October. In the process of conducting research, the students learn to apply many physics concepts, and learn valuable scientific research and writing skills. Those students that choose to continue with astrophysics can often dive directly into a high-level research project immediately when they arrive at college. These programs have been funded by NASA, through E/PO grants attached to parent research grants.

  11. Antioxidant activity of selected Indian spices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobana, S; Naidu, K A

    2000-02-01

    Spices and vegetables possess antioxidant activity that can be applied for preservation of lipids and reduce lipid peroxidation in biological systems. The potential antioxidant activities of selected spices extracts (water and alcohol 1:1) were investigated on enzymatic lipid peroxidation. Water and alcoholic extract (1:1) of commonly used spices (garlic, ginger, onion, mint, cloves, cinnamon and pepper) dose-dependently inhibited oxidation of fatty acid, linoleic acid in presence of soybean lipoxygenase. Among the spices tested, cloves exhibited highest while onion showed least antioxidant activity. The relative antioxidant activities decreased in the order of cloves, cinnamon, pepper, ginger, garlic, mint and onion. Spice mix namely ginger, onion and garlic; onion and ginger; ginger and garlic showed cumulative inhibition of lipid peroxidation thus exhibiting their synergistic antioxidant activity. The antioxidant activity of spice extracts were retained even after boiling for 30 min at 100 degrees C, indicating that the spice constituents were resistant to thermal denaturation. The antioxidant activity of these dietary spices suggest that in addition to imparting flavor to the food, they possess potential health benefits by inhibiting the lipid peroxidation.

  12. Shelter from the Storm: Protecting the Chandra X-ray Observatory from Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Robert A.; Morris, David C.; Virani, Shanil N.; Wolk, Scott J.; Blackwell, William C.; Minow, Joseph I.; O'dell, Stephen L.

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory was launched in July 1999, and the first images were recorded by the ACIS x-ray detector in August 1999. Shortly after first light, degradation of the energy resolution and charge transfer efficiency in the ACIS CCD detectors was observed, and this was quickly attributed to cumulative particle radiation damage in the CCD's, in particular from 100 keV to 200 keV protons. Since the onset of this radiation damage to ACIS, several improvements have been made to autonomous Chandra operation and ground-based operations and mission planning, to limit the effects of radiation while preserving optimum observing efficiency for the Observatory. These changes include implementing an automatic science instrument radiation protection system on Chandra, implementing a real-time radiation monitoring and alert system by the Science Operations Team, and improving the radiation prediction models used in mission planning for the Observatory. These satellite- and ground-based systems provide protection for Chandra from passages through the Earth's trapped radiation belts and outer magnetosphere and from flares and coronal mass ejections from the Sun. We describe the design and performance of the automatic on-board radiation protection system on Chandra, and the ground-based software systems and data products for real-time radiation monitoring. We also describe the development and characterize the performance of the Chandra Radiation Model (CRM), which provides predictions of the solar wind and magnetospheric proton fluxes along Chandra's orbit, indexed by the geomagnetic activity index, Kp. We compare the observed and predicted damage rates to ACIS based on net mission proton fluence, and outline planned enhancements to the CRM.

  13. NASA's High Energy Vision: Chandra and the X-Ray Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mais, D. E.; Stencel, R. E.; Richards, D.

    2004-05-01

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory is the most sophisticated X-ray observatory launched by NASA. Chandra is designed to observe X-rays from high-energy regions of the universe, such as the remnants of supernovae explosions, col- liding galaxies, black holes, pulsars, neutron stars, quasars, and X-ray bi- nary stars. The spectacular results from the first five years of Chandra ob- servations are changing and redefining theories with each observation. Every exciting new image shows glimpses of such exotic phenomena as super-massive black holes, surprising black hole activity in old galaxies, rivers of grav- ity that define the cosmic landscape, unexpected x-ray activity in proto- stars and failed stars, puzzling distributions of elements in supernovae remnants, the sound waves from a super-massive black hole, and the even the tantalizing possibility of an entirely new form of matter - the strange quark star. On September 14, 2000, triggered by alerts from amateur astron- omers worldwide, Chandra observed the outburst of the brightest northern dwarf nova SS Cygni. The cooperation of hundreds of amateur variable star astronomers and the Chandra X-Ray scientists and spacecraft specialists pro- vided proof that the collaboration of amateur and professional astronomers is a powerful tool to study cosmic phenomena.

  14. On active current selection for Lagrangian profilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jouffroy, Jerome; Zhou, Qiuyang; Zielinski, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    simple and computationally-efficient control strategies to actively select and use ocean currents so that a profiler can autonomously reach a desired destination. After briefly presenting a typical profiler and possible mechanical modifications for a coastal environment, we introduce simple mathematical...... models for the profiler and the currents it will use. We then present simple feedback controllers that, using the direction of the currents and taking into account the configuration of the environment (coastal or deep-sea), is able to steer the profiler to any desired horizontal location. To illustrate...... the approach, a few results are presented using both simulated currents and real current velocities from the North Sea....

  15. Activity and action screening of selected disinfectants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Balharová

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This research work is aimed to monitoring of selected disinfectants´activity in operational conditions. Hereby there have been monitored two acidic disinfectants Despon K and Mikasan D, which have had-by their producer-stated different recommended concentration. These solutions were monitored in viewpoint of their activity at different temperature, time of circulation, pH and water hardness. In this work there were measured pH of solutions in unloaded medium to be compared with pH of solutions in loaded medium and this measuring was carried out regularly each week within a one month period. During this period there was also monitored total plate count (TPC, which was stated in the dairy, where samples were taken two-times monthly. It has been found, that the disinfectants Mikasan D and Mikal 94D are effective even by high water hardness.

  16. The Chandra Source Catalog: Processing and Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Janet; Evans, Ian N.; Glotfelty, Kenny J.; Hain, Roger; Hall, Diane M.; Miller, Joseph B.; Plummer, David A.; Zografou, Panagoula; Primini, Francis A.; Anderson, Craig S.; Bonaventura, Nina R.; Chen, Judy C.; Davis, John E.; Doe, Stephen M.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Galle, Elizabeth C.; Gibbs, Danny G., II; Grier, John D.; Harbo, Peter N.; He, Xiang Qun (Helen); Houck, John C.; Karovska, Margarita; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Lauer, Jennifer; McCollough, Michael L.; McDowell, Jonathan C.; Mitschang, Arik W.; Morgan, Douglas L.; Mossman, Amy E.; Nichols, Joy S.; Nowak, Michael A.; Refsdal, Brian L.; Rots, Arnold H.; Siemiginowska, Aneta L.; Sundheim, Beth A.; Tibbetts, Michael S.; van Stone, David W.; Winkelman, Sherry L.

    2009-09-01

    Chandra Source Catalog processing recalibrates each observation using the latest available calibration data, and employs a wavelet-based source detection algorithm to identify all the X-ray sources in the field of view. Source properties are then extracted from each detected source that is a candidate for inclusion in the catalog. Catalog processing is completed by matching sources across multiple observations, merging common detections, and applying quality assurance checks. The Chandra Source Catalog processing system shares a common processing infrastructure and utilizes much of the functionality that is built into the Standard Data Processing (SDP) pipeline system that provides calibrated Chandra data to end-users. Other key components of the catalog processing system have been assembled from the portable CIAO data analysis package. Minimal new software tool development has been required to support the science algorithms needed for catalog production. Since processing pipelines must be instantiated for each detected source, the number of pipelines that are run during catalog construction is a factor of order 100 times larger than for SDP. The increased computational load, and inherent parallel nature of the processing, is handled by distributing the workload across a multi-node Beowulf cluster. Modifications to the SDP automated processing application to support catalog processing, and extensions to Chandra Data Archive software to ingest and retrieve catalog products, complete the upgrades to the infrastructure to support catalog processing.

  17. Chandra Imaging of Gamma-Ray Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Kargaltsev, Oleg; Hare, Jeremy; Pavlov, George G

    2013-01-01

    We review the multiwavelength properties of the few known gamma-ray binaries, focusing on extended emission recently resolved with Chandra. We discuss the implications of these findings for the nature of compact objects and for physical processes operating in these systems.

  18. Spectral analysis of the Chandra comet survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodewits, D.; Christian, D. J.; Torney, M.; Dryer, M.; Lisse, C. M.; Dennerl, K.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Wolk, S. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Hoekstra, R.

    2007-01-01

    Aims. We present results of the analysis of cometary X-ray spectra with an extended version of our charge exchange emission model (Bodewits et al. 2006). We have applied this model to the sample of 8 comets thus far observed with the Chandra X-ray observatory and acis spectrometer in the 300 - 1000

  19. Chandra Catches Early Phase of Cosmic Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    A NASA Chandra X-ray Observatory image has revealed a complex of several intergalactic hot gas clouds in the process of merging. The superb Chandra spatial resolution made it possible to distinguish individual galaxies from the massive clouds of hot gas. One of the clouds, which that envelops hundreds of galaxies, has an extraordinarily low concentration of iron atoms, indicating that it is in the very early stages of cluster evolution. "We may be seeing hot intergalactic gas in a relatively pristine state before it has been polluted by gas from galaxies," said Q. Daniel Wang of the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, and lead author on an upcoming Astrophysical Journal article describing the study. "This discovery should provide valuable insight into how the most massive structures in the universe are assembled." 3-Panel Image of Abell 2125, Its Core & Galaxy C153 3-Panel Image of Abell 2125, Its Core & Galaxy C153 The complex, known as Abell 2125,is about 3 billion light years from Earth, and is seen at a time about 11 billion years after the Big Bang, when many galaxy clusters are believed to have formed. The Chandra Abell 2125 image shows several huge elongated clouds of multimillion degree gas coming together from different directions. These hot gas clouds, each of which contains hundreds of galaxies, appear to be in the process of merging to form a single massive galaxy cluster. Chandra, Hubble Space Telescope, and Very Large Array radio telescope data show that several galaxies in the Abell 2125 core cluster are being stripped of their gas as they fall through surrounding high-pressure hot gas. This stripping process has enriched the core cluster's gas in heavy elements such as iron. Abell 2125's Core & Galaxy C153 Abell 2125's Core & Galaxy C153 The gas in the pristine cloud, which is still several million light years away from the core cluster, is conspicuous for its lack of iron atoms. This anemic cloud must be in a very early evolutionary stage. The

  20. Chandra Examines a Quadrillion-Volt Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    The high-voltage environment of one of the most energetic and strongly magnetized pulsars known has been surveyed by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. A team of astronomers found a powerful jet of high-energy particles extending over a distance of 20 light years and bright arcs believed to be due to particles of matter and anti-matter generated by the pulsar. The team of US, Canadian, and Japanese scientists pointed Chandra at the rapidly spinning neutron star B1509-58, located 19,000 light years away in the constellation of Circinus, for over five hours. These results were announced at the "Two Years of Science with Chandra" symposium in Washington, DC. "Jets and arcs on this vast scale have never been seen in any other pulsar," said Bryan Gaensler of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. "The spectacular images we have obtained of this source are letting us test theories as to how pulsars unleash so much energy." The features seen with Chandra give the scientists insight into the process by which voltages of more than 7000 trillion volts are created around rotating neutron stars (the dense remnants of supernova explosions) and how these extreme voltages affect their environment. B1509-58 is of particular interest because it has a much stronger magnetic field than the Crab Nebula pulsar, which exhibits similar features on a much smaller scale. The general picture emerging from these results is that high-energy particles of matter and antimatter are streaming away from the neutron star along its poles and near its equator. The particles leaving the poles produce the jets; astronomers speculate that only one side of the jet is apparent in B1509-58, indicating that this one side is beamed in our direction, while the other is rushing away. "Until this observation, no one knew for sure whether such tremendous voltages and energy outputs were a trademark of all pulsars, or if the Crab was an oddball," said Vicky Kaspi of McGill University in Montreal. "Now thanks

  1. The End of Days -- Chandra Catches X-ray Glow From Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-12-01

    operations team replanned the telescope's observation activities and by Monday morning, and by Monday morning, Chandra was pointed at the supernova and observed it for about nine hours. Lewin, who had been awarded the rights to Chandra's first observation of a nearby supernova, was ecstatic. "This is a unique chance that we have been hoping for!!!!" he wrote in an e-mail to Tananbaum. "I was impressed by how rapid the Chandra response was, " said Kirshner. "Supernovae expand quickly and cool quickly, so each day we delay observing the supernova it has changed irretrievably," Filippenko said. "We caught this really early, only a day or two after the explosion. We were lucky." The Chandra observation was taken with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) on November 1 and 2, and 11 and 12, 1999 in two separate observations that lasted approximately nine hours each. ACIS was built by Pennsylvania State University, University Park. and MIT. To follow Chandra's progress, visit the Chandra site at: http://chandra.harvard.edu AND http://chandra.nasa.gov NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL, manages the Chandra program. TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, CA, is the prime contractor for the spacecraft. The Smithsonian's Chandra X-ray Center controls science and flight operations from Cambridge, MA. This image will be available on NASA Video File which airs at noon, 3:00 p.m., 6:00 p.m., 9:00 p.m. and midnight Eastern Time. NASA Television is available on GE-2, transponder 9C at 85 degrees West longitude, with vertical polarization. Frequency is on 3880.0 megahertz, with audio on 6.8 megahertz. High resolution digital versions of the X-ray image (JPG, 300 dpi TIFF ) and other information associated with this release are available on the Internet at: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/sn1999em/ or via links in: http://chandra.harvard.edu

  2. First Images From Chandra X-Ray Observatory to be Released

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-08-01

    The first images from the world's most powerful X-ray telescope, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, will be unveiled at a media briefing at 1 p.m. EDT, Thursday, Aug. 26. The briefing will be held in the James E. Webb Auditorium at NASA Headquarters, 300 E St. SW, Washington, DC. The images include the spectacular remnants of a supernova and other astronomical objects. Panelists will be: - Dr. Edward Weiler, Associate Administrator for Space Science, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC; - Dr. Harvey Tananbaum, Director of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's Chandra X-ray Center, Cambridge, MA; - Dr. Martin Weisskopf, NASA's Chandra Project Scientist, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL; and - Dr. Robert Kirshner, astrophysicist, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. The event will be carried live on NASA Television with question-and-answer capability for reporters covering the briefing from participating NASA centers and from the Chandra Operations Control Center in Cambridge. NASA Television is available on transponder 9C, satellite GE-2 at 85 degrees West longitude, vertical polarization, frequency 3880 MHz, audio of 6.8 MHz. Chandra has been undergoing activation and checkout since it was placed into orbit during Space Shuttle mission STS-93 in July. Chandra will examine exploding stars, black holes, colliding galaxies and other high-energy cosmic phenomena to help scientists gain a better understanding of the structure and evolution of the universe. Chandra images and additional information will be available following the briefing on the Internet at: http://chandra.nasa.gov and http://chandra.harvard.edu NASA press releases and other information are available automatically by sending an Internet electronic mail message to domo@hq.nasa.gov. In the body of the message (not the subject line) users should type the words "subscribe press-release" (no quotes). The system will reply with a confirmation via E-mail of each subscription. A second

  3. Chandra X-ray Observatory Optical Axis and Aimpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Chandra X-ray Observatory revolutionized the X-ray astronomy as being the first, and so far the only, X-ray telescope achieving sub-arcsecond resolution. Chandra comprises of three principal elements: the High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA), Pointing Control and Aspect Determination (PCAD) system, and the Science Instrument Module (SIM). To achieve and retain the unprecedented imaging quality, it is critical that these three principal elements stay rigid and stable for the entire life time of the Chandra operation. Tracking the Chandra optical axis and aimpoint with respect to detector positions is the most relevant measurement for understanding telescope stability. The study shows that both the optical axis and the aimpoint has been drifting since Chandra launch. I will discuss the telescope focal-point, optical axis, aimpoint, their positiondrifts during the mission, the impact to Chandra operations, and the permanent default aimpoint, to be implemented in Chandra cycle 18.

  4. Chandra Observations of the Components of Clusters, Groups, and Galaxies and their Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Forman, W; Markevitch, M L; Vikhlinin, A A; Churazov, E

    2001-01-01

    We discuss two themes from Chandra observations of galaxies, groups, and clusters. First, we review the merging process as seen through the high angular resolution of Chandra. We present examples of sharp, edge-like surface brightness structures ``cold fronts'', the boundaries of the remaining cores of merger components and the Chandra observations of CL0657, the first clear example of a strong cluster merger shock. In addition to reviewing already published work, we present observations of the cold front around the elliptical galaxy NGC1404 which is infalling into the Fornax cluster and we discuss multiple ``edges'' in ZW3146. Second, we review the effects of relativistic, radio-emitting plasmas or ``bubbles'', inflated by active galactic nuclei, on the hot X-ray emitting gaseous atmospheres in galaxies and clusters. We review published work and also discuss the unusual X-ray structures surrounding the galaxies NGC4636 and NGC507.

  5. Selection of active spaces for multiconfigurational wavefunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Sebastian; Boguslawski, Katharina; Reiher, Markus, E-mail: markus.reiher@phys.chem.ethz.ch [Laboratorium für Physikalische Chemie, ETH Zürich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Janowski, Tomasz; Pulay, Peter, E-mail: pulay@uark.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States)

    2015-06-28

    The efficient and accurate description of the electronic structure of strongly correlated systems is still a largely unsolved problem. The usual procedures start with a multiconfigurational (usually a Complete Active Space, CAS) wavefunction which accounts for static correlation and add dynamical correlation by perturbation theory, configuration interaction, or coupled cluster expansion. This procedure requires the correct selection of the active space. Intuitive methods are unreliable for complex systems. The inexpensive black-box unrestricted natural orbital (UNO) criterion postulates that the Unrestricted Hartree-Fock (UHF) charge natural orbitals with fractional occupancy (e.g., between 0.02 and 1.98) constitute the active space. UNOs generally approximate the CAS orbitals so well that the orbital optimization in CAS Self-Consistent Field (CASSCF) may be omitted, resulting in the inexpensive UNO-CAS method. A rigorous testing of the UNO criterion requires comparison with approximate full configuration interaction wavefunctions. This became feasible with the advent of Density Matrix Renormalization Group (DMRG) methods which can approximate highly correlated wavefunctions at affordable cost. We have compared active orbital occupancies in UNO-CAS and CASSCF calculations with DMRG in a number of strongly correlated molecules: compounds of electronegative atoms (F{sub 2}, ozone, and NO{sub 2}), polyenes, aromatic molecules (naphthalene, azulene, anthracene, and nitrobenzene), radicals (phenoxy and benzyl), diradicals (o-, m-, and p-benzyne), and transition metal compounds (nickel-acetylene and Cr{sub 2}). The UNO criterion works well in these cases. Other symmetry breaking solutions, with the possible exception of spatial symmetry, do not appear to be essential to generate the correct active space. In the case of multiple UHF solutions, the natural orbitals of the average UHF density should be used. The problems of the UNO criterion and their potential solutions

  6. A Chandra Study of the Galactic Globular Cluster Omega Centauri

    CERN Document Server

    Haggard, Daryl; Davies, Melvyn B

    2009-01-01

    We analyze a ~70 ksec Chandra ACIS-I exposure of the globular cluster Omega Centauri (NGC 5139). The ~17 amin x 17 amin field of view fully encompasses three core radii and almost twice the half-mass radius. We detect 180 sources to a limiting flux of ~4.3x10^-16 erg/cm^2/s (Lx = 1.2x10^30 erg/s at 4.9 kpc). After accounting for the number of active galactic nuclei and possible foreground stars, we estimate that 45-70 of the sources are cluster members. Four of the X-ray sources have previously been identified as compact accreting binaries in the cluster--three cataclysmic variables (CVs) and one quiescent neutron star. Correlating the Chandra positions with known variable stars yields eight matches, of which five are probable cluster members that are likely to be binary stars with active coronae. Extrapolating these optical identifications to the remaining unidentified X-ray source population, we estimate that 20-35 of the sources are CVs and a similar number are active binaries. This likely represents most ...

  7. Coevolution of active vision and feature selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floreano, Dario; Kato, Toshifumi; Marocco, Davide; Sauser, Eric

    2004-03-01

    We show that complex visual tasks, such as position- and size-invariant shape recognition and navigation in the environment, can be tackled with simple architectures generated by a coevolutionary process of active vision and feature selection. Behavioral machines equipped with primitive vision systems and direct pathways between visual and motor neurons are evolved while they freely interact with their environments. We describe the application of this methodology in three sets of experiments, namely, shape discrimination, car driving, and robot navigation. We show that these systems develop sensitivity to a number of oriented, retinotopic, visual-feature-oriented edges, corners, height, and a behavioral repertoire to locate, bring, and keep these features in sensitive regions of the vision system, resembling strategies observed in simple insects.

  8. VARIABILITY OF OPTICAL COUNTERPARTS IN THE CHANDRA GALACTIC BULGE SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britt, C. T.; Hynes, R. I.; Johnson, C. B.; Baldwin, A.; Collazzi, A.; Gossen, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Jonker, P. G.; Torres, M. A. P. [SRON, Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Sorbonnelaan 2, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands); Nelemans, G. [Department of Astrophysics, IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Maccarone, T. [Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Box 41051, Science Building, Lubbock, TX 79409-1051 (United States); Steeghs, D.; Greiss, S. [Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Heinke, C. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, CCIS 4-183, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1 (Canada); Bassa, C. G. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Villar, A. [Department of Physics, Massachussettes Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States); Gabb, M. [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We present optical light curves of variable stars consistent with the positions of X-ray sources identified with the Chandra X-ray Observatory for the Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS). Using data from the Mosaic-II instrument on the Blanco 4 m Telescope at CTIO, we gathered time-resolved photometric data on timescales from ∼2 hr to 8 days over the 3/4 of the X-ray survey containing sources from the initial GBS catalog. Among the light curve morphologies we identify are flickering in interacting binaries, eclipsing sources, dwarf nova outbursts, ellipsoidal variations, long period variables, spotted stars, and flare stars. Eighty-seven percent of X-ray sources have at least one potential optical counterpart. Twenty-seven percent of these candidate counterparts are detectably variable; a much greater fraction than expected for randomly selected field stars, which suggests that most of these variables are real counterparts. We discuss individual sources of interest, provide variability information on candidate counterparts, and discuss the characteristics of the variable population.

  9. APC implementation in Chandra Asri - ethylene plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidiq, Mochamad; Mustofa, Ali

    2017-05-01

    Nowadays, the modern process plants are continuously improved for maximizing production, Optimization of the energy and raw material and reducing the risk. Due to many disturbances appearance between the process units, hence, the failure of one unit might have a bad effect on the overall productivity. Ethylene Plant have significant opportunities for using Advanced Process Control (APC) technologies to improve operation stability, push closer to quality or equipment limit, and improve the capability of process units to handle disturbances. APC implementation had considered a best answer for solving multivariable control problem. PT. Chandra Asri Petrochemical, Tbk (CAP) operates a large naphtha cracker complex at Cilegon, Indonesia. To optimize the plant operation and to enhance the benefit, Chandra Asri has been decided to implement Advance Process Control (APC) for ethylene plant. The APC implementation technology scopes at CAP are as follows: 1. Hot Section : Furnaces, Quench Tower 2. Cold Section : Demethanizer, Deethanizer, Acetylene Converter, Ethylene Fractionator, Depropanizer, Propylene Fractionator, Debutanizer

  10. Chandra hardware and systems: keeping things running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, Lisa

    2006-06-01

    System management for any organization can be a challenge, but satellite projects present their own issues. I will be presenting the network and system architecture chosen to support the scientists in the Chandra X-ray Center. My group provides the infrastructure for science data processing, mission planning, user support, archive support and software development. Our challenge is to create a stable environment with enough flexibility to roll with the changes during the mission. I'll discuss system and network choices, web service, backups, security and systems monitoring. Also, how to build infrastructure that's flexible, how to support a large group of scientists with a relatively small staff, what challenges we faced (anticipated and unanticipated) and what lessons we learned over the past 6 years since the launch of Chandra. Finally I'll outline our plans for the future including beowulf cluster support, an improved helpdesk system, methods for dealing with the explosive amount of data that needs to be managed.

  11. Statistical Characterization of the Chandra Source Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Primini, Francis A; Davis, John E; Nowak, Michael A; Evans, Ian N; Glotfelty, Kenny J; Anderson, Craig S; Bonaventura, Nina R; Chen, Judy C; Doe, Stephen M; Evans, Janet D; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Galle, Elizabeth C; Gibbs, Danny G; Grier, John D; Hain, Roger M; Hall, Diane M; Harbo, Peter N; Xiangqun,; He,; Karovska, Margarita; Kashyap, Vinay L; Lauer, Jennifer; McCollough, Michael L; McDowell, Jonathan C; Miller, Joseph B; Mitschang, Arik W; Morgan, Douglas L; Mossman, Amy E; Nichols, Joy S; Plummer, David A; Refsdal, Brian L; Rots, Arnold H; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Sundheim, Beth A; Tibbetts, Michael S; Van Stone, David W; Winkelman, Sherry L; Zografou, Panagoula

    2011-01-01

    The first release of the Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) contains ~95,000 X-ray sources in a total area of ~0.75% of the entire sky, using data from ~3,900 separate ACIS observations of a multitude of different types of X-ray sources. In order to maximize the scientific benefit of such a large, heterogeneous data-set, careful characterization of the statistical properties of the catalog, i.e., completeness, sensitivity, false source rate, and accuracy of source properties, is required. Characterization efforts of other, large Chandra catalogs, such as the ChaMP Point Source Catalog (Kim et al. 2007) or the 2 Mega-second Deep Field Surveys (Alexander et al. 2003), while informative, cannot serve this purpose, since the CSC analysis procedures are significantly different and the range of allowable data is much less restrictive. We describe here the characterization process for the CSC. This process includes both a comparison of real CSC results with those of other, deeper Chandra catalogs of the same targets and e...

  12. A Deep Chandra ACIS Survey of M51

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, K. D.; Long, Knox S.; Kilgard, Roy E.

    2016-08-01

    We have obtained a deep X-ray image of the nearby galaxy M51 using Chandra. Here we present the catalog of X-ray sources detected in these observations and provide an overview of the properties of the point-source population. We find 298 sources within the D 25 radii of NGC 5194/5, of which 20% are variable, a dozen are classical transients, and another half dozen are transient-like sources. The typical number of active ultraluminous X-ray sources in any given observation is ˜5, and only two of those sources persist in an ultraluminous state over the 12 yr of observations. Given reasonable assumptions about the supernova remnant population, the luminosity function is well described by a power law with an index between 1.55 and 1.7, only slightly shallower than that found for populations dominated by high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), which suggests that the binary population in NGC 5194 is also dominated by HMXBs. The luminosity function of NGC 5195 is more consistent with a low-mass X-ray binary dominated population. Based on observations made with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory under contract #NAS83060, and the data were obtained through program GO1-12115.

  13. Chandra Observation of the Starburst Galaxy NGC 2146

    CERN Document Server

    Inui, T; Tsuru, T G; Koyama, K; Matsushita, S; Peck, A B; Tarchi, A; Inui, Tatsuya; Matsumoto, Hironori; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Koyama, Katsuji; Matsushita, Satoki; Peck, Alison B.; Tarchi, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    We present six monitoring observations of the starburst galaxy NGC 2146 using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We have detected 67 point sources in the 8'.7 x 8'.7 field of view of the ACIS-S detector. Six of these sources were Ultra-Luminous X-ray Sources, the brightest of which has a luminosity of 5 x 10^{39} ergs s^{-1}. One of the source, with a luminosity of ~1 x 10^{39} ergs s^{-1}, is coincident with the dynamical center location, as derived from the ^{12}CO rotation curve. We suggest that this source may be a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus. We have produced a table where the positions and main characteristics of the Chandra-detected sources are reported. The comparison between the positions of the X-ray sources and those of compact sources detected in NIR or radio does not indicate any definite counterpart. Taking profit of the relatively large number of sources detected, we have derived a logN-logS relation and a luminosity function. The former shows a break at \\~10^{-15} ergs cm^{-2} s^{-1}, t...

  14. Groups of Galaxies in AEGIS: The 200 ksec Chandra Extended X-ray Source catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Jeltema, Tesla E; Laird, Elise S; Willmer, Christopher N A; Coil, Alison L; Cooper, Michael C; Davis, Marc; Nandra, Kirpal; Newman, Jeffrey A

    2009-01-01

    We present the discovery of seven X-ray emitting groups of galaxies selected as extended X-ray sources in the 200 ksec Chandra coverage of the All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS). In addition, we report on AGN activity associated to these systems. Using the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey coverage, we identify optical counterparts and determine velocity dispersions. In particular, we find three massive high-redshift groups at z>0.7, one of which is at z=1.13, the first X-ray detections of spectroscopically selected DEEP2 groups. We also present a first look at the the L_X-T, L_X-sigma, and sigma-T scaling relations for high-redshift massive groups. We find that the properties of these X-ray selected systems agree well with the scaling relations of similar systems at low redshift, although there are X-ray undetected groups in the DEEP2 catalogue with similar velocity dispersions. The other three X-ray groups with identified redshifts are associated with lower mass groups at z~0.07 and...

  15. Chandra Catches Cannibal Galaxy in the Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory image of Perseus A provides new insight into how this supergiant galaxy has grown by cannibalizing other galaxies and gas in the vicinity. For the first time astronomers see an X-ray shadow cast by a smaller galaxy as its gas is being stripped away by the enormous galaxy. The research was reported by Professor Andrew Fabian of the Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge, England on June 7 at the 196th National Meeting of the American Astronomical Society, in Rochester, NY. Other members of the research team are Jeremy Sanders, Stefano Ettori, Steve Allen, Carolin Crawford, Kazushi Iwasawa, and Roderick Johnstone of the Institute of Astronomy, Gregory Taylor on the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM, and Patrick Ogle of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA. Perseus A, or NGC 1275, is in the center of a large galaxy cluster 320 million light years from Earth. The cluster, which contains thousands of galaxies and enough gas to make thousands more, is one of the largest gravitationally bound objects in the universe. Over the eons, Perseus A has accumulated hundreds of billions of stars to become one of the most massive known galaxies as gas and galaxies have been pulled inward by gravity. The Chandra observation shows a region of hot gas that extends over several hundred thousand light years. The gas in the outer portion of the cluster has a temperature of 70 million degrees. The cluster gas cools gradually and settles toward the center of the cluster. A galaxy with "only" about 20 billion stars is falling into Perseus A (located at two o'clock from the center of the image) and appears as a small dark patch due to absorption of X rays by cool gas in the infalling galaxy. Another larger hole seen further out is thought to be due to a bubble of high-energy particles ejected in an explosion from Perseus A hundreds of millions of years ago. These outbursts are presumably fueled by matter releasing tremendous

  16. The Chandra Survey of Extragalactic Sources in the 3CR Catalog: X-ray Emission from Nuclei, Jets, and Hotspots in the Chandra Archival Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Massaro, F; Liuzzo, E; Orienti, M; Paladino, R; Paggi, A; Tremblay, G R; Wilkes, B J; Kuraszkiewicz, J; Baum, S A; O'Dea, C P

    2016-01-01

    As part of our program to build a complete radio and X-ray database of all the 3CR extragalactic radio sources, we present an analysis of 93 sources for which Chandra archival data are available. Most of these sources have been already published. Here we provide a uniform re-analysis and present nuclear X-ray fluxes and X-ray emission associated with radio jet knots and hotspots using both publicly available radio images and new radio images that have been constructed from data available in the VLA archive. For about 1/3 of the sources in the selected sample a comparison between the Chandra and the radio observations was not reported in the literature: we find X-ray detections of 2 new radio jet knots and 17 hotspots. We also report the X-ray detection of extended emission from the intergalactic medium of 15 galaxy clusters, two of which were most likely unknown previously.

  17. THE CHANDRA SURVEY OF EXTRAGALACTIC SOURCES IN THE 3CR CATALOG: X-RAY EMISSION FROM NUCLEI, JETS, AND HOTSPOTS IN THE CHANDRA ARCHIVAL OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaro, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Torino, via Pietro Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Harris, D. E.; Paggi, A.; Wilkes, B. J.; Kuraszkiewicz, J. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Liuzzo, E.; Orienti, M.; Paladino, R. [Istituto di Radioastronomia, INAF, via Gobetti 101, I-40129, Bologna (Italy); Tremblay, G. R. [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Physics Department, Yale University, P.O. Box 208120, New Haven, CT 06520-8120 (United States); Baum, S. A.; O’Dea, C. P. [University of Manitoba, Dept of Physics and Astronomy, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    As part of our program to build a complete radio and X-ray database of all Third Cambridge catalog extragalactic radio sources, we present an analysis of 93 sources for which Chandra archival data are available. Most of these sources have already been published. Here we provide a uniform re-analysis and present nuclear X-ray fluxes and X-ray emission associated with radio jet knots and hotspots using both publicly available radio images and new radio images that have been constructed from data available in the Very Large Array archive. For about 1/3 of the sources in the selected sample, a comparison between the Chandra and radio observations was not reported in the literature: we find X-ray detections of 2 new radio jet knots and 17 hotspots. We also report the X-ray detection of extended emission from the intergalactic medium for 15 galaxy clusters.

  18. In vitro antifungal and cytotoxicity activities of selected Tanzanian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vitro antifungal and cytotoxicity activities of selected Tanzanian medicinal plants. ... the antifungal and cytotoxic activities of four medicinal plants from Tanzania, ... exhibited antifungal activity against test fungal strains with MIC range of 0.78 ...

  19. Laser Induced Selective Activation For Subsequent Autocatalytic Electroless Plating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yang

    The subject of this PhD thesis is “Laser induced selective activation for subsequent autocatalytic electroless plating.” The objective of the project is to investigate the process chains for micro structuring of polymer surfaces for selective micro metallization. Laser induced selective activation...

  20. ASA's Chandra Neon Discovery Solves Solar Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory survey of nearby sun-like stars suggests there is nearly three times more neon in the sun and local universe than previously believed. If true, this would solve a critical problem with understanding how the sun works. "We use the sun to test how well we understand stars and, to some extent, the rest of the universe," said Jeremy Drake of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. "But in order to understand the sun, we need to know exactly what it is made of," he added. It is not well known how much neon the sun contains. This is critical information for creating theoretical models of the sun. Neon atoms, along with carbon, oxygen and nitrogen, play an important role in how quickly energy flows from nuclear reactions in the sun's core to its edge, where it then radiates into space. Chandra X-ray Spectrum of II Pegasi Chandra X-ray Spectrum of II Pegasi The rate of this energy flow determines the location and size of a crucial stellar region called the convection zone. The zone extends from near the sun's surface inward approximately 125,000 miles. The zone is where the gas undergoes a rolling, convective motion much like the unstable air in a thunderstorm. "This turbulent gas has an extremely important job, because nearly all of the energy emitted at the surface of the sun is transported there by convection," Drake said. The accepted amount of neon in the sun has led to a paradox. The predicted location and size of the solar convection zone disagree with those deduced from solar oscillations. Solar oscillations is a technique astronomers previously relied on to probe the sun's interior. Several scientists have noted the problem could be fixed if the abundance of neon is in fact about three times larger than currently accepted. Attempts to measure the precise amount of neon in the Sun have been frustrated by a quirk of nature; neon atoms in the Sun give off no signatures in visible light. However, in a gas

  1. X-ray observations of dust obscured galaxies in the Chandra Deep Field South

    CERN Document Server

    Corral, A; Comastri, A; Ranalli, P; Akylas, A; Salvato, M; Lanzuisi, G; Vignali, C; Koutoulidis, L

    2016-01-01

    We present the properties of X-ray detected dust obscured galaxies (DOGs) in the Chandra Deep Field South. In recent years, it has been proposed that a significant percentage of the elusive Compton-thick (CT) active galactic nuclei (AGN) could be hidden among DOGs. In a previous work, we presented the properties of X-ray detected DOGs by making use of the deepest X-ray observations available at that time, the 2Ms observations of the Chandra deep fields. In that work, we only found a moderate percentage ($<$ 50%) of CT AGN among the DOGs sample, but we were limited by poor photon statistics. In this paper, we use not only a deeper 6 Ms Chandra survey of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S), but combine these data with the 3 Ms XMM-Newton survey of the CDF-S. We also take advantage of the great coverage of the CDF-S region from the UV to the far-IR to fit the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of our sources. Out of the 14 AGN composing our sample, 9 are highly absorbed (but only 3 could be CT AGN), wherea...

  2. The BMW-Chandra Serendipitous Source Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, P.; Campana, S.; Mignani, R. P.; Moretti, A.; Mottini, M.; Panzera, M. R.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2004-08-01

    We present the BMW-Chandra source catalog drawn from all Chandra ACIS-I pointed observations with an exposure time in excess of 10 ks public as of March 2003 (136 observations). Using the wavelet detection algorithm developed by Lazzati et al. (1999) and Campana et al. (1999), which can characterize point-like as well as extended sources, we identified 21325 sources. Among them, 16758 are serendipitous, i.e. not associated with the targets of the pointings, and do not require a non-automated analysis. This makes our catalog the largest compilation of Chandra sources to date. The 0.5--10 keV absorption corrected fluxes of these sources range from ˜ 3× 10-16 to 9×10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 with a median of 7× 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. The catalog consists of count rates and relative errors in three energy bands (total, 0.5--7 keV; soft, 0.5--2 keV; and hard band, 2--7 keV), and source positions relative to the highest signal-to-noise detection among the three bands. The wavelet algorithm also provides an estimate of the extension of the source which we refined with a σ -clipping method. We report on the main properties of the sources in our catalog, such as sky coverage ( ˜ 8 deg2 at a limiting flux of ˜ 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1) and cosmological log N--log S for a subset at high Galactic latitude (∣ b ∣ > 20o) for a flux as low as ˜ 1.5 × 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. Support for this work was provided by the Italian MIUR.

  3. Chandra Observations of Embedded Young Stellar Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Koyama, K

    2001-01-01

    This paper reviews the Chandra deep exposure observations of star forming regions, rho-Ophiuchi, Orion Molecular Clouds 2 and 3, Sagittarius B2 and Monoceros R2. The results are; (1) class I protostars are found to exhibit higher temperature plasma than those of T Tauri stars, (2) heavily absorbed X-rays are discovered from the candidates of class 0 protostars, (3) hard and highly variable X-rays are observed from high-mass young stars, and (4) young brown dwarfs emit X-rays similar to those of low-mass young stars.

  4. Chandra Associates Pulsar and Historic Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    SAN DIEGO -- Scientists using NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory have found new evidence that a pulsar in the constellation of Sagittarius was created when a massive star exploded, witnessed by Chinese astronomers in the year 386 AD. If confirmed, this will be only the second pulsar to be clearly associated with a historic event. These results were presented today by Victoria Kaspi and Mallory Roberts of McGill University at the American Astronomical Society meeting. Also participating in the research were Gautum Vasisht from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Eric Gotthelf from Columbia University, Michael Pivovaroff from Therma-Wave, Inc., and Nobuyuki Kawai from the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Japan. The scientists used Chandra to locate the pulsar exactly at the geometric center of the supernova remnant known as G11.2-0.3. This location provides very strong evidence that the pulsar, a neutron star that is rotating 14 times a second, was formed in the supernova of 386 AD, and therefore has an age of 1615 years. "Determining the true ages of astronomical objects is notoriously difficult, and for this reason, historical records of supernovas are of great importance,"said Kaspi."In roughly the past 2,000 years, fewer than 10 reports of probable supernovae have been archived mostly by Asian astronomers. Of those handful, the remnant of 1054 AD, the Crab Nebula, was until now the only pulsar whose birth could be associated with a historic event - and, hence, the only neutron star that has a firm age." Between mid-April and mid-May in the year 386 AD, a young "guest star", presumably a supernova, was recorded by Chinese observers in the direction of the sky now known as the constellation of Sagittarius. In the 1970s, radio astronomers discovered an expanding nebula of gas and high-energy particles, called G11.2-0.3, that is believed to be the remnant of that explosion. In 1997, a team of X-ray astronomers used Japan’s ASCA satellite to discover a pulsar

  5. Chandra Looks Over a Cosmic Four-Leaf Clover

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-01

    . Cloverleaf Quasar Hubble Optical Image of the Cloverleaf quasar If a single star or a multiple star system in one of the foreground galaxies passed in front of the light path for the brightest image, then that image would be selectively magnified. The X-rays would be magnified much more than the visible light, if they came from a smaller region around the black hole than the visible light. The enhancement of the X-rays from iron ions would be due to this same effect. The analysis indicates that the X-rays are coming from a very small region, about the size of the solar system, around the supermassive black hole. The visible light is coming from a region ten or more times larger. The angular size of these regions at a distance of 11 billion light years is tens of thousands times smaller than the smallest region that can be resolved by the Hubble Space Telescope. Illustration of Wind from Accretion Disk Around a Black Hole Illustration of Wind from Accretion Disk Around a Black Hole "The significance of the detection of microlensed X-rays from the Cloverleaf quasar lies in the extremely small region that is enhanced by the microlens," said Chartas. "This gives us the ability to make strong tests of models for the flow of gas around a supermassive black hole." Other team members include Michael Eracleous (Penn State), Eric Agol (University of Washington), and Sarah Gallagher (UCLA). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington. Northrop Grumman of Redondo Beach, Calif., formerly TRW, Inc., was the prime development contractor for the observatory. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations from the Chandra X-ray Center in Cambridge, Mass. Additional information and images are available at: http://chandra.harvard.edu and http://chandra.nasa.gov

  6. Selective Activation and Disengagement of Moral Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, Albert

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes psychological mechanisms by which moral control is selectively disengaged from inhumane conduct in ordinary and unusual circumstances. Explores the symptoms of moral exclusion as described in the literature. Presents categories that unify theory on moral exclusion and contribute practical classifications for use in empirical studies. (JS)

  7. The 2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-North Survey and the 250 ks Extended Chandra Deep Field-South Survey: Improved Point-Source Catalogs

    CERN Document Server

    Xue, Y Q; Brandt, W N; Alexander, D M; Bauer, F E; Lehmer, B D; Yang, G

    2016-01-01

    We present improved point-source catalogs for the 2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-North (CDF-N) and the 250 ks Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (E-CDF-S), implementing a number of recent improvements in Chandra source-cataloging methodology. For the CDF-N/E-CDF-S, we provide a main catalog that contains 683/1003 X-ray sources detected with wavdetect at a false-positive probability threshold of $10^{-5}$ that also satisfy a binomial-probability source-selection criterion of $P<0.004$/$P<0.002$. Such an approach maximizes the number of reliable sources detected: a total of 196/275 main-catalog sources are new compared to the Alexander et al. (2003) CDF-N/Lehmer et al. (2005) E-CDF-S main catalogs. We also provide CDF-N/E-CDF-S supplementary catalogs that consist of 72/56 sources detected at the same wavdetect threshold and having $P$ of $0.004-0.1$/$0.002-0.1$ and $K_s\\le22.9/K_s\\le22.3$ mag counterparts. For all $\\approx1800$ CDF-N and E-CDF-S sources, including the $\\approx500$ newly detected ones (these being...

  8. Cytotoxic Activity of Selected Nigerian Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Sowemimo, A; Venter, M.; Baatjies, L; Koekemoer, T

    2009-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most prominent human diseases which has stimulated scientific and commercial interest in the discovery of new anticancer agents from natural sources. The current study investigates the cytotoxic activity of ethanolic extracts of sixteen Nigerian plants used locally for the treatment of cancer using the MTT assay on the HeLa cell line. Sapium ellipticum leaves showed activity comparable to the reference compound Cisplatin and greater cytotoxic activity than Combretum panic...

  9. The Quality and Stability of Chandra Telescope Spacial Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ping

    2017-08-01

    Chandra X-ray Observatory revolutionized the X-ray astronomy as being the first, and so far the only, X-ray telescope achieving sub-arcsecond spacial resolution. Chandra is comprised of three principal elements: the High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA), Pointing Control and Aspect Determination (PCAD) system, and the Science Instrument Module (SIM), which is where the X-ray detectors mounted and is connected to the HRMA by a 10-meter long Optical Bench Assembly. To achieve and retain the unprecedented imaging quality, it is critical that these three principal elements to stay rigid and stable for the entire life time of the Chandra operation. I will review the issues of telescope pointing stability, optical Axis, aimpoint and their impacts to the Chandra operation, and evaluate the integrity and stability of the telescope. I will show images taken from all four detectors since launch to demonstrate the quality and stability of the Chandra spacial resolution.

  10. X-ray Mass Profiles from Chandra Galaxy Atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paggi, Alessandro; Kim, Dong-Woo; Anderson, Craig; Burke, Douglas J.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Fruscione, Antonella; Lauer, Jennifer L.; McCollough, Michael L.; Morgan, Douglas; Mossman, Amy; O'Sullivan, Ewan; Trinchieri, Ginevra

    2016-04-01

    We present preliminary results of a Chandra/XMM-Newton joint analysis on a sample of three Early Type Galaxies (ETGs, namely NGC4649, NGC4636 and NGC5846). X-ray observations of the hot ISM is used to measure the total enclosed mass assuming hydrostatic equilibrium, and compasion with mass distributions obtained through optical kinematics data of globular clusters and planetary nebulae yields informations about disturbances in the ISM distribution due to nuclear activity, merging history, etc. Our analysis makes use of the Chandra Galaxy Atlas (CGA) data products - exploiting the unmatched spatial resolution of the ACIS detectors to reveal fine ISM features and disturbances in the inner galactic regions - and XMM-Newton data - relying on the large field of view of EPIC detector to extend the mass profiles to larger radii. We then measured the mass profiles in various pie sectors to separate different gas features (e.g., discontinuity and extended tail) and compared them with GCs/PNe based mass profiles. The X-ray mass profiles of NGC4649 show a generally relaxed morphology and, in agreement with previous analysis, the comparison with the optical mass profiles shows a significant deviations on parsec scale likely due to non-thermal pressure linked to nuclear activity. In significantly disturbed cases (NGC4648 and NGC5846) where we found discontinuities and extended tails, we found that the mass profiles are over-estimated toward the compressed discontinuity and under-estimated toward the extended tails, similar to inflow and outflow cases. These preliminary results are promising toward an extended analysis of the whole CGA sample in order to study the distribution of gas temperature and metal abundances in the ISM, and to investigate scaling relations between ETG global quantities like ISM temperature, luminosity and total mass.

  11. X-raying Galaxies: A Chandra Legacy

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Q Daniel

    2010-01-01

    This presentation reviews Chandra's major contribution to the understanding of nearby galaxies. After a brief summary on significant advances in characterizing various types of discrete X-ray sources, the presentation focuses on the global hot gas in and around galaxies, especially normal ones like our own. The hot gas is a product of stellar and AGN feedback -- the least understood part in theories of galaxy formation and evolution. Chandra observations have led to the first characterization of the spatial, thermal, chemical, and kinetic properties of the gas in our Galaxy. The gas is concentrated around the Galactic bulge and disk on scales of a few kpc. The column density of chemically-enriched hot gas on larger scales is at least an order magnitude smaller, indicating that it may not account for the bulk of the missing baryon matter predicted for the Galactic halo according to the standard cosmology. Similar results have also been obtained for other nearby galaxies. The X-ray emission from hot gas is well...

  12. Chandra Observations of SNR RCW 103

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, Kari A; Park, Sangwook

    2015-01-01

    We analyze three Chandra observations, with a combined exposure time of 99 ks, of the Galactic supernova remnant RCW 103, a young supernova remnant, previously with no clear detection of metal-rich ejecta. Based on our imaging and spectral analyses of these deep Chandra data, we find evidence for metal-rich ejecta emission scattered throughout the remnant. X-ray emission from the shocked ejecta is generally weak, and the shocked circumstellar medium (CSM) is a largely dominant component across the entire remnant. The CSM component shows abundances of ~0.5 solar, while Ne, Mg, Si, S, and Fe abundances of the ejecta are up to a few times solar. Comparison of these ejecta abundances with yields from supernova nucleosynthesis models suggests, together with the existence of a central neutron star, a progenitor mass of ~18-20 M$_\\odot$, though the Fe/Si ratios are larger than predicted. The shocked CSM emission suggests a progenitor with high mass-loss rate and subsolar metallicity.

  13. Stellar Forensics with Striking Image from Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    A spectacular new image shows how complex a star's afterlife can be. By studying the details of this image made from a long observation by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers can better understand how some stars die and disperse elements like oxygen into the next generation of stars and planets. At a distance of about 20,000 light years, G292.0+1.8 is one of only three supernova remnants in the Milky Way known to contain large amounts of oxygen. The image shows a rapidly expanding, intricately structured, debris field that contains, along with oxygen, other elements such as neon and silicon that were forged in the star before it exploded. Hard X-ray Image of G292.0+1.8 Hard X-ray Image of G292.0+1.8 "We are finding that, just like snowflakes, each supernova remnant is complicated and beautiful in its own way," said Sangwook Park of Penn State who led the work, released in conjunction with the "8 Years of Chandra" symposium in Huntsville, Ala. The new, deep Chandra image - equaling nearly 6 days worth of observing time - shows an incredibly complex structure. Understanding the details of G292.0+1.8 is especially important because astronomers have considered it to be a "textbook" case of a supernova created by the death of a massive star. Chandra X-ray Image of G292.0+1.8 Chandra X-ray Image of G292.0+1.8 By mapping the distribution of X-rays in different energy bands, the Chandra image traces the distribution of chemical elements ejected in the supernova. The results imply that the explosion was not symmetrical. For example, blue (silicon and sulfur) and green (magnesium) are seen strongly in the upper right, while yellow and orange (oxygen) dominate the lower left. These elements light up at different temperatures, indicating that the temperature is higher in the upper right portion of G292.0+1.8. Slightly below and to the left of the center of G292.0+1.8 is a pulsar, a dense, rapidly rotating neutron star that remained behind after the original star

  14. Antibacterial activity of selected Egyptian ethnomedicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashait, M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Medicinal plants have recently received the attention of the antimicrobial activity of plants and their metabolites due to the challenge of growing incidences of drug-resistant pathogens. The aims of this study were to determine the antibacterial activities of plant extracts used as ethnomedicinal in Egypt. Methodology and Results: Investigations were carried out to assess the antibacterial efficiency of 11 plant extracts used as ethnopharmacological among Egyptian native people against infectious diseases. Crude methanol, ethanol,chloroform, hexane, acetone and aqueous extract of plants were tested for antibacterial activity in vitro against ten bacterial isolates using the disc diffusion method test. Discs were impregnated with 2 mg/mL of different solvent extracts. Among all the crude extracts, the methanol extract showed the highest activity than other extracts. P. harmala and S. officinalis exhibited highest antibacterial activity against gram positive and negative bacteria while the remainingplants extracts showed less activity. All the plant extracts showed no significant effect against the Bordetella bronchisepta ATCC 4617 except the extracts of M. fragrans and L. sativum. E. coli is the most sensitive microorganism tested, with the lowest MIC value (0.5 mg/mL in the presence of the plant extract of P. harmala and S. officinalis.Conclusion, significance and impact of study: Results obtained herein, may suggest that the ethnomedicinal Egyptian plants possess antimicrobial activity and therefore, they can be used in biotechnological fields as natural preservative ingredients in food and/or pharmaceutical industry.

  15. The MOJAVE Chandra Sample: A Correlation Study of Blazars and Radio Galaxies in X-ray and Radio Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Brandon Scott

    2011-05-01

    The Chandra X-ray observatory has increased the quality and number of detections the X-ray regime since its launch in 1999. It is an important tool for studying the jets which are associated with Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and their possible emission mechanisms. The MOJAVE Chandra Sample (MCS) is a sample of 27 AGN which have been selected from the radio flux-limited MOJAVE (Monitoring of Jets in AGN with VLBA Experiments) sample. The objects contained in the MOJAVE sample are traditionally associated with relativistically beamed jets that have small viewing angles. The MCS was created to study the correlation of X-ray and radio emission on kiloparsec scales. The complete sample is made up of all MOJAVE Fanaroff & Riley type II objects which have over 100 mJy of extended radio emission at 1.4 GHz and a radio structure of at least 3" in extent. Chandra observations have revealed X-ray and radio correlation in 21 of the 27 jets, bringing the detection rate to ˜78%. The selection criteria provides a quantitative method of discovering new X-ray jets associated with AGN from radio observations. The X-ray morphologies are usually well correlated with the radio emission, except for the sources which show extreme bending on the kiloparsec scale. The emission mechanism for these relativistically beamed quasars and radio galaxies can be interpreted as inverse Compton scattering off of the cosmic microwave background by the electrons in the jets (IC/CMB). The emission mechanism is reinforced by spectral energy distributions (SED) which model the emission mechanisms for sources with sufficient X-ray, optical, and radio data available. I have explored the effects of jet bending and jet deceleration in conjunction with the inverse Compton emission model and used different scenarios to derive best fit viewing angles and bulk Lorentz factors, which were calculated by using the superluminal speeds along with parameters that were derived from the IC/CMB model. The range of

  16. Antibacterial activity of selected glass ionomer cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Łuczaj-Cepowicz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of the paper was to determine the antibacterial activity of four glass ionomer cements against bacteria of the genera Streptococcus and Lactobacillus.Material and methods: Four capsulated glass ionomer cements were applied in the study: Fuji Triage (GC, Fuji IX (GC, Ketac Molar (3M Espe and Ketac Silver (3M Espe. Four standard bacterial strains were used to assess the antibacterial activity of the studied cements: Streptococcus mutans, S. sanguis, S. salivarius and Lactobacillus casei. The antibacterial activity was determined by the agar diffusion method. The bacterial suspension was spread with a cotton swab on TSA plates. For each material six wells (7 mm diameter, 5 mm deep were made with a cork borer. Each well was then filled with freshly prepared cements. The results were obtained by measuring the bacterial growth inhibition zone after 1, 2, 3 and 7 days. Results: Fuji Triage cement inhibited the growth of all bacterial strains. Fuji IX cement demonstrated the most potent antibacterial activity against S. sanguis. Ketac Molar showed antibacterial activity against S. sanguis and S. salivarius, whereas Ketac Silver was efficient against S. mutans as well. Neither of the Ketac cements inhibited growth of the standard L. casei strain. Discussion: Antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements has attracted the interest of scientists in recent years. Most authors, including us, carried out experiments using the agar diffusion method and demonstrated antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements. Different antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements, observed in our study and studies of other authors, depended on the evaluated cement, bacterial strain and period of evaluation.

  17. Antibacterial activity of selected glass ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczaj-Cepowicz, Elżbieta; Marczuk-Kolada, Grażyna; Zalewska, Anna; Pawińska, Małgorzata; Leszczyńska, Katarzyna

    2014-01-22

    The aim of the paper was to determine the antibacterial activity of four glass ionomer cements against bacteria of the genera Streptococcus and Lactobacillus. Four capsulated glass ionomer cements were applied in the study: Fuji Triage (GC), Fuji IX (GC), Ketac Molar (3M Espe) and Ketac Silver (3M Espe). Four standard bacterial strains were used to assess the antibacterial activity of the studied cements: Streptococcus mutans, S. sanguis, S. salivarius and Lactobacillus casei. The antibacterial activity was determined by the agar diffusion method. The bacterial suspension was spread with a cotton swab on TSA plates. For each material six wells (7 mm diameter, 5 mm deep) were made with a cork borer. Each well was then filled with freshly prepared cements. The results were obtained by measuring the bacterial growth inhibition zone after 1, 2, 3 and 7 days. Fuji Triage cement inhibited the growth of all bacterial strains. Fuji IX cement demonstrated the most potent antibacterial activity against S. sanguis. Ketac Molar showed antibacterial activity against S. sanguis and S. salivarius, whereas Ketac Silver was efficient against S. mutans as well. Neither of the Ketac cements inhibited growth of the standard L. casei strain. Antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements has attracted the interest of scientists in recent years. Most authors, including us, carried out experiments using the agar diffusion method and demonstrated antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements. Different antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements, observed in our study and studies of other authors, depended on the evaluated cement, bacterial strain and period of evaluation.

  18. Chandra Detects Halo Of Hot Gas Around Milky Way-Like Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    the galaxy's disk. These data clearly show the hot gas is heated by clusters of massive stars and is now expanding into the halo of the galaxy. NGC 4631 X-ray: NASA/CXC/UMass/D.Wang et al. UV: NASA/GSFC/UIT "What we see in NGC 4631 can be thought of as the bursting flames of a gigantic cosmic camp fire," said Wang. "Using Chandra and Hubble together, we really get a complete story of what is happening in this galaxy." NGC 4631 is a galaxy that has high amounts of star formation, possibly triggered by interaction with neighboring galaxies. Such star formation might have created the conditions necessary to heat the gas seen by Chandra, as vast amounts of energy are released from supernovas and massive stars in star-forming regions - enough to lift the gas out of the plane of the galaxy. These new results provide important clues about the cycling of energy and mass in a galaxy like our own Milky Way and about the evolutionary history of galaxies, which are thought to be more active in star formation in the past than at the present. Other members of the research team include: Stefan Immler, University of Massachusetts; Rene Walterbos, New Mexico State University; James Lauroesch, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, and Dieter Breitschwerdt, Max Plank Institute, Germany. Chandra observed NGC 4631 with its Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) instrument, which was developed for NASA by Pennsylvania State University, University Park, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL, manages the Chandra program, and TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, CA, is the prime contractor for the spacecraft. The Smithsonian's Chandra X-ray Center controls science and flight operations from Cambridge, MA.

  19. Automated classification of Chandra X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehm, Derek; Kargaltsev, O.; Rangelov, B.; Volkov, I.; Pavlov, G. G.

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of the latest generation X-ray telescopes there has been a major influx of data associated with the detection of hundreds of thousands X-ray sources. As one can rarely tell a source type from its X-ray properties alone, the full potential of the X-ray catalogs can only be unlocked by correlating multiwavelength (MW) properties via cross-identification with other surveys. However, one would spend an enormous amount of time classifying these objects by their physical nature if the classification was to be done on a source-by-source basis by humans. Therefore, we are using a supervised learning algorithm to classify sources detected by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The classifications are based on a training dataset which currently includes about 7,000 X-ray sources of known nature (main sequence stars, Wolf-Rayet stars, young stars, active galactic nuclei, low mass X-ray binaries, high mass x-ray binaries, and neutron stars). For each source, the training dataset includes up to 24 multiwavelength properties. The efficiency and accuracy of the classification is verified by dividing the training dataset in two and performing cross-validation. The results are also inspected by plotting source properties in 2D slices of the parameter space. As an application of our automated procedure we classified unidentified sources in the supernova remnant (SNR) G352.7-0.1, in the field of HESS J1809-193, and in part of the Chandra Source Catalog 1.0. We present the results of the verification tests and the classification results. This research was partially supported by NASA/SAO grant AR3-14017X.

  20. Activation of Selected Core Muscles during Pressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W. Nesser

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Unstable surface training is often used to activate core musculature during resistance training. Unfortunately, unstable surface training is risky and leads to detraining. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine core muscle activation during stable surface ground-based lifts. Methods: Fourteen recreational trained and former NCAA DI athletes (weight 84.2 ± 13.3 kg; height 176.0 ± 9.5 cm; age 20.9 ± 2.0 years volunteered for participation. Subjects completed two ground-based lifts: overhead press and push-press. Surface EMG was recorded from 4 muscles on the right side of the body (Rectus Abdominus (RA, External Oblique (EO, Transverse Abdominus (TA, and Erector Spinae (ES. Results: Paired sample T-tests identified significant muscle activation differences between the overhead press and the push-press included ES and EO. Average and peak EMG for ES was significantly greater in push-press (P<0.01. Anterior displacement of COP was significantly greater in push-press compared to overhead press during the eccentric phase. Conclusion: The push-press was identified as superior in core muscle activation when compared to the overhead pressing exercise. Keywords: torso, stability, weight lifting, resistance training

  1. Chandra Resolves Cosmic X-ray Glow and Finds Mysterious New Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    -energy X-ray background, showing that it arose in very faraway galaxies with extremely bright cores, called quasars or Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). The Chandra team sampled a region of the sky about one-fifth the angular area of a full moon and resolved about 80 percent of the more-energetic X-ray background into discrete sources. Stretched across the entire sky, this would account for approximately 70 million sources, most of which would be identified with galaxies. Their analysis confirms that a significant fraction of the X-ray background cannot be due to diffuse radiation from hot, intergalactic gas. Combined X-ray and optical observations showed that nearly one third of the sources are galaxies whose cores are very bright in X rays yet emit virtually no optical light from the core. The observation suggests that these "veiled galactic nuclei" galaxies may number in the tens of millions over the whole sky. They almost certainly harbor a massive black hole at their core that produces X rays as the gas is pulled toward it at nearly the speed of light. Their bright X-ray cores place these galaxies in the AGN family. Because these numerous AGN are bright in X rays, but optically dim, the Chandra observation implies that optical surveys of AGN are very incomplete. A second new class of objects, comprising approximately one-third of the background, is assumed to be "ultra-faint galaxies." Mushotzky said that these sources may emit little or no optical light, either because the dust around the galaxy blocks the light totally or because the optical light is eventually absorbed by relatively cool gas during its long journey across the universe. In the latter scenario, Mushotzky said that these sources would have a redshift of 6 or higher, meaning that they are well over 14 billion light years away and thus the earliest, most distant objects ever identified. "This is a very exciting discovery," said Dr. Alan Bunner, Director of NASA's Structure and Evolution of the universe

  2. X-Ray bright active galactic nuclei in massive galaxy clusters - II. The fraction of galaxies hosting active nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehlert, S.; von der Linden, A.; Allen, S. W.

    2013-01-01

    We present a measurement of the fraction of cluster galaxies hosting X-ray bright active galactic nuclei (AGN) as a function of clustercentric distance scaled in units of r500. Our analysis employs high-quality Chandra X-ray and Subaru optical imaging for 42 massive X-ray-selected galaxy cluster...

  3. Chandra's View of Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This Chandra image reveals, in detail, the turbulent debris created by a supernova explosion that was observed by the Danish Astronomer Tycho Brahe in the year 1572. The colors show different x-ray energies, with red, green, and blue representing low, medium, and high energies, respectively. Most likely caused by the destruction of a white dwarf star, a shock wave produced by the expanding debris is outlined by the sharp blue circular arcs of 20 million degree Celsius gas seen on the outer rim. The stellar debris, visible only by x-ray, has a temperature of about 10 million degrees, and shows up as mottled yellow, green, and red fingers of gas.

  4. Chandra data archive operations: lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollough, Michael L.; Rots, Arnold H.; Winkelman, Sherry L.

    2006-06-01

    We present a discussion of the lessons learned from establishing and operating the Chandra Data Archive (CDA). We offer an overview of the archive, what preparations were done before launch, the transition to operations, actual operations, and some of the unexpected developments that had to be addressed in running the archive. From this experience we highlight some of the important issues that need to be addressed in the creation and running of an archive for a major project. Among these are the importance of data format standards; the integration of the archive with the rest of the mission; requirements throughout all phases of the mission; operational requirements; what to expect at launch; the user interfaces; how to anticipate new tasks; and overall importance of team management and organization.

  5. An Archival Chandra and XMM-Newton Survey of Type 2 Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jianjun; Ptak, Andrew Francis; Heckman, Timothy; Zakamska, Nadia L.

    2013-01-01

    In order to investigate obscuration in high-luminosity type 2 active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we analyzed Chandra and XMM-Newton archival observations for 71 type 2 quasars detected at 0.05 100 eV in the rest frame) and we detect this line in the other sources through a joint fit (spectral stacking). The correlation between the Fe K alpha and [O III] fluxes and the inverse correlation of the equivalent width of the Fe Ka line with the ratio of hard X-ray and [O III] fluxes is consistent with previous results for lower luminosity Seyfert 2 galaxies. We conclude that obscuration is the cause of the weak hard X-ray emission rather than intrinsically low X-ray luminosities. We find that about half of the population of optically selected type 2 quasars are likely to be Compton thick. We also find no evidence that the amount of X-ray obscuration depends on the AGN luminosity (over a range of more than three orders of magnitude in luminosity).

  6. The BMW-Chandra Serendipitous Source Catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, P.; Campana, S.; Mignani, R. P.; Moretti, A.; Panzera, M. R.; Tagliaferri, G.

    We present the BMW-Chandra Source Catalogue drawn from all Chandra ACIS-I pointed observations with an exposure time in excess of 10 ks public as of March 2003 (136 observations). Using the wavelet detection algorithm developed by \\citep{Lazzatiea99} and \\citep{Campanaea99}, which can characterize point-like as well as extended sources, we identified 21325 sources which were visually inspected and verified. Among them, 16758 are not associated with the targets of the pointings and are considered certain; they have a 0.5-10 keV absorption corrected flux distribution median of ˜ 7 × 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. The catalogue consists of source positions, count rates, extensions and relative errors in three energy bands (total, 0.5-7 keV; soft, 0.5-2 keV; and hard band, 2-7 keV), as well as the additional information drawn from the headers of the original files. We also extracted source counts in four additional energy bands, (0.5-1.0 keV, 1.0-2.0 keV, 2.0-4.0 keV and 4.0-7.0 keV). We compute the sky coverage in the soft and hard bands. The complete catalogue provides a sky coverage in the soft band (0.5-2 keV, S/N =3) of ˜ 8 deg2 at a limiting flux of ˜ 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1, and ˜ 2 deg2 at a limiting flux of ˜ 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. http://www.merate.mi.astro.it/~xanadu/BMC/bmc_home.html

  7. AEGIS: Chandra Observation of DEEP2 Galaxy Groups and Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, T; Davis, D; Newman, J; Davis, M; Nandra, K; Laird, E; Koo, D; Coil, A; Cooper, M; Croton, D; Yan, R

    2006-01-01

    We present a 200 ksec Chandra observation of seven spectroscopically selected, high redshift (0.75 < z < 1.03) galaxy groups and clusters discovered by the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey in the Extended Groth Strip (EGS). X-ray emission at the locations of these systems is consistent with background. The 3-sigma upper limits on the bolometric X-ray luminosities (L_X) of these systems put a strong constraint on the relation between L_X and the velocity dispersion of member galaxies sigma_gal at z~1; the DEEP2 systems have lower luminosity than would be predicted by the local relation. Our result is consistent with recent findings that at high redshift, optically selected clusters tend to be X-ray underluminous. A comparison with mock catalogs indicates that it is unlikely that this effect is entirely caused by a measurement bias between sigma_gal and the dark matter velocity dispersion. Physically, the DEEP2 systems may still be in the process of forming and hence not fully virialized, or they may be defic...

  8. Locomotor activity in Drosophila melanogaster selected for different wing lengths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noach, EJK; De Jong, G; Scharloo, W

    1998-01-01

    Locomotor activity and its plasticity were investigated in Drosophila melanogaster lines selected for Long and for Short wings at two different temperatures. Flies were tested in a locometer at two different Activity temperatures. Locomotor activity, a physiological character, showed phenotypic plas

  9. Silica dust exposures during selected construction activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Mary Ellen; Seixas, Noah; Majar, Maria; Camp, Janice; Morgan, Michael

    2003-01-01

    This study characterized exposure for dust-producing construction tasks. Eight common construction tasks were evaluated for quartz and respirable dust exposure by collecting 113 personal task period samples for cleanup; demolition with handheld tools; concrete cutting; concrete mixing; tuck-point grinding; surface grinding; sacking and patching concrete; and concrete floor sanding using both time-integrating filter samples and direct-reading respirable dust monitors. The geometric mean quartz concentration was 0.10 mg/m(3) (geometric standard deviation [GSD]=4.88) for all run time samples, with 71% exceeding the threshold limit value. Activities with the highest exposures were surface grinding, tuck-point grinding, and concrete demolition (GM[GSD] of 0.63[4.12], 0.22[1.94], and 0.10[2.60], respectively). Factors recorded each minute were task, tool, work area, respiratory protection and controls used, estimated cross draft, and whether anyone nearby was making dust. Factors important to exposure included tool used, work area configuration, controls employed, cross draft, and in some cases nearby dust. More protective respirators were employed as quartz concentration increased, although respiratory protection was found to be inadequate for 42% of exposures. Controls were employed for only 12% of samples. Exposures were reduced with three controls: box fan for surface grinding and floor sanding, and vacuum/shroud for surface grinding, with reductions of 57, 50, and 71%, respectively. Exposures were higher for sweeping compound, box fan for cleanup, ducted fan dilution, and wetted substrate. Construction masons and laborers are frequently overexposed to silica. The usual protection method, respirators, was not always adequate, and engineering control use was infrequent and often ineffective.

  10. Compressive Sleeping Wireless Sensor Networks With Active Node Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Wei; Wassell, Ian J.

    2014-01-01

    This is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from IEEE via http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/GLOCOM.2014.7036776 In this paper, we propose an active node selection framework for compressive sleeping wireless sensor networks (WSNs) in order to improve the signal acquisition performance and network lifetime. The node selection can be seen as a specialized sensing matrix design problem where the sensing matrix consists of selected rows of an identity matrix. By capitalizing ...

  11. Catalytic Activation of Nitrogen Dioxide for Selective Synthesis of Nitroorganics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-15

    attack of NO2– at a methyl group in the FA9550-11-1-0253: Catalytic Activation of Nitrogen Dioxide for Selective Synthesis of Nitroorganics PI: Seth...They can be installed (generally as their pinacol esters) by efficient iridium -catalyzed undirected aryl C-H activation. They can then be used to...of ipso nitro-deboronation, in reasonable yields. Trichlorotris(pyridine) iridium (III) is the most selective catalyst for this reaction. The reaction

  12. Using ACIS on the Chandra X-ray Observatory as a particle radiation monitor II

    CERN Document Server

    Grant, C E; Bautz, M W; O'Dell, S L

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer is an instrument on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. CCDs are vulnerable to radiation damage, particularly by soft protons in the radiation belts and solar storms. The Chandra team has implemented procedures to protect ACIS during high-radiation events including autonomous protection triggered by an on-board radiation monitor. Elevated temperatures have reduced the effectiveness of the on-board monitor. The ACIS team has developed an algorithm which uses data from the CCDs themselves to detect periods of high radiation and a flight software patch to apply this algorithm is currently active on-board the instrument. In this paper, we explore the ACIS response to particle radiation through comparisons to a number of external measures of the radiation environment. We hope to better understand the efficiency of the algorithm as a function of the flux and spectrum of the particles and the time-profile of the radiation event.

  13. The Parameters Selection of SMA Optically Activated an Its Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhi-min; CHEN Yu-ming; YU Xiao-lei

    2002-01-01

    Shape Memory Alloy ( SMA ) optically activated is the key technology of optical SMA activator.According to the shape memory mechanism of SMA, researches are done on the activating response time and light wavelength of activating source etc of SMA optically activated to approach the parameters selection of optical activation. SMA has the optimum efficiency in the range of 13 seconds to 27 seconds when SMA is illuminated continuously by wavelength of 675um; The power of light wave has a low effect on SMA; The longer the activating wavelength, the quicker the response time of SMA activated. If the proper activating time and activating wavelength are adopted, and the structure deformation of composite material of SMA imbedded may be actively controlled, an ideal effect will be gotten. The research provides an evidence for the design of optical SMA activator and is of great significance to its application. The research on smart structure has a wide application prospect.

  14. SEARCHING FOR BULK MOTIONS IN THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM OF MASSIVE, MERGING CLUSTERS WITH CHANDRA CCD DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ang; Yu, Heng; Tozzi, Paolo; Zhu, Zong-Hong, E-mail: yuheng@bnu.edu.cn, E-mail: zhuzh@bnu.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, 100875 (China)

    2016-04-10

    We search for bulk motions in the intracluster medium (ICM) of massive clusters showing evidence of an ongoing or recent major merger with spatially resolved spectroscopy in Chandra CCD data. We identify a sample of six merging clusters with >150 ks Chandra exposure in the redshift range 0.1 < z < 0.3. By performing X-ray spectral analysis of projected ICM regions selected according to their surface brightness, we obtain the projected redshift maps for all of these clusters. After performing a robust analysis of the statistical and systematic uncertainties in the measured X-ray redshift z{sub X}, we check whether or not the global z{sub X} distribution differs from that expected when the ICM is at rest. We find evidence of significant bulk motions at more than 3σ in A2142 and A115, and less than 2σ in A2034 and A520. Focusing on single regions, we identify significant localized velocity differences in all of the merger clusters. We also perform the same analysis on two relaxed clusters with no signatures of recent mergers, finding no signs of bulk motions, as expected. Our results indicate that deep Chandra CCD data enable us to identify the presence of bulk motions at the level of v{sub BM} > 1000 km s{sup −1} in the ICM of massive merging clusters at 0.1 < z < 0.3. Although the CCD spectral resolution is not sufficient for a detailed analysis of the ICM dynamics, Chandra CCD data constitute a key diagnostic tool complementing X-ray bolometers on board future X-ray missions.

  15. Electrocatalytic Activity and Selectivity - a Density Functional Theory Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karamad, Mohammadreza

    the isolated sites that are active for CO2 reduction and surrounded by inactive elements towards both hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and CO2 reduction to direct the selectivity towards favorable products. In the next step, using this concept we screen for suitable catalysts. Our screening includes viii both......-catalysts towards two appealing electrochemical reactions: 1)electroreduction of CO2 to hydrocarbons and alcohols, and 2) electrochemical production of hydrogen peroxide, i.e. H2O2, from its elements i.e. H2 and O2. The thesis is divided into three parts: In the first part, electro-catalytic activity of different...... site concept to tune the activity and selectivity for oxygen reduction towards H2O2 production. We screen for new catalysts that exhibit both high catalytic activity and selectivity by constructing activity volcano plots for ORR towards water and H2O2. Moreover, the stability of these catalysts...

  16. In Brief: Chandra Observatory marks 10 years in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2009-08-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, originally envisioned as a 5-year mission, was deployed into an elliptical orbit around Earth 10 years ago, on 23 July 1999. The most powerful X-ray telescope yet, Chandra has provided a peak into the high-energy universe and has independently confirmed the existence of dark energy. Martin Weisskopf, Chandra project scientist at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala., said discoveries made possible by the observatory “have made dramatic changes to our understanding of the universe and its constituents.” “The Great Observatories program—of which Chandra is a major part—shows how astronomers need as many tools as possible to tackle the big questions out there,” said Ed Weiler, associate administrator of NASA's Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The Hubble Space Telescope, Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, and Spitzer Space Telescope are NASA's other Great Observatories. For more information, visit http://chandra.harvard.edu/ten/ and http://chandra.nasa.gov.

  17. Chandra counterparts of CANDELS GOODS-S sources

    CERN Document Server

    Cappelluti, N; Fontana, A; Zamorani, G; Amorin, R; Castellano, M; Merlin, E; Santini, P; Elbaz, D; Schreiber, C; Shu, X; Wang, T; Dunlop, J S; Bourne, N; Bruce, V A; Buitrago, F; Michałowski, Michał J; Derriere, S; Ferguson, H C; Faber, S M; Vito, F

    2015-01-01

    Improving the capabilities of detecting faint X-ray sources is fundamental to increase the statistics on faint high-z AGN and star-forming galaxies.We performed a simultaneous Maximum Likelihood PSF fit in the [0.5-2] keV and [2-7] keV energy bands of the 4 Ms {\\em Chandra} Deep Field South (CDFS) data at the position of the 34930 CANDELS H-band selected galaxies. For each detected source we provide X-ray photometry and optical counterpart validation. We validated this technique by means of a raytracing simulation. We detected a total of 698 X-ray point-sources with a likelihood $\\mathcal{L}$$>$4.98 (i.e. $>$2.7$\\sigma$). We show that the prior knowledge of a deep sample of Optical-NIR galaxies leads to a significant increase of the detection of faint (i.e. $\\sim$10$^{-17}$ cgs in the [0.5-2] keV band) sources with respect to "blind" X-ray detections. By including previous catalogs, this work increases the total number of X-ray sources detected in the 4 Ms CDFS, CANDELS area to 793, which represents the large...

  18. Antioxidant activity of various extracts of selected gourd vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Baljeet S; Yadav, Roshanlal; Yadav, Ritika B; Garg, Munish

    2016-04-01

    Study was conducted to evaluate the antioxidative activity of methanolic (ME), ethanolic (EE) and butanolic extracts (BE) of selected gourd vegetables. The antioxidant activity was investigated using different assays namely ferric thiocyanate test (FTC), thiobarbituric acid test (TBA), ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and DPPH free radicals scavenging test. A densitometric HPTLC analysis was performed for the analysis of phenolic acids and flavonoids. Different extracts of the selected gourd vegetables revealed different antioxidant activity. Different extracts of Lagenaria siceraria, Momordica charantia and Luffa cylindrica revealed significantly higher (p siceraria and M. charantia.

  19. Deep Chandra observations of Pictor A

    CERN Document Server

    Hardcastle, M J; Birkinshaw, M; Croston, J H; Goodger, J L; Marshall, H L; Perlman, E S; Siemiginowska, A; Stawarz, L; Worrall, D M

    2015-01-01

    We report on deep Chandra observations of the nearby broad-line radio galaxy Pictor A, which we combine with new Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) observations. The new X-ray data have a factor 4 more exposure than observations previously presented and span a 15-year time baseline, allowing a detailed study of the spatial, temporal and spectral properties of the AGN, jet, hotspot and lobes. We present evidence for further time variation of the jet, though the flare that we reported in previous work remains the most significantly detected time-varying feature. We also confirm previous tentative evidence for a faint counterjet. Based on the radio through X-ray spectrum of the jet and its detailed spatial structure, and on the properties of the counterjet, we argue that inverse-Compton models can be conclusively rejected, and propose that the X-ray emission from the jet is synchrotron emission from particles accelerated in the boundary layer of a relativistic jet. For the first time, we find evidence that...

  20. Chandra observations of Cygnus OB2

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Nicholas J; Drew, Janet E; Vink, Jorick S

    2011-01-01

    Cygnus OB2 is the nearest example of a massive star forming region, containing over 50 O-type stars and hundreds of B-type stars. We have analyzed two Chandra pointings in Cyg OB2, detecting ~1700 X-ray sources, of which ~1450 are thought to be members of the association. Optical and near-IR photometry has been obtained for ~90% of these sources from recent deep Galactic plane surveys. We have performed isochrone fits to the near-IR color-magnitude diagram, deriving ages of 3.5(+0.75,-1.0) and 5.25(+1.5,-1.0) Myrs for sources in the two fields, both with considerable spreads around the pre-MS isochrones. The presence of a second population in the region, somewhat older than the present-day O-type stars, has been suggested by other authors and fits with the ages derived here. The fraction of sources with inner circumstellar disks (as traced by the K-band excess) is found to be very low, but appropriate for a population of age ~5 Myrs. We measure the stellar mass functions and find a power-law slope of Gamma = ...

  1. Chandra X-ray Detection of the Enigmatic Field Star BP Psc

    CERN Document Server

    Kastner, Joel H; Rodriguez, David; Grosso, Nicolas; Zuckerman, B; Perrin, Marshall D; Forveille, Thierry; Graham, James R

    2010-01-01

    BP Psc is a remarkable emission-line field star that is orbited by a dusty disk and drives a parsec-scale system of jets. We report the detection by the Chandra X-ray Observatory of a weak X-ray point source coincident with the centroids of optical/IR and submillimeter continuum emission at BP Psc. As the star's photosphere is obscured throughout the visible and near-infrared, the Chandra X-ray source likely represents the first detection of BP Psc itself. The X-rays most likely originate with magnetic activity at BP Psc and hence can be attributed either to a stellar corona or to star-disk interactions. The log of the ratio of X-ray to bolometric luminosity (log(L_X/L_{bol}) lies in the range -5.8 to -4.2. This is smaller than log(L_X/L_{bol}) ratios typical of low-mass, pre-main sequence stars, but is well within the log(L_X/L_{bol}) range observed for rapidly-rotating (FK Com-type) G giant stars. Hence, the Chandra results favor an exotic model wherein the disk/jet system of BP Psc is the result of its ver...

  2. Selective activation of neuromuscular compartments within the human trapezius muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtermann, A; Roeleveld, K; Mork, P J

    2009-01-01

    was to investigate whether subdivisions within the human trapezius can be independently activated by voluntary command using biofeedback guidance. Bipolar electromyographical electrodes were situated on four subdivisions of the trapezius muscle. The threshold for "active" and "rest" for each subdivision was set...... to >12% and biofeedback from each of the four trapezius subdivisions, 11 of 15 subjects learned selective activation of at least one of the four anatomical subdivisions of the trapezius...

  3. Thinking outside the box: rectilinear shapes selectively activate scene-selective cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Shahin; Echavarria, Cesar E; Tootell, Roger B H

    2014-05-14

    Fifteen years ago, an intriguing area was found in human visual cortex. This area (the parahippocampal place area [PPA]) was initially interpreted as responding selectively to images of places. However, subsequent studies reported that PPA also responds strongly to a much wider range of image categories, including inanimate objects, tools, spatial context, landmarks, objectively large objects, indoor scenes, and/or isolated buildings. Here, we hypothesized that PPA responds selectively to a lower-level stimulus property (rectilinear features), which are common to many of the above higher-order categories. Using a novel wavelet image filter, we first demonstrated that rectangular features are common in these diverse stimulus categories. Then we tested whether PPA is selectively activated by rectangular features in six independent fMRI experiments using progressively simplified stimuli, from complex real-world images, through 3D/2D computer-generated shapes, through simple line stimuli. We found that PPA was consistently activated by rectilinear features, compared with curved and nonrectangular features. This rectilinear preference was (1) comparable in amplitude and selectivity, relative to the preference for category (scenes vs faces), (2) independent of known biases for specific orientations and spatial frequency, and (3) not predictable from V1 activity. Two additional scene-responsive areas were sensitive to a subset of rectilinear features. Thus, rectilinear selectivity may serve as a crucial building block for category-selective responses in PPA and functionally related areas.

  4. PASS-GP: Predictive active set selection for Gaussian processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henao, Ricardo; Winther, Ole

    2010-01-01

    to the active set selection strategy and marginal likelihood optimization on the active set. We make extensive tests on the USPS and MNIST digit classification databases with and without incorporating invariances, demonstrating that we can get state-of-the-art results (e.g.0.86% error on MNIST) with reasonable......We propose a new approximation method for Gaussian process (GP) learning for large data sets that combines inline active set selection with hyperparameter optimization. The predictive probability of the label is used for ranking the data points. We use the leave-one-out predictive probability...... available in GPs to make a common ranking for both active and inactive points, allowing points to be removed again from the active set. This is important for keeping the complexity down and at the same time focusing on points close to the decision boundary. We lend both theoretical and empirical support...

  5. Echoes of multiple outbursts of Sagittarius A* revealed by Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Clavel, Maïca; Goldwurm, A; Morris, M R; Ponti, G; Soldi, S; Trap, G

    2013-01-01

    The relatively rapid spatial and temporal variability of the X-ray radiation from some molecular clouds near the Galactic center shows that this emission component is due to the reflection of X-rays generated by a source that was luminous in the past, most likely the central supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A*. Studying the evolution of the molecular cloud reflection features is therefore a key element to reconstruct Sgr A*'s past activity. The aim of the present work is to study this emission on small angular scales in order to characterize the source outburst on short time scales. We use Chandra high-resolution data collected from 1999 to 2011 to study the most rapid variations detected so far, those of clouds between 5' and 20' from Sgr A* towards positive longitudes. Our systematic spectral-imaging analysis of the reflection emission, notably of the Fe Kalpha line at 6.4 keV and its associated 4-8 keV continuum, allows us to characterize the variations down to 15" angular scale and 1-year time scale. ...

  6. Stellar X-ray sources in the Chandra COSMOS survey

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Nicholas J; Civano, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of the X-ray properties of a sample of solar- and late-type field stars identified in the Chandra Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS), a deep (160ks) and wide (0.9 deg2) extragalactic survey. The sample of 60 sources was identified using both morphological and photometric star/galaxy separation methods. We determine X-ray count rates, extract spectra and light curves and perform spectral fits to determine fluxes and plasma temperatures. Complementary optical and near-IR photometry is also presented and combined with spectroscopy for 48 of the sources to determine spectral types and distances for the sample. We find distances ranging from 30pc to ~12kpc, including a number of the most distant and highly active stellar X-ray sources ever detected. This stellar sample extends the known coverage of the L_X-distance plane to greater distances and higher luminosities, but we do not detect as many intrinsically faint X-ray sources compared to previous surveys. Overall the sample is typically more...

  7. Invisible Giant: Chandra's Limits on X-rays from Betelgeuse

    CERN Document Server

    Posson-Brown, J; Pease, D O; Drake, J J; Posson-Brown, Jennifer; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Pease, Deron O.; Drake, Jeremy J.

    2006-01-01

    We have analyzed Chandra calibration observations of Betelgeuse ($\\alpha$ Ori, M2 Iab, $m_{V} = 0.58$, 131 pc) obtained at the aimpoint locations of the HRC-I (8 ks), HRC-S (8 ks), and ACIS-I (5 ks). Betelgeuse is undetected in all the individual observations as well as cumulatively. We derive $3\\sigma$ upper limits to its X-ray count rates and compute the corresponding X-ray flux upper limits for isothermal coronal plasma over a range of temperatures, $T=0.3-10$~MK. We place a flux limit at the telescope of $\\fx\\approx4\\times10^{-15}$~ergs~s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ at T=1~MK. The upper limit is lowered by a factor of $\\approx3$ at higher temperatures, roughly an order of magnitude lower than that obtained previously. Assuming that the entire stellar surface is active, these fluxes correspond to a surface flux limit that ranges from 30-7000~ergs~s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ at T=1~MK, to $\\approx 1$~ergs~s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ at higher temperatures, five orders of magnitude lower than the quiet Sun X-ray surface flux. We discuss...

  8. 75 FR 7471 - Chandra Coffee and Rabun Boatworks, Complainants v. Georgia Power Company, Respondent; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Chandra Coffee and Rabun Boatworks, Complainants v. Georgia Power Company... January 8, 2010, Chandra Coffee and Rabun Boatworks (Complainants) filed with the Federal...

  9. Monopolar intracochlear pulse trains selectively activate the inferior colliculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenecker, Matthew C; Bonham, Ben H; Stakhovskaya, Olga A; Snyder, Russell L; Leake, Patricia A

    2012-10-01

    Previous cochlear implant studies using isolated electrical stimulus pulses in animal models have reported that intracochlear monopolar stimulus configurations elicit broad extents of neuronal activation within the central auditory system-much broader than the activation patterns produced by bipolar electrode pairs or acoustic tones. However, psychophysical and speech reception studies that use sustained pulse trains do not show clear performance differences for monopolar versus bipolar configurations. To test whether monopolar intracochlear stimulation can produce selective activation of the inferior colliculus, we measured activation widths along the tonotopic axis of the inferior colliculus for acoustic tones and 1,000-pulse/s electrical pulse trains in guinea pigs and cats. Electrical pulse trains were presented using an array of 6-12 stimulating electrodes distributed longitudinally on a space-filling silicone carrier positioned in the scala tympani of the cochlea. We found that for monopolar, bipolar, and acoustic stimuli, activation widths were significantly narrower for sustained responses than for the transient response to the stimulus onset. Furthermore, monopolar and bipolar stimuli elicited similar activation widths when compared at stimulus levels that produced similar peak spike rates. Surprisingly, we found that in guinea pigs, monopolar and bipolar stimuli produced narrower sustained activation than 60 dB sound pressure level acoustic tones when compared at stimulus levels that produced similar peak spike rates. Therefore, we conclude that intracochlear electrical stimulation using monopolar pulse trains can produce activation patterns that are at least as selective as bipolar or acoustic stimulation.

  10. 1990 Nationwide Truck Activity and Commodity Survey selected tabulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    The Nationwide Truck Activity and Commodity Survey (NTACS) provides detailed activity data for a sample of trucks covered in the 1987 Truck Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS) for days selected at random over a 12-month period ending in 1990. The NTACS was conducted by the US Bureau of the Census for the US Department of Transportation (DOT). A Public Use File for the NTACS was developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under a reimbursable agreement with the DOT. The content of the Public Use File and the detailed design of the NTACS are described in the ORNL Report [open quotes]Technical Documentation for the 1990 Nationwide Truck Activity and Commodity Survey Public Use File[close quotes]. (1992). ORNL Technical Report No. TM-12188, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831. The main purpose of this summary report is to provide selected tables based on the public use file.

  11. Chandra x-ray results on v426 ophiuchi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Homer

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available De las observaciones de 45 ks de Chandra de V426 Oph hemos obtenido espectros de rayos X de alta resoluci on con relaci on se~nal-a-ruido moderada, y una curva de luz no interrumpida de buena calidad. Los espectros se adaptan razonablemente a un modelo de ujo de enfriamiento, similar a EX Hya y U Gem. Nuestro an alisis de las curvas de luz de Chandra y las adicionales de rayos X/ optico revela una modulaci on persistente a 4.2 hr desde 1988 hasta 2003, probablemente el per odo de giro de la enana blanca, indicando una naturaleza polar intermedia para V426 Oph.

  12. Chandra Images Provide New Vision of Cosmic Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    Images from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory released today reveal previously unobserved features in the remnants of three different supernova explosions. Two of the remnants G21.5-0.9 and PSR 0540-69 show dramatic details of the prodigious production of energetic particles by a rapidly rotating, highly magnetized neutron star, as well as the enormous shell structures produced by the explosions. The image of the third remnant, E0102-72, reveals puzzling spoke-like structures in its interior. G21.5-0.9, in the constellation of Scutum, is about 16,000 light years (1 light year = 6 trillion miles) from Earth. Chandra's image shows a bright nebula surrounded by a much larger diffuse cloud. Inside the inner nebula is a bright central source that is thought to be a rapidly rotating highly magnetized neutron star. A rotating neutron star acts like a powerful generator, creating intense electric voltages that accelerate electrons to speeds close to the speed of light. The total output of this generator is greater than a thousand suns. The fluffy appearance of the central nebula is thought to be due to magnetic field lines which constrain the motions of the high-energy electrons. "It's a remarkable image," said Dr. Patrick Slane of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. "Neither the inner core nor the outer shell has ever been seen before." "It is as though we have a set of Russian dolls, with structures embedded within structures," said Professor Gordon Garmire of Penn State University, and principal investigator of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, the X-ray camera that was used to make two of the images. NASA's project scientist, Dr. Martin Weisskopf of the Marshall Space Flight Center said, "Chandra's capability to provide surprises and insights continues." PSR 0540-69 PSR 0540-69 The existence of a rotating neutron star, or pulsar, in the center of G21.5-0.9 is inferred from the appearance of the nebula and the energy distribution of X-rays and radio

  13. Nustar and Chandra Insight into the Nature of the 3-40 Kev Nuclear Emission in Ngc 253

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmer, Bret D.; Wik, Daniel R.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Ptak, Andrew; Antoniu, V.; Argo, M.K.; Bechtol, K.; Boggs, S.; Christensen, F.E.; Craig, W.W.; Hailey, C.J.; Harrison, F.A.; Krivonos, R.; Leyder, Jean-Christophe Xavier Georges; Maccarone, T.J.; Stern, D.; Venters, T.; Zezas, A.; Zhang, W.W.

    2013-01-01

    We present results from three nearly simultaneous Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and Chandra monitoring observations between 2012 September 2 and 2012 November 16 of the local star-forming galaxy NGC 253. The 3-40 kiloelectron volt intensity of the inner approximately 20 arcsec (approximately 400 parsec) nuclear region, as measured by NuSTAR, varied by a factor of approximately 2 across the three monitoring observations. The Chandra data reveal that the nuclear region contains three bright X-ray sources, including a luminous (L (sub 2-10 kiloelectron volt) approximately few × 10 (exp 39) erg per s) point source located approximately 1 arcsec from the dynamical center of the galaxy (within the sigma 3 positional uncertainty of the dynamical center); this source drives the overall variability of the nuclear region at energies greater than or approximately equal to 3 kiloelectron volts. We make use of the variability to measure the spectra of this single hard X-ray source when it was in bright states. The spectra are well described by an absorbed (power-law model spectral fit value, N(sub H), approximately equal to 1.6 x 10 (exp 23) per square centimeter) broken power-law model with spectral slopes and break energies that are typical of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), but not active galactic nuclei (AGNs). A previous Chandra observation in 2003 showed a hard X-ray point source of similar luminosity to the 2012 source that was also near the dynamical center (Phi is approximately equal to 0.4 arcsec); however, this source was offset from the 2012 source position by approximately 1 arcsec. We show that the probability of the 2003 and 2012 hard X-ray sources being unrelated is much greater than 99.99% based on the Chandra spatial localizations. Interestingly, the Chandra spectrum of the 2003 source (3-8 kiloelectron volts) is shallower in slope than that of the 2012 hard X-ray source. Its proximity to the dynamical center and harder Chandra spectrum

  14. Predictive Active Set Selection Methods for Gaussian Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henao, Ricardo; Winther, Ole

    2012-01-01

    We propose an active set selection framework for Gaussian process classification for cases when the dataset is large enough to render its inference prohibitive. Our scheme consists of a two step alternating procedure of active set update rules and hyperparameter optimization based upon marginal...... likelihood maximization. The active set update rules rely on the ability of the predictive distributions of a Gaussian process classifier to estimate the relative contribution of a datapoint when being either included or removed from the model. This means that we can use it to include points with potentially...... high impact to the classifier decision process while removing those that are less relevant. We introduce two active set rules based on different criteria, the first one prefers a model with interpretable active set parameters whereas the second puts computational complexity first, thus a model...

  15. A submillimetre galaxy at z=4.76 in the LABOCA survey of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South

    CERN Document Server

    Coppin, Kristen; Alexander, David M; Weiss, Axel; Walter, Fabian; Swinbank, Mark; Greve, Thomas; Kovacs, Attila; De Breuck, Carlos; Dickinson, Mark; Ibar, Edo; Ivison, Rob; Reddy, Naveen; Spinrad, Hyron; Stern, Daniel; Brandt, Niel; Chapman, Scott; Dannerbauer, Helmut; van Dokkum, Pieter; Dunlop, James; Frayer, David; Gawiser, Eric; Geach, James; Huynh, Minh; Knudsen, Kirsten; Koekemoer, Anton; Lehmer, Bret; Menten, Karl; Papovich, Casey; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schinnerer, Eva; Wardlow, Julie; van der Werf, Paul

    2009-01-01

    We report on the identification of the highest redshift submm-selected source currently known: LESSJ033229.4-275619. This source was detected in the Large Apex BOlometer CAmera (LABOCA) Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS) Submillimetre Survey (LESS), a sensitive 870-um survey (~1.2-mJy rms) of the full 30'x30' ECDFS with the LABOCA camera on the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) telescope. The submm emission is identified with a radio counterpart for which optical spectroscopy provides a redshift of z=4.76. We show that the bolometric emission is dominated by a starburst with a star formation rate of ~1000 Msun/yr, although we also identify a moderate luminosity Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) in this galaxy. Thus it has characteristics similar to those of z~2 submm galaxies (SMGs), with a mix of starburst and obscured AGN signatures. This demonstrates that ultraluminous starburst activity is not just restricted to the hosts of the most luminous (and hence rare) QSOs at z~5, but was also occurring in l...

  16. The LABOCA survey of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South: Two modes of star formation in AGN hosts?

    CERN Document Server

    Lutz, D; Rafferty, D; Shao, L; Hasinger, G; Weiss, A; Walter, F; Smail, I; Alexander, D M; Brandt, W N; Chapman, S; Coppin, K; Schreiber, N M Forster; Gawiser, E; Genzel, R; Greve, T R; Ivison, R J; Koekemoer, A M; Kurczynski, P; Menten, K M; Nordon, R; Popesso, P; Schinnerer, E; Silverman, J D; Wardlow, J; Xue, Y Q

    2010-01-01

    We study the co-existence of star formation and AGN activity in X-ray selected AGN by analyzing stacked 870um submm emission from a deep and wide map of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South, obtained with LABOCA at the APEX telescope. The total X-ray sample of 895 sources with median redshift z~1 is detected at a mean submm flux of 0.49+-0.04mJy, corresponding to a typical star formation rate around 30Msun/yr for a T=35K, beta=1.5 greybody far-infrared SED. The good S/N permits stacking analyses for subgroups. We observe a trend of star formation rate increasing with redshift. An increase of star formation rate with AGN luminosity is indicated at the highest L_2-10>~1E44erg/s luminosities only. Increasing trends with X-ray obscuration as expected in some AGN evolutionary scenarios are not observed for the bulk of the X-ray AGN sample but may be present for the highest intrinsic luminosity objects. This suggests a transition between two modes in the coexistence of AGN activity and star formation. For the bulk...

  17. Activity modes selection for project crashing through deterministic simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Mohanty

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The time-cost trade-off problem addressed by CPM-based analytical approaches, assume unlimited resources and the existence of a continuous time-cost function. However, given the discrete nature of most resources, the activities can often be crashed only stepwise. Activity crashing for discrete time-cost function is also known as the activity modes selection problem in the project management. This problem is known to be NP-hard. Sophisticated optimization techniques such as Dynamic Programming, Integer Programming, Genetic Algorithm, Ant Colony Optimization have been used for finding efficient solution to activity modes selection problem. The paper presents a simple method that can provide efficient solution to activity modes selection problem for project crashing.Design/methodology/approach: Simulation based method implemented on electronic spreadsheet to determine activity modes for project crashing. The method is illustrated with the help of an example.Findings: The paper shows that a simple approach based on simple heuristic and deterministic simulation can give good result comparable to sophisticated optimization techniques.Research limitations/implications: The simulation based crashing method presented in this paper is developed to return satisfactory solutions but not necessarily an optimal solution.Practical implications: The use of spreadsheets for solving the Management Science and Operations Research problems make the techniques more accessible to practitioners. Spreadsheets provide a natural interface for model building, are easy to use in terms of inputs, solutions and report generation, and allow users to perform what-if analysis.Originality/value: The paper presents the application of simulation implemented on a spreadsheet to determine efficient solution to discrete time cost tradeoff problem.

  18. Antimicrobial Activity of Xanthohumol and Its Selected Structural Analogues

    OpenAIRE

    Monika Stompor; Barbara Żarowska

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of structural analogues of xanthohumol 1, a flavonoid compound found in hops (Humulus lupulus). The agar-diffusion method using filter paper disks was applied. Biological tests performed for selected strains of Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria, fungi (Alternaria sp.), and yeasts (Rhodotorula rubra, Candida albicans) revealed that compounds with at least one hydroxyl group—...

  19. 1WGAJ1226.9+3332 a high redshift cluster discovered by Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Cagnoni, I; Kim, D W; Mazzotta, P; Huang, J S; Celotti, A

    2001-01-01

    We report the detection of 1WGAJ1226.9+3332 as an arcminute scale extended X-ray source with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The Chandra observation and R and K band imaging strongly support the identification of 1WGAJ1226.9+3332 as a high redshift cluster of galaxies, most probably at z=0.85 +- 0.15, with an inferred temperature kT =10 (+4;-3) keV and an unabsorbed luminosity (in a r=120" aperture) of 1.3 (+0.16;-0.14) x 1e45 erg/s (0.5-10 keV). This indication of redshift is also supported by the K and R band imaging, and is in agreement with the spectroscopic redshift of 0.89 found by Ebeling et al. (2001). The surface brightness profile is consistent with a beta-model with beta=0.770 +- 0.025, rc=(18.1 +-0.9)" (corresponding to 101 +- 5 kpc at z=0.89), and S(0)=1.02 +- 0.08 counts/arcsec**2. 1WGAJ1226.9+3332 was selected as an extreme X-ray loud source with FX/FV>60; this selection method, thanks to the large area sampled, seems to be a highly efficient method for finding luminous high z clusters of galaxi...

  20. Patient Selection and Activity Planning Guide for Selective Internal Radiotherapy With Yttrium-90 Resin Microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, Wan-Yee, E-mail: josephlau@surgery.cuhk.edu.hk [Faculty of Medicine, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories (Hong Kong); Kennedy, Andrew S. [Wake Radiology Oncology, Cary, NC (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Kim, Yun Hwan [Department of Radiology, Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lai, Hee Kit [Nuclear Medicine and PET Centre, Mount Elizabeth Hospital, Singapore (Singapore); Lee, Rheun-Chuan [Department of Radiology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Leung, Thomas W.T. [Comprehensive Oncology Centre, Hong Kong Sanatorium and Hospital (Hong Kong); Liu, Ching-Sheng [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Salem, Riad [Division of Interventional Radiology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Sangro, Bruno [Liver Unit, Clinica Universitaria de Navarra and Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en Red de Enfermedades Hepaticas y Digestivas, Pamplona (Spain); Shuter, Borys [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, National University Hospital, Singapore (Singapore); Wang, Shih-Chang [Parker-Hughes Professor of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Selective internal radiotherapy (SIRT) with yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) resin microspheres can improve the clinical outcomes for selected patients with inoperable liver cancer. This technique involves intra-arterial delivery of {beta}-emitting microspheres into hepatocellular carcinomas or liver metastases while sparing uninvolved structures. Its unique mode of action, including both {sup 90}Y brachytherapy and embolization of neoplastic microvasculature, necessitates activity planning methods specific to SIRT. Methods and Materials: A panel of clinicians experienced in {sup 90}Y resin microsphere SIRT was convened to integrate clinical experience with the published data to propose an activity planning pathway for radioembolization. Results: Accurate planning is essential to minimize potentially fatal sequelae such as radiation-induced liver disease while delivering tumoricidal {sup 90}Y activity. Planning methods have included empiric dosing according to degree of tumor involvement, empiric dosing adjusted for the body surface area, and partition model calculations using Medical Internal Radiation Dose principles. It has been recommended that at least two of these methods be compared when calculating the microsphere activity for each patient. Conclusions: Many factors inform {sup 90}Y resin microsphere SIRT activity planning, including the therapeutic intent, tissue and vasculature imaging, tumor and uninvolved liver characteristics, previous therapies, and localization of the microsphere infusion. The influence of each of these factors has been discussed.

  1. Cross inhibition improves activity selection when switching incurs time costs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James A.R.MARSHALL; Angélique FAVREAU-PEIGN(E); Lutz FROMHAGE; John M.MCNAMARA; Lianne F.S.MEAH; Alasdair I.HOUSTON

    2015-01-01

    We consider a behavioural model of an animal choosing between two activities,based on positive feedback,and examine the effect of introducing cross inhibition between the motivations for the two activities.While cross-inhibition has previously been included in models of decision making,the question of what benefit it may provide to an animal's activity selection behaviour has not previously been studied.In neuroscience and in collective behaviour cross-inhibition,and other equivalent means of coupling evidence-accumulating pathways,have been shown to approximate statistically-optimal decision-making and to adaptively break deadlock,thereby improving decision performance.Switching between activities is an ongoing decision process yet here we also find that cross-inhibition robustly improves its efficiency,by reducing the frequency of costly switches between behaviours [Current Zoology 61 (2):242-250,2015].

  2. High-Redshift AGNs and the Next Decade of Chandra and XMM-Newton

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, W N

    2016-01-01

    We briefly review how X-ray observations of high-redshift active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z = 4-7 have played a critical role in understanding their basic demographics as well as their physical processes; e.g., absorption by nuclear material and winds, accretion rates, and jet emission. We point out some key remaining areas of uncertainty, highlighting where further Chandra and XMM-Newton observations/analyses, combined with new multiwavelength survey data, can advance understanding over the next decade.

  3. An Introduction to the Chandra Carina Complex Project

    CERN Document Server

    Townsley, Leisa K; Corcoran, Michael F; Feigelson, Eric D; Gagné, Marc; Montmerle, Thierry; Oey, M S; Smith, Nathan; Garmire, Gordon P; Getman, Konstantin V; Povich, Matthew S; Evans, Nancy Remage; Nazé, Yaël; Parkin, E R; Preibisch, Thomas; Wang, Junfeng; Wolk, Scott J; Chu, You-Hua; Cohen, David H; Gruendl, Robert A; Hamaguchi, Kenji; King, Robert R; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; McCaughrean, Mark J; Moffat, Anthony F J; Oskinova, L M; Pittard, Julian M; Stassun, Keivan G; ud-Doula, Asif; Walborn, Nolan R; Waldron, Wayne L; Churchwell, Ed; Nichols, J S; Owocki, Stanley P; Schulz, N S

    2011-01-01

    The Great Nebula in Carina provides an exceptional view into the violent massive star formation and feedback that typifies giant HII regions and starburst galaxies. We have mapped the Carina star-forming complex in X-rays, using archival Chandra data and a mosaic of 20 new 60ks pointings using the Chandra X-ray Observatory's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, as a testbed for understanding recent and ongoing star formation and to probe Carina's regions of bright diffuse X-ray emission. This study has yielded a catalog of properties of >14,000 X-ray point sources; >9800 of them have multiwavelength counterparts. Using Chandra's unsurpassed X-ray spatial resolution, we have separated these point sources from the extensive, spatially-complex diffuse emission that pervades the region; X-ray properties of this diffuse emission suggest that it traces feedback from Carina's massive stars. In this introductory paper, we motivate the survey design, describe the Chandra observations, and present some simple results, pr...

  4. Romanticism or Reality? An Exploration of Frances Mary Hendry's "Chandra."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jilaine

    This paper singles out a novel written for children about India, "Chandra" (1995) by Frances Mary Hendry, as a powerful and useful novel to present to today's 11 to 14 year old students. The paper contends that the novel allows students to explore and consider different value systems, challenges them to become aware of prejudice and the…

  5. Cosmological constraints from Chandra observations of galaxy clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Steven W

    2002-09-15

    Chandra observations of rich, relaxed galaxy clusters allow the properties of the X-ray gas and the total gravitating mass to be determined precisely. Here, we present results for a sample of the most X-ray luminous, dynamically relaxed clusters known. We show that the Chandra data and independent gravitational lensing studies provide consistent answers on the mass distributions in the clusters. The mass profiles exhibit a form in good agreement with the predictions from numerical simulations. Combining Chandra results on the X-ray gas mass fractions in the clusters with independent measurements of the Hubble constant and the mean baryonic matter density in the Universe, we obtain a tight constraint on the mean total matter density of the Universe, Omega(m), and an interesting constraint on the cosmological constant, Omega(Lambda). We also describe the 'virial relations' linking the masses, X-ray temperatures and luminosities of galaxy clusters. These relations provide a key step in linking the observed number density and spatial distribution of clusters to the predictions from cosmological models. The Chandra data confirm the presence of a systematic offset of ca. 40% between the normalization of the observed mass-temperature relation and the predictions from standard simulations. This finding leads to a significant revision of the best-fit value of sigma(8) inferred from the observed temperature and luminosity functions of clusters.

  6. Broad analgesic activity of a novel, selective M1 agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Michael W; Martino, Giovanni; Coupal, Martin; Lindberg, Mattias; Schroeder, Patricia; Santhakumar, Vijayaratnam; Valiquette, Manon; Sandin, Johan; Widzowski, Daniel; Laird, Jennifer

    2017-09-01

    Although the muscarinic receptor family has long been a source of potentially compelling targets for small molecule drug discovery, it was difficult to achieve agonist selectivity within the family. A new class of M1 muscarinic agonists has emerged, and these compounds have been characterized as agonists that activate the receptor at an allosteric site. Members of this class of M1 agonists have been shown to be selective across the muscarinic receptors. However, upon introduction of a novel pharmacologic mechanism, it is prudent to ensure that no new off-target activities have arisen, particularly within the context of in vivo experiments. Reported here, is the in vitro and in vivo characterization of a novel M1 agonist tool compound, PPBI, and demonstrations that the primary biological effects of PPBI are mediated through M1. PPBI reverses d-amphetamine locomotor activity, but fails to do so in transgenic mice that do not express M1. PPBI also reverses a natural deficit in a rat cognition model at a level of exposure which also activates cortical circuitry. Most notably, PPBI is analgesic in a variety of rat and mouse models and the analgesic effect of PPBI is reversed by an M1-preferring antagonist and an M1-selective toxin. Finally, the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic measures of PPBI are compared across multiple endpoints which highlights that activity in models of psychosis and pain require higher exposures than that required in the cognition model. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Habitat Selection and Activity Pattern of GPS Collared Sumateran Tigers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolly Priatna

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Although translocation has been used in mitigating human-carnivore conflict for decades, few studies have been conducted on the behavioral ecology of released animals. Such information is necessary in the context of sustainable forest management. In this study we determine the type of land cover used as main habitat and examine the activity pattern of translocated tigers. Between 2008 and 2010 we captured six conflict tigers and translocated them 74-1,350 km from their capture sites in Sumatera. All tigers were fitted with global positioning system (GPS collars. The collars were set to fix 24-48 location coordinates per day.  All translocated tigers showed a preference for a certain habitat type within their new home range, and tended to select the majority of natural land cover type within the landscape as their main habitat, but the availability of natural forest habitat within the landscape remains essensial for their survival. The activity of male translocated tigers differed significantly between the six time intervals of 24 hours, and their most active periods were in the afternoon (14:00-18:00 hours and in the evening (18:00-22:00 hours. Despite being preliminary, the findings of this study-which was the first such study conducted in Sumatera-highlight the conservation value of tiger translocation and provide valuable information for improving future management of conflict tigers.Keywords: activity pattern, GPS collars, habitat selection, sumateran tiger, translocation

  8. Grafting of activated carbon cloths for selective adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gineys, M.; Benoit, R.; Cohaut, N.; Béguin, F.; Delpeux-Ouldriane, S.

    2016-05-01

    Chemical functionalization of an activated carbon cloth with 3-aminophthalic acid and 4-aminobenzoic acid groups by the in situ formation of the corresponding diazonium salt in aqueous acidic solution is reported. The nature and amount of selected functions on an activated carbon surface, in particular the grafted density, were determined by potentiometric titration, elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The nanotextural properties of the modified carbon were explored by gas adsorption. Functionalized activated carbon cloth was obtained at a discrete grafting level while preserving interesting textural properties and a large porous volume. Finally, the grafting homogeneity of the carbon surface and the nature of the chemical bonding were investigated using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) technique.

  9. Design of a high activity and selectivity alcohol catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, H.C.; Mills, G.A.

    1992-11-30

    Efforts to synthesize bimetallic cluster-derived Rh-Mo catalysts for CO and CO[sub 2] hydrogenation to preferentially produce oxygenates. The rhodium-molybdenum cluster, (PPh[sub 3])[sub 2]RhMO(CO)([mu]-CO)[sub 2]Cp, was employed as a precursor to alumina- and silica-supported catalysts which were in CO hydrogenation. When compared to catalysts made from the distinct organometallic complexes, RhH(CO)(PPh[sub 3])[sub 3] and [MO(CO)[sub 3]Cp][sub 2], the catalysts derived from a binuclear precursor show higher activities for CO hydrogenation and superior selectivities towards oxygenates, namely, methanol, dimethyl ether and ethanol. Their product distributions depend on the support. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies indicate that CO chemisorbs on cluster-derived catalysts as gem-dicarbonyls while it is chemisorbed only in the linear-carbonyl configuration on catalysts made from separate rhodium and molybdenum complexes. The particular oxygenate selectivity of the cluster-derived catalysts may be correlated to the strong electronic interaction between Rh and Mo. Carbon dioxide hydrogenation has also been carried out on the catalysts mentioned above. Again, the cluster-derived catalysts show higher oxygenate selectivities. Finally, the catalysts were studied with regard to both CO and CO[sub 2] hydrogenation kinetics, apparent activation energies inferred.

  10. Toxicity and mutagenic activity of some selected Nigerian plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowemimo, A A; Fakoya, F A; Awopetu, I; Omobuwajo, O R; Adesanya, S A

    2007-09-25

    The toxicity and mutagenic potential of most African plants implicated in the management of cancer have not been investigated. The ethanolic extracts of selected Nigerian plants were subsequently studied using the brine shrimp lethality tests, inhibition of telomerase activity and induction of chromosomal aberrations in vivo in rat lymphocytes. Morinda lucida root bark, Nymphaea lotus whole plant and Garcinia kola root were active in the three test systems. Bryophyllum calycinum whole plant, Annona senegalensis root, Hymenocardia acida stem bark, Erythrophleum suaveolens leaves and Spondiathus preussii stem bark were toxic to brine shrimps and caused chromosomal damage in rat lymphocytes. Ficus exasperata leaves, Chrysophyllum albidum root bark and Hibiscus sabdariffa leaves were non-toxic to all the three test systems. Chenopodium ambrosioides whole plant was non-toxic to brine shrimps and rat lymphocyte chromosomes but showed inhibition in the conventional telomerase assay indicating a possible selectivity for human chromosomes. The result justified the use of the first eight plants and Chenopodium ambrosioides in the management of cancer in south west Nigeria although they appear to be non-selective and their mode of action may be different from plant to plant. All these plants except Chenopodium ambrosioides are also mutagenic and cytotoxic.

  11. NASA's Chandra Finds That Saturn Reflects X-rays From Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    When it comes to mysterious X-rays from Saturn, the ringed planet may act as a mirror, reflecting explosive activity from the sun, according to scientists using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. The findings stem from the first observation of an X-ray flare reflected from Saturn's low-latitudes - the region that correlates to Earth's equator and tropics. Led by Dr. Anil Bhardwaj, a planetary scientist at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Ala., the study revealed that Saturn acts as a diffuse mirror for solar X-rays. Counting photons - particles that carry electromagnetic energy including X-rays - was critical to this discovery. For every few thousand X-ray photons Saturn receives from the sun, it reflects a single X-ray photon back. Previous studies revealed that Jupiter, with a diameter 11 times that of Earth, behaves in a similar fashion. Saturn is about 9.5 times as big as Earth, but is twice as far from Earth as Jupiter. "The bigger the planet and nearer to the Sun, the more solar photons it will intercept - resulting in more reflected X-rays," said Bhardwaj. "These results imply we could use giant planets like Jupiter and Saturn as remote-sensing tools. By reflecting solar activity back to us, they could help us monitor X-ray flaring on portions of the sun facing away from Earth's space satellites." Massive solar explosions called flares often accompany coronal mass ejections, which emit solar material and magnetic field. When directed toward the Earth, these ejections can wreak havoc on communication systems from cell phones to satellites. Even as the research appears to have solved one mystery - the source of Saturn's X-rays, it fueled longstanding questions about magnetic fields. Earth's magnetic field is the reason compasses work, since the field acts like a huge bar magnet, causing the magnetic north pole of a compass to point to the magnetic south pole of the Earth. In addition, migratory birds seem to sense the magnetic field

  12. First Results from the 7 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South Survey: A Good Hard Look at Growing Supermassive Black Holes in the Distant Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, William; Chandra Deep Fields Team

    2017-01-01

    Sensitive cosmic X-ray surveys with the Chandra, XMM-Newton, and now NuSTAR observatories have revolutionized our ability to find and study distant active galactic nuclei (AGNs), the main sites of supermassive black hole growth in the Universe. I will describe some recent discoveries about the demographics, physics, and ecology of distant AGNs coming from the deepest Chandra survey to date, the 7 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South. Some specific topics covered will include (1) robust X-ray spectral and variability characterization of the AGNs producing most of cosmic accretion power; (2) the demographics of AGNs in the first galaxies as revealed by direct detection and stacking; and (3) AGN/galaxy interactions as investigated via the host properties of X-ray AGNs. I will also briefly describe other remarkable discoveries coming from this survey; e.g., measurements of the evolving X-ray binary populations of normal and starburst galaxies.

  13. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of selected medicinal plants from Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krimat Soumia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of methanolic extract extracts of selected Algerian medicinal plants. Methods: Antioxidant activity of extracts was evaluated in terms of radical scavenging potential (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and β-carotene bleaching assay. Total phenolic contents and flavonoid contents were also measured. Antimicrobial activity of these plants was examined against Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans. Results: The values of IC50 ranged from 4.30 μg/mL to 486.6 μg/mL for the DPPH method, while total antioxidant activity using β-carotene/linoleic acid bleaching assay ranged from 17.03% to 86.13%. It was found that Pistacia lentiscus showed the highest antioxidant capacities using DPPH assay (IC50=4.30 μg/mL, while Populus trimula, Origanum glandulosum, Centaurea calcitrapa, Sysimbrium officinalis and Rhamnus alaternus showed the highest percent of total antioxidant activity in β-carotene/linoleic acid bleaching assay. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents ranged from 3.96 to 259.65 mg GAE/g extract and from 1.13 to 26.84 mg QE/g extract, respectively. The most interesting antimicrobial activity was obtained from Sysimbrium officinalis, Rhamnus alaternus, Origanum glandulosum, Cupressus sempervirens, Pinus halipensis and Centaurea calcitrapa. Conclusions: The results indicated that the plants tested may be potential sources for isolation of natural antioxidant and antimicrobial compounds.

  14. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of selected medicinal plants from Algeria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Krimat Soumia; Dob Tahar; Lamari Lynda; Boumeridja Saida; Chelghoum Chabane; Metidji Hafidha

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of methanolic extract extracts of selected Algerian medicinal plants. Methods:Antioxidant activity of extracts was evaluated in terms of radical scavenging potential (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) and β-carotene bleaching assay. Total phenolic contents and flavonoid contents were also measured. Antimicrobial activity of these plants was examined against Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans. Results:The values of IC50 ranged from 4.30 μg/mL to 486.6 μg/mL for the DPPH method, while total antioxidant activity using β-carotene/linoleic acid bleaching assay ranged from 17.03%to 86.13%. It was found that Pistacia lentiscus showed the highest antioxidant capacities using DPPH assay (IC50=4.30 μg/mL), while Populus trimula, Origanum glandulosum, Centaurea calcitrapa, Sysimbrium officinalis and Rhamnus alaternus showed the highest percent of total antioxidant activity inβ-carotene/linoleic acid bleaching assay. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents ranged from 3.96 to 259.65 mg GAE/g extract and from 1.13 to 26.84 mg QE/g extract, respectively. The most interesting antimicrobial activity was obtained from Sysimbrium officinalis, Rhamnus alaternus, Origanum glandulosum, Cupressus sempervirens, Pinus halipensis and Centaurea calcitrapa. Conclusions:The results indicated that the plants tested may be potential sources for isolation of natural antioxidant and antimicrobial compounds.

  15. Synthesis of a selective HDAC6 inhibitor active in neuroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Vincent; Simões-Pires, Claudia A; Nurisso, Alessandra; Petit, Charlotte; Dos Santos Passos, Carolina; Randazzo, Giuseppe Marco; Martinet, Nadine; Bertrand, Philippe; Cuendet, Muriel

    2016-10-15

    In recent years, the role of HDAC6 in neurodegeneration has been partially elucidated, which led some authors to propose HDAC6 inhibitors as a therapeutic strategy to treat neurodegenerative diseases. In an effort to develop a selective HDAC6 inhibitor which can cross the blood brain barrier (BBB), a modified hydroxamate derivative (compound 3) was designed and synthetized. This compound was predicted to have potential for BBB penetration based on in silico and in vitro evaluation of passive permeability. When tested for its HDAC inhibitory activity, the IC50 value of compound 3 towards HDAC6 was in the nM range in both enzymatic and cell-based assays. Compound 3 showed a cell-based selectivity profile close to that of tubastatin A in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells, and a good BBB permeability profile.

  16. THE CHANDRA LOCAL VOLUME SURVEY: THE X-RAY POINT-SOURCE CATALOG OF NGC 300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binder, B.; Williams, B. F.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Anderson, S. F.; Weisz, D. R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Eracleous, M. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Gaetz, T. J.; Plucinsky, P. P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Skillman, E. D. [Astronomy Department, University of Minnesota, 116 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Kong, A. K. H. [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2012-10-10

    We present the source catalog of a new Chandra ACIS-I observation of NGC 300 obtained as part of the Chandra Local Volume Survey. Our 63 ks exposure covers {approx}88% of the D{sub 25} isophote (R Almost-Equal-To 6.3 kpc) and yields a catalog of 95 X-ray point sources detected at high significance to a limiting unabsorbed 0.35-8 keV luminosity of {approx}10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}. Sources were cross-correlated with a previous XMM-Newton catalog, and we find 75 'X-ray transient candidate' sources that were detected by one observatory, but not the other. We derive an X-ray scale length of 1.7 {+-} 0.2 kpc and a recent star formation rate of 0.12 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} in excellent agreement with optical observations. Deep, multi-color imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope, covering {approx}32% of our Chandra field, was used to search for optical counterparts to the X-ray sources, and we have developed a new source classification scheme to determine which sources are likely X-ray binaries, supernova remnants, and background active galactic nucleus candidates. Finally, we present the X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) at different X-ray energies, and we find the total NGC 300 X-ray point-source population to be consistent with other late-type galaxies hosting young stellar populations ({approx}< 50 Myr). We find that XLF of sources associated with older stellar populations has a steeper slope than the XLF of X-ray sources coinciding with young stellar populations, consistent with theoretical predictions.

  17. Antimycobacterial and cytotoxic activity of selected medicinal plant extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguta, Joseph M.; Appiah-Opong, Regina; Nyarko, Alexander K.; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Addo, Phyllis G.A.; Otchere, Isaac; Kissi-Twum, Abena

    2016-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains an ongoing threat to human health. Several medicinal plants are used traditionally to treat tuberculosis in Ghana. The current study was designed to investigate the antimycobacterial activity and cytotoxicity of crude extracts from five selected medicinal plants. Material and methods The microplate alamar blue assay (MABA) was used for antimycobacterial studies while the CellTiter 96® AQueous Assay, which is composed of solutions of a novel tetrazolium compound [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt; MTS] and an electron coupling reagent (phenazine methosulfate) PMS, was used for cytotoxic studies. Correlation coefficients were used to compare the activity of crude extracts against nonpathogenic strains and the pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis subsp.tuberculosis. Results Results of the MIC determinations indicated that all the crude extracts were active on all the three tested mycobacterial strains. Minimum inhibitory concentration values as low as 156.3 µg/mL against M. tuberculosis; Strain H37Ra (ATCC® 25,177™) were recorded from the leaves of Solanum torvum Sw. (Solanaceae). Cytotoxicity of the extracts varied, and the leaves from S. torvum had the most promising selectivity index. Activity against M. tuberculosis; Strain H37Ra was the best predictor of activity against pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis subsp.tuberculosis (correlation coefficient=0.8). Conclusion The overall results of the present study provide supportive data on the use of some medicinal plants for tuberculosis treatment. The leaves of Solanum torvum are a potential source of anti-TB natural products and deserve further investigations to develop novel anti-TB agents against sensitive and drug resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. PMID:26875647

  18. Antimycobacterial and cytotoxic activity of selected medicinal plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguta, Joseph M; Appiah-Opong, Regina; Nyarko, Alexander K; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Addo, Phyllis G A; Otchere, Isaac; Kissi-Twum, Abena

    2016-04-22

    Tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains an ongoing threat to human health. Several medicinal plants are used traditionally to treat tuberculosis in Ghana. The current study was designed to investigate the antimycobacterial activity and cytotoxicity of crude extracts from five selected medicinal plants. The microplate alamar blue assay (MABA) was used for antimycobacterial studies while the CellTiter 96® AQueous Assay, which is composed of solutions of a novel tetrazolium compound [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt; MTS] and an electron coupling reagent (phenazine methosulfate) PMS, was used for cytotoxic studies. Correlation coefficients were used to compare the activity of crude extracts against nonpathogenic strains and the pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis subsp.tuberculosis. Results of the MIC determinations indicated that all the crude extracts were active on all the three tested mycobacterial strains. Minimum inhibitory concentration values as low as 156.3µg/mL against M. tuberculosis; Strain H37Ra (ATCC® 25,177™) were recorded from the leaves of Solanum torvum Sw. (Solanaceae). Cytotoxicity of the extracts varied, and the leaves from S. torvum had the most promising selectivity index. Activity against M. tuberculosis; Strain H37Ra was the best predictor of activity against pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis subsp.tuberculosis (correlation coefficient=0.8). The overall results of the present study provide supportive data on the use of some medicinal plants for tuberculosis treatment. The leaves of Solanum torvum are a potential source of anti-TB natural products and deserve further investigations to develop novel anti-TB agents against sensitive and drug resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Chandra Opens New Line of Investigation on Dark Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-05-01

    Astronomers have detected and probed dark energy by applying a powerful, new method that uses images of galaxy clusters made by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. The results trace the transition of the expansion of the Universe from a decelerating to an accelerating phase several billion years ago, and give intriguing clues about the nature of dark energy and the fate of the Universe. "Dark energy is perhaps the biggest mystery in physics," said Steve Allen of the Institute of Astronomy (IoA) at the University of Cambridge in England, and leader of the study. "As such, it is extremely important to make an independent test of its existence and properties." Abell 2029 Chandra X-ray Image of Abell 2029 Allen and his colleagues used Chandra to study 26 clusters of galaxies at distances corresponding to light travel times of between one and eight billion years. These data span the time when the Universe slowed from its original expansion, before speeding up again because of the repulsive effect of dark energy. "We're directly seeing that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating by measuring the distances to these galaxy clusters," said Andy Fabian also of the IoA, a co-author on the study. The new Chandra results suggest that the dark energy density does not change quickly with time and may even be constant, consistent with the "cosmological constant" concept first introduced by Albert Einstein. If so, the Universe is expected to continue expanding forever, so that in many billions of years only a tiny fraction of the known galaxies will be observable. More Animations Animation of the "Big Rip" If the dark energy density is constant, more dramatic fates for the Universe would be avoided. These include the "Big Rip," where dark energy increases until galaxies, stars, planets and eventually atoms are eventually torn apart. The "Big Crunch," where the Universe eventually collapses on itself, would also be ruled out. Chandra's probe of dark energy relies on the unique

  20. Electroless Plating on Plastic Induced by Selective Laser Activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yang; Tang, Peter Torben; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for selective micro metallization of polymers. A Nd:YAG laser is employed to draw patterns on polymer surfaces that are submerged in a liquid (usually water). After subsequent activation with palladium chloride and followed by auto-catalytic electroless plating...... in width with 50μm between two tracks, but further optimization is expected in this field. Due to the porous and rough structure of the laser track, excellent adhesion between metallization and substrate is obtained. On top of the first copper layer, additional metal such as nickel, gold, palladium or tin...

  1. Chandra Multi-wavelength Plane (ChaMPlane) Survey Design and Initial Results

    CERN Document Server

    Grindlay, J; Hong, J S; Jenkins, J; Kim, D W; Schlegel, E M; Drake, J; Kashyap, V; Edmonds, P; Cohn, H; Lugger, P M; Cool, A; Grindlay, Jonathan; Zhao, Ping; Hong, JaeSub; Jenkins, Johnathan; Kim, Dong-Woo; Schlegel, Eric; Drake, Jeremy; Kashyap, Vinay; Edmonds, Peter; Cohn, Haldan; Lugger, Phyllis; Cool, Adrienne

    2002-01-01

    The Chandra Multiwavength Plane (ChaMPlane) Survey of the galactic plane incorporates serendipitous sources from selected Chandra pointings in or near the galactic plane (b 20 ksec; lack of bright diffuse or point sources) to measure or constrain the luminosity function of low-luminosity accretion sources in the Galaxy. The primary goal is to detect and identify accreting white dwarfs (cataclysmic variables, with space density still uncertain by a factor of >10-100), neutron stars and black holes (quiescent low mass X-ray binaries) to constrain their space densities and thus origin and evolution. Secondary objectives are to identify Be stars in high mass X-ray binaries and constrain their space densities, and to survey the H-R diagram for stellar coronal sources. A parallel optical imaging under the NOAO Long Term Survey program provides deep optical images using the Mosaic imager on the CTIO and KPNO 4-m telescopes. The 36arcmin X 36arcmin optical images (Halpha, R, V and I) cover ~5X the area of each enclos...

  2. An X-ray view of 82 LINERs with Chandra and XMM-Newton data

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Martin, O; Márquez, I; Guainazzi, M; Jimenez-Bailon, E

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of an homogeneous X-ray analysis for 82 nearby LINERs selected from the catalogue of Carrillo et al. (1999). All sources have available Chandra (68 sources) and/or XMM-Newton (55 sources) observations. This is the largest sample of LINERs with X-ray spectral data (60 out of the 82 objects) and significantly improves our previous analysis based on Chandra data for 51 LINERs (Gonzalez-Martin et al. 2006). It increases both the sample size and adds XMM-Newton data. New models permit the inclusion of double absorbers in the spectral fits. Nuclear X-ray morphology is inferred from the compactness of detected nuclear sources in the hard band (4.5-8.0 keV). Sixty per cent of the sample shows a compact nuclear source and are classified as AGN candidates. The spectral analysis indicates that best fits involve a composite model: absorbed primary continuum and (2) soft spectrum below 2 keV described by an absorbed scatterer and/or a thermal component. The resulting median spectra parameters and th...

  3. Face-selective activation in a congenital prosopagnosic subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson, Uri; Avidan, Galia; Deouell, Leon Y; Bentin, Shlomo; Malach, Rafael

    2003-04-01

    Congenital prosopagnosia is a severe impairment in face identification manifested from early childhood in the absence of any evident brain lesion. In this study, we used fMRI to compare the brain activity elicited by faces in a congenital prosopagnosic subject (YT) relative to a control group of 12 subjects in an attempt to shed more light on the nature of the brain mechanisms subserving face identification. The face-related activation pattern of YT in the ventral occipito-temporal cortex was similar to that observed in the control group on several parameters: anatomical location, activation profiles, and hemispheric laterality. In addition, using a modified vase-face illusion, we found that YT's brain activity in the face-related regions manifested global grouping processes. However, subtle differences in the degree of selectivity between objects and faces were observed in the lateral occipital cortex. These data suggest that face-related activation in the ventral occipito-temporal cortex, although necessary, might not be sufficient by itself for normal face identification.

  4. Antifungal activity of essential oils against selected terverticillate penicillia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felšöciová, Soňa; Kačániová, Miroslava; Horská, Elena; Vukovič, Nenad; Hleba, Lukáš; Petrová, Jana; Rovná, Katarina; Stričík, Michal; Hajduová, Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to screen 15 essential oils of selected plant species, viz. Lavandula angustifolia, Carum carvi, Pinus mungo var. pulmilio, Mentha piperita, Chamomilla recutita L., Pinus sylvestris, Satureia hortensis L., Origanum vulgare L., Pimpinella anisum, Rosmarinus officinalis L., Salvia officinalis L., Abietis albia etheroleum, Chamomilla recutita L. Rausch, Thymus vulgaris L., Origanum vulgare L. for antifungal activity against five Penicillium species: Penicillium brevicompactum, Penicillium citrinum, Penicillium crustosum, Penicillium expansum and Penicillium griseofulvum. The method used for screening included the disc diffusion method. The study points out the wide spectrum of antifungal activity of essential oils against Penicillium fungi. There were five essential oils of the 15 mentioned above which showed a hopeful antifungal activity: Pimpinella anisum, Chamomilla recutita L., Thymus vulgaris, Origanum vulgare L. The most hopeful antifungal activity and killing effect against all tested penicillia was found to be Origanum vulgare L. and Pimpinella anisum. The lowest level of antifungal activity was demonstrated by the oils Pinus mungo var. pulmilio, Salvia officinalis L., Abietis albia etheroleum, Chamomilla recutita L. Rausch, Rosmarinus officinalis.

  5. Training of selective attention in work-active stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starovasnik Žagavec, Barbara; Mlinarič Lešnik, Vesna; Goljar, Nika

    2015-12-01

    The aim was to examine the effects of computer-based cognitive rehabilitation of attention in work-active patients after stroke. The study included 11 patients treated as inpatients at the University Rehabilitation Institute, Republic of Slovenia, who were included in intensive selective attention training four times a week for 3 months. Each patient was assessed at the initial and the final rehabilitation stage with the TAP system (Test of Attentional Performance), alertness, and divided attention tasks. The results indicate a moderate to strong increase in performance on the divided attention test and a mild effect on the alertness test. Early cognitive rehabilitation of the attentional system can contribute toward recovery of divided attention in work-active patients after stroke.

  6. Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope Study of the Globular Cluster NGC 288

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, A K H; Pooley, D; Lewin, W H G; Homer, L; Verbunt, F; Anderson, S F; Margon, B

    2006-01-01

    We report on the Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of the globular cluster NGC 288. We detect four X-ray sources within the core radius and seven additional sources within the half-mass radius down to a limiting luminosity of Lx=7e30 erg/s (assuming cluster membership) in the 0.3-7 keV band. We also observed the cluster with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys and identify optical counterparts to seven X-ray sources out of the nine sources within the HST field-of-view. Based on the X-ray and optical properties, we find 2-5 candidates of cataclysmic variables (CVs) or chromospherically active binaries, and 2-5 background galaxies inside the half-mass radius. Since the core density of NGC 288 is very low, the faint X-ray sources of NGC 288 found in the Chandra and HST observations is higher than the prediction on the basis of the collision frequency. We suggest that the CVs and chromospherically active binaries are primordial in origin, in agreement with theoretical expectation.

  7. The sub-mJy radio sky in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South: source population

    CERN Document Server

    Bonzini, M; Mainieri, V; Kellermann, K I; Miller, N; Rosati, P; Tozzi, P; Vattakunnel, S

    2013-01-01

    The sub-mJy radio population is a mixture of active systems, that is star forming galaxies (SFGs) and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We study a sample of 883 radio sources detected at 1.4 GHz in a deep Very Large Array survey of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (E-CDFS) that reaches a best rms sensitivity of 6 microJy. We have used a simple scheme to disentangle SFGs, radio-quiet (RQ), and radio-loud (RL) AGNs based on the combination of radio data with Chandra X-ray data and mid-infrared observations from Spitzer. We find that at flux densities between about 30 and 100 microJy the radio population is dominated by SFGs (~60%) and that RQ AGNs become increasingly important over RL ones below 100 microJy. We also compare the host galaxy properties of the three classes in terms of morphology, optical colours and stellar masses. Our results show that both SFG and RQ AGN host galaxies have blue colours and late type morphology while RL AGNs tend to be hosted in massive red galaxies with early type morphology....

  8. A Chandra Study of Radial Temperature Profiles of the Intra-Cluster Medium in 50 Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Zhenghao; Wang, Jingying; Gu, Junhua; Li, Weitian; Hu, Dan; Zhang, Chenhao; Gu, Liyi; An, Tao; Liu, Chengze; Zhang, Zhongli; Zhu, Jie; Wu, Xiang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the spatial distribution of the ICM temperature in galaxy clusters in a quantitative way and probe the physics behind, we analyze the X-ray spectra of a sample of 50 galaxy clusters, which were observed with the Chandra ACIS instrument in the past 15 years, and measure the radial temperature profiles out to $0.45r_{500}$. We construct a physical model that takes into account the effects of gravitational heating, thermal history (such as radiative cooling, AGN feedback, and thermal conduction) and work done via gas compression, and use it to fit the observed temperature profiles by running Bayesian regressions. The results show that in all cases our model provides an acceptable fit at the 68% confidence level. To further validate this model we select nine clusters that have been observed with both Chandra (out to $\\gtrsim 0.3r_{500}$) and Suzaku (out to $\\gtrsim 1.5r_{500}$), fit their Chandra spectra with our model, and compare the extrapolation of the best-fits with the Suzaku measure...

  9. Selective adsorption of flavor-active components on hydrophobic resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffarionpour, Shima; Sevillano, David Mendez; Van der Wielen, Luuk A M; Noordman, T Reinoud; Brouwer, Eric; Ottens, Marcel

    2016-12-09

    This work aims to propose an optimum resin that can be used in industrial adsorption process for tuning flavor-active components or removal of ethanol for producing an alcohol-free beer. A procedure is reported for selective adsorption of volatile aroma components from water/ethanol mixtures on synthetic hydrophobic resins. High throughput 96-well microtiter-plates batch uptake experimentation is applied for screening resins for adsorption of esters (i.e. isoamyl acetate, and ethyl acetate), higher alcohols (i.e. isoamyl alcohol and isobutyl alcohol), a diketone (diacetyl) and ethanol. The miniaturized batch uptake method is adapted for adsorption of volatile components, and validated with column breakthrough analysis. The results of single-component adsorption tests on Sepabeads SP20-SS are expressed in single-component Langmuir, Freundlich, and Sips isotherm models and multi-component versions of Langmuir and Sips models are applied for expressing multi-component adsorption results obtained on several tested resins. The adsorption parameters are regressed and the selectivity over ethanol is calculated for each tested component and tested resin. Resin scores for four different scenarios of selective adsorption of esters, higher alcohols, diacetyl, and ethanol are obtained. The optimal resin for adsorption of esters is Sepabeads SP20-SS with resin score of 87% and for selective removal of higher alcohols, XAD16N, and XAD4 from Amberlite resin series are proposed with scores of 80 and 74% respectively. For adsorption of diacetyl, XAD16N and XAD4 resins with score of 86% are the optimum choice and Sepabeads SP2MGS and XAD761 resins showed the highest affinity towards ethanol.

  10. Biochemical approaches to selective antifungal activity. Focus on azole antifungals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanden Bossche, H; Marichal, P; Gorrens, J; Coene, M C; Willemsens, G; Bellens, D; Roels, I; Moereels, H; Janssen, P A

    1989-01-01

    Azole antifungals (e.g. the imidazoles: miconazole, clotrimazole, bifonazole, imazalil, ketoconazole, and the triazoles: diniconazole, triadimenol, propiconazole, fluconazole and itraconazole) inhibit in fungal cells the 14 alpha-demethylation of lanosterol or 24-methylenedihydrolanosterol. The consequent inhibition of ergosterol synthesis originates from binding of the unsubstituted nitrogen (N-3 or N-4) of their imidazole or triazole moiety to the heme iron and from binding of their N-1 substituent to the apoprotein of a cytochrome P-450 (P-450(14)DM) of the endoplasmic reticulum. Great differences in both potency and selectivity are found between the different azole antifungals. For example, after 16h of growth of Candida albicans in medium supplemented with [14C]-acetate and increasing concentrations of itraconazole, 100% inhibition of ergosterol synthesis is achieved at 3 x 10(-8) M. Complete inhibition of this synthesis by fluconazole is obtained at 10(-5) M only. The agrochemical imidazole derivative, imazalil, shows high selectivity, it has almost 80 and 98 times more affinity for the Candida P-450(s) than for those of the piglet testes microsomes and bovine adrenal mitochondria, respectively. However, the topically active imidazole antifungal, bifonazole, has the highest affinity for P-450(s) of the testicular microsomes. The triazole antifungal itraconazole inhibits at 10(-5) M the P-450-dependent aromatase by 17.9, whereas 50% inhibition of this enzyme is obtained at about 7.5 x 10(-6)M of the bistriazole derivative fluconazole. The overall results show that both the affinity for the fungal P-450(14)DM and the selectivity are determined by the nitrogen heterocycle and the hydrophobic N-1 substituent of the azole antifungals. The latter has certainly a greater impact. The presence of a triazole and a long hypdrophobic nonligating portion form the basis for itraconazole's potency and selectivity.

  11. The Young Stellar Population in M17 Revealed by Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broos, Patrick S.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Townsley, Leisa K.; Getman, Konstantin V.; Wang, Junfeng; Garmire, Gordon P.; Jiang, Zhibo; Tsuboi, Yohko

    2007-04-01

    We report here results from a Chandra ACIS observation of the stellar populations in and around the M17 H II region. The field reveals 886 sources with observed X-ray luminosities (uncorrected for absorption) between ˜29.3 ergs s-1tables of X-ray source properties, several results are presented: 1. The X-ray luminosity function is calibrated to that of the Orion Nebula Cluster population to infer a total population of roughly 8000-10,000 stars in M17, one-third lying in the central NGC 6618 cluster. 2. About 40% of the ACIS sources are heavily obscured with AV>10 mag. Some are concentrated around well-studied star-forming regions -- IRS 5/UC1, the Kleinmann-Wright Object, and M17-North -- but most are distributed across the field. As previously shown, star formation appears to be widely distributed in the molecular clouds. X-ray emission is detected from 64 of the hundreds of Class I protostar candidates that can be identified by near- and mid-infrared colors. These constitute the most likely protostar candidates known in M17. 3. The spatial distribution of X-ray stars is complex: in addition to the central NGC 6618 cluster and well-known embedded groups, we find a new embedded cluster (designated M17-X), a 2 pc long arc of young stars along the southwest edge of the M17 H II region, and 0.1 pc substructure within various populations. These structures may indicate that the populations are dynamically young. 4. All (14/14) of the known O stars but only about half (19/34) of the known B0-B3 stars in the M17 field are detected. These stars exhibit the long-reported correlation between X-ray and bolometric luminosities of LX˜10-7Lbol. While many O and early-B stars show the soft X-ray emission expected from microshocks in their winds or moderately hard emission that could be caused by magnetically channeled wind shocks, six of these stars exhibit very hard thermal plasma components (kT>4 keV) that may be due to colliding wind binaries. More than 100 candidate new OB

  12. Antimicrobial Activity of Xanthohumol and Its Selected Structural Analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stompor, Monika; Żarowska, Barbara

    2016-05-11

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of structural analogues of xanthohumol 1, a flavonoid compound found in hops (Humulus lupulus). The agar-diffusion method using filter paper disks was applied. Biological tests performed for selected strains of Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria, fungi (Alternaria sp.), and yeasts (Rhodotorula rubra, Candida albicans) revealed that compounds with at least one hydroxyl group-all of them have it at the C-4 position-demonstrated good activity. Our research showed that the strain S. aureus was more sensitive to chalcones than to the isomers in which the heterocyclic ring C is closed (flavanones). The strain R. rubra was moderately sensitive to only one compound: 4-hydroxy-4'-methoxychalcone 8. Loss of the hydroxyl group in the B-ring of 4'-methoxychalcones or its replacement by a halogen atom (-Cl, -Br), nitro group (-NO₂), ethoxy group (-OCH₂CH₃), or aliphatic substituent (-CH₃, -CH₂CH₃) resulted in the loss of antimicrobial activity towards both R. rubra yeast and S. aureus bacteria. Xanthohumol 1, naringenin 5, and chalconaringenin 7 inhibited growth of S. aureus, whereas 4-hydroxy-4'-methoxychalcone 8 was active towards two strains: S. aureus and R. rubra.

  13. Antioxidant activity in selected Slovenian organic and conventional crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manca KNAP

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The demand for organically produced food is increasing. There is widespread belief that organic food is substantially healthier and safer than conventional food. According to literature organic food is free of phytopharmaceutical residues, contain less nitrates and more antioxidants. The aim of the present study was to verify if there are any differences in the antioxidant activity between selected Slovenian organic and conventional crops. Method of DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl was used to determine the antioxidant activity of 16 samples from organic and conventional farms. The same varieties of crops were analysed. DPPH method was employed to measure the antioxidant activity of polar antioxidants (AAp and antioxidant activity of fraction in ethyl acetate soluble antioxidants (EA AA. Descriptive statistics and variance analysis were used to describe differences between farming systems. Estimated differences between interactions for the same crop and different farming practice were mostly not statistically significant except for the AAp for basil and beetroot. Higher statistically significant values were estimated for conventional crops. For the EA AA in broccoli, cucumber, rocket and cherry statistically significant higher values were estimated for organic production.

  14. Antimicrobial Activity of Xanthohumol and Its Selected Structural Analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Stompor

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of structural analogues of xanthohumol 1, a flavonoid compound found in hops (Humulus lupulus. The agar-diffusion method using filter paper disks was applied. Biological tests performed for selected strains of Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli bacteria, fungi (Alternaria sp., and yeasts (Rhodotorula rubra, Candida albicans revealed that compounds with at least one hydroxyl group—all of them have it at the C-4 position—demonstrated good activity. Our research showed that the strain S. aureus was more sensitive to chalcones than to the isomers in which the heterocyclic ring C is closed (flavanones. The strain R. rubra was moderately sensitive to only one compound: 4-hydroxy-4’-methoxychalcone 8. Loss of the hydroxyl group in the B-ring of 4’-methoxychalcones or its replacement by a halogen atom (−Cl, −Br, nitro group (−NO2, ethoxy group (−OCH2CH3, or aliphatic substituent (−CH3, −CH2CH3 resulted in the loss of antimicrobial activity towards both R. rubra yeast and S. aureus bacteria. Xanthohumol 1, naringenin 5, and chalconaringenin 7 inhibited growth of S. aureus, whereas 4-hydroxy-4′-methoxychalcone 8 was active towards two strains: S. aureus and R. rubra.

  15. GENDER-SELECTIVE INTERACTION BETWEEN AGING AND CARDIOVASCULAR SYMPATHETIC ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorat D Kiran

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Physiologically aging refers to the impaired ability to maintain homeostasis during external as wellas internal stresses. The sympathetic nervous system becomes tonically, progressively and markedlyactivated with aging in humans. Study is done to measure the cardiovascular sympatheticdysfunctions in the males and females of the different age groups. Total 80, healthy subjects nothaving any major illness and any chronic addiction, were selected for the study. All the subjects wereevaluated by using “CANWIN cardiac autonomic neuropathy analyzer” using the tests like Pulse rateby Palpatory method, Blood Pressure response to sudden standing and Sustained Handgrip test. In all the elderly subjects the sympathetic system was over activated and this over activation of the sympathetic system became more severe as the age advanced. Aging is accompanied by a greater increase in sympathetic activity in women than in men, independent of menopausal status. The study concludes that there is more marked influence of age on sympathetic nervous system activation and impaired sensitivity of baroreceptors in women than men.

  16. Chandra and Swift Observations of Unidentified Fermi-LAT Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Davide; Cheung, T.; Gehrels, N.

    2010-03-01

    In the last year we targeted some of the unidentified Fermi-LAT objects (UFOs) at high Galactic latitude with Chandra and Swift in order to determine the basic properties (positions, fluxes, hardness ratios) of all X-ray sources within the Fermi-LAT localization circles. These satellites enable us to detect the X-ray conterparts with a flux limit that is at least an order of magnitude lower than achieved in extant RASS data and to further follow-up at other wavelengths, with the ultimate goal to reveal the nature of these enigmatic gamma-ray sources. Here we present the results obtained with 5 Chandra pointings of high Galactic latitude UFOs in the Fermi-LAT 3-months bright source list. The association of detected X-ray sources within the improved 11-months Fermi-LAT localization circles with available optical and radio observations is discussed.

  17. Chandra Cluster Cosmology Project III: Cosmological Parameter Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikhlinin, A.; Kravtsov, A. V.; Burenin, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    , and nearly a factor of 2 improvement in systematics compared with constraints that can be obtained without clusters. The joint analysis of these four data sets puts a conservative upper limit on the masses of light neutrinos ∑m ν ...Chandra observations of large samples of galaxy clusters detected in X-rays by ROSAT provide a new, robust determination of the cluster mass functions at low and high redshifts. Statistical and systematic errors are now sufficiently small, and the redshift leverage sufficiently large for the mass...... function evolution to be used as a useful growth of a structure-based dark energy probe. In this paper, we present cosmological parameter constraints obtained from Chandra observations of 37 clusters with langzrang = 0.55 derived from 400 deg2 ROSAT serendipitous survey and 49 brightest z ≈ 0.05 clusters...

  18. Adapative software solutions: lessons learned from Chandra flight operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shropshire, Daniel P.; Bucher, Sabina; Rose, Joseph

    2006-06-01

    After over 6 highly successful years on orbit, the Chandra X-ray Observatory continues to deliver world class science to members of the X-ray community. Much of this success can be attributed to an excellent space vehicle, however; the creation of several unique software tools has allowed for extremely efficient and smooth running operations. The Chandra Flight Operations Team, staffed by members of Northrop Grumman Space Technology, has created a suite of software tools designed to help optimize on-console operations, mission planning and scheduling, and spacecraft engineering and trending. Many of these tools leverage COTS products and Web based technologies. We describe the original mission concepts, need for supplemental software tools, development and implementation, use of these tools in the current operations scenario, and efficiency improvements due to their use.

  19. BibCat: The Chandra Data Archive Bibliography Cataloging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelman, S.; Rots, A.

    2010-12-01

    The Chandra Data Archive (CDA) has been tracking publications in refereed journals and on-line conference proceedings that are based on Chandra observations since early in the mission. Over the years this database and its associated tools have expanded dramatically. In this paper we describe our newly renovated bibliography architecture with an emphasis on new features which have been added including: auto-scan capabilities to reduce in an automated fashion the number of papers which need to be manually classified and to flag keywords (such as observatory names or surveys) used within papers; multi-user classification allowing quality assurance checks; multi-observatory capabilities allowing multiple facilities to use the same database independently; and plug-in support allowing access to associated observatory data to more fully describe data links in papers.

  20. Updates on Chandra Data Analysis and Calibration Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Jonathan C.; Nowak, M. A.; X-ray Center, Chandra

    2008-03-01

    We review recent issues and improvements in Chandra data analysis, highlighting changes to the instrument and telescope calibration, the availability of new tools and scripts, and the completion of the "Repro 3" reprocessing. In CALDB 3.4.2, released in December 2007, new time dependent ACIS gain files were released. CALDB 3.4.1 (Sep 2007) included new ACIS blank sky background files as well as a new HRC-I degap geometry file. Following reprocessing of the entire archive (except for some early postlaunch observations) retrieved data should be consistent with the latest processing system, which makes a number of earlier analysis steps obsolete. Finally, we will briefly describe the forthcoming Chandra Source Catalog.

  1. Highlights and discoveries from the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tananbaum, H; Weisskopf, M C; Tucker, W; Wilkes, B; Edmonds, P

    2014-06-01

    Within 40 years of the detection of the first extra-solar x-ray source in 1962, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has achieved an increase in sensitivity of 10 orders of magnitude, comparable to the gain in going from naked-eye observations to the most powerful optical telescopes over the past 400 years. Chandra is unique in its capabilities for producing sub-arcsecond x-ray images with 100-200 eV energy resolution for energies in the range 0.08 black holes; the growth of supermassive black holes and their role in the regulation of star formation and growth of galaxies; impacts of collisions, mergers, and feedback on growth and evolution of groups and clusters of galaxies; and properties of dark matter and dark energy.

  2. Bipartite functions of the CREB co-activators selectively direct alternative splicing or transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelio, Antonio L; Caputi, Massimo; Conkright, Michael D

    2009-09-16

    The CREB regulated transcription co-activators (CRTCs) regulate many biological processes by integrating and converting environmental inputs into transcriptional responses. Although the mechanisms by which CRTCs sense cellular signals are characterized, little is known regarding how CRTCs contribute to the regulation of cAMP inducible genes. Here we show that these dynamic regulators, unlike other co-activators, independently direct either pre-mRNA splice-site selection or transcriptional activation depending on the cell type or promoter context. Moreover, in other scenarios, the CRTC co-activators coordinately regulate transcription and splicing. Mutational analyses showed that CRTCs possess distinct functional domains responsible for regulating either pre-mRNA splicing or transcriptional activation. Interestingly, the CRTC1-MAML2 oncoprotein lacks the splicing domain and is incapable of altering splice-site selection despite robustly activating transcription. The differential usage of these distinct domains allows CRTCs to selectively mediate multiple facets of gene regulation, indicating that co-activators are not solely restricted to coordinating alternative splicing with increase in transcriptional activity.

  3. Cross-matching within the Chandra Source Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rots, Arnold H.; Burke, Douglas J.; Civano, Francesca; Hain, Roger; Nguyen, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Cross-matching among overlapping source detections in the development of the Chandra Source Catalog (CSC) presents considerable challenges, since the Point Spread Function (PSF) of the Chandra X-ray Observatory varies significantly over the field of view. For the production of the second release of the CSC we have developed a cross-match tool that is based on the Bayesian algorithms by Budavari, Heinis, and Szalay (ApJ 679, 301 and 705, 739), making use of the error ellipses for the derived positions of the detections.However, calculating match probabilities only on the basis of error ellipses breaks down when the PSFs are significantly different. This is an issue that is not commonly addressed in cross-match tools. We have applied a satisfactory modification to the algorithm that, although not perfect, ameliorates the issue for the vast majority of such cases.A separate issue is that as the number of overlapping detections increases, the number of matches to be considered increases at an alarming rate, requiring procedural adjustments to ensure that the cross-matching finishes within a Hubble time.We intend to make the tool available as a general purpose cross-match engine for calculating match probabilities between sources in multiple catalogs simultaneously.This work has been supported by NASA under contract NAS 8-03060 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for operation of the Chandra X-ray Center.

  4. Antifungal activity of essential oils against selected terverticillate penicillia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soňa Felšöciová

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to screen 15 essential oils of selected plant species, viz. [i]Lavandula angustifolia[/i], [i]Carum carvi[/i], [i]Pinus mungo var. pulmilio[/i], [i]Mentha piperita[/i], [i]Chamomilla recutita[/i] L.,[i] Pinus sylvestris[/i], [i]Satureia hortensis[/i] L., [i]Origanum vulgare[/i] L., [i]Pimpinella anisum[/i], [i]Rosmarinus officinali[/i]s L., [i]Salvia officinalis[/i] L., [i]Abietis albia etheroleum[/i], [i]Chamomilla recutita[/i] L. [i]Rausch[/i], [i]Thymus vulgaris[/i] L., [i]Origanum vulgare[/i] L. for antifungal activity against five [i]Penicillium[/i] species: [i]Penicillium brevicompactum[/i], [i]Penicillium citrinum[/i], [i]Penicillium crustosum[/i], [i]Penicillium expansum[/i] and [i]Penicillium griseofulvum[/i]. The method used for screening included the disc diffusion method. The study points out the wide spectrum of antifungal activity of essential oils against [i]Penicillium[/i] fungi. There were five essential oils of the 15 mentioned above which showed a hopeful antifungal activity: [i]Pimpinella anisum[/i], [i]Chamomilla recutita[/i] L., [i]Thymus vulgaris[/i], [i]Origanum vulgare[/i] L. The most hopeful antifungal activity and killing effect against all tested penicillia was found to be [i]Origanum vulgare[/i] L. and [i]Pimpinella anisum[/i]. The lowest level of antifungal activity was demonstrated by the oils [i]Pinus mungo var. pulmilio[/i], [i]Salvia officinalis[/i] L., [i]Abietis albia etheroleum[/i], [i]Chamomilla recutita[/i] L.[i] Rausch[/i], [i]Rosmarinus officinalis[/i].

  5. Direct and selective small-molecule activation of proapoptotic BAX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Reyna, Denis E; Bellairs, Joseph A; Leshchiner, Elizaveta S; Walensky, Loren D

    2013-01-01

    BCL-2 family proteins are key regulators of the apoptotic pathway. Antiapoptotic members sequester the BCL-2 homology 3 (BH3) death domains of proapoptotic members such as BAX to maintain cell survival. The antiapoptotic BH3-binding groove has been successfully targeted to reactivate apoptosis in cancer. We recently identified a geographically distinct BH3-binding groove that mediates direct BAX activation, suggesting a new strategy for inducing apoptosis by flipping BAX’s ‘on switch’. Here we applied computational screening to identify a BAX activator molecule that directly and selectively activates BAX. We demonstrate by NMR and biochemical analyses that the molecule engages the BAX trigger site and promotes the functional oligomerization of BAX. The molecule does not interact with the BH3-binding pocket of antiapoptotic proteins or proapoptotic BAK and induces cell death in a BAX-dependent fashion. To our knowledge, we report the first gain-of-function molecular modulator of a BCL-2 family protein and demonstrate a new paradigm for pharmacologic induction of apoptosis. PMID:22634637

  6. Anti-inflammatory activity in selected Antarctic benthic organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan eMoles

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Antarctic benthos was prospected in search for anti-inflammatory activity in polar benthic invertebrates, in two different geographical areas: deep-bottoms of the Eastern Weddell Sea and shallow-waters of the South Shetland Islands. A total of 36 benthic algae and invertebrate species were selected to perform solubility tests in order to test them for anti-inflammatory activity. From these, ethanol extracts of ten species from five different phyla resulted suitable to be studied in cell macrophage cultures (RAW 264.7. Cytotoxicity (MTT method and production of inflammatory mediators (prostaglandin E2, leukotriene B4, interleukin-1 were determined at three extract concentrations (50, 125, 250 g/mL. Bioassays resulted in four different species showing anti-inflammatory activity corresponding to three sponges: Mycale (Oxymycale acerata, Isodictya erinacea, and I. toxophila; and one hemichordate: Cephalodiscus sp. These results show that Antarctic sessile invertebrates may have great value as a source of lead compounds with potential pharmaceutical applications.

  7. Deep Chandra observations of the stripped galaxy group falling into Abell 2142

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, D.; Gaspari, M.; Owers, M. S.; Roediger, E.; Molendi, S.; Gastaldello, F.; Paltani, S.; Ettori, S.; Venturi, T.; Rossetti, M.; Rudnick, L.

    2017-09-01

    In the local Universe, the growth of massive galaxy clusters mainly operates through the continuous accretion of group-scale systems. The infalling group in Abell 2142 is the poster child of such an accreting group, and as such, it is an ideal target to study the astrophysical processes induced by structure formation. We present the results of a deep (200 ks) observation of this structure with Chandra that highlights the complexity of this system in exquisite detail. In the core of the group, the spatial resolution of Chandra reveals a leading edge and complex AGN-induced activity. The morphology of the stripped gas tail appears straight in the innermost 250 kpc, suggesting that magnetic draping efficiently shields the gas from its surroundings. However, beyond 300 kpc from the core, the tail flares and the morphology becomes strongly irregular, which could be explained by a breaking of the drape, for example, caused by turbulent motions. The power spectrum of surface-brightness fluctuations is relatively flat (P2D ∝ k-2.3), which indicates that thermal conduction is strongly inhibited even beyond the region where magnetic draping is effective. The amplitude of density fluctuations in the tail is consistent with a mild level of turbulence with a Mach number M3D 0.1 - 0.25. Overall, our results show that the processes leading to the thermalization and mixing of the infalling gas are slow and relatively inefficient.

  8. A Deep Chandra Observation of the AGN Outburst and Merger in Hickson Compact Group 62

    CERN Document Server

    Rafferty, D A; Nulsen, P E J; McNamara, B R; Brandt, W N; Wise, M W; Röttgering, H J A

    2012-01-01

    We report on an analysis of new Chandra data of the galaxy group HCG 62, well known for possessing cavities in its intragroup medium (IGM) that were inflated by the radio lobes of its central active galactic nucleus (AGN). With the new data, a factor of three deeper than previous Chandra data, we re-examine the energetics of the cavities and determine new constraints on their contents. We confirm that the ratio of radiative to mechanical power of the AGN outburst that created the cavities is less than 10^-4, among the lowest of any known cavity system, implying that the relativistic electrons in the lobes can supply only a tiny fraction of the pressure required to support the cavities. This finding implies additional pressure support in the lobes from heavy particles (e.g., protons) or thermal gas. Using spectral fits to emission in the cavities, we constrain any such volume-filling thermal gas to have a temperature kT > 4.3 keV. For the first time, we detect X-ray emission from the central AGN, with a lumino...

  9. Lifecycle Prognostics Architecture for Selected High-Cost Active Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N. Lybeck; B. Pham; M. Tawfik; J. B. Coble; R. M. Meyer; P. Ramuhalli; L. J. Bond

    2011-08-01

    There are an extensive body of knowledge and some commercial products available for calculating prognostics, remaining useful life, and damage index parameters. The application of these technologies within the nuclear power community is still in its infancy. Online monitoring and condition-based maintenance is seeing increasing acceptance and deployment, and these activities provide the technological bases for expanding to add predictive/prognostics capabilities. In looking to deploy prognostics there are three key aspects of systems that are presented and discussed: (1) component/system/structure selection, (2) prognostic algorithms, and (3) prognostics architectures. Criteria are presented for component selection: feasibility, failure probability, consequences of failure, and benefits of the prognostics and health management (PHM) system. The basis and methods commonly used for prognostics algorithms are reviewed and summarized. Criteria for evaluating PHM architectures are presented: open, modular architecture; platform independence; graphical user interface for system development and/or results viewing; web enabled tools; scalability; and standards compatibility. Thirteen software products were identified and discussed in the context of being potentially useful for deployment in a PHM program applied to systems in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These products were evaluated by using information available from company websites, product brochures, fact sheets, scholarly publications, and direct communication with vendors. The thirteen products were classified into four groups of software: (1) research tools, (2) PHM system development tools, (3) deployable architectures, and (4) peripheral tools. Eight software tools fell into the deployable architectures category. Of those eight, only two employ all six modules of a full PHM system. Five systems did not offer prognostic estimates, and one system employed the full health monitoring suite but lacked operations and

  10. Acetylcholine activity in selective striatal regions supports behavioral flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragozzino, Michael E; Mohler, Eric G; Prior, Margaret; Palencia, Carlos A; Rozman, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Daily living often requires individuals to flexibly respond to new circumstances. There is considerable evidence that the striatum is part of a larger neural network that supports flexible adaptations. Cholinergic interneurons are situated to strongly influence striatal output patterns which may enable flexible adaptations. The present experiments investigated whether acetylcholine actions in different striatal regions support behavioral flexibility by measuring acetylcholine efflux during place reversal learning. Acetylcholine efflux selectively increased in the dorsomedial striatum, but not dorsolateral or ventromedial striatum during place reversal learning. In order to modulate the M2-class of autoreceptors, administration of oxotremorine sesquifumurate (100 nM) into the dorsomedial striatum, concomitantly impaired reversal learning and an increase in acetylcholine output. These effects were reversed by the m(2) muscarinic receptor antagonist, AF-DX-116 (20 nM). The effects of oxotremorine sesquifumurate and AF-DX-116 on acetylcholine efflux were selective to behaviorally-induced changes as neither treatment affected acetylcholine output in a resting condition. In contrast to reversal learning, acetylcholine efflux in the dorsomedial striatum did not change during place acquisition. The results reveal an essential role for cholinergic activity and define its locus of control to the dorsomedial striatum in cognitive flexibility.

  11. Novel antimicrobial peptides with high anticancer activity and selectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Lun Chu

    Full Text Available We describe a strategy to boost anticancer activity and reduce normal cell toxicity of short antimicrobial peptides by adding positive charge amino acids and non-nature bulky amino acid β-naphthylalanine residues to their termini. Among the designed peptides, K4R2-Nal2-S1 displayed better salt resistance and less toxicity to hRBCs and human fibroblast than Nal2-S1 and K6-Nal2-S1. Fluorescence microscopic studies indicated that the FITC-labeled K4R2-Nal2-S1 preferentially binds cancer cells and causes apoptotic cell death. Moreover, a significant inhibition in human lung tumor growth was observed in the xenograft mice treated with K4R2-Nal2-S1. Our strategy provides new opportunities in the development of highly effective and selective antimicrobial and anticancer peptide-based therapeutics.

  12. Substrate integrated ferrite phase shifters and active frequency selective surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Cahill, B M

    2002-01-01

    There are two distinct parts to this thesis; the first investigates the use of ferrite tiles in the construction of printed phase shifting transmission lines, culminating in the design of two compact electromagnetic controlled beam steered patch and slot antenna arrays. The second part investigates the use of active frequency selective surfaces (AFSS), which are later used to cover a uPVC constructed enclosure. Field intensity measurements are taken from within the enclosure to determine the dynamic screening effectiveness. Trans Tech G-350 Ferrite is investigated to determine its application in printed microstrip and stripline phase shifting transmission lines. 50-Ohm transmission lines are constructed using the ferrite tile and interfaced to Rogers RT Duroid 5870 substrate. Scattering parameter measurements are made under the application of variable magnetic fields to the ferrite. Later, two types of planar microwave beam steering antennas are constructed. The first uses the ferrites integrated into the Dur...

  13. Phenolic profile and antioxidant activity in selected seeds and sprouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pająk, Paulina; Socha, Robert; Gałkowska, Dorota; Rożnowski, Jacek; Fortuna, Teresa

    2014-01-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of germination on the phenolic acids and flavonoids profile, as well as antioxidant activity (AA), in selected edible seeds of mung beans, radish, broccoli and sunflower. Germination increased the total phenolic (TP) and flavonoid (TF) levels, as well as the AA of the seeds, and influenced the profile of free and bound phenolic compounds. Among the samples, mung bean was characterised by lowest levels of TP and TF, as well as AA, evaluated using ABTS, DPPH and FRAP assays. Sunflower and radish sprouts were the most rich in phenolic compounds. Insignificant amounts of free phenolic acids were found in the free phenolic acid fraction; alkaline hydrolysis of the seeds and sprouts extracts provided the majority of the phenolic acids. The amounts of free and bound flavonoids were inconsiderable both for seeds and sprouts.

  14. Chandra Observations of Dying Radio Sources in Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgia, M.; Markevitch, M.; Govoni, F.; Parma, P.; Fanti, R.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Mack, K.-H.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The dying radio sources represent a very interesting and largely unexplored stage of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) evolution. They are considered to be very rare, and almost all of the few known ones were found in galaxy clusters. However, considering the small number detected so far, it has not been possible to draw any firm conclusions about their X-ray environment. Aims. We present X-ray observations performed with the Chandra satellite of the three galaxy clusters Abell 2276, ZwCl 1829.3+6912, and RX J1852.1+5711, which harbor at their center a dying radio source with an ultra-steep spectrum that we recently discovered. Methods. We analyzed the physical properties of the X-ray emitting gas surrounding these elusive radio sources. We determined the global X-ray properties of the clusters, derived the azimuthally averaged profiles of metal abundance, gas temperature, density, and pressure. Furthermore, we estimated the total mass profiles. Results. The large-scale X-ray emission is regular and spherical, suggesting a relaxed state for these systems. Indeed, we found that the three clusters are also characterized by significant enhancements in the metal abundance and declining temperature profiles toward the central region. For all these reasons, we classified RX J1852.1+5711, Abell 2276, and ZwCl 1829.3+6912 as cool-core galaxy clusters. Conclusions. We calculated the non-thermal pressure of the radio lobes assuming that the radio sources are in the minimum energy condition. For all dying sources we found that this is on average about one to two orders of magnitude lower than that of the external gas, as found for many other radio sources at the center of galaxy groups and clusters. We found marginal evidence for the presence of X-ray surface brightness depressions coincident with the fossil radio lobes of the dying sources in A2276 and ZwCl 1829.3+691. We estimated the outburst age and energy output for these two dying sources. The energy power from

  15. Chandra Grating Spectroscopy of Three Hot White Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczak, J.; Werner, K.; Rauch, T.; Schuh, S.; Drake, J. J.; Kruk, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopic observations of single hot white dwarfs are scarce. With the Chandra Low-Energy Transmission Grating, we have observed two white dwarfs, one is of spectral type DA (LB1919) and the other is a non-DA of spectral type PG1159 (PG1520+525). The spectra of both stars are analyzed, together with an archival Chandra spectrum of another DA white dwarf (GD246). Aims. The soft X-ray spectra of the two DA white dwarfs are investigated in order to study the effect of gravitational settling and radiative levitation of metals in their photospheres. LB1919 is of interest because it has a significantly lower metallicity than DAs with otherwise similar atmospheric parameters. GD246 is the only white dwarf known that shows identifiable individual iron lines in the soft X-ray range. For the PG1159 star, a precise effective temperature determination is performed in order to confine the position of the blue edge of the GW Vir instability region in the HRD. Methods. The Chandra spectra are analyzed with chemically homogeneous as well as stratified NLTE model atmospheres that assume equilibrium between gravitational settling and radiative acceleration of chemical elements. Archival EUV and UV spectra obtained with EUVE, FUSE, and HST are utilized to support the analysis. Results. No metals could be identified in LB1919. All observations are compatible with a pure hydrogen atmosphere. This is in stark contrast to the vast majority of hot DA white dwarfs that exhibit light and heavy metals and to the stratified models that predict significant metal abundances in the atmosphere. For GD246 we find that neither stratified nor homogeneous models can fit the Chandra spectrum. The Chandra spectrum of PG1520+525 constrains the effective temperature to T(sub eff) = 150 000 +/- 10 000 K. Therefore, this nonpulsating star together with the pulsating prototype of the GWVir class (PG1159-035) defines the location of the blue edge of the GWVir instability region

  16. LoCuSS: Hydrostatic Mass Measurements of the High-$L_X$ Cluster Sample -- Cross-calibration of Chandra and XMM-Newton

    CERN Document Server

    Martino, Rossella; Bourdin, Hervé; Smith, Graham P; Bartalucci, Iacopo; Marrone, Daniel P; Finoguenov, Alexis; Okabe, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-01

    We present a consistent analysis of Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of an approximately mass-selected sample of 50 galaxy clusters at $0.15Chandra and XMM-Newton backgrounds to $<2\\%$ and $<5\\%$ precision respectively. To verify the cross-calibration of Chandra and XMM-Newton-based cluster mass measurements, we derive the mass profiles of the 21 clusters that have been observed with both satellites, extracting surface brightness and temperature profiles from identical regions of the respective datasets. We obtain consistent results for the gas and total hydrostatic cluster masses: the average ratio of Chandra- to XMM-Newton-based measurements of $M_{\\rm gas}$ and $M_X$ at $r_{500}$ are $0.99\\pm0.02$ and $1.02\\pm0.05$, respectively with an intrinsic scatter of $\\sim3\\%$ for gas masses and $\\sim8...

  17. Chandra Reviews Black Hole Musical: Epic But Off-Key

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    A gigantic sonic boom generated by a supermassive black hole has been found with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, along with evidence for a cacophony of deep sound. This discovery was made by using data from the longest X-ray observation ever of M87, a nearby giant elliptical galaxy. M87 is centrally located in the Virgo cluster of galaxies and is known to harbor one of the Universe's most massive black holes. Scientists detected loops and rings in the hot, X-ray emitting gas that permeates the cluster and surrounds the galaxy. These loops provide evidence for periodic eruptions that occurred near the supermassive black hole, and that generate changes in pressure, or pressure waves, in the cluster gas that manifested themselves as sound. Chandra Low Energy X-ray Images of M87 Chandra Low Energy X-ray Images of M87 "We can tell that many deep and different sounds have been rumbling through this cluster for most of the lifetime of the Universe," said William Forman of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA). The outbursts in M87, which happen every few million years, prevent the huge reservoir of gas in the cluster from cooling and forming many new stars. Without these outbursts and resultant heating, M87 would not be the elliptical galaxy it is today. "If this black hole wasn't making all of this noise, M87 could have been a completely different type of galaxy," said team member Paul Nulsen, also of the CfA, "possibly a huge spiral galaxy about 30 times brighter than the Milky Way." Chandra High Energy X-ray Image of M87 Chandra High Energy X-ray Image of M87 The outbursts result when material falls toward the black hole. While most of the matter is swallowed, some of it was violently ejected in jets. These jets are launched from regions close to the black hole (neither light nor sound can escape from the black hole itself) and push into the cluster's gas, generating cavities and sound which then propagate outwards. Chandra's M87 observations also

  18. Subunit-selective proteasome activity profiling uncovers uncoupled proteasome subunit activities during bacterial infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Misas-villamil, Johana C.; Burgh, Van Der Aranka M.; Grosse-holz, Friederike; Bach-pages, Marcel; Kovács, Judit; Kaschani, Farnusch; Schilasky, Sören; Emon, Asif E.K.; Ruben, Mark; Kaiser, Markus; Overkleeft, Hermen S.; Hoorn, van der Renier A.L.

    2017-01-01

    The proteasome is a nuclear-cytoplasmic proteolytic complex involved in nearly all regulatory pathways in plant cells. The three different catalytic activities of the proteasome can have different functions, but tools to monitor and control these subunits selectively are not yet available in plant

  19. Identification of Early Intermediates of Caspase Activation Using Selective Inhibitors and Activity-Based Probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, Alicia B.; Witte, Martin D.; Denault, Jean-Bernard; Sadaghiani, Amir Masoud; Sexton, Kelly M.B.; Salvesen, Guy S.; Bogyo, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    Caspases are cysteine proteases that are key effectors in apoptotic cell death. Currently, there is a lack of tools that can be used to monitor the regulation of specific caspases in the context of distinct apoptotic programs. We describe the development of highly selective inhibitors and active sit

  20. Tracing the Mass-Dependent Star Formation History of Late-Type Galaxies using X-ray Emission: Results from the CHANDRA Deep Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmer, B.D; Brandt, W.N.; Schneider, D.P.; Steffen, A.T.; Alexander, D.M.; Bell, E.F.; Hornschemeier, A.E.; McIntosh, D.H.; Bauer, F.E.; Gilli, R.; Mainieri, V.; Silverman, J.D.; Tozzi, P.; Wolf, C.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the X-ray evolution over the last approx.9 Gyr of cosmic history (i.e., since z = 1.4) of late-type galaxy populations in the Chandra Deep Field-North and Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-N and E-CDF-S. respectively; jointly CDFs) survey fields. Our late-type galaxy sample consists of 2568 galaxies. which were identified using rest-frame optical colors and HST morphologies. We utilized X-ray stacking analyses to investigate the X-ray emission from these galaxies, emphasizing the contributions from normal galaxies that are not dominated by active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Over this redshift range, we find significant increases (factors of approx. 5-10) in the X-ray-to-optical mean luminosity ratio (L(sub x)/L(sub B)) and the X-ray-to-stellar-mass mean ratio (L(sub x)/M(sub *)) for galaxy populations selected by L(sub B) and M(sub *), respectively. When analyzing galaxy samples selected via SFR, we find that the mean X-ray-to-SFR ratio (L(sub x)/SFR) is consistent with being constant over the entire redshift range for galaxies with SFR = 1-100 Solar Mass/yr, thus demonstrating that X-ray emission can be used as a robust indicator of star-formation activity out to z approx. 1.4. We find that the star-formation activity (as traced by X-ray luminosity) per unit stellar mass in a given redshift bin increases with decreasing stellar mass over the redshift range z = 0.2-1, which is consistent with previous studies of how star-formation activity depends on stellar mass. Finally, we extend our X-ray analyses to Lyman break galaxies at z approx. 3 and estimate that L(sub x)/L(sub B) at z approx. 3 is similar to its value at z = 1.4.

  1. Selective activation of mechanosensitive ion channels using magnetic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Steven; McBain, Stuart; Dobson, Jon; El Haj, Alicia J

    2008-08-01

    This study reports the preliminary development of a novel magnetic particle-based technique that permits the application of highly localized mechanical forces directly to specific regions of an ion-channel structure. We demonstrate that this approach can be used to directly and selectively activate a mechanosensitive ion channel of interest, namely TREK-1. It is shown that manipulation of particles targeted against the extended extracellular loop region of TREK-1 leads to changes in whole-cell currents consistent with changes in TREK-1 activity. Responses were absent when particles were coated with RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) peptide or when magnetic fields were applied in the absence of magnetic particles. It is concluded that changes in whole-cell current are the result of direct force application to the extracellular loop region of TREK-1 and thus these results implicate this region of the channel structure in mechano-gating. It is hypothesized that the extended loop region of TREK-1 may act as a tension spring that acts to regulate sensitivity to mechanical forces, in a nature similar to that described for MscL. The development of a technique that permits the direct manipulation of mechanosensitive ion channels in real time without the need for pharmacological drugs has huge potential benefits not only for basic biological research of ion-channel gating mechanisms, but also potentially as a tool for the treatment of human diseases caused by ion-channel dysfunction.

  2. Antioxidant Activities of Nine Selected Culinary Spices from China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Ying; Ding Ying; Zhang Liu-juan; Liu Xian-jin

    2015-01-01

    The antioxidant activities and the total phenolic contents of the water and/or ethanol extracts of the nine selected culinary spices from China were systematically investigated. Both ethanol extracts and water extracts had high ability of 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging, 2, 2'-azinobis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP). The ethanol extract of Sichuan pepper showed the highest ability of DPPH radical scavenging. The extract with the highest ABTS radical scavenging effect was that of ethanol extract of cinnamon. Both ethanol and water extracts of cinnamon possessed the high ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) with the values of 4 541.87 and 1 134.52 µmol of Fe (Ⅱ)/g. The extracts with high hydroxyl radical-mediated deoxyribose degradation were all the ethanol extracts as follows:cinnamon, bay leaf, Sichuan pepper, star anise and fennel. The extracts with high antioxidant activities also had the high contents of the phenols. The study indicated that these spices might be potentially be used as natural antioxidants in food.

  3. The Chandra X-ray Observatory is prepped for solar panel deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    In the Vertical Processing Facility, a TRW technician checks the attachment of the solar panel array (out of sight to the right) to the Chandra X-ray Observatory, at left. Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93.

  4. Chandra Survey of Nearby Highly Inclined Disc Galaxies - III: Comparison with Hydrodynamical Simulations of Circumgalactic Coronae

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jiang-Tao; Wang, Q Daniel

    2014-01-01

    X-ray observations of circumgalactic coronae provide a valuable means by which to test galaxy formation theories. Two primary mechanisms are thought to be responsible for the establishment of such coronae: accretion of intergalactic gas (IGM) and/or galactic feedback. In this paper, we first compare our Chandra sample of galactic coronae of 53 nearby highly-inclined disc galaxies to an analytical model considering only the accretion of IGM. We confirm the existing conclusion that this pure accretion model substantially over-predicts the coronal emission. We then select 30 field galaxies from our original sample, and correct their coronal luminosities to uniformly compare them to deep X-ray measurements of several massive disc galaxies from the literature, as well as to a comparable sample of simulated galaxies drawn from the Galaxies-Intergalactic Medium Interaction Calculation (GIMIC). These simulations explicitly model both accretion and SNe feedback and yield galaxies exhibit X-ray properties in broad agre...

  5. Antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity of selected Egyptian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuete, Victor; Wiench, Benjamin; Hegazy, Mohamed-Elamir F; Mohamed, Tarik A; Fankam, Aimé G; Shahat, Abdelaaty A; Efferth, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Medicinal plants have been used as a source of remedies since ancient times in Egypt. The present study was designed to investigate the antibacterial activity and the cytotoxicity of the organic extracts from 16 selected medicinal plants of Egypt. The study was also extended to the isolation of the antiproliferative compound jaeschkeanadiol p-hydroxybenzoate (FH-25) from Ferula hermonis. The microbroth dilution was used to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the samples against twelve bacterial strains belonging to four species, Providencia stuartii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli, while a resazurin assay was used to assess the cytotoxicity of the extracts on the human pancreatic cancer cell line MiaPaCa-2, breast cancer cell line MCF-7, CCRF-CEM leukemia cells, and their multidrug resistant subline, CEM/ADR5000. The results of the MIC determination indicated that all the studied crude extracts were able to inhibit the growth of at least one of the tested bacterial species, the best activity being recorded with the crude extracts from F. hermonis and Vitis vinifera, whichwere active against 91.7% and 83.3% of the studied bacteria, respectively. The lowest MIC value of 128 μg/mL was recorded against P. stuartii ATCC 29916 and E. coli ATCC 10536 with the extract from V. vinifera and Commiphora molmol, respectively. In the cytotoxicity study, IC50 values below 20 μg/mL were recorded for the crude extract of F. hermonis on all four studied cancer cell lines. FH-25 also showed good cytotoxicity against MCF-7 cells (IC50: 2.47 μg/mL). Finally, the results of the present investigation provided supportive data for the possible use of the plant extracts investigated herein, mostly F. hermonis and V. vinifera in the treatment of bacterial infections and jaeschkeanadiol p-hydroxybenzoate in the control of cancer diseases. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 µg/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests

  7. A wide Chandra view of the core of the Perseus cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Fabian, A C; Allen, S W; Canning, R E A; Churazov, E; Crawford, C S; Forman, W; GaBany, J; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J; Johnstone, R M; Russell, H R; Reynolds, C S; Salome, P; Taylor, G B; Young, A J

    2011-01-01

    We present new Chandra images of the X-ray emission from the core of the Perseus cluster of galaxies. The total observation time is now 1.4 Ms. New depressions in X-ray surface brightness are discovered to the north of NGC1275, which we interpret as old rising bubbles. They imply that bubbles are long-lived and do not readily breakup when rising in the hot cluster atmosphere. The existence of a 300 kpc long NNW-SSW bubble axis means there cannot be significant transverse large scale flows exceeding 100 km/s. Interesting spatial correlations are seen along that axis in early deep radio maps. A semi-circular cold front about 100 kpc west of the nucleus is seen. It separates an inner disturbed region dominated by the activity of the active nucleus of NGC1275 from the outer region where a subcluster merger dominates.

  8. Annealing bounds to prevent further Charge Transfer Inefficiency increase of the Chandra X-ray CCDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monmeyran, Corentin, E-mail: comonmey@mit.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Patel, Neil S., E-mail: neilp@mit.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Bautz, Mark W., E-mail: mwb@space.mit.edu [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Grant, Catherine E., E-mail: cgrant@space.mit.edu [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Prigozhin, Gregory Y., E-mail: gyp@space.mit.edu [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Agarwal, Anuradha, E-mail: anu@mit.edu [Microphotonics Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Kimerling, Lionel C., E-mail: lckim@mit.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Microphotonics Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    After the front-illuminated CCDs on board the X-ray telescope Chandra were damaged by radiation after launch, it was decided to anneal them in an effort to remove the defects introduced by the irradiation. The annealing led to an unexpected increase of the Charge Transfer Inefficiency (CTI). The performance degradation is attributed to point defect interactions in the devices. Specifically, the annealing at 30 °C activated the diffusion of the main interstitial defect in the device, the carbon interstitial, which led to its association with a substitutional impurity, ultimately resulting in a stable and electrically active defect state. Because the formation reaction of this carbon interstitial and substitutional impurity associate is diffusion limited, we recommend a higher upper bound for the annealing temperature and duration of any future CCD anneals, that of −50 °C for one day or −60 °C for a week, to prevent further CTI increase.

  9. Annealing bounds to prevent further Charge Transfer Inefficiency increase of the Chandra X-ray CCDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monmeyran, Corentin; Patel, Neil S.; Bautz, Mark W.; Grant, Catherine E.; Prigozhin, Gregory Y.; Agarwal, Anuradha; Kimerling, Lionel C.

    2016-12-01

    After the front-illuminated CCDs on board the X-ray telescope Chandra were damaged by radiation after launch, it was decided to anneal them in an effort to remove the defects introduced by the irradiation. The annealing led to an unexpected increase of the Charge Transfer Inefficiency (CTI). The performance degradation is attributed to point defect interactions in the devices. Specifically, the annealing at 30 °C activated the diffusion of the main interstitial defect in the device, the carbon interstitial, which led to its association with a substitutional impurity, ultimately resulting in a stable and electrically active defect state. Because the formation reaction of this carbon interstitial and substitutional impurity associate is diffusion limited, we recommend a higher upper bound for the annealing temperature and duration of any future CCD anneals, that of -50 °C for one day or -60 °C for a week, to prevent further CTI increase.

  10. Selective antitumor activity of roscovitine in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Cyril; Hajek, Michael; Biktasova, Asel; Bellinger, Gary; Yarbrough, Wendell G; Issaeva, Natalia

    2016-06-21

    Radiation and chemotherapy that are commonly used to treat human cancers damage cellular DNA. DNA damage appears to be more toxic to cancer cells than normal cells, most likely due to deregulated checkpoint activation and/or deficiency in DNA repair pathways that are characteristics of many tumors. However, unwanted side effects arise as a result of DNA damage to normal cells during the treatment.Here, we show that roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor that inhibits CDK-1, CDK-2, CDK-5, CDK-7, and CDK-9 due to competitive binding to the ATP site on the kinases, causes significant DNA damage followed by p53-dependent cell death in human papilloma virus (HPV)-positive, but not in HPV-negative, head and neck cancer cells. Since HPV positivity was a molecular marker for increased sensitivity of cells to roscovitine, we reasoned that systemic roscovitine administration would not be toxic to healthy HPV-negative tissue. Indeed, low roscovitine doses significantly inhibited the growth of HPV-associated xenografted tumors in mice without causing any detectable side effects.Given that inhibition of CDKs has been shown to inhibit replication of several viruses, we suggest that roscovitine treatment may represent a selective and safe targeted therapeutic option against HPV-positive head and neck cancer.

  11. Anticancer activities of selected species of North American lichen extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Gajendra; El-Naggar, Atif M; St Clair, Larry L; O'Neill, Kim L

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of human deaths in the USA. Despite continuous efforts to treat cancer over the past 50 years, human mortality rates have not decreased significantly. Natural products, such as lichens, have been good sources of anticancer drugs. This study reports the cytotoxic activity of crude extracts of 17 lichen species against Burkitt's lymphoma (Raji) cells. Out of the 17 lichen species, extracts from 14 species showed cytotoxicity against Raji cells. On the basis of IC50 values, we selected Xanthoparmelia chlorochroa and Tuckermannopsis ciliaris to study the mechanism of cell death. Viability of normal lymphocytes was not affected by the extracts of X. chlorochroa and T. ciliaris. We found that extracts from both lichens decreased proliferation, accumulated cells at the G0 /G1 stage, and caused apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Both lichen extracts also caused upregulation of p53. The T. ciliaris extract upregulated the expression of TK1 but X. chlorochroa did not. We also found that usnic, salazinic, constictic, and norstictic acids were present in the extract of X. chlorochroa, whereas protolichesterinic acid in T. ciliaris extracts. Our data demonstrate that lichen extracts merit further research as a potential source of anticancer drugs.

  12. Smart Cylindrical Dome Antenna Based on Active Frequency Selective Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongyu Ding

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we proposed a beamforming antenna, which is realized using an omnidirectional antenna in the center surrounded by a cylindrical smart dome. The smart dome is made of 16 active frequency selective surface columns of which the amplitude and phase response can be continuously tuned by varying the bias voltages of the employed varactors. Thus, the performance of the proposed antenna could achieve higher gain, better nulling level, and more agility than many switch methods-based cylindrical reconfigurable antennas. Moreover, in order to overcome the unavailable analytical synthesis caused by complex mutual coupling between columns, we develop a genetic algorithm based optimization system and conducted a serial of experiments to evaluate the high-gain, nulling, continuously steering, and frequency-invariant ability. The results show that, during the frequency tunable range of the AFSS (2.0 GHz to 2.7 GHz, the antenna can offer an additional gain of up to 6.57 dB and nulling level of −56.41 dBi. For the high-gain modes, the −3 dB beam widths are 26°–34°, which offers enhanced angular resolution compared with other reported beam-sweeping work. Furthermore, the radiation pattern is continuously steerable.

  13. Chandra X-Ray Sources in the LALA Cetus Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. X.; Zheng, Z. Y.; Malhotra, S.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Rhoads, J. E.; Norman, C. A.; Heckman, T. M.

    2007-11-01

    The 174 ks Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer exposure of the Large Area Lyman Alpha Survey (LALA) Cetus field is the second of the two deep Chandra images on LALA fields. In this paper we present the Chandra X-ray sources detected in the Cetus field, along with an analysis of X-ray source counts, stacked X-ray spectrum, and optical identifications. A total of 188 X-ray sources were detected: 174 in the 0.5-7.0 keV band, 154 in the 0.5-2.0 keV band, and 113 in the 2.0-7.0 keV band. The X-ray source counts were derived and compared with LALA field (172 ks exposure). Interestingly, we find consistent hard-band X-ray source density, but (36+/-12)% higher soft-band X-ray source density in Cetus field. The weighted stacked spectrum of the detected X-ray sources can be fitted by a power law with photon index Γ=1.55. Based on the weighted stacked spectrum, we find that the resolved fraction of the X-ray background drops from (72+/-1)% at 0.5-1.0 keV to (63+/-4)% at 6.0-8.0 keV. The unresolved spectrum can be fitted by a power law over the range 0.5-7 keV, with a photon index Γ=1.22. We also present optical counterparts for 154 of the X-ray sources, down to a limiting magnitude of r'=25.9 (Vega), using a deep r'-band image obtained with the MMT. Optical Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the University of Arizona and the Smithsonian Institution.

  14. A Million-Second Chandra View of Cassiopeia A

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, U; Badenes, C; Berends, F A; Blondin, J M; Cioffi, D; Delaney, T A; Dewey, D; Fesen, R A; Flanagan, K A; Fryer, C L; Ghavamian, P; Hughes, J P; Morse, J A; Plucinsky, P P; Petre, R; Pohl, M; Rudnick, L; Sankrit, R; Slane, P O; Smith, R K; Vink, J; Warren, J S; Hwang, Una; Badenes, Carles; Berendse, Fred; Blondin, John; Cioffi, Denis; Laney, Tracey De; Dewey, Daniel; Fesen, Robert; Flanagan, Kathryn A.; Fryer, Christopher L.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Hughes, John P.; Morse, Jon A.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Petre, Robert; Pohl, Martin; Rudnick, Lawrence; Sankrit, Ravi; Slane, Patrick O.; Smith, Randall K.; Vink, Jacco; Warren, Jessica S.

    2004-01-01

    We introduce a million-second observation of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The bipolar structure of the Si-rich ejecta (NE jet and SW counterpart) is clearly evident in the new images, and their chemical similarity is confirmed by their spectra. These are most likely due to jets of ejecta as opposed to cavities in the circumstellar medium, since we can reject simple models for the latter. The properties of these jets and the Fe-rich ejecta will provide clues to the explosion of Cas A.

  15. Chandra Observations of Tycho’s Supernova Remnant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U. Hwang; R. Petre; A. E. Szymkowiak; S. S. Holt

    2002-03-01

    We present a new Chandra observation of Tycho’s supernova remnant with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer. Multicolor X-ray imaging reveals new details of the outer shock and ejecta. At energies between 4 and 6 keV, the outline of the outer shock is clearly revealed in X-rays for the first time. The distribution of the emission from lines of Si and Fe are confirmed to have a different morphology from each other, and the Si ejecta are shown to extend to the blast shock at several locations. Characteristic spectra of the outer shock and ejecta are also presented.

  16. Chandra ACIS Observations of the Nearby Spiral Galaxy NGC 300

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobar, Dale; Turner, Kevin; Schlegel, Eric M.

    2017-01-01

    The ACIS detector (Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer) onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory has imaged the nearby spiral NGC 300 over three epochs for a total exposure of 1.885x102 ksec. We describe each observation as well as the merged data set. Each exposure contains 132 individual sources. We focus on the time variability and luminosity distributions of the sources. Initial results show no diffuse emissions in the galaxy. Finally, we compare the merged data set and the detected sources with other wavebands.

  17. Lessons Learned Designing and Building the Chandra Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenberg, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    This poster offers some of the major lessons learned by key members of the Chandra Telescope team. These lessons are gleaned from our experiences developing, designing, building and testing the telescope and its subsystems, with 15 years of hindsight. Among the topics to be discussed are the early developmental tests, known as VETA-I and VETA-II, requirements derivation, the impact of late requirements and reflection on the conservatism in the design process. This poster offers some opinions on how these lessons can affect future missions.

  18. Chandra Discovers Eruption and Pulsation in Nova Outburst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has discovered a giant outburst of X-rays and unusual cyclical pulsing from a white dwarf star that is closely orbiting another star -- the first time either of these phenomena has been seen in X-rays. The observations are helping scientists better understand the thermonuclear explosions that occur in certain binary star systems. The observations of Nova Aquilae were reported today at the "Two Years of Science with Chandra" symposium by an international team led by Sumner Starrfield of Arizona State University. "We found two important results in our Chandra observations. The first was an underlying pulsation every 40 minutes in the X-ray brightness, which we believe comes from the cyclical expansion and contraction of the outer layers of the white dwarf," said Starrfield. "The other result was an enormous flare of X-rays that lasted for 15 minutes. Nothing like this has been seen before from a nova, and we don't know how to explain it." Novas occur on a white dwarf (a star which used up all its nuclear fuel and shrank to roughly the size of the Earth) that is orbiting a normal size star. Strong gravity tides drag hydrogen gas off the normal star and onto the white dwarf, where it can take more than 100,000 years for enough hydrogen to accumulate to ignite nuclear fusion reactions. Gradually, these reactions intensify until a cosmic-sized hydrogen bomb blast results. The outer layers of the white dwarf are then blown away, producing a nova outburst that can be observed for a period of months to years as the material expands into space. "Chandra has allowed us to see deep into the gases ejected by this giant explosion and extract unparalleled information on the evolution of the white dwarf whose surface is exploding," said Jeremy Drake of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. The brightening of Nova Aquilae was first detected by optical astronomers in December 1999. "Although this star is at a distance of more than 6

  19. Excellent activity and selectivity of Cu-SSZ-13 in the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kim, Do Heui; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2010-10-21

    Superior activity and selectivity of a Cu ion-exchanged SSZ-13 zeolite in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with NH3 were observed, in comparison to Cu-beta and Cu-ZSM-5 zeolites. Cu-SSZ-13 was not only more active in the NOx SCR reaction over the entire temperature range studied (up to 550 °C), but also more selective toward nitrogen formation, resulting in significantly lower amounts of NOx by-products (i.e., NO2 and N2O) than the other two zeolites. In addition, Cu-SSZ-13 demonstrated the highest activity and N2 formation selectivity in the oxidation of NH3. The results of this study strongly suggest that Cu-SSZ-13 is a promising candidate as a catalyst for NOx SCR with great potential in after-treatment systems for either mobile or stationary sources.

  20. Historical Remembrances of the Chandra X-ray Observatory: How Partnerships Created Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Robert

    2009-09-01

    As the astronomy community plans for new ventures in space, we're forced to find creative solutions to operate within the ever increasing fiscal constraints of the current economic environment. The Chandra X-ray Observatory program offers an example of how missions can be successfully developed within manageable budget constraints. The ten year anniversary offers us the chance to look back at the Chandra team's special partnership between scientists, managers, and industry that led to our success.Chandra experienced many of the challenges common to major observatories: state-of-the-art technical requirements, budget-induced slips, and restructurings. Yet the Chandra team achieved excellent performance for dramatically lower cost. In fact, Chandra completed its prime mission for billions of dollars less than originally planned. In 1992, NASA MSFC and Northrop Grumman (then TRW) together led a major restructure that saved approximately 3.4B in program cost, while we improved the imaging capability and observing efficiency of Chandra. This was accomplished by a combination of team-work, systems engineering, advanced technology insertion, and effective approaches for program implementation, combined with a high performance culture that aligned goals and focused on mission success. Northrop Grumman is proud of our role in supporting the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and our academic partners in advancing the frontiers of x-ray astronomy and scientific discovery with Chandra. As Chandra continues its extended mission, the observatory continues to provide superb scientific performance.

  1. Chandra and XMM–Newton Observations of H2O Maser Galaxy Mrk 348

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. Wang; J. S. Zhang; Q. Guo

    2014-09-01

    For H2O megamaser galaxy Mrk 348, Chandra and XMM–Newton data are analysed. The nuclear fitting results of XMM–Newton data suggest the possible existence of a heavily obscured AGN. But the nuclear spectrum extracted from Chandra cannot be well-fitted by the best fitting model for XMM–Newton. Further optimal fitting and discussions are needed.

  2. Chandra Takes In The Bright Lights, Big City Of The Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has made a stunning, high-energy panorama of the central regions of our Milky Way galaxy. The findings are an important step toward understanding the most active area of the Milky Way as well as other galaxies throughout the universe. Like a sprawling megalopolis, the new Chandra images show hundreds of white dwarf stars, neutron stars and black holes bathed in an incandescent fog of multimillion-degree gas around a supermassive black hole. "The center of the galaxy is where the action is," said Q. Daniel Wang of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. "With these images, we get a new perspective of the interplay between stars, gas and dust, as well as the magnetic fields and gravity in the region. We can see how such forces affect the immediate vicinity and may influence other aspects of the galaxy." Wang presented the montage of 30 separate Chandra images today at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Washington, and in a paper published in the Jan. 10, 2002, issue of the journal Nature. The images, made with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) July 16-21, 2001, covered a 400- by 900-light-year swath of the center of the galaxy. One immediate result was that the team could separate out the individual X-ray sources from the diffuse glow produced by hot gas. "We can now see that the sources are responsible for most of the X-rays from highly ionized iron previously attributed to the diffuse glow," said Eric Gotthelf, of Columbia University in New York, a co-author. "So we must now revise our notion of the hot gas, which appears to be about 10 times cooler than previously thought. It's only a relatively mild 10 million degrees!" The diffuse X-ray emission seems to be related to the turmoil and density of matter in the inner Milky Way. Stars are forming there at a much more rapid rate than in the galactic "suburbs." Many of the most massive stars in the galaxy are located in the galactic center and are furiously

  3. Melanogenesis and antityrosinase activity of selected South african plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapunya, Manyatja Brenda; Nikolova, Roumiana Vassileva; Lall, Namrita

    2012-01-01

    Melanin is the pigment that is responsible for the colour of eyes, hair, and skin in humans. Tyrosinase is known to be the key enzyme in melanin biosynthesis. Overactivity of this enzyme leads to dermatological disorders such as age spots, melanoma and sites of actinic damage. Ten plants belonging to four families (Asphodelaceae, Anacardiaceae, Oleaceae, and Rutaceae) were investigated for their effect on tyrosinase using both L-tyrosine and L-DOPA as substrates. Ethanol leaf extracts (500 μg/mL) of Aloe ferox, Aloe aculeata, Aloe pretoriensis, and Aloe sessiliflora showed 60%, 31%, 17%, and 13% inhibition of tyrosinase activity respectively, when L-tyrosine was used as a substrate. Harpephyllum caffrum (leaves) at a concentration of 500 μg/mL had an inhibitory effect of 70% on tyrosinase when L-DOPA was used as a substrate. The IC(50) of Harpephyllum caffrum (leaves and bark) were found to be 51 ± 0.002 and 40 ± 0.035 μg/mL, respectively. Following the results obtained from the tyrosinase assay, extracts from Harpephyllum caffrum were selected for further testing on their effect on melanin production and their cytotoxicity on melanocytes in vitro. The IC(50) of both extracts was found to be 6.25 μg/mL for melanocyte cells. Bark extract of Harpephyllum caffrum showed 26% reduction in melanin content of melanocyte cells at a concentration of 6.25 μg/mL. The leaf extract of this plant showed some toxicity on melanocyte cells. Therefore, the bark extract of Harpephyllum caffrum could be considered as an antityrosinase agent for dermatological disorders such as age spots and melasoma.

  4. Melanogenesis and Antityrosinase Activity of Selected South African Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manyatja Brenda Mapunya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Melanin is the pigment that is responsible for the colour of eyes, hair, and skin in humans. Tyrosinase is known to be the key enzyme in melanin biosynthesis. Overactivity of this enzyme leads to dermatological disorders such as age spots, melanoma and sites of actinic damage. Ten plants belonging to four families (Asphodelaceae, Anacardiaceae, Oleaceae, and Rutaceae were investigated for their effect on tyrosinase using both L-tyrosine and L-DOPA as substrates. Ethanol leaf extracts (500 μg/mL of Aloe ferox, Aloe aculeata, Aloe pretoriensis, and Aloe sessiliflora showed 60%, 31%, 17%, and 13% inhibition of tyrosinase activity respectively, when L-tyrosine was used as a substrate. Harpephyllum caffrum (leaves at a concentration of 500 μg/mL had an inhibitory effect of 70% on tyrosinase when L-DOPA was used as a substrate. The IC50 of Harpephyllum caffrum (leaves and bark were found to be 51±0.002 and 40±0.035 μg/mL, respectively. Following the results obtained from the tyrosinase assay, extracts from Harpephyllum caffrum were selected for further testing on their effect on melanin production and their cytotoxicity on melanocytes in vitro. The IC50 of both extracts was found to be 6.25 μg/mL for melanocyte cells. Bark extract of Harpephyllum caffrum showed 26% reduction in melanin content of melanocyte cells at a concentration of 6.25 μg/mL. The leaf extract of this plant showed some toxicity on melanocyte cells. Therefore, the bark extract of Harpephyllum caffrum could be considered as an antityrosinase agent for dermatological disorders such as age spots and melasoma.

  5. Impacts of Chandra X-ray Observatory Public Communications and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcand, Kimberly K.; Watzke, Megan; Lestition, Kathleen; Edmonds, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory Center runs a multifaceted Public Communications & Engagement program encompassing press relations, public engagement, and education. Our goals include reaching a large and diverse audience of national and international scope, establishing direct connections and working relationships with the scientists whose research forms the basis for all products, creating peer-reviewed materials and activities that evolve from an integrated pipeline design and encourage users toward deeper engagement, and developing materials that target underserved audiences such as women, Spanish speakers, and the sight and hearing impaired. This talk will highlight some of the key features of our program, from the high quality curated digital presence to the cycle of research and evaluation that informs our practice at all points of the program creation. We will also discuss the main impacts of the program, from the tens of millions of participants reached through the establishment and sustainability of a network of science 'volunpeers.'

  6. Chandra Reveals Heavy Obscuration and Circumnuclear Star Formation in Seyfert 2 Galaxy NGC 4968

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Yaqoob, Tahir; Levenson, N. A.; Boorman, Peter; Heckman, Timothy M.; Gandhi, Poshak; Rigby, Jane R.; Urry, C. Megan; Ptak, Andrew F.

    2017-01-01

    We present the Chandra imaging and spectral analysis of NGC 4968, a nearby (z = 0.00986) Seyfert 2 galaxy. We discover extended (∼1 kpc) X-ray emission in the soft band (0.5–2 keV) that is neither coincident with the narrow line region nor the extended radio emission. Based on spectral modeling, it is linked to on-going star formation (∼2.6–4 M⊙ yr‑1). The soft emission at circumnuclear scales (inner ∼400 pc) originates from hot gas, with kT ∼ 0.7 keV, while the most extended thermal emission is cooler (kT ∼ 0.3 keV). We refine previous measurements of the extreme Fe Kα equivalent width in this source ({EW}={2.5}-1.0+2.6 {keV}), which suggests the central engine is completely embedded within Compton-thick levels of obscuration. Using physically motivated models fit to the Chandra spectrum, we derive a Compton-thick column density (NH > 1.25 × 1024 cm‑2) and an intrinsic hard (2–10 keV) X-ray luminosity of ∼3–8 × 1042 erg s‑1 (depending on the presumed geometry of the obscurer), which is over two orders of magnitude larger than that observed. The large Fe Kα EW suggests a spherical covering geometry, which could be confirmed with X-ray measurements above 10 keV. NGC 4968 is similar to other active galaxies that exhibit extreme Fe Kα EWs (i.e., >2 keV) in that they also contain on-going star formation. This work supports the idea that gas associated with nuclear star formation may increase the covering factor of the enshrouding gas and play a role in obscuring active galactic nuclei.

  7. The Chandra Deep Field South the 1 Million Second

    CERN Document Server

    Rosati, P; Giacconi, R; Gilli, R; Hasinger, G; Kewley, L J; Mainieri, V; Nonino, M; Norman, C; Szokoly, G; Wang, J X; Zirm, A W; Bergeron, J; Borgani, S; Gilmozzi, R; Grogin, N A; Koekemoer, A M; Schreier, E J; Zheng, W

    2002-01-01

    We present the main results from our 940 ksec observation of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS), using the source catalog described in an accompanying paper (Giacconi et al. 2001). We extend the measurement of source number counts to 5.5e-17 erg/cm^2/s in the soft 0.5-2 keV band and 4.5e-16 erg/cm^2/s in the hard 2-10 keV band. The hard band LogN-LogS shows a significant flattening (slope~=0.6) below ~1e-14 erg/cm^2/s, leaving at most 10-15% of the X-ray background (XRB) to be resolved, the main uncertainty lying in the measurement of the total flux of the XRB. On the other hand, the analysis in the very hard 5-10 keV band reveals a relatively steep LogN-LogS (slope ~=1.3) down to 1e-15 erg/cm^2/s. Together with the evidence of a progressive flattening of the average X-ray spectrum near the flux limit, this indicates that there is still a non negligible population of faint hard sources to be discovered at energies not well probed by Chandra, which possibly contribute to the 30 keV bump in the spectrum of the...

  8. Chandra Multiwavelength Project X-ray Point Source Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, M; Wilkes, B J; Green, P J; Kim, E; Anderson, C S; Barkhouse, W A; Evans, N R; Ivezic, Z; Karovska, M; Kashyap, V L; Lee, M G; Maksym, P; Mossman, A E; Silverman, J D; Tananbaum, H D; Kim, Minsun; Kim, Dong-Woo; Wilkes, Belinda J.; Green, Paul J.; Kim, Eunhyeuk; Anderson, Craig S.; Barkhouse, Wayne A.; Evans, Nancy R.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Karovska, Margarita; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Maksym, Peter; Mossman, Amy E.; Silverman, John D.; Tananbaum, Harvey D.

    2006-01-01

    We present the Chandra Multiwavelength Project (ChaMP) X-ray point source catalog with ~6,800 X-ray sources detected in 149 Chandra observations covering \\~10 deg^2. The full ChaMP catalog sample is seven times larger than the initial published ChaMP catalog. The exposure time of the fields in our sample ranges from 0.9 to 124 ksec, corresponding to a deepest X-ray flux limit of f_{0.5-8.0} = 9 x 10^{-16} erg/cm2/sec. The ChaMP X-ray data have been uniformly reduced and analyzed with ChaMP-specific pipelines, and then carefully validated by visual inspection. The ChaMP catalog includes X-ray photometric data in 8 different energy bands as well as X-ray spectral hardness ratios and colors. To best utilize the ChaMP catalog, we also present the source reliability, detection probability and positional uncertainty. To quantitatively assess those parameters, we performed extensive simulations. In particular, we present a set of empirical equations: the flux limit as a function of effective exposure time, and the p...

  9. Chandra Observes the End of an Era SN 1987A

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, Kari A; Park, Sangwook; McCray, Richard; Dwek, Eli; Burrows, David N

    2016-01-01

    Updated imaging and photometric results from Chandra observations of SN 1987A, covering the last 16 years, are presented. We find that the 0.5-2 keV light curve has remained constant at ~8x10^-12 erg s^-1 cm^-2 since 9500 days, with the 3-8 keV light curve continuing to increase until at least 10000 days. The expansion rate of the ring is found to be energy dependent, such that after day 6000 the ring expands faster in the 2-10 keV band than it does at energies <2 keV. Images show a reversal of the east-west asymmetry between 7000 and 8000 days after the explosion. The latest images suggest the southeastern side of the equatorial ring is beginning to fade. Consistent with the latest optical and infrared results, our Chandra analysis indicates the blast wave is now leaving the dense equatorial ring, which marks the beginning of a major change in the evolutionary phase of the supernova remnant 1987A.

  10. Chandra Cluster Cosmology Project III: Cosmological Parameter Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Vikhlinin, A; Burenin, R A; Ebeling, H; Forman, W R; Hornstrup, A; Jones, C; Murray, S S; Nagai, D; Quintana, H; Voevodkin, A

    2008-01-01

    Chandra observations of large samples of galaxy clusters detected in X-rays by ROSAT provide a new, robust determination of the cluster mass functions at low and high redshifts. Statistical and systematic errors are now sufficiently small, and the redshift leverage sufficiently large for the mass function evolution to be used as a useful growth of structure based dark energy probe. In this paper, we present cosmological parameter constraints obtained from Chandra observations of 36 clusters with =0.55 derived from 400deg^2 ROSAT serendipitous survey and 49 brightest z=~0.05 clusters detected in the All-Sky Survey. Evolution of the mass function between these redshifts requires Omega_Lambda>0 with a ~5sigma significance, and constrains the dark energy equation of state parameter to w0=-1.14+-0.21, assuming constant w and flat universe. Cluster information also significantly improves constraints when combined with other methods. Fitting our cluster data jointly with the latest supernovae, WMAP, and baryonic aco...

  11. The Chandra COSMOS Legacy survey: optical/IR identifications

    CERN Document Server

    Marchesi, S; Elvis, M; Salvato, M; Brusa, M; Comastri, A; Gilli, R; Hasinger, G; Lanzuisi, G; Miyaji, T; Treister, E; Urry, C M; Vignali, C; Zamorani, G; Allevato, V; Cappelluti, N; Cardamone, C; Finoguenov, A; Griffiths, R E; Karim, A; Laigle, C; LaMassa, S M; Jahnke, K; Ranalli, P; Schawinski, K; Schinnerer, E; Silverman, J D; Smolcic, V; Suh, H; Trakhtenbrot, B

    2015-01-01

    We present the catalog of optical and infrared counterparts of the Chandra COSMOS-Legacy Survey, a 4.6 Ms Chandra program on the 2.2 square degrees of the COSMOS field, combination of 56 new overlapping observations obtained in Cycle 14 with the previous C-COSMOS survey. In this Paper we report the i, K, and 3.6 micron identifications of the 2273 X-ray point sources detected in the new Cycle 14 observations. We use the likelihood ratio technique to derive the association of optical/infrared (IR) counterparts for 97% of the X-ray sources. We also update the information for the 1743 sources detected in C-COSMOS, using new K and 3.6 micron information not available when the C-COSMOS analysis was performed. The final catalog contains 4016 X-ray sources, 97% of which have an optical/IR counterpart and a photometric redshift, while 54% of the sources have a spectroscopic redshift. The full catalog, including spectroscopic and photometric redshifts and optical and X-ray properties described here in detail, is availa...

  12. The BMW-Chandra survey. Serendipitous Source Catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, P; Campana, S; Moretti, A; Panzera, M R; Tagliaferri, G; Mottini, M

    2009-01-01

    We present the BMW-Chandra source catalogue derived from Chandra ACIS-I observations (exposure time >10ks) public as of March 2003 by using a wavelet detection algorithm (Lazzati et al. 1999; Campana et al. 1999). The catalogue contains a total of 21325 sources, 16758 of which are serendipitous. Our sky coverage in the soft band (0.5-2 keV, S/N =3) is ~8 deg^2 for F_X > 10^-13 erg cm^-2 s-1, and ~2 deg^2 for F_X >10^-15 erg cm^-2 s^-1. The catalogue contains information on positions, count rates (and errors) in three energy bands. (total, 0.5-7 keV; soft, 0.5-2 keV; and hard, 2-7keV), and in four additional energy bands, SB1 (0.5-1keV), SB2 (1-2 keV), HB1 (2-4 keV), and HB2 (4-7keV), as well as information on the source extension, and cross-matches with the FIRST, IRAS, 2MASS, and GSC-2 catalogues.

  13. The BMW-Chandra survey. Serendipitous Source Catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, P.; Mignani, R. P.; Campana, S.; Moretti, A.; Panzera, M. R.; Tagliaferri, G.; Mottini, M.

    2009-07-01

    We present the BMW-Chandra source catalogue derived from Chandra ACIS-I observations (exposure time > 10ks) public as of March 2003 by using a wavelet detection algorithm (Lazzati et al. 1999; Campana et al. 1999). The catalogue contains a total of 21325 sources, 16758 of which are serendipitous. Our sky coverage in the soft band (0.5-2keV, S/N=3) is ~ 8 deg2 for FX ≥ 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1, and ~ 2 deg2 for FX ≥ 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. The catalogue contains information on positions, count rates (and errors) in three energy bands (total, 0.5-7keV; soft, 0.5-2keV; and hard, 2-7keV), and in four additional energy bands, SB1 (0.5-1keV), SB2 (1-2keV), HB1 (2-4keV), and HB2 (4-7keV), as well as information on the source extension, and cross-matches with the FIRST, IRAS, 2MASS, and GSC-2 catalogues.

  14. Exploring Genetic Drift and Natural Selection through a Simulation Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maret, Timothy J.; Rissing, Steven W.

    1998-01-01

    Reports on the development of a laboratory exercise that would allow students to explore the concept of genetic drift. Discusses the concept of genetic drift that is coincident with natural selection and that closely models the real world. (DDR)

  15. Unsupervised selection of informative descriptors in QSAR study of anti-HIV activities of HEPT derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagheri, Saeed; Omidikia, Nematollah; Kompany-Zareh, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    With the increasing ease of measuring and calculating multiple descriptors per molecule in quantitative structure-activity relationship, the importance of variable selection for data reduction and improving interpretability is gaining importance. While variable selection has been extensively...

  16. Structure-activity relationships for the antifungal activity of selective estrogen receptor antagonists related to tamoxifen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, Arielle; Martin, Jennifer A; DiDone, Louis; Bradley, Erin K; Mutz, Mitchell; Krysan, Damian J

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is one of the most important invasive fungal infections and is a significant contributor to the mortality associated with HIV/AIDS. As part of our program to repurpose molecules related to the selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) tamoxifen as anti-cryptococcal agents, we have explored the structure-activity relationships of a set of structurally diverse SERMs and tamoxifen derivatives. Our data provide the first insights into the structural requirements for the antifungal activity of this scaffold. Three key molecular characteristics affecting anti-cryptococcal activity emerged from our studies: 1) the presence of an alkylamino group tethered to one of the aromatic rings of the triphenylethylene core; 2) an appropriately sized aliphatic substituent at the 2 position of the ethylene moiety; and 3) electronegative substituents on the aromatic rings modestly improved activity. Using a cell-based assay of calmodulin antagonism, we found that the anti-cryptococcal activity of the scaffold correlates with calmodulin inhibition. Finally, we developed a homology model of C. neoformans calmodulin and used it to rationalize the structural basis for the activity of these molecules. Taken together, these data and models provide a basis for the further optimization of this promising anti-cryptococcal scaffold.

  17. Structure-activity relationships for the antifungal activity of selective estrogen receptor antagonists related to tamoxifen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arielle Butts

    Full Text Available Cryptococcosis is one of the most important invasive fungal infections and is a significant contributor to the mortality associated with HIV/AIDS. As part of our program to repurpose molecules related to the selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM tamoxifen as anti-cryptococcal agents, we have explored the structure-activity relationships of a set of structurally diverse SERMs and tamoxifen derivatives. Our data provide the first insights into the structural requirements for the antifungal activity of this scaffold. Three key molecular characteristics affecting anti-cryptococcal activity emerged from our studies: 1 the presence of an alkylamino group tethered to one of the aromatic rings of the triphenylethylene core; 2 an appropriately sized aliphatic substituent at the 2 position of the ethylene moiety; and 3 electronegative substituents on the aromatic rings modestly improved activity. Using a cell-based assay of calmodulin antagonism, we found that the anti-cryptococcal activity of the scaffold correlates with calmodulin inhibition. Finally, we developed a homology model of C. neoformans calmodulin and used it to rationalize the structural basis for the activity of these molecules. Taken together, these data and models provide a basis for the further optimization of this promising anti-cryptococcal scaffold.

  18. Use of a lag differential reinforcement contingency to increase varied selections of classroom activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammilleri, Anthony P; Hanley, Gregory P

    2005-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of a lag differential reinforcement contingency on 2 students' activity selections using reversal designs. Results showed that the lag contingency was responsible for promoting increased novel selections, engagement in diverse activities, and greater progress with respect to programmed academic activities.

  19. Use Of A Lag Differential Reinforcement Contingency To Increase Varied Selections Of Classroom Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Cammilleri, Anthony P; Hanley, Gregory P

    2005-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of a lag differential reinforcement contingency on 2 students' activity selections using reversal designs. Results showed that the lag contingency was responsible for promoting increased novel selections, engagement in diverse activities, and greater progress with respect to programmed academic activities.

  20. Use of a Lag Differential Reinforcement Contingency to Increase Varied Selections of Classroom Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammilleri, Anthony P.; Hanley, Gregory P.

    2005-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of a lag differential reinforcement contingency on 2 students' activity selections using reversal designs. Results showed that the lag contingency was responsible for promoting increased novel selections, engagement in diverse activities, and greater progress with respect to programmed academic activities.

  1. THE CHANDRA LOCAL VOLUME SURVEY: THE X-RAY POINT-SOURCE POPULATION OF NGC 404

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binder, B.; Williams, B. F.; Weisz, D. R. [University of Washington, Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Eracleous, M. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Center for Gravitational Wave Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Gaetz, T. J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kong, A. K. H. [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Skillman, E. D. [University of Minnesota, Astronomy Department, 116 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    We present a comprehensive X-ray point-source catalog of NGC 404 obtained as part of the Chandra Local Volume Survey. A new 97 ks Chandra ACIS-S observation of NGC 404 was combined with archival observations for a total exposure of {approx}123 ks. Our survey yields 74 highly significant X-ray point sources and is sensitive to a limiting unabsorbed luminosity of {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 35} erg s{sup -1} in the 0.35-8 keV band. To constrain the nature of each X-ray source, cross-correlations with multi-wavelength data were generated. We searched overlapping Hubble Space Telescope observations for optical counterparts to our X-ray detections, but find only two X-ray sources with candidate optical counterparts. We find 21 likely low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), although this number is a lower limit due to the difficulties in separating LMXBs from background active galactic nuclei. The X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) in both the soft and hard energy bands are presented. The XLFs in the soft band (0.5-2 keV) and the hard band (2-8 keV) have a limiting luminosity at the 90% completeness limit of 10{sup 35} erg s{sup -1} and 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}, respectively, significantly lower than previous X-ray studies of NGC 404. We find the XLFs to be consistent with those of other X-ray populations dominated by LMXBs. However, the number of luminous (>10{sup 37} erg s{sup -1}) X-ray sources per unit stellar mass in NGC 404 is lower than is observed for other galaxies. The relative lack of luminous XRBs may be due to a population of LMXBs with main-sequence companions formed during an epoch of elevated star formation {approx}0.5 Gyr ago.

  2. CHANDRA HIGH-RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS OF CID-42, A CANDIDATE RECOILING SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Civano, F.; Elvis, M.; Lanzuisi, G.; Aldcroft, T.; Trichas, M.; Fruscione, A. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bongiorno, A.; Brusa, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Blecha, L.; Loeb, A. [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Comastri, A.; Gilli, R. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, Bologna 40127 (Italy); Salvato, M.; Komossa, S. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, Excellence Cluster, Boltzmannstrass 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Koekemoer, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Mainieri, V. [ESO, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Piconcelli, E. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, Monteporzio-Catone 00040 (Italy); Vignali, C. [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, Bologna 40127 (Italy)

    2012-06-10

    We present Chandra High Resolution Camera observations of CID-42, a candidate recoiling supermassive black hole (SMBH) at z = 0.359 in the COSMOS survey. CID-42 shows two optical compact sources resolved in the HST/ACS image embedded in the same galaxy structure and a velocity offset of {approx}1300 km s{sup -1} between the H{beta} broad and narrow emission line, as presented by Civano et al. Two scenarios have been proposed to explain the properties of CID-42: a gravitational wave (GW) recoiling SMBH and a double Type 1/Type 2 active galactic nucleus (AGN) system, where one of the two is recoiling because of slingshot effect. In both scenarios, one of the optical nuclei hosts an unobscured AGN, while the other one, either an obscured AGN or a star-forming compact region. The X-ray Chandra data allow us to unambiguously resolve the X-ray emission and unveil the nature of the two optical sources in CID-42. We find that only one of the optical nuclei is responsible for the whole X-ray unobscured emission observed and a 3{sigma} upper limit on the flux of the second optical nucleus is measured. The upper limit on the X-ray luminosity plus the analysis of the multiwavelength spectral energy distribution indicate the presence of a star-forming region in the second source rather than an obscured SMBH, thus favoring the GW recoil scenario. However, the presence of a very obscured SMBH cannot be fully ruled out. A new X-ray feature, in a SW direction with respect to the main source, is discovered and discussed.

  3. Chandra's Find of Lonely Halo Raises Questions About Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-10-01

    Dark matter continues to confound astronomers, as NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory demonstrated with the detection of an extensive envelope of dark matter around an isolated elliptical galaxy. This discovery conflicts with optical data that suggest a dearth of dark matter around similar galaxies, and raises questions about how galaxies acquire and keep such dark matter halos. The observed galaxy, known as NGC 4555, is unusual in that it is a fairly large, elliptical galaxy that is not part of a group or cluster of galaxies. In a paper to be published in the November 1, 2004 issue of the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Ewan O'Sullivan of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA and Trevor Ponman of the University of Birmingham, United Kingdom, use the Chandra data to show that the galaxy is embedded in a cloud of 10-million-degree-Celsius gas. X-ray/Optical Composite of NGC 4555 X-ray/Optical Composite of NGC 4555 This hot gas cloud has a diameter of about 400,000 light years, about twice that of the visible galaxy. An enormous envelope, or halo, of dark matter is needed to confine the hot cloud to the galaxy. The total mass of the dark matter halo is about ten times the combined mass of the stars in the galaxy, and 300 times the mass of the hot gas cloud. A growing body of evidence indicates that dark matter - which interacts with itself and "normal" matter only through gravity - is the dominant form of matter in the universe. According to the popular "cold dark matter" theory, dark matter consists of mysterious particles left over from the dense early universe that were moving slowly when galaxies and galaxy clusters began to form. "The observed properties of NGC 4555 confirm that elliptical galaxies can posses dark matter halos of their own, regardless of their environment," said O'Sullivan. "This raises an important question: what determines whether elliptical galaxies have dark matter halos?" DSS Optical Image of NGC

  4. Chandra Locates Mother Lode of Planetary Ore in Colliding Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has discovered rich deposits of neon, magnesium, and silicon in a pair of colliding galaxies known as The Antennae. When the clouds in which these elements are present cool, an exceptionally high number of stars with planets should form. These results may foreshadow the fate of the Milky Way and its future collision with the Andromeda Galaxy. "The amount of enrichment of elements in The Antennae is phenomenal," said Giuseppina Fabbiano of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) in Cambridge, Mass. at a press conference at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Atlanta, Ga. "This must be due to a very high rate of supernova explosions in these colliding galaxies." Fabbiano is lead author of a paper on this discovery by a team of U.S. and U.K. scientists that will appear in an upcoming issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters. When galaxies collide, direct hits between stars are extremely rare, but collisions between huge gas clouds in the galaxies can trigger a stellar baby boom. The most massive of these stars race through their evolution in a few million years and explode as supernovas. Heavy elements manufactured inside these stars are blown away by the explosions and enrich the surrounding gas for thousands of light years. "The amount of heavy elements supports earlier studies that indicate there was a very high rate of relatively recent supernovas, 30 times that of the Milky Way," according to collaborator Andreas Zezas of the CfA. Animation of Colliding Galaxies Animation of Colliding Galaxies The supernova violence also heats the gas to millions of degrees Celsius. This makes much of the matter in the clouds invisible to optical telescopes, but it can be observed by an X-ray telescope. Chandra data revealed for the first time regions of varying enrichment in the galaxies – in one cloud magnesium and silicon are 16 and 24 times as abundant as in the Sun. "These are the kinds of elements that

  5. Chandra Discovers the X-ray Signature of a Powerful Wind from a Galactic Microquasar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-11-01

    Wide Web, along with other information about the discovery, at http://www.astro.psu.edu/users/niel/cirx1/cirx1.html. A binary-star system 20,000 light years from Earth in the constellation of Circinus. Animation showing the strong variability over time of one of the P Cygni spectral lines seen by Chandra from Circinus X-1 (Click Image to View Animation) Credit: Niel Brandt and Norbert Schulz (Note: This animation is the same as the one referred to in the above paragraph) Atoms irradiated with energetic X-rays can emit as well as absorb them at specific wavelengths. Whether astronomers observe emission or absorption depends on the state and environment of the irradiated atoms, so these processes carry vital information about the emitting and absorbing material. Regarding the time-lapse movie, Schulz commented "You can see this profile flipping up and down between a strong emission line on the red side and a strong absorption line on the blue side. We don't yet fully understand what this means, but it does indicate the dynamic nature of this system. We see indications that sometimes either the emitting or the absorbing region gets obscured by matter so thick that not even X rays can penetrate it." The researchers say one reason their discovery that Circinus X-1 has a high-velocity wind is important is that this small two-star system now has striking similarities with a type of luminous active galaxy known as a broad-absorption-line quasar. Broad-absorption-line quasars are galaxies containing a violent centers powered by supermassive black holes. "This type of galaxy has an accretion disk circling its black hole plus very powerful winds created when radiation pushes material off of the disk and out into space," Brandt says. "The disk winds from broad-absorption-line quasars create P Cygni lines in the spectra of these objects. Circinus X-1, with the newly detected X-ray P Cygni profiles, appears in many ways to be a microscopic version of a broad-absorption-line quasar

  6. An active and selective heterogeneous catalytic system for Michael addition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hoda Keipour; Mohammad A. Khalilzadeh; Abolfazl Hosseini; Afsaneh Pilevar; Daryoush Zareyee

    2012-01-01

    Potassium fluoride doped natural zeolite was found to be an efficient and selective solid base catalyst for 1,4-Michael addition.The catalyst is easily prepared and the workup procedure simplified by simple filtration.All products were obtained in high yields as well as short reaction times.

  7. Selected problems of targeting active labour market policies in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Monika Maria Maksim; Dominik Sliwicki

    2012-01-01

    Well targeted active labour market policies create better prospects for achieving higher net employment effects. This article attempts to analyse targeting of active labour market policies in the context of regulations contained in the Act of Employment Promotion and Labour Market Institutions, and current evaluation findings. The paper analyses basic active labour market policies, that have been in place in Poland in 2009. To assess program targeting logistic regression was applied.

  8. Chandra Observations of Shock Kinematics in Supernova Remnant 1987A

    CERN Document Server

    Zhekov, S A; Borkowski, K J; Burrows, D N; Park, S

    2005-01-01

    We report the first results from deep X-ray observations of the SNR 1987A with the Chandra LETG. Temperatures inferred from line ratios range from 0.1 - 2 keV and increase with ionization potential. Expansion velocities inferred from X-ray line profiles range from 300 - 1700 km/s, much less than the velocities inferred from the radial expansion of the radio and X-ray images. We can account for these observations with a scenario in which the X-rays are emitted by shocks produced where the supernova blast wave strikes dense protrusions of the inner circumstellar ring, which are also responsible for the optical hot spots.

  9. Chandra LETG Observations of Supernova Remnant 1987A

    CERN Document Server

    Zhekov, S A; Burrows, D N; McCray, R; Park, S; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Burrows, David N.; Cray, Richard Mc; Park, Sangwook; Zhekov, Svetozar A.

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the results from deep Chandra LETG observations of the supernova remnant 1987A (SNR 1987A). We find that a distribution of shocks, spanning the same range of velocities (from 300 to 1700 km/s) as deduced in the first part of our analysis (Zhekov et al. 2005, ApJL, 628, L127), can account for the entire X-ray spectrum of this object. The post-shock temperature distribution is bimodal, peaking at kT 0.5 and 3 keV. Abundances inferred from the X-ray spectrum have values similar to those for the inner circumstellar ring, except that the abundances of nitrogen and oxygen are approximately a factor of two lower than those inferred from the optical/UV spectrum. The velocity of the X-ray emitting plasma has decreased since 1999, apparently because the blast wave has entered the main body of the inner circumstellar ring.

  10. Chandra LETGS and XMM-Newton observations of NGC 4593

    CERN Document Server

    Steenbrugge, K C; Blustin, A J; Branduardi-Raymont, G; Sako, M; Behar, E; Kahn, S M; Paerels, F B S; Walter, R

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze spectra of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4593 obtained with the Chandra Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (LETGS), the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) and the European Photon Imaging Camera's (EPIC) onboard of XMM-Newton. The two observations were separated by ~7 months. In the LETGS spectrum we detect a highly ionized warm absorber corresponding to an ionization state of 400x10^{-9} W m, visible as a depression at 10-18 AA. This depression is formed by multiple weak Fe and Ne lines. A much smaller column density was found for the lowly ionized warm absorber, corresponding to xi = 3x10^{-9} W m. However, an intermediate ionization warm absorber is not detected. For the RGS data the ionization state is hard to constrain. The EPIC results show a narrow Fe Kalpha line.

  11. Selected Energy Education Activities for Pennsylvania Middle School Grades. Draft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Nancy; And Others

    These activities are intended to help increase awareness and understanding of the energy situation and to encourage students to become energy conservationists. The document is divided into sections according to discipline area. A final section is devoted to interdisciplinary activities involving several discipline areas integrated with the energy…

  12. Metallocarbene Artificial Enzymes : Extending Transition Metal Selectivity and Protein Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basauri Molina, M.

    2015-01-01

    A series of new semi-synthetic metalloprotein hybrids were created via the covalent binding of organometallic species in the active site of lipases, accordingly resulting in the first active site-directed (ASD) homogeneous artificial metalloenzymes. The use of this method promises the generation of

  13. THE CHANDRA COSMOS LEGACY SURVEY: OPTICAL/IR IDENTIFICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchesi, S.; Civano, F.; Urry, C. M. [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, 260 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Elvis, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Salvato, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Brusa, M.; Lanzuisi, G.; Vignali, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Zamorani, G.; Cappelluti, N. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Hasinger, G. [Institute for Astronomy, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Miyaji, T. [Instituto de Astronomía sede Ensenada, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Km. 103, Carret. Tijunana-Ensenada, Ensenada, BC (Mexico); Treister, E. [Universidad de Concepción, Departamento de Astronomía, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Allevato, V.; Finoguenov, A. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Gustaf Hällströmin katu 2a, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Cardamone, C. [Department of Science, Wheelock College, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Griffiths, R. E. [Physics and Astronomy Dept., Natural Sciences Division, University of Hawaii at Hilo, 200 W. Kawili Street, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Karim, A. [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Universität Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); and others

    2016-01-20

    We present the catalog of optical and infrared counterparts of the Chandra  COSMOS-Legacy  Survey, a 4.6 Ms Chandra  program on the 2.2 deg{sup 2} of the COSMOS field, combination of 56 new overlapping observations obtained in Cycle 14 with the previous C-COSMOS survey. In this Paper we report the i, K, and 3.6 μm identifications of the 2273 X-ray point sources detected in the new Cycle 14 observations. We use the likelihood ratio technique to derive the association of optical/infrared (IR) counterparts for 97% of the X-ray sources. We also update the information for the 1743 sources detected in C-COSMOS, using new K and 3.6 μm information not available when the C-COSMOS analysis was performed. The final catalog contains 4016 X-ray sources, 97% of which have an optical/IR counterpart and a photometric redshift, while ≃54% of the sources have a spectroscopic redshift. The full catalog, including spectroscopic and photometric redshifts and optical and X-ray properties described here in detail, is available online. We study several X-ray to optical (X/O) properties: with our large statistics we put better constraints on the X/O flux ratio locus, finding a shift toward faint optical magnitudes in both soft and hard X-ray band. We confirm the existence of a correlation between X/O and the the 2–10 keV luminosity for Type 2 sources. We extend to low luminosities the analysis of the correlation between the fraction of obscured AGNs and the hard band luminosity, finding a different behavior between the optically and X-ray classified obscured fraction.

  14. An investigation into a half page from Newton's Principia in the wake of Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Snow, W M

    2002-01-01

    There is a section in Chandrashekar's ''Newton's Principia for the Common Reader '', (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1995) in which he claims to find a small error in the Principia. . However we believe that there is a mistake of interpretation underlying Chandra's claim and that the Principia is correct as it stands. This short paper describes Chandra's misinterpretation of a geometric construction of Newton and gives an outline of Newton's demonstration by following the standard English version of the Principia line by line and converting it into modern mathematical notation in the spirit of Chandra's book.

  15. Searching for bulk motions in the ICM of massive, merging clusters with Chandra CCD data

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ang; Tozzi, Paolo; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2016-01-01

    We search for bulk motions in the Intra Cluster Medium (ICM) of massive clusters showing evidence of an ongoing or a recent major merger, with spatially resolved spectroscopy in {\\sl Chandra} CCD data. We identify a sample of 6 merging clusters with >150 ks {\\sl Chandra} exposure in the redshift range 0.1 1000$ km/s in the ICM of massive merging clusters at 0.1 < z < 0.3. Despite the CCD spectral resolution is not sufficient for a detailed analysis of the ICM dynamics, {\\sl Chandra} CCD data constitute a key diagnostic tool complementary to X-ray bolometers onboard future X-ray missions.

  16. NASA'S Chandra Finds New Evidence on Origin of Supernovas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    CAMBRIDGE, Ma. -- Astronomers may now know the cause of an historic supernova explosion that is an important type of object for investigating dark energy in the universe. The discovery, made using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, also provides strong evidence that a star can survive the explosive impact generated when a companion star goes supernova. The new study examined the remnant of a supernova observed by the Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe in 1572. The object, dubbed Tycho for short, was formed by a Type Ia supernova, a category of stellar explosion useful in measuring astronomical distances because of their reliable brightness. Type Ia supernovas have been used to determine that the universe is expanding at an accelerating rate, an effect attributed to the prevalence of an invisible, repulsive force throughout space called dark energy. A team of researchers analyzed a deep Chandra observation of Tycho and found an arc of X-ray emission in the supernova remnant. Evidence supports the conclusion that a shock wave created the arc when a white dwarf exploded and blew material off the surface of a nearby companion star. "There has been a long-standing question about what causes Type Ia supernovas," said Fangjun Lu of the Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing. "Because they are used as steady beacons of light across vast distances, it is critical to understand what triggers them." One popular scenario for Type Ia supernovas involves the merger of two white dwarfs. In this case, no companion star or evidence for material blasted off a companion should exist. In the other main competing theory, a white dwarf pulls material from a "normal," or sun-like, companion star until a thermonuclear explosion occurs. Both scenarios may actually occur under different conditions, but the latest Chandra result from Tycho supports the latter one. n addition, the Tycho study seems to show the remarkable resiliency of stars, as the supernova

  17. Chandra Finds Well-Established Black Holes In Distant Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-01

    Pushing further back toward the first generation of objects to form in the universe, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has observed the three most distant known quasars and found them to be prodigious producers of X-rays. This indicates that the supermassive black holes powering them were already in place when the Universe was only about one billion years old. "Chandra's superb sensitivity has allowed the detection of X-rays from the dawn of the modern universe, when the first massive black holes and galaxies were forming," said Niel Brandt of Penn State University, leader of one the teams involved. "These results indicate that future X-ray surveys should be able to detect the first black holes to form in the Universe." The three quasars were recently discovered at optical wavelengths by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and are 13 billion light years from Earth, making them the most distant known quasars. The X-rays Chandra detected were emitted when the universe was only a billion years old, about 7 percent of the present age of the Universe. Since X-rays reveal conditions in the immediate vicinity of supermassive black holes, Brandt proposed that Chandra look at these objects in three snapshots of about two hours each to see if they were different from their older counterparts. The observations on January 29, 2002 were made public immediately and the four different teams quickly went to work on them. Brandt's team concluded that the quasars looked similar to ones that were at least twice as old, so the conditions around the central black hole had not changed much in that time, contrary to some theoretical expectations. A team led by Smita Mathur of Ohio State University reached a similar conclusion. "These young quasars do not appear to be any different from their older cousins, based upon our current understanding and assumptions," said Mathur. "Perhaps the most remarkable thing about them may be that they are so absolutely unremarkable." Jill Bechtold of the

  18. Distribution of alpha-amylase activity in selected broiler tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodeheaver, D P; Wyatt, R D

    1986-02-01

    In an examination of broiler alpha-amylase, significant variation in the serum enzyme activity level was noted, adult levels were lower than those of young chicks. Analysis of alpha-amylase activity in various body fluids and tissues of 11-day and 7-week-old broilers indicated that the liver cannot be considered a source of alpha-amylase, although there was activity in both liver tissue and bile of 10 units/g wet weight and 35 units/100 ml, respectively. Fluid from the oral cavity had low levels of alpha-amylase activity, less than 100 units/100 ml, which decreased with age, indicating that the salivary glands may synthesize some alpha-amylase but are not a primary source. Sonication of the pancreatic homogenates was found to significantly increase the apparent activity of alpha-amylase 35-fold over unsonicated homogenates. The pancreas was the major source of alpha-amylase with activities ranging from 89 X 10(2) to 445 X 10(2) units/g wet weight. The level of activity increased with age of the bird. The electrophoretic zymograms of serum, liver, and pancreatic homogenates indicate a similar pancreatic origin for the alpha-amylase found in each tissue or fluid.

  19. Chandra-SDSS Normal and Star-Forming Galaxies I: X-ray Source Properties of Galaxies Detected by Chandra in SDSS DR2

    CERN Document Server

    Hornschemeier, A E; Ptak, A F; Tremonti, C A; Colbert, E J M

    2004-01-01

    We have cross-correlated X-ray catalogs derived from archival Chandra ACIS observations with a Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 2 (DR2) galaxy catalog to form a sample of 42 serendipitously X-ray detected galaxies over the redshift interval 0.03 < z < 0.25. This pilot study will help fill in the "redshift gap" between local X-ray-studied samples of normal galaxies and those in the deepest X-ray surveys. Our chief purpose is to compare optical spectroscopic diagnostics of activity (both star-formation and accretion) with X-ray properties of galaxies. Our work supports a normalization value of the X-ray-star-formation-rate (X-ray-SFR) correlation consistent with the lower values published in the literature. The difference is in the allocation of X-ray emission to high-mass X-ray binaries relative to other components such as hot gas, low-mass X-ray binaries, and/or AGN. We are able to quantify a few pitfalls in the use of lower-resolution, lower signal-to-noise optical spectroscopy to identify ...

  20. Precise Localization of the Soft Gamma Repeater SGR 1627-41 with Chandra and the Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar AXP 1E1841-045 with Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Stefanie; Patel, Sandeep K.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Bouchet, Patrice; Ozel, Feryal; Tennant, Allyn F.; Woods, Peter M.; Hurley, Kevin; Becker, Werner; Slane, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    We present precise localizations of AXP 1E184-045 and SGR 1627-41 with Chandra. We obtained new infrared observations of SGR 1627-41 and reanalyzed archival observations of AXP 1E1841-045 in order to refine their positions and search for infrared counterparts. A faint source is detected inside the error circle of AXP 1E1841-045. In the case of SGR 1627-41, several sources are located within the error radius of the X-ray position, and we discuss the likelihood of one of them being the counterpart. We compare the properties of our candidates to those of other known anomalous X-ray pulsar (AXP) and soft gamma repeater (SGR) counterparts. We find that the counterpart candidates for SGR 1627-41 and SGR 1806-20 would have to be intrinsically much brighter than AXPs in order to have counterparts detectable with the observational limits currently available for these sources. To confirm the reported counterpart of SGR 1806-20, we obtained new infrared observations during the 2003 July burst activation of the source. No brightening of the suggested counterpart is detected, implying that the counterpart of SGR 1806-20 remains yet to be identified.

  1. 15 CFR 922.21 - Selection of active candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... from the SEL for Active Candidate consideration based on a preliminary assessment of the designation... environmental impact statement shall be published in the Federal Register and in newspapers in the area(s)...

  2. ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITIES AND PHENOLIC PROFILE OF SIX MOROCCAN SELECTED HERBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madiha Bichra

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The present work evaluated the antioxidant capacity of six plants commonly used in traditional Moroccan medicine. The antioxidant capacity was estimated by DPPH test, ferrous ion chelating activity and ABTS test. As results, the highest antioxidant activities were found in Mentha suaveolens, Salvia officinalis and Mentha viridis. Different species showed significant differences in their total phenolic content (TPC. The highest level of phenolics was found in Salvia officinalis and the lowest in Pelargonium roseum. Linear correlation was found between TPC, especially the non-flavonoid content (NFC and the antioxidant activity. Qualitative and quantitative analyzes of major phenolics by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC were also performed. On the basis of the obtained results, these studied medicinal herbs were found to serve as a potential source of natural antioxidants due to their richness in phenolic compounds and marked antioxidant activity.

  3. Antioxidant activity of selected wild Canadian prairie fruits

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background. Canadian prairies are a habitat for unique wild plants. The main object of the present study was to investigate phytochemicals content and antioxidant activity in seven wild Canadian prairie fruits. Material and methods. The presence of total phenolics, flavonoids, anthocyanins and antioxidant activity were identified in the extracts according to standard procedure. Results. Wild rose had the highest amounts of total phenolics and total flavonoids, whereas ...

  4. Hydrocarbon-stapled lipopeptides exhibit selective antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenner, Zachary B; Crittenden, Christopher M; Gonzalez, Martín; Brodbelt, Jennifer S; Bruns, Kerry A

    2017-01-10

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) occur widely in nature and have been studied for their therapeutic potential. AMPs are of interest due to the large number of possible chemical structural combinations using natural and unnatural amino acids, with varying effects on their biological activities. Using physicochemical properties from known naturally occurring amphipathic cationic AMPs, several hydrocarbon-stapled lipopeptides (HSLPs) were designed, synthesized, and tested for antimicrobial properties. Peptides were chemically modified by N-terminal acylation, C-terminal amidation, and some were hydrocarbon stapled by intramolecular olefin metathesis. The effects of peptide length, amphipathic character, and stapling on antimicrobial activity were tested against Escherichia coli, three species of Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus megaterium, and Enterococcus faecalis), and two strains of Candida albicans. Peptides were shown to disrupt liposomes of different phospholipid composition, as measured by leakage of a fluorescent compound from vesicles. Peptides with (S)-2-(4'-pentenyl)-alanine substituted for L-alanine in a reference peptide showed a marked increase in antimicrobial activity, hemolysis, and membrane disruption. Stapled peptides exhibited slightly higher antimicrobial potency; those with greatest hydrophobic character showed the greatest hemolysis and liposome leakage, but lower antimicrobial activity. The results support a model of HSLPs as membrane-disruptive AMPs with potent antimicrobial activity and relatively low hemolytic potential at biologically active peptide concentrations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. The activity of selected glycosidases in salivary gland tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierc, Marcin; Minarowski, Lukasz; Woźniak, Lukasz; Chojnowska, Sylwia; Knas, Malgorzata; Szajda, Slawomir; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2010-09-30

    The monitoring of the patients after salivary gland tumors surgery is an important clinical issue. Still imperfect diagnostic procedures also remain a challenge for searching new sensitive and specific biomarkers of neoplastic processes in salivary glands. The aim of the presented study was an the assessment of the activity of HEX, with its isoforms HEX-A and HEX-B, GLU, GAL, MAN and FUC in salivary gland tumor tissues in comparison to a healthy salivary gland tissues taken during autopsy. A group of 42 patients with benign and malignant salivary gland tumors, aged 25-65 were examined. Fragments of salivary gland tumor tissue, fragments of healthy tissue removed during autopsy, blood serum and saliva were collected from patients with salivary gland tumors and healthy volunteers. In salivary gland tumor tissue the activity of HEX, HEX-A, HEX-B, GAL, FUC was considerably higher than in comparison to healthy salivary gland tissue and ascending trend of activity of GLU, MAN was also noticed. The activity of all lysosomal exoglycosidases in blood serum in patients with salivary gland tumors was considerably higher in comparison to healthy volunteers blood serum. The considerably higher activity of HEX, HEX-A, GLU, GAL, MAN, FUC and descending trend of activity of HEX-B were noticed in saliva of patients with salivary gland tumors in comparison to healthy volunteers. The assessment of HEX in blood serum and saliva of patients with salivary gland tumor can be possibly used in diagnostics and monitoring of salivary glands tumors.

  6. Starburst-AGN mixing: II. Optically-selected active galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, Rebecca L; Ho, I-Ting; Dopita, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    We use 4 galaxies from the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) survey with clear signs of accretion onto supermassive black holes to investigate the relative contribution of star-formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity to the line-emission of each galaxy as a function of radius. The combination of star-formation and AGN activity produces curved "mixing sequences" on standard optical diagnostic diagrams, and the fraction of emission due to AGN activity decreases smoothly with distance from the centre of the galaxy. We use the AGN activity profiles to calculate the size of the AGN narrow line regions, which have radii of ~ 6.3 kpc. We calculate the fractional contribution of the star-formation and the AGN activity to the global Halpha, [O II] $\\lambda \\lambda$ 3727,3729 and [O III] $\\lambda$ 5007 luminosities of each galaxy, and show that both ionization sources contribute significantly to the emission in all three lines. We use weighted combinations of stellar and AGN photoionization mo...

  7. Antitubercular activity and phytochemical screening of selected medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajandeep Kaur

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants offer a hope for developing alternate medicines for the treatment of Tuberculosis.. The present study was done to evaluate in vitro anti-tubercular activity of five medicinal plants viz., Syzygium aromaticum, Piper nigrum, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Aegele marmelos and Lawsonia inermis. Solvent extracts of Syzygium aromaticum, Piper nigrum, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Aegele marmelos and Lawsonia inermis were tested in vitro for their activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv strain using Microplate Alamar Blue Assay. Activity in MABA was evaluated by lowest concentration of sample that prevents color change to pink. Extracts of all the five plants Syzygium aromaticum, Piper nigrum, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Aegele marmelos and Lawsonia inermis exhibited anti-tuberculosis activity, the proportion of inhibition of these plants extracts for M. tuberculosis H37Rv, inhibition was found to be 0.8µg/ml, 50µg/ml, 12.5µg/ml and 50µg/ml respectively. Our findings showed that all these plants exhibited activity against MDR isolates of H37Rv M. tuberculosis strain. Further studies aimed at isolation and identification of active substances from the extracts needs to be carried out

  8. The high-redshift (z>3) AGN population in the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field South

    CERN Document Server

    Vito, F; Gilli, R; Comastri, A; Iwasawa, K; Brandt, W N; Alexander, D M; Brusa, M; Lehmer, B; Bauer, F E; Schneider, D P; Xue, Y Q; Luo, B

    2012-01-01

    We present results from a spectral analysis of a sample of high-redshift (z>3) X-ray selected AGN in the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S), the deepest X-ray survey to date. The sample is selected using the most recent spectroscopic and photometric information available in this field. It consists of 34 sources with median redshift z=3.7, 80 median net counts in the 0.5-7 keV band and median rest-frame absorption-corrected luminosity $L_{2-10 \\rmn{keV}}\\approx1.5\\times10^{44}\\rmn{erg} \\rmn{s^{-1}}$. Spectral analysis for the full sample is presented and the intrinsic column density distribution, corrected for observational biases using spectral simulations, is compared with the expectations of X-ray background (XRB) synthesis models. We find that $\\approx57$ per cent of the sources are highly obscured ($N_H>10^{23}\\rmn{cm^{-2}}$). Source number counts in the $0.5-2\\rmn{keV}$ band down to flux $F_{0.5-2 \\rmn{keV}}\\approx4\\times10^{-17}\\rmn{erg} \\rmn{s^{-1}cm^{-2}}$ are also presented. Our results are consis...

  9. The Chandra Deep Group Survey -- cool core evolution in groups and clusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pascut, Aurelia

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of a study which assembles deep observations with the ACIS-I instrument on the Chandra Observatory to study the evolution in the core properties of a sample of galaxy groups and clusters out to redshifts $z\\approx 1.3$. A search for extended objects within these fields yields a total of 62 systems for which redshifts are available, and we added a further 24 non-X-ray-selected clusters, to investigate the impact of selection effects and improve our statistics at high redshift. Six different estimators of cool core strength are applied to these data: the entropy (K) and cooling time ($t_{cool}$) within the cluster core, the cooling time as a fraction of the age of the Universe ($t_{cool}/t_{Uni}$), and three estimators based on the cuspiness of the X-ray surface brightness profile. A variety of statistical tests are used to quantify evolutionary trends in these cool core indicators. In agreement with some previous studies, we find that there is significant evolution in $t_{cool}/t_{Uni}$, ...

  10. Enzymatically active high-flux selectively gas-permeable membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Ying-Bing; Cecchi, Joseph L.; Rempe, Susan; FU, Yaqin; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2016-01-26

    An ultra-thin, catalyzed liquid transport medium-based membrane structure fabricated with a porous supporting substrate may be used for separating an object species such as a carbon dioxide object species. Carbon dioxide flux through this membrane structures may be several orders of magnitude higher than traditional polymer membranes with a high selectivity to carbon dioxide. Other gases such as molecular oxygen, molecular hydrogen, and other species including non-gaseous species, for example ionic materials, may be separated using variations to the membrane discussed.

  11. Biological activity of selected plants with adaptogenic effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Ivanišová

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine biological activity of plants with adaptogenic effect: Panax ginseng Mayer., Withania somnifera L., Eleuterococcus senticosus Rupr. et Maxim., Astragallus membranaceus Fisch. and Codonopsis pilosulae Franch. The antioxidant activity was detected by DPPH and phosphomolybdenum method, total polyphenol content with Folin – Ciocalteu reagent, flavonoids content by aluminium chloride method. The detection of antimicrobial activity was carried out by disc diffusion method against three species of Gram-negative bacteria: Escherichia coli CCM 3988, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica CCM 3807, Yersinia enterocolitica CCM 5671 and two Gram-positive bacteria: Bacillus thuringiensis CCM 19, Stapylococcus aureus subsp. aureus CCM 2461. Results showed that plants with adaptogenic effect are rich for biologically active substances. The highest antioxidant activity by DPPH method was determined in the sample of Eleuterococcus senticosus (3.15 mg TEAC – Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity per g of sample and by phosphomolybdenum method in the sample of Codonopsis pilosulae (188.79 mg TEAC per g of sample. In the sample of Panax ginseng was measured the highest content of total polyphenols (8.10 mg GAE – galic acid equivalent per g of sample and flavonoids (3.41 μg QE – quercetin equivalent per g of sample. All samples also showed strong antimicrobial activity with the best results in Panax ginseng and Withania somnifera in particular for species Yersinia enterocolitica CCM 5671 and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica CCM 3807. The analyzed species of plant with high value of biological activity can be used more in the future, not only in food, but also in cosmetics and pharmaceutical industries.

  12. Interstellar extinction and the distribution of stellar populations in the direction of the ultra-deep Chandra Galactic field

    CERN Document Server

    Revnivtsev, M; Burenin, R; Grindlay, J E; Karasev, D; Forman, W

    2010-01-01

    We studied the stellar population in the central 6.6x6.6arcmin,region of the ultra-deep (1Msec) Chandra Galactic field - the "Chandra bulge field" (CBF) approximately 1.5 degrees away from the Galactic Center - using the Hubble Space Telescope ACS/WFC blue (F435W) and red (F625W) images. We mainly focus on the behavior of red clump giants - a distinct stellar population, which is known to have an essentially constant intrinsic luminosity and color. By studying the variation in the position of the red clump giants on a spatially resolved color-magnitude diagram, we confirm the anomalous total-to-selective extinction ratio, as reported in previous work for other Galactic bulge fields. We show that the interstellar extinction in this area is = 4 on average, but varies significantly between ~3-5 on angular scales as small as 1 arcminute. Using the distribution of red clump giants in an extinction-corrected color-magnitude diagram, we constrain the shape of a stellar-mass distribution model in the direction of thi...

  13. Chandra and ASCA X-ray Observations of the Radio Supernova SN1979C IN NGC 4321

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, A; Schlegel, E M

    2001-01-01

    We report on the X-ray observation of the radio selected supernova SN1979C carried out with ASCA in 1997 December and serendipitously available from a Chandra Guaranteed Time Observation in 1999 November. The supernova, of type SN II-Linear (SN IIL), was first observed in the optical and occurred in the weakly barred, almost face on spiral galaxy NGC 4321 (M100). The galaxy, a member of the Virgo S cluster, is at a distance of 17.1 Mpc, and contains at least three other supernovae discovered in this century. The useful exposure time was ~25 ks for the Solid-State Imaging Spectrometer (SIS), ~28 ks for the Gas Scintillation Imaging Spectrometer (GIS), and ~2.5 ks for Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS). No point source was detected at the radio position of SN1979C in a 3' diameter half power response circle in the ASCA data. The background and galaxy subtracted SN signal had a 3sigma upper limit to the flux of 6.3x10^-14 ergs/s/cm^-2 in the full ASCA SIS band (0.4-10.0 keV) and a 3sigma upper li...

  14. A Chandra Study of the Image Power Spectra of 41 Cool Core and Non-Cool Core Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Chenhao; Zhu, Zhenghao; Li, Weitian; Hu, Dan; Wang, Jingying; Gu, Junhua; Gu, Liyi; Zhang, Zhongli; Liu, Chengze; Zhu, Jie; Wu, Xiang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    In this work we propose a new diagnostic to segregate cool core (CC) clusters from non-cool core (NCC) clusters by studying the two-dimensional power spectra of the X-ray images observed with the Chandra X-ray observatory. Our sample contains 41 members ($z=0.01\\sim 0.54$), which are selected from the Chandra archive when a high photon count, an adequate angular resolution, a relatively complete detector coverage, and coincident CC-NCC classifications derived with three traditional diagnostics are simultaneously guaranteed. We find that in the log-log space the derived image power spectra can be well represented by a constant model component at large wavenumbers, while at small wavenumbers a power excess beyond the constant component appears in all clusters, with a clear tendency that the excess is stronger in CC clusters. By introducing a new CC diagnostic parameter, i.e., the power excess index (PEI), we classify the clusters in our sample and compare the results with those obtained with three traditional C...

  15. The antioxidant activity of selected wild orchids of Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Babu Chand

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the antioxidant activity as well as the total polyphenolics and flavonoids content of thirteen extracts from nine wild orchids of Nepal. Methods: First, a preliminary phytochemical screening of thirteen extracts of nine orchids was carried out using established protocols. Then, the total polyphenolic and flavonoid contents of each extract were evaluated using the Folin-Ciocalteu's phenol reagent and aluminium chloride methods respectively. Finally, antioxidant activity was determined by 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl free radical scavenging assay and expressed in terms of half inhibition concentrations (IC50 values. Results: All the tested parameters showed significant variation at P = 0.05. The total flavonoids varied with the greatest amounts found in the leaves of Rhynchostylis retusa and the smallest amounts found in the roots of Gastrochilus acutifolius (G. acutifolius. The amount of total polyphenolics was highest in the stems of Vanda cristata and lowest in the leaves of G. acutifolius. Antioxidant activity was highest in the stems of Vanda cristata and lowest in the leaves of G. acutifolius. Conclusions: Some of the orchid extracts studied exhibited levels of antioxidant activity which were comparable to or even higher than those found for extracts of medicinal plants and orchids studied previously. It is suggested that drugs and natural food additives can be extracted from those wild orchids with high levels of antioxidant activity.

  16. Antibacterial activity of some selected medicinal plants of Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhary Fayyaz M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Screening of the ethnobotenical plants is a pre-requisite to evaluate their therapeutic potential and it can lead to the isolation of new bioactive compounds. Methods The crude extracts and fractions of six medicinal important plants (Arisaema flavum, Debregeasia salicifolia, Carissa opaca, Pistacia integerrima, Aesculus indica, and Toona ciliata were tested against three Gram positive and two Gram negative ATCC bacterial species using the agar well diffusion method. Results The crude extract of P. integerrima and A. indica were active against all tested bacterial strains (12-23 mm zone of inhibition. Other four plant's crude extracts (Arisaema flavum, Debregeasia salicifolia, Carissa opaca, and Toona ciliata were active against different bacterial strains. The crude extracts showed varying level of bactericidal activity. The aqueous fractions of A. indica and P. integerrima crude extract showed maximum activity (19.66 and 16 mm, respectively against B. subtilis, while the chloroform fractions of T. ciliata and D. salicifolia presented good antibacterial activities (13-17 mm zone of inhibition against all the bacterial cultures tested. Conclusion The methanol fraction of Pistacia integerrima, chloroform fractions of Debregeasia salicifolia &Toona ciliata and aqueous fraction of Aesculus indica are suitable candidates for the development of novel antibacterial compounds.

  17. Antimycobacterial and Antifungal Activities of Selected Four Salvia Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Tan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The content of essential oils of endemic Salvia cilicica was analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS techniques. Spathulenol (23.8 %, caryophyllene oxide (14.9 % and hexadecanoic acid (10.3 % were identified as the major components in the oil of Salvia cilicica. Additionally, in this study ethanol extracts of the aerial parts and essential oils of four Salvia species ( S. cilicica, S. officinalis, S. fruticosa, S. tomentosa , as well as the roots of S. cilicica were investigated their antimycobacterial and antifungal activities including infectious diseases. The antimycobacterial activity was analyzed against three Mycobacterium tuberculosis (sensitive-, resistant-standard strains and multidrug resistance clinical isolate strains and the antifungal activity was compared with two dermotophytes (Microsporum gypseum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes var. erinacei and three Candida species by the broth microdilution method. The essentials oils of the four tested Salvia species showed high antimycobacterial and antifungal activity (MIC between 0.2-12.5 mcg/mL in comparison to the aerial parts and root extracts . The antifungal and antimycobacterial potential of the ethanol extracts and essential oils were introduced to determine whether, Salvia species can be used in phytotherapy against the yeasts, dermatophytes and M. tuberculosis. To the best of our knowledge this is the first study of S. cilicica about their antimycobacterial and antifungal activities and chemical composition of its essential oils.

  18. Antioxidant activity of selected wild Canadian prairie fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Klensporf-Pawlik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Canadian prairies are a habitat for unique wild plants. The main object of the present study was to investigate phytochemicals content and antioxidant activity in seven wild Canadian prairie fruits. Material and methods. The presence of total phenolics, flavonoids, anthocyanins and antioxidant activity were identified in the extracts according to standard procedure. Results. Wild rose had the highest amounts of total phenolics and total flavonoids, whereas elderberry ex- hibited the highest amount of anthocyanins. All extracts showed good scavenging activities towards DPPH radicals. The results showed a good linear relationship between oxygen radical absorbance capacity and total phenolics indicating that radicals are scavenged at a greater rate as the total phenolics content increases. Addi- tionally, all extracts when applied at concentration of 800 ppm, showed ability to inhibit oxidation of canola oil. In SOT test the best results were obtained when extract of American mountain ash was used. In general, wild rose followed by American mountain ash demonstrated the highest antioxidant activity among assessed Canadian prairie fruits. Conclusion. From the results it can be concluded that prairie fruit extracts are a rich source of phenolic compounds and poses a high antioxidant activity, confirmed by assessment with different type of radicals employed.

  19. Quantitative ultraviolet skin exposure in children during selected outdoor activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville, S K; Rosenthal, F S; Luckmann, R; Lew, R A

    1991-06-01

    We determined the cumulative exposure of 3 body sites to ultraviolet radiation from sunlight for 126 children observed from 1-3 d during a variety of common recreational activities at a girl scout camp, baseball camp and community baseball field. Median arm exposure to children playing baseball at a camp ranged from 27.6% to 33.2% of the possible ambient exposure. These exposures are similar to adult exposures reported for comparable activities. Median exposure to the arm at the girl scout camp during mixed activities ranged from 9.0% to 26.5% of possible ambient exposure. At the girl scout camp, exposure both within and between activity groups varied substantially and were more variable than the baseball players' exposure. Arm exposure was greater than cheek and forehead exposure for all subject groups, with an arm-to-cheek exposure ratio ranging from 1.7 to 2.3. For organized sports, such as baseball, it may be possible to assign a single exposure estimate for use in epidemiologic studies or risk estimates. However, for less uniform outdoor activities, wide variability in exposure makes it more difficult to predict an individual's exposure.

  20. Invitro antioxidant activity of selected antiasthmatic herbal constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilani, P; Kasthuribai, N; Duraisamy, B; Dhamodaran, P; Ravichandran, S; Ilango, K; Suresh, B

    2009-04-01

    Asthmatic patients are more subjected to continuous oxidative stress. Roosting the antioxidant defenses of asthma patient could be beneficial as it may help thwart symptoms of the lung disease and asthma. Considering these facts different plant extracts and phytoconstituents with proven anti asthmatic property had been subjected to antioxidant study at various combinations using Diphenyl Vicryl Hydrazyl radical scavenging method, Hydrogen Peroxide radical scavenging method, Nitric oxide radical inhibition method, ABTS radical scavenging method and Lipid peroxidation assay method.All the selected herbal based constituents and extracts at different combination showed a potent antioxidant activiy by Nitric oxide radical inhibition activiy method followed by ABTS method. The present finding suggests that the selected plant based anti asthmatic constituents namely Coleus extract (10% Forskolin), Piper longum extract (20% Piperine), CurcuminC3Complex (60% Curcumin), Vasaka (30% Vasicinone), Forskolin (95%), Pperine (98%), Curcumin C3 Complex (98.5%) and Vasicinone (75%) could be utilised in alternate anti asthmatic therapy, since they play a vital role in scavenging Nitric oxide which could prevent the bronchial inflammation in asthmatic patients.

  1. Selective Electrocatalytic Activity of Ligand Stabilized Copper Oxide Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauffman, Douglas R; Ohodnicki, Paul R; Kail, Brian W; Matranga, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Ligand stabilization can influence the surface chemistry of Cu oxide nanoparticles (NPs) and provide unique product distributions for electrocatalytic methanol (MeOH) oxidation and CO{sub 2} reduction reactions. Oleic acid (OA) stabilized Cu{sub 2}O and CuO NPs promote the MeOH oxidation reaction with 88% and 99.97% selective HCOH formation, respectively. Alternatively, CO{sub 2} is the only reaction product detected for bulk Cu oxides and Cu oxide NPs with no ligands or weakly interacting ligands. We also demonstrate that OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs can reduce CO{sub 2} into CO with a {approx}1.7-fold increase in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to bulk Cu oxides. The OA stabilized Cu oxide NPs also show 7.6 and 9.1-fold increases in CO/H{sub 2} production ratios compared to weakly stabilized and non-stabilized Cu oxide NPs, respectively. Our data illustrates that the presence and type of surface ligand can substantially influence the catalytic product selectivity of Cu oxide NPs.

  2. Cytotoxic and antioxidant activity of selected marine sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chairman K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the anticancer activity of the crude extracts of Rhabdastrella globostellata (R. globostellata and Spirastrella inconstans (S. inconstans var. moeandrina Dendy. Methods: Soxhlet extraction method was used to extract the secondary metabolites and various assays antioxidant, anticancer and various assays were carried out. The extract were tested anticancer activity against a HeLa, Raw 264.7 and Hek-293. Results: The sponge extracts tested exhibited from median to high toxicity in at least one of the toxicity bioassays performed. The antioxidant activity of the isolated metabolite in ethylacetate solution was assessed by SOD and GTH assays and compared with that of other known natural antioxidants. Conclusions: Potent antioxidants have been detected among both phenolic metabolites and alkaloids. Antioxidant effects of tested compounds have been attributed to their action as chain-breaking antioxidants and/or as scavengers of radicals

  3. The activity of selected glycosidases in salivary gland tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Chojnowska

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring of the patients after salivary gland tumors surgery is an important clinical issue. Still imperfect diagnostic procedures also remain a challenge for searching new sensitive and specific biomarkers of neoplastic processes in salivary glands. The aim of the presented study was an the assessment of the activity of HEX, with its isoforms HEX-A and HEX-B, GLU, GAL, MAN and FUC in salivary gland tumor tissues in comparison to a healthy salivary gland tissues taken during autopsy. A group of 42 patients with benign and malignant salivary gland tumors, aged 25-65 were examined. Fragments of salivary gland tumor tissue, fragments of healthy tissue removed during autopsy, blood serum and saliva were collected from patients with salivary gland tumors and healthy volunteers. In salivary gland tumor tissue the activity of HEX, HEX-A, HEX-B, GAL, FUC was considerably higher than in comparison to healthy salivary gland tissue and ascending trend of activity of GLU, MAN was also noticed. The activity of all lysosomal exoglycosidases in blood serum in patients with salivary gland tumors was considerably higher in comparison to healthy volunteers blood serum. The considerably higher activity of HEX, HEX-A, GLU, GAL, MAN, FUC and descending trend of activity of HEX-B were noticed in saliva of patients with salivary gland tumors in comparison to healthy volunteers. The assessment of HEX in blood serum and saliva of patients with salivary gland tumor can be possibly used in diagnostics and monitoring of salivary glands tumors.

  4. Comparative anthelmintic activity investigation of selected ethno-medicinal weeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueblos, Kirstin Rhys S.; Bajalla, Mark; Pacheco, Dixie; Ganot, Sheila; Paig, Daisy; Tapales, Radyn; Lagare, Jeanne; Quimque, Mark Tristan J.

    2017-01-01

    Helminth infections are one of the seriously neglected potent diseases in many parts of the world. The problems of parasitic helminthes becoming resistant to currently available anthelmintic drugs pose a challenge for the search - relying on natural products - for new and better anthelmintics. In this paper, four abundant Philippine weeds: Chrysopogon aciculatus Trin. Cyperus brevifolius Rottb., Ruellia tuberosa Linn. and Saccharum spontaneum Linn. were investigated for their anthelmintic activities to establish basis of their folkloric claim. The hexane-soluble and chloroform-soluble extracts were obtained through sequential solvent partitioning of the crude ethanolic extract of the air-dried aerial part of each plant sample. Meanwhile, the decoction was obtained from fresh aerial part of the plant samples. All extracts were then subjected to in vitro anthelmintic screening at different concentration as per method of Ghosh, et al. against African nightcrawler earthworms (Eudrillus euginiae) in which the activity of the extracts was determined by correlation with time. The anthelmintic bioassay results revealed a dose-dependent toxicity relationship. It indicated relatively low anthelmintic activities of the decoction of the four plant samples as compared to their corresponding crude ethanol extracts. Among the crude ethanol extracts, C. brevifolius (CBE) gave fastest time to bring about paralysis and death to the test organisms at all concentrations tested. For the hexane extracts, R. tuberosa (RTH) gave better activity among other plant samples. Lastly, among the chloroform-soluble extracts, both that of C. brevifolius (CBC) and R. tuberosa (RTC) comparably showed strongest anthelmintic activities at all tested concentrations, thus, exhibited best anthelmintic activity that is remarkably comparable to the positive control, Mebendazole at the highest concentration tested. In fact, CBC and RTC showed highest anthelmintic potential compared to all extracts tested in

  5. Comparison of the Electromyographic Activation Level and Unilateral Selectivity of Erector Spinae during Different Selected Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lan-Yuen; Wang, Yu-Lin; Huang, Yu-Han; Yang, Chich-Haung; Hou, Yi-You; Harn, Hans I-Chen; You, Yu-Lin

    2012-01-01

    For patients with scoliosis, core stabilization exercises may be beneficial in improving muscle strength and trunk dynamic control. However, few studies have examined whether the erector spinae (ES) activation status during unilateral spinal extensor strengthening meets the guideline for patients with spinal scoliosis. To determine ES activation…

  6. Antioxidant activities of selective gluten free ancient grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancient grains were known for special nutritional values along with gluten free qualities. Amaranth, quinoa, teff, buckwheat flours were evaluated for pasting properties, water holding capacity, phenolic contents, and antioxidant activities (free and bound). They all had higher water holding capacit...

  7. Effects of selected surfactants on soil microbial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surfactants (surface-active agents) facilitate and accentuate the emulsifying, dispersing, spreading, and wetting properties of liquids. Surfactants are used in industry to reduce the surface tension of liquid and to solubilize compounds. For agricultural pest management, surfactants are an import...

  8. ANTIOXIDANT AND ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITIES OF SELECTED ARMENIAN MEDICINAL PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardapetyan H

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant potentials of ethanolic and aqueous extracts of Hypericum perforatum, Ocimum basilicum, Laurus nobilis leaves were evaluated by 2, 2-diphenyl-l-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH assay. Simultaneously total flavonoids content and antibacterial potential of all the tested extract was also monitored. The highest radical scavenging capacity (RSC was reported in ethanolic extract of H. perforatum leaves while the lowest RSC was reported in the aqueous extract of L. nobilis. The ethanolic extracts of L. nobilis posses more DPPH radical scavenging action, than their aqueous extracts. Ethanolic and aqueous extracts of H. perforatum shows significant antioxidant activity, it is near to inhibition capacities while ethanolic extract of O. basilicum leaf has exhibited small activity as compared with its aqueous extract. RSC of ethanolic extracts can correlates with flavonoids content. The antiradical activity of ethanolic and aqueous extracts of L.nobilis leaf can also correlate with total flavonoids content, while such type of correlation was not reported in the case of H. perforatum and O. basilicum leaves extracts. RSC of tested extracts can be ranged in the following way: quercetin > rutin > eth. H. perforatum > aq. H. perforatum > aq. O. basilicum > eth L.nobilis > eth. O. basilicum > aq. L.nobilis. All the ethanolic extracts express more antibacterial activity than aqueous extracts.

  9. Antioxidant activities in extracts of selected indigenous vegetables ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-04-23

    Apr 23, 2014 ... anion radicals and reducing power) than ethanol extracts. ... species (or their active constituents) identified as having high levels of antioxidant ... carbonate solution was added to the mixture and adjusted to 10 ml with distilled ... aqueous ethanol and to the test tubes 0.1 ml of 10% aluminium nitrate was ...

  10. Structure activity relationship of selective GABA uptake inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogensen, Stine Byskov; Jørgensen, Lars; Madsen, Karsten K;

    2015-01-01

    A series of β-amino acids with lipophilic diaromatic side chain was synthesized and characterized pharmacologically on mouse γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) transporter subtypes mGAT1-4 in order to investigate structure activity relationships (SAR) for mGAT2 (corresponding to hBGT-1). Variation...

  11. Antimicrobial, antioxidant activities and chemical composition of selected Thai spices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juraithip Wungsintaweekul

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Nine volatile oils and six methanol extracts from Ocimum americanum, O. basilicum, O. sanctum, Citrus hystrix,Alpinia galanga, Curcuma zedoaria, Kaempferia parviflora and Zingiber cassumunar were assessed for antimicrobial andantioxidant activities. The volatile oils and extracts were investigated against eight bacteria and three fungi. The resultsillustrated that O. americanum volatile oil exhibited broad spectrum activity against tested bacteria with the MICs ranging1.4-3.6 mg/ml and Candida spp. with the MICs ranging from 0.5-0.6 mg/ml. The O. sanctum volatile oil showed a considerableactivity against only Candida spp. with the MICs ranging from 0.8-1.4 mg/ml. Interestingly, growth of Mycobacteriumphlei was inhibited by the volatiles of O. americanum, C. hystrix peel, and C. zedoaria with MIC of 1.7, 3.5 and 1.2 mg/ml,respectively. For antioxidant activity evaluation, the methanol extracts of C. hystrix (leaf and peel and K. parviflora hadpotent antioxidant activity by the radical-scavenging DPPH method with IC50 of 24.6, 66.3 and 61.5 mg/ml, respectively.GC-MS analysis revealed the typical chemical profiles of the volatile oils. The major component showed the characteristicsof the volatile oils and was probably responsible for the antimicrobial effect.

  12. Functionally Selective AT(1) Receptor Activation Reduces Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hostrup, Anders; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Bentzen, Bo Hjort;

    2012-01-01

    of the physiological functions of AngII. The AT(1)R mediates its effects through both G protein-dependent and independent signaling, which can be separated by functionally selective agonists. In the present study we investigate the effect of AngII and the ß-arrestin biased agonist [SII]AngII on ischemia......-reperfusion injury in rat hearts. Isolated hearts mounted in a Langendorff perfused rat heart preparations showed that preconditioning with [SII]AngII reduced the infarct size induced by global ischemia from 46±8.4% to 22±3.4%. In contrast, neither preconditioning with AngII nor postconditioning with AngII or [SII...

  13. The Making of the Chandra X-ray Observatory: the Project Scientist's Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Weisskopf, Martin C

    2010-01-01

    We review the history of the development of the Chandra X-ray Observatory from our personal perspective. This review is necessarily biased and limited by space since it attempts to cover a time span approaching 5 decades.

  14. Performance as Promised: How the Chandra X-ray Observatory Accomplished One of Nasa's Most Challenging Missions for Billions of Dollars Less than Originally Planned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Greg; Hefner, Keith

    2004-01-01

    As the nation looks toward bold new ventures in space, the Chandra X-ray Observatory program offers an example of how billion-dollar missions can be successfully developed within tightening fiscal constraints. Chandra experienced many of challenges facing bold space programs (state-of-the-art technical requirements and budget-induced slips and restructurings), and yet the Chandra team achieved nearly all the originally envisioned performance for dramatically lower cost. This was accomplished by a combination of team- work, systems engineering, advanced technology insertion, and effective approaches for program implementation. A thorough tradeoff of science utility vs. cost led to the selection of a highly elliptical orbit with uncrewed robotic delivery, deployment, and maintenance. Progressive, focused technology demonstrations were accomplished prior to commitment of major resources to critical elements of the system design, such as the high resolution mirror assembly (HRMA). Pathfinder hardware was developed to reduce risks. A variety of schedule risk reduction measures were implemented and resulted in the X-ray calibration taking place exactly within five days of its originally planned date after after five years of development. The team worked together in an effective manner to contain requirements creep. reductions such as the ACIS-2 chip device. It is estimated that the above combination of measures achieved the avoidance of over $4B in costs, while enabling a highly successful mission.

  15. Activity of endodontic antibacterial agents against selected anaerobic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Cláudio Maniglia

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of substances used as antibacterial agents (solutions of 10% calcium hydroxide, camphorated paramonochlorophenol - PMCC, 2% chlorhexidine digluconate and 10% castor oil plant detergent on anaerobic bacteria (Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586, Prevotella nigrescens ATCC 33563, Clostridium perfringens ATCC 13124 and Bacteroides fragilis ATCC 25285, using a broth dilution technique, was evaluated in vitro. For determination of minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericide concentrations (MIC and MBC, two culture broths, Reinforced Clostridial Medium (RCM and supplemented Brucella, standardized inoculum and serially diluted solutions were used. All antibacterial agents presented antimicrobial activity that varied for different bacteria. There were no differences in the performance of the two broths. Chlorhexidine digluconate was the most effective, with the lowest MICs, followed by castor oil detergent, PMCC and calcium hydroxide. C. perfringens and B. fragilis were the most resistant bacteria to all agents.

  16. Effects of mining activities on selected aquatic organisms

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Ph.D. Except for agriculture, the mining industry is considered as not only the oldest but also the most important industry. Mining involves the removal of minerals from the earth's crust for usage by mankind. The disturbance during mining activities such as mining effluent has an effect on the natural aquatic environment. In any freshwater environment, the macroinvertebrates form a vital link between the abiotic envinronment and the organisms in higher trophic levels. It is thus true that...

  17. Chandra position of IGR J17454-2919 and discovery of a possible NIR counterpart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paizis, A.; Nowak, M.; Chati, S.;

    2015-01-01

    On 2014 November 3, we observed the recently discovered INTEGRAL source IGR J17454-2919 (ATels #6530, #6574 and #6602) with Chandra HETGS for 20ks. The J2000.0 Chandra position we obtain is RA: 17 45 27.689 DEC: -29 19 53.83 (90% uncertainty of 0.6") This position (2.4" away from the Swift positi...

  18. STUDIES ON ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY AND PHYTOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF CITRUS FRUIT JUICES AGAINST SELECTED ENTERIC PATHOGENS

    OpenAIRE

    Bansode.D.S.; Chavan.M.D.

    2012-01-01

    The present study was carried out to find out the antimicrobial activity and phytochemical study of citrus fruit juices viz. Lemon (Citrus limon) and Orange (Citrus ourantium) against medically important selected enteric pathogens. As microorganisms are becoming resistant to present day antibiotics, our study focuses on antimicrobial activity and phytochemical study of Citrus fruit juices against selected enteric pathogens. Biological active compounds present in the medicinal important fruit ...

  19. The Field X-ray AGN Fraction to z=0.7 from the Chandra Multiwavelength Project and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Haggard, Daryl; Anderson, Scott F; Constantin, Anca; Aldcroft, Tom L; Kim, Dong-Woo; Barkhouse, Wayne A

    2010-01-01

    We employ the Chandra Multiwavelength Project (ChaMP) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to study the fraction of X-ray-active galaxies in the field out to z = 0.7. We utilize spectroscopic redshifts from SDSS and ChaMP, as well as photometric redshifts from several SDSS catalogs, to compile a parent sample of more than 100,000 SDSS galaxies and nearly 1,600 Chandra X-ray detections. Detailed ChaMP volume completeness maps allow us to investigate the local fraction of active galactic nuclei (AGN), defined as those objects having broad-band X-ray luminosities L_X (0.5-8 keV) > 10^42 erg s^-1, as a function of absolute optical magnitude, X-ray luminosity, redshift, mass, and host color/morphological type. In five independent samples complete in redshift and i-band absolute magnitude, we determine the field AGN fraction to be between 0.16 +/- 0.06% (for z M_i > -20) and 3.80 +/- 0.92% (for z < 0.7 and M_i < -23). We find striking agreement between our ChaMP/SDSS field AGN fraction and the Chandra clu...

  20. Evaluation of Antileishmanial Activity of Selected Brazilian Plants and Identification of the Active Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdir Cechinel Filho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated extracts, fractions, and isolated compounds from some selected Brazilian medicinal plants against strains of promastigotes of Leishmania amazonensis and L. brasiliensis in vitro. The cell viability was determined, comparing the results with reference standards. The dichloromethane fractions of the roots, stems, and leaves of Allamanda schottii showed IC50 values between 14.0 and 2.0 μg/mL. Plumericin was the main active compound, with IC50 of 0.3 and 0.04 μg/mL against the two species of Leishmania analyzed. The hexane extract of Eugenia umbelliflora fruits showed IC50 of 14.3 and 5.7 μg/mL against L. amazonensis and L. brasiliensis, respectively. The methanolic extracts of the seeds of Garcinia achachairu and guttiferone A presented IC50 values of 35.9 and 10.4 μg/mL, against L. amazonensis, respectively. The ethanolic extracts of the stem barks of Rapanea ferruginea and the isolated compound, myrsinoic acid B, presented activity against L. brasiliensis with IC50 of 24.1 and 6.1 μg/mL. Chloroform fraction of Solanum sisymbriifolium exhibited IC50 of 33.8 and 20.5 μg/mL, and cilistol A was the main active principle, with IC50 of 6.6 and 3.1 μg/mL against L. amazonensis and L. brasiliensis, respectively. It is concluded that the analyzed plants are promising as new and effective antiparasitic agents.

  1. Resolving galaxy cluster gas properties at z~1 with XMM-Newton and Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Bartalucci, I; Pratt, G W; Démoclès, J; van der Burg, R F J; Mazzotta, P

    2016-01-01

    We present a pilot X-ray study of the five most massive ($M_{500}>5 \\times 10^{14} M_{\\odot}$), distant (z~1), galaxy clusters detected via the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. We optimally combine XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations by leveraging the throughput of XMM to obtain spatially-resolved spectroscopy, and the spatial resolution of Chandra to probe the bright inner parts and to detect embedded point sources. Capitalising on the excellent agreement in flux-related measurements, we present a new method to derive the density profiles, constrained in the centre by Chandra and in the outskirts by XMM. We show that the Chandra-XMM combination is fundamental for morphological analysis at these redshifts, the Chandra resolution being required to remove point source contamination, and the XMM sensitivity allowing higher significance detection of faint substructures. The sample is dominated by dynamically disturbed objects. We use the combined Chandra-XMM density profiles and spatially-resolved temperature prof...

  2. Structural basis for AMPA receptor activation and ligand selectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hogner, A; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm Jensen; Jin, R

    2002-01-01

    Glutamate is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter within the mammalian CNS, playing an important role in many different functions in the brain such as learning and memory. In this study, a combination of molecular biology, X-ray structure determinations, as well as electrophysiology...... correlation between domain closure and efficacy has been obtained from electrophysiology experiments undertaken on non-desensitising GluR2i(Q)-L483Y receptors expressed in oocytes, providing strong evidence that receptor activation occurs as a result of domain closure. The structural results, combined...

  3. Role of intracortical inhibition in selective hand muscle activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinear, Cathy M; Byblow, Winston D

    2003-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that intracortical inhibition (ICI) plays an important role in shaping the output from primary motor cortex (M1). This study explored the muscle specificity and temporal modulation of ICI during the performance of a phasic index finger flexion task. Fifteen subjects were asked to rest their dominant hand on a computer mouse and depress the mouse button using their index finger in time with a 1-Hz auditory metronome, while keeping the rest of their hand as relaxed as possible. Responses to single- and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation were recorded from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor pollicis brevis (APB) muscles while subjects were at rest and during "on" and "off" phases of the task. For FDI during the on phase, motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude and pretrigger EMG increased and ICI decreased, as expected. This pattern of modulation was also observed for APB in seven subjects. The remaining eight subjects demonstrated a decrease in MEP amplitude and increase in ICI for APB during the on phase. This was associated with significantly less APB activation during the on phase. These findings suggest that an increase in ICI and decrease in corticospinal excitability can prevent unwanted muscle activation in a muscle-specific, temporally modulated manner.

  4. EXAMINING THE RADIO-LOUD/RADIO-QUIET DICHOTOMY WITH NEW CHANDRA AND VLA OBSERVATIONS OF 13 UGC GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharb, P.; Axon, D. J.; Robinson, A. [Physics Department, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Capetti, A.; Balmaverde, B. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino, Strada Osservatorio 20, 10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Chiaberge, M.; Macchetto, D. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Grandi, P. [INAF, Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica, Bologna (Italy); Giovannini, G. [INAF, Istituto di Radioastronomia di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Montez, R., E-mail: kharb@cis.rit.edu [Center for Imaging Science, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    We present the results from new {approx}15 ks Chandra-ACIS and 4.9 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) observations of 13 galaxies hosting low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs). This completes the multiwavelength study of a sample of 51 nearby early-type galaxies described in Capetti and Balmaverde and Balmaverde and Capetti. The aim of the three previous papers was to explore the connection between the host galaxies and AGN activity in a radio-selected sample. We detect nuclear X-ray emission in eight sources and radio emission in all but one (viz., UGC 6985). The new VLA observations improve the spatial resolution by a factor of 10: the presence of nuclear radio sources in 12 of the 13 galaxies confirms their AGN nature. As previously indicated, the behavior of the X-ray and radio emission in these sources depends strongly on the form of their optical surface brightness profiles derived from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, i.e., on their classification as 'core', 'power-law', or 'intermediate' galaxies. With more than twice the number of 'power-law' and 'intermediate' galaxies compared to previous work, we confirm with a much higher statistical significance that these galaxies lie well above the radio-X-ray correlation established in Fanaroff-Riley type I radio galaxies and the low-luminosity 'core' galaxies. This result highlights the fact that the 'radio-loud/radio-quiet' dichotomy is a function of the host galaxy's optical surface brightness profile. We present radio-optical-X-ray spectral indices for all 51 sample galaxies. Survival statistics point to significant differences in the radio-to-optical and radio-to-X-ray spectral indices between the 'core' and 'power-law galaxies (Gehan's Generalized Wilcoxon test probability p for the two classes being statistically similar is <10{sup -5}), but not in the optical-to-X-ray spectral indices (p = 0.25). Therefore, the

  5. Highly active ozonides selected against drug resistant malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Lis; de Sousa, Bruno; Cabral, Lília; Cristiano, Maria LS; Nogueira, Fátima

    2016-01-01

    Ever increasing multi-drug resistance by Plasmodium falciparum is creating new challenges in malaria chemotherapy. In the absence of licensed vaccines, treatment and prevention of malaria is heavily dependent on drugs. Potency, range of activity, safety, low cost and ease of administration are crucial issues in the design and formulation of antimalarials. We have tested three synthetic ozonides NAC89, LC50 and LCD67 in vitro and in vivo against multidrug resistant Plasmodium. In vitro, LC50 was at least 10 times more efficient inhibiting P. falciparum multidrug resistant Dd2 strain than chloroquine and mefloquine and as efficient as artemisinin (ART), artesunate and dihydroartemisinin. All three ozonides showed high efficacy in clearing parasitaemia in mice, caused by multi-drug resistant Plasmodium chabaudi strains, by subcutaneous administration, demonstrating high efficacy in vivo against ART and artesunate resistant parasites. PMID:27276364

  6. Highly active ozonides selected against drug resistant malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lis Lobo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ever increasing multi-drug resistance by Plasmodium falciparum is creating new challenges in malaria chemotherapy. In the absence of licensed vaccines, treatment and prevention of malaria is heavily dependent on drugs. Potency, range of activity, safety, low cost and ease of administration are crucial issues in the design and formulation of antimalarials. We have tested three synthetic ozonides NAC89, LC50 and LCD67 in vitro and in vivo against multidrug resistant Plasmodium. In vitro, LC50 was at least 10 times more efficient inhibiting P. falciparum multidrug resistant Dd2 strain than chloroquine and mefloquine and as efficient as artemisinin (ART, artesunate and dihydroartemisinin. All three ozonides showed high efficacy in clearing parasitaemia in mice, caused by multi-drug resistant Plasmodium chabaudi strains, by subcutaneous administration, demonstrating high efficacy in vivo against ART and artesunate resistant parasites.

  7. Screening of selected pesticides for oestrogen receptor activation in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne; Breinholt, Vibeke; Larsen, John Christian

    1999-01-01

    .0, 2.4, and 1.9-fold increase in proliferation of human MCF7 breast cancer cells (E3 clone). The relative proliferation efficiency (RPE) was 43-69%, indicating partial agonism at the oestrogen receptor. Several pesticides did not have any effect oil the proliferation response after 6 days of exposure......Twenty pesticides were tested for their ability to activate the oestrogen receptor in vitro using an,MCF7 cell proliferation assay and a Yeast Oestrogen Screen. The fungicides fenarimol, triadimefon, and triadimenol were identified as weak oestrogen receptor agonists, which at 10 mu M induces a 2......, including. chlorpyrifos, diuron, iprodion, linuron, pentachlorphenol, prochloraz, propioconazol, propyzamine, quintozen, tetrachorvinphos and tetradifon. Some pesticides resulted in a negligible proliferation response, which was nor statistically significant under the present experimental conditions...

  8. Degradability of selected azo dye metabolites in activated sludge systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekici, P; Leupold, G; Parlar, H

    2001-08-01

    The stability of eight environmentally relevant azo dye metabolites [o-aminotoluene (2), 4,4'-thiodianiline (4), 4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane (6), p-chloroaniline (7), 2,4-toluylenediamine (9), p-kresidine (14), 2,4-diaminoanisole (15), and 2-naphthylamine (18)] was investigated in activated sludge systems and compared to their hydrolysis stability. For both studies, test systems of the EC and EPA were used. The results show that degradation under aerobic conditions proceeds via oxidation of the substituents located on the aromatic ring or on the side chain. Under anaerobic conditions, the azo bond is reductively cleaved, which leads to the substituted amines. These are toxic and potentially hazardous to the environment.

  9. Near-Infrared Properties of Faint X-rays Sources from NICMOS Imaging in the Chandra Deep Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Colbert, J W; Yan, L; Malkan, M A; McCarthy, P; Colbert, James W.; Teplitz, Harry; Yan, Lin; Malkan, Matthew; Carthy, Patrick Mc

    2004-01-01

    We measure the near-infrared properties of 42 X-ray detected sources from the Chandra Deep Fields North and South, the majority of which lie within the NICMOS Hubble Deep Field North and Ultra Deep Field. We detect all 42 Chandra sources with NICMOS, with 95% brighter than H = 24.5. We find that X-ray sources are most often in the brightest and most massive galaxies. Neither the X-ray fluxes nor hardness ratios of the sample show any correlation with near-infrared flux, color or morphology. This lack of correlation indicates there is little connection between the two emission mechanisms and is consistent with the near-infrared emission being dominated by starlight rather than a Seyfert non-stellar continuum. Near-infrared X-ray sources make up roughly half of all extremely red (J-H > 1.4) objects brighter than H > 24.5. These red X-ray sources have a range of hardness ratios similar to the rest of the sample, decreasing the likelihood of dust-obscured AGN activity as the sole explanation for their red color. ...

  10. Dissecting patterns of preparatory activity in the frontal eye fields during pursuit target selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Ramanujan T; Joshua, Mati

    2017-07-19

    We investigated the composition of preparatory activity of frontal eye field (FEF) neurons in monkeys performing a pursuit target selection task. In response to the orthogonal motion of a large and a small reward target, monkeys initiated pursuit biased towards the direction of large reward target motion. FEF neurons exhibited robust preparatory activity preceding movement initiation in this task. Preparatory activity consisted of two components, ramping activity that was constant across target selection conditions and a flat offset in firing rates that signaled the target selection condition. Ramping activity accounted for 50% of the variance in the preparatory activity and was linked most strongly, on a trial-by-trial basis, to pursuit eye movement latency rather than to its direction or gain. The offset in firing rates that discriminated target selection conditions accounted for 25% of the variance in the preparatory activity, and was commensurate with a winner-take-all representation signaling the direction of large reward target motion rather than a representation that matched the parameters of the upcoming movement. These offer new insights into the role the frontal eye fields play in target selection and pursuit control. They show that preparatory activity in the FEF signals more strongly when to move rather than where or how to move, and suggest that structures outside the FEF augment its contributions to the target selection process. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Neurophysiology.

  11. Too Young to Shine? Chandra analysis of X-ray emission in nearby primordial galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu-Zych, Antara; Henry, Alaina L.; Yukita, Mihoko; Fragos, Tassos; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Lehmer, Bret; Ptak, Andrew; Zezas, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The 2—10 keV X-ray emission in star-forming galaxies traces the population of high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) and is a function of both the star formation rate (SFR) and metallicity, according to several studies. Theoretical studies predict that stars retain more mass over their lifetimes due to weaker stellar winds in lower metallicity environments, and therefore, produce more luminous and numerous HMXBs. We present Chandra analysis for a local sample of primordial galaxies, Hα emitters (HAEs). Our selection is based on large Hα equivalent widths (EW(Hα)>500Å, suggestive of bursts of star formation within 6 Myr), SFR >1 M⊙/yr and low metallicities (Z extreme youth (young stellar age) of the galaxies, where HMXBs may not have fully formed. Our investigation of HMXB formation as a function of stellar age, metallicity and SFR offers important refinements to the X-ray emission from the first galaxies and on predictions of black hole binaries, which are precursors of gravitational wave sources.

  12. ESO Imaging Survey. The Stellar Catalogue in the Chandra Deep Field South

    CERN Document Server

    Groenewegen, M A T; Hatziminaoglou, E; Benoist, C; Olsen, L F; Costa, L; Arnouts, S; Madejsky, R; Mignani, R P; Rité, C; Sikkema, G; Slijkhuis, R; Vandame, B

    2002-01-01

    (abridged) Stellar catalogues in five passbands (UBVRI) over an area of approximately 0.3 deg^2, comprising about 1200 objects, and in seven passbands (UBVRIJK) over approximately 0.1 deg^2, comprising about 400 objects, in the direction of the Chandra Deep Field South are presented. The 90% completeness level of the number counts is reached at approximately U = 23.8, B = 24.0, V = 23.5, R = 23.0, I = 21.0, J = 20.5, K = 19.0. A scheme is presented to select point sources from these catalogues, by combining the SExtractor parameter CLASS_STAR from all available passbands. Probable QSOs and unresolved galaxies are identified by using the previously developed \\chi^2-technique (Hatziminaoglou et al 2002), that fits the overall spectral energy distributions to template spectra and determines the best fitting template. The observed number counts, colour-magnitude diagrams, colour-colour diagrams and colour distributions are presented and, to judge the quality of the data, compared to simulations based on the predi...

  13. Contemporaneous Chandra HETG and Suzaku X-ray Observations of NGC 4051

    CERN Document Server

    Lobban, A P; Miller, L; Turner, T J; Braito, V; Kraemer, S B; Crenshaw, D M

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a deep 300 ks Chandra HETG observation of the highly variable narrow-line Seyfert Type 1 galaxy NGC 4051. The HETG spectrum reveals 28 significant soft X-ray ionised lines in either emission or absorption; primarily originating from H-like and He-like K-shell transitions of O, Ne, Mg and Si (including higher order lines and strong forbidden emission lines from O VII and Ne IX) plus high ionisation L-shell transitions from Fe XVII to Fe XXII and lower ionisation inner-shell lines (e.g. O VI). Modelling the data with XSTAR requires four distinct ionisation zones for the gas, all outflowing with velocities < 1000 km/s. A selection of the strongest emission/absorption lines appear to be resolved with FWHM of ~600 km/s. We also present the results from a quasi-simultaneous 350 ks Suzaku observation of NGC 4051 where the XIS spectrum reveals strong evidence for blueshifted absorption lines at ~6.8 and ~7.1 keV, consistent with previous findings. Modelling with XSTAR suggests that this i...

  14. High spatial resolution spectroscopy of Tycho’s SNR with Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yun-Dong; Yang, Xue-Juan

    2017-02-01

    We present high spatial resolution X-ray spectroscopy of Tycho’s supernova remnant (SNR) using observational data from Chandra. The whole remnant was divided into 26 × 27 regions, with each of them covering 20\\prime\\prime × 20\\prime\\prime. We selected 536 pixels with enough events to generate spectra and fit them with an absorbed two component non-equilibrium ionization model. We obtained maps of absorbing column density, weight-averaged temperature, ionization age and abundances for O, Ne, Mg, Si, S and Fe, with emission used to determine the weight. The abundance maps and the finding that Fe abundance is not correlated with any other element suggest that Fe is located at a smaller radius than other elements, supporting the onion shell model with emission from more massive elements peaking more toward the center. A tight correlation between Si and S abundances support both Si and S coming from explosive O-burning and/or incomplete Si-burning. O and Ne abundances show no correlation with any other element. Considering that O, Ne and Mg are all synthesized in the same process (C/Ne-burning), we suggest that O/Ne/Mg might mix well with other elements during the explosion of the supernova and the expansion of the SNR.

  15. Isolated Cu2+ ions: active sites for selective catalytic reduction of NO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korhonen, S.T.; Fickel, D.W.; Lobo, R.F.; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Beale, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Cu chabazite catalysts show remarkable low temperature activity in selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO. This high activity is due to the unique character of the zeolite framework that allows only the presence of one type of isolated mononuclear Cu2+ species. These Cu2+ species are the active s

  16. α-Glucosidase inhibitory activity of selected Malaysian plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzatil Awanis Mohd Bukhari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a common metabolic disease indicated by unusually high plasma glucose level that can lead to major complications such as diabetic neuropathy, retinopathy, and cardiovascular diseases. One of the effective therapeutic managements of the disease is to reduce postprandial hyperglycemia through inhibition of α-glucosidase, a carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzyme to retard overall glucose absorption. In recent years, a plenty of research works have been conducted looking for novel and effective α-glucosidase inhibitors (AGIs from natural sources as alternatives for the synthetic AGI due to their unpleasant side effects. Plants and herbs are rich with secondary metabolites that have massive pharmaceutical potential. Besides, studies showed that phytochemicals such as flavonoids, alkaloids, terpenoids, anthocyanins, glycosides, and phenolic compounds possess significant inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase enzyme. Malaysia is a tropical country that is rich with medicinal herbs. In this review, we focus on eight Malaysian plants with the potential as AGI to develop a potential functional food or lead compounds against diabetes.

  17. Broadband sensor and actuator selection for active control of smart structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Larry P.

    1995-05-01

    This paper advances the state of the art in the selection of minimal configurations of sensors and actuators for active vibration control with smart structures. The method extends previous transducer selection work by (1) presenting a unified treatment of the selection and placement of large numbers of sensors and actuators in a smart structure, (2) developing computationally efficient techniques to select the best sensor-actuator pairs for multiple unknown force disturbances exciting the structure, (3) selecting the best sensors and actuators over multiple frequencies, and (4) providing bounds on the performance of the transducer selection algorithms. The approach is based on a novel, multidimensional householder QR factorization algorithm applied to the frequency response matrices that define the vibration control problem. This paper presents the theoretical development of the method, as well as experimental results from active vibration control demonstrations for the ARPA SPICES (synthesis and processing of intelligent cost-effective structures) project.

  18. The host galaxies of X-ray selected Active Galactic Nuclei to z=2.5: Structure, star-formation and their relationships from CANDELS and Herschel/PACS

    CERN Document Server

    Rosario, D J; van der Wel, A; Kartaltepe, J; Lang, P; Santini, P; Wuyts, S; Lutz, D; Rafelski, M; Villforth, C; Alexander, D M; Bauer, F E; Bell, E F; Berta, S; Brandt, W N; Conselice, C J; Dekel, A; Faber, S M; Ferguson, H C; Genzel, R; Grogin, N A; Kocevski, D D; Koekemoer, A M; Koo, D C; Lotz, J M; Magnelli, B; Maiolino, R; Mozena, M; Mullaney, J R; Papovich, C J; Popesso, P; Tacconi, L J; Trump, J R; Avadhuta, S; Bassett, R; Bell, A; Bernyk, M; Bournaud, F; Cassata, P; Cheung, E; Croton, D; Donley, J; DeGroot, L; Guedes, J; Hathi, N; Herrington, J; Hilton, M; Lai, K; Lani, C; Martig, M; McGrath, E; Mutch, S; Mortlock, A; McPartland, C; O'Leary, E; Peth, M; Pillepich, A; Poole, G; Snyder, D; Straughn, A; Telford, O; Tonini, C; Wandro, P

    2014-01-01

    We study the relationship between the structure and star-formation rate (SFR) of X-ray selected low and moderate luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the two Chandra Deep Fields, using Hubble Space Telescope imaging from the Cosmic Assembly Near Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and deep far-infrared maps from the PEP+GOODS-Herschel survey. We derive detailed distributions of structural parameters and FIR luminosities from carefully constructed control samples of galaxies, which we then compare to those of the AGNs. At z~1, AGNs show slightly diskier light profiles than massive inactive (non-AGN) galaxies, as well as modestly higher levels of gross galaxy disturbance (as measured by visual signatures of interactions and clumpy structure). In contrast, at z~2, AGNs show similar levels of galaxy disturbance as inactive galaxies, but display a red central light enhancement, which may arise due to a more pronounced bulge in AGN hosts or due to extinguished nuclear light. We undertake a number ...

  19. Chandra's Darkest Bright Star: not so Dark after All?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    2008-11-01

    The Chandra High Resolution camera (HRC) has obtained numerous short exposures of the ultraviolet (UV)-bright star Vega (α Lyrae; HD 172167: A0 V), to calibrate the response of the detector to out-of-band (non-X-ray) radiation. A new analysis uncovered a stronger "blue leak" in the imaging section (HRC-I) than reported in an earlier study of Vega based on a subset of the pointings. The higher count rate—a factor of nearly 2 above prelaunch estimates—raised the possibility that genuine coronal X-rays might lurk among the out-of-band events. Exploiting the broader point-spread function of the UV leak compared with soft X-rays identified an excess of counts centered on the target, technically at 3σ significance. A number of uncertainties, however, prevent a clear declaration of a Vegan corona. A more secure result would be within reach of a deep uninterrupted HRC-I pointing.

  20. The Chandra COSMOS Legacy survey: overview and point source catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Civano, F; Comastri, A; Urry, M C; Elvis, M; Cappelluti, N; Puccetti, S; Brusa, M; Zamorani, G; Hasinger, G; Aldcroft, T; Alexander, D M; Allevato, V; Brunner, H; Capak, P; Finoguenov, A; Fiore, F; Fruscione, A; Gilli, R; Glotfelty, K; Griffiths, R E; Hao, H; Harrison, F A; Jahnke, K; Kartaltepe, J; Karim, A; LaMassa, S M; Lanzuisi, G; Miyaji, T; Ranalli, P; Salvato, M; Sargent, M; Scoville, N J; Schawinski, K; Schinnerer, E; Silverman, J; Smolcic, V; Stern, D; Toft, S; Trakhenbrot, B; Treister, E; Vignali, C

    2016-01-01

    The COSMOS-Legacy survey is a 4.6 Ms Chandra program that has imaged 2.2 deg$^2$ of the COSMOS field with an effective exposure of $\\simeq$160 ks over the central 1.5 deg$^2$ and of $\\simeq$80 ks in the remaining area. The survey is the combination of 56 new observations, obtained as an X-ray Visionary Project, with the previous C-COSMOS survey. We describe the reduction and analysis of the new observations and the properties of 2273 point sources detected above a spurious probability of 2$\\times 10^{-5}$. We also present the updated properties of the C-COSMOS sources detected in the new data. The whole survey includes 4016 point sources (3814, 2920 and 2440 in the full, soft and hard band). The limiting depths are 2.2 $\\times$ 10$^{-16}$, 1.5 $\\times$ 10$^{-15}$ and 8.9$\\times$ 10$^{-16}$ ${\\rm erg~cm}^{-2}~{\\rm s}^{-1}$ in the 0.5-2, 2-10 and 0.5-10 keV bands, respectively. The observed fraction of obscured AGN with column density $> 10^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$ from the hardness ratio (HR) is $\\sim$50$^{+17}_{-16}$%...

  1. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Image of Crab Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    After barely 2 months in space, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO) took this sturning image of the Crab Nebula, the spectacular remains of a stellar explosion, revealing something never seen before, a brilliant ring around the nebula's heart. The image shows the central pulsar surrounded by tilted rings of high-energy particles that appear to have been flung outward over a distance of more than a light-year from the pulsar. Perpendicular to the rings, jet-like structures produced by high-energy particles blast away from the pulsar. Hubble Space Telescope images have shown moving knots and wisps around the neutron star, and previous x-ray images have shown the outer parts of the jet and hinted at the ring structure. With CXO's exceptional resolution, the jet can be traced all the way in to the neutron star, and the ring pattern clearly appears. The image was made with CXO's Advanced Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) and High Energy Transmission Grating. The Crab Nebula, easily the most intensively studied object beyond our solar system, has been observed using virtually every astronomical instrument that could see that part of the sky

  2. Chandra observation of the supernova remnant N11L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Chen, Yang; Chu, You-Hua; Williams, Rosa M.

    2016-06-01

    We performed a Chandra X-ray study of the supernova remnant (SNR) N11L in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The X-ray emission is predominantly distributed within the main shell and the northern loop-like filaments traced by the optical narrow band images, with an indistinct extension along the north area. The brightest emission comes from a northeast-southwest ridge, and peaks at two patches at center and southwest. Spectral analysis indicates that the blast wave is propagating in a inhomogenous environment, and the X-ray emission overall is dominated by thermal gas whose composition is consistent with the LMC average abundance. The ionization time of the hot plasma implied by the X-ray spectral analysis is consistent with the Sedov age of the SNR derived from the best-fit parameters and the apparent radius of the SNR based on the optical images, however, the consequent explosion energy is no only at least one order of magnitude less than the canonical value of 10^{51} ergs, but also takes a small portion of the thermal energy of the hot gas. That discrepancy supports the blown-out scenario.

  3. Investigating the cores of fossil systems with Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Bharadwaj, V; Sanders, J S; Schellenberger, G

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the cores of fossil galaxy groups and clusters (`fossil systems') using archival Chandra data for a sample of 17 fossil systems. We determined the cool-core fraction for fossils via three observable diagnostics, the central cooling time, cuspiness, and concentration parameter. We quantified the dynamical state of the fossils by the X-ray peak/brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), and the X-ray peak/emission weighted centre separations. We studied the X-ray emission coincident with the BCG to detect the presence of potential thermal coronae. A deprojection analysis was performed for z < 0.05 fossils to obtain cooling time and entropy profiles, and to resolve subtle temperature structures. We investigated the Lx-T relation for fossils from the 400d catalogue to see if the scaling relation deviates from that of other groups. Most fossils are identified as cool-core objects via at least two cool-core diagnostics. All fossils have their dominant elliptical galaxy within 50 kpc of the X-ray peak, and mo...

  4. LOFAR, VLA, and Chandra observations of the Toothbrush galaxy cluster

    CERN Document Server

    van Weeren, R J; Brüggen, M; Andrade-Santos, F; Ogrean, G A; Williams, W L; Röttgering, H J A; Dawson, W A; Forman, W R; de Gasperin, F; Hardcastle, M J; Jones, C; Miley, G K; Rafferty, D A; Rudnick, L; Sabater, J; Sarazin, C L; Shimwell, T W; Bonafede, A; Best, P N; Bîrzan, L; Cassano, R; Chyży, K T; Croston, J H; Dijkema, T J; Ensslin, T; Ferrari, C; Heald, G; Hoeft, M; Horellou, C; Jarvis, M J; Kraft, R P; Mevius, M; Intema, H T; Murray, S S; Orrú, E; Pizzo, R; Sridhar, S S; Simionescu, A; Stroe, A; van der Tol, S; White, G J

    2016-01-01

    We present deep LOFAR observations between 120-181 MHz of the "Toothbrush" (RX J0603.3+4214), a cluster that contains one of the brightest radio relic sources known. Our LOFAR observations exploit a new and novel calibration scheme to probe 10 times deeper than any previous study in this relatively unexplored part of the spectrum. The LOFAR observations, when combined with VLA, GMRT, and Chandra X-ray data, provide new information about the nature of cluster merger shocks and their role in re-accelerating relativistic particles. We derive a spectral index of $\\alpha = -0.8 \\pm 0.1$ at the northern edge of the main radio relic, steepening towards the south to $\\alpha \\approx - 2$. The spectral index of the radio halo is remarkably uniform ($\\alpha = -1.16$, with an intrinsic scatter of $\\leq 0.04$). The observed radio relic spectral index gives a Mach number of $\\mathcal{M} = 2.8^{+0.5}_{-0.3}$, assuming diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). However, the gas density jump at the northern edge of the large radio r...

  5. Coronal physics and the chandra emission line project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Brickhouse

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Con el lanzamiento del observatorio de rayos-X Chandra se ha iniciado la espectroscop a de alta resoluci on en rayos-X de las fuentes c osmicas. Observa- ciones profundas de tres fuentes estelares con emisi on coronal|Capela, Proci on y HR 1099|est an dando no s olo datos de calibraci on invaluables sino tambi en medios de comparaci on para los modelos de emisi on de plasmas. Estos modelos, que han sido cuestionados por los problemas para entender los datos de baja y moderada re- soluci on de ASCA y del EUVE, son necesarios para interpretar los datos de coronas estelares, galaxias y c umulos de galaxias, remanentes de supernova y otras fuentes. El Proyecto de L neas de Emisi on es una colaboraci on para mejorar los modelos y su primera fase es la comparaci on de los modelos con los espectros observados de Capela, Proci on y HR 1099. Las metas de la comparaci on son (1 determinar y veri car la precisi on y fortaleza de los diagn osticos y (2 identi car y priorizar los elementos de la espectroscop a que requieran m as trabajo tanto te orico como de laboratorio. Uno de los puntos cr ticos de esta labor es entender hasta que punto se pueden aplicar las hip otesis simpli cadoras comunmente usadas (equilibrio coro- nal, baja opacidad. Discutimos, en este contexto, los avances m as recientes en el entendimiento de las coronas estelares.

  6. Chandra Multiwavelength Project: Normal Galaxies at Intermediate Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, D W; Colmenero, E R; Green, P J; Kim, M; Mossman, A; Schlegel, E M; Silverman, J D; Aldcroft, T; Ivezic, Z; Anderson, C; Kashyap, V; Tananbaum, H; Wilkes, B J

    2005-01-01

    (abridged) We have investigated 136 Chandra extragalactic sources without broad optical emission lines, including 93 galaxies with narrow emission lines (NELG) and 43 with only absorption lines (ALG). Based on fx/fo, Lx, X-ray spectral hardness and optical emission line diagnostics, we have conservatively classified 36 normal galaxies (20 spirals and 16 ellipticals) and 71 AGNs. We found no statistically significant evolution in Lx/LB, within the limited z range. We have built log(N)-log(S), after correcting for completeness based on a series of simulations. The best-fit slope is -1.5 for both S and B energy bands, which is considerably steeper than that of the AGN-dominated cosmic background sources, but slightly flatter than the previous estimate, indicating normal galaxies will not exceed the AGN population until fx ~ 2 x 10-18 erg s-1 cm-2 (a factor of ~5 lower than the previous estimate). A group of NELGs appear to be heavily obscured in X-rays, i.e., a typical type 2 AGN. After correcting for intrinsic ...

  7. Chandra Phase-Resolved Spectroscopy of the Crab Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Weisskopf, M C; Paerels, F; Becker, W; Tennant, A F; Swartz, D A; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Dell, Stephen L. O'; Paerels, Frits; Becker, Werner; Tennant, Allyn F.; Swartz, Douglas A.

    2004-01-01

    We present the first phase-resolved study of the X-ray spectral properties of the Crab Pulsar that covers all pulse phases. The superb angular resolution of the Chandra X-ray Observatory enables distinguishing the pulsar from the surrounding nebulosity, even at pulse minimum. Analysis of the pulse-averaged spectrum measures interstellar X-ray extinction due primarily to photoelectric absorption and secondarily to scattering by dust grains in the direction of the Crab Nebula. We confirm previous findings that the line-of-sight to the Crab is underabundant in oxygen, although more-so than recently measured. Using the abundances and cross sections from Wilms, Allen & McCray (2000) we find [O/H] = (3.33 +/-0.25) x 10**-4. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase measures the low-energy X-ray spectral index even at pulse minimum -- albeit with large statistical uncertainty -- and we find marginal evidence for variations of the spectral index. The data are also used to set a new (3-sigma) upper lim...

  8. Chandra Observations of Outflows from PSR J1509-5850

    CERN Document Server

    Klingler, Noel; Rangelov, Blagoy; Pavlov, George G; Posselt, Bettina; Ng, C -Y

    2016-01-01

    PSR J1509-5850 is a middle-aged pulsar with the period P ~ 89 ms, spin-down power Edot = 5.1 x 10^35 erg/s, at a distance of about 3.8 kpc. We report on deep Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of this pulsar and its pulsar wind nebula (PWN). In addition to the previously detected tail extending up to 7' southwest from the pulsar (the southern outflow), the deep images reveal a similarly long, faint diffuse emission stretched toward the north (the northern outflow) and the fine structure of the compact nebula (CN) in the pulsar vicinity. The CN is resolved into two lateral tails and one axial tail pointing southwest (a morphology remarkably similar to that of the Geminga PWN), which supports the assumption that the pulsar moves towards the northeast. The luminosities of the southern and northern outflows are about 1 x 10^33 and 4 x 10^32 erg/s, respectively. The spectra extracted from four regions of the southern outflow do not show any softening with increasing distance from the pulsar. The lack of synchr...

  9. Chandra Confirmation of a Pulsar Wind Nebula in DA 495

    CERN Document Server

    Arzoumanian, Z; Landecker, T L; Kothes, R; Camilo, F

    2008-01-01

    As part of a multiwavelength study of the unusual radio supernova remnant DA 495, we present observations made with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Imaging and spectroscopic analysis confirms the previously detected X-ray source at the heart of the annular radio nebula, establishing the radiative properties of two key emission components: a soft unresolved source with a blackbody temperature of 1 MK consistent with a neutron star, surrounded by a nonthermal nebula 40'' in diameter exhibiting a power-law spectrum with photon index Gamma = 1.6+/-0.3, typical of a pulsar wind nebula. The implied spin-down luminosity of the neutron star, assuming a conversion efficiency to nebular flux appropriate to Vela-like pulsars, is ~10^{35} ergs/s, again typical of objects a few tens of kyr old. Morphologically, the nebular flux is slightly enhanced along a direction, in projection on the sky, independently demonstrated to be of significance in radio polarization observations; we argue that this represents the orientation o...

  10. Imaging the Circumnuclear Region of NGC 1365 with Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Junfeng; Elvis, M; Risaliti, G; Mazzarella, J M; Howell, J H; Lord, S

    2009-01-01

    We present the first Chandra/ACIS imaging study of the circumnuclear region of the nearby Seyfert galaxy NGC 1365. The X-ray emission is resolved into point-like sources and complex, extended emission. The X-ray morphology of the extended emission shows a biconical soft X-ray emission region extending ~5 kpc in projection from the nucleus, coincident with the high excitation outflow cones seen in optical emission lines particularly to the northwest. Harder X-ray emission is detected from a kpc-diameter circumnuclear ring, coincident with the star-forming ring prominent in the Spitzer mid-infrared images; this X-ray emission is partially obscured by the central dust lane of NGC 1365. Spectral fitting of spatially separated components indicates a thermal plasma origin for the soft extended X-ray emission (kT=0.57 keV). Only a small amount of this emission can be due to photoionization by the nuclear source. Detailed comparison with [OIII]5007 observations shows the hot interstellar medium (ISM) is spatially ant...

  11. Reviewing ChIPS, The Chandra Imaging and Plotting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.; Burke, D. J.; Evans, I. N.; Evans, J. D.; McLaughlin, W.

    2015-09-01

    The Chandra Imaging and Plotting System (ChIPS) is a 2D plotting system designed to allow users to easily create, manipulate, and produce publication quality visualizations. ChIPS has a simple but very powerful interactive interface that allows users to dynamically modify the contents and layout of their plots quickly and efficiently, with the results of any changes being immediately visible. ChIPS allows users to construct their plots fully interactively, and then save the final plot commands as a Python script. This bypasses the need to iteratively edit and rerun the script when developing the plot. Features such as undo and redo commands allow users to easily step backwards and forwards through previous commands, while the ability so save ChIPS sessions in a platform-independent state file allows the session to be restored at any time, even on another machine. Because ChIPS offers a Python interface, users can analyze their data using the broad array of modules offered in Python, and visualize the information in ChIPS at the same time. In this paper we explore the design decisions behind the development of ChIPS and some of the lessons learned along the way.

  12. Chandra Confirmation of a Pulsar Wind Nebula in DA 495

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzoumanian, Z.; Safi-Harb, S.; Landecker, T.L.; Kothes, R.; Camilo, F.

    2008-01-01

    As part of a multiwavelength study of the unusual radio supernova remnant DA 495, we present observations made with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Imaging and spectroscopic analysis confirms the previously detected X-ray source at the heart of the annular radio nebula, establishing the radiative properties of two key emission components: a soft unresolved source with a blackbody temperature of 1 MK consistent with a neutron star, surrounded by a nontherma1 nebula 40" in diameter exhibiting a power-law spectrum with photon index Gamma = 1.63, typical of a pulsar wind nebula. Morphologically, the nebula appears to be slightly extended along a direction, in projection on the sky, previously demonstrated to be of significance in radio and ASCA observations; we argue that this represents the orientation of the pulsar spin axis. At smaller scales, a narrow X-ray feature is seen extending out 5" from the point source, but energetic arguments suggest that it is not the resolved termination shock of the pulsar wind against the ambient medium. Finally, we argue based on synchrotron lifetimes in the nebular magnetic field that DA 495 represents the first example of a pulsar wind nebula in which electromagnetic flux makes up a significant part, together with particle flux, of the neutron star's wind.

  13. A Chandra Study of the Radio Galaxy NGC 326: Wings, Outburst History, and AGN Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Hodges-Kluck, Edmund

    2011-01-01

    NGC 326 is one of the most prominent X- or Z-shaped radio galaxies (XRGs/ZRGs) and has been the subject of several studies attempting to explain its morphology through either fluid motions or reorientation of the jet axis. We examine a 100 ks archival Chandra exposure and find several features associated with the radio galaxy: a high-temperature front that may indicate a shock, high-temperature knots around the rim of the radio emission, and a cavity associated with the eastern wing of the radio galaxy. A reasonable interpretation of these features in light of the radio data allows us to reconstruct the history of the AGN outbursts. The active outburst was likely once a powerful radio source which has since decayed, and circumstantial evidence favors reorientation as the means to produce the wings. Because of the obvious interaction between the radio galaxy and the ICM and the wide separation between the active lobes and wings, we conclude that XRGs are excellent sources in which to study AGN feedback in gala...

  14. Transcriptional Activation of Inflammatory Genes: Mechanistic Insight into Selectivity and Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Afsar U; Williams, Bryan R G; Hannigan, Gregory E

    2015-11-11

    Acute inflammation, an integral part of host defence and immunity, is a highly conserved cellular response to pathogens and other harmful stimuli. An inflammatory stimulation triggers transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes that carry out specific functions such as anti-microbial activity or tissue healing. Based on the nature of inflammatory stimuli, an extensive exploitation of selective transcriptional activations of pro-inflammatory genes is performed by the host to ensure a defined inflammatory response. Inflammatory signal transductions are initiated by the recognition of inflammatory stimuli by transmembrane receptors, followed by the transmission of the signals to the nucleus for differential gene activations. The differential transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory genes is precisely controlled by the selective binding of transcription factors to the promoters of these genes. Among a number of transcription factors identified to date, NF-κB still remains the most prominent and studied factor for its diverse range of selective transcriptional activities. Differential transcriptional activities of NF-κB are dictated by post-translational modifications, specificities in dimer formation, and variability in activation kinetics. Apart from the differential functions of transcription factors, the transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes is also governed by chromatin structures, epigenetic markers, and other regulators as the field is continuously expanding.

  15. CHEERS Results from NGC 3393, II: Investigating the Extended Narrow Line Region using Deep Chandra Observations and Hubble Narrow Line Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Maksym, W Peter; Elvis, Martin; Karovska, Margarita; Paggi, Alessandro; Raymond, John; Wang, Junfeng; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa

    2016-01-01

    The CHandra Extended Emission Line Region Survey (CHEERS) is an X-ray study of nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN) designed to take full advantage of Chandra's unique angular resolution by spatially resolving feedback signatures and effects. In the second paper of a series on CHEERS target NGC 3393, we examine deep high-resolution Chandra images and compare them with Hubble narrow line images of [O III], [S II] and H$\\alpha$, as well as previously-unpublished mid-ultraviolet (MUV) images. We find evidence for a complex multi-phase structure in the circumnuclear ISM, with no single simple correlation between X-rays and high-ionization ([O III]/H$\\alpha$-dominated) and low-ionization ([S II]-dominated) features. We also find X-ray structures ~50-pc in extent, H$\\alpha$ evidence for gas compression, and extended MUV emission associated with the S-shaped arms that envelope the radio jets. In conjunction with existing STIS kinematics, these findings support a role for shock contributions to the feedback, driven by...

  16. A CHANDRA-VLA INVESTIGATION OF THE X-RAY CAVITY SYSTEM AND RADIO MINI-HALO IN THE GALAXY CLUSTER RBS 797

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doria, Alberto [Argelander-Institut fuer Astronomie, Auf dem Huegel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Gitti, Myriam; Brighenti, Fabrizio [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, Bologna 40127 (Italy); Ettori, Stefano [Astronomical Observatory of Bologna-INAF, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Nulsen, Paul E. J.; McNamara, Brian R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    We present a study of the cavity system in the galaxy cluster RBS 797 based on Chandra and Very Large Array (VLA) data. RBS 797 (z = 0.35) is one of the most distant galaxy clusters in which two pronounced X-ray cavities have been discovered. The Chandra data confirm the presence of a cool core and indicate a higher metallicity along the cavity directions. This is likely due to the active galactic nucleus outburst, which lifts cool metal-rich gas from the center along the cavities, as seen in other systems. We find indications that the cavities are hotter than the surrounding gas. Moreover, the new Chandra images show bright rims contrasting with the deep, X-ray deficient cavities. The likely cause is that the expanding 1.4 GHz radio lobes have displaced the gas, compressing it into a shell that appears as bright cool arms. Finally, we show that the large-scale radio emission detected with our VLA observations may be classified as a radio mini-halo, powered by the cooling flow, as it nicely follows the trend P{sub radio} versus P{sub CF} predicted by the reacceleration model.

  17. Utilizing Selected Di- and Trinucleotides of siRNA to Predict RNAi Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs induce posttranscriptional gene silencing in various organisms. siRNAs targeted to different positions of the same gene show different effectiveness; hence, predicting siRNA activity is a crucial step. In this paper, we developed and evaluated a powerful tool named “siRNApred” with a new mixed feature set to predict siRNA activity. To improve the prediction accuracy, we proposed 2-3NTs as our new features. A Random Forest siRNA activity prediction model was constructed using the feature set selected by our proposed Binary Search Feature Selection (BSFS algorithm. Experimental data demonstrated that the binding site of the Argonaute protein correlates with siRNA activity. “siRNApred” is effective for selecting active siRNAs, and the prediction results demonstrate that our method can outperform other current siRNA activity prediction methods in terms of prediction accuracy.

  18. Development of response activation and inhibition in a selective stop-signal task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Laar, M.C.; van den Wildenberg, W.P.M.; van Boxtel, G.J.M.; van der Molen, M.W.

    2014-01-01

    To gain more insight into the development of action control, the current brain potential study examined response selection, activation, and selective inhibition during choice- and stop-signal processing in three age groups (8-, 12-, and 21-year-olds). Results revealed that age groups differed in the

  19. Activity and Selectivity for O-2 Reduction to H2O2 on Transition Metal Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siahrostami, Samira; Verdaguer Casadevall, Arnau; Karamad, Mohammadreza;

    2013-01-01

    Industrially viable electrochemical production of H2O2 requires active, selective and stable electrocatalyst materials to catalyse the oxygen reduction reaction to H2O2. On the basis of density functional theory calculations, we explain why single site catalysts such as Pd/Au show improved select...

  20. Rule-based versus probabilistic selection for active surveillance using three definitions of insignificant prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.D.F. Venderbos (Lionne); M.J. Roobol-Bouts (Monique); C.H. Bangma (Chris); R.C.N. van den Bergh (Roderick); L.P. Bokhorst (Leonard); D. Nieboer (Daan); Godtman, R; J. Hugosson (Jonas); van der Kwast, T; E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractTo study whether probabilistic selection by the use of a nomogram could improve patient selection for active surveillance (AS) compared to the various sets of rule-based AS inclusion criteria currently used. We studied Dutch and Swedish patients participating in the European Randomized s

  1. Consistent selection towards low activity phenotypes when catchability depends on encounters among human predators and fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alós, Josep; Palmer, Miquel; Arlinghaus, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Together with life-history and underlying physiology, the behavioural variability among fish is one of the three main trait axes that determines the vulnerability to fishing. However, there are only a few studies that have systematically investigated the strength and direction of selection acting on behavioural traits. Using in situ fish behaviour revealed by telemetry techniques as input, we developed an individual-based model (IBM) that simulated the Lagrangian trajectory of prey (fish) moving within a confined home range (HR). Fishers exhibiting various prototypical fishing styles targeted these fish in the model. We initially hypothesised that more active and more explorative individuals would be systematically removed under all fished conditions, in turn creating negative selection differentials on low activity phenotypes and maybe on small HR. Our results partly supported these general predictions. Standardised selection differentials were, on average, more negative on HR than on activity. However, in many simulation runs, positive selection pressures on HR were also identified, which resulted from the stochastic properties of the fishes' movement and its interaction with the human predator. In contrast, there was a consistent negative selection on activity under all types of fishing styles. Therefore, in situations where catchability depends on spatial encounters between human predators and fish, we would predict a consistent selection towards low activity phenotypes and have less faith in the direction of the selection on HR size. Our study is the first theoretical investigation on the direction of fishery-induced selection of behaviour using passive fishing gears. The few empirical studies where catchability of fish was measured in relation to passive fishing techniques, such as gill-nets, traps or recreational fishing, support our predictions that fish in highly exploited situations are, on average, characterised by low swimming activity, stemming, in

  2. Consistent selection towards low activity phenotypes when catchability depends on encounters among human predators and fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Alós

    Full Text Available Together with life-history and underlying physiology, the behavioural variability among fish is one of the three main trait axes that determines the vulnerability to fishing. However, there are only a few studies that have systematically investigated the strength and direction of selection acting on behavioural traits. Using in situ fish behaviour revealed by telemetry techniques as input, we developed an individual-based model (IBM that simulated the Lagrangian trajectory of prey (fish moving within a confined home range (HR. Fishers exhibiting various prototypical fishing styles targeted these fish in the model. We initially hypothesised that more active and more explorative individuals would be systematically removed under all fished conditions, in turn creating negative selection differentials on low activity phenotypes and maybe on small HR. Our results partly supported these general predictions. Standardised selection differentials were, on average, more negative on HR than on activity. However, in many simulation runs, positive selection pressures on HR were also identified, which resulted from the stochastic properties of the fishes' movement and its interaction with the human predator. In contrast, there was a consistent negative selection on activity under all types of fishing styles. Therefore, in situations where catchability depends on spatial encounters between human predators and fish, we would predict a consistent selection towards low activity phenotypes and have less faith in the direction of the selection on HR size. Our study is the first theoretical investigation on the direction of fishery-induced selection of behaviour using passive fishing gears. The few empirical studies where catchability of fish was measured in relation to passive fishing techniques, such as gill-nets, traps or recreational fishing, support our predictions that fish in highly exploited situations are, on average, characterised by low swimming activity

  3. Environmental Contaminants Monitoring in Selected Wetlands of Wyoming: Biologically Active Elements Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sediment, water and biota were collected from selected wetlands in Wyoming for the Biologically Active Elements (BAE) Study in 1988, 1989 and 1990 to identify...

  4. The Chandra X-ray Observatory is prepped for solar panel deployment copy form; photos beginning with

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    TRW workers in the Vertical Processing Facility check equipment after deployment of the solar panel array above them, attached to the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93.

  5. CHANDRA ACIS Survey of X-Ray Point Sources: The Source Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Song; Liu, Jifeng; Qiu, Yanli; Bai, Yu; Yang, Huiqin; Guo, Jincheng; Zhang, Peng

    2016-06-01

    The Chandra archival data is a valuable resource for various studies on different X-ray astronomy topics. In this paper, we utilize this wealth of information and present a uniformly processed data set, which can be used to address a wide range of scientific questions. The data analysis procedures are applied to 10,029 Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer observations, which produces 363,530 source detections belonging to 217,828 distinct X-ray sources. This number is twice the size of the Chandra Source Catalog (Version 1.1). The catalogs in this paper provide abundant estimates of the detected X-ray source properties, including source positions, counts, colors, fluxes, luminosities, variability statistics, etc. Cross-correlation of these objects with galaxies shows that 17,828 sources are located within the D 25 isophotes of 1110 galaxies, and 7504 sources are located between the D 25 and 2D 25 isophotes of 910 galaxies. Contamination analysis with the log N-log S relation indicates that 51.3% of objects within 2D 25 isophotes are truly relevant to galaxies, and the “net” source fraction increases to 58.9%, 67.3%, and 69.1% for sources with luminosities above 1037, 1038, and 1039 erg s-1, respectively. Among the possible scientific uses of this catalog, we discuss the possibility of studying intra-observation variability, inter-observation variability, and supersoft sources (SSSs). About 17,092 detected sources above 10 counts are classified as variable in individual observation with the Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) criterion (P K-S < 0.01). There are 99,647 sources observed more than once and 11,843 sources observed 10 times or more, offering us a wealth of data with which to explore the long-term variability. There are 1638 individual objects (˜2350 detections) classified as SSSs. As a quite interesting subclass, detailed studies on X-ray spectra and optical spectroscopic follow-up are needed to categorize these SSSs and pinpoint their properties. In addition

  6. Peptide-Based Selective Inhibitors of Matrix Metalloproteinase-Mediated Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret W. Ndinguri

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs exhibit a broad array of activities, some catalytic and some non-catalytic in nature. An overall lack of selectivity has rendered small molecule, active site targeted MMP inhibitors problematic in execution. Inhibitors that favor few or individual members of the MMP family often take advantage of interactions outside the enzyme active site. We presently focus on peptide-based MMP inhibitors and probes that do not incorporate conventional Zn2+ binding groups. In some cases, these inhibitors and probes function by binding only secondary binding sites (exosites, while others bind both exosites and the active site. A myriad of MMP mediated-activities beyond selective catalysis can be inhibited by peptides, particularly cell adhesion, proliferation, motility, and invasion. Selective MMP binding peptides comprise highly customizable, unique imaging agents. Areas of needed improvement for MMP targeting peptides include binding affinity and stability.

  7. In Vitro Selection for Small-Molecule-Triggered Strand Displacement and Riboswitch Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Laura; Meyer, Adam J; Ellefson, Jared W; Milligan, John N; Forlin, Michele; Ellington, Andrew D; Mansy, Sheref S

    2015-10-16

    An in vitro selection method for ligand-responsive RNA sensors was developed that exploited strand displacement reactions. The RNA library was based on the thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) riboswitch, and RNA sequences capable of hybridizing to a target duplex DNA in a TPP regulated manner were identified. After three rounds of selection, RNA molecules that mediated a strand exchange reaction upon TPP binding were enriched. The enriched sequences also showed riboswitch activity. Our results demonstrated that small-molecule-responsive nucleic acid sensors can be selected to control the activity of target nucleic acid circuitry.

  8. The VLA Survey of the Chandra Deep Field South. IV. Source Population

    CERN Document Server

    Padovani, P; Tozzi, P; Kellermann, K I; Fomalont, E B; Miller, N; Rosati, P; Shaver, P

    2008-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of 256 radio sources from our deep (flux density limit of 42 microJy at the field centre at 1.4 GHz) Chandra Deep Field South 1.4 and 5 GHz VLA survey. The radio population is studied by using a wealth of multi-wavelength information in the radio, optical, and X-ray bands. The availability of redshifts for ~ 80% of the sources in our complete sample allows us to derive reliable luminosity estimates for the majority of the objects. X-ray data, including upper limits, for all our sources turn out to be a key factor in establishing the nature of faint radio sources. Due to the faint optical levels probed by this study, we have uncovered a population of distant Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) systematically missing from many previous studies of sub-millijansky radio source identifications. We find that, while the well-known flattening of the radio number counts below 1 mJy is mostly due to star forming galaxies, these sources and AGN make up an approximately equal fraction of the sub-m...

  9. The X-ray Flux Distribution of Sagittarius A* as Seen by Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Neilsen, J; Nowak, M A; Dexter, J; Witzel, G; Barrière, N; Li, Y; Baganoff, F K; Degenaar, N; Fragile, P C; Gammie, C; Goldwurm, A; Grosso, N; Haggard, D

    2014-01-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the X-ray flux distribution of Sgr A* from the Chandra X-ray Observatory's 3 Ms Sgr A* X-ray Visionary Project (XVP) in 2012. Our analysis indicates that the observed X-ray flux distribution can be decomposed into a steady quiescent component, represented by a Poisson process with rate $Q=(5.24\\pm0.08)\\times10^{-3}$ cts s$^{-1},$ and a variable component, represented by a power law process ($dN/dF\\propto F^{-\\xi},$ $\\xi=1.92_{-0.02}^{+0.03}$). This slope matches our recently-reported distribution of flare luminosities. The variability may also be described by a log-normal process with a median unabsorbed 2-8 keV flux of $1.8^{+0.9}_{-0.6}\\times10^{-14}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ and a shape parameter $\\sigma=2.4\\pm0.2,$ but the power law provides a superior description of the data. In this decomposition of the flux distribution, all of the intrinsic X-ray variability of Sgr A* (spanning at least three orders of magnitude in flux) can be attributed to flaring activity, likely ...

  10. The Chandra COSMOS-Legacy survey: Source X-ray spectral properties

    CERN Document Server

    Marchesi, S; Civano, F; Iwasawa, K; Suh, H; Comastri, A; Zamorani, G; Allevato, V; Griffiths, R; Miyaji, T; Ranalli, P; Salvato, M; Schawinski, K; Silverman, J; Treister, E; Urry, C M; Vignali, C

    2016-01-01

    We present the X-ray spectral analysis of the 1855 extragalactic sources in the Chandra COSMOS-Legacy survey catalog having more than 30 net counts in the 0.5-7 keV band. 38% of the sources are optically classified Type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGN), 60% are Type 2 AGN and 2% are passive, low-redshift galaxies. We study the distribution of AGN photon index and of the intrinsic absorption N(H,z) based on the sources optical classification: Type 1 have a slightly steeper mean photon index than Type 2 AGN, which on the other hand have average intrinsic absorption ~3 times higher than Type 1 AGN. We find that ~15% of Type 1 AGN have N(H,z)>1E22 cm^(-2), i.e., are obscured according to the X-ray spectral fitting; the vast majority of these sources have L(2-10keV)>$1E44 erg/s. The existence of these objects suggests that optical and X-ray obscuration can be caused by different phenomena, the X-ray obscuration being for example caused by dust-free material surrounding the inner part of the nuclei. ~18% of Type 2 AG...

  11. A Chandra Observation of the TW Hydrae Association Brown Dwarf 2MASSW J1139511-315921

    CERN Document Server

    Castro, Philip J; Gagné, Marc

    2011-01-01

    We report on a sequence of Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of the TW Hydrae brown dwarf (BD) 2MASSW J1139511-315921 (2M1139). In the combined 31 ks ACIS-S exposure, 2M1139 is detected at the 3-sigma confidence level. We find an X-ray luminosity of L_X = 1.4^(+2.7)_(-1.0) x 10^26 ergs s^-1 or log(L_X/L_bol) = -4.8 +/- 0.3. This object is similar to another TW Hydrae BD member, CD-33 7795B (TWA 5B): both have H-alpha emission, both show no signatures of accretion, and both have comparable ages and spectral types. TWA 5B was previously detected in X-rays with a luminosity of L_X = 4 x 10^27 ergs s^-1 or log(L_X/L_bol) = -3.4, an order of magnitude more luminous in X-rays than 2M1139. We find that the discrepancy between the X-ray luminosity of 2M1139 and TWA 5B is consistent with the spread in X-ray luminosity in the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) for BDs of similar spectral types. Though rotation may play a role in the X-ray activity of ultracool dwarfs like 2M1139 and TWA 5B, the discrepancy cannot be expla...

  12. The reflection of two past outbursts of Sagittarius A* observed by Chandra during the last decade

    CERN Document Server

    Clavel, Maïca; Goldwurm, A; Morris, M R; Ponti, G; Soldi, S; Trap, G

    2014-01-01

    The supermassive black hole at the Galactic center, Sagittarius A*, has experienced periods of higher activity in the past. The reflection of these past outbursts is observed in the molecular material surrounding the black hole but reconstructing its precise lightcurve is difficult since the distribution of the clouds along the line of sight is poorly constrained. Using Chandra high-resolution data collected from 1999 to 2011 we studied both the 6.4 keV and the 4-8 keV emission of the region located between Sgr A* and the Radio Arc, characterizing its variations down to 15" angular scale and 1-year time scale. The emission from the molecular clouds in the region varies significantly, showing either a 2-year peaked emission or 10-year linear variations. This is the first time that such fast variations are measured. Based on the cloud parameters, we conclude that these two behaviors are likely due to two distinct past outbursts of Sgr A* during which its luminosity rose to at least 10^39 erg/s.

  13. Nuclear Accretion in Galaxies of the Local Universe: Clues from Chandra Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Pellegrini, S

    2005-01-01

    In order to find an explanation for the radiative quiescence of supermassive black holes in the local Universe, for a sample of nearby galaxies the most accurate estimates are collected for the mass of a central black hole M_BH, the nuclear X-ray luminosity L_X,nuc and the circumnuclear hot gas density and temperature, by using Chandra data. L_X,nuc varies by \\sim 3 orders of magnitude and does not show a relationship with M_BH or with the Bondi mass accretion rate \\dotM_B. L_X,nuc is always much lower than expected if \\dotM_B ends in a standard accretion disc with high radiative efficiency (this instead can be the case of the active nucleus of Cen A). Radiatively inefficient accretion as in the standard ADAF modeling may explain the low luminosities of a few cases; for others, the predicted luminosity is still too high and, in terms of Eddington-scaled quantities, it is increasingly higher than observed, for increasing \\dotM_B. Variants of the simple radiatively inefficient scenario including outflow and con...

  14. Chandra X-ray Observations of NGC 4258: Iron Absorption Lines from the Nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Young, A J

    2004-01-01

    We report sub-arcsecond resolution X-ray imaging spectroscopy of the low luminosity active galactic nucleus of NGC 4258 and its immediate surroundings with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. NGC 4258 was observed four times, with the first two observations separated by one month, followed over a year later by two consecutive observations. The spectrum of the nucleus is well described by a heavily absorbed, hard X-ray power law of variable luminosity, plus a constant, thermal soft X-ray component. We do not detect an iron K alpha emission line with the upper limit to the equivalent width of a narrow, neutral iron line ranging between 94 and 887 eV (90% confidence) for the different observations. During the second observation on 2000-04-17, two narrow absorption features are seen with >99.5% confidence at ~6.4 keV and ~6.9 keV, which we identify as resonant absorption lines of Fe XVIII - Fe XIX K alpha and Fe XXVI K alpha, respectively. In addition, the 6.9 keV absorption line is probably variable on a timescale of...

  15. The Chandra Deep Field-South Survey: 7 Ms Source Catalogs

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, B; Xue, Y Q; Lehmer, B; Alexander, D M; Bauer, F E; Vito, F; Yang, G; Basu-Zych, A R; Comastri, A; Gilli, R; Gu, Q -S; Hornschemeier, A E; Koekemoer, A; Liu, T; Mainieri, V; Paolillo, M; Ranalli, P; Rosati, P; Schneider, D P; Shemmer, O; Smail, I; Sun, M; Tozzi, P; Vignali, C; Wang, J -X

    2016-01-01

    We present X-ray source catalogs for the $\\approx7$ Ms exposure of the Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S), which covers a total area of 484.2 arcmin$^2$. Utilizing WAVDETECT for initial source detection and ACIS Extract for photometric extraction and significance assessment, we create a main source catalog containing 1008 sources that are detected in up to three X-ray bands: 0.5-7.0 keV, 0.5-2.0 keV, and 2-7 keV. A supplementary source catalog is also provided including 47 lower-significance sources that have bright ($K_s\\le23$) near-infrared counterparts. We identify multiwavelength counterparts for 992 (98.4%) of the main-catalog sources, and we collect redshifts for 986 of these sources, including 653 spectroscopic redshifts and 333 photometric redshifts. Based on the X-ray and multiwavelength properties, we identify 711 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the main-catalog sources. Compared to the previous $\\approx4$ Ms CDF-S catalogs, 291 of the main-catalog sources are new detections. We have achieved unpre...

  16. A very deep Chandra view of metals, sloshing and feedback in the Centaurus cluster of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, J S; Taylor, G B; Russell, H R; Blundell, K M; Canning, R E A; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J; Walker, S A; Grimes, C K

    2016-01-01

    We examine deep Chandra X-ray observations of the Centaurus cluster of galaxies, Abell 3526. Applying a gradient magnitude filter reveals a wealth of structure, from filamentary soft emission on 100pc (0.5 arcsec) scales close to the nucleus to features 10s of kpc in size at larger radii. The cluster contains multiple high-metallicity regions with sharp edges. Relative to an azimuthal average, the deviations of metallicity and surface brightness are correlated, and the temperature is inversely correlated, as expected if the larger scale asymmetries in the cluster are dominated by sloshing motions. Around the western cold front are a series of ~7 kpc 'notches', suggestive of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. The cold front width varies from 4 kpc down to close to the electron mean free path. Inside the front are multiple metallicity blobs on scales of 5-10 kpc, which could have been uplifted by AGN activity, also explaining the central metallicity drop and flat inner metallicity profile. Close to the nucleus are...

  17. Chandra Study of the Cepheus B Star Forming Region: Stellar Populations and the Initial Mass Function

    CERN Document Server

    Getman, K V; Feigelson, E D; Garmire, G; Townsley, L; Tsujimoto, M; Broos, Patrick; Feigelson, Eric D.; Garmire, Gordon; Getman, Konstantin V.; Townsley, Leisa; Tsujimoto, Masahiro

    2006-01-01

    Cepheus B (Cep B) molecular cloud and a portion of the nearby Cep OB3b OB association, one of the most active regions of star formation within 1 kpc, has been observed with the ACIS detector on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We detect 431 X-ray sources, of which 89% are confidently identified as clustered pre-main sequence stars. Two main results are obtained. First, we provide the best census to date for the stellar population of the region. We identify many members of two rich stellar clusters: the lightly obscured Cep OB3b association, and the deeply embedded cluster in Cep B whose existence was previously traced only by a handful of radio sources and T Tauri stars. Second, we find a discrepancy between the X-ray Luminosity Functions of the Cep OB3b and the Orion Nebula Cluster. This may be due to different Initial Mass Functions of two regions (excess of ~0.3 solar mass stars), or different age distributions. Several other results are obtained. A diffuse X-ray component seen in the field is attribut...

  18. X-ray Sources in the Hubble Deep Field Detected by Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Hornschemeier, A E; Garmire, G P; Schneider, D P; Broos, P S; Townsley, L K; Bautz, M W; Burrows, D N; Chartas, G; Feigelson, E D; Griffiths, R; Lumb, D H; Nousek, J A; Sargent, W L W

    2000-01-01

    We present first results from an X-ray study of the Hubble Deep Field North (HDF-N) and its environs obtained using 166 ks of data collected by the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory. This is the deepest X-ray observation ever reported, and in the HDF-N itself we detect six X-ray sources down to a 0.5--8 keV flux limit of 4E-16 erg cm^-2 s^-1. Comparing these sources with objects seen in multiwavelength HDF-N studies shows positional coincidences with the extremely red object NICMOS J123651.74 +621221.4, an active galactic nucleus (AGN), three elliptical galaxies, and one nearby spiral galaxy. The X-ray emission from the ellipticals is consistent with that expected from a hot interstellar medium, and the spiral galaxy emission may arise from a `super-Eddington' X-ray binary or ultraluminous supernova remnant. Four of the X-ray sources have been detected at radio wavelengths. We also place X-ray upper limits on AGN candidates found in the HDF-N, and we present the t...

  19. Deep Chandra study of the truncated cool core of the Ophiuchus cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Werner, N; Canning, R E A; Allen, S W; King, A L; Sanders, J S; Simionescu, A; Taylor, G B; Morris, R G; Fabian, A C

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a deep (280 ks) Chandra observation of the Ophiuchus cluster, the second-brightest galaxy cluster in the X-ray sky. The cluster hosts a truncated cool core, with a temperature increasing from kT~1 keV in the core to kT~9 keV at r~30 kpc. Beyond r~30 kpc the intra-cluster medium (ICM) appears remarkably isothermal. The core is dynamically disturbed with multiple sloshing induced cold fronts, with indications for both Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. The sloshing is the result of the strongly perturbed gravitational potential in the cluster core, with the central brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) being displaced southward from the global center of mass. The residual image reveals a likely subcluster south of the core at the projected distance of r~280 kpc. The cluster also harbors a likely radio phoenix, a source revived by adiabatic compression by gas motions in the ICM. Even though the Ophiuchus cluster is strongly dynamically active, the amplitude of density fluctuat...

  20. X-ray spectral variability of seven LINER nuclei with XMM-Newton and Chandra data

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández-García, L; Márquez, I; Masegosa, J

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important features in active galactic nuclei (AGN) is the variability of their emission. Variability has been discovered at X-ray, UV, and radio frequencies on time scales from hours to years. Among the AGN family and according to theoretical studies, Low-Ionization Nuclear Emission Line Region (LINER) nuclei would be variable objects on long time scales. Our purpose is to investigate spectral X-ray variability in LINERs and to understand the nature of these kinds of objects, as well as their accretion mechanism. Chandra and XMM-Newton public archives were used to compile X-ray spectra of seven LINER nuclei at different epochs with time scales of years. To search for variability we fit all the spectra from the same object with a set of models, in order to identify the parameters responsible for the variability pattern. We also analyzed the light curves in order to search for short time scale (from hours to days) variability. Whenever possible, UV variability was also studied. We found spectral...

  1. LOFAR, VLA, and Chandra Observations of the Toothbrush Galaxy Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Weeren, R. J.; Brunetti, G.; Brüggen, M.; Andrade-Santos, F.; Ogrean, G. A.; Williams, W. L.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Dawson, W. A.; Forman, W. R.; de Gasperin, F.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Jones, C.; Miley, G. K.; Rafferty, D. A.; Rudnick, L.; Sabater, J.; Sarazin, C. L.; Shimwell, T. W.; Bonafede, A.; Best, P. N.; Bîrzan, L.; Cassano, R.; Chyży, K. T.; Croston, J. H.; Dijkema, T. J.; Enßlin, T.; Ferrari, C.; Heald, G.; Hoeft, M.; Horellou, C.; Jarvis, M. J.; Kraft, R. P.; Mevius, M.; Intema, H. T.; Murray, S. S.; Orrú, E.; Pizzo, R.; Sridhar, S. S.; Simionescu, A.; Stroe, A.; van der Tol, S.; White, G. J.

    2016-02-01

    We present deep LOFAR observations between 120 and 181 MHz of the “Toothbrush” (RX J0603.3+4214), a cluster that contains one of the brightest radio relic sources known. Our LOFAR observations exploit a new and novel calibration scheme to probe 10 times deeper than any previous study in this relatively unexplored part of the spectrum. The LOFAR observations, when combined with VLA, GMRT, and Chandra X-ray data, provide new information about the nature of cluster merger shocks and their role in re-accelerating relativistic particles. We derive a spectral index of α =-0.8+/- 0.1 at the northern edge of the main radio relic, steepening toward the south to α ≈ -2. The spectral index of the radio halo is remarkably uniform (α =-1.16, with an intrinsic scatter of ≤slant 0.04). The observed radio relic spectral index gives a Mach number of { M }={2.8}-0.3+0.5, assuming diffusive shock acceleration. However, the gas density jump at the northern edge of the large radio relic implies a much weaker shock ({ M }≈ 1.2, with an upper limit of { M }≈ 1.5). The discrepancy between the Mach numbers calculated from the radio and X-rays can be explained if either (i) the relic traces a complex shock surface along the line of sight, or (ii) if the radio relic emission is produced by a re-accelerated population of fossil particles from a radio galaxy. Our results highlight the need for additional theoretical work and numerical simulations of particle acceleration and re-acceleration at cluster merger shocks.

  2. X-Ray bright active galactic nuclei in massive galaxy clusters - II. The fraction of galaxies hosting active nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehlert, S.; von der Linden, A.; Allen, S. W.

    2013-01-01

    We present a measurement of the fraction of cluster galaxies hosting X-ray bright active galactic nuclei (AGN) as a function of clustercentric distance scaled in units of r500. Our analysis employs high-quality Chandra X-ray and Subaru optical imaging for 42 massive X-ray-selected galaxy cluster......, both of which are also suppressed near cluster centres to a comparable extent. These results strongly support the idea that X-ray AGN activity and strong star formation are linked through their common dependence on available reservoirs of cold gas....... fields spanning the redshift range 0.2 cluster galaxy AGN fraction in the central...

  3. Binding among Select Episodic Elements Is Altered via Active Short-Term Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Donna J.; Voss, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    Of the many elements that comprise an episode, are any disproportionately bound to the others? We tested whether active short-term retrieval selectively increases binding. Individual objects from multiobject displays were retrieved after brief delays. Memory was later tested for the other objects. Cueing with actively retrieved objects facilitated…

  4. The Effect of Size on the Oxygen Electroreduction Activity of Mass‐Selected Platinum Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pérez Alonso, Francisco; McCarthy, David Norman; Nierhoff, Anders Ulrik Fregerslev

    2012-01-01

    A matter of size: The particle size effect on the activity of the oxygen reduction reaction of size-selected platinum clusters was studied. The ORR activity decreased with decreasing Pt nanoparticle size, corresponding to a decrease in the fraction of terraces on the surfaces of the Pt nanopartic...

  5. The effect of size on the oxygen electroreduction activity of mass-selected platinum nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pérez Alonso, Francisco; McCarthy, David N; Nierhoff, Anders

    2012-01-01

    A matter of size: The particle size effect on the activity of the oxygen reduction reaction of size-selected platinum clusters was studied. The ORR activity decreased with decreasing Pt nanoparticle size, corresponding to a decrease in the fraction of terraces on the surfaces of the Pt nanopartic...

  6. Synthesis and preliminary evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of selected 3-benzofurancarboxylic acid derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossakowski, Jerzy; Krawiecka, Mariola; Kuran, Bozena; Stefańska, Joanna; Wolska, Irena

    2010-07-06

    Halogen derivatives of selected 3-benzofurancarboxylic acids were prepared using 6-acetyl-5-hydroxy-2-methyl-3-benzofuranocarboxylic acid as starting material. (1)H-NMR spectra were obtained for all of the synthesized structures, and for compound VI, an X-ray crystal structure was also obtained. All derivatives were tested for antimicrobial activity against a selection of Gram-positive cocci, Gram-negative rods and yeasts. Three compounds, III, IV, and VI, showed antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria (MIC 50 to 200 microg/mL). Compounds VI and III exhibited antifungal activity against the Candida strains C. albicans and C. parapsilosis (MIC-100 microg/mL).

  7. Selective disruption of high sensitivity heat activation but not capsaicin activation of TRPV1 channels by pore turret mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yuanyuan; Yang, Fan; Cao, Xu; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Wang, KeWei; Zheng, Jie

    2012-04-01

    The capsaicin receptor transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV)1 is a highly heat-sensitive ion channel. Although chemical activation and heat activation of TRPV1 elicit similar pungent, painful sensation, the molecular mechanism underlying synergistic activation remains mysterious. In particular, where the temperature sensor is located and whether heat and capsaicin share a common activation pathway are debated. To address these fundamental issues, we searched for channel mutations that selectively affected one form of activation. We found that deletion of the first 10 amino acids of the pore turret significantly reduced the heat response amplitude and shifted the heat activation threshold, whereas capsaicin activation remained unchanged. Removing larger portions of the turret disrupted channel function. Introducing an artificial sequence to replace the deleted region restored sensitive capsaicin activation in these nonfunctional channels. The heat activation, however, remained significantly impaired, with the current exhibiting diminishing heat sensitivity to a level indistinguishable from that of a voltage-gated potassium channel, Kv7.4. Our results demonstrate that heat and capsaicin activation of TRPV1 are structurally and mechanistically distinct processes, and the pore turret is an indispensible channel structure involved in the heat activation process but is not part of the capsaicin activation pathway. Synergistic effect of heat and capsaicin on TRPV1 activation may originate from convergence of the two pathways on a common activation gate.

  8. Managing radiation degradation of CCDs on the Chandra X-ray Observatory II

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Bissell, Bradley A.; Blackwell, William C.; Cameron, Robert A.; Chappell, Jon II.; DePasquale, Joseph M.; Gage, Kenneth R.; Grant, Catherine E.; Harbison, Christine F.

    2005-01-01

    The CCDs on the Chandra X-ray Observatory are vulnerable to radiation damage from low-energy protons scattered off the telescope's mirrors onto the focal plane. Following unexpected damage incurred early in the mission, the Chandra Team developed, implemented, and maintains a radiation-protection program. This program - involving scheduled radiation safing during radiation-belt passes, intervention based upon real-time space-weather conditions and radiation-environment modeling, and on-board radiation monitoring with autonomous radiation safing - has successfully managed the radiation damage to the CCDs. Since implementing the program, the charge-transfer inefficiency (CTI) has increased at an average annual rate of only 2.9x10^-6 (2.3%) for the front- illuminated CCDs and 0.95x10^-6 (6.5%) for the back-illuminated CCDs. This paper describes the current status of Chandra radiation-management program.

  9. The Chandra Deep Field-North Survey and the Cosmic X-ray Background

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, W N; Bauer, F E; Hornschemeier, A E

    2002-01-01

    Chandra has performed a 1.4 Ms survey centred on the Hubble Deep Field-North (HDF-N), probing the X-ray Universe 55-550 times deeper than was possible with pre-Chandra missions. We describe the detected point and extended X-ray sources and discuss their overall multiwavelength (optical, infrared, submillimeter, and radio) properties. Special attention is paid to the HDF-N X-ray sources, luminous infrared starburst galaxies, optically faint X-ray sources, and high-to-extreme redshift AGN. We also describe how stacking analyses have been used to probe the average X-ray emission properties of normal and starburst galaxies at cosmologically interesting distances. Finally, we discuss plans to extend the survey and argue that a 5-10 Ms Chandra survey would lay key groundwork for future missions such as XEUS and Generation-X.

  10. A STUDY OF ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF ETHANOLIC EXTRACTS OF VARIOUS PLANT LEAVES AGAINST SELECTED MICROBIAL SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.Valarmathy,

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the antimicrobial activities of extract of leaves were examined against four common bacterial isolates. The ethanolic extracts of various leaves such as Moringa oleifera (Murungai , Musa paradisiaca (Banana, Azardiratica indica (Neem, Cynodon dactylon(Grass, Alternanthera sessilis (Ponnangkani, Anisochilus carnosus (Karpooravalli, investigated individually for antimicrobial activity by disc diffusion method .These were investigated against selected species of Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Vibrio cholerae, Klebsiella pneumoniae to find the inhibitory activities of the microbes. The ethanolic extract of Azardiratica indica showed considerably high activity against Escherichia coli than other extracts. These results were compared with standard antibiotic Penicillin. But the extract showed higher activity than the given standard antibiotic.

  11. RXTE, Chandra, and XMM Spectroscopy of the Fe-K Lines and Compton Reflection in Type 1 AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqoob, Tahir

    2004-01-01

    This award pertains to an RXTE observation of the Seyfert 1 galaxy Akn 120. The purpose of the observation was to measure the Fe-K emission line and the Compton reflection continuum with RXTE, simultaneously with Chandra and XMM. Such measurements can severely constrain accretion disk models of the central engine since the Fe-K line emission and Compton reflection are intimately related in terms of the physics of X-ray reprocessing in optically-thick matter. Akn 120 was selected for this study because it is amongst the brightest AGN in its class and has a particularly strong and apparently broad Fe-K emission line. The results could then also be used to lay the ground work for even higher resolution studies with Astro-E2. Unfortunately, the Chandra observation was not performed but a contemporaneous XMM observation was performed by another group of researchers. Those data recently became public and can be compared with the RXTE data. In addition, non-contemporaneous observations with other missions do still provide additional important constraints (for example any non-varying line or continuum emission components can be established and used to reject or preserve various model scenarios). We analyzed the RXTE data and found a strong Fe-K emission line (resolved even with the poor resolution of RXTE), and a strong Compton-reflection continuum (see Fig. l(a)). We found that the results of archival ASCA data on Akn 120 had not been published in the literature so we analyzed the ASCA data too, in order to compare with the new RXTE data. Fig. l(b) shows that the ASCA data also reveal a strong, broad FeK emission line (but the data are not sensitive to the Compton-reflection continuum). We compared our spectral fitting results for the RXTE and ASCA data with the results from XMM and from previous RXTE observations.

  12. Deep Chandra study of the truncated cool core of the Ophiuchus cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, N.; Zhuravleva, I.; Canning, R. E. A.; Allen, S. W.; King, A. L.; Sanders, J. S.; Simionescu, A.; Taylor, G. B.; Morris, R. G.; Fabian, A. C.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of a deep Chandra observation of the Ophiuchus cluster, the second brightest galaxy cluster in the X-ray sky. The cluster hosts a truncated cool core, with a temperature increasing from kT ˜ 1 keV in the core to kT ˜ 9 keV at r ˜ 30 kpc. Beyond r ˜ 30 kpc, the intracluster medium (ICM) appears remarkably isothermal. The core is dynamically disturbed with multiple sloshing-induced cold fronts, with indications for both Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. The residual image reveals a likely subcluster south of the core at the projected distance of r ˜ 280 kpc. The cluster also harbours a likely radio phoenix, a source revived by adiabatic compression by gas motions in the ICM. Even though the Ophiuchus cluster is strongly dynamically active, the amplitude of density fluctuations outside of the cooling core is low, indicating velocities smaller than ˜100 km s-1. The density fluctuations might be damped by thermal conduction in the hot and remarkably isothermal ICM, resulting in our underestimate of gas velocities. We find a surprising, sharp surface brightness discontinuity, that is curved away from the core, at r ˜ 120 kpc to the south-east of the cluster centre. We conclude that this feature is most likely due to gas dynamics associated with a merger. The cooling core lacks any observable X-ray cavities and the active galactic nucleus (AGN) only displays weak, point-like radio emission, lacking lobes or jets. The lack of strong AGN activity may be due to the bulk of the cooling taking place offset from the central supermassive black hole.

  13. Selective activation of primary afferent fibers evaluated by sine-wave electrical stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Katafuchi Toshihiko; Takaki Atsushi; Rashid Md Harunor; Furue Hidemasa; Koga Kohei; Yoshimura Megumu

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Transcutaneous sine-wave stimuli at frequencies of 2000, 250 and 5 Hz (Neurometer) are thought to selectively activate Aβ, Aδ and C afferent fibers, respectively. However, there are few reports to test the selectivity of these stimuli at the cellular level. In the present study, we analyzed action potentials (APs) generated by sine-wave stimuli applied to the dorsal root in acutely isolated rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) preparations using intracellular recordings. We also measured e...

  14. Enhanced activity and selectivity of carbon nanofiber supported Pd catalysts for nitrite reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Danmeng; Choe, Jong Kwon; Shapley, John R; Werth, Charles J

    2012-03-06

    Pd-based catalyst treatment represents an emerging technology that shows promise to remove nitrate and nitrite from drinking water. In this work we use vapor-grown carbon nanofiber (CNF) supports in order to explore the effects of Pd nanoparticle size and interior versus exterior loading on nitrite reduction activity and selectivity (i.e., dinitrogen over ammonia production). Results show that nitrite reduction activity increases by 3.1-fold and selectivity decreases by 8.0-fold, with decreasing Pd nanoparticle size from 1.4 to 9.6 nm. Both activity and selectivity are not significantly influenced by Pd interior versus exterior CNF loading. Consequently, turnover frequencies (TOFs) among all CNF catalysts are similar, suggesting nitrite reduction is not sensitive to Pd location on CNFs nor Pd structure. CNF-based catalysts compare favorably to conventional Pd catalysts (i.e., Pd on activated carbon or alumina) with respect to nitrite reduction activity and selectivity, and they maintain activity over multiple reduction cycles. Hence, our results suggest new insights that an optimum Pd nanoparticle size on CNFs balances faster kinetics with lower ammonia production, that catalysts can be tailored at the nanoscale to improve catalytic performance for nitrite, and that CNFs hold promise as highly effective catalyst supports in drinking water treatment.

  15. Enhanced Activity and Selectivity of Carbon Nanofiber Supported Pd Catalysts for Nitrite Reduction

    KAUST Repository

    Shuai, Danmeng

    2012-03-06

    Pd-based catalyst treatment represents an emerging technology that shows promise to remove nitrate and nitrite from drinking water. In this work we use vapor-grown carbon nanofiber (CNF) supports in order to explore the effects of Pd nanoparticle size and interior versus exterior loading on nitrite reduction activity and selectivity (i.e., dinitrogen over ammonia production). Results show that nitrite reduction activity increases by 3.1-fold and selectivity decreases by 8.0-fold, with decreasing Pd nanoparticle size from 1.4 to 9.6 nm. Both activity and selectivity are not significantly influenced by Pd interior versus exterior CNF loading. Consequently, turnover frequencies (TOFs) among all CNF catalysts are similar, suggesting nitrite reduction is not sensitive to Pd location on CNFs nor Pd structure. CNF-based catalysts compare favorably to conventional Pd catalysts (i.e., Pd on activated carbon or alumina) with respect to nitrite reduction activity and selectivity, and they maintain activity over multiple reduction cycles. Hence, our results suggest new insights that an optimum Pd nanoparticle size on CNFs balances faster kinetics with lower ammonia production, that catalysts can be tailored at the nanoscale to improve catalytic performance for nitrite, and that CNFs hold promise as highly effective catalyst supports in drinking water treatment. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  16. Intrinsic Absorption in the Spectrum of Mrk 279: Simultaneous Chandra, FUSE, and STIS Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Jennifer E.; Kriss, Gerard A.; Lee, Julia C; Arav, Nahum; Ogle, Patrick; Roraback, Kenneth; Weaver, Kimberly; Alexander, Tal; Brotherton, Michael; Green, Richard F.; Hutchings, John; Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; Marshall, Herman; Oegerle, William; Zheng, Wei

    2004-01-01

    We present a study of the intrinsic X-ray and far-ultraviolet absorption in the Seyfert 1.5 galaxy Markarian 279 using simultaneous observations from the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope, and the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). We also present FUSE observations made at three additional epochs. We detect the Fe K-alpha emission line in the Chandra spectrum, and its flux is consistent with the low X-ray continuu...

  17. Medium chain fatty acids are selective peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) γ activators and pan-PPAR partial agonists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liberato, Marcelo Vizoná; Nascimento, Alessandro S; Ayers, Steven D; Lin, Jean Z; Cvoro, Aleksandra; Silveira, Rodrigo L; Martínez, Leandro; Souza, Paulo C T; Saidemberg, Daniel; Deng, Tuo; Amato, Angela Angelica; Togashi, Marie; Hsueh, Willa A; Phillips, Kevin; Palma, Mário Sérgio; Neves, Francisco A R; Skaf, Munir S; Webb, Paul; Polikarpov, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) act through peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) γ to increase insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes (T2DM), but deleterious effects of these ligands mean that selective modulators with improved clinical profiles are needed. We obtained a crystal structure of

  18. Selective Activation of Cholinergic Interneurons Enhances Accumbal Phasic Dopamine Release: Setting the Tone for Reward Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Cachope

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine plays a critical role in motor control, addiction, and reward-seeking behaviors, and its release dynamics have traditionally been linked to changes in midbrain dopamine neuron activity. Here, we report that selective endogenous cholinergic activation achieved via in vitro optogenetic stimulation of nucleus accumbens, a terminal field of dopaminergic neurons, elicits real-time dopamine release. This mechanism occurs via direct actions on dopamine terminals, does not require changes in neuron firing within the midbrain, and is dependent on glutamatergic receptor activity. More importantly, we demonstrate that in vivo selective activation of cholinergic interneurons is sufficient to elicit dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. Therefore, the control of accumbal extracellular dopamine levels by endogenous cholinergic activity results from a complex convergence of neurotransmitter/neuromodulator systems that may ultimately synergize to drive motivated behavior.

  19. Human activity recognition based on feature selection in smart home using back-propagation algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hongqing; He, Lei; Si, Hao; Liu, Peng; Xie, Xiaolei

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, Back-propagation(BP) algorithm has been used to train the feed forward neural network for human activity recognition in smart home environments, and inter-class distance method for feature selection of observed motion sensor events is discussed and tested. And then, the human activity recognition performances of neural network using BP algorithm have been evaluated and compared with other probabilistic algorithms: Naïve Bayes(NB) classifier and Hidden Markov Model(HMM). The results show that different feature datasets yield different activity recognition accuracy. The selection of unsuitable feature datasets increases the computational complexity and degrades the activity recognition accuracy. Furthermore, neural network using BP algorithm has relatively better human activity recognition performances than NB classifier and HMM.

  20. Active Learning for Mention Detection: A Comparison of Sentence Selection Strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Madnani, Nitin; Kambhatla, Nanda; Roukos, Salim

    2009-01-01

    We propose and compare various sentence selection strategies for active learning for the task of detecting mentions of entities. The best strategy employs the sum of confidences of two statistical classifiers trained on different views of the data. Our experimental results show that, compared to the random selection strategy, this strategy reduces the amount of required labeled training data by over 50% while achieving the same performance. The effect is even more significant when only named mentions are considered: the system achieves the same performance by using only 42% of the training data required by the random selection strategy.

  1. Active season microhabitat and vegetation selection by giant gartersnakes associated with a restored marsh in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Brian J.; Valcarcel, Patricia; Wylie, Glenn D.; Coates, Peter S.; Casazza, Michael L.; Rosenberg, Daniel K.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of habitat selection can reveal important patterns to guide habitat restoration and management for species of conservation concern. Giant gartersnakes Thamnophis gigas are endemic to the Central Valley of California, where >90% of their historical wetland habitat has been converted to agricultural and other uses. Information about the selection of habitats by individual giant gartersnakes would guide habitat restoration by indicating which habitat features and vegetation types are likely to be selected by these rare snakes. We examined activity patterns and selection of microhabitats and vegetation types by adult female giant gartersnakes with radiotelemetry at a site composed of rice agriculture and restored wetlands using a paired case-control study design. Adult female giant gartersnakes were 14.7 (95% credible interval [CRI] = 9.4–23.7) times more likely to be active (foraging, mating, or moving) when located in aquatic habitats than when located in terrestrial habitats. Microhabitats associated with cover—particularly emergent vegetation, terrestrial vegetation, and litter—were positively selected by giant gartersnakes. Individual giant gartersnakes varied greatly in their selection of rice and rock habitats, but varied little in their selection of open water. Tules Schoenoplectus acutus were the most strongly selected vegetation type, and duckweed Lemna spp., water-primrose Ludwigia spp., forbs, and grasses also were positively selected at the levels of availability observed at our study site. Management practices that promote the interface of water with emergent aquatic and herbaceous terrestrial vegetation will likely benefit giant gartersnakes. Given their strong selection of tules, restoration of native tule marshes will likely provide the greatest benefit to these threatened aquatic snakes.

  2. Feature Selection in Classification of Eye Movements Using Electrooculography for Activity Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Activity recognition is needed in different requisition, for example, reconnaissance system, patient monitoring, and human-computer interfaces. Feature selection plays an important role in activity recognition, data mining, and machine learning. In selecting subset of features, an efficient evolutionary algorithm Differential Evolution (DE, a very efficient optimizer, is used for finding informative features from eye movements using electrooculography (EOG. Many researchers use EOG signals in human-computer interactions with various computational intelligence methods to analyze eye movements. The proposed system involves analysis of EOG signals using clearness based features, minimum redundancy maximum relevance features, and Differential Evolution based features. This work concentrates more on the feature selection algorithm based on DE in order to improve the classification for faultless activity recognition.

  3. Chandra measurements of a complete sample of X-ray luminous galaxy clusters: the luminosity-mass relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, P. A.; Maughan, B. J.; Dahle, H.; Bonamente, M.; Landry, D.; Jones, C.; Joy, M.; Murray, S. S.; van der Pyl, N.

    2017-02-01

    We present the results of work involving a statistically complete sample of 34 galaxy clusters, in the redshift range 0.15 ≤ z ≤ 0.3 observed with Chandra. We investigate the luminosity-mass (LM) relation for the cluster sample, with the masses obtained via a full hydrostatic mass analysis. We utilize a method to fully account for selection biases when modelling the LM relation, and find that the LM relation is significantly different from the relation modelled when not account for selection effects. We find that the luminosity of our clusters is 2.2 ± 0.4 times higher (when accounting for selection effects) than the average for a given mass and its mass is 30 per cent lower than the population average for a given luminosity. Equivalently, using the LM relation measured from this sample without correcting for selection biases would lead to the underestimation by 40 per cent of the average mass of a cluster with a given luminosity. Comparing the hydrostatic masses to mass estimates determined from the YX parameter, we find that they are entirely consistent, irrespective of the dynamical state of the cluster.

  4. Selectivity Profiling and Biological Activity of Novel β-Carbolines as Potent and Selective DYRK1 Kinase Inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Rüben

    Full Text Available DYRK1A is a pleiotropic protein kinase with diverse functions in cellular regulation, including cell cycle control, neuronal differentiation, and synaptic transmission. Enhanced activity and overexpression of DYRK1A have been linked to altered brain development and function in Down syndrome and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. The β-carboline alkaloid harmine is a high affinity inhibitor of DYRK1A but suffers from the drawback of inhibiting monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A with even higher potency. Here we characterized a series of novel harmine analogs with minimal or absent MAO-A inhibitory activity. We identified several inhibitors with submicromolar potencies for DYRK1A and selectivity for DYRK1A and DYRK1B over the related kinases DYRK2 and HIPK2. An optimized inhibitor, AnnH75, inhibited CLK1, CLK4, and haspin/GSG2 as the only off-targets in a panel of 300 protein kinases. In cellular assays, AnnH75 dose-dependently reduced the phosphorylation of three known DYRK1A substrates (SF3B1, SEPT4, and tau without negative effects on cell viability. AnnH75 inhibited the cotranslational tyrosine autophosphorylation of DYRK1A and threonine phosphorylation of an exogenous substrate protein with similar potency. In conclusion, we have characterized an optimized β-carboline inhibitor as a highly selective chemical probe that complies with desirable properties of drug-like molecules and is suitable to interrogate the function of DYRK1A in biological studies.

  5. [SCREENING AND SELECTION OF THE SOIL MICROORGANISMS ON THE ABILITY OF "NITROGEN-FIXING ACTIVITY"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patyka V Ph; Kyrychenko, O V; Kots, S Ya

    2015-01-01

    The isolates of microorganisms from the rhizosphere of spring barley plants and soil at the use of analytical selection method was isolated. Its isolates on the ability of "nitrogen-fixing activity" was tested. It was shown that isolates of microorganisms had different of the colonies formed and cultural growth on the Eshbi's selective medium as well as the ability to fixing of molecular nitrogen. The different levels of intensity and dynamics of isolates nitrogenase activity in vitro were identified. New isolates of the soil microorganisms complement of the gene pool diazotrophic bacteria. Its isolates are perspectivity for the study as the basis or components of the bacterial fertilizers for the crops.

  6. Structure-activity relationship study of selective benzimidazole-based inhibitors of Cryptosporidium parvum IMPDH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirubakaran, Sivapriya; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Sharling, Lisa; Zhang, Minjia; Liu, Xiaoping; Ray, Soumya S.; MacPherson, Iain S.; Striepen, Boris; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Cuny, Gregory D.

    2012-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parasites are important waterborne pathogens of both humans and animals. The C. parvum and C. hominis genomes indicate that the only route to guanine nucleotides is via inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH). Thus the inhibition of the parasite IMPDH presents a potential strategy for treating Cryptosporidium infections. A selective benzimidazole-based inhibitor of C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) was previously identified in a high throughput screen. Here we report a structure-activity relationship study of benzimidazole-based compounds that resulted in potent and selective inhibitors of CpIMPDH. Several compounds display potent antiparasitic activity in vitro. PMID:22310229

  7. Conformal Array Pattern Synthesis and Activated Elements Selection Strategy Based on PSOGSA Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The pattern synthesis and activated element selection for conformal array is investigated based on hybrid particle swarm optimization-gravitational search algorithm (PSOGSA in this paper. With the introduction of PSOGSA algorithm which is a novel hybrid optimization technique, the element excitations are optimized to obtain the desired pattern for conformal array in the case of considering uncoupled and coupled element pattern. Numerical simulation and full-wave electromagnetic calculation verify the advantage and efficiency of our method. Then, a novel strategy of activated element selection based on PSOGSA algorithm is proposed for saving the energy consumption in conformal array.

  8. Synthesis, structure-activity relationships, and characterization of novel nonsteroidal and selective androgen receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlienger, Nathalie; Lund, Birgitte W; Pawlas, Jan; Badalassi, Fabrizio; Bertozzi, Fabio; Lewinsky, Rasmus; Fejzic, Alma; Thygesen, Mikkel B; Tabatabaei, Ali; Bradley, Stefania Risso; Gardell, Luis R; Piu, Fabrice; Olsson, Roger

    2009-11-26

    Herein we describe the discovery of ACP-105 (1), a novel and potent nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) with partial agonist activity relative to the natural androgen testosterone. Compound 1 was developed from a series of compounds found in a HTS screen using the receptor selection and amplification technology (R-SAT). In vivo, 1 improved anabolic parameters in a 2-week chronic study in castrated male rats. In addition to compound 1, a number of potent antiandrogens were discovered from the same series of compounds whereof one compound, 13, had antagonist activity at the AR T877A mutant involved in prostate cancer.

  9. Can Programmed or Self-Selected Physical Activity Affect Physical Fitness of Adolescents?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neto Cláudio F.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to verify the effects of programmed and self-selected physical activities on the physical fitness of adolescents. High school adolescents, aged between 15 and 17 years, were divided into two experimental groups: a a self-selected physical activity group (PAS with 55 students (aged 15.7 ± 0.7 years, who performed physical activities with self-selected rhythm at the following sports: basketball, volleyball, handball, futsal and swimming; and b a physical fitness training group (PFT with 53 students (aged 16.0 ± 0.7 years, who performed programmed physical fitness exercises. Both types of activity were developed during 60 min classes. To assess physical fitness the PROESP-BR protocol was used. The statistical analysis was performed by repeated measures ANOVA. The measurements of pre and post-tests showed significantly different values after PFT in: 9 minute running test, medicine ball throw, horizontal jump, abdominal endurance, running speed and flexibility. After PAS differences were detected in abdominal endurance, agility, running speed and flexibility. The intervention with programmed physical activity promoted more changes in the physical abilities; however, in the self-selected program, agility was improved probably because of the practice of sports. Therefore, physical education teachers can use PFT to improve cardiorespiratory fitness and power of lower and upper limbs and PAS to improve agility of high school adolescents.

  10. Semantic Wavelet-Induced Frequency-Tagging (SWIFT) Periodically Activates Category Selective Areas While Steadily Activating Early Visual Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig-Robert, Roger; VanRullen, Rufin; Tsuchiya, Naotsugu

    2015-01-01

    Primate visual systems process natural images in a hierarchical manner: at the early stage, neurons are tuned to local image features, while neurons in high-level areas are tuned to abstract object categories. Standard models of visual processing assume that the transition of tuning from image features to object categories emerges gradually along the visual hierarchy. Direct tests of such models remain difficult due to confounding alteration in low-level image properties when contrasting distinct object categories. When such contrast is performed in a classic functional localizer method, the desired activation in high-level visual areas is typically accompanied with activation in early visual areas. Here we used a novel image-modulation method called SWIFT (semantic wavelet-induced frequency-tagging), a variant of frequency-tagging techniques. Natural images modulated by SWIFT reveal object semantics periodically while keeping low-level properties constant. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we indeed found that faces and scenes modulated with SWIFT periodically activated the prototypical category-selective areas while they elicited sustained and constant responses in early visual areas. SWIFT and the localizer were selective and specific to a similar extent in activating category-selective areas. Only SWIFT progressively activated the visual pathway from low- to high-level areas, consistent with predictions from standard hierarchical models. We confirmed these results with criterion-free methods, generalizing the validity of our approach and show that it is possible to dissociate neural activation in early and category-selective areas. Our results provide direct evidence for the hierarchical nature of the representation of visual objects along the visual stream and open up future applications of frequency-tagging methods in fMRI.

  11. Selected topics on the active control of helicopter aeromechanical and vibration problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, Peretz P.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes in a concise manner three selected topics on the active control of helicopter aeromechanical and vibration problems. The three topics are as follows: (1) the active control of helicopter air-resonance using an LQG/LTR approach; (2) simulation of higher harmonic control (HHC) applied to a four bladed hingeless helicopter rotor in forward flight; and (3) vibration suppression in forward flight on a hingeless helicopter rotor using an actively controlled, partial span, trailing edge flap, which is mounted on the blade. Only a few selected illustrative results are presented. The results obtained clearly indicate that the partial span, actively controlled flap has considerable potential for vibration reduction in helicopter rotors.

  12. The power of script knowledge and selective retrieval in the recall of daily activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migueles, Malen; García-Bajos, Elvira

    2012-01-01

    In this study we examined the effects of script knowledge and selective retrieval on the recall of daily activities. The participants studied daily activities typically performed over the course of a normal day from morning to bedtime, presented in chronological order or as a random list. Then half of the participants practiced retrieval for part of the activities. The use of the script improved recall in the ordered presentation. The facilitation effect caused by retrieval practice was greater in the random presentation, showing that retrieval is a powerful mnemonic enhancer, especially for nonorganized materials. Script-driven processing in the ordered presentation prevented inhibitory effects derived from selective retrieval practice, whereas retrieval-induced forgetting was observed in the random presentation, which lacked the temporal and causal structure of the script. The results show the power of the script to moderate inhibition and the effectiveness of retrieval practice in the recall of daily activities.

  13. Direction selectivity is computed by active dendritic integration in retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivyer, Benjamin; Williams, Stephen R

    2013-12-01

    Active dendritic integration is thought to enrich the computational power of central neurons. However, a direct role of active dendritic processing in the execution of defined neuronal computations in intact neural networks has not been established. Here we used multi-site electrophysiological recording techniques to demonstrate that active dendritic integration underlies the computation of direction selectivity in rabbit retinal ganglion cells. Direction-selective retinal ganglion cells fire action potentials in response to visual image movement in a preferred direction. Dendritic recordings revealed that preferred-direction moving-light stimuli led to dendritic spike generation in terminal dendrites, which were further integrated and amplified as they spread through the dendritic arbor to the axon to drive action potential output. In contrast, when light bars moved in a null direction, synaptic inhibition vetoed neuronal output by directly inhibiting terminal dendritic spike initiation. Active dendritic integration therefore underlies a physiologically engaged circuit-based computation in the retina.

  14. EVALUATION OF HUMAN RELIABILITY IN SELECTED ACTIVITIES IN THE RAILWAY INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika SUJOVÁ

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on evaluation of human reliability in the human – machine system in the railway industry. Based on a survey of a train dispatcher and of selected activities, we have identified risk factors affecting the dispatcher‘s work and the evaluated risk level of their influence on the reliability and safety of preformed activities. The research took place at the authors‘ work place between 2012-2013. A survey method was used. With its help, authors were able to identify selected work activities of train dispatcher’s risk factors that affect his/her work and the evaluated seriousness of its in-fluence on the reliability and safety of performed activities. Amongst the most important finding fall expressions of un-clear and complicated internal regulations and work processes, a feeling of being overworked, fear for one’s safety at small, insufficiently protected stations.

  15. Regression-Based Feature Selection on Large Scale Human Activity Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Mazaar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present an approach for regression-based feature selection in human activity recognition. Due to high dimensional features in human activity recognition, the model may have over-fitting and can’t learn parameters well. Moreover, the features are redundant or irrelevant. The goal is to select important discriminating features to recognize the human activities in videos. R-Squared regression criterion can identify the best features based on the ability of a feature to explain the variations in the target class. The features are significantly reduced, nearly by 99.33%, resulting in better classification accuracy. Support Vector Machine with a linear kernel is used to classify the activities. The experiments are tested on UCF50 dataset. The results show that the proposed model significantly outperforms state-of-the-art methods.

  16. Near-infrared light controlled photocatalytic activity of carbon quantum dots for highly selective oxidation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haitao; Liu, Ruihua; Lian, Suoyuan; Liu, Yang; Huang, Hui; Kang, Zhenhui

    2013-04-21

    Selective oxidation of alcohols is a fundamental and significant transformation for the large-scale production of fine chemicals, UV and visible light driven photocatalytic systems for alcohol oxidation have been developed, however, the long wavelength near infrared (NIR) and infrared (IR) light have not yet fully utilized by the present photocatalytic systems. Herein, we reported carbon quantum dots (CQDs) can function as an effective near infrared (NIR) light driven photocatalyst for the selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde. Based on the NIR light driven photo-induced electron transfer property and its photocatalytic activity for H2O2 decomposition, this metal-free catalyst could realize the transformation from benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde with high selectivity (100%) and conversion (92%) under NIR light irradiation. HO˙ is the main active oxygen specie in benzyl alcohol selective oxidative reaction confirmed by terephthalic acid photoluminescence probing assay (TA-PL), selecting toluene as the substrate. Such metal-free photocatalytic system also selectively converts other alcohol substrates to their corresponding aldehydes with high conversion, demonstrating a potential application of accessing traditional alcohol oxidation chemistry.

  17. EGF stimulates the activation of EGF receptors and the selective activation of major signaling pathways during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Ping; Shi, Huaiping; Jiang, Jennifer; Wang, Yuluan; Wang, Zhixiang

    2015-03-01

    Mitosis and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) are both targets for cancer therapy. The role of EGFR signaling in mitosis has been rarely studied and poorly understood. The limited studies indicate that the activation of EGFR and downstream signaling pathways is mostly inhibited during mitosis. However, we recently showed that EGFR is phosphorylated in response to EGF stimulation in mitosis. Here we studied EGF-induced EGFR activation and the activation of major signaling pathways downstream of EGFR during mitosis. We showed that EGFR was strongly activated by EGF during mitosis as all the five major tyrosine residues including Y992, Y1045, Y1068, Y1086, and Y1173 were phosphorylated to a level similar to that in the interphase. We further showed that the activated EGFR is able to selectively activate some downstream signaling pathways while avoiding others. Activated EGFR is able to activate PI3K and AKT2, but not AKT1, which may be responsible for the observed effects of EGF against nocodazole-induced cell death. Activated EGFR is also able to activate c-Src, c-Cbl and PLC-γ1 during mitosis. However, activated EGFR is unable to activate ERK1/2 and their downstream substrates RSK and Elk-1. While it activated Ras, EGFR failed to fully activate Raf-1 in mitosis due to the lack of phosphorylation at Y341 and the lack of dephosphorylation at pS259. We conclude that contrary to the dogma, EGFR is activated by EGF during mitosis. Moreover, EGFR-mediated cell signaling is regulated differently from the interphase to specifically serve the needs of the cell in mitosis.

  18. Quantitative structure-activity relationships of selective antagonists of glucagon receptor using QuaSAR descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoj Kumar, Palanivelu; Karthikeyan, Chandrabose; Hari Narayana Moorthy, Narayana Subbiah; Trivedi, Piyush

    2006-11-01

    In the present paper, quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) approach was applied to understand the affinity and selectivity of a novel series of triaryl imidazole derivatives towards glucagon receptor. Statistically significant and highly predictive QSARs were derived for glucagon receptor inhibition by triaryl imidazoles using QuaSAR descriptors of molecular operating environment (MOE) employing computer-assisted multiple regression procedure. The generated QSAR models revealed that factors related to hydrophobicity, molecular shape and geometry predominantly influences glucagon receptor binding affinity of the triaryl imidazoles indicating the relevance of shape specific steric interactions between the molecule and the receptor. Further, QSAR models formulated for selective inhibition of glucagon receptor over p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase of the compounds in the series highlights that the same structural features, which influence the glucagon receptor affinity, also contribute to their selective inhibition.

  19. The Host Galaxies of X-Ray Selected Active Galactic Nuclei to z - 2.5: Structure, Star-Formation and Their Relationships from CANDELS and Herschel/Pacs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, D.J.; McIntosh, D. H.; van der Wel, A.; Kartaltepe, J.; Lang, P.; Santini, P.; Wuyts, S.; Lutz, D.; Rafelski, M.; Villforth, C.; Alexander, D. M.; Bauer, F. E.; Bell, E. F.; Berta, S.; Brandt, W. N.; Conselice, C. J.; Dekel, A.; Faber, S. M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Genzel, R.; Grogin, N. A.; Kocevski, D. D.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Koo, D. C.; Straughn, A.

    2014-01-01

    We study the relationship between the structure and star-formation rate (SFR) of X-ray selected low and moderate luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the two Chandra Deep Fields, using Hubble Space Telescope imaging from the Cosmic Assembly Near Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and deep far-infrared maps from the PEP+GOODS-Herschel survey. We derive detailed distributions of structural parameters and FIR luminosities from carefully constructed control samples of galaxies, which we then compare to those of the AGNs. At z is approximately 1, AGNs show slightly diskier light profiles than massive inactive (non-AGN) galaxies, as well as modestly higher levels of gross galaxy disturbance (as measured by visual signatures of interactions and clumpy structure). In contrast, at z 2, AGNs show similar levels of galaxy disturbance as inactive galaxies, but display a red central light enhancement, which may arise due to a more pronounced bulge in AGN hosts or due to extinguished nuclear light. We undertake a number of tests of both these alternatives, but our results do not strongly favour one interpretation over the other. The mean SFR and its distribution among AGNs and inactive galaxies are similar at z greater than 1.5. At z less than 1, however, clear and significant enhancements are seen in the SFRs of AGNs with bulge-dominated light profiles. These trends suggest an evolution in the relation between nuclear activity and host properties with redshift towards a minor role for mergers and interactions at z greater than 15

  20. Activity and selectivity control in reductive amination of butyraldehyde over noble metal catalysts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodis, E.; Lefferts, Leonardus; Muller, T.E.; Pestman, R.; Lercher, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Approaches to control selectivity and activity in the catalytic reductive amination of butyraldehyde with ammonia over carbon supported noble metal catalysts (Ru, Rh, Pd, and Pt) were explored. Detailed analysis of the reaction network shows that the Schiff base N-[butylidene]butan-1-amine is the

  1. Basic Research on Selecting ISDC Activity for Decommissioning Costing in KRR-2 Decommissioning Project Experience Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Chan-Ho; Park, Hee-Seong; Jin, Hyung-Gon; Park, Seung-Kook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    KAERI is performing research for calculation of expected time of a decommissioning work and evaluation of decommissioning cost and this research calculate a decommissioning work unit productivity based on the experience data of decommissioning activity for KRR-2. The KAERI be used to calculate the decommissioning cost and manage the experience data from the decommissioning activity through the Decommissioning Information Management System (DECOMMIS), Decommissioning Facility Characterization DB System (DEFACS), and Decommissioning Work-unit Productivity Calculation System (DEWOCS). In this paper, the methodology was presented how select the ISDC activities in dismantling work procedures of a 'removal of radioactive concrete'. The reason to select the 'removal of radioactive concrete' is main key activity and generates the amount of radioactive waste. This data will take advantage of the cost estimation after the code for the selected items derived ISDC. There are various efforts for decommissioning costing in each country. In particular, OECD/NEA recommends decommissioning cost estimation using the ISDC and IAEA provides for Cost Estimation for Research Reactors in Excel (CERREX) program that anyone is easy to use the cost evaluation from a limited decommissioning experience in domestic. In the future, for the decommissioning cost evaluation, the ISDC will be used more widely in a strong position. This paper has described a method for selecting the ISDC item from the actual dismantling work procedures.

  2. Potent Systemic Anticancer Activity of Adenovirally Expressed EGFR-Selective TRAIL Fusion Protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremer, Edwin; van Dam, Gooitzen M.; de Bruyn, Marco; van Riezen, Manon; Dijkstra, Marike; Kamps, Gera; Helfrich, Wijnand; Haisma, Hidde

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated potent tumor cell-selective pro-apoptotic activity of scFv425:sTRAIL, a recombinant fusion protein comprised of EGFR-directed antibody fragment (scFv425) genetically fused to human soluble TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (sTRAIL). Here, we report on the promising th

  3. Redox-Active Metal-Organic Composites for Highly Selective Oxygen Separation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wen [Physical & Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Banerjee, Debasis [Physical & Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Liu, Jian [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Schaef, Herbert T. [Physical & Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Crum, Jarrod V. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Fernandez, Carlos A. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Kukkadapu, Ravi K. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Nie, Zimin [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Nune, Satish K. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Motkuri, Radha K. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Chapman, Karena W. [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Engelhard, Mark H. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Hayes, James C. [National Security Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Silvers, Kurt L. [National Security Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Krishna, Rajamani [Van' t Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904 1098 XH Amsterdam The Netherlands; McGrail, B. Peter [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Liu, Jun [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Thallapally, Praveen K. [Physical & Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA

    2016-03-08

    A redox-active metal-organic composite material shows improved and selective O-2 adsorption over N-2 with respect to individual components (MIL-101 and ferrocene). The O-2 sensitivity of the composite material arises due to the formation of maghemite nanoparticles with the pore of the metal-organic framework material.

  4. Effects of selective REM sleep deprivation on prefrontal gamma activity and executive functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi-Cabrera, M; Rosales-Lagarde, A; del Río-Portilla, Y; Sifuentes-Ortega, R; Alcántara-Quintero, B

    2015-05-01

    Given that the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is involved in executive functions and is deactivated and decoupled from posterior associative regions during REM sleep, that Gamma temporal coupling involved in information processing is enhanced during REM sleep, and that adult humans spend about 90 min of every 24h in REM sleep, it might be expected that REM sleep deprivation would modify Gamma temporal coupling and have a deteriorating effect on executive functions. We analyzed EEG Gamma activity and temporal coupling during implementation of a rule-guided task before and after REM sleep deprivation and its effect on verbal fluency, flexible thinking and selective attention. After two nights in the laboratory for adaptation, on the third night subjects (n=18) were randomly assigned to either selective REM sleep deprivation effectuated by awakening them at each REM sleep onset or, the same number of NREM sleep awakenings as a control for unspecific effects of sleep interruptions. Implementation of abstract rules to guide behavior required greater activation and synchronization of Gamma activity in the frontopolar regions after REM sleep reduction from 20.6% at baseline to just 3.93% of total sleep time. However, contrary to our hypothesis, both groups showed an overall improvement in executive task performance and no effect on their capacity to sustain selective attention. These results suggest that after one night of selective REM sleep deprivation executive functions can be compensated by increasing frontal activation and they still require the participation of supervisory control by frontopolar regions.

  5. A Highly Active and Selective Manganese Oxide Promoted Cobalt-on-Silica Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Breejen, Johan P.; Frey, Anne M.; Yang, Jia; Holmen, Anders; van Schooneveld, Matti M.; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Stephan, Odile; Bitter, Johannes H.; de Jong, Krijn P.

    2011-01-01

    A highly active and selective manganese oxide-promoted silica-supported cobalt catalyst for the Fischer-Tropsch reaction is reported. Co/MnO/SiO2 catalysts were prepared via impregnation of a cobalt nitrate and manganese nitrate precursor, followed by drying and calcination in an NO/He flow. The cat

  6. Structure-Activity Relationships in Salinomycin: Cytotoxicity and Phenotype Selectivity of Semi-synthetic Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgström, Björn; Huang, Xiaoli; Hegardt, Cecilia; Oredsson, Stina; Strand, Daniel

    2017-02-10

    The ionophore salinomycin has attracted attention for its exceptional ability to selectively reduce the proportion of cells with stem-like properties in cancer cell populations of varying origin. Targeting the tumorigenicity of such cells is of interest as they are implicated in recurrence, metastasis, and drug resistance. Structural derivatives of salinomycin are thus sought after, both as tools for probing the molecular mechanism(s) underlying the observed phenotype effects, and for improving selectivity and activity against cancer stem cells. Synthetic strategies for modification of each of the directly accessible functional groups of salinomycin are presented and the resulting library of analogues was investigated to establish structure-activity relationships, both with respect to cytotoxicity and phenotype selectivity in breast cancer cells. 20-O-Acylated derivatives stand out by exhibiting both improved selectivity and activity. Mechanistically, the importance of the ionophore properties of salinomycin is highlighted by a significant loss of activity by modifications directly interfering with either of the two primary ion coordinating motifs in salinomycin, the C11 ketone and the C1 carboxylate.

  7. Frequency Response Analysis of Current Controllers for Selective Harmonic Compensation in Active Power Filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lascu, C.; Asiminoaei, L.; Boldea, I.;

    2009-01-01

    This paper compares four current control structures for selective harmonic compensation in active power filters. All controllers under scrutiny perform the harmonic compensation by using arrays of resonant controllers, one for the fundamental and one for each harmonic of interest, in order to ach...

  8. Verification of a characterization method of the laser-induced selective activation based on industrial lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yang; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tang, Peter T.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, laser-induced selective activation (LISA) for subsequent autocatalytic copper plating is performed by several types of industrial scale lasers, including a Nd:YAG laser, a UV laser, a fiber laser, a green laser, and a short pulsed laser. Based on analysis of all the laser-machine...

  9. Chandra High Resolution Spectroscopy of the Burst Spectrum of EXO 0748-67

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telis, G.; Paerels, F.; Audard, M.; Lanz, T.; Cottam, J.; Méndez, R.M.; Bildsten, L.; Chang, P.; Marshall, H.

    2004-01-01

    We have observed EXO0748-67 for approximately 300 ksec with the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer on Chandra. A total of 35 Type I X-ray bursts occurred during our observation, and from these we obtained a composite burst spectrum with high sensitivity in the Fe K band. Along with the sp

  10. The STS-93 crew takes part in payload familiarization of the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    A TRW technician joins STS-93 Commander Eileen Collins (center) and Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby (right) as they observe the Chandra X- ray Observatory on its work stand inside the Vertical Processing Facility. Other members of the STS-93 crew who are at KSC for payload familiarization are Mission Specialists Catherine G. Coleman and Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as a shuttle mission commander. She was the first woman pilot of a Space Shuttle, on mission STS-63, and also served as pilot on mission STS-84. The fifth member of the crew is Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 9 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93 . Formerly called the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, Chandra comprises three major elements: the spacecraft, the science instrument module (SIM), and the world's most powerful X-ray telescope. Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe.

  11. Chandra and XMM–Newton Observations of H2O Maser Galaxy Mrk 266

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. Wang; J. S. Zhang; J. H. Fan

    2011-03-01

    For H2O megamaser galaxy Mrk 266, its Chandra and XMM–Newton data are analyzed here. It shows existence of two obscured nuclei (separation is ∼ 5''). Our preferred model, the high energy reflected model can fit the hard component of both nuclei spectra well.

  12. Finding Supernova Ia Progenitors with the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mikkel T. B.; Nelemans, Gijs; Voss, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    We examine pre-supernova Chandra images to find X-ray luminosities of type Ia supernova progenitors. At present, we have one possible direct detection and upper limits for the X-ray luminosities of a number of other supernova progenitors. The method has also yielded a possible detection of a X...

  13. CHANDRA Observations of V407 Vul: Confirmation of the Spin-up

    CERN Document Server

    Strohmayer, T E

    2004-01-01

    V407 Vul is a candidate double-degenerate binary with a putative 1.756 mHz (9.5 min) orbital frequency. In a previous timing study using archival ROSAT and ASCA data we reported evidence for an increase of this frequency at a rate consistent with expectations for gravitational radiation from a detached ultracompact binary system. Here we report the results of new CHANDRA timing observations which confirm the previous indications of spin-up of the X-ray frequency, and provide much tighter constraints on the frequency derivative. We obtained with CHANDRA a total of 90 ksec of exposure in two epochs separated in time by 11.5 months. The total time span of the archival ROSAT, ASCA and new CHANDRA data is now 10.5 years. This more than doubles the interval spanned by the ROSAT and ASCA data alone, providing much greater sensitivity to a frequency derivative. With the addition of the CHANDRA data an increasing frequency is unavoidable, with a value df/dt = 7.0 x 10-18 Hz/s. Although a long-term spin-up trend is con...

  14. Chandra Data Analysis of H2O Megamaser Galaxy NGC 4258

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Baisheng Liu; Jiangshui Zhang; Jin Wang

    2011-03-01

    Chandra observations of NGC 4258 were analyzed to investigate the circumnuclear environment of the H2O megamaser galaxy. Its adaptively-smoothed image shows a bright nucleus and another weak source nearby. For the maser host nucleus, our preferred fitting of its spectra gives the absorption of ∼ 7 × 1022cm-2.

  15. A Chandra X-Ray observation of the binary millisecond pulsar PSR J1023+0038

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogdanov, S.; Archibald, A.M.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Kaspi, V.M.; Lorimer, D.; McLaughlin, M.A.; Ransom, S.M.; Stairs, I.H.

    2011-01-01

    We present a Chandra X-Ray Observatory ACIS-S variability, spectroscopy, and imaging study of the peculiar binary containing the millisecond pulsar J1023+0038. The X-ray emission from the system exhibits highly significant (12.5σ) large-amplitude (factor of two to three) orbital variability over the

  16. Chandra observations of comet 9P/Tempel 1 during the Deep Impact campaign

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisse, C. M.; Dennerl, K.; Christian, D. J.; Wolk, S. J.; Bodewits, D.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Hansen, K. C.; Hoekstra, R.; Combi, M.; Fry, C. D.; Dryer, M.; Maekinen, T.; Sun, W.; Jansen, K.C.; Mäkinen, T.

    2007-01-01

    We present results from the Chandra X-ray Observatory's extensive campaign studying Comet 9P/Tempel 1 (T1) in support of NASA's Deep Impact (DI) mission. T1 was observed for similar to 295 ks between 30th June and 24th July 2005, and continuously for similar to 64 ks on July 4th during the impact ev

  17. Analytic parameter dependence of Harish-Chandra modules for real reductive Lie groups - a family affair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Noort, V.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is written in the subfield of mathematics known as representation theory of real reductive Lie groups. Let G be a Lie group in the Harish-Chandra class with maximal compact subgroup K and Lie algebra g. Let Omega be a connected complex manifold. By a family of G-representations parametri

  18. Analytic parameter dependence of Harish-Chandra modules for real reductive Lie groups - a family affair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Noort, V.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837768

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is written in the subfield of mathematics known as representation theory of real reductive Lie groups. Let G be a Lie group in the Harish-Chandra class with maximal compact subgroup K and Lie algebra g. Let Omega be a connected complex manifold. By a family of G-representations parametri

  19. Sharp Chandra View of ROSAT All-Sky Survey Bright Sources: I. Improvement of Positional Accuracy

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Shuang; Liu, Jifeng

    2016-01-01

    The ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) represents one of the most complete and sensitive soft X-ray all-sky surveys to date. However, the deficient positional accuracy of the RASS Bright Source Catalog (BSC) and subsequent lack of firm optical identifications affect the multi-wavelength studies of X-ray sources. The widely used positional errors $\\sigma_{pos}$ based on the Tycho Stars Catalog (Tycho-1) have previously been applied for identifying objects in the optical band. The considerably sharper Chandra view covers a fraction of RASS sources, whose $\\sigma_{pos}$ could be improved by utilizing the sub-arcsec positional accuracy of Chandra observations. We cross-match X-ray objects between the BSC and \\emph{Chandra} sources extracted from the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) archival observations. A combined counterparts list (BSCxACIS) with \\emph{Chandra} spatial positions weighted by the X-ray flux of multi-counterparts is employed to evaluate and improve the former identifications of BSC with the other...

  20. The Brera Multi-scale Wavelet Chandra Survey. The serendipitous source catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, P; Mignani, R P; Moretti, A; Panzera, M R; Tagliaferri, G; Mottini, M

    2009-01-01

    We present the Brera Multi-scale Wavelet Chandra (BMW-Chandra) source catalogue drawn from essentially all Chandra ACIS-I pointed observations with an exposure time in excess of 10ks public as of March 2003 (136 observations). Using the wavelet detection algorithm developed by Lazzati et al. (1999) and Campana et al. (1999), which can characterise both point-like and extended sources, we identified 21325 sources. Among them, 16758 are serendipitous, i.e. not associated with the targets of the pointings. This makes our catalogue the largest compilation of Chandra sources to date. The 0.5-10keV absorption corrected fluxes of these sources range from 3E-16 to 9E-12 erg/cm2/s with a median of 7E-15 erg/cm2/s. The catalogue consists of count rates and relative errors in three energy bands (total, 0.5-7keV; soft, 0.5-2keV; and hard, 2-7keV), where the detection was performed, and source positions relative to the highest signal-to-noise detection among the three bands. The wavelet algorithm also provides an estimate...

  1. Chandra Cluster Cosmology Project. II. Samples and X-Ray Data Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikhlinin, A.; Burenin, R. A.; Ebeling, H.;

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the measurements of the galaxy cluster mass functions at z ≈ 0.05 and z ≈ 0.5 using high-quality Chandra observations of samples derived from the ROSAT PSPC All-Sky and 400 deg2 surveys. We provide a full reference for the data analysis procedures, present updated calibration of relati...

  2. The Chandra ACIS Timing Survey Project: glimpsing a sample of faint X-ray pulsators

    CERN Document Server

    Israel, Gian Luca; Castillo, Guillermo Andres Rodriguez; Sidoli, Lara

    2016-01-01

    We report on the discovery of 41 new pulsating sources in the data of the Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, which is sensitive to X-ray photons in the 0.3-10 keV band. The archival data of the first 15 years of Chandra observations were retrieved and analysed by means of fast Fourier transforms, employing a peak-detection algorithm able to screen candidate signals in an automatic fashion. We carried out the search for new X-ray pulsators in light curves with more than 50 photons, for a total of about 190,000 lightcurves out of about 430,000 extracted. With these numbers, the ChAndra Timing Survey at Brera And Roma astronomical observatories (CATS@BAR) - as we called the project - represents the largest ever systematic search for coherent signals in the classic X-ray band. More than 50 per cent of the signals were confirmed by further Chandra (for those sources with two or more pointings), XMM-Newton or ROSAT data. The period distribution of the new X-ray pulsators above about 2,000s resembles that of...

  3. Intrinsic Absorption in the Spectrum of Mrk 279: Simultaneous Chandra, FUSE, and STIS Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, J E; Lee, J C; Arav, N; Ogle, P M; Roraback, K; Weaver, K; Alexander, T; Brotherton, M; Green, R F; Hutchings, J B; Kaiser, M E; Marshall, H; Oegerle, W; Zheng, W; Scott, Jennifer E.; Kriss, Gerard A.; Lee, Julia C.; Arav, Nahum; Ogle, Patrick; Roraback, Kenneth; Weaver, Kimberly; Alexander, Tal; Brotherton, Michael; Green, Richard F.; Hutchings, John; Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; Marshall, Herman; Oegerle, William; Zheng, Wei

    2004-01-01

    We present a study of the intrinsic X-ray and far-ultraviolet absorption in the Seyfert 1.5 galaxy Markarian 279 using simultaneous observations from the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope, and the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). We also present FUSE observations made at three additional epochs. We detect the Fe K-alpha emission line in the Chandra spectrum, and its flux is consistent with the low X-ray continuum flux level of Mrk 279 at the time of the observation. Due to low signal-to-noise ratios in the Chandra spectrum, no O VII or O VIII absorption features are observable in the Chandra data, but the UV spectra reveal strong and complex absorption from HI and high-ionization species such as O VI, N V, and C IV, as well as from low-ionization species such as C III, N III, C II, and N II in some velocity components. The far-UV spectral coverage of the FUSE data provides information on high-order Lyman series absorption, which...

  4. Acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of some selected Nigerian medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiwo O. Elufioye

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Plants have been found to be useful as memory enhansers as well as antiaging. Twenty two of such plants from sixteen families were investigated for their acetylcholinesterase (AChE and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE inhibitory activities using the in vitro Ellman's spectrophotometric and in situ bioautographic methods with physostigmine as standard. At least three morphological parts were examined for each of the plants investigated and the test concentration was 42.5 µg/ mL. Some plants were active on both enzymes though with some morphological parts being more active than others. The root bark of Spondias mombin showed the highest activity to the two enzymes; 64.77% and 83.94% on AChE and BuChE respectively. Other plant parts of the selected plants exhibited some remarkable selectivity in their actions. Those selectively active against AChE were Alchornia laxiflora stem bark (41.12% and root bark, Callophyllum inophyllurn root bark (56.52%. The leaves of C. jagus (74.25%, Morinda lucida leaves (40.15%, Peltophorum pterocarpum leaves and stem bark (49.5% and 68.85%, respectively, physiostigmine gave 90.31% inhibition. Generally higher activities were found against BuChE. Bombax bromoposenze leaves, root bark and stem bark were particularly active. The inhibition was over 80%. Other selective plant parts are the leaves Antiaris africana, Cissampelos owarensis aerial parts (78.96%, Combretum molle leaves and stem bark (90.42% and 88.13%, respectively, Dioscorea dumentorum root bark and tuber (over 87%, G. kola leaves, Markhamia tomentosa root bark, Pycnanthus angolensis stem bark and Tetrapleura tetraptera leaves. Most of these plants are taken as food or are food ingredients in Nigeria and may account for the low incidence of Alzheimer's disease in the country and may play certain roles in the mediation of the disease.

  5. An investigation of the impact of selected prereading activities on student content learning through laboratory activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, Jesse (Shaya)

    This study investigated whether two prereading activities impacted student learning from hands-on science activities. The study was based on constructivist learning theory. Based on the work of Piaget, it was hypothesized that students who activated prior knowledge would learn more from the activities. Based on the work of Vygotsky it was hypothesized that students who talk more and write more would learn more from the activity. The K-W-L chart and anticipation guide strategies were used with eighth grade students at Graves Middle School in Whittier, California before learning about levers and convection currents. D. M. Ogle (1986) created the three-column K-W-L chart to have students activate prior knowledge. In the first column, the students write what they already know about a subject, in the second column, the students write what they want to know about the subject, and the students complete the third column after learning about a subject by writing answers to the questions that they asked in the second column. Duffelmeyer (1994) created the anticipation guide based on Herber's (1978) reasoning guide. In the anticipation guide, the teacher creates three or four sentences that convey the major ideas of the topic and the students either agree or disagree with the statements. After learning about the topic, students revisit their answers and decide if they were correct or incorrect and they must defend their choices. This research used the Solomon (1947) four-square design and compared both the experimental groups to a control group that simply discussed the concepts before completing the activity. The research showed no significant difference between the control group and either of the treatment groups. The reasons for the lack of significant differences are considered. It was hypothesized that since the students were unfamiliar with the prereading activities and did not have much experience with using either writing-to-learn or talking-to-learn strategies, the

  6. Resolving galaxy cluster gas properties at z ∼ 1 with XMM-Newton and Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartalucci, I.; Arnaud, M.; Pratt, G. W.; Démoclès, J.; van der Burg, R. F. J.; Mazzotta, P.

    2017-02-01

    Massive, high-redshift, galaxy clusters are useful laboratories to test cosmological models and to probe structure formation and evolution, but observations are challenging due to cosmological dimming and angular distance effects. Here we present a pilot X-ray study of the five most massive (M500 > 5 × 1014M⊙), distant (z 1), clusters detected via the Sunyaev-Zel'Dovich effect. We optimally combine XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations by leveraging the throughput of XMM-Newton to obtain spatially-resolved spectroscopy, and the spatial resolution of Chandra to probe the bright inner parts and to detect embedded point sources. Capitalising on the excellent agreement in flux-related measurements, we present a new method to derive the density profiles, which are constrained in the centre by Chandra and in the outskirts by XMM-Newton. We show that the Chandra-XMM-Newton combination is fundamental for morphological analysis at these redshifts, the Chandra resolution being required to remove point source contamination, and the XMM-Newton sensitivity allowing higher significance detection of faint substructures. Measuring the morphology using images from both instruments, we found that the sample is dominated by dynamically disturbed objects. We use the combined Chandra-XMM-Newton density profiles and spatially-resolved temperature profiles to investigate thermodynamic quantities including entropy and pressure. From comparison of the scaled profiles with the local REXCESS sample, we find no significant departure from standard self-similar evolution, within the dispersion, at any radius, except for the entropy beyond 0.7 R500. The baryon mass fraction tends towards the cosmic value, with a weaker dependence on mass than that observed in the local Universe. We make a comparison with the predictions from numerical simulations. The present pilot study demonstrates the utility and feasibility of spatially-resolved analysis of individual objects at high-redshift through

  7. Selection of Psychrotolerant Microorganisms Producing Cold-Active Pectinases for Biotechnological Processes at Low Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María S. Cabeza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In winemaking, low temperatures are favourable for the production and retention of flavour and colour components, requiring the use of cold-active enzymes. For this reason, 'psychrotolerant' microorganisms have been isolated and selected based on their ability to produce pectinolytic enzymes with satisfactory activity at low temperatures. Different mature grape varieties with designation of origin were sampled from the region of San Rafael (Mendoza, Argentina, and pectinolytic bacterial, fungal and yeast strains were isolated. The pectinolytic activity was measured by cup-plate assay, quantification of released reducing sugars and viscosity reduction of pectin solution. Two bacteria (Bacillus sp. SC-G and SC-H and two yeast strains were selected for their good pectinase activity at low temperatures. Among them, the strain with the highest activity, Bacillus sp. SC-H, was selected. According to their 16S rRNA profiles, Bacillus sp. SC-G and SC-H can be classified as members of Bacillus subtilis. Among the assayed techniques, the rotary evaporation was found to be the most appropriate to obtain enzymatic extracts with highest activity. The optimal conditions for the enzymatic activity were 30 °C and pH=5.0 for the concentrated extract, and 45 °C and pH=6.0 for the filtered supernatant. The concentrated extract presented good activity at 3 °C, confirming that it was a cold-active enzyme. Natural extraction and enzymatic preparation were used to extract pigments and polyphenols from Malbec grapes. Better results were obtained for the enzymatic extract with regard to index, shade, CIELab coordinates, CIELab colour differences and polyphenols (measured using Folin-Ciocalteu.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Chandra obs. of ultracompact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) (Pandya+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, V.; Mulchaey, J.; Greene, J. E.

    2016-05-01

    We present the first comprehensive archival study of the X-ray properties of ultracompact dwarf (UCD) galaxies, with the goal of identifying weakly accreting central black holes in UCDs. Our study spans 578 UCDs distributed across 13 different host systems, including clusters, groups, fossil groups, and isolated galaxies. Of the 336 spectroscopically confirmed UCDs with usable archival Chandra imaging observations, 21 are X-ray-detected. Imposing a completeness limit of LX>2x1038erg/s, the global X-ray detection fraction for the UCD population is ~3%. Of the 21 X-ray-detected UCDs, seven show evidence of long-term X-ray time variability on the order of months to years. X-ray-detected UCDs tend to be more compact than non-X-ray-detected UCDs, and we find tentative evidence that the X-ray detection fraction increases with surface luminosity density and global stellar velocity dispersion. The X-ray emission of UCDs is fully consistent with arising from a population of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). In fact, there are fewer X-ray sources than expected using a naive extrapolation from globular clusters. Invoking the fundamental plane of black hole activity for SUCD1 near the Sombrero galaxy, for which archival Jansky Very Large Array imaging at 5GHz is publicly available, we set an upper limit on the mass of a hypothetical central black hole in that UCD to be X-rays alone, and so we address the utility of follow-up radio observations to find weakly accreting central black holes. (3 data files).

  9. The Norma arm region Chandra survey catalog: X-ray populations in the spiral arms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornasini, Francesca M. [Astronomy Department, University of California, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Tomsick, John A.; Bodaghee, Arash; Krivonos, Roman A. [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); An, Hongjun [Department of Physics, McGill University, Rutherford Physics Building, 3600 University Street, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Rahoui, Farid [European Southern Observatory, Karl Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Gotthelf, Eric V. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Bauer, Franz E. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Stern, Daniel, E-mail: f.fornasini@berkeley.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, MS 169-506, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    We present a catalog of 1415 X-ray sources identified in the Norma Arm Region Chandra Survey (NARCS), which covers a 2° × 0.°8 region in the direction of the Norma spiral arm to a depth of ≈20 ks. Of these sources, 1130 are point-like sources detected with ≥3σ confidence in at least one of three energy bands (0.5-10, 0.5-2, and 2-10 keV), five have extended emission, and the remainder are detected at low significance. Since most sources have too few counts to permit individual classification, they are divided into five spectral groups defined by their quantile properties. We analyze stacked spectra of X-ray sources within each group, in conjunction with their fluxes, variability, and infrared counterparts, to identify the dominant populations in our survey. We find that ∼50% of our sources are foreground sources located within 1-2 kpc, which is consistent with expectations from previous surveys. Approximately 20% of sources are likely located in the proximity of the Scutum-Crux and near Norma arm, while 30% are more distant, in the proximity of the far Norma arm or beyond. We argue that a mixture of magnetic and nonmagnetic cataclysmic variables dominates the Scutum-Crux and near Norma arms, while intermediate polars and high-mass stars (isolated or in binaries) dominate the far Norma arm. We also present the cumulative number count distribution for sources in our survey that are detected in the hard energy band. A population of very hard sources in the vicinity of the far Norma arm and active galactic nuclei dominate the hard X-ray emission down to f{sub X} ≈ 10{sup –14} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}, but the distribution curve flattens at fainter fluxes. We find good agreement between the observed distribution and predictions based on other surveys.

  10. A competitive inhibitory circuit for selection of active and passive fear responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadok, Jonathan P; Krabbe, Sabine; Markovic, Milica; Courtin, Julien; Xu, Chun; Massi, Lema; Botta, Paolo; Bylund, Kristine; Müller, Christian; Kovacevic, Aleksandar; Tovote, Philip; Lüthi, Andreas

    2017-02-02

    When faced with threat, the survival of an organism is contingent upon the selection of appropriate active or passive behavioural responses. Freezing is an evolutionarily conserved passive fear response that has been used extensively to study the neuronal mechanisms of fear and fear conditioning in rodents. However, rodents also exhibit active responses such as flight under natural conditions. The central amygdala (CEA) is a forebrain structure vital for the acquisition and expression of conditioned fear responses, and the role of specific neuronal sub-populations of the CEA in freezing behaviour is well-established. Whether the CEA is also involved in flight behaviour, and how neuronal circuits for active and passive fear behaviour interact within the CEA, are not yet understood. Here, using in vivo optogenetics and extracellular recordings of identified cell types in a behavioural model in which mice switch between conditioned freezing and flight, we show that active and passive fear responses are mediated by distinct and mutually inhibitory CEA neurons. Cells expressing corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF(+)) mediate conditioned flight, and activation of somatostatin-positive (SOM(+)) neurons initiates passive freezing behaviour. Moreover, we find that the balance between conditioned flight and freezing behaviour is regulated by means of local inhibitory connections between CRF(+) and SOM(+) neurons, indicating that the selection of appropriate behavioural responses to threat is based on competitive interactions between two defined populations of inhibitory neurons, a circuit motif allowing for rapid and flexible action selection.

  11. Which Approach Is More Effective in the Selection of Plants with Antimicrobial Activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ana Carolina Oliveira; Santana, Elidiane Fonseca; Saraiva, Antonio Marcos; Coutinho, Felipe Neves; Castro, Ricardo Henrique Acre; Pisciottano, Maria Nelly Caetano; Amorim, Elba Lúcia Cavalcanti; Albuquerque, Ulysses Paulino

    2013-01-01

    The development of the present study was based on selections using random, direct ethnopharmacological, and indirect ethnopharmacological approaches, aiming to evaluate which method is the best for bioprospecting new antimicrobial plant drugs. A crude extract of 53 species of herbaceous plants collected in the semiarid region of Northeast Brazil was tested against 11 microorganisms. Well-agar diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) techniques were used. Ten extracts from direct, six from random, and three from indirect ethnopharmacological selections exhibited activities that ranged from weak to very active against the organisms tested. The strain most susceptible to the evaluated extracts was Staphylococcus aureus. The MIC analysis revealed the best result for the direct ethnopharmacological approach, considering that some species yielded extracts classified as active or moderately active (MICs between 250 and 1000 µg/mL). Furthermore, one species from this approach inhibited the growth of the three Candida strains. Thus, it was concluded that the direct ethnopharmacological approach is the most effective when selecting species for bioprospecting new plant drugs with antimicrobial activities. PMID:23878595

  12. Which Approach Is More Effective in the Selection of Plants with Antimicrobial Activity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Oliveira Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of the present study was based on selections using random, direct ethnopharmacological, and indirect ethnopharmacological approaches, aiming to evaluate which method is the best for bioprospecting new antimicrobial plant drugs. A crude extract of 53 species of herbaceous plants collected in the semiarid region of Northeast Brazil was tested against 11 microorganisms. Well-agar diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC techniques were used. Ten extracts from direct, six from random, and three from indirect ethnopharmacological selections exhibited activities that ranged from weak to very active against the organisms tested. The strain most susceptible to the evaluated extracts was Staphylococcus aureus. The MIC analysis revealed the best result for the direct ethnopharmacological approach, considering that some species yielded extracts classified as active or moderately active (MICs between 250 and 1000 µg/mL. Furthermore, one species from this approach inhibited the growth of the three Candida strains. Thus, it was concluded that the direct ethnopharmacological approach is the most effective when selecting species for bioprospecting new plant drugs with antimicrobial activities.

  13. Synthesis and Preliminary Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Activity of Selected 3-Benzofurancarboxylic Acid Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Wolska

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Halogen derivatives of selected 3-benzofurancarboxylic acids were prepared using 6-acetyl-5-hydroxy-2-methyl-3-benzofuranocarboxylic acid as starting material. 1H-NMR spectra were obtained for all of the synthesized structures, and for compound VI, an X-ray crystal structure was also obtained. All derivatives were tested for antimicrobial activity against a selection of Gram-positive cocci, Gram-negative rods and yeasts. Three compounds, III, IV, and VI, showed antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria (MIC 50 to 200 mg/mL. Compounds VI and III exhibited antifungal activity against the Candida strains C. albicans and C. parapsilosis (MIC – 100 mg/mL.

  14. Comparison of antioxidant activity of Moringa oleifera and selected vegetables in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vusumzi Pakade

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant activity of the leaves and flowers of the Moringaoleifera plant were investigated and the results were compared to those of selected vegetables (cabbage, spinach, broccoli, cauliflower and peas. Antioxidant activity was determined by analysing the total phenolics content, total flavonoids content, reducing power and radical scavenging activity using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical method. The total phenolics content of moringa was almost twice that of the vegetables and the total flavonoids content was three times that of the selected vegetables. The reducing power of moringa was higher than that of the vegetables and the percentage of free radicals remaining was lower compared with the vegetables. These results combined show that moringa is a good source of antioxidants. This finding also explains why moringa forms part of the diet of people in many developing countries, especially in the southern hemisphere.

  15. 1990 Nationwide Truck Activity and Commodity Survey selected tabulations. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    The Nationwide Truck Activity and Commodity Survey (NTACS) provides detailed activity data for a sample of trucks covered in the 1987 Truck Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS) for days selected at random over a 12-month period ending in 1990. The NTACS was conducted by the US Bureau of the Census for the US Department of Transportation (DOT). A Public Use File for the NTACS was developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under a reimbursable agreement with the DOT. The content of the Public Use File and the detailed design of the NTACS are described in the ORNL Report {open_quotes}Technical Documentation for the 1990 Nationwide Truck Activity and Commodity Survey Public Use File{close_quotes}. (1992). ORNL Technical Report No. TM-12188, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831. The main purpose of this summary report is to provide selected tables based on the public use file.

  16. The Chandra ACIS Timing Survey Project: glimpsing a sample of faint X-ray pulsators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, G. L.; Esposito, P.; Rodríguez Castillo, G. A.; Sidoli, L.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the discovery of 41 new pulsating sources in the data of the Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, which is sensitive to X-ray photons in the 0.3-10 keV band. The archival data of the first 15 yr of Chandra observations were retrieved and analysed by means of fast Fourier transforms, employing a peak-detection algorithm able to screen candidate signals in an automatic fashion. We carried out the search for new X-ray pulsators in light curves with more than 50 photons, for a total of about 190 000 light curves out of about 430 000 extracted. With these numbers, the ChAndra Timing Survey at Brera And Roma astronomical observatories (CATS @ BAR) - as we called the project - represents the largest ever systematic search for coherent signals in the classic X-ray band. More than 50 per cent of the signals were confirmed by further Chandra (for those sources with two or more pointings), XMM-Newton or ROSAT data. The period distribution of the new X-ray pulsators above ˜2000 s resembles that of cataclysmic variables, while there is a paucity of sources with shorter period and low fluxes. Since there is not an obvious bias against these detections, a possible interpretation is in terms of a magnetic gating mechanism in accreting neutron stars. Finally, we note that CATS @ BAR is a living project and the detection algorithm will continue to be routinely applied to the new Chandra data as they become public. Based on the results obtained so far, we expect to discover about three new pulsators every year.

  17. Structural insights into human peroxisome proliferator activated receptor delta (PPAR-delta selective ligand binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda A H Batista

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs δ, α and γ are closely related transcription factors that exert distinct effects on fatty acid and glucose metabolism, cardiac disease, inflammatory response and other processes. Several groups developed PPAR subtype specific modulators to trigger desirable effects of particular PPARs without harmful side effects associated with activation of other subtypes. Presently, however, many compounds that bind to one of the PPARs cross-react with others and rational strategies to obtain highly selective PPAR modulators are far from clear. GW0742 is a synthetic ligand that binds PPARδ more than 300-fold more tightly than PPARα or PPARγ but the structural basis of PPARδ:GW0742 interactions and reasons for strong selectivity are not clear. Here we report the crystal structure of the PPARδ:GW0742 complex. Comparisons of the PPARδ:GW0742 complex with published structures of PPARs in complex with α and γ selective agonists and pan agonists suggests that two residues (Val312 and Ile328 in the buried hormone binding pocket play special roles in PPARδ selective binding and experimental and computational analysis of effects of mutations in these residues confirms this and suggests that bulky substituents that line the PPARα and γ ligand binding pockets as structural barriers for GW0742 binding. This analysis suggests general strategies for selective PPARδ ligand design.

  18. A four-dimensional virtual hand brain-machine interface using active dimension selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Adam G.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) traditionally rely on a fixed, linear transformation from neural signals to an output state-space. In this study, the assumption that a BMI must control a fixed, orthogonal basis set was challenged and a novel active dimension selection (ADS) decoder was explored. Approach. ADS utilizes a two stage decoder by using neural signals to both (i) select an active dimension being controlled and (ii) control the velocity along the selected dimension. ADS decoding was tested in a monkey using 16 single units from premotor and primary motor cortex to successfully control a virtual hand avatar to move to eight different postures. Main results. Following training with the ADS decoder to control 2, 3, and then 4 dimensions, each emulating a grasp shape of the hand, performance reached 93% correct with a bit rate of 2.4 bits s-1 for eight targets. Selection of eight targets using ADS control was more efficient, as measured by bit rate, than either full four-dimensional control or computer assisted one-dimensional control. Significance. ADS decoding allows a user to quickly and efficiently select different hand postures. This novel decoding scheme represents a potential method to reduce the complexity of high-dimension BMI control of the hand.

  19. Selective activation of parvalbumin- or somatostatin-expressing interneurons triggers epileptic seizurelike activity in mouse medial entorhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekhlef, Latefa; Breschi, Gian Luca; Lagostena, Laura; Russo, Giovanni; Taverna, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    GABAergic interneurons are thought to play a critical role in eliciting interictal spikes (IICs) and triggering ictal discharges in temporal lobe epilepsy, yet the contribution of different interneuronal subtypes to seizure initiation is still largely unknown. Here we took advantage of optogenetic techniques combined with patch-clamp and field recordings to selectively stimulate parvalbumin (PV)- or somatostatin (SOM)-positive interneurons expressing channelrhodopsin-2 (CHR-2) in layers II-III of adult mouse medial entorhinal cortical slices during extracellular perfusion with the proconvulsive compound 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, 100-200 μM). In control conditions, blue laser photostimulation selectively activated action potential firing in either PV or SOM interneurons and, in both cases, caused a robust GABAA-receptor-mediated inhibition in pyramidal cells (PCs). During perfusion with 4-AP, brief photostimuli (300 ms) activating either PV or SOM interneurons induced patterns of epileptiform activity that closely replicated spontaneously occurring IICs and tonic-clonic ictal discharges. Laser-induced synchronous firing in both interneuronal types elicited large compound GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) correlating with IICs and preictal spikes. In addition, spontaneous and laser-induced epileptic events were similarly initiated in concurrence with a large increase in extracellular potassium concentration. Finally, interneuron activation was unable to stop or significantly shorten the progression of seizurelike episodes. These results suggest that entorhinal PV and SOM interneurons are nearly equally effective in triggering interictal and ictal discharges that closely resemble human temporal lobe epileptic activity.

  20. Anti-microbial activity and anti-complement activity of extracts obtained from selected Hawaiian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locher, C P; Burch, M T; Mower, H F; Berestecky, J; Davis, H; Van Poel, B; Lasure, A; Vanden Berghe, D A; Vlietinck, A J

    1995-11-17

    Selected plants having a history of use in Polynesian traditional medicine for the treatment of infectious disease were investigated for anti-viral, anti-fungal and anti-bacterial activity in vitro. Extracts from Scaevola sericea, Psychotria hawaiiensis, Pipturus albidus and Eugenia malaccensis showed selective anti-viral activity against Herpes Simplex Virus-1 and 2 and Vesicular Stomatitis Virus. Aleurites moluccana extracts showed anti-bacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, while Pipturus albidus and Eugenia malaccensis extracts showed growth inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. Psychotria hawaiiensis and Solanum niger inhibited growth of the fungi Microsporum canis, Trichophyton rubrum and Epidermophyton floccosum, while Ipomoea sp., Pipturus albidus, Scaevola sericea, Eugenia malaccensis, Piper methysticum, Barringtonia asiatica and Adansonia digitata extracts showed anti-fungal activity to a lesser extent. Eugenia malaccensis was also found to inhibit the classical pathway of complement suggesting that an immunological basis for its in vivo activity was identified. This study has confirmed some of the ethnobotanical reports of Hawaiian medicinal plants having curative properties against infections using biological assays in vitro.

  1. Identification of Anabolic Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators with Reduced Activities in Reproductive Tissues and Sebaceous Glands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Azriel; Harada, Shun-Ichi; Kimmel, Donald B.; Bai, Chang; Chen, Fang; Rutledge, Su Jane; Vogel, Robert L.; Scafonas, Angela; Gentile, Michael A.; Nantermet, Pascale V.; McElwee-Witmer, Sheila; Pennypacker, Brenda; Masarachia, Patricia; Sahoo, Soumya P.; Kim, Yuntae; Meissner, Robert S.; Hartman, George D.; Duggan, Mark E.; Rodan, Gideon A.; Towler, Dwight A.; Ray, William J.

    2009-01-01

    Androgen replacement therapy is a promising strategy for the treatment of frailty; however, androgens pose risks for unwanted effects including virilization and hypertrophy of reproductive organs. Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs) retain the anabolic properties of androgens in bone and muscle while having reduced effects in other tissues. We describe two structurally similar 4-aza-steroidal androgen receptor (AR) ligands, Cl-4AS-1, a full agonist, and TFM-4AS-1, which is a SARM. TFM-4AS-1 is a potent AR ligand (IC50, 38 nm) that partially activates an AR-dependent MMTV promoter (55% of maximal response) while antagonizing the N-terminal/C-terminal interaction within AR that is required for full receptor activation. Microarray analyses of MDA-MB-453 cells show that whereas Cl-4AS-1 behaves like 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), TFM-4AS-1 acts as a gene-selective agonist, inducing some genes as effectively as DHT and others to a lesser extent or not at all. This gene-selective agonism manifests as tissue-selectivity: in ovariectomized rats, Cl-4AS-1 mimics DHT while TFM-4AS-1 promotes the accrual of bone and muscle mass while having reduced effects on reproductive organs and sebaceous glands. Moreover, TFM-4AS-1 does not promote prostate growth and antagonizes DHT in seminal vesicles. To confirm that the biochemical properties of TFM-4AS-1 confer tissue selectivity, we identified a structurally unrelated compound, FTBU-1, with partial agonist activity coupled with antagonism of the N-terminal/C-terminal interaction and found that it also behaves as a SARM. TFM-4AS-1 and FTBU-1 represent two new classes of SARMs and will allow for comparative studies aimed at understanding the biophysical and physiological basis of tissue-selective effects of nuclear receptor ligands. PMID:19846549

  2. Identification of anabolic selective androgen receptor modulators with reduced activities in reproductive tissues and sebaceous glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Azriel; Harada, Shun-Ichi; Kimmel, Donald B; Bai, Chang; Chen, Fang; Rutledge, Su Jane; Vogel, Robert L; Scafonas, Angela; Gentile, Michael A; Nantermet, Pascale V; McElwee-Witmer, Sheila; Pennypacker, Brenda; Masarachia, Patricia; Sahoo, Soumya P; Kim, Yuntae; Meissner, Robert S; Hartman, George D; Duggan, Mark E; Rodan, Gideon A; Towler, Dwight A; Ray, William J

    2009-12-25

    Androgen replacement therapy is a promising strategy for the treatment of frailty; however, androgens pose risks for unwanted effects including virilization and hypertrophy of reproductive organs. Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs) retain the anabolic properties of androgens in bone and muscle while having reduced effects in other tissues. We describe two structurally similar 4-aza-steroidal androgen receptor (AR) ligands, Cl-4AS-1, a full agonist, and TFM-4AS-1, which is a SARM. TFM-4AS-1 is a potent AR ligand (IC(50), 38 nm) that partially activates an AR-dependent MMTV promoter (55% of maximal response) while antagonizing the N-terminal/C-terminal interaction within AR that is required for full receptor activation. Microarray analyses of MDA-MB-453 cells show that whereas Cl-4AS-1 behaves like 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), TFM-4AS-1 acts as a gene-selective agonist, inducing some genes as effectively as DHT and others to a lesser extent or not at all. This gene-selective agonism manifests as tissue-selectivity: in ovariectomized rats, Cl-4AS-1 mimics DHT while TFM-4AS-1 promotes the accrual of bone and muscle mass while having reduced effects on reproductive organs and sebaceous glands. Moreover, TFM-4AS-1 does not promote prostate growth and antagonizes DHT in seminal vesicles. To confirm that the biochemical properties of TFM-4AS-1 confer tissue selectivity, we identified a structurally unrelated compound, FTBU-1, with partial agonist activity coupled with antagonism of the N-terminal/C-terminal interaction and found that it also behaves as a SARM. TFM-4AS-1 and FTBU-1 represent two new classes of SARMs and will allow for comparative studies aimed at understanding the biophysical and physiological basis of tissue-selective effects of nuclear receptor ligands.

  3. Neochromine S5 improves contact hypersensitivity through a selective effect on activated T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhe; Ma, Yuxiang; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Xiong; Zhou, Hang; Liu, Hailiang; Zhou, Yang; Wu, Xuefeng; Shen, Yan; Sun, Yang; Li, Jianxin; Wu, Xudong; Xu, Qiang

    2014-11-15

    Strategy on activated T cells is an effective treatment for T cell mediated diseases. By using a synthesized chromone derivative, we examined its effects on the activated T cells. This compound, (Z)-1,3-dihydroxy-9-methyl-13H-benzo[b]chromeno[3,2-f][1,4]oxazepin-13-one (neochromine S5), exhibited immunosuppressive activity in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, neochromine S5 selectively inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in T lymphocytes activated by concanavalin A (Con A) in a dose-dependent manner but not in naïve T lymphocytes, distinct from quercetin. This compound triggered mitochondrial apoptotic pathway including cleavage of caspase 3, caspase 9 and PARP, downregulation of bcl-2 and release of cytochrome c in activated T cells, but did not affect ER stress or Fas signals. In addition, neochromine S5 downregulated the expression of CD25 and CD69 and the production of inflammatory cytokines, including TNFα, IFNγ and IL-2, improved ear swelling in mice with contact hypersensitivity, reduced CD4(+) T cells infiltration, and increased apoptosis of isolated T lymphocytes from peripheral lymph nodes. Moreover, neochromine S5 showed no effect on the weight of mice and their immune organs, while dexamethasone caused a significant weight loss. Taken together, our results suggest that neochromine S5 exerts a unique anti-inflammatory activity mainly through a selective effect on activated T cells, which is different from the current immunosuppressant, dexamethasone.

  4. In vitro antiprotozoal activities and cytotoxicity of some selected Cameroonian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndjakou Lenta, B; Vonthron-Sénécheau, C; Fongang Soh, R; Tantangmo, F; Ngouela, S; Kaiser, M; Tsamo, E; Anton, R; Weniger, B

    2007-04-20

    Eight extracts from seven selected Cameroonian medicinal plants, traditionally used to treat malaria and other protozoal diseases, were tested in vitro for their antiprotozoal activities against Plasmodium falciparum K1 chloroquine-resistant strain, Leishmania donovani, Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, protozoa responsible for malaria, visceral leishmaniasis, Chagas disease and African trypanosomiasis, respectively. The most active extract against Plasmodium falciparum K1 strain and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense was the methanolic extract of Albizia zygia (Fabaceae) stem bark with IC(50) values of 1.0 microg/ml and 0.2 microg/ml, respectively. Five extracts showed IC(50) values below 5mug/ml against Leishmania donovani, with the methanolic seed extract of Harungana madagascarensis showing the highest activity, but only the methanolic extract of Albizia zygia showed activity against Trypanosoma cruzi. Cytotoxicity and selectivity indexes were estimated for the most active extracts. The best ratio of cytotoxicity to antiplasmodial activity (SI(a)=14) was established for the methanolic leaf extract of Symphonia globulifera (Clusiaceae), while the methanolic stem bark extract of Albizia zygia showed the best ratio of cytotoxicity to antitrypanosomal activity (SI(b)=22.5).

  5. The use of EMG biofeedback for learning of selective activation of intra-muscular parts within the serratus anterior muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtermann, A; Mork, P J; Andersen, L L

    2010-01-01

    Motor control and learning possibilities of scapular muscles are of clinical interest for restoring scapular muscle balance in patients with neck and shoulder disorders. The aim of the study was to investigate whether selective voluntary activation of intra-muscular parts within the serratus...... anterior can be learned with electromyographical (EMG) biofeedback, and whether the lower serratus anterior and the lower trapezius muscle comprise the lower scapula rotation force couple by synergistic activation. Nine healthy males practiced selective activation of intra-muscular parts within...... to selectively activate the lower serratus anterior, and two subjects learned to selectively activate the upper serratus anterior. During selective activation of the lower serratus anterior, the activity of this muscle part was 14.4+/-10.3 times higher than the upper serratus anterior activity (P

  6. Selective activation of the human tibial and common peroneal nerves with a flat interface nerve electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiefer, M. A.; Freeberg, M.; Pinault, G. J. C.; Anderson, J.; Hoyen, H.; Tyler, D. J.; Triolo, R. J.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Electrical stimulation has been shown effective in restoring basic lower extremity motor function in individuals with paralysis. We tested the hypothesis that a flat interface nerve electrode (FINE) placed around the human tibial or common peroneal nerve above the knee can selectively activate each of the most important muscles these nerves innervate for use in a neuroprosthesis to control ankle motion. Approach. During intraoperative trials involving three subjects, an eight-contact FINE was placed around the tibial and/or common peroneal nerve, proximal to the popliteal fossa. The FINE's ability to selectively recruit muscles innervated by these nerves was assessed. Data were used to estimate the potential to restore active plantarflexion or dorsiflexion while balancing inversion and eversion using a biomechanical simulation. Main results. With minimal spillover to non-targets, at least three of the four targets in the tibial nerve, including two of the three muscles constituting the triceps surae, were independently and selectively recruited in all subjects. As acceptable levels of spillover increased, recruitment of the target muscles increased. Selective activation of muscles innervated by the peroneal nerve was more challenging. Significance. Estimated joint moments suggest that plantarflexion sufficient for propulsion during stance phase of gait and dorsiflexion sufficient to prevent foot drop during swing can be achieved, accompanied by a small but tolerable inversion or eversion moment.

  7. Improvement of aromatic thiol release through the selection of yeasts with increased β-lyase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belda, Ignacio; Ruiz, Javier; Navascués, Eva; Marquina, Domingo; Santos, Antonio

    2016-05-16

    The development of a selective medium for the rapid differentiation of yeast species with increased aromatic thiol release activity has been achieved. The selective medium was based on the addition of S-methyl-l-cysteine (SMC) as β-lyase substrate. In this study, a panel of 245 strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains was tested for their ability to grow on YCB-SMC medium. Yeast strains with an increased β-lyase activity grew rapidly because of their ability to release ammonium from SMC in comparison to others, and allowed for the easy isolation and differentiation of yeasts with promising properties in oenology, or another field, for aromatic thiol release. The selective medium was also helpful for the discrimination between those S. cerevisiae strains, which present a common 38-bp deletion in the IRC7 sequence (present in around 88% of the wild strains tested and are likely to be less functional for 4-mercapto-4-methylpentan-2-one (4MMP) production), and those S. cerevisiae strains homozygous for the full-length IRC7 allele. The medium was also helpful for the selection of non-Saccharomyces yeasts with increased β-lyase activity. Based on the same medium, a highly sensitive, reproducible and non-expensive GC-MS method for the evaluation of the potential volatile thiol release by different yeast isolates was developed.

  8. Enhancement of bimetallic Fe-Mn/CNTs nano catalyst activity and product selectivity using microemulsion technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zahra; Zolfaghari; Ahmad; Tavasoli; Saber; Tabyar; Ali; Nakhaei; Pour

    2014-01-01

    Bimetallic Fe-Mn nano catalysts supported on carbon nanotubes(CNTs) were prepared using microemulsion technique with water-to-surfactant ratios of 0.4-1.6. The nano catalysts were extensively characterized by different methods and their activity and selectivity in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis(FTS) have been assessed in a fixed-bed microreactor. The physicochemical properties and performance of the nanocatalysts were compared with the catalyst prepared by impregnation method. Very narrow particle size distribution has been produced by the microemulsion technique at relatively high loading of active metal. TEM images showed that small metal nano particles in the range of 3–7 nm were not only confined inside the CNTs but also located on the outer surface of the CNTs. Using microemulsion technique with water to surfactant ratio of0.4 decreased the average iron particle sizes to 5.1 nm. The reduction percentage and dispersion percentage were almost doubled. Activity and selectivity were found to be dependent on the catalyst preparation method and average iron particle size. CO conversion and FTS rate increased from 49.1% to 71.0% and 0.144 to 0.289 gHC/(gcat h), respectively. While the WGS rate decreased from 0.097 to 0.056 gCO2/(gcat h). C5+liquid hydrocarbons selectivity decreased slightly and olefins selectivity almost doubled.

  9. The role of surface reactions on the active and selective catalyst design for bioethanol steam reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, M.; Padilla, R.; Serrano-Lotina, A.; Rodríguez, L.; Brey, J. J.; Daza, L.

    In order to study the role of surface reactions involved in bioethanol steam reforming mechanism, a very active and selective catalyst for hydrogen production was analysed. The highest activity was obtained at 700 °C, temperature at which the catalyst achieved an ethanol conversion of 100% and a selectivity to hydrogen close to 70%. It also exhibited a very high hydrogen production efficiency, higher than 4.5 mol H 2 per mol of EtOH fed. The catalyst was operated at a steam to carbon ratio (S/C) of 4.8, at 700 °C and atmospheric pressure. No by-products, such as ethylene or acetaldehyde were observed. In order to consider a further application in an ethanol processor, a long-term stability test was performed under the conditions previously reported. After 750 h, the catalyst still exhibited a high stability and selectivity to hydrogen production. Based on the intermediate products detected by temperature programmed desorption and reaction (TPD and TPR) experiments, a reaction pathway was proposed. Firstly, the adsorbed ethanol is dehydrogenated to acetaldehyde producing hydrogen. Secondly, the adsorbed acetaldehyde is transformed into acetone via acetic acid formation. Finally, acetone is reformed to produce hydrogen and carbon dioxide, which were the final reaction products. The promotion of such reaction sequence is the key to develop an active, selective and stable catalyst, which is the technical barrier for hydrogen production by ethanol reforming.

  10. The role of surface reactions on the active and selective catalyst design for bioethanol steam reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benito, M. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/Marie Curie 2, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Ciemat, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Padilla, R.; Serrano-Lotina, A.; Rodriguez, L.; Daza, L. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/Marie Curie 2, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Brey, J.J. [Hynergreen Technologies, Av. Buhaira 2, 41018 Sevilla (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    In order to study the role of surface reactions involved in bioethanol steam reforming mechanism, a very active and selective catalyst for hydrogen production was analysed. The highest activity was obtained at 700 C, temperature at which the catalyst achieved an ethanol conversion of 100% and a selectivity to hydrogen close to 70%. It also exhibited a very high hydrogen production efficiency, higher than 4.5 mol H{sub 2} per mol of EtOH fed. The catalyst was operated at a steam to carbon ratio (S/C) of 4.8, at 700 C and atmospheric pressure. No by-products, such as ethylene or acetaldehyde were observed. In order to consider a further application in an ethanol processor, a long-term stability test was performed under the conditions previously reported. After 750 h, the catalyst still exhibited a high stability and selectivity to hydrogen production. Based on the intermediate products detected by temperature programmed desorption and reaction (TPD and TPR) experiments, a reaction pathway was proposed. Firstly, the adsorbed ethanol is dehydrogenated to acetaldehyde producing hydrogen. Secondly, the adsorbed acetaldehyde is transformed into acetone via acetic acid formation. Finally, acetone is reformed to produce hydrogen and carbon dioxide, which were the final reaction products. The promotion of such reaction sequence is the key to develop an active, selective and stable catalyst, which is the technical barrier for hydrogen production by ethanol reforming. (author)

  11. Benzothiophene inhibitors of MK2. Part 1: structure-activity relationships, assessments of selectivity and cellular potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David R; Meyers, Marvin J; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Caspers, Nicole; Poda, Gennadiy I; Long, Scott A; Pierce, Betsy S; Mahoney, Matthew W; Mourey, Robert J

    2009-08-15

    Identification of potent benzothiophene inhibitors of mitogen activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2), structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies, selectivity assessments against CDK2, cellular potency and mechanism of action are presented. Crystallographic data provide a rationale for the observed MK2 potency as well as selectivity over CDK2 for this class of inhibitors.

  12. Selective Propene Epoxidation on Immobilized Au6-10 Clusters: The Effect of Hydrogen and Water on Activity and Selectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Sungsik; Molina, Luis M.; López, María J.

    2009-01-01

    Epoxidation made easy: Subnanometer gold clusters immobilized on amorphous alumina result in a highly active and selective catalyst for propene epoxidation. The highest selectivity is found for gas mixtures involving oxygen and water, thus avoiding the use of hydrogen. Ab initio DFT calculations...... are used to identify key reaction intermediates and reaction pathways. The results confirm the high catalyst activity owing to the formation of propene oxide metallacycles. Al green, Au yellow, O red, and C gray....

  13. Moulded interconnect device fabrication by two shot molding and lasert induced selective activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Jie; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    This report on the project “Molded Interconnect Device (MID) by two shot injection molding and laser induced selective activation” has been submitted to fulfil the requirements for the master project at department of Manufacturing Engineering and Management of Technical University of Denmark (IPL...... interconnect device was achieved with two innovative processes such as two shot injection molding which combines platetable and none-platetable thermoplastics, and laser induced selective activation which uses a laser to draw circuit on the thermoplastic surface containing laser sensitive additive. Different...

  14. Orally Active and Selective Tubulin Inhibitors as Anti-Trypanosome Agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Nanavaty

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need to develop a safe, effective, orally active, and inexpensive therapy for African trypanosomiasis due to the drawbacks of current drugs. Selective tubulin inhibitors have the potential to be promising drug candidates for the treatment of this disease, which is based on the tubulin protein structural difference between mammalian and trypanosome cells. We propose to identify novel tubulin inhibitors from a compound library developed based on the lead compounds that selectively target trypanosomiasis.We used Trypanosoma brucei brucei as the parasite model, and human normal kidney cells and mouse microphage cells as the host model. Growth rates of both trypanosomes and mammalian cells were determined as a means to screen compounds that selectively inhibit the proliferation of parasites. Furthermore, we examined the cell cycle profile of the parasite and compared tubulin polymerization dynamics before and after the treatment using identified compounds. Last, in vivo anti-parasite activities of these compounds were determined in T. brucei-infected mice.Three compounds were selected that are 100 fold more effective against the growth of T. brucei cells than mammalian cells. These compounds caused cell cycle progression defects in T. brucei cells. Western analyses indicated that these compounds decreased tubulin polymerization in T. brucei cells. The in vivo investigation revealed that these compounds, when admitted orally, inhibited T. brucei cell proliferation in mouse blood. However, they were not potent enough to clear up the infection completely.These compounds are promising lead compounds as orally active agents for drug development of anti-trypanosome agents. A more detail structure activity relationship (SAR was summarized that will be used to guide future lead optimization to improve the selectivity and potency of the current compounds.

  15. Evaluation of Insecticidal and Anti-oxidant activity of Selected Medicinal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Jahan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Methanolic extracts of some selected medicinal plants, Arnica montana, Apis mellifica, Uva ursi, Urtica urens, Digitalis purpurae, Cicuta virosa, Sambucus nigra and Thuja occidentalis were evaluated for their insecticidal (on the stored grain pest, Tribolium castaneum and antioxidant activity. Permetherin was used as a reference standard for insecticidal activity and percentage mortality was found 100% at 100mg/2ml. All crude extracts exhibited concentration and time dependent insecticidal activity. Among all extracts Digitalis purpurae exhibited the highest percentage mortality (60%. Anti-oxidant activity of theses extracts were determined by DPPH radical scavenging activity and phosphomolybdate methods while using ascorbic acid as a reference standard. Significant anti-oxidant activities were revealed by U. ursi at 100 mg/ml concentration (96% DPPH scavenging activity and 91.85% total anti-oxidant activity and D. purpurae 1 mg/ml (94.25% DPPH scavenging activity and 92.28% total anti-oxidant activity; followed by, T. occidentalis, A. mellifica, U. urens C. virosa, S. nigra and A. montana in the descending series.

  16. An in vitro evaluation of selective demineralised enamel removal using bio-active glass air abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Avijit; Pabari, Hiten; Paolinelis, George; Thompson, Ian D; Watson, Timothy F

    2011-12-01

    Unnecessary over-preparation of carious enamel often occurs clinically during operative caries management. The working hypothesis to be investigated in this study is the potential for bio-active glass air abrasion to remove selectively only demineralised enamel in artificial enamel lesions when compared to equivalent alumina air abrasion, so potentially minimising cavity over-preparation. Bisected artificial, paired smooth surface enamel lesions on ethics-approved, extracted sound human molars were created and subsequently air abraded with 27 μm alumina (n = 19) and bio-active glass (n = 19). The difference between pre-operative lesion boundary and post-operative cavity margin was calculated following optical confocal fluorescent assessment of the lesion boundary. Data indicated mean% over-preparation (sound enamel removal) of 176% with alumina and 15.2% for bio-active glass (p = 0.005). Bio-active glass abrasion removed completely the demineralised enamel from artificial lesions with clinically insignificant over-preparation of sound tissue, indicating technique selectivity towards grossly demineralised enamel. Alumina air abrasion resulted in substantial enamel removal in both sound and demineralised tissues indicating the operator selectivity required to use the techniques effectively in clinical practice.

  17. The Associative Memory Deficit in Aging Is Related to Reduced Selectivity of Brain Activity during Encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saverino, Cristina; Fatima, Zainab; Sarraf, Saman; Oder, Anita; Strother, Stephen C; Grady, Cheryl L

    2016-09-01

    Human aging is characterized by reductions in the ability to remember associations between items, despite intact memory for single items. Older adults also show less selectivity in task-related brain activity, such that patterns of activation become less distinct across multiple experimental tasks. This reduced selectivity or dedifferentiation has been found for episodic memory, which is often reduced in older adults, but not for semantic memory, which is maintained with age. We used fMRI to investigate whether there is a specific reduction in selectivity of brain activity during associative encoding in older adults, but not during item encoding, and whether this reduction predicts associative memory performance. Healthy young and older adults were scanned while performing an incidental encoding task for pictures of objects and houses under item or associative instructions. An old/new recognition test was administered outside the scanner. We used agnostic canonical variates analysis and split-half resampling to detect whole-brain patterns of activation that predicted item versus associative encoding for stimuli that were later correctly recognized. Older adults had poorer memory for associations than did younger adults, whereas item memory was comparable across groups. Associative encoding trials, but not item encoding trials, were predicted less successfully in older compared with young adults, indicating less distinct patterns of associative-related activity in the older group. Importantly, higher probability of predicting associative encoding trials was related to better associative memory after accounting for age and performance on a battery of neuropsychological tests. These results provide evidence that neural distinctiveness at encoding supports associative memory and that a specific reduction of selectivity in neural recruitment underlies age differences in associative memory.

  18. Multidrug resistance-selective antiproliferative activity of Piper amide alkaloids and synthetic analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue-Hu; Goto, Masuo; Wang, Li-Ting; Hsieh, Kan-Yen; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Tang, Gui-Hua; Long, Chun-Lin; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2014-10-15

    Twenty-five amide alkaloids (1-25) from Piper boehmeriifolium and 10 synthetic amide alkaloid derivatives (39-48) were evaluated for antiproliferative activity against eight human tumor cell lines, including chemosensitive and multidrug-resistant (MDR) cell lines. The results suggested tumor type-selectivity. 1-[7-(3,4,5-Trimethoxyphenyl)heptanoyl]piperidine (46) exhibited the best inhibitory activity (IC50=4.94 μM) against the P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-overexpressing KBvin MDR sub-line, while it and all other tested compounds, except 9, were inactive (IC50 >40 μM) against MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-3. Structure-activity relationships (SARs) indicated that (i) 3,4,5-trimethoxy phenyl substitution is critical for selectivity against KBvin, (ii) the 4-methoxy group in this pattern is crucial for antiproliferative activity, (iii) double bonds in the side chain are not needed for activity, and (iv), in arylalkenylacyl amide alkaloids, replacement of an isobutylamino group with pyrrolidin-1-yl or piperidin-1-yl significantly improved activity. Further study on Piper amides is warranted, particularly whether side chain length affects the ability to overcome the MDR cancer phenotype.

  19. The Activity of Surface Electromyographic Signal of Selected Muscles during Classic Rehabilitation Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinzhuang Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Prone bridge, unilateral bridge, supine bridge, and bird-dog are classic rehabilitation exercises, which have been advocated as effective ways to improve core stability among healthy individuals and patients with low back pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the activity of seven selected muscles during rehabilitation exercises through the signal of surface electromyographic. Approaches. We measured the surface electromyographic signals of four lower limb muscles, two abdominal muscles, and one back muscle during rehabilitation exercises of 30 healthy students and then analyzed its activity level using the median frequency method. Results. Different levels of muscle activity during the four rehabilitation exercises were observed. The prone bridge and unilateral bridge caused the greatest muscle fatigue; however, the supine bridge generated the lowest muscle activity. There was no significant difference (P>0.05 between left and right body side muscles in the median frequency slope during the four rehabilitation exercises of seven muscles. Conclusions. The prone bridge can affect the low back and lower limb muscles of most people. The unilateral bridge was found to stimulate muscles much more active than the supine bridge. The bird-dog does not cause much fatigue to muscles but can make most selected muscles active.

  20. Active Learning to Overcome Sample Selection Bias: Application to Photometric Variable Star Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Richards, Joseph W; Brink, Henrik; Miller, Adam A; Bloom, Joshua S; Butler, Nathaniel R; James, J Berian; Long, James P; Rice, John

    2011-01-01

    Despite the great promise of machine-learning algorithms to classify and predict astrophysical parameters for the vast numbers of astrophysical sources and transients observed in large-scale surveys, the peculiarities of the training data often manifest as strongly biased predictions on the data of interest. Typically, training sets are derived from historical surveys of brighter, more nearby objects than those from more extensive, deeper surveys (testing data). This sample selection bias can cause catastrophic errors in predictions on the testing data because a) standard assumptions for machine-learned model selection procedures break down and b) dense regions of testing space might be completely devoid of training data. We explore possible remedies to sample selection bias, including importance weighting (IW), co-training (CT), and active learning (AL). We argue that AL---where the data whose inclusion in the training set would most improve predictions on the testing set are queried for manual follow-up---i...