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Sample records for chandra high energy

  1. Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrum of AE Aquarii

    CERN Document Server

    Mauche, Christopher W

    2009-01-01

    (Abridged) The results of a Chandra X-ray Observatory High-Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) observation of the nova-like cataclysmic binary AE Aqr are described. First, the X-ray spectrum is that of an optically thin multi-temperature thermal plasma; the X-ray emission lines are broad, with widths that increase with the line energy, from sigma~1 eV for O VIII to sigma~5.5 eV for Si XIV; the X-ray spectrum is reasonably well fit by a plasma model with a Gaussian emission measure distribution that peaks at log T(K)=7.16, has a width sigma=0.48, an Fe abundance equal to 0.44 times solar, and other metal (primarily Ne, Mg, and Si) abundances equal to 0.76 times solar; and for a distance d=100 pc, the total emission measure EM=8.0E53 cm^-3 and the 0.5-10 keV luminosity L_X=1.1E31 erg/s. Second, based on the f/(i+r) flux ratios of the forbidden (f), intercombination (i), and recombination (r) lines of the He alpha triplets of N VI, O VII, and Ne IX measured by Itoh et al. in the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spec...

  2. The Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating: Design, Fabrication, Ground Calibration and Five Years in Flight

    CERN Document Server

    Canizares, C R; Dewey, D; Flanagan, K A; Galton, E B; Huenemoerder, D P; Ishibashi, K; Markert, T H; Marshall, H L; McGuirk, M; Schattenburg, M L; Schulz, N S; Smith, H I; Wise, M; Canizares, Claude R.; Davis, John E.; Dewey, Daniel; Flanagan, Kathryn A.; Galton, Eugene B.; Huenemoerder, David P.; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Markert, Thomas H.; Marshall, Herman L.; Guirk, Michael Mc; Schattenburg, Mark L.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Smith, Henry I.; Wise, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Details of the design, fabrication, ground and flight calibration of the High Energy Transmission Grating, HETG, on the Chandra X-ray Observatory are presented after five years of flight experience. Specifics include the theory of phased transmission gratings as applied to the HETG, the Rowland design of the spectrometer, details of the grating fabrication techniques, and the results of ground testing and calibration of the HETG. For nearly six years the HETG has operated essentially as designed, although it has presented some subtle flight calibration effects.

  3. In-Flight Calibration of the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, H L; Ishibashi, K; Marshall, Herman L.; Dewey, Daniel; Ishibashi, Kazunori

    2003-01-01

    We present results from in-flight calibration of the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Basic grating assembly parameters such as orientation and average grating period were measured using emission line sources. These sources were also used to determine the locations of individual CCDs within the flight detector. The line response function (LRF) was modeled in detail using an instrument simulator based on pre-flight measurements of the grating alignments and periods. These LRF predictions agree very well with in-flight observations of sources with narrow emission lines. Using bright continuum sources, we test the consistency of the detector quantum efficiencies by comparing positive orders to negative orders.

  4. The Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Observation of an X-ray Ionization Cone in Markarian 3

    OpenAIRE

    Sako, Masao; Kahn, Steven M.; Paerels, Frits; Liedahl, Duane A.

    2000-01-01

    We present a preliminary analysis of the first high-resolution X-ray spectrum of a Seyfert 2 galaxy, Mkn 3, obtained with the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The high-energy spectrum (lambda < 4 Ang) is dominated by reflection of the AGN continuum radiation in a cold optically thick medium and contains bright K-alpha fluorescent lines from iron and silicon, as well as weak, blended lines from sulfur and magnesium. The soft X-ray emission (4...

  5. The Kinematics and Physical Conditions of the Ionized Gas in NGC 4593 from Chandra High-Energy Grating Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    McKernan, B; George, I M; Turner, T J

    2003-01-01

    We observed the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4593 with the Chandra high energy transmission gratings and present a detailed analysis of the soft X-ray spectrum. We measure strong absorption lines from He-like O, Ne, Mg, Si, H-like N, O, Ne, Mg, Si and highly ionized Fe XIX-XXV. Only the NLya, OLya and MgLya lines appear to be marginally resolved. We identify a spectral feature at $\\sim 0.707$ keV with a neutral Fe L edge, which might suggest that there is dust along the line-of-sight to \

  6. The Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Observation of an X-ray Ionization Cone in Markarian 3

    CERN Document Server

    Sako, M; Paerels, F B S; Liedahl, D A; Sako, Masao; Kahn, Steven M.; Paerels, Frits; Liedahl, Duane A.

    2000-01-01

    We present a preliminary analysis of the first high-resolution X-ray spectrum of a Seyfert 2 galaxy, Mkn 3, obtained with the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The high-energy spectrum (lambda < 4 Ang) is dominated by reflection of the AGN continuum radiation in a cold optically thick medium and contains bright K-alpha fluorescent lines from iron and silicon, as well as weak, blended lines from sulfur and magnesium. The soft X-ray emission (4 < lambda < 23 Ang) is spatially extended along the [O III] ionization cone and shows discrete signatures of emission following recombination and photoexcitation produced in a warm photoionized region. The measured iron L line fluxes indicate that emission from collisionally ionized plasma is almost completely negligible, and does not contribute significantly to the total energy budget of the X-ray emission. We find that significant fractions of the H- and He-like resonance lines, as well as the observed iron L l...

  7. What Did We Learn From Chandra, Xmm-Newton And Fermi-Lat About The High Energy Emission In Young Radio Sources?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemiginowska, Aneta; Guainazzi, M.; Hardcastle, M.; Kelly, B. C.; Kunert-Bajraszewska, M.; Migliori, G.; Sobolewska, M.; Stawarz, L.

    2013-04-01

    Giga-Hertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) and Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) radio sources comprise a large population of compact objects with radio emission fully contained within the innermost regions of the host galaxy (< a few kpc). Spectral and kinematic age measurements indicate their young age (typically < thousands years and in some cases less a few hundred years). These sources provide the important insights to the initial phase of the jet formation, radio source growth, source evolution and the jet impact on the ISM in the very central regions of the host galaxy. We have obtained Chandra and XMM-Newton observations for a large sample of these sources over several observing cycles. Our most recent Chandra observations targeted Compact Symmetric Objects (CSO) associated with the nuclear regions of nearby galaxies. All these CSO have measured kinematic ages within 100-3000 year old. I will present the results of our ongoing observing program focusing on the high energy properties of these young sources.

  8. High Resolution Spectroscopy of the X-ray Photoionized Wind in Cygnus X-3 with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Paerels, F B S; Sako, M; Liedahl, D A; Brinkman, A C; Van der Meer, R L J; Kaastra, J S; Predehl, P; Paerels, Frits; Cottam, Jean; Sako, Masao; Liedahl, Duane A.

    2000-01-01

    We present a preliminary analysis of the 1--10 keV spectrum of the massiveX-ray binary Cyg X-3, obtained with the High Energy Transmission GratingSpectrometer on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The source reveals a richlydetailed discrete emission spectrum, with clear signatures ofphotoionization-driven excitation. Among the spectroscopic novelties in the data are the first astrophysicaldetections of a number of He-like 'triplets' (Si, S, Ar) with emission lineratios characteristic of photoionization equilibrium, fully resolved narrowradiative recombination continua of Mg, Si, and S, the presence of the H-likeFe Balmer series, and a clear detection of a ~ 800 km/s large scale velocityfield, as well as a ~1500 km/s FWHM Doppler broadening in the source. Webriefly touch on the implications of these findings for the structure of theWolf-Rayet wind.

  9. The Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer probes the dusty warm absorber in the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG--6-30-15

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, J. C.; Canizares, C. R.; Marshall, H. L.; Fabian, A. C.; Morales, R.; Schulz, N. S.; Iwasawa, K.

    2001-01-01

    The Chandra HETGS spectra of the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG--6-30-15 show numerous narrow, unresolved (FWHM 0.48 keV (< 26 A). We attribute previous reports of an apparently highly redshifted O VII edge to the neutral Fe L absorption complex and th...

  10. High-Energy Processes in Young Stars: Chandra X-ray Spectroscopy of HDE 283572, RY Tau, and LkCa 21

    CERN Document Server

    Audard, M; Smith, K W; Güdel, M; Pallavicini, R; Audard, Marc; Skinner, Stephen L.; Smith, Kester W.; Guedel, Manuel; Pallavicini, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    Weak-lined T Tauri stars (WTTS) represent the important stage of stellar evolution between the accretion phase and the zero-age main sequence. At this stage, the star decouples from its accretion disk, and spins up to a higher rotation rate than in the preceding classical T Tauri phase. Consequently, dynamo processes can be expected to become even stronger at this stage. High energy processes can have effects on the remaining circumstellar material, possibly including protoplanets and planetesimals, and these effects may account for certain observable properties of asteroids in the current solar system. Chandra observed for 100 ks the WTTS HDE 283572 which probes the PMS stage of massive A-type stars. We present first results of the analysis of its high-resolution X-ray spectrum obtained with the High-Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer. A wide range of Fe lines of high ionization states are observed, indicating a continuous emission measure distribution. No significant signal is detected longward of the...

  11. The Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer probes the dusty warm absorber in the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG--6-30-15

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, J C; Marshall, H L; Fabian, A C; Morales, R; Schulz, N S; Iwasawa, K

    2001-01-01

    The Chandra HETGS spectra of the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG--6-30-15 show numerous narrow, unresolved (FWHM 0.48 keV (< 26 A). We attribute previous reports of an apparently highly redshifted O VII edge to the neutral Fe L absorption complex and the O VII resonance series (by transitions higher than He $\\gamma$; He $\\alpha,\\beta,\\gamma$ are also seen at lower energies). The implied dust column density needed to explain the FeI L edge feature agrees with that obtained from earlier reddening studies, which had already concluded that the dust should be associated with the ionized absorber (given the relatively lower observed X-ray absorption by cold gas). Our findings contradict the interpretation of Branduardi-Raymont et al. (2001), based on XMM-Newton RGS spectra, that this spectral region is dominated by highly relativistic soft X-ray line emission originating near the central black hole. Here we review these issues pertaining to the soft X-ray spectral features as addressed by Lee et al., (2001). (Details foun...

  12. High-Resolution Chandra X-ray Imaging and Spectroscopy of the Sigma Orionis Cluster

    OpenAIRE

    Skinner, S.L.; Sokal, K. R.; Cohen, D. H.; Gagne, M.; Owocki, S.P.; Townsend, R. D.

    2008-01-01

    We present results of a 90 ksec Chandra X-ray observation of the young sigma Orionis cluster (age ~3 Myr) obtained with the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer. We use the high resolution grating spectrum and moderate resolution CCD spectrum of the massive central star sigma Ori AB (O9.5V + B0.5V) to test wind shock theories of X-ray emission and also analyze the high spatial resolution zero-order ACIS-S image of the central cluster region. Chandra detected 42 X-ray sources on the p...

  13. Chandra Opens New Line of Investigation on Dark Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-05-01

    Astronomers have detected and probed dark energy by applying a powerful, new method that uses images of galaxy clusters made by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. The results trace the transition of the expansion of the Universe from a decelerating to an accelerating phase several billion years ago, and give intriguing clues about the nature of dark energy and the fate of the Universe. "Dark energy is perhaps the biggest mystery in physics," said Steve Allen of the Institute of Astronomy (IoA) at the University of Cambridge in England, and leader of the study. "As such, it is extremely important to make an independent test of its existence and properties." Abell 2029 Chandra X-ray Image of Abell 2029 Allen and his colleagues used Chandra to study 26 clusters of galaxies at distances corresponding to light travel times of between one and eight billion years. These data span the time when the Universe slowed from its original expansion, before speeding up again because of the repulsive effect of dark energy. "We're directly seeing that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating by measuring the distances to these galaxy clusters," said Andy Fabian also of the IoA, a co-author on the study. The new Chandra results suggest that the dark energy density does not change quickly with time and may even be constant, consistent with the "cosmological constant" concept first introduced by Albert Einstein. If so, the Universe is expected to continue expanding forever, so that in many billions of years only a tiny fraction of the known galaxies will be observable. More Animations Animation of the "Big Rip" If the dark energy density is constant, more dramatic fates for the Universe would be avoided. These include the "Big Rip," where dark energy increases until galaxies, stars, planets and eventually atoms are eventually torn apart. The "Big Crunch," where the Universe eventually collapses on itself, would also be ruled out. Chandra's probe of dark energy relies on the unique

  14. Yes, High School Students Can Analyze Chandra Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keohane, J. W.; Clearfield, C. R.; Olbert, C. M.

    2002-12-01

    For the past two years, high school students at the North Carolina School of Science and Math (NCSSM) have worked with new and archival Chandra data, and have produced interesting scientific results. These results have included one refereed paper in the Ap.J., and about a dozen presentations at scientific meetings (including three at this meeting). The students were selected, based on interest, from the junior class at NCSSM, to stay on campus and work intensively for 2 to 4 weeks over the summer. Each team of students selected an object with public Chandra ACIS data, and were taught how to produce data products such as images and spectra, as well as conduct a literature search. In most cases, a paper had already been published using those data, and the students were usually able to reproduce the results. As the students waded through the literature, they would search for a theory to test or an interesting new phenomenon. Often the students would request an image in another wavelength to compare in detail to the Chandra data. After the summer, many students continued to work throughout the following fall semester, producing a paper for submission to the Siemens Westinghouse Science and Technology Competition by the beginning of October. In the process of conducting research, the students learn to apply many physics concepts, and learn valuable scientific research and writing skills. Those students that choose to continue with astrophysics can often dive directly into a high-level research project immediately when they arrive at college. These programs have been funded by NASA, through E/PO grants attached to parent research grants.

  15. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of Procyon by Chandra and XMM-Newton

    OpenAIRE

    Raassen, A.J.J.; Mewe, R.; Audard, M.; Guedel, M.; Behar, E; Kaastra, J.S.; Van Der Meer, R.L.J.; Foley, C. R.; Ness, J.-U.

    2002-01-01

    We report the analysis of the high-resolution soft X-ray spectrum of the nearby F-type star Procyon in the wavelength range from 5 to 175 Angstrom obtained with the Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (LETGS) on board Chandra and with the Reflection Grating Spectrometers (RGS) and the EPIC-MOS CCD spectrometers on board XMM-Newton. Line fluxes have been measured separately for the RGS and LETGS. Spectra have been fitted globally to obtain self-consistent temperatures, emission measur...

  16. High-Resolution Chandra X-ray Imaging and Spectroscopy of the Sigma Orionis Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Skinner, S L; Cohen, D H; Gagné, M; Owocki, S P; Townsend, R D

    2008-01-01

    We present results of a 90 ksec Chandra X-ray observation of the young sigma Orionis cluster (age ~3 Myr) obtained with the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer. We use the high resolution grating spectrum and moderate resolution CCD spectrum of the massive central star sigma Ori AB (O9.5V + B0.5V) to test wind shock theories of X-ray emission and also analyze the high spatial resolution zero-order ACIS-S image of the central cluster region. Chandra detected 42 X-ray sources on the primary CCD (ACIS-S3). All but five have near-IR or optical counterparts and about one-fourth are variable. Notable high-mass stellar detections are sigma Ori AB, the magnetic B star sigma Ori E, and the B5V binary HD 37525. Most of the other detections have properties consistent with lower mass K or M-type stars. We present the first X-ray spectrum of the unusual infrared source IRS1 located 3.3 arc-sec north of sigma Ori AB, which is likely an embedded T Tauri star whose disk/envelope is being photoevaporated by sigma Or...

  17. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of Procyon by Chandra and XMM-Newton

    CERN Document Server

    Raassen, A J J; Audard, M; Güdel, M; Behar, E; Kaastra, J S; Van der Meer, R L J; Foley, C R; Ness, J U

    2002-01-01

    We report the analysis of the high-resolution soft X-ray spectrum of the nearby F-type star Procyon in the wavelength range from 5 to 175 Angstrom obtained with the Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (LETGS) on board Chandra and with the Reflection Grating Spectrometers (RGS) and the EPIC-MOS CCD spectrometers on board XMM-Newton. Line fluxes have been measured separately for the RGS and LETGS. Spectra have been fitted globally to obtain self-consistent temperatures, emission measures, and abundances. The total volume emission measure is ~4.1 x 10e50/cm3 with a peak between 1 and 3 MK. No indications for a dominant hot component (T > 4 MK) were found. We present additional evidence for the lack of a solar-type FIP-effect, confirming earlier EUVE results.

  18. CHANDRA HIGH-RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS OF CID-42, A CANDIDATE RECOILING SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Civano, F.; Elvis, M.; Lanzuisi, G.; Aldcroft, T.; Trichas, M.; Fruscione, A. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bongiorno, A.; Brusa, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Blecha, L.; Loeb, A. [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Comastri, A.; Gilli, R. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, Bologna 40127 (Italy); Salvato, M.; Komossa, S. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, Excellence Cluster, Boltzmannstrass 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Koekemoer, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Mainieri, V. [ESO, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Piconcelli, E. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, Monteporzio-Catone 00040 (Italy); Vignali, C. [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, Bologna 40127 (Italy)

    2012-06-10

    We present Chandra High Resolution Camera observations of CID-42, a candidate recoiling supermassive black hole (SMBH) at z = 0.359 in the COSMOS survey. CID-42 shows two optical compact sources resolved in the HST/ACS image embedded in the same galaxy structure and a velocity offset of {approx}1300 km s{sup -1} between the H{beta} broad and narrow emission line, as presented by Civano et al. Two scenarios have been proposed to explain the properties of CID-42: a gravitational wave (GW) recoiling SMBH and a double Type 1/Type 2 active galactic nucleus (AGN) system, where one of the two is recoiling because of slingshot effect. In both scenarios, one of the optical nuclei hosts an unobscured AGN, while the other one, either an obscured AGN or a star-forming compact region. The X-ray Chandra data allow us to unambiguously resolve the X-ray emission and unveil the nature of the two optical sources in CID-42. We find that only one of the optical nuclei is responsible for the whole X-ray unobscured emission observed and a 3{sigma} upper limit on the flux of the second optical nucleus is measured. The upper limit on the X-ray luminosity plus the analysis of the multiwavelength spectral energy distribution indicate the presence of a star-forming region in the second source rather than an obscured SMBH, thus favoring the GW recoil scenario. However, the presence of a very obscured SMBH cannot be fully ruled out. A new X-ray feature, in a SW direction with respect to the main source, is discovered and discussed.

  19. The High Resolution X-ray Spectrum of SS 433 using the Chandra HETGS

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, H L; Schulz, N S; Marshall, Herman L.; Canizares, Claude R.; Schulz, Norbert S.

    2001-01-01

    We present observations of SS 433 using the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer. Many emission lines of highly ionized elements are detected with the relativistic blue and red Doppler shifts. The lines are measurably broadened to 1700 km/s (FWHM) and the widths do not depend significantly on the characteristic emission temperature, suggesting that the emission occurs in a freely expanding region of constant collimation with opening angle of 1.23 +/- 0.06 deg. The blue shifts of lines from low temperature gas are the same as those of high temperature gas within our uncertainties, again indicating that the hottest gas we observe to emit emission lines is already at terminal velocity. Fits to the emission line fluxes give a range of temperatures in the jet from 5e6 to 1e8 K. We derive the emission measure as a function of temperature for a four component model that fits the line flux data. Using the density sensitive Si XIII triplet, the characteristic electron density is 1e14 cm^{-3}, where th...

  20. High-Resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Seyfert 2 Galaxy Circinus with Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambruna, Rita M.; Netzer, Hagai; Kaspi, Shai; Brandt, W. N.; Chartas, G.; Garmire, G. P.; Nousek, John A.; Weaver, K. A.

    2000-01-01

    Results from a 60 ks Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) observation of the nearby Seyfert 2 Circinus are presented. The spectrum shows a wealth of emission lines at both soft and hard X-rays, including lines of Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe, and a prominent Fe K(alpha) line at 6.4 keV. We identify several of the He-like components and measure several of the Lyman lines of the N-like ions. The lines' profiles are unresolved at the limited signal-to-noise ratio of the data. Our analysis of the zeroth-order image in a companion paper constrains the size of the emission region to be 20-60 pc, suggesting that emission within this volume is almost entirely due to the reprocessing of the obscured central source. Here we show that a model containing two distinct components can reproduce almost all the observed properties of this gas. The ionized component can explain the observed intensities of the ionized species, assuming twice-solar composition and an N is proportional r(exp -1.5) density distribution. The neutral component is highly concentrated, well within the 0.8" point source, and is responsible for almost all of the observed K(alpha) (6.4 keV) emission. Circinus seems to be different than Mkn 3 in terms of its gas distribution.

  1. High School Students Discover Neutron Star Using Chandra and VLA Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Three high school students, using data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA), have found the first evidence of a neutron star in the nearby supernova remnant IC443, a system long studied by professional astronomers. This remarkable discovery has led the team to the national finals and a 1st place finish in the team competition at the Siemens-Westinghouse Science and Technology Competition held today in Washington, DC. Charles Olbert (age 18), Christopher Clearfield (age 18), and Nikolas Williams (age 16), all of the North Carolina School for Science and Mathematics (NCSSM) in Durham, NC, found a point-like source of X rays embedded in the remains of the stellar explosion, or supernova. Based on both the X-ray and radio data, the students determined that the central object in IC443 is most likely a young and rapidly rotating neutron star -- an object known as a "pulsar." "This is a really solid scientific finding," said Bryan Gaensler of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a noted pulsar expert who reviewed the paper for the team. "Everyone involved should be really proud of this accomplishment." Taking advantage of Chandra's superior angular resolution, the North Carolina students found the source embedded in IC443, a region known to be emitting particularly high-energy X rays. In a highly unusual situation, the students got access to the Chandra data from their science teacher, Dr. Jonathan Keohane. Keohane applied for the observation time while still associated with NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. "The students really went through the whole analysis process themselves," said Keohane. "And, they even lived together all summer near the school to complete the research." In order to confirm the evidence from Chandra, the students turned to the National Radio Observatory's Dale Frail who gave the student team VLA data on IC443. While the radio data did not reveal any periodicity, the VLA

  2. Predicting Chandra CCD Degradation with the Chandra Radiation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Blackwell, William C.; DePasquale, Joseph M.; Grant, Catherine E.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Spitzbart, Bradley D.; Wolk, Scott J.

    2008-01-01

    Not long after launch of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, it was discovered that the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) detector was rapidly degrading due to radiation. Analysis by Chandra personnel showed that this degradation was due to 10w energy protons (100 - 200 keV) that scattered down the optical path onto the focal plane. In response to this unexpected problem, the Chandra Team developed a radiation-protection program that has been used to manage the radiation damage to the CCDs. This program consists of multiple approaches - scheduled sating of the ACIS detector from the radiation environment during passage through radiation belts, real-time monitoring of space weather conditions, on-board monitoring of radiation environment levels, and the creation of a radiation environment model for use in computing proton flux and fluence at energies that damage the ACIS detector. This radiation mitigation program has been very successful. The initial precipitous increase in the CCDs' charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) resulting from proton damage has been slowed dramatically, with the front-illuminated CCDS having an increase in CTI of only 2.3% per year, allowing the ASIS detector's expected lifetime to exceed requirements. This paper concentrates on one aspect of the Chandra radiation mitigation program, the creation of the Chandra Radiation Model (CRM). Because of Chandra's highly elliptical orbit, the spacecraft spends most of its time outside of the trapped radiation belts that present the severest risks to the ACIS detector. However, there is still a proton flux environment that must be accounted for in all parts of Chandra's orbit. At the time of Chandra's launch there was no engineering model of the radiation environment that could be used in the outer regions of the spacecraft's orbit, so the CRM was developed to provide the flux environment of 100 - 200 keV protons in the outer magnetosphere, magnetosheath, and solar wind regions of geospace. This

  3. LOCALIZING INTEGRAL SOURCES WITH CHANDRA: X-RAY AND MULTI-WAVELENGTH IDENTIFICATIONS AND ENERGY SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomsick, John A.; Bodaghee, Arash [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Chaty, Sylvain; Rodriguez, Jerome [AIM (UMR-E 9005 CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot) Irfu/Service d' Astrophysique, Centre de Saclay, FR-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Rahoui, Farid [Astronomy Department, Harvard University, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Halpern, Jules [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027-6601 (United States); Kalemci, Emrah [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I -Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey); Oezbey Arabaci, Mehtap, E-mail: jtomsick@ssl.berkeley.edu [Physics Department, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06531 (Turkey)

    2012-08-01

    We report on Chandra observations of 18 hard X-ray (>20 keV) sources discovered with the INTEGRAL satellite near the Galactic plane. For 14 of the INTEGRAL sources, we have uncovered one or two potential Chandra counterparts per source. These provide soft X-ray (0.3-10 keV) spectra and subarcsecond localizations, which we use to identify counterparts at other wavelengths, providing information about the nature of each source. Despite the fact that all of the sources are within 5 Degree-Sign of the plane, four of the IGR sources are active galactic nuclei (AGNs; IGR J01545+6437, IGR J15391-5307, IGR J15415-5029, and IGR J21565+5948) and four others are likely AGNs (IGR J03103+5706, IGR J09189-4418, IGR J16413-4046, and IGR J16560-4958) based on each of them having a strong IR excess and/or extended optical or near-IR emission. We compare the X-ray and near-IR fluxes of this group of sources to those of AGNs selected by their 2-10 keV emission in previous studies and find that these IGR AGNs are in the range of typical values. There is evidence in favor of four of the sources being Galactic (IGR J12489-6243, IGR J15293-5609, IGR J16173-5023, and IGR J16206-5253), but only IGR J15293-5609 is confirmed as a Galactic source as it has a unique Chandra counterpart and a parallax measurement from previous optical observations that puts its distance at 1.56 {+-} 0.12 kpc. The 0.3-10 keV luminosity for this source is (1.4{sup +1.0}{sub -0.4}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 32} erg s{sup -1}, and its optical/IR spectral energy distribution is well described by a blackbody with a temperature of 4200-7000 K and a radius of 12.0-16.4 R{sub Sun }. These values suggest that IGR J15293-5609 is a symbiotic binary with an early K-type giant and a white dwarf accretor. We also obtained likely Chandra identifications for IGR J13402-6428 and IGR J15368-5102, but follow-up observations are required to constrain their source types.

  4. High-Redshift AGNs and the Next Decade of Chandra and XMM-Newton

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, W N

    2016-01-01

    We briefly review how X-ray observations of high-redshift active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z = 4-7 have played a critical role in understanding their basic demographics as well as their physical processes; e.g., absorption by nuclear material and winds, accretion rates, and jet emission. We point out some key remaining areas of uncertainty, highlighting where further Chandra and XMM-Newton observations/analyses, combined with new multiwavelength survey data, can advance understanding over the next decade.

  5. Highly Clumpy Structure of the Thermal Composite Supernova Remnant 3C391 Unveiled by Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Y; Slane, P O; Wang, Q D; Chen, Yang; Su, Yang; Slane, Patrick O.

    2005-01-01

    The nature of the internal thermal X-ray emission seen in ``thermal composite" supernova remnants is still uncertain. Chandra observation of the 3C391 shows a southeast-northwest elongated morphology and unveils a highly clumpy structure of the remnant. Detailed spatially resolved spectral analysis for the small-scale features reveals normal metal abundance and uniform temperature for the interior gas. The properties of the hot gas comparatively favor the cloudlet evaporation model as a main mechanism for the ``thermal composite" X-ray appearance, though radiative rim and thermal conduction may also be effective. A faint protrusion is found in Si and S lines out of the southwest radio border.

  6. Lunar Prospecting With Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    Observations of the bright side of the Moon with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory have detected oxygen, magnesium, aluminum and silicon over a large area of the lunar surface. The abundance and distribution of those elements will help to determine how the Moon was formed. "We see X-rays from these elements directly, independent of assumptions about the mineralogy and other complications," said Jeremy Drake of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass., at a press conference at the "Four Years with Chandra" symposium in Huntsville, Alabama. "We have Moon samples from the six widely-space Apollo landing sites, but remote sensing with Chandra can cover a much wider area," continued Drake. "It's the next best thing to being there, and it's very fast and cost-effective." The lunar X-rays are caused by fluorescence, a process similar to the way that light is produced in fluorescent lamps. Solar X-rays bombard the surface of the Moon, knock electrons out of the inner parts of the atoms, putting them in a highly unstable state. Almost immediately, other electrons rush to fill the gaps, and in the process convert their energy into the fluorescent X-rays seen by Chandra. According to the currently popular "giant impact" theory for the formation of the Moon, a body about the size of Mars collided with the Earth about 4.5 billion years ago. This impact flung molten debris from the mantle of both the Earth and the impactor into orbit around the Earth. Over the course of tens of millions of years, the debris stuck together to form the Moon. By measuring the amounts of aluminum and other elements over a wide area of the Moon and comparing them to the Earth's mantle, Drake and his colleagues plan to help test the giant impact hypothesis. "One early result," quipped Drake, "is that there is no evidence for large amounts of calcium, so cheese is not a major constituent of the Moon." Illustration of Earth's Geocorona Illustration of Earth's Geocorona The same

  7. High-Resolution X-ray and Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of the Complex Intrinsic Absorption in NGC 4051 with Chandra and HST

    OpenAIRE

    Collinge, M. J.; Brandt, W. N.; Kaspi, Shai; Crenshaw, D. Michael; Elvis, Martin; Kraemer, Steven B.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Sambruna, Rita M.; Wills, Beverley J.

    2001-01-01

    We present the results from simultaneous observations of the Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4051 with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer and the HST Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. The X-ray grating spectrum reveals absorption and emission lines from hydrogen-like and helium-like ions of O, Ne, Mg and Si. We resolve two distinct X-ray absorption systems: a high-velocity blueshifted system at -2340+/-130 km/s and a low-velocity blueshifted system at -600+/-130 km...

  8. NASA's Chandra Finds Black Holes Are "Green"

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-01

    Black holes are the most fuel efficient engines in the Universe, according to a new study using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. By making the first direct estimate of how efficient or "green" black holes are, this work gives insight into how black holes generate energy and affect their environment. The new Chandra finding shows that most of the energy released by matter falling toward a supermassive black hole is in the form of high-energy jets traveling at near the speed of light away from the black hole. This is an important step in understanding how such jets can be launched from magnetized disks of gas near the event horizon of a black hole. Illustration of Fuel for a Black Hole Engine Illustration of Fuel for a Black Hole Engine "Just as with cars, it's critical to know the fuel efficiency of black holes," said lead author Steve Allen of the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at Stanford University, and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. "Without this information, we cannot figure out what is going on under the hood, so to speak, or what the engine can do." Allen and his team used Chandra to study nine supermassive black holes at the centers of elliptical galaxies. These black holes are relatively old and generate much less radiation than quasars, rapidly growing supermassive black holes seen in the early Universe. The surprise came when the Chandra results showed that these "quiet" black holes are all producing much more energy in jets of high-energy particles than in visible light or X-rays. These jets create huge bubbles, or cavities, in the hot gas in the galaxies. Animation of Black Hole in Elliptical Galaxy Animation of Black Hole in Elliptical Galaxy The efficiency of the black hole energy-production was calculated in two steps: first Chandra images of the inner regions of the galaxies were used to estimate how much fuel is available for the black hole; then Chandra images were used to estimate the power required to produce

  9. Are there cool-core clusters at high-redshift? Chandra results and prospects with WFXT

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Joana S; Rosati, Piero

    2010-01-01

    In this contribution we trace the evolution of cool-core clusters out to z~1.3 using high-resolution Chandra data of three representative cluster samples spanning different redshift ranges. Our analysis is based on the measurement of the surface brightness (SB) concentration, c_SB, which strongly anti-correlates with the central cooling time and allows us to characterize the cool-core strength in low S/N data. We confirm a negative evolution in the fraction of cool-core clusters with redshift, in particular for very strong cool-cores. Still, we find evidence for a large population of well formed cool-cores at z ~ 1. This analysis is potentially very effective in constraining the nature and the evolution of the cool-cores, once large samples of high-z clusters will be available. In this respect, we explore the potential of the proposed mission Wide Field X-ray Telescope (WFXT) to address this science case. We conclude that WFXT provides the best trade-off of angular resolution, sensitivity and covered solid an...

  10. The high-redshift (z>3) AGN population in the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field South

    CERN Document Server

    Vito, F; Gilli, R; Comastri, A; Iwasawa, K; Brandt, W N; Alexander, D M; Brusa, M; Lehmer, B; Bauer, F E; Schneider, D P; Xue, Y Q; Luo, B

    2012-01-01

    We present results from a spectral analysis of a sample of high-redshift (z>3) X-ray selected AGN in the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S), the deepest X-ray survey to date. The sample is selected using the most recent spectroscopic and photometric information available in this field. It consists of 34 sources with median redshift z=3.7, 80 median net counts in the 0.5-7 keV band and median rest-frame absorption-corrected luminosity $L_{2-10 \\rmn{keV}}\\approx1.5\\times10^{44}\\rmn{erg} \\rmn{s^{-1}}$. Spectral analysis for the full sample is presented and the intrinsic column density distribution, corrected for observational biases using spectral simulations, is compared with the expectations of X-ray background (XRB) synthesis models. We find that $\\approx57$ per cent of the sources are highly obscured ($N_H>10^{23}\\rmn{cm^{-2}}$). Source number counts in the $0.5-2\\rmn{keV}$ band down to flux $F_{0.5-2 \\rmn{keV}}\\approx4\\times10^{-17}\\rmn{erg} \\rmn{s^{-1}cm^{-2}}$ are also presented. Our results are consis...

  11. High Spatial Resolution Spectroscopy of G292.0+1.8 with Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xue-Juan; Li, Shun-yu; Lu, Fang-Jun

    2014-01-01

    We present high spatial resolution X-ray spectroscopy of supernova remnant G292.0+1.8 with the {\\sl Chandra} observations. The X-ray emitting region of this remnant was divided into 25 $\\times$ 25 pixels with a scale of 20$\\arcsec$ $\\times$ 20$\\arcsec$ each. Spectra of 324 pixels were created and fitted with an absorbed one component non-equilibrium ionization model. With the spectral analysis results we obtained maps of absorbing column density, temperature, ionization age, and the abundances for O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, and Fe. The abundances of O, Ne and Mg show tight correlations between each other in the range of about two orders of magnitude, suggesting them all from explosive C/Ne burning. Meanwhile, the abundances of Si and S are also well correlated, indicating them to be the ashes of explosive explosive O-burning or incomplete Si-burbing. The Fe emission lines are not prominent among the whole remnant, and its abundance are significantly deduced, indicating that the reverse shock may have not propagated to...

  12. Chandra survey of nearby highly inclined disk galaxies - IV. New insights into the working of stellar feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q. Daniel; Li, Jiangtao; Jiang, Xiaochuan; Fang, Taotao

    2016-04-01

    Galaxy evolution is regulated by the interplay between galactic discs and their surrounding medium. We study this interplay by examining how the galactic coronal emission efficiency of stellar feedback depends on the (surface and specific) star formation rates (SFRs) and other parameters for a sample of 52 Chandra-observed nearby highly inclined disc galaxies. We first measure the star-forming galactic disc sizes, as well as the SFRs of these galaxies, using data from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer, and then show that (1) the specific 0.5-2 keV luminosity of the coronal emission correlates with the specific SFR in a sub-linear fashion: on average, LX/LK∝(SFR/M*)Γ with Γ = 0.29 ± 0.12; (2) the efficiency of the emission LX/SFR decreases with increasing surface SFR (ISFR; Γ = -0.44 ± 0.12); and (3) the characteristic temperature of the X-ray-emitting plasma weakly correlates with ISFR (Γ = 0.08 ± 0.04). These results, somewhat surprising and anti-intuitive, suggest that (i) the linear correlation between LX and SFR, as commonly presented, is largely due to the correlation of these two parameters with galaxy mass; (ii) much of the mechanical energy from stellar feedback likely drives global outflows with little X-ray cooling and with a mass-loading efficiency decreasing fast with increasing ISFR (Γ ≲ -0.5); (iii) these outflows heat and inflate the medium around the galactic disks of massive galaxies, reducing its radiative cooling rate, whereas for relatively low-mass galaxies, the energy in the outflows is probably dissipated in regions far away from the galactic discs.

  13. In Brief: Chandra Observatory marks 10 years in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2009-08-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, originally envisioned as a 5-year mission, was deployed into an elliptical orbit around Earth 10 years ago, on 23 July 1999. The most powerful X-ray telescope yet, Chandra has provided a peak into the high-energy universe and has independently confirmed the existence of dark energy. Martin Weisskopf, Chandra project scientist at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala., said discoveries made possible by the observatory “have made dramatic changes to our understanding of the universe and its constituents.” “The Great Observatories program—of which Chandra is a major part—shows how astronomers need as many tools as possible to tackle the big questions out there,” said Ed Weiler, associate administrator of NASA's Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The Hubble Space Telescope, Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, and Spitzer Space Telescope are NASA's other Great Observatories. For more information, visit http://chandra.harvard.edu/ten/ and http://chandra.nasa.gov.

  14. Chandra High-resolution Spectroscopy of the Circumnuclear Matter in the Broad-line Radio Galaxy 3C 445

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, J. N.; Gofford, J.; Braito, V.; Sambruna, R.

    2010-12-01

    We present evidence for X-ray line emitting and absorbing gas in the nucleus of the broad-line radio galaxy 3C 445. A 200 ks Chandra Low Energy Transmission Grating observation of 3C 445 reveals the presence of several highly ionized emission lines in the soft X-ray spectrum, primarily from the He- and H-like ions of O, Ne, Mg, and Si. Radiative recombination emission is detected from O VII and O VIII, indicating that the emitting gas is photoionized. The He-like emission appears to be resolved into forbidden and intercombination line components, which implies a high density of >1010 cm-3, while the oxygen lines are velocity broadened with a mean width of ~2600 km s-1 (FWHM). The density and widths of the ionized lines indicate an origin of the gas on sub-parsec scales in the broad-line region. The X-ray continuum of 3C 445 is heavily obscured either by a partial coverer or by a photoionized absorber of column density N H = 2 × 1023 cm-2 and ionization parameter log ξ = 1.4 erg cm s-1. However, the view of the X-ray line emission is unobscured, which requires the absorber to be located at radii well within any parsec-scale molecular torus. Instead we suggest that the X-ray absorber in 3C 445 may be associated with an outflowing but clumpy accretion disk wind, with an observed outflow velocity of ~10, 000 km s-1.

  15. Localizing INTEGRAL Sources with Chandra: X-Ray and Multi-Wavelength Identifications and Energy Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Tomsick, John A; Chaty, Sylvain; Rodriguez, Jerome; Rahoui, Farid; Halpern, Jules; Kalemci, Emrah; Arabaci, Mehtap Ozbey

    2012-01-01

    We report on Chandra observations of 18 hard X-ray (>20 keV) sources discovered with the INTEGRAL satellite near the Galactic plane. For 14 of the INTEGRAL sources, we have uncovered one or two potential Chandra counterparts per source. These provide soft X-ray (0.3-10 keV) spectra and sub-arcsecond localizations, which we use to identify counterparts at other wavelengths, providing information about the nature of each source. Despite the fact that all of the sources are within 5 degrees of the plane, four of the IGR sources are AGN (IGR J01545+6437, IGR J15391-5307, IGR J15415-5029, and IGR J21565+5948) and four others are likely AGN (IGR J03103+5706, IGR J09189-4418, IGR J16413-4046, and IGR J16560-4958) based on each of them having a strong IR excess and/or extended optical or near-IR emission. We compare the X-ray and near-IR fluxes of this group of sources to those of AGN selected by their 2-10 keV emission in previous studies and find that these IGR AGN are in the range of typical values. There is evide...

  16. Thin fused silica optics for a high angular resolution and large collecting area X Ray telescope after Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareschi, Giovanni; Citterio, Oberto; Civitani, Marta M; Basso, Stefano; Campana, Sergio; Conconi, Paolo; Ghigo, Mauro; Mattaini, Enrico; Moretti, Alberto; Parodi, Giancarlo; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero

    2014-08-01

    The implementation of an X-ray mission with high imaging capabilities, similar to those achieved with Chandra (SMART-X project, led by CfA together with other US institutes. This project is based on adjustable segments of thin foil mirrors with piezo-electric actuators, aiming to achieve an effective area >2 m2 at 1 keV and an angular resolution better than 1 arcsec HEW. Another attractive technology to realize an X-ray telescope with similar characteristics is being developed at NASA/Goddard. In this case the mirrors are based on Si substrates that are super-polished and figured starting from a bulky Si ingot, from which they are properly cut. Here we propose an alternative method based on precise direct grinding, figuring and polishing of thin (a few mm) glass shells with innovative deterministic polishing methods. This is followed by a final correction via ion figuring to obtain the desired accuracy. For this purpose, a temporary stiffening structure is used to support the shell from the polishing operations up to its integration in the telescope supporting structure. This paper deals with the technological process under development, the results achieved so far and some mission scenarios based on this kind of optics, aiming to achieve an effective area more than 10 times larger than Chandra and an angular resolution of 1 arcsec HEW on axis and of a few arcsec off-axis across a large field of view (1o in diameter).

  17. Chandra grating spectroscopy of three hot white dwarfs

    OpenAIRE

    Adamczak, J.; Werner, K.; Rauch, T.; Schuh, S.; Drake, J. J.; Kruk, J. W.

    2012-01-01

    Context. High-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopic observations of single hot white dwarfs are scarce. With the Chandra Low-Energy Transmission Grating, we have observed two white dwarfs, one is of spectral type DA (LB1919) and the other is a non-DA of spectral type PG1159 (PG1520+525). The spectra of both stars are analyzed, together with an archival Chandra spectrum of another DA white dwarf (GD246). Aims. The soft X-ray spectra of the two DA white dwarfs are investigated in orde...

  18. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Observation of the High-Redshift Cluster MS 1054-0321

    CERN Document Server

    Jeltema, T E; Bautz, M W; Malm, M R; Donahue, M; Garmire, G P; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Canizares, Claude R.; Bautz, Mark W.; Malm, Michael R.; Donahue, Megan; Garmire, Gordon P.

    2001-01-01

    We observed MS 1054-0321, the highest redshift cluster of galaxies in the Einstein Medium Sensitivity Survey (EMSS), with the Chandra ACIS-S detector. We find the X-ray temperature of the cluster to be 10.4 +1.7 -1.5 keV, lower than, but statistically consistent with, the temperature inferred previously. This temperature agrees well with the observed velocity dispersion and that found from weak lensing. We are also able to make the first positive identification of an iron line in this cluster and find a value of 0.26 +/- 0.15 for the abundance relative to solar, consistent with early enrichment of the ICM. We confirm significant substructure in the form of two distinct clumps in the X-ray distribution. The eastern clump seems to coincide with the main cluster component. It has a temperature of 10.5 +3.4 -2.1 keV, approximately the same as the average spectral temperature for the whole cluster. The western clump is cooler, with a temperature of 6.7 +1.7 -1.2 and may be a subgroup falling into the cluster. Thou...

  19. X-ray Lighthouses of the High-Redshift Universe. II. Further Snapshot Observations of the Most Luminous z>4 Quasars with Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Vignali, C; Schneider, D P; Kaspi, S

    2005-01-01

    We report on Chandra observations of a sample of 11 optically luminous (Mb4 quasars known and hence represent ideal witnesses of the end of the "dark age ''. Nine quasars are detected by Chandra, with ~2-57 counts in the observed 0.5-8 keV band. These detections increase the number of X-ray detected AGN at z>4 to ~90; overall, Chandra has detected ~85% of the high-redshift quasars observed with snapshot (few kilosecond) observations. PSS 1506+5220, one of the two X-ray undetected quasars, displays a number of notable features in its rest-frame ultraviolet spectrum, the most prominent being broad, deep SiIV and CIV absorption lines. The average optical-to-X-ray spectral index for the present sample (=-1.88+/-0.05) is steeper than that typically found for z>4 quasars but consistent with the expected value from the known dependence of this spectral index on quasar luminosity. We present joint X-ray spectral fitting for a sample of 48 radio-quiet quasars in the redshift range 3.99-6.28 for which Chandra observati...

  20. High-Resolution X-ray and Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of the Complex Intrinsic Absorption in NGC 4051 with Chandra and HST

    CERN Document Server

    Collinge, M J; Kaspi, S; Crenshaw, D M; Elvis, M; Krämer, S B; Reynolds, C S; Sambruna, R M; Wills, B J; Kaspi, Shai; Elvis, Martin; Kraemer, Steven B.; Reynolds, Christopher S; Sambruna, Rita M.; Wills, Beverley J.

    2001-01-01

    We present the results from simultaneous observations of the Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4051 with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer and the HST Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. The X-ray grating spectrum reveals absorption and emission lines from hydrogen-like and helium-like ions of O, Ne, Mg and Si. We resolve two distinct X-ray absorption systems: a high-velocity blueshifted system at -2340+/-130 km/s and a low-velocity blueshifted system at -600+/-130 km/s. In the UV spectrum we detect strong absorption, mainly from C IV, N V and Si IV, that is resolved into as many as nine different intrinsic absorption systems with velocities between -650 km/s and 30 km/s. Although the low-velocity X-ray absorption is consistent in velocity with many of the UV absorption systems, the high-velocity X-ray absorption seems to have no UV counterpart. In addition to the absorption and emission lines, we also observe rapid X-ray variability and a state of low X-ray flux during the last ~15 k...

  1. Revealing the heavily obscured AGN population of High Redshift 3CRR Sources with Chandra X-ray Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkes, Belinda J; Haas, Martin; Barthel, Peter; Leipski, Christian; Willner, S P; Worrall, D M; Birkinshaw, Mark; Antonucci, Robert; Ashby, M L N; Chini, Rolf; Fazio, G G; Lawrence, Charles; Ogle, Patrick; Schulz, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Chandra observations of a complete, flux-limited sample of 38 high-redshift (10) indicating obscuration (log N_H ~ 22-24 cm^-2). These properties and the correlation between obscuration and radio core-fraction are consistent with orientation-dependent obscuration as in Unification models. About half the NLRGs have soft X-ray hardness ratios and/or high [OIII] emission line to X-ray luminosity ratio suggesting obscuration by Compton thick (CT) material so that scattered nuclear or extended X-ray emission dominates (as in NGC1068). The ratios of unobscured to Compton-thin (10^{22} 1.5 x 10^{24} cm^-2) is 2.5:1.4:1 in this high luminosity, radio-selected sample. The obscured fraction is 0.5, higher than is typically reported for AGN at comparable luminosities from multi-wavelength surveys (0.1-0.3). Assuming random nuclear orientation, the unobscured half-opening angle of the disk/wind/torus structure is ~ 60deg and the obscuring material covers 30deg of which ~ 12deg is Compton thick. The multi-wavelength prope...

  2. Chandra high resolution spectroscopy of the circumnuclear matter in the Broad Line Radio Galaxy 3C445

    CERN Document Server

    Reeves, J N; Braito, V; Sambruna, R

    2010-01-01

    We present evidence for X-ray line emitting and absorbing gas in the nucleus of the Broad-Line Radio Galaxy (BLRG), 3C 445. A 200ks Chandra LETG observation of 3C 445 reveals the presence of several highly ionized emission lines in the soft X-ray spectrum, primarily from the He and H-like ions of O, Ne, Mg and Si. Radiative recombination emission is detected from O VII and O VIII, indicating that the emitting gas is photoionized. The He-like emission appears to be resolved into forbidden and intercombination line components, which implies a high density of >10^{10} cm^{-3}, while the Oxygen lines are velocity broadened with a mean width of ~2600 km s^{-1} (FWHM). The density and widths of the ionized lines indicate an origin of the gas on sub-parsec scales in the Broad Line Region (BLR).The X-ray continuum of 3C 445 is heavily obscured either by a partial coverer or by a photoionized absorber of column density N_{H}=2x10^{23} cm^{-2} and ionization parameter log(xi)=1.4 erg cm s^{-1}. However the view of the ...

  3. Highlights and Discoveries from the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Tananbaum, H; Tucker, W; Wilkes, B; Edmonds, P

    2014-01-01

    Within 40 years of the detection of the first extrasolar X-ray source in 1962,NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has achieved an increase in sensitivity of 10 orders of magnitude, comparable to the gain in going from naked-eye observations to the most powerful optical telescopes over the past 400 years. Chandra is unique in its capabilities for producing sub-arcsecond X-ray images with 100-200 eV energy resolution for energies in the range 0.08high precision, detecting extremely faint sources, and obtaining high resolution spectra of selected cosmic phenomena. The extended Chandra mission provides a long observing baseline with stable and well-calibrated instruments, enabling temporal studies over time-scales from milliseconds to years. In this report we present a selection of highlights that illustrate how observations using Chandra, sometimes alone, but often in conjunction with other telescopes, have deepened, and in some instances revolutionized, our understanding ...

  4. The Chandra X-Ray Observatory: Progress Report and Highlights

    CERN Document Server

    Weisskopf, Martin C

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 13 years, the Chandra X-ray Observatory's ability to provide high resolution X-ray images and spectra have established it as one of the most versatile and powerful tools for astrophysical research in the 21st century. Chandra explores the hot, x-ray-emitting regions of the universe, observing sources with fluxes spanning more than 10 orders of magnitude, from the X-ray brightest, Sco X-1, to the faintest sources in the Chandra Deep Field South survey. Thanks to its continuing operational life, the Chandra mission now also provides a long observing baseline which, in and of itself, is opening new research opportunities. In addition, observations in the past few years have deepened our understanding of the co-evolution of supermassive black holes and galaxies, the details of black hole accretion, the nature of dark energy and dark matter, the details of supernovae and their progenitors, the interiors of neutron stars, the evolution of massive stars, and the high-energy environment of protoplanetar...

  5. Chandra survey of nearby highly inclined disk galaxies -- IV: New insights into the working of stellar feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Q Daniel; Jiang, Xiaochuan; Fang, Taotao

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy evolution is regulated by the interplay between galactic disks and their surrounding medium. We study this interplay by examining how the galactic coronal emission efficiency of stellar feedback depends on the (surface and specific) star formation rates (SFRs) and other parameters for a sample of 52 Chandra-observed nearby highly inclined disk galaxies. We first measure the star forming galactic disk sizes, as well as the SFRs of these galaxies, using data from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer, and then show that 1) the specific 0.5-2~keV luminosity of the coronal emission correlates with the specific SFR in a {\\sl sub-linear} fashion: on average, $L_X/L_K \\propto (SFR/M_*)^{\\Gamma}$ with $\\Gamma =0.29\\pm0.12$; 2) the efficiency of the emission $ L_X/SFR$ decreases with increasing surface SFR ($I_{SFR}$; $\\Gamma = -0.44\\pm0.12$); and 3) the characteristic temperature of the X-ray-emitting plasma weakly correlates with $I_{SFR}$ ($\\Gamma = 0.08\\pm0.04$). These results, somewhat surprising and ant...

  6. Physical properties of the interstellar medium using high-resolution Chandra spectra: O K-edge absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatuzz, E.; Mendoza, C. [Centro de Física, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas (IVIC), P.O. Box 20632, Caracas 1020A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); García, J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, MS-6, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kallman, T. R. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Bautista, M. A.; Gorczyca, T. W., E-mail: egatuzz@ivic.gob.ve, E-mail: claudio@ivic.gob.ve, E-mail: javier@head.cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: manuel.bautista@wmich.edu, E-mail: thomas.gorczyca@wmich.edu, E-mail: timothy.r.kallman@nasa.gov [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Chandra high-resolution spectra toward eight low-mass Galactic binaries have been analyzed with a photoionization model that is capable of determining the physical state of the interstellar medium. Particular attention is given to the accuracy of the atomic data. Hydrogen column densities are derived with a broadband fit that takes into account pileup effects, and in general are in good agreement with previous results. The dominant features in the oxygen-edge region are O I and O II Kα absorption lines whose simultaneous fits lead to average values of the ionization parameter of log ξ = –2.90 and oxygen abundance of A{sub O} = 0.70. The latter is given relative to the standard by Grevesse and Sauval, but rescaling with the revision by Asplund et al. would lead to an average abundance value fairly close to solar. The low average oxygen column density (N{sub O} = 9.2 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup –2}) suggests a correlation with the low ionization parameters, the latter also being in evidence in the column density ratios N(O II)/N(O I) and N(O III)/N(O I) that are estimated to be less than 0.1. We do not find conclusive evidence for absorption by any other compound but atomic oxygen in our oxygen-edge region analysis.

  7. Chandra Catches Cannibal Galaxy in the Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory image of Perseus A provides new insight into how this supergiant galaxy has grown by cannibalizing other galaxies and gas in the vicinity. For the first time astronomers see an X-ray shadow cast by a smaller galaxy as its gas is being stripped away by the enormous galaxy. The research was reported by Professor Andrew Fabian of the Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge, England on June 7 at the 196th National Meeting of the American Astronomical Society, in Rochester, NY. Other members of the research team are Jeremy Sanders, Stefano Ettori, Steve Allen, Carolin Crawford, Kazushi Iwasawa, and Roderick Johnstone of the Institute of Astronomy, Gregory Taylor on the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM, and Patrick Ogle of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA. Perseus A, or NGC 1275, is in the center of a large galaxy cluster 320 million light years from Earth. The cluster, which contains thousands of galaxies and enough gas to make thousands more, is one of the largest gravitationally bound objects in the universe. Over the eons, Perseus A has accumulated hundreds of billions of stars to become one of the most massive known galaxies as gas and galaxies have been pulled inward by gravity. The Chandra observation shows a region of hot gas that extends over several hundred thousand light years. The gas in the outer portion of the cluster has a temperature of 70 million degrees. The cluster gas cools gradually and settles toward the center of the cluster. A galaxy with "only" about 20 billion stars is falling into Perseus A (located at two o'clock from the center of the image) and appears as a small dark patch due to absorption of X rays by cool gas in the infalling galaxy. Another larger hole seen further out is thought to be due to a bubble of high-energy particles ejected in an explosion from Perseus A hundreds of millions of years ago. These outbursts are presumably fueled by matter releasing tremendous

  8. THE CHANDRA MULTI-WAVELENGTH PROJECT: OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY AND THE BROADBAND SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF X-RAY-SELECTED AGNs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trichas, Markos; Green, Paul J.; Aldcroft, Tom; Kim, Dong-Woo; Mossman, Amy [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Silverman, John D. [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha 5-1-5, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Barkhouse, Wayne [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202 (United States); Cameron, Robert A. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Constantin, Anca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, James Madison University, PHCH, Harrisonburg, VA 22807 (United States); Ellison, Sara L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8P 1A1 (Canada); Foltz, Craig [Division of Astronomical Sciences, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22230 (United States); Haggard, Daryl [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Jannuzi, Buell T. [NOAO, Kitt Peak National Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); Marshall, Herman L. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Perez, Laura M. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Romero-Colmenero, Encarni [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory, 7935 (South Africa); Ruiz, Angel [Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera-INAF, Milan (Italy); Smith, Malcolm G., E-mail: mtrichas@cfa.harvard.edu [Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory, La Serena (Chile); and others

    2012-06-01

    From optical spectroscopy of X-ray sources observed as part of the Chandra Multi-wavelength Project (ChaMP), we present redshifts and classifications for a total of 1569 Chandra sources from our targeted spectroscopic follow-up using the FLWO/1.5 m, SAAO/1.9 m, WIYN 3.5 m, CTIO/4 m, KPNO/4 m, Magellan/6.5 m, MMT/6.5 m, and Gemini/8 m telescopes, and from archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopy. We classify the optical counterparts as 50% broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs), 16% emission line galaxies, 14% absorption line galaxies, and 20% stars. We detect QSOs out to z {approx} 5.5 and galaxies out to z {approx} 3. We have compiled extensive photometry, including X-ray (ChaMP), ultraviolet (GALEX), optical (SDSS and ChaMP-NOAO/MOSAIC follow-up), near-infrared (UKIDSS, Two Micron All Sky Survey, and ChaMP-CTIO/ISPI follow-up), mid-infrared (WISE), and radio (FIRST and NVSS) bands. Together with our spectroscopic information, this enables us to derive detailed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for our extragalactic sources. We fit a variety of template SEDs to determine bolometric luminosities, and to constrain AGNs and starburst components where both are present. While {approx}58% of X-ray Seyferts (10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} < L{sub 2-10keV} <10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) require a starburst event (>5% starburst contribution to bolometric luminosity) to fit observed photometry only 26% of the X-ray QSO (L{sub 2-10keV} >10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) population appear to have some kind of star formation contribution. This is significantly lower than for the Seyferts, especially if we take into account torus contamination at z > 1 where the majority of our X-ray QSOs lie. In addition, we observe a rapid drop of the percentage of starburst contribution as X-ray luminosity increases. This is consistent with the quenching of star formation by powerful QSOs, as predicted by the merger model, or with a time lag between the peak of star formation and QSO

  9. THE CHANDRA MULTI-WAVELENGTH PROJECT: OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY AND THE BROADBAND SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF X-RAY-SELECTED AGNs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From optical spectroscopy of X-ray sources observed as part of the Chandra Multi-wavelength Project (ChaMP), we present redshifts and classifications for a total of 1569 Chandra sources from our targeted spectroscopic follow-up using the FLWO/1.5 m, SAAO/1.9 m, WIYN 3.5 m, CTIO/4 m, KPNO/4 m, Magellan/6.5 m, MMT/6.5 m, and Gemini/8 m telescopes, and from archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopy. We classify the optical counterparts as 50% broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs), 16% emission line galaxies, 14% absorption line galaxies, and 20% stars. We detect QSOs out to z ∼ 5.5 and galaxies out to z ∼ 3. We have compiled extensive photometry, including X-ray (ChaMP), ultraviolet (GALEX), optical (SDSS and ChaMP-NOAO/MOSAIC follow-up), near-infrared (UKIDSS, Two Micron All Sky Survey, and ChaMP-CTIO/ISPI follow-up), mid-infrared (WISE), and radio (FIRST and NVSS) bands. Together with our spectroscopic information, this enables us to derive detailed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for our extragalactic sources. We fit a variety of template SEDs to determine bolometric luminosities, and to constrain AGNs and starburst components where both are present. While ∼58% of X-ray Seyferts (1042 erg s–1 2–10keV 44 erg s–1) require a starburst event (>5% starburst contribution to bolometric luminosity) to fit observed photometry only 26% of the X-ray QSO (L2–10keV >1044 erg s–1) population appear to have some kind of star formation contribution. This is significantly lower than for the Seyferts, especially if we take into account torus contamination at z > 1 where the majority of our X-ray QSOs lie. In addition, we observe a rapid drop of the percentage of starburst contribution as X-ray luminosity increases. This is consistent with the quenching of star formation by powerful QSOs, as predicted by the merger model, or with a time lag between the peak of star formation and QSO activity. We have tested the hypothesis that there should be a

  10. 75 FR 7471 - Chandra Coffee and Rabun Boatworks, Complainants v. Georgia Power Company, Respondent; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Chandra Coffee and Rabun Boatworks, Complainants v. Georgia Power Company... January 8, 2010, Chandra Coffee and Rabun Boatworks (Complainants) filed with the Federal...

  11. Gravitational Lens Helps Chandra Find Rare Type of Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-01

    cases representing a Type 2 quasar, the optical radiation from the quasar is absorbed while the high-energy X rays penetrate the veil. The energy absorbed by the gas and dust is re-radiated at lower energy infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. Six of the submillimeter sources that were discovered were not detected in X rays. This could mean that a central black hole is shrouded by an unusually thick cloud of dust and gas, or an additional source of submillimeter radiation is present, perhaps due to a burst of star formation. A paper describing these results will be published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. The Chandra observations were made on November 5, 1999 using the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS). The team involved scientists from the Instititute of Astronomy, the University of Durham, University College London, and the Observatoire Midi-Pyrenees in France. The ACIS instrument was built for NASA by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, and Pennsylvania State University, University Park. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program. TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, Calif., is the prime contractor for the spacecraft. The Smithsonian's Chandra X-ray Center controls science and flight operations from Cambridge, Mass. For images connected to this release, and to follow Chandra's progress, visit the Chandra site at : http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2000/type2/index.html AND http://chandra.nasa.gov

  12. Chandra High Resolution Spectroscopy of the Circumnuclear Matter in the Broad Line Radio Galaxy, 3C 445

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, J. N.; Gofford, J.; Braito, V.; Sambruna, R.

    2010-01-01

    We present evidence for X-ray line emitting and absorbing gas in the nucleus of the Broad-Line Radio Galaxy (BLRG), 3C445. A 200 ks Chandra LETG observation of 3C 445 reveals the presence of several highly ionized emission lines in the soft X-ray spectrum, primarily from the He and H-like ions of O, Ne, Mg and Si. Radiative recombination emission is detected from O VII and O VIII, indicating that the emitting gas is photoionized. The He-like emission appears to be resolved into forbidden and intercombination line components, which implies a high density of greater than 10(sup 10) cm(sup -3), while the lines are velocity broadened with a mean width of 2600 km s(sup -1). The density and widths of the ionized lines indicate an origin of the gas on sub-parsec scales in the Broad Line Region (BLR). The X-ray continuum of 3C 445 is heavily obscured by a photoionized absorber of column density N(sub H) = 2 x 10(sup 23) cm(sup -2) and ionization parameter log xi = 1.4 erg cm s(sup -1). However the view of the X-ray line emission is unobscured, which requires the absorber to be located at radii well within any parsec scale molecular torus. Instead we suggest that the X-ray absorber in 3C 445 may be associated with an outflowing, but clumpy accretion disk wind, with an observed outflow velocity of approximately 10000 km s(sup -1).

  13. Chandra X-ray Observatory Optical Axis and Aimpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Chandra X-ray Observatory revolutionized the X-ray astronomy as being the first, and so far the only, X-ray telescope achieving sub-arcsecond resolution. Chandra comprises of three principal elements: the High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA), Pointing Control and Aspect Determination (PCAD) system, and the Science Instrument Module (SIM). To achieve and retain the unprecedented imaging quality, it is critical that these three principal elements stay rigid and stable for the entire life time of the Chandra operation. Tracking the Chandra optical axis and aimpoint with respect to detector positions is the most relevant measurement for understanding telescope stability. The study shows that both the optical axis and the aimpoint has been drifting since Chandra launch. I will discuss the telescope focal-point, optical axis, aimpoint, their positiondrifts during the mission, the impact to Chandra operations, and the permanent default aimpoint, to be implemented in Chandra cycle 18.

  14. Contributions of the NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory performed its first observations over a decade ago. Chandra's spectacular images and detailed spectra of astrophysical systems ranging from solar system objects to distant galaxies and galaxy clusters have provided information on such diverse topics as the properties of planetary and cometary atmospheres, stellar formation and demise, black hole-galaxy-cluster interactions, and properties of dark matter and dark energy. This presentation highlights some discoveries made with Chandra and briefly discusses future prospects.

  15. The BMW-Chandra Serendipitous Source Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, P.; Campana, S.; Mignani, R. P.; Moretti, A.; Mottini, M.; Panzera, M. R.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2004-08-01

    We present the BMW-Chandra source catalog drawn from all Chandra ACIS-I pointed observations with an exposure time in excess of 10 ks public as of March 2003 (136 observations). Using the wavelet detection algorithm developed by Lazzati et al. (1999) and Campana et al. (1999), which can characterize point-like as well as extended sources, we identified 21325 sources. Among them, 16758 are serendipitous, i.e. not associated with the targets of the pointings, and do not require a non-automated analysis. This makes our catalog the largest compilation of Chandra sources to date. The 0.5--10 keV absorption corrected fluxes of these sources range from ˜ 3× 10-16 to 9×10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 with a median of 7× 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. The catalog consists of count rates and relative errors in three energy bands (total, 0.5--7 keV; soft, 0.5--2 keV; and hard band, 2--7 keV), and source positions relative to the highest signal-to-noise detection among the three bands. The wavelet algorithm also provides an estimate of the extension of the source which we refined with a σ -clipping method. We report on the main properties of the sources in our catalog, such as sky coverage ( ˜ 8 deg2 at a limiting flux of ˜ 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1) and cosmological log N--log S for a subset at high Galactic latitude (∣ b ∣ > 20o) for a flux as low as ˜ 1.5 × 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. Support for this work was provided by the Italian MIUR.

  16. The CHANDRA HETGS X-ray Grating Spectrum of Eta Carinae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, M. F.; Swank, J. H.; Petre, R.; Ishibashi, K.; Davidson, K.; Townsley, L.; Smith, R.; White, S.; Viotti, R.; Damineli, A.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Eta Carinae may be the most massive and luminous star in the Galaxy and is suspected to be a massive, colliding wind binary system. The CHANDRA X-ray observatory has obtained a calibrated, high-resolution X-ray spectrum of the star uncontaminated by the nearby extended soft X-ray emission. Our 89 ksec CHANDRA observation with the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) shows that the hot gas near the star is non-isothermal. The temperature distribution may represent the emission on either side of the colliding wind bow shock, effectively 'resolving' the shock. If so, the pre-shock wind velocities are approximately 700 and 1800 km/s in our analysis, and these velocities may be interpreted as the terminal velocities of the winds from 71 Carinae and from the hidden companion star. The forbidden-to-intercombination line ratios for the He-like ions of S, Si, and Fe are large, indicating that the line forming region lies far from the stellar photosphere. The iron fluorescent line at 1.93 angstroms, first detected by ASCA, is clearly resolved from the thermal iron line in the CHANDRA grating spectrum. The Fe fluorescent line is weaker in our CHANDRA observation than in any of the ASCA spectra. The CHANDRA observation also provides the first high-time resolution lightcurve of the uncontaminated stellar X-ray emission from 77 Carinae and shows that there is no significant, coherent variability during the CHANDRA observation. The 77 Carinae CHANDRA grating spectrum is unlike recently published X-ray grating spectra of single massive stars in significant ways and is generally consistent with colliding wind emission in a massive binary.

  17. The Chandra/HETG view of NGC 1365 in a Compton-thick state

    OpenAIRE

    Nardini, E.; Gofford, J; Reeves, JN; Braito, V.; Risaliti, G.; Costa, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present the analysis of a Chandra High-Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) observation of the local Seyfert galaxy NGC 1365. The source, well known for its dramatic X-ray spectral variability, was caught in a reflection-dominated, Compton-thick state. The high spatial resolution afforded by Chandra allowed us to isolate the soft X-ray emission from the active nucleus, neglecting most of the contribution from the kpc-scale starburst ring. The HETG spectra thus revealed a wealth of He- and H-...

  18. The CHANDRA HETGS X-ray Grating Spectrum of Eta Car

    OpenAIRE

    Corcoran, M. F; Swank, J.H.; Petre, R.; Ishibashi, K.; Davidson, K.; Townsley, L.; Smith, R.; S. White; Viotti, R; A. Damineli

    2001-01-01

    Eta Car may be the most massive and luminous star in the Galaxy and is suspected to be a massive, colliding wind binary system. The CHANDRA X-ray observatory has obtained a calibrated, high-resolution X-ray spectrum of the star uncontaminated by the nearby extended soft X-ray emisssion. Our 89 ksec CHANDRA observation with the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) shows that the hot gas near the star is non-isothermal. The temperature distribution may represent the emission on...

  19. Chandra and XMM–Newton Observations of H2O Maser Galaxy Mrk 266

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. Wang; J. S. Zhang; J. H. Fan

    2011-03-01

    For H2O megamaser galaxy Mrk 266, its Chandra and XMM–Newton data are analyzed here. It shows existence of two obscured nuclei (separation is ∼ 5''). Our preferred model, the high energy reflected model can fit the hard component of both nuclei spectra well.

  20. Stellar Forensics with Striking Image from Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    exploded. Assuming that the pulsar was born at the center of the remnant, it is thought that recoil from the lopsided explosion may have kicked the pulsar in this direction. Pulsar Wind Nebula in G292.0+1.8 Pulsar Wind Nebula in G292.0+1.8 Surrounding the pulsar is a so-called pulsar wind nebula, a magnetized bubble of high-energy particles. The narrow, jet-like feature running from north to south in the image is likely parallel to the spin axis of the pulsar. This structure is most easily seen in high energy X-rays. In the case of G292.0+1.8, the spin direction and the kick direction do not appear to be aligned, in contrast to apparent spin-kick alignments in some other supernova remnants. Another intriguing feature of this remnant is the bright equatorial belt of X-ray emission that extends across the center of the remnant. This structure is thought to have been created when the star - before it died - expelled material from around its equator via winds. The orientation of the equatorial belt suggests that the parent star maintained the same spin axis both before and after it exploded. DSS Optical Image of G292.0+1.8 DSS Optical Image of G292.0+1.8 "The detection of the pulsar and its wind nebula confirms that the supernova that led to G292 produced a neutron star through the collapse of the core of a massive star," said coauthor John Hughes of Rutgers University, "The ability to study the asymmetry of the original explosion using X-ray images of the remnant gives us a powerful new technique for learning about these cataclysmic events." These results will appear in an upcoming issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for the agency's Science Mission Directorate. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations from the Chandra X-ray Center in Cambridge, Mass.

  1. Chandra Independently Determines Hubble Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    light years from Earth. These results do not rely on the traditional distance ladder. Bonamente and his colleagues find the Hubble constant to be 77 kilometers per second per megaparsec (a megaparsec is equal to 3.26 million light years), with an uncertainty of about 15%. This result agrees with the values determined using other techniques. The Hubble constant had previously been found to be 72, give or take 8, kilometers per second per megaparsec based on Hubble Space Telescope observations. The new Chandra result is important because it offers the independent confirmation that scientists have been seeking and fixes the age of the Universe between 12 and 14 billion years. Chandra X-ray Image of CL J1226.9+3332 Chandra X-ray Image of CL J1226.9+3332 "These new results are entirely independent of all previous methods of measuring the Hubble constant," said team member Marshall Joy also of MSFC. The astronomers used a phenomenon known as the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, where photons in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) interact with electrons in the hot gas that pervades the enormous galaxy clusters. The photons acquire energy from this interaction, which distorts the signal from the microwave background in the direction of the clusters. The magnitude of this distortion depends on the density and temperature of the hot electrons and the physical size of the cluster. Using radio telescopes to measure the distortion of the microwave background and Chandra to measure the properties of the hot gas, the physical size of the cluster can be determined. From this physical size and a simple measurement of the angle subtended by the cluster, the rules of geometry can be used to derive its distance. The Hubble constant is determined by dividing previously measured cluster speeds by these newly derived distances. Chandra X-ray Image of Abell 1689 Chandra X-ray Image of Abell 1689 This project was championed by Chandra's telescope mirror designer, Leon Van Speybroeck, who passed

  2. Chandra Data Reveal Rapidly Whirling Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    A new study using results from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory provides one of the best pieces of evidence yet that many supermassive black holes are spinning extremely rapidly. The whirling of these giant black holes drives powerful jets that pump huge amounts of energy into their environment and affects galaxy growth. A team of scientists compared leading theories of jets produced by rotating supermassive black holes with Chandra data. A sampling of nine giant galaxies that exhibit large disturbances in their gaseous atmospheres showed that the central black holes in these galaxies must be spinning at near their maximum rates. People Who Read This Also Read... NASA’s Swift Satellite Catches First Supernova in The Act of Exploding Black Holes Have Simple Feeding Habits Jet Power and Black Hole Assortment Revealed in New Chandra Image Erratic Black Hole Regulates Itself "We think these monster black holes are spinning close to the limit set by Einstein's theory of relativity, which means that they can drag material around them at close to the speed of light," said Rodrigo Nemmen, a visiting graduate student at Penn State University, and lead author of a paper on the new results presented at American Astronomical Society in Austin, Texas. The research reinforces other, less direct methods previously used which have indicated that some stellar and supermassive black holes are spinning rapidly. According to Einstein's theory, a rapidly spinning black hole makes space itself rotate. This effect, coupled with gas spiraling toward the black hole, can produce a rotating, tightly wound vertical tower of magnetic field that flings a large fraction of the inflowing gas away from the vicinity of the black hole in an energetic, high-speed jet. Computer simulations by other authors have suggested that black holes may acquire their rapid spins when galaxies merge, and through the accretion of gas from their surroundings. "Extremely fast spin might be very common for large

  3. The First Chandra Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; /NASA, Marshall; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Cameron, Robert A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /SLAC; Gandhi,; Foellmi, Cedric; /European Southern Obs., Chile; Elsner, Ronald F.; /NASA, Marshall; Patel, Sandeep K.; /USRA, Huntsville; Wu, Kinwah; /Mullard Space Sci. Lab.; O' Dell, Stephen; /NASA, Marshall

    2005-09-09

    Before the official first-light images, the Chandra X-ray Observatory obtained an X-ray image of the field to which its focal plane was first exposed. We describe this historic observation and report our study of the first Chandra field. Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) detected 15 X-ray sources, the brightest being dubbed ''Leon X-1'' to honor the Chandra Telescope Scientist, Leon Van Speybroeck. Based upon our analysis of the X-ray data and spectroscopy at the European Southern Observatory (ESO; La Silla, Chile), we find that Leon X-1 is a Type-1 (unobscured) active galactic nucleus (AGN) at a redshift z = 0.3207. Leon X-1 exhibits strong Fe II emission and a broad-line Balmer decrement that is unusually flat for an AGN. Within the context of the Eigenvector-1 correlation space, these properties suggest that Leon X-1 may be a massive ({ge} 10{sup 9} M{sub {circle_dot}}) black hole, accreting at a rate approaching its Eddington limit.

  4. Chandra Captures Flare From Brown Dwarf

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    only 16 light years from Earth. The absence of X-rays from LP 944-20 during the non-flaring period is in itself a significant result. It sets the lowest limit on steady X-ray power produced by a brown dwarf, and shows that the million degree Celsius upper atmospheres, or coronas, cease to exist as the surface temperature of a brown dwarf cools below about 2500 degrees Celsius. "This is an important confirmation of the trend that hot gas in the atmospheres of lower mass stars is produced only in flares," said Professor Lars Bildsten of the University of California, Santa Barbara, also a member of the team. Brown dwarfs have too little mass to sustain significant nuclear reactions in their cores. Their primary source of energy is the release of gravitational energy as they slowly contract. They are very dim ­ less than a tenth of a percent as luminous as the Sun -- and of great interest to astronomers because they are poorly understood and probably a very common class of objects that are intermediate between normal stars and giant planets. The 12-hour observation of LP 944-20 was made on December 15, 1999, using the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS). The ACIS instrument was built for NASA by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, and Pennsylvania State University, University Park. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program. TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, Calif., is the prime contractor for the spacecraft. The Smithsonian's Chandra X-ray Center controls science and flight operations from Cambridge, Mass. Images associated with this release are available on the World Wide Web at: http://chandra.harvard.edu AND http://chandra.nasa.gov High resolution digital versions of the X-ray image (JPG, 300 dpi TIFF) are available at the Internet sites listed above.

  5. High Energy $\

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment is a high statistics exposure of BEBC filled with hydrogen to both @n and &bar.@n beams. The principal physics aims are : \\item a) The study of the production of charmed mesons and baryons using fully constrained events. \\end{enumerate} b) The study of neutral current interactions on the free proton. \\item c) Measurement of the cross-sections for production of exclusive final state N* and @D resonances. \\item d) Studies of hadronic final states in charged and neutral current reactions. \\item e) Measurement of inclusive charged current cross-sections and structure functions. \\end{enumerate}\\\\ \\\\ The neutrino flux is determined by monitoring the flux of muons in the neutrino shield. The Internal Picket Fence and External Muon Identifier of BEBC are essential parts of the experiment. High resolution cameras are used to search for visible decays of short-lived particles.

  6. Beyond Chandra - the X-ray Surveyor

    CERN Document Server

    Weisskopf, Martin C; Tananbaum, Harvey; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 16 years, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has provided an unparalleled means for exploring the universe with its half-arcsecond angular resolution. Chandra studies have deepened our understanding of galaxy clusters, active galactic nuclei, galaxies, supernova remnants, planets, and solar system objects addressing almost all areas of current interest in astronomy and astrophysics. As we look beyond Chandra, it is clear that comparable or even better angular resolution with greatly increased photon throughput is essential to address even more demanding science questions, such as the formation and subsequent growth of black hole seeds at very high redshift; the emergence of the first galaxy groups; and details of feedback over a large range of scales from galaxies to galaxy clusters. Recently, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, together with the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, has initiated a concept study for such a mission named the X-ray Surveyor. This study starts with a baseline payloa...

  7. Chandra Reviews Black Hole Musical: Epic But Off-Key

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    A gigantic sonic boom generated by a supermassive black hole has been found with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, along with evidence for a cacophony of deep sound. This discovery was made by using data from the longest X-ray observation ever of M87, a nearby giant elliptical galaxy. M87 is centrally located in the Virgo cluster of galaxies and is known to harbor one of the Universe's most massive black holes. Scientists detected loops and rings in the hot, X-ray emitting gas that permeates the cluster and surrounds the galaxy. These loops provide evidence for periodic eruptions that occurred near the supermassive black hole, and that generate changes in pressure, or pressure waves, in the cluster gas that manifested themselves as sound. Chandra Low Energy X-ray Images of M87 Chandra Low Energy X-ray Images of M87 "We can tell that many deep and different sounds have been rumbling through this cluster for most of the lifetime of the Universe," said William Forman of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA). The outbursts in M87, which happen every few million years, prevent the huge reservoir of gas in the cluster from cooling and forming many new stars. Without these outbursts and resultant heating, M87 would not be the elliptical galaxy it is today. "If this black hole wasn't making all of this noise, M87 could have been a completely different type of galaxy," said team member Paul Nulsen, also of the CfA, "possibly a huge spiral galaxy about 30 times brighter than the Milky Way." Chandra High Energy X-ray Image of M87 Chandra High Energy X-ray Image of M87 The outbursts result when material falls toward the black hole. While most of the matter is swallowed, some of it was violently ejected in jets. These jets are launched from regions close to the black hole (neither light nor sound can escape from the black hole itself) and push into the cluster's gas, generating cavities and sound which then propagate outwards. Chandra's M87 observations also

  8. High energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report here on progress made for the period from December 1, 1992 (the date of submission of our latest progress report) to November 30, 1993 for DOE Grant No. DE-FG05-92ER40717. The new results from the SMC experiment have generated a buzz of theoretical activity. Our involvement with the D0 experiment and the upgrade has increased substantially during the past two years so that we now have six people heavily committed and making what can only be described as a large and disproportionate impact on D0 physics output. Some of the new developments made here at Rice in Neural Network and Probability Density Estimation techniques for data analysis promise to have applications both in D0 and beyond. We report a load of new results from our high-pt jet photoproduction experiment. In addition we have been working on KTeV, albeit without having adequate funding for this work. Progress on the theoretical front has been nothing short of amazing, as is reported herein. In a grand lecture tour during this sabbatical year, Paul Stevenson has already reported his breakthroughs at ten institutions, including CERN, Oxford, Cambridge, Rutherford Lab, Imperial College, and Durham University. The group at Rice University has had an exceptionally productive year and we are justifiably proud of the progress which is reported here

  9. Ten Years of Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2009-01-01

    We celebrated the 10-th anniversary of the Launch of the Chandra X-ray Observatory on July 13, 2009. During these 10 years data from this Great Observatory have had a profound impact on 21st century astrophysics. With its unrivaled capability to produce sub-arcsecond images, the Observatory has enabled astronomers to make new discoveries in topics as diverse as comets and cosmology. We shall review some of the highlights, discuss the current status, and future plans.

  10. Chandra Examines Black Holes Large and Small in Nearby Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    's supermassive black hole." On astronomical scales, this galaxy is considered quite close, a mere13 million light years from Earth. Since it’s located near the plane of our own Milky Way Galaxy, the Circinus galaxy is partially hidden by intervening dust along our line of sight. As a result, the galaxy went unnoticed until about 25 years ago. Along with Sambruna and Bauer, the first research group included Hagai Netzer of Tel-Aviv University and the following collaborators from Penn State: Niel Brandt, George Chartas, Gordon Garmire, John Nousek, and Shai Kaspi. The University of Maryland team also included Andrew Wilson. The results of theses Chandra observations appear in recent and upcoming papers in The Astrophysical and Astronomical Journals. Observations with Chandra, using the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) and the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS), were made on June 6-7, 2000 and observations without the HETGS were made on March 14, 2000. The HETG and ACIS instruments were built for NASA by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, and Pennsylvania State University, University Park. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, manages the Chandra program for the Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, California, is the prime contractor for the spacecraft. The Smithsonian's Chandra X-ray Center controls science and flight operations from Cambridge, MA. Images associated with this release are available on the World Wide Web at: http://chandra.harvard.edu AND http://chandra.nasa.gov

  11. Chandra Grating Spectroscopy of Three Hot White Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczak, J.; Werner, K.; Rauch, T.; Schuh, S.; Drake, J. J.; Kruk, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopic observations of single hot white dwarfs are scarce. With the Chandra Low-Energy Transmission Grating, we have observed two white dwarfs, one is of spectral type DA (LB1919) and the other is a non-DA of spectral type PG1159 (PG1520+525). The spectra of both stars are analyzed, together with an archival Chandra spectrum of another DA white dwarf (GD246). Aims. The soft X-ray spectra of the two DA white dwarfs are investigated in order to study the effect of gravitational settling and radiative levitation of metals in their photospheres. LB1919 is of interest because it has a significantly lower metallicity than DAs with otherwise similar atmospheric parameters. GD246 is the only white dwarf known that shows identifiable individual iron lines in the soft X-ray range. For the PG1159 star, a precise effective temperature determination is performed in order to confine the position of the blue edge of the GW Vir instability region in the HRD. Methods. The Chandra spectra are analyzed with chemically homogeneous as well as stratified NLTE model atmospheres that assume equilibrium between gravitational settling and radiative acceleration of chemical elements. Archival EUV and UV spectra obtained with EUVE, FUSE, and HST are utilized to support the analysis. Results. No metals could be identified in LB1919. All observations are compatible with a pure hydrogen atmosphere. This is in stark contrast to the vast majority of hot DA white dwarfs that exhibit light and heavy metals and to the stratified models that predict significant metal abundances in the atmosphere. For GD246 we find that neither stratified nor homogeneous models can fit the Chandra spectrum. The Chandra spectrum of PG1520+525 constrains the effective temperature to T(sub eff) = 150 000 +/- 10 000 K. Therefore, this nonpulsating star together with the pulsating prototype of the GWVir class (PG1159-035) defines the location of the blue edge of the GWVir instability region

  12. Chandra grating spectroscopy of three hot white dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczak, J.; Werner, K.; Rauch, T.; Schuh, S.; Drake, J. J.; Kruk, J. W.

    2012-10-01

    Context. High-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopic observations of single hot white dwarfs are scarce. With the Chandra Low-Energy Transmission Grating, we have observed two white dwarfs, one is of spectral type DA (LB 1919) and the other is a non-DA of spectral type PG 1159 (PG 1520+525). The spectra of both stars are analyzed, together with an archival Chandra spectrum of another DA white dwarf (GD 246). Aims: The soft X-ray spectra of the two DA white dwarfs are investigated in order to study the effect of gravitational settling and radiative levitation of metals in their photospheres. LB 1919 is of interest because it has a significantly lower metallicity than DAs with otherwise similar atmospheric parameters. GD 246 is the only white dwarf known that shows identifiable individual iron lines in the soft X-ray range. For the PG 1159 star, a precise effective temperature determination is performed in order to confine the position of the blue edge of the GW Vir instability region in the HRD. Methods: The Chandra spectra are analyzed with chemically homogeneous as well as stratified NLTE model atmospheres that assume equilibrium between gravitational settling and radiative acceleration of chemical elements. Archival EUV and UV spectra obtained with EUVE, FUSE, and HST are utilized to support the analysis. Results: No metals could be identified in LB 1919. All observations are compatible with a pure hydrogen atmosphere. This is in stark contrast to the vast majority of hot DA white dwarfs that exhibit light and heavy metals and to the stratified models that predict significant metal abundances in the atmosphere. For GD 246 we find that neither stratified nor homogeneous models can fit the Chandra spectrum. The Chandra spectrum of PG 1520+525 constrains the effective temperature to Teff = 150 000 ± 10 000 K. Therefore, this nonpulsating star together with the pulsating prototype of the GW Vir class (PG 1159 - 035) defines the location of the blue edge of the GW Vir

  13. Spatially resolving a starburst galaxy at hard X-ray energies: NuSTAR, CHANDRA, AND VLBA observations of NGC 253

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wik, D. R.; Lehmer, B. D.; Hornschemeier, A. E.;

    2014-01-01

    intermediate state black hole X-ray binaries. The global X-ray emission of the galaxy-dominated by the off-nuclear ULX and nuclear sources, which are also likely ULXs-falls steeply (photon index ≳ 3) above 10 keV, consistent with other NuSTAR-observed ULXs, and no significant excess above the background is...... the first time. As a follow up to our initial study of its nuclear region, we present the first results concerning the full galaxy from simultaneous NuSTAR, Chandra, and Very Long Baseline Array monitoring of the local starburst galaxy NGC 253. Above ~10 keV, nearly all the emission is concentrated...... within 100" of the galactic center, produced almost exclusively by three nuclear sources, an off-nuclear ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX), and a pulsar candidate that we identify for the first time in these observations. We detect 21 distinct sources in energy bands up to 25 keV, mostly consisting of...

  14. Spatially Resolving a Starburst Galaxy at Hard X-ray Energies: NuSTAR, Chandra, AND VLBA Observations of NGC 253

    CERN Document Server

    Wik, Daniel R; Hornschemeier, Ann E; Yukita, Mihoko; Ptak, Andrew; Zezas, Andreas; Antoniou, Vallia; Argo, Megan K; Bechtol, Keith; Boggs, Steven; Christensen, Finn; Craig, William; Hailey, Charles; Harrison, Fiona; Krivanos, Roman; Maccarone, Thomas J; Stern, Daniel; Venters, Tonia; Zhang, William W

    2014-01-01

    Prior to the launch of NuSTAR, it was not feasible to spatially resolve the hard (E > 10 keV) emission from galaxies beyond the Local Group. The combined NuSTAR dataset, comprised of three ~165 ks observations, allows spatial characterization of the hard X-ray emission in the galaxy NGC 253 for the first time. As a follow up to our initial study of its nuclear region, we present the first results concerning the full galaxy from simultaneous NuSTAR, Chandra, and VLBA monitoring of the local starburst galaxy NGC 253. Above ~10 keV, nearly all the emission is concentrated within 100" of the galactic center, produced almost exclusively by three nuclear sources, an off-nuclear ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX), and a pulsar candidate that we identify for the first time in these observations. We detect 21 distinct sources in energy bands up to 25 keV, mostly consisting of intermediate state black hole X-ray binaries. The global X-ray emission of the galaxy - dominated by the off-nuclear ULX and nuclear sources, whic...

  15. Six Years Into Its Mission, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory Continues to Achieve Scientific Firsts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    In August 1999, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory opened for business. Six years later, it continues to achieve scientific firsts. "When Chandra opened its sunshade doors for the first time, it opened the possibility of studying the X-ray emission of the universe with unprecedented clarity," said Chandra project scientist Dr. Martin Weisskopf of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. "Already surpassing its goal of a five-year life, Chandra continues to rewrite textbooks with discoveries about our own solar system and images of celestial objects as far as billions of light years away." Based on the observatory's outstanding results, NASA Headquarters in Washington decided in 2001 to extend Chandra s mission from five years to ten. During the observatory s sixth year of operation, auroras from Jupiter, X-rays from Saturn, and the early days of our solar system were the focus of Chandra discoveries close to home -- discoveries with the potential to better understand the dynamics of life on Earth. Jupiter's auroras are the most spectacular and active auroras in the solar system. Extended Chandra observations revealed that Jupiter s auroral X-rays are caused by highly charged particles crashing into the atmosphere above Jupiter's poles. These results gave scientists information needed to compare Jupiter's auroras with those from Earth, and determine if they are triggered by different cosmic and planetary events. Mysterious X-rays from Saturn also received attention, as Chandra completed the first observation of a solar X-ray flare reflected from Saturn's low-latitudes, the region that correlates to Earth's equator and tropics. This observation led scientists to conclude the ringed planet may act as a mirror, reflecting explosive activity from the sun. Solar-storm watchers on Earth might see a surprising benefit. The results imply scientists could use giant planets like Saturn as remote-sensing tools to help monitor X-ray flaring on portions of the sun

  16. Galaxy Clusters with Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Forman, W; Markevitch, M L; Vikhlinin, A A; Churazov, E

    2002-01-01

    We discuss Chandra results related to 1) cluster mergers and cold fronts and 2) interactions between relativistic plasma and hot cluster atmospheres. We describe the properties of cold fronts using NGC1404 in the Fornax cluster and A3667 as examples. We discuss multiple surface brightness discontinuities in the cooling flow cluster ZW3146. We review the supersonic merger underway in CL0657. Finally, we summarize the interaction between plasma bubbles produced by AGN and hot gas using M87 and NGC507 as examples.

  17. Deep Chandra observation of the galaxy cluster WARPJ1415.1+3612 at z=1: an evolved cool-core cluster at high-redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Joana S; Rosati, Piero; Nonino, Mario; Giovannini, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Using the deepest (370 ksec) Chandra observation of a high-redshift galaxy cluster, we perform a detailed characterization of the intra-cluster medium (ICM) of WARPJ1415.1+3612 at z=1.03. We also explore the connection between the ICM core properties and the radio/optical properties of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG). We perform a spatially resolved analysis of the ICM to obtain temperature, metallicity and surface brightness profiles. Using the deprojected temperature and density profiles we accurately derive the cluster mass at different overdensities. In addition to the X-ray data, we use archival radio VLA imaging and optical GMOS spectroscopy of the central galaxy to investigate the feedback between the central galaxy and the ICM. The X-ray spectral analysis shows a significant temperature drop towards the cluster center, with a projected value of Tc = 4.6 \\pm 0.4 keV, and a remarkably high central iron abundance peak, Zc= 3.6 Zsun. The central cooling time is shorter than 0.1 Gyr and the entropy is e...

  18. New Results from Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Forman, W; Jones, C; Vikhlinin, A A; Churazov, E

    2001-01-01

    We discuss two themes from Chandra observations of galaxies and clusters. First, we describe the effects of radio-emitting plasmas or ``bubbles'', inflated by active galactic nuclei, on the hot X-ray emitting gaseous atmospheres in galaxies and clusters. We describe the interaction of the ``bubbles'' and the X-ray emitting gas as the buoyant bubbles rise through the hot gas. Second, we describe sharp, edge-like surface brightness structures in clusters. Chandra observations show that these features are not shock fronts as was originally thought, but ``cold fronts'', most likely the boundaries of the remaining cores of merger components. Finally, we present recent observations of M86 and NGC507 which show similar sharp features around galaxies. For M86, the sharp edge is the boundary between the galaxy's X-ray corona and the Virgo cluster gas. The structures around NGC507, the central galaxy in a group, could be relics of galaxy formation or may reflect the motion of NGC507 in the larger potential of the group...

  19. X-ray observations of dust obscured galaxies in the Chandra Deep Field South

    CERN Document Server

    Corral, A; Comastri, A; Ranalli, P; Akylas, A; Salvato, M; Lanzuisi, G; Vignali, C; Koutoulidis, L

    2016-01-01

    We present the properties of X-ray detected dust obscured galaxies (DOGs) in the Chandra Deep Field South. In recent years, it has been proposed that a significant percentage of the elusive Compton-thick (CT) active galactic nuclei (AGN) could be hidden among DOGs. In a previous work, we presented the properties of X-ray detected DOGs by making use of the deepest X-ray observations available at that time, the 2Ms observations of the Chandra deep fields. In that work, we only found a moderate percentage ($<$ 50%) of CT AGN among the DOGs sample, but we were limited by poor photon statistics. In this paper, we use not only a deeper 6 Ms Chandra survey of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S), but combine these data with the 3 Ms XMM-Newton survey of the CDF-S. We also take advantage of the great coverage of the CDF-S region from the UV to the far-IR to fit the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of our sources. Out of the 14 AGN composing our sample, 9 are highly absorbed (but only 3 could be CT AGN), wherea...

  20. High resolution Chandra HETG and RXTE observations of GRS 1915+105 A hot disk atmosphere & cold gas enriched in Iron and Silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, J C; Schulz, N S; Remillard, R A; Blackman, E G; Fabian, A C

    2001-01-01

    The time-averaged 30 ks Chandra HETGS observation of the micro-quasar GRS 1915+105 in the low hard state reveals for the first time in this source neutral K absorption edges from Fe, Si, Mg, & S. Ionized resonance absorption from H-, and He-like Fe (XXV, XXVI), Ca XX and possibly emission from neutral Fe Kalpha and ionized Fe XXV (forbidden, or the resonance emission component of a P-Cygni profile) are also seen. We report the tentative detection of the first astrophysical signature of XAFS in the photoelectric edge of Si (and possibly Fe and Mg), attributed to material in grains. The large column densities measured from the neutral edges reveal anomalous Si and Fe abundances. Scenarios for which the anomalous abundances can be attributed to surrounding cold material associated with GRS 1915+105 and/or that the enrichment may signify either a highly unusual supernova/hypernova, or external supernova activity local to the binary are discussed. We attribute the ionized features to a hot disk, disk-wind, or ...

  1. SPATIALLY RESOLVING A STARBURST GALAXY AT HARD X-RAY ENERGIES: NuSTAR, CHANDRA, AND VLBA OBSERVATIONS OF NGC 253

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wik, D. R.; Lehmer, B. D.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Yukita, M.; Ptak, A.; Venters, T.; Zhang, W. W. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Zezas, A. [Physics Department, University of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Antoniou, V. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Argo, M. K. [ASTRON, The Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990-AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Bechtol, K. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Boggs, S.; Craig, W.; Krivonos, R. [U.C. Berkeley Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Christensen, F. [National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Hailey, C. [Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Harrison, F. [Caltech Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, Pasadena, CA (United States); Maccarone, T. J. [Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Stern, D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    Prior to the launch of NuSTAR, it was not feasible to spatially resolve the hard (E > 10 keV) emission from galaxies beyond the Local Group. The combined NuSTAR data set, comprised of three ∼165 ks observations, allows spatial characterization of the hard X-ray emission in the galaxy NGC 253 for the first time. As a follow up to our initial study of its nuclear region, we present the first results concerning the full galaxy from simultaneous NuSTAR, Chandra, and Very Long Baseline Array monitoring of the local starburst galaxy NGC 253. Above ∼10 keV, nearly all the emission is concentrated within 100'' of the galactic center, produced almost exclusively by three nuclear sources, an off-nuclear ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX), and a pulsar candidate that we identify for the first time in these observations. We detect 21 distinct sources in energy bands up to 25 keV, mostly consisting of intermediate state black hole X-ray binaries. The global X-ray emission of the galaxy—dominated by the off-nuclear ULX and nuclear sources, which are also likely ULXs—falls steeply (photon index ≳ 3) above 10 keV, consistent with other NuSTAR-observed ULXs, and no significant excess above the background is detected at E > 40 keV. We report upper limits on diffuse inverse Compton emission for a range of spatial models. For the most extended morphologies considered, these hard X-ray constraints disfavor a dominant inverse Compton component to explain the γ-ray emission detected with Fermi and H.E.S.S. If NGC 253 is typical of starburst galaxies at higher redshift, their contribution to the E > 10 keV cosmic X-ray background is <1%.

  2. Chandra and NuSTAR studies of the ultraluminous X-ray sources in M82

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brightman, Murray; Harrison, Fiona; Walton, Dom; Fuerst, Felix; Bachetti, Matteo; Zezas, Andreas; Ptak, Andrew; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Yukita, Mihoko; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Grefenstette, Brian

    2016-04-01

    With the discovery of the ultraluminous X-ray pulsar in M82 by Bachetti et al (2014), there has been renewed interest in the galaxy, which also hosts one of the best candidates for an intermediate-mass black hole. We present results on the spectral and temporal properties of the pulsar from 15 years of Chandra observations with implications for theoretical modeling of the source, as well as the high-energy constraints on both sources from NuSTAR.

  3. Jet Power and Black Hole Assortment Revealed in New Chandra Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    A dramatic new Chandra image of the nearby galaxy Centaurus A provides one of the best views to date of the effects of an active supermassive black hole. Opposing jets of high-energy particles can be seen extending to the outer reaches of the galaxy, and numerous smaller black holes in binary star systems are also visible. The image was made from an ultra-deep look at the galaxy Centaurus A, equivalent to more than seven days of continuous observations. Centaurus A is the nearest galaxy to Earth that contains a supermassive black hole actively powering a jet. X-ray Image of Centaurus A, Labeled X-ray Image of Centaurus A, Labeled A prominent X-ray jet extending for 13,000 light years points to the upper left in the image, with a shorter "counterjet" aimed in the opposite direction. Astronomers think that such jets are important vehicles for transporting energy from the black hole to the much larger dimensions of a galaxy, and affecting the rate at which stars form there. High-energy electrons spiraling around magnetic field lines produce the X-ray emission from the jet and counterjet. This emission quickly saps the energy from the electrons, so they must be continually reaccelerated or the X-rays will fade out. Knot-like features in the jets detected in the Chandra image show where the acceleration of particles to high energies is currently occurring, and provides important clues to understanding the process that accelerates the electrons to near-light speeds. People Who Read This Also Read... NASA’s Swift Satellite Catches First Supernova in The Act of Exploding Black Holes Have Simple Feeding Habits Chandra Data Reveal Rapidly Whirling Black Holes Erratic Black Hole Regulates Itself The inner part of the X-ray jet close to the black hole is dominated by these knots of X-ray emission, which probably come from shock waves -- akin to sonic booms -- caused by the jet. Farther from the black hole there is more diffuse X-ray emission in the jet. The cause of particle

  4. The Chandra HelpDesk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galle, Elizabeth C.

    2008-03-01

    The Chandra X-ray Center (CXC) HelpDesk has answered hundreds of user questions over the course of the Chandra mission, ranging from basic syntax errors to advanced analysis questions. This talk gives an introduction to the HelpDesk system and staff, presents a sample of recent HelpDesk requests, and discusses how user-submitted questions improve the software and documentation.

  5. The CHANDRA X-ray Grating Spectrum of Eta Carinae

    CERN Document Server

    Corcoran, M F; Petre, R; Ishibashi, K; Davidson, K; Townsley, L K; Smith, R; White, S; Viotti, R; Damineli, A

    2001-01-01

    Eta Car may be the most massive and luminous star in the Galaxy and is suspected to be a massive, colliding wind binary system. The CHANDRA X-ray observatory has obtained a calibrated, high-resolution X-ray spectrum of the star uncontaminated by the nearby extended soft X-ray emisssion. Our 89 ksec CHANDRA observation with the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) shows that the hot gas near the star is non-isothermal. The temperature distribution may represent the emission on either side of the colliding wind bow shock, effectively ``resolving'' the shock. The pre-shock wind velocities are ~500 and ~ 2000 km/s in our analysis, and these velocities are interpreted as the terminal velocities of the winds from Eta Car and from the hidden companion star. The abundances of Si and Fe are significantly non-solar based on the strengths of the observed H- and He-like emission lines. The iron fluorescent line at 1.93 Angstrom, first detected by ASCA, is clearly resolved from the thermal iron line in th...

  6. Catching a Galactic Football: Chandra Examines Cygnus A

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-11-01

    Using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers have found a giant football-shaped cavity within X-ray emitting hot gas surrounding the galaxy Cygnus A. The cavity in the hot gas has been created by two powerful jets emitted from the central black hole region in the nucleus of Cygnus A. Hot gas is steadily being piled up around the cavity as it continuously expands, creating a bright rim of X-ray emission. The jets themselves terminate in radio and X-ray emitting "hot spots" some 300,000 light years from the center of the galaxy. These results are being presented to the High Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomical Society meeting in Honolulu, HI, by Andrew S. Wilson, Andrew J. Young (University of Maryland) and Patrick L. Shopbell (California Institute of Technology). "This is a spectacular cavity, which is inflated by jets and completely surrounds the Cygnus A galaxy," said Dr. Wilson, who is Professor of Astronomy at the University of Maryland, College Park. "We are witnessing a battle between the gravity of the Cygnus A galaxy, which is trying to pull the hot gas inwards, and the pressure of material created by the jets, which is trying to push the hot gas outwards." Cygnus A has long been famous as the brightest radio source in the sky. It is the nearest powerful radio galaxy. The Chandra X-ray image, which was taken with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), shows the cavity surrounded by a vast sea of extremely hot gas. The elongated oval shape comes from the force of the outwardly moving jets as they push through the hot gas. Bright bands around the "equator of the football" are also visible, and this may be evidence of material swirling toward the central black hole. Cygnus A Illustration Illustration of Cygnus A Credit: CXC Without the jets, an X-ray image of Cygnus A, which is about 700 million light years from Earth, would appear as a more or less spherical region (about 2 million light years across) of hot gas slowly

  7. NASA Chandra X-ray Observatory Selected as Editor's Choice in 2000 Discover Magazine Awards for Technological Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory, NASA's newest and most powerful X-ray space telescope, has been selected as the winner of the Editor's Choice category of the 2000 Discover Magazine Awards for Technological Innovation. The team of government, industry, university and research institutions that designed, built and deployed Chandra for NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala, will be formally recognized June 24 at a gala awards celebration at Epcot at the Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando, Fl. Dr. Harvey Tananbaum, director of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's Chandra X-ray Science Center, Cambridge, Mass., which conducts the Chandra science mission for NASA, will receive the award on behalf of the team. "Chandra has opened a new window for astronomers into the universe of high-energy cosmic events such as pulsars, supernova remnants and black holes," said Tananbaum. "We're now able to create spectacularly detailed images of celestial phenomena whose mere existence we could only hypothesize before." Among Chandra's most significant discoveries to date, he lists the detection of a giant ring around the heart of the Crab Nebula, details of the shock wave created by an exploding star and resolution of the high-energy X-ray "glow" in the universe into millions of specific light sources. "The successful launch, deployment and on-orbit operations of NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory is a testament to the solid partnership between TRW, NASA and the science community that has been enabling NASA's most important space science missions for the past 40 years," said Timothy W. Hannemann, executive vice president and general manager, TRW Space & Electronics Group. "The extraordinary images that Chandra is delivering daily speaks loudly not only to the quality of the science instruments on board, but also to the engineering talents and dedication to mission success exhibited by every member of NASA's Chandra mission team." Chandra, named in honor of Nobel

  8. Chandra grating spectroscopy of three hot white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczak, J; Rauch, T; Schuh, S; Drake, J J; Kruk, J W

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopic observations of single hot white dwarfs are scarce. With the Chandra Low-Energy Transmission Grating, we have observed two white dwarfs, one is of spectral type DA (LB 1919) and the other is a non-DA of spectral type PG1159 (PG 1520+525). The spectra of both stars are analyzed, together with an archival Chandra spectrum of another DA white dwarf (GD 246). The soft X-ray spectra of the two DA white dwarfs are investigated in order to study the effect of gravitational settling and radiative levitation of metals in their photospheres. LB 1919 is of interest because it has a significantly lower metallicity than DAs with otherwise similar atmospheric parameters. GD 246 is the only white dwarf known that shows identifiable individual iron lines in the soft X-ray range. For the PG1159 star, a precise effective temperature determination is performed in order to confine the position of the blue edge of the GW Vir instability region in the HRD. (abridged)

  9. Chandra Sees Shape of Universe During Formative, Adolescent Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-03-01

    Scientists using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory have taken a snapshot of the adolescent universe from about five billion years ago when the familiar web-like structure of galaxy chains and voids first emerged. The observation reveals distant and massive galaxies dotting the sky, clustered together under the gravitational attraction of deep, unseen pockets of dark matter. This provides important clues of how the universe matured from its chaotic beginnings to its elegant structure we see today. These results are presented today in a press conference at the meeting of the High Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomical Society at Mt. Tremblant, Quebec. "Piece by piece, we are assembling a photo album of the universe through the ages," said Yuxuan Yang, a doctorate candidate at the University of Maryland, College Park, who conducted the analysis. "Last month we saw a picture of the infant universe taken with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. Now we can add a snapshot of its adolescence." The Chandra observation traced a patch of sky known as the Lockman Hole in the constellation Ursa Major (containing the Big Dipper). Chandra saw a rich density of active galaxies, seven times denser than what has been detected in previous optical and radio surveys at similar distances. This provides the clearest picture yet at the large-scale structure of the universe at such distances (and age), according to Dr. Richard Mushotzky of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., who led the observation. Lockman Hole JPEG, TIFF, PS An image that has been "blurred" to allow better view of the structures outlined by the X-ray sources. The color represents the spectra of the AGN. The red color indicates the sources on average radiates at longer wavelength while green and blue colors indicates the sources radiates at shorter wavelength. The Green and blue regions appear to form a wall, or shows more lumpiness than the "red" sources. If one could capture the

  10. High-Resolution {\\it Chandra} Spectroscopy of tau Scorpii A Narrow-Line X-ray Spectrum From a Hot Star

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, D H; MacFarlane, J J; Miller, N A; Cassinelli, J P; Owocki, S P; Liedahl, D A; Cohen, David H.; Messi\\`{e}res, Genevi\\`{e}ve E. de; Farlane, Joseph J. Mac; Miller, Nathan A.; Cassinelli, Joseph P.; Owocki, Stanley P.; Liedahl, Duane A.

    2003-01-01

    Long known to be an unusual early-type star by virtue of its hard and strong X-ray emission, tau Scorpii poses a severe challenge to the standard picture of O star wind-shock X-ray emission. The Chandra HETGS spectrum now provides significant direct evidence that this B0.2 star does not fit this standard wind-shock framework. The many emission lines detected with the Chandra gratings are significantly narrower than what would be expected from a star with the known wind properties of tau Sco, although they are broader than the corresponding lines seen in late-type coronal sources. While line ratios are consistent with the hot plasma on this star being within a few stellar radii of the photosphere, from at least one He-like complex there is evidence that the X-ray emitting plasma is located more than a stellar radius above the photosphere. The Chandra spectrum of tau Sco is harder and more variable than those of other hot stars, with the exception of the young magnetized O star theta Ori C. We discuss these new...

  11. A Chandra-Swift View of Point Sources in Hickson Compact Groups: High AGN Fraction but a Dearth of Strong AGNs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzanavaris, P.; Gallagher, S. C.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Fedotov, K.; Eracleous, M.; Brandt, W. N.; Desjardins, T. D.; Charlton, J. C.; Gronwall, C.

    2014-01-01

    We present Chandra X-ray point source catalogs for 9 Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs, 37 galaxies) at distances of 34-89 Mpc. We perform detailed X-ray point source detection and photometry and interpret the point source population by means of simulated hardness ratios. We thus estimate X-ray luminosities (L(sub x)) for all sources, most of which are too weak for reliable spectral fitting. For all sources, we provide catalogs with counts, count rates, power-law indices (gamma), hardness ratios, and L(sub X), in the full (0.5-8.0 keV), soft (0.5-2.0 keV), and hard (2.0-8.0 keV) bands. We use optical emission-line ratios from the literature to re-classify 24 galaxies as star-forming, accreting onto a supermassive black hole (AGNs), transition objects, or low-ionization nuclear emission regions. Two-thirds of our galaxies have nuclear X-ray sources with Swift/UVOT counterparts. Two nuclei have L(sub X),0.5-8.0 keV > 10(exp 42) erg s-1, are strong multi-wavelength active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and follow the known alpha OX-?L? (nearUV) correlation for strong AGNs. Otherwise, most nuclei are X-ray faint, consistent with either a low-luminosity AGN or a nuclear X-ray binary population, and fall in the 'non-AGN locus' in alpha OX-?L? (nearUV) space, which also hosts other normal galaxies. Our results suggest that HCG X-ray nuclei in high specific star formation rate spiral galaxies are likely dominated by star formation, while those with low specific star formation rates in earlier types likely harbor a weak AGN. The AGN fraction in HCG galaxies with MR (is) less than -20 and L(sub X),0.5-8.0 keV (is) greater than 10(exp 41) erg s-1 is 0.08+0.35 -0.01, somewhat higher than the 5% fraction in galaxy clusters.

  12. Dynamics of the Shocked Gas in the Eta Carinae System as Seen by Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.; Henley, D. B.; Ishibashi, K.; Gull, T.; Nielsen, K.; Pittard, J. M.

    2006-01-01

    We report on a series of X-ray spectra of the supermassive star Eta Carinae obtained by the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer on the CHANDRA X-ray observatory before, during and after the star's X-ray minimum in the summer of 2003. The X-ray spectra show significant variations in emission measure and absorption, in the strength of the iron K edge and fluorescent iron emission, but show little change in the distribution of emission measure with temperature. The CHANDRA spectra also resolve emission from Si, S, Fe and other elements in H-like and He-like configurations. The HETGS spectra show that these lines change in centroid energy along with evidence of changes in the forbidden-to-intercombination ratios of the He-like triplets. These spectra offer strong support that the X-ray emission originates within a shock cone around an unseen, massive companion. The variations of the X-ray line spectrum provide a direct measure of the dynamics of the shocked gas in this cone and also evidence that the hottest region of the shock is not always in collisional ionization equilibrium. We discuss these results in light of the recent discovery of He II 4686 emission and the reported discovery of FUV emission from the companion star. This work was supported by SAO/Chandra grant GO3-4008A.

  13. ASA's Chandra Neon Discovery Solves Solar Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory survey of nearby sun-like stars suggests there is nearly three times more neon in the sun and local universe than previously believed. If true, this would solve a critical problem with understanding how the sun works. "We use the sun to test how well we understand stars and, to some extent, the rest of the universe," said Jeremy Drake of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. "But in order to understand the sun, we need to know exactly what it is made of," he added. It is not well known how much neon the sun contains. This is critical information for creating theoretical models of the sun. Neon atoms, along with carbon, oxygen and nitrogen, play an important role in how quickly energy flows from nuclear reactions in the sun's core to its edge, where it then radiates into space. Chandra X-ray Spectrum of II Pegasi Chandra X-ray Spectrum of II Pegasi The rate of this energy flow determines the location and size of a crucial stellar region called the convection zone. The zone extends from near the sun's surface inward approximately 125,000 miles. The zone is where the gas undergoes a rolling, convective motion much like the unstable air in a thunderstorm. "This turbulent gas has an extremely important job, because nearly all of the energy emitted at the surface of the sun is transported there by convection," Drake said. The accepted amount of neon in the sun has led to a paradox. The predicted location and size of the solar convection zone disagree with those deduced from solar oscillations. Solar oscillations is a technique astronomers previously relied on to probe the sun's interior. Several scientists have noted the problem could be fixed if the abundance of neon is in fact about three times larger than currently accepted. Attempts to measure the precise amount of neon in the Sun have been frustrated by a quirk of nature; neon atoms in the Sun give off no signatures in visible light. However, in a gas

  14. Probing the wind-wind collision in Gamma Velorum with high-resolution Chandra X-ray spectroscopy: evidence for sudden radiative braking and non-equilibrium ionization

    OpenAIRE

    Henley, D. B.; Stevens, I. R.; Pittard, J. M.

    2004-01-01

    We present a new analysis of an archived Chandra HETGS X-ray spectrum of the WR+O colliding wind binary Gamma Velorum. The spectrum is dominated by emission lines from astrophysically abundant elements: Ne, Mg, Si, S and Fe. From a combination of broad-band spectral analysis and an analysis of line flux ratios we infer a wide range of temperatures in the X-ray emitting plasma (~4-40 MK). As in the previously published analysis, we find the X-ray emission lines are essentially unshifted, with ...

  15. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hynes, Robert I.; Jonker, P.G.; Bassa, C. G.; Dieball, A.; Greiss, S.; Maccarone, T. J.; Nelemans, G.; Steeghs, D.; Torres, M. A. P.; Britt, C. T.; Clem, J. L.; Gossen, L.; Grindlay, J. E.; Groot, P.J.; Kuiper, L.; Kuulkers, E.; Mendez, M.; Mikles, V. J.; Ratti, E. M.; Rea, N.; van Haaften, L.; Wijnands, R.; in't Zand, J. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (CGBS) is a shallow but wide survey of two approximately 6x1 degree strips of the Galactic Bulge about a degree above and below the plane. The survey by design targets regions where extinction and crowding are manageable and optical counterparts are accessible to de

  16. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hynes, Robert I.; Jonker, P. G.; Bassa, C. G.; Nelemans, G.; Steeghs, D.; Torres, M. A. P.; Maccarone, T. J.; Greiss, S.; Clem, J.; Dieball, A.; Mikles, V. J.; Britt, C. T.; Gossen, L.; Collazzi, A. C.; Wijnands, R.; In't Zand, J. J. M.; Mendez, M.; Rea, N.; Kuulkers, E.; Ratti, E. M.; van Haaften, L. M.; Heinke, C.; Ozel, F.; Groot, P. J.; Verbunt, F.

    2012-01-01

    The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a shallow but wide survey of two approximately 6x1 degree strips of the Galactic Bulge about a degree above and below the plane. The survey by design targets regions where extinction and crowding are manageable and optical counterparts are accessible to det

  17. Contemporaneous Chandra HETG and Suzaku X-ray Observations of NGC 4051

    OpenAIRE

    Lobban, AP; Reeves, JN; Miller, LL; Turner, TJ; Braito, V.; Kraemer, SB; Crenshaw, DM

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a deep 300ks Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) observation of the highly variable narrow-line Seyfert Type 1 galaxy NGC 4051. The HETG spectrum reveals 28 significant soft X-ray ionized lines in either emission or absorption; primarily originating from H-like and He-like K-shell transitions of O, Ne, Mg and Si (including higher order lines and strong forbidden emission lines from Ovii and Neix) plus high-ionization L-shell transitions from Fexvii to Fex...

  18. Nustar and Chandra Insight into the Nature of the 3-40 Kev Nuclear Emission in Ngc 253

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmer, Bret D.; Wik, Daniel R.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Ptak, Andrew; Antoniu, V.; Argo, M.K.; Bechtol, K.; Boggs, S.; Christensen, F.E.; Craig, W.W.; Hailey, C.J.; Harrison, F.A.; Krivonos, R.; Leyder, Jean-Christophe Xavier Georges; Maccarone, T.J.; Stern, D.; Venters, T.; Zezas, A.; Zhang, W.W.

    2013-01-01

    We present results from three nearly simultaneous Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and Chandra monitoring observations between 2012 September 2 and 2012 November 16 of the local star-forming galaxy NGC 253. The 3-40 kiloelectron volt intensity of the inner approximately 20 arcsec (approximately 400 parsec) nuclear region, as measured by NuSTAR, varied by a factor of approximately 2 across the three monitoring observations. The Chandra data reveal that the nuclear region contains three bright X-ray sources, including a luminous (L (sub 2-10 kiloelectron volt) approximately few × 10 (exp 39) erg per s) point source located approximately 1 arcsec from the dynamical center of the galaxy (within the sigma 3 positional uncertainty of the dynamical center); this source drives the overall variability of the nuclear region at energies greater than or approximately equal to 3 kiloelectron volts. We make use of the variability to measure the spectra of this single hard X-ray source when it was in bright states. The spectra are well described by an absorbed (power-law model spectral fit value, N(sub H), approximately equal to 1.6 x 10 (exp 23) per square centimeter) broken power-law model with spectral slopes and break energies that are typical of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), but not active galactic nuclei (AGNs). A previous Chandra observation in 2003 showed a hard X-ray point source of similar luminosity to the 2012 source that was also near the dynamical center (Phi is approximately equal to 0.4 arcsec); however, this source was offset from the 2012 source position by approximately 1 arcsec. We show that the probability of the 2003 and 2012 hard X-ray sources being unrelated is much greater than 99.99% based on the Chandra spatial localizations. Interestingly, the Chandra spectrum of the 2003 source (3-8 kiloelectron volts) is shallower in slope than that of the 2012 hard X-ray source. Its proximity to the dynamical center and harder Chandra spectrum

  19. Chandra Observations of Variable Embedded X-ray sources in Orion. Paper I: Resolving Orion Trapezium

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz, N. S.; Canizares, C.; Huenemoerder, D.; Kastner, J.H.; Taylor, S. C.; Bergstrom, E. J.

    2000-01-01

    We used the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory to perform two observations, separated by three weeks, of the Orion Trapezium region. The zeroth order images on the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) provide spatial resolution of 0.5" and moderate energy resolution. Within a 160"x140" region around the Orion Trapezium we resolve 111 X-ray sources with luminosities between 7x10^{28} ergs/s and 2x10^{32} ergs/s. We do not detect any ...

  20. The Chandra Observation of the IP TX Col

    OpenAIRE

    Schlegel, Eric M.; Salinas, Anandi

    2003-01-01

    We present a preliminary look at the serendipitous observation of the intermediate polar TX Col by Chandra. The 52 ksec observation is uninterrupted, providing an opportunity to disentangle the light curve and power spectra components. We illustrate the energy-dependence of the power spectrum.

  1. Chandra Observations of SN 1987A: The Soft X-Ray Light Curve Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helder, E. A.; Broos, P. S.; Dewey, D.; Dwek, E.; McCray, R.; Park, S.; Racusin, J. L.; Zhekov, S. A.; Burrows, D. N.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the present stage of SN 1987A as observed by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. We reanalyze published Chandra observations and add three more epochs of Chandra data to get a consistent picture of the evolution of the X-ray fluxes in several energy bands. We discuss the implications of several calibration issues for Chandra data. Using the most recent Chandra calibration files, we find that the 0.5-2.0 keV band fluxes of SN 1987A have increased by approximately 6 x 10(exp-13) erg s(exp-1)cm(exp-2) per year since 2009. This is in contrast with our previous result that the 0.5-2.0 keV light curve showed a sudden flattening in 2009. Based on our new analysis, we conclude that the forward shock is still in full interaction with the equatorial ring.

  2. High-energy detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Camarda, Giuseppe; Cui, Yonggang; James, Ralph B.

    2011-11-22

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  3. HDE 245059: A Weak-Lined T Tauri Binary Revealed by Chandra and Keck

    OpenAIRE

    Saavedra, C. Baldovin; Audard, M.; Duchêne, G.; Güdel, M.; Skinner, S.L.; Paerels, F. B. S.; Ghez, A.; McCabe, C.

    2009-01-01

    We present the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) and Keck observations of HDE 245059, a young weak-lined T Tauri star (WTTS), member of the pre-main sequence group in the Lambda Orionis Cluster. Our high spatial resolution, near-infrared observations with Keck reveal that HDE 245059 a binary separated by 0.87". Based on this new information we have obtained an estimate of the masses of the binary components; 3M_{sun} and 2.5M_{sun} for the north and south component...

  4. High-Energy Emission at Shocks in Millisecond Pulsar Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kust Harding, Alice; Wadiasingh, Zorawar; Venter, Christo; Boettcher, Markus

    2016-04-01

    A large number of new Black Widow (BW) and Redback (RB) energetic millisecond pulsars have been discovered through radio searches of unidentified Fermi sources, increasing the known number of these systems from 4 to 28. We model the high-energy emission components from particles accelerated to several TeV in intrabinary shocks in BW and RB systems, and their predicted modulation at the binary orbital period. Synchrotron emission is expected at X-ray energies and such modulated emission has already been detected by Chandra and XMM. Inverse Compton emission from accelerated particles scattering the UV emission from the radiated companion star is expected in the Fermi and TeV bands. Detections or constraints on this emission will probe the unknown physics of pulsar winds.

  5. Historical Remembrances of the Chandra X-ray Observatory: How Partnerships Created Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Robert

    2009-09-01

    As the astronomy community plans for new ventures in space, we're forced to find creative solutions to operate within the ever increasing fiscal constraints of the current economic environment. The Chandra X-ray Observatory program offers an example of how missions can be successfully developed within manageable budget constraints. The ten year anniversary offers us the chance to look back at the Chandra team's special partnership between scientists, managers, and industry that led to our success.Chandra experienced many of the challenges common to major observatories: state-of-the-art technical requirements, budget-induced slips, and restructurings. Yet the Chandra team achieved excellent performance for dramatically lower cost. In fact, Chandra completed its prime mission for billions of dollars less than originally planned. In 1992, NASA MSFC and Northrop Grumman (then TRW) together led a major restructure that saved approximately 3.4B in program cost, while we improved the imaging capability and observing efficiency of Chandra. This was accomplished by a combination of team-work, systems engineering, advanced technology insertion, and effective approaches for program implementation, combined with a high performance culture that aligned goals and focused on mission success. Northrop Grumman is proud of our role in supporting the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and our academic partners in advancing the frontiers of x-ray astronomy and scientific discovery with Chandra. As Chandra continues its extended mission, the observatory continues to provide superb scientific performance.

  6. High energy beam lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetto, M.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    The ISAC post accelerator comprises an RFQ, DTL and SC-linac. The high energy beam lines connect the linear accelerators as well as deliver the accelerated beams to two different experimental areas. The medium energy beam transport (MEBT) line connects the RFQ to the DTL. The high energy beam transport (HEBT) line connects the DTL to the ISAC-I experimental stations (DRAGON, TUDA-I, GPS). The DTL to superconducting beam (DSB) transport line connects the ISAC-I and ISAC-II linacs. The superconducting energy beam transport (SEBT) line connects the SC linac to the ISAC-II experimental station (TUDA-II, HERACLES, TIGRESS, EMMA and GPS). All these lines have the function of transporting and matching the beams to the downstream sections by manipulating the transverse and longitudinal phase space. They also contain diagnostic devices to measure the beam properties.

  7. Chandra and XMM-Newton view of the warm absorbing gas in Mrk 290

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S. N.; Ji, L.; Marshall, H. L.; Longinotti, A. L.; Evans, D.; Gu, Q. S.

    2011-02-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) and XMM-Newton high-resolution spectra of the bright Seyfert 1 galaxy, Mrk 290. The Chandra HETGS spectra reveal complex absorption features that can be best described by a combination of three ionized absorbers. The outflow velocities of these warm absorbers are about 450 km s-1, consistent with the three absorption components found in a previous far-UV study. The ionizing continuum of Mrk 290 fluctuated by a factor of 1.4 during Chandra observations on a time-scale of 17 d. Using the response in opacity of the three absorbers to this fluctuation, we put a lower limit on the distance from the ionizing source of 0.9 pc for the medium ionized absorber and an upper limit on a distance of 2.5 pc for the lowest ionized absorber. The three ionization components lie on the stable branch of the thermal equilibrium curve, indicating roughly the same gas pressure. Therefore, the thermal wind from the torus is most likely the origin of warm absorbing gas in Mrk 290. During the XMM-Newton observation, the ionizing luminosity was 50 per cent lower compared to that in the Chandra observation. The Reflection Grating Spectrometer spectrum is well fitted by a two-phase warm absorber, with several additional absorption lines attributed to a Galactic high-velocity cloud, complex C. Neither the ionization parameter ξ nor the column density NH of the two absorbing components varied significantly, compared to the results from Chandra observations. The outflow velocities of both components were 1260 km s-1. We suggest that an entirely new warm absorber from the torus passed through our line of sight. Assuming the torus wind model, the estimated mass outflow rate is ˜0.1 M⊙ per year while the nuclear accretion rate is ˜0.04 M⊙ per year. The O VII and Ne IX forbidden lines are the most prominent soft X-ray emission lines, with a mean redshift of 700 km s-1 relative to the systematic

  8. Theoretical high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses theoretical research in high energy physics at Columbia University. Some of the research topics discussed are: quantum chromodynamics with dynamical fermions; lattice gauge theory; scattering of neutrinos by photons; atomic physics constraints on the properties of ultralight-ultraweak gauge bosons; black holes; Chern- Simons physics; S-channel theory of superconductivity; charged boson system; gluon-gluon interactions; high energy scattering in the presence of instantons; anyon physics; causality constraints on primordial magnetic manopoles; charged black holes with scalar hair; properties of Chern-Aimona-Higgs solitons; and extended inflationary universe

  9. NASA'S Chandra Finds New Evidence on Origin of Supernovas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    CAMBRIDGE, Ma. -- Astronomers may now know the cause of an historic supernova explosion that is an important type of object for investigating dark energy in the universe. The discovery, made using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, also provides strong evidence that a star can survive the explosive impact generated when a companion star goes supernova. The new study examined the remnant of a supernova observed by the Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe in 1572. The object, dubbed Tycho for short, was formed by a Type Ia supernova, a category of stellar explosion useful in measuring astronomical distances because of their reliable brightness. Type Ia supernovas have been used to determine that the universe is expanding at an accelerating rate, an effect attributed to the prevalence of an invisible, repulsive force throughout space called dark energy. A team of researchers analyzed a deep Chandra observation of Tycho and found an arc of X-ray emission in the supernova remnant. Evidence supports the conclusion that a shock wave created the arc when a white dwarf exploded and blew material off the surface of a nearby companion star. "There has been a long-standing question about what causes Type Ia supernovas," said Fangjun Lu of the Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing. "Because they are used as steady beacons of light across vast distances, it is critical to understand what triggers them." One popular scenario for Type Ia supernovas involves the merger of two white dwarfs. In this case, no companion star or evidence for material blasted off a companion should exist. In the other main competing theory, a white dwarf pulls material from a "normal," or sun-like, companion star until a thermonuclear explosion occurs. Both scenarios may actually occur under different conditions, but the latest Chandra result from Tycho supports the latter one. n addition, the Tycho study seems to show the remarkable resiliency of stars, as the supernova

  10. Chandra Observations of Eight Sources Discovered by INTEGRAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsick, John A.; Krivonos, Roman; Wang, Qinan; Bodaghee, Arash; Chaty, Sylvain; Rahoui, Farid; Rodriguez, Jerome; Fornasini, Francesca M.

    2016-01-01

    We report on 0.3-10 keV observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory of eight hard X-ray sources discovered within 8° of the Galactic plane by the International Gamma-ray Astrophysics Laboratory satellite. The short (˜5 ks) Chandra observations of the IGR source fields have yielded very likely identifications of X-ray counterparts for three of the IGR sources: IGR J14091-6108, IGR J18088-2741, and IGR J18381-0924. The first two have very hard spectra in the Chandra band that can be described by a power law with photon indices of Γ = 0.6 ± 0.4 and -{0.7}-0.3+0.4, respectively (90% confidence errors are given), and both have a unique near-IR counterpart consistent with the Chandra position. IGR J14091-6108 also displays a strong iron line and a relatively low X-ray luminosity, and we argue that the most likely source type is a cataclysmic variable (CV), although we do not completely rule out the possibility of a high mass X-ray binary. IGR J18088-2741 has an optical counterpart with a previously measured 6.84 hr periodicity, which may be the binary orbital period. We also detect five cycles of a possible 800-950 s period in the Chandra light curve, which may be the compact object spin period. We suggest that IGR J18088-2741 is also most likely a CV. For IGR J18381-0924, the spectrum is intrinsically softer with {{Γ }}={1.5}-0.4+0.5, and it is moderately absorbed, NH = (4 ± 1) × 1022 cm-2. There are two near-IR sources consistent with the Chandra position, and they are both classified as galaxies, making it likely that IGR J18381-0924 is an active galactic nucleus. For the other five IGR sources, we provide lists of nearby Chandra sources, which may be used along with further observations to identify the correct counterparts, and we discuss the implications of the low inferred Chandra count rates for these five sources.

  11. Chandra Observations of SNR RCW 103

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, Kari A; Park, Sangwook

    2015-01-01

    We analyze three Chandra observations, with a combined exposure time of 99 ks, of the Galactic supernova remnant RCW 103, a young supernova remnant, previously with no clear detection of metal-rich ejecta. Based on our imaging and spectral analyses of these deep Chandra data, we find evidence for metal-rich ejecta emission scattered throughout the remnant. X-ray emission from the shocked ejecta is generally weak, and the shocked circumstellar medium (CSM) is a largely dominant component across the entire remnant. The CSM component shows abundances of ~0.5 solar, while Ne, Mg, Si, S, and Fe abundances of the ejecta are up to a few times solar. Comparison of these ejecta abundances with yields from supernova nucleosynthesis models suggests, together with the existence of a central neutron star, a progenitor mass of ~18-20 M$_\\odot$, though the Fe/Si ratios are larger than predicted. The shocked CSM emission suggests a progenitor with high mass-loss rate and subsolar metallicity.

  12. Chandra Catches "Piranha" Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Supermassive black holes have been discovered to grow more rapidly in young galaxy clusters, according to new results from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. These "fast-track" supermassive black holes can have a big influence on the galaxies and clusters that they live in. Using Chandra, scientists surveyed a sample of clusters and counted the fraction of galaxies with rapidly growing supermassive black holes, known as active galactic nuclei (or AGN). The data show, for the first time, that younger, more distant galaxy clusters contained far more AGN than older, nearby ones. Galaxy clusters are some of the largest structures in the Universe, consisting of many individual galaxies, a few of which contain AGN. Earlier in the history of the universe, these galaxies contained a lot more gas for star formation and black hole growth than galaxies in clusters do today. This fuel allows the young cluster black holes to grow much more rapidly than their counterparts in nearby clusters. Illustration of Active Galactic Nucleus Illustration of Active Galactic Nucleus "The black holes in these early clusters are like piranha in a very well-fed aquarium," said Jason Eastman of Ohio State University (OSU) and first author of this study. "It's not that they beat out each other for food, rather there was so much that all of the piranha were able to really thrive and grow quickly." The team used Chandra to determine the fraction of AGN in four different galaxy clusters at large distances, when the Universe was about 58% of its current age. Then they compared this value to the fraction found in more nearby clusters, those about 82% of the Universe's current age. The result was the more distant clusters contained about 20 times more AGN than the less distant sample. AGN outside clusters are also more common when the Universe is younger, but only by factors of two or three over the same age span. "It's been predicted that there would be fast-track black holes in clusters, but we never

  13. Deeper Chandra Follow-up of Cygnus TeV Source Perpetuates Mystery

    CERN Document Server

    Butt, Y; Benaglia, P; Combi, J; Dame, T; Miniati, F; Romero, G; Butt, Yousaf; Drake, Jeremy; Benaglia, Paula; Combi, Jorge; Dame, Thomas; Miniati, Francesco; Romero, Gustavo

    2005-01-01

    A 50 ksec Chandra observation of the unidentified TeV source in Cygnus reported by the HEGRA collaboration reveals no obvious X-ray counterpart(s). 220 Point-like X-ray sources are detected within or nearby the extended TeV J2032+4130 source region, of which at least 30 are massive stars and 6 are known radio emitters. Based on the low X-ray and radio emissivity we favor a nucleonic rather than electronic origin of the very high energy gamma-ray flux and suspect it is related to the very massive and extremely powerful Cygnus OB2 stellar association.

  14. A Deep Chandra X-ray Spectrum of the Accreting Young Star TW Hydrae

    OpenAIRE

    Brickhouse, N. S.; Cranmer, S. R.; Dupree, A. K.; Luna, G. J. M.; Wolk, S.

    2010-01-01

    We present X-ray spectral analysis of the accreting young star TW Hydrae from a 489 ks observation using the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating. The spectrum provides a rich set of diagnostics for electron temperature T_e, electron density N_e, hydrogen column density N_H, relative elemental abundances and velocities and reveals its source in 3 distinct regions of the stellar atmosphere: the stellar corona, the accretion shock, and a very large extended volume of warm postshock plasma. ...

  15. Theoretical high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This progress report discusses research by Columbia University staff in high energy physics. Some of the topics discussed are as follows: lattice gauge theory; quantum chromodynamics; parity doublets; solitons; baryon number violation; black holes; magnetic monopoles; gluon plasma; Chern-Simons theory; and the inflationary universe

  16. NASA Unveils First Images From Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-08-01

    Extraordinary first images from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory trace the aftermath of a gigantic stellar explosion in such stunning detail that scientists can see evidence of what may be a neutron star or black hole near the center. Another image shows a powerful X-ray jet blasting 200,000 light years into intergalactic space from a distant quasar. Released today, both images confirm that NASA's newest Great Observatory is in excellent health and its instruments and optics are performing up to expectations. Chandra, the world's largest and most sensitive X-ray telescope, is still in its orbital check-out and calibration phase. "When I saw the first image, I knew that the dream had been realized," said Dr. Martin Weisskopf, Chandra Project Scientist, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL. "This observatory is ready to take its place in the history of spectacular scientific achievements." "We were astounded by these images," said Harvey Tananbaum, Director of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's Chandra X- ray Center, Cambridge, MA. "We see the collision of the debris from the exploded star with the matter around it, we see shock waves rushing into interstellar space at millions of miles per hour, and, as a real bonus, we see for the first time a tantalizing bright point near the center of the remnant that could possibly be a collapsed star associated with the outburst." Chandra's PKS 0637-752 PKS 0637-752 After the telescope's sunshade door was opened last week, one of the first images taken was of the 320-year-old supernova remnant Cassiopeia A, which astronomers believe was produced by the explosion of a massive star. Material blasted into space from the explosion crashed into surrounding material at 10 million miles per hour. This collision caused violent shock waves, like massive sonic booms, creating a vast 50-million degree bubble of X-ray emitting gas. Heavy elements in the hot gas produce X-rays of specific energies. Chandra's ability

  17. Theoretical High Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christ, Norman H.; Weinberg, Erick J.

    2014-07-14

    we provide reports from each of the six faculty supported by the Department of Energy High Energy Physics Theory grant at Columbia University. Each is followed by a bibliography of the references cited. A complete list of all of the publications in the 12/1/2010-04/30/2014 period resulting from research supported by this grant is provided in the following section. The final section lists the Ph.D. dissertations based on research supported by the grant that were submitted during this period.

  18. Highlights and discoveries from the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tananbaum, H; Weisskopf, M C; Tucker, W; Wilkes, B; Edmonds, P

    2014-06-01

    Within 40 years of the detection of the first extra-solar x-ray source in 1962, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has achieved an increase in sensitivity of 10 orders of magnitude, comparable to the gain in going from naked-eye observations to the most powerful optical telescopes over the past 400 years. Chandra is unique in its capabilities for producing sub-arcsecond x-ray images with 100-200 eV energy resolution for energies in the range 0.08 black holes; the growth of supermassive black holes and their role in the regulation of star formation and growth of galaxies; impacts of collisions, mergers, and feedback on growth and evolution of groups and clusters of galaxies; and properties of dark matter and dark energy. PMID:24913425

  19. Chandra Finds Well-Established Black Holes In Distant Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-01

    University of Arizona and her colleagues disagree. In addition to the three distant Sloan quasars, they observed 14 other quasars with distances between 12 and 12.5 billion light years. Bechtold's group looked at their larger sample to determine that the younger, more distant quasars were radiating a lower percentage of their energy in X-rays. "The X-ray data are consistent with predictions of some theories that a hot gas atmosphere is associated with the accretion disk swirling around a central supermassive black hole," said Bechtold, provided the distant quasars have more massive black holes than nearby ones. "These theories predict that large supermassive black holes should be relatively weaker X-ray emittters than smaller ones, which is what we observed with Chandra." All groups agreed that the masses of the black holes producing the X-rays are huge, given their relative youth. By various estimates, the three quasars each weighed in at between one and 10 billion times the mass of the Sun. By comparison, the black hole at the center of the Milky Way is believed to contain the mass equivalent to only about 3 million Suns. Daniel Schwartz of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics took a different approach to the same data. In addition to looking at the quasars themselves, he examined the space around them. His search paid off with the discovery of a new X-ray source, which may be only about half a million light years away from the quasar SDSS 1306+0356 "It's not clear what the source is," said Schwartz. "One plausible explanation is that it is due to a high-energy jet of material ejected by the quasar over at least several hundred thousand years." Chandra has detected a number of such jets, which could be generated by the extraction of energy from the rotation of a supermassive black hole. In addition to SDSS 1306+0356, which has a cosmological redshift z = 5.99, the other distant Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars observed in this study are SDSS 0836+0054 (redshift

  20. The BMW-Chandra Serendipitous Source Catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, P.; Campana, S.; Mignani, R. P.; Moretti, A.; Panzera, M. R.; Tagliaferri, G.

    We present the BMW-Chandra Source Catalogue drawn from all Chandra ACIS-I pointed observations with an exposure time in excess of 10 ks public as of March 2003 (136 observations). Using the wavelet detection algorithm developed by \\citep{Lazzatiea99} and \\citep{Campanaea99}, which can characterize point-like as well as extended sources, we identified 21325 sources which were visually inspected and verified. Among them, 16758 are not associated with the targets of the pointings and are considered certain; they have a 0.5-10 keV absorption corrected flux distribution median of ˜ 7 × 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. The catalogue consists of source positions, count rates, extensions and relative errors in three energy bands (total, 0.5-7 keV; soft, 0.5-2 keV; and hard band, 2-7 keV), as well as the additional information drawn from the headers of the original files. We also extracted source counts in four additional energy bands, (0.5-1.0 keV, 1.0-2.0 keV, 2.0-4.0 keV and 4.0-7.0 keV). We compute the sky coverage in the soft and hard bands. The complete catalogue provides a sky coverage in the soft band (0.5-2 keV, S/N =3) of ˜ 8 deg2 at a limiting flux of ˜ 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1, and ˜ 2 deg2 at a limiting flux of ˜ 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. http://www.merate.mi.astro.it/~xanadu/BMC/bmc_home.html

  1. High energy nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1988 progress report of the High Energy Nuclear Physics laboratory (Polytechnic School, France), is presented. The Laboratory research program is focused on the fundamental physics of interactions, on the new techniques for the acceleration of charged particles and on the nuclei double beta decay. The experiments are performed on the following topics: the measurement of the π0 inclusive production and the photons production in very high energy nuclei-nuclei interactions and the nucleon stability. Concerning the experiments under construction, a new detector for LEP, the study and simulation of the hadronic showers in a calorimeter and the H1 experiment (HERA), are described. The future research programs and the published papers are listed

  2. High Energy Particle Accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    Audio Productions, Inc, New York

    1960-01-01

    Film about the different particle accelerators in the US. Nuclear research in the US has developed into a broad and well-balanced program.Tour of accelerator installations, accelerator development work now in progress and a number of typical experiments with high energy particles. Brookhaven, Cosmotron. Univ. Calif. Berkeley, Bevatron. Anti-proton experiment. Negative k meson experiment. Bubble chambers. A section on an electron accelerator. Projection of new accelerators. Princeton/Penn. build proton synchrotron. Argonne National Lab. Brookhaven, PS construction. Cambridge Electron Accelerator; Harvard/MIT. SLAC studying a linear accelerator. Other research at Madison, Wisconsin, Fixed Field Alternate Gradient Focusing. (FFAG) Oakridge, Tenn., cyclotron. Two-beam machine. Comments : Interesting overview of high energy particle accelerators installations in the US in these early years. .

  3. Theoretical high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses progress on theoretical high energy physics at Columbia University in New York City. Some of the topics covered are: Chern-Simons gauge field theories; dynamical fermion QCD calculations; lattice gauge theory; the standard model of weak and electromagnetic interactions; Boson-fermion model of cuprate superconductors; S-channel theory of superconductivity and axial anomaly and its relation to spin in the parton model

  4. First Terrestrial Soft X-ray Aurora Observations by Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gladstone, G. Randall; Waite, J. Hunter, Jr.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Ostgaard, Nikolai; Chang, Shen-Wu; Metzger, Albert E.; Majeed, Tariq

    2004-01-01

    Northern polar "auroral" regions of Earth was observed by High-Resolution Camera in imaging mode (T32C-I) aboard Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO) during mid December 2003 - mid April 2004. Ten CXO observations, each approximately 20 min duration, were made in a non-conventional method (due to CXO technical issues), such that Chandra was aimed at a fixed point in sky and the Earth's polar cusp was allowed to drift through the HRC-I field-of-view. The observations were performed when CXO was near apogee and timed during northern winter mostly near midnight (6 hr), except two observations which occurred around 1200 UT, so that northern polar region is entirely in dark and solar fluoresced x-ray contamination can be avoided. These observations were aimed at searching the Earth's soft x-ray aurora and to do a comparative study with Jupiter's x-ray aurora, where a pulsating x-ray hot-spot near the northern magnetic pole has been observed by Chandra that implies a particle source region near Jupiter's magnetopause, and entry of heavy solar wind ions due to high-latitude reconnection as a viable explanation for the soft x-ray emissions. The first Chandra soft (0.1-2 keV) x-ray observations of Earth's aurora show that it is highly variable (intense arc, multiple arcs, diffuse, at times almost absent). In at least one of the observations an isolated blob of emission is observed where we expect cusp to be: giving indication of solar wind charge-exchange signature in x-rays. We are comparing the Chandra x-ray observations with observations at other wavelengths and particle data from Earth-orbiting satellites and solar wind measurements from near-Earth ACE and SOH0 spacecraft. Preliminary results from these unique CXO-Earth observations will be presented and discussed.

  5. A $Chandra-Swift$ View of Point Sources in Hickson Compact Groups: High AGN fraction but a dearth of strong AGNs

    CERN Document Server

    Tzanavaris, P; Hornschemeier, A E; Fedotov, K; Eracleous, M; Brandt, W N; Desjardins, T D; Charlton, J C; Gronwall, C

    2014-01-01

    We present $Chandra$ X-ray point source catalogs for 9 Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs, 37 galaxies) at distances $34 - 89$ Mpc. We perform detailed X-ray point source detection and photometry, and interpret the point source population by means of simulated hardness ratios. We thus estimate X-ray luminosities ($L_X$) for all sources, most of which are too weak for reliable spectral fitting. For all sources, we provide catalogs with counts, count rates, power-law indices ($\\Gamma$), hardness ratios, and $L_X$, in the full ($0.5-8.0$ keV), soft ($0.5-2.0$ keV) and hard ($2.0-8.0$ keV) bands. We use optical emission-line ratios from the literature to re-classify 24 galaxies as star-forming, accreting onto a supermassive black hole (AGNs), transition objects, or low-ionization nuclear emission regions (LINERs). Two-thirds of our galaxies have nuclear X-ray sources with $Swift$/UVOT counterparts. Two nuclei have $L_{X,{\\rm 0.5-8.0 keV}}$~$ > 10^{42}$ erg s$^{-1}$, are strong multi-wavelength AGNs and follow the known...

  6. Probing the wind-wind collision in Gamma Velorum with high-resolution Chandra X-ray spectroscopy: evidence for sudden radiative braking and non-equilibrium ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Henley, D B; Pittard, J M

    2004-01-01

    We present a new analysis of an archived Chandra HETGS X-ray spectrum of the WR+O colliding wind binary Gamma Velorum. The spectrum is dominated by emission lines from astrophysically abundant elements: Ne, Mg, Si, S and Fe. From a combination of broad-band spectral analysis and an analysis of line flux ratios we infer a wide range of temperatures in the X-ray emitting plasma (~4-40 MK). As in the previously published analysis, we find the X-ray emission lines are essentially unshifted, with a mean FWHM of 1240 +/- 30 km/s. Calculations of line profiles based on hydrodynamical simulations of the wind-wind collision predict lines that are blueshifted by a few hundred km/s. The lack of any observed shift in the lines may be evidence of a large shock-cone opening half-angle (> 85 degrees), and we suggest this may be evidence of sudden radiative braking. From the R and G ratios measured from He-like forbidden-intercombination-resonance triplets we find evidence that the Mg XI emission originates from hotter gas c...

  7. Very high energy colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, B.

    1985-05-01

    The conclusions are relatively simple, but represent a considerable challenge to the machine builder. High luminosity is essential. We may in the future discover some new kind of high cross section physics, but all we know now indicates that the luminosity has to increase as the square of the center of mass energy. A reasonable luminosity to scale from for electron machines would be 10/sup 33/ cm/sup -2/ s/sup -1/ at a center of mass energy of 3 TeV. The required emittances in very high energy machines are small. It will be a real challenge to produce these small emittances and to maintain them during acceleration. The small emittances probably make acceleration by laser techniques easier, if such techniques will be practical at all. The beam spot sizes are very small indeed. It will be a challenge to design beam transport systems with the necessary freedom from aberration required for these small spot sizes. It would of course help if the beta functions at the collision points could be reduced. Beam power will be large - to paraphrase the old saying, ''power is money'' - and efficient acceleration systems will be required.

  8. Chandra Observations of Eight Sources Discovered by INTEGRAL

    CERN Document Server

    Tomsick, John A; Wang, Qinan; Bodaghee, Arash; Chaty, Sylvain; Rahoui, Farid; Rodriguez, Jerome; Fornasini, Francesca M

    2015-01-01

    We report on 0.3-10 keV observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory of eight hard X-ray sources discovered within 8 degrees of the Galactic plane by the INTEGRAL satellite. The short (5 ks) Chandra observations of the IGR source fields have yielded very likely identifications of X-ray counterparts for three of the IGR sources: IGR J14091-6108, IGR J18088-2741, and IGR J18381-0924. The first two have very hard spectra in the Chandra band that can be described by a power-law with photon indices of Gamma = 0.6+/-0.4 and -0.7(+0.4)(-0.3), respectively (90% confidence errors are given), and both have a unique near-IR counterpart consistent with the Chandra position. IGR J14091-6108 also displays a strong iron line and a relatively low X-ray luminosity, and we argue that the most likely source type is a Cataclysmic Variable (CV), although we do not completely rule out the possibility of a High Mass X-ray Binary. IGR J18088-2741 has an optical counterpart with a previously measured 6.84 hr periodicity, which may...

  9. Chandra Observations of Neutron Stars -- An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Weisskopf, M. C.

    2002-01-01

    We present a brief review of Chandra observations of neutron stars, with a concentration on neutron stars in supernova remnants. The early Chandra results clearly demonstrate how critical the angular resolution has been in order to separate the neutron star emission from the surrounding nebulosity.

  10. Chandra Multi-wavelength Plane Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Zhao; J.E. Grindlay; J. Hong; M. Servillat; M. van den Berg

    2014-01-01

    Chandra Multi-wavelength Plane Survey (ChaMPlane) surveys the X-ray point sources discovered by the Chandra X-ray Observatory in the galactic plane in order to constrain the populations of faint (L x ≤ 1033 erg/s) accretion-powered sources in the Galaxy. This multi-wavelength survey includes data fr

  11. Theoretical high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brief reports are given on the work of several professors. The following areas are included: quantum chromodynamics calculations using numerical lattice gauge theory and a high-speed parallel computer; the ''spin wave'' description of bosonic particles moving on a lattice with same-site exclusion; a high-temperature expansion to 13th order for the O(4)-symmetric φ4 model on a four-dimensional F4 lattice; spin waves and lattice bosons; superconductivity of C60; meson-meson interferometry in heavy-ion collisions; baryon number violation in the Standard Model in high-energy collisions; hard thermal loops in QCD; electromagnetic interactions of anyons; the relation between Bose-Einstein and BCS condensations; Euclidean wormholes with topology S1 x S2 x R; vacuum decay and symmetry breaking by radiative corrections; inflationary solutions to the cosmological horizon and flatness problems; and magnetically charged black holes

  12. High frequency energy measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-frequency (> 100 MHz) energy measurements present special problems to the experimenter. Environment or available electronics often limit the applicability of a given detector type. The physical properties of many detectors are frequency dependent and in some cases, the physical effect employed can be frequency dependent. State-of-the-art measurements generally involve a detection scheme in association with high-speed electronics and a method of data recording. Events can be single or repetitive shot requiring real time, sampling, or digitizing data recording. Potential modification of the pulse by the detector and the associated electronics should not be overlooked. This presentation will review typical applications, methods of choosing a detector, and high-speed detectors. Special considerations and limitations of some applications and devices will be described

  13. Chandra Observations of Starburst Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestwich, Andrea; Lavoie, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present early X-ray results from Chandra for two starburst galaxies, M82 and NGC3256, obtained using AXAF CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS-I) and the HRC. For M82 the arcsecond spatial resolution enables us to separate the point source component from the extended emission for the first time. Astrometry reveals that most of the X-ray sources are not coincident with the family of compact radio sources believed to be Super Nova Remnants (SNRs). In addition, based on three epoch Chandra observations, several of the X-ray sources are clearly variable indicating that they are binaries. When we deconvolve the extended and point source components detected in the hard X-ray band, we find that 50 percent arises from the extended component. This fact, together with its morphology, constrains the various models proposed to explain the hard X-ray emission. For NGC3256 we resolve two closely separated nuclei. These new data support a pure starburst origin for the total X-ray emission rather than a composite AGN/starburst, thereby making NGC3256 one of the most X-ray luminous starburst galaxies known.

  14. Chandra Finds Oxygen and Neon Ring in Ashes of Exploded Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has revealed an expanding ring-like structure of oxygen and neon that was hurled into space by the explosion of a massive star. The image of E0102-72 provides unprecedented details about the creation and dispersal of heavy elements necessary to form planets like Earth. The results were reported by Professor Claude Canizares of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, at the 195th national meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Atlanta, Ga. Drs. Kathryn Flanagan, David Davis, and John Houck of MIT collaborated with Canizares in this investigation. E0102-72 is the remnant of a supernova explosion located in our neighbor galaxy, the Small Magellanic Cloud, nearly 200,000 light years away. It was created by the explosion of a star that was more than ten times as massive as our Sun. We are seeing the aftermath of the explosion a thousand or more years after the outburst. Shock waves are heating gas to temperatures of nearly 10 million degrees, so it glows with X-rays that are detected by Chandra's instruments. By using the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETG), astronomers were able to pinpoint the distribution of each chemical element individually and measure the velocities of different parts of the expanding ring. They also show the shock wave in a kind of "freeze-frame," revealing the progressive heating of the stellar matter as it plows into the surrounding gas. This is the first time such detailed X-ray information has ever been obtained for a supernova remnant, and should provide critical clues to the nature of supernovas. The grating spectrometer, which was built by an MIT team led by Canizares, spreads the X-rays according to their wavelength, giving distinct images of the object at specific wavelengths characteristic of each chemical element. Small wavelength shifts caused by the Doppler effect are used to measure the expansion velocities of each element independently. "We've been

  15. High energy hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The more novel and important design considerations and features of high energy hadron colliders (pp or p anti p) are discussed. The paper does not attempt to be sufficient for making a complete design, but contains enough references to other papers necessary for doing so. Formulas are generally given without derivation, and notations are not consistent from section to section. For most formulas the derivation is transparent although the mathematics may be lengthy. Whenever obscure, an explanation of the procedure for derivation will be given in physical terms. Detailed mathematical derivations can be found in the references. 10 references

  16. High energy electron cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkhomchuk, V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-09-01

    High energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. The questions of using electron cooling with and without a magnetic field are presented for discussion at this workshop. The electron cooling method was suggested by G. Budker in the middle sixties. The original idea of the electron cooling was published in 1966. The design activities for the NAP-M project was started in November 1971 and the first run using a proton beam occurred in September 1973. The first experiment with both electron and proton beams was started in May 1974. In this experiment good result was achieved very close to theoretical prediction for a usual two component plasma heat exchange.

  17. Prospects at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I discuss some possibilities for neutrino experiments in the fixed-target environment of the SPS, Tevatron, and UNK, with their primary proton beams of 0.4, 0.9, and 3.0 TeV. The emphasis is on unfinished business: issues that have been recognized for some time, but not yet resolved. Then I turn to prospects for proton-proton colliders to explore the 1-TeV scale. I review the motivation for new physics in the neighborhood of 1 TeV and mention some discovery possibilities for high-energy, high-luminosity hadron colliders and the implications they would have for neutrino physics. I raise the possibility of the direct study of neutrino interactions in hadron colliders. I close with a report on the status of the SSC project. 38 refs., 17 figs

  18. A Full Year's Chandra Exposure on SDSS Quasars from the Chandra Multiwavelength Project

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Paul J; Richards, G T; Barkhouse, W A; Constantin, A; Haggard, D; Karovska, M; Kim, D -W; Kim, M; Vikhlinin, A; Mossman, A; Silverman, J D; Anderson, S F; Kashyap, V; Wilkes, B J; Tananbaum, H

    2008-01-01

    We study the spectral energy distributions and evolution of a large sample of optically selected quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) that were observed in 323 Chandra images analyzed by the Chandra Multiwavelength Project (ChaMP). Our highest-confidence matched sample includes 1135 X-ray detected quasars in the redshift range 0.23 QSOs detected, we find no evidence for evolution out to z~5 for either the X-ray photon index Gamma or for the ratio of optical/UV to X-ray flux alpha_ox. About 10% of detected QSOs are obscured (Nh>1E22), but the fraction might reach ~1/3 if most non-detections are absorbed. We confirm a significant correlation between alpha_ox and optical luminosity, but it flattens or disappears for fainter AGN alone. Gamma hardens significantly both towards higher X-ray luminosity, and for relatively X-ray loud quasars. These trends may represent a relative increase in non-thermal X-ray emission, and our findings thereby strengthen analogies between Galactic black hole binaries and ...

  19. High energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    This proposal is for the continuation of the High Energy Physics program at the University of California at Riverside. In hadron collider physics the authors will complete their transition from experiment UA1 at CERN to the DZERO experiment at Fermilab. On experiment UA1 their effort will concentrate on data analysis at Riverside. At Fermilab they will coordinate the high voltage system for all detector elements. They will also carry out hardware/software development for the D0 muon detector. The TPC/Two-Gamma experiment has completed its present phase of data-taking after accumulating 160 pb{sup {minus}}1 of luminosity. The UC Riverside group will continue data and physics analysis and make minor hardware improvement for the high luminosity run. The UC Riverside group is participating in design and implementation of the data acquisition system for the OPAL experiment at LEP. Mechanical and electronics construction of the OPAL hadron calorimeter strip readout system is proceeding on schedule. Data analysis and Monte Carlo detector simulation efforts are proceeding in preparation for the first physics run when IEP operation comenses in fall 1989.

  20. High energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This proposal is for the continuation of the High Energy Physics program at the University of California at Riverside. In hadron collider physics the authors will complete their transition from experiment UA1 at CERN to the DZERO experiment at Fermilab. On experiment UA1 their effort will concentrate on data analysis at Riverside. At Fermilab they will coordinate the high voltage system for all detector elements. They will also carry out hardware/software development for the D0 muon detector. The TPC/Two-Gamma experiment has completed its present phase of data-taking after accumulating 160 pb-1 of luminosity. The UC Riverside group will continue data and physics analysis and make minor hardware improvement for the high luminosity run. The UC Riverside group is participating in design and implementation of the data acquisition system for the OPAL experiment at LEP. Mechanical and electronics construction of the OPAL hadron calorimeter strip readout system is proceeding on schedule. Data analysis and Monte Carlo detector simulation efforts are proceeding in preparation for the first physics run when IEP operation comenses in fall 1989

  1. Recent and Future Observations in the X-ray and Gamma-ray Bands: Chandra, Suzaku, GLAST, and NuSTAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madejski, Greg; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2005-12-02

    This paper presents a brief overview of the accomplishments of the Chandra satellite that are shedding light on the origin of high energy particles in astrophysical sources, with the emphasis on clusters of galaxies. It also discusses the prospects for the new data to be collected with instruments recently launched--such as Suzaku--or those to be deployed in the near future, and this includes GLAST and NuSTAR.

  2. High Energy Density Capacitors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA?s future space science missions cannot be realized without the state of the art energy storage devices which require high energy density, high reliability, and...

  3. High energy magnetic excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report emphasizes that the current development in condensed matter physics opens a research field fit to inelastic neutron scattering experiments in the eV range which is easilly accessed by spallation neutron sources. Several important subjects adopted at thermal reactors are shown. It is desired to extend the implementation of the spectroscopic experiments for investigation of higher energy magnetic excitations. For La2CuO4, which is the mother crystal of the first high Tc materials found by Bednortz and Muller, it seems to be believed that the magnetism is well characterized by the two-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnetic Hamiltonian, and it is widely accepted that the magnetism is a most probable progenitor of high Tc superconductors. The unusual properties of spin correlations in this crystal have been studied extensively by standard neutron scattering techniques with steady neutrons at BNL. FeSi is not ordered magnetically but shows a very unique feature of temperature induced magnetism, which also has been studied extensively by using the thermal neutron scattering technique at BNL. In these experiments, polarized neutrons are indispensable to extract the clean magnetic components out of other components of non-magnetic scattering. (N.K.)

  4. Applications for edge detection techniques using Chandra and XMM-Newton data: galaxy clusters and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, S. A.; Sanders, J. S.; Fabian, A. C.

    2016-09-01

    The unrivalled spatial resolution of the Chandra X-ray observatory has allowed many breakthroughs to be made in high-energy astrophysics. Here we explore applications of Gaussian gradient magnitude (GGM) filtering to X-ray data, which dramatically improves the clarity of surface brightness edges in X-ray observations, and maps gradients in X-ray surface brightness over a range of spatial scales. In galaxy clusters, we find that this method is able to reveal remarkable substructure behind the cold fronts in Abell 2142 and Abell 496, possibly the result of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. In Abell 2319 and Abell 3667, we demonstrate that the GGM filter can provide a straightforward way of mapping variations in the widths and jump ratios along the lengths of cold fronts. We present results from our ongoing programme of analysing the Chandra and XMM-Newton archives with the GGM filter. In the Perseus cluster, we identify a previously unseen edge around 850 kpc from the core to the east, lying outside a known large-scale cold front, which is possibly a bow shock. In MKW 3s we find an unusual `V' shape surface brightness enhancement starting at the cluster core, which may be linked to the AGN jet. In the Crab nebula a new, moving feature in the outer part of the torus is identified which moves across the plane of the sky at a speed of ˜0.1c, and lies much further from the central pulsar than the previous motions seen by Chandra.

  5. Chandra and Swift Observations of Unidentified Fermi-LAT Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Davide; Cheung, T.; Gehrels, N.

    2010-03-01

    In the last year we targeted some of the unidentified Fermi-LAT objects (UFOs) at high Galactic latitude with Chandra and Swift in order to determine the basic properties (positions, fluxes, hardness ratios) of all X-ray sources within the Fermi-LAT localization circles. These satellites enable us to detect the X-ray conterparts with a flux limit that is at least an order of magnitude lower than achieved in extant RASS data and to further follow-up at other wavelengths, with the ultimate goal to reveal the nature of these enigmatic gamma-ray sources. Here we present the results obtained with 5 Chandra pointings of high Galactic latitude UFOs in the Fermi-LAT 3-months bright source list. The association of detected X-ray sources within the improved 11-months Fermi-LAT localization circles with available optical and radio observations is discussed.

  6. The Chandra X-Ray Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Weisskopf, Martin C

    2011-01-01

    Significant advances in science always take place when the state of the art in instrumentation improves dramatically. NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory represents such an advance. Launched in July of 1999, Chandra is an observatory designed to study the x-ray emission from all categories of astronomical objects --- from comets, planets, and normal stars to quasars, galaxies, and clusters of galaxies. At the heart of this observatory is the precision X-Ray optic that has been vital for Chandra's outstanding success and which features an angular resolution improved by an order of magnitude compared to its forerunners. The Chandra mission is now entering its 13-th year of operation. Given that the Observatory was designed for a minimum of 3 years of operation testifies to its robust and carefully thought out design. We review the design and construction of the remarkable telescope, present examples of its usage for astronomy and astrophysics, and speculate upon the future.

  7. FSU High Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prosper, Harrison B. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Adams, Todd [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Askew, Andrew [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Berg, Bernd [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Blessing, Susan K. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Okui, Takemichi [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Owens, Joseph F. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Reina, Laura [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Wahl, Horst D. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The High Energy Physics group at Florida State University (FSU), which was established in 1958, is engaged in the study of the fundamental constituents of matter and the laws by which they interact. The group comprises theoretical and experimental physicists, who sometimes collaborate on projects of mutual interest. The report highlights the main recent achievements of the group. Significant, recent, achievements of the group’s theoretical physicists include progress in making precise predictions in the theory of the Higgs boson and its associated processes, and in the theoretical understanding of mathematical quantities called parton distribution functions that are related to the structure of composite particles such as the proton. These functions are needed to compare data from particle collisions, such as the proton-proton collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), with theoretical predictions. The report also describes the progress in providing analogous functions for heavy nuclei, which find application in neutrino physics. The report highlights progress in understanding quantum field theory on a lattice of points in space and time (an area of study called lattice field theory), the progress in constructing several theories of potential new physics that can be tested at the LHC, and interesting new ideas in the theory of the inflationary expansion of the very early universe. The focus of the experimental physicists is the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN. The report, however, also includes results from the D0 experiment at Fermilab to which the group made numerous contributions over a period of many years. The experimental group is particularly interested in looking for new physics at the LHC that may provide the necessary insight to extend the standard model (SM) of particle physics. Indeed, the search for new physics is the primary task of contemporary particle physics, one motivated by the need to explain certain facts, such as the

  8. Chandra Observations of SNR RCW 103

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Kari A.; Burrows, David N.; Park, Sangwook

    2015-01-01

    We analyze three Chandra observations, with a combined exposure time of 99 ks, of the Galactic supernova remnant RCW 103, a young supernova remnant, previously with no clear detection of metal-rich ejecta. Based on our imaging and spectral analyses of these deep Chandra data, we find evidence for metal-rich ejecta emission scattered throughout the remnant. X-ray emission from the shocked ejecta is generally weak, and the shocked circumstellar medium (CSM) is a largely dominant component acros...

  9. A Spatial and Spectral Study of Nonthermal Filaments in Historical Supernova Remnants: Observational Results with Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Bamba, A; Yoshida, T; Terasawa, T; Koyama, K; Bamba, Aya; Yamazaki, Ryo; Yoshida, Tatsuo; Terasawa, Toshio; Koyama, Katsuji

    2004-01-01

    The outer shells of young supernova remnants (SNRs) are the most plausible acceleration sites of high-energy electrons with the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) mechanism. We studied spatial and spectral properties close to the shock fronts in four historical SNRs (Cas A, Kepler's remnant, Tycho's remnant, and RCW 86) with excellent spatial resolution of {\\it Chandra}. In all of the SNRs, hard X-ray emissions were found on the rims of the SNRs, which concentrate in very narrow regions (so-called "filaments"); apparent scale widths on the upstream side are below or in the order of the point spread function of {\\it Chandra}, while 0.5--40 arcsec (0.01--0.4 pc) on the downstream side with most reliable distances. The spectra of these filaments can be fitted with both thermal and nonthermal (power-law and {\\tt SRCUT}) models. The former requires unrealistic high temperature ($\\ga$2 keV) and low abundances ($\\la$1 solar) for emission from young SNRs and may be thus unlikely. The latter reproduces the spectra wit...

  10. HDE 245059: A Weak-Lined T Tauri Binary Revealed by Chandra and Keck

    CERN Document Server

    Saavedra, C Baldovin; Duchêne, G; Güdel, M; Skinner, S L; Paerels, F B S; Ghez, A; McCabe, C

    2009-01-01

    We present the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) and Keck observations of HDE 245059, a young weak-lined T Tauri star (WTTS), member of the pre-main sequence group in the Lambda Orionis Cluster. Our high spatial resolution, near-infrared observations with Keck reveal that HDE 245059 a binary separated by 0.87". Based on this new information we have obtained an estimate of the masses of the binary components; 3M_{sun} and 2.5M_{sun} for the north and south components, respectively. We have estimated the age of the system to be ~2-3 Myr. We detect both components of the binary in the zeroth order Chandra image and in the grating spectra. Our fits to the spectrum of the binary have shown that the emission is dominated by a plasma between 8 and 15 MK, a soft component at 4 MK and a hard component at 50 MK are also detected. The value of the hydrogen column density was low, 8 x 10^{19} cm^{-2}, likely due to the clearing of the inner region of the Lambda Orionis cloud. The abundance pat...

  11. The Chandra/HETG view of NGC 1365 in a Compton-thick state

    CERN Document Server

    Nardini, E; Reeves, J N; Braito, V; Risaliti, G; Costa, M

    2015-01-01

    We present the analysis of a Chandra High-Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) observation of the local Seyfert galaxy NGC 1365. The source, well known for its dramatic X-ray spectral variability, was caught in a reflection-dominated, Compton-thick state. The high spatial resolution afforded by Chandra allowed us to isolate the soft X-ray emission from the active nucleus, neglecting most of the contribution from the kpc-scale starburst ring. The HETG spectra thus revealed a wealth of He- and H-like lines from photoionized gas, whereas in larger aperture observations these are almost exclusively produced through collisional ionization in the circumnuclear environment. Once the residual thermal component is accounted for, the emission-line properties of the photoionized region close to the hard X-ray continuum source indicate that NGC 1365 has some similarities to the local population of obscured active galaxies. In spite of the limited overall data quality, several soft X-ray lines seem to have fairly broad prof...

  12. X-ray Monitoring of Gravitational Lenses With Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Bin; Kochanek, Christopher S; Chartas, George; Blackburne, Jeffery A; Morgan, Christopher W

    2012-01-01

    We present \\emph{Chandra} monitoring data for six gravitationally lensed quasars: QJ 0158$-$4325, HE 0435$-$1223, HE 1104$-$1805, SDSS 0924+0219, SDSS 1004+4112, and Q 2237+0305. We detect X-ray microlensing variability in all six lenses with high confidence. We detect energy dependent microlensing in HE 0435$-$1223, SDSS 1004+4112, SDSS 0924+0219 and Q 2237+0305. We present a detailed spectral analysis for each lens, and find that simple power-law models plus Gaussian emission lines give good fits to the spectra. We detect intrinsic spectral variability in two epochs of Q 2237+0305. We detect differential absorption between images in four lenses. We also detect the \\feka\\ emission line in all six lenses, and the Ni XXVII K$\\alpha$ line in two images of Q 2237+0305. The rest frame equivalent widths of the \\feka\\ lines are measured to be 0.4--1.2 keV, significantly higher than those measured in typical active galactic nuclei of similar X-ray luminosities. This suggests that the \\feka\\ emission region is more c...

  13. Chandra counterparts of CANDELS GOODS-S sources

    CERN Document Server

    Cappelluti, N; Fontana, A; Zamorani, G; Amorin, R; Castellano, M; Merlin, E; Santini, P; Elbaz, D; Schreiber, C; Shu, X; Wang, T; Dunlop, J S; Bourne, N; Bruce, V A; Buitrago, F; Michałowski, Michał J; Derriere, S; Ferguson, H C; Faber, S M; Vito, F

    2015-01-01

    Improving the capabilities of detecting faint X-ray sources is fundamental to increase the statistics on faint high-z AGN and star-forming galaxies.We performed a simultaneous Maximum Likelihood PSF fit in the [0.5-2] keV and [2-7] keV energy bands of the 4 Ms {\\em Chandra} Deep Field South (CDFS) data at the position of the 34930 CANDELS H-band selected galaxies. For each detected source we provide X-ray photometry and optical counterpart validation. We validated this technique by means of a raytracing simulation. We detected a total of 698 X-ray point-sources with a likelihood $\\mathcal{L}$$>$4.98 (i.e. $>$2.7$\\sigma$). We show that the prior knowledge of a deep sample of Optical-NIR galaxies leads to a significant increase of the detection of faint (i.e. $\\sim$10$^{-17}$ cgs in the [0.5-2] keV band) sources with respect to "blind" X-ray detections. By including previous catalogs, this work increases the total number of X-ray sources detected in the 4 Ms CDFS, CANDELS area to 793, which represents the large...

  14. NASA'S Chandra Finds Superfluid in Neutron Star's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has discovered the first direct evidence for a superfluid, a bizarre, friction-free state of matter, at the core of a neutron star. Superfluids created in laboratories on Earth exhibit remarkable properties, such as the ability to climb upward and escape airtight containers. The finding has important implications for understanding nuclear interactions in matter at the highest known densities. Neutron stars contain the densest known matter that is directly observable. One teaspoon of neutron star material weighs six billion tons. The pressure in the star's core is so high that most of the charged particles, electrons and protons, merge resulting in a star composed mostly of uncharged particles called neutrons. Two independent research teams studied the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A, or Cas A for short, the remains of a massive star 11,000 light years away that would have appeared to explode about 330 years ago as observed from Earth. Chandra data found a rapid decline in the temperature of the ultra-dense neutron star that remained after the supernova, showing that it had cooled by about four percent over a 10-year period. "This drop in temperature, although it sounds small, was really dramatic and surprising to see," said Dany Page of the National Autonomous University in Mexico, leader of a team with a paper published in the February 25, 2011 issue of the journal Physical Review Letters. "This means that something unusual is happening within this neutron star." Superfluids containing charged particles are also superconductors, meaning they act as perfect electrical conductors and never lose energy. The new results strongly suggest that the remaining protons in the star's core are in a superfluid state and, because they carry a charge, also form a superconductor. "The rapid cooling in Cas A's neutron star, seen with Chandra, is the first direct evidence that the cores of these neutron stars are, in fact, made of superfluid and

  15. High-energy neutrino fluxes from AGN populations inferred from X-ray surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobsen, Idunn B; On, Alvina Y L; Saxton, Curtis J

    2015-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos and photons are complementary messengers, probing violent astrophysical processes and structural evolution of the Universe. X-ray and neutrino observations jointly constrain conditions in active galactic nuclei (AGN) jets: their baryonic and leptonic contents, and particle production efficiency. Testing two standard neutrino production models for local source Cen A \\citep{KT2008,BB2009}, we calculate the high-energy neutrino spectra of single AGN sources and derive the flux of high-energy neutrinos expected for the current epoch. Assuming that accretion determines both X-rays and particle creation, our parametric scaling relations predict neutrino yield in various AGN classes. We derive redshift-dependent number densities of each class, from {\\it Chandra} and {\\it Swift}/BAT X-ray luminosity functions \\citep{SGB2008,ACS2009}. We integrate the neutrino spectrum expected from the cumulative history of AGN (correcting for cosmological and source effects, e.g. jet orientation and beaming). B...

  16. Unveiling obscured accretion in the Chandra Deep Field South

    CERN Document Server

    Fiore, F; Santini, P; Puccetti, S; Brusa, M; Feruglio, C; Fontana, A; Giallongo, E; Comastri, A; Gruppioni, C; Pozzi, F; Zamorani, G; Vignali, C

    2007-01-01

    A large population of heavily obscured, Compton Thick AGNs is predicted by models of galaxy formation, models of Cosmic X-ray Background and by the ``relic'' super-massive black-hole mass function measured from local bulges. However, so far only a handful of Compton thick AGNs have been possibly detected using even the deepest Chandra and XMM surveys. Compton-thick AGNs can be recovered thanks to the reprocessing of the AGN UV emission in the infrared by selecting sources with AGN luminosity's in the mid-infrared and faint near-infrared and optical emission. To this purpose, we make use of deep HST, VLT, Spitzer and Chandra data on the Chandra Deep Field South to constrain the number of Compton thick AGN in this field. We show that sources with high 24micron to optical flux ratios and red colors form a distinct source population, and that their infrared luminosity is dominated by AGN emission. Analysis of the X-ray properties of these extreme sources shows that most of them are indeed likely to be highly obsc...

  17. Chandra Observes the End of an Era SN 1987A

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Kari A.; Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Park, Sangwook; McCray, Richard; Dwek, Eli; Burrows, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Updated imaging and photometric results from Chandra observations of SN 1987A, covering the last 16 years, are presented. We find that the 0.5-2 keV light curve has remained constant at ~8x10^-12 erg s^-1 cm^-2 since 9500 days, with the 3-8 keV light curve continuing to increase until at least 10000 days. The expansion rate of the ring is found to be energy dependent, such that after day 6000 the ring expands faster in the 2-10 keV band than it does at energies

  18. Applications for edge detection techniques using Chandra and XMM-Newton data: galaxy clusters and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, S A; Fabian, A C

    2016-01-01

    The unrivalled spatial resolution of the Chandra X-ray observatory has allowed many breakthroughs to be made in high energy astrophysics. Here we explore applications of Gaussian Gradient Magnitude (GGM) filtering to X-ray data, which dramatically improves the clarity of surface brightness edges in X-ray observations, and maps gradients in X-ray surface brightness over a range of spatial scales. In galaxy clusters, we find that this method is able to reveal remarkable substructure behind the cold fronts in Abell 2142 and Abell 496, possibly the result of Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities. In Abell 2319 and Abell 3667, we demonstrate that the GGM filter can provide a straightforward way of mapping variations in the widths and jump ratios along the lengths of cold fronts. We present results from our ongoing programme of analysing the Chandra and XMM-Newton archives with the GGM filter. In the Perseus cluster we identify a previously unseen edge around 850 kpc from the core to the east, lying outside a known large ...

  19. The Chandra Local Volume Survey: The X-ray Point Source Population of NGC 404

    CERN Document Server

    Binder, B; Eracleous, M; Gaetz, T J; Kong, A K H; Skillman, E D; Weisz, D R

    2012-01-01

    We present a comprehensive X-ray point source catalog of NGC 404 obtained as part of the Chandra Local Volume Survey. A new, 97 ks Chandra ACIS-S observation of NGC 404 was combined with archival observations for a total exposure of ~123 ks. Our survey yields 74 highly significant X-ray point sources and is sensitive to a limiting unabsorbed luminosity of ~6x10^35 erg s^-1 in the 0.35-8 keV band. To constrain the nature of each X-ray source, cross-correlations with multi-wavelength data were generated. We searched overlapping HST observations for optical counterparts to our X-ray detections, but find only two X-ray sources with candidate optical counterparts. We find 21 likely low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), although this number is a lower limit due to the difficulties in separating LMXBs from background AGN. The X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) in both the soft and hard energy bands are presented. The XLFs in the soft band (0.5-2 keV) and the hard band (2-8 keV) have a limiting luminosity at the 90% comple...

  20. A Deep Chandra X-ray Spectrum of the Accreting Young Star TW Hydrae

    CERN Document Server

    Brickhouse, N S; Dupree, A K; Luna, G J M; Wolk, S

    2010-01-01

    We present X-ray spectral analysis of the accreting young star TW Hydrae from a 489 ks observation using the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating. The spectrum provides a rich set of diagnostics for electron temperature T_e, electron density N_e, hydrogen column density N_H, relative elemental abundances and velocities and reveals its source in 3 distinct regions of the stellar atmosphere: the stellar corona, the accretion shock, and a very large extended volume of warm postshock plasma. The presence of Mg XII, Si XIII, and Si XIV emission lines in the spectrum requires coronal structures at ~10 MK. Lower temperature lines (e.g., from O VIII, Ne IX, and Mg XI) formed at 2.5 MK appear more consistent with emission from an accretion shock. He-like Ne IX line ratio diagnostics indicate that T_e = 2.50 +/- 0.25 MK and N_e = 3.0 +/- 0.2 x 10^(12) cm^(-3) in the shock. These values agree well with standard magnetic accretion models. However, the Chandra observations significantly diverge from current model pred...

  1. High energy neutron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegand, C.

    1948-04-27

    It is the purpose of this paper to describe a neutron detector suitable for monitoring a flux of neutrons whose energy is greater than about 50 MeV. Detection of the neutrons is accomplished by their ability to induce fission in heavy elements. Kelly and Wiegand studied the neutron fission of Bi, Pb, Ti, Hg, Au, and Pt at various neutron energies and the presently described counter is an application of this work.

  2. Renewable Energy Riding High

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    China is putting greater emphasis on green energy as it tries to clean up industry and meet target for cuts in carbon emissions over the past two years, China has already leapfrogged competitors from Denmark, Germany, Spain and the United States to become the world's largest maker of wind turbines and solar panels. At the same time, the country is also taking steps to build more nuclear reactors and energy-efficient coal power plants.

  3. EIS Data on the Chandra Deep Field South Released

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of this note is to announce that the ESO Imaging Survey programme has released a full set of optical/infrared data covering the socalled Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S) rapidly becoming a favoured target for cosmological studies in the southern hemisphere. The field was originally selected for deep X-ray observations with Chandra and XMM. The former have already been completed producing the deepest high-resolution X-ray image ever taken with a total integration time of one million seconds. The data obtained by EIS include J and Ks infrared observations of an area of 0.1 square degree nearly matching the Chandra image down to JAB ~ 23.4 and KAB ~ 22.6 and UU'BVRI optical observations over 0.25 square degree, matching the XMM field of view, reaching 5 s limiting magnitudes of U'AB = 26.0, UAB = 25.7, BAB = 26.4, VAB = 25.4, RA B = 25.5 and IA B = 24.7 mag, as measured within a 2 ´ FWHM aperture.

  4. High energy cosmic ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief introduction to High Energy Cosmic Ray Astronomy is presented. This field covers a 17 decade energy range (2.104-1020) eV. Recent discoveries done with gamma-ray detectors on-board satellites and ground-based Cherenkov devices are pushing for a fast development of new and innovative techniques, specially in the low energy region which includes the overlapping of satellite and ground-based measurements in the yet unexplored energy range 20 keV-250 GeV. Detection of unexpected extremely high energy events have triggered the interest of the international scientific community. (orig.)

  5. High energy nuclear structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear field theory has been applied to study nuclear matter as well as finite nuclei. Within the mean field approximation the known bulk properties of nuclei such as binding energy, density, and compressibility are well reproduced. Charge and matter distributions of closed shell nuclei are in good agreement with experimental results, so are rms radii and single-particle energy levels. In addition to the description of known nuclear structure the field theoretical approach may reveal entirely new nuclear phenomena, based on the explicite treatment of mesonic degrees of freedom. The existence of such abnormal nuclear states was proposed by Lee and Wick employing the sigma-model Lagrangian. There the non-linearity of the meson field equations allows for soliton solutions in the presence of nucleons, in particular the sigma-field may exhibit a kink. Some of these solutions are considered

  6. High Energy Vision: Processing X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    DePasquale, Joseph; Edmonds, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Astronomy is by nature a visual science. The high quality imagery produced by the world's observatories can be a key to effectively engaging with the public and helping to inspire the next generation of scientists. Creating compelling astronomical imagery can, however, be particularly challenging in the non-optical wavelength regimes. In the case of X-ray astronomy, where the amount of light available to create an image is severely limited, it is necessary to employ sophisticated image processing algorithms to translate light beyond human vision into imagery that is aesthetically pleasing while still being scientifically accurate. This paper provides a brief overview of the history of X-ray astronomy leading to the deployment of NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, followed by an examination of the specific challenges posed by processing X-ray imagery. The authors then explore image processing techniques used to mitigate such processing challenges in order to create effective public imagery for X-ray astronomy. ...

  7. Chandra Observations of Tycho’s Supernova Remnant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U. Hwang; R. Petre; A. E. Szymkowiak; S. S. Holt

    2002-03-01

    We present a new Chandra observation of Tycho’s supernova remnant with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer. Multicolor X-ray imaging reveals new details of the outer shock and ejecta. At energies between 4 and 6 keV, the outline of the outer shock is clearly revealed in X-rays for the first time. The distribution of the emission from lines of Si and Fe are confirmed to have a different morphology from each other, and the Si ejecta are shown to extend to the blast shock at several locations. Characteristic spectra of the outer shock and ejecta are also presented.

  8. Chandra Counterparts of CANDELS GOODS-S Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelluti, N.; Comastri, A.; Fontana, A.; Zamorani, G.; Amorin, R.; Castellano, M.; Merlin, E.; Santini, P.; Elbaz, D.; Schreiber, C.; Shu, X.; Wang, T.; Dunlop, J. S.; Bourne, N.; Bruce, V. A.; Buitrago, F.; Michałowski, Michał J.; Derriere, S.; Ferguson, H. C.; Faber, S. M.; Vito, F.

    2016-06-01

    Improving the capabilities of detecting faint X-ray sources is fundamental for increasing the statistics on faint high-z active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and star-forming galaxies (SFGs). We performed a simultaneous maximum likelihood point-spread function fit in the [0.5–2] keV and [2–7] keV energy bands of the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS) data at the position of the 34,930 CANDELS H-band selected galaxies. For each detected source we provide X-ray photometry and optical counterpart validation. We validated this technique by means of a ray-tracing simulation. We detected a total of 698 X-ray point sources with a likelihood { L }\\gt 4.98 (i.e., >2.7σ). We show that prior knowledge of a deep sample of optical–NIR galaxies leads to a significant increase in the detection of faint (i.e., ∼10‑17 cgs in the [0.5–2] keV band) sources with respect to “blind” X-ray detections. By including previous X-ray catalogs, this work increases the total number of X-ray sources detected in the 4 Ms CDFS, CANDELS area to 793, which represents the largest sample of extremely faint X-ray sources assembled to date. Our results suggest that a large fraction of the optical counterparts of our X-ray sources determined by likelihood ratio actually coincides with the priors used for the source detection. Most of the new detected sources are likely SFGs or faint, absorbed AGNs. We identified a few sources with putative photometric redshift z > 4. Despite the low number statistics and the uncertainties on the photo z, this sample significantly increases the number of X-ray-selected candidate high-z AGNs.

  9. High-energy communication

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Communication Group

    2015-01-01

    On Wednesday at 10.40 a.m., the LHC operators declared “stable beams” after two years of technical stop and a few months of commissioning. It was an exciting day for all the teams involved, including those who worked on communicating the news to the public and the media on multiple platforms.   CERN’s most successful tweet on 3 June featured collision images from ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb and was shared 800 times by the Twitter audience. Live blogging, social media posts, a live webcast, and a constant outpouring of photos and videos: Wednesday morning was a crazy time for the communication teams from CERN, the experiments and various institutes around the world. Even though the event started very early in the morning (the live CCC blog started at 7 a.m. and the live webcast at 8.20 a.m.), the public and the media tuned in to follow and generously cover the start of the LHC’s physics run at an unprecedented energy of 13 TeV. The statistics showed th...

  10. Conference on High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Conference on High Energy Physics (HEP 2016) will be held from August 24 to 26, 2016 in Xi'an, China. This Conference will cover issues on High Energy Physics. It dedicates to creating a stage for exchanging the latest research results and sharing the advanced research methods. HEP 2016 will be an important platform for inspiring international and interdisciplinary exchange at the forefront of High Energy Physics. The Conference will bring together researchers, engineers, technicians and academicians from all over the world, and we cordially invite you to take this opportunity to join us for academic exchange and visit the ancient city of Xi’an.

  11. Chandra X-ray Spectroscopy of Kes75, its Young Pulsar, and its Synchrotron Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, B F; Helfand, D J

    2001-01-01

    We have observed the young Galactic supernova remnant Kes 75 with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. This object is one of an increasing number of examples of a shell-type remnant with a central extended radio core harboring a pulsar. Here we present a preliminary spatially resolved spectroscopic analysis of the Kes~75 system. We find that the spectrum of the pulsar is significantly harder than that of the wind nebula, and both of these components can be isolated from the diffuse thermal emission that seems to follow the same distribution as the extended radio shell. When we characterize the thermal emission with a model of an under-ionized plasma and non-solar elemental abundances, we require a significant diffuse high energy component, which we model as a power-law with a photon index similar to that of the synchrotron nebula.

  12. High energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    Hadron collider studies will focus on: (i) the search for the top quark with the newly installed D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, (ii) the upgrade of the D0 detector to match the new main injector luminosity and (iii) R&D on silicon microstrip tracking devices for the SSC. High statistics studies of Z{sup 0} decay will continue with the OPAL detector at LEP. These studies will include a direct measurement of Z decay to neutrinos, the search for Higgs and heavy quark decays of Z. Preparations for the Large Scintillation Neutrino Detector (LSND) to measure neutrino oscillations at LAMPF will focus on data acquisition and testing of photomultiplier tubes. In the theoretical area E. Ma will concentrate on mass-generating radiative mechanisms for light quarks and leptons in renormalizable gauge field theories. J. Wudka`s program includes a detailed investigation of the magnetic-flip approach to the solar neutrino.

  13. Managing radiation degradation of CCDs on the Chandra X-ray Observatory II

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Bissell, Bradley A.; Blackwell, William C.; Cameron, Robert A.; Chappell, Jon II.; DePasquale, Joseph M.; Gage, Kenneth R.; Grant, Catherine E.; Harbison, Christine F.

    2005-01-01

    The CCDs on the Chandra X-ray Observatory are vulnerable to radiation damage from low-energy protons scattered off the telescope's mirrors onto the focal plane. Following unexpected damage incurred early in the mission, the Chandra Team developed, implemented, and maintains a radiation-protection program. This program - involving scheduled radiation safing during radiation-belt passes, intervention based upon real-time space-weather conditions and radiation-environment modeling, and on-board radiation monitoring with autonomous radiation safing - has successfully managed the radiation damage to the CCDs. Since implementing the program, the charge-transfer inefficiency (CTI) has increased at an average annual rate of only 2.9x10^-6 (2.3%) for the front- illuminated CCDs and 0.95x10^-6 (6.5%) for the back-illuminated CCDs. This paper describes the current status of Chandra radiation-management program.

  14. Chandra-ASCA-RXTE observations of the micro-quasar GRS 1915+105

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, J C; Reynolds, C S; Fabian, A C; Blackman, E G

    2000-01-01

    A Chandra AO1 30ks HETGS observation of the X-ray transient micro-quasar GRS 1915+105 reveals absorption edges and faint line emission over the HETG energy range. We find from a preliminary analysis evidence for prominent neutral K edges associated with iron, silicon, magnesium, and tentatively sulphur. The column densities assuming solar abundances are consistent with ~ few x $10^{22} cm^{-2}$ in excess of the Galactic value, and may point to surrounding cold material associated with GRS 1915+105. Neutral Fe K$\\alpha$ emission, and ionized absorption from Fe XXV and Fe XXVI are resolved. We limit our discussion to the Chandra results.

  15. [Research in high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses progress in the following research in high energy physics: The crystal ball experiment; delco at PEP; proton decay experiment; MACRO detector; mark III detector; SLD detector; CLEO II detector; and the caltech L3 group

  16. Computing in high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computing in high energy physics has changed over the years from being something one did on a slide-rule, through early computers, then a necessary evil to the position today where computers permeate all aspects of the subject from control of the apparatus to theoretical lattice gauge calculations. The state of the art, as well as new trends and hopes, were reflected in this year's 'Computing In High Energy Physics' conference held in the dreamy setting of Oxford's spires. The conference aimed to give a comprehensive overview, entailing a heavy schedule of 35 plenary talks plus 48 contributed papers in two afternoons of parallel sessions. In addition to high energy physics computing, a number of papers were given by experts in computing science, in line with the conference's aim – 'to bring together high energy physicists and computer scientists'

  17. Research in high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses research being conducted in high energy physics in the following areas: quantum chromodynamics; drift chambers; proton-antiproton interactions; particle decays; particle production; polarimeters; quark-gluon plasma; and conformal field theory. (LSP)

  18. High Energy Transport Code HETC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physics contained in the High Energy Transport Code (HETC), in particular the collision models, are discussed. An application using HETC as part of the CALOR code system is also given. 19 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  19. High energy physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this research is to understand the fundamental constituents of matter and their interactions. At this time, the following activities are underway: e+e- interactions and Z0 physics at CERN; studies to upgrade the L3 detector at LHC; very high statistics charm physics at Fermilab; search for the H particle at BNL; search for the fifth force; rare kaon decay experiments at BNL; study of B-meson physics at hadron colliders; e+e- pair creation by light at SLAC; R ampersand D related to SSC experiments and the GEM detector; and theoretical research in elementary particle physics and cosmology. The main additions to the activities described in detail in the original grant proposal are (1) an experiment at SLAC (E-144) to study strong-field QED effects in e-laser and γ-laser collisions, and (2) a search for the H particle at BNL (E-188). The R ampersand D efforts for the GEM detector have also considerably expanded. In this paper we give a brief status report for each activity currently under way

  20. High energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-10

    The Counter Group continues to work on data analysis for Fermilab Experiment E653. Altogether, they expect several thousand reconstructed charm events and approximately 25 B pair events of which 12 have been observed thus far. Preparation continue for Fermilab Experiment E781, a high statistics study of charm baryon production. In the Theory Group, Cutkosky and collaborators study hadron phenomenology and non-perturbative QCD calculations. Levine has a long standing program in computational QED to obtain improved theoretical values for g-2 of the electron. Wolfenstein, Li, and their collaborators have worked on areas of weak interaction phenomenology that may yield insights beyond the standard model, e.g. CP violation and non-zero neutrino masses. Holman has been concerned with phase transitions in gauge theories relevant to cosmological problems. During 1991 most of the group effort was concentrated on the L3 experiment at CERN. Highlights of the results from the analysis of the Z[degrees] resonance include (a) a measurement of the strong coupling constant [alpha][sub s] for b quarks (b) a precision measurement of the average time of B hadrons and (c) a direct determination of the number of light neutrino faculties from the reaction e[sup +]e[sup [minus

  1. Energy spectra of high energy atmospheric neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsui, K.; Minorikawa, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Focusing on high energy neutrinos ( or = 1 TeV), a new calculation of atmospheric neutrino intensities was carried out taking into account EMC effects observed in P-A collisions by accelerator, recent measurement of primary cosmic ray spectrum and results of cosmic ray muon spectrum and charge ratio. Other features of the present calculation are (1) taking into account kinematics of three body decays of kaons and charm particles in diffusion equations and (2) taking into account energy dependence of kaon production.

  2. The Chandra/HETG view of NGC 1365 in a Compton-thick state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, E.; Gofford, J.; Reeves, J. N.; Braito, V.; Risaliti, G.; Costa, M.

    2015-11-01

    We present the analysis of a Chandra High-Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) observation of the local Seyfert galaxy NGC 1365. The source, well known for its dramatic X-ray spectral variability, was caught in a reflection-dominated, Compton-thick state. The high spatial resolution afforded by Chandra allowed us to isolate the soft X-ray emission from the active nucleus, neglecting most of the contribution from the kpc-scale starburst ring. The HETG spectra thus revealed a wealth of He- and H-like lines from photoionized gas, whereas in larger aperture observations these are almost exclusively produced through collisional ionization in the circumnuclear environment. Once the residual thermal component is accounted for, the emission-line properties of the photoionized region close to the hard X-ray continuum source indicate that NGC 1365 has some similarities to the local population of obscured active galaxies. In spite of the limited overall data quality, several soft X-ray lines seem to have fairly broad profiles (˜800-1300 km s-1 full width at half-maximum), and a range of outflow velocities (up to ˜1600 km s-1, but possibly reaching a few thousand km s-1) appears to be involved. At higher energies, the Kα fluorescence line from neutral iron is resolved with >99 per cent confidence, and its width of ˜3000 km s-1 points to an origin from the same broad-line region clouds responsible for eclipsing the X-ray source and likely shielding the narrow-line region.

  3. The AAVSO High Energy Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Aaron

    2004-06-01

    The AAVSO is expanding its International Gamma-Ray Burst Network to incorporate other high energy objects such as blazars and magnetic cataclysmic variables (polars). The new AAVSO High Energy Network will be collaborating with the Global Telescope Network (GTN) to observe bright blazars in support of the upcoming GLAST mission. We also will be observing polars in support of the XMM mission. This new network will involve both visual and CCD obsrvers and is expected to last for many years.

  4. High energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Counter Group continues to work on data analysis for Fermilab Experiment E653. Altogether, they expect several thousand reconstructed charm events and approximately 25 B pair events of which 12 have been observed thus far. Preparation continue for Fermilab Experiment E781, a high statistics study of charm baryon production. In the Theory Group, Cutkosky and collaborators study hadron phenomenology and non-perturbative QCD calculations. Levine has a long standing program in computational QED to obtain improved theoretical values for g-2 of the electron. Wolfenstein, Li, and their collaborators have worked on areas of weak interaction phenomenology that may yield insights beyond the standard model, e.g. CP violation and non-zero neutrino masses. Holman has been concerned with phase transitions in gauge theories relevant to cosmological problems. During 1991 most of the group effort was concentrated on the L3 experiment at CERN. Highlights of the results from the analysis of the Z degrees resonance include (a) a measurement of the strong coupling constant αs for b quarks (b) a precision measurement of the average time of B hadrons and (c) a direct determination of the number of light neutrino faculties from the reaction e+e- → ν bar νγ. We also began a major upgrade of the L3 luminosity monitor by replacing PWC chamber by a Si strip system in front of the BGO calorimeters. Finally we have continued our SSC R ampersand D work on BaF2 by joining the GEM collaboration

  5. High energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-10

    The Counter Group continues to work on data analysis for Fermilab Experiment E653. Altogether, they expect several thousand reconstructed charm events and approximately 25 B pair events of which 12 have been observed thus far. Preparation continue for Fermilab Experiment E781, a high statistics study of charm baryon production. In the Theory Group, Cutkosky and collaborators study hadron phenomenology and non-perturbative QCD calculations. Levine has a long standing program in computational QED to obtain improved theoretical values for g-2 of the electron. Wolfenstein, Li, and their collaborators have worked on areas of weak interaction phenomenology that may yield insights beyond the standard model, e.g. CP violation and non-zero neutrino masses. Holman has been concerned with phase transitions in gauge theories relevant to cosmological problems. During 1991 most of the group effort was concentrated on the L3 experiment at CERN. Highlights of the results from the analysis of the Z{degrees} resonance include (a) a measurement of the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s} for b quarks (b) a precision measurement of the average time of B hadrons and (c) a direct determination of the number of light neutrino faculties from the reaction e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}{gamma}. We also began a major upgrade of the L3 luminosity monitor by replacing PWC chamber by a Si strip system in front of the BGO calorimeters. Finally we have continued our SSC R&D work on BaF{sub 2} by joining the GEM collaboration.

  6. HEASARC - The High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smale, Alan P.

    2011-01-01

    The High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) is NASA's archive for high-energy astrophysics and cosmic microwave background (CMB) data, supporting the broad science goals of NASA's Physics of the Cosmos theme. It provides vital scientific infrastructure to the community by standardizing science data formats and analysis programs, providing open access to NASA resources, and implementing powerful archive interfaces. Over the next five years the HEASARC will ingest observations from up to 12 operating missions, while serving data from these and over 30 archival missions to the community. The HEASARC archive presently contains over 37 TB of data, and will contain over 60 TB by the end of 2014. The HEASARC continues to secure major cost savings for NASA missions, providing a reusable mission-independent framework for reducing, analyzing, and archiving data. This approach was recognized in the NRC Portals to the Universe report (2007) as one of the HEASARC's great strengths. This poster describes the past and current activities of the HEASARC and our anticipated developments in coming years. These include preparations to support upcoming high energy missions (NuSTAR, Astro-H, GEMS) and ground-based and sub-orbital CMB experiments, as well as continued support of missions currently operating (Chandra, Fermi, RXTE, Suzaku, Swift, XMM-Newton and INTEGRAL). In 2012 the HEASARC (which now includes LAMBDA) will support the final nine-year WMAP data release. The HEASARC is also upgrading its archive querying and retrieval software with the new Xamin system in early release - and building on opportunities afforded by the growth of the Virtual Observatory and recent developments in virtual environments and cloud computing.

  7. The Chandra Source Catalog: Processing and Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Janet; Evans, Ian N.; Glotfelty, Kenny J.; Hain, Roger; Hall, Diane M.; Miller, Joseph B.; Plummer, David A.; Zografou, Panagoula; Primini, Francis A.; Anderson, Craig S.; Bonaventura, Nina R.; Chen, Judy C.; Davis, John E.; Doe, Stephen M.; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Galle, Elizabeth C.; Gibbs, Danny G., II; Grier, John D.; Harbo, Peter N.; He, Xiang Qun (Helen); Houck, John C.; Karovska, Margarita; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Lauer, Jennifer; McCollough, Michael L.; McDowell, Jonathan C.; Mitschang, Arik W.; Morgan, Douglas L.; Mossman, Amy E.; Nichols, Joy S.; Nowak, Michael A.; Refsdal, Brian L.; Rots, Arnold H.; Siemiginowska, Aneta L.; Sundheim, Beth A.; Tibbetts, Michael S.; van Stone, David W.; Winkelman, Sherry L.

    2009-09-01

    Chandra Source Catalog processing recalibrates each observation using the latest available calibration data, and employs a wavelet-based source detection algorithm to identify all the X-ray sources in the field of view. Source properties are then extracted from each detected source that is a candidate for inclusion in the catalog. Catalog processing is completed by matching sources across multiple observations, merging common detections, and applying quality assurance checks. The Chandra Source Catalog processing system shares a common processing infrastructure and utilizes much of the functionality that is built into the Standard Data Processing (SDP) pipeline system that provides calibrated Chandra data to end-users. Other key components of the catalog processing system have been assembled from the portable CIAO data analysis package. Minimal new software tool development has been required to support the science algorithms needed for catalog production. Since processing pipelines must be instantiated for each detected source, the number of pipelines that are run during catalog construction is a factor of order 100 times larger than for SDP. The increased computational load, and inherent parallel nature of the processing, is handled by distributing the workload across a multi-node Beowulf cluster. Modifications to the SDP automated processing application to support catalog processing, and extensions to Chandra Data Archive software to ingest and retrieve catalog products, complete the upgrades to the infrastructure to support catalog processing.

  8. Spectral analysis of the Chandra comet survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodewits, D.; Christian, D. J.; Torney, M.; Dryer, M.; Lisse, C. M.; Dennerl, K.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Wolk, S. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Hoekstra, R.

    2007-01-01

    Aims. We present results of the analysis of cometary X-ray spectra with an extended version of our charge exchange emission model (Bodewits et al. 2006). We have applied this model to the sample of 8 comets thus far observed with the Chandra X-ray observatory and acis spectrometer in the 300 - 1000

  9. High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Lebedev, Sergey V

    2007-01-01

    During the past decade, research teams around the world have developed astrophysics-relevant research utilizing high energy-density facilities such as intense lasers and z-pinches. Every two years, at the International conference on High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics, scientists interested in this emerging field discuss the progress in topics covering: - Stellar evolution, stellar envelopes, opacities, radiation transport - Planetary Interiors, high-pressure EOS, dense plasma atomic physics - Supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, exploding systems, strong shocks, turbulent mixing - Supernova remnants, shock processing, radiative shocks - Astrophysical jets, high-Mach-number flows, magnetized radiative jets, magnetic reconnection - Compact object accretion disks, x-ray photoionized plasmas - Ultrastrong fields, particle acceleration, collisionless shocks. These proceedings cover many of the invited and contributed papers presented at the 6th International Conference on High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophys...

  10. The discovery of X-rays from Venus with Chandra

    OpenAIRE

    Dennerl, K.; Burwitz, V.; Englhauser, J.; Lisse, C.; Wolk, S.

    2002-01-01

    On January 10 and 13, 2001, Venus was observed for the first time with an X-ray astronomy satellite. The observation, performed with the ACIS-I and LETG/ACIS-S instruments on Chandra, yielded data of high spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution. Venus is clearly detected as a half-lit crescent, with considerable brightening on the sunward limb. The morphology agrees well with that expected from fluorescent scattering of solar X-rays in the planetary atmosphere. The radiation is observed at...

  11. Discovery of X-rays from Venus with Chandra

    OpenAIRE

    Dennerl, K.; Burwitz, V.; Englhauser, J.; Lisse, C.; Wolk, S.

    2002-01-01

    On January 10 and 13, 2001, Venus was observed for the first time with an X-ray astronomy satellite. The observation, performed with the ACIS-I and LETG/ACIS-S instruments on Chandra, yielded data of high spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution. Venus is clearly detected as a half-lit crescent, with considerable brightening on the sunward limb. The morphology agrees well with that expected from fluorescent scattering of solar X-rays in the planetary atmosphere. The radiation is observed at...

  12. Discovery of X-rays from Mars with Chandra

    OpenAIRE

    Dennerl, Konrad

    2002-01-01

    On 4 July 2001, X-rays from Mars were detected for the first time. The observation was performed with the ACIS-I detector onboard Chandra and yielded data of high spatial and temporal resolution, together with spectral information. Mars is clearly detected as an almost fully illuminated disk, with an indication of limb brightening at the sunward side, accompanied by some fading on the opposite side. The morphology and the X-ray luminosity of ~4 MW are fully consistent with fluorescent scatter...

  13. Chandra Observes the End of an Era SN 1987A

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, Kari A; Park, Sangwook; McCray, Richard; Dwek, Eli; Burrows, David N

    2016-01-01

    Updated imaging and photometric results from Chandra observations of SN 1987A, covering the last 16 years, are presented. We find that the 0.5-2 keV light curve has remained constant at ~8x10^-12 erg s^-1 cm^-2 since 9500 days, with the 3-8 keV light curve continuing to increase until at least 10000 days. The expansion rate of the ring is found to be energy dependent, such that after day 6000 the ring expands faster in the 2-10 keV band than it does at energies <2 keV. Images show a reversal of the east-west asymmetry between 7000 and 8000 days after the explosion. The latest images suggest the southeastern side of the equatorial ring is beginning to fade. Consistent with the latest optical and infrared results, our Chandra analysis indicates the blast wave is now leaving the dense equatorial ring, which marks the beginning of a major change in the evolutionary phase of the supernova remnant 1987A.

  14. The BMW-Chandra survey. Serendipitous Source Catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, P; Campana, S; Moretti, A; Panzera, M R; Tagliaferri, G; Mottini, M

    2009-01-01

    We present the BMW-Chandra source catalogue derived from Chandra ACIS-I observations (exposure time >10ks) public as of March 2003 by using a wavelet detection algorithm (Lazzati et al. 1999; Campana et al. 1999). The catalogue contains a total of 21325 sources, 16758 of which are serendipitous. Our sky coverage in the soft band (0.5-2 keV, S/N =3) is ~8 deg^2 for F_X > 10^-13 erg cm^-2 s-1, and ~2 deg^2 for F_X >10^-15 erg cm^-2 s^-1. The catalogue contains information on positions, count rates (and errors) in three energy bands. (total, 0.5-7 keV; soft, 0.5-2 keV; and hard, 2-7keV), and in four additional energy bands, SB1 (0.5-1keV), SB2 (1-2 keV), HB1 (2-4 keV), and HB2 (4-7keV), as well as information on the source extension, and cross-matches with the FIRST, IRAS, 2MASS, and GSC-2 catalogues.

  15. The BMW-Chandra survey. Serendipitous Source Catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, P.; Mignani, R. P.; Campana, S.; Moretti, A.; Panzera, M. R.; Tagliaferri, G.; Mottini, M.

    2009-07-01

    We present the BMW-Chandra source catalogue derived from Chandra ACIS-I observations (exposure time > 10ks) public as of March 2003 by using a wavelet detection algorithm (Lazzati et al. 1999; Campana et al. 1999). The catalogue contains a total of 21325 sources, 16758 of which are serendipitous. Our sky coverage in the soft band (0.5-2keV, S/N=3) is ~ 8 deg2 for FX ≥ 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1, and ~ 2 deg2 for FX ≥ 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. The catalogue contains information on positions, count rates (and errors) in three energy bands (total, 0.5-7keV; soft, 0.5-2keV; and hard, 2-7keV), and in four additional energy bands, SB1 (0.5-1keV), SB2 (1-2keV), HB1 (2-4keV), and HB2 (4-7keV), as well as information on the source extension, and cross-matches with the FIRST, IRAS, 2MASS, and GSC-2 catalogues.

  16. Deep Chandra observations of Pictor A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardcastle, M. J.; Lenc, E.; Birkinshaw, M.; Croston, J. H.; Goodger, J. L.; Marshall, H. L.; Perlman, E. S.; Siemiginowska, A.; Stawarz, Ł.; Worrall, D. M.

    2016-02-01

    We report on deep Chandra observations of the nearby broad-line radio galaxy Pictor A, which we combine with new Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) observations. The new X-ray data have a factor of 4 more exposure than observations previously presented and span a 15 yr time baseline, allowing a detailed study of the spatial, temporal and spectral properties of the AGN, jet, hotspot and lobes. We present evidence for further time variation of the jet, though the flare that we reported in previous work remains the most significantly detected time-varying feature. We also confirm previous tentative evidence for a faint counterjet. Based on the radio through X-ray spectrum of the jet and its detailed spatial structure, and on the properties of the counterjet, we argue that inverse-Compton models can be conclusively rejected, and propose that the X-ray emission from the jet is synchrotron emission from particles accelerated in the boundary layer of a relativistic jet. For the first time, we find evidence that the bright western hotspot is also time-varying in X-rays, and we connect this to the small-scale structure in the hotspot seen in high-resolution radio observations. The new data allow us to confirm that the spectrum of the lobes is in good agreement with the predictions of an inverse-Compton model and we show that the data favour models in which the filaments seen in the radio images are predominantly the result of spatial variation of magnetic fields in the presence of a relatively uniform electron distribution.

  17. High Energy Neutrinos from Space

    CERN Document Server

    Gaisser, Thomas K

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of the search for high-energy neutrinos from astrophysical sources. Results from large neutrino telescopes in water (Antares, Baikal) and ice (IceCube) are discussed as well as observations from the surface with Auger and from high altitude with ANITA. Comments on IceTop, the surface component of IceCube are also included.

  18. Chandra Observations of the Components of Clusters, Groups, and Galaxies and their Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Forman, W; Markevitch, M L; Vikhlinin, A A; Churazov, E

    2001-01-01

    We discuss two themes from Chandra observations of galaxies, groups, and clusters. First, we review the merging process as seen through the high angular resolution of Chandra. We present examples of sharp, edge-like surface brightness structures ``cold fronts'', the boundaries of the remaining cores of merger components and the Chandra observations of CL0657, the first clear example of a strong cluster merger shock. In addition to reviewing already published work, we present observations of the cold front around the elliptical galaxy NGC1404 which is infalling into the Fornax cluster and we discuss multiple ``edges'' in ZW3146. Second, we review the effects of relativistic, radio-emitting plasmas or ``bubbles'', inflated by active galactic nuclei, on the hot X-ray emitting gaseous atmospheres in galaxies and clusters. We review published work and also discuss the unusual X-ray structures surrounding the galaxies NGC4636 and NGC507.

  19. Using ACIS on the Chandra X-ray Observatory as a particle radiation monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Grant, C E; Bautz, M W; O'Dell, S L

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) is one of two focal-plane instruments on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. During initial radiation-belt passes, the exposed ACIS suffered significant radiation damage from trapped soft protons scattering off the x-ray telescope's mirrors. The primary effect of this damage was to increase the charge-transfer inefficiency (CTI) of the ACIS 8 front-illuminated CCDs. Subsequently, the Chandra team implemented procedures to remove the ACIS from the telescope's focus during high-radiation events: planned protection during radiation-belt transits; autonomous protection triggered by an on-board radiation monitor; and manual intervention based upon assessment of space-weather conditions. However, as Chandra's multilayer insulation ages, elevated temperatures have reduced the effectiveness of the on-board radiation monitor for autonomous protection. Here we investigate using the ACIS CCDs themselves as a radiation monitor. We explore the 10-year database to evaluate the CCDs' ...

  20. The Chandra Deep Field-North Survey and the Cosmic X-ray Background

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, W N; Bauer, F E; Hornschemeier, A E

    2002-01-01

    Chandra has performed a 1.4 Ms survey centred on the Hubble Deep Field-North (HDF-N), probing the X-ray Universe 55-550 times deeper than was possible with pre-Chandra missions. We describe the detected point and extended X-ray sources and discuss their overall multiwavelength (optical, infrared, submillimeter, and radio) properties. Special attention is paid to the HDF-N X-ray sources, luminous infrared starburst galaxies, optically faint X-ray sources, and high-to-extreme redshift AGN. We also describe how stacking analyses have been used to probe the average X-ray emission properties of normal and starburst galaxies at cosmologically interesting distances. Finally, we discuss plans to extend the survey and argue that a 5-10 Ms Chandra survey would lay key groundwork for future missions such as XEUS and Generation-X.

  1. Multiplicities in high energy interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the data on multiplicities in high energy interactions. Results from e+e- annihilation, from neutrino interactions, and from hadronic collisions, both diffractive and nondiffractive, are compared and contrasted. The energy dependence of the mean charged multiplicity, , as well as the rapidity density at Y = 0 are presented. For hadronic collisions, the data on neutral pion production shows a strong correlation with . The heavy particle fractions increase with √s up to the highest energies. The charged particle multiplicity distributions for each type of reaction show a scaling behavior when expressed in terms of the mean. Attempts to understand this behavior, which was first predicted by Koba, Nielsen, and Olesen, are discussed. The multiplicity correlations and the energy variation of the shape of the KNO scaling distribution provide important constraints on models. Some extrapolations to the energies of the Superconducting Super Collider are made. 51 refs., 27 figs

  2. High energy elastic hadron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with the WA7 experiment at the CERN super proton synchrotron (SPS). The elastic differential cross sections of pion-proton, kaon-proton, antiproton-proton, and proton-proton at lower SPS energies over a wide range of momentum transfer were measured. Some theoretical models in the light of the experimental results are reviewed, and a comprehensive impact parameter analysis of antiproton-proton elastic scattering over a wide energy range is presented. A nucleon valence core model for high energy proton-proton and antiproton-proton elastic scattering is described

  3. Simulation of High Energy Muons

    CERN Document Server

    Mashtakov, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    Under the scope of a CERN summer student project, a Geant4 physical model has been developed and committed to the Geant4 repository to allow precise simulation of high-energy muons and hadrons transport inside a material. Resulted angular distributions produced by this model have small deviations from those that were obtained by the Geant4 model used by default. High-energetic muons energy losses inside the CMS tracker have also been estimated and may vary from 0.05% up to 2.5%.

  4. Chandra Discovers the X-ray Signature of a Powerful Wind from a Galactic Microquasar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-11-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has detected, for the first time in X rays, a stellar fingerprint known as a P Cygni profile--the distinctive spectral signature of a powerful wind produced by an object in space. The discovery reveals a 4.5-million-mile-per-hour wind coming from a highly compact pair of stars in our galaxy, report researchers from Penn State and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in a paper they will present on 8 November 2000 during a meeting of the High-Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomical Society in Honolulu, Hawaii. The paper also has been accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal Letters. "To our knowledge, these are the first P Cygni profiles reported in X rays," say researchers Niel Brandt, assistant professor of astronomy and astrophysics at Penn State, and Norbert S. Schulz, research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The team made the discovery during their first observation of a binary-star system with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which was launched into space in July 1999. The system, known as Circinus X-1, is located about 20,000 light years from Earth in the constellation Circinus near the Southern Cross. It contains a super-dense neutron star in orbit around a normal fusion-burning star like our Sun. Although Circinus X-1 was discovered in 1971, many properties of this system remain mysterious because Circinus X-1 lies in the galactic plane where obscuring dust and gas have blocked its effective study in many wavelengths. The P Cygni spectral profile, previously detected primarily at ultraviolet and optical wavelengths but never before in X rays, is the textbook tool astronomers rely on for probing stellar winds. The profile looks like the outline of a roller coaster, with one really big hill and valley in the middle, on a data plot with velocity on one axis and the flow rate of photons per second on the other. It is named after the famous star P Cygni, in which such

  5. X-ray Sources in the Magellanic Clouds: analysis of 15 Years of XMM-Newton and Chandra Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J.; Laycock, S.; Christodoulou, D.; Drake, J.; Fingerman, S.; Hong, J.; Zezas, A.; Antoniou, V.; Coe, M.; Ho, W.

    2016-06-01

    Using ˜160 XMM-Newton, ˜180 Chandra, and all weekly RXTE observations, we have generated a comprehensive library of the known pulsars in the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds (SMC, LMC). We classify various pulsar properties in the range of log L_{X}=32-38 erg s^{-1} and incorporate related parameters in theoretical models. With the high time-resolution data of the EPIC and Chandra cameras and the latest calibration files and software, our 15 year pipeline generates a suite of useful products for each pulsar detection: event lists, high time-resolution light curves, periodograms, spectra, and complete histories of the dot{P}, the pulse fraction, etc., in the broad, soft (0.2-2 keV), and hard (2-12 keV) energy bands. After combining the observations from these telescopes, we found that 15 pulsars are clearly spinning up and another 15 pulsars are distinctly spinning down. We also used the faintest and brightest sources to map out the propeller line and the Eddington line, respectively. We compared the observed pulse profiles to geometric models of X-ray emission in order to constrain the physical parameters of the pulsars. We are preparing a public release of this library so that it can be used by other groups as well.

  6. High energy astrophysics. An introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on observational examples this book reveals and explains high-energy astrophysical processes. Presents the theory of astrophysical processes in a didactic approach by deriving equations step by step. With several attractive astronomical pictures. High-energy astrophysics has unveiled a Universe very different from that only known from optical observations. It has revealed many types of objects in which typical variability timescales are as short as years, months, days, and hours (in quasars, X-ray binaries, and other objects), and even down to milli-seconds in gamma ray bursts. The sources of energy that are encountered are only very seldom nuclear fusion, and most of the time gravitation, a paradox when one thinks that gravitation is, by many orders of magnitude, the weakest of the fundamental interactions. The understanding of these objects' physical conditions and the processes revealed by high-energy astrophysics in the last decades is nowadays part of astrophysicists' culture, even of those active in other domains of astronomy. This book evolved from lectures given to master and PhD students at the University of Geneva since the early 1990s. It aims at providing astronomers and physicists intending to be active in high-energy astrophysics a broad basis on which they should be able to build the more specific knowledge they will need. While in the first part of the book the physical processes are described and derived in detail, the second part studies astrophysical objects in which high-energy astrophysics plays a crucial role. This two-pronged approach will help students recognise physical processes by their observational signatures in contexts that may differ widely from those presented here.

  7. High energy astrophysics. An introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courvoisier, Thierry J.L. [Geneva Univ., Versoix (Switzerland). ISDC, Data Centre for Astrophysics

    2013-07-01

    Based on observational examples this book reveals and explains high-energy astrophysical processes. Presents the theory of astrophysical processes in a didactic approach by deriving equations step by step. With several attractive astronomical pictures. High-energy astrophysics has unveiled a Universe very different from that only known from optical observations. It has revealed many types of objects in which typical variability timescales are as short as years, months, days, and hours (in quasars, X-ray binaries, and other objects), and even down to milli-seconds in gamma ray bursts. The sources of energy that are encountered are only very seldom nuclear fusion, and most of the time gravitation, a paradox when one thinks that gravitation is, by many orders of magnitude, the weakest of the fundamental interactions. The understanding of these objects' physical conditions and the processes revealed by high-energy astrophysics in the last decades is nowadays part of astrophysicists' culture, even of those active in other domains of astronomy. This book evolved from lectures given to master and PhD students at the University of Geneva since the early 1990s. It aims at providing astronomers and physicists intending to be active in high-energy astrophysics a broad basis on which they should be able to build the more specific knowledge they will need. While in the first part of the book the physical processes are described and derived in detail, the second part studies astrophysical objects in which high-energy astrophysics plays a crucial role. This two-pronged approach will help students recognise physical processes by their observational signatures in contexts that may differ widely from those presented here.

  8. Chandra hardware and systems: keeping things running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, Lisa

    2006-06-01

    System management for any organization can be a challenge, but satellite projects present their own issues. I will be presenting the network and system architecture chosen to support the scientists in the Chandra X-ray Center. My group provides the infrastructure for science data processing, mission planning, user support, archive support and software development. Our challenge is to create a stable environment with enough flexibility to roll with the changes during the mission. I'll discuss system and network choices, web service, backups, security and systems monitoring. Also, how to build infrastructure that's flexible, how to support a large group of scientists with a relatively small staff, what challenges we faced (anticipated and unanticipated) and what lessons we learned over the past 6 years since the launch of Chandra. Finally I'll outline our plans for the future including beowulf cluster support, an improved helpdesk system, methods for dealing with the explosive amount of data that needs to be managed.

  9. Assessing high wind energy penetration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tande, J.O.

    1995-01-01

    expanding the grid connected wind power capacity in Praia, the capital of Cape Verde. The currently installed 1 MW of wind power is estimated to supply close to 10% of the electric energy consumption in 1996. Increasing the wind energy penetration to a higher level is considered viable as the project......In order to convincingly promote installing wind power capacity as a substantial part of the energy supply system, a set of careful analyses must be undertaken. This paper applies a case study concentrated on assessing the cost/benefit of high wind energy penetration. The case study considers...... settings are close to ideal, including a very capable national utility company, Electra, a conventional power supply system based on imported heavy fuel and gas oil, and favourable wind conditions with an estimated annual average of 9.3 m/s at the hub height of the wind turbines. With the applied case...

  10. High-energy atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Drukarev, Evgeny G

    2016-01-01

    This self-contained text introduces readers to the field of high-energy atomic physics - a new regime of photon-atom interactions in which the photon energies significantly exceed the atomic or molecular binding energies, and which opened up with the recent advent of new synchrotron sources. From a theoretical point of view, a small-parameter characteristic of the bound system emerged, making it possible to perform analytic perturbative calculations that can in turn serve as benchmarks for more powerful numerical computations. The first part of the book introduces readers to the foundations of this new regime and its theoretical treatment. In particular, the validity of the small-parameter perturbation expansion and of the lowest-order approximation is critically reviewed. The following chapters then apply these insights to various atomic processes, such as photoionization as a many-body problem, dominant mechanisms for the production of ions at higher energies, Compton scattering and ionization accompanied b...

  11. Ultra High Energy Neutrino Astronomy

    OpenAIRE

    Berezinsky, V.

    2005-01-01

    The short review of theoretical aspects of ultra high energy (UHE) neutrinos and superGZK neutrinos. The sources and diffuse fluxes of UHE neutrinos are discussed. Much attention is given to comparison of the cascade and cosmic ray upper bounds for diffuse neutrino fluxes. Cosmogenic neutrinos and neutrinos from the mirror mater are considered as superGZK neutrinos.

  12. Chandra Discovers Eruption and Pulsation in Nova Outburst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    ,000 light years, it could be seen with the naked eye for about a month, during which it was about 100,000 times brighter than our own Sun," said R. Mark Wagner of the University of Arizona. Nova Aquilae Chandra observed the nova, so-called because early astronomers believed they heralded the appearance of a new star, four times from April 2000 through October 2000. "Our first Chandra observations showed that the expanding gas around Nova Aquilae was hot and nearly opaque," said Joachim Krautter of the State Observatory in Heidelberg, Germany. "When we looked months later with Chandra, the expanding gases cleared enough for us to see through them to the underlying star on which the explosion occurred." The latter Chandra X-ray data revealed the cyclical changes in brightness are due to the white dwarf expanding and shrinking over a 40-minute period. They also showed that the temperature on the surface of the white dwarf was 300,000 degrees Celsius, making Nova Aquilae one of the hottest stars ever observed to undergo such pulsations. "The observations told us that thermonuclear fusion reactions were still occurring on the surface layers of the white dwarf - more than eight months after the explosion first began!" said Robert Gehrz of the University of Minnesota. Other members of the team are Howard Bond (Space Telescope Science Institute), Yousaf Butt (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), Koji Mukai (Goddard Space Flight Center), Peter Hauschildt (University of Georgia), Margarida Hernanz (Institute for Space Studies, Catalonia, Spain), Marina Orio (University of Wisconsin and the Torino Observatory in Italy), and Charles Woodward (University of Minnesota). Chandra observed Nova Aquilae for a total of 10 hours with the High Resolution Camera (HRC) and the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS). The HRC was built for NASA by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, MA. The ACIS instrument was built for NASA by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

  13. Photoproduction at High Energy and High Intensity

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The photon beam used for this programme is tagged and provides a large flux up to very high energies (150-200 GeV). It is also hadron-free, since it is obtained by a two-step conversion method. A spectrometer is designed to exploit this beam and to perform a programme of photoproduction with a high level of sensitivity (5-50 events/picobarn).\\\\ \\\\ Priority will be given to the study of processes exhibiting the point-like behaviour of the photon, especially deep inelastic Compton scattering. The spectrometer has two magnets. Charged tracks are measured by MWPC's located only in field-free regions. Three calorimeters provide a large coverage for identifying and measuring electrons and photons. An iron filter downstream identifies muons. Most of the equipment is existing and recuperated from previous experiments.

  14. The Chandra Deepest Fields in the Infrared: Making the Connection between Normal Galaxies and AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogin, N. A.; Ferguson, H. C.; Dickinson, M. E.; Giavalisco, M.; Mobasher, B.; Padovani, P.; Williams, R. E.; Chary, R.; Gilli, R.; Heckman, T. M.; Stern, D.; Winge, C.

    2001-12-01

    Within each of the two Chandra Deepest Fields (CDFs), there are ~10'x15' regions targeted for non-proprietary, deep SIRTF 3.6--24μ m imaging as part of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) Legacy program. In advance of the SIRTF observations, the GOODS team has recently begun obtaining non-proprietary, deep ground-based optical and near-IR imaging and spectroscopy over these regions, which contain virtually all of the current ≈1 Msec CXO coverage in the CDF North and much of the ≈1 Msec coverage in the CDF South. In particular, the planned depth of the near-IR imaging (JAB ~ 25.3; HAB ~ 24.8; KAB ~ 24.4) combined with the deep Chandra data can allow us to trace the evolutionary connection between normal galaxies, starbursts, and AGN out to z ~ 1 and beyond. We describe our CDF Archival program, which is integrating these GOODS-supporting observations together with the CDF archival data and other publicly-available datasets in these regions to create a multi-wavelength deep imaging and spectroscpic database available to the entire community. We highlight progress toward near-term science goals of this program, including: (a) pushing constraints on the redshift distribution and spectral-energy distributions of the faintest X-ray sources to the deepest possible levels via photometric redshifts; and (b) better characterizing the heavily-obscured and the high-redshift populations via both a near-IR search for optically-undetected CDF X-ray sources and also X-ray stacking analyses on the CXO-undetected EROs in these fields.

  15. High energy astrophysics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Courvoisier, Thierry J -L

    2013-01-01

    High-energy astrophysics has unveiled a Universe very different from that only known from optical observations. It has revealed many types of objects in which typical variability timescales are as short as years, months, days, and hours (in quasars, X-ray binaries, and other objects), and even down to milli-seconds in gamma ray bursts. The sources of energy that are encountered are only very seldom nuclear fusion, and most of the time gravitation, a paradox when one thinks that gravitation is, by many orders of magnitude, the weakest of the fundamental interactions. The understanding of these objects' physical conditions and the processes revealed by high-energy astrophysics in the last decades is nowadays part of astrophysicists' culture, even of those active in other domains of astronomy. This book evolved from lectures given to master and PhD students at the University of Geneva since the early 1990s. It aims at providing astronomers and physicists intending to be active in high-energy astrophysics a broad...

  16. High-energy atmospheric neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Sinegovsky, S I; Sinegovskaya, T S

    2010-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos, arising from decays of mesons that were produced through the cosmic rays collisions with air nuclei, form unavoidable background noise in the astrophysical neutrino detection problem. The atmospheric neutrino flux above 1 PeV should be supposedly dominated by the contribution of charmed particle decays. These (prompt) neutrinos originated from decays of massive and shortlived particles, $D^\\pm$, $D^0$, $\\bar{D}{}^0$, $D_s^\\pm$, $\\Lambda^+_c$, form the most uncertain fraction of the high-energy atmospheric neutrino flux because of poor explored processes of the charm production. Besides, an ambiguity in high-energy behavior of pion and especially kaon production cross sections for nucleon-nucleus collisions may affect essentially the calculated neutrino flux. There is the energy region where above flux uncertainties superimpose. A new calculation presented here reveals sizable differences, up to the factor of 1.8 above 1 TeV, in muon neutrino flux predictions obtained with usage of known...

  17. Multiwavelength campaign on Mrk 509 XIV. Chandra HETGS spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Kaastra, J S; Arav, N; Behar, E; Bianchi, S; Branduardi-Raymont, G; Cappi, M; Costantini, E; Kriss, G A; De Marco, B; Mehdipour, M; Paltani, S; Petrucci, P -O; Pinto, C; Ponti, G; Steenbrugge, K C; de Vries, C P

    2014-01-01

    We present in this paper the results of a 270 ks Chandra HETGS observation in the context of a large multiwavelength campaign on the Seyfert galaxy Mrk 509. The HETGS spectrum allows us to study the high ionisation warm absorber and the Fe-K complex in Mrk 509. We search for variability in the spectral properties of the source with respect to previous observations in this campaign, as well as for evidence of ultra-fast outflow signatures. The Chandra HETGS X-ray spectrum of Mrk 509 was analysed using the SPEX fitting package. We confirm the basic structure of the warm absorber found in the 600 ks XMM-Newton RGS observation observed three years earlier, consisting of five distinct ionisation components in a multikinematic regime. We find little or no variability in the physical properties of the different warm absorber phases with respect to previous observations in this campaign, except for component D2 which has a higher column density at the expense of component C2 at the same outflow velocity (-240 km/s). ...

  18. A Deep Chandra ACIS Survey of M51

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, K. D.; Long, Knox S.; Kilgard, Roy E.

    2016-08-01

    We have obtained a deep X-ray image of the nearby galaxy M51 using Chandra. Here we present the catalog of X-ray sources detected in these observations and provide an overview of the properties of the point-source population. We find 298 sources within the D 25 radii of NGC 5194/5, of which 20% are variable, a dozen are classical transients, and another half dozen are transient-like sources. The typical number of active ultraluminous X-ray sources in any given observation is ˜5, and only two of those sources persist in an ultraluminous state over the 12 yr of observations. Given reasonable assumptions about the supernova remnant population, the luminosity function is well described by a power law with an index between 1.55 and 1.7, only slightly shallower than that found for populations dominated by high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), which suggests that the binary population in NGC 5194 is also dominated by HMXBs. The luminosity function of NGC 5195 is more consistent with a low-mass X-ray binary dominated population. Based on observations made with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory under contract #NAS83060, and the data were obtained through program GO1-12115.

  19. Preliminary Results from a Coordinated Hisaki/Chandra/XMM-Newton Study of the Jovian Aurora and Io Plasma Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Ralph; Kimura, Tomoki; Elsner, Ronald; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Gladstone, Randy; Badman, Sarah Victoria; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Murakami, Go; Murray, Stephen S.; Roediger, Elke; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Yoshioka, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a coordinated Hisaki/Chandra/XMM-Newton observational campaign of the Jovian aurora and Io plasma torus. The data were taken over a three week period in April, 2014. Jupiter was observed continuously with Hisaki, six times with the Chandra/HRC instrument for roughly 12 hours per observation, and twice by XMM-Newton. The goal of this observational campaign was to understand how energy and matter are exchanged between the Jovian aurora, the IPT, and the Solar wind. X-ray observations provide key diagnostics on highly stripped ions and keV electrons in the Jovian magnetosphere. We use the temporal, spatial, and spectral capabilities of the three instruments to search for correlated variability between the Solar wind, the EUV-emitting plasma of the IPT and UV aurora, and the ions responsible for the X-ray aurora. Preliminary analysis suggests a strong 45 min periodicity in the EUV emission from the electron aurora. There is some evidence for complex variability of the X-ray auroras on scales of tens of minutes. There is also clear morphological changes in the X-ray aurora that do not appear to be correlated with either variations in the IPT or Solar wind.

  20. High-energy irradiation and mass loss rates of hot Jupiters in the solar neighborhood

    CERN Document Server

    Salz, M; Czesla, S; Schmitt, J H M M

    2015-01-01

    Giant gas planets in close proximity to their host stars experience strong irradiation. In extreme cases photoevaporation causes a transonic, planetary wind and the persistent mass loss can possibly affect the planetary evolution. We have identified nine hot Jupiter systems in the vicinity of the Sun, in which expanded planetary atmospheres should be detectable through Lyman alpha transit spectroscopy according to predictions. We use X-ray observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton of seven of these targets to derive the high-energy irradiation level of the planetary atmospheres and the resulting mass loss rates. We further derive improved Lyman alpha luminosity estimates for the host stars including interstellar absorption. According to our estimates WASP-80 b, WASP-77 b, and WASP-43 b experience the strongest mass loss rates, exceeding the mass loss rate of HD 209458 b, where an expanded atmosphere has been confirmed. Furthermore, seven out of nine targets might be amenable to Lyman alpha transit spectroscopy...

  1. Chandra view of the warm-hot intergalactic medium toward 1ES 1553+113: Absorption-line detections and identifications. I

    OpenAIRE

    F. Nicastro; Barcons, Xavier; Paerels, F. B. S.

    2013-01-01

    We present the first results from our pilot 500 ks Chandra Low Energy Transmission Grating Large Program observation of the soft X-ray brightest source in the z ≳ 0.4 sky, the blazar 1ES 1553+113, aimed to secure the first uncontroversial detections of the missing baryons in the X-rays. We identify a total of 11 possible absorption lines, with single-line statistical significances between 2.2σ and 4.1σ. Six of these lines are detected at high single-line statistical significance (3.6 ≤ σ ≤ 4....

  2. An X-ray look at the Seyfert 1 Galaxy Mrk 590: XMM-Newton and Chandra reveal complexity in circumnuclear gas

    OpenAIRE

    Longinotti, A. L.; Bianchi, S.; Santos-Lleo, M.; Rodriguez-Pascual, P.; Guainazzi, M.; Cardaci, M.; Pollock, A.M.T.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a partially simultaneous observation of the bright Seyfert 1 Galaxy Mrk590, performed by XMM-Newton and Chandra. The long exposure (~100 ks) allows to investigate with great detail the Fe K complex at 6-7 keV and the presence of soft X-ray spectral features. We have analysed XMM-Newton data from the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) in the 0.5-12 keV band and from the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) in the 0.35-2.5 keV band, and data from the High Energy Transm...

  3. NASA'S Chandra Finds Superfluid in Neutron Star's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has discovered the first direct evidence for a superfluid, a bizarre, friction-free state of matter, at the core of a neutron star. Superfluids created in laboratories on Earth exhibit remarkable properties, such as the ability to climb upward and escape airtight containers. The finding has important implications for understanding nuclear interactions in matter at the highest known densities. Neutron stars contain the densest known matter that is directly observable. One teaspoon of neutron star material weighs six billion tons. The pressure in the star's core is so high that most of the charged particles, electrons and protons, merge resulting in a star composed mostly of uncharged particles called neutrons. Two independent research teams studied the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A, or Cas A for short, the remains of a massive star 11,000 light years away that would have appeared to explode about 330 years ago as observed from Earth. Chandra data found a rapid decline in the temperature of the ultra-dense neutron star that remained after the supernova, showing that it had cooled by about four percent over a 10-year period. "This drop in temperature, although it sounds small, was really dramatic and surprising to see," said Dany Page of the National Autonomous University in Mexico, leader of a team with a paper published in the February 25, 2011 issue of the journal Physical Review Letters. "This means that something unusual is happening within this neutron star." Superfluids containing charged particles are also superconductors, meaning they act as perfect electrical conductors and never lose energy. The new results strongly suggest that the remaining protons in the star's core are in a superfluid state and, because they carry a charge, also form a superconductor. "The rapid cooling in Cas A's neutron star, seen with Chandra, is the first direct evidence that the cores of these neutron stars are, in fact, made of superfluid and

  4. Chandra "Hears" A Black Hole For The First Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory detected sound waves, for the first time, from a super-massive black hole. The "note" is the deepest ever detected from an object in the universe. The tremendous amounts of energy carried by these sound waves may solve a longstanding problem in astrophysics. The black hole resides in the Perseus cluster, located 250 million light years from Earth. In 2002, astronomers obtained a deep Chandra observation that shows ripples in the gas filling the cluster. These ripples are evidence for sound waves that have traveled hundreds of thousands of light years away from the cluster's central black hole. perseus animation Illustration of Ripples in Perseus "We have observed the prodigious amounts of light and heat created by black holes, now we have detected the sound," said Andrew Fabian of the Institute of Astronomy (IoA) in Cambridge, England, and leader of the study. In musical terms, the pitch of the sound generated by the black hole translates into the note of B flat. But, a human would have no chance of hearing this cosmic performance, because the note is 57 octaves lower than middle-C (by comparison a typical piano contains only about seven octaves). At a frequency over a million, billion times deeper than the limits of human hearing, this is the deepest note ever detected from an object in the universe. "The Perseus sound waves are much more than just an interesting form of black hole acoustics," said Steve Allen, also of the IoA and a co-investigator in the research. "These sound waves may be the key in figuring out how galaxy clusters, the largest structures in the universe, grow," Allen said. For years astronomers have tried to understand why there is so much hot gas in galaxy clusters and so little cool gas. Hot gas glowing with X-rays should cool, and the dense central gas should cool the fastest. The pressure in this cool central gas should then fall, causing gas further out to sink in towards the galaxy, forming trillions of

  5. The Brera Multi-scale Wavelet Chandra Survey. The serendipitous source catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, P; Mignani, R P; Moretti, A; Panzera, M R; Tagliaferri, G; Mottini, M

    2009-01-01

    We present the Brera Multi-scale Wavelet Chandra (BMW-Chandra) source catalogue drawn from essentially all Chandra ACIS-I pointed observations with an exposure time in excess of 10ks public as of March 2003 (136 observations). Using the wavelet detection algorithm developed by Lazzati et al. (1999) and Campana et al. (1999), which can characterise both point-like and extended sources, we identified 21325 sources. Among them, 16758 are serendipitous, i.e. not associated with the targets of the pointings. This makes our catalogue the largest compilation of Chandra sources to date. The 0.5-10keV absorption corrected fluxes of these sources range from 3E-16 to 9E-12 erg/cm2/s with a median of 7E-15 erg/cm2/s. The catalogue consists of count rates and relative errors in three energy bands (total, 0.5-7keV; soft, 0.5-2keV; and hard, 2-7keV), where the detection was performed, and source positions relative to the highest signal-to-noise detection among the three bands. The wavelet algorithm also provides an estimate...

  6. Harvard University High Energy Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mainly experimental research program in high energy physics at Harvard is summarized in a descriptive fashion according to the following outline: Proton endash antiproton colliding beam program at Fermilab -- CDF (forward/backward electromagnetic calorimeters -- FEM, central muon extension -- CMX, gas calorimetry and electronics development, front-end electronics upgrades, software development, physics analysis, timetable), electron -- positron collisions in the upsilon region -- CLEO (the hardware projects including CLEO II barrel TOF system and silicon drift detector R ampersand D, physics analysis), search for νμ to ντ oscillations with the NOMAD experiment at CERN, the solenoidal detector collaboration at the SSC, muon scattering at FNAL -- E665, the L3 experiment, and phenomenological analysis of high-energy bar pp cross sections. 149 refs

  7. [Research in high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review the efforts of the Notre Dame non accelerator high energy physics group. Our major effort has been directed toward the IMB deep underground detector. Since the departure of the Michigan group our responsibilities to the group have grown. We are also very active in pursuing physics with the IMB 3 detector. Currently we are studying proton decay, point neutrino sources and neutrino oscillations with the contained event sample

  8. A high energy physics perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marciano, W.J.

    1997-01-13

    The status of the Standard model and role of symmetry in its development are reviewed. Some outstanding problems are surveyed and possible solutions in the form of additional {open_quotes}Hidden Symmetries {close_quotes} are discussed. Experimental approaches to uncover {open_quotes}New Physics{close_quotes} associated with those symmetries are described with emphasis on high energy colliders. An outlook for the future is given.

  9. A high energy physics perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status of the Standard model and role of symmetry in its development are reviewed. Some outstanding problems are surveyed and possible solutions in the form of additional open-quotes Hidden Symmetries close quotes are discussed. Experimental approaches to uncover open-quotes New Physicsclose quotes associated with those symmetries are described with emphasis on high energy colliders. An outlook for the future is given

  10. High energy density aluminum battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Gilbert M.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Dai, Sheng; Dudney, Nancy J.; Manthiram, Arumugan; McIntyre, Timothy J.; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Hansan

    2016-10-11

    Compositions and methods of making are provided for a high energy density aluminum battery. The battery comprises an anode comprising aluminum metal. The battery further comprises a cathode comprising a material capable of intercalating aluminum or lithium ions during a discharge cycle and deintercalating the aluminum or lithium ions during a charge cycle. The battery further comprises an electrolyte capable of supporting reversible deposition and stripping of aluminum at the anode, and reversible intercalation and deintercalation of aluminum or lithium at the cathode.

  11. Astrophysics at very high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presents three complementary lectures on very-high-energy astrophysics given by worldwide leaders in the field. Reviews the recent advances in and prospects of gamma-ray astrophysics and of multi-messenger astronomy. Prepares readers for using space and ground-based gamma-ray observatories, as well as neutrino and other multi-messenger detectors. With the success of Cherenkov Astronomy and more recently with the launch of NASA's Fermi mission, very-high-energy astrophysics has undergone a revolution in the last years. This book provides three comprehensive and up-to-date reviews of the recent advances in gamma-ray astrophysics and of multi-messenger astronomy. Felix Aharonian and Charles Dermer address our current knowledge on the sources of GeV and TeV photons, gleaned from the precise measurements made by the new instrumentation. Lars Bergstroem presents the challenges and prospects of astro-particle physics with a particular emphasis on the detection of dark matter candidates. The topics covered by the 40th Saas-Fee Course present the capabilities of current instrumentation and the physics at play in sources of very-high-energy radiation to students and researchers alike. This book will encourage and prepare readers for using space and ground-based gamma-ray observatories, as well as neutrino and other multi-messenger detectors.

  12. Quantum chromodynamics at high energy

    CERN Document Server

    Kovchegov, Yuri V

    2012-01-01

    Filling a gap in the current literature, this book is the first entirely dedicated to high energy QCD including parton saturation. It presents groundbreaking progress on the subject and describes many of the problems at the forefront of research, bringing postgraduate students, theorists and advanced experimentalists up to date with the current status of the field. A broad range of topics in high energy QCD are covered, most notably on the physics of parton saturation and the Color Glass Condensate (CGC). The material is presented in a pedagogical way, with numerous examples and exercises. Discussion ranges from the quasi-classical McLerran–Venugopalan model to the linear and non-linear BFKL/BK/JIMWLK small-x evolution equations. The authors adopt both a theoretical and experimental outlook and present the physics of strong interactions in a universal way, making it useful to physicists from various sub-communities and applicable to processes studied at high energy accelerators around the world.

  13. IV. Workshop on High Energy Spin Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this proceedings the results on high energy spin physics are summarized. The theory of spin phenomenon and the experimental results at intermediate energy and at high energy spin physics and new technical developments in polarization experiments are presented

  14. First Terrestrial Soft X-Ray Auroral Observation by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Gladstone, G. Randall; Elsner, Ronald F.; Oestgaard, Nikolai; Waite, J. Hunter, Jr.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Chang, Shen-Wu; Majeed, Tariq; Metzger, Albert E.

    2007-01-01

    Northern auroral regions of Earth were imaged with energetic photons in the 0.1-10keV range using the High-Resolution Camera (HRC-I) aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory at 10 epochs (each approx.20 min duration) between mid- December 2003 and mid-April 2004. These observations aimed at searching for Earth's soft (X-ray aurora in a comparative study with Jupiter's X-ray aurora, where a pulsating X-ray "hot-spot" has been previously observed by Chandra. The first Chandra soft X-ray observations of Earth's aurora show that it is highly variable 0ntense arcs, multiple arcs, diffuse patches, at times absent). In at least one of the observations an isolated blob of emission is observed near the expected cusp location. A fortuitous overflight of DMSP satellite F13 provided SSJ/4 energetic particle measurements above a bright arc seen by Chandra on 24 January 2004, 20:01-20:22 UT. A model of the emissions expected strongly suggests that the observed soft X-ray signal is bremsstrahlung and characteristic K-shell line emissions of nitrogen and oxygen in the atmosphere produced by electrons.

  15. Developments in high energy theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sunil Mukhi; Probir Roy

    2009-07-01

    This non-technical review article is aimed at readers with some physics back-ground, including beginning research students. It provides a panoramic view of the main theoretical developments in high energy physics since its inception more than half a century ago, a period in which experiments have spanned an enormous range of energies, theories have been developed leading up to the Standard Model, and proposals – including the radical paradigm of String Theory – have been made to go beyond the Standard Model. The list of references provided here is not intended to properly credit all original work but rather to supply the reader with a few pointers to the literature, specifically highlighting work done by Indian authors.

  16. Swift J1644+57: Chandra observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.

    2012-11-01

    We observed the X-ray counterpart to the candidate relativistic tidal disruption event Swift J1644+57 (Levan et al. 2011 Science, 333 199; Bloom et al. 2011 Science 333 202; Burrows et al. 2011 Nature 476 421; Zauderer et al. 2011 Nature 476 425) with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, beginning on 26 November 2012 at 10:25 UT. A total integration of 24.7 ks was obtained, and the object was placed at the default position on the ACIS S3 chip.

  17. Chandra Locates Mother Lode of Planetary Ore in Colliding Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has discovered rich deposits of neon, magnesium, and silicon in a pair of colliding galaxies known as The Antennae. When the clouds in which these elements are present cool, an exceptionally high number of stars with planets should form. These results may foreshadow the fate of the Milky Way and its future collision with the Andromeda Galaxy. "The amount of enrichment of elements in The Antennae is phenomenal," said Giuseppina Fabbiano of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) in Cambridge, Mass. at a press conference at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Atlanta, Ga. "This must be due to a very high rate of supernova explosions in these colliding galaxies." Fabbiano is lead author of a paper on this discovery by a team of U.S. and U.K. scientists that will appear in an upcoming issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters. When galaxies collide, direct hits between stars are extremely rare, but collisions between huge gas clouds in the galaxies can trigger a stellar baby boom. The most massive of these stars race through their evolution in a few million years and explode as supernovas. Heavy elements manufactured inside these stars are blown away by the explosions and enrich the surrounding gas for thousands of light years. "The amount of heavy elements supports earlier studies that indicate there was a very high rate of relatively recent supernovas, 30 times that of the Milky Way," according to collaborator Andreas Zezas of the CfA. Animation of Colliding Galaxies Animation of Colliding Galaxies The supernova violence also heats the gas to millions of degrees Celsius. This makes much of the matter in the clouds invisible to optical telescopes, but it can be observed by an X-ray telescope. Chandra data revealed for the first time regions of varying enrichment in the galaxies – in one cloud magnesium and silicon are 16 and 24 times as abundant as in the Sun. "These are the kinds of elements that

  18. Duke University high energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortney, L.R.; Goshaw, A.T.; Walker, W.D.

    1992-07-01

    This Progress Report presents a review of the research done in 1992 by the Duke High Energy Physics Group. This is the first year of a three-year grant which was approved by the Office of High Energy Physics at DOE after an external review of our research program during the summer of 1991. Our research is centered at Fermilab where we are involved with two active experiments, one using the Tevatron collider (CDF, the Collider Detector Facility) and the other using a proton beam in the high intensity laboratory (E771, study of beauty production). In addition to these running experiments we are continuing the analysis of data from experiments E735 (collider search for a quark-gluon plasma), E705 (fixed target study of direct photon and {sub {Chi}} meson production) and E597 (particle production from hadron-nucleus collisions). Finally, this year has seen an expansion of our involvement with the design of the central tracking detector for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) and an increased role in the governance of the collaboration. Descriptions of these research activities are presented in this report.

  19. High Energy Gas Fracturing Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte, R.

    2001-02-27

    The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed two tests of a high-energy gas fracturing system being developed by Western Technologies of Crossville, Tennessee. The tests involved the use of two active wells located at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), thirty-five miles north of Casper, Wyoming (See Figure 1). During the testing process the delivery and operational system was enhanced by RMOTC, Western Technologies, and commercial wireline subcontractors. RMOTC has assisted an industrial client in developing their technology for high energy gas fracturing to a commercial level. The modifications and improvements implemented during the technology testing process are instrumental in all field testing efforts at RMOTC. The importance of well selection can also be critical in demonstrating the success of the technology. To date, significant increases in well productivity have been clearly proven in well 63-TPX-10. Gross fluid production was initially raised by a factor of three. Final production rates increased by a factor of six with the use of a larger submersible pump. Well productivity (bbls of fluid per foot of drawdown) increased by a factor of 15 to 20. The above results assume that no mechanical damage has occurred to the casing or cast iron bridge plug which could allow well production from the Tensleep ''B'' sand. In the case of well 61-A-3, a six-fold increase in total fluid production was seen. Unfortunately, the increase is clouded by the water injection into the well that was necessary to have a positive fluid head on the propellant tool. No significant increase in oil production was seen. The tools which were retrieved from both 63-TPX-10 and 61-A-3 indicated a large amount of energy, similar to high gram perforating, had been expended downhole upon the formation face.

  20. High temperature thermoelectric energy conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considerable advances were made in the late '50's and early early '60's in the theory and development of materials for high-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion. This early work culminated in a variety of materials, spanning a range of temperatures, with the product of the figure of merit, Z, and temperature, T, i.e., the dimensionless figure of merit, ZT, of the order of one. This experimental limitation appeared to be universal and led a number of investigators to explore the possibility that a ZT- also represents a theoretical limitation. It was found not to be so

  1. Chandra Looks Over a Cosmic Four-Leaf Clover

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-01

    A careful analysis of observations by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory of a rare quadruple quasar has uncovered evidence that possibly a single star in a foreground galaxy magnified X-rays coming from the quasar. This discovery gives astronomers a new and extremely precise probe of the gas flow around the supermassive black hole that powers the quasar. "If our interpretation is correct, then we are seeing details around this black hole that are 50,000 times smaller than either the Hubble Space Telescope or Chandra could see under ordinary circumstances," said George Chartas of Penn State University in University Park, and lead author of a recent article on the Cloverleaf quasar in The Astrophysical Journal. The Cloverleaf quasar is a single object about 11 billion light years from Earth that appears as four images produced by a process known as gravitational lensing. If one or more galaxies lie along the line of sight to a more distant quasar, the gravitational field of the intervening galaxies can bend and magnify the light from the quasar and produce multiple images of it. The four images of the Cloverleaf quasar have been produced by one or more intervening galaxies. Cloverleaf Quasar Chandra X-ray Image of the Cloverleaf quasar One of the images (A), in the Cloverleaf is brighter than the others in both optical and X-ray light. Chartas and his colleagues found the relative brightness of this image was greater in X-ray than in optical light. The X-rays from iron atoms were also enhanced relative to X-rays at lower energies. Since the amount of brightening due to gravitational lensing does not vary with the wavelength, this means that an additional object has magnified the X-rays. The increased magnification of the X-ray light can be explained by gravitational microlensing, an effect which has been used to search for compact stars and planets in our galaxy. Microlensing occurs when a star or a multiple star system passes in front of light from a background object

  2. High-Energy-Density Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slenes, Kirk

    2003-01-01

    Capacitors capable of storing energy at high densities are being developed for use in pulse-power circuits in such diverse systems as defibrillators, particle- beam accelerators, microwave sources, and weapons. Like typical previously developed energy-storage capacitors, these capacitors are made from pairs of metal/solid-dielectric laminated sheets that are wound and pressed into compact shapes to fit into cans, which are then filled with dielectric fluids. Indeed, these capacitors can be fabricated largely by conventional fabrication techniques. The main features that distinguish these capacitors from previously developed ones are improvements in (1) the selection of laminate materials, (2) the fabrication of the laminated sheets from these materials, and (3) the selection of dielectric fluids. In simplest terms, a high-performance laminated sheet of the type used in these capacitors is made by casting a dielectric polymer onto a sheet of aluminized kraft paper. The dielectric polymer is a siloxane polymer that has been modified with polar pendant groups to increase its permittivity and dielectric strength. Potentially, this polymer is capable of withstanding an energy density of 7.5 J/cm3, which is four times that of the previous state-of-the-art-capacitor dielectric film material. However, the full potential of this polymer cannot be realized at present because (1) at thicknesses needed for optimum performance (.8.0 m), the mechanical strength of a film of this polymer is insufficient for incorporation into a wound capacitor and (2) at greater thickness, the achievable energy density decreases because of a logarithmic decrease in dielectric strength with increasing thickness. The aluminized kraft paper provides the mechanical strength needed for processing of the laminate and fabrication of the capacitor, and the aluminum film serves as an electrode layer. Because part of the thickness of the dielectric is not occupied by the modified siloxane polymer, the

  3. Chandra Finds Surprising Black Hole Activity In Galaxy Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-01

    bright active galaxies, often referred to as Active Galactic Nuclei, or AGN. Many astronomers think that all galaxies have central, supermassive black holes, yet only a small percent show activity. What is needed to power the AGN is fuel in the form of a nearby reservoir of gas and dust. Galaxy clusters contain hundreds to thousands of galaxies. They are the largest known structures in the universe and serve as a microcosm for the mechanics of the Universe at large. The galaxies in clusters are often old, reddish elliptically shaped galaxies, distinct from blue, spiral galaxies like our own. These old galaxies also do not have many young stars. The theory now in question is that as galaxies enter into clusters at high speeds, they are stripped of their interstellar gas, much as a strong wind strips leaves from a tree. Galaxies may also collide with one another and use up all of their gas in one huge burst of star formation triggered by this interaction. These processes remove most, if not all, of the gas that isn't locked up in stars. As they no longer have the raw material to form new stars, the stellar population slowly gets old and the Galaxy appears red. No gas is left to fuel an AGN. Previous surveys of galaxy clusters with optical telescopes have found that about only one percent of the galaxies in a cluster have AGN. This latest Chandra observation if typical, however, bumps the count up to about 5 percent. The team found six red galaxies with high X-ray activity during a nearly 14-hour Chandra observation of a galaxy cluster named Abell 2104, over 700 million light years from Earth. Based on previous optical surveys, only one was expected. "If we relied on optical data alone, we would have missed these hidden monsters," said co-author Dr. John Mulchaey. Only one of the six AGN, in fact, had the optical spectral properties typical of AGN activity. "The presence of these AGN indicate that supermassive black holes have somehow retained a fuel source, despite the

  4. High energy physics and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research will focus on the implications of recent theories and experiments in high energy physics of the evolution of the early universe, and on the constraints that cosmological considerations can place on such theories. Several problems are under investigation, including studies of the nature of dark matter and the signature of annihilations in the galactic halo, where the resulting γ-ray fluxes are potentially observable, and in stars, where stellar evolution may be affects. We will develop constraints on the inflationary predictions of scale-free primordial fluctuations in a universe at critical closure density by studying their linear and non-linear evolution after they re-enter the particle horizon, examining the observable imprint of primordial density fluctuations on the cosmic microwave background radiation in both flat and curved cosmological models, and implications for observations of large-scale galaxy clustering and structure formation theories. We will also study spectral distortions in the microwave background radiation that are produced by exotic particle decays in the very early universe. We expect such astrophysical considerations to provide fruitful insights both into high-energy particle physics and into possible cosmological for the early universe

  5. Approaches to high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of the present state of the art in high energy physics is presented highlighting the developments in hadron physics, field theory and nuclear democracy. To begin with, description of 'hadrons' is given on the basis of quantum electrodynamics. The role of the quantum numbers assigned to quarks are explained. Lepton-hadron scattering and hadron-hadron scattering are discussed. The quark-parton model of the nucleon is explained. The recently discovered Psi resonances and the consequent introduction of new quantum number 'charm' are mentioned. Next, Yang-Mills Gauge theories, the unification of weak and electromagnetic interactions and the concept of weak neutral currents are discussed. Gauge theories of strong interactions, quantum chromodynamics and the concept of 'Bags' are explained. Magnetic monopoles (solitons) are described with basis on non-linear field theories. High energy bounds in the axiomatic field theory are formulated. The general properties of S-matrix elements obtained in a quantum local field theory are mentioned. Lastly, the shifting of the reliance on field concepts to other approaches, specially through S-matrix and the application of Regge poles and cuts is explained. The duality hypothesis is postulated to explain processes such as pp→pp with the 'pomeron exchange' concept. Dual models of strong interactions are discussed. Future trends are indicated. (A.K.)

  6. Chandra Observes the End of an Era in SN 1987A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Kari A.; Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Park, Sangwook; McCray, Richard; Dwek, Eli; Burrows, David N.

    2016-09-01

    Updated imaging and photometric results from Chandra observations of SN 1987A, covering the last 16 years, are presented. We find that the 0.5-2 keV light curve has remained constant at ˜8 × 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2 since 9500 days, with the 3-8 keV light curve continuing to increase until at least 10,000 days. The expansion rate of the ring is found to be energy dependent, such that after day 6000 the ring expands faster in the 2-10 keV band than it does at energies fade. Consistent with the latest optical and infrared results, our Chandra analysis indicates the blast wave is now leaving the dense ER, which marks the beginning of a major change in the evolutionary phase of the supernova remnant 1987A.

  7. Chandra mission scheduling on-orbit experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Sabina; Williams, Brent; Pendexter, Misty; Balke, David

    2008-07-01

    Scheduling observatory time to maximize both day-to-day science target integration time and the lifetime of the observatory is a formidable challenge. Furthermore, it is not a static problem. Of course, every schedule brings a new set of observations, but the boundaries of the problem change as well. As spacecraft ages, its capabilities may degrade. As in-flight experience grows, capabilities may expand. As observing programs are completed, the needs and expectations of the science community may evolve. Changes such as these impact the rules by which a mission scheduled. In eight years on orbit, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory Mission Planning process has adapted to meet the challenge of maximizing day-to-day and mission lifetime science return, despite a consistently evolving set of scheduling constraints. The success of the planning team has been achieved, not through the use of complex algorithms and optimization routines, but through processes and home grown tools that help individuals make smart short term and long term Mission Planning decisions. This paper walks through the processes and tools used to plan and produce mission schedules for the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Nominal planning and scheduling, target of opportunity response, and recovery from on-board autonomous safing actions are all addressed. Evolution of tools and processes, best practices, and lessons learned are highlighted along the way.

  8. Spectral Analysis of the Chandra Comet Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Bodewits, D; Torney, M; Dryer, M; Lisse, C M; Dennerl, K; Zurbuchen, T H; Wolk, S J; Tielens, A G G M; Hoekstra, R

    2007-01-01

    We present results of the analysis of cometary X-ray spectra with an extended version of our charge exchange emission model (Bodewits et al. 2006). We have applied this model to the sample of 8 comets thus far observed with the Chandra X-ray observatory and ACIS spectrometer in the 300-1000 eV range. The surveyed comets are C/1999 S4 (LINEAR), C/1999 T1 (McNaught-Hartley), C/2000 WM1 (LINEAR), 153P/2002 (Ikeya-Zhang), 2P/2003 (Encke), C/2001 Q4 (NEAT), 9P/2005 (Tempel 1) and 73P/2006-B (Schwassmann-Wachmann 3) and the observations include a broad variety of comets, solar wind environments and observational conditions. The interaction model is based on state selective, velocity dependent charge exchange cross sections and is used to explore how cometary X-ray emission depend on cometary, observational and solar wind characteristics. It is further demonstrated that cometary X-ray spectra mainly reflect the state of the local solar wind. The current sample of Chandra observations was fit using the constrains of ...

  9. The origin of emission and absorption features in Ton S180 Chandra observations

    OpenAIRE

    Różańska, A.; Czerny, B.; Siemiginowska, A.; Dumont, A. -M.; Kawaguchi, T.

    2003-01-01

    We present new interpretation of Ton S180 spectrum obtained by {\\it Chandra} Spectrometer (Low Energy Transmission Grating). Several narrow absorption lines and a few emission disk lines have been successfully fitted to the data. We have not found any significant edges accompanying line emission. We propose the interpretation of narrow lines consistent with the paper recently written by Krolik (2002), where warm absorber is strongly inhomogeneous. Such situation is possible in so called multi...

  10. Oxides having high energy densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Kang, Kisuk

    2013-09-10

    Certain disclosed embodiments generally relate to oxide materials having relatively high energy and/or power densities. Various aspects of the embodiments are directed to oxide materials having a structure B.sub.i(M.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2, for example, a structure Li.sub.j(Ni.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2 such as Li(Ni.sub.0.5Mn.sub.0.5)O.sub.2. In this structure, Y represents one or more atoms, each independently selected from the group consisting of alkaline earth metals, transition metals, Group 14 elements, Group 15, or Group 16 elements. In some embodiments, such an oxide material may have an O3 crystal structure, and/or a layered structure such that the oxide comprises a plurality of first, repeating atomic planes comprising Li, and a plurality of second, repeating atomic planes comprising Ni and/or Y.

  11. How To Cover NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-01

    NASA's newest space telescope, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, is scheduled for launch not earlier than July 20, 1999, aboard Space Shuttle mission STS-93. The world's most powerful X-ray observatory, Chandra will join the Hubble Space Telescope and NASA's other great observatories in an unprecedented study of our universe. With its capability to "see" an otherwise invisible but violent, vibrant and ever-changing universe, Chandra will provide insights into the universe's structure and evolution. The following information is designed to assist news media representatives cover launch and activation of the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Covering from the Chandra Control Center NASA will establish a news center at the Chandra X-ray Observatory Operations Control Center in Cambridge, Mass., during the critical period of launch and early activation. The news center will be open from approximately two days prior to launch until the observatory is established in its operating orbit approximately 11 days after launch. The telephone numbers for the news center are: (617) 496-4454 (617) 496-4462 (617) 496-4484 The news center will be staffed around the clock during the Shuttle mission by media relations officers knowledgeable about the Chandra mission and its status. Media covering from the news center will be provided work space and have opportunities for face-to-face interviews with Chandra management, control team members and Chandra scientists. They will be able to participate in daily Chandra status briefings and have access to a special control room viewing area. Additionally, media covering from Cambridge will receive periodic status reports on Chandra and the STS-93 mission, and will be able to participate in interactive televised briefings on the STS-93 mission originating from other NASA centers. While advance accreditation is not required, media interested in covering Chandra from the Operations Control Center should contact Dave Drachlis by telephone at (256) 544

  12. Automated classification of Chandra X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehm, Derek; Kargaltsev, O.; Rangelov, B.; Volkov, I.; Pavlov, G. G.

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of the latest generation X-ray telescopes there has been a major influx of data associated with the detection of hundreds of thousands X-ray sources. As one can rarely tell a source type from its X-ray properties alone, the full potential of the X-ray catalogs can only be unlocked by correlating multiwavelength (MW) properties via cross-identification with other surveys. However, one would spend an enormous amount of time classifying these objects by their physical nature if the classification was to be done on a source-by-source basis by humans. Therefore, we are using a supervised learning algorithm to classify sources detected by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The classifications are based on a training dataset which currently includes about 7,000 X-ray sources of known nature (main sequence stars, Wolf-Rayet stars, young stars, active galactic nuclei, low mass X-ray binaries, high mass x-ray binaries, and neutron stars). For each source, the training dataset includes up to 24 multiwavelength properties. The efficiency and accuracy of the classification is verified by dividing the training dataset in two and performing cross-validation. The results are also inspected by plotting source properties in 2D slices of the parameter space. As an application of our automated procedure we classified unidentified sources in the supernova remnant (SNR) G352.7-0.1, in the field of HESS J1809-193, and in part of the Chandra Source Catalog 1.0. We present the results of the verification tests and the classification results. This research was partially supported by NASA/SAO grant AR3-14017X.

  13. [High energy physics and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research will focus on the implications of recent theories and experiments in high energy physics for the evolution of the early Universe, and on the constraints that cosmological considerations can place on such theories. Several problems are under investigation, including the development of constraints on the inflationary predictions of scale-free primordial fluctuations in a universe at critical closure density by studying their linear and non-linear evolution after they re-enter the particle horizon. We will examine the observable imprint of primordial density fluctuations on the cosmic microwave background radiation in curved cosmological models. Most astronomical evidence points to an open universe: one of our goals is to reconcile this conclusion with the particle physics input. We will investigate the response of the matter distribution to a network of cosmic strings produced during an early symmetry--breaking transition, and compute the resulting cosmic microwave background anisotropies. We will simulate the formation of large--scale structures whose dynamics are dominated by weakly interacting particles such as axions massive neutrinos or photinos in order to model the formation of galaxies, galaxy clusters and superclusters. We will study the distortions in the microwave background radiation, both spectral and angular, that are produced by ionized gas associated with forming clusters and groups of galaxies. We will also study constraints on exotic cooling mechanisms involving axions and majorons set by stellar evolution and the energy input into low mass stars by cold dark matter annihilation in galactic nuclei. We will compute the detailed gamma ray spectrum predicted by various cold dark matter candidates undergoing annihilation in the galactic halo and bulge

  14. High energy physics and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research will focus on the implications of recent theories and experiments in high energy physics for the evolution of the early Universe, and on the constraints that cosmological considerations can place on such theories. Several problems are under investigation, including the development of constraints on the inflationary predictions of scale--free primordial fluctuations in a universe at critical closure density by studying their linear and non-linear evolution after they re-enter the particle horizon. We will examine the observable imprint of primordial density fluctuations on the cosmic microwave background radiation curved cosmological models. Most astronomical evidence points to an open universe: one of our goals is to reconcile this conclusion with the particle physics input. We will investigate the response of the matter distribution to a network of cosmic strings produced during an early symmetry-breaking transition, and compute the resulting cosmic microwave background anisotropies. We will simulate the formation of large-scale structures whose dynamics are dominated by weakly interacting particles such as axions, massive neutrinos or photinos in order to model the formation of galaxies, galaxy clusters and superclusters. We will study of the distortions in the microwave background radiation, both spectral and angular, that are produced by ionized gas associated with forming clusters and groups of galaxies. We will also study constraints on exotic cooling mechanisms involving axions and majorons set by stellar evolution and the energy input into low mass stars by cold dark matter annihilation galactic nuclei. We will compute the detailed gamma ray spectrum predicted by various cold dark matter candidates undergoing annihilation in the galactic halo and bulge

  15. Chandra data archive operations: lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollough, Michael L.; Rots, Arnold H.; Winkelman, Sherry L.

    2006-06-01

    We present a discussion of the lessons learned from establishing and operating the Chandra Data Archive (CDA). We offer an overview of the archive, what preparations were done before launch, the transition to operations, actual operations, and some of the unexpected developments that had to be addressed in running the archive. From this experience we highlight some of the important issues that need to be addressed in the creation and running of an archive for a major project. Among these are the importance of data format standards; the integration of the archive with the rest of the mission; requirements throughout all phases of the mission; operational requirements; what to expect at launch; the user interfaces; how to anticipate new tasks; and overall importance of team management and organization.

  16. Modeling Contamination Migration on the Chandra X-ray Observatory II

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Steve; Swartz, Doug; Tice, Neil; Plucinsky, Paul; Grant, Catherine; Marshall, Herman; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    During its first 14 years of operation, the cold (about -60degC) optical blocking filter of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory, has accumulated a growing layer of molecular contamination that attenuates low-energy x rays. Over the past few years, the accumulation rate, spatial distribution, and composition may have changed, perhaps partially related to changes in the operating temperature of the ACIS housing. This evolution of the accumulation of the molecular contamination has motivated further analysis of contamination migration on the Chandra X-ray Observatory, particularly within and near the ACIS cavity. To this end, the current study employs a higher-fidelity geometric model of the ACIS cavity, detailed thermal modeling based upon monitored temperature data, and an accordingly refined model of the molecular transport.

  17. A Chandra/HETGS Census of X-ray Variability From Sgr A* During 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Neilsen, J; Gammie, C; Dexter, J; Markoff, S; Haggard, D; Nayakshin, S; Wang, Q D; Grosso, N; Porquet, D; Tomsick, J A; Degenaar, N; Fragile, P C; Wijnands, R; Miller, J M; Baganoff, F K

    2013-01-01

    We present the first systematic analysis of the X-ray variability of Sgr A* during the Chandra X-ray Observatory's 2012 Sgr A* X-ray Visionary Project (XVP). With 38 High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) observations spaced an average of 7 days apart, this unprecedented campaign enables detailed study of the X-ray emission from this supermassive black hole at high spatial, spectral and timing resolution. In 3 Ms of observations, we detect 39 X-ray flares from Sgr A*, lasting from a few hundred seconds to approximately 8 ks, and ranging in 2-10 keV luminosity from ~1e34 erg/s to 2e35 erg/s. Despite tentative evidence for a gap in the distribution of flare peak count rates, there is no evidence for X-ray color differences between faint and bright flares. Our preliminary X-ray flare luminosity distribution dN/dL is consistent with a power law with index -1.9 (+0.3 -0.4); this is similar to some estimates of Sgr A*'s NIR flux distribution. The observed flares contribute one-third of the total X-ra...

  18. High sensitivity fluid energy harvester

    CERN Document Server

    Morarka, Amit

    2016-01-01

    An ambient energy harvesting device was design and fabricated. It can harness kinetic energy of rain droplets and low velocity wind flows. The energy converted into electrical energy by using a single device. The technique used by the device was based on the principles of electromagnetic induction and cantilever. Readily available materials were characterized and used for the fabrication of cantilever. Under the laboratory conditions, water droplets having diameter 4mm and wind with speed 0.5m/s were used as the two distinct sources. Without making any changes in the geometry or the materials used, the device was able to convert kinetic energy from both the sources to provide voltage in the range of 0.7-1VAC. The work was conceptualized to provide an autonomous device which can harness energy from both the renewable energy sources.

  19. Using ACIS on the Chandra X-ray Observatory as a particle radiation monitor II

    CERN Document Server

    Grant, C E; Bautz, M W; O'Dell, S L

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer is an instrument on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. CCDs are vulnerable to radiation damage, particularly by soft protons in the radiation belts and solar storms. The Chandra team has implemented procedures to protect ACIS during high-radiation events including autonomous protection triggered by an on-board radiation monitor. Elevated temperatures have reduced the effectiveness of the on-board monitor. The ACIS team has developed an algorithm which uses data from the CCDs themselves to detect periods of high radiation and a flight software patch to apply this algorithm is currently active on-board the instrument. In this paper, we explore the ACIS response to particle radiation through comparisons to a number of external measures of the radiation environment. We hope to better understand the efficiency of the algorithm as a function of the flux and spectrum of the particles and the time-profile of the radiation event.

  20. A Deep Chandra X-Ray Spectrum of the Accreting Young Star TW Hydrae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickhouse, N. S.; Cranmer, S. R.; Dupree, A. K.; Luna, G. J. M.; Wolk, S.

    2010-02-01

    We present X-ray spectral analysis of the accreting young star TW Hydrae from a 489 ks observation using the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating. The spectrum provides a rich set of diagnostics for electron temperature Te , electron density Ne , hydrogen column density NH , relative elemental abundances, and velocities, and reveals its source in three distinct regions of the stellar atmosphere: the stellar corona, the accretion shock, and a very large extended volume of warm postshock plasma. The presence of Mg XII, Si XIII, and Si XIV emission lines in the spectrum requires coronal structures at ~10 MK. Lower temperature lines (e.g., from O VIII, Ne IX, and Mg XI) formed at 2.5 MK appear more consistent with emission from an accretion shock. He-like Ne IX line ratio diagnostics indicate that Te = 2.50 ± 0.25 MK and Ne = 3.0 ± 0.2 × 1012 cm-3 in the shock. These values agree well with standard magnetic accretion models. However, the Chandra observations significantly diverge from current model predictions for the postshock plasma. This gas is expected to cool radiatively, producing O VII as it flows into an increasingly dense stellar atmosphere. Surprisingly, O VII indicates Ne = 5.7+4.4 -1.2 × 1011 cm-3, 5 times lower than Ne in the accretion shock itself and ~7 times lower than the model prediction. We estimate that the postshock region producing O VII has roughly 300 times larger volume and 30 times more emitting mass than the shock itself. Apparently, the shocked plasma heats the surrounding stellar atmosphere to soft X-ray emitting temperatures and supplies this material to nearby large magnetic structures—which may be closed magnetic loops or open magnetic field leading to mass outflow. Our model explains the soft X-ray excess found in many accreting systems as well as the failure to observe high Ne signatures in some stars. Such accretion-fed coronae may be ubiquitous in the atmospheres of accreting young stars.

  1. IACHEC Cross-Calibration of Chandra, NuSTAR, Swift, Suzaku, and XMM-Newton with 3C 273 and PKS 2155-304

    CERN Document Server

    Madsen, Kristin K; Forster, Karl; Guainazzi, Matteo; Marshall, Herman L; Miller, Eric D; Page, Kim L; Stuhlinge, Martin

    2016-01-01

    On behalf of the International Astronomical Consortium for High Energy Calibration (IACHEC), we present results from the cross-calibration campaigns in 2012 on 3C 273 and in 2013 on PKS 2155-304 between the then active X-ray observatories Chandra, NuSTAR, Suzaku, Swift and XMM-Newton. We compare measured fluxes between instrument pairs in two energy bands, 1-5 keV and 3-7 keV and calculate an average cross-normalization constant for each energy range. We review known cross-calibration features and provide a series of tables and figures to be used for evaluating cross-normalization constants obtained from other observations with the above mentioned observatories.

  2. High-Energy Astrophysics: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy astrophysics is the study of objects and phenomena in space with energy densities much greater than that found in normal stars and galaxies. These include black holes, neutron stars, cosmic rays, hypernovae and gamma-ray bursts. A history and an overview of high-energy astrophysics will be presented, including a description of the objects that are observed. Observing techniques, space-borne missions in high-energy astrophysics and some recent discoveries will also be described. Several entirely new types of astronomy are being employed in high-energy astrophysics. These will be briefly described, along with some NASA missions currently under development.

  3. Six Years of Chandra Observations of Supernova Remnants

    OpenAIRE

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Hughes, John P.

    2005-01-01

    We present a review of the first six years of Chandra X-ray Observatory observations of supernova remnants. From the official "first-light" observation of Cassiopeia A that revealed for the first time the compact remnant of the explosion, to the recent million-second spectrally-resolved observation that revealed new details of the stellar composition and dynamics of the original explosion, Chandra observations have provided new insights into the supernova phenomenon. We present an admittedly ...

  4. Finding Rare AGN: XMM-Newton and Chandra Observations of SDSS Stripe 82

    CERN Document Server

    LaMassa, Stephanie M; Cappelluti, Nico; Civano, Francesca; Ranalli, Piero; Glikman, Eilat; Treister, Ezequiel; Richards, Gordon; Ballantyne, David; Stern, Daniel; Comastri, Andrea; Cardamone, Carie; Schawinski, Kevin; Boehringer, Hans; Chon, Gayoung; Murray, Stephen S; Green, Paul; Nandra, Kirpal

    2013-01-01

    We have analyzed the {\\it XMM-Newton} and {\\it Chandra} data overlapping $\\sim$16.5 deg$^2$ of Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82, including $\\sim$4.6 deg$^2$ of proprietary {\\it XMM-Newton} data that we present here. In total, 3362 unique X-ray sources are detected at high significance. We derive the {\\it XMM-Newton} number counts and compare them with our previously reported {\\it Chandra} Log$N$-Log$S$ relations and other X-ray surveys. The Stripe 82 X-ray source lists have been matched to multi-wavelength catalogs using a maximum likelihood estimator algorithm. We discovered the highest redshift ($z=5.86$) quasar yet identified in an X-ray survey. We find 2.5 times more high luminosity (L$_x \\geq 10^{45}$ erg s$^{-1}$) AGN than the smaller area {\\it Chandra} and {\\it XMM-Newton} survey of COSMOS and 1.3 times as many identified by XBo\\"otes. Comparing the high luminosity AGN we have identified with those predicted by population synthesis models, our results suggest that this AGN population is a more import...

  5. CHANDRA-LETGS X-ray observations of Capella Temperature, density and abundance diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Ness, J U; Schmitt, J H M M; Raassen, A J J; Porquet, D; Kaastra, J S; Van der Meer, R L J; Burwitz, V; Predehl, P

    2001-01-01

    Electron density diagnostics based on the triplets of Helium-like CV, NVI, and OVII are applied to the X-ray spectra of Capella and Procyon measured with the Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (LETGS) on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory. New theoretical models for the calculation of the line ratios between the forbidden (f), intercombination (i), and the resonance (r) lines of the helium-like triplets are used. The derived densities are quite typical of densities found in the solar active regions, and also pressures and temperatures in Procyon's and Capella's corona at a level of T=10^6K are quite similar. We find no evidence for densities as high as measured in solar flares. Comparison of our Capella and Procyon measurements with the Sun shows little difference in the physical properties of the layers producing the CV, NVI, and OVII emission. Assuming the X-ray emitting plasma to be confined in magnetic loops, we obtain typical loop length scales of L_Capella > 8 L_Procyon from the loop scaling ...

  6. X-Ray Spectroscopy of diffuse Galactic Interstellar Matter with Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Norbert S.; Paerels, Frits

    One of the expectations with the advent of the High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) spectrometer onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory was to measure precise photoelectric edges of major cosmic elements such as O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe. Early studies revealed complex absorption structures around the O K, Fe L, and Ne K edges which were identified with absorption from the various phases of the interstellar medium and which could place limits on ionization fractions in these phases. The dust content in interstellar matter as well as, for example, the fraction of how much oxygen is locked into dust are issues of importance and here resolved X-ray edges can determine significant limits. I will review predictions made by cross-sections and depletion factors and compare with current observations specifically with respect to silicon absorption in the interstellar medium. Dust grain models and in conjunction with laboratory measurements are now used to improve current interstellar X-ray absorption models.

  7. The X-ray Spectrum of the Rapid Burster using the Chandra HETGS

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, H L; Fox, D; Miller, J M; Guerriero, R; Morgan, E; Van der Klis, M; Bildsten, L; Dotani, T; Lewin, W H G

    2001-01-01

    We present observations of the Rapid Burster (RB, also known as MXB 1730-335) using the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer. The average interval between type II (accretion) bursts was about 40 s. There was one type I (thermonuclear flash) burst and about 20 "mini-bursts" which are probably type II bursts whose peak flux is 10-40% of the average peak flux of the other type II bursts. The time averaged spectra of the type II bursts are well fit by a blackbody with a temperature of kT = 1.6 keV, a radius of 8.9 km for a distance of 8.6 kpc, and an interstellar column density of 1.7e22 per sq. cm. No narrow emission or absorption lines were clearly detected. The 3 sigma upper limits to the equivalent widths of any features are < 10 eV in the 1.1-7.0 keV band and as small as 1.5 eV near 1.7 keV. We suggest that Comptonization destroys absorption features such as the resonance line of Fe XXVI.

  8. Chandra LETGS observation of the variable NLS1 galaxy Ark 564

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, J. M.

    2013-03-01

    We present an analysis of the 100 ks X-ray spectrum of the narrow-line Seyfert 1 Galaxy Ark 564, taken with the Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (LETGS) on board Chandra. Using χ2 statistics, several continuum models of the time-averaged spectrum of this object are compared, obtaining a semi-empirical solution for the description of the intrinsic emission continuum and a physical solution for the intrinsic absorption of the system. We find that the 0.1-10 keV spectrum can be well described by a power law plus two thermal components that account for the soft step. We are also able to detect and measure several narrow, unresolved absorption lines arising from highly ionized species of C, N, O, and Fe. The material seems to have a velocity consistent with the systemic velocity of the galaxy. This piece of evidence, in addition to the very low observed column density of NH ~ 1020 cm-2, is in good agreement with the scenario of a transverse biconical outflow with a gas density of n ≲ 3 × 1012 cm-3 at distances beyond the broad-line region r ≳ 10 lt-days, but a dust torus origin cannot be ruled out. The reduced spectrum is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr(130.79.128.5) or via cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/551/A95

  9. The Brera Multi-scale Wavelet Chandra Survey. I. Serendipitous source catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, P; Mignani, R P; Moretti, A; Mottini, M; Panzera, M R; Tagliaferri, G

    2008-01-01

    We present the BMW-Chandra source catalogue drawn from essentially all Chandra ACIS-I pointed observations with an exposure time in excess of 10ks public as of March 2003 (136 observations). Using the wavelet detection algorithm developed by Lazzati et al. (1999) and Campana et al. (1999), which can characterise both point-like and extended sources, we identified 21325 sources. Among them, 16758 are serendipitous, i.e. not associated with the targets of the pointings, and do not require a non-automated analysis. This makes our catalogue the largest compilation of Chandra sources to date. The 0.5--10 keV absorption corrected fluxes of these sources range from ~3E-16 to 9E-12 erg cm^-2 s^-1 with a median of 7E-15 erg cm^-2 s^-1. The catalogue consists of count rates and relative errors in three energy bands (total, 0.5-7keV; soft, 0.5-2keV; and hard, 2-7keV), and source positions relative to the highest signal-to-noise detection among the three bands. The wavelet algorithm also provides an estimate of the exten...

  10. High Energy Observations of XRF 030723: Evidence for an Off-axis Gamma-Ray Burst?

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, N R; Suzuki, M; Kawai, N; Lamb, D Q; Graziani, C; Donaghy, T Q; Dullighan, A; Vanderspek, R; Crew, G B; Ford, P; Ricker, G; Atteia, J L; Yoshida, A; Shirasaki, Y; Tamagawa, T; Torii, K; Matsuoka, M; Fenimore, E E; Galassi, M; Doty, J; Villaseñor, J D; Prigozhin, G Y; Jernigan, J G; Barraud, C; Boër, M; Dezalay, J P; Olive, J F; Hurley, K; Levine, A; Martel, F; Morgan, E; Woosley, S E; Cline, T; Braga, J; Manchanda, R K; Pizzichini, G

    2004-01-01

    We report High Energy Transient Explorer 2 (HETE-2) Wide Field X-ray Monitor/French Gamma Telescope observations of XRF030723 along with observations of the XRF afterglow made using the 6.5m Magellan Clay telescope and the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The observed peak energy E_pk_obs of the nu F_nu burst spectrum is found to lie within (or below) the WXM 2-25 keV passband at 98.5% confidence, and no counts are detected above 30 keV. Our best fit value is E_pk_obs=8.4+3.5/-3.4 keV. The ratio of X-ray to Gamma-ray flux for the burst follows a correlation found for GRBs observed with HETE-2, and the duration of the burst is similar to that typical of long-duration GRBs. If we require that the burst isotropic equivalent energy E_iso and E_pk_rest satisfy the relation discovered by Amati et al. (2002), a redshift of z=0.38+0.36/-0.18 can be determined, in agreement with constraints determined from optical observations. We are able to fit the X-ray afterglow spectrum and to measure its temporal fade. Although the be...

  11. Theory of high-energy messengers

    CERN Document Server

    Dermer, Charles D

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the distant high-energy universe comes from photons, ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs), high-energy neutrinos, and gravitational waves. The theory of high-energy messengers reviewed here focuses on the extragalactic background light at all wavelengths, cosmic rays and magnetic fields in intergalactic space, and neutrinos of extragalactic origin. Comparisons are drawn between the intensities of photons and UHECRs in intergalactic space, and the high-energy neutrinos recently detected with IceCube at about the Waxman-Bahcall flux. Source candidates for UHECRs and high-energy neutrinos are reviewed, focusing on star-forming and radio-loud active galaxies. HAWC and Advanced LIGO are just underway, with much anticipation.

  12. Fast Electronics in High-Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigand, Clyde

    1958-08-08

    A brief review of fast electronics is given, leading up to the present state of the art. Cherenkov counters in high-energy physics are discussed, including an example of a velocity-selecting Cherenkov counter. An electronic device to aid in aligning external beams from high-energy accelerators is described. A scintillation-counter matrix to identify bubble chamber tracks is discussed. Some remarks on the future development of electronics in high-energy physics experiments are included.

  13. Harvard University High Energy Physics progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal goals of this work are to carry out forefront programs in high energy physics research and to provide first rate educational opportunities for students. The experimental program supported through HEPL is carried out at the major accelerator centers in the world and addresses some of the most important questions in high energy physics. The program is based at Harvard's High Energy Physics Laboratory, which has offices, computing facilities, and engineering support, and both electronics and machine shops

  14. High-energy electron diffraction and microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, L M; Whelan, M J

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to high energy electron diffraction and elastic and inelastic scattering of high energy electrons, with particular emphasis on applications to modern electron microscopy. Starting from a survey of fundamental phenomena, the authors introduce the most important concepts underlying modern understanding of high energy electron diffraction. Dynamical diffraction in transmission (THEED) and reflection (RHEED) geometries is treated using ageneral matrix theory, where computer programs and worked examples are provided to illustrate the concepts and to f

  15. Split School of High Energy Physics 2015

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Split School of High Energy Physics 2015 (SSHEP 2015) was held at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture (FESB), University of Split, from September 14 to September 18, 2015. SSHEP 2015 aimed at master and PhD students who were interested in topics pertaining to High Energy Physics. SSHEP 2015 is the sixth edition of the High Energy Physics School. Previous five editions were held at the Department of Physics, University of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  16. Chandra X-ray spectroscopy of a clear dip in GX 13+1

    CERN Document Server

    D'Aì, A; Di Salvo, T; Riggio, A; Burderi, L; Robba, N R

    2014-01-01

    The source GX 13+1 is a persistent, bright Galactic X-ray binary hosting an accreting neutron star. It shows highly ionized absorption features, with a blueshift of $\\sim$ 400 km s$^{-1}$ and an outflow-mass rate similar to the accretion rate. Many other X-ray sources exhibit warm absorption features, and they all show periodic dipping behavior at the same time. Recently, a dipping periodicity has also been determined for GX 13+1 using long-term X-ray folded light-curves, leading to a clear identification of one of such periodic dips in an archival Chandra observation. We give the first spectral characterization of the periodic dip of GX 13+1 found in this archival Chandra observation performed in 2010. We used Chandra/HETGS data (1.0--10 keV band) and contemporaneous RXTE/PCA data (3.5--25 keV) to analyze the broadband X-ray spectrum. We adopted different spectral models to describe the continuum emission and used the XSTAR-derived warm absorber component to constrain the highly ionized absorption features. ...

  17. The Chandra X-Ray Observatory's Radiation Environment and the AP-8/AE-8 Model

    CERN Document Server

    Virani, S N; Plucinsky, P P; Butt, Y M; Virani, Shanil N.; Mueller-Mellin, Reinhold; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Butt, Yousaf M.

    2000-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) was launched on July 23, 1999 and reached its final orbit on August 7, 1999. The CXO is in a highly elliptical orbit, approximately 140,000 km x 10,000 km, and has a period of approximately 63.5 hours (~ 2.65 days). It transits the Earth's Van Allen belts once per orbit during which no science observations can be performed due to the high radiation environment. The Chandra X-ray Observatory Center (CXC) currently uses the National Space Science Data Center's ``near Earth'' AP-8/AE-8 radiation belt model to predict the start and end times of passage through the radiation belts. However, our scheduling software uses only a simple dipole model of the Earth's magnetic field. The resulting B, L magnetic coordinates, do not always give sufficiently accurate predictions of the start and end times of transit of the Van Allen belts. We show this by comparing to the data from Chandra's on-board radiation monitor, the EPHIN (Electron, Proton, Helium Instrument particle detector) instr...

  18. High energy physics and cloud computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High Energy Physics (HEP) has been a strong promoter of computing technology, for example WWW (World Wide Web) and the grid computing. In the new era of cloud computing, HEP has still a strong demand, and major international high energy physics laboratories have launched a number of projects to research on cloud computing technologies and applications. It describes the current developments in cloud computing and its applications in high energy physics. Some ongoing projects in the institutes of high energy physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, including cloud storage, virtual computing clusters, and BESⅢ elastic cloud, are also described briefly in the paper. (authors)

  19. High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) is the primary archive for NASA missions dealing with extremely energetic phenomena, from...

  20. Chandra Observations of Comets C/2012 S1 (ISON) and C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snios, Bradford; Kharchenko, Vasili; Lisse, Carey M.; Wolk, Scott J.; Dennerl, Konrad; Combi, Michael R.

    2016-02-01

    We present our results on the Chandra X-ray Observatory Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) observations of the bright Oort Cloud comets C/2012 S1 (ISON) and C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS). ISON was observed between 2013 October 31-November 06 during variable speed solar wind (SW), and PanSTARRS was observed between 2013 April 17-23 during fast SW. ISON produced an extended parabolic X-ray morphology consistent with a collisionally thick coma, while PanSTARRS demonstrated only a diffuse X-ray-emitting region. We consider these emissions to be from charge exchange (CX) and model each comet's emission spectrum from first principles accordingly. Our model agrees with the observational spectra and also generates composition ratios for heavy, highly charged SW ions interacting with the cometary atmosphere. We compare our derived SW ion compositions to observational data and find a strong agreement between them. These results further demonstrate the utility of CX emissions as a remote diagnostics tool of both astrophysical plasma interaction and SW composition. In addition, we observe potential soft X-ray emissions via ACIS around 0.2 keV from both comets that are correlated in intensity to the hard X-ray emissions between 0.4-1.0 keV. We fit our CX model to these emissions, but our lack of a unique solution at low energies makes it impossible to conclude if they are cometary CX in origin. Finally, we discuss probable emission mechanism sources for the soft X-rays and explore new opportunities these findings present in understanding cometary emission processes via Chandra.

  1. CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF COMETS C/2012 S1 (ISON) AND C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snios, Bradford; Kharchenko, Vasili [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Lisse, Carey M. [Planetary Exploration Group, Space Department, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Wolk, Scott J. [Chandra X-Ray Observatory Center, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dennerl, Konrad [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Combi, Michael R. [Department of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2016-02-20

    We present our results on the Chandra X-ray Observatory Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) observations of the bright Oort Cloud comets C/2012 S1 (ISON) and C/2011 L4 (PanSTARRS). ISON was observed between 2013 October 31–November 06 during variable speed solar wind (SW), and PanSTARRS was observed between 2013 April 17–23 during fast SW. ISON produced an extended parabolic X-ray morphology consistent with a collisionally thick coma, while PanSTARRS demonstrated only a diffuse X-ray-emitting region. We consider these emissions to be from charge exchange (CX) and model each comet's emission spectrum from first principles accordingly. Our model agrees with the observational spectra and also generates composition ratios for heavy, highly charged SW ions interacting with the cometary atmosphere. We compare our derived SW ion compositions to observational data and find a strong agreement between them. These results further demonstrate the utility of CX emissions as a remote diagnostics tool of both astrophysical plasma interaction and SW composition. In addition, we observe potential soft X-ray emissions via ACIS around 0.2 keV from both comets that are correlated in intensity to the hard X-ray emissions between 0.4–1.0 keV. We fit our CX model to these emissions, but our lack of a unique solution at low energies makes it impossible to conclude if they are cometary CX in origin. Finally, we discuss probable emission mechanism sources for the soft X-rays and explore new opportunities these findings present in understanding cometary emission processes via Chandra.

  2. Chandra Observations of QSO 2237+0305

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, X; Agol, E; Bautz, M W; Garmire, G P

    2003-01-01

    We present the observations of the gravitationally lensed system QSO 2237+0305 performed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory on 2000 Sept. 6, and on 2001 Dec. 8 for 30.3 ks and 9.5 ks, respectively. Imaging analysis resolves the four X-ray images of the Einstein Cross. A possible fifth image is detected; however, this detection less certain. Fits to the combined spectrum of all images of the Einstein Cross assuming a simple power law with Galactic and intervening absorption at the lensing galaxy yield a photon index of 1.90(+0.05,-0.05). For the first observation, this spectral model yields a 0.4-8.0 keV X-ray flux of 4.6e-13 erg cm-2 s-1 and a 0.4-8.0 keV lensed luminosity of 1.0e46 erg s-1. The source exhibits variability both over long and short time scales. The X-ray flux has dropped by 20% between the two observations, and the K-S test showed that image A is variable at the 97% confidence level within the first observation. Furthermore, a possible time-delay of 2.7(+0.5,-0.9) hours between images A and B ...

  3. Deep Chandra observations of Pictor A

    CERN Document Server

    Hardcastle, M J; Birkinshaw, M; Croston, J H; Goodger, J L; Marshall, H L; Perlman, E S; Siemiginowska, A; Stawarz, L; Worrall, D M

    2015-01-01

    We report on deep Chandra observations of the nearby broad-line radio galaxy Pictor A, which we combine with new Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) observations. The new X-ray data have a factor 4 more exposure than observations previously presented and span a 15-year time baseline, allowing a detailed study of the spatial, temporal and spectral properties of the AGN, jet, hotspot and lobes. We present evidence for further time variation of the jet, though the flare that we reported in previous work remains the most significantly detected time-varying feature. We also confirm previous tentative evidence for a faint counterjet. Based on the radio through X-ray spectrum of the jet and its detailed spatial structure, and on the properties of the counterjet, we argue that inverse-Compton models can be conclusively rejected, and propose that the X-ray emission from the jet is synchrotron emission from particles accelerated in the boundary layer of a relativistic jet. For the first time, we find evidence that...

  4. Chandra observations of Cygnus OB2

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Nicholas J; Drew, Janet E; Vink, Jorick S

    2011-01-01

    Cygnus OB2 is the nearest example of a massive star forming region, containing over 50 O-type stars and hundreds of B-type stars. We have analyzed two Chandra pointings in Cyg OB2, detecting ~1700 X-ray sources, of which ~1450 are thought to be members of the association. Optical and near-IR photometry has been obtained for ~90% of these sources from recent deep Galactic plane surveys. We have performed isochrone fits to the near-IR color-magnitude diagram, deriving ages of 3.5(+0.75,-1.0) and 5.25(+1.5,-1.0) Myrs for sources in the two fields, both with considerable spreads around the pre-MS isochrones. The presence of a second population in the region, somewhat older than the present-day O-type stars, has been suggested by other authors and fits with the ages derived here. The fraction of sources with inner circumstellar disks (as traced by the K-band excess) is found to be very low, but appropriate for a population of age ~5 Myrs. We measure the stellar mass functions and find a power-law slope of Gamma = ...

  5. Ultra high energy cosmic rays: A review

    CERN Document Server

    Stanev, Todor

    2010-01-01

    We present the main results on the energy spectrum and composition of the highest energy cosmic rays of energy exceeding 10$^{18}$ eV obtained by the High Resolution Fly's Eye and the Southern Auger Observatory. The current results are somewhat contradictory and raise interesting questions about the origin and character of these particles.

  6. URBox : High tech energy and informal housing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuperus, Y.J.; Smets, D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the URBox concept encompassing the high tech end of solar energy and informal low cost and affordable housing. It aims to contribute to solving the global energy crisis by building solar energy settlements in deserts where land is affordable and sunshine in abundance. First the

  7. An X-ray look at the Seyfert 1 Galaxy Mrk 590: XMM-Newton and Chandra reveal complexity in circumnuclear gas

    CERN Document Server

    Longinotti, A L; Santos-Lleó, M; Rodriguez-Pascual, P; Guainazzi, M; Cardaci, M; Pollock, A M T

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a partially simultaneous observation of the bright Seyfert 1 Galaxy Mrk590, performed by XMM-Newton and Chandra. The long exposure (~100 ks) allows to investigate with great detail the Fe K complex at 6-7 keV and the presence of soft X-ray spectral features. We have analysed XMM-Newton data from the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) in the 0.5-12 keV band and from the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) in the 0.35-2.5 keV band, and data from the High Energy Transmission Gratings (HETGs) onboard Chandra. UV and optical data from the Optical Monitor (OM) onboard XMM-Newton are also included in the analysis. The broad band spectrum is well described by an unabsorbed power law and three unresolved Fe~K lines in the 6-7 keV range. The presence of a Compton reflection component and a narrow Fe K line at 6.4 keV is consistent with an origin via torus reflection. The ionised Fe lines at ~6.7 and 7 keV are instead most likely originated by scattering on a warm and ionised gas. The soft X-r...

  8. Chandra Phase-Resolved Spectroscopy of the Crab Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Weisskopf, M C; Paerels, F; Becker, W; Tennant, A F; Swartz, D A; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Dell, Stephen L. O'; Paerels, Frits; Becker, Werner; Tennant, Allyn F.; Swartz, Douglas A.

    2004-01-01

    We present the first phase-resolved study of the X-ray spectral properties of the Crab Pulsar that covers all pulse phases. The superb angular resolution of the Chandra X-ray Observatory enables distinguishing the pulsar from the surrounding nebulosity, even at pulse minimum. Analysis of the pulse-averaged spectrum measures interstellar X-ray extinction due primarily to photoelectric absorption and secondarily to scattering by dust grains in the direction of the Crab Nebula. We confirm previous findings that the line-of-sight to the Crab is underabundant in oxygen, although more-so than recently measured. Using the abundances and cross sections from Wilms, Allen & McCray (2000) we find [O/H] = (3.33 +/-0.25) x 10**-4. Analysis of the spectrum as a function of pulse phase measures the low-energy X-ray spectral index even at pulse minimum -- albeit with large statistical uncertainty -- and we find marginal evidence for variations of the spectral index. The data are also used to set a new (3-sigma) upper lim...

  9. X-rays beware: the deepest Chandra catalogue of point sources in M31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulic, N.; Gallagher, S. C.; Barmby, P.

    2016-10-01

    This study represents the most sensitive Chandra X-ray point source catalogue of M31. Using 133 publicly available Chandra ACIS-I/S observations totalling ˜1 Ms, we detected 795 X-ray sources in the bulge, north-east, and south-west fields of M31, covering an area of ≈0.6 deg2, to a limiting unabsorbed 0.5-8.0 keV luminosity of ˜1034 erg s-1. In the inner bulge, where exposure is approximately constant, X-ray fluxes represent average values because they were determined from many observations over a long period of time. Similarly, our catalogue is more complete in the bulge fields since monitoring allowed more transient sources to be detected. The catalogue was cross-correlated with a previous XMM-Newton catalogue of M31's D25 isophote consisting of 1948 X-ray sources, with only 979 within the field of view of our survey. We found 387 (49 per cent) of our Chandra sources (352 or 44 per cent unique sources) matched to within 5 arcsec of 352 XMM-Newton sources. Combining this result with matching done to previous Chandra X-ray sources we detected 259. new sources in our catalogue. We created X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) in the soft (0.5-2.0 keV) and hard (2.0-8.0 keV) bands that are the most sensitive for any large galaxy based on our detection limits. Completeness-corrected XLFs show a break around ≈1.3 × 1037 erg s-1, consistent with previous work. As in past surveys, we find that the bulge XLFs are flatter than the disc, indicating a lack of bright high-mass X-ray binaries in the disc and an aging population of low-mass X-ray binaries in the bulge.

  10. Polarimeter for high energy photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Vlahovic, Branislav; Tedeschi, David; Danagulian, Samuel; Litvienko, Vladimir; Pinayev, Igor

    1999-11-01

    The physics program at TJNAF includes fundamental experiments with polarized photon beam in few GeV energy range. Development of the Polarimeter for use in Hall B experiments is the subject of present abstract. We have proposed to take advantage of the recent progress in silicon micro strip detectors for measurement of the geometry and angle correlation in electron positron pair production from an amorphous converter. A detailed analysis of the setup including MC simulation shows an experimental asymmetry σ_allel/σ_⊥ ~ 1.7 in a wide range of the photon energies. This asymmetry value is confirmed by our experimental results obtained using 100 percent polarized 40 MeV γ rays at Duke FEL.

  11. Chandra and XMM Observations of the Composite Supernova Remnant G327.1-1.1

    CERN Document Server

    Temim, Tea; Gaensler, B M; Hughes, John P; van der Swaluw, Eric

    2008-01-01

    We present new X-ray imaging and spectroscopy of a composite supernova remnant G327.1-1.1 using the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observatories. G327.1-1.1 has an unusual morphology consisting of a symmetric radio shell and an off center nonthermal component that indicates the presence of a pulsar wind nebula (PWN). Radio observations show a narrow finger of emission extending from the PWN structure towards the northwest. X-ray studies with ASCA, ROSAT, and BeppoSAX revealed elongated extended emission and a compact source at the tip of the finger that may be coincident with the actual pulsar. The high resolution Chandra observations provide new insight into the structure of the inner region of the remnant. The images show a compact source embedded in a cometary structure, from which a trail of X-ray emission extends in the southeast direction. The Chandra images also reveal two prong-like structures that appear to originate from the vicinity of the compact source and extend into a large bubble that is oriente...

  12. X-ray luminous galaxies I. Chandra observations of IRAS00317-2142

    CERN Document Server

    Georgantopoulos, I; Ward, M J

    2003-01-01

    We present Chandra observations of the enigmatic galaxy IRAS00317-2142, which is classified as a star-forming galaxy on the basis of the ionization level of its emission lines. However, a weak broad H\\alpha wing and a high X-ray luminosity give away the presence of an active nucleus. The Chandra image reveals a nuclear point source (L_(2-10 keV) 6x10^{41} erg s-1), contributing over 80% of the galaxy X-ray counts in the 0.3-8 keV band. This is surrounded by some fainter nebulosity extending up to 6 kpc. The nucleus does not show evidence for short-term variability. However, we detect long term variations between the ROSAT, ASCA and Chandra epoch. Indeed,the source has decreased its flux by over a factor of 25 in a period of about 10 years. The nuclear X-ray spectrum is well represented by a power-law with a photon index of 1.91^{+0.17}_{-0.15} while the extended emission by a Raymond-Smith component with a temperature of 0.6 keV. We find no evidence for the presence of an Fe line. The nucleus is absorbed by a...

  13. The Chandra Cygnus OB2 Legacy Survey: Design and X-ray Point Source Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Nicholas J; Guarcello, Mario G; Aldcroft, Tom L; Kashyap, Vinay L; Damiani, Francesco; DePasquale, Joe; Fruscione, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    The Cygnus OB2 association is the largest concentration of young and massive stars within 2 kpc of the Sun, including an estimated 65 O-type stars and hundreds of OB stars. The Chandra Cygnus OB2 Legacy Survey is a large imaging program undertaken with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The survey has imaged the central 0.5 deg^2 of the Cyg OB2 association with an effective exposure of 120ks and an outer 0.35 deg^2 area with an exposure of 60ks. Here we describe the survey design and observations, the data reduction and source detection, and present a catalog of 8,000 X-ray point sources. The survey design employs a grid of 36 heavily (~50%) overlapping pointings, a method that overcomes Chandra's low off-axis sensitivity and produces a highly uniform exposure over the inner 0.5 deg^2. The full X-ray catalog is described here and is made available online.

  14. High energy physics in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US program in high energy physics from 1985 to 1995 is reviewed. The program depends primarily upon work at the national accelerator centers, but includes a modest but diversified nonaccelerator program. Involvement of universities is described. International cooperation in high energy physics is discussed, including the European, Japanese, USSR, and the People's Republic of China's programs. Finally, new facilities needed by the US high energy physics program are discussed, with particular emphasis given to a Superconducting Super Collider for achieving ever higher energies in the 20 TeV range

  15. High Energy Laser Techniques In Industrial Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdelyi, Laszlo; Fagan, William F.

    1984-03-01

    High energy lasers are used for industrial measurements in connection with additional instrumentations. The most advanced system for this purposes is the Image Derotator. This system in combination with high energy laser systems is a powerful engeneering and scientific tool in the field of holographic interferometry and speckle photography. Traditional measurements complete the application range of the Image Derotator.

  16. Expectations for ultra-high energy interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strong interactions at ultra-high energies are discussed with emphasis on the hadrons produced in high energy collisions. Evidence is considered that quantum chromodynamics might be the right theory, and also some estimates are given of quantum chromodynamics asymptotic-freedom phenomena, the work under discussion being very preliminary. 6 references

  17. A Parton Shower for High Energy Jets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jeppe Rosenkrantz; Lonnblad, Leif; M. Smillie, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    We present a method to match the multi-parton states generated by the High Energy Jets Monte Carlo with parton showers generated by the Ariadne program using the colour dipole model. The High Energy Jets program already includes a full resummation of soft divergences. Hence, in the matching...

  18. New aspects of high energy density plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The papers presented at the symposium on 'New aspects of high energy density plasma' held at National Institute for Fusion Science are collected in this proceedings. The papers reflect the present status and recent progress in the experiments and theoretical works on high energy density plasma produced by pulsed power technology. The 13 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  19. CAMAC high energy physics electronics hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CAMAC hardware for high energy physics large spectrometers and control systems is reviewed as is the development of CAMAC modules at the High Energy Laboratory, JINR (Dubna). The total number of crates used at the Laboratory is 179. The number of CAMAC modules of 120 different types exceeds 1700. The principles of organization and the structure of developed CAMAC systems are described. (author)

  20. AEGIS: Chandra Observation of DEEP2 Galaxy Groups and Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, T; Davis, D; Newman, J; Davis, M; Nandra, K; Laird, E; Koo, D; Coil, A; Cooper, M; Croton, D; Yan, R

    2006-01-01

    We present a 200 ksec Chandra observation of seven spectroscopically selected, high redshift (0.75 < z < 1.03) galaxy groups and clusters discovered by the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey in the Extended Groth Strip (EGS). X-ray emission at the locations of these systems is consistent with background. The 3-sigma upper limits on the bolometric X-ray luminosities (L_X) of these systems put a strong constraint on the relation between L_X and the velocity dispersion of member galaxies sigma_gal at z~1; the DEEP2 systems have lower luminosity than would be predicted by the local relation. Our result is consistent with recent findings that at high redshift, optically selected clusters tend to be X-ray underluminous. A comparison with mock catalogs indicates that it is unlikely that this effect is entirely caused by a measurement bias between sigma_gal and the dark matter velocity dispersion. Physically, the DEEP2 systems may still be in the process of forming and hence not fully virialized, or they may be defic...

  1. The Chandra Carina Complex Project View of Trumpler 16

    CERN Document Server

    Wolk, Scott J; Getman, Konstantin V; Feigelson, Eric D; Preibisch, Thomas; Townsley, Leisa K; Wang, Junfeng; Stassun, Keivan G; King, Robert R; McCaughrean, Mark J; Moffat, Anthony F J; Zinnecker, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Trumpler 16 is a well--known rich star cluster containing the eruptive supergiant $\\eta$ Carin\\ae\\ and located in the Carina star-forming complex. In the context of the Chandra Carina Complex Project, we study Trumpler 16 using new and archival X-ray data. A revised X-ray source list of the Trumpler 16 region contains 1232 X-ray sources including 1187 likely Carina members. These are matched to 1047 near-infrared counterparts detected by the HAWK-I instrument at the VLT allowing for better selection of cluster members. The cluster is irregular in shape. Although it is roughly circular, there is a high degree of sub-clustering, no noticeable central concentration and an extension to the southeast. The high--mass stars show neither evidence of mass segregation nor evidence of strong differential extinction. The derived power-law slope of the X-ray luminosity function for Trumpler 16 reveals a much steeper function than the Orion Nebula Cluster implying different ratio of solar- to higher-mass stars. We estimate...

  2. The complex circumnuclear environment of the broad-line radio galaxy 3C 390.3 revealed by Chandra HETG

    CERN Document Server

    Tombesi, F; Kallman, T; Reynolds, C S; Mushotzky, R F; Braito, V; Behar, E; Leutenegger, M A; Cappi, M

    2016-01-01

    We present the first high spectral resolution X-ray observation of the broad-line radio galaxy 3C 390.3 obtained with the high energy transmission grating (HETG) spectrometer on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The spectrum shows complex emission and absorption features in both the soft X-rays and Fe K band. We detect emission and absorption lines in the energy range between E = 700-1000 eV associated with ionized Fe L transitions (Fe XVII-XX). An emission line at the energy of E=6.4 keV consistent with the Fe K\\alpha is also observed. Our best-fit model requires at least three different components: (i) a hot emission component likely associated with the hot interstellar medium in this elliptical galaxy with temperature kT=0.5+/-0.1 keV; (ii) a warm absorber with ionization parameter log\\xi=2.3+/-0.5 erg s^{-1} cm, column density logN_H=20.7+/-0.1 cm^{-2}, and outflow velocity of v_{out}<150 km s^{-1}; (iii) a lowly ionized reflection component in the Fe K band likely associated with the optical broad ...

  3. Ultra high energy cosmic rays: the highest energy frontier

    CERN Document Server

    Neto, João R T de Mello

    2015-01-01

    Ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) are the highest energy messengers of the present universe, with energies up to $10^{20}$ eV. Studies of astrophysical particles (nuclei, electrons, neutrinos and photons) at their highest observed energies have implications for fundamental physics as well as astrophysics. The primary particles interact in the atmosphere and generate extensive air showers. Analysis of those showers enables one not only to estimate the energy, direction and most probable mass of the primary cosmic particles, but also to obtain information about the properties of their hadronic interactions at an energy more than one order of magnitude above that accessible with the current highest energy human-made accelerator. In this contribution we will review the state-of-the-art in UHECRs detection. We will present the leading experiments Pierre Auger Observatory and Telescope Array and discuss the cosmic ray energy spectrum, searches for directional anisotropy, studies of mass composition, the determ...

  4. High Energy Density Capacitors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Capacitor size and reliability are often limiting factors in pulse power, high speed switching, and power management and distribution (PMAD) systems. T/J...

  5. X-ray emission line spectroscopy of cataclysmic variables. II. Temperatures and densities from line ratios in the Chandra HETG band

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlegel, E. M.; Shipley, H. V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas-San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States); Rana, V. R. [Space Radiation Laboratory, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Barrett, P. E. [US Naval Observatory, Washington, DC 20392-5420 (United States); Singh, K. P., E-mail: eric.schlegel@utsa.edu, E-mail: vrana@srl.caltech.edu, E-mail: barrett.paul@usno.navy.mil, E-mail: singh@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai (India)

    2014-12-10

    We summarize the results of a line-by-line fitting analysis of the available spectra obtained using the Chandra High-Energy Transmission Grating. We confirm the existence of broad ionization and electron temperature ranges and high number densities in cataclysmic variables (CVs) of all subtypes. Temperatures range from ∼0.4 keV to ∼5-10 keV or more with a broad range detected in any given CV. In other words, single-temperature models do not describe the line emission. Number densities also cover a broad range, from 10{sup 12} to >10{sup 16} cm{sup –3}. We demonstrate that much of the plasma is in a nonequilibrium state; the Fe emission, however, may arise from plasma in the ionization equilibrium.

  6. X-ray emission line spectroscopy of cataclysmic variables. II. Temperatures and densities from line ratios in the Chandra HETG band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We summarize the results of a line-by-line fitting analysis of the available spectra obtained using the Chandra High-Energy Transmission Grating. We confirm the existence of broad ionization and electron temperature ranges and high number densities in cataclysmic variables (CVs) of all subtypes. Temperatures range from ∼0.4 keV to ∼5-10 keV or more with a broad range detected in any given CV. In other words, single-temperature models do not describe the line emission. Number densities also cover a broad range, from 1012 to >1016 cm–3. We demonstrate that much of the plasma is in a nonequilibrium state; the Fe emission, however, may arise from plasma in the ionization equilibrium.

  7. Broad Iron Emission from Gravitationally Lensed Quasars Observed by Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Walton, D J; Miller, J M; Reis, R C; Stern, D; Harrison, F A

    2015-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated the potential of gravitationally lensed quasars to extend measurements of black hole spin out to high-redshift with the current generation of X-ray observatories. Here we present an analysis of a large sample of 27 lensed quasars in the redshift range 1.0Chandra, utilizing over 1.6 Ms of total observing time, focusing on the rest-frame iron K emission from these sources. Although the X-ray signal-to-noise (S/N) currently available does not permit the detection of iron emission from the inner accretion disk in individual cases in our sample, we find significant structure in the stacked residuals. In addition to the narrow core, seen almost ubiquitously in local AGN, we find evidence for an additional underlying broad component from the inner accretion disk, with a clear red wing to the emission profile. Based on simulations, we find the detection of this broader component to be significant at greater than the 3-sigma level. This implies that iron emission...

  8. The LABOCA Survey of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, A; Coppin, K; Greve, T R; Walter, F; Smail, Ian; Dunlop, J S; Knudsen, K K; Alexander, D M; Bertoldi, F; Brandt, W N; Chapman, S C; Cox, P; Dannerbauer, H; De Breuck, C; Gawiser, E; Ivison, R J; Lutz, D; Menten, K M; Koekemoer, A M; Kreysa, E; Kurczynski, P; Rix, H -W; Schinnerer, E; Van der Werf, P P

    2009-01-01

    We present a sensitive 870 micron survey of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS) using LABOCA on the APEX telescope. The LABOCA ECDFS Submillimetre Survey (LESS) covers the full 30' x 30' field size of the ECDFS and has a uniform noise level of 1.2 mJy/beam. LESS is thus the largest contiguous deep submillimetre survey undertaken to date. The noise properties of our map show clear evidence that we are beginning to be affected by confusion noise. We present a catalog of 126 SMGs detected with a significance level above 3.7 sigma. The ECDFS exhibits a deficit of bright SMGs relative to previously studied blank fields but not of normal star-forming galaxies that dominate the extragalactic background light (EBL). This is in line with the underdensities observed for optically defined high redshift source populations in the ECDFS (BzKs, DRGs,optically bright AGN and massive K-band selected galaxies). The differential source counts in the full field are well described by a power law with a slope of alpha=-3...

  9. CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF SGR 1627–41 NEAR QUIESCENCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on an observation of SGR 1627–41 made with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory on 2011 June 16. Approximately three years after its outburst activity in 2008, the source's flux has been declining, as it approaches its quiescent state. For an assumed power-law spectrum, we find that the absorbed 2-10 keV flux for the source is 1.0+0.3–0.2 × 10–13 erg cm–2 s–1 with a photon index of 2.9 ± 0.8 (NH = 1.0 × 1023 cm–2). This flux is approximately consistent with that measured at the same time after the source's outburst in 1998. With measurements spanning three years after the 2008 outburst, we analyze the long-term flux and spectral evolution of the source. The flux evolution is well described by a double exponential with decay times of 0.5 ± 0.1 and 59 ± 6 days, and a thermal cooling model fit suggests that SGR 1627–41 may have a hot core (Tc ∼ 2 × 108 K). We find no clear correlation between flux and spectral hardness as found in other magnetars. We consider the quiescent X-ray luminosities of magnetars and the subset of rotation-powered pulsars with high magnetic fields (B ∼> 1013 G) in relation to their spin-inferred surface magnetic field strength and find a possible trend between the two quantities.

  10. Chandra observation of the relativistic binary J1906+0746

    CERN Document Server

    Kargaltsev, O

    2009-01-01

    PSR J1906+0746 is a 112-kyr-old radio pulsar in a tight relativistic binary with a compact high-mass companion, at the distance of about 5 kpc. We observed this unique system with the Chandra ACIS detector for 31.6 ks. Surprisingly, not a single photon was detected within the 3" radius from the J1906+0746 radio position. For a plausible range of hydrogen column densities, n_H=(0.5-1)\\times10^{22} cm^{-2}, the nondetection corresponds to the 90% upper limit of (3-5)\\times10^{30} erg s^{-1} on the unabsorbed 0.5-8 keV luminosity for the power-law model with Gamma=1.0-2.0, and ~10^{32} erg s^{-1} on the bolometric luminosity of the thermal emission from the NS surface. The inferred limits are the lowest known for pulsars with spin-down properties similar to those of PSR J1906+0746. We have also tentatively detected a puzzling extended structure which looks like a tilted ring with a radius of 1.6' centered on the pulsar. The measured 0.5-8 keV flux of the feature, 3.1\\times10^{-14} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1}, implies an ...

  11. Stellar X-ray sources in the Chandra COSMOS survey

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Nicholas J; Civano, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of the X-ray properties of a sample of solar- and late-type field stars identified in the Chandra Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS), a deep (160ks) and wide (0.9 deg2) extragalactic survey. The sample of 60 sources was identified using both morphological and photometric star/galaxy separation methods. We determine X-ray count rates, extract spectra and light curves and perform spectral fits to determine fluxes and plasma temperatures. Complementary optical and near-IR photometry is also presented and combined with spectroscopy for 48 of the sources to determine spectral types and distances for the sample. We find distances ranging from 30pc to ~12kpc, including a number of the most distant and highly active stellar X-ray sources ever detected. This stellar sample extends the known coverage of the L_X-distance plane to greater distances and higher luminosities, but we do not detect as many intrinsically faint X-ray sources compared to previous surveys. Overall the sample is typically more...

  12. Discovery of X-rays from Mars with Chandra

    CERN Document Server

    Dennerl, K

    2002-01-01

    On 4 July 2001, X-rays from Mars were detected for the first time. The observation was performed with the ACIS-I detector onboard Chandra and yielded data of high spatial and temporal resolution, together with spectral information. Mars is clearly detected as an almost fully illuminated disk, with an indication of limb brightening at the sunward side, accompanied by some fading on the opposite side. The morphology and the X-ray luminosity of ~4 MW are fully consistent with fluorescent scattering of solar X-rays in the upper Mars atmosphere. The X-ray spectrum is dominated by a single narrow emission line, which is most likely caused by O-K_alpha fluorescence. No evidence for temporal variability is found. This is in agreement with the solar X-ray flux, which was almost constant during the observation. In addition to the X-ray fluorescence, there is evidence for an additional source of X-ray emission, indicated by a faint X-ray halo which can be traced to about three Mars radii, and by an additional component ...

  13. Chandra's Darkest Bright Star: not so Dark after All?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    2008-11-01

    The Chandra High Resolution camera (HRC) has obtained numerous short exposures of the ultraviolet (UV)-bright star Vega (α Lyrae; HD 172167: A0 V), to calibrate the response of the detector to out-of-band (non-X-ray) radiation. A new analysis uncovered a stronger "blue leak" in the imaging section (HRC-I) than reported in an earlier study of Vega based on a subset of the pointings. The higher count rate—a factor of nearly 2 above prelaunch estimates—raised the possibility that genuine coronal X-rays might lurk among the out-of-band events. Exploiting the broader point-spread function of the UV leak compared with soft X-rays identified an excess of counts centered on the target, technically at 3σ significance. A number of uncertainties, however, prevent a clear declaration of a Vegan corona. A more secure result would be within reach of a deep uninterrupted HRC-I pointing.

  14. High energy density lithium batteries

    CERN Document Server

    Aifantis, Katerina E; Kumar, R Vasant

    2010-01-01

    Cell phones, portable computers and other electronic devices crucially depend on reliable, compact yet powerful batteries. Therefore, intensive research is devoted to improving performance and reducing failure rates. Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries promise significant advancement and high application potential for hybrid vehicles, biomedical devices, and everyday appliances. This monograph provides special focus on the methods and approaches for enhancing the performance of next-generation batteries through the use of nanotechnology. Deeper understanding of the mechanisms and strategies is

  15. High energy physics at UCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hadron collider group is studying proton-antiproton interactions at the world's highest collision energy 2 TeV. Data-taking with the D0 detector is in progress at Fermilab and the authors have begun the search for the top quark. S. Wimpenny is coordinating the effort to detect t bar t decaying to two leptons, the most readily identifiable channel. At UC Riverside design and testing for a silicon tracker for the D0 upgrade is in progress; a parallel development for the SDC detector at SSC is also underway. The major group effort of the lepton group has been devoted to the OPAL experiment at LEP. They will continue to focus on data-taking to improve the quality and quantity of their data sample. A large number of papers have been published based on approximately 500,000 events taken so far. The authors will concentrate on physics analysis which provides stringent tests of the Standard Model. The authors are continuing participation in the RD5 experiment at the SPS to study muon triggering and tracking. The results of this experiment will provide critical input for the design of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment being proposed for the LHC. The theory group has been working on problems concerning the possible vilation of e-μ-τ universality, effective Lagrangians, neutrino physics, as well as quark and lepton mass matrices

  16. High energy physics at UCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    The hadron collider group is studying proton-antiproton interactions at the world`s highest collision energy 2 TeV. Data-taking with the D0 detector is in progress at Fermilab and the authors have begun the search for the top quark. S. Wimpenny is coordinating the effort to detect t{bar t} decaying to two leptons, the most readily identifiable channel. At UC Riverside design and testing for a silicon tracker for the D0 upgrade is in progress; a parallel development for the SDC detector at SSC is also underway. The major group effort of the lepton group has been devoted to the OPAL experiment at LEP. They will continue to focus on data-taking to improve the quality and quantity of their data sample. A large number of papers have been published based on approximately 500,000 events taken so far. The authors will concentrate on physics analysis which provides stringent tests of the Standard Model. The authors are continuing participation in the RD5 experiment at the SPS to study muon triggering and tracking. The results of this experiment will provide critical input for the design of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment being proposed for the LHC. The theory group has been working on problems concerning the possible vilation of e-{mu}-{tau} universality, effective Lagrangians, neutrino physics, as well as quark and lepton mass matrices.

  17. Contemporaneous Chandra HETG and Suzaku X-ray observations of NGC 4051

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobban, A. P.; Reeves, J. N.; Miller, L.; Turner, T. J.; Braito, V.; Kraemer, S. B.; Crenshaw, D. M.

    2011-07-01

    We present the results of a deep 300 ks Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) observation of the highly variable narrow-line Seyfert Type 1 galaxy NGC 4051. The HETG spectrum reveals 28 significant soft X-ray ionized lines in either emission or absorption; primarily originating from H-like and He-like K-shell transitions of O, Ne, Mg and Si (including higher order lines and strong forbidden emission lines from O VII and Ne IX) plus high-ionization L-shell transitions from Fe XVII to Fe XXII and lower ionization inner-shell lines (e.g. O VI). Modelling the data with XSTAR requires four distinct ionization zones for the gas, all outflowing with velocities log ξ= 4.1+0.2-0.1; vout˜-0.02c) which potentially may have a significant effect on the host galaxy environment via feedback. Finally, we also simultaneously model the broad-band 2008 XIS+HXD (Hard X-ray Detector) Suzaku data with archival Suzaku data from 2005 when the source was observed to have entered an extended period of low flux in an attempt to analyse the cause of the long-term spectral variability. We find that we can account for this by allowing for large variations in the normalization of the intrinsic power-law component which may be interpreted as being due to significant changes in the covering fraction of a Compton-thick partial-coverer obscuring the central continuum emission.

  18. Coordinated Optical/X-ray observations of the CTTS V2129 Oph The Chandra View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaccomio, E.; Argiroffi, C.; Alencar, S. H. P.; Bouvier, J.; Donati, J.-F.; Getman, K.; Gregory, S. G.; Hussain, G.; Ibrahimov, M.; Jardine, M. M.; Skelly, M.; Walter, F.

    2011-12-01

    Young low-mass accreting stars (classical T Tauri stars; CTTSs) possess strong magnetic fields that are responsible for the regulation of the accretion and outflow processes, and the confinement and heating of coronal plasma. Understanding the physics of CTTS magnetospheres and of their interaction with circumstellar disks can elucidate the history and evolution of our own Sun and Solar System, at the stage when planets were being formed. In June 2009 we have conducted an extensive multi-wavelength observing campaign of V2129 Oph, a K5 CTTS in the ρ Ophiuchi molecular cloud, with the goal of obtaining a synoptic view of its photosphere, magnetic field, coronal plasma, and of its accretion spot(s) and funnel flow(s). We here report on the X-ray emission, as observed by the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG). High-density plasma, presumably from the accretion shock, is responsible for the soft X-ray emission, at least during the first half of the observation. The X-ray emission from both the coronal plasma (T˜20MK) and the cooler and denser material from the accretion spot (T˜3MK) is observed to vary between the first and second half of the observation. From the high-resolution X-ray spectra we constrain the emission measure of the two components and the density of the cool plasma. Finally we interpret the time variability of the cool plasma component in terms of stellar rotation and the time-changing viewing angle of the accretion stream, as constrained by simultaneous optical observations.

  19. A Lightweight, Precision-Deployable, Optical Bench for High Energy Astrophysics Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, Rolf; Dailey, D.; Lillie, C.

    2011-09-01

    The small angle of total reflection for X-rays, forcing grazing incidence optics with large collecting areas to long focal lengths, has been a fundamental barrier to the advancement of high-energy astrophysics. Design teams around the world have long recognized that a significant increase in effective area beyond Chandra and XMM-Newton requires either a deployable optical bench or separate X-ray optics and instrument module on formation flying spacecraft. Here, we show that we have in hand the components for a lightweight, precision-deployable optical bench that, through its inherent design features, is the affordable path to the next generation of imaging high-energy astrophysics missions. We present our plans for a full-scale engineering model of a deployable optical bench for Explorer-class missions. We intend to use this test article to raise the technology readiness level (TRL) of the tensegrity truss for a lightweight, precision-deployable optical bench for high-energy astrophysics missions from TRL 3 to TRL 5 through a set of four well-defined technology milestones. The milestones cover the architecture's ability to deploy and control the focal point, characterize the deployed dynamics, determine long-term stability, and verify the stowed load capability. Our plan is based on detailed design and analysis work and the construction of a first prototype by our team. Building on our prior analysis and the high TRL of the architecture components we are ready to move on to the next step. The key elements to do this affordably are two existing, fully characterized, flight-quality, deployable booms. After integrating them into the test article, we will demonstrate that our architecture meets the deployment accuracy, adjustability, and stability requirements. The same test article can be used to further raise the TRL in the future.

  20. New accelerators in high-energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First, I should like to mention a few new ideas that have appeared during the last few years in the accelerator field. A couple are of importance in the design of injectors, usually linear accelerators, for high-energy machines. Then I shall review some of the somewhat sensational accelerator projects, now in operation, under construction or just being proposed. Finally, I propose to mention a few applications of high-energy accelerators in fields other than high-energy physics. I realize that this is a digression from my title but I hope that you will find it interesting

  1. High Energy Physics Research at Louisiana Tech

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawyer, Lee [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Greenwood, Zeno [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Wobisch, Marcus [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2013-06-28

    The goal of this project was to create, maintain, and strengthen a world-class, nationally and internationally recognized experimental high energy physics group at Louisiana Tech University, focusing on research at the energy frontier of collider-based particle physics, first on the DØ experiment and then with the ATLAS experiment, and providing leadership within the US high energy physics community in the areas of jet physics, top quark and charged Higgs decays involving tau leptons, as well as developing leadership in high performance computing.

  2. CERN and the high energy frontier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsesmelis Emmanuel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the particle physics programme at CERN at the high-energy frontier. Starting from the key open questions in particle physics and the large-scale science facilities existing at CERN, concentrating on the Large Hadron Collider(LHC, this paper goes on to present future possibilities for global projects in high energy physics. The paper presents options for future colliders, all being within the framework of the recently updated European Strategy for Particle Physics, and all of which have a unique value to add to experimental particle physics. The paper concludes by outlining key messages for the way forward for high-energy physics research.

  3. The Chandra X-ray Survey of Planetary Nebulae (ChanPlaNS): Probing Binarity, Magnetic Fields, and Wind Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Kastner, J H; Balick, B; Frew, D J; Miszalski, B; Sahai, R; Blackman, E; Chu, Y -H; De Marco, O; Frank, A; Guerrero, M A; Lopez, J A; Rapson, V; Zijlstra, A; Behar, E; Bujarrabal, V; Corradi, R L M; Nordhaus, J; Parker, Q; Sandin, C; Schönberner, D; Soker, N; Sokoloski, J L; Steffen, M; Ueta, T; Villaver, E

    2012-01-01

    We present an overview of the initial results from the Chandra Planetary Nebula Survey (ChanPlaNS), the first systematic (volume-limited) Chandra X-ray Observatory survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood. The first phase of ChanPlaNS targeted 21 mostly high-excitation PNe within ~1.5 kpc of Earth, yielding 3 detections of diffuse X-ray emission and 9 detections of X-ray-luminous point sources at the central stars (CSPNe) of these objects. Combining these results with those obtained from Chandra archival data for all (14) other PNe within ~1.5 kpc that have been observed to date, we find an overall X-ray detection rate of 68%. Roughly 50% of the PNe observed by Chandra harbor X-ray-luminous CSPNe, while soft, diffuse X-ray emission tracing shocks formed by energetic wind collisions is detected in ~30%; five objects display both diffuse and point-like emission components. The presence of X-ray sources appears correlated with PN density structure, in that molecule-poor, elliptical nebulae are...

  4. The Norma arm region Chandra survey catalog: X-ray populations in the spiral arms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornasini, Francesca M. [Astronomy Department, University of California, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Tomsick, John A.; Bodaghee, Arash; Krivonos, Roman A. [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); An, Hongjun [Department of Physics, McGill University, Rutherford Physics Building, 3600 University Street, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Rahoui, Farid [European Southern Observatory, Karl Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Gotthelf, Eric V. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Bauer, Franz E. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Stern, Daniel, E-mail: f.fornasini@berkeley.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, MS 169-506, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    We present a catalog of 1415 X-ray sources identified in the Norma Arm Region Chandra Survey (NARCS), which covers a 2° × 0.°8 region in the direction of the Norma spiral arm to a depth of ≈20 ks. Of these sources, 1130 are point-like sources detected with ≥3σ confidence in at least one of three energy bands (0.5-10, 0.5-2, and 2-10 keV), five have extended emission, and the remainder are detected at low significance. Since most sources have too few counts to permit individual classification, they are divided into five spectral groups defined by their quantile properties. We analyze stacked spectra of X-ray sources within each group, in conjunction with their fluxes, variability, and infrared counterparts, to identify the dominant populations in our survey. We find that ∼50% of our sources are foreground sources located within 1-2 kpc, which is consistent with expectations from previous surveys. Approximately 20% of sources are likely located in the proximity of the Scutum-Crux and near Norma arm, while 30% are more distant, in the proximity of the far Norma arm or beyond. We argue that a mixture of magnetic and nonmagnetic cataclysmic variables dominates the Scutum-Crux and near Norma arms, while intermediate polars and high-mass stars (isolated or in binaries) dominate the far Norma arm. We also present the cumulative number count distribution for sources in our survey that are detected in the hard energy band. A population of very hard sources in the vicinity of the far Norma arm and active galactic nuclei dominate the hard X-ray emission down to f{sub X} ≈ 10{sup –14} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}, but the distribution curve flattens at fainter fluxes. We find good agreement between the observed distribution and predictions based on other surveys.

  5. Innovations in the Analysis of Chandra-ACIS Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Broos, Patrick S; Feigelson, Eric D; Getman, Konstantin V; Bauer, Franz E; Garmire, Gordon P

    2010-01-01

    As members of the instrument team for the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) on NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and as Chandra General Observers, we have developed a wide variety of data analysis methods that we believe are useful to the Chandra community, and have constructed a significant body of publicly-available software (the ACIS Extract package) addressing important ACIS data and science analysis tasks. This paper seeks to describe these data analysis methods for two purposes: to document the data analysis work performed in our own science projects, and to help other ACIS observers judge whether these methods may be useful in their own projects (regardless of what tools and procedures they choose to implement those methods). The ACIS data analysis recommendations we offer here address much of the workflow in a typical ACIS project, including data preparation, point source detection via both wavelet decomposition and image reconstruction, masking point sources, identification of diffuse structure...

  6. High Energy Studies of Astrophysical Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, Lia Racquel

    Astrophysical dust---any condensed matter ranging from tens of atoms to micron sized grains---accounts for about one third of the heavy elements produced in stars and disseminated into space. These tiny pollutants are responsible for producing the mottled appearance in the spray of light we call the "Milky Way." However these seemingly inert particles play a strong role in the physics of the interstellar medium, aiding star and planet formation, and perhaps helping to guide galaxy evolution. Most dust grains are transparent to X-ray light, leaving a signature of atomic absorption, but also scattering the light over small angles. Bright X-ray objects serendipitously situated behind large columns of dust and gas provide a unique opportunity to study the dust along the line of sight. I focus primarily on X-ray scattering through dust, which produces a diffuse halo image around a central point source. Such objects have been observed around X-ray bright Galactic binaries and extragalactic objects that happen to shine through the plane of the Milky Way. I use the Chandra X-ray Observatory, a space-based laboratory operated by NASA, which has imaging resolution ideal for studying X-ray scattering halos. I examine several bright X-ray objects with dust-free sight lines to test their viability as templates and develop a parametric model for the Chandra HETG point spread function (PSF). The PSF describes the instrument's imaging response to a point source, an understanding of which is necessary for properly measuring the surface brightness of X-ray scattering halos. I use an HETG observation of Cygnus X-3, one of the brightest objects available in the Chandra archive, to derive a dust grain size distribution. There exist degenerate solutions for the dust scattering halo, but with the aid of Bayesian analytics I am able to apply prior knowledge about the Cyg X-3 sight line to measure the relative abundance of dust in intervening Milky Way spiral arms. I also demonstrate how

  7. Modeling Contamination Migration on the Chandra X-Ray Observatory - III

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tice, Neil W.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Grant, Catherine E.; Marshall, Herman L.; Vikhlinin, Alexy A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Dahmer, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    During its first 16 years of operation, the cold (about -60 C) optical blocking filter of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory, has accumulated a growing layer of molecular contamination that attenuates low-energy x rays. Over the past few years, the accumulation rate, spatial distribution, and composition have changed. This evolution has motivated further analysis of contamination migration within and near the ACIS cavity, in part to evaluate potential bake-out scenarios intended to reduce the level of contamination. Keywords: X-ray astronomy, CCDs, contamination, modeling and simulation, spacecraft operations

  8. Simultaneous Chandra and VLA Observations of Young Stars and Protostars in rho Ophiuchus Cloud Core A

    OpenAIRE

    Gagne, Marc; Skinner, Stephen L.; Daniel, Kathryne J.

    2004-01-01

    A 96-ks Chandra X-ray observation of rho Ophiuchus cloud core A detected 87 sources, of which 60 were identified with counterparts at other wavelengths. The X-ray detections include 12 of 14 known classical T Tauri stars in the field, 15 of 17 known weak-lined TTS, and 4 of 15 brown dwarf candidates. The X-ray detections are characterized by hard, heavily absorbed emission. The mean photon energy of a typical source is 3 keV, and more than half of the detections are variable. Prominent X-ray ...

  9. Modeling Contamination Migration on the Chandra X-ray Observatory - II

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tice, Neil W.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Grant, Catherine E.; Marshall, Herman L.; Vikhlinin, Alexey A.; Tennant, Allyn F.

    2013-01-01

    During its first 14 years of operation, the cold (about -60C) optical blocking filter of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory, has accumulated a growing layer of molecular contamination that attenuates low-energy x rays. Over the past few years, the accumulation rate, spatial distribution, and composition have changed. This evolution has motivated further analysis of contamination migration within and near the ACIS cavity. To this end, the current study employs a higher-fidelity geometric model of the ACIS cavity, detailed thermal modeling based upon temperature data, and a refined model of the molecular transport.

  10. The Soft X-ray Spectrum from NGC 1068 Observed with LETGS on Chandra

    OpenAIRE

    Brinkman, A. C.; Kaastra, J.S.; Van Der Meer, R.L.J.; Kinkhabwala, A.; Behar, E; Kahn, S. M.; Paerels, F. B. S.; Sako, M.

    2002-01-01

    Using the combined spectral and spatial resolving power of the Low Energy Transmission Grating (LETGS) on board Chandra, we obtain separate spectra from the bright central source of NGC 1068 (Primary region), and from a fainter bright spot 4" to the NE (Secondary region). Both spectra are dominated by line emission from H- and He-like ions of C through S, and from Fe L-shell ions, but also include narrow radiative recombination continua, indicating that most of the soft X-ray emission arises ...

  11. The O VII X-Ray Forest Toward Markarian 421: Consistency between XMM-Newton and Chandra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaastra, J.S.; Werner, N.; Herder, J.W.A.den; /SRON, Utrecht; Paerels, F.B.S.; /Columbia U., Astron. Astrophys.; de Plaa, J.; /SRON, Utrecht; Rasmussen, A.P.; /KIPAC, Menlo; de Vries, C.P.; /SRON, Utrecht

    2006-04-28

    Recently the first detections of highly ionized gas associated with two Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM) filaments have been reported. The evidence is based on X-ray absorption lines due to O VII and other ions observed by Chandra towards the bright blazar Mrk 421. We investigate the robustness of this detection by a re-analysis of the original Chandra LETGS spectra, the analysis of a large set of XMM-Newton RGS spectra of Mrk 421, and additional Chandra observations. We address the reliability of individual spectral features belonging to the absorption components, and assess the significance of the detection of these components. We also use Monte Carlo simulations of spectra. We confirm the apparent strength of several features in the Chandra spectra, but demonstrate that they are statistically not significant. This decreased significance is due to the number of redshift trials that are made and that are not taken into account in the original discovery paper. Therefore these features must be attributed to statistical fluctuations. This is confirmed by the RGS spectra, which have a higher signal to noise ratio than the Chandra spectra, but do not show features at the same wavelengths. Finally, we show that the possible association with a Ly{alpha} absorption system also lacks sufficient statistical evidence. We conclude that there is insufficient observational proof for the existence of the two proposed WHIM filaments towards Mrk 421, the brightest X-ray blazar on the sky. Therefore, the highly ionized component of the WHIM still remains to be discovered.

  12. Neutrino physics at very high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciulli, F.; Barish, B.; Ford, W.; Oddone, P.; Peck, C.; /Caltech; Maschke, A.; /Fermilab; Barish, B.; /Caltech

    1970-06-01

    NAL presents the opportunity to expand our knowledge of neutrino interactions from energies of less than 10 GeV up to more than 300 GeV. We propose an exploratory experiment which is designed to emphasize the physics of very high energy interactions ({approx}300 GeV).

  13. The Chandra X-Ray Observatory: Observations of Neutron Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2004-01-01

    We present here an overview of the status of the Chandra X-ray Observatory which has now been operating for five years. The Observatory is running smoothly, and the scientific return continues to be outstanding. We provide some details on the molecular contamination of the ACIS filters and its impact on observations. We review the observations with Chandra of the pulsar in the Crab Nebula and add some general comments as to the analysis of X-ray spectra. We conclude with comments about the fu...

  14. Lessons We Learned Designing and Building the Chandra Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenberg, Jonathan; Matthews, Gary; Atkinson, C.; Cohen, L.; Golisano, C.; Havey, K.; Hefner, K.; Jones, C.; Kegley, J.; Knollenberg, P.; Lavoie, T.; Oliver, J.; Plucinsky, P.; Tananbaun, H.; Texter, S.; Weisskopf, M.

    2014-01-01

    2014 marks the crystal (15th) anniversary of the launch of the Chandra X-ray Observatory. This paper offers some of the major lessons learned by some of the key members of the Chandra Telescope team. We offer some of the lessons gleaned from our experiences developing, designing, building and testing the telescope and its subsystems, with 15 years of hindsight. Among the topics to be discussed are the early developmental tests, known as VETA-I and VETA-II, requirements derivation, the impact of late requirements and reflection on the conservatism in the design process.

  15. The evolution of high energy accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courant, E.D.

    1989-10-01

    In this lecture I would like to trace how high energy particle accelerators have grown from tools used for esoteric small-scale experiments to gigantic projects being hotly debated in Congress as well as in the scientific community.

  16. Physics at High Energy Photon Photon Colliders

    OpenAIRE

    Chanowitz, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    I review the physics prospects for high energy photon photon colliders, emphasizing results presented at the LBL Gamma Gamma Collider Workshop. Advantages and difficulties are reported for studies of QCD, the electroweak gauge sector, supersymmetry, and electroweak symmetry breaking.

  17. The evolution of high energy accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this lecture I would like to trace how high energy particle accelerators have grown from tools used for esoteric small-scale experiments to gigantic projects being hotly debated in Congress as well as in the scientific community

  18. Research in High Energy Physics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, John S.

    2013-08-09

    This final report details the work done from January 2010 until April 2013 in the area of experimental and theoretical high energy particle physics and cosmology at the University of California, Davis.

  19. High Energy Single Frequency Resonant Amplifier Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR phase I project proposes a single frequency high energy resonant amplifier for remote sensing. Current state-of-art technologies can not provide all...

  20. A unified treatment of high energy interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drescher, H.J.; Werner, K. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 44 - Nantes (France). Lab. de Physique Subatomique et des Technologies Associees; Hladik, M. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 44 - Nantes (France). Lab. de Physique Subatomique et des Technologies Associees]|[SAP AG, Berlin (Germany); Ostapchenko, S. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Inst. of Nuclear Physics]|[Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 44 - Nantes (France). Lab. de Physique Subatomique et des Technologies Associees

    1999-11-01

    It is well known that high energy interactions as different as electron-positron annihilation, deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering, proton-proton interactions, and nucleus-nucleus collisions have many features in common. Based upon this observation, a model for all these interactions is constructed which relies on the fundamental hypothesis that the behavior of high energy interactions is universal. (author) 19 refs.

  1. Elementary particle physics and high energy phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following research in high energy physics: the properties of the z neutral boson with the SLD detector; the research and development program for the SDC muon detector; the fixed-target k-decay experiments; the Rocky Mountain Consortium for HEP; high energy photoproduction of states containing heavy quarks; and electron-positron physics with the CLEO II and Mark II detectors. (LSP)

  2. Energy efficiency of high pressure pneumatic systems

    OpenAIRE

    Trujillo, José A.

    2015-01-01

    The energy efficiency assessment of high-pressure pneumatic circuits is the aim of this dissertation. From a historical perspective the past and cur- rent activities with regards to the energy saving conservation in pneumatic technology were examined, and it could be concluded that high pressure pneumatic circuits have been repeatedly used for years in several industrial applications but to date no studies on that specific field are known. After a systematic review of studies concerning e...

  3. High Energy Flywheel Containment Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colozza, Anthony J.; Trase, Larry (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A flywheel testing facility is being constructed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This facility is to be used for life cycle testing of various flywheel rotors. The lifecycle testing consists of spinning a rotor from a low rpm (approx. 20,000 ) to a high rpm (approx. 60,000) and then back to the low rpm. This spin cycle will model that which the rotor will see during use. To simulate the lifetime of the rotor, the spin cycle will be performed tens of thousands of times. A typical life cycle spin test is expected to last six months. During this time the rotor will be spun through a cycle every five minutes. The test will run continuously for the six month period barring a flywheel failure. Since it is not reasonable to have the surrounding area evacuated of personnel for the duration of the testing, the flywheel facility has to be designed to withstand a flywheel rotor failure and insure that there is no danger to any personnel in the adjacent buildings or surrounding areas. In order to determine if the facility can safely contain a flywheel rotor failure an analysis of the facility in conjunction with possible flywheel failure modes was performed. This analysis is intended as a worst case evaluation of the burst liner and vacuum tank's ability to contain a failure. The test chamber consists of a cylindrical stainless steel vacuum tank, two outer steel containment rings, and a stainless steel burst liner. The stainless steel used is annealed 302, which has an ultimate strength of 620 MPa (90,000 psi). A diagram of the vacuum tank configuration is shown. The vacuum tank and air turbine will be located below ground in a pit. The tank is secured in the pit with 0.3 m (12 in.) of cement along the base and the remaining portion of the tank is surrounded by gravel up to the access ports. A 590 kg (1300 lb.) bulkhead is placed on top of the pit during operation and the complete facility is housed within a concrete structure which has 7.5 cm (3 in.) thick walls. A cutaway

  4. High-energy cosmic-ray acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Bustamante, M; de Paula, W; Duarte Chavez, J A; Gago, A M; Hakobyan, H; Jez, P; Monroy Montañez, J A; Ortiz Velasquez, A; Padilla Cabal, F; Pino Rozas, M; Rodriguez Patarroyo, D J; Romeo, G L; Saldaña-Salazar , U J; Velasquez, M; von Steinkirch, M

    2010-01-01

    We briefly review the basics of ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray acceleration. The Hillas criterion is introduced as a geometrical criterion that must be fulfilled by potential acceleration sites, and energy losses are taken into account in order to obtain a more realistic scenario. The different available acceleration mechanisms are presented, with special emphasis on Fermi shock acceleration and its prediction of a power-law cosmic-ray energy spectrum. We conclude that first-order Fermi acceleration, though not entirely satisfactory, is the most promising mechanism for explaining the ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray flux.

  5. High energy physics advisory panel's subpanel on vision for the future of high-energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report was requested by the Secretary of Energy to (1) define a long-term program for pursuing the most important high-energy physics goals since the termination of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project, (2) assess the current US high-energy physics program, and (3) make recommendations regarding the future of the field. Subjects on which recommendations were sought and which the report addresses were: high-energy physics funding priorities; facilitating international collaboration for future construction of large high-energy physics facilities; optimizing uses of the investment made in the SSC; how to encourage displaced scientists and engineers to remain in high-energy physics and to attract young scientists to enter the field in the future. The report includes a description of the state of high-energy physics research in the context of history, a summary of the SSC project, and documentation of the report's own origins and development

  6. Looking for High Energy Peaked Blazars

    OpenAIRE

    Costamante, L.; Ghisellini, G.; Celotti, A.; Giommi, P.; Padovani, P.; Tagliaferri, G.; Wolter, A.; Chiaberge, M.; Fossati, G; Pian, E.; L. Maraschi(INAF National Institute for Astrophysics, I-00136 Rome, Italy); Tavecchio, F.; Treves, A.

    2000-01-01

    Blazars can be classified on the basis of their overall Spectral Energy Distribution (SED). BL Lac objects are usually divided in LBL or HBL (Low or High energy peaked BL Lacs), according to the peak frequency of the synchrotron emission, if in the optical or UV-soft-X band respectively. FSRQs instead are characterized by synchrotron peaks mainly at IR-optical frequencies, similarly to LBLs. Here we report on recent BeppoSAX observations which are unveiling the high energy branch of the range...

  7. Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Dova, M T

    2015-01-01

    The origin of the ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) with energies above E > 10 17 eV, is still unknown. The discovery of their sources will reveal the engines of the most energetic astrophysical accelerators in the universe. This is a written version of a series of lectures devoted to UHECR at the 2013 CERN-Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics. We present anintroduction to acceleration mechanisms of charged particles to the highest energies in astrophysical objects, their propagation from the sources to Earth, and the experimental techniques for their detection. We also discuss some of the relevant observational results from Telescope Array and Pierre Auger Observatory. These experiments deal with particle interactions at energies orders of magnitude higher than achieved in terrestrial accelerators.

  8. High Energy Particles in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Widom, A; Larsen, L

    2008-01-01

    Collective Ampere law interactions producing magnetic flux tubes piercing through sunspots into and then out of the solar corona allow for low energy nuclear reactions in a steady state and high energy particle reactions if a magnetic flux tube explodes in a violent event such as a solar flare. Filamentous flux tubes themselves are vortices of Ampere currents circulating around in a tornado fashion in a roughly cylindrical geometry. The magnetic field lines are parallel to and largely confined within the core of the vortex. The vortices may thereby be viewed as long current carrying coils surrounding magnetic flux and subject to inductive Faraday and Ampere laws. These laws set the energy scales of (i) low energy solar nuclear reactions which may regularly occur and (ii) high energy electro-weak interactions which occur when magnetic flux coils explode into violent episodic events such as solar flares or coronal mass ejections.

  9. Identifying the nature of high energy Astroparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Mora, Karen Salomé Caballero

    2016-01-01

    High energy Astroparticles include Cosmic Ray, gamma ray and neutrinos, all of them coming from the universe. The origin and production, acceleration and propagation mechanisms of ultrahigh-energy CR (up to $10^{20}$ eV) are still unknown. Knowledge on particle interactions taking place at those energies, useful for studying current theories on particle physics, can be obtained only from measurements of high energy astroparticles. In the present document some techniques on data analysis of mass composition of UHECR with the Pierre Auger Observatory are described. The relevance of the muon component of air showers produced by the primary CR, as well as some low energy simulations of that component, are explained.

  10. A Chandra detection of diffuse hard X-ray emission associated with the lobes of the radio galaxy 3C 452

    CERN Document Server

    Isobe, N; Makishima, K; Iyomoto, N; Suzuki, M; Murakami, M M; Mori, M; Abe, K

    2002-01-01

    An 80 ksec Chandra ACIS observation of the radio galaxy 3C 452 is reported. A diffuse X-ray emission associated with the lobes has been detected with high statistical significance, together with the X-ray nucleus of the host galaxy. The 0.5--5 keV ACIS spectrum of the diffuse emission is described by a two-component model, consisting of a soft thermal plasma emission from the host galaxy halo and a hard non-thermal power-law component. The hard component is ascribed to the inverse Comptonization of cosmic microwave background photons by the synchrotron emitting electrons in the lobes, because its spectral energy index, 0.68+-0.28, is consistent with the radio synchrotron index, 0.78. These results reveal a significant electron dominance in the lobes. The electrons are inferred to have a relatively uniform distribution, while the magnetic field is compressed toward the lobe periphery.

  11. A High Energy Nuclear Database Proposal

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, D A; Brown, David A.; Vogt, Ramona

    2005-01-01

    We propose to develop a high-energy heavy-ion experimental database and make it accessible to the scientific community through an on-line interace. This database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This database should eventually contain all published data from the Bevalac, AGS and SPS to RHIC and LHC energies, proton-proton to nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as other relevant systems and all measured observables. Such a database would have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models to a broad range of old and new experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for intertial confinement fusion and target a...

  12. Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database

    CERN Document Server

    Vogt, D A B R

    2005-01-01

    We propose to develop a high-energy heavy-ion experimental database and make it accessible to the scientific community through an on-line interface. This database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This database should eventually contain all published data from Bevalac, AGS and SPS to RHIC and LHC energies, proton-proton to nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as other relevant systems, and all measured observables. Such a database would have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models to a broad range of old and new experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for inertial confinement fusion and target and ...

  13. High energy density in multisoliton collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadatmand, Danial; Dmitriev, Sergey V.; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G.

    2015-09-01

    Solitons are very effective in transporting energy over great distances and collisions between them can produce high energy density spots of relevance to phase transformations, energy localization and defect formation among others. It is then important to study how energy density accumulation scales in multisoliton collisions. In this study, we demonstrate that the maximal energy density that can be achieved in collision of N slowly moving kinks and antikinks in the integrable sine-Gordon field, remarkably, is proportional to N2, while the total energy of the system is proportional to N . This maximal energy density can be achieved only if the difference between the number of colliding kinks and antikinks is minimal, i.e., is equal to 0 for even N and 1 for odd N and if the pattern involves an alternating array of kinks and antikinks. Interestingly, for odd (even) N the maximal energy density appears in the form of potential (kinetic) energy, while kinetic (potential) energy is equal to zero. The results of the present study rely on the analysis of the exact multisoliton solutions for N =1 ,2 , and 3 and on the numerical simulation results for N =4 ,5 ,6 , and 7. The effect of weak Hamiltonian and non-Hamiltonian perturbations on the maximal energy density in multikink collisions is also discussed as well as that of the collision relative phase. Based on these results one can speculate that the soliton collisions in the sine-Gordon field can, in principle, controllably produce very high energy density. This can have important consequences for many physical phenomena described by the Klein-Gordon equations.

  14. High energy physics. Ultimate structure of matter and energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some of the principle discoveries and insights and their development up to today are sketched. It is shown how one layer after another was discovered by penetrating farther into the structure of matter. Covered are the mounting energy scale, discoveries at high energy frontier, the families of quarks and leptons, the four forces of nature, some achievements of the past few years, particle accelerators and experimental apparatus. A glossary of terms is included

  15. Indiana University High Energy Physics, Task A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses research at Indians University on the following high energy physics experiments: A search for mesons with unusual quantum numbers; hadronic states produced in association with high-mass dimuons; FNAL E740 (D0); superconducting super collider; and OPAL experiment at CERN

  16. High-energy X-ray imaging of the pulsar wind nebula MSH 15-52: constraints on particle acceleration and transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    An, Hongjun; Madsen, Kristin K.; Reynolds, Stephen P.;

    2014-01-01

    -resolution imaging. However, the spatial extent decreases with energy, which we attribute to synchrotron energy losses as the particles move away from the shock. The hard-band maps show a relative deficit of counts in the northern region toward the RCW 89 thermal remnant, with significant asymmetry.We find......We present the first images of the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) MSH 15−52 in the hard X-ray band (8 keV), as measured with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). Overall, the morphology of the PWN as measured by NuSTAR in the 3–7 keV band is similar to that seen in Chandra high...

  17. High energy experimental physics: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains papers of high energy physics experiments and detector equipment design. Proposals are also given for future experiments. Some of the topics covered in this report are: high energy predictions for /bar char/pp and pp elastic scattering and total cross sections; D0 forward drift chambers; polarized beam facility; analyzing power measurment in inclusive pion production at high transverse momentum; Skyrme model for baryons; string models for color flux tubes; hadronic decays for the /tau/ lepton; and meson form factors in perturbative QCD

  18. High energy hadron-hadron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of a study on high energy collisions with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (1) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (2) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (3) e+e- annihilation. For elastic scattering, a modified form for the hadronic matter form factor of the proton was proposed which is still dipole in form but contains an energy--dependent range parameter. This new expression of the opacity function fits the elastic bar pp scattering very well from the ISR to S bar ppS energies. Extrapolation of this theory also yielded results bar pp in good agreement with the bar pp differential cross section measured at the Tevatron. For inelastic hadron-hadron collisions, we have made a systematic investigation of the single-particle momentum spectra in the entire S bar ppS energy region. Results are useful for the extrapolation of angular distribution to the higher SSC energies. In e+e- annihilation, a detailed analysis of all available experimental multiplicity data from PETRA to LEP energies has been performed. The cluster size of emitted hadrons increases gradually with energy. Aside from high-energy collisions, the giant fullerene molecules were studied and precise algebraic eigenvalue expressions of the Hueckel problem for carbon-240 were obtained

  19. Chandra: Ten Years of Amazing Science with a Great Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2009-01-01

    We review briefly review the history of the development of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, highlighting certain details that many attendees of this Conference might not be aware of. We then present a selection of scientific highlights of the first 10 years of this remarkable and unique mission.

  20. Romanticism or Reality? An Exploration of Frances Mary Hendry's "Chandra."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jilaine

    This paper singles out a novel written for children about India, "Chandra" (1995) by Frances Mary Hendry, as a powerful and useful novel to present to today's 11 to 14 year old students. The paper contends that the novel allows students to explore and consider different value systems, challenges them to become aware of prejudice and the making of…

  1. The Chandra X-Ray Observatory: Five Years of Operation

    OpenAIRE

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2005-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory is the X-ray component of NASA's Great Observatory Program and has been operating successfully for over five years. We present here brief overview of the technical performance and some of the remarkable discoveries.

  2. Cosmological constraints from Chandra observations of galaxy clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Steven W

    2002-09-15

    Chandra observations of rich, relaxed galaxy clusters allow the properties of the X-ray gas and the total gravitating mass to be determined precisely. Here, we present results for a sample of the most X-ray luminous, dynamically relaxed clusters known. We show that the Chandra data and independent gravitational lensing studies provide consistent answers on the mass distributions in the clusters. The mass profiles exhibit a form in good agreement with the predictions from numerical simulations. Combining Chandra results on the X-ray gas mass fractions in the clusters with independent measurements of the Hubble constant and the mean baryonic matter density in the Universe, we obtain a tight constraint on the mean total matter density of the Universe, Omega(m), and an interesting constraint on the cosmological constant, Omega(Lambda). We also describe the 'virial relations' linking the masses, X-ray temperatures and luminosities of galaxy clusters. These relations provide a key step in linking the observed number density and spatial distribution of clusters to the predictions from cosmological models. The Chandra data confirm the presence of a systematic offset of ca. 40% between the normalization of the observed mass-temperature relation and the predictions from standard simulations. This finding leads to a significant revision of the best-fit value of sigma(8) inferred from the observed temperature and luminosity functions of clusters.

  3. INNOVATIONS IN THE ANALYSIS OF CHANDRA-ACIS OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As members of the instrument team for the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) on NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and as Chandra General Observers, we have developed a wide variety of data analysis methods that we believe are useful to the Chandra community, and have constructed a significant body of publicly available software (the ACIS Extract package) addressing important ACIS data and science analysis tasks. This paper seeks to describe these data analysis methods for two purposes: to document the data analysis work performed in our own science projects and to help other ACIS observers judge whether these methods may be useful in their own projects (regardless of what tools and procedures they choose to implement those methods). The ACIS data analysis recommendations we offer here address much of the workflow in a typical ACIS project, including data preparation, point source detection via both wavelet decomposition and image reconstruction, masking point sources, identification of diffuse structures, event extraction for both point and diffuse sources, merging extractions from multiple observations, nonparametric broadband photometry, analysis of low-count spectra, and automation of these tasks. Many of the innovations presented here arise from several, often interwoven, complications that are found in many Chandra projects: large numbers of point sources (hundreds to several thousand), faint point sources, misaligned multiple observations of an astronomical field, point source crowding, and scientifically relevant diffuse emission.

  4. An Introduction to the Chandra Carina Complex Project

    CERN Document Server

    Townsley, Leisa K; Corcoran, Michael F; Feigelson, Eric D; Gagné, Marc; Montmerle, Thierry; Oey, M S; Smith, Nathan; Garmire, Gordon P; Getman, Konstantin V; Povich, Matthew S; Evans, Nancy Remage; Nazé, Yaël; Parkin, E R; Preibisch, Thomas; Wang, Junfeng; Wolk, Scott J; Chu, You-Hua; Cohen, David H; Gruendl, Robert A; Hamaguchi, Kenji; King, Robert R; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; McCaughrean, Mark J; Moffat, Anthony F J; Oskinova, L M; Pittard, Julian M; Stassun, Keivan G; ud-Doula, Asif; Walborn, Nolan R; Waldron, Wayne L; Churchwell, Ed; Nichols, J S; Owocki, Stanley P; Schulz, N S

    2011-01-01

    The Great Nebula in Carina provides an exceptional view into the violent massive star formation and feedback that typifies giant HII regions and starburst galaxies. We have mapped the Carina star-forming complex in X-rays, using archival Chandra data and a mosaic of 20 new 60ks pointings using the Chandra X-ray Observatory's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, as a testbed for understanding recent and ongoing star formation and to probe Carina's regions of bright diffuse X-ray emission. This study has yielded a catalog of properties of >14,000 X-ray point sources; >9800 of them have multiwavelength counterparts. Using Chandra's unsurpassed X-ray spatial resolution, we have separated these point sources from the extensive, spatially-complex diffuse emission that pervades the region; X-ray properties of this diffuse emission suggest that it traces feedback from Carina's massive stars. In this introductory paper, we motivate the survey design, describe the Chandra observations, and present some simple results, pr...

  5. Extra galactic sources of high energy neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Waxman, E

    2005-01-01

    The main goal of the construction of large volume, high energy neutrino telescopes is the detection of extra-Galactic neutrino sources. The existence of such sources is implied by observations of ultra-high energy, >10^{19} eV, cosmic-rays (UHECRs), the origin of which is a mystery. The observed UHECR flux sets an upper bound to the extra-Galactic high energy neutrino intensity, which implies that the detector size required to detect the signal in the energy range of 1 TeV to 1 PeV is >=1 giga-ton, and much larger at higher energy. Optical Cerenkov neutrino detectors, currently being constructed under ice and water, are expected to achieve 1 giga-ton effective volume for 1 TeV to 1 PeV neutrinos. Coherent radio Cerenkov detectors (and possibly large air-shower detectors) will provide the >> 1 giga-ton effective volume required for detection at ~10^{19} eV. Detection of high energy neutrinos associated with electromagnetically identified sources will allow to identify the sources of UHECRs, will provide a uniq...

  6. Opportunities for high wind energy penetration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tande, J.O.; Hansen, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    Wind power is today a mature technology, which at windy locations, is economically competitive to conventional power generation technologies. This and growing global environmental concerns have led governments to encourage and plan for wind energy development, a typical aim being 10% of electricity...... consumption. The successful operation of the three major power systems of Cape Verde, with a total wind energy penetration of about 15% since December 1994, demonstrates that power systems can be operated with high penetration of wind energy by adding simple control and monitoring systems only. Thorough...... analyses conclude that expanding to even above 15% wind energy penetration in the Cape Verde power systems is economical. Worldwide, numerous locations with favorable wind conditions and power systems similar to the Capeverdean provide good opportunities for installing wind farms and achieving high wind...

  7. High Energy Radiation from $\\gamma$ Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Dermer, C D; Dermer, Charles D.; Chiang, James

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) engines are probed most intimately during the prompt gamma-ray luminous phase when the expanding blast wave is closest to the explosion center. Using GRBs 990123 and 940217 as guides, we briefly review observations of high-energy emission from GRBs and summarize some problems in GRB physics. \\gamma\\gamma transparency arguments imply relativistic beaming. The parameters that go into the external shock model are stated, and we show numerical simulation results of gamma-ray light curves from relativistic blast waves with different amounts of baryon loading. A distinct component due to the synchrotron self-Compton process produces significant emission at GeV and TeV energies. Predictions for spectral and temporal evolution at these energies are presented for a blast wave expanding into uniform surroundings. Observations of the slow decay of GeV-TeV radiation provide evidence for ultra-high energy cosmic ray acceleration in GRBs.

  8. Alternative Approaches to High Energy Density Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, J.

    2016-10-01

    This paper explores selected approaches to High Energy Density (HED) fusion, beginning with discussion of ignition requirements at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The needed improvements to achieve ignition are closely tied to the ability to concentrate energy in the implosion, manifested in the stagnation pressure, Pstag. The energy that must be assembled in the imploded state to ignite varies roughly as Pstag-2, so among other requirements, there is a premium on reaching higher Pstag to achieve ignition with the available laser energy. The U.S. inertial confinement fusion program (ICF) is pursuing higher Pstag on NIF through improvements to capsule stability and symmetry. One can argue that recent experiments place an approximate upper bound on the ultimate ignition energy requirement. Scaling the implosions consistently in spatial, temporal and energy scales shows that implosions of the demonstrated quality ignite robustly at 9-15 times the current energy of NIF. While lasers are unlikely to reach that bounding energy, it appears that pulsed-power sources could plausibly do so, giving a range of paths forward for ICF depending on success in improving energy concentration. In this paper, I show the scaling arguments then discuss topics from my own involvement in HED fusion. The recent Viewfactor experiments at NIF have shed light on both the observed capsule drive deficit and errors in the detailed modelling of hohlraums. The latter could be important factors in the inability to achieve the needed symmetry and energy concentration. The paper then recounts earlier work in Fast Ignition and the uses of pulsed-power for HED and fusion applications. It concludes with a description of a method for improving pulsed-power driven hohlraums that could potentially provide a factor of 10 in energy at NTF-like drive conditions and reach the energy bound for indirect drive ICF.

  9. A high energy photon polarimeter for astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Eingorn, Maxim; Vlahovic, Branislav; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Urciuoli, Guido Maria; De Persio, Fulvio; Meddi, Franco

    2015-01-01

    A high-energy photon polarimeter for astrophysics studies in the energy range from 20 MeV to 1000 MeV is considered. The proposed concept uses a stack of silicon micro-strip detectors where they play the roles of both a converter and a tracker. The purpose of this paper is to outline the parameters of such a polarimeter and to estimate the productivity of measurements. Our study supported by a Monte Carlo simulation shows that with a one-year observation period the polarimeter will provide 5.5 % accuracy of the polarization degree for a photon energy of 100 MeV, which would be a significant advance relative to the currently explored energy range of a few MeV. The proposed polarimeter design could easily be adjusted to the specific photon energy range to maximize efficiency if needed.

  10. Chandra and Swift X-ray Observations of the X-ray Pulsar SMC X-2 During the Outburst of 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Li, K L; Hu, C. -P; Lin, L. C. C.; Kong, Albert K. H.

    2016-01-01

    We report the Chandra/HRC-S and Swift/XRT observations for the 2015 outburst of the high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) pulsar in the Small Magellanic Cloud, SMC X-2. While previous studies suggested that either an O star or a Be star in the field is the high-mass companion of SMC X-2, our Chandra/HRC-S image unambiguously confirms the O-type star as the true optical counterpart. Using the Swift/XRT observations, we extracted accurate orbital parameters of the pulsar binary through a time of arriva...

  11. Updated phase coherent timing solution of the isolated neutron star RX J0720.4-3125 using recent XMM-Newton and Chandra observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hohle, M. M.; Haberl, F.; Vink, J.; Turolla, R.; Zane, S.; de Vries, C. P.; Mendez, M.

    2010-01-01

    Aims. Since the last phase coherent timing solution of the nearby radio-quiet isolated neutron star RX J0720.4-3125 six new XMM-Newton and three Chandra observations were carried out. The phase coherent timing solutions from previous authors were performed without restricting to a fixed energy band.

  12. Balance Function in High-Energy Collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Tawfik, A.; Shalaby, Asmaa G.

    2015-01-01

    Aspects and implications of the balance functions (BF) in high-energy physics are reviewed. The various calculations and measurements depending on different quantities, for example, system size, collisions centrality, and beam energy, are discussed. First, the different definitions including advantages and even short-comings are highlighted. It is found that BF, which are mainly presented in terms of relative rapidity, and relative azimuthal and invariant relative momentum, are se...

  13. Metal abundances in PG1159 stars from Chandra and FUSE spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Werner, K; Dreizler, S; Rauch, T; Barstow, M A; Kruk, J W

    2002-01-01

    We investigate FUSE spectra of three PG1159 stars and do not find any evidence for iron lines. From a comparison with NLTE models we conclude a deficiency of 1-1.5 dex. We speculate that iron was transformed into heavier elements. A soft X-ray Chandra spectrum of the unique H- and He-deficient star H1504+65 is analyzed. We find high neon and magnesium abundances and confirm that H1504+65 is the bare core of either a C-O or a O-Ne-Mg white dwarf.

  14. Chandra Observations of Dying Radio Sources in Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgia, M.; Markevitch, M.; Govoni, F.; Parma, P.; Fanti, R.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Mack, K.-H.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The dying radio sources represent a very interesting and largely unexplored stage of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) evolution. They are considered to be very rare, and almost all of the few known ones were found in galaxy clusters. However, considering the small number detected so far, it has not been possible to draw any firm conclusions about their X-ray environment. Aims. We present X-ray observations performed with the Chandra satellite of the three galaxy clusters Abell 2276, ZwCl 1829.3+6912, and RX J1852.1+5711, which harbor at their center a dying radio source with an ultra-steep spectrum that we recently discovered. Methods. We analyzed the physical properties of the X-ray emitting gas surrounding these elusive radio sources. We determined the global X-ray properties of the clusters, derived the azimuthally averaged profiles of metal abundance, gas temperature, density, and pressure. Furthermore, we estimated the total mass profiles. Results. The large-scale X-ray emission is regular and spherical, suggesting a relaxed state for these systems. Indeed, we found that the three clusters are also characterized by significant enhancements in the metal abundance and declining temperature profiles toward the central region. For all these reasons, we classified RX J1852.1+5711, Abell 2276, and ZwCl 1829.3+6912 as cool-core galaxy clusters. Conclusions. We calculated the non-thermal pressure of the radio lobes assuming that the radio sources are in the minimum energy condition. For all dying sources we found that this is on average about one to two orders of magnitude lower than that of the external gas, as found for many other radio sources at the center of galaxy groups and clusters. We found marginal evidence for the presence of X-ray surface brightness depressions coincident with the fossil radio lobes of the dying sources in A2276 and ZwCl 1829.3+691. We estimated the outburst age and energy output for these two dying sources. The energy power from

  15. Why is High Energy Physics Lorentz Invariant?

    CERN Document Server

    Afshordi, Niayesh

    2015-01-01

    Despite the tremendous empirical success of equivalence principle, there are several theoretical motivations for existence of a preferred reference frame (or aether) in a consistent theory of quantum gravity. However, if quantum gravity had a preferred reference frame, why would high energy processes enjoy such a high degree of Lorentz symmetry? While this is often considered as an argument against aether, here I provide three independent arguments for why perturbative unitarity (or weak coupling) of the Lorentz-violating effective field theories put stringent constraints on possible observable violations of Lorentz symmetry at high energies. In particular, the interaction with the scalar graviton in a consistent low-energy theory of gravity and a (radiatively and dynamically) stable cosmological framework, leads to these constraints. The violation (quantified by the relative difference in maximum speed of propagation) is limited to $\\lesssim 10^{-10} E({\\rm eV})^{-4}$ (superseding all current empirical bound...

  16. Experimental and theoretical high energy physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress in the various components of the UCLA High-Energy Physics Research program is summarized, including some representative figures and lists of resulting presentations and published papers. Principal efforts were directed at the following: (I) UCLA hadronization model, PEP4/9 e+e- analysis, bar P decay; (II) ICARUS and astroparticle physics (physics goals, technical progress on electronics, data acquisition, and detector performance, long baseline neutrino beam from CERN to the Gran Sasso and ICARUS, future ICARUS program, and WIMP experiment with xenon), B physics with hadron beams and colliders, high-energy collider physics, and the φ factory project; (III) theoretical high-energy physics; (IV) H dibaryon search, search for KL0 → π0γγ and π0ν bar ν, and detector design and construction for the FNAL-KTeV project; (V) UCLA participation in the experiment CDF at Fermilab; and (VI) VLPC/scintillating fiber R ampersand D

  17. Future high energy colliders symposium. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsa, Z. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Institute for Theoretical Physics]|[Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    A `Future High Energy Colliders` Symposium was held October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITP) in Santa Barbara. This was one of the 3 symposia hosted by the ITP and supported by its sponsor, the National Science Foundation, as part of a 5 month program on `New Ideas for Particle Accelerators`. The long term program and symposia were organized and coordinated by Dr. Zohreh Parsa of Brookhaven National Laboratory/ITP. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss the future direction of high energy physics by bringing together leaders from the theoretical, experimental and accelerator physics communities. Their talks provided personal perspectives on the physics objectives and the technology demands of future high energy colliders. Collectively, they formed a vision for where the field should be heading and how it might best reach its objectives.

  18. Future high energy colliders symposium. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 'Future High Energy Colliders' Symposium was held October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITP) in Santa Barbara. This was one of the 3 symposia hosted by the ITP and supported by its sponsor, the National Science Foundation, as part of a 5 month program on 'New Ideas for Particle Accelerators'. The long term program and symposia were organized and coordinated by Dr. Zohreh Parsa of Brookhaven National Laboratory/ITP. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss the future direction of high energy physics by bringing together leaders from the theoretical, experimental and accelerator physics communities. Their talks provided personal perspectives on the physics objectives and the technology demands of future high energy colliders. Collectively, they formed a vision for where the field should be heading and how it might best reach its objectives

  19. CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF SGR 1627-41 NEAR QUIESCENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Hongjun; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Cumming, Andrew [Department of Physics, McGill University, Rutherford Physics Building, 3600 University Street, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Tomsick, John A.; Bodaghee, Arash [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Gotthelf, E. V. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Rahoui, Farid [Department of Astronomy and Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Harvard University, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-09-20

    We report on an observation of SGR 1627-41 made with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory on 2011 June 16. Approximately three years after its outburst activity in 2008, the source's flux has been declining, as it approaches its quiescent state. For an assumed power-law spectrum, we find that the absorbed 2-10 keV flux for the source is 1.0{sup +0.3}{sub -0.2} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -13} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} with a photon index of 2.9 {+-} 0.8 (N{sub H} = 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}). This flux is approximately consistent with that measured at the same time after the source's outburst in 1998. With measurements spanning three years after the 2008 outburst, we analyze the long-term flux and spectral evolution of the source. The flux evolution is well described by a double exponential with decay times of 0.5 {+-} 0.1 and 59 {+-} 6 days, and a thermal cooling model fit suggests that SGR 1627-41 may have a hot core (T{sub c} {approx} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} K). We find no clear correlation between flux and spectral hardness as found in other magnetars. We consider the quiescent X-ray luminosities of magnetars and the subset of rotation-powered pulsars with high magnetic fields (B {approx}> 10{sup 13} G) in relation to their spin-inferred surface magnetic field strength and find a possible trend between the two quantities.

  20. Detector for high-energy photon backscatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Michael D.; Erker, Joseph W.; Duncan, Michael Z.; Hartford, Thomas J.; Sivers, E. A.; Hopkinson, James F.

    1993-12-01

    High energy photon backscatter uses pair production to probe deep beneath surfaces with single side accessibility or to image thick, radiographically opaque objects. At the higher photon energies needed to penetrate thick and/or highly attenuating objects, Compton backscatter becomes strongly forward peaked with relatively little backscatter flux. Furthermore, the downward energy shift of the backscattered photon makes it more susceptible to attenuation on its outbound path. Above 1.022 MeV, pair production is possible; at about 10 MeV, pari production crosses over Compton scatter as the dominant x-ray interaction mechanism. The backscattered photons can be hard x rays from the bremsstrahlung of the electrons and positrons or 0.511 MeV photons from the annihilation of the positron. Monte Carlo computer simulations of such a backscatter system were done to characterize the output signals and to optimize a high energy detector design. This paper touches on the physics of high energy backscatter imaging and describes at some length the detector design for tomographic and radiographic imaging.

  1. A Chandra View Of Nonthermal Emission In The Northwestern Region Of Supernova Remnant RCW 86: Particle Acceleration And Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Castro, Daniel; Slane, Patrick O; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali

    2013-01-01

    The shocks of supernova remnants (SNRs) are believed to accelerate particles to cosmic ray (CR) energies. The amplification of the magnetic field due to CRs propagating in the shock region is expected to have an impact on both the emission from the accelerated particle population, as well as the acceleration process itself. Using a 95 ks observation with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory, we map and characterize the synchrotron emitting material in the northwestern region of RCW 86. We model spectra from several different regions, filamentary and diffuse alike, where emission appears dominated by synchrotron radiation. The fine spatial resolution of Chandra allows us to obtain accurate emission profiles across 3 different non-thermal rims in this region. The narrow width (l = 10''-30'') of these filaments constrains the minimum magnetic field strength at the post-shock region to be approximately 80 {\\mu}G.

  2. COMPILATION OF CURRENT HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohl, C.G.; Kelly, R.L.; Armstrong, F.E.; Horne, C.P.; Hutchinson, M.S.; Rittenberg, A.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P.; Addis, L.; Ward, C.E.W.; Baggett, N.; Goldschmidt-Clermong, Y.; Joos, P.; Gelfand, N.; Oyanagi, Y.; Grudtsin, S.N.; Ryabov, Yu.G.

    1981-05-01

    This is the fourth edition of our compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about April 1981, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1977. We emphasize that only approved experiments are included.

  3. Elementary particle physics and high energy phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental and theoretical high-energy physics programs at the University of Colorado are reported. Areas of concentration include the following: study of the properties of the Z0 with the SLD detector; fixed-target K-decay experiments; the R ampersand D program for the muon system: the SDC detector; high-energy photoproduction of states containing heavy quarks; electron--positron physics with the CLEO II detector at CESR; lattice QCD; and spin models and dynamically triangulated random surfaces. 24 figs., 2 tabs., 117 refs

  4. Beam dynamics in high energy particle accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Wolski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Particle accelerators are essential tools for scientific research in fields as diverse as high energy physics, materials science and structural biology. They are also widely used in industry and medicine. Producing the optimum design and achieving the best performance for an accelerator depends on a detailed understanding of many (often complex and sometimes subtle) effects that determine the properties and behavior of the particle beam. Beam Dynamics in High Energy Particle Accelerators provides an introduction to the concepts underlying accelerator beam line design and analysis, taking an approach that emphasizes the elegance of the subject and leads into the development of a range of powerful techniques for understanding and modeling charged particle beams.

  5. High Energy Sources Monitored with OMC

    CERN Document Server

    Risquez, D; Caballero-Garcia, M D; Alfonso-Garzon, J; Mas-Hesse, J M

    2008-01-01

    The Optical Monitoring Camera on-board INTEGRAL (OMC) provides Johnson V band photometry of any potentially variable source within its field of view. Taking advantage of the INTEGRAL capabilities allowing the simultaneous observation of different kind of objects in the optical, X and gamma rays bands, we have performed a study of the optical counterparts of different high-energy sources. Up to now, OMC has detected the optical counterpart for more than 100 sources from the High Energy Catalog (Ebisawa et al., 2003). The photometrically calibrated light curves produced by OMC can be accessed through our web portal at: http://sdc.laeff.inta.es/omc

  6. Status of High-Energy Neutrino Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalski, Marek

    2014-01-01

    With the recent discovery of high-energy neutrinos of extra-terrestrial origin by the IceCube neutrino observatory, neutrino-astronomy is entering a new era. This review will cover currently operating open water/ice neutrino telescopes, the latest evidence for a flux of extra-terrestrial neutrinos and current efforts in the search for steady and transient neutrino point sources. Generalised constraints on potential astrophysical sources are presented, allowing to focus the hunt for the sources of the observed high-energy neutrinos.

  7. Chandra Detection of the First X-ray Forest along the Line of Sight To Mkn 421

    CERN Document Server

    Nicastro, F; Elvis, M; Drake, J; Fiore, F; Fang, T; Fruscione, A; Krongold, Y; Marshall, H; Williams, R; Nicastro, Fabrizio; Mathur, Smita; Elvis, Martin; Drake, Jeremy; Fiore, Fabrizio; Fang, Taotao; Fruscione, Antonella; Krongold, Yair; Marshall, Herman; Williams, Rik

    2005-01-01

    We present the first >=3.5 sigma (conservative) or >=5.8 sigma (sum of lines significance) detection of two Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM) filaments at z>0, which we find along the line of sight to the blazar Mkn 421. These systems are detected through highly ionized resonant metal absorption in high quality Chandra-ACIS and -HRC Low Energy Transmission Grating (LETG) spectra of Mkn 421, obtained following our two Target of Opportunity requests during two outburst phases. The two intervening WHIM systems that we detect, have OVII and NVII columns of N(OVII)=(1.0 +/- 0.3) x 1e15 cm-2} N(NVII)=(0.8 +/- 0.4) x 1e15 cm-2, and N(OVII)=(0.7 +/- 0.3) x 1e15 cm-2, N(NVII)=(1.4 +/- 0.5) x 1e15 cm-2 respectively. From the detected number of WHIM filaments along this line of sight we can estimate the number of OVII filaments per unit redshift with columns larger than 7e14 cm-2, dP(OVII)/dz(N(OVII)>=7e14) = 67^{+88}_{-43}, consistent, within the large 1-sigma errors, with the hydrodynamical simulation predictions o...

  8. Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of the first quasars X-rays from the age of cosmic enlightenment

    CERN Document Server

    Vignali, C; Schneider, D P; Anderson, S F; Fan, X; Gunn, J E; Kaspi, S; Richards, G T; Strauss, M A; Strauss, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    We report on Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of a sample of 13 quasars at z~4.7-5.4 mostly taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The present sample complements previous X-ray studies of z>4 quasars, in which the majority of the objects are optically more luminous and at lower redshifts. All but two of our quasars have been detected in the X-ray band, thus doubling the number of z>4.8 X-ray detected quasars. The two non-detections are likely to be due to a short exposure time and to the presence of intrinsic absorption. We confirm and extend to the highest redshifts the presence of a correlation between AB1450(1+z) magnitude and soft X-ray flux for z>4 quasars, and the presence of a steeper optical-to-X-ray spectral energy distribution (parameterized by aox) for high-luminosity, high-redshift quasars than for lower-luminosity, lower-redshift quasars. The second effect is likely due to the known anti-correlation between aox and rest-frame 2500 Angstrom luminosity, whose significance is confirmed v...

  9. Observation of high current effects in high energy linear accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeman, J.T.

    1991-12-01

    The acceleration and transport of electron beams with high currents and low emittances are subjects studied very carefully for many operating accelerators and most future accelerators. For a example, several Free Electron Lasers (FEL) and the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) presently operate with high energy intense beams. The next generation of synchrotron light sources and future linear colliders require a much higher degree of component precision and beam control. In this note the basic concepts governing the effects of high currents in accelerators are explored, including observations of high currents in present accelerators. The effects of longitudinal wakefields on acceleration and energy spreads are studied first. Then, the transverse equations of motion are developed including the technique of BNS damping to control wakefield growth. These wakefield effects are investigated to characterize their influence on the control and observation of beam oscillations. Finally, the reduction of transverse wakefield effects is important for maintaining the emittance of intense beams. 49 refs., 48 figs.

  10. Studies of Pulsar Wind Nebula in the Supernova Remnant IC443: Preliminary Observations from the Chandra Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyibi, E. A.

    2009-10-01

    Preliminary observations of the Chandra data were made in order to study the Pulsar Wind Nebula in the Supernova Remnant IC443. The Chandra X-ray observatory short observation on IC443 was centred on 13 chip ACIS. The CIAO analytical programme was used for the data analysis. The data were separated into point source, with an energy range of 2.1 to 10.0 keV, and diffuse source with energy less than 2.1 Kev. The resulting spectra were fitted to a power law. The observed density numbers and the normalised counts of both the point source and the diffuse source were used to describe the X-ray source. Afin d'étudier la "Pulsar wind Nebula" dans le reste de la Supernova IC 443, nous avons mené une exploitation préliminaire des observations provenant du satellite spatiale Chandra. L'observation brêve de IC 443, par Chandra fut centrée sur les composantes du spectromètre identifiées par la séquence 13. Le programme informatique CIAO fut utilisé pour l'analyse des données. Les données furent groupées en sources ponctuelles, chacune ayant des énergies allant de 2.1 a 10.0 kev ; et en sources diffuses chacune avec des énergies de moins de 2.1 kev. Les spectres obtenus furent interpolés à l'aide de fonction puissance. La densité de flux ainsi que le décompte des particules induites au détecteur par le rayonnement provenant des sources ponctuelles et diffuses furent utilisés pour décrire la source de rayon-X.

  11. Precision timing measurements for high energy photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Dustin, E-mail: djanders@caltech.edu [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Apreysan, Artur; Bornheim, Adi; Duarte, Javier; Newman, Harvey; Pena, Cristian [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ronzhin, Anatoly [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Particle colliders operating at high luminosities present challenging environments for high energy physics event reconstruction and analysis. We discuss how timing information, with a precision on the order of 10 ps, can aid in the reconstruction of physics events under such conditions. We present calorimeter based timing measurements from test beam experiments in which we explore the ultimate timing precision achievable for high energy photons or electrons of 10 GeV and above. Using a prototype calorimeter consisting of a 1.7×1.7×1.7 cm{sup 3} lutetium–yttrium oxyortho-silicate (LYSO) crystal cube, read out by micro-channel plate photomultipliers, we demonstrate a time resolution of 33.5±2.1 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV. In a second measurement, using a 2.5×2.5×20 cm{sup 3} LYSO crystal placed perpendicularly to the electron beam, we achieve a time resolution of 59±11 ps using a beam energy of 4 GeV. We also present timing measurements made using a shashlik-style calorimeter cell made of LYSO and tungsten plates, and demonstrate that the apparatus achieves a time resolution of 54±5 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV.

  12. Transverse Diagnostics For High Energy Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Castro Carballo, Maria Elena

    2007-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a circular synchrotron accelerator that will explore new Physics at the higher energies ever achieved, aiming to find the Higgs boson. The LHC is being built at CERN and by 2007 it will be ready to produce head-on collisions of protons at a centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV. The employment of superconducting magnets for achieving high energies, the high luminosity required for physics, the limited dynamic aperture and the large energy stored in the beams will make the machine very challenging to operate, especially during the injection process and the energy ramp. Two particular problems will be a high sensitivity to beam losses and a relatively poor field quality requiring the use of many types of magnetic correction elements. This may lead to the inclusion of certain beam measurements in feedback loops, making special demands on the control system. The injection and acceleration of the LHC proton beams without particle losses and emittance blow up will require an accurate co...

  13. OER reduction with high-energy neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Further to work recently reported (Harrison et al Brit. J. Radiol.; 48:409 (1975)) that neutrons produced by 80 MeV deuterons bombarding a thick beryllium target have an OER = 1.3 +- 0.2 measured with Vicia seedlings, data are here presented of additional measurements with other high-energy neutron sources. Primary beams of 35 MeV deuterons, 66 MeV protons, 80 MeV deuterons and 101 MeV protons produced neutrons of 15, 22, 32 and 50 mean energy respectively. The neutron OER values, with standard errors, are shown as a function of mean neutron energy. The data suggest a significant reduction in OER as the mean energy is increased above 25 MeV. The implications of these results for cancer therapy are clear since the original rationale for clinical trials with neutrons was centred almost exclusively on reduced OER. (U.K.)

  14. Baryon number violation in high energy collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the phenomenology of baryon number violation induced by electroweak instantons. We find that if the naive-instanton amplitudes were valid for arbitrarily high energies, the event rate at the SSC would be a few per hour, with a typical event consisting of 3 'primary' antileptons and 7 'primary' antiquark jets, accompanied by ≅ 85 electroweak gauge bosons, having a sharp threshold in the total sub-energy at about 17 TeV. We describe how to establish their electroweak-instanton-induced origin. The naive instanton approximation is known to overestimate the rate for these processes, so this work focusses attention on the need for more accurate calculations, and for a calculational method which is appropriate when the energy of the initial particles is above the sphaleron energy. (orig.)

  15. Detection of High-Energy Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Lohse, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    In spite of quantum field theoretical and philosophical problems to define the concept of elementary particles and to understand their localizability, particles become intuitively apparent by the traces they leave in particle detectors. Today, experimental particle physicists have reached a high degree of perfection in measuring and visualizing particles up to highest energies using a variety of high technology detection devices and sophisticated, powerful particle accel...

  16. Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays: Strangelets?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐仁新; 吴飞

    2003-01-01

    The conjecture that ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) are actually strangelets is discussed. Besides the reason that strangelets can do as cosmic rays beyond the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin-cutoff, another argument to support the conjecture is addressed by the study of formation of Te V-scale microscopic black holes when UHECRs bombarding bare strange stars. It is proposed that the exotic quark surface of a bare strange star could be an effective astro-laboratory in the investigations of the extra dimensions and of the detection of ultra-high-energy neutrino fluxes. The flux of neutrinos (and other point-like particles) with energy larger than 2.3 × 1020 eV could be expected to be smaller than 10-26 cm-2 s-1 if there are two extra spatial dimensions.

  17. ACCELERATING POLARIZED PROTONS TO HIGH ENERGY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRAVAR, A.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRUNO, D.; BUNCE, G.; ET AL.

    2006-10-02

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designed to provide collisions of high energy polarized protons for the quest of understanding the proton spin structure. Polarized proton collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV have been achieved in RHIC since 2001. Recently, polarized proton beam was accelerated to 250 GeV in RHIC for the first time. Unlike accelerating unpolarized protons, the challenge for achieving high energy polarized protons is to fight the various mechanisms in an accelerator that can lead to partial or total polarization loss due to the interaction of the spin vector with the magnetic fields. We report on the progress of the RHIC polarized proton program. We also present the strategies of how to preserve the polarization through the entire acceleration chain, i.e. a 200 MeV linear accelerator, the Booster, the AGS and RHIC.

  18. Chandra and XMM-Newton study of the supernova remnant Kes 73 hosting the magnetar 1E 1841-045

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Harsha S.; Safi-Harb, Samar [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg MB R3T 2N2 (Canada); Slane, Patrick O. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gotthelf, E. V., E-mail: harsha@physics.umanitoba.ca, E-mail: samar@physics.umanitoba.ca, E-mail: slane@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: eric@astro.columbia.edu [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2014-01-20

    We present a Chandra and XMM-Newton study of the supernova remnant (SNR) Kes 73 hosting the anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1841–045. The Chandra image reveals clumpy structures across the remnant with enhanced emission along the western rim. The X-ray emission fills the radio shell and spatially correlates with the infrared image. The global X-ray spectrum is described by a two-component thermal model with a column density N {sub H} = 2.6{sub −0.3}{sup +0.4}×10{sup 22} cm{sup –2} and a total luminosity of L{sub X} = 3.3{sub −0.5}{sup +0.7}×10{sup 37} erg s{sup –1} (0.5-10 keV, at an assumed distance of 8.5 kpc). The soft component is characterized by a temperature kT{sub s} = 0.5{sub −0.2}{sup +0.1} keV, a high ionization timescale, and enhanced Si and S abundances, suggesting emission that is dominated by shocked ejecta. The hard component has a temperature kT{sub h} = 1.6{sub −0.7}{sup +0.8} keV, a relatively low ionization timescale, and mostly solar abundances suggesting emission that is dominated by interstellar/circumstellar shocked material. A spatially resolved spectroscopy study reveals no significant variations in the spectral properties. We infer an SNR age ranging between 750 yr and 2100 yr, an explosion energy of 3.0{sub −1.8}{sup +2.8}×10{sup 50} erg and a shock velocity of (1.2 ± 0.3)×10{sup 3} km s{sup –1} (under the Sedov phase assumption). We also discuss the possible scenario for Kes 73 expanding into the late red-supergiant wind phase of its massive progenitor. Comparing the inferred metal abundances to core-collapse nucleosynthesis model yields, we estimate a progenitor mass ≳20 M {sub ☉}, adding a candidate to the growing list of highly magnetized neutron stars proposed to be associated with very massive progenitors.

  19. Study of the energy response of high pressure ionization chamber for high energy gamma-ray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUA Zheng-Dong; XU Xun-Jiang; WANG Jian-Hua; LIU Shu-Dong; LI Jian-Ping

    2008-01-01

    The energy response calibration of the commonly used high pressure ionization chamber is very difficult to obtain when the gamma-ray energy is more than 3 MeV.In order to get the calibration of the higher part of the high pressure ionization chamber,we use the Fluka Monte Carlo program to perfclrm the energy response in both the spherical and the cylindrical high pressure ionization chamber which are full of argon gas.The results compared with prior study when the gamma-ray energy is less than 1.25 MeV.Our result of Monte Carlo calculation shows agreement with those obtained by measurement within the uncertainty of the respective methods.The calculation of this study is significant for the high pressure ionization chamber to measure the high energy gamma-ray.

  20. Astrophysics, cosmology and high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief survey is given of some topics in astrophysics and cosmology, with special emphasis on the inter-relation between the properties of the early Universe and recent ideas in high energy physics, and on simple order-of-magnitude arguments showing how the scales and dimensions of cosmic phenomena are related to basic physical constants. (orig.)

  1. Density Estimation Trees in High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Anderlini, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Density Estimation Trees can play an important role in exploratory data analysis for multidimensional, multi-modal data models of large samples. I briefly discuss the algorithm, a self-optimization technique based on kernel density estimation, and some applications in High Energy Physics.

  2. Technology arising from High-Energy Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    An exibition was held as a part of the Meeting on Technology arising from High- Energy Physics (24-26 April 1974). The Proceedings (including a list of stands) were published as Yellow Report, CERN 74-9, vol. 1-2.

  3. Phenomenology of extragalactic high energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The course is divided in two main bodies: Chapters 1 and 2 deal with some of the fundamental properties of the production of high energy radiation, while chapter 3 is devoted to the observations of active galaxies; chapter 4 presents the X-ray emission of clusters of galaxies and the sky background

  4. Wigner Functions in High Energy Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Csorgo, T.

    2003-01-01

    Recent developments are (meta)reviewed in the applications of Wigner functions to describe the observed single particle spectra and two-particle Bose-Einstein (or Hanbury Brown -- Twiss) correlations in high energy particle and nuclear physics, with examples from hadron-proton and Pb + Pb collisions at CERN SPS.

  5. Resume: networking in high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Networking in High Energy Physics covers communications inside the experiment and internationally. Inside the experiment the need for agreed 'codes of practice' is now accepted. Within Europe it is accepted that a common infrastructure based on the use of the ISO OSI protocols should be used. In the USA a community initiative has been proposed. The background to these approaches is discussed. (author)

  6. Indiana University High Energy Physics, Task A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses research in High Energy Physics under the following experiments: Meson spectroscopy at BNL; dimuon production at FNAL; the DO collider experiment at FNAL; the Mark II experiment at SLC and PEP; the OPAL experiment at CERN; and the superconducting supercollider

  7. Studies in theorectical high energy particles physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the research being done at the University of Illinois in theoretical high energy physics. Some areas discussed are string models, collider physics, symmetries in gauge theories, sigma model, radiative decay of mesons, supersymmetry, superconducting, and hydroproduction of charm

  8. High-Energy Physics: Exit America?

    CERN Multimedia

    Seife, Charles

    2005-01-01

    Budget cuts and cancellations threaten to end U.S. exploration of the particle frontier. Fermilab's Tevatron, due to shut down around 200, could be the last large particle accelerator in the United States; the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva should ensure European dominance of high-energy physics (3 pages)

  9. Theoretical and experimental high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses experimental and theoretical work in High Energy Physics. Some topics discussed are: quantum field theory; supersymmetry; cosmology; superstring model; relic photinos; inflationary universe; dark matter; standard model; supernovae; semileptonic decay; quantum Langevin equation; underground neutrino detection at Soudan; strange quark systems; cosmic ray detection; superconducting super collider detectors; and studies of direct photon production

  10. Wigner Functions in High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Csörgö, T

    2004-01-01

    Recent developments are (meta)reviewed in the applications of Wigner functions to describe the observed single particle spectra and two-particle Bose-Einstein (or Hanbury Brown -- Twiss) correlations in high energy particle and nuclear physics, with examples from hadron-proton and Pb + Pb collisions at CERN SPS.

  11. Theoretical and experimental high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics: The Soudan enterprise; study of strange quarks at Fermilab; direct photons at Fermilab; the Brookhaven programs; AMY and CLEO: studies of e+e- annihilations; cosmic ray studies with the DO muon chamber; progress report on HEP computer upgrade; muon triggering and reconstruction at SSC; and, theoretical high energy physics

  12. PC database for high energy preprint collections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a microcomputer database used by the high energy group to keep track of preprints in our collection. It is used as a supplement to the SLAC-SPIRES database to retrieve preprints on hand. This was designed as a low overhead system for a small group

  13. Extremely High Current, High-Brightness Energy Recovery Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Beavis, Dana; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bluem, Hans; Brennan, Joseph M; Burger, Al; Burrill, Andrew; Calaga, Rama; Cameron, Peter; Chang, Xiangyun; Cole, Michael; Connolly, Roger; Delayen, Jean R; Favale, Anthony; Gassner, David M; Grimes, Jacob T; Hahn, Harald; Hershcovitch, Ady; Holmes, Douglas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Johnson, Peter; Kayran, Dmitry; Kewisch, Jorg; Kneisel, Peter; Lambiase, Robert; Litvinenko, Vladimir N; McIntyre, Gary; Meng, Wuzheng; Nehring, Thomas; Nicoletti, Tony; Oerter, Brian; Pate, David; Phillips, Larry; Preble, Joseph P; Rank, Jim; Rao, Triveni; Rathke, John; Roser, Thomas; Russo, Thomas; Scaduto, Joseph; Schultheiss, Tom; Segalov, Zvi; Smith, Kevin T; Todd, Alan M M; Warren-Funk, L; Williams, Neville; Wu, Kuo-Chen; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Yip, Kin; Zaltsman, Alex; Zhao, Yongxiang

    2005-01-01

    Next generation ERL light-sources, high-energy electron coolers, high-power Free-Electron Lasers, powerful Compton X-ray sources and many other accelerators were made possible by the emerging technology of high-power, high-brightness electron beams. In order to get the anticipated performance level of ampere-class currents, many technological barriers are yet to be broken. BNL's Collider-Accelerator Department is pursuing some of these technologies for its electron cooling of RHIC application, as well as a possible future electron-hadron collider. We will describe work on CW, high-current and high-brightness electron beams. This will include a description of a superconducting, laser-photocathode RF gun and an accelerator cavity capable of producing low emittance (about 1 micron rms normalized) one nano-Coulomb bunches at currents of the order of one ampere average.

  14. Highly Compressed Ion Beams for High Energy Density Science

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Alex; Briggs, Richard J; Callahan, Debra; Caporaso, George; Celata, C M; Davidson, Ronald C; Faltens, Andy; Grant-Logan, B; Grisham, Larry; Grote, D P; Henestroza, Enrique; Kaganovich, Igor D; Lee, Edward; Lee, Richard; Leitner, Matthaeus; Nelson, Scott D; Olson, Craig; Penn, Gregory; Reginato, Lou; Renk, Tim; Rose, David; Sessler, Andrew M; Staples, John W; Tabak, Max; Thoma, Carsten H; Waldron, William; Welch, Dale; Wurtele, Jonathan; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory (HIF-VNL) is developing the intense ion beams needed to drive matter to the High Energy Density (HED) regimes required for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) and other applications. An interim goal is a facility for Warm Dense Matter (WDM) studies, wherein a target is heated volumetrically without being shocked, so that well-defined states of matter at 1 to 10 eV are generated within a diagnosable region. In the approach we are pursuing, low to medium mass ions with energies just above the Bragg peak are directed onto thin target "foils," which may in fact be foams or "steel wool" with mean densities 1% to 100% of solid. This approach complements that being pursued at GSI, wherein high-energy ion beams deposit a small fraction of their energy in a cylindrical target. We present the requirements for warm dense matter experiments, and describe suitable accelerator concepts, including novel broadband traveling wave pulse-line, drift-tube linac, RF, and single-gap approa...

  15. Updated phase coherent timing solution of the isolated neutron star RX J0720.4-3125 using recent XMM-Newton and Chandra observations

    OpenAIRE

    Hohle, M. M.; Haberl, F.; Vink, J.; Turolla, R.; Zane, S.; de Vries, C. P.; Méndez, M.

    2010-01-01

    Aims. Since the last phase coherent timing solution of the nearby radio-quiet isolated neutron star RXJ0720.4−3125 six new XMM-Newton and three Chandra observations were carried out. The phase coherent timing solutions from previous authors were performed without restricting to a fixed energy band. However, we recently showed that the phase residuals are energy dependent, and thus phase coherent solutions must be computed referring always to the same energy band. Methods. We updated the phase...

  16. Semiconductor High-Energy Radiation Scintillation Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kastalsky, A; Spivak, B

    2006-01-01

    We propose a new scintillation-type detector in which high-energy radiation produces electron-hole pairs in a direct-gap semiconductor material that subsequently recombine producing infrared light to be registered by a photo-detector. The key issue is how to make the semiconductor essentially transparent to its own infrared light, so that photons generated deep inside the semiconductor could reach its surface without tangible attenuation. We discuss two ways to accomplish this, one based on doping the semiconductor with shallow impurities of one polarity type, preferably donors, the other by heterostructure bandgap engineering. The proposed semiconductor scintillator combines the best properties of currently existing radiation detectors and can be used for both simple radiation monitoring, like a Geiger counter, and for high-resolution spectrography of the high-energy radiation. The most important advantage of the proposed detector is its fast response time, about 1 ns, essentially limited only by the recombi...

  17. Contemporaneous observations of the radio galaxy NGC 1275 from radio to very high energy gamma-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksić, J; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Bangale, P; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bock, R K; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Fidalgo, D Carreto; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; De Lotto, B; Mendez, C Delgado; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Farina, E; Ferenc, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Giavitto, G; Godinović, N; Muñoz, A González; Gozzini, S R; Hadamek, A; Hadasch, D; Herrero, A; Hildebrand, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Idec, W; Kadenius, V; Kellermann, H; Knoetig, M L; Krause, J; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Lozano, I; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Nakajima, D; Niedzwiecki, A; Nilsson, K; Nowak, N; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Partini, S; Persic, M; Prada, F; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Preziuso, S; Puljak, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, K; Salvati, M; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamatescu, V; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Storz, J; Sun, S; Surić, T; Takalo, L; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Uellenbeck, M; Vogler, P; Wagner, R M; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Balmaverde, B; Kataoka, J; Rekola, R; Takahashi, Y; .,

    2013-01-01

    The radio galaxy NGC 1275, recently identified as a very high energy (VHE, >100 GeV) gamma-ray emitter by MAGIC, is one of the few non-blazar AGN detected in the VHE regime. In order to better understand the origin of the gamma-ray emission and locate it within the galaxy, we study contemporaneous multi-frequency observations of NGC 1275 and model the overall spectral energy distribution (SED). We analyze unpublished MAGIC observations carried out between Oct. 2009 and Feb. 2010, and the already published ones taken between Aug. 2010 and Feb. 2011. We study the multi-band variability and correlations analyzing data of Fermi-LAT (0.1 - 100 GeV), Chandra (X-ray), KVA (optical) and MOJAVE (radio) taken during the same period. Using custom Monte Carlo simulations corresponding to early MAGIC stereo data, we detect NGC 1275 also in the earlier MAGIC campaign. The flux level and energy spectra are similar to the results of the second campaign. The monthly light curve above 100 GeV shows a hint of variability at the...

  18. Automatic Energy Schemes for High Performance Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundriyal, Vaibhav [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Although high-performance computing traditionally focuses on the efficient execution of large-scale applications, both energy and power have become critical concerns when approaching exascale. Drastic increases in the power consumption of supercomputers affect significantly their operating costs and failure rates. In modern microprocessor architectures, equipped with dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS) and CPU clock modulation (throttling), the power consumption may be controlled in software. Additionally, network interconnect, such as Infiniband, may be exploited to maximize energy savings while the application performance loss and frequency switching overheads must be carefully balanced. This work first studies two important collective communication operations, all-to-all and allgather and proposes energy saving strategies on the per-call basis. Next, it targets point-to-point communications to group them into phases and apply frequency scaling to them to save energy by exploiting the architectural and communication stalls. Finally, it proposes an automatic runtime system which combines both collective and point-to-point communications into phases, and applies throttling to them apart from DVFS to maximize energy savings. The experimental results are presented for NAS parallel benchmark problems as well as for the realistic parallel electronic structure calculations performed by the widely used quantum chemistry package GAMESS. Close to the maximum energy savings were obtained with a substantially low performance loss on the given platform.

  19. Solar electric energy supply at high altitude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knaupp, W.; Mundschau, E. [Zentrum fur Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung (ZSW), Ulm (Germany)

    2004-04-01

    Solar-hydrogen systems were analyzed regarding their usability as energy supply system for high altitude platforms. In a first step for an assessment of solar and photovoltaic resources near-ground spectral transmittances of atmosphere were extended with simplified height correction functions to achieve spectral irradiance descriptions versus atmospheric height up to 25 km. The influence of atmospheric height to different solar cell technologies regarding electrical performance was quantified at some examples for the aspect of spectral distribution with the help of the introduced spectral height factor. The main attention during analysis of the whole solar-hydrogen energy system was directed to characteristics of current or near term available technology. Specific power weight of photovoltaic system, electrolyzer, fuel cell and gas tanks and their dependence on operation mode and power range were assessed. A pre-design of a solar-hydrogen energy system was carried out for an airship (volume 580,000 m3) withstanding continuous wind speeds up to {approx} 130 km/h. The calculated coverage ratio of photovoltaic and load share of energy system mark the frame of usability. Depending on the airship size, shape and other external boundary conditions the total electrical energy demand could be covered by a solar-hydrogen energy system of current or near term technology for full year operation. However further investigations are necessary regarding e.g. further mass reductions. (author)

  20. Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, David A.; Vogt, Ramona

    2005-03-31

    We propose to develop a high-energy heavy-ion experimental database and make it accessible to the scientific community through an on-line interface. This database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This database should eventually contain all published data from Bevalac and AGS to RHIC to CERN-LHC energies, proton-proton to nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as other relevant systems, and all measured observables. Such a database would have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models to a broad range of old and new experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for inertial confinement fusion and target and source development for upcoming facilities such as the Next Linear Collider. To enhance the utility of this database, we propose periodically performing evaluations of the data and summarizing the results in topical reviews.

  1. High-energy fluxes of atmospheric neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Sinegovskaya, T S; Sinegovsky, S I

    2013-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos from decays of mesons, produced in collisions of cosmic ray particles with air nuclei, form unavoidable background for detection of astrophysical neutrinos. More precise calculations of the high-energy neutrino spectrum are required since measurements in the IceCube experiment reach the intriguing energy region where a contribution of the prompt neutrinos and/or astrophysical ones should be discovered. Basing on the referent hadronic models QGSJET II-03, SIBYLL 2.1, we calculate high-energy spectra, both of the muon and electron atmospheric neutrinos, averaged over zenith-angles. The computation is made using three parameterizations of cosmic ray spectra which include the knee region. All calculations are compared with the atmospheric neutrino measurements by Frejus and IceCube. The prompt neutrino flux predictions obtained with thequark-gluon string model (QGSM) for the charm production by Kaidalov & Piskunova do not contradict to the IceCube measurements and upper limit on the astr...

  2. High Energy Polarization of Blazars : Detection Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Nachiketa; Fields, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Emission from blazar jets in the ultraviolet, optical, and infrared is polarized. If these low-energy photons were inverse-Compton scattered, the upscattered high-energy photons retain a fraction of the polarization. Current and future X-ray and gamma-ray polarimeters such as INTEGRAL-SPI, PoGOLITE, X-Calibur, Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter, GEMS-like missions, ASTRO-H, and POLARIX have the potential to discover polarized X-rays and gamma-rays from blazar jets for the first time. Detection of such polarization will open a qualitatively new window into high-energy blazar emission; actual measurements of polarization degree and angle will quantitatively test theories of jet emission mechanisms. We examine the detection prospects of blazars by these polarimetry missions using examples of 3C 279, PKS 1510-089, and 3C 454.3, bright sources with relatively high degrees of low-energy polarization. We conclude that while balloon polarimeters will be challenged to detect blazars within reasonable observational times (wit...

  3. Advances in High Energy Materials (Review Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. R. Nair

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Research and development efforts for realizing higher performance levels of high energy materials (HEMs are continued unabated all over the globe. Of late, it is becoming increasingly necessary to ensure that such materials are also eco-friendly. This has provided thrust to research in the area of force multiplying HEMs and compounds free from pollution causing components. Enhancement of the performance necessitates introduction of strained structure or increase in oxygen balance to achieve near stoichiometry. The search for environment friendly molecules is focused on chlorine free propellant compositions and lead free primary explosives. Energetic polymers offer added advantage of partitioning of energy and thus not necessitating the concentration of only solid components (HEMs and metal fuels in the formulations, to achieve higher performance, thereby leading to improvement in energetics without adversely affecting the processability and mechanical properties. During recent times, research in the area of insensitive explosives has received impetus particularly with the signature of STANAG. This paper gives a review of the all-round advances in the areas of HEMs encompassing oxidizers, high-energy dense materials, insensitive high-energy materials, polymers and plasticizers. Selected formulations based on these materials are also included.Defence Science Journal, 2010, 60(2, pp.137-151, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.60.327

  4. High energy photon-photon collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Zerwas, P.M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    1994-07-01

    The collisions of high energy photons produced at a electron-positron collider provide a comprehensive laboratory for testing QCD, electroweak interactions and extensions of the standard model. The luminosity and energy of the colliding photons produced by back-scattering laser beams is expected to be comparable to that of the primary e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions. In this overview, we shall focus on tests of electroweak theory in photon-photon annihilation, particularly {gamma}{gamma} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}, {gamma}{gamma} {yields} Higgs bosons, and higher-order loop processes, such as {gamma}{gamma} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, Z{gamma} and ZZ. Since each photon can be resolved into a W{sup +}W{sup minus} pair, high energy photon-photon collisions can also provide a remarkably background-free laboratory for studying WW collisions and annihilation. We also review high energy {gamma}{gamma} tests of quantum chromodynamics, such as the scaling of the photon structure function, t{bar t} production, mini-jet processes, and diffractive reactions.

  5. Chandra Reveals The X-Ray Glint In The Cat's Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    SAN DIEGO -- Scientists have discovered a glowing bubble of hot gas and an unexpected X-ray bright central star within the planetary nebula known as the Cat's Eye using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. The new results, presented today at the American Astronomical Society meeting, provide insight into the ways that stars like our Sun end their lives. Scientists believe they are witnessing the expulsion of material from a star that is in the last stages of its existence as a normal star. Material shed by the star is flying away at a speed of about 4 million miles per hour, and the star itself is expected to collapse to become a white dwarf star in a few million years. The X-ray data from the Cat's Eye Nebula, also known as NGC 6543, clearly show a bright central star surrounded by a cloud of multimillion-degree gas. By comparing the Chandra data with those from the Hubble Space Telescope, researchers are able to see where the hotter, X-ray emitting gas appears in relation to the cooler material seen in optical wavelengths by Hubble. "Despite the complex optical appearance of the nebula, the X-ray emission illustrates unambiguously that the hot gas in the central bubble is driving the expansion of the optical nebula," said You-Hua Chu of the University of Illinois and lead author of the paper submitted to the Astrophysical Journal. "The Chandra data will help us to better understand how stars similar to our Sun produce planetary nebulas and evolve into white dwarfs as they grow old." With Chandra, astronomers measured the temperature of the central bubble of X-ray emitting material, and this presents a new puzzle. Though still incredibly energetic and hot enough to emit X-rays, this hot gas is cooler than scientists would have expected from the stellar wind that has come to stagnation from the initial high speed of 4 million miles per hour. At first, the researchers thought that the cooler, outer shell might have mixed with the energetic material closer to the

  6. A high energy photon polarimeter for astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Eingorn, Maxim; Fernando, Lakma; Vlahovic, Branislav; Ilie, Cosmin; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Urciuoli, Guido Maria; De Persio, Fulvio; Meddi, Franco

    2015-01-01

    A high-energy photon polarimeter for astrophysics studies in the energy range from 20 MeV to 1000 MeV is considered. The proposed concept uses a stack of silicon micro-strip detectors where they play the roles of both a converter and a tracker. The purpose of this paper is to outline the parameters of such a polarimeter and to estimate the productivity of measurements. Our study supported by a Monte Carlo simulation shows that with a one-year observation period the polarimeter will provide 6%...

  7. High energy photons production in nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hard photon production, in nucleus-nucleus collisions, were studied at beam energies between 10 and 125 MeV. The main characteristics of the photon emission are deduced. They suggest that the neutron-proton collisions in the early stage of the reaction are the main source of high energy gamma-rays. An overview of the theoretical approaches is given and compared with experimental results. Theoretical attempts to include the contribution of charged pion exchange currents to photon production, in calculations of proton-nucleus-gamma and nucleus-nucleus-gamma reactions, showed suitable fitting with experimental data

  8. Stochastic aspects of QCD at high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I present a pedagogical discussion of the influence of particle number fluctuations on the high energy evolution in QCD. I emphasize the event-by-event description and the correspondence with the problem of ''fluctuating pulled fronts'' in statistical physics. I explain that the correlations generated by fluctuations reduce the phase space for BFKL evolution up to saturation. Because of that, the evolution slows down, and the rate for the energy increase of the saturation momentum is considerably decreased. I discuss the diagrammatic interpretation of the particle number fluctuations in terms of pomeron loops. (orig.)

  9. Opportunities for high wind energy penetration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tande, J.O.; Hansen, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    Wind power is today a mature technology, which at windy locations, is economically competitive to conventional power generation technologies. This and growing global environmental concerns have led governments to encourage and plan for wind energy development, a typical aim being 10% of electricity...... analyses conclude that expanding to even above 15% wind energy penetration in the Cape Verde power systems is economical. Worldwide, numerous locations with favorable wind conditions and power systems similar to the Capeverdean provide good opportunities for installing wind farms and achieving high wind...

  10. HIGH ENERGY POLARIZATION OF BLAZARS: DETECTION PROSPECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, N. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Pavlidou, V. [Department of Physics, University of Crete, 71003 Heraklion (Greece); Fields, B. D. [Department of Astronomy and Department of Physics, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Emission from blazar jets in the ultraviolet, optical, and infrared is polarized. If these low-energy photons were inverse-Compton scattered, the upscattered high-energy photons retain a fraction of the polarization. Current and future X-ray and gamma-ray polarimeters such as INTEGRAL-SPI, PoGOLITE, X-Calibur, Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter, GEMS-like missions, ASTRO-H, and POLARIX have the potential to discover polarized X-rays and gamma-rays from blazar jets for the first time. Detection of such polarization will open a qualitatively new window into high-energy blazar emission; actual measurements of polarization degree and angle will quantitatively test theories of jet emission mechanisms. We examine the detection prospects of blazars by these polarimetry missions using examples of 3C 279, PKS 1510-089, and 3C 454.3, bright sources with relatively high degrees of low-energy polarization. We conclude that while balloon polarimeters will be challenged to detect blazars within reasonable observational times (with X-Calibur offering the most promising prospects), space-based missions should detect the brightest blazars for polarization fractions down to a few percent. Typical flaring activity of blazars could boost the overall number of polarimetric detections by nearly a factor of five to six purely accounting for flux increase of the brightest of the comprehensive, all-sky, Fermi-LAT blazar distribution. The instantaneous increase in the number of detections is approximately a factor of two, assuming a duty cycle of 20% for every source. The detectability of particular blazars may be reduced if variations in the flux and polarization fraction are anticorrelated. Simultaneous use of variability and polarization trends could guide the selection of blazars for high-energy polarimetric observations.

  11. A Census of X-ray gas in NGC 1068: Results from 450ks of Chandra HETG Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallman, T.; Evans, Daniel A.; Marshall, H.; Canizares, C.; Longinotti, A.; Nowak, M.; Schulz, N.

    2016-01-01

    We present models for the X-ray spectrum of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068. These are fitted to data obtained using the High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) on the Chandra X-ray observatory. The data show line and radiative recombination continuum (RRC) emission from a broad range of ions and elements. The models explore the importance of excitation processes for these lines including photoionization followed by recombination, radiative excitation by absorption of continuum radiation and inner shell fluorescence. The models show that the relative importance of these processes depends on the conditions in the emitting gas, and that no single emitting component can fit the entire spectrum. In particular, the relative importance of radiative excitation and photoionization/recombination differs according to the element and ion stage emitting the line. This in turn implies a diversity of values for the ionization parameter of the various components of gas responsible for the emission, ranging from log(ξ)=1 – 3. Using this, we obtain an estimate for the total amount of gas responsible for the observed emission. The mass flux through the region included in the HETG extraction region is approximately 0.3 M⊙ yr−1 assuming ordered flow at the speed characterizing the line widths. This can be compared with what is known about this object from other techniques.

  12. Consistency of Hitomi, XMM-Newton and Chandra 3.5 keV data from Perseus

    CERN Document Server

    Conlon, Joseph P; Jennings, Nicholas; Krippendorf, Sven; Rummel, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Hitomi observations of Perseus with the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) provide a high-resolution look at the 3.5 keV feature reported by multiple groups in the Perseus cluster. The Hitomi spectrum -- which involves the sum of diffuse cluster emission and the point-like central Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) -- does not show any excess at $E \\sim 3.5 {\\rm keV}$, giving an apparent inconsistency with previous observations of excess diffuse emission. We point out that 2009 Chandra data reveals a strong dip in the AGN spectrum at $E = (3.54 \\pm 0.02) {\\rm keV}$ (cluster frame) -- the identical energy to the diffuse excess observed by XMM-Newton. Scaling this dip to the 2016 AGN luminosity and adding it to the diffuse XMM-Newton excess, this predicts an overall dip in the SXS field of view of $(-7.7 \\pm 4.6) \\times 10^{-6} \\, {\\rm ph} \\, {\\rm cm}^{-2} \\, {\\rm s}^{-1}$ at $E= 3.54$ keV -- a precise match to the Hitomi data when broadened by the dark matter virial velocity. We describe models of Fluorescent Dark Matte...

  13. X-ray spectroscopy of the ADC source X1822-371 with Chandra and XMM-Newton

    CERN Document Server

    Iaria, R; D'Aì, A; Burderi, L; Mineo, T; Riggio, A; Papitto, A; Robba, N R

    2012-01-01

    The eclipsing low-mass X-ray binary X1822-371 is the prototype of the accretion disc corona (ADC) sources. We analyse two Chandra observations and one XMM-Newton observation to study the discrete features and their variation as a function of the orbital phase, deriving constraints on the temperature, density, and location of the plasma responsible for emission lines. The HETGS and XMM/Epic-pn observed X1822-371 for 140 and 50 ks, respectively. We extracted an averaged spectrum and five spectra from five selected orbital-phase intervals that are 0.04-0.25, 0.25-0.50, 0.50-0.75, 0.75-0.95, and, finally, 0.95-1.04; the orbital phase zero corresponds to the eclipse time. All spectra cover the energy band between 0.35 and 12 keV. We confirm the presence of local neutral matter that partially covers the X-ray emitting region; the equivalent hydrogen column is $5 \\times 10^{22}$ cm$ ^{-2}$ and the covered fraction is about 60-65%. We identify emission lines from highly ionised elements, and a prominent fluorescence ...

  14. Corona, Jet, and Relativistic Line Models for Suzaku/RXTE/Chandra-HETG Observations of the Cygnus X-1 Hard State

    CERN Document Server

    Nowak, Michael A; Trowbridge, Sarah N; Markoff, Sera B; Wilms, Joern; Pottschmidt, Katja; Coppi, Paolo; Maitra, Dipankar; Davis, John E; Tramper, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Using Suzaku and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, we have conducted a series of four simultaneous observations of the galactic black hole candidate Cyg X-1 in what were historically faint and spectrally hard low states. Additionally, all of these observations occurred near superior conjunction with our line of sight to the X-ray source passing through the dense phases of the focused wind from the mass donating secondary. One of our observations was also simultaneous with observations by the Chandra-High Energy Transmission Grating. These latter spectra are crucial for revealing the ionized absorption due to the secondary's focused wind. Such absorption is present and must be accounted for in all four spectra. These simultaneous data give an unprecedented view of the 0.8-300 keV spectrum of Cyg X-1, and hence bear upon both corona and X-ray emitting jet models of black hole hard states. Three models fit the spectra well: coronae with thermal or mixed thermal/non-thermal electron populations, and jets. All thre...

  15. Evidence for a high energy curvature in the XMM-Newton spectrum of the ULX NGC1313 X-1

    CERN Document Server

    Dewangan, G C; Rao, A R

    2005-01-01

    ASCA X-ray spectra of many ULXs were described in terms of optically thick emission from hot (kT ~1-2keV) accretion disks, while recent XMM-Newton and Chandra observations have revealed a cool (kT ~0.2keV), soft X-ray excess emission from a number of them. Here we utilize improved calibration and high signal-to-noise XMM-Newton spectra of NGC1313 X-1 to present evidence for a cool (~0.2keV) soft excess and a curved or a cutoff power-law (Gamma ~1-1.5, E_cutoff ~3-8keV). The high energy curvature may also be described by a hot (~1-2.5keV) multicolor disk blackbody. The soft excess emission is unlikely to arise from a cool disk as its blackbody temperature is similar in three XMM-Newton observations, despite a change in the observed flux by a factor of about two. Thus, previous estimates of the black hole mass of 1000Msun for NGC1313 X-1 based on the temperature of the soft excess emission is unlikely to be correct. The power-law cutoff energy is found to decrease from ~8keV to \\~3keV when the ULX brightened by...

  16. Anatomy of the AGN in NGC 5548: III. The high-energy view with NuSTAR and INTEGRAL

    CERN Document Server

    Ursini, F; Petrucci, P -O; Matt, G; Cappi, M; Bianchi, S; Kaastra, J; Harrison, F; Walton, D J; di Gesu, L; Costantini, E; De Marco, B; Kriss, G A; Mehdipour, M; Paltani, S; Peterson, B M; Ponti, G; Steenbrugge, K C

    2015-01-01

    We describe the analysis of the seven broad-band X-ray continuum observations of the archetypal Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 that were obtained with XMM-Newton or Chandra, simultaneously with high-energy (> 10 keV) observations with NuSTAR and INTEGRAL. These data were obtained as part of a multiwavelength campaign undertaken from the summer of 2013 till early 2014. We find evidence of a high-energy cut-off in at least one observation, which we attribute to thermal Comptonization, and a constant reflected component that is likely due to neutral material at least a few light months away from the continuum source. We confirm the presence of strong, partial covering X-ray absorption as the explanation for the sharp decrease in flux through the soft X-ray band. The obscurers appear to be variable in column density and covering fraction on time scales as short as weeks. A fit of the average spectrum over the range 0.3-400 keV with a realistic Comptonization model indicates the presence of a hot corona with a temperat...

  17. The Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO): An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    1999-01-01

    Significant advances in science inevitably occur when the state of the art in instrumentation improves. NASA's newest Great Observatory, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO) -- formally known as the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) -- launched on July 23, 1999 and represents such an advance. The CXO is designed to study the x-ray emission from all categories of astronomical objects from normal stars to quasars.

  18. A Pair Polarimeter for High Energy Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedeschi, David; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Abbott, D.; Vlahovic, B.; Hotta, T.; Kohri, H.; Matsumura, T.; Mibe, T.; Nakano, T.; Yurita, T.; Zegers, R.; Khandaker, M.; Feldman, G.; O'Rielly, G. V.; Wood, M.; Asai, G.; Rudge, A.; Weilhammer, P.

    2001-10-01

    The physics program at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility includes fundamental experiments with polarized photon beams in the GeV energy range. To measure the degree of photon polarization, a photon polarimeter based on the detection of e^+e^- pairs has been developed for use in Hall B and was recently tested at the LEPS facility at SPring-8 in Japan. The use of silicon micro-strip detectors allows for the first time the measurement of the angle correlation in electron-positron pair production by high energy photons incident on an amorphous converter. Theoretical calculations of the pair production process show an asymmetry σ_allel/σ_⊥ ~ 1.7 in a wide range of photon energies. Experimental results from the measurement of the pair asymmetry using 2 GeV photons from the SPring-8 facility will be presented.

  19. Energy harvesting in high voltage measuring techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żyłka, Pawel; Doliński, Marcin

    2016-02-01

    The paper discusses selected problems related to application of energy harvesting (that is, generating electricity from surplus energy present in the environment) to supply autonomous ultra-low-power measurement systems applicable in high voltage engineering. As a practical example of such implementation a laboratory model of a remote temperature sensor is presented, which is self-powered by heat generated in a current-carrying busbar in HV- switchgear. Presented system exploits a thermoelectric harvester based on a passively cooled Peltier module supplying micro-power low-voltage dc-dc converter driving energy-efficient temperature sensor, microcontroller and a fibre-optic transmitter. Performance of the model in laboratory simulated conditions are presented and discussed.

  20. Low to high temperature energy conversion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C. G. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method for converting heat energy from low temperature heat sources to higher temperature was developed. It consists of a decomposition chamber in which ammonia is decomposed into hydrogen and nitrogen by absorbing heat of decomposition from a low temperature energy source. A recombination reaction then takes place which increases the temperature of a fluid significantly. The system is of use for the efficient operation of compact or low capital investment turbine driven electrical generators, or in other applications, to enable chemical reactions that have a critical lower temperature to be used. The system also recovers heat energy from low temperature heat sources, such as solar collectors or geothermal sources, and converts it to high temperatures.

  1. The End of Days -- Chandra Catches X-ray Glow From Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Through a combination of serendipity and skill, scientists have used NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory to capture a rare glimpse of X-radiation from the early phases of a supernova, one of the most violent events in nature. Although more than a thousand supernovas have been observed by optical astronomers, the early X-ray glow from the explosions has been detected in less than a dozen cases. The Chandra observations were made under the direction of a team of scientists from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, led by Walter Lewin and his graduate student, Derek Fox. When combined with simultaneous observations by radio and optical telescopes, the X-ray observations tell about the thickness of the shell that was blown off, its density, its speed, and how much material was shed by the star before it exploded. Chandra observed an X-ray glow from SN1999em with the total power of 50,000 suns. Ten days later it observed the supernova for another nine hours, and found that the X rays had faded to half their previous intensity. The optical luminosity, which had the brightness of 200 million suns, had faded somewhat less. No radio emission was detected at any time. With this information, the MIT group and their colleagues are already piecing together a picture of the catastrophic explosion. Observations by optical astronomers showed that SN1999em was a Type II supernova produced by the collapse of the core of a star ten or more times as massive as the Sun. The intense heat generated in the collapse produces a cataclysmic rebound that sends high speed debris flying outward at speeds in excess of 20 million miles per hour. The debris crashes into matter shed by the former star before the explosion. This awesome collision generates shock waves that heat expanding debris to three million degrees. The X-ray glow from this hot gas was detected by Chandra and gives astrophysicists a better understanding of the dynamics of the explosion, as well as the

  2. High-performance computing system for high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we present technical details and recent developments for a computing cluster working in a GRID environment, configured for high energy physics experiments at the National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering. Main ideas and concepts behind the GRID technology are described. Two Virtual Organizations (VO) LHCb and ILC using GRID resources for Monte Carlo production, data analysis and data storage are presented together with the recently initiated development of their specific tools. (authors)

  3. 10+ more years of Chandra-XMM-Newton Synergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, B.

    2016-06-01

    In this current golden age of X-ray astronomy, the frontiers of the X-ray Universe are continually expanding in multiple, often unexpected, directions, due to the extraordinary success and longevity of both ESA's XMM-Newton and NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. These two ground-breaking, major observatories are supported by a number of smaller, more focused missions which feed into and expand the discovery space of X-ray astronomy even further. With the prospect of another decade of observing, now is an excellent time to take stock of how far we have come, and to look forward to the future with a view to maximizing the scientific legacy of both XMM-Newton and Chandra. This not only involves optimizing the contents of the archives and the impact of the science results, but also laying the ground-work for the next generation of X-ray telescopes, led by ESA's Athena mission in the late 2020s. I will summarize the synergy between XMM-Newton and Chandra, including complementary capabilities which facilitate coordinated observations and science programs, and overlapping capabilities which often provide the necessary confirmation (or not) of new, marginal and/or controversial results.

  4. Chandra Observation of Abell 2065: An Unequal Mass Merger?

    CERN Document Server

    Chatzikos, M; Sarazin, C L; Chatzikos, Marios; Sarazin, Craig L.

    2006-01-01

    We present an analysis of a 41 ks Chandra observation of the merging cluster Abell 2065 with the ACIS-I detector. Previous observations with ROSAT and ASCA provided evidence for an ongoing merger, but also suggested that there were two surviving cooling cores, which were associated with the two cD galaxies in the center of the cluster. The Chandra observation reveals only one X-ray surface brightness peak, which is associated with the more luminous, southern cD galaxy. The gas related with that peak is cool and displaced slightly from the position of the cD. The data suggest that this cool material has formed a cold front. On the other hand, in the higher spatial resolution Chandra image, the second feature to the north is not associated with the northern cD; rather, it appears to be a trail of gas behind the main cD. We argue that only one of the two cooling cores has survived the merger, although it is possible that the northern cD may not have possessed a cool core prior to the merger. We use the cool core...

  5. The evolution of high energy accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courant, E.D.

    1994-08-01

    Accelerators have been devised and built for two reasons: In the first place, by physicists who needed high energy particles in order to have a means to explore the interactions between particles that probe the fundamental elementary forces of nature. And conversely, sometimes accelerator builders produce new machines for higher energy than ever before just because it can be done, and then challenge potential users to make new discoveries with the new means at hand. These two approaches or motivations have gone hand in hand. This lecture traces how high energy particle accelerators have grown from tools used for esoteric small-scale experiments to the gigantic projects of today. So far all the really high-energy machines built and planned in the world--except the SLC--have been ring accelerators and storage rings using the strong-focusing method. But this method has not removed the energy limit, it has only pushed it higher. It would seem unlikely that one can go beyond the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)--but in fact a workshop was held in Sicily in November 1991, concerned with the question of extrapolating to 100 TeV. Other acceleration and beam-forming methods are now being discussed--collective fields, laser acceleration, wake-field accelerators etc., all aimed primarily at making linear colliders possible and more attractive than with present radiofrequency methods. So far it is not entirely clear which of these schemes will dominate particle physics in the future--maybe something that has not been thought of as yet.

  6. [Experimental and theoretical high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are carrying out a research program in high energy experimental particle physics. Studies of high energy hadronic interactions and leptoproduction processes continue using several experimental techniques. Progress has been made on the study of multiparticle production processes in nuclei. Ultra-high energy cosmic ray nucleus-nucleus interactions have been investigated by the Japanese American Cosmic Emulsion Experiment (JACEE) using balloon-borne emulsion chamber detectors. In the area of particle astrophysics, our studies of cosmic ray nuclear interactions have enabled us to make the world's most accurate determination of the composition of the cosmic rays above 1013 eV. We have the only detector that can observe interaction vertices and identify particles at energies up to 10--15 eV. Our observations are getting close to placing limits on the acceleration mechanisms postulated for pulsars in which the spin and magnetic moment axes are at different angles. In June, 1989 approval was given by NASA for our participation in the Space Station program. The SCINATT experiment will make use of emulsion chamber detectors, similar to the planned JACEE hybrid balloon flight detectors. These detectors will permit precise determination of secondary particle charges, momenta and rapidities, and the accumulation of data will be at least a factor of 10 to 100 greater than in balloon experiments. Emulsion chamber techniques are also employed in an experiment using accelerator heavy ion beams at CERN and Brookhaven National Laboratory to investigate particle production processes in central collisions of nuclei in the energy range 15--200A GeV. Our study of hadroproduction in lepton interactions is continuing with approval of another 8 months run for deep inelastic muon scattering experiment E665 at Fermilab

  7. The evolution of high energy accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accelerators have been devised and built for two reasons: In the first place, by physicists who needed high energy particles in order to have a means to explore the interactions between particles that probe the fundamental elementary forces of nature. And conversely, sometimes accelerator builders produce new machines for higher energy than ever before just because it can be done, and then challenge potential users to make new discoveries with the new means at hand. These two approaches or motivations have gone hand in hand. This lecture traces how high energy particle accelerators have grown from tools used for esoteric small-scale experiments to the gigantic projects of today. So far all the really high-energy machines built and planned in the world--except the SLC--have been ring accelerators and storage rings using the strong-focusing method. But this method has not removed the energy limit, it has only pushed it higher. It would seem unlikely that one can go beyond the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)--but in fact a workshop was held in Sicily in November 1991, concerned with the question of extrapolating to 100 TeV. Other acceleration and beam-forming methods are now being discussed--collective fields, laser acceleration, wake-field accelerators etc., all aimed primarily at making linear colliders possible and more attractive than with present radiofrequency methods. So far it is not entirely clear which of these schemes will dominate particle physics in the future--maybe something that has not been thought of as yet

  8. Lectures on High-Energy Neutrino Astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilometer-scale neutrino detectors such as IceCube are discovery instruments covering nuclear and particle physics, cosmology and astronomy. Examples of their multidisciplinary missions include the search for the particle nature of dark matter and for additional small dimensions of space. In the end, their conceptual design is very much anchored to the observational fact that Nature produces protons and photons with energies in excess of 1020 and 1013 eV, respectively. The cosmic ray connection sets the scale of cosmic neutrino fluxes. In this context, we discuss the first results of the completed AMANDA detector and the science reach of its extension, IceCube. Similar experiments are under construction in the Mediterranean. Neutrino astronomy is also expanding in new directions with efforts to detect air showers, acoustic and radio signals initiated by super-EeV neutrinos. The outline of these lectures is as follows: Introduction Cosmic Neutrinos Associated with the Highest Energy Cosmic Rays Why Kilometer-Scale Detectors? Blueprints of Cosmic Accelerators: Gamma Ray Bursts and Active Galaxies High Energy Neutrino Telescopes: Methodologies of Neutrino Detection High Energy Neutrino Telescopes: Status

  9. High energy electron-positron physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, Ahmed

    1988-01-01

    With the termination of the physics program at PETRA, and with the start of TRISTAN and the SLC and later LEP, an era of e+e- physics has come to an end and a new one begins. The field is changing from a field of few specialists, to becoming one of the mainstream efforts of the high energy community. It seems appropriate at this moment to summarize what has been learned over the past years, in a way most useful to any high energy physicists, in particular to newcomers in the e+e- field. This is the purpose of the book. This book should be used as a reference for future workers in the field of

  10. Origin of the universe and high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this book it is briefly exposed what it is done in the world in relation with the high energy physics. Also, it is presented a brief historical description of the earth evolution, the universe and physics in general. This book counts with eight chapters. The first chapter deals with the relationship of man with science. The second chapter speaks about the origin of universe. The third chapter comments about the stars and galaxies formation. The fourth chapter treats how the scientists and researchers continue to studying the subnuclear world. The fifth chapter deals with subjects and models of nuclear physics. In the sixth chapter it is described the function of the particles accelerator. The seventh chapter comments about the multidisciplinary aspects of the research of elementary particles. Finally, the eighth chapter deals with the advances of high energy physics in the andean region of Latin America. (author)

  11. Compilation of current high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation of current high-energy physics experiments is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and the nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), KEK, Rutherford (RHEL), Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. Nominally, the compilation includes summaries of all high-energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about June 1978, and had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1975. The experimental summaries are supplemented with three indexes to the compilation, several vocabulary lists giving names or abbreviations used, and a short summary of the beams at each of the laboratories (except Rutherford). The summaries themselves are included on microfiche

  12. New Prospects in High Energy Astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blandford, Roger; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-11-15

    Recent discoveries using TeV, X-ray and radio telescopes as well as Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray arrays are leading to new insights into longstanding puzzles in high energy astrophysics. Many of these insights come from combining observations throughout the electromagnetic and other spectra as well as evidence assembled from different types of source to propose general principles. Issues discussed in this general overview include methods of accelerating relativistic particles, and amplifying magnetic field, the dynamics of relativistic outflows and the nature of the prime movers that power them. Observational approaches to distinguishing hadronic, leptonic and electromagnetic outflows and emission mechanisms are discussed along with probes of the velocity field and the confinement mechanisms. Observations with GLAST promise to be very prescriptive for addressing these problems.

  13. High energy physics at UC Riverside

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    This report discusses progress made for the following two tasks: experimental high energy physics, Task A, and theoretical high energy physics, Task B. Task A1 covers hadron collider physics. Information for Task A1 includes: personnel/talks/publications; D0: proton-antiproton interactions at 2 TeV; SDC: proton-proton interactions at 40 TeV; computing facilities; equipment needs; and budget notes. The physics program of Task A2 has been the systematic study of leptons and hadrons. Information covered for Task A2 includes: personnel/talks/publications; OPAL at LEP; OPAL at LEP200; CMS at LHC; the RD5 experiment; LSND at LAMPF; and budget notes. The research activities of the Theory Group are briefly discussed and a list of completed or published papers for this period is given.

  14. High energy density redox flow device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Carter, W. Craig; Ho, Bryan Y; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

    2014-05-13

    Redox flow devices are described in which at least one of the positive electrode or negative electrode-active materials is a semi-solid or is a condensed ion-storing electroactive material, and in which at least one of the electrode-active materials is transported to and from an assembly at which the electrochemical reaction occurs, producing electrical energy. The electronic conductivity of the semi-solid is increased by the addition of conductive particles to suspensions and/or via the surface modification of the solid in semi-solids (e.g., by coating the solid with a more electron conductive coating material to increase the power of the device). High energy density and high power redox flow devices are disclosed. The redox flow devices described herein can also include one or more inventive design features. In addition, inventive chemistries for use in redox flow devices are also described.

  15. Power Supplies for High Energy Particle Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Pranab Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The on-going research and the development projects with Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland has generated enormous enthusiasm and interest amongst all to know about the ultimate findings on `God's Particle'. This paper has made an attempt to unfold the power supply requirements and the methodology adopted to provide the stringent demand of such high energy particle accelerators during the initial stages of the search for the ultimate particles. An attempt has also been made to highlight the present status on the requirement of power supplies in some high energy accelerators with a view that, precautionary measures can be drawn during design and development from earlier experience which will be of help for the proposed third generation synchrotron to be installed in India at a huge cost.

  16. High energy physics at UC Riverside

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses progress made for the following two tasks: experimental high energy physics, Task A, and theoretical high energy physics, Task B. Task A1 covers hadron collider physics. Information for Task A1 includes: personnel/talks/publications; D0: proton-antiproton interactions at 2 TeV; SDC: proton-proton interactions at 40 TeV; computing facilities; equipment needs; and budget notes. The physics program of Task A2 has been the systematic study of leptons and hadrons. Information covered for Task A2 includes: personnel/talks/publications; OPAL at LEP; OPAL at LEP200; CMS at LHC; the RD5 experiment; LSND at LAMPF; and budget notes. The research activities of the Theory Group are briefly discussed and a list of completed or published papers for this period is given

  17. Thermodynamic perturbations in the X-ray halo of 33 clusters of galaxies observed with Chandra ACIS

    CERN Document Server

    Hofmann, F; Nandra, K; Clerc, N; Gaspari, M

    2016-01-01

    In high-resolution X-ray observations of the hot plasma in clusters of galaxies significant structures caused by AGN feedback, mergers, and turbulence can be detected. Many clusters have been observed by Chandra in great depth and at high resolution. Using archival data taken with the Chandra ACIS instrument the aim was to study thermodynamic perturbations of the X-ray emitting plasma and to apply this to better understand the thermodynamic and dynamic state of the intra cluster medium (ICM). We analysed deep observations for a sample of 33 clusters with more than 100 ks of Chandra exposure each at distances between redshift 0.025 and 0.45. The combined exposure of the sample is 8 Ms. Fitting emission models to different regions of the extended X-ray emission we searched for perturbations in density, temperature, pressure, and entropy of the hot plasma. For individual clusters we mapped the thermodynamic properties of the ICM and measured their spread in circular concentric annuli. Comparing the spread of dif...

  18. Semiconductor High-Energy Radiation Scintillation Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Kastalsky, A.; Luryi, S.; Spivak, B

    2006-01-01

    We propose a new scintillation-type detector in which high-energy radiation produces electron-hole pairs in a direct-gap semiconductor material that subsequently recombine producing infrared light to be registered by a photo-detector. The key issue is how to make the semiconductor essentially transparent to its own infrared light, so that photons generated deep inside the semiconductor could reach its surface without tangible attenuation. We discuss two ways to accomplish this, one based on d...

  19. Emerging Computing Technologies in High Energy Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Farbin, Amir

    2009-01-01

    While in the early 90s High Energy Physics (HEP) lead the computing industry by establishing the HTTP protocol and the first web-servers, the long time-scale for planning and building modern HEP experiments has resulted in a generally slow adoption of emerging computing technologies which rapidly become commonplace in business and other scientific fields. I will overview some of the fundamental computing problems in HEP computing and then present the current state and future potential of empl...

  20. Networking for High Energy and Nuclear Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, Harvey B.

    2007-01-01

    This report gives an overview of the status and outlook for the world's research networks and major international links used by the high energy physics and other scientific communities, network technology advances on which our community depends and in which we have an increasingly important role, and the problem of the Digital Divide, which is a primary focus of ICFA's Standing Committee on Inter-regional Connectivity (SCIC). Wide area networks of sufficient, and rapidly increasing end-to...

  1. HIGH ENERGY RATE EXTRUSION OF URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, L.

    1963-07-23

    A method of extruding uranium at a high energy rate is described. Conditions during the extrusion are such that the temperature of the metal during extrusion reaches a point above the normal alpha to beta transition, but the metal nevertheless remains in the alpha phase in accordance with the Clausius- Clapeyron equation. Upon exiting from the die, the metal automatically enters the beta phase, after which the metal is permitted to cool. (AEC)

  2. Statistical Learning in High Energy and Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmermann, J.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis studies the performance of statistical learning methods in high energy and astrophysics where they have become a standard tool in physics analysis. They are used to perform complex classification or regression by intelligent pattern recognition. This kind of artificial intelligence is achieved by the principle ``learning from examples'': The examples describe the relationship between detector events and their classification. The application of statistical learning ...

  3. Physics with nuclei at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physics with nuclei at high energy is not reducible to a superposition of interactions involving individual nucleons; rather, qualitatively new phenomena show up. This is what one concludes from recent data on dilepton production off nuclei and on elastic proton-nucleus scattering. Furthermore, recent analyses of ion collisions at BNL and CERN reveal a number of non-conventional features. The relevant contributions to this Rencontre are summarized here. 37 refs., 16 figs

  4. Automatic Keywording of High Energy Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Dallman, David (CERN); Le Meur, Jean-Yves; GreyNet, Grey Literature Network Service

    2000-01-01

    Bibliographic databases were developed from the traditional library card catalogue in order to enable users to access library documents via various types of bibliographic information, such as title, author, series or conference date. In addition these catalogues sometimes contained some form of indexation by subject, such as the Universal (or Dewey) Decimal Classification used for books. With the introduction of the eprint archives, set up by the High Energy Physics (HEP) Community in the ear...

  5. High-Energy Compton Scattering Light Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Hartemann, Fred V; Barty, C; Crane, John; Gibson, David J; Hartouni, E P; Tremaine, Aaron M

    2005-01-01

    No monochromatic, high-brightness, tunable light sources currently exist above 100 keV. Important applications that would benefit from such new hard x-ray sources include: nuclear resonance fluorescence spectroscopy, time-resolved positron annihilation spectroscopy, and MeV flash radiography. The peak brightness of Compton scattering light sources is derived for head-on collisions and found to scale with the electron beam brightness and the drive laser pulse energy. This gamma 2

  6. Very high energy gamma ray astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Whipple Observatory High Resolution Camera will be used in a vigorous program of observations to search for new sources of very-high-energy gamma rays. In addition, a search for antimatter using the moon-earth system as an ion spectrometer will be begun. The first phase of GRANITE, the new 37-element 11-m camera, will be concluded with first light scheduled for September, 1991. The two cameras will operate in support of the Gamma Ray Observatory mission in the winter of 1991/2

  7. High energy behaviour of nonabelian gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high energy behavior (in the Regge limit) of nonabelian gauge theories is reviewed. After a general remark concerning the question to what extent the Regge limit can be approached within perturbation theory, we first review the reggeization of elementary particles within nonabelian gauge theories. Then the derivation of a unitary high energy description of a massive (= spontaneously broken) nonabelian gauge model is described, which results in a complete reggeon calculus. There is strong evidence that the zero mass limit of this reggeon calculus exists, thus giving rise to the hope that the Regge behavior in pure Yang-Mills theories (QCD) can be reached in this way. In the final part of these lectures two possible strategies for solving this reggeon calculus (both for the massive and the massless case) are outlined. One of them leads to a geometrical picture in which the distribution of the wee partons obeys a diffusion law. The other one makes contact with reggeon field theory and predicts that QCD in the high energy limit is described by critical reggeon field theory. (orig.)

  8. Data preservation in High Energy Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data from high-energy physics experiments are collected with significant financial and human effort and are mostly unique. However, until recently no coherent strategy existed for data preservation and re-use, and many important and complex data sets have simply been lost. While the current focus is on the LHC at CERN, in the current period several important and unique experimental programs at other facilities are coming to an end, including those at HERA, b-factories and the Tevatron. To address this issue, an inter-experimental study group on HEP data preservation and long-term analysis (DPHEP) was convened at the end of 2008. The group now aims to publish a full and detailed review of the present status of data preservation in high energy physics. This contribution summarises the results of the DPHEP study group, describing the challenges of data preservation in high energy physics and the group's first conclusions and recommendations. The physics motivation for data preservation, generic computing and preservation models, technological expectations and governance aspects at local and international levels are examined.

  9. Data Preservation in High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kogler, Roman; Steder, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Data from high-energy physics experiments are collected with significant financial and human effort and are mostly unique. However, until recently no coherent strategy existed for data preservation and re-use, and many important and complex data sets have simply been lost. While the current focus is on the LHC at CERN, in the current period several important and unique experimental programs at other facilities are coming to an end, including those at HERA, b-factories and the Tevatron. To address this issue, an inter-experimental study group on HEP data preservation and long-term analysis (DPHEP) was convened at the end of 2008. The group now aims to publish a full and detailed review of the present status of data preservation in high energy physics. This contribution summarises the results of the DPHEP study group, describing the challenges of data preservation in high energy physics and the group's first conclusions and recommendations. The physics motivation for data preservation, generic computing and pre...

  10. High-energy injuries of the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obert, L; Loisel, F; Jardin, E; Gasse, N; Lepage, D

    2016-02-01

    High-energy injuries to the wrist gather complex fractures of the distal radius, radiocarpal dislocations, perilunate dislocations, and other intracarpal dislocations. Depending on the energy of the injury and the position of the wrist at the time of impact, the patient, often a young male with a high functional demand, presents one of these injuries associating fracture(s) and ligament injury. The trauma is often bilateral, with proximal lesions (elbow) very often associated with contusion or compression of the median nerve. Diagnosis is confirmed by wrist X-rays, which are sufficient to determine treatment for radiocarpal and perilunate dislocations. In cases of distal radius fractures or other intracarpal dislocations, a preoperative CT is necessary. Reduction of the dislocation and relief of neurovascular compression are performed immediately. The final treatment of each lesion (bone fixation, ligament repair) can be undertaken simultaneously or delayed, depending on the patient and the lesions. Cartilage lesions, resulting from the high-energy injury, can be estimated using arthroscopy but cannot be repaired and determine the prognosis. The surgeon's objective is to restore joint congruence, which does not prevent stiffness, the main complication of these rare injuries, which the surgeon must know how to recognize and treat. PMID:26782706

  11. Target technology of high energy neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a facility of high energy neutron source for materials research and development, Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) is a strong candidate. The FMIT is designed to study the irradiation effect of fusion neutron on a fusion reactor materials. The FMIT generates a high-flux, high-energy neutron, which is produced in a stripping reaction by impinging a 3.5 MeV-0.1A beam of deuterons on a flowing lithium target. Target technology obtained in the FMIT will be useful for Energy Selective Neutron Irradiation Test Facility (ESNIT) and IFMIF of D-Li stripping reaction facility. In the first report (I), the flowing lithium target of the FMIT was reviewed, and some technical considerations in design were pointed out. In the second report (II), the target assembly and target material were proposed as the option of the HEDEL reference design of FMIT in order to improve the hazard and economy for the Li system: Firstly, the exchangeable target back wall and the measures to minimize the outside device damage in case of back wall breaking, and secondly, the option of molten fluoride salt as target material were proposed. (M.T.)

  12. 14 CFR 27.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 27... Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must be able to...

  13. 14 CFR 29.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 29... § 29.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  14. 14 CFR 25.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 25... § 25.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  15. Deep Chandra Observations of HCG 16 - I. Active Nuclei, Star formation and Galactic Winds

    CERN Document Server

    O'Sullivan, E; Vrtilek, J M; Giacintucci, S; Trevisan, M; David, L P; Ponman, T J; Mamon, G A; Raychaudhury, S

    2014-01-01

    We present new, deep Chandra X-ray and Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope 610~MHz observations of the spiral-galaxy-rich compact group HCG 16, which we use to examine nuclear activity, star formation and the high luminosity X-ray binary populations in the major galaxies. We confirm the presence of obscured active nuclei in NGC 833 and NGC 835, and identify a previously unrecognized nuclear source in NGC 838. All three nuclei are variable on timescales of months to years, and for NGC 833 and NGC 835 this is most likely caused by changes in accretion rate. The deep Chandra observations allow us to detect for the first time an Fe-K$\\alpha$ emission line in the spectrum of the Seyfert 2 nucleus of NGC 835. We find that NGC 838 and NGC 839 are both starburst-dominated systems, with only weak nuclear activity, in agreement with previous optical studies. We estimate the star formation rates in the two galaxies from their X-ray and radio emission, and compare these results with estimates from the infra-red and ultra-vio...

  16. A Chandra/ACIS Study of 30 Doradus I. Superbubbles and Supernova Remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Townsley, L K; Broos, P S; Chu, Y H; Feigelson, E D; Garmire, G P; Pavlov, G G

    2006-01-01

    We present an X-ray tour of diffuse emission in the 30 Doradus star-forming complex in the Large Magellanic Cloud using high-spatial-resolution X-ray images and spatially-resolved spectra obtained with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The dominant X-ray feature of the 30 Doradus nebula is the intricate network of diffuse emission generated by interacting stellar winds and supernovae working together to create vast superbubbles filled with hot plasma. We construct maps of the region showing variations in plasma temperature (T = 3--9 million degrees), absorption (N_H = 1--6 x 10^{21} cm^{-2}), and absorption-corrected X-ray surface brightness (S_X = 3--126 x 10^{31} ergs s^{-1} pc^{-2}). Enhanced images reveal the pulsar wind nebula in the composite supernova remnant N157B and the Chandra data show spectral evolution from non-thermal synchrotron emission in the N157B core to a thermal plasma in its outer regions. In a companion paper we show that R136, the central mass...

  17. Chandra Observations and Modeling of Geocoronal Charge Exchange X-Ray Emission During Solar Wind Gusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornbleuth, Marc; Wargelin, Bradford J.; Juda, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) X-rays are emitted when highly charged solar wind ions such as O7+ collide with neutral gas. The best known examples of this occur around comets, but SWCX emission also arises in the Earth's tenuous outer atmosphere and throughout the heliosphere as neutral H and He from the interstellar medium flows into the solar system. This geocoronal and heliospheric emission comprises much of the soft X-ray background and is seen in every X-ray observation. Geocoronal emission, although usually weaker than heliospheric emission, arises within a few tens of Earth radii and therefore responds much more quickly (on time scales of less than an hour) to changes in solar wind intensity than the widely distributed heliospheric emission.We have studied a dozen Chandra observations when the flux of solar wind protons and O7+ ions was at its highest. These gusts of wind cause correspondingly abrupt changes in geocoronal SWCX X-ray emission,which may or may not be apparent in Chandra data depending on a given observation's line of sight through the magnetosphere. We compare observed changes in the X-ray background with predictions from a fully 3D analysis of SWCX emission based on magnetospheric simulations using the BATS-R-US model.

  18. Chandra view of the dynamically young cluster of galaxies A1367 II. point sources

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, M

    2002-01-01

    A 40 ks \\emph{Chandra} ACIS-S observation of the dynamically young cluster A1367 yields new insights on X-ray emission from cluster member galaxies. We detect 59 point-like sources in the ACIS field, of which 8 are identified with known cluster member galaxies. Thus in total 10 member galaxies are detected in X-rays when three galaxies discussed in paper I (Sun & Murray 2002; NGC 3860 is discussed in both papers) are included. The superior spatial resolution and good spectroscopy capability of \\chandra allow us to constrain the emission nature of these galaxies. Central nuclei, thermal halos and stellar components are revealed in their spectra. Four new low luminosity nuclei (LLAGN) are found, including an absorbed one (NGC 3861). This discovery makes the LLAGN/AGN content in this part of A1367 very high ($\\sim$ 20%). Thermal halos with temperatures around 0.5 - 0.8 keV are revealed in the spectra of two elliptical galaxies NGC 3842 and NGC 3837, which suggests that galactic coronae can survive in cluster...

  19. Chandra Multi-wavelength Plane (ChaMPlane) Survey Design and Initial Results

    CERN Document Server

    Grindlay, J; Hong, J S; Jenkins, J; Kim, D W; Schlegel, E M; Drake, J; Kashyap, V; Edmonds, P; Cohn, H; Lugger, P M; Cool, A; Grindlay, Jonathan; Zhao, Ping; Hong, JaeSub; Jenkins, Johnathan; Kim, Dong-Woo; Schlegel, Eric; Drake, Jeremy; Kashyap, Vinay; Edmonds, Peter; Cohn, Haldan; Lugger, Phyllis; Cool, Adrienne

    2002-01-01

    The Chandra Multiwavength Plane (ChaMPlane) Survey of the galactic plane incorporates serendipitous sources from selected Chandra pointings in or near the galactic plane (b 20 ksec; lack of bright diffuse or point sources) to measure or constrain the luminosity function of low-luminosity accretion sources in the Galaxy. The primary goal is to detect and identify accreting white dwarfs (cataclysmic variables, with space density still uncertain by a factor of >10-100), neutron stars and black holes (quiescent low mass X-ray binaries) to constrain their space densities and thus origin and evolution. Secondary objectives are to identify Be stars in high mass X-ray binaries and constrain their space densities, and to survey the H-R diagram for stellar coronal sources. A parallel optical imaging under the NOAO Long Term Survey program provides deep optical images using the Mosaic imager on the CTIO and KPNO 4-m telescopes. The 36arcmin X 36arcmin optical images (Halpha, R, V and I) cover ~5X the area of each enclos...

  20. Synchrotron Radiation from Outer Space and the Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    OpenAIRE

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2006-01-01

    The universe provides numerous extremely interesting astrophysical sources of synchrotron X radiation. The Chandra X-ray Observatory and other X-ray missions provide powerful probes of these and other cosmic X-ray sources. Chandra is the X-ray component of NASA's Great Observatory Program which also includes the Hubble Space telescope, the Spitzer Infrared Telescope Facility, and the now defunct Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. The Chandra X-Ray Observatory provides the best angular resolution ...

  1. Topics in calorimetry for high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These lectures focus on a series of topics now of interest or which have been of interest to designes of calorimeters in the past few years. The examples concentrate on calorimeters from DESY because its focus this year is on e-P physics, and on CDF and SDC because they are best known to the author. Calorimeters are, broadly speaking, devices to measure the total energy of particles. In general, no one device will be optimal for all types of particles. The two broadest classes of calorimeters in high energy physics are the electromagnetic calorimeters used primarily for photons and electrons, and the hadronic calorimeters used for most charged mesons and baryons. Most operate by absorbing and thereby measuring a significant amount of the incoming particles energy directly. Some particles may require special devices for their interactions and observation. Modern calorimeters are characterized by energy and position resolution, and cost and size. Calorimeter cost is often a trade-off between performance desired and money available. The optimum cost will require a careful choice of materials, reduction of the overall size of the detector, elimination of labor intensive construction techniques, and careful consideration of the cost of calibration systems. Since at least some of these requirements which optimize cost and resolution are contradictory, the ideal calorimeter in seldom what one ends up building

  2. Gamma-ray bursts at high and very high energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piron, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are extra-galactic and extremely energetic transient emissions of gamma rays, which are thought to be associated with the death of massive stars or the merger of compact objects in binary systems. Their huge luminosities involve the presence of a newborn stellar-mass black hole emitting a relativistic collimated outflow, which accelerates particles and produces non-thermal emissions from the radio domain to the highest energies. In this article, I review recent progresses in the understanding of GRB jet physics above 100 MeV, based on Fermi observations of bright GRBs. I discuss the physical implications of these observations and their impact on GRB modeling, and I present some prospects for GRB observation at very high energies in the near future. xml:lang="fr"

  3. Gamma-Ray Bursts at high and very high energies

    CERN Document Server

    Piron, F

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are extra-galactic and extremely energetic transient emissions of gamma rays, which are thought to be associated with the death of massive stars or the merger of compact objects in binary systems. Their huge luminosities involve the presence a newborn stellar-mass black hole emitting a relativistic collimated outflow, which accelerates particles and produces non-thermal emissions from the radio domain to the highest energies. In this article, I review recent progresses in the understanding of GRB jet physics above 100 MeV, based on Fermi observations of bright GRBs. I discuss the physical implications of these observations and their impact on GRB modeling, and I present some prospects for GRB observation at very high energies in the near future.

  4. Perspectives on future high energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samios, N.P.

    1996-12-31

    The author states two general ways in which one must proceed in an attempt to forecast the future of high energy physics. The first is to utilize the state of knowledge in the field and thereby provide theoretical and experimental guidance on future directions. The second approach is technical, namely, how well can one do in going to higher energies with present techniques or new accelerator principles. He concludes that the future strategy is straightforward. The present accelerator facilities must be upgraded and run to produce exciting and forefront research. At the same time, the theoretical tools should be sharpened both extrapolating from lower energies (100 GeV) to high (multi TeV) and vice versa. The US should be involved in the LHC, both in the accelerator and experimental areas. There should be an extensive R and D program on accelerators for a multi-TeV capability, emphasizing e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders. Finally, the international cooperative activities should be strengthened and maintained.

  5. High energy neutrino astronomy and its telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doing astronomy with photons of energies in excess of a GeV has turned out to be extremely challenging. Efforts are underway to develop instruments that may push astronomy to wavelengths smaller than 10-14 cm by mapping the sky using high energy neutrinos instead. Neutrino astronomy, born with the identification of thermonuclear fusion in the sun and the particle processes controlling the fate of a nearby supernova, will reach outside the galaxy and make measurements relevant to cosmology. The field is immersed in technology in the domains of particle physics to which many of its research goals are intellectually connected. To mind come the search for neutrino mass, cold dark matter (supersymmetric particles?) and the monopoles of the Standard Model. While a variety of collaborations are pioneering complementary methods by building telescopes with effective area in excess of 0.01 km2, we show here that the natural scale of a high energy neutrino telescope is 1 km2. With several thousand optical modules and a price tag unlikely to exceed 100 million dollars, the scope of a kilometer-scale instrument is similar to that of experiments presently being commissioned such as the SNO neutrino observatory in Canada and the Superkamiokande experiment in Japan

  6. Initial conditions in high-energy collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petreska, Elena

    This thesis is focused on the initial stages of high-energy collisions in the saturation regime. We start by extending the McLerran-Venugopalan distribution of color sources in the initial wave-function of nuclei in heavy-ion collisions. We derive a fourth-order operator in the action and discuss its relevance for the description of color charge distributions in protons in high-energy experiments. We calculate the dipole scattering amplitude in proton-proton collisions with the quartic action and find an agreement with experimental data. We also obtain a modification to the fluctuation parameter of the negative binomial distribution of particle multiplicities in proton-proton experiments. The result implies an advancement of the fourth-order action towards Gaussian when the energy is increased. Finally, we calculate perturbatively the expectation value of the magnetic Wilson loop operator in the first moments of heavy-ion collisions. For the magnetic flux we obtain a first non-trivial term that is proportional to the square of the area of the loop. The result is close to numerical calculations for small area loops.

  7. Theory Summary: Very High Energy Cosmic Rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Subir

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This is a summary of ISVHECRI 2012 from a theorist’s perspective. A hundred years after their discovery, there is renewed interest in very high energy cosmic raysand their interactions which can provide unique information on new physics well beyond the Standard Model if only we knew how to unambiguously decipher the experimental data. While the observational situation has improved dramatically on the past decade with regard to both improved statistics and better understood systematics, the long standing questions regarding the origin of cosmic rays remain only partially answered, while further questions have been raised by new data. A recent development discussed at this Symposium is the advent of forward physics data from several experiments at the LHC, which have broadly vindicated the air shower simulation Monte Carlos currently in use and reduced their uncertainties further. Nevertheless there is still a major extrapolation required to interpret the highest energy air showers observed which appear to be undergoing a puzzling change in their elemental composition, even casting doubt on whether the much vaunted GZK cutoff has indeedbeen observed. The situation is further compounded by the apparent disagreement between Auger and Telescope Array data. A crucial diagnostic will be provided by the detection of the accompanying ultra-high energy cosmic neutrinos — two intriguing events have recently been recorded by IceCube.

  8. Experimental heavy ion physics at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the research activities of the experimental high energy heavy ion physics group at Vanderbilt University carried out under Grant No. DE-FG05092ER40712 with the Department of Energy during the period Oct 1, 1992 to Nov 30, 1993. This research encompasses four areas of related inquiry in relativistic and high energy nuclear reactions. The preparation of the PHENIX experiment which has been approved as one of the two major experiments at RHIC to start in 1998. The RD10/RD45 Muon Identifier experiment which will provide essential input for the design of the Muon Endcap arm detector sub-system in PHENIX. The E855 Soft Photon Experiment at the AGS designed to clarify the status of a possible quark-gluon-plasma signature with presently available heavy-ion collisions. The construction CsI Ball detector project at Texas A ampersand M which is designed as part of a comprehensive detector system which will probe the nuclear equation of state in the 50 MeV/nucleon domain

  9. Grid Computing in High Energy Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the next two decades, major high energy physics (HEP) experiments, particularly at the Large Hadron Collider, will face unprecedented challenges to achieving their scientific potential. These challenges arise primarily from the rapidly increasing size and complexity of HEP datasets that will be collected and the enormous computational, storage and networking resources that will be deployed by global collaborations in order to process, distribute and analyze them.Coupling such vast information technology resources to globally distributed collaborations of several thousand physicists requires extremely capable computing infrastructures supporting several key areas: (1) computing (providing sufficient computational and storage resources for all processing, simulation and analysis tasks undertaken by the collaborations); (2) networking (deploying high speed networks to transport data quickly between institutions around the world); (3) software (supporting simple and transparent access to data and software resources, regardless of location); (4) collaboration (providing tools that allow members full and fair access to all collaboration resources and enable distributed teams to work effectively, irrespective of location); and (5) education, training and outreach (providing resources and mechanisms for training students and for communicating important information to the public).It is believed that computing infrastructures based on Data Grids and optical networks can meet these challenges and can offer data intensive enterprises in high energy physics and elsewhere a comprehensive, scalable framework for collaboration and resource sharing. A number of Data Grid projects have been underway since 1999. Interestingly, the most exciting and far ranging of these projects are led by collaborations of high energy physicists, computer scientists and scientists from other disciplines in support of experiments with massive, near-term data needs. I review progress in this

  10. High Energy Failure Containment for Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pektas, Pete; Baker, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this paper will be to investigate advancements and any commonality between spacecraft debris containment and the improvements being made in ballistic protection. Scope: This paper will focus on cross application of protection devices and methods, and how they relate to protecting humans from failures in spacecraft. The potential gain is to reduce the risk associated with hardware failure, while decreasing the weight and size of energy containment methods currently being used by the government and commercial industry. Method of Approach: This paper will examine testing that has already been accomplished in regards to the failure of high energy rotating hardware and compare it to advancements in ballistic protection. Examples are: DOT research and testing of turbine containment as documented in DOT/FAA/AR-96/110, DOT/FAA/AR-97/82, DOT/FAA/AR-98/22. It will also look at work accomplished by companies such as ApNano and IBD Deisenroth in the development of nano ceramics and nanometric steels. Other forms of energy absorbent materials and composites will also be considered and discussed. New Advances in State of the Art: There have been numerous advances in technology in regards to high energy debris containment and in the similar field of ballistic protection. This paper will discuss methods such as using impregnated or dry Kevlar, ceramic, and nano-technology which have been successfully tested but are yet to be utilized in spacecraft. Reports on tungsten disulfide nanotubes claim that they are 4-5 times stronger than steel and reports vary about the magnitude increase over Kevlar, but it appears to be somewhere in the range of 2-6 times stronger. This technology could also have applications in the protection of pressure vessels, motor housings, and hydraulic component failures.

  11. Semiconductor high-energy radiation scintillation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kastalsky, A. [University at Stony Brook, ECE Department and NY State Center for Advanced Sensor Technology, Stony Brook, NY 11794-2350 (United States); Luryi, S. [University at Stony Brook, ECE Department and NY State Center for Advanced Sensor Technology, Stony Brook, NY 11794-2350 (United States)]. E-mail: serge.luryi@stonybrook.edu; Spivak, B. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2006-09-15

    We propose a new scintillation-type detector in which high-energy radiation generates electron-hole pairs in a direct-gap semiconductor material that subsequently recombine producing infrared light to be registered by a photo-detector. The key issue is how to make the semiconductor essentially transparent to its own infrared light, so that photons generated deep inside the semiconductor could reach its surface without tangible attenuation. We discuss two ways to accomplish this, one based on doping the semiconductor with shallow impurities of one polarity type, preferably donors, the other by heterostructure bandgap engineering. The proposed semiconductor scintillator combines the best properties of currently existing radiation detectors and can be used for both simple radiation monitoring, like a Geiger counter, and for high-resolution spectrography of the high-energy radiation. An important advantage of the proposed detector is its fast response time, about 1 ns, essentially limited only by the recombination time of minority carriers. Notably, the fast response comes without any degradation in brightness. When the scintillator is implemented in a qualified semiconductor material (such as InP or GaAs), the photo-detector and associated circuits can be epitaxially integrated on the scintillator slab and the structure can be stacked-up to achieve virtually any desired absorption capability.

  12. High-Energy X-Ray Imaging of the Pulsar Wind Nebula MSH 15-52: Constraints on Particle Acceleration and Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hongjun; Madsen, Kristin K.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Fryer, Chris L.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Zhang, William W.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first images of the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) MSH 15-52 in the hard X-ray band (8 keV), as measured with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). Overall, the morphology of the PWN as measured by NuSTAR in the 3-7 keV band is similar to that seen in Chandra high-resolution imaging. However, the spatial extent decreases with energy, which we attribute to synchrotron energy losses as the particles move away from the shock. The hard-band maps show a relative deficit of counts in the northern region toward the RCW 89 thermal remnant, with significant asymmetry. We find that the integrated PWN spectra measured with NuSTAR and Chandra suggest that there is a spectral break at 6 keV, which may be explained by a break in the synchrotron emitting electron distribution at approximately 200 TeV and/or imperfect cross calibration. We also measure spatially resolved spectra, showing that the spectrum of the PWN softens away from the central pulsar B1509-58, and that there exists a roughly sinusoidal variation of spectral hardness in the azimuthal direction. We discuss the results using particle flow models. We find non-monotonic structure in the variation with distance of spectral hardness within 50 of the pulsar moving in the jet direction, which may imply particle and magnetic-field compression by magnetic hoop stress as previously suggested for this source. We also present two-dimensional maps of spectral parameters and find an interesting shell-like structure in the N(sub H) map. We discuss possible origins of the shell-like structure and their implications.

  13. High-energy X-ray imaging of the pulsar wind nebula MSH 15–52: constraints on particle acceleration and transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Hongjun; Kaspi, Victoria M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Madsen, Kristin K.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Grefenstette, Brian W. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Reynolds, Stephen P. [Physics Department, NC State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Fryer, Chris L. [CCS-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hailey, Charles J.; Mori, Kaya [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Zhang, William W. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    We present the first images of the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) MSH 15–52 in the hard X-ray band (≳8 keV), as measured with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). Overall, the morphology of the PWN as measured by NuSTAR in the 3-7 keV band is similar to that seen in Chandra high-resolution imaging. However, the spatial extent decreases with energy, which we attribute to synchrotron energy losses as the particles move away from the shock. The hard-band maps show a relative deficit of counts in the northern region toward the RCW 89 thermal remnant, with significant asymmetry. We find that the integrated PWN spectra measured with NuSTAR and Chandra suggest that there is a spectral break at 6 keV, which may be explained by a break in the synchrotron-emitting electron distribution at ∼200 TeV and/or imperfect cross calibration. We also measure spatially resolved spectra, showing that the spectrum of the PWN softens away from the central pulsar B1509–58, and that there exists a roughly sinusoidal variation of spectral hardness in the azimuthal direction. We discuss the results using particle flow models. We find non-monotonic structure in the variation with distance of spectral hardness within 50'' of the pulsar moving in the jet direction, which may imply particle and magnetic-field compression by magnetic hoop stress as previously suggested for this source. We also present two-dimensional maps of spectral parameters and find an interesting shell-like structure in the N {sub H} map. We discuss possible origins of the shell-like structure and their implications.

  14. University of Oklahoma - High Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skubic, Patrick L. [University of Oklahoma

    2013-07-31

    The High Energy Physics program at the University of Oklahoma, Pat Skubic, Principal Investigator, is attempting to understand nature at the deepest level using the most advanced experimental and theoretical tools. The four experimental faculty, Brad Abbott, Phil Gutierrez, Pat Skubic, and Mike Strauss, together with post-doctoral associates and graduate students, are finishing their work as part of the D0 collaboration at Fermilab, and increasingly focusing their investigations at the Large Hadron Collidor (LHC) as part of the ATLAS Collaboration. Work at the LHC has become even more exciting with the recent discovery by ATLAS and the other collaboration, CMS, of the long-sought Higgs boson, which plays a key role in generating masses for the elementary constituents of matter. Work of the OUHEP group has been in the three areas of hardware, software, and analysis. Now that the Higgs boson has been discovered, completing the Standard Model of fundamental physics, new efforts will focus on finding hints of physics beyond the standard model, such as supersymmetry. The OUHEP theory group (Kim Milton, PI) also consists of four faculty members, Howie Baer, Chung Kao, Kim Milton, and Yun Wang, and associated students and postdocs. They are involved in understanding fundamental issues in formulating theories of the microworld, and in proposing models that carry us past the Standard Model, which is an incomplete description of nature. They therefore work in close concert with their experimental colleagues. One also can study fundamental physics by looking at the large scale structure of the universe; in particular the ``dark energy'' that seems to be causing the universe to expand at an accelerating rate, effectively makes up about 3/4 of the energy in the universe, and yet is totally unidentified. Dark energy and dark matter, which together account for nearly all of the energy in the universe, are an important probe of fundamental physics at the very shortest

  15. Studies of high energy phenomena using muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report covers the activities of the NIU high energy physics group as supported by DOE contract AC02-87ER40368 during the period from July of 1990 to June of 1991 and from February to March 1992. Our group has three main efforts which will be discussed in this paper. The first is the D0 experiment at the Fermilab proton-antiproton collider, with major emphasis on its muon system. The second is the involvement of a portion of the group in Fermilab Experiment 789 which involved detection of meson decays. Finally, we discuss our work with the SDC collaboration at the SSC

  16. Future high energy colliders. Formal report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Report includes copies of transparencies and notes from the presentations made at the Symposium on Future High Energy Colliders, October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara California, that was made available by the authors. Editing, reduction and changes to the authors contributions were made only to fulfill the printing and publication requirements. We would like to take this opportunity and thank the speakers for their informative presentations and for providing copies of their transparencies and notes for inclusion in this Report

  17. UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherfoord, John P. [University of Arizona; Johns, Kenneth A. [University of Arizona; Shupe, Michael A. [University of Arizona; Cheu, Elliott C. [University of Arizona; Varnes, Erich W. [University of Arizona; Dienes, Keith [University of Arizona; Su, Shufang [University of Arizona; Toussaint, William Doug [University of Arizona; Sarcevic, Ina [University of Arizona

    2013-07-29

    The High Energy Physics Group at the University of Arizona has conducted forefront research in elementary particle physics. Our theorists have developed new ideas in lattice QCD, SUSY phenomenology, string theory phenomenology, extra spatial dimensions, dark matter, and neutrino astrophysics. The experimentalists produced significant physics results on the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider and on the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. In addition, the experimentalists were leaders in detector development and construction, and on service roles in these experiments.

  18. The High Energy Radiation Pattern from BFKLex

    CERN Document Server

    Chachamis, G

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a recent study on high-energy jet production in the multi-Regge limit done with the use of the Monte Carlo event generator BFKLex which includes collinear improvements in the form of double-log contributions. We will show results for the average transverse momentum and azimuthal angle of the final state jets when at least one of them is very forward in rapidity and another one is very backward. We also discuss the introduction of a new observable which accounts for the average rapidity ratio among subsequent emissions.

  19. Predictions of High Energy Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comay E.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Eight predictions of high energy experimental results are presented. The predictions contain the $Sigma ^+$ charge radius and results of two kinds of experiments using energetic pionic beams. In addition, predictions of the failure to find the following objects are presented: glueballs, pentaquarks, Strange Quark Matter, magnetic monopoles searched by their direct interaction with charges and the Higgs boson. The first seven predictions rely on the Regular Charge-Monopole Theory and the last one relies on mathematical inconsistencies of the Higgs Lagrangian density.

  20. Photomask specifications for high energy physics detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Pindo, M

    2002-01-01

    Planar technologies used for radiation detector fabrication imply an extensive use of photomasks whose characteristics are critical in determining final detector performance. Compatibly with their manufacturing process, photomasks must satisfy the application-specific requirements dictated both by wafer manufacturers and detector final users. The design and realization of microstrip and pixel detectors, widely used in high energy physics experiments, ask for intensive scientific effort, advanced technology and important economical investments. Photomask specification definition is one of the fundamental steps to optimize detector fabrication processes and fulfill experimental requirements at the most appropriate cost.