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Sample records for chambers detector supplying

  1. Drift chamber detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers is presented. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysied, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author)

  2. Multi-chamber ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the detector a single beta ionization source and a double- or three-chamber set-up is used, the chambers being designed in the shape of a truncated cone and facing each other with their bases. The source can be positioned with respect to the common center or modal electrode, the adjustment of the ionization in each chamber this becoming easier. The center or modal electrode also can be adjusted with respect to the source. (DG)

  3. Drift Chambers detectors; Detectores de deriva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, I.; Martinez laso, L.

    1989-07-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs.

  4. Ionization chamber smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One kind of smoke detector, the ionization-type, is regulated by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) because it uses a radioactive substance in its mechanism. Radioactivity and radiation are natural phenomena, but they are not very familiar to the average householder. This has led to a number of questions being asked of the AECB. These questions and AECB responses are outlined

  5. Ion chamber based neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derzon, Mark S; Galambos, Paul C; Renzi, Ronald F

    2014-12-16

    A neutron detector with monolithically integrated readout circuitry, including: a bonded semiconductor die; an ion chamber formed in the bonded semiconductor die; a first electrode and a second electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; and the readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the first and second electrodes. The bonded semiconductor die includes an etched semiconductor substrate bonded to an active semiconductor substrate. The readout circuitry is formed in a portion of the active semiconductor substrate. The ion chamber has a substantially planar first surface on which the first electrode is formed and a substantially planar second surface, parallel to the first surface, on which the second electrode is formed. The distance between the first electrode and the second electrode may be equal to or less than the 50% attenuation length for neutrons in the neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber.

  6. Neutron-chamber detectors and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detector applications in Nuclear Safeguards and Waste Management have included measuring neutrons from fission and (alpha,n) reactions with well-moderated neutron proportional counters, often embedded in a slab of polyethylene. Other less-moderated geometries are useful for detecting both bare and moderated fission-source neutrons with good efficiency. The neutron chamber is an undermoderated detector design comprising a large, hollow, polyethylene-walled chamber containing one or more proportional counters. Neutron-chamber detectors are relatively inexpensive; can have large apertures, usually through a thin chamber wall; and offer very good detection efficiency per dollar. Neutron-chamber detectors have also been used for monitoring vehicles and for assaying large crates of transuranic waste. Our Monte Carlo calculations for a new application (monitoring low-density waste for concealed plutonium) illustrate the advantages of the hollow-chamber design for detecting moderated fission sources. 9 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Compact ion chamber based neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derzon, Mark S.; Galambos, Paul C.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2015-10-27

    A directional neutron detector has an ion chamber formed in a dielectric material; a signal electrode and a ground electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the signal and ground electrodes; and a signal processor electrically coupled to the readout circuitry. The ion chamber has a pair of substantially planar electrode surfaces. The chamber pressure of the neutron absorbing material is selected such that the reaction particle ion trail length for neutrons absorbed by the neutron absorbing material is equal to or less than the distance between the electrode surfaces. The signal processor is adapted to determine a path angle for each absorbed neutron based on the rise time of the corresponding pulse in a time-varying detector signal.

  8. Ionization-chamber smoke detector system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Robert F.

    1976-10-19

    This invention relates to an improved smoke-detection system of the ionization-chamber type. In the preferred embodiment, the system utilizes a conventional detector head comprising a measuring ionization chamber, a reference ionization chamber, and a normally non-conductive gas triode for discharging when a threshold concentration of airborne particulates is present in the measuring chamber. The improved system is designed to reduce false alarms caused by fluctuations in ambient temperature. Means are provided for periodically firing the gas discharge triode and each time recording the triggering voltage required. A computer compares each triggering voltage with its predecessor. The computer is programmed to energize an alarm if the difference between the two compared voltages is a relatively large value indicative of particulates in the measuring chamber and to disregard smaller differences typically resulting from changes in ambient temperature.

  9. Pressurized ionization chamber detectors for industrial use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of the thickness of the sheets made of different materials, e.g. metal, plastic, paper, cellulose, rubber, etc., is one of many industrial applications of nuclear techniques. The ionizing radiation detectors of ionization chamber type are based on measuring the variations in either exposure rate (for gamma radiation) or absorbed dose rate (for beta radiation) occurring in materials of different thickness, placed between the radiation source and the detector. The variations in exposure rate and absorbed dose rate can be traced by using radiation detectors of the ionization chamber type, which convert the exposure rate, X point, or the absorbed dose rate, D point, into a proportional electric current. The more stable the ionization current of the chambers (keeping a constant exposure rate or absorbed dose rate), the slighter the variations that can be detected in either exposure rate or absorbed dose rate, hence in the absorbing material placed between the radiation source and the detector. Based on these facts, several variants of such detectors, including the ionization chamber CIS-P5M-100Kr, CIS-P2M-1000Kr and CIS-P8M-70Kr, have been made. (author)

  10. Design of an ionization diffusion chamber detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prototype of an Ionization Diffusion Chamber detector has been made. It is a silindrical glass, 20 cm in diameter, 13,5 cm in height, air gas filled, operated at room pressure and room temperature at the top of this instrument while for the box temperature dry ice (CO2 solid) temperature is used. This detector is ready for seeing alpha and beta particle tracks. (author)

  11. Monitored Drift Chambers in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Herten, G

    Monitored Drift Chambers (MDT) are used in the ATLAS Detector to measure the momentum of high energy muons. They consist of drift tubes, which are filled with an Ar-CO2 gas mixture at 3 bar gas pressure. About 1200 drift chambers are required for ATLAS. They are up to 6 m long. Nevertheless the position of every wire needs to be known with a precision of 20 µm within a chamber. In addition, optical alignment sensors are required to measure the relative position of adjacent chambers with a precision of 30µm. This gigantic task seems impossible at first instance. Indeed it took many years of R&D to invent the right tools and methods before the first chamber could be built according to specifications. Today, at the time when 50% of the chambers have been produced, we are confident that the goal for ATLAS can be reached. The mechanical precision of the chambers could be verified with the x-ray tomograph at CERN. This ingenious device, developed for the MDT system, is able to measure the wire position insid...

  12. SONTRAC: A solar neutron track chamber detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, T. L.; Frye, G. M., Jr.; Owens, A.

    1985-01-01

    The recent detection on the solar maximum mission (SMM) satellite of high energy neutrons emitted during large solar flares has provided renewed incentive to design a neutron detector which has the sensitivity, energy resolution, and time resolution to measure the neutron time and energy spectra with sufficient precision to improve our understanding of the basic flare processes. Over the past two decades a variety of neutron detectors has been flown to measure the atmospheric neutron intensity above 10 MeV and to search for solar neutrons. The SONTRAC (Solar Neutron Track Chamber) detector, a new type of neutron detector which utilizes n-p scattering and has a sensitivity 1-3 orders of magnitude greater than previous instruments in the 20-200 MeV range is described. The energy resolution is 1% for neutron kinetic energy, T sub n 50 MeV. When used with a coded aperture mask at 50 m (as would be possible on the space station) an angular resolution of approx. 4 arc sec could be achieved, thereby locating the sites of high energy nuclear interactions with an angular precision comparable to the existing x-ray experiments on SMM. The scintillation chamber is investigated as a track chamber for high energy physics, either by using arrays of scintillating optical fibers or by optical imaging of particle trajectories in a block of scintillator.

  13. The 'Diogene' detector, 4π drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Diogene' is a detector with a solid angle near the steradian 4π, mainly comprising a drift chamber and capable of detecting in coincidence several tens of charged particles. Built by several laboratories (Dph-N/Saclay, CRN/Strasbourg and LPC/Clermont-Ferrand) it should be ready round about June 1980 to use the heavy ion beams of Saturne II for studying the multiple production of pions and protons in central collisions of relativistic heavy ions

  14. Wire chamber radiation detector with discharge control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wire chamber radiation detector has spaced apart parallel electrodes and grids defining an ignition region in which charged particles or other ionizing radiations initiate brief localized avalanche discharges and defining an adjacent memory region in which sustained glow discharges are initiated by the primary discharges. Conductors of the grids at each side of the memory section extend in orthogonal directions enabling readout of the X-Y coordinates of locations at which charged particles were detected by sequentially transmitting pulses to the conductors of one grid while detecting transmissions of the pulses to the orthogonal conductors of the other grid through glow discharges. One of the grids bounding the memory region is defined by an array of conductive elements each of which is connected to the associated readout conductor through a separate resistance. The wire chamber avoids ambiguities and imprecisions in the readout of coordinates when large numbers of simultaneous or near simultaneous charged particles have been detected. Down time between detection periods and the generation of radio frequency noise are also reduced

  15. Detector Physics of Resistive Plate Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Lippmann, Christian; Riegler, W

    2003-01-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) are gaseous parallel plate avalanche detectors that implement electrodes made from a material with a high volume resistivity between 10^7 and 10^12 Ohm cm. Large area RPCs with 2mm single gaps operated in avalanche mode provide above 98% efficiency and a time resolution of around 1ns up to a flux of several kHz/cm2. These Trigger RPCs will, as an example, equip the muon detector system of the ATLAS experiment at CERN on an area of 3650m2 and with 355.000 independent read out channels. Timing RPCs with a gas gap of 0.2 to 0.3mm are widely used in multi gap configurations and provide 99% efficiency and time resolution down to 50ps. While their performance is comparable to existing scintillator-based Time-Of-Flight (TOF) technology, Timing RPCs feature a significantly, up to an order of magnitude, lower price per channel. They will for example equip the 176m2 TOF barrel of the ALICE experiment at CERN with 160.000 independent read out cells. RPCs were originally operated in stream...

  16. A time expansion chamber as a vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-resolution drift chamber based on the time expansion principle has been built as a vertex detector for the Mark J experiment at DESY. The chamber design and the associated control and readout system are described. Results on chamber performance obtained from test beam measurements and first results from running at PETRA are reported. (orig.)

  17. OPAL Central Detector (Including vertex, jet and Z chambers)

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. OPAL's central tracking system consists of (in order of increasing radius) a silicon microvertex detector, a vertex detector, a jet chamber, and z-chambers. All the tracking detectors work by observing the ionization of atoms by charged particles passing by: when the atoms are ionized, electrons are knocked out of their atomic orbitals, and are then able to move freely in the detector. These ionization electrons are detected in the different parts of the tracking system. (This piece includes the vertex, jet and Z chambers) In the picture above, the central detector is the piece being removed to the right.

  18. Data Quality Monitoring for the CMS Resistive Plate Chamber Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimmino, A.; CMS Collaboration

    2011-06-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs), with their excellent time resolution (˜ 2 ns), were chosen as dedicated muon trigger detectors for the CMS experiment. RPCs fulfill the job of muon identification, estimate the momentum and unambiguously assign bunch crossing. The critical tasks of monitoring detector performances, debugging hardware, and certifying recorded data are carried out by the RPC Data Quality Monitoring (DQM) system. We here describe the structure, functionalities, and performances of the DQM applications for the CMS RPC detector.

  19. Contribution to Diogene detector drift chambers study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diogene detector has been brought into operation at Saclay with the collaboration of Strasbourg CRN and Clermont-Ferrand LPC. The Diogene essential characteristic is its solid angle near four pi, allowing complete exclusive measurements. Diogene characteristics allow to detect an important multiplicity of charged particles in coincidence, to measure their impulse until a transverse impulse around 1 GeV/c, and to identify them by their energy loss measurement. These general characteristics are exposed after some brief recalls on charged particle detection and migration counters. Technical aspects of the prototype are examined. It has been built to test fabrication technology, choice exactness and performance estimation validity. These detector performance estimation calculations that may be waited for in tracks reconstruction, impulse and energy loss resolution are exposed. Before, the electrostatics study for the prototype is reviewed. The temporary balance of already carried out tests is made

  20. Electron Neutrino Classification in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Płoński, Piotr; Stefan, Dorota; Sulej, Robert; Zaremba, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinos are one of the least known elementary particles. The detection of neutrinos is an extremely difficult task since they are affected only by weak sub-atomic force or gravity. Therefore large detectors are constructed to reveal neutrino's properties. Among them the Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr-TPC) detectors provide excellent imaging and particle identification ability for studying neutrinos. The computerized methods for automatic reconstruction and identification of parti...

  1. Novel Front-end Electronics for Time Projection Chamber Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    García García, Eduardo José

    This work has been carried out in the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and it was supported by the European Union as part of the research and development towards the European detector the (EUDET) project, specifically for the International Linear Collider (ILC). In particle physics there are several different categories of particle detectors. The presented design is focused on a particular kind of tracking detector called Time Projection Chamber (TPC). The TPC provides a three dimensional image of electrically charged particles crossing a gaseous volume. The thesis includes a study of the requirements for future TPC detectors summarizing the parameters that the front-end readout electronics must fulfill. In addition, these requirements are compared with respect to the readouts used in existing TPC detectors. It is concluded that none of the existing front-end readout designs fulfill the stringent requirements. The main requirements for future TPC detectors are high integration, an increased n...

  2. Proportional counters as monitoring detectors of BAC chambers at the ZEUS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the investigations presented is the elaboration of the system monitoring working conditions of BAC chambers. The backing calorimeter (BAC) at the ZEUS detector of the HERA accelerator consisting of 5000 proportional chambers of a total volume of 60 m3 is supplied with a gas mixture of Ar+10% CO2 by an open gas system. Flow proportional counters with a 55Fe source are used as gas system monitoring detectors. These counters and sources were designed and made exclusively for that application. The ageing effect of the Ar+CO2 mixture has also been studied. Monitoring measurements of the pulse height distribution enable us to follow the changes of gas pressure and composition in BAC proportional chambers. The results of these measurements will be used for off-line corrections of BAC data. (orig.)

  3. Secondary electrons detectors for beam tracking: micromegas and wire chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pancin, J [GANIL, bvd H. Becquerel, Caen (France); Chaminade, T; Drouart, A; Kebbiri, M; Riallot, M [CEA-DSM/IRFU, Gif Sur Yvette (France); Fernandez, B [CNA, University of Sevilla, c/T. Edison, Sevilla (Spain); Naqvi, F, E-mail: pancin@ganil.f [IKP, University of Koeln, Zuelpicher Str., Koeln (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    SPIRAL2 or FAIR will be able to deliver beams of radioactive isotopes of low energy (less than 10 MeV/n). The emittance of these new beams will impose the use of beam tracking detectors to reconstruct the exact impact position of the nuclei on the experimental target. However, due to their thickness, the classical detectors will generate a lot of energy and angular straggling. A possible alternative is the SED principle (Secondary Electron Detector). It consists of an emissive foil placed in beam and a detector for the secondary electrons ejected by the passing of the nuclei through the foil. An R and D program has been initiated at CEA Saclay to study the possibility to use low pressure gaseous detectors as SED for beam tracking. Some SED have been already used on the VAMOS spectrometer at GANIL since 2004. We have constructed new detectors on this model to measure their performances in time and spatial resolution, and counting rate. Other detector types are also under study. For the first time, a test with different micromegas detectors at 4 Torr has been realized. A comparison on the time resolution has been performed between wire chamber and micromegas at very low pressure. The use of micromegas could be promising to improve the counting rate capability and the robustness of beam tracking detectors.

  4. Secondary electrons detectors for beam tracking: micromegas and wire chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SPIRAL2 or FAIR will be able to deliver beams of radioactive isotopes of low energy (less than 10 MeV/n). The emittance of these new beams will impose the use of beam tracking detectors to reconstruct the exact impact position of the nuclei on the experimental target. However, due to their thickness, the classical detectors will generate a lot of energy and angular straggling. A possible alternative is the SED principle (Secondary Electron Detector). It consists of an emissive foil placed in beam and a detector for the secondary electrons ejected by the passing of the nuclei through the foil. An R and D program has been initiated at CEA Saclay to study the possibility to use low pressure gaseous detectors as SED for beam tracking. Some SED have been already used on the VAMOS spectrometer at GANIL since 2004. We have constructed new detectors on this model to measure their performances in time and spatial resolution, and counting rate. Other detector types are also under study. For the first time, a test with different micromegas detectors at 4 Torr has been realized. A comparison on the time resolution has been performed between wire chamber and micromegas at very low pressure. The use of micromegas could be promising to improve the counting rate capability and the robustness of beam tracking detectors.

  5. New development of holography in particle detectors: application to bubble chambers and streamer chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes the contribution of holography in two particle detectors well used in high energy physics. A first part presents the possibilities of a double beam holographic set up with diffuse illumination in the case of large scale bubble chamber (more than 1000 litres). The second part introduces the results obtained by the use of an in-line holographic recording in a streamer chamber (a streamer is the electroluminescent state of an electronic avalanche). In both cases, the new possibilities offered by these developments are discussed (resolution and depth of field of holographic images)

  6. Acoustic Sensor Design for Dark Matter Bubble Chamber Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felis, Ivan; Martínez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Ardid, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter bubble chamber detectors use piezoelectric sensors in order to detect and discriminate the acoustic signals emitted by the bubbles grown within the superheated fluid from a nuclear recoil produced by a particle interaction. These sensors are attached to the outside walls of the vessel containing the fluid. The acoustic discrimination depends strongly on the properties of the sensor attached to the outer wall of the vessel that has to meet the requirements of radiopurity and size. With the aim of optimizing the sensor system, a test bench for the characterization of the sensors has been developed. The sensor response for different piezoelectric materials, geometries, matching layers, and backing layers have been measured and contrasted with FEM simulations and analytical models. The results of these studies lead us to have a design criterion for the construction of specific sensors for the next generation of dark matter bubble chamber detectors (250 L). PMID:27294937

  7. Acoustic Sensor Design for Dark Matter Bubble Chamber Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan Felis; Juan Antonio Martínez-Mora; Miguel Ardid

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter bubble chamber detectors use piezoelectric sensors in order to detect and discriminate the acoustic signals emitted by the bubbles grown within the superheated fluid from a nuclear recoil produced by a particle interaction. These sensors are attached to the outside walls of the vessel containing the fluid. The acoustic discrimination depends strongly on the properties of the sensor attached to the outer wall of the vessel that has to meet the requirements of radiopurity and size. ...

  8. Method for study of a drift chamber detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To define an algorithm for calculation of a linear trajectory parameters, the physical and geometrical characteristics of the drift chamber detector located in the volume, and these of the measurement and storing system have been studied, the left-right ambiguit problem has been specially investigated. The algorithm (square roots method and iteration) has been tested with Monte-Carlo calculation, before it has been applied to physical events

  9. Electron Neutrino Classification in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Płoński, Piotr; Sulej, Robert; Zaremba, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinos are one of the least known elementary particles. The detection of neutrinos is an extremely difficult task since they are affected only by weak sub-atomic force or gravity. Therefore large detectors are constructed to reveal neutrino's properties. Among them the Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr-TPC) detectors provide excellent imaging and particle identification ability for studying neutrinos. The computerized methods for automatic reconstruction and identification of particles are needed to fully exploit the potential of the LAr-TPC technique. Herein, the novel method for electron neutrino classification is presented. The method constructs a feature descriptor from images of observed event. It characterizes the signal distribution propagated from vertex of interest, where the particle interacts with the detector medium. The classifier is learned with a constructed feature descriptor to decide whether the images represent the electron neutrino or cascade produced by photons. The proposed ap...

  10. Image Segmentation in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Płoński, Piotr; Sulej, Robert; Zaremba, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    The Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr-TPC) detectors provide excellent imaging and particle identification ability for studying neutrinos. An efficient and automatic reconstruction procedures are required to exploit potential of this imaging technology. Herein, a novel method for segmentation of images from LAr-TPC detectors is presented. The proposed approach computes a feature descriptor for each pixel in the image, which characterizes amplitude distribution in pixel and its neighbourhood. The supervised classifier is employed to distinguish between pixels representing particle's track and noise. The classifier is trained and evaluated on the hand-labeled dataset. The proposed approach can be a preprocessing step for reconstructing algorithms working directly on detector images.

  11. Bremstrahlung Detection and Chamber Obstruction Localisation Using Scanning Radiation Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Naylor, G A; Robinson, D

    2005-01-01

    Radiation monitors consisting of scintillating plastic coupled to photomultipliers are used for diagnostic purposes. By scanning such a detector or a radiation scatterer, two applications are demonstrated: i) Monitoring of vacuum chamber conditioning by monitoring gas Bremstrahlung from residual gas. ii) Localisation of beam interception (beam losses) by longitudinal scanning of a radiation detector. The measurement of gas pressure inside long, small cross section, vacuum vessels is difficult due to the distance between the centre of the vacuum vessel and vacuum gauges (leading to a low vacuum conductance). The narrow beam of gamma Bremstrahlung radiation is intercepted by scanning tungsten blades in the beam line front-end allowing a radiation shower to be detected outside the vacuum vessel proportional to the gas pressure in the corresponding storage ring straight section. A second detector mounted on rails can be moved over a length of 6.5m parallel to the ESRF storage ring so as to localise regions of bea...

  12. Large area neutron detector based on Li6 ionization chamber with integrated body-moderator of high density polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detector was developed and funded by DHS to be a lower cost alternative to 3He detectors. A 6Li foil-lined ionization chamber was prepared with fill gas at one atmosphere and pulse mode operation. The high-density polyethylene (HOPE) body serves also as a neutron moderator. All electrodes, including high voltage bias supply, are hermetically sealed within the plastic slabs.

  13. Limited streamer chambers for the large volume detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tracking system of the Large Volume Detector, an underground experiment to study muons and nutrino astronomy, will use ∝ 15000 limited streamer chambers. We describe a comparison between the standard binary mixture (30% argon + 70% isobutane) and a low-hydrocarbon ternary mixture (2% argon + 10% isobutane + 88% carbon dioxide). The ternary composition results in a 400-volt-shorter single count-rate plateau, a 20% smaller primary streamer pulse-height, and a much higher streamer multiplicity. The count-rate plateaus have also been studied over a wide composition range of isobutane, argon, and carbon dioxide mixtures. We also discuss the streamer chamber quality control procedures and the results obtained from a sample of 2900 devices operated with the binary mixture. (orig.)

  14. The Laboratory appraisal of ionisation chamber smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper traces the development of the National Radiological Protection Board test programme for ionisation chamber smoke detectors, describes methods and summarises the results from the detectors which have been examined by NRPB. The results of dose rate and surface contamination measurements are included as well as data from the destructive testing programme. The 600degC fire test continues to produce the most interesting results especially concerning material incompatibility problems. Some source holder materials invariably cause loss of source integrity during a fire, as do certain methods of fixing the foil to the holder. In addition plastics containing certain fire retardants produce corrosive combustion products which cause loss of integrity of otherwise well-mounted sources. Fire tests at 1200degC were discontinued at an early stage in the programme since it was felt there was no additional information to be gained. As all detectors are now tested with respect to the NEA recommendations, the 1200degC incineration tests have been reinstated as part of the test programme. The criterion of failure relates to activity which becomes airborne rather than the total leakage concept which applies at the lower temperature. All the detectors submitted will ultimately be subjected to this test, and some preliminary results are presented here. (H.K.)

  15. The power supply system of the CLEO III silicon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CLEO III detector has recently commenced data taking at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR). One important component of this detector is a four layer double-sided silicon tracker with 93% solid angle coverage. This detector ranges in size and number of readout channels between the LEP and LHC silicon detectors. In order to reach the detector performance goals of signal-to-noise ratios greater than 15 : 1 low noise front-end electronics together with highly regulated low noise power supplies were used. In this paper, we describe the low-noise power supply system and associated monitoring and safety features used by the CLEO III silicon tracker

  16. A new TXRF vacuum chamber with sample changer for chemical analysis using silicon drift chamber detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Several TXRF spectrometers for chemical analysis as well as for wafer surface analysis are commercially available. But there is no one available for chemical analysis offering the possibility to measure the samples in vacuum conditions. Vacuum of 10-2 mbar in the sample environment helps to reduce the background due to scattering from air, thus to improve the detection limits as well as to reduce the absorption of low energy fluorescence radiation from low Z elements and extend the elemental range to be measured and removes the Ar lines from the spectrum. The x-ray group of the Atominstitut designed and fabricated a new vacuum chamber for TXRF equipped with a 12 position sample changer from Italstructures, Riva, Italy. The detector used was a 10 mm2 silicon drift detector (KETEK, Munich, Germany), offering the advantage of electrically cooling, so no LN2 is required. The chamber was designed to be attached to a diffraction tube housing, e.g. with a fine focus Mo-x-ray tube and uses a multilayer monochromator. Spectra are stored by a small AMTEK MCA and control between sample changer and MCA communication is done by a modified AMPTEK software. The performance is expressed in detection limits of 1 pg Rb for Mo Ka excitation with 50 kV, 40 mA excitation conditions, 1000 s lifetime, obtained from a sample containing 600 pg Rb as single element standard. Details on performance, reproducibility and light element excitation and detection are presented. (author)

  17. New drift chamber for the Mark II detector at the SLAC Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of the new cylindrical drift chamber for the Mark II detector at the SLAC Linear Collider is described. Prototype tests to determine the working parameters of the chamber and to study possible gas mixtures are discussed

  18. ''24/36/48'' Cathode Strip Chamber layout for SSC GEM Detector muon subsystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ''48/48/48'' φ-segmentation design for the Cathode Strip Chambers in the GEM Detector produces a number of coverage ''gaps'' in φ and θ. A revised ''24/36/48'' φ-segmentation layout provides increased geometric coverage and a significant reduction in the number of chambers in the detector. This will increase physics performance while reducing the labor costs associated with building and installing chambers in the GEM Detector. This paper documents the physical layout of the proposed change to the baseline chamber arrangement

  19. Development of high voltage power supply for nuclear radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this thesis is to develop a versatile NIM compatible high voltage power supply for proper operation of nuclear radiation detectors especially for those high resolution detectors such as semiconductor detectors, and proportional counters which require high voltage power supply with very low output ripple and high output stability. A driven type dc-ac inverter and a voltage multiplier are applied to convert a low de voltage to high dc voltage. The filter circuit is used to reduce the output ripple when the power supply is loaded and a close-loop voltage control circuit is used to minimize the drift in the output voltage. Adjustment of the output level for desired value is done through a three turn high precision potentiometer. Besides, micro-circuits are used in order to reduce undesirable temperature effect and at the same time to minimize size and weight of the high voltage module

  20. A cylindrical xenon ionization chamber detector for high resolution, room temperature gamma radiation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 0.75 l gridded cylindrical ionization chamber gamma radiation detector using highly purified xenon near the critical point as the detection medium is described. The detector operates at room temperature with a noise subtracted intrinsic energy resolution of 1.8% at 662 keV. The detector design and performance variables are discussed in comparison to previous planar and cylindrical xenon detectors. (orig.)

  1. Development of a Bioaerosol single particle detector (BIO IN) for the Fast Ice Nucleus CHamber FINCH

    OpenAIRE

    Bundke, U.; Reimann, B.; Nillius, B.; Jaenicke, R.; Bingemer, H.

    2010-01-01

    In this work we present the setup and first tests of our new BIO IN detector. This detector was constructed to classify atmospheric ice nuclei (IN) for their biological content. It is designed to be coupled to the Fast Ice Nucleus CHamber FINCH. If one particle acts as an ice nucleus, it will be at least partly covered with ice at the end of the development section of the FINCH chamber. The device combines an auto-fluorescence detector and a circular depolarization detector ...

  2. Calibration of PICO Bubble Chamber Dark Matter Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Miaotianzi; PICO Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The PICO Collaboration builds bubble chambers for the direct detection of WIMP dark matter. I will present the suite of calibration experiments performed to measure the sensitivity of these chambers to nuclear recoils (the expected WIMP signal) and to gamma rays (a common background to the WIMP signal). These calibrations include measurements with a 10-ml C3F8 bubble chamber at Northwestern University and with a 30-ml C3F8 bubble chamber deployed in the University of Montreal's tandem Van de Graaf facility, giving the bubble chamber response to a variety of gamma rays, broad-spectrum neutron sources, and mono-energetic low energy neutrons. I will compare our measured sensitivities to those predicted by a simple thermodynamic model and will show how the results impact our ability to detect dark matter, with a focus on light WIMP searches. Supported by DOE Grant: DE-SC0012161.

  3. Construction of control and instrumentation devices of high voltage power supply of double chamber plasma nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A control and instrumentation devices of high voltage power supply of double chamber plasma nitrogen have been made. This device consists of the software and hardware component. Hardware component consists of SCR phase angle controller LPC-50HDA type, T100MD1616+ PLC, high voltage transformer and voltage rectifier system. Software component used a LADDER program and TBasic serves to control of the high voltage output. The components in these devices have been tested in the double chamber plasma nitrogen. Its performance meet with the design criteria that can supply of plasma nitrogen operation voltage in the range 290 Vdc to 851 Vdc with glow discharge current 0.4 A to 1.4 A. In general it can be said that the control and instrumentation devices of high voltage power supply is ready for use at the double chamber plasma nitrogen device. (author)

  4. Wide-gap large spark chamber supplying by high-voltage radio pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the process of avalanche formation in wide-gap (2 gaps 15 cm each) spark chambers when supplying them by high-voltage pulse (field intensity is 5.7-7.0 kV/cm, pulse duration-250-150 ns) of unipolar shape, a directed drift of charges in electric field takes place, which results in the shift of the track photographed as to actual particle tra ectory. To decrease the shift in the process of chamber supply a high-voltage radio pulse was used, which presented an attenuatina sinusoid. When supplying the chamber by sign-alternating pulse the shift constitutes 0.16+-0.15 mm, and the angle - 5.3x10-5+- 1.1x10-3 rad. When supplying by unipolar pulse the shift eqUals O.58+-0.40 mm, and the angle - 1.5x10-4+-2.5x10-3 rad. The use of sign-alternating supply permitted to increase the accuracy of track localization and to decrease the dependence of track brightness on the angle of particle entrance to the chamber

  5. XIth Workshop on Resistive Plate Chambers and Related Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    RPC2012 continues the tradition of regular scientific meetings, first started in 1991 at Lecce, with following editions in Roma, Pavia, Napoli, Bari, Coimbra, Clermont-Ferrand, Seoul, Mumbai, Darmstadt. The RPC detection technique has found large application in LHC detectors and in astroparticle physics experiments. The workshop focused on performance of large RPC systems, ageing and detector materials studies, electronics for RPCs, physics of basic processes in the gas, timing applications, new ideas for RPC detectors.

  6. Radon progeny distributions inside a diffusion chamber and their contributions to track density in SSNT detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffusion of alpha emitter radon progeny inside a cylindrical diffusion chamber was simulated. In the simulation of atomic movements, we took into account the random nature of the diffusion direction and the decay process. The alpha emitter distributions in volume, lateral wall and top cover of a 6.0cm height diffusion chamber for different diameters were determined. Results show non-uniform distribution of radon progeny. As chamber diameter increases, the tendency of radon progeny is to accumulate in central regions of the chamber volume (218Po) and inner wall (218Po and 214Po). Depending on chamber diameter and detector size, non-uniform distribution of radon progeny deposited on SSNTs surface can be achieved if the detector is horizontally located at the bottom. The fraction of surface where 222Rn progeny are deposited diminishes as chamber diameter increases. Due to the relatively short 218Po half-life, for diameters larger than the assumed height its subsequent atoms decay in air before their deposition on chamber wall. The form in which radon progeny is distributed in volume and walls of chamber can affect the quantity and distribution of tracks in detector

  7. Estimation of the response of ion chamber detectors to beta radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique was developed to calculate the response of cylindrical ion chambers to large area beta sources. Beta particles were simulated as vectors originating from a point on a source plane. Response calculations were performed for various source-plane-to-detector distances. The data testified to the dependency of response on source position and size. The results were compared with measured data. The technique was then used to evaluate the response characteristics of two chamber designs. Results showed that a design with concentric dual chambers could provide a means to estimate source geometry and distance. In addition, a detector employing stacked thin chambers could directly measure the extent of non-uniform ionisation in the chamber. (author)

  8. Power supply monitoring system for high-voltage supply to an ionisation chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ionization chamber is used for control of particle accelerators and consequently loaded with high dose-rates during radiation pulses. The measuring equipment consists of a transmitter- and receiver-system with opto-coupler, hallgenerators, field plates or isolating transformer and controls a relais which allows to block the direct current components. (DG)

  9. Compact drift-chambers for the OPAL forward detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two planes of four chambers are mounted in front of the forward calorimeter at each end of OPAL. Beam tests at CERN show good linearity (within 0.5 mm over 130 mm maximum drift) and good resolution in the drift direction (average 300 μm over the whole range of drift distances). The resolution along the wire is ±1 mm. (orig.)

  10. Drift power supply for Si(Li) detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A drift power supply for Si(Li) detector has been developed, which is completely different from many other power supplies for common use. The drift power supply provides the most extensive useful voltage range of 0∼1000 V, and is continuously adjustable. It has good stability, constant power and compact structure, and the maximum output current is 100 mA. Since SCR's (silicon-controlled-rectifier) with trigger diodes and other new components are adopted and a power restriction circuit is considered in design, so during the operation when the resistance rate of silicon pieces in drifting process changes with the temperature, the power remains constant. The lower the resistance rate when the temperature raises, the higher the drift current and lower the voltage on the silicon piece. On the contrast, the higher the resistance rate when the temperature lowers, the lower the drift current, and higher the voltage on the silicon piece. Forty pieces of Si(Li) detector have been successfully drifted by using this drift power supply

  11. Event reconstruction in the vertex chamber of the KEDR detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The techniques of cosmic and beam event reconstruction in vertex detector (VD) of KEDR are described in this paper. The information on spatial resolution and detection efficiency of the VD drift tubes was obtained using cosmic events. The results of processing of elastic electron-positron scattering events and multihadron production near J/ψ resonance are presented

  12. Performance of the Cathode Strip Chamber endcap muon detectors in Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Wulsin, H Wells

    2015-01-01

    Since the end of Run 1 of the LHC in 2012, the outermost ring has been added to the CMS Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) endcap muon detector, and the readout electronics of the innermost ring of CSCs have been upgraded to accommodate the larger luminosity and collision energy anticipated in Run 2. A major effort was required to build, install, and commission these new chambers and electronics. This talk summarizes the improvements made during this upgrade and presents the performance of the CSC detector during the early stages of Run 2.

  13. An ionization chamber shower detector for the LHC luminosity monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Beche, J F; Datte, P S; Haguenauer, Maurice; Manfredi, P F; Millaud, J E; Placidi, Massimo; Ratti, L; Re, V; Riot, V J; Schmickler, Hermann; Speziali, V; Turner, W C

    2000-01-01

    The front IR quadrupole absorbers (TAS) and the IR neutral particle absorbers (TAN) in the high luminosity insertions of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) each absorb approximately 1.8 TeV of forward collision products on average per pp interaction (~235 W at design luminosity 10/sup 34/ cm/sup -2/ s/sup -1/). This secondary particle flux can be exploited to provide a useful storage ring operations tool for optimization of luminosity. A novel segmented, multi-gap, pressurized gas ionization chamber is being developed for sampling the energy deposited near the maxima of the hadronic/electromagnetic showers in these absorbers. The system design choices have been strongly influenced by optimization of signal to noise ratio and by the very high radiation environment. The ionization chambers are instrumented with low noise, fast, pulse shaping electronics to be capable of resolving individual bunch crossings at 40 MHz. Data on each bunch are to be separately accumulated over multiple bunch crossings until the desire...

  14. Time expansion chambers of the ALICE Transition Radiation Detector (TRD)

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The TRD is segmented into 18 sectors in the azimuthal angle. Each sector consists of 6 layers in the radial direction and is composed of 5 stacks in the longitudinal direction. This amounts to 540 individual detector modules with a total active area of roughly 750 m2 and 1.2 million readout channels. The largest module is 159 cm long and 120 cm wide.

  15. Test beam Results of the Forward RPC Prototype Chamber for the CMS Muon Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aftab, Zia; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Jan, J A; Khan, Mohammad Khalid; Solaija, Tariq

    2001-01-01

    A full size prototype of the second forward RPC station (RE2/2) for the CMS detector has been tested during the 2000 beam test. The prototype was exposed to high irradiation flux using the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) and the 200 GeV muon beam from X5 beamline. We have studied number of chamber parameters which are relevant for the trigger such as: time resolution, efficiency, cluster size and rate capability. We have used two different gas mixtures to understand the effect of SF6 on the efficiency plateau and the rate capability of the chamber. We have also studied the intrinsic chamber rate for different discrimination thresholds.

  16. Circuitry for monitoring a high direct current voltage supply for an ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An arrangement to measure the voltage of the supply and a switching means controlled by this is described. The voltage measurer consists of first and second signal coupling means, the input of the second (connected to the voltage supply) is connected in series with the output of the first. An ionization chamber with this circuitry may be used to monitor the radiation output of a particle accelerator more accurately. Faulty measurements of the dose output, caused by voltages in the earth circuit, are avoided. (U.K.)

  17. The gas proportional scintillation counter/microstrip gas chamber hybrid detector

    OpenAIRE

    Freitas, D. S. A. P.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Santos, J. M. F. dos; Conde, C. A. N.

    2003-01-01

    The gas proportional scintillation counter/microstrip gas chamber (GPSC/MSGC) hybrid detector for X-ray spectrometry is described. The detector uses a CsI-coated microstrip plate placed in direct contact with the gas-filling as the photosensor readout for the GPSC scintillation substituting for the photomultiplier tube (PMT). Usable photosensor maximum gain is limited by optical positive feedback due to the additional scintillation produced in the electron avalanche process at the MSP anodes,...

  18. Test of a MICROMEGAS detector for the muon tracking chambers of ALICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An alternative solution for the muon tracking chambers of ALICE, based on the detector MICROMEGAS, is investigated at SUBATECH. Three prototypes have been constructed and tested in the 3 GeV/c pion beam of the CERN PS. The characteristics of these detectors, and the set-up used for the tracking test are described. Results concerning efficiencies and spatial resolutions as a function of gas mixtures, high voltages and the angular incidences of the particles are presented and discussed. (author)

  19. Test stands for the Central Drift Chamber front end hybrid in the Stanford Linear Collider Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, C.C.; Yim, A.K.

    1987-10-01

    The Central Drift Chamber (CDC) of the SLAC Linear Collider Detector (SLD) uses 1280 front end electronic hybrid modules. Each of these modules contains over 450 components and performs numerous functions. This paper describes the four test stands for production and detailed circuit characterizations of these hybrids. Descriptions and performance of some of the important functions of the test systems will be presented here.

  20. Degradation in the efficiency of glass Resistive Plate Chambers operated without external gas supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resistive plate chambers (RPC) are particle detectors commonly used by the high energy physics community. Their normal operation requires a constant flow of gas mixture to prevent self-poisoning which reduces the chamber's capability to detect particles. We studied how quickly the efficiency of two RPCs drops when operated in sealed mode, i.e. without refreshing the gas mixture. The test aim is to determine how RPCs could be used as particle detectors in non-laboratory applications, such as those exploiting muon tomography for geological imaging or homeland security. The two sealed RPCs were operated in proportional mode for a period of more than three months, and their efficiencies were recorded continuously and analysed in 8-hours intervals. The results show that the efficiency drops on average by 0.79 ± 0.01 % every 24 hours of operation and returns close to the initial value after purging the old gas mixture and flushing the chambers with fresh gas

  1. Neutron and gamma detector using an ionization chamber with an integrated body and moderator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Lestone, John Paul

    2006-07-18

    A detector for detecting neutrons and gamma radiation includes a cathode that defines an interior surface and an interior volume. A conductive neutron-capturing layer is disposed on the interior surface of the cathode and a plastic housing surrounds the cathode. A plastic lid is attached to the housing and encloses the interior volume of the cathode forming an ionization chamber, into the center of which an anode extends from the plastic lid. A working gas is disposed within the ionization chamber and a high biasing voltage is connected to the cathode. Processing electronics are coupled to the anode and process current pulses which are converted into Gaussian pulses, which are either counted as neutrons or integrated as gammas, in response to whether pulse amplitude crosses a neutron threshold. The detector according to the invention may be readily fabricated into single or multilayer detector arrays.

  2. The engineering development of an actively controlled precise muon chamber for the SDC detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the detector configuration for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) evolved, a number of concepts for MUON chambers were proposed and investigated. The Boston Group (Brandeis, Harvard and Tufts Universities, with Draper Laboratory) has developed a concept incorporating elliptical section drift tubes with field shaping and intermediate wire supports. This approach combines good single and multi-track resolution with a small channel count and modularity at the tube level. Other concepts have been developed which arise from differing interpretations of the fundamental physics and economic requirements. These include: Octagonal Drift Tubes, Unsupported Wires, No Field Shaping, U. Wisconsin; Round Tubes, Unsupported Wires, w or w/o Field Shaping, U. Washington; JFT Chambers (Multi-Wire, Intermediate Support, Field Shaping), KEK, Japan. This paper outlines the mechanical implementation of the Boston MUON chamber concept and discusses the rationale for several key design decisions imposed by the stringent mechanical tolerances. A prototype MUON chamber designed to verify design feasibility, performance, and cost is also described. A special section is devoted to the design and development of an optical alignment system within the chamber, which provides error signals driving the intermediate supports to true position. The Boston subgroup MUON chamber design is called the wine rack concept by virtue of its numerous (non-structural) drift tubes laid into a supporting chamber, which provides structural and handling capability. A number of individual θ,φ, and Stereo chambers is normally grouped into a supermodule, which in turn is assembled into a multi-layer supertower. Supertowers are the basic elements of the SDC MUON System, each comprising three supermodule layers in the barrel region and five in the forward regions

  3. Positron imaging with multiwire proportional chamber-gamma converter hybrid detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large area positron camera was developed using multiwire proportional chambers as detectors and electromagnetic delay lines for coordinate readout. Honeycomb structured gamma converters made of lead are coupled to the chambers for efficient gamma detection and good spatial resolution. Two opposing detectors, each having a sensitive area of 48 cm x 48 cm, are operated in coincidence for the detection of annihilation gammas (511 keV) from positron emitters. Detection efficiency of 4.2 percent per detector and spatial resolution of 6 to 7 mm FWHM at the mid-plane were achieved. The present camera operates at a maximum count rate of 24 K counts/min, limited by accidental coincidence. The theory for the gamma converter is presented along with a review of the operation of the multiwire proportional chamber and delay line readout. Calculated gamma converter efficiencies are compared with the measured results using a prototype test chamber. The characteristics of the positron camera system is evaluated, and the performance is shown to be consistent with calculation

  4. History of the bubble chamber and related active- and internal-target nuclear tracking detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donald Glaser, 1960 Nobel laureate in Physics, recently passed away (2013), as have many of his colleagues who were involved with the early development of bubble chambers at the University of Michigan. In this paper I will review those early years and the subsequent wide-spread application of active-target (AT) bubble chambers that dominated high-energy physics (HEP) research for over thirty years. Some of the related, but more modern nuclear tracking detectors being used in HEP, neutrino astrophysics and dark-matter searches also will be discussed

  5. A TPC [Time Projection Chamber] detector for the study of high multiplicity heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) detector with complete pad coverage is presented. The TPC will allow the measurements of high multiplicity (∼ 200 tracks) relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions initiated with the heaviest, most energetic projectiles available at the LBL BEVALAC accelerator facility. The front end electronics, composed of over 15,000 time sampling channels, will be located on the chamber. The highly integrated, custom designed, electronics and the VME based data acquisition system are described. 10 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  6. Dosimetric characteristics of the novel 2D ionization chamber array OCTAVIUS Detector 1500

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The dosimetric properties of the OCTAVIUS Detector 1500 (OD1500) ionization chamber array (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany) have been investigated. A comparative study was carried out with the OCTAVIUS Detector 729 and OCTAVIUS Detector 1000 SRS arrays. Methods: The OD1500 array is an air vented ionization chamber array with 1405 detectors in a 27 × 27 cm2 measurement area arranged in a checkerboard pattern with a chamber-to-chamber distance of 10 mm in each row. A sampling step width of 5 mm can be achieved by merging two measurements shifted by 5 mm, thus fulfilling the Nyquist theorem for intensity modulated dose distributions. The stability, linearity, and dose per pulse dependence were investigated using a Semiflex 31013 chamber (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany) as a reference detector. The effective depth of measurement was determined by measuring TPR curves with the array and a Roos chamber type 31004 (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany). Comparative output factor measurements were performed with the array, the Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber and the Diode 60012 (both PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany). The energy dependence of the OD1500 was measured by comparing the array’s readings to those of a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber for varying mean photon energies at the depth of measurement, applying to the Semiflex chamber readings the correction factor kNR for nonreference conditions. The Gaussian lateral dose response function of a single array detector was determined by searching the convolution kernel suitable to convert the slit beam profiles measured with a Diode 60012 into those measured with the array’s central chamber. An intensity modulated dose distribution measured with the array was verified by comparing a OD1500 measurement to TPS calculations and film measurements. Results: The stability and interchamber sensitivity variation of the OD1500 array were within ±0.2% and ±0.58%, respectively. Dose linearity was within 1% over the

  7. Dosimetric characteristics of the novel 2D ionization chamber array OCTAVIUS Detector 1500

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelljes, T. S., E-mail: tenzin.s.stelljes@uni-oldenburg.de; Looe, H. K.; Chofor, N.; Poppe, B. [Clinic for Radiation Therapy, Pius-Hospital, Oldenburg 26121, Germany and WG Medical Radiation Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg 26129 (Germany); Harmeyer, A.; Reuter, J. [WG Medical Radiation Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg 26129 (Germany); Harder, D. [Prof. em., Medical Physics and Biophysics, Georg August University, Göttingen 37073 (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric properties of the OCTAVIUS Detector 1500 (OD1500) ionization chamber array (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany) have been investigated. A comparative study was carried out with the OCTAVIUS Detector 729 and OCTAVIUS Detector 1000 SRS arrays. Methods: The OD1500 array is an air vented ionization chamber array with 1405 detectors in a 27 × 27 cm{sup 2} measurement area arranged in a checkerboard pattern with a chamber-to-chamber distance of 10 mm in each row. A sampling step width of 5 mm can be achieved by merging two measurements shifted by 5 mm, thus fulfilling the Nyquist theorem for intensity modulated dose distributions. The stability, linearity, and dose per pulse dependence were investigated using a Semiflex 31013 chamber (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany) as a reference detector. The effective depth of measurement was determined by measuring TPR curves with the array and a Roos chamber type 31004 (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany). Comparative output factor measurements were performed with the array, the Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber and the Diode 60012 (both PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany). The energy dependence of the OD1500 was measured by comparing the array’s readings to those of a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber for varying mean photon energies at the depth of measurement, applying to the Semiflex chamber readings the correction factor k{sub NR} for nonreference conditions. The Gaussian lateral dose response function of a single array detector was determined by searching the convolution kernel suitable to convert the slit beam profiles measured with a Diode 60012 into those measured with the array’s central chamber. An intensity modulated dose distribution measured with the array was verified by comparing a OD1500 measurement to TPS calculations and film measurements. Results: The stability and interchamber sensitivity variation of the OD1500 array were within ±0.2% and ±0.58%, respectively. Dose linearity was within 1

  8. A fast position sensitive microstrip-gas-chamber detector at high count rate operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolbnya, I. P.; Alberda, H.; Hartjes, F. G.; Udo, F.; Bakker, R. E.; Konijnenburg, M.; Homan, E.; Cerjak, I.; Goedtkindt, P.; Bras, W.

    2002-11-01

    Testing of a newly developed position sensitive high count rate microstrip gas chamber (MSGC) detector at high count rate operation has been carried out at the Dutch-Belgian x-ray scattering beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (Grenoble, France) with a high intensity x-ray beam. The measurements show local count rate capabilities up to approx4.5 x105 counts/s/channel. Experimental data taken with this detector are also shown. These tests show that both time resolution down to 1.5 ms/frame and a reliable operation at high counting rates can be achieved.

  9. Expert System for the LHC CMS Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapsevicius, Valdas, E-mail: valdas.rapsevicius@cern.ch [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); Vilnius University, Didlaukio g. 47-325, LT-08303 Vilnius (Lithuania); Juska, Evaldas, E-mail: evaldas.juska@cern.ch [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States)

    2014-02-21

    Modern High Energy Physics experiments are of high demand for a generic and consolidated solution to integrate and process high frequency data streams by applying experts' knowledge and inventory configurations. In this paper we present the Expert System application that was built for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) aiming to support the detector operations and to provide integrated monitoring. The main building blocks are the integration platform, rule-based complex event processing engine, ontology-based knowledge base, persistent storage and user interfaces for results and control.

  10. Verification of traceability and backscattering in surface entrance air kerma measurements with detector type ionizing chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, G.J.; Peixoto, J.G.P., E-mail: guilherm@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Measurements of doses in radiology services by ionizing chambers are easier than those made by TLD, however the protocols for measurements differ regarding the calibration. The objectives were to verify the traceability in the measures of ESAK corrected by the inverse square law, due to the difference in position between the source and IC and the influence of the backscattered radiation in bringing the detector to the table. Was defined a procedure practiced by the radiological services and designed experimental arrangements for the same technique. Was noted that the approximation of the detector to the table generated a significant backscattered. (author)

  11. Neutron imaging detector based on the muPIC micro-pixel chamber

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, J. D.; Hattori, K.; Fujioka, H.; Harada, M; Iwaki, S.; Kabuki, S.; Kishimoto, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kurosawa, S.; Miuchi, K; Nagae, T.; Nishimura, H; Oku, T; SAWANO, T.; Shinohara, T

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a prototype time-resolved neutron imaging detector employing the micro-pixel chamber (muPIC), a micro-pattern gaseous detector, coupled with a field programmable gate array-based data acquisition system for applications in neutron radiography at high-intensity neutron sources. The prototype system, with an active area of 10cm x 10cm and operated at a gas pressure of 2 atm, measures both the energy deposition (via time-over-threshold) and 3-dimensional track of each neutron-i...

  12. Time-zero fission-fragment detector based on low-pressure multiwire proportional chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A time-zero fission fragment (FF) detector, based on the technique of low-pressure multiwire proportional chambers (LPMWPC), has been designed and constructed for the heavy hypernuclear lifetime experiment (E95-002) at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Its characteristics and the method of time-zero reconstruction were investigated using fission fragments from a 252Cf spontaneous fission source. The influence of the ionization energy loss was also studied. It is shown that Heptane, Hexane, and Isobutane gases at a pressure of 1-2 Torr are all suitable for such a FF detector. As desired by experiment, a timing resolution of about 200 ps (FWHM) for a chamber size of 21x21 cm2 was achieved

  13. Prototype results of a high resolution vertex drift chamber for the Mark II SLC Upgrade detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Test results from a full-length prototype of the drift chamber vertex detector for the Mark II SLC Upgrade detector are presented. The 22 cell jet chamber employs planes of grid wires above and below the sense wire plane to increase the electrostatic stability of the sense wires and to narrow the electron arrival time distribution. Two different grid designs have been investigated. The spatial resolution and pulse widths have been measured at a variety of operating points and for different timing schemes in a mixture of 92% CO2 and 8% isobutane. Typical results at 3 atmospheres pressure give an average resolution over a 2 cm drift distance of 30 μm for both designs. Efficient double track detection is achieved for tracks separated by 500 μm for one design and by 1000 μm for the other

  14. Time-zero fission-fragment detector based on low-pressure multiwire proportional chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Assamagan, Ketevi A; Bayatyan, G L; Carlini, R; Danagulyan, S; Eden, T; Egiyan, K; Ent, R; Fenker, H; Gan, L; Gasparian, A; Grigoryan, N K; Greenwood, Z; Gueye, P; Hashimoto, O; Johnston, K; Keppel, C; Knyazyan, S; Majewski, S; Margaryan, A; Margaryan, Yu L; Marikian, G G; Martoff, J; Mkrtchyan, H G; Parlakyan, L; Sato, Y; Sawafta, R; Simicevic, N; Tadevosyan, V; Takahashi, T; Tang, L; Vartanian, G S; Vulcan, W; Wells, S; Wood, S

    1999-01-01

    A time-zero fission fragment (FF) detector, based on the technique of low-pressure multiwire proportional chambers (LPMWPC), has been designed and constructed for the heavy hypernuclear lifetime experiment (E95-002) at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Its characteristics and the method of time-zero reconstruction were investigated using fission fragments from a sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf spontaneous fission source. The influence of the ionization energy loss was also studied. It is shown that Heptane, Hexane, and Isobutane gases at a pressure of 1-2 Torr are all suitable for such a FF detector. As desired by experiment, a timing resolution of about 200 ps (FWHM) for a chamber size of 21x21 cm sup 2 was achieved.

  15. A spherical drift chamber area detector for X-ray crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Bolon, C; Lanza, R; Quigley, G; Rich, A

    1979-01-01

    A multiwire proportional chamber system has been built as an area detector for use in X-ray crystallography with Cu K/sub alpha / radiation (1.54AA). The chamber, constructed by Charpak and collaborators at CERN, consists of a 10cm thick spherical interaction region with a radial electric field, a transition from spherical to plane geometry and a 50cm*50cm multiwire proportional chamber and subtends a 90 degrees opening angle. Two dimensional position information is obtained from orthogonal cathode planes using a high speed analog centroid finding technique. Data on spatial and energy resolution as a function of angle and depth of interaction in the spherical drift region using a collimated, pulsed, X-ray source are presented. Ionization loss as a function of drift distance and field and loss due to field shaping grids has also been measured. (6 refs).

  16. Identification of Low Momentum Electrons in The Time Projection Chamber of The ALICE Detector.

    CERN Document Server

    Mwewa, Chilufya

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents results obtained in the study to identify noisy low momentum electrons in the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) of the ALICE detector. To do this, the Circle Hough Transform is employed under the openCV library in python programming. This is tested on simulated tracks in the transverse view of the TPC. It is found that the noisy low momentum electrons can be identified and their exact positions in the transverse plane can be obtained.

  17. The honeycomb strip chamber: A two coordinate and high precision muon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes the construction and performance of the Honeycomb Strip Chamber (HSC). The HSC offers several advantages with respect to classical drift chambers and drift tubes. The main features of the HSC are: -The detector offers the possibility of simultaneous readout of two orthogonal coordinates with approximately the same precision. - The HSC technology is optimised for mass production. This means that the design is modular (monolayers) and automisation of most of the production steps is possible (folding and welding machines). - The technology is flexible. The cell diameter can easily be changed from a few millimetres to at least 20 mm by changing the parameters in the computer programme of the folding machine. The number of monolayers per station can be chosen freely to the demands of the experiment. -The honeycomb structure gives the detector stiffness and makes it self supporting. This makes the technology a very transparent one in terms of radiation length which is important to prevent multiple scattering of high energetic muons. - The dimensions of the detector are defined by high precision templates. Those templates constrain for example the overall tolerance on the wire positions to 20 μm rms. Reproduction of the high precision assembly of the detector is thus guaranteed. (orig.)

  18. The honeycomb strip chamber: A two coordinate and high precision muon detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolsma, H.P.T.

    1996-04-19

    This thesis describes the construction and performance of the Honeycomb Strip Chamber (HSC). The HSC offers several advantages with respect to classical drift chambers and drift tubes. The main features of the HSC are: -The detector offers the possibility of simultaneous readout of two orthogonal coordinates with approximately the same precision. - The HSC technology is optimised for mass production. This means that the design is modular (monolayers) and automisation of most of the production steps is possible (folding and welding machines). - The technology is flexible. The cell diameter can easily be changed from a few millimetres to at least 20 mm by changing the parameters in the computer programme of the folding machine. The number of monolayers per station can be chosen freely to the demands of the experiment. -The honeycomb structure gives the detector stiffness and makes it self supporting. This makes the technology a very transparent one in terms of radiation length which is important to prevent multiple scattering of high energetic muons. - The dimensions of the detector are defined by high precision templates. Those templates constrain for example the overall tolerance on the wire positions to 20 {mu}m rms. Reproduction of the high precision assembly of the detector is thus guaranteed. (orig.).

  19. A resistive plate chamber muon detector for the CMS experiment at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN will use Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) as a system for muon detection. RPCs will be also a relevant part of the dedicated muon trigger. The CMS barrel region will be equipped with 480 double gap RPCs operated in avalanche mode using a Freon based gas mixture. A great effort is being done to customize a detector able to satisfy the stringent requirements needed to operate in a hostile background environment during normal operation. Excellent muon efficiency, high rate capability, good time resolution, low cluster size and low neutron and gamma sensitivity will characterise the system. Such features have been carefully evaluated during the detector design and measured during the following R and D program. As the mass production started an intensive commitment period for monitoring the quality of the RPCs followed and involved researchers from Bari, Napoli, Pavia and Sofia Institutes. Production and assembling of the detectors was managed in Bari, Napoli, Sofia and at General Tecnica factory; cosmic rays tests in Pavia, Bari and Sofia assured the chambers final quality certification. Further tests at the CERN ISR site completed the process before the final installation on the experimental site. The detector performance will be analyzed in detail; the quality control procedures of the main RPC components will be reviewed as well as the cosmic test results for the mass production accomplished so far. Problems encountered and the adopted strategies for their solutions will be also discussed

  20. Neutron imaging detector based on the muPIC micro-pixel chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, J D; Fujioka, H; Harada, M; Iwaki, S; Kabuki, S; Kishimoto, Y; Kubo, H; Kurosawa, S; Miuchi, K; Nagae, T; Nishimura, H; Oku, T; Sawano, T; Shinohara, T; Suzuki, J; Takada, A; Tanimori, T; Ueno, K

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a prototype time-resolved neutron imaging detector employing the micro-pixel chamber (muPIC), a micro-pattern gaseous detector, coupled with a field programmable gate array-based data acquisition system for applications in neutron radiography at high-intensity neutron sources. The prototype system, with an active area of 10cm x 10cm and operated at a gas pressure of 2 atm, measures both the energy deposition (via time-over-threshold) and 3-dimensional track of each neutron-induced event, allowing the reconstruction of the neutron interaction point with improved accuracy. Using a simple position reconstruction algorithm, a spatial resolution of 349 +/- 36 microns was achieved, with further improvement expected. The detailed tracking allows strong rejection of background gamma-rays, resulting in an effective gamma sensitivity of 10^-12 or less, coupled with stable, robust neutron identification. The detector also features a time resolution of 0.6 microseconds.

  1. Front-End electronics development for the new Resistive Plate Chamber detector of HADES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, A.; Belver, D.; Cabanelas, P.; Díaz, J.; Garzón, J. A.; González-Díaz, D.; Koenig, W.; Lange, J. S.; Marín, J.; Montes, N.; Skott, P.; Traxler, M.

    2007-11-01

    In this paper we present the new RPC wall, which is being installed in the HADES detector at Darmstadt GSI. It consists of time-of-flight (TOF) detectors used for both particle identification and triggering. Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) detectors are becoming widely used because of their excellent TOF capabilities and reduced cost. The wall will contain 1024 RPC modules, covering an active area of around 7 m2, replacing the old TOFino detector at the low polar angle region. The excellent TOF and good charge resolutions of the new detector will improve the time resolution to values better than 100 ps. The Front-End electronics for the readout of the RPC signals is implemented with two types of boards to satisfy the space constraints: the Daughterboards are small boards that amplify the low level signals from the detector and provide fast discriminators for time of flight measurements, as well as an integrator for charge measurements. The Motherboard provides stable DC voltages and a stable ground, threshold DACs for the discriminators, multiplicity trigger and impedance matched paths for transfer of time window signals that contain information about time and charge. These signals are sent to a custom TDC board that label each event and send data through Ethernet to be conveniently stored.

  2. Fail-safe ion chamber errant beam detector tailored for personnel protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This fail-safe ion chamber system is designed to be part of the personnel safety system (PSS) for the Los Alamos neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Its job is to protect the occupants of the experimental areas from large radiation doses caused by errant beam conditions during beam transport from the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) to the LANSCE neutron spallation target. Due to limited shielding between the beam transport line and the experimental area only if the beam losses in the transport line are very low. The worst case beam spill scenario is calculated to result in a personnel exposure of about 0.01 Gys/s (1 rad/s). Although the preferred solution is to increase the bulk shielding between the beam line and the experimental area, the physical dimensions of the site do not permit an adequate amount of shielding to be added. The solution adopted is a layered system of three types of highly reliable detector systems: a current limiter system located in the beam line, a neutron detector system located in the experimental areas, and an ion chamber system located on the walls of the beam line tunnels. The ion chamber system is capable of shutting off the beam in less than 0.5 s, resulting in a worst case personnel exposure of 0.005 Gys (0.5 rad). 4 figs

  3. Fail-safe ion chamber errant beam detector tailored for personnel protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This fail-safe ion chamber system is designed to be part of the personnel safety system (PSS) for the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Its job is to protect the occupants of the experimental areas from large radiation doses caused by errant beam conditions during beam transport from the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) to the LANSCE neutron spallation target. The worst case beam spill scenario is calculated to result in a personnel exposure of about 0.01 Gys/s (1 rad/s). Although the preferred solution is to increase the bulk shielding between the beam line and the experimental area, the physical dimensions of the site do not permit an adequate amount of shielding to be added. The solution adopted is a layered system of three types of highly reliable detector systems: a current limiter system located in the beam line, a neutron detector system located in the experimental areas, and an ion chamber system located on the walls of the beam line tunnels. The ion chamber system is capable of shutting off the beam in less than 0.5 s, resulting in a worst case personnel exposure of 0.005 Gys (0.5 rad). 4 figs

  4. DIRAC detector experiment: the vacuum chamber (blue), beginning of the flat chamber (yellow), magnetic screen (orange) in front of the magnet. The vacuum tube for the primary proton beam is below (sil ver color)

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    1999-01-01

    DIRAC detector experiment: the vacuum chamber (blue), beginning of the flat chamber (yellow), magnetic screen (orange) in front of the magnet. The vacuum tube for the primary proton beam is below (sil ver color)

  5. Increase of the radon measurement efficiency by adding teflon electret in diffusion chamber with track detector LR-115

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diffusion chamber with electret and tack etch detector LR-115, for radon measurements is described in this paper. As electret we used a teflon disc with stabilized electrical charge density. Track density depends on the distance between detector and the electret: this dependence is given in this paper. (author)

  6. Design and construction of a target chamber and associated equipments for the BARC Charged Particle Detector Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 60 cm diameter spherical high-vacuum target-chamber with side-opening hemispherical-lids, two ancillary-chambers, beam-line-tubes, tees and other high-vacuum components, and chamber-lid handling systems have been designed, constructed and installed for the Charged Particle Detector Array in BARC-TIFR Pelletron-LINAC Facility, Mumbai. This array of several tens of Si-CsI detector modules and other ancillary-detectors will be used for investigations in fusion-fission dynamics, nuclear structure at elevated temperatures and angular momenta, exotic nuclear clusters and related fields. This paper describes the unique features of the system that aid different coincidence experiments, the chamber fabrication experience and the pump-down characteristics with a turbo molecular pump. Unlike many other target chambers in use, this chamber allows multiple overall geometrical configurations to be set to reach experimental goals. For instance, by replacing a hemispherical-lid from one side with a flat-lid, the overall configuration becomes hemispherical. This way, high geometrical efficiency can be provided to an ancillary gamma detector array by allowing it to move close to target from the flat-lid side, although with some sacrifice of geometrical efficiency for charged particles. In experiments where a further improvement of geometrical efficiency for a gamma array is desired, a third compact-cylinder configuration can also be arrived at. Thinned portion of the lids of the chamber also allow neutron coincidence measurements with charged particles and gamma rays.

  7. TGLD: A 16-channel charge readout chip for the PHENIX Pad Chamber detector subsystem at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes TGLD, a charge readout chip for the PHENIX Pad Chamber (PC) subsystem at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in Upton, NY. Due to the PC's high channel density, the TGLD and associated circuitry operate within the active detector region as permanent, zero access components, with remote set-up and test during collider operation. The TGLD design accommodates varying pad capacitance and charge gain for three detector subassemblies that detect particles at three different distances form the PHENIX collision vertex. The design also provides adjustable discrimination thresholds from MIP/10 to 2 MIP (Minimum Ionizing Particle). Three TGLD chips operate with a complimentary digital memory unit (DMU) to form 48 channel low power, low mass, readout cards. Partitioning of readout electronics and address control for robust remote operation are discussed. Component and system test results are also reported

  8. Optimization of micro-strip gas chamber as two-dimensional neutron detector using gadolinium converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masaoka, Sei; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Yamagishi, Hideshi; Soyama, Kazuhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-02-01

    A micro-strip gas chamber (MSGC) has been developing as a two-dimensional position sensitive neutron detector for neutron scattering experiments using high-intensity pulsed-neutron source in a high-intensity proton accelerator facility. MSGC is required for the high count rate, high detective efficiency, high positional resolution, stabilization and covering large area. Our purpose in this paper is to verify the proper of Gadolinium as MSGC converter. First, the basic property of Gadolinium converter was examined by simple experiments using a zero-dimensional neutron detector on the purpose of deriving the detective efficiency. Second, the optimization of the arrangement of a capillary plate in MSGC has been done by simulation on the MSGC using Gadolinium converter. As a result of that, it has been proved that Gadolinium can be theoretically used as a converter of MSGC. (author)

  9. Plane-parallel chamber as detector for time-of-flight measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Akimov, V A; Boyarinov, S V

    2002-01-01

    To arrange time-of-flight measurements in terms of the ALICE experiment one designed a system of gas detectors to record minimal-ionizing particles (MIP). Detector system is based on a plane-parallel gas-filled chamber (PPC) operating under gas intensification avalanche-type regime. One presents the results of simulation of gas discharge in PPC and evaluates the accuracy of measurement of MIP time-of-flight. One analyzes the test results of performances of PPC of various dimensions and with working gas medium various compositions. One detected correlation of flight time and of signal amplitude of PPC. One stresses, as well, positive effect of admission of electronegative additions into gas mixture. PPC time resolution constitutes 200-250 ps and MIP recording efficiency - exactly 70-90%

  10. Optimization of micro-strip gas chamber as two-dimensional neutron detector using gadolinium converter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A micro-strip gas chamber (MSGC) has been developing as a two-dimensional position sensitive neutron detector for neutron scattering experiments using high-intensity pulsed-neutron source in a high-intensity proton accelerator facility. MSGC is required for the high count rate, high detective efficiency, high positional resolution, stabilization and covering large area. Our purpose in this paper is to verify the proper of Gadolinium as MSGC converter. First, the basic property of Gadolinium converter was examined by simple experiments using a zero-dimensional neutron detector on the purpose of deriving the detective efficiency. Second, the optimization of the arrangement of a capillary plate in MSGC has been done by simulation on the MSGC using Gadolinium converter. As a result of that, it has been proved that Gadolinium can be theoretically used as a converter of MSGC. (author)

  11. Improving the gas gain monitoring system in multiwire proportional chambers for MUON detector of LHCb experiment.

    CERN Document Server

    Ruvinskaia, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    The gas gain monitoring system in multi-wire proportional chambers for MUON detector of LHCb has been constructed and commissioned. It includes an online- monitoring, tools for analysis the archived data and an alarm system on the quality of the gas mixture. Finally, it will be implemented in the main ECS of LHCb for MUON detector and as a part of safety system of LHCb as a permanent online monitor of the quality of the gas mixture in MWPCs. The main advantage of this setup is a monitoring of Gas Gain (GG) in MWPCs with radioactive sources independently from the presence of beam at LHC. It also provides an option for prompt reaction in case of a problem with the gas.

  12. A 200 cm x 50 cm large multigap resistive plate chamber based neutron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakorev, Dmitry; Elekes, Zoltan; Bemmerer, Daniel; Kempe, Mathias; Sobiella, Manfred; Stach, Daniel; Wagner, Andreas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Dresden (Germany); Roeder, Marko; Zuber, Kai [TU Dresden (Germany); Cowan, Thomas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    A prototype for a multigap resistive plate chamber (MRPC) based detector of 200 cm x 50 cm size for 1 GeV neutrons has been developed, built and tested. The principle of operation is the conversion of the high-energy neutron to a charged particle in an iron converter, and the detection of the charged particle in the MRPC. Experiments using the single-electron mode of operation of the ELBE 40 MeV electron accelerator showed that a time resolution of {sigma}{sub t}<100 ps was reached for minimum-ionizing particles, at nearly full efficiency. Extensive simulations show that it is feasible to construct a time-of-flight detector for GeV neutrons based on such a principle.

  13. Development and Evaluation of the Muon Trigger Detector Using a Resistive Plate Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PHENIX Experiment is the largest of the four experiments that have taken data at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. PHENIX, the Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment, is designed specifically to measure direct probes of the collisions such as electrons, muons, and photons. The primary goal of PHENIX is to discover and study a new state of matter called the Quark-Gluon Plasma. Among many particles, muons coming from W-boson decay gives us key information to analyze the spin of proton. Resistive plate chambers are proposed as a suitable solution as a muon trigger because of their fast response and good time resolution, flexibility in signal readout, robustness and the relatively low cost of production. The RPC detectors for upgrade were assembled and their performances were evaluated. The procedure to make the detectors better was optimized and described in detail in this thesis. The code based on ROOT was written and by using this the performance of the detectors made was evaluated, and all of the modules for north muon arm met the criteria and installation at PHENIX completed in November 2009. As RPC detectors that we made showed fast response, capacity of covering wide area with a resonable price and good spatial resolution, this will give the opportunity for applications, such as diagnosis and customs inspection system

  14. Development and Evaluation of the Muon Trigger Detector Using a Resistive Plate Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Byeong Hyeon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Kyun; Kang, Jeong Soo [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Jin; Choi, Ihn Jea [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Brookhaven (United States); Kim, Chong; Hong, Byung Sik [Korea University, Seol (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    The PHENIX Experiment is the largest of the four experiments that have taken data at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. PHENIX, the Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment, is designed specifically to measure direct probes of the collisions such as electrons, muons, and photons. The primary goal of PHENIX is to discover and study a new state of matter called the Quark-Gluon Plasma. Among many particles, muons coming from W-boson decay gives us key information to analyze the spin of proton. Resistive plate chambers are proposed as a suitable solution as a muon trigger because of their fast response and good time resolution, flexibility in signal readout, robustness and the relatively low cost of production. The RPC detectors for upgrade were assembled and their performances were evaluated. The procedure to make the detectors better was optimized and described in detail in this thesis. The code based on ROOT was written and by using this the performance of the detectors made was evaluated, and all of the modules for north muon arm met the criteria and installation at PHENIX completed in November 2009. As RPC detectors that we made showed fast response, capacity of covering wide area with a resonable price and good spatial resolution, this will give the opportunity for applications, such as diagnosis and customs inspection system.

  15. A new design of the gaseous imaging detector: Micro Pixel Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Ochi, A; Koishi, S; Tanimori, T; Nagae, T; Nakamura, M

    2001-01-01

    The novel gaseous detector 'Micro Pixel Chamber (Micro PIC)' has been developed for X-ray, gamma-ray and charged particle imaging. This detector consists of double sided printing circuit board (PCB). The stable operation of Micro PIC is realized by thick substrate and wide anode strips. One of the most outstanding feature is the process of production and the cost. The base technology of producing Micro PIC is same as producing PCB, then detector with large detection area (more than 10 cmx10 cm) can be made by present technology. Our first tests were performed using a 3 cmx3 cm detection area with a readout of 0.4 mm pitch. The gas gain and stability were measured in these tests. The gas gain of 10 sup 4 was obtained using argon ethane (8:2) gas mixture. Also, there was no discharge between anodes and cathodes in the gain of 10 sup 3 during two days of continuous operation. Although some discharges occurred in the higher gain (approximately 10 sup 4), no critical damage on the detector was found.

  16. Tests of the data acquisition system and detector control system for the muon chambers of the CMS experiment at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Phys. Inst. III A of RWTH Aachen University is involved in the development, production and tests of the Drift Tube (DT) muon chambers for the barrel muon system of the CMS detector at the LHC at CERN (Geneva). The present thesis describes some test procedures which were developed and performed for the chamber local Data Acquisition (DAQ) system, as well as for parts of the Detector Control System (DCS). The test results were analyzed and discussed. Two main kinds of DAQ tests were done. On the one hand, to compare two different DAQ systems, the chamber signals were split and read out by both systems. This method allowed to validate them by demonstrating, that there were no relevant differences in the measured drift times, generated by the same muon event in the same chamber cells. On the other hand, after the systems were validated, the quality of the data was checked. For this purpose extensive noise studies were performed. The noise dependence on various parameters (threshold,HV) was investigated quantitatively. Also detailed studies on single cells, qualified as ''dead'' and ''noisy'' were done. For the DAQ tests a flexible hardware and software environment was needed. The organization and installation of the supplied electronics, as well as the software development was realized within the scope of this thesis. The DCS tests were focused on the local gas pressure read-out components, attached directly to the chamber: pressure sensor, manifolds and the pressure ADC (PADC). At first it was crucial to proof, that the calibration of the mentioned chamber components for the gas pressure measurement is valid. The sensor calibration data were checked and possible differences in their response to the same pressure were studied. The analysis of the results indicated that the sensor output depends also on the ambient temperature, a new experience which implied an additional pedestal measurement of the chamber gas pressure sensors at CMS. The second test sequence

  17. Study of the tracking chambers of the ALICE detector dimuons arm at LHC; Etude des chambers de trajectographie du bras dimuons du detecteur ALICE au LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bimbot, L.; Courtat, P.; Crane, B. [Services Techniques, Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)] [and others

    1999-11-01

    An important R and D program for the tracking chambers of the ALICE dimuon arm is currently being carried out at the IPN. The aim is to determine the optimum detector type and geometry. Numerous simulations have been carried out for pad chamber configurations to determine the multi-hit separation as a function of pad geometry. The signal processing has also been studied in detail. Two small prototypes have been constructed and studied during in-beam tests. (authors) 7 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Diamond detector versus silicon diode and ion chamber in photon beams of different energy and field size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was to test the suitability of a PTW diamond detector for nonreference condition dosimetry in photon beams of different energy (6 and 25 MV) and field size (from 2.6 cmx2.6 cm to 10 cmx10 cm). Diamond behavior was compared to that of a Scanditronix p-type silicon diode and a Scanditronix RK ionization chamber. Measurements included output factors (OF), percentage depth doses (PDD) and dose profiles. OFs measured with diamond detector agreed within 1% with those measured with diode and RK chamber. Only at 25 MV, for the smallest field size, RK chamber underestimated OFs due to averaging effects in a pointed shaped beam profile. Agreement was found between PDDs measured with diamond detector and RK chamber for both 6 MV and 25 MV photons and down to 5 cmx5 cm field size. For the 2.6 cmx2.6 cm field size, at 25 MV, RK chamber underestimated doses at shallow depth and the difference progressively went to zero in the distal region. PDD curves measured with silicon diode and diamond detector agreed well for the 25 MV beam at all the field sizes. Conversely, the nontissue equivalence of silicon led, for the 6 MV beam, to a slight overestimation of the diode doses in the distal region, at all the field sizes. Penumbra and field width measurements gave values in agreement for all the detectors but with a systematic overestimate by RK measurements. The results obtained confirm that ion chamber is not a suitable detector when high spatial resolution is required. On the other hand, the small differences in the studied parameters, between diamond and silicon systems, do not lead to a significant advantage in the use of diamond detector for routine clinical dosimetry

  19. Analysis of SCR control circuit testing for power supply double chamber plasma nitriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of scr control circuit testing for power supply double chamber plasma nitriding has been performed. Analysis of testing was carried out to find out and validate the performance of the SCR control circuit. The testing method is direct measurement consist of oscillator circuit and SCR performance test. The analysis of oscillator circuit with main component of OT UJT 2646 and OT 240 transformer on the SCR control circuit was functioning properly. This can be seen with the formation of the 4 V voltage Vcc as an indication pulse signal to activate the gate on the SCR and at 12 V Vcc voltage (max) pulse signal is almost full. This pulse signal will be used to activate the SCR gate so that the SCR output voltage can be controlled. For SCR that installed on the doubler circuit, they are functioning properly too. The indication is the voltage on the output side of the doubler circuit is almost twice as the input side. The addition of test time (operation time) and the addition of the load current is proportional to the temperature of SCR. (author)

  20. Performance of the front-end signal processing electronics for the drift chambers of the Stanford large detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the performance of the front-end analog and digital signal processing electronics for the drift chambers of the Stanford Large Detector (SLD) detector at the Stanford Linear Collider. The electronics mounted on printed circuit boards include up to 64 channels of transimpedance amplification, analog sampling, A/D conversion, and associated control circuitry. Measurements of the time resolution, gain, noise, linearity, crosstalk, and stability of the readout electronics are described and presented. The expected contribution of the electronics to the relevant drift chamber measurement resolutions (i.e., timing and charge division) is given

  1. Statistical model of quality of radon measurements using electret ion chamber detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a statistical model for estimating probability, which states that a quality of radon measurements using the electret ion chamber system RM-1 will be accurate. The quality of the electret measurement was modelled as a ratio between the reference radon concentration and values measured under real conditions with varied levels of indoor radon concentration and microclimate indoor conditions. It was stated that the accuracy tolerance of measured values is 20 % of the given reference value. To estimate the uncertainty of the statistical model, the exact confidence limits for the estimated probabilities are computed. The statistical model was confirmed by an independent set of measurements. Moreover, the effect of absolute humidity on the quality estimation of electret detectors are also statistically analysed and discussed. The results of the statistical model confirm that the electret system is robust and suitable for estimation of radon concentration. (authors)

  2. Improvement of the drift chamber system in the SAPHIR detector and first measurements of the Φ meson production at threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SAPHIR detector at ELSA enables the measurement of photon induced Φ meson production from threshold up to 3 GeV in the full kinematical range. A considerable improvement of the drift chamber system is a precondition of gaining the necessary data rate in an acceptable time. The research focuses attention on the choice of the chamber gas and on a different mechanical construction, so as to minimize the negative influences of the photon beam crossing the sensitive volume of the drift chamber system. In addition, first preliminary results of the total and the differential cross section for the Φ meson production close to threshold were evaluated. (orig.)

  3. The analog Resistive Plate Chamber detector of the ARGO-YBJ experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bartoli, B; Bi, X J; Cao, Z; Catalanotti, S; Chen, S Z; Chen, T L; Cui, S W; Dai, B Z; D'Amone, A; Danzengluobu,; De Mitri, I; Piazzoli, B D'Ettorre; Di Girolamo, T; Di Sciascio, G; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Zhenyong; Gou, Q B; Guo, Y Q; He, H H; Hu, Haibing; Hu, Hongbo; Iacovacci, M; Iuppa, R; Jia, H Y; Labaciren,; Li, H J; Liu, C; Liu, J; Liu, M Y; Lu, H; Ma, L L; Ma, X H; Mancarella, G; Mari1, S M; Marsella, G; Mastroianni, S; Montini, P; Ning, C C; Perrone, L; Pistilli, P; Salvini1, P; Santonico, R; Shen, P R; Sheng, X D; Shi, F; Surdo, A; Tan, Y H; Vallania, P; Vernetto, S; Vigorito, C; Wang, H; Wu, C Y; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yang, Q Y; Yang, X C; Yao, Z G; Yuan, A F; Zha, M; Zhang, H M; Zhang, L; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhao, J; Zhaxiciren,; Zhaxisangzhu,; Zhou, X X; Zhu, F R; Zhu, Q Q

    2015-01-01

    The ARGO-YBJ experiment has been in stable data taking from November 2007 till February 2013 at the YangBaJing Cosmic Ray Observatory (4300 m a.s.l.). The detector consists of a single layer of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) ( about 6700 m^2}) operated in streamer mode. The signal pick-up is obtained by means of strips facing one side of the gas volume. The digital readout of the signals, while allows a high space-time resolution in the shower front reconstruction, limits the measurable energy to a few hundred TeV. In order to fully investigate the 1-10 PeV region, an analog readout has been implemented by instrumenting each RPC with two large size electrodes facing the other side of the gas volume. Since December 2009 the RPC charge readout has been in operation on the entire central carpet (about 5800 m^2). In this configuration the detector is able to measure the particle density at the core position where it ranges from tens to many thousands of particles per m^2. Thus ARGO-YBJ provides a highly detailed...

  4. Testing of multigap Resistive Plate Chambers for Electron Ion Collider Detector Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Hannah; Phenix Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Despite decades of research on the subject, some details of the spin structure of the nucleon continues to be unknown. To improve our knowledge of the nucleon spin structure, the construction of a new collider is needed. This is one of the primary goals of the proposed Electron Ion Collider (EIC). Planned EIC spectrometers will require good particle identification. This can be provided by time of flight (TOF) detectors with excellent timing resolutions of 10 ps. A potential TOF detector that could meet this requirement is a glass multigap resistive plate chamber (mRPC). These mRPCs can provide excellent timing resolution at a low cost. The current glass mRPC prototypes have a total of twenty 0.1 mm thick gas gaps. In order to test the feasibility of this design, a cosmic test stand was assembled. This stand used the coincidence of scintillators as a trigger, and contains fast electronics. The construction, the method of testing, and the test results of the mRPCs will be presented.

  5. Construction and qualification of the Power Supply system of the AMS-02 Tracker detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menichelli, M.; Accardo, L.; Ambrosi, G.; Battiston, R.; Bizzarri, M.; Blasko, S.; Cosson, D.; Fiori, E.M.; Maris, O.; Papi, A.; Scolieri, G. [INFN, Sez. Di Perugia, via Pascoli, 06100 Perugia (Italy)

    2007-04-15

    The AMS-02 Tracker power supply system, described in this paper, has been designed optimizing noise performances, modularity and efficiency. The power is distributed starting from a 28V line coming from the power distribution system is converted into the needed voltages by means of DC-DC converters, and for bias supply and front-end voltages is post-regulated by means of linear regulators. Components Off The Shelf (COTS) have been extensively used in the construction of this power supply, however various radiation test campaigns have been performed in order to verify the reliability of these components. The power supply architecture developed for the tracker detector has been used as a guideline for the development of the power supplies for the other detectors in the experiment.

  6. Development of a Time-resolved Neutron Imaging Detector Based on the {\\mu}PIC Micro-Pixel Chamber

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Joseph D.; Harada, Masahide; Hattori, Kaori; Iwaki, Satoru; Kabuki, Shigeto; Kishimoto, Yuji; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Miuchi, Kentaro; Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Nishimura, Hironobu; Oku, Takayuki; Sawano, Tatsuya; Shinohara, Takenao

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a prototype time-resolved neutron imaging detector employing a micro-pattern gaseous detector known as the micro-pixel chamber ({\\mu}PIC) coupled with a field-programmable-gate-array-based data acquisition system. Our detector system combines 100{\\mu}m-level spatial and sub-{\\mu}s time resolutions with a low gamma sensitivity of less than 10^-12 and high data rates, making it well suited for applications in neutron radiography at high-intensity, pulsed neutron sources. In th...

  7. Design and performance of a heavy ion detector using a gridded ionization chamber with helical position-sensitive proportional counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A counter specifically designed for heavy ions and low-energy helium ions has been constructed for use in the focal plane of a Q3D spectrometer. The counter utilizes a gridded ionization chamber to measure energy loss and total energy of the particles incident on the detector and a helical proportional chamber to establish the position and hence the momentum along the focal plane. The ionization chamber information is used to establish the mass and charge of the incident particle with high precision and under low background conditions. The helix provides excellent spatial resolution along with high counting rate performance and a resolution independent of the angle at which the particles enter the detector

  8. Prestaciones del Detector Central de Muones del Experimento CMS: las Camaras de Deriva y su Sistema de Trigger (Performance of the Central Muon Detector of the Experiment CMS: the Drift Tube Chambers and its Trigger System)

    CERN Document Server

    Muñoz, Carlos Villanueva

    2007-01-01

    Prestaciones del Detector Central de Muones del Experimento CMS: las Camaras de Deriva y su Sistema de Trigger (Performance of the Central Muon Detector of the Experiment CMS: the Drift Tube Chambers and its Trigger System)

  9. A charged particle telescope with a gas ionization chamber ΔE detector with axial charge collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ionization chamber as ΔE detector with axial field configuration has been set up. No frisch grid is required. The detector is backed by a surface barrier E detector. The thin aluminized mylar entrance window acts as anode on which positive voltage is applied. A charged particle telescope with the above ionization chamber has been fabricated. It consists of three parts, the window assembly, the gas cell and the E detector assembly. These are described. The performance of the detector was tested in a vacuum chamber using 241Am and 239Pu α-sources at various pressures and anode voltages using a gas length of 3 cm. The gas mixture used was 90 per cent argon and 10 per cent methane. The measurements showed that operating anode voltage in the range of 300 to 600V and the pressure range from 0.1 to 0.9 kg/cm2 were suitable for heavy ions. (M.G.B.)

  10. Simultaneous operation of a test apparatus filled with liquid argon as bubble chamber, calorimeter and scintillation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physics motivations for the use of argon as a new bubble chamber liquid are discussed. Results, obtained from a 2.7 1 argon detector in SPS and SC beams at CERN, comprise its track sensitivity to ionizing particles and to a laser beam in the bubble chamber mode, its use as a calorimeter through the collection of free charges in an electric field and the recording of the scintillation light produced by ionizing particles. Various interference phenomena during the simultaneous use of the hybrid properties, as well as purity requirements on the liquid are discussed. Furthermore, nitrogen and argon/nitrogen mixtures were investigated. Applications of our technique for neutrino experiments at TeV accelerators and as vertex detectors are briefly outlined. In-line holography, successfully tested in BEBC, could simplify the optical track recording and improve the resolution in very large detectors. (orig.)

  11. Conceptual design report for the SDC barrel and intermediate muon detectors based on a jet-type drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a jet-type drift chamber for the barrel and intermediate muon detectors of SDC. The chamber system consists of large multiwire drift chambers having a simple box-type frame structure: 2. 5 x 0.4 m2 in cross section and maximum 9 m in length. A chamber module consists of double layers of small jet cells. The drift cell is composed of a wire plane, including 3 sense wires, and cathode plates parallel to the wire plane. The two layers in a chamber are staggered to each other by half a cell width. The jet cell is tilted such that its principle axis points to the interaction point. Such an arrangement, together with a constant drift velocity of the jet cell, allows us to design a simple and powerful trigger system for high momentum muons utilizing a drift time sum between a pair of staggered cells. The multi-hit capability will be helpful to distinguish high momentum muon tracks from associated electromagnetic debris as has been demonstrated by the Fermilab beam test T816. The maximum drift time fulfills the SDC requirement. A preliminary FEM analysis of the chamber module verified the excellent structural stiffness. It makes the support structure and the alignment system relatively simple. These features will reduce the total cost as well as ensure a good performance of the chamber system. (J.P.N.)

  12. The CMS Micro-strip Gas Chamber Project Development of a high resolution tracking detector for harsh radiation environments

    CERN Document Server

    Bellazzini, R; Brez, A; Cattai, A; Gariano, G; Latronico, L; Loni, R; Lumb, N; Moggi, A; Morelli, A; Papanestis, A; Reale, S; Salaris, C; Spandre, G; Massai, M M; Spezziga, M; Toropin, A N

    2001-01-01

    Thirty-two large area Micro-Strip Gas Chambers were tested in a high intensity, 350~MeV pion beam at PSI to prove that we had reached a Milestone for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment. The particle rate was approximately 6 kHz/mm2, distributed over the whole active area of the detectors, and this rate was maintained for a total integrated time of 493 hours. All of the chambers were operated with signal-to-noise values at or above that corresponding to 98 % hit detection efficiency at CMS; the average S/N was 31. No indications of any gain instabilities or ageing effects were observed. In the official 3-week Milestone period, three strips from a total of 16384 were damaged, a result which is twenty times lower than the minimal requirement for CMS. The spark rate of the detectors was very low and decreased with time to an average of one spark per chamber per day. The cathode voltages of 24 of the chambers were increased over a one week period to investigate the behaviour of the detectors at higher gain...

  13. Development of a multistep parallel-plate chamber as time projection chamber end-cap or vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the course of development of the multistep avalanche chamber the authors have realized several multiple electrode parallel-plate devices exhibiting stable gains well in excess of 105 which are thus capable of detecting minimum ionizing particles. This paper presents the design and discusses the performance of a two-step parallel-plate avalanche chamber. A region of moderate electric field --the drift region where charges are released by ionizing radiation--is followed by two layers of comparable and very high field where charge multiplication occurs. Owing to the choice of the electrodes--either cross-wire meshes or parallel thick-wire grids at small pitch--the electric field is uniform over most of the gaps, and charge multiplication proceeds through a parallel-plate avalanche mode. In order to obtain a fast signal and a reduced avalanche spread in their prototypes, the authors have adopted rather narrow typical gaps of 4 mm for the first amplification region and 1 mm for the second. To avoid edge sparking, they have used either a gap increase at the edges or the insertion of thin mylar foil around the frame's edges. The last electrode in the structure, made with a printed-circuit board, is the only one equipped with electronics and is conveniently operated at ground potential. At regular intervals, four rows of pads are used to determine the coordinates of tracks in selected positions. Argon (90%) and methane (10%) comprise the gas filling

  14. Development of a Time-resolved Neutron Imaging Detector Based on the {\\mu}PIC Micro-Pixel Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Joseph D; Hattori, Kaori; Iwaki, Satoru; Kabuki, Shigeto; Kishimoto, Yuji; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Miuchi, Kentaro; Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Nishimura, Hironobu; Oku, Takayuki; Sawano, Tatsuya; Shinohara, Takenao; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Takada, Atsushi; Tanimori, Toru; Ueno, Kazuki; Ikeno, Masahiro; Tanaka, Manobu; Uchida, Tomohisa

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a prototype time-resolved neutron imaging detector employing a micro-pattern gaseous detector known as the micro-pixel chamber ({\\mu}PIC) coupled with a field-programmable-gate-array-based data acquisition system. Our detector system combines 100{\\mu}m-level spatial and sub-{\\mu}s time resolutions with a low gamma sensitivity of less than 10^-12 and high data rates, making it well suited for applications in neutron radiography at high-intensity, pulsed neutron sources. In the present paper, we introduce the detector system and present several test measurements performed at NOBORU (BL10), J-PARC to demonstrate the capabilities of our prototype. We also discuss future improvements to the spatial resolution and rate performance.

  15. Calibration of the central jet chamber of the OPAL detector with UV laser beams: Methods and results on jet chamber prototypes (FSP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The central tracking device of the OPAL experiment at the LEP e+e--collider consists of a pictorial jet chamber with a diameter of 4 m and 4 m length. The calibration of such a large detector is performed by the help of a UV laser system generating straight tracks even in the presence of magnetic fields. Intensive investigations of the laser calibration power and performance were done at the Full Scale Prototype (FSP) of the OPAL jet chamber. Laser double tracks with a precisely known distance are used to determine the drift velocity with an accuracy of 0.1%. From the measured deviations of a straight laser track electronic time offsets, wire positions and field distortions are derived. These calibration constants were applied to correct the measured drift times of test beam events. The sagitta and momentum resolutions of the thus corrected tracks have been obtained in the range from 6 GeV/c to 50 GeV/c. Extrapolating the results to the final OPAL jet chamber, a momentum resolution of σ-p/p = 6% is expected for 50 GeV/c tracks in a magnetic field of 4 kG. (orig.)

  16. Study on the realization of a minimum ionizing particle detector: development of a PPAC (Parallel-plate Avalanche Chamber)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parallel-Plate Avalanche Chamber (PPAC) detectors are used currently to observe nuclear disintegrations in nuclear physics. The work that has been done here shows PPAC can be used in high energy physics under certain conditions to detect minimum ionizing particles. Their advantage is to join good time resolution with low matter density. A PPAC prototype has been made with 90% efficiency, 3 NS jitter, 2 NS rise time, 20 mg/cm2 mass, 1.5 mm spatial accuracy. The parameters studied were electrodes design, choice of gas filling, electronics and anode strips. The detector is to be used as a hodoscope with high flux of particles

  17. 2D x-ray imaging using a micro-pattern gas detector 'micro pixel chamber (μ-PIC)'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The micro-pattern gas detector (MPGD) has a fine electrode structure, and it can obtain much higher positional resolution compared to that of the conventional gas detector based on the multi-wire proportional chamber. The 'Micro Pixel Chamber (μ-PIC)' is a new MPGD developed at Kyoto University. It has been applied not only to X-ray crystallographic analysis, but also particle and nuclear physics. In the present study, some experiments were conducted in order to evaluate the capability of μ-PIC in X-ray analysis. The gas gain of 3000 and linearity up to 200 kcps were obtained. Effect of parallax was examined, showing the image distortion within the theoretical estimate. Small angle X-ray scattering experiment using a collagen sample was also conducted, having demonstrated good X-ray imaging performance of μ-PIC. (author)

  18. High density spiral projection chamber (HDSPC): Design of the end-cap detectors of the OBELIX experiment at LEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the design of a cylindrical high density projection chamber that uses the spiral projection chamber geometry and will instrument the end-caps of the proposed OBELIX experiment at LEAR. This detector -high density spiral projection chamber has axial symmetry, radial drift electric field, a radiator made of converter disks alternating with drift volumes and the amplification and readout region in the outer part of the cylinder. It is equipped with FADC electronics and reconstructs in three dimensions primary ionization produced in the active volume. It features fine granularity and high angular resolution near the beam pipe and appears particularly advantageous for γ and prong detection in the forward and very forward region of storage rings and extracted beam experiments. (orig.)

  19. Construction and performance of large flash chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction and performance of 12' x 12' flash chambers used in a 340 ton neutrino detector under construction at Fermilab is described. The flash chambers supply digital information with a spatial resolution of 0.2'', and are used to finely sample the shower development of the reaction products of neutrino interactions. The flash chambers are easy and inexpensive to build and are electronically read out

  20. Tests of the data acquisition system and detector control system for the muon chambers of the CMS experiment at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowa, Michael Christian

    2009-02-27

    The Phys. Inst. III A of RWTH Aachen University is involved in the development, production and tests of the Drift Tube (DT) muon chambers for the barrel muon system of the CMS detector at the LHC at CERN (Geneva). The present thesis describes some test procedures which were developed and performed for the chamber local Data Acquisition (DAQ) system, as well as for parts of the Detector Control System (DCS). The test results were analyzed and discussed. Two main kinds of DAQ tests were done. On the one hand, to compare two different DAQ systems, the chamber signals were split and read out by both systems. This method allowed to validate them by demonstrating, that there were no relevant differences in the measured drift times, generated by the same muon event in the same chamber cells. On the other hand, after the systems were validated, the quality of the data was checked. For this purpose extensive noise studies were performed. The noise dependence on various parameters (threshold,HV) was investigated quantitatively. Also detailed studies on single cells, qualified as ''dead'' and ''noisy'' were done. For the DAQ tests a flexible hardware and software environment was needed. The organization and installation of the supplied electronics, as well as the software development was realized within the scope of this thesis. The DCS tests were focused on the local gas pressure read-out components, attached directly to the chamber: pressure sensor, manifolds and the pressure ADC (PADC). At first it was crucial to proof, that the calibration of the mentioned chamber components for the gas pressure measurement is valid. The sensor calibration data were checked and possible differences in their response to the same pressure were studied. The analysis of the results indicated that the sensor output depends also on the ambient temperature, a new experience which implied an additional pedestal measurement of the chamber gas pressure

  1. Time-of-flight ERD with a 200 mm2 Si3N4 window gas ionization chamber energy detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low energy heavy ion elastic recoil detection work has been carried out in Jyväskylä since 2009 using home made timing detectors, a silicon energy detector and a timestamping data acquisition setup forming a time-of-flight–energy telescope. In order to improve the mass resolution of the setup a new energy detector was designed to replace the silicon solid state detector, which suffered from radiation damage and had poor resolution for heavy recoils. In this paper the construction and operation of an isobutane filled gas ionization chamber with a 14 × 14 mm2 100 nm thick silicon nitride window are described. In addition to greatly improved energy resolution for heavy ions, the detector is also able to detect hydrogen recoils simultaneously in the energy range of 100–1000 keV. Additionally the detector has position sensitivity by means of timing measurement, which can be performed without compromising the performance of the detector in any other way. The achieved position sensitivity improves the depth resolution near the surface

  2. The power supply system for the DEPFET pixel detector at BELLE II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rummel, Stefan, E-mail: Stefan.Rummel@lmu.de [Ludwig-Maximilians Universität, Coulombwall 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Excellence Cluster Universe, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-01-21

    The upgrade of the KEKB accelerator towards 8×10{sup 35}cm{sup −2}s{sup −1} poses several challenges for the BELLE II detector. Especially the innermost detector will be faced with a significant radiation of several MRad per year as well as a high hit density. To cope with this a silicon pixel detector will be used for the inner layers of the silicon tracker. The pixel detector (PXD) consists of two layers of DEPFET active pixel sensors. The DEPFET technology has an unique set of advantages like low power dissipation in the active area, flexible device size, radiation hardness and a thinning procedure allowing to adjust the thickness of the device over a wide range. The two layers close to the interaction point together with a low material budget will improve the IP resolution by a factor of 2 compared to the previous installed silicon detector. In addition silicon stand-alone pattern recognition will be possible together with the four layers of double sided strip detectors (DSSD) of the strip detector. The PXD detector system consists of the DEPFET modules with integrated readout chips, the data handling hybrid receiving the data and sending them to compute nodes performing an online pattern recognition. Moreover the power supply system provides the supply voltages for the DEPFET from a position outside of the detector. The power distribution is designed to provide low output impedance over all frequencies and transient response with appropriate overshoots. The PXD pose several challenges to the power distribution system—number of voltages, tight requirements on regulation and noise. -- Highlights: ► The KEKB accelerator receive a luminosity upgrade towards 8×10{sup 35}cm{sup −2}s{sup −1}. ► A two layer pixel detector based on the DEPFET technology will be installed. ► An improvement of a factor of 2 in. impact parameter resolution is expected. ► The 34 A dedicated power supply system for the detector is under development which aims for low

  3. Fission chambers as the best suited detector family for in vessel neutron instrumentation of the sodium-cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) is one of the main options as a next generation reactor. Its in-vessel instrumentation is required to detect any abnormal situation at a sufficiently early stage, and thus to deliver measurements that are reliable and easy to interpret over several reactor cycles. In this paper we pick up the detector family that is the best suited for the in-vessel SFR instrumentation with respect to this requirement. Three types of detectors that are widely used for in-core neutron measurements are reviewed: fission chambers, boron-lined proportional counters and self-powered neutron detectors. We use as an input data neutron and gamma spectra that have been computed for a preliminary design of the SFR in different locations. We compute for each detector family the expected signal, to assess whether its level is sufficient. The evolution of the signal due to the depletion of the active part of the detectors is also addressed, to examine whether it is compatible with long term measurements. The issue of leakage current and irradiation damages is examined. Fission chambers appear to be the best suited detector family for in vessel neutron instrumentation of the SFR, able to deliver an interpretable signal for a wide dynamic of reactor power and for three or more operating cycles. This conclusion is supported by three key assets: the possibility to choose the fissile deposit according to the location in the reactor, the excellent rejection of the gamma events by using the Campbelling mode, and the intrinsic wide dynamic of those detectors when combining pulse mode and Campbelling mode. The Campbelling mode is also a convenient way to deal with the leakage current. In contrast, the two other types are shown to be inadequate for SFR measurements. (authors)

  4. Construction and test of a gas system for the supply of a jet chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An existing test jetchamber has been made operational by the installation of an appropriate gas system. As the chamber is to study problems of the OPAL jetchamber, its gas system has to meet requirements similar to that of OPAL: Set-up of very well defined gas mixtures at given pressure, removal of residual O2 molecules and admixture of a small amount of H2O. After successful testing of the single components, measurement of the drift velocity vd was used as a functional test of the overall system. Excellent agreement has been achieved with existing OPAL drift velocity-data. (orig.)

  5. Qualification measurements of the voltage supply system as well as conceptionation of a state machine for the detector control of the ATLAS pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The supply system and the control system of the ATLAS pixel detector represent important building blocks of the pixel detector. Corresponding studies of the supply system, which were performed within a comprehensive test system, the so-called system test, with nearly all final components and the effects on the pixel detector are object of this thesis. A further point of this thesis is the coordination and further development of the detector-control-system software under regardment of the different partial systems. A main topic represents thereby the conceptionation of the required state machine as interface for the users and the connection to the data acquisition system

  6. Sensitivity factor analysis using computer simulation for radon detection in cylindrical diffusion chambers with nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensitivity factor analysis for radon detection in cylindrical diffusion chambers was carried out using computer program developed in C language. Radon gas entering to cylindrical cup dosimeter decays registering alpha tracks on NTD film in the chamber. The processes following each radon decay such as progeny particle formation, progeny decay, diffusion through Brownian motion, surface deposition and track registration on NTDs complexities the scenario inside the diffusion chamber. This can be analysed in a better way using computer simulation. Present work involves development of program for analysis on partial sensitivity factor of radon in cup dosimeters. Random numbers are used for accounting the uncertainty in alpha particle emission points and directions of alpha emission. First part of the work involves analyses of fluence on bare detector and comparison with theoretical result. Then the variation in sensitivity factor is analyzed by putting angle constrain. Then different energy windows for countable alpha track registration on LR115 type detectors are considered and the results are presented. (author)

  7. A micro-gap, air-filled ionisation chamber as a detector for criticality accident dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A micro-gap air-filled ionisation chamber was designed for criticality dosimetry. The special feature of the chamber is its very small gap between electrodes of only 0.3 mm. This prevents ion recombination at high dose rates and minimises the influence of gas on secondary particles spectrum. The electrodes are made of polypropylene because of higher content of hydrogen in this material, when compared with soft tissue. The difference between neutron and gamma sensitivity in such chamber becomes practically negligible. The chamber's envelope contains two specially connected capacitors, one for polarising the electrodes and the other for collecting the ionisation charge. Air-filled ionisation chamber with very small gap is a simple dosemeter, which fulfills the most desired properties of criticality accident dosemeters. Short ion collection time is achieved by combination of small gap and relatively high polarising voltage. For the same reason, parasitic recombination of ions in the chamber is negligibly small even at high dose rates. The difference between neutron and gamma sensitivity is small for tissue-equivalent chamber and is expected to become practically negligible when the chamber electrodes are made of polypropylene. Additional capacitor provides a broad measuring range from ∼0.1 Gy up to ∼25 Gy; however, leakage of electrical charge from polarising capacitor has to be observed and taken into account. Periodical re-charging of the device is necessary. Obviously, final test of the device in conditions simulating criticality accident is needed and will be performed as soon as available. (authors)

  8. Evaluation of dose distributions in gamma chamber using glass plate detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan Pradeep

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A commercial glass plate of thickness 1.75 mm has been utilized for evaluation of dose distributions inside the irradiation volume of gamma chamber using optical densitometry technique. The glass plate showed linear response in the dose range 0.10 Kilo Gray (kGy to 10 kGy of cobalt-60 gamma radiation with optical sensitivity 0.04 Optical Density (OD /kGy. The change in the optical density at each identified spatial dose matrix on the glass plate in relation to the position in the irradiation volume has been presented as dose distributions inside the gamma chamber. The optical density changes have been graphically plotted in the form of surface diagram of color washes for different percentage dose rate levels as isodose distributions in gamma chamber. The variation in dose distribution inside the gamma chamber unit, GC 900, BRIT India make, using this technique has been observed within ± 15%. This technique can be used for routine quality assurances and dose distribution validation of any gamma chamber during commissioning and source replacement. The application of commercial glass plate for dose mapping in gamma chambers has been found very promising due to its wider dose linearity, quick measurement, and lesser expertise requirement in application of the technique.

  9. A charged particle telescope with a gas ionization chamber ΔE detector with axial charge collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A charged particle telescope with a gas ionization in which no frisch grid is used has been set-up. The three basic parts of this telescope are: (1) the window assembly, (2) the gas cell and (3) the E detctor assembly. These parts are described. The active length of the ionization chamber can be changed easily according to the need. The field configuration is axial. Using a gas mixture of 90 per cent argon and 10 per cent methane, and alpha-sources 241Am and 239Pu, the performance of the detector was tested in a vacuum chamber at various pressures and various anode voltages for gas length of 3 cm. It is observed that energy resolution is 185 keV at 1.2 kg/cm2 gas pressure and the suitable range of operating anode voltage is 300 to 600 v. (M.G.B)

  10. The time-projection chamber: A new 4π detector for charged particles: A new 4π detector for charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new approach to the problems of track recognition and momentum measurement of high energy charged particles is described, and a detector particularly suitable for PEP energies is discussed. The central idea is the utilization of a large methane-filled drift chamber placed in a strong magnetic field, with the drift field oriented parallel to the magnetic field. In this configuration transverse diffusion of the ionization electrons can be very substantially suppressed by the magnetic field. This in turn leads to the possibility of measurement accuracies on the order of 100 microns after one meter of drift. At the same time, the detector can provide truly 3-dimensional spatial data, free from the ambiguities characteristic of conventional techniques involving spatial projections. The reconstruction efficiency can be expected to approach 100%, even for events of the highest multiplicities

  11. Characterizations of Cathode pad chamber as tracking detector for MUON Spectrometer of ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Pal, Sanjoy

    The present thesis gives an overview of A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN with particular emphasis on the contribution of the Indian Collaboration to the Muon Spectrometer. The two major activities of the Indian Collaboration namely, the 2$^{nd}$ Tracking Station and MANAS chip, have been covered in detail. A full scale prototype chamber (0$^{th}$ chamber) for the 2$^{nd}$ station was tested at CERN with beams from PS and SPS. Detail analysis of his data was carried out by me to validate the design and fabrication procedure for these large area Cathode Pad Chambers. This analysis also determined the production specifications of the MANAS chip. The thesis present every step which led to timely production of the ten chambers (two spare) of the 2$^{nd}$ station. At every stage strict quality control measures were adopted and various tests were carried out to validate every production step. I have been closely associated with the chamber production and all the validation...

  12. Initial test results of an ionization chamber shower detector for a LHC luminosity monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Datte, P S; Haguenauer, Maurice; Manfredi, P F; Manghisoni, M; Millaud, J E; Placidi, Massimo; Ratti, L; Riot, V J; Schmickler, Hermann; Speziali, V; Traversi, G; Turner, W C

    2003-01-01

    A novel segmented multigap pressurized gas ionization chamber is being developed for optimization of the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The ionization chambers are to be installed in the front quadrupole and 0 degrees neutral particle absorbers in the high luminosity interaction regions (IRs) and sample the energy deposited near the maxima of the hadronic/electromagnetic showers in these absorbers. The ionization chambers are instrumented with low noise, fast pulse-shaping electronics to be capable of resolving individual bunch crossings at 40 MHz. In this paper, we report the initial results of our second test of this instrumentation in a super proton synchrotron (SPS) external proton beam. Single 300 GeV protons are used to simulate the hadronic/electromagnetic showers produced by the forward collision products from the interaction regions of the LHC. The capability of instrumentation to measure the luminosity of individual bunches in a 40 MHz bunch train is demonstrated. (10 refs) .

  13. Initial test results of an ionization chamber shower detector for a LHC luminosity monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel, segmented, multi-gap, pressurized gas ionization chamber is being developed for optimization of the luminosity of the LHC. The ionization chambers are to be installed in the front quadrupole and zero degree neutral particle absorbers in the high luminosity IRs and sample the energy deposited near the maxima of the hadronic/electromagnetic showers in these absorbers. The ionization chambers are instrumented with low noise, fast, pulse shaping electronics to be capable of resolving individual bunch crossings at 40 MHz. In this paper we report the initial results of our second test of this instrumentation in an SPS external proton beam. Single 300 GeV protons are used to simulate the hadronic/electromagnetic shower produced by the forward collision products from the interaction regions of the LHC. The capability of instrumentations to measure the luminosity of individual bunches in a 40 MHz bunch train is demonstrated

  14. Thin gap parallel mesh chamber: a sparkless high-rate detector

    OpenAIRE

    Fonte, P.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Ivaniouchenkov, Y; Peskov, V.; Policarpo, A.

    1998-01-01

    In this work we describe a parallel geometry gaseous detector constituted by a thin (0.6 mm) amplifying gap preceded by a drift region. The gap is delimited by a metal plate and by a wire mesh. The detector can count up to a rate of 10^7 Hz/mm2 at gain 1000 and retains at lower counting rates the high gains (close to 10^6) that are typical of parallel geometry detectors. Additionally it was found that in the thin amplifying gap the discharges seem to be self-quenched and that full sparks do n...

  15. A study of an optimal technological solution for the electronics of particle position sensitive gas detectors (multiwire proportional chambers)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work aims at optimizing the electronics for position sensitive gas detectors. The first part is a review of proportional chamber operation principles and presents the different possibilities for the architecture of the electronics. The second part involves electronic signal processing for best signal-to-noise ratio. We present a time-variant filter based on a second order base line restorer.It allows a simple pole-zero and tail cancellation at high counting rates. Also, various interpolating algorithms for cathode strip chambers have been studied. The last part reports the development of a complete electronic system, from the preamplifiers up to the readout and control interface, for the cathode strip chambers in the focal plane of the BBS Spectrometer at KVI, Holland. The system is based on application specific D-size VXI modules. In all modules, the 16-bit ADCs and FIFO memory are followed by a Digital Signal Processor, which performs data filtering and cathode induced charge interpolation. Very good analog noise performance is obtained in a multi-processor environment. (author)

  16. Filtering data from a drift-chamber detector using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the implementation of an analog neural network chip (Intel 80170NX ETANN) to filter a multi-signal read-out from flash-ADCs used in a liquid argon time projection chamber (ICARUS). The training and subsequent testing of the network is discussed in some detail. A network consisting of multiple sub-networks is proposed to perform signal filtering, determination of peak position and track finding. (orig.)

  17. Integrated High-Rate Transition Radiation Detector and Tracking Chamber for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD-6 \\\\ \\\\Over the past five years, RD-6 has developed a transition radiation detector and charged particle tracker for high rate operation at LHC. The detector elements are based on C-fibre reinforced kapton straw tubes of 4~mm diameter filled with a Xenon gas mixture. Detailed measurements with and without magnetic field have been performed in test beams, and in particular have demonstrated the possibility of operating straw tubes at very high rate (up to 20~MHz) with accurate drift-time measurement accuracy. A full-scale engineering prototype containing 10~000 straws is presently under assembly and will be accurately measured with a powerful X-ray tube. Integrated front-end electronics with fast readout have been designed and successfully operated in test beam. \\\\ \\\\Finally extensive simulations performed for ATLAS have shown that such a detector will provide powerful pattern recognition, accurate momentum measurements, efficient level-2 triggering and excellent electron identification, even at the highe...

  18. Development of a monitor system for gas based detectors and measurement of electron attachment in the chamber gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of an international collaboration a new electron-positron linear accelerator (ILC) with a c. m. energy up to 500 GeV is planned. For the International Large Detector Concept (ILD) a time projection chamber (TPC) shall perform precise measurements of the particle tracks. In order to fulfil the high requirements on the resolution, a microstructure gas-amplification system is used for read-out. For research and development of the detector principle for the application at the ILC at DESY a large TPC prototype is developed. For the operation of the detector it is necessary to monitor its state and especially that of the measurement gas. For this purpose in the framework of this thesis a slow control system is built, which shall make possible for the different collaboration partners to operate the prototype and to integrate the slow control data into their measurement. For this with an object-oriented control system a graphic user interface was created, which makes an overview over the applied measurement devices and a driving allows. Furthermore the influence of impurities of the gas mixture by oxygen was studied. For this with a small TPC prototype measurements of the electron attachment coefficient at different oxygen concentrations were performed with a magnetic flux density of 4 T. From the amplitude of the measurement signal a rate for the electron attachment could be determined. The values obtained for this agree sufficiently in comparison with literature values

  19. Experimental study of track density distribution on LR115 detector and deposition fraction of sup 2 sup 1 sup 8 Po in diffusion chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Koo, V S Y; Ho, J P Y; Nikezic, D; Yu, K N

    2002-01-01

    The radial distribution of track density on a solid-state nuclear track detector inside a diffusion chamber is a function of the fraction f of sup 2 sup 1 sup 8 Po decay before deposition. In the present work, procedures are proposed to determine f experimentally by determining the track density distribution on an LR115 detector in a diffusion chamber. First, a relatively tall diffusion chamber, with a height of 8 cm, was chosen. After exposure, the LR115 detector was etched. A transparent template with concentric circles was devised to study the radial distribution of sensitivity using an optical microscope. The distributions according to different values of f were also calculated using Monte Carlo simulations. By minimizing the deviations between these Monte Carlo curves and the experimental data, f was found to be 0.4.

  20. Patient specific IMRT quality assurance with film, ionization chamber and detector arrays: Our institutional experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study was conducted to review patient specific IMRT QA delivered at our institution using Varian LINACs and TomoTherapy Hi-Art system and categorized according to the anatomical site, type of treatment machine, and treatment planning systems (TPS). Material and methods: Three thousand and three hundred seven patient data were evaluated for a time ranging from 2006 to 2011; these data were gauged using several methods used in the QA process. Ion chambers and film were used in 1738 patient plan QA in the earlier years followed by ion chamber arrays in 1569 patient plan QA in the latter years. Patients were grouped according to several parameters including TPS, site of treatment, and type of treatment machine in comparing the measured versus computed dose differences. From 2006 through early 2009, 736 TomoTherapy plans, 651 Pinnacle3 plans, and 351 Corvus plans were evaluated using ion chambers and films. The pass criterion at the institution at the time of these measurements was 3% dose difference and 3 mm distance to agreement. For the years ranging from 2009 to 2011, 1569 patient IMRT QAs were performed and evaluated on the institution's pass criteria of 90% γ value on Varian linacs with Millennium 80, 120 and High-Definition 120 multileaf collimators. Results: Average point dose difference between measured and calculated plans for Pinnacle3, Hi-ART TomoTherapy, and Corvus TPS were 0.1205%, −0.0042%, and −0.0178%. Among the QA plans measured using a 2D array, average gamma values for brain, head and neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis were 97.2%, 95.7%, 96.2%, 97.0%, and 96.2%, respectively. Average gamma values based on 80, 120, HD 120 and TomoTherapy MLC configurations were 96.5%, 96.2%, 96.3%, and 97%, respectively. A 2-tailed paired Student's T-test did not reveal the presence of statistically significant differences based on either TPS, anatomical sites, number of beams or arcs, number of control points, or the MLC configuration (p

  1. Studies with a liquid argon time projection chamber. Addressing technological challenges of large-scale detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael Schenk evaluates new technologies and methods, such as cryogenic read-out electronics and a UV laser system, developed to optimise the performance of large liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPC). Amongst others, the author studies the uniformity of the electric field produced by a Greinacher high-voltage generator operating at cryogenic temperatures, measures the linear energy transfer (LET) of muons and the longitudinal diffusion coefficient of electrons in liquid argon. The results are obtained by analysing events induced by cosmic-ray muons and UV laser beams. The studies are carried out with ARGONTUBE, a prototype LArTPC in operation at the University of Bern, Switzerland, designed to investigate the feasibility of drift distances of up to five metres for electrons in liquid argon.

  2. Development of a bioaerosol single particle detector (BIO IN for the fast ice nucleus chamber FINCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Bundke

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present the setup and first tests of our new BIO IN detector. This detector is designed to classify atmospheric ice nuclei (IN for their biological content. Biological material is identified via its auto-fluorescence (intrinsic fluorescence after irradiation with UV radiation. Ice nuclei are key substances for precipitation development via the Bergeron–Findeisen process. The level of scientific knowledge regarding origin and climatology (temporal and spatial distribution of IN is very low. Some biological material is known to be active as IN even at relatively high temperatures of up to –2°C (e.g. pseudomonas syringae bacteria. These biological IN could have a strong influence on the formation of clouds and precipitation. We have designed the new BIO IN sensor to analyze the abundance of IN of biological origin. The instrument will be flown on one of the first missions of the new German research aircraft ''HALO'' (High Altitude and LOng Range.

  3. Review of some problems encountered with In-Core Fission chambers and Self-Powered Neutron Detectors in PWR's. Tests - Present use - Outlook on the near future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The working conditions of in-core detectors are investigated as well as some reliability problems which depend on nuclear environment (such as decrease of sensibility, loss of insulation...). Then we review the long-term irradiation tests in experimental reactor that have been carried out by the CEA these last years, with fission chambers (FC) and Self-Powered Detectors (SPD). The travelling probe system with moveable FC used in the 900 MWe PWR is briefly described. Finally an outlook on future possibilities is given; for instance the use of fixed SPD and a moveable FC in the same thimble, allowing recalibration of the fixed detectors

  4. Very low noise AC/DC power supply systems for large detector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaboldi, C.; Baù, A.; Carniti, P.; Cassina, L.; Giachero, A.; Gotti, C.; Maino, M.; Passerini, A.; Pessina, G.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we present the first part of the power supply system for the CUORE and LUCIFER arrays of bolometric detectors. For CUORE, it consists of AC/DC commercial power supplies (0-60 V output) followed by custom DC/DC modules (48 V input, ±5 V to ±13.5 V outputs). Each module has 3 floating and independently configurable output voltages. In LUCIFER, the AC/DC + DC/DC stages are combined into a commercial medium-power AC/DC source. At the outputs of both setups, we introduced filters with the aim of lowering the noise and to protect the following stages from high voltage spikes that can be generated by the energy stored in the cables after the release of accidental short circuits. Output noise is very low, as required: in the 100 MHz bandwidth the RMS level is about 37 μVRMS (CUORE setup) and 90 μVRMS (LUCIFER setup) at a load of 7 A, with a negligible dependence on the load current. Even more importantly, high frequency switching disturbances are almost completely suppressed. The efficiency of both systems is above 85%. Both systems are completely programmable and monitored via CAN bus (optically coupled).

  5. ASSEMBLY and CHARACTERIZATION OF RESISTIVE PLATE CHAMBERS IN INDIA FOR THE CMS DETECTOR

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Ramandeep

    2015-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment is a general purpose detector being operated at Large Hadron Collider (LHC) facility at CERN. The RE4 upgrade project was envisaged to improve the Level-1 trigger efficiency in the forward region, when LHC would run at its full designed energy and luminosity after the first Long Shutdown (LS-1, 2013-2014). About 200 RPCs were built for the upgrade at three assembly sites in India, CERN and Ghent. India contributed to 50, RE4/2 RPCs along with 200 Cu-cooling units for the entire upgrade for which the assembly and characterization of RPCs was carried out jointly by Nuclear Physics Division-BARC and Panjab University-Chandigarh. The gas-gaps after their arrival from KODEL, South Korea, underwent mechanical tests for leak and popped spacers, followed by electrical tests for long term monitoring of leakage currents. After the assembly, each RPC was evaluated for its efficiency, cluster size, noise and strip profiles. The Cu-cooling units build at BARC were also tested acc...

  6. Ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objects of the invention are, first, to provide an ionization detector having a three chamber structure characterised by a built-in feedback path that regeneratively stabilizes the operating point of the detector. Secondly, to provide a specially designed chamber construction including electrodes shaped so as to enhance the efficiency of the chamber and reduce ion recombination. The ionization chamber described has a chamber structure with a first closed chamber and a second chamber able to receive gases from outside. These two chambers have a common boundary including a common electrode. One electrode associated with the second chamber, and one within the first chamber, define a third chamber within the first chamber allowing an ionization path between. A radioactive source provides ionizing radiation for all three chambers and establishes an ionization current. There is a detector coupled to the common electrode for detecting changes in this current. (U.K.)

  7. A test of cathode strip read-out for the multi wire proportional chambers of the inner detector of DELPHI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The outer part of the Inner Detector of the DELPHI experiment consists of five concentric multiwire proportional chambers (MWPC's). The cylindrical cathodes of these MWPC's are each divided into 192 strips which form loops around the beam. The analysis of the charge distribution induced on the 150 cm long strips will provide the coordinates along the beam of the traversing particle. The comparison between anode charge and total induced cathode charge will resolve ghosts in a multitrack event. The five MWPC's as a whole will function as a track trigger. This report presents results from a flat prototype, equipped with full size cathode strips, tested with cosmic rays. The spatial resolution was measured to be 130 μm (2.9% of the strip width). The RMS of the ratio distribution of total cathode charge and anode charge was measured to be 2.2%. We present an analysis of two track charge distributions. This procedure allows to obtain single track performance if the hits are separated by at least 7 mm. 8 refs.; 9 figs

  8. Computer program for the sensitivity calculation of a CR-39 detector in a diffusion chamber for radon measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computer software for calculation of the sensitivity of a CR-39 detector closed in a diffusion chamber to radon is described in this work. The software consists of two programs, both written in the standard Fortran 90 programming language. The physical background and a numerical example are given. Presented software is intended for numerous researches in radon measurement community. Previously published computer programs TRACK-TEST.F90 and TRACK-VISION.F90 [D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 174, 160 (2006); D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 178, 591 (2008)] are used here as subroutines to calculate the track parameters and to determine whether the track is visible or not, based on the incident angle, impact energy, etching conditions, gray level, and visibility criterion. The results obtained by the software, using five different V functions, were compared with the experimental data found in the literature. Application of two functions in this software reproduced experimental data very well, while other three gave lower sensitivity than experiment

  9. Comparison of ionisation chamber and semiconductor detector devices for measurement of the dose–width product for panoramic dental units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doses for panoramic dental radiography are assessed in terms of the dose–width product (DWP) or dose–area product, which gives a measure of the radiation through a whole exposure. The DWP can be measured using a pencil ionisation chamber (IC) similar to that used for computed tomography dose assessment. However, ICs are sensitive to radiation incident from all directions and so backscatter from the image receptor may increase the recorded dose. This study compares measurements performed using four options: a pencil IC mounted straight on the image receptor, the IC mounted with a steel plate to the rear to standardise scatter conditions, the IC mounted with a steel plate and lead collimators in front to minimise the effect of extra-focal radiation, and a Quart Dido employing a one square centimetre semiconductor detector (SD) designed for panoramic measurements. The results indicate that modification of the current method by incorporating a steel plate reduced the measurement dose by 7% on average, but the reduction was greater for units with semiconductor imaging plates. The measurements with the SD agree more closely with the IC with the steel plate to the rear. An IC with a backing plate to standardise scatter or a suitable SD is recommended for measurement on panoramic dental units. (paper)

  10. A neutron detector based on microchannel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a large-area neutron detector design based on microchannel plates (MCPs). Two characteristics of the MCP make it ideal as a high-rate neutron detector: (1) its signals can have a very fast rise time, and (2) it can count at a high rate. The MCP-based detector could use both the high-voltage power supplies and the readout electronics designed for a neutron detector based on the multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC)

  11. Propagation of the trip behavior in the VENUS vertex chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high voltage system of the VENUS vertex chamber occasionally trips by a discharge somewhere among cathode electrodes during data taking. This trip behavior induces often additional trips at other electrodes such as the skin and the grid electrodes in the vertex chamber. This propagation mechanism of trips is so complicated in this system related with multi-electrodes. Although the vertex chamber is already installed inside the VENUS detector and consequently the discharge is not able to observe directly, a trial to estimate the propagation has been done using only the information which appears around the trip circuits and the power supply of the vertex chamber. (author)

  12. Activity measurements of radioactive solutions by liquid scintillation counting and pressurized ionization chambers and Monte Carlo simulations of source-detector systems for metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research works 'Activity measurements of radioactive solutions by liquid scintillation and pressurized ionization chambers and Monte Carlo simulations of source-detector systems' was presented for the graduation: 'Habilitation a diriger des recherches'. The common thread of both themes liquid scintillation counting and pressurized ionization chambers lies in the improvement of the techniques of radionuclide activity measurement. Metrology of ionization radiation intervenes in numerous domains, in the research, in the industry including the environment and the health, which are subjects of constant concern for the world population these last years. In this big variety of applications answers a large number of radionuclides of diverse disintegration scheme and under varied physical forms. The presented works realized within the National Laboratory Henri Becquerel have for objective to assure detector calibration traceability and to improve the methods of activity measurements within the framework of research projects and development. The improvement of the primary and secondary activity measurement methods consists in perfecting the accuracy of the measurements in particular by a better knowledge of the parameters influencing the detector yield. The works of development dealing with liquid scintillation counting concern mainly the study of the response of liquid scintillators to low energy electrons as well as their linear absorption coefficients using synchrotron radiation. The research works on pressurized ionization chambers consist of the study of their response to photons and electrons by experimental measurements compared to the simulation of the source-detector system using Monte Carlo codes. Besides, the design of a new type of ionization chamber with variable pressure is presented. This new project was developed to guarantee the precision of the amount of activity injected into the patient within the framework of diagnosis examination

  13. Comparison of depth-dose distributions of proton therapeutic beams calculated by means of logical detectors and ionization chamber modeled in Monte Carlo codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzak, Robert; Konefał, Adam; Sokół, Maria; Orlef, Andrzej

    2016-08-01

    The success of proton therapy depends strongly on the precision of treatment planning. Dose distribution in biological tissue may be obtained from Monte Carlo simulations using various scientific codes making it possible to perform very accurate calculations. However, there are many factors affecting the accuracy of modeling. One of them is a structure of objects called bins registering a dose. In this work the influence of bin structure on the dose distributions was examined. The MCNPX code calculations of Bragg curve for the 60 MeV proton beam were done in two ways: using simple logical detectors being the volumes determined in water, and using a precise model of ionization chamber used in clinical dosimetry. The results of the simulations were verified experimentally in the water phantom with Marcus ionization chamber. The average local dose difference between the measured relative doses in the water phantom and those calculated by means of the logical detectors was 1.4% at first 25 mm, whereas in the full depth range this difference was 1.6% for the maximum uncertainty in the calculations less than 2.4% and for the maximum measuring error of 1%. In case of the relative doses calculated with the use of the ionization chamber model this average difference was somewhat greater, being 2.3% at depths up to 25 mm and 2.4% in the full range of depths for the maximum uncertainty in the calculations of 3%. In the dose calculations the ionization chamber model does not offer any additional advantages over the logical detectors. The results provided by both models are similar and in good agreement with the measurements, however, the logical detector approach is a more time-effective method.

  14. The great advance in the technology of particle detectors during the year was the discovery of the properties of multiwire proportional chambers and drift chambers

    CERN Multimedia

    1968-01-01

    In these chambers each wire is an independent proportional counter with its own amplifier and logic circuit. The low cost of the associated electronics makes realistic moderately large systems, with thousands of wires. The resolution time of each wire is of the order of 100 ns, with 3mm spacing. Roger Bouclier is working on an early model tested in a PS beam-line.

  15. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Was used in ISR (Intersecting Storage Ring) split field magnet experiment. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  16. Applications of a micro-pixel chamber (μPIC) based, time-resolved neutron imaging detector at pulsed neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The realization of high-intensity, pulsed spallation neutron sources such as J-PARC in Japan and SNS in the US has brought time-of-flight (TOF) based neutron techniques to the fore and spurred the development of new detector technologies. When combined with high-resolution imaging, TOF-based methods become powerful tools for direct imaging of material properties, including crystal structure/internal strain, isotopic/temperature distributions, and internal and external magnetic fields. To carry out such measurements in the high-intensities and high gamma backgrounds found at spallation sources, we have developed a new time-resolved neutron imaging detector employing a micro-pattern gaseous detector known as the micro-pixel chamber (μPIC) coupled with a field-programmable-gate-array-based data acquisition system. The detector combines 100μm-level (σ) spatial and sub-μs time resolutions with low gamma sensitivity of less than 10−12 and a rate capability on the order of Mcps (mega-counts-per-second). Here, we demonstrate the application of our detector to TOF-based techniques with examples of Bragg-edge transmission and neutron resonance transmission imaging (with computed tomography) carried out at J-PARC. We also consider the direct imaging of magnetic fields with our detector using polarized neutrons.

  17. OPAL Jet Chamber Prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. OPAL's central tracking system consists of (in order of increasing radius) a silicon microvertex detector, a vertex detector, a jet chamber, and z-chambers. All the tracking detectors work by observing the ionization of atoms by charged particles passing by: when the atoms are ionized, electrons are knocked out of their atomic orbitals, and are then able to move freely in the detector. These ionization electrons are detected in the dirfferent parts of the tracking system. This piece is a prototype of the jet chambers

  18. Surface and Buildup Region Dose Measurements with Markus Parallel-Plate Ionization Chamber, GafChromic EBT3 Film, and MOSFET Detector for High-Energy Photon Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Akbas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate surface and buildup region doses for 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams using a Markus parallel-plate ionization chamber, GafChromic EBT3 film, and MOSFET detector for different field sizes and beam angles. The measurements were made in a water equivalent solid phantom at the surface and in the buildup region of the 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams at 100 cm source-detector distance for 5 × 5, 10 × 10, and 20 × 20 cm2 field sizes and 0°, 30°, 60°, and 80° beam angles. The surface doses using 6 MV photon beams for 10 × 10 cm2 field size were found to be 20.3%, 18.8%, and 25.5% for Markus chamber, EBT3 film, and MOSFET detector, respectively. The surface doses using 15 MV photon beams for 10 × 10 cm2 field size were found to be 14.9%, 13.4%, and 16.4% for Markus chamber, EBT3 film, and MOSFET detector, respectively. The surface dose increased with field size for all dosimeters. As the angle of the incident radiation beam became more oblique, the surface dose increased. The effective measurement depths of dosimeters vary; thus, the results of the measurements could be different. This issue can lead to mistakes at surface and buildup dosimetry and must be taken into account.

  19. Qualification measurements of the voltage supply system as well as conceptionation of a state machine for the detector control of the ATLAS pixel detector; Qualifizierungsmessungen des Spannungsversorgungssystems sowie Konzeptionierung einer Zustandsmaschine fuer die Detektorkontrolle des ATLAS-Pixeldetektors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultes, Joachim

    2007-02-15

    The supply system and the control system of the ATLAS pixel detector represent important building blocks of the pixel detector. Corresponding studies of the supply system, which were performed within a comprehensive test system, the so-called system test, with nearly all final components and the effects on the pixel detector are object of this thesis. A further point of this thesis is the coordination and further development of the detector-control-system software under regardment of the different partial systems. A main topic represents thereby the conceptionation of the required state machine as interface for the users and the connection to the data acquisition system.

  20. Surface and buildup region dose measurements with Markus parallel-plate ionization chamber, Gafchromic EBT3 film and MOSFET detector for high energy photon beams

    CERN Document Server

    Akbas, Ugur; Koksal, Canan; Bilge, Hatice

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate surface and buildup region doses for 6 MV photon beams using a Markus parallel-plate ionization chamber, GafChromic EBT3 film and MOSFET detector for different field sizes and beam angles. The measurements were made in a water equivalent solid phantom at the surface and in the buildup region of the 6 MV photon beams at 100 cm source-detector distance (SDD) for 5x5, 10x10 and 20x20 cm2 field sizes and 0, 30, 60, 80 and 90 beam angles. The surface doses for 10x10 cm2 field size were found to be 20.33%, 18.80% and 25.48% for Markus chamber, EBT3 film and MOSFET detector, respectively. The surface dose increased with field size for all dosimeters. As the angle of the incident radiation beam became more oblique, the surface dose increased. The effective measurement depths of dosimeters vary, thus the results of the measurements could be different. This issue can lead to mistakes at surface and buildup dosimetry, and must be taken into account.

  1. The air supply hole of the inlet chamber and preventing the inflow of harmful impurities into the ventilation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Litvinova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the dependences of carbon monoxide (II concentrations on the height of the building façade based on the results of in situ tests with the goal of preventing the inflow of pollutants into the ventilation system. Carbon oxide (II may enter the premises when the inlet ventilation system is working through the inlet chamber from external sources of emission. i.e. vehicles and low and medium-power boilers in the urban environment. We have constructed nomograms to adjust the height of the receiving hole for air intake by the ventilation system depending on the quality of the outdoor air on the height of buildings from external sources of different heights in relation to the building. We have suggested guidelines allowing to design ventilation systems depending on the quality of outdoor air over the entire height of the building, which cannot be done at the design stage.

  2. Simulation calculations on the construction of the energy-tagged photon beam as well as development and test of the side drift chambers of the Bonn SAPHIR detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SAPHIR-detector is built up at the continuous photon beam of the Electron Stretcher and Accelerator ELSA in Bonn. The equipment is designed for investigations of reactions with more then two particles in the final state and for photon energies up to 3.5 GeV. A tagging-system determines the energy of the Bremsstrahlung-photons and a set-up of five large driftchambers measures the tracks of the charged particles. This work describes a program which was used to develop the best design of the tagging-hodoscope. In a second part the tests of the planar side-chambers and their evaluation is described. These measurements were carried out to fix the gasfilling and the parameters of the best working point. It is shown, that the chambers can reach a resolution of σ≤200 μm. (orig.)

  3. A study of materials used for muon chambers at the CMS Experiment at the LHC: interaction with gas, new materials and new technologies for detector upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Colafranceschi, Stefano

    This thesis lays its foundation in both technological and theoretical stud- ies carried out between several aspects of applied engineering. There are several original contributions within the material science. The first is the detailed studies about the CMS RPC gas filters, which required an intense 3 years data-taking and ended up with a complete characterization of purifier materials. On top of this a stable ad − hoc setup (GGM) has been devel- oped for the CMS Experiment in order to monitor the RPC muon chamber working point. Finally a complete new detector has been designed, build and tested using new technology and new electronics establishing the word’s record in size for this kind of detector, which is taken under consideration for the upgrade of the high-η region of the CMS Experiment.

  4. An Upgraded Front-End Switching Power Supply Design For the ATLAS TileCAL Detector of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Drake, Gary; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    We present the design of an upgraded switching power supply brick for the front-end electronics of the ATLAS hadron tile calorimeter (TileCAL) at the LHC. The new design features significant improvement in noise, improved fault detection, and generally a more robust design, while retaining the compact size, water-cooling, output control, and monitoring features in this 300 KHz design. We discuss the improvements to the design, and the radiation testing that we have done to qualify the design. We also present our plans for the production of 2400 new bricks for installation on the detector in 2013.

  5. Ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ionization chamber X-ray detector is described. It comprises a flat cathode sheet parallel to an anode which has a perforated insulating layer on its surface. An open grid, a thin perforated metal sheet is disposed on the insulating layer - the perforations of the layer and sheet are aligned. There is a detector gas and means for maintaining the grid at an electric potential between that of the anode and cathode and for measuring the current flow from the anode to the cathode. The grid shields the anode from the electric field produced by the positive ions which flow towards the cathode and this permits an independent measurement of the electron current flowing to the anode; even when the X-ray pulse length is not much shorter than the ion drift time. The recovery time of the ionization chamber is thus decreased by several orders of magnitude over previous chambers. The grid will normally be fixed to the anode and by shielding the anode from the cathode electric field, tends to eliminate capacitive microphone currents which would otherwise flow in the anode circuit. (U.K.)

  6. An Efficient, FPGA-Based, Cluster Detection Algorithm Implementation for a Strip Detector Readout System in a Time Projection Chamber Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Kyle J.; Hill, Joanne E. (Editor); Black, J. Kevin; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Jahoda, Keith

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental challenge in a spaceborne application of a gas-based Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for observation of X-ray polarization is handling the large amount of data collected. The TPC polarimeter described uses the APV-25 Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) to readout a strip detector. Two dimensional photoelectron track images are created with a time projection technique and used to determine the polarization of the incident X-rays. The detector produces a 128x30 pixel image per photon interaction with each pixel registering 12 bits of collected charge. This creates challenging requirements for data storage and downlink bandwidth with only a modest incidence of photons and can have a significant impact on the overall mission cost. An approach is described for locating and isolating the photoelectron track within the detector image, yielding a much smaller data product, typically between 8x8 pixels and 20x20 pixels. This approach is implemented using a Microsemi RT-ProASIC3-3000 Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), clocked at 20 MHz and utilizing 10.7k logic gates (14% of FPGA), 20 Block RAMs (17% of FPGA), and no external RAM. Results will be presented, demonstrating successful photoelectron track cluster detection with minimal impact to detector dead-time.

  7. An efficient, FPGA-based, cluster detection algorithm implementation for a strip detector readout system in a Time Projection Chamber polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Kyle J.; Hill, Joanne E.; Black, J. Kevin; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Jahoda, Keith

    2016-05-01

    A fundamental challenge in a spaceborne application of a gas-based Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for observation of X-ray polarization is handling the large amount of data collected. The TPC polarimeter described uses the APV-25 Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) to readout a strip detector. Two dimensional photo- electron track images are created with a time projection technique and used to determine the polarization of the incident X-rays. The detector produces a 128x30 pixel image per photon interaction with each pixel registering 12 bits of collected charge. This creates challenging requirements for data storage and downlink bandwidth with only a modest incidence of photons and can have a significant impact on the overall mission cost. An approach is described for locating and isolating the photoelectron track within the detector image, yielding a much smaller data product, typically between 8x8 pixels and 20x20 pixels. This approach is implemented using a Microsemi RT-ProASIC3-3000 Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), clocked at 20 MHz and utilizing 10.7k logic gates (14% of FPGA), 20 Block RAMs (17% of FPGA), and no external RAM. Results will be presented, demonstrating successful photoelectron track cluster detection with minimal impact to detector dead-time.

  8. Precision templates for gluing wire holding pieces to chamber frames; Plantillas de precision para la construccion de detectores de muones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berdugo, J.; Burgos, C; Cerrada, M.

    1995-07-01

    In the present report we describe the procedure which has been used in order to optimize the precision obtained when positioning forward backward muon chamber sensor wire planes of the L3 experiment at CERN. With templates produced at CIEMAT a precision of about 10 microns. In sizes of the order of 3 meters. has been achieved. (Author) 2 refs.

  9. Study of a particle detector with very high spatial precision (drift chambers), and analysis of the physical phenomena governing the operation of this detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physical principles of drift chambers are studied and various measurements which can be performed with these chambers are described. The laws governing the passage of particles through matter are first reviewed and different transport coefficients, (velocity, scattering coefficient, characteristic energy ...) of the electrons under the influence of an electric field for different gases (argon, CO2, isobutane, methane, methylal) are studied. The theoretical predictions are then compared with the experimental results. The different amplification processes in the gas and the space charge effect of the positive ions on electron multiplication for large particle fluxes are also studied as well as the mobility of positive ions in different gases. After these results, the operating characteristics (efficiency, linearity of the space-time ratio, spatial resolution), with and without an external magnetic field are determined

  10. A new total reflection X-ray fluorescence vacuum chamber with sample changer analysis using a silicon drift detector for chemical analysis*1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streli, C.; Wobrauschek, P.; Pepponi, G.; Zoeger, N.

    2004-08-01

    There are several TXRF spectrometers commercially available for chemical analysis as well as for wafer surface analysis, but there is up to now no spectrometer for chemical analysis available that allows to measure samples under vacuum conditions. Simply a rough vacuum of 10 -2 mbar for the sample environment reduces the background due to scattering from air, thus to improve the detection limits. The absorption of low energy fluorescence radiation from low Z elements is reduced and therefore extends the elemental range to be measured down to Na. Finally evacuation of the chamber removes the Ar K-lines from the spectrum. The new vacuum chamber for TXRF named WOBISTRAX is equipped with a 12-position sample changer, a 10-mm 2 silicon drift detector (SDD) with an 8-μm Be entrance window and electrical cooling by Peltier effect, so no LN 2 is required. The chamber was designed to be attached to a diffraction tube housing. WOBISTRAX can be operated with a 3 kW long fine focus Mo-X-ray tube and uses a Mo/Si multilayer for monochromatization. The modified software is performing the motion control between sample changer and MCA features. The performance is expressed in terms of detection limits which are 700 fg Rb for Mo Kα excitation with 50 kV, 40 mA excitation conditions, 1000 s livetime. Using a Cr-X-ray tube for excitation of Al the achieved detection limits are 52 pg. So it could be shown that with the same measuring chamber and using an SDD with 8 μm Be window and a Cr-tube for excitation, low Z elements can be also measured with good detection limits.

  11. A new total reflection X-ray fluorescence vacuum chamber with sample changer analysis using a silicon drift detector for chemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are several TXRF spectrometers commercially available for chemical analysis as well as for wafer surface analysis, but there is up to now no spectrometer for chemical analysis available that allows to measure samples under vacuum conditions. Simply a rough vacuum of 10-2 mbar for the sample environment reduces the background due to scattering from air, thus to improve the detection limits. The absorption of low energy fluorescence radiation from low Z elements is reduced and therefore extends the elemental range to be measured down to Na. Finally evacuation of the chamber removes the Ar K-lines from the spectrum. The new vacuum chamber for TXRF named WOBISTRAX is equipped with a 12-position sample changer, a 10-mm2 silicon drift detector (SDD) with an 8-μm Be entrance window and electrical cooling by Peltier effect, so no LN2 is required. The chamber was designed to be attached to a diffraction tube housing. WOBISTRAX can be operated with a 3 kW long fine focus Mo-X-ray tube and uses a Mo/Si multilayer for monochromatization. The modified software is performing the motion control between sample changer and MCA features. The performance is expressed in terms of detection limits which are 700 fg Rb for Mo Kα excitation with 50 kV, 40 mA excitation conditions, 1000 s livetime. Using a Cr-X-ray tube for excitation of Al the achieved detection limits are 52 pg. So it could be shown that with the same measuring chamber and using an SDD with 8 μm Be window and a Cr-tube for excitation, low Z elements can be also measured with good detection limits

  12. Joint measurement of the atmospheric muon flux through the Puy de Dôme volcano with plastic scintillators and Resistive Plate Chambers detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosino, F.; Anastasio, A.; Bross, A.; Béné, S.; Boivin, P.; Bonechi, L.; Cârloganu, C.; Ciaranfi, R.; Cimmino, L.; Combaret, Ch.; D'Alessandro, R.; Durand, S.; Fehr, F.; Français, V.; Garufi, F.; Gailler, L.; Labazuy, Ph.; Laktineh, I.; Lénat, J.-F.; Masone, V.; Miallier, D.; Mirabito, L.; Morel, L.; Mori, N.; Niess, V.; Noli, P.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Portal, A.; Rubinov, P.; Saracino, G.; Scarlini, E.; Strolin, P.; Vulpescu, B.

    2015-11-01

    The muographic imaging of volcanoes relies on the measured transmittance of the atmospheric muon flux through the target. An important bias affecting the result comes from background contamination mimicking a higher transmittance. The MU-RAY and TOMUVOL collaborations measured independently in 2013 the atmospheric muon flux transmitted through the Puy de Dôme volcano using their early prototype detectors, based on plastic scintillators and on Glass Resistive Plate Chambers, respectively. These detectors had three (MU-RAY) or four (TOMUVOL) detection layers of 1 m2 each, tens (MU-RAY) or hundreds (TOMUVOL) of nanosecond time resolution, a few millimeter position resolution, an energy threshold of few hundreds MeV, and no particle identification capabilities. The prototypes were deployed about 1.3 km away from the summit, where they measured, behind rock depths larger than 1000 m, remnant fluxes of 1.83±0.50(syst)±0.07(stat) m-2 d-1 deg-2 (MU-RAY) and 1.95±0.16(syst)±0.05(stat) m-2 d-1 deg-2 (TOMUVOL), that roughly correspond to the expected flux of high-energy atmospheric muons crossing 600 meters water equivalent (mwe) at 18° elevation. This implies that imaging depths larger than 500 mwe from 1 km away using such prototype detectors suffer from an overwhelming background. These measurements confirm that a new generation of detectors with higher momentum threshold, time-of-flight measurement, and/or particle identification is needed. The MU-RAY and TOMUVOL collaborations expect shortly to operate improved detectors, suitable for a robust muographic imaging of kilometer-scale volcanoes.

  13. Prototype multiwire proportional chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    Chambers of this type were initially developed within the Alpha project (finally not approved). They were designed such to minimize the radiation length with a view to a mass spectrometer of high resolution meant to replace the Omega detector. The chambers were clearly forerunners for the (drift) chambers later built for R606 with the novel technique of crimping the wires. See also photo 7510039X.

  14. Silicon drift-chamber prototype for the upgrade of the UA6 experiment at the CERN p /bar char/p collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large-area (≅ 4 x 4 cm2) silicon drift chamber has been designed and constructed in order to investigate its possible use in the UA6 experiment. The drift chamber will supply unambiguously (x,y) space points on each track; each arm of the UA6 spectrometer will be provided with two layers of drift detectors. 12 refs., 4 figs

  15. Lab-on-a-robot: integrated microchip CE, power supply, electrochemical detector, wireless unit, and mobile platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Christopher; Valdez, David C; Bergeron, Phillip; Mora, Maria F; Garcia, Carlos D; Ayon, Arturo

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, the fabrication of a wireless mobile unit containing an electrochemical detection module and a 3-channel high-voltage power supply (HVPS) designed for microchip CE is described. The presented device consists of wireless global positioning system controlled robotics, an electrochemical detector utilizing signal conditioning analog circuitry and a digital feedback range controller, a HVPS, an air pump, and a CE microchip. A graphical user interface (LabVIEW) was also designed to communicate wirelessly with the device, from a distant personal computer communication port. The entire device is integrated and controlled by digital hardware implemented on a field programmable gate array development board. This lab-on-a-robot is able to navigate to a global position location, acquire an air sample, perform the analysis (injection, separation, and detection), and send the data (electropherogram) to a remote station without exposing the analyst to the testing environment. PMID:19130571

  16. A close-up of the ALEPH Time Projection Chamber (TPC) after the detector was dismantled, with a slice removed for the exhibition at the Musée International d'Horlogerie.

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On the occasion of CERN's 50th anniversary, starting 2 December at the Musée International d'Horlogerie in La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland, a new exhibition will pay tribute to physics, from the cosmic to the subatomic scales. The exhibition, which run for several years, includes a slice of the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) from ALEPH, one of the LEP detectors, which CERN donated to the museum when the detector was dismantled.

  17. Design of a low ripple high efficiency power supply for X ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combining with a voltage multiplier circuit and an electronic filter, the high efficiency DC-DC step up controller MAX668 is used to implement a high efficiency low noise positive 100 voltage power supply. Instead of the conventional linear constant current design mode, a step down switch power chip is used as the power regulator, and an instrumentation amplifier chip AD623 is selected to amplify the voltage signal drop on the current sense resistor and construct a negative feedback to the power regulator. Experimental results show that the power dissipation of high voltage supplier is 14.5 mW, while the ripple noise is less than 15 mV. When the output current is 350 mA, the efficiency of the constant current source is larger than 81.3%. (authors)

  18. Recent ATLAS Detector Improvements

    CERN Document Server

    de Nooij, L; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    During the recent LHC shutdown period, ATLAS performed vital maintenance and improvements on the various sub-detectors. For the calorimeters, repairs were carried out on front-end electronics and power supplies to recover detector coverage that had been lost since the last maintenance period. The ALFA luminosity detector was installed along the beam line and is currently being commissioned. Smaller scale repairs were needed on the Inner Detector. Maintenance on the muon system included repairs on the readout as well as updates and leak checks in the gas systems. Six TGC chambers were also replaced. This poster summarizes the repairs and their expected improvement for physics performance and reliability of ATLAS for the upcoming LHC run.

  19. Prostatic arterial supply: demonstration by multirow detector Angio CT and Catheter Angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the prostatic arterial supply with multidetector Angio CT and Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA). DSA was performed in 21 male patients (7 of these also underwent Pelvic Angio CT); a further 4 patients only underwent Angio CT. Prostatic arteries were classified according to their origin, direction, number of pedicles, termination and anastomoses with surrounding arteries in 50 pelvic sides. The most frequent origin was the internal pudendal artery (n = 28; 56%) with the common gluteal-pudendal trunk the next commonest (n = 14; 28%). Less frequent origins were the obturator artery (n = 6; 12%) or the inferior gluteal artery (n = 2; 4%). Two separate vascular pedicles were found in 12 pelvic sides (24%). There were anastomoses with the termination of the internal pudendal artery in 24% of cases (n = 12), with the contra-lateral prostatic arteries in 6 cases (12%), and to the superior vesical artery in 4 cases (8%). Defining prostatic artery origin and direction is paramount to allow selective catheterisation. Angio CT is very useful as a pre-intervention tool. The number of independent vascular pedicles and the presence of anastomoses with surrounding arteries should be taken into account when planning prostatic arterial embolisation. (orig.)

  20. Prostatic arterial supply: demonstration by multirow detector Angio CT and Catheter Angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilhim, Tiago [Departamento Universitario de Anatomia, Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Hospital Saint Louis, Interventional Radiology, Lisbon (Portugal); Pisco, Joao M. [Hospital Saint Louis, Interventional Radiology, Lisbon (Portugal); Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Departamento Universitario de Radiologia, Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas, Lisbon (Portugal); Furtado, Andrea; Casal, Diogo; Pais, Diogo; O' Neill, Joao E.G. [Departamento Universitario de Anatomia, Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Campos Pinheiro, Luis [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Departamento Universitario de Urologia, Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2011-05-15

    To evaluate the prostatic arterial supply with multidetector Angio CT and Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA). DSA was performed in 21 male patients (7 of these also underwent Pelvic Angio CT); a further 4 patients only underwent Angio CT. Prostatic arteries were classified according to their origin, direction, number of pedicles, termination and anastomoses with surrounding arteries in 50 pelvic sides. The most frequent origin was the internal pudendal artery (n = 28; 56%) with the common gluteal-pudendal trunk the next commonest (n = 14; 28%). Less frequent origins were the obturator artery (n = 6; 12%) or the inferior gluteal artery (n = 2; 4%). Two separate vascular pedicles were found in 12 pelvic sides (24%). There were anastomoses with the termination of the internal pudendal artery in 24% of cases (n = 12), with the contra-lateral prostatic arteries in 6 cases (12%), and to the superior vesical artery in 4 cases (8%). Defining prostatic artery origin and direction is paramount to allow selective catheterisation. Angio CT is very useful as a pre-intervention tool. The number of independent vascular pedicles and the presence of anastomoses with surrounding arteries should be taken into account when planning prostatic arterial embolisation. (orig.)

  1. Treatment delivery reproducibility of an helical tomotherapy system evaluated by using 2-D ionization chamber and imaging detector arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tomotherapy Hi-Art system (HT) is a radiation therapy machine that integrate the delivery of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in a helical fashion together with a real time computed tomography (CT) image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). The radiation source (Linac, 6 MV) is collimated into a fan beam and modulated by means of a binary multileaf collimator (MLC). A xenon detector array, opposite the radiation source, allows a megavoltage-CT (MVCT) acquisition of patient images for set-up verification and collect exit dosimetry data during the treatment delivery. The HT treatment unit can in principle provide a treatment verification method called ''dose reconstruction'' that allows the daily treatment to be reconstructed in the form of delivered dose images. These delivered dose images could be compared to images of planned dose to determine if following treatments should be modified to correct for errors in completed treatments - a process called ''adaptive radiation therapy''. The combination of daily CT imaging and dose reconstruction capabilities could therefore allow an extremely high accuracy in treatment delivery process. Although this type of validation dosimetry is not yet available on current HT units, the acquisition system is increasingly used for dosimetry purposes as well as for imaging purposes

  2. Electrode module of the RISC spectrometer streamer chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RISC spectrometer streamer chamber is one of the biggest among the acting in our days controlled track detectors of this type. Its feeling volume constitutes 3.5 m3. A bipolar scheme of its high-voltage power supply is another peculiarity of this chamber. This unit is the first streamer chamber with bipolar supply successfully operating on the accelerator. Studied is the operation of the six-meter module of grid electrodes which is the main part of the streamer chamber forming its feeling volume. The following problems are under consideration: choice of configuration and basic parameters of electrode module, estimation of high-voltage isolation strength, construction of the case and operation volumes of the chamber, calculation estimations and assembly technique of grid electrodes. The streamer regime in the given chamber was obtained during its first start in April, 1977. By now, some experiments with the RISC spectrometer streamer chamber have been carried out on the Serpuchov accelerator. The results of these experiments are under study

  3. CP violation in the B0 - B0- system with the CMS detector at the LHC and study of microstrip gas chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis has been performed for the CMS project at the LHC, the proton-proton collider at CERN, whose first data taking is foreseen for the years 2004-2005. This work is divided in two parts. The first part includes a general study about low energy electron identification using the very fine granularity and the high resolution of the electromagnetic calorimeter of CMS. The efficiency of this algorithm is estimated to be about 60% and the hadron rejection factor is about 400. These identified electrons can be used for the B hadron tagging as well as for the reconstruction of the semi-inclusive decay Bd0 → J/ψ (→e+e-) + X. The new sensitivities of the CMS detector to the angles α and β of the CKM unitarity triangle with this new possibilities and new proton structure functions are: δ(sin(2α)) = 0.06 (+0.018-0.014) δ(sin(2β)) = 0.053 (+0.017-0.012). This results are comparable to what is expected for the dedicated B-Physics experiments. The second part concerns the development of a new type of microstrip gas chambers (MGC) where the anodes are separated from the cathode plane by a few microns. This geometry allows a fast charge collection (about 10 ns), gain values of more than 3000 and an energy resolution of 20% for the peek of a 55Fe source. (author)

  4. Design of monitoring circuit of PMT HV power supply control system of LASCAR scintillator array detector at RIBLL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is described that the monitoring circuit of PMT HV power supply control system of LASCAR in this paper, which is based on CC123 HV power supply module supplied by Beijing HAMAMATSU Phonetics Co.. The detailed design of this monitoring circuit, which has combined MCU and Personal Computer, is presented. (authors)

  5. SU-C-304-01: Investigation of Various Detector Response Functions and Their Geometry Dependence in a Novel Method to Address Ion Chamber Volume Averaging Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barraclough, B; Lebron, S [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Li, J; Fan, Qiyong; Liu, C; Yan, G [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A novel convolution-based approach has been proposed to address ion chamber (IC) volume averaging effect (VAE) for the commissioning of commercial treatment planning systems (TPS). We investigate the use of various convolution kernels and its impact on the accuracy of beam models. Methods: Our approach simulates the VAE by iteratively convolving the calculated beam profiles with a detector response function (DRF) while optimizing the beam model. At convergence, the convolved profiles match the measured profiles, indicating the calculated profiles match the “true” beam profiles. To validate the approach, beam profiles of an Elekta LINAC were repeatedly collected with ICs of various volumes (CC04, CC13 and SNC 125) to obtain clinically acceptable beam models. The TPS-calculated profiles were convolved externally with the DRF of respective IC. The beam model parameters were reoptimized using Nelder-Mead method by forcing the convolved profiles to match the measured profiles. We evaluated three types of DRFs (Gaussian, Lorentzian, and parabolic) and the impact of kernel dependence on field geometry (depth and field size). The profiles calculated with beam models were compared with SNC EDGE diode-measured profiles. Results: The method was successfully implemented with Pinnacle Scripting and Matlab. The reoptimization converged in ∼10 minutes. For all tested ICs and DRFs, penumbra widths of the TPS-calculated profiles and diode-measured profiles were within 1.0 mm. Gaussian function had the best performance with mean penumbra width difference within 0.5 mm. The use of geometry dependent DRFs showed marginal improvement, reducing the penumbra width differences to less than 0.3 mm. Significant increase in IMRT QA passing rates was achieved with the optimized beam model. Conclusion: The proposed approach significantly improved the accuracy of the TPS beam model. Gaussian functions as the convolution kernel performed consistently better than Lorentzian and

  6. A twin ionization chamber setup as detector for light charged particles with energies around 1 MeV applied to the 10B(n, α)7Li reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The setup and operating conditions of a gridded twin ionization chamber with sample change facility to study light charged particle properties in the 1 MeV region is described. Detailed studies of different grid geometries in connection with the choice of an eligible counting gas mixture and the applied high voltage have been performed. Due to the high overall amplification of the small electrical chamber signals obtained from such low-energy particles, special filters have been developed in order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. Timing properties of the chamber signals are discussed in detail. Information available from chamber signals and encoding methods are elucidated by spectra of alpha particles created by 234,235U spontaneous alpha decay. The detector permits the independent and simultaneous measurement of energy and angular distribution of particles in both sides of the chamber. Finally, preliminary results and related analysis methods will be presented for the investigation of the 10B(n, α0)/10B(n, α1γ) branching ratios

  7. A twin ionization chamber setup as detector for light charged particles with energies around 1 MeV applied to the sup 1 sup 0 B(n, alpha) sup 7 Li reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Göpfert, A; Bax, H

    2000-01-01

    The setup and operating conditions of a gridded twin ionization chamber with sample change facility to study light charged particle properties in the 1 MeV region is described. Detailed studies of different grid geometries in connection with the choice of an eligible counting gas mixture and the applied high voltage have been performed. Due to the high overall amplification of the small electrical chamber signals obtained from such low-energy particles, special filters have been developed in order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. Timing properties of the chamber signals are discussed in detail. Information available from chamber signals and encoding methods are elucidated by spectra of alpha particles created by sup 2 sup 3 sup 4 sup , sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U spontaneous alpha decay. The detector permits the independent and simultaneous measurement of energy and angular distribution of particles in both sides of the chamber. Finally, preliminary results and related analysis methods will be presented for the...

  8. JADE muon detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, J.; Armitage, J.C.M.; Baines, J.T.M.; Ball, A.H.; Bamford, G.; Barlow, R.J.; Bowdery, C.K.; Chrin, J.T.M.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Glendinning, I.; Greenshaw, T.; Hassard, J.F.; Hill, P.; King, B.T.; Loebinger, F.K.; Macbeth, A.A.; McCann, H.; Mercer, D.; Mills, H.E.; Murphy, P.G.; Prosper, H.B.; Rowe, P.; Stephens, K.

    1985-08-01

    The JADE muon detector consists of 618 planar drift chambers interspersed between layers of hadron absorber. This paper gives a detailed description of the construction and operation of the detector as a whole and discusses the properties of the drift chambers. The muon detector has been operating successfully at PETRA for five years. (orig.).

  9. Gridded ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved ionization chamber type x-ray detector comprises a heavy gas at high pressure disposed between an anode and a cathode. An open grid structure is disposed adjacent the anode and is maintained at a voltsge intermediate between the cathode and anode potentials. The electric field which is produced by positive ions drifting toward the cathode is thus shielded from the anode. Current measuring circuits connected to the anode are, therefore, responsive only to electron current flow within the chamber and the recovery time of the chamber is shortened. The grid structure also serves to shield the anode from electrical currents which might otherwise be induced by mechanical vibrations in the ionization chamber structure

  10. DELPHI's Ring Imaging Cherenkov Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    The hundreds of mirrors around this Ring Imaging Cherenkov Chamber reflect cones of light created by fast moving particles to a detector. The velocity of a particle can be measured by the size of the ring produced on the detector. DELPHI, which ran from 1989 to 2000 on the LEP accelerator, was primarily concerned with particle identification.

  11. The TESLA Time Projection Chamber

    OpenAIRE

    Ghodbane, Nabil

    2002-01-01

    A large Time Projection Chamber is proposed as part of the tracking system for a detector at the TESLA electron positron linear collider. Different ongoing R&D studies are reviewed, stressing progress made on a new type readout technique based on Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors.

  12. spark chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    A few cosmic rays pass through your body every second of every day, no matter where you are. Look at the spark chamber to your right – every flash is the track made by a cosmic ray from outer space. The spark chamber is filled with a special gas mixture. Cosmic rays knock electrons out of the atoms in the gas. These electrons accelerate towards high voltage metal strips layered throughout the chamber, creating sparks like little bolts of lightning.

  13. spark chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    A few cosmic rays pass through your body every second of every day, no matter where you are. Look at the spark chamber to your right – every flash is the track made by a cosmic ray from outer space. The spark chamber is filled with a special gas mixture. Cosmic rays knock electrons out of the atoms in the gas. These electrons accelerate towards high voltage metal strips layered throughout the chamber, creating sparks like little bolts of lightning.

  14. Test chamber for alpha spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Robert P.

    1977-01-01

    Alpha emitters for low-level radiochemical analysis by measurement of alpha spectra are positioned precisely with respect to the location of a surface-barrier detector by means of a chamber having a removable threaded planchet holder. A pedestal on the planchet holder holds a specimen in fixed engagement close to the detector. Insertion of the planchet holder establishes an O-ring seal that permits the chamber to be pumped to a desired vacuum. The detector is protected against accidental contact and resulting damage.

  15. Ussing Chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhout, J.; Wortelboer, H.; Verhoeckx, K.

    2015-01-01

    The Ussing chamber system is named after the Danish zoologist Hans Ussing, who invented the device in the 1950s to measure the short-circuit current as an indicator of net ion transport taking place across frog skin (Ussing and Zerahn, Acta Physiol Scand 23:110-127, 1951). Ussing chambers are increa

  16. The KLOE drift chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adinolfi, M.; Aloisio, A.; Ambrosino, F.; Andryakov, A.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Anulli, F.; Bacci, C.; Bankamp, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Bellini, F.; Bencivenni, G.; Bertolucci, S.; Bini, C.; Bloise, C.; Bocci, V.; Bossi, F.; Branchini, P.; Bulychjov, S.A.; Cabibbo, G.; Calcaterra, A.; Caloi, R.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Carboni, G.; Cardini, A.; Casarsa, M.; Cataldi, G.; Ceradini, F.; Cervelli, F.; Cevenini, F.; Chiefari, G.; Ciambrone, P.; Conetti, S.; Conticelli, S.; Lucia, E. De; Robertis, G. De; Sangro, R. De; Simone, P. De; Zorzi, G. De; Dell' Agnello, S.; Denig, A.; Domenico, A. Di; Donato, C. Di; Falco, S. Di; Doria, A.; Drago, E.; Elia, V.; Erriquez, O.; Farilla, A.; Felici, G.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrer, M.L.; Finocchiaro, G.; Forti, C.; Franceschi, A.; Franzini, P.; Gao, M.L.; Gatti, C.; Gauzzi, P.; Giovannella, S.; Golovatyuk, V.; Gorini, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grandegger, W.; Graziani, E.; Guarnaccia, P.; Hagel, U.V.; Han, H.G.; Han, S.W.; Huang, X.; Incagli, M.; Ingrosso, L.; Jang, Y.Y.; Kim, W.; Kluge, W.; Kulikov, V.; Lacava, F.; Lanfranchi, G.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Lomtadze, F.; Luisi, C.; Mao, C.S.; Martemianov, M.; Matsyuk, M.; Mei, W.; Merola, L.; Messi, R.; Miscetti, S.; Moalem, A.; Moccia, S.; Moulson, M.; Mueller, S.; Murtas, F.; Napolitano, M.; Nedosekin, A.; Panareo, M.; Pacciani, L.; Pages, P.; Palutan, M.; Paoluzi, L.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passalacqua, L.; Passaseo, M.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, G.; Picca, D.; Pirozzi, G.; Pistillo, C.; Pollack, M.; Pontecorvo, L.; Primavera, M.; Ruggieri, F.; Santangelo, P.; Santovetti, E.; Saracino, G.; Schamberger, R.D.; Schwick, C.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Scuri, F.; Sfiligoi, I.; Shan, J.; Silano, P.; Spadaro, T.; Spagnolo, S.; Spiriti, E.; Stanescu, C.; Tong, G.L.; Tortora, L.; Valente, E.; Valente, P. E-mail: paolo.valente@lnf.infn.it; Valeriani, B.; Venanzoni, G.; Veneziano, S.; Wu, Y.; Xie, Y.G.; Zhao, P.P.; Zhou, Y

    2001-04-01

    The tracking detector of the KLOE experiment is 4 m diameter, 3.3 m length drift chamber, designed to contain a large fraction of the decays of low-energy K{sub L} produced at the Frascati DAPHINE phi-factory. The chamber is made by a thin carbon fiber structure and operated with a helium-based gas mixture in order to minimise conversion of low-energy photons and multiple scattering inside the sensitive volume. The tracking information is provided by 58 layers of stereo wires defing 12,582 cells, 2x2 cm{sup 2} in size in the 12 innermost layers and 3x3 cm{sup 2} in the outer ones. Details of the chamber design, calibration procedure and tracking performances are presented.

  17. The KLOE drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tracking detector of the KLOE experiment is 4 m diameter, 3.3 m length drift chamber, designed to contain a large fraction of the decays of low-energy KL produced at the Frascati DAPHINE phi-factory. The chamber is made by a thin carbon fiber structure and operated with a helium-based gas mixture in order to minimise conversion of low-energy photons and multiple scattering inside the sensitive volume. The tracking information is provided by 58 layers of stereo wires defing 12,582 cells, 2x2 cm2 in size in the 12 innermost layers and 3x3 cm2 in the outer ones. Details of the chamber design, calibration procedure and tracking performances are presented

  18. Air ionization wire plane chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation Measurement for protection level instrumentation requires large number of detectors. Since the number is large, the detector should be cost effective and yet should have good sensitivity. Gas detectors with presently available microelectronics and signal processing capabilities opened a new era in radiation monitoring. Present paper describes the use of air filled multi anode grid planes as detector for alpha detection. Due to multiple anode wire planes, the charge collection efficiency of the air ionization chamber is higher as compared to conventional ionization chamber. The signal from this Wire Plane Chamber (WPC) has a faster and narrower pulse shape as compared to conventional two-electrode chamber of similar dimensions. The reduction in capacitance also improves the signal to noise ratio so that air can be used as the ionization medium without any special cleaning procedure etc and it may be possible to use even engineering plastic as the structural material for the chamber. The paper gives the results obtained so far with this air ionization chamber. (author)

  19. Liquid xenon multiwire chamber for positron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The liquid xenon multiwire chamber has been proposed as a detector of 511 keV gamma-photons for positron emission tomography (PET). Both the scintillation and the ionization signal, read from the anode wires, are used. A test chamber of about 300 cm3 and containing six multiwire ionization cells has been built. The cell is formed by two plane cathodes, 10 mm apart, and 20 anode wires spaced by 2.5 mm tied to pairs resulting in 10 channels, read out independently. The first experiments were performed for a single cell. The number of the anode wire on which the signal is induced gives the depth of interaction in the detector with a precision of 5 mm. This is important information allowing one to reduce the parallax error and, therefore, to decrease the tomograph size and improve the solid angle. The position sensitivity across the cell (or along the tomograph ring) is achieved by measurement of the drift time of the electrons from the point of primary ionization to the anode, triggered by the scintillation detected with a photomultiplier tube. The scintillation also supplies a fast trigger for the coincidence analysis. (orig.)

  20. Wire chambers revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiwire proportional chambers (MWPCs) have long been used as position-sensitive charged particle detectors in nuclear and high-energy physics. MWPCs are large-area gas-filled ionisation chambers in which large arrays of fine wires are used to measure the position of ionisation produced in the gas by the passage of charged particles. The important properties of MWPCs are high-spatial-resolution, large-area, high-count-rate performance at low cost. For research applications, detectors several metres square have been built and small-area detectors have a charged particle resolution of 0.4 mm at a count rate of several million per second. Modification is required to MWPCs for nuclear medicine imaging. A gamma rays or X-rays cannot be detected directly, they must be converted into photo- or Compton scatter electrons. Photon-electron conversion requires the use of high atomic number materials in the body of the chamber. Pressurised xenon is the most useful form of ''gas only'' photon-electron convertor and has been used successfully in a gamma camera for the detection of gamma rays at energies below 100 keV. This camera has been developed specifically for high-count-rate first-pass cardiac imaging. This high-pressure xenon gas MWPC is the key to a highly competitive system which can outperform scintillator-based systems. The count rate performance is close to a million counts per second and the intrinsic spatial resolution is better than the best scintillator-based camera.The only clinical detector have been developed for positron emission tomography, where thin lead or lead-glass can provide an acceptable convertor for 511 keV photons. Two MWPC positron cameras have been evaluated clinically and one is now routine use in clinical oncology. The problems of detection efficiency have not been solved by these detectors although reliability and large-area PET imaging have been proven. (orig./HSI)

  1. Wire Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1986-01-01

    Two wire chambers made originally for the R807 Experiment at CERN's Intersecting Storage Rings. In 1986 they were used for the PS 201 experiment (Obelix Experiment) at LEAR, the Low Energy Antiproton Ring. The group of researchers from Turin, using the chambers at that time, changed the acquisition system using for the first time 8 bit (10 bit non linear) analog to digital conversion for incoming signals from the chambers. The acquisition system was controlled by 54 CPU and 80 digital signal processors. The power required for all the electronics was 40 kW. For the period, this system was one of the most powerful on-line apparatus in the world. The Obelix Experiment was closed in 1996. To find more about how a wire chamber works, see the description for object CERN-OBJ-DE-038.

  2. Vacuum chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed description is given of the vacuum chamber of the so-called experimental equipment DEMAS (double-arm-time-of-flight spectrometer) at the heavy ion accelerator U-400 at the JINR-Dubna. (author)

  3. Aging in the large CDF axial drift chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allspach, D.; Ambrose, D.; Binkley, M.; /Fermilab; Bromberg, C.; /Michigan State U.; Burkett, K.; Kephart, R.; Madrak, R.; Miao, T.; Mukherjee, A.; Roser, R.; Wagner, R.L.

    2004-12-01

    The Central Outer Tracker (COT) is a large axial drift chamber in the Collider Detector at Fermilab operating with a gas mixture that is 50/50 argon/ethane with an admixture of 1.7% isopropanol. In its first two years of operation the COT showed unexpected aging with the worst parts of the chamber experiencing a gain loss of {approx}50% for an accumulated charge of {approx}35 mC/cm. By monitoring the pulse height of hits on good tracks, it was possible to determine the gain as a function of time and location in the chamber. In addition, the currents of the high voltage supplies gave another monitor of chamber gain and its dependence on the charge deposition rate. The aging was worse on the exhaust end of the chamber consistent with polymer buildup as the gas flows through the chamber. The distribution in azimuth suggests that aging is enhanced at lower temperatures, but other factors such as gas flow patterns may be involved. Elemental and molecular analysis of the sense wires found a coating that is mostly carbon and hydrogen with a small amount of oxygen; no silicon or other contaminants were identified. High resolution electron microscope pictures of the wire surface show that the coating is smooth with small sub-micron nodules. In the course of working with the chamber gas system, we discovered a small amount of O{sub 2} is enough to reverse the aging. Operating the chamber with {approx}100 ppm of O{sub 2} reversed almost two years of gain loss in less than 10 days while accumulating {le} 2 mC/cm.

  4. Proposal for a Full-Scale Prototype Single-Phase Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber and Detector Beam Test at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Kutter, T

    2015-01-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) will use a large liquid argon (LAr) detector to measure the CP violating phase, determine the neutrino mass hier- archy and perform precision tests of the three-flavor paradigm in long-baseline neutrino oscillations. The detector will consist of four modules each with a fiducial mass of 10 kt of LAr and due to its unprecedented size will allow sensitive searches for proton decay and the detection and measurement of electron neutrinos from core collapse supernovae [1]. The first 10 kt module will use single-phase LAr detection technique and be itself modular in design. The successful manufacturing, installation and operation of several full-scale detector components in a suitable configuration represents a critical engineering milestone prior to the construction and operation of the first full 10 kt DUNE detector module at the SURF underground site. A charged particle beam test of a prototype detector will provide critical calibration measurements as well as inva...

  5. Simulation and calibration of the specific energy loss of the central jet chambers of the H1 detector and measurement of the inclusive D{sup *{+-}} meson cross section in photoproduction at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennekemper, Eva

    2011-12-15

    In this thesis the photoproduction of D{sup *} mesons in ep collisions at HERA is analysed. D{sup *} mesons are detected in the 'golden' decay channel D{sup *} {yields} K{pi}{pi}{sub s} with the H1 detector. Compared to earlier analyses, the systematic uncertainty is reduced due to two main improvements. Firstly, the simulation of the Fast Track Trigger, which is based on tracks measured within the central jet chambers, allows the trigger efficiency dependence of various kinematic variables to be evaluated. Secondly, the use of specific energy loss provides the possibility to suppress the non-resonant background. In order to use particle identification with the specific energy loss in the analysis, the simulation of the specific energy loss in the central jet chambers of the H1 detector is improved and the necessary correction functions and calibrations have been determined. This improved final H1 detector simulation is used to determine the cross section of photoproduction of D{sup *} mesons in the HERA II data sample, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 113 pb{sup -1}. The measurement was performed in the kinematic region of Q{sup 2}<2 GeV for the photon virtuality and photon-proton center of mass energies of 100

  6. The knife-edge chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the design for a new technology for particle track detectors is described. Using standard IC fabrication techniques, a pattern of microscopic knife edges and field-shaping electrodes can be fabricated on a silicon substrate. The knife-edge chamber uniquely offers attractive performance for the track chambers required for SSC detectors, for which no present technology is yet satisfactory. Its features include: excellent radiation hardness (10 Mrad), excellent spatial resolution (∼20 μm), short drift time (20 ns), and large pulse height (1 mV)

  7. Design and implementation of an integrated architecture for massive parallel data treatment of analogue signals supplied by silicon detectors of very high spatial resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This doctorate thesis studies an integrated architecture designed to a parallel massive treatment of analogue signals supplied by silicon detectors of very high spatial resolution. The first chapter is an introduction presenting the general outline and the triggering conditions of the spectrometer. Chapter two describes the operational structure of a microvertex detector made of Si micro-plates associated to the measuring chains. Information preconditioning is related to the pre-amplification stage, to the pile-up effects and to the reduction in the time characteristic due to the high counting rates. The chapter three describes the architecture of the analogue delay buffer, makes an analysis of the intrinsic noise and presents the operational testings and input/output control operations. The fourth chapter is devoted to the description of the analogue pulse shape processor and gives also the testings and the corresponding measurements on the circuit. Finally, the chapter five deals with the simplest modeling of the entire conditioning chain. Also, the testings and measuring procedures are here discussed. In conclusion the author presents some prospects for improving the signal-to-noise ratio by summation of the de-convoluted micro-paths. 78 refs., 78 figs., 1 annexe

  8. Measurement system for evaluation of the muon chambers for the LHCb experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a detector with the complexity of the LHCb, where only for the muon system more than 1300 chambers, divided into 20 different types, will be used, resulting on more than 120 k channels to be readout, it is of crucial importance to study the many types of chambers to create a complete knowledge of the detector operation and to guarantee a high-quality performance during the experiment. To make it possible, a complete setup was built and a C++ based software was developed to carry out a set of measurements on the full-equipped chambers of the LHCb muon detector. The setup is made of front-end control electronics, high-voltage supply and acquisition circuitry while the software, running on a PC, remotely controls each element of the system and implements a number of automatized procedures to assess the main characteristics of the chambers. The main advantages of this system are its versatility and speed of measurement which are crucial to the experiment since there is the need to characterize every single chamber before final installation. Moreover, in this work it was proposed to measure the starting knee of the high-voltage operational plateau without the use of an external trigger by making use of the internal structure of the chambers. Two laboratories were prepared at CERN (European Laboratory for Particle Physics) to receive this system; one used to test chambers arrived from the CERN itself and the PNPI (Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute) production sites, and one to test the chambers arrived from the INFN (National Institute of Nuclear Physics) production sites. In this document, the hardware and software setup will be presented together with the measurement-oriented implementations.

  9. MPS II drift chamber system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MPS II detectors are narrow drift space chambers designed for high position resolution in a magnetic field and in a very high particle flux environment. Central to this implementation was the development of 3 multi-channel custom IC's and one multi-channel hybrid. The system is deadtimeless and requires no corrections on an anode-to-anode basis. Operational experience and relevance to ISABELLE detectors is discussed

  10. Robert Chambers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Biekart (Kees); D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractProfessor Robert Chambers is a Research Associate at the Institute of Development Studies (IDS), University of Sussex (Brighton, UK), where he has been based for the last 40 years, including as Professorial Research Fellow. He became involved in the field of development management in the

  11. Bubble chamber: colour enhanced tracks

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    This artistically-enhanced image of real particle tracks was produced in the Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC). Liquid hydrogen is used to create bubbles along the paths of the particles as a piston expands the medium. A magnetic field is produced in the detector causing the particles to travel in spirals, allowing charge and momentum to be measured.

  12. Development of an active 238uranium(VI)-fluoride detector chamber for precision experiments in photon-induced fission at the S-DALINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The polarized injector SPIN at the S-DALINAC provides spin polarized electrons for circularly polarized bremsstrahlung with a high degree of polarization near the endpoint energy of the spectrum, enabling the search for forward-backward asymmetries of the light and heavy fission fragment originating from parity non-conservation in the photon-induced fission process of 238U. An active 238uranium(VI)-fluoride gas target has been developed along the lines of a simple Frisch grid ionization chamber to raise the luminosity and to study the properties of an 238uranium(VI)-fluoride/argon gas mixture. The active 238uranium(VI)-fluoride gas target has been filled with argon and 238uranium(VI)-fluoride using mass flow controllers. At different settings data has been acquired and interpreted. Instantly after filling the chamber with some 238uranium(VI)-fluoride the anode and cathode signal are severely lowered and gain only slowly. Apparently the 238uranium(VI)-fluoride acts as a very efficient electron collector because of its complexity and the high amount of fluorine and its electronegativity. Over time, the amount of gaseous 238uranium(VI)-fluoride is reduced and different processes are possible to explain this effect. In the present configuration of the active 238uranium(VI)-fluoride gas target no sound quantitative information on the properties of an 238uranium(VI)-fluoride/argon gas mixture can be given. Raising the luminosity for precision experiments in photon-induced fission at the S-DALINAC with an active 238uranium(VI)-fluoride gas target appears to be impossible.

  13. Gas filled detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main types of gas filled nuclear detectors: ionization chambers, proportional counters, parallel-plate avalanche counters (PPAC) and microstrip detectors are described. New devices are shown. A description of the processes involved in such detectors is also given. (K.A.) 123 refs.; 25 figs.; 3 tabs

  14. The CLAS drift chamber system

    CERN Document Server

    Mestayer, M D; Asavapibhop, B; Barbosa, F J; Bonneau, P; Christo, S B; Dodge, G E; Dooling, T; Duncan, W S; Dytman, S A; Feuerbach, R; Gilfoyle, G P; Gyurjyan, V; Hicks, K H; Hicks, R S; Hyde-Wright, C E; Jacobs, G; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Kossov, M; Kuhn, S E; Magahiz, R A; Major, R W; Martin, C; McGuckin, T; McNabb, J; Miskimen, R A; Müller, J A; Niczyporuk, B B; O'Meara, J E; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Robb, J; Roudot, F; Schumacher, R A; Tedeschi, D J; Thompson, R A; Tilles, D; Tuzel, W; Vansyoc, K; Vineyard, M F; Weinstein, L B; Wilkin, G R; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J

    2000-01-01

    Experimental Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory houses the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, the magnetic field of which is produced by a superconducting toroid. The six coils of this toroid divide the detector azimuthally into six sectors, each of which contains three large multi-layer drift chambers for tracking charged particles produced from a fixed target on the toroidal axis. Within the 18 drift chambers are a total of 35,148 individually instrumented hexagonal drift cells. The novel geometry of these chambers provides for good tracking resolution and efficiency, along with large acceptance. The design and construction challenges posed by these large-scale detectors are described, and detailed results are presented from in-beam measurements.

  15. The CLAS drift chamber system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mestayer, M.D.; Carman, D.S.; Asavaphibhop, B. [and others

    1999-04-01

    Experimental Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory houses the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, the magnetic field of which is produced by a superconducting toroid. The six coils of this toroid divide the detector azimuthally into six sectors, each of which contains three large multi-layer drift chambers for tracking charged particles produced from a fixed target on a toroidal axis. Within the 18 drift chambers are a total of 35,148 individually instrumented hexagonal drift cells. The novel geometry of these chambers provides for good tracking resolution and efficiency, along with large acceptance. The design and construction challenges posed by these large-scale detectors are described, and detailed results are presented from in-beam measurements.

  16. The CLAS drift chamber system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory houses the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, the magnetic field of which is produced by a superconducting toroid. The six coils of this toroid divide the detector azimuthally into six sectors, each of which contains three large multi-layer drift chambers for tracking charged particles produced from a fixed target on the toroidal axis. Within the 18 drift chambers are a total of 35,148 individually instrumented hexagonal drift cells. The novel geometry of these chambers provides for good tracking resolution and efficiency, along with large acceptance. The design and construction challenges posed by these large-scale detectors are described, and detailed results are presented from in-beam measurements

  17. The world's largest time projection chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Peter Glassel, the technical coordinator for the ALICE time projection chamber, is seen sitting inside the detector; the largest in the world at nearly 100 cubic metres. Thousands of wires are connected to read out electronic data produced as particles are created in lead-lead collisions at the centre of the detector. These particles will cause the medium within the time projection chamber to ionise along their tracks allowing the particle paths to be recreated.

  18. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsey, C.S.; Denby, B.; Haggerty, H.

    1992-10-01

    We discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial log VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed.

  19. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial log VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed

  20. Ultrasonic liquid level detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotz, Dennis M.; Hinz, William R.

    2010-09-28

    An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use within a shielded container, the detector being tubular in shape with a chamber at its lower end into which liquid from in the container may enter and exit, the chamber having an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver in its top wall and a reflector plate or target as its bottom wall whereby when liquid fills the chamber a complete medium is then present through which an ultrasonic wave may be transmitted and reflected from the target thus signaling that the liquid is at chamber level.

  1. Development of the mixed radiation detector for target chamber II of BEPCII-LINAC test beam%BEPCII-LINAC试验束第二靶室混合辐射测量探测器的研制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐兴华; 李家才; 徐进章; 柯尊建; 安广朋; 杨涛; 张少平

    2011-01-01

    In target chamber II of the BEPCII-LINAC Test Beam, radiation field of mixed particles (mainly proton,neutron, gamma, pion, positron and electron) of consecutive energy is generated from the object target bombarded by the 1.89 GeV pulsed electron beams from the linear accelerator. This mixed radiation field is ideal for irradiating materials or biological samples. However, these experiments need to know the dose of various particles delivered to the samples. In light of this, a mixed radiation detector (phoswich detector) was developed. In this paper, the basic process of the detector development and its key properties are reported. The basic structure of detector and principles of detection are given. GEANT4 simulation results of detection efficiency of different particle and performance of n-y discrimination are given. The results show that the mixed radiation detector, with the design specifications being achieved, satisfies the measurements of mixed field in the Test Beam.%BEPCII-LINAC试验束(Test Beam)第二靶室内,1.89 GeV脉冲电子束轰击目标靶产生的次级粒子(主要为质子、中子、伽玛、正负pion和正负电子)形成了能量连续的混合粒子辐射场,该辐射场是材料或生物样品(如农作物种子)辐照损伤效应试验的理想场所.这些试验都迫切需要给出各种样品对不同粒子的受照剂量,因此研制一个混合辐射测量探测器--叠层闪烁体探测器.本文阐述该探测器研制的基本过程,并对其关键性能进行研究与测试;阐明了探测器的基本结构设计与制作过程和.探测基本原理,给出对不同粒子探测效率的GEANT4模拟结果,并对探测器的n-γ分辨性能进行了测试.结果显示该混合辐射测量探测器基本满足.rest Beam混合场的测量需要,达到预期的基本设计指标.

  2. A large scale knife-edge chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To date, three different tracking detectors, Straw Tube Chamber, Silicon Strip Detector and Scintillation Fiber Detector, as well as their combinations, have been proposed for the SSC experiments. However all of them have their own problems as tracking detectors for use in very high luminosity experiment at the SSC. Scintillation fiber detector is excellent in its speed, spatial resolution and low occupancy. However the fatal problem is the readout devices. Questions on its radiation hardness have not yet been totally solved. As a solution to this challenge, a knife-edge chamber was proposed. The knife-edge chamber is essentially a multi-wire proportional chamber. This chamber has, however, a drawback which is shared with the silicon strip detector, i.e., the size of a single chamber is limited by that of the silicon wafer. Recently at KEK, a program has been started to overcome this problem. The KEK method is to make v-shape grooves on a metal plate, such as a nickel-plated steel, and to use the metal plate as a negative to make sharp-edged electrodes. After this process, there are two possibilities, which are under consideration at the moment. The first possibility is to use the electroforming technique. The second possibility is to use the plastic molding technique by using the machined metal plate as a negative. The KEK machine shop has recently built a high precision shaper machine to produce gratings for synchrotron radiation research. (N.K.)

  3. Chamber transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OLSON,CRAIG L.

    2000-05-17

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system.

  4. The Mark II Vertex Drift Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have completed constructing and begun operating the Mark II Drift Chamber Vertex Detector. The chamber, based on a modified jet cell design, achieves 30 μm spatial resolution and 2 gas mixtures. Special emphasis has been placed on controlling systematic errors including the use of novel construction techniques which permit accurate wire placement. Chamber performance has been studied with cosmic ray tracks collected with the chamber located both inside and outside the Mark II. Results on spatial resolution, average pulse shape, and some properties of CO2 mixtures are presented. 10 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  5. Particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Joram, Christian

    1998-01-01

    The lecture series will present and overview of the basic techniques and underlying physical principles of particle detectors, applied to current and future high energy physics experiments. Illustrating examples, mainly from the field of collider experiments, will demonstrate the performance and limitations of the various techniques. After and introduction we shall concentrate on particle tracking. Wire chambers, drift chambers, micro gaseous tracking devices and solid state trackers will be discussed. It follows and overview of scintillators, photon detection, fiber tracking and nuclear emulsions. One lecture will deal with the various techniques of calorimetry. Finally we shall focus on methods developed for particle identification. These comprise specific energy loss, time of flight Cherenkov and transition radiation detectors.

  6. Multi-step avalanche chambers for FNAL experiment E605

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physical processes in multi-step avalanche chambers, detector properties, and difficulties in operation are discussed. Advantages of multi-step chambers over classical MWPC for specific experimental problems encountered in experiment E605 (high-flux environment and CERENKOV imaging) are described. Some details of detector design are presented

  7. A 4 π charged-particle detector array for light-ion-induced nuclear fragmentation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, K.; Alexander, A.; Bracken, D. S.; Brzychczyk, J.; Dorsett, J.; Ensman, R.; Renshaw Foxford, E.; Hamilton, T.; Komisarcik, K.; McDonald, K. N.; Morley, K. B.; Poehlman, J.; Powell, C.; Viola, V. E.; Yoder, N. R.; Ottarson, J.; Madden, N.

    1994-12-01

    Operating characteristics of the Indiana Silicon Sphere 4 π detector array are outlined. The detector geometry is spherical, with 90 telescopes in the forward hemisphere and 72 at backward angles, covering a total solid angle of 74% of 4π. Each telescope consists of a simple gas-ion chamber, operated with C3F8 gas, followed by a 0.5 mm thick ion-implanted silicon detector and a 28 mm CsI(Tl) crystal, readout by a photodiode. Custom-built bias supplies and NIM preamp/shaper modules were used in conjunction with commercial CFD, TDC and ADC CAMAC units.

  8. A 4[pi] charged-particle detector array for light-ion-induced nuclear fragmentation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiatkowski, K. (Departments of Chemistry and Physics and IUCF, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)); Alexander, A. (Departments of Chemistry and Physics and IUCF, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)); Bracken, D.S. (Departments of Chemistry and Physics and IUCF, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)); Brzychczyk, J. (Departments of Chemistry and Physics and IUCF, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)); Dorsett, J. (Departments of Chemistry and Physics and IUCF, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)); Ensman, R. (Departments of Chemistry and Physics and IUCF, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)); Foxford, E.R. (Departments of Chemistry and Physics and IUCF, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)); Hamilton, T. (Departments of Chemistry and Physics and IUCF, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)); Komisarcik, K. (Dep

    1994-12-30

    Operating characteristics of the Indiana Silicon Sphere 4[pi] detector array are outlined. The detector geometry is spherical, with 90 telescopes in the forward hemisphere and 72 at backward angles, covering a total solid angle of 74% of 4[pi]. Each telescope consists of a simple gas-ion chamber, operated with C[sub 3]F[sub 8] gas, followed by a 0.5 mm thick ion-implanted silicon detector and a 28 mm CsI(Tl) crystal, readout by a photodiode. Custom-built bias supplies and NIM preamp/shaper modules were used in conjunction with commercial CFD, TDC and ADC CAMAC units. ((orig.))

  9. A 4π charged-particle detector array for light-ion-induced nuclear fragmentation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operating characteristics of the Indiana Silicon Sphere 4π detector array are outlined. The detector geometry is spherical, with 90 telescopes in the forward hemisphere and 72 at backward angles, covering a total solid angle of 74% of 4π. Each telescope consists of a simple gas-ion chamber, operated with C3F8 gas, followed by a 0.5 mm thick ion-implanted silicon detector and a 28 mm CsI(Tl) crystal, readout by a photodiode. Custom-built bias supplies and NIM preamp/shaper modules were used in conjunction with commercial CFD, TDC and ADC CAMAC units. ((orig.))

  10. Proposal for the award of a contract, based on competitive tendering by CCLRC-RUTHERFORD APPLETON LABORATORY, for the supply of the Front-End Driver Boards for the Tracker detector of the CMS experime

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract, based on competitive tendering by CCLRC-RUTHERFORD APPLETON LABORATORY, for the supply of the Front-End Driver (FED) boards for the Tracker detector of the CMS experiment. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to a contract for the CERN share towards the cost of the supply of 500 FED boards for the Tracker detector of the CMS experiment with CCLRC-RUTHERFORD APPLETON LABORATORY (UK) for a total amount of 1 676 000 Pounds sterling (3 788 000 Swiss francs), not subject to revision. CERN's contribution to the contract will not exceed 575 000 Pounds sterling (1 300 000 Swiss francs). The remaining 1 101 000 Pounds sterling (2 488 000 Swiss francs) will be financed by several other participating institutes of the CMS Collaboration.

  11. Ionization chambers for LET determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Franz-Joachim; Bassler, Niels; Tölli, Heikki;

    2010-01-01

    Modern radiotherapy facilities for cancer treatment such as the Heavy Ion Therapy Centre (HIT) in Heidelberg (Germany) enable sub millimetre precision in dose deposition. For the measurement of such dose distributions and  characterization of the particle beams, detectors with high spatial...... of columnar recombination was designed to model the detector efficiency of an ionization chamber. Here, we have shown that despite the approximations and simplification made, the theory is correct for the LETs typically found in clinical radiotherapy employing particles from protons to carbon ions...

  12. Development of multiwire proportional chambers

    CERN Multimedia

    Charpak, G

    1969-01-01

    It has happened quite often in the history of science that theoreticians, confronted with some major difficulty, have successfully gone back thirty years to look at ideas that had then been thrown overboard. But it is rare that experimentalists go back thirty years to look again at equipment which had become out-dated. This is what Charpak and his colleagues did to emerge with the 'multiwire proportional chamber' which has several new features making it a very useful addition to the armoury of particle detectors. In the 1930s, ion-chambers, Geiger- Muller counters and proportional counters, were vital pieces of equipment in nuclear physics research. Other types of detectors have since largely replaced them but now the proportional counter, in new array, is making a comeback.

  13. General purpose nuclear irradiation chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear technology has found a great need for use in medicine, industry, and research. Smoke detectors in our homes, medical treatments and new varieties of plants by irradiating its seeds are just a few examples of the benefits of nuclear technology. Portable neutron source such as Californium-252, available at Industrial Technology Division (BTI/ PAT), Malaysian Nuclear Agency, has a 2.645 year half-life. However, 252Cf is known to emit gamma radiation from the source. Thus, this chamber aims to provide a proper gamma shielding for samples to distinguish the use of mixed neutron with gamma-rays or pure neutron radiation. The chamber is compatible to be used with other portable neutron sources such as 241Am-Be as well as the reactor TRIGA PUSPATI for higher neutron dose. This chamber was designed through a collaborative effort of Kulliyyah Engineering, IIUM with the Industrial Technology Division (BTI) team, Malaysian Nuclear Agency. (Author)

  14. The GODDESS ionization chamber: developing robust windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Rose; Baugher, Travis; Cizewski, Jolie; Pain, Steven; Ratkiewicz, Andrew; Goddess Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Reaction studies of nuclei far from stability require high-efficiency arrays of detectors and the ability to identify beam-like particles, especially when the beam is a cocktail beam. The Gammasphere ORRUBA Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) is made up of the Oak Ridge-Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of silicon detectors for charged particles inside of the gamma-ray detector array Gammasphere. A high-rate ionization chamber is being developed to identify beam-like particles. Consisting of twenty-one alternating anode and cathode grids, the ionization chamber sits downstream of the target chamber and is used to measure the energy loss of recoiling ions. A critical component of the system is a thin and robust mylar window which serves to separate the gas-filled ionization chamber from the vacuum of the target chamber with minimal energy loss. After construction, windows were tested to assure that they would not break below the required pressure, causing harm to the wire grids. This presentation will summarize the status of the ionization chamber and the results of the first tests with beams. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation.

  15. Neutron detector array at IUAC: Design features and instrumentation developments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Sugathan; A Jhingan; K S Golda; T Varughese; S Venkataramanan; N Saneesh; V V Satyanarayana; S K Suman; J Antony; Ruby Shanti; K Singh; S K Saini; A Gupta; A Kothari; P Barua; Rajesh Kumar; J Zacharias; R P Singh; B R Behera; S K Mandal; I M Govil; R K Bhowmik

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics and performance of the newly commissioned neutron detector array at IUAC are described. The array consists of 100 BC501 liquid scintillators mounted in a semispherical geometry and are kept at a distance of 175 cm from the reaction point. Each detector is a 5″ × 5″ cylindrical cell coupled to 5″ diameter photomultiplier tube (PMT). Signal processing is realized using custom-designed home-made integrated electronic modules which perform neutron–gamma discrimination using zero cross timing and time-of-flight (TOF) technique. Compact custom-built high voltage power supply developed using DC–DC converters are used to bias the detector. The neutrons are recorded in coincidence with fission fragments which are detected using multi-wire proportional counters mounted inside a 1m diameter SS target chamber. The detectors and electronics have been tested off-line using radioactive sources and the results are presented.

  16. Drift and proportional tracking chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many techniques have been exploited in constructing tracking chambers, particle detectors which measure the trajectories and momenta of charged particles. The particular features of high-energy interactions - charged particle multiplicities, angular correlations and complex vertex topologies, to name a few - and the experimental environment of the accelerator - event rates, background rates, and so on - accent the importance of certain detector characteristics. In high energy e+e-, anti pp and pp interactions the final states are dominated by closely collimated jets of high multiplicity, requiring good track-pair resolution in the tracking chamber. High energy particles deflect very little in limited magnetic field volumes, necessitating good spatial resolution for accurate momentum measurements. The colliding beam technique generally requires a device easily adapted to full solid-angle coverage, and the high event rates expected in some of these machines put a premium on good time resolution. Finally, the production and subsequent decays of the tau, charmed and beautiful mesons will provide multiple vertex topologies. To reconstruct these vertices reliably will require considerable improvements in spatial resolution and track-pair resolution. This lecture considers the proportional counter and its descendant, the drift chamber, as tracking chambers. Its goal is to review the physics of this device in order to understand its performance limitations and promises

  17. MUON DETECTORS: DT

    CERN Multimedia

    Marco Dallavalle

    2012-01-01

      Although the year 2012 is the third year without access to the chambers and the Front-End electronics, the fraction of good channels is still very high at 99.1% thanks also to the constant care provided by the on-site operation team. The downtime caused to CMS as a consequence of DT failures is to-date <2%. The intervention on the LV power supplies, which required a large number of CAEN modules (137 A3050, 13 A3100, and 3 MAO) to be removed from the detector, reworked and tested during this Year-End Technical Stop, can now, after a few months of stable operation of the LV, be declared to have solved once-and-for-all the persistent problem with the overheating LV Anderson connectors. Another piece of very good news is that measurements of the noise from single-hit rate outside the drift-time box as a function of the LHC luminosity show that the noise rate and distribution are consistent with expectations of the simulations in the Muon TDR, which have guided the detector design and constru...

  18. Making MUSIC: A multiple sampling ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shumard, B. [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203 H-113, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)]. E-mail: shumard@phy.anl.gov; Henderson, D.J. [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203 H-113, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Rehm, K.E. [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203 H-113, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Tang, X.D. [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203 H-113, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) was developed for use in conjunction with the Atlas scattering chamber (ATSCAT). This chamber was developed to study the ({alpha}, p) reaction in stable and radioactive beams. The gas filled ionization chamber is used as a target and detector for both particles in the outgoing channel (p + beam particles for elastic scattering or p + residual nucleus for ({alpha}, p) reactions). The MUSIC detector is followed by a Si array to provide a trigger for anode events. The anode events are gated by a gating grid so that only ({alpha}, p) reactions where the proton reaches the Si detector result in an anode event. The MUSIC detector is a segmented ionization chamber. The active length of the chamber is 11.95 in. and is divided into 16 equal anode segments (3.5 in. x 0.70 in. with 0.3 in. spacing between pads). The dead area of the chamber was reduced by the addition of a Delrin snout that extends 0.875 in. into the chamber from the front face, to which a mylar window is affixed. 0.5 in. above the anode is a Frisch grid that is held at ground potential. 0.5 in. above the Frisch grid is a gating grid. The gating grid functions as a drift electron barrier, effectively halting the gathering of signals. Setting two sets of alternating wires at differing potentials creates a lateral electric field which traps the drift electrons, stopping the collection of anode signals. The chamber also has a reinforced mylar exit window separating the Si array from the target gas. This allows protons from the ({alpha}, p) reaction to be detected. The detection of these protons opens the gating grid to allow the drift electrons released from the ionizing gas during the ({alpha}, p) reaction to reach the anode segment below the reaction.

  19. Making MUSIC: A multiple sampling ionization chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumard, B.; Henderson, D. J.; Rehm, K. E.; Tang, X. D.

    2007-08-01

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) was developed for use in conjunction with the Atlas scattering chamber (ATSCAT). This chamber was developed to study the (α, p) reaction in stable and radioactive beams. The gas filled ionization chamber is used as a target and detector for both particles in the outgoing channel (p + beam particles for elastic scattering or p + residual nucleus for (α, p) reactions). The MUSIC detector is followed by a Si array to provide a trigger for anode events. The anode events are gated by a gating grid so that only (α, p) reactions where the proton reaches the Si detector result in an anode event. The MUSIC detector is a segmented ionization chamber. The active length of the chamber is 11.95 in. and is divided into 16 equal anode segments (3.5 in. × 0.70 in. with 0.3 in. spacing between pads). The dead area of the chamber was reduced by the addition of a Delrin snout that extends 0.875 in. into the chamber from the front face, to which a mylar window is affixed. 0.5 in. above the anode is a Frisch grid that is held at ground potential. 0.5 in. above the Frisch grid is a gating grid. The gating grid functions as a drift electron barrier, effectively halting the gathering of signals. Setting two sets of alternating wires at differing potentials creates a lateral electric field which traps the drift electrons, stopping the collection of anode signals. The chamber also has a reinforced mylar exit window separating the Si array from the target gas. This allows protons from the (α, p) reaction to be detected. The detection of these protons opens the gating grid to allow the drift electrons released from the ionizing gas during the (α, p) reaction to reach the anode segment below the reaction.

  20. Making MUSIC: A multiple sampling ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) was developed for use in conjunction with the Atlas scattering chamber (ATSCAT). This chamber was developed to study the (α, p) reaction in stable and radioactive beams. The gas filled ionization chamber is used as a target and detector for both particles in the outgoing channel (p + beam particles for elastic scattering or p + residual nucleus for (α, p) reactions). The MUSIC detector is followed by a Si array to provide a trigger for anode events. The anode events are gated by a gating grid so that only (α, p) reactions where the proton reaches the Si detector result in an anode event. The MUSIC detector is a segmented ionization chamber. The active length of the chamber is 11.95 in. and is divided into 16 equal anode segments (3.5 in. x 0.70 in. with 0.3 in. spacing between pads). The dead area of the chamber was reduced by the addition of a Delrin snout that extends 0.875 in. into the chamber from the front face, to which a mylar window is affixed. 0.5 in. above the anode is a Frisch grid that is held at ground potential. 0.5 in. above the Frisch grid is a gating grid. The gating grid functions as a drift electron barrier, effectively halting the gathering of signals. Setting two sets of alternating wires at differing potentials creates a lateral electric field which traps the drift electrons, stopping the collection of anode signals. The chamber also has a reinforced mylar exit window separating the Si array from the target gas. This allows protons from the (α, p) reaction to be detected. The detection of these protons opens the gating grid to allow the drift electrons released from the ionizing gas during the (α, p) reaction to reach the anode segment below the reaction

  1. The Outer Tracker Detector of the HERA-B Experiment Part I: Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Albrecht, H

    2005-01-01

    The HERA-B Outer Tracker is a large system of planar drift chambers with about 113000 read-out channels. Its inner part has been designed to be exposed to a particle flux of up to 2.10^5 cm^-2 s^-1, thus coping with conditions similar to those expected for future hadron collider experiments. 13 superlayers, each consisting of two individual chambers, have been assembled and installed in the experiment. The stereo layers inside each chamber are composed of honeycomb drift tube modules with 5 and 10 mm diameter cells. Chamber aging is prevented by coating the cathode foils with thin layers of copper and gold, together with a proper drift gas choice. Longitudinal wire segmentation is used to limit the occupancy in the most irradiated detector regions to about 20 %. The production of 978 modules was distributed among six different laboratories and took 15 months. For all materials in the fiducial region of the detector good compromises of stability versus thickness were found. A closed-loop gas system supplies th...

  2. ALICE Silicon Strip Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Nooren, G

    2013-01-01

    The Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) constitutes the two outermost layers of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE Experiment. The SSD plays a crucial role in the tracking of the particles produced in the collisions connecting the tracks from the external detectors (Time Projection Chamber) to the ITS. The SSD also contributes to the particle identification through the measurement of their energy loss.

  3. Repatriation of Gamma Chambers Exported by India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT) is engaged in the production and supply of laboratory gamma chambers. The gamma chambers are self-shielded devices in which a number of 60Co source pencils placed in a cylindrical cage. The gamma chambers are type approved as a device and a transportation package separately by the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board. BRIT has exported number of such gamma chambers. For some of the gamma chambers, the type approval validity period is over and can no longer be transported. Hence, the radiation sources need to be transferred to a type approved package before transportation. BRIT has decommissioned five such gamma chambers so far and sources have been repatriated back to India. (author)

  4. Detecting dark matter with scintillating bubble chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianjie; Dahl, C. Eric; Jin, Miaotianzi; Baxter, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Threshold based direct WIMP dark matter detectors such as the superheated bubble chambers developed by the PICO experiment have demonstrated excellent electron-recoil and alpha discrimination, excellent scalability, ease of change of target fluid, and low cost. However, the nuclear-recoil like backgrounds have been a limiting factor in their dark matter sensitivity. We present a new type of detector, the scintillating bubble chamber, which reads out the scintillation pulse of the scattering events as well as the pressure, temperature, acoustic traces, and bubble images as a conventional bubble chamber does. The event energy provides additional handle to discriminate against the nuclear-recoil like backgrounds. Liquid xenon is chosen as the target fluid in our prototyping detector for its high scintillation yield and suitable vapor pressure which simplifies detector complexity. The detector can be used as an R&D tool to study the backgrounds present in the current PICO bubble chambers or as a prototype for standalone dark matter detectors in the future. Supported by DOE Grant DE-SC0012161.

  5. Dosimetry by paired chambers (TEP-TEG and C-CO2 chamber)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paired chambers are defined as the combination of a neutron and γ sensitive detector and a γ sensitive one, such as the combination of a tissue equivalent ionization chamber (TEP-TEG chamber) and a carbon ionization chamber (C-CO2 chamber). The paired chambers have a feature to be capable of measuring the dose in an irradiation field directly by absorbed dose unit. The authors performed dosimetry by using the paired chambers to investigate the possibility of medical and biological researches by means of the fast neutron beam obtained in the reactor ''Yayoi''. First, the specifications for the paired chambers used, and next, the dose evaluation method are described. The result of dose calibration for the paired chambers shows that the carbon chamber has the reproducibility within 3% deviation and the TEP chamber system has that of 2%. As the examples of measurement, the dosimetry for a living body radiation field by fast neutron beam and that for epithermal neutron irradiation system are reported. The comparison of these dosimetrical results with the other paired chambers seems to show that the satisfactory dosimeter has been produced. The parameters employed for dose conversion are considered to be applicable to the measurement of the epithermal neutron irradiation system. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  6. Development of a monitor system for gas based detectors and measurement of electron attachment in the chamber gas; Aufbau eines Monitorsystems fuer gasbasierte Detektoren und Messung der Elektronenanlagerung im Kammergas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linzmaier, Diana

    2009-01-15

    In the framework of an international collaboration a new electron-positron linear accelerator (ILC) with a c. m. energy up to 500 GeV is planned. For the International Large Detector Concept (ILD) a time projection chamber (TPC) shall perform precise measurements of the particle tracks. In order to fulfil the high requirements on the resolution, a microstructure gas-amplification system is used for read-out. For research and development of the detector principle for the application at the ILC at DESY a large TPC prototype is developed. For the operation of the detector it is necessary to monitor its state and especially that of the measurement gas. For this purpose in the framework of this thesis a slow control system is built, which shall make possible for the different collaboration partners to operate the prototype and to integrate the slow control data into their measurement. For this with an object-oriented control system a graphic user interface was created, which makes an overview over the applied measurement devices and a driving allows. Furthermore the influence of impurities of the gas mixture by oxygen was studied. For this with a small TPC prototype measurements of the electron attachment coefficient at different oxygen concentrations were performed with a magnetic flux density of 4 T. From the amplitude of the measurement signal a rate for the electron attachment could be determined. The values obtained for this agree sufficiently in comparison with literature values. [German] Im Rahmen einer internationalen Kollaboration ist ein neuer Elektronen-Positronen-Linearbeschleuniger (ILC) mit einer Schwerpunktsenergie bis zu 500 GeV geplant. Fuer das International Large Detector Concept (ILD) soll eine Zeitprojektionskammer (TPC) praezise Vermessungen der Teilchenspuren durchfuehren. Um die hohen Anforderungen an die Aufloesung zu erfuellen, wird ein Mikrostruktur-Gasverstaerkungssystem zur Auslese verwendet. Zur Erforschung und Entwicklung des

  7. Directed Energy Anechoic Chamber

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Directed Energy Anechoic Chamber comprises a power anechoic chamber and one transverse electromagnetic cell for characterizing radiofrequency (RF) responses of...

  8. Physicist makes muon chamber sing

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    This Monitored Drift Tube detector, consisting of argon-CO2-filled aluminium tubes with a wire down the centre of each, will track muons in ATLAS; Tiecke used a single tube from one of these detectors to create the pipes in his organ. Particle physicists can make good musicians; but did you know particle detectors can make good music? That's what NIKHEF physicist Henk Tiecke learned when he used pipes cut from the ATLAS Monitored Drift Tube detector (MDT) to build his own working Dutch-style barrel organ in the autumn of 2005. 'I like to work with my hands,' said Tiecke, who worked as a senior physicist at NIKHEF, Amsterdam, on ZEUS until his retirement last summer. Tiecke had already constructed his barrel organ when he visited some colleagues in the ATLAS muon chambers production area at Nikhef in 2005. He noticed that the aluminium tubes they were using to build the chambers were about three centimetres in diameter-just the right size for a pipe in a barrel organ. 'The sound is not as nice as from wooden...

  9. Design and Performance of the ATLAS Muon Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Polini, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Muon detection plays a key role at the Large Hadron Collider. The ATLAS Muon Spectrometer includes Monitored Drift Tubes (MDT) and Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) for precision momentum measurement in the toroidal magnetic field. Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) in the barrel region, and Thin Gap Chambers (TGC) in the end-caps, provide the level-1 trigger and a second coordinate used for tracking in conjunction with the MDT. The Detector Control System of each subdetector technology is required to monitor and safely operate tens of thousand of channels, which are distributed on several subsystems, including low and high voltage power supplies, trigger and front-end electronics, currents and thresholds monitoring, alignment and environmental sensors, gas and electronic infrastructure. The system is also required to provide a level of abstraction for ease of operation as well as specific tools allowing expert actions and detailed analysis of archived data. The hardware architecture and the software solutions adopted...

  10. Georges Charpak and his multiwire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    In 1968, Georges Charpak developed the 'multiwire proportional chamber', a gas-filled box with a large number of parallel detector wires, each connected to individual amplifiers. Linked to a computer, it could achieve a counting rate a thousand times better than existing techniques - without a camera in sight. From left to right, Georges Charpak, Fabio Sauli and Jean-Claude Santiard working on a multiwire chamber in 1970.

  11. The OPAL jet chamber full scale prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of a jet chamber for the central detector of OPAL has been tested with a full scale prototype. The design of this prototype, its mechanical and electrical structure and its support system for high voltage, gas, laser calibration and readout are described. Operating experience has been gathered since summer 1984. The chamber performance in terms of spatial resolution and particle identification capability is given. (orig.)

  12. Development and characterization of scintillation based detectors for the use in radiological early warning networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To detect radiological incidents, all members of the European Union have installed nationwide radiological early warning networks. Most of the installed detector systems supply only dosimetric information. Novel spectrometry systems are considered to be good candidates for a new detector generation for environmental radiation monitoring because they will supply both nuclide-specific information and ambient dose equivalent rate values. Four different detector types were chosen and compared with each other (LaBr3, CeBr3, SrI2 scintillation detectors, and CdZnTe, a semiconductor detector). As a first step, the inherent background of these detectors was measured in the low background underground laboratory UDO II of PTB. As a second step, the relative detection sensitivity between the various detectors was determined at different energies. Finally, the detectors were exposed to a 4π-radiation field of radon progeny in PTB's radon chamber. The obtained results show that the investigated detectors are well suited for environmental radiation monitoring

  13. Development and characterization of scintillation based detectors for the use in radiological early warning networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, P.; Dombrowski, H.; Neumaier, S.

    2016-02-01

    To detect radiological incidents, all members of the European Union have installed nationwide radiological early warning networks. Most of the installed detector systems supply only dosimetric information. Novel spectrometry systems are considered to be good candidates for a new detector generation for environmental radiation monitoring because they will supply both nuclide-specific information and ambient dose equivalent rate values. Four different detector types were chosen and compared with each other (LaBr3, CeBr3, SrI2 scintillation detectors, and CdZnTe, a semiconductor detector). As a first step, the inherent background of these detectors was measured in the low background underground laboratory UDO II of PTB. As a second step, the relative detection sensitivity between the various detectors was determined at different energies. Finally, the detectors were exposed to a 4π-radiation field of radon progeny in PTB's radon chamber. The obtained results show that the investigated detectors are well suited for environmental radiation monitoring.

  14. ATLAS detector performance status and operations, improvements during shutdown, and 2011 data taking

    CERN Document Server

    Benekos, Ch N; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    After the successful 2010 LHC run, where the ATLAS detector recorder 45$mathrm{pb^{-1}}$ of proton-proton collision data with 93.6% data taking efficiency and during the recent LHC shutdown period, ATLAS performed vital maintenance and improvements on the various sub-detectors. Maintenance on the Muon Spectrometer included repairs on the readout system as well as updates and leak checks in the gas system. Six TGC chambers have been also replaced. For the Calorimeters, repairs were carried out on the front-end electronics and power supplies to recover detector coverage that have been lost since the last maintenance period. Repairs were also performed on the Inner Detector, but at a smaller scale. Finally the ALFA luminosity detector was installed along the beam line and is being commissioned. This talk summarizes the above repairs and their expected improvement for physics performance and reliability of the ATLAS for the 2011 LHC run.

  15. The DELPHI Detector (DEtector with Lepton Photon and Hadron Identification)

    CERN Multimedia

    Crawley, B; Munich, K; Mckay, R; Matorras, F; Joram, C; Malychev, V; Behrmann, A; Van dam, P; Drees, J K; Stocchi, A; Adam, W; Booth, P; Bilenki, M; Rosenberg, E I; Morton, G; Rames, J; Hahn, S; Cosme, G; Ventura, L; Marco, J; Tortosa martinez, P; Monge silvestri, R; Moreno, S; Phillips, H; Alekseev, G; Boudinov, E; Martinez rivero, C; Gitarskiy, L; Davenport, M; De clercq, C; Firestone, A; Myagkov, A; Belous, K; Haider, S; Hamilton, K M; Lamsa, J; Rahmani, M H; Malek, A; Hughes, G J; Peralta, L; Carroll, L; Fuster verdu, J A; Cossutti, F; Gorn, L; Yi, J I; Bertrand, D; Myatt, G; Richard, F; Shapkin, M; Hahn, F; Ferrer soria, A; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P; Sekulin, R; Timmermans, J; Baillon, P

    2002-01-01

    % DELPHI The DELPHI Detector (Detector with Lepton Photon and Hadron Identification) \\\\ \\\\DELPHI is a general purpose detector for physics at LEP on and above the Z$^0$, offering three-dimensional information on curvature and energy deposition with fine spatial granularity as well as identification of leptons and hadrons over most of the solid angle. A superconducting coil provides a 1.2~T solenoidal field of high uniformity. Tracking relies on the silicon vertex detector, the inner detector, the Time Projection Chamber (TPC), the outer detector and forward drift chambers. Electromagnetic showers are measured in the barrel with high granularity by the High Density Projection Chamber (HPC) and in the endcaps by $ 1 ^0 $~x~$ 1 ^0 $ projective towers composed of lead glass as active material and phototriode read-out. Hadron identification is provided mainly by liquid and gas Ring Imaging Counters (RICH). The instrumented magnet yoke serves for hadron calorimetry and as filter for muons, which are identified in t...

  16. Development and progress in resistive plate chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hong-Fang; WU Jian

    2004-01-01

    Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) is a robust and low cost gas detector, which is extensively used in high-energy physics, cosmic and astroparticle physics experiments. Over the past twenty years, as a particle detector,RPC has made remarkable progress. The main achievements, features and results of experiemantal tests including R&D and production of the RPCs by several Chinese groups in recent years are reported in this article.

  17. Angular resolution of stacked resistive plate chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Samuel, Deepak; Murgod, Lakshmi P

    2016-01-01

    We present here detailed derivations of mathematical expressions for the angular resolution of a set of stacked resistive plate chambers (RPCs). The expressions are validated against experimental results using data collected from the prototype detectors (without magnet) of the upcoming India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). In principle, these expressions can be used for any other detector with an architecture similar to that of RPCs.

  18. Bubble Chambers for Experiments in Nuclear Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    DiGiovine, B.; Henderson, D.; Holt, R. J.; Rehm, K. E.; Raut, R.; Robinson, A.; Sonnenschein, A.; Rusev, G.; A.P. Tonchev; Ugalde, C.

    2015-01-01

    A bubble chamber has been developed to be used as an active target system for low energy nuclear astrophysics experiments. Adopting ideas from dark matter detection with superheated liquids, a detector system compatible with gamma-ray beams has been developed. This detector alleviates some of the limitations encountered in standard measurements of the minute cross sections of interest to stellar environments. While the astrophysically relevant nuclear reaction processes at hydrostatic burning...

  19. 气吹式播种机气室结构对流场性能的影响分析%Flow Field Performance Analysis of Seed-box Gas Chamber Structure in Cylinder Precision Tomato Seeder Based on the Pneumatic Suspension Seed Supply

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊伟; 胡斌; 杨文伟; 罗昕; 李俊虹

    2016-01-01

    Through the study of domestic and foreign seeder for the kind of way , a new method was designed based on the Pneumatic suspension seed supply .And the box chamber was studied theoretically ,including internal flow mathemati-cal model of the seed-box air chamber .Design three kinds of structural shapes of the gas chamber with different height , different width , different inlet velocity .In order to find out the effect of each factor on the export of a box chamber flow field uniformity and the exit velocity ,the orthogonal numerical simulation experiment was carried out by the Fluent soft-ware platform .The results showed that the inlet velocity and chamber width of the species have significant effect on the experimental results ( PA=0 .004<0 .05 , PB=0 .011<0 .05 ) .The structural shape of the seed-box chamber was the main factor affecting the outlet velocity of the gas chamber and the flow field uniformity .The simulation results provide a theoretical basis for the production and testing of the latter prototype .%通过对国内外育苗播种机供种方式的研究,设计了一种基于气吹式供种的新方案,并对种箱气室进行了理论分析研究,包括种箱气室内部流场数学模型研究。同时,设计了3种结构形状的气室,运用Fluent 软件平台,分别在不同高度,不同宽度、不同入口速度情况下进行正交数值模拟实验,找出各因素对种箱气室出口流场均匀性和出口速度的影响规律及结果,显示种箱气室的入口速度和气室宽度对实验结果有显著性影响,种箱气室结构形状是气室出口速度的大小及流场均匀性为主要影响因素。仿真实验结果为后期样机的制作及其试验提供了有效的理论基础。

  20. Replacement of HANARO Neutron Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doo, Seung Gyu; Choe, Yeong San; Lee, Min Woo; Kim, Hyung Kyoo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    In 1994, HANARO(High-flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor) Neutron Detector of Wide-range Fission Chamber type by Gamma-Metrics were installed in HANARO Reactor Protection System(RPS) and Reactor Regulating System(RRS). HANARO selected the wide-range Fission Chamber which is better than Ionization Chamber at mechanical performance. Ionization Chamber is using the guide tube in underwater. Besides Ionization Chamber need the shutter mechanism for correction of detector. But wide-range Fission Chamber is not necessary the guide tube and shutter mechanism. HANARO Neutron Detectors are generating the electrical signal for using to operate the HANARO. We found the abnormal condition of the electrical signal in 2004 and that is considerably affecting the HANARO RPS and RRS. Therefore, we checked electrical signal and electrical insulation resistance in HANARO neutron detectors. Consequently, because the electrical insulation resistance was decreased, HANARO neutron detectors were operating the abnormal condition. So, we changed neutron detector. This paper will describe the procedure and results of changing neutron detectors.

  1. Detector instrumentation for nuclear fission studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akhil Jhingan

    2015-09-01

    The study of heavy-ion-induced fusion–fission reactions require nuclear instrumentation that include particle detectors such as proportional counters, ionization chambers, silicon detectors, scintillation detectors, etc., and the front-end electronics for these detectors. Using the detectors mentioned above, experimental facilities have been developed for carrying out fusion–fission experiments. This paper reviews the development of detector instrumentation at IUAC.

  2. Vacuum chamber for intersection I-4

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    Vacuum chamber for intersection I-4 of the ISR being assembled inside a wooden mock-up of the gap of the split-field magnet. The central round-cylinder section is provisional and is to be replaced by an elliptic-cylinder section to give more space vertically for installation of detectors. Supports for the central section are of carbon fibre composite.

  3. Technical Design Study for the PANDA Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, M; Dørheim, S; Höppner, C; Ketzer, B; Konorov, I; Neubert, S; Paul, S; Rauch, J; Uhl, S; Vandenbroucke, M; Berger, M; Berger-Chen, J -C; Cusanno, F; Fabbietti, L; Münzer, R; Arora, R; Frühauf, J; Kiš, M; Leifels, Y; Kleipa, V; Hehner, J; Kunkel, J; Kurz, N; Peters, K; Risch, H; Schmidt, C J; Schmitt, L; Schwab, S; Soyk, D; Voss, B; Weinert, J; Beck, R; Kaiser, D; Lang, M; Schmitz, R; Walther, D; Bühler, P; Müllner, P; Zmeskal, J; Hermann, N

    2012-01-01

    This document illustrates the technical layout and the expected performance of a Time Projection Chamber as the central tracking system of the PANDA experiment. The detector is based on a continuously operating TPC with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) amplification.

  4. Radiological risk from Am-241 in ionisation smoke chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author discusses the risk to man from the use of ionisation smoke chamber detectors with an Am-241 radiation source. The estimated dose is compared with that due to natural radioactivity. (G.T.H.)

  5. Close cathode chamber: Low material budget MWPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Performance of asymmetric-type MWPC-s are presented. In this structure, referred to as Close Cathode Chamber in an earlier study, the material budget is significantly reduced on one hand by the elimination of external support frame, on the other hand by thin detector walls. In this paper it is demonstrated that the outline is compatible with large size detectors (1 m wire length), maintaining mechanical and operation stability, with total weight of 3 kg (including support structure) for a half square meter surface. The detection efficiency and response time is shown to be sufficient for L0 triggering in the ALICE VHMPID layout. Reduced sensitivity to cathode deformations (due to internal overpressure as mechanical strain) is directly demonstrated. On small sized chambers, improvement of position resolution with analog readout is evaluated, reaching 0.09 mm RMS with 2 mm wide cathode segments. Simulation results on signal time evolutions are presented. With the above studies, comparison of classical MWPC-s and the Close Cathode Chamber design is performed in all major aspects. -- Highlights: ► Asymmetric multi-wire proportional chamber, called the Close Cathode Chamber, is studied. ► Large size construction feasibility up to 1 m wire length is demonstrated in test beam and cosmic rays. ► Reduction of dependence of gas gain on chamber internal pressure is directly demonstrated. ► Position resolution and signal formation is shown to be compatible with classical MWPC.

  6. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the very high event rates projected for experiments at the SSC and LHC, it is important to investigate new approaches to on line pattern recognition. The use of neural networks for pattern recognition. The use of neural networks for pattern recognition in high energy physics detectors has been an area of very active research. The authors discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial analog VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed

  7. Measuring the sensitivity of a boron-lined ion chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron-lined ion chambers are used to monitor external neutron flux from fissionable materials assembled at the Los Alamos Critical Assembly Experiment Facility. The sensitivity of these chambers must be measured periodically in order to detect changes in filling gas and to evaluate other factors that may affect chamber performance. We delineate a procedure to measure ion chamber response using a particular neutron source (239PuBe) in a particular moderating geometry of polyethylene. We also discuss use of the amplifier, high-voltage power supply, recorders, and scram circuits that comprise the complete ion chamber monitoring system

  8. MUON DETECTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    F. Gasparini

    DT As announced in the previous Bulletin MU DT completed the installation of the vertical chambers of barrel wheels 0, +1 and +2. 242 DT and RPC stations are now installed in the negative barrel wheels. The missing 8 (4 in YB-1 and 4 in YB-2) chambers can be installed only after the lowering of the two wheels into the UX cavern, which is planned for the last quarter of the year. Cabling on the surface of the negative wheels was finished in May after some difficulties with RPC cables. The next step was to begin the final commissioning of the wheels with the final trigger and readout electronics. Priority was giv¬en to YB0 in order to check everything before the chambers were covered by cables and services of the inner detectors. Commissioning is not easy since it requires both activity on the central and positive wheels underground, as well as on the negative wheels still on the surface. The DT community is requested to commission the negative wheels on surface to cope with a possible lack of time a...

  9. MUON DETECTORS: CSC

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Hauser

    2011-01-01

    The CSC detector continued to operate well during the March-June 2011 period. As the luminosity has climbed three orders of magnitude, the currents drawn in the CSC high-voltage system have risen correspondingly, and the current trip thresholds have been increased from 1 μA to 5 μA (and 20 in ME1/1 chambers). A possible concern is that a long-lasting and undesirable corona is capable of drawing about 1 μA, and thus may not be detected by causing current trips; on the other hand it is easily dealt with by cycling HV when detected. To better handle coronas, software is being developed to better detect them, although a stumbling block is the instability of current measurements in some of the channels of the CAEN supplies used in ME1/1. A survey of other issues faced by the CSC Operations team was discussed at the 8th June 2011 CSC Operations/DPG meeting (Rakness). The most important issues, i.e. those that have caused a modest amount of downtime, are all being actively addressed. These are:...

  10. Reconstruction of data in low-mass magnetostrictive chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reconstruction of spark positions in a set of low-mass spark chambers with remote magnetostrictive readout, used in a study of the reaction π-p → K0 Λ, is described. The main detectors used were optical spark chambers but in order to provide information close to the vertices low-mass magnetostrictive chambers were fitted inside the cone of the superconducting polarised target magnet. (U.K.)

  11. ALICE Time Projection Chamber (TPC) Readout Sector in Lab

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main particle tracking detector in ALICE. Charged particles crossing the gas of the TPC knock electrons out of their atoms, which drift in the eletric field. By measuring the arrival of electrons at the end of the chamber, at segments such as the one shown here, the TPC will reconstruct the paths of the original charged particles.

  12. Monte Carlo Simulation Optimizing Design of Grid Ionization Chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG; Yu-lai; WANG; Qiang; YANG; Lu

    2013-01-01

    The grid ionization chamber detector is often used for measuring charged particles.Based on Monte Carlo simulation method,the energy loss distribution and electron ion pairs of alpha particle with different energy have been calculated to determine suitable filling gas in the ionization chamber filled with

  13. Construction of a drift chamber prototype for the CMS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General design features of a small size drift chamber prototype are described in this report. Prototype construction has taken place at CIEMAT and we explain in detail the assembly procedure. This activity is part of a long term project to mass produce chambers for the muon barrel detector of the CMS experiment which will be installed at CERN. (Author)

  14. The muon chambers take centre stage at CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The CMS muon chambers are now starting to arrive at CERN in significant numbers. All in all, the muon system of the CMS detector will comprise some 1400 of these chambers. Twenty percent of those for the endcaps have already been installed, while the assembly of those for the barrel will start in December.

  15. Performance test of a triple GEM chamber with Cosmics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the response of the detector to the cosmic muons is reported and the efficiency of charged particle detection of the chamber at different GEM voltages is estimated . This study would help in optimizing the operating conditions of the triple GEM chamber

  16. The electronics readout system for the OPAL Vertex Drift Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Vertex Drift Chamber for the OPAL experiment at LEP provides high quality track co-ordinates using multi-hit sub-nanosecond timing to detect the drifted electrons. This paper explains the electronic techniques that have been devised and implemented for the detector. The overall performance of the system is demonstrated with measurements from the final OPAL chamber. (author)

  17. Radiation detectors laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiation detectors laboratory was established with the assistance of the International Atomic Energy Agency which gave this the responsibility to provide its services at National and regional level for Latin America and it is located at the ININ. The more expensive and delicate radiation detectors are those made of semiconductor, so it has been put emphasis in the use and repairing of these detectors type. The supplied services by this laboratory are: selection consultant, detectors installation and handling and associated systems. Installation training, preventive and corrective maintenance of detectors and detection systems calibration. (Author)

  18. The physics of Resistive Plate Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Riegler, Werner

    2004-01-01

    Over the last 3 years we investigated theoretical aspects of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) in order to clarify some of the outstanding questions on space charge effects, high efficiency of small gap RPCs, charge spectra, signal shape and time resolution. In a series of reports we analyzed RPC performance including all detector aspects covering primary ionization, avalanche multiplication, space charge effects, signal induction in presence of resistive materials, crosstalk along detectors with long strips and front-end electronics. Using detector gas parameters entirely based on theoretical predictions and physical models for avalanche development and space charge effects we are able to reproduce measurements for 2 and 0.3 mm RPCs to very high accuracy without any additional assumptions. This fact gives a profound insight into the workings of RPCs and also underlines the striking difference in operation regime when compared to wire chambers. A summary of this work as well as recent results on three-dimensiona...

  19. Proportional chamber application to ionization measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility is investigated to use a proportional chamber measuring ionization particle losses in developing a detector capable of tracking the simultaneous passage of several particles against the background of a large number of single particles. The chamber used, with a 100x100 mm2 working plane, has three high-voltage electrodes and two signal planes spaced at 6 mm. The operating gas is argon + methylal (C3H8O2) at atmospheric pressure. The calculations made with consideration for the resolution obtained in the chamber, i.e., approximately 20% (5.9 keV) indicate that by using four chamber clearances it is possible to obtain the tracking efficiency of three particles over 99%

  20. The CDF vertex time projection chamber system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vertex time projection chamber (VTPC) system is one of the major components of the charged particle tracking system for the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The chambers cover about seven units of pseudorapidity (η) and must be capable of handling substantially more than the 30-35 charged particle tracks produced by typical anti pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of 1.8 TeV. The chambers are optimized to provide the good pattern recognition in the r-z view required to locate the event vertex, measure the overall event topology, and to complement the r-φ tracking in the large axial wire drift chamber that surrounds them. The chambers provide r-z information using TDC data from sense wire signals. Information on the φ of tracks is obtained from cathode pad signals on a subset of chambers read out by a FADC system. A similar system measures dE/dx of tracks in the forward cones surrounding the exiting beams. Because of the large number of photons that pass through the detector during each collision, novel techniques are required to reduce the amount of material in the chamber. These techniques include a custom surface mount integrated circuit preamplifier, epoxy-graphite and Kapton covered foam structural members, and miniature coaxial signal cables. The mechanical construction of the chamber, radiation length vs angle, and details of the electronics are described. The event reconstruction, corrections, and preliminary performance results for 1.8 TeV anti pp collisions are also discussed. (orig.)

  1. Development of Portable Detector of Locomotive Power Supply Based on LPC2368%基于LPC2368的便携式机车供电检测仪的研制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍凯; 陈志鸿; 赵潭羿

    2011-01-01

    机车向车辆提供DC600V或AC380V电源,对机车纽装完毕后需要检测其电力连接器插座供电是否故障。目前,检测方法大多是采用万用表人工测量,检修员的危险系数高。据此设计了基于LPC2368的便携式机车供电检测仪,能检测并显示机车供电各项电压,并判断出接错或断路故障,提高了故障诊断的准确性和诊断速度,降低检修员的危险性。%The power DC600V or AC380V is supplied to vehicles by Locomotives, and the fault detection of power supply connector socket is a part of the maintenance process, after assembling of Locomotives are completed. Recently, the manual measurement using multimeter is the most widely used, which causes a high risk level for maintenance. In this paper a portable detector of power supply for locomotive based on LPC2368 is designed to measure and display the power supply voltage of locomotive and diagnose the fault wire and open circuit at the same time, which improve the accuracy and speed of diagnosis and reduce the detection risk level.

  2. ATLAS Detector Performance status, improvements during winter 2010 shutdown and results with initial 2011 data taking period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benekos, Nektarios Chr

    2012-02-01

    After the successful 2010 LHC run, where the ATLAS detector recorder 45pb-1 of proton-proton collision data with 93.6% data taking efficiency and during the recent LHC shutdown period, ATLAS performed vital maintenance and improvements on the various sub-detectors. Maintenance on the Muon Spectrometer included repairs on the readout system as well as updates and leak checks in the gas system. Six TGC chambers have been also replaced. For the Calorimeters, repairs were carried out on the front-end electronics and power supplies to recover detector coverage that have been lost since the last maintenance period. Repairs were also performed on the Inner Detector, but at a smaller scale. Finally the ALFA luminosity detector was installed along the beam line and is being commissioned. This talk summarizes the above repairs and their expected improvement for physics performance and reliability of the ATLAS for the 2011 LHC run.

  3. A Preliminary Study on Time Projection Chamber Simulation for Fission Cross Section Measurements with Geant4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the details of the TPC simulation with Geant4 and show the results. TPC can provide more information than a fission chamber in that it is possible to distinguish different particle types. Simulations are conducted for uranium and plutonium targets with 20MeV neutrons. The simulation results are compared with the reference and show reasonable results. This is the first phase of study for realizing a TPC in the NFS at RAON, and we have more work to do, such as applying an electric field, signal processing in the simulation, and manufacturing of a TPC. The standard in fission cross section measurement is a fission chamber. It is basically just two parallel plates separated by a few centimeters of gas. A power supply connected to the plates sets up a moderate electric field. The target is deposited onto one of the plates. When fission occurs, the fragments ionize the gas, and the electric field causes the produced electrons to drift to the opposite plate, which records the total energy deposited in the chamber. A Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is a gas ionization detector similar to a fission chamber. However, it can measure the charged particle trajectories in the active volume in three dimensions by adding several readouts on the pad plane (fission chamber has only one readout one a pad plane). The specific ionization for each particle track enables the TPC to distinguish different particle types. A TPC will be used for fission cross section measurements in the Neutron Science Facility (NSF) at RAON. As a preliminary study, we present details of TPC simulation with Geant4 and discuss the results

  4. Plug Detector Bypass Breaker Guard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, Joel Richard (Maryville, TN); Dearstone, Robert Link (Powell, TN)

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus wherein the apparatus is a container having an inner chamber, an inlet, an outlet, a breaker assembly having at least one blade within the inner chamber of the container and a motor for driving the blade. Material is supplied to the inner chamber of the container through the inlet of the container and the breaker assembly is operated to reduce any clumped material into unclumped material which is then dispensed from the container through the outlet of the container.

  5. MUSIC chamber for investigation of fusion processes with radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved model of a Multiple Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) has been achieved. An outline of the chamber is presented. One can distinguish the 11 pads of the anode, the cage allowing to obtain a uniform electric field inside the chamber, the 5 x 5 cm2 Silicon microstrip detector-target and the Veto silicon detector. The 11 channel preamplifier is coupled directly to the anode pads. Due to this arrangement, an important increase of the signal noise ratio was obtained. The preamplifier scheme is given also. The integrated circuit of the type AMP-3 has a special construction of hybrid type. The circuitry layout is also presented. (authors)

  6. Analysis of RE4 Construction Cosmic Muon Test Data and Comparison with 2015 Collision Calibration Run Data for the Newly Installed RPC Chambers in the 4th Muon Endcap Station of the CMS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Iqbal, Muhammad Ansar

    2015-01-01

    RPC are the heart of the muon system of CMS experiment at LHC, CERN. Recently a new endcap layer, RE4, was added to increase redundancy. These added chambers were tested during the construction period with cosmic muons in the 904 lab at Prevessin, CERN. This study analyzes the HV scan from those tests and compares them with the first 2015 collision data taken at Point-5. The analysis showed that most of the chambers were producing more than 90% efficiency and were in good agreement with the Point-5 results. Those which did not give good results were reported. Other variables like working point and maximum efficiency were also studied.

  7. Radiation detectors laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Institute for Nuclear Research has established a Radiation detector laboratory that has the possibility of providing to the consultants on the handling and applications of the nuclear radiation detectors. It has special equipment to repair the radiation detectors used in spectroscopy as the hyper pure Germanium for gamma radiation and the Lithium-silica for X-rays. There are different facilities in the laboratory that can become useful for other institutions that use radiation detectors. This laboratory was created to satisfy consultant services, training and repairing of the radiation detectors both in national and regional levels for Latin America. The laboratory has the following sections: Nuclear Electronic Instrumentation; where there are all kind of instruments for the measurement and characterization of detectors like multichannel analyzers of pulse height, personal computers, amplifiers and nuclear pulse preamplifiers, nuclear pulses generator, aleatories, computer programs for radiation spectra analysis, etc. High vacuum; there is a vacuum escape measurer, two high vacuum pumps to restore the vacuum of detectors, so the corresponding measurers and the necessary tools. Detectors cleaning; there is an anaerobic chamber for the detectors handling at inert atmosphere, a smoke extraction bell for cleaning with the detector solvents. Cryogenic; there are vessels and tools for handling liquid nitrogen which is used for cooling the detectors when they required it. (Author)

  8. Development of new radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The works on the development of radiation detectors performed at Waseda University are described. As the fundamental studies on radiation detectors, measurement was made for the Z3 dependence of the power of metal targets to stop alpha particles or C-ions, the Fano factor in rare gas, the peak value of the energy given by fast charged particles to materials and its fluctuation, the W-value and the Fano factor of liquid rare gas, and the LET dependence of the luminescence efficiency of liquid rare gas by radiation. The development of liquid rare gas detectors has been made. The considered detector types were a pulse ionization chamber with grid (liquid Xe), a proportional luminescent counter (liquid Xe), an electromagnetic calorimeter (liquid Ar, liquid Xe), and a photo-ionization detector. The development of silicon detectors is also in progress. The silicon detectors under development are a silicon detector telescope for satellite experiment, a silicon shower detector for balloon experiment, and a micron strip silicon detector for synchrotron radiation or elementary particle experiment. The use of plastic track detectors for cosmic ray observation has been examined. The discrimination of isotopes by using a new plastic CR-39 was able to be done. The detectors for low level alpha and gamma spectroscopy have been investigated. For alpha particles, a pulse ionization chamber with a cylindrical grid has been used. For gamma-ray, a Compton-suppressed Ge(Li) detector has been used. (Kato, T.)

  9. Cold fission studies using a double-ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation on spontaneous fission of 252Cf is described. Both fission fragments are detected coincidentally with a double ionization chamber as a 4 π detector. Special techniques are demonstrated which allow the determination of nuclear masses and charges for cold fission fragments. Detector properties such as systematic errors and their correction are studied with the help of α particles. (orig.)

  10. Positron camera with high-density avalanche chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of an extensive investigation of the properties of high-density avalanche chambers (HIDAC) are presented. This study has been performed in order to optimize the layout of HIDAC detectors, since they are intended to be applied as position sensitive detectors for annihilation radiation in a positron emission tomograph being under construction. (author)

  11. KEKB electromagnet power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numbers of electromagnet power supply for KEKB are 2,243 except BT. To satisfy stability, DAC in the current control circuit, current detector, R and D of small thermostatic bath and a calibration method of current using CPU were introduced. They satisfied needs. With producing R and D apparatus of switching source, problems of ripple, stability and noise were solved, so that we began mass production. In this paper, many kinds of R and D and performance and troubles after operation of KEKB power source are described. A plan of design of power supply consisted of seven items such as high accuracy, serial communication of interface, small type, high affectivity, easy maintenance, independence of current setting and current detector for monitor and control of radiation and conduction noise of switching power supply. These items were satisfied by development of interface board of ARCNET communication, introduction of double buffer method for interface through CPU, power supply unit by air-cooled method using a switching method and small thermostatic oven for bending and quadrupole electromagnet. R and D of DCCT, burden and shunt resistance, DAC, thermostatic bath, power supply, offset and gain calibration by double buffer method, specification of power supply, various kinds of measurements of mass production apparatus at rising, after long operation and problems before and after operation are reported. The results of R and D made satisfy the specification of stability and ripple of power supply. Although many switching power supply were operated, there was no noise and troubles at the initial period decreased. However, in order to use many power supply, the performance measurement and maintenance are very important at long shut down. (S.Y.)

  12. The VENUS detector at TRISTAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of the VENUS detector is described. In this paper, emphasis is placed on the central tracking chamber and the electromagnetic shower calorimeters. Referring to computer simulations and test measurements with prototypes, the expected performance of our detector system is discussed. The contents are, for the most part, taken from the VENUS proposal /2/. (author)

  13. Streamer chamber: pion decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1992-01-01

    The real particles produced in the decay of a positive pion can be seen in this image from a streamer chamber. Streamer chambers consist of a gas chamber through which a strong pulsed electric field is passed, creating sparks as a charged particle passes through it. A magnetic field is added to cause the decay products to follow curved paths so that their charge and momentum can be measured.

  14. Electromagnetic reverberation chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Besnier, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Dedicated to a complete presentation on all aspects of reverberation chambers, this book provides the physical principles behind these test systems in a very progressive manner. The detailed panorama of parameters governing the operation of electromagnetic reverberation chambers details various applications such as radiated immunity, emissivity, and shielding efficiency experiments.In addition, the reader is provided with the elements of electromagnetic theory and statistics required to take full advantage of the basic operational rules of reverberation chambers, including calibration proc

  15. Development of fission chamber for nuclear reactors controlling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fission Chambers are gas-filled type detectors that operate in the ionization chamber regime, which is without electron multiplication. As the fill-gas is not directly ionized by neutrons, fission chambers are lined with fissile material that through interaction with neutrons fission products are produced, are highly ionizing particles. Pulse type operation of these detectors are used for neutron flux measurements during start up and shut-down reactor conditions in which pulses of high amplitude produced by fission products can be easily discriminated from those produced by alpha radiation from uranium and also from the external gamma field. With current or current fluctuation mode operation (Campbell) the use of these detectors can be extended for the whole range of reactor operation. In this work, it is presented the development and construction of a fission chamber at IPEN-CNEN/SP. Furthermore, the material and techniques used and also the operational characteristics obtained with the first prototype are given. (author)

  16. A study of an optimal technological solution for the electronics of particle position sensitive gas detectors (multiwire proportional chambers); Etude d`une solution technologique optimale pour l`electronique de localisation des particules avec des detecteurs a gaz (chambre proportionelle multifils)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zojceski, Z. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS - IN2P3 Universite Paris Sud, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France)

    1997-12-31

    This work aims at optimizing the electronics for position sensitive gas detectors. The first part is a review of proportional chamber operation principles and presents the different possibilities for the architecture of the electronics. The second part involves electronic signal processing for best signal-to-noise ratio. We present a time-variant filter based on a second order base line restorer.It allows a simple pole-zero and tail cancellation at high counting rates. Also, various interpolating algorithms for cathode strip chambers have been studied. The last part reports the development of a complete electronic system, from the preamplifiers up to the readout and control interface, for the cathode strip chambers in the focal plane of the BBS Spectrometer at KVI, Holland. The system is based on application specific D-size VXI modules. In all modules, the 16-bit ADCs and FIFO memory are followed by a Digital Signal Processor, which performs data filtering and cathode induced charge interpolation. Very good analog noise performance is obtained in a multi-processor environment. (author). 127 refs.

  17. UA1 central detector

    CERN Multimedia

    The UA1 central detector was crucial to understanding the complex topology of proton-antiproton events. It played a most important role in identifying a handful of Ws and Zs among billions of collisions. The detector was a 6-chamber cylindrical assembly 5.8 m long and 2.3 m in diameter, the largest imaging drift chamber of its day. It recorded the tracks of charged particles curving in a 0.7 Tesla magnetic field, measuring their momentum, the sign of their electric charge and their rate of energy loss (dE/dx). Atoms in the argon-ethane gas mixture filling the chambers were ionised by the passage of charged particles. The electrons which were released drifted along an electric field shaped by field wires and were collected on sense wires. The geometrical arrangement of the 17000 field wires and 6125 sense wires allowed a spectacular 3-D interactive display of reconstructed physics events to be produced.

  18. Innovations in gas filled ionisation chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gas filled parallel plate ion chamber and coaxial cylindrical ion chambers are widely used for detection of nuclear radiations for more than hundred years. Thin Metal electrodes or metal coated planes are used as cathode and anodes in both parallel plate and cylindrical ionization chambers since its invention. For neutral particle detection, either the ionising medium or a coated electrode surface is used as a converter material for producing secondary charged particles which are detected in these ionisation chambers. Boron, and 235U are coated as thin layer on the cathode surface with optimum thickness to give maximum neutron detection sensitivity. The neutron sensitivity mostly depends upon the coated surface area and to enhance the neutron sensitivity diameter and the length/ diameter of the coated electrodes have to be increased which also results in an increase in the volume of the counter. For many applications, it is necessary to reduce the size of the counter by a factor of 2 to 5 but having the same efficiency. Recently this has been achieved by designing a non planar electrode surface/ s which has surface area larger by a factor or up to five keeping the external dimensions the same. By using this new technique, it is possible to increase the coated area up to 5 times, without changing the overall dimensions of the counter both for proportional counters and ion chambers. The three methods have been developed to enhance the neutron sensitivity the use of: additional coated wires, coated baffles, coated fins: in sensitive volume of gas detectors. The introduction of these three-dimensional boron coated structures into the sensitive volume without enlarging the outer detector dimensions increases the Boron/Uranium content in the sensitive region without any significant change in the nature of the pulses from these counters. In the newly developed Wire Plane Chambers both in the DC mode and pulse mode, wire planes have been used as anode and cathodes with

  19. Design and Performance of the Detector Control System of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Polini, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    Muon detection plays a key role at the Large Hadron Collider. The ATLAS Muon Spectrometer includes Monitored Drift Tubes (MDT) and Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) for precision momentum measurement in the toroidal magnetic field. Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) in the barrel region, and Thin Gap Chambers (TGC) in the end-caps, provide the level-1 trigger and a second coordinate used for tracking in conjunction with the MDT. The Detector Control System of each subdetector technology is required to monitor and safely operate tens of thousand of channels, which are distributed on several subsystems, including low and high voltage power supplies, trigger and front-end electronics, currents and thresholds monitoring, alignment and environmental sensors, gas and electronic infrastructure. The system is also required to provide a level of abstraction for ease of operation as well as specific tools allowing expert actions and detailed analysis of archived data. The hardware architecture and the software solutions adopted...

  20. The 3He Supply Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouzes, Richard T.

    2009-05-01

    One of the main uses for 3He is in gas proportional counters for neutron detection. Radiation portal monitors deployed for homeland security and non-proliferation use such detectors. Other uses of 3He are for research detectors, commercial instruments, well logging detectors, dilution refrigerators, for targets or cooling in nuclear research, and for basic research in condensed matter physics. The US supply of 3He comes almost entirely from the decay of tritium used in nuclear weapons by the US and Russia. A few other countries contribute a small amount to the world’s 3He supply. Due to the large increase in use of 3He for homeland security, the supply has dwindled, and can no longer meet the demand. This white paper reviews the problems of supply, utilization, and alternatives.

  1. The CMS detector before closure

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2006-01-01

    The CMS detector before testing using muon cosmic rays that are produced as high-energy particles from space crash into the Earth's atmosphere generating a cascade of energetic particles. After closing CMS, the magnets, calorimeters, trackers and muon chambers were tested on a small section of the detector as part of the magnet test and cosmic challenge. This test checked the alignment and functionality of the detector systems, as well as the magnets.

  2. Quality control of ATLAS muon chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Fabich, Adrian

    ATLAS is a general-purpose experiment for the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Its Muon Spectrometer will require ∼ 5500m2 of precision tracking chambers to measure the muon tracks along a spectrometer arm of 5m to 15m length, embedded in a magnetic field of ∼ 0.5T. The precision tracking devices in the Muon System will be high pressure drift tubes (MDTs). Approximately 370,000 MDTs will be assembled into ∼ 1200 drift chambers. The performance of the MDT chambers is very much dependent on the mechanical quality of the chambers. The uniformity and stability of the performance can only be assured providing very high quality control during production. Gas tightness, high-voltage behaviour and dark currents are global parameters which are common to gas detectors. For all chambers, they will be tested immediately after the chamber assembly at every production site. Functional tests, for example radioactive source scans and cosmic-ray runs, will be performed in order to establish detailed performan...

  3. Study on the effect factor of the absolute fission rates measured by depleted uranium fission chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absolute fission rates was measured by the depleted uranium fission chamber. The efficiency of the fission fragments recorded in the fission chamber was analyzed. The factor influencing absolute fission rates was studied in the experiment, including the disturbing effect between detectors and the effect of the structural material of the fission chamber, etc

  4. Results obtained with position sensitive multiwire proportional chambers with helium, carbon, and oxygen nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emming, J. G.; Gilland, J. R.; Godden, G. D.; Smith, L. H.; Zardiackas, F.

    1974-01-01

    Spatial resolution performance results obtained at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory Bevatron with prototype multiwire proportional chamber spatial detectors with integral delay line readout are presented. The effects due to incident nuclei charge, chamber operating parameters, chamber design, electronics, gas mixtures, and magnetic field presence have been investigated and are discussed.

  5. BEBC bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    Looking up into the interior of BEBC bubble chamber from the expansion cylinder. At the top of the chamber two fish-eye lenses are installed and three other fish-eye ports are blanked off. In the centre is a heat exchanger.

  6. High resolution drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High precision drift chambers capable of achieving less than or equal to 50 μm resolutions are discussed. In particular, we compare so called cool and hot gases, various charge collection geometries, several timing techniques and we also discuss some systematic problems. We also present what we would consider an ''ultimate'' design of the vertex chamber. 50 refs., 36 figs., 6 tabs

  7. Introduction to detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Walenta, Albert H

    1995-01-01

    Concepts for momentum measurements,particle identification and energy measurements (calorimeters) as well for imaging applications in medecine, biology and industry (non destructive testing) will be put into relation to the specific detection princip In particular the resolution for position, time, energy and intensity measurement and the efficiency will be discussed. Signal extraction,electronic signal processing and principles of information capture will close the logic circle to the input : the radiation properties.The lecture will provide some sources for data tables and small demonstration computer programs f The basic detector physics as interaction of radiation with matter, information transport via free charges,photons and phonons and the signal formation will be presented in some depth with emphasis on the influence on specific parameters for detector The lecture will cover the most popular detector principles, gas detectors (ion chambers,MPWC's and MSGC's), semiconductor detectors scintillators and ...

  8. Ion feedback suppression in Time Projection Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Sauli, Fabio; Everaerts, P

    2006-01-01

    A controlled-voltage Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) can be used to block the re-injection of positive ions in large volume Time Projection Chambers. With proper choice of geometry, gas filling and external fields, good electron transmission can be obtained at very low GEM voltages; pulsed ion gating is then much easier than with conventional wire grids, requiring hundreds of volts. Gating schemes suited for the TPC detector planned for the International Linear Collider detector are described. The possibility of GEM-based DC-operated ion filters, exploiting the difference in diffusion properties of ions and electrons, is also discussed.

  9. Performance of large area Micro Pixel Chamber

    OpenAIRE

    Nagayoshi, T.; Kubo, H.; Miuchi, K; Ochi, A.; Orito, R.; Takada, A; Tanimori, T.; Ueno, M

    2003-01-01

    A novel gaseous two-dimensional imaging detector "Micro Pixel Chamber (micro-PIC)" has been developed. This detector is based on double sided printed circuit board (PCB). We have developed large area (10cm x 10cm) micro-PICs with 65536 pixel anodes of 400um pitch on a 100um thick insulating substrate. Achieved energy resolution was 30% (FWHM) at 5.9keV, and a gas gain of 7000 was obtained with argon ethane (8:2) gas mixture. This gain is high enough to detect minimum ionizing particles with s...

  10. The BaBar LST Detector High Voltage System: Design And Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benelli, G.; Honscheid, K.; Lewis, E.A.; Regensburger, J.J.; Smith, D.S.; /Ohio State U.

    2006-08-18

    In 2004, the first two sextants of the new Limited Streamer Tube (LST) detector were installed in the BABAR experiment to replace the ageing Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) as active detectors for the BABAR Instrumented Flux Return (IFR) muon system. Each streamer tube of the new detector consists of 8 cells. The cell walls are coated with graphite paint and a 100 {micro}m wire forms the anode. These wires are coupled in pairs inside the tubes resulting in 4 independent two-cell segments per LST. High voltage (HV) is applied to the 4 segments through a custom connector that also provides the decoupling capacitor to pick up the detector signals from the anode wires. The BABAR LST detector is operated at 5.5 kV. The high voltage system for the LST detector was designed and built at The Ohio State University (OSU HVPS). Each of the 25 supplies built for BaBar provides 80 output channels with individual current monitoring and overcurrent protection. For each group of 20 channels the HV can be adjusted between 0 and 6 kV. A 4-fold fan-out is integrated in the power supplies to provide a total of 320 outputs. The power supplies are controlled through built-in CANbus and Ethernet (TCP/IP) interfaces. In this presentation we will discuss the design and novel features of the OSU HVPS system and its integration into the BABAR EPICS detector control framework. Experience with the supplies operation during the LST extensive quality control program and their performance during the initial data taking period will be discussed.

  11. The BaBar LST Detector High Voltage System: Design And Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2004, the first two sextants of the new Limited Streamer Tube (LST) detector were installed in the BABAR experiment to replace the ageing Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) as active detectors for the BABAR Instrumented Flux Return (IFR) muon system. Each streamer tube of the new detector consists of 8 cells. The cell walls are coated with graphite paint and a 100 (micro)m wire forms the anode. These wires are coupled in pairs inside the tubes resulting in 4 independent two-cell segments per LST. High voltage (HV) is applied to the 4 segments through a custom connector that also provides the decoupling capacitor to pick up the detector signals from the anode wires. The BABAR LST detector is operated at 5.5 kV. The high voltage system for the LST detector was designed and built at The Ohio State University (OSU HVPS). Each of the 25 supplies built for BaBar provides 80 output channels with individual current monitoring and overcurrent protection. For each group of 20 channels the HV can be adjusted between 0 and 6 kV. A 4-fold fan-out is integrated in the power supplies to provide a total of 320 outputs. The power supplies are controlled through built-in CANbus and Ethernet (TCP/IP) interfaces. In this presentation we will discuss the design and novel features of the OSU HVPS system and its integration into the BABAR EPICS detector control framework. Experience with the supplies operation during the LST extensive quality control program and their performance during the initial data taking period will be discussed

  12. Rapid-Cycling Bubble-Chamber, details

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Parts of the hydraulic expansion system of the Rapid-Cycling Bubble-Chamber (RCBC). RCBC was the largest of 3 rapid-cycling bubble-chambers (the others were LEBC and HOLEBC), used as target- and vertex-detectors within the European Hybrid Spectrometer (EHS) in the SPS North Area (EHN1). RCBC contained 250 l of liquid hydrogen and was located inside a 3 T superconducting magnet. It was designed for 30 expansions/s (100 times faster than BEBC), the system shown here allowed 50 expansions/s. RCBC operated from 1981 to 1983 for experiments NA21, NA22 and NA23 at a rate of 15 expansions/s, clocking up a total of over 4 million. In the rear, at left, is bearded Lucien Veillet; Augustin Didona is at the right. See also 8001009. The installation of the piston assembly in the RCBC chamber body is shown in the Annual Report 1980, p.65.

  13. Construction and performance of the PHENIX pad chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the Pad Chamber detector system in the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The three station system provides space points along each track in the spectrometer arms at mid-rapidity and covers a total area of 88 m2. Its main functions are to provide the track coordinate along the beam and to ensure reliable pattern recognition at very high particle multiplicity. A new concept for two dimensional wire chamber readout via its finely segmented cathode was developed. The full readout system, comprising 172 800 electronic channels, is described together with the challenging design of the chambers. The electronics, mounted on the outer chamber face, together with the chamber itself amounts to 1.2% of a radiation length. Results from cosmic ray tests, showing an average efficiency better than 99.5% for all chambers are presented. The experiences from the full scale operation in the first run are reported

  14. Construction and performance of the PHENIX pad chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adcox, K.; Ajitanand, J.; Alexander, J.; Barrette, J.; Belkin, R.; Borland, D.; Bryan, W.L.; Rietz, R. du; El Chenawi, K.; Cherlin, A.; Fellenstein, J.; Filimonov, K.; Fraenkel, Z.; Gan, D.; Garpman, S.; Gil, Y.; Greene, S.V.; Gustafsson, H.-A.; Holzmann, W.; Issah, M.; Jagadish, U.; Lacey, R.; Lauret, J.; Liccardi, W.; Mark, S.K.; Milan, J.; Miller, T.E.; Milov, A.; Mitchell, J.T.; Nilsson, P.; Nikkinen, L.; Nystrand, J.; O' Brien, E.; Oskarsson, A. E-mail: anders.oskarsson@kosufy.lu.se; Oesterman, L.; Otterlund, I.; Qi, Y.; Pasmantirer, B.; Pinkenburg, C.; Ravinovich, I.; Rosati, M.; Rose, A.; Silvermyr, D.; Sivertz, M.; Smith, M.C.; Starinsky, N.; Stenlund, E.; Teodorescu, O.; Tserruya, I.; Tydesjoe, H.; Xie, W.; Young, G.R.; Yurevich, V

    2003-02-01

    We present the Pad Chamber detector system in the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The three station system provides space points along each track in the spectrometer arms at mid-rapidity and covers a total area of 88 m{sup 2}. Its main functions are to provide the track coordinate along the beam and to ensure reliable pattern recognition at very high particle multiplicity. A new concept for two dimensional wire chamber readout via its finely segmented cathode was developed. The full readout system, comprising 172 800 electronic channels, is described together with the challenging design of the chambers. The electronics, mounted on the outer chamber face, together with the chamber itself amounts to 1.2% of a radiation length. Results from cosmic ray tests, showing an average efficiency better than 99.5% for all chambers are presented. The experiences from the full scale operation in the first run are reported.

  15. Alpha particle spectroscopy by gridded ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gridded ionization chamber has been constructed with the aim of determining its ultimate energy resolution in alpha spectroscopy, utilizing a cooled FET pre-amplifier of the type normally employed with semiconductor detectors. With suitable mechanical collimation of the alpha particles, their fine structure has been measured with an energy resolution of -11.5 keV (fwhm), achieved using an Ar + 0.75% C2H2 mixture as the filling gas. (orig.)

  16. The Bern Infinitesimal Bubble Chamber (BIBC)

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The chamber body was machined from a block of aluminium. The visible volume was cylindrical with 65 mm diameter and 35 mm depth. It was filled with propane or freon. It was meant as vertex detector in the search of short-lived particles. It was also used with in-line holography resulting in 8 µm bubble size and 9 cm depth of the field. See E. Ramseyer, B. Hahn and E. Hugentobler, Nucl. Instrum. Methods 201 (1982) 335.

  17. Bubble chamber: D meson production and decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    This event shows real particle tracks from the Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC), which was used to observe neutrino and hadron beams between 1973 and 1984 from the PS and SPS accelerators. In this event a neutrino interacts with a proton producing an excited D meson. A labeled diagram is seen on the right as the particles spiral in the magnetic field of the detector.

  18. Characterization and application of two extrapolation chambers in standard X radiation beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extrapolation chambers are ionization chambers with variable volume, and they are mainly utilized as beta radiation detectors. In this work two extrapolation chambers were characterized, a commercial PTW extrapolation chamber and another extrapolation chamber developed at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN, for application as reference systems in mammography, conventional diagnostic radiology and radiotherapy beams. The results obtained from the characterization tests of the chamber response: leakage current, short- and medium terms stability, determination of the saturation currents and the ion collection efficiencies, angular and energy dependence, show that these extrapolation chambers may be utilized for low-energy X radiation beam dosimetry. The transmission factors in tissue and the calibration factors were also determined for all cited radiation qualities. Finally, a procedure was established for calibration of radiation detectors in standard X radiation beams, using the extrapolation chambers. (author)

  19. Suppressing drift chamber diffusion without magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martoff, C.J. E-mail: cmartoff@nimbus.temple.edu; Snowden-Ifft, D.P.; Ohnuki, T.; Spooner, N.; Lehner, M

    2000-02-01

    The spatial resolution in drift chamber detectors for ionizing radiation is limited by diffusion of the primary electrons. A strong magnetic field along the drift direction is often applied (Fancher et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 161 (1979) 383) because it suppresses the transverse diffusion, improving the resolution but at considerable increase in cost and complexity. Here we show that transverse track diffusion can be strongly suppressed without any magnetic field. This is achieved by using a gas additive which reversibly captures primary ionization electrons, forming negative ions. The ions drift with thermal energies even at very high drift fields and low pressures (E/P=28.5 V/cm torr), and the diffusion decreases with increasing drift field. Upon arrival at the avalanche region of the chamber the negative ions are efficiently stripped and ordinary avalanche gain is obtained. Using this technique, r.m.s. transverse diffusion less than 200 {mu}m has been achieved over a 15 cm drift path at 40 torr with zero magnetic field. The method can provide high spatial resolution in detectors with long drift distances and zero magnetic field. Negative ion drift chambers would be particularly useful at low pressures and in situations such as space-based or underground experiments where detector size scaleability is important and cost, space, or power constraints preclude the use of a magnetic field.

  20. Measuring chamber of the device for determination of the wear particle radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proposed is a measuring chamber for a device designed for determining radioactivity of wear particles in the system of lubrication of an internal-combustion engine. The chamber consists of of a case with two chambers for supplying oil to a cylindrical cavity of the chamber and of one channel for offtake from the cavity. A characteristic feature of the invention is that for increasing the accuracy of measurements the supplying channels are tangetial relative to the internal surface of the cavity, and the offtake channel is radial and located between them. The application of the chamber decrease measurement errors from 20-30% to 5-6%

  1. High temperature fission chambers. State-of-the-art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the control and the surveillance of fast breeder reactors, high temperature fission chambers able to operate in extremes of temperature and gamma dose perform two essential functions: in-vessel integrated neutronic control; clad failure detection by integrated detectors. In addition, they can be used for example to: measure the weight of the control rods; monitor the insertion of new sub assemblies (SAs) and withdrawal of irradiated SAs; eventually monitor the neutron flux in Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). Since 1970, a major research development and qualification programme has been undertaken in France. This programme has resulted in the development of: dedicated manufacturing processes for fission chambers to cope with the specific conditions in fast breeder reactors; a complete range of detectors to cover all other possible applications. This paper reviews: the detectors in their dedicated applications; the main problems encountered, studies made and solutions found; the detector qualification status; the performance of the detectors in the French fast breeder reactors. (authors)

  2. MUON DETECTORS: DT

    CERN Multimedia

    Marco Dallavalle

    2013-01-01

    The DT group is undertaking substantial work both for detector maintenance and for detec-tor upgrade. Maintenance interventions on chambers and minicrates require close collaboration between DT, RPC and HO, and are difficult because they depend on the removal of thermal shields and cables on the front and rear of the chambers in order to gain access. The tasks are particularly critical on the central wheel due to the presence of fixed services. Several interventions on the chambers require extraction of the DT+RPC package: a delicate operation due to the very limited space for handling the big chambers, and the most dangerous part of the DT maintenance campaign. The interventions started in July 2013 and will go on until spring 2014. So far out of the 16 chambers with HV problems, 13 have been already repaired, with a global yield of 217 recovered channels. Most of the observed problems were due to displacement of impurities inside the gaseous volume. For the minicrates and FE, repairs occurred on 22 chambe...

  3. Multi axis motor control system for BARC-TIFR LINAC scattering chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general purpose scattering chamber of 150 cm diameter and 50 cm height is recently installed at BARC-TIFR LINAC facility. Scattering chamber is used in several experiments using particle accelerators. A remote controlled system is developed to perform various operation in scattering chamber. Four servo motors with PLC interface have been used to meet the precise positioning of target and detectors in scattering chamber. User interface software has been developed in Java which interacts with the system over Ethernet

  4. ALICE Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Lippmann, C

    2013-01-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main device in the ALICE 'central barrel' for the tracking and identification (PID) of charged particles. It has to cope with unprecedented densities of charges particles.

  5. Toxic Test Chambers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Hazardous material test facility Both facilities have 16,000 cubic foot chambers, equipped with 5000 CFM CBR filter systems with an air change...

  6. Calorimetry with flash chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The flash chambers used in the Fermilab E594 neutrino experiment are described, and their use in a calorimeter discussed. Resolutions obtained with a calibration beam are presented, and comments made about the pattern recognition capabilities of the calorimeter

  7. Bubble chamber: antiproton annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    These images show real particle tracks from the annihilation of an antiproton in the 80 cm Saclay liquid hydrogen bubble chamber. A negative kaon and a neutral kaon are produced in this process, as well as a positive pion. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that had been heated to boiling point.

  8. Gridded Ionization Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present paper the working principles of a gridded ionization chamber are given, and all the different factors that determine its resolution power are analyzed in detail. One of these devices, built in the Physics Division of the JEN and designed specially for use in measurements of alpha spectroscopy, is described. finally the main applications, in which the chamber can be used, are shown. (Author) 17 refs

  9. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Paolucci

    2012-01-01

    The RPC system is operating with a very high uptime, an average chamber efficiency of about 95% and an average cluster size around 1.8. The average number of active channels is 97.7%. Eight chambers are disconnected and forty are working in single-gap mode due to high-voltage problems. The total luminosity lost due to RPCs in 2012 is 88.46 pb–1. One of the main goals of 2012 was to improve the stability of the endcap trigger that is strongly correlated to the performances of the detector, due to the 3-out-3 trigger logic. At beginning of 2011 the instability of the detector efficiency was about 10%. Detailed studies found that this was mainly due to the strong correlation between the performance of the detector and the atmospheric pressure (P). Figure XXY shows the linear correlation between the average cluster size of the endcap chamber versus P. This effect is expected for gaseous detectors and can be reduced by correcting the applied high-voltage working point (HVapp) according to the followi...

  10. First ALICE detectors installed!

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Detectors to track down penetrating muon particles are the first to be placed in their final position in the ALICE cavern. The Alice muon spectrometer: in the foreground the trigger chamber is positioned in front of the muon wall, with the dipole magnet in the background. After the impressive transport of its dipole magnet, ALICE has begun to fill the spectrometer with detectors. In mid-July, the ALICE muon spectrometer team achieved important milestones with the installation of the trigger and the tracking chambers of the muon spectrometer. They are the first detectors to be installed in their final position in the cavern. All of the eight half planes of the RPCs (resistive plate chambers) have been installed in their final position behind the muon filter. The role of the trigger detector is to select events containing a muon pair coming, for instance, from the decay of J/ or Y resonances. The selection is made on the transverse momentum of the two individual muons. The internal parts of the RPCs, made o...

  11. Scintillating fiber detector

    CERN Document Server

    Vozak, Matous

    2016-01-01

    NA61 is one of the physics experiments at CERN dedicated to study hadron states coming from interactions of SPS beams with various targets. To determine the position of a secondary beam, three proportional chambers are placed along the beamline. However, these chambers tend to have slow response. In order to obtain more precise time information, use of another detector is being considered. Fast response and compact size is making scintillation fiber (SciFi) with silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) read out a good candidate. This report is focused on analysing data from SciFi collected in a test beam at the beginning of July 2016.

  12. Bubble chambers for experiments in nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiovine, B.; Henderson, D.; Holt, R. J.; Raut, R.; Rehm, K. E.; Robinson, A.; Sonnenschein, A.; Rusev, G.; Tonchev, A. P.; Ugalde, C.

    2015-05-01

    A bubble chamber has been developed to be used as an active target system for low energy nuclear astrophysics experiments. Adopting ideas from dark matter detection with superheated liquids, a detector system compatible with γ-ray beams has been developed. This detector alleviates some of the limitations encountered in standard measurements of the minute cross-sections of interest to stellar environments. While the astrophysically relevant nuclear reaction processes at hydrostatic burning temperatures are dominated by radiative captures, in this experimental scheme we measure the time-reversed processes. Such photodisintegrations allow us to compute the radiative capture cross-sections when transitions to excited states of the reaction products are negligible. Due to the transformation of phase space, the photodisintegration cross-sections are up to two orders of magnitude higher. The main advantage of the new target-detector system is a density several orders of magnitude higher than conventional gas targets. Also, the detector is virtually insensitive to the γ-ray beam itself, thus allowing us to detect only the products of the nuclear reaction of interest. The development and the operation as well as the advantages and disadvantages of the bubble chamber are discussed.

  13. Bubble chambers for experiments in nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bubble chamber has been developed to be used as an active target system for low energy nuclear astrophysics experiments. Adopting ideas from dark matter detection with superheated liquids, a detector system compatible with γ-ray beams has been developed. This detector alleviates some of the limitations encountered in standard measurements of the minute cross-sections of interest to stellar environments. While the astrophysically relevant nuclear reaction processes at hydrostatic burning temperatures are dominated by radiative captures, in this experimental scheme we measure the time-reversed processes. Such photodisintegrations allow us to compute the radiative capture cross-sections when transitions to excited states of the reaction products are negligible. Due to the transformation of phase space, the photodisintegration cross-sections are up to two orders of magnitude higher. The main advantage of the new target-detector system is a density several orders of magnitude higher than conventional gas targets. Also, the detector is virtually insensitive to the γ-ray beam itself, thus allowing us to detect only the products of the nuclear reaction of interest. The development and the operation as well as the advantages and disadvantages of the bubble chamber are discussed

  14. Neutron measurements with miniature fission chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report analyses the use and qualification of miniature fission chambers for two types of neutron measurements: 1) relative measurements in nuclear power reactors, or nuclear irradiation reactors. We consider the problem of burnable fissile material in detectors, under important neutron exposures and conclude on recommending the use of regenerating neutron detectors. 2) Measurements of integral physical parameters in experimental reactors. This method has been applied to measurements of fission rates in detectors with strong alpha-rays emitter deposits in order to establish standard tables of physical parameters. It has been used in particular for detectors including very radioactive actinium series. After a discussion of the instrumentation choice and data processing, specific to each measurements, we provide results on: 1) the technological and neutron behaviour of regenerating miniature fission chambers, in the swimming pool reactor 'TRITON', under a neutron exposure of 7.1020 n cm-2 and a gamma-rays exposure of 1,5.1011 rads about. The fissile material is 235U and the fertile material 234U. 2) The integral measurements of effective cross sections for 241Am and 238Pu in the experimental reactor 'MINERVE' use for study of problems of fast neutron reactors

  15. Development of a sample chamber for micro-PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new sample chamber for micro-PIXE analysis of geological thick samples has been successfully developed. A target in the sample chamber is normal to the beam and Si(Li) detectors are located at 135deg to the beam direction. For the sample observation, a normal viewing optics with the optical axis collinear with the beam is achieved by a combination of long working distance microscope and mirror with a central hole for the beam transmission. The normal incidence beam and normal viewing are essential to raise a spatial resolution of the thick target analysis. In addition, the sample chamber has fulfilled ten requirements as for material, driving stage, X-ray absorbers, space for another detector, etc. The information obtained by the development can give a new guide to manufacture the sample chamber for the micro-PIXE. (author)

  16. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, H.B.

    1985-10-01

    A description of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is given. It is a calorimetric detector, which covers almost the complete solid angle around the interaction region with segmented calorimeter ''towers''. A 1.5 Tesla superconducting solenoid, 3m in diameter and 5m long, provides a uniform magnetic field in the central region for magnetic analysis of charged particles. The magnetic field volume is filled with a large cylindrical drift chamber and a set of Time Projection Chambers. Muon detection is accomplished with drift chambers outside the calorimeters in the central region and with large magnetized steel toroids and associated drift chambers in the forward-backward regions. The electronics has a large dynamic range to allow measurement of both high energy clusters and small energy depositions made by penetrating muons. Interesting events are identified by a trigger system which, together with the rest of the data acquisition system, is FASTBUS based.

  17. The coated cathode conductive layer chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a gaseous detector consisting of thin anode strips vacuum-evaporated on one side of a 100 μ thick plastic layer, alternating on the back side of the same foil with wider parallel cathode strips. Ionizatin released in a drift space on the anode side is amplified and detected much in the same way as in the microstrip gas chamber; in our detector however spontaenous breakdown due to surface currents is completely avoided by the presence of the insulating layer between anodes and cathodes. To reduce surface and volume charging up, we have used polymer foils with a moderate volume resistivity. The first results show good efficiency, good plateaux and time resolution in detecting low-rate minimum ionizing electrons. Although not suited for high rate or good energy resolution applications, this kind of detector seems rather promising for realizing cheaply large active surfaces. (orig.)

  18. Bubble Chambers for Experiments in Nuclear Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    DiGiovine, B; Holt, R J; Rehm, K E; Raut, R; Robinson, A; Sonnenschein, A; Rusev, G; Tonchev, A P; Ugalde, C

    2015-01-01

    A bubble chamber has been developed to be used as an active target system for low energy nuclear astrophysics experiments. Adopting ideas from dark matter detection with superheated liquids, a detector system compatible with gamma-ray beams has been developed. This detector alleviates some of the limitations encountered in standard measurements of the minute cross sections of interest to stellar environments. While the astrophysically relevant nuclear reaction processes at hydrostatic burning temperatures are dominated by radiative captures, in this experimental scheme we measure the time-reversed processes. Such photodisintegrations allow us to compute the radiative capture cross sections when transitions to excited states of the reaction products are negligible. Due to the transformation of phase space, the photodisintegration cross sections are up to two orders of magnitude higher. The main advantage of the new target-detector system is a density several orders of magnitude higher than conventional gas tar...

  19. Proportional chambers for the Σ installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two types of proportional chambers used in experiments with SIGMA set are considered. The main parameters of detecting electronics, high-voltage, low-voltage and gas supplies are presented. The first type chambers consist of the round or square frames of sheet foiled glass-cloth-base laminate, on which surface electrode lands and joints between them are applied by photographic printing. The second type chamber electrodes are also made of the sheet foiled glass-cloth-base laminate as strips arranged at the ends of two rectangular metallic profiles. The chamber sensitive regions vary from 64x64 mm to 768x2500 mm. The chambers are used for more than 15 years in different experiments, such as determination of elastic scattering, study of J/ψ and ψ' particle production, search for charm particles in hadron interactions, measuring the change of π--meson polarizability, study of μ+μ-π- system production. The experience of past years manifested their high efficiency and reliability

  20. The LUX Prototype Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Akerib, D S; Bedikian, S; Bernstein, A; Bolozdynya, A; Bradley, A; Cahn, S; Carr, D; Chapman, J J; Clark, K; Classen, T; Curioni, A; Dahl, C E; Dazeley, S; deViveiros, L; Dragowsky, M; Druszkiewicz, E; Fiorucci, S; Gaitskell, R J; Hall, C; Faham, C; Holbrook, B; Kastens, L; Kazkaz, K; Kwong, J; Lander, R; Leonard, D; Malling, D; Mannino, R; McKinsey, D N; Mei, D; Mock, J; Morii, M; Nikkel, J; Phelps, P; Shutt, T; Skulski, W; Sorensen, P; Spaans, J; Steigler, T; Svoboda, R; Sweany, M; Thomson, J; Tripathi, M; Walsh, N; Webb, R; White, J; Wolfs, F L H; Woods, M; Zhang, C

    2012-01-01

    The LUX (Large Underground Xenon) detector is a two-phase xenon Time Projection Chamber (TPC) designed to search for WIMP-nucleon dark matter interactions. As with all noble element detectors, continuous purification of the detector medium is essential to produce a large ($>$1ms) electron lifetime; this is necessary for efficient measurement of the electron signal which in turn is essential for achieving robust discrimination of signal from background events. In this paper we describe the development of a novel purification system deployed in a prototype detector. The results from the operation of this prototype indicated heat exchange with an efficiency above 94% up to a flow rate of 42 slpm, allowing for an electron drift length greater than 1 meter to be achieved in approximately two days and sustained for the duration of the testing period.

  1. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Paolucci

    2013-01-01

    During LS1, the Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) collaboration is focusing its efforts on installation and commissioning of the fourth endcap station (RE4) and on the reparation and maintenance of the present system (1100 detectors). The 600 bakelite gaps, needed to build 200 double-gap RE4 chambers are being produced in Korea. Chamber construction and testing sites are located at CERN, in Ghent University, and at BARC (India). At present, 42 chambers have been assembled, 32 chambers have been successfully tested with cosmic rays runs and 7 Super Modules, made by two chambers, have been built at CERN by a Bulgarian/Georgian/Italian team and are now ready to be installed in the positive endcap. The 36 Super Modules needed to complete the positive endcap will be ready in September and installation is scheduled for October 2013. The Link-Board system for RE4 is under construction in Naples. Half of the system has been delivered at CERN in June. Six crates (Link-Board Boxes) and 75 boards, needed to instrument t...

  2. Laser calibration system for the CERES Time Projection Chamber

    OpenAIRE

    Miskowiec, Dariusz; Braun-Munzinger, Peter

    2008-01-01

    A Nd:YAG laser was used to simulate charged particle tracks at known positions in the CERES Time Projection Chamber at the CERN SPS. The system was primarily developed to study the response of the readout electronics and to calibrate the electron drift velocity. Further applications were the determination of the gating grid transparency, the chamber position calibration, and long-term monitoring of drift properties of the gas in the detector.

  3. Properties of a commercial extrapolation chamber in β radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A commercial extrapolation chamber was tested in different β radiation fields and its properties investigated. Its usefulness for β radiation calibration and dosimetry was verified. Experiments were performed in order to obtain the main characteristics such as the calibration factors (and consequently the energy dependence) for all chamber collecting electrodes (between 10 and 40 mm diameter), the transmission factors in tissue and the useful source-detector distance range

  4. Imploded test-chamber for an ISR intersection

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    At the ISR intersection points the vacuum chambers had to be as "transparent" as possible, for the p-p collision product particles to reach the detectors with minimum hindrance. This meant the choice of a light, yet very strong, metal; minimum thickness; and corrugation for mechanical strength. The test-chamber seen here was made of 0.6 mm thick corrugated titanium, obviously not strong enough to withstand the atmospheric pressure.

  5. Drift chamber tracking with a VLSI neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have tested a commercial analog VLSI neural network chip for finding in real time the intercept and slope of charged particles traversing a drift chamber. Voltages proportional to the drift times were input to the Intel ETANN chip and the outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. We will discuss the chamber and test setup, the chip specifications, and results of recent tests. We'll briefly discuss possible applications in high energy physics detector triggers

  6. A study of Ks0, Λ and anti Λ production in 60 and 200 GeV per nucleon OAu and pAu collisions with a streamer chamber detector at the CERN SPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of neutral strange particles Ks0, Λ and anti Λ has been studied in 60 and 200 GeV per nucleon OAu and pAu collisions with the streamer chamber vertex spectrometer of the NA35 experiment at the CERN-SPS accelerator. Ratios of neutral strange particle production to negatively charged particle production in selected regions of phase space were measured to be the same in OAu and pAu reactions. The rates of strange particle production in central OAu collisions are about a factor of 16 higher than in pAu collisions when compared in the same regions of phase space. If an enhancement of strange particle production in OAu collisions relative to pAu collisions is considered to be a signature for quark-gluon plasma formation, no evidence supporting it is observed. The experimental results are compared to the Lund FRITIOF model. (orig.)

  7. Target Chamber Manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantillo, Anthony; Watson, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    A system has been developed to allow remote actuation of sensors in a high vacuum target chamber used with a particle accelerator. Typically, sensors of various types are placed into the target chamber at specific radial and angular positions relative to the beam line and target. The chamber is then evacuated and the experiments are performed for those sensor positions. Then, the chamber is opened, the sensors are repositioned to new angles or radii, and the process is repeated, with a separate pump-down cycle for each set of sensor positions. The new sensor positioning system allows scientists to pre-set the radii of up to a dozen sensors, and then remotely actuate their angular positions without breaking the vacuum of the target chamber. This reduces the time required to reposition sensors from 6 hours to 1 minute. The sensors are placed into one of two tracks that are separately actuated using vacuum-grade stepping motors. The positions of the sensors are verified using absolute optical rotary encoders, and the positions are accurate to 0.5 degrees. The positions of the sensors are electronically recorded and time-stamped after every change. User control is through a GUI using LabVIEW.

  8. Development of the ZEUS Central Tracking Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design concept and development of the ZEUS Central Tracking Detector is described. This is a cylindrical drift chamber designed for track reconstruction, electron identification and event triggering in a high crossing-rate, high magnetic field environment. (author)

  9. Tracking and Alignment in the CMS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ronga, Frederic Jean

    2007-01-01

    This Report summarises the alignment strategy of the CMS detector. Track reconstruction in the silicon tracker and muon chambers is briefly described. We then present the different sources of alignment information, in particular alignment algorithms using reconstructed tracks.

  10. Radiation detectors laboratory; Laboratorio de detectores de radiacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez J, F.J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    The Radiation detectors laboratory was established with the assistance of the International Atomic Energy Agency which gave this the responsibility to provide its services at National and regional level for Latin America and it is located at the ININ. The more expensive and delicate radiation detectors are those made of semiconductor, so it has been put emphasis in the use and repairing of these detectors type. The supplied services by this laboratory are: selection consultant, detectors installation and handling and associated systems. Installation training, preventive and corrective maintenance of detectors and detection systems calibration. (Author)

  11. NGL supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the key drivers behind natural gas liquids (NGL) supply were discussed. These include: (1) volume and location of conventional oil and gas reserves, (2) accessibility of gas to reach economic natural gas markets in North America, (3) composition of produced gas stream, and (4) access to economic NGL logistics and processing infrastructure. Supply developments over the last 10 years and the supply outlook were also reviewed. The review showed that the value of Canadian NGL production has risen steadily over the last 10 years with a sharp increase in 1996. There has been continued expansion of NGTL, TCPL and PGT gas infrastructures. NGL supply is driven by natural gas production. Extraction of NGLs from gas is dependent on demand, economics and infrastructure. It was considered very likely that future NGL supply will increase with increased gas production and recovery from upgraders. 5 figs

  12. Automated Electrostatics Environmental Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Carlos; Lewis, Dean C.; Buchanan, Randy K.; Buchanan, Aubri

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Electrostatics Chamber (MEC) is an environmental chamber designed primarily to create atmospheric conditions like those at the surface of Mars to support experiments on electrostatic effects in the Martian environment. The chamber is equipped with a vacuum system, a cryogenic cooling system, an atmospheric-gas replenishing and analysis system, and a computerized control system that can be programmed by the user and that provides both automation and options for manual control. The control system can be set to maintain steady Mars-like conditions or to impose temperature and pressure variations of a Mars diurnal cycle at any given season and latitude. In addition, the MEC can be used in other areas of research because it can create steady or varying atmospheric conditions anywhere within the wide temperature, pressure, and composition ranges between the extremes of Mars-like and Earth-like conditions.

  13. The OPAL muon barrel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akers, R.J. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Allison, J. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Ashton, P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Bahan, G.A. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Baines, J.T.M. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Banks, J.N. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Barlow, R.J. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Barnett, S. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Beeston, C. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Chrin, J.T.M. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Clowes, S.G. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Davies, O.W. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Duerdoth, I.P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Hinde, P.S. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Hughes-Jones, R.E. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Lafferty, G.D. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Loebinger, F.K. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Macbeth, A.A. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; McGowan, R.F. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Moss, M.W. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Murphy, P.G. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Nijjhar, B. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; O`Dowd, A.J.P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Pawley, S.J. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Phillips, P.D. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Richards, G.E.

    1995-04-21

    The barrel part of the OPAL muon detector consists of 110 drift chambers forming four layers outside the hadron absorber. Each chamber covers an area of 1.2 m by up to 10.4 m and has two cells with wires parallel to the beam and a drift distance of 297 mm. A detailed description of the design, construction, operation and performance of the sub-detector is given. The system has been operating successfully since the start of LEP in 1989. ((orig.)).

  14. HF production in CMS-Resistive Plate Chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of highly reactive compounds in the gas mixture during Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) operation at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) is studied. Results from two different types of chambers are discussed: 50 x 50 cm2 RPC prototypes and two final CMS-RB1 chambers. The RB1 detectors were also connected to a closed loop gas system. Gas composition, possible additional impurities as well as fluoride ions have been monitored in different gamma irradiation conditions both in open and closed loop mode. The chemical composition of the RPC electrode surface has also been analyzed using an electron microscope equipped with an EDS/X-ray

  15. Scintillator detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent application relates to a scintillator detector array for use in computerized tomography and comprises a housing including a plurality of chambers, the said housing having a front wall transmissive to x-rays and side walls opaque to x-rays, such as of tungsten and tantalum, a liquid scintillation medium including a soluble fluor, the solvent for the fluor being disposed in the chambers. The solvent comprises either an intrinsically high Z solvent or a solvent which has dissolved therein a high Z compound e.g. iodo or bromonaphthalene; or toluene, xylene or trimethylbenzene with a lead or tin alkyl dissolved therein. Also disposed about the chambers are a plurality of photoelectric devices. (author)

  16. He leak testing of Indus-2 dipole vacuum chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Centre for Advanced Technology is developing its second synchrotron radiation source INDUS-2 which is a 2.5 GeV electron storage ring. Dipole vacuum chambers are the vital components of Indus-2 vacuum system. Each of these chambers is approx. 3.6 m long and 0.67 m wide with 24 nos. of ports of various sizes. The dipole chambers were made by machining two halves and they are then lip welded together. The dipole chamber has approx. 14 m of total weld length and it was leak tested for leak tightness of the order of 10-10 mbar 1/s. Helium mass spectrometer leak detector (HMSLD) was utilized for the leak testing. Subsequently the leaks of various orders in welding joints were repaired and leak tightness achieved. This paper describes the experiences during leak testing of 20 nos. of aluminum dipole chambers for INDUS-2

  17. Radon detection in conical diffusion chambers: Monte Carlo calculations and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rickards, J.; Golzarri, J. I.; Espinosa, G., E-mail: espinosa@fisica.unam.mx [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México Circuito de la Investigación Científica, Ciudad Universitaria México, D.F. 04520, México (Mexico); Vázquez-López, C. [Departamento de Física, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN Ave. IPN 2508, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, México 07360, DF, México (Mexico)

    2015-07-23

    The operation of radon detection diffusion chambers of truncated conical shape was studied using Monte Carlo calculations. The efficiency was studied for alpha particles generated randomly in the volume of the chamber, and progeny generated randomly on the interior surface, which reach track detectors placed in different positions within the chamber. Incidence angular distributions, incidence energy spectra and path length distributions are calculated. Cases studied include different positions of the detector within the chamber, varying atmospheric pressure, and introducing a cutoff incidence angle and energy.

  18. Ionization chamber for high dose measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Industrial gamma irradiators facilities are designed for processing large amounts of products, which are exposed to large doses of gamma radiation. The irradiation, in industrial scale, is usually carried out in a dynamic form, where the products go through a 60Co gamma source with activity of TBq to P Bq (k Ci to MCi). The dose is estimated as being directly proportional to the time that the products spend to go through the source. However, in some situations, mainly for research purposes or for validation of customer process following the ISO 11137 requirements, it is required to irradiate small samples in a static position with fractional deliver doses. The samples are put inside the irradiation room at a fixed distance from the source and the dose is usually determined using dosimeters. The dose is only known after the irradiation, by reading the dosimeter. Nevertheless, in the industrial irradiators, usually different kinds of products with different densities go through between the source and the static position samples. So, the dose rate varies in function of the product density. A suitable methodology would be to monitor the samples dose in real time, measuring the dose on line with a radiation detector, which would improve the dose accuracy and avoid the overdose. A cylindrical ionization chamber of 0.9 cm3 has been developed for high-doses real-time monitoring, during the sample irradiation at a static position in a 60Co gamma industrial plant. Nitrogen and argon gas at pressure of 10 exp 5 Pa (1 bar) was utilized to fill the ionization chamber, for which an appropriate configuration was determined to be used as a detector for high-dose measurements. To transmit the signal generated in the ionization chamber to the associated electronic and processing unit, a 20 m mineral insulated cable was welded to the ionization chamber. The signal to noise ratio produced by the detector was about 100. The dosimeter system was tested at a category I gamma irradiator

  19. High efficiency ionization chamber for fission experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The width of fission fragment mass distribution indicates the number of di rent fragments which are produced during the fission process from a given excited state. Smaller width means more limited variety of fission fragments which can indicate clusterization effect in hyperdeformed states before fission and also means less amount of nuclear waste. A new gridded ionization chamber was constructed at Atomki to examine the mass distribution of the fission fragments from neutron induced fission of some U and Th isotopes. The design is based on a twin ionization chamber developed by C. Budtz-Jorgensen et al. Our aim was to increase the efficiency of the measurements by applying multiple detector units. This compound detector permits simultaneous measurement of the total kinetic energy and fission fragment emission angle with respect to the detector symmetry axis. The chamber consists of five twin parallel plate ionization chambers with Frisch grids. Assuming that at low counting rates only one target emits fission fragments in one event, the an- odes and the grids were interconnected form- ing two groups (A1-G1, A2-G2). In order to identify which target emitted the fission fragments the signals from each cathodes are also processed. The energy of the fission fragments is determined from the anode pulse heights, while the sum of the grid and anode signals is used to deduce the fragment emission angle θ with respect to the symmetry axis of the chamber: Qsum = -n0e[1 - (X/D)cosθ). The angle dependent energy losses in the tar get can be determined using this angular information. In order to minimize the distance between the targets and the neutron source, smaller distance between the plates and a smaller diameter had to be chosen as in Ref. This arrangement required higher gas pressure, which is necessary to stop the fission fragments before reaching the electrodes. A gas mixture of 90% Ar + 10% CH4 at 2 atm pressure was used. With a

  20. LHCb velo detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    Photo 01 : L. to r.: D. Malinon, Summer Student, J. Libby, Fellow, J. Harvey, Head of CERN LHCb group, D. Schlatter, Head of the EP Division in front of the LHCb velo detector test beam (on the right). Photo 02 : L. to r.: J. Harvey, D. Schlatter, W. Riegler (staff), H.J. Hilke, LHCb Technical Coordinator in front of the muon chamber test beam

  1. Xenon Bubble Chambers for Direct Dark Matter Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Levy, C; Genovesi, J; Khaitan, D; Klimov, K; Mock, J; Szydagis, M

    2016-01-01

    The search for dark matter is one of today's most exciting fields. As bigger detectors are being built to increase their sensitivity, background reduction is an ever more challenging issue. To this end, a new type of dark matter detector is proposed, a xenon bubble chamber, which would combine the strengths of liquid xenon TPCs, namely event by event energy resolution, with those of a bubble chamber, namely insensitivity to electronic recoils. In addition, it would be the first time ever that a dark matter detector is active on all three detection channels, ionization and scintillation characteristic of xenon detectors, and heat through bubble formation in superheated fluids. Preliminary simulations show that, depending on threshold, a discrimination of 99.99\\% to 99.9999+\\% can be achieved, which is on par or better than many current experiments. A prototype is being built at the University at Albany, SUNY. The prototype is currently undergoing seals, thermal, and compression testing.

  2. Ionization smoke detector with controlled sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ionization smoke detector has been developed which has housing and sensing chambers together controlling the flow of detected smoke or aerosols containing particulate matter. This control of the air flow through the sensing chamber maintains the sensitivity to smoke even in the presence of winds or drafts. (DN)

  3. Photon detector for MEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During this past August and September, we had beam time at LAMPF for an engineering study of the second prototype cylindrical photon pair spectrometer for MEGA. All of the scintillators in the detector, a total of 40, and 40% of the drift chamber cells were instrumented for this run. The main photon arm activities during the run were to compare event patterns in the chamber to our Monte Carlo generated events, to study the trigger rate and to determine the background rates in the various detector elements. At low beam intensity, the event patterns from the chamber closely resembled those generated from the Monte Carlo. The background rates in the scintillators and the innermost drift chamber layer were close to those anticipated from previous studies. However the background rates in the outer two drift chamber layers were substantially higher than we had expected. This high rate was traced to low energy photons interacting with field and sense wires. The trigger studies during the run have led us to consider alternative strategies including two different first stage triggers and a second stage trigger. The combination of the second stage trigger with either of the two first stage triggers is expected to provide good detection efficiency while keeping the raw trigger rate below that required by the data acquisition system. Detailed discussions of both the background and trigger studies are discussed in this report. Since the run, our work on methods to obtain the z-position in the photon arm drift chambers has continued. Our goal is to obtain the z coordinate to 5 mm FWHM. At this level, the z uncertainty makes a negligible contribution to the overall photon energy resolution and only a small contribution to the angular resolution. We have been studying an option which uses delay lines to provide a direct z determination. The results of our study are discussed in this report

  4. MUON DETECTORS: CSC

    CERN Multimedia

    Richard Breedon

    Following the opening of the CMS detector, commissioning of the cathode strip chamber (CSC) system resumed in earnest. Some on-chamber electronics problems could be fixed on the positive endcap when each station became briefly accessible as the steel yokes were peeled off. There was no opportunity to work on the negative endcap chambers during opening; this had to wait instead until the yokes were again separated and the stations accessible during closing. In March, regular detector-operating shifts were resumed every weekday evening during which Local Runs were taken using cosmic rays to monitor and validate repairs and improvements that had taken place during the day. Since April, the CSC system has been collecting cosmic data under shift supervision 24 hours a day on weekdays, and 24/7 operation began in early June. The CSC system arranged shifts for continuous running in the entire first half of 2009. One reward of this effort is that every chamber of the CSC system is alive and recording events. There...

  5. UA1 prototype detector

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Prototype of UA1 central detector inside a plexi tube. The UA1 central detector was crucial to understanding the complex topology of proton-antiproton events. It played a most important role in identifying a handful of Ws and Zs among billions of collisions. The detector was a 6-chamber cylindrical assembly 5.8 m long and 2.3 m in diameter, the largest imaging drift chamber of its day. It recorded the tracks of charged particles curving in a 0.7 Tesla magnetic field, measuring their momentum, the sign of their electric charge and their rate of energy loss (dE/dx). Atoms in the argon-ethane gas mixture filling the chambers were ionised by the passage of charged particles. The electrons which were released drifted along an electric field shaped by field wires and were collected on sense wires. The geometrical arrangement of the 17000 field wires and 6125 sense wires allowed a spectacular 3-D interactive display of reconstructed physics events to be produced.

  6. Study on a drift chamber for high energy experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with the studies of a multiwire gaseous detector operating as a drift chamber, which will be part of the SELEX spectrometer of the experiment Fermilab E781. A prototype was designed to be built and tested at IFUSP. Results are shown of the analysis of data taken with another similar detector whose construction and test were done at Fermilab, with the aim of studying its characterization and performance. (author)

  7. Wire chamber conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This booklet contains program and the abstracts of the papers presented at the conference, most of them dealing with performance testing of various types of wire chambers. The publication of proceedings is planned as a special issue of 'Nuclear instruments and methods' later on. All abstracts are in English. An author index for the book of abstracts is given. (A.N.)

  8. Scanning bubble chamber pictures

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    These were taken at the 2 m hydrogen bubble chamber. The photo shows an early Shiva system where the pre-measurements needed to qualify the event were done manually (cf photo 7408136X). The scanning tables were located in bld. 12. Gilberte Saulmier sits on foreground, Inge Arents at centre.

  9. LEP Vacuum Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This is a cut-out of a LEP vacuum chamber for dipole magnets showing the beam channel and the pumping channel with the getter (NEG) strip and its insulating supports. A water pipe connected to the cooling channel can also be seen at the back.The lead radiation shield lining is also shown. See also 8305563X.

  10. LEP vacuum chamber, prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Final prototype for the LEP vacuum chamber, see 8305170 for more details. Here we see the strips of the NEG pump, providing "distributed pumping". The strips are made from a Zr-Ti-Fe alloy. By passing an electrical current, they were heated to 700 deg C.

  11. Conceptual design study of the hylife lithium waterfall laser fusion chamber. FY 1978 annual report to Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conceptual design studies of the target chamber defined the general configuration and dimensions of the chamber and the inlet plenum, orifice plate, and nozzle plate concepts required to generate the desired lithium jet fall. Preliminary studies were performed of the target chamber interfaces with the liquid lithium supply system, the laser system, the pellet injection system, and the target chamber mounting and support system. Target chamber environmental effects resulting from typical thermonuclear burns were evaluated. The outlet region of the target chamber was outlined conceptually, and preliminary design considerations were given to the annular graphite reflector regions of the target chamber and the associated liquid lithium coolant passages

  12. Nursing Supplies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Nursing Supplies Page Content Article Body Throughout most of ... budget. (Nursing equipment also makes wonderful baby gifts.) Nursing Bras A well-made nursing bra that comfortably ...

  13. Circuitry for use with an ionizing-radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved system of circuitry for use in combination with an ionizing-radiation detector over a wide range of radiation levels includes a current-to-frequency converter together with a digital data processor for respectively producing and measuring a pulse repetition frequency which is proportional to the output current of the ionizing-radiation detector, a dc-to-dc converter for providing closely regulated operating voltages from a rechargeable battery and a bias supply for providing high voltage to the ionization chamber. The ionizing-radiation detector operating as a part of this system produces a signal responsive to the level of ionizing radiation in the vicinity of the detector, and this signal is converted into a pulse frequency which will vary in direct proportion to such level of ionizing-radiation. The data processor, by counting the number of pulses from the converter over a selected integration interval, provides a digital indication of radiation dose rate, and by accumulating the total of all such pulses provides a digital indication of total integrated dose. Ordinary frequency-to-voltage conversion devices or digital display techniques can be used as a means for providing audible and visible indications of dose and dose-rate levels

  14. Water supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Options and methodologies for the development of fresh water supplies on Bikini Atoll are much the same as those practiced in the rest of the Marshall Islands and for that matter, most atolls in the central Pacific Ocean Basin. That is, rainfall distribution on Bikini produces a distinct wet season, lasting from about May through November, with the remaining months being generally dry. As a result, fresh water from surface catchments tends to be plentiful during the wet season? but is usually scarce during the dry months, and alternative sources such as groundwater must be utilized during this time. On Bikini the problems of fresh water supply are somewhat more difficult than for most Marshall Island atolls because rainfall is only about half the Marshall Island's average. Tus water supply is a critical factor limiting the carrying capacity of Bikini Atoll. To address this problem BARC has undertaken a study of the Bikini Atoll water supply. Te primary objectives of this work are to determine: (1) alternatives available for fresh water supply, 2 the amounts, location and quality of available supplies and 3 optimal development methods. The study planned for one's year duration, has been underway only since the summer of 1985 and is thus not yet fully completed. However, work done to date, which is presented in this report of preliminary findings, provides a reasonably accurate picture of Bikini's fresh water supplies and the various options available for their development. The work remaining to be completed will mainly add refinements to the water supply picture presented in the sections to follow

  15. Modeling of a highly enriched 235U fission chamber for spent fuel assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Accurate fission chamber models require accurate design information. • Fissile mass amount, active layer thickness and structural materials determine the detector sensitivity. • Fission products in fission chambers can be modeled and transported in a Monte Carlo code such as MCNPX. • Fission products transport plays a key role when determining a fission chamber sensitivity. • The model is in good agreement with experimental data. - Abstract: Fission chambers loaded with high enriched uranium are used for spent fuel measurements in the so-called Fork detector. The Fork detector is one of the work-horses used by safeguards inspectors for spent fuel measurements during verification activities in the framework of the Non-Proliferation and Euratom Treaties. Having an accurate and validated model of the measurement equipment is beneficial for the investigation of this type of applications. SCK• CEN is carrying out a significant effort to model the Fork detector with the MCNPX code. However, scarce information is known about the fission chambers. This work describes the impact of the design information of the fission chamber on the calculated detector sensitivity and, consequently, on the overall Fork detector response for neutrons, using Monte Carlo simulations. The heavy ions transport in the active layer of the fission chamber was also studied and the resulting fission product energy spectra were compared with the available experimental data

  16. Ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ionization detecting fire alarm device that comprises a double chamber structure, a source disposed in at least one of the chambers and a vernier adjusting screw electrode protruding into one chamber is described. The chamber containing the adjustable electrode is more open to the atmosphere than the other chamber, porting is provided between chambers and detection occurs by sensing the rate of change of ionization current in the chamber structure. The source or sources, one being in each chamber, is a beta source such as a nickel 63 source. A change in ionization current is detected by a unique circuit of this invention which comprises a programmable unijunction transistor oscillator circuit. 19 claims, 4 figures

  17. Plug Detector Bypass Breaker Guard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, J.R.; Dearstone, R.L.

    2000-05-23

    A method and apparatus are disclosed wherein the apparatus is a container having an inner chamber, an inlet, an outlet, a breaker assembly having at least one blade within the inner chamber of the container and a motor for driving the blade. Material is supplied to the inner chamber of the container through the inlet of the container and the breaker assembly is operated to reduce any clumped material into unclumped material which is then dispensed from the container through the outlet of the container.

  18. The emulsion chamber technology experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, John C.

    1992-01-01

    Photographic emulsion has the unique property of recording tracks of ionizing particles with a spatial precision of 1 micron, while also being capable of deployment over detector areas of square meters or 10's of square meters. Detectors are passive, their cost to fly in Space is a fraction of that of instruments of similar collecting. A major problem in their continued use has been the labor intensiveness of data retrieval by traditional microscope methods. Two factors changing the acceptability of emulsion technology in space are the astronomical costs of flying large electronic instruments such as ionization calorimeters in Space, and the power and low cost of computers, a small revolution in the laboratory microscope data-taking. Our group at UAH made measurements of the high energy composition and spectra of cosmic rays. The Marshall group has also specialized in space radiation dosimetry. Ionization calorimeters, using alternating layers of lead and photographic emulsion, to measure particle energies up to 10(exp 15) eV were developed. Ten balloon flights were performed with them. No such calorimeters have ever flown in orbit. In the ECT program, a small emulsion chamber was developed and will be flown on the Shuttle mission OAST-2 to resolve the principal technological questions concerning space exposures. These include assessments of: (1) pre-flight and orbital exposure to background radiation, including both self-shielding and secondary particle generation; the practical limit to exposure time in space can then be determined; (2) dynamics of stack to optimize design for launch and weightlessness; and (3) thermal and vacuum constraints on emulsion performance. All these effects are cumulative and affect our ability to perform scientific measurements but cannot be adequately predicted by available methods.

  19. Liquid scintillator time projection chamber concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are presented from a small-scale experiment to investigate the use of room temperature organic liquid scintillators as the active medium for a time projection chamber (TPC). The optical properties of liquid scintillators have long been known, but their ability to transport charge has remained, until now, largely untested. The idea of using room temperature liquids as an active medium for an ionisation chamber was first presented in [1]. Since then the range of liquid scintillators available has been greatly developed. We present successful transport of ionization charges in a selection of both, pure organic liquid solvents and liquid scintillator cocktails over 20 mm using a variety of electric drift field strengths. The target of this research is to offer a cost effective alternative to liquid noble gas detectors in neutrino physics

  20. Alpha-particle spectrometry of large-area samples using an open-flow pulse ionisation chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionization chambers are established and well known detectors of ionizing radiation. Current-mode chambers are in frequent use in such fields as dosimetry, environmental surveillance and radiation protection, while pulse-mode, Frisch-grid, chambers used to be used for spectrometry and have largely been replaced by scintillation and semiconducting-diode detectors. Dealing specifically with low-level alpha-particle spectrometry, the surface-barrier or ion-implanted semiconducting detectors are the standard choice, but in some applications where radiochemical treatment and production of small electroplated samples are impossible or inconvenient, pulse-ionization chambers are still in use. For breath and air-radon samples scintillation cells dominate, but pulse ionization chambers are utilized as high-standard laboratory instruments. For continuous measurements of radon concentration in air, a multiwire-electrode ionization chamber has been described. A commercial radon-in-air system, based on a pulse ionization chamber is described. (author)

  1. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Iaselli

    The RPC group has invested a large effort in the study of trigger spikes observed during CRAFT data taking. The chambers are susceptible to noise generated by the flickering of fluorescent and projector lamps in the cavern (with magnetic field on). Soon after the end of CRAFT, it was possible to reproduce the phenomena using a waveform generator and to study possible modifications to be implemented in the grounding schema. Hardware actions have been already taken in order to reduce the detector sensitivity: star washers on the chamber front panels and additional shielding have been added where possible. During the shutdown maintenance activity many different problems were tackled on the barrel part. A few faulty high voltage connector/cable problems were fixed; now only two RPC chambers are left with single-gap mode operation. One chamber in YB+2 was replaced due to gas leakage. All the front-end electronic boards were replaced in 3 chambers (stations MB2 and MB3 in YB-2), that had been damaged after the coo...

  2. Silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status and recent progress of silicon detectors for high energy physics is reviewed. Emphasis is put on detectors with high spatial resolution and the use of silicon detectors in calorimeters. (orig.)

  3. Construction and Test of MDT Chambers for the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, F; Dietl, H.; Kroha, H.; Lagouri, Th.; Manz, A.; Ostapchuk, A.; Richter, Robert, 1; Schael, S.; Chouridou, S.; Deile, M.; Kortner, O.; Staude, A.; Stroehmer, R.; Trefzger, T.

    2001-01-01

    The Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers for the muon spectrometer of the AT- LAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) consist of 3-4 layers of pressurized drift tubes on either side of a space frame carrying an optical monitoring system to correct for deformations. The full-scale prototype of a large MDT chamber has been constructed with methods suitable for large-scale production. X-ray measurements at CERN showed a positioning accuracy of the sense wires in the chamber of better than the required 20 ?microns (rms). The performance of the chamber was studied in a muon beam at CERN. Chamber production for ATLAS now has started.

  4. Initial Back-to-Back Fission Chamber Testing in ATRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjamin Chase; Troy Unruh; Joy Rempe

    2014-06-01

    Development and testing of in-pile, real-time neutron sensors for use in Materials Test Reactor experiments is an ongoing project at Idaho National Laboratory. The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility has sponsored a series of projects to evaluate neutron detector options in the Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility (ATRC). Special hardware was designed and fabricated to enable testing of the detectors in the ATRC. Initial testing of Self-Powered Neutron Detectors and miniature fission chambers produced promising results. Follow-on testing required more experiment hardware to be developed. The follow-on testing used a Back-to-Back fission chamber with the intent to provide calibration data, and a means of measuring spectral indices. As indicated within this document, this is the first time in decades that BTB fission chambers have been used in INL facilities. Results from these fission chamber measurements provide a baseline reference for future measurements with Back-to-Back fission chambers.

  5. Principles of operation of multiwire proportional and drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first multiwire proportional chamber, in its modern conception, was constructed and operated in the years 1967-68. It was soon recognized that the main properties of a multiwire proportional chamber, i.e. very good time resolution, good position accuracy and self-triggered operation, are very attractive for the use of the new device in high-energy physics experiments. Today, most fast detectors contain a large number of proportional chambers, and their use has spread to many different fields of applied research, such as X-ray and heavy ion astronomy, nuclear medicine, and protein crystallography. In many respects, however, multiwire proportional chambers are still experimental devices, requiring continuous attention for good operation and sometimes reacting in unexpected ways to a change in the environmental conditions. Furthermore, in the fabrication and operation of a chamber people seem to use a mixture of competence, technical skill and magic rites, of the kind ''I do not know why I'm doing this but somebody told me to do so''. In these notes the authors illustrate the basic phenomena underlying the behaviour of a gas detector, with the hope that the reader will not only better understand the reasons for some irrational-seeming preferences (such as, for example, in the choice of the gas mixture), but will also be able better to design detectors for his specific experimental needs

  6. Three chamber negative ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A negative ion vessel is divided into an excitation chamber, a negative ionization chamber and an extraction chamber by two magnetic filters. Input means introduces neutral molecules into a first chamber where a first electron discharge means vibrationally excites the molecules which migrate to a second chamber. In the second chamber a second electron discharge means ionizes the molecules, producing negative ions which are extracted into or by a third chamber. A first magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the negative ionization chamber from the excitation chamber. A second magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the extraction chamber from the negative ionizing chamber. An extraction grid at the end of the negative ion vessel attracts negative ions into the third chamber and accelerates them. Another grid, located adjacent to the extraction grid, carries a small positive voltage in order to inhibit positive ions from migrating into the extraction chamber and contour the plasma potential. Additional electrons can be suppressed from the output flux using ExB forces provided by magnetic field means and the extractor grid electric potential

  7. Micromegas chambers for the experiment ATLAS at the LHC (A Brief Overview)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongadze, A. L.

    2016-03-01

    The increase in luminosity and energy of the Large hadron collider (LHC) in the next upgrade (Phase-1) in 2018-2019 will lead to a significant increase in radiation load on the ATLAS detector, primarily in the areas close to the interaction point of the LHC proton beams. One of these regions is the Small Wheel of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer. It is planned to be replaced with the New Small Wheel that will have Micromegas chambers as main coordinate detectors. The paper gives an overview of all existing types of Micromegas detectors with special focus on the Micromegas chambers for the ATLAS detector upgrade.

  8. Response of a resistive plate chamber to particles leaking laterally from a thick absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resistive plate chamber detectors, working in streamer mode, have been chosen to equip the ALICE/LHC dimuon trigger. In ALICE, the detector will be placed orthogonal to a thick beam shield. Tests of the detector have been performed in order to investigate its performances in such running conditions. These tests show that resistive plate chambers can be operated in streamer mode in these particular conditions without dramatic deterioration of the overall performances. FLUKA simulations reproduce the experimental results within a factor 1.5. Such a test is not only relevant for the ALICE dimuon trigger but for all collider experiments using the RPC detector

  9. The Delphi outer detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design criteria, construction and performance of the Delphi outer detector are discussed. The detector is a 5-layer, 5 m long, 2 m inner radius, 2.1 m outer radius 'cylindrical' drift chamber consisting of 3480 individual 1.65x1.65 cm2 drift tubes operating in limited streamer mode. The drift time-distance relationship for a single tube has been measured using a pulsed laser as a function of both track angle and longitudinal magnetic field. These data have been used to reconstruct cosmic rays in a completed detector module and yield a transverse resolution of 80 μm per point over most of the cell, rising to 90 μm near the corners of the tubes. The detection efficiency per cell for minimum ionising particles is greater than 98.5%. (orig.)

  10. Resistive Plate Chambers commissioning and performance results for 2015

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) detector system at the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment at the LHC confers robustness and redundancy to the muon trigger. During the first long shutdown of the LHC (2013-2014) the CMS muon RPC system has been upgraded with 144 double-gap chambers on the forth forward stations. A total of 1056 double-gap chambers cover the pseudo-rapidity region up to 1.6. The main detector parameters are constantly and closely monitored to achieve operational stability and high quality data in the harsh conditions of the second run period of the LHC (13 TeV and 25 ns bunch spacing). Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) performance results for 2015 with pp collisions at 13 TeV are presented. These results include the occupancy, efficiency of newly installed detectors after applying new working point, history plots for the RPC relevant variables such as: Cluster Size, Efficiency, percentage of inactive detector during operation and Rates and overall system noise. RPC variables are studied as funct...

  11. Fabrication and testing of a large area cathode pad chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics (SINP) is participating in the Forward Muon Spectrometer collaboration of ALICE at CERN and is responsible in the design and fabrication of the second tracking station. The tracking detectors will be cathode pad chambers (CPC). Two small CPC prototypes have already been fabricated and tested at CERN

  12. A Bragg curve ionization chamber for acceleration mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ionization chamber based on the Bragg curve spectrometry method to be used as the final detector in a accelerator mass spectrometry system is described. The first tests with a Cl beam give energy resolution of 1% and Z resolving power of 72 at Z=17

  13. Scintillations in ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High purity Ar and mixtures of Ar with 1% CH4, 3% CH4, CO2 and N2, respectively, have been applied for fission fragment detection in a gridded ionization chamber. Gas scintillation has been observed simultaneously with a photomultiplier VALVO-XP 2041. Whereas all mixtures work equally well as an ionization gas, only Ar + 3% N2 shows a primary scintillation yield sufficient for fas timing. (orig.)

  14. Double chambered right ventricle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chul Koo; Yu, Yun Jeong; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Han, Man Chung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-12-15

    Fourteen cases of double chambered right ventricle were diagnosed angiographically and of these nine cases were confirmed after operation and autopsy at Seoul National University Hospital in recent four years since 1979. The clinical and radiological findings with the emphasis on the cinecardiographic findings were analysed. The summaries of the analysis are as follows: 1. Among 14 cases, 6 cases were male and 8 cases were female. Age distribution was from 4 years to 36 years. 2. In chest x-ray findings, pulmonary vascularity was increased in 8 cases, decreased in 4 cases, and normal in 2 cases. Cardiomegaly was observed in 8 cases and other showed normal heart size. 3. In cinecardiography, 11 cases had interventricular septal defect. Among these 11 cases, VSD located in proximal high pressure chamber was in 2 cases and located in distal low pressure chamber was in 9 cases. 4. The location of aberrant muscle bundle in sinus portion of right ventricle was in 8 cases. In the rest 6 cases, the aberrant muscle bundle was located below the infundibulum of right ventricle. 5. For accurate diagnosis and differential diagnosis with other congenital cardiac anomalies such as Tetralogy of Fallot or isolated pulmonic stenosis, biplane cineangiography and catheterization is an essential procedure.

  15. Magma chambers: Formation, local stresses, excess pressures, and compartments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, Agust

    2012-09-01

    An existing magma chamber is normally a necessary condition for the generation of a large volcanic edifice. Most magma chambers form through repeated magma injections, commonly sills, and gradually expand and change their shapes. Highly irregular magma-chamber shapes are thermo-mechanically unstable; common long-term equilibrium shapes are comparatively smooth and approximate those of ellipsoids of revolution. Some chambers, particularly small and sill-like, may be totally molten. Most chambers, however, are only partially molten, the main part of the chamber being crystal mush, a porous material. During an eruption, magma is drawn from the crystal mush towards a molten zone beneath the lower end of the feeder dyke. Magma transport to the feeder dyke, however, depends on the chamber's internal structure; in particular on whether the chamber contains pressure compartments that are, to a degree, isolated from other compartments. It is only during large drops in the hydraulic potential beneath the feeder dyke that other compartments become likely to supply magma to the erupting compartment, thereby contributing to its excess pressure (the pressure needed to rupture a magma chamber) and the duration of the eruption. Simple analytical models suggest that during a typical eruption, the excess-pressure in the chamber decreases exponentially. This result applies to a magma chamber that (a) is homogeneous and totally fluid (contains no compartments), (b) is not subject to significant replenishment (inflow of new magma into the chamber) during the eruption, and (c) contains magma where exsolution of gas has no significant effect on the excess pressure. For a chamber consisting of pressure compartments, the exponential excess-pressure decline applies primarily to a single erupting compartment. When more than one compartment contributes magma to the eruption, the excess pressure may decline much more slowly and irregularly. Excess pressure is normally similar to the in

  16. Silicon drift-chamber studies for possible use at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is proposed to continue the program now underway at the University of Pittsburgh to study the feasibility of using silicon drift-chambers as particle tracking devices at RHIC. We are currently testing a UA6-type detector obtained from BNL and plan to also study a new device that will become available this year: a cylindrical geometry detector designed for NA45 (CERN). In addition we propose to fabricate and study a detector to be used in vertex determination for the RHIC OASIS experiment. The two-year budget for this proposal is $246.962. 5 refs., 12 figs

  17. A Time Projection Chamber with GEM-Based Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Attié, David; Bellerive, Alain; Bezshyyko, Oleg; Bhattacharya, Deb Sankar; Bhattacharya, Purba; Bhattacharya, Sudeb; Caiazza, Stefano; Colas, Paul; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dehmelt, Klaus; Desch, Klaus; Diener, Ralf; Dixit, Madhu; Fleck, Ivor; Fujii, Keisuke; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Ganjour, Serguei; Gao, Yuanning; Gros, Philippe; Hayman, Peter; Hedberg, Vincent; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Jönsson, Leif; Kaminski, Jochen; Kato, Yukihiro; Kawada, Shin-ichi; Killenberg, Martin; Kleinwort, Claus; Kobayashi, Makoto; Krylov, Vladyslav; Li, Bo; Li, Yulan; Lundberg, Björn; Lupberger, Michael; Majumdar, Nayana; Matsuda, Takeshi; Mehdiyev, Rashid; Mjörnmark, Ulf; Müller, Felix; Münnich, Astrid; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Oskarsson, Anders; Österman, Lennart; Peterson, Daniel; Riallot, Marc; Rosemann, Christoph; Roth, Stefan; Schade, Peter; Schäfer, Oliver; Settles, Ronald Dean; Shirazi, Amir Noori; Smirnova, Oxana; Sugiyama, Akira; Takahashi, Tohru; Tian, Junping; Timmermans, Jan; Titov, Maksym; Tsionou, Dimitra; Vauth, Annika; Wang, Wenxin; Watanabe, Takashi; Werthenbach, Ulrich; Yang, Yifan; Yang, Zhenwei; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenker, Klaus; Zhang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    For the International Large Detector concept at the planned International Linear Collider, the use of time projection chambers (TPC) with micro-pattern gas detector readout as the main tracking detector is investigated. In this paper, results from a prototype TPC, placed in a 1 T solenoidal field and read out with three independent GEM-based readout modules, are reported. The TPC was exposed to a 6 GeV electron beam at the DESY II synchrotron. The efficiency for reconstructing hits, the measurement of the drift velocity, the space point resolution and the control of field inhomogeneities are presented.

  18. Web-Based Cathode Strip Chamber Data Display

    CERN Multimedia

    Firmansyah, M

    2013-01-01

    Cathode Strip Chamber (CSC) is a detector that uses gas and high electric field to detect particles. When a particle goes through CSC, it will ionize gas particles and generate electric signal in the anode and cathode of the detector. Analysis of the electric signal data can help physicists to reconstruct path of the particles and determine what happen inside the detector. Using data display, analysis of CSC data becomes easier. One can determine which data is interesting, unusual, or maybe only contain noise.\

  19. Tracks in a streamer chamber initiated by N2-laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the appearance of a new intensively developing field of pulse laser use related with high-precise spatial and energy calibration of radiation detectors the possibility to create laser radiation tracks in a streamer chamber by means of the LGI-21 commercial pulse nitrogen laser is studied. For this purpose saturated vapours of organic compounds with ionization potential less than 7.36 eV are introduced into the chamber working gas. It is shown that molecules of the compounds are ionized with high probability by two laser radiation quanta absorption. At that, one laser can create several dozens of tracks with the cross section less than 1 mm2 and practically any linear density of streamers. The conclusion is made that the laser investigated is a perspective instrument for calibrating not only streamer chambers but other gas-filled detectors of charged particles

  20. Modification of neutron response of a TE ionization chamber for radiological protection purpose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tissue equivalent ionization chamber is applied in all known methods for measuring dose equivalent in mixed radiation fields. Most of the TE ionization chambers are not fully homogeneous. The deviation of a TE ionization chamber from homogeneity leads to inaccurate neutron dosimetry. It is shown that a controlled inhomogeneity of a TE gas filled cavity in a TE ionization chamber results in suitable modification of the response to neutrons particularly in a set of detectors consisting of a TE ionization chamber and an organic scintillation detector designed to determine dose equivalent index quantities of mixed radiation. The response of a TE chamber having infinite cavity filled with following gas mixtures: TE methane based composition, CH4 + N2 -TE only for hydrogen, CH4 + N2 + 3He -TE only for hydrogen was calculated for neutrons in the energy range from thermal to 1 MeV

  1. Design and development of photoelectron detection chambers for the DELPHI experiment RICH Cerenkov counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The particle identifier of the Barrel-RICH detector, based on the Cerenkov effect is a crucial element of the DELPHI spectrometer. In this detector, Cerenkov light is focussed as a ring whose diameter is related to the velocity of the particle. The measure of the ring's diameter is done by conversion of photons in a gaseous environment and then by measure of the position of the photons in a wire chamber after the drift of the photoelectrons. Three types of wire chambers (chambers in U shape, circular chambers, chambers with flat cathodes) have been designed and tested. The choice of the flat cathode chambers has been determined by the reliability, the simplicity and the considerations of price

  2. Cooling in the ALICE detector

    OpenAIRE

    Almén, Ylva

    2015-01-01

    At CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva, Switzerland, a new modern particle accelerator called the LHC, Large Hadron Collider, is being projected. One of the four large detectors of the LHC, ALICE, consists of many sub-detectors. Temperature stability in ALICE is of great importance for the experiments performed here.  In the ALICE sub-detector TPC, Time Projection Chamber, there is a great risk for thermal instability.  This will cause false data in the experiments, a...

  3. Status of triple GEM muon chambers for the LHCb experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muon triggering and offline muon identification are fundamental requirements for the LHCb experiment, which will begin to take data at the start-up of the LHC machine. The identification of muon particles and an estimate of the transverse momentum (ΔpT/pT∼20%) in the near-beam area of the first muon station is achieved by a set of 12 double triple-GEM detectors which covers an area of about 0.6m2. Since b-quark production is peaked in the forward direction, GEM detectors will trigger about 20% of muons from B-particle decays. In this paper the results of the detector quality checks on anode and cathode panels planarity, GEM foil HV test, chamber gas leak and gain uniformity are presented. The performance of a chamber, composed of two triple-GEM detectors logically OR-ed, has been measured in a recent test beam at the SPS, with particle bunches with a time structure of 25 ns similar to the LHC running conditions. In this test the final front-end electronics and the final LHCb DAQ have been used. This result demonstrates that the detector can achieve the required performances (efficiency larger than 96%) at a detector gain of 4000, thus ensuring a long detector lifetime in the harsh LHCb environment

  4. Ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel ionization detector for use in X-ray tomography is described in detail. To achieve the ultimate resolution, the use of small detectors is necessary and, for ionization detectors, this implies using xenon gas at high pressure. Conventional small detectors can suffer from ''bowing'' but the present design overcomes their problems. (U.K.)

  5. α spectrometer of parallel plate grid ionization chamber of high energy resolution and applied

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parallel plate Grid ionization chamber with cathode area of 300 cm2 was developed and applied to detect minimum α-emitters. It consist of a vacuum system, a gas cycle system of the parallel plate grid ionization chamber, electronics (a high voltage supply, a pre-amplifier and a main amplifier) and a computer-multichannel analyzer. The energy resolution is 23 keV FWHM for the 244Cm electrostatic precipitated source. The integral background is typically 10 counts/h between 4 and 6 MeV. The detector efficiency is 50%. The minimum detecting activity is 3 x 10-4 Bq (3σ, 30 hours). This spectrometer is suitable for detecting various samples, such as samples of the soil, water, air, bion, food, structural material, geology, archaeology, α-emitters of afterprocessing and measuring α activity of accounting for and control of nuclear material and monitoring the artificial radioactivity nuclides of environment samples around nuclear facilities. The spectrometer is equipped with apparatus for preparing large area α source by using vacuum deposition or ultrasonic pulverization. The operating program of preparing source is simple. The source thickness can be kept in 40-60 μm/cm2

  6. α spectrometer of parallel plate grid ionization chamber of high energy resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parallel plate grid ionization chamber with cathode area of 300 cm2 was developed and applied to detect minimum α-emitters. It consist of a vacuum system, a gas cycle system of the parallel plate grid ionization chamber, electronics (a high voltage supply, a pre-amplifier and a main amplifier) and a computer-multichannel analyzer. The energy resolution is 23 keV FWHM for the 244Cm electrostatic precipitated source. The integral background is typically 10 counts/h between 4 and 6 MeV. The detector efficiency is 50%. The minimum detecting activity is 3 x 10-4 Bq (3σ, 30 hours). This spectrometer is suitable for detecting various samples, such as samples of the soil, water, air, bion, food, structural material, geology, archaeology, α-emitters of after processing and measuring α activity of accounting for and control of nuclear material and monitoring the artificial radioactivity nuclides of environment samples around nuclear facilities. The spectrometer is equipped with apparatus for preparing large area α source by using vacuum deposition or ultrasonic pulverization. The operating program of preparing source is simple. The source thickness can be kept in 40-60 μm/cm2

  7. Commissioning of a large segmented ion chamber for the FMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lister, C.J.; Davids, C.N.; Blumenthal, D.J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    A large-area sectored ion chamber was built by a Yale-Daresbury (U.K.) - ANL collaboration to allow extensions of studies of N = Z (T = 0) nuclei. The ion chamber is a conventional DE-DE-E detector which is 20-cm deep, but each anode is segmented into eight pads to allow high count-rate capability and ray-trace reconstruction. With suitable electronics, the detector can become eight close-packed ion chambers, considerably reducing the count rate in each. A position-wire plane allows further raytracing which should permit the rejection of anomalous trajectories and improve Z-separation. A brief test run was scheduled shortly after delivery. Performance appeared promising, but issues of gain matching and cross talk need further exploration. We will study these features {open_quotes}off line{close_quotes} and hope to perform a full experiment on selenium isotopes in the summer. This detector appears to have many uses and is potentially more useful than previous detectors of its type. Similar detectors are being built for the HHRF at Oak Ridge and for Texas A&M University.

  8. Prototype of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber (TPC) Field-Cage

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The ALICE Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main particle tracking detector in ALICE. Charged particles crossing the gas of the TPC knock electons out of their atoms, which then drift in in the electric field. By measuring the arrival of electrons at the end of the chamber, the TPC will reconstruct the paths of the original charged particles.

  9. Arrival at CERN of the first MB4 DT chambers from Turin

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcos Fernandez Garcia

    2005-01-01

    The largest DT chambers to be installed into the outermost station of the CMS barrel muon detector (MB4) are built by INFN-Turin. The first batch of four chambers, out of 40, arrived at the CERN ISR area on February 2005.

  10. The LUX Prototype Detector: Heat Exchanger Development

    OpenAIRE

    Akerib, D. S.; Bai, X.; S. Bedikian; Bernstein, A.; Bolozdynya, A.; Bradley, A; S Cahn; Carr, D.; Chapman, J. J.; Clark, K.; Classen, T.; Curioni, A.; Dahl, C E; Dazeley, S.; deViveiros, L.

    2012-01-01

    The LUX (Large Underground Xenon) detector is a two-phase xenon Time Projection Chamber (TPC) designed to search for WIMP-nucleon dark matter interactions. As with all noble element detectors, continuous purification of the detector medium is essential to produce a large ($>$1ms) electron lifetime; this is necessary for efficient measurement of the electron signal which in turn is essential for achieving robust discrimination of signal from background events. In this paper we describe the dev...

  11. Performance of large area Micro Pixel Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Nagayoshi, T; Miuchi, K; Ochi, A; Orito, R; Takada, A; Tanimori, T; Ueno, M

    2003-01-01

    A novel gaseous two-dimensional imaging detector "Micro Pixel Chamber (micro-PIC)" has been developed. This detector is based on double sided printed circuit board (PCB). We have developed large area (10cm x 10cm) micro-PICs with 65536 pixel anodes of 400um pitch on a 100um thick insulating substrate. Achieved energy resolution was 30% (FWHM) at 5.9keV, and a gas gain of 7000 was obtained with argon ethane (8:2) gas mixture. This gain is high enough to detect minimum ionizing particles with such a small electrode pitch. Although several discharges occurred during 65 hours continuous operation, the detectors have kept stable operation with high gain. The micro-PIC is a useful detector for many applications e.g. X-ray, gamma ray, and charged particle imaging. The micro electrode structure allows us to measure directions of primary electrons due to incident X-rays or gamma rays, which provide a strong method for X-ray polarimetry and gamma-ray imaging.

  12. Monte Carlo simulation on the application of boron-coated MRPC thermal neutron detector to the compensated neutron logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The compensated neutron logging technology is widely used in oil exploration and development. The neutron detector commonly used in this technology is the helium-3 proportional counter. Due to the decreasing in supply of the helium-3 gas, the price of the helium-3 proportional counter rises quickly. Purpose: The aim is to develop a new type of neutron detector to replace the helium-3 tubes in the compensated neutron logging technology. Methods: A new thermal neutron detector coated with a layer of thermal neutron converter in the inner glass of the Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) was developed. Under the conventional and underbalanced conditions, Monte Carlo method was used to simulate the response of the boron-coated MRPC thermal neutron detector and helium-3 proportional counter employed in compensated neutron logging technology. Results: It is shown that the SS/LS increases with the rise of porosity using either the boron-coated MRPC thermal neutron detector or the helium-3 proportional counter, and the results of these two detectors are basically identical. Conclusion: It indicates that the boron-coated MRPC thermal neutron detector can be used for compensated neutron logging. (authors)

  13. Stereo: cylindrical drift chamber for muon decay experiments at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A stereo, cylindrical drift chamber has been built for use in a search for rare decay modes of the muon at LAMPF. This chamber (part of the Crystal Box detector) has 728 cells on 8 concentric annuli at alternating angles of 100 to 160 from the chamber axis and with radii from 105 to 220 mm. The basic cell cross section is (9 x 10) mm2 and the inter-layer spacing is 4.7 mm. Preliminary results show the single-wire efficiencies to be greater than 99%. Based on results obtained from prototype chambers, we hope to achieve 170-μm resolution (including multiple scattering) when TDC offsets and sense-wire locations found in a careful inspection of the endplates are added to the track-finding algorithm

  14. MUON DETECTORS: CSC

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Hauser

    2011-01-01

    The earliest collision data in 2011 already show that the CSC detector performance is very similar to that seen in 2010. That is discussed in the DPG write-up elsewhere in this Bulletin. This report focuses on a few operational developments, the ME1/1 electronics replacement project, and the preparations at CERN for building the fourth station of CSC chambers ME4/2. During the 2010 LHC run, the CSC detector ran smoothly for the most part and yielded muon triggers and data of excellent quality. Moreover, no major operational problems were found that needed to be fixed during the Extended Technical Stop. Several improvements to software and configuration were however made. One such improvement is the automation of recovery from chamber high-voltage trips. The algorithm, defined by chamber experts, uses the so-called "Expert System" to analyse the trip signals sent from DCS and, based on the frequency and the timing of the signals, respond appropriately. This will make the central DCS shifters...

  15. Vacuum Chambers for LEP sections

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    The picture shows sections of the LEP vacuum chambers to be installed in the dipole magnets (left) and in the quadrupoles (right). The dipole chamber has three channels: the beam chamber, the pumping duct where the NEG (non-evaporabe getter) is installed and the water channel for cooling (on top in the picture). The pumping duct is connected to the beam chamber through holes in the separating wall. The thick lead lining to shield radiation can also be seen. These chambers were manufactured as extruded aluminium alloy profiles.

  16. Magma chamber processes in central volcanic systems of Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Þórarinsson, Sigurjón Böðvar; Tegner, Christian

    2009-01-01

    olivine basalts from Iceland that had undergone about 20% crystallisation of olivine, plagioclase and clinopyroxene and that the macrorhythmic units formed from thin magma layers not exceeding 200-300 m. Such a "mushy" magma chamber is akin to volcanic plumbing systems in settings of high magma supply...

  17. Construction and Test of New Precision Drift-Tube Chambers for the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Kroha, Hubert; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, Korbinian; Takasugi, Eric

    2016-01-01

    ATLAS muon detector upgrades aim for increased acceptance for muon triggering and precision tracking and for improved rate capability of the muon chambers in the high-background regions of the detector with increasing LHC luminosity. The small-diameter Muon Drift Tube (sMDT) chambers have been developed for these purposes. With half of the drift-tube diameter of the MDT chambers and otherwise unchanged operating parameters, sMDT chambers share the advantages of the MDTs, but have an order of magnitude higher rate capability and can be installed in detector regions where MDT chambers do not fit in. The chamber assembly methods have been optimized for mass production, minimizing construction time and personnel. Sense wire positioning accuracies of 5 ?micons have been achieved in serial production for large-size chambers comprising several hundred drift tubes. The construction of new sMDT chambers for installation in the 2016/17 winter shutdown of the LHC and the design of sMDT chambers in combination with new R...

  18. The D0 detector upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fermilab collider program is undergoing a major upgrade of both the accelerator complex and the two detectors. Operation of the Tevatron at luminosities upwards of ten time that currently provided will occur in early 1999 after the commissioning of the new Fermilab Main Injector. The D0 upgrade program has been established to deliver a detector that will meet the challenges of this environment. A new magnetic tracker consisting of a superconducting solenoid, a silicon vertex detector, a scintillating fiber central tracker, and a central preshower detector will replace the current central tracking and transition radiation chambers. We present the design and performance capabilities of these new systems and describe results from physics simulations that demonstrate the physics reach of the upgraded detector

  19. Review of wire chamber aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper makes an overview of the wire chamber aging problems as a function of various chamber design parameters. It emphasizes the chemistry point of view and many examples are drawn from the plasma chemistry field as a guidance for a possible effort in the wire chamber field. The paper emphasizes the necessity of variable tuning, the importance of purity of the wire chamber environment, as well as it provides a practical list of presently known recommendations. In addition, several models of the wire chamber aging are qualitatively discussed. The paper is based on a summary talk given at the Wire Chamber Aging Workshop held at LBL, Berkeley on January 16-17, 1986. Presented also at Wire Chamber Conference, Vienna, February 25-28, 1986. 74 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs

  20. Development of gas detectors for time and energy measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary results of a gas detector to be used as stop detector in a time-of-flight telescope are reported. The timing signal is derived from a very thin parallel plate avalanche counter working in the same gas volume of the energy detector (an ionization chamber of conventional type). (orig.)

  1. A scintillating fiber detector for the D0 upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Step 1 version of the D0 upgrade, the inner vertex chamber will be replaced by a system of silicon microstrips surrounded by a scintillating fiber detector. Details of the detector design and status of R ampersand D and construction programs for the detector are presented. Progress on the upcoming large-scale cosmic ray test at Fermilab is also reported

  2. A study of aging effects in gas proportional detectors at the BAC calorimeter of the ZEUS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multicell proportional chambers at the backing calorimeter of the ZEUS experiment at the storage ring HERA are supplied with a gas mixture of Ar/CO2 by an open gas system. Flow proportional counters with the build-up 55Fe sources are used as gas system monitoring detectors. The ZEUS experiment is planned to collect data for about 10 years. Therefore, the lifetime of the Ar/CO2 mixture should be known. In this paper, the results of laboratory tests and preliminary measurements of the aging effects for monitoring counters are presented. ((orig.))

  3. Council Chamber exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    To complete the revamp of CERN’s Council Chamber, a new exhibition is being installed just in time for the June Council meetings.   Panels will showcase highlights of CERN’s history, using some of the content prepared for the exhibitions marking 50 years of the PS, which were displayed in the main building last November. The previous photo exhibition in the Council Chamber stopped at the 1970s. To avoid the new panels becoming quickly out of date, photos are grouped together around specific infrastructures, rather than following a classic time-line. “We have put the focus on the accelerators – the world-class facilities that CERN has been offering researchers over the years, from the well-known large colliders to the lesser-known smaller facilities,” says Emma Sanders, who worked on the content. The new exhibition will be featured in a future issue of the Bulletin with photos and an interview with Fabienne Marcastel, designer of the exhibit...

  4. Cardiac chamber scintiscanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two methods of cardiac chamber scintiscanning, i.e. 'first pass' and 'ECG-triggered' examinations, are explained and compared. Two tables indicate the most significant radiation doses of the applied radio tracers, i.e. 99m-Tc-pertechnetate and 99m-Tc-HSA, to which a patient is exposed. These averaged values are calculated from various data given in specialised literature. On the basis of data given in literature, an effective half-life of approximately 5 hours in the intravascular space was calculated for the erythrocytes labelled with technetium 99m. On this basis, the radiation doses for the patients due to 99m-Tc-labelled erythrocytes are estimated. The advantages and disadvantages of the two methods applied for cardiac chamber scintiscanning are put into contrast and compared with the advantages and disadvantages of the quantitative X-ray cardiography of the left heart. The still existing problems connected with the assessment of ECG-triggered images are discussed in detail. The author performed investigations of his own, which concerned the above-mentioned problems. (orig./MG)

  5. MUON DETECTORS: DT

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Dallavalle.

    The DT system is ready for the LHC start up. The status of detector hardware, control and safety, of the software for calibration and monitoring and of people has been reviewed at several meetings, starting with the CMS Action Matrix Review and with the Muon Barrel Workshop (October 5 to 7). The disconnected HV channels are at a level of about 0.1%. The loss in detector acceptance because of failures in the Read-Out and Trigger electronics is about 0.5%. The electronics failure rate has been lower this year: next year will tell us whether the rate has stabilised and hopefully will confirm that the number of spares is adequate for ten years operation. Although the detector safety control is very accurate and robust, incidents have happened. In particular the DT system suffered from a significant water leak, originated in the top part of YE+1, that generated HV trips in eighteen chambers going transversely down from the top sector in YB+2 to the bottom sector in YB-2. All chambers recovered and all t...

  6. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Paolucci

    2011-01-01

    During data-taking in 2010 the RPC system behaviour was very satisfactory for both the detector and trigger performances. Most of the data analyses are now completed and many results and plots have been approved in order to be published in the muon detector paper. A very detailed analysis of the detector efficiency has been performed using 60 million muon events taken with the dedicated RPC monitor stream. The results have shown that the 96.3% of the system was working properly with an average efficiency of 95.4% at 9.35 kV in the Barrel region and 94.9% at 9.55 kV in the Endcap. Cluster size goes from 1.6 to 2.2 showing a clear and well-known correlation with the strip pitch. Average noise in the Barrel is less than 0.4 Hz/cm2 and about 98% of full system has averaged noise less then 1 Hz/cm2. A linear dependence of the noise versus the luminosity has been preliminary observed and is now under study. Detailed chamber efficiency maps have shown a few percent of chambers with a non-uniform efficiency distribu...

  7. MUON DETECTORS: DT

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Dallavalle

    2013-01-01

    The DT collaboration is undertaking substantial work both for detector maintenance – after three years since the last access to the chambers and their front-end electronics – and upgrade. The most critical maintenance interventions are chambers and Minicrate repairs, which have not begun yet, because they need proper access to each wheel of the CMS barrel, meaning space for handling the big chambers in the few cases where they have to be extracted, and, more in general, free access from cables and thermal shields in the front and back side of the chambers. These interventions are planned for between the coming Autumn until next spring. Meanwhile, many other activities are happening, like the “pigtail” intervention on the CAEN AC/DC converters which has just taken place. The upgrade activities continue to evolve in good accordance with the schedule, both for the theta Trigger Board (TTRB) replacement and for the Sector Collector (SC) relocation from the UXC to the US...

  8. Development of the portable alpha-ray spectrometer based on the PIPS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to maintain the needs of determining radiation contamination in-situ rapidly, we established a kind of portable alpha-ray spectrometer based on the PIPS detector. The instrument employs PIPS detector to capture α-ray, signals are collected and disposed by preamplifier circuit and the signal acquisition module, then spectra analysis is achieved by C8051F120 MCU control platform. Man-machine interface was organized by matrix keyboard and LCD display. Both lithium-ion batteries and power processing module were used to supply the system power. We designed a vacuum measurement chamber in order to obtain higher energy resolution and cleaner spectra. By performance testing we get that the whole power consumption of this instrument is 105 mA, energy resolution is 8.1% in normal air environment and 6.7% in vacuum. The instrument has high -precision, good stability, low power consumption, and is very suitable for in-situ measuring. (authors)

  9. Study on optimization design for anode structure of the high-pressure xenon chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of potential distribution in ionization chamber with coplanar grid anode on its energy resolution was theoretically analyzed first in this paper. Then a model to calculate the static electric field within a High-Pressure Xenon (HPXe) ionization chamber's detecting volume was set up with Maxwell3D software. Using that model the potential distribution in chamber with different number, radius or position of anode was obtained. Eventually the influences of anode's number, radius and position on the chamber's energy resolution were studied. The results show that the more number of anode, the smaller radius of anode and the nearer position from chamber's mid-axis, the better energy resolution of the ionization chamber could be achieved. This study could provide a reference for optimization design of the detectors similar to HPXe ionization chamber. (authors)

  10. Autoignition Chamber for Remote Testing of Pyrotechnic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Maureen L.; Steward, Gerald R.; Dartez, Toby W.

    2009-01-01

    The autoignition chamber (AIC) performs by remotely heating pyrotechnic devices that can fit the inner diameter of the tube furnace. Two methods, a cold start or a hot start, can be used with this device in autoignition testing of pyrotechnics. A cold start means extending a pyrotechnic device into the cold autoignition chamber and then heating the device until autoignition occurs. A hot start means heating the autoignition chamber to a specified temperature, and then extending the device into a hot autoignition chamber until autoignition occurs. Personnel are remote from the chamber during the extension into the hot chamber. The autoignition chamber, a commercially produced tubular furnace, has a 230-V, single-phase, 60-Hz electrical supply, with a total power output of 2,400 W. It has a 6-in. (15.2-cm) inner diameter, a 12-in. (30.4-cm) outer diameter and a 12-in.- long (30.4-cm), single-zone, solid tubular furnace (element) capable of heating to temperatures up to 2,012 F (1,100 C) in air.

  11. Demonstration of new possibilities of multilayer technology on resistive microstrip/ microdot detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Cairo, V.; de Oliveira, R.; Fonte, P.; S. Franchino; Peskov, V.; Picchi, P.; Pietropaolo, F.

    2016-01-01

    The first successful attempts to optimize the electric field in Resistive Microstrip Gas Chamber and resistive microdot detectors using additional field shaping strips located inside the detector substrate are described

  12. Description of new vacuum chamber correction concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danby, G.T.; Jackson, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    For rapid cycled accelerators eddy currents induced in vacuum chambers (VC) are typically the dominant source of systematic and random field aberrations. Complex thin wall VC are expensive and delicate where bakeout is required, as in the AGS Booster under construction. Thick wall VC are rugged and economical but produce large eddy currents. A ''Self-Correction'' concept has been developed and tested which corrects automatically by transformer action, even for variable /dot B/ cycles. Coils attached to the outside of the VC cancel eddy current aberrations over the entire ''good field'' aperture. The (inexpensive) correction coils follow the local contour of the VC, so large transverse VC movements are tolerated; both the aberrations and their corrections have the same displaced coordinates. Experimental results are presented for Booster correction coil designs demonstrating both self-correction and excitation by a separate power supply. Analytic results applicable to the Booster and other fast cycling accelerators are discussed. The eddy current field aberrations induced in a pre-production full size vacuum chamber inserted in an AGS Booster dipole have been successfully eliminated by the ''self correction'' coils attached to its surface. The voltage induced in a two-turns per pole ''back leg'' winding is sufficient to supply the necessary current through the correction winding. A nichrome wire attached in series provides adjustable resistance for current control. 2 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Study of fission fragment trapping detector used in neutron detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To detect the absolute neutron flux in a weak neutron field and restricted space, the fission fragment trapping detector was fabricated and the properties of the detector were studied. In this paper, the detector and shielding chamber used in neutron detection were described and the experimental measurements of the fission rate in specific condition were performed with the detection system and the result has been compared with that obtained by fission chamber. The influence of the shielding chamber on the measured results was analyzed. (authors)

  14. Comment on 'Proton beam monitor chamber calibration'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmans, Hugo; Vatnitsky, Stanislav M

    2016-09-01

    We comment on a recent article (Gomà et al 2014 Phys. Med. Biol. 59 4961-71) which compares different routes of reference dosimetry for the energy dependent beam monitor calibration in scanned proton beams. In this article, a 3% discrepancy is reported between a Faraday cup and a plane-parallel ionization chamber in the experimental determination of the number of protons per monitor unit. It is further claimed that similar discrepancies between calorimetry and ionization chamber based dosimetry indicate that [Formula: see text]-values tabulated for proton beams in IAEA TRS-398 might be overestimated. In this commentary we show, however, that this supporting argument misrepresents the evidence in the literature and that the results presented, together with published data, rather confirm that there exist unresolved problems with Faraday cup dosimetry. We also show that the comparison in terms of the number of protons gives a biased view on the uncertainty estimates for both detectors while the quantity of interest is absorbed dose to water or dose-area-product to water, even if a beam monitor is calibrated in terms of the number of protons. Gomà et al (2014 Phys. Med. Biol. 59 4961-71) also report on the discrepancy between cylindrical and plane-parallel ionization chambers and confirm experimentally that in the presence of a depth dose gradient, theoretical values of the effective point of measurement, or alternatively a gradient correction factor, account for the discrepancy. We believe this does not point to an error or shortcoming of IAEA TRS-398, which prescribes taking the centre of cylindrical ionization chambers as reference point, since it recommends reference dosimetry to be performed in the absence of a depth dose gradient. But these observations reveal that important aspects of beam monitor calibration in scanned proton beams are not addressed in IAEA TRS-398 given that those types of beams were not widely implemented at the time of its publication

  15. Long-range alpha detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Historically, alpha-particle and alpha-contamination detectors have been limited by the very short range of alpha particles in air and by relatively poor sensitivity even if the particles are intercepted. Alpha detectors have had to be operated in a vacuum or in close proximity to the source if reasonable efficiency is desired. Alpha particles interact with the ambient air, producing ionization in the air at the rate of ∼30,000 ion pairs per mega-electron-volt of alpha energy. These charges can be transported over significant distances (several meters) in a moving current of air generated by a small fan. An ion chamber located in front of the fan measures the current carried by the moving ions. The long-range alpha detector (LRAD) offers several advantages over more traditional alpha detectors. First and foremost, it can operate efficiently even if the contamination is not easily accessible. Second, ions generated by contamination in crevices and other unmonitorable locations can be detected if the airflow penetrates those areas. Third, all of the contamination on a large surface will generate ions that can be detected in a single detector; hence, the detector's sensitivity to distributed sources is not limited by the size of the probe. Finally, a simple ion chamber can detect very small electric currents, making this technique potentially quite sensitive

  16. ΔE-E telescope with high energy resolution large sensitive area ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction and the performances of ΔE-E telescope with active thick 11 cm and window area 1600 mm2 are described. ΔE detector is a Frisch ionization chamber. The performances of ΔE detector utilizing 239Pu-α source is tested. The optimum ΔE resolution obtained is 4.6%

  17. A Bubble Chamber Simulator: A New Tool for the Physics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Mainly used in the 1960s, bubble chambers played a major role in particle physics. Now replaced with modern electronic detectors, we believe they remain an important didactic tool to introduce particle physics as they provide visual, appealing and insightful pictures. Sadly, this rare type of detector is mostly accessible through open-door events…

  18. Design, construction and characterization of special ionization chambers for X radiation beams monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X radiation equipment may show fluctuations in the radiation beam intensity, as they are connected to the power net. These intensity variations can, in turn, modify the air kerma rate produced by this radiation beam. In a calibration laboratory, where radiation detectors (from clinics and hospital services) are calibrated, variations in the radiation beam intensity may cause an error in the absorbed dose determination. The monitor ionization chambers are used to verify the radiation beam intensity constancy, and to provide a correction for possible fluctuations. In this work, monitor ionization chambers for X radiation beams were designed, assembled and characterized. The developed ionization chambers have an innovative design, ring-shaped, with aluminium or graphite electrodes. These ring-shaped ionization chambers have the advantage of not interfering in the direct radiation beams. A double-volume ionization chamber with graphite electrodes was also developed. This ionization chamber is similar to the commercial monitor ionization chamber used in the Calibration Laboratory of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares. All developed ionization chambers were tested in several standardized radiation beams and their performances were compared with those of commercial ionization chambers. The results show that two of the four ionization chambers developed showed performance comparable to that of the commercial ionization chambers tested. Besides presenting good results, the ionization chambers were designed and manufactured using low cost materials, which are easily found on the Brazilian market. (author)

  19. Mush Column Magma Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Magma chambers are a necessary concept in understanding the chemical and physical evolution of magma. The concept may well be similar to a transfer function in circuit or time series analysis. It does what needs to be done to transform source magma into eruptible magma. In gravity and geodetic interpretations the causative body is (usually of necessity) geometrically simple and of limited vertical extent; it is clearly difficult to `see' through the uppermost manifestation of the concentrated magma. The presence of plutons in the upper crust has reinforced the view that magma chambers are large pots of magma, but as in the physical representation of a transfer function, actual magma chambers are clearly distinct from virtual magma chambers. Two key features to understanding magmatic systems are that they are vertically integrated over large distances (e.g., 30-100 km), and that all local magmatic processes are controlled by solidification fronts. Heat transfer considerations show that any viable volcanic system must be supported by a vertically extensive plumbing system. Field and geophysical studies point to a common theme of an interconnected stack of sill-like structures extending to great depth. This is a magmatic Mush Column. The large-scale (10s of km) structure resembles the vertical structure inferred at large volcanic centers like Hawaii (e.g., Ryan et al.), and the fine scale (10s to 100s of m) structure is exemplified by ophiolites and deeply eroded sill complexes like the Ferrar dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The local length scales of the sill reservoirs and interconnecting conduits produce a rich spectrum of crystallization environments with distinct solidification time scales. Extensive horizontal and vertical mushy walls provide conditions conducive to specific processes of differentiation from solidification front instability to sidewall porous flow and wall rock slumping. The size, strength, and time series of eruptive behavior

  20. Experiments with a spark chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors constructed an experimental spark chamber with a useable volume of 7 x 7 x 5 cm having six parallel 2-mm thick stainless steel plates. The distance between each plate is 8 mm. The chamber is filled with neon under a pressure of one atmosphere. On applying a pulse of about 10 keV on the plates immediately after the passage of a charged particle through the chamber, sparks form along the trajectory of the particle and may easily be photographed. The chamber was first used with cosmic ray μ mesons and then put into the π-meson beam of the SATURN synchrocyclotron. The efficiency of the chamber as a function of voltage and retardation of the applied electric pulse and the dead time are given. The first results obtained with a chamber of 10-litre volume are also presented. (author)

  1. The BABAR Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Aubert, B.; Bazan, A.; Boucham, A.; Boutigny, D.; Bonis, I.; Favier, J.; Gaillard, JM; Jeremie, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; T. Le Flour(LAPP, Annecy); Lees, JP; Lieunard, S; Petitpas, P.; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V.

    2001-01-01

    This is the pre-print version of the Article. The official published version can be accessed from the link below. Copyright @ 2002 Elsevier. BABAR, the detector for the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric e+e− B Factory operating at the (4S) resonance, was designed to allow comprehensive studies of CP-violation in B-meson decays. Charged particle tracks are measured in a multi-layer silicon vertex tracker surrounded by a cylindrical wire drift chamber. Electromagnetic showers from electrons and photon...

  2. The User-friendly On-Line Diffusion Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Aviles Acosta, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    The On-Line Diffusion Chamber is a stand-alone apparatus built to carry out short-live radiotracer diffusion studies. The availability of the on-demand production of isotopes in the ISOLDE facility, and the design of the apparatus to streamline the implantation process, annealing treatment, ion gun ablation with a tape transport system, and radiation intensity measurement with a Ge gamma detector all in the same apparatus, gives the On-Line Diffusion Chamber a unique ability to studies with short-lived radioisotopes or isomer states that are not possible in any other facility in the world.

  3. Time expansion chamber and single ionization cluster measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The time expansion chamber (TEC), a new type of drift chamber, allows the measurement of microscopic details of ionization. The mean drift time interval from subsequent sngle ionization clusters of a relativistic particle in the TEC can be made large enough compared to the width of a anode signal to allow the recording of the clusters separately. Since single primary electrons can be detected, the cluster counting would allow an improved particle separation using the relativistic rise of primary ionization. In another application, very high position accuracy for track detectors or improved energy resolution may be obtained. Basic ionization phenomena and drift properties can be measured at the single electron level

  4. A spark-chamber spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A programme of developing techniques for the construction and use of spark chambers in high-energy physics experiments has been undertaken. Several methods of construction have been tested and found satisfactory. One method is to cement aluminium plates to frames made from glass or Plexiglas strips. Another is to place the aluminium plates in grooves machined in Plexiglas, forming a ''shelf'' design. A chamber made of rows of wires was successfully operated with a He-alcohol mixture. These chambers can either be filled with gas and sealed, or gas can be passed through them continuously. Chambers have been constructed with plates of various thicknesses ranging from 0.032 in downwards. The operation of the chambers with various spacings between the plates was also investigated. The performance of these chambers, when filled with several different gases (Ne, He, A) and with gas-alcohol mixtures, has been investigated. Several methods of applying high-voltage pulses to the chambers have been attempted. The results of these investigations are presented. Spark chambers placed in a magnetic field can be used in principle to determine the momentum of charged particles and if lead converter-plates are incorporated with them, the resulting system should serve as a gamma-ray spectrometer of high resolution and high efficiency. A magnet with an 18-in useful diameter and a 13000-G field is being fitted with spark chambers, whose performance will be tested with cosmic rays and with an accelerator beam. Results from such tests are presented. (author)

  5. A compact gas ionization chamber for VERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The increasing demand for measuring long-lived radionuclides with small AMS machines at energies below 1 MeV per nucleon raises the need for compact detectors which still have a decent energy resolution and allow for a clear identification of the incident particles. Based on a design by the AMS group at the ETH Zurich a compact gas ionization chamber was built and installed at the VERA 3 MV AMS facility. Due to its compact design, the detector easily fits into a DN100 cross-piece and can be inserted and retracted without breaking the vacuum. The anode is split into two active regions which allows the simultaneous measurement of ΔE and ERES. An identification of the incident particles is therefore possible via their different stopping powers. For the entrance window silicon nitride foils are used. These foils are remarkably homogeneous and can be obtained pinhole-free with thicknesses down to 50 nm. In this work the setup of the detector together with the results of first measurements of the previously difficult to measure AMS-relevant radionuclides 10Be, 36Cl and 41Ca will be presented. (author)

  6. Gridded ionization chamber for detection of x-ray wave activity in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to carry out x-ray observations of magnetohydrodynamic wave activity of the plasma during DD and DT (deuterium-beam-heated deuterium and tritium plasmas, respectively) operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), we will need detectors not susceptible to nuclear radiation damage. We have investigated the use of gridded ionization chambers as fast nondamageable x-ray detectors. A prototype chamber is described which was tested on the PDX tokamak. These tests and laboratory tests with a pulsed x-ray source suggest that the detector has sufficient sensitivity and speed for the required measurements

  7. Gridded ionization chamber for detecion of x-ray wave activity in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to carry out X-ray observations of magnetohydrodynamic wave activity of the plasma during DD and DT (deuterium-beam-heated deuterium and tritium plasmas, respectively) operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), we will need detectors not susceptible to nuclear radiation damage. We have investigated the use of gridded ionization chambers as fast nondamageable X-ray detectors. A prototype chamber is described, which was tested on the PDX tokamak. These tests and laboratory tests with a pulsed X-ray source suggest that the detector has sufficient sensitivity and speed for the required measurements

  8. ATLAS Monitored Drift Tube Chambers in E = 11 MeV Neutron Background

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, T.; Mlynek, A; Biebel, O.; R. Hertenberger; Nunnemann, T.; D. Merkl; Rauscher, F.; D. Schaile; Stroehmer, R

    2009-01-01

    The influence of fast neutrons on the occupancy and the single tube resolution of ATLAS muon drift detectors was investigated by exposing a chamber built out of 3 layers of 3 short standard drift tubes to neutron flux-densities of up to 16 kHz/cm2 at a neutron energy of E=11 MeV. Pulse shape capable NE213 scintillaton detectors and a calibrated BF3 neutron detector provided monitoring of the neutron flux-density and energy. The sensitivity of the drift chamber to the neutrons was measured to ...

  9. Comparison of CMS Resistive Plate Chambers performance during LHC RUN-1 and RUN-2

    CERN Document Server

    Shah, Mehar Ali

    2016-01-01

    The Resistive Plate Chambers detector system at the CMS experiment at the LHC provides robustness and redundancy to the muon trigger. A total of 1056 double-gap chambers cover the pseudo-rapidity region < 1.6. The main detector parameters and environmental conditions are constantly and closely monitored to achieve operational stability and high quality data in the harsh conditions of the second run period of the LHC with center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. First results of overall detector stability with 2015 data and comparisons with data from the LHC RUN-1 period at 8 TeV are presented.

  10. Comparison of CMS Resistive Plate Chambers performance during LHC RUN-1 and RUN-2

    CERN Document Server

    Shah, Mehar Ali

    2016-01-01

    The Resistive Plate Chambers detector system at the CMS experiment at the LHC provides robustness and redundancy to the muon trigger. A total of 1056 double-gap chambers cover the pseudo-rapidity region lt 1.6. The main detector parameters and environmental conditions are constantly and closely monitored to achieve operational stability and high quality data in the harsh conditions of the second run period of the LHC with center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. First results of overall detector stability with 2015 data and comparisons with data from the LHC RUN-1 period at 8 TeV are presented.

  11. Monte Carlo studies on Cathode Strip/Pad Chambers for the ALICE Di-Muon Arm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurzinger, R.; Le Bornec, Y.; Willis, N.

    1996-04-01

    A general overview about the properties of Cathode Strip and Pad Chambers is given. Position finding methods are discussed and compared within Monte Carlo studies. Noise contributions and their minimization are discussed. Pad chambers allow a two-dimensional readout with spatial resolution of {sigma} < 100 {mu}m in direction parallel to the anode wire. The resolution normal to the anode wire depends mainly on the wire spacing. Special attention is paid on the double-hit resolution capability of the pad chamber. An outlook is given on the possible utilisation of Cathode Pad Chambers in the Di-Muon Arm of the ALICE detector at LHC. (author). 44 refs.

  12. Monte Carlo studies on Cathode Strip/Pad Chambers for the ALICE Di-Muon Arm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general overview about the properties of Cathode Strip and Pad Chambers is given. Position finding methods are discussed and compared within Monte Carlo studies. Noise contributions and their minimization are discussed. Pad chambers allow a two-dimensional readout with spatial resolution of σ < 100 μm in direction parallel to the anode wire. The resolution normal to the anode wire depends mainly on the wire spacing. Special attention is paid on the double-hit resolution capability of the pad chamber. An outlook is given on the possible utilisation of Cathode Pad Chambers in the Di-Muon Arm of the ALICE detector at LHC. (author)

  13. Automatic semi-continuous accumulation chamber for diffuse gas emissions monitoring in volcanic and non-volcanic areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelli, Matteo; Raco, Brunella; Norelli, Francesco; Virgili, Giorgio; Continanza, Davide

    2016-04-01

    Since various decades the accumulation chamber method is intensively used in monitoring activities of diffuse gas emissions in volcanic areas. Although some improvements have been performed in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility of the detectors, the equipment used for measurement of gas emissions temporal variation usually requires expensive and bulky equipment. The unit described in this work is a low cost, easy to install-and-manage instrument that will make possible the creation of low-cost monitoring networks. The Non-Dispersive Infrared detector used has a concentration range of 0-5% CO2, but the substitution with other detector (range 0-5000 ppm) is possible and very easy. Power supply unit has a 12V, 7Ah battery, which is recharged by a 35W solar panel (equipped with charge regulator). The control unit contains a custom programmed CPU and the remote transmission is assured by a GPRS modem. The chamber is activated by DataLogger unit, using a linear actuator between the closed position (sampling) and closed position (idle). A probe for the measure of soil temperature, soil electrical conductivity, soil volumetric water content, air pressure and air temperature is assembled on the device, which is already arranged for the connection of others external sensors, including an automatic weather station. The automatic station has been tested on the field at Lipari island (Sicily, Italy) during a period of three months, performing CO2 flux measurement (and also weather parameters), each 1 hour. The possibility to measure in semi-continuous mode, and at the same time, the gas fluxes from soil and many external parameters, helps the time series analysis aimed to the identification of gas flux anomalies due to variations in deep system (e.g. onset of volcanic crises) from those triggered by external conditions.

  14. Major detectors in elementary-particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the 1983 issue of LBL-91 we introduce a supplement - a folio of descriptions of the world's major elementary particle physics detectors. Modern high energy physics usually involves the use of massive, costly, carefully engineered, large solid angle detectors. These detectors require a long lead time for construction, are often integrated with an accelerator, accumulate data over many years, and are in reality a combination of numerous subsystems. As was the case with bubble chambers, many experiments are performed with the same data, or with data taken after relatively minor changes or additions to the detector configuration. These experiments are often reported in journals whose space limitations make repeated full descriptions of the detector impossible. The detailed properties and performance of the detector are usually described in a fragmented series of papers in more specialized, technologically oriented journals. New additions are often not well documented. Several detectors often make similar measurements and physicists want to make quick comparisons of their respective capabilities. Designers of new large detectors and even of smaller experiments need to know what already exists and what performance has been achieved. To aid the physics community, the Particle Data Group has produced this brief folio of the world's major large detectors. This first edition has some notable omissions: in particular, the bubble chambers and any associated spectrometers, and the still somewhat tentative LEP, SLC, and TRISTAN detectors

  15. Charge-Focusing Readout of Time Projection Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, S J; Jaegle, I; Rosen, M D; Seong, I S; Thorpe, T N; Vahsen, S E; Yamaoka, J

    2013-01-01

    Time projection chambers (TPCs) have found a wide range of applications in particle physics, nuclear physics, and homeland security. For TPCs with high-resolution readout, the readout electronics often dominate the price of the final detector. We have developed a novel method which could be used to build large-scale detectors while limiting the necessary readout area. By focusing the drift charge with static electric fields, we would allow a small area of electronics to be sensitive to particle detection for a much larger detector volume. The resulting cost reduction could be important in areas of research which demand large-scale detectors, including dark matter searches and detection of special nuclear material. We present simulations made using the software package Garfield of a focusing structure to be used with a prototype TPC with pixel readout. This design should enable significant focusing while retaining directional sensitivity to incoming particles. We also present first experimental results and com...

  16. Detector to detector corrections: A comprehensive experimental study of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small radiotherapy beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of the present study is to provide a comprehensive set of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small beams, for a wide range of real time and passive detectors. The detector specific correction factors determined in this study may be potentially useful as a reference data set for small beam dosimetry measurements. Methods: Dose response of passive and real time detectors was investigated for small field sizes shaped with a micromultileaf collimator ranging from 0.6 × 0.6 cm2 to 4.2 × 4.2 cm2 and the measurements were extended to larger fields of up to 10 × 10 cm2. Measurements were performed at 5 cm depth, in a 6 MV photon beam. Detectors used included alanine, thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), stereotactic diode, electron diode, photon diode, radiophotoluminescent dosimeters (RPLDs), radioluminescence detector based on carbon-doped aluminium oxide (Al2O3:C), organic plastic scintillators, diamond detectors, liquid filled ion chamber, and a range of small volume air filled ionization chambers (volumes ranging from 0.002 cm3 to 0.3 cm3). All detector measurements were corrected for volume averaging effect and compared with dose ratios determined from alanine to derive a detector correction factors that account for beam perturbation related to nonwater equivalence of the detector materials. Results: For the detectors used in this study, volume averaging corrections ranged from unity for the smallest detectors such as the diodes, 1.148 for the 0.14 cm3 air filled ionization chamber and were as high as 1.924 for the 0.3 cm3 ionization chamber. After applying volume averaging corrections, the detector readings were consistent among themselves and with alanine measurements for several small detectors but they differed for larger detectors, in particular for some small ionization chambers with volumes larger than 0.1 cm3. Conclusions: The results demonstrate how important it is for the appropriate corrections to be

  17. Microscopic Simulation of Particle Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schindler, Heinrich

    Detailed computer simulations are indispensable tools for the development and optimization of modern particle detectors. The interaction of particles with the sensitive medium, giving rise to ionization or excitation of atoms, is stochastic by its nature. The transport of the resulting photons and charge carriers, which eventually generate the observed signal, is also subject to statistical fluctuations. Together with the readout electronics, these processes - which are ultimately governed by the atomic cross-sections for the respective interactions - pose a fundamental limit to the achievable detector performance. Conventional methods for calculating electron drift lines based on macroscopic transport coefficients used to provide an adequate description for traditional gas-based particle detectors such as wire chambers. However, they are not suitable for small-scale devices such as micropattern gas detectors, which have significantly gained importance in recent years. In this thesis, a novel approach, bas...

  18. X spectrometry with pulse detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison is made of various types of pulse X-ray detectors (scintillators + photomultipliers, proportional counters, ionisation chambers, semi-conductor detectors: Si (Li) and Ge (Li) ) as well as of their associated electronic equipment, from the point of view of the resolving power, the detection efficiency and the working surface, for photons of from 100 eV to 100 KeV. Semiconductor detectors (Si (Li) up to 50 KeV, Ge (Li) from 10 KeV up to 100 KeV) should rapidly find uses in all cases where an excellent resolving power is necessary (in X-fluorescence for example), whereas proportional counters present greater advantages for applications calling for a high detection surface, and also for very soft X-rays because the window of the detector can be very thin. (author)

  19. Another Detector for the International Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Akchurin, Nural; Wigmans, Richard; Arnold, Hanna; Bazal, Aaron; Basili, Robert; Hauptman, John; Overton, Tim; Priest, Andrew; Zhao, Bingzhe; Mikhailichenko, Alexander; Cascella, Michele; Grancagnolo, Franco; Tassielli, Giovanni; Bedeschi, Franco; Scuri, Fabrizio; Park, Sung Keun; Ignatov, Fedor; Gaudio, Gabriella; Livan, Michele

    2013-01-01

    We describe another detectora designed for the International Linear Collider based on several tested instrumentation innovations in order to achieve the necessary experi- mental goal of a detecter that is 2-to-10 times better than the already excellent SLC and LEP detectors, in particular, (1) dual-readout calorimeter system based on the RD52/DREAM measurements at CERN, (2) a cluster-counting drift chamber based on the successful kloe chamber at Frascati, and (3) a second solenoid to return the magnetic flux without iron. A high-performance pixel vertex chamber is presently un- defined. We discuss particle identification, momentum and energy resolutions, and the machine-detector interface that together offer the possibility of a very high-performance detector for $e^+e^-$physics up to $\\sqrt{s} = 1$ TeV.

  20. Concept of a solid-state drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operation of a solid state drift chamber is described, and its use in a high rate, high multiplicity environment is discussed. The Solid State Drift Chamber (SSDCH) is a thin wafer of a high purity n-type silicon (few cm2 x a few hundreds μm thick) with a single small-area, small-capacitance anode readout. The drift voltage is supplied to an array of drift electrodes on both sides of the wafer to produce a uniform drift field parallel to the surface of the wafer and to ensure the complete depletion of the wafer

  1. The EXO-200 detector, part I: Detector design and construction

    CERN Document Server

    Auger, M; Barbeau, P S; Bartoszek, L; Baussan, E; Beauchamp, E; Benitez-Medina, C; Breidenbach, M; Chauhan, D; Cleveland, B; Conley, R; Cook, J; Cook, S; Coppens, A; Craddock, W; Daniels, T; Davis, C G; Davis, J; deVoe, R; Dobi, A; Dolinski, M J; Dunford, M; Fairbank, W; Farine, J; Fierlinger, P; Franco, D; Giroux, G; Gornea, R; Graham, K; Gratta, G; Hagemann, C; Hall, C; Hall, K; Hargrove, C; Herrin, S; Hodgson, J; Hughes, M; Karelin, A; Kaufman, L J; Kirk, J; Kuchenkov, A; Kumar, K; Leonard, D S; Leonard, F; LePort, F; Mackay, D; MacLellan, R; Marino, M; Merkle, K; Mong, B; Díez, M Montero; Müller, A R; Neilson, R; Odian, A; O'Sullivan, K; Oullet, C; Piepke, A; Pocar, A; Prescott, C Y; Pushkin, K; Rivas, A; Rollin, E; Rowson, P C; Sabourov, A; Sinclair, D; Skarpaas, K; Slutsky, S; Stekhanov, V; Strickland, V; Swift, M; Tosi, D; Twelker, K; Vuilleumier, J -L; Vuilleumier, J -M; Walton, T; Weber, M; Wichoski, U; Wodin, J; Wright, J D; Yang, L; Yen, Y -R

    2012-01-01

    EXO-200 is an experiment designed to search for double beta decay of $^{136}$Xe with a single-phase, liquid xenon detector. It uses an active mass of 110 kg of xenon enriched to 80.6% in the isotope 136 in an ultra-low background time projection chamber capable of simultaneous detection of ionization and scintillation. This paper describes the EXO-200 detector with particular attention to the most innovative aspects of the design that revolves around the reduction of backgrounds, the efficient use of the expensive isotopically enriched xenon, and the optimization of the energy resolution in a relatively large volume.

  2. National Ignition Facility Target Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wavrik, R W; Cox, J R; Fleming, P J

    2000-10-05

    On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This

  3. National Ignition Facility Target Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This was

  4. Potentials of advanced gas detectors for health physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large variety of fast electronics gaseous detectors has been developed in recent years to meet the challenging requirements of particle physics experiments. These devices, and in particular the multiwire proportional chamber, the drift chamber, the time protection chamber and the microstrip gas chamber, have increasingly good granularity and tracking capability for complex events, and very good tolerance to large radiation fluxes. After a short summary of the operating principles of gas detectors, this paper elaborates on possible applications of the new devices as tools to analyse experimentally the microscopic features of the energy loss mechanisms in biological tissues (nanodosimetry). The combination of a time projection chamber as main detector with a microstrip end-plate, taking advantage of the scale expansion provided by operating at low gas density, should allow us to reach a granularity at the nanometer scale only achievable today with passive devices. (Author)

  5. Potentials of advanced gas detectors for health physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauli, F. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1995-12-31

    A large variety of fast electronics gaseous detectors has been developed in recent years to meet the challenging requirements of particle physics experiments. These devices, and in particular the multiwire proportional chamber, the drift chamber, the time protection chamber and the microstrip gas chamber, have increasingly good granularity and tracking capability for complex events, and very good tolerance to large radiation fluxes. After a short summary of the operating principles of gas detectors, this paper elaborates on possible applications of the new devices as tools to analyse experimentally the microscopic features of the energy loss mechanisms in biological tissues (nanodosimetry). The combination of a time projection chamber as main detector with a microstrip end-plate, taking advantage of the scale expansion provided by operating at low gas density, should allow us to reach a granularity at the nanometer scale only achievable today with passive devices. (Author).

  6. Characterization of the first stage prototype of the TIFFIN detector

    OpenAIRE

    Ashley, Rachel Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    A single-sided, gridded, gas ionization chamber with digital read-out and a dedicated gas-flow control system was built as the first stage prototype of the Twin Ionization chamber for Fission Fragment Investigation (TIFFIN) detector. The detector was tested with an α-particle source, and the operating parameters of the detector were probed to establish its response. Investigation of the operating parameters of the prototype led to an energy resolution of 8.69(1)% when running the detector wit...

  7. Large area two dimensional position sensitive detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After an introduction, a position-sensitive ionization chamber, a parallel-plate detector, and a multiwire position-sensitive chamber are described. Then the data acquisition and analysis methods are considered. Furthermore, the experimental methods for a multi-parameter experiment are described. Finally, the measurement of gamma-ray and neutron multiplicities and sequential fission is considered, and the results are presented. (HSI)

  8. Performance test for radon measuring instruments using radon chamber at PTB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorimachi, Atsuyuki [Institute of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Hirosaki University, 66-1 Hon-cho, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8564 (Japan); Ishikawa, Tetsuo [Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Tokonami, Shinji, E-mail: tokonami@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp [Institute of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Hirosaki University, 66-1 Hon-cho, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8564 (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    An intercomparison on radon ({sup 222}Rn) measuring instruments was carried out at the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany (PTB). Two types of alpha track detectors based on a passive {sup 222}Rn-thoron ({sup 220}Rn) discriminative measurement technique were used: these were the commercially available Raduet and Radopot detectors that were developed and calibrated by the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan (NIRS). The {sup 222}Rn grab sampling and continuous measurement methods were also compared using the PTB pulse ionization chamber. The results using the passive detectors showed that there was a good agreement between the time-integrated {sup 222}Rn concentrations obtained from the Raduet detectors and the PTB pulse ionization chamber, as in the case with the Radopot detectors. In the grab sampling measurements, the agreement between the {sup 222}Rn concentrations measured using the NIRS gas storage ionization chamber and the PTB pulse ionization chamber was within 5% as in the case with the NIRS scintillation cell measurement. Similar to the measurements of the passive detectors and grab sampling, little distinct difference in the {sup 222}Rn concentration was observed for the NIRS continuous electrostatic collection monitor. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Performance test for radon measuring instruments at PTB was carried out. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NIRS passive detectors, grab sampling and continuous instrument were used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The radon concentrations obtained by NIRS agreed with those from PTB.

  9. Multiwire proportional chamber for Moessbauer spectroscopy: development and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new Multiwere proportional Chamber designed for Moessbauer Spectroscopy is presented. This detector allows transmission backscattering experiments using either photons or electrons. The Moessbauer data acquisition system, partially developed for this work is described. A simple method for determining the frontier between true proportional and semi-proportional regions of operation in gaseous detectors is proposed. The study of the tertiary gas mixture He-Ar-CH4 leads to a straight forward way of energy calibration of the electron spectra. Moessbauer spectra using Fe-57 source are presented. In particular those obtained with backsattered electrons show the feasibility of depth selective analysis with gaseous proportional counters. (author)

  10. Bakelite chambers for time-of-flight measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Cwiok, M; Górski, M; Królikowski, J

    1999-01-01

    We report on the search of composite organic materials with the volume resistivity ranging from 10 sup 8 to 10 sup 1 sup 1 OMEGA cm. Materials having resistivity in this range may be used for electrodes of thin gap Parallel Plate Avalanche Chambers. Gas detectors of such structure and operated at increased gas pressure allow, potentially, a sub-nanosecond time resolution. Using bakelite-like material with electrical properties well tuned during manufacturing opens the possibility to overcome limitations related to the semi-conductive glass employed usually for ultrafast gas detectors of parallel plate structure for time-of-flight technique.

  11. Glass resistive plate chambers in the OPERA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OPERA is an underground neutrino oscillation experiment to search for ντ appearance from a pure νμ beam produced at CERN. To flag the events due to the neutrino interactions with the rock surrounding the OPERA detector, a large VETO system, based on the use of Glass Resistive Plate Chambers (GRPC) has been realized. We describe the detectors, the tests performed before the installation in the underground laboratories and the monitor system for the water pollution in the GRPC gas mixture

  12. Comparison of gamma densitometer detectors used in loss of coolant studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipp, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Ionization chamber type gamma detectors are used in water-steam density measurements in loss of coolant studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Ionization chambers have replaced current-mode scintillation detectors to obtain stability and freedom from magnetic field interference. However, this change results in some loss of fast transient response. Results of studies comparing the transient response of ionization chamber detectors, plastic scintillation detectors, and sodium iodide (NaI) detectors to rapid changes in gamma intensity demonstrate that plastic scintillation detectors have the fastest response and most closely reproduce the transient; ionization chambers have an initial fast response followed by a slower response, which may produce errors in fast transient measurements; and NaI scintillation detectors have a moderately fast initial response followed by an extremely slow response, which produces errors in even slow transient measurements.

  13. Progress on CMS detector lowering

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    It was an amazing engineering challenge - the lowering of the first hugeendcap disc (YE+3) of the CMS detector slowly and carefully 100 metres underground. The spectacular descent took place on 30 November and was documented by a film crew from Reuters news group. The uniquely shaped slice is 16 m high, about 50 cm thick, and weighs 400 tonnes. It is one of 15 sections that make up the complete CMS detector. The solid steel structure of the disc forms part of the magnet return yoke and is equipped on both sides with muon chambers. A special gantry crane lowered the element, with just 20 cm of leeway between the edges of the detector and the walls of the shaft! On 12 December, a further section of the detector (YE+2) containing the cathode strip chamber made the 10-hour journey underground. This piece is 16 m high and weighs 880 tonnes. There are now four sections of the detector in the experimental cavern, with a further 11 to follow. The endcap disc YE+3 (seen in the foreground) begins its journey down the ...

  14. Development of a portable gas-filled ionization chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, K. Y.; Cha, S. M.; Gwak, M. S.

    2014-02-01

    A new portable gas-filled ionization chamber has been designed and constructed at the Physics Department of Sung Kyun Kwan University. To overcome the maximum count rate of ˜105 particles per second of a conventional ionization chamber, which utilizes a Frisch grid, and to enhance the portability of a detector, we adopted the design of multiple electrodes and modified it from the original designs by Kimura et al. and Chae et al. The new design utilizes a stack of multiple electrodes installed perpendicular to the optical beam axis. This configuration provides a fast response time for the detector, which is essential for high-rate counting. The device has been tested with a 241Am ( t 1/2 = 432.2 years) radioactive α source, which mainly emits 5.486-MeV (branching ratio of 85%) and 5.443-MeV (branching ratio of 13%) α particles. An energy resolution of 6.3% was achieved.

  15. Development of a portable gas-filled ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new portable gas-filled ionization chamber has been designed and constructed at the Physics Department of Sung Kyun Kwan University. To overcome the maximum count rate of ∼ 105 particles per second of a conventional ionization chamber, which utilizes a Frisch grid, and to enhance the portability of a detector, we adopted the design of multiple electrodes and modified it from the original designs by Kimura et al. and Chae et al. The new design utilizes a stack of multiple electrodes installed perpendicular to the optical beam axis. This configuration provides a fast response time for the detector, which is essential for high-rate counting. The device has been tested with a 241Am (t1/2 = 432.2 years) radioactive α source, which mainly emits 5.486-MeV (branching ratio of 85%) and 5.443-MeV (branching ratio of 13%) α particles. An energy resolution of 6.3% was achieved.

  16. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Paolucci

    2011-01-01

    The RPC muon detector and trigger are working very well, contributing positively to the high quality of CMS data. Most of 2011 has been used to improve the stability of our system and the monitoring tools used online and offline by the shifters and experts. The high-voltage working point is corrected, chamber-by-chamber, for pressure variation since July 2011. Corrections are applied at PVSS level during the stand-by mode (no collision) and are not changed until the next fill. The single detector calibration, HV scan, of February and the P-correction described before were very important steps towards fine-tuning the stability of the RPC performances. A very detailed analysis of the RPC performances is now ongoing and from preliminary results we observe an important improvements of the cluster size stability in time. The maximum oscillation of the cluster size run by run is now about 1%. At the same time we are not observing the same stability in the detection efficiency that shows an oscillation of about ...

  17. Radiation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fultz, Brent T.

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and X-rays generated in backscatter Mossbauer effect spectroscopy and X-ray spectrometry, which has a large "window" for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

  18. HPXe ionization chambers for γ spectrometry at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottini-Hustache, S.; Monsanglant-Louvet, C.; Haan, S.; Dmitrenko, V.; Grachev, V.; Ulin, S.

    2004-01-01

    High pressure xenon (HPXe) ionization chambers exhibit many characteristics which make them particularly suitable for industrial γ spectrometry at room or higher temperature. The use of a gas as detection medium allows one to reach very large effective volumes and makes these chambers relatively insensitive to radiation damage. Further, the high atomic number of xenon ( Z=54) enhances the total absorption of incident photons and provides, combined to high pressure, a good enough detection efficiency with respect to solid state detectors. Furthermore, such ionization chambers with Frisch grid appear to be very stable over wide periods (e.g. a research prototype has been used aboard MIR orbital station for several years) and temperature range (up to 180°), without maintenance. The characteristics of different prototypes are presented. Their detection efficiency and energy resolution are studied as a function of incident γ ray energy. New developments in electronics and signal processing are also investigated to improve their performances.

  19. HPXe ionization chambers for γ spectrometry at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High pressure xenon (HPXe) ionization chambers exhibit many characteristics which make them particularly suitable for industrial γ spectrometry at room or higher temperature. The use of a gas as detection medium allows one to reach very large effective volumes and makes these chambers relatively insensitive to radiation damage. Further, the high atomic number of xenon (Z=54) enhances the total absorption of incident photons and provides, combined to high pressure, a good enough detection efficiency with respect to solid state detectors. Furthermore, such ionization chambers with Frisch grid appear to be very stable over wide periods (e.g. a research prototype has been used aboard MIR orbital station for several years) and temperature range (up to 180 deg. ), without maintenance. The characteristics of different prototypes are presented. Their detection efficiency and energy resolution are studied as a function of incident γ ray energy. New developments in electronics and signal processing are also investigated to improve their performances

  20. Streamlined Calibration of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer Precision Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Levin, DS; The ATLAS collaboration; Dai, T; Diehl, EB; Ferretti, C; Hindes, JM; Zhou, B

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS Muon Spectrometer is comprised of nearly 1200 optically Monitored Drifttube Chambers (MDTs) containing 354,000 aluminum drift tubes. The chambers are configured in barrel and endcap regions. The momentum resolution required for the LHC physics reach (dp/p = 3% and 10% at 100 GeV and 1 TeV) demands rigorous MDT drift tube calibration with frequent updates. These calibrations (RT functions) convert the measured drift times to drift radii and are a critical component to the spectrometer performance. They are sensitive to the MDT gas composition: Ar 93%, CO2 7% at 3 bar, flowing through the detector at arate of 100,000 l hr−1. We report on the generation and application of Universal RT calibrations derived from an inline gas system monitor chamber. Results from ATLAS cosmic ray commissioning data are included. These Universal RTs are intended for muon track reconstuction in LHC startup phase.

  1. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Iaselli

    2010-01-01

    During the technical stop, the RPC team was part of the CMS task force team working on bushing replacements in the Endcap cooling system, also validating the repairs in terms of connectivity (HV, LV and signal cables), and gas leak, on RE chambers. In parallel, the RPC team profited from the opportunity to cure several known problems: six chambers with HV problems (1 off + 5 single gaps) were recovered on both gaps; four known HV problems were localized at chamber level; additional temperature sensors were installed on cooling pipes on negative REs; one broken LV module in RE-1 was replaced. During the last month, the RPC group has made big improvements in the operations tools. New trigger supervisor software has substantially reduced the configuration time. Monitoring is now more robust and more efficient in providing prompt diagnostics. The detector has been under central DCS control for two weeks. Improvements have been made to both functionality and documentation and no major problems were found. Beam s...

  2. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Paolucci

    2012-01-01

      2011 data-taking was very satisfactory for both the RPC detector and trigger. The RPC system ran very smoothly in 2011, showing an excellent stability and very high data-tacking efficiency. Data loss for RPC was about 0.37%, corresponding to 19 pb−1. Most of the performance studies, based on 2011 data, are now completed and the results have been already approved by CMS to be presented at the RPC 2012 conference (February 2012 at LNF). During 2011, the number of disconnected chambers increased from six to eight corresponding to 0.8% of the full system, while the single-gap-mode chambers increased from 28 to 31. Most of the problematic chambers are due to bad high-voltage connection and electronic failures that can be solved only during the 2013-2014 Long Shutdown. 98.4% of the electronic channels were operational. The average detection efficiency in 2011 was about 95%, which was the same value measured during the HV scan done at the beginning of the 2011 data-taking. Efficiency has be...

  3. MUON DETECTORS: DT

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Redondo Fernandez

    2011-01-01

    The DT system has operated successfully during the entire 2011 data-taking: the fraction of good channels was always >99.4 % and the downtime caused to CMS amounts to a few inverse picobarns. This excellent performance does not come without a price: the DT group requested more than 30 short accesses to the underground experimental cavern (UXC).  A large fraction of interventions was for dealing with overheated LV Anderson connectors, whose failure can affect larger sections of the detector (a whole chamber, or half a wheel of the CMS barrel, etc.). A crash programme for reworking those connections will take place during the Year-End Technical Stop. The system of six vd chambers (VDC) that were installed on the DT exhaust gas line have operated successfully. The VDCs are small drift chambers the size of a shoebox that measure the drift velocity every 10 minutes. Possible deviations from the nominal value could be caused by a contamination of the gas mixture or changes in pressure or temperat...

  4. MUON DETECTORS: CSC

    CERN Multimedia

    R. Breedon

    Figure 2: Five ME4/2 chambers mounted on the +endcap. At the end of June, five large, outer cathode strip chambers (CSC) that were produced as spares during the original production were mounted on part of the disk space reserved for ME4/2 on the positive endcap (Fig. 2). The chambers were cabled, attached to services, and fully integrated and commissioned into the CSC DAQ and trigger systems. Comprising almost a full trigger sector, CMS will be able to test the significant improvement the trigger efficiency of the EMU system that the presence of the full ME4/2 ring is expected to bring. The return of beam in November was observed as “splash” events in the CSCs in which the detectors were showered with a huge number of particles at the same time. Although the CSCs were operating at a lower standby voltage the multiple hits on a strips could not be individually distinguished.&am...

  5. Department of Radiation Detectors - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work carried out in 1996 in the Department of Radiation Detectors concentrated on three subjects: (i) Semiconductor Detectors (ii) X-ray Tube Generators (iii) Material Modification Using Ion and Plasma Beams. The Departamental objectives are: a search for new types of detectors, adapting modern technologies (especially of industrial microelectronics) to detector manufacturing, producing unique detectors tailored for physics experiments, manufacturing standard detectors for radiation measuring instruments. These objectives were accomplished in 1996 by: research on unique detectors for nuclear physics (e.g. a spherical set of particle detectors silicon ball), detectors for particle identification), development of technology of high-resistivity silicon detectors HRSi (grant proposal), development of thermoelectric cooling systems (grant proposal), research on p-i-n photodiode-based personal dosimeters, study of applicability of industrial planar technology in producing detectors, manufacturing detectors developed in previous years, re-generating and servicing customer detectors of various origin. The Department conducts research on the design and technology involved in producing X-ray generators based on X-ray tubes of special construction. Various tube models and their power supplies were developed. Some work has also been devoted to the detection and dosimetry of X-rays. X-ray tube generators are applied to non-destructive testing and are components of analytical systems such as: X-ray fluorescence chemical composition analysis, gauges of layer thickness and composition stress measurements, on-line control of processes, others where an X-ray tube may replace a radio-isotope source. In 1996, the Department: reviewed the domestic demand for X-ray generators, developed an X-ray generator for diagnosis of ostheroporosis of human limbs, prepared a grant proposal for the development of a new instrument for radiotherapy, the so-called needle-like X-ray tube. (author)

  6. Gas supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of all the main sources of fossil fuels, natural gas stands as a newcomer. While it has already reached an age of maturity in the New World, due to the seniority of its development there, it is marked by the hopes and growth rates of a new energy source in European and Asia. As it becomes a major world energy source, natural gas has to secure consumer confidence, and thereby its own future development. To do so, a reliable supply of it must remain available, and at prices compatible with users' needs. How does natural gas resemble other sources of energy. And what specific features distinguish it in many ways from the others. The answers to these questions are themselves basis elements for understanding the physical process linking the gas field to the client's appliance. They also shed some light on the evolving commercial ties among producers and gas companies on the large regional markets around the world - North America, Europe and the Far East

  7. The central drift chamber for the D0 experiment: Design, construction and test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cylindrical drift chamber has been designed and built at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. This chamber is to be installed in the D0 detector which is being completed at the Fermi National Accelerator. In this dissertation the design, construction and testing of this chamber are described. The characteristic features of this chamber are cells formed by solid walls and a modular structure. Much discussion is given to the performance of and results from a chamber made from three final modules which was installed in the D0 interaction region during the 1988/1989 collider run. Using this chamber proton anti-proton interactions were measured at the D0 interaction point

  8. The central drift chamber for the D0 experiment: Design, construction and test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnke, T.

    1989-08-01

    A cylindrical drift chamber has been designed and built at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. This chamber is to be installed in the D0 detector which is being completed at the Fermi National Accelerator. In this dissertation the design, construction and testing of this chamber are described. The characteristic features of this chamber are cells formed by solid walls and a modular structure. Much discussion is given to the performance of and results from a chamber made from three final modules which was installed in the D0 interaction region during the 1988/1989 collider run. Using this chamber proton anti-proton interactions were measured at the D0 interaction point.

  9. A multiple sampling ionization chamber for the External Target Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber used as a particle identification device for high energy heavy ions has been developed for the External Target Facility. The performance of this detector was tested with a 239Pu α source and RI beams. A Z resolution (FWHM) of 0.4–0.6 was achieved for nuclear fragments of 18O at 400 AMeV

  10. Imaging with high Dynamic using an Ionization Chamber

    OpenAIRE

    Menk, Ralf-Hendrik; Amenitsch, Heinz; Arfelli, Fulvia; Bernstorff, Sigrid; Besch, Hans Juergen; Voltolina, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    In this work a combination of an ionization chamber with one-dimensional spatial resolution and a MicroCAT structure will be presented. The combination between gas gain operations and integrating front-end electronics yields a dynamic range as high as eight to nine orders of magnitude. Therefore this device is well suitable for medical imaging or applications such as small angle x-ray scattering, where the requirements on the dynamic of the detector are exceptional high. Basically the describ...

  11. Low Pressure Negative Ion Drift Chamber for Dark Matter Search

    CERN Document Server

    Snowden-Ifft, D P; Burwell, J M

    2000-01-01

    Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are an attractive candidate for the dark matter thought to make up the bulk of the mass of our universe. We explore here the possibility of using a low pressure negative ion drift chamber to search for WIMPs. The innovation of drifting ions, instead of electrons, allows the design of a detector with exceptional sensitivity to, background rejection from, and signature of WIMPs.

  12. Data analysis for bubble chamber and hybrid systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The course will be mainly devoted to data-processing aspects of present-day bubble chamber experiments involving the use of external particle detectors. Present trends will be briefly reviewed from the point of view of instrumentation and trigger conditions employed to realize the physics objectives. The lectures will include a discussion of software aids and disciplines for program maintenance and development and the management of data structures. (orig.)

  13. Two-dimensional position sensitive ionization chamber with GEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Noritaka; Noro, Tetsuo; Sakaguchi, Satoshi; Takao, Hideaki; Nishio, Yasutaka

    2014-09-01

    We have been developing a multi-anode ionization chamber for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at Kyushu University. Furthermore, we are planning to construct a neutron detector with high position resolution by combining the chamber with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) and a neutron converter. One of purposes is the measurement of p-> , pn knockout reaction from unstable nuclei. The multi-anode ionization chamber is composed of subdivided multiple anodes, a cathode to produce an uniform electric field, and a Frisch grid. The chamber must have position sensitivity because obtaining a beam profile is required for AMS measurements, where counting loss should be avoided. Also in the case of the neutron detector, it is necessary to measure the position to deduce the scattering angles. We have recently established a two-dimensional position readout system by the following methods: the measurement of horizontal position is enabled by trimming some anodes into wedge-like shape, and vertical position can be determined by the ratio of induced charge on the grid to the total charge on anodes. In addition, improvement of S/N ratio is important for isotope separation and position resolution. We installed a rectangular-shaped GEM and tried improving S/N ratio by electron amplification.

  14. Geant4 simulation of a large volume segmented clover detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The simulation for the energy spectra, efficiency and add back factor for the large volume segmented clover detector at VECC has been performed in the Geant4 platform. The details about the segmented clover detector and its comparison of measured efficiency with a INGA clover detector has been reported earlier. Geometry construction. The size of each crystal in this detector is 9 cm (length) x 6 cm (diameter), which is larger than a normal clover detector used in INGA array, having typical size of 7 cm (length) x 5 cm (diameter). The detector is housed inside an aluminium vacuum chamber

  15. New CMS detectors under construction at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    While the LHC will play the starring role in the 2013/2014 Long Shutdown (LS1), the break will also be a chance for its experiments to upgrade their detectors. CMS will be expanding its current muon detection systems, fitting 72 new cathode strip chambers (CSC) and 144 new resistive plate chambers (RPC) to the endcaps of the detector. These new chambers are currently under construction in Building 904.   CMS engineers install side panels on a CSC detector in Building 904. "The original RPC and CSC detectors were constructed in bits and pieces around the world," says Armando Lanaro, CSC construction co-ordinator. "But for the construction of these additional chambers, we decided to unify the assembly and testing into a single facility at CERN. There, CMS technicians, engineers and physicists are taking raw materials and transforming them into installation-ready detectors.” This new facility can be found in Building 904. Once the assembly site for the strai...

  16. Performance of the SLD Central Drift Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report for the first time on the performance of the SLD Central Drift Chamber (CDC) at SLC, which has been recording data since 1992. The low mass of the chamber and the use of a gas characterized by both a low drift velocity and low diffusion constant help to minimize the drift-distance measurement errors. We describe some of the calibrations and corrections applied to the data, and report on the resolutions achieved thus far. We measure an intrinsic drift resolution of 55-110 μm in the region of uniform field. Analysis of the full drift-pulse waveform allows for efficient double-hit resolution of about 1 mm. Momentum resolution is characterized by the formula (dpt/pt2)2 = 0.00502 + (0.010/pt)2. Used in conjunction with the SLD vertex detector, the CDC permits measurements of impact parameters of high-momentum tracks to the level of 10 μm in the r-φ plane and 36 μm the r-z plane. A resolution of 6.4% is achieved in the measurement of dE/dx for the electrons in Bhabha scattering events

  17. LRAD, semiconductor, and other radiation detectors applied to environmental monitoring for alpha and beta contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The very short range of alpha particles in air (typically 2 to 3 cm) has severely limited the use of traditional alpha monitors for detecting and identifying small amounts of alpha-producing contamination in soil, water, and other materials. Monitors based on the traditional alpha detector technology are often hard pressed to meet continually increasing sensitivity requirements. The long-range alpha detector (LRAD) avoids the distance restriction by detecting the ions produced by the interaction of alpha particles with air, rather than the alpha particles directly. The ions are swept into an ion detector either by a moving air current (generated by a fan) or a weak electric field. The LRAD is limited by the distance the ions can travel in the ∼5-s ion lifetime (1 to 100 m), rather than by the several-centimeter range of the alpha particles. The LRAD can be used to perform sensitive (less than 10 disintegrations per minute per 100 cm2) field scans of large surface areas (ranging from hundreds of square meters of concrete floor to thousands of square meters of soil). Because the 'active' element in a LRAD is a solid-metal ion collection plate, the detector is relatively inexpensive, easy to service, and quite rugged. However, the LRAD cannot supply any spectroscopic information to help identify the contaminant. Semiconductor, ionization chamber, and other types of particle detector can generate clean spectra from small samples of material and can identify trace amounts of surface contamination. Furthermore, these detectors are rugged enough to use routinely in a mobile laboratory for isotope identification of 'hot spots' located by the LRAD system. The combination of the LRAD with either an alpha spectrometer or a mobile laboratory with other particle detectors has applications for field beta-particle monitoring (such as would result from tritium contamination) as well as alpha particle detection. (author)

  18. Two-dimensional position sensitive neutron detector

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A M Shaikh; S S Desai; A K Patra

    2004-08-01

    A two-dimensional position sensitive neutron detector has been developed. The detector is a 3He + Kr filled multiwire proportional counter with charge division position readout and has a sensitive area of 345 mm × 345 mm, pixel size 5 mm × 5 mm, active depth 25 mm and is designed for efficiency of 70% for 4 Å neutrons. The detector is tested with 0.5 bar 3He + 1.5 bar krypton gas mixture in active chamber and 2 bar 4He in compensating chamber. The pulse height spectrum recorded at an anode potential of 2000 V shows energy resolution of ∼ 25% for the 764 keV peak. A spatial resolution of 8 mm × 6 mm is achieved. The detector is suitable for SANS studies in the range of 0.02–0.25 Å-1.

  19. Studies of gaseous multiplication coefficient in isobutane using a resistive plate chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Due to the increasing demands concerning High Energy Physics, Nuclear Medicine and other Nuclear Applications about gaseous detectors operating in high electric fields, many efforts have been done about the choice of filling gases that fulfill these requirements. In this context, the electron transport parameters in gases, as the gaseous multiplication coefficient, play an important role not only for detector design but also for simulation and modeling of discharges, allowing the validation of electron impact cross-sections. In the present work the preliminary measurements of gaseous multiplication coefficient, as function of the reduced electric field (from 36V/cm.Torr until 93V/cm.Torr), for isobutane are presented. Among several filling gases, isobutane is widely used in resistive plate chambers RPCs, and other gaseous detectors, due to its timing properties. Although its characteristics, there is a lack of swarm parameters data in literature for this gas, mainly at high electric fields. The experimental method used is based on the Pulsed Townsend technique, which follows from Townsend equation solution for a uniform electric field. Considering the ratio between the current (I), measured in avalanche mode, and the primary ionization current (I0), the effective multiplication coefficient can be determined, since alpha = d-1ln(I/I0), where d is the gap between the electrodes. In our configuration, the experimental setup consists of two parallel plates enclosure in a stainless steel chamber at gas flow regime. The anode, is made of a high resistivity (2.1012Ω.cm) glass (3mm thick and 14mm diameter), while the cathode is of aluminium (40mm diameter). Primary electrons are produced by irradiating the cathode with a nitrogen laser (LTB MNL200-LD) and are accelerated toward the anode by means of a high voltage power supply (Bertan 225-30). In order to validate the technique and to analyze effects of non-uniformity, results for nitrogen, which has well

  20. Studies of gaseous multiplication coefficient in isobutane using a resistive plate chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Josemary A.C.; Botelho, Suzana; Tobias, Carmen C.B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Sao Paulo (PUC/SP), SP (Brazil); Lima, Iara B.; Vivaldini, Tulio C. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ridenti, Marco A.; Pascholati, Paulo R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Lab. do Acelerador Linear; Fonte, Paulo; Mangiarotti, Alessio [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Dept. de fisica. Lab. de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas

    2009-07-01

    Full text: Due to the increasing demands concerning High Energy Physics, Nuclear Medicine and other Nuclear Applications about gaseous detectors operating in high electric fields, many efforts have been done about the choice of filling gases that fulfill these requirements. In this context, the electron transport parameters in gases, as the gaseous multiplication coefficient, play an important role not only for detector design but also for simulation and modeling of discharges, allowing the validation of electron impact cross-sections. In the present work the preliminary measurements of gaseous multiplication coefficient, as function of the reduced electric field (from 36V/cm.Torr until 93V/cm.Torr), for isobutane are presented. Among several filling gases, isobutane is widely used in resistive plate chambers RPCs, and other gaseous detectors, due to its timing properties. Although its characteristics, there is a lack of swarm parameters data in literature for this gas, mainly at high electric fields. The experimental method used is based on the Pulsed Townsend technique, which follows from Townsend equation solution for a uniform electric field. Considering the ratio between the current (I), measured in avalanche mode, and the primary ionization current (I{sub 0}), the effective multiplication coefficient can be determined, since alpha = d{sup -1}ln(I/I{sub 0}), where d is the gap between the electrodes. In our configuration, the experimental setup consists of two parallel plates enclosure in a stainless steel chamber at gas flow regime. The anode, is made of a high resistivity (2.10{sup 12}{omega}.cm) glass (3mm thick and 14mm diameter), while the cathode is of aluminium (40mm diameter). Primary electrons are produced by irradiating the cathode with a nitrogen laser (LTB MNL200-LD) and are accelerated toward the anode by means of a high voltage power supply (Bertan 225-30). In order to validate the technique and to analyze effects of non-uniformity, results for