WorldWideScience

Sample records for chambers detector supplying

  1. Drift chamber detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers is presented. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysied, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author)

  2. Drift Chambers detectors; Detectores de deriva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, I.; Martinez laso, L.

    1989-07-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs.

  3. Multi-chamber ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the detector a single beta ionization source and a double- or three-chamber set-up is used, the chambers being designed in the shape of a truncated cone and facing each other with their bases. The source can be positioned with respect to the common center or modal electrode, the adjustment of the ionization in each chamber this becoming easier. The center or modal electrode also can be adjusted with respect to the source. (DG)

  4. Ionization chamber smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One kind of smoke detector, the ionization-type, is regulated by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) because it uses a radioactive substance in its mechanism. Radioactivity and radiation are natural phenomena, but they are not very familiar to the average householder. This has led to a number of questions being asked of the AECB. These questions and AECB responses are outlined

  5. Ion chamber based neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derzon, Mark S; Galambos, Paul C; Renzi, Ronald F

    2014-12-16

    A neutron detector with monolithically integrated readout circuitry, including: a bonded semiconductor die; an ion chamber formed in the bonded semiconductor die; a first electrode and a second electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; and the readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the first and second electrodes. The bonded semiconductor die includes an etched semiconductor substrate bonded to an active semiconductor substrate. The readout circuitry is formed in a portion of the active semiconductor substrate. The ion chamber has a substantially planar first surface on which the first electrode is formed and a substantially planar second surface, parallel to the first surface, on which the second electrode is formed. The distance between the first electrode and the second electrode may be equal to or less than the 50% attenuation length for neutrons in the neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber.

  6. Neutron-chamber detectors and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detector applications in Nuclear Safeguards and Waste Management have included measuring neutrons from fission and (alpha,n) reactions with well-moderated neutron proportional counters, often embedded in a slab of polyethylene. Other less-moderated geometries are useful for detecting both bare and moderated fission-source neutrons with good efficiency. The neutron chamber is an undermoderated detector design comprising a large, hollow, polyethylene-walled chamber containing one or more proportional counters. Neutron-chamber detectors are relatively inexpensive; can have large apertures, usually through a thin chamber wall; and offer very good detection efficiency per dollar. Neutron-chamber detectors have also been used for monitoring vehicles and for assaying large crates of transuranic waste. Our Monte Carlo calculations for a new application (monitoring low-density waste for concealed plutonium) illustrate the advantages of the hollow-chamber design for detecting moderated fission sources. 9 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Compact ion chamber based neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derzon, Mark S.; Galambos, Paul C.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2015-10-27

    A directional neutron detector has an ion chamber formed in a dielectric material; a signal electrode and a ground electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the signal and ground electrodes; and a signal processor electrically coupled to the readout circuitry. The ion chamber has a pair of substantially planar electrode surfaces. The chamber pressure of the neutron absorbing material is selected such that the reaction particle ion trail length for neutrons absorbed by the neutron absorbing material is equal to or less than the distance between the electrode surfaces. The signal processor is adapted to determine a path angle for each absorbed neutron based on the rise time of the corresponding pulse in a time-varying detector signal.

  8. Cosmic Muon Detector Using Proportional Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Varga, Dezső; Hamar, Gergő; Molnár, Janka Sára; Oláh, Éva; Pázmándi, Péter

    2015-01-01

    A set of classical multi-wire proportional chambers were designed and constructed with the main purpose of efficient cosmic muon detection. These detectors are relatively simple to construct, and at the same time are low cost, making them ideal for educational purposes. The detector layers have efficiencies above 99% for minimum ionizing cosmic muons, and their position resolution is about 1 cm, that is, particle trajectories are clearly observable. Visualization of straight tracks is possible using an LED array, with the discriminated and latched signal driving the display. Due to the exceptional operating stability of the chambers, the design can also be used for cosmic muon telescopes.

  9. Pressurized ionization chamber detectors for industrial use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of the thickness of the sheets made of different materials, e.g. metal, plastic, paper, cellulose, rubber, etc., is one of many industrial applications of nuclear techniques. The ionizing radiation detectors of ionization chamber type are based on measuring the variations in either exposure rate (for gamma radiation) or absorbed dose rate (for beta radiation) occurring in materials of different thickness, placed between the radiation source and the detector. The variations in exposure rate and absorbed dose rate can be traced by using radiation detectors of the ionization chamber type, which convert the exposure rate, X point, or the absorbed dose rate, D point, into a proportional electric current. The more stable the ionization current of the chambers (keeping a constant exposure rate or absorbed dose rate), the slighter the variations that can be detected in either exposure rate or absorbed dose rate, hence in the absorbing material placed between the radiation source and the detector. Based on these facts, several variants of such detectors, including the ionization chamber CIS-P5M-100Kr, CIS-P2M-1000Kr and CIS-P8M-70Kr, have been made. (author)

  10. Ionization-chamber smoke detector system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Robert F.

    1976-10-19

    This invention relates to an improved smoke-detection system of the ionization-chamber type. In the preferred embodiment, the system utilizes a conventional detector head comprising a measuring ionization chamber, a reference ionization chamber, and a normally non-conductive gas triode for discharging when a threshold concentration of airborne particulates is present in the measuring chamber. The improved system is designed to reduce false alarms caused by fluctuations in ambient temperature. Means are provided for periodically firing the gas discharge triode and each time recording the triggering voltage required. A computer compares each triggering voltage with its predecessor. The computer is programmed to energize an alarm if the difference between the two compared voltages is a relatively large value indicative of particulates in the measuring chamber and to disregard smaller differences typically resulting from changes in ambient temperature.

  11. Design of an ionization diffusion chamber detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prototype of an Ionization Diffusion Chamber detector has been made. It is a silindrical glass, 20 cm in diameter, 13,5 cm in height, air gas filled, operated at room pressure and room temperature at the top of this instrument while for the box temperature dry ice (CO2 solid) temperature is used. This detector is ready for seeing alpha and beta particle tracks. (author)

  12. Monitored Drift Chambers in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Herten, G

    Monitored Drift Chambers (MDT) are used in the ATLAS Detector to measure the momentum of high energy muons. They consist of drift tubes, which are filled with an Ar-CO2 gas mixture at 3 bar gas pressure. About 1200 drift chambers are required for ATLAS. They are up to 6 m long. Nevertheless the position of every wire needs to be known with a precision of 20 µm within a chamber. In addition, optical alignment sensors are required to measure the relative position of adjacent chambers with a precision of 30µm. This gigantic task seems impossible at first instance. Indeed it took many years of R&D to invent the right tools and methods before the first chamber could be built according to specifications. Today, at the time when 50% of the chambers have been produced, we are confident that the goal for ATLAS can be reached. The mechanical precision of the chambers could be verified with the x-ray tomograph at CERN. This ingenious device, developed for the MDT system, is able to measure the wire position insid...

  13. SONTRAC: A solar neutron track chamber detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, T. L.; Frye, G. M., Jr.; Owens, A.

    1985-01-01

    The recent detection on the solar maximum mission (SMM) satellite of high energy neutrons emitted during large solar flares has provided renewed incentive to design a neutron detector which has the sensitivity, energy resolution, and time resolution to measure the neutron time and energy spectra with sufficient precision to improve our understanding of the basic flare processes. Over the past two decades a variety of neutron detectors has been flown to measure the atmospheric neutron intensity above 10 MeV and to search for solar neutrons. The SONTRAC (Solar Neutron Track Chamber) detector, a new type of neutron detector which utilizes n-p scattering and has a sensitivity 1-3 orders of magnitude greater than previous instruments in the 20-200 MeV range is described. The energy resolution is 1% for neutron kinetic energy, T sub n 50 MeV. When used with a coded aperture mask at 50 m (as would be possible on the space station) an angular resolution of approx. 4 arc sec could be achieved, thereby locating the sites of high energy nuclear interactions with an angular precision comparable to the existing x-ray experiments on SMM. The scintillation chamber is investigated as a track chamber for high energy physics, either by using arrays of scintillating optical fibers or by optical imaging of particle trajectories in a block of scintillator.

  14. The 'Diogene' detector, 4π drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Diogene' is a detector with a solid angle near the steradian 4π, mainly comprising a drift chamber and capable of detecting in coincidence several tens of charged particles. Built by several laboratories (Dph-N/Saclay, CRN/Strasbourg and LPC/Clermont-Ferrand) it should be ready round about June 1980 to use the heavy ion beams of Saturne II for studying the multiple production of pions and protons in central collisions of relativistic heavy ions

  15. Wire chamber radiation detector with discharge control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wire chamber radiation detector has spaced apart parallel electrodes and grids defining an ignition region in which charged particles or other ionizing radiations initiate brief localized avalanche discharges and defining an adjacent memory region in which sustained glow discharges are initiated by the primary discharges. Conductors of the grids at each side of the memory section extend in orthogonal directions enabling readout of the X-Y coordinates of locations at which charged particles were detected by sequentially transmitting pulses to the conductors of one grid while detecting transmissions of the pulses to the orthogonal conductors of the other grid through glow discharges. One of the grids bounding the memory region is defined by an array of conductive elements each of which is connected to the associated readout conductor through a separate resistance. The wire chamber avoids ambiguities and imprecisions in the readout of coordinates when large numbers of simultaneous or near simultaneous charged particles have been detected. Down time between detection periods and the generation of radio frequency noise are also reduced

  16. Detector Physics of Resistive Plate Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Lippmann, Christian; Riegler, W

    2003-01-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) are gaseous parallel plate avalanche detectors that implement electrodes made from a material with a high volume resistivity between 10^7 and 10^12 Ohm cm. Large area RPCs with 2mm single gaps operated in avalanche mode provide above 98% efficiency and a time resolution of around 1ns up to a flux of several kHz/cm2. These Trigger RPCs will, as an example, equip the muon detector system of the ATLAS experiment at CERN on an area of 3650m2 and with 355.000 independent read out channels. Timing RPCs with a gas gap of 0.2 to 0.3mm are widely used in multi gap configurations and provide 99% efficiency and time resolution down to 50ps. While their performance is comparable to existing scintillator-based Time-Of-Flight (TOF) technology, Timing RPCs feature a significantly, up to an order of magnitude, lower price per channel. They will for example equip the 176m2 TOF barrel of the ALICE experiment at CERN with 160.000 independent read out cells. RPCs were originally operated in stream...

  17. OPAL Central Detector (Including vertex, jet and Z chambers)

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. OPAL's central tracking system consists of (in order of increasing radius) a silicon microvertex detector, a vertex detector, a jet chamber, and z-chambers. All the tracking detectors work by observing the ionization of atoms by charged particles passing by: when the atoms are ionized, electrons are knocked out of their atomic orbitals, and are then able to move freely in the detector. These ionization electrons are detected in the different parts of the tracking system. (This piece includes the vertex, jet and Z chambers) In the picture above, the central detector is the piece being removed to the right.

  18. Data Quality Monitoring for the CMS Resistive Plate Chamber Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimmino, A.; CMS Collaboration

    2011-06-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs), with their excellent time resolution (˜ 2 ns), were chosen as dedicated muon trigger detectors for the CMS experiment. RPCs fulfill the job of muon identification, estimate the momentum and unambiguously assign bunch crossing. The critical tasks of monitoring detector performances, debugging hardware, and certifying recorded data are carried out by the RPC Data Quality Monitoring (DQM) system. We here describe the structure, functionalities, and performances of the DQM applications for the CMS RPC detector.

  19. The Detector Control Systems for the CMS Resistive Plate Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Paolucci, P; Gómez-Reino, R; Viviani, C; Shahzad, R; Khurshid, T

    2010-01-01

    The Resistive Plate Chamber system is composed by 912 double-gap chambers equipped with about $10^4$ front-end boards. The correct and safe operation of the RPC system requires a sophisticated and complex online Detector Control System, able to monitor and control 2$\\cdot10^4$ hardware devices distributed on an area of about 5000 m$^2$. The RPC DCS acquires, monitors and stores about $10^5$ parameters coming from the detector, the electronics, the power system, the gas, and cooling systems. The DCS system and the first results, obtained during the 2007 and 2008 CMS cosmic runs, will be described in this paper.

  20. Contribution to Diogene detector drift chambers study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diogene detector has been brought into operation at Saclay with the collaboration of Strasbourg CRN and Clermont-Ferrand LPC. The Diogene essential characteristic is its solid angle near four pi, allowing complete exclusive measurements. Diogene characteristics allow to detect an important multiplicity of charged particles in coincidence, to measure their impulse until a transverse impulse around 1 GeV/c, and to identify them by their energy loss measurement. These general characteristics are exposed after some brief recalls on charged particle detection and migration counters. Technical aspects of the prototype are examined. It has been built to test fabrication technology, choice exactness and performance estimation validity. These detector performance estimation calculations that may be waited for in tracks reconstruction, impulse and energy loss resolution are exposed. Before, the electrostatics study for the prototype is reviewed. The temporary balance of already carried out tests is made

  1. Novel Front-end Electronics for Time Projection Chamber Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    García García, Eduardo José

    This work has been carried out in the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and it was supported by the European Union as part of the research and development towards the European detector the (EUDET) project, specifically for the International Linear Collider (ILC). In particle physics there are several different categories of particle detectors. The presented design is focused on a particular kind of tracking detector called Time Projection Chamber (TPC). The TPC provides a three dimensional image of electrically charged particles crossing a gaseous volume. The thesis includes a study of the requirements for future TPC detectors summarizing the parameters that the front-end readout electronics must fulfill. In addition, these requirements are compared with respect to the readouts used in existing TPC detectors. It is concluded that none of the existing front-end readout designs fulfill the stringent requirements. The main requirements for future TPC detectors are high integration, an increased n...

  2. Acoustic Sensor Design for Dark Matter Bubble Chamber Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felis, Ivan; Martínez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Ardid, Miguel

    2016-06-10

    Dark matter bubble chamber detectors use piezoelectric sensors in order to detect and discriminate the acoustic signals emitted by the bubbles grown within the superheated fluid from a nuclear recoil produced by a particle interaction. These sensors are attached to the outside walls of the vessel containing the fluid. The acoustic discrimination depends strongly on the properties of the sensor attached to the outer wall of the vessel that has to meet the requirements of radiopurity and size. With the aim of optimizing the sensor system, a test bench for the characterization of the sensors has been developed. The sensor response for different piezoelectric materials, geometries, matching layers, and backing layers have been measured and contrasted with FEM simulations and analytical models. The results of these studies lead us to have a design criterion for the construction of specific sensors for the next generation of dark matter bubble chamber detectors (250 L).

  3. Acoustic Sensor Design for Dark Matter Bubble Chamber Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felis, Ivan; Martínez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Ardid, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter bubble chamber detectors use piezoelectric sensors in order to detect and discriminate the acoustic signals emitted by the bubbles grown within the superheated fluid from a nuclear recoil produced by a particle interaction. These sensors are attached to the outside walls of the vessel containing the fluid. The acoustic discrimination depends strongly on the properties of the sensor attached to the outer wall of the vessel that has to meet the requirements of radiopurity and size. With the aim of optimizing the sensor system, a test bench for the characterization of the sensors has been developed. The sensor response for different piezoelectric materials, geometries, matching layers, and backing layers have been measured and contrasted with FEM simulations and analytical models. The results of these studies lead us to have a design criterion for the construction of specific sensors for the next generation of dark matter bubble chamber detectors (250 L). PMID:27294937

  4. Acoustic Sensor Design for Dark Matter Bubble Chamber Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Felis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dark matter bubble chamber detectors use piezoelectric sensors in order to detect and discriminate the acoustic signals emitted by the bubbles grown within the superheated fluid from a nuclear recoil produced by a particle interaction. These sensors are attached to the outside walls of the vessel containing the fluid. The acoustic discrimination depends strongly on the properties of the sensor attached to the outer wall of the vessel that has to meet the requirements of radiopurity and size. With the aim of optimizing the sensor system, a test bench for the characterization of the sensors has been developed. The sensor response for different piezoelectric materials, geometries, matching layers, and backing layers have been measured and contrasted with FEM simulations and analytical models. The results of these studies lead us to have a design criterion for the construction of specific sensors for the next generation of dark matter bubble chamber detectors (250 L.

  5. New development of holography in particle detectors: application to bubble chambers and streamer chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes the contribution of holography in two particle detectors well used in high energy physics. A first part presents the possibilities of a double beam holographic set up with diffuse illumination in the case of large scale bubble chamber (more than 1000 litres). The second part introduces the results obtained by the use of an in-line holographic recording in a streamer chamber (a streamer is the electroluminescent state of an electronic avalanche). In both cases, the new possibilities offered by these developments are discussed (resolution and depth of field of holographic images)

  6. Acoustic Sensor Design for Dark Matter Bubble Chamber Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan Felis; Juan Antonio Martínez-Mora; Miguel Ardid

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter bubble chamber detectors use piezoelectric sensors in order to detect and discriminate the acoustic signals emitted by the bubbles grown within the superheated fluid from a nuclear recoil produced by a particle interaction. These sensors are attached to the outside walls of the vessel containing the fluid. The acoustic discrimination depends strongly on the properties of the sensor attached to the outer wall of the vessel that has to meet the requirements of radiopurity and size. ...

  7. Electron Neutrino Classification in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Płoński, Piotr; Sulej, Robert; Zaremba, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinos are one of the least known elementary particles. The detection of neutrinos is an extremely difficult task since they are affected only by weak sub-atomic force or gravity. Therefore large detectors are constructed to reveal neutrino's properties. Among them the Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr-TPC) detectors provide excellent imaging and particle identification ability for studying neutrinos. The computerized methods for automatic reconstruction and identification of particles are needed to fully exploit the potential of the LAr-TPC technique. Herein, the novel method for electron neutrino classification is presented. The method constructs a feature descriptor from images of observed event. It characterizes the signal distribution propagated from vertex of interest, where the particle interacts with the detector medium. The classifier is learned with a constructed feature descriptor to decide whether the images represent the electron neutrino or cascade produced by photons. The proposed ap...

  8. Bremstrahlung Detection and Chamber Obstruction Localisation Using Scanning Radiation Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Naylor, G A; Robinson, D

    2005-01-01

    Radiation monitors consisting of scintillating plastic coupled to photomultipliers are used for diagnostic purposes. By scanning such a detector or a radiation scatterer, two applications are demonstrated: i) Monitoring of vacuum chamber conditioning by monitoring gas Bremstrahlung from residual gas. ii) Localisation of beam interception (beam losses) by longitudinal scanning of a radiation detector. The measurement of gas pressure inside long, small cross section, vacuum vessels is difficult due to the distance between the centre of the vacuum vessel and vacuum gauges (leading to a low vacuum conductance). The narrow beam of gamma Bremstrahlung radiation is intercepted by scanning tungsten blades in the beam line front-end allowing a radiation shower to be detected outside the vacuum vessel proportional to the gas pressure in the corresponding storage ring straight section. A second detector mounted on rails can be moved over a length of 6.5m parallel to the ESRF storage ring so as to localise regions of bea...

  9. Large area neutron detector based on Li6 ionization chamber with integrated body-moderator of high density polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detector was developed and funded by DHS to be a lower cost alternative to 3He detectors. A 6Li foil-lined ionization chamber was prepared with fill gas at one atmosphere and pulse mode operation. The high-density polyethylene (HOPE) body serves also as a neutron moderator. All electrodes, including high voltage bias supply, are hermetically sealed within the plastic slabs.

  10. Limited streamer chambers for the large volume detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tracking system of the Large Volume Detector, an underground experiment to study muons and nutrino astronomy, will use ∝ 15000 limited streamer chambers. We describe a comparison between the standard binary mixture (30% argon + 70% isobutane) and a low-hydrocarbon ternary mixture (2% argon + 10% isobutane + 88% carbon dioxide). The ternary composition results in a 400-volt-shorter single count-rate plateau, a 20% smaller primary streamer pulse-height, and a much higher streamer multiplicity. The count-rate plateaus have also been studied over a wide composition range of isobutane, argon, and carbon dioxide mixtures. We also discuss the streamer chamber quality control procedures and the results obtained from a sample of 2900 devices operated with the binary mixture. (orig.)

  11. The Laboratory appraisal of ionisation chamber smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper traces the development of the National Radiological Protection Board test programme for ionisation chamber smoke detectors, describes methods and summarises the results from the detectors which have been examined by NRPB. The results of dose rate and surface contamination measurements are included as well as data from the destructive testing programme. The 600degC fire test continues to produce the most interesting results especially concerning material incompatibility problems. Some source holder materials invariably cause loss of source integrity during a fire, as do certain methods of fixing the foil to the holder. In addition plastics containing certain fire retardants produce corrosive combustion products which cause loss of integrity of otherwise well-mounted sources. Fire tests at 1200degC were discontinued at an early stage in the programme since it was felt there was no additional information to be gained. As all detectors are now tested with respect to the NEA recommendations, the 1200degC incineration tests have been reinstated as part of the test programme. The criterion of failure relates to activity which becomes airborne rather than the total leakage concept which applies at the lower temperature. All the detectors submitted will ultimately be subjected to this test, and some preliminary results are presented here. (H.K.)

  12. Time Projection Chambers for the T2K Near Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2010-01-01

    The T2K experiment is designed to study neutrino oscillation properties by directing a high intensity neutrino beam produced at J-PARC in Tokai, Japan, towards the large Super-Kamiokande detector located 295 km away, in Kamioka, Japan. The experiment includes a sophisticated near detector complex, 280 m downstream of the neutrino production target in order to measure the properties of the neutrino beam and to better understand neutrino interactions at the energy scale below a few GeV. A key element of the near detectors is the ND280 tracker, consisting of two active scintillator-bar target systems surrounded by three large time projection chambers (TPCs) for charged particle tracking. The data collected with the tracker is used to study charged current neutrino interaction rates and kinematics prior to oscillation, in order to reduce uncertainties in the oscillation measurements by the far detector. The tracker is surrounded by the former UA1/Nomad dipole magnet and the TPCs measure the charges, momenta, and ...

  13. Theoretical and numerical simulation of critical gas supply of refuge chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao Hao; Jiang Shuguang; Tao Weiyong; Wu Zhengyan; Zhang Weiqing; Wang Kai

    2016-01-01

    The personnel in refuge chamber absorb O2 and exhale CO2 all the time. Supplying O2 and removing CO2 are the basic function of refuge chamber. After disaster occurs, the supply of the compressed air or oxy-gen for personnel in refuge chamber is limited. Thus, how to effectively use the compressed air and oxy-gen and try to improve the time of supply has a great significance. Supplying more oxygen will result in waste, while supplying less oxygen will cause its concentration to be lower, and harm life safety. This research uses the theoretical calculation and numerical simulation, finds critical gas supply for refuge chamber, and illuminates the change law of gas concentration with critical gas supply in refuge chamber, which provides theoretical guidance for effective use of compressed air and oxygen in refuge chamber.

  14. Comparative study of ionization chamber detectors vis-a-vis a CCD detector for dispersive XAS measurement in transmission geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poswal, A. K.; Agrawal, A.; Bhattachryya, D.; Jha, S. N.; Sahoo, N. K. [Applied Spectroscopy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai -400 085 (India)

    2013-02-05

    We have designed and fabricated parallel plate ionization chamber detectors and voltage vs. current characteristics (V-I curve) of the detectors were recorded with synchrotron radiation to qualify for use in X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. After qualifying the ionization chambers, the detectors were used in the dispersive EXAFS beamline (BL-08) at INDUS-2 SRS in Turbo-XAS geometry. Using the same setup and under the same setting, XAS spectra were also recorded with a CCD detector and the observation on relative performance of the ionization chamber vis-a-vis the CCD detector is presented in this paper.

  15. X-ray detector for automatic exposure control using ionization chamber filled with xenon gas

    CERN Document Server

    Nakagawa, A; Yoshida, T

    2003-01-01

    This report refers to our newly developed X-ray detector for reliable automatic X-ray exposure control, which is to be widely used for X-ray diagnoses in various clinical fields. This new detector utilizes an ionization chamber filled with xenon gas, in contrast to conventional X-ray detectors which use ionization chambers filled with air. Use of xenon gas ensures higher sensitivity and thinner design of the detector. The xenon gas is completely sealed in the chamber, so that the influence of the changes in ambient environments is minimized. (author)

  16. Development of high voltage power supply for nuclear radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this thesis is to develop a versatile NIM compatible high voltage power supply for proper operation of nuclear radiation detectors especially for those high resolution detectors such as semiconductor detectors, and proportional counters which require high voltage power supply with very low output ripple and high output stability. A driven type dc-ac inverter and a voltage multiplier are applied to convert a low de voltage to high dc voltage. The filter circuit is used to reduce the output ripple when the power supply is loaded and a close-loop voltage control circuit is used to minimize the drift in the output voltage. Adjustment of the output level for desired value is done through a three turn high precision potentiometer. Besides, micro-circuits are used in order to reduce undesirable temperature effect and at the same time to minimize size and weight of the high voltage module

  17. XIth Workshop on Resistive Plate Chambers and Related Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    RPC2012 continues the tradition of regular scientific meetings, first started in 1991 at Lecce, with following editions in Roma, Pavia, Napoli, Bari, Coimbra, Clermont-Ferrand, Seoul, Mumbai, Darmstadt. The RPC detection technique has found large application in LHC detectors and in astroparticle physics experiments. The workshop focused on performance of large RPC systems, ageing and detector materials studies, electronics for RPCs, physics of basic processes in the gas, timing applications, new ideas for RPC detectors.

  18. a High Resolution Ionization Chamber for the SPIDER Fission Fragment Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F.; Arnold, C. W.; Laptev, A. B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Jandel, M.; Nelson, R. O.; White, M. C.; Hecht, A. A.; Mader, D.

    2014-09-01

    An ionization chamber for measuring the energy loss and kinetic energy of fragments produced through neutron-induced fission at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has been designed as a component of the the new SPIDER detector. Design criteria included energy resolutions of <1% for high energy resolution and increased charge resolution. The ionization chamber will be combined with a high resolution time-of-flight detector to achieve fragment yield measurements with mass and nuclear charge resolutions of 1 amu and Z=1. The present status of the ionization chamber will be presented.

  19. Effects of thoron on a radon detector of pulse-ionization chamber type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, T

    2004-01-01

    A radon detector of pulse-ionization chamber (PIC) type could have some sensitivity for thoron. Thus, the presence of thoron could interfere with precise measurement of radon. In the present study, effects of thoron on the most common type of PIC detector (commercial name AlphaGUARD) were investigated using an exposure chamber. The AlphaGUARD was exposed to a mixture of radon and thoron, together with a radon/thoron discriminative monitor that employs a silicon solid-state detector. The thoron sensitivity of the PIC detector was estimated by comparing the two detectors. As a result, the thoron sensitivity was about 10% compared with the radon sensitivity. In other words, the radon concentration (Bq m(-3)) measured with the PIC detector was approximately the sum of the actual radon concentration (Bq m(-3)) and 10% of the thoron concentration (Bq m(-3)). The sensitivity to thoron should be considered in measurements in thoron-enhanced areas. PMID:15103062

  20. Radon progeny distributions inside a diffusion chamber and their contributions to track density in SSNT detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffusion of alpha emitter radon progeny inside a cylindrical diffusion chamber was simulated. In the simulation of atomic movements, we took into account the random nature of the diffusion direction and the decay process. The alpha emitter distributions in volume, lateral wall and top cover of a 6.0cm height diffusion chamber for different diameters were determined. Results show non-uniform distribution of radon progeny. As chamber diameter increases, the tendency of radon progeny is to accumulate in central regions of the chamber volume (218Po) and inner wall (218Po and 214Po). Depending on chamber diameter and detector size, non-uniform distribution of radon progeny deposited on SSNTs surface can be achieved if the detector is horizontally located at the bottom. The fraction of surface where 222Rn progeny are deposited diminishes as chamber diameter increases. Due to the relatively short 218Po half-life, for diameters larger than the assumed height its subsequent atoms decay in air before their deposition on chamber wall. The form in which radon progeny is distributed in volume and walls of chamber can affect the quantity and distribution of tracks in detector

  1. Estimation of the response of ion chamber detectors to beta radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique was developed to calculate the response of cylindrical ion chambers to large area beta sources. Beta particles were simulated as vectors originating from a point on a source plane. Response calculations were performed for various source-plane-to-detector distances. The data testified to the dependency of response on source position and size. The results were compared with measured data. The technique was then used to evaluate the response characteristics of two chamber designs. Results showed that a design with concentric dual chambers could provide a means to estimate source geometry and distance. In addition, a detector employing stacked thin chambers could directly measure the extent of non-uniform ionisation in the chamber. (author)

  2. Compact drift-chambers for the OPAL forward detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two planes of four chambers are mounted in front of the forward calorimeter at each end of OPAL. Beam tests at CERN show good linearity (within 0.5 mm over 130 mm maximum drift) and good resolution in the drift direction (average 300 μm over the whole range of drift distances). The resolution along the wire is ±1 mm. (orig.)

  3. On line high dose static position monitoring by ionization chamber detector for industrial gamma irradiators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Ary A; Vieira, Jose M; Hamada, Margarida M

    2010-01-01

    A 1 cm(3) cylindrical ionization chamber was developed to measure high doses on line during the sample irradiation in static position, in a (60)Co industrial plant. The developed ionization chamber showed to be suitable for use as a dosimeter on line. A good linearity of the detector was found between the dose and the accumulated charge, independently of the different dose rates caused by absorbing materials.

  4. Performance of the Cathode Strip Chamber endcap muon detectors in Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Wulsin, H Wells

    2015-01-01

    Since the end of Run 1 of the LHC in 2012, the outermost ring has been added to the CMS Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) endcap muon detector, and the readout electronics of the innermost ring of CSCs have been upgraded to accommodate the larger luminosity and collision energy anticipated in Run 2. A major effort was required to build, install, and commission these new chambers and electronics. This talk summarizes the improvements made during this upgrade and presents the performance of the CSC detector during the early stages of Run 2.

  5. Time expansion chambers of the ALICE Transition Radiation Detector (TRD)

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The TRD is segmented into 18 sectors in the azimuthal angle. Each sector consists of 6 layers in the radial direction and is composed of 5 stacks in the longitudinal direction. This amounts to 540 individual detector modules with a total active area of roughly 750 m2 and 1.2 million readout channels. The largest module is 159 cm long and 120 cm wide.

  6. An ionization chamber shower detector for the LHC luminosity monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Beche, J F; Datte, P S; Haguenauer, Maurice; Manfredi, P F; Millaud, J E; Placidi, Massimo; Ratti, L; Re, V; Riot, V J; Schmickler, Hermann; Speziali, V; Turner, W C

    2000-01-01

    The front IR quadrupole absorbers (TAS) and the IR neutral particle absorbers (TAN) in the high luminosity insertions of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) each absorb approximately 1.8 TeV of forward collision products on average per pp interaction (~235 W at design luminosity 10/sup 34/ cm/sup -2/ s/sup -1/). This secondary particle flux can be exploited to provide a useful storage ring operations tool for optimization of luminosity. A novel segmented, multi-gap, pressurized gas ionization chamber is being developed for sampling the energy deposited near the maxima of the hadronic/electromagnetic showers in these absorbers. The system design choices have been strongly influenced by optimization of signal to noise ratio and by the very high radiation environment. The ionization chambers are instrumented with low noise, fast, pulse shaping electronics to be capable of resolving individual bunch crossings at 40 MHz. Data on each bunch are to be separately accumulated over multiple bunch crossings until the desire...

  7. Test beam Results of the Forward RPC Prototype Chamber for the CMS Muon Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aftab, Zia; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Jan, J A; Khan, Mohammad Khalid; Solaija, Tariq

    2001-01-01

    A full size prototype of the second forward RPC station (RE2/2) for the CMS detector has been tested during the 2000 beam test. The prototype was exposed to high irradiation flux using the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) and the 200 GeV muon beam from X5 beamline. We have studied number of chamber parameters which are relevant for the trigger such as: time resolution, efficiency, cluster size and rate capability. We have used two different gas mixtures to understand the effect of SF6 on the efficiency plateau and the rate capability of the chamber. We have also studied the intrinsic chamber rate for different discrimination thresholds.

  8. Drift power supply for Si(Li) detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A drift power supply for Si(Li) detector has been developed, which is completely different from many other power supplies for common use. The drift power supply provides the most extensive useful voltage range of 0∼1000 V, and is continuously adjustable. It has good stability, constant power and compact structure, and the maximum output current is 100 mA. Since SCR's (silicon-controlled-rectifier) with trigger diodes and other new components are adopted and a power restriction circuit is considered in design, so during the operation when the resistance rate of silicon pieces in drifting process changes with the temperature, the power remains constant. The lower the resistance rate when the temperature raises, the higher the drift current and lower the voltage on the silicon piece. On the contrast, the higher the resistance rate when the temperature lowers, the lower the drift current, and higher the voltage on the silicon piece. Forty pieces of Si(Li) detector have been successfully drifted by using this drift power supply

  9. Power supply monitoring system for high-voltage supply to an ionisation chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ionization chamber is used for control of particle accelerators and consequently loaded with high dose-rates during radiation pulses. The measuring equipment consists of a transmitter- and receiver-system with opto-coupler, hallgenerators, field plates or isolating transformer and controls a relais which allows to block the direct current components. (DG)

  10. Neutron and gamma detector using an ionization chamber with an integrated body and moderator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Lestone, John Paul

    2006-07-18

    A detector for detecting neutrons and gamma radiation includes a cathode that defines an interior surface and an interior volume. A conductive neutron-capturing layer is disposed on the interior surface of the cathode and a plastic housing surrounds the cathode. A plastic lid is attached to the housing and encloses the interior volume of the cathode forming an ionization chamber, into the center of which an anode extends from the plastic lid. A working gas is disposed within the ionization chamber and a high biasing voltage is connected to the cathode. Processing electronics are coupled to the anode and process current pulses which are converted into Gaussian pulses, which are either counted as neutrons or integrated as gammas, in response to whether pulse amplitude crosses a neutron threshold. The detector according to the invention may be readily fabricated into single or multilayer detector arrays.

  11. The engineering development of an actively controlled precise muon chamber for the SDC detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the detector configuration for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) evolved, a number of concepts for MUON chambers were proposed and investigated. The Boston Group (Brandeis, Harvard and Tufts Universities, with Draper Laboratory) has developed a concept incorporating elliptical section drift tubes with field shaping and intermediate wire supports. This approach combines good single and multi-track resolution with a small channel count and modularity at the tube level. Other concepts have been developed which arise from differing interpretations of the fundamental physics and economic requirements. These include: Octagonal Drift Tubes, Unsupported Wires, No Field Shaping, U. Wisconsin; Round Tubes, Unsupported Wires, w or w/o Field Shaping, U. Washington; JFT Chambers (Multi-Wire, Intermediate Support, Field Shaping), KEK, Japan. This paper outlines the mechanical implementation of the Boston MUON chamber concept and discusses the rationale for several key design decisions imposed by the stringent mechanical tolerances. A prototype MUON chamber designed to verify design feasibility, performance, and cost is also described. A special section is devoted to the design and development of an optical alignment system within the chamber, which provides error signals driving the intermediate supports to true position. The Boston subgroup MUON chamber design is called the wine rack concept by virtue of its numerous (non-structural) drift tubes laid into a supporting chamber, which provides structural and handling capability. A number of individual θ,φ, and Stereo chambers is normally grouped into a supermodule, which in turn is assembled into a multi-layer supertower. Supertowers are the basic elements of the SDC MUON System, each comprising three supermodule layers in the barrel region and five in the forward regions

  12. Positron imaging with multiwire proportional chamber-gamma converter hybrid detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, D.Y.H.

    1976-09-01

    A large area positron camera was developed using multiwire proportional chambers as detectors and electromagnetic delay lines for coordinate readout. Honeycomb structured gamma converters made of lead are coupled to the chambers for efficient gamma detection and good spatial resolution. Two opposing detectors, each having a sensitive area of 48 cm x 48 cm, are operated in coincidence for the detection of annihilation gammas (511 keV) from positron emitters. Detection efficiency of 4.2 percent per detector and spatial resolution of 6 to 7 mm FWHM at the mid-plane were achieved. The present camera operates at a maximum count rate of 24 K counts/min, limited by accidental coincidence. The theory for the gamma converter is presented along with a review of the operation of the multiwire proportional chamber and delay line readout. Calculated gamma converter efficiencies are compared with the measured results using a prototype test chamber. The characteristics of the positron camera system is evaluated, and the performance is shown to be consistent with calculation.

  13. A TPC [Time Projection Chamber] detector for the study of high multiplicity heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) detector with complete pad coverage is presented. The TPC will allow the measurements of high multiplicity (∼ 200 tracks) relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions initiated with the heaviest, most energetic projectiles available at the LBL BEVALAC accelerator facility. The front end electronics, composed of over 15,000 time sampling channels, will be located on the chamber. The highly integrated, custom designed, electronics and the VME based data acquisition system are described. 10 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  14. History of the bubble chamber and related active- and internal-target nuclear tracking detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becchetti, F.D., E-mail: fdb@umich.edu

    2015-06-01

    Donald Glaser, 1960 Nobel laureate in Physics, recently passed away (2013), as have many of his colleagues who were involved with the early development of bubble chambers at the University of Michigan. In this paper I will review those early years and the subsequent wide-spread application of active-target (AT) bubble chambers that dominated high-energy physics (HEP) research for over thirty years. Some of the related, but more modern nuclear tracking detectors being used in HEP, neutrino astrophysics and dark-matter searches also will be discussed.

  15. Dosimetric characteristics of the novel 2D ionization chamber array OCTAVIUS Detector 1500

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelljes, T. S., E-mail: tenzin.s.stelljes@uni-oldenburg.de; Looe, H. K.; Chofor, N.; Poppe, B. [Clinic for Radiation Therapy, Pius-Hospital, Oldenburg 26121, Germany and WG Medical Radiation Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg 26129 (Germany); Harmeyer, A.; Reuter, J. [WG Medical Radiation Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg 26129 (Germany); Harder, D. [Prof. em., Medical Physics and Biophysics, Georg August University, Göttingen 37073 (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric properties of the OCTAVIUS Detector 1500 (OD1500) ionization chamber array (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany) have been investigated. A comparative study was carried out with the OCTAVIUS Detector 729 and OCTAVIUS Detector 1000 SRS arrays. Methods: The OD1500 array is an air vented ionization chamber array with 1405 detectors in a 27 × 27 cm{sup 2} measurement area arranged in a checkerboard pattern with a chamber-to-chamber distance of 10 mm in each row. A sampling step width of 5 mm can be achieved by merging two measurements shifted by 5 mm, thus fulfilling the Nyquist theorem for intensity modulated dose distributions. The stability, linearity, and dose per pulse dependence were investigated using a Semiflex 31013 chamber (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany) as a reference detector. The effective depth of measurement was determined by measuring TPR curves with the array and a Roos chamber type 31004 (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany). Comparative output factor measurements were performed with the array, the Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber and the Diode 60012 (both PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany). The energy dependence of the OD1500 was measured by comparing the array’s readings to those of a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber for varying mean photon energies at the depth of measurement, applying to the Semiflex chamber readings the correction factor k{sub NR} for nonreference conditions. The Gaussian lateral dose response function of a single array detector was determined by searching the convolution kernel suitable to convert the slit beam profiles measured with a Diode 60012 into those measured with the array’s central chamber. An intensity modulated dose distribution measured with the array was verified by comparing a OD1500 measurement to TPS calculations and film measurements. Results: The stability and interchamber sensitivity variation of the OD1500 array were within ±0.2% and ±0.58%, respectively. Dose linearity was within 1

  16. Design and implementation of the detector control system for the BESⅢ drift chamber cosmic ray test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xi-Hui; XIE Xiao-Xi; LI Xiao-Nan; GAO Cui-Shan; ZHANG Yin-Hong; NIE Zhen-Dong; MIN Jian; XIE Yi-GANG

    2008-01-01

    After the construction of the BESⅢ drift chamber,a long period of cosmic rays test is necessary to verify its performance.This also provides a good opportunity to integrate the detector readout electronics and Detector Control System (DCS) into a unified working system.The goal of the DCS is to guarantee reliable physics data quality and the safe operation of the detector.It monitors and controls the HV,gas,VME crates and the environmental variables.The upper-level system is mainly developed from LabVIEW and the lower-level system mainly uses MCU and PLC technology.The system is designed to be highly flexible and scalable so that it can be applied to other detectors with little or no change.In the immediate future,it will be integrated into the entire BESⅢ Slow Control System.

  17. Neutron imaging detector based on the muPIC micro-pixel chamber

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, J. D.; Hattori, K.; Fujioka, H.; Harada, M; Iwaki, S.; Kabuki, S.; Kishimoto, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kurosawa, S.; Miuchi, K; Nagae, T.; Nishimura, H; Oku, T; SAWANO, T.; Shinohara, T

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a prototype time-resolved neutron imaging detector employing the micro-pixel chamber (muPIC), a micro-pattern gaseous detector, coupled with a field programmable gate array-based data acquisition system for applications in neutron radiography at high-intensity neutron sources. The prototype system, with an active area of 10cm x 10cm and operated at a gas pressure of 2 atm, measures both the energy deposition (via time-over-threshold) and 3-dimensional track of each neutron-i...

  18. Expert System for the LHC CMS Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapsevicius, Valdas, E-mail: valdas.rapsevicius@cern.ch [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); Vilnius University, Didlaukio g. 47-325, LT-08303 Vilnius (Lithuania); Juska, Evaldas, E-mail: evaldas.juska@cern.ch [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States)

    2014-02-21

    Modern High Energy Physics experiments are of high demand for a generic and consolidated solution to integrate and process high frequency data streams by applying experts' knowledge and inventory configurations. In this paper we present the Expert System application that was built for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) aiming to support the detector operations and to provide integrated monitoring. The main building blocks are the integration platform, rule-based complex event processing engine, ontology-based knowledge base, persistent storage and user interfaces for results and control.

  19. Degradation in the efficiency of glass Resistive Plate Chambers operated without external gas supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resistive plate chambers (RPC) are particle detectors commonly used by the high energy physics community. Their normal operation requires a constant flow of gas mixture to prevent self-poisoning which reduces the chamber's capability to detect particles. We studied how quickly the efficiency of two RPCs drops when operated in sealed mode, i.e. without refreshing the gas mixture. The test aim is to determine how RPCs could be used as particle detectors in non-laboratory applications, such as those exploiting muon tomography for geological imaging or homeland security. The two sealed RPCs were operated in proportional mode for a period of more than three months, and their efficiencies were recorded continuously and analysed in 8-hours intervals. The results show that the efficiency drops on average by 0.79 ± 0.01 % every 24 hours of operation and returns close to the initial value after purging the old gas mixture and flushing the chambers with fresh gas

  20. Time-zero fission-fragment detector based on low-pressure multiwire proportional chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Assamagan, Ketevi A; Bayatyan, G L; Carlini, R; Danagulyan, S; Eden, T; Egiyan, K; Ent, R; Fenker, H; Gan, L; Gasparian, A; Grigoryan, N K; Greenwood, Z; Gueye, P; Hashimoto, O; Johnston, K; Keppel, C; Knyazyan, S; Majewski, S; Margaryan, A; Margaryan, Yu L; Marikian, G G; Martoff, J; Mkrtchyan, H G; Parlakyan, L; Sato, Y; Sawafta, R; Simicevic, N; Tadevosyan, V; Takahashi, T; Tang, L; Vartanian, G S; Vulcan, W; Wells, S; Wood, S

    1999-01-01

    A time-zero fission fragment (FF) detector, based on the technique of low-pressure multiwire proportional chambers (LPMWPC), has been designed and constructed for the heavy hypernuclear lifetime experiment (E95-002) at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Its characteristics and the method of time-zero reconstruction were investigated using fission fragments from a sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf spontaneous fission source. The influence of the ionization energy loss was also studied. It is shown that Heptane, Hexane, and Isobutane gases at a pressure of 1-2 Torr are all suitable for such a FF detector. As desired by experiment, a timing resolution of about 200 ps (FWHM) for a chamber size of 21x21 cm sup 2 was achieved.

  1. Development of an Ionization Chamber for the SPIDER Fission Fragment Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F.; Arnold, C. W.; Laptev, A. B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Jandel, M.; Nelson, R. O.; White, M. C.

    2014-05-01

    The ionization chamber component of the SPIDER detector has been designed to measure energy loss and kinetic energy of fragments produced through neutron-induced fission with energy resolutions of <1% and a time-dependent signal collection. Important design elements implemented are an axial configuration of the electrodes for improved energy loss and measurement and a thin silicon nitride entrance window to minimize both energy loss and energy straggling of the incoming fragments. High energy resolution and improved charge resolution from the ionization chamber are combined with the high precision of the upstream time-of-flight component of SPIDER to achieve resolutions in mass and nuclear charge of 1 AMU and Z=1. A discussion of the present resolution capabilities of the ionization chamber will be presented.

  2. Identification of Low Momentum Electrons in The Time Projection Chamber of The ALICE Detector.

    CERN Document Server

    Mwewa, Chilufya

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents results obtained in the study to identify noisy low momentum electrons in the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) of the ALICE detector. To do this, the Circle Hough Transform is employed under the openCV library in python programming. This is tested on simulated tracks in the transverse view of the TPC. It is found that the noisy low momentum electrons can be identified and their exact positions in the transverse plane can be obtained.

  3. The honeycomb strip chamber: A two coordinate and high precision muon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes the construction and performance of the Honeycomb Strip Chamber (HSC). The HSC offers several advantages with respect to classical drift chambers and drift tubes. The main features of the HSC are: -The detector offers the possibility of simultaneous readout of two orthogonal coordinates with approximately the same precision. - The HSC technology is optimised for mass production. This means that the design is modular (monolayers) and automisation of most of the production steps is possible (folding and welding machines). - The technology is flexible. The cell diameter can easily be changed from a few millimetres to at least 20 mm by changing the parameters in the computer programme of the folding machine. The number of monolayers per station can be chosen freely to the demands of the experiment. -The honeycomb structure gives the detector stiffness and makes it self supporting. This makes the technology a very transparent one in terms of radiation length which is important to prevent multiple scattering of high energetic muons. - The dimensions of the detector are defined by high precision templates. Those templates constrain for example the overall tolerance on the wire positions to 20 μm rms. Reproduction of the high precision assembly of the detector is thus guaranteed. (orig.)

  4. Performance evaluation of several radon detectors in the standard chamber and dwellings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Seok Won; Kim, Yong Jae; Chang, Byung Uck; Byun, Jong In; Yun, Ju Yong [University of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    To ensure the performance of radon detectors, three passive radon detectors (RadTrak, Radopot, and E-PERM) have been reviewed. The difference ratios of RadTrak and Radopot tested in the radon standard chamber were -13.2% and -6.0%, respectively, which were in good accordance within 20% of the value measured by AlphaGUARD. To ensure the performance of the long term measurement, the 3 detectors were installed at the same position of approximately one hundred of dwellings for one year. The correlation curve between RadTrak and Radopot shows good agreement with a correlation coefficient (R{sup 2}) of 0.91. However, the correlation curve between E-PERM and Radopot shows bad agreement (R{sup 2} = 0.021). In addition, the distribution map of annual mean indoor gamma dose rate measured with E-PERM was not in accordance with the distribution map of outdoor gamma dose rate measured by Portable Ion Chamber. According to the results, some requisites for the selection of the radon passive detectors in the large-scale indoor radon survey were discussed.

  5. The honeycomb strip chamber: A two coordinate and high precision muon detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolsma, H.P.T.

    1996-04-19

    This thesis describes the construction and performance of the Honeycomb Strip Chamber (HSC). The HSC offers several advantages with respect to classical drift chambers and drift tubes. The main features of the HSC are: -The detector offers the possibility of simultaneous readout of two orthogonal coordinates with approximately the same precision. - The HSC technology is optimised for mass production. This means that the design is modular (monolayers) and automisation of most of the production steps is possible (folding and welding machines). - The technology is flexible. The cell diameter can easily be changed from a few millimetres to at least 20 mm by changing the parameters in the computer programme of the folding machine. The number of monolayers per station can be chosen freely to the demands of the experiment. -The honeycomb structure gives the detector stiffness and makes it self supporting. This makes the technology a very transparent one in terms of radiation length which is important to prevent multiple scattering of high energetic muons. - The dimensions of the detector are defined by high precision templates. Those templates constrain for example the overall tolerance on the wire positions to 20 {mu}m rms. Reproduction of the high precision assembly of the detector is thus guaranteed. (orig.).

  6. Neutron imaging detector based on the muPIC micro-pixel chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, J D; Fujioka, H; Harada, M; Iwaki, S; Kabuki, S; Kishimoto, Y; Kubo, H; Kurosawa, S; Miuchi, K; Nagae, T; Nishimura, H; Oku, T; Sawano, T; Shinohara, T; Suzuki, J; Takada, A; Tanimori, T; Ueno, K

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a prototype time-resolved neutron imaging detector employing the micro-pixel chamber (muPIC), a micro-pattern gaseous detector, coupled with a field programmable gate array-based data acquisition system for applications in neutron radiography at high-intensity neutron sources. The prototype system, with an active area of 10cm x 10cm and operated at a gas pressure of 2 atm, measures both the energy deposition (via time-over-threshold) and 3-dimensional track of each neutron-induced event, allowing the reconstruction of the neutron interaction point with improved accuracy. Using a simple position reconstruction algorithm, a spatial resolution of 349 +/- 36 microns was achieved, with further improvement expected. The detailed tracking allows strong rejection of background gamma-rays, resulting in an effective gamma sensitivity of 10^-12 or less, coupled with stable, robust neutron identification. The detector also features a time resolution of 0.6 microseconds.

  7. Front-End electronics development for the new Resistive Plate Chamber detector of HADES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, A.; Belver, D.; Cabanelas, P.; Díaz, J.; Garzón, J. A.; González-Díaz, D.; Koenig, W.; Lange, J. S.; Marín, J.; Montes, N.; Skott, P.; Traxler, M.

    2007-11-01

    In this paper we present the new RPC wall, which is being installed in the HADES detector at Darmstadt GSI. It consists of time-of-flight (TOF) detectors used for both particle identification and triggering. Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) detectors are becoming widely used because of their excellent TOF capabilities and reduced cost. The wall will contain 1024 RPC modules, covering an active area of around 7 m2, replacing the old TOFino detector at the low polar angle region. The excellent TOF and good charge resolutions of the new detector will improve the time resolution to values better than 100 ps. The Front-End electronics for the readout of the RPC signals is implemented with two types of boards to satisfy the space constraints: the Daughterboards are small boards that amplify the low level signals from the detector and provide fast discriminators for time of flight measurements, as well as an integrator for charge measurements. The Motherboard provides stable DC voltages and a stable ground, threshold DACs for the discriminators, multiplicity trigger and impedance matched paths for transfer of time window signals that contain information about time and charge. These signals are sent to a custom TDC board that label each event and send data through Ethernet to be conveniently stored.

  8. Fail-safe ion chamber errant beam detector tailored for personnel protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This fail-safe ion chamber system is designed to be part of the personnel safety system (PSS) for the Los Alamos neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Its job is to protect the occupants of the experimental areas from large radiation doses caused by errant beam conditions during beam transport from the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) to the LANSCE neutron spallation target. Due to limited shielding between the beam transport line and the experimental area only if the beam losses in the transport line are very low. The worst case beam spill scenario is calculated to result in a personnel exposure of about 0.01 Gys/s (1 rad/s). Although the preferred solution is to increase the bulk shielding between the beam line and the experimental area, the physical dimensions of the site do not permit an adequate amount of shielding to be added. The solution adopted is a layered system of three types of highly reliable detector systems: a current limiter system located in the beam line, a neutron detector system located in the experimental areas, and an ion chamber system located on the walls of the beam line tunnels. The ion chamber system is capable of shutting off the beam in less than 0.5 s, resulting in a worst case personnel exposure of 0.005 Gys (0.5 rad). 4 figs

  9. Fail-safe ion chamber errant beam detector tailored for personnel protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This fail-safe ion chamber system is designed to be part of the personnel safety system (PSS) for the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Its job is to protect the occupants of the experimental areas from large radiation doses caused by errant beam conditions during beam transport from the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) to the LANSCE neutron spallation target. The worst case beam spill scenario is calculated to result in a personnel exposure of about 0.01 Gys/s (1 rad/s). Although the preferred solution is to increase the bulk shielding between the beam line and the experimental area, the physical dimensions of the site do not permit an adequate amount of shielding to be added. The solution adopted is a layered system of three types of highly reliable detector systems: a current limiter system located in the beam line, a neutron detector system located in the experimental areas, and an ion chamber system located on the walls of the beam line tunnels. The ion chamber system is capable of shutting off the beam in less than 0.5 s, resulting in a worst case personnel exposure of 0.005 Gys (0.5 rad). 4 figs

  10. Increase of the radon measurement efficiency by adding teflon electret in diffusion chamber with track detector LR-115

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diffusion chamber with electret and tack etch detector LR-115, for radon measurements is described in this paper. As electret we used a teflon disc with stabilized electrical charge density. Track density depends on the distance between detector and the electret: this dependence is given in this paper. (author)

  11. DIRAC detector experiment: the vacuum chamber (blue), beginning of the flat chamber (yellow), magnetic screen (orange) in front of the magnet. The vacuum tube for the primary proton beam is below (sil ver color)

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    1999-01-01

    DIRAC detector experiment: the vacuum chamber (blue), beginning of the flat chamber (yellow), magnetic screen (orange) in front of the magnet. The vacuum tube for the primary proton beam is below (sil ver color)

  12. Improving the gas gain monitoring system in multiwire proportional chambers for MUON detector of LHCb experiment.

    CERN Document Server

    Ruvinskaia, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    The gas gain monitoring system in multi-wire proportional chambers for MUON detector of LHCb has been constructed and commissioned. It includes an online- monitoring, tools for analysis the archived data and an alarm system on the quality of the gas mixture. Finally, it will be implemented in the main ECS of LHCb for MUON detector and as a part of safety system of LHCb as a permanent online monitor of the quality of the gas mixture in MWPCs. The main advantage of this setup is a monitoring of Gas Gain (GG) in MWPCs with radioactive sources independently from the presence of beam at LHC. It also provides an option for prompt reaction in case of a problem with the gas.

  13. Optimization of micro-strip gas chamber as two-dimensional neutron detector using gadolinium converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masaoka, Sei; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Yamagishi, Hideshi; Soyama, Kazuhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-02-01

    A micro-strip gas chamber (MSGC) has been developing as a two-dimensional position sensitive neutron detector for neutron scattering experiments using high-intensity pulsed-neutron source in a high-intensity proton accelerator facility. MSGC is required for the high count rate, high detective efficiency, high positional resolution, stabilization and covering large area. Our purpose in this paper is to verify the proper of Gadolinium as MSGC converter. First, the basic property of Gadolinium converter was examined by simple experiments using a zero-dimensional neutron detector on the purpose of deriving the detective efficiency. Second, the optimization of the arrangement of a capillary plate in MSGC has been done by simulation on the MSGC using Gadolinium converter. As a result of that, it has been proved that Gadolinium can be theoretically used as a converter of MSGC. (author)

  14. A new design of the gaseous imaging detector: Micro Pixel Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Ochi, A; Koishi, S; Tanimori, T; Nagae, T; Nakamura, M

    2001-01-01

    The novel gaseous detector 'Micro Pixel Chamber (Micro PIC)' has been developed for X-ray, gamma-ray and charged particle imaging. This detector consists of double sided printing circuit board (PCB). The stable operation of Micro PIC is realized by thick substrate and wide anode strips. One of the most outstanding feature is the process of production and the cost. The base technology of producing Micro PIC is same as producing PCB, then detector with large detection area (more than 10 cmx10 cm) can be made by present technology. Our first tests were performed using a 3 cmx3 cm detection area with a readout of 0.4 mm pitch. The gas gain and stability were measured in these tests. The gas gain of 10 sup 4 was obtained using argon ethane (8:2) gas mixture. Also, there was no discharge between anodes and cathodes in the gain of 10 sup 3 during two days of continuous operation. Although some discharges occurred in the higher gain (approximately 10 sup 4), no critical damage on the detector was found.

  15. The magic cube and the pixel ionization chamber: detectors for monitor and dosimetry of radiotherapy beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerio, S.; Boriano, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cirio, R.; Donetti, M.; Garelli, E.; Giordanengo, S.; Madon, E.; Marchetto, F.; Nastasi, U.; Peroni, C.; Sanz Freire, C. J.; Sardo, A.; Trevisiol, E.

    2003-09-01

    Tumor therapy takes advantage of the energy deposition of radiation to concentrate high doses in the target while sparing healthy tissue. Elective pathologies for highly conformal radiotherapies such as photon Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and radiotherapy with hadrons are head and neck, eye, prostate and in general all tumors that are either deep or located close to critical organs. In the world there are several centers that are using such techniques and a common problem that is being experienced is the verification of treatment plans and monitoring of the beam. We have designed and built two detectors that allow 2D and 3D measurements of dose and fluence of such beams. The detectors allow measurements on big surfaces, up to 25∗25 cm2. The active media are parallel plate, strip and pixel segmented ionization chambers with front-end Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) readout and PC based data acquistion. The description of dosimeter, chamber and electronics will be given with results from beam tests and therapy plan verification.

  16. Tests of the data acquisition system and detector control system for the muon chambers of the CMS experiment at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Phys. Inst. III A of RWTH Aachen University is involved in the development, production and tests of the Drift Tube (DT) muon chambers for the barrel muon system of the CMS detector at the LHC at CERN (Geneva). The present thesis describes some test procedures which were developed and performed for the chamber local Data Acquisition (DAQ) system, as well as for parts of the Detector Control System (DCS). The test results were analyzed and discussed. Two main kinds of DAQ tests were done. On the one hand, to compare two different DAQ systems, the chamber signals were split and read out by both systems. This method allowed to validate them by demonstrating, that there were no relevant differences in the measured drift times, generated by the same muon event in the same chamber cells. On the other hand, after the systems were validated, the quality of the data was checked. For this purpose extensive noise studies were performed. The noise dependence on various parameters (threshold,HV) was investigated quantitatively. Also detailed studies on single cells, qualified as ''dead'' and ''noisy'' were done. For the DAQ tests a flexible hardware and software environment was needed. The organization and installation of the supplied electronics, as well as the software development was realized within the scope of this thesis. The DCS tests were focused on the local gas pressure read-out components, attached directly to the chamber: pressure sensor, manifolds and the pressure ADC (PADC). At first it was crucial to proof, that the calibration of the mentioned chamber components for the gas pressure measurement is valid. The sensor calibration data were checked and possible differences in their response to the same pressure were studied. The analysis of the results indicated that the sensor output depends also on the ambient temperature, a new experience which implied an additional pedestal measurement of the chamber gas pressure sensors at CMS. The second test sequence

  17. Diamond detector versus silicon diode and ion chamber in photon beams of different energy and field size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was to test the suitability of a PTW diamond detector for nonreference condition dosimetry in photon beams of different energy (6 and 25 MV) and field size (from 2.6 cmx2.6 cm to 10 cmx10 cm). Diamond behavior was compared to that of a Scanditronix p-type silicon diode and a Scanditronix RK ionization chamber. Measurements included output factors (OF), percentage depth doses (PDD) and dose profiles. OFs measured with diamond detector agreed within 1% with those measured with diode and RK chamber. Only at 25 MV, for the smallest field size, RK chamber underestimated OFs due to averaging effects in a pointed shaped beam profile. Agreement was found between PDDs measured with diamond detector and RK chamber for both 6 MV and 25 MV photons and down to 5 cmx5 cm field size. For the 2.6 cmx2.6 cm field size, at 25 MV, RK chamber underestimated doses at shallow depth and the difference progressively went to zero in the distal region. PDD curves measured with silicon diode and diamond detector agreed well for the 25 MV beam at all the field sizes. Conversely, the nontissue equivalence of silicon led, for the 6 MV beam, to a slight overestimation of the diode doses in the distal region, at all the field sizes. Penumbra and field width measurements gave values in agreement for all the detectors but with a systematic overestimate by RK measurements. The results obtained confirm that ion chamber is not a suitable detector when high spatial resolution is required. On the other hand, the small differences in the studied parameters, between diamond and silicon systems, do not lead to a significant advantage in the use of diamond detector for routine clinical dosimetry

  18. The analog Resistive Plate Chamber detector of the ARGO-YBJ experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bartoli, B; Bi, X J; Cao, Z; Catalanotti, S; Chen, S Z; Chen, T L; Cui, S W; Dai, B Z; D'Amone, A; Danzengluobu,; De Mitri, I; Piazzoli, B D'Ettorre; Di Girolamo, T; Di Sciascio, G; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Zhenyong; Gou, Q B; Guo, Y Q; He, H H; Hu, Haibing; Hu, Hongbo; Iacovacci, M; Iuppa, R; Jia, H Y; Labaciren,; Li, H J; Liu, C; Liu, J; Liu, M Y; Lu, H; Ma, L L; Ma, X H; Mancarella, G; Mari1, S M; Marsella, G; Mastroianni, S; Montini, P; Ning, C C; Perrone, L; Pistilli, P; Salvini1, P; Santonico, R; Shen, P R; Sheng, X D; Shi, F; Surdo, A; Tan, Y H; Vallania, P; Vernetto, S; Vigorito, C; Wang, H; Wu, C Y; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yang, Q Y; Yang, X C; Yao, Z G; Yuan, A F; Zha, M; Zhang, H M; Zhang, L; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhao, J; Zhaxiciren,; Zhaxisangzhu,; Zhou, X X; Zhu, F R; Zhu, Q Q

    2015-01-01

    The ARGO-YBJ experiment has been in stable data taking from November 2007 till February 2013 at the YangBaJing Cosmic Ray Observatory (4300 m a.s.l.). The detector consists of a single layer of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) ( about 6700 m^2}) operated in streamer mode. The signal pick-up is obtained by means of strips facing one side of the gas volume. The digital readout of the signals, while allows a high space-time resolution in the shower front reconstruction, limits the measurable energy to a few hundred TeV. In order to fully investigate the 1-10 PeV region, an analog readout has been implemented by instrumenting each RPC with two large size electrodes facing the other side of the gas volume. Since December 2009 the RPC charge readout has been in operation on the entire central carpet (about 5800 m^2). In this configuration the detector is able to measure the particle density at the core position where it ranges from tens to many thousands of particles per m^2. Thus ARGO-YBJ provides a highly detailed...

  19. Prestaciones del Detector Central de Muones del Experimento CMS: las Camaras de Deriva y su Sistema de Trigger (Performance of the Central Muon Detector of the Experiment CMS: the Drift Tube Chambers and its Trigger System)

    CERN Document Server

    Muñoz, Carlos Villanueva

    2007-01-01

    Prestaciones del Detector Central de Muones del Experimento CMS: las Camaras de Deriva y su Sistema de Trigger (Performance of the Central Muon Detector of the Experiment CMS: the Drift Tube Chambers and its Trigger System)

  20. Development of a Time-resolved Neutron Imaging Detector Based on the {\\mu}PIC Micro-Pixel Chamber

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Joseph D.; Harada, Masahide; Hattori, Kaori; Iwaki, Satoru; Kabuki, Shigeto; Kishimoto, Yuji; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Miuchi, Kentaro; Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Nishimura, Hironobu; Oku, Takayuki; Sawano, Tatsuya; Shinohara, Takenao

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a prototype time-resolved neutron imaging detector employing a micro-pattern gaseous detector known as the micro-pixel chamber ({\\mu}PIC) coupled with a field-programmable-gate-array-based data acquisition system. Our detector system combines 100{\\mu}m-level spatial and sub-{\\mu}s time resolutions with a low gamma sensitivity of less than 10^-12 and high data rates, making it well suited for applications in neutron radiography at high-intensity, pulsed neutron sources. In th...

  1. Analysis of SCR control circuit testing for power supply double chamber plasma nitriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of scr control circuit testing for power supply double chamber plasma nitriding has been performed. Analysis of testing was carried out to find out and validate the performance of the SCR control circuit. The testing method is direct measurement consist of oscillator circuit and SCR performance test. The analysis of oscillator circuit with main component of OT UJT 2646 and OT 240 transformer on the SCR control circuit was functioning properly. This can be seen with the formation of the 4 V voltage Vcc as an indication pulse signal to activate the gate on the SCR and at 12 V Vcc voltage (max) pulse signal is almost full. This pulse signal will be used to activate the SCR gate so that the SCR output voltage can be controlled. For SCR that installed on the doubler circuit, they are functioning properly too. The indication is the voltage on the output side of the doubler circuit is almost twice as the input side. The addition of test time (operation time) and the addition of the load current is proportional to the temperature of SCR. (author)

  2. The CMS Micro-strip Gas Chamber Project Development of a high resolution tracking detector for harsh radiation environments

    CERN Document Server

    Bellazzini, R; Brez, A; Cattai, A; Gariano, G; Latronico, L; Loni, R; Lumb, N; Moggi, A; Morelli, A; Papanestis, A; Reale, S; Salaris, C; Spandre, G; Massai, M M; Spezziga, M; Toropin, A N

    2001-01-01

    Thirty-two large area Micro-Strip Gas Chambers were tested in a high intensity, 350~MeV pion beam at PSI to prove that we had reached a Milestone for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment. The particle rate was approximately 6 kHz/mm2, distributed over the whole active area of the detectors, and this rate was maintained for a total integrated time of 493 hours. All of the chambers were operated with signal-to-noise values at or above that corresponding to 98 % hit detection efficiency at CMS; the average S/N was 31. No indications of any gain instabilities or ageing effects were observed. In the official 3-week Milestone period, three strips from a total of 16384 were damaged, a result which is twenty times lower than the minimal requirement for CMS. The spark rate of the detectors was very low and decreased with time to an average of one spark per chamber per day. The cathode voltages of 24 of the chambers were increased over a one week period to investigate the behaviour of the detectors at higher gain...

  3. Development of a Time-resolved Neutron Imaging Detector Based on the {\\mu}PIC Micro-Pixel Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Joseph D; Hattori, Kaori; Iwaki, Satoru; Kabuki, Shigeto; Kishimoto, Yuji; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Miuchi, Kentaro; Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Nishimura, Hironobu; Oku, Takayuki; Sawano, Tatsuya; Shinohara, Takenao; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Takada, Atsushi; Tanimori, Toru; Ueno, Kazuki; Ikeno, Masahiro; Tanaka, Manobu; Uchida, Tomohisa

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a prototype time-resolved neutron imaging detector employing a micro-pattern gaseous detector known as the micro-pixel chamber ({\\mu}PIC) coupled with a field-programmable-gate-array-based data acquisition system. Our detector system combines 100{\\mu}m-level spatial and sub-{\\mu}s time resolutions with a low gamma sensitivity of less than 10^-12 and high data rates, making it well suited for applications in neutron radiography at high-intensity, pulsed neutron sources. In the present paper, we introduce the detector system and present several test measurements performed at NOBORU (BL10), J-PARC to demonstrate the capabilities of our prototype. We also discuss future improvements to the spatial resolution and rate performance.

  4. Study on the realization of a minimum ionizing particle detector: development of a PPAC (Parallel-plate Avalanche Chamber)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parallel-Plate Avalanche Chamber (PPAC) detectors are used currently to observe nuclear disintegrations in nuclear physics. The work that has been done here shows PPAC can be used in high energy physics under certain conditions to detect minimum ionizing particles. Their advantage is to join good time resolution with low matter density. A PPAC prototype has been made with 90% efficiency, 3 NS jitter, 2 NS rise time, 20 mg/cm2 mass, 1.5 mm spatial accuracy. The parameters studied were electrodes design, choice of gas filling, electronics and anode strips. The detector is to be used as a hodoscope with high flux of particles

  5. High density spiral projection chamber (HDSPC): Design of the end-cap detectors of the OBELIX experiment at LEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the design of a cylindrical high density projection chamber that uses the spiral projection chamber geometry and will instrument the end-caps of the proposed OBELIX experiment at LEAR. This detector -high density spiral projection chamber has axial symmetry, radial drift electric field, a radiator made of converter disks alternating with drift volumes and the amplification and readout region in the outer part of the cylinder. It is equipped with FADC electronics and reconstructs in three dimensions primary ionization produced in the active volume. It features fine granularity and high angular resolution near the beam pipe and appears particularly advantageous for γ and prong detection in the forward and very forward region of storage rings and extracted beam experiments. (orig.)

  6. Time-of-flight ERD with a 200 mm2 Si3N4 window gas ionization chamber energy detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julin, Jaakko; Laitinen, Mikko; Sajavaara, Timo

    2014-08-01

    Low energy heavy ion elastic recoil detection work has been carried out in Jyväskylä since 2009 using home made timing detectors, a silicon energy detector and a timestamping data acquisition setup forming a time-of-flight-energy telescope. In order to improve the mass resolution of the setup a new energy detector was designed to replace the silicon solid state detector, which suffered from radiation damage and had poor resolution for heavy recoils. In this paper the construction and operation of an isobutane filled gas ionization chamber with a 14 × 14 mm2 100 nm thick silicon nitride window are described. In addition to greatly improved energy resolution for heavy ions, the detector is also able to detect hydrogen recoils simultaneously in the energy range of 100-1000 keV. Additionally the detector has position sensitivity by means of timing measurement, which can be performed without compromising the performance of the detector in any other way. The achieved position sensitivity improves the depth resolution near the surface.

  7. Tests of the data acquisition system and detector control system for the muon chambers of the CMS experiment at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowa, Michael Christian

    2009-02-27

    The Phys. Inst. III A of RWTH Aachen University is involved in the development, production and tests of the Drift Tube (DT) muon chambers for the barrel muon system of the CMS detector at the LHC at CERN (Geneva). The present thesis describes some test procedures which were developed and performed for the chamber local Data Acquisition (DAQ) system, as well as for parts of the Detector Control System (DCS). The test results were analyzed and discussed. Two main kinds of DAQ tests were done. On the one hand, to compare two different DAQ systems, the chamber signals were split and read out by both systems. This method allowed to validate them by demonstrating, that there were no relevant differences in the measured drift times, generated by the same muon event in the same chamber cells. On the other hand, after the systems were validated, the quality of the data was checked. For this purpose extensive noise studies were performed. The noise dependence on various parameters (threshold,HV) was investigated quantitatively. Also detailed studies on single cells, qualified as ''dead'' and ''noisy'' were done. For the DAQ tests a flexible hardware and software environment was needed. The organization and installation of the supplied electronics, as well as the software development was realized within the scope of this thesis. The DCS tests were focused on the local gas pressure read-out components, attached directly to the chamber: pressure sensor, manifolds and the pressure ADC (PADC). At first it was crucial to proof, that the calibration of the mentioned chamber components for the gas pressure measurement is valid. The sensor calibration data were checked and possible differences in their response to the same pressure were studied. The analysis of the results indicated that the sensor output depends also on the ambient temperature, a new experience which implied an additional pedestal measurement of the chamber gas pressure

  8. Qualification measurements of the voltage supply system as well as conceptionation of a state machine for the detector control of the ATLAS pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The supply system and the control system of the ATLAS pixel detector represent important building blocks of the pixel detector. Corresponding studies of the supply system, which were performed within a comprehensive test system, the so-called system test, with nearly all final components and the effects on the pixel detector are object of this thesis. A further point of this thesis is the coordination and further development of the detector-control-system software under regardment of the different partial systems. A main topic represents thereby the conceptionation of the required state machine as interface for the users and the connection to the data acquisition system

  9. The time-projection chamber: A new 4π detector for charged particles: A new 4π detector for charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new approach to the problems of track recognition and momentum measurement of high energy charged particles is described, and a detector particularly suitable for PEP energies is discussed. The central idea is the utilization of a large methane-filled drift chamber placed in a strong magnetic field, with the drift field oriented parallel to the magnetic field. In this configuration transverse diffusion of the ionization electrons can be very substantially suppressed by the magnetic field. This in turn leads to the possibility of measurement accuracies on the order of 100 microns after one meter of drift. At the same time, the detector can provide truly 3-dimensional spatial data, free from the ambiguities characteristic of conventional techniques involving spatial projections. The reconstruction efficiency can be expected to approach 100%, even for events of the highest multiplicities

  10. Evaluation of dose distributions in gamma chamber using glass plate detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan Pradeep

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A commercial glass plate of thickness 1.75 mm has been utilized for evaluation of dose distributions inside the irradiation volume of gamma chamber using optical densitometry technique. The glass plate showed linear response in the dose range 0.10 Kilo Gray (kGy to 10 kGy of cobalt-60 gamma radiation with optical sensitivity 0.04 Optical Density (OD /kGy. The change in the optical density at each identified spatial dose matrix on the glass plate in relation to the position in the irradiation volume has been presented as dose distributions inside the gamma chamber. The optical density changes have been graphically plotted in the form of surface diagram of color washes for different percentage dose rate levels as isodose distributions in gamma chamber. The variation in dose distribution inside the gamma chamber unit, GC 900, BRIT India make, using this technique has been observed within ± 15%. This technique can be used for routine quality assurances and dose distribution validation of any gamma chamber during commissioning and source replacement. The application of commercial glass plate for dose mapping in gamma chambers has been found very promising due to its wider dose linearity, quick measurement, and lesser expertise requirement in application of the technique.

  11. Correction of measured Gamma-Knife output factors for angular dependence of diode detectors and PinPoint ionization chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hršak, Hrvoje; Majer, Marija; Grego, Timor; Bibić, Juraj; Heinrich, Zdravko

    2014-12-01

    Dosimetry for Gamma-Knife requires detectors with high spatial resolution and minimal angular dependence of response. Angular dependence and end effect time for p-type silicon detectors (PTW Diode P and Diode E) and PTW PinPoint ionization chamber were measured with Gamma-Knife beams. Weighted angular dependence correction factors were calculated for each detector. The Gamma-Knife output factors were corrected for angular dependence and end effect time. For Gamma-Knife beams angle range of 84°-54°. Diode P shows considerable angular dependence of 9% and 8% for the 18 mm and 14, 8, 4 mm collimator, respectively. For Diode E this dependence is about 4% for all collimators. PinPoint ionization chamber shows angular dependence of less than 3% for 18, 14 and 8 mm helmet and 10% for 4 mm collimator due to volumetric averaging effect in a small photon beam. Corrected output factors for 14 mm helmet are in very good agreement (within ±0.3%) with published data and values recommended by vendor (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden). For the 8 mm collimator diodes are still in good agreement with recommended values (within ±0.6%), while PinPoint gives 3% less value. For the 4 mm helmet Diodes P and E show over-response of 2.8% and 1.8%, respectively. For PinPoint chamber output factor of 4 mm collimator is 25% lower than Elekta value which is generally not consequence of angular dependence, but of volumetric averaging effect and lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. Diodes P and E represent good choice for Gamma-Knife dosimetry.

  12. Characterizations of Cathode pad chamber as tracking detector for MUON Spectrometer of ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Pal, Sanjoy

    The present thesis gives an overview of A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN with particular emphasis on the contribution of the Indian Collaboration to the Muon Spectrometer. The two major activities of the Indian Collaboration namely, the 2$^{nd}$ Tracking Station and MANAS chip, have been covered in detail. A full scale prototype chamber (0$^{th}$ chamber) for the 2$^{nd}$ station was tested at CERN with beams from PS and SPS. Detail analysis of his data was carried out by me to validate the design and fabrication procedure for these large area Cathode Pad Chambers. This analysis also determined the production specifications of the MANAS chip. The thesis present every step which led to timely production of the ten chambers (two spare) of the 2$^{nd}$ station. At every stage strict quality control measures were adopted and various tests were carried out to validate every production step. I have been closely associated with the chamber production and all the validation...

  13. Initial test results of an ionization chamber shower detector for a LHC luminosity monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Datte, P S; Haguenauer, Maurice; Manfredi, P F; Manghisoni, M; Millaud, J E; Placidi, Massimo; Ratti, L; Riot, V J; Schmickler, Hermann; Speziali, V; Traversi, G; Turner, W C

    2003-01-01

    A novel segmented multigap pressurized gas ionization chamber is being developed for optimization of the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The ionization chambers are to be installed in the front quadrupole and 0 degrees neutral particle absorbers in the high luminosity interaction regions (IRs) and sample the energy deposited near the maxima of the hadronic/electromagnetic showers in these absorbers. The ionization chambers are instrumented with low noise, fast pulse-shaping electronics to be capable of resolving individual bunch crossings at 40 MHz. In this paper, we report the initial results of our second test of this instrumentation in a super proton synchrotron (SPS) external proton beam. Single 300 GeV protons are used to simulate the hadronic/electromagnetic showers produced by the forward collision products from the interaction regions of the LHC. The capability of instrumentation to measure the luminosity of individual bunches in a 40 MHz bunch train is demonstrated. (10 refs) .

  14. Construction and test of a gas system for the supply of a jet chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An existing test jetchamber has been made operational by the installation of an appropriate gas system. As the chamber is to study problems of the OPAL jetchamber, its gas system has to meet requirements similar to that of OPAL: Set-up of very well defined gas mixtures at given pressure, removal of residual O2 molecules and admixture of a small amount of H2O. After successful testing of the single components, measurement of the drift velocity vd was used as a functional test of the overall system. Excellent agreement has been achieved with existing OPAL drift velocity-data. (orig.)

  15. Sensitivity of LR115 detector in diffusion chamber to {sup 222}Rn in the presence of {sup 220}Rn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, V.S.Y.; Yip, C.W.Y.; Ho, J.P.Y.; Nikezic, D.; Yu, K.N. E-mail: peter.yu@cityu.edu.hk

    2002-06-01

    Determination has been made of the sensitivity of LR115 type 2-track detectors (in units of m) to {sup 222}Rn, measured in the presence of {sup 220}Rn. Measurements have been made by means of a widely used diffusion chamber while Monte Carlo simulations have also been conducted. The experimentally derived sensitivities for {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn were found to be 0.470{+-}0.022 and 0.486{+-}0.042 m, respectively. For Monte Carlo simulations, the sensitivities to {sup 222}Rn gas were found to range from 0.618x10{sup -2} m (assuming that all {sup 218}Po progeny decay before deposition onto the internal walls of the diffusion chamber) to 0.405x10{sup -2} m (assuming that all {sup 218}Po progeny are deposited on the internal walls of the same containment vessel before decaying). The sensitivity to {sup 220}Rn gas of 0.465x10{sup -2} m found from Monte Carlo simulations agrees to within uncertainty with experimental findings. The experimentally derived sensitivity value for {sup 222}Rn indicates that 30% of the {sup 218}Po progeny decay before deposition onto the internal walls of the diffusion chamber.

  16. Plasma Panel Detectors for MIP Detection for the SLHC and a Test Chamber Design

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, Robert; Etzion, Erez; Friedman, Peter S; Levin, Daniel S; Moshe, Meny Ben; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Zhou, Bing

    2010-01-01

    Performance demands for high and super-high luminosity at the LHC (up to 10^35 cm^(-2) sec^(-1) after the 2017 shutdown) and at future colliders demand high resolution tracking detectors with very fast time response and excellent temporal and spatial resolution. We are investigating a new radiation detector technology based on Plasma Display Panels (PDP), the underlying engine of panel plasma television displays. The design and production of PDPs is supported by four decades of industrial development. Emerging from this television technology is the Plasma Panel Sensor (PPS), a novel variant of the micropattern radiation detector. The PPS is fundamentally an array of micro-Geiger plasma discharge cells operating in a non-ageing, hermetically sealed gas mixture . We report on the PPS development program, including design of a PPS Test Cell.

  17. Integrated High-Rate Transition Radiation Detector and Tracking Chamber for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD-6 \\\\ \\\\Over the past five years, RD-6 has developed a transition radiation detector and charged particle tracker for high rate operation at LHC. The detector elements are based on C-fibre reinforced kapton straw tubes of 4~mm diameter filled with a Xenon gas mixture. Detailed measurements with and without magnetic field have been performed in test beams, and in particular have demonstrated the possibility of operating straw tubes at very high rate (up to 20~MHz) with accurate drift-time measurement accuracy. A full-scale engineering prototype containing 10~000 straws is presently under assembly and will be accurately measured with a powerful X-ray tube. Integrated front-end electronics with fast readout have been designed and successfully operated in test beam. \\\\ \\\\Finally extensive simulations performed for ATLAS have shown that such a detector will provide powerful pattern recognition, accurate momentum measurements, efficient level-2 triggering and excellent electron identification, even at the highe...

  18. Filtering data from a drift-chamber detector using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the implementation of an analog neural network chip (Intel 80170NX ETANN) to filter a multi-signal read-out from flash-ADCs used in a liquid argon time projection chamber (ICARUS). The training and subsequent testing of the network is discussed in some detail. A network consisting of multiple sub-networks is proposed to perform signal filtering, determination of peak position and track finding. (orig.)

  19. Experimental study of track density distribution on LR115 detector and deposition fraction of sup 2 sup 1 sup 8 Po in diffusion chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Koo, V S Y; Ho, J P Y; Nikezic, D; Yu, K N

    2002-01-01

    The radial distribution of track density on a solid-state nuclear track detector inside a diffusion chamber is a function of the fraction f of sup 2 sup 1 sup 8 Po decay before deposition. In the present work, procedures are proposed to determine f experimentally by determining the track density distribution on an LR115 detector in a diffusion chamber. First, a relatively tall diffusion chamber, with a height of 8 cm, was chosen. After exposure, the LR115 detector was etched. A transparent template with concentric circles was devised to study the radial distribution of sensitivity using an optical microscope. The distributions according to different values of f were also calculated using Monte Carlo simulations. By minimizing the deviations between these Monte Carlo curves and the experimental data, f was found to be 0.4.

  20. Operation of Resistive Plate Chamber Detectors with a New Environmentally Friendly Freon

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, Helen Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    RPC particle gas detectors at CERN provide a vital element to the physics experiments carried out on the LHC. While their current operation and working gas mixtures are successful, environ- mental and economic factors force a revision of the mixture, specifically the eventual replacement of the current Freon gas R134-a with a newer, less environmentally harmful formulation, namely R1234-yf. The methods and results presented here outline the detector response to the introduction of the new Freon and its behavior under various mixtures. The electronegativity and hence impact on RPC parameters was investigated. It was found that the new Freon gas is indeed electroneg- ative, and suppresses the RPC signal. The mixture was modified to include Argon to increase ionization, and the final results of the operation of the RPC were satisfactory. Further work to refine the mixture for future implementation is necessary.

  1. Patient specific IMRT quality assurance with film, ionization chamber and detector arrays: Our institutional experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study was conducted to review patient specific IMRT QA delivered at our institution using Varian LINACs and TomoTherapy Hi-Art system and categorized according to the anatomical site, type of treatment machine, and treatment planning systems (TPS). Material and methods: Three thousand and three hundred seven patient data were evaluated for a time ranging from 2006 to 2011; these data were gauged using several methods used in the QA process. Ion chambers and film were used in 1738 patient plan QA in the earlier years followed by ion chamber arrays in 1569 patient plan QA in the latter years. Patients were grouped according to several parameters including TPS, site of treatment, and type of treatment machine in comparing the measured versus computed dose differences. From 2006 through early 2009, 736 TomoTherapy plans, 651 Pinnacle3 plans, and 351 Corvus plans were evaluated using ion chambers and films. The pass criterion at the institution at the time of these measurements was 3% dose difference and 3 mm distance to agreement. For the years ranging from 2009 to 2011, 1569 patient IMRT QAs were performed and evaluated on the institution's pass criteria of 90% γ value on Varian linacs with Millennium 80, 120 and High-Definition 120 multileaf collimators. Results: Average point dose difference between measured and calculated plans for Pinnacle3, Hi-ART TomoTherapy, and Corvus TPS were 0.1205%, −0.0042%, and −0.0178%. Among the QA plans measured using a 2D array, average gamma values for brain, head and neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis were 97.2%, 95.7%, 96.2%, 97.0%, and 96.2%, respectively. Average gamma values based on 80, 120, HD 120 and TomoTherapy MLC configurations were 96.5%, 96.2%, 96.3%, and 97%, respectively. A 2-tailed paired Student's T-test did not reveal the presence of statistically significant differences based on either TPS, anatomical sites, number of beams or arcs, number of control points, or the MLC configuration (p

  2. ASSEMBLY and CHARACTERIZATION OF RESISTIVE PLATE CHAMBERS IN INDIA FOR THE CMS DETECTOR

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Ramandeep

    2015-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment is a general purpose detector being operated at Large Hadron Collider (LHC) facility at CERN. The RE4 upgrade project was envisaged to improve the Level-1 trigger efficiency in the forward region, when LHC would run at its full designed energy and luminosity after the first Long Shutdown (LS-1, 2013-2014). About 200 RPCs were built for the upgrade at three assembly sites in India, CERN and Ghent. India contributed to 50, RE4/2 RPCs along with 200 Cu-cooling units for the entire upgrade for which the assembly and characterization of RPCs was carried out jointly by Nuclear Physics Division-BARC and Panjab University-Chandigarh. The gas-gaps after their arrival from KODEL, South Korea, underwent mechanical tests for leak and popped spacers, followed by electrical tests for long term monitoring of leakage currents. After the assembly, each RPC was evaluated for its efficiency, cluster size, noise and strip profiles. The Cu-cooling units build at BARC were also tested acc...

  3. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1967-01-01

    Magnetoscriptive readout wire chamber.Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  4. Very low noise AC/DC power supply systems for large detector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaboldi, C.; Baù, A.; Carniti, P.; Cassina, L.; Giachero, A.; Gotti, C.; Maino, M.; Passerini, A.; Pessina, G.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we present the first part of the power supply system for the CUORE and LUCIFER arrays of bolometric detectors. For CUORE, it consists of AC/DC commercial power supplies (0-60 V output) followed by custom DC/DC modules (48 V input, ±5 V to ±13.5 V outputs). Each module has 3 floating and independently configurable output voltages. In LUCIFER, the AC/DC + DC/DC stages are combined into a commercial medium-power AC/DC source. At the outputs of both setups, we introduced filters with the aim of lowering the noise and to protect the following stages from high voltage spikes that can be generated by the energy stored in the cables after the release of accidental short circuits. Output noise is very low, as required: in the 100 MHz bandwidth the RMS level is about 37 μVRMS (CUORE setup) and 90 μVRMS (LUCIFER setup) at a load of 7 A, with a negligible dependence on the load current. Even more importantly, high frequency switching disturbances are almost completely suppressed. The efficiency of both systems is above 85%. Both systems are completely programmable and monitored via CAN bus (optically coupled).

  5. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Proportional multi-wire chamber. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle. Proportional wire chambers allow a much quicker reading than the optical or magnetoscriptive readout wire chambers.

  6. Track segment finding with CGEM-IT and matching to outer drift chamber tracks in the BESIII detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin-Hua; Wang, Liang-Liang; Wu, Ling-Hui; Ju, Xu-Dong; Xiu, Qing-Lei; Dong, Liao-Yuan; Dong, Ming-Yi; Li, Wei-Dong; Li, Wei-Guo; Liu, Huai-Min; Ou-Yang, Qun; Yuan, Ye; Zhang, Yao

    2016-09-01

    The relative differences in coordinates of Cylindrical Gas Electron Multiplier Detector-based Inner Tracker (CGEM-IT) clusters are studied to search for track segments in CGEM-IT for the BESIII experiment. With the full simulation of single muon track samples, clear patterns are found and parameterized for the correct cluster combinations. The cluster combinations satisfying the patterns are selected as track segment candidates in CGEM-IT with an efficiency higher than 99%. The parameters of the track segments are obtained by a helix fitting. Some χ2 quantities, evaluating the differences in track parameters between the track segments in CGEM-IT and the tracks found in the outer drift chamber, are calculated and used to match them. Proper χ2 requirements are determined as a function of transverse momentum and the matching efficiency is found to be reasonable. Supported by National Key Basic Research Program of China (2015CB856706), National Natural Science Foundation of China (11575222, 11205184, 11205182, 11121092, 11475185) and Joint Funds of National Natural Science Foundation of China (U1232201)

  7. Design of Multi-unit Control System of High Voltage Power Supply for LASCAR Scintillator Detector Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WuLijie; WangJinchuan; XiaoGuoqing; GuoZhongyan; ZhanWenlong; QiHuirong; XuZhiguo; ZhangLi; DingXianli; XuHushan; SunZhiyu; LiJiaxing; LiChen; WangMeng; ChenLixin; HuZhengguo; MaoRuishi; ZhaoTiecheng

    2003-01-01

    The power voltages of Photomultipliers (PMTs) at RIBLL LASCAR scintillator detector array are distributed between 900 V and 1 800 V irregularly. 392 CC123 modules are employed to supply high voltage for the PMT array. The CC123 module serves as PMT interface groupware package, and it can transform +12 V DC input voltage to ranges of 0~-2200 V for the PMT power supply corresponding to 0~+5 V output voltage from the control board crate. The relation of PMT power supply with the output voltage of the control crate is shown in Fig.1.

  8. Comparison of depth-dose distributions of proton therapeutic beams calculated by means of logical detectors and ionization chamber modeled in Monte Carlo codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzak, Robert; Konefał, Adam; Sokół, Maria; Orlef, Andrzej

    2016-08-01

    The success of proton therapy depends strongly on the precision of treatment planning. Dose distribution in biological tissue may be obtained from Monte Carlo simulations using various scientific codes making it possible to perform very accurate calculations. However, there are many factors affecting the accuracy of modeling. One of them is a structure of objects called bins registering a dose. In this work the influence of bin structure on the dose distributions was examined. The MCNPX code calculations of Bragg curve for the 60 MeV proton beam were done in two ways: using simple logical detectors being the volumes determined in water, and using a precise model of ionization chamber used in clinical dosimetry. The results of the simulations were verified experimentally in the water phantom with Marcus ionization chamber. The average local dose difference between the measured relative doses in the water phantom and those calculated by means of the logical detectors was 1.4% at first 25 mm, whereas in the full depth range this difference was 1.6% for the maximum uncertainty in the calculations less than 2.4% and for the maximum measuring error of 1%. In case of the relative doses calculated with the use of the ionization chamber model this average difference was somewhat greater, being 2.3% at depths up to 25 mm and 2.4% in the full range of depths for the maximum uncertainty in the calculations of 3%. In the dose calculations the ionization chamber model does not offer any additional advantages over the logical detectors. The results provided by both models are similar and in good agreement with the measurements, however, the logical detector approach is a more time-effective method.

  9. Activity measurements of radioactive solutions by liquid scintillation counting and pressurized ionization chambers and Monte Carlo simulations of source-detector systems for metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research works 'Activity measurements of radioactive solutions by liquid scintillation and pressurized ionization chambers and Monte Carlo simulations of source-detector systems' was presented for the graduation: 'Habilitation a diriger des recherches'. The common thread of both themes liquid scintillation counting and pressurized ionization chambers lies in the improvement of the techniques of radionuclide activity measurement. Metrology of ionization radiation intervenes in numerous domains, in the research, in the industry including the environment and the health, which are subjects of constant concern for the world population these last years. In this big variety of applications answers a large number of radionuclides of diverse disintegration scheme and under varied physical forms. The presented works realized within the National Laboratory Henri Becquerel have for objective to assure detector calibration traceability and to improve the methods of activity measurements within the framework of research projects and development. The improvement of the primary and secondary activity measurement methods consists in perfecting the accuracy of the measurements in particular by a better knowledge of the parameters influencing the detector yield. The works of development dealing with liquid scintillation counting concern mainly the study of the response of liquid scintillators to low energy electrons as well as their linear absorption coefficients using synchrotron radiation. The research works on pressurized ionization chambers consist of the study of their response to photons and electrons by experimental measurements compared to the simulation of the source-detector system using Monte Carlo codes. Besides, the design of a new type of ionization chamber with variable pressure is presented. This new project was developed to guarantee the precision of the amount of activity injected into the patient within the framework of diagnosis examination

  10. Time-of-flight ERD with a 200 mm{sup 2} Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} window gas ionization chamber energy detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julin, Jaakko, E-mail: jaakko.julin@jyu.fi; Laitinen, Mikko; Sajavaara, Timo

    2014-08-01

    Low energy heavy ion elastic recoil detection work has been carried out in Jyväskylä since 2009 using home made timing detectors, a silicon energy detector and a timestamping data acquisition setup forming a time-of-flight–energy telescope. In order to improve the mass resolution of the setup a new energy detector was designed to replace the silicon solid state detector, which suffered from radiation damage and had poor resolution for heavy recoils. In this paper the construction and operation of an isobutane filled gas ionization chamber with a 14 × 14 mm{sup 2} 100 nm thick silicon nitride window are described. In addition to greatly improved energy resolution for heavy ions, the detector is also able to detect hydrogen recoils simultaneously in the energy range of 100–1000 keV. Additionally the detector has position sensitivity by means of timing measurement, which can be performed without compromising the performance of the detector in any other way. The achieved position sensitivity improves the depth resolution near the surface.

  11. The great advance in the technology of particle detectors during the year was the discovery of the properties of multiwire proportional chambers and drift chambers

    CERN Multimedia

    1968-01-01

    In these chambers each wire is an independent proportional counter with its own amplifier and logic circuit. The low cost of the associated electronics makes realistic moderately large systems, with thousands of wires. The resolution time of each wire is of the order of 100 ns, with 3mm spacing. Roger Bouclier is working on an early model tested in a PS beam-line.

  12. Applications of a micro-pixel chamber (μPIC) based, time-resolved neutron imaging detector at pulsed neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The realization of high-intensity, pulsed spallation neutron sources such as J-PARC in Japan and SNS in the US has brought time-of-flight (TOF) based neutron techniques to the fore and spurred the development of new detector technologies. When combined with high-resolution imaging, TOF-based methods become powerful tools for direct imaging of material properties, including crystal structure/internal strain, isotopic/temperature distributions, and internal and external magnetic fields. To carry out such measurements in the high-intensities and high gamma backgrounds found at spallation sources, we have developed a new time-resolved neutron imaging detector employing a micro-pattern gaseous detector known as the micro-pixel chamber (μPIC) coupled with a field-programmable-gate-array-based data acquisition system. The detector combines 100μm-level (σ) spatial and sub-μs time resolutions with low gamma sensitivity of less than 10−12 and a rate capability on the order of Mcps (mega-counts-per-second). Here, we demonstrate the application of our detector to TOF-based techniques with examples of Bragg-edge transmission and neutron resonance transmission imaging (with computed tomography) carried out at J-PARC. We also consider the direct imaging of magnetic fields with our detector using polarized neutrons.

  13. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Was used in ISR (Intersecting Storage Ring) split field magnet experiment. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  14. Surface and Buildup Region Dose Measurements with Markus Parallel-Plate Ionization Chamber, GafChromic EBT3 Film, and MOSFET Detector for High-Energy Photon Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Akbas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate surface and buildup region doses for 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams using a Markus parallel-plate ionization chamber, GafChromic EBT3 film, and MOSFET detector for different field sizes and beam angles. The measurements were made in a water equivalent solid phantom at the surface and in the buildup region of the 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams at 100 cm source-detector distance for 5 × 5, 10 × 10, and 20 × 20 cm2 field sizes and 0°, 30°, 60°, and 80° beam angles. The surface doses using 6 MV photon beams for 10 × 10 cm2 field size were found to be 20.3%, 18.8%, and 25.5% for Markus chamber, EBT3 film, and MOSFET detector, respectively. The surface doses using 15 MV photon beams for 10 × 10 cm2 field size were found to be 14.9%, 13.4%, and 16.4% for Markus chamber, EBT3 film, and MOSFET detector, respectively. The surface dose increased with field size for all dosimeters. As the angle of the incident radiation beam became more oblique, the surface dose increased. The effective measurement depths of dosimeters vary; thus, the results of the measurements could be different. This issue can lead to mistakes at surface and buildup dosimetry and must be taken into account.

  15. OPAL Jet Chamber Prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. OPAL's central tracking system consists of (in order of increasing radius) a silicon microvertex detector, a vertex detector, a jet chamber, and z-chambers. All the tracking detectors work by observing the ionization of atoms by charged particles passing by: when the atoms are ionized, electrons are knocked out of their atomic orbitals, and are then able to move freely in the detector. These ionization electrons are detected in the dirfferent parts of the tracking system. This piece is a prototype of the jet chambers

  16. Qualification measurements of the voltage supply system as well as conceptionation of a state machine for the detector control of the ATLAS pixel detector; Qualifizierungsmessungen des Spannungsversorgungssystems sowie Konzeptionierung einer Zustandsmaschine fuer die Detektorkontrolle des ATLAS-Pixeldetektors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultes, Joachim

    2007-02-15

    The supply system and the control system of the ATLAS pixel detector represent important building blocks of the pixel detector. Corresponding studies of the supply system, which were performed within a comprehensive test system, the so-called system test, with nearly all final components and the effects on the pixel detector are object of this thesis. A further point of this thesis is the coordination and further development of the detector-control-system software under regardment of the different partial systems. A main topic represents thereby the conceptionation of the required state machine as interface for the users and the connection to the data acquisition system.

  17. Surface and buildup region dose measurements with Markus parallel-plate ionization chamber, Gafchromic EBT3 film and MOSFET detector for high energy photon beams

    CERN Document Server

    Akbas, Ugur; Koksal, Canan; Bilge, Hatice

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate surface and buildup region doses for 6 MV photon beams using a Markus parallel-plate ionization chamber, GafChromic EBT3 film and MOSFET detector for different field sizes and beam angles. The measurements were made in a water equivalent solid phantom at the surface and in the buildup region of the 6 MV photon beams at 100 cm source-detector distance (SDD) for 5x5, 10x10 and 20x20 cm2 field sizes and 0, 30, 60, 80 and 90 beam angles. The surface doses for 10x10 cm2 field size were found to be 20.33%, 18.80% and 25.48% for Markus chamber, EBT3 film and MOSFET detector, respectively. The surface dose increased with field size for all dosimeters. As the angle of the incident radiation beam became more oblique, the surface dose increased. The effective measurement depths of dosimeters vary, thus the results of the measurements could be different. This issue can lead to mistakes at surface and buildup dosimetry, and must be taken into account.

  18. A study of materials used for muon chambers at the CMS Experiment at the LHC: interaction with gas, new materials and new technologies for detector upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Colafranceschi, Stefano

    This thesis lays its foundation in both technological and theoretical stud- ies carried out between several aspects of applied engineering. There are several original contributions within the material science. The first is the detailed studies about the CMS RPC gas filters, which required an intense 3 years data-taking and ended up with a complete characterization of purifier materials. On top of this a stable ad − hoc setup (GGM) has been devel- oped for the CMS Experiment in order to monitor the RPC muon chamber working point. Finally a complete new detector has been designed, build and tested using new technology and new electronics establishing the word’s record in size for this kind of detector, which is taken under consideration for the upgrade of the high-η region of the CMS Experiment.

  19. An efficient, FPGA-based, cluster detection algorithm implementation for a strip detector readout system in a Time Projection Chamber polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Kyle J.; Hill, Joanne E.; Black, J. Kevin; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Jahoda, Keith

    2016-05-01

    A fundamental challenge in a spaceborne application of a gas-based Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for observation of X-ray polarization is handling the large amount of data collected. The TPC polarimeter described uses the APV-25 Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) to readout a strip detector. Two dimensional photo- electron track images are created with a time projection technique and used to determine the polarization of the incident X-rays. The detector produces a 128x30 pixel image per photon interaction with each pixel registering 12 bits of collected charge. This creates challenging requirements for data storage and downlink bandwidth with only a modest incidence of photons and can have a significant impact on the overall mission cost. An approach is described for locating and isolating the photoelectron track within the detector image, yielding a much smaller data product, typically between 8x8 pixels and 20x20 pixels. This approach is implemented using a Microsemi RT-ProASIC3-3000 Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), clocked at 20 MHz and utilizing 10.7k logic gates (14% of FPGA), 20 Block RAMs (17% of FPGA), and no external RAM. Results will be presented, demonstrating successful photoelectron track cluster detection with minimal impact to detector dead-time.

  20. An Efficient, FPGA-Based, Cluster Detection Algorithm Implementation for a Strip Detector Readout System in a Time Projection Chamber Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Kyle J.; Hill, Joanne E. (Editor); Black, J. Kevin; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Jahoda, Keith

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental challenge in a spaceborne application of a gas-based Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for observation of X-ray polarization is handling the large amount of data collected. The TPC polarimeter described uses the APV-25 Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) to readout a strip detector. Two dimensional photoelectron track images are created with a time projection technique and used to determine the polarization of the incident X-rays. The detector produces a 128x30 pixel image per photon interaction with each pixel registering 12 bits of collected charge. This creates challenging requirements for data storage and downlink bandwidth with only a modest incidence of photons and can have a significant impact on the overall mission cost. An approach is described for locating and isolating the photoelectron track within the detector image, yielding a much smaller data product, typically between 8x8 pixels and 20x20 pixels. This approach is implemented using a Microsemi RT-ProASIC3-3000 Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), clocked at 20 MHz and utilizing 10.7k logic gates (14% of FPGA), 20 Block RAMs (17% of FPGA), and no external RAM. Results will be presented, demonstrating successful photoelectron track cluster detection with minimal impact to detector dead-time.

  1. Two large-area anode-pad MICROMEGAS chambers as the basic elements of a pre-shower detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aphecetche, L.; Delagrange, H.; D'Enterria, D. G.; Le Guay, M.; Li, X.; Martínez, G.; Mora, M. J.; Pichot, P.; Roy, D.; Schutz, Y.

    2001-03-01

    The design of a detector based on MICROMEGAS (MICRO MEsh GAseous Structure) technology is presented. Our detector is characterized by a large active area of 398×281 mm2, a pad read-out with 20×22 mm2 segmentation, and an uniform amplification gap obtained by insulating spacers ( 100 μm high and 200 μm in diameter). The performances of several prototypes have been evaluated under irradiation with secondary beams of 2 GeV/c momentum charged pions and electrons. We consider such a detector as the basic element for a pre-shower detector to equip the PHOton Spectrometer (PHOS) of the ALICE experiment. Its assets are modularity, small amount of material, robustness and low cost.

  2. Two large-area anode-pad MICROMEGAS chambers as the basic elements of a pre-shower detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aphecetche, L; D'Enterria, D G; Le Guay, M; Li, X; Martínez, G; Mora, M J; Pichot, P; Roy, D; Schutz, Y

    2001-01-01

    The design of a detector based on MICROMEGAS (MICRO MEsh GAseous Structure) technology is presented. Our detector is characterized by a large active area of 398(\\times)281 mm(^{2}), a pad read-out with 20(\\times)22 mm(^{2}) segmentation, and an uniform amplification gap obtained by insulating spacers (100 (\\mu)m high and 200 (\\mu)m in diameter). The performances of several prototypes have been evaluated under irradiation with secondary beams of 2 GeV/c momentum charged pions and electrons. We consider such a detector as the basic element for a pre-shower detector to equip the PHOton Spectrometer (PHOS) of the ALICE experiment. Its assets are modularity, small amount of material, robustness and low cost.

  3. Precision templates for gluing wire holding pieces to chamber frames; Plantillas de precision para la construccion de detectores de muones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berdugo, J.; Burgos, C; Cerrada, M.

    1995-07-01

    In the present report we describe the procedure which has been used in order to optimize the precision obtained when positioning forward backward muon chamber sensor wire planes of the L3 experiment at CERN. With templates produced at CIEMAT a precision of about 10 microns. In sizes of the order of 3 meters. has been achieved. (Author) 2 refs.

  4. An Upgraded Front-End Switching Power Supply Design For the ATLAS TileCAL Detector of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Drake, Gary; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    We present the design of an upgraded switching power supply brick for the front-end electronics of the ATLAS hadron tile calorimeter (TileCAL) at the LHC. The new design features significant improvement in noise, improved fault detection, and generally a more robust design, while retaining the compact size, water-cooling, output control, and monitoring features in this 300 KHz design. We discuss the improvements to the design, and the radiation testing that we have done to qualify the design. We also present our plans for the production of 2400 new bricks for installation on the detector in 2013.

  5. The air supply hole of the inlet chamber and preventing the inflow of harmful impurities into the ventilation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Litvinova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the dependences of carbon monoxide (II concentrations on the height of the building façade based on the results of in situ tests with the goal of preventing the inflow of pollutants into the ventilation system. Carbon oxide (II may enter the premises when the inlet ventilation system is working through the inlet chamber from external sources of emission. i.e. vehicles and low and medium-power boilers in the urban environment. We have constructed nomograms to adjust the height of the receiving hole for air intake by the ventilation system depending on the quality of the outdoor air on the height of buildings from external sources of different heights in relation to the building. We have suggested guidelines allowing to design ventilation systems depending on the quality of outdoor air over the entire height of the building, which cannot be done at the design stage.

  6. Prototype multiwire proportional chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    Chambers of this type were initially developed within the Alpha project (finally not approved). They were designed such to minimize the radiation length with a view to a mass spectrometer of high resolution meant to replace the Omega detector. The chambers were clearly forerunners for the (drift) chambers later built for R606 with the novel technique of crimping the wires. See also photo 7510039X.

  7. A close-up of the ALEPH Time Projection Chamber (TPC) after the detector was dismantled, with a slice removed for the exhibition at the Musée International d'Horlogerie.

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On the occasion of CERN's 50th anniversary, starting 2 December at the Musée International d'Horlogerie in La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland, a new exhibition will pay tribute to physics, from the cosmic to the subatomic scales. The exhibition, which run for several years, includes a slice of the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) from ALEPH, one of the LEP detectors, which CERN donated to the museum when the detector was dismantled.

  8. Silicon drift-chamber prototype for the upgrade of the UA6 experiment at the CERN p /bar char/p collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large-area (≅ 4 x 4 cm2) silicon drift chamber has been designed and constructed in order to investigate its possible use in the UA6 experiment. The drift chamber will supply unambiguously (x,y) space points on each track; each arm of the UA6 spectrometer will be provided with two layers of drift detectors. 12 refs., 4 figs

  9. Lab-on-a-robot: integrated microchip CE, power supply, electrochemical detector, wireless unit, and mobile platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Christopher; Valdez, David C; Bergeron, Phillip; Mora, Maria F; Garcia, Carlos D; Ayon, Arturo

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, the fabrication of a wireless mobile unit containing an electrochemical detection module and a 3-channel high-voltage power supply (HVPS) designed for microchip CE is described. The presented device consists of wireless global positioning system controlled robotics, an electrochemical detector utilizing signal conditioning analog circuitry and a digital feedback range controller, a HVPS, an air pump, and a CE microchip. A graphical user interface (LabVIEW) was also designed to communicate wirelessly with the device, from a distant personal computer communication port. The entire device is integrated and controlled by digital hardware implemented on a field programmable gate array development board. This lab-on-a-robot is able to navigate to a global position location, acquire an air sample, perform the analysis (injection, separation, and detection), and send the data (electropherogram) to a remote station without exposing the analyst to the testing environment. PMID:19130571

  10. Proposal for the award of a contract, without competitive tendering, for the supply of radiation hard luminosity detectors for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract, without competitive tendering, for the supply of four radiation-hard luminosity detectors for the LHC. For the reasons explained in this document, the Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with CEA-LETI (FR) for the supply of four radiation-hard luminosity detectors for a total amount of 247 770 euros (385 456 Swiss francs), not subject to revision. The amount in Swiss francs has been calculated using the present rate of exchange.

  11. SU-E-T-96: Demonstration of a Consistent Method for Correcting Surface Dose Measurements Using Both Solid State and Ionization Chamber Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, T; Gerbi, B; Higgins, P [UniversityMinnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare the surface dose (SD) measured using a PTW 30-360 extrapolation chamber with different commonly used dosimeters (Ds): parallel plate ion chambers (ICs): RMI-449 (Attix), Capintec PS-033, PTW 30-329 (Markus) and Memorial; TLD chips (cTLD), TLD powder (pTLD), optically stimulated (OSLs), radiochromic (EXR2) and radiographic (EDR2) films, and to provide an intercomparison correction to Ds for each of them. Methods: Investigations were performed for a 6 MV x-ray beam (Varian Clinac 2300, 10x10 cm{sup 2} open field, SSD = 100 cm). The Ds were placed at the surface of the solid water phantom and at the reference depth dref=1.7cm. The measurements for cTLD, OSLs, EDR2 and EXR2 were corrected to SD using an extrapolation method (EM) indexed to the baseline PTW 30-360 measurements. A consistent use of the EM involved: 1) irradiation of three Ds stacked on top of each other on the surface of the phantom; 2) measurement of the relative dose value for each layer; and, 3) extrapolation of these values to zero thickness. An additional measurement was performed with externally exposed OSLs (eOSLs), that were rotated out of their protective housing. Results: All single Ds measurements overestimated the SD compared with the extrapolation chamber, except for Attix IC. The closest match to the true SD was measured with the Attix IC (− 0.1%), followed by pTLD (0.5%), Capintec (4.5%), Memorial (7.3%), Markus (10%), cTLD (11.8%), eOSL (12.8%), EXR2 (14%), EDR2 (14.8%) and OSL (26%). The EM method of correction for SD worked well for all Ds, except the unexposed OSLs. Conclusion: This EM cross calibration of solid state detectors with an extrapolation or Attix chamber can provide thickness corrections for cTLD, eOSLs, EXR2, and EDR2. Standard packaged OSLs were not found to be simply corrected.

  12. Design of a low ripple high efficiency power supply for X ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combining with a voltage multiplier circuit and an electronic filter, the high efficiency DC-DC step up controller MAX668 is used to implement a high efficiency low noise positive 100 voltage power supply. Instead of the conventional linear constant current design mode, a step down switch power chip is used as the power regulator, and an instrumentation amplifier chip AD623 is selected to amplify the voltage signal drop on the current sense resistor and construct a negative feedback to the power regulator. Experimental results show that the power dissipation of high voltage supplier is 14.5 mW, while the ripple noise is less than 15 mV. When the output current is 350 mA, the efficiency of the constant current source is larger than 81.3%. (authors)

  13. Prostatic arterial supply: demonstration by multirow detector Angio CT and Catheter Angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilhim, Tiago [Departamento Universitario de Anatomia, Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Hospital Saint Louis, Interventional Radiology, Lisbon (Portugal); Pisco, Joao M. [Hospital Saint Louis, Interventional Radiology, Lisbon (Portugal); Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Departamento Universitario de Radiologia, Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas, Lisbon (Portugal); Furtado, Andrea; Casal, Diogo; Pais, Diogo; O' Neill, Joao E.G. [Departamento Universitario de Anatomia, Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Campos Pinheiro, Luis [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Departamento Universitario de Urologia, Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2011-05-15

    To evaluate the prostatic arterial supply with multidetector Angio CT and Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA). DSA was performed in 21 male patients (7 of these also underwent Pelvic Angio CT); a further 4 patients only underwent Angio CT. Prostatic arteries were classified according to their origin, direction, number of pedicles, termination and anastomoses with surrounding arteries in 50 pelvic sides. The most frequent origin was the internal pudendal artery (n = 28; 56%) with the common gluteal-pudendal trunk the next commonest (n = 14; 28%). Less frequent origins were the obturator artery (n = 6; 12%) or the inferior gluteal artery (n = 2; 4%). Two separate vascular pedicles were found in 12 pelvic sides (24%). There were anastomoses with the termination of the internal pudendal artery in 24% of cases (n = 12), with the contra-lateral prostatic arteries in 6 cases (12%), and to the superior vesical artery in 4 cases (8%). Defining prostatic artery origin and direction is paramount to allow selective catheterisation. Angio CT is very useful as a pre-intervention tool. The number of independent vascular pedicles and the presence of anastomoses with surrounding arteries should be taken into account when planning prostatic arterial embolisation. (orig.)

  14. CP violation in the B0 - B0- system with the CMS detector at the LHC and study of microstrip gas chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis has been performed for the CMS project at the LHC, the proton-proton collider at CERN, whose first data taking is foreseen for the years 2004-2005. This work is divided in two parts. The first part includes a general study about low energy electron identification using the very fine granularity and the high resolution of the electromagnetic calorimeter of CMS. The efficiency of this algorithm is estimated to be about 60% and the hadron rejection factor is about 400. These identified electrons can be used for the B hadron tagging as well as for the reconstruction of the semi-inclusive decay Bd0 → J/ψ (→e+e-) + X. The new sensitivities of the CMS detector to the angles α and β of the CKM unitarity triangle with this new possibilities and new proton structure functions are: δ(sin(2α)) = 0.06 (+0.018-0.014) δ(sin(2β)) = 0.053 (+0.017-0.012). This results are comparable to what is expected for the dedicated B-Physics experiments. The second part concerns the development of a new type of microstrip gas chambers (MGC) where the anodes are separated from the cathode plane by a few microns. This geometry allows a fast charge collection (about 10 ns), gain values of more than 3000 and an energy resolution of 20% for the peek of a 55Fe source. (author)

  15. micro strip gas chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    About 16 000 Micro Strip Gas Chambers like this one will be used in the CMS tracking detector. They will measure the tracks of charged particles to a hundredth of a millimetre precision in the region near the collision point where the density of particles is very high. Each chamber is filled with a gas mixture of argon and dimethyl ether. Charged particles passing through ionise the gas, knocking out electrons which are collected on the aluminium strips visible under the microscope. Such detectors are being used in radiography. They give higher resolution imaging and reduce the required dose of radiation.

  16. JADE muon detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, J.; Armitage, J.C.M.; Baines, J.T.M.; Ball, A.H.; Bamford, G.; Barlow, R.J.; Bowdery, C.K.; Chrin, J.T.M.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Glendinning, I.; Greenshaw, T.; Hassard, J.F.; Hill, P.; King, B.T.; Loebinger, F.K.; Macbeth, A.A.; McCann, H.; Mercer, D.; Mills, H.E.; Murphy, P.G.; Prosper, H.B.; Rowe, P.; Stephens, K.

    1985-08-01

    The JADE muon detector consists of 618 planar drift chambers interspersed between layers of hadron absorber. This paper gives a detailed description of the construction and operation of the detector as a whole and discusses the properties of the drift chambers. The muon detector has been operating successfully at PETRA for five years. (orig.).

  17. SU-C-304-01: Investigation of Various Detector Response Functions and Their Geometry Dependence in a Novel Method to Address Ion Chamber Volume Averaging Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barraclough, B; Lebron, S [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Li, J; Fan, Qiyong; Liu, C; Yan, G [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A novel convolution-based approach has been proposed to address ion chamber (IC) volume averaging effect (VAE) for the commissioning of commercial treatment planning systems (TPS). We investigate the use of various convolution kernels and its impact on the accuracy of beam models. Methods: Our approach simulates the VAE by iteratively convolving the calculated beam profiles with a detector response function (DRF) while optimizing the beam model. At convergence, the convolved profiles match the measured profiles, indicating the calculated profiles match the “true” beam profiles. To validate the approach, beam profiles of an Elekta LINAC were repeatedly collected with ICs of various volumes (CC04, CC13 and SNC 125) to obtain clinically acceptable beam models. The TPS-calculated profiles were convolved externally with the DRF of respective IC. The beam model parameters were reoptimized using Nelder-Mead method by forcing the convolved profiles to match the measured profiles. We evaluated three types of DRFs (Gaussian, Lorentzian, and parabolic) and the impact of kernel dependence on field geometry (depth and field size). The profiles calculated with beam models were compared with SNC EDGE diode-measured profiles. Results: The method was successfully implemented with Pinnacle Scripting and Matlab. The reoptimization converged in ∼10 minutes. For all tested ICs and DRFs, penumbra widths of the TPS-calculated profiles and diode-measured profiles were within 1.0 mm. Gaussian function had the best performance with mean penumbra width difference within 0.5 mm. The use of geometry dependent DRFs showed marginal improvement, reducing the penumbra width differences to less than 0.3 mm. Significant increase in IMRT QA passing rates was achieved with the optimized beam model. Conclusion: The proposed approach significantly improved the accuracy of the TPS beam model. Gaussian functions as the convolution kernel performed consistently better than Lorentzian and

  18. A twin ionization chamber setup as detector for light charged particles with energies around 1 MeV applied to the sup 1 sup 0 B(n, alpha) sup 7 Li reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Göpfert, A; Bax, H

    2000-01-01

    The setup and operating conditions of a gridded twin ionization chamber with sample change facility to study light charged particle properties in the 1 MeV region is described. Detailed studies of different grid geometries in connection with the choice of an eligible counting gas mixture and the applied high voltage have been performed. Due to the high overall amplification of the small electrical chamber signals obtained from such low-energy particles, special filters have been developed in order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. Timing properties of the chamber signals are discussed in detail. Information available from chamber signals and encoding methods are elucidated by spectra of alpha particles created by sup 2 sup 3 sup 4 sup , sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U spontaneous alpha decay. The detector permits the independent and simultaneous measurement of energy and angular distribution of particles in both sides of the chamber. Finally, preliminary results and related analysis methods will be presented for the...

  19. Multi-anode ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E. (South Setauket, NY); Smith, Graham (Port Jefferson, NY); Mahler, George J. (Rocky Point, NY); Vanier, Peter E. (Setauket, NY)

    2010-12-28

    The present invention includes a high-energy detector having a cathode chamber, a support member, and anode segments. The cathode chamber extends along a longitudinal axis. The support member is fixed within the cathode chamber and extends from the first end of the cathode chamber to the second end of the cathode chamber. The anode segments are supported by the support member and are spaced along the longitudinal surface of the support member. The anode segments are configured to generate at least a first electrical signal in response to electrons impinging thereon.

  20. The Big European Bubble Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    1977-01-01

    The 3.70 metre Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC), dismantled on 9 August 1984. During operation it was one of the biggest detectors in the world, producing direct visual recordings of particle tracks. 6.3 million photos of interactions were taken with the chamber in the course of its existence.

  1. DELPHI's Ring Imaging Cherenkov Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    The hundreds of mirrors around this Ring Imaging Cherenkov Chamber reflect cones of light created by fast moving particles to a detector. The velocity of a particle can be measured by the size of the ring produced on the detector. DELPHI, which ran from 1989 to 2000 on the LEP accelerator, was primarily concerned with particle identification.

  2. The TESLA Time Projection Chamber

    OpenAIRE

    Ghodbane, Nabil

    2002-01-01

    A large Time Projection Chamber is proposed as part of the tracking system for a detector at the TESLA electron positron linear collider. Different ongoing R&D studies are reviewed, stressing progress made on a new type readout technique based on Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors.

  3. Test chamber for alpha spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Robert P.

    1977-01-01

    Alpha emitters for low-level radiochemical analysis by measurement of alpha spectra are positioned precisely with respect to the location of a surface-barrier detector by means of a chamber having a removable threaded planchet holder. A pedestal on the planchet holder holds a specimen in fixed engagement close to the detector. Insertion of the planchet holder establishes an O-ring seal that permits the chamber to be pumped to a desired vacuum. The detector is protected against accidental contact and resulting damage.

  4. spark chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    A few cosmic rays pass through your body every second of every day, no matter where you are. Look at the spark chamber to your right – every flash is the track made by a cosmic ray from outer space. The spark chamber is filled with a special gas mixture. Cosmic rays knock electrons out of the atoms in the gas. These electrons accelerate towards high voltage metal strips layered throughout the chamber, creating sparks like little bolts of lightning.

  5. spark chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    A few cosmic rays pass through your body every second of every day, no matter where you are. Look at the spark chamber to your right – every flash is the track made by a cosmic ray from outer space. The spark chamber is filled with a special gas mixture. Cosmic rays knock electrons out of the atoms in the gas. These electrons accelerate towards high voltage metal strips layered throughout the chamber, creating sparks like little bolts of lightning.

  6. Ussing Chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhout, J.; Wortelboer, H.; Verhoeckx, K.

    2015-01-01

    The Ussing chamber system is named after the Danish zoologist Hans Ussing, who invented the device in the 1950s to measure the short-circuit current as an indicator of net ion transport taking place across frog skin (Ussing and Zerahn, Acta Physiol Scand 23:110-127, 1951). Ussing chambers are increa

  7. Proposal for a Full-Scale Prototype Single-Phase Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber and Detector Beam Test at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Kutter, T

    2015-01-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) will use a large liquid argon (LAr) detector to measure the CP violating phase, determine the neutrino mass hier- archy and perform precision tests of the three-flavor paradigm in long-baseline neutrino oscillations. The detector will consist of four modules each with a fiducial mass of 10 kt of LAr and due to its unprecedented size will allow sensitive searches for proton decay and the detection and measurement of electron neutrinos from core collapse supernovae [1]. The first 10 kt module will use single-phase LAr detection technique and be itself modular in design. The successful manufacturing, installation and operation of several full-scale detector components in a suitable configuration represents a critical engineering milestone prior to the construction and operation of the first full 10 kt DUNE detector module at the SURF underground site. A charged particle beam test of a prototype detector will provide critical calibration measurements as well as inva...

  8. Simulation and calibration of the specific energy loss of the central jet chambers of the H1 detector and measurement of the inclusive D{sup *{+-}} meson cross section in photoproduction at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennekemper, Eva

    2011-12-15

    In this thesis the photoproduction of D{sup *} mesons in ep collisions at HERA is analysed. D{sup *} mesons are detected in the 'golden' decay channel D{sup *} {yields} K{pi}{pi}{sub s} with the H1 detector. Compared to earlier analyses, the systematic uncertainty is reduced due to two main improvements. Firstly, the simulation of the Fast Track Trigger, which is based on tracks measured within the central jet chambers, allows the trigger efficiency dependence of various kinematic variables to be evaluated. Secondly, the use of specific energy loss provides the possibility to suppress the non-resonant background. In order to use particle identification with the specific energy loss in the analysis, the simulation of the specific energy loss in the central jet chambers of the H1 detector is improved and the necessary correction functions and calibrations have been determined. This improved final H1 detector simulation is used to determine the cross section of photoproduction of D{sup *} mesons in the HERA II data sample, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 113 pb{sup -1}. The measurement was performed in the kinematic region of Q{sup 2}<2 GeV for the photon virtuality and photon-proton center of mass energies of 100

  9. Vacuum chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed description is given of the vacuum chamber of the so-called experimental equipment DEMAS (double-arm-time-of-flight spectrometer) at the heavy ion accelerator U-400 at the JINR-Dubna. (author)

  10. Beam-loss monitoring system with free-air ionization chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, H.; Shibata, S.; Hiramatsu, S.; Uchino, K.; Takashima, T.

    1980-08-01

    A monitoring system for proton beam losses was installed in the proton synchrotron at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics in Japan (KEK). The system consists of 56 air ionization chambers (AIC) for radiation detectors, 56 integrators, 56 variable gain amplifiers, two multiplexers, a computer interface circuit, a manual controller and a high tension power supply. The characteristics of the AIC, time resolution, radiation measurement upper limit saturation, kinetic energy dependence of the sensitivity, chamber activation effect, the beam loss detection system and the results of observations with the monitoring system are described.

  11. Gas filled detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main types of gas filled nuclear detectors: ionization chambers, proportional counters, parallel-plate avalanche counters (PPAC) and microstrip detectors are described. New devices are shown. A description of the processes involved in such detectors is also given. (K.A.) 123 refs.; 25 figs.; 3 tabs

  12. MPS II drift chamber system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platner, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    The MPS II detectors are narrow drift space chambers designed for high position resolution in a magnetic field and in a very high particle flux environment. Central to this implementation was the development of 3 multi-channel custom IC's and one multi-channel hybrid. The system is deadtimeless and requires no corrections on an anode-to-anode basis. Operational experience and relevance to ISABELLE detectors is discussed.

  13. Ultrasonic liquid level detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotz, Dennis M.; Hinz, William R.

    2010-09-28

    An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use within a shielded container, the detector being tubular in shape with a chamber at its lower end into which liquid from in the container may enter and exit, the chamber having an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver in its top wall and a reflector plate or target as its bottom wall whereby when liquid fills the chamber a complete medium is then present through which an ultrasonic wave may be transmitted and reflected from the target thus signaling that the liquid is at chamber level.

  14. Robert Chambers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Biekart (Kees); D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractProfessor Robert Chambers is a Research Associate at the Institute of Development Studies (IDS), University of Sussex (Brighton, UK), where he has been based for the last 40 years, including as Professorial Research Fellow. He became involved in the field of development management in the

  15. Development of the mixed radiation detector for target chamber II of BEPCII-LINAC test beam%BEPCII-LINAC试验束第二靶室混合辐射测量探测器的研制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐兴华; 李家才; 徐进章; 柯尊建; 安广朋; 杨涛; 张少平

    2011-01-01

    In target chamber II of the BEPCII-LINAC Test Beam, radiation field of mixed particles (mainly proton,neutron, gamma, pion, positron and electron) of consecutive energy is generated from the object target bombarded by the 1.89 GeV pulsed electron beams from the linear accelerator. This mixed radiation field is ideal for irradiating materials or biological samples. However, these experiments need to know the dose of various particles delivered to the samples. In light of this, a mixed radiation detector (phoswich detector) was developed. In this paper, the basic process of the detector development and its key properties are reported. The basic structure of detector and principles of detection are given. GEANT4 simulation results of detection efficiency of different particle and performance of n-y discrimination are given. The results show that the mixed radiation detector, with the design specifications being achieved, satisfies the measurements of mixed field in the Test Beam.%BEPCII-LINAC试验束(Test Beam)第二靶室内,1.89 GeV脉冲电子束轰击目标靶产生的次级粒子(主要为质子、中子、伽玛、正负pion和正负电子)形成了能量连续的混合粒子辐射场,该辐射场是材料或生物样品(如农作物种子)辐照损伤效应试验的理想场所.这些试验都迫切需要给出各种样品对不同粒子的受照剂量,因此研制一个混合辐射测量探测器--叠层闪烁体探测器.本文阐述该探测器研制的基本过程,并对其关键性能进行研究与测试;阐明了探测器的基本结构设计与制作过程和.探测基本原理,给出对不同粒子探测效率的GEANT4模拟结果,并对探测器的n-γ分辨性能进行了测试.结果显示该混合辐射测量探测器基本满足.rest Beam混合场的测量需要,达到预期的基本设计指标.

  16. Small SRS photon field profile dosimetry performed using a PinPoint air ion chamber, a diamond detector, a novel silicon-diode array (DOSI), and polymer gel dosimetry. Analysis and intercomparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, E; Maris, T G; Zacharopoulou, F; Papadakis, A; Manolopoulos, S; Green, S; Wojnecki, C

    2008-10-01

    Small photon fields are increasingly used in modern radiotherapy and especially in IMRT and SRS/SRT treatments. The uncertainties related to small field profile measurements can introduce significant systematic errors to the overall treatment process. These measurements are challenging mainly due to the absence of charged particle equilibrium conditions, detector size and composition effects, and positioning problems. In this work four different dosimetric methods have been used to measure the profiles of three small 6 MV circular fields having diameters of 7.5, 15.0, and 30.0 mm: a small sensitive volume air ion chamber, a diamond detector, a novel silicon-diode array (DOSI), and vinyl-pyrrolidone based polymer gel dosimeter. The results of this work support the validity of previous findings, suggesting that (a) air ion chambers are not suitable for small field dosimetry since they result in penumbra broadening and require significant corrections due to severe charged particle transport alterations; (b) diamond detectors provide high resolution and rather accurate small field profile measurements, as long as positioning problems can be addressed and the necessary dose rate corrections are correctly applied; and (c) the novel silicon-diode array (DOSI) used in this study seems to be adequate for small field profile measurements overcoming positioning problems. Polymer gel data were assumed as reference data to which the other measurement data were compared both qualitatively and quantitatively using the gamma-index concept. Polymer gels are both phantom and dosimeter, hence there are no beam perturbation effects. In addition, polymer gels are tissue equivalent and can provide high-spatial density and high-spatial resolution measurements without positioning problems, which makes them useful for small field dosimetry measurements. This work emphasizes the need to perform beam profile measurements of small fields (for acceptance, commissioning, treatment planning

  17. Bubble chamber: colour enhanced tracks

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    This artistically-enhanced image of real particle tracks was produced in the Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC). Liquid hydrogen is used to create bubbles along the paths of the particles as a piston expands the medium. A magnetic field is produced in the detector causing the particles to travel in spirals, allowing charge and momentum to be measured.

  18. The CLAS drift chamber system

    CERN Document Server

    Mestayer, M D; Asavapibhop, B; Barbosa, F J; Bonneau, P; Christo, S B; Dodge, G E; Dooling, T; Duncan, W S; Dytman, S A; Feuerbach, R; Gilfoyle, G P; Gyurjyan, V; Hicks, K H; Hicks, R S; Hyde-Wright, C E; Jacobs, G; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Kossov, M; Kuhn, S E; Magahiz, R A; Major, R W; Martin, C; McGuckin, T; McNabb, J; Miskimen, R A; Müller, J A; Niczyporuk, B B; O'Meara, J E; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Robb, J; Roudot, F; Schumacher, R A; Tedeschi, D J; Thompson, R A; Tilles, D; Tuzel, W; Vansyoc, K; Vineyard, M F; Weinstein, L B; Wilkin, G R; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J

    2000-01-01

    Experimental Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory houses the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, the magnetic field of which is produced by a superconducting toroid. The six coils of this toroid divide the detector azimuthally into six sectors, each of which contains three large multi-layer drift chambers for tracking charged particles produced from a fixed target on the toroidal axis. Within the 18 drift chambers are a total of 35,148 individually instrumented hexagonal drift cells. The novel geometry of these chambers provides for good tracking resolution and efficiency, along with large acceptance. The design and construction challenges posed by these large-scale detectors are described, and detailed results are presented from in-beam measurements.

  19. The CLAS drift chamber system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mestayer, M.D.; Carman, D.S.; Asavaphibhop, B. [and others

    1999-04-01

    Experimental Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory houses the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, the magnetic field of which is produced by a superconducting toroid. The six coils of this toroid divide the detector azimuthally into six sectors, each of which contains three large multi-layer drift chambers for tracking charged particles produced from a fixed target on a toroidal axis. Within the 18 drift chambers are a total of 35,148 individually instrumented hexagonal drift cells. The novel geometry of these chambers provides for good tracking resolution and efficiency, along with large acceptance. The design and construction challenges posed by these large-scale detectors are described, and detailed results are presented from in-beam measurements.

  20. The world's largest time projection chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Peter Glassel, the technical coordinator for the ALICE time projection chamber, is seen sitting inside the detector; the largest in the world at nearly 100 cubic metres. Thousands of wires are connected to read out electronic data produced as particles are created in lead-lead collisions at the centre of the detector. These particles will cause the medium within the time projection chamber to ionise along their tracks allowing the particle paths to be recreated.

  1. Results from the MAC Vertex chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, H.N.

    1987-05-01

    The design, construction, and performance characteristics of a high precision gaseous drift chamber made of thin walled proportional tubes are described. The device achieved an average spatial resolution of 45 ..mu..m in use for physics analysis with the MAC detector. The B-lifetime result obtained with this chamber is discussed.

  2. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial log VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed

  3. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsey, C.S.; Denby, B.; Haggerty, H.

    1992-10-01

    We discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial log VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed.

  4. A 4[pi] charged-particle detector array for light-ion-induced nuclear fragmentation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiatkowski, K. (Departments of Chemistry and Physics and IUCF, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)); Alexander, A. (Departments of Chemistry and Physics and IUCF, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)); Bracken, D.S. (Departments of Chemistry and Physics and IUCF, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)); Brzychczyk, J. (Departments of Chemistry and Physics and IUCF, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)); Dorsett, J. (Departments of Chemistry and Physics and IUCF, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)); Ensman, R. (Departments of Chemistry and Physics and IUCF, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)); Foxford, E.R. (Departments of Chemistry and Physics and IUCF, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)); Hamilton, T. (Departments of Chemistry and Physics and IUCF, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)); Komisarcik, K. (Dep

    1994-12-30

    Operating characteristics of the Indiana Silicon Sphere 4[pi] detector array are outlined. The detector geometry is spherical, with 90 telescopes in the forward hemisphere and 72 at backward angles, covering a total solid angle of 74% of 4[pi]. Each telescope consists of a simple gas-ion chamber, operated with C[sub 3]F[sub 8] gas, followed by a 0.5 mm thick ion-implanted silicon detector and a 28 mm CsI(Tl) crystal, readout by a photodiode. Custom-built bias supplies and NIM preamp/shaper modules were used in conjunction with commercial CFD, TDC and ADC CAMAC units. ((orig.))

  5. A 4π charged-particle detector array for light-ion-induced nuclear fragmentation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operating characteristics of the Indiana Silicon Sphere 4π detector array are outlined. The detector geometry is spherical, with 90 telescopes in the forward hemisphere and 72 at backward angles, covering a total solid angle of 74% of 4π. Each telescope consists of a simple gas-ion chamber, operated with C3F8 gas, followed by a 0.5 mm thick ion-implanted silicon detector and a 28 mm CsI(Tl) crystal, readout by a photodiode. Custom-built bias supplies and NIM preamp/shaper modules were used in conjunction with commercial CFD, TDC and ADC CAMAC units. ((orig.))

  6. Summary of activity. Topic I: detectors and experiments. [High-energy detectors for use at ISABELLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, J; Ozaki, S

    1978-01-01

    Results of a workshop studying detectors for Isabelle experimental halls are described. The detectors must be very reliable. Spatial resolution of the tracking detectors must be high to provide accurate measurements of angle and momentum, retain a short resolving time, and show excellent multiparticle handling capability. Included in the study were hodoscopes, drift chambers, proportional chambers, time projection chambers, Cherenkov counters, electromagnetic shower detectors, and hadron calorimeters. Data handling methods were also included in the studies. (FS)

  7. An ionization chamber with magnetic levitated electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Kawaguchi, T

    1999-01-01

    A new type of ionization chamber which has magnetically levitated electrodes has been developed. The electrodes are supplied voltages for the repelling of ions by a battery which is also levitated with the electrodes. The characteristics of this ionization chamber are investigated in this paper.

  8. ALICE Silicon Strip Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Nooren, G

    2013-01-01

    The Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) constitutes the two outermost layers of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE Experiment. The SSD plays a crucial role in the tracking of the particles produced in the collisions connecting the tracks from the external detectors (Time Projection Chamber) to the ITS. The SSD also contributes to the particle identification through the measurement of their energy loss.

  9. MUON DETECTORS: DT

    CERN Document Server

    Marco Dallavalle

    2012-01-01

      Although the year 2012 is the third year without access to the chambers and the Front-End electronics, the fraction of good channels is still very high at 99.1% thanks also to the constant care provided by the on-site operation team. The downtime caused to CMS as a consequence of DT failures is to-date <2%. The intervention on the LV power supplies, which required a large number of CAEN modules (137 A3050, 13 A3100, and 3 MAO) to be removed from the detector, reworked and tested during this Year-End Technical Stop, can now, after a few months of stable operation of the LV, be declared to have solved once-and-for-all the persistent problem with the overheating LV Anderson connectors. Another piece of very good news is that measurements of the noise from single-hit rate outside the drift-time box as a function of the LHC luminosity show that the noise rate and distribution are consistent with expectations of the simulations in the Muon TDR, which have guided the detector design and constru...

  10. Neutron detector array at IUAC: Design features and instrumentation developments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Sugathan; A Jhingan; K S Golda; T Varughese; S Venkataramanan; N Saneesh; V V Satyanarayana; S K Suman; J Antony; Ruby Shanti; K Singh; S K Saini; A Gupta; A Kothari; P Barua; Rajesh Kumar; J Zacharias; R P Singh; B R Behera; S K Mandal; I M Govil; R K Bhowmik

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics and performance of the newly commissioned neutron detector array at IUAC are described. The array consists of 100 BC501 liquid scintillators mounted in a semispherical geometry and are kept at a distance of 175 cm from the reaction point. Each detector is a 5″ × 5″ cylindrical cell coupled to 5″ diameter photomultiplier tube (PMT). Signal processing is realized using custom-designed home-made integrated electronic modules which perform neutron–gamma discrimination using zero cross timing and time-of-flight (TOF) technique. Compact custom-built high voltage power supply developed using DC–DC converters are used to bias the detector. The neutrons are recorded in coincidence with fission fragments which are detected using multi-wire proportional counters mounted inside a 1m diameter SS target chamber. The detectors and electronics have been tested off-line using radioactive sources and the results are presented.

  11. Development of multiwire proportional chambers

    CERN Multimedia

    Charpak, G

    1969-01-01

    It has happened quite often in the history of science that theoreticians, confronted with some major difficulty, have successfully gone back thirty years to look at ideas that had then been thrown overboard. But it is rare that experimentalists go back thirty years to look again at equipment which had become out-dated. This is what Charpak and his colleagues did to emerge with the 'multiwire proportional chamber' which has several new features making it a very useful addition to the armoury of particle detectors. In the 1930s, ion-chambers, Geiger- Muller counters and proportional counters, were vital pieces of equipment in nuclear physics research. Other types of detectors have since largely replaced them but now the proportional counter, in new array, is making a comeback.

  12. The GODDESS ionization chamber: developing robust windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Rose; Baugher, Travis; Cizewski, Jolie; Pain, Steven; Ratkiewicz, Andrew; Goddess Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Reaction studies of nuclei far from stability require high-efficiency arrays of detectors and the ability to identify beam-like particles, especially when the beam is a cocktail beam. The Gammasphere ORRUBA Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) is made up of the Oak Ridge-Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of silicon detectors for charged particles inside of the gamma-ray detector array Gammasphere. A high-rate ionization chamber is being developed to identify beam-like particles. Consisting of twenty-one alternating anode and cathode grids, the ionization chamber sits downstream of the target chamber and is used to measure the energy loss of recoiling ions. A critical component of the system is a thin and robust mylar window which serves to separate the gas-filled ionization chamber from the vacuum of the target chamber with minimal energy loss. After construction, windows were tested to assure that they would not break below the required pressure, causing harm to the wire grids. This presentation will summarize the status of the ionization chamber and the results of the first tests with beams. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation.

  13. Development of a monitor system for gas based detectors and measurement of electron attachment in the chamber gas; Aufbau eines Monitorsystems fuer gasbasierte Detektoren und Messung der Elektronenanlagerung im Kammergas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linzmaier, Diana

    2009-01-15

    In the framework of an international collaboration a new electron-positron linear accelerator (ILC) with a c. m. energy up to 500 GeV is planned. For the International Large Detector Concept (ILD) a time projection chamber (TPC) shall perform precise measurements of the particle tracks. In order to fulfil the high requirements on the resolution, a microstructure gas-amplification system is used for read-out. For research and development of the detector principle for the application at the ILC at DESY a large TPC prototype is developed. For the operation of the detector it is necessary to monitor its state and especially that of the measurement gas. For this purpose in the framework of this thesis a slow control system is built, which shall make possible for the different collaboration partners to operate the prototype and to integrate the slow control data into their measurement. For this with an object-oriented control system a graphic user interface was created, which makes an overview over the applied measurement devices and a driving allows. Furthermore the influence of impurities of the gas mixture by oxygen was studied. For this with a small TPC prototype measurements of the electron attachment coefficient at different oxygen concentrations were performed with a magnetic flux density of 4 T. From the amplitude of the measurement signal a rate for the electron attachment could be determined. The values obtained for this agree sufficiently in comparison with literature values. [German] Im Rahmen einer internationalen Kollaboration ist ein neuer Elektronen-Positronen-Linearbeschleuniger (ILC) mit einer Schwerpunktsenergie bis zu 500 GeV geplant. Fuer das International Large Detector Concept (ILD) soll eine Zeitprojektionskammer (TPC) praezise Vermessungen der Teilchenspuren durchfuehren. Um die hohen Anforderungen an die Aufloesung zu erfuellen, wird ein Mikrostruktur-Gasverstaerkungssystem zur Auslese verwendet. Zur Erforschung und Entwicklung des

  14. Making MUSIC: A multiple sampling ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) was developed for use in conjunction with the Atlas scattering chamber (ATSCAT). This chamber was developed to study the (α, p) reaction in stable and radioactive beams. The gas filled ionization chamber is used as a target and detector for both particles in the outgoing channel (p + beam particles for elastic scattering or p + residual nucleus for (α, p) reactions). The MUSIC detector is followed by a Si array to provide a trigger for anode events. The anode events are gated by a gating grid so that only (α, p) reactions where the proton reaches the Si detector result in an anode event. The MUSIC detector is a segmented ionization chamber. The active length of the chamber is 11.95 in. and is divided into 16 equal anode segments (3.5 in. x 0.70 in. with 0.3 in. spacing between pads). The dead area of the chamber was reduced by the addition of a Delrin snout that extends 0.875 in. into the chamber from the front face, to which a mylar window is affixed. 0.5 in. above the anode is a Frisch grid that is held at ground potential. 0.5 in. above the Frisch grid is a gating grid. The gating grid functions as a drift electron barrier, effectively halting the gathering of signals. Setting two sets of alternating wires at differing potentials creates a lateral electric field which traps the drift electrons, stopping the collection of anode signals. The chamber also has a reinforced mylar exit window separating the Si array from the target gas. This allows protons from the (α, p) reaction to be detected. The detection of these protons opens the gating grid to allow the drift electrons released from the ionizing gas during the (α, p) reaction to reach the anode segment below the reaction

  15. Making MUSIC: A multiple sampling ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shumard, B. [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203 H-113, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)]. E-mail: shumard@phy.anl.gov; Henderson, D.J. [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203 H-113, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Rehm, K.E. [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203 H-113, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Tang, X.D. [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203 H-113, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) was developed for use in conjunction with the Atlas scattering chamber (ATSCAT). This chamber was developed to study the ({alpha}, p) reaction in stable and radioactive beams. The gas filled ionization chamber is used as a target and detector for both particles in the outgoing channel (p + beam particles for elastic scattering or p + residual nucleus for ({alpha}, p) reactions). The MUSIC detector is followed by a Si array to provide a trigger for anode events. The anode events are gated by a gating grid so that only ({alpha}, p) reactions where the proton reaches the Si detector result in an anode event. The MUSIC detector is a segmented ionization chamber. The active length of the chamber is 11.95 in. and is divided into 16 equal anode segments (3.5 in. x 0.70 in. with 0.3 in. spacing between pads). The dead area of the chamber was reduced by the addition of a Delrin snout that extends 0.875 in. into the chamber from the front face, to which a mylar window is affixed. 0.5 in. above the anode is a Frisch grid that is held at ground potential. 0.5 in. above the Frisch grid is a gating grid. The gating grid functions as a drift electron barrier, effectively halting the gathering of signals. Setting two sets of alternating wires at differing potentials creates a lateral electric field which traps the drift electrons, stopping the collection of anode signals. The chamber also has a reinforced mylar exit window separating the Si array from the target gas. This allows protons from the ({alpha}, p) reaction to be detected. The detection of these protons opens the gating grid to allow the drift electrons released from the ionizing gas during the ({alpha}, p) reaction to reach the anode segment below the reaction.

  16. Development and characterization of scintillation based detectors for the use in radiological early warning networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, P.; Dombrowski, H.; Neumaier, S.

    2016-02-01

    To detect radiological incidents, all members of the European Union have installed nationwide radiological early warning networks. Most of the installed detector systems supply only dosimetric information. Novel spectrometry systems are considered to be good candidates for a new detector generation for environmental radiation monitoring because they will supply both nuclide-specific information and ambient dose equivalent rate values. Four different detector types were chosen and compared with each other (LaBr3, CeBr3, SrI2 scintillation detectors, and CdZnTe, a semiconductor detector). As a first step, the inherent background of these detectors was measured in the low background underground laboratory UDO II of PTB. As a second step, the relative detection sensitivity between the various detectors was determined at different energies. Finally, the detectors were exposed to a 4π-radiation field of radon progeny in PTB's radon chamber. The obtained results show that the investigated detectors are well suited for environmental radiation monitoring.

  17. Development and characterization of scintillation based detectors for the use in radiological early warning networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To detect radiological incidents, all members of the European Union have installed nationwide radiological early warning networks. Most of the installed detector systems supply only dosimetric information. Novel spectrometry systems are considered to be good candidates for a new detector generation for environmental radiation monitoring because they will supply both nuclide-specific information and ambient dose equivalent rate values. Four different detector types were chosen and compared with each other (LaBr3, CeBr3, SrI2 scintillation detectors, and CdZnTe, a semiconductor detector). As a first step, the inherent background of these detectors was measured in the low background underground laboratory UDO II of PTB. As a second step, the relative detection sensitivity between the various detectors was determined at different energies. Finally, the detectors were exposed to a 4π-radiation field of radon progeny in PTB's radon chamber. The obtained results show that the investigated detectors are well suited for environmental radiation monitoring

  18. The DELPHI Detector (DEtector with Lepton Photon and Hadron Identification)

    CERN Multimedia

    Crawley, B; Munich, K; Mckay, R; Matorras, F; Joram, C; Malychev, V; Behrmann, A; Van dam, P; Drees, J K; Stocchi, A; Adam, W; Booth, P; Bilenki, M; Rosenberg, E I; Morton, G; Rames, J; Hahn, S; Cosme, G; Ventura, L; Marco, J; Tortosa martinez, P; Monge silvestri, R; Moreno, S; Phillips, H; Alekseev, G; Boudinov, E; Martinez rivero, C; Gitarskiy, L; Davenport, M; De clercq, C; Firestone, A; Myagkov, A; Belous, K; Haider, S; Hamilton, K M; Lamsa, J; Rahmani, M H; Malek, A; Hughes, G J; Peralta, L; Carroll, L; Fuster verdu, J A; Cossutti, F; Gorn, L; Yi, J I; Bertrand, D; Myatt, G; Richard, F; Shapkin, M; Hahn, F; Ferrer soria, A; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P; Sekulin, R; Timmermans, J; Baillon, P

    2002-01-01

    % DELPHI The DELPHI Detector (Detector with Lepton Photon and Hadron Identification) \\\\ \\\\DELPHI is a general purpose detector for physics at LEP on and above the Z$^0$, offering three-dimensional information on curvature and energy deposition with fine spatial granularity as well as identification of leptons and hadrons over most of the solid angle. A superconducting coil provides a 1.2~T solenoidal field of high uniformity. Tracking relies on the silicon vertex detector, the inner detector, the Time Projection Chamber (TPC), the outer detector and forward drift chambers. Electromagnetic showers are measured in the barrel with high granularity by the High Density Projection Chamber (HPC) and in the endcaps by $ 1 ^0 $~x~$ 1 ^0 $ projective towers composed of lead glass as active material and phototriode read-out. Hadron identification is provided mainly by liquid and gas Ring Imaging Counters (RICH). The instrumented magnet yoke serves for hadron calorimetry and as filter for muons, which are identified in t...

  19. Physicist makes muon chamber sing

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    This Monitored Drift Tube detector, consisting of argon-CO2-filled aluminium tubes with a wire down the centre of each, will track muons in ATLAS; Tiecke used a single tube from one of these detectors to create the pipes in his organ. Particle physicists can make good musicians; but did you know particle detectors can make good music? That's what NIKHEF physicist Henk Tiecke learned when he used pipes cut from the ATLAS Monitored Drift Tube detector (MDT) to build his own working Dutch-style barrel organ in the autumn of 2005. 'I like to work with my hands,' said Tiecke, who worked as a senior physicist at NIKHEF, Amsterdam, on ZEUS until his retirement last summer. Tiecke had already constructed his barrel organ when he visited some colleagues in the ATLAS muon chambers production area at Nikhef in 2005. He noticed that the aluminium tubes they were using to build the chambers were about three centimetres in diameter-just the right size for a pipe in a barrel organ. 'The sound is not as nice as from wooden...

  20. Repatriation of Gamma Chambers Exported by India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT) is engaged in the production and supply of laboratory gamma chambers. The gamma chambers are self-shielded devices in which a number of 60Co source pencils placed in a cylindrical cage. The gamma chambers are type approved as a device and a transportation package separately by the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board. BRIT has exported number of such gamma chambers. For some of the gamma chambers, the type approval validity period is over and can no longer be transported. Hence, the radiation sources need to be transferred to a type approved package before transportation. BRIT has decommissioned five such gamma chambers so far and sources have been repatriated back to India. (author)

  1. Directed Energy Anechoic Chamber

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Directed Energy Anechoic Chamber comprises a power anechoic chamber and one transverse electromagnetic cell for characterizing radiofrequency (RF) responses of...

  2. Georges Charpak and his multiwire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    In 1968, Georges Charpak developed the 'multiwire proportional chamber', a gas-filled box with a large number of parallel detector wires, each connected to individual amplifiers. Linked to a computer, it could achieve a counting rate a thousand times better than existing techniques - without a camera in sight. From left to right, Georges Charpak, Fabio Sauli and Jean-Claude Santiard working on a multiwire chamber in 1970.

  3. Detector instrumentation for nuclear fission studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akhil Jhingan

    2015-09-01

    The study of heavy-ion-induced fusion–fission reactions require nuclear instrumentation that include particle detectors such as proportional counters, ionization chambers, silicon detectors, scintillation detectors, etc., and the front-end electronics for these detectors. Using the detectors mentioned above, experimental facilities have been developed for carrying out fusion–fission experiments. This paper reviews the development of detector instrumentation at IUAC.

  4. Laboratory aging studies for the HERA-B muon chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Danilov, M; Titov, M; Zaitsev, Y

    2002-01-01

    The severe radiation environment of the HERA-B experiment leads to a maximum accumulated charge on a wire, within the muon detector, of 200 mC/cm wire. For operation in this high-intensity environment, the main criteria for the gas choice turned out to be stability against aging. We report recent results of laboratory aging studies performed by irradiating proportional wire chambers filled with Ar/CF sub 4 /CH sub 4 (74:20:6), Ar/CF sub 4 /CH sub 4 (67:30:3), and Ar/CF sub 4 /CO sub 2 (65:30:5) mixtures. The penetration of water and oxygen through the walls of plastic tubes has also been investigated. Water can be introduced indirect to the gas mixture by using polyamide (nylon) pipes for gas supply lines.

  5. GEM Detector Electric Field Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    GEM (Gas Electron Multiplier) detectors have been widely employed in the experimental field of high energy physics and nuclear physics. As a successor to drift chambers, GEMs are much easier to fabricate and have a much higher spatial resolution

  6. MUON DETECTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    F. Gasparini

    DT As announced in the previous Bulletin MU DT completed the installation of the vertical chambers of barrel wheels 0, +1 and +2. 242 DT and RPC stations are now installed in the negative barrel wheels. The missing 8 (4 in YB-1 and 4 in YB-2) chambers can be installed only after the lowering of the two wheels into the UX cavern, which is planned for the last quarter of the year. Cabling on the surface of the negative wheels was finished in May after some difficulties with RPC cables. The next step was to begin the final commissioning of the wheels with the final trigger and readout electronics. Priority was giv¬en to YB0 in order to check everything before the chambers were covered by cables and services of the inner detectors. Commissioning is not easy since it requires both activity on the central and positive wheels underground, as well as on the negative wheels still on the surface. The DT community is requested to commission the negative wheels on surface to cope with a possible lack of time a...

  7. Development and progress in resistive plate chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hong-Fang; WU Jian

    2004-01-01

    Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) is a robust and low cost gas detector, which is extensively used in high-energy physics, cosmic and astroparticle physics experiments. Over the past twenty years, as a particle detector,RPC has made remarkable progress. The main achievements, features and results of experiemantal tests including R&D and production of the RPCs by several Chinese groups in recent years are reported in this article.

  8. Angular resolution of stacked resistive plate chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Samuel, Deepak; Murgod, Lakshmi P

    2016-01-01

    We present here detailed derivations of mathematical expressions for the angular resolution of a set of stacked resistive plate chambers (RPCs). The expressions are validated against experimental results using data collected from the prototype detectors (without magnet) of the upcoming India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). In principle, these expressions can be used for any other detector with an architecture similar to that of RPCs.

  9. Bubble Chambers for Experiments in Nuclear Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    DiGiovine, B.; Henderson, D.; Holt, R. J.; Rehm, K. E.; Raut, R.; Robinson, A.; Sonnenschein, A.; Rusev, G.; A.P. Tonchev; Ugalde, C.

    2015-01-01

    A bubble chamber has been developed to be used as an active target system for low energy nuclear astrophysics experiments. Adopting ideas from dark matter detection with superheated liquids, a detector system compatible with gamma-ray beams has been developed. This detector alleviates some of the limitations encountered in standard measurements of the minute cross sections of interest to stellar environments. While the astrophysically relevant nuclear reaction processes at hydrostatic burning...

  10. MUON DETECTORS: CSC

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Hauser

    2011-01-01

    The CSC detector continued to operate well during the March-June 2011 period. As the luminosity has climbed three orders of magnitude, the currents drawn in the CSC high-voltage system have risen correspondingly, and the current trip thresholds have been increased from 1 μA to 5 μA (and 20 in ME1/1 chambers). A possible concern is that a long-lasting and undesirable corona is capable of drawing about 1 μA, and thus may not be detected by causing current trips; on the other hand it is easily dealt with by cycling HV when detected. To better handle coronas, software is being developed to better detect them, although a stumbling block is the instability of current measurements in some of the channels of the CAEN supplies used in ME1/1. A survey of other issues faced by the CSC Operations team was discussed at the 8th June 2011 CSC Operations/DPG meeting (Rakness). The most important issues, i.e. those that have caused a modest amount of downtime, are all being actively addressed. These are:...

  11. ATLAS Award for Difficult Task : two Russian companies were honoured with an ATLAS Award, for supply of the ATLAS Inner Detector barrel support structure elements, last week.

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    From left to right, V. Riadovikov (IHEP Protvino), N. Voronkov (RSPKrunitchev), J. Margoulis (RSP Krunitchev), D. Froidevaux (CERN), A. Romashin (ORPE Technologiya), J. Callahan (CERN/Indiana University), A. Catinaccio (CERN) and O. Komissar (ORPE Technologiya), stand in front of the ATLAS inner detector barrel support structure, manufactured by ORPE Technologiya and RSP Krunitchev.

  12. Technical Design Study for the PANDA Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, M; Dørheim, S; Höppner, C; Ketzer, B; Konorov, I; Neubert, S; Paul, S; Rauch, J; Uhl, S; Vandenbroucke, M; Berger, M; Berger-Chen, J -C; Cusanno, F; Fabbietti, L; Münzer, R; Arora, R; Frühauf, J; Kiš, M; Leifels, Y; Kleipa, V; Hehner, J; Kunkel, J; Kurz, N; Peters, K; Risch, H; Schmidt, C J; Schmitt, L; Schwab, S; Soyk, D; Voss, B; Weinert, J; Beck, R; Kaiser, D; Lang, M; Schmitz, R; Walther, D; Bühler, P; Müllner, P; Zmeskal, J; Hermann, N

    2012-01-01

    This document illustrates the technical layout and the expected performance of a Time Projection Chamber as the central tracking system of the PANDA experiment. The detector is based on a continuously operating TPC with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) amplification.

  13. Vacuum chamber for intersection I-4

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    Vacuum chamber for intersection I-4 of the ISR being assembled inside a wooden mock-up of the gap of the split-field magnet. The central round-cylinder section is provisional and is to be replaced by an elliptic-cylinder section to give more space vertically for installation of detectors. Supports for the central section are of carbon fibre composite.

  14. Development of new radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The works on the development of radiation detectors performed at Waseda University are described. As the fundamental studies on radiation detectors, measurement was made for the Z3 dependence of the power of metal targets to stop alpha particles or C-ions, the Fano factor in rare gas, the peak value of the energy given by fast charged particles to materials and its fluctuation, the W-value and the Fano factor of liquid rare gas, and the LET dependence of the luminescence efficiency of liquid rare gas by radiation. The development of liquid rare gas detectors has been made. The considered detector types were a pulse ionization chamber with grid (liquid Xe), a proportional luminescent counter (liquid Xe), an electromagnetic calorimeter (liquid Ar, liquid Xe), and a photo-ionization detector. The development of silicon detectors is also in progress. The silicon detectors under development are a silicon detector telescope for satellite experiment, a silicon shower detector for balloon experiment, and a micron strip silicon detector for synchrotron radiation or elementary particle experiment. The use of plastic track detectors for cosmic ray observation has been examined. The discrimination of isotopes by using a new plastic CR-39 was able to be done. The detectors for low level alpha and gamma spectroscopy have been investigated. For alpha particles, a pulse ionization chamber with a cylindrical grid has been used. For gamma-ray, a Compton-suppressed Ge(Li) detector has been used. (Kato, T.)

  15. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the very high event rates projected for experiments at the SSC and LHC, it is important to investigate new approaches to on line pattern recognition. The use of neural networks for pattern recognition. The use of neural networks for pattern recognition in high energy physics detectors has been an area of very active research. The authors discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial analog VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed

  16. Experience in construction and testing of plastic limited streamer chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, A.H.; Bard, R.L.; Bensen, D.; Cates, C.; Colmer, J.D.; Floros, P.; Fritz, D.J.; Goldey, P.R.; Miller, W.W.; Norkin, D.T.; Rapp, P.; Rozmarynowski, P.; Lee, J.R.; San Sebastian, M.; Schultz, J.; Skuja, A.; Springer, R.W.; Subramanyam, J.; Zawistowski, T.; Zorn, G.T. (Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1990-04-01

    This paper describes the manufacture and testing of multi-cell limited streamer chambers destined for use in the hadron calorimeter of the OPAL detector at LEP. All operations, from chamber cathode coating to the testing of completed sub-assemblies, have been performed under the same roof. The experience gained is useful in highlighting procedures crucial to the successful construction of this type of detector.

  17. The VENUS detector at TRISTAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of the VENUS detector is described. In this paper, emphasis is placed on the central tracking chamber and the electromagnetic shower calorimeters. Referring to computer simulations and test measurements with prototypes, the expected performance of our detector system is discussed. The contents are, for the most part, taken from the VENUS proposal /2/. (author)

  18. ALICE Time Projection Chamber (TPC) Readout Sector in Lab

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main particle tracking detector in ALICE. Charged particles crossing the gas of the TPC knock electrons out of their atoms, which drift in the eletric field. By measuring the arrival of electrons at the end of the chamber, at segments such as the one shown here, the TPC will reconstruct the paths of the original charged particles.

  19. Monte Carlo Simulation Optimizing Design of Grid Ionization Chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG; Yu-lai; WANG; Qiang; YANG; Lu

    2013-01-01

    The grid ionization chamber detector is often used for measuring charged particles.Based on Monte Carlo simulation method,the energy loss distribution and electron ion pairs of alpha particle with different energy have been calculated to determine suitable filling gas in the ionization chamber filled with

  20. Construction of a drift chamber prototype for the CMS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General design features of a small size drift chamber prototype are described in this report. Prototype construction has taken place at CIEMAT and we explain in detail the assembly procedure. This activity is part of a long term project to mass produce chambers for the muon barrel detector of the CMS experiment which will be installed at CERN. (Author)

  1. The muon chambers take centre stage at CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The CMS muon chambers are now starting to arrive at CERN in significant numbers. All in all, the muon system of the CMS detector will comprise some 1400 of these chambers. Twenty percent of those for the endcaps have already been installed, while the assembly of those for the barrel will start in December.

  2. The electronics readout system for the OPAL Vertex Drift Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Vertex Drift Chamber for the OPAL experiment at LEP provides high quality track co-ordinates using multi-hit sub-nanosecond timing to detect the drifted electrons. This paper explains the electronic techniques that have been devised and implemented for the detector. The overall performance of the system is demonstrated with measurements from the final OPAL chamber. (author)

  3. Reconstruction of data in low-mass magnetostrictive chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reconstruction of spark positions in a set of low-mass spark chambers with remote magnetostrictive readout, used in a study of the reaction π-p → K0 Λ, is described. The main detectors used were optical spark chambers but in order to provide information close to the vertices low-mass magnetostrictive chambers were fitted inside the cone of the superconducting polarised target magnet. (U.K.)

  4. The physics of Resistive Plate Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Riegler, Werner

    2004-01-01

    Over the last 3 years we investigated theoretical aspects of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) in order to clarify some of the outstanding questions on space charge effects, high efficiency of small gap RPCs, charge spectra, signal shape and time resolution. In a series of reports we analyzed RPC performance including all detector aspects covering primary ionization, avalanche multiplication, space charge effects, signal induction in presence of resistive materials, crosstalk along detectors with long strips and front-end electronics. Using detector gas parameters entirely based on theoretical predictions and physical models for avalanche development and space charge effects we are able to reproduce measurements for 2 and 0.3 mm RPCs to very high accuracy without any additional assumptions. This fact gives a profound insight into the workings of RPCs and also underlines the striking difference in operation regime when compared to wire chambers. A summary of this work as well as recent results on three-dimensiona...

  5. 气吹式播种机气室结构对流场性能的影响分析%Flow Field Performance Analysis of Seed-box Gas Chamber Structure in Cylinder Precision Tomato Seeder Based on the Pneumatic Suspension Seed Supply

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊伟; 胡斌; 杨文伟; 罗昕; 李俊虹

    2016-01-01

    Through the study of domestic and foreign seeder for the kind of way , a new method was designed based on the Pneumatic suspension seed supply .And the box chamber was studied theoretically ,including internal flow mathemati-cal model of the seed-box air chamber .Design three kinds of structural shapes of the gas chamber with different height , different width , different inlet velocity .In order to find out the effect of each factor on the export of a box chamber flow field uniformity and the exit velocity ,the orthogonal numerical simulation experiment was carried out by the Fluent soft-ware platform .The results showed that the inlet velocity and chamber width of the species have significant effect on the experimental results ( PA=0 .004<0 .05 , PB=0 .011<0 .05 ) .The structural shape of the seed-box chamber was the main factor affecting the outlet velocity of the gas chamber and the flow field uniformity .The simulation results provide a theoretical basis for the production and testing of the latter prototype .%通过对国内外育苗播种机供种方式的研究,设计了一种基于气吹式供种的新方案,并对种箱气室进行了理论分析研究,包括种箱气室内部流场数学模型研究。同时,设计了3种结构形状的气室,运用Fluent 软件平台,分别在不同高度,不同宽度、不同入口速度情况下进行正交数值模拟实验,找出各因素对种箱气室出口流场均匀性和出口速度的影响规律及结果,显示种箱气室的入口速度和气室宽度对实验结果有显著性影响,种箱气室结构形状是气室出口速度的大小及流场均匀性为主要影响因素。仿真实验结果为后期样机的制作及其试验提供了有效的理论基础。

  6. UA1 central detector

    CERN Multimedia

    The UA1 central detector was crucial to understanding the complex topology of proton-antiproton events. It played a most important role in identifying a handful of Ws and Zs among billions of collisions. The detector was a 6-chamber cylindrical assembly 5.8 m long and 2.3 m in diameter, the largest imaging drift chamber of its day. It recorded the tracks of charged particles curving in a 0.7 Tesla magnetic field, measuring their momentum, the sign of their electric charge and their rate of energy loss (dE/dx). Atoms in the argon-ethane gas mixture filling the chambers were ionised by the passage of charged particles. The electrons which were released drifted along an electric field shaped by field wires and were collected on sense wires. The geometrical arrangement of the 17000 field wires and 6125 sense wires allowed a spectacular 3-D interactive display of reconstructed physics events to be produced.

  7. Two chamber reaction furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  8. Measuring the sensitivity of a boron-lined ion chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron-lined ion chambers are used to monitor external neutron flux from fissionable materials assembled at the Los Alamos Critical Assembly Experiment Facility. The sensitivity of these chambers must be measured periodically in order to detect changes in filling gas and to evaluate other factors that may affect chamber performance. We delineate a procedure to measure ion chamber response using a particular neutron source (239PuBe) in a particular moderating geometry of polyethylene. We also discuss use of the amplifier, high-voltage power supply, recorders, and scram circuits that comprise the complete ion chamber monitoring system

  9. The CMS detector before closure

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2006-01-01

    The CMS detector before testing using muon cosmic rays that are produced as high-energy particles from space crash into the Earth's atmosphere generating a cascade of energetic particles. After closing CMS, the magnets, calorimeters, trackers and muon chambers were tested on a small section of the detector as part of the magnet test and cosmic challenge. This test checked the alignment and functionality of the detector systems, as well as the magnets.

  10. The CDF vertex time projection chamber system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vertex time projection chamber (VTPC) system is one of the major components of the charged particle tracking system for the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The chambers cover about seven units of pseudorapidity (η) and must be capable of handling substantially more than the 30-35 charged particle tracks produced by typical anti pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of 1.8 TeV. The chambers are optimized to provide the good pattern recognition in the r-z view required to locate the event vertex, measure the overall event topology, and to complement the r-φ tracking in the large axial wire drift chamber that surrounds them. The chambers provide r-z information using TDC data from sense wire signals. Information on the φ of tracks is obtained from cathode pad signals on a subset of chambers read out by a FADC system. A similar system measures dE/dx of tracks in the forward cones surrounding the exiting beams. Because of the large number of photons that pass through the detector during each collision, novel techniques are required to reduce the amount of material in the chamber. These techniques include a custom surface mount integrated circuit preamplifier, epoxy-graphite and Kapton covered foam structural members, and miniature coaxial signal cables. The mechanical construction of the chamber, radiation length vs angle, and details of the electronics are described. The event reconstruction, corrections, and preliminary performance results for 1.8 TeV anti pp collisions are also discussed. (orig.)

  11. Analysis of RE4 Construction Cosmic Muon Test Data and Comparison with 2015 Collision Calibration Run Data for the Newly Installed RPC Chambers in the 4th Muon Endcap Station of the CMS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Iqbal, Muhammad Ansar

    2015-01-01

    RPC are the heart of the muon system of CMS experiment at LHC, CERN. Recently a new endcap layer, RE4, was added to increase redundancy. These added chambers were tested during the construction period with cosmic muons in the 904 lab at Prevessin, CERN. This study analyzes the HV scan from those tests and compares them with the first 2015 collision data taken at Point-5. The analysis showed that most of the chambers were producing more than 90% efficiency and were in good agreement with the Point-5 results. Those which did not give good results were reported. Other variables like working point and maximum efficiency were also studied.

  12. Development of Portable Detector of Locomotive Power Supply Based on LPC2368%基于LPC2368的便携式机车供电检测仪的研制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍凯; 陈志鸿; 赵潭羿

    2011-01-01

    机车向车辆提供DC600V或AC380V电源,对机车纽装完毕后需要检测其电力连接器插座供电是否故障。目前,检测方法大多是采用万用表人工测量,检修员的危险系数高。据此设计了基于LPC2368的便携式机车供电检测仪,能检测并显示机车供电各项电压,并判断出接错或断路故障,提高了故障诊断的准确性和诊断速度,降低检修员的危险性。%The power DC600V or AC380V is supplied to vehicles by Locomotives, and the fault detection of power supply connector socket is a part of the maintenance process, after assembling of Locomotives are completed. Recently, the manual measurement using multimeter is the most widely used, which causes a high risk level for maintenance. In this paper a portable detector of power supply for locomotive based on LPC2368 is designed to measure and display the power supply voltage of locomotive and diagnose the fault wire and open circuit at the same time, which improve the accuracy and speed of diagnosis and reduce the detection risk level.

  13. Sector multipad prototype of the FMD-MCP detector for ALICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antropov, A. E.; Fedotov, A. V.; Feofilov, G. A.; Izrailov, E. K.; Kasatkin, V. A.; Klempt, W.; Kolojvari, A. A.; Larin, M. P.; Lazarev, V.; Novikov, I. A.; Potapov, S. V.; Stolyarov, O. I.; Tsimbal, F. A.; Tulina, T. A.; Valiev, F. F.; Vinogradov, L. I.

    1998-12-01

    We present results of the technology, manufacturing and first tests of a novel MCP-based sector prototype for the forward multiplicity detector for the ALICE experiment at the LHC. The detector provides better than sqrt( M)/ M resolution for high multiplicity events, and about 50 ps timing resolution. Two sector MCPs are mounted on a 200 μm ceramics board with the multipad readout integrated with a passive summator. The setup is baked under 300°C and then sealed into a thin wall (200 μm) stainless-steel vacuum sector chamber with a Ti getter keeping a vacuum of 10 -5 Torr. A new technology of Al coating is applied in order to reduce the hydrogen leakage through the chamber walls. New multichannel ceramics feedthroughs were also developed for the signal readout and voltage supply. The results of the first in-lab and in-beam tests are discussed.

  14. MUSIC chamber for investigation of fusion processes with radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved model of a Multiple Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) has been achieved. An outline of the chamber is presented. One can distinguish the 11 pads of the anode, the cage allowing to obtain a uniform electric field inside the chamber, the 5 x 5 cm2 Silicon microstrip detector-target and the Veto silicon detector. The 11 channel preamplifier is coupled directly to the anode pads. Due to this arrangement, an important increase of the signal noise ratio was obtained. The preamplifier scheme is given also. The integrated circuit of the type AMP-3 has a special construction of hybrid type. The circuitry layout is also presented. (authors)

  15. A Preliminary Study on Time Projection Chamber Simulation for Fission Cross Section Measurements with Geant4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the details of the TPC simulation with Geant4 and show the results. TPC can provide more information than a fission chamber in that it is possible to distinguish different particle types. Simulations are conducted for uranium and plutonium targets with 20MeV neutrons. The simulation results are compared with the reference and show reasonable results. This is the first phase of study for realizing a TPC in the NFS at RAON, and we have more work to do, such as applying an electric field, signal processing in the simulation, and manufacturing of a TPC. The standard in fission cross section measurement is a fission chamber. It is basically just two parallel plates separated by a few centimeters of gas. A power supply connected to the plates sets up a moderate electric field. The target is deposited onto one of the plates. When fission occurs, the fragments ionize the gas, and the electric field causes the produced electrons to drift to the opposite plate, which records the total energy deposited in the chamber. A Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is a gas ionization detector similar to a fission chamber. However, it can measure the charged particle trajectories in the active volume in three dimensions by adding several readouts on the pad plane (fission chamber has only one readout one a pad plane). The specific ionization for each particle track enables the TPC to distinguish different particle types. A TPC will be used for fission cross section measurements in the Neutron Science Facility (NSF) at RAON. As a preliminary study, we present details of TPC simulation with Geant4 and discuss the results

  16. Positron camera with high-density avalanche chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of an extensive investigation of the properties of high-density avalanche chambers (HIDAC) are presented. This study has been performed in order to optimize the layout of HIDAC detectors, since they are intended to be applied as position sensitive detectors for annihilation radiation in a positron emission tomograph being under construction. (author)

  17. Cold fission studies using a double-ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation on spontaneous fission of 252Cf is described. Both fission fragments are detected coincidentally with a double ionization chamber as a 4 π detector. Special techniques are demonstrated which allow the determination of nuclear masses and charges for cold fission fragments. Detector properties such as systematic errors and their correction are studied with the help of α particles. (orig.)

  18. A study of an optimal technological solution for the electronics of particle position sensitive gas detectors (multiwire proportional chambers); Etude d`une solution technologique optimale pour l`electronique de localisation des particules avec des detecteurs a gaz (chambre proportionelle multifils)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zojceski, Z. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS - IN2P3 Universite Paris Sud, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France)

    1997-12-31

    This work aims at optimizing the electronics for position sensitive gas detectors. The first part is a review of proportional chamber operation principles and presents the different possibilities for the architecture of the electronics. The second part involves electronic signal processing for best signal-to-noise ratio. We present a time-variant filter based on a second order base line restorer.It allows a simple pole-zero and tail cancellation at high counting rates. Also, various interpolating algorithms for cathode strip chambers have been studied. The last part reports the development of a complete electronic system, from the preamplifiers up to the readout and control interface, for the cathode strip chambers in the focal plane of the BBS Spectrometer at KVI, Holland. The system is based on application specific D-size VXI modules. In all modules, the 16-bit ADCs and FIFO memory are followed by a Digital Signal Processor, which performs data filtering and cathode induced charge interpolation. Very good analog noise performance is obtained in a multi-processor environment. (author). 127 refs.

  19. Development of fission chamber for nuclear reactors controlling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fission Chambers are gas-filled type detectors that operate in the ionization chamber regime, which is without electron multiplication. As the fill-gas is not directly ionized by neutrons, fission chambers are lined with fissile material that through interaction with neutrons fission products are produced, are highly ionizing particles. Pulse type operation of these detectors are used for neutron flux measurements during start up and shut-down reactor conditions in which pulses of high amplitude produced by fission products can be easily discriminated from those produced by alpha radiation from uranium and also from the external gamma field. With current or current fluctuation mode operation (Campbell) the use of these detectors can be extended for the whole range of reactor operation. In this work, it is presented the development and construction of a fission chamber at IPEN-CNEN/SP. Furthermore, the material and techniques used and also the operational characteristics obtained with the first prototype are given. (author)

  20. MUON DETECTORS: DT

    CERN Multimedia

    Marco Dallavalle

    2013-01-01

    The DT group is undertaking substantial work both for detector maintenance and for detec-tor upgrade. Maintenance interventions on chambers and minicrates require close collaboration between DT, RPC and HO, and are difficult because they depend on the removal of thermal shields and cables on the front and rear of the chambers in order to gain access. The tasks are particularly critical on the central wheel due to the presence of fixed services. Several interventions on the chambers require extraction of the DT+RPC package: a delicate operation due to the very limited space for handling the big chambers, and the most dangerous part of the DT maintenance campaign. The interventions started in July 2013 and will go on until spring 2014. So far out of the 16 chambers with HV problems, 13 have been already repaired, with a global yield of 217 recovered channels. Most of the observed problems were due to displacement of impurities inside the gaseous volume. For the minicrates and FE, repairs occurred on 22 chambe...

  1. Study on the effect factor of the absolute fission rates measured by depleted uranium fission chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absolute fission rates was measured by the depleted uranium fission chamber. The efficiency of the fission fragments recorded in the fission chamber was analyzed. The factor influencing absolute fission rates was studied in the experiment, including the disturbing effect between detectors and the effect of the structural material of the fission chamber, etc

  2. Results obtained with position sensitive multiwire proportional chambers with helium, carbon, and oxygen nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emming, J. G.; Gilland, J. R.; Godden, G. D.; Smith, L. H.; Zardiackas, F.

    1974-01-01

    Spatial resolution performance results obtained at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory Bevatron with prototype multiwire proportional chamber spatial detectors with integral delay line readout are presented. The effects due to incident nuclei charge, chamber operating parameters, chamber design, electronics, gas mixtures, and magnetic field presence have been investigated and are discussed.

  3. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Paolucci

    2012-01-01

    The RPC system is operating with a very high uptime, an average chamber efficiency of about 95% and an average cluster size around 1.8. The average number of active channels is 97.7%. Eight chambers are disconnected and forty are working in single-gap mode due to high-voltage problems. The total luminosity lost due to RPCs in 2012 is 88.46 pb–1. One of the main goals of 2012 was to improve the stability of the endcap trigger that is strongly correlated to the performances of the detector, due to the 3-out-3 trigger logic. At beginning of 2011 the instability of the detector efficiency was about 10%. Detailed studies found that this was mainly due to the strong correlation between the performance of the detector and the atmospheric pressure (P). Figure XXY shows the linear correlation between the average cluster size of the endcap chamber versus P. This effect is expected for gaseous detectors and can be reduced by correcting the applied high-voltage working point (HVapp) according to the followi...

  4. First ALICE detectors installed!

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Detectors to track down penetrating muon particles are the first to be placed in their final position in the ALICE cavern. The Alice muon spectrometer: in the foreground the trigger chamber is positioned in front of the muon wall, with the dipole magnet in the background. After the impressive transport of its dipole magnet, ALICE has begun to fill the spectrometer with detectors. In mid-July, the ALICE muon spectrometer team achieved important milestones with the installation of the trigger and the tracking chambers of the muon spectrometer. They are the first detectors to be installed in their final position in the cavern. All of the eight half planes of the RPCs (resistive plate chambers) have been installed in their final position behind the muon filter. The role of the trigger detector is to select events containing a muon pair coming, for instance, from the decay of J/ or Y resonances. The selection is made on the transverse momentum of the two individual muons. The internal parts of the RPCs, made o...

  5. Scintillating fiber detector

    CERN Document Server

    Vozak, Matous

    2016-01-01

    NA61 is one of the physics experiments at CERN dedicated to study hadron states coming from interactions of SPS beams with various targets. To determine the position of a secondary beam, three proportional chambers are placed along the beamline. However, these chambers tend to have slow response. In order to obtain more precise time information, use of another detector is being considered. Fast response and compact size is making scintillation fiber (SciFi) with silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) read out a good candidate. This report is focused on analysing data from SciFi collected in a test beam at the beginning of July 2016.

  6. Quality control of ATLAS muon chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Fabich, Adrian

    ATLAS is a general-purpose experiment for the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Its Muon Spectrometer will require ∼ 5500m2 of precision tracking chambers to measure the muon tracks along a spectrometer arm of 5m to 15m length, embedded in a magnetic field of ∼ 0.5T. The precision tracking devices in the Muon System will be high pressure drift tubes (MDTs). Approximately 370,000 MDTs will be assembled into ∼ 1200 drift chambers. The performance of the MDT chambers is very much dependent on the mechanical quality of the chambers. The uniformity and stability of the performance can only be assured providing very high quality control during production. Gas tightness, high-voltage behaviour and dark currents are global parameters which are common to gas detectors. For all chambers, they will be tested immediately after the chamber assembly at every production site. Functional tests, for example radioactive source scans and cosmic-ray runs, will be performed in order to establish detailed performan...

  7. The Physics of Particle Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Dan

    2000-08-01

    Here is a comprehensive introduction to the physical principles and design of particle detectors, covering all major detector types in use today. After discussing the size and energy scales involved in different physical processes, the book considers nondestructive methods, including the photoelectric effect, photomultipliers, scintillators, Cerenkov and transition radiation, scattering and ionization, and the use of magnetic fields in drift and wire chambers. A complete chapter is devoted to silicon detectors. In the final part of the book, Green discusses destructive measurement techniques. Throughout, he emphasizes the physical principles underlying detection and shows, through appropriate examples, how those principles are best utilized in real detectors. Exercises and detailed further reading lists are included.

  8. Target chambers for gammashpere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, M.P.; Falout, J.W.; Nardi, B.G. [and others

    1995-08-01

    One of our responsibilities for Gammasphere, was designing and constructing two target chambers and associated beamlines to be used with the spectrometer. The first chamber was used with the early implementation phase of Gammasphere, and consisted of two spun-Al hemispheres welded together giving a wall thickness of 0.063 inches and a diameter of 12 inches.

  9. High resolution drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High precision drift chambers capable of achieving less than or equal to 50 μm resolutions are discussed. In particular, we compare so called cool and hot gases, various charge collection geometries, several timing techniques and we also discuss some systematic problems. We also present what we would consider an ''ultimate'' design of the vertex chamber. 50 refs., 36 figs., 6 tabs

  10. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INFORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Experience Japan The Japanese Chamber of Commerce and Industry will further promote its Japan-experience program and seek cooperation with various Chinese institutions.Between early May and June 2007,the chamber organized a Chinese college student delegation to Japan with the support from its members in China.

  11. BEBC bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    Looking up into the interior of BEBC bubble chamber from the expansion cylinder. At the top of the chamber two fish-eye lenses are installed and three other fish-eye ports are blanked off. In the centre is a heat exchanger.

  12. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, H.B.

    1985-10-01

    A description of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is given. It is a calorimetric detector, which covers almost the complete solid angle around the interaction region with segmented calorimeter ''towers''. A 1.5 Tesla superconducting solenoid, 3m in diameter and 5m long, provides a uniform magnetic field in the central region for magnetic analysis of charged particles. The magnetic field volume is filled with a large cylindrical drift chamber and a set of Time Projection Chambers. Muon detection is accomplished with drift chambers outside the calorimeters in the central region and with large magnetized steel toroids and associated drift chambers in the forward-backward regions. The electronics has a large dynamic range to allow measurement of both high energy clusters and small energy depositions made by penetrating muons. Interesting events are identified by a trigger system which, together with the rest of the data acquisition system, is FASTBUS based.

  13. Rapid-Cycling Bubble-Chamber, details

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Parts of the hydraulic expansion system of the Rapid-Cycling Bubble-Chamber (RCBC). RCBC was the largest of 3 rapid-cycling bubble-chambers (the others were LEBC and HOLEBC), used as target- and vertex-detectors within the European Hybrid Spectrometer (EHS) in the SPS North Area (EHN1). RCBC contained 250 l of liquid hydrogen and was located inside a 3 T superconducting magnet. It was designed for 30 expansions/s (100 times faster than BEBC), the system shown here allowed 50 expansions/s. RCBC operated from 1981 to 1983 for experiments NA21, NA22 and NA23 at a rate of 15 expansions/s, clocking up a total of over 4 million. In the rear, at left, is bearded Lucien Veillet; Augustin Didona is at the right. See also 8001009. The installation of the piston assembly in the RCBC chamber body is shown in the Annual Report 1980, p.65.

  14. The Bern Infinitesimal Bubble Chamber (BIBC)

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The chamber body was machined from a block of aluminium. The visible volume was cylindrical with 65 mm diameter and 35 mm depth. It was filled with propane or freon. It was meant as vertex detector in the search of short-lived particles. It was also used with in-line holography resulting in 8 µm bubble size and 9 cm depth of the field. See E. Ramseyer, B. Hahn and E. Hugentobler, Nucl. Instrum. Methods 201 (1982) 335.

  15. Bubble chamber: D meson production and decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    This event shows real particle tracks from the Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC), which was used to observe neutrino and hadron beams between 1973 and 1984 from the PS and SPS accelerators. In this event a neutrino interacts with a proton producing an excited D meson. A labeled diagram is seen on the right as the particles spiral in the magnetic field of the detector.

  16. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Paolucci

    2013-01-01

    During LS1, the Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) collaboration is focusing its efforts on installation and commissioning of the fourth endcap station (RE4) and on the reparation and maintenance of the present system (1100 detectors). The 600 bakelite gaps, needed to build 200 double-gap RE4 chambers are being produced in Korea. Chamber construction and testing sites are located at CERN, in Ghent University, and at BARC (India). At present, 42 chambers have been assembled, 32 chambers have been successfully tested with cosmic rays runs and 7 Super Modules, made by two chambers, have been built at CERN by a Bulgarian/Georgian/Italian team and are now ready to be installed in the positive endcap. The 36 Super Modules needed to complete the positive endcap will be ready in September and installation is scheduled for October 2013. The Link-Board system for RE4 is under construction in Naples. Half of the system has been delivered at CERN in June. Six crates (Link-Board Boxes) and 75 boards, needed to instrument t...

  17. Preliminary studies of a new monitor ionization chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizumi, Maíra T; Vivolo, Vitor; Caldas, Linda V E

    2010-01-01

    A new monitor ionization chamber was developed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN) in order to monitor X-ray beams. The main difference of this monitor ionization chamber in relation to other monitor chambers is its geometry, which consists of a ring-shaped sensitive volume. Because of this geometry, the monitor chamber has a central hole through which the direct radiation beam passes. The operational characteristics of the monitor chamber were evaluated: saturation, ion collection efficiency and polarity effect. Besides these tests, the short- and medium-term stabilities of its response were also evaluated. During the tests the leakage current was always negligible. All results showed values within those recommended internationally (IEC, 1997. Medical electrical equipment-dosimeters with ionization chambers and/or semi-conductor detectors as used in X-ray diagnostic imaging. IEC 61674. International Electrotechnical Commission, Genève).

  18. Construction and performance of the PHENIX pad chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the Pad Chamber detector system in the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The three station system provides space points along each track in the spectrometer arms at mid-rapidity and covers a total area of 88 m2. Its main functions are to provide the track coordinate along the beam and to ensure reliable pattern recognition at very high particle multiplicity. A new concept for two dimensional wire chamber readout via its finely segmented cathode was developed. The full readout system, comprising 172 800 electronic channels, is described together with the challenging design of the chambers. The electronics, mounted on the outer chamber face, together with the chamber itself amounts to 1.2% of a radiation length. Results from cosmic ray tests, showing an average efficiency better than 99.5% for all chambers are presented. The experiences from the full scale operation in the first run are reported

  19. Characterization and application of two extrapolation chambers in standard X radiation beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extrapolation chambers are ionization chambers with variable volume, and they are mainly utilized as beta radiation detectors. In this work two extrapolation chambers were characterized, a commercial PTW extrapolation chamber and another extrapolation chamber developed at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN, for application as reference systems in mammography, conventional diagnostic radiology and radiotherapy beams. The results obtained from the characterization tests of the chamber response: leakage current, short- and medium terms stability, determination of the saturation currents and the ion collection efficiencies, angular and energy dependence, show that these extrapolation chambers may be utilized for low-energy X radiation beam dosimetry. The transmission factors in tissue and the calibration factors were also determined for all cited radiation qualities. Finally, a procedure was established for calibration of radiation detectors in standard X radiation beams, using the extrapolation chambers. (author)

  20. Radiation detectors laboratory; Laboratorio de detectores de radiacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez J, F.J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    The Radiation detectors laboratory was established with the assistance of the International Atomic Energy Agency which gave this the responsibility to provide its services at National and regional level for Latin America and it is located at the ININ. The more expensive and delicate radiation detectors are those made of semiconductor, so it has been put emphasis in the use and repairing of these detectors type. The supplied services by this laboratory are: selection consultant, detectors installation and handling and associated systems. Installation training, preventive and corrective maintenance of detectors and detection systems calibration. (Author)

  1. The OPAL muon barrel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akers, R.J. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Allison, J. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Ashton, P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Bahan, G.A. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Baines, J.T.M. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Banks, J.N. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Barlow, R.J. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Barnett, S. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Beeston, C. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Chrin, J.T.M. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Clowes, S.G. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Davies, O.W. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Duerdoth, I.P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Hinde, P.S. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Hughes-Jones, R.E. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Lafferty, G.D. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Loebinger, F.K. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Macbeth, A.A. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; McGowan, R.F. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Moss, M.W. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Murphy, P.G. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Nijjhar, B. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; O`Dowd, A.J.P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Pawley, S.J. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Phillips, P.D. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Phys. and Astron.; Richards, G.E.

    1995-04-21

    The barrel part of the OPAL muon detector consists of 110 drift chambers forming four layers outside the hadron absorber. Each chamber covers an area of 1.2 m by up to 10.4 m and has two cells with wires parallel to the beam and a drift distance of 297 mm. A detailed description of the design, construction, operation and performance of the sub-detector is given. The system has been operating successfully since the start of LEP in 1989. ((orig.)).

  2. The ALEPH detector

    CERN Multimedia

    1988-01-01

    For detecting the direction and momenta of charged particles with extreme accuracy, the ALEPH detector had at its core a time projection chamber, for years the world's largest. In the foreground from the left, Jacques Lefrancois, Jack Steinberger, Lorenzo Foa and Pierre Lazeyras. ALEPH was an experiment on the LEP accelerator, which studied high-energy collisions between electrons and positrons from 1989 to 2000.

  3. LHCb velo detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    Photo 01 : L. to r.: D. Malinon, Summer Student, J. Libby, Fellow, J. Harvey, Head of CERN LHCb group, D. Schlatter, Head of the EP Division in front of the LHCb velo detector test beam (on the right). Photo 02 : L. to r.: J. Harvey, D. Schlatter, W. Riegler (staff), H.J. Hilke, LHCb Technical Coordinator in front of the muon chamber test beam

  4. A model to forecast magma chamber rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, John; Drymoni, Kyriaki; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2016-04-01

    An understanding of the amount of magma available to supply any given eruption is useful for determining the potential eruption magnitude and duration. Geodetic measurements and inversion techniques are often used to constrain volume changes within magma chambers, as well as constrain location and depth, but such models are incapable of calculating total magma storage. For example, during the 2012 unrest period at Santorini volcano, approximately 0.021 km3 of new magma entered a shallow chamber residing at around 4 km below the surface. This type of event is not unusual, and is in fact a necessary condition for the formation of a long-lived shallow chamber. The period of unrest ended without culminating in eruption, i.e the amount of magma which entered the chamber was insufficient to break the chamber and force magma further towards the surface. Using continuum-mechanics and fracture-mechanics principles, we present a model to calculate the amount of magma contained at shallow depth beneath active volcanoes. Here we discuss our model in the context of Santorini volcano, Greece. We demonstrate through structural analysis of dykes exposed within the Santorini caldera, previously published data on the volume of recent eruptions, and geodetic measurements of the 2011-2012 unrest period, that the measured 0.02% increase in volume of Santorini's shallow magma chamber was associated with magmatic excess pressure increase of around 1.1 MPa. This excess pressure was high enough to bring the chamber roof close to rupture and dyke injection. For volcanoes with known typical extrusion and intrusion (dyke) volumes, the new methodology presented here makes it possible to forecast the conditions for magma-chamber failure and dyke injection at any geodetically well-monitored volcano.

  5. MUON DETECTORS: CSC

    CERN Multimedia

    Richard Breedon

    Following the opening of the CMS detector, commissioning of the cathode strip chamber (CSC) system resumed in earnest. Some on-chamber electronics problems could be fixed on the positive endcap when each station became briefly accessible as the steel yokes were peeled off. There was no opportunity to work on the negative endcap chambers during opening; this had to wait instead until the yokes were again separated and the stations accessible during closing. In March, regular detector-operating shifts were resumed every weekday evening during which Local Runs were taken using cosmic rays to monitor and validate repairs and improvements that had taken place during the day. Since April, the CSC system has been collecting cosmic data under shift supervision 24 hours a day on weekdays, and 24/7 operation began in early June. The CSC system arranged shifts for continuous running in the entire first half of 2009. One reward of this effort is that every chamber of the CSC system is alive and recording events. There...

  6. Photon detector for MEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During this past August and September, we had beam time at LAMPF for an engineering study of the second prototype cylindrical photon pair spectrometer for MEGA. All of the scintillators in the detector, a total of 40, and 40% of the drift chamber cells were instrumented for this run. The main photon arm activities during the run were to compare event patterns in the chamber to our Monte Carlo generated events, to study the trigger rate and to determine the background rates in the various detector elements. At low beam intensity, the event patterns from the chamber closely resembled those generated from the Monte Carlo. The background rates in the scintillators and the innermost drift chamber layer were close to those anticipated from previous studies. However the background rates in the outer two drift chamber layers were substantially higher than we had expected. This high rate was traced to low energy photons interacting with field and sense wires. The trigger studies during the run have led us to consider alternative strategies including two different first stage triggers and a second stage trigger. The combination of the second stage trigger with either of the two first stage triggers is expected to provide good detection efficiency while keeping the raw trigger rate below that required by the data acquisition system. Detailed discussions of both the background and trigger studies are discussed in this report. Since the run, our work on methods to obtain the z-position in the photon arm drift chambers has continued. Our goal is to obtain the z coordinate to 5 mm FWHM. At this level, the z uncertainty makes a negligible contribution to the overall photon energy resolution and only a small contribution to the angular resolution. We have been studying an option which uses delay lines to provide a direct z determination. The results of our study are discussed in this report

  7. UA1 prototype detector

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Prototype of UA1 central detector inside a plexi tube. The UA1 central detector was crucial to understanding the complex topology of proton-antiproton events. It played a most important role in identifying a handful of Ws and Zs among billions of collisions. The detector was a 6-chamber cylindrical assembly 5.8 m long and 2.3 m in diameter, the largest imaging drift chamber of its day. It recorded the tracks of charged particles curving in a 0.7 Tesla magnetic field, measuring their momentum, the sign of their electric charge and their rate of energy loss (dE/dx). Atoms in the argon-ethane gas mixture filling the chambers were ionised by the passage of charged particles. The electrons which were released drifted along an electric field shaped by field wires and were collected on sense wires. The geometrical arrangement of the 17000 field wires and 6125 sense wires allowed a spectacular 3-D interactive display of reconstructed physics events to be produced.

  8. Apparatus for nuclear logging employing sub wall mounted detectors and modular connector assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, C.A.; Daigle, G.A.; Rountree, S.; Talmadge, G.; Grunbeck, J.; Wassell, M.

    1993-06-01

    A nuclear logging apparatus for logging a borehole formation is described comprising: a drill collar sub having a sub wall and having opposed ends; a radioactive source in said sub; at least one detector assembly in said sub, said detector assembly being spaced from said radioactive source and said detector assembly being positioned to detect radiation resulting from emissions emitted by said source; at least one chamber in said sub wall; at least one chamber cover, said chamber cover including attachment means for forming fluid tight and removable attachment to said at least one chamber; and said detector assembly being positioned in said at least one chamber.

  9. Measuring chamber of the device for determination of the wear particle radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proposed is a measuring chamber for a device designed for determining radioactivity of wear particles in the system of lubrication of an internal-combustion engine. The chamber consists of of a case with two chambers for supplying oil to a cylindrical cavity of the chamber and of one channel for offtake from the cavity. A characteristic feature of the invention is that for increasing the accuracy of measurements the supplying channels are tangetial relative to the internal surface of the cavity, and the offtake channel is radial and located between them. The application of the chamber decrease measurement errors from 20-30% to 5-6%

  10. Bubble chambers for experiments in nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiovine, B.; Henderson, D.; Holt, R. J.; Raut, R.; Rehm, K. E.; Robinson, A.; Sonnenschein, A.; Rusev, G.; Tonchev, A. P.; Ugalde, C.

    2015-05-01

    A bubble chamber has been developed to be used as an active target system for low energy nuclear astrophysics experiments. Adopting ideas from dark matter detection with superheated liquids, a detector system compatible with γ-ray beams has been developed. This detector alleviates some of the limitations encountered in standard measurements of the minute cross-sections of interest to stellar environments. While the astrophysically relevant nuclear reaction processes at hydrostatic burning temperatures are dominated by radiative captures, in this experimental scheme we measure the time-reversed processes. Such photodisintegrations allow us to compute the radiative capture cross-sections when transitions to excited states of the reaction products are negligible. Due to the transformation of phase space, the photodisintegration cross-sections are up to two orders of magnitude higher. The main advantage of the new target-detector system is a density several orders of magnitude higher than conventional gas targets. Also, the detector is virtually insensitive to the γ-ray beam itself, thus allowing us to detect only the products of the nuclear reaction of interest. The development and the operation as well as the advantages and disadvantages of the bubble chamber are discussed.

  11. Bubble chambers for experiments in nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bubble chamber has been developed to be used as an active target system for low energy nuclear astrophysics experiments. Adopting ideas from dark matter detection with superheated liquids, a detector system compatible with γ-ray beams has been developed. This detector alleviates some of the limitations encountered in standard measurements of the minute cross-sections of interest to stellar environments. While the astrophysically relevant nuclear reaction processes at hydrostatic burning temperatures are dominated by radiative captures, in this experimental scheme we measure the time-reversed processes. Such photodisintegrations allow us to compute the radiative capture cross-sections when transitions to excited states of the reaction products are negligible. Due to the transformation of phase space, the photodisintegration cross-sections are up to two orders of magnitude higher. The main advantage of the new target-detector system is a density several orders of magnitude higher than conventional gas targets. Also, the detector is virtually insensitive to the γ-ray beam itself, thus allowing us to detect only the products of the nuclear reaction of interest. The development and the operation as well as the advantages and disadvantages of the bubble chamber are discussed

  12. Ionization smoke detector with controlled sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ionization smoke detector has been developed which has housing and sensing chambers together controlling the flow of detected smoke or aerosols containing particulate matter. This control of the air flow through the sensing chamber maintains the sensitivity to smoke even in the presence of winds or drafts. (DN)

  13. Application of Gas Chromatographic analysis to RPC detectors in the ATLAS experiment at CERN-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    De Asmundis, R

    2007-01-01

    Starting from 2007 a large number (1200) Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) detectors will be used as muon trigger detectors in the ATLAS Experiment at CERN-LHC accelerator. RPC are gaseous detector in which the quality and the stability of the gas mixture as well as the design of the gas supplying system, play a fundamental role in their functioning. RPC are foreseen to work more than ten years in the high radiation environment of ATLAS and the gas mixture acts really as a "lifeguard" for the detectors. For this reason a great attention has been devoted to the gas studies in order to optimize RPC performance, robustness and reliability in a high radiation environment. In this paper we describe the work done to decide how to supply and control in an optimal way the gas to the detectors, in order to ensure their best performance for a long time. The activity, based on Gas Chromatographic (GC) analysis, has been carried on a sample of final RPC working in radiation conditions much more intense than those foreseen f...

  14. Toxic Test Chambers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Hazardous material test facility Both facilities have 16,000 cubic foot chambers, equipped with 5000 CFM CBR filter systems with an air change...

  15. ALICE Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Lippmann, C

    2013-01-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main device in the ALICE 'central barrel' for the tracking and identification (PID) of charged particles. It has to cope with unprecedented densities of charges particles.

  16. Calorimetry with flash chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The flash chambers used in the Fermilab E594 neutrino experiment are described, and their use in a calorimeter discussed. Resolutions obtained with a calibration beam are presented, and comments made about the pattern recognition capabilities of the calorimeter

  17. Vacuum chamber 'bicone'

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    This chamber is now in the National Museum of History and Technology, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, USA, where it was exposed in an exhibit on the History of High Energy Accelerators (1977).

  18. Silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status and recent progress of silicon detectors for high energy physics is reviewed. Emphasis is put on detectors with high spatial resolution and the use of silicon detectors in calorimeters. (orig.)

  19. Bubble chamber: antiproton annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    These images show real particle tracks from the annihilation of an antiproton in the 80 cm Saclay liquid hydrogen bubble chamber. A negative kaon and a neutral kaon are produced in this process, as well as a positive pion. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that had been heated to boiling point.

  20. The coated cathode conductive layer chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a gaseous detector consisting of thin anode strips vacuum-evaporated on one side of a 100 μ thick plastic layer, alternating on the back side of the same foil with wider parallel cathode strips. Ionizatin released in a drift space on the anode side is amplified and detected much in the same way as in the microstrip gas chamber; in our detector however spontaenous breakdown due to surface currents is completely avoided by the presence of the insulating layer between anodes and cathodes. To reduce surface and volume charging up, we have used polymer foils with a moderate volume resistivity. The first results show good efficiency, good plateaux and time resolution in detecting low-rate minimum ionizing electrons. Although not suited for high rate or good energy resolution applications, this kind of detector seems rather promising for realizing cheaply large active surfaces. (orig.)

  1. Bubble Chambers for Experiments in Nuclear Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    DiGiovine, B; Holt, R J; Rehm, K E; Raut, R; Robinson, A; Sonnenschein, A; Rusev, G; Tonchev, A P; Ugalde, C

    2015-01-01

    A bubble chamber has been developed to be used as an active target system for low energy nuclear astrophysics experiments. Adopting ideas from dark matter detection with superheated liquids, a detector system compatible with gamma-ray beams has been developed. This detector alleviates some of the limitations encountered in standard measurements of the minute cross sections of interest to stellar environments. While the astrophysically relevant nuclear reaction processes at hydrostatic burning temperatures are dominated by radiative captures, in this experimental scheme we measure the time-reversed processes. Such photodisintegrations allow us to compute the radiative capture cross sections when transitions to excited states of the reaction products are negligible. Due to the transformation of phase space, the photodisintegration cross sections are up to two orders of magnitude higher. The main advantage of the new target-detector system is a density several orders of magnitude higher than conventional gas tar...

  2. Drift chamber tracking with a VLSI neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have tested a commercial analog VLSI neural network chip for finding in real time the intercept and slope of charged particles traversing a drift chamber. Voltages proportional to the drift times were input to the Intel ETANN chip and the outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. We will discuss the chamber and test setup, the chip specifications, and results of recent tests. We'll briefly discuss possible applications in high energy physics detector triggers

  3. Properties of a commercial extrapolation chamber in β radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A commercial extrapolation chamber was tested in different β radiation fields and its properties investigated. Its usefulness for β radiation calibration and dosimetry was verified. Experiments were performed in order to obtain the main characteristics such as the calibration factors (and consequently the energy dependence) for all chamber collecting electrodes (between 10 and 40 mm diameter), the transmission factors in tissue and the useful source-detector distance range

  4. Imploded test-chamber for an ISR intersection

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    At the ISR intersection points the vacuum chambers had to be as "transparent" as possible, for the p-p collision product particles to reach the detectors with minimum hindrance. This meant the choice of a light, yet very strong, metal; minimum thickness; and corrugation for mechanical strength. The test-chamber seen here was made of 0.6 mm thick corrugated titanium, obviously not strong enough to withstand the atmospheric pressure.

  5. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Iaselli

    The RPC group has invested a large effort in the study of trigger spikes observed during CRAFT data taking. The chambers are susceptible to noise generated by the flickering of fluorescent and projector lamps in the cavern (with magnetic field on). Soon after the end of CRAFT, it was possible to reproduce the phenomena using a waveform generator and to study possible modifications to be implemented in the grounding schema. Hardware actions have been already taken in order to reduce the detector sensitivity: star washers on the chamber front panels and additional shielding have been added where possible. During the shutdown maintenance activity many different problems were tackled on the barrel part. A few faulty high voltage connector/cable problems were fixed; now only two RPC chambers are left with single-gap mode operation. One chamber in YB+2 was replaced due to gas leakage. All the front-end electronic boards were replaced in 3 chambers (stations MB2 and MB3 in YB-2), that had been damaged after the coo...

  6. The Delphi outer detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design criteria, construction and performance of the Delphi outer detector are discussed. The detector is a 5-layer, 5 m long, 2 m inner radius, 2.1 m outer radius 'cylindrical' drift chamber consisting of 3480 individual 1.65x1.65 cm2 drift tubes operating in limited streamer mode. The drift time-distance relationship for a single tube has been measured using a pulsed laser as a function of both track angle and longitudinal magnetic field. These data have been used to reconstruct cosmic rays in a completed detector module and yield a transverse resolution of 80 μm per point over most of the cell, rising to 90 μm near the corners of the tubes. The detection efficiency per cell for minimum ionising particles is greater than 98.5%. (orig.)

  7. Proportional chambers for the Σ installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two types of proportional chambers used in experiments with SIGMA set are considered. The main parameters of detecting electronics, high-voltage, low-voltage and gas supplies are presented. The first type chambers consist of the round or square frames of sheet foiled glass-cloth-base laminate, on which surface electrode lands and joints between them are applied by photographic printing. The second type chamber electrodes are also made of the sheet foiled glass-cloth-base laminate as strips arranged at the ends of two rectangular metallic profiles. The chamber sensitive regions vary from 64x64 mm to 768x2500 mm. The chambers are used for more than 15 years in different experiments, such as determination of elastic scattering, study of J/ψ and ψ' particle production, search for charm particles in hadron interactions, measuring the change of π--meson polarizability, study of μ+μ-π- system production. The experience of past years manifested their high efficiency and reliability

  8. Radon detection in conical diffusion chambers: Monte Carlo calculations and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rickards, J.; Golzarri, J. I.; Espinosa, G., E-mail: espinosa@fisica.unam.mx [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México Circuito de la Investigación Científica, Ciudad Universitaria México, D.F. 04520, México (Mexico); Vázquez-López, C. [Departamento de Física, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN Ave. IPN 2508, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, México 07360, DF, México (Mexico)

    2015-07-23

    The operation of radon detection diffusion chambers of truncated conical shape was studied using Monte Carlo calculations. The efficiency was studied for alpha particles generated randomly in the volume of the chamber, and progeny generated randomly on the interior surface, which reach track detectors placed in different positions within the chamber. Incidence angular distributions, incidence energy spectra and path length distributions are calculated. Cases studied include different positions of the detector within the chamber, varying atmospheric pressure, and introducing a cutoff incidence angle and energy.

  9. Segmented ionization chambers for beam monitoring in hadrontherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braccini, Saverio; Cirio, Roberto; Donetti, Marco; Marchetto, Flavio; Pittà, Giuseppe; Lavagno, Marco; La Rosa, Vanessa

    2015-05-01

    Segmented ionization chambers represent a good solution to monitor the position, the intensity and the shape of ion beams in hadrontherapy. Pixel and strip chambers have been developed for both passive scattering and active scanning dose delivery systems. In particular, strip chambers are optimal for pencil beam scanning, allowing for spatial and time resolutions below 0.1 mm and 1 ms, respectively. The MATRIX pixel and the Strip Accurate Monitor for Beam Applications (SAMBA) detectors are described in this paper together with the results of several beam tests and industrial developments based on these prototypes.

  10. HF production in CMS-Resistive Plate Chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of highly reactive compounds in the gas mixture during Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) operation at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) is studied. Results from two different types of chambers are discussed: 50 x 50 cm2 RPC prototypes and two final CMS-RB1 chambers. The RB1 detectors were also connected to a closed loop gas system. Gas composition, possible additional impurities as well as fluoride ions have been monitored in different gamma irradiation conditions both in open and closed loop mode. The chemical composition of the RPC electrode surface has also been analyzed using an electron microscope equipped with an EDS/X-ray

  11. Xenon Bubble Chambers for Direct Dark Matter Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Levy, C; Genovesi, J; Khaitan, D; Klimov, K; Mock, J; Szydagis, M

    2016-01-01

    The search for dark matter is one of today's most exciting fields. As bigger detectors are being built to increase their sensitivity, background reduction is an ever more challenging issue. To this end, a new type of dark matter detector is proposed, a xenon bubble chamber, which would combine the strengths of liquid xenon TPCs, namely event by event energy resolution, with those of a bubble chamber, namely insensitivity to electronic recoils. In addition, it would be the first time ever that a dark matter detector is active on all three detection channels, ionization and scintillation characteristic of xenon detectors, and heat through bubble formation in superheated fluids. Preliminary simulations show that, depending on threshold, a discrimination of 99.99\\% to 99.9999+\\% can be achieved, which is on par or better than many current experiments. A prototype is being built at the University at Albany, SUNY. The prototype is currently undergoing seals, thermal, and compression testing.

  12. He leak testing of Indus-2 dipole vacuum chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Centre for Advanced Technology is developing its second synchrotron radiation source INDUS-2 which is a 2.5 GeV electron storage ring. Dipole vacuum chambers are the vital components of Indus-2 vacuum system. Each of these chambers is approx. 3.6 m long and 0.67 m wide with 24 nos. of ports of various sizes. The dipole chambers were made by machining two halves and they are then lip welded together. The dipole chamber has approx. 14 m of total weld length and it was leak tested for leak tightness of the order of 10-10 mbar 1/s. Helium mass spectrometer leak detector (HMSLD) was utilized for the leak testing. Subsequently the leaks of various orders in welding joints were repaired and leak tightness achieved. This paper describes the experiences during leak testing of 20 nos. of aluminum dipole chambers for INDUS-2

  13. Cooling in the ALICE detector

    OpenAIRE

    Almén, Ylva

    2015-01-01

    At CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva, Switzerland, a new modern particle accelerator called the LHC, Large Hadron Collider, is being projected. One of the four large detectors of the LHC, ALICE, consists of many sub-detectors. Temperature stability in ALICE is of great importance for the experiments performed here.  In the ALICE sub-detector TPC, Time Projection Chamber, there is a great risk for thermal instability.  This will cause false data in the experiments, a...

  14. Study on a drift chamber for high energy experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with the studies of a multiwire gaseous detector operating as a drift chamber, which will be part of the SELEX spectrometer of the experiment Fermilab E781. A prototype was designed to be built and tested at IFUSP. Results are shown of the analysis of data taken with another similar detector whose construction and test were done at Fermilab, with the aim of studying its characterization and performance. (author)

  15. Automated Electrostatics Environmental Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Carlos; Lewis, Dean C.; Buchanan, Randy K.; Buchanan, Aubri

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Electrostatics Chamber (MEC) is an environmental chamber designed primarily to create atmospheric conditions like those at the surface of Mars to support experiments on electrostatic effects in the Martian environment. The chamber is equipped with a vacuum system, a cryogenic cooling system, an atmospheric-gas replenishing and analysis system, and a computerized control system that can be programmed by the user and that provides both automation and options for manual control. The control system can be set to maintain steady Mars-like conditions or to impose temperature and pressure variations of a Mars diurnal cycle at any given season and latitude. In addition, the MEC can be used in other areas of research because it can create steady or varying atmospheric conditions anywhere within the wide temperature, pressure, and composition ranges between the extremes of Mars-like and Earth-like conditions.

  16. MUON DETECTORS: CSC

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Hauser

    2011-01-01

    The earliest collision data in 2011 already show that the CSC detector performance is very similar to that seen in 2010. That is discussed in the DPG write-up elsewhere in this Bulletin. This report focuses on a few operational developments, the ME1/1 electronics replacement project, and the preparations at CERN for building the fourth station of CSC chambers ME4/2. During the 2010 LHC run, the CSC detector ran smoothly for the most part and yielded muon triggers and data of excellent quality. Moreover, no major operational problems were found that needed to be fixed during the Extended Technical Stop. Several improvements to software and configuration were however made. One such improvement is the automation of recovery from chamber high-voltage trips. The algorithm, defined by chamber experts, uses the so-called "Expert System" to analyse the trip signals sent from DCS and, based on the frequency and the timing of the signals, respond appropriately. This will make the central DCS shifters...

  17. Heavy liquid bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1965-01-01

    The CERN Heavy liquid bubble chamber being installed in the north experimental hall at the PS. On the left, the 1180 litre body; in the centre the magnet, which can produce a field of 26 800 gauss; on the right the expansion mechanism.

  18. Wire chamber conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This booklet contains program and the abstracts of the papers presented at the conference, most of them dealing with performance testing of various types of wire chambers. The publication of proceedings is planned as a special issue of 'Nuclear instruments and methods' later on. All abstracts are in English. An author index for the book of abstracts is given. (A.N.)

  19. LEP vacuum chamber, prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Final prototype for the LEP vacuum chamber, see 8305170 for more details. Here we see the strips of the NEG pump, providing "distributed pumping". The strips are made from a Zr-Ti-Fe alloy. By passing an electrical current, they were heated to 700 deg C.

  20. OPAL Muon Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the 4 experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 to 2000. This is a slice of the outermost layer of OPAL : the muon chambers. This outside layer detects particles which are not stopped by the previous layers. These are mostly muons.

  1. LEP Vacuum Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This is a cut-out of a LEP vacuum chamber for dipole magnets showing the beam channel and the pumping channel with the getter (NEG) strip and its insulating supports. A water pipe connected to the cooling channel can also be seen at the back.The lead radiation shield lining is also shown. See also 8305563X.

  2. Scanning bubble chamber pictures

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    These were taken at the 2 m hydrogen bubble chamber. The photo shows an early Shiva system where the pre-measurements needed to qualify the event were done manually (cf photo 7408136X). The scanning tables were located in bld. 12. Gilberte Saulmier sits on foreground, Inge Arents at centre.

  3. Response of a resistive plate chamber to particles leaking laterally from a thick absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resistive plate chamber detectors, working in streamer mode, have been chosen to equip the ALICE/LHC dimuon trigger. In ALICE, the detector will be placed orthogonal to a thick beam shield. Tests of the detector have been performed in order to investigate its performances in such running conditions. These tests show that resistive plate chambers can be operated in streamer mode in these particular conditions without dramatic deterioration of the overall performances. FLUKA simulations reproduce the experimental results within a factor 1.5. Such a test is not only relevant for the ALICE dimuon trigger but for all collider experiments using the RPC detector

  4. Conceptual design study of the hylife lithium waterfall laser fusion chamber. FY 1978 annual report to Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conceptual design studies of the target chamber defined the general configuration and dimensions of the chamber and the inlet plenum, orifice plate, and nozzle plate concepts required to generate the desired lithium jet fall. Preliminary studies were performed of the target chamber interfaces with the liquid lithium supply system, the laser system, the pellet injection system, and the target chamber mounting and support system. Target chamber environmental effects resulting from typical thermonuclear burns were evaluated. The outlet region of the target chamber was outlined conceptually, and preliminary design considerations were given to the annular graphite reflector regions of the target chamber and the associated liquid lithium coolant passages

  5. Monte Carlo simulation on the application of boron-coated MRPC thermal neutron detector to the compensated neutron logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The compensated neutron logging technology is widely used in oil exploration and development. The neutron detector commonly used in this technology is the helium-3 proportional counter. Due to the decreasing in supply of the helium-3 gas, the price of the helium-3 proportional counter rises quickly. Purpose: The aim is to develop a new type of neutron detector to replace the helium-3 tubes in the compensated neutron logging technology. Methods: A new thermal neutron detector coated with a layer of thermal neutron converter in the inner glass of the Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) was developed. Under the conventional and underbalanced conditions, Monte Carlo method was used to simulate the response of the boron-coated MRPC thermal neutron detector and helium-3 proportional counter employed in compensated neutron logging technology. Results: It is shown that the SS/LS increases with the rise of porosity using either the boron-coated MRPC thermal neutron detector or the helium-3 proportional counter, and the results of these two detectors are basically identical. Conclusion: It indicates that the boron-coated MRPC thermal neutron detector can be used for compensated neutron logging. (authors)

  6. Construction and Test of MDT Chambers for the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, F; Dietl, H.; Kroha, H.; Lagouri, Th.; Manz, A.; Ostapchuk, A.; Richter, Robert, 1; Schael, S.; Chouridou, S.; Deile, M.; Kortner, O.; Staude, A.; Stroehmer, R.; Trefzger, T.

    2001-01-01

    The Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers for the muon spectrometer of the AT- LAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) consist of 3-4 layers of pressurized drift tubes on either side of a space frame carrying an optical monitoring system to correct for deformations. The full-scale prototype of a large MDT chamber has been constructed with methods suitable for large-scale production. X-ray measurements at CERN showed a positioning accuracy of the sense wires in the chamber of better than the required 20 ?microns (rms). The performance of the chamber was studied in a muon beam at CERN. Chamber production for ATLAS now has started.

  7. MUON DETECTORS: DT

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Dallavalle.

    The DT system is ready for the LHC start up. The status of detector hardware, control and safety, of the software for calibration and monitoring and of people has been reviewed at several meetings, starting with the CMS Action Matrix Review and with the Muon Barrel Workshop (October 5 to 7). The disconnected HV channels are at a level of about 0.1%. The loss in detector acceptance because of failures in the Read-Out and Trigger electronics is about 0.5%. The electronics failure rate has been lower this year: next year will tell us whether the rate has stabilised and hopefully will confirm that the number of spares is adequate for ten years operation. Although the detector safety control is very accurate and robust, incidents have happened. In particular the DT system suffered from a significant water leak, originated in the top part of YE+1, that generated HV trips in eighteen chambers going transversely down from the top sector in YB+2 to the bottom sector in YB-2. All chambers recovered and all t...

  8. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Paolucci

    2011-01-01

    During data-taking in 2010 the RPC system behaviour was very satisfactory for both the detector and trigger performances. Most of the data analyses are now completed and many results and plots have been approved in order to be published in the muon detector paper. A very detailed analysis of the detector efficiency has been performed using 60 million muon events taken with the dedicated RPC monitor stream. The results have shown that the 96.3% of the system was working properly with an average efficiency of 95.4% at 9.35 kV in the Barrel region and 94.9% at 9.55 kV in the Endcap. Cluster size goes from 1.6 to 2.2 showing a clear and well-known correlation with the strip pitch. Average noise in the Barrel is less than 0.4 Hz/cm2 and about 98% of full system has averaged noise less then 1 Hz/cm2. A linear dependence of the noise versus the luminosity has been preliminary observed and is now under study. Detailed chamber efficiency maps have shown a few percent of chambers with a non-uniform efficiency distribu...

  9. Initial Back-to-Back Fission Chamber Testing in ATRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjamin Chase; Troy Unruh; Joy Rempe

    2014-06-01

    Development and testing of in-pile, real-time neutron sensors for use in Materials Test Reactor experiments is an ongoing project at Idaho National Laboratory. The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility has sponsored a series of projects to evaluate neutron detector options in the Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility (ATRC). Special hardware was designed and fabricated to enable testing of the detectors in the ATRC. Initial testing of Self-Powered Neutron Detectors and miniature fission chambers produced promising results. Follow-on testing required more experiment hardware to be developed. The follow-on testing used a Back-to-Back fission chamber with the intent to provide calibration data, and a means of measuring spectral indices. As indicated within this document, this is the first time in decades that BTB fission chambers have been used in INL facilities. Results from these fission chamber measurements provide a baseline reference for future measurements with Back-to-Back fission chambers.

  10. Resistive Plate Chambers commissioning and performance results for 2015

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) detector system at the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment at the LHC confers robustness and redundancy to the muon trigger. During the first long shutdown of the LHC (2013-2014) the CMS muon RPC system has been upgraded with 144 double-gap chambers on the forth forward stations. A total of 1056 double-gap chambers cover the pseudo-rapidity region up to 1.6. The main detector parameters are constantly and closely monitored to achieve operational stability and high quality data in the harsh conditions of the second run period of the LHC (13 TeV and 25 ns bunch spacing). Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) performance results for 2015 with pp collisions at 13 TeV are presented. These results include the occupancy, efficiency of newly installed detectors after applying new working point, history plots for the RPC relevant variables such as: Cluster Size, Efficiency, percentage of inactive detector during operation and Rates and overall system noise. RPC variables are studied as funct...

  11. A multiple sampling ionization chamber for the External Target Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. H.; Tang, S. W.; Ma, P.; Lu, C. G.; Yang, H. R.; Wang, S. T.; Yu, Y. H.; Yue, K.; Fang, F.; Yan, D.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, Z. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z. Y.; Duan, L. M.; Sun, B. H.

    2015-09-01

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber used as a particle identification device for high energy heavy ions has been developed for the External Target Facility. The performance of this detector was tested with a 239Pu α source and RI beams. A Z resolution (FWHM) of 0.4-0.6 was achieved for nuclear fragments of 18O at 400 AMeV.

  12. MUON DETECTORS: DT

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Dallavalle

    2013-01-01

    The DT collaboration is undertaking substantial work both for detector maintenance – after three years since the last access to the chambers and their front-end electronics – and upgrade. The most critical maintenance interventions are chambers and Minicrate repairs, which have not begun yet, because they need proper access to each wheel of the CMS barrel, meaning space for handling the big chambers in the few cases where they have to be extracted, and, more in general, free access from cables and thermal shields in the front and back side of the chambers. These interventions are planned for between the coming Autumn until next spring. Meanwhile, many other activities are happening, like the “pigtail” intervention on the CAEN AC/DC converters which has just taken place. The upgrade activities continue to evolve in good accordance with the schedule, both for the theta Trigger Board (TTRB) replacement and for the Sector Collector (SC) relocation from the UXC to the US...

  13. A Time Projection Chamber with GEM-Based Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Attié, David; Bellerive, Alain; Bezshyyko, Oleg; Bhattacharya, Deb Sankar; Bhattacharya, Purba; Bhattacharya, Sudeb; Caiazza, Stefano; Colas, Paul; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dehmelt, Klaus; Desch, Klaus; Diener, Ralf; Dixit, Madhu; Fleck, Ivor; Fujii, Keisuke; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Ganjour, Serguei; Gao, Yuanning; Gros, Philippe; Hayman, Peter; Hedberg, Vincent; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Jönsson, Leif; Kaminski, Jochen; Kato, Yukihiro; Kawada, Shin-ichi; Killenberg, Martin; Kleinwort, Claus; Kobayashi, Makoto; Krylov, Vladyslav; Li, Bo; Li, Yulan; Lundberg, Björn; Lupberger, Michael; Majumdar, Nayana; Matsuda, Takeshi; Mehdiyev, Rashid; Mjörnmark, Ulf; Müller, Felix; Münnich, Astrid; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Oskarsson, Anders; Österman, Lennart; Peterson, Daniel; Riallot, Marc; Rosemann, Christoph; Roth, Stefan; Schade, Peter; Schäfer, Oliver; Settles, Ronald Dean; Shirazi, Amir Noori; Smirnova, Oxana; Sugiyama, Akira; Takahashi, Tohru; Tian, Junping; Timmermans, Jan; Titov, Maksym; Tsionou, Dimitra; Vauth, Annika; Wang, Wenxin; Watanabe, Takashi; Werthenbach, Ulrich; Yang, Yifan; Yang, Zhenwei; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenker, Klaus; Zhang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    For the International Large Detector concept at the planned International Linear Collider, the use of time projection chambers (TPC) with micro-pattern gas detector readout as the main tracking detector is investigated. In this paper, results from a prototype TPC, placed in a 1 T solenoidal field and read out with three independent GEM-based readout modules, are reported. The TPC was exposed to a 6 GeV electron beam at the DESY II synchrotron. The efficiency for reconstructing hits, the measurement of the drift velocity, the space point resolution and the control of field inhomogeneities are presented.

  14. Web-Based Cathode Strip Chamber Data Display

    CERN Multimedia

    Firmansyah, M

    2013-01-01

    Cathode Strip Chamber (CSC) is a detector that uses gas and high electric field to detect particles. When a particle goes through CSC, it will ionize gas particles and generate electric signal in the anode and cathode of the detector. Analysis of the electric signal data can help physicists to reconstruct path of the particles and determine what happen inside the detector. Using data display, analysis of CSC data becomes easier. One can determine which data is interesting, unusual, or maybe only contain noise.\

  15. Silicon drift-chamber studies for possible use at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is proposed to continue the program now underway at the University of Pittsburgh to study the feasibility of using silicon drift-chambers as particle tracking devices at RHIC. We are currently testing a UA6-type detector obtained from BNL and plan to also study a new device that will become available this year: a cylindrical geometry detector designed for NA45 (CERN). In addition we propose to fabricate and study a detector to be used in vertex determination for the RHIC OASIS experiment. The two-year budget for this proposal is $246.962. 5 refs., 12 figs

  16. Tracks in a streamer chamber initiated by N2-laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the appearance of a new intensively developing field of pulse laser use related with high-precise spatial and energy calibration of radiation detectors the possibility to create laser radiation tracks in a streamer chamber by means of the LGI-21 commercial pulse nitrogen laser is studied. For this purpose saturated vapours of organic compounds with ionization potential less than 7.36 eV are introduced into the chamber working gas. It is shown that molecules of the compounds are ionized with high probability by two laser radiation quanta absorption. At that, one laser can create several dozens of tracks with the cross section less than 1 mm2 and practically any linear density of streamers. The conclusion is made that the laser investigated is a perspective instrument for calibrating not only streamer chambers but other gas-filled detectors of charged particles

  17. Installation and cosmic ray test of the high voltage system of the BESⅢdrift chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    After examination of the designed high voltage power supply system of the BESⅢ drift chamber in the beam test of the full length prototype of drift chamber,a full system covering all the channels of high voltage was installed.The system's training and the high voltage value adjustment were carried out in the cosmic ray test of the BESⅢ drift chamber.The cosmic ray test for the full system and its final installation on the BESⅢ drift chamber were reported.The full system of high voltage power supply works stably and reliably.

  18. Infrared detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Rogalski, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    This second edition is fully revised and reorganized, with new chapters concerning third generation and quantum dot detectors, THz detectors, cantilever and antenna coupled detectors, and information on radiometry and IR optics materials. Part IV concerning focal plane arrays is significantly expanded. This book, resembling an encyclopedia of IR detectors, is well illustrated and contains many original references … a really comprehensive book.-F. Sizov, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Sciences, Kiev, Ukraine

  19. Commissioning of a large segmented ion chamber for the FMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lister, C.J.; Davids, C.N.; Blumenthal, D.J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    A large-area sectored ion chamber was built by a Yale-Daresbury (U.K.) - ANL collaboration to allow extensions of studies of N = Z (T = 0) nuclei. The ion chamber is a conventional DE-DE-E detector which is 20-cm deep, but each anode is segmented into eight pads to allow high count-rate capability and ray-trace reconstruction. With suitable electronics, the detector can become eight close-packed ion chambers, considerably reducing the count rate in each. A position-wire plane allows further raytracing which should permit the rejection of anomalous trajectories and improve Z-separation. A brief test run was scheduled shortly after delivery. Performance appeared promising, but issues of gain matching and cross talk need further exploration. We will study these features {open_quotes}off line{close_quotes} and hope to perform a full experiment on selenium isotopes in the summer. This detector appears to have many uses and is potentially more useful than previous detectors of its type. Similar detectors are being built for the HHRF at Oak Ridge and for Texas A&M University.

  20. Arrival at CERN of the first MB4 DT chambers from Turin

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcos Fernandez Garcia

    2005-01-01

    The largest DT chambers to be installed into the outermost station of the CMS barrel muon detector (MB4) are built by INFN-Turin. The first batch of four chambers, out of 40, arrived at the CERN ISR area on February 2005.

  1. Development of the portable alpha-ray spectrometer based on the PIPS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to maintain the needs of determining radiation contamination in-situ rapidly, we established a kind of portable alpha-ray spectrometer based on the PIPS detector. The instrument employs PIPS detector to capture α-ray, signals are collected and disposed by preamplifier circuit and the signal acquisition module, then spectra analysis is achieved by C8051F120 MCU control platform. Man-machine interface was organized by matrix keyboard and LCD display. Both lithium-ion batteries and power processing module were used to supply the system power. We designed a vacuum measurement chamber in order to obtain higher energy resolution and cleaner spectra. By performance testing we get that the whole power consumption of this instrument is 105 mA, energy resolution is 8.1% in normal air environment and 6.7% in vacuum. The instrument has high -precision, good stability, low power consumption, and is very suitable for in-situ measuring. (authors)

  2. A double faced ionization chamber for quality control in diagnostic radiology beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jonas O; Caldas, Linda V E

    2012-07-01

    The development of new radiation detectors of low cost but with adequate materials is a very important task for countries that have to import ionization chambers such as Brazil. A special double faced ionization chamber was developed for use in conventional diagnostic radiology beams and computed tomography energy ranges. The results show that this new chamber present applicability in conventional diagnostic radiology and computed tomography quality control programs.

  3. Study of fission fragment trapping detector used in neutron detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To detect the absolute neutron flux in a weak neutron field and restricted space, the fission fragment trapping detector was fabricated and the properties of the detector were studied. In this paper, the detector and shielding chamber used in neutron detection were described and the experimental measurements of the fission rate in specific condition were performed with the detection system and the result has been compared with that obtained by fission chamber. The influence of the shielding chamber on the measured results was analyzed. (authors)

  4. The BABAR Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Aubert, B.; Bazan, A.; Boucham, A.; Boutigny, D.; Bonis, I.; Favier, J.; Gaillard, JM; Jeremie, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; T. Le Flour(LAPP, Annecy); Lees, JP; Lieunard, S; Petitpas, P.; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V.

    2001-01-01

    This is the pre-print version of the Article. The official published version can be accessed from the link below. Copyright @ 2002 Elsevier. BABAR, the detector for the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric e+e− B Factory operating at the (4S) resonance, was designed to allow comprehensive studies of CP-violation in B-meson decays. Charged particle tracks are measured in a multi-layer silicon vertex tracker surrounded by a cylindrical wire drift chamber. Electromagnetic showers from electrons and photon...

  5. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  6. Construction and Test of New Precision Drift-Tube Chambers for the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Kroha, Hubert; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, Korbinian; Takasugi, Eric

    2016-01-01

    ATLAS muon detector upgrades aim for increased acceptance for muon triggering and precision tracking and for improved rate capability of the muon chambers in the high-background regions of the detector with increasing LHC luminosity. The small-diameter Muon Drift Tube (sMDT) chambers have been developed for these purposes. With half of the drift-tube diameter of the MDT chambers and otherwise unchanged operating parameters, sMDT chambers share the advantages of the MDTs, but have an order of magnitude higher rate capability and can be installed in detector regions where MDT chambers do not fit in. The chamber assembly methods have been optimized for mass production, minimizing construction time and personnel. Sense wire positioning accuracies of 5 ?micons have been achieved in serial production for large-size chambers comprising several hundred drift tubes. The construction of new sMDT chambers for installation in the 2016/17 winter shutdown of the LHC and the design of sMDT chambers in combination with new R...

  7. Major detectors in elementary-particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the 1983 issue of LBL-91 we introduce a supplement - a folio of descriptions of the world's major elementary particle physics detectors. Modern high energy physics usually involves the use of massive, costly, carefully engineered, large solid angle detectors. These detectors require a long lead time for construction, are often integrated with an accelerator, accumulate data over many years, and are in reality a combination of numerous subsystems. As was the case with bubble chambers, many experiments are performed with the same data, or with data taken after relatively minor changes or additions to the detector configuration. These experiments are often reported in journals whose space limitations make repeated full descriptions of the detector impossible. The detailed properties and performance of the detector are usually described in a fragmented series of papers in more specialized, technologically oriented journals. New additions are often not well documented. Several detectors often make similar measurements and physicists want to make quick comparisons of their respective capabilities. Designers of new large detectors and even of smaller experiments need to know what already exists and what performance has been achieved. To aid the physics community, the Particle Data Group has produced this brief folio of the world's major large detectors. This first edition has some notable omissions: in particular, the bubble chambers and any associated spectrometers, and the still somewhat tentative LEP, SLC, and TRISTAN detectors

  8. Vacuum Chambers for LEP sections

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    The picture shows sections of the LEP vacuum chambers to be installed in the dipole magnets (left) and in the quadrupoles (right). The dipole chamber has three channels: the beam chamber, the pumping duct where the NEG (non-evaporabe getter) is installed and the water channel for cooling (on top in the picture). The pumping duct is connected to the beam chamber through holes in the separating wall. The thick lead lining to shield radiation can also be seen. These chambers were manufactured as extruded aluminium alloy profiles.

  9. Microscopic Simulation of Particle Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schindler, Heinrich

    Detailed computer simulations are indispensable tools for the development and optimization of modern particle detectors. The interaction of particles with the sensitive medium, giving rise to ionization or excitation of atoms, is stochastic by its nature. The transport of the resulting photons and charge carriers, which eventually generate the observed signal, is also subject to statistical fluctuations. Together with the readout electronics, these processes - which are ultimately governed by the atomic cross-sections for the respective interactions - pose a fundamental limit to the achievable detector performance. Conventional methods for calculating electron drift lines based on macroscopic transport coefficients used to provide an adequate description for traditional gas-based particle detectors such as wire chambers. However, they are not suitable for small-scale devices such as micropattern gas detectors, which have significantly gained importance in recent years. In this thesis, a novel approach, bas...

  10. Nursing Supplies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Nursing Supplies Page Content Article Body Throughout most of ... budget. (Nursing equipment also makes wonderful baby gifts.) Nursing Bras A well-made nursing bra that comfortably ...

  11. The APS ceramic chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milton, S.; Warner, D.

    1994-07-01

    Ceramics chambers are used in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) machines at the locations of the pulsed kicker and bumper magnets. The ceramic will be coated internally with a resistive paste. The resistance is chosen to allow the low frequency pulsed magnet field to penetrate but not the high frequency components of the circulating beam. Another design goal was to keep the power density experienced by the resistive coating to a minimum. These ceramics, their associated hardware, the coating process, and our recent experiences with them are described.

  12. Review of wire chamber aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper makes an overview of the wire chamber aging problems as a function of various chamber design parameters. It emphasizes the chemistry point of view and many examples are drawn from the plasma chemistry field as a guidance for a possible effort in the wire chamber field. The paper emphasizes the necessity of variable tuning, the importance of purity of the wire chamber environment, as well as it provides a practical list of presently known recommendations. In addition, several models of the wire chamber aging are qualitatively discussed. The paper is based on a summary talk given at the Wire Chamber Aging Workshop held at LBL, Berkeley on January 16-17, 1986. Presented also at Wire Chamber Conference, Vienna, February 25-28, 1986. 74 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs

  13. Another Detector for the International Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Akchurin, Nural; Wigmans, Richard; Arnold, Hanna; Bazal, Aaron; Basili, Robert; Hauptman, John; Overton, Tim; Priest, Andrew; Zhao, Bingzhe; Mikhailichenko, Alexander; Cascella, Michele; Grancagnolo, Franco; Tassielli, Giovanni; Bedeschi, Franco; Scuri, Fabrizio; Park, Sung Keun; Ignatov, Fedor; Gaudio, Gabriella; Livan, Michele

    2013-01-01

    We describe another detectora designed for the International Linear Collider based on several tested instrumentation innovations in order to achieve the necessary experi- mental goal of a detecter that is 2-to-10 times better than the already excellent SLC and LEP detectors, in particular, (1) dual-readout calorimeter system based on the RD52/DREAM measurements at CERN, (2) a cluster-counting drift chamber based on the successful kloe chamber at Frascati, and (3) a second solenoid to return the magnetic flux without iron. A high-performance pixel vertex chamber is presently un- defined. We discuss particle identification, momentum and energy resolutions, and the machine-detector interface that together offer the possibility of a very high-performance detector for $e^+e^-$physics up to $\\sqrt{s} = 1$ TeV.

  14. First Observation of Low Energy Electron Neutrinos in a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, R; Asaadi, J; Baller, B; Bolton, T; Bromberg, C; Cavanna, F; Church, E; Edmunds, D; Ereditato, A; Farooq, S; Fitzpatrick, R S; Fleming, B; Hackenburg, A; Horton-Smith, G; James, C; Lang, K; Luo, X; Mehdiyev, R; Page, B; Palamara, O; Rebel, B; Schukraft, A; Scanavini, G; Soderberg, M; Spitz, J; Szelc, A M; Weber, M; Yang, T; Zeller, G P

    2016-01-01

    Liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) produce remarkable fidelity in the observation of neutrino interactions. The superior capabilities of such detectors to reconstruct the spatial and calorimetric information of neutrino events have made them the detectors of choice in a number of experiments, specifically those looking to observe electron neutrino ($\

  15. Progress on CMS detector lowering

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    It was an amazing engineering challenge - the lowering of the first hugeendcap disc (YE+3) of the CMS detector slowly and carefully 100 metres underground. The spectacular descent took place on 30 November and was documented by a film crew from Reuters news group. The uniquely shaped slice is 16 m high, about 50 cm thick, and weighs 400 tonnes. It is one of 15 sections that make up the complete CMS detector. The solid steel structure of the disc forms part of the magnet return yoke and is equipped on both sides with muon chambers. A special gantry crane lowered the element, with just 20 cm of leeway between the edges of the detector and the walls of the shaft! On 12 December, a further section of the detector (YE+2) containing the cathode strip chamber made the 10-hour journey underground. This piece is 16 m high and weighs 880 tonnes. There are now four sections of the detector in the experimental cavern, with a further 11 to follow. The endcap disc YE+3 (seen in the foreground) begins its journey down the ...

  16. Council Chamber exhibition

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    To complete the revamp of CERN’s Council Chamber, a new exhibition is being installed just in time for the June Council meetings.   Panels will showcase highlights of CERN’s history, using some of the content prepared for the exhibitions marking 50 years of the PS, which were displayed in the main building last November. The previous photo exhibition in the Council Chamber stopped at the 1970s. To avoid the new panels becoming quickly out of date, photos are grouped together around specific infrastructures, rather than following a classic time-line. “We have put the focus on the accelerators – the world-class facilities that CERN has been offering researchers over the years, from the well-known large colliders to the lesser-known smaller facilities,” says Emma Sanders, who worked on the content. The new exhibition will be featured in a future issue of the Bulletin with photos and an interview with Fabienne Marcastel, designer of the exhibit...

  17. Radiation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fultz, Brent T.

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and X-rays generated in backscatter Mossbauer effect spectroscopy and X-ray spectrometry, which has a large "window" for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

  18. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Paolucci

    2011-01-01

    The RPC muon detector and trigger are working very well, contributing positively to the high quality of CMS data. Most of 2011 has been used to improve the stability of our system and the monitoring tools used online and offline by the shifters and experts. The high-voltage working point is corrected, chamber-by-chamber, for pressure variation since July 2011. Corrections are applied at PVSS level during the stand-by mode (no collision) and are not changed until the next fill. The single detector calibration, HV scan, of February and the P-correction described before were very important steps towards fine-tuning the stability of the RPC performances. A very detailed analysis of the RPC performances is now ongoing and from preliminary results we observe an important improvements of the cluster size stability in time. The maximum oscillation of the cluster size run by run is now about 1%. At the same time we are not observing the same stability in the detection efficiency that shows an oscillation of about ...

  19. Comparison of gamma densitometer detectors used in loss of coolant studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipp, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Ionization chamber type gamma detectors are used in water-steam density measurements in loss of coolant studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Ionization chambers have replaced current-mode scintillation detectors to obtain stability and freedom from magnetic field interference. However, this change results in some loss of fast transient response. Results of studies comparing the transient response of ionization chamber detectors, plastic scintillation detectors, and sodium iodide (NaI) detectors to rapid changes in gamma intensity demonstrate that plastic scintillation detectors have the fastest response and most closely reproduce the transient; ionization chambers have an initial fast response followed by a slower response, which may produce errors in fast transient measurements; and NaI scintillation detectors have a moderately fast initial response followed by an extremely slow response, which produces errors in even slow transient measurements.

  20. COUPP - a search for dark matter with a continuously sensitive bubble chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collar, Juan,; Crum, Keith; Mishra, Smriti; Nakazawa, Dante; Odom, Brian; Rasmussen, Julia; Riley, Nathan; Szydagis, Matthew; /Chicago U.; Behnke, Ed; Levine, Ilan; Vander Werf, Nate; /Indiana U., South Bend; Cooper, Peter; Crisler, Mike; Hu, Martin; Ramberg, Erik; Sonnenschein, Andrew; Tschirhart, Robert; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    We propose to construct and operate a 60-kg room temperature CF{sub 3}I bubble chamber as a prototype dark matter (WIMP) detector. Operating in weakly-superheated mode, the chamber will be sensitive to WIMP induced nuclear recoils above 10 keV, while rejecting background electron recoils at a level approaching 10{sup 10}. We would first commission and operate this chamber in the MINOS near detector hall with the goal to demonstrate stable operation and measure internal contamination and any other backgrounds. This chamber, or an improved version, would then be relocated to an appropriate deep underground site such as the Soudan Mine. This detector will have unique sensitivity to spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon couplings, and even in this early stage of development will attain competitive sensitivity to spin-independent couplings.

  1. Design, construction and characterization of special ionization chambers for X radiation beams monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X radiation equipment may show fluctuations in the radiation beam intensity, as they are connected to the power net. These intensity variations can, in turn, modify the air kerma rate produced by this radiation beam. In a calibration laboratory, where radiation detectors (from clinics and hospital services) are calibrated, variations in the radiation beam intensity may cause an error in the absorbed dose determination. The monitor ionization chambers are used to verify the radiation beam intensity constancy, and to provide a correction for possible fluctuations. In this work, monitor ionization chambers for X radiation beams were designed, assembled and characterized. The developed ionization chambers have an innovative design, ring-shaped, with aluminium or graphite electrodes. These ring-shaped ionization chambers have the advantage of not interfering in the direct radiation beams. A double-volume ionization chamber with graphite electrodes was also developed. This ionization chamber is similar to the commercial monitor ionization chamber used in the Calibration Laboratory of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares. All developed ionization chambers were tested in several standardized radiation beams and their performances were compared with those of commercial ionization chambers. The results show that two of the four ionization chambers developed showed performance comparable to that of the commercial ionization chambers tested. Besides presenting good results, the ionization chambers were designed and manufactured using low cost materials, which are easily found on the Brazilian market. (author)

  2. MUON DETECTORS: CSC

    CERN Multimedia

    R. Breedon

    Figure 2: Five ME4/2 chambers mounted on the +endcap. At the end of June, five large, outer cathode strip chambers (CSC) that were produced as spares during the original production were mounted on part of the disk space reserved for ME4/2 on the positive endcap (Fig. 2). The chambers were cabled, attached to services, and fully integrated and commissioned into the CSC DAQ and trigger systems. Comprising almost a full trigger sector, CMS will be able to test the significant improvement the trigger efficiency of the EMU system that the presence of the full ME4/2 ring is expected to bring. The return of beam in November was observed as “splash” events in the CSCs in which the detectors were showered with a huge number of particles at the same time. Although the CSCs were operating at a lower standby voltage the multiple hits on a strips could not be individually distinguished.&am...

  3. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Paolucci

    2012-01-01

      2011 data-taking was very satisfactory for both the RPC detector and trigger. The RPC system ran very smoothly in 2011, showing an excellent stability and very high data-tacking efficiency. Data loss for RPC was about 0.37%, corresponding to 19 pb−1. Most of the performance studies, based on 2011 data, are now completed and the results have been already approved by CMS to be presented at the RPC 2012 conference (February 2012 at LNF). During 2011, the number of disconnected chambers increased from six to eight corresponding to 0.8% of the full system, while the single-gap-mode chambers increased from 28 to 31. Most of the problematic chambers are due to bad high-voltage connection and electronic failures that can be solved only during the 2013-2014 Long Shutdown. 98.4% of the electronic channels were operational. The average detection efficiency in 2011 was about 95%, which was the same value measured during the HV scan done at the beginning of the 2011 data-taking. Efficiency has be...

  4. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Document Server

    G. Iaselli

    2010-01-01

    During the technical stop, the RPC team was part of the CMS task force team working on bushing replacements in the Endcap cooling system, also validating the repairs in terms of connectivity (HV, LV and signal cables), and gas leak, on RE chambers. In parallel, the RPC team profited from the opportunity to cure several known problems: six chambers with HV problems (1 off + 5 single gaps) were recovered on both gaps; four known HV problems were localized at chamber level; additional temperature sensors were installed on cooling pipes on negative REs; one broken LV module in RE-1 was replaced. During the last month, the RPC group has made big improvements in the operations tools. New trigger supervisor software has substantially reduced the configuration time. Monitoring is now more robust and more efficient in providing prompt diagnostics. The detector has been under central DCS control for two weeks. Improvements have been made to both functionality and documentation and no major problems were found. Beam s...

  5. MUON DETECTORS: DT

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Redondo Fernandez

    2011-01-01

    The DT system has operated successfully during the entire 2011 data-taking: the fraction of good channels was always >99.4 % and the downtime caused to CMS amounts to a few inverse picobarns. This excellent performance does not come without a price: the DT group requested more than 30 short accesses to the underground experimental cavern (UXC).  A large fraction of interventions was for dealing with overheated LV Anderson connectors, whose failure can affect larger sections of the detector (a whole chamber, or half a wheel of the CMS barrel, etc.). A crash programme for reworking those connections will take place during the Year-End Technical Stop. The system of six vd chambers (VDC) that were installed on the DT exhaust gas line have operated successfully. The VDCs are small drift chambers the size of a shoebox that measure the drift velocity every 10 minutes. Possible deviations from the nominal value could be caused by a contamination of the gas mixture or changes in pressure or temperat...

  6. Comment on 'Proton beam monitor chamber calibration'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmans, Hugo; Vatnitsky, Stanislav M

    2016-09-01

    We comment on a recent article (Gomà et al 2014 Phys. Med. Biol. 59 4961-71) which compares different routes of reference dosimetry for the energy dependent beam monitor calibration in scanned proton beams. In this article, a 3% discrepancy is reported between a Faraday cup and a plane-parallel ionization chamber in the experimental determination of the number of protons per monitor unit. It is further claimed that similar discrepancies between calorimetry and ionization chamber based dosimetry indicate that [Formula: see text]-values tabulated for proton beams in IAEA TRS-398 might be overestimated. In this commentary we show, however, that this supporting argument misrepresents the evidence in the literature and that the results presented, together with published data, rather confirm that there exist unresolved problems with Faraday cup dosimetry. We also show that the comparison in terms of the number of protons gives a biased view on the uncertainty estimates for both detectors while the quantity of interest is absorbed dose to water or dose-area-product to water, even if a beam monitor is calibrated in terms of the number of protons. Gomà et al (2014 Phys. Med. Biol. 59 4961-71) also report on the discrepancy between cylindrical and plane-parallel ionization chambers and confirm experimentally that in the presence of a depth dose gradient, theoretical values of the effective point of measurement, or alternatively a gradient correction factor, account for the discrepancy. We believe this does not point to an error or shortcoming of IAEA TRS-398, which prescribes taking the centre of cylindrical ionization chambers as reference point, since it recommends reference dosimetry to be performed in the absence of a depth dose gradient. But these observations reveal that important aspects of beam monitor calibration in scanned proton beams are not addressed in IAEA TRS-398 given that those types of beams were not widely implemented at the time of its publication

  7. ATLAS Monitored Drift Tube Chambers in E = 11 MeV Neutron Background

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, T.; Mlynek, A; Biebel, O.; R. Hertenberger; Nunnemann, T.; D. Merkl; Rauscher, F.; D. Schaile; Stroehmer, R

    2009-01-01

    The influence of fast neutrons on the occupancy and the single tube resolution of ATLAS muon drift detectors was investigated by exposing a chamber built out of 3 layers of 3 short standard drift tubes to neutron flux-densities of up to 16 kHz/cm2 at a neutron energy of E=11 MeV. Pulse shape capable NE213 scintillaton detectors and a calibrated BF3 neutron detector provided monitoring of the neutron flux-density and energy. The sensitivity of the drift chamber to the neutrons was measured to ...

  8. Comparison of CMS Resistive Plate Chambers performance during LHC RUN-1 and RUN-2

    CERN Document Server

    Shah, Mehar Ali

    2016-01-01

    The Resistive Plate Chambers detector system at the CMS experiment at the LHC provides robustness and redundancy to the muon trigger. A total of 1056 double-gap chambers cover the pseudo-rapidity region < 1.6. The main detector parameters and environmental conditions are constantly and closely monitored to achieve operational stability and high quality data in the harsh conditions of the second run period of the LHC with center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. First results of overall detector stability with 2015 data and comparisons with data from the LHC RUN-1 period at 8 TeV are presented.

  9. Comparison of CMS Resistive Plate Chambers performance during LHC RUN-1 and RUN-2

    CERN Document Server

    Shah, Mehar Ali

    2016-01-01

    The Resistive Plate Chambers detector system at the CMS experiment at the LHC provides robustness and redundancy to the muon trigger. A total of 1056 double-gap chambers cover the pseudo-rapidity region lt 1.6. The main detector parameters and environmental conditions are constantly and closely monitored to achieve operational stability and high quality data in the harsh conditions of the second run period of the LHC with center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. First results of overall detector stability with 2015 data and comparisons with data from the LHC RUN-1 period at 8 TeV are presented.

  10. Geant4 simulation of a large volume segmented clover detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The simulation for the energy spectra, efficiency and add back factor for the large volume segmented clover detector at VECC has been performed in the Geant4 platform. The details about the segmented clover detector and its comparison of measured efficiency with a INGA clover detector has been reported earlier. Geometry construction. The size of each crystal in this detector is 9 cm (length) x 6 cm (diameter), which is larger than a normal clover detector used in INGA array, having typical size of 7 cm (length) x 5 cm (diameter). The detector is housed inside an aluminium vacuum chamber

  11. Super-resolution non-parametric deconvolution in modelling the radial response function of a parallel plate ionization chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulmala, A; Tenhunen, M

    2012-11-01

    The signal of the dosimetric detector is generally dependent on the shape and size of the sensitive volume of the detector. In order to optimize the performance of the detector and reliability of the output signal the effect of the detector size should be corrected or, at least, taken into account. The response of the detector can be modelled using the convolution theorem that connects the system input (actual dose), output (measured result) and the effect of the detector (response function) by a linear convolution operator. We have developed the super-resolution and non-parametric deconvolution method for determination of the cylinder symmetric ionization chamber radial response function. We have demonstrated that the presented deconvolution method is able to determine the radial response for the Roos parallel plate ionization chamber with a better than 0.5 mm correspondence with the physical measures of the chamber. In addition, the performance of the method was proved by the excellent agreement between the output factors of the stereotactic conical collimators (4-20 mm diameter) measured by the Roos chamber, where the detector size is larger than the measured field, and the reference detector (diode). The presented deconvolution method has a potential in providing reference data for more accurate physical models of the ionization chamber as well as for improving and enhancing the performance of the detectors in specific dosimetric problems.

  12. A high time resolution multi-gap resistive plate chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Research on a single cell Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MR PC)was carried out for the Time Of Flight detector (TOF) R and D of the STAR experi-ment. The property of the single chamber was tested with the test beam facility T10at CERN in Geneva. The MRPC was scanned with the test beam to get the efficiencyand time resolution at different position of the active area. The HV plateau was alsomeasured. The time resolution is 65 ps which satisfies the requirement of STAR. Theworking mechanism of the MRPC is also explained.

  13. Time expansion chamber and single ionization cluster measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The time expansion chamber (TEC), a new type of drift chamber, allows the measurement of microscopic details of ionization. The mean drift time interval from subsequent sngle ionization clusters of a relativistic particle in the TEC can be made large enough compared to the width of a anode signal to allow the recording of the clusters separately. Since single primary electrons can be detected, the cluster counting would allow an improved particle separation using the relativistic rise of primary ionization. In another application, very high position accuracy for track detectors or improved energy resolution may be obtained. Basic ionization phenomena and drift properties can be measured at the single electron level

  14. The User-friendly On-Line Diffusion Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Aviles Acosta, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    The On-Line Diffusion Chamber is a stand-alone apparatus built to carry out short-live radiotracer diffusion studies. The availability of the on-demand production of isotopes in the ISOLDE facility, and the design of the apparatus to streamline the implantation process, annealing treatment, ion gun ablation with a tape transport system, and radiation intensity measurement with a Ge gamma detector all in the same apparatus, gives the On-Line Diffusion Chamber a unique ability to studies with short-lived radioisotopes or isomer states that are not possible in any other facility in the world.

  15. New CMS detectors under construction at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    While the LHC will play the starring role in the 2013/2014 Long Shutdown (LS1), the break will also be a chance for its experiments to upgrade their detectors. CMS will be expanding its current muon detection systems, fitting 72 new cathode strip chambers (CSC) and 144 new resistive plate chambers (RPC) to the endcaps of the detector. These new chambers are currently under construction in Building 904.   CMS engineers install side panels on a CSC detector in Building 904. "The original RPC and CSC detectors were constructed in bits and pieces around the world," says Armando Lanaro, CSC construction co-ordinator. "But for the construction of these additional chambers, we decided to unify the assembly and testing into a single facility at CERN. There, CMS technicians, engineers and physicists are taking raw materials and transforming them into installation-ready detectors.” This new facility can be found in Building 904. Once the assembly site for the strai...

  16. Mush Column Magma Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Magma chambers are a necessary concept in understanding the chemical and physical evolution of magma. The concept may well be similar to a transfer function in circuit or time series analysis. It does what needs to be done to transform source magma into eruptible magma. In gravity and geodetic interpretations the causative body is (usually of necessity) geometrically simple and of limited vertical extent; it is clearly difficult to `see' through the uppermost manifestation of the concentrated magma. The presence of plutons in the upper crust has reinforced the view that magma chambers are large pots of magma, but as in the physical representation of a transfer function, actual magma chambers are clearly distinct from virtual magma chambers. Two key features to understanding magmatic systems are that they are vertically integrated over large distances (e.g., 30-100 km), and that all local magmatic processes are controlled by solidification fronts. Heat transfer considerations show that any viable volcanic system must be supported by a vertically extensive plumbing system. Field and geophysical studies point to a common theme of an interconnected stack of sill-like structures extending to great depth. This is a magmatic Mush Column. The large-scale (10s of km) structure resembles the vertical structure inferred at large volcanic centers like Hawaii (e.g., Ryan et al.), and the fine scale (10s to 100s of m) structure is exemplified by ophiolites and deeply eroded sill complexes like the Ferrar dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The local length scales of the sill reservoirs and interconnecting conduits produce a rich spectrum of crystallization environments with distinct solidification time scales. Extensive horizontal and vertical mushy walls provide conditions conducive to specific processes of differentiation from solidification front instability to sidewall porous flow and wall rock slumping. The size, strength, and time series of eruptive behavior

  17. Optical Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbert, Bernd; Goushcha, Alexander

    Optical detectors are applied in all fields of human activities from basic research to commercial applications in communication, automotive, medical imaging, homeland security, and other fields. The processes of light interaction with matter described in other chapters of this handbook form the basis for understanding the optical detectors physics and device properties.

  18. Automatic semi-continuous accumulation chamber for diffuse gas emissions monitoring in volcanic and non-volcanic areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelli, Matteo; Raco, Brunella; Norelli, Francesco; Virgili, Giorgio; Continanza, Davide

    2016-04-01

    Since various decades the accumulation chamber method is intensively used in monitoring activities of diffuse gas emissions in volcanic areas. Although some improvements have been performed in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility of the detectors, the equipment used for measurement of gas emissions temporal variation usually requires expensive and bulky equipment. The unit described in this work is a low cost, easy to install-and-manage instrument that will make possible the creation of low-cost monitoring networks. The Non-Dispersive Infrared detector used has a concentration range of 0-5% CO2, but the substitution with other detector (range 0-5000 ppm) is possible and very easy. Power supply unit has a 12V, 7Ah battery, which is recharged by a 35W solar panel (equipped with charge regulator). The control unit contains a custom programmed CPU and the remote transmission is assured by a GPRS modem. The chamber is activated by DataLogger unit, using a linear actuator between the closed position (sampling) and closed position (idle). A probe for the measure of soil temperature, soil electrical conductivity, soil volumetric water content, air pressure and air temperature is assembled on the device, which is already arranged for the connection of others external sensors, including an automatic weather station. The automatic station has been tested on the field at Lipari island (Sicily, Italy) during a period of three months, performing CO2 flux measurement (and also weather parameters), each 1 hour. The possibility to measure in semi-continuous mode, and at the same time, the gas fluxes from soil and many external parameters, helps the time series analysis aimed to the identification of gas flux anomalies due to variations in deep system (e.g. onset of volcanic crises) from those triggered by external conditions.

  19. Two-dimensional position sensitive neutron detector

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A M Shaikh; S S Desai; A K Patra

    2004-08-01

    A two-dimensional position sensitive neutron detector has been developed. The detector is a 3He + Kr filled multiwire proportional counter with charge division position readout and has a sensitive area of 345 mm × 345 mm, pixel size 5 mm × 5 mm, active depth 25 mm and is designed for efficiency of 70% for 4 Å neutrons. The detector is tested with 0.5 bar 3He + 1.5 bar krypton gas mixture in active chamber and 2 bar 4He in compensating chamber. The pulse height spectrum recorded at an anode potential of 2000 V shows energy resolution of ∼ 25% for the 764 keV peak. A spatial resolution of 8 mm × 6 mm is achieved. The detector is suitable for SANS studies in the range of 0.02–0.25 Å-1.

  20. The CPLEAR detector at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, R; Alhalel, T; Angelopoulos, Angelos; Apostolakis, Alcibiades J; Aslanides, Elie; Backenstoss, Gerhard; Bal, F; Bard, J P; Barraca, D; Bee, C P; Behnke, O; Benelli, A; Bennet, J; Bertin, V; Blanc, F; Bloch, P; Bonnet, M; Bula, C; Calzas, A; Carlson, P J; Carroll, M; Carvalho, J; Cawley, E; Charalambous, S; Chardalas, M; Chardin, G; Charra, P; Chertok, M B; Cody, A; Da Silva, J; Damianoglou, D; Daniel, R; Danielsson, M; Dechelette, Paul; Dedieu, M; Dedoussis, S; Dejardin, M; Derré, J; Dijksman, A; Dinkespiler, B; Dodgson, M; Dröge, M; Duclos, J; Dudragne, J; Durand, D; Ealet, A; Eckart, B; Eleftheriadis, C; Engster, Claude; Evangelou, I; Faravel, L; Fassnacht, P; Faure, J L; Felder, C; Ferreira-Marques, R; Fetscher, W; Fidecaro, Maria; Filipcic, A; Francis, D; Fry, J; Fuglesang, C; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gally, Y; Gamet, R; Garreta, D; Geiss, D; Geralis, R; Gerber, H J; Go, A; Gumplinger, P; Guyon, D; Guyot, C; Harrison, P; Harrison, P F; Haselden, A; Hayman, P J; Hazen, E S; Henry-Coüannier, F; Heyes, W G; Hollander, R W; Hubert, E; Jacobs, C; Jansson, K; Johner, H U; Jon-And, K; Karkour, N; Kérek, A; Kesseler, G; Kettle, P R; King, D; Klados, T; Kochowski, Claude; Kokkas, P; Kontek, K; Kreuger, R; Lawry, T; Lecouturier, T; Le Gac, R; Leimgruber, F; Linget, D; Liolios, A; Löfstedt, B; Louis, F; Machado, E; Maley, P; Mall, U; Mandic, I; Manthos, N; Marel, Gérard; Marin, C P; Martin, H; Michau, J C; Mikuz, M; Miller, J; Montanet, François; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nanni, F; Onofre, A; Pagels, B; Papadopoulos, I M; Pavlopoulos, P; Pelucchi, F; Petit, P; Philippoussis, K; Pinto da Cunha, J; Policarpo, Armando; Polivka, G; Postma, H; Rheme, C; Rickenbach, R; Roberts, B L; Rozaki, E; Ruf, T; Sacks, L; Sakelliou, L; Sanders, P; Santoni, C; Sarigiannis, K; Schäfer, M; Schaller, L A; Schietinger, T; Schopper, A; Schune, P; Soares, A; Steinacher, M; Tatsis, S; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thibault, C; Touchard, F; Touramanis, C; Triantis, F A; Tröster, D A; Tsamouranis, I; Tschopp, H; Tsilimigras, Panayiotis; Van Beveren, E; van Eijk, C W E; Van Koningsfeld, V; Vanuxem, J P; Varner, G S; Verweij, H; Vlachos, S; Warner, D; Watson, E; Weber, P; Wendler, H; Wigger, O; Witzig, C; Wolter, M; Yéche, C; Zavrtanik, D; Zimmerman, D

    1996-01-01

    The CPLEAR collaboration has constructed a detector at CERN for an extensive programme of CP-, T- and CPT-symmetry studies using ${\\rm K}^0$ and $\\bar{\\rm K}^0$ produced by the annihilation of $\\bar{\\rm p}$'s in a hydrogen gas target. The ${\\rm K}^0$ and $\\bar{\\rm K}^0$ are identified by their companion products of the annihilation ${\\rm K}^{\\pm} \\pi^{\\mp}$ which are tracked with multiwire proportional chambers, drift chambers and streamer tubes. Particle identification is carried out with a liquid Cherenkov detector for fast separation of pions and kaons and with scintillators which allow the measurement of time of flight and energy loss. Photons are measured with a lead/gas sampling electromagnetic calorimeter. The required antiproton annihilation modes are selected by fast online processors using the tracking chamber and particle identification information. All the detectors are mounted in a 0.44 T uniform field of an axial solenoid of diameter 2 m and length 3.6 m to form a magnetic spectrometer capable o...

  1. High-density avalanche chambers for positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manfrass, P.; Enghardt, W.; Fromm, W.D.; Wohlfarth, D.; Hohmuth, K.

    1988-12-15

    A positron tomograph for radiopharmaceutical and medical research is under construction. In its final stage it will cover six high-density avalanche chambers (HIDAC) in a hexagonal arrangement. Each detector with a sensitive area of 50x28 cm/sup 2/ will consist of a stack of four pairs of multihole photon-to-electron converters with a multiwire proportional counter (MWPC) in between. An experimental investigation of detector properties as time and spatial resolutions as well as detector efficiency in dependence to converter structure, electric field strength and counting gas mixture preceded the final design of these detectors. Results of these studies are outlined. Furthermore, longitudinal tomograms taken with a stationary test camera are presented.

  2. Charge-Focusing Readout of Time Projection Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, S J; Jaegle, I; Rosen, M D; Seong, I S; Thorpe, T N; Vahsen, S E; Yamaoka, J

    2013-01-01

    Time projection chambers (TPCs) have found a wide range of applications in particle physics, nuclear physics, and homeland security. For TPCs with high-resolution readout, the readout electronics often dominate the price of the final detector. We have developed a novel method which could be used to build large-scale detectors while limiting the necessary readout area. By focusing the drift charge with static electric fields, we would allow a small area of electronics to be sensitive to particle detection for a much larger detector volume. The resulting cost reduction could be important in areas of research which demand large-scale detectors, including dark matter searches and detection of special nuclear material. We present simulations made using the software package Garfield of a focusing structure to be used with a prototype TPC with pixel readout. This design should enable significant focusing while retaining directional sensitivity to incoming particles. We also present first experimental results and com...

  3. Integrated outburst detector sensor-model tests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DZIURZY(N)SKI Wac(I)aw; WASILEWSKI Stanis(I)aw

    2011-01-01

    Outbursts of methane and rocks are,similarly to rock bursts,the biggest hazards in deep mines and are equally difficult to predict.The violent process of the outburst itself,along with the scale and range of hazards following the rapid discharge of gas and rocks,requires solutions which would enable quick and unambiguous detection of the hazard,immediate power supply cut-off and evacuation of personnel from potentially hazardous areas.For this purpose,an integrated outburst detector was developed.Assumed functions of the sensor which was equipped with three measuring and detection elements:a chamber for constant measurement of methane concentration,pressure sensor and microphone.Tests of the sensor model were carried out to estimate the parameters which characterize the dynamic properties of the sensor.Given the impossibility of carrying out the full scale experimental outburst,the sensor was tested during the methane and coal dust explosions in the testing gallery at KD Barbara.The obtained results proved that the applied solutions have been appropriate.

  4. MUON DETECTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    F.Gasparini

    Barrel Good progress has been made since the last CMS Week: the RPC chambers with gas problems have been success¬fully replaced in YB+2 (4 chambers) and YB+1 (5 chambers). Replacing of two chambers in YB-1 is ongoing. All the alignment MABs have been installed (few repairs were needed) and control and monitoring system is under test. The LINK system connecting the Tracker to the Endcap Disks and to the MABs in YB+1 and YB+2 is well advanced and will be ready for CMS test closure. This system concerns the relative positions of three ele¬ments at the moment of the final closure, the Alignment Ring on the Tracker, the Link Disk on YEs and MABs on YBs. Final possible corrective actions are under discussion or planned. Significant progress was made in the UXC infrastructure with the completion of the power distribution from S4F and the refurbishing of the cooling distribution on all gas towers. A prototype of the small online drift velocity measuring chambers is operational in the gas room fo...

  5. The DarkSide-50 outer detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerdale, S.; Agnes, P.; Agostino, L.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Alexander, T.; Alton, A. K.; Arisaka, K.; Back, H. O.; Baldin, B.; Biery, K.; Bonfini, G.; Bossa, M.; Bottino, B.; Brigatti, A.; Brodsky, J.; Budano, F.; Bussino, S.; Cadeddu, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cadoni, M.; Calaprice, F.; Canci, N.; Candela, A.; Cao, H.; Cariello, M.; Carlini, M.; Catalanotti, S.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Cocco, A. G.; Covone, G.; D’Angelo, D.; D’Incecco, M.; Davini, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Deo, M.; De Vincenzi, M.; Derbin, A.; Devoto, A.; Di Eusanio, F.; Di Pietro, G.; Edkins, E.; Empl, A.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Fomenko, K.; Foster, G.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Giganti, C.; Goretti, A. M.; Granato, F.; Grandi, L.; Gromov, M.; Guan, M.; Guardincerri, Y.; Hackett, B. R.; Herner, K. R.; Hungerford, E. V.; Aldo, Ianni; Andrea, Ianni; James, I.; Jollet, C.; Keeter, K.; Kendziora, C. L.; Kobychev, V.; Koh, G.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kubankin, A.; Li, X.; Lissia, M.; Lombardi, P.; Luitz, S.; Ma, Y.; Machulin, I. N.; Mandarano, A.; Mari, S. M.; Maricic, J.; Marini, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meregaglia, A.; Meyers, P. D.; Miletic, T.; Milincic, R.; Montanari, D.; Monte, A.; Montuschi, M.; Monzani, M. E.; Mosteiro, P.; Mount, B. J.; Muratova, V. N.; Musico, P.; Napolitano, J.; Orsini, M.; Ortica, F.; Pagani, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Pantic, E.; Parmeggiano, S.; Pelczar, K.; Pelliccia, N.; Perasso, S.; Pocar, A.; Pordes, S.; Pugachev, D. A.; Qian, H.; Randle, K.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Reinhold, B.; Renshaw, A. L.; Romani, A.; Rossi, B.; Rossi, N.; Rountree, S. D.; Sablone, D.; Saggese, P.; Saldanha, R.; Sands, W.; Sangiorgio, S.; Savarese, C.; Segreto, E.; Semenov, D. A.; Shields, E.; Singh, P. N.; DSkorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Stanford, C.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Tatarowicz, J.; Testera, G.; Tonazzo, A.; Trinchese, P.; Unzhakov, E. V.; Vishneva, A.; Vogelaar, B.; Wada, M.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Watson, A. W.; Wilhelmi, J.; Wojcik, M. M.; Xiang, X.; Xu, J.; Yang, C.; Yoo, J.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zec, A.; Zhong, W.; Zhu, C.; Zuzel, G.; The DarkSide Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    DarkSide-50 is a dark matter detection experiment searching for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), in Gran Sasso National Laboratory. For experiments like DarkSide-50, neutrons are one of the primary backgrounds that can mimic WIMP signals. The experiment consists of three nested detectors: a liquid argon time projection chamber surrounded by two outer detectors. The outermost detector is a 10 m by 11 m cylindrical water Cherenkov detector with 80 PMTs, designed to provide shielding and muon vetoing. Inside the water Cherenkov detector is the 4 m diameter spherical boron-loaded liquid scintillator veto, with a cocktail of pseudocumene, trimethyl borate, and PPO wavelength shifter, designed to provide shielding, neutron vetoing, and in situ measurements of the TPC backgrounds. We present design and performance details of the DarkSide-50 outer detectors.

  6. TV X-ray flaw detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the invention is to ensure optimum operation of a TV x-ray flaw detector under transient non-destructive testing conditions. The operating conditions are optimized by using an electronic circuit compromizing series-connected line block extraction block, peak detector, differentiation block, zero member and control unit of radiation source voltage supply. The block diagram of the flaw detector is given, its operation principle is described

  7. Multiwire proportional chamber for Moessbauer spectroscopy: development and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new Multiwere proportional Chamber designed for Moessbauer Spectroscopy is presented. This detector allows transmission backscattering experiments using either photons or electrons. The Moessbauer data acquisition system, partially developed for this work is described. A simple method for determining the frontier between true proportional and semi-proportional regions of operation in gaseous detectors is proposed. The study of the tertiary gas mixture He-Ar-CH4 leads to a straight forward way of energy calibration of the electron spectra. Moessbauer spectra using Fe-57 source are presented. In particular those obtained with backsattered electrons show the feasibility of depth selective analysis with gaseous proportional counters. (author)

  8. Bakelite chambers for time-of-flight measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Cwiok, M; Górski, M; Królikowski, J

    1999-01-01

    We report on the search of composite organic materials with the volume resistivity ranging from 10 sup 8 to 10 sup 1 sup 1 OMEGA cm. Materials having resistivity in this range may be used for electrodes of thin gap Parallel Plate Avalanche Chambers. Gas detectors of such structure and operated at increased gas pressure allow, potentially, a sub-nanosecond time resolution. Using bakelite-like material with electrical properties well tuned during manufacturing opens the possibility to overcome limitations related to the semi-conductive glass employed usually for ultrafast gas detectors of parallel plate structure for time-of-flight technique.

  9. Development of Fission Chamber Assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGJinwei; ZHANGWei; SONGXianying; LIXu

    2003-01-01

    The fission chambers which are gas counters with fissile material inside chamber,provide essential information for plasma opcharacteristics. In conjunction with the neutron flux monitor system these provide time-resolved measurements of the global neutron source strength and fusion power from thermal nuclear fusion reactor as ITER for all plasma conditions for which neutrons are produced.

  10. National Ignition Facility Target Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wavrik, R W; Cox, J R; Fleming, P J

    2000-10-05

    On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This

  11. Concept of a solid-state drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operation of a solid state drift chamber is described, and its use in a high rate, high multiplicity environment is discussed. The Solid State Drift Chamber (SSDCH) is a thin wafer of a high purity n-type silicon (few cm2 x a few hundreds μm thick) with a single small-area, small-capacitance anode readout. The drift voltage is supplied to an array of drift electrodes on both sides of the wafer to produce a uniform drift field parallel to the surface of the wafer and to ensure the complete depletion of the wafer

  12. Streamlined Calibration of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer Precision Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Levin, DS; The ATLAS collaboration; Dai, T; Diehl, EB; Ferretti, C; Hindes, JM; Zhou, B

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS Muon Spectrometer is comprised of nearly 1200 optically Monitored Drifttube Chambers (MDTs) containing 354,000 aluminum drift tubes. The chambers are configured in barrel and endcap regions. The momentum resolution required for the LHC physics reach (dp/p = 3% and 10% at 100 GeV and 1 TeV) demands rigorous MDT drift tube calibration with frequent updates. These calibrations (RT functions) convert the measured drift times to drift radii and are a critical component to the spectrometer performance. They are sensitive to the MDT gas composition: Ar 93%, CO2 7% at 3 bar, flowing through the detector at arate of 100,000 l hr−1. We report on the generation and application of Universal RT calibrations derived from an inline gas system monitor chamber. Results from ATLAS cosmic ray commissioning data are included. These Universal RTs are intended for muon track reconstuction in LHC startup phase.

  13. Imaging with high Dynamic using an Ionization Chamber

    OpenAIRE

    Menk, Ralf-Hendrik; Amenitsch, Heinz; Arfelli, Fulvia; Bernstorff, Sigrid; Besch, Hans Juergen; Voltolina, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    In this work a combination of an ionization chamber with one-dimensional spatial resolution and a MicroCAT structure will be presented. The combination between gas gain operations and integrating front-end electronics yields a dynamic range as high as eight to nine orders of magnitude. Therefore this device is well suitable for medical imaging or applications such as small angle x-ray scattering, where the requirements on the dynamic of the detector are exceptional high. Basically the describ...

  14. A multiple sampling ionization chamber for the External Target Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X.H., E-mail: zhxh@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Tang, S.W.; Ma, P.; Lu, C.G.; Yang, H.R.; Wang, S.T.; Yu, Y.H.; Yue, K.; Fang, F. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Yan, D.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, Z.M.; Sun, Y. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Sun, Z.Y.; Duan, L.M. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Sun, B.H. [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2015-09-21

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber used as a particle identification device for high energy heavy ions has been developed for the External Target Facility. The performance of this detector was tested with a {sup 239}Pu α source and RI beams. A Z resolution (FWHM) of 0.4–0.6 was achieved for nuclear fragments of {sup 18}O at 400 AMeV.

  15. Ionization Chambers for Monitoring in High-Intensity Neutrino Beams

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, J; Velissaris, C; Erwin, A R; Ping, H; Viren, B M; Diwan, M V

    2002-01-01

    Radiation-hard ionization chambers were tested using an intense electron beam from the accelerator test facility (ATF) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The detectors were designed to be used as the basic element for monitoring muons in the Main Injector Neutrino beamline (NuMI) at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). Measurements of linearity of response, voltage dependence, and the onset of ionization saturation as a function of gap voltage were performed.

  16. MS Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koppenaal, David W.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Denton, M Bonner B.; Sperline, Roger P.; Hieftje, Gary M.; Schilling, G. D.; Andrade, Francisco J.; Barnes IV., James H.

    2005-11-01

    Good eyesight is often taken for granted, a situation that everyone appreciates once vision begins to fade with age. New eyeglasses or contact lenses are traditional ways to improve vision, but recent new technology, i.e. LASIK laser eye surgery, provides a new and exciting means for marked vision restoration and improvement. In mass spectrometry, detectors are the 'eyes' of the MS instrument. These 'eyes' have also been taken for granted. New detectors and new technologies are likewise needed to correct, improve, and extend ion detection and hence, our 'chemical vision'. The purpose of this report is to review and assess current MS detector technology and to provide a glimpse towards future detector technologies. It is hoped that the report will also serve to motivate interest, prompt ideas, and inspire new visions for ion detection research.

  17. 太阳能辅助供热挂面烘房热能构成与应用潜力分析%Analysis of Heat Energy Constitution and Application Potential about Solar-assist-ed Heat Supply Noodle Drying Chamber in Chinese Dried Noodle Drying Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武亮; 刘锐; 于晓磊; 张影全; 张波; 魏益民

    2015-01-01

    为研究太阳能辅助供热挂面烘房的热能构成、节能效果及建设和管理成本,本文以某一挂面生产企业的太阳能-燃煤供热锅炉和挂面干燥生产车间为研究对象,分别于2015年4.28—4.29、6.01—6.03和7.28—7.29,分3次9d监测了不同时间段的耗煤量(243~251MJ/kg)、太阳能利用时长、挂面产量和蒸发水分的质量。分析结果表明:在调查时间内燃煤单独供热平均时长16.50h,单位煤耗28.60~32.05kg/t;太阳能结合燃煤供热平均时长5.64h,单位煤耗18.32~20.53kg/t,太阳能供热占比35.94%;太阳能单独供热(未使用燃煤系统)平均时长1.88h。太阳能辅助供热挂面烘房平均煤耗为23.97~26.86kg/t;太阳能为该段时间生产提供了17.51%的能量,相当于节约燃煤257.94kg,约等于生产8.05~9.02t挂面所耗煤量。以全年生产200d计,估计每年可节约标准煤43.48t,减少碳排放113.05t;以燃煤(243~251MJ/kg)到厂价600~800元计,可节约生产成本30953~41271元。%For studying heat energy constitution, energy-saving effect and cost of installation and maintenance about solar energy assisted heat supply drying noodle drying process in chamber, a production line which energy was supplied by solar and coal was chosen as research object, coal consumption in different time periods, time of solar energy utilized and noodle produc-tion were monitored, 9 days survey was conducted during 4.28-4.29, 6.01-6.03, 7.28-7.29, 2015. Results showed that, in survey period, average time of coal heating alone was 16.5h, unit coal consumption was 28.60-32.05kg/t (noodle product); so-lar combined with coal heating 5.64h, unit coal consumption was 18.32-20.53kg/t, share 37.12%of total energy consumption in this period; solar heating alone (without coal) 1.88h; share17.51%about whole energy consumption in noodle production of all day, equivalent to saving coal 257.94kg, approximately equal to coal consumption

  18. Testing of large real-size GEM detector for CBM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector has been extensively used in many experiments for its excellent performance as a tracking detector. In CBM experiment, Muon Chamber detector (MUCH) for tracking muon, will be built using GEM based detector technology. In this direction several R and D has been performed with small to medium size triple GEM chambers. A real-size triple GEM detector proto-type, suitable for 1st detector station of MUCH detector, has been tested using high intensity proton beam of momentum 2.36 GeV/c at COSY, Germany. We get efficiency of detector >95 % at Δ VGEM = 371: 85 V. The variation of efficiency of the detector with rate of incoming particle is within 1%. The detector shows a gain of 3509 at ∆ Vgem = 375.18 Volt. The gain is stable with high rate of incoming particles with a small variation (∼9%)

  19. The central drift chamber for the D0 experiment: Design, construction and test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cylindrical drift chamber has been designed and built at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. This chamber is to be installed in the D0 detector which is being completed at the Fermi National Accelerator. In this dissertation the design, construction and testing of this chamber are described. The characteristic features of this chamber are cells formed by solid walls and a modular structure. Much discussion is given to the performance of and results from a chamber made from three final modules which was installed in the D0 interaction region during the 1988/1989 collider run. Using this chamber proton anti-proton interactions were measured at the D0 interaction point

  20. The central drift chamber for the D0 experiment: Design, construction and test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnke, T.

    1989-08-01

    A cylindrical drift chamber has been designed and built at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. This chamber is to be installed in the D0 detector which is being completed at the Fermi National Accelerator. In this dissertation the design, construction and testing of this chamber are described. The characteristic features of this chamber are cells formed by solid walls and a modular structure. Much discussion is given to the performance of and results from a chamber made from three final modules which was installed in the D0 interaction region during the 1988/1989 collider run. Using this chamber proton anti-proton interactions were measured at the D0 interaction point.

  1. The L3 vertex detector: Design and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The L3 vertex detector is comprised of the time expansion chamber (TEC), the Z-chamber and a layer of plastic scintillating fibers. The TEC has shown a high spatial resolution and an excellent multi-track reconstruction capability at LEP luminosity. The Z-chamber provides information about the z-coordinates of the tracks and the fibers are used for calibrating the drift velocity with a high precision. A description of the L3 vertex detector, its readout and data acquisition and its performance during the 1990 LEP running period is presented in this paper. (orig.)

  2. Two-dimensional position sensitive ionization chamber with GEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Noritaka; Noro, Tetsuo; Sakaguchi, Satoshi; Takao, Hideaki; Nishio, Yasutaka

    2014-09-01

    We have been developing a multi-anode ionization chamber for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at Kyushu University. Furthermore, we are planning to construct a neutron detector with high position resolution by combining the chamber with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) and a neutron converter. One of purposes is the measurement of p-> , pn knockout reaction from unstable nuclei. The multi-anode ionization chamber is composed of subdivided multiple anodes, a cathode to produce an uniform electric field, and a Frisch grid. The chamber must have position sensitivity because obtaining a beam profile is required for AMS measurements, where counting loss should be avoided. Also in the case of the neutron detector, it is necessary to measure the position to deduce the scattering angles. We have recently established a two-dimensional position readout system by the following methods: the measurement of horizontal position is enabled by trimming some anodes into wedge-like shape, and vertical position can be determined by the ratio of induced charge on the grid to the total charge on anodes. In addition, improvement of S/N ratio is important for isotope separation and position resolution. We installed a rectangular-shaped GEM and tried improving S/N ratio by electron amplification.

  3. A detector for use in high energy bremsstrahlung shielding studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design, development and calibration of a detector based on the principle of the Moxon-Rae detector is discussed. It is ideally suited to the measurement of the energy fluence of photons transmitted through a thick shield which has been irradiated with high energy bremsstrahlung. The detection sensitivity is 104 to 105 times that of the P2 ion chamber

  4. The CLEO-III Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Mountain, R J; Artuso, M; Ayad, R; Azfar, F; Coan, T E; Efimov, A; Fadeev, V; Kopp, S E; Kubota, Y; Lipeles, E; Majumder, G; Schuh, S; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, A; Staeck, J; Stone, S; Viehhauser, G; Volobuev, I P

    1999-01-01

    The CLEO-III Detector upgrade for charged particle identification is discussed. The RICH design uses solid LiF crystal radiators coupled with multi-wire chamber photon detectors, using TEA as the photosensor, and low-noise Viking readout electronics. Results from our beam test at Fermilab are presented.

  5. MUON DETECTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Iaselli

    Drift Tubes The long run of chamber certification and test at ISR ended in October. The full lot of 250 DT chambers, and some of the 16 spare not kept in the assembly sites for further studies and tests, were tested and equipped with Minicrates. It’s the end of a hard work lasted more than three years. 58 BMU Stations (DT + RPC) were installed in three weeks in the wheels YB-1 and -2 in the surface hall at point 5. With the exception of 6 chambers to be installed in the feet of YB0 and -1,-2 after the cabling this achieve¬ment marks the end of the installation of the Barrel MU in surface. Commissioning of the installed chambers is already going on.YB+2 passed the review to certify its readiness for lowering. Lowering is foreseen for the beginning of January, followed within a couple of weeks by that of YB+1. Lot of work is being deployed in the definition of the services on YB0. They are crucial for the definition of the length of many cables foreseen to be installed starting in January....

  6. Tests of Cathode Strip Chamber Prototypes

    CERN Document Server

    Bonushkin, Yuri; Chrisman, David; Durkin, S; Ferguson, Thomas; Giacomelli, Paolo; Gorn, William; Hauser, Jay; Hirschfelder, J; Hoftiezer, John; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Kisselev, Oleg; Klem, Daniel; Korytov, Andrey; Layter, John G; Lennous, Paul; Ling, Ta-Yung; Matthey, Christina; Medved, Serguei; Minor, C; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Müller, Thomas; Otwinowski, Stanislaw; Preston, L; Prokofiev, O E; Rush, Chuck J; Schenk, P; Sedykh, Yu; Smirnov, Igor; Soulimov, V; Vaniachine, A; Vercelli, T; Wuest, Craig R; Zeng, Ji-Yang; von Goeler, Eberhard

    1997-01-01

    We report on the results of testing two six-layer 0.6 x 0.6 cm^2 cathode strip chamber ( CSC) prototypes in a muon beam at CERN. The prototypes were designed to simulate sections of the end-cap muon system of the Compact Muon Solenoid ( CMS) detector which will be installed at the Large Hadron Collider ( LHC). We measured the spatial and time resolutions of each chamber for different gains, different orientations with respect to the beam direction and different strength magnetic fields. The single-layer spatial resolution of a prototype with a strip pitch of 15.88 mm ranged from 78 micron to 468 micron, depending on whether the particle passed between two cathode strips or through the center of a strip; its six-layer resolution was found to be 44 micron. The single-layer spatial resolution of a prototype with a strip pitch of 6.35 mm ranged from 54 to 66 micron; its six-layer resolution w as found to be 23 micron. The efficiency for collecting an anode wire signal from one of six layers within a 20 ns time wi...

  7. ATLAS detector records its first curved muon

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    The barrel muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector has acquired its first cosmic event in a magnetic field produced by the barrel toroid magnet. This was an important test of the chambers in their final configurations, and marked the first triggering and measurement of curved cosmic ray muons in ATLAS.

  8. The GEM Detector projective alignment simulation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precision position knowledge (< 25 microns RMS) of the GEM Detector muon system at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) is an important physics requirement necessary to minimize sagitta error in detecting and tracking high energy muons that are deflected by the magnetic field within the GEM Detector. To validate the concept of the sagitta correction function determined by projective alignment of the muon detectors (Cathode Strip Chambers or CSCs), the basis of the proposed GEM alignment scheme, a facility, called the ''Alignment Test Stand'' (ATS), is being constructed. This system simulates the environment that the CSCs and chamber alignment systems are expected to experience in the GEM Detector, albeit without the 0.8 T magnetic field and radiation environment. The ATS experimental program will allow systematic study and characterization of the projective alignment approach, as well as general mechanical engineering of muon chamber mounting concepts, positioning systems and study of the mechanical behavior of the proposed 6 layer CSCs. The ATS will consist of a stable local coordinate system in which mock-ups of muon chambers (i.e., non-working mechanical analogs, representing the three superlayers of a selected barrel and endcap alignment tower) are implemented, together with a sufficient number of alignment monitors to overdetermine the sagitta correction function, providing a self-consistency check. This paper describes the approach to be used for the alignment of the GEM muon system, the design of the ATS, and the experiments to be conducted using the ATS

  9. First measurement of nuclear recoil head-tail sense in a fiducialised WIMP dark matter detector

    OpenAIRE

    Battat, J. B. R.; Daw, E.; Ezeribe, A. C.; Gauvreau, J. -L.; Harton, J.L.; Lafler, R.; Lee, E. R.; Loomba, D.; Lumnah, A.; Miller, E. H.; Mouton, F.; Murphy, A. StJ.; Paling, S. M.; Phan, N. S.; Robinson, M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent computational results suggest that directional dark matter detectors have potential to probe for WIMP dark matter particles below the neutrino floor. The DRIFT-IId detector used in this work is a leading directional WIMP search time projection chamber detector. We report the first measurements of the detection of the directional nuclear recoils in a fully fiducialised low-pressure time projection chamber. In this new operational mode, the distance between each event vertex and the read...

  10. Aging phenomena in gaseous detectors - perspectives from the 2001 workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Hohlmann, M; Tesch, N; Titov, M

    2002-01-01

    High-Energy Physics experiments are currently entering a new era which requires the operation of gaseous particle detectors at unprecedented high rates and integrated particle fluxes. Full functionality of such detectors over the lifetime of an experiment in a harsh radiation environment is of prime concern. New classes of gaseous detectors such as large-scale straw-type detectors, Micro-pattern Gas Detectors, and resistive plate chambers--each with their own specific aging characteristics--have evolved since the first workshop on wire chamber aging was held at LBL, Berkeley in 1986. The 2001 workshop provided a forum to review the progress since 1986 in understanding aging effects and to exchange recent experiences. A summary of the main results reported at the 2001 workshop is presented providing a systematic review of aging effects in state-of-the-art detectors.

  11. Photon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Va`vra, J.

    1995-10-01

    J. Seguinot and T. Ypsilantis have recently described the theory and history of Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors. In this paper, I will expand on these excellent review papers, by covering the various photon detector designs in greater detail, and by including discussion of mistakes made, and detector problems encountered, along the way. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photo-electrons. For gaseous devices, this requires the correct choice of gas gain in order to prevent breakdown and wire aging, together with the use of low noise electronics having the maximum possible amplification. In addition, the detector must be constructed of materials which resist corrosion due to photosensitive materials such as, the detector enclosure must be tightly sealed in order to prevent oxygen leaks, etc. The most critical step is the selection of the photocathode material. Typically, a choice must be made between a solid (CsI) or gaseous photocathode (TMAE, TEA). A conservative approach favors a gaseous photocathode, since it is continuously being replaced by flushing, and permits the photon detectors to be easily serviced (the air sensitive photocathode can be removed at any time). In addition, it can be argued that we now know how to handle TMAE, which, as is generally accepted, is the best photocathode material available as far as quantum efficiency is concerned. However, it is a very fragile molecule, and therefore its use may result in relatively fast wire aging. A possible alternative is TEA, which, in the early days, was rejected because it requires expensive CaF{sub 2} windows, which could be contaminated easily in the region of 8.3 eV and thus lose their UV transmission.

  12. Photon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Seguinot and T. Ypsilantis have recently described the theory and history of Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors. In this paper, I will expand on these excellent review papers, by covering the various photon detector designs in greater detail, and by including discussion of mistakes made, and detector problems encountered, along the way. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photo-electrons. For gaseous devices, this requires the correct choice of gas gain in order to prevent breakdown and wire aging, together with the use of low noise electronics having the maximum possible amplification. In addition, the detector must be constructed of materials which resist corrosion due to photosensitive materials such as, the detector enclosure must be tightly sealed in order to prevent oxygen leaks, etc. The most critical step is the selection of the photocathode material. Typically, a choice must be made between a solid (CsI) or gaseous photocathode (TMAE, TEA). A conservative approach favors a gaseous photocathode, since it is continuously being replaced by flushing, and permits the photon detectors to be easily serviced (the air sensitive photocathode can be removed at any time). In addition, it can be argued that we now know how to handle TMAE, which, as is generally accepted, is the best photocathode material available as far as quantum efficiency is concerned. However, it is a very fragile molecule, and therefore its use may result in relatively fast wire aging. A possible alternative is TEA, which, in the early days, was rejected because it requires expensive CaF2 windows, which could be contaminated easily in the region of 8.3 eV and thus lose their UV transmission

  13. Elevator mechanism and method for scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An elevator mechanism and method for raising and lowering radioactive samples through a shielded vertical counting chamber in a benchtop scintillation detector is described. The elevator mechanism adds little or nothing to the height of the detector by using an elongated flexible member such as a metal tape secured to the bottom of the elevator platform and extending downwardly through the counting chamber and its bottom shielding, where the tape is bent laterally for connection to a drive means. In the particular embodiment illustrated, the tape is bent laterally below the bottom shielding for the counting chamber, and then upwardly along or through one side of the shielding to a reel at the top of the shielding. The tape is wound onto the reel, and the reel is driven by a reversible motor which winds and unwinds the tape on the reel to raise and lower the elevator platform

  14. Studies of gaseous multiplication coefficient in isobutane using a resistive plate chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Josemary A.C.; Botelho, Suzana; Tobias, Carmen C.B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Sao Paulo (PUC/SP), SP (Brazil); Lima, Iara B.; Vivaldini, Tulio C. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ridenti, Marco A.; Pascholati, Paulo R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Lab. do Acelerador Linear; Fonte, Paulo; Mangiarotti, Alessio [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Dept. de fisica. Lab. de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas

    2009-07-01

    Full text: Due to the increasing demands concerning High Energy Physics, Nuclear Medicine and other Nuclear Applications about gaseous detectors operating in high electric fields, many efforts have been done about the choice of filling gases that fulfill these requirements. In this context, the electron transport parameters in gases, as the gaseous multiplication coefficient, play an important role not only for detector design but also for simulation and modeling of discharges, allowing the validation of electron impact cross-sections. In the present work the preliminary measurements of gaseous multiplication coefficient, as function of the reduced electric field (from 36V/cm.Torr until 93V/cm.Torr), for isobutane are presented. Among several filling gases, isobutane is widely used in resistive plate chambers RPCs, and other gaseous detectors, due to its timing properties. Although its characteristics, there is a lack of swarm parameters data in literature for this gas, mainly at high electric fields. The experimental method used is based on the Pulsed Townsend technique, which follows from Townsend equation solution for a uniform electric field. Considering the ratio between the current (I), measured in avalanche mode, and the primary ionization current (I{sub 0}), the effective multiplication coefficient can be determined, since alpha = d{sup -1}ln(I/I{sub 0}), where d is the gap between the electrodes. In our configuration, the experimental setup consists of two parallel plates enclosure in a stainless steel chamber at gas flow regime. The anode, is made of a high resistivity (2.10{sup 12}{omega}.cm) glass (3mm thick and 14mm diameter), while the cathode is of aluminium (40mm diameter). Primary electrons are produced by irradiating the cathode with a nitrogen laser (LTB MNL200-LD) and are accelerated toward the anode by means of a high voltage power supply (Bertan 225-30). In order to validate the technique and to analyze effects of non-uniformity, results for

  15. Studies of gaseous multiplication coefficient in isobutane using a resistive plate chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Due to the increasing demands concerning High Energy Physics, Nuclear Medicine and other Nuclear Applications about gaseous detectors operating in high electric fields, many efforts have been done about the choice of filling gases that fulfill these requirements. In this context, the electron transport parameters in gases, as the gaseous multiplication coefficient, play an important role not only for detector design but also for simulation and modeling of discharges, allowing the validation of electron impact cross-sections. In the present work the preliminary measurements of gaseous multiplication coefficient, as function of the reduced electric field (from 36V/cm.Torr until 93V/cm.Torr), for isobutane are presented. Among several filling gases, isobutane is widely used in resistive plate chambers RPCs, and other gaseous detectors, due to its timing properties. Although its characteristics, there is a lack of swarm parameters data in literature for this gas, mainly at high electric fields. The experimental method used is based on the Pulsed Townsend technique, which follows from Townsend equation solution for a uniform electric field. Considering the ratio between the current (I), measured in avalanche mode, and the primary ionization current (I0), the effective multiplication coefficient can be determined, since alpha = d-1ln(I/I0), where d is the gap between the electrodes. In our configuration, the experimental setup consists of two parallel plates enclosure in a stainless steel chamber at gas flow regime. The anode, is made of a high resistivity (2.1012Ω.cm) glass (3mm thick and 14mm diameter), while the cathode is of aluminium (40mm diameter). Primary electrons are produced by irradiating the cathode with a nitrogen laser (LTB MNL200-LD) and are accelerated toward the anode by means of a high voltage power supply (Bertan 225-30). In order to validate the technique and to analyze effects of non-uniformity, results for nitrogen, which has well

  16. Golden Jubilee photos: A New Class of Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    In the 1960s, detection in particle physics mainly meant examining millions of photographs from bubble chambers or spark chambers. This was slow, labour intensive and not suitable for studies into rare phenomena, so there was a bottleneck that could have affected further progress in high energy physics. The transistor revolution triggered new ideas. While a camera could detect a spark, a detector wire connected to an amplifier could detect a much smaller effect. In 1968, Georges Charpak developed the 'multiwire proportional chamber', a gas-filled box with a large number of parallel detector wires, each connected to individual amplifiers. Linked to a computer, it could achieve a counting rate a thousand times better than existing techniques - without a camera in sight. Today practically every experiment in particle physics uses some type of track detector that is based on the principle of the multiwire proportional chamber. The technology is also used in many other fields using ionising radiation such as biol...

  17. MUON DETECTORS: ALIGNMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Gomez

    2011-01-01

    A new set of muon alignment constants was approved in August. The relative position between muon chambers is essentially unchanged, indicating good detector stability. The main changes concern the global positioning of the barrel and of the endcap rings to match the new Tracker geometry. Detailed studies of the differences between track-based and optical alignment of DTs have proven to be a valuable tool for constraining Tracker alignment weak modes, and this information is now being used as part of the alignment procedure. In addition to the “split-cosmic” analysis used to investigate the muon momentum resolution at high momentum, a new procedure based on reconstructing the invariant mass of di-muons from boosted Zs is under development. Both procedures show an improvement in the momentum precision of Global Muons with respect to Tracker-only Muons. Recent developments in track-based alignment include a better treatment of the tails of residual distributions and accounting for correla...

  18. MUON DETECTOR BARREL DRIFT TUBES (DT)

    CERN Multimedia

    Fabrizio Gasparini

    The DT system is made of 250 chambers, installed in the five wheels of the CMS Iron Yoke. Each wheel is subdivided in 10 sectors of four chambers each. Two sectors per wheel, the top and bottom ones, are equipped with 5 chambers, the large outer MB4s being split in two. The electronics for local, i.e. chamber, readout and generation of trigger primitives sits on Minicrates installed on each chamber (on-detector electronics). The data from each chamber are collected and synchronized by the off-detector electronics, sitting on the Wheel towers and organized per sector. HV and LV are organized per sector and per quarter (3 sectors) of each wheel respectively, DAQ and DCS have one branch per wheel. At the end of the February CMS Week the central wheel was fully operational and the two positive wheels, YB+1 and +2, fully commissioned. They were successfully moved over the vacuum tank and closed against YB0. The negative wheels were still open, with DT commissioning and final LV and DCS cabling being completed ...

  19. Upgrades of the ATLAS muon spectrometer with sMDT chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, C.; Kroha, H.

    2016-07-01

    With half the drift-tube diameter of the Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers of the ATLAS muon spectrometer and otherwise unchanged operating parameters, small-diameter Muon Drift Tube (sMDT) chambers provide an order of magnitude higher rate capability and can be installed in detector regions where MDT chambers do not fit. The chamber assembly time has been reduced by a factor of seven to one working day and the sense wire positioning accuracy improved by a factor of two to better than ten microns. Two sMDT chambers have been installed in ATLAS in 2014 to improve the momentum resolution in the barrel part of the spectrometer. The construction of an additional twelve chambers covering the feet regions of the ATLAS detector has started. It will be followed by the replacement of the MDT chambers at the ends of the barrel inner layer by sMDTs improving the performance at the high expected background rates and providing space for additional RPC trigger chambers.

  20. Upgrades of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer with sMDT Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Ferretti, Claudio; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    With half the drift-tube diameter of the Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers of the ATLAS muon spectrometer and otherwise unchanged operating parameters, small-diameter Muon Drift Tube (sMDT) chambers provide an order of magnitude higher rate capability and can be installed in detector regions where MDT chambers do not fit. The chamber assembly time has been reduced by a factor of seven to one working day and the sense wire positioning accuracy improved by a factor of two to better than ten microns. Two sMDT chambers have been installed in ATLAS in 2014 to improve the momentum resolution in the barrel part of the spectrometer. The construction of additional twelve chambers covering the feet regions of the ATLAS detector has started. It will be followed by the replacement of the MDT chambers at the ends of the barrel inner layer by sMDTs improving the Performance at the high expected background rates and providing space for additional RPC trigger chambers.

  1. Upgrades of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer with sMDT Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Ferretti, C

    2016-01-01

    With half the drift-tube diameter of the Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers of the ATLAS muon spectrometer and otherwise unchanged operating parameters, small-diameter Muon Drift Tube (sMDT) chambers provide an order of magnitude higher rate capability and can be installed in detector regions where MDT chambers do not fit. The chamber assembly time has been reduced by a factor of seven to one working day and the sense wire positioning accuracy improved by a factor of two to better than ten microns. Two sMDT chambers have been installed in ATLAS in 2014 to improve the momentum resolution in the barrel part of the spectrometer. The construction of an additional twelve chambers covering the feet regions of the ATLAS detector has started. It will be followed by the replacement of the MDT chambers at the ends of the barrel inner layer by sMDTs improving the Performance at the high expected background rates and providing space for additional RPC trigger chambers.

  2. Upgrades Of The ATLAS Muon Spectrometer With sMDT Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Ferretti, Claudio; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers of the ATLAS muon spectrometer demonstrated that they provide very precise and robust tracking over large areas. Goals of ATLAS muon detector upgrades are to increase the acceptance for precision muon momentum measurement and triggering and to improve the rate capability of the muon chambers in the high-background regions when the LHC luminosity increases. Small-diameter Muon Drift Tube (sMDT) chambers have been developed for these purposes. With half the drift-tube diameter of the MDT chambers and otherwise unchanged operating parameters, sMDT chambers share the advantages with the MDTs, but have more than ten times higher rate capability and can be installed in detector regions where MDT chambers do not fit in. The chamber assembly methods have been optimized for mass production, reducing cost and construction time considerably and improving the sense wire positioning accuracy to better than ten microns. Two sMDT chambers have been installed in 2014 to improve the mom...

  3. Portable cosmic particle detectors for subsurface density mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oláh, László; Gábor Barnaföldi, Gergely; Hamar, Gergö; Surányi, Gergely; Varga, Dezsö

    2016-04-01

    Muography deduces the density length in the interior of the investigated geological object, such as a mountain or volcano by the measurement of the cosmic muon absorption along different paths through the object. If path lengths (average densities) are measured, the average density (path length) can be deduced along the muon paths. A portable, low power consumption cosmic particle tracking detector based on Close Cathode multi-wire proportional chambers [1,2] has been developed for muography based on our earlier developments and experiences at the Wigner RCP of the HAS in Budapest [3,4,5]. The newly developed tracking system consists of six layers with the sensitive area of 0.25 m2 [6]. The spatial resolution of 2 mm provides an angular resolution of 15 mrad. This instrument has been optimized for underground and outdoor measurements: it has a Raspberry pi controlled data acquisition system which includes a custom designed board with a coincidence unit and allows high level remote control, data management and analysis. The individual trigger signals, number of missed triggers, analogue signals from chambers and the temperature are recorded. The duration of data readout (dead time) is 100 microsec. The DAQ software runs on the Raspberry Pi. For standard operation, a graphical user interface has been developed, running on any remote computer with Internet connection (both of wired and wireless) to the Raspberry Pi. A temperature-controlled high-voltage power supply provides a stable and reasonable (> 95 %) tracking performance for the measurements. With total power consumption of 5W, a portable tracking detector can operate for 5 days with a standard 50 Ah battery and with gas (non flammable Ar-CO2 mixture) consumption of 0.5 liter per hour, a 10 l bottle at pressure of 150 bar is enough for four month. The portability (total weight of less than 30 kg) allowed that our tracking detectors have been applied in underground caverns for subsurface density mapping. The

  4. Comparison between a commercial and homemade ionization chamber for dosimetry of {sup 60}Co beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves, Lucio P.; Perini, Ana P.; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: lpneves@ipen.b, E-mail: aperini@ipen.b, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The Calibration Laboratory at IPEN/CNEN (LCI) has developed several ionization detectors for dosimetry in diagnostic radiology, radiation protection and radiotherapy. Recently, a cylindrical ionization chamber, with a sensitive volume of 1.06cm{sup 3}, was developed, and several tests were performed to characterize this ionization chamber for radiotherapy level. The results showed that its performance was within the recommended international limits. In order to complement the studies regarding the response of this ionization chamber, in this work, the chamber response was compared with that of a commercial ionization chamber Farmer PTW, model TN30011-1. The ionization chamber produced at LCI is made of PVC and PMMA. A special build-up cap for {sup 60}Co beams was made of acrylic, with 4.00 mm thickness. All tests of both ionization chambers were performed under the same conditions, allowing good geometrical reproducibility. The performed tests were: saturation, ion collection efficiency, polarity effect and chamber tilt. The results obtained in this comparison program were all within the international recommendations, and demonstrate a good agreement of the performance of the commercial and the homemade ionization chambers. From this comparison results and from previous data, it is possible to conclude that the ionization chamber produced at IPEN presents usefulness for dosimetric applications at radiotherapy level in {sup 60}Co beams.(author)

  5. R3B time projection chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Legou P.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Within the international FAIR project, the R3B collaboration (Reaction studies with Radioactive Relativistic beams will be in charge of the physics program with secondary beams of energy between 200 and 1500MeV per nucleon. Central to the R3B set-up will be a large-aperture superconducting magnet under construction at CEA-Saclay. An international collaboration has been formed to work on the design of a large time-projection chamber (TPC to be installed behind this magnet to cover the full phase-space of the charged fragments produced in the target. Within this collaboration, tests of detector prototypes were performed with the heavy-ions beams at GSI Darmstadt. These prototypes were equipped with a gaseous Micromegas detector. Two amplification technologies were tested, either conventional or resistive Micromegas and two construction concepts, bulk-Micromegas or micro-meshes screwed on the PCB. We will present the results of the last beam and the 1m TPC station which will be dedicated to make tests using the real drift distance and compare the performances of micromegas and GEM.

  6. 78 FR 27441 - NIJ Evaluation of Hand-Held Cell Phone Detector Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... of Justice Programs NIJ Evaluation of Hand-Held Cell Phone Detector Devices AGENCY: National...) is soliciting interest in supplying hand-held cell phone detector devices for participation in an... soliciting interest in supplying hand-held cell phone detector devices for participation in an evaluation...

  7. MUON DETECTORS: DT

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Redondo

    2011-01-01

    During the second quarter of 2011, the DT system has continued to operate successfully with a high fraction of good channels (>99 %) and causing extremely little downtime to CMS. The high fraction of operated channels did not come for free: DT requested 18 short UXC accesses in the 3 months from March to May 2011. The dominant causes for these interventions were HV related interventions (7), which typically affect a small fraction of a chamber, and interventions for dealing with overheated LV Anderson connectors (7), whose failure could affect larger fractions of the detector (a whole chamber, half a wheel). With respect to the CMS downtime, a successful effort with colleagues from the DT Track Finder of the Level-1 Trigger system allowed to overcome a relatively relevant source of downtime from DTTF FED Out-Of-Sync errors, which would appear randomly during data-taking. The DT group developed a system configuration that would make it possible to reproduce the error without beam, thereby sparing lumin...

  8. The Cathode Strip Chamber Data Acquisition System for CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Bylsma, B G; Gilmore, J R; Gu, J H; Ling, T Y

    2007-01-01

    The Cathode Strip Chamber (CSC) [1] Data Acquisition (DAQ) system for the CMS [2] experiment at the LHC [3] will be described. The CSC system is large, consisting of 218K cathode channels and 183K anode channels. This leads to a substantial data rate of ~1.5GByte/s at LHC design luminosity (1034cm-2s-1) and the CMS first level trigger (L1A) rate of 100KHz. The DAQ system consists of three parts. The first part is on-chamber Cathode Front End Boards (CFEB)[4], which amplify, shape, store, and digitise chamber cathode signals, and Anode Front End Boards (AFEB)[5], which amplify, shape and discriminate chamber anode signals. The second part is the Peripheral Crate Data Acquisition Motherboards (DAQMB), which control the onchamber electronics and the readout of the chamber. The third part is the off-detector DAQ interface boards, which perform real time error checking, electronics reset requests and data concentration. It passes the resulting data to a CSC local DAQ farm, as well as CMS main DAQ [6]. All electron...

  9. Pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Passmore, M S

    2001-01-01

    positions on the detector. The loss of secondary electrons follows the profile of the detector and increases with higher energy ions. studies of the spatial resolution predict a value of 5.3 lp/mm. The image noise in photon counting systems is investigated theoretically and experimentally and is shown to be given by Poisson statistics. The rate capability of the LAD1 was measured to be 250 kHz per pixel. Theoretical and experimental studies of the difference in contrast for ideal charge integrating and photon counting imaging systems were carried out. It is shown that the contrast differs and that for the conventional definition (contrast = (background - signal)/background) the photon counting device will, in some cases, always give a better contrast than the integrating system. Simulations in MEDICI are combined with analytical calculations to investigate charge collection efficiencies (CCE) in semiconductor detectors. Different pixel sizes and biasing conditions are considered. The results show charge shari...

  10. Calorimeter detectors

    CERN Document Server

    de Barbaro, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Although the instantaneous and integrated luminosity in HL-LHC will be far higher than the LHC detectors were originally designed for, the Barrel calorimeters of the four experiments are expected to continue to perform well  throughout the Phase II program. The conditions for the End-Cap calorimeters are far more challenging and whilst some detectors will require relatively modest changes, others require far more substantial upgrades. We present the results of longevity and performance studies for the calorimeter systems of the four main LHC experiments and outline the upgrade options under consideration. We include a discussion of the R&D required to make the final technology choices for the upgraded detectors.

  11. MAMA Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, Stuart

    1998-01-01

    Work carried out under this grant led to fundamental discoveries and over one hundred publications in the scientific literature. Fundamental developments in instrumentation were made including all the instrumentation on the EUVE satellite, the invention of a whole new type of grazing instrument spectrometer and the development of fundamentally new photon counting detectors including the Wedge and Strip used on EUVE and many other missions and the Time Delay detector used on OREFUS and FUSE. The Wedge and Strip and Time Delay detectors were developed under this grant for less than two million dollars and have been used in numerous missions most recently for the FUSE mission. In addition, a fundamentally new type of diffuse spectrometer has been developed under this grant which has been used in instrumentation on the MMSAT spacecraft and the Lewis spacecraft. Plans are underway to use this instrumentation on several other missions as well.

  12. Extension of the operational lifetime of the proportional chambers in the HERMES spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experience of the extension of the proportional chambers lifetime at the HERMES (DESY) experiment is presented. A non-invasive technique against the aging process while continuously operating the detectors in the gap of the HERMES spectrometer magnet was performed. It was found that adding 0.14% water to the 65%Ar+30%CO2+5%CF4 gas mixture perfectly cancelled the appearance of self-sustained current (Malter effect). The studies of the remedy for the lifetime extension were performed with the test prototypes of the original proportional chambers. For the complete recovery of the aged test proportional chambers a special training method was developed as well. Training of the aged proportional chamber at 80%CF4+20%CO2 mixture glow discharge with reversed high voltage demonstrated a complete recovery of the detector

  13. Extension of the operational lifetime of the proportional chambers in the HERMES spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belostotski, S. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Science, Gatchina, St. Petersburg district 188350 (Russian Federation); Frullani, S. [Physics Laboratory, Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN Sezione di Roma-gruppo Sanita, viale Regina Elena 299, Rome I-00161 (Italy); Gavrilov, G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Science, Gatchina, St. Petersburg district 188350 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: gavrilov@mail.desy.de; Miklukho, O.; Shchipunov, L.; Veretennikov, D.; Vikhrov, V. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Science, Gatchina, St. Petersburg district 188350 (Russian Federation)

    2008-06-21

    The experience of the extension of the proportional chambers lifetime at the HERMES (DESY) experiment is presented. A non-invasive technique against the aging process while continuously operating the detectors in the gap of the HERMES spectrometer magnet was performed. It was found that adding 0.14% water to the 65%Ar+30%CO{sub 2}+5%CF{sub 4} gas mixture perfectly cancelled the appearance of self-sustained current (Malter effect). The studies of the remedy for the lifetime extension were performed with the test prototypes of the original proportional chambers. For the complete recovery of the aged test proportional chambers a special training method was developed as well. Training of the aged proportional chamber at 80%CF{sub 4}+20%CO{sub 2} mixture glow discharge with reversed high voltage demonstrated a complete recovery of the detector.

  14. Cyclically controlled welding purge chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Robert L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An arrangement for butt-welding cylindrical sections of large, thin-wall tanks includes a rotatable mandrel with side-by-side sets of radial position adjusters. Each set of adjusters bears on one of the tank sections adjacent the seam, to prevent the sections from sagging out-of-round. The mandrel rotates relative to the welder, so that a continuous seam is formed. A purge chamber is fixed in position behind the seam at the weld head, and is flushed with inert gas. The purge chamber includes a two-sided structure which is contiguous with the cylindrical sections and a circumferential vane to form an open-ended tube-like structure, through which the radial position adjusters pass as the mandrel and cylindrical workpiece sections rotate. The tube-like structure is formed into a chamber by a plurality of movable gates which are controlled to maintain a seal while allowing adjusters to progress through the purge chamber.

  15. The multigap resistive plate chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeballos, E. Cerron [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); World Lab., Lausanne (Switzerland); Crotty, I. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Hatzifotiadou, D. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); World Lab., Lausanne (Switzerland); Valverde, J. Lamas [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); World Lab., Lausanne (Switzerland); Univ. Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France); Neupane, S. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); World Lab., Lausanne (Switzerland); Williams, M. C. S. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Zichichi, A. [Univ. of Bologna, Bologna (Italy)

    2015-02-03

    The paper describes the multigap resistive plate chamber (RPC). This is a variant of the wide gap RPC. However it has much improved time resolution, while keeping all the other advantages of the wide gap RPC design.

  16. Construction and performance of the L3 central tracking detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The L3 central tracking detector has been in operation since the start-up of LEP (Large Electron Positron collider) in 1989. This detector consists of a Time Expansion Chamber (TEC), a layer of Plastic Scintillating Fibers and a Z-chamber. The TEC gives a high spatial resolution and an excellent multi-track reconstruction capability. The fibers are designed to calibrate the drift velocity with high precision. The Z-Chamber provides TEC with accurate information about the z-coordinates of the tracks. A description of the design and the infrastructure of these three detectors, including the readout and data acquisition system, is given. The performance of the detectors during the 1990 and 1991 LEP running periods is presented. (orig.)

  17. Detector development and experiments at COSY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings contain the manuscripts of the lectures presented at the named workshop. These concern a review about the COSY project, ideal detectors for hadron physics at COSY, possible experiments at COSY, magnetic spectrometers, a modification of BIG KARL, consideration on COSY experiments in the early stage, a detector for exclusive 2-meson production experiments, the excitation of baryons and physics with complex projectiles, a status report about the Indiana cooler ring, special scintillators, multiwire chambers, position-sensitive semiconductor detectors, detectors for neutral particles, a small large-acceptance photon detector, a status report of the two-arm photon spectrometer TAPS, studies on the parity violation in the pp scattering, the measurement of excitation functions for the study of dibaryon states, and results from the neutron workshop held in February 1988 at the KFA Juelich. (HSI)

  18. ... ALICE forges ahead with further detectors

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    Following the installation of the HMPID, the project has progressed swiftly with further detectors being lowered into the ALICE cavern. The first supermodule of the ALICE transition radiation detector was successfully installed on 10 October. The TRD collaborators from Germany standing next to the supermodule mounted in a rotating frame (bottom left corner) in the ALICE cavern. In the final configuration, 18 supermodules that make up the transition radiation detector will cylindrically surround the large time projection chamber in the central barrel of the ALICE experiment. Each supermodule is about 7 metre long and consists of 30 drift chambers in six layers. The construction of the modules is a collaboration between five institutes in Germany (Universities of Frankfurt and Heidelberg and Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH in Darmstadt), Romania (NIPNE Bucharest) and Russia (JINR Dubna) with radiators (See 'Did you know?' section) produced at the University of Muenster, Germany. During the summer, ...

  19. The HERMES Back Drift Chambers

    OpenAIRE

    al, S. Bernreuther et

    1998-01-01

    The tracking system of the HERMES spectrometer behind the bending magnet consists of two pairs of large planar 6-plane drift chambers. The design and performance of these chambers is described. This description comprises details on the mechanical and electronical design, information about the gas mixture used and its properties, results on alignment, calibration, resolution, and efficiencies, and a discussion of the experience gained through the first three years of operation.

  20. BEBC Big European Bubble Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    A view of the dismantling of the magnet of BEBC, the 3.7 m European Bubble Chamber : iron magnetic shielding ; lower and upper parts of the vacuum enclosure of the magnet; turbo-molecular vacuum pumps for the "fish-eye" windows; the two superconducting coils; a handling platform; the two cryostats suspended from the bar of the travelling crane which has a 170 ton carrying capacity. The chamber proper, not dismantled, is inside the shielding.

  1. Development of a Micro Pixel Chamber for the ATLAS Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Ochi, Atsuhiko; Komai, Hidetoshi; Edo, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    The Micro Pixel Chamber (μ-PIC) is being developed a sacandidate for the muon system of the ATLAS detector for upgrading in LHC experiments. The μ-PIC is a micro-pattern gaseous detector that doesn’t have floating structure such as wires, mesh, or foil. This detector can be made by printed-circuit-board (PCB) technology, which is commercially available and suited for mass production. Operation tests have been performed under high flux neutrons under similar conditions to the ATLAS cavern. Spark rates are measured using several gas mixtures under 7 MeV neutron irradiation, and good properties were observed using neon, ethane, and CF4 mixture of gases.Using resistive materials as electrodes, we are also developing a new μ-PIC, which is not expected to damage the electrodes in the case of discharge sparks.

  2. Development of a Liquefied Noble Gas Time Projection Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, Ezra; White, Aaron; Aidala, Christine

    2015-10-01

    Liquefied noble gas detectors have been used for various applications in recent years for detecting neutrinos, neutrons, photons, and potentially dark matter. The University of Michigan is developing a detector with liquid argon to produce scintillation light and ionization electrons. Our data collection method will allow high-resolution energy measurement and spatial reconstruction of detected particles by using multi-pixel silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) and a cylindrical time projection chamber (TPC) with a multi-wire endplate. We have already designed a liquid argon condenser and purification unit surrounded by an insulating vacuum, constructed circuitry for temperature and pressure sensors, and created software to obtain high-accuracy sensor readouts. The status of detector development will be presented. Funded through the Michigan Memorial Phoenix Project.

  3. BES detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Beijing Spectrometer (BES) is a general purpose solenoidal detector at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC). It is designed to study exclusive final states in e+e- annihilations at the center of mass energy from 3.0 to 5.6 GeV. This requires large solid angle coverage combined with good charged particle momentum resolution, good particle identification and high photon detection efficiency at low energies. In this paper we describe the construction and the performance of BES detector. (orig.)

  4. Dark matter limits froma 15 kg windowless bubble chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szydagis, Matthew Mark [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2011-03-01

    The COUPP collaboration has successfully used bubble chambers, a technology previously applied only to high-energy physics experiments, as direct dark matter detectors. It has produced the world's most stringent spin-dependent WIMP limits, and increasingly competitive spin-independent limits. These limits were achieved by capitalizing on an intrinsic rejection of the gamma background that all other direct detection experiments must address through high-density shielding and empirically-determined data cuts. The history of COUPP, including its earliest prototypes and latest results, is briefly discussed in this thesis. The feasibility of a new, windowless bubble chamber concept simpler and more inexpensive in design is discussed here as well. The dark matter limits achieved with a 15 kg windowless chamber, larger than any previous COUPP chamber (2 kg, 4 kg), are presented. Evidence of the greater radiopurity of synthetic quartz compared to natural is presented using the data from this 15 kg device, the first chamber to be made from synthetic quartz. The effective reconstruction of the three-dimensional positions of bubbles in a highly distorted optical field, with ninety-degree bottom lighting similar to cloud chamber lighting, is demonstrated. Another innovation described in this thesis is the use of the sound produced by bubbles recorded by an array of piezoelectric sensors as the primary means of bubble detection. In other COUPP chambers, cameras have been used as the primary trigger. Previous work on bubble acoustic signature differentiation using piezos is built upon in order to further demonstrate the ability to discriminate between alpha- and neutron-induced events.

  5. Proceedings of the symposium on high energy detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the study meeting on measuring instruments held three years ago, large change has arisen. Valuable experiences have been accumulated by the successful conclusion of the first term experiments in the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics. The improvement of detectors and the development of new detectors are strongly desired just before starting the future plans. In low energy field also, the steady advance has been accomplished. This symposium was held in such situation on September 18 and 19, 1979, at KEK, and aimed at clarifying the present status and accomplishment of high energy detectors, and setting forth the future prospect. On the first day, the review of recent topics concerning position detectors and particle-identifying detectors, and the reports on drift chambers, liquid wire chambers and the single wire chambers using charge division method were mainly presented. On the second day, the reports on the electronics related to position detectors, particle-identifying detectors, calorimeters, and the development of new detectors, the consideration on multiple tracks as the future plan, and the review of transition radiation detectors were presented. The results of this symposium will surely be utilized for the high energy experiments hereafter. The 26 papers presented are outlined. (Kako, I.)

  6. Anterior chamber depth during hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gracitelli CPB

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Carolina Pelegrini Barbosa Gracitelli,1 Francisco Rosa Stefanini,1 Fernando Penha,1 Miguel Ângelo Góes,2 Sérgio Antonio Draibe,2 Maria Eugênia Canziani,2 Augusto Paranhos Junior1 1Ophthalmology Department, 2Division of Nephrology, Federal University of São Paulo – UNIFESP, São Paulo, Brazil Background: Exacerbation of chronic glaucoma or acute glaucoma is occasionally observed in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD because of anterior chamber depth changes during this therapy. Purpose: To evaluate anterior chamber depth and axial length in patients during HD sessions. Methods: A total of 67 eyes of 35 patients were prospectively enrolled. Axial length and anterior chamber depth were measured using ultrasonic biometry, and these measures were evaluated at three different times during HD sessions. Body weight and blood pressure pre- and post-HD were also measured. Results: There was no difference in the axial length between the three measurements (P = 0.241. We observed a significantly decreased anterior chamber depth (P = 0.002 during HD sessions. Conclusion: Our results support the idea that there is a change in anterior chamber depth in HD sessions. Keywords: anterior chamber, hemodialysis, axial length, acute angle-closure glaucoma

  7. The application of a NaI(Tl) detector system for measuring neutrons with capturing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NaI(Tl) detector and the lead-shielding chamber used to measure neutron with capturing method were introduced. The detector system was applied in the experiment. The γ rays from the capturing foils was measured. The performance of the capturing detector was studied

  8. Comparison of experimental and calculated calibration coefficients for a high sensitivity ionization chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiot, M N; Mesradi, M R; Chisté, V; Morin, M; Rigoulay, F

    2012-09-01

    The response of a Vacutec 70129 ionization chamber was calculated using the PENELOPE-2008 Monte Carlo code and compared to experimental data. The filling gas mixture composition and its pressure have been determined using IC simulated response adjustment to experimental results. The Monte Carlo simulation revealed a physical effect in the detector response to photons due to the presence of xenon in the chamber. A very good agreement is found between calculated and experimental calibration coefficients for 17 radionuclides.

  9. Calibration of cathode strip gains in multiwire drift chambers of the GlueX experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berdnikov, V. V.; Somov, S. V.; Pentchev, L.; Somov, A.

    2016-07-01

    A technique for calibrating cathode strip gains in multiwire drift chambers of the GlueX experiment is described. The accuracy of the technique is estimated based on Monte Carlo generated data with known gain coefficients in the strip signal channels. One of the four detector sections has been calibrated using cosmic rays. Results of drift chamber calibration on the accelerator beam upon inclusion in the GlueX experimental setup are presented.

  10. Invention and History of the Bubble Chamber (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Don Glaser won the 1960 Nobel Prize for Physics for his 1952 invention of the bubble chamber at Berkeley Lab, a type of particle detector that became the mainstay of high-energy physics research throughout the 1960s and 1970s. He discusses how, inspired by bubbles in a glass of beer, he invented the bubble chamber and detected cosmic-ray muons.

  11. The 150 ns detector project: Progress with small detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, W. K.; Russell, S. R.; Kleinfelder, Stuart A.; Segal, Julie

    1994-09-01

    This project's long term goal is to develop a pixel area detector capable of 6 MHz frame rates (150 ns/frame). Our milestones toward this goal are: a single pixel, 1 × 256 1D and 8 × 8 2D detectors, 256 × 256 2D detectors and, finally, 1024 × 1024 2D detectors. The design strategy is to supply a complete electronics chain (resetting preamp, selectable gain amplifier, analog-to-digital converter (ADC), and memory) for each pixel. In the final detectors these will all be custom integrated circuits. The front end preamplifiers are being integrated first, since their design and performance are both the most unusual and also critical to the project's success. Similarly, our early work is also concentrating on devising and perfecting detector structures which are thick enough (1 mm) to absorb over 99% of the incident X-rays in the energy range of interest. In this paper we discuss our progress toward the 1 × 256 1D and 8 × 8 2D detectors. We have fabricated sample detectors at Stanford's Center for Integrated Systems and are preparing both to test them individually and to wirebond them to the preamplifier samples to produce our first working small 1D and 2D detectors. We will describe our solutions to the design problems associated with collecting charge in less than 30 ns from 1 mm thick pixels in high resistivity silicon. We have constructed and tested the front end of our preamplifier design using a commercial 1.2 μm CMOS technology and are moving on to produce a few channels of the complete preamplifier, including a switchable gain stage and output stage. We will discuss both the preamplifier design and our initial test results.

  12. Study on the energy dependence of gamma radiation detectors for {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co; Estudo da dependencia energetica de detectores de radiacao gama para {sup 137}Cs e {sup 60}Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonato, Fernanda B.C.; Diniz, Raphael E.; Carvalho, Valdir S.; Vivolo, Vitor; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: fbnonato@ipen.b, E-mail: rediniz@ipen.b, E-mail: vcsouza@ipen.b, E-mail: vivolo@ipen.b, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    38 Geiger-Mueller radiation detectors and 9 ionization chambers were calibrated, viewing to study the energy dependence of the monitor response for gamma radiation fields ({sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co). The results were considered satisfactory only for ionization chambers and for some Geiger-Mueller detectors

  13. High precision thermal neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional position sensitive detectors are indispensable in neutron diffraction experiments for determination of molecular and crystal structures in biology, solid-state physics and polymer chemistry. Some performance characteristics of these detectors are elementary and obvious, such as the position resolution, number of resolution elements, neutron detection efficiency, counting rate and sensitivity to gamma-ray background. High performance detectors are distinguished by more subtle characteristics such as the stability of the response (efficiency) versus position, stability of the recorded neutron positions, dynamic range, blooming or halo effects. While relatively few of them are needed around the world, these high performance devices are sophisticated and fairly complex, their development requires very specialized efforts. In this context, we describe here a program of detector development, based on 3He filled proportional chambers, which has been underway for some years at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Fundamental approaches and practical considerations are outlined that have resulted in a series of high performance detectors with the best known position resolution, position stability, uniformity of response and reliability over time, for devices of this type

  14. Report on Advanced Detector Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James K. Jewell

    2012-09-01

    Neutron, gamma and charged particle detection improvements are key to supporting many of the foreseen measurements and systems envisioned in the R&D programs and the future fuel cycle requirements, such as basic nuclear physics and data, modeling and simulation, reactor instrumentation, criticality safety, materials management and safeguards. This task will focus on the developmental needs of the FCR&D experimental programs, such as elastic/inelastic scattering, total cross sections and fission neutron spectra measurements, and will leverage a number of existing neutron detector development efforts and programs, such as those at LANL, PNNL, INL, and IAC as well as those at many universities, some of whom are funded under NE grants and contracts. Novel materials and fabrication processes combined with state-of-the-art electronics and computing provide new opportunities for revolutionary detector systems that will be able to meet the high precision needs of the program. This work will be closely coordinated with the Nuclear Data Crosscut. The Advanced Detector Development effort is a broadly-focused activity that supports the development of improved nuclear data measurements and improved detection of nuclear reactions and reactor conditions. This work supports the design and construction of large-scale, multiple component detectors to provide nuclear reaction data of unprecedented quality and precision. Examples include the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) and the DANCE detector at LANL. This work also supports the fabrication and end-user application of novel scintillator materials detection and monitoring.

  15. High precision thermal neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radeka, V.; Schaknowski, N.A.; Smith, G.C.; Yu, B. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Two-dimensional position sensitive detectors are indispensable in neutron diffraction experiments for determination of molecular and crystal structures in biology, solid-state physics and polymer chemistry. Some performance characteristics of these detectors are elementary and obvious, such as the position resolution, number of resolution elements, neutron detection efficiency, counting rate and sensitivity to gamma-ray background. High performance detectors are distinguished by more subtle characteristics such as the stability of the response (efficiency) versus position, stability of the recorded neutron positions, dynamic range, blooming or halo effects. While relatively few of them are needed around the world, these high performance devices are sophisticated and fairly complex, their development requires very specialized efforts. In this context, we describe here a program of detector development, based on {sup 3}He filled proportional chambers, which has been underway for some years at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Fundamental approaches and practical considerations are outlined that have resulted in a series of high performance detectors with the best known position resolution, position stability, uniformity of response and reliability over time, for devices of this type.

  16. MUON DETECTORS: RPC

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Iaselli

    During the last 3 months the RPC group has made impressive improvements in the refinement of the operation tools and understanding of the detector. The full barrel and part of the plus end cap participated systematically to global runs producing millions of trigger on cosmics. The main monitoring tools were robust and efficient in controlling the detector and in diagnosis of problems. After the refinement of the synchronization procedure, detailed studies of the chamber performances, as a function of high voltage and front-end threshold, were pursued. In parallel, new tools for the prompt analysis were developed which have enabled a fast check of the data at the CMS Centre. This effort has been very valuable since it has helped in discovering many minor bugs in the reconstruction software and database which are now being fixed. Unfortunately, a large part of the RE2 station has developed increasing operational current. Some preliminary investigation leads to the conclusion that the serial gas circulation e...

  17. Dosimetric evaluation of a 2D pixel ionization chamber for implementation in clinical routine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present the results of a dosimetric evaluation of a 2D ionization chamber array with the objective of its implementation for quality assurance in clinical routine. The pixel ionization chamber MatriXX (Scanditronix Wellhofer, Germany) consists of 32 x 32 chambers with a distance of 7.6 mm between chamber centres. The effective depth of measurement under the surface of the detector was determined. The dose and energy dependence, the behaviour of the device during its initial phase and its time stability as well as the lateral response of a single chamber of the detector in cross-plane and diagonal directions were analysed. It could be shown, that the detector's response is linear with dose and energy independent. Taking the lateral response into account, two different dose profiles, for a pyramidal and an IMRT dose distribution, were applied to compare the data generated by a treatment planning system with measurements. From these investigations it can be concluded that the detector is a suitable device for quality assurance and 2D dose verifications

  18. "Radon Concentration Survey in Inner Rooms from Deputy Chamber and National Congress—Brasília/DF"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nícoli, Ieda Gomes; Cardozo, Kátia Maria; de Azevedo Gouvea, Vandir

    2008-08-01

    Radon gas has been monitored in many environments such as rural and urban houses, high natural radioactivity areas and underground mining regions. Nevertheless few data are reported in literature about studies in state buildings. So we get in touch with these buildings managers, where work the Deputy Chamber and the National Congress in Brasília—DF, in order to obtain radon data in these state buildings, so representative for brazilian people. In order to make a preliminary scanning of radon concentration in these buildings, it was put in selected points, radon nuclear track passive detectors type SSNTD, specifically polycarbonate Lexan, which were exposed for periods from two to five months. Afterwards they were sent to Nuclear Engineering Institute in Rio de Janeiro for analysis of 222Rn contents. Derived values, whose average value was about 73 Bq/m3, were all under maximum permissible limits for radon 200 Bq/m3, established by International Comission on Radiological Protection—ICRP 65, for inner environments of houses and state buildings. This work has been coordinated by CNEN Office in Brasélia with effective participation of Nuclear Engineering Institute from CNEN—RJ, that has worked since beginning of april 2004, supplying and analysing radon detectors.

  19. Physicist makes muon chamber sing

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    1. This Monitored Drift Tube detector, consisting of argon-CO2-filled aluminium tubes with a wire down the centre of each, will track muons in ATLAS; Tiecke used a single tube from one of these detectors to create the pipes in his organ.

  20. Construction and Test of Muon Drift Tube Chambers for High Counting Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Schwegler, Philipp; Dubbert, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    Since the start of operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN on 20 November 2009, the instantaneous luminosity is steadily increasing. The muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at the LHC is instrumented with trigger and precision tracking chambers in a toroidal magnetic field. Monitored Drift-Tube (MDT) chambers are employed as precision tracking chambers, complemented by Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) in the very forward region where the background counting rate due to neutrons and γ's produced in shielding material and detector components is too high for the MDT chambers. After several upgrades of the CERN accelerator system over the coming decade, the instantaneous luminosity is expected to be raised to about five times the LHC design luminosity. This necessitates replacement of the muon chambers in the regions with the highest background radiation rates in the so-called Small Wheels, which constitute the innermost layers of the muon spectrometer end-caps, by new detectors with higher rate cap...

  1. Building and testing of the first real size prototype chamber of CBM MUCH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A triple GEM (Gas Electron Multiplier) based tracking system will be a part of the Muon Chamber (MUCH) system in the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the upcoming FAIR facility at GSI. The actual layout of the GEM based station consists of three layers of detectors. Each layer consists of trapezoidal shaped modules arranged azimuthally around the beam - pipe in a staggered manner. The active area and the granularity of the detector has been optimized using realistic simulations in CBM framework. In this paper we report for the first time the fabrication and assembly of a real size prototype GEM chamber

  2. A multiple sampling time projection ionization chamber for nuclear fragment tracking and charge measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detector has been developed for the tracking and charge measurement of the projectile fragment nuclei produced in relativistic nuclear collisions. This device, MUSIC II, is a second generation Multiple Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC), and employs the principles of ionization and time projection chambers. It provides unique charge determination for charges Z≥6, and excellent track position measurement. MUSIC II has been used most recently with the EOS (equation of state) TPC and other EOS collaboration detectors. Earlier it was used with other systems in experiments at the Heavy Ion Superconducting Spectrometer (HISS) facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the ALADIN spectrometer at GSI. (orig.)

  3. Aligning the CMS Muon Chambers with the Muon Alignment System during an Extended Cosmic Ray Run

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; Niegel, M; Oberst, O; Oehler, A; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Piparo, D; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Ratnikova, N; Renz, M; Saout, C; Sartisohn, G; Scheurer, A; Schieferdecker, P; Schilling, F P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Sturm, P; Troendle, D; Trunov, A; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Zeise, M; Zhukov, V; Ziebarth, E B; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Karafasoulis, K; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Mavrommatis, C; Petrakou, E; Zachariadou, A; Gouskos, L; Katsas, P; Panagiotou, A; Evangelou, I; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Patras, V; Triantis, F A; Bencze, G; Boldizsar, L; Debreczeni, G; Hajdu, C; Hernath, S; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Krajczar, K; Laszlo, A; Patay, G; Sikler, F; Toth, N; Vesztergombi, G; Beni, N; Christian, G; Imrek, J; Molnar, J; Novak, D; Palinkas, J; Szekely, G; Szillasi, Z; Tokesi, K; Veszpremi, V; Kapusi, A; Marian, G; Raics, P; Szabo, Z; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Zilizi, G; Bansal, S; Bawa, H S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Jindal, M; Kaur, M; Kaur, R; Kohli, J M; Mehta, M Z; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, A; Singh, J B; Singh, S P; Ahuja, S; Arora, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chauhan, S; Choudhary, B C; Gupta, P; Jain, S; Jain, S; Jha, M; Kumar, A; Ranjan, K; Shivpuri, R K; Srivastava, A K; Choudhury, R K; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kataria, S K; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Maity, M; Majumder, D; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Nayak, A; Saha, A; Sudhakar, K; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Mondal, N K; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Fahim, A; Jafari, A; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Moshaii, A; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rouhani, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Chiumarulo, F; Clemente, A; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cuscela, G; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; De Robertis, G; Donvito, G; Fedele, F; Fiore, L; Franco, M; Iaselli, G; Lacalamita, N; Loddo, F; Lusito, L; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Manna, N; Marangelli, B; My, S; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Papagni, G; Piccolomo, S; Pierro, G A; Pinto, C; Pompili, A; Pugliese, G; Rajan, R; Ranieri, A; Romano, F; Roselli, G; Selvaggi, G; Shinde, Y; Silvestris, L; Tupputi, S; Zito, G; Abbiendi, G; Bacchi, W; Benvenuti, A C; Boldini, M; Bonacorsi, D; Braibant-Giacomelli, S; Cafaro, V D; Caiazza, S S; Capiluppi, P; Castro, A; Cavallo, F R; Codispoti, G; Cuffiani, M; D'Antone, I; Dallavalle, G M; Fabbri, F; Fanfani, A; Fasanella, D; Giacomelli, P; Giordano, V; Giunta, M; Grandi, C; Guerzoni, M; Marcellini, S; Masetti, G; Montanari, A; Navarria, F L; Odorici, F; Pellegrini, G; Perrotta, A; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Siroli, G; Torromeo, G; Travaglini, R; Albergo, S; Costa, S; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Tuve, C; Barbagli, G; Broccolo, G; Ciulli, V; Civinini, C; D'Alessandro, R; Focardi, E; Frosali, S; Gallo, E; Genta, C; Landi, G; Lenzi, P; Meschini, M; Paoletti, S; Sguazzoni, G; Tropiano, A; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Colafranceschi, S; Colonna, D; Fabbri, F; Giardoni, M; Passamonti, L; Piccolo, D; Pierluigi, D; Ponzio, B; Russo, A; Fabbricatore, P; Musenich, R; Benaglia, A; Calloni, M; Cerati, G B; D'Angelo, P; De Guio, F; Farina, F M; Ghezzi, A; Govoni, P; Malberti, M; Malvezzi, S; Martelli, A; Menasce, D; Miccio, V; Moroni, L; Negri, P; Paganoni, M; Pedrini, D; Pullia, A; Ragazzi, S; Redaelli, N; Sala, S; Salerno, R; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tancini, V; Taroni, S; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; Cimmino, A; De Gruttola, M; Fabozzi, F; Iorio, A O M; Lista, L; Lomidze, D; Noli, P; Paolucci, P; Sciacca, C; Azzi, P; Bacchetta, N; Barcellan, L; Bellan, P; Bellato, M; Benettoni, M; Biasotto, M; Bisello, D; Borsato, E; Branca, A; Carlin, R; Castellani, L; Checchia, P; Conti, E; Dal Corso, F; De Mattia, M; Dorigo, T; Dosselli, U; Fanzago, F; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Giubilato, P; Gonella, F; Gresele, A; Gulmini, M; Kaminskiy, A; Lacaprara, S; Lazzizzera, I; Margoni, M; Maron, G; Mattiazzo, S; Mazzucato, M; Meneghelli, M; Meneguzzo, A T; Michelotto, M; Montecassiano, F; Nespolo, M; Passaseo, M; Pegoraro, M; Perrozzi, L; Pozzobon, N; Ronchese, P; Simonetto, F; Toniolo, N; Torassa, E; Tosi, M; Triossi, A; Vanini, S; Ventura, S; Zotto, P; Zumerle, G; Baesso, P; Berzano, U; Bricola, S; Necchi, M M; Pagano, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Torre, P; Vicini, A; Vitulo, P; Viviani, C; Aisa, D; Aisa, S; Babucci, E; Biasini, M; Bilei, G M; Caponeri, B; Checcucci, B; Dinu, N; Fanò, L; Farnesini, L; Lariccia, P; Lucaroni, A; Mantovani, G; Nappi, A; Piluso, A; Postolache, V; Santocchia, A; Servoli, L; Tonoiu, D; Vedaee, A; Volpe, R; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bernardini, J; Berretta, L; Boccali, T; Bocci, A; Borrello, L; Bosi, F; Calzolari, F; Castaldi, R; Dell'Orso, R; Fiori, F; Foà, L; Gennai, S; Giassi, A; Kraan, A; Ligabue, F; Lomtadze, T; Mariani, F; Martini, L; Massa, M; Messineo, A; Moggi, A; Palla, F; Palmonari, F; Petragnani, G; Petrucciani, G; Raffaelli, F; Sarkar, S; Segneri, G; Serban, A T; Spagnolo, P; Tenchini, R; Tolaini, S; Tonelli, G; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Baccaro, S; Barone, L; Bartoloni, A; Cavallari, F; Dafinei, I; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Diemoz, M; Franci, D; Longo, E; Organtini, G; Palma, A; Pandolfi, F; Paramatti, R; Pellegrino, F; Rahatlou, S; Rovelli, C; Alampi, G; Amapane, N; Arcidiacono, R; Argiro, S; Arneodo, M; Biino, C; Borgia, M A; Botta, C; Cartiglia, N; Castello, R; Cerminara, G; Costa, M; Dattola, D; Dellacasa, G; Demaria, N; Dughera, G; Dumitrache, F; Graziano, A; Mariotti, C; Marone, M; Maselli, S; Migliore, E; Mila, G; Monaco, V; Musich, M; Nervo, M; Obertino, M M; Oggero, S; Panero, R; Pastrone, N; Pelliccioni, M; Romero, A; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Trapani, P P; Trocino, D; Vilela Pereira, A; Visca, L; Zampieri, A; Ambroglini, F; Belforte, S; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Gobbo, B; Penzo, A; Chang, S; Chung, J; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kong, D J; Park, H; Son, D C; Bahk, S Y; Song, S; Jung, S Y; Hong, B; Kim, H; Kim, J H; Lee, K S; Moon, D H; Park, S K; Rhee, H B; Sim, K S; Kim, J; Choi, M; Hahn, G; Park, I C; Choi, S; Choi, Y; Goh, J; Jeong, H; Kim, T J; Lee, J; Lee, S; Janulis, M; Martisiute, D; Petrov, P; Sabonis, T; Castilla Valdez, H; Sánchez Hernández, A; Carrillo Moreno, S; Morelos Pineda, A; Allfrey, P; Gray, R N C; Krofcheck, D; Bernardino Rodrigues, N; Butler, P H; Signal, T; Williams, J C; Ahmad, M; Ahmed, I; Ahmed, W; Asghar, M I; Awan, M I M; Hoorani, H R; Hussain, I; Khan, W A; Khurshid, T; Muhammad, S; Qazi, S; Shahzad, H; Cwiok, M; Dabrowski, R; Dominik, W; Doroba, K; Konecki, M; Krolikowski, J; Pozniak, K; Romaniuk, Ryszard; Zabolotny, W; Zych, P; Frueboes, T; Gokieli, R; Goscilo, L; Górski, M; Kazana, M; Nawrocki, K; Szleper, M; Wrochna, G; Zalewski, P; Almeida, N; Antunes Pedro, L; Bargassa, P; David, A; Faccioli, P; Ferreira Parracho, P G; Freitas Ferreira, M; Gallinaro, M; Guerra Jordao, M; Martins, P; Mini, G; Musella, P; Pela, J; Raposo, L; Ribeiro, P Q; Sampaio, S; Seixas, J; Silva, J; Silva, P; Soares, D; Sousa, M; Varela, J; Wöhri, H K; Altsybeev, I; Belotelov, I; Bunin, P; Ershov, Y; Filozova, I; Finger, M; Finger, M Jr; Golunov, A; Golutvin, I; Gorbounov, N; Kalagin, V; Kamenev, A; Karjavin, V; Konoplyanikov, V; Korenkov, V; Kozlov, G; Kurenkov, A; Lanev, A; Makankin, A; Mitsyn, V V; Moisenz, P; Nikonov, E; Oleynik, D; Palichik, V; Perelygin, V; Petrosyan, A; Semenov, R; Shmatov, S; Smirnov, V; Smolin, D; Tikhonenko, E; Vasil'ev, S; Vishnevskiy, A; Volodko, A; Zarubin, A; Zhiltsov, V; Bondar, N; Chtchipounov, L; Denisov, A; Gavrikov, Y; Gavrilov, G; Golovtsov, V; Ivanov, Y; Kim, V; Kozlov, V; Levchenko, P; Obrant, G; Orishchin, E; Petrunin, A; Shcheglov, Y; Shchetkovskiy, A; Sknar, V; Smirnov, I; Sulimov, V; Tarakanov, V; Uvarov, L; Vavilov, S; Velichko, G; Volkov, S; Vorobyev, A; Andreev, Yu; Anisimov, A; Antipov, P; Dermenev, A; Gninenko, S; Golubev, N; Kirsanov, M; Krasnikov, N; Matveev, V; Pashenkov, A; Postoev, V E; Solovey, A; Solovey, A; Toropin, A; Troitsky, S; Baud, A; Epshteyn, V; Gavrilov, V; Ilina, N; Kaftanov, V; Kolosov, V; Kossov, M; Krokhotin, A; Kuleshov, S; Oulianov, A; Safronov, G; Semenov, S; Shreyber, I; Stolin, V; Vlasov, E; Zhokin, A; Boos, E; Dubinin, M; Dudko, L; Ershov, A; Gribushin, A; Klyukhin, V; Kodolova, O; Lokhtin, I; Petrushanko, S; Sarycheva, L; Savrin, V; Snigirev, A; Vardanyan, I; Dremin, I; Kirakosyan, M; Konovalova, N; Rusakov, S V; Vinogradov, A; Akimenko, S; Artamonov, A; Azhgirey, I; Bitioukov, S; Burtovoy, V; Grishin, V; Kachanov, V; Konstantinov, D; Krychkine, V; Levine, A; Lobov, I; Lukanin, V; Mel'nik, Y; Petrov, V; Ryutin, R; Slabospitsky, S; Sobol, A; Sytine, A; Tourtchanovitch, L; Troshin, S; Tyurin, N; Uzunian, A; Volkov, A; Adzic, P; Djordjevic, M; Jovanovic, D; Krpic, D; Maletic, D; Puzovic, J; Smiljkovic, N; Aguilar-Benitez, M; Alberdi, J; Alcaraz Maestre, J; Arce, P; Barcala, J M; Battilana, C; Burgos Lazaro, C; Caballero Bejar, J; Calvo, E; Cardenas Montes, M; Cepeda, M; Cerrada, M; Chamizo Llatas, M; Clemente, F; Colino, N; Daniel, M; De La Cruz, B; Delgado Peris, A; Diez Pardos, C; Fernandez Bedoya, C; Fernández Ramos, J P; Ferrando, A; Flix, J; Fouz, M C; Garcia-Abia, P; Garcia-Bonilla, A C; Gonzalez Lopez, O; Goy Lopez, S; Hernandez, J M; Josa, M I; Marin, J; Merino, G; Molina, J; Molinero, A; Navarrete, J J; Oller, J C; Puerta Pelayo, J; Romero, L; Santaolalla, J; Villanueva Munoz, C; Willmott, C; Yuste, C; Albajar, C; Blanco Otano, M; de Trocóniz, J F; Garcia Raboso, A; Lopez Berengueres, J O; Cuevas, J; Fernandez Menendez, J; Gonzalez Caballero, I; Lloret Iglesias, L; Naves Sordo, H; Vizan Garcia, J M; Cabrillo, I J; Calderon, A; Chuang, S H; Diaz Merino, I; Diez Gonzalez, C; Duarte Campderros, J; Fernandez, M; Gomez, G; Gonzalez Sanchez, J; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Jorda, C; Lobelle Pardo, P; Lopez Virto, A; Marco, J; Marco, R; Martinez Rivero, C; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P; Matorras, F; Rodrigo, T; Ruiz Jimeno, A; Scodellaro, L; Sobron Sanudo, M; Vila, I; Vilar Cortabitarte, R; Abbaneo, D; Albert, E; Alidra, M; Ashby, S; Auffray, E; Baechler, J; Baillon, P; Ball, A H; Bally, S L; Barney, D; Beaudette, F; Bellan, R; Benedetti, D; Benelli, G; Bernet, C; Bloch, P; Bolognesi, S; Bona, M; Bos, J; Bourgeois, N; Bourrel, T; Breuker, H; Bunkowski, K; Campi, D; Camporesi, T; Cano, E; Cattai, A; Chatelain, J P; Chauvey, M; Christiansen, T; Coarasa Perez, J A; Conde Garcia, A; Covarelli, R; Curé, B; De Roeck, A; Delachenal, V; Deyrail, D; Di Vincenzo, S; Dos Santos, S; Dupont, T; Edera, L M; Elliott-Peisert, A; Eppard, M; Favre, M; Frank, N; Funk, W; Gaddi, A; Gastal, M; Gateau, M; Gerwig, H; Gigi, D; Gill, K; Giordano, D; Girod, J P; Glege, F; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R; Goudard, R; Gowdy, S; Guida, R; Guiducci, L; Gutleber, J; Hansen, M; Hartl, C; Harvey, J; Hegner, B; Hoffmann, H F; Holzner, A; Honma, A; Huhtinen, M; Innocente, V; Janot, P; Le Godec, G; Lecoq, P; Leonidopoulos, C; Loos, R; Lourenço, C; Lyonnet, A; Macpherson, A; Magini, N; Maillefaud, J D; Maire, G; Mäki, T; Malgeri, L; Mannelli, M; Masetti, L; Meijers, F; Meridiani, P; Mersi, S; Meschi, E; Meynet Cordonnier, A; Moser, R; Mulders, M; Mulon, J; Noy, M; Oh, A; Olesen, G; Onnela, A; Orimoto, T; Orsini, L; Perez, E; Perinic, G; Pernot, J F; Petagna, P; Petiot, P; Petrilli, A; Pfeiffer, A; Pierini, M; Pimiä, M; Pintus, R; Pirollet, B; Postema, H; Racz, A; Ravat, S; Rew, S B; Rodrigues Antunes, J; Rolandi, G; Rovere, M; Ryjov, V; Sakulin, H; Samyn, D; Sauce, H; Schäfer, C; Schlatter, W D; Schröder, M; Schwick, C; Sciaba, A; Segoni, I; Sharma, A; Siegrist, N; Siegrist, P; Sinanis, N; Sobrier, T; Sphicas, P; Spiga, D; Spiropulu, M; Stöckli, F; Traczyk, P; Tropea, P; Troska, J; Tsirou, A; Veillet, L; Veres, G I; Voutilainen, M; Wertelaers, P; Zanetti, M; Bertl, W; Deiters, K; Erdmann, W; Gabathuler, K; Horisberger, R; Ingram, Q; Kaestli, H C; König, S; Kotlinski, D; Langenegger, U; Meier, F; Renker, D; Rohe, T; Sibille, J; Starodumov, A; Betev, B; Caminada, L; Chen, Z; Cittolin, S; Da Silva Di Calafiori, D R; Dambach, S; Dissertori, G; Dittmar, M; Eggel, C; Eugster, J; Faber, G; Freudenreich, K; Grab, C; Hervé, A; Hintz, W; Lecomte, P; Luckey, P D; Lustermann, W; Marchica, C; Milenovic, P; Moortgat, F; Nardulli, A; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pape, L; Pauss, F; Punz, T; Rizzi, A; Ronga, F J; Sala, L; Sanchez, A K; Sawley, M C; Sordini, V; Stieger, B; Tauscher, L; Thea, A; Theofilatos, K; Treille, D; Trüb, P; Weber, M; Wehrli, L; Weng, J; Zelepoukine, S; Amsler, C; Chiochia, V; De Visscher, S; Regenfus, C; Robmann, P; Rommerskirchen, T; Schmidt, A; Tsirigkas, D; Wilke, L; Chang, Y H; Chen, E A; Chen, W T; Go, A; Kuo, C M; Li, S W; Lin, W; Bartalini, P; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, K F; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y; Lei, Y J; Lin, S W; Lu, R S; Schümann, J; Shiu, J G; Tzeng, Y M; Ueno, K; Velikzhanin, Y; Wang, C C; Wang, M; Adiguzel, A; Ayhan, A; Azman Gokce, A; Bakirci, M N; Cerci, S; Dumanoglu, I; Eskut, E; Girgis, S; Gurpinar, E; Hos, I; Karaman, T; Karaman, T; Kayis Topaksu, A; Kurt, P; Önengüt, G; Önengüt Gökbulut, G; Ozdemir, K; Ozturk, S; Polatöz, A; Sogut, K; Tali, B; Topakli, H; Uzun, D; Vergili, L N; Vergili, M; Akin, I V; Aliev, T; Bilmis, S; Deniz, M; Gamsizkan, H; Guler, A M; Öcalan, K; Serin, M; Sever, R; Surat, U E; Zeyrek, M; Deliomeroglu, M; Demir, D; Gülmez, E; Halu, A; Isildak, B; Kaya, M; Kaya, O; Ozkorucuklu, S; Sonmez, N; Levchuk, L; Lukyanenko, S; Soroka, D; Zub, S; Bostock, F; Brooke, J J; Cheng, T L; Cussans, D; Frazier, R; Goldstein, J; Grant, N; Hansen, M; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Hill, C; Huckvale, B; Jackson, J; Mackay, C K; Metson, S; Newbold, D M; Nirunpong, K; Smith, V J; Velthuis, J; Walton, R; Bell, K W; Brew, C; Brown, R M; Camanzi, B; Cockerill, D J A; Coughlan, J A; Geddes, N I; Harder, K; Harper, S; Kennedy, B W; Murray, P; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Tomalin, I R; Williams, J H; Womersley, W J; Worm, S D; Bainbridge, R; Ball, G; Ballin, J; Beuselinck, R; Buchmuller, O; Colling, D; Cripps, N; Davies, G; Della Negra, M; Foudas, C; Fulcher, J; Futyan, D; Hall, G; Hays, J; Iles, G; Karapostoli, G; MacEvoy, B C; Magnan, A M; Marrouche, J; Nash, J; Nikitenko, A; Papageorgiou, A; Pesaresi, M; Petridis, K; Pioppi, M; Raymond, D M; Rompotis, N; Rose, A; Ryan, M J; Seez, C; Sharp, P; Sidiropoulos, G; Stettler, M; Stoye, M; Takahashi, M; Tapper, A; Timlin, C; Tourneur, S; Vazquez Acosta, M; Virdee, T; Wakefield, S; Wardrope, D; Whyntie, T; Wingham, M; Cole, J E; Goitom, I; Hobson, P R; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Leslie, D; Munro, C; Reid, I D; Siamitros, C; Taylor, R; Teodorescu, L; Yaselli, I; Bose, T; Carleton, M; Hazen, E; Heering, A H; Heister, A; John, J St; Lawson, P; Lazic, D; Osborne, D; Rohlf, J; Sulak, L; Wu, S; Andrea, J; Avetisyan, A; Bhattacharya, S; Chou, J P; Cutts, D; Esen, S; Kukartsev, G; Landsberg, G; Narain, M; Nguyen, D; Speer, T; Tsang, K V; Breedon, R; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M; Case, M; Cebra, D; Chertok, M; Conway, J; Cox, P T; Dolen, J; Erbacher, R; Friis, E; Ko, W; Kopecky, A; Lander, R; Lister, A; Liu, H; Maruyama, S; Miceli, T; Nikolic, M; Pellett, D; Robles, J; Searle, M; Smith, J; Squires, M; Stilley, J; Tripathi, M; Vasquez Sierra, R; Veelken, C; Andreev, V; Arisaka, K; Cline, D; Cousins, R; Erhan, S; Hauser, J; Ignatenko, M; Jarvis, C; Mumford, J; Plager, C; Rakness, G; Schlein, P; Tucker, J; Valuev, V; Wallny, R; Yang, X; Babb, J; Bose, M; Chandra, A; Clare, R; Ellison, J A; Gary, J W; Hanson, G; Jeng, G Y; Kao, S C; Liu, F; Liu, H; Luthra, A; Nguyen, H; Pasztor, G; Satpathy, A; Shen, B C; Stringer, R; Sturdy, J; Sytnik, V; Wilken, R; Wimpenny, S; Branson, J G; Dusinberre, E; Evans, D; Golf, F; Kelley, R; Lebourgeois, M; Letts, J; Lipeles, E; Mangano, B; Muelmenstaedt, J; Norman, M; Padhi, S; Petrucci, A; Pi, H; Pieri, M; Ranieri, R; Sani, M; Sharma, V; Simon, S; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Campagnari, C; D'Alfonso, M; Danielson, T; Garberson, J; Incandela, J; Justus, C; Kalavase, P; Koay, S A; Kovalskyi, D; Krutelyov, V; Lamb, J; Lowette, S; Pavlunin, V; Rebassoo, F; Ribnik, J; Richman, J; Rossin, R; Stuart, D; To, W; Vlimant, J R; Witherell, M; Apresyan, A; Bornheim, A; Bunn, J; Chiorboli, M; Gataullin, M; Kcira, D; Litvine, V; Ma, Y; Newman, H B; Rogan, C; Timciuc, V; Veverka, J; Wilkinson, R; Yang, Y; Zhang, L; Zhu, K; Zhu, R Y; Akgun, B; Carroll, R; Ferguson, T; Jang, D W; Jun, S Y; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Terentyev, N; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Dinardo, M E; Drell, B R; Ford, W T; Heyburn, B; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K; Wagner, S R; Zang, S L; Agostino, L; Alexander, J; Blekman, F; Cassel, D; Chatterjee, A; Das, S; Gibbons, L K; Heltsley, B; Hopkins, W; Khukhunaishvili, A; Kreis, B; Kuznetsov, V; Patterson, J R; Puigh, D; Ryd, A; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Vaughan, J; Weng, Y; Wittich, P; Beetz, C P; Cirino, G; Sanzeni, C; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Afaq, M A; Albrow, M; Ananthan, B; Apollinari, G; Atac, M; Badgett, W; Bagby, L; Bakken, J A; Baldin, B; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Biery, K; Binkley, M; Bloch, I; Borcherding, F; Brett, A M; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Chetluru, V; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Churin, I; Cihangir, S; Crawford, M; Dagenhart, W; Demarteau, M; Derylo, G; Dykstra, D; Eartly, D P; Elias, J E; Elvira, V D; Evans, D; Feng, L; Fischler, M; Fisk, I; Foulkes, S; Freeman, J; Gartung, P; Gottschalk, E; Grassi, T; Green, D; Guo, Y; Gutsche, O; Hahn, A; Hanlon, J; Harris, R M; Holzman, B; Howell, J; Hufnagel, D; James, E; Jensen, H; Johnson, M; Jones, C D; Joshi, U; Juska, E; Kaiser, J; Klima, B; Kossiakov, S; Kousouris, K; Kwan, S; Lei, C M; Limon, P; Lopez Perez, J A; Los, S; Lueking, L; Lukhanin, G; Lusin, S; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Mason, D; McBride, P; Miao, T; Mishra, K; Moccia, S; Mommsen, R; Mrenna, S; Muhammad, A S; Newman-Holmes, C; Noeding, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Rivera, R; Rivetta, C H; Ronzhin, A; Rossman, P; Ryu, S; Sekhri, V; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sfiligoi, I; Sharma, S; Shaw, T M; Shpakov, D; Skup, E; Smith, R P; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Suzuki, I; Tan, P; Tanenbaum, W; Tkaczyk, S; Trentadue, R; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitmore, J; Wicklund, E; Wu, W; Yarba, J; Yumiceva, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Barashko, V; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Gartner, J; Holmes, D; Kim, B; Klimenko, S; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotov, K; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Madorsky, A; Matchev, K; Mitselmakher, G; Pakhotin, Y; Piedra Gomez, J; Prescott, C; Rapsevicius, V; Remington, R; Schmitt, M; Scurlock, B; Wang, D; Yelton, J; Ceron, C; Gaultney, V; Kramer, L; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Baer, H; Bertoldi, M; Chen, J; Dharmaratna, W G D; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Jenkins, M; Johnson, K F; Prettner, E; Prosper, H; Sekmen, S; Baarmand, M M; Guragain, S; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Mermerkaya, H; Ralich, R; Vodopiyanov, I; Abelev, B; Adams, M R; Anghel, I M; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Callner, J; Castro, M A; Cavanaugh, R; Dragoiu, C; Garcia-Solis, E J; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatian, S; Mironov, C; Shabalina, E; Smoron, A; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    The alignment system for the muon spectrometer of the CMS detector comprises three independent subsystems of optical and analog position sensors. It aligns muon chambers with respect to each other and to the central silicon tracker. System commissioning at full magnetic field began in 2008 during an extended cosmic ray run. The system succeeded in tracking muon detector movements of up to 18 mm and rotations of several milliradians under magnetic forces. Depending on coordinate and subsystem, the system achieved chamber alignment precisions of 140-350 microns and 30-200 microradians. Systematic errors on displacements are estimated to be 340-590 microns based on comparisons with independent photogrammetry measurements.

  4. Bluetooth Communication Interface for EEG Signal Recording in Hyperbaric Chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastena, Lucio; Formaggio, Emanuela; Faralli, Fabio; Melucci, Massimo; Rossi, Marco; Gagliardi, Riccardo; Ricciardi, Lucio; Storti, Silvia F

    2015-07-01

    Recording biological signals inside a hyperbaric chamber poses technical challenges (the steel walls enclosing it greatly attenuate or completely block the signals as in a Faraday cage), practical (lengthy cables creating eddy currents), and safety (sparks hazard from power supply to the electronic apparatus inside the chamber) which can be overcome with new wireless technologies. In this technical report we present the design and implementation of a Bluetooth system for electroencephalographic (EEG) recording inside a hyperbaric chamber and describe the feasibility of EEG signal transmission outside the chamber. Differently from older systems, this technology allows the online recording of amplified signals, without interference from eddy currents. In an application of this technology, we measured EEG activity in professional divers under three experimental conditions in a hyperbaric chamber to determine how oxygen, assumed at a constant hyperbaric pressure of 2.8 ATA , affects the bioelectrical activity. The EEG spectral power estimated by fast Fourier transform and the cortical sources of the EEG rhythms estimated by low-resolution brain electromagnetic analysis were analyzed in three different EEG acquisitions: breathing air at sea level; breathing oxygen at a simulated depth of 18 msw, and breathing air at sea level after decompression. PMID:25608308

  5. A ΔE-E Telescope with Ionization Chamber Used in Excitation Function Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiSonglin; WangQi; DongYuchuan; XuHuagen; ChenRuofu

    2003-01-01

    A thorough study of excitation function in dissipative heavy ion collision requires the identification of the nuclear charge number Z of the reaction products. For this purpose, a special designed ΔE-E telescope is employed, which consists of a gas filled ionization chamber to detect the energy loss and a position sensitive semiconductor Si detector (300μm in thickness and 8 mm×45 mm in active area) as the residual energy detector. The ionization chamber with a sensitive length of about 60 mm, is divided into two parts of ΔE1 and ΔE2, each with length of 30 mm. The trajectory of the incident particles is parallel to the direction of the electric field in the ionization chamber. The anodes of ΔE1 and ΔE2 are realized through the rectangular empty metallic frames. In order to collect ionized charge produced by the incident particle inside the ionization chamber effectively, two equipotential frame-shape electrodes were placed on both sides of each anode, to form a strong electric focused field toward the anode. The advantages of this type of the detector arc as follows: (1)lower energy detection threshold; (2) wide dynamical range both for the light particles and the heavy fragments;(3) larger solid angle coverage with a relatively smaller detector size based on the position information from the Si detector.

  6. Gas supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of all the main sources of fossil fuels, natural gas stands as a newcomer. While it has already reached an age of maturity in the New World, due to the seniority of its development there, it is marked by the hopes and growth rates of a new energy source in European and Asia. As it becomes a major world energy source, natural gas has to secure consumer confidence, and thereby its own future development. To do so, a reliable supply of it must remain available, and at prices compatible with users' needs. How does natural gas resemble other sources of energy. And what specific features distinguish it in many ways from the others. The answers to these questions are themselves basis elements for understanding the physical process linking the gas field to the client's appliance. They also shed some light on the evolving commercial ties among producers and gas companies on the large regional markets around the world - North America, Europe and the Far East

  7. Calculation of the electric field inside electret ionisation chambers - Influence on the response function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of electret ion chambers for gamma dose and radon exposure measurement was increasing rapidly in the last years. In contrast to conventional ion chambers, the electric field in these detectors is not constant during the exposure time. Both field-strength and direction are changing due to inhomogeneous decrease of the electret surface charges. Data of numerical field calculations inside cylindrical electret Ionisation chambers are given. The change of the field-strength distribution with respect to electret discharge is described. The influence on the response function is discussed and experimentally verified. (author)

  8. Position reconstruction in drift chambers operated with Xe, $CO_{2}$ (15\\%)

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, C; Appelshäuser, H; Bielcikova, J; Blume, C; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bucher, D; Busch, O; Catanescu, V; Ciobanu, M; Daues, H W; Emschermann, D; Fateev, O V; Foka, P; Garabatos, C; Gunji, T; Herrmann, N; Inuzuka, M; Ivanov, M; Kislov, E; Lindenstruth, V; Lippmann, C; Ludolphs, W; Mahmoud, T; Petracek, V; Petrovici, M; Radomski, S; Rusanov, I; Sandoval, A; Santo, R; Schicker, R; Schwarz, K; Simon, R S; Smykov, L P; Soltveit, H K; Stachel, J; Stelzer, H; Tsiledakis, G; Vulpescu, B; Wessels, J P; Windelband, B; Yurevich, V; Zanevsky, Yu; Zaudtke, O

    2005-01-01

    We present measurements of position and angular resolution of drift chambers operated with a Xe, CO2 (15%) mixture. The results are compared to Monte Carlo simulations and important systematic effects - in particular the dispersive nature of the absorption of transition radiation and non-linearities - are discussed. The measurements were carried out with prototype drift chambers of the ALICE Transition Radiation Detector, but our findings can be generalized to other drift chambers with similar geometry, where the electron drift is perpendicular to the wire planes.

  9. Cosmic ray tests of a 4.6 m-long test drift chamber for JLC

    CERN Document Server

    Kurihara, Y; Sudo, S; Abe, T; Fujii, K; Ishihara, N; Khalatyan, N; Matsui, T; Nitoh, O; Ohama, T; Okuno, H; Sugiyama, A; Takahashi, K; Watanabe, T; Yoshida, T

    2000-01-01

    Performance of a 4.6 m-long drift chamber filled with a CO sub 2 iso-butane (90:10) mixture was studied using cosmic-ray data, in the course of detector R and D for JLC. After correcting the data for wire displacements due to gravitational and electrostatic forces, a spatial resolution of 100 mu m per wire was achieved over the full length of the chamber. The relation between wire efficiency and oxygen remnant in the chamber gas is also discussed.

  10. Cosmic ray tests of a 4.6 m-long test drift chamber for JLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Performance of a 4.6 m-long drift chamber filled with a CO2 iso-butane (90:10) mixture was studied using cosmic-ray data, in the course of detector R and D for JLC. After correcting the data for wire displacements due to gravitational and electrostatic forces, a spatial resolution of 100 μm per wire was achieved over the full length of the chamber. The relation between wire efficiency and oxygen remnant in the chamber gas is also discussed

  11. Plasma chemistry in wire chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phenomenology of wire chamber aging is discussed and fundamentals of proportional counters are presented. Free-radical polymerization and plasma polymerization are discussed. The chemistry of wire aging is reviewed. Similarities between wire chamber plasma (>1 atm dc-discharge) and low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas, which have been more widely studied, are suggested. Construction and use of a system to allow study of the plasma reactions occurring in wire chambers is reported. A proportional tube irradiated by an 55Fe source is used as a model wire chamber. Condensable species in the proportional tube effluent are concentrated in a cryotrap and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Several different wire chamber gases (methane, argon/methane, ethane, argon/ethane, propane, argon/isobutane) are tested and their reaction products qualitatively identified. For all gases tested except those containing methane, use of hygroscopic filters to remove trace water and oxygen contaminants from the gas resulted in an increase in the average molecular weight of the products, consistent with results from low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas. It is suggested that because water and oxygen inhibit polymer growth in the gas phase that they may also reduce polymer deposition in proportional tubes and therefore retard wire aging processes. Mechanistic implications of the plasma reactions of hydrocarbons with oxygen are suggested. Unresolved issues in this work and proposals for further study are discussed

  12. Emulsion Chamber Technology Experiment (ECT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, John C.; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    1996-01-01

    The experimental objective of Emulsion Chamber Technology (ECT) was to develop space-borne emulsion chamber technology so that cosmic rays and nuclear interactions may subsequently be studied at extremely high energies with long exposures in space. A small emulsion chamber was built and flown on flight STS-62 of the Columbia in March 1994. Analysis of the several hundred layers of radiation-sensitive material has shown excellent post-flight condition and suitability for cosmic ray physics analysis at much longer exposures. Temperature control of the stack was 20 +/-1 C throughout the active control period and no significant deviations of temperature or pressure in the chamber were observed over the entire mission operations period. The unfortunate flight attitude of the orbiter (almost 90% Earth viewing) prevented any significant number of heavy particles (Z greater than or equal to 10) reaching the stack and the inverted flow of shower particles in the calorimeter has not allowed evaluation of absolute primary cosmic ray-detection efficiency nor of the practical time limits of useful exposure of these calorimeters in space to the level of detail originally planned. Nevertheless, analysis of the observed backgrounds and quality of the processed photographic and plastic materials after the flight show that productive exposures of emulsion chambers are feasible in low orbit for periods of up to one year or longer. The engineering approaches taken in the ECT program were proven effective and no major environmental obstacles to prolonged flight are evident.

  13. Construction and Test of the Precision Drift Chambers for the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, F; Bratzler, U; Dietl, H; Kotov, S; Kroha, H; Lagouri, Th; Manz, A; Ostapchuk, A; Richter, R; Schael, S; Chouridou, S; Deile, M; Kortner, O; Staude, A; Stroehmer, R; Trefzger, T

    2016-01-01

    The Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers for the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) consist of 3-4 layers of pressurised drift tubes on either side of a space frame carrying an optical deformation monitoring system. The chambers have to provide a track position resolution of 40 microns with a single-tube resolution of at least 80 microns and a sense wire positioning accu- racy of 20 ?microns (rms). The feasibility was demonstrated with the full-scale prototype of one of the largest MDT chambers with 432 drift tubes of 3.8 m length. For the ATLAS muon spectrometer, 88 chambers of this type have to be built. The first chamber has been completed with a wire positioning accuracy of 14 microns (rms).

  14. A double faced ionization chamber for quality control in diagnostic radiology beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jonas O., E-mail: josofisico@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242, 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242, 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    The development of new radiation detectors of low cost but with adequate materials is a very important task for countries that have to import ionization chambers such as Brazil. A special double faced ionization chamber was developed for use in conventional diagnostic radiology beams and computed tomography energy ranges. The results show that this new chamber present applicability in conventional diagnostic radiology and computed tomography quality control programs. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We constructed a double faced ionization chamber. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was submitted to conventional diagnostic and computed tomography X-rays beams. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The results obtained showed good agreement with international standards. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This ionization chamber can be used in clinic quality control program.

  15. Drift velocity measurement and pressure monitoring in the CMS muon chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The drift velocity of the CMS muon chambers drift tubes is a key parameter for both muon trigger and reconstruction. Several operational parameters can influence the drift velocity: a change of the absolute pressure, a variation of the gas mixture or a contamination of the chamber gas by air, the temperature and the fringe B field. A dedicated chamber was built in the Institut IIIA at Aachen in order to measure continuously the drift velocity, scanning all muon chambers of the five barrel wheels. The differential pressure is monitored using four sensors per muon chamber, as it shouldn't exceed the safety value. The absolute pressure must stay always slightly above the ambient pressure to avoid the contamination by air entering the detectors. The latest drift velocity and differential pressure monitoring results are presented.

  16. Development of Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors Technologies

    CERN Multimedia

    Richer, J; Santos, D; Barsuk, S; Hamar, G; Shah, M K; Catanesi, M G; Colaleo, A; Maggi, M; Loddo, F; Berardi, V; Bagliesi, M; Menon, G; Richter, R; Lahonde-hamdoun, C; Dris, M; Geralis, T; Chechik, R; Ochi, A; Hartjes, F; Lopes, I M; Deshpande, A; Franz, A; Dabrowski, W; Fiutowski, T A; Ferreira, A; Bastos de oliveira, C A; Miller, B W; Plazas de pinzon, M C; Hillemanns, H; Tsarfati, T; Voss, B J R; Dafni, T; Carmona martinez, J M; Stocchi, A; Dinu, N; Bezshyyko, O; Semeniouk, I; Giebels, B; Marton, K; De leo, R; De lucia, E; Alviggi, M; Bellerive, A; Herten, L G; Zimmermann, S U; Martin-albo simon, J; Serra diaz cano, L; Derre, J; Giomataris, I; Peyaud, A; Schune, P; Delagnes, E; Delbart, A; Charles, G; Wang, W; Markou, A; Cibinetto, G; Edo, Y; Hessey, N P; Neves, F F; Solovov, V; Xia, L; Stoll, S; Sampsonidis, D; Mindur, B; Zielinska, A Z; Sauli, F; Calapez de albuquerque veloso, J F; Kahlaoui, N; Sharma, A; Bilevych, Y; Zenker, K; Cebrian guajardo, S V; Luzon marco, G M; Dalmaz, A E; Geffroy, N A; Guillaudin, O J H; Cornebise, P; Lounis, A; Bruel, P J; Laszlo, A; Mukerjee, K; Nappi, E; Nuzzo, S V; Bencivenni, G; Tessarotto, F; Levorato, S; Dixit, M S; Munoz-vidal, J; Sorel, M; Liubarsky, I; Riallot, M; Jeanneau, F; Nizery, F G; Maltezos, S; Kyriakis, A; Lyashenko, A; Van der graaf, H; Ferreira marques, R; Alexa, C; Liyanage, N; Dehmelt, K; Hemmick, T K; Polychronakos, V; Cisbani, E; Garibaldi, F; Koperny, S Z; Mora mas, F; Das neves dias carramate, L F; Domingues amaro, F; Van stenis, M; Resnati, F; Lupberger, M; Desch, K K; Soyk, D; Segui iglesia, L; Adloff, C J; Chefdeville, M; Vouters, G; Poilleux, P R; Ranieri, A; Lami, S; Shekhtman, L; Dolgov, A; Bamberger, A; Landgraf, U; Kortner, O; Ferrero, A; Attie, D M; Bressler, S; Tsigaridas, S; Surrow, B; Gnanvo, K A K; Feege, N M; Woody, C L; Bhattacharya, S; Capogni, M; Hohlmann, M; Veenhof, R J; Tapan, I; Dangendorf, V; Monteiro bernades, C M; Castro serrato, H F; De oliveira, R; Ropelewski, L; Behnke, T; Peltier, F; Boudry, V; Radicioni, E; Lai, A; Turini, N; Shemyakina, E; Gomez cadenas, J J; Giganon, A E; Titov, M; Aune, S; Galan lacarra, J A; Papakrivopoulos, I; Komai, H; Van bakel, N A; Tchepel, V; Repond, J O; Li, Y; Kourkoumelis, C; Tzamarias, S; Xiotidis, I; Majumdar, N; Kowalski, T; Da rocha azevedo, C D; Trabelsi, A; Riegler, W; Ketzer, B F; Rosemann, C G; Iguaz gutierrez, F J; Herrera munoz, D C; Drancourt, C; Mayet, F; Geerebaert, Y; Fodor, Z P; De robertis, G; Morello, G; Scribano memoria, A; Cecchi, R; Dalla torre, S; Gregori, M; Buzulutskov, A; Schwegler, P; Sanchez nieto, F J; Ferrario, P; Lorca galindo, D; Alvarez puerta, V; Colas, P M A; Gros, M; Neyret, D; Zito, M; Ferrer ribas, E; Procureur, S; Breskin, A; Martoiu, V S; Purschke, M L; Loomba, D; Gasik, P J; Petridou, C; Kordas, K; Mukhopadhyay, S; Urciuoli, G M; Bucciantonio, M; Bhopatkar, V S; Biagi, S F; Ji, X; Kanaki, K; Zavazieva, D; Capeans garrido, M D M; Schindler, H; Kaminski, J; Krautscheid, T; Lippmann, C; Arora, R; Garcia irastorza, I; Puill, V; Wicek, F B; Burmistrov, L; Singh, K P; Pugliese, G; Felici, G; Mehdiyev, R; Kroha, H; Monrabal-capilla, F; Kunne, F; Alexopoulos, T; Daskalakis, G; Bettoni, D; Heijhoff, K; Yu, B; Xiao, Z; Tzanakos, G; Leisos, A; Frullani, S; Toledo alarcon, J F; Sahin, O; Kalkan, Y; Giboni, K; Krieger, C; Gaglione, R; Breton, D R; Bhattacharyya, S; Abbrescia, M; Erriquez, O; Paticchio, V; Cardini, A; Aloisio, A; Bressan, A; Tikhonov, Y; Schumacher, M; Simon, F R; Nowak, S; Yahlali haddou, N; Herlant, S; Chaus, A; Fanourakis, G; Arazi, L; Homma, Y; Timmermans, J; Fonte, P; Underwood, D G; Azmoun, B; Fassouliotis, D; Wiacek, P; Esteve bosch, R; Dos santos covita, D; Monteiro da silva, A L; Marques ferreira dos santos, J; Baidali, S

    The proposed R&D collaboration, RD51, aims at facilitating the development of advanced gas-avalanche detector technologies and associated electronic-readout systems, for applications in basic and applied research. Advances in particle physics have always been enabled by parallel advances in radiation-detector technology. Radiation detection and imaging with gas-avalanche detectors, capable of economically covering large detection volumes with a low material budget, have been playing an important role in many fields. Besides their widespread use in particle-physics and nuclear-physics experiments, gaseous detectors are employed in many other fields: astro-particle research and applications such as medical imaging, material science, and security inspection. While extensively employed at the LHC, RHIC, and other advanced HEP experiments, present gaseous detectors (wire-chambers, drift-tubes, resistive-plate chambers and others) have limitations which may prevent their use in future experiments. Present tec...

  17. Design, construction and testing of a radon experimental chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To carry out studies on the radon behavior under controlled and stable conditions it was designed and constructed a system that consists of two parts: a container of mineral rich in Uranium and an experimentation chamber with radon united one to the other one by a step valve. The container of uranium mineral approximately contains 800 gr of uranium with a law of 0.28%; the radon gas emanated by the mineral is contained tightly by the container. When the valve opens up the radon gas it spreads to the radon experimental chamber; this contains 3 accesses that allow to install different types of detectors. The versatility of the system is exemplified with two experiments: 1. With the radon experimental chamber and an associated spectroscopic system, the radon and two of its decay products are identified. 2. The design of the system allows to couple the mineral container to other experimental geometries to demonstrate this fact it was coupled and proved a new automatic exchanger system of passive detectors of radon. The results of the new automatic exchanger system when it leave to flow the radon freely among the container and the automatic exchanger through a plastic membrane of 15 m. are shown. (Author)

  18. First Half Of The ATLAS Vacuum Chamber Arrives

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The ATLAS detector, built to observe and record the products of head-on collisions of protons in the Large Hadron Collider, is one of the largest and most elaborate particle physics experiments ever designed. It is the product of a world-wide effort by over 1800 scientists from more than 150 laboratories and institutions in 34 countries. With the detector due to begin operation in 2005, its various components have started to arrive from their manufacturers around the world, the most recent being the first of the two vacuum chambers for the two end cap toroid magnets. As it is too big to transport all at once it is comes in two halves. Each half of the vacuum chamber weighs 40 tonnes and is about 11x5.5x5 cubic meters in size. The huge 500 cubic meter vacuum vessles are an in kind contribution to ATLAS from NIKHEF (the Netherlands Institute for High Energy Physics) following a design by the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK. The chamber was built and delivered by the Royal Schelde Exotech shipyards i...

  19. First joint test beam of CMS Drift Tubes (DT) and Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC)

    CERN Multimedia

    Paolo Giacomelli

    2001-01-01

    The first full size muon drift tube chamber ever built for the CMS barrel with the final cell design (constructed at CIEMAT, Madrid) was succesfully tested with a muon beam in September 2001 at the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at CERN. For the first time also both muon detectors for the CMS barrel (DT + RPC) were coupled together. The results of this test were fully succesful and confirmed the excellent performance of both detectors together in a radiation environment.

  20. Neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Andrew C.; Jardret; Vincent D.

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  1. Tohoku one meter bubble chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the request of Tohoku University and the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, IHI has developed a complete freon bubble chamber system successfully, which is used for photo analysis of elementary particles physics. This system will be delivered to Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Illinois (U.S.A.) and will be coupled with the superconducting accelerator (TEVATRON) for the study of elementary particles. The total system of the freon bubble chamber is composed of a stainless steel casting spherical bubble chamber with a diameter of about one meter, an expansion system for freon pressure control, hydraulic system for driving an expansion piston, a freon feed system, a temperature control system, an overall control system as well as camera and flashlight for photograph. (author)

  2. "Flat-Fish" Vacuum Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    The picture shows a "Flat-Fish" vacuum chamber being prepared in the ISR workshop for testing prior to installation in the Split Field Magnet (SFM) at intersection I4. The two shells of each part were hydroformed from 0.15 mm thick inconel 718 sheet (with end parts in inconel 600 for easier manual welding to the arms) and welded toghether with two strips which were attached by means of thin stainless steel sheets to the Split Field Magnet poles in order to take the vertical component of the atmospheric pressure force. This was the thinnest vacuum chamber ever made for the ISR. Inconel material was chosen for its high elastic modulus and strenght at chamber bake-out temperature. In this picture the thin sheets transferring the vertical component of the atmosferic pressure force are attached to a support frame for testing. See also 7712182, 7712179.

  3. Impedances of Laminated Vacuum Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burov, A.; Lebedev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-22

    First publications on impedance of laminated vacuum chambers are related to early 70s: those are of S. C. Snowdon [1] and of A. G. Ruggiero [2]; fifteen years later, a revision paper of R. Gluckstern appeared [3]. All the publications were presented as Fermilab preprints, and there is no surprise in that: the Fermilab Booster has its laminated magnets open to the beam. Being in a reasonable mutual agreement, these publications were all devoted to the longitudinal impedance of round vacuum chambers. The transverse impedance and the flat geometry case were addressed in more recent paper of K. Y. Ng [4]. The latest calculations of A. Macridin et al. [5] revealed some disagreement with Ref. [4]; this fact stimulated us to get our own results on that matter. Longitudinal and transverse impendances are derived for round and flat laminated vacuum chambers. Results of this paper agree with Ref. [5].

  4. The Indiana silicon sphere 4{pi} charged-particle detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiatkowski, K. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chem. and Phys. and IUCF; Bracken, D.S. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chem. and Phys. and IUCF; Morley, K.B. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chem. and Phys. and IUCF; Brzychczyk, J. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chem. and Phys. and IUCF; Renshaw Foxford, E. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chem. and Phys. and IUCF; Komisarcik, K. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chem. and Phys. and IUCF; Viola, V.E. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chem. and Phys. and IUCF; Yoder, N.R. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Chem. and Phys. and IUCF; Dorsett, J. [Department of Chemistry Technical Services, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Poehlman, J. [Department of Chemistry Technical Services, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Madden, N. [Consultant, Livermore, CA (United States); Ottarson, J. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    1995-06-15

    A low threshold charged particle detector array for the study of fragmentation processes in light-ion-induced reactions has been constructed and successfully implemented at the IUCF and Saturne II accelerators. The array consists of 162-triple-element detector telescopes mounted in a spherical geometry and covering 74% of 4{pi} in solid angle. Telescope elements are composed of (1) an axial-field gas ionization chamber operated with C{sub 3}F{sub 8} gas; (2) a 0.5 mm thick passivated silicon detector, and (3) a 2.8 cm thick CsI(Tl) scintillation crystal with photodiode readout. Discrete element identification is obtained for ejectiles up to Z similar 16 over the dynamic range 0.7{<=}E/A{<=}95 MeV/nucleon. Isotopes are also distinguished for H, He, Li and Be ejectiles with 8< or {approx}E/A< or {approx}95 MeV. Custom-designed electronics are employed for bias supplies and linear signal processing. Data are acquired via a CAMAC/VME/Ethernet system. (orig.).

  5. Quality control for the first large areas of triple GEM chambers for the CMS endcaps

    CERN Document Server

    Tytgat, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The CMS GEM collaboration plans to equip the very forward muon system with triple GEM detectors that can withstand the environment of the high-luminosity LHC. This project is at the final stages of R and D and moving to production. An unprecedented large area of several 100m2 are to be instrumented with GEM detectors which will be produced in six different sites around the world. A common construction and quality control procedure is required to ensure the performance of each detector. The quality control steps will include optical inspection, cleaning and baking of all materials and parts used to build the detector, leakage current tests of the GEM foils, high voltage tests, gas leak tests of the chambers and monitoring pressure drop vs. time, gain calibration to know the optimal operation region of the detector, gain uniformity tests, and studying the efficiency, noise and tracking performance of the detectors in a cosmic stand using scintillators.

  6. MUON DETECTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    F. Gasparini

    Barrel Muons The last CMS week was dominated by the lowering of YB0. The date of lowering was fixed in January for February 28th. RPC and DT cabling of YB0 had to be done on the surface to allow a complete check of the status of the chambers before lowering. When the decision of the date was taken, the wheel cabling, planned to start at end of December, was not yet started for several “muon independent” reasons. Cabling and DT /RPC test started on Jan 22nd and ended on Feb 19th. Several teams worked on the surface of the wheel in parallel on the three different items, finishing just in time for lowering. This was a real challenge and a significant result. So by the end of the CMS Week, all the positive part of CMS plus YB0 were in the cavern. YB+2 had been lowered in January 19th, and YB+1 on February 1st. The vertical chambers of sectors 1 and 7 (8 DT/RPC packs), whose space was taken by the lowering machinery, had to be installed after lowering. This was done from Jan 24 to Jan 26 for...

  7. MUON DETECTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    F. Gasparini

    DT Commissioning of the two negative wheels was done on the surface to gain time; YB-1 was completed in June and that of YB-2 on October 3. A new test is ongoing following their lowering into the experiment cavern (UX). In the UX cavern, YB0 and YB+1 testing was completed by the end of August, and the two last sectors of YB+2 will be finished by the end of November. The two negative wheels were lowered at the beginning of October and the installation of the chambers in the vertical sectors was done immediately. Three important events took place at the end of October: the last of the 250 DT +RPC packs was installed in Sector 7 of YB-2; full power was switched on for the first time in a full wheel (on YB0, albeit with temporary power distribution) and 50,000 events of cosmic muons, including many spectacular showers crossing the fully active YB0 (50 chambers), were recorded in about 15 minutes. Other crucial tests were achieved, in difficult conditions, to prove the performance of the DT DAQ. The DAQ ha...

  8. Major detectors in elementary-particle physics. [Portfolio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidal, G.; Armstrong, B.; Rittenberg, A.

    1983-03-01

    With the 1983 issue of LBL-91 we introduce a supplement - a folio of descriptions of the world's major elementary particle physics detectors. Modern high energy physics usually involves the use of massive, costly, carefully engineered, large solid angle detectors. These detectors require a long lead time for construction, are often integrated with an accelerator, accumulate data over many years, and are in reality a combination of numerous subsystems. As was the case with bubble chambers, many experiments are performed with the same data, or with data taken after relatively minor changes or additions to the detector configuration. These experiments are often reported in journals whose space limitations make repeated full descriptions of the detector impossible. The detailed properties and performance of the detector are usually described in a fragmented series of papers in more specialized, technologically oriented journals. New additions are often not well documented. Several detectors often make similar measurements and physicists want to make quick comparisons of their respective capabilities. Designers of new large detectors and even of smaller experiments need to know what already exists and what performance has been achieved. To aid the physics community, the Particle Data Group has produced this brief folio of the world's major large detectors. This first edition has some notable omissions: in particular, the bubble chambers and any associated spectrometers, and the still somewhat tentative LEP, SLC, and TRISTAN detectors.

  9. The Forward Muon Detector of L3

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, A; Alarcon, J; Alberdi, J; Alexandrov, V S; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Ariza, M; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bakker, F; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Barcala, J M; Becker, U; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Betev, B L; Biland, A; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Borisov, V S; Bosseler, K; Bouvier, P; Brambilla, Elena; Burger, J D; Burgos, C; Buskens, J; Carlier, J C; Carlino, G; Causaus, J; Cavallo, N; Cerjak, I; Cerrada-Canales, M; Chang, Y H; Chen, H S; Chendvankar, S R; Chvatchkine, V B; Daniel, M; De Asmundis, R; Decreuse, G; Deiters, K; Djambazov, L; Duraffourg, P; Erné, F C; Esser, H; Ezekiev, S; Faber, G; Fabre, M; Fernández, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Fritschi, M; García-Abia, P; González, A; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haller, C; Herold, W D; Herrmann, J M; Hervé, A; Hofer, H; Höfer, M; Hofer, T; Homma, J; Horisberger, Urs; Horváth, I L; Ingenito, P; Innocente, Vincenzo; Ioudine, I; Jaspers, M; de Jong, P; Kästli, W; Kaspar, H; Kitov, V; König, A C; Koutsenko, V F; Lanzano, S; Lapoint, C; Lebedev, A; Lecomte, P; Lista, L; Lübelsmeyer, K; Lustermann, W; Ma, J M; Milesi, M; Molinero, A; Montero, A; Moore, R; Nahn, S; Navarrete, J J; Okle, M; Orlinov, I; Ostojic, R; Pandoulas, D; Paolucci, P; Parascandolo, P; Passeggio, G; Patricelli, S; Peach, D; Piccolo, D; Pigni, L; Postema, H; Puras, C; Ren, D; Rewiersma, P A M; Rietmeyer, A; Riles, K; Risco, J; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Röser, U; Romero, L; Van Rossum, W; Rykaczewski, H; Sarakinos, M E; Sassowsky, M; Shchegelskii, V; Scholz, N; Schultze, K; Schuylenburg, H; Sciacca, C; Seiler, P G; Siedenburg, T; Siedling, R; Smith, B; Soulimov, V; Sadhakar, K; Syben, O; Tonutti, M; Udovcic, A; Ulbricht, J; Veillet, L; Vergain, M; Viertel, Gert M; Von Gunten, H P; Vorobyov, A A; Vrankovic, V; De Waard, A; Waldmeier-Wicki, S; Wallraff, W; Walter, H C; Wang, J C; Wei, Z L; Wetter, R; Willmott, C; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, R J; Yang, K S; Zhou, L; Zhou, Y; Zuang, H L

    1996-01-01

    The Forward-Backward muon detector of the L3 experiment is presented. Intended to be used for LEP 200 physics, it consists of 96 self-calibrating drift chambers of a new design enclosing the magnet pole pieces of the L3 solenoid. The pole pieces are toroidally magnetized to form two independent analyzing spectrometers. A novel trigger is provided by resistive plate counters attached to the drift chambers. Details about the design, construction and performance of the whole system are given together with results obtained during the 1995 running at LEP.

  10. NIST Ionization Chamber "A" Sample-Height Corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    For over 30 years scientists in the NIST radioactivity group have been using their pressurized ionization chamber "A" (PIC "A") to make measurements of radioactivity and radioactive half-lives. We now have evidence that some of those reported measurements were incorrect due to slippage of the source positioning ring over time. The temporal change in the holder caused an error in the source-height within the chamber, which was thought to be invariant. This unaccounted-for height change caused a change in the detector response and thus a relative error in measured activity on the order of 10(-5) to 10(-3) per year, depending on the radionuclide. The drifting detector response affected calibration factors and half-life determinations. After discovering the problem, we carried out historic research and new sensitivity tests. As a result, we have created a quantitative model of the effect and have used that model to estimate corrections to some of the past measurement results from PIC "A". In this paper we report the details and results of that model. Meanwhile, we have fixed the positioning ring and are recalibrating the detector using primary measurement methods and enhanced quality control measures.

  11. NIST Ionization Chamber “A” Sample-Height Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    For over 30 years scientists in the NIST radioactivity group have been using their pressurized ionization chamber “A” (PIC “A”) to make measurements of radioactivity and radioactive half-lives. We now have evidence that some of those reported measurements were incorrect due to slippage of the source positioning ring over time. The temporal change in the holder caused an error in the source-height within the chamber, which was thought to be invariant. This unaccounted-for height change caused a change in the detector response and thus a relative error in measured activity on the order of 10−5 to 10−3 per year, depending on the radionuclide. The drifting detector response affected calibration factors and half-life determinations. After discovering the problem, we carried out historic research and new sensitivity tests. As a result, we have created a quantitative model of the effect and have used that model to estimate corrections to some of the past measurement results from PIC “A”. In this paper we report the details and results of that model. Meanwhile, we have fixed the positioning ring and are recalibrating the detector using primary measurement methods and enhanced quality control measures. PMID:26900515

  12. Micromegas chambers for the ATLAS muon spectrometer upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Ntekas, Konstantinos; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Micromegas, an abbreviation for Micro MEsh Gaseous Structure, is a robust detector with excellent spatial resolution and high rate capability. An R\\& D activity, called Muon ATLAS MicroMegas Activity (MAMMA) which was initiated in 2007 in order to explore the potential of the MM technology for use in the ATLAS experiment. After several years of prototyping and testing, the ATLAS collaboration has chosen the micromegas technology (MM) along with the small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) for the upgrade of the inner muon station in the high-rapidity region, the so called New Small Wheel (NSW) upgrade project. It employs eight layers of MM and eight layers of sTGC detectors. The NSW project requires fully efficient micromegas chambers, able to cope with the maximum expected rate of $15\\,\\mathrm{kHz/cm^2}$ featuring spatial resolution better than $100\\,\\mu\\mathrm{m}$. The MM detectors will cover a total active area of $\\sim1200\\,\\mathrm{m^2}$ and will be operated in a moderate magnetic field with intensity up ...

  13. RID-41 gamma flaw detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design is described and the main characteristics are given of a universal stationary hose-type gamma flow detector with a 60Co source from 3O to 4g0 Ci for high-productive control of thick-walled products from steel and other materials. The principal units of the instrument are a radiation head, a control panel, and a charge-exchange container. The flaw detector may be used both in shield chambers and in shop or mounting conditions on complying with due requirements of radiation protection. The high activity of the source at relatively small dimensions of its active part ensures good detection of defects. The high radioscopy rate permits to use the flaw detector in conditions of increased background radiation, e.g. during routine repairs and inspections at nuclear power plants. The instrument may also be used in radiometric complexes, and produces a considerable economic effect. This flaw-detector corresponds to ISO and IAEA requirements and may be delivered for export

  14. Evaluation of track-etch detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted to evaluate the precision and accuracy of Track-Etch passive radon detectors manufactured by the Terradex Corporation. Four configurations of these detectors were exposed to known radon concentrations in the Eastern Environmental Radiation Facility radon chamber under varying exposure regimines and sent to Terradex for processing and readout. Data reported by Terradex and our own exposure concentrations were used to calculate calibration numbers for each configuration which were then compared to calibration numbers used by Terradex. Results of our study indicate that groups of detectors exposed together and processed together demonstrate similarity in response. Groups of detectors exposed and processed at different times, however, did not always agree with each other nor with published Terradex calibration numbers

  15. A multilayer surface detector for ultracold neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhehui; Callahan, N B; Adamek, E R; Bacon, J D; Blatnik, M; Brandt, A E; Broussard, L J; Clayton, S M; Cude-Woods, C; Currie, S; Dees, E B; Ding, X; Gao, J; Gray, F E; Hoffbauer, M A; Holley, A T; Ito, T M; Liu, C -Y; Makela, M; Ramsey, J C; Pattie,, R W; Salvat, D J; Saunders, A; Schmidt, D W; Schulze, R K; Seestrom, S J; Sharapov, E I; Sprow, A; Tang, Z; Wei, W; Wexler, J W; Womack, T L; Young, A R; Zeck, B A

    2015-01-01

    A multilayer surface detector for ultracold neutrons (UCNs) is described. The top $^{10}$B layer is exposed to the vacuum chamber and directly captures UCNs. The ZnS:Ag layer beneath the $^{10}$B layer is a few microns thick, which is sufficient to detect the charged particles from the $^{10}$B(n,$\\alpha$)$^7$Li neutron-capture reaction, while thin enough so that ample light due to $\\alpha$ and $^7$Li escapes for detection by photomultiplier tubes. One-hundred-nm thick $^{10}$B layer gives high UCN detection efficiency, as determined by the mean UCN kinetic energy, detector materials and others. Low background, including negligible sensitivity to ambient neutrons, has also been verified through pulse-shape analysis and comparisons with other existing $^3$He and $^{10}$B detectors. This type of detector has been configured in different ways for UCN flux monitoring, development of UCN guides and neutron lifetime research.

  16. Testing an hydrogen streamer chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    A 2x10 cm gap streamer chamber, 35x55 cm2 in surface, was built and tested at CERN. Good tracks of cosmic rays were obtained up to atmospheric pressure, see F. Rohrbach et al, CERN-LAL (Orsay) Collaboration, Nucl. Instr. Methods 141 (1977) 229. Michel Cathenoz stand on the center.

  17. Study of a high spatial accuracy particle detector (drift tubes)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is the study of a detector which will be used in the Muon Experiment at CERN. The use of such a detector is to give a spatial information; it has the originality to be constituted of a set of individual tubes. In the description of a single tube and of a small detector of twenty-four tubes, the emphasis is put on the choice of the gas mixture. The study made with the small detector allows a comparison of this system with classical drift chambers

  18. Gas-discharge particle detector with ball-tipped anodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new gas-discharge particle detector, whose anode is a set of balls 2mm in diameter is investigated. The chamber is blowing down by the argon-methane-methylal gas mixture with the ratio 3:1:1. The detector operates in the self-quenching streamer mode, has high efficiency and a wide counting characteristic plateau. The maximum counting rate of particles at one ball is ∼ 2.5x104 s-1. The ball-tipped anodes allow making reliable complex-shaped detectors. Two-coordinate detection of multiparticle events can be naturally organized in detectors like that

  19. Endcap Muon Chamber Calibration and Monitoring Procedures in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Vickey Boeriu, Oana

    2009-01-01

    The cathode strip chamber (CSC) system is one of the three types of muon detectors used in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It consists of 468 chambers, with a total of $\\sim$218k strips and $\\sim$183k wires, placed onto two endcaps. Calibration tests which monitor the system stability, measure configuration constants that will be downloaded to electronics and calculate the calibration constants needed in the offline reconstruction - like crosstalk, gains, noise and connectivity - are performed regularly. The full chain of acquiring, analyzing and applying the calibration constants was successfully tested recently for the first time on the CSC system, using cosmic-ray data recorded during the Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge (MTCC).

  20. Study of the response of low pressure ionization chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Nebot Del Busto, E; Effinger, E; Grishin, V; Herranz Alvarez, J

    2012-01-01

    The Beam Loss Monitoring System (BLM) of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is based on parallel plate Ionization Chambers (IC) with active volume 1.5l and a nitrogen filling gas at 0.1 bar overpressure. At the largest loss locations, the ICs generate signals large enough to saturate the read-out electronics. A reduction of the active volume and filling pressure in the ICs would decrease the amount of charge collected in the electrodes, and so provide a higher saturation limit using the same electronics. This makes Little Ionization Chambers (LIC) with both reduced pressure and small active volume a good candidate for these high radiation areas. In this contribution we present measurements performed with several LIC monitors with reduced active volume and various filling pressures. These detectors were tested under various conditions with different beam setups, with standard LHC ICs used for calibration purposes

  1. Industrial defectoscope based on multiwire proportional chamber in CAMAC system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The defectoscope for non-destructive testing has been built at the Institute of Radioelectronics in collaboration with the Electrotechnical Institute, Non-destructive Division. The defectoscope consists of the following parts: gamma radiation detector, multiwire proportional chamber with γ-e converter, preamplifier system attached directly to the chamber wires, logic module of CAMAC philoscopy, and MERA 300 minicomputer. The defectoscope is used to detect material flaws in tested objects, irradiated from an internal radiation source. Minicomputer used enables data processing. The data collected in mincomputer memory are the radiological image of a tested object. It is possible to display the collected image on a television monitor, to display any profile of the image on an oscilloscope, to print the map of the image on a mosaic printer. (author)

  2. Development of Vacuum Chambers in Low Z Material

    CERN Document Server

    Garion, C; Gallilee, M; Perez Espinos, J

    2013-01-01

    Highly transparent vacuum chambers are increasingly required in high energy particle physics. In particular, vacuum chambers in the experiments should be as transparent as possible to minimize the background to the detectors, whilst also reducing the material activation. Beryllium is, so far, the most performant material for this application, but it presents some drawbacks such as brittleness, manufacturing issues, toxic if broken, high cost and low availability. A development work to obtain an alternative material to beryllium with similar performance is being carried out at CERN. Three categories have been defined and considered: raw bulk material, material composites and structural composites. The main functional requirements are: vacuum compatibility (leak tightness, low outgassing rate), temperature resistance (in the range 200-230 °C), transparency, and mechanical stiffness and strength. After beryllium, carbon is the element with the lowest atomic number that is practical for this application; therefo...

  3. Performance of the CMS Drift Tube Chambers with Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; Niegel, M; Oberst, O; Oehler, A; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Piparo, D; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Ratnikova, N; Renz, M; Saout, C; Sartisohn, G; Scheurer, A; Schieferdecker, P; Schilling, F P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Sturm, P; Troendle, D; Trunov, A; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Zeise, M; Zhukov, V; Ziebarth, E B; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Karafasoulis, K; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Mavrommatis, C; Petrakou, E; Zachariadou, A; Gouskos, L; Katsas, P; Panagiotou, A; Evangelou, I; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Patras, V; Triantis, F A; Bencze, G; Boldizsar, L; Debreczeni, G; Hajdu, C; Hernath, S; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Krajczar, K; Laszlo, A; Patay, G; Sikler, F; Toth, N; Vesztergombi, G; Beni, N; Christian, G; Imrek, J; Molnar, J; Novak, D; Palinkas, J; Szekely, G; Szillasi, Z; Tokesi, K; Veszpremi, V; Kapusi, A; Marian, G; Raics, P; Szabo, Z; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Zilizi, G; Bansal, S; Bawa, H S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Jindal, M; Kaur, M; Kaur, R; Kohli, J M; Mehta, M Z; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, A; Singh, J B; Singh, S P; Ahuja, S; Arora, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chauhan, S; Choudhary, B C; Gupta, P; Jain, S; Jain, S; Jha, M; Kumar, A; Ranjan, K; Shivpuri, R K; Srivastava, A K; Choudhury, R K; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kataria, S K; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Maity, M; Majumder, D; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Nayak, A; Saha, A; Sudhakar, K; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Mondal, N K; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Fahim, A; Jafari, A; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Moshaii, A; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rouhani, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Chiumarulo, F; Clemente, A; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cuscela, G; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; De Robertis, G; Donvito, G; Fedele, F; Fiore, L; Franco, M; Iaselli, G; Lacalamita, N; Loddo, F; Lusito, L; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Manna, N; Marangelli, B; My, S; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Papagni, G; Piccolomo, S; Pierro, G A; Pinto, C; Pompili, A; Pugliese, G; Rajan, R; Ranieri, A; Romano, F; Roselli, G; Selvaggi, G; Shinde, Y; Silvestris, L; Tupputi, S; Zito, G; Abbiendi, G; Bacchi, W; Benvenuti, A C; Boldini, M; Bonacorsi, D; Braibant-Giacomelli, S; Cafaro, V D; Caiazza, S S; Capiluppi, P; Castro, A; Cavallo, F R; Codispoti, G; Cuffiani, M; D'Antone, I; Dallavalle, G M; Fabbri, F; Fanfani, A; Fasanella, D; Giacomelli, P; Giordano, V; Giunta, M; Grandi, C; Guerzoni, M; Marcellini, S; Masetti, G; Montanari, A; Navarria, F L; Odorici, F; Pellegrini, G; Perrotta, A; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Siroli, G; Torromeo, G; Travaglini, R; Albergo, S; Costa, S; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Tuve, C; Barbagli, G; Broccolo, G; Ciulli, V; Civinini, C; D'Alessandro, R; Focardi, E; Frosali, S; Gallo, E; Genta, C; Landi, G; Lenzi, P; Meschini, M; Paoletti, S; Sguazzoni, G; Tropiano, A; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Colafranceschi, S; Colonna, D; Fabbri, F; Giardoni, M; Passamonti, L; Piccolo, D; Pierluigi, D; Ponzio, B; Russo, A; Fabbricatore, P; Musenich, R; Benaglia, A; Calloni, M; Cerati, G B; D'Angelo, P; De Guio, F; Farina, F M; Ghezzi, A; Govoni, P; Malberti, M; Malvezzi, S; Martelli, A; Menasce, D; Miccio, V; Moroni, L; Negri, P; Paganoni, M; Pedrini, D; Pullia, A; Ragazzi, S; Redaelli, N; Sala, S; Salerno, R; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tancini, V; Taroni, S; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; Cimmino, A; De Gruttola, M; Fabozzi, F; Iorio, A O M; Lista, L; Lomidze, D; Noli, P; Paolucci, P; Sciacca, C; Azzi, P; Bacchetta, N; Barcellan, L; Bellan, P; Bellato, M; Benettoni, M; Biasotto, M; Bisello, D; Borsato, E; Branca, A; Carlin, R; Castellani, L; Checchia, P; Conti, E; Dal Corso, F; De Mattia, M; Dorigo, T; Dosselli, U; Fanzago, F; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Giubilato, P; Gonella, F; Gresele, A; Gulmini, M; Kaminskiy, A; Lacaprara, S; Lazzizzera, I; Margoni, M; Maron, G; Mattiazzo, S; Mazzucato, M; Meneghelli, M; Meneguzzo, A T; Michelotto, M; Montecassiano, F; Nespolo, M; Passaseo, M; Pegoraro, M; Perrozzi, L; Pozzobon, N; Ronchese, P; Simonetto, F; Toniolo, N; Torassa, E; Tosi, M; Triossi, A; Vanini, S; Ventura, S; Zotto, P; Zumerle, G; Baesso, P; Berzano, U; Bricola, S; Necchi, M M; Pagano, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Torre, P; Vicini, A; Vitulo, P; Viviani, C; Aisa, D; Aisa, S; Babucci, E; Biasini, M; Bilei, G M; Caponeri, B; Checcucci, B; Dinu, N; Fanò, L; Farnesini, L; Lariccia, P; Lucaroni, A; Mantovani, G; Nappi, A; Piluso, A; Postolache, V; Santocchia, A; Servoli, L; Tonoiu, D; Vedaee, A; Volpe, R; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bernardini, J; Berretta, L; Boccali, T; Bocci, A; Borrello, L; Bosi, F; Calzolari, F; Castaldi, R; Dell'Orso, R; Fiori, F; Foà, L; Gennai, S; Giassi, A; Kraan, A; Ligabue, F; Lomtadze, T; Mariani, F; Martini, L; Massa, M; Messineo, A; Moggi, A; Palla, F; Palmonari, F; Petragnani, G; Petrucciani, G; Raffaelli, F; Sarkar, S; Segneri, G; Serban, A T; Spagnolo, P; Tenchini, R; Tolaini, S; Tonelli, G; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Baccaro, S; Barone, L; Bartoloni, A; Cavallari, F; Dafinei, I; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Diemoz, M; Franci, D; Longo, E; Organtini, G; Palma, A; Pandolfi, F; Paramatti, R; Pellegrino, F; Rahatlou, S; Rovelli, C; Alampi, G; Amapane, N; Arcidiacono, R; Argiro, S; Arneodo, M; Biino, C; Borgia, M A; Botta, C; Cartiglia, N; Castello, R; Cerminara, G; Costa, M; Dattola, D; Dellacasa, G; Demaria, N; Dughera, G; Dumitrache, F; Graziano, A; Mariotti, C; Marone, M; Maselli, S; Migliore, E; Mila, G; Monaco, V; Musich, M; Nervo, M; Obertino, M M; Oggero, S; Panero, R; Pastrone, N; Pelliccioni, M; Romero, A; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Trapani, P P; Trocino, D; Vilela Pereira, A; Visca, L; Zampieri, A; Ambroglini, F; Belforte, S; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Gobbo, B; Penzo, A; Chang, S; Chung, J; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kong, D J; Park, H; Son, D C; Bahk, S Y; Song, S; Jung, S Y; Hong, B; Kim, H; Kim, J H; Lee, K S; Moon, D H; Park, S K; Rhee, H B; Sim, K S; Kim, J; Choi, M; Hahn, G; Park, I C; Choi, S; Choi, Y; Goh, J; Jeong, H; Kim, T J; Lee, J; Lee, S; Janulis, M; Martisiute, D; Petrov, P; Sabonis, T; Castilla Valdez, H; Sánchez Hernández, A; Carrillo Moreno, S; Morelos Pineda, A; Allfrey, P; Gray, R N C; Krofcheck, D; Bernardino Rodrigues, N; Butler, P H; Signal, T; Williams, J C; Ahmad, M; Ahmed, I; Ahmed, W; Asghar, M I; Awan, M I M; Hoorani, H R; Hussain, I; Khan, W A; Khurshid, T; Muhammad, S; Qazi, S; Shahzad, H; Cwiok, M; Dabrowski, R; Dominik, W; Doroba, K; Konecki, M; Krolikowski, J; Pozniak, K; Romaniuk, Ryszard; Zabolotny, W; Zych, P; Frueboes, T; Gokieli, R; Goscilo, L; Górski, M; Kazana, M; Nawrocki, K; Szleper, M; Wrochna, G; Zalewski, P; Almeida, N; Antunes Pedro, L; Bargassa, P; David, A; Faccioli, P; Ferreira Parracho, P G; Freitas Ferreira, M; Gallinaro, M; Guerra Jordao, M; Martins, P; Mini, G; Musella, P; Pela, J; Raposo, L; Ribeiro, P Q; Sampaio, S; Seixas, J; Silva, J; Silva, P; Soares, D; Sousa, M; Varela, J; Wöhri, H K; Altsybeev, I; Belotelov, I; Bunin, P; Ershov, Y; Filozova, I; Finger, M; Finger, M Jr; Golunov, A; Golutvin, I; Gorbounov, N; Kalagin, V; Kamenev, A; Karjavin, V; Konoplyanikov, V; Korenkov, V; Kozlov, G; Kurenkov, A; Lanev, A; Makankin, A; Mitsyn, V V; Moisenz, P; Nikonov, E; Oleynik, D; Palichik, V; Perelygin, V; Petrosyan, A; Semenov, R; Shmatov, S; Smirnov, V; Smolin, D; Tikhonenko, E; Vasil'ev, S; Vishnevskiy, A; Volodko, A; Zarubin, A; Zhiltsov, V; Bondar, N; Chtchipounov, L; Denisov, A; Gavrikov, Y; Gavrilov, G; Golovtsov, V; Ivanov, Y; Kim, V; Kozlov, V; Levchenko, P; Obrant, G; Orishchin, E; Petrunin, A; Shcheglov, Y; Shchetkovskiy, A; Sknar, V; Smirnov, I; Sulimov, V; Tarakanov, V; Uvarov, L; Vavilov, S; Velichko, G; Volkov, S; Vorobyev, A; Andreev, Yu; Anisimov, A; Antipov, P; Dermenev, A; Gninenko, S; Golubev, N; Kirsanov, M; Krasnikov, N; Matveev, V; Pashenkov, A; Postoev, V E; Solovey, A; Solovey, A; Toropin, A; Troitsky, S; Baud, A; Epshteyn, V; Gavrilov, V; Ilina, N; Kaftanov, V; Kolosov, V; Kossov, M; Krokhotin, A; Kuleshov, S; Oulianov, A; Safronov, G; Semenov, S; Shreyber, I; Stolin, V; Vlasov, E; Zhokin, A; Boos, E; Dubinin, M; Dudko, L; Ershov, A; Gribushin, A; Klyukhin, V; Kodolova, O; Lokhtin, I; Petrushanko, S; Sarycheva, L; Savrin, V; Snigirev, A; Vardanyan, I; Dremin, I; Kirakosyan, M; Konovalova, N; Rusakov, S V; Vinogradov, A; Akimenko, S; Artamonov, A; Azhgirey, I; Bitioukov, S; Burtovoy, V; Grishin, V; Kachanov, V; Konstantinov, D; Krychkine, V; Levine, A; Lobov, I; Lukanin, V; Mel'nik, Y; Petrov, V; Ryutin, R; Slabospitsky, S; Sobol, A; Sytine, A; Tourtchanovitch, L; Troshin, S; Tyurin, N; Uzunian, A; Volkov, A; Adzic, P; Djordjevic, M; Jovanovic, D; Krpic, D; Maletic, D; Puzovic, J; Smiljkovic, N; Aguilar-Benitez, M; Alberdi, J; Alcaraz Maestre, J; Arce, P; Barcala, J M; Battilana, C; Burgos Lazaro, C; Caballero Bejar, J; Calvo, E; Cardenas Montes, M; Cepeda, M; Cerrada, M; Chamizo Llatas, M; Clemente, F; Colino, N; Daniel, M; De La Cruz, B; Delgado Peris, A; Diez Pardos, C; Fernandez Bedoya, C; Fernández Ramos, J P; Ferrando, A; Flix, J; Fouz, M C; Garcia-Abia, P; Garcia-Bonilla, A C; Gonzalez Lopez, O; Goy Lopez, S; Hernandez, J M; Josa, M I; Marin, J; Merino, G; Molina, J; Molinero, A; Navarrete, J J; Oller, J C; Puerta Pelayo, J; Romero, L; Santaolalla, J; Villanueva Munoz, C; Willmott, C; Yuste, C; Albajar, C; Blanco Otano, M; de Trocóniz, J F; Garcia Raboso, A; Lopez Berengueres, J O; Cuevas, J; Fernandez Menendez, J; Gonzalez Caballero, I; Lloret Iglesias, L; Naves Sordo, H; Vizan Garcia, J M; Cabrillo, I J; Calderon, A; Chuang, S H; Diaz Merino, I; Diez Gonzalez, C; Duarte Campderros, J; Fernandez, M; Gomez, G; Gonzalez Sanchez, J; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Jorda, C; Lobelle Pardo, P; Lopez Virto, A; Marco, J; Marco, R; Martinez Rivero, C; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P; Matorras, F; Rodrigo, T; Ruiz Jimeno, A; Scodellaro, L; Sobron Sanudo, M; Vila, I; Vilar Cortabitarte, R; Abbaneo, D; Albert, E; Alidra, M; Ashby, S; Auffray, E; Baechler, J; Baillon, P; Ball, A H; Bally, S L; Barney, D; Beaudette, F; Bellan, R; Benedetti, D; Benelli, G; Bernet, C; Bloch, P; Bolognesi, S; Bona, M; Bos, J; Bourgeois, N; Bourrel, T; Breuker, H; Bunkowski, K; Campi, D; Camporesi, T; Cano, E; Cattai, A; Chatelain, J P; Chauvey, M; Christiansen, T; Coarasa Perez, J A; Conde Garcia, A; Covarelli, R; Curé, B; De Roeck, A; Delachenal, V; Deyrail, D; Di Vincenzo, S; Dos Santos, S; Dupont, T; Edera, L M; Elliott-Peisert, A; Eppard, M; Favre, M; Frank, N; Funk, W; Gaddi, A; Gastal, M; Gateau, M; Gerwig, H; Gigi, D; Gill, K; Giordano, D; Girod, J P; Glege, F; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R; Goudard, R; Gowdy, S; Guida, R; Guiducci, L; Gutleber, J; Hansen, M; Hartl, C; Harvey, J; Hegner, B; Hoffmann, H F; Holzner, A; Honma, A; Huhtinen, M; Innocente, V; Janot, P; Le Godec, G; Lecoq, P; Leonidopoulos, C; Loos, R; Lourenço, C; Lyonnet, A; Macpherson, A; Magini, N; Maillefaud, J D; Maire, G; Mäki, T; Malgeri, L; Mannelli, M; Masetti, L; Meijers, F; Meridiani, P; Mersi, S; Meschi, E; Meynet Cordonnier, A; Moser, R; Mulders, M; Mulon, J; Noy, M; Oh, A; Olesen, G; Onnela, A; Orimoto, T; Orsini, L; Perez, E; Perinic, G; Pernot, J F; Petagna, P; Petiot, P; Petrilli, A; Pfeiffer, A; Pierini, M; Pimiä, M; Pintus, R; Pirollet, B; Postema, H; Racz, A; Ravat, S; Rew, S B; Rodrigues Antunes, J; Rolandi, G; Rovere, M; Ryjov, V; Sakulin, H; Samyn, D; Sauce, H; Schäfer, C; Schlatter, W D; Schröder, M; Schwick, C; Sciaba, A; Segoni, I; Sharma, A; Siegrist, N; Siegrist, P; Sinanis, N; Sobrier, T; Sphicas, P; Spiga, D; Spiropulu, M; Stöckli, F; Traczyk, P; Tropea, P; Troska, J; Tsirou, A; Veillet, L; Veres, G I; Voutilainen, M; Wertelaers, P; Zanetti, M; Bertl, W; Deiters, K; Erdmann, W; Gabathuler, K; Horisberger, R; Ingram, Q; Kaestli, H C; König, S; Kotlinski, D; Langenegger, U; Meier, F; Renker, D; Rohe, T; Sibille, J; Starodumov, A; Betev, B; Caminada, L; Chen, Z; Cittolin, S; Da Silva Di Calafiori, D R; Dambach, S; Dissertori, G; Dittmar, M; Eggel, C; Eugster, J; Faber, G; Freudenreich, K; Grab, C; Hervé, A; Hintz, W; Lecomte, P; Luckey, P D; Lustermann, W; Marchica, C; Milenovic, P; Moortgat, F; Nardulli, A; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pape, L; Pauss, F; Punz, T; Rizzi, A; Ronga, F J; Sala, L; Sanchez, A K; Sawley, M C; Sordini, V; Stieger, B; Tauscher, L; Thea, A; Theofilatos, K; Treille, D; Trüb, P; Weber, M; Wehrli, L; Weng, J; Zelepoukine, S; Amsler, C; Chiochia, V; De Visscher, S; Regenfus, C; Robmann, P; Rommerskirchen, T; Schmidt, A; Tsirigkas, D; Wilke, L; Chang, Y H; Chen, E A; Chen, W T; Go, A; Kuo, C M; Li, S W; Lin, W; Bartalini, P; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, K F; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y; Lei, Y J; Lin, S W; Lu, R S; Schümann, J; Shiu, J G; Tzeng, Y M; Ueno, K; Velikzhanin, Y; Wang, C C; Wang, M; Adiguzel, A; Ayhan, A; Azman Gokce, A; Bakirci, M N; Cerci, S; Dumanoglu, I; Eskut, E; Girgis, S; Gurpinar, E; Hos, I; Karaman, T; Karaman, T; Kayis Topaksu, A; Kurt, P; Önengüt, G; Önengüt Gökbulut, G; Ozdemir, K; Ozturk, S; Polatöz, A; Sogut, K; Tali, B; Topakli, H; Uzun, D; Vergili, L N; Vergili, M; Akin, I V; Aliev, T; Bilmis, S; Deniz, M; Gamsizkan, H; Guler, A M; Öcalan, K; Serin, M; Sever, R; Surat, U E; Zeyrek, M; Deliomeroglu, M; Demir, D; Gülmez, E; Halu, A; Isildak, B; Kaya, M; Kaya, O; Ozkorucuklu, S; Sonmez, N; Levchuk, L; Lukyanenko, S; Soroka, D; Zub, S; Bostock, F; Brooke, J J; Cheng, T L; Cussans, D; Frazier, R; Goldstein, J; Grant, N; Hansen, M; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Hill, C; Huckvale, B; Jackson, J; Mackay, C K; Metson, S; Newbold, D M; Nirunpong, K; Smith, V J; Velthuis, J; Walton, R; Bell, K W; Brew, C; Brown, R M; Camanzi, B; Cockerill, D J A; Coughlan, J A; Geddes, N I; Harder, K; Harper, S; Kennedy, B W; Murray, P; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Tomalin, I R; Williams, J H; Womersley, W J; Worm, S D; Bainbridge, R; Ball, G; Ballin, J; Beuselinck, R; Buchmuller, O; Colling, D; Cripps, N; Davies, G; Della Negra, M; Foudas, C; Fulcher, J; Futyan, D; Hall, G; Hays, J; Iles, G; Karapostoli, G; MacEvoy, B C; Magnan, A M; Marrouche, J; Nash, J; Nikitenko, A; Papageorgiou, A; Pesaresi, M; Petridis, K; Pioppi, M; Raymond, D M; Rompotis, N; Rose, A; Ryan, M J; Seez, C; Sharp, P; Sidiropoulos, G; Stettler, M; Stoye, M; Takahashi, M; Tapper, A; Timlin, C; Tourneur, S; Vazquez Acosta, M; Virdee, T; Wakefield, S; Wardrope, D; Whyntie, T; Wingham, M; Cole, J E; Goitom, I; Hobson, P R; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Leslie, D; Munro, C; Reid, I D; Siamitros, C; Taylor, R; Teodorescu, L; Yaselli, I; Bose, T; Carleton, M; Hazen, E; Heering, A H; Heister, A; John, J St; Lawson, P; Lazic, D; Osborne, D; Rohlf, J; Sulak, L; Wu, S; Andrea, J; Avetisyan, A; Bhattacharya, S; Chou, J P; Cutts, D; Esen, S; Kukartsev, G; Landsberg, G; Narain, M; Nguyen, D; Speer, T; Tsang, K V; Breedon, R; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M; Case, M; Cebra, D; Chertok, M; Conway, J; Cox, P T; Dolen, J; Erbacher, R; Friis, E; Ko, W; Kopecky, A; Lander, R; Lister, A; Liu, H; Maruyama, S; Miceli, T; Nikolic, M; Pellett, D; Robles, J; Searle, M; Smith, J; Squires, M; Stilley, J; Tripathi, M; Vasquez Sierra, R; Veelken, C; Andreev, V; Arisaka, K; Cline, D; Cousins, R; Erhan, S; Hauser, J; Ignatenko, M; Jarvis, C; Mumford, J; Plager, C; Rakness, G; Schlein, P; Tucker, J; Valuev, V; Wallny, R; Yang, X; Babb, J; Bose, M; Chandra, A; Clare, R; Ellison, J A; Gary, J W; Hanson, G; Jeng, G Y; Kao, S C; Liu, F; Liu, H; Luthra, A; Nguyen, H; Pasztor, G; Satpathy, A; Shen, B C; Stringer, R; Sturdy, J; Sytnik, V; Wilken, R; Wimpenny, S; Branson, J G; Dusinberre, E; Evans, D; Golf, F; Kelley, R; Lebourgeois, M; Letts, J; Lipeles, E; Mangano, B; Muelmenstaedt, J; Norman, M; Padhi, S; Petrucci, A; Pi, H; Pieri, M; Ranieri, R; Sani, M; Sharma, V; Simon, S; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Campagnari, C; D'Alfonso, M; Danielson, T; Garberson, J; Incandela, J; Justus, C; Kalavase, P; Koay, S A; Kovalskyi, D; Krutelyov, V; Lamb, J; Lowette, S; Pavlunin, V; Rebassoo, F; Ribnik, J; Richman, J; Rossin, R; Stuart, D; To, W; Vlimant, J R; Witherell, M; Apresyan, A; Bornheim, A; Bunn, J; Chiorboli, M; Gataullin, M; Kcira, D; Litvine, V; Ma, Y; Newman, H B; Rogan, C; Timciuc, V; Veverka, J; Wilkinson, R; Yang, Y; Zhang, L; Zhu, K; Zhu, R Y; Akgun, B; Carroll, R; Ferguson, T; Jang, D W; Jun, S Y; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Terentyev, N; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Dinardo, M E; Drell, B R; Ford, W T; Heyburn, B; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K; Wagner, S R; Zang, S L; Agostino, L; Alexander, J; Blekman, F; Cassel, D; Chatterjee, A; Das, S; Gibbons, L K; Heltsley, B; Hopkins, W; Khukhunaishvili, A; Kreis, B; Kuznetsov, V; Patterson, J R; Puigh, D; Ryd, A; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Vaughan, J; Weng, Y; Wittich, P; Beetz, C P; Cirino, G; Sanzeni, C; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Afaq, M A; Albrow, M; Ananthan, B; Apollinari, G; Atac, M; Badgett, W; Bagby, L; Bakken, J A; Baldin, B; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Biery, K; Binkley, M; Bloch, I; Borcherding, F; Brett, A M; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Chetluru, V; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Churin, I; Cihangir, S; Crawford, M; Dagenhart, W; Demarteau, M; Derylo, G; Dykstra, D; Eartly, D P; Elias, J E; Elvira, V D; Evans, D; Feng, L; Fischler, M; Fisk, I; Foulkes, S; Freeman, J; Gartung, P; Gottschalk, E; Grassi, T; Green, D; Guo, Y; Gutsche, O; Hahn, A; Hanlon, J; Harris, R M; Holzman, B; Howell, J; Hufnagel, D; James, E; Jensen, H; Johnson, M; Jones, C D; Joshi, U; Juska, E; Kaiser, J; Klima, B; Kossiakov, S; Kousouris, K; Kwan, S; Lei, C M; Limon, P; Lopez Perez, J A; Los, S; Lueking, L; Lukhanin, G; Lusin, S; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Mason, D; McBride, P; Miao, T; Mishra, K; Moccia, S; Mommsen, R; Mrenna, S; Muhammad, A S; Newman-Holmes, C; Noeding, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Rivera, R; Rivetta, C H; Ronzhin, A; Rossman, P; Ryu, S; Sekhri, V; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sfiligoi, I; Sharma, S; Shaw, T M; Shpakov, D; Skup, E; Smith, R P; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Suzuki, I; Tan, P; Tanenbaum, W; Tkaczyk, S; Trentadue, R; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitmore, J; Wicklund, E; Wu, W; Yarba, J; Yumiceva, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Barashko, V; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Gartner, J; Holmes, D; Kim, B; Klimenko, S; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotov, K; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Madorsky, A; Matchev, K; Mitselmakher, G; Pakhotin, Y; Piedra Gomez, J; Prescott, C; Rapsevicius, V; Remington, R; Schmitt, M; Scurlock, B; Wang, D; Yelton, J; Ceron, C; Gaultney, V; Kramer, L; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Baer, H; Bertoldi, M; Chen, J; Dharmaratna, W G D; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Jenkins, M; Johnson, K F; Prettner, E; Prosper, H; Sekmen, S; Baarmand, M M; Guragain, S; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Mermerkaya, H; Ralich, R; Vodopiyanov, I; Abelev, B; Adams, M R; Anghel, I M; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Callner, J; Castro, M A; Cavanaugh, R; Dragoiu, C; Garcia-Solis, E J; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatian, S; Mironov, C; Shabalina, E; Smoron, A; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    Studies of the performance of the CMS drift tube barrel muon system are described, with results based on data collected during the CMS Cosmic Run at Four Tesla. For most of these data, the solenoidal magnet was operated with a central field of 3.8 T. The analysis of data from 246 out of a total of 250 chambers indicates a very good muon reconstruction capability, with a coordinate resolution for a single hit of about 260 microns, and a nearly 100% efficiency for the drift tube cells. The resolution of the track direction measured in the bending plane is about 1.8 mrad, and the efficiency to reconstruct a segment in a single chamber is higher than 99%. The CMS simulation of cosmic rays reproduces well the performance of the barrel muon detector.

  4. Optimisation and Characterisation of Glass RPC for India-based Neutrino Observatory Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Kanishka, R.; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Indumathi, D.

    2016-01-01

    The proposed magnetised Iron CALorimeter detector (ICAL) to be built in the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) laboratory aims to detect atmospheric muon neutrinos. In order to achieve improved physics results, the constituent components of the detector must be fully understood by proper characterisation and optimisation of various parameters. Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) are the active detector elements in the ICAL detector and can be made of glass or bakelite. The number of RPCs requ...

  5. Performance parameters of a liquid filled ionization chamber array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poppe, B.; Stelljes, T. S.; Looe, H. K.; Chofor, N. [Clinic for Radiation Therapy, Pius-Hospital, Oldenburg 26121, Germany and WG Medical Radiation Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg 26121 (Germany); Harder, D. [Prof. em., Medical Physics and Biophysics, Georg August University, Göttingen 37073 (Germany); Willborn, K. [Clinic for Radiation Therapy, Pius-Hospital, Oldenburg 26121 (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: In this work, the properties of the two-dimensional liquid filled ionization chamber array Octavius 1000SRS (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) for use in clinical photon-beam dosimetry are investigated.Methods: Measurements were carried out at an Elekta Synergy and Siemens Primus accelerator. For measurements of stability, linearity, and saturation effects of the 1000SRS array a Semiflex 31013 ionization chamber (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) was used as a reference. The effective point of measurement was determined by TPR measurements of the array in comparison with a Roos chamber (type 31004, PTW-Freiburg, Germany). The response of the array with varying field size and depth of measurement was evaluated using a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber as a reference. Output factor measurements were carried out with a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber, a diode (type 60012, PTW-Freiburg, Germany), and the detector array under investigation. The dose response function for a single detector of the array was determined by measuring 1 cm wide slit-beam dose profiles and comparing them against diode-measured profiles. Theoretical aspects of the low pass properties and of the sampling frequency of the detector array were evaluated. Dose profiles measured with the array and the diode detector were compared, and an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) field was verified using the Gamma-Index method and the visualization of line dose profiles.Results: The array showed a short and long term stability better than 0.1% and 0.2%, respectively. Fluctuations in linearity were found to be within ±0.2% for the vendor specified dose range. Saturation effects were found to be similar to those reported in other studies for liquid-filled ionization chambers. The detector's relative response varied with field size and depth of measurement, showing a small energy dependence accounting for maximum signal deviations of ±2.6% from the reference condition for the setup used. The σ-values of

  6. One-dimensional flame instability and control of burning in fire-chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor E. Volkov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The flame stability with regard to one-dimensional exponential perturbations both for the combustion in the fire-chamber and the flame propagating in closed tubes or chambers is investigated. It is proved that both stability and instability are possible for the combustion process. At the same time the one-dimensional flame instability is guaranteed near the front wall of the fire-chamber where the fuel supply is realized. Therefore the control of combustion in the fire-chamber leads to support of the flame at the maximum possible distance from the front wall of the fire-chamber to prevent the vibratory combustion or to diminish intensity of pulsations if these pulsations are inevitable.

  7. Self-shunted streamer chamber spectrometer with CCD video cameras for studying pion interactions with light nuclei at energies below the Δ-resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is presented of the detector system (a self-shunted streamer chamber in a magnetic field, equipped with two CCD video cameras) developed by the DUBTO collaboration for studying pion interactions with light nuclei at the JINR phasotron

  8. Pulse height measurements and electron attachment in drift chambers operated with Xe,CO2 mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Andronic, A

    2003-01-01

    We present pulse height measurements in drift chambers operated with Xe,CO2 gas mixtures. We investigate the attachment of primary electrons on oxygen and SF6 contaminants in the detection gas. The measurements are compared with simulations of properties of drifting electrons. We present two methods to check the gas quality: gas chromatography and Fe55 pulse height measurements using monitor detectors.

  9. Software alignment of the BESⅢ main drift chamber using the Kalman Filter method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ji-Ke; MAO Ze-Pu; BIAN Jian-Ming; CAO Guo-Fu; CAO Xue-Xiang; CHEN Shen-Jian; DENG Zi-Yan; FU Cheng-Dong; GAO Yuan-Ning; HE Kang-Lin; HE Miao; HUA Chun-Fei; HUANG Bin; HUANG Xing-Tao; JI Xiao-Bin; LI Fei; LI Hai-Bo; LI Wei-Dong; LIANG Yu-Tie; LIU Chun-Xiu; LIU Huai-Min; LIU Suo; LIU Ying-Jie; MA Qiu-Mei; MA Xiang; MAO Ya-Jun; MO Xiao-Hu; PAN Ming-Hua; PANG Cai-Ying; PING Rong-Gang; QIN Ya-Hong; QIU Jin-Fa; SUN Sheng-Sen; SUN Yong-Zhao; WANG Liang-Liang; WEN Shuo-Pin; WU Ling-Hui; XIE Yu-Guang; XU Min; YAN Liang; YOU Zheng-Yun; YUAN Chang-Zheng; YUAN Ye; ZHANG Bing-Yun; ZHANG Chang-Chun; ZHANG Jian-Yong; ZHANG Xue-Yao; ZHANG Yao; ZHENG Yang-Heng; ZHU Ke-Jun; ZHU Yong-Sheng; ZHU Zhi-Li; ZOU Jia-Heng

    2009-01-01

    Software alignment is quite important for a tracking detector to reach its ultimate position accuracy and momentum resolution. We developed a new alignment algorithm for the BESⅢ Main Drift Chamber using the Kalman Filter method. Two different types of data which are helix tracks and straight tracks are used to test this algorithm, and the results show that the design and implementation is successful.

  10. Construction and test of the final CMS Barrel Drift Tube Muon Chamber prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alberdi, J.; Arneodo, M.; Banicz, K.; Benettoni, M.; Benvenuti, A.; Bethke, S.; Cerrada, M. E-mail: cerrada@ciemat.es; Cirio, R.; Colino, N.; Conti, E.; Dallavalle, M.; Daniel, M.; Dattola, D.; Daudo, F.; De Giorgi, M.; Dosselli, U.; Fanfani, A.; Fanin, C.; Fouz, M.C.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giacomelli, P.; Giordano, V.; Gonella, F.; Grandi, C.; Guaita, P.; Guerzoni, M.; Lacaprara, S.; Lippi, I.; Marcellini, S.; Marin, J.; Martinelli, R.; Maselli, S.; Meneguzzo, A.; Migliore, E.; Mocholi, J.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Montanari, C.; Odorici, F.; Oller, J.C.; Paoletti, S.; Passaseo, M.; Pegoraro, M.; Peroni, C.; Puerta, J.; Reithler, H.; Romero, A.; Romero, L.; Ronchese, P.; Rossi, A.M.; Rovelli, T.; Sacchi, R.; Salicio, J.M.; Staiano, A.; Steinbeck, T.; Torassa, E.; Travaglini, R.; Ventura, L.; Ventura, S.; Vitelli, A.; Voetee, F.; Wegner, M.; Willmott, C.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G

    2002-03-21

    A prototype of the CMS Barrel Muon Detector incorporating all the features of the final chambers was built using the mass production assembly procedures and tools. The performance of this prototype was studied in a muon test beam at CERN and the results obtained are presented in this paper.

  11. Construction and test of the final CMS barrel drift tube muon chamber prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar-Benítez, M; Arneodo, M; Banicz, K; Benettoni, M; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bethke, Siegfried; Cerrada, M; Cirio, R; Colino, N; Conti, E; Dallavalle, G M; Daniel, M; Dattola, D; Daudo, F; De Giorgi, M; Dosselli, U; Fanfani, A; Fanin, C; Fouz-Iglesias, M C; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Glacomelli, P; Giordano, V; Gonella, F; Grandi, C; Guaita, P; Guerzoni, M; Lacaprara, S; Lippi, I; Marcellini, S; Marin, J; Martinelli, R; Maselli, S; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Migliore, E; Mocholí-Mocholí, J; Monaco, V; Montanari, A; Montnari, C; Odorici, F; Oller, J C; Paoletti, S; Passaseo, M; Pegoraro, M; Peroni, C; Puerta, J; Reithler, H; Romero, A; Romero, L; Ronchese, P; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Sacchi, R; Salicio, J M; Staiano, A; Steinbeck, T M; Torassa, E; Travaglini, R; Ventura, L; Ventura, Sandro; Vitelli, A; Voetee, F; Wegner, M; Willmott, C; Zotto, P L; Zumerle, G

    2002-01-01

    A prototype of the CMS Barrel Muon Detector incorporating all the features of the final chambers was built using the mass production assembly procedures and tools. The performance of this prototype was studied in a muon test beam at CERN and the results obtained are presented in this paper. (12 refs).

  12. Early steps towards quarks and their interactions using neutrino beams in CERN bubble chamber experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Don H.

    2016-06-01

    Results from neutrino experiments at CERN in the1970's, using bubble chamber detectors filled with heavy liquids, gave early evidence for the existence of quarks and gluons as real dynamical objects. In detail, the measured moments of the non-singlet structure functions provided crucial support for the validity of the present theory of the strong inter-quark interactions, quantum chromodynamics.

  13. AXEL: High pressure xenon gas Time Projection Chamber for neutrinoless double beta decay search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Sheng

    2016-05-01

    AXEL is a high pressure xenon gas TPC detector being developed for neutrinoless double-beta decay search. We use proportional scintillation mode with a new electroluminescence light detection scheme to achieve very high energy resolution with a large detector. The detector has a capability of tracking which can be used reduce background. The project is in a R&D phase, and we report current status of our prototype chamber with 10 L and 8 bar Xe gas. We also present the results of the photon detection efficiency measurement and the linearity test of silicon photomultiplier(SiPM).

  14. Status of the HISS MUSIC detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This note describes the status of a new type of high resolution large area charged particle detector constructed for use at the Bevalac HISS facility. High charge resolution is attained by measuring many samples of the ionization produced along the path of a particle as it traverses 144 cm of P10 gas. A Multiple Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) detector was selected for use at HISS because it can cover a large area(1M x 1M) at relatively low cost and return individual charge identification for multiple fragments emitted from relativistic heavy ion interactions

  15. Study of Performance of Bakelite Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC)

    CERN Document Server

    Ganai, R; Roy, A; Muduli, B; Chattopadhyay, S; Ahammed, Z; Das, G; Ramnarayan, S

    2016-01-01

    Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) is a type of gaseous detector having excellent time and position resolutions. VECC is involved in the R\\&D of indigenously developed bakelite RPCs. The largest size of bakelite RPC developed in India is 100 cm $\\times$ 100 cm. We present here the test results of a bakelite sample along with the cosmic ray test results of a bakelite RPC (30 cm $\\times$ 30 cm $\\times$ 0.2cm) fabricated at VECC. The steps taken towards the development of a large size (240 cm $\\times$ 120 cm $\\times$ 0.2 cm) bakelite RPC have also been discussed.

  16. Resistive plate chambers for muon detection at LHC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶沿林; 应军; 班勇; 刘洪涛; 蔡建新; 朱子美; 马经国; 陈陶; 钱思进

    2002-01-01

    One resistive plate chamber made of Chinese materials and one Italian resistive platechamber have been tested in the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at CERN on a high intensitymuon beam together with a 137Cs source to give a uniform photon background, and simulatingconditions close to those expected for an LHC muon detector. The results are analyzed. Goodspace and time resolutions are obtained which satisfy the future CMS experiment requirements.The detection efficiency is different between two RPCs against a high irradiation background. Thereason is discussed.

  17. Highly efficient resistive plate chambers for high rate environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The full scale prototype of an Inverted Double Gap RPC module for ME-1/1 station of the CMS detector was tested in the Gamma Irradiation Facility at the CERN SPS muon beam. The chamber made of medium resistivity bakelite and filled with 'green gas' mixture of C2H2F4/iso-butane/SF6 has wide efficiency plateau and good timing properties when operated in avalanche mode under continuous irradiation with strong 137Cs source for rates up to about 5 kHz/cm2/gap

  18. A new plant chamber facility PLUS coupled to the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR

    OpenAIRE

    Hohaus, T.; Kuhn, U.; S. Andres; Kaminski, M.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; A. Wahner; R. Wegener; Yu, Z.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2015-01-01

    A new PLant chamber Unit for Simulation (PLUS) for use with the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction Chamber) has been build and characterized at the Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Germany. The PLUS chamber is an environmentally controlled flow through plant chamber. Inside PLUS the natural blend of biogenic emissions of trees are mixed with synthetic air and are transferred to the SAPHIR chamber ...

  19. A Fast Ionization Chamber for GODDESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumb, R. T.; Lipman, A. S.; Baugher, T.; Cizewski, J. A.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Pain, S. D.; Kozub, R. L.

    2014-09-01

    Transfer reactions are among the main methods used in nuclear physics to probe the structure of nuclei. Such information is needed to constrain nuclear models and to understand various nucleosynthesis processes. In many cases, the nuclear level densities are too high to be resolved in transfer reactions via charged particle detection alone. This problem and issues arising from contaminants in radioactive beams can be addressed by using particle- γ coincidence techniques along with heavy recoil identification in inverse kinematics. A device to accomplish these tasks is Gammasphere ORRUBA: Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS), currently being commissioned for the ATLAS facility at ANL. We are currently building a compact, tilted grid ionization chamber for GODDESS to detect and identify beam-like recoils near zero degrees in the lab. The tilt (30 degrees off normal to the beam) helps the ion pairs to be detected quickly, after drifting only a short distance away from the beam axis. This reduces the response time, allowing counting rates of ~500,000/s. The design and current status of the project will be presented. Research supported by the U. S. DOE.

  20. Resistive plate chambers in positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Paulo; Blanco, Alberto; Couceiro, Miguel; Ferreira, Nuno C.; Lopes, Luís; Martins, Paulo; Ferreira Marques, Rui; Fonte, Paulo

    2013-07-01

    Resistive plate chambers (RPC) were originally deployed for high energy physics. Realizing how their properties match the needs of nuclear medicine, a LIP team proposed applying RPCs to both preclinical and clinical positron emission tomography (RPC-PET). We show a large-area RPC-PET simulated scanner covering an axial length of 2.4m —slightly superior to the height of the human body— allowing for whole-body, single-bed RPC-PET acquisitions. Simulations following NEMA (National Electrical Manufacturers Association, USA) protocols yield a system sensitivity at least one order of magnitude larger than present-day, commercial PET systems. Reconstruction of whole-body simulated data is feasible by using a dedicated, direct time-of-flight-based algorithm implemented onto an ordered subsets estimation maximization parallelized strategy. Whole-body RPC-PET patient images following the injection of only 2mCi of 18-fluorodesoxyglucose (FDG) are expected to be ready 7 minutes after the 6 minutes necessary for data acquisition. This compares to the 10-20mCi FDG presently injected for a PET scan, and to the uncomfortable 20-30minutes necessary for its data acquisition. In the preclinical field, two fully instrumented detector heads have been assembled aiming at a four-head-based, small-animal RPC-PET system. Images of a disk-shaped and a needle-like 22Na source show unprecedented sub-millimeter spatial resolution.

  1. Monolithic JFET preamplifier for ionization chamber calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prototype preamplifier circuit is presented for use in SSC ionization chamber calorimeters. It consists of a new type of silicon integrated circuit comprised of very low noise junction FET (JFET) components. Presently, monolithic preamplifier circuits for use in highly segmented detectors are made of implanted channel JFETs or MOS devices. While such circuits solve the density problems, they do not perform to the same level of low noise characteristics as found in discrete JFET components. The JFETs which comprise this new integrated circuit preserve the excellent low noise performance normally found only in discrete JFETs. JFETs also are much more radiation resistant and less prone to damage by electromagnetic discharges than MOS transistors. Two innovative fabrication processes are discussed. They solve the difficult gate-to-gate isolation problem needed to manufacture JFET integrated circuits. Both allow the use of an epitaxially formed channel and a diffused gate, as in standard discrete JFET processing. This, presumably, results in JFETs which exhibit lower noise than those made with implanted channels. 11 refs., 9 figs

  2. Measurement of ion and electron drift velocity and electronic attachment in air for ionization chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Boissonnat, Guillaume; Colin, Jean; Remadi, Aurelien; Salvador, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Air-ionization chambers have been used in radiotherapy and particle therapy for decades. However, fundamental parameters in action in the detector responses are sparsely studied. In this work we aimed to measure the electronic attachment, electrons and ions mobilities of an ionization chamber (IC) in air. The main idea is to extract these from the actual response of the IC to a single ionizing particle in order to insure that they were measured in the same condition they are to be used while neglecting undesired phenomena: recombination and space charge effect. The non-standard signal shape analysis performed here were also confronted to a more standard drift chamber measurements using time-of-flight. It was found that both detectors displayed compatible results concerning positive and negative ions drift velocities where literature data is well spread out. In the same time, electron attachment measurements sit in the middle of known measurements while electron drift velocities seemed to show an offset compar...

  3. Theoretical calculation on CR-39 response for radon measurements and optimum diffusion chambers dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, H. R.; Ghandi, Kh.; Rahimi, M.; Negarestani, A.

    2008-11-01

    One method to measure radon gas concentration in the air with a long time of radiation is trace chemical etching technique. There is a direct proportion between the number of traces on solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) and activity concentration of radon. In this paper, calibration constant for a cylindrical chamber with CR-39 detector has been measured analytically. Using this measurement, trace curves on the base of concentration for chambers with different heights and radii have been drawn. The results show that to measure radon gas concentration, the optimum chamber should have a height between 3.5 and 4 cm and a radius between 2.5 and 3.2 cm.

  4. Theoretical calculation on CR-39 response for radon measurements and optimum diffusion chambers dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Askari, H.R.; Ghandi, Kh. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Vali-e-Asr University, Rafsanjan 7713936417 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahimi, M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Vali-e-Asr University, Rafsanjan 7713936417 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: rahimi_bam@yahoo.com; Negarestani, A. [International Center for Science and High Technology and Environmental Sciences, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-11-11

    One method to measure radon gas concentration in the air with a long time of radiation is trace chemical etching technique. There is a direct proportion between the number of traces on solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) and activity concentration of radon. In this paper, calibration constant for a cylindrical chamber with CR-39 detector has been measured analytically. Using this measurement, trace curves on the base of concentration for chambers with different heights and radii have been drawn. The results show that to measure radon gas concentration, the optimum chamber should have a height between 3.5 and 4 cm and a radius between 2.5 and 3.2 cm.

  5. Directional detection of Dark Matter with the MIcro-tpc MAtrix of Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Couturier, C; Naraghi, F; Riffard, Q; Santos, D; Sauzet, N; Colas, P; Ribas, E Ferrer; Giomataris, I; Busto, J; Fouchez, D; Tao, C; Zhou, N

    2016-01-01

    Particles weakly interacting with ordinary matter, with an associated mass of the order of an atomic nucleus (WIMPs), are plausible candidates for Dark Matter. The direct detection of an elastic collision of a target nuclei induced by one of these WIMPs has to be discriminated from the signal produced by the neutrons, which leaves the same signal in a detector. The MIMAC (MIcro-tpc MAtrix of Chambers) collaboration has developed an original prototype detector which combines a large pixelated Micromegas coupled with a fast, self-triggering, electronics. Aspects of the two-chamber module in operation in the Modane Underground Laboratory are presented: calibration, characterization of the $^{222}$Rn progeny. A new test bench combining a MIMAC chamber with the COMIMAC portable quenching line has been set up to characterize the 3D tracks of low energy ions in the MIMAC gas mixture: the preliminary results thereof are presented. Future steps are briefly discussed.

  6. Detector to detector corrections: A comprehensive experimental study of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small radiotherapy beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azangwe, Godfrey, E-mail: g.azangwe@iaea.org; Grochowska, Paulina; Izewska, Joanna; Meghzifene, Ahmed [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna International Centre, PO Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria); Georg, Dietmar; Hopfgartner, Johannes; Lechner, Wolfgang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University Vienna/AKH Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna, Austria and Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Andersen, Claus E.; Beierholm, Anders R.; Helt-Hansen, Jakob [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Technical University of Denmark, Risø Campus, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Mizuno, Hideyuki; Fukumura, Akifumi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi 263-8555 (Japan); Yajima, Kaori [Association for Nuclear Technology in Medicine, 7-16, Nihonbashikodenmacho, chuou-ku, Tokyo 103-0001 (Japan); Gouldstone, Clare; Sharpe, Peter [National Physical Laboratory, Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Division, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Palmans, Hugo [National Physical Laboratory, Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Division, Teddington TW11 0LW, United Kingdom and EBG MedAustron GmbH, Medical Physics Department, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of the present study is to provide a comprehensive set of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small beams, for a wide range of real time and passive detectors. The detector specific correction factors determined in this study may be potentially useful as a reference data set for small beam dosimetry measurements. Methods: Dose response of passive and real time detectors was investigated for small field sizes shaped with a micromultileaf collimator ranging from 0.6 × 0.6 cm{sup 2} to 4.2 × 4.2 cm{sup 2} and the measurements were extended to larger fields of up to 10 × 10 cm{sup 2}. Measurements were performed at 5 cm depth, in a 6 MV photon beam. Detectors used included alanine, thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), stereotactic diode, electron diode, photon diode, radiophotoluminescent dosimeters (RPLDs), radioluminescence detector based on carbon-doped aluminium oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C), organic plastic scintillators, diamond detectors, liquid filled ion chamber, and a range of small volume air filled ionization chambers (volumes ranging from 0.002 cm{sup 3} to 0.3 cm{sup 3}). All detector measurements were corrected for volume averaging effect and compared with dose ratios determined from alanine to derive a detector correction factors that account for beam perturbation related to nonwater equivalence of the detector materials. Results: For the detectors used in this study, volume averaging corrections ranged from unity for the smallest detectors such as the diodes, 1.148 for the 0.14 cm{sup 3} air filled ionization chamber and were as high as 1.924 for the 0.3 cm{sup 3} ionization chamber. After applying volume averaging corrections, the detector readings were consistent among themselves and with alanine measurements for several small detectors but they differed for larger detectors, in particular for some small ionization chambers with volumes larger than 0.1 cm{sup 3}. Conclusions: The results demonstrate

  7. Design and construction of a radiation monitor with ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and construction of a portable radiation monitor with ionization chamber for gamma and x rays measurements in the range from 40 KeV to 2 MeV are described in detail. The monitor is calibrated to give the exposure rate in Roentgens/hour in three linear ranges: 0-25 mR/h, 0-250 mR/h and 0-2500 mR/h for an ionization chamber with a sensitive volume of 600 cubic centimeters. Two conventional 9 V alkaline batteries are used to energize the monitor. The small current coming from the ionization chamber is measured by an operational amplifier with electrometer characteristics. The high voltage power supply to bias the chamber is made with a blocking oscillator and a ferrite transformer. Starting form a discussion of the desired characteristics of the monitor, the technical specifications are established. The design criteria for every section are shown. The testing procedures used to qualify every block and the results for three units are reported. (Author)

  8. Cleaning supplies and equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000443.htm Cleaning supplies and equipment To use the sharing features on this page, ... to clean supplies and equipment. Disinfecting Supplies and Equipment Start by wearing the right personal protective equipment ( ...

  9. PHENIX central arm tracking detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PHENIX tracking system consists of Drift Chambers (DC), Pad Chambers (PC) and the Time Expansion Chamber (TEC). PC1/DC and PC2/TEC/PC3 form the inner and outer tracking units, respectively. These units link the track segments that transverse the RICH and extend to the EMCal. The DC measures charged particle trajectories in the r-phi direction to determine pT of the particles and the invariant mass of particle pairs. The PCs perform 3D spatial point measurements for pattern recognition and longitudinal momentum reconstruction and provide spatial resolution of a few mm in both r-phi and z. The TEC tracks particles passing through the region between the RICH and the EMCal. The design and operational parameters of the detectors are presented and running experience during the first year of data taking with PHENIX is discussed. The observed spatial and momentum resolution is given which imposes a limitation on the identification and characterization of charged particles in various momentum ranges

  10. Resistive Plate Chamber Digitization in a Hadronic Shower Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Z; Wang, Y; Yue, Q; Yang, Z; Apostolakis, J; Folger, G; Grefe, C; Ivantchenko, V; Ribon, A; Uzhinskiy, V; Boumediene, D; Carloganu, C; Français, V; Cho, G; Kim, D-W; Lee, S C; Park, W; Vallecorsa, S; Cauwenbergh, S; Tytgat, M; Pingault, A; Zaganidis, N; Brianne, E; Ebrahimi, A; Gadow, K; Göttlicher, P; Günter, C; Hartbrich, O; Hermberg, B; Irles, A; Krivan, F; Krüger, K; Kvasnicka, J; Lu, S; Lutz, B; Morgunov, V; Neubüser, C; Provenza, A; Reinecke, M; Sefkow, F; Schuwalow, S; Tran, H L; Garutti, E; Laurien, S; Matysek, M; Ramilli, M; Schroeder, S; Bilki, B; Norbeck, E; Northacker, D; Onel, Y; Chang, S; Khan, A; Kim, D H; Kong, D.J; Oh, Y D; Kawagoe, K; Hirai, H; Sudo, Y; Suehara, T; Sumida, H; Yoshioka, T; Gil, E Cortina; Mannai, S; Buridon, V; Combaret, C; Caponetto, L; Eté, R; Garillot, G; Grenier, G; Han, R; Ianigro, J C; Kieffer, R; Laktineh, I; Lumb, N; Mathez, H; Mirabito, L; Petrukhin, A; Steen, A; Antequera, J Berenguer; Alamillo, E Calvo; Fouz, M-C; Marin, J; Puerta-Pelayo, J; Verdugo, A; Chadeeva, M; Danilov, M; Gabriel, M; Goecke, P; Kiesling, C; vanderKolk, N; Simon, F; Szalay, M; Bilokin, S; Bonis, J; Cornebise, P; Richard, F; Pöschl, R; Rouëné, J; Thiebault, A; Zerwas, D; Anduze, M; Balagura, V; Belkadhi, K; Boudry, V; Brient, J-C; Cornat, R; Frotin, M; Gastaldi, F; Haddad, Y; Magniette, F; Ruan, M; Rubio-Roy, M; Shpak, K; Videau, H; Yu, D; Callier, S; di Lorenzo, S Conforti; Dulucq, F; Martin-Chassard, G; de la Taille, Ch; Raux, L; Seguin-Moreau, N; Kotera, K; Ono, H; Takeshita, T; Corriveau, F

    2016-01-01

    The CALICE Semi-Digital Hadron Calorimeter (SDHCAL) technological prototype is a sampling calorimeter using Glass Resistive Plate Chamber detectors with a three-threshold readout as the active medium. This technology is one of the two options proposed for the hadron calorimeter of the International Large Detector for the International Linear Collider. The prototype was exposed to beams of muons, electrons and pions of different energies at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. To be able to study the performance of such a calorimeter in future experiments it is important to ensure reliable simulation of its response. In this paper we present our prototype simulation performed with GEANT4 and the digitization procedure achieved with an algorithm called SimDigital. A detailed description of this algorithm is given and the methods to determinate its parameters using muon tracks and electromagnetic showers are explained. The comparison with hadronic shower data shows a good agreement up to 50 GeV. Discrepancies are ...

  11. LEP vacuum chamber, early prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    The structure of LEP, with long bending magnets and little access to the vacuum chamber between them, required distributed pumping. This is an early prototype for the LEP vacuum chamber, made from extruded aluminium. The main opening is for the beam. The small channel to the right is for cooling water, to carry away the heat deposited by the synchroton radiation from the beam. The 4 slots in the channel to the left house the strip-shaped ion-getter pumps (see 7810255). The ion-getter pumps depended on the magnetic field of the bending magnets, too low at injection energy for the pumps to function well. Also, a different design was required outside the bending magnets. This design was therefore abandoned, in favour of a thermal getter pump (see 8301153 and 8305170).

  12. Actuator System with Dual Chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    (8), the lid having a shaft opening (17) for a shaft (6) coupled to the magnetic rotor (5), wherein the magnetic rotor (5), when inserted in the translator cylinder (2), is arranged to translate a linear movement of the translator cylinder (2) into a rotational movement of the magnetic rotor by using...... magnetic flux (82) interacting between the magnetic stator and the magnetic rotor, said rotational movements is being transferred through a shaft (6), the lid (8) with a shaft opening (17) arranged for receiving the shaft (6), wherein the shaft is arranged to make both the linear and the rotational...... movement in the shaft opening (17), the lid (8) being arranged for confining the second end (15) of the translator cylinder (2), the translator cylinder confined by the lid (8) forms,when divided by the magnetic rotor (5), a first chamber (TC) with a first volume and a second chamber(BC) with a second...

  13. Wide range radioactive gas concentration detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David F.

    1984-01-01

    A wide range radioactive gas concentration detector and monitor which is capable of measuring radioactive gas concentrations over a range of eight orders of magnitude. The device of the present invention is designed to have an ionization chamber which is sufficiently small to give a fast response time for measuring radioactive gases but sufficiently large to provide accurate readings at low concentration levels. Closely spaced parallel plate grids provide a uniform electric field in the active region to improve the accuracy of measurements and reduce ion migration time so as to virtually eliminate errors due to ion recombination. The parallel plate grids are fabricated with a minimal surface area to reduce the effects of contamination resulting from absorption of contaminating materials on the surface of the grids. Additionally, the ionization chamber wall is spaced a sufficient distance from the active region of the ionization chamber to minimize contamination effects.

  14. Monitoring Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers With A Raspberry Pi Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patteson, Crystal

    2016-03-01

    The MicroBooNE detector is the first of three liquid argon (LAr) time projection chambers (TPCs) that are central to the short-baseline neutrino program at Fermilab. These chambers consist of thousands of stainless steel or beryllium-copper sense wires that detect ionization electrons produced when neutrinos interact with liquid argon nuclei inside the detector. The wires are several hundred microns in diameter to several meters in length. The construction of such LAr TPCs often takes place in an assembly hall, which is different from the detector hall where the experiment will operate, as was the case with MicroBooNE. Since in situ access to the chamber and its wires in the beamline enclosure can be limited, we investigate the possibility of using a Raspberry Pi single-board computer connected to a low-cost camera installed inside the cryostat as a cost-efficient way to verify the integrity of the wires after transport. We also highlight other benefits of this monitoring device implemented in MicroBooNE, including detector hall surveillance and verification of the status of LED indicators on detector electronics. The author would like to thank Dr. Matthew Toups for his encouragement and guidance on this research project.

  15. Simulation and measurements of the response of an air ionisation chamber exposed to a mixed high-energy radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CERN's radiation protection group operates a network of simple and robust ionisation chambers that are installed inside CERN's accelerator tunnels. These ionisation chambers are used for the remote reading of ambient dose rate equivalents inside the machines during beam-off periods. This Radiation Protection Monitor for dose rates due to Induced Radioactivity ('PMI', trade name: PTW, Type 34031) is a non-confined air ionisation plastic chamber which is operated under atmospheric pressure. Besides its current field of operation it is planned to extend the use of this detector in the Large Hadron Collider to measure radiation under beam operation conditions to obtain an indication of the machine performance. Until now, studies of the PMI detector have been limited to the response to photons. In order to evaluate its response to other radiation components, this chamber type was tested at CERF, the high-energy reference field facility at CERN. Six PMI detectors were installed around a copper target being irradiated by a mixed hadron beam with a momentum of 120 GeV c-1. Each of the chosen detector positions was defined by a different radiation field, varying in type and energy of the incident particles. For all positions, detailed measurements and FLUKA simulations of the detector response were performed. This paper presents the promising comparison between the measurements and simulations and analyses the influence of the different particle types on the resulting detector response. (authors)

  16. The KEK 1 m hydrogen bubble chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A medium size hydrogen bubble chamber has been constructed at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, KEK. The bubble chamber has been designed to be operated with a maximum rate of three times per half a second in every two second repetition time of the accelerator, by utilizing a hydraulic expansion system. The bubble chamber has a one meter diameter and a visible volume of about 280 l. A three-view stereo camera system is used for taking photographic pictures of the chamber. A 2 MW bubble chamber magnet is constructed. The main part of the bubble chamber vessel is supported by the magnet yoke. The magnet gives a maximum field of 18.4 kG at the centre of the fiducial volume of the chamber. The overall system of the KEK 1 m hydrogen bubble chamber facility is described in some detail. Some operational characteristics of the facility are also reported. (auth.)

  17. NRAO RF Anechoic Chamber & Antenna Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A shielded anechoic chamber measuring 15 by 15 by 37 feet is located in the Jansky Laboratory at Green Bank. This chamber has been outfitted as a far-field antenna...

  18. Magma chamber processes in central volcanic systems of Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Þórarinsson, Sigurjón Böðvar; Tegner, Christian

    2009-01-01

    New field work and petrological investigations of the largest gabbro outcrop in Iceland, the Hvalnesfjall gabbro of the 6-7 Ma Austurhorn intrusive complex, have established a stratigraphic sequence exceeding 800 m composed of at least 8 macrorhythmic units. The bases of the macrorhythmic units...... olivine basalts from Iceland that had undergone about 20% crystallisation of olivine, plagioclase and clinopyroxene and that the macrorhythmic units formed from thin magma layers not exceeding 200-300 m. Such a "mushy" magma chamber is akin to volcanic plumbing systems in settings of high magma supply...... rate including the mid-ocean ridges and present-day magma chambers over the Iceland mantle plume. The Austurhorn central volcano likely formed in an off-rift flank zone proximal to the Iceland mantle plume during a major rift relocation....

  19. Theory of fission detector signals in reactor measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Pál, L

    2015-01-01

    The Campbell theorem, relating the variance of the current of a fission chamber (a "filtered Poisson process") to the intensity of the detection events and to the detector pulse shape, becomes invalid when the neutrons generating the fission chamber current are not independent. Recently a formalism was developed by the present authors [1], by which the variance of the detector current could be calculated for detecting neutrons in a subcritical multiplying system, where the detection events are obviously not independent. In the present paper, the previous formalism, which only accounted for prompt neutrons, is generalised to account also for delayed neutrons. A rigorous probabilistic analysis of the detector current was performed by using the same simple, but realistic detector model as in the previous work. The results of the present analysis made it possible to determine the bias of the traditional Campbelling techniques both qualitatively and quantitatively. The results show that the variance still remains ...

  20. Calorimeter based detectors for high energy hadron colliders. [Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-23

    The work was directed in two complementary directions, the D0 experiment at Fermilab, and the GEM detector for the SSC. Efforts have been towards the data taking and analysis with the newly commissioned D0 detector at Fermilab in the {bar p}p Collider run that started in May 1992 and ended on June 1, 1993. We involved running and calibration of the calorimeter and tracking chambers, the second level trigger development, and various parts of the data analysis, as well as studies for the D0 upgrade planned in the second half of this decade. Another major accomplishment was the ``delivery`` of the Technical Design Report for the GEM SSC detector. Efforts to the overall detector and magnet design, design of the facilities, installation studies, muon system coordination, muon chamber design and tests, muon system simulation studies, and physics simulation studies. In this document we describe these activities separately.