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Sample records for chamaedoreeae supports eocene

  1. A dated phylogeny of the palm tribe Chamaedoreeae supports Eocene dispersal between Africa, North and South America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuenca-Navarro, Argelia; Lange, Conny Bruun Asmussen; Borchsenius, Finn

    2008-01-01

    the phylogenetic relationships and biogeography of the Chamaedoreeae. The resulting phylogeny fully resolved the generic relationships within the tribe. The exact area of origin of the tribe remains uncertain, but dating analyses indicated an initial diversification of the Chamaedoreeae during the Early Eocene...

  2. The oldest accurate record of Scenopinidae in the Lowermost Eocene amber of France (Diptera: Brachycera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrouste, Romain; Azar, Dany; Nel, Andre

    2016-03-22

    Eocenotrichia magnifica gen. et sp. nov. (Diptera: Scenopinidae: Metatrichini) is described and illustrated from the Lowermost Eocene amber of Oise (France) and represents the oldest definitive window fly fossil. The present discovery in the Earliest Eocene supports the Late Cretaceous-Paleocene age currently proposed for the emergence of Metatrichini.

  3. Large Variations in Ice Volume During the Middle Eocene "Doubthouse"

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    Dawber, C. F.; Tripati, A. K.

    2008-12-01

    The onset of glacial conditions in the Cenozoic is widely held to have begun ~34 million years ago, coincident with the Eocene-Oligocene boundary1. Warm and high pCO2 'greenhouse' intervals such as the Eocene are generally thought to be ice-free2. Yet the sequence stratigraphic record supports the occurrence of high-frequency sea-level change of tens of meters in the Middle and Late Eocene3, and large calcite and seawater δ18O excursions (~0.5-1.0 permil) have been reported in foraminifera from open ocean sediments4. As a result, the Middle Eocene is often considered the intermediary "doubthouse". The extent of continental ice during the 'doubthouse' is controversial, with estimates of glacioeustatic sea level fall ranging from 30 to 125m2,3,5. We present a new δ18Osw reconstruction for Ocean Drilling Project (ODP) Site 1209 in the tropical Pacific Ocean. It is the first continuous high-resolution record for an open-ocean site that is not directly influenced by changes in the carbonate compensation depth, which enables us to circumvent many of the limitations of existing records. Our record shows increases of 0.8 ± 0.2 (1 s.e) permil and 1.1 ± 0.2 permil at ~44-45 and ~42-41 Ma respectively, which suggests glacioeustatic sea level variations of ~90 m during the Middle Eocene. Modelling studies have shown that fully glaciating Antarctica during the Eocene should drive a change in seawater (δ18Osw) of 0.45 permil, and lower sea level by ~55 m6. Our results therefore support significant ice storage in both the Northern and Southern Hemisphere during the Middle Eocene 'doubthouse'. 1.Miller, Kenneth G. et al., 1990, Eocene-Oligocene sea-level changes in the New Jersey coastal plain linked to the deep-sea record. Geological Society of America Bulletin 102, 331-339 2.Pagani, M. et al., 2005, Marked decline in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations during the Paleogene. Science 309 (5734), 600-603. 3.Browning, J., Miller, K., and Pak, D., 1996, Global implications

  4. Eocene lizard from Germany reveals amphisbaenian origins.

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    Müller, Johannes; Hipsley, Christy A; Head, Jason J; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Hilger, André; Wuttke, Michael; Reisz, Robert R

    2011-05-19

    Amphisbaenia is a speciose clade of fossorial lizards characterized by a snake-like body and a strongly reinforced skull adapted for head-first burrowing. The evolutionary origins of amphisbaenians are controversial, with molecular data uniting them with lacertids, a clade of Old World terrestrial lizards, whereas morphology supports a grouping with snakes and other limbless squamates. Reports of fossil stem amphisbaenians have been falsified, and no fossils have previously tested these competing phylogenetic hypotheses or shed light on ancestral amphisbaenian ecology. Here we report the discovery of a new lacertid-like lizard from the Eocene Messel locality of Germany that provides the first morphological evidence for lacertid-amphisbaenian monophyly on the basis of a reinforced, akinetic skull roof and braincase, supporting the view that body elongation and limblessness in amphisbaenians and snakes evolved independently. Morphometric analysis of body shape and ecology in squamates indicates that the postcranial anatomy of the new taxon is most consistent with opportunistically burrowing habits, which in combination with cranial reinforcement indicates that head-first burrowing evolved before body elongation and may have been a crucial first step in the evolution of amphisbaenian fossoriality.

  5. Eocene diversification of crown group rails (Aves: Gruiformes: Rallidae).

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    García-R, Juan C; Gibb, Gillian C; Trewick, Steve A

    2014-01-01

    Central to our understanding of the timing of bird evolution is debate about an apparent conflict between fossil and molecular data. A deep age for higher level taxa within Neoaves is evident from molecular analyses but much remains to be learned about the age of diversification in modern bird families and their evolutionary ecology. In order to better understand the timing and pattern of diversification within the family Rallidae we used a relaxed molecular clock, fossil calibrations, and complete mitochondrial genomes from a range of rallid species analysed in a Bayesian framework. The estimated time of origin of Rallidae is Eocene, about 40.5 Mya, with evidence of intrafamiliar diversification from the Late Eocene to the Miocene. This timing is older than previously suggested for crown group Rallidae, but fossil calibrations, extent of taxon sampling and substantial sequence data give it credence. We note that fossils of Eocene age tentatively assigned to Rallidae are consistent with our findings. Compared to available studies of other bird lineages, the rail clade is old and supports an inference of deep ancestry of ground-dwelling habits among Neoaves.

  6. Eocene diversification of crown group rails (Aves: Gruiformes: Rallidae.

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    Juan C García-R

    Full Text Available Central to our understanding of the timing of bird evolution is debate about an apparent conflict between fossil and molecular data. A deep age for higher level taxa within Neoaves is evident from molecular analyses but much remains to be learned about the age of diversification in modern bird families and their evolutionary ecology. In order to better understand the timing and pattern of diversification within the family Rallidae we used a relaxed molecular clock, fossil calibrations, and complete mitochondrial genomes from a range of rallid species analysed in a Bayesian framework. The estimated time of origin of Rallidae is Eocene, about 40.5 Mya, with evidence of intrafamiliar diversification from the Late Eocene to the Miocene. This timing is older than previously suggested for crown group Rallidae, but fossil calibrations, extent of taxon sampling and substantial sequence data give it credence. We note that fossils of Eocene age tentatively assigned to Rallidae are consistent with our findings. Compared to available studies of other bird lineages, the rail clade is old and supports an inference of deep ancestry of ground-dwelling habits among Neoaves.

  7. Was the Eocene Arctic a Source Area for Exotic Plants and Mammals? (Invited)

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    Eberle, J. J.; Harrington, G. J.; Fricke, H. C.; Humphrey, J.; Hackett, L.; Newbrey, M.; Hutchison, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    Today’s High Arctic is undergoing rapid warming, but the impact on its animal and plant communities is not clear. As a deep time analog to better understand and predict the impacts of global warming on the Arctic biota, early Eocene (52-53 Ma) rocks on Ellesmere Island, Nunavut in Canada’s High Arctic (~79°N latitude) preserve evidence of diverse terrestrial ecosystems that supported dense forests inhabited by turtles, alligators, snakes, primates, tapirs, brontotheres, and hippo-like Coryphodon. The fossil localities were just a few degrees further south and still well above the Arctic Circle during the early Eocene; consequently, the biota experienced months of continuous sunlight as well as darkness, the Arctic summer and winter, respectively. The flora and fauna of the early Eocene Arctic imply warmer, wetter conditions than at present, and recently published analyses of biogenic phosphate from fossil fish, turtle, and mammal estimate warm summers (19 - 20 C) and mild, above-freezing winters. In general, temperature estimates for the early Eocene Arctic can be compared to those found today in temperate rainforests in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. The early Eocene Arctic mammalian fauna shares most genera with coeval mid-latitude faunas thousands of kilometers to the south in the US Western Interior, and several genera also are shared with Europe and Asia. Recent analyses suggest that the large herbivores such as hippo-like Coryphodon were year-round inhabitants in the Eocene Arctic forests. Although several of the Eocene Arctic mammalian taxa are hypothesized to have originated in either mid-latitude North America or Asia, the earlier occurrence of certain clades (e.g., tapirs) in the Arctic raises the possibility of a northern high-latitude origin. Analysis of the early Eocene Arctic palynoflora indicates comparable richness to early Eocene plant communities in the US Western Interior, but nearly 50% of its species (mostly angiosperms) are

  8. Diversity of cingulate xenarthrans in the middle-late Eocene of Northwestern Argentina

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    Martín R. Ciancio

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of Paleogene mammals of intermediate and low latitudes has increased in the last decades and has been clearly demonstrated their importance in the comprehension of the evolution and faunistic changes outside Patagonia. The study of these faunas permits establishing new comparisons among contemporaneous faunistic associations, completing the distributional patterns, and evaluating evolutionary changes in the lineages in relation to climatic conditions prevailing in each of the different regions. In this work we study the diversity of Dasypodidae recovered from the Geste Formation (Northwestern Argentina. Bearing levels of Geste Formation were referred alternatively to a Barrancan subage of Casamayoran SALMA (middle Eocene, Lutetian–Bartonian or a Mustersan SALMA (middle–late Eocene, Bartonian–Priabonian on faunistic comparations with their equivalent in Patagonia, although absolute isotopic data indicates ca. 37–35 Ma (late Eocene, Priabonian. We described the following taxa of Dasypodidae: (i Dasypodinae Astegotheriini: cf. Astegotherium sp., ?Prostegotherium sp., Parastegosimpsonia cf. P. peruana; (ii Dasypodinae indet.; (iii Euphractinae Euphractini: Parutaetus punaensis sp. nov.; (iv Dasypodidae incertae sedis: Pucatherium parvum, Punatherium catamarcensis gen. et sp. nov. In comparison with other beds bearing Eocene cingulate faunas from Northwestern Argentina, Geste Formation presents the greatest diversity of dasypodids. This association is consistent with a late Eocene age and shows a taxonomic and biogeographic relevant features given by a unique specific composition: (i it differs from that known for contemporaneous faunas from Southern latitudes and younger associations from more tropical areas; (ii it includes genera with close affinities to those distant areas; (iii it presents unique taxa typical from Eocene units exposed at Northwestern Argentina. This highlights the evolutionary and biogeographic meaning of the

  9. Eocene paleosols of King George Island, Maritime Antarctica

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    Spinola, Diogo; Portes, Raquel; Schaefer, Carlos; Kühn, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Red layers between lava flows on King George Island, Maritime Antarctica, were formed during the Eocene, which was one of the warmest periods on Earth in the Cenozoic. Our hypothesis is that these red layers are paleosols formed in periods of little or no volcanic activity. Therefore, our main objective was to identify the main pedogenic properties and features to distinguish these from diagenetic features formed after the lava emplacement. Additionally, we compared our results with volcanic soils formed under different climates to find the best present analogue. The macromorphological features indicate a pedogenic origin, because of the occurrence of well-defined horizons based on colour and structure. Micromorphological analyses showed that most important pedogenic features are the presence of biological channels, plant residues, anisotropic b-fabric, neoformed and illuvial clay and distinct soil microstructure. Although the paleosols are not strongly weathered, the geochemical data also support the pedogenic origin despite of diagenetic features as the partial induration of the profiles and zeolites filling nearly all voids in the horizons in contact with the overlying lava flow, indicating circulation of hydrothermal fluids. The macromorphological and micromorphological features of these paleosols are similar to the soils formed under seasonal climates. Thus, these paleosol features do not correspond to the other proxies (e.g. sediment, plant fossils), which indicate a wet, non-seasonal climate, as in Valdivian Forest, Chile, during the Eocene in King George Island

  10. Middle Eocene rodents from Peruvian Amazonia reveal the pattern and timing of caviomorph origins and biogeography.

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    Antoine, Pierre-Olivier; Marivaux, Laurent; Croft, Darin A; Billet, Guillaume; Ganerød, Morgan; Jaramillo, Carlos; Martin, Thomas; Orliac, Maëva J; Tejada, Julia; Altamirano, Ali J; Duranthon, Francis; Fanjat, Grégory; Rousse, Sonia; Gismondi, Rodolfo Salas

    2012-04-07

    The long-term isolation of South America during most of the Cenozoic produced a highly peculiar terrestrial vertebrate biota, with a wide array of mammal groups, among which caviomorph rodents and platyrrhine primates are Mid-Cenozoic immigrants. In the absence of indisputable pre-Oligocene South American rodents or primates, the mode, timing and biogeography of these extraordinary dispersals remained debated. Here, we describe South America's oldest known rodents, based on a new diverse caviomorph assemblage from the late Middle Eocene (approx. 41 Ma) of Peru, including five small rodents with three stem caviomorphs. Instead of being tied to the Eocene/Oligocene global cooling and drying episode (approx. 34 Ma), as previously considered, the arrival of caviomorphs and their initial radiation in South America probably occurred under much warmer and wetter conditions, around the Mid-Eocene Climatic Optimum. Our phylogenetic results reaffirm the African origin of South American rodents and support a trans-Atlantic dispersal of these mammals during Middle Eocene times. This discovery further extends the gap (approx. 15 Myr) between first appearances of rodents and primates in South America.

  11. Nummulite biostratigraphy of the Eocene succession in the Bahariya Depression, Egypt: Implications for timing of iron mineralization

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    Afify, A. M.; Serra-Kiel, J.; Sanz-Montero, M. E.; Calvo, J. P.; Sallam, E. S.

    2016-08-01

    In the northern part of the Bahariya Depression (Western Desert, Egypt) the Eocene carbonate succession, unconformably overlying the Cretaceous deposits, consists of three main stratigraphic units; the Naqb, Qazzun and El Hamra formations. The Eocene carbonates are relevant as they locally host a large economic iron mineralization. This work revises the stratigraphic attribution of the Eocene formations on the basis of larger benthic foraminifers from both carbonate and ironstone beds. Eight Nummulites species spanning the late Ypresian - early Bartonian (SBZ12 to SBZ17) were identified, thus refining the chronostratigraphic framework of the Eocene in that region of Central Egypt. Moreover, additional sedimentological insight of the Eocene carbonate rocks is presented. The carbonate deposits mainly represent shallow marine facies characteristic of inner to mid ramp settings; though deposits interpreted as intertidal to supratidal are locally recognized. Dating of Nummulites assemblages from the youngest ironstone beds in the mines as early Bartonian provides crucial information on the timing of the hydrothermal and meteoric water processes resulting in the formation of the iron ore mineralization. The new data strongly support a post-depositional, structurally-controlled formation model for the ironstone mineralization of the Bahariya Depression.

  12. Lower Eocene on Majevica north of Tuzla (NE Bosnia

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    Jernej Pavšič

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In Lower Eocene marlstones on Mt. Majevica in northeastern Bosnia species Nummulites atacicus and N. robustus were determined, the latter first found on the Balkan Peninsula.In the beds occur next to Paleogene many redeposited Cretaceous nannoplankton species, an indication of the exposure of Cretaceous beds in Lower Eocene in the investigated area.

  13. Early Eocene birds from La Borie, southern France

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourdon, Estelle; Mourer-Chauviré, Cécile; Laurent, Yves

    2016-01-01

    The Early Eocene locality of La Borie is located in the village of Saint-Papoul, in southern France. These Eocene fluvio-lacustrine clay deposits have yielded numerous vertebrate remains. Mammalian taxa found in the fossiliferous levels indicate an age near the reference level MP 8–9, which corre...

  14. Early Eocene birds from La Borie, southern France

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourdon, Estelle; Mourer-Chauviré, Cécile; Laurent, Yves

    2016-01-01

    The Early Eocene locality of La Borie is located in the village of Saint-Papoul, in southern France. These Eocene fluvio-lacustrine clay deposits have yielded numerous vertebrate remains. Mammalian taxa found in the fossiliferous levels indicate an age near the reference level MP 8–9, which...

  15. Evidence for middle Eocene Arctic sea ice from diatoms and ice-rafted debris.

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    Stickley, Catherine E; St John, Kristen; Koç, Nalân; Jordan, Richard W; Passchier, Sandra; Pearce, Richard B; Kearns, Lance E

    2009-07-16

    Oceanic sediments from long cores drilled on the Lomonosov ridge, in the central Arctic, contain ice-rafted debris (IRD) back to the middle Eocene epoch, prompting recent suggestions that ice appeared in the Arctic about 46 million years (Myr) ago. However, because IRD can be transported by icebergs (derived from land-based ice) and also by sea ice, IRD records are restricted to providing a history of general ice-rafting only. It is critical to differentiate sea ice from glacial (land-based) ice as climate feedback mechanisms vary and global impacts differ between these systems: sea ice directly affects ocean-atmosphere exchanges, whereas land-based ice affects sea level and consequently ocean acidity. An earlier report assumed that sea ice was prevalent in the middle Eocene Arctic on the basis of IRD, and although somewhat preliminary supportive evidence exists, these data are neither comprehensive nor quantified. Here we show the presence of middle Eocene Arctic sea ice from an extraordinary abundance of a group of sea-ice-dependent fossil diatoms (Synedropsis spp.). Analysis of quartz grain textural characteristics further supports sea ice as the dominant transporter of IRD at this time. Together with new information on cosmopolitan diatoms and existing IRD records, our data strongly suggest a two-phase establishment of sea ice: initial episodic formation in marginal shelf areas approximately 47.5 Myr ago, followed approximately 0.5 Myr later by the onset of seasonally paced sea-ice formation in offshore areas of the central Arctic. Our data establish a 2-Myr record of sea ice, documenting the transition from a warm, ice-free environment to one dominated by winter sea ice at the start of the middle Eocene climatic cooling phase.

  16. The demise of the early Eocene greenhouse - Decoupled deep and surface water cooling in the eastern North Atlantic

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    Bornemann, André; D'haenens, Simon; Norris, Richard D.; Speijer, Robert P.

    2016-10-01

    Early Paleogene greenhouse climate culminated during the early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO, 50 to 53 Ma). This episode of global warmth is subsequently followed by an almost 20 million year-long cooling trend leading to the Eocene-Oligocene glaciation of Antarctica. Here we present the first detailed planktic and benthic foraminiferal isotope single site record (δ13C, δ18O) of late Paleocene to middle Eocene age from the North Atlantic (Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 401, Bay of Biscay). Good core recovery in combination with well preserved foraminifera makes this site suitable for correlations and comparison with previously published long-term records from the Pacific Ocean (e.g. Allison Guyot, Shatsky Rise), the Southern Ocean (Maud Rise) and the equatorial Atlantic (Demerara Rise). Whereas our North Atlantic benthic foraminiferal δ18O and δ13C data agree with the global trend showing the long-term shift toward heavier δ18O values, we only observe minor surface water δ18O changes during the middle Eocene (if at all) in planktic foraminiferal data. Apparently, the surface North Atlantic did not cool substantially during the middle Eocene. Thus, the North Atlantic appears to have had a different surface ocean cooling history during the middle Eocene than the southern hemisphere, whereas cooler deep-water masses were comparatively well mixed. Our results are in agreement with previously published findings from Tanzania, which also support the idea of a muted post-EECO surface-water cooling outside the southern high-latitudes.

  17. Early Eocene birds from La Borie, southern France

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    Estelle Bourdon

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The early Eocene locality of La Borie is located in the village of Saint-Papoul, in southern France. These Eocene flu-vio-lacustrine clay deposits have yielded numerous vertebrate remains. Mammalian taxa found in the fossiliferous levels indicate an age near the reference level MP 8–9, which corresponds to the middle Ypresian, early Eocene. Here we provide a detailed description of the avian remains that were preliminarily reported in a recent study of the vertebrate fauna from La Borie. A maxilla, a quadrate, cervical vertebrae, a femur and two tibiotarsi are assigned to the giant ground bird Gastornis parisiensis (Gastornithidae. These new avian remains add to the fossil record of Gastornis, which is known from the late Paleocene to middle Eocene of Europe, early Eocene of Asia and early Eocene of North America. Gastornis parisiensis differs from the North American Gastornis giganteus in several features, including the more ventral position of the narial openings and the slender orbital process of quadrate. Two tibiotarsi and one tarsometatarsus are assigned to a new genus and species of Geranoididae, Galligeranoides boriensis gen. et sp. nov. So far, this family was known only from the early and middle Eocene of North America. The fossils from La Borie constitute the first record of the Geranoididae in Europe. We show that Gastornis coexisted with the Geranoididae in the early Eocene of both Europe (La Borie and North America (Willwood Formation. The presence of Geranoididae and the large flightless bird Gastornis on either side of the present-day North Atlantic provides further evidence that a high-latitude land connection existed between Europe and North America in the early Eocene.

  18. Studies in neotropical paleobotany. XIV. A palynoflora from the middle Eocene Saramaguacan formation of Cuba

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    Graham, A.; Cozadd, D.; Areces-Mallea, A.; Frederiksen, N.O.

    2000-01-01

    An assemblage of 46 fossil pollen and spore types is described from a core drilled through the middle Eocene Saramaguacan Formation, Camaguey Province, eastern Cuba. Many of the specimens represent unidentified or extinct taxa but several can be identified to family (Palmae, Bombacaceae, Gramineae, Moraceae, Myrtaceae) and some to genus (Pteris, Crudia, Lymingtonia?). The paleo-climate was warm-temperate to subtropical which is consistent with other floras in the region of comparable age and with the global paleotemperature curve. Older plate tectonic models show a variety of locations for proto-Cuba during Late Cretaceous and later times, including along the norther coast of South America. More recent models depict western and central Cuba as two separate parts until the Eocene, and eastern Cuba (joined to northern Hispaniola) docking to central Cuba also in the Eocene. All fragments are part of the North American Plate and none were directly connected with northern South America in late Mesozoic or Cenozoic time. The Saramaguacan flora supports this model because the assemblage is distinctly North American in affinities, with only one type (Retimonocolpites type 1) found elsewhere only in South America.

  19. Cool-water Eocene-Oligocene carbonate sedimentation on a paleobathymetric high, Kangaroo Island, southern Australia

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    James, Noel P.; Matenaar, Joanne; Bone, Yvonne

    2016-07-01

    The Kingscote Limestone is a thin, biofragmental ~ 41 m thick Paleogene subtropical to cool-temperate carbonate interpreted to have accumulated in a seaway developed between a series of mid-shelf islands. It is a pivotal section that allows interpretation of a region in which there is little exposure of early Cenozoic shelf sediments. Sedimentation occurred on part of the shelf along the northern margin of an extensive Eocene embayment that evolved into a narrow Oligocene ocean following collapse of the Tasman Gateway. Eocene strata are subtropical echinoid-rich floatstones with conspicuous bryozoans, and mollusks, together with large and small benthic foraminifers. Numerous echinoid rudstone storm deposits punctuate the succession. Correlation with coeval Eocene strata across southern Australia supports a regional facies model wherein inner neritic biosiliceous spiculitic sediments passed outboard into calcareous facies. The silica was derived from land covered by a thriving subtropical forest and attendant deep weathering. Oligocene rocks are distinctively cooler cyclic cross-bedded bryozoan rudstones and floatstones with a similar benthic biota but dominated by bryozoans and containing no large benthic foraminifers. These deposits are interpreted as flood-dominated tidal subaqueous dunes that formed in a flood-tide dominated inter-island strait. Omission surfaces at the top of the Eocene and at the top of most Oligocene cycles are Fe-stained hardgrounds that underwent extensive multigeneration seafloor and meteoric diagenesis prior to deposition of the next cycle. Cycles in the Kingscote Limestone, although mostly m-scale and compositionally distinct are similar to those across the region and point to a recurring cycle motif controlled by icehouse eustasy and local paleogeography.

  20. The Terrestrial Eocene-Oligocene Transition in North America

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    Prothero, Donald R.; Emry, Robert J.

    1996-06-01

    The transition from the Eocene to the Oligocene epoch, occurring approximately 47 to 30 million years ago, was the most dramatic episode of climatic and biotic change since the demise of the dinosaurs. The mild tropical climates of the Paleocene and early Eocene were replaced by modern climatic conditions and extremes, including glacial ice in Antarctica. The first part of this book summarizes the latest information in the dating and correlation of the strata of late middle Eocene through early Oligocene age in North America. The second part reviews almost all the important terrestrial reptiles and mammals found near the Eocene-Oligocene boundary, in the White River Chronofauna--from the turtles, snakes and lizards to the common rodents, carnivores, oreodonts and deer of the Badlands. This is the first comprehensive treatment of these topics in over sixty years, and will be invaluable to vertebrate paleontologists, geologists, mammalogists and evolutionary biologists.

  1. Late Paleocene–early Eocene carbon isotope stratigraphy from a near-terrestrial tropical section and antiquity of Indian mammals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Samanta; A Sarkar; M K Bera; Jyotsana Rai; S S Rathore

    2013-02-01

    Late Paleocene to early Eocene (∼56 to 51 Ma) interval is characterized by five distinct transient warming (hyperthermal) events (Paleocene–Eocene thermal maximum (PETM), H1/ETM2/ELMO, H2, I1 and I2) in a super greenhouse globe associated with negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs). Although well-documented marine records exist at different latitudes, terrestrial PETM sections are rare. In particular, almost no terrestrial records of either the PETM or early Eocene hyperthermals (EEHs) are yet available from the tropics. Further, evolution of modern order of mammals near the PETM has been recorded in many northern continents; however, the response of mammals in the tropics to these warming events is unknown. A tropical terrestrial record of these hyperthermal/CIE events, encompassing the earliest modern order mammal bearing horizon from India, can therefore be vital in understanding climatic and biotic evolution during the earliest Cenozoic time. Here, for the first time, we report high resolution carbon isotope (13C) stratigraphy, nannofossil, and Sr isotope ratio of marine fossil carbonate from the Cambay Shale Formation of Western India. The record shows complete preservation of all the above CIE events, including the PETM, hitherto unknown from the equatorial terrestrial records. 13C chemostratigraphy further suggests that at least the present early Eocene mammal-bearing horizon, recently discovered at Vastan, does not support the `out of India' hypothesis of earliest appearance of modern mammals and subsequent dispersal to the Holarctic continents.

  2. Late Paleocene-early Eocene carbon isotope stratigraphy from a near-terrestrial tropical section and antiquity of Indian mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, A.; Sarkar, A.; Bera, M. K.; Rai, Jyotsana; Rathore, S. S.

    2013-02-01

    Late Paleocene to early Eocene (~56 to 51 Ma) interval is characterized by five distinct transient warming (hyperthermal) events (Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM), H1/ETM2/ELMO, H2, I1 and I2) in a super greenhouse globe associated with negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs). Although well-documented marine records exist at different latitudes, terrestrial PETM sections are rare. In particular, almost no terrestrial records of either the PETM or early Eocene hyperthermals (EEHs) are yet available from the tropics. Further, evolution of modern order of mammals near the PETM has been recorded in many northern continents; however, the response of mammals in the tropics to these warming events is unknown. A tropical terrestrial record of these hyperthermal/CIE events, encompassing the earliest modern order mammal bearing horizon from India, can therefore be vital in understanding climatic and biotic evolution during the earliest Cenozoic time. Here, for the first time, we report high resolution carbon isotope ( δ 13C) stratigraphy, nannofossil, and Sr isotope ratio of marine fossil carbonate from the Cambay Shale Formation of Western India. The record shows complete preservation of all the above CIE events, including the PETM, hitherto unknown from the equatorial terrestrial records. δ 13C chemostratigraphy further suggests that at least the present early Eocene mammal-bearing horizon, recently discovered at Vastan, does not support the `out of India' hypothesis of earliest appearance of modern mammals and subsequent dispersal to the Holarctic continents.

  3. Widespread Antarctic glaciation during the Late Eocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Andrew; Riley, Teal R.; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Rittner, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Marine sedimentary rocks drilled on the southeastern margin of the South Orkney microcontinent in Antarctica (Ocean Drilling Program Leg 113 Site 696) were deposited between ∼36.5 Ma to 33.6 Ma, across the Eocene-Oligocene climate transition. The recovered rocks contain abundant grains exhibiting mechanical features diagnostic of iceberg-rafted debris. Sand provenance based on a multi-proxy approach that included petrographic analysis of over 275,000 grains, detrital zircon geochronology and apatite thermochronometry rule out local sources (Antarctic Peninsula or the South Orkney Islands) for the material. Instead the ice-transported grains show a clear provenance from the southern Weddell Sea region, extending from the Ellsworth-Whitmore Mountains of West Antarctica to the coastal region of Dronning Maud Land in East Antarctica. This study provides the first evidence for a continuity of widespread glacier calving along the coastline of the southern Weddell Sea embayment at least 2.5 million yrs before the prominent oxygen isotope event at 34-33.5 Ma that is considered to mark the onset of widespread glaciation of the Antarctic continent.

  4. Middle-Eocene artiodactyls from Shanghuang (Jiangsu Province, Coastal China) and the diversity of basal dichobunoids in Asia

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    Metais, Grégoire; Qi, Tao; Guo, Jianwei; Beard, K. Christopher

    2008-12-01

    A new assemblage of basal dichobunoid artiodactyls from the middle-Eocene Shanghuang fissure fillings includes the diacodexeid Jiangsudon shanghuangensis gen. and sp. nov., a new species of the lantianine dichobunoid Elaschitotherium, Elaschitotherium crepaturus sp. nov., and an indeterminate suoid which is presently the earliest record of this clade. Diacodexeids are also represented by two forms provisionally referred to cf. Diacodexis sp. and to an indeterminate Diacodexeidae, respectively. The occurrence of diacodexeids in Shanghuang contrasts with the early and earliest middle-Eocene chronological range of the family in Europe and North America and suggests that the stratigraphic range of the family in Asia extends up to the middle Eocene. This may reflect particular habitats in coastal China that may have been relatively stable during the early and middle Eocene, thus preserving forest-dwelling artiodactyls that became extinct in the other Holarctic regions. Compared to other supposedly coeval North American, European, and Asian faunas, the Shanghuang mammalian assemblage is most similar to early Uintan faunas of North America but is also remarkable in recording forms close to taxa that are characteristic of the Wasatchian and Bridgerian North American Land Mammal Ages. The Irdinmanhan age of the Shanghuang fauna is supported by the mammalian assemblage recovered from the fissure D, but an Arshantan age cannot be completely ruled out at this point. Although the Shanghuang assemblage is biased towards preservation of small components of the mammalian fauna, the Shanghuang fauna provide an important and unique window into the Eocene diversity and early evolution of cetartiodactyls in eastern Asia.

  5. Antarctic birds (Neornithes during the Cretaceous-Eocene times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Tambussi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Antarctic fossil birds can be confidently assigned to modern orders and families, such as a goose-like anseriform, two loon-like and a seriema-like, all recorded before the K/T boundary at the López de Bertodano Fomation. Also, the discovery of a ratite and a phororhacids from the uppermost levels of the Submeseta Allomember (Late Eocene, suggests that West Antarctica was functional to dispersal routes obligate terrestrial birds. Representatives of Falconiformes Polyborinae, Ciconiiformes, Phoenicoteriformes, Charadriiformes, Pelagornitidae and Diomedeidae constitute the non-penguin avian assemblages of the Eocene of La Meseta Formation. Fifthteen Antarctic species of penguins have been described including the oldest penguin of West Antarctica, Croswallia unienwillia. The Anthropornis nordenskjoeldi Biozone (36.13 and 34.2 Ma, Late Eocene is characterized by bearing one of the highest frequencies of penguin bones and the phospatic brachiopod Lingula., together with remains of Gadiforms, sharks and primitive mysticete whales. Anthropornis nordenskjoeldi, Delphinornis gracilis, D. arctowski, Archaeospheniscus lopdelli, and Palaeeudyptes antarcticus are exclusively of the La Meseta Formation. Anthropornis nordenskjoeldi was evidently the largest penguin recorded at the James Ross Basin, whereas Delphinornis arctowski is the smallest, and include one of the worldwide highest morphological and taxonomic penguin diversity living sympatrically. The progressive climate cooling of the Eocene could have affected the penguin populations, because of climatic changes linked with habitat availability and food web processes. However, there is not available evidence about Antarctic penguins' evolution after the end of the Eocene.

  6. Large amplitude variations in carbon cycling and terrestrial weathering during the latest Paleocene and earliest Eocene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slotnick, B.S.; Dickens, G.R.; Nicolo, M.J.; Hollis, C.J.; Crampton, J.S.; Strong, C.P.; Zachos, J.C.; Sluijs, A.; Lourens, L.; Lauretano, V.

    2011-01-01

    Global temperatures rose ~6°C from the late Paleocene ca. 58 Ma to the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO) ca. 52–50 Ma. Superimposed, were certainly two geologically brief (< 200 kyr) intervals of extreme warming, the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) and Eocene thermal maximum 2 (ETM-2 or H

  7. Derived, still living cockroach genus Cariblattoides (Blattida: Blattellidae) from the Eocene sediments of Green River in Colorado, USA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter Vr(s)ansk(y); Lubomir Vidli(c)ka; Fedor (C)iampor Jr; Finnegan Marsh

    2012-01-01

    Cariblattoides labandeirai sp.n.from the Eocene sediments of Green River in Colorado,USA bear only two plesiomorphies,but also several significant autapomorphies within the advanced and highly derived living cockroach genus.Thus,Cariblattoides with extant occurrence in the Caribbean and South America was historically common in the Nearctic,and represents important evidence for the occurrence of derived living genera of cockroaches ~50 Ma ago.Generally,the vast majority of living genera were absent during the Palaeocene,thus the diversification of most living cockroach lineages near the Palaeocene/Eocene boundary must have been extremely rapid.Females of living C.suave,the type species,have identical (sophisticated) coloration of pronotum,but the most related living taxa are C.piraiensis and C.fontesi from Brazil (supported by phylogenetical analysis).

  8. High bat (Chiroptera) diversity in the Early Eocene of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Thierry; Rana, Rajendra S.; Missiaen, Pieter; Rose, Kenneth D.; Sahni, Ashok; Singh, Hukam; Singh, Lachham

    2007-12-01

    The geographic origin of bats is still unknown, and fossils of earliest bats are rare and poorly diversified, with, maybe, the exception of Europe. The earliest bats are recorded from the Early Eocene of North America, Europe, North Africa and Australia where they seem to appear suddenly and simultaneously. Until now, the oldest record in Asia was from the Middle Eocene. In this paper, we report the discovery of the oldest bat fauna of Asia dating from the Early Eocene of the Cambay Formation at Vastan Lignite Mine in Western India. The fossil taxa are described on the basis of well-preserved fragments of dentaries and lower teeth. The fauna is highly diversified and is represented by seven species belonging to seven genera and at least four families. Two genera and five species are new. Three species exhibit very primitive dental characters, whereas four others indicate more advanced states. Unexpectedly, this fauna presents strong affinities with the European faunas from the French Paris Basin and the German Messel locality. This could result from the limited fossil record of bats in Asia, but could also suggest new palaeobiogeographic scenarios involving the relative position of India during the Early Eocene.

  9. A new Late Eocene anthropoid primate from Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaimanee, Y; Suteethorn, V; Jaeger, J J; Ducrocq, S

    1997-01-30

    The fossil record of anthropoid primates from the Middle Eocene of South Asia is so far restricted to two genera (Pondaungia cotteri Pilgrim, 1937 and Amphipithecus mogaungensis Colbert, 1937 from the Eocene Pondaung deposits of Burma) whose anthropoid status and phylogenetic position have long been under debate because they represent the oldest highly derived fossil primates of anthropoid grade. Moreover, several new African taxa, some of which are even older, have been recently included in the suborder Anthropoidea, suggesting an African origin for this group. Conversely, new fossil primates recently discovered in China (Eosimias) have been related to the most primitive representatives of Anthropoidea, alternatively suggesting an Asian origin and a probable Asian radiation centre. We report here the discovery of a new anthropoid from the Thai Late Eocene locality of Krabi, which displays several additional anthropoid characters with regard to those of the Eocene Burmese genera. This species, which is about the size of the Fayum Aegyptopithecus, can be related to the Burmese forms, and it further provides strong additional evidence for a southeast Asian evolutionary centre for anthropoids.

  10. Scaled biotic disruption during early Eocene global warming events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Gibbs

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Late Paleocene and early Eocene hyperthermals are transient global warming events associated with massive carbon injection or carbon redistribution in the ocean-atmosphere system, and are considered partial analogues for current anthropogenic climate change. Because the magnitude of carbon release varied between the events, they are natural experiments ideal for exploring the relationship between carbon cycle perturbations, climate change and biotic response. Here we quantify marine biotic variability through three million years of the early Eocene, including five hyperthermals, utilizing a method that allows us to integrate the records of different plankton groups through scenarios ranging from background to major extinction events. Our long-time-series calcareous nannoplankton record indicates a scaling of biotic disruption to climate change associated with the amount of carbon released during the various hyperthermals. Critically, only the three largest hyperthermals, the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2 and the I1 event, show above-background variance, suggesting that the magnitude of carbon input and associated climate change needs to surpass a threshold value to cause significant biotic disruption.

  11. Scaled biotic disruption during early Eocene global warming events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gibbs, S.J.; Bown, P.R.; Murphy, B.H.; Sluijs, A.; Edgar, K.M.; Pälike, H.; Bolton, C.T.; Zachos, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Late Paleocene and early Eocene hyperthermals are transient warming events associated with massive perturbations of the global carbon cycle, and are considered partial analogues for current anthropogenic climate change. Because the magnitude of carbon release varied between the events, they are natu

  12. Scaled biotic disruption during early Eocene global warming events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Gibbs

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Late Paleocene and early Eocene hyperthermals are transient warming events associated with massive perturbations of the global carbon cycle, and are considered partial analogues for current anthropogenic climate change. Because the magnitude of carbon release varied between the events, they are natural experiments ideal for exploring the relationship between carbon cycle perturbations, climate change and biotic response. Here we quantify marine biotic variability through three million years of the early Eocene that include five hyperthermals, utilizing a method that allows us to integrate the records of different plankton groups through scenarios ranging from background to major extinction events. Our long time-series calcareous nannoplankton record indicates a scaling of biotic disruption to climate change associated with the amount of carbon released during the various hyperthermals. Critically, only the three largest hyperthermals, the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2 and the I1 event, show above-background variance, suggesting that the magnitude of carbon input and associated climate change needs to surpass a threshold value to cause significant biotic disruption.

  13. Insights into the Tectonic Evolution of the North American Cordilleran Hinterland from Detrital Zircon Double Dating of the Eocene Elko Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canada, A.; Cassel, E. J.; Smith, M. E.; Stockli, D. F.; Jicha, B. R.; Singer, B. S.

    2015-12-01

    The North American Cordilleran hinterland, from eastern Nevada to western Utah, is the product of Mesozoic crustal thickening and eventual orogen collapse. In NE Nevada, the Eocene Elko Formation represents ~10 Myr of high-elevation (up to 3.5 km) lacustrine deposition within a Paleogene orogenic plateau interior, prior to Neogene extensional collapse. Detrital zircon U-Pb and (U-Th)/He (ZHe) double dating from the Elko Formation constrains the timing and magnitude of tectonic-scale processes as well as the evolution of hinterland paleohydrology and magmatism. Eocene maximum depositional ages from detrital zircon are largely consistent with new single crystal sanidine 40Ar/39Ar ages for Elko Formation tuff beds. U-Pb-He double dating of Eocene sediments supports several phases of exhumation and surface uplift in the hinterland. ZHe ages, combined with U-Pb geochronology, clast assemblages, and paleocurrent analysis suggest a significant amount of detritus from the Roberts Mountain Allochthon (RMA) and back-arc plutons was transported to the Elko Basin during the middle Eocene. Detrital zircons sourced from the RMA record progressive unroofing and are characterized by Archean-Paleoproterozoic crystallization ages and Mesoproterozoic-Triassic cooling ages. The preponderance of Precambrian ZHe ages during the middle-late Eocene and the absence of reset ZHe ages throughout the basin imply that sediment burial did not exceed depths of >6 km during the Phanerozoic. Double dating of several grains from a sandstone below the base of the lacustrine section also confirms the presence of volcanic detritus derived from the Challis volcanic field of central Idaho 400 kilometers to the northeast. Lag time analysis permits discrimination of syndepositional volcanic grains from grains derived from rapidly exhumed sources. Lag time analysis (excluding volcanic grains) indicates that several source areas west of the Elko Basin have undergone major exhumation during the late Eocene.

  14. Seasonal variability in Arctic temperatures during the early Eocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, J. J.; Fricke, H. C.; Humphrey, J.; Hackett, L.; Newbrey, M.; Hutchison, H.

    2009-12-01

    As a deep time analog for today’s rapidly warming Arctic region, early Eocene (~53 Ma) rocks on Ellesmere Island, Arctic Canada (~79° N.) preserve evidence of lush swamp forests inhabited by turtles, alligators, primates, tapirs, and hippo-like Coryphodon. Although the rich flora and fauna of the early Eocene Arctic imply warmer, wetter conditions that at present, quantitative estimates of Eocene Arctic climate are rare. By analyzing oxygen isotope ratios of biogenic phosphate from mammal, fish, and turtle fossils from a single locality on central Ellesmere Island, we provide estimates of early Eocene Arctic temperature, including mean annual temperature (MAT) of ~ 8° C, mean annual range in temperature (MART) of ~ 16.5° C, warm month mean temperature (WMMT) of 16 - 19° C, and cold month mean temperature (CMMT) of 0 - 1° C. Our seasonal range in temperature is similar to the range in estimated MAT obtained using different proxies. In particular, unusually high estimates of early Eocene Arctic MAT and sea surface temperature (SST) by others that are based upon the distribution of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) membrane lipids in terrestrial soil bacteria and marine Crenarchaeota fall within our range of WMMT, suggesting a bias towards summer values. Consequently, caution should be taken when using these methods to infer MAT and SST that, in turn, are used to constrain climate models. From a paleontologic perspective, our temperature estimates verify that alligators and tortoises, by way of nearest living relative-based climatic inference, are viable paleoclimate proxies for mild, above-freezing year-round temperatures. Although in both of these reptiles, past temperature tolerances were greater than in their living descendants.

  15. Rapid Middle Eocene temperature change in western North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methner, Katharina; Mulch, Andreas; Fiebig, Jens; Wacker, Ulrike; Gerdes, Axel; Graham, Stephan A.; Chamberlain, C. Page

    2016-09-01

    Eocene hyperthermals are among the most enigmatic phenomena of Cenozoic climate dynamics. These hyperthermals represent temperature extremes superimposed on an already warm Eocene climate and dramatically affected the marine and terrestrial biosphere, yet our knowledge of temperature and rainfall in continental interiors is still rather limited. We present stable isotope (δ18O) and clumped isotope temperature (Δ47) records from a middle Eocene (41 to 40 Ma) high-elevation mammal fossil locality in the North American continental interior (Montana, USA). Δ47 paleotemperatures of soil carbonates delineate a rapid +9/-11 °C temperature excursion in the paleosol record. Δ47 temperatures progressively increase from 23 °C ± 3 °C to peak temperatures of 32 °C ± 3 °C and subsequently drop by 11 °C. This hyperthermal event in the middle Eocene is accompanied by low δ18O values and reduced pedogenic carbonate concentrations in paleosols. Based on laser ablation U/Pb geochronology of paleosol carbonates in combination with magnetostratigraphy, biostratigraphy, stable isotope, and Δ47 evidence, we suggest that this pronounced warming event reflects the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) in western North America. The terrestrial expression of northern hemisphere MECO in western North America appears to be characterized by warmer and wetter (sub-humid) conditions, compared to the post-MECO phase. Large and rapid shifts in δ18O values of precipitation and pedogenic CaCO3 contents parallel temperature changes, indicating the profound impact of the MECO on atmospheric circulation and rainfall patterns in the western North American continental interior during this transient warming event.

  16. Antarctic glaciation caused ocean circulation changes at the Eocene-Oligocene transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldner, A; Herold, N; Huber, M

    2014-07-31

    Two main hypotheses compete to explain global cooling and the abrupt growth of the Antarctic ice sheet across the Eocene-Oligocene transition about 34 million years ago: thermal isolation of Antarctica due to southern ocean gateway opening, and declining atmospheric CO2 (refs 5, 6). Increases in ocean thermal stratification and circulation in proxies across the Eocene-Oligocene transition have been interpreted as a unique signature of gateway opening, but at present both mechanisms remain possible. Here, using a coupled ocean-atmosphere model, we show that the rise of Antarctic glaciation, rather than altered palaeogeography, is best able to explain the observed oceanographic changes. We find that growth of the Antarctic ice sheet caused enhanced northward transport of Antarctic intermediate water and invigorated the formation of Antarctic bottom water, fundamentally reorganizing ocean circulation. Conversely, gateway openings had much less impact on ocean thermal stratification and circulation. Our results support available evidence that CO2 drawdown--not gateway opening--caused Antarctic ice sheet growth, and further show that these feedbacks in turn altered ocean circulation. The precise timing and rate of glaciation, and thus its impacts on ocean circulation, reflect the balance between potentially positive feedbacks (increases in sea ice extent and enhanced primary productivity) and negative feedbacks (stronger southward heat transport and localized high-latitude warming). The Antarctic ice sheet had a complex, dynamic role in ocean circulation and heat fluxes during its initiation, and these processes are likely to operate in the future.

  17. Late Middle Eocene primate from Myanmar and the initial anthropoid colonization of Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaimanee, Yaowalak; Chavasseau, Olivier; Beard, K Christopher; Kyaw, Aung Aung; Soe, Aung Naing; Sein, Chit; Lazzari, Vincent; Marivaux, Laurent; Marandat, Bernard; Swe, Myat; Rugbumrung, Mana; Lwin, Thit; Valentin, Xavier; Zin-Maung-Maung-Thein; Jaeger, Jean-Jacques

    2012-06-26

    Reconstructing the origin and early evolutionary history of anthropoid primates (monkeys, apes, and humans) is a current focus of paleoprimatology. Although earlier hypotheses frequently supported an African origin for anthropoids, recent discoveries of older and phylogenetically more basal fossils in China and Myanmar indicate that the group originated in Asia. Given the Oligocene-Recent history of African anthropoids, the colonization of Africa by early anthropoids hailing from Asia was a decisive event in primate evolution. However, the fossil record has so far failed to constrain the nature and timing of this pivotal event. Here we describe a fossil primate from the late middle Eocene Pondaung Formation of Myanmar, Afrasia djijidae gen. et sp. nov., that is remarkably similar to, yet dentally more primitive than, the roughly contemporaneous North African anthropoid Afrotarsius. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that Afrasia and Afrotarsius are sister taxa within a basal anthropoid clade designated as the infraorder Eosimiiformes. Current knowledge of eosimiiform relationships and their distribution through space and time suggests that members of this clade dispersed from Asia to Africa sometime during the middle Eocene, shortly before their first appearance in the African fossil record. Crown anthropoids and their nearest fossil relatives do not appear to be specially related to Afrotarsius, suggesting one or more additional episodes of dispersal from Asia to Africa. Hystricognathous rodents, anthracotheres, and possibly other Asian mammal groups seem to have colonized Africa at roughly the same time or shortly after anthropoids gained their first toehold there.

  18. Multiple early Eocene hyperthermals: Their sedimentary expression on the New Zealand continental margin and in the deep sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolo, Micah J.; Dickens, Gerald R.; Hollis, Christopher J.; Zachos, James C.

    2007-08-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) ca. 55.5 Ma was a geologically brief interval characterized by massive influx of isotopically light carbon, extreme changes in global climate, and profound variations in Earth system processes. An outstanding issue is whether it was an isolated event, or the most prominent example of a recurring phenomenon. Recent studies of condensed deep-sea sections support the latter, but this finding remains uncertain. Here we present and discuss lithologic and carbon isotope records across two lower Eocene outcrops on South Island, New Zealand. The PETM manifests as a marl-rich horizon with a significant negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE). Above, in sediment deposited between 54 and 53 Ma, are four horizons with similar though less pronounced expressions. Marl beds of all five horizons represent increased terrigenous sedimentation, presumably linked to an accelerated hydrological cycle. Five corresponding clay-rich horizons and CIEs are found in deep-sea records, although the lithologic variations represent carbonate dissolution rather than siliciclastic dilution. The presence of five intervals with similar systemic responses in different environments suggests a mechanism that repeatedly injected large masses of 13 C-depleted carbon during the early Eocene.

  19. Late Eocene diatomite from the Peruvian coastal desert, coastal upwelling in the eastern Pacific, and Pacific circulation before the terminal Eocene event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marty, R.; Dunbar, R.; Martin, J.B.; Baker, P.

    1988-09-01

    Previously undocumented late Eocene diatomaceous sediments are present near Fundo Desbarrancado (FD) in southern Peru. These sediments are similar to Miocene diatomite from the same area but, unlike the Miocene diatomite, the FD sediments contain cherty layers, are enriched in CaCO/sub 3/, have a diverse and abundant radiolarian fauna, and possess varved-massive and millimeter- and meter-scale biogenic-terrigenous alternations. The FD sediments are part of an Eocene sequence that includes the clastic sediments of the Paracas Formation, and they are correlative to the Chira Formation of northern Peru. The Paleogene biogenic sediments of western South America show that coastal upwelling developed in the eastern Pacific before the latest Eocene, argue for the existence of a proto-Humboldt current at this time, and suggest that the terminal Eocene event was the culmination of gradual changes and not a catastrophic event at the Eocene/Oligocene boundary.

  20. The Middle Eocene flora of Csordakút (N Hungary)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdei, Boglárka; Rákosi, László

    2009-02-01

    The Middle Eocene fossil plant assemblage from Csordakút (N Hungary) comprises plant remains preserved exclusively as impressions. Algae are represented by abundant remains of Characeae, including both vegetative fragments and gyrogonites. Remains of angiosperms comprise Lauraceae (Daphnogene sp.), Fagaceae (cf. Eotrigonobalanus furcinervis), Ulmaceae (Cedrelospermum div. sp.), Myricaceae (Myrica sp., Comptonia div. sp.), Leguminosae (leaves and fruit), Rhamnaceae (?Zizyphus zizyphoides), Elaeocarpaceae (Sloanea nimrodi, Sloanea sp. fruit), Smilacaceae (Smilax div. sp.). The absence of gymnosperms is indicative of a floristic similarity to the coeval floras of Tatabánya (N Hungary) and Girbou in Romania. Sloanea nimrodi (Ettingshausen) Kvaček & Hably, a new element for the Hungarian fossil record indicates a floristic relation to the Late Eocene flora of Kučlin (Bohemia).

  1. Impact ejecta at the Paleocene-Eocene boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Morgan F.; Fung, Megan K.; Wright, James D.; Katz, Miriam E.; Kent, Dennis V.

    2016-10-01

    Extraterrestrial impacts have left a substantial imprint on the climate and evolutionary history of Earth. A rapid carbon cycle perturbation and global warming event about 56 million years ago at the Paleocene-Eocene (P-E) boundary (the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum) was accompanied by rapid expansions of mammals and terrestrial plants and extinctions of deep-sea benthic organisms. Here, we report the discovery of silicate glass spherules in a discrete stratigraphic layer from three marine P-E boundary sections on the Atlantic margin. Distinct characteristics identify the spherules as microtektites and microkrystites, indicating that an extraterrestrial impact occurred during the carbon isotope excursion at the P-E boundary.

  2. Late Eocene impact microspherules - Stratigraphy, age and geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, G.; D'Hondt, S. L.; Orth, C. J.; Gilmore, J. S.; Oliver, P. Q.; Shoemaker, E. M.; Molina, E.

    1987-03-01

    The stratigraphy, faunal changes, and geochemistry of deep-sea sediments associated with late Eocene microtektite and microspherule layers are reported. Microprobe analyses of major element compositions of microspherules show that, although there is some compositional overlap in all three late Eocene layers as well as with the Pleistocene Australasian and Ivory Coast microtektites, each microspherule population has characteristic compositional features. All three microspherule layers are associated with decreased carbonate, possibly due to a sudden productivity change, increased dissolution as a result of sea-level and climate fluctuations, or impact events. A discovery of microtektites in the Gl. cerroazulensis Zone off the New Jersey coast extends the North American strewn field from the Caribbean to the northwest Atlantic.

  3. Webspinners in Early Eocene amber from western India (Insecta, Embiodea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Engel

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The family Scelembiidae (Neoembiodea: Embiomorpha: Archembioidea is recorded from Asia for the first time, based on two individuals preserved in Early Eocene amber from the Cambay Basin, western India. Kumarembia hurleyi Engel & Grimaldi, gen. n. et sp. n., is described, figured, and distinguished from other archembioid genera. The genus shares male genitalic features with scelembiids, otherwise known from South America and Africa.

  4. A New Eocene Casquehead Lizard (Reptilia, Corytophanidae) from North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Jack L

    2015-01-01

    A new fossil showing affinities with extant Laemanctus offers the first clear evidence for a casquehead lizard (Corytophanidae) from the Eocene of North America. Along with Geiseltaliellus from roughly coeval rocks in central Europe, the new find further documents the tropical fauna present during greenhouse conditions in the northern mid-latitudes approximately 50 million years ago (Ma). Modern Corytophanidae is a neotropical clade of iguanian lizards ranging from southern Mexico to northern South America.

  5. Asian Eocene monsoons as revealed by leaf architectural signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, Robert A.; Yang, Jian; Herman, Alexei B.; Kodrul, Tatiana; Maslova, Natalia; Spicer, Teresa E. V.; Aleksandrova, Galina; Jin, Jianhua

    2016-09-01

    The onset and development of the Asian monsoon systems is a topic that has attracted considerable research effort but proxy data limitations, coupled with a diversity of definitions and metrics characterizing monsoon phenomena, have generated much debate. Failure of geological proxies to yield metrics capable of distinguishing between rainfall seasonality induced by migrations of the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) from that attributable to topographically modified seasonal pressure reversals has frustrated attempts to understand mechanisms underpinning monsoon development and dynamics. Here we circumvent the use of such single climate parameter metrics in favor of detecting directly the distinctive attributes of different monsoon regimes encoded in leaf fossils. Leaf form adapts to the prevailing climate, particularly under the extreme seasonal stresses imposed by monsoons, so it is likely that fossil leaves carry a unique signature of past monsoon regimes. Leaf form trait spectra obtained from fossils from Eocene basins in southern China were compared with those seen in modern leaves growing under known climate regimes. The fossil leaf trait spectra, including those derived from previously published fossil floras from northwestern India, were most similar to those found in vegetation exposed to the modern Indonesia-Australia Monsoon (I-AM), which is largely a product of seasonal migrations of the ITCZ. The presence of this distinctive leaf physiognomic signature suggests that although a monsoon climate existed in Eocene time across southern Asia the characteristics of the modern topographically-enhanced South Asia Monsoon had yet to develop. By the Eocene leaves in South Asia had become well adapted to an I-AM type regime across many taxa and points to the existence of a pervasive monsoon climate prior to the Eocene. No fossil trait spectra typical of exposure to the modern East Asia monsoon were seen, suggesting the effects of this system in southern

  6. Scaled biotic disruption during early Eocene global warming events

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbs, S. J.; Bown, P. R.; Murphy, B. H.; Sluijs, A.; Edgar, K. M.; Pälike, H.; C. T. Bolton; Zachos, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    Late Paleocene and early Eocene hyperthermals are transient warming events associated with massive perturbations of the global carbon cycle, and are considered partial analogues for current anthropogenic climate change. Because the magnitude of carbon release varied between the events, they are natural experiments ideal for exploring the relationship between carbon cycle perturbations, climate change and biotic response. Here we quantify marine biotic variability through three million years o...

  7. New Eocene damselflies and first Cenozoic damsel-dragonfly of the isophlebiopteran lineage (Insecta: Odonata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrouste, Romain; Nel, André

    2015-10-09

    The study of a new specimen of Petrolestes hendersoni from the Eocene Green Formation allows a more precise description of the enigmatic damselfly and the diagnosis of the Petrolestini. Petrolestes messelensis sp. nov. is described from the Eocene Messel Formation in Germany, extending the distribution of the Petrolestini to the European Eocene. The new damsel-dragonfly family Pseudostenolestidae is described for the new genus and species Pseudostenolestes bechlyi, from the Eocene Messel Formation. It is the first Cenozoic representative of the Mesozoic clade Isophlebioptera.

  8. Late Eocene-Oligocene Te Kuiti Group at Mount Roskill, Auckland, New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edbrooke, S.W.; Crouch, E.M.; Morgans, H.E.G.; Sykes, R. [Institute of Geology and Nuclear Sciences, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    1998-03-01

    A 592 m deep water bore drilled at Mount Roskill in central Auckland, New Zealand, produced the first record of the Te Kuiti Group in Central Auckland. The group comprised erosionally truncated Glen Massey Formation beneath the Waitemata Group, a complete section through Mangakotuku Formation, and an incomplete Waikato Coal Measures section. Drilling stopped in Waikato Coal Measures, probably less than 30 m short of Paleozoic or Mesozoic basement. Vitrinite reflectance measurements indicate a lignite rank for coal fragments collected from the coal measures, and suggest a maximum burial depth of c. 800 m. Six Te Kuiti Group samples examined for palynomorphs and foraminifers gave ages ranging from Runangan to early Whaingaroan and show a transition from a predominantly terrestrial late Eocene environment to a shallow marine setting in the early Oligocene. Results support the suggestion that the southern limit to the Northland Allochthon lies north of Auckland.

  9. Microfacies and biofabric of nummulite accumulations (Bank) from the Eocene deposits of Western Alborz (NW Iran)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Mehdi; Mosaddegh, Hossein; Abbassi, Nasrollah

    2016-12-01

    The nummulite bank from the Eocene Ziarat Formation is described for the first time from Alborz, Iran, enhancing the record of these nummulite-rich accumulations in the Eocene of the circum-Tethyan carbonate platform. Five microfacies types have been defined within the shallow-water carbonate deposits of the Ziarat formation located in the western Alborz zone. Microfacies type 1 contains the most diverse Alveolina species associated with predominance of Nummulites A-forms. Microfacies type 2 is characterized by the presence of bivalve (oysters) fragments. Microfacies type 3 is supported by the high abundance of nummulitids. Microfacies type 4 is dominated by the occurrence of encrusting foraminifera-algal with flat growth forms that are mainly formed within the acervulinids assemblage. Finally, there is the presence of orthophragminids and nummuitids represented by microfacies type 5. Microfacies data obtained from the investigation area show that nummulite banks were formed within the back, core and fore-bank palaeoenvironments. The classification method of this paper is based on use biometric, biofabric, taphonomic and palaeoecological characteristics of larger benthic foraminifera. In addition, the calculated intraskeletal porosity by the use of numerous sections and FE-SEM images of Nummulites tests were displacement of tests in order to achieve a better understanding of paleo-conditions that occurred during sedimentation. We conclude that differences among bank frameworks suggest that small biconvex A-forms of Nummulites tests along with alveolinids were living in shallow, euphotic waters, whereas robust and ovate nummulitid tests thrived and concentrated in the intermediate (40-80 m) water with biofabrics in the min-scales, which indicates the influence of waves and currents in combination with wave-winnowing processes. More distal accumulations, the fore-bank were characterized by orthophragminid and nummulitid tests in the deeper part of the photic zone

  10. Early to Middle Eocene vegetation dynamics at the Wilkes Land Margin (Antarctica)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Contreras, L.; Pross, J.; Bijl, P.K.; Koutsodendris, A.; Raine, J.I.; van de Schootbrugge, B.; Brinkhuis, H.

    2013-01-01

    The early Eocene epoch was characterized by extreme global warmth, which in terrestrial settings was characterized by an expansion of near-tropical vegetation belts into the high latitudes. During the middle to late Eocene, global cooling caused the retreat of tropical vegetation to lower latitudes.

  11. Astronomical pacing of late Palaeocene to early Eocene global warming events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lourens, L.J.; Sluijs, A.; Kroon, D.; Zachos, J.C.; Thomas, E.; Röhl, U.; Bowles, J.; Raffi, I.

    2005-01-01

    At the boundary between the Palaeocene and Eocene epochs, about 55 million years ago, the Earth experienced a strong global warming event, the Palaeocene–Eocene thermal maximum. The leading hypothesis to explain the extreme greenhouse conditions prevalent during this period is the dissociation of 1,

  12. Aridification in continental Asia after the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosboom, R.E.; Abels, H.A.; Hoorn, C.; van den Berg, B.C.J.; Guo, Z.; Dupont-Nivet, G.

    2014-01-01

    Global climate cooling from greenhouse to icehouse conditions occurred across an enigmatic transitional interval during the Eocene epoch characterized by incipient polar ice-sheet formation as well as short-lived warming events, of which the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) is most noticeable.

  13. Earliest record of the fossil snake Palaeophis from the Paleocene/Eocene boundary in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Hans Viborg; Cuny, Gilles Guy Roger; Rasmussen, Arne Redsted;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. – The earliest record of Palaeophis ever found in Denmark is here based on vertebrae described from the Paleocene/Eocene Stolleklint Clay of the Isle of Mors (northern Denmark). Although much smaller, they appear quite similar to the Eocene vertebra described from the Fur Formation in t...

  14. Recognition of Early Eocene global carbon isotope excursions using lipids of marine Thaumarchaeota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoon, P.L.; Heilmann-Clausen, C.; Schultz, B.P.; Sluijs, A.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Schouten, S.

    2013-01-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; similar to 56 Ma) and Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2; similar to 53 Ma) are geological short (<200,000 years) episodes of extreme global warming and environmental change. Both the PETM and ETM2 are associated with the injection of C-13-depleted carbon into

  15. Recognition of Early Eocene global carbon isotope excursions using lipids of marine Thaumarchaeota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoon, P.L.; Heilmann-Clausen, C.; Pagh Schultz, B.; Sluijs, A.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Schouten, S.

    2013-01-01

    The Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; ∼56 Ma) and Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2; ∼53 Ma) are geological short (<200,000 years) episodes of extreme global warming and environmental change. Both the PETM and ETM2 are associated with the injection of 13C-depleted carbon into the ocean–atmosphere

  16. Exploring Terrestrial Temperature Changes during the Early Eocene Hyperthermals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, K. E.; Clyde, W. C.; Fricke, H. C.; Eiler, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Early Eocene is marked by a number of rapid global warming events called hyperthermals. These hyperthermals are associated with negative carbon isotope excursions (CIE) in both marine and terrestrial records. Multiple theories exist to explain the connection of these hyperthermals with the CIEs and each theory predicts different responses by the climate system. Characterizing the timing, duration and magnitude of temperature change that is associated with these hyperthermals is important for determining whether the hyperthermals are all driven by the same underlying climate dynamics or perhaps differ from one another in cause and climatic consequences. In the simplest case, all share a common underlying mechanism; this predicts that the associated temperature changes scale in a predictable way with the magnitude of the CIE (and perhaps exhibit other similarities, such as the relative amplitudes of marine and terrestrial temperature change). To our knowledge, however, the only hyperthermal with paleotemperature data from land is the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). Here we present preliminary carbonate clumped isotope paleotemperature estimates for Early Eocene hyperthermal ETM2/H2 from paleosol carbonates from the Bighorn Basin in Wyoming, USA. We compare the results to existing clumped isotope paleotemperature estimates for the PETM in the Bighorn Basin. Temperatures recorded by paleosol carbonates (which likely reflect near-peak summer ground temperatures) prior to each CIE are ~30°C and increase to ~40-43°C during the apex of each CIE. Following both CIEs, temperatures drop back to pre-CIE values. In the case of ETM2/H2, temperatures begin to rise again immediately, possibly in association with a later hyperthermal, though further work needs to be done to establish this with certainty. These preliminary data suggest that both the absolute values and the magnitudes of temperature changes associated with the PETM and ETM2/H2 are similar; the

  17. Comet or asteroid shower in the late Eocene?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagle, Roald; Claeys, Philippe

    2004-07-23

    The passage of a comet shower approximately 35 million years ago is generally advocated to explain the coincidence during Earth's late Eocene of an unusually high flux of interplanetary dust particles and the formation of the two largest craters in the Cenozoic, Popigai and the Chesapeake Bay. However, new platinum-group element analyses indicate that Popigai was formed by the impact of an L-chondrite meteorite. Such an asteroidal projectile is difficult to reconcile with a cometary origin. Perhaps instead the higher delivery rate of extraterrestrial matter, dust, and large objects was caused by a major collision in the asteroid belt.

  18. Was Global Warming at the Paleocene-Eocene Boundary Terminated by Flood Volcanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegner, C.; Larsen, R. B.

    2008-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) has recently been attributed to greenhouse gases released from sedimentary basins in the Northeast Atlantic due to interaction with continental flood basalt magmatism. In the marine section in Denmark the alkaline Ash-17 has been dated at 55.1 plus minus 0.1 Ma and the PETM at 55.6-55.4 Ma. A similar alkaline tephra deposit in the uppermost part of the East Greenland flood basalt succession has also been dated at 55.1 plus minus 0.1 Ma and provides a linkage to Ash-17. Our recent results on the pressure of the coeval Skaergaard intrusion indicate that the majority of flood basalts erupted in less than 300,000 years. It is therefore possible to correlate the main flood basalt event with the interval immediately postdating PETM (55.4-55.1 Ma). This is consistent with a report of a small dinoflagellate cyst assemblage with a high proportion of Apectodinium homomorphum in one productive sample from sediments within the lower volcanics underlying the main flood basalt succession. The Apectodinium genus is usually abundant in the PETM interval. A scarcity of ash layers within the PETM interval also supports a correlation of the main flood basalt event with the overlying marine section including more abundant ash layers. The high eruption rate of the main flood basalts is likely to have resulted in atmospheric cooling caused by sulfuric acid aerosols produced from volcanic sulfur dioxide. Available estimates for volume and composition of the Northeast Atlantic flood basalts indicate that at least 36 teratonnes of sulfur dioxide was pumped into the atmosphere. This average 120 megatonnes per year over 300,000 years. For comparison, the historic Laki eruption in Iceland is estimated to have released 120 megatonnes sulfur dioxide over 5 months. We suggest that flood volcanism of the Northeast Atlantic terminated the global warming event at the Paleocene-Eocene boundary.

  19. An extinct Eocene taxon of the daisy family (Asteraceae): evolutionary, ecological and biogeographical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreda, Viviana D.; Palazzesi, Luis; Katinas, Liliana; Crisci, Jorge V.; Tellería, María C.; Bremer, Kåre; Passala, Mauro G.; Bechis, Florencia; Corsolini, Rodolfo

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Morphological, molecular and biogeographical information bearing on early evolution of the sunflower alliance of families suggests that the clade containing the extant daisy family (Asteraceae) differentiated in South America during the Eocene, although palaeontological studies on this continent failed to reveal conclusive support for this hypothesis. Here we describe in detail Raiguenrayun cura gen. & sp. nov., an exceptionally well preserved capitulescence of Asteraceae recovered from Eocene deposits of northwestern Patagonia, Argentina. Methods The fossil was collected from the 47·5 million-year-old Huitrera Formation at the Estancia Don Hipólito locality, Río Negro Province, Argentina. Key Results The arrangement of the capitula in a cymose capitulescence, the many-flowered capitula with multiseriate–imbricate involucral bracts and the pappus-like structures indicate a close morphological relationship with Asteraceae. Raiguenrayun cura and the associated pollen Mutisiapollis telleriae do not match exactly any living member of the family, and clearly represent extinct taxa. They share a mosaic of morphological features today recognized in taxa phylogenetically close to the root of Asteraceae, such as Stifftieae, Wunderlichioideae and Gochnatieae (Mutisioideae sensu lato) and Dicomeae and Oldenburgieae (Carduoideae), today endemic to or mainly distributed in South America and Africa, respectively. Conclusions This is the first fossil genus of Asteraceae based on an outstandingly preserved capitulescence that might represent the ancestor of Mutisioideae–Carduoideae. It might have evolved in southern South America some time during the early Palaeogene and subsequently entered Africa, before the biogeographical isolation of these continents became much more pronounced. The new fossil represents the first reliable point for calibration, favouring an earlier date to the split between Barnadesioideae and the rest of Asteraceae than previously

  20. Early Eocene cyclicity at the Wilkes Land Margin, Antarctica: Orbital forcing and environmental response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehl, U.; Bijl, P.; Jiménez, F.; Pross, J.; Contreras, L.; Tauxe, L.; Bohaty, S. M.; Bendle, J.; Brinkhuis, H.; IODP Expedition 318 Scientists

    2011-12-01

    The early Eocene Greenhouse interval (~56-49 Ma) was punctuated by multiple transient global warming events, or hyperthermals - the most prominent of which was the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). Additional thermal maxima identified in Eocene records exhibit negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs), carbonate dissolution horizons, and biotic perturbations, although of reduced magnitude and duration relative to the PETM. Many hyperthermals have been identified or postulated in the early Eocene, but it is unclear which of these events are normal carbon-cycle variations that occurred at orbital frequencies and which are exceptional events outside the normal range of Eocene carbon-cycle variability. Here we present a high-resolution cyclostratigraphy for a new early Eocene drillcore from the Wilkes Land Margin in direct proximity to the Antarctic continent (Site U1356 drilled during IODP Expedition 318). Site U1356 was situated in a mid-shelf setting during the early Eocene and is characterized by a superb magnetostratigraphy and a robust biostratigraphic age control. Our investigation includes XRF core scanning and ICP-MS data as well as bulk organic carbon isotope ratios (delta13Corg) in combination with the concentration of the total organic carbon (TOC). The early Eocene at Site U1356 consists of well developed cyclic claystones including the interval of magnetochron C24 which is ideal to re-evaluate the early Eocene part of the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS) and to provide new insights into the environmental responses as well as orbital configuration of early Eocene climatic cycles.

  1. Occurrence of gigantic biogenic magnetite during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, D.; Raub, T. D.; Kopp, R. E.; Guerquin-Kern, J. L.; Wu, T. D.; Rouiller, I.; Smirnov, A. V.; Sears, S. K.; Lücken, U.; Tikoo, S. M.; Hesse, R.; Kirschvink, J. L.; Vali, H.

    2009-04-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is one of the most severe climatic events of the Cenozoic Era. A massive injection of light carbon into the oceans and atmosphere over a few thousand of years triggered drastic perturbation of Earth's climate resulting in abrupt global warming of ~5-9oC [Sluijs et al., 2007] that persisted for ~180,000 years. This episode is marked by the diversification and radiation of terrestrial plants and mammals while in the marine realm numerous deep-sea benthic foraminifera species disappeared and new forms evolved. Sediments deposited during the PETM are clay-rich and contain distinct evidence of these climatic changes. Kopp et al., (2007) and Lippert & Zachos (2007) report an extraordinary magnetofossil ‘Lagerstätte' in lowermost Eocene kaolinite-rich clay sediments deposited at subtropical paleolatitude in the Atlantic Coastal Plain of New Jersey, USA. Magnetofossils are magnetic particles produced most abundantly by magnetotactic bacteria. Kopp et al. (2007) and Lippert & Zachos (2007) used ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectroscopy, other rock magnetic methods, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of magnetic separates to characterize sediments from boreholes at Ancora (ODP Leg 174AX) and Wilson Lake, NJ, respectively. These sediments contain abundant ~40- to 300-nm cuboidal, elongate-prismatic and bullet-shaped magnetofossils, sometimes arranged in short chains, resembling crystals in living magnetotactic bacteria. Despite the scarcity of intact magnetofossil chains, the asymmetry ratios of the FMR spectra reflects a profusion of elongate single domain (SD) crystals and/or chains. Here we address both conundrums by reporting the discovery from these same sediments of exceptionally large and novel biogenic magnetite crystals unlike any previously reported from living organisms or from sediments. Aside from abundant bacterial magnetofossils, electron microscopy reveals novel spearhead-like and spindle-like magnetite

  2. First record of eocene bony fishes and crocodyliforms from Canada's Western Arctic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaelyn J Eberle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Discovery of Eocene non-marine vertebrates, including crocodylians, turtles, bony fishes, and mammals in Canada's High Arctic was a critical paleontological contribution of the last century because it indicated that this region of the Arctic had been mild, temperate, and ice-free during the early - middle Eocene (∼53-50 Ma, despite being well above the Arctic Circle. To date, these discoveries have been restricted to Canada's easternmost Arctic - Ellesmere and Axel Heiberg Islands (Nunavut. Although temporally correlative strata crop out over 1,000 km west, on Canada's westernmost Arctic Island - Banks Island, Northwest Territories - they have been interpreted as predominantly marine. We document the first Eocene bony fish and crocodyliform fossils from Banks Island. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe fossils of bony fishes, including lepisosteid (Atractosteus, esocid (pike, and amiid, and a crocodyliform, from lower - middle Eocene strata of the Cyclic Member, Eureka Sound Formation within Aulavik National Park (∼76°N. paleolat.. Palynology suggests the sediments are late early to middle Eocene in age, and likely spanned the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These fossils extend the geographic range of Eocene Arctic lepisosteids, esocids, amiids, and crocodyliforms west by approximately 40° of longitude or ∼1100 km. The low diversity bony fish fauna, at least at the family level, is essentially identical on Ellesmere and Banks Islands, suggesting a pan-High Arctic bony fish fauna of relatively basal groups around the margin of the Eocene Arctic Ocean. From a paleoclimatic perspective, presence of a crocodyliform, gar and amiid fishes on northern Banks provides further evidence that mild, year-round temperatures extended across the Canadian Arctic during early - middle Eocene time. Additionally, the Banks Island crocodyliform is consistent with the phylogenetic hypothesis of a Paleogene divergence

  3. Radiative forcing by forest and subsequent feedbacks in the early Eocene climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Port

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Using the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology Earth System Model, we investigate the forcing of forests and the feedback triggered by forests in the pre-industrial climate and in the early Eocene climate (about 54 to 52 million years ago. Other than the interglacial, pre-industrial climate, the early Eocene climate was characterised by high temperatures which led to almost ice-free poles. We compare simulations in which all continents are covered either by dense forest or by bare soil. To isolate the effect of soil albedo, we choose either bright soils or dark soils, respectively. Considering bright soil, forests warm in both, the early Eocene climate and the current climate, but the warming differs due to differences in climate feedbacks. The lapse-rate and water-vapour feedback is stronger in early Eocene climate than in current climate, but strong and negative cloud feedbacks and cloud masking in the early Eocene climate outweigh the stronger positive lapse-rate and water-vapour feedback. In the sum, global mean warming is weaker in the early Eocene climate. Sea-ice related feedbacks are weak in the almost ice-free climate of the early Eocene leading to a weak polar amplification. Considering dark soil, our results change. Forests cools stronger in the early Eocene climate than in the current climate because the lapse-rate and water-vapour feedback is stronger in the early Eocene climate while cloud feedbacks and cloud masking are equally strong in both climates. The different temperature change by forest in both climates highlights the state-dependency of vegetation's impact on climate.

  4. When Indian crabs were not yet Asian - biogeographic evidence for Eocene proximity of India and Southeast Asia

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    Klaus Sebastian

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The faunal and floral relationship of northward-drifting India with its neighboring continents is of general biogeographic interest as an important driver of regional biodiversity. However, direct biogeographic connectivity of India and Southeast Asia during the Cenozoic remains largely unexplored. We investigate timing, direction and mechanisms of faunal exchange between India and Southeast Asia, based on a molecular phylogeny, molecular clock-derived time estimates and biogeographic reconstructions of the Asian freshwater crab family Gecarcinucidae. Results Although the Gecarcinucidae are not an element of an ancient Gondwana fauna, their subfamily Gecarcinucinae, and probably also the Liotelphusinae, evolved on the Indian Subcontinent and subsequently dispersed to Southeast Asia. Estimated by a model testing approach, this dispersal event took place during the Middle Eocene, and thus before the final collision of India and the Tibet-part of Eurasia. Conclusions We postulate that the India and Southeast Asia were close enough for exchange of freshwater organisms during the Middle Eocene, before the final Indian-Eurasian collision. Our data support geological models that assume the Indian plate having tracked along Southeast Asia during its move northwards.

  5. A new genus and species of Heroini (Perciformes: Cichlidae from the early Eocene of southern South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Alano Perez

    Full Text Available The Lumbrera Formation is the uppermost unit of the Salta Group, which crops out in northwestern Argentina. The paleoenvironment of the Lumbrera Formation is interpreted as a perennial lake deposited under temperate climatic conditions during the early to middle Eocene. Its fossil content is made up of palynomorphs, insects, crocodiles, turtles, lizards, and mammals, besides an ichthyofauna formed by cichlids, poeciliids and dipnoans. †Plesioheros chauliodus is described based on a single individual from this formation, which was fossilized as a lateral view impression (missing anal and caudal fins. It can be distinguished from other cichlids by a moderately deep body, enlarged anterior dentary teeth bearing subapical cusp, a low abdominal vertebral count (10, five canal openings in the dentary, and XI + 12 dorsal-fin rays. A phylogenetic analysis, using the matrix by Kullander (1998, recovered †Plesioheros within Heroini. This species was recovered most closely related to Australoheros and to the deep-bodied South American heroins. The occurrence of an Eocene Heroini, as well as of other cichlid lineages in the same stratigraphical level, is evidence of an ancient diversification in this family. This ancient age supports the hypothesis that the Cichlidae originated on Gondwana.

  6. Stable isotope and calcareous nannofossil assemblage record of the late Paleocene and early Eocene (Cicogna section)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnini, Claudia; Spofforth, David J. A.; Dickens, Gerald R.; Rio, Domenico; Pälike, Heiko; Backman, Jan; Muttoni, Giovanni; Dallanave, Edoardo

    2016-04-01

    We present records of stable carbon and oxygen isotopes, CaCO3 content, and changes in calcareous nannofossil assemblages across an 81 m thick section of upper Paleocene-lower Eocene marine sedimentary rocks now exposed along the Cicogna Stream in northeast Italy. The studied stratigraphic section represents sediment accumulation in a bathyal hemipelagic setting from approximately 57.5 to 52.2 Ma, a multi-million-year time interval characterized by perturbations in the global carbon cycle and changes in calcareous nannofossil assemblages. The bulk carbonate δ13C profile for the Cicogna section, once placed on a common timescale, resembles that at several other locations across the world, and includes both a long-term drop in δ13C and multiple short-term carbon isotope excursions (CIEs). This precise correlation of widely separated δ13C records in marine sequences results from temporal changes in the carbon composition of the exogenic carbon cycle. However, diagenesis has likely modified the δ13C record at Cicogna, an interpretation supported by variations in bulk carbonate δ18O, which do not conform to expectations for a primary signal. The record of CaCO3 content reflects a combination of carbonate dilution and dissolution, as also inferred at other sites. Our detailed documentation and statistical analysis of calcareous nannofossil assemblages show major differences before, during and after the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. Other CIEs in our lower Paleogene section do not exhibit such a distinctive change; instead, these events are sometimes characterized by variations restricted to a limited number of taxa and transient shifts in the relative abundance of primary assemblage components. Both long-lasting and short-lived modifications to calcareous nannofossil assemblages preferentially affected nannoliths or holococcoliths such as Discoaster, Fasciculithus, Rhomboaster/Tribrachiatus, Sphenolithus and Zygrhablithus, which underwent distinct variations in

  7. Middle Eocene (Bartonian) Nummulites perforatus bank from the Transylvanian Basin, Romania: an example from a classical occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabolcs Attila, Kövecsi; Lóránd, Silye; György, Less; Sorin, Filipescu

    2016-04-01

    Giant uni-cellulars, Nummulites lived in stable oligotrophic environments throughout the Eocene of the Tethys forming large accumulations called "banks" (Arni, 1965), which were identified on the top of the Cǎpusu Formation, Transylvanian Basin (Popescu, 1978). The studied outcrop is located near Cǎpusu village, Cluj County where we studied two sections (CA1, CA2). They consist of medium to coarse grained sands with abundant Nummulites perforatus (A and B forms). Sporadically specimens of Nummulites beaumonti are also present. According to the larger foraminiferal zonation of Serra-Kiel et al. (1998) the studied nummlitic bank is referred to the SBZ 17 Zone (early Bartonian). Specimens were recovered from 6 samples, about 2 kg each, prepared by standard methods. In section CA1 the A/B ratio ranges between 42/1 and 117/1 while in section CA2 the A/B ratio varies between 27/1 and 52/1. The higher A/B ratio suggests that the original Nummulites assemblages was winnowed in situ. By contrast, the lower A/B ratio indicates that the original assemblage was supposedly selectively winnowed (Ainger, 1985), but they are in situ (Seddighi et al., 2015). This interpretation is supported by the fact, that in all samples the Nummulites specimens (both A and B form) are bioeroded and abraded, which indicates a shallow water environment with high hydrodynamic activity (Racey, 2001; Papazzoni, 2008). Based on our observations the studied nummulitic accumulations consist mostly of monospecific assemblages, and they form a bank. The identified biofabrics, the A/B ratio of the assemblages and the presence of both A and B forms support this interpretation. The presence of the abraded Nummulites tests further suggest that the studied deposits were sedimented in a shallow water environment with high hydrodynamic activity, probably in a wave dominant setting. References: Aigner, T. 1982. Event-stratification in nummulite accumulations and in shell beds from the Eocene of Egypt. In

  8. Cyclocarya cf. paliurus (Batal.) Iljinskaja (Juglandaceae) from the Hunchun Formation (Eocene), Jilin Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong-Xing SUN; Albert G. ABLAEV; Yu-Fei WANG; Cheng-Sen LI

    2005-01-01

    The leaflet architecture of Cyclocarya cf. paliurus (Batal.) Iljinskaja from the Hunchun Formation (Middle Eocene) shows similarity to that of modern C. paliurus (Batal.) Iljinskaja and the specimen is the oldest fossil record in Europe and Asia. The distributions of C. cf. paliurus and other fossil records,such as Glyptostrobus, Metasequoia, Nyssa, and Liquidambar, in Hunchun flora show that it would have been a warmer-temperature to subtropical climate in Hunchun District during the Eocene period.

  9. Earliest record of the fossil snake Palaeophis from the Paleocene/Eocene boundary in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Hans Viborg; Cuny, Gilles; Redsted Rasmussen, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. – The earliest record of Palaeophis ever found in Denmark is here based on vertebrae described from the Paleocene/Eocene Stolleklint Clay of the Isle of Mors (northern Denmark). Although much smaller, they appear quite similar to the Eocene vertebra described from the Fur Formation in t...... in the same area, and all belong to the ‘primitive’ grade of Palaeophis species, although a more precise identification cannot be provided at the moment....

  10. Eocene relatives of cod icefishes (Perciformes: Notothenioidei) from Seymour Island, Antarctica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bieńkowska-Wasiluk, Małgorzata; Bonde, Niels Christensøn; Møller, Peter Rask

    2013-01-01

    Fragmentary skull bones and vertebra from the Upper Eocene La Meseta Formation on Seymour (Marambio) Island, Antarctic Peninsula have been described as gadiform fishes, informally named “Mesetaichthys”. Here we describe jaws as Mesetaichthys jerzmanskae n. g. and n. sp., and refer this taxon to t...... of notothenioids in connection with the deterioration of the climate in Antarctica during the Late Eocene-Oligocene is discussed....

  11. Crown Group Lejeuneaceae and Pleurocarpous Mosses in Early Eocene (Ypresian) Indian Amber

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Cambay amber originates from the warmest period of the Eocene, which is also well known for the appearance of early angiosperm-dominated megathermal forests. The humid climate of these forests may have triggered the evolution of epiphytic lineages of bryophytes; however, early Eocene fossils of bryophytes are rare. Here, we present evidence for lejeuneoid liverworts and pleurocarpous mosses in Cambay amber. The preserved morphology of the moss fossil is inconclusive for a detailed taxonomic t...

  12. Planktic foraminiferal biostratigraphy, paleoecology and chronostratigraphy across the Eocene/Oligocene boundary in northern Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoui-Yaakoub, Narjess; Grira, Chaima; Mtimet, Moncef Saïd; Negra, Mohamed Hédi; Molina, Eustoquio

    2017-01-01

    The biostratigraphic analysis of the Eocene-Oligocene transition of the Menzel Bou Zelfa and Jhaff sections in northeastern Tunisia (Cap Bon peninsula) allows us to identify a continuous planktic foraminiferal biozonation. The following biozones were recognized: Globigerinatheka semiinvoluta Zone (E14), Globigerinatheka index Zone (E15), (Hantkenina alabamensis Zone (E16) of the upper Eocene and Pseudohastigerina naguewichiensis Zone (O1) of the lower Oligocene. A rapid mass extinction event in planktic foraminifera occurred at the Eocene-Oligocene transition, including the extinction of the turborotalids (Turborotalia cerroazulensis, Turborotalia cocoaensis and Turborotalia cunialensis) followed by a significant size reduction of the genus Pseudohastigerina and the extinction of the hantkeninids (Hantkenina alabamensis, Hantkenina brevispina, Hantkenina nanggulanensis and Cribrohantkenina lazzarii), which mark the Eocene/Oligocene boundary. These species were tropical and subtropical surface and intermediate dwellers, with distinctive morphologies (carinate turborotalids and spinose hantkeninids), which were well adapted species of k-strategy. The surviving planktic foraminifera species were quite similar in morphology with globular chambers (globigerinids) and small planispiral (pseudohastigerinids), which were opportunistic species of r-strategy. The recognition of a 4 m thick interval, between the extinction of turborotalids and hantkeninids, indicates that the section is continuous and one of the most expanded throughout the Eocene-Oligocene transition. This section could serve as an auxiliary section (hypostratotype) for the complete definition of the Global Stratotype Section and Point for the Eocene/Oligocene boundary, which mark the base of the Rupelian Stage.

  13. A structural intermediate between triisodontids and mesonychians (Mammalia, Acreodi) from the earliest Eocene of Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabuce, Rodolphe; Clavel, Julien; Antunes, Miguel Telles

    2011-02-01

    A new mammal, Mondegodon eutrigonus gen. et sp. nov., is described from the earliest Eocene locality of Silveirinha, Portugal. This species shows dental adaptations indicative of a carnivorous diet. M. eutrigonus is referred to the order Acreodi and considered, along with the early Paleocene North American species Oxyclaenus cuspidatus, as a morphological intermediate between two groups of ungulate-like mammals, namely, the triisodontids and mesonychians. Considering that triisodontids are early to early-late Paleocene North American taxa, Mondegodon probably belongs to a group that migrated from North America towards Europe during the first part of the Paleocene. Mondegodon could represent thus a relict genus, belonging to the ante-Eocene European mammalian fauna. The occurrence of such a taxon in Southern Europe may reflect a period of isolation of this continental area during the Paleocene/Eocene transition. In this context, the non-occurrence of closely allied forms of Mondegodon in the Eocene North European mammalian faunas is significant. This strengthens the hypothesis that the mammalian fauna from Southern Europe is characterized by a certain degree of endemism during the earliest Eocene. Mondegodon also presents some striking similarities with an unnamed genus from the early Eocene of India which could represent the first Asian known transitional form between the triisodontids and mesonychians.

  14. Origin of the glauconite from the Middle Eocene, Qarara Formation, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegab, Omar A.; Abd El-Wahed, Ahmed G.

    2016-11-01

    Although the Middle Eocene sediments at the Nile Valley, Egypt have been extensively studied, the origin of glauconites in these sediments is still questionable. In this paper, the glauconites that occur in the Qarara Formation were subjected to petrographical and mineralogical studies to assess their origin. Glauconite pellets or grains have been separated from the glauconitic sandy units of the studied three sections. They are present in different colors and different forms. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that bulk samples are composed of mixed - layer clays (illite-montmorillonite), quartz, microcline, and albite. The separated glauconite grains are present in two shapes, the first is spherical and the second is elliptical, both are green in color with different grades. They are authigenic in origin as evidenced by high sorting, presence of deep or surficial fractures, and as supported to form by alteration of fecal pellets. They are also less mature as evidenced by their pale green color and by the higher expandable layer contents in their mixed-layer clay composition.

  15. Investigating vegetation-climate feedbacks during the early Eocene

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    C. A. Loptson

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that the early Eocene was a time of extreme global warmth, extending to the high latitudes. However, there are discrepancies between the results of many previous modelling studies and the proxy data at high latitudes, with models struggling to simulate the shallow temperature gradients of this time period to the same extent as the proxies indicate. Vegetation-climate feedbacks play an important role in the present day, but are often neglected in paleoclimate modelling studies and this may be a contributing factor to resolving the model-data discrepancy. Here we investigate these vegetation-climate feedbacks by carrying out simulations of the early Eocene climate at 2 × and 4 × pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 with fixed vegetation (homogeneous shrubs everywhere and dynamic vegetation. The results show that the simulations with dynamic vegetation are warmer in the global annual mean than the simulations with fixed shrubs by 0.9 °C at 2 × and 1.8 °C at 4 ×. In addition, the warming when CO2 is doubled from 2 × to 4 × is 1 °C higher (in the global annual mean with dynamic vegetation than with fixed shrubs. This corresponds to an increase in climate sensitivity of 26%. This difference in warming is enhanced at high latitudes, with temperatures increasing by over 50% in some regions of Antarctica. In the Arctic, ice-albedo feedbacks are responsible for the majority of this warming. On a global scale, energy balance analysis shows that the enhanced warming with dynamic vegetation is mainly associated with an increase in atmospheric water vapour but changes in clouds also contribute to the temperature increase. It is likely that changes in surface albedo due to changes in vegetation cover resulted in an initial warming which triggered these water vapour feedbacks. In conclusion, dynamic vegetation goes some way to resolving the discrepancy, but our modelled temperatures cannot reach the same warmth as the data suggests in the

  16. Middle Eocene seagrass facies from Apennine carbonate platforms (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassetti, Laura; Benedetti, Andrea; Brandano, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Two stratigraphic sections located in the Latium-Abruzzi (Monte Porchio, Central Apennines, Central Italy) and in the Apulian carbonate platform (S. Cesarea-Torre Tiggiano, Salento, Southern Italy) were measured and sampled to document the sedimentological characteristic and the faunistic assemblages of Middle Eocene seagrass deposits. The faunistic assemblages are dominated by porcellaneous foraminifera Orbitolites, Alveolina, Idalina, Spiroloculina, Quinqueloculina, Triloculina and abundant hooked-shaped gypsinids, associated with hooked red algae and green algae Halimeda. Fabiania, rotaliids and textulariids as well as nummulitids are subordinated. The samples were assigned to Lutetian (SBZ13-16) according to the occurrence of Nummulites cf. lehneri, Alveolina ex. gr. elliptica, Idalina berthelini, Orbitolites complanatus, Slovenites decastroi and Medocia blayensis. At Santa Cesarea reticulate nummulites occur in association with Alveolina spp. and Halkyardia minima marking the lower Bartonian (SBZ17). Three main facies associations have been recognised: I) larger porcellaneous foraminiferal grainstones with orbitolitids and alveolinids deposited into high-energy shallow-water settings influenced by wave processes that reworked the sediments associated with a seagrass; II) grainstone to packstone with small porcellaneous foraminifera and abundant permanently-attached gypsinids deposited in a more protected (e.g., small embayment) in situ vegetated environment; III) bioclastic packstone with parautochthonous material reworked from the seagrass by rip currents and accumulated into rip channels in a slightly deeper environment. The biotic assemblages suggest that the depositional environment is consistent with tropical to subtropical vegetated environments within oligotrophic conditions.

  17. METALLOGENY OF EOCENE SYNCOLLISIONAL GRANITES OF MOTAJICA AND PROSARA MOUNTAINS

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    Ivan Jurković

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The geological setting is dominated by Eocene (48.7 Ma syncollisional granitoids in the form of a small pluton in the Motajica Mt. and in the form of numerous sills and dykes in the Prosara Mt. Microelement paragenesis of these magmatites, pegmatites, greisens and quartz veins are distinguished by U, Th, Ce, Y, P, Nb, Ta, B, Li, F, Be, Sn, Mo, W, Fe, Cu, Pb. These elements and 87Sr/86Sr and 18O isotopic values indicate the mantle origin of magma contaminated by relatively sterile lithospheric rocks. The most probable hypothesis of such a hybrid magma formation is the "slab break-off model". Deep erosion of Motajica granitoid pluton opened its acrobatholitic and epibatholitic level with numerous, but small pegmatite deposits (beryllites, tourmalinites, emeraldites and sylexites with piezoelectric quartz. Greisenization marked by strong silicification and muscovitization affected less than 1% of pluton. It is characterized by minor and accessory molybdenite, wolframite, huebnerite, scheelite, fluorite. Hydrothermal occurrences, galena and Fe minerals have only a mineralogical significance. Economically significant are numerous autochthonous kaolin deposits formed in Pliocene-Pleistocene time. Prosara apomagmatic granitoids, exclusively granite dykes are metallogenetically sterile.

  18. Late Eocene stable isotope stratigraphy of North Atlantic IODP Site U1411: Orbitally paced climatic heartbeat at the close of the Eocene greenhouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coxall, Helen; Bohaty, Steve; Wilson, Paul; Liebrand, Diederik; Nyberg, Anna; Holmström, Max

    2016-04-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 342 drilled sediment drifts on the Newfoundland margin to recover high-resolution records of North Atlantic ocean-climate history and track the evolution of the modern climate system through the Late Cretaceous and Early Cenozoic. An early Paleogene deep-sea benthic stable isotope composite record from multiple Exp. 342 sites is currently in development and will provide a key reference section for investigations of Atlantic and global climate dynamics. This study presents initial results for the late Eocene slice of the composite from Site U1411, located at mid depth (˜2850m Eocene paleodepth) on the Southeast Newfoundland Ridge. Stable oxygen (δ18O) and carbon (δ13C) isotope ratios were measured on 640 samples hosting exceptionally well-preserved epifaunal benthic foraminifera obtained from the microfossil-rich uppermost Eocene clays at 4cm spacing. Sedimentation rates average 2-3 cm/kyr through the late Eocene, such that our sampling resolution is sufficient to capture the dominant Milankovitch frequencies. Late Eocene Site U1411 benthic δ18O values (1.4 to 0.5‰ VPDB) are comparable to the Pacific and elsewhere in the Atlantic at similar depths; however, δ13C is lower by ˜0.5 ‰ with values intermediate between those of the Southern Labrador Sea to the north (-1 to 0) and mid latitude/South Atlantic (0.5 to 1.5) to the south, suggesting poorly ventilated bottom waters in the late Eocene North Atlantic and limited production of North Atlantic deep water. Applying the initial shipboard magneto-biostratigraphic age framework, the Site U1411 benthic δ13C and δ18O records display clear cyclicity on orbital timescales. Spectral analysis of the raw unfiltered datasets identifies eccentricity (400 and 100 kyr), obliquity (40 kyr) and precession (˜20 kyr) signals imprinted on our time series, revealing distinct climatic heart beats in the late Eocene prior to the transition into the 'ice house'.

  19. Sonora, Mexico, source for the Eocene Poway Conglomerate of southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Patrick L.; Smith, T. E.

    1989-04-01

    Alluvial-fan conglomerates of the Eocene Poway Group are composed largely of exotic rhyolite and dacite clasts derived from far to the east of their Eocene depositional site. Remnants of the Upper Jurassic bedrock source of the Poway rhyolite clasts may yet be exposed in hills in Sonora, Mexico. For this study, pieces of bedrock were taken from hills 13 km west of El Plomo in Sonora. Clasts texturally and mineralogically similar to the Sonoran bedrock were collected from the apex of the Eocene alluvial fan in San Diego County, California Nine couplets of bedrock and conglomerate clast samples (textural twins) were analyzed for 16 trace elements selected for their wide range of behaviors during magmatic and alteration processes. Statistical comparisons of the trace-element data, by using the standard error-of-the-difference method, show that there are no significant differences between the two populations. These data strongly suggest that the rhyolitic bedrock hills west of El Plomo were part of the source terrane for the Eocene conglomerate in San Diego. The latitudinal separation between bedrock source and the site of deposition is only the 2° created by the opening of the Gulf of California This implies that any boundary separating a paleomagnetically efined, Baja-Borderland terrane from the craton since Eocene time was at least 100 km east of the Gulf of California in northernmost Sonora.

  20. Invading Europe: did climate or geography trigger early Eocene primate dispersals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soligo, Christophe

    2007-01-01

    The Palaeocene-Eocene transition is characterized by a significant turnover of mammalian taxa in the fossil record of the northern continents, and primates are among the groups that make their first appearance at this time. One of the many questions that remain to be answered with regard to the earliest evolution of primates is the reason for their sudden and virtually simultaneous appearance in the fossil records of Asia, Europe and North America. The most obvious environmental correlate of the Palaeocene-Eocene transition is a sharp but relatively short-lived warming event leading up to the Palaeocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) and evidenced in the stratigraphic record by a negative delta(13)C excursion. It remains unclear, however, whether or how this warming event may have influenced Palaeocene-Eocene faunal turnovers. This paper explores the hypothesis that environmental changes associated with the PETM facilitated an invasion of Western Europe by primates by comparing the ecological structure of local mammalian fauna immediately before and following the Palaeocene-Eocene transition. The results suggest that changes to the ecological profile of local mammalian fauna were relatively small and did not favour an invasion by primates, although a major uncertainty remains with respect to the availability of arboreal niches. At present it seems more likely that the invasion of western Europe by primates was due to the breakdown of one or more dispersal barriers close to the end of the Palaeocene.

  1. The oldest African bat from the early Eocene of El Kohol (Algeria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravel, Anthony; Marivaux, Laurent; Tabuce, Rodolphe; Adaci, Mohammed; Mahboubi, Mohammed; Mebrouk, Fateh; Bensalah, Mustapha

    2011-05-01

    The Afro-Arabian Paleogene fossil record of Chiroptera is very poor. In North Africa and Arabia, this record is limited, thus far, to a few localities mainly in Tunisia (Chambi, late early Eocene), Egypt (Fayum, late Eocene to early Oligocene), and Sultanate of Oman (Taqah, early Oligocene). It consists primarily of isolated teeth or mandible fragments. Interestingly, these African fossil bats document two modern groups (Vespertilionoidea and Rhinolophoidea) from the early Eocene, while the bat fossil record of the same epoch of North America, Eurasia, and Australia principally includes members of the "Eochiroptera." This paraphyletic group contains all primitive microbats excluding modern families. In Algeria, the region of Brezina, southeast of the Atlas Mountains, is famous for the early Eocene El Kohol Formation, which has yielded one of the earliest mammalian faunas of the African landmass. Recent fieldwork in the same area has led to the discovery of a new vertebrate locality, including isolated teeth of Chiroptera. These fossils represent the oldest occurrence of Chiroptera in Africa, thus extending back the record of the group to the middle early Eocene (Ypresian) on that continent. The material consists of an upper molar and two fragments of lower molars. The dental character association matches that of "Eochiroptera." As such, although very fragmentary, the material testifies to the first occurrence of "Eochiroptera" in Algeria, and by extension in Africa. This discovery demonstrates that this basal group of Chiroptera had a worldwide distribution during the early Paleogene.

  2. Tectonic significance of paleobotanically estimated climate and altitude of the late Eocene erosion surface, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Kathryn M.; Chase, Clement G.

    1992-07-01

    Erosion beveled the Laramide Front Range uplift in Colorado to a surface of low relief by the end of the Eocene. This study uses J. A. Wolfe's new multivariate climate analysis techniques to determine the paleoelevation of this regional surface by examining the overlying 35 Ma Florissant flora. A multiple regression model explaining 93.3% of the variance in mean annual temperature was developed using Wolfe's dataset of 31 leaf physiognomic character states for 86 modern vegetation sites. These character states were scored on 29 species collected from one facies of the Florissant Lake Beds. The paleotemperature estimate of mean annual temperature (10.7 ±1.5 °C) derived from these data, when combined with sea-level temperature and terrestrial lapse rate, implies a late Eocene paleoelevation of 2.4-2.7 km. Pliocene uplift is thus not required to explain the present elevation of 2.5 km. It is unclear when and why the southern Rocky Mountains achieved this elevation. Magmatic crustal thickening can explain the late Eocene high elevation of the southern Rockies, but neither this mechanism nor compressive thickening explains why the Great Plains, which are tied to the Florissant elevation by the Wall Mountain Tuff, were also high. This paleoelevation estimate indicates that regional surfaces of planation could be formed at high elevation in the Eocene, probably because of peculiarities of the Eocene climate.

  3. Biostratigraphy of a Paleocene–Eocene Foreland Basin boundary in southern Tibet

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    Xiaoqiao Wan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study of the Paleocene–Eocene boundary within a foreland basin of southern Tibet, which was dominated by a carbonate ramp depositional environment, documents more complex environmental conditions than can be derived from studies of the deep oceanic environment. Extinction rates for larger foraminiferal species in the Zongpu-1 Section apply to up to 46% of the larger foraminiferal taxa. The extinction rate in southern Tibet is similar to rates elsewhere in the world, but it shows that the Paleocene fauna disappeared stepwise through the Late Paleocene, with Eocene taxa appearing abruptly above the boundary. A foraminifera turnover was identified between Members 3 and 4 of the Zongpu Formation—from the Miscellanea–Daviesina assemblage to an Orbitolites–Alveolina assemblage. The Paleocene and Eocene boundary is between the SBZ 4 and SBZ 5, where it is marked by the extinction of Miscellanea miscella and the first appearance of Alveolina ellipsodalis and a large number of Orbitolites. Chemostratigraphically, the δ13C values from both the Zongpu-1 and Zongpu-2 Sections show three negative excursions in the transitional strata, one in Late Paleocene, one at the boundary, and one in the early Eocene. The second negative excursion of δ13C, which is located at the P–E boundary, coincides with larger foraminifera overturn. These faunal changes and the observed δ13C negative excursions provide new evidence on environmental changes across the Paleocene–Eocene boundary in Tibet.

  4. Biostratigraphy of a Paleocene-Eocene Foreland Basin boundary in southern Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoqiao Wan; Xi Wang; Luba F.Jansa

    2010-01-01

    This study of the Paleocene-Eocene boundary within a foreland basin of southern Tibet,which was dominated by a carbonate ramp depositional environment, documents more complex environmental conditions than can be derived from studies of the deep oceanic environment. Extinction rates for larger foraminiferal species in the Zongpu-1 Section apply to up to 46% of the larger foraminiferal taxa.The extinction rate in southern Tibet is similar to rates elsewhere in the world, but it shows that the Paleocene fauna disappeared stepwise through the Late Paleocene, with Eocene taxa appearing abruptly above the boundary. A foraminifera turnover was identified between Members 3 and 4 of the Zongpu Formation-from the Miscellanea-Daviesina assemblage to an Orbitolites-Alveolina assemblage. The Paleocene and Eocene boundary is between the SBZ 4 and SBZ 5, where it is marked by the extinction of Miscellanea miscella and the first appearance of Alveolina ellipsodalis and a large number of Orbitolites.Chemostratigraphically, the δ13C values from both the Zongpu-1 and Zongpu-2 Sections show three negative excursions in the transitional strata, one in Late Paleocene, one at the boundary, and one in the early Eocene. The second negative excursion of δ13C, which is located at the P-E boundary, coincides with larger foraminifera overturn. These faunal changes and the observed δ13C negative excursions provide new evidence on environmental changes across the Paleocene-Eocene boundary in Tibet.

  5. New protocetid whale from the middle eocene of pakistan: birth on land, precocial development, and sexual dimorphism.

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    Philip D Gingerich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protocetidae are middle Eocene (49-37 Ma archaeocete predators ancestral to later whales. They are found in marine sedimentary rocks, but retain four legs and were not yet fully aquatic. Protocetids have been interpreted as amphibious, feeding in the sea but returning to land to rest. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two adult skeletons of a new 2.6 meter long protocetid, Maiacetus inuus, are described from the early middle Eocene Habib Rahi Formation of Pakistan. M. inuus differs from contemporary archaic whales in having a fused mandibular symphysis, distinctive astragalus bones in the ankle, and a less hind-limb dominated postcranial skeleton. One adult skeleton is female and bears the skull and partial skeleton of a single large near-term fetus. The fetal skeleton is positioned for head-first delivery, which typifies land mammals but not extant whales, evidence that birth took place on land. The fetal skeleton has permanent first molars well mineralized, which indicates precocial development at birth. Precocial development, with attendant size and mobility, were as critical for survival of a neonate at the land-sea interface in the Eocene as they are today. The second adult skeleton is the most complete known for a protocetid. The vertebral column, preserved in articulation, has 7 cervicals, 13 thoracics, 6 lumbars, 4 sacrals, and 21 caudals. All four limbs are preserved with hands and feet. This adult is 12% larger in linear dimensions than the female skeleton, on average, has canine teeth that are 20% larger, and is interpreted as male. Moderate sexual dimorphism indicates limited male-male competition during breeding, which in turn suggests little aggregation of food or shelter in the environment inhabited by protocetids. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Discovery of a near-term fetus positioned for head-first delivery provides important evidence that early protocetid whales gave birth on land. This is consistent with skeletal

  6. Variability of the planktonic foraminifera community across the Eocene/Oligocene boundary, Fuente Caldera Section, Baetic Ranges (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legarda-Lisarri, A.

    2013-12-01

    During the Eocene/Oligocene transition, in a massive extinction event that took place about 33.7 million years ago, the current high resolution study analyzes qualitatively and quantitatively the community structure of the planktonic foraminifera that were preserved in the hemipelagic sediments of the Tethys Sea. The sampled section of the Fuente Caldera column, located in the Baetic mountain ranges, spans a register of 396,551.7 years. Based in the identification of 27 species, that belong to 13 genera and 2 families of foraminifera, there have been found three biozones of Gonzalvo Zonation (Gonzalvo, 2002) in the studied stratigraphic interval: Turborotalia cocoaensis and Cribrohantkenina lazzarii Biozones (Rupelian), and Paragloborotalia increbescens (Priabonian). The planktonic foraminifera associations variability patterns are defined by paleoecologic indexes (diversity index, high and low latitude species index and planktonic and benthic foraminifera index), by geochemical proxies: δ18O and δ13C and by 'Q' Mode Factor Analysis. They prove that the deposition environment is outer platform and also, they suggest that the studied area in the Tethys Sea underwent many thermal pulses, during which some species extinct or appear. In the first extinction event the species Turborotalia cocoaensis and Turborotalia cunialensis became extinct. In the second one, Hantkenina alabamensis, Hantkenina brevispina, Cribrohantkenina lazzarii and Pseudohastigerina micra became extinct while a succession occured; Globigerina officinalis, Globoturborotalita anguliofficinalis and Tenuitellinata angustiumbilicata appeared. The cooling event that finished in the Lower Oligocene was the biggest of these pulses, which was extremely abrupt and corresponds to the Oi-1 event that was described by Miller (Miller, 1991). All this evidences that the planktonic foraminifera extinction in the Upper Eocene was a gradual and fast event, what is supported by the Factor Analysis application. Key

  7. WEATHERING PROCESS IN EOCENE FLYSCH IN REGION OF SPLIT (CROATIA

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    Predrag Miščević

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The Eocene flysh in the region of Split (Dalmatia, Croatia is char¬acterized by the presence of layers with different characteristics. It mainly includes thin-layered marls, clayey marls, calcareous marls, clastic lay¬ered limestones, calcarenites and breccias. Those parts that can be de¬scribed as the soft rocks or hard clays by the mechanical means, exposed to weathering reduce the durability within "an engineering time scale". The paper deals with the factors that influence the weathering process. The analyzed weathering is a combination of processes acting simulta¬neously. Most of these processes depend on the change of the water con¬tent, thus the weathering process mainly develops when a material is subjected to the wetting-drying process, On the base of these results form of degradation process is modeled. The weathering process can be main¬ly described as physical weathering combined with chemical weathering on the free surfaces and on the cracks walls. Erosion as a result of weath¬ering, is the dominant geomorphic process on analyzed flysch terrain. According to the analysis, as the most appropriate due to the characteris¬tics the tests are chosen as index properties. Some of these tests are modified in order to adapt them to the determined characteristics of ma¬terials from flysch layers. The correlations between the measured values are used as the basis for the classification proposal of the analyzed mate¬rial, according to its resistance to weathering processes. Roughly, three main groups of samples are recognizable: the first one with carbonate content more then 90% is not weathered at the engineers time scale; the second group with carbonate content from 75% to 90% include samples susceptible to weathering in engineers time scale; the third group with carbonate content less then 75% include samples in which the weather¬ing occurs immediately after the exposition to the weathering factors.

  8. Astragalar morphology of late Eocene anthropoids from the Fayum Depression (Egypt) and the origin of catarrhine primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiffert, E R; Simons, E L

    2001-12-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of the late Eocene anthropoids Catopithecus browni and Proteopithecus sylviae are currently a matter of debate, with opinion divided as to whether these taxa are stem or crown anthropoids. The phylogenetic position of Catopithecus is of particular interest, for, unlike the highly generalized genus Proteopithecus, this taxon shares apomorphic dental and postcranial features with more derived undoubted catarrhines that appear in the same region 1-2 Ma later. If these apomorphies are homologous and Catopithecus is a stem catarrhine, the unique combination of plesiomorphic and apomorphic features preserved in this anthropoid would have important implications for our understanding of the crown anthropoid morphotype and the pattern of morphological character transformations that occurred during the early phases of stem catarrhine evolution.Well-preserved astragali referrable to Proteopithecus, Catopithecus, and the undoubted early Oligocene stem catarrhine Aegyptopithecus have provided additional morphological evidence that allows us to further evaluate competing hypotheses of interrelationships among Eocene-Oligocene Afro-Arabian anthropoids. Qualitative observations and multivariate morphometric analyses reveal that the astragalar morphology of Proteopithecus is very similar to that of early Oligocene parapithecids and living and extinct small-bodied platyrrhines, and strengthens the hypothesis that the morphological pattern shared by these taxa is primitive within crown Anthropoidea. In contrast, Catopithecus departs markedly from the predicted crown anthropoid astragalar morphotype and shares a number of apomorphic features (e.g., deep cotylar fossa, laterally projecting fibular facet, trochlear asymmetry, mediolaterally wide astragalar head) with Aegyptopithecus and Miocene-Recent catarrhines. The evidence from the astragalus complements other independent data from the dentition, humerus and femur of Catopithecus that support this

  9. Temperature and salinity changes associated with the Paleocene-Eocene Carbon Isotope Excursion along the mid Atlantic margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, M.; Miller, K. G.; Wright, J. D.; Rosenthal, Y.; Babila, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) was an abrupt warming event, characterized by a global temperature increase of about 5-8°C and associated with the Carbon Isotope Excursion (CIE) of ~2.5-4‰ in marine environments. Here we evaluate temperature and salinity changes across the Paleocene/Eocene boundary in the Millville New Jersey coastal plain core (ODP Leg 174AX) using two independent temperature proxies (the organic paleothermometer TEX86 and Mg/Ca ratio of planktonic foraminifera) and δ18O of planktonic foraminifera. Paleotemperature estimates show warming of 5-7°C during the CIE, though different temperature calibrations provide a broad range of absolute temperatures. We argue that the temperature calibration of TEXL 86 provides the best temperature estimate (warming from 23°C to 30°C) because it is the only one that yields realistic salinities, whereas the TEXH 86 calibration yields extremely high sea surface salinities (~48 psu in the latest Paleocene). In contrast to the previous studies, use of the correct calibration effectively eliminates any temperature increase prior to the CIE suggesting that temperature was not the trigger for the massive release of carbon. A salinity decrease of at least ~4 psu was associated with the onset of the CIE/PETM. This implies freshening of surface and thermocline waters supports the hypothesis of an enhanced hydrological cycle. We conclude that our results are consistent with the hypothesis of Appalachian Amazon river system development and increased river runoff to the New Jersey continental margin during the PETM.

  10. Minimal erosion in central Tibet since the Eocene and implications for plateau development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrmann, Alexander; Kapp, Paul; Reiners, Peter; Gyunn, Jerome; Carrapa, Barbara

    2010-05-01

    The growth history of the Tibetan plateau remains elusive, despite its importance for assessing mechanisms of continental lithosphere deformation and associated changes in surface elevation and climate system dynamics. In contrast to the actively growing plateau margins, the interior of the modern Tibetan plateau is characterized by extremely low erosion rates. We present the first apatite (U-Th)/He low-temperature thermochronologic results from samples collected away from late Cenozoic rifts in the Lhasa and Qiangtang terranes of central Tibet. These data are complemented by apatite fission-track and K-feldspar 40Ar/39Ar results, to construct continuous cooling histories. The data indicate that in most places, low erosion rates (< ~0.05 mm/yr) were established by the time India collided with Asia ~50 Myr ago, following earlier episodes of more rapid exhumation that correspond in time with documented Cretaceous - Eocene thrust belt activity. Findings of large-magnitude (≥50%) upper-crustal shortening and substantial exhumation prior to 50 Myr ago, followed by minimal subsequent denudation, support the establishment of a proto-plateau in central Tibet prior to the Indo-Asian collision. Collectively, the exhumation history of central Tibet, away from the influence of late Cenozoic rifts, contrasts sharply with that of the Lhasa region in the southern Lhasa terrane and near the modern margins of the plateau which show prominent erosional signatures of the Indo-Asian collision. Any viable model of plateau development must explain these prominent spatial variations in exhumation history as well as the lack of a corresponding expression in the modern topography.

  11. An Eocene orthocone from Antarctica shows convergent evolution of internally shelled cephalopods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtson, Stefan; Reguero, Marcelo A.; Mörs, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Background The Subclass Coleoidea (Class Cephalopoda) accommodates the diverse present-day internally shelled cephalopod mollusks (Spirula, Sepia and octopuses, squids, Vampyroteuthis) and also extinct internally shelled cephalopods. Recent Spirula represents a unique coleoid retaining shell structures, a narrow marginal siphuncle and globular protoconch that signify the ancestry of the subclass Coleoidea from the Paleozoic subclass Bactritoidea. This hypothesis has been recently supported by newly recorded diverse bactritoid-like coleoids from the Carboniferous of the USA, but prior to this study no fossil cephalopod indicative of an endochochleate branch with an origin independent from subclass Bactritoidea has been reported. Methodology/Principal findings Two orthoconic conchs were recovered from the Early Eocene of Seymour Island at the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica. They have loosely mineralized organic-rich chitin-compatible microlaminated shell walls and broadly expanded central siphuncles. The morphological, ultrustructural and chemical data were determined and characterized through comparisons with extant and extinct taxa using Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (SEM/EDS). Conclusions/Significance Our study presents the first evidence for an evolutionary lineage of internally shelled cephalopods with independent origin from Bactritoidea/Coleoidea, indicating convergent evolution with the subclass Coleoidea. A new subclass Paracoleoidea Doguzhaeva n. subcl. is established for accommodation of orthoconic cephalopods with the internal shell associated with a broadly expanded central siphuncle. Antarcticerida Doguzhaeva n. ord., Antarcticeratidae Doguzhaeva n. fam., Antarcticeras nordenskjoeldi Doguzhaeva n. gen., n. sp. are described within the subclass Paracoleoidea. The analysis of organic-rich shell preservation of A. nordenskjoeldi by use of SEM/EDS techniques revealed fossilization of hyposeptal cameral soft tissues

  12. A stromatolite exhibiting both biogenic and abiogenic growth phases from the Eocene Green River Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantz, C. M.; Petryshyn, V. A.; Corsetti, F. A.; Bhartia, R.; Salas, E. C.; Nealson, K. H.

    2012-12-01

    The microstructure of microdigitate carbonate stromatolites from the Rife Bed of the Eocene Green River Formation (located near Rock Springs, Wyoming) alternates between calcite fans and micrite. Chemical and petrographic analysis of the stromatolites suggests the different microstructures result from significantly different growth regimes, potentially involving the biogenicity of the microfabrics. The calcite fan fabric is generally considered an abiogenic fabric. The micrite fabric, on the other hand, contains grains trapped at angles well beyond the angle of repose, suggesting the presence of a sticky substance (hypothesized to be microbial mats) during formation. Magnetic susceptibility has been recently developed by Petryshyn et al as a biosignature using the premise that microbial mats can trap very fine grains (including magnetic grains, ubiquitous in terrestrial environments) past the angle of repose while abiogenic structures with the same topography cannot. In these stromatolites, micritic layers have a greater magnetic susceptibility than calcite fan layers, consistent with the petrographic results. In addition, organic material was mapped within the stromatolites using deep-UV native fluorescence spectroscopy, a new technique that highlights π bond-containing organic molecules and avoids problems with mineral fluorescence inherent in other fluorescent techniques. Distinct organic features were present in the micritic layers and absent in the calcite fan layers. Attempts were made to identify the specific organic compounds mapped using organic extractions and traditional Raman spectroscopy. While trace amounts of organic compounds were detected in bulk organic extractions from the stromatolite, specific compounds could not be successfully correlated to deep-UV signatures. Strong calcite fluorescence prevented the detection of organic compounds using visible Raman scattering. Thus, at the time of abstract submission the organic material present had not

  13. Tropical and Holarctic Ants in Late Eocene Ambers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perkovsky E. E.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on representative collections, the ratio of tropical and Holarctic ant species in Priabonian (Late Eocene Baltic, Bitterfeld (Saxonian, Danish and Rovno ambers is analyzed for the first time. In surveyed representative collections of Baltic amber, the ratios of Holarctic and tropical ant species are from 1.1 to 1.5; with 10 Holarctic and 9 tropical species (out of 31 in the PIN-964 collection, and 9 and 5 species (out of 29 in the Giecewicz collection; the ratio in the representative collection of Saxonian amber is 0.9, 11 Holarctic species vs. 12 tropical species (out of 55; in the representative collection of Rovno amber it is 0.65, 15 vs. 23 species (out of 79; and in the representative collection of Danish amber it is 0.64, 7 vs. 11 species (out of 36. Hence, in representative collections of Baltic amber, Holarctic species clearly prevail not just in terms of the share of their specimens (by 9.8 to 19.6 times, but also by the number of species. In Bitterfeld amber, Holarctic species are somewhat less numerous than tropical ones, but their specimens are 6 times greater. In representative collections of Rovno and Danish ambers, the number of Holarctic species is 1.5 to 1.7 times smaller than that of tropical species, but the number of their specimens is 4.9 to 6.9 times greater. The numbers of tropical and Holarctic species represented by more than one specimen is similar in Priabonian ambers, 25 versus 22, but Holarctic species include four dominants or subdominants. The abundance of temperate elements in the Priabonian amber ant fauna along with the relatively small number of tropical elements greatly distinguishes it from the Middle European Lutetian ant faunas of Messel and Eckfeld in shale, which do not have temperate elements at all. Formica phaethusa Wheeler, Glaphyromyrmex oligocenicus Wheeler, Plagiolepis squamifera Mayr, Proceratium eocenicum Dlussky, Hypoponera atavia (Mayr, Ponera lobulifera Dlussky, Aphaenogaster mersa

  14. Diagenesis of the lower Eocene Thebes Formation, Gebel Rewagen area, Eastern Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaaban, Mohamad N.

    2004-03-01

    The diagenesis of lower Eocene shallow water carbonates with flint was studied in the Gebel Rewagen area, Eastern Desert, Egypt. The carbonates are mainly wackestones to packstones with benthic bioclasts embedded in a dark red luminescent micrite matrix. The studied succession displays a complex diagenetic history that involves syngenetic and late diagenetic processes. Silica, which exists either as persistent bands, nodules and/or silicified benthic bioclasts shows a distinctive pattern regarding its distribution, source, depositional environments and timing. Three lines of evidence support a syngenetic origin of the chert bands: (1) they alternate in a cyclic manner within the host carbonates and (2) they exhibit noticeable lateral persistence throughout the investigated area following the strata boundaries and (3) there is a lack of any carbonate dissolution in limestone adjacent to chert bands. The deposition of silica bands in association with shallow water carbonates is possibly related to eustatic sea-level changes, which were accompanied by episodic variations in silica and carbonate productivities. With a relative sea-level fall and the establishment of a lowstand period at the end of the early Eocene, a basinward shift of the groundwater zones is expected within the carbonate platform. During this period some late diagenetic processes took place, which involve: (1) the formation of siliceous and carbonate concretionary growths, (2) partial silicification of bioclasts, (3) neomorphic stabilization of the CaCO 3 bioclasts and (4) the formation of equant calcite cement. Siliceous and carbonate concretions are believed to have taken place within microenvironments created and controlled by sulphate-reducing bacteria and physico-chemical and kinetic factors near a marine-meteoric water mixing zone. This is inferred from the distribution of iron sulphides, the non-ferroan nature of all concretions and the depleted δ13C (-5.4‰ to -6.0‰ PDB) and δ18O (-5.8

  15. Two new parrots (Psittaciformes) from the Lower Eocene Fur Formation of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waterhouse, David; Lindow, Bent Erik Kramer; Zelenkov, Nikita;

    2008-01-01

    Two new fossil psittaciform birds from the Lower Eocene ‘Mo Clay' (Fur Formation) of Denmark (c. 54 Ma) are described. An unnamed specimen is assigned to the extinct avian family of stem-group parrots, Pseudasturidae (genus and species incertae sedis), while a second (Mopsitta tanta gen. et sp. n...

  16. Early Eocene climatic optimum: Environmental impact on the North Iberian continental margin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Payros, A.; Ortiz, S.; Millán, I.; Arostegi, J.; Orue-Etxebarria, X.; Apellaniz, E.

    2015-01-01

    The early Eocene climatic optimum, which constituted the peak of the long-term early Cenozoic global warming, had a significant impact on the environmental evolution of terrestrial and oceanic areas. Surprisingly, however, its influence on continental margins is poorly known. New insights are provid

  17. A new libelluloid family from the Eocene Green River Formation (Colorado, USA) (Odonata, Anisoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiri, Asma; Nel, Andre; Garrouste, Romain

    2015-10-16

    The new family Urolibellulidae is proposed for the new genus and species Urolibellula eocenica, based on a fossil dragonfly from the Eocene Green River Formation (USA). This new taxon is considered as the sister group of the extant Libellulidae. As the oldest libellulid dragonfly is dated from the Turonian, the Urolibellulidae should also be at least Late Cretaceous.

  18. Variability in the length of the sea ice season in the middle eocene arctic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stickley, C.E.; Koç, N.; Pearce, R.B.; Kemp, A.E.S.; Jordan, R.W.; Sangiorgi, F.; St. John, K.

    2012-01-01

    Finely laminated Middle Eocene sediments from the central Arctic contain high abundances of the delicate, sea ice–dwelling fossil diatoms Synedropsis spp. and sea ice–rafted debris (sea ice–IRD), establishing an offshore seasonal sea ice regime ca. 47 Ma. Synedropsis spp. co-occur with other diatom

  19. Diachronous seawater retreat from the southwestern margin of the Tarim Basin in the late Eocene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Jimin; Windley, Brian F.; Zhang, Zhiliang; Fu, Bihong; Li, Shihu

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the present hyper-arid inland basin surrounded by the high mountains of Central Asia, the western Tarim Basin was once connected with the Tajik Basin at least in the late Eocene, when an epicontinental sea extended from the western Tarim Basin to Europe. Western Tarim is a key site fo

  20. Macrofauna associations and formation of shell concentrations in the Early Eocene Roda Formation (southern Pyrenees, Spain)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinius, A.W.

    1995-01-01

    The invertebrate macrofauna (mainly molluscs) of the Early Eocene Roda Formation (southern Pyrenees, Spain) is reported and classified in seven biofacies associations, representing ecologically related groups of macro-invertebrates of shallow marine fan-delta environments ranging in depth from inter

  1. Climate, carbon cycling and marine ecology during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frieling, J.

    2016-01-01

    The Paleocene and Eocene are characterized by strong greenhouse climates. Atmospheric CO2 concentrations and global temperatures were much higher than today. The period from 60 to 50 million years ago (Ma) is marked by a gradual warming trend of ~8 ºC in the deep ocean. The interval from 56 to 50 Ma

  2. Eocene prevalence of monsoon-like climate over eastern China reflected by hydrological dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dehai; Lu, Shicong; Han, Shuang; Sun, Xiaoyan; Quan, Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Hydrological dynamics of sedimentary basins are essential for understanding regional climatic pattern in the geological past. In previous qualitative studies lithologically depending on the occurrence of featured sedimentary rocks, the Eocene climate of China had been subdivided into three latitudinal zones, with one subtropical high-controlled arid zone throughout middle China, and two humid zones respectively in the north and south. However, recent advances on mammalian fauna distribution, plant fossil-based quantitative paleoclimatic reconstruction, and modeling experiment jointly suggest that the relatively humid monsoonal climate might have prevailed over the territory. Here we examine and compare sedimentary sequences of 10 Eocene sections across eastern China, and hence the lake level fluctuations, to discuss the nature of climate type. Our results show that, instead of the categorically zonal pattern, the hydroclimate dynamics is intensified landward. This is demonstrated by the fact that, in contrast to the wide developed coal layers around the periphery, evaporites are growingly occurred endocentrically to the central part of middle China. However, although we have had assumed that all evaporites are indicator of extreme aridity, the highly oscillated climate in the central part of middle China was humid in the majority of the Eocene, distinct from permanent arid as seen in deserts or steppe along modern horse latitude. From the upcountry distribution pattern of the Eocene hydrological dynamics, it appears that the relatively dry climate in central China was caused by the impact of continentality or rain shadow effect under monsoonal, or monsoon-like climate.

  3. The first Late Eocene continental faunal assemblage from tropical North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Hidalgo, Eduardo; Smith, Krister T.; Guerrero-Arenas, Rosalia; Alvarado-Ortega, Jesus

    2015-01-01

    To date, the terrestrial faunal record of the North American late Eocene has been recovered from its subtropical and temperate regions. We report the first late Eocene continental faunal assemblage from tropical North America, in southern Mexico. Fossil specimens were collected from mudstones that crop out in the Municipality of Santiago Yolomécatl, in northwestern Oaxaca. Previously published K-Ar ages of 32.9 ± 0.9 and 35.7 ± 1.0 Ma in overlain nearby volcanic rocks and biostratigraphy of these new localities suggests a Chadronian mammal age for this new local fauna. The assemblage is composed by two turtle taxa, Rhineura, two caniform taxa, a sciurid, a jimomyid rodent, a geomyine rodent, Gregorymys, Leptochoerus, Perchoerus probus, Merycoidodon, a protoceratid, Poebrotherium, Nanotragulus, Miohippus assinoboiensis, a chalicotherid, a tapiroid, cf. Amynodontopsis, Trigonias and the hymenopteran ichnofossils Celliforma curvata and Fictovichnus sciuttoi. The records of these taxa in northwestern Oaxaca greatly expand southerly their former geographic distribution in North America. The records of the geomorph rodents and Nanotragulus extend their former known biochronological range to the late Eocene. The hymenopteran ichnofossils in the localities suggest the presence of a bare soil after periodic waterlogging, under a sub-humid to sub-arid climate. This new local fauna represents the first glimpse of Eocene vertebrate and invertebrate terrestrial life from tropical North America.

  4. Triggers and consequences of glacial expansion across the Eocene - Oligocene Transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houben, A.J.P.

    2012-01-01

    The results described in this thesis provide a rather complex picture of climatic, environmental and biotic changes preceding and arising from the onset of Antarctic glaciation. This period is commonly known as the greenhouse to icehouse transition across the Eocene-Oligocene Transition (EOT, 34-33

  5. Early Eocene hyperthermals record orbitally controlled changes in high latitude climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeotti, S.; DeConto, R. M.; Lanci, L.; Pagani, M.; Rohl, U.; Westerhold, T.; Zachos, J. C.

    2012-04-01

    The Late Paleocene to Early Eocene records a succession of short-term (104 yr) negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) in marine carbonates and organic carbon. Available data indicate that at least three of these episodes, including the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) at ca. 55.5, the Eocene Thermal Maximum (ETM)2 at ca. 53.5 Ma and the ETM3 at ca. 52 Ma, were associated with rapid warming, and widespread marine carbonate dissolution forced by shoaling of the carbonate lysocline and lowering of the carbonate saturation state. Large temperature raises associated with decreased δ13C values in both terrestrial and oceanic records and concomitant acidification of oceanic waters implies that hyperthermals were caused by the addition of massive amounts of 13C-depleted greenhouse gases (CH4 and/or CO-2) into the atmosphere and subsequent sequestration by oceanic waters. Cyclostratigraphic analyses of marine sequences provided evidence that CIEs and associated carbonate dissolution episodes were linked to orbital changes in insolation. Here we show grounds that Early Eocene hyperthermals are part of a continuum of δ13C anomaly and carbonate dissolution episodes and are triggered by long-term orbitally-controlled changes in local climates at high latitudes.

  6. Occurrence and distribution of bacterial tetraether lipids in the Eocene Canadian Arctic paleosols: paleoclimate implications (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehay, S.; Jahren, A.; Schubert, B.; Eberle, J. J.; Summons, R. E.

    2010-12-01

    The Early to Middle Eocene (~56-45 Ma) was a “greenhouse” interval with average global temperatures warmer than any other time in the Cenozoic. This period was characterized by warm climates at high latitude leading to lush forests and the arrival of new mammal groups north of the Arctic Circle (>73°N). Glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) are membrane-spanning lipids characteristic of certain archaea and bacteria and it has been demonstrated that branched and cyclic GDGTs derived from soil bacteria vary in structure as a function of environmental factors. Proxies based on the relative abundances of methyl branched and cyclopentyl bacterial tetraethers are hypothesized to correlate with mean annual air temperature and soil pH. Here we present the occurrence and distribution of GDGTs in a range of paleosol and sediment samples from Axel Heiberg Island and Ellesmere Island, Nunavut (eastern Canadian Arctic) and Banks Island in the Northwest Territories (western Canadian Arctic). Preliminary results on 11 paleosol samples from the middle Eocene-aged Geodetic Hills Fossil Forest on Axel Heiberg Island indicate a mean annual air temperature of about 9°C. Earlier paleotemperature estimates for Axel Heiberg Island led to values ranging from 9°C to 15°C for the Middle Eocene. Recent temperature prediction for Ellesmere Island (Early Eocene) based upon oxygen isotope ratios of biogenic phosphate from mammal and fish fossils led to ~8°C. In contrast, GDGTs from a marine sedimentary sequence from Lomonosov Ridge in the central Arctic Ocean led to much higher Early Eocene temperature. Thus, the evaluation of the paleotemperature for the Early to Middle Eocene is still a subject of controversy. Ongoing GDGTs analysis of samples from Ellesmere and Banks Islands should give a more comprehensive paleoenvironmental description of the Eocene Arctic. Differences observed between the various paleotemperature estimates will also be discussed. GDGTs distributions are

  7. Early Eocene rodents (Mammalia) from the Subathu Formation of type area (Himachal Pradesh), NW sub-Himalaya, India: Palaeobiogeographic implications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Smita Gupta; Kishor Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Based on isolated upper cheek teeth, two new early Eocene rodents (Subathumys solanorius gen. et sp. nov. and Subathumys globulus gen. et sp. nov.) and three others (Birbalomys cf. sondaari, Birbalomys sp., cf. Chapattimys sp.) are recorded from the lower–middle part of the Subathu Formation of the type area in Himachal Pradesh, northwestern sub-Himalaya (India). The new rodents exhibit morphological features most similar to the unified ctenodactyloid family Chapattimyidae (including Yuomyidae), which is also represented in the assemblage from the upper part (middle Eocene) of the Subathu Formation. The associated lower cheek teeth are provisionally described as three indeterminate chapattimyid taxa. The new Subathu rodents are somewhat younger than the previously documented early Eocene assemblages from the Indian subcontinent, and are chronologically intermediate between the early Eocene ailuravines from Gujarat in the western peninsular India and the middle Eocene chapattimyids from northwestern India and Pakistan. They suggest that chapattimyids originated in the sub-Himalayan region during the Ypresian, which is earlier than previously believed. The absence of ailuravines in this as well as younger rodent assemblages from the subcontinent seems to suggest that ailuravines (Ischyromyidae), within a relatively short time after their appearance in the peninsular India in the early Eocene, may have been replaced by the indigenous chapattimyids. The co-occurrence in the early Eocene Subathu assemblage of three or more chapattimyids indicates their early radiation and dominance during the early and middle Eocene. This record of rodents opens the possibility of recovery of other small mammal remains in older levels of the Subathu Formation, which will be important for understanding linkage with early Eocene faunas from peninsular India, Europe and North America.

  8. Greenland ice sheet initiation and Arctic sea ice coincide with Eocene and Oligocene CO2 changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripati, Aradhna; Darby, Dennis

    2016-04-01

    Earth's modern ocean-climate system is largely defined by the presence of glacial ice on landmasses in both hemispheres. Northern Hemisphere ice was previously thought to have formed no earlier than the Miocene or Oligocene, about 20-30 million years after the widespread onset of Antarctic glaciation at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. Controversially, the episodic presence of seasonal Arctic sea ice and glacial ice in the Northern Hemisphere beginning in the early Oligocene to Middle Eocene has been inferred from multiple observations. Here we use precise source determinations based on geochemical measurements of ice-rafted debris (IRD) from an ODP core in the Greenland Sea (75° N) to constrain glacial ice and sea ice-rafting in the Northern Hemisphere during the middle Eocene through early Oligocene. The chemical fingerprint of 2,334 detrital Fe oxide grains indicates most of these grains are from Greenland with >98% certainty. Thus the coarse IRD in the Greenland Sea originates from widespread areas of east Greenland as far south as the Denmark Strait area (~68° N), with additional IRD sources from the circum-Arctic Ocean. This is the first definitive evidence that mid-Eocene IRD in the Greenland Sea is from Greenland. Episodic glaciation of different source regions on Greenland is synchronous with times of ice-rafting in the western Arctic and ephemeral perennial Arctic ice cover. Intervals of bipolar glacial ice storage in the middle Eocene through early Oligocene coincide with evidence for periods of reduced CO2, associated with carbon cycle perturbations.

  9. Stratigraphic responses to a major tectonic event in a foreland basin: the Ecuadorian Oriente Basin from Eocene to Oligocene times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophoul, Frédéric; Baby, Patrice; Dávila, Celso

    2002-02-01

    The Eocene to Oligocene sediments of the Ecuadorian Oriente Basin record two kinds of second-order stratigraphic response to the tectonic evolution. Lower Eocene shows evidences of local scale syntectonic deposits. This tectonic activity can be related to right lateral convergent movements inverting pre-cretaceous extensional structures. Upper Eocene and Oligocene sediments are integrated as the expression of an isostatic rebound characterizing a basin scale syntectonic deposition. This response is evidenced by a reciprocal architecture of the depositional sequences identified in the sedimentary formations. These data have allowed us to propose a new geodynamic model for the Paleogene evolution of the Oriente Basin.

  10. The early Eocene birds of the Messel fossil site: a 48 million-year-old bird community adds a temporal perspective to the evolution of tropical avifaunas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Gerald

    2016-04-08

    Birds play an important role in studies addressing the diversity and species richness of tropical ecosystems, but because of the poor avian fossil record in all extant tropical regions, a temporal perspective is mainly provided by divergence dates derived from calibrated molecular analyses. Tropical ecosystems were, however, widespread in the Northern Hemisphere during the early Cenozoic, and the early Eocene German fossil site Messel in particular has yielded a rich avian fossil record. The Messel avifauna is characterized by a considerable number of flightless birds, as well as a high diversity of aerial insectivores and the absence of large arboreal birds. With about 70 currently known species in 42 named genus-level and at least 39 family-level taxa, it approaches extant tropical biotas in terms of species richness and taxonomic diversity. With regard to its taxonomic composition and presumed ecological characteristics, the Messel avifauna is more similar to the Neotropics, Madagascar, and New Guinea than to tropical forests in continental Africa and Asia. Because the former regions were geographically isolated during most of the Cenozoic, their characteristics may be due to the absence of biotic factors, especially those related to the diversification of placental mammals, which impacted tropical avifaunas in Africa and Asia. The crown groups of most avian taxa that already existed in early Eocene forests are species-poor. This does not support the hypothesis that the antiquity of tropical ecosystems is key to the diversity of tropical avifaunas, and suggests that high diversification rates may be of greater significance.

  11. Primary Study on Quantitative Reconstruction of Middle-Late Eocene Climate in Jianghan Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports our primary effort in the quantitative reconstruction of paleoclimate based on the thrine in phytoecology of the affinity parent plants in the stratigraphic pollen records. The Eocene pollen data come from our former study on the Mingjia borehole 1 in the Jianghan basin. The fluctuating trend in the parameter curve of climate shows that the climate in the Middle Eocene in the Jianghan basin was more or less comparable with that of the present 22°-26°N, characteristic of a humid, semi-humid central-southern subtropical climate. The annual temperature at that time dropped by 1 ℃-4 ℃ in the Late Eocene, approximately equal to that of the present 23°-28°N of northern-central subtropical climate. However, the climate composite at that time, characterized by higher temperature, small annual range and big fluctuation in precipitation, was quite different from the present one. The average temperature in January in the Middle Eocene, higher than that of today, ranged between 5 ℃ and 9 ℃, indicating that no effect of winter monsoon occurred in the Middle Eocene, though such an effect may have occurred occasionally in the Late Eocene. Major temperature decline is recognized at the depth of 2 100 m in the borehole, as was indicated by the decline in average January temperature, the increase in annual range, and the increase in the deciduous broad-leaved types of trees in the spore-pollen assemblage. The sharp fluctuation in the annual precipitation, usually raging from 300 to 1 700 mm, was favorable for the migration and accumulation of salty deposit. When the precipitation was lower than 1 000 mm, ephemera shrub increased at the same depth as that of the salty deposit. It is, therefore, deduced that the formation of the salty deposit was attributed mainly to the dry and hot environment in the high mountains and deep basins. The small annual precipitation and the intense fluctuation are favorable for the sustainable accumulation of the salts

  12. A Model-Model and Data-Model Comparison for the Early Eocene Hydrological Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Matthew J.; Lunt, Daniel J.; Huber, Matthew; Heinemann, Malte; Kiehl, Jeffrey; LeGrande, Allegra; Loptson, Claire A.; Roberts, Chris D.; Sagoo, Navjit; Shields, Christine

    2016-01-01

    A range of proxy observations have recently provided constraints on how Earth's hydrological cycle responded to early Eocene climatic changes. However, comparisons of proxy data to general circulation model (GCM) simulated hydrology are limited and inter-model variability remains poorly characterised. In this work, we undertake an intercomparison of GCM-derived precipitation and P - E distributions within the extended EoMIP ensemble (Eocene Modelling Intercomparison Project; Lunt et al., 2012), which includes previously published early Eocene simulations performed using five GCMs differing in boundary conditions, model structure, and precipitation-relevant parameterisation schemes. We show that an intensified hydrological cycle, manifested in enhanced global precipitation and evaporation rates, is simulated for all Eocene simulations relative to the preindustrial conditions. This is primarily due to elevated atmospheric paleo-CO2, resulting in elevated temperatures, although the effects of differences in paleogeography and ice sheets are also important in some models. For a given CO2 level, globally averaged precipitation rates vary widely between models, largely arising from different simulated surface air temperatures. Models with a similar global sensitivity of precipitation rate to temperature (dP=dT ) display different regional precipitation responses for a given temperature change. Regions that are particularly sensitive to model choice include the South Pacific, tropical Africa, and the Peri-Tethys, which may represent targets for future proxy acquisition. A comparison of early and middle Eocene leaf-fossil-derived precipitation estimates with the GCM output illustrates that GCMs generally underestimate precipitation rates at high latitudes, although a possible seasonal bias of the proxies cannot be excluded. Models which warm these regions, either via elevated CO2 or by varying poorly constrained model parameter values, are most successful in simulating a

  13. Insights into the early Eocene hydrological cycle from an ensemble of atmosphere–ocean GCM simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Carmichael

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies, utilising a range of proxies, indicate that a significant perturbation to global hydrology occurred at the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; ~56 Ma. An enhanced hydrological cycle for the warm early Eocene is also suggested to have played a key role in maintaining high-latitude warmth during this interval. However, comparisons of proxy data to General Circulation Model (GCM simulated hydrology are limited and inter-model variability remains poorly characterised, despite significant differences in simulated surface temperatures. In this work, we undertake an intercomparison of GCM-derived precipitation and P-E distributions within the EoMIP ensemble (Lunt et al., 2012, which includes previously-published early Eocene simulations performed using five GCMs differing in boundary conditions, model structure and precipitation relevant parameterisation schemes. We show that an intensified hydrological cycle, manifested in enhanced global precipitation and evaporation rates, is simulated for all Eocene simulations relative to preindustrial. This is primarily due to elevated atmospheric paleo-CO2, although the effects of differences in paleogeography/ice sheets are also of importance in some models. For a given CO2 level, globally-averaged precipitation rates vary widely between models, largely arising from different simulated surface air temperatures. Models with a similar global sensitivity of precipitation rate to temperature (dP/dT display different regional precipitation responses for a given temperature change. Regions that are particularly sensitive to model choice include the South Pacific, tropical Africa and the Peri-Tethys, which may represent targets for future proxy acquisition. A comparison of early and middle Eocene leaf-fossil-derived precipitation estimates with the GCM output illustrates that a number of GCMs underestimate precipitation rates at high latitudes. Models which warm these regions, either via elevated

  14. Fossil plants indicate that the most significant decrease in atmospheric CO2 happened prior to the Eocene-Oligocene boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinthorsdottir, Margret; Porter, Amanda; Holohan, Aidan; Kunzmann, Lutz; Collinson, Margaret; McElwain, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    A unique stratigraphic sequence of fossil leaves of Eotrigonobalanus furcinervis (extinct trees of the beech family, Fagaceae) from central Germany was utilized to derive an atmospheric pCO2 record with multiple data points spanning the late middle to late Eocene, two sampling levels which may be earliest Oligocene, and two samples from later in the Oligocene. Using the stomatal proxy, which relies on the inverse relationship between pCO2 and leaf stomatal density, we show that a ~40% decrease in pCO2 preceded the large shift in marine oxygen isotope records that characterizes the Eocene-Oliogocene climate transition. The results endorse the theory that pCO2 drawdown was the main forcer of the Eocene-Oligocene climate change, and a 'tipping point' was reached in the latest Eocene, triggering the plunge of the Earth System into icehouse conditions.

  15. A long-bodied centriscoid fish from the basal Eocene of Kabardino-Balkaria, northern Caucasus, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannikov, Alexandre F.; Carnevale, Giorgio

    2012-05-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene transition is of crucial interest for interpreting the Cenozoic evolutionary radiation of vertebrates. A substantial increase of the number of vertebrate families occurred between the Late Paleocene and Early Eocene, with the appearance of most of the representatives of extant lineages. Basal Eocene marine fish diversity is currently poorly known, exclusively restricted to two assemblages from Denmark and Turkmenistan, respectively. Exceptionally well-preserved articulated skeletal remains of fishes have recently been discovered from a basal Eocene sapropelitic layer exposed along the Kheu River in the Republic of Kabardino-Balkaria, northern Caucasus, Russia. Here, we report on Gerpegezhus paviai gen. et sp. nov., a new peculiar syngnathoid fish from this new Ciscaucasian locality. The morphological structure of the single available specimen suggests that it is the first long-bodied member of the superfamily Centriscoidea, representing the sole member of the new family Gerpegezhidae, which forms a sister pair with the extant family Centriscidae.

  16. New Protocetid Whale from the Middle Eocene of Pakistan: Birth on Land, Precocial Development, and Sexual Dimorphism

    OpenAIRE

    Gingerich, Philip D.; Munir Ul-Haq; Wighart von Koenigswald; Sanders, William J.; B. Holly Smith; Zalmout, Iyad S.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Protocetidae are middle Eocene (49-37 Ma) archaeocete predators ancestral to later whales. They are found in marine sedimentary rocks, but retain four legs and were not yet fully aquatic. Protocetids have been interpreted as amphibious, feeding in the sea but returning to land to rest. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two adult skeletons of a new 2.6 meter long protocetid, Maiacetus inuus, are described from the early middle Eocene Habib Rahi Formation of Pakistan. M. inuus differs...

  17. Occurence and preservation of Eocene squamariacean and coralline rhodoliths: Eau, Tonga: Chapter 9 in Paleoalgology: contemporary research and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchbinder, Binyamin; Halley, Robert B.; Toomey, Donald F.; Nitecki, Matthew H.

    1985-01-01

    A widespread rhodolith facies occurs within middle Eocene limestones of Eua, Tonga (Fig. 1). These limestones, first described by Hoffmeister (1932), represent a portion of a broad, early Tertiary platform that developed in the Tonga area prior to disruption and uplift by later Tertiary plate movements (Kroenke and Tongilava 1975). Algal rhodoliths form beds several meters thick within Eocene limestones and occur at localities several kilometers apart along the length of Eua.

  18. Petrology of upper Eocene-Oligocene plutonic rocks of Moalleman Damghan area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohansal, Reza; Zolfaghari, Seddigheh; Hashem Emami, Mohammad

    2010-05-01

    The plutonic rocks of this area include cryptodoms, hypoabyssal plutonic bodies and dikes which intruded in to the late Lutetian- late Eocene rocks. The hypoabyssal plutonic rocks in Moalleman are classified in to two main groups: - Acidic rocks, including microgranite to microgranodiorite. - Intermediate rocks, including microquartzmonzodiorite to microquartzdiorite of hypoabyssal type. Presence of fine-grained mafic xenoliths with abundant biotite, amphibole and pyroxene in the intermediate rocks may be considered as an evidence of the role of mantle melting occurrence in the formation of these rocks. Occurrence of a felsitic texture, showing a high differentiation coefficient and existence of large quarts which are embayed, rounded and infiltered by material, and finally turmalinization in the acidic rocks due to Boron metasomatism suggest the role of crust in the formation of afore mentioned rocks as well. In some acidic rocks plagioclases show oscillatory zoning. This phenomenon along with the fact that biotite granites in these rocks crystallized before crystallization of quarts and after crystallization of alkali feldspar suggest that the crystallization of these rocks accomplished in the presence of 2 percent water, pertitic texture in some feldspars of the intermediate rocks this conclusion. Supports on the basis of the geochemical studies most of the hypoabyssal rocks of Moalleman area fall in subalkaline- calcoalkaline fields. Variation of immobile incompatible trace elements versus differentiation coefficient and the situation of samples in winkler diagram show the role of crustal- melting in the formation of acidic rocks. Trace element content of some rocks (e.g. Cu and Sm) with in this group show mantle specification, while some other rocks (e.g. Zr, Th, Hf) show crustal specification. The intermediate rocks of the study area therefore, indicate a hybridization of magmas from both the mantle and crust. Study of the temperature and water vapour

  19. Biostratigraphic implications of the first Eocene land-mammal fauna from the North American coastal plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgate, James W.

    1988-11-01

    A newly discovered vertebrate fossil assemblage, the Casa Blanca local fauna, comes from the Laredo Formation, Claiborne Group, of Webb County, Texas, and is the first reported Eocene land-mammal fauna from the coastal plain of North America. The mammalian fauna is correlated with the Serendipity and Candelaria local faunas of west Texas, the Uinta C faunas of the Rocky Mountains, the Santiago Formation local fauna of southern California, and the Swift Current Creek local fauna of Saskatchewan. The vertebrate-bearing deposit lies about 32 m above a horizon containing the marine gastropod Turritella cortezi, which ranges from east Texas to northeast Mexico in the lower half of the Cook Mountain and Laredo Formations and is a guide fossil to the Hurricane Lentil in the Cook Mountain Formation. Nannoplankton found in these middle Eocene formations belong to the upper half of Nannoplankton Zone I6 and allow correlation with European beds of late Lutetian to early Bartonian age.

  20. Fossil Atherospermataceae from lower Eocene sediments of Austria: Laurelia Juss. from the EECO section at Krappfeld in Carinthia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Christa-Ch.; Egger, Hans

    2015-04-01

    . The presence of Laurelia pollen during the EECO in Austria supports the theory that the taxon originated in western Gondwana and subsequently migrated to New Zealand before the early Miocene (Laurelia leaf fossils), but also is a witness of a northward migration through Africa to reach southern Europe. During northward migration, the plant must have adapted to warmer temperatures in order to grow under the early Eocene "subtropical to tropical" conditions and probably evolved into an understorey tree where the environment was less hot and more humid.

  1. New genus and species names for the Eocene lizard Cadurcogekko rugosus Augé, 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolet, Arnau; Daza, Juan D; Augé, Marc; Bauer, Aaron M

    2015-07-10

    Cadurcogekko rugosus Augé, 2005 was described as a gekkotan lizard from the Eocene of France. A revision of the material has revealed that the holotype, a nearly complete dentary, actually belongs to a scincid lizard, for which we erect the new genus Gekkomimus. The rest of material originally referred to C. rugosus is of undoubted gekkotan nature and is included in the new species Cadurcogekko verus, with the exception of a partial left dentary belonging to the iguanid lizard Cadurciguana hoffstetteri.

  2. Lower Paleogene Tectonostratigraphy of Balochistan: Evidence for Time-Transgressive Late Paleocene-Early Eocene Uplift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. Clyde

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of lithofacies, paleoflow directions, and sandstone petrography of upper Paleocene-lower Eocene paralic and continental sediments exposed along the transpressional suture zone of the western margin of the Indian plate indicate that the process of deformation and uplift of the carbonate shelf in this area had started by late Paleocene time. This tectonic uplift and deformation is documented by: (1 an overall shallowing upward synorogenic sequence of sediments, (2 proximal conglomerate facies (consisting of lower Paleocene and Mesozoic clasts dominating in the western part of the study area and distal facies of sandstone and shale dominating in the eastern part of the study area, (3 the existence of an unconformity of late Paleocene-early Eocene age in the Quetta and Kalat regions, (4 paleocurrent directions in deltaic and fluvial deposits indicating southeastward flowing sediment dispersal paths during late Paleocene-early Eocene time, which is opposite to that found in the late Cretaceous, suggesting a reversal in the depositional slope of the Cretaceous shelf, and (5 petrographic study of sandstones indicating a collision suture/fold thrust belt provenance. This episode of uplift and deformation could be the result of India-Arabian transpression with associated ophiolite obduction or, more likely, to represent the local response to initial India-Asia contact. The unroofing pattern and uplift geometry of the western Indian shelf suggests that this tectonism first started in the southern part of the study area (Kalat-Khuzdar area during the late Paleocene-early Eocene and proceeded northward in a time-transgressive fashion.

  3. Eocene global warming events driven by ventilation of oceanic dissolved organic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Philip F; Norris, Richard D; Wilson, Paul A; Pälike, Heiko; Westerhold, Thomas; Röhl, Ursula; Bolton, Clara T; Gibbs, Samantha

    2011-03-17

    'Hyperthermals' are intervals of rapid, pronounced global warming known from six episodes within the Palaeocene and Eocene epochs (∼65-34 million years (Myr) ago). The most extreme hyperthermal was the ∼170 thousand year (kyr) interval of 5-7 °C global warming during the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, 56 Myr ago). The PETM is widely attributed to massive release of greenhouse gases from buried sedimentary carbon reservoirs, and other, comparatively modest, hyperthermals have also been linked to the release of sedimentary carbon. Here we show, using new 2.4-Myr-long Eocene deep ocean records, that the comparatively modest hyperthermals are much more numerous than previously documented, paced by the eccentricity of Earth's orbit and have shorter durations (∼40 kyr) and more rapid recovery phases than the PETM. These findings point to the operation of fundamentally different forcing and feedback mechanisms than for the PETM, involving redistribution of carbon among Earth's readily exchangeable surface reservoirs rather than carbon exhumation from, and subsequent burial back into, the sedimentary reservoir. Specifically, we interpret our records to indicate repeated, large-scale releases of dissolved organic carbon (at least 1,600 gigatonnes) from the ocean by ventilation (strengthened oxidation) of the ocean interior. The rapid recovery of the carbon cycle following each Eocene hyperthermal strongly suggests that carbon was re-sequestered by the ocean, rather than the much slower process of silicate rock weathering proposed for the PETM. Our findings suggest that these pronounced climate warming events were driven not by repeated releases of carbon from buried sedimentary sources, but, rather, by patterns of surficial carbon redistribution familiar from younger intervals of Earth history.

  4. Description of two genera and species of late Eocene Anthropoidea from Egypt.

    OpenAIRE

    Simons, E L

    1989-01-01

    In 1987 and 1988 fossils of two previously unknown genera and species of Egyptian early Tertiary Anthropoidea were discovered in the Fayum Depression of Egypt. These are much older than all other Fayum, Oligocene primates and are believed to be Eocene in age. These genera, here named Catopithecus and Proteopithecus, come from a new Fayum site, L-41, and resemble Oligopithecus from the Jebel Qatrani Formation (lower sequence) at quarry E. They are here placed with the latter in a subfamily, Ol...

  5. Biomarker characteristics of the Turonian–Eocene succession, Belayim oilfields, central Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    W.Sh. El Diasty; A.A. Abo Ghonaim; A.R. Mostafa; S.Y. El Beialy; Edwards, K. J.

    2016-01-01

    This study assesses the hydrocarbon source rocks of the Belayim oilfields, central Gulf of Suez, Egypt. Detailed geochemical methods, including liquid chromatography, gas chromatography and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, are used to characterize organic-rich facies of the Turonian–Eocene deposits. Crude oil samples are analyzed using C7 and stable carbon isotopes, in addition to analysis of the extracts, in order to throw light on the organic matter source, composition, and thermal mat...

  6. Atmospheric pCO2 Reconstructed across the Early Eocene Hyperthermals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Y.; Schubert, B.

    2015-12-01

    Negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) are commonly associated with extreme global warming. The Early Eocene is punctuated by five such CIEs, the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM, ca. 55.8 Ma), H1 (ca. 53.6 Ma), H2 (ca. 53.5 Ma), I1 (ca. 53.3 Ma), and I2 (ca. 53.2 Ma), each characterized by global warming. The negative CIEs are recognized in both marine and terrestrial substrates, but the terrestrial substrates exhibit a larger absolute magnitude CIE than the marine substrates. Here we reconcile the difference in CIE magnitude between the terrestrial and marine substrates for each of these events by accounting for the additional carbon isotope fractionation by C3 land plants in response to increased atmospheric pCO2. Our analysis yields background and peak pCO2 values for each of the events. Assuming a common mechanism for each event, we calculate that background pCO2 was not static across the Early Eocene, with the highest background pCO2 immediately prior to I2, the last of the five CIEs. Background pCO2 is dependent on the source used in our analysis with values ranging from 300 to 720 ppmv provided an injection of 13C-depleted carbon with δ13C value of -60‰ (e.g. biogenic methane). The peak pCO2 during each event scales according to the magnitude of CIE, and is therefore greatest during the PETM and smallest during H2. Both background and peak pCO2 are higher if we assume a mechanism of permafrost thawing (δ13C = -25‰). Our reconstruction of pCO2 across these events is consistent with trends in the δ18O value of deep-sea benthic foraminifera, suggesting a strong link between pCO2 and temperature during the Early Eocene.

  7. Background- versus event-level biotic variability: Hyperthermals of the late Paleocene and early Eocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, S.; Murphy, B. H.; Pälike, H.

    2009-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) was an abrupt global warming event 55 million years ago (Ma) which has received much attention in recent years as an analogue for anthropogenic carbon emissions. We now know that the PETM was not unique, but was perhaps the most extreme of a number of abrupt carbon cycle perturbations throughout the late Paleocene and early Eocene. These inferred transient warming events, or ‘hyperthermals’, all have characteristic negative carbon isotope excursions (CIE). Unlike the PETM, it is currently unclear whether there was a significant biotic response to these additional CIEs, and if so, whether the amplitude of response varied systematically with excursion magnitude. Here, we present high-resolution nannofossil records from a two million year interval spanning the Paleocene-Eocene boundary at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1209 in the paleo-subequatorial Pacific. This interval, from ~55 to 53 Ma, includes the PETM, a second hyperthermal named the Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2 or ‘Elmo’), and a further number of smaller excursions. These data allow us to look for common biotic signatures and to document the level of assemblage variability relative to the inferred levels of environmental change associated with each CIE. We use this dataset as a case-study for investigating different statistical means of quantifying and comparing biotic responses to background and event-level perturbation. Preliminary analyses suggest that, as expected, the PETM exhibited the greatest level of assemblage variability, well above background levels, followed in order of CIE magnitude by the ETM2. Several of the smaller excursions have no significant assemblage variability above background levels, pointing to a critical threshold level of environmental perturbation.

  8. A remarkable cranium of Plesiopithecus teras (Primates, Prosimii) from the Eocene of Egypt.

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    Between 1991 and 1993 specimens of a highly distinctive primate, named Plesiopithecus teras [Simons, E.L. (1992) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89, 10743-10747], were found at site L-41 in late Eocene deposits of the Fayum Depression, Egypt. The most important of these specimens consists of a nearly complete skull, which facilitates the evaluation of affinities of this primate. Characteristics of the known material now demonstrate that Plesiopithecus is a prosimian, although mandibular molar morp...

  9. Astronomical calibration of the geological timescale: closing the middle Eocene gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Westerhold

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available To explore cause and consequences in past climate reconstructions highly accuracy age models are inevitable. The highly accurate astronomical calibration of the geological time scale beyond 40 million years critically depends on the accuracy of orbital models and radio-isotopic dating techniques. Discrepancies in the age dating of sedimentary successions and the lack of suitable records spanning the middle Eocene have prevented development of a continuous astronomically calibrated geological timescale for the entire Cenozoic Era. We now solve this problem by constructing an independent astrochronological stratigraphy based on Earth's stable 405 kyr eccentricity cycle between 41 and 48 million years ago (Ma with new data from deep-sea sedimentary sequences in the South Atlantic Ocean. This new link completes the Paleogene astronomical time scale and confirms the intercalibration of radio-isotopic and astronomical dating methods back through the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, 55.930 Ma and the Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary (66.022 Ma. Coupling of the Paleogene 405 kyr cyclostratigraphic frameworks across the middle Eocene further paves the way for extending the Astronomical Time Scale (ATS into the Mesozoic.

  10. Crown Group Lejeuneaceae and Pleurocarpous Mosses in Early Eocene (Ypresian) Indian Amber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, Jochen; Scheben, Armin; Bechteler, Julia; Lee, Gaik Ee; Schäfer-Verwimp, Alfons; Hedenäs, Lars; Singh, Hukam; Pócs, Tamás; Nascimbene, Paul C; Peralta, Denilson F; Renner, Matt; Schmidt, Alexander R

    2016-01-01

    Cambay amber originates from the warmest period of the Eocene, which is also well known for the appearance of early angiosperm-dominated megathermal forests. The humid climate of these forests may have triggered the evolution of epiphytic lineages of bryophytes; however, early Eocene fossils of bryophytes are rare. Here, we present evidence for lejeuneoid liverworts and pleurocarpous mosses in Cambay amber. The preserved morphology of the moss fossil is inconclusive for a detailed taxonomic treatment. The liverwort fossil is, however, distinctive; its zig-zagged stems, suberect complicate-bilobed leaves, large leaf lobules, and small, deeply bifid underleaves suggest a member of Lejeuneaceae subtribe Lejeuneinae (Harpalejeunea, Lejeunea, Microlejeunea). We tested alternative classification possibilities by conducting divergence time estimates based on DNA sequence variation of Lejeuneinae using the age of the fossil for corresponding age constraints. Consideration of the fossil as a stem group member of Microlejeunea or Lejeunea resulted in an Eocene to Late Cretaceous age of the Lejeuneinae crown group. This reconstruction is in good accordance with published divergence time estimates generated without the newly presented fossil evidence. Balancing available evidence, we describe the liverwort fossil as the extinct species Microlejeunea nyiahae, representing the oldest crown group fossil of Lejeuneaceae.

  11. Crown Group Lejeuneaceae and Pleurocarpous Mosses in Early Eocene (Ypresian Indian Amber.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Heinrichs

    Full Text Available Cambay amber originates from the warmest period of the Eocene, which is also well known for the appearance of early angiosperm-dominated megathermal forests. The humid climate of these forests may have triggered the evolution of epiphytic lineages of bryophytes; however, early Eocene fossils of bryophytes are rare. Here, we present evidence for lejeuneoid liverworts and pleurocarpous mosses in Cambay amber. The preserved morphology of the moss fossil is inconclusive for a detailed taxonomic treatment. The liverwort fossil is, however, distinctive; its zig-zagged stems, suberect complicate-bilobed leaves, large leaf lobules, and small, deeply bifid underleaves suggest a member of Lejeuneaceae subtribe Lejeuneinae (Harpalejeunea, Lejeunea, Microlejeunea. We tested alternative classification possibilities by conducting divergence time estimates based on DNA sequence variation of Lejeuneinae using the age of the fossil for corresponding age constraints. Consideration of the fossil as a stem group member of Microlejeunea or Lejeunea resulted in an Eocene to Late Cretaceous age of the Lejeuneinae crown group. This reconstruction is in good accordance with published divergence time estimates generated without the newly presented fossil evidence. Balancing available evidence, we describe the liverwort fossil as the extinct species Microlejeunea nyiahae, representing the oldest crown group fossil of Lejeuneaceae.

  12. Tectonic rotations and internal structure of Eocene plutons in Chuquicamata, northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somoza, R.; Tomlinson, A. J.; Zaffarana, C. B.; Singer, S. E.; Puigdomenech Negre, C. G.; Raposo, M. I. B.; Dilles, J. H.

    2015-07-01

    A paleomagnetic and AMS study on Eocene plutonic complexes in the Calama area, northern Chile, reveals high-temperature, high-coercivity magnetizations of dominantly thermoremanent origin and magnetic fabrics controlled by magnetite. The paleomagnetic results indicate that ~ 43 Ma plutons underwent clockwise tectonic rotation, whereas adjacent ~ 39 Ma plutons did not undergo discernible rotation. This points to a middle Eocene age for the younger tectonic rotations associated with the Central Andean Rotation Pattern in the Chuquicamata-Calama area. The petrofabric in these rocks formed under conditions ranging from purely magmatic (i.e. before full crystallization) to low-temperature solid-state deformation. AMS and paleomagnetism suggest that the plutonic bodies were formed by progressive amalgamation of subvertical magma sheets spanning multiple magnetic polarity chrons. The parallelism between magmatic and tectonic foliations suggests that regional tectonic stress controlled ascent, emplacement and rock deformation during cooling. In this context, we suggest that magma ascent and emplacement in the upper crust likely exploited Mesozoic structures which were locally reactivated in the Eocene.

  13. Provenance and palaeogeographic implications of Eocene-Oligocene sedimentary rocks in the northwestern Basin and Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, A.E.; Colgan, J.P.; York, C.

    2009-01-01

    A thick sequence of uppermost Eocene to lower Oligocene volcaniclastic and sedimentary rocks is exposed at the base of the Warner Range in northeastern California. This isolated exposure provides insight into the palaeogeographic setting of the northwestern Basin and Range during this time period. Significant thinning of the unit over 35km of lateral exposure and predominantly volcanic clast compositions suggest that the sequence was deposited in an alluvial plain adjacent to a volcanic arc. Palaeocurrent indicators in the conglomerates define a NNE transport direction. Detrital zircon analysis on coarse sandstones and dating of individual granite cobbles show a range of ages consistent with a local, volcanic source area primarily from the SSW with some far-travelled input from northern Nevada; the far-travelled component increases in influence as the unit thins to the north. Comparison with other sedimentary sequences of Eocene age and integration with palaeofloral and geophysical data help to define drainage divides, and suggest that this sequence accumulated in a relatively isolated, intra-arc basin. This localized accumulation differs markedly from contemporaneous drainages to the south that transported material westwards from central Nevada to the palaeoshoreline, and suggests that ongoing volcanism had a strong influence on palaeogeography in this region during the Eocene and Oligocene.

  14. Cranial asymmetry in Eocene archaeocete whales and the evolution of directional hearing in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlke, Julia M; Gingerich, Philip D; Welsh, Robert C; Wood, Aaron R

    2011-08-30

    Eocene archaeocete whales gave rise to all modern toothed and baleen whales (Odontoceti and Mysticeti) during or near the Eocene-Oligocene transition. Odontocetes have asymmetrical skulls, with asymmetry linked to high-frequency sound production and echolocation. Mysticetes are generally assumed to have symmetrical skulls and lack high-frequency hearing. Here we show that protocetid and basilosaurid archaeocete skulls are distinctly and directionally asymmetrical. Archaeocete asymmetry involves curvature and axial torsion of the cranium, but no telescoping. Cranial asymmetry evolved in Eocene archaeocetes as part of a complex of traits linked to directional hearing (such as pan-bone thinning of the lower jaws, mandibular fat pads, and isolation of the ear region), probably enabling them to hear the higher sonic frequencies of sound-producing fish on which they preyed. Ultrasonic echolocation evolved in Oligocene odontocetes, enabling them to find silent prey. Asymmetry and much of the sonic-frequency range of directional hearing were lost in Oligocene mysticetes during the shift to low-frequency hearing and bulk-straining predation.

  15. Sources and cycling of mercury in the paleo Arctic Ocean from Hg stable isotope variations in Eocene and Quaternary sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, J. D.; Blum, J. D.; Moore, T. C.; Polyak, L.; Jakobsson, M.; Meyers, P. A.; Biswas, A.

    2017-01-01

    Mercury stable isotopic compositions were determined for marine sediments from eight locations in the Arctic Ocean Basin. Mass dependent fractionation (MDF) and mass independent fractionation (MIF) of Hg stable isotopes were recorded across a variety of depositional environments, water depths, and stratigraphic ages. δ202Hg (MDF) ranges from -2.34‰ to -0.78‰; Δ199Hg (MIF) from -0.18‰ to +0.12‰; and Δ201Hg (MIF) from -0.29‰ to +0.05‰ for the complete data set (n = 33). Holocene sediments from the Chukchi Sea and Morris Jesup Rise record the most negative Δ199Hg values, while Pleistocene sediments from the Central Arctic Ocean record the most positive Δ199Hg values. The most negative δ202Hg values are recorded in Pleistocene sediments. Eocene sediments (Lomonosov Ridge) show some overlap in their Hg isotopic compositions with Quaternary sediments, with a sample of the Arctic Ocean PETM (56 Ma) most closely matching the average Hg isotopic composition of Holocene Arctic marine sediments. Collectively, these data support a terrestrially-dominated Hg source input for Arctic Ocean sediment through time, although other sources, as well as influences of sea ice, atmospheric mercury depletion events (AMDEs), and anthropogenic Hg (in core top samples) on Hg isotopic signatures must also be considered.

  16. Identifying tectonic and climatic drivers for deep-marine siliciclastic systems: Middle Eocene, Spanish Pyrenees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, K. T.; Scotchman, J. I.; Robinson, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    Analysis of the sedimentary record in deep time requires the deconvolution of tectonic and climatic drivers. The deep-marine siliciclastic systems in the Middle Eocene Ainsa-Jaca basin, Spanish Pyrenees, with their excellent outcrops and good temporal resolution, provide an opportunity to identify the relative importance of tectonic and climatic drivers on deposition over ~10 Myr at a time when the Earth’s climate was shifting from a greenhouse to icehouse conditions. The cumulative ~4 km of stratigraphy contains 8 sandy systems with a total of ~25 discrete channelized sandbodies that accumulated in water depths of ~400-800 m, and that were controlled by the ~400-kyr Milkankovitch frequency with modes, at ~100 kyr and ~41 kyr (possibly stacked ~23-kyr) influencing bottom-water conditions, causing periodic stratification in the water column across a submarine sill within the eastern, more proximal depositional systems in the Ainsa basin. We also identify a range of sub-Milankovitch millennial-scale cycles (Scotchman et al. 2009). In the Ainsa basin, the interplay of basin-bounding growth anticlines defined and controlled the position and stacking patterns of the sandy systems and their constituent channelized sandbodies, in a process of seesaw tectonics by: (i) Westward lateral offset-stacking of channelized sandbodies due to growth of the eastern anticline (Mediano), and (ii) Eastward (orogenwards) back-stepping of the depositional axis of each sandy system, due to phases of relative uplift of the opposing Boltaña growth anticline. The first-order control on accommodation, and the flow paths, for deep-marine sedimentation were tectonic, with the pacing of the supply of coarse siliciclastics being driven by global climatic processes, particularly Milankovitch-type frequencies. The dominance of eccentricity and obliquity is similar to results from the continental lacustrine Eocene Green River Formation, and the observations from ODP Site 1258 that the early to

  17. Eocene seasonality and seawater alkaline earth reconstruction using shallow-dwelling large benthic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David; Müller, Wolfgang; Oron, Shai; Renema, Willem

    2013-11-01

    Intra-test variability in Mg/Ca and other (trace) elements within large benthic foraminifera (LBF) of the family Nummulitidae have been investigated using laser-ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). These foraminifera have a longevity and size facilitating seasonal proxy retrieval and a depth distribution similar to 'surface-dwelling' planktic foraminifera. Coupled with their abundance in climatically important periods such as the Paleogene, this means that this family of foraminifera are an important but under-utilised source of palaeoclimatic information. We have calibrated the relationship between Mg/Ca and temperature in modern Operculina ammonoides and observe a ˜2% increase in Mg/Ca °C-1. O. ammonoides is the nearest living relative of the abundant Eocene genus Nummulites, enabling us to reconstruct mid-Eocene tropical sea surface temperature seasonality by applying our calibration to fossil Nummulites djokdjokartae from Java. Our results indicate a 5-6 °C annual temperature range, implying greater than modern seasonality in the mid-Eocene (Bartonian). This is consistent with seasonal surface ocean cooling facilitated by enhanced Eocene tropical cyclone-induced upper ocean mixing, as suggested by recent modelling results. Analyses of fossil N. djokdjokartae and Operculina sp. from the same stratigraphic interval demonstrate that environmental controls on proxy distribution coefficients are the same for these two genera, within error. Using previously published test-seawater alkaline earth metal distribution coefficients derived from an LBF of the same family (Raitzsch et al., 2010) and inorganic calcite, with appropriate correction systematics for secular Mg/Casw variation (Evans and Müller, 2012), we use our fossil data to produce a more accurate foraminifera-based Mg/Casw reconstruction and an estimate of seawater Sr/Ca. We demonstrate that mid-Eocene Mg/Casw was ≲2 molmol, which is in contrast to the model most

  18. POST-Eocene subsidence of the Marshall Islands recorded by drowned atolls on Harrie and Sylvania guyots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlanger, S. O.; Campbell, J. F.; Jackson, M. W.

    Geophysical and geological surveys of Harrie and Sylvania Guyots in the northern Marshall Islands show that both of these volcanic edifices are capped by drowned atolls of Early Eocene age. The volcanic eruptions that formed both of these guyots were apparently coeval with the eruptions that formed the volcanic edifice below Enewetak Atoll. These Eocene eruptions took place in an off-ridge setting in a region that had experienced a complex history of Cretaceous mid-plate volcanism. Present depths to the tops of these drowned Eocene atolls are 1520 m at Harrie and 1480 m at Sylvania which, taken together with the coeval subsidence of Enewetak atoll of ˜1300-1400 m and the post-Late Cretaceous subsidence of the Nauru Basin of ˜1600 m, show that this region has subsided rapidly, as a unit, atop a thermally rejuvenated lithosphere of Middle Jurassic age. The Eocene atolls on Harrie and Sylvania Guyots drowned during a rapid sea level rise ˜49 Ma that followed a period of relatively high sea levels in Early Eocene time.

  19. Paleolimnology of Lake Tubutulik, an iron-meromictic Eocene Lake, eastern Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Kendell A.

    1988-01-01

    Sideritic lacustrine mudstone was found in drill core from a uranium deposit in the Death Valley area in the eastern part of the Seward Peninsula, Alaska. The precursor sediments for this rock were deposited in an unusual "iron-meromictic" Eocene lake, herein named Lake Tubutulik, which occupied part of the Boulder Creek basin, a structural graben that is probably a southern extension of the larger Death Valley basin. The Boulder Creek basin is bounded on the west by granite of the Late Cretaceous Darby Pluton, on the east by Precambrian to Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks. The lake basin was formed by basaltic flows that dammed the river valley of the ancestral Tubutulik River in early Eocene time. Lake Tubutulik contained a nearshore facies of fine-grained organic mud and an offshore facies of laminated sideritic mud. The offshore (profundal) laminated mudstone consists of alternating layers of authigenic siderite and detrital layers containing mostly quartz and clay minerals. Both lacustrine facies contain turbidities. The lacustrine sediments graded laterally into an onshore facies of colluvial and fluvial sandstone, paludal mudstone, and coal. The ancient lake apparently occupied a small deep basin in a tectonically active area of high relief. Meromixus was probably stabilized by reduced iron and bicarbonate dissolved in the monimolimnion. The intensity of meromixus decreased as the lake became shallower from sediment filling. The source of the iron, abundant in the monimolimnion of Lake Tubutulik, was probably the Eocene basalt. Based on carbon isotope analysis of the siderite, the dissolved bicarbonate in the profundal facies was largely inorganic. Sideritic carbon in one sample from the onshore paludal facies has an isotopic signature ( δ13C = +16.9) consistent with residual carbon formed during methanogenic fermentation.

  20. New fauna of archaeocete whales (Mammalia, Cetacea) from the Bartonian middle Eocene of southern Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingerich, Philip D.; Zouhri, Samir

    2015-11-01

    Six genera and species of archaic whales are present in a new fauna from the Aridal Formation at Gueran in the Sahara Desert of southwestern Morocco. Three of the archaeocete species represent semiaquatic Protocetidae and three species are fully aquatic Basilosauridae. Protocetids are characteristic of Lutetian lower middle Eocene strata, and basilosaurids are characteristic of Priabonian late Eocene beds. Similar representation of both families is restricted to intervening Bartonian strata and indicative of a late middle Eocene age. Archaeocetes from Gueran include (1) a small protocetid represented by a partial humerus, teeth, and vertebrae; (2) a middle-sized protocetid represented by a partial innominate and proximal femur; (3) the very large protocetid Pappocetus lugardi represented by teeth, a partial innominate, and two partial femora; (4) a new species of the small basilosaurid Chrysocetus represented by a dentary, teeth, humeri, and many vertebrae; (5) a new species of the larger basilosaurid Platyosphys (resurrected as a distinct genus) represented by a partial braincase, tympanic bulla, and many vertebrae; and (6) the large basilosaurid Eocetus schweinfurthi represented by teeth, a tympanic bulla, and lumbar vertebrae. The Gueran locality is important geologically because it constrains the age of a part of the Aridal Formation, and biologically because it includes a diversity of archaic whales represented by partial skeletons with vertebrae in sequence and by forelimb and hind limb remains. With further collecting, Gueran archaeocete skeletons promise to clarify the important evolutionary transition from foot-powered swimming in Protocetidae to the tail-powered swimming of Basilosauridae and all later Cetacea.

  1. Paleolimnology of Lake Tubutulik, an iron-meromictic Eocene Lake, eastern Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, K.A.

    1988-01-01

    Sideritic lacustrine mudstone was found in drill core from a uranium deposit in the Death Valley area in the eastern part of the Seward Peninsula, Alaska. The precursor sediments for this rock were deposited in an unusual "iron-meromictic" Eocene lake, herein named Lake Tubutulik, which occupied part of the Boulder Creek basin, a structural graben that is probably a southern extension of the larger Death Valley basin. The Boulder Creek basin is bounded on the west by granite of the Late Cretaceous Darby Pluton, on the east by Precambrian to Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks. The lake basin was formed by basaltic flows that dammed the river valley of the ancestral Tubutulik River in early Eocene time. Lake Tubutulik contained a nearshore facies of fine-grained organic mud and an offshore facies of laminated sideritic mud. The offshore (profundal) laminated mudstone consists of alternating layers of authigenic siderite and detrital layers containing mostly quartz and clay minerals. Both lacustrine facies contain turbidities. The lacustrine sediments graded laterally into an onshore facies of colluvial and fluvial sandstone, paludal mudstone, and coal. The ancient lake apparently occupied a small deep basin in a tectonically active area of high relief. Meromixus was probably stabilized by reduced iron and bicarbonate dissolved in the monimolimnion. The intensity of meromixus decreased as the lake became shallower from sediment filling. The source of the iron, abundant in the monimolimnion of Lake Tubutulik, was probably the Eocene basalt. Based on carbon isotope analysis of the siderite, the dissolved bicarbonate in the profundal facies was largely inorganic. Sideritic carbon in one sample from the onshore paludal facies has an isotopic signature (??13C = +16.9) consistent with residual carbon formed during methanogenic fermentation. ?? 1988.

  2. Palaeocology of coal-bearing Eocene sediments in central Anatolia (Turkey) based on quantitative palynological data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkiraz, M.S.; Kayseri, M.S.; Akgun, F. [Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Geological Engineering

    2008-04-15

    In this study, the lignite-bearing Yoncali formation between Yozgat and Sorgun, in central Anatolia has been palynologically examined. Based on 37 outcrop samples, quantitative palynological studies recognized 64 genera and 136 palynoflora species in the palynological assemblage, which indicated a Middle-Late Eocene age. This paper also presents a quantitative palaeovegetation and palaeoclimate reconstruction for the Middle-Upper Eocene coal occurrences of Central Anatolia on the basis of palynomorph assemblages. The diversified floral and ecological characteristics of the pollen taxa indicates that the Middle-Upper Eocene formations in central Anatolia were characterized by the presence of a complex mangrove swamp with contributions by Nypa, Pelliciera, Avicennia, Diporites tszkaszentgydrgyi and dinoflagellate cysts which reflect warm climatic conditions. Lowland-riparian and montane elements are characterized by the dominance of Myricaceae, Symplocaceae, Icacinaceae, Quercus, Pinus and Castanea. Swamp-freshwater elements are represented by Sparganjaceae, Nymphaceae, Taxodjaceae, Cupressaceae and Nyssa as well as fern spores such as Osmundaceae and Gleicheniaceae. The calculations were performed with the help of the 'Coexistence Approach' method to climatically evaluate palynoflora from the Yozgat-Sorgun area. The obtained results have been compared to data derived from the application of the Coexistence Approach to other, already published Central Anatolian palynofloras of the same age. The results of the climatic inferences suggest that the palaeoclimatic conditions were in the megathermal zone, megatherm/mesotherm intermediate zone whereas mesothermic conditions prevailed in the montane region. Likewise, the results of mean annual range of temperatures indicate the influence of the Indian ocean, which enabled the development of the mangroves.

  3. Late Eocene sea surface cooling of the western North Atlantic (ODP Site 647A)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwinska, Kasia K.; Coxall, Helen K.; Schouten, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The initial shift out of the early Cenozoic greenhouse and into a glacial icehouse climate occurred during the middle to late Eocene and culminated in the abrupt growth of a continental-scale ice cap on Antarctica, during an episode known as the Oligocene Isotope Event 1 (Oi-1) ˜33.7 Ma. Documenting the patterns of global and regional cooling prior to Oi-1 is crucial for understanding the driving force and feedback behind the switch in climate mode. Well-dated high-resolution temperature records, however, remain sparse and the climatic response in some of the most climatically sensitive regions of the Earth, including the high latitude North Atlantic (NA), where today large amounts of ocean heat are exchanged, are poorly known. Here we present a sea surface palaeotemperature record from the late Eocene to the early Oligocene (32.5 Ma to 35 Ma) of ODP Hole 647A based on archaeal tetraether lipids (TEX86H). The site is located in the western North Atlantic (Southern Labrador Sea) and is the most northerly located (53° N) open ocean site with a complete Eocene-Oligocene sequence which yields both calcareous and organic microfossils suitable for detailed proxy reconstructions. Our record agrees with the magnitude of temperature decrease (˜3 ° C sea surface cooling) recorded by alkenones and pollen data from the Greenland Sea, but our higher resolution study reveals that the high latitude NA cooling step occurred about 500 kyrs prior to the Oi-1 Antarctic glaciation, at around ˜34.4 Ma. This cooling can be explained by regional effects related to local NA tectonics including ocean gateways, known to have changed at the time, with potential to effect NA overturning circulation due to adjustments in the thermohaline density balance. Alternatively, the cooling itself may be due to changes in NA circulation, suggesting that global ocean circulation played a role in pre-conditioning the Earth for Antarctic glaciation.

  4. Declining moisture availability in late Eocene Antarctica as deduced from Nothofagus sporopollenin δ13C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griener, K. W.; Nelson, D. M.; Warny, S.

    2012-12-01

    Palynological data demonstrate that significant changes in vegetation and climate occurred at the Eocene-Oligocene (E-O) Boundary on the Antarctic Peninsula. These changes include decreases in terrestrial palynomorph abundance and diversity as well as dinoflagellate assemblages that reflect colder sea surface temperatures and increased glaciation (Warny and Askin, 2011). Understanding the factors controlling these changes in climate and vegetation is a topic of great interest. One area of remaining uncertainty is how the hydrologic regime varied during Antarctica's shift from greenhouse to icehouse conditions. For example, estimates of Antarctic precipitation from around the E-O boundary based on plant leaf margins (e.g. Francis et al., 2008), clay mineralogy (e.g. Christian and Kennett, 1997), and models (Thorn and DeConto 2006) are vastly different. We used a moving-wire device interfaced with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (Sessions et al., 2005; Nelson et al., 2008) to analyze δ13C of small quantities of Nothofagus sporopollenin extracted from Antarctic Eocene SHALDRIL cores from ~35.9 Mya, just prior to the E-O Boundary (Bohaty et al., 2011). We also analyzed δ13C of modern Nothofagus sporopollenin from herbaria specimens and related these results to historical climate data. Our modern data show that carbon isotope discrimination (Δ) of Nothofagus sporopollenin is positively correlated with mean annual and growing-season precipitation, consistent with prior studies that demonstrate a strong relationship between Δ and water availability in C3 plants. Eocene Nothofagus Δ values progressively decreased through time, implying a decline in moisture availability. There is a close correlation between Nothofagus palynomorph abundance (Warny and Askin, 2011) and Δ, indicating that Nothofagus abundance declined in response to decreasing moisture availability. We consider changes in sea surface temperatures as well as increased glaciation as possible causes

  5. Ironstone deposits hosted in Eocene carbonates from Bahariya (Egypt)-New perspective on cherty ironstone occurrences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afify, A. M.; Sanz-Montero, M. E.; Calvo, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    This paper gives new insight into the genesis of cherty ironstone deposits. The research was centered on well-exposed, unique cherty ironstone mineralization associated with Eocene carbonates from the northern part of the Bahariya Depression (Egypt). The economically important ironstones occur in the Naqb Formation (Early Eocene), which is mainly formed of shallow marine carbonate deposits. Periods of lowstand sea-level caused extensive early dissolution (karstification) of the depositional carbonates and dolomitization associated with mixing zones of fresh and marine pore-water. In faulted areas, the Eocene carbonate deposits were transformed into cherty ironstone with preservation of the precursor carbonate sedimentary features, i.e. skeletal and non-skeletal grain types, thickness, bedding, lateral and vertical sequential arrangement, and karst profiles. The ore deposits are composed of iron oxyhydroxides, mainly hematite and goethite, chert in the form of micro- to macro-quartz and chalcedony, various manganese minerals, barite, and a number of subordinate sulfate and clay minerals. Detailed petrographic analysis shows that quartz and iron oxides were coetaneous and selectively replaced carbonates, the coarse dolomite crystals having been preferentially transformed into quartz whereas the micro-crystalline carbonates were replaced by the iron oxyhydroxides. A number of petrographic, sedimentological and structural features including the presence of hydrothermal-mediated minerals (e.g., jacobsite), the geochemistry of the ore minerals as well as the structure-controlled location of the mineralization suggest a hydrothermal source for the ore-bearing fluids circulating through major faults and reflect their proximity to centers of magmatism. The proposed formation model can contribute to better understanding of the genetic mechanisms of formation of banded iron formations (BIFs) that were abundant during the Precambrian.

  6. Suckers (Fish, Catostomidae) from the Eocene of China ac-count for the family's current disjunct distributions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Unequivocal Eocene suckers from China are for the first time reported here. This discovery demonstrates that catostomids of the Eocene Epoch (some 55-35 Ma ago) are scattered widely on mainland Asia as well as western North America. The present day disjunct distribution pattern of catostomids, with 68 extant species widespread in North America and the northern part of Middle America and only two in the restricted areas of Asia, is the result of their post-Eocene decline in Asia due to the competitive pressure from cyprinids, their Late Cenozoic radiation in North America, and the vicariant and dispersal events triggered by the changed biogeographic landscape. All of these prove to be a historical product of the geological, biological, and climatic changes throughout the Cenozoic.

  7. Paleocene-Eocene transition at Naqb Assiut, Kharga Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt: Stratigraphical and paleoenvironmental inferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Dawy, Moustafa, Hassan; Obaidalla, Nageh Abdelrahman; Mahfouz, Kamel Hussien; Abdel Wahed, Samar Adel

    2016-05-01

    This work depends on the study of the lower part of the Esna Formation which encompasses the Paleocene-Eocene (P-E) transition in Egypt as well as at Naqb Assiut section, Kharga Oasis, Western Desert. The Paleocene/Eocene (P/E) boundary is represented by El Dababiya Quarry Member which consists of five distinctive beds (nos. 1-5) at the GSSP. On the other hand, at Naqb Assiut section this boundary is only represented by the upper two beds (nos. 4&5), whereas, the lower three beds (nos. 1-3) are missing due to a hiatus. This hiatus is marked by the occurrence of an irregular surface contains pebbles and phosphatic materials. This hiatus may be related to the echo of Sryian Arc Orogeny at the P/E time. Biostratigraphically; four planktonic foraminiferal zones are defined from base to top as: Acarinina soldadoensis/Globanomalina pseudomenardii and Morozovella velascoensis (late Paleocene), Acarinina sibaiyaensis and Pseudohastigerina wilcoxensis/Morozovella velascoensis (early Eocene). The Acarinina sibaiyaensis Zone which represents the P//E/boundary is characterized by the occurrence of intrazonal hiatus at it's lower part. The benthonic foraminiferal taxa contain abundant representatives of Midway-type fauna (∼91% of the whole assemblages), beside few Velasco-type faunal ones (∼9%), indicating an outer neritic (150-200 m) water depth of deposition during the P-E transition. Quantitative analysis and composition of benthonic foraminiferal assemblages are indicative for various environmental changes around the P/E boundary. They reflected a high diversity, increase of epifaunal taxa, and low-intermediate productivity conditions, which indicates a well-ventilated bottom water and oligo - to mesotrophic conditions during the late Paleocene age. Rapid extinction of about 18% of the entire benthonic foraminiferal species started at the P/E boundary, where the last occurrence of Angulogavelinella avnimelechi is pronounced at the base of this boundary. There is a

  8. Two new parrots (Psittaciformes) from the Lower Eocene Fur Formation of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waterhouse, David; Lindow, Bent Erik Kramer; Zelenkov, Nikita;

    2008-01-01

    Two new fossil psittaciform birds from the Lower Eocene ‘Mo Clay' (Fur Formation) of Denmark (c. 54 Ma) are described. An unnamed specimen is assigned to the extinct avian family of stem-group parrots, Pseudasturidae (genus and species incertae sedis), while a second (Mopsitta tanta gen. et sp. nov.......) is the largest fossil parrot yet known. Both specimens are the first fossil records of these birds from Denmark. Although the phylogenetic position of Mopsitta is unclear (it is classified as family incertae sedis), this form is phylogenetically closer to Recent Psittacidae than to other known Palaeogene...... psittaciforms and may, therefore, represent the oldest known crowngroup parrot....

  9. Submarine-fan facies associations of the Eocene Butano Sandstone, Santa Cruz mountains, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Tor H.

    1984-06-01

    The Eocene Butano Sandstone was deposited as a submarine fan in a relatively small, partly restricted basin in a borderland setting. It is possibly as thick as 3000 m and was derived from erosion of nearly Mesozoic granitic and older metamorphic rocks located to the south. Deposition was at lower bathyal to abyssal water depths. The original fan may have been 120-to 160-km long and 80-km wide. Outcrops of submarine-canyon, innerfan, middle-fan, and outer-fan facies associations indicate that the depositional model of Mutti and Ricci Lucchi can be used to describe the Butano Sandstone.

  10. The first Aleyrodidae from the Lowermost Eocene Oise amber (Hemiptera: Sternorrhyncha).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drohojowska, Jowita; Szwedo, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    The first records are provided of the family Aleyrodidae in the Lowermost Eocene amber of Oise, France. The following new taxa in the subfamily Aleurodicinae are described, figured and discussed, together with an identification key: Oisedicus maginus gen. et sp. n., Clodionusfizoli gen. et sp. n., Lukotekia menae gen. et sp. n. and Isaraselis cladiva gen. et sp. n. Unplaced species of Lukotekia are briefly described, and the diversity of the whiteflies from Oise amber is discussed. The importance of fossils for palaeoecological and palaeoclimatological reconstruction is briefly considered.

  11. Coralgal facies of the Upper Eocene-Lower Oligocene limestones in Letca-Rastoci area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Prica

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper are described the coralgal facies identified in the Upper Eocene-Lower Oligocene limestone succession (Cozla Formation outcropping in two quarries at Letca and Rastoci (Sălaj district, Romania. In the studied profiles the coral and algae limestones are interlayered with bioclastic limestones with foraminifera. On the top of relatively deep water deposits, coral and algae crusts and dendritic corals coated by algae were deposited. The environment registered a gradual deepening, the deposits being completely immersed, while bioclastic limestones with foraminifera were recurrently formed. This cycle is repeated, the whole succession being caracterized by several such “parasequences”.

  12. Earth Pressure at rest of Søvind Marl – a highly overconsolidated Eocene clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech, Gitte Lyng; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated earth pressure at rest, K0, in highly overconsolidated Eocene clay called Søvind Marl, which exhibits extremely high plasticity indices of up to 300%, a highly fissured structure, and preconsolidation stresses up to 6,800 kPa. Continuous Loading Oedometer (CLO) tests...... in situ stresses to various stress levels to estimate continuous K0 development in this highly overconsolidated clay. The normally consolidated earth pressure at rest was found for two different sample ages of Søvind Marl to be between 0.42 and 0.68. Results indicated the overconsolidated K0 reached...

  13. Penguin response to the Eocene climate and ecosystem change in the northern Antarctic Peninsula region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadwiszczak, Piotr

    2010-08-01

    Eocene Antarctic penguins are known solely from the La Meseta Formation (Seymour Island, James Ross Basin). They are most numerous and taxonomically diverse (at least ten species present) within strata formed at the end of this epoch, which is concomitant with a significant cooling trend and biotic turnover prior to the onset of glaciation. Moreover, all newly appeared taxa were small-bodied, and most probably evolved in situ. Interestingly, some chemical proxies suggest enhanced nutrient upwelling events that coincided with obvious changes in the record of La Meseta penguins.

  14. Paleocene-Early Eocene larger foraminiferal biostratigraphy of Yemen and Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Carlo, M.; Serra-Kiel, J.; Pignatti, J.

    2012-04-01

    The Paleogene larger foraminiferal biostratigraphy is today rather well assessed for the Tethyan domain. In order to contribute to the full integration of the Middle-East in the widely employed Shallow Benthic Zonation, a preliminary report on the Paleocene-Early Eocene larger foraminiferal assemblages from Yemen and Oman is provided here. The sections investigated in Yemen range in age from the Upper Cretaceous to the Oligocene. The Paleogene of Yemen is widely affected by dolomitization and only by analyzing over 1,700 thin sections from 60 stratigraphic sections (mainly from Hadramaut and Socotra) it has been possible to adequately investigate the fossil assemblages. In contrast, the deposits from northern Oman are characterized by rich and extraordinarily well-preserved Paleocene-Lower Eocene larger foraminiferal assemblages. This preliminary report focuses mainly on the Paleocene-Early Eocene deposits of the Umm-er-Radhuma formation. The Paleocene-Lower Eocene assemblages are characterized by strong affinities with northern Somalia. Hyaline forms such as Daviesina khatiyahi, Miscellanea gr. rhomboidea/dukhani, M. miscella, Saudia, Sakesaria, Lockhartia, Ranikothalia, Dictyokathina largely prevail in SBZ 3-4 deposits. Nummulites, Ranikothalia and Daviesina ruida characterize the Lower Ypresian. Subordinately, porcelaneous forms such as "Taberina" daviesi and conical agglutinated (Daviesiconus) also occur; alveolinids (such as Alveolina vredenburgi and A. decipiens) are relatively abundant in the basal Lower Ypresian of Socotra. In contrast to the coeval deposits from Yemen, the Paleocene section of Oman (Wadi Duqm, Abat-Tiwi platform) yields very well-preserved larger foraminiferal assemblages and agglutinated and porcelaneous forms are well represented. The occurrence of abundant Globoreticulina paleocenica is noteworthy along with an as yet undescribed Lacazinella species. The co-occurrence of Coskinon sp., "Plumokathina dienii", Dictyoconus turriculus and

  15. Palaeoclimate reconstruction within the upper Eocene in central Germany using fossil plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraweck, Karolin; Kunzmann, Lutz; Uhl, Dieter; Kleber, Arno

    2013-04-01

    The Eocene has been commonly called "The world`s last greenhouse period" covering the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) as well as the Eocene-Oligocene turnover. In the mid-latitudes of Europe this turnover was characterized by pronounced climatic changes from subtropical towards temperate conditions that were accompanied by significant vegetational changes on land. Fossil plants are regarded as excellent palaeoenvironmental proxies, because leaf physiognomy often reflects climate conditions. The study site, the Paleogene Weißelster basin in central Germany, including fluvial, estuarine and lacustrine deposits, provides several excellently preserved megafloras for reconstructions of terrestrial palaeoclimate. For our case study we used material from different stratigraphic horizons within the late Eocene Zeitz megafloral assemblage recovered from the open-cast mines of Profen and Schleenhain. These horizons cover a time interval of ca. 3 Ma. The Zeitz megafloral assemblage ("Florenkomplex") was characterized by mainly evergreen, notophyllous vegetation, consisting of warm-temperate to subtropical elements. Tropical species are present but very rare. To infer the regional climatic conditions and putative climate changes from these fossil plants we compare proxy data obtained by the application of standard methods for quantitative reconstruction of palaeoclimate data: the coexistence approach (CA), leaf margin analysis (LMA) and Climate Leaf Analysis Multivariate Program (CLAMP).Before the CA was applied to the material the list of putative nearest living relative species (NLR) was carefully revisited and partly revised. In case of the LMA approach information of so-called "silent taxa" (fossil species preserved by diaspores, leaf margin state is inferred from NLR data) were partly included in the data set. The four floras from the Zeitz megafloral assemblage show slightly different floral compositions caused by various taphonomic processes. An aim of the

  16. A dynamic climate and ecosystem state during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum: inferences from dinoflagellate cyst assemblages on the New Jersey Shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sluijs

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Late Paleocene and Early Eocene climates and ecosystems underwent significant change during several transient global warming phases, associated with rapidly increasing atmospheric carbon concentrations, of which the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; ~55.5 Ma is best studied. While biotic response to the PETM as a whole (~170 kyrs has been relatively well documented, variations during the PETM have been neglected. Here we present organic dinoflagellate cyst (dinocyst distribution patterns across two stratigraphically expanded PETM sections from the New Jersey Shelf, Bass River and Wilson Lake. Many previously studied sites show a uniform abundance of the thermophilic and presumably heterotrophic taxon Apectodinium that spans the entire carbon isotope excursion (CIE of the PETM. In contrast, the New Jersey sections show large variations in abundances of many taxa during the PETM, including the new species Florentinia reichartii that we formally propose. We infer paleoecological preferences of taxa that show temporal abundance peaks, both qualitative and absolute quantitative, from empirical as well as statistical information, i.e., principle (PCA and canonical correspondence analyses (CCA. In the CCAs, we combine the dinocyst data with previously published environmental proxy data from these locations, such as TEX86 paleothermometry, magnetic susceptibility and sedimentary size fraction. The combined information supports previous inferences that sea level rose during the PETM, but also indicates a (regional increase in fresh-water runoff that started ~10 kyr after the onset of the CIE, and perhaps precession-paced cycles in sea surface productivity. The highly variable dinocyst assemblages of the PETM contrast with rather stable Upper Paleocene assemblages, which suggests that carbon input caused a dynamic climate state, at least regionally.

  17. Siamopithecus eocaenus, a late Eocene anthropoid primate from Thailand: its contribution to the evolution of anthropoids in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducrocq, S

    1999-06-01

    Dental remains of a late Eocene anthropoid primate from Thailand, Siamopithecus eocaenus, have been recently reported; complete description and comparisons of this material are given here. Siamopithecus displays several derived dental features that suggest close phylogenetic affinities among the Thai species, the Burmese Pondaungia, and the North African and Omani propliopithecines Aegyptopithecus and Moeripithecus. The geographic origin of anthropoid primates cannot be securely determined at present, but the available fossil record indicates that faunal exchanges between Africa and Southeast Asia were very probable during the Eocene, and that direct relationships between Asian and African anthropoid primates can be inferred.

  18. Insights into Ocean Acidification During the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum from Boron Isotopes at Southern Ocean Site 738

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moebius, I.; Hoenisch, B.; Friedrich, O.

    2015-12-01

    The Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) is a ~650-kyr interval of global warming, with a brief ~50 ky long peak warming interval, and an abrupt termination. Deep sea and surface ocean temperature evolution across this interval are fairly well constrained, but thus far we have little understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the gradual warming and rapid recovery. Carbonate mass accumulation rates suggest a shoaling of the carbonate compensation depth, and studies on alkenones indicate increasing atmospheric CO2 levels during the MECO. This suggests an increase in surface ocean CO2, and consequently ocean acidification. However, the severity and timing of the proposed ocean acidification with respect to the onset, peak warming and the termination are currently not well resolved. The boron isotopic composition (δ11B) recorded in planktic foraminifer shells offers an opportunity to infer oceanic pH across this interval. We are working on a boron isotope reconstruction from Southern Ocean IODP site 738 and South Atlantic IODP site 1263, covering 42.0 to 38.5 Ma. These sites are characterized by good carbonate preservation and well-defined age models have been established. Additionally, ecology, nutrient content and bottom-water oxygenation have been shown to change significantly across the event towards a more eutrophic, periodically oxygen-depleted environment supporting different biological communities. We selected the planktic foraminifera species Acarinina spinuloinflata for this study because it is symbiont-bearing, suggesting a near-surface habitat and little vertical migration in the water column, and because of its abundance in the samples. δ11B data will be translated to surface ocean pH and atmospheric pCO2 will be approximated to refine knowledge about the carbon cycle during this time. Parallel analysis of two core sites will help to evaluate the tenacity of the data.

  19. Evolution and biogeography of the slipper orchids: Eocene vicariance of the conduplicate genera in the Old and New World Tropics.

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    Yan-Yan Guo

    Full Text Available Intercontinental disjunctions between tropical regions, which harbor two-thirds of the flowering plants, have drawn great interest from biologists and biogeographers. Most previous studies on these distribution patterns focused on woody plants, and paid little attention to herbs. The Orchidaceae is one of the largest families of angiosperms, with a herbaceous habit and a high species diversity in the Tropics. Here we investigate the evolutionary and biogeographical history of the slipper orchids, which represents a monophyletic subfamily (Cypripedioideae of the orchid family and comprises five genera that are disjunctly distributed in tropical to temperate regions. A relatively well-resolved and highly supported phylogeny of slipper orchids was reconstructed based on sequence analyses of six maternally inherited chloroplast and two low-copy nuclear genes (LFY and ACO. We found that the genus Cypripedium with a wide distribution in the northern temperate and subtropical zones diverged first, followed by Selenipedium endemic to South America, and finally conduplicate-leaved genera in the Tropics. Mexipedium and Phragmipedium from the neotropics are most closely related, and form a clade sister to Paphiopedilum from tropical Asia. According to molecular clock estimates, the genus Selenipedium originated in Palaeocene, while the most recent common ancestor of conduplicate-leaved slipper orchids could be dated back to the Eocene. Ancestral area reconstruction indicates that vicariance is responsible for the disjunct distribution of conduplicate slipper orchids in palaeotropical and neotropical regions. Our study sheds some light on mechanisms underlying generic and species diversification in the orchid family and tropical disjunctions of herbaceous plant groups. In addition, we suggest that the biogeographical study should sample both regional endemics and their widespread relatives.

  20. Eocene primates of South America and the African origins of New World monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Mariano; Tejedor, Marcelo F; Campbell, Kenneth E; Chornogubsky, Laura; Novo, Nelson; Goin, Francisco

    2015-04-23

    The platyrrhine primates, or New World monkeys, are immigrant mammals whose fossil record comes from Tertiary and Quaternary sediments of South America and the Caribbean Greater Antilles. The time and place of platyrrhine origins are some of the most controversial issues in primate palaeontology, although an African Palaeogene ancestry has been presumed by most primatologists. Until now, the oldest fossil records of New World monkeys have come from Salla, Bolivia, and date to approximately 26 million years ago, or the Late Oligocene epoch. Here we report the discovery of new primates from the ?Late Eocene epoch of Amazonian Peru, which extends the fossil record of primates in South America back approximately 10 million years. The new specimens are important for understanding the origin and early evolution of modern platyrrhine primates because they bear little resemblance to any extinct or living South American primate, but they do bear striking resemblances to Eocene African anthropoids, and our phylogenetic analysis suggests a relationship with African taxa. The discovery of these new primates brings the first appearance datum of caviomorph rodents and primates in South America back into close correspondence, but raises new questions about the timing and means of arrival of these two mammalian groups.

  1. Anatomically preserved seeds of Nuphar (Nymphaeaceae) from the Early Eocene of Wutu, Shandong Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Iju; Manchester, Steven R; Chen, Zhiduan

    2004-08-01

    Well-preserved seeds from the early Eocene of Wutu, Shandong, China are assigned to the genus Nuphar (Nymphaeaceae) based on morphology and anatomy. The seeds of Nuphar wutuensis sp. nov. are ellipsoidal to ovoid, 4-5 mm long with a clearly visible raphe ridge, and a truncate apex capped by a circular operculum ca. 1 mm in diameter bearing a central micropylar protrusion. These features, along with the testa composed of a uniseriate outer layer of equiaxial pentagonal to hexagonal surface cells and a middle layer 4-6 cells thick composed of thick-walled, periclinally elongate sclereids, correspond to the morphology and anatomy of extant Nuphar and distinguish this fossil species from all other extant and extinct genera of Nymphaeales. These seeds provide the oldest record for the genus in Asia and are supplemented by a similar well-preserved specimen from the Paleocene of North Dakota, USA. These data, together with the prior recognition of Brasenia (Cabombaceae) in the middle Eocene, indicate that the families Nymphaeaceae and Cabombaceae had differentiated by the early Tertiary.

  2. Fossils and Fossil Climate: The Case for Equable Continental Interiors in the Eocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Scott L.; Greenwood, David R.

    1993-08-01

    There are many methods for inferring terrestrial palaeoclimates from palaeontological data, including the size and species diversity of ectothermic vertebrates, the locomotor and dental adaptations of mammals, characteristics of leaf shape, size, and epidermis, wood anatomy, and the climatic preferences of nearest living relatives of fossil taxa. Estimates of palaeotemperature have also been based on stable oxygen isotope ratios in shells and bones. Interpretation of any of these data relies in some way on uniformitarian assumptions, although at different levels depending on the method. Most of these methods can be applied to a palaeoclimatic reconstruction for the interior of North America during the early Eocene, which is thought to be the warmest interval of global climate in the Cenozoic. Most of the data indicate warm equable climates with little frost. Rainfall was variable, but strong aridity was local or absent. The inferred palaeoclimate is very different from the present climate of the region and from model simulations for the Eocene. This suggests that models fail to incorporate forcing factors that were present at that time, that they treat the heat regime of continents unrealistically, and/or that model inputs such as sea surface temperature gradients or palaeotopography are incorrect.

  3. Description of a Well Preserved Fetus of the European Eocene Equoid Eurohippus messelensis.

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    Jens Lorenz Franzen

    Full Text Available The early Middle Eocene locality of Grube Messel, near Darmstadt (Germany, is famous for its complete vertebrate skeletons. The degree of preservation of soft tissues, such as body silhouettes, internal organs and gut contents, is frequently remarkable. The present specimen was analyzed for remnants of the reproductive system. Classic anatomy and osteology and high-resolution micro-x-ray were applied to describe the fetus of the European Eocene equoid Eurohippus messelensis. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM was used for determination of soft tissue remnants. The fetus is the earliest and best-preserved fossil specimen of its kind. The postcranial fetal skeleton is almost complete and largely articulated, allowing the conclusion that the pregnant mare was in late gestation. The apparent intrauterine position of the fetus is normal for the phase of pregnancy. Death of mare and fetus were probably not related to problems associated with parturition. Soft tissue interpreted as the uteroplacenta and a broad uterine ligament are preserved due to bacterial activity and allow considerations on the evolutionary development of the structures.

  4. FUNCTIONAL IMPLICATIONS OF A SINGULAR PENGUIN SCAPULA (AVES, SPHENISCIFORMES FROM THE EOCENE OF ANTARCTICA

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    CAROLINA ACOSTA HOSPITALECHE

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Penguins have peculiar modifications in their skeletal anatomy as a consequence of their extremely specialized diving habit. Morphological specialization is particularly evident in the forelimb. However, the kinematics of the pectoral girdle appears to be key to the locomotion of penguins. Penguin scapulae have an unusual morphology among birds. Modern penguins have a very large (especially broad scapula, whereas this bone is long but narrower in basal fossil species. The recent finding of an incomplete scapula with a singular acromion in the Upper Eocene Submeseta Allomember of the La Meseta Formation in the Antarctic Peninsula reveals a scapula proportionally narrower than those of modern penguins but similar to that of Waimanu and possibly other Eocene species. Osteological comparisons and muscular dissections of modern penguins show that the most striking feature is the curvature of the acromion, and the consequent enlargement of the facies articularis clavicularis. The configuration of the acromion and the corpus scapula reflects a lack of functional optimization in terms of the resistance to forces transverse to the body axis. The scapula´s general morphology suggests it belonged to a medium to large-sized penguin species with no so specialized diving skills. 

  5. Scale insect larvae preserved in vertebrate coprolites (Le Quesnoy, France, Lower Eocene): paleoecological insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Ninon; Foldi, Imre; Godinot, Marc; Petit, Gilles

    2016-10-01

    Coprolites of terrestrial vertebrates from the Sparnacian Le Quesnoy locality (Ypresian, Eocene, MP7, 53 Ma; Oise, France) were examined for possible parasitic helminth eggs. The extraction of the coprolite components was performed by a weak acetolyse and a slide mounting in glycerin. This long examination did not reveal paleoparasite remains, which may be explained through several arguments. However, some pollen grains, some enigmatic components, and two well-preserved first-instar cochineal nymphs (Hemiptera: Sternorrhyncha: Coccoidea) were evidenced in coprolites. Identified as Coccidae, these larvae are the earliest stage of the scale insect development ever reported as fossil, revealing the specific environment of preservation that fossilized scats may provide. These observations, combined to the coprolites morphotype, enable to ascribe the fossil scats producer to a small herbivorous mammal present in the deposit (early perissodactyls or Plesiadapidae). Regarding the ecology of extant representatives of Coccidae, this mammal was a likely foliage consumer, and the abundant Juglandaceae and/or Tiliaceae from Le Quesnoy might have lived parasitized by scale insects. These Early Eocene parasites had an already well-established dissemination strategy, with prevalent minute first-instar larvae. The herein performed extraction technique appears well-suited for the study of carbonate coprolites and could certainly be useful for evidencing other kind of microorganisms (including internal parasites).

  6. Storm-generated accumulation of nummulite banks in Eocene of Cairo, Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aigner, T.

    1983-03-01

    Nummulite banks which are common in neritic and shelf-edge facies in many parts of the Tethyan Eocene have been mainly regarded as reef-type buildups so far. However, stratification and biofabrics of such banks in the middle Eocene around Cairo demonstrate the importance of physical processes in molding nummulitic sediment bodies. Initiation of a nummulite bank at the Giza Pyramids Plateau is localized by a preexisting paleohigh, inherited from Late Cretaceous tectonism. On this submarine swell (about 1 x 1.5 km wide), ecological conditions were optimal for a flourishing Nummulites gizehensis-community, resulting in greater sediment production than in adjacent environments. Growth of the nummulite bank into a sediment body over 30 m (98 ft) in thickness and more than 1 km (.62 mi) in length is strongly enhanced by mechanical concentration of nummulite tests into coquinal packstones. These are interpreted to be a product of storm-generated winnowing. Paleoecological evidence shows that nummulite banks are largely an in-situ lag deposit. Periods of nummulite settlement are episodically disturbed by catastrophic storm events, which result in winnowing and local accumulation of the heavier bioclasts. During shallowing, patch reefs and a back-bank lagoon formed on the landward side of the bank. This facies association may be regarded as a model for hydrocarbon reservoirs. The high intraparticle porosity in nummulite tests (54%) makes the banks a potential reservoir, while adjacent and overlying lagoonal mudstone and wackestone may serve as source and cap rocks.

  7. Organic petrology and coalbed gas content, Wilcox Group (Paleocene-Eocene), northern Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackley, P.C.; Warwick, P.D.; Breland, F.C.

    2007-01-01

    Wilcox Group (Paleocene-Eocene) coal and carbonaceous shale samples collected from four coalbed methane test wells in northern Louisiana were characterized through an integrated analytical program. Organic petrographic analyses, gas desorption and adsorption isotherm measurements, and proximate-ultimate analyses were conducted to provide insight into conditions of peat deposition and the relationships between coal composition, rank, and coalbed gas storage characteristics. The results of petrographic analyses indicate that woody precursor materials were more abundant in stratigraphically higher coal zones in one of the CBM wells, consistent with progradation of a deltaic depositional system (Holly Springs delta complex) into the Gulf of Mexico during the Paleocene-Eocene. Comparison of petrographic analyses with gas desorption measurements suggests that there is not a direct relationship between coal type (sensu maceral composition) and coalbed gas storage. Moisture, as a function of coal rank (lignite-subbituminous A), exhibits an inverse relationship with measured gas content. This result may be due to higher moisture content competing for adsorption space with coalbed gas in shallower, lower rank samples. Shallower ( 600??m) coal samples containing less moisture range from under- to oversaturated with respect to their CH4 adsorption capacity.

  8. Heterogeneity in global vegetation and terrestrial climate change during the late Eocene to early Oligocene transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pound, Matthew J.; Salzmann, Ulrich

    2017-02-01

    Rapid global cooling at the Eocene – Oligocene Transition (EOT), ~33.9–33.5 Ma, is widely considered to mark the onset of the modern icehouse world. A large and rapid drop in atmospheric pCO2 has been proposed as the driving force behind extinctions in the marine realm and glaciation on Antarctica. However, the global terrestrial response to this cooling is uncertain. Here we present the first global vegetation and terrestrial temperature reconstructions for the EOT. Using an extensive palynological dataset, that has been statistically grouped into palaeo-biomes, we show a more transitional nature of terrestrial climate change by indicating a spatial and temporal heterogeneity of vegetation change at the EOT in both hemispheres. The reconstructed terrestrial temperatures show for many regions a cooling that started well before the EOT and continued into the Early Oligocene. We conclude that the heterogeneous pattern of global vegetation change has been controlled by a combination of multiple forcings, such as tectonics, sea-level fall and long-term decline in greenhouse gas concentrations during the late Eocene to early Oligocene, and does not represent a single response to a rapid decline in atmospheric pCO2 at the EOT.

  9. Eocene primates of South America and the African origins of New World monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Mariano; Tejedor, Marcelo F.; Campbell, Kenneth E.; Chornogubsky, Laura; Novo, Nelson; Goin, Francisco

    2015-04-01

    The platyrrhine primates, or New World monkeys, are immigrant mammals whose fossil record comes from Tertiary and Quaternary sediments of South America and the Caribbean Greater Antilles. The time and place of platyrrhine origins are some of the most controversial issues in primate palaeontology, although an African Palaeogene ancestry has been presumed by most primatologists. Until now, the oldest fossil records of New World monkeys have come from Salla, Bolivia, and date to approximately 26 million years ago, or the Late Oligocene epoch. Here we report the discovery of new primates from the ?Late Eocene epoch of Amazonian Peru, which extends the fossil record of primates in South America back approximately 10 million years. The new specimens are important for understanding the origin and early evolution of modern platyrrhine primates because they bear little resemblance to any extinct or living South American primate, but they do bear striking resemblances to Eocene African anthropoids, and our phylogenetic analysis suggests a relationship with African taxa. The discovery of these new primates brings the first appearance datum of caviomorph rodents and primates in South America back into close correspondence, but raises new questions about the timing and means of arrival of these two mammalian groups.

  10. STRATIGRAPHIC REVISION OF THE EOCENE ALBIDONA FORMATION IN THE TYPE LOCALITY (CALABRIA, SOUTHERN ITALY

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    LUCA BARUFFINI

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Original biostratigraphic and sedimentologic data concerning the type-section of the Albidona Formation (Liguride Complex, Southern Apennines, Italy are presented and discussed. Since its definition in 1962, this lithostratigraphic unit has been the object of controversial interpretations in terms of age attribution and paleotectonic significance. Based on cross-observations performed on calcareous nannofossils and palynomorphs, we conclude that the Albidona Formation must be assigned to the Eocene and, based on these evidences, we make a review of the previous biostratigraphic literature. We further recognise four different turbidite systems (named A to D, bounded by minor stratigraphic hiatuses, that are characterised by different sedimentary facies assemblages and petrofacies. The overall vertical arrangement demonstrates that the Albidona Formation was deposited in a tectonically mobile basin during a phase of deformation that is older than the apenninic deformation and must be likely referred to the alpine tectonics of the Calabrian arc. Moreover, the relationship with the underlying folded unit suggests for the Albidona Formation the significance of an episutural deposit relevant to a Paleogene deformation that affected the older units of the Liguride Complex. By considering stratigraphic and sedimentological features, we suggest a correlation of the Albidona Formation with analogue turbidite suites cropping out in the Apennines, discussing their significance in the context of the Eocene tectonic paroxysm in the Mediterranean area.

  11. Description of two genera and species of late Eocene Anthropoidea from Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, E L

    1989-12-01

    In 1987 and 1988 fossils of two previously unknown genera and species of Egyptian early Tertiary Anthropoidea were discovered in the Fayum Depression of Egypt. These are much older than all other Fayum, Oligocene primates and are believed to be Eocene in age. These genera, here named Catopithecus and Proteopithecus, come from a new Fayum site, L-41, and resemble Oligopithecus from the Jebel Qatrani Formation (lower sequence) at quarry E. They are here placed with the latter in a subfamily, Oligopithecinae, that is ranked in the Propliopithecidae. The level of L-41 is separated from quarry E by at least one major unconformity and 47 m of section. Only a maxilla of Proteopithecus is known. Its molars and premolars resemble those of later Fayum Propliopithecus and Aegyptopithecus and do not resemble those of Apidium and Parapithecus, all of which come from the Jebel Qatrani Formation, upper sequence. The type specimen of Catopithecus confirms a lower dental formula of 2-1-2-3, as in Catarrhini. These species appear to be the oldest primates undoubtedly related to humans. Their dental anatomy points to a derivation of Anthropoidea from Eocene adapids.

  12. Micro-halocline enabled nutrient recycling may explain extreme Azolla event in the Eocene Arctic Ocean.

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    Monique M L van Kempen

    Full Text Available In order to understand the physicochemical mechanisms that could explain the massive growth of Azolla arctica in the Eocene Arctic Ocean, we carried out a laboratory experiment in which we studied the interacting effects of rain and wind on the development of salinity stratification, both in the presence and in the absence of a dense Azolla cover. Additionally, we carried out a mesocosm experiment to get a better understanding of the nutrient cycling within and beneath a dense Azolla cover in both freshwater and brackish water environments. Here we show that Azolla is able to create a windproof, small-scale salinity gradient in brackish waters, which allows for efficient recycling of nutrients. We suggest that this mechanism ensures the maintenance of a large standing biomass in which additional input of nutrients ultimately result in a further expansion of an Azolla cover. As such, it may not only explain the extent of the Azolla event during the Eocene, but also the absence of intact vegetative Azolla remains and the relatively low burial efficiency of organic carbon during this interval.

  13. Cool-water carbonates in an Eocene palaeoestuary, Norseman Formation, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Jonathan D. A.; Bone, Yvonne; James, Noel P.

    1996-02-01

    Numerous palaeovalleys formed extensive drowned estuaries during Eocene transgressions along the southwestern part of the southern margin of Australia. The Tertiary sediments of the Cowan palaeovalley have been extensively drilled, revealing deposition of the Norseman Formation during the Middle Eocene Tortachilla transgression. Initial deposition occurred during transgression of the valley to form a drowned estuary. Sediments consisted of coarse-grained muddy, lithic, iron and glauconite-rich sands and gravels of mixed carbonate and quartz. Pure carbonates accumulated during the highstand, produced by a typical shallow temperate water assemblage of bryozoans, coralline algae, echinoids and molluscs and were swept into shoals by strong tidal currents. Minor "tropical" components in the form of large benthic foraminifers and dasycladacean algae are present. Coarse bryozoan and trough cross-bedded carbonate sands accumulated in the margins of the estuary and fine bryozoan sands in the deeper parts. Rhodoliths accumulated to form shoals in sheltered localities. The Spencer Gulf and Gulf St. Vincent of South Australia provide close modern analogues to the Cowan palaeovalley and the Norseman Formation. Modern carbonate sediments off Esperance on the south coast of Western Australia contain "tropical" faunal elements within an otherwise temperate skeletal assemblage and also provide a modern analogue. The Norseman Formation thus provides an excellent example of cool-water carbonate deposition in near-shore, tide-dominated environments. This study complements and contrasts existing cool-water shelf facies models based on Tertiary carbonates deposited on deep shelves elsewhere in southern Australia.

  14. Biomarker characteristics of the Turonian–Eocene succession, Belayim oilfields, central Gulf of Suez, Egypt

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    W.Sh. El Diasty

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses the hydrocarbon source rocks of the Belayim oilfields, central Gulf of Suez, Egypt. Detailed geochemical methods, including liquid chromatography, gas chromatography and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, are used to characterize organic-rich facies of the Turonian–Eocene deposits. Crude oil samples are analyzed using C7 and stable carbon isotopes, in addition to analysis of the extracts, in order to throw light on the organic matter source, composition, and thermal maturity. The source rocks are mainly derived from algae and bacteria deposited under normal saline and reducing palaeoenvironmental conditions, with a minimal contribution from terrestrial organic and mainly clay-poor source rocks. This is evidenced by the n-alkane distribution, the pristane/phytane, homohopane, gammacerane index, the high concentration of cholestane, the presence of the C30 n-propylcholestanes and low diasteranes ratios. The source rock extracts range from immature to marginally mature, based on biomarker maturity-related parameters. A similar scenario is envisaged from the crude oil samples which showed a partial positive correlation with the source rocks of the Eocene Thebes Formation, and the Upper Cretaceous Brown Limestone. Our data suggest that Turonian–Santonian Matulla Formation samples may signify the presence of some oil in the study area.

  15. Mineralogy and geochemistry of xenoliths in the Eocene volcanic rocks from southwest of Jandaq

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    Samineh Rajabi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Eocene volcanic rocks from the southwest of the Jandaq (Kuh-e-Godar-e-Siah, Central-East Iran micro-continent are andesitic basalt and andesite in composition. These rocks contain xenoliths with granulitic mineralogy. Mineral assemblage of these xenoliths is plagioclase + phlogopite + corundum + sillimanite + chlorite + phengite with granublastic, poiklioblastic and foliated textures in the pick metamorphic condition. Thermometry of phlogopite in these xenoliths suggests the average temperature 782oC. The characteristics of the xenoliths are consistent with the granolitic facies metamorphism of the Al-saturated Si-undersaturated crustal sediments at the lower crust condition. Melting of these granulites forms the magma which crystallized the S-type granitoids. Differentiation and crystallization of this magma causes the S-type granite formation. Therefore, the S-type granites in the study area are probably generated from melting of the granulites parts of which brought to the surface as xenoliths by Eocene magmatism in south of the Jandaq (Kuh-e-Godar-e-Siah. S-type granites in the study area are located along the Doruneh, Chupanan and Aeirakan faults in the Aeirakan area and Jandaq ophiolite. These granites are the source of uranium, thorium and uranium ore in southwest of the Aeirakan mountain.

  16. Flat meridional temperature gradient in the early Eocene in the subsurface rather than surface ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Sze Ling; Laepple, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    The early Eocene (49-55 million years ago) is a time interval characterized by elevated surface temperatures and atmospheric CO2 (refs ,), and a flatter-than-present latitudinal surface temperature gradient. The multi-proxy-derived flat temperature gradient has been a challenge to reproduce in model simulations, especially the subtropical warmth at the high-latitude surface oceans, inferred from the archaeal lipid-based palaeothermometry, . Here we revisit the interpretation by analysing a global collection of multi-proxy temperature estimates from sediment cores spanning millennia to millions of years. Comparing the variability between proxy types, we demonstrate that the present interpretation overestimates the magnitude of past climate changes on all timescales. We attribute this to an inappropriate calibration, which reflects subsurface ocean but is calibrated to the sea surface, where the latitudinal temperature gradient is steeper. Recalibrating the proxy to the temperatures of subsurface ocean, where the signal is probably formed, yields colder -temperatures and latitudinal gradient consistent with standard climate model simulations of the Eocene climate, invalidating the apparent, extremely warm polar sea surface temperatures. We conclude that there is a need to reinterpret -inferred marine temperature records in the literature, especially for reconstructions of past warm climates that rely heavily on this proxy as reflecting subsurface ocean.

  17. Molecular composition and paleobotanical origin of Eocene resin from northeast India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arka Rudra; Suryendu Dutta; Srinivasan V Raju

    2014-07-01

    The molecular composition of fossil resins from early to middle Eocene coal from northeast India, has been analyzed for the first time to infer their paleobotanical source. The soluble component of fossil resin was analyzed using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). The resin extracts are composed of cadalene-based C15 sesquiterpenoids and diagenetically altered triterpenoids. The macromolecular composition was investigated using pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC–MS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The major pyrolysis products are C15} bicyclic sesquiterpenoids, alkylated naphthalenes, benzenes and a series of C17–C34 -alkene--alkane pairs. Spectroscopic analysis revealed the dominance of aliphatic components. The presence of cadalene-based sequiterpenoids confirms the resin to be Class II or dammar resin, derived from angiosperms of Dipterocarpaceae family. These sesquiterpenoids are often detected in many SE Asian fluvio-deltaic oils. Dipterocarpaceae are characteristic of warm tropical climate suggesting the prevalence of such climate during early Eocene in northeast India.

  18. Large sedimentary aquifer system and sustainable management: investigations of hydrogeological and geochemical variations in Eocene sand aquifer, south western France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcuit, E.; Negrel, P. J.; Petelet-Giraud, E.; Durst, P.

    2010-12-01

    In the sedimentary Aquitaine Basin, the Eocene Sand Aquifer system, mostly confined, represents strategic resources for drinking water, irrigation, gas storage and geothermal resources. Therefore, its quantity and quality issues are essential for the sustainable management in this large region that extends over 116,000 km2 (i.e. one-fifth of the French territory). The Eocene Sand Aquifer system comprises at least five aquifers: Paleocene, Eocene infra-molassic sands, early Eocene, middle Eocene, and late Eocene. The extension and thickness of Eocene aquifer layers and negative confined layers vary throughout the basin, from several tens of metres to a hundred metres. The deposit sequences characterizing the Eocene Aquifer System are progradational westward from detrital deposits to carbonates. Eocene sands and Eocene limestones are hydraulically connected and covered by an aquiclude of up to several hundred metres thick of molassic sediments. The groundwater recharge is assumed to occur through the Eocene outcrops located in the north and north-east, and in the south east in contact with the Montagne Noire as well as by vertical leakage from the upper and lower aquifers. Another recharge is suspected in the south near the Petites Pyrenees. According to isotopic data, both present-day recharge and old recharge (16-35 ky) can be evidenced. The north and south evolutions of the piezometric surface are different. In the north, because of years of pumping, a trough in the potentiometric surface has been formed. The piezometric decline is roughly one meter per year in the depression centre. In the south, the decline of the water table is roughly half a meter per year. Furthermore, in the south part, around two sites of gas storage, significant fluctuations of the potentiometric surface are superimposed to the variations resulting from water abstraction, due to the injection and abstraction of gas. However, a major difficulty for the sustainable management is the lack of

  19. Biotic Response in Aquatic Reptiles (Testudines) during Earliest Eocene Climatic Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holroyd, P. A.; Hutchison, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    The earliest Eocene is marked by significant events of global warming: the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) at ~55.8 Ma and two short-lived events (ETM2 or Elmo and H2) approximately 2 Ma later. These environmental changes induced strong responses in the continental biota. Noteworthy changes in North American mid-latitude faunas and floras that are temporally correlated with earliest Eocene warming events include: increased diversity; turnover; and significant range changes, comprising both northward shifts in ranges of North American taxa as well as intercontinental dispersal across Holarctica. Evidence for these biotic changes comes directly from the fossil record and indirectly from phylogeographic analyses of molecular phylogenies of extant biota. To date, the stratigraphic record of biotic change has only been examined for the flora and terrestrial mammals. Data on reptiles and for continental aquatic systems are particularly lacking. In order to assess the impact of climate-mediated faunal change in aquatic systems during early Paleogene warming, we have focused on developing a detailed record of fossil turtles (Testudines) from the Bighorn Basin of Wyoming, where these records can be directly compared to similarly studied mammalian and floral data and to isotopic studies that provide independent proxies of climate change. Using genus-level occurrence data from more than 450 stratigraphically-constrained localities spanning ~2.5 Ma, we calculated first and last appearances, taxonomic richness, and relative abundance as measured by presence-absence (site occupancy). Among turtles, taxonomic richness increased episodically through the earliest Eocene with two new taxa appearing at the PETM, two immediately following it, and two at Biohorizon B, an interval associated with the younger hyperthermals. These new, immigrant taxa eventually comprised 40% of known generic richness. Phylogenetically, the inferred biogeographic source regions are southern North

  20. Molecular phylogeny of the harvestmen genus Sabacon (Arachnida: Opiliones: Dyspnoi) reveals multiple Eocene-Oligocene intercontinental dispersal events in the Holarctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönhofer, Axel L; McCormack, Maureen; Tsurusaki, Nobuo; Martens, Jochen; Hedin, Marshal

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the phylogeny and biogeographic history of the Holarctic harvestmen genus Sabacon, which shows an intercontinental disjunct distribution and is presumed to be a relatively old taxon. Molecular phylogenetic relationships of Sabacon were estimated using multiple gene regions and Bayesian inference for a comprehensive Sabacon sample. Molecular clock analyses, using relaxed clock models implemented in BEAST, are applied to date divergence events. Biogeographic scenarios utilizing S-DIVA and Lagrange C++ are reconstructed over sets of Bayesian trees, allowing for the incorporation of phylogenetic uncertainty and quantification of alternative reconstructions over time. Four primary well-supported subclades are recovered within Sabacon: (1) restricted to western North America; (2) eastern North American S. mitchelli and sampled Japanese taxa; (3) a second western North American group and taxa from Nepal and China; and (4) eastern North American S. cavicolens with sampled European Sabacon species. Three of four regional faunas (wNA, eNA, East Asia) are thereby non-monophyletic, and three clades include intercontinental disjuncts. Molecular clock analyses and biogeographic reconstructions support nearly simultaneous intercontinental dispersal coincident with the Eocene-Oligocene transition. We hypothesize that biogeographic exchange in the mid-Tertiary is likely correlated with the onset of global cooling, allowing cryophilic Sabacon taxa to disperse within and among continents. Morphological variation supports the divergent genetic clades observed in Sabacon, and suggests that a taxonomic revision (e.g., splitting Sabacon into multiple genera) may be warranted.

  1. East Greenland flood basalt volcanism: duration, volatile flux and correlation to the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegner, C.; Heilmann-Clausen, C.; Larsen, R. B.; Kent, A. J. R.

    2012-04-01

    Massive flood basalt volcanism in the NE Atlantic 56 million years ago can be related to the initial manifestation of the Iceland plume and ensuing continental rifting, and has been correlated with a short (c. 200,000 years) global warming period, the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM). A hypothesis is that magmatic sills emplaced into organic-rich sediments on the Norwegian margin triggered rapid release of greenhouse gases. However, the largest exposed volcanic succession in the region, the E Greenland flood basalts provide additional details. The alkaline Ash-17 provides regional correlation of continental volcanism and pertubation of the oceanic environment. In E Greenland Ash-17 is interbedded with the uppermost part of the flood basalt succession. In the marine sections of Denmark, Ash-17 postdates PETM, most likely by 3-400,000 years. While radiometric ages bracket the duration of the main flood basalt event to less than a million years, the subsidence history of the Skaergaard intrusion due to flood basalt emplacement indicates it took less than 300,000 years. It is therefore possible that the main flood basalts in E Greenland postdates PETM. This is supported by a scarcity of ash layers within the PETM interval. Continental flood basalt provinces represent some of the highest sustained volcanic outputs preserved within the geologic record. Recent studies have focused on estimating the atmospheric loading of volatile elements and have led to the suggestion that they may be associated with significant global climate changes and mass extinctions. Estimates suggest that c. 400,000 km3 of basaltic lava erupted in E Greenland and the Faeroe islands. Based on measurements of melt inclusions and solubility models, approximately 3000 Gt of SO2 and 220 Gt of HCl were released by these basalts. Calculated yearly fluxes approach 10 Mt/y SO2 and 0.7 Mt/y HCl. Refinements of these estimates, based largely on further melt inclusion measurements, are proceeding. Our

  2. A new genus and species of Heroini (Perciformes: Cichlidae from the early Eocene of southern South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Alano Perez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Lumbrera Formation is the uppermost unit of the Salta Group, which crops out in northwestern Argentina. The paleoenvironment of the Lumbrera Formation is interpreted as a perennial lake deposited under temperate climatic conditions during the early to middle Eocene. Its fossil content is made up of palynomorphs, insects, crocodiles, turtles, lizards, and mammals, besides an ichthyofauna formed by cichlids, poeciliids and dipnoans. †Plesioheros chauliodus is described based on a single individual from this formation, which was fossilized as a lateral view impression (missing anal and caudal fins. It can be distinguished from other cichlids by a moderately deep body, enlarged anterior dentary teeth bearing subapical cusp, a low abdominal vertebral count (10, five canal openings in the dentary, and XI + 12 dorsal-fin rays. A phylogenetic analysis, using the matrix by Kullander (1998, recovered †Plesioheros within Heroini. This species was recovered most closely related to Australoheros and to the deep-bodied South American heroins. The occurrence of an Eocene Heroini, as well as of other cichlid lineages in the same stratigraphical level, is evidence of an ancient diversification in this family. This ancient age supports the hypothesis that the Cichlidae originated on Gondwana.A Formação Lumbrera é a unidade do topo do Grupo Salta, aflorante na região noroeste da Argentina. O paleoambiente da Formação Lumbrera tem sido interpretado como um lago perene depositado sob um clima temperado durante o início do Eoceno. Seu conteúdo fóssil é formado por palinomorfos, insetos, crocodilos, tartarugas, lagartos, mamíferos, além de uma ictiofauna que inclui ciclídeos, poeciliídeos e dipnóicos. †Plesioheros chauliodus é descrito com base em um único indivíduo coletado nesta formação, preservado como impressão em vista lateral (faltando as nadadeiras anal e caudal. Ele pode ser distinguido de outros ciclídeos por um corpo

  3. A high resolution study of trace elements and stable isotopes in oyster shells to estimate central asian middle eocene seasonality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bougeois, L.; de Rafélis, M.; Reichart, G.-J.; de Nooijer, L.J.; Nicollin, F.; Dupont-Nivet, G.

    2014-01-01

    Modern Asian climate is characterized by strong seasonality caused by the duality between monsoon-dominated conditions in southeastern Asia and semi-arid to arid conditions in Central Asia. Eocene high-resolution proxy records which enable the reconstruction of the onset and magnitude of changes in

  4. A high resolution study of trace elements and stable isotopes in oyster shells to estimate Central Asian Middle Eocene seasonality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bougeois, L.; de Rafelis, M.; Reichart, G.-J.; de Nooijer, L.J.; Nicollin, F.; Dupont-Nivet, G.

    2014-01-01

    Modern Asian climate is characterized by strong seasonality caused by the duality between monsoon-dominated conditions in southeastern Asia and semi-arid to arid conditions in Central Asia. Eocene high-resolution proxy records which enable the reconstruction of the onset and magnitude of changes in

  5. Multiproxy record of abrupt sea-surface cooling across the Eocene-Oligocene transition in the Gulf of Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wade, B.S.; Houben, A.J.P.; Quaijtaal, W.; Schouten, S.; Rosenthal, Y.; Miller, K.G.; Katz, M.E.; Wright, J.D.; Brinkhuis, H.

    2012-01-01

    The Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT; ca. 33–34 Ma) was a time of pronounced climatic change, marked by the establishment of continental-scale Antarctic ice sheets. The timing and extent of temperature change associated with the EOT is controversial. Here we present multiproxy EOT climate records (~

  6. Multiproxy record of abrupt sea-surface cooling across the Eocene-Oligocene transition in the Gulf of Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wade, B.S.; Houben, A.J.P.; Quaijtaal, W.; Schouten, S.; Rosenthal, Y.; Miller, K.G.; Katz, M.E.; Wright, J.D.; Brinkhuis, H.

    2012-01-01

    The Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT; ca. 33–34 Ma) was a time of pronounced climatic change, marked by the establishment of continental-scale Antarctic ice sheets. The timing and extent of temperature change associated with the EOT is controversial. Here we present multiproxy EOT climate records (∼

  7. A new genus and species of ibis fly in the Lowermost Eocene amber of Oise (France) (Diptera: Athericidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myskowiak, Justine; Nel, André

    2014-10-02

    A new athericid genus and species, Eoatrichops jeanbernardi, gen. n., sp. n., is described, based on four specimens from the Lowermost Eocene of Oise (France). Its external morphology is analyzed and compared with of all genera of Athericidae. Eoatrichops is very similar to the modern genus Atrichops Verrall, differences concern the wing venation and tibial spur formula. 

  8. Reconstruction of the Arctic Ocean environment during the Eocene Azolla interval using geochemical proxies and climate modeling. Geologica Ultraiectina (331)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speelman, E.N.

    2010-01-01

    With the realization that the Arctic Ocean was covered with enormous quantities of the aquatic floating fern Azolla 49 Myrs ago, new questions regarding the Eocene conditions facilitating these blooms arose. This dissertation describes the reconstruction of paleo-environmental conditions facilitatin

  9. Environmental impact and magnitude of paleosol carbonate carbon isotope excursions marking five early Eocene hyperthermals in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abels, H.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304848018; Lauretano, V.; van Yperen, Anna E.; Hopman, Tarek; Zachos, J.C.; Lourens, L.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/125023103; Gingerich, P.D.; Bowen, G.J.

    2016-01-01

    Transient greenhouse warming events in the Paleocene and Eocene were associated with the addition of isotopically light carbon to the exogenic atmosphere–ocean carbon system, leading to substantial environmental and biotic change. The magnitude of an accompanying carbon isotope excursion (CIE) can b

  10. TECTONO-SEDIMENTARY EVOLUTION OF THE EOCENE TRANSGRESSIVE DEPOSITS IN THE ACIGÖL, BURDUR AND ISPARTA AREAS (SW TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EZHER TOKER

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The Eocene transgressive deposits of the Acıgöl, Burdur and Isparta basins are the best exposed of the SW Turkey and shed light on one of the outstanding problems of the tectono-sedimentary evolution during paleotectonic and neotectonic period. In the present paper we describe a tectonic model of the progressive foreland migration of the allochthonous units such as Lycian and Antalya nappes, initialemplacement onto stable carbonate platform in the Early Oligocene, carrying piggy-back basins and incorporating from alluvial fan to deep-marine deposits recognized in these terrigenous successions.In general, the facies and structural observations on the overall Mid-Late Eocene clastic sequences, outcropping in behind the Lycian nappes, indicate: i the alluvial fan to shallow marine settings of the Başçeşme Fm in Acıgöl, ii the Varsakyayla Fm in Burdur and iii proximal to distal flysch facies trend of the Kayıköy Fm in Isparta. The collected data allow us to hypothesize that the Mid-Late Eocene tectono-sedimentary history was characterized by a terrigenous clastics, probably lying on the constructing tectonic edifice and then deformed and covered by a piggy-back like sequence. Thetectono-sedimentary evolution of the Eocene transgressive in SW Turkey has been probably developed through a progressive migration towards the foreland basin.

  11. Shallow marine ostracode turnover in response to environmental change during the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum in northwest Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsi, Abdel-Mohsen M.; Speijer, Robert P.; Stassen, Peter; Steurbaut, Etienne

    2011-02-01

    Two outcrop sections spanning the Paleocene-early Eocene boundary in the Sidi Nasseur-Wadi Mezaz area in northwest Tunisia provided rich ostracode assemblages, yielding 26 species of which three are newly described: Reymenticosta bassiounii, Reymenticosta nasseurensis and Buntonia? tunisiensis. The recorded ostracode fauna and associated foraminifera reflect deposition in a coastal to inner neritic environment. Many of the recorded taxa have a wide geographic distribution throughout the Middle East and North Africa. A correspondence is also observed with West African faunas, especially in the early Eocene fauna. These taxa seem to have originated in West Africa during the Paleocene and migrated northwards during the late Paleocene to early Eocene. Sea-level change and decrease in oxygenation associated with the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) caused the local disappearance of the South Tethyan Paleocene fauna represented by Paracosta kefensis (morphotype-A), Paracosta aff. paleomokattamensis, Paracypris sp. B Esker, Loxoconcha saharaensis, Buntonia sp. 3 Donze et al., Protobuntonia nakkadii, and probably Reymenticosta bassiounii and R. nasseurensis. Simultaneously, a new but poorly diverse Afro-Tethyan fauna, mainly represented by Alocopocythere attitogonensis and Buntonia? tunisiensis, settled in the studied part of the basin. After the PETM, diversity increased again as various taxa (e.g. Bairdia aegyptiaca, Reticulina lamellata and Aegyptiana duwiensis) (re)appeared. Although detailed records across the P/E boundary are still sparse, it appears that the PETM exerted significant influence on the paleobiogeography and composition of Tethyan ostracode faunas.

  12. Paleontology, paleobiogeography and paleoecology of Carolia-bearing beds from the Late Eocene rocks at Nile-Fayum Divide, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shazly, Soheir H.; Abdel-Gawad, Gouda I.; Salama, Yasser F.; Sayed, Dina M.

    2016-12-01

    The Paleontological study of the Carolia-bearing beds in (Qasr El-Sagha Formation) at Nile-Fayum Divide reveals the presences of thirteen species (three gastropods, six oysters and four Carolias). The paleobiogeography of these fauna indicates that genus Carolia Cantraine, 1838 was first recorded from the Lower Eocene of Egypt and Indian-Pakistani Region and spread out throughout the Tethyan province, West Africa and North and South America and its last occurrence was in the Early Miocene of North America. It shows also that, the first appearance of Ostrea (T.) multicostata (Deshayes, 1832) was in the Paleocene of Tunis and Algeria, and spread during the Eocene into India, northwestern Europe and the entire northern African regions. However, Cubitostrea (Cubitostrea) cubitus (Deshayes, 1832) was first reported in the Middle Eocene of France and spread to Texas in North America and North Africa. The statistical study on genus Carolia indicates that the distance between the byssal muscle scar and the retractor muscle scar increases with the increase of the left valve convexity. The paleoecological study of these faunal groups shows that, the predation and the parasitic elements as well as the stress environmental factors, caused the extinction of genus Carolia at the end of Late Eocene in Egypt.

  13. Trace fossils from the eocene Lillebælt clay formation, Røsnæs Peninsula, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jan Kresten; Milàn, Jesper; Mesfun, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    A cliff exposure of the Eocene Lillebælt Clay Formation, on the Røsnæs peninsula of Zealand, Denmark, has yielded a diverse trace-fossil assemblage. The trace fossils are described formally for the first time and assigned to Phymatoderma melvillensis, unnamed clusters of small burrows, Ophiomorph...

  14. Prolonged high relief in the northern Cordilleran orogenic front during middle and late Eocene extension based on stable isotope paleoaltimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Majie; Constenius, Kurt N.; Dettman, David L.

    2017-01-01

    The paleoelevation and size of the North America Cordilleran orogen during the late Cretaceous-Paleogene contractional and subsequent extensional tectonics remain enigmatic. We present new estimates of paleorelief of the northern Cordilleran orogenic front during the middle and late Eocene using oxygen isotope compositions of unaltered molluscan fossils and paleosol carbonates in the Kishenehn basin. Bounded by several mountains ranges to the east, the Kishenehn basin was a half graben developed during middle Eocene to early Miocene collapse of the Cordilleran orogen. These mollusk taxa include three sympatric groups with affinities to wet tropical, semi-arid subtropical, and temperate environments. Our reconstructed surface water δ18O values vary between -19.8‰ and -6.3‰ (VSMOW) during the middle and late Eocene. The large differences in paleoenvironments and surface water δ18O values suggest that the catchment of the Kishenehn basin was at variable elevation. The estimated paleorelief between the basin and the surrounding mountains, based on both Rayleigh condensation model and predictions of Eocene precipitation isotope values using an isotope-enabled global climate model, is ∼4 km, and the basin floor was thermal uplift caused by mantle upwelling, and isostatic uplift caused by removing lower lithosphere or oceanic slab.

  15. Climatic control on primary productivity changes during development of the Late Eocene Kiliran Jao lake, Central Sumatra Basin, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widayat, Agus Haris; van de Schootbrugge, Bas; Oschmann, Wolfgang; Anggayana, Komang; Püttmann, Wilhelm

    2016-01-01

    A 102 m long core section of the late Eocene Kiliran Jao oil shale has been studied by means of palynofacies and inorganic geochemistry to examine the role of climate change on the development of the Kiliran Jao paleo-lake. Climate changes during deposition of the studied oil shale are interpreted f

  16. A Backarc Basin Origin for the Eocene Volcanic Rocks North of Abbas Abad, East of Shahrud, Northeast Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalatbari Jafari, M.; Mobasher, K.; Davarpanah, A.; Babaie, H.; La Tour, T.

    2008-12-01

    The region in northeastern Iran, bordered by the Miami fault and the Doruneh fault, mainly exposes the Eocene volcanic and Tertiary sedimentary rocks and sporadic outcrops of pre- Jurassic metamorphic rocks such as gneiss and mica-schist. We have divided the volcanic and volcanic-sedimentary rocks into six main units: E1 through the youngest E6. North of Abbas Abad, the Lower Eocene is conglomerate, sandstone, and red shale with lenses of nummulite-bearing limestone at the base, and dacitic lava (E1) at the top. The nummulites give an Early Eocene age for the limestone lenses. The E2 unit includes vesicular basalt, intercalated, intraformational conglomerate, and lenses of nummulite-bearing limestone. E3 is volcanic- sedimentary, and is made of green tuff, tuffite, shale, and nummulite bearing limestone. E4 includes basalt and vesicular trachy-basalt, and E5 is mostly sedimentary, made of tan marl, sandstone, shale, and lenses of Middle Eocene nummulite-bearing limestone. The E6 unit is the most extensive, with at least three levels of nummulite-bearing limestone lenses which give a Middle to Early Eocene age. The volcanic rocks of the E6 unit include few hundred meters of epiclastic to hyaloclastic breccia, with intercalations of lava at the base. These are overlain by four horizons of aphyric olivine basalt and basalt, and phyric trachy-andesite and trachy-basalt. The volume of the aphyric lavas decreases, and that of the phyric lavas increases upsection. The Eocene volcanic sequence is covered by turbidite; the marl washings give an Eocene-Oligocene age range. Chondrite-normalized multi-element plots indicate enrichment of the Eocene Abbas Abad volcanic rocks in the LILE elements, with variable ratios of La/Yb (4.36-19.33) and La/Sm (3.10-7.91). These plots show a gentle slope, and the volcanic rocks in the E1 to E4 units are less enriched than those in the E6 unit, probably reflecting the difference in the original source for the melt. The multi-element plots

  17. Carbon isotope excursions in paleosol carbonate marking five early Eocene hyperthermals in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. Abels

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Transient greenhouse warming events in the Paleocene and Eocene were associated with the addition of isotopically-light carbon to the exogenic atmosphere–ocean carbon pool, leading to substantial environmental and biotic change. The magnitude of an accompanying carbon isotope excursion (CIE can be used to constrain both the sources and amounts of carbon released during an event, as well as to correlate marine and terrestrial records with high precision. The Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM is well documented, but CIE records for the subsequent warming events are still rare especially from the terrestrial realm. Here, we provide new CIE records for two of the smaller hyperthermal events, I1 and I2, in paleosol carbonate, as well as two additional records of ETM2 and H2 in the Bighorn Basin. Stratigraphic comparison of this expanded, high-resolution terrestrial carbon isotope record to the deep-sea benthic foraminifera records from ODP Sites 1262 and 1263, Walvis Ridge, in the southern Atlantic Ocean corroborates that the Bighorn Basin fluvial sediments record global atmospheric change. The stratigraphic thicknesses of the eccentricity-driven hyperthermals in these archives are in line with precession-forcing of the 7 m thick fluvial overbank-avulsion sedimentary cycles. Using the CALMAG bulk oxide mean annual precipitation proxy, we reconstruct similar or slightly wetter than background soil moisture contents during the four younger hyperthermals, in contrast to drying observed during the PETM. Soil carbonate CIEs vary in magnitude proportionally with the marine CIEs for the four smaller early Eocene hyperthermals. This relationship breaks down for the PETM, with the soil carbonate CIE ~ 2–4‰ less than expected if all five linearly relate to marine CIEs. If the PETM CO2 forcing was similar but scaled to the younger hyperthermals, photosynthetic isotope fractionation or soil environmental factors are needed to explain this anomaly. We

  18. Climatic and floral change during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum in the Bighorn Basin (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, S. L.

    2009-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is an interval of global warming lasting ~150 ka that occurred at the start of the Eocene, ~55.8 Ma. Globally, temperature rose 4-8 °C in association with carbon cycle changes attributed to the release of >5,000 Pg of C into the ocean-atmosphere system. Fossil plants from the PETM in the Bighorn Basin, northwestern Wyoming, show that latest Paleocene forests contained palms, deciduous taxodiaceous conifers, and a variety of deciduous and evergreen angiosperms, many belonging to lineages with north temperate distributions. Mean annual temperature (MAT) for the latest Paleocene inferred from leaf margin analysis is ~18 °C. Early and mid-PETM floras have a completely different composition. They lack conifers and broad-leaved deciduous taxa with north temperate distributions, and are dominated by palms, legumes, and other angiosperm taxa with living relatives in the dry tropical forests of Central and South America. Leaf margin analysis gives an MAT of ~23 °C. Floras of this type are known from a stratigraphic interval ~30 m thick that also produces geochemical and mammalian faunal indicators of the PETM. Floras from late PETM or earliest post-PETM time are composed largely of species that had been present in the latest Paleocene, with a few new species that are common in the early Eocene. The inferred MAT is ~18 °C. Leaf size data suggest that the PETM was drier than the immediately preceding and following times. Floral data from the Bighorn Basin indicate that the magnitude of temperature change in this mid-latitude continental interior was similar to that inferred for the surface ocean. Evidence for dryness or seasonal dryness during the PETM has been observed in sections in northern Spain as well as in Wyoming, raising the possibility of widespread water stress in the middle northern latitudes. Change in floral composition during the PETM is consistent with regional extinction in mid-latitude populations of plants

  19. Upper Paleocene-Lower Eocene biostratigraphy of Darb Gaga, Southeastern Kharga Oasis Western Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouda, Khaled; Berggren, William A.; Abdel Sabour, Ayman

    2016-06-01

    Paleontological studies on the Upper Paleocene-Lower Eocene succession at Darb Gaga, southeastern Kharga Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt document the changes associated with the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), such as 1) a radical alteration of the relative and absolute abundance of planktonic foraminifera; 2) a massive occurrence of the excursion planktonic foraminiferal taxa; 3) a widespread deposition of calcarenite yielding atypical (extremely high) faunal abundance associated with the younger phase of warming; and 4) a concentration of coprolites associated with the middle phase of warming. We also document the Lowest Occurrence (LO) of dimorphic larger benthic and excursion foraminifera during the earlier phase of warming at Darb Gaga, as recorded in Bed 1 of the Dababiya Quarry Member. The absence of these faunas in Bed 1 at Dababiya (the GSSP for the P/E Boundary) is likely to be due to both intense deficiency in dissolved oxygen and massive carbonate dissolution. Only remains (fish remains) of faunas that can tolerate the toxicity produced by low oxygen conditions are found in the stratigraphic record of this (oldest) phase at Dababiya. The Dababiya Quarry Member (DQM) at Darb Gaga reflects the unfolding of the sedimentary and biotic changes associated with the PETM global warming at, and following, the Paleocene/Eocene boundary on the southern Tethys platform. The changes began with a rapid increase in bottom and "intermediate" water temperature. The temperature increase was accompanied by removal of oxygen during the early and middle stages of warming. This led to the absence of both subbotinids and calcareous benthic foraminifera in the early and second coprolite-bearing phases (Beds 2 and 3 of the DQM). Dissolution seems to have no role during these stages as shown by the unusual abundance and good preservation of the warm-tolerant Ac. sibaiyaensis. This species reaches its maximum abundance in Bed 2 where it exhibits a broad range of size (63

  20. Recognition of Early Eocene global carbon isotope excursions using lipids of marine Thaumarchaeota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoon, Petra L.; Heilmann-Clausen, Claus; Pagh Schultz, Bo; Sluijs, Appy; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; ˜56 Ma) and Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2; ˜53 Ma) are geological short (CIE) and massive dissolution of deep sea carbonate. However, the magnitude of these CIEs vary with the type of fossil matter, i.e. multiple carbonate phases, bulk organic matter, and terrestrial and marine biomarker lipids, making it difficult to constrain the actual CIE in atmospheric and oceanic carbon pools. Here we analyzed the stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether lipids (GDGTs) derived from marine Thaumarchaeota in sediments deposited during the PETM in the North Sea Basin and ETM2 in the Arctic Ocean. The δ13C values of these lipids are potentially directly recording variations in δ13C dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and can thus provide a record of marine δ13C DIC across both these Eocene carbon cycle perturbations. Reconstructed pre-CIE δ13CDIC values are slightly lower (0.5-1‰) than modern day values, possibly because Thaumarchaeotal lipids are not only derived from surface waters but also from 13C-depleted subsurface waters. Their values decrease by ˜3.6 (±0.3) ‰ and ˜2.5 (±0.7)‰ during the PETM and ETM2, respectively. The CIE in crenarchaeol for ETM2 is higher than that in marine calcite from other locations, possibly because of the admixture of deep water 13C-depleted CO2 generated by the euxinic conditions that developed occasionally during ETM2. However, the reconstructed PETM CIE lies close to the CIE inferred from marine calcite, suggesting that the δ13C record of crenarchaeol may document changes in marine DIC during the PETM in the North Sea Basin. The δ13C of thaumarchaeotal lipids may thus be a novel tool to reconstruct the δ13C of DIC in sediments that are devoid of carbonates, but relatively rich in organic matter, such as shallow marine coastal settings.

  1. Geology, geochemistry and genesis of the Eocene Lailishan Sn deposit in the Sanjiang region, SW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hua-Wen; Pei, Qiu-Ming; Zhang, Shou-Ting; Zhang, Lin-Kui; Tang, Li; Lin, Jin-Zhan; Zheng, Luo

    2017-04-01

    The Lailishan deposit is an important tin deposit that is genetically associated with an Early Eocene biotite granite in the western Yunnan metallogenic belt in the Sanjiang region, SW China. This study reports new zircon U-Pb ages and Hf isotopic data, whole-rock elements, mica Ar-Ar age and C-H-O-S-Pb isotope for the Lailishan Sn deposit. The mineralization-related biotite granite crystallized during the Early Eocene (50.5 Ma), with its zircon εHf(t) values ranging from -11.5 to -7.6 and two-stage Hf model ages (TDM2) ranging from 1.60 to 1.85 Ga. The rocks are peraluminous with A/CNK values of 0.99-1.08. The granites display high Si, Al and K contents but low Mg, Fe and Ca contents. The rocks show flat chondrite-normalized REE patterns with strong Eu negative anomalies. These characteristics indicate that the magma originated from a continental crustal source. The hydrothermal muscovite exhibits an Ar-Ar plateau age of 50.4 ± 0.2 Ma. The δ18O and δD values of hydrothermal quartz from the deposit range from -7.32‰ to 4.01‰ and from -124.9‰ to -87.1‰, respectively. The δ13CPDB and δ18OSMOW values of calcite range from -11.3‰ to -3.7‰ and from +2.2‰ to +12.7‰, respectively. The sulfur isotopic compositions (δ34SV-CDT) range from +3.3‰ to +8.6‰ for sulfide separates, and the lead isotopic ratios 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb range from 18.668 to 18.746, from 15.710 to 15.743 and from 39.202 to 39.295, respectively. These isotopic compositions are similar to those of magma-derived fluids, indicating that the ore-forming fluids and materials mainly originated from magmatic rocks with some input from meteoric water. This evidence suggests that the tin mineralization is closely linked to the Lailishan I-type granites. In combination with previous data, it is proposed in this study that widespread early Eocene magmatism resulted from the slab breakoff of the subducting Neo-Tethyan slab at ca. 55 Ma.

  2. Groundwater pollution risk mapping for the Eocene aquifer of the Oum Er-Rabia basin, Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettazarini, Said

    2006-11-01

    Sustainable development requires the management and preservation of water resources indispensable for all human activities. When groundwater constitutes the main water resource, vulnerability maps therefore are an important tool for identifying zones of high pollution risk and taking preventive measures in potential pollution sites. The vulnerability assessment for the Eocene aquifer in the Moroccan basin of Oum Er-Rabia is based on the DRASTIC method that uses seven parameters summarizing climatic, geological, and hydrogeological conditions controlling the seepage of pollutant substances to groundwater. Vulnerability maps were produced by using GIS techniques and applying the “generic” and “agricultural” models according to the DRASTIC charter. Resulting maps revealed that the aquifer is highly vulnerable in the western part of the basin and areas being under high contamination risk are more extensive when the “agricultural” model was applied.

  3. Whales originated from aquatic artiodactyls in the Eocene epoch of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thewissen, J G M; Cooper, Lisa Noelle; Clementz, Mark T; Bajpai, Sunil; Tiwari, B N

    2007-12-20

    Although the first ten million years of whale evolution are documented by a remarkable series of fossil skeletons, the link to the ancestor of cetaceans has been missing. It was known that whales are related to even-toed ungulates (artiodactyls), but until now no artiodactyls were morphologically close to early whales. Here we show that the Eocene south Asian raoellid artiodactyls are the sister group to whales. The raoellid Indohyus is similar to whales, and unlike other artiodactyls, in the structure of its ears and premolars, in the density of its limb bones and in the stable-oxygen-isotope composition of its teeth. We also show that a major dietary change occurred during the transition from artiodactyls to whales and that raoellids were aquatic waders. This indicates that aquatic life in this lineage occurred before the origin of the order Cetacea.

  4. Isotopic compositions and probable origins of organic molecules in the Eocene Messel shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, J. M.; Takigiku, Ray; Ocampo, Ruben; Callot, Enry J.; Albrecht, Pierre

    1987-01-01

    It is shown here that the carbon isotopic compositions of biomarkers from the Eocene Messel shale, accumulated 47 + or - 2 million years ago in anaerobic waters at the bottom of a lake, allow identification of specific sources for some materials and reconstruction of carbon flows within the lake and its sediments. The C-13 content of organic matter synthesized by lacustrine primary producers can be estimated from the observed C-13 content of the geoporphyrins derived from their chlorophylls. Total organic material in the shale is depleted in C-13 by six parts per thousand relative to that input. This difference cannot be explained by selective loss of components enriched in C-13, nor, as shown by isotopic compositions of other biomarkers, by inputs from land plants surrounding the lake or from methanogenic bacteria.

  5. Dinocyst taphonomy, impact craters, cyst ghosts, and the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Lucy E.

    2012-01-01

    Dinocysts recovered from sediments related to the Chesapeake Bay impact structure in Virginia and the earliest Eocene suboxic environment in Maryland show strange and intriguing details of preservation. Features such as curled processes, opaque debris, breakage, microborings and cyst ghosts, among others, invite speculation about catastrophic depositional processes, rapid burial and biological and chemical decay. Selected specimens from seven cores taken in the coastal plain of Virginia and Maryland show abnormal preservation features in various combinations that merit illustration, description, discussion and further study. Although the depositional environments described are extreme, many of the features discussed are known from, or could be found in, other environments. These environments will show both similarities to and differences from the extreme environments here.

  6. Geochemical and Petrologic Constraints on the Source of Eocene Volcanism at Mole Hill, Rockingham County, VA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E. A.; Beard, J. S.

    2010-12-01

    Mole Hill is an Eocene (48 Ma) basaltic volcanic neck located west of Harrisonburg, VA, and provides a unique opportunity to probe the mantle beneath the Shenandoah Valley. It lies on the northeastern edge of a swarm of alkaline-series volcanic plugs, dikes, and diatremes extending through Rockingham and Highland Counties, VA, and Pendleton County, WV. The Eocene volcanics are thought to have exploited extensive basement fracture systems originally formed during the Alleghenian Orogeny and subsequent rifting. The Eocene volcanism may have been triggered by reactivation of faults due to global shifts in relative plate motions (Southworth 1993, USGS Bull, B1839-I) but the source material and magmatic processes for the Eocene volcanism are largely unknown. Compositional and texture analyses of xenocrystic and groundmass clinopyroxene, olivine, and spinel were completed either at Virginia Tech on the Cameca SX-50 electron microprobe in the Dept of Geological Sciences, or in the Dept of Mineral Sciences, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C using the JEOL JXA-8900R WD/EDS microanalyzer or the FEI NOVA nanoSEM600 FEG Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope. Xenocrysts up to 2cm in diameter are distributed throughout the volcanic neck, with clinopyroxene >>spinel>olivine. The clinopyroxene and olivine xenocrysts show undulatory extinction in cross-polarized light and are found as individual crystals or as aggregates. Clinopyroxene xenocryst cores are high-Al, low-Cr augite ( ˜Wo44En46Fs10) with Mg# 78.5-85.9. The clinopyroxene xenocrysts have compositionally zoned rims 100-250 μm-wide containing abundant plagioclase inclusions and sparse melt inclusions in a sieve texture. The outer edges of xenocrysts approach the compositions of groundmass and microphenocryst clinopyroxenes ( ˜Wo47En38Fs15; Mg# 67.9-74.5). Olivine xenocrysts contain sulfide inclusions and Cr-rich spinel and have Mg-rich ( ˜Fo86-90) cores with more Fe- and Ca-rich rims (Fo70

  7. Pristine Early Eocene wood buried deeply in kimberlite from northern Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander P Wolfe

    Full Text Available We report exceptional preservation of fossil wood buried deeply in a kimberlite pipe that intruded northwestern Canada's Slave Province 53.3±0.6 million years ago (Ma, revealed during excavation of diamond source rock. The wood originated from forest surrounding the eruption zone and collapsed into the diatreme before resettling in volcaniclastic kimberlite to depths >300 m, where it was mummified in a sterile environment. Anatomy of the unpermineralized wood permits conclusive identification to the genus Metasequoia (Cupressaceae. The wood yields genuine cellulose and occluded amber, both of which have been characterized spectroscopically and isotopically. From cellulose δ(18O and δ(2H measurements, we infer that Early Eocene paleoclimates in the western Canadian subarctic were 12-17°C warmer and four times wetter than present. Canadian kimberlites offer Lagerstätte-quality preservation of wood from a region with limited alternate sources of paleobotanical information.

  8. Pristine Early Eocene wood buried deeply in kimberlite from northern Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Alexander P; Csank, Adam Z; Reyes, Alberto V; McKellar, Ryan C; Tappert, Ralf; Muehlenbachs, Karlis

    2012-01-01

    We report exceptional preservation of fossil wood buried deeply in a kimberlite pipe that intruded northwestern Canada's Slave Province 53.3±0.6 million years ago (Ma), revealed during excavation of diamond source rock. The wood originated from forest surrounding the eruption zone and collapsed into the diatreme before resettling in volcaniclastic kimberlite to depths >300 m, where it was mummified in a sterile environment. Anatomy of the unpermineralized wood permits conclusive identification to the genus Metasequoia (Cupressaceae). The wood yields genuine cellulose and occluded amber, both of which have been characterized spectroscopically and isotopically. From cellulose δ(18)O and δ(2)H measurements, we infer that Early Eocene paleoclimates in the western Canadian subarctic were 12-17°C warmer and four times wetter than present. Canadian kimberlites offer Lagerstätte-quality preservation of wood from a region with limited alternate sources of paleobotanical information.

  9. Early-middle Eocene birds from the Lillebaelt Clay Formation of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindow, Bent Erik Kramer

    2009-01-01

    The marine Lillebaelt Clay Formation of central Denmark is of early-middle Eocene age (late Ypresian - middle Lutetian; microfossil zones NP 13-NP 15). Over 20 bird fossils collected by amateur palaeontologists have been acquired through the Danish national ‘Danekrae' fossil treasure trove...... legislation. The fossils are preserved in clay ironstone concretions and almost two-thirds are isolated skulls preserved three-dimensionally. Bird fossils of this age and degree of preservation are rare in an international context. The fossils indicate a very diverse assemblage consisting of both marine...... and terrestrial forms. These include at least one pelagornithid or 'pseudo-toothed bird'; two or three taxa with charadriiform affinities (shorebirds and allies); a massive, narrow-beaked psittaciform (parrots and allies); a large rallid (rail) and one lithornithid (extinct, volant palaeognaths). The Lillebaelt...

  10. Sharply increased insect herbivory during the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currano, Ellen D.; Wilf, Peter; Wing, Scott L.; Labandeira, Conrad C.; Lovelock, Elizabeth C.; Royer, Dana L.

    2008-01-01

    The Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, 55.8 Ma), an abrupt global warming event linked to a transient increase in pCO2, was comparable in rate and magnitude to modern anthropogenic climate change. Here we use plant fossils from the Bighorn Basin of Wyoming to document the combined effects of temperature and pCO2 on insect herbivory. We examined 5,062 fossil leaves from five sites positioned before, during, and after the PETM (59–55.2 Ma). The amount and diversity of insect damage on angiosperm leaves, as well as the relative abundance of specialized damage, correlate with rising and falling temperature. All reach distinct maxima during the PETM, and every PETM plant species is extensively damaged and colonized by specialized herbivores. Our study suggests that increased insect herbivory is likely to be a net long-term effect of anthropogenic pCO2 increase and warming temperatures. PMID:18268338

  11. Preconsolidation of Søvind Marl - a highly fissured Eocene clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech, Gitte Lyng; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl

    2015-01-01

    Determination of the preconsolidation stresses is a key tool in geotechnical engineering used to evaluate and estimate the behavior of soils. However, it has been proven difficult to accurately estimate the preconsolidation in highly fissured overconsolidated clays, due to the effect of the fissu......Determination of the preconsolidation stresses is a key tool in geotechnical engineering used to evaluate and estimate the behavior of soils. However, it has been proven difficult to accurately estimate the preconsolidation in highly fissured overconsolidated clays, due to the effect...... of the fissured structure of the clay. This article presents oedometer tests performed on Søvind Marl, a plastic Eocene clay, with a high presence of fissures and slickensides. Four incremental loading oedometer tests and four continuous loading oedometer tests were performed in order to determine...

  12. Palaeoenvironment of Eocene prodelta in Spitsbergen recorded by the trace fossil Phycosiphon incertum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Rodríguez-Tovar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ichnological, sedimentological and geochemical analyses were conducted on the Eocene Frysjaodden Formation in order to interpret palaeoenvironment prodelta sediments in the Central Basin of Spitsbergen. Phycosiphon incertum is the exclusive ichnotaxon showing differences in size, distribution, abundance and density, and relation to laminated/bioturbated intervals. Large P. incertum mainly occur dispersed, isolated and randomly distributed throughout the weakly laminated/non-laminated intervals. Small P. incertum occur occasionally in patches of several burrows within laminated intervals or as densely packed burrows in thin horizons in laminated intervals or constituting fully bioturbated intervals that are several centimetres thick. Ichnological changes are mainly controlled by oxygenation, although the availability of benthic food cannot be discarded. Changes in oxygenation and rate of sedimentation can be correlated with the registered variations in the Bouma sequence of the distal turbiditic beds within prodeltal shelf sediments.

  13. MIDDLE EOCENE TO EARLY MIOCENE FORAMINIFERAL BIOSTRATIGRAPHY IN THE EPILIGURIAN SUCCESSION (NORTHERN APENNINES, ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NICOLETTA MANCIN

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available A quantitative biostratigraphical study was performed on the foraminiferal assemblages from 15 stratigraphic sections of the Epiligurian Succession (Middle Eocene-Early Miocene, Northern Apennines, Italy. This study enabled us to identify the presence of some of the standard bioevents and to note that other bioevents are absent or show a different chronostratigraphic range. Other additional bioevents, identified throughout the area, have therefore been utilised to improve the biostratigraphical resolution of the Epiligurian sediments. These bioevents include the massive extinction of the muricate species at the Bartonian/Priabonian boundary; the increasing abundance of Paragloborotalia opima opima near Subzone P21a/P21b and the Rupelian/Chattian boundaries; and the FO of Globoquadrina dehiscens at the Subzone N4a/N4b boundary. 

  14. CALCAREOUS NANNOFOSSIL BIOSTRATIGRAPHY OF PALEOCENE TO MIDDLE EOCENE SUCCESSIONS (TERTIARY FLYSCH AUCTT. OF THE NORTHERN APENNINES

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    RITA CATANZARITI

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available An accurate biostratigraphic study of the Paleocene-middle Eocene calcareous nannofossils was performed on the turbiditic successions that characterize the Northern Apennines Mt. Caio, Farini d’Olmo, Mt. Sporno and Mt. Penice Units, belonging to the “Tertiary Flysch Auctt.” and referable to the External Ligurides. This geologic complex accumulated in a link key area, located between the oceanic Ligure-Piedmontese domain and the Adria continental margin. The reference biostratigraphic scheme used in the study is the recently published calcareous nannofossil biozonation proposed for the Paleogene by Agnini et al. (2014. The obtained biostratigraphic and chronostratigraphic data suggest that further investigation is needed to clarify the tectono-sedimentary evolution and to unravel the complex architecture of the External Ligurides.

  15. The circum-Antarctic sedimentary record; a dowsing rod for Antarctic ice in the Eocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, H.

    2012-12-01

    Arguments for short-lived Antarctic glacial events during the Eocene (55-34 Ma) are compelling, however the paleoceanographic proxy records upon which these arguments are based (e.g., benthic δ18O, eustatic sea level, deep sea carbonate deposition) are global signals in which the role of Antarctic ice volume variability is ambiguous. That is to say, the proxy response to ice volume may be masked other processes. As a result broad correlations between proxies for ice volume are lacking during suspected Eocene glacial events. I will present a more direct approach for detecting Antarctic ice sheets in the Eocene; utilizing provenance information derived from the radiogenic isotopic composition of the terrigenous component of marine sediments near Antarctica. The method relies on knowledge that marine sediments represent a mixture derived from different basement terrains with different isotopic fingerprints. A key issue when using sedimentary deposits to characterize continental sediment sources is to deconvolve different sources from the mixed signal of the bulk sample. The pioneering work of Roy et al. (2007) and van de Flierdt et al. (2007) represents a major advance in Antarctic provenance studies. It is now known that the isotopic composition of neodymium (Nd) and hafnium (Hf) in modern circum-Antarctic sediments are distributed in a pattern that mimics the basement age of sediment sources around Antarctica. For this study I selected two Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) sites on southern Kerguelen Plateau (ODP Sites 738 and 748) because of their proximity to Prydz Bay, where Precambrian sediment sources contribute to extremely nonradiogenic isotopic signatures in modern sediments in the Prydz Bay region. New detrital Nd isotope records from these sediment cores reveal an Nd isotope excursion at the Bartonian/Priabonian boundary (ca. 37 Ma) that coincides with a 0.5 ‰ increase in benthic foram δ18O values. Detrital sediment ɛNd values are around -12 in intervals

  16. Spicules of Litistidic sponges from the upper Eocene Verhivtsevska depression (Miiddle Dniprean

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    Ivanova T.A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available For the first time a taxonomic composition of lithistid sponges which are lived in the Late Eocene basin of Verchovtzev depression Ukrainian Shield is supposed by the spicules morphological analysis. There are sponges of ten geneses and seven families presented in paleocoenosis, but families Theonellidae (geneses Lerouxia, Rhagadinia andPlinthosellidae (genusPlinthosella are dominated. Threenewmorphospeciesof spicules aredescribed: Phyllotriaenapartita T.A.Ivanova morphosp.n., Ph. araneola T.A.Ivanova, morphosp.n., Tetracrepides semiornatus T.A.Ivanova, morphosp.n. Their stratigraphical meaning is determined. These spicules are characteristic for the Obuchovian Suite and would be used as the paleontological criterion of the Obuchovian Suite determination in geological sections of the Middle Dnieper region.

  17. Basalt of Summit Creek: Eocene Magmatism Associated with Farallon Slab Break Off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, L. B.; Tepper, J. H.; Eddy, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    In the Pacific Northwest the Early-Middle Eocene was a time of widespread magmatism and tectonic reorganization that included accretion of the Siletzia terrane, Challis volcanism, and establishment of the modern Cascade arc. Although individual events are well documented our knowledge of the underlying tectonic framework is incomplete. To better understand the tectonic changes that occurred during this interval we studied the ~48 Ma Basalt of Summit Creek (BSC), a 1500m section of lavas located south of Mt. Rainier that erupted during the critical time period between the docking of Siletzia and the initiation of the modern Cascade arc. The BSC consists mainly of tholeiitic basalts (wt. % SiO2 = 45.54-63.45, Mg# = 0.68-0.30) with EMORB traits (La/YbN = 1.2-5.9; 206Pb/204Pb = 19.005-19.102; 207Pb/204Pb = 15.538-15.593; 208Pb/204Pb = 38.560-38.714). These lavas lack arc signatures (e.g., HFSE depletions) but overlap in elemental and isotopic composition with oceanic basalts of the Crescent Formation (part of Siletzia) located ~100 km to the west. We suggest that emplacement of lavas that lack arc traits in what was the forearc was a response to break off of the Farallon slab, which occurred as a result of the accretion of Siletzia at ~49 Ma (Wells et al., 2014). Break off opened a gap in the subducted slab, allowing upwelling and subsequent decompression melting. BSC lavas are consistent in age, location and composition with this model. After break off subduction resumed outboard of Siletzia, initiating the Cascade arc. Thus, BSC provides evidence of Farallon slab break off and furthers our understanding of the tectonic transition from widespread magmatism of the Early-Middle Eocene to the Cascade arc.

  18. Dynamic, Large-Magnitude CCD Changes in the Atlantic During the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordesch, W.; Bohaty, S. M.; Palike, H.; Wilson, P. A.; Edgar, K. M.; Agnini, C.; Westerhold, T.; Roehl, U.

    2015-12-01

    The Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO; ~40.1 Ma) is a transient global warming event that abruptly reversed the long-term Eocene cooling trend. The primary driving mechanism(s) must be linked to a CO2 increase; however, geochemical modeling experiments show that prevailing hypotheses are incompatible with the paleoclimate record. To further examine changes in deep-sea carbonate burial, we identify the MECO for the first time at ODP Site 929 (Equatorial Atlantic; ~3935 m paleodepth) and present new lithological and geochemical data for this site, including benthic foraminiferal stable isotopes (δ18O and δ13C), XRF scanning data, and an orbitally tuned age model. We combine these records with data from a suite of Atlantic sites to form a depth transect between ~2-4 km (DSDP Site 523, ODP Site 1260 and 1263, IODP Site U1404) representing the first detailed record of carbonate dissolution in the Atlantic spanning the MECO. This compilation reveals dissolution at water depths as shallow as ~2 km (>1 km shallower than previous estimates) with multiple and discrete short-lived (<100 kyr) phases of carbonate compensation depth (CCD) shoaling during and after the event. Careful reevaluation of the Pacific CCD records combined with new results suggests similar short-term variability and magnitude of shoaling globally. These data provide new constraints on carbon release history during the MECO and, potentially, the forcing mechanisms for warming. The transient CCD shoaling events indicate multiple pulses of carbon input and acidification decoupled from deep-sea δ18O and δ13C records, indicating that these events must not have been driven directly by changes in temperature or carbon burial/storage - potentially reconciling some of the data-model discrepancies.

  19. Eocene age of the Baranowski Glacier Group at Red Hill, King George Island, West Antarctica

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    Mozer Anna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiometric and geochemical studies were carried out at Red Hill in the southern part of King George Island (South Shetland Islands, northern Antarctic Peninsula on the Bransfield Strait coast. The rock succession at Red Hill has been determined to represent the Baranowski Glacier Group that was previously assigned a Late Cretaceous age. Two formations were distinguished within this succession: the lower Llano Point Formation and the upper Zamek Formation. These formations have stratotypes defined further to the north on the western coast of Admiralty Bay. On Red Hill the Llano Point Formation consists of terrestrial lavas and pyroclastic breccia; the Zamek Formation consist predominantly of fine to coarse tuff, pyroclastic breccia, lavas, tuffaceous mud-, silt-, and sandstone, locally conglomeratic. The lower part of the Zamek Formation contains plant detritus (Nothofagus, dicotyledonous, thermophilous ferns and numerous coal seams (vitrinitic composition that confirm the abundance of vegetation on stratovolcanic slopes and surrounding lowlands at that time. Selected basic to intermediate igneous rocks from the succession have been analysed for the whole-rock K-Ar age determination. The obtained results indicate that the Red Hill succession was formed in two stages: (1 from about 51–50 Ma; and (2 46–42 Ma, i.e. during the Early to Middle Eocene. This, in combination with other data obtained from other Baranowski Glacier Group exposures on western coast of Admiralty Bay, confirms the recently defined position of the volcano-clastic succession in the stratigraphic scheme of King George Island. The new stratigraphic position and lithofacies development of the Red Hill succession strongly suggest its correlation with other Eocene formations containing fossil plants and coal seams that commonly occur on King George Island.

  20. Crustal shortening and Eocene extension in the southeastern Canadian Cordillera: Some thermal and rheological considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mian; Furlong, Kevin P.

    1993-06-01

    Metamorphic core complexes in the southeastern Canadian Cordillera were formed during Eocene crustal extension, shortly (within a few millions of years) after Late Jurassic-Paleocene crustal shortening. Thermal-rheological modeling, constrained by geological and geochronological studies of the Valhalla core complex and other core complexes in this region, is used to investigate two major problems concerning the formation of these core complexes: (1) the dynamic links between crustal shortening and extension and (2) the cooling history and unroofing rates during extension. Thermal-rheological effects associated with crustal shortening are integrated through the history of crustal compression, since crustal shortening in this region was a long and slow process and cannot be treated as an instantaneous event. Our results suggest that crustal shortening may have played an important role in Eocene extension in the southeastern Canadian Cordillera by (1) producing a thickened and therefore unstable crust and (2) thermally weakening the lithosphere. However, heat generated by crustal shortening is not enough to account for the thermal state of the Valhalla complex, and additional heat sources at depth may be necessary. We then investigate thermal evolution during extension in both a simple shear model and a progressive pure stretching model. We show that the geotherm in an extensional region is time-and space-dependent and is affected by many variables including the preextensional thermal history and the mode of extension. Thus caution needs to be exercised when inferring unroofing rates from thermochronologic data. The cooling history of the Valhalla core complex may be explained by unroofing at rates of 1-2 mm/yr.

  1. Southern ocean warming, sea level and hydrological change during the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sluijs

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A brief (~150 kyr period of widespread global average surface warming marks the transition between the Paleocene and Eocene epochs, ~56 million years ago. This so-called "Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum" (PETM is associated with the massive injection of 13C-depleted carbon, reflected in a negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE. Biotic responses include a global abundance peak (acme of the subtropical dinoflagellate Apectodinium. Here we identify the PETM in a marine sedimentary sequence deposited on the East Tasman Plateau at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP Site 1172 and show, based on the organic paleothermometer TEX86, that southwest Pacific sea surface temperatures increased from ~26 °C to ~33°C during the PETM. Such temperatures before, during and after the PETM are >10 °C warmer than predicted by paleoclimate model simulations for this latitude. In part, this discrepancy may be explained by potential seasonal biases in the TEX86 proxy in polar oceans. Additionally, the data suggest that not only Arctic, but also Antarctic temperatures may be underestimated in simulations of ancient greenhouse climates by current generation fully coupled climate models. An early influx of abundant Apectodinium confirms that environmental change preceded the CIE on a global scale. Organic dinoflagellate cyst assemblages suggest a local decrease in the amount of river run off reaching the core site during the PETM, possibly in concert with eustatic rise. Moreover, the assemblages suggest changes in seasonality of the regional hydrological system and storm activity. Finally, significant variation in dinoflagellate cyst assemblages during the PETM indicates that southwest Pacific climates varied significantly over time scales of 103 – 104 years during this event, a finding comparable to similar studies of PETM successions from the New Jersey Shelf.

  2. The South Pyrenean Eocene carbonate megabreccias revisited: new interpretation based on evidence from the Pamplona Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payros, Aitor; Pujalte, Victoriano; Orue-Etxebarria, Xabier

    1999-05-01

    The South Pyrenean Foreland Basin contains numerous units of Eocene carbonate megabreccias intercalated with siliciclastic turbidites and derived by resedimentation of shallow-marine carbonate platforms. Previous studies were limited mainly to the foreland eastern part, known as the Jaca Basin. The present study from the Pamplona Basin, a western part of the foreland trough, sheds new light on the origin and regional significance of these South Pyrenean Eocene carbonate megabreccias (SPECMs). The number of the SPECM units in the foreland basin is higher than previously recognized and their age is somewhat older than originally assumed. The SPECM units appear to occur as time-stratigraphic clusters, which can be correlated with the relative sea-level lowstands and linked with phases of tectonic activity. The megabreccias were derived from a carbonate-platform system hosted by the foreland basin's southern (passive) margin. The episodic instability and mass wasting were triggered by phases of structural steepening (forebulge uplift) accompanied by high-magnitude earthquakes, with the former causing platform emergence, increased load stresses and excess pore-water pressure in the carbonate ramp. The SPECM deposits were emplaced by cohesive debris flows evolving into high-density turbidite currents. An ideal SPECM unit consists of (1) an immature, homogeneous debrite in the proximal part; (2) a differentiated, bipartite debrite and turbidite in the medial part; and (3) an incomplete, base-missing debrite overlain by turbidite, or a turbidite alone, in the distal part. The debrite component volumetrically predominates in the SPECM units, and the original terms `megaturbidite' and `seismoturbidite' thus seem to be inappropriate for these deposits.

  3. Volutidae (Mollusca: Gastropoda) of the Lakhra Formation (Earliest Eocene, Sindh, Pakistan): systematics, biostratigraphy and paleobiogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Didier; Pacaud, Jean-Michel; Métais, Grégoire; Bartolini, Annachiara; Lashari, Rafiq A; Brohi, Imdad A; Solangi, Sarfraz H; Marivaux, Laurent; Welcomme, Jean-Loup

    2014-06-27

    The paleobiodiversity of the Volutidae (Mollusca: Gastropoda) of the Ranikot Group (Sindh, Pakistan) and particularly of the Lakhra Formation (SBZ 5 biozone, Earliest Eocene), is reconsidered on the basis of new material collected during recent field trips. Ten new species are described (Mitreola brohii sp. nov., Lyrischapa vredenburgi sp. nov., L. brevispira sp. nov., Athleta (Volutopupa) citharopsis sp. nov., A. (Volutocorbis) lasharii sp. nov., Volutilithes welcommei sp. nov., V. sindhiensis sp. nov., Pseudaulicina coxi sp. nov., Sindhiluta lakhraensis sp. nov. and Pakiluta solangii sp. nov.) and one species is in open nomenclature (Lyria sp.). Three new genera are described: Lyriopsis gen. nov. [Volutinae, ?Lyriini, type species: Lyriopsis cossmanni (Vredenburg, 1923)], Sindhiluta gen. nov. [Volutilithinae, type species: Sindhiluta lakhraensis n. sp.] and Pakiluta gen. nov. [?Volutodermatinae, type species: Pakiluta solangii n. sp.]. Two new combinations are proposed: Lyriopsis cossmanni (Vredenburg, 1923) comb. nov. and Athleta (Volutopupa) intercrenatus (Cossmann & Pissarro, 1909) comb. nov. Lectotypes are designated for Lyria cossmanni Vredenburg, 1923, L. feddeni Vredenburg, 1923, Volutospina noetlingi Cossmann & Pissarro, 1909, V. intercrenata Cossmann & Pissarro, 1909 and Athleta (Volutocorbis) victoriae Vredenburg, 1923. With 21 species, this volutid fauna is the most diverse recorded from the Tethys Ocean during Earliest Eocene time. The assemblage is characterized by a strong turnover marked by regional speciation and the appearance of many western Tethyan invaders. Although at the species level, the assemblage documents a strong provincialism, at the genus level, the high number of shared genera between Eastern Tethyan and Old World Tethyan realms begins a phase of long-term homogeneity of volutid assemblages from the Tethyan paleobiogeographic province.

  4. Geochemical and geological control on filling history of Eocene reservoirs, Maracaibo Basin, Venezuela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, M.; Maguregui, J.; Toro, C.; Marquina, M. [Intevep S.A., Caracas (Venezuela)

    1996-08-01

    Crude oils of Eocene fluvio-deltaic reservoirs in {open_quotes}Bloque V{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}Centro Lago{close_quotes} fields in the center of the Maracaibo Lake show many differences in composition, which are due to stratigraphically and structurally controlled reservoir geometry and a low rate of in-reservoir mixing of at least two successive petroleum charges. Oils produced from the top of structural highs contain 18(H) oleanane, higher Pr/Ph and C{sub 23-3}/C{sub 24-4} ratios, a lower proportion of DBT/P compounds, and clearly different fingerprint patterns in the C{sub 6}-C{sub 15} range, than those observed in oils produced from the lower parts of the structures. These compositional differences suggest that two source rocks, or two distinctive organic facies within the same Cretaceous La Luna Formation, generated and filled vertically poorly connected Eocene reservoirs. On the other hand, saturate-biomarkers ratios, triaromatics (C{sub 21}/C{sub 21}+C{sub 28}), n-paraffins (n-C{sub 20}/n-C{sub 29}) and n-heptane index suggest that oils in upper reservoirs are slightly less mature than oils in lower reservoirs and, consequently filled the structure first. Additional evidence from formation water analysis and tectonic basin evolution allow us to interpret at least two petroleum pulses from Cretaceous source rocks during Upper Miocene to present day kitchens located in the Andes foredeep at the southeast of the study area.

  5. Taphonomy of the fossil insects of the middle Eocene Kishenehn Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale E. Greenwalt

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The lacustrine oil shales of the Coal Creek Member of the Kishenehn Formation in northwestern Montana comprise a relatively unstudied middle Eocene fossil insect locality. Herein, we detail the stratigraphic position of the fossiliferous unit, describe the insect fauna of the Coal Creek locality and document its bias towards very small but remarkably pre-served insects. In addition, the depositional environment is examined and the mineral constituents of the laminations that comprise the varves of the Kishenehn oil shale are defined. Fifteen orders of insects have been recorded with the majority of all insects identified as aquatic with the families Chironomidae (Diptera and Corixidae (Hemiptera dominant. The presence of small aquatic insects, many of which are immature, the intact nature of >90% of the fossil insects and the presence of Daphnia ephippia, all indicate that the depositional environment was the shallow margin of a large freshwater lake. The fossil insects occur within fossilized microbial mat layers that comprise the bedding planes of the oil shale. Unlike the fossiliferous shales of the Florissant and Okanagan Highlands, the mats are not a product of diatomaceous algae nor are diatom frustules a component of the sediments or the varve structure. Instead, the varves are composed of very fine eolian siliciclastic silt grains overlaid with non-diatomaceous, possibly cyanobacteria-derived microbial mats which contain distinct traces of polyaromatic hydrocarbons. A distinct third layer composed of essentially pure calcite is present in the shale of some exposures and is presumably derived from the seasonal warming-induced precipitation of carbonate from the lake’s waters. The Coal Creek locality presents a unique opportunity to study both very small middle Eocene insects not often preserved as compression fossils in most Konservat-Lagerstätte and the processes that led to their preservation.

  6. Decreased Temperate but not Polar Fish Productivity Across the Eocene-Oligocene Transition: Insights from Ichthyoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zill, M.; Sibert, E. C.; Norris, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Eocene-Oligocene Transition (EOT, 38-28 Ma) was a period of global cooling and increased nutrient delivery to the ocean. It is associated with the onset of permanent ice sheet on Antarctica, and the beginning of a highly productive polar ecosystem, dominated by diatoms and favoring short, efficient food chains. In a highly efficient, large phytoplankton-dominated ecosystem, we would expect to see higher abundances of consumers, as fewer trophic steps means more carbon available to upper trophic level groups. Here we use the accumulation rate of ichthyoliths (fish teeth and dermal scales) to measure the relative export production of fish through this time period of changing climate. Records from the South Atlantic gyre (DSDP Site 522) the South Pacific Gyre (DSDP Site 596) and the Southern Ocean (DSDP Site 689) show a 50% reduction in ichthyolith accumulation rate in the vicinity the Eocene Oligocene boundary. However, this drop in fish production occurs just after the E/O in the Atlantic, 4 million years before the E/O in the Pacific and 6 million years prior to the E/O in the Southern Ocean. Since the EOT is generally associated with an increase in productivity and diatom blooms in the Southern Ocean and tropical Pacific, we would expect that the abundance of fish would increase across the transition. Our results are surprisingly the inverse of this expectation, and suggest that the transition from greenhouse to icehouse did not produce increase in forage fish or even a response of any kind during the climatological transition into the icehouse world. Indeed, it seems that ichthyolith accumulation rate and primary productivity are not perfectly linked, and it may be that ichthyolith accumulation is responding more to another factor, such as ocean temperature or prey availability that is not linked to the increased diatom production during the EOT.

  7. Environmental forcing of terrestrial carbon isotope excursion amplification across five Eocene hyperthermals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, G. J.; Abels, H.

    2015-12-01

    Abrupt changes in the isotope composition of exogenic carbon pools accompany many major episodes of global change in the geologic record. The global expression of this change in substrates that reflect multiple carbon pools provides important evidence that many events reflect persistent, global redistribution of carbon between reduced and oxidized stocks. As the diversity of records documenting any event grows, however, discrepancies in the expression of carbon isotope change among substrates are almost always revealed. These differences in magnitude, pace, and pattern of change can complicate interpretations of global carbon redistribution, but under ideal circumstances can also provide additional information on changes in specific environmental and biogeochemical systems that accompanied the global events. Here we evaluate possible environmental influences on new terrestrial records of the negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) associated with multiple hyperthermals of the Early Eocene, which show a common pattern of amplified carbon isotope change in terrestrial paleosol carbonate records relative to that recorded in marine substrates. Scaling relationships between climate and carbon-cycle proxies suggest that that the climatic (temperature) impact of each event scaled proportionally with the magnitude of its marine CIE, likely implying that all events involved release of reduced carbon with a similar isotopic composition. Amplification of the terrestrial CIEs, however, does not scale with event magnitude, being proportionally less for the first, largest event (the PETM). We conduct a sensitivity test of a coupled plant-soil carbon isotope model to identify conditions that could account for the observed CIE scaling. At least two possibilities consistent with independent lines of evidence emerge: first, varying effects of pCO2 change on photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination under changing background pCO2, and second, contrasting changes in regional

  8. Stable isotope and calcareous nannofossil assemblage records for the Cicogna section: toward a detailed template of late Paleocene and early Eocene global carbon cycle and nannoplankton evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Agnini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present records of stable carbon and oxygen isotopes, CaCO3 content, and changes in calcareous nannofossil assemblages across an 81 m thick section of upper Paleocene-lower Eocene marine sedimentary rocks now exposed along Cicogna Stream in northeast Italy. The studied stratigraphic section represents sediment accumulation in a bathyal hemipelagic setting from approximately 57.5 to 52.2 Ma, a multi-million-year time interval characterized by perturbations in the global carbon cycle and changes in calcareous nannofossil assemblages. The bulk carbonate δ13C profile for the Cicogna section, once placed on a common time scale, resembles that at several other locations across the world, and includes both a long-term drop in δ13C, and multiple short-term carbon isotope excursions (CIEs. This precise correlation of widely separated δ13C records in marine sequences results from temporal changes in the carbon composition of the exogenic carbon cycle. However, diagenesis has likely modified the δ13C record at Cicogna, an interpretation supported by variations in bulk carbonate δ18O, which do not conform to expectations for a primary signal. The record of CaCO3 content reflects a combination of carbonate dilution and dissolution, as also inferred at other sites. Our detailed documentation and statistical analysis of calcareous nannofossil assemblages show major differences before, during and after the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum. Other CIEs in our lower Paleogene section do not exhibit such a distinctive change; instead, these events are sometimes characterized by variations restricted to a limited number of taxa and transient shifts in the relative abundance of primary assemblage components. Both long-lasting and short-lived modifications to calcareous nannofossil assemblages preferentially affected nannoliths or holococcoliths such as Discoaster, Fasciculithus, Rhomboaster/Tribrachiatus, Spenolithus and Zygrhablithus, which underwent

  9. Stable isotope and calcareous nannofossil assemblage records for the Cicogna section: toward a detailed template of late Paleocene and early Eocene global carbon cycle and nannoplankton evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnini, C.; Spofforth, D. J. A.; Dickens, G. R.; Rio, D.; Pälike, H.; Backman, J.; Muttoni, G.; Dallanave, E.

    2015-09-01

    We present records of stable carbon and oxygen isotopes, CaCO3 content, and changes in calcareous nannofossil assemblages across an 81 m thick section of upper Paleocene-lower Eocene marine sedimentary rocks now exposed along Cicogna Stream in northeast Italy. The studied stratigraphic section represents sediment accumulation in a bathyal hemipelagic setting from approximately 57.5 to 52.2 Ma, a multi-million-year time interval characterized by perturbations in the global carbon cycle and changes in calcareous nannofossil assemblages. The bulk carbonate δ13C profile for the Cicogna section, once placed on a common time scale, resembles that at several other locations across the world, and includes both a long-term drop in δ13C, and multiple short-term carbon isotope excursions (CIEs). This precise correlation of widely separated δ13C records in marine sequences results from temporal changes in the carbon composition of the exogenic carbon cycle. However, diagenesis has likely modified the δ13C record at Cicogna, an interpretation supported by variations in bulk carbonate δ18O, which do not conform to expectations for a primary signal. The record of CaCO3 content reflects a combination of carbonate dilution and dissolution, as also inferred at other sites. Our detailed documentation and statistical analysis of calcareous nannofossil assemblages show major differences before, during and after the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum. Other CIEs in our lower Paleogene section do not exhibit such a distinctive change; instead, these events are sometimes characterized by variations restricted to a limited number of taxa and transient shifts in the relative abundance of primary assemblage components. Both long-lasting and short-lived modifications to calcareous nannofossil assemblages preferentially affected nannoliths or holococcoliths such as Discoaster, Fasciculithus, Rhomboaster/Tribrachiatus, Spenolithus and Zygrhablithus, which underwent distinct variations in

  10. Stable isotope paleoclimatology of the earliest Eocene using kimberlite-hosted mummified wood from the Canadian Subarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, B. A.; Halfar, J.; Gedalof, Z.; Bollmann, J.; Schulze, D. J.

    2015-10-01

    The recent discovery of well-preserved mummified wood buried within a subarctic kimberlite diamond mine prompted a paleoclimatic study of the early Eocene "hothouse" (ca. 53.3 Ma). At the time of kimberlite eruption, the Subarctic was warm and humid producing a temperate rainforest biome well north of the Arctic Circle. Previous studies have estimated that mean annual temperatures in this region were 4-20 °C in the early Eocene, using a variety of proxies including leaf margin analysis and stable isotopes (δ13C and δ18O) of fossil cellulose. Here, we examine stable isotopes of tree-ring cellulose at subannual- to annual-scale resolution, using the oldest viable cellulose found to date. We use mechanistic models and transfer functions to estimate earliest Eocene temperatures using mummified cellulose, which was well preserved in the kimberlite. Multiple samples of Piceoxylon wood within the kimberlite were crossdated by tree-ring width. Multiple proxies are used in combination to tease apart likely environmental factors influencing the tree physiology and growth in the unique extinct ecosystem of the Polar rainforest. Calculations of interannual variation in temperature over a multidecadal time-slice in the early Eocene are presented, with a mean annual temperature (MAT) estimate of 11.4 °C (1 σ = 1.8 °C) based on δ18O, which is 16 °C warmer than the current MAT of the area (-4.6 °C). Early Eocene atmospheric δ13C (δ13Catm) estimates were -5.5 (±0.7) ‰. Isotopic discrimination (Δ) and leaf intercellular pCO2 ratio (ci/ca) were similar to modern values (Δ = 18.7 ± 0.8 ‰; ci/ca = 0.63 ± 0.03 %), but intrinsic water use efficiency (Early Eocene iWUE = 211 ± 20 μmol mol-1) was over twice the level found in modern high-latitude trees. Dual-isotope spectral analysis suggests that multidecadal climate cycles somewhat similar to the modern Pacific Decadal Oscillation likely drove temperature and cloudiness trends on 20-30-year timescales, influencing

  11. Porosity and sonic velocity depth trends of Eocene chalk in Atlantic Ocean: Influence of effective stress and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awedalkarim, Ahmed; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2014-01-01

    . This indicates pore-filling cementation via an activation energy mechanism. We proposed a predictive equation for porosity reduction with burial stress. This equation is relevant for basin analysis and hydrocarbon exploration to predict porosity if sonic velocity data for subsurface chalk is available.......We aimed to relate changes in porosity and sonic velocity data, measured on water-saturated Eocene chalks from 36 Ocean Drilling Program drill sites in the Atlantic Ocean, to vertical effective stress and thermal maturity. We considered only chalk of Eocene age to avoid possible influence...... of geological age on chalk compaction trends. For each depth, vertical effective stresses as defined by Terzaghi and by Biot were calculated. We used bottom-hole temperature data to calculate the time–temperature index of thermal maturity (TTI) as defined by Lopatin. Porosity and compressional wave velocity...

  12. Evidence for Tibetan Plateau Uplift in Qaidam Basin before Eocene-Oligocene Boundary and Its Climatic Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei Junling; Sun Zhiming; Wang Xisheng; Zhao Yue; Ge Xiaohong; Guo Xinzhuan; Li Haibing; Si Jialiang

    2009-01-01

    Geometry analysis of the Hongsanhan (红三旱) Section in the northwestern Qaidam basin illustrates the typical growth strata in the Xiaganchaigou (下干柴沟) Formation. The age and sedimentation rates of the Xiaganchaigou and the Shangganchaigou (上干柴沟) formations were determined by the high-resolution magnetostratigraphy. This result shows that the growth strata began to form at ca. 38.0 Ma and increased sedimentation rates occurred at ca. 37.0 Ma. The uplift of the Tibetan plateau before the Eocene-Oligocene boundary is confirmed, which enables us to better understand the relationship between climatic changes and the tectonic uplift. This uplift event could have resuited in the regional drying by blocking the moisture and contributed to the Eocene-Oligocene boundary global cooling event due to the declining atmospheric CO2 concentrations by increased weathering of the mountains.

  13. Metre-scale cyclicity in Middle Eocene platform carbonates in northern Egypt: Implications for facies development and sequence stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Mohamed; El-Sorogy, Abdelbaset; Moussa, Mahmoud

    2016-07-01

    The shallow-water carbonates of the Middle Eocene in northern Egypt represent a Tethyan reef-rimmed carbonate platform with bedded inner-platform facies. Based on extensive micro- and biofacies documentation, five lithofacies associations were defined and their respective depositional environments were interpreted. Investigated sections were subdivided into three third-order sequences, named S1, S2 and S3. Sequence S1 is interpreted to correspond to the Lutetian, S2 corresponds to the Late Lutetian and Early Bartonian, and S3 represents the Late Bartonian. Each of the three sequences was further subdivided into fourth-order cycle sets and fifth-order cycles. The complete hierarchy of cycles can be correlated along 190 km across the study area, and highlighting a general "layer-cake" stratigraphic architecture. The documentation of the studied outcrops may contribute to the better regional understanding of the Middle Eocene formations in northern Egypt and to Tethyan pericratonic carbonate models in general.

  14. Did the continent and sea have different temperatures in the northern Antarctic Peninsula during the Middle Eocene?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.L. Cione

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The Seymour Island beds include a remarkable representation of the continental flora and fauna and marine fauna of Eocene in southern high latitudes. We suggest that, at least during the deposition of the best sampled unit, the Cucullaea I Allomember of the La Meseta Alloformation in the Seymour Island area, a cold temperate terrestrial environment co-existed with relatively warmer temperatures in the adjacent shallow shelf sea. This is suggested by the fish and invertebrate fauna and could have been due to the presence of warmer waters of a current reaching the region from the north. The temperature drop proposed for the time of deposition of the uppermost part of the La Meseta Formation (Submeseta Allomember appears to correspond to the global drop of the end of the Eocene and beginning of Oligocene and not to the establishment of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current.

  15. A late Eocene-early Oligocene transgressive event in the Golfo San Jorge basin: palynological results and stratigraphic implications

    OpenAIRE

    Paredes, José M.; Foix, Nicolas; Guerstein, Gladys Raquel; Guler, Maria Veronica; Irigoyen, Martin; Moscoso, Pablo; Giordano, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    A new Cenozoic dataset in the subsurface of the South Flank of the Golfo San Jorge Basin (Santa Cruz province) allowed to identify a non-previously recognized transgressive event of late Eocene to early Oligocene age. Below of a marine succession containing a dinoflagellate cyst assemblage that characterizes the C/G palynological zone of the Chenque Formation (early Miocene), a 80–110 m thick marine succession contains a palynological assemblage integrated by Gelatia inflata, Diphyes colliger...

  16. Stable isotope paleoclimatology of the earliest Eocene using kimberlite-hosted mummified wood from the Canadian Subarctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Hook

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The recent discovery of well-preserved mummified wood buried within a subarctic kimberlite diamond mine prompted a paleoclimatic study of the early Eocene "hothouse" (ca. 53.3 Ma. At the time of kimberlite eruption, the Subarctic and Artic were warm and humid producing a temperate rainforest biome well north of the Arctic Circle. Previous studies have estimated mean annual temperatures in this region were 4–20 °C in the early Eocene, using a variety of proxies including leaf margin analysis, and stable isotopes (δ18O of fossil cellulose. Here, we examine stable isotopes of tree-ring cellulose at subannual to annual scale resolution, using the oldest viable cellulose found to date. We use mechanistic models and transfer functions to estimate earliest Eocene temperatures using mummified cellulose, which was well preserved in the kimberlite. Multiple samples of Piceoxylon wood within the kimberlite were crossdated by tree-ring width. Multiple proxies are used in combination to tease apart likely environmental factors influencing the tree physiology and growth in the unique extinct ecosystem of the Polar rainforest. Calculations of interannual variation in temperature over a multidecadal time-slice in the early Eocene are presented, with a mean temperature estimate of 11.4 °C (1σ = 1.8 °C based on δ18O. Dual-isotope spectral analysis suggests that multidecadal climate cycles similar to the modern Pacific Decadal Oscillation likely drove temperature and cloudiness trends on 20–30 year timescales.

  17. Basin Evolution of the Cretaceous-Early Eocene Xigaze Forearc, Southern Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, D. A.; Carrapa, B.; Kapp, P. A.; Gehrels, G. E.; Reiners, P. W.

    2013-12-01

    An understanding of the processes which control the evolution of forearc basins is important for deciphering the tectonic development of a convergent margin prior to continent-continent suturing. This study presents sedimentologic, modal petrographic and geo-thermochronologic data from the Xigaze forearc basin, preserved along ~ 600 km of the Indus-Yarlung Suture Zone in southern Tibet. From late Cretaceous to early Cenozoic time, subduction of Neo-Tethyan oceanic crust beneath the southern margin of Asia accommodated the northward motion of the Indian craton and formed the Xigaze forearc basin. Following collision with India in the early Cenozoic, the basin transitioned from predominantly marine to non-marine sedimentation and was subsequently uplifted to a mean elevation of 5000 m. Thus, the sedimentary record in the Xigaze forearc preserves information regarding the tectonic evolution of the Indo-Asia continental margin prior to and following collision. We present new measured sections and geo-thermochronologic data from Early Cretaceous to Early Eocene clastic and carbonate sedimentary rocks, preserved in two previously unexplored regions of the forearc, (1) at its western most extent, northwest of Saga, and (2) north of Lhatse. In turn, we compare our results with previously published data in order to synthesize our current understanding of forearc evolution. Strata preserved in the Lhaste region record an initial shallow marine phase of forearc sedimentation (Aptian), but quickly transition to deep marine slope and distal fan turbidite facies (Albian-Campanian). In contrast, facies preserved in the Saga region record a younger shoaling upward marine sequence (Maastrichtian-Ypresian), with the uppermost ~ 400 m consisting of fluvial channel sandstones and red-green paleosols. Facies and depositional environments in the Saga region are highly variable along strike, with turbidites, shelf limestones, estuarine siliciclastics and thick paleosols sequences all

  18. Middle Eocene Nummulites and their offshore re-deposition: A case study from the Middle Eocene of the Venetian area, northeastern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Davide; Nebelsick, James H.; Puga-Bernabéu, Ángel; Luciani, Valeria

    2013-11-01

    The Middle Eocene Calcari nummulitici formation from northeastern Italy, Venetian area, represents a shallow-marine carbonate ramp developed on the northern Tethyan margin. In the Monti Berici area, its main components are larger foraminifera and coralline red algal communities that constitute thick carbonate sedimentary successions. Middle ramp and proximal outer ramp environments are recognized using component relationships, biofacies and sedimentary features. The middle-ramp is characterized by larger flattened-lenticular Nummulites on palaeohighs between which rhodoliths formed. Larger Nummulites palaeohighs containing Nummulites millecaput, Nummulites crassus, Nummulites discorbinus and Nummulites cf. gizehensis developed more basin-wards. The following relatively quiet environments of basin-wards of the palaeohighs represent areas of maximum carbonate production. The transition between the distal middle- and the proximal outer-ramp settings is marked in the study area by a large erosional surface which is interpreted to have been formed as a result of an erosive channel body filled in by deposits re-sedimented from shallower depths. These off-shore re-sedimented channelized deposits, ascribed to the Shallow Benthic Zone SBZ 15, lying on hemipelagic marls (planktonic foraminiferal zone E9 (P11)) allow for a biostratigraphic correlation to the Late Lutetian. The studied deposits, represented by packstone to rudstones, were displaced whilst still unlithified. The Lutetian-Bartonian regression along with the local tectonic activity promoted the production of a high amount of biogenic shallow-water carbonates mainly produced in the Mossano middle-ramp settings. These prograded towards the basinal areas with high-sedimentation rate of carbonate deposits characterized by the larger Nummulites rudstones. Such high amounts of sediment led to sediment instability which potentially could be mobilized either by return currents due to occasional major storms or by

  19. A new conception on the formation of the first bend of Yangtze River: its relations with Eocene magmatic activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on field observations, the author proposes a new understanding on the formation of the first bend of the Yangtze River. The relationship between the formation of the first bend of the Yangtze River and Eocene magmatic activity is expounded, suggesting that the first bend of the Yangtze River is the result from choking of the strong magmatic activity in Eocene. As a result, the upstream became a natural reservoir, whose riverside between Mt. Yulong and Mt. Haba was burst,guiding Jinshajiang River running eastward. At the same time, the drastic uplift of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau led to the deep dissection of the river cut down the channel, resulting in the formation of the Tiger Leaping Gorge. The magnitude of uplift in the study area (located in the eastern of the Tibetan Plateau) is calculated. Taking Mt. Yulong as a base, the magnitude of lift is 3,300 m from Eocene to Pliocene, adding 700 m since Pleistocene, totaling up to 4,000 m or so.

  20. Tropical/subtropical Upper Paleocene Lower Eocene fluvial deposits in eastern central Patagonia, Chile (46°45'S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, M.; de la Cruz, R.; Troncoso, A.

    2000-11-01

    A succession of quartz-rich fluvial sandstones and siltstones derived from a mainly rhyolitic source and minor metamorphic rocks, located to the west, represent the first Upper Paleocene-Early Eocene deposits described in Chilean eastern central Patagonian Cordillera (46°45'S). This unit, exposed 25 km south of Chile Chico, south of lago General Carrera, is here defined as the Ligorio Márquez Formation. It overlies with an angular unconformity Lower Cretaceous shallow marine sedimentary rocks (Cerro Colorado Formation) and subaerial tuffs that have yielded K-Ar dates of 128, 125 and 123 Ma (Flamencos Tuffs, of the Divisadero Group). The Ligorio Márquez Formation includes flora indicative of a tropical/subtropical climate, and its deposition took place during the initial part of the Late Paleocene-Early Eocene Cenozoic optimum. The underlying Lower Cretaceous units exhibit folding and faulting, implying a pre-Paleocene-Lower Eocene contractional tectonism. Overlying Oligocene-Miocene marine and continental facies in the same area exhibit thrusts and normal faults indicative of post-Lower Miocene contractional tectonism.

  1. Maastrichtian-Early Eocene litho-biostratigraphy and palægeography of the northern Gulf of Suez region, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibner, C.; Marzouk, A. M.; Kuss, J.

    2001-02-01

    The Maastrichtian-Lower Eocene sediments on both sides of the northern Gulf of Suez can be subdivided into eight formal formations (including one group) and one informal formation that are described in detail. These lithostratigraphic units reflect three different environmental regimes of deposition or non-deposition. The first regime is characterised by uplift and erosion or non-deposition resulting mostly from the uplift of the Northern Galala/Wadi Araba structure, a branch of the Syrian Arc Foldbelt. The shallow water carbonate platform and slope deposits of the Late Campanian-Maastrichtian St Anthony Formation and the Paleocene-Lower Eocene Southern Galala and Garra Formations represent the second regime and are found north and south of the Northern Galala/Wadi Araba High. The third regime is represented by basinal chalks, marls and shales of the Maastrichtian Sudr Formation and of the Paleocene-Eocene Dakhla, Tarawan and Esna Formations, the Dakhla/Tarawan/Esna informal formation and the Thebes Group. The distribution and lateral interfingering of the above mentioned environmental regimes reflect different vertical movements, changing basin morphology, sea level changes and progradation of shallow water sediments and is illustrated on 11 palæogeographic maps.

  2. Eocene high-latitude temperature gradients over time and space based on d18O values of fossil shark teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeichner, S. S.; Kim, S.; Colman, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    Early-Mid Eocene (56.0-33.9Mya) is characterized by a temperate Antarctic climate and shallower latitudinal temperature gradients than those in present day. The warmer waters off the coast of the Antarctic Peninsula provided suitable habitats for taxa (i.e., sharks) that live today at lower latitudes. Stable isotope analysis of Eocene shark teeth provides a proxy to understand high latitude temperature gradients. However, shark ecology, in particular migration and occupation of tidal versus pelagic habitats, must be considered in the interpretation of stable isotope data. In this study, we analyze d18OPO4 values from the enameloid of Striatolamia (synonymized with Carcharias) shark teeth from the La Meseta formation (Seymour Island, Antarctica) to estimate paleotemperature in Early-Mid Eocene Antarctica, and assess the impact of ecology versus environmental signals on d18OPO4 values. We compare the ranges and offsets between our measured shark tooth d18OPO4 and published bivalve d18OCO3 values to test whether shark teeth record signals of migration across latitudinal temperature gradients, or instead reflect seasonal and long-term temporal variation across La Meseta stratigraphic units.

  3. Geochronological and taxonomic revisions of the middle Eocene Whistler Squat Quarry (Devil's Graveyard Formation, Texas) and implications for the early Uintan in Trans-Pecos Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisano, Christopher J; Kirk, E Christopher; Townsend, K E Beth; Deino, Alan L

    2014-01-01

    The Whistler Squat Quarry (TMM 41372) of the lower Devil's Graveyard Formation in Trans-Pecos Texas is a middle Eocene fossil locality attributed to Uintan biochronological zone Ui1b. Specimens from the Whistler Squat Quarry were collected immediately above a volcanic tuff with prior K/Ar ages ranging from ∼47-50 Ma and below a tuff previously dated to ∼44 Ma. New 40Ar/39Ar analyses of both of the original tuff samples provide statistically indistinguishable ages of 44.88±0.04 Ma for the lower tuff and 45.04±0.10 Ma for the upper tuff. These dates are compatible with magnetically reversed sediments at the site attributable to C20r (43.505-45.942 Ma) and a stratigraphic position above a basalt dated to 46.80 Ma. Our reanalysis of mammalian specimens from the Whistler Squat Quarry and a stratigraphically equivalent locality significantly revises their faunal lists, confirms the early Uintan designation for the sites, and highlights several biogeographic and biochronological differences when compared to stratotypes in the Bridger and Uinta Formations. Previous suggestions of regional endemism in the early Uintan are supported by the recognition of six endemic taxa (26% of mammalian taxa) from the Whistler Squat Quarry alone, including three new taxa. The revised faunal list for the Whistler Squat Quarry also extends the biostratigraphic ranges of nine non-endemic mammalian taxa to Ui1b.

  4. A Fish Assemblage from the Middle Eocene from Libya (Dur At-Talah) and the Earliest Record of Modern African Fish Genera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Olga; Pinton, Aurélie; Cappetta, Henri; Adnet, Sylvain; Valentin, Xavier; Salem, Mustapha; Jaeger, Jean-Jacques

    2015-01-01

    In the early nineteen sixties, Arambourg and Magnier found some freshwater fish (i.e., Polypterus sp., Siluriformes indet. and Lates sp.) mixed with marine members in an Eocene vertebrate assemblage at Gebel Coquin, in the southern Libyan Desert. This locality, aged ca 37-39Ma and now known under the name of Dur At-Talah, has been recently excavated. A new fish assemblage, mostly composed of teeth, was collected by the Mission Paléontologique Franco-Libyenne. In this paper, we describe freshwater fish members including a dipnoan (Protopterus sp.), and several actinopterygians: bichir (Polypterus sp.), aba fish (Gymnarchus sp.), several catfishes (Chrysichthys sp. and a mochokid indet.), several characiforms (including the tiger fish Hydrocynus sp., and one or two alestin-like fish), and perciforms (including the snake-head fish Parachanna sp. and at least one cichlid). Together with the fossiliferous outcrops at Birket Qarun in Egypt, the Libyan site at Dur At-Talah reduces a 10-Ma chronological gap in the fossil record of African freshwater fish. Their fish assemblages overlap in their composition and thus constitute a rather homogenous, original and significant amount of new elements regarding the Paleogene African ichthyofauna. This supports the establishment of the modern African freshwater fish fauna during this time period because these sites mostly contain the earliest members known in modern genera.

  5. At the root of the early penguin neck: a study of the only two cervicodorsal spines recovered from the Eocene of Antarctica

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    Piotr Jadwiszczak

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The spinal column of early Antarctic penguins is poorly known, mainly due to the scarcity of articulated vertebrae in the fossil record. One of the most interesting segments of this part of the skeleton is the transitional series located at the root of the neck. Here, two such cervicodorsal series, comprising reinterpreted known material and a new specimen from the Eocene of Seymour Island (Antarctic Peninsula, were investigated and contrasted with those of modern penguins and some fossil bones. The new specimen is smaller than the counterpart elements in recent king penguins, whereas the second series belonged to a large-bodied penguin from the genus Palaeeudyptes. It had been assigned by earlier researchers to P. gunnari (a species of “giant” penguins and a Bayesian analysis—a Bayes factor approach based on size of an associated tarsometatarsus—strongly supported such an assignment. Morphological and functional studies revealed that mobility within the aforementioned segment probably did not differ substantially between extant and studied fossil penguins. There were, however, intriguing morphological differences between the smaller fossil specimen and the comparative material related to the condition of the lateral excavation in the first cervicodorsal vertebra and the extremely small size of the intervertebral foramen located just prior to the first “true” thoracic vertebra. The former feature could have resulted from discrepancy in severity of external pneumatization. Both fossils provided valuable insights into the morphology and functioning of the axial skeleton in early penguins.

  6. Palynology, palynofacies and petroleum potential of the Upper Cretaceous-Eocene Matulla, Brown Limestone and Thebes formations, Belayim oilfields, central Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Diasty, W. Sh.; El Beialy, S. Y.; Abo Ghonaim, A. A.; Mostafa, A. R.; El Atfy, H.

    2014-07-01

    Palynological, palynofacies and organic geochemical results of 46 samples retrieved from the Upper Cretaceous - Eocene Matulla, Brown Limestone and Thebes formations, Belayim oilfields, central Gulf of Suez, Egypt are presented. The two latter formations are not dated palynologically as their lithology is not promising for palynological yield. However the Matulla Formation is dated as Turonian-Santonian age, based on the combined evidence of pollen and dinocysts. Palynofacies analysis carried out under both transmitted and fluorescent microscopy indicated that both the Thebes and Brown Limestone formations are deposited under a distal suboxic-anoxic environment. On the other hand, the Turonian-Santonian Matulla Formation supported the existence of a marginal marine deposition under dysoxic-anoxic basin to proximal suboxic-anoxic shelf environments. Rock-Eval pyrolysis and TOC results indicated that most of the studied formations are thermally immature to marginally mature and have a good petroleum potential. They are organically-rich in both oil- and gas-prone kerogen Type-II and II/III, deposited under marine reducing conditions favorable for hydrocarbon generation and expulsion.

  7. The Rise of Flowering Plants and Land Surface Physics: The Cretaceous and Eocene Were Different

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upchurch, G. R.; Feild, T.

    2010-12-01

    The Cretaceous and Eocene have served as the poster children of past greenhouse climates. One difference between the two time periods is that angiosperms (flowering plants) underwent a major diversification and rise to dominance during the mid-Cretaceous to Paleocene. Flowering plants differ from all other living and fossil plants in having significantly higher rates of transpiration and photosynthesis, which in modern leaves correlate with the density of venation (Dv), a feature that can be measured directly from fossils. This increase in Dv, coupled with an increase in the abundance of angiosperms, is thought to have had major impact on the climate system. This is, in part, because transpiration plays an important role in determining the ratio of sensible to latent heat flux from the land surface and in determining precipitation rate in regions such as the equatorial rainforest. Analysis of Dv in fossil leaves indicates two phases of increase in transpiration rate for angiosperms during the Cretaceous-Paleocene. The oldest known angiosperms (Aptian-early Albian) have a low Dv characteristic of extant and fossil ferns and gymnosperms. At this time angiosperms are low-stature plants of minor importance in terms of relative abundance and diversity (<5%). The first phase of Dv increase occurs during the Late Albian to Cenomanian, where average Dv is 40% greater than that of conifers and ferns, and maximum Dv reaches levels characteristic of many trees from the temperate zone. This first phase coincides with the first local dominance of angiosperms, the first occurrence of moderate to large angiosperm trees (up to 1 m in diameter) , and the first common occurrence of angiosperms in the Arctic. The second phase of Dv increase occurs during the Maastrichtian to Paleocene, where average Dv reaches levels characteristic of modern tropical forests and maximum Dv reaches the level found in highly productive modern vegetation. This second phase coincides with the rise to

  8. Productivity response of calcareous nannoplankton to Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2

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    M. Dedert

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Early Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2 at ~53.7 Ma is one of multiple hyperthermal events that followed the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, ~56 Ma. The negative carbon excursion and deep ocean carbonate dissolution which occurred during the event imply that a substantial amount (103 Gt of carbon (C was added to the ocean-atmosphere system, consequently increasing atmospheric CO2(pCO2. This makes the event relevant to the current scenario of anthropogenic CO2 additions and global change. Resulting changes in ocean stratification and pH, as well as changes in exogenic cycles which supply nutrients to the ocean, may have affected the productivity of marine phytoplankton, especially calcifying phytoplankton. Changes in productivity, in turn, may affect the rate of sequestration of excess CO2 in the deep ocean and sediments. In order to reconstruct the productivity response by calcareous nannoplankton to ETM2 in the South Atlantic (Site 1265 and North Pacific (Site 1209, we employ the coccolith Sr/Ca productivity proxy with analysis of well-preserved picked monogeneric populations by ion probe supplemented by analysis of various size fractions of nannofossil sediments by ICP-AES. The former technique of measuring Sr/Ca in selected nannofossil populations using the ion probe circumvents possible contamination with secondary calcite. Avoiding such contamination is important for an accurate interpretation of the nannoplankton productivity record, since diagenetic processes can bias the productivity signal, as we demonstrate for Sr/Ca measurements in the fine (<20 μm and other size fractions obtained from bulk sediments from Site 1265. At this site, the paleoproductivity signal as reconstructed from the Sr/Ca appears to be governed by cyclic changes, possibly orbital forcing, resulting in a 20–30% variability in Sr/Ca in dominant genera as obtained by ion probe. The ~13 to 21

  9. Sequence stratigraphic analysis of Eocene Rock Strata, Offshore Indus, southwest Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Natasha; Rehman, Khaista; Ahmad, Sajjad; Khokher, Jamil; Hajana, M. Iqbal; Hanif, M.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, seismic data from two wells (Pak G2-1 and Indus Marine-1C) and age diagnostic larger benthic foraminifera (LBF) within drill cuttings has been used for the first time to identify depositional sequences within the carbonates in the Offshore Indus Basin, Pakistan. The Offshore Indus is tectonically categorized as a passive continental margin where carbonates occur as shelf carbonates in the near offshore and on volcanic seamounts in deeper waters. Seismic data analysis has indicated the presence of minor faults and carbonate buildups above the igneous basement in the south. Patterns of the seismic reflections enabled definition of three seismic facies units identified as: Unit 1 basement, represented by chaotic, moderate amplitude reflection configuration; while parallel bedding and the drape of overlying strata is typical character of Unit 2, carbonate mound facies. The younger Miocene channels represent Unit 3. The diagnosis of Alveolina vredenburgi/cucumiformis biozone confirmed the Ilerdian (55-52 Ma) stage constituting a second order cycle of deposition for the Eocene carbonates (identified as Unit 2). The carbonate succession has been mainly attributed to an early highstand system tract (HST). The environmental conditions remained favorable leading to the development of keep-up carbonates similar to pinnacle buildups as a result of aggradation during late transgressive system tract and an early HST. The carbonate sequence in the south (Pak G2-1) is thicker and fossiliferous representing inner to middle shelf depths based on fauna compared to the Indus Marine-1C in the north, which is devoid of fossils. Three biozones (SBZ 5, SBZ 6 and SBZ 8) were identified based on the occurrence of LBF. The base of the SBZ 5 zone marks the larger foraminifera turnover and the Paleocene-Eocene (P-E) boundary. The LBF encountered in this study coincides with earlier findings for the P-E boundary. Our findings indicate that the entire Ilerdian stage ranges from 55

  10. Paleoenvironmental reconstruction of the Early Eocene Wind River Formation in the Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, E.; Fan, M.; Sheldon, N. D.

    2011-12-01

    Terrestrial basin systems provide important information on paleoclimatic, paleoecological, and paleoenvironmental factors and how they control and respond to global changes and spatio-temporal heterogeneity. Examining these dynamics is crucial for times of major global change like the broad-scale climatic trends (warm/wet/high-CO2 conditions) of the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). As most climatic records of such events are derived from global marine datasets, regional terrestrial studies such as these provide a better model for understanding ecological responses and the localized effects of events like the EECO. The formation of the Wind River Basin (northwestern Wyoming) has been studied for decades, but its regional climatic, environmental, and ecological dynamics have been largely overlooked. Recent work in other contemporaneous sites in the Green River Basin has suggested that the dynamics and rapidity of climate change in terrestrial interiors during the EECO may have been significantly different than what is indicated by the marine record, so to address these issues on a more regional scale we examined paleosols preserved in the fluvial, basin-margin Wind River Formation preserved near Dubois, Wyoming. Field identification of the paleosols indicated a suite that includes primarily Inceptisols and Alfisols; most exhibited significant redoximorphic features and Bg horizons that indicate a ponded floodplain paleoenvironment, while others contained deep Bk horizons (>100 cm) consistent with more well-drained, but still sub-humid to humid conditions. Based on the identification of these well-developed soil features, along with distinct horizonation and root development, paleosols were robustly correlated and sampled throughout the Formation, and environmental descriptors were assigned. To further examine the question of regional terrestrial climate/environmental change, whole rock geochemistry (XRF) samples from paleosol depth profiles were analyzed for use

  11. High resolution taxonomic study of the late Eocene (~34 Ma) Florissant palynoflora, Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchal, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    The Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument is located in Teller County in central Colorado, at approximate latitude 38°54'N and longitude 105°13'. The lithologies of the Florissant Formation consist of coarse-grained arkosic and volcanoclastic sandstones and conglomerates, finer shale, and tuffaceus mudstone and siltstone. It is divided into six units, mostly of lacustrine and fluvial origin with volcanic sediments interfingering and topping the strata. Volcanic units have been dated using the 40Ar/39Ar single-crystal method, giving an absolute age of ca. 34 Ma for the upper fossiliferous sedimentary unit. This pinpoints the formation of the Florissant sediments at the end of the Eocene, providing fruitful insight into the changing palaeoecosystem of the region at the dawn of the Oligocene. The formation is very well known for its rich fossil insect fauna and well preserved plant macrofossils found in the shale units, and the silicified tree stumps occurring in the lower mudstone unit. The sample used for this study originates from the upper shale unit, the fifth unit from the base of the formation. Previous studies on the plant macrofossils, mesofossils and the palynoflora have shown that during the late Eocene the surroundings of Florissant palaeo-lake were covered by diverse mixed broad-leaved evergreen/deciduous and needle-leafed forests. Until now pollen from the Florissant Formation has mostly been described according to conventional morphological nomenclature, using light microscopy (LM) only. In this study the same individual pollen grains are investigated using both LM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), by means of single grain technique. This provides best exploitable results concerning a more detailed resolution regarding taxonomy and more accurate identifications. The main goal of this study is to compile a well resolved taxonomic species list based on the palynoflora, to clarify the generic and species diversity of selected families (e

  12. Productivity response of calcareous nannoplankton to Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedert, M.; Stoll, H. M.; Kroon, D.; Shimizu, N.; Kanamaru, K.; Ziveri, P.

    2012-05-01

    The Early Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2) at ~53.7 Ma is one of multiple hyperthermal events that followed the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, ~56 Ma). The negative carbon excursion and deep ocean carbonate dissolution which occurred during the event imply that a substantial amount (103 Gt) of carbon (C) was added to the ocean-atmosphere system, consequently increasing atmospheric CO2(pCO2). This makes the event relevant to the current scenario of anthropogenic CO2 additions and global change. Resulting changes in ocean stratification and pH, as well as changes in exogenic cycles which supply nutrients to the ocean, may have affected the productivity of marine phytoplankton, especially calcifying phytoplankton. Changes in productivity, in turn, may affect the rate of sequestration of excess CO2 in the deep ocean and sediments. In order to reconstruct the productivity response by calcareous nannoplankton to ETM2 in the South Atlantic (Site 1265) and North Pacific (Site 1209), we employ the coccolith Sr/Ca productivity proxy with analysis of well-preserved picked monogeneric populations by ion probe supplemented by analysis of various size fractions of nannofossil sediments by ICP-AES. The former technique of measuring Sr/Ca in selected nannofossil populations using the ion probe circumvents possible contamination with secondary calcite. Avoiding such contamination is important for an accurate interpretation of the nannoplankton productivity record, since diagenetic processes can bias the productivity signal, as we demonstrate for Sr/Ca measurements in the fine (productivity during ETM2. This high productivity phase is probably the result of enhanced nutrient supply either from land or from upwelling. The ion probe results show that calcareous nannoplankton productivity was not reduced by environmental conditions accompanying ETM2 at Site 1265, but imply an overall sustained productivity and potentially a small productivity increase during the extreme

  13. Chicxulub Impact, Yucatan Carbonate Platform, Cretaceous-Paleogene Boundary and Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.

    2015-12-01

    Chicxulub formed 66 Ma ago by an asteroid impact on the Yucatan carbonate platform, southern Gulf of Mexico. Impact produced a 200 km diameter crater, platform fracturing, deformation and ejecta emplacement. Carbonate sedimentation restarted and crater was covered by up to 1 km of sediments. Drilling programs have sampled the Paleogene sediments, which record the changing sedimentation processes in the impact basin and platform. Here, results of a study of the Paleocene-Eocene sediments cored in the Santa Elena borehole are used to characterize the K/Pg and PETM. The borehole reached a depth of 504 m and was continuously cored, sampling the post-impact sediments and impact breccias, with contact at 332 m. For this study, we analyzed the section from ~230 to ~340 m, corresponding to the upper breccias and Paleocene-Eocene sediments. The lithological column, constructed from macroscopic and thin-section petrographic analyses, is composed of limestones and dolomitized limestones with several thin clay layers. Breccias are melt and basement clast rich, described as a suevitic unit. Section is further investigated using paleomagnetic, rock magnetic, X-ray fluorescence geochemical and stable isotope analyses. Magnetic polarities define a sequence of reverse to normal, which correlate to the geomagnetic polarity time scale from chrons 29r to 26r. The d13 C values in the first 20 m interval range from 1.2 to 3.5 %0 and d18 O values range from -1.4 to -4.8 %0. Isotope values show variation trends that correlate with the marine carbon and oxygen isotope patterns for the K-Pg boundary and early Paleocene. Positive carbon isotopes suggest relatively high productivity, with apparent recovery following the K-Pg extinction event. Geochemical data define characteristic trends, with Si decreasing gradually from high values in the suevites, low contents in Paleocene sediments with intervals of higher variability and then increased values likely marking the PETM. Variation trends are

  14. Paleocene-Eocene Paleoclimatic Event Records in the Chicxulub Crater (Yucatan, Gulf of Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Cruz, L. L.; Fucugauchi, J. U.

    2013-05-01

    Chicxulub crater was formed by an asteroid impact on the Yucatan carbonate platform about 65.5 Ma ago at the Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary. After crater formation, carbonate deposition gradually covered the structure, preserving a largely undisturbed sedimentary record for the Paleogene. As part of the studies, drilling programs with continuous core recovery have been conducted over the past years. The cores preserve a record of post-impact processes, life recovery in target area, platform evolution and emergence, sea-level changes and the paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic conditions in the region. To contribute to the knowledge of the Paleocene-Eocene warming and changes in oceanic hydrography, we carried out x-ray fluorescence and stable oxygen and carbon isotope studies of the carbonate sections on top of the impact breccias sampled in the Santa Elena and Yaxcopoil-1 boreholes. The Santa Elena borehole is located 110 km radial distance from crater center, outside the crater rim. Yaxcopoil-1 borehole is located 62 km away from crater center in the terrace zone inside the crater rim. The Cenozoic sequence is about 332 m and 796 m thick in the Santa Elena and Yaxcopoil-1 boreholes. The stable isotope records are correlated to data on marine sediment cores from the ocean drilling projects for the Paleocene and Eocene, which permit inferences on the paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic reconstruction as well as additional stratigraphic constraints for the sections. The positive bulk carbon isotope (δ13C) values in the basal Paleocene sediments reflect a return or enhancement of ocean productivity following plankton extinctions following the K/Pg impact. The Paleocene represents a time of global warmth temperatures with low vertical and latitudinal gradients in the oceans, likely resulting from elevated CO2 levels. δ13C values in the Santa Elena borehole show increases between 3 and 4 % by the late Paleocene that decrease to levels prevailing before the K

  15. Expansion and diversification of high-latitude radiolarian assemblages in the late Eocene linked to a cooling event in the Southwest Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascher, K. M.; Hollis, C. J.; Bohaty, S. M.; Cortese, G.; McKay, R. M.

    2015-07-01

    The Eocene was characterised by "greenhouse" climate conditions that were gradually terminated by a long-term cooling trend through the middle and late Eocene. This long-term trend was determined by several large-scale climate perturbations that culminated in a shift to "ice-house" climates at the Eocene-Oligocene Transition. Geochemical and micropaleontological proxies suggest that tropical-to-subtropical sea-surface temperatures persisted into the late Eocene in the high-latitude Southwest Pacific Ocean. Here, we present radiolarian microfossil assemblage and foraminiferal oxygen and carbon stable isotope data from Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Sites 277, 280, 281 and 283 from the middle Eocene to early Oligocene (~ 40-33 Ma) to identify oceanographic changes in the Southwest Pacific across this major transition in Earth's climate history. The Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum at ~ 40 Ma is characterised by a negative shift in foraminiferal oxygen isotope values and a radiolarian assemblage consisting of about 5 % of low latitude taxa Amphicraspedum prolixum group and Amphymenium murrayanum. In the early late Eocene at ~ 37 Ma, a positive oxygen isotope shift can be correlated to the Priabonian Oxygen Isotope Maximum (PrOM) event - a short-lived cooling event recognized throughout the Southern Ocean. Radiolarian abundance, diversity, and preservation increase during the middle of this event at Site 277 at the same time as diatoms. The PrOM and latest Eocene radiolarian assemblages are characterised by abundant high-latitude taxa. These high-latitude taxa also increase in abundance during the late Eocene and early Oligocene at DSDP Sites 280, 281 and 283 and are associated with very high diatom abundance. We therefore infer a~northward expansion of high-latitude radiolarian taxa onto the Campbell Plateau towards the end of the late Eocene. In the early Oligocene (~ 33 Ma) there is an overall decrease in radiolarian abundance and diversity at Site 277, and diatoms

  16. High resolution cyclostratigraphy of the early Eocene – new insights into the origin of the Cenozoic cooling trend

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    T. Westerhold

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Here we present a high-resolution cyclostratigraphy based on X-ray fluorescence (XRF core scanning data from a new record retrieved from the tropical western Atlantic (Demerara Rise, ODP Leg 207, Site 1258. The Eocene sediments from ODP Site 1258 cover magnetochrons C20 to C24 and show well developed cycles. This record includes the missing interval for reevaluating the early Eocene part of the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS, also providing key aspects for reconstructing high-resolution climate variability during the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO. Detailed spectral analysis demonstrates that early Eocene sedimentary cycles are characterized by precession frequencies modulated by short (100 kyr and long (405 kyr eccentricity with a generally minor obliquity component. Counting of both the precession and eccentricity cycles results in revised estimates for the duration of magnetochrons C21r through C24n. Our cyclostratigraphic framework also corroborates that the geochronology of the Eocene Green River Formation (Wyoming, USA is still questionable mainly due to the uncertain correlation of the "Sixth Tuff" to the GPTS.

    Right at the onset of the long-term Cenozoic cooling trend the dominant eccentricity-modulated precession cycles of ODP Site 1258 are interrupted by strong obliquity cycles for a period of ~800 kyr in the middle of magnetochron C22r. These distinct obliquity cycles at this low latitude site point to (1 a high-latitude driving mechanism on global climate variability from 50.1 to 49.4 Ma, and (2 seem to coincide with a significant drop in atmospheric CO2 concentration below a critical threshold between 2- and 3-times the pre-industrial level (PAL. The here newly identified orbital configuration of low eccentricity in combination with high obliquity amplitudes during this ~800-kyr period and the crossing of a critical pCO2 threshold may have led to the formation of the first ephemeral

  17. The Tectonic Event of the Cenozoic in the Tasman Area, Western Pacific, and Its Role in Eocene Global Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collot, J.; Sutherland, R.; Rouillard, P.; Patriat, M.; Roest, W. R.; Bache, F.

    2014-12-01

    The geometry and age progression of Emperor and Hawaii seamounts provide compelling evidence for a major change in Pacific plate motion over a short period of geological time at c. 50 Ma. This time approximately coincides with significant changes in plate boundary configuration and rate in the Indian Ocean, Antarctica, and with the onset of subduction zones in the western Pacific from Japan to New Zealand. This new subduction system that initiated during Eocene time can be divided into two sectors: The northern sector formed at the eastern boundary of the Philippine Sea plate and evolved into the Izu-Bonin-Mariana system. It has and is being extensively studied (2014 IODP expedition 351) to determine the magmatic products, but is limited in the record that is preserved because it is entirely intra-oceanic in character. The southern sector, the Tasman Area sector, borders continental fragments of Gondwana from Papua New Guinea, New Caledonia and New Zealand. This subduction zone evolved into the Tonga-Kemadec system. Because most of the southwest Pacific remained in marine conditions throughout Paleogene time and because rapid seawards roll-back of the subduction is inferred to have happened, it presents extensive well-preserved stratigraphic records to study the Eocene-Oligocene plate boundary evolution. The recent compilation of c. 100.000 km of 2D seismic data in the Tasman Frontier database has allowed us to describe, in the overriding plate of the proto subduction, stratigraphic evidence for large Cenozoic vertical movements (2-4 km) over a lateral extension of 2000 km (from New Caledonia to New Zealand), long-wavelength (~500 km) warping and large amounts of reverse faulting and folding near the proto-trench. These recent observations from the Lord Howe Rise, New Caledonia Trough and South Norfolk Ridge system reveal clear evidence for convergent deformation (uplift and erosion) and subsequent subsidence recorded in Eocene and Oligocene stratal relationships

  18. Characterization of organics consistent with β-chitin preserved in the Late Eocene cuttlefish Mississaepia mississippiensis.

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    Patricia G Weaver

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Preservation of original organic components in fossils across geological time is controversial, but the potential such molecules have for elucidating evolutionary processes and phylogenetic relationships is invaluable. Chitin is one such molecule. Ancient chitin has been recovered from both terrestrial and marine arthropods, but prior to this study had not been recovered from fossil marine mollusks. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Organics consistent with β-chitin are recovered in cuttlebones of Mississaepia mississippiensis from the Late Eocene (34.36 million years ago marine clays of Hinds County, Mississippi, USA. These organics were determined and characterized through comparisons with extant taxa using Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (SEM/EDS, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (Hyperprobe, Fourier Transmission Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR and Immunohistochemistry (IHC. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study presents the first evidence for organics consistent with chitin from an ancient marine mollusk and discusses how these organics have been degraded over time. As mechanisms for their preservation, we propose that the inorganic/organic lamination of the cuttlebone, combined with a suboxic depositional environment with available free Fe(2+ ions, inhibited microbial or enzymatic degradation.

  19. Environmental changes during the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum in Spitsbergen as reflected by benthic foraminifera

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    Jenö Nagy

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The study deals with environmental changes during the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM and its background conditions in Spitsbergen through analysis of benthic foraminiferal assemblages (FA in a section drilled in the Paleogene Central Basin. The impact of this extreme global warming occurs here in prodelta shelf mudstones composing the lower part of the Gilsonryggen Member (Frysjaodden Formation. The start of the PETM perturbation is marked by a faunal turnover, in which the medium-diversity circumpolar Reticulophragmium assemblage was replaced by a low-diversity Trochammina fauna. During the hyperthermal period, benthic foraminiferal diversity decreased severely, while the dominance of small-sized taxa with epifaunal morphology strongly increased. This low-diversity fauna occurs in sediments with a reduced thorium/uranium ratio (proxy for oxygenation and kaolinite enrichment (proxy for high humidity. The faunal changes were thus caused by the combined effects of hypoxic and hyposaline conditions in a stratified water column, due to extreme warming with its accompanying intensified hydrologic cycle. The PETM acme coincides with the maximum flooding surface (MFS of the Gilsonryggen depositional sequence, composed of the Gilsonryggen Member and the overlying Battfjellet and Aspelintoppen formations. The transgressive phase of the sequence was initiated by local tectonics, while the eustatic sea-level rise of the PETM was superimposed on this transgression.To access the supplementary material for this article, please see supplementary files under Article Tools online.

  20. Late Eocene pollen records and palaeoenvironmental changes in northern Tibetan Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The Eocene palaeovegetation landscape and palaeoclimate reconstructed from the pollen records in the Jiuquan Basin, northwest China provide some important information on the early uplift of the Tibetan Plateau and the origin and evolution of the aridification in northwest China. The records show the arid-semiarid scrubs with open forest palynofloras controlled by the subtropical high existed in northwest China during the 40.2-33.4 Ma. Four pollen assemblages are found: Nitrariadites-Cheno-podipollis-Pinaceae assemblage (40.2-37.9 Ma) is followed by Chenopodipollis-Nitrariadites assemblage (37.9-34.6 Ma), Pinuspollenites & Abietineaepollenites-Chenopodipollis assemblage (34.6-33.9 Ma), and Chenopodipollis-Nitrariadites assemblage (33.9-33.4 Ma). The percentage of thermophilic types is in anti-correlation with that of the dry types, which means the palaeoclimate is relatively warmwet or cold-dry during most of that time. Such aridity may be related to the water vapor reduction and the planetary wind system movement northward in response to the cooling caused by small-ephemeral icesheets.

  1. Eocene and not Cretaceous origin of spider wasps: Fossil evidence from amber

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    Juanita Rodriguez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Spider wasps had long been proposed to originate in the mid-Cretaceous based on the Burmese amber fossil Bryopompilus interfector Engel and Grimaldi, 2006. We performed a morphological examination of this fossil and determined it does not belong to Pompilidae or any other described hymenopteran family. Instead, we place it in the new family Bryopompilidae. The oldest verifiable member of the Pompilidae is from Baltic amber, which suggests the family probably originated in the Eocene, not in the mid-Cretaceous as previously proposed. The origin of spider wasps appears to be correlated with an increase in spider familial diversity in the Cenozoic. We also we add two genera to the extinct pompilid fauna: Tainopompilus gen. nov., and Paleogenia gen. nov., and describe three new species of fossil spider wasps: Anoplius planeta sp. nov., from Dominican amber (Burdigalian to Langhian; Paleogenia wahisi sp. nov., from Baltic amber (Lutetian to Priabonian; and Tainopompilus argentum sp. nov, from Dominican amber (Chattian to Langhian.

  2. Value of information analysis for groundwater quality monitoring network design Case study: Eocene Aquifer, Palestine

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    Khader, A.; McKee, M.

    2010-12-01

    Value of information (VOI) analysis evaluates the benefit of collecting additional information to reduce or eliminate uncertainty in a specific decision-making context. It makes explicit any expected potential losses from errors in decision making due to uncertainty and identifies the “best” information collection strategy as one that leads to the greatest expected net benefit to the decision-maker. This study investigates the willingness to pay for groundwater quality monitoring in the Eocene Aquifer, Palestine, which is an unconfined aquifer located in the northern part of the West Bank. The aquifer is being used by 128,000 Palestinians to fulfill domestic and agricultural demands. The study takes into account the consequences of pollution and the options the decision maker might face. Since nitrate is the major pollutant in the aquifer, the consequences of nitrate pollution were analyzed, which mainly consists of the possibility of methemoglobinemia (blue baby syndrome). In this case, the value of monitoring was compared to the costs of treating for methemoglobinemia or the costs of other options like water treatment, using bottled water or importing water from outside the aquifer. And finally, an optimal monitoring network that takes into account the uncertainties in recharge (climate), aquifer properties (hydraulic conductivity), pollutant chemical reaction (decay factor), and the value of monitoring is designed by utilizing a sparse Bayesian modeling algorithm called a relevance vector machine.

  3. Increased precipitation and weathering across the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum in central China

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    Chen, Zuoling; Ding, Zhongli; Yang, Shiling; Zhang, Chunxia; Wang, Xu

    2016-06-01

    Global warming during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) ˜55.5 million years ago (Ma) was associated with a massive release of carbon to the ocean-atmosphere system, as evidenced by a prominent negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) and widespread dissolution of marine carbonates. The paleohydrologic response to the PETM warming has been studied worldwide; however, relevant records of environmental perturbation in Asia are lacking so far. Here we extend the record of this event in central China, a subtropical paleosetting, through geochemical and mineralogical analyses of lacustrine sediments. Geochemical indicators of authigenic carbonates—including molar Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios—suggest an overall increased precipitation across the PETM, compatible with the disappearance of authigenic dolomite and the appearance of kaolinite in the strata. The relatively humid conditions persisted long after the carbon-cycle perturbation had stopped, implying that the transient hyper-greenhouse warming might have forced the regional climate system into a new climate state that was not easily reversed. Additionally, a gradual increase in chemical index of alteration (CIA) and the appearance of kaolinite are associated with the PETM, indicating an intensified silicate weathering and pedogenesis in the watershed in response to warmer and more humid climate. Our results corroborate the theory that an accelerated continental chemical weathering served as a negative feedback to sequester carbon and lower the atmospheric greenhouse-gas levels during the PETM.

  4. Climate signals in Middle Eocene deep-marine clastic systems, Ainsa Basin, Spanish Pyrenees

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    Pickering, K. T.; Cantalejo, B.; Scotchman, J. I.

    2014-12-01

    The Ainsa Basin, Spanish Pyrenees, occupies a crucial position between the non-marine, marginal-marine and shallow-marine environments that acted as the sediment-supply and staging areas for sediment transfer processes into the deep-marine environments of the Ainsa Basin, and the more distal Jaca and Pamplona basins. Studies of source-to-sink systems make the Eocene stratigraphy of the Pyrenees and adjoining areas one of the best natural laboratories worldwide for understanding a complete sedimentary system. The hydrocarbon industry requires good predictive models for the distribution of reservoir and non-reservoir deposits. Using a wide range of proxy physical and geochemical data, we show with a high degree of confidence that Milankovitch forcing at a range of astronomical scales controlled deposition of the thin-bedded, fine-grained sandy turbidites and hemipelagites throughout the basin (~ 70% of the stratigraphy). The driver on sandy channelised submarine-fan deposition (the principal sandbodies) cannot be simply related to Milankovitch frequencies and is likely to be due to a combination of climatic, tectonic and/or autocyclic processes.

  5. Decline of coral reefs during late Paleocene to early Eocene global warming

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    C. Scheibner

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1980s the frequency of warming events has intensified and simultaneously widespread coral bleaching, and enhanced coral mortality have been observed. Yet, it remains unpredictable how tropical coral reef communities will react to prolonged adverse conditions. Possibly, coral reef systems are sufficiently robust to withstand continued environmental pressures. But if coral mortality increases, what will platform communities of the future look like? The co-evolution of early Paleogene carbonate platforms and palaeoclimate may provide insight. Here we document the impact of early Paleogene global warming on shallow-water carbonate platforms in the Tethys. Between 59 and 55 Ma, three discrete stages in platform development can be identified Tethys-wide: during the first stage carbonate platforms mainly consisted of coralgal reefs; during the second – transitional – stage coralgal reefs thrived only at middle latitudes and gave way to larger foraminifera as dominant carbonate producer in low latitudes; finally, during the third stage, newly developing larger foraminifera lineages completely took over the role as main carbonate-producing organisms in low to middle latitudes. We postulate that rising temperatures led to a stepwise demise of Paleocene coral reefs, giving way to an unprecedented expansion of larger foraminifera, dominating Tethyan platforms during the early Eocene.

  6. Youngest representative of the extinct genus Microphorites in the Eocene amber of France (Diptera: Dolichopodidae: Microphorinae).

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    Bramuzzo, Simone; Nel, André

    2017-02-13

    Prior to the present study, seven species of the fossil microphorine (Dolichopodidae s. lat.) genus Microphorites Hennig, 1971 have been described: Microphorites extinctus Hennig, 1971 (type species), M. oculeus Grimaldi & Cumming, 1999, and M. similis Grimaldi & Cumming, 1999 (all from the Early Cretaceous Lebanese amber), M. deploegi Nel et al., 2004 (from the Early Cretaceous of France), M. utrillensis Peñalver, 2008 (from the Early Cretaceous amber of Spain), M. magaliae Perrichot & Engel, 2014 (from the Late Cretaceous amber of France), M. moravicus Tkoč et al., 2016 (possibly from the Paleogene amber of Moravia) (Hennig 1971; Grimaldi & Cumming 1999; Nel et al. 2004; Arillo et al. 2008; Perrichot & Engel 2014; Tkoč et al. 2016). Based on the dating of these amber species, Microphorites could be among the rare insect genera recorded from both the Cretaceous and the Paleogene. Here we describe Microphorites erikai sp. nov., first accurate Eocene Microphorites from the Oise amber (France), on the basis of a complete female specimen.

  7. Stratigraphy, sedimentology and paleontology of lower Eocene San Jose formation, central San Juan basin, New Mexico

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    Lucas, S.G.; Smith, L.N. (New Mexico Museum of Natural History, Albuquerque (USA))

    1989-09-01

    The lower Eocene San Jose Formation in the central portion of the San Juan basin (Gobernador-Vigas Canyon area) consists of the Cuba Mesa, Regina, Llaves, and Tapicitos Members. Well log data indicate that, from its 100-m thickness, the Cuba Mesa Member thins toward the basin center and pinches out to the northeast by lat. 36{degree}40'N, long. 107{degree}19'W. The Regina Member has the most extensive outcrops in the central basin, and it decreases in sandstone/mud rock ratio to the north. The Llaves and Tapicitos Members occur only at the highest elevations, are thin due to erosion, and are not mappable as separate units. Well log data and 1,275 m of measured stratigraphic section in the Regina, Llaves, and Tapicitos Members indicate these strata are composed of approximately 35% medium to coarse-grained sandstone and 65% fine-grained sandstone and mud rock. Sedimentology and sediment-dispersal patterns indicate deposition by generally south-flowing streams that had sources to the northwest, northeast, and east. Low-sinuosity, sand-bedded, braided( ) streams shifted laterally across about 1 km-wide channel belts to produce sheet sandstones that are prominent throughout the San Jose Formation. Subtle levees separated channel environments from floodplain and local lacustrine areas. Avulsion relocated channels periodically to areas on the floodplain, resulting in the typically disconnected sheet sandstones within muddy overbank deposits of the Regina Member.

  8. Eocene activity on the Western Sierra Fault System and its role incising Kings Canyon, California

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    Sousa, Francis J.; Farley, Kenneth A.; Saleeby, Jason; Clark, Marin

    2016-04-01

    Combining new and published apatite (U-Th)/He and apatite 4He/3He data from along the Kings River canyon, California we rediscover a west-down normal fault on the western slope of the southern Sierra Nevada, one of a series of scarps initially described by Hake (1928) which we call the Western Sierra Fault System. Integrating field observations with apatite (U-Th)/He data, we infer a single fault trace 30 km long, and constrain the vertical offset across this fault to be roughly a kilometer. Thermal modeling of apatite 4He/3He data documents a pulse of footwall cooling near the fault and upstream in the footwall at circa 45-40 Ma, which we infer to be the timing of a kilometer-scale incision pulse resulting from the fault activity. In the context of published data from the subsurface of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys, our data from the Western Sierra Fault System suggests an Eocene tectonic regime dominated by low-to-moderate magnitude extension, surface uplift, and internal structural deformation of the southern Sierra Nevada and proximal Great Valley forearc.

  9. MAASTRICHTIAN TO EOCENE CALCAREOUS NANNOFOSSIL BIOSTRATIGRAPHY FROM THE TABIAGO SECTION, BRIANZA AREA, NORTHERN ITALY

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    FABRIZIO TREMOLADA

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Calcareous nannofossil biostratigraphic investigations have been carried out on samples collected from the Tabiago section, Brianza, northern Italy. This section records early Maastrichtian (CC23b nannofossil zone to early Eocene (NP10 nannofossil zone calcareous nannofossil assemblages. The Cretaceous-Tertiary transition is characterized by major changes in sedimentation rates and two likely stratigraphic gaps. The Cretaceous Brenno Formation was deposited with a high sedimentation rate (~20 m/m.y., whilst the Tabiago Formation of Paleogene age records a drastic decrease (~10 m/m.y.. The absence of the CC26 zonal marker Micula prinsii may indicate a stratigraphic hiatus or an extremely condensed level in the latest Maastrichtian. However, only two samples have been collected and analyzed in this interval due to low exposure of the outcrop, and the absence of M. prinsii could be the result of diagenetic overprint or insufficient sampling. A stratigraphic hiatus or a very condensed interval corresponds to the upper part of NP1 nannofossil zone and PƒÑ foraminiferal Zone and P1a Subzone in the early Paleocene. The poor exposure of the outcrop prevents to precisely locate the zonal boundaries between NP4 and NP5 and between NP9 and NP10 and impedes the documentation of possible further stratigraphic gaps or condensed intervals.    

  10. The Upper Eocene crustose coralline algal pavement in the Colli Berici, north-eastern Italy

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    Davide Bassi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available A crustose coralline algal pavement, identified in Upper Eocene (Priabonian shallow water, middleramp carbonates in north-eastern Italy (Colli Berici, Southern Alps, represents a rare example of this facies.The crustose pavement consists of a coralline crust bindstone with a wackestone-packstone matrix, and is characterised by the dominance of crustose coralline thalli composed primarily of melobesioids (Lithothamnion and Mesophyllum and mastophoroids (Spongites, Lithoporella, Neogoniolithon. In places the coralline bindstone can be seen to develop from isolated encrusting-to-foliose thalli which bifurcate and join to form an open framework interbedded with matrix debris from crusts. Various forms of rhodoliths occur commonly within this facies. The largest discoidal rhodoliths (up to 12 cm of large diameter show an inner arrangement consisting of loosely packed laminar (encrusting-to-foliose coralline thalli with a high percentage of constructional voids (50-63%. Accessory components are represented by larger hyaline perforated foraminifera such as nummulitids and orthophragminids. This facies formed in a ramp palaeoenvironment characterised by relatively low hydrodynamic energy and low rates of sedimentation. Channelised structures present within the facies were formed by return currents which swept the middle ramp creating such distal structures. Further toward the distal middle-ramp the return currents decreased in energy and discharged nutrients allowing the mesotrophic crustose coralline algal pavement to develop.

  11. Long-term legacy of massive carbon input to the Earth system: Anthropocene versus Eocene.

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    Zeebe, Richard E; Zachos, James C

    2013-10-28

    Over the next few centuries, with unabated emissions of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2), a total of 5000 Pg C may enter the atmosphere, causing CO2 concentrations to rise to approximately 2000 ppmv, global temperature to warm by more than 8(°)C and surface ocean pH to decline by approximately 0.7 units. A carbon release of this magnitude is unprecedented during the past 56 million years-and the outcome accordingly difficult to predict. In this regard, the geological record may provide foresight to how the Earth system will respond in the future. Here, we discuss the long-term legacy of massive carbon release into the Earth's surface reservoirs, comparing the Anthropocene with a past analogue, the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, approx. 56 Ma). We examine the natural processes and time scales of CO2 neutralization that determine the atmospheric lifetime of CO2 in response to carbon release. We compare the duration of carbon release during the Anthropocene versus PETM and the ensuing effects on ocean acidification and marine calcifying organisms. We also discuss the conundrum that the observed duration of the PETM appears to be much longer than predicted by models that use first-order assumptions. Finally, we comment on past and future mass extinctions and recovery times of biotic diversity.

  12. Constraints on ocean circulation at the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum from neodymium isotopes

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    A. N. Abbott

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Global warming during the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM ~55 million years ago (Ma coincided with a massive release of carbon to the ocean–atmosphere system, as indicated by carbon isotopic data. Previous studies have argued for a role for changing ocean circulation, possibly as a trigger or response to climatic changes. We use neodymium (Nd isotopic data to reconstruct short high-resolution records of deep-water circulation across the PETM. These records are derived by reductively leaching sediments from seven globally distributed sites and comparing data with published data from fossil fish debris to reconstruct past deep ocean circulation across the PETM. The Nd data for the leachates are interpreted to be consistent with previous studies that have used fish teeth and benthic foraminiferal δ13C to constrain regions of convection. There is some evidence from combining Nd isotope and δ13C records that the three major ocean basins may not have had substantial exchanges of deep waters. If the isotopic data are interpreted within this framework, then the observed pattern may be explained if the strength of overturning in each basin varied distinctly over the PETM, resulting in differences in deep-water aging gradients between basins. Results are consistent with published interpretations from proxy data and model simulations that suggest modulation of overturning circulation had an important role for global recovery of the ocean–atmosphere system after the PETM.

  13. Warm tropical sea surface temperatures in the Late Cretaceous and Eocene epochs.

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    Pearson, P N; Ditchfield, P W; Singano, J; Harcourt-Brown, K G; Nicholas, C J; Olsson, R K; Shackleton, N J; Hall, M A

    2001-10-04

    Climate models with increased levels of carbon dioxide predict that global warming causes heating in the tropics, but investigations of ancient climates based on palaeodata have generally indicated cool tropical temperatures during supposed greenhouse episodes. For example, in the Late Cretaceous and Eocene epochs there is abundant geological evidence for warm, mostly ice-free poles, but tropical sea surface temperatures are generally estimated to be only 15-23 degrees C, based on oxygen isotope palaeothermometry of surface-dwelling planktonic foraminifer shells. Here we question the validity of most such data on the grounds of poor preservation and diagenetic alteration. We present new data from exceptionally well preserved foraminifer shells extracted from impermeable clay-rich sediments, which indicate that for the intervals studied, tropical sea surface temperatures were at least 28-32 degrees C. These warm temperatures are more in line with our understanding of the geographical distributions of temperature-sensitive fossil organisms and the results of climate models with increased CO2 levels.

  14. The Paleocene - Eocene Thermal Maximum: Temperature and Ecology in the Tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieling, J.; Gebhardt, H.; Adekeye, O. A.; Akande, S. O.; Reichart, G. J.; Middelburg, J. J. B. M.; Schouten, S.; Huber, M.; Sluijs, A.

    2014-12-01

    Various records across the Paleocene - Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) have established approximately 5 °C of additional surface and deep ocean warming, superimposed on the already warm latest Paleocene. The PETM is further characterized by a global negative stable carbon isotope excursion (CIE), poleward migration of thermophilic biota, ocean acidification, increased weathering, photic zone euxinia and intensified hydrological cycle. Reconstructed temperatures for the PETM in mid and high-latitudes regularly exceed modern open marine tropical temperatures. Constraints on absolute tropical temperatures are, however, limited. We studied the PETM in a sediment section from the Nigerian sector of the Dahomey Basin, deposited on the shelf near the equator. We estimate sea surface temperatures by paired analyses of TEX86, and Mg/Ca and δ18O of foraminifera from the Shagamu Quarry. These show Palaeocene temperatures of ~33 °C and SSTs rose by 4 °C during the PETM based on TEX86. During the PETM, intermittent photic zone euxinia developed based on the presence of the biomarker isorenieratane. Interestingly, during peak warmth, dinoflagellate cyst abundances and diversity are remarkably low. From our new data and evidence from modern dinoflagellate experiments, we conclude that thermal stress was the main driver for this observation. We derive that endothermal and most ectothermal nektonic and planktonic marine eukaryotic organisms could not have lived in the surface waters in this part of the tropics during the PETM.

  15. Productivity feedback did not terminate the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM

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    A. Torfstein

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM occurred approximately 55 million years ago, and is one of the most dramatic abrupt global warming events in the geological record. This warming was triggered by the sudden release of thousands of gigatons of carbon into the atmosphere and is widely perceived to be the best analogue for current anthropogenic climate change. Yet, the mechanism of recovery from this event remains controversial. A massive increase in the intensity of the marine biological pump (''productivity feedback'' has been suggested to cause a drawdown of atmospheric CO2 and subsequent carbon sequestration in the ocean. A re-evaluation of the ''productivity feedback hypothesis'', based on biogenic barium mass accumulation rates (Ba-MARs for a site in the Southern Ocean, finds that any increase in export production lagged the initial carbon release by at least ~70 000 years. This implies that export production did not rapidly remove excess carbon from the atmosphere, and renders the most likely mechanism for carbon removal to be silicate weathering, at much slower rates than previously assumed.

  16. Halophilic archaea cultivated from surface sterilized middle-late eocene rock salt are polyploid.

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    Salla T Jaakkola

    Full Text Available Live bacteria and archaea have been isolated from several rock salt deposits of up to hundreds of millions of years of age from all around the world. A key factor affecting their longevity is the ability to keep their genomic DNA intact, for which efficient repair mechanisms are needed. Polyploid microbes are known to have an increased resistance towards mutations and DNA damage, and it has been suggested that microbes from deeply buried rock salt would carry several copies of their genomes. Here, cultivable halophilic microbes were isolated from a surface sterilized middle-late Eocene (38-41 million years ago rock salt sample, drilled from the depth of 800 m at Yunying salt mine, China. Eight unique isolates were obtained, which represented two haloarchaeal genera, Halobacterium and Halolamina. We used real-time PCR to show that our isolates are polyploid, with genome copy numbers of 11-14 genomes per cell in exponential growth phase. The ploidy level was slightly downregulated in stationary growth phase, but the cells still had an average genome copy number of 6-8. The polyploidy of halophilic archaea living in ancient rock salt might be a factor explaining how these organisms are able to overcome the challenge of prolonged survival during their entombment.

  17. Multi-proxy records of Eocene vegetation and climatic dynamics from North America

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    Sheldon, N. D.; Smith, S. Y.; Stromberg, C. A.; Hyland, E.; Miller, L. A.

    2010-12-01

    The Eocene is characterized by a “thermal maximum” in the early part, and a shift to “icehouse” conditions by the end of the epoch. Consequently, this is an interesting time to look at vegetation dynamics and understanding plant responses to environmental change, especially as refinement of global climate models is needed if we are to understand future climate change impacts. Paleobotanical evidence, such as phytoliths (plant silica bodies), and paleoenvironmental indicators, such as paleosols, offer an opportunity to study vegetation composition and dynamics in the absence of macrofossils on a variety of spatial and temporal scales. To examine the interaction between paleoclimatic/paleoenvironmental changes and paleovegetation changes, we will compare and contrast two well-dated, high-resolution, multi-proxy records from North America. The margins of the Green River Basin system during the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (53-50 Ma) are an extremely important location for understanding ecological composition and potential climatic drivers of North American floral diversification, because this area is widely considered the point of origin for many modern grass clades. We examined paleosols preserved in the fluvial, basin-margin Wasatch Formation preserved near South Pass, Wyoming. Field identification of the paleosols indicated a suite that includes Entisols, Inceptisols, and Alfisols. To reconstruct paleovegetation, pedogenic carbonates were analyzed isotopically, and samples were collected and extracted for phytoliths . By combining these paleobotanical proxies with quantitative climatic proxies on whole rock geochemistry, we will present an integrated vegetation-climate history of the EECO at the margins of the Green River Basin. Second, we will present high-resolution record of vegetation patterns based on phytoliths from a section of the Renova Formation, Timberhills region, Montana dated to 39.2 ± 3 Ma. The section is composed of Alfisols, Entisols

  18. Petrology and petrogenesis of the Eocene Volcanic rocks in Yildizeli area (Sivas), Central Anatolia, Turkey

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    Doğa Topbay, C.; Karacık, Zekiye; Genç, S. Can; Göçmengil, Gönenç

    2015-04-01

    Yıldızeli region to the south of İzmir Ankara Erzincan suture zone is situated on the large Sivas Tertiary sedimentary basin. After the northern branch of the Neotethyan Ocean was northerly consumed beneath the Sakarya Continent, a continent - continent collision occurred between the Anatolide- Tauride platform and Pontides and followed a severe intermediate magmatism during the Late Cretaceous- Tertiary period. This created an east-west trending volcanic belt along the whole Pontide range. In the previous studies different models are suggested for the Eocene volcanic succession such as post-collisional, delamination and slab-breakoff models as well as the arc model for its westernmost parts. We will present our field and geochemical data obtained from the Yıldızeli and its surroundings for its petrogenesis, and will discuss the tectonic model(s) on the basis of their geochemical/petrological aspects. Cenozoic volcanic sequences of Yıldızeli region which is the main subject of this study, overlie Pre-Mesozoic crustal meta-sedimentary group of Kırşehir Massif, Ophiolitic mélange and Cretaceous- Paleocene? flysch-like sequences. In the northern part of Yıldızeli region, north vergent thrust fault trending E-W seperates the ophiolitic mélange complex from the Upper Cretaceous-Paleocene and Tertiary formations. Volcano-sedimentary units, Eocene in age, of the Yıldızeli (Sivas-Turkey) which are intercalated with sedimentary deposits related to the collision of Anatolide-Tauride and a simultaneous volcanic activity (i.e. the Yıldızeli volcanics), exposed throughout a wide zone along E-W orientation. Yıldızeli volcanics consist of basalts, basaltic-andesites and andesitic lavas intercalated flow breccias and epiclastic, pyroclastic deposits. Basaltic andesite lavas contain Ca-rich plagioclase + clinopyroxene ± olivine with minor amounts of opaque minerals in a matrix comprised of microlites and glass; andesitic lavas are generally contain Ca

  19. Palaeoskapha sichuanensis gen. Et sp. Nov. (Menispermaceae) from the Eocene Relu Formation in western Sichuan, West China%Palaeoskapha sichuanensis gen. et sp. nov. (Menispermaceae) from the Eocene Relu Formation in western Sichuan, West China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Frédéric M. B. JACQUES; GUO Shuang-Xing

    2007-01-01

    Palaeoskapha sichuanensis gen. et sp. nov. of Menispermaceae is described here for the first time based on a well preserved fossil fruit. The specimen was found in the Relu Formation of western Sichuan, West China. The specimen, straight, boat-shaped endocarp with large ventral condyle, clearly belongs to the tribe Tinosporeae. The wide aperture of the double condyle, combined with a whole shape not deeply invaginated, indicates a genus different from what was already known to science for this tribe. This fossil widens the distribution of the tribe during Eocene from North America and Europe to Asia, where it was formerly unknown.

  20. Transition of Eocene whales from land to sea: evidence from bone microstructure.

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    Alexandra Houssaye

    Full Text Available Cetacea are secondarily aquatic amniotes that underwent their land-to-sea transition during the Eocene. Primitive forms, called archaeocetes, include five families with distinct degrees of adaptation to an aquatic life, swimming mode and abilities that remain difficult to estimate. The lifestyle of early cetaceans is investigated by analysis of microanatomical features in postcranial elements of archaeocetes. We document the internal structure of long bones, ribs and vertebrae in fifteen specimens belonging to the three more derived archaeocete families--Remingtonocetidae, Protocetidae, and Basilosauridae--using microtomography and virtual thin-sectioning. This enables us to discuss the osseous specializations observed in these taxa and to comment on their possible swimming behavior. All these taxa display bone mass increase (BMI in their ribs, which lack an open medullary cavity, and in their femora, whereas their vertebrae are essentially spongious. Humeri and femora show opposite trends in microanatomical specialization in the progressive independence of cetaceans from a terrestrial environment. Humeri change from very compact to spongious, which is in accordance with the progressive loss of propulsive role for the forelimbs, which were used instead for steering and stabilizing. Conversely, hind-limbs in basilosaurids became strongly reduced with no involvement in locomotion but display strong osteosclerosis in the femora. Our study confirms that Remingtonocetidae and Protocetidae were almost exclusively aquatic in locomotion for the taxa sampled, which probably were shallow water suspended swimmers. Basilosaurids display osseous specializations similar to those of modern cetaceans and are considered more active open-sea swimmers. This study highlights the strong need for homologous sections in comparative microanatomical studies, and the importance of combining information from several bones of the same taxon for improved functional

  1. Transition of Eocene whales from land to sea: evidence from bone microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houssaye, Alexandra; Tafforeau, Paul; de Muizon, Christian; Gingerich, Philip D

    2015-01-01

    Cetacea are secondarily aquatic amniotes that underwent their land-to-sea transition during the Eocene. Primitive forms, called archaeocetes, include five families with distinct degrees of adaptation to an aquatic life, swimming mode and abilities that remain difficult to estimate. The lifestyle of early cetaceans is investigated by analysis of microanatomical features in postcranial elements of archaeocetes. We document the internal structure of long bones, ribs and vertebrae in fifteen specimens belonging to the three more derived archaeocete families--Remingtonocetidae, Protocetidae, and Basilosauridae--using microtomography and virtual thin-sectioning. This enables us to discuss the osseous specializations observed in these taxa and to comment on their possible swimming behavior. All these taxa display bone mass increase (BMI) in their ribs, which lack an open medullary cavity, and in their femora, whereas their vertebrae are essentially spongious. Humeri and femora show opposite trends in microanatomical specialization in the progressive independence of cetaceans from a terrestrial environment. Humeri change from very compact to spongious, which is in accordance with the progressive loss of propulsive role for the forelimbs, which were used instead for steering and stabilizing. Conversely, hind-limbs in basilosaurids became strongly reduced with no involvement in locomotion but display strong osteosclerosis in the femora. Our study confirms that Remingtonocetidae and Protocetidae were almost exclusively aquatic in locomotion for the taxa sampled, which probably were shallow water suspended swimmers. Basilosaurids display osseous specializations similar to those of modern cetaceans and are considered more active open-sea swimmers. This study highlights the strong need for homologous sections in comparative microanatomical studies, and the importance of combining information from several bones of the same taxon for improved functional interpretation.

  2. Synchronizing terrestrial and marine records of environmental change across the Eocene-Oligocene transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahy, Diana; Condon, Daniel J.; Terry, Dennis O.; Fischer, Anne U.; Kuiper, Klaudia F.

    2015-10-01

    Records of terrestrial environmental change indicate that continental cooling and/or aridification may have predated the greenhouse-icehouse climate shift at the Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT) by ca. 600 kyr. In North America, marine-terrestrial environmental change asynchronicity is inferred from a direct comparison between the astronomically tuned marine EOT record and published 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of volcanic tuffs from the White River Group (WRG) sampled at Flagstaff Rim (Wyoming) and Toadstool Geologic Park (Nebraska), which are type sections for the Chadronian and Orellan North American Land Mammal Ages. We present a new age-model for the WRG, underpinned by high-precision 206Pb/238U zircon dates from 15 volcanic tuffs, including six tuffs previously dated using the 40Ar/39Ar technique. Weighted mean zircon 206Pb/238U dates from this study are up to 1.0 Myr younger than published anorthoclase and biotite 40Ar/39Ar data (calibrated relative to Fish Canyon sanidine at 28.201 Ma). Giving consideration to the complexities, strengths, and limitations associated with both the 40Ar/39Ar and 206Pb/238U datasets, our interpretation is that the recalculated 40Ar/39Ar dates are anomalously old, and the 206Pb/238U (zircon) dates more accurately constrain deposition. 206Pb/238U calibrated age-depth models were developed in order to facilitate a robust intercomparison between marine and terrestrial archives of environmental change, and indicate that: (i) early Orellan (terrestrial) cooling recorded at Toadstool Geologic Park was synchronous with the onset of early Oligocene Antarctic glaciation and (ii) the last appearance datums of key Chadronian mammal taxa are diachronous by ca. 0.7 Myr between central Wyoming and NW Nebraska.

  3. Strata-bound Dolomitization in the Eocene Laki Formation, Matyaro Jabal Area Lakhi Range, Sindh, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Waseem Khan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The limestone of Eocene age Laki Formation of Matyaro Jabal area, Lakhi Range SindhPakistan has been studied to see different sedimentary features and diagenetic overprinting. The most diagnostic diagenetic feature of the Laki Formation is the formation of strata bound dolostone over extensive area. The dolostone beds which are separated by non-dolomitic limestone have developed at three different stratigraphic levels whose thickness vary from few centimeters to about 5 meters. Interbedded non dolomitic limestone is characterized by highly fossiliferous to less fossiliferous white chalky limestone with significant secondary porosity. The dolostone beds make lower erosional contact with chalky limestone while upper contact is sharp as well as transitional. The dolostone beds are very hard to soft with well developed dissolution cavities and karstification horizons. As a result of dolostone formation, the primary sedimentary features of rock fabrics and bioclasts are poorly preserved. However, few bioclastic grains show partial preservation with enhanced dissolution and biomoldic porosity. Dolomitization and different porosity types such as; intragranular, vuggy, molidic, intercrystalline, fracture and fenestral have made the limestone of Laki Formation as potential hydrocarbon reservoir rock. The mechanism of stratabound dolostone formation within Laki Formation is due to the mixing of seawater and fresh water with optimum Mg:Ca ratio. The Mg rich sea-water circulated through highly porous and permeable strata which was responsible for stratabound dolostone formation in the Laki Formation. The extrinsic factors such as sea level fluctuations and tectonics also played a vital role for dissolution along with porosity and permeability enhancement followed by dolomitization.

  4. Testing orbital forcing in the Eocene deltaic sequences of the South-Pyrenean Foreland Basins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcés, Miguel; López-Blanco, Miguel; Valero, Luis; Beamud, Elisabet; Pueyo-Morer, Emilio; Rodríguez-Pinto, Adriana

    2014-05-01

    Paleoclimate proxy records from marine pelagic sediments show that a link exists between long-period orbital cyclicity and the pattern of high latitude glaciations. Thus, a sound possibility exist that transgressive-regressive third-order sequences from shallow marine environments reflect long-period orbital (glacioeustatic) forcing, as suggested from a variety of shallow marine settings of different ages, from Mesozoic to Paleogene. In this study we aim at testing the role of the 400 kyr eccentricity cycle in the sequential organization of the Late Eocene deltaic sequences of the Belsue-Atares Formation, in the Jaca-Pamplona Basin. The overall record spans from latest Lutetian to early Priabonian and consists of nearly 1000 meters of siliciclastic deltaic to mixed platform sequences of various scales. Very notorious lateral changes in both stratigraphic thickness and sedimentary facies witness the synkinematic character of these sediments, deposited simultaneously to intrabasinal fold growth. A magnetostratigraphy based chronostratigraphic framework is used, first, to determine the age and duration of the sequences and, second, to establish a robust correlation with other deltaic sequences within the south-pyrenean foreland. The long-distance correlation exercise is used to discriminate between local (tectonic) and global (climatic) forcing factors, under the assumption that climate signature is synchronous, while tectonic forcing is prone to yield diachronic units at basin scale. Astronomical tuning with the 400-kyr cycle of the eccentricity solution of the Earth orbit is attempted on the basis of derived magnetostratigraphic age constrains. Our results suggest that transgressive (regressive) trends correlate with maxima (minima) of eccentricity cycle, a phase-relationship which is compatible with a base-level (accommodation) driven forcing.

  5. Milankovitch Modulated Eocene Growth Strata From the Jaca Piggyback Basin, Spanish Pyrenees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasio, D. J.; Hinnov, L. A.; Newton, M. L.; Kodama, K. P.

    2005-12-01

    New stratigraphic and rock magnetic data from the southern margin of the Jaca basin, Spanish Pyrenees, shows evidence of Eocene sedimentary cycles modulated by the climatic effects of Milankovitch orbital forcing. Tectonic processes simultaneously controlled larger-scale stratigraphic sequences and overall wedge-top basin development. Within the context of existing magnetostratigraphy, we described 1 km of marine basinal and prodeltaic rocks near Pico del Aguila, a large-scale synsedimentary fold, and collected samples every ~4krs for ~4myrs for lithologic and rock magnetic analysis. In magnetochrons C17r, C18n.1n, and C18n.1r (1.27myrs) anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM) variations occur with strong hierarchical bundling patterns suggestive of precession-scale cycles grouped into 100 kyr eccentricity cycles, and "super bundled" into 400 kyr eccentricity cycles. This pattern was exploited to construct an "eccentricity time scale" for the series producing a minimally tuned time series that is 1.3 myrs in duration; comparing well with the magnetochron calibration. Spectral analysis of this ARM time series shows that the 100-kyr tuning has aligned power into all of the principal orbital frequency bands: long eccentricity (1/(400 kyrs)), obliquity (1/(40.4 kyrs)), long precession (1/(24.4 kyrs)), and short precession (1/(20 kyrs)). Lithologic data, including bed thickness and grain size also shows high frequency periodicity we attribute to precessional forcing. ARM variations may result from climate modulated carbonate production or more likely, variable detrital inputs such as atmospheric dust (varying wind intensity or aridity) or watershed erosion (runoff variation) rather than diagenetic sources. The Milankovitch based chronology within the growth stratigraphy was then used to calculate deformation rates. Tilt rates of 9 degrees / myr for folding are comparable to other studies in which deformation was averaged over more time. We show that Milankovitch

  6. Oceanic mafic magmatism in the Siletz terrane, NW North America: Fragments of an Eocene oceanic plateau?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Bethan A.; Kerr, Andrew C.; Mullen, Emily K.; Weis, Dominique

    2017-03-01

    The Siletz terrane, a predominantly mafic accreted oceanic terrane, is located in the Cascadia forearc region of Oregon, Washington and Vancouver Island. The terrane represents a late Palaeocene-Eocene large igneous province that consists of pillow lavas, massive flows and intrusive sheets. Previously it has been proposed that the Siletz terrane represents either an accreted oceanic plateau, hotspot island chain, backarc basin, island arc, or a sequence of slab window volcanics. A province-wide geochemical reassessment of the terrane, including new high precision Sr-Pb-Nd-Hf isotope data, has been used to assess the validity of the proposed tectonomagmatic models for the Siletz terrane. The trace element data show little evidence of crustal contamination, or an arc signature, and the samples have rare earth element (REE) patterns that are flat to light REE enriched. These features are similar to other oceanic plateaus such as the Ontong Java and the Caribbean. Initial isotope ratios range from 206Pb/204 Pb: 18.751 to 19.668, 207Pb/204Pb: 15.507 to 15.661, 208Pb/204Pb: 38.294 to 39.2128, 176Hf/177Hf: 0.28300 to 0.28316 (εHf: 9.0 to 14.5), 143Nd/144Nd: 0.51282 to 0.51299 (εNd: 5.0 to 8.1) and 87Sr/86Sr: 0.70302 to 0.70380. These data are consistent with a mantle source of the Siletz terrane that appears to have been heterogeneous and slightly enriched. The enriched signature has characteristics of both EM2 and HIMU components and this, combined with a calculated mantle potential temperature well above ambient mantle, indicates derivation of the Siletz magmatism from a mantle plume, possibly the Yellowstone Hotspot. We therefore conclude that the Siletz terrane represents an accreted oceanic plateau.

  7. Osteology of Icadyptes salasi, a giant penguin from the Eocene of Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksepka, Daniel T; Clarke, Julia A; DeVries, Thomas J; Urbina, Mario

    2008-08-01

    We present the first detailed description of the giant Eocene penguin Icadyptes salasi. The species is characterized by a narrow skull with a hyper-elongate spear-like beak, a robust cervical column and a powerful flipper. The bony beak tip of Icadyptes is formed by fusion of several elements and is unique among penguins, differing markedly from previously described giant penguin beaks. Vascular canal patterning similar to that of boobies, frigatebirds and albatrosses suggests I. salasi may have had a thin, sheet-like rhamphotheca unlike the thick rugose rhamphotheca of modern penguins. Together, these features suggest a novel ecology for I. salasi, most likely involving the capture of larger prey items via spearing. As the first described giant penguin specimen to preserve a complete wing skeleton, the I. salasi holotype yields significant insight into the shape, proportions and orientation of the wing in giant penguins. In articulation, the forelimb of I. salasi is straighter, permitting less manus and antibrachium flexion, than previous depictions of giant penguin wings. Cross-sections of the humerus and ulna reveal a level of osteosclerosis equalling or surpassing that of extant penguins. Based on ontogenetic data from extant penguins and the morphology of the carpometacarpus of I. salasi, we infer the retention of a free alular phalanx in basal penguins. Previously, the status of this element in penguins was disputed. Differences in the proportions of the manual phalanges contribute to a more abruptly tapering wingtip in I. salasi compared with crown penguins. Fossils from Peru, including the I. salasi holotype specimen, document that penguins expanded to nearly the whole of their extant latitudinal range early in their evolutionary history and during one of the warmest intervals in the Cenozoic.

  8. A middle Eocene mesoeucrocodylian (Crocodyliformes) from the Kaninah Formation, Republic of Yemen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Nancy J.; Hill, Robert V.; Al-Wosabi, Mohammed; Schulp, Anne; As-Saruri, Mustafa; Al-Nimey, Fuad; Jolley, Lea Ann; Schulp-Stuip, Yvonne; O'Connor, Patrick

    2013-09-01

    During the Cenozoic, the Arabian Plate separated from continental Africa and assumed a closer geographical relationship with Eurasia. As such, the vertebrate fossil record of the Arabian Peninsula has great potential for documenting faunal interchanges that occurred as a result of such tectonic events, with a shift from a primarily Afro-Arabian fauna in the Palaeogene to a more cosmopolitan fauna in the Neogene. Understanding of the sequence and timing of this faunal interchange has long been hampered by a lack of palaeontological data. Recently recovered fossils from the Middle Eocene Kaninah Formation of Yemen constitute the earliest Palaeogene record of continental vertebrates from the Arabian Peninsula, thereby offering a rare glimpse at the region's post- -Cretaceous fauna. Here we describe fossil materials from the Kaninah Formation, a collection of dental and postcranial elements representing a mesoeucrocodylian crocodyliform of unclear affinities. The specimen exhibits ziphodont tooth morphology along with a biserial paravertebral shield and polygonal gastral osteoderms, consistent with certain mesoeucrocodylians (e.g., ziphodontan notosuchians). Yet the associated fragmentary anterior caudal vertebra, although badly abraded, preserves morphology suggestive of procoely. This vertebral type in combination with the dental and osteoderm morphology is much more taxonomically restrictive and consistent with the suite of characters exhibited by atoposaurids, a finding that would significantly extend that clade through the Cretaceous/Palaeogene boundary. Alternatively, given the relative paucity of information from the region during the Palaeogene, the combination of characteristics of the Kaninah crocodyliform may reflect a novel or poorly known form exhibiting previously unrecognised character mosaicism. We take a conservative approach, and refer the Kaninah specimen to Mesoeucrocodylia, Atoposauridae (?) pending discovery of more complete material. New fossils

  9. Evidence of Late Palaeocene-Early Eocene equatorial rain forest refugia in southern Western Ghats, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Prasad; A Farooqui; S K M Tripathi; R Garg; B Thakur

    2009-11-01

    Equatorial rain forests that maintain a balance between speciation and extinction are hot-spots for studies of biodiversity. Western Ghats in southern India have gained attention due to high tropical biodiversity and endemism in their southern most area. We attempted to track the affinities of the pollen flora of the endemic plants of Western Ghat area within the fossil palynoflora of late Palaeocene-early Eocene (∼55–50 Ma) sedimentary deposits of western and northeastern Indian region. The study shows striking similarity of extant pollen with twenty eight most common fossil pollen taxa of the early Palaeogene. Widespread occurrences of coal and lignite deposits during early Palaeogene provide evidence of existence of well diversified rain forest community and swampy vegetation in the coastal low lying areas all along the western and northeastern margins of the Indian subcontinent. Prevalence of excessive humid climate during this period has been seen as a result of equatorial positioning of Indian subcontinent, superimposed by a long term global warming phase (PETM and EECO) during the early Palaeogene. The study presents clear evidence that highly diversified equatorial rain forest vegetation once widespread in the Indian subcontinent during early Palaeogene times, are now restricted in a small area as a refugia in the southernmost part of the Western Ghat area. High precipitation and shorter periods of dry months seem to have provided suitable environment to sustain lineages of ancient tropical vegetation in this area of Western Ghats in spite of dramatic climatic changes subsequent to the post India-Asia collision and during the Quaternary and Recent times.

  10. Late Cretaceous-early Eocene counterclockwise rotation of the Fueguian Andes and evolution of the Patagonia-Antarctic Peninsula system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poblete, F.; Roperch, P.; Arriagada, C.; Ruffet, G.; Ramírez de Arellano, C.; Hervé, F.; Poujol, M.

    2016-02-01

    The southernmost Andes of Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego present a prominent arc-shaped structure: the Patagonian Bend. Whether the bending is a primary curvature or an orocline is still matter of controversy. New paleomagnetic data have been obtained south of the Beagle Channel in 39 out of 61 sites. They have been drilled in Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous sediments and interbedded volcanics and in mid-Cretaceous to Eocene intrusives of the Fuegian Batholith. The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility was measured at each site and the influence of magnetic fabric on the characteristic remanent magnetizations (ChRM) in plutonic rocks was corrected using inverse tensors of anisotropy of remanent magnetizations. Normal polarity secondary magnetizations with west-directed declination were obtained in the sediments and they did not pass the fold test. These characteristic directions are similar to those recorded by mid Cretaceous intrusives suggesting a remagnetization event during the normal Cretaceous superchron and describe a large (> 90°) counterclockwise rotation. Late Cretaceous to Eocene rocks of the Fueguian Batholith, record decreasing counterclockwise rotations of 45° to 30°. These paleomagnetic results are interpreted as evidence of a large counterclockwise rotation of the Fueguian Andes related to the closure of the Rocas Verdes Basin and the formation of the Darwin Cordillera during the Late Cretaceous and Paleocene. The tectonic evolution of the Patagonian Bend can thus be described as the formation of a progressive arc from an oroclinal stage during the closure of the Rocas Verdes basin to a mainly primary arc during the final stages of deformation of the Magallanes fold and thrust belt. Plate reconstructions show that the Antarctic Peninsula would have formed a continuous margin with Patagonia between the Early Cretaceous and the Eocene, and acted as a non-rotational rigid block facilitating the development of the Patagonian Bend.

  11. The Paleocene Eocene carbon isotope excursion in higher plant organic matter: Differential fractionation of angiosperms and conifers in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Stefan; Woltering, Martijn; Rijpstra, W. Irene C.; Sluijs, Appy; Brinkhuis, Henk; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2007-06-01

    A study of upper Paleocene-lower Eocene (P-E) sediments deposited on the Lomonosov Ridge in the central Arctic Ocean reveals relatively high abundances of terrestrial biomarkers. These include dehydroabietane and simonellite derived from conifers (gymnosperms) and a tetra-aromatic triterpenoid derived from angiosperms. The relative percentage of the angiosperm biomarker of the summed angiosperm + conifer biomarkers was increased at the end of the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM), different when observed with pollen counts which showed a relative decrease in angiosperm pollen. Stable carbon isotopic analysis of these biomarkers shows that the negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) during the PETM amounts to 3‰ for both conifer biomarkers, dehydroabietane and simonellite, comparable to the magnitude of the CIE inferred from marine carbonates, but significantly lower than the 4.5‰ of the terrestrial C 29n-alkane [M. Pagani, N. Pedentchouk, M. Huber, A. Sluijs, S. Schouten, H. Brinkhuis, J.S. Sinninghe Damsté, G.R. Dickens, and the IODP Expedition 302 Expedition Scientists (2006), Arctic's hydrology during global warming at the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum. Nature, 442, 671-675.], which is a compound sourced by both conifers and angiosperms. Conspicuously, the angiosperm-sourced aromatic triterpane shows a much larger CIE of 6‰ and suggests that angiosperms increased in their carbon isotopic fractionation during the PETM. Our results thus indicate that the 4.5‰ C 29n-alkane CIE reported previously represents the average CIE of conifers and angiosperms at this site and suggest that the large and variable CIE observed in terrestrial records may be partly explained by the variable contributions of conifers and angiosperms. The differential response in isotopic fractionation of angiosperms and conifers points to different physiological responses of these vegetation types to the rise in temperature, humidity, and greenhouse gases during the PETM.

  12. New early Eocene vertebrate assemblage from western India reveals a mixed fauna of European and Gondwana affinities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thierry Smith; Kishor Kumar; Rajendra S. Rana; Annelise Folie; Floréal Solé; Corentin Noiret; Thomas Steeman; Ashok Sahni; Kenneth D. Rose

    2016-01-01

    The Ypresian Cambay Shale Formation at Vastan and Mangrol lignite mines in Gujarat, western India, has yielded a rich vertebrate fauna with numerous taxa of European affinities. Here we report a new, approximately contemporary vertebrate assemblage from two fossiliferous layers in the nearby mine of Tadkeshwar. These layers have yielded a similar mammal fauna with the co-occurrence of the perissodactyl-like cambaytheriid Cambaytherium thewissi, the adapoid primates Marcgodinotius indicus and cf. Asiadapis cambayensis, and the hyaenodontid Indohyaenodon raoi. The presence of these species in both Vastan and Tadkeshwar mines and at different levels suggests that the deposits between the two major lignite seams represent a single land mammal age. Apart from the aforementioned species there is a new, smaller species of Cambaytherium, and a new genus and species of esthonychid tillodont. This fauna also contains the first large early Eocene vertebrates from India, including an unidentified Cor-yphodon-like pantodont, a dyrosaurid crocodyliform and a new giant madtsoiid snake. Among the Tadkeshwar vertebrates several taxa are of Gondwana affinities, such as Pelomedusoides turtles, dyr-osaurids, and large madtsoiids, attesting that the early Eocene was a crucial period in India during which Laurasian taxa of European affinities co-existed with relict taxa from Gondwana before the India-Asia collision. Our results suggest that terrestrial faunas could have dispersed to or from Europe during ep-isodes of contact between the Indian subcontinent and different island blocks along the northern margin of the Neotethys, such as the KohistaneLadakh island-arc system. Gondwana taxa might represent remnants of ghost lineages shared with Madagascar, which reached the Indian subcontinent during the late Cretaceous; alternatively they might have come from North Africa and passed along the southern margin of the Neotethys to reach the Indian subcontinent. These dispersals would have

  13. Late Eocene clay boron-derived paleosalinity in the Qaidam Basin and its implications for regional tectonics and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chengcheng; Yang, Yibo; Fang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Weilin

    2016-12-01

    The Qaidam Basin, located on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau and containing Cenozoic sediments with a maximum thickness of 12,000 m, is an ideal place to study the phased uplift of the NE Tibetan Plateau and regional climate change. The estimation of the paleosalinity of sedimentary environments not only helps to evaluate the evolution of lakes in this region but offers insights into contemporaneous climate change. We present detailed geochemical and mineralogical investigations from the lacustrine interval of the Hongliugou section in the northern Qaidam Basin to reconstruct salinity fluctuations in the paleolake during the late Eocene era ( 42.0-35.5 Ma). The clay mineral assemblages mainly contain smectite, illite, chlorite, kaolinite and irregular illite/smectite mixed layers. Clay boron-derived paleosalinity estimates (equivalent boron content, Couch's paleosalimeter and B/Ga ratios) along with other proxies sensitive to salinity changes (e.g., Rb/K ratios and ostracod assemblages) collectively indicate an overall brackish sedimentary environment with a higher-salinity period at approximately 40.0-39.2 Ma. This higher-salinity period indicates a more arid environment and is probably related to global cooling. However, the global cooling in late Eocene cannot explain the overall stable long-term salinity pattern, implying that other factors exist. We propose that the migration of the Yiliping depression depocenter in the northern Qaidam and increased orographic rainfall induced by late Eocene tectonic activity at the northern margin of the basin might have partly offset the increase in salinity driven by global cooling.

  14. Timing of cut-and-fill sequences in the John Day Formation (Eocene-Oligocene), Painted Hills area, central Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bestland, E.A.; Retallack, G.J. (Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences); Swisher, C.C. III (Inst. of Human Origins, Berkeley, CA (United States)); Fremd, T.J. (John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, John Day, OR (United States))

    1993-04-01

    Large-scale cut-and-fill features in the Eocene-Oligocene part of the John Day Formation in the Pained Hills area of central Oregon can be interpreted as terrestrial depositional sequences, mapped as lithostratigraphic units, and correlated to North American Land Mammal Ages (NALMA). New laser-fusion 40Ar/39Ar single-crystal ages from the John Day Formation provide evidence for the timing of these sequences and a revised placement of the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. The sequences are bound by erosional surfaces that have relief of up to 60 m, are marked in places by claystone breccias full of reworked soil clasts, and separate otherwise conformable strata. The lowermost depositional sequence in the John Day Formation contains very well developed, Fe- and Al-rich paleosols, laterite horizons, and the welded tuff of member A (39.7 my), and probably correlates to the Duchesean and Chadronian NALMA. These brick-rid claystones are sharply truncated by prominent detrital laterite horizon. Overlying this basal sequence is a second sequence of much less well developed paleosols, abundant tuffs and lacustrine tuffaceous claystones. This sequence contains a distinctive biotite tuff (33 my) and the type locality of the Bridge Creek fossil flora and probably correlates to the Orellan NALMA. Above this biotite tuff are alternating red, dark gray, and tan paleosols and a prominent crystal vitric tuff (32.7 my). The Eocene-Oligocene boundary lies between these two sequences, associated with the laterite horizon that truncates the basal red beds. A major truncation surface cuts this sequence and is overlain by a third sequence of thin red paleosols which probably correlates with the Whitneyan NALMA. Above this is a fourth sequence (Arikareean NALMA) consisting of greenish-tan paleosols, a crystal vitric tuff near its base (29.8 my) and the Picture Gorge Ignimbrite (28.7 my).

  15. Lacustrine 87Sr/86Sr as a tracer to reconstruct Milankovitch forcing of the Eocene hydrologic cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddouh, M'bark; Meyers, Stephen R.; Carroll, Alan R.; Beard, Brian L.; Johnson, Clark M.

    2016-08-01

    The Green River Formation (GRF) provides one of the premier paleoclimate archives of the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (∼50 Ma), representing the apex of the early Cenozoic greenhouse climate. Rhythmic lake-level variability expressed in the GRF has inspired numerous hypotheses for the behavior of the Eocene hydrologic cycle, including its linkage to astronomical forcing, solar variability, and the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). However, the lack of sufficient proxy data to document atmospheric water-mass transport and the geographic pattern of evaporation/precipitation/runoff has made it difficult to discriminate between different models for astronomical forcing. Variable 87Sr/86Sr ratios of bedrock that encompass the GRF provide an opportunity to reconstruct the spatial expression of the Eocene hydrologic cycle and its linkage to lake level. Here Sr isotope data from the Wilkins Peak Member, a rhythmic succession that has been demonstrated to record Milankovitch forcing of lake levels, indicate that high lake levels reflect an increased proportion of runoff from less radiogenic rocks west of the basin, eliminating a number of the existing astronomical-forcing hypotheses. The 87Sr/86Sr variability is consistent with a change in mean ENSO state, which is predicted by climate models to be linked to orbital-insolation. Thus, the 87Sr/86Sr data reveal a coupling of high frequency (ENSO) and low frequency (astronomical) climate variability, and also predict the existence of sizable astronomically-forced alpine snowpack during the last greenhouse climate. More broadly, this study demonstrates the utility of 87Sr/86Sr as a powerful tool for reconstructing the deep-time hydrologic cycle.

  16. New early Eocene vertebrate assemblage from western India reveals a mixed fauna of European and Gondwana affinities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Smith

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Ypresian Cambay Shale Formation at Vastan and Mangrol lignite mines in Gujarat, western India, has yielded a rich vertebrate fauna with numerous taxa of European affinities. Here we report a new, approximately contemporary vertebrate assemblage from two fossiliferous layers in the nearby mine of Tadkeshwar. These layers have yielded a similar mammal fauna with the co-occurrence of the perissodactyl-like cambaytheriid Cambaytherium thewissi, the adapoid primates Marcgodinotius indicus and cf. Asiadapis cambayensis, and the hyaenodontid Indohyaenodon raoi. The presence of these species in both Vastan and Tadkeshwar mines and at different levels suggests that the deposits between the two major lignite seams represent a single land mammal age. Apart from the aforementioned species there is a new, smaller species of Cambaytherium, and a new genus and species of esthonychid tillodont. This fauna also contains the first large early Eocene vertebrates from India, including an unidentified Coryphodon-like pantodont, a dyrosaurid crocodyliform and a new giant madtsoiid snake. Among the Tadkeshwar vertebrates several taxa are of Gondwana affinities, such as Pelomedusoides turtles, dyrosaurids, and large madtsoiids, attesting that the early Eocene was a crucial period in India during which Laurasian taxa of European affinities co-existed with relict taxa from Gondwana before the India-Asia collision. Our results suggest that terrestrial faunas could have dispersed to or from Europe during episodes of contact between the Indian subcontinent and different island blocks along the northern margin of the Neotethys, such as the Kohistan–Ladakh island-arc system. Gondwana taxa might represent remnants of ghost lineages shared with Madagascar, which reached the Indian subcontinent during the late Cretaceous; alternatively they might have come from North Africa and passed along the southern margin of the Neotethys to reach the Indian subcontinent. These

  17. Neotropical eocene coastal floras and [sup 18]O/[sup 16]O-estimated warmer vs. cooler equatorial waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, A. (Kent State Univ., OH (United States))

    1994-03-01

    The history of the earth's sea-surface temperature (SST) in equatorial regions during the Tertiary is unsettled because of uncertainty as to the presence and extent of glaciers during the Paleogene. The [sup 16]O trapped in glaciers and subsequently released back to the ocean basins as meltwater during interglacials affects the [sup 18]O/[sup 16]O ratio of sea water, one of the variables that must be known for oxygen isotope paleotemperature analysis of calcareous fossils. Estimates of SST range from [approximately]18 to 20 C, assuming an ice-free earth, to [approximately]28 C assuming glaciers were present in the Paleogene. Low latitude SST presently averages 28C, so the former estimate gives a value 8 to 10 C cooler than present, while the latter gives a value as warm or slightly warmer than present. The figures are important for interpreting terrestrial vegetational history because the temperature differential between low and high latitudes is a major factor in determining global climates through the control of poleward transfer of heat. The middle( ) to late Eocene Gatuncillo Formation palynoflora of Panama was deposited at the ocean-continental interface at [approximately]9[degrees]N latitude. The individual components and paleocommunities are distinctly tropical and similar to the present vegetation along the Atlantic coast of southern Central America. This is consistent with data emerging from other recently studied tropical coastal biotas and represents a contribution from paleobiology toward eventually resolving the problem of Eocene equatorial marine environments. Collectively, the evidence is beginning to favor a model of Eocene SST near present values. 50 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  18. Deep-sea ecosystem response to the Middle Eocene Climate Optimum (MECO) in the North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunzel, Dorothea; Schmiedl, Gerhard; Friedrich, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the benthic foraminiferal diversity and species composition from North Atlantic IODP Site U1408 in order to document changes in deep-water circulation and organic matter fluxes across the Middle Eocene Climate Optimum (MECO). Site U1408 was drilled at a present water depth of 3022 m southeast of the coast of Newfoundland. The benthic foraminiferal faunas are characterized by generally high species diversity suggesting favorable environmental conditions throughout the studied interval. Among a total of 193 benthic foraminiferal taxa the most dominant genera include Nuttallides, Oridorsalis, Cibicidoides, Pullenia, Anomalinoides, Globocassidulina and Gyroidinoides. Increased abundances of elongate-cylindrical infaunal species suggest approximately 460 ka duration of the MECO (from around 40.19 to 39.73 Ma) and the presence of slightly less ventilated bottom waters and elevated food availability during this time interval. The duration of the MECO also coincides with the presence of the planktonic foraminifer Orbulinoides beckmanni, which therefore is used as an Eocene biostratigraphy marker defining the end of the warm interval with its Last Appearance Datum. Changes in the benthic foraminiferal fauna probably reflect the onset of deep-water formation in the northern North Atlantic Ocean as response to the long-term climatic cooling trend of the middle Eocene. The intensification of deep-water currents and increased influence of cold and well-ventilated deep-water masses is reflected by increased importance of the Nuttallides truempyi-fauna. Superimposed on this long-term faunal trend are changes in the distribution of Globocassidulina subglobosa at a period of approximately 200 ka suggesting an eccentricity forcing of deep-water formation and associated food quality at the sea floor.

  19. Integrating South Pacific carbon cycling and climate history from Late Paleocene to Middle Eocene: an upper slope transect from eastern New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotnick, B. S.; Dickens, G. R.; Hollis, C. J.; Crampton, J. S.; Strong, C.; Zachos, J. C.; Hines, B. R.; Philips, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Late Paleocene to Middle Eocene was characterized by prominent variations in global carbon cycling, which operated on both long (>10e6) and short (CIEs) occur through this interval, although it is not clear if they are hyperthermals. In addition, strata from the late Early Eocene has lower carbonate contents than were measured in beds that span the numerous yet distinct clay-rich Early Eocene hyperthermals, an indication that the flux of carbonate to the seafloor decreased, either because of lower surface water carbonate production or because of extreme shoaling of the lysocline. Overall, these records are broadly correlative to preliminary records from other Clarence Valley sections and can be correlated to the paleotemperature record from Canterbury Basin to the south.

  20. A new find of the fossil Cyclosorus from the Eocene of South China and its paleoclimatic implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naugolnykh, Serge V; Wang, Li; Han, Meng; Jin, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The thelypteroid ferns are widely distributed across tropical regions around the world, but information about their fossil representatives is scarce. A new species, Cyclosorus scutum Naugolnykh, Wang, Han et Jin was discovered from the Eocene Changchang Formation of Hainan Island, South China, and is described on the basis of sterile and fertile leaves, sori, sporangia and spores preserved in situ. Discovery of this new species clearly shows that climatic conditions of that time in this area were humid, i.e. warm and wet.

  1. Platform sedimentation and collapse in a carbonate-dominated margin of a foreland basin (Jaca basin, Eocene, southern Pyrenees)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnolas, Antonio; Teixell, Antonio

    1994-12-01

    The Eocene Jaca basin is a foreland basin with well-exposed carbonate platforms in the distal margin. This margin underwent alternating periods of stable platform growth and platform drowning. Periods of drowning were accompanied by large-scale collapses with generation of shelf-edge truncations and resedimentation of carbonate megabreccias into a terrigenous turbiditic trough. These features caused a stepped retreat of the platforms and are related to episodic variations of tectonic loading in the hinterland and correlative flexural bending of the distal basin.

  2. Development, evolution, and destruction of the saline mineral area of Eocene Lake Uinta, Piceance Basin, western Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ronald C.; Brownfield, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Halite and the sodium bicarbonate mineral nahcolite were deposited in Eocene-age saline Lake Uinta in the Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado. Variations in the areal extent of saline mineral deposition through time were studied using descriptions of core and outcrop. Saline minerals have been extensively leached by groundwater, and the original extent of saline deposition was determined from the distribution of empty vugs and collapse breccias. Because vugs and breccias strongly influence groundwater movement, determining where leaching has occurred is an important consideration for in-situ oil shale extraction methods currently being developed.

  3. Community Structure in the Amber Forest: Study of the Arthropod Syninclusia in the Rovno Amber(Late Eocene of Ukraine)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Evgeny E.PERKOVSKY; Alexandr P.RASNITSYN; Anatoly P.VLASKIN; Sergej P.RASNITSYN

    2010-01-01

    Arthropodan syninclusions in the Late Eocene Rovno amber were examined using x2 to reveal correlation of the component groups(some taxa of Diptera,ants,aphids,and mites)supposedly indicative of the biocoenotic relationships in the ancient amber forest.Three tightly correlated groups were identified,representing a putative aerial plankton guild(Chironomidae+Ceratopogonidae)and two tree-trunk guilds,one of which(Dolichopodidae+Germaraphis)is possibly connected to more open or/and more hygrophilous habitats than the other(Sciara zone Diptera+"Acarus"rhombeus).The ants were not linked with any of the above components.

  4. PSEUDORHOMBODINIUM CINGULOINDENTATUM GEN. ET SP. N. (DINOFLAGELLATA: A NEW ORGANIC WALLED DINOFLAGELLATE CYST FROM THEUPPER EOCENE OF SICILY, ITALY

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    STEFANO TORRICELLI

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The organic walled dinoflagellate cyst Pseudorhombodinium cinguloindentatum gen. et sp. n. is formally described from the Upper Eocene of Sicily, Italy. It consists of a brown coloured, circumcavate wetzelielloid cyst with marked V-shaped cingular indentations in the pericyst. The proposed generic name refers to similarities existing in the overall morphology with the genus Rhombodinium Gocht. However, substantial differences in archeopyle styling, in the disposition of antapical horns, and in the amount of cingular indentation, advocate the erection of the new genus Pseudorhombodinium. 

  5. Middle-Late Eocene structure of the southern Levant continental margin — Tectonic motion versus global sea-level change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segev, Amit; Schattner, Uri; Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    2011-03-01

    During the Paleogene greenhouse episode Earth experienced the warmest period of the Cenozoic while global sea level rose by more than 100 m. However, geological evidence from the Levant margin, northwestern Arabian plate, indicates that throughout this period seabed deepening exceeded 1000 m. Lithology from Israel, Syria, Lebanon and Jordan is mainly pelagic and neritic, interfered by occasional fossil sub-marine slumps. In order to understand this dissimilarity we quantify the vertical tectonic motion of the Levant continental margin through the Paleogene. The margin began to take shape during the Late Permian and it was reactivated during the Oligocene. Based on information from outcrops, drillholes, seismic reflection and refraction, gravity, and previous publications, a multi-layered model of the Levant lithosphere was established. Layers include the Moho, top of the crystalline basement and covering sediments up to the Late Eocene. The model was restored horizontally by 100 km along the younger Dead Sea transform. Assuming local isostatic compensation, vertical restoration yielded the paleo-bathymetry which prevailed across northwestern Arabia during the Middle-Late Eocene. Results show that following the margin subsidence the Cretaceous Levantine platform became ramp shaped during the Eocene. Most parts of the central Levant were submerged under ~ 200 to ~ 1800 m of water, while the paleo-bathymetric gradients ranged from ~ 2° at the shelf to ~ 6° at the slope. The apparent dissimilarity between sea level and our tectonic-based calculations is up to an order of magnitude. These differences may be resolved by accounting for vertical tectonic motions and sediment supply rates. Our results stress the importance of the presented crustal structure. As opposed to the backstripping procedure, the structural map of the top Eocene interface was constructed upwards from the well established top Turonian (Judea Group) interface since only scarce and sporadic outcrops

  6. The serpulid worm Rotularia spirulaea from Eocene beds near Gračišće in Istria, Croatia

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    Vasja Mikuž

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In paper several selected specimens of sedentary Polychaetes of species Rotularia spirulaea (Lamarck, 1818 are presented. They were found in Middel Eocene – Lutetian calcareous breccias and conglomerates, respectively olistostromes,below the village of Gračišće near Pazin in Istria (Croatia. The rare individuals are of various shapes and sizes, and they occur among numerous nummulitines, corals, molluscs, echinoderms, bryozoans, lithothamnias and other fossil remains. The mentioned rocks and their contents are constituting parts of the Istrian Paleogene basins, in this istance of the Pazin flysch basin.

  7. Glaciation and erosion of Eastern Greenland at the Eocene-Oligocene transition: Insights from low-temperature thermochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Thomas; Steer, Philippe; Gallagher, Kerry; Szulc, Adam; Whittam, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Climate cooling through the Late Cenozoic was important in the evolution of glaciated mountain ranges. While the onset of accelerated Cenozoic exhumation is generally associated with the Quaternary at mid-latitudes, coincident with the local onset of glaciation, some high-latitude passive margins may have experienced earlier glaciation starting at 30-38 Ma or even 45 Ma. To address this issue, we use a set of new AFT data from 16 sub-vertical profiles sampled along the fjords of the central Eastern Greenland margin between 68° and 76° N, combined with new apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He (AHe) data from selected profiles. To infer thermal histories and exhumation from these profiles, we use the software QTQt. The modeling results show a major phase of exhumation in the East Greenland margin between 68° and 76° N starting at 30±5 Ma. The spatial distribution of the exhumation shows that normal faulting on East Greenland margin had no resolvable influence on exhumation related to the cooling phase. However, the timing is coincident with the dramatic worldwide fall of surface temperature at the Eocene-Oligocene transition. We therefore suggest that a transition from an Eocene fluvial to an Oligocene glacial-dominated landscape triggered a period of enhanced erosion. We infer from the thermal histories that around 2.7±1.9 km of erosion occurred close to the coast since the Eocene-Oligocene transition. This amount of erosion is consistent with the incision of the fjords and with the effective removal of 2.3±1.5 km of basalt thickness, deduced by the thermal modeling of a heating phase at 55±5 Ma. This phase of erosion is most strongly evidenced near the coast, suggesting either that continental ice extent was limited to the coastal areas or that erosion was less efficient outside these areas, leading to no obvious signal in thermochronometric data further north. Overall, this study provides the first onshore evidence of the onset of continental ice in East Greenland margin

  8. Database for the geologic map of upper Eocene to Holocene volcanic and related rocks in the Cascade Range, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Andrew D.; Ramsey, David W.; Smith, James G.

    2014-01-01

    This geospatial database for a geologic map of the Cascades Range in Washington state is one of a series of maps that shows Cascade Range geology by fitting published and unpublished mapping into a province-wide scheme of lithostratigraphic units. Geologic maps of the Eocene to Holocene Cascade Range in California and Oregon complete the series, providing a comprehensive geologic map of the entire Cascade Range that incorporates modern field studies and that has a unified and internally consistent explanantion. The complete series will be useful for regional studies of volcanic hazards, volcanology, and tectonics.

  9. Reconstructing Changes in Deep Ocean Temperature and Global Carbon Cycle during the Early Eocene Warming Trend: High-Resolution Benthic Stable Isotope Records from the SE Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauretano, V.; Zachos, J. C.; Lourens, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    From the late Paleocene to the early Eocene, Earth's surface temperatures generally rose, resulting in an increase of at least 5°C in the deep ocean and culminating in the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). This long-term warming was punctuated by a series of short-lived global warming events known as "hyperthermals", of which the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) represents the most extreme example. At least two other short-term episodes have been identified as hyperthermals: the ETM2 (or Elmo event) at about 53.7 Myr and the ETM3 (or X-event) at about 52.5 Myr. These transient events are marked by prominent carbon isotope excursions (CIEs), recorded in marine and continental sedimentary sequences and driven by fast and massive injections of 13C-depleted carbon into the ocean-atmosphere system. Recently, evidence has indicated the presence of a regular series of hyperthermal events following the peak in temperatures of the EECO. However, continuous records are needed to investigate short- and long- term changes in the climate system throughout the Early Eocene warming trend. Here, we present new high-resolution benthic stable isotope records of the Early Eocene from ODP Site 1263, (Walvis Ridge, SE Atlantic). The carbon and oxygen records document changes in deep-sea temperature and global carbon cycle encompassing the Early Eocene hyperthermal events and the EECO interval. The transition phase to the post-EECO events is distinct by the decoupling of carbon and oxygen isotopes on the long-term scale. Spectral and wavelet analyses suggest the influence of orbital forcing, specifically long and short eccentricity cycles.

  10. Hyainailourine and teratodontine cranial material from the late Eocene of Egypt and the application of parsimony and Bayesian methods to the phylogeny and biogeography of Hyaenodonta (Placentalia, Mammalia

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    Matthew R. Borths

    2016-11-01

    the topologies recovered from each phylogenetic method, we reconstructed the biogeographic history of Hyaenodonta using parsimony optimization (PO, likelihood optimization (LO, and Bayesian Binary Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC to examine support for the Afro-Arabian origin of Hyaenodonta. Across all analyses, we found that Hyaenodonta most likely originated in Europe, rather than Afro-Arabia. The clade is estimated by tip-dating analysis to have undergone a rapid radiation in the Late Cretaceous and Paleocene; a radiation currently not documented by fossil evidence. During the Paleocene, lineages are reconstructed as dispersing to Asia, Afro-Arabia, and North America. The place of origin of Hyainailouroidea is likely Afro-Arabia according to the Bayesian topologies but it is ambiguous using parsimony. All topologies support the constituent clades–Hyainailourinae, Apterodontinae, and Teratodontinae–as Afro-Arabian and tip-dating estimates that each clade is established in Afro-Arabia by the middle Eocene.

  11. Onset of the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum in the southern Pacific Ocean (DSDP Site 277, Campbell Plateau

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    C. J. Hollis

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Re-examination of a sediment core collected by the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP Site 277 on the western margin of the Campbell Plateau, Southwest Pacific Ocean (paleolatitude of ∼ 65° S, has identified an intact Paleocene–Eocene (P–E boundary overlain by a 34 cm-thick record of the initial phase of the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM within nannofossil chalk. The upper part of the PETM is truncated, either due to drilling disturbance or a sedimentary hiatus. An intact record of the onset of the PETM is indicated by a gradual decrease in δ13C values over 20 cm, followed by a 14 cm interval in which δ13C is 2‰ lighter than uppermost Paleocene values. After accounting for effects of diagenetic alteration, we use δ18O and Mg/Ca values from foraminiferal tests to determine that intermediate and surface waters warmed by ∼ 6° at the onset of the PETM prior to the full development of the negative δ13C excursion. After this initial warming, sea temperatures were relatively stable through the PETM, but declined abruptly across the unconformity that truncates the event at this site. Mg/Ca analysis of foraminiferal tests indicate peak intermediate and surface water temperatures of ∼ 19 and ∼ 32 °C, respectively. These temperatures may be influenced by enhanced poleward ocean heat transport during the PETM and surface water values may also be biased towards warm season temperatures.

  12. Sedimentary characteristics and depositional model of a Paleocene-Eocene salt lake in the Jiangling Depression, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaocan; Wang, Chunlian; Liu, Chenglin; Zhang, Zhaochong; Xu, Haiming; Huang, Hua; Xie, Tengxiao; Li, Haonan; Liu, Jinlei

    2015-11-01

    We studied the sedimentary characteristics of a Paleocene-Eocene salt lake in the Jiangling Depression through field core observation, thin section identification, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis. On the basis of sedimentary characteristics we have summarized the petrological and mineralogical characteristics of the salt lake and proposed 9 types of grade IV salt rhythms. The deposition shows a desalting to salting order of halite-argillaceous-mudstone-mud dolostonemud anhydrock-glauberite-halite. The relationship among grade IV rhythms, water salinity and climate fluctuations was analyzed. Based on the analysis of the relationship between boron content and mudstone color and by combining the mineralogy and sedimentary environment characteristics, we propose that the early and late Paleocene Shashi Formation in the Jiangling Depression was a paleolacustrine depositional environment with a high salt content, which is a representation of the shallow water salt lake depositional model. The middle Paleocene Shashi Formation and the early Eocene Xingouzui Formation were salt and brackish sedimentary environments with low salt content in a deep paleolake, which represents a deep salt lake depositional model.

  13. Artiodactyls from the Pondaung Formation (Myanmar): new data and reevaluation of the South Asian Faunal Province during the Middle Eocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Métais, Grégoire; Soe, Aung Naing; Marivaux, Laurent; Beard, K. Christopher

    2007-09-01

    Although Asia is thought to have played a critical role in the radiation of artiodactyls, the fossil record of stem selenodonts (“dichobunoids”) remains dramatically poor in tropical Asian regions. In this study, we report a new dichobunid genus and species Cadutherium kyaukmagyii and a new basal ruminant genus and species Irrawadymeryx pondaungi, from the late Middle Eocene Pondaung Formation, Central Myanmar. Although the scarcity of the present material prevents any attempts to investigate the phylogenetic relationships of Cadutherium with contemporaneous forms from other Holarctic landmasses, this new form shed new light on the diversity of these small rabbit-like ungulates during a key period of their evolutionary history. Reexamination of the small-bodied artiodactyls from Pondaung leads us to propose new identifications of certain published specimens and, in turn, to investigate the temporal and geographic distribution of taxa recognized in the Pondaung Formation. Although fragmentary, these potential new taxa reveal an unsuspected diversity of small forms among artiodactyls of Pondaung. This addition to the Eocene record of dichobunoids and early ruminants provides further insight in the diversity of dental patterns among small artiodactyls from the Pondaung Formation and attests to the antiquity of these groups in Southeast Asia.

  14. A new late Eocene Bicornucythere species (Ostracoda, Crustacea) from Myanmar, and its significance for the evolutionary history of the genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Tatsuhiko; Suzuki, Hisashi; Soe, Aung-Naing; Htike, Thaung; Nomura, Ritsuo; Takai, Masanaru

    2015-02-17

    The ostracode genus Bicornucythere (Ostracoda, Crustacea) is abundant in modern-day eutrophic marine bays, and is widely distributed in estuaries and inner bays throughout East Asia, including in China, Korea, Japan, and the Russian Far East. The evolutionary history of Bicornucythere is poorly understood. Here, we report on a new species of Bicornucythere (Bicornucythere concentrica sp. nov.) from the upper Eocene Yaw Formation in the Central Myanmar Basin. The oldest previously known Bicornucythere taxon, Bicornucythere secedens, was reported from lower Miocene strata in India, although a molecular phylogeny suggests that the genus first appeared in the Late Cretaceous. Bicornucythere concentrica sp. nov. is at least 10.9 million years older than the earliest known B. secedens. The new species occurs with Ammonia subgranulosa, a benthic foraminifer, an association that is representative of brackish water conditions in modern Asian bays. Our findings indicate that extant genera have inhabited Asian bays since the late Eocene. The paleobiogeography of Bicornucythere indicates that the taxon was dispersed onto Indian coasts during the collision between the Indian and Eurasian plates.

  15. Space-time distribution of ignimbrite volcanism in the southern SMO: From Eocene to Pliocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Obregon, J.; Aguirre-Diaz, G. J.

    2004-12-01

    A distinct variation in the age of the ignimbrites of the Sierra Madre Occidental (SMO) is observed in the southern portion, which includes the area between Tepic, Nayarit (-105° W) and Aguascalientes, Ags (-102° W). Older, high-grade ignimbrites are Eocene and occur as scattered outcrops. These are in turn covered by a widespread and voluminous sequence of high-grade ignimbrites and silicic to intermediate lavas that ranges in age from Middle Oligocene to Middle Miocene. The peak of this ignimbrite volcanism was at about 21 Ma to 22 Ma, but there is evidence showing that it initiated since about 30 Ma and ended at about 17.5 Ma. This ignimbrite and lava sequence is in turn covered by another series of lavas, predominantly mafic to intermediate, in the southern part of the area. This latest volcanism represents the initiation of the Mexican Volcanic Belt. Ignimbrite volcanism apparently initiated at the NE part of the study area, and migrated to the SW with time, that is from the area Presa Calles to the valley of Bolaños. Isotopic ages reported on these rocks, cluster in various groups reflecting the time evolution of volcanism. Rocks older than 30 Ma tend to occur on the raised blocks of Sierra de El Laurel and Northern Sierra de Morones, in the eastern part of the area. The interval from 30 to 20 Ma comprises a discontinuous set of ages that are concentrated in the blocks of Southern Sierra de Morones, Tlaltenango, Bolaños and the area around Cinco Minas-San Pedro Analco-Hostotipaquillo. An apparent gap of ages occurs between 12 to 18 Ma, followed by a predominantly mafic volcanism scattered mainly to the south of the area, that represents the transition of SMO to MVB. Finally mafic volcanism of the MVB of 3 to 4 Ma is present in the south, in the area excavated on the vicinity of Rio Grande de Santiago. A similar migration pattern has been reported in general for the whole SMO by Aguirre-Diaz and Labarthe-Hernandez (2003), from NE Chihuahua to SW Nayarit

  16. Resilient terrestrial ecosystems at the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, S.

    2010-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) was an interval of global warming lasting ~200 ka that began ~56 Ma. Global temperature rose 5-8 °C in association with the emission of thousands of Pg of carbon into the ocean-atmosphere system. PETM rocks and fossils are extensively exposed in the SE Bighorn Basin of Wyoming, where the event is represented by ~40 m of fluvial rocks. Fossil plants demonstrate a rapid and nearly complete turnover in floral composition that also suggests a change in the structure of vegetation. Floras collected from the last ~50 ka of the Paleocene are composed of Platanaceae (sycamores), Betulaceae (birches), Fagaceae (oaks), Lauraceae (laurels), Juglandaceae (walnuts), Cercidiphyllaceae (katsura), Taxodiaceae (dawn redwood), and Arecaceae (palms), among others. Many of these families are most diverse and abundant today in temperate to subtropical, mid-latitude forests. During the body of the carbon isotope excursion (CIE) associated with the PETM fossil floras have a completely different composition. All of the latest Paleocene plant types are absent, except for palms, and instead the floras are dominated by Fabaceae (bean family). Other taxa include Sapindaceae (soapberry), Annonaceae (paw-paw), and Hernandiaceae. Where living relatives are known, they live in dry tropical forests of Central and South America. This floral composition is maintained through the ~30 m of section representing the ~110 ka-long body of the CIE, the same interval characterized by dwarfed mammalian faunas. During the recovery phase of the CIE most of the latest Paleocene plants returned to the area of study, although some new taxa appeared, apparently coming in from Europe or Asia. The distinctive PETM floral types are not seen after the recovery phase of the CIE. Change in floral composition during the PETM apparently represents regional extirpations of populations of plants that preferred warm, mesic conditions, and northward range extensions of plants that

  17. Global Carbon Cycle Perturbations and Implications for Arctic Hydrology during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Y.; Kump, L.; Diefendorf, A. F.; Freeman, K. H.

    2011-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; ca. 55.9 Ma) was an interval of geologically abrupt global warming lasting ~200 ka. It has been proposed as an ancient analogue for future climate response to CO2 emission from fossil fuel burning. The onset of this event is fueled by a large release of 13C-depleted carbon into the ocean-atmosphere system. However, there is a large discrepancy in the magnitude of the carbon isotope excursion (CIE) between marine and terrestrial records. Here we present new organic geochemical data and stable carbon isotope records from n-alkanes and pristane extracted from core materials representing the most expanded PETM section yet recovered from a nearshore marine early Cenozoic succession from Spitsbergen. The low hydrogen index and oxygen index indicate that organic matter has been thermally altered, consistent with n-alkanes that do not show a clear odd-over-even predominance as reflected by the low and constant carbon preference index. The δ13C records of long chain n-alkanes from core BH9-05 track the δ13C recorded in total organic carbon, but are ~3% more negative prior to the CIE, ~4.5% more negative during the CIE, and ~4% more negative after the CIE. An orbital age model derived from the same core suggests the CIE from n-alkanes appears more abruptly onset than the bulk organic carbon, indicating possibly climate-induced modification to the observed feature in n-alkanes. In addition, the carbon isotope values of individual long-chain (n-C27 to n-C31) n-alkanes tend to become less negative with increasing chain length resulting in the smallest magnitude CIEs in longer chain lengths (i.e. n-C31) and the largest magnitude CIEs in shorter chain lengths (i.e. n-C27). We are currently considering the effect of plant community and paleoclimate on the observed pattern of CIE in n-alkanes to evaluate carbon cycle perturbations and Arctic hydrology changes during the PETM. One interpretation of these patterns is that there was an

  18. New or previously unrecorded avian taxa from the Middle Eocene of Messel (Hessen, Germany

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    G. Mayr

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Three new or from this site previously unrecorded birds are described from the Middle Eocene of Messel (Hessen, Germany. Serudaptus pohli n. gen. n. sp. is a new taxon of the Pseudasturidae and is distinguished from the other species of this family by its short and stout tarsometatarsus and the long and strong claws. An isolated foot of a gruiform bird is assigned to Idiornis cf. itardiensis (Idiornithidae and would, if this assignment can be confirmed, demonstrate the existence of this species for a period of 23 million years. The proportions of the toes suggest that Idiornis cf. itardiensis was less cursorial than its next recent relatives, the Cariamidae. In addition thereto, an exceptionally well preserved skeleton of a sandcoleid bird (Coliiformes: Sandcoleidae gives new information on the osteology and feathering of sandcoleid birds. The specimen resembles the genera Eoglaucidium and Anneavis but it has not been possible to assign it to one of these two genera with certainty. Drei neue oder von dieser Fundstelle bisher nicht nachgewiesene Vögel werden aus dem Mittel-Eozän von Messel (Hessen, Deutschland beschrieben. Serudaptus pohli n. gen. n. sp. ist ein neues Taxon der Pseudasturidae und unterscheidet sich von den anderen Arten dieser Familie durch den kurzen und gedrungenen Tarsometatarsus und die langen, kräftigen Krallen. Der isolierte Fuß eines gruiformen Vogels wird Idiornis cf. itardiensis (Idiornithidae zugeordnet und würde, wenn sich diese Zuordnung bestätigt, die Existenz dieser Art über einen Zeitraum von 23 Millionen Jahren zeigen. Die Zehenproportionen legen nahe, dass Idiornis cf. itardiensis weniger an eine laufende Lebensweise angepasst war als seine nächsten rezenten Verwandten, die Cariamidae. Darüber hinaus zeigt ein außergewöhnlich gut erhaltenes Skelett eines Vertreters der Sandcoleidae bisher unbekannte Einzelheiten der Osteologie und Befiederung dieser Familie. Das Exemplar ähnelt den Gattungen

  19. Geology and geochemistry of the Eocene zeolite bearing volcaniclastic sediments of Metaxades, Thrace, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsirambides, A.

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available The Eocene zeolite-bearing volcaniclastic sediments (Ca-rich clinoptilolite 51 % on average of Metaxades, Thrace, Greece, are studied in terms of geology and chemical composition. The alternating formations along a vertical profile in the Metaxades main quarry face are: Discrete horizons of zeolite-bearing volcaniclastic tuffs, zeolite-bearing volcaniclastic tuffs including pebbles, zeolite-bearing volcaniclastic tuffs including thin silica-rich layers, and a calc-clayey horizon. A positive correlation is observed between MgO and CaO in the volcaniclastic tuffs including silica-rich layers. Sr, Rb and Ba are the most abundant trace elements in alllayers; among them, Sr is found to correlate positively with zeolite. The enrichment of sorne trace elements is mainly attributed to mineral abundances, mineral chemistry or leaching processes. The zeolite-bearing volcaniclastic sediments of Metaxades represent an inhomogeneous sequence, which was deposited in a shallow marine environment under turbulent to quiet sedimentary conditions.Los sedimentos eocenos volcanoclásticos con zeolita (51% de media de clinoptilolita rica en Ca de Metaxades, Tracia, Grecia, se estudian desde el punto de vista geológico y de su composición química. Las formaciones alternantes que se pueden observar en un corte vertical en la cantera principal de Metaxades son: horizontes aislados de tufos volcanoclásticos con zeolita y con delgadas capas ricas en sílice, y un horizonte calco-arcilloso. Se observa una correlación positiva entre MgO y CaO en los tufss volcanoclásticos que presentan capas ricas en sílice. El Sr, el Rb y el Ba son los elementos traza más abundantes en todos los horizontes. Entre ellos, el Sr presenta una correlación positiva con la zeolita. El enriquecimiento en algunos elementos traza se atribuye esencialmente a las abundancias de los minerales, la química mineral, o a fenómenos de lixivinción. Los sedimentos volcanoclásticos con zeolita de

  20. Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) and its Effects on Continental Biotas: Evidence from Polecat Bench in Northwestern Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingerich, P. D.

    2012-12-01

    Many important environmental events in the geological past were first recognized by their effects on the associated biota, and this is true for the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum or PETM global greenhouse warming event, which happened 55 million years before present. In the Southern Ocean, PETM carbon and oxygen isotope anomalies were found to coincide with a major terminal-Paleocene disappearance or extinction of benthic foraminiferans. On North America the PETM carbon isotope excursion (CIE) was found to coincide with mammalian dwarfing and a major initial-Eocene appearance or origination event of continental mammals. Linking the two records, marine and continental, resolved a long-standing disagreement over competing definitions of the Paleocene-Eocene epoch boundary, and more importantly indicated that the PETM greenhouse warming event was global. Dwarfing of herbivorous mammals can be interpreted as a response to elevated atmospheric CO2. The origin of modern orders of mammals including Artiodactyla, Perissodactyla, and Primates ('APP' taxa) is more complicated and difficult to explain but the origin of these orders may also be a response, directly or indirectly, to PETM warming. We now know from Polecat Bench and elsewhere in North America that the biotic response to PETM greenhouse warming involved the appearance of at least two new mammalian faunas distinct from previously known Clarkforkian mammals of the upper or late Paleocene and previously known Wasatchian mammals of the lower or early Eocene. Three stages and ages of the former are known (Cf-1 to Cf-3) and seven stages and ages of the latter are known (Wa-1 to Wa-7), each occupying about a hundred meters of strata representing a half-million years or so of time. Between the standard Clarkforkian and Wasatchian faunal zones is an initial 'Wa-M' faunal zone of only five or so meters in thickness and something on the order of 20 thousand years of geological time. The Wa-M fauna includes the first

  1. Environmental- and sea-level change revealed by dinoflagellate cysts during the Eocene-Oligocene transition at St. Stephens Quarry, Alabama, USA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quaijtaal, W.; Wade, B.S.; Schouten, S.; Houben, A.J.P.; Rosenthal, Y.; Miller, K.G.; Brinkhuis, H.

    2011-01-01

    The Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT, ~34 Myr ago) represents the final transition from the early Paleogene “Greenhouse” into the present “Icehouse” by the initiation of Antarctic glaciation. The EOT is recorded in deep-sea benthic foraminiferal oxygen isotope (δ18O) records as two increasing steps,

  2. Sedimentary facies and sequential architecture of tide-influenced alluvial deposits : an example from the middle Eocene Capella formation, South-Central Pyrenees, Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuevas Gozalo, M.C

    1989-01-01

    The sediments investigated consist of a thick sequence of clastic deposits of middle Eocene age, the Capella Formation. At the time of deposition the sedimentary basin was tectonically active. Tectonic influence in the sedimentary sequence is recognized from angular unconformities, synsedimentary fa

  3. Warming, euxinia and sea level rise during the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum on the Gulf Coastal Plain: implications for ocean oxygenation and nutrient cycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijs, A.; van Roij, L.; Harrington, G.J.; Schouten, S.; Sessa, J.A.; LeVay, L.J.; Reichart, G.-J.; Slomp, C.P.

    2014-01-01

    The Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, ~ 56 Ma) was a ~ 200 kyr episode of global warming, associated with massive injections of 13C-depleted carbon into the ocean–atmosphere system. Although climate change during the PETM is relatively well constrained, effects on marine oxygen concentrations

  4. Fossil and modern sponge fauna of southern Australia and adjacent regions compared: interpretation, evolutionary and biogeographic significance of the late Eocene ‘soft’ sponges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Łukowiak, M.

    2016-01-01

    The late Eocene ‘soft’ sponge fauna of southern Australia is reconstructed based on disassociated spicules and is used to interpret the paleoecology and environmental context of shallow marine communities in this region. The reconstructed sponge association was compared with coeval sponge assemblage

  5. Warming, euxinia and sea level rise during the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum on the Gulf Coastal Plain: implications for ocean oxygenation and nutrient cycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijs, A.; van Roij, L.; Harrington, G.J.; Schouten, S.; Sessa, J.A.; LeVay, L.J.; Reichart, G.-J.; Slomp, C.P.

    2014-01-01

    The Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum(PETM, ?56 Ma) was a ?200 kyr episode of globalwarming, associated with massive injections of 13C-depletedcarbon into the ocean–atmosphere system. Although climatechange during the PETM is relatively well constrained,effects on marine oxygen concentrations and nut

  6. New diversity among the Trochodendraceae from the Early/Middle Eocene Okanogan Highlands of British Columbia, Canada, and northeastern Washington State, United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pigg, Kathleen B.; Dillhoff, Richard M.; DeVore, Melanie L.; Wehr, Wesley C.

    2007-01-01

    Newly recognized fossil infructescences and leaves of the Trochodendraceae are described from the Early/ Middle Eocene McAbee and One Mile Creek sites of British Columbia, Canada, and Republic, eastern Washington State, United States. Trochodendron drachukii Pigg, Dillhoff, DeVore, & Wehr sp. nov.,

  7. Orbital control on carbon cycle alterations and hyperthermal events in a cooling world: the late Early to Mid Eocene record at Possagno (southern Alps, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeotti, Simone; Sprovieri, Mario; Moretti, Matteo; Rio, Domenico; Fornaciari, Eliana; Giusberti, Luca; Agnini, Claudia; Backman, Jan; Lanci, Luca; Luciani, Valeria

    2013-04-01

    The late Early Eocene to Middle Eocene ~50-45 Million years ago (Ma) time interval in the middle bathyal, pelagic/hemipelagic succession of the Western Tethys Possagno section (southern Alps, Veneto), contains several episodes of negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) and concomitant dissolution of carbonates. These episodes are superimposed on a long term global climate cooling that started at about 51 Ma following the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). Spectral analysis indicates that CIEs and dissolution events are paced by orbital forcing, confirming the global significance of previous finding on the same interval from Western and Southern Atlantic and Equatorial Pacific sites. The frequency and magnitude of CIEs through time is controlled by long-term modulations of orbital parameters, including long eccentricity (400 kyr) and a 1.2 million year modulation. Highest frequency of events - at the orbital scale - is observed across the EECO, which provides an observational basis to validate theoretical models predicting a threshold effect resulting from orbital forcing superimposed on gradually changing mean global boundary conditions. The observation of the 1.2 million year beat (long-term modulation of obliquity) together with previously published observation of enhanced obliquity (41 kyr) forcing across major CIEs and dissolution intervals indicates that high latitude feedbacks to orbital forcing played a fundamental role in the emplacement of the hyperthermals. The observed orbital forcing signature closely match that of early Eocene hyperthermals, suggesting similar driving processes.

  8. Crustal structure in the Elko-Carlin Region, Nevada, during Eocene gold mineralization: Ruby-East Humboldt metamorphic core complex as a guide to the deep crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, K.A.

    2003-01-01

    The deep crustal rocks exposed in the Ruby-East Humboldt metamorphic core complex, northeastern Nevada, provide a guide for reconstructing Eocene crustal structure ???50 km to the west near the Carlin trend of gold deposits. The deep crustal rocks, in the footwall of a west-dipping normal-sense shear system, may have underlain the Pin??on and Adobe Ranges about 50 km to the west before Tertiary extension, close to or under part of the Carlin trend. Eocene lakes formed on the hanging wall of the fault system during an early phase of extension and may have been linked to a fluid reservoir for hydrothermal circulation. The magnitude and timing of Paleogene extension remain indistinct, but dikes and tilt axes in the upper crust indicate that spreading was east-west to northwest-southeast, perpendicular to a Paleozoic and Mesozoic orogen that the spreading overprinted. High geothermal gradients associated with Eocene or older crustal thinning may have contributed to hydrothermal circulation in the upper crust. Late Eocene eruptions, upper crustal dike intrusion, and gold mineralization approximately coincided temporally with deep intrusion of Eocene sills of granite and quartz diorite and shallower intrusion of the Harrison Pass pluton into the core-complex rocks. Stacked Mesozoic nappes of metamorphosed Paleozoic and Precambrian rocks in the core complex lay at least 13 to 20 km deep in Eocene time, on the basis of geobarometry studies. In the northern part of the complex, the presently exposed rocks had been even deeper in the late Mesozoic, to >30 km depths, before losing part of their cover by Eocene time. Nappes in the core plunge northward beneath the originally thicker Mesozoic tectonic cover in the north part of the core complex. Mesozoic nappes and tectonic wedging likely occupied the thickened midlevel crustal section between the deep crustal core-complex intrusions and nappes and the overlying upper crust. These structures, as well as the subsequent large

  9. The Eocene-Oligocene sedimentary record in the Chesapeake Bay impact structure: Implications for climate and sea-level changes on the western Atlantic margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, P.; Wade, B.S.; Kontny, A.; ,

    2009-01-01

    A multidisciplinary investigation of the Eocene-Oligocene transition in the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP)-U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Eyreville core from the Chesapeake Bay impact basin was conducted in order to document environmental changes and sequence stratigraphic setting. Planktonic foraminifera and calcareous nannofossil biostratigraphy indicate that the Eyreville core includes an expanded upper Eocene (Biozones E15 to E16 and NP19/20 to NP21, respectively) and a condensed Oligocene-Miocene (NP24-NN1) sedimentary sequence. The Eocene-Oligocene contact corresponds to a =3-Ma-long hiatus. Eocene- Oligocene sedimentation is dominated by great diversity and varying amounts of detrital and authigenic minerals. Four sedimentary intervals are identified by lithology and mineral content: (1) A 30-m-thick, smectite- and illite-rich interval directly overlies the Exmore Formation, suggesting long-term reworking of impact debris within the Chesapeake Bay impact structure. (2) Subsequently, an increase in kaolinite content suggests erosion from soils developed during late Eocene warm and humid climate in agreement with data derived from other Atlantic sites. However, the kaolinite increase may also be explained by change to a predominant sediment input from outside the Chesapeake Bay impact structure caused by progradation of more proximal facies belts during the highstand systems tract of the late Eocene sequence E10.Spectral analysis based on gamma-ray and magnetic susceptibility logs suggests infl uence of 1.2 Ma low-amplitude oscillation of the obliquity period during the late Eocene. (3) During the latest Eocene (Biozones NP21 and E16), several lithological contacts (clay to clayey silt) occur concomitant with a prominent change in the mineralogical composition with illite as a major component: This lithological change starts close to the Biozone NP19/20-NP21 boundary and may correspond to sequence boundary E10-E11 as observed in

  10. Depositional controls on coal distribution and quality in the Eocene Brunner Coal Measures, Buller Coalfield, South Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, R.M.; Sykes, R.

    1996-01-01

    The Buller Coalfield on the West Coast of the South Island, New Zealand, contains the Eocene Brunner Coal Measures. The coal measures unconformably overlie Paleozoic-Cretaceous basement rocks and are conformably overlain by, and laterally interfinger with, the Eocene marine Kaiata Formation. This study examines the lithofacies frameworks of the coal measures in order to interpret their depositional environments. The lower part of the coal measures is dominated by conglomeratic lithofacies that rest on a basal erosional surface and thicken in paleovalleys incised into an undulating peneplain surface. These lithofacies are overlain by sandstone, mudstone and organic-rich lithofacies of the upper part of the coal measures. The main coal seam of the organic-rich lithofacies is thick (10-20 m), extensive, locally split, and locally absent. This seam and associated coal seams in the Buller Coalfield are of low- to high-volatile bituminous rank (vitrinite reflectance between 0.65% and 1.75%). The main seam contains a variable percentage of ash and sulphur. These values are related to the thickening and areal distribution of the seam, which in turn, were controlled by the nature of clastic deposition and peat-forming mire systems, marine transgression and local tidal incursion. The conglomeratic lithofacies represent deposits of trunk and tributary braided streams that rapidly aggraded incised paleovalleys during sea-level stillstands. The main seam represents a deposit of raised mires that initially developed as topogenous mires on abandoned margins of inactive braidbelts. Peat accumulated in mires as a response to a rise in the water table, probably initially due to gradual sea-level rise and climate, and the resulting raised topography served as protection from floods. The upper part of the coal measures consists of sandstone lithofacies of flu vial origin and bioturbated sandstone, mudstone and organic-rich lithofacies, which represent deposits of paralic (deltaic

  11. Middle Eocene paleocirculation of the southwestern Atlantic Ocean, the anteroom to an ice-house world: evidence from dinoflagellates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raquel Guerstein, G.; Daners, Gloria; Palma, Elbio; Ferreira, Elizabete P.; Premaor, Eduardo; Amenábar, Cecilia R.; Belgaburo, Alexandra

    2016-04-01

    Middle Eocene dinoflagellate cyst organic walled assemblages from sections located in the Antarctic Peninsula, Tierra del Fuego, Santa Cruz province and south of Chile are mainly represented by endemic taxa, which are also dominant in several circum - Antarctic sites located southern 45° S. Some members of this endemic Antarctic assemblage, including especies of Enneadocysta, Deflandrea, Vozzhennikovia, and Spinidinium, have been recognised in sites along the Southwest Atlantic Ocean Shelf at Colorado (˜38° S), Punta del Este (˜36° S) and Pelotas (˜30° S) basins. Northern 30° S, at Jequitinhonha (˜17oS) and Sergipe (˜11° S) basins, there is no evidence of the endemic Antarctic members, except for Enneadocysta dictyostila, recorded in very low proportion. Based on its positive correlation with CaCO3 percentages we assume that this species is the unique member of the endemic assemblage apparently tolerant to warm surface waters. Previous research developed in the Tasman area has related the presence of endemic taxa at mid- latitudes to a strong clockwise subpolar gyre favoured by the partial continental blockage of the Tasmanian Gateways and the Drake Passage. In this work we propose that the dinoflagellate cyst distribution along the South Atlantic Ocean Shelf can be explained by a similar dynamical mechanism induced by a cyclonic subpolar gyre on the South Atlantic Ocean. The western boundary current of this gyre, starting on the west Antarctic continental slope, would follow a similar path to the present Malvinas Current on the Patagonian slope. Modelling and observational studies at the Patagonian shelf-break have shown that a cyclonic western boundary current promotes upwelling and intrusion of cold oceanic waters to the shelf and intensifies the northward shelf transport. In a similar way we hypothesize that during the Middle Eocene the western boundary current of a proto-Weddell Gyre transported the circum-antarctic waters and the endemic components

  12. Nature and melting processes of the lithosphere beneath the North-East Qiangqtang terrane, Central Tibet, during Eocene times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goussin, Fanny; Guillot, Stéphane; Schulmann, Karel; Cordier, Carole; Oliot, Emilien; Replumaz, Anne; Roperch, Pierrick; Dupont-Nivet, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    At the time of the collision with India (~55Ma), the southern margin of Asia was a composite continental domain resulting from an already long history of successive accretions of different terranes having different rheologies. Knowledge about the structure, composition and thermal state of the Tibetan lithosphere through time is thus fundamental to understand the respective contributions of pre-Cenozoïc and Cenozoïc tectonics in the building of the Plateau to its present-day elevations. We focused on the boundary between the Qiangtang terrane to the south, and the Songpan-Ganze terrane to the north. We jointly studied deep crustal xenoliths and associated (ultra-)potassic magmatism from the Eocene basins of Nangqian and Xialaxiu (Qinghai Province, China), north of the Qiangtang terrane. The aims were to retrieve the composition and the thermal state of the lower crust during Eocene times, to study the behavior of the lower crust and lithospheric mantle of the Eastern Qiangtang terrane and the adjacent Songpan-Ganze terrane at the time of the collision, and the link with the magmatic activity. Crustal xenoliths are of two types: biotite-rich, amphibole bearing metasediments; and garnet-bearing quartzo-feldspathic gneisses. Such assemblages are typical of very high-grade amphibolite and granulite facies metamorphism; further study should allow us to quantify the pressures and temperatures those rocks experienced until the time they were sampled by their host lavas. Major element geochemistry places the c.a. 51-49 Ma (Spurlin et al., 2005) Xialaxiu volcanic field in a fairly differentiated (SiO2~65-70 wt%) high-K field of the calc-alcaline series. Trace element analysis suggests a strong crustal contamination of the primary mantellic melts. C.a. 38-37 Ma (Spurlin et al., 2005) Nangqian magmatic bodies span across the alkaline series, with high to extreme (K2O~6wt%) values. Complex major and trace element patterns, coupled with high-resolution microprobe data on

  13. High-resolution magneto-biostratigraphy of the early Eocene to early Oligocene from Indian Ocean Hole 711A and Italian Monte Cagnero section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savian, J. F.; Jovane, L.; Coccioni, R.; Frontalini, F.; Bohaty, S.; Wilson, P.; Roberts, A. P.; Florindo, F.; Trindade, R.

    2013-05-01

    One of the main challenges in the integration and analysis of palaeorecords is development of high-resolution age models. An accurate age control is fundamental for the reliable determination of sequences of events in the geological record. The early Eocene to the early Oligocene interval witnessed major changes in Earth's paleoclimate and paleogeography. Stable isotope records (δ18O and δ13C) from pelagic foraminifera for this time period show a long-term cooling trend which ends with an abrupt step, the Oi-1, near the Eocene/Oligocene transition at ~34 Ma, interpreted as the onset of glaciation in Antarctica. Several mechanisms have been proposed as the cause for this event, including the opening of the Southern Ocean, the decrease in atmospheric greenhouse gases, and the closure of the Neo-Tethys (STENT). Superimposed on this long-term cooling trend, some anomalous warming events occur, from which the middle Eocene climatic optimum (MECO) at 40 Ma is the most important. Here we report a high-resolution integrated age model of early Eocene-early Oligocene successions from two sites (Monte Cagnero, Central Italy and ODP Hole 711A, Indian Ocean), using magnetostratigraphy and biostratigraphy, and we also show lithostratigraphy, environmental magnetism, CaCO3, and isotope records on bulk carbonate. In parallel, we provide a high-resolution rock magnetic study of these sections including environmental magnetism data (magnetic susceptibility, ARM, IRM, and BIRM), IRM acquisition, thermomagnetic curves, hysteresis and FORC diagrams. Through these data, the main climatic events are recognized in these sections by the ubiquitous occurrence of non-interacting SD magnetite (in a mixture with fine hematite in the inland sections) associated with spikes in geochemical and isotopic data. These paleorecords will contribute to better understanding of the Eocene and Oligocene global climatic changes.

  14. A model–data comparison for a multi-model ensemble of early Eocene atmosphere–ocean simulations: EoMIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Lunt

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The early Eocene (~55 to 50 Ma is a time period which has been explored in a large number of modelling and data studies. Here, using an ensemble of previously published model results, making up "EoMIP" – the Eocene Modelling Intercomparison Project – and syntheses of early Eocene terrestrial and sea surface temperature data, we present a self-consistent inter-model and model–data comparison. This shows that the previous modelling studies exhibit a very wide inter-model variability, but that at high CO2, there is good agreement between models and data for this period, particularly if possible seasonal biases in some of the proxies are considered. An energy balance analysis explores the reasons for the differences between the model results, and suggests that differences in surface albedo feedbacks, water vapour and lapse rate feedbacks, and prescribed aerosol loading are the dominant cause for the different results seen in the models, rather than inconsistencies in other prescribed boundary conditions or differences in cloud feedbacks. The CO2 level which would give optimal early Eocene model–data agreement, based on those models which have carried out simulations with more than one CO2 level, is in the range of 2500 ppmv to 6500 ppmv. Given the spread of model results, tighter bounds on proxy estimates of atmospheric CO2 and temperature during this time period will allow a quantitative assessment of the skill of the models at simulating warm climates. If it is the case that a model which gives a good simulation of the Eocene will also give a good simulation of the future, then such an assessment could be used to produce metrics for weighting future climate predictions.

  15. Upper Eocene tektite and impact ejecta layer on the Continental Slope off New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, B. P.; Koeberl, C.; Blum, J. D.; McHugh, C. M. G.

    1998-03-01

    During Leg 150 of the Ocean Drilling Project (ODP) two sites (903C and 904A) were cored which have sediments of the same biostratigraphic age as the upper Eocene tektite-bearing ejecta layer at Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Site 612. Core 45X from ODP Site 904A (~ 4 km north of Site 612) contains a 5-cm-thick tektite-bearing ejecta layer and Core 56 from Site 903C (~ 8 km north-northwest of Site 904) contains a 2-cm-thick layer of impact ejecta without any tektite or impact glass. Shocked quartz and feldspar grains, with multiple sets of planar deformation features, and abundant coesite-bearing grains are present at both sites. The major oxide contents, trace element compositions, and rare earth element patterns of the Site 904 tektites are similar to those of the Site 612 tektites and to North American tektites (especially bediasites). The Sr and Nd values for one composite tektite sample from Site 904 fall within the range previously obtained for the Site 612 tektites, which defines a linear trend that, if extrapolated, would intersect the values obtained for North American tektites. The water contents of eight tektite fragments from Site 904 range from 0.017 to 0.098 wt. %, and, thus, are somewhat higher than is typical for tektites. The heavy mineral assemblages of the 63 - 125 m size fractions from the ejecta layers at Sites 612, 903, and 904 are all similar. Therefore, we conclude that the ejecta layer at all three sites are from the same impact event and that the tektites at Sites 904 and 612 belong to the North American tektite strewn field. Clinopyroxene-bearing (cpx) spherules occur below, or in the lower part of, the main ejecta layer at all three sites. At all three sites the cpx spherules have been partly or completely replaced with pyrite which preserved the original crystalline textures. Site 612, 903, and 904 cpx spherules are similar to those found in the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, central equatorial Pacific, western equatorial Pacific, and

  16. Paleohydrologic change across the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum, Bighorn Basin, WY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baczynski, A. A.; McInerney, F. A.; Wing, S. L.; Kraus, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    One of the uncertainties in accurately predicting future climate change involves how the hydrologic cycle will respond to increasing pCO2 and temperature. Quantifying the relationship between carbon cycle perturbations and the hydrologic cycle in the geologic past is crucial to understanding and accurately modeling how anthropogenic carbon emissions will affect future changes in the hydrologic cycle. Records of paleohydrologic response to global warming in the geologic past are rare, particularly for continental interiors, where climate model projections of precipitation are highly uncertain. Here we examine hydrogen isotope ratios of leaf waxes as a tool for reconstructing paleohydrologic change in the continental interior of North America across the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), an abrupt, transient episode of extreme global warming ~56 Ma. New hydrogen isotope measurements of leaf-wax n-alkanes from the southeastern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming record two positive shifts during the PETM. n-Alkane δD values first shift to more positive values just after the onset of the carbon isotope excursion and then again higher up in the body of the carbon isotope excursion, with a return to slightly more negative δD values in between. Paleobotanical, paleopedologic, and isotope data from the same field area have suggested that the Bighorn Basin may have experienced a drier or more seasonally dry climate during the PETM. Mean annual precipitation estimates based on paleosol major oxides, soil wetness assessed using the soil morphology index, and an aridity proxy based on differences in δ18O values of tooth enamel in aridity-sensitive and aridity-insensitive mammals each independently suggest a potential two-phase drying within the PETM interval. Similarly, the hydrogen isotope record could reflect two periods of drying, with a return to slightly wetter conditions in between. However, leaf-wax hydrogen isotope ratios reflect not only source water hydrogen isotope

  17. A new avian fauna from the early-middle Eocene Lillebælt Clay Formation of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindow, Bent Erik Kramer

    Climate Optimum, a period of elevated temperatures resulting from rapid greenhouse warming. Comparison of the new bird fauna with the recently revised fauna from the older (54 mya) Fur Formation of Denmark, represents a unique opportunity to investigate the effect of the prehistoric greenhouse warming......A number of hitherto undescribed fossil bird remains have been recovered from the Lillebælt Clay Formation of central Denmark, which is early-middle Eocene in age (~50 to 43 mya). The core of the material consists of fossils acquired through the Danish ‘Danekræ' fossil treasure trove legislation....... Almost two-thirds of the fossils are isolated skulls preserved three-dimensionally in clay ironstone concretions; bird fossils of this age and degree of preservation are extremely rare in an international context. A preliminary investigation has revealed the presence of at least one odontopterygid...

  18. New retroplumid crabs (Crustacea, Brachyura, Retroplumidae Gill, 1894) from the Eocene of Huesca (Aragón, Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artal, Pedro; Van Bakel, Barry W M; Fraaije, René H B; Jagt, John W M

    2013-01-01

    Two new brachyurans assignable to the family Retroplumidae Gill, 1894, Serrablopluma diminuta n. gen., n. sp., and Gaudipluma bacamortensis n. gen., n. sp., from the Eocene of northern Spain (Huesca, Aragón), substantially enlarge our current knowledge of the morphological diversity of the family. The material, with well-preserved ventral surfaces, permits the erection of two new genera that can be referred to the family with confidence on the basis of the general carapace shape, narrow front, a reduced last pair of pereiopods and characteristic thoracic sternum (broad, trapezoidal sternites 3, 4, subrectangular sternites 5-7, sternite 8 conspicuously reduced and inclined). Serrablopluma diminuta n. gen., n. sp. co-occurs with two other retroplumids in the most diverse fossil assemblage of that family known to date.

  19. Origin of a thick, redeposited carbonate bed in Eocene turbidites of the Hecho Group, south-central Pyrenees, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, D. R.; Mutti, E.; Rosell, J.; Séguret, M.

    1981-04-01

    Large-scale carbonate beds interbedded in basin-plain turbidites of the Eocene Hecho Group, northern Spain, are interpreted as giant turbidity-current deposits because of their internal organization and lateral extent. One such bed, the Roncal Unit, has been traced down the axis of the basin for 75 km and commonly reaches thicknesses in excess of 100 m. Internally, the Roncal Unit displays an overall upward decrease in grain size, from a basal megabreccia with large slabs of carbonate platform debris to a calcareous mudstone. The Roncal Unit was probably deposited from a highly mobile and competent sediment gravity flow generated by an earthquake shock, which led to the catastrophic collapse and subsequent transport of the upper part of a carbonate platform flanking the basin. *Present addresses: (Johns) Koninklijke/Shell Exploratie en Produktie Laboratorium, Rijswijk, Netherlands; (Mutti) Istituto di Geologia, Universitá di Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy

  20. New tropical carcharhinids (chondrichthyes, carcharhiniformes) from the late Eocene early Oligocene of Balochistan, Pakistan: Paleoenvironmental and paleogeographic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnet, S.; Antoine, P.-O.; Hassan Baqri, S. R.; Crochet, J.-Y.; Marivaux, L.; Welcomme, J.-L.; Métais, G.

    2007-04-01

    New selachians (sharks and rays) have been collected from several late Eocene and early Oligocene marine localities in the Bugti Hills (Balochistan, Pakistan). Two new species of Requiem sharks (close to the Recent "Bull shark") are described : Carcharhinus balochensis and Carcharhinus perseus. The rest of the fauna is notable for the strong representation of Carcharhiniformes. These selachian faunas represent a unique tropical association for the Oligocene period and one of the first modern tropical selachian faunas, with modern taxa such as the two new species of "Bull sharks", Negaprion sp. and one of the first occurrences of Sphyrna sp. Moreover, these faunas permit paleoenvironmental interpretation of adjacent land masses. The relatively modern aspect of these faunas, compared with other contemporaneous and younger selachian associations from Atlantic and Mediterranean seas, suggests biogeographic isolation of selachian communities living in eastern and western parts of the Tethys before its final closure during the early-middle Miocene.

  1. Evidence of a giant helmeted frog (Australobatrachia, Calyptocephalellidae) from Eocene levels of the Magallanes Basin, southernmost Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Rodrigo A.; Jimenez-Huidobro, Paulina; Soto-Acuña, Sergio; Yury-Yáñez, Roberto E.

    2014-11-01

    The fossil record of frogs from South America has improved dramatically in recent years. Here we describe a distal fragment of a large-sized humerus recovered from the middle-to-upper Eocene of southernmost Chile. The large distally located ventral condyle, and the presence of two epicondyles (radial and ulnar) confirm its identity as an anuran humerus. Comparisons with humeri from extant and fossil South American neobatrachians suggest a phylogentic affinity to calyptocephalellids (Australobatrachia). If correct, the new fossil represents the first occurrence of this family in high latitudes of South America and the first amphibian recovered from the Magallanes (=Austral) Basin. The humerus also represents evidence for one of the largest frogs known to date from anywhere in the world. Such exceptional body size may reflect an unusually hot and damp palaeoenvironment.

  2. A new genus and species of micro bee fly from the Earliest Eocene French amber (Diptera: Mythicomyiidae: Psiloderoidinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myskowiak, Justine; Garrouste, Romain; Nel, Andre

    2016-05-26

    Mythicomyiidae, or micro bee flies, are tiny flies (0.5-5.0 mm) that are found throughout most parts of the world except the highest altitudes and latitudes (Greathead & Evenhuis 2001). Including all extinct and extant taxa, the Mythicomyiidae currently comprise more than 380 valid taxonomic species distributed among 30 genera. The subfamily Psiloderoidinae is especially well represented among the fossil Mythicomyiidae by seven Cretaceous or Cenozoic genera. We here describe a new genus and a new species of this subfamily based on fossils from the Earliest Eocene of Oise (France). A Psiloderoidinae, Proplatypygus matilei Nel & DePloëg, 2004, is already described in this amber. Another mythicomyiid, Eurodoliopteryx inexpectatus Nel, 2006, is the most frequent bombylioid in this amber (Nel & DePloëg, 2004; Nel, 2006).

  3. Cocos sahnii Kaul: A Cocos nucifera L.-like fruit from the Early Eocene rainforest of Rajasthan, western India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anumeha Shukla; Rakesh C Mehrotra; Jaswant S Guleria

    2012-09-01

    Cocos sahnii Kaul, a fossil palm fruit, is validated and described from the Fuller’s earth deposits of Kapurdi village of Rajasthan considered as Early Eocene in age. The fossil best resembles the genus Cocos, particularly Cocos nucifera L., which is now a common coastal element thriving in highly moist conditions. The recovery of this coconut-like fruit, along with earlier described evergreen taxa from the same formation, suggests the existence of typical tropical, warm and humid coastal conditions during the depositional period. The present arid to semi-arid climatic conditions occurring in Rajasthan indicate drastic climate change in the region during the Cenozoic. The possible time for the onset of aridity in the region which caused the total eradication of semi-evergreen to evergreen forests is discussed, as well as the palaeobiogeography of coconuts.

  4. Flowers, fruits, seeds, and pollen of Landeenia gen. nov., an extinct sapindalean genus from the Eocene of Wyoming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchester, S R; Hermsen, E J

    2000-12-01

    The new genus Landeenia is recognized on the basis of flowers, pollen, infructescences, fruits, and seeds from the middle Eocene of southwestern and northwestern Wyoming. Landeenia aralioides (MacGinitie) comb.nov. has cymose inflorescences with actinomorphic, bisexual flowers, a pentamerous calyx, about ten stamens, and a superior gynoecium of ∼18 carpels sharing a single style. The fruits are globose to oblate, loculicidally dehiscent capsules, with a persistent calyx, and contain flat, elliptical seeds that are surrounded by a small wing. Pollen removed from the anthers is tricolpate with finely striate sculpture. Although clearly dicotyledonous, the combination of characters found in Landeenia is not known in any modern genus. The familial affinities of the plant, though certainly not with the Araliaceae as previously thought, remain uncertain. However, the combination of characters is consistent with treatment as a member of the Sapindales. The fossil material is thus assigned to the rank of Sapindales-Incertae sedis.

  5. An occurrence of the protocetid whale "Eocetus" wardii in the middle Eocene Piney Point Formation of Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weems, R.E.; Edwards, L.E.; Osborne, J.E.; Alford, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    Two protocetid whale vertebrae, here referred to “Eocetus” wardii, have been recovered from the riverbed of the Pamunkey River in east-central Virginia. Neither bone was found in situ, but both were found with lumps of lithified matrix cemented to their surfaces. Most of this matrix was removed and processed for microfossils. Specimens of dinoflagellates were successfully recovered and this flora clearly demonstrates that both vertebrae came from the middle Eocene Piney Point Formation, which crops out above and below river level in the area where the bones were discovered. These vertebrae are the oldest whale remains reported from Virginia and are as old as any cetacean remains known from the western hemisphere.

  6. Early Eocene carbon isotope excursions: Evidence from the terrestrial coal seam in the Fushun Basin, Northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zuoling; Ding, Zhongli; Tang, Zihua; Wang, Xu; Yang, Shiling

    2014-05-01

    A series of transient global warming events between 56 and 50 Ma are characterized by a pronounced negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE). However, the documents of these hyperthermals, such as Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 and H2 events, have come chiefly from marine sediments, and their expression in terrestrial organic carbon is still poorly constrained. Here we yield a high-resolution carbon isotope record of terrestrial organic material from the Fushun Basin, which displays four prominent CIEs with magnitudes larger than 2.5‰. Based on age constraint and comparisons with deep-sea records, our data provide the first evidence of the four hyperthermals in coal seams and suggest a global significance of these events. Moreover, the difference of CIE magnitudes between marine and terrestrial records shows a significant linear correlation with the marine carbonate CIE, implying that these events are likely attributable to recurring injections of 13C-depleted carbon from submarine methane hydrates and/or permafrost.

  7. CLASTS OF UPPERMOST ALBIAN (VRACONIAN LIMESTONE IN THE EOCENE CUCCURU 'E FLORES CONGLOMERATE OF THE M. ALBO MASSIF (EASTERN SARDINIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IGINIO DIENI

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Rare clasts of richly fossiliferous uppermost Albian (Vraconian auctt. glauconitic and phosphatic, ammonite-bearing limestone have been found in the Eocene Cuccuru ’e Flores Conglomerate in the area of M. Albo massif (eastern Sardinia. The limestone is wholly comparable in facies and fossil assemblage to the classical outcrop known in the Orosei area. The fossil content includes also brachiopods and abundant planktonic foraminifers of the Thalmanninella (formerly Rotalipora appenninica Zone. In the palaeontological part the brachiopods Orbirhynchia parkinsoni and Capillithyris capillata are described and discussed. Vraconian highly condensed deposits, characterized by basal erosional gaps of variable importance, have particular relevance, being known to be widely distributed in the northern Tethyan margin with common characteristics, such as authigenic glauconite, phosphatic nodules and a rich outer-shelf fauna. 

  8. Post-Eocene volcanics of the Abazar district, Qazvin, Iran: Mineralogical and geochemical evidence for a complex magmatic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiabanha, A.; Bardintzeff, J. M.; Kananian, A.; Rahimi, G.

    2012-02-01

    The style of volcanism of post-Eocene volcanism in the Alborz zone of northern Iran is different to that of Eocene volcanism (Karaj Formation). Indeed, the volcanic succession of the Abazar district, located in a narrow volcanic strip within the Alborz magmatic assemblage, is characterized by distinct mineralogical and chemical compositions linked to a complex magmatic evolution. The succession was produced by explosive eruptions followed by effusive eruptions. Two main volcanic events are recognized: (1) a thin rhyolitic ignimbritic sheet underlain by a thicker lithic breccia, and (2) lava flows including shoshonite, latite, and andesite that overlie the first event across a reddish soil horizon. Plagioclase in shoshonite (An 48-92) shows normal zoning, whereas plagioclase in latite and andesite (An 48-75) has a similar composition but shows reverse and oscillatory zoning. QUILF temperature calculations for shoshonites and andesites yield temperatures of 1035 °C and 1029 °C, respectively. The geothermometers proposed by Ridolfi et al. (2010) and Holland and Blundy (1994) yield temperatures of 960 °C and 944 °C for latitic lava, respectively. The samples of volcanic rock show a typical geochemical signature of the continental arc regime, but the andesites clearly differ from the shoshonites, the latites and the rhyolites. The mineralogical and chemical characteristics of these rocks are explained by the following petrogenesis: (1) intrusion of a hot, mantle-depth mafic (shoshonitic) magma, which differentiated in the magma chamber to produce a latitic and then a rhyolitic liquid; (2) rhyolitic ignimbritic eruptions from the top of the magma chamber, following by shoshonitic and then latitic extrusions; (3) magma mingling between the latitic and andesitic magmas, as indicated by the occurrence of andesite clasts within the latite; and (4) andesitic effusions. The youngest volcanic events in the Alborz zone show a close chemical relationship with continental arc

  9. Frequency modulation reveals the phasing of orbital eccentricity during Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Event II and the Eocene hyperthermals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurin, Jiří; Meyers, Stephen R.; Galeotti, Simone; Lanci, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Major advances in our understanding of paleoclimate change derive from a precise reconstruction of the periods, amplitudes and phases of the 'Milankovitch cycles' of precession, obliquity and eccentricity. While numerous quantitative approaches exist for the identification of these astronomical cycles in stratigraphic data, limitations in radioisotopic dating, and instability of the theoretical astronomical solutions beyond ∼50 Myr ago, can challenge identification of the phase relationships needed to constrain climate response and anchor floating astrochronologies. Here we demonstrate that interference patterns accompanying frequency modulation (FM) of short eccentricity provide a robust basis for identifying the phase of long eccentricity forcing in stratigraphic data. One- and two-dimensional models of sedimentary distortion of the astronomical signal are used to evaluate the veracity of the FM method, and indicate that pristine eccentricity FM can be readily distinguished in paleo-records. Apart from paleoclimatic implications, the FM approach provides a quantitative technique for testing and calibrating theoretical astronomical solutions, and for refining chronologies for the deep past. We present two case studies that use the FM approach to evaluate major carbon-cycle perturbations of the Eocene and Late Cretaceous. Interference patterns in the short-eccentricity band reveal that Eocene hyperthermals ETM2 ('Elmo'), H2, I1 and ETM3 (X; ∼52-54 Myr ago) were associated with maxima in the 405-kyr cycle of orbital eccentricity. The same eccentricity configuration favored regional anoxic episodes in the Mediterranean during the Middle and Late Cenomanian (∼94.5-97 Myr ago). The initial phase of the global Oceanic Anoxic Event II (OAE II; ∼93.9-94.5 Myr ago) coincides with maximum and falling 405-kyr eccentricity, and the recovery phase occurs during minimum and rising 405-kyr eccentricity. On a Myr scale, the event overlaps with a node in eccentricity

  10. Ecological Impact of Climate Change on Leaf Economic Strategies Across the Paleocene- Eocene Thermal Maximum, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, D. L.; Currano, E. D.; Wilf, P.; Wing, S. L.; Labandeira, C. C.; Lovelock, E. C.

    2007-12-01

    Deciphering the ecological impacts of climate change is a key priority for paleontologists and ecologists alike. An important ecological metric in vegetated settings is the leaf economics spectrum, which represents an adaptive continuum running from rapid resource acquisition to maximized resource retention. This spectrum is comprised of a large number of coordinated traits, including leaf mass per area (LMA), leaf lifespan, photosynthetic rate, nutrient concentration, and palatability to herbivores. Here we apply a recently developed technique for reconstructing LMA to a suite of four isotaphonomic fossil plant sites spanning the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, USA. This technique is based on the biomechanical scaling between petiole width and leaf mass, and it has been calibrated with 65 present-day sites from five continents and tested on two well-known Eocene fossil localities (Bonanza, Utah and Republic, Washington). There are no significant differences in LMA among plants across the PETM. This stasis is present despite a backdrop of extreme climate change during the PETM in this region, including a three-to-four-fold increase in atmospheric CO2, an ~5 °C rise in temperature, and possible drying. Moreover, quantitative measurements of insect herbivory show, on average, a two-fold increase during the PETM relative to before and after the event. We interpret our results to suggest that leaf-economic relationships can, in some situations, partially decouple. More specifically, our documented increase in insect herbivory during the PETM with no concomitant decrease in LMA implies that during this interval less carbon was being captured by plants per unit of investment. Because the rate and magnitude of climate change during the PETM is similar to present-day anthropogenic changes, our results may provide clues for predictions of ecological impacts in the near future.

  11. Taking the pulse of the carbon release during the onset of the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babila, T. L.; Bralower, T. J.; Robinson, M. M.; Self-Trail, J. M.; Zachos, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) (~55 Ma) is a warming event characterized by a negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) representing a large and rapid injection of carbon into global reservoirs. Debate continues regarding the mechanism, magnitude, and tempo of the carbon released. A few terrestrial and marine sediment records document two distinct δ13C excursions a pre-onset excursion (POE) and CIE interpreted as evidence of multiple carbon injections. We generated geochemical records of ocean carbonate chemistry and temperature using cores drilled by the U.S Geological Survey (USGS) that recovered expanded sections of the PETM onset along the mid-Atlantic coastal plain. Our stable isotope (δ13C and δ18O) planktonic foraminifer records from South Dover Bridge (SDB), Maryland USA exhibit prominent anomalies across the Paleocene-Eocene boundary consistent to proximal coastal sites. δ13C records of mixed-layer (Acarinina spp.) and thermocline (Subbotina spp.) dwelling planktonic foraminifera show two negative carbon excursions that include a 2 ‰ POE and 3-4 ‰ CIE that return to baseline values between events in conjunction with bulk carbonate trends. Remarkably, contemporaneous foraminifer δ18O records exhibit only a minor response during the POE. This could be an artifact of preservation, or at face value, indicative of little to no warming. For the latter, this would require a rapid, but relatively small carbon release. To test the coupled link between atmosphere and surface ocean δ13C records we aim to integrate our geochemical results with model simulations to establish the duration and global extent of multiple carbon releases.

  12. An Ocean Acidification Pulse in the Pre-onset Carbon Isotope Excursion Preceding the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, M. M.; Self-Trail, J. M.; Willard, D. A.; Stassen, P.; Spivey, W.

    2015-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; ~55.5 Ma) is recognized globally in marine sediments by a carbonate dissolution zone, the extinction or turnover of benthic taxa, and a radiation of planktic excursion taxa, all accompanied by a rapid-onset, negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE). The cause and nature of the massive carbon release leading to this extreme climate event remains under debate. Regardless of cause, the environmental and ecosystem changes centered on the PETM are the subject of much study because they provide an analog to modern deteriorating conditions associated with the ongoing rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide. We present evidence from sediments of the South Dover Bridge core, deposited on the U.S. mid-Atlantic shelf, for an ocean acidification event in the latest Paleocene that coincides with a relatively small (-2‰) negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) that precedes the larger (-4‰) Paleocene-Eocene CIE onset. Planktic foraminifers during this pre-onset event (POE) show post-deposition dissolution in which the coarsely cancellate and muricate wall textures characteristic of many Late Paleocene species have been dissolved away, leaving smooth, thin-walled specimens often with collapsed chambers. In addition, we document biotic responses in benthic, planktic, and terrestrial communities to the POE, including shifts in foraminifer and pollen assemblages and adaptations in calcareous nannofossil species in response to environmental perturbations. A complete recovery is evident between the POE and CIE in both the carbon isotopic signal and in the biotic response, providing additional evidence not only for a pulsed carbon release, but also for a more rapid rate of carbon release than is suggested by a single pulse over a longer period of time. The timing, nature and magnitude of ecological changes during the less extreme POE shallow water acidification event may help to define the ecological tipping point of shallow marine ecosystems.

  13. Sudden intrusion of corrosive bottom water into the South Atlantic during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, K. J.; Alexander, K.; Bralower, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum, ˜55 million years before present, was a period of rapid warming marked by a negative carbon isotope excursion and widespread dissolution of seafloor carbonate. These changes have been attributed to a massive release of carbon into the exogenic carbon cycle, and thus, the event provides an analog for future climate and environmental changes given the current anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Previous attempts to constrain the amount of carbon released have produced widely diverging results, between 2000 and 10,000 gigatons carbon (GtC). Sediment records indicate that acidification of deep waters was generally more extensive and severe in the Atlantic and Caribbean regions, with more modest changes in the Southern and Pacific Oceans. Here we compare simulations integrated with the UVic Earth System Climate Model with reconstructions of temperature and dissolution to present a mechanism that might explain the observed spatial differences and to constrain the total mass of carbon released. Due to the late Paleocene topography, highly corrosive waters accumulate in the deep North Atlantic before the PETM in our simulations. Several thousand years into the event, deep ocean warming destabilizes the North Atlantic water column and triggers deep water formation. This causes the corrosive bottom water to spill over an equatorial sill into the South Atlantic and through the Southern and Pacific Oceans, progressively gaining alkalinity. The simulated pattern of sediment dissolution along the path taken by this corrosive water is consistent with most dissolution estimates made from CaCO3 measurements in the Paleocene-Eocene sediment record. We find two scenarios that agree best with proxy data: a carbon release of 7000 GtC in combination with pre-event atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations of 840 ppm and a carbon release of 7000-10,000 GtC with pre-event CO2 concentrations of 1680 ppm.

  14. The time-space distribution of Eocene to Miocene magmatism in the central Peruvian polymetallic province and its metallogenetic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissig, Thomas; Ullrich, Thomas D.; Tosdal, Richard M.; Friedman, Richard; Ebert, Shane

    2008-07-01

    Eocene to late Miocene magmatism in the central Peruvian high-plain (approx. between Cerro de Pasco and Huancayo; Lats. ˜10.2-12°S) and east of the Cordillera Occidental is represented by scattered shallow-level intrusions as well as subaerial domes and volcanic deposits. These igneous rocks are calc-alkalic and range from basalt to rhyolite in composition, and many of them are spatially, temporally and, by inference, genetically associated with varied styles of major polymetallic mineralization. Forty-four new 40Ar- 39Ar and three U/Pb zircon dates are presented, many for previously undated intrusions. Our new time constraints together with data from the literature now cover most of the Cenozoic igneous rocks of this Andean segment and provide foundation for geodynamic and metallogenetic research. The oldest Cenozoic bodies are of Eocene age and include dacitic domes to the west of Cerro de Pasco with ages ranging from 38.5 to 33.5 Ma. South of the Domo de Yauli structural dome, Eocene igneous rocks occur some 15 km east of the Cordillera Occidental and include a 39.34 ± 0.28 Ma granodioritic intrusion and a 40.14 ± 0.61 Ma rhyolite sill, whereas several diorite stocks were emplaced between 36 and 33 Ma. Eocene mineralization is restricted to the Quicay high-sulfidation epithermal deposit some 10 km to the west of Cerro de Pasco. Igneous activity in the earliest Oligocene was concentrated up to 70 km east of the Cordillera Occidental and is represented by a number of granodioritic intrusions in the Milpo-Atacocha area. Relatively voluminous early Oligocene dacitic to andesitic volcanism gave rise to the Astabamba Formation to the southeast of Domo de Yauli. Some stocks at Milpo and Atacocha generated important Zn-Pb (-Ag) skarn mineralization. After about 29.3 Ma, magmatism ceased throughout the study region. Late Oligocene igneous activity was restricted to andesitic and dacitic volcanic deposits and intrusions around Uchucchacua (approx. 25 Ma) and felsic

  15. Warming, euxinia and sea level rise during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum on the Gulf Coastal Plain: implications for ocean oxygenation and nutrient cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluijs, A.; van Roij, L.; Harrington, G. J.; Schouten, S.; Sessa, J. A.; LeVay, L. J.; Reichart, G.-J.; Slomp, C. P.

    2014-07-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, ~ 56 Ma) was a ~ 200 kyr episode of global warming, associated with massive injections of 13C-depleted carbon into the ocean-atmosphere system. Although climate change during the PETM is relatively well constrained, effects on marine oxygen concentrations and nutrient cycling remain largely unclear. We identify the PETM in a sediment core from the US margin of the Gulf of Mexico. Biomarker-based paleotemperature proxies (methylation of branched tetraether-cyclization of branched tetraether (MBT-CBT) and TEX86) indicate that continental air and sea surface temperatures warmed from 27-29 to ~ 35 °C, although variations in the relative abundances of terrestrial and marine biomarkers may have influenced these estimates. Vegetation changes, as recorded from pollen assemblages, support this warming. The PETM is bracketed by two unconformities. It overlies Paleocene silt- and mudstones and is rich in angular (thus in situ produced; autochthonous) glauconite grains, which indicate sedimentary condensation. A drop in the relative abundance of terrestrial organic matter and changes in the dinoflagellate cyst assemblages suggest that rising sea level shifted the deposition of terrigenous material landward. This is consistent with previous findings of eustatic sea level rise during the PETM. Regionally, the attribution of the glauconite-rich unit to the PETM implicates the dating of a primate fossil, argued to represent the oldest North American specimen on record. The biomarker isorenieratene within the PETM indicates that euxinic photic zone conditions developed, likely seasonally, along the Gulf Coastal Plain. A global data compilation indicates that O2 concentrations dropped in all ocean basins in response to warming, hydrological change, and carbon cycle feedbacks. This culminated in (seasonal) anoxia along many continental margins, analogous to modern trends. Seafloor deoxygenation and widespread (seasonal) anoxia likely

  16. Apatite fission track evidence for the Cretaceous-Cenozoic cooling history of the Qilian Shan (NW China) and for stepwise northeastward growth of the northeastern Tibetan Plateau since early Eocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Bangshen; Hu, Daogong; Yang, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Yaoling; Tan, Chengxuan; Zhang, Peng; Feng, Chengjun

    2016-07-01

    Apatite fission track (AFT) data from hinterland of the Qilian Shan at the northeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau suggest this range has experienced northeastward propagation of surface uplift since early Eocene and that crustal shortening occurred in the Qilian Shan before the late Miocene. Thermochronometry data indicate that the Qilian Shan experienced a three-stage cooling history, including: (1) rapid initial cooling during Cretaceous; (2) a stage of slow cooling during late Cretaceous-early Eocene; and (3) rapid stepwise cooling in a southwestern-northeastern orientation since early Eocene. Cretaceous rapid cooling may be a record of the Lhasa block and Eurasian collision. Early Cretaceous denudation was followed by tectonic and quasi-isothermal quiescence that continued until early Eocene. Early Eocene rapid cooling in the South Qilian Shan may be the first far-field response in the Qilian Shan to the collision and convergence of the Indian and Eurasian continents. From late Eocene to middle Miocene, crustal shortening propagated into the Central Qilian Shan and North Qilian Shan and produced surface uplift of the entire Qilian Shan region before the late Miocene. This study provides a better understanding of the tectonic evolution of the Qilian Shan and when the far-field stress from the India-Eurasia collision into the northeastern Tibetan Plateau began.

  17. Revisiting carbonate chemistry controls on planktic foraminifera Mg / Ca: implications for sea surface temperature and hydrology shifts over the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum and Eocene-Oligocene transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David; Wade, Bridget S.; Henehan, Michael; Erez, Jonathan; Müller, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Much of our knowledge of past ocean temperatures comes from the foraminifera Mg / Ca palaeothermometer. Several nonthermal controls on foraminifera Mg incorporation have been identified, of which vital effects, salinity, and secular variation in seawater Mg / Ca are the most commonly considered. Ocean carbonate chemistry is also known to influence Mg / Ca, yet this is rarely examined as a source of uncertainty, either because (1) precise pH and [CO32-] reconstructions are sparse or (2) it is not clear from existing culture studies how a correction should be applied. We present new culture data of the relationship between carbonate chemistry and Mg / Ca for the surface-dwelling planktic species Globigerinoides ruber and compare our results to data compiled from existing studies. We find a coherent relationship between Mg / Ca and the carbonate system and argue that pH rather than [CO32-] is likely to be the dominant control. Applying these new calibrations to data sets for the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) and Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT) enables us to produce a more accurate picture of surface hydrology change for the former and a reassessment of the amount of subtropical precursor cooling for the latter. We show that pH-adjusted Mg / Ca and δ18O data sets for the PETM are within error of no salinity change and that the amount of precursor cooling over the EOT has been previously underestimated by ˜ 2 °C based on Mg / Ca. Finally, we present new laser-ablation data of EOT-age Turborotalia ampliapertura from St. Stephens Quarry (Alabama), for which a solution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) Mg / Ca record is available (Wade et al., 2012). We show that the two data sets are in excellent agreement, demonstrating that fossil solution and laser-ablation data may be directly comparable. Together with an advancing understanding of the effect of Mg / Casw, the coherent picture of the relationship between Mg / Ca and pH that we outline

  18. The oldest fossil record of the megamouth shark from the late Eocene of Denmark and comments on the enigmatic megachasmid origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenshu Shimada

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The megamouth shark (Lamniformes: Megachasmidae has sporadic occurrences both in the present-day oceans and in the fossil record. In this paper, we describe a new megachasmid, Megachasma alisonae sp. nov., on the basis of a morphologically distinct tooth collected from the Pyt Member of the late Eocene Søvind Marl Formation at Moesgård Strand in Denmark, that represents the geologically oldest known Megachasma. The tooth likely came from an individual that measured somewhere between 1.3 and 3.5 m long, and its morphology and chipped cusp tips suggest that it possibly fed on macro-zooplankton and small fishes that had hard skeletal components. Its occurrence in the mid-Priabonian Pyt Member at least suggests that the shark inhabited a relatively deep, open marine environment about 36 Ma ago. This Eocene specimen is significant because it illustrates the dental condition of early megachasmids, which is distinctively odontaspidid-like morphologically.

  19. Colemanus keeleyorum (Braconidae, Ichneutinae s. l.: a new genus and species of Eocene wasp from the Green River Formation of western North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fisher

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A new genus and species of Ichneutinae s. l., Colemanus keeleyorum Fisher, is described from the Eocene Green River Formation in Colorado, USA. Colemanus was placed on a phylogenetic hypothesis using morphological data. Using a parsimony criterion, Colemanus is placed within Proteropini (Ichneutinae s. l.. Reconstructions of well-preserved regions (mesosomal dorsum and wings are included. A previously described species from lower Oligocene Baltic amber is transferred to Colemanus, resulting in the new combination C. contortus (Brues, 1933.

  20. Apatite fission-track evidence for regional exhumation in the subtropical Eocene, block faulting, and localized fluid flow in east-central Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Bacon, Charles R.; O'Sullivan, Paul B.; Day, Warren C.

    2016-01-01

    The origin and antiquity of the subdued topography of the Yukon–Tanana Upland (YTU), the physiographic province between the Denali and Tintina faults, are unresolved questions in the geologic history of interior Alaska and adjacent Yukon. We present apatite fission-track (AFT) results for 33 samples from the 2300 km2 western Fortymile district in the YTU in Alaska and propose an exhumation model that is consistent with preservation of volcanic rocks in valleys that requires base level stability of several drainages since latest Cretaceous–Paleocene time. AFT thermochronology indicates widespread cooling below ∼110 °C at ∼56–47 Ma (early Eocene) and ∼44–36 Ma (middle Eocene). Samples with ∼33–27, ∼19, and ∼10 Ma AFT ages, obtained near a major northeast-trending fault zone, apparently reflect hydrothermal fluid flow. Uplift and erosion following ∼107 Ma magmatism exposed plutonic rocks to different extents in various crustal blocks by latest Cretaceous time. We interpret the Eocene AFT ages to suggest that higher elevations were eroded during the Paleogene subtropical climate of the subarctic, while base level remained essentially stable. Tertiary basins outboard of the YTU contain sediment that may account for the required >2 km of removed overburden that was not carried to the sea by the ancestral Yukon River system. We consider a climate driven explanation for the Eocene AFT ages to be most consistent with geologic constraints in concert with block faulting related to translation on the Denali and Tintina faults resulting from oblique subduction along the southern margin of Alaska.

  1. Whence the beardogs? Reappraisal of the Middle to Late Eocene ‘Miacis’ from Texas, USA, and the origin of Amphicyonidae (Mammalia, Carnivora)

    OpenAIRE

    Tomiya, Susumu; Tseng, Zhijie Jack

    2016-01-01

    The Middle to Late Eocene sediments of Texas have yielded a wealth of fossil material that offers a rare window on a diverse and highly endemic mammalian fauna from that time in the southern part of North America. These faunal data are particularly significant because the narrative of mammalian evolution in the Paleogene of North America has traditionally been dominated by taxa that are known from higher latitudes, primarily in the Rocky Mountain and northern Great Plains regions. Here we rep...

  2. Elucidating the affinities and habitat of ancient, widespread Cyperaceae: Volkeria messelensis gen. et sp. nov., a fossil mapanioid sedge from the Eocene of Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Selena Y.; Collinson, Margaret E.; Simpson, David A.; Rudall, Paula J.; Marone, Federica; Stampanoni, Marco

    2009-01-01

    The sedges (family Cyperaceae) are an economically and ecologically important monocot group dating back at least to the Paleocene. While modern genera are mostly unknown before the Oligocene, several extinct taxa are recognized as the earliest sedges. Their affinities have been unclear until now, because they are found as isolated, often abraded fruits or endocarps. Exceptionally preserved sedge fossils from the Middle Eocene of Messel, Germany yield more characters for identification, Fossil...

  3. The effects of secular calcium and magnesium concentration changes on the thermodynamics of seawater acid/base chemistry: Implications for Eocene and Cretaceous ocean carbon chemistry and buffering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Mathis P.; Sigman, Daniel M.; Higgins, John A.; Haug, Gerald H.

    2015-05-01

    Reconstructed changes in seawater calcium and magnesium concentration ([Ca2+], [Mg2+]) predictably affect the ocean's acid/base and carbon chemistry. Yet inaccurate formulations of chemical equilibrium "constants" are currently in use to account for these changes. Here we develop an efficient implementation of the MIAMI Ionic Interaction Model to predict all chemical equilibrium constants required for carbon chemistry calculations under variable [Ca2+] and [Mg2+]. We investigate the impact of [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] on the relationships among the ocean's pH, CO2, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), saturation state of CaCO3 (Ω), and buffer capacity. Increasing [Ca2+] and/or [Mg2+] enhances "ion pairing," which increases seawater buffering by increasing the concentration ratio of total to "free" (uncomplexed) carbonate ion. An increase in [Ca2+], however, also causes a decline in carbonate ion to maintain a given Ω, thereby overwhelming the ion pairing effect and decreasing seawater buffering. Given the reconstructions of Eocene [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] ([Ca2+]~20 mM; [Mg2+]~30 mM), Eocene seawater would have required essentially the same DIC as today to simultaneously explain a similar-to-modern Ω and the estimated Eocene atmospheric CO2 of ~1000 ppm. During the Cretaceous, at ~4 times modern [Ca2+], ocean buffering would have been at a minimum. Overall, during times of high seawater [Ca2+], CaCO3 saturation, pH, and atmospheric CO2 were more susceptible to perturbations of the global carbon cycle. For example, given both Eocene and Cretaceous seawater [Ca2+] and [Mg2+], a doubling of atmospheric CO2 would require less carbon addition to the ocean/atmosphere system than under modern seawater composition. Moreover, increasing seawater buffering since the Cretaceous may have been a driver of evolution by raising energetic demands of biologically controlled calcification and CO2 concentration mechanisms that aid photosynthesis.

  4. Nutritional Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutritional support is therapy for people who cannot get enough nourishment by eating or drinking. You may ... absorb nutrients through your digestive system You receive nutritional support through a needle or catheter placed in ...

  5. Eruptive history, geochronology, and post-eruption structural evolution of the late Eocene Hall Creek Caldera, Toiyabe Range, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Joseph P.; Henry, Christopher D.

    2017-02-24

    The magmatic, tectonic, and topographic evolution of what is now the northern Great Basin remains controversial, notably the temporal and spatial relation between magmatism and extensional faulting. This controversy is exemplified in the northern Toiyabe Range of central Nevada, where previous geologic mapping suggested the presence of a caldera that sourced the late Eocene (34.0 mega-annum [Ma]) tuff of Hall Creek. This region was also inferred to be the locus of large-magnitude middle Tertiary extension (more than 100 percent strain) localized along the Bernd Canyon detachment fault, and to be the approximate location of a middle Tertiary paleodivide that separated east and west-draining paleovalleys. Geologic mapping, 40Ar/39Ar dating, and geochemical analyses document the geologic history and extent of the Hall Creek caldera, define the regional paleotopography at the time it formed, and clarify the timing and kinematics of post-caldera extensional faulting. During and after late Eocene volcanism, the northern Toiyabe Range was characterized by an east-west trending ridge in the area of present-day Mount Callaghan, probably localized along a Mesozoic anticline. Andesite lava flows erupted around 35–34 Ma ponded hundreds of meters thick in the erosional low areas surrounding this structural high, particularly in the Simpson Park Mountains. The Hall Creek caldera formed ca. 34.0 Ma during eruption of the approximately 400 cubic kilometers (km3) tuff of Hall Creek, a moderately crystal-rich rhyolite (71–77 percent SiO2) ash-flow tuff. Caldera collapse was piston-like with an intact floor block, and the caldera filled with thick (approximately 2,600 meters) intracaldera tuff and interbedded breccia lenses shed from the caldera walls. The most extensive exposed megabreccia deposits are concentrated on or close to the caldera floor in the southwestern part of the caldera. Both silicic and intermediate post-caldera lavas were locally erupted within 400 thousand

  6. The Eocene Rusayl Formation, Oman, carbonaceous rocks in calcareous shelf sediments: Environment of deposition, alteration and hydrocarbon potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dill, H.G.; Wehner, H.; Kus, J. [Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources, P.O. Box 510163, D-30631 Hannover (Germany); Botz, R. [University Kiel, Geological-Paleontological Department, Olshausenstrasse 40-60, D-24118 Kiel (Germany); Berner, Z.; Stueben, D. [Technical University Karlsruhe, Institute for Mineralogy and Geochemistry, Fritz-Haber-Weg 2, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Al-Sayigh, A. [Sultan Qaboos University, Geological Dept. PO Box 36, Al-Khod (Oman)

    2007-10-01

    Paralic carbonaceous series intercalated among calcareous shelf sediments have seldom been investigated. During the early Eocene, calcareous and siliciclastic sediments were deposited on a wide shelf in front of low-reliefed hinterland in the Al Khawd region in NE Oman. The siliciclastic-calcareous sediments originated from strongly reworked debris of the Arabic Shield. The underlying Semail Ophiolite did not act as a direct source of debris but provided some heat to increase the maturity of carbonaceous rocks and modify the isotope signal of the calcareous minerals in the Rusayl Formation. A multidisciplinary approach involving sedimentology, mineralogy, chemistry, coal petrography and paleontology resulted in the establishment of nine stratigraphic lithofacies units and provides the reader with a full picture from deposition of the mixed carbonaceous-calcareous-siliciclastic rocks to the most recent stages of post-depositional alteration of the Paleogene formations. The calcareous Jafnayn Formation (lithofacies unit I) developed in a subtidal to intertidal regime, influenced episodically by storms. Deepening of the calcareous shelf towards younger series was ground to a halt by paleosols developing on a disconformity (lithofacies unit II) and heralding the onset of the Rusayl Formation. The stratigraphic lithofacies units III and IV reflect mangrove swamps which from time to time were flooded through washover fans from the open sea. The presence of Spinozonocolpites and the taxon Avicennia, which today belong to a coastal marsh vegetational community, furnish palynological evidence to the idea of extensive mangrove swamps in the Rusayl Formation [El Beialy, S.Y., 1998. Stratigraphic and palaeonenvironmental significance of Eocene palynomorphs from the Rusayl Shale Formation, Al Khawd, northern Oman. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology 102, 249-258]. During the upper Rusayl Formation (lithofacies units V through VII) algal mats episodically flooded by marine

  7. An Eocene/Oligocene boundary geochemical proxy record from Ocean Drilling Program Site 1211 on the Shatsky Rise, Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, T.; Clarke, L. J.; Leng, M.

    2009-04-01

    Evidence for significant global oceanographic and climatic change at the Eocene/Oligocene Boundary (EOB) is well documented, but records from the Pacific Ocean are limited to a single location, Site 1218 (Lear et al., 2004; Coxall et al., 2005). Here we present new data from the Shatsky Rise for cores collected during Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 198 that detail geochemical change across the boundary. During ODP Leg 198 an EOB section was recovered at Site 1211 (palaeodepth 2000-3000 m) on the southern high of the Shatsky Rise. This EOB section is a seemingly complete calcareous nannofossil ooze rich section, suggesting deposition above the carbonate compensation depth (CCD) throughout the EOB period. Deposition above the CCD should mean that changes in carbonate ion concentration, a potential control on foraminiferal Mg/Ca ratios, will be reduced in comparison to existing records from ODP Site 1218 (palaeodepth ~3800 m; Lear et al., 2004). Based on data published in the ODP Leg 198 Initial and Scientific Reports, relevant Site 1211 cores were sampled across the EOB, as marked out by the last occurrence of Hantkenina spp. and a notable colour reflectance change. In the absence of a palaeomagnetic record, Sr-isotope chronostratigraphy has been used to supplement the existing biostratigraphy and facilitate the development of a more robust age model. Samples were picked for both benthonic and planktonic foraminifera, which subsequently were analysed for stable carbon- and oxygen-isotope and element/Ca (particularly Mg/Ca) ratios. These foraminiferal proxy data are supplemented by stable-isotope records from the <38 micron fine fraction, %CaCO3 and scanning X-ray florescence (Ca and Fe) data from across the EOB. The geochemical proxy data show the ubiquitous EOB positive shift in oxygen-isotope ratios synchronous with increases in %CaCO3, colour reflectance and % sand, suggesting enhanced carbonate preservation/sedimentation compared to the late Eocene. Benthonic

  8. Deducing the magma chamber processes of middle Eocene volcanics, Sivas and Tokat regions; NE Turkey: Insights from clinopyroxene chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göçmengil, Gönenç; Karacık, Zekiye; Genç, Ş. Can; Prelevic, Dejan

    2016-04-01

    Middle Eocene Tokat and Sivas volcanic successions occur within the İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan suture zone. Different models are suggested for the development of the middle Eocene volcanism such as post-collisional, delamination and slab-breakoff models as well as the arc magmatism. In both areas, volcanic units cover all the basement units with a regional disconformity and comprise lavas spanning a compositional range from mainly basalt-basaltic andesite to a lesser amount trachyte. Here, we report mineral chemistry of different basaltic lavas through transect from northern continent (Tokat region, Pontides) to southern continent (Sivas region, Kırşehir block) to deduce the characteristics of the magma chamber processes which are active during the middle Eocene. Basaltic lavas include olivine bearing basalts (Ol-basalt: ± olivine + clinopyroxene + plagioclase); amphibole bearing basaltic andesite (Amp-basaltic andesite: amphibole + clinopyroxene + plagioclase ± biotite) and pyroxene bearing basaltic andesite (Px-basaltic andesite: clinopyroxene + plagioclase). Microlitic, glomeroporphyric and pilotaxitic texture are common. Clinopyroxene phenocrystals (macro ≥ 750 μm and micro ≤300 μm) are common in all three lava series which are investigated by transecting core to rim compositional profiles. They are generally augite and diopside; euhedral to subhedral in shape with oscillatory, normal and reverse zoning patterns. Also, all clinopyroxene phenocrystals are marked by moderately high Mg# (for Ol-basalt: 67-91; avg. 80; Amp-basaltic andesite: 76-83, avg: 80; Px -basaltic andesite 68-95, avg: 81). In Ol-basalt, clinopyroxene phenocrystals show normal zonation (high Mg# cores and low Mg# rims). In Amp-basaltic andesite, clinopyroxenes are generally homogenous in composition with minor variation of Mg# towards the rims. On the contrary, in Px-basaltic andesite, clinopyroxene macro phenocrystals show reverse zonation with the core with low Mg# and the rims with

  9. Environmental impact and magnitude of paleosol carbonate carbon isotope excursions marking five early Eocene hyperthermals in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abels, Hemmo A.; Lauretano, Vittoria; van Yperen, Anna E.; Hopman, Tarek; Zachos, James C.; Lourens, Lucas J.; Gingerich, Philip D.; Bowen, Gabriel J.

    2016-05-01

    Transient greenhouse warming events in the Paleocene and Eocene were associated with the addition of isotopically light carbon to the exogenic atmosphere-ocean carbon system, leading to substantial environmental and biotic change. The magnitude of an accompanying carbon isotope excursion (CIE) can be used to constrain both the sources and amounts of carbon released during an event and also to correlate marine and terrestrial records with high precision. The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is well documented, but CIE records for the subsequent warming events are still rare, especially from the terrestrial realm.Here, we provide new paleosol carbonate CIE records for two of the smaller hyperthermal events, I1 and I2, as well as two additional records of Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2) and H2 in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, USA. Stratigraphic comparison of this expanded, high-resolution terrestrial carbon isotope history to the deep-sea benthic foraminiferal isotope records from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) sites 1262 and 1263, Walvis Ridge, in the southern Atlantic Ocean corroborates the idea that the Bighorn Basin fluvial sediments record global atmospheric change. The ˜ 34 m thicknesses of the eccentricity-driven hyperthermals in these archives corroborate precession forcing of the ˜ 7 m thick fluvial overbank-avulsion sedimentary cycles. Using bulk-oxide mean-annual-precipitation reconstructions, we find soil moisture contents during the four younger hyperthermals that are similar to or only slightly wetter than the background, in contrast with soil drying observed during the PETM using the same proxy, sediments, and plant fossils.The magnitude of the CIEs in soil carbonate for the four smaller, post-PETM events scale nearly linearly with the equivalent event magnitudes documented in marine records. In contrast, the magnitude of the PETM terrestrial CIE is at least 5 ‰ smaller than expected based on extrapolation of the scaling relationship established

  10. Eocene Granitoids of the Okhotsk Complex in Sakhalin Island, Russian Far East: Petrogenesis and tectonic implications from zircon U-Pb ages, geochemical and Sr-Nd isotopic characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jia Ping; Alexandrov, Igor; Jahn, Bor-ming

    2016-04-01

    Hokkaido. The geochemical and isotopic characteristics are also comparable for granitic rocks from the two islands. The granitoids from Sakhalin show arc geochemical characteristics, and their isotopic signatures suggest a generation by partial melting of sources rich in juvenile (mantle-derived) component. In fact, the source nature of the granitoids is quite similar to the Eocene and Miocene granitoids of Hokkaido. However, the Okhotsk granitoids with transitional characteristics between I- and A- granite types were probably generated in more complicated magmatic processes or tectonic regime, making it more ambiguous to define their petrogenesis and tectonic setting. Since the Okhotsk Complex was emplaced in the Ozersk accretionary terrain in southern Sakhalin, we infer that the granitic magmatism was probably related to a tectonic transition from a subduction phase to a strike-slip phase and recorded a signature of supra-subduction, post-accretionary and strike-slip processes. Thus, the age of 42-44 Ma may hint an important period of tectonic change in southern Sakhalin. (Supported by RFBR Research Project No15-55-52035, Russia and MOST 104-2913-M-002-005, Taiwan) Key words: Sakhalin, granitoids, accretionary orogen, Sr-Nd isotopes, Okhotsk Complex

  11. Environmental perturbations at the early Eocene ETM2, H2, and I1 events as inferred by Tethyan calcareous plankton (Terche section, northeastern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Onofrio, Roberta; Luciani, Valeria; Fornaciari, Eliana; Giusberti, Luca; Boscolo Galazzo, Flavia; Dallanave, Edoardo; Westerhold, Thomas; Sprovieri, Mario; Telch, Sonia

    2016-09-01

    Several early Eocene hyperthermals have been recently investigated and characterized in terms of temperature anomalies and oceanographic changes. The effects of these climatic perturbations on biotic communities are much less constrained. Here we present new records from the Terche section (northeastern Italy) that, for the first time, integrates data on planktic foraminifera and calcareous nannofossils across three post-Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs). The biomagnetostratigraphic framework generated at Terche allows us to confidently relate such CIEs to the Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2), H2, and I1 events. Each of these events coincides with lithological anomalies characterized by significantly lower calcium carbonate content (marly units, MUs). We interpret these MUs as mainly linked to an effect of increased terrigenous dilution, as dissolution proxies do not display significant variations. Calcareous plankton assemblages change significantly across these events and radiolarians increase. Observed changes suggest that transient warming and environmental perturbations, though more intense during ETM2, occurred during each of the three investigated perturbations. Variations among calcareous plankton suggest increase in surface-water eutrophication with respect to the pre-event conditions, coupled with a weakening of the upper water-column thermal stratification. Higher nutrient discharge was related to intensification of the hydrological cycle as a consequence of the warmer climate. These conditions persisted during the early CIE recovery, implying slower recovery rates for the environment and biota than for the carbon cycle.

  12. Dextral strike-slip along the Kapıdağ shear zone (NW Turkey): evidence for Eocene westward translation of the Anatolian plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkoğlu, Ercan; Zulauf, Gernold; Linckens, Jolien; Ustaömer, Timur

    2016-10-01

    The northern part of the Kapıdağ Peninsula (Marmara Sea, NW Turkey) is affected by the E-W trending Kapıdağ shear zone, which cuts through calc-alkaline granitoids of the Ocaklar pluton resulting in mylonitic orthogneiss. Macroscopic and microscopic shear-sense indicators, such as SC fabrics, shear bands, σ-clasts and mica fish, unequivocally suggest dextral strike-slip for the Kapıdağ shear zone. Based on petrographic data, deformation microfabrics of quartz and feldspar, and the slip systems in quartz, the dextral shearing should have been active at T = 500-300 °C and P < 5 kbar. Published K-Ar and 39Ar-40Ar cooling ages of hornblende and biotite suggest that cooling below 500-300 °C occurred during the Eocene (ca. 45-ca. 35 Ma), meaning that the Kapıdağ shear zone should have been active during Middle to Late Eocene times. The differential stress related to the shearing was <50 MPa as is indicated by the size of recrystallized quartz grains. Based on the new and published data, it is concluded that the westward movement of the Anatolian plate might have been active almost continuously from the Middle Eocene until recent times.

  13. Paleomagnetic Results On Clastic Turbidite Systems In Compressional Settings: Example From The Eocene Hecho Group (southern Pyrenees, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oms, O.; Dinarès-Turell, J.; Remacha, E.

    The Hecho group clastic turbidites were deposited in the southpyrenean foreland basin during the Paleocene and Eocene. These turbidites have provided well-known strati- graphic and facies models, and can be considered as one of the most studied ancient turbidite models of the world. This is because of the quality and preservation of the sedimentary record (basin-wide lateral continuity of rock-bodies, physical correlation linking deep-sea with platform strata, clear interaction with tectonic structures etc.) However, the Hecho group has not been a target for paleomagnetic studies despite the overwhelming sedimentological knowledge (in fact, sediments from such sedimento- logical and tectonic settings have been largely overlooked in the magnetostratigraphic literature). Here we present the results from a 2200 m-thick section mostly located in the Aragón valley north of the Jaca village (Huesca province). Planktic forams and calcareous nannoplankton data place the section in the middle Eocene. The lower and middle part of the section is representative of the pure flysch stage of the basin evo- lution (in the appenninic sense) and is build up by deep clastic depositional systems including carbonate megabreccias. The upper part of the section involves the transi- tion to a molasse stage by the occurrence of channelized turbidites (known as Rapitán system) that further up evolve to prodelta and platform deposits (Larrés slope marls and Sabiñánigo sandstone formations, respectively). The paleomagnetic investigation is based on the study of about 280 samples from 80 sampling sites, including mea- surements of remanence, anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and rock magnetic experiments. Our data shows that magnetization is carried out mainly by iron sulphides that define a section dominated by reversed polarities although normal polarity zones are found. Considering the biostratigraphic constraints we make a cor- relation to the standard polarity scale

  14. Variability in climate and productivity during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum in the western Tethys (Forada section)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusberti, L.; Boscolo Galazzo, F.; Thomas, E.

    2016-02-01

    The Forada section (northeastern Italy) provides a continuous, expanded deep-sea record of the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) in the central-western Tethys. We combine a new, high-resolution, benthic foraminiferal assemblage record with published calcareous plankton, mineralogical and biomarker data to document climatic and environmental changes across the PETM, highlighting the benthic foraminiferal extinction event (BEE). The onset of the PETM, occurring ˜ 30 kyr after a precursor event, is marked by a thin, black, barren clay layer, possibly representing a brief pulse of anoxia and carbonate dissolution. The BEE occurred within the 10 cm interval including this layer. During the first 3.5 kyr of the PETM, several agglutinated recolonizing taxa show rapid species turnover, indicating a highly unstable, CaCO3-corrosive environment. Calcareous taxa reappeared after this interval, and the next ˜9 kyr were characterized by rapid alternation of peaks in abundance of various calcareous and agglutinated recolonizers. These observations suggest that synergistic stressors, including deepwater CaCO3 corrosiveness, low oxygenation, and high environmental instability caused the extinction. Combined faunal and biomarker data (BIT index, higher plant n-alkane average chain length) and the high abundance of the mineral chlorite suggest that erosion and weathering increased strongly at the onset of the PETM, due to an overall wet climate with invigorated hydrological cycle, which led to storm flood events carrying massive sediment discharge into the Belluno Basin. This interval was followed by the core of the PETM, characterized by four precessionally paced cycles in CaCO3 %, hematite %, δ13C, abundant occurrence of opportunistic benthic foraminiferal taxa, and calcareous nannofossil and planktonic foraminiferal taxa typical of high-productivity environments, radiolarians, and lower δDn-alkanes. We interpret these cycles as reflecting alternation between an overall

  15. Benthic foraminifera at the Paleocene/Eocene thermal maximum in the western Tethys (Forada section): variability in climate and productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusberti, L.; Boscolo Galazzo, F.; Thomas, E.

    2015-09-01

    The Forada section (northeastern Italy) provides a continuous, expanded deep-sea record of the Paleocene/Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) in the central-western Tethys. We combine a new, high resolution, benthic foraminiferal assemblage record with published calcareous plankton, mineralogical and biomarker data to document climatic and environmental changes across the PETM, highlighting the benthic foraminiferal extinction event (BEE). The onset of the PETM, occurring ~ 30 kyr after a precursor event, is marked by a thin, black, barren clay layer, possibly representing a brief pulse of anoxia and carbonate dissolution. The BEE occurred within the 10 cm interval including this layer. During the first 3.5 kyr of the PETM several agglutinated recolonizing taxa show rapid species turnover, indicating a highly unstable, CaCO3-corrosive environment. Calcareous taxa reappeared after this interval, and the next ~ 9 kyr were characterized by rapid alternation of peaks in abundance of various calcareous and agglutinant recolonizers. These observations suggest that synergistic stressors including deep water CaCO3-corrosiveness, low oxygenation, and high environmental instability caused the extinction. Combined faunal and biomarker data (BIT index, higher plant n-alkane average chain length) and the high abundance of the mineral chlorite suggest that erosion and weathering increased strongly at the onset of the PETM, due to an overall wet climate with invigorated hydrological cycle, which led to storm flood-events carrying massive sediment discharge into the Belluno Basin. This interval was followed by the core of the PETM, characterized by four precessionally paced cycles in CaCO3%, hematite%, δ13C, abundant occurrence of opportunistic benthic foraminiferal taxa, as well as calcareous nannofossil and planktonic foraminiferal taxa typical of high productivity environments, radiolarians, and lower δDn-alkanes. We interpret these cycles as reflecting alternation between an

  16. Terrestrial records of Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2 / H1 / Elmo) and H2 in the Bighorn Basin (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abels, H. A.; Clyde, W. C.; Gingerich, P. D.; Hilgen, F. J.; Fricke, H. C.; Bowen, G. J.; Lourens, L. J.

    2012-04-01

    Late Paleocene and early Eocene hyperthermal events are short-lived periods of rapid greenhouse warming related to massive increases in the concentration of atmospheric CO2. Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2; also known as the Elmo event or H1) is the second largest of these events after the PETM and is followed after ~100 kyr by the smaller H2 event. ETM2 has only been documented in a few high-resolution marine successions and suggested in one low-resolution terrestrial record. Thus the impact of ETM2 on continental climates and biotas remains largely unknown. Recently, we located two successive negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) of ~3.8 and ~2.8 per mille in paleosol carbonate in the floodplain sedimentary record of the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming (USA). The C24r/C24n magnetochron boundary is pinpointed above the base of the larger CIE in our paleomagnetic results (Fig. 1). This stratigraphic position and the pattern and magnitude of the events indicate that the CIEs are the ETM2/H1 and H2 events, respectively. Mammal finds in the McCullough Peaks area where we documented the CIEs indicate that the Wa4-Wa5 biozone boundary occurs well below ETM2. If rapid faunal turnover at the Wa4-Wa5 boundary (known as 'biohorizon B') involved extinction of Ectocion and Haplomylus and the first appearance of Bunophorus, as commonly assumed, then faunal turnover at biohorizon B cannot be explained by greenhouse warming at the ETM2 hyperthermal event. Our new terrestrial carbon isotope record of ETM2/H1 and H2 reveals, when placed in an astronomically-calibrated timeframe, a very similar pattern to records recovered from marine successions. The magnitudes of the ongoing CIEs are similar to those found in western India that has been tentatively linked to ETM2. Also, the CIEs of PETM, ETM2, and H2 in paleosol carbonate records from the Bighorn Basin seem to scale linearly with CIEs in marine carbonate records from the same events.

  17. Evidence for changes in subsurface circulation in the late Eocene equatorial Pacific from radiolarian-bound nitrogen isotope values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Rebecca S.; Moore, Theodore C.; Erhardt, Andrea M.; Scher, Howie D.

    2015-07-01

    Microfossil-bound organic matter represents an important archive of surface ocean environmental information. Sedimentary nitrogen (N) isotope reconstructions of surface nitrate consumption and nitrogen source changes are made using fossil diatom (autotrophs) and planktic foraminiferal (heterotrophs)-bound organic matter with success. However, because diatoms and planktic foraminifera are poorly preserved and sedimentary organic matter content is near zero during the late Eocene, our ability to examine nutrient dynamics across this important climate transition is limited. Here we present new data exploring the use of N isotope records from radiolarian tests. A comparison of surface ocean nitrate and core top bulk and radiolarian N isotope values (as δ15N) from the equatorial Pacific indicates that radiolarian-N records δ15N variability with fidelity but that a significant offset exists between bulk sedimentary and diatom δ15N values and those measured from radiolarians (~7.1 ± 1.1‰). A downcore profile of radiolarian δ15N values is compared to siliceous microfossil assemblage changes across the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. Average of radiolarian-bound δ15N values is 0.5 ± 2.0‰, which, when corrected using the offset derived from the modern surface samples, suggests that the mean nitrogen isotopic composition of the early Cenozoic eastern Pacific was not significantly different from today. The overall trend, of decreasing δ15N values with decreasing export productivity, is consistent with either a regional decline in pelagic denitrification or a large-scale change in nutrient sources to the eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP), both linked to the cooling climate and changing intermediate water circulation. Decreasing/low δ15N values cooccur with high radiolarian species turnover at ~35.5 and 34 Ma, suggestive of a significant ecological change in the EEP, consistent with cooling and water mass distribution changes. The preliminary results suggest that

  18. New phiomorph rodents from the latest Eocene of Egypt, and the impact of Bayesian “clock”-based phylogenetic methods on estimates of basal hystricognath relationships and biochronology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham M. Sallam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Fayum Depression of Egypt has yielded fossils of hystricognathous rodents from multiple Eocene and Oligocene horizons that range in age from ∼37 to ∼30 Ma and document several phases in the early evolution of crown Hystricognathi and one of its major subclades, Phiomorpha. Here we describe two new genera and species of basal phiomorphs, Birkamys korai and Mubhammys vadumensis, based on rostra and maxillary and mandibular remains from the terminal Eocene (∼34 Ma Fayum Locality 41 (L-41. Birkamys is the smallest known Paleogene hystricognath, has very simple molars, and, like derived Oligocene-to-Recent phiomorphs (but unlike contemporaneous and older taxa apparently retained dP4∕4 late into life, with no evidence for P4∕4 eruption or formation. Mubhammys is very similar in dental morphology to Birkamys, and also shows no evidence for P4∕4 formation or eruption, but is considerably larger. Though parsimony analysis with all characters equally weighted places Birkamys and Mubhammys as sister taxa of extant Thryonomys to the exclusion of much younger relatives of that genus, all other methods (standard Bayesian inference, Bayesian “tip-dating,” and parsimony analysis with scaled transitions between “fixed” and polymorphic states place these species in more basal positions within Hystricognathi, as sister taxa of Oligocene-to-Recent phiomorphs. We also employ tip-dating as a means for estimating the ages of early hystricognath-bearing localities, many of which are not well-constrained by geological, geochronological, or biostratigraphic evidence. By simultaneously taking into account phylogeny, evolutionary rates, and uniform priors that appropriately encompass the range of possible ages for fossil localities, dating of tips in this Bayesian framework allows paleontologists to move beyond vague and assumption-laden “stage of evolution” arguments in biochronology to provide relatively rigorous age assessments of poorly

  19. K-Ar age and geochemistry of the SW Japan Paleogene cauldron cluster: Implications for Eocene-Oligocene thermo-tectonic reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaoka, T.; Kiminami, K.; Nishida, K.; Takemoto, M.; Ikawa, T.; Itaya, T.; Kagami, H.; Iizumi, S.

    2011-01-01

    Systematic K-Ar dating and geochemical analyses of Paleogene cauldrons in the Sanin Belt of SW Japan have been made to explore the relationship between the timing of their formation and the Paleogene subduction history of SW Japan documented in the Shimanto accretionary complex. We also examine the magma sources and tectonics beneath the backarc region of SW Japan at the eastern plate boundary of Eurasia. Fifty-eight new K-Ar ages and 19 previously reported radiometric age data show that the cauldrons formed during Middle Eocene to Early Oligocene time (43-30 Ma), following a period of magmatic hiatus from 52 to 43 Ma. The hiatus coincides with absence of an accretionary prism in the Shimanto Belt. Resumption of the magmatism that formed the cauldron cluster in the backarc was concurrent with voluminous influx of terrigenous detritus to the trench, as a common tectono-thermal event within a subduction system. The cauldrons are composed of medium-K calc-alkaline basalts to rhyolites and their plutonic equivalents. These rocks are characterized by lower concentrations of large ion lithophile elements (LILE) including K 2O, Ba, Rb, Th, U and Li, lower (La/Yb) n ratios, lower initial Sr isotopic ratios (0.7037-0.7052) and higher ɛNd( T) values (-0.5 to +3.5) relative to Late Cretaceous to Early Paleogene equivalents. There are clear trends from enriched to depleted signatures with decreasing age, from the Late Cretaceous to the Paleogene. The same isotopic shift is also confirmed in lower crust-derived xenoliths, and is interpreted as mobilization of pre-existing enriched lithospheric mantle by upwelling depleted asthenosphere. Relatively elevated geothermal gradients are presumed to have prevailed over wide areas of the backarc and forearc of the SW Japan arc-trench system during the Eocene to Oligocene. Newly identified Late Eocene low silica adakites and high-Mg andesites in the Sanin Belt and Early Eocene A-type granites in the SW Korea Peninsula probably formed

  20. A new dromiid crab (Crustacea, Brachyura, Dromioidea) from the Upper Eocene of Huesca (Aragón, northern Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artal, Pedro; Bakel, Barry W M Van; Domínguez, José L; Gómez, Guillermo

    2016-01-08

    A new genus and species of brachyuran crab from the Upper Eocene (Priabonian) strata in Basa Valley (Huesca, northern Spain) assignable to the superfamily Dromioidea, Basadromia longifrons n. gen., n. sp., adds to current knowledge of the morphological diversity and geographical-stratigraphical distribution of the superfamily. The main characters of the new form, such as the orbitofrontal construction with two median teeth and an rostral tooth situated in a lower plane, two minor frontal (inner orbital) teeth, well-marked cervical and branchial grooves, general carapace outline, and the shape and distribution of dorsal regions, confirm placement in Dromioidea. Unique features, such as the four conspicuous frontal teeth, lateral margins of carapace with small, subtle spines, the reduced length of the posterior margin, disposition of dorsal grooves, and peculiar shape and distribution of the dorsal regions (mainly protogastric and epibranchial), warrants the erection of a new genus and new species. In the absence of ventral features the new taxon is tentatively assigned to the family Dromiidae after detailed comparison with both fossil and extant members.

  1. Tectonic control on sediment sources in the Jaca basin (Middle and Upper Eocene of the South-Central Pyrenees)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roigé, Marta; Gómez-Gras, David; Remacha, Eduard; Daza, Raquel; Boya, Salvador

    2016-03-01

    The Eocene clastic systems of the Jaca foreland Basin (southern Pyrenees) allow us to identify changes in sediment composition through time. We provide new data on sediment composition and sources of the northern Jaca basin, whose stratigraphic evolution from Middle Lutetian deep-marine to Priabonian alluvial systems record a main reorganization in the active Pyrenean prowedge. Petrological analysis shows that the Banastón and the Lower Jaca turbidite systems (Middle-Upper Lutetian) were fed from an eastern source, which dominated during the sedimentation of the Hecho Group turbidites. In contrast, the upper part of the Jaca turbidite systems (Lutetian-Bartonian transition) records an increase in the number of subvolcanic rock and hybrid-sandstone fragments (intrabasinal and extrabasinal grains) being the first system clearly fed from the north. This change is interpreted as associated with an uplifting of the Eaux-Chaudes/Lakora thrust sheet in the northern Axial Zone. The Middle Bartonian Sabiñánigo sandstone derives from eastern and northeastern source areas. In contrast, the overlying Late Bartonian-Early Priabonian Atarés delta records sediment input from the east. The Santa Orosia alluvial system records a new distinct compositional change, with a very high content of hybrid-sandstone clasts from the Hecho Group, again from a northern provenance. Such cannibalized clasts were sourced from newly emerged areas of the hinterland, associated with the basement-involved Gavarnie thrust activity in the Axial Zone.

  2. Fossil nothofagaceous leaves from the Eocene of western Antarctica and their bearing on the origin, dispersal and systematics of Nothofagus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; HaoMin

    2007-01-01

    Fossil leaves resembling Nothofagaceae have been investigated from the Eocene of western Antarctica and a new form genus Nothofagofolia is proposed for these kinds of fossils. Some new specimens belonging to this form genus are described. They were collected from the Fossil Hill locality of Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, South Shetland Islands, western Antarctica. Two new species, two new combinations and an unnamed species are reported. A number of published Nothofagus leaf fossils from the same locality are discussed and revised. As a result of these studies of Nothofagus leaf morphology, we conclude that (1) Nothofagus probably originated in high latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere during the middle-late Late Cretaceous and diversified, dispersed gradually to the lower latitudes of the same hemisphere; (2) leaf morphological characters are significant for the systematics of the family Nothofagaceae, especially at the intrageneric level; and (3) extant species of Nothofagus known from southern temperate areas have more primitive leaf morphological characters and lower leaf ranks than those from tropical mountains as well as those of the Fagaceae and Betulaceae.

  3. Expanded oxygen minimum zones during the late Paleocene-early Eocene: Hints from multiproxy comparison and ocean modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X.; Thomas, E.; Winguth, A. M. E.; Ridgwell, A.; Scher, H.; Hoogakker, B. A. A.; Rickaby, R. E. M.; Lu, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Anthropogenic warming could well drive depletion of oceanic oxygen in the future. Important insight into the relationship between deoxygenation and warming can be gleaned from the geological record, but evidence is limited because few ocean oxygenation records are available for past greenhouse climate conditions. We use I/Ca in benthic foraminifera to reconstruct late Paleocene through early Eocene bottom and pore water redox conditions in the South Atlantic and Southern Indian Oceans and compare our results with those derived from Mn speciation and the Ce anomaly in fish teeth. We conclude that waters with lower oxygen concentrations were widespread at intermediate depths (1.5-2 km), whereas bottom waters were more oxygenated at the deepest site, in the Southeast Atlantic Ocean (>3 km). Epifaunal benthic foraminiferal I/Ca values were higher in the late Paleocene, especially at low-oxygen sites, than at well-oxygenated modern sites, indicating higher seawater total iodine concentrations in the late Paleocene than today. The proxy-based bottom water oxygenation pattern agrees with the site-to-site O2 gradient as simulated in a comprehensive climate model (Community Climate System Model Version 3), but the simulated absolute dissolved O2 values are low (< 35 µmol/kg), while higher O2 values ( 60-100 µmol/kg) were obtained in an Earth system model (Grid ENabled Integrated Earth system model). Multiproxy data together with improvements in boundary conditions and model parameterization are necessary if the details of past oceanographic oxygenation are to be resolved.

  4. Long Wavelenth Subsidence of Western Europe during Late Eocene-Oligocene (38-23 Ma): Mantle Dynamic Effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillocheau, Francois; Robin, Cécile; Bessin, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Western Europe (France, southern Britain, southern Belgium, western Germany) is subsiding during Late Eocene to Oligocene (38-23 Ma) as suggested by the growth of numerous small sedimentary basins mainly filled by lacustrine deposits with some brackish to marine deposits. This large-scale subsidence is coeval with the early stage of the so-called Oligocene rifts (in fact Late Bartonian to Rupelian): Lower Rhinegraben, Bresse, Limagnes. The subsiding domain extends from Cornwall to the Rhine Graben including the Armorican Massif, the southern Paris Basin, the northern Aquitaine Basin, the French Central Massif, the Ardennes-Eifel… This subsidence occurred at a period of global sea level fall and then an eustatic component cannot explain (1) the accommodation space creation and (2) the marine floding with a paroxysm during Early Oligocene times (Armorican Massif, ?Ardennes, French Massif central). This marine flooding also indicate that the relief of the Hercynian basement was less elevated and smoother than today. Some of those small "basins" were interpreted as little rifts, but new mapping (e.g. Puy-en-Velay or Forez Plain in the French Massif central) or new geophysical data (e.g. Rennes Basin in the Armorican massif) suggest that no faults control those basins or that they result from post-depositional collapses. This long wavelength subsidence is at the scale of the mantle dynamic. Possible mantle mechanisms and the relationships with the "Oligocene" rifts and the North Sea inversion will be discussed.

  5. Ichnofabrics of the Capdevila Formation (early Eocene) in the Los Palacios Basin (western Cuba): Paleoenvironmental and paleoecological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas-Martín, Jorge; Netto, Renata Guimarães; Lavina, Ernesto Luis Correa; Rojas-Consuegra, Reinaldo

    2014-12-01

    The ichnofabrics present in the early Eocene siliciclastic deposits of the Capdevila Formation exposed in the Pinar del Rio area (Los Palacios Basin, western Cuba) are analyzed in this paper and their paleoecological and paleoenvironmental significance are discussed. Nine ichnofabrics were recognized in the dominantly sandy sedimentary succession: Ophiomorpha, Asterosoma, Thalassinoides, Palaeophycus, Scolicia, Bichordites-Thalassinoides, Rhizocorallium, Scolicia-Thalassinoides and rhizobioturbation. Diversity of ichnofauna is low and burrows made by detritus-feeding organisms in well oxygenated and stenohaline waters predominate. Suites of the Cruziana and Skolithos Ichnofacies lacking their archetypical characteristics were recognized, being impoverished in diversity and presenting dominance of echinoderm and decapods crustacean burrows as a response to the environmental stress caused by the high frequency of deposition. The ichnofabric distribution in the studied succession, its recurrence in the sandstone beds and the presence of a Glossifungites Ichnofacies suite with rhizobioturbation associated reflect a shoaling-upward event with subaerial exposure of the substrate. The integrated analysis of the ichnology and the sedimentary facies suggests deposition in a shallow slope frequently impacted by gravitational flows and high-energy events. The evidence of substrate exposure indicates the occurrence of a forced regression and suggests the existence of a sequence boundary at the top of the Capdevila Formation.

  6. Porphyrins from Messel oil shale (Eocene, Germany): Structure elucidation, geochemical and biological significance, and distribution as a function of depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo, Rubén; Bauder, Claude; Callot, Henry J.; Albrecht, Pierre

    1992-02-01

    The extraction and isolation procedures of twenty nickel porphyrins (seven alkylporphyrins, thirteen carboxylic acids) from lacustrine Messel shale (Eocene, Germany), as well as the unequivocal structural assignments (obtained using 200 and 400 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), nuclear Overhauser effect, mass spectrometry and total or partial synthesis of six reference compounds) are described. Ten porphyrins could be specifically correlated with biological precursors: algal chlorophyll c (4), bacteriochlorophylls d (3) and heme (3), while the remaining ones may arise from several chlorophylls. The structures of these fossil pigments mostly confirm the classical "Treibs scheme," including the origin of some porphyrins from nonchlorophyll sources. They also show that, even in a very immature sediment, deep modifications occur, including, in particular, extensive degradation of chlorophyll E ring. The composition of the porphyrin fractions of Messel oil shale was also studied as a function of depth. A porphyrin acids/alkylporphyrins ratio varying from 0.35 to 24.8 demonstrated that the apparent homogeneity of the shale is not reflected on the molecular scale. This was confirmed when the abundance of the twenty individual porphyrins of known structure was measured along the core. Significant correlations between individual porphyrins were found: fossils of bacteriochlorophylls d, homolog pairs of porphyrins (3-H/3-ethyl), etc.

  7. Oil shale resources in the Eocene Green River Formation, Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, Colorado, and Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed a comprehensive assessment of in-place oil in oil shales in the Eocene Green River in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, Colorado, and Utah. This CD-ROM includes reports, data, and an ArcGIS project describing the assessment. A database was compiled that includes about 47,000 Fischer assays from 186 core holes and 240 rotary drill holes. Most of the oil yield data were analyzed by the former U.S. Bureau of Mines oil shale laboratory in Laramie, Wyoming, and some analyses were made by private laboratories. Location data for 971 Wyoming oil-shale drill holes are listed in a spreadsheet and included in the CD-ROM. Total in-place resources for the three assessed units in the Green River Formation are: (1) Tipton Shale Member, 362,816 million barrels of oil (MMBO), (2) Wilkins Peak Member, 704,991 MMBO, and (3) LaClede Bed of the Laney Member, 377,184 MMBO, for a total of 1.44 trillion barrels of oil in place. This compares with estimated in-place resources for the Piceance Basin of Colorado of 1.53 trillion barrels and estimated in-place resources for the Uinta Basin of Utah and Colorado of 1.32 trillion barrels.

  8. Pronounced peramorphosis in lissamphibians--Aviturus exsecratus (Urodela, Cryptobranchidae from the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum of Mongolia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davit Vasilyan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The oldest and largest member of giant salamanders (Cryptobranchidae Aviturus exsecratus appears in the latest Paleocene (near the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum of Mongolia. Based on femoral and vertebral morphology and metrics, a terrestrial adaptation has been supposed for this species. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A detailed morphological reinvestigation of published as well as unpublished material reveals that this salamander shows a vomerine dentition that is posteriorly shifted and arranged in a zigzag pattern, a strongly developed olfactory region within the cranial cavity, and the highest bone ossification and relatively longest femur among all fossil and recent cryptobranchids. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The presence of these characteristics indicates a peramorphic developmental pattern for Aviturus exsecratus. Our results from Av. exsecratus indicate for the first time pronounced peramorphosis within a crown-group lissamphibian. Av. exsecratus represents a new developmental trajectory within both fossil and recent lissamphibian clades characterized by extended ontogeny and large body size, resembling the pattern known from late Paleozoic eryopines. Moreover, Av. exsecratus is not only a cryptobranchid with distinctive peramorphic characters, but also the first giant salamander with partially terrestrial (amphibious lifestyle. The morphology of the vomers and dentaries suggests the ability of both underwater and terrestrial feeding.

  9. Climate and Biota across the Eocene-Oligocene transition at Site 1090: recent advances on calcareous nannofossils as paleoclimatic and dissolution proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pea, Laura; Fioroni, Chiara; Villa, Giuliana; Persico, Davide; Bohaty, Steve

    2010-05-01

    The Eocene-Oligocene transition represents the biggest biotic turnover in the Cenozoic, involving both terrestrial and marine realms. In this study we present the results obtained by a quantitative analysis of late Eocene-early Oligocene (35.5- 33.1 Ma) calcareous nannofossil assemblages from ODP Site 1090 Hole B (Leg 177). This Hole is located on the southern flank of the Agulhas Ridge on the Subantarctic sector of the Atlantic Ocean (42°54'S), and lies along the boundary between the North Atlantic Deep Water and the Circumpolar Deep Water. Thanks to its position above the Carbonate Compensation Depth (3702 m), the nannofossil assemblage preservation is from poor to good in most of the section, even thought some intervals are barren. A well-preserved magnetostratigraphic signal along all of the section and nannofossil biostratigraphy provided the time framework essential for interpreting the assemblage variations. Within a high resolution biostratigraphic framework and through the comparison with bulk oxygen and carbon isotope datasets we attempt to reconstruct sea surface water temperature and trophic conditions, aimed to a late Eocene - early Oligocene paleoceanographic reconstruction for the South Atlantic. A marked change in the nannofossil assemblages is associated with the Oi-1 event: a nonlinear increase of cool-water taxa gives evidence as the evolution of this climatic event is more complex than previously estimated by calcareous nannofossils in the Southern Ocean (Villa et al., 2008). In fact cool-water taxa variation trend likely reflects the two distinct shifts (Step 1 and Step) recognised by Coxall et al. (2005) within the oxygen isotope shift .Step 1 falls in the uppermost part of magnetochron C13r, while the end of step 2 correlates with the base of Chron C13n (Channell et al., 2005). Furthermore, changes in nannofossil abundance and preservation suggest CCD depth fluctuations, showing a deepening near the Eocene/Oligocene boundary, as previously

  10. Supporting Info

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Supporting Information This dataset is associated with the following publication: Washington , J., T. Jenkins, and E. Weber. Identification of Unsaturated and 2H...

  11. Supporting Info

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Supporting Info This dataset is associated with the following publication: Washington , J., and T. Jenkins. Abiotic Hydrolysis of Fluorotelomer-Based Polymers as a...

  12. Supporting Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is the supporting information for the journal article. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Rankin, K., S. Mabury, T. Jenkins, and J....

  13. First known feeding trace of the eocene bottom-dwelling fish Notogoneus osculus and its paleontological significance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J Martin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Green River Formation (early Eocene, about 42-53 Ma at and near Fossil Butte National Monument in Wyoming, USA, is world famous for its exquisitely preserved freshwater teleost fish in the former Fossil Lake. Nonetheless, trace fossils attributed to fish interacting with the lake bottom are apparently rare, and have not been associated directly with any fish species. Here we interpret the first known feeding and swimming trace fossil of the teleost Notogoneus osculus Cope (Teleostei: Gonorynchidae, which is also represented as a body fossil in the same stratum. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A standard description of the trace fossil, identified as Undichna cf. U. simplicatas, was augmented by high-resolution digital images and spatial and mathematical analyses, which allowed for detailed interpretations of the anatomy, swimming mode, feeding behavior, and body size of the tracemaker. Our analysis indicates that the tracemaker was about 45 cm long; used its caudal, anal, and pelvic fins (the posterior half of its body to make the swimming traces; and used a ventrally oriented mouth to make overlapping feeding marks. We hypothesize that the tracemaker was an adult Notogoneus osculus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results are the first to link a specific teleost tracemaker with a trace fossil from the Green River Formation, while also interpreting the size and relative age of the tracemaker. The normal feeding and swimming behaviors indicated by the trace fossil indicate temporarily oxygenated benthic conditions in the deepest part of Fossil Lake, counter to most paleoecological interpretations of this deposit. Lastly, our spatial and mathematical analyses significantly update and advance previous approaches to the study of teleost trace fossils.

  14. High-Resolution Magnetostratigraphic and Rock Magnetic Cyclo-stratigraphic Study of the Eocene Arguis Formation, Spanish Pyrenees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, K. P.; Anastasio, D. J.; Pares, J.; Newton, M. `

    2007-05-01

    In order to provide a high-resolution chronostratigraphic record, an 800 meter section of the Arguis Formation, an Eocene marine flysch deposited in the Jaca Basin of the Spanish Pyrenees was sampled for magnetostratigraphy and rock magnetic cyclo-stratigraphy. Oriented cores were collected to refine a previously determined magnetostratigraphy. Their paleomagnetic analysis shows that the oldest 600 meters of the Arguis Formation spans chrons C18n.1n to C17n.2n or about two million years. For 300 m of the section 395 un- oriented hand samples were collected for rock magnetic cyclo-stratigraphy at a 75 cm sampling interval (about every 4 kyr) in order to resolve the precessional index. Anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM) was measured for each sample to construct a ferromagnetic mineral concentration time series. Spectral analysis of the ARM time series, calibrated by the magnetostratigraphically-determined chron boundaries, shows periodicities consistent with astronomical forcing at Milankovitch frequencies. Decompaction of the time series using a newly developed rock magnetic technique removed the effects of differential compaction and improved the resolution of Milankovitch power. The time series was bandpass filtered and tuned to the precessional index using the La2004 orbital model. The precessional tuning improves spectral power at all orbital frequencies. Primary detrital magnetite controls the ARM signal with minor contributions from secondary authigenic pyrrhotite. The ferromagnetic mineral concentrations are most likely caused by climate-driven source area, runoff or aridity variations. They provide a high resolution (precessional scale) chronostratigraphic record that allows a detailed deformation rate study of a nearby growth fold.

  15. Nazca-South America interactions and the late Eocene-late Oligocene flat-slab episode in the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Driscoll, Leland J.; Richards, Mark A.; Humphreys, Eugene D.

    2012-04-01

    The most prominent features of the Andean range are the Altiplano and Puna plateaus, which were constructed by crustal shortening and uplift over the past ˜45 Myr. The early construction of these plateaus may have controlled subsequent growth of the orogen. Proposed models have suggested that an abrupt acceleration in relative motion between the Nazca plate and the South American plate at ˜30 Ma may have led to compression of the continent. However, the major plate motion change occurred at 25-23 Ma, and paleomagnetic rotations and crustal shortening of the Andean forearc require that the Arica Bend formed prior to about 25 Ma. Inferred history of flat-slab subduction along the Altiplano section of the Andean margin and the structure of the adjacent South American cratonic shield combine to suggest an alternate scenario, based partly upon geodynamic models of oceanic-continental plate interactions in subduction zones. We propose that central Andean tectonism may have been controlled by two distinct regimes of subduction: (1) oblique subduction along the central Andean margin during the late Eocene and Oligocene accompanied by downdip alignment with the center of the Amazonian Shield (flat-slab activity in this phase of orogenesis may have been caused by a combination of cratonic root enhanced tectonics and oceanic plateau subduction) and (2) an abrupt transition to trench-normal subduction after ˜25 Ma toward the more distal São Francisco Craton was accompanied by a return to normal angle subduction. Similar interactions are hypothesized to have occurred during the Laramide Orogeny in western North America.

  16. Geology and geochronology of the Tana Basin, Ethiopia: LIP volcanism, super eruptions and Eocene-Oligocene environmental change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prave, A. R.; Bates, C. R.; Donaldson, C. H.; Toland, H.; Condon, D. J.; Mark, D.; Raub, T. D.

    2016-06-01

    New geological and geochronological data define four episodes of volcanism for the Lake Tana region in the northern Ethiopian portion of the Afro-Arabian Large Igneous Province (LIP): pre-31 Ma flood basalt that yielded a single 40Ar/39Ar age of 34.05 ± 0.54 / 0.56 Ma; thick and extensive felsic ignimbrites and rhyolites (minimum volume of 2- 3 ×103 km3) erupted between 31.108 ± 0.020 / 0.041 Ma and 30.844 ± 0.027 / 0.046 Ma (U-Pb CA-ID-TIMS zircon ages); mafic volcanism bracketed by 40Ar/39Ar ages of 28.90 ± 0.12 / 0.14 Ma and 23.75 ± 0.02 / 0.04 Ma; and localised scoraceous basalt with an 40Ar/39Ar age of 0.033 ± 0.005 / 0.005 Ma. The felsic volcanism was the product of super eruptions that created a 60-80 km diameter caldera marked by km-scale caldera-collapse fault blocks and a steep-sided basin filled with a minimum of 180 m of sediment and the present-day Lake Tana. These new data enable mapping, with a finer resolution than previously possible, Afro-Arabian LIP volcanism onto the timeline of the Eocene-Oligocene transition and show that neither the mafic nor silicic volcanism coincides directly with perturbations in the geochemical records that span that transition. Our results reinforce the view that it is not the development of a LIP alone but its rate of effusion that contributes to inducing global-scale environmental change.

  17. Eocene extension in Idaho generated massive sediment floods into Franciscan trench and into Tyee, Great Valley, and Green River basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitru, Trevor A.; Ernst, W.G.; Wright, James E.; Wooden, Joseph L.; Wells, Ray E.; Farmer, Lucia P.; Kent, Adam J.R.; Graham, Stephan A.

    2013-01-01

    The Franciscan Complex accretionary prism was assembled during an ∼165-m.y.-long period of subduction of Pacific Ocean plates beneath the western margin of the North American plate. In such fossil subduction complexes, it is generally difficult to reconstruct details of the accretion of continent-derived sediments and to evaluate the factors that controlled accretion. New detrital zircon U-Pb ages indicate that much of the major Coastal belt subunit of the Franciscan Complex represents a massive, relatively brief, surge of near-trench deposition and accretion during Eocene time (ca. 53–49 Ma). Sediments were sourced mainly from the distant Idaho Batholith region rather than the nearby Sierra Nevada. Idaho detritus also fed the Great Valley forearc basin of California (ca. 53–37 Ma), the Tyee forearc basin of coastal Oregon (49 to ca. 36 Ma), and the greater Green River lake basin of Wyoming (50–47 Ma). Plutonism in the Idaho Batholith spanned 98–53 Ma in a contractional setting; it was abruptly superseded by major extension in the Bitterroot, Anaconda, Clearwater, and Priest River metamorphic core complexes (53–40 Ma) and by major volcanism in the Challis volcanic field (51–43 Ma). This extensional tectonism apparently deformed and uplifted a broad region, shedding voluminous sediments toward depocenters to the west and southeast. In the Franciscan Coastal belt, the major increase in sediment input apparently triggered a pulse of massive accretion, a pulse ultimately controlled by continental tectonism far within the interior of the North American plate, rather than by some tectonic event along the plate boundary itself.

  18. Mineralogy and geochemistry of the main glauconite bed in the Middle Eocene of Texas: paleoenvironmental implications for the verdine facies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherie C Harding

    Full Text Available The Main Glauconite Bed (MGB is a pelleted greensand located at Stone City Bluff on the south bank of the Brazos River in Burleson County, Texas. It was deposited during the Middle Eocene regional transgression on the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain. Stratigraphically it lies in the upper Stone City Member, Crockett Formation, Claiborne Group. Its mineralogy and geochemistry were examined in detail, and verdine facies minerals, predominantly odinite, were identified. Few glauconitic minerals were found in the green pelleted sediments of the MGB. Without detailed mineralogical work, glaucony facies minerals and verdine facies minerals are easily mistaken for one another. Their distinction has value in assessing paleoenvironments. In this study, several analytical techniques were employed to assess the mineralogy. X-ray diffraction of oriented and un-oriented clay samples indicated a clay mixture dominated by 7 and 14Å diffraction peaks. Unit cell calculations from XRD data for MGB pellets match the odinite-1M data base. Electron microprobe analyses (EMPA from the average of 31 data points from clay pellets accompanied with Mössbauer analyses were used to calculate the structural formula which is that of odinite: Fe(3+ 0.89 Mg0.45 Al0.67 Fe(2+ 0.30 Ti0.01 Mn0.01 Σ = 2.33 (Si1.77 Al0.23 O5.00 (OH4.00. QEMSCAN (Quantitative Evaluation of Minerals by Scanning Electron Microscopy data provided mineral maps of quantitative proportions of the constituent clays. The verdine facies is a clay mineral facies associated with shallow marine shelf and lagoonal environments at tropical latitudes with iron influx from nearby runoff. Its depositional environment is well documented in modern nearshore locations. Recognition of verdine facies clays as the dominant constituent of the MGB clay pellets, rather than glaucony facies clays, allows for a more precise assessment of paleoenvironmental conditions.

  19. Mineralogy and geochemistry of the main glauconite bed in the Middle Eocene of Texas: paleoenvironmental implications for the verdine facies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Sherie C; Nash, Barbara P; Petersen, Erich U; Ekdale, A A; Bradbury, Christopher D; Dyar, M Darby

    2014-01-01

    The Main Glauconite Bed (MGB) is a pelleted greensand located at Stone City Bluff on the south bank of the Brazos River in Burleson County, Texas. It was deposited during the Middle Eocene regional transgression on the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain. Stratigraphically it lies in the upper Stone City Member, Crockett Formation, Claiborne Group. Its mineralogy and geochemistry were examined in detail, and verdine facies minerals, predominantly odinite, were identified. Few glauconitic minerals were found in the green pelleted sediments of the MGB. Without detailed mineralogical work, glaucony facies minerals and verdine facies minerals are easily mistaken for one another. Their distinction has value in assessing paleoenvironments. In this study, several analytical techniques were employed to assess the mineralogy. X-ray diffraction of oriented and un-oriented clay samples indicated a clay mixture dominated by 7 and 14Å diffraction peaks. Unit cell calculations from XRD data for MGB pellets match the odinite-1M data base. Electron microprobe analyses (EMPA) from the average of 31 data points from clay pellets accompanied with Mössbauer analyses were used to calculate the structural formula which is that of odinite: Fe(3+) 0.89 Mg0.45 Al0.67 Fe(2+) 0.30 Ti0.01 Mn0.01) Σ = 2.33 (Si1.77 Al0.23) O5.00 (OH)4.00. QEMSCAN (Quantitative Evaluation of Minerals by Scanning Electron Microscopy) data provided mineral maps of quantitative proportions of the constituent clays. The verdine facies is a clay mineral facies associated with shallow marine shelf and lagoonal environments at tropical latitudes with iron influx from nearby runoff. Its depositional environment is well documented in modern nearshore locations. Recognition of verdine facies clays as the dominant constituent of the MGB clay pellets, rather than glaucony facies clays, allows for a more precise assessment of paleoenvironmental conditions.

  20. A new interpretation of the two-step δ18O signal at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. Dijkstra

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The most marked step in the global climate transition from "Greenhouse" to "Icehouse" Earth occurred at the Eocene-Oligocene (E–O boundary, 33.7 Ma. Evidence for climatic changes comes from many sources, including the marine benthic δ18O record, showing an increase by 1.2–1.5‰ at this time. This positive excursion is characterised by two steps, separated by a plateau. The increase in δ18O values has been attributed to rapid glaciation of the Antarctic continent, previously ice-free. Simultaneous changes in the δ13C record are indicative of a greenhouse gas control on climate. Previous studies show that a decline in pCO2 beyond a certain threshold value may have initiated the growth of a Southern Hemispheric ice sheet. These studies were not able to conclusively explain the remarkable two-step profile in δ18O. Furthermore, they did not address the potential role of changes in ocean circulation in the E–O transition. Here a new interpretation of the δ18O signal is presented, based on model simulations using a simple coupled 8-box-ocean, 4-box-atmosphere model with an added land ice component. The model was forced with a slowly decreasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. It is argued that the first step in the δ18O represents a shift in meridional overturning circulation from a Southern Ocean to a bipolar source of deep-water formation, which is associated with a cooling of the deep sea. This shift can be initiated by a small density perturbation in the model, although there is also a parameter regime for which the shift occurs spontaneously. The second step in the δ18O profile occurs due to a rapid glaciation of the Antarctic continent. This new interpretation is a robust outcome of our model and is in good agreement with proxy data.

  1. A new mechanism for the two-step δ18O signal at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. von der Heydt

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The most marked step in the global climate transition from "Greenhouse" to "Icehouse" Earth occurred at the Eocene-Oligocene (E-O boundary, 33.7 Ma. Evidence for climatic changes comes from many sources, including the marine benthic δ18O record, showing an increase by 1.2–1.5‰ at this time. This positive excursion is characterised by two steps, separated by a plateau. The increase in δ18O values has been attributed to rapid glaciation of the Antarctic continent, previously ice-free. Simultaneous changes in the δ13C record are suggestive of a greenhouse gas control on climate. Previous modelling studies show that a decline in pCO2 beyond a certain threshold value may have initiated the growth of a Southern Hemispheric ice sheet. These studies were not able to conclusively explain the remarkable two-step profile in δ18O. Furthermore, they considered changes in the ocean circulation only regionally, or indirectly through the oceanic heat transport. The potential role of global changes in ocean circulation in the E-O transition has not been addressed yet. Here a new interpretation of the δ18O signal is presented, based on model simulations using a simple coupled 8-box-ocean, 4-box-atmosphere model with an added land ice component. The model was forced with a slowly decreasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. It is argued that the first step in the δ18O record reflects a shift in meridional overturning circulation from a Southern Ocean to a bipolar source of deep-water formation, which is associated with a cooling of the deep sea. The second step in the δ18O profile occurs due to a rapid glaciation of the Antarctic continent. This new mechanism is a robust outcome of our model and is qualitatively in close agreement with proxy data.

  2. Major perturbations in the global carbon cycle and photosymbiont-bearing planktic foraminifera during the early Eocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciani, Valeria; Dickens, Gerald R.; Backman, Jan; Fornaciari, Eliana; Giusberti, Luca; Agnini, Claudia; D'Onofrio, Roberta

    2016-04-01

    A marked switch in the abundance of the planktic foraminiferal genera Morozovella and Acarinina occurred at low-latitude sites near the start of the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO), a multi-million-year interval when Earth surface temperatures reached their Cenozoic maximum. Stable carbon and oxygen isotope data of bulk sediment are presented from across the EECO at two locations: Possagno in northeast Italy and Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Site 577 in the northwest Pacific. Relative abundances of planktic foraminifera are presented from these two locations, as well as from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1051 in the northwest Atlantic. All three sections have good stratigraphic markers, and the δ13C records at each section can be correlated amongst each other and to δ13C records at other locations across the globe. These records show that a series of negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) occurred before, during and across the EECO, which is defined here as the interval between the J event and the base of Discoaster sublodoensis. Significant though ephemeral modifications in planktic foraminiferal assemblages coincide with some of the short-term CIEs, which were marked by increases in the relative abundance of Acarinina, similar to what happened across established hyperthermal events in Tethyan settings prior to the EECO. Most crucially, a temporal link exists between the onset of the EECO, carbon cycle changes during this time and the decline in Morozovella. Possible causes are manifold and may include temperature effects on photosymbiont-bearing planktic foraminifera and changes in ocean chemistry.

  3. Antarctic birds (Neornithes during the Cretaceous-Eocene times Aves antàrticas (Neornithes durante el lapso cretácico - eoceno

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Tambussi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Antarctic fossil birds can be confidently assigned to modern orders and families, such as a goose-like anseriform, two loon-like and a seriema-like, all recorded before the K/T boundary at the López de Bertodano Fomation. Also, the discovery of a ratite and a phororhacids from the uppermost levels of the Submeseta Allomember (Late Eocene, suggests that West Antarctica was functional to dispersal routes obligate terrestrial birds. Representatives of Falconiformes Polyborinae, Ciconiiformes, Phoenicoteriformes, Charadriiformes, Pelagornitidae and Diomedeidae constitute the non-penguin avian assemblages of the Eocene of La Meseta Formation. Fifthteen Antarctic species of penguins have been described including the oldest penguin of West Antarctica, Croswallia unienwillia. The Anthropornis nordenskjoeldi Biozone (36.13 and 34.2 Ma, Late Eocene is characterized by bearing one of the highest frequencies of penguin bones and the phospatic brachiopod Lingula., together with remains of Gadiforms, sharks and primitive mysticete whales. Anthropornis nordenskjoeldi, Delphinornis gracilis, D. arctowski, Archaeospheniscus lopdelli, and Palaeeudyptes antarcticus are exclusively of the La Meseta Formation. Anthropornis nordenskjoeldi was evidently the largest penguin recorded at the James Ross Basin, whereas Delphinornis arctowski is the smallest, and include one of the worldwide highest morphological and taxonomic penguin diversity living sympatrically. The progressive climate cooling of the Eocene could have affected the penguin populations, because of climatic changes linked with habitat availability and food web processes. However, there is not available evidence about Antarctic penguins' evolution after the end of the Eocene.Las aves fósiles antárticas pueden ser asignadas a órdenes y familias vivientes, incluyendo restos de un Anseriformes que recuerda al ganso overo, dos colimbos y una supuesta seriema, todos registrados en sedimentos cretácicos de

  4. Bighorn Basin Coring Project: Palynofloral changes and taphonomy through the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, G.; Jardine, P.

    2012-12-01

    The early Palaeogene hyperthermals provide an unprecedented opportunity to investigate the biotic responses to rapid and transient global warming events. As part of the Bighorn Basin Coring Project (BBCP), we have analyzed 182 sporomorph (pollen and spore) samples from three newly cored sites in the Bighorn Basin of Wyoming. Two sites, Basin Substation (121 samples) and Polecat Bench (41 samples), contain the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, ETM1), and one early Eocene site, Gilmore Hill (20 samples), contains the ELMO (ETM2) event. We have focused initially on the Basin Substation section, because it is more organic rich, has demonstrated higher sporomorph recovery potential than the other two sites, and is the main focus of complementary geochemical analyses. Below 90 m core depth sporomorph concentrations are typically 1000 - 10 000 grains/gram, but between 90 and 60 m these decline to gymnosperms Cupressacites hiatipites (cypress, Cupressaceae) and bisaccate pollen (Pinaceae and/or Podocarpaceae), and the angiosperm taxa Polyatriopollenites vermontensis (wingnut or wheel wingnut, Juglandaceae), Caryapollenites spp. (hickory, Juglandaceae), and Alnipollenites spp. (alder, Betulaceae). However, samples are heterogeneous in terms of the dominant taxon, with different taxa having the highest relative abundance in different samples. In the upper part of the core, the assemblage is similar to that in the lower part, but with a more consistent dominance of gymnosperm taxa, and with the addition of Eocene marker taxa Intratriporopollenites instructus (linden, Tilioideae) and Celtis spp. (hackberry, Cannabaceae). These both have their first appearance at 56.14 m in the core, just above the zone of low sporomorph recovery. These results point to (a) a decrease in sporomorph preservation that is linked to environmental change during the PETM event, and (b) repeated reorganizations of plant relative abundances prior to the PETM. Current research is focusing on the

  5. Cenozoic tectono-thermal history of the Tordrillo Mountains, Alaska: Paleocene-Eocene ridge subduction, decreasing relief, and late Neogene faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benowitz, Jeff A.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Layer, Paul W.; O'Sullivan, Paul B.; Wallace, Wes K.; Gillis, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Topographic development inboard of the continental margin is a predicted response to ridge subduction. New thermochronology results from the western Alaska Range document ridge subduction related orogenesis. K-feldspar thermochronology (KFAT) of bedrock samples from the Tordrillo Mountains in the western Alaska Range complement existing U-Pb, 40Ar/39Ar and AFT (apatite fission track) data to provide constraints on Paleocene pluton emplacement, and cooling as well as Late Eocene to Miocene vertical movements and exhumation along fault-bounded blocks. Based on the KFAT analysis we infer rapid exhumation-related cooling during the Eocene in the Tordrillo Mountains. Our KFAT cooling ages are coeval with deposition of clastic sediments in the Cook Inlet, Matanuska Valley and Tanana basins, which reflect high-energy depositional environments. The Tordrillo Mountains KFAT cooling ages are also the same as cooling ages in the Iliamna Lake region, the Kichatna Mountains of the western Alaska Range, and Mt. Logan in the Wrangell-St. Elias Mountains, thus rapid cooling at this time encompasses a broad region inboard of, and parallel to, the continental margin extending for several hundred kilometers. We infer these cooling events and deposition of clastic rocks are related to thermal effects that track the eastward passage of a slab window in Paleocene-Eocene time related to the subduction of the proposed Resurrection-Kula spreading ridge. In addition, we conclude that the reconstructed KFATmax negative age-elevation relationship is likely related to a long period of decreasing relief in the Tordrillo Mountains.

  6. Djebelemur, a Tiny Pre-Tooth-Combed Primate from the Eocene of Tunisia: A Glimpse into the Origin of Crown Strepsirhines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marivaux, Laurent; Ramdarshan, Anusha; Essid, El Mabrouk; Marzougui, Wissem; Ammar, Hayet Khayati; Lebrun, Renaud; Marandat, Bernard; Merzeraud, Gilles; Tabuce, Rodolphe; Vianey-Liaud, Monique

    2013-01-01

    Background Molecular clock estimates of crown strepsirhine origins generally advocate an ancient antiquity for Malagasy lemuriforms and Afro-Asian lorisiforms, near the onset of the Tertiary but most often extending back to the Late Cretaceous. Despite their inferred early origin, the subsequent evolutionary histories of both groups (except for the Malagasy aye-aye lineage) exhibit a vacuum of lineage diversification during most part of the Eocene, followed by a relative acceleration in diversification from the late Middle Eocene. This early evolutionary stasis was tentatively explained by the possibility of unrecorded lineage extinctions during the early Tertiary. However, this prevailing molecular view regarding the ancient origin and early diversification of crown strepsirhines must be viewed with skepticism due to the new but still scarce paleontological evidence gathered in recent years. Methodological/Principal Findings Here, we describe new fossils attributable to Djebelemur martinezi, a≈50 Ma primate from Tunisia (Djebel Chambi). This taxon was originally interpreted as a cercamoniine adapiform based on limited information from its lower dentition. The new fossils provide anatomical evidence demonstrating that Djebelemur was not an adapiform but clearly a distant relative of lemurs, lorises and galagos. Cranial, dental and postcranial remains indicate that this diminutive primate was likely nocturnal, predatory (primarily insectivorous), and engaged in a form of generalized arboreal quadrupedalism with frequent horizontal leaping. Djebelemur did not have an anterior lower dentition as specialized as that characterizing most crown strepsirhines (i.e., tooth-comb), but it clearly exhibited a transformed antemolar pattern representing an early stage of a crown strepsirhine-like adaptation (“pre-tooth-comb”). Conclusions/Significance These new fossil data suggest that the differentiation of the tooth-comb must postdate the djebelemurid divergence, a view

  7. Djebelemur, a tiny pre-tooth-combed primate from the Eocene of Tunisia: a glimpse into the origin of crown strepsirhines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Marivaux

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular clock estimates of crown strepsirhine origins generally advocate an ancient antiquity for Malagasy lemuriforms and Afro-Asian lorisiforms, near the onset of the Tertiary but most often extending back to the Late Cretaceous. Despite their inferred early origin, the subsequent evolutionary histories of both groups (except for the Malagasy aye-aye lineage exhibit a vacuum of lineage diversification during most part of the Eocene, followed by a relative acceleration in diversification from the late Middle Eocene. This early evolutionary stasis was tentatively explained by the possibility of unrecorded lineage extinctions during the early Tertiary. However, this prevailing molecular view regarding the ancient origin and early diversification of crown strepsirhines must be viewed with skepticism due to the new but still scarce paleontological evidence gathered in recent years. METHODOLOGICAL/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we describe new fossils attributable to Djebelemur martinezi, a≈50 Ma primate from Tunisia (Djebel Chambi. This taxon was originally interpreted as a cercamoniine adapiform based on limited information from its lower dentition. The new fossils provide anatomical evidence demonstrating that Djebelemur was not an adapiform but clearly a distant relative of lemurs, lorises and galagos. Cranial, dental and postcranial remains indicate that this diminutive primate was likely nocturnal, predatory (primarily insectivorous, and engaged in a form of generalized arboreal quadrupedalism with frequent horizontal leaping. Djebelemur did not have an anterior lower dentition as specialized as that characterizing most crown strepsirhines (i.e., tooth-comb, but it clearly exhibited a transformed antemolar pattern representing an early stage of a crown strepsirhine-like adaptation ("pre-tooth-comb". CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These new fossil data suggest that the differentiation of the tooth-comb must postdate the djebelemurid

  8. Large-scale displacement along the Altyn Tagh Fault (North Tibet) since its Eocene initiation: Insight from detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology and subsurface data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Feng; Jolivet, Marc; Fu, Suotang; Zhang, Changhao; Zhang, Qiquan; Guo, Zhaojie

    2016-05-01

    Marking the northern boundary of the Tibetan plateau, the Altyn Tagh fault plays a crucial role in accommodating the Cenozoic crustal deformation affecting the plateau. However, its initiation time and amount of offset are still controversial despite being key information for the understanding of Tibet evolution. In this study, we present 1122 single LA-ICP-MS detrital zircon U-Pb ages obtained from 11 Mesozoic to Cenozoic sandstone samples, collected along two sections in the northwestern Qaidam basin (Eboliang and Huatugou). These data are combined with new 3D seismic reflection profiles to demonstrate that: (1) from the Paleocene to early Eocene, the Eboliang section was approximately located near the present position of Anxi, 360 ± 40 km southwest from its current location along the Altyn Tagh fault, and sediments were mainly derived from the Altyn Tagh Range. At the same period, the Huatugou section was approximately located near the present position of Tula, ca. 360 km southwest from its current location along the Altyn Tagh fault, and the Eastern Kunlun Range represented a significant sediment source. (2) Left-lateral strike-slip movement along the Altyn Tagh fault initiated during the early-middle Eocene, resulting in northeastward displacement of the two sections. (3) By early Miocene, the intensive deformation within the Altyn Tagh Range and northwestern Qaidam basin strongly modified the drainage system, preventing the materials derived from the Altyn Tagh Range to reach the Eboliang and the Huatugou sections. The post-Oligocene clastic material in the western Qaidam basin is generally derived from local sources and recycling of the deformed Paleocene to Oligocene strata. From these data, we suggest enhanced tectonic activity within the Altyn Tagh Range and northwestern Qaidam basin since Miocene time, and propose an early-middle Eocene initiation of left-lateral strike-slip faulting leading to a 360 ± 40 km offset along the Altyn Tagh fault.

  9. The onset of the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum, including the K/X event, at Branch Stream, Clarence Valley, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotnick, B. S.; Dickens, G. R.; Hollis, C. J.; Crampton, J. S.; Strong, P.; Dallanave, E.; Philips, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO), lasting from ~53-50 Ma, has been characterized as the warmest sustained interval through the Cenozoic. It was comprised of a broad temperature maximum with elevated atmospheric pCO2, noticeable shifts in carbon cycling, and a variety of faunal and floral changes. This included one, and likely additional, brief (CIEs) have been coupled to massive fluxes of 13C-depleted carbon into the exogenic system and global climate change. However, much about EECO remains unknown because of a lack of detailed and coupled proxy records; we are currently generating useful records to better characterize lithological and geochemical signatures of EECO. Here, we help rectify this problem by presenting a new lithologic and carbon isotopic record for a ~84-m-thick section of early Eocene upper slope calcareous-rich sediments, now lithified and exposed along Branch Stream, New Zealand. Comparison of new carbon isotopic and lithologic records of this greatly expanded section to nearby Mead Stream identifies multiple negative CIEs in short succession and generally more marl during lowermost EECO (~53.3-51.7 Ma), with the most prominent of these equating to the K/X event. The early Eocene lithologic and δ13C records at Branch and Mead Streams are remarkably similar to each other, with the following distinctions: sequences at Branch Stream are thicker and generally have a wider range of δ13C across CIEs. Both expanded sections are marked by terrigenous dilution, best explained by enhanced seasonal precipitation, elevated greenhouse-gas concentrations, and likely global warming. These data indicate lowermost EECO can be described as a time with a general δ13C low superimposed by a series of short-term climate perturbations.

  10. Petrogenesis of Paleocene-Eocene porphyry deposit-related granitic rocks in the Yaguila-Sharang ore district, central Lhasa terrane, Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junxing; Li, Guangming; Evans, Noreen J.; Qin, Kezhang; Li, Jinxiang; Zhang, Xia'nan

    2016-11-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene ore deposits in the Gangdese Metallogenic Belt, Tibet, are thought to have been formed during the main period of India-Asia continental collision. This paper reports the whole-rock major element, trace element, and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions and zircon trace element contents of volcanic and intrusive rocks from the Paleocene Yaguila skarn Pb-Zn-Ag deposit and adjacent Eocene Sharang porphyry Mo deposit in the central Lhasa terrane, Tibet. Geochemical signatures and Nd-Hf isotopic compositions indicate that the Yaguila Cretaceous rhyolitic rocks were formed by the melting of ancient continental crust, whereas the Paleocene causative granite porphyry may have resulted from the interaction between mantle-derived and crustal-derived materials when continental collision was initiated. The dramatic increase of εNd(t) values between emplacement of the granite porphyry and later porphyritic biotite granite suggests a greater involvement of mantle materials during the crystallization of the barren biotite granite stock. The post-ore Miocene granodiorite porphyry has a similar geochemical signature to the Sharang Miocene dykes, suggesting they were both generated from melting of enriched lithospheric mantle. Nd-Hf mixing calculations indicate an increasing contribution of mantle materials in Paleocene to Eocene intrusions, consistent with the regional tectonic model of Neo-Tethyan oceanic slab roll-back and break-off. Zircons from both the Yaguila and Sharang ore-related porphyries have higher Ce anomalies than those from the barren granitoids, suggesting that Mo mineralization was closely related to highly oxidized and differentiated magma. The fertile intrusions in the Yaguila-Sharang district contain EuN/EuN∗ values from 0.3 to 0.6, higher than the non-mineralized intrusions. The processes of early crystallization of plagioclase and/or SO2-degassing from underlying magma can explain the observed negative Eu anomalies in zircon.

  11. Nature and composition of interbedded marine basaltic pumice in the ~52–50 Ma Vastan lignite sequence, western India: Implication for Early Eocene MORB volcanism offshore Arabian Sea

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sarajit Sensarma; Hukam Singh; R S Rana; Debajyoti Paul; Ashok Sahni

    2017-03-01

    The recognition of pyroclasts preserved in sedimentary environments far from its source is uncommon. We here describe occurrences of several centimetres-thick discontinuous basaltic pumice lenses occurring within the Early Eocene Vastan lignite mine sedimentary sequence, western India at two different levels –one at ~5 m and the other at 10 m above a biostratigraphically constrained 52 Ma old marker level postdating the Deccan Volcanism. These sections have received global attention as they record mammalian and plant radiations. We infer the repetitive occurrence of pumice have been sourced from a ~52–50Ma MORB related to sea-floor spreading in the western Arabian Sea, most plausibly along the Carlsberg Ridge. Pyroclasts have skeletal plagioclase with horsetail morphologies ± pyroxene ± Fe–Ti oxide euhedral crystals, and typically comprise of circular polymodal (radii ≤10 to ≥30 μm), non-coalescing microvesicles (>40–60%). The pumice have undergone considerable syngenetic alteration during oceanic transport and post-burial digenesis, and are a composite mixture of Fe–Mn-rich clay and hydrated alteredbasaltic glass (palagonite). The Fe–Mn-rich clay is extremely low in SiO₂, Al₂ O₂, TiO₂ , MgO, alkalies and REE, but very high in Fe₂O₃, MnO, P, Ba, Sr contents, and palagonitization involved significant loss of SiO₂, Al₂O₃, MgO and variable gain in Fe₂O₃, TiO₂, Ni, V, Zr, Zn and REE. Bubble initiationto growth in the ascending basaltic magma (liquidus ~1200–1250◦C) may have occured in ~3 hr. Shortdistance transport, non-connected vesicles, deposition in inner shelf to more confined lagoonal condition in the Early Eocene and quick burial helped preservation of the pumice in Vastan. Early Eocene Arabian Sea volcanism thus might have been an additional source to marginal sediments along the passive margin of western India.

  12. New records and species of Crepidodera Chevrolat (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in Eocene European amber, with a brief review of described fossil beetles from Bitterfeld amber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukejs, Andris; Biondi, Maurizio; Alekseev, Vitalii I

    2016-11-15

    Based on six relatively well-preserved specimens from Eocene Baltic amber, Crepidodera tertiotertiaria sp. nov. is described. The new species is illustrated and compared with morphologically similar extant and fossil relatives. It is the third described fossil species of Crepidodera Chevrolat. In addition to the new taxon, new fossil records of C. decolorata Nadein & Perkovsky from Baltic and Bitterfeld amber are presented. A key to species of Crepidodera described from fossil resins is provided, and a checklist of Coleoptera described from Bitterfeld amber is compiled.

  13. The Eocene-Oligocene transition at ODP Site 1263, Atlantic Ocean: decreases in nannoplankton size and abundance and correlation with benthic foraminiferal assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordiga, M.; Henderiks, J.; Tori, F.; Monechi, S.; Fenero, R.; Thomas, E.

    2015-05-01

    The biotic response of calcareous nannoplankton to environmental and climatic changes during the Eocene-Oligocene transition (~34.8-32.7 Ma) was investigated at high resolution at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1263 (Walvis Ridge, South East Atlantic Ocean), and compared with a lower resolution benthic foraminiferal record. During this time interval, the global climate which had been warm during the Eocene, under high levels of atmospheric CO2 (pCO2), transitioned into the cooler climate of the Oligocene, with overall lower pCO2. At Site 1263, the absolute nannofossil abundance (coccoliths per gram of sediment; N g-1) and the mean coccolith size decreased distinctly across the E-O boundary (EOB; 33.89 Ma), mainly due to a sharp decline in abundance of large-sized Reticulofenestra and Dictyococcites, within ~53 kyr. Since carbonate dissolution did not vary much across the EOB, the decrease in abundance and size of nannofossils may highlight an overall decrease in their export production, which could have led to an increased ratio of organic to inorganic carbon (calcite) burial, as well as variations in the food availability for benthic foraminifers. The benthic foraminiferal assemblage data show the global decline in abundance of rectilinear species with complex apertures in the latest Eocene (~34.5 Ma), potentially reflecting changes in the food source, thus phytoplankton, followed by transient increased abundance of species indicative of seasonal delivery of food to the sea floor (Epistominella spp.; ~34.04-33.54 Ma), with a short peak in overall food delivery at the EOB (buliminid taxa; ~33.9 Ma). After Oi-1 (starting at ~33.4 Ma), a high abundance of Nuttallides umbonifera indicates the presence of more corrosive bottom waters, possibly combined with less food arriving at the sea floor. The most important signals in the planktonic and benthic communities, i.e. the marked decrease of large reticulofenestrids, extinctions of planktonic foraminifer species and

  14. A re-description of the fossil damselfly Eolestes syntheticus Cockerell, 1940 (Odonata: Zygoptera: Eolestidae n. fam.) with description of new taxa from the Eocene of North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwalt, Dale E; Bechly, Günter

    2014-11-24

    The enigmatic species Eolestes syntheticus Cockerell, 1940, from the Early Eocene of North America, previously attributed to the lestoid family Synlestidae, is re-examined in light of the discovery of new material from the Middle Eocene Kishenehn Formation in northwestern Montana. E. syntheticus and a new species, Eolestes ramosus sp. n., are attributed to a new family Eolestidae fam. n.. In addition, a new genus and species very closely related to Lestidae but assigned to family unknown, Lutetialestes uniformis sp. n., is described from the Kishenehn Formation.

  15. Supporting ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    maximilien brice

    2003-01-01

    Eighteen feet made of stainless steel will support the barrel ATLAS detector in the cavern at Point 1. In total, the ATLAS feet system will carry approximately 6000 tons, and will give the same inclination to the detector as the LHC accelerator.

  16. Oligocene sivaladapid primate from the Bugti Hills (Balochistan, Pakistan) bridges the gap between Eocene and Miocene adapiform communities in Southern Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marivaux, Laurent; Welcomme, Jean-Loup; Ducrocq, Stéphane; Jaeger, Jean-Jacques

    2002-04-01

    A new species of Guangxilemur (Sivaladapidae, Adapiformes) is described from the early Oligocene Chitarwata Formation (Bugti Member) of the Bugti Hills, Sulaiman geological Province, Balochistan, Pakistan. Guangxilemur singsilai n. sp. provides further diagnostic morphological characters from its newly described upper and lower dentitions, confirming its intermediate phylogenetic position between Eocene and Miocene Asian sivaladapid adapiforms. G. singsilai possesses moderately developed shearing and puncturing molar features and maintains lingual cusps on upper molars as in Eocene hoanghoniines; in contrast, it possesses a typical molariform P(4) as in Miocene sivaladapines. The important paleogeographic changes that have affected South Asia during the Tertiary (related to the collision between the Indian and Eurasian Plates) have played a critical role in reforming circulation and climatic differentiation. The presence in Pakistan of an unique and well-diversified Oligocene primate fauna, clearly demonstrates that South Asia maintained favourable environmental conditions during the middle Caenozoic global climatic deterioration that coincides with drastic changes in faunal structure on the whole Holarctic Province, including the extinction of adapiform primates.

  17. Evidence for seagrass meadows and their response to paleoenvironmental changes in the early Eocene (Jafnayn Formation, Wadi Bani Khalid, N Oman)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás, Sara; Frijia, Gianluca; Bömelburg, Esther; Zamagni, Jessica; Perrin, Christine; Mutti, Maria

    2016-07-01

    The recognition and understanding of vegetated habitats in the fossil record are of crucial importance in order to investigate paleoecological responses and indirectly infer climate and sea-level changes. However, the low preservation potential of plants and macroalgae hampers a direct identification of these environments in the geological past. Here we present sedimentological and paleontological evidences as tool to identify the presence of different seagrass-vegetated environments in the shallow marine settings of the lower Eocene Jafnayn platform of Oman and their responses to paleoenvironmental changes. The studied lower Eocene deposits consist of well bedded, nodular packstones dominated by encrusting acervulinid and alveolinid foraminifera passing upward to an alternance of packstones with echinoids and quartz grains and grainstones rich in Orbitolites, smaller miliolid foraminifera and quartz grains. The presence of seagrass is inferred by the occurrence of encrusting acervulinids and soritid Orbitolites, as well as by their test morphologies together with further sedimentological criteria. The clear shift observed in the faunal assemblages and sedimentary features may be related to a major reorganization of the carbonate system passing from a carbonate platform to a ramp-like platform with increased terrigenous sedimentation. Heterotroph tubular acervulinids and oligotroph alveolinids of the carbonate platform were replaced upward by more heterotroph organisms such as large, discoidal Orbitolites and smaller miliolids, most likely due to enhanced nutrient levels which would have led to a change of phytal substrate, from cylindrical-leaf dominated grasses into flat-leafed ones.

  18. Weddellian marine/coastal vertebrates diversity from a basal horizon (Ypresian, Eocene of the Cucullaea I Allomember, La Meseta formation, Seymour (Marambio Island, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo A. Reguero

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The La Meseta Formation crops out in Seymour/Marambio Island, Weddell Sea, northeast of the Antarctic Peninsula and contains one of the world's most diverse assemblages of Weddellian marine/coastal verte-brates of Early Eocene (Ypresian age. The La Meseta Formation is composed of poorly consolidated, marine sandstones and siltstones which were deposited in a coastal, deltaic and/or estuarine environment. It includes marine invertebrates and vertebrates as well as terrestrial vertebrates and plants. The highly fossiliferous basal horizon (Cucullaeashell bed, Telm 4 of Sadler 1988 of the CucullaeaI Allomember is a laterally extensive shell bed with sandy matrix. The fish remains, including 35 species from 26 families, of the Ypresian Cucullaeabed represent one of the most abundant and diverse fossil vertebrate faunas yet recorded in southern latitudes. Stratigraphic distribution and phylogenetic relationships of the Weddellian sphenisciforms are consistent with a first radiation of this group in the Early Eocene. The first inquestionable archaeocete from Antarctica is recorded in this unit and is referred to a new taxon.

  19. Litho- and biostratigraphy of the Lower Eocene carbonate sequence in Upper Egypt: evidence for uplifting and resedimentation of the Paleocene section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keheila, E. A.; Soliman, H. A.; El-Ayyat, Abd Alla M.

    The Lower Eocene carbonate succession outcropping east of Qena and Sohag, Upper Egypt is divided into the thebes and Drunka Formations. Field observations and petrographic analysis demonstrated interfingering relationship between these units. Moreover, the Assiuti Chalk and Manfalut Formations of Bishay (1961, 1966) as well as the Thebes Formation of Said (1961) are considered here unique lithostratigraphic unit. Biostratigraphically, the Lower Eocene carbonates are subdivided into two larger foraminiferal zones: (1) Nummulites solitarius (discocyclina irregularis/Operculina libyca) Zone (Early Ypresian) and (2) Nummulites planulatus/N. burdigalensis Zone (Late Ypresian) besides three algal zones of Late Ypresian age: (1) Ovulites maillolensis Zone followed upward by (2) Carpathoporella occidentalis Zone and (3) Belzungia borneti Zone. These faunla and floral zones are correlated and all the identified larger foraminifera (nummulites, discocyclines and operculines) and calcareous green algae (dasycladacean and codiacean) are point counted as well as their vertical distribution in six measured columnar sections are represented. Here, for the first time, coexistence of mixed Paleocene reworked planktonic foraminifers with the Ypressian sediments is recorded in the Thebes Formation. Therefore, we suggest that the Paleocene sequence in Egypt may have been subjected to uplifting and subaerial exposure followed by severe denudation during the Ypresian time.

  20. Late Paleocene-middle Eocene benthic foraminifera on a Pacific seamount (Allison Guyot, ODP Site 865): Greenhouse climate and superimposed hyperthermal events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arreguín-Rodríguez, Gabriela J.; Alegret, Laia; Thomas, Ellen

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the response of late Paleocene-middle Eocene (~60-37.5 Ma) benthic foraminiferal assemblages to long-term climate change and hyperthermal events including the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 865 on Allison Guyot, a seamount in the Mid-Pacific Mountains. Seamounts are isolated deep-sea environments where enhanced current systems interrupt bentho-pelagic coupling, and fossil assemblages from such settings have been little evaluated. Assemblages at Site 865 are diverse and dominated by cylindrical calcareous taxa with complex apertures, an extinct group which probably lived infaunally. Dominance of an infaunal morphogroup is unexpected in a highly oligotrophic setting, but these forms may have been shallow infaunal suspension feeders, which were ecologically successful on the current-swept seamount. The magnitude of the PETM extinction at Site 865 was similar to other sites globally, but lower diversity postextinction faunas at this location were affected by ocean acidification as well as changes in current regime, which might have led to increased nutrient supply through trophic focusing. A minor hyperthermal saw less severe effects of changes in current regime, with no evidence for carbonate dissolution. Although the relative abundance of infaunal benthic foraminifera has been used as a proxy for surface productivity through bentho-pelagic coupling, we argue that this proxy can be used only in the absence of changes in carbonate saturation and current-driven biophysical linking.

  1. Functioning of an ancient sediment routing system; Mass balance and sediment budget of the Eocene Escanilla Formation, Spanish central Pyrenees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, N. A.; Whittaker, A. C.; Allen, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    One of the key challenges that sedimentologists and stratigraphers face is trying to understand what controls grain-size and sedimentary facies in basins, with the ultimate goal of stratigraphic prediction. It has been shown that the crucial parameters that control grain-size trends are the sediment discharge into the basin, the characteristic grain size mix of the supply, and the spatial distribution of subsidence. In this paper we present an outcrop case study of the Escanilla Formation, where all these parameters have been constrained, and explore how knowledge of these parameters translates into stratigraphic architecture. The mid-upper Eocene Escanilla Formation is part of a 200 km-long sediment routing system that was sourced primarily from the Axial Zone of the South-Central Pyrenees and deposited in a series of wedge-top basins (La Pobla, Tremp-Graus, Ainsa and Jaca basins). The Escanilla system consists of a wide variety of depositional environments and is one of the rare examples where all components of the ancient routing system are readily available for study: from proximal alluvial fanglomerates in the Sis and Gurb paleovalleys, braided river deposits in the Tremp-Graus and eastern Ainsa basins, deltaic, shallow marine and continental slope deposits in the western Ainsa Basin, and deep marine turbidite deposits in the Jaca Basin. This makes it a world class siliciclastic analogue for hydrocarbon exploration. In this study we examine how the mass balance and sediment budget influenced sedimentary trends within this paleo-sediment routing system. The entire sediment routing system has been delimited using new provenance data and a correlation from source to sink is proposed, subdividing the 7.7 Myr duration of deposition into three time intervals of roughly equal duration. Within these time intervals, the sedimentary budgets of the Escanilla system have been calculated and a mass balance framework established, enabling the quantitative assessment of how

  2. Nahcolite and halite deposition through time during the saline mineral phase of Eocene Lake Uinta, Piceance Basin, western Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ronald C.; Brownfield, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Halite and the sodium bicarbonate mineral nahcolite were deposited during the saline phase of Eocene Lake Uinta in the Piceance Basin, western Colorado. Variations in the area of saline mineral deposition through time were interpreted from studies of core and outcrop. Saline minerals were extensively leached by groundwater, so the original extent of saline deposition was estimated from the distribution of empty vugs and collapse breccias. Vugs and breccias strongly influence groundwater movement, so determining where leaching has occurred is an important consideration for in-situ oil shale extraction methods currently being developed. Lake Uinta formed when two smaller fresh water lakes, one in the Uinta Basin of eastern Utah and the other in the Piceance Basin of western Colorado, expanded and coalesced across the Douglas Creek arch, an area of comparatively low subsidence rates. Salinity increased shortly after this expansion, but saline mineral deposition did not begin until later, after a period of prolonged infilling created broad lake-margin shelves and a comparatively small deep central lake area. These shelves probably played a critical role in brine evolution. A progression from disseminated nahcolite and nahcolite aggregates to bedded nahcolite and ultimately to bedded nahcolite and halite was deposited in this deep lake area during the early stages of saline deposition along with rich oil shale that commonly shows signs of slumping and lateral transport. The area of saline mineral and rich oil shale deposition subsequently expanded, in part due to infilling of the compact deep area, and in part because of an increase in water flow into Lake Uinta, possibly due to outflow from Lake Gosiute to the north. Finally, as Lake Uinta in the Piceance Basin was progressively filled from north to south by volcano-clastic sediment, the saline depocenter was pushed progressively southward, eventually covering much of the areas that had previously been marginal shelves

  3. Magnitude of the carbon isotope excursion at the Paleocene Eocene thermal maximum: The role of plant community change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Francesca A.; Wing, Scott L.; Freeman, Katherine H.

    2007-10-01

    Carbon-isotope measurements ( δ13C) of leaf-wax n-alkanes from the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, reveal a negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) of 4-5‰, which is 1-2‰ larger than that observed in marine carbonate δ13C records. Reconciling these records requires either that marine carbonates fail to record the full magnitude of the CIE or that the CIE in plants has been amplified relative to the marine. Amplification of the CIE has been proposed to result from an increase in available moisture that allowed terrestrial plants to increase 13C-discrimination during the PETM. Leaf physiognomy, paleopedology and hydrogen isotope ratios of leaf-wax lipids from the Bighorn Basin, however, all suggest that rather than a simple increase in available moisture, climate alternated between wet and dry during the PETM. Here we consider two other explanations and test them quantitatively with the carbon isotopic record of plant lipids. The "marine modification" hypothesis is that the marine carbonate record was modified by chemical changes at the PETM and that plant lipids record the true magnitude of the CIE. Using atmospheric CO 2δ13C values estimated from the lipid record, and equilibrium fractionation between CO 2 and carbonate, we estimate the expected CIE for planktonic foraminifera to be 6‰. Instead, the largest excursion observed is about 4‰. No mechanism for altering marine carbonate by 2‰ has been identified and we thus reject this explanation. The "plant community change" hypothesis is that major changes in floral composition during the PETM amplified the CIE observed in n-alkanes by 1-2‰ relative to marine carbonate. This effect could have been caused by a rapid transition from a mixed angiosperm/conifer flora to a purely angiosperm flora. The plant community change hypothesis is consistent with both the magnitude and pattern of CIE amplification among the different n-alkanes, and with data from fossil plants

  4. Methane and environmental change during the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM): Modeling the PETM as a multistage event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carozza, D. A.; Mysak, L. A.

    2012-04-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM), approximately 55 million years ago, was a period of intense climate and environmental change that was associated with the release of unprecedented amounts of light carbon to the ocean-atmosphere system. This event is documented by large negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) in oceanic and terrestrial environments, by an abrupt shoaling of the lysocline and calcite compensation depth, and by significant increases in average global temperature. Due to its 13C-depleted isotopic composition and strong atmospheric radiative forcing, methane is thought to have played a pivotal role during the PETM. Recent high-resolution geochemical records indicate that the PETM has a more complex structure than was apparent in earlier records. In particular, ocean sediment cores indicate that the PETM CIE was composed of three notable excursions separated by two 20-ky periods of negligible del13C change. Moreover, a 3-ky warming period that occurred prior to the PETM CIE has indicated that the carbon release that caused the initial CIE may not have produced the initial warming, as was previously postulated and modeled.In this study, we couple an atmospheric methane box model to a box model of the global carbon cycle, which is tuned to the background state of the PETM, in order to constrain the carbon emission and assess the role of methane. The initial 4 ky of the PETM are modeled as two separate stages involving: 1) a gradual warming with little or no lysocline shoaling or CIE, and 2) an abrupt warming, lysocline shoaling, and a CIE. For each stage, a range of atmospheric and oceanic emission scenarios representing different amounts, rates, and isotopic content of emitted carbon are simulated, and then compared to the sedimentary record. The sensitivity of the results to changes in climate sensitivity, global temperature change, lysocline shoaling, CIE, and background carbon dioxide concentration, among other variables, is tested. We

  5. Bottom water changes in the subtropical North Atlantic and the Southern Ocean associated to the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moebius, I.; Friedrich, O.; Edgar, K. M.; Scher, H. D.; Sexton, P.

    2013-12-01

    The Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO) is a ~650 kyr interval of pronounced global warmth from which the climate system recovered in less than 50 kyr. Despite the valuable insights that the deep-sea sedimentary record could provide on the benthic ecosystem response to this protracted global warming event, and the mechanisms responsible for its relatively rapid recovery, we have little understanding of either. Here we present new data on bottom-water characteristics from ODP Sites 1051 (subtropical North Atlantic) and 738 (Southern Ocean), spanning the MECO and post-MECO interval (41.1 to 39.5 Ma). At Site 1051 we used benthic foraminiferal assemblages and benthic foraminifera accumulation rates (BFAR). We find little change in the species composition, but we identify two transient intervals of BFARs increasing by one order of magnitude associated with peak warming: High Productivity Intervals HPI-1 (40.07 - 39.98 Ma) and HPI-2 (39.70 - 39.62 Ma). We correlate these HPIs to intervals of increased organic carbon burial found in the Tethys and suggest that they represent periods of strengthened productivity in the subtropical North Atlantic and the Tethys. At Southern Ocean Site 738 we used benthic foraminiferal assemblages in combination with Cerium-anomaly data. In contrast to Site 1051, we notice a turnover of the benthic foraminiferal communities during the MECO (40.60 and 39.95 Ma) towards an assemblage dominated by infaunal taxa indicative of eutrophication. Additionally, we observe a drop in benthic foraminiferal abundances during the peak warming (40.10 - 39.97 Ma), synchronous to a low Cerium-anomaly and small excursion in ɛNd values. This indicates a decrease in bottom-water oxygenation during MECO peak warming, potentially caused by the transient influence of an older, oxygen-depleted water mass. Overall, our data suggest that the extent and rate of environmental change associated with the MECO vary greatly in different ocean basins and that the

  6. Sedimentology and stratigraphy of the middle Eocene Guara carbonate platform near Arguis, South-West Pyrenean foreland: Implications for basin physiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyghe, D.; Castelltort, S.; Serra-Kiel, J.; Filleaudeau, P.-Y.; Emmanuel, L.; Mouthereau, F.; Renard, M.

    2009-04-01

    The Pyrenees results from the collision between Spain and Europe and developed between the upper Cretaceous (Santonian) and the Miocene. Its foreland basins are characterised by a thick fill of detrital and carbonate sediments. The diversity of Eocene deposits in the southern Pyrenean foreland basin is of particular use in facies sedimentology due to their exceptional outcropping quality and well established stratigraphic framework and has been taken as type examples of many different sedimentary environments. Most studies have concerned facies sedimentology of detrital series in turbiditic environments, meandering and braided rivers, alluvial fans, and deltas. In contrast, the Eocene carbonate series have attracted less attention. The marine Guara limestones are a formation of lower to middle Eocene age deposited on the southern border of the western Pyrenean foreland basin (Jaca basin). They were deposited as a retrogradational carbonate platform dominated by large benthic foraminifers near or at the flexural forebulge of the foreland basin as the Pyrenean orogen developed. This formation represents the last episode of carbonate platform in the Pyrenees and remains poorly studied. In the present work our aim is to provide a detailed facies analysis and physiographic reconstructions of the Guara carbonate platform. This is crucial to unravel the respective influences of tectonics, climate and rheology of the lithosphere on the foreland basin tectonic and stratigraphic development, and it brings new constraints on the paleoenvironments and paleogeography during the Lutetian, i.e. at the beginning of the major phase of activity of the Pyrenean orogenesis. Two outcrops were studied in the Sierras Marginales at the localities of Arguis and Lusera. The Lusera section once restored in its initial position is located to the North of the Arguis section in a basinward direction such that comparing time-equivalent facies between these two sections helps us reconstructing

  7. Early Eocene hyperthermal events ETM2, H2 and I1 as recorded by Tethyan planktic foraminifera in the Terche section (northernastern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Onofrio, Roberta; Luciani, Valeria; Giusberti, Luca; Fornaciari, Eliana; Sprovieri, Mario

    2014-05-01

    In the last years, several transient episodes of extreme warming, the so-called hyperthermals, have been recognized in addition to the well-know Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; ~55.5 Ma), superimposed on the long-term Paleocene-early Eocene warming trend peaking in the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). To the present, perturbations produced by hyperthermals are well documented in terms of isotopic variations whereas their influence on the biota is still largely unexplored. The Terche section, located in the Venetian Pre-Alps (northeastern Italy), is an expanded latest Paleocene-lower Eocene succession deposited in a bathyal setting of a continental margin of the central-western Tethys. This section is particularly suitable to study post-PETM hyperthermals because it contains three well-exposed and expanded marly-clayey units (MUs) corresponding to intervals of negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs). Calcareous plankton biostratigraphy allow us to refer them to the hyperthermals ETM2 (or H1; ~53.7 Ma), H2 (~53.6 Ma) and I1(~53.3 Ma). Here we present the first detailed quantitative analysis of planktic foraminiferal assemblages across these early Eocene hyperthermals events. Quantitative analysis of planktic foraminiferal genera shows a long-term trend of variation upon which higher frequency variations are superimposed. We interpret such long-term variation as the response to the long-term warming trend since it highlights a slight increase of the warm indicators, such as the acarininids, and decrease of the cold form subbotinids. The high frequency variations, instead, closely related to the CIEs and to the MUs, record a pronounced increase in acarininids (up to 68%) and a parallel marked decline in the abundances of subbotinids and other component of planktic foraminiferal assemblages. The MUs are also associated with an increase of the eutrophic radiolarians. This aspect, together with the dominance of acarininids, can be interpreted as a

  8. Supporting ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Eighteen feet made of stainless steel will support the barrel ATLAS detector in the cavern at Point 1. In total, the ATLAS feet system will carry approximately 6000 tons, and will give the same inclination to the detector as the LHC accelerator. The installation of the feet is scheduled to finish during January 2004 with an installation precision at the 1 mm level despite their height of 5.3 metres. The manufacture was carried out in Russia (Company Izhorskiye Zavody in St. Petersburg), as part of a Russian and JINR Dubna in-kind contribution to ATLAS. Involved in the installation is a team from IHEP-Protvino (Russia), the ATLAS technical co-ordination team at CERN, and the CERN survey team. In all, about 15 people are involved. After the feet are in place, the barrel toroid magnet and the barrel calorimeters will be installed. This will keep the ATLAS team busy for the entire year 2004.

  9. Southern high-latitude terrestrial climate change during the Palaeocene-Eocene derived from a marine pollen record (ODP Site 1172, East Tasman Plateau)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, L.; Pross, J.; Bijl, P. K.; O'Hara, R. B.; Raine, J. I.; Sluijs, A.; Brinkhuis, H.

    2014-07-01

    Reconstructing the early Palaeogene climate dynamics of terrestrial settings in the high southern latitudes is important to assess the role of high-latitude physical and biogeochemical processes in the global climate system. However, whereas a number of high-quality Palaeogene climate records has become available for the marine realm of the high southern latitudes over the recent past, the long-term evolution of coeval terrestrial climates and ecosystems is yet poorly known. We here explore the climate and vegetation dynamics on Tasmania from the middle Palaeocene to the early Eocene (60.7-54.2 Ma) based on a sporomorph record from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1172 on the East Tasman Plateau. Our results show that three distinctly different vegetation types thrived on Tasmania under a high-precipitation regime during the middle Palaeocene to early Eocene, with each type representing different temperature conditions: (i) warm-temperate forests dominated by gymnosperms that were dominant during the middle and late Palaeocene (excluding the middle/late Palaeocene transition); (ii) cool-temperate forests dominated by southern beech (Nothofagus) and araucarians that transiently prevailed across the middle/late Palaeocene transition interval (~ 59.5 to ~ 59.0 Ma); and (iii) paratropical forests rich in ferns that were established during and in the wake of the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). The transient establishment of cool-temperate forests lacking any frost-sensitive elements (i.e. palms and cycads) across the middle/late Palaeocene transition interval indicates markedly cooler conditions, with the occurrence of frosts in winter, on Tasmania during that time. The integration of our sporomorph data with previously published TEX86-based sea-surface temperatures from ODP Site 1172 documents that the vegetation dynamics on Tasmania were closely linked with the temperature evolution in the Tasman sector of the Southwest Pacific region. Moreover, the

  10. Southern high-latitude terrestrial climate change during the Paleocene-Eocene derived from a marine pollen record (ODP Site 1172, East Tasman Plateau)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, L.; Pross, J.; Bijl, P. K.; O'Hara, R. B.; Raine, J. I.; Sluijs, A.; Brinkhuis, H.

    2014-01-01

    Reconstructing the early Paleogene climate dynamics of terrestrial settings in the high southern latitudes is important to assess the role of high-latitude physical and biogeochemical processes in the global climate system. However, whereas a number of high-quality Paleogene climate records has become available for the marine realm of the high southern latitudes over the recent past, the long-term evolution of coeval terrestrial climates and ecosystems is yet poorly known. We here explore the climate and vegetation dynamics on Tasmania from the middle Paleocene to the early Eocene (60.7-54.2 Ma) based on a sporomorph record from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1172 on the East Tasman Plateau. Our results show that three distinctly different vegetation types thrived on Tasmania under a high-precipitation regime during the middle Paleocene to early Eocene, with each type representing different temperature conditions: (i) warm-temperate forests dominated by gymnosperms that were dominant during the middle and late Paleocene; (ii) cool-temperate forests dominated by southern beech (Nothofagus) and araucarians across the middle/late Paleocene transition interval (~59.5 to ~59.0 Ma); and (iii) paratropical forests rich in ferns that were established during and in the wake of the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). The transient establishment of cool-temperate forests lacking any frost-sensitive elements (i.e., palms and cycads) across the middle/late Paleocene transition interval indicates markedly cooler conditions, with the occurrence of frosts in winter, on Tasmania during that time. The integration of our sporomorph data with previously published TEX86-based sea-surface temperatures from ODP Site 1172 documents that the vegetation dynamics on Tasmania were closely linked with the temperature evolution in the Tasman sector of the Southwest Pacific region. Moreover, the comparison of our season-specific climate estimates for the sporomorph assemblages from ODP

  11. The Very Late Eocene Opening of Fram Strait between the Arctic Ocean and the Nordic Seas: Linkages with the Popigai Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillaire-Marcel, C.; Poirier, A.

    2013-12-01

    The transition from the Eocene Arctic Lake to the Arctic Ocean through the opening of Fram Strait, initially dated at ca. 18 Ma based on palynological inferences (Moran et al., 2004, Nature 441, 601-605), has been recently assigned to the very late Eocene (~ 36 Ma) based on Os-isotope stratigraphy and Re-Os isochron ages of sediments from the IODP-ACEX core (Lomonosov Ridge) (Poirier & Hillaire-Marcel, 2011, GRL 38, L14607). Here, we examine the potential linkages of this event with the Popigai meteoritic impact from northeastern Siberia, which has been dated independently at 35.7×0.2 Ma (Bottomley et al. 1997, Nature 338, 365-368). Noteworthy is the fact that in the earliest marine sediments of the ACEX core, the Os-isotope stratigraphy records an isotopic excursion which we tentatively assigned to the chondritic impactor of Popigai. Sr and Pb isotope signatures of detrital sediments (i.e., following the removal of exchangeable fractions) were thus used to further document the sources of terrigenous sediments deposited before, during, and after the transition episode. Above and below the lacustrine/marine boundary, we note relatively constant source provenances (or mixture of sources), implying that relative contributions from regional detrital sedimentary sources, thus relative erosion rates over surrounding continents, did not change much at a Ma-long time scale. On the other hand, a sharp change highlights the lacustrine/marine transition, with an abrupt shift to low values in 87Sr/88Sr, also marked by a (smaller) excursion in all three 204Pb-normalised lead isotopes values (corrected for in-situ decay of U). This isotopic excursion might also be due to the Popigai chondritic Impactor. The impact-related ejection over basaltic target materials would have produced the particulate matter of suitable composition (Wooden et al. 1993, GCA 57, 3677-3704) to account for the isotopic excursion observed. A first order estimate of the Popigai impact yields a value of

  12. Southern high-latitude terrestrial climate change during the Paleocene–Eocene derived from a marine pollen record (ODP Site 1172, East Tasman Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Contreras

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstructing the early Paleogene climate dynamics of terrestrial settings in the high southern latitudes is important to assess the role of high-latitude physical and biogeochemical processes in the global climate system. However, whereas a number of high-quality Paleogene climate records has become available for the marine realm of the high southern latitudes over the recent past, the long-term evolution of coeval terrestrial climates and ecosystems is yet poorly known. We here explore the climate and vegetation dynamics on Tasmania from the middle Paleocene to the early Eocene (60.7–54.2 Ma based on a sporomorph record from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP Site 1172 on the East Tasman Plateau. Our results show that three distinctly different vegetation types thrived on Tasmania under a high-precipitation regime during the middle Paleocene to early Eocene, with each type representing different temperature conditions: (i warm-temperate forests dominated by gymnosperms that were dominant during the middle and late Paleocene; (ii cool-temperate forests dominated by southern beech (Nothofagus and araucarians across the middle/late Paleocene transition interval (~59.5 to ~59.0 Ma; and (iii paratropical forests rich in ferns that were established during and in the wake of the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM. The transient establishment of cool-temperate forests lacking any frost-sensitive elements (i.e., palms and cycads across the middle/late Paleocene transition interval indicates markedly cooler conditions, with the occurrence of frosts in winter, on Tasmania during that time. The integration of our sporomorph data with previously published TEX86-based sea-surface temperatures from ODP Site 1172 documents that the vegetation dynamics on Tasmania were closely linked with the temperature evolution in the Tasman sector of the Southwest Pacific region. Moreover, the comparison of our season-specific climate estimates for the sporomorph

  13. Astronomical forcing of sedimentary cycles of Late Eocene Liushagang Formation in the Bailian Sag, Fushan Depression, Beibuwan Basin, South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹海洋; 金思丁; 孙鸣; 王华

    2016-01-01

    Sediments in the Liushagang Formation of Late Eocene form a group of key hydrocarbon play fairways in the Beibuwan Basin, South China Sea. As an important reservoir-forming combination, the Liushagang Formation consists of deltaic siliciclastic and show clear sedimentary cyclicity. According to paleontology research and stratigraphic correlation, the boundary between Liushagang Formation (Els) and Weizhou Formation (Ewz) is regarded as the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. The oxygen isotope dating for well cores from the top of the first Member of Liushagang Formation (Els1) and the bottom of the third Member of Weizhou Formation (Ewz3) give an isochron age of 35.2 Ma. Here, we use GR logging data as a paleoenvironmental proxy to conduct a detailed cyclostratigraphic study of the Els1 in the Bailian Sag, Fushan Depression. Power spectra, evolutionary fast Fourier transformation and wavelet analysis all reveal significant sedimentary cycles in Els1. The ratios of cycle wavelengths in these stratigraphic units are 21׃5׃2.8׃1.2׃1, and are interpreted as Milankovitch cycles of 400 ka and 96 ka eccentricity, 52 ka obliquity, 22 ka and 19 ka precession cycles, respectively. An astronomical time scale is established by tuning filtered 96 ka eccentricity cycles to a target curve of Well L2 in the Bailian Sag. Based on regional stratigraphic framework, combined with seismic, cores and logging data, the HST of the first member of the Liushagang Formation (Els1) delta in Well L2 was divided into six parasequence sets named Ps1-Ps6. According to the spectrum analysis by Simple Lomb periodogram from PAST program packages, the sediment accumulation rate of each parasequence sets first increased and then decreased as time went by. The sediment accumulation rate of Ps4 reached the maximum (0.127 m/ka) during the most prosperous period of delta prograding. Finally, the duration of each period of parasequence sets and more accurate geological age were calculated on the basis of

  14. Integrated biostratigraphy, stage boundaries and Paleoclimatology of the Upper Cretaceous-Lower Eocene successions in Kharga and Dakhala Oases, Western Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, H.; Al Sawy, S.

    2014-08-01

    The Upper Cretaceous-Lower Eocene succession in the studied sections is divided into four rock units that arranged from base to top: the Dakhla, Tarawan, Esna and the Thebes formations. Detailed study of the foraminifera and calcareous nannofossils has led to the recognition of 58 and 82 species, respectively. Based on planktonic foraminifera and calcareous nannofossils 8 planktonic foraminiferal biozones (CF4, P2, P3, P4, E1, E2, E3 and E4) have been recognized as well as 8 calcareous nannofossil biozones (CC25b, NP3, NP4, NP5, NP6, NP7/8, NP9, and NP10). At Gabal Teir/Tarawan section, Kharga Oasis, the Paleocene can be divided into three stages; Danian, Selandian and Thanetian. The Danian/Selandian boundary is placed at P3a/P3b zonal boundary (LO of Igorina albeari) which corresponds to the level of LO of Lithoptychius ulii, Fasciculithus pileatus, Fasciculithus involutus and Lithoptychius janii (upper part of Zone NP4). The Selandian/Thanetian boundary, on the other hand, can be traced within the foraminiferal Zone P4 (Globanomalina pseudomenardii Zone) and between the nannofossil zones NP6 and NP7/8 (LO of Discoaster mohleri). At Gabal Ghanima section, the Paleocene/Eocene boundary is located within the lower part of the Esna Formation. It can be traced at the base of planktonic foraminiferal Zone E1 (LOs of Acarinina africana, A sibaiyaensis and Morozovella allinsoensis), and at the NP9a/NP9b subzonal boundary (LO of Rhomboaster spp). However, the lower Eocene succession seems to be condensed and punctuated by minor hiatus (absence of Subzone NP10a). The dominance of cool water nannofossil species in the late Maastrichtian and early Danian interval suggests a gradual decrease in the surface water paleotemperature. However, a slight warming condition prevailed around the Danian/Selandian transition as evidenced by the warm water nannofossil species. At the P/E boundary interval, the high abundance of warm-water taxa (e.g. Discoaster, Sphenolithus, Rhomboaster

  15. The palaeoclimatic significance of Eurasian Giant Salamanders (Cryptobranchidae: Zaissanurus, Andrias) - indications for elevated humidity in Central Asia during global warm periods (Eocene, late Oligocene warming, Miocene Climate Optimum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyan, Davit; Böhme, Madelaine; Winklhofer, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Cryptobranchids represent a group of large sized (up to 1.8 m) tailed amphibians known since the Middle Jurassic (Gao & Shubin 2003). Two species are living today in eastern Eurasia: Andrias davidianus (China) and A. japonicus (Japan). Cenozoic Eurasian fossil giant salamanders are known with two genera and two or three species from over 30 localities, ranging from the Late Eocene to the Early Pliocene (Böhme & Ilg 2003). The Late Eocene species Zaissanurus beliajevae is restricted to the Central Asian Zaissan Basin (SE-Kazakhstan, 50°N, 85°E), whereas the Late Oligocene to Early Pliocene species Andrias scheuchzeri is distributed from Central Europe to the Zaissan Basin. In the latter basin the species occur during two periods; the latest Oligocene and the late Early to early Middle Miocene (Chkhikvadse 1982). Andrias scheuchzeri is osteological indistinguishable from both recent species, indicating a similar ecology (Westfahl 1958). To investigate the palaeoclimatic significance of giant salamanders we analyzed the climate within the present-day distribution area and at selected fossil localities with independent palaeoclimate record. Our results indicate that fossil and recent Andrias species occur in humid areas where the mean annual precipitation reach over 900 mm (900 - 1.300 mm). As a working hypothesis (assuming a similar ecology of Andrias and Zaissanurus) we interpret occurrences of both fossil Eurasian giant salamanders as indicative for humid palaeoclimatic conditions. Based on this assumption the Late Eocene, the latest Oligocene (late Oligocene warming) and the late Early to early Middle Miocene (Miocene Climatic Optimum) of Central Asia (Zaissan Basin) are periods of elevated humidity, suggesting a direct (positive) relationship between global climate and Central Asian humidity evolution. Böhme M., Ilg A. 2003: fosFARbase, www.wahre-staerke.com/ Chkhikvadze V.M. 1982. On the finding of fossil Cryptobranchidae in the USSR and Mongolia. Vertebrata

  16. Paleocene-Eocene δ13C of marine and terrestrial organic matter: implications for the magnitude of total organic carbon hyperthermal isotope excursions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluijs, A.; Dickens, G. R.

    2011-12-01

    A series of "hyperthermals" occurred during the Late Paleocene and Early Eocene (~58-50 Ma). These transient global warming events were characterized by prominent negative excursions in the stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) of carbon-bearing phases, and widespread dissolution of deep-sea carbonate; they were almost certainly geologically brief intervals of rapid and massive injection of 13C-depleted carbon into the combined ocean-atmosphere-biosphere system. However, the carbon masses involved remain the source of considerable debate, in part because the carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) are expressed differently, depending on the substrate analyzed and the location. For example, the CIE across the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; ~56 Ma), now measured in numerous phases at over 100 locations, ranges between 2 - 8 %, even after discounting sections with truncated records. Three factors might cause individual carbon isotope records to differ in shape and magnitude from changes in the global exogenic carbon cycle during hyperthermal events: (i) Changes in the isotope composition of the proximal carbon source (e.g., DIC); (ii) Changes in isotope fractionation through physiological response to ecological change; and (iii) Changes in the relative abundance of components with different δ13C. All three factors likely influence the magnitude of the CIE in many records across hyperthermal events. Here, we discuss how the third factor impacts the δ13C of total organic carbon (TOC) in a shallow marine sequence. Over the past years, bulk organic δ13C, BIT index and palynomorph records have been published for the late Paleocene-early Eocene interval at IODP Hole 4A on Lomonosov Ridge, Arctic Ocean. These records show a long-term -3 % decrease in TOC and a long-term increase in the proportion of marine organic carbon; they also show a rapid -5.5 % CIE in TOC and the proportion of marine organic carbon across the PETM. After correcting for long-term variations in

  17. Fidelity of fossil n-alkanes from leaf to paleosol and applications to the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, R. T.; McInerney, F. A.; Baczynski, A. A.; Wing, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    Long chain n-alkanes (C21-C35) are well-known as biomarkers of terrestrial plants. They can be preserved across a wide range of terrestrial and marine environments, survive in the sedimentary record for millions of years, and can serve as proxies for ancient environments. Most n-alkane records are derived from sediments rather than directly from fossil leaves. However, little is known about the fidelity of the n-alkane record: how and where leaf preservation relates to n-alkane preservation and how patterns of n-alkane carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) compare to living relatives. To examine these questions, we analyzed n-alkanes from fluvial sediments and individual leaf fossils collected in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, across the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) carbon isotope excursion. We assessed the fidelity of the n-alkane signature from individual fossil leaves via three separate means. 1) Spatial variations were assessed by comparing n-alkane concentrations on a fossil leaf and in sediments both directly adjacent to the leaf and farther away. Absolute concentrations were greater within the compression fossil than in the directly adjacent sediment, which were in turn greater than in more distant sediment. 2) n-Alkane abundances and distributions were examined in fossil leaves having a range of preservational quality, from fossils with intact cuticle to carbonized fossils lacking cuticle and higher-order venation. The best preserved fossils preserved a higher concentration of n-alkanes and showed the most similar n-alkane distribution to living relatives. However, a strong odd over even predominance suggests a relatively unmodified plant source occurred in all samples regardless of preservation state. 3) n-Alkane δ13C values were measured for both fossil leaves and their living relatives. Both the saw-tooth pattern of δ13C values between odd and even chain lengths and the general decrease in δ13C values with increasing chain length are consistent with

  18. Chemical abrasion-SIMS (CA-SIMS) U-Pb dating of zircon from the late Eocene Caetano caldera, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Kathryn E.; Coble, Matthew A.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Henry, Christopher D.; Colgan, Joseph P.; John, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Zircon geochronology is a critical tool for establishing geologic ages and time scales of processes in the Earth's crust. However, for zircons compromised by open system behavior, achieving robust dates can be difficult. Chemical abrasion (CA) is a routine step prior to thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) dating of zircon to remove radiation-damaged parts of grains that may have experienced open system behavior and loss of radiogenic Pb. While this technique has been shown to improve the accuracy and precision of TIMS dating, its application to high-spatial resolution dating methods, such as secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), is relatively uncommon. In our efforts to U-Pb date zircons from the late Eocene Caetano caldera by SIMS (SHRIMP-RG: sensitive high resolution ion microprobe, reverse geometry), some grains yielded anomalously young U-Pb ages that implicated Pb-loss and motivated us to investigate with a comparative CA and non-CA dating study. We present CA and non-CA 206Pb/238U ages and trace elements determined by SHRIMP-RG for zircons from three Caetano samples (Caetano Tuff, Redrock Canyon porphyry, and a silicic ring-fracture intrusion) and for R33 and TEMORA-2 reference zircons. We find that non-CA Caetano zircons have weighted mean or bimodal U-Pb ages that are 2–4% younger than CA zircons for the same samples. CA Caetano zircons have mean U-Pb ages that are 0.4–0.6 Myr older than the 40Ar/39Ar sanidine eruption age (34.00 ± 0.03 Ma; error-weighted mean, 2σ), whereas non-CA zircons have ages that are 0.7–1.3 Myr younger. U-Pb ages do not correlate with U (~ 100–800 ppm), Th (~ 50–300 ppm) or any other measured zircon trace elements (Y, Hf, REE), and CA and non-CA Caetano zircons define identical trace element ranges. No statistically significant difference in U-Pb age is observed for CA versus non-CA R33 or TEMORA-2 zircons. Optical profiler measurements of ion microprobe pits demonstrate consistent depths of ~ 1.6

  19. Organic petrology and geochemistry of Eocene Suzak bituminous marl, north-central Afghanistan: Depositional environment and source rock potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackley, Paul C.; Sanfilipo, John

    2016-01-01

    Organic geochemistry and petrology of Eocene Suzak bituminous marl outcrop samples from Madr village in north-central Afghanistan were characterized via an integrated analytical approach to evaluate depositional environment and source rock potential. Multiple proxies suggest the organic-rich (TOC ∼6 wt.%) bituminous marls are ‘immature’ for oil generation (e.g., vitrinite Ro rock sulfur content is ∼2.3 wt.% whereas sulfur content is ∼5.0–5.6 wt.% in whole rock extracts with high polar components, consistent with extraction from S-rich Type IIs organic matter which could generate hydrocarbons at low thermal maturity. Low Fe-sulfide mineral abundance and comparison of Pr/Ph ratios between saturate and whole extracts suggest limited Fe concentration resulted in sulfurization of organic matter during early diagenesis. From these observations, we infer that a Type IIs kerogen in ‘immature’ bituminous marl at Madr could be generating high sulfur viscous oil which is seeping from outcrop. However, oil-seep samples were not collected for correlation studies. Aluminum-normalized trace element concentrations indicate enrichment of redox sensitive trace elements Mo, U and V and suggest anoxic-euxinic conditions during sediment deposition. The bulk of organic matter observed via optical microscopy is strongly fluorescent amorphous bituminite grading to lamalginite, possibly representing microbial mat facies. Short chain n-alkanes peak at C14–C16 (n-C17/n-C29 > 1) indicating organic input from marine algae and/or bacterial biomass, and sterane/hopane ratios are low (0.12–0.14). Monoaromatic steroids are dominated by C28clearly indicating a marine setting. High gammacerane index values (∼0.9) are consistent with anoxia stratification and may indicate intermittent saline-hypersaline conditions. Stable C isotope ratios also suggest a marine depositional scenario for the Suzak samples, consistent with the presence of marine foraminifera including

  20. Relative humidity across the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum via combined hydrogen-oxygen isotope paleohygrometry (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, F. A.; Bloch, J. I.; Secord, R.; Wing, S. L.; Kraus, M. J.; Boyer, D. M.

    2009-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) presents an opportunity to characterize continental hydrologic changes during rapid and extreme global warming. The Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, USA, has long been recognized for the PETM sequences preserved there and sits in an ideal location for recording hydrologic changes in the interior of North America. The southeast Bighorn Basin is of particular interest because it contains not only alluvial paleosols and vertebrate fossils, but also macrofloral remains from the PETM. The carbon isotope excursion associated with this event is preserved in this part of the Basin in leaf wax lipids, tooth enamel, and bulk organic matter. To characterize the hydrologic changes that occurred during the PETM we are applying a suite of isotopic, paleobotanical and paleopedological approaches to sections in the southeast Bighorn Basin. Reported here are results from the combined hydrogen and oxygen isotope analysis aimed at reconstructing relative humidity. Oxygen isotope ratios (δ18O) of biogenic apatite from mammalian tooth enamel and fish scales vary with environment, physiology and diet. Because mammals are homeothermic, they primarily track surface water values with predictable physiological offsets. Hydrogen isotope ratios (δD) of leaf-wax lipids (long-chain n-alkanes) reflect both meteoric water δD values and additional D-enrichment caused by evapotranspiration. The enrichment factor between water δD and n-alkane δD can therefore be used as a proxy for relative humidity (RH). In this study, δ18O of surface water is estimated using the δ18O of Coryphodon tooth enamel. We use these δ18O values to estimate surface water δD values using the Global Meteoric Water Line (δD = 8δ18O + 10). We then calculate relative humidity from n-alkane δD values using a Craig-Gordon type isotopic model for D-enrichment caused by transpiration from leaves. Results of the combined hydrogen-oxygen isotope paleohygrometer indicate a general rise in

  1. First fossil record of Discocephalinae (Insecta, Pentatomidae): a new genus from the middle Eocene of Río Pichileufú, Patagonia, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrulevičius, Julián F.; Popov, Yuri A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A new genus and species of Discocephalini, Acanthocephalonotum martinsnetoi gen. n. et sp. n. is described from Río Pichileufú, middle Eocene of Patagonia, Argentina at palaeolatitude ~ 46°S. The new species is the first fossil representative of the Discocephalinae. This taxon is extant in equatorial to subtropical America, and some species reach warm temperate latitudes (Buenos Aires province). The new genus is distinguished from the other genera of Discocephalini by the combination of these characters: interocular width greater than head length; head massive and quadrangular with the anterior margin almost straight; juga touching each other; labrum thick and curved; triangular ante-ocular process extending beyond the eye; broad spine-like antero-lateral process of the pronotum; pronotum explanate and bean shaped; scutellum triangular with a circular tongue reaching the anterior side of abdominal segment 7; and wings well developed with membrane just surpassing end of abdomen. PMID:25061387

  2. Morphological and behavioral convergence in extinct and extant bugs: the systematics and biology of a new unusual fossil lace bug from the eocene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Wappler

    Full Text Available The bug Gyaclavator kohlsi Wappler, Guilbert, Wedmann et Labandeira, gen. et sp. nov., represents a new extinct genus of lace bugs (Insecta: Heteroptera: Tingidae occurring in latest early Eocene deposits of the Green River Formation, from the southern Piceance Basin of Northwestern Colorado, in North America. Gyaclavator can be placed within the Tingidae with certainty, perhaps it is sistergroup to Cantacaderinae. If it belongs to Cantacaderinae, it is the first fossil record of this group for North America. Gyaclavator has unique, conspicuous antennae bearing a specialized, highly dilated distiflagellomere, likely important for intra- or intersex reproductive competition and attraction. This character parallels similar antennae in leaf-footed bugs (Coreidae, and probably is associated with a behavioral convergence as well.

  3. Comparison of vitrified and unvitrified Eocene woody tissues by TMAH thermochemolysis – implications for the early stages of the formation of vitrinite

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    Huggett William W

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Samples of vitrified and unvitrified Eocene woody plant tissues collected from the Fossil Forest site, Geodetic Hills, Axel Heiberg Island, have been characterized by TMAH thermochemolysis. All samples are gymnosperm-derived, are of very low maturity and all share the same post-depositional geologic history. Differences in the distributions of products observed from vitrified and unvitrified samples suggest that vitrification of woody tissue is associated with modification of the lignin C3 side chain, following loss of all or most of the carbohydrate present in the precursor woody tissues. The key driver of vitrification appears to be physical compression of the tissue following biological removal of cellulosic materials.

  4. Towards completion of the early Eocene aviary: A new bird group from the Messel oil shale (Aves, Eopachypterygidae, fam. nov.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Gerald

    2015-09-08

    A new avian species is described from the early Eocene Messel fossil site in Germany. Eopachypteryx praeterita, gen. et sp. nov. is a small bird and exhibits a characteristic morphology with a short and robust beak, a distinctively shaped coracoid, stout humerus, robust pectoral girdle skeleton, and short hindlimbs. Although similarities to the Paleogene Eocuculus as well as to some extant telluravian and strisorine taxa are noted, the phylogenetic affinities of the new species are unresolved. To account for the fact that the new species is clearly distinguished from any of the known fossil or extant avian taxa, it is here assigned to the new taxon Eopachypterygidae, fam. nov.. Eopachypteryx praeterita is represented by three partial skeletons. A further partial skeleton from Messel belongs to a second, unnamed species, which is tentatively referred to Eopachypteryx.

  5. Integrated borehole and outcrop study for documentation of sea level cycles within the Early Eocene Naredi Formation,western Kutch,India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Urbashi; Sarkar; Santanu; Banerjee; P.K.Saraswati

    2012-01-01

    A combined micropalaeontological and sedimentological investigation of the Early Eocene Naredi Formation (thickness varying between 20 m and 60 m) reveals a complete third-order cycle and six fourth-order sea level cycles. Within the third-order cycle the foraminiferal abundance and diversity gradually increase upwards and reach their maximum values at about 41 m thickness above the base of the formation and subsequently decrease upward and finally give way upward to an unfossiliferous zone at the topmost part. Within a fourth-order cycle foraminiferal abundance and diversity exhibit a similar increasing and decreasing pattern. Bounded between two unconformities the Naredi Formation represents a sequence. A highly fossiliferous Assilinabearing limestone interval represents the maximum flooding zone which separates the transgressive systems tract at the base from the highstand systems tract at the top.

  6. Redescription and designation of a neotype for Pseudoloris reguanti Crusafont-Pairó, 1967, an Eocene primate from the Iberian Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minwer-Barakat, Raef; Marigó, Judit; Moyà-Solà, Salvador

    2013-06-01

    The species Pseudoloris reguanti (Microchoerinae, Omomyidae, Primates) was described by Miquel Crusafont-Pairó in 1967, based on a single lower molar from the Late Eocene Spanish site Sant Cugat de Gavadons. Sometime later, the holotype and unique material of P. reguanti was lost from the collections of the Institut Català de Paleontologia Miquel Crusafont. Recently, several isolated teeth of Pseudoloris from the type locality have been found in the collections of the Naturhistorisches Museum Basel, Switzerland, including two lower molars. According to the description of Crusafont-Pairó, one of the specimens may correspond to the holotype, but this statement cannot be proved due to the lack of illustrations accompanying the original definition of the species. In this work we designate this specimen as a neotype, also providing proper descriptions, measurements and illustrations of the new material and an emended diagnosis for the species.

  7. Zircon U-Pb dating of Maherabad porphyry copper-gold prospect area: evidence for a late Eocene porphyry-related metallogenic epoch in east of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Malekzadeh Shafaroudi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Eastern Iran has great potential for porphyry copper deposits, as a result of its past subduction zone tectonic setting that lead to extensive alkaline to calc-alkaline magmatic activity in Tertiary time. Maherabad is the first porphyry Cu-Au prospecting area which is discovered in eastern Iran. This is related to a succession o f monzonitic to dioritic porphyries stocks that were emplaced within volcanic rocks. Monzonitic porphyries have basic role in mineralization. Hydrothermal alteration zones are well developed including potassic, sericitic-potassic, quartz-sericite-carbonate-pyrite, quartz-carbonate-pyrite, silicified-propylitic, propylitic, carbonate and silicified zones. Mineralization occurs as Disseminated, stockwork and hydrothermal breccia. Based on early stage of exploration, Cu is between 179- 6830 ppm (ave. 3200 ppm and Au is up to 1000 ppb (ave. 570 ppb. This prospect is gold- rich porphyry copper deposit. Laser-ablation U-Pb dating of two samples from ore-related intrusive rocks indicate that these two monzonitic porphyries crystallized at 39.0 ± 0.8 Ma to 38.2 ± 0.8 Ma, within a short time span of less than ca. 1 Ma during the middle Eocene. This provides the first precise ages for metallogenic episode of porphyry-type mineralization. Also, the initial 87Sr/86Sr and (143Nd/144Ndi was recalculated to an age of 39 Ma. Initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios for monzonitic rocks are 0.7047-0.7048. The (143Nd/144Ndi isotope composition are 0.512694-0.512713. Initial ε Nd isotope values 1.45-1.81. Based on isotopic data the magma had originated beyond the continental crust. The study will be used for tectonic-magmatic setting and evolution of eastern Iran. Keywords: Lut block, Middle Eocene, Zircon, Geochronology, Laser ablation ICP-MS,

  8. A new genus and species of marine catfishes (Siluriformes; Ariidae) from the upper Eocene Birket Qarun Formation, Wadi El-Hitan, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Wadi El-Hitan, the UNESCO World Heritage Site, of the Fayum Depression in the northeast part of the Western Desert of Egypt, has produced a remarkable collection of Eocene vertebrates, in particular the fossil whales from which it derives its name. Here we describe a new genus and species of marine catfishes (Siluriformes; Ariidae), Qarmoutus hitanensis, from the base of the upper Eocene Birket Qarun Formation, based on a partial neurocranium including the complete left side, partial right dentary, left suspensorium, two opercles, left pectoral girdle and spine, nuchal plates, first and second dorsal spines, Weberian apparatus and a disassociated series of abdominal vertebrae. All of the elements belong to the same individual and some of them were found articulated. Qarmoutus gen. nov. is the oldest and the most complete of the Paleogene marine catfishes unearthed from the Birket Qarun Formation. The new genus exhibits distinctive features not seen in other African Paleogene taxa, such as different sculpturing on the opercle and pectoral girdle with respect to that on the neurocranium and nuchal plates, denticulate ornamentation on the skull bones arranged in longitudinal rows and forming a radiating pattern on the sphenotic, pterotic, extrascapular and the parieto-supraoccipital, indentations or pitted ornamentation on the nuchal plates as well as the parieto-supraoccipital process, strut-like radiating pattern of ornamentation on the opercle from the proximal articulation to margins, longitudinal, curved, reticulate ridges and tubercular ornamentations on the cleithrum, sinuous articulation between the parieto-supraoccipital process and the anterior nuchal plate, long, narrow, and arrowhead shaped nuchal shield, very small otic capsules restricted to the prootic. Multiple parsimony and Bayesian morphological phylogenetic analyses of Ariidae, run with and without “molecular scaffolds”, yield contradictory results for the placement of Qarmoutus; the genus is

  9. Tectono-climatic signals in linear, confined, point-sourced, deep-marine siliciclastic systems as analog for submarine-canyon fills, Eocene, Spanish Pyrenees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, K.

    2008-12-01

    The linear, confined geometry, and point-sourced nature, of the deep-marine siliciclastic systems in the Eocene Ainsa-Jaca basin, Spanish Pyrenees, provides a useful ancient spatial-temporal comparison and partial analog for the architecture and controls on the sedimentary infill of large submarine canyons / multiple canyons at continental margins with active tectonics, including salt and shale diapirism. The cumulative ~4 km of stratigraphy contains 8 sandy systems with a total of ~25 discrete channelized sandbodies that accumulated over ~10 Myr in water depths of ~400 to 800 m, that were controlled by the ~400-kyr Milkankovitch frequency with modes, at ~100 kyr and ~41 kyr (possibly stacked ~23-kyr) influencing bottom- water conditions, causing periodic stratification in the water column across a submarine sill within the western part of the more proximal depositional systems. Local tectonics defined and controlled the position and stacking patterns of the 8 sandy systems and their constituent channelized sandbodies, in a process of "seesaw tectonics" by: (i) Westward lateral offset-stacking of channelized sandbodies due to growth of the eastern side of the basin, and (ii) Eastward (orogenwards) "back-stepping" of the depositional axis of each sandy system, due to phases of relative uplift of the opposing lateral margin. Thus, the first-order control on accommodation for deep-marine sedimentation was tectonic, with the pacing of the supply of coarse siliciclastics being driven by global climatic processes, particularly Milankovitch-type frequencies. The dominance of eccentricity and obliquity is similar to results from the continental lacustrine, Eocene Green River Formation. The age model for the Ainsa basin yields an average sediment accumulation rate of ~40 cm kyr-1, that is consistent with that inferred from the spectral analysis on bioturbation intensity for fine-grained sedimentation (~30 cm kyr-1). This paper compares and contrasts depositional patterns

  10. Massive and permanent decline of symbiont bearing morozovellids and δ13C perturbations across the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum at the Possagno section (Southern Alps of northeastern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Luciani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO records the highest prolonged global temperatures over the past 70 Ma. Understanding the causes and timing of Eocene climate change remains a major challenge in Cenozoic paleoceanography, which includes the biotic response to climate variability and the changes among planktic foraminiferal assemblages across the EECO. The symbiont bearing and shallow dwelling genera Morozovella and Acarinina were important calcifiers in the tropical-subtropical early Paleogene oceans but almost completely disappeared at about 38 Ma, near the Bartonian/Priabonian boundary. We show here that morozovellids record a first critical step across the EECO through a major permanent decline in relative abundance from the Tethyan Possagno section and ODP Site 1051 in the western subtropical North Atlantic. Possible causes may include increased eutrophication, weak water column stratification, changes in ocean chemistry, loss of symbiosis and possible complex interaction with other microfossil groups. Relative abundances of planktic foraminiferal taxa at Possagno parallel negative shifts in both δ13C and δ18O of bulk sediment from Chron C24r to basal Chron C20r. The post-EECO stable isotopic excursions towards lighter values are of modest intensity. Significant though ephemeral modifications in the planktic foraminiferal communities occur during these minor isotopic excursions. These modifications are marked by pronounced increases in relative abundance of acarininids, in a manner similar to their behaviour during pre-EECO hyperthermals in the Tethyan settings, which suggest a pronounced biotic sensitivity to climate change of planktic foraminifera even during the post-EECO interval.

  11. Late Eocene to Early Miocene Andean uplift inferred from detrital zircon fission track and U-Pb dating of Cenozoic forearc sediments (15-18°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decou, A.; von Eynatten, H.; Dunkl, I.; Frei, D.; Wörner, G.

    2013-08-01

    Timing, amount, and mechanisms of uplift in the Central Andes have been a matter of debate in the last decade. Our study is based on the Cenozoic Moquegua Group deposited in the forearc basin between the Western Cordillera and the Coastal Cordillera in southern Peru from ˜50 to ˜4 Ma. The Moquegua Group consists mainly of mud-flat to fluvial siliciclastic sediments with upsection increasing grain size and volcanic intercalations. Detrital zircon U-Pb dating and fission track thermochronology allow us to refine previous sediment provenance models and to constrain the timing of Late Eocene to Early Miocene Andean uplift. Uplift-related provenance and facies changes started around 35 Ma and thus predate major voluminous ignimbrite eruptions that started at ˜25 by up to 10 Ma. Therefore magmatic addition to the crust cannot be an important driving factor for crustal thickening and uplift at Late Eocene to Early Oligocene time. Changes in subduction regime and the subducting plate geometry are suggested to control the formation of significant relief in the area of the future Western Cordillera which acts as an efficient large-scale drainage divide between Altiplano and forearc from at least 15.5 to 19°S already at ˜35 Ma. The model integrates the coincidence of (i) onset of provenance change no later than 35 Ma, (ii) drastic decrease in convergence rates at ˜40, (iii) a flat-subduction period at around ˜40 to ˜30 Ma leading to strong interplate coupling, and (iv) strong decrease in volcanic activity between 45 and 30 Ma.

  12. Eocene (Lutetian) Shark-Rich Coastal Paleoenvironments of the Southern North Sea Basin in Europe: Biodiversity of the Marine Fürstenau Formation Including Early White and Megatooth Sharks

    OpenAIRE

    C. G. Diedrich

    2012-01-01

    The Fürstenau Formation (Lutetian, Paleogene, Eocene) is based on type sections near Fürstenau in Germany (central Europe) and is built of 22 meter thick marine glauconitic and strongly bioturbated sands, clays, and a vertebrate-rich conglomerate bed. The conglomerate layer from the Early Lutetian transgression reworked Lower Cretaceous, and Paleogene marine sediments. It is dominated by pebbles from the locally mountains which must have been transported by an ancient river in a delta fan. Ma...

  13. A land micro-mammal fauna from the Early Eocene marine Egem deposits (NP12, Belgium) and the first occurrence of the peradectid marsupial Armintodelphys outside North America

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, T.; Smith, R

    2013-01-01

    Dental remains of land mammals are sometimes discovered in shallow marine Paleogene deposits of the North Sea Basin. Such is the case for eleven specimens we describe here from the Early Eocene Egemkapel Clay Member in the middle part of the Tielt Formation, found in Ampe quarry at Egem in Northwestern Belgium. The small fauna consists of 6 taxa, including the neoplagiaulacid multituberculate Ectypodus, the erinaceomorph insectivore Macrocranion, the nyctitheriid Leptacodon, an eochiropteran ...

  14. Large amplitude variations in global carbon cycling and terrestrial weathering from the late Paleocene through the early Eocene: carbon isotope and terrigenous accumulation records at Mead Stream, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotnick, B. S.; Dickens, G. R.; Nicolo, M.; Hollis, C. J.; Crampton, J. S.; Zachos, J. C.

    2010-12-01

    Global temperatures rose ~6°C from the late Paleocene ca. 58 Ma to the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO) ca. 52 - 50 Ma. Superimposed on this were at least two geologically brief (CIEs) and clay-rich horizons (marls), the latter caused by excess terrigenous dilution. 283 new samples were collected, mostly between ETM-2 and the EECO; these were analyzed for carbonate content, lithology, and bulk carbonate carbon isotopes. Five marl-rich beds occur in upper Paleocene and lowermost Eocene strata. These mark the known and suspected hyperthermals: PETM, ETM-2, H-2, I-1 and I-2. Above is a greatly expanded (100 m-thick) unit represented by a series of marl beds which correlates to the EECO. Carbonate contents are generally 60-90% throughout the studied interval, with lows being marls. Similar to findings elsewhere, there is an overall long-term drop in δ13C from the late Paleocene to early Eocene. This is punctuated by multiple short-term CIEs of variable magnitude (PETM: 2.5‰; ETM-2: 1.0‰; H-2: 0.2‰; I-1: 0.6%). The EECO is a series of negative CIEs with magnitudes ranging between 0.2 - 0.6‰. Of these, the K/X/ETM-3 event (another suspected hyperthermal) is the most pronounced (0.6‰). The late Paleocene-early Eocene δ13C record at Mead Stream is remarkably similar to other records generated at deep-sea sites, except that lows in δ13C span intervals of relatively high sedimentation (terrigenous dilution) rather than intervals of relatively low sedimentation (carbonate dissolution). We suggest that over ~6 million years, there was a series of short-term climate perturbations, each characterized by massive carbon input and greater continental weathering. The suspected link involves global warming and enhanced seasonality in precipitation.

  15. Organic geochemistry and petrology of subsurface Paleocene-Eocene Wilcox and Claiborne Group coal beds, Zavala County, Maverick Basin, Texas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackley, Paul C.; Warwick, Peter; Hook, Robert W.; Alimi, Hossein; Mastalerz, Maria; Swanson, Sharon M.

    2012-01-01

    Coal samples from a coalbed methane exploration well in northern Zavala County, Maverick Basin, Texas, were characterized through an integrated analytical program. The well was drilled in February, 2006 and shut in after coal core desorption indicated negligible gas content. Cuttings samples from two levels in the Eocene Claiborne Group were evaluated by way of petrographic techniques and Rock–Eval pyrolysis. Core samples from the Paleocene–Eocene Indio Formation (Wilcox Group) were characterized via proximate–ultimate analysis in addition to petrography and pyrolysis. Two Indio Formation coal samples were selected for detailed evaluation via gas chromatography, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy. Samples are subbituminous rank as determined from multiple thermal maturity parameters. Elevated rank (relative to similar age coal beds elsewhere in the Gulf Coast Basin) in the study area is interpreted to be a result of stratigraphic and/or structural thickening related to Laramide compression and construction of the Sierra Madre Oriental to the southwest. Vitrinite reflectance data, along with extant data, suggest the presence of an erosional unconformity or change in regional heat flow between the Cretaceous and Tertiary sections and erosion of up to >5 km over the Cretaceous. The presence of liptinite-rich coals in the Claiborne at the well site may indicate moderately persistent or recurring coal-forming paleoenvironments, interpreted as perennially submerged peat in shallow ephemeral lakes with herbaceous and/or flotant vegetation. However, significant continuity of individual Eocene coal beds in the subsurface is not suggested. Indio Formation coal samples contain abundant telovitrinite interpreted to be preserved from arborescent, above-ground woody vegetation that developed during the middle portion of mire development in forested swamps. Other petrographic criteria suggest enhanced biological, chemical and physical

  16. Paleomagnetic evidence for a pre-early Eocene (˜ 50 Ma) bending of the Patagonian orocline (Tierra del Fuego, Argentina): Paleogeographic and tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffione, Marco; Speranza, Fabio; Faccenna, Claudio; Rossello, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    The southernmost segment of the Andes of southern Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego forms a ˜ 700 km long orogenic re-entrant with an interlimb angle of ˜ 90° known as Patagonian orocline. No reliable paleomagnetic evidence has been gathered so far to assess whether this great orogenic bend is a primary arc formed over an articulated paleomargin, or is due to bending of a previously less curved (or rectilinear) chain. Here we report on an extensive paleomagnetic and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) study carried out on 22 sites (298 oriented cores), predominantly sampled in Eocene marine clays from the external Magallanes belt of Tierra del Fuego. Five sites (out of six giving reliable paleomagnetic results) containing magnetite and subordinate iron sulphides yield a positive fold test at the 99% significance level, and document no significant rotation since ˜ 50 Ma. Thus, the Patagonian orocline is either a primary bend, or an orocline formed after Cretaceous-earliest Tertiary rotations. Our data imply that the opening of the Drake Passage between South America and Antarctica (probably causing the onset of Antarctica glaciation and global climate cooling), was definitely not related to the formation of the Patagonian orocline, but was likely the sole consequence of the 32 ± 2 Ma Scotia plate spreading. Well-defined magnetic lineations gathered at 18 sites from the Magallanes belt are sub-parallel to (mostly E-W) local fold axes, while they trend randomly at two sites from the Magallanes foreland. Our and previous AMS data consistently show that the Fuegian Andes were characterized by a N-S compression and northward displacing fold-thrust sheets during Eocene-early Miocene times (50-20 Ma), an unexpected kinematics considering coeval South America-Antarctica relative motion. Both paleomagnetic and AMS data suggest no significant influence from the E-W left-lateral Magallanes-Fagnano strike-slip fault system (MFFS), running a few kilometres south of our

  17. Insights into the dolomitization process and porosity modification in sucrosic dolostones, Avon Park Formation (Middle Eocene), East-Central Florida, U.S.A.

    KAUST Repository

    Maliva,, Robert G.

    2011-03-01

    The Avon Park Formation (middle Eocene) in central Florida, U.S.A., contains shallow-water carbonates that have been replaced by dolomite to varying degrees, ranging from partially replaced limestones, to highly porous sucrosic dolostones, to, less commonly, low-porosity dense dolostones. The relationships between dolomitization and porosity and permeability were studied focusing on three 305-m-long cores taken in the City of Daytona Beach. Stable-isotope data from pure dolostones (mean δ 18O = +3.91% V-PDB) indicate dolomite precipitation in Eocene penesaline pore waters, which would be expected to have been at or above saturation with respect to calcite. Nuclear magnetic log-derived porosity and permeability data indicate that dolomitization did not materially change total porosity values at the bed and formation scale, but did result in a general increase in pore size and an associated substantial increase in permeability compared to limestone precursors. Dolomitization differentially affects the porosity and permeability of carbonate strata on the scale of individual crystals, beds, and formations. At the crystal scale, dolomitization occurs in a volume-for-volume manner in which the space occupied by the former porous calcium carbonate is replaced by a solid dolomite crystal with an associated reduction in porosity. Dolomite crystal precipitation was principally responsible for calcite dissolution both at the actual site of dolomite crystal growth and in the adjoining rock mass. Carbonate is passively scavenged from the formation, which results in no significant porosity change at the formation scale. Moldic pores after allochems formed mainly in beds that experienced high degrees of dolomitization, which demonstrates the intimate association of the dolomitization process with carbonate dissolution. The model of force of crystallization-controlled replacement provides a plausible explanation for key observations concerning the dolomitization process in the

  18. A new paleomagnetic Paleocene-Eocene apparent polar wandering path derived from magnetostratigraphies: correlations for faunal and floral development at high latitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, M.; Besse, J.; Fluteau, F.

    2005-12-01

    The development of endemic warm-climate flora and fauna at high latitudes in both hemispheres attests to the global warming that affected the Earth at the end of the Paleocene and the beginning of the Eocene. Nonetheless, the presence of these species at very high latitudes is also conditional on insolation, and the presence of tropical flora and fauna at very high paleomagnetic paleolatitudes, well north of the Arctic Circle, remains intriguing. We thus reappraise paleomagnetic data in a new way, defining an apparent geomagnetic polar wander path (APWP) from the beginning of the Paleocene to the middle of the mid-Eocene (65-42Ma) using a selection of magnetostratigraphies published over the last 25 years. Six series of VGPs are sufficiently long and of high enough quality to be retained; they originate from Gubbio (Italy) and from leg 74 for the African plate; from the Aix en Provence (France) and Basque (Spain) basins for Europe; from leg 171B for North America, and from leg 121 for Australia. For each site, a VGP (virtual geomagnetic pole) is defined for each magnetic anomaly and then transferred using classical kinematic parameters onto Africa selected as the single reference frame. The successive mean geomagnetic poles for each anomaly (hence perfectly synchronous) are then calculated in order to define the APWP. This shows a loop with two cusps at anomalies 26-25 (61-56 Ma) and 24-23 (56-51 Ma); the corresponding mean poles differ according to McFadden and McElhinny (1990), whereas the end poles relating to anomalies 29-27 (65.5-61 Ma) and 22-19 (51-42.5 Ma) are identical. The plate movements inferred from this loop, possibly related to an episode of true polar wander, are shown to be in agreement with the climatic and paleoenvironmental data and suggests a migration of flora and fauna which is synchronous with migration of the pole, rather than an adaptation of these species to the polar obscurity.

  19. Group Decision Process Support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, John; Hijikata, Masao

    1997-01-01

    Introducing the notion of Group Decision Process Support Systems (GDPSS) to traditional decision-support theorists.......Introducing the notion of Group Decision Process Support Systems (GDPSS) to traditional decision-support theorists....

  20. Eocene to Miocene back-arc basin basalts and associated island arc tholeiites from northern Sulawesi (Indonesia): Implications for the geodynamic evolution of the Celebes basin; Basaltes de bassin arriere-arc de l`Eocene-Miocene et tholeiites d`arc insulaire associees du nord Sulawesi (Indonesie): implications pour l`evolution geodynamique du bassin des Celebes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangin, C. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 75 - Paris (France); Maury, R.C.; Bellon, H.; Cotten, J. [Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, 29 - Brest (France); Polve, M. [Universite Paul Sabatier, 31 - Toulouse (France); Priadi, B.; Soeria-Atmadja, R. [Department of Geology, ITB, Bandung (Indonesia); Joron, J.L. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. de Recherche sur l`Etat Condense, les Atomes et les Molecules

    1997-12-31

    Eocene BABB basalts intruded by tholeiitic and calk-alkalic island arc magmatic rocks are reported from the north arm of Sulawesi (Indonesia). Age and geochemical similarities between these basalts and those drilled in the Celebes Sea indicate this North Sulawesi volcanic arc was built on the same oceanic crust. The 25 deg late Neogene clockwise rotation of the north arm of Sulawesi following its collision with fragments of Australia (Sula, Buton) is not sufficient to explain the asymmetrical magnetic anomalies in the Celebes basin. The North Sulawesi island arc could be interpreted as having progressively retreated northward on its own Celebes sea back arc basin, during an episode of Palaeogene-early Neogene tectonic erosion along the trench. (authors) 37 refs.

  1. Coal geology of the Paleocene-Eocene Calvert Bluff Formation (Wilcox Group) and the Eocene Manning Formation (Jackson Group) in east-central Texas; field trip guidebook for the Society for Organic Petrology, Twelfth Annual Meeting, The Woodlands, Texas, August 30, 1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, Peter D.; Crowley, Sharon S.

    1995-01-01

    The Jackson and Wilcox Groups of eastern Texas (fig. 1) are the major lignite producing intervals in the Gulf Region. Within these groups, the major lignite-producing formations are the Paleocene-Eocene Calvert Bluff Formation (Wilcox) and the Eocene Manning Formation (Jackson). According to the Keystone Coal Industry Manual (Maclean Hunter Publishing Company, 1994), the Gulf Coast basin produces about 57 million short tons of lignite annually. The state of Texas ranks number 6 in coal production in the United States. Most of the lignite is used for electric power generation in mine-mouth power plant facilities. In recent years, particular interest has been given to lignite quality and the distribution and concentration of about a dozen trace elements that have been identified as potential hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. As pointed out by Oman and Finkelman (1994), Gulf Coast lignite deposits have elevated concentrations of many of the HAPs elements (Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Hg, Mn, Se, U) on a as-received gm/mmBtu basis when compared to other United States coal deposits used for fuel in thermo-electric power plants. Although regulations have not yet been established for acceptable emissions of the HAPs elements during coal burning, considerable research effort has been given to the characterization of these elements in coal feed stocks. The general purpose of the present field trip and of