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Sample records for challenging epithelial odontogenic

  1. Peripheral epithelial odontogenic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carzoglio, J.; Tancredi, N.; Capurro, S.; Ravecca, T.; Scarrone, P.

    2006-01-01

    A new case of peripheral epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg tumor) is reported. It is localized in the superior right gingival region, a less frequent site, and has the histopathological features previously reported. Immunochemical studies were performed, revealing a differential positive stain to cytokeratins in tumor cells deeply seated in the tumor mass, probably related to tumoral cell heterogeneity.Interestingly, in this particular case S-100 protein positive reactivity was also detected in arborescent cells intermingled with tumoral cells, resembling Langerhans cells. Even though referred in the literature in central Pindborg tumors, no references were found about their presence in peripheral tumors, like the one that is presented here

  2. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic cyst with odontome in left mandible

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    R Kamala

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcifying epithelial odontogenic cyst is a mixed odontogenic benign tumor but most of the cases present cystic characteristics. We present a case report of calcifying epithelial odontogenic cyst with odontoma in a 20-year-old male who presented with a painless unilateral swelling of the jaw. The lesion involved an impacted 37 which was displaced to the lower border of the mandible and a calcified mass that was within the cystic lesion that was recognized as odontoma. The lesion was surgically removed along with 36 and 37 was allowed to erupt.

  3. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor of the posterior maxilla

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    Vidya Ajila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT is a rare odontogenic neoplasm comprising <1% of all odontogenic tumors. It is commonly seen in the third to fifth decades of life without any gender predilection. It usually occurs in the mandibular posterior region. A painless, slow growing swelling with bone expansion is the most common clinical feature of CEOT. Radiographically, it presents as a mixed lesion with or without an associated impacted tooth. Confirmation of the diagnosis is by histopathological examination. We describe an unusual case of CEOT occurring in the maxillary posterior region and involving the maxillary sinus. The associated impacted third molar was displaced to the lateral wall of the nose and root resorption was seen in all the teeth associated with the lesion. There was no evidence of calcification in conventional as well as computed tomography images.

  4. Msx and dlx homeogene expression in epithelial odontogenic tumors.

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    Ruhin-Poncet, Blandine; Ghoul-Mazgar, Sonia; Hotton, Dominique; Capron, Frédérique; Jaafoura, Mohamed Habib; Goubin, Gérard; Berdal, Ariane

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial odontogenic tumors are rare jaw pathologies that raise clinical diagnosis and prognosis dilemmas notably between ameloblastomas and clear cell odontogenic carcinomas (CCOCs). In line with previous studies, the molecular determinants of tooth development-amelogenin, Msx1, Msx2, Dlx2, Dlx3, Bmp2, and Bmp4-were analyzed by RT-PCR, ISH, and immunolabeling in 12 recurrent ameloblastomas and in one case of CCOC. Although Msx1 expression imitates normal cell differentiation in these tumors, other genes showed a distinct pattern depending on the type of tumor and the tissue involved. In benign ameloblastomas, ISH localized Dlx3 transcripts and inconstantly detected Msx2 transcripts in epithelial cells. In the CCOC, ISH established a lack of both Dlx3 and Msx2 transcripts but allowed identification of the antisense transcript of Msx1, which imitates the same scheme of distribution between mesenchyme and epithelium as in the cup stage of tooth development. Furthermore, while exploring the expression pattern of signal molecules by RT-PCR, Bmp2 was shown to be completely inactivated in the CCOC and irregularly noticeable in ameloblastomas. Bmp4 was always expressed in all the tumors. Based on the established roles of Msx and Dlx transcription factors in dental cell fates, these data suggest that their altered expression is a proposed trail to explain the genesis and/or the progression of odontogenic tumors.

  5. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, a rare presentation in children: Two case reports

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    Susant Mohanty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT is a rare and benign odontogenic neoplasm that affects the jaws. It is certainly an atypical instance to find this tumor in children. Here, we present two case reports of CEOT presenting in mandible of a 12- and 13-year-old female child, respectively. CEOT have been reported to show features of malignant transformation also.

  6. Odontogenic Cysts and Neoplasms.

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    Bilodeau, Elizabeth Ann; Collins, Bobby M

    2017-03-01

    This article reviews a myriad of common and uncommon odontogenic cysts and tumors. The clinical presentation, gross and microscopic features, differential diagnosis, prognosis, and diagnostic pitfalls are addressed for inflammatory cysts (periapical cyst, mandibular infected buccal cyst/paradental cyst), developmental cysts (dentigerous, lateral periodontal, glandular odontogenic, orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst), benign tumors (keratocystic odontogenic tumor, ameloblastoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, ameloblastic fibroma and fibroodontoma, odontoma, squamous odontogenic tumor, calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor, primordial odontogenic tumor, central odontogenic fibroma, and odontogenic myxomas), and malignant tumors (clear cell odontogenic carcinoma, ameloblastic carcinoma, ameloblastic fibrosarcoma). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Report of Two Cases of Combined Odontogenic Tumors: Ameloblastoma with Odontogenic Keratocyst and Ameloblastic Fibroma with Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst.

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    Neuman, Ashley Nicole; Montague, Lindsay; Cohen, Donald; Islam, Nadim; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel

    2015-09-01

    Combined odontogenic neoplasms have rarely been documented. Such tumors have also been described by other researchers as "hybrid" lesions. The histologic features are often identical to other individually well-established odontogenic neoplasms such as ameloblastoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, ameloblastic fibroma (AF), and ameloblastic fibro-odontoma. Their clinical presentation is variable, ranging from cysts to neoplasms showing varying degrees of aggressive behavior. Most combined tumors contain features of one of the odontogenic tumors in combination with either a calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) or a calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor. We present two new cases of combined odontogenic tumors: an ameloblastoma with an odontogenic keratocyst and an AF with COC. Predicting clinical outcome is challenging when a combination tumor is encountered due to the paucity of such lesions. One must understand salient features of these entities and differentiate them from the more common conventional neoplasms to expand classification and provide prognostic criteria.

  8. Analysis of the proliferative potential of odontogenic epithelial cells of pericoronal follicles.

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    Cimadon, Natalia; Lauxen, Isabel Silva; Carrard, Vinicius Coelho; Sant'Ana Filho, Manoel; Rados, Pantelis Varvaki; Oliveira, Márcia Gaiger

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the proliferative potential and the cell proliferation rate of odontogenic epithelial cells. Forty-two cases of pericoronal follicles of impacted third molars were submitted to silver impregnation technique for quantification of argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNOR) and immunohistochemical staining for EGFR and Ki-67. For AgNOR quantification, the mean number of active nucleolar organizer regions per nucleus (mAgNOR) and the percentage of cells with 1, 2, 3 and 4 or more AgNORs per nucleus (pAgNOR) were quantified. Ki-67 immunolabeling was quantified, whereas for EGFR, a descriptive analysis of staining patterns (membrane, cytoplasm or membrane + cytoplasm positivity) was performed. We evaluated the reduced epithelium of the enamel organ and/or islands of odontogenic epithelium present in the entire connective tissue. mAgNOR were 1.43 (1.0-2.42) and were significantly different among pericoronary follicles from upper and lower teeth (p = 0.041). Immunostaining of Ki-67 was negative in all cases. EGFR immunolabeling was found mainly in the cytoplasm and was more intense in islands and cords when compared to reduced epithelium of the enamel organ. Odontogenic epithelial cells of some pericoronal follicles have proliferative potential, suggesting their association with the development of odontogenic lesions. The authors suggest that nonerupted, especially of the lower teeth, should be monitored and if necessary removed.

  9. Quantitative analysis of the epithelial lining architecture in radicular cysts and odontogenic keratocysts

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    Landini Gabriel

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper describes a quantitative analysis of the cyst lining architecture in radicular cysts (of inflammatory aetiology and odontogenic keratocysts (thought to be developmental or neoplastic including its 2 counterparts: solitary and associated with the Basal Cell Naevus Syndrome (BCNS. Methods Epithelial linings from 150 images (from 9 radicular cysts, 13 solitary keratocysts and 8 BCNS keratocysts were segmented into theoretical cells using a semi-automated partition based on the intensity of the haematoxylin stain which defined exclusive areas relative to each detected nucleus. Various morphometrical parameters were extracted from these "cells" and epithelial layer membership was computed using a systematic clustering routine. Results Statistically significant differences were observed across the 3 cyst types both at the morphological and architectural levels of the lining. Case-wise discrimination between radicular cysts and keratocyst was highly accurate (with an error of just 3.3%. However, the odontogenic keratocyst subtypes could not be reliably separated into the original classes, achieving discrimination rates slightly above random allocations (60%. Conclusion The methodology presented is able to provide new measures of epithelial architecture and may help to characterise and compare tissue spatial organisation as well as provide useful procedures for automating certain aspects of histopathological diagnosis.

  10. Correlation between ploidy status using flow cytometry and nucleolar organizer regions in benign and malignant epithelial odontogenic tumors.

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    Mohamed Mahmoud, Sarah Ahmed; El-Rouby, Dalia Hussein; El-Ghani, Safa Fathy Abd; Badawy, Omnia Mohamed

    2017-06-01

    Differentiation between the aggressive benign odontogenic tumors and their malignant counterparts is controversial and difficult. While flow cytometry (FCM) allowed DNA analysis in neoplasia, argyrophilic organizer regions (AgNORs) number and/or size in a nucleus are correlated with the ribosomal gene activity and therefore with cellular proliferation. The aim of this research was to study the diagnostic accuracy of FCM and AgNORs staining in differentiating between benign and malignant epithelial odontogenic tumors and to correlate between these two interventions. Sixteen benign cases [8 cases of ameloblastoma (AB) and 8 cases of keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT)] and 13 malignant epithelial odontogenic tumors [8 cases of ameloblastic carcinoma (ABC) and 5 cases of clear cell odontogenic carcinoma(CCOC)] were included in the current study. For FCM analysis, a single cell suspension from Formalin fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumors was prepared according to a modified method described by Hedley (1989) and AgNORs staining were performed in accordance to the Ploton protocol (1986). Analysis of AgNORs was performed using both quantitative and qualitative methods. The work revealed that all the examined tumors were diploid, except for 40% of CCOC cases. The S-phase fraction (SPF) value, AgNORs count and AgNORs area/cell showed statistically significant difference on comparing benign and malignant groups. A weak positive correlation was observed between SPF and AgNORs count. The SPF value was considered to be more sensitive and specific in differentiation between aggressive benign and malignant epithelial odontogenic tumors in comparison to AgNORs counting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Expression of bcl-2 in the Epithelial Lining of Odontogenic Keratocysts

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    Gh. Jahanshahi

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: The aggressive nature and high recurrence rate of Odontogenic Keratocysts (OKCs may be due to unknown factors inherent in the epithelium or because of enzymatic activity in the fibrous wall. Bcl-2 protein is characterized by its ability to inhibit apoptosis.Purpose: The aim of the present study was to analyze the expression of bcl-2 protein in OKCs and to compare it with the more common radicular and dentigerous cysts. The possible relationship between inflammation and bcl-2 expression was also investigated.Materials and Methods: Formalin fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections of 20 OKCs, 20 radicular and 20 dentigerous cysts were immunohistochemically analyzed for immunoreactivity of the bcl-2 protein.Results: Bcl-2 expression was observed in 19 OKCs (95%, one radicular cyst (5%and one dentigerous cyst (5%. There was no statistically significant relationship between inflammation and the number of bcl-2 positive cells. Immunoreactivity was mainly noted in the basal or basal/supra basal layers.Conclusion: Considering the fact that bcl-2 over expression may lead to increased survival of epithelial cells, present study may demonstrate a possible relationship between the aggressive nature of OKC and the intrinsic growth potential of its lining epithelium. Furthermore a basal/supra basal distribution of bcl-2 positive cells was seen in some odontogenic keratocysts which may have a significant impact on the behavior of this cyst.

  12. Hypercementosis and odontogenic epithelial hyperplasia associated with a tooth root remnant mimicking a neoplasm. A case report.

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    Zustin, J; Friedrich, R E

    2010-01-01

    Hypercementosis presents as painless, single or multiple non-neoplastic cementum formation beyond the physiological limits of the tooth. It often occurs in the apical area of the involved tooth following infection, chemical or mechanical trauma. We report on radiographic and histopathological findings in a single case of late intraosseous hypercementosis and odontogenic epithelial hyperplasia associated with a minute apical tooth root remnant years after its extraction, mimicking a tumour.

  13. Decompression of keratocystic odontogenic tumors leading to increased fibrosis, but without any change in epithelial proliferation.

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    Awni, Sarah; Conn, Brendan

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether decompression treatment induces changes in the histology or biologic behavior of keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT). Seventeen patients with KCOT underwent decompression treatment with or without enucleation. Histologic evaluation and immunohistochemical expression of p53, Ki-67, and Bcl-2 were analyzed by using conventional microscopy. KCOT showed significantly increased fibrosis (P = .01) and a subjective reduction in mitotic activity (P = .03) after decompression. There were no statistically significant changes in the expression of proliferation markers. An increase in daughter-cysts or epithelial rests was seen after decompression (P = .04). Recurrence was noted in four of 16 cases, and expression of p53 was strongly correlated with prolonged duration of treatment (P = .01) and intense inflammatory changes (P = .02). Structural changes in the KCOT epithelium or capsule following decompression facilitate surgical removal of the tumor. There was no statistical evidence that decompression influences expression of proliferation markers in the lining, indicating that the potential for recurrence may not be restricted to the cellular level. The statistically significant increase of p53 expression with increased duration of treatment and increase of inflammation may also indicate the possibility of higher rates of recurrence with prolonged treatment and significant inflammatory changes. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Non-calcifying and Langerhans cell-rich variant of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor

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    Hung-Pin Lin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study reported the clinicopathological features, treatment and prognosis of nine cases of noncalcifying and Langerhans cell (LC-rich calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT collected from the English literature. Of the nine cases, seven were intraosseous and two were extraosseous. All nine tumors were found in Asian patients. The age of the nine patients ranged from 20 years to 58 years with a mean age of 41 years. There were five female and four male patients. The seven intraosseous cases included six in the anterior and premolar region of the maxilla and one in the posterior region and ascending ramus of the mandible. The two extraosseous cases were located at the upper lateral incisor and premolar gingivae, respectively. Of the seven intraosseous cases, five showed unilocular and two multilocular radiolucency without foci of calcification. Six of the seven intraosseous cases showed resorption of the tooth roots in the tumor-involved region. Histologically, noncalcifying and LC-rich CEOTs were composed of small nests and thin strands of tumor epithelial cells with a relatively high number of LCs among them. This was the reason why we classed these nine cases as noncalcifying and LC-rich CEOTs. Two extraosseous cases received total excision of the gingival mass. For the seven intraosseous cases, four accepted partial maxillectomy or mandibulectomy, two received total excision or enucleation, and one underwent curettage. The six cases with the follow-up information available showed no tumor recurrence after a follow-up period of 6 months to 10 years.

  15. Immunohistochemical evaluation of inducible nitric oxide synthase in the epithelial lining of odontogenic cysts: A qualitative and quantitative analysis.

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    Akshatha, B K; Karuppiah, Karpagaselvi; Manjunath, G S; Kumarswamy, Jayalakshmi; Papaiah, Lokesh; Rao, Jyothi

    2017-01-01

    The three common odontogenic cysts include radicular cysts (RCs), dentigerous cysts (DCs), and odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs). Among these 3 cysts, OKC is recently been classified as benign keratocystic odontogenic tumor attributing to its aggressive behavior, recurrence rate, and malignant potential. The present study involved qualitative and quantitative analysis of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in epithelial lining of RCs, DCs, and OKCs, compare iNOS expression in epithelial linings of all the 3 cysts and determined overexpression of iNOS in OKCs which might contribute to its aggressive behavior and malignant potential. The present study is to investigate the role of iNOS in the pathogenesis of OKCs, DCs, and RCs by evaluating the iNOS expression in the epithelial lining of these cysts. Analysis of iNOS expression in epithelial lining cells of 20 RCs, 20 DCs, and 20 OKCs using immunohistochemistry done. The percentage of positive cells and intensity of stain was assessed and compared among all the 3 cysts using contingency coefficient. Kappa statistics for the two observers were computed for finding interobserver agreement. The percentage of iNOS-positive cells was found to be remarkably high in OKCs (12/20) -57.1% as compared to RCs (6/20) - 28.6% and DCs (3/20) - 14.3%. The interobserver agreement for iNOS-positive percentage cells was arrived with kappa values with OKCs → Statistically significant ( P > 0.000), RCs → statistically significant ( P > 0.001) with no significant values for DCs. No statistical difference exists among 3 study samples in regard to the intensity of staining with iNOS. Increased iNOS expression in OKCs may contribute to bone resorption and accumulation of wild-type p53, hence, making OKCs more aggressive.

  16. Mural odontogenic epithelial proliferations within the wall of a dentigerous cyst: their significance.

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    Generson, R M; Porter, J M; Stratigos, G T

    1976-12-01

    A case of a dentigerous cyst with proliferating odontogenic epithelium in a 5-year-old black boy is presented. A controversy exists in the histologic diagnosis and surgical treatment of this lesion. The accuracy of the pathologic diagnosis is imperative, as it will determine to a great extent the surgical modality of treatment.

  17. A mixed odontogenic sarcoma: A challenging histopathologic case and brief review of the literature.

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    Atarbashi-Moghadam, Saede; Lotfi, Ali; Mokhtari, Sepideh

    2018-01-01

    Ameloblastic fibro-odontosarcoma (AFOS) is an extremely rare malignant mixed odontogenic tumor. The ectomesenchymal part of the neoplasm shows malignancy, whereas the epithelial component is rather benign. In addition, small areas with deposition of enamel matrix and dentine material are seen. The rarity of this neoplasm and microscopic similarities with other malignant and benign tumors can lead to diagnostic problems. Here, we describe the histopathologic features of a new case of AFOS of the mandible in a 34-year-old female patient. It is essential for oral pathologists to be familiar with the microscopic features of this rare neoplasm to have a proper diagnosis. This is also the first reported case of AFOS that closely resembles osteosarcoma in some areas.

  18. Osteo-/odontogenic differentiation of induced mesenchymal stem cells generated through epithelial-mesenchyme transition of cultured human keratinocytes.

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    Yi, Jin-Kyu; Mehrazarin, Shebli; Oh, Ju-Eun; Bhalla, Anu; Oo, Jenessa; Chen, Wei; Lee, Min; Kim, Reuben H; Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Park, No-Hee; Kang, Mo K

    2014-11-01

    Revascularization of necrotic pulp has been successful in the resolution of periradicular inflammation; yet, several case studies suggest the need for cell-based therapies using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as an alternative for de novo pulp regeneration. Because the availability of MSCs may be limited, especially in an aged population, the current study reports an alternative approach in generating MSCs from epidermal keratinocytes through a process called epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). We induced EMT in primary normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) by transient transfection of small interfering RNA targeting the p63 gene. The resulting cells were assayed for their mesenchymal marker expression, proliferation capacities as a monolayer and in a 3-dimensional collagen scaffold, and differentiation capacities. Transient transfection of p63 small-interfering RNA successfully abolished the expression of endogenous p63 in NHEKs and induced the expression of mesenchymal markers (eg, vimentin and fibronectin), whereas epithelial markers (eg, E-cadherin and involucrin) were lost. The NHEKs exhibiting the EMT phenotype acquired extended replicative potential and an increased telomere length compared with the control cells. Similar to the established MSCs, the NHEKs with p63 knockdown showed attachment onto the 3-dimensional collagen scaffold and underwent progressive proliferation and differentiation. Upon differentiation, these EMT cells expressed alkaline phosphatase activity, osteocalcin, and osteonectin and readily formed mineralized nodules detected by alizarin S red staining, showing osteo-/odontogenic differentiation. The induction of EMT in primary NHEKs by means of transient p63 knockdown allows the generation of induced MSCs from autologous sources. These cells may be used for tissues engineering purposes, including that of dental pulp. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cyclin d1 expression in odontogenic cysts.

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    Taghavi, Nasim; Modabbernia, Shirin; Akbarzadeh, Alireza; Sajjadi, Samad

    2013-01-01

    In the present study expression of cyclin D1 in the epithelial lining of odontogenic keratocyst, radicular cyst, dentigerous cyst and glandular odontogenic cyst was investigated to compare proliferative activity in these lesions. Immunohistochemical staining of cyclin D1 on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections of odontogenic keratocysts (n=23), dentigerous cysts (n=20), radicular cysts (n=20) and glandular odontogenic cysts (n=5) was performed by standard EnVision method. Then, slides were studied to evaluate the following parameters in epithelial lining of cysts: expression, expression pattern, staining intensity and localization of expression. The data analysis showed statistically significant difference in cyclin D1 expression in studied groups (p keratocysts, but difference was not statistically significant among groups respectively (p=0.204, 0.469). Considering expression localization, cyclin D1 positive cells in odontogenic keratocysts and dentigerous cysts were frequently confined in parabasal layer, different from radicular cysts and glandular odontogenic cysts. The difference was statistically significant (p keratocyst and the entire cystic epithelium of glandular odontogenic cysts comparing to dentigerous cysts and radicular cysts, implying the possible role of G1-S cell cycle phase disturbances in the aggressiveness of odontogenic keratocyst and glandular odontogenic cyst.

  20. Large keratocystic odontogenic tumor of the mandible

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    Sri Krishna Koppula

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The odontogenic keratocyst (OKC is a rare odontogenic cyst of epithelial origin. There are many types of cysts of the jaws, but what make the odontogenic keratocyst unusual are its characteristic features including its potentially aggressive behavior, high recurrence rate, and an association with the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Odontogenic keratocysts, now reclassified as keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs by the World Health Organization, are a clinical entity with a characteristic microscopic picture, kinetic growth, and biological behavior. The characteristic features are unique among all the different inflammatory and developmental cysts that occur in the jaws. In this report, we present a 35-year-old female patient with a massive KCOT with buccal cortical plate expansion and unusual anteroposterior extension extending from the premolar area up to the condyle.

  1. Odontogenic Cysts - An Overview.

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    Nayyer, Namita V; Macluskey, Michaelina; Keys, William

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to discuss the clinical features, radiological assessment, histopathology and management of a variety of odontogenic cysts. It also highlights the reclassification of odontogenic keratocysts to keratocystic odontogenic tumours.

  2. The odontogenic keratocyst: from cyst to tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard Mora, Madeline

    2008-01-01

    The odontogenic keratocysts had traditionally been considered as a developmental odontogenic cyst. The characteristics exhibited by this pathology such as its clinical behavior, the high rate of recurrence, its association with the syndrome nevoid basal cell carcinoma, high mitotic activity shown by the epithelial lining and the presence of 'cysts daughter' in capsule of fibrous connective tissue, as well as the discovery of genetic abnormalities caused the World Health Organization (WHO) reclassified as a benign neoplasm and will use the term odontogenic keratocyst tumor to name it. (author) [es

  3. Big Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor of the Mandible

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    KCOT originates as an extension of the basal epithelial cells or the dental organ due to degeneration of the stellate reticulum, or odontogenic epithelial remnants in the mandible or ... transformation into a squamous cell carcinoma. (3). CASE PRESENTATION. A 30 years old male patient came from the southern part of ...

  4. Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst mimicking periapical cyst

    OpenAIRE

    Rajalakshmi, R; Sreeja, C; Vijayalakshmi, D; Leelarani, V

    2013-01-01

    Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst (OOC) denotes the odontogenic cyst that microscopically has an orthokeratinised epithelial lining. OOC is characterised by a less-aggressive behaviour and a low rate of recurrence. This report describes a case of OOC involving posterior part of the mandible that mimicked periapical cyst in a 14-year-old boy. The initial clinical diagnosis was given as periapical cyst based on the clinical and radiographical features. Enucleation of the cyst was performed and ...

  5. A series of 240 odontogenic keratocysts: Should we continue to use the terminology of 'keratocystic odontogenic tumour' for the solid variant of odontogenic keratocyst?

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    Kahraman, Devrim; Gunhan, Omer; Celasun, Bulent

    2018-04-11

    Most of the odontogenic keratocysts show an indolent behaviour like non-neoplastic lesions. For this reason, the odontogenic keratocyst was reclassified within the odontogenic cysts category in the WHO 2017 classification. Some odontogenic keratocysts may contain satellite cysts or solid squamoid islands within their wall. Recently, a solid form of odontogenic keratocyst has also been described which is composed entirely of multiple epithelial islands and small cysts in a collagenous stroma. The true nature of this variant is unclear yet. In this article, we present a series of 204 odontogenic keratocyst cases. Clinical and histologic findings of the cases in this series were described. These were also categorised according to the presence of satellite lesions. Additionally, the features of two cases of the solid form of odontogenic keratocysts were compared with those of the previous reports and other histologically similar odontogenic lesions. Current evidence suggests that this variant may be neoplastic and it differs from other odontogenic keratocysts, at least histologically. We believe diagnosing a solid lesion as a cyst is counterintuitive and the term "keratocystic odontogenic tumour" better describes this particular variant. Copyright © 2018 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Odontogenic Keratocyst of mandible

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    de Lima, José Lacet; Dias-Ribeiro, Eduardo; Honfi, Evaldo Sales; de Araújo, Túlio Neves; de Góes, Kilma Keilla Honório; Aragão, Maria do Socorro

    2006-01-01

    The Odontogenic Keratocyst is a developmental odontogenic cyst and deserves special attention because of its peculiar histopathologic features and biologic behavior. It is believed that the Odontogenic Keratocyst arises from the proliferation of remnants of dental lamina. It is usually asymptomatic, and solitary lesion, however, it may be associated with Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome. This work aimed to present a case of a very extensive Odontogenic Keratocyst in a 28-year-old woman.

  7. Analysis of silver stained nucleolar organizing regions in odontogenic cysts and tumors.

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    Prasanna, Md; Charan, Cr; Reddy Ealla, Kranti Kiran; Surekha, V; Kulkarni, Ganesh; Gokavarapu, Sandhya

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the probable differences in cell proliferation index of odontogenic cysts and tumors by means of a comparative silver stained nucleolar organizing region (AgNOR) quantification. This descriptive cross-sectional study was done on archival paraffin blocks (n = 62), consisting of 10 odontogenic keratocysts, 10 dentigerous cysts, 10 radicular cysts, 10 conventional ameloblastomas, 10 adenomatoid odontogenic tumors, 10 calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors and 2 ameloblasic carcinomas. The mean AgNOR count of odontogenic cysts was 1.709 and the benign odontogenic tumors was 1.862. Highest AgNOR count was recorded in odontogenic keratocyst and lowest was seen in radicular cyst. Statistically significant difference in AgNOR counts of ameloblastoma and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, amelobalastoma and calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, benign odontogenic tumors and ameloblastic carcinoma were seen. AgNORs in ameloblastic carcinoma were more in number and more widely spread. AgNOR technique may be considered a good indicator of cell proliferation in odontogenic cysts and tumors.

  8. Different manifestations of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor

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    Estevam Rubens Utumi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor normally presents as apainless, slow-growing mass, involving both maxilla and mandible,primarily the anterior segment (incisor/canine area. It generallyaffects young adults in the third to fourth decades, with no genderpredilection. Computerized tomography images revealed importantcharacteristics that were not detected by panoramic radiography,such as fenestration, calcification and tooth-like structures. Thetypical microscopic feature of this lesion is the presence of variableamounts of aberrant epithelial cells, without nuclei, which arenamed “ghost cells”. In addition, dysplastic dentine can be foundand occasionally the cyst can be associated with an area of dentalhard tissue formation resembling an odontoma. The treatment forcalcifying cystic odontogenic tumor involves simple enucleationand curettage. The purpose of this article is to present two differentmanifestation of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor in whichcomputerized tomography, associated to clinical features, servedas an important tool for diagnosis, adequate surgical planning andfollow-up of patients.

  9. Expression of extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer in odontogenic cysts.

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    Ali, Mohammad Abdulhadi Abbas

    2008-08-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) is known to induce matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) production. The expression of EMMPRIN in odontogenic cysts has not been previously studied. This study was done to determine the presence and the variability of EMMPRIN expression in various types of odontogenic cysts. An immunohistochemical study using a polyclonal anti-EMMPRIN antibody was done using 48 odontogenic cyst cases: 13 odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs), 18 dentigerous cysts (DCs), and 17 periapical cysts (PAs). Twelve cases of normal dental follicles (DFs) were also included in this study for comparison. EMMPRIN immunoreactivity was detected in all of the cysts and DFs studied. In odontogenic cysts, EMMPRIN immunoreactivity was generally higher in basal cells than in suprabasal cells. The overall EMMPRIN expression in the epithelial lining of the 3 different types of odontogenic cyst was significantly higher than in the DFs. Overall EMMPRIN expression was also found to be significantly higher in the epithelial lining of OKCs than in the other types of cysts. This study confirmed that EMMPRIN is present in odontogenic cysts and DFs. The higher EMMPRIN expression in OKCs suggests that it may be involved in the aggressive behavior of this type of cyst.

  10. Immunohistochemical Analysis of P63 Expression in Odontogenic Lesions

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    Atarbashi Moghadam, Saede; Atarbashi Moghadam, Fazele; Eini, Ebrahim

    2013-01-01

    P63 may have a role in tumorigenesis and cytodifferentiation of odontogenic lesions. We investigated the immunohistochemical expression of P63 in a total of 30 cases of odontogenic cysts and tumors. The percentage of positive cells was calculated in the lining of odontogenic cysts and islands of ameloblastoma. P63 expression was evident in all types of odontogenic lesions. P63 was expressed throughout the lining epithelium of odontogenic keratocyst except surface parakeratinized layer. In addition, calcifying odontogenic cyst showed P63 expression in all layers. In almost all radicular and dentigerous cysts, the basal and parabasal layers were immunoreactive. Peripheral cells of ameloblastoma expressed P63; however, stellate reticulum had weaker immunostaining. No significant difference in P63 expression was observed between studied lesions (P = 0.86). Expression of P63 in odontogenic lesions suggests that this protein is important in differentiation and proliferation of odontogenic epithelial cells. However, it seems that it could not be a useful marker to differentiate between aggressive and nonaggressive lesions. P63 also represents a progenitor or basal cell marker, and it is not expressed in mature differentiated cells. PMID:24350278

  11. Immunohistochemical Analysis of P63 Expression in Odontogenic Lesions

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    Saede Atarbashi Moghadam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available P63 may have a role in tumorigenesis and cytodifferentiation of odontogenic lesions. We investigated the immunohistochemical expression of P63 in a total of 30 cases of odontogenic cysts and tumors. The percentage of positive cells was calculated in the lining of odontogenic cysts and islands of ameloblastoma. P63 expression was evident in all types of odontogenic lesions. P63 was expressed throughout the lining epithelium of odontogenic keratocyst except surface parakeratinized layer. In addition, calcifying odontogenic cyst showed P63 expression in all layers. In almost all radicular and dentigerous cysts, the basal and parabasal layers were immunoreactive. Peripheral cells of ameloblastoma expressed P63; however, stellate reticulum had weaker immunostaining. No significant difference in P63 expression was observed between studied lesions (. Expression of P63 in odontogenic lesions suggests that this protein is important in differentiation and proliferation of odontogenic epithelial cells. However, it seems that it could not be a useful marker to differentiate between aggressive and nonaggressive lesions. P63 also represents a progenitor or basal cell marker, and it is not expressed in mature differentiated cells.

  12. [Mixed odontogenic tumors in children and adolescents].

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    Gyulai-Gaál, Szabolcs; Takács, Daniel; Barabás, József; Tarján, Ildikó; Martonffy, Katalin; Szabó, György; Suba, Zsuzsanna

    2007-04-01

    Mixed odontogenic tumors in the jaws of children and adolescents usually cause dentition anomalies. The typical forms of these are ameloblastic fibroma, ameloblastic fibroodontoma, complex odontoma and compound odontoma. In the present study mixed odontogenic tumor cases are presented in patients under 20 years of age. All of them were associated with tooth eruption disturbances. Further aim of this study was to discuss the nature and interrelationships of this group of lesions. Ameloblastic fibromas (AFs) are true, mixed, soft tissue neoplasms, deriving from the proliferation of both odontogenic epithelium and mesenchyma. They have a potential to both recurrence and malignant transformation. Ameloblastic fibroodontomas (AFOs) may be regarded as hamartomas, which exhibit epithelial, mesenchymal and abundant hard tissue components of the developing teeth. Odontomas are calcifying benign hamartomas, and represent the most common type of odontogenic jaw tumors among patients less than 20y, having complex and compound variants. Complex odontomas (CXOs) are built up from amorphous hard tissue elements, and generally occur in the premolar or molar regions of the maxilla. Compound odontomas (CDOs) usually appear in the maxilla, in the region of the incisors and canines, and contain small, radio-opaque structures reminiscent of rudimentary teeth. Early diagnosis and treatment of mixed odontogenic jaw tumors in children may prevent the serious orthodontic complications and jaw deformations.

  13. Odontogenic keratocyst: a peripheral variant.

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    Vij, H; Vij, R; Gupta, V; Sengupta, S

    2011-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocyst, which is developmental in nature, is an intraosseous lesion though on rare occasions it may occur in an extraosseous location. The extraosseous variant is referred to as peripheral odontogenic keratocyst. Though, clinically, peripheral odontogenic keratocyst resembles the gingival cyst of adults, it has histologic features that are pathognomonic of odontogenic keratocyst. This article presents a case of this uncommon entity.

  14. Comparision of Immunohistochemical Expression of CD10 in Odontogenic Cysts

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    Munisekhar, M.S.; Suri, Charu; Rajalbandi, Santosh Kumar; M.R., Pradeep; Gothe, Pavan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Expression of CD10 has been documented in various tumors like nasopharyngeal carcinoma, gastric carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, odontogenic tumors. Aim: To evaluate and compare CD10 expression in odontogenic cysts like radicular cyst, dentigerous cyst and odontogenic keratocyst (OKC). Materials and Methods: Total 60 cases were included in the study, comprising 20 cases each of radicular, dentigerous and odontogenic keratocyst. Each case was evaluated and compared for immunohistochemical expression of CD10. Results obtained were statistically analysed using ANOVA test followed by post hoc test Tukey-Kramer Multiple Comparisons Test for continuous variable and Chi-square test for discrete variable. Results: More number of cases showing sub-epithelial stromal CD10 expression were found in OKC among the cysts. Conclusion: CD10 expression was more in OKC compared to radicular and dentigerous cysts. PMID:25584313

  15. Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst mimicking periapical cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajalakshmi, R; Sreeja, C; Vijayalakshmi, D; Leelarani, V

    2013-10-07

    Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst (OOC) denotes the odontogenic cyst that microscopically has an orthokeratinised epithelial lining. OOC is characterised by a less-aggressive behaviour and a low rate of recurrence. This report describes a case of OOC involving posterior part of the mandible that mimicked periapical cyst in a 14-year-old boy. The initial clinical diagnosis was given as periapical cyst based on the clinical and radiographical features. Enucleation of the cyst was performed and the specimen was sent for histopathological examination. A definite diagnosis of OOC was made by histopathological examination of the biopsy specimen. This case emphases on including OOC in the differential diagnosis of radiolucencies occurring in the periapical region of non-vital tooth.

  16. Squamous cell carcinoma arising in an odontogenic cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Jae Jung; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae; Choi, Jeong Hee

    2003-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma arising in an odontogenic cyst is uncommon. The diagnosis of carcinoma arising in a cyst requires that there must be an area of microscopic transition from the benign epithelial cyst lining to the invasive squamous cell carcinoma. We report a histopathologically proven case of squamous cell carcinoma arising in a residual mandibular cyst in a 54-year-old woman.

  17. Expression of p73 and TRAIL in odontogenic cysts and tumors.

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    Mascitti, Marco; Santarelli, Andrea; Zizzi, Antonio; Procaccini, Maurizio; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo; Rubini, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors are a group of lesions arising from the odontogenic apparatus. Although the mechanism of oncogenesis and tumor progression in these lesions remains unknown, certain proteins, such as those involved in apoptosis, seem to be involved in the differentiation and proliferation of odontogenic epithelial cells. The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of p73 and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in odontogenic tumors and cysts, and to clarify changes in the expression of these proteins. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed on 21 ameloblastomas, 15 keratocystic odontogenic tumors and 15 dentigerous cysts. We carried out quantitative assessment of p73 and TRAIL expression by determining the percentages of positive cells on a continuous scale. Five cases of orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst were also examined. The percentages of cells immunohistochemically positive for p73 were 52.6 ± 25.4% in ameloblastomas, 76.0 ± 13.1% in keratocystic odontogenic tumors, and 26.7 ± 30.7% in odontogenic cysts, whereas the corresponding figures for TRAIL were 57.6 ± 16.1%, 8.9 ± 10.0%, and 1.5 ± 0.5%, respectively. Imbalance of the apoptosis pathway, with dysregulation of p73 and TRAIL, seems to play a role in the oncogenesis of odontogenic tumors.(J Oral Sci 58, 459-464, 2016).

  18. Comparison of Mast Cells Count in Odontogenic Cysts Using Histochemical Staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi-Moghaddam, Mahdieh; Abbaszadeh-Bidokhty, Hamid; Bijani, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic cysts are among the most frequent destructive lesions of jaws which their pathogenesis and growth mechanism are not cleared. With respect to different roles of mast cells, they may play a role in the pathogenesis and growth of odontogenic cysts. The aim of present study was to evaluate mast cells in the most common odontogenic cyst. Thirty paraffin-embedded tissue blocks including 10 radicular cysts, 10 dentigerous cysts and 10 odontogenic keratocysts were used and 5 micron sections stained with toluidine blue and observed by light microscope under ×400 magnification to evaluate mast cells within these cysts. For each case, 5 high-power field areas, selected from hot-spot areas, were considered and each area divided into 3 zones: intra-epithelial zone, sub-epithelial zone and deep zone. Most of the studied cyst showed presence of mast cells. There was not any significant difference in mast cell count between studied cysts ( P -values > 0.05).With respect to intra-epithelial, sub-epithelial and deep zones, there was not any significant difference between three studied cysts. There was not any significant difference between sub-epithelial zone and deep zone within each of these cysts. There was only significant difference between intra-epithelial zone and sub-epithelial zone within dentigerous cysts and odontogenic keratocysts ( P -value keratocysts.

  19. Expression of Ki-67 in odontogenic cysts: A comparative study between odontogenic keratocysts, radicular cysts and dentigerous cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Tapan G; Chalishazar, Monali; Kumar, Malay

    2018-01-01

    Odontogenic cysts are the most common cysts of the jaws and are formed from the remnants of the odontogenic apparatus. Among these odontogenic cysts, radicular cysts (RCs) (about 60% of all diagnosed jaw cysts), dentigerous cysts (DCs) (16.6% of all jaw cysts) and odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) (11.2% of all developmental odontogenic cysts) are the most common. The behavior of any lesion is generally reflected by its growth potential. Growth potential is determined by measuring the cell proliferative activity. The cell proliferative activity is measured by various methods among which immunohistochemistry (IHC) is the commonly used technique. Most of the IHC studies on cell proliferation have been based on antibodies such as Ki-67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. In the present study, the total sample size comprised of 45 cases of odontogenic cysts, with 15 cases each of OKC, RC and DC. Here, an attempt is made to study immunohistochemical (streptavidin-biotin detection system HRP-DAB) method to assess the expression of Ki-67 in different layers of the epithelial lining of OKCs, RCs and DCs. Ki-67 positive cells were highest in epithelium of OKC as compared to DC and RC. The increased Ki-67 labeling index and its expression in suprabasal cell layers of epithelial lining in OKC and its correlation with suprabasal cell layers of epithelial lining in DC and RC could contribute toward its clinically aggressive behavior. OKC is of more significance to the oral pathologist and oral surgeon because of its specific histopathological features, high recurrence rate and aggressive behavior.

  20. Cytokeratin 19 Expression Patterns of Dentigerous Cysts and Odontogenic Keratocysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, KP; Vidya, M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although numerous investigators have studied the pattern of keratin expression in different odontogenic cysts, the results have been variable. Aim: The present study was conducted to determine the pattern of expression of cytokeratin 19 (CK 19) in the epithelial lining of odontogenic keratocysts and dentigerous cysts. Materials and Methods: The epithelial layers showing expression of the epithelial marker CK 19 was determined by immunohistochemical methods in 15 tissue specimens each of histopathologically confirmed cases of dentigerous cysts and odontogenic keratocysts. Statistical analysis was done to compare the CK 19 expression between dentigerous cyst and odontogenic keratocyst using the Chi-square test. P keratocysts, 40% (6/15) of the specimens were negative for CK 19, 40% (6/15) of the specimens showed expression only in a single layer of the epithelium, and 20% (3/15) of the specimens showed expression in more than one layer, but not the entire thickness of the epithelium. The observed differences in CK 19 expression by the two lesions were statistically significant (P < 0.01). Conclusion: The differences in CK 19 expression by these cysts may be utilized as a diagnostic tool in differentiating between these two lesions. PMID:25861531

  1. Calcifying odontogenic cyst of anterior maxilla with complex odontoma

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    Yadavalli Guruprasad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC is an unusual and unique lesion with characteristics of a solid neoplasm and of a cyst. It shows considerable amount of histopathological diversity, with variable clinical behavior such as cystic, neoplastic and infiltrating malignant behavior. It is a rare developmental odontogenic cyst with notable presence of histopathological features, which include a cystic lining demonstrating characteristic "Ghost" epithelial cells with a propensity to calcify. Odontomes are best known as hamartomatous benign tumors rather than true neoplasms, arising from odontogenic tissues. Histologically, they are classified as compound and complex variety. We report a rare case of COC of anterior maxilla with complex odontome in a 12-year-old female child.

  2. Immunohistochemical expression of protein 53, murine double minute 2, B-cell lymphoma 2, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in odontogenic cysts and keratocystic odontogenic tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão, Hebel Cavalcanti; Gordón-Núñez, Manuel Antonio; de Amorim, Rivadavio Fernandes Batista; Freitas, Roseana de Almeida; de Souza, Lelia Batista

    2013-01-01

    Even though odontogenic cysts share a similar histogenesis, they show different growth and differentiation profile due to differences in the proliferative cellular activity. We perform an immunohistochemical assessment of protein 53 (p53), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), B-cell lymphoma 2 (bcl-2), and murine double minute 2 (MDM2) expression in odontogenic cysts and keratocystic odontogenic tumor analyzing their correlation with the biological behavior of these lesions. By the streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase method with antibodies against p53, PCNA, bcl-2, and MDM2 proteins, 11 radicular cysts, 11 dentigerous cysts, and 11 keratocystic odontogenic tumor were analyzed. The non-parametric Mann-Whitney U-test and Kruskall-Wallis test (P ≤ 0.05) were used to analyze the data. Immunopositivity for PCNA was observed in all cases appraised, predominantly in the suprabasal layer of keratocystic odontogenic tumor epithelial lining (SD ± 19.44), but no significant differences were found among the groups of lesions. Bcl-2 immunoexpression was observed especially in the basal layer of keratocystic odontogenic tumor. PCNA LI was significantly higher than bcl-2 LI in keratocystic odontogenic tumor. MDM2 and p53 immunoexpression were not detected in the lesions studied. Among the evaluated lesions, the keratocystic odontogenic tumor showed different immunoexpression of the proliferation and apoptosis markers. The results of this study suggest that the keratocystic odontogenic tumor presents distinct biological behavior of the odontogenic cysts, as for the processes of proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation, reinforcing the information in favor of the neoplastic nature of this lesion.

  3. Evaluation of Neoplastic Nature of Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor Versus Ameloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KHALIFA, Gh.A.; SMOKIER, H.M.; ABO-HAGER, E.A.

    2010-01-01

    Although most of odontogenic tumors are benign, some of them will show locally destructive behavior, as keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is now known as a benign but aggressive odontogenic neoplasm. The neoplastic characteristics in KCOT have been suggested from clinical as well as pathologic aspects. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is a gelatinase form of the MMPs family, which is a group of proteolytic enzymes that degrade many types of collagen. Cysteine aspartic acid-specific protease-3 (caspase-3) is the most downstream enzyme in the apoptosis-inducing protease pathway and is probably the most clearly associated with cell death. The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare the extracellular degradation potentiality (MMP-2) and apoptosis (caspase-3) of the epithelial lining in KCOT versus radicular cysts and ameloblastoma, in order to reinforce its classification as an odontogenic tumor. Material and Methods: Twenty-six surgical specimens including keratocyst odontogenic tumor (KCOT; n=l 1), ameloblastoma (AB; n=8) and radicular cysts (RC; n=7) were examined for expression of MMP-2 and caspase-3 using the immunohistochemical method. Results: For MMP-2 immuno expression, AB showed the statistically significant highest mean area percentage, followed by KCOT, while RC showed the statistically significant lowest mean area percentage. As for caspase-3, there was no statistically significant difference between KCOT and AB, while RC showed the statistically significantly lowest mean area percentage. Conclusion: Overexpression of MMP-2 protein related to growth and progression of lesions analyzed and may be one of the factors enhancing the recurrence of KCOT and invasion of AB. In addition, the epithelial lining of KCOT showed a high cell turnover reinforcing its classification as an odontogenic tumor

  4. Multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors in a non-syndromic minor patient: Report of an unusual case

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    Shalu Rai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT is developmental odontogenic cysts of epithelial origin known for their potentially aggressive behavior and significant rate of recurrences. Single odontogenic cysts are very well documented in the literature. Multiple (KCOT are principle features of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome; Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. We report an intriguing case of multiple KCOT in a non-syndromic patient simultaneously occurring in maxilla as well as in mandible with brief highlight on molecular data and the treatment modality.

  5. Evaluation of Amelotin Expression in Benign Odontogenic Tumors

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    Daiana Paula Stolf

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Amelotin (AMTN is highly and selectively expressed by odontogenic epithelium-derived ameloblasts throughout the maturation stage of enamel formation. The protein is secreted and concentrated at the basal lamina interface between ameloblasts and the mineralized enamel matrix. Odontogenic tumors (OT are characterized by morphological resemblance to the developing tooth germ. OT vary from slowly expanding, encapsulated tumors to locally aggressive and destructive lesions. The purpose of this study was to determine the expression profile of AMTN in benign odontogenic tumors and to correlate it with specific features of the lesions. Methods: Immunohistochemical staining for AMTN was performed on human ameloblastoma, ameloblastic fibroma (AF, ameloblastic fibro-odontoma (AFO, odontoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT and calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT. Results: Generally, ameloblastoma and AF did not stain for AMTN. A strong signal was detected in ameloblast-like layers of AFO and odontoma. Epithelial cells in AOT did not stain for AMTN, while calcifying areas of extracellular eosinophilic matrix were intensely stained. Interestingly, ghost cells present in odontomas and CCOT revealed variable staining, again in association with calcification foci. Conclusions: Amelotin expression was consistently detected in tumors presenting differentiated ameloblasts and obvious matrix deposition. Additionally, the presence of the protein in the eosinophilic matrix and small mineralized foci of AOT and calcification areas of ghost cells may suggest a role for AMTN in the control of mineralization events. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2013; 1(5.000: 236-245

  6. Pattern and presentation of odontogenic jaw cysts: a clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awan, M.U.A.; Ibrahim, M.W.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the pattern and presentations of odontogenic jaw cysts in patients reporting at the Armed Forces Institute of Dentistry. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Armed Forces Institute of Dentistry, from Jan to Dec 2007. Material and Methods: Hundred patients including 70 males and 30 females with the age range 5-65 years were included in the study. History, clinical examination, radiographic examination and histopathologic examination of lesion were carried out for each patient. A proforma was filled for each patient for all relevant information, presentation and pattern. Diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 10. Results: Out of total 100 patients, 58 percent were diagnosed with radicular cysts, 25 percent with dentigerous cysts, 15 percent with odontogenic keratocyst, 1 percent patient with calcifying epithelial odontogenic cyst and 1 percent patient was diagnosed with eruption cyst. Conclusion: The study demonstrates that radicular cyst was the most common odontogenic cysts followed by dentigerous and odontogenic keratocysts respectively in our study sample. (author)

  7. Odontogenic keratocyst radiographic features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nartey, N. O.; Saini, T.

    1990-01-01

    The clinical features often patients with odontogenic keratocysts were studied. One patient had Gorlin-GoJtz syndrome. A total of fourteen radiolucent lesions were observed on radiographic examination. All the fourteen lesions were diagnosed as odontogenic keratocyst after histopathclogical examination of biopsied tissue from the patients. The age at diagnosis ranged from 25-72 years with a mean age of 37.6 years. The male : female ratio was 2.3:1. Thirteen of these lesions occurred in the mandible, nine involved the mandibular third molar region. Involvement of the ramus of the mandible produced a sausage-shaped radiolucency. Cystic lesions which have been present for long periods of time showed scalloped margins, due to the regional resorption of the surrounding bone. The bony ledges present on the cortical bones simulated multilocular appearance in such cases. It was also observed that the lesions in older individuals perforated the cortical plates rather than eliciting a periostally induced bony expansion. (author)

  8. Immunohistochemical evaluation of podoplanin in odontogenic tumours & cysts using anti-human podoplanin antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Namrata; Khanduri, Nitin; Kurup, Deepak; Gupta, Brijesh; Mitra, Pranjan; Chawla, Roshani

    2017-01-01

    Odontogenic Cysts & tumors originate through some aberration from the normal pattern of odontogenesis. Ameloblastoma is one of the most frequent intraosseous odontogenic tumors. However it is no longer appropriate to use the diagnosis of ameloblastoma without specifying the type. Varied-clinical entities of ameloblastoma differ in their biologic behaviour. Odontogenic cysts like dentigerous and radicular cysts are less aggressive in nature than odontogenic tumors. Recently, podoplanin commonly used as a lymphatic endothelial marker in cancers has recently been found to play a possible role in odontogenic tumorigenesis also. Therefore the purpose of this study was to immunohistochemically analyse the expression of podoplanin in ameloblastomas, KCOTs, dentigerous cysts, radicular cysts & dental follicles. Paraffin-embedded tissue specimens of 15 Ameloblastomas (7 follicular, 6 unicystic, 2 desmoplastic),10KCOTs, 5 dentigerous cysts, 5 radicular cysts & 5 dental follicles were immunohistochemically examined using antibody against podoplanin. All ameloblastomas displayed podoplanin expression in ameloblast-like cells of the epithelial islands while the stellate-reticulum like cells exhibited no or weak immunostaining. Expression of podoplanin in KCOTs was strongly positive in the cells of the basal and suprabasal layers & odontogenic epithelial nests. Positive immunoreaction for podoplanin was observed in the inflammatory radicular cysts and inflamed dentigerous cyst only and negative or weak expression in the lining epithelium of uninflamed dentigerous cysts and dental follicles. Our results suggest that podoplanin can be used as a potential proliferative marker to observe the aggressive behaviour of ameloblastomas and KCOTs.

  9. Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor − A Report of Two Cases with Histopathology Correlation

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    Pavitra Baskaran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT is an uncommon, hamartomatous, benign, epithelial lesion of odontogenic origin that was first described by Driebaldt in 1907, as a pseudo-adenoameloblastoma. The current World Health Organisation (WHO classification of odontogenic tumors defines AOT as being composed of the odontogenic epithelium in a variety of histoarchitectural patterns, embedded in mature connective tissue stroma, and characterized by slow, but progressive growth. The current article reports two cases with different presentations; first in a young female patient and the second in a middle-aged male patient. The importance of biopsy, which is the gold standard for diagnosis, and its use in planning of the treatment is discussed.

  10. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor of mandible

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    Ankita Bohra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratocystic odontogenic tumor is considered to be a benign cystic neoplasia of jaw bone with a higher rate of recurrence. It is noted to be third most common odontogenic cyst after radicular and dentigerous cyst. Most common location is posterior mandible and ascending ramus. A case with odontogenic keratocyst of the right posterior mandible is presented with proper clinical and radiographic examinations along with histopathological investigation. Cystic lesion was surgically resected with iliac crest bone graft replacement and reconstruction plate placement. Follow-up of 1 year is completed with repeated radiographic examinations in 4 months interval with no evidence of recurrence.

  11. Morphometric evaluation of AgNORs in odontogenic cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreeshyla, Huchanahalli S; Shashidara, Raju; Sudheendra, Udyavara Sridhara

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the morphometry of AgNORs in odontogenic cysts and to compare their biologic behavior to determine whether AgNOR morphometry is helpful in predicting the behavior. Ten cases each of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cyst (DC) and radicular cyst (RC) were stained with silver nitrate. Morphometric analysis of 100 selected epithelial and connective tissue cells was done to record their nuclear volume, nuclear perimeter, contour index of the nucleus, AgNOR count, AgNOR proportion and single AgNOR volume. The results were statistically analyzed using ANOVA. AgNOR count, nuclear volume and nuclear perimeter were greatest in the OKC followed by DC and RC, suggesting that these parameters differentiate between the aggressive and less aggressive odontogenic cysts. Single AgNOR volume and AgNOR proportion were greatest in the RC followed by OKC and DC, respectively. Results of our study taken in isolation point to AgNOR count as the most reliable factor in differentiating between aggressive and nonaggressive odontogenic cysts.

  12. Automated classification of four types of developmental odontogenic cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydenlund, A; Eramian, M; Daley, T

    2014-04-01

    Odontogenic cysts originate from remnants of the tooth forming epithelium in the jaws and gingiva. There are various kinds of such cysts with different biological behaviours that carry different patient risks and require different treatment plans. Types of odontogenic cysts can be distinguished by the properties of their epithelial layers in H&E stained samples. Herein we detail a set of image features for automatically distinguishing between four types of odontogenic cyst in digital micrographs and evaluate their effectiveness using two statistical classifiers - a support vector machine (SVM) and bagging with logistic regression as the base learner (BLR). Cyst type was correctly predicted from among four classes of odontogenic cysts between 83.8% and 92.3% of the time with an SVM and between 90 ± 0.92% and 95.4 ± 1.94% with a BLR. One particular cyst type was associated with the majority of misclassifications. Omission of this cyst type from the data set improved the classification rate for the remaining three cyst types to 96.2% for both SVM and BLR. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Differential expression of cyclin D1 in keratin-producing odontogenic cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Sirera, Beatriz; Forner-Navarro, Leopoldo; Vera-Sempere, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the expression levels of Cyclin D1 (CCD1), a nuclear protein that plays a crucial role in cell cycle progression, in a series of keratin-producing odontogenic cysts. A total of 58 keratin-producing odontogenic cysts, diagnosed over ten years and classified according to the WHO 2005 criteria, were immunohistochemically analyzed in terms of CCD1 expression, which was quantified in the basal, suprabasal and intermediate/superficial epithelial compartments. The extent of immunostaining was measured as a proportion of total epithelial thickness. Quantified immunohistochemical data were correlated with clinicopathological features and clinical recurrence. Keratin-producing odontogenic cysts were classified as 6 syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumors (S-KCOT), 40 sporadic or non-syndromic KCOT (NS-KCOT) and 12 orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts (OOC). Immunohistochemically, CCD1 staining was evident predominantly in the parabasal region of all cystic lesions, but among-lesion differences were apparent, showing a clear expansion of parabasal compartment especially in the S-KCOT, followed to a lesser extent in the NS-KCOT, and being much more reduced in the OOC, which had the greatest average epithelial thickness. The differential expression of CCD1 noted in the present study suggests that dysregulation of cell cycle progression from G1 to the S phase contributes to the different aggressiveness of these lesions. However, CCD1 expression levels did not predict NS-KCOT recurrence, which is likely influenced by factors unrelated to lesion biology.

  14. Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor and ndash; An Interesting Case Report.

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    Tim Peter Thermadam

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Among the jaw lesions, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, ameloblastoma, dentigerous cyst forms the common ones. Even though there are classical clinical features for each of the odontogenic lesions, at times, it may be difficult to arrive at a clinical diagnosis for the lesion without the histopathological examination. Age, gender and demographic data can be overlapping in few lesions. We hereby present an interesting case of similar type where in clinical diagnosis was challenging and interesting. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(3.000: 209-213

  15. Initial-Stage Primary Intraosseous Squamous Cell Carcinoma Derived from Odontogenic Keratocyst with Unusual Keratoameloblastomatous Change of the Maxilla: A Case Report and Literature Discussion

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    Kentaro Kikuchi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma (PIOSCC is a rare malignant neoplasm derived from odontogenic epithelial remnants in the central jaw bone. Most PIOSCCs originate from odontogenic cysts with a nonkeratinized epithelial lining, especially from radicular/residual and dentigerous cysts. There have been few reports of PIOSCCs derived from the odontogenic keratocyst (OKC, particularly those describing pathological features at the initial stage. The diagnosis of PIOSCC is difficult and based on exclusion of other carcinomas, including metastatic tumors from other primary sites. Here, we report an extremely rare case of initial-stage PIOSCC derived from the OKC with unusual keratoameloblastomatous change of the maxilla.

  16. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Hyung Kyu

    1983-01-01

    A 18-year-old man had a painless swelling in the right anterior portion of maxilla for 2 years. On radiographic examination, a radiolucent region that was not associated with an unerupted tooth was seen. Small scattered radiopaque foci were seen in the cystic lumen. At second case, a 16-year-old girl had a painless swelling in the anterior portion of maxilla for 3 years. On radio graphic examination, a radiolucent region that associated with an unerupted tooth was seen. Multiple scattered radiopaque foci were seen in the radiolucent cystic lumen. With the patient under local anesthesia, well encapsulated tumors were enucleated. The diagnosis made in the pathologist's report was Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor, benign lesion often having distinct clinical and radiographic features.

  17. Odontogenic Fibromyxoma of Maxilla: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KV Umashankar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic fibromyxoma (OM is a rare locally invasive, non metastasizing benign neoplasm found exclusively in the jaws. It commonly occurs in the second and third decade,and the mandible is involved more commonly than the maxilla. The lesion often grows without symptoms and presents as a painless swelling. The radiographic features are variable so the diagnosis is not easy in many cases. It posesa diagnostic and therapeutic challenge due to its morphology and biological behaviour. A caseo f OM of the maxilla with unusual radiographic and histological features is described in a 27 year old female.

  18. Morphometric evaluation of keratocystic odontogenic tumor before and after marsupialization

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    Deborah Campos Telles

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was the morphometric evaluation of the epithelial lining and fibrous capsule in histological specimens of keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KOTs before and after marsupialization. Histological sections from six KOTs that had undergone marsupialization followed by enucleation were photographed. The thickness and features of the capsule and of the epithelial lining of the tumor were evaluated upon marsupialization and upon subsequent enucleation using Axion Vision software. The histological specimens taken upon marsupialization presented an epithelial lining that is typical of KOTs. After marsupialization, the enucleated specimens had a modified epithelial lining and a fibrous capsule that both presented a greater median thickness (p = 0.0277 and p = 0.0212, respectively, morphological changes, and significant enlargement. These modifications can facilitate full surgical treatment and may well be related to a low KOT recurrence rate.

  19. [Therapy and course of recurrent odontogenic keratocyst. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Christoph B; Pajarola, Gion F; Grätz, Klaus W

    2005-01-01

    Recurrence following the surgical treatment of keratocysts of the jaws may present a major problem to the oral surgeon. The surgical treatment of patients with odontogenic keratocysts is concerning the high recurrence rate demanding and difficult. It has been suggested that recurrence is a consequence of technical of microcysts in the mucosa overlying the recurrent lesions. Attemps have been made to reduce this high recurrence rate by improved surgical techniques, such as removal of superadjacent mucosa, smoothing of the osseous wall of the cystic cavity, resection of neighboring parts of the mandible, tanning of the epithelial lining of the cyst with Carnoy's solution and marsupialisation. On the basis of a case report it was the aim of the authors to present the surgical treatment of odontogenic, recurrent keratocysts at the Clinic for Maxillo-Facial Surgery, University Hospital Zurich, from the primary operation following the Brosch-procedure in 1971 up to the latest cystectomy in 2004.

  20. Surgical Management of Recurrent Odontogenic Keratocyst

    OpenAIRE

    Semi, Ravinder Singh; Thapliyal, G. K.; Menon, Suresh

    2010-01-01

    The odontogenic keratocyst is a distinct entity arising from odontogenic epithelium. The unique histopathological appearance and the propensity for recurrence has made it management controversial in terms of the conservatism to be followed. This article describes the management of a case of recurrent odontogenic keratocyst with an aggressive therapy being adopted due to the nature of the pathology.

  1. Evaluation of Calretinin expression in Ameloblastoma and Non-Neoplastic Odontogenic Cysts - An immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Silva, Shaloom; Sumathi, M K; Balaji, N; Shetty, Nisha K N; Pramod, K M; Cheeramelil, Jacob

    2013-12-01

    Calretinin a 29-kDa calcium binding protein is expressed widely in normal human tissue and tumours including amelobastoma. The objective of this study was to determine calretinin expression in heamatoxylin and eosin diagnosed cases of ameloblastoma and non-neoplastic odontogenic cysts. The lining epithelium in 3 cases of radicular cysts, 5 cases of odontogenic keratocysts, 5 cases of dentigerous cysts and 11 cases of ameloblastomas were examined for expression of calretinin. No positive epithelial staining was observed in radicular and dentigerous cysts. In comparison, however 100% of cases of ameloblastomas and 40% of cases of odontogenic karatocysts showed positive calretinin expression. Calretinin may be a specific immunohistochemical marker for ameloblastoma. If there is any possible relation between calretinin expression and neural origin of the odontogenic epithelium and its neoplastic transformation and if calretinin could be used as an early marker to predict the tendency of neoplastic change of odontogenic epithelium could be answered through further researches. How to cite this article: D'Silva S, Sumathi MK, Balaji N, Shetty NK, Pramod KM, Cheeramelil J. Evaluation of Calretinin expression in Ameloblastoma and Non-Neoplastic Odontogenic Cysts - An immunohistochemical study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(6):42-8 .

  2. Role of HIF-1α and CASPASE-3 in cystogenesis of odontogenic cysts and tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Natacha M M; de Siqueira, Adriane S; Ribeiro, André L R; da Silva Kataoka, Maria S; Jaeger, Ruy G; de Alves-Júnior, Sérgio M; Smith, Andrew M; de Jesus Viana Pinheiro, João

    2018-01-01

    Odontogenic cysts and tumors are the most relevant lesions that affect the gnathic bones. These lesions have in common the formation of cystic areas and this common feature may suggest involvement of similar mechanisms. The hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α), a responsive protein to hypoxia and caspase-3, an irreversible apoptosis marker, may contribute to cyst formation. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the immunoexpression of these proteins in odontogenic cysts and tumors. Twenty cases of ameloblastoma, keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KOT) (n = 20), radicular cyst (RC) (n = 18), dentigerous cyst (DC) (n = 11), calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (n = 8), and dental follicle (DF) (n = 10) were used to investigate HIF-1α and caspase-3 expression in sequential serial cuts by immunohistochemistry. HIF-1α was overexpressed in RC, DC, and ameloblastoma when compared with DF. The basal and sometimes the lower suprabasal layer showed no or very low expression in DC, KOT, and ameloblastoma, the last also showing strong expression in solid epithelial areas and initial cystic formation regions. Caspase-3 was found to be overexpressed in all lesions, with the highest expression in odontogenic cysts compared to tumors. HIF-1α and caspase-3 were localized in similar areas of the same lesions, especially in the epithelium surrounding cystic formations. This study showed distinct immunoexpression of HIF-1α and caspase-3 in odontogenic cyst and tumors, with higher expression observed in odontogenic cysts. These findings suggest a possible correlation between hypoxia, apoptosis, and cystogenesis, leading to understand the mechanisms responsible to cystic formation in odontogenic lesions.

  3. Odontogenic keratocyst in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDouceur, E E B; Walker, K S; Mohr, F C; Murphy, B

    2014-01-01

    Odontogenic cysts are derived from odontogenic epithelium, can be locally invasive and destructive and have been reported rarely in cats. A 16-year-old, male domestic shorthair cat had a 3-year history of a slowly progressive, right mandibular swelling. Intraoral dental radiographs revealed a multilocular, radiolucent, cystic mass within the right mandible that extended from the distal aspect of the canine tooth to the mesial aspect of the fourth premolar tooth. Radiographically, the mass was associated with distortion and regional destruction of the right mandibular bone and resorption of regional tooth roots. Histological examination of an incisional biopsy sample revealed multiple ruptured cysts lined by stratified squamous epithelium of odontogenic origin with luminal parakeratinization and a prominent palisading basal cell layer. The cyst contained abundant orthokeratotic and parakeratotic keratin. The clinical, radiographical and histological features were consistent with a diagnosis of odontogenic keratocyst, as seen in man. This is the first report of an odontogenic keratocyst in a cat. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Is podoplanin expression associated with transforming growth factor-β signaling in odontogenic cysts and tumors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etemad-Moghadam, Shahroo; Alaeddini, Mojgan

    2018-03-26

    Induction of podoplanin by transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) has been shown in a number of lesions but not in odontogenic tumors (OTs). We evaluated the association between these markers in OTs for the first time and compared their expression among the different neoplasms. Immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibody against podoplanin and TGF-β was performed on 76 odontogenic cysts and tumors. Spearman's correlation coefficient, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney U tests followed by adjustment with Bonferroni were used for statistical analysis (P keratocysts, and calcifying odontogenic cysts. Significant differences were observed only between OMs and each of the other neoplasms. Podoplanin immunostaining in the connective tissue was absent in most lesions. TGF-β was significantly different among the study sample but not between the lesions in paired comparisons. None of the studied OTs showed significant correlations between podoplanin-TGF-β, in either the epithelium or the stroma. These markers were also descriptively reported in calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors. The inductive effect of TGF-β on podoplanin seems to be limited, if any, in odontogenic lesions. Podoplanin appears to play a role in some aspects of OTs with epithelial or mixed origins. Despite the possible participation of podoplanin in tumorigenesis, it may not necessarily be involved in the aggressive behavior of OTs. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Odontogenic myxoma: report of 2 cases

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    Kim, Joo Yeon; Park, Geum Mee; Cho, Bong Hae; Nah, Kyung Soo [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-15

    The odontogenic myxoma is an infiltrative benign tumor of bone that occurs almost exclusively in the jaw bones and comprises 3% to 6% of odontogenic tumors. This neoplasm is thought to arise from the primitive mesenchymal structures of a developing tooth, including the dental follicle, dental papilla, or periodontal ligament. Radiographically the odontogenic myxoma may produce several patterns: unicystic, multilocular, pericoronal, and radiolucent-radiopaque, making the differential diagnosis difficult. In this report, two cases of the odontogenic myxoma in the jaw bones are presented. The first case involved only the mandible, while the second case involved the maxilla. Both cases presented extensive multilocular radiolucencies characteristic of odontogenic myxoma.

  6. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor

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    BRENDA DE SOUZA MOURA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the frequency of keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KOT in the Oral Surgery Service (OSS of the University Hospital Clementino Fraga Filho of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (HUCFF / UFRJ, with respect to recurrence rate, gender, age of recurrence and location of the injury Methods: clinical records were reviewed and histopathological reports of KOT patients of the HUCFF/UFRJ between 2002 and 2012. Patients diagnosed with KOT were divided into two groups for the occurrence of relapse: positive (n=6 and negative (n=19 Results: regarding the location, there was a predilection for the mandible. In the average age of patients in the positive group was 40.5 and the negative group, 35.53. In the distribution by gender, positive group showed equal distribution, different from that observed in the negative group, which showed a predilection for males Conclusion: KOT was the second most frequent injury in our patients, recurrence was lower among males and had the jaw as most affected location

  7. Orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst: A rare presentation

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    Neha Bhasin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthokeratinized Odontogenic Cyst (OOC is a developmental cyst of odontogenic origin and was initially defined as the uncommon orthokeratinized variant of the Odontogenic Keratocyst (OKC, until the World Health Organization′s (WHO′s classification in 2005, where it was separated from the Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor (KCOT. It is a relatively uncommon developmental cyst comprising of only 0.4% of all odontogenic cysts. It is rather mystifying that its radiographic features are similar to the dentigerous cyst and histological characteristics are similar to the odontogenic keratocyst; and it has inconsistent cytokeratin expression profiles overlapping with both the dentigerous cyst and odontogenic keratocyst as well as with the epidermis. It has a predilection for the posterior mandibular region. This is a report of a rare case of OOC in an unusual maxillary anterior region, with emphasis on its biological characteristics.

  8. Assessment of MRI and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in the differential diagnosis of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaumi, Jun-ichi; Yanagi, Yoshinobu; Konouchi, Hironobu; Hisatomi, Miki; Matsuzaki, Hidenobu; Shigehara, Hiroshi; Kishi, Kanji

    2004-01-01

    The radiographical differentiation of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) from dentigerous cysts, calcifying odontogenic cysts, calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors, odontogenic keratocysts and amelobastomas is sometimes difficult. We attempted to differentiate AOT from other lesions similar to AOT in radiographic findings using MRI. The MRI features of AOT in our three cases included homogeneous low SI in the cystic portion and homogeneous intermediate SI in the solid portion on T1WI, homogeneous high SI in the cystic portion and intermediate to slightly high SI in the solid portion on T2WI and enhancement of only the solid portion on CE-T1WI although none of the sequences included SI of calcifications. The contrast index curves in the three cases of AOT showed a gradual increase to 300 s, which signified a benign tumor. These MRI features were characteristic features of AOT and might be a basis for differentiating AOT from the above possible lesions in radiographic examinations

  9. Immunohistochemical Assessment of HER3 Expression in Odontogenic Cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarmand, Marieh; Saravani, Shirin; Kamyab, Nazanin; Jahantigh, Mehdi; Torabi Parizi, Molouk

    2015-11-01

    It has been demonstrated that HER3 plays an important role in some human cancers and the HER3 expression is associated with worse survival in solid tumors. This study was conducted to compare HER3 expression in epithelial lining of radicular cysts (RCs), dentigerous cysts (DCs) and odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs). This was a descriptive-analytical study, which assessed all 57 paraffin blocks of RCs, DCs and OKCs (21 RCs, 16 DCs, 20 OKC) from pathological archive of Dentistry College of Zahedan, Iran. The HER3 expression in cytoplasm and membrane was examined by immunohistochemical method. The data collected was analyzed using SPSS16 by ANOVA and Chi-square. P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. The HER3 expression had positive results in 52.4% of OKC, 50% of DC and only 20% of RC samples. There was a significant difference between HER3 expression in OKCs and RCs. The HER3 expression in developmental odontogenic cysts was higher than that in inflammatory odontogenic cysts. The higher rate of HER3 expression in OKC may justify inherent growth potential, stimulation-independent proliferation capability, invasive growth and high recurrence rate of the cyst accepted today as a tumor.

  10. Evaluation of collagen in connective tissue walls of odontogenic cysts--a histochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vij, Ruchieka; Vij, Hitesh; Rao, Nirmala N

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the nature of collagen in the connective tissue walls of odontogenic cysts, like the odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cyst and radicular cyst using picrosirius red stained sections. Furthermore, it was intended to assess if the capsular connective tissue can affect the nature of overlying epithelium, thus emphasizing the role of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in biological behaviour of the cysts. The material for the study included 51 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks (15 odontogenic keratocyst, 15 dentigerous cysts, 15 radicular cysts and four normal mucosa and two dental follicular tissue as controls), retrieved from the Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, MCODS, Manipal. Tissue blocks were sectioned at 5-μm thickness, stained with picrosirius red stain and observed with polarization and light microscopy. Few sections of OKC and dentigerous cyst exhibited greenish-yellow birefringence in sub-epithelial region, whereas others showed a yellowish-orange birefringence under polarization microscopy. Most radicular cysts had yellowish-orange to orange birefringence. Shift in colour in case OKC and dentigerous cyst was attributed to the presence of inflammation in those sections. These regions also exhibited either a change in phenotype or thickness of overlying epithelium. This technique can be used to study the nature of collagen fibres in odontogenic cyst walls. Further studies with an increased sample size and using various epithelial and mesenchymal markers and ssDNA antibodies should be carried out to confirm the effect of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions on the nature of epithelium of odontogenic cysts. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Case Presentation of Concomitant and Contiguous Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor and Focal Cemento-Ossifying Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, Gita; Donoghue, Mandana; Reichart, Peter A; Pazuhi, Neda

    2015-01-01

    A 24 year-old male was presented for the diagnosis of an asymptomatic bony expansion in relation to the right maxillary canine and first premolar. The unilocular radiolucent lesion with central foci of calcification had caused divergence of canine and first premolar roots without any resorption. This case report details a diagnosis of two distinct disease processes of different cellular origin namely, focal cemento-ossifying dysplasia and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor in a previously unreported concomitant and contiguous relationship. The diagnosis was determined by a combination of clinical, radiographic, histopathological and surgical evidence. This case highlights two points, first the need to examine all mixed radiolucent-radiopaque lesions with advanced imaging techniques to assess the number and extent of the lesions prior to treatment planning. Second a likely role of periodontal ligament as the tissue source for odontogenic epithelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells required for the development of odontogenic tumors and cemento-osseous dysplasias.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging: a useful tool to distinguish between keratocystic odontogenic tumours and odontogenic cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, F A; Probst, M; Pautke, Ch; Kaltsi, E; Otto, S; Schiel, S; Troeltzsch, M; Ehrenfeld, M; Cornelius, C P; Müller-Lisse, U G

    2015-03-01

    In contrast to odontogenic cysts, keratocystic odontogenic tumours often recur and require more aggressive surgical treatment, so we tried to find features that distinguished between them on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Without knowing the diagnosis, two radiologists reviewed intensity (low, intermediate, or high) and homogeneity (homogeneous or heterogeneous) of signals in short-tau-inversion-recovery (STIR), T1- and T2-weighted, and fat-suppressed, contrast-enhanced MRI in 20 consecutive patients with oval, radiolucent lesions of the mandible on panoramic radiography, and who were subsequently confirmed histopathologically to have either an odontogenic cyst or a keratocystic odontogenic tumour (n=10 in each group). Fisher's exact test was statistically significant at pkeratocystic odontogenic tumours (3/10, p=0.02, and 1/10, p=0.01, respectively). One radiologist found odontogenic cysts were more likely to be homogeneous on unenhanced T1-weighted images (odontogenic cysts 9/10, keratocystic odontogenic tumours 3/10, p=0.02) and one on contrast-enhanced MRI, when the cyst wall was enhanced (odontogenic cysts 7/9, keratocystic odontogenic tumours 0/3, p=0.01). There were no other significant distinguishing features on MRI. In conclusion, the signal intensity of the enhanced wall seems to be a feature on contrast-enhanced MRI that differentiates odontogenic cysts from keratocystic odontogenic tumours. Copyright © 2014 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Hybrid Odontogenic Lesion: A Rare Entity

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    Reza Imani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid tumors are very rare tumors composed of two different tumor entities, each of which conforms to an exactly defined tumor category. A 14-year-old boy was referred for an intraosseous painless lesion with a histopathological feature of multiple odontogenic lesions including calcifying odontogenic cyst, complex odontoma and ameloblastic fibro-odontoma. The final diagnosis considered to be a hybrid odontogenic lesion.

  14. [Effect of weather on odontogenic abscesses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, G; Schmidseder, R

    1978-11-01

    An increased frequency of odontogenous abcesses was observed on certain days in the course of routine clinical practice. We therefore investigated the possibility of a statistically significant weather-related odontogenous soft-tissue purulence originating from chronic apical periodontitis. Medical reports of patients treated between 1970 and 1977 were used. Our study indicated that the frequency of odontogenous abcesses was significantly higher with cyclonic weather conditions, i.e., weather with low barometric pressure.

  15. Central Odontogenic Fibroma of Simple Type

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    Prasanth Thankappan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Central odontogenic fibroma (COF is an extremely rare benign tumor that accounts for 0.1% of all odontogenic tumors. It is a lesion associated with the crown of an unerupted tooth resembling dentigerous cyst. In this report, a 10-year-old male patient is presented, who was diagnosed with central odontogenic fibroma of simple type from clinical, radiological, and histopathological findings.

  16. Diagnostic Factors of Odontogenic Cysts in Iranian Population: A Retrospective Study Over the Past Two Decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajerani, Hassan; Esmaeelinejad, Mohammad; Sabour, Siamak; Aghdashi, Farzad; Dehghani, Nima

    2015-06-01

    Early diagnosis of odontogenic cysts due to their silent progression is always a challenging problem for clinicians. The current study aimed to evaluate the frequency of odontogenic cysts and related factors in a selected Iranian population. The current cross-sectional study was conducted on 312 patients' recorded data in Taleghani Hospital, Tehran, Iran, from April 1993 to December 2013. All related data were extracted from the records and categorized in tables. The correlation between the variables was analyzed by either chi-square or multinominal logistic regression tests. The P values Keratocyst (OKC) was the most common odontogenic cyst of all followed by the dentigerous cyst as the second most common lesion. Most of the patients were in the second or third decades of their lives, although there was no statistically significant age distribution. The finding of the current study showed that calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) occurrence was significantly related to the history of trauma. Enucleation and curettage of the odontogenic cysts were the most common treatment plans of all. The current study showed that clinicians should consider the many factors associated with the occurrence of odontogenic cysts.

  17. A study of the distribution of B-cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 in odontogenic cyst and tumors: Histochemical study

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    Khushboo Phull

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: High expression of bcl-2 in KCOT supports the general agreement that some features of KCOT are those of a neoplasia. The bcl-2 expression in connective tissue cells suggests that these cells may also be important as epithelial cells in the biological behavior odontogenic keratocyst.

  18. Bilateral Odontogenic Keratocyst of the Mandible

    OpenAIRE

    Ram, Hari; Mohammad, Shadab; Husain, Nuzhat; Gupta, Shalini; Kumar, Ajay

    2011-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a cyst of dental origin with an aggressive clinical behavior, having high recurrence rate. Multiple cysts are associated with bifid-rib basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome). We present a case of bilateral odontogenic keratocyst in a cleft lip patient.

  19. The junctional epithelium originates from the odontogenic epithelium of an erupted tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima-Himuro, Sara; Oshima, Masamitsu; Yamamoto, Gou; Ogawa, Miho; Furuya, Madoka; Tanaka, Junichi; Nishii, Kousuke; Mishima, Kenji; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Tsuji, Takashi; Yamamoto, Matsuo

    2014-05-02

    The junctional epithelium (JE) is an epithelial component that is directly attached to the tooth surface and has a protective function against periodontal diseases. In this study, we determined the origin of the JE using a bioengineered tooth technique. We transplanted the bioengineered tooth germ into the alveolar bone with an epithelial component that expressed green fluorescence protein. The reduced enamel epithelium from the bioengineered tooth fused with the oral epithelium, and the JE was apparently formed around the bioengineered tooth 50 days after transplantation. Importantly, the JE exhibited green fluorescence for at least 140 days after transplantation, suggesting that the JE was not replaced by oral epithelium. Therefore, our results demonstrated that the origin of the JE was the odontogenic epithelium, and odontogenic epithelium-derived JE was maintained for a relatively long period.

  20. Comparison of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen Expression in Odontogenic Keratocyst and Ameloblastoma: An Immunohistochemical Study

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    Hiroshi Takahashi

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA is a nuclear protein synthesized in the late G1 and S phase of the cell cycle, and immunohistochemical detection of the protein represents a useful marker for the proliferating fraction of cells in tissue specimens. PCNA expression was studied in odontogenic keratocysts (n = 15 and ameloblastomas (n = 46 using an avidin–biotin–peroxidase complex method on routinely processed paraffin sections. The percentage of PCNA-positive cells determined by point counting was significantly lower in the ameloblastomas (mean 9.4%, standard deviation (SD 11.0 than in odontogenic keratocysts (mean 29.9%, SD 24.0. In ameloblastomas, the mean percentage of PCNA-positive cells was lowest in the acanthomatous pattern and highest in plexiform pattern. The mean percentage of PCNA-positive cells in plexiform pattern was non-significantly higher than that in follicular pattern. The mean percentage of PCNA-positive cells in plexiform and follicular patterns was significantly higher than that in cyctic and acanthomatous patterns. The frequency of PCNA-positive cells was significantly higher in the peripheral cells of follicular and plexiform patterns than in the central cells of both patterns (p < 0.01. Therefore, peripheral cells were regarded as reserve cell of central cells. The mean percentage of PCNA-positive cells in the epithelial lining of odontogenic keratocyst was not significantly different from those in the peripheral cells of follicular and plexiform patterns of ameloblastoma. In contrast, the odontogenic keratocyst exhibited a mean percentage of PCNA-positive cells which was statistically higher than that in other histological elements of ameloblastomas. The present study suggests that odontogenic keratocyst is regarded as benign odontogenic tumour.

  1. Evaluation of mast cells in periapical cysts, dentigerous cysts, and keratocystic odontogenic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Noronha Santos Netto, Juliana; Pires, Fábio Ramôa; da Fonseca, Eliene Carvalho; Silva, Licínio Esmeraldo; de Queiroz Chaves Lourenço, Simone

    2012-09-01

    Several cell types are associated with the development of cystic and tumoral odontogenic lesions. Among inflammatory cells, mast cells can be associated with their pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to analyze mast cells in periapical cysts, dentigerous cysts, and keratocystic odontogenic tumors. Tissue sections were submitted to toluidine blue staining and immunohistochemistry with antibody anti-tryptase (clone G3). Mast cells were quantitated using Image-Pro Plus software to obtain the mean number of mast cells in three regions: epithelial, superficial portion of the fibrous wall and deep portion of the fibrous wall from 20 periapical cysts, 20 dentigerous cysts (six non-inflamed and 14 inflamed) and 20 keratocystic odontogenic tumors (four non-inflamed and 16 inflamed). The mean number of mast cells detected per lesion by immunohistochemistry (4.1) was higher than by histochemistry (1.5) (Pcysts and keratocystic odontogenic tumors showed a higher mean number of mast cells than non-inflamed lesions in all regions. The deep region from all cysts showed the highest mean number of degranulated mast cells, except for non-inflamed keratocystic odontogenic tumors analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemical staining detected higher number of mast cells than histochemistry. The higher number of mast cells observed in inflamed lesions could indicate the participation of these cells in the inflammatory response in odontogenic lesions. The prevalence of degranulated mast cells in the deep region suggests intense activity of these cells, possibly related to growth of cystic lesions. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Biochemical and Cytological Comparison of Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumours to Nonkeratinising Odontogenic Cysts Fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patidar, Madhvika; Shetty, Pushparaj; Patidar, Nitesh; Mittal, Sugandh; Singh, Hanspal; Chethna

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the levels of albumin, prealbumin, total protein, inorganic phosphate and presence of keratinocytes in the cystic fluid for the diagnosis and appropriate treatment planning of keratocystic odontogenic tumours and other non keratinizing odontogenic cysts. Fifteen keratocystic odontogenic tumour and 15 controls were studied. The cystic fluid was aspirated and analysed to determine the levels of albumin, prealbumin, total protein, inorganic phosphate and the presence of keratinocytes. The data collected was statistically evaluated using Mann Whitney U-Test and Student's t-test. A highly significant difference (pkeratocystic odontogenic tumour and non keratinizing odontogenic cysts. The presence of albumin also showed a significant difference (pkeratocystic odontogenic tumour in a minimally invasive and highly accurate fashion.

  3. [Study of 103 cases of odontogenic cysts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moctezuma-Bravo, Gustavo Sergio; Magallanes-González, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    To describe characteristics of odontogenic cysts in a Mexican population. A retrospective study of 103 odontogenic cysts in 86 patients was done. The data were obtained from files of the Pathology Department of a General Hospital. We observed a frequency of the 8.13 % of odontogenic cysts (103) in 1266 pathological studies. The dentigerous cyst 56 % and odontogenic keratocyst 33 % were the most common odontogenic cysts. Sixty one percent of the cysts appeared in the second and third decades of life. In 71 cysts, 42 % appeared in the posterior region jaw, 29 % in the anterior region of the maxilla and 21 % in the posterior region of the maxilla. A 6.7 % developed a recurrence after treatment and a case of keratocyst of posterior region of the maxilla was associated with epidermoid carcinoma. The study included three women with the syndrome of carcinoma of the basal cell nevus, who presented multiple keratocysts. The dentigerous cysts and odontogenic keratocysts were the most frequent odontogenic cysts. They appeared mainly in the second and third decades of life.

  4. The role of vascular endothelial growth factor in proliferation of odontogenic cysts and tumors: An immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Bhavana; Chandra, Shaleen; Singh, Anil; Sah, Kunal; Raj, Vineet; Gupta, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is capable of initiating angiogenesis in blood vessels and may act as mitogenic agent for epithelium of odontogenic cysts and tumors. This study was conducted to evaluate the role of epithelial VEGF expression in odontogenic cysts and ameloblastoma and its correlation with argyrophilic nucleolar organizer region counts to assess its role in their biological behavior. In this retrospective cross-sectional study, 45 histologically confirmed cases, 15 cases of each of keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs), dentigerous cysts, and ameloblastomas were examined for immunohistochemical expression for epithelial VEGF, and argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) (used as secondary marker in this study) staining was done for comparing the proliferative capacity with VEGF. KCOT shows mild expression within the basal layers and strong expression in the suprabasal layer whereas, in dentigerous cysts, a majority showed no VEGF expression whereas ameloblastomas showed strong expression in all cases by stellate reticulum-like cells at the center of the follicles and suprabasal layers of epithelium. The results of AgNOR counts were higher in KCOTs as compared to ameloblastoma and least in dentigerous cysts. VEGF expression by the epithelium of odontogenic cysts and tumors may play a role in epithelial proliferation via autocrine mechanism as reflected by increased AgNOR counts. The angiogenic activity via paracrine pathway may be responsible for the difference in growth rate and neoplastic behavior of the lesions.

  5. Histological and three dimensional organization of the odontogenic organ in the lower incisor of 100 gram rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C E; Warshawsky, H

    1975-04-01

    A three dimensional reconstruction of the epithelial tissue at the apical end of the lower rat incisor was made from serial 1 mum thick cross sections. This tissue formed an elongated structure, called the odontogenic organ, which was composed of a bulbous and a "U"-shaped part. Both parts were joined to one another at the posterior aspect of the apical foramen. The bulbous part of the odontogenic organ was situated at the lingual side of the "U"-shaped part and protruded anteriorly over the pulp. It was formed by cells of the outer dental epithelium and stellate reticulum whose organization suggested that the bulbous part was important in the production of cells for renewal of all the epithelia of the incisor. The "U"-shaped part of the odontogenic organ was apparently derived from the bulbous part and delineated the pulp by forming the lateral, mesial and labial sidewalls around the apical foramen. It was composed of all the epithelial cell types recognizable as precursors to (a) cells of the enamel organ which form the enamel, and (b) Hertwig's epithelial root sheath, a part of the odontogenic organ which induces the formation of dentin on the lingual aspect of the incisor.

  6. Cerebral Abscess Potentially of Odontogenic Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marouene Ben Hadj Hassine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic origins are rarely implicated in the formation of brain abscesses. The relative paucity of this kind of infection and the difficulty in matching the causative microorganisms of a brain abscess to an odontogenic source can explain the late management of patients. We herein describe a case of a 46-year-old man with a cerebellar abscess that was probably due to an odontogenic infection. The diagnosis supported by imaging and microscopic identification, mini craniectomy for abscess drainage followed by eradication of all potential dental infectious foci, and an antibiotic regimen based on cephalosporins, metronidazole, and vancomycine contributed to a successful outcome.

  7. Transcriptomic response of goat mammary epithelial cells to Mycoplasma agalactiae challenge – a preliminary study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ogorevc, Jernej; Mihevc, Sonja Prpar; Hedegaard, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma agalactiae (Ma) is one of the main aetiological agents of intramammary infections in small ruminants, causing contagious agalactia. To better understand the underlying disease patterns a primary goat mammary epithelial cell (pgMEC) culture was established from the mammary tissue......, steroid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, apoptosis signalling, transcription regulation, and cell cycle regulation. Based on the results we suggest that mammary epithelial cells in vivo contribute to the immune system by the induced expression of cytokines and other chemotactic agents, activation...

  8. Non-odontogenic tumors of the facial bones in children and adolescents: role of multiparametric imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Minerva; Stefanelli, Salvatore; Poletti, Pierre Alexandre; Merlini, Laura; Rougemont, Anne-Laure

    2017-01-01

    Tumors of the pediatric facial skeleton represent a major challenge in clinical practice because they can lead to functional impairment, facial deformation, and long-term disfigurement. Their treatment often requires a multidisciplinary approach, and radiologists play a pivotal role in the diagnosis and management of these lesions. Although rare, pediatric tumors arising in the facial bones comprise a wide spectrum of benign and malignant lesions of osteogenic, fibrogenic, hematopoietic, neurogenic, or epithelial origin. The more common lesions include Langerhans cell histiocytosis and osteoma, while rare lesions include inflammatory myofibroblastic and desmoid tumors; juvenile ossifying fibroma; primary intraosseous lymphoma; Ewing sarcoma; and metastases to the facial bones from neuroblastoma, Ewing sarcoma, or retinoblastoma. This article provides a comprehensive approach for the evaluation of children with non-odontogenic tumors of the facial skeleton. Typical findings are discussed with emphasis on the added value of multimodality multiparametric imaging with computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), positron emission tomography CT (PET CT), and PET MRI. Key imaging findings and characteristic histologic features of benign and malignant lesions are reviewed and the respective role of each modality for pretherapeutic assessment and post-treatment follow-up. Pitfalls of image interpretation are addressed and how to avoid them. (orig.)

  9. Non-odontogenic tumors of the facial bones in children and adolescents: role of multiparametric imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Minerva; Stefanelli, Salvatore; Poletti, Pierre Alexandre; Merlini, Laura [University of Geneva, Division of Radiology, Department of Imaging and Medical Informatics, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Rougemont, Anne-Laure [University of Geneva, Division of Clinical Pathology, Department of Genetic and Laboratory Medicine, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2017-04-15

    Tumors of the pediatric facial skeleton represent a major challenge in clinical practice because they can lead to functional impairment, facial deformation, and long-term disfigurement. Their treatment often requires a multidisciplinary approach, and radiologists play a pivotal role in the diagnosis and management of these lesions. Although rare, pediatric tumors arising in the facial bones comprise a wide spectrum of benign and malignant lesions of osteogenic, fibrogenic, hematopoietic, neurogenic, or epithelial origin. The more common lesions include Langerhans cell histiocytosis and osteoma, while rare lesions include inflammatory myofibroblastic and desmoid tumors; juvenile ossifying fibroma; primary intraosseous lymphoma; Ewing sarcoma; and metastases to the facial bones from neuroblastoma, Ewing sarcoma, or retinoblastoma. This article provides a comprehensive approach for the evaluation of children with non-odontogenic tumors of the facial skeleton. Typical findings are discussed with emphasis on the added value of multimodality multiparametric imaging with computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), positron emission tomography CT (PET CT), and PET MRI. Key imaging findings and characteristic histologic features of benign and malignant lesions are reviewed and the respective role of each modality for pretherapeutic assessment and post-treatment follow-up. Pitfalls of image interpretation are addressed and how to avoid them. (orig.)

  10. Quantitative assessment of silver-stained nucleolar organizer region in odontogenic cysts to correlate the growth and malignant potentiality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Sailendra Nath; Paul, R R; Ray, Jay Gopal; Majumdar, Sumit; Uppala, Divya

    2017-01-01

    The most common and important odontogenic cyst involving jaws is the odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) or primordial cyst, the dentigerous cyst and the radicular cyst. These cysts all though do not show similar behavior, they all have the potentiality to recur. Silver nitrate staining of the nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) of the benign and malignant lesions is becoming very useful as a diagnostic indicator. Thus, the aim of this study is to assess the diagnostic potential of AgNORs in the cystic epithelium of common odontogenic cysts. Archived specimens of odontogenic cysts were stained with hematoxylin and eosin stain and AgNOR stain. The comparative evaluation of the AgNOR counts was done among the three varieties of odontogenic cysts, i.e., radicular cysts, dentigerous cysts and OKC and were observed that the mean for OKC was significantly higher than that of radicular cyst. Therefore, AgNor could be used as an efficient tool for comparative evaluation of microscopic features such as epithelial thickness, surface keratinization and mural proliferation in dentigerous cyst to that of the AgNOR count.

  11. Odontogenic Keratocyst Mimicking Paradental Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Enrico Borgonovo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this paper is to present an uncommon clinical and radiographic aspect of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC mimicking paradental cyst. Methods. A 32-year-old female patient showed a well-delimited radiolucent lesion connected with the root of the left third molar with close anatomical relationship with the mandibular canal. The clinical, radiographic, and anamnestic features lead us to diagnose a paradental cyst that was treated by enucleation after extraction of the partially impacted tooth. Results. Histological analysis showed typical histological features of PKC such as the presence of a lining of stratified squamous epithelium with a well-defined basal layer of palisading columnar of cuboidal cells. Conclusion. Initial X-ray analysis and the position of the lesion related to the third mandibular tooth caused us to mistakenly diagnose a paradental cyst. We were only able to identify the cyst as an PKC rather than a paradental cyst after histological analysis.

  12. Cytokeratin Expression in Evaluation of Odontogenic Cysts | Iyogun ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cytokeratin Expression in Evaluation of Odontogenic Cysts. ... Annals of Biomedical Sciences ... odontogenic cysts were immunophenotyped for cytokeratins 7, 17, 19 & 20 at the pathology department of Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano.

  13. Caveolin-1 expression in odontogenic cysts and ameloblastomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafari-Ashkavandi, Zohreh; Pardis, Soheil; Asadzadeh, Maryam; Andisheh-Tadbir, Azadeh; Dehghani-Nazhvani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the caveolin-1 expression in a group of odontogenic cysts and tumors. In this cross-sectional study, the expression of caveolin-1 was evaluated immunohistochemically in 75 samples including 18 cases of dentigerous cyst, 18 odontogenic keratocysts, 3 orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts, 2 calcifying odontogenic cysts and 34 ameloblastomas (solid and unicystic). Positive immunohistochemical reaction was found in 100% of odontogenic cysts and this was significantly more than both unicystic (65%) and solid (55%) ameloblastomas. The present study showed the expression of caveolin-1 in all odontogenic cysts and more than ameloblastomas. The results suggested that absence of caveolin-1 might enhance aggressiveness of odontogenic lesions and could be a useful marker for distinguishing ameloblastomas from other odontogenic lesions.

  14. Odontogenic Infections: A 1-year Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi, Benjamin; Weusmann, Jens; Azaripour, Adriano; Braun, Benedikt; Walter, Christian; Willershausen, Brita

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the prevalence, demographic patterns and management of odontogenic infections in patients undergoing treatment in an outpatient dental emergency service of a university hospital. In a retrospective study of the year 2012, all patients suffering from odontogenic infections were included. Demographic data, diagnosis and the conducted treatment were analyzed. Odontogenic infections were defined as pulpitis, apical and marginal periodontitis, abscesses and pericoronitis. A total of 2,058 out of 4,209 emergency patients suffered from odontogenic infections. The majority (45.0%) had an apical periodontitis, 20.8% abscesses, 17.3% a marginal periodontitis, 16.3% a pulpitis and 5.8% a pericoronitis. Mean age was 37.5 ± 17.0 years standard deviation (SD) (1.2-96.4). Most patients were 20 to 29 years (24.6%), followed by the age group of 30 to 39 year old patients (21.0%). Males were affected more frequently (55.5%) than females (45.5%). Most of the patients (64.5%) of the patients received a dental or surgical treatment. Antibiotics were prescribed in 31.7% of cases. Amoxicillin was the most common prescribed antibiotic (54.5%). Odontogenic infections represent one of the main reasons for consulting the emergency service. Due to the high number of cases and the severe complications, dentists have to be familiar with the surgical management of odontogenic infections as well as the appropriate use of antibiotics. Nearly half of all patients who sought, treatment in the emergency service had an odontogenic infectious disease. This should be considered for the organization and planning of the service.

  15. Frequency of odontogenic cysts and tumors: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nigel R; Gannon, Orla M; Savage, Neil W; Batstone, Martin D

    2014-02-01

    A systematic review of the literature from 1993 to 2011 was undertaken examining frequency data of the most common odontogenic cysts and tumors. Seven inclusion criteria were met for the paper to be incorporated. In the preliminary search 5231 papers were identified, of these 26 papers met the inclusion criteria. There were 18 297 odontogenic cysts reported. Of these there were 9982 (54.6%) radicular cysts, 3772 (20.6%) dentigerous cysts and 2145 (11.7%) keratocystic odontogenic tumors. With the reclassification of keratocystic odontogenic tumor in 2005 as an odontogenic tumor, there were 8129 odontogenic tumors reported with 3001 (36.9%) ameloblastomas, 1163 (14.3%) keratocystic odontogenic tumors, 533 (6.5%) odontogenic myxomas, 337 (4.1%) adenomatoid odontogenic tumors and 127 (1.6%) ameloblastic fibromas. This systematic review found that odontogenic cysts are 2.25 times more frequent than odontogenic tumors. The most frequent odontogenic cyst and tumor were the radicular cyst and ameloblastoma respectively. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. A Rare Presentation of Odontogenic Keratocyst Mimicking an Antral Polyp

    OpenAIRE

    Sudhakar, S; Geethika, V; Ramaswamy, P; Kumar, PK; Sreenivasulu, P

    2014-01-01

    Maxillary sinus harbours many pathological lesions. Many of those presents as a sinonasal mass and are rarely symptomatic. These masses are usually an antral polyp, mucoceles or mucous retention cysts. Odontogenic keratocyst, a benign odontogenic lesion presenting within the maxillary sinus is a rare entity. We present a case of odontogenic keratocyst of the maxillary sinus in a 35 years old female.

  17. Transcriptomic response of goat mammary epithelial cells to Mycoplasma agalactiae challenge – a preliminary study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ogorevc, Jernej; Mihevc, Sonja Prpar; Hedegaard, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma agalactiae (Ma) is one of the main aetiological agents of intramammary infections in small ruminants, causing contagious agalactia. To better understand the underlying disease patterns a primary goat mammary epithelial cell (pgMEC) culture was established from the mammary tissue and ch....... Additionally, the results represent comprehensive goat mammary transcriptome information and demonstrate the applicability of the comparative genomics approach for annotation of goat data, using transcriptome information of a closely related species (Bos taurus) as a reference....

  18. p53 expression and mutation analysis of odontogenic cysts with and without dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Darren P

    2012-01-01

    Overexpression of p53 protein is well described in odontogenic cystic lesions (OCLs), including those with epithelial dysplasia; however, most p53 antibodies stain both wild-type and mutated p53 protein and may not reflect genotype. Direct sequencing of the p53 gene has not identified mutations in OCLs with dysplasia. The purpose of this study was to determine the molecular basis of p53 expression in several types of OCLs with and without dysplasia. The study material comprised 13 OCLs: odontogenic keratocyst (n = 5), orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (n = 5), dentigerous cyst (n = 2), lateral periodontal cyst (n = 1), and unspecified developmental odontogenic cyst (UDOC) (n = 1). Five of these had features of mild or moderate epithelial dysplasia. One intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) that was believed to have arisen from an antecedent dysplastic orthokeratinized OC was also included. Immunohistochemistry was performed using the DO7 monoclonal antibody that recognizes wild-type and mutated p53. DNA was extracted from microdissected tissue for all samples and exons 4 to 8 of the p53 gene direct sequenced. In 4 of 5 OCLs with dysplasia there was strong nuclear staining of basal and suprabasal cells. In all cases without dysplasia, nuclear expression in basal cells was either negative or weak and was absent in suprabasal cell nuclei. A mutation in exon 6 of the p53 gene (E224D) was identified in both the dysplastic orthokeratinized OC and the subsequent intraosseous SCC. OCLs with features of dysplasia show increased expression of p53 protein that does not reflect p53 mutational status. One dysplastic OC shared the same p53 mutation with a subsequent intraosseous SCC, indicating that p53 mutation may be associated with malignant transformation in this case. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Simultaneous adenomatoid odontogenic and keratocystic odontogenic tumours in a patient with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, M; Shepard, M; Coleman, H

    2014-03-01

    Gorlin and Goltz described a syndrome in which multiple basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts and bifid ribs occurred in combination. The jaw keratocysts are a consistent feature of 'Gorlin-Goltz' or naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Central nervous system and ocular involvement occurred together with the fairly typical facial features of frontal bossing and hypertelorism. This case report documents the pathology associated with an impacted maxillary canine tooth in a boy with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. The patient presented for investigation of the failure of eruption of the right permanent maxillary canine tooth. Radiographic investigation showed the presence of a well circumscribed radiolucency located around the crown of an impacted right maxillary canine tooth. The patient's medical history revealed a medulloblastoma that was treated 13 years ago. The right maxillary canine tooth and associated peri-coronal tissue were removed under general anaesthetic. A diagnosis of a keratocystic odontogenic tumour with an associated adenomatoid odontogenic tumour was made. The common differential diagnoses for a peri-coronal radiolucency in the maxilla that need to be considered by dentists include a dentigerous cyst, follicular keratocystic odontogenic tumour and adenomatoid odontogenic tumour. A rare case of both keratocystic odontogenic tumour and associated follicular adenomatoid odontogenic tumour is described in a patient with naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  20. Odontogenic cysts in three dogs: one odontogenic keratocyst and two dentigerous cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Kadosawa, Tsuyoshi; Ishiguro, Taketo; Takagi, Satoshi; Ochiai, Kenji; Kimura, Takashi; Okumura, Masahiro; Fujinaga, Toru

    2004-09-01

    Odontogenic cysts, which showed cystic radiolucency in the jaw bone by radiographic examination and computed tomography, were enucleated by operation in 3 dogs. One dog had a odontogenic keratocyst in the incisive bone of the right maxilla and another 2 cases revealed dentigerous cysts in the mandible. These cyst walls were enucleated or transpired by semiconductor laser. Afterwards, osteogenesis was confirmed at the defective part of jaw bone by extirpation of the cyst in all cases, and no recurrence has been noted in any cases. Odontogenic cyst is a disease which should be treated by surgical extirpation or transpiration.

  1. Odontogenic cysts in three dogs: One odontogenic keratocyst and two dentigerous cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, K.; Kadosawa, T.; Ishiguro, T.; Takagi, S.; Ochiai, K.; Kimura, T.; Okumura, M.; Fujinaga, T.

    2004-01-01

    Odontogenic cysts, which showed cystic radiolucency in the jaw bone by radiographic examination and computed tomography, were enucleated by operation in 3 dogs. One dog had a odontogenic keratocyst in the incisive bone of the right maxilla and another 2 cases revealed dentigerous cysts in the mandible. These cyst walls were enucleated or transpired by semiconductor laser. Afterwards, osteogenesis was confirmed at the defective pan of jaw bone by extirpation of the cyst in all cases, and no recurrence has been noted in any cases. Odontogenic cyst is a disease which should be treated by surgical extirpation or transpiration

  2. Glandular odontogenic cyst: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tambawaia, Shahnaz S.; Karjodkar, Freny R.; Yadav, Archana; Sansare, Kaustubh; Sontakke, Subodh

    2014-01-01

    Glandular odontogenic cysts (GOCs) are rare intrabony solitary or multiloculated cysts of odontogenic origin. The importance of GOCs lies in the fact that they exhibit a propensity for recurrence similar to keratocystic odontogenic tumors and that they may be confused microscopically with central mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Thus, the oral and maxillofacial radiologists play an important role in definitive diagnosis of GOC based on distinctive cases; though they are rare. In large part, this is due to the GOC's complex and frequently non-specific histopathology. This report describes a case of GOC occurrence in the posterior mandibular ramus region in a 17-year-old female, which is a rare combination of site, age, and gender for occurrence.

  3. Glandular odontogenic cyst: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tambawaia, Shahnaz S.; Karjodkar, Freny R.; Yadav, Archana; Sansare, Kaustubh; Sontakke, Subodh [Nair Hospital Dental College, Mumbai (India)

    2014-03-15

    Glandular odontogenic cysts (GOCs) are rare intrabony solitary or multiloculated cysts of odontogenic origin. The importance of GOCs lies in the fact that they exhibit a propensity for recurrence similar to keratocystic odontogenic tumors and that they may be confused microscopically with central mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Thus, the oral and maxillofacial radiologists play an important role in definitive diagnosis of GOC based on distinctive cases; though they are rare. In large part, this is due to the GOC's complex and frequently non-specific histopathology. This report describes a case of GOC occurrence in the posterior mandibular ramus region in a 17-year-old female, which is a rare combination of site, age, and gender for occurrence.

  4. MR imaging of epithelial cysts of the oral and maxillofacial region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisatomi, Miki; Asaumi, Jun-ichi; Konouchi, Hironobu; Shigehara, Hiroshi; Yanagi, Yoshinobu; Kishi, Kanji

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to review the magnetic resonance (MR) appearance of primary epithelial cysts in order to distinguish the cysts from other possible lesions. MR images were obtained in 27 cases of epithelial cysts, including 7 odontogenic keratocysts, 3 dentigerous cysts, 1 glandular odontogenic cyst, 10 radicular cysts, 4 nasopalatine duct cysts, and 2 nasolabial cysts. In addition, contrast enhanced MR imagings were performed in 12 cases, including 3 odontogenic keratocysts, 1 dentigerous cyst, 1 glandular odontogenic cyst, and 7 radicular cysts. We obtained the following results on the basis of the above MR and contrast enhanced MR findings. (a) Odontogenic keratocysts had a predilection for intermediate-high signal intensity (SI) on T1-weighted images (WI) and heterogeneous low-high SI on T2WI. (b) Dentigerous cysts, glandular odontogenic cyst, radicular cysts and nasolabial cysts showed the same predilection with the SI, which were homogeneous intermediate SI on T1WI and homogeneous high SI on T2WI. (c) The MR images of the nasopalatine duct cysts, which showed homogeneous high SI on T1WI, were specific. (d) The Gd-T1WI would be useful in decisively differentiating odontogenic cysts, which showed rim-enhancement, from tumors consisting of solid components. In conclusion, we were able to obtain more information from the MR and contrast enhanced MR images than from conventional radiograph findings

  5. Immunohistochemical study of ki-67 and bcl-2 expression in some odontogenic cystic lesions with different clinical behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hossein Tabatabaei

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cystic lesions with odontogenic epithelial origin and similar clinicoradiographic appearance, show different clinical behaviors. Objective: To compare some factors related to cell proliferation and escape from apoptosis in epithelium covering two groups of odontogenic cystic lesions with different clinical behaviors. Methods: In this cross-sectional study 11 paraffin-embedded samples were selected of each lesions radicular cyst, dentigerous cyst, odontogenic keratocyst, and unicystic ameloblastoma. The sample underwent immunohistochemical staining for investigating the expression of ki-67 antigen and bcl-2 protein. Data analyzed with SPSS17 software and Kruskal–Wallis and chi-square statistical tests. Findings: Most of ki-67 positive cells were observed in parabasal layer of odontogenic keratocyst [35.50±26.29%; P=0.001]. The average of ki-67-LI was more in parabasal layer of aggressive group (26.80±37.79% compared to non-aggressive group (4.04±3.38%, was not being statistically significant. The highest average of bcl-2-LI was 95±6.70% in basal layer of odontogenic keratocyst (P=0.001. In all layers, the average of bcl-2-LI was more in aggressive lesions compared to non-aggressive ones and the highest amount was found in basal layer (72.45±3.94×10% which was statistically significant (P=0.001. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, more expression of the markers related to escape from apoptosis in aggressive lesions group compared to non-aggressive group, suggests that escape from apoptosis had a more critical role in aggressive behavior of odontogenic cystic lesions.

  6. Recurrent odontogenic keratocyst within the masticatory space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Su Yeon; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Choi, Hyun Bae; Choi, Soon Chul [School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    The odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a developmental odontogenic cyst typically occurring in the jaws. Since the first description of OKC was published in 1956, the lesion has been of particular interest because of its specific histopathologic features, high recurrence rate, and aggressive behavior. Recurrences most commonly arise within bone at the site of the original cyst. However, as lining cells may find their way into surrounding tissues either from implantation during surgery or from cortical perforation recurrences may arise at a distance from the original cyst. Here, we report a rare case of recurrent OKC which was first developed in mandible and recurred within the masticatory space.

  7. Recurrent odontogenic keratocyst within the masticatory space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Su Yeon; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Choi, Hyun Bae; Choi, Soon Chul

    2008-01-01

    The odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a developmental odontogenic cyst typically occurring in the jaws. Since the first description of OKC was published in 1956, the lesion has been of particular interest because of its specific histopathologic features, high recurrence rate, and aggressive behavior. Recurrences most commonly arise within bone at the site of the original cyst. However, as lining cells may find their way into surrounding tissues either from implantation during surgery or from cortical perforation recurrences may arise at a distance from the original cyst. Here, we report a rare case of recurrent OKC which was first developed in mandible and recurred within the masticatory space.

  8. Odontogenic keratocyst: What is in the name?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Meghanand T.; Singh, Anjali; Singhvi, Abhishek; Sharma, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    The classification of odontogenic cysts is complicated and can create confusion for both clinicians and pathologists. The odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is an enigmatic developmental cyst that deserves special attention. It has characteristic histopathological and clinical features; but, what makes this cyst special is its aggressive behavior and high recurrence rate. Despite of many classifications and nomenclature, unfortunately the clinicians still have to face difficulties in the management of this commonly found jaw lesion. This article is an effort to provide an overview of various aspects of OKC with emphasis on nomenclature, recurrence, molecular aspects, and management of OKC. PMID:24082717

  9. Prevalence of developmental odontogenic cysts in children and adolescents with emphasis on dentigerous cyst and odontogenic keratocyst (keratocystic odontogenic tumor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nannan; Gao, Xing; Xu, Ziyuan; Chen, Zhuo; Zhu, Laikuan; Wang, Jinrui; Liu, Wei

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the incidence and prevalence of developmental odontogenic cysts in children and adolescents and compare the features of the two most common types, dentigerous cyst and keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT). A retrospective review in a series of 369 patients with all histological diagnoses of developmental odontogenic cysts in children (≤12 years) and adolescents (13-18 years) was conducted. Among these, 361 (97.8%) patients were diagnosed as dentigerous cyst (n = 281) and KCOT (n = 80), with the male-to-female ratios of dentigerous cyst and KCOT both being 2:1. The average age of the patients with KCOT was older than that of those with dentigerous cyst (14.7 years vs 11.8 years, p < 0.001). Dentigerous cyst (59.1%) was more common in children, but KCOT (78.8%) was more common in adolescents (p < 0.001). Dentigerous cyst (57.6%) predominantly located on the maxilla, but KCOT (60.3%) predominantly located on the mandible (p = 0.010). Adolescent patients with lesions located on the mandible would favor KCOT over dentigerous cyst. This study aids in better knowledge of the prevalence of developmental odontogenic cysts in a large pediatric population, and shows that a well-supported early diagnosis is indispensable for a more adequate treatment.

  10. p53 and PCNA Expression in Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumors Compared with Selected Odontogenic Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedmajidi, Maryam; Nafarzadeh, Shima; Siadati, Sepideh; Shafaee, Shahryar; Bijani, Ali; Keshmiri, Nazanin

    2013-01-01

    p53 and PCNA expression in keratocystic odontogenic tumors compared with selected odontogenic cysts Summary: The aim of this study was to evaluate p53 and PCNA expression in different odontogenic lesions regarding their different clinical behaviors. Slices prepared from 94 paraffin-embedded tissue blocks (25 radicular cysts (RC), 23 dentigerous cysts (DC), 23 keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT) and 23 calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors (CCOT)) were stained with p53 and PCNA antibodies using immunohistochemistry procedure. The highest level of p53 expression was in the basal layer of RC, and the highest level of PCNA expression was in the suprabasal layer of KCOT. The differences of p53 expression in basal and suprabasal layers as well as PCNA expression in the suprabasal layer were significant but there was no significant difference in PCNA expression in the basal layer of these lesions. The expression of p53 in the basal layer of RC was higher than in other cysts. This may be due to intensive inflammatory infiltration. Also, the high level of PCNA expression in the suprabasal layer of KCOT may justify its neoplastic nature and tendency to recurrence. KCOT and calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors did not show similar expression of studied biomarkers. PMID:24551811

  11. Expression of podoplanin and TGF-beta in glandular odontogenic cyst and its comparison with developmental and inflammatory odontogenic cystic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaeddini, Mojgan; Eshghyar, Nosratollah; Etemad-Moghadam, Shahroo

    2017-01-01

    The number of studies investigating the immunohistochemical characteristics of glandular odontogenic cysts (GOCs) is limited, due to its rarity. TGF-beta has been suggested to induce podoplanin expression in some lesions. We aimed to evaluate and compare podoplanin and TGF-beta expression in GOC and other odontogenic cystic lesions. A total of 43 samples including five GOCs, 10 dentigerous cysts (DCs), eight unicystic ameloblastoma (UAs), and 20 radicular cysts (RCs) were selected and subjected to immunohistochemical staining using monoclonal antibodies against podoplanin and TGF-beta. Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U-test were used for statistical analysis along with Bonferroni for adjusting P-values (P < 0.05). Podoplanin immunoreactivity was observed in 80%, 70%, and 100% of DCs, RCs, and UAs, respectively, while none of the GOCs were positive for this marker (P = 0.004). Significant differences were only found in the GOC specimens. TGF-beta positivity occurred in the capsule and epithelium of all GOCs and DCs, while RCs and UAs demonstrated different expression percentages in the capsular and epithelial tissues. Epithelial TGF-beta showed significant differences among the studied lesions (P = 0.007) with the main difference found between DCs with RCs and DCs with UAs. Lack of podoplanin expression might be involved in the characteristic histologic and behavioral features of GOC, which seems to be unrelated to TGF-beta expression. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Prevalence of odontogenic cysts and tumors among UAE population

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    Natheer Hashim Al-Rawi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Odontogenic cysts and tumors are lesions that tend to arise from the tooth apparatus or its remnants. Odontogenic cysts and tumors constitute an important aspect of oral maxillofacial pathology as they can be diagnosed in general dental practice. Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of odontogenic cysts and tumors diagnosed in the UAE and to compare the results with findings in the literature. Materials and Methods: Data of odontogenic cysts diagnosed between 1990 and 2010 were collected from the files of the Oral Pathology Laboratory and Oral Surgery Department of Tawam Hospital, UAE. Results: Most of the prevalent odontogenic cysts are radicular cysts (69.1% - followed by dentigerous cysts (7.9%. Among the odontogenic tumors, the most prevalent is odontoma (12.2% followed by ameloblastoma (2.9%. The middle and posterior mandible was the most common anatomic site for the formation of cysts and tumors. In fact, 93.4% of patients over 40 years presented with odontogenic cysts, whereas 6.3% presented with odontogenic tumor. Odontoma as odontogenic tumor was seen mostly in the first and second decades of life. Conclusion: The prevalence of odontogenic cysts was similar to that reported in the literature, with inflammatory cysts occurring most frequently.

  13. Immunohistochemical evaluation of myofibroblast density in odontogenic cysts and tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Halimi, Monireh; Jabbari, Golchin

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to investigate myofibroblast (MF) density in a broad spectrum of odontogenic cysts and tumors and the relation between the density of MFs and the clinical behavior of these lesions. Methods. A total of 105 cases of odontogenic lesions, including unicystic ameloblastoma (UAM), solid ameloblastoma (SA), odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cyst (DC), radicular cyst (RC) (15 for each category), and odontogenic myxoma (OM), adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) (10 for each category), were immunohistochemically stained with anti-α-smooth muscle actin antibody. The mean percentage of positive cells in 10 high-power fields was considered as MF density for each case. Results. A statistically significant difference was observed in the mean scores between the study groups (P 0.05). The number of MFs was significantly higher in OKC and lower in COC compared to other odontogenic cysts (P = 0.007 and P = 0.045, respectively). Conclusion. The results of the present study suggest a role for MFs in the aggressive behavior of odontogenic lesions. MFs may represent an important target of therapy, especially for aggressive odontogenic lesions. Our findings support the classification of OKC in the category of odontogenic tumors.

  14. CD56 Expression in Odontogenic Cysts and Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafari-Ashkavandi, Zohreh; Dehghani-Nazhvani, Ali; Razmjouyi, Faranak

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Odontogenic cysts and tumors have a wide spectrum of clinical characteristics that lead to the different management strategies. Since definite diagnosis is difficult in some cases, it has been suggested that CD56 may be a candidate marker for definitive diagnosis of some odontogenic tumors. The present study was designed to examine CD56 expression in lesions with histopathological similarities. Materials and methods. In this cross-sectional, analytical study the subjects were 22 ameloblastomas, 13 dentigerous cysts, 10 keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT), 4 adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (AOT), 3 orthokeratinized odonto-genic cysts, 3 calcifying odontogenic cysts (COC) and one glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC). All the samples were examined for CD56 immunoreactivity. Data were analyzed using chi-square test. Results. Twenty cases (91%) of ameloblastomas, 3 (75%) AOT, 4 (40%) KCOT and one case of GOC were positive for CD56. None of the dentigerous cysts, COC and orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts was CD56-positive. There was a significant difference in the CD56 expression between ameloblastoma and dentigerous cyst, as well as COC. Also, KCOT showed significantly higher expression than orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst. Conclusion. In this study CD56 expression was limited to the odontogenic tumors and more aggressive cystic lesions. This marker can be a useful aid for distinguishing cysts and tumors from similar lesions.

  15. Odontogenic cervical necrotizing fasciitis, etiological aspects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is a rare but very severe infection that affects the soft‑tissues of the cephalic extremity. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis most frequently occurs secondarily to inflammatory odontogenic disorders and represents the most severe infection of maxillofacial spaces, with a high lethal potential.

  16. Radiographic study of the odontogenic keratocyst

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    Chun, Sang Deuk; An, Chang Hyeon; Choi, Karp Shik [Kyungpook National University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-03-15

    To acquire the useful diagnostic information through the analysis of the clinical and radiological characteristics of mandibular odontogenic keratocyst. The researchers compared and analysed the clinical and radiological features of 112 cases of mandibular odontogenic keratocyst confirmed by histopathologic examination. Mandibular odontogenic keratocysts occurred more frequently in males than in females and the incidence is the highest in the 2nd and 3rd decades. These cysts occurred in the mandibular posterior area, angle-ramus area and anterior area 51.8%, 31.2% and 17.0% respectively. These cysts had undulating border (69.6%) rather than smooth border (30.4%). Most of these cysts had well-defined hyperostotic border (94.6%). These cysts caused cortical thinning or expansion (78.6%) rather than no cortical reaction (21.4%). Loss of lamina dura was observed in 72.3%, displacement of tooth appeared in 35.7% and root resorption appeared in 12.5% of cases. In 71% of cases, displacement of mandibular canal was observed. Internal patterns of lesional radiolucency were even (61.6%) or uneven (38.4%). These results would be helpful in diagnosing of mandibular odontogenic keratocyst.

  17. Radiographic study of the odontogenic keratocyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Sang Deuk; An, Chang Hyeon; Choi, Karp Shik

    2005-01-01

    To acquire the useful diagnostic information through the analysis of the clinical and radiological characteristics of mandibular odontogenic keratocyst. The researchers compared and analysed the clinical and radiological features of 112 cases of mandibular odontogenic keratocyst confirmed by histopathologic examination. Mandibular odontogenic keratocysts occurred more frequently in males than in females and the incidence is the highest in the 2nd and 3rd decades. These cysts occurred in the mandibular posterior area, angle-ramus area and anterior area 51.8%, 31.2% and 17.0% respectively. These cysts had undulating border (69.6%) rather than smooth border (30.4%). Most of these cysts had well-defined hyperostotic border (94.6%). These cysts caused cortical thinning or expansion (78.6%) rather than no cortical reaction (21.4%). Loss of lamina dura was observed in 72.3%, displacement of tooth appeared in 35.7% and root resorption appeared in 12.5% of cases. In 71% of cases, displacement of mandibular canal was observed. Internal patterns of lesional radiolucency were even (61.6%) or uneven (38.4%). These results would be helpful in diagnosing of mandibular odontogenic keratocyst.

  18. Odontogenic facial swelling of unknown origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjitkar, S; Cheung, W; Yong, R; Deverell, J; Packianathan, M; Hall, C

    2015-12-01

    Current radiography techniques have limitations in detecting subtle odontogenic anomalies or defects that can lead to dentoalveolar and facial infections. This report examines the application of micro-CT imaging on two extracted teeth to enable detailed visualization of subtle odontogenic defects that had given rise to facial swelling. Two extracted non-carious mandibular left primary canine teeth (73) associated with odontogenic infections were selected from two patients, and an intact contralateral tooth (83) from one of the patients was used as a control. All three teeth were subjected to three-dimensional micro-CT imaging at a resolution of 20 μm. Tooth 73 from the first case displayed dentine pores (channels) that established communication between the pulp chamber and the exposed dentine surface. In comparison, tooth 73 from the second case had a major vertical crack extending from the external enamel surface into the pulp chamber. The control tooth did not display any anomalies or major cracks. The scope of micro-CT imaging can be extended from current in vitro applications to establish post-extraction diagnosis of subtle odontogenic defects, in a manner similar to deriving histopathological diagnoses in extracted teeth. Ongoing technological advancements hold the promise for more widespread translatory applications. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  19. Management of Odontogenic Fibromyxoma in Pediatric Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These may include dental papilla, dental follicle or periodontal. Management of Odontogenic Fibromyxoma in. Pediatric Nigerian Patients: A Review of 8 Cases. Omeje KU, Amole IO, Osunde OD1 ... OFM have been reported in other parts of the body including .... related to both the chronic blood loss from areas of ulceration.

  20. Overexpression of MDM2 protein in ameloblastomas as compared to adenomatoid odontogenic tumor

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    A Krishna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent studies on odontogenic tumors have identified various molecular alterations responsible for their development, and determination of epithelial proliferation is a useful means of investigating the differences in biologic behavior of these tumors. One such specific marker to identify proliferative activity and tumor aggressiveness by immunohistochemistry (IHC is MDM2, 90-95kDa protein. Objective: This immunohistochemical study using MDM2 expression was undertaken to understand better the diverse biological activity of two groups of odontogenic tumors namely ameloblastoma and adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT based on their cell proliferation activity. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 cases, comprising of 36 ameloblastoma samples and 14 AOT samples, were subjected to heat-induced antigen retrieval method using citrate buffer in a pressure cooker. Consequently, the sections were stained with MDM2 monoclonal antibody and visualized using an LSAB+ kit. Results: In ameloblastomas, statistically significant association was seen between plexiform ameloblastomas, follicular ameloblastomas with granular cell changes, desmoplastic and unicystic variants. The predominant nuclear staining by MDM2 revealed overexpression in ameloblastomas as compared to AOT. Conclusion: The MDM2 overexpression noticed in plexiform ameloblastoma, follicular ameloblastoma with granular cell changes and acanthomatous ameloblastoma when compared to simple unicystic and desmoplastic ameloblastoma suggest a relatively enhanced proliferative phenotype of these solid multicystic variants of ameloblastomas. On overall comparison, higher expression was noted in ameloblastomas when compared to AOT. This indicates differences in the aggressive nature between these two groups of odontogenic tumors favoring the perception of a greater aggressive nature of ameloblastomas.

  1. OCT4 and SOX2 are reliable markers in detecting stem cells in odontogenic lesions

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    Abhishek Banerjee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context (Background: Stem cells are a unique subpopulation of cells in the human body with a capacity to initiate differentiation into various cell lines. Tumor stem cells (TSCs are a unique subpopulation of cells that possess the ability to initiate a neoplasm and sustain self-renewal. Epithelial stem cell (ESC markers such as octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4 and sex-determining region Y (SRY-box 2 (SOX2 are capable of identifying these stem cells expressed during the early stages of tooth development. Aims: To detect the expression of the stem cell markers OCT4 and SOX2 in the normal odontogenic tissues and the odontogenic cysts and tumors. Materials and Methods: Paraffin sections of follicular tissue, radicular cyst, dentigerous cyst, odontogenic keratocyst, ameloblastoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, and ameloblastic carcinoma were obtained from the archives. The sections were subjected to immunohistochemical assay by the use of mouse monoclonal antibodies to OCT4 and SOX2. Statistical Analysis: The results were evaluated by descriptive analysis. Results: The results show the presence of stem cells in the normal and lesional tissues with these stem cell identifying markers. SOX2 was found to be more consistent and reliable in the detection of stem cells. Conclusion: The stem cell expressions are maintained in the tumor transformation of tissue and probably suggest that there is no phenotypic change of stem cells in progression from normal embryonic state to its tumor component. The quantification and localization reveals interesting trends that indicate the probable role of the cells in the pathogenesis of the lesions.

  2. The species translation challenge-a systems biology perspective on human and rat bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poussin, Carine; Mathis, Carole; Alexopoulos, Leonidas G; Messinis, Dimitris E; Dulize, Rémi H J; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Melas, Ioannis N; Sakellaropoulos, Theodore; Rhrissorrakrai, Kahn; Bilal, Erhan; Meyer, Pablo; Talikka, Marja; Boué, Stéphanie; Norel, Raquel; Rice, John J; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2014-01-01

    The biological responses to external cues such as drugs, chemicals, viruses and hormones, is an essential question in biomedicine and in the field of toxicology, and cannot be easily studied in humans. Thus, biomedical research has continuously relied on animal models for studying the impact of these compounds and attempted to 'translate' the results to humans. In this context, the SBV IMPROVER (Systems Biology Verification for Industrial Methodology for PROcess VErification in Research) collaborative initiative, which uses crowd-sourcing techniques to address fundamental questions in systems biology, invited scientists to deploy their own computational methodologies to make predictions on species translatability. A multi-layer systems biology dataset was generated that was comprised of phosphoproteomics, transcriptomics and cytokine data derived from normal human (NHBE) and rat (NRBE) bronchial epithelial cells exposed in parallel to more than 50 different stimuli under identical conditions. The present manuscript describes in detail the experimental settings, generation, processing and quality control analysis of the multi-layer omics dataset accessible in public repositories for further intra- and inter-species translation studies.

  3. A Rare Presentation of Odontogenic Keratocyst Mimicking an Antral Polyp

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    S Sudhakar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Maxillary sinus harbours many pathological lesions. Many of those presents as a sinonasal mass and are rarely symptomatic. These masses are usually an antral polyp, mucoceles or mucous retention cysts. Odontogenic keratocyst, a benign odontogenic lesion presenting within the maxillary sinus is a rare entity. We present a case of odontogenic keratocyst of the maxillary sinus in a 35 years old female.

  4. Construction of a cDNA library from human retinal pigment epithelial cells challenged with rod outer segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaney, D M; Rakoczy, P E; Constable, I J

    1995-05-01

    To study genes expressed by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells during phagocytosis and digestion of rod outer segments (ROS), a complementary (c)DNA library was produced using an in-vitro model. The cDNA library can be used to study molecular changes which contribute to the development of diseases due to a failure in outer segment phagocytosis and digestion by RPE cells. Here we demonstrate a way to study genes and their functions using a molecular biological approach and describing the first step involved in this process, the construction of a cDNA library. Human RPE cells obtained from the eyes of a seven-year-old donor were cultured and challenged with bovine ROS. The culture was harvested and total RNA was extracted. Complementary DNA was transcribed from the messenger (m)RNA and was directionally cloned into the LambdaGEM-4 bacteriophage vector successfully. Some clones were picked and the DNA extracted, to determine the size of the inserts as a measure of the quality of the library. Molecular biology and cell culture are important tools to be used in eye research, especially in areas where tissue is limiting and animal models are not available. We now have a ROS challenged RPE cDNA library which will be used to identify genes responsible for degrading phagocytosed debris within the retinal pigment epithelium.

  5. A 10-year retrospective study on odontogenic tumors in Iran

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    Nasim Taghavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to review cases of odontogenic tumors diagnosed in two pathology centers in Tehran, Iran, during a 10-year period. Study Design: Patients′ records were seen at two teaching pathology Centre′s of Shahid Beheshti University between the months of March 2000 to 2010 with histologic diagnosis of any type of odontogenic tumors. The records were analyzed for frequency, age, sex, site, as well as clinical, radiographic and histopathologic findings. Results: Of 30706 biopsies, 4767 (15.5% cases were diagnosed as oral and maxillofacial lesions. Among these, 720 cases were tumoral with 188 (26.1% cases of odontogenic tumors. Tumors with odontogenic epithelium origin formed 70.2% of total numbers of odontogenic tumors. Mixed odontogenic tumors and tumors of odontogenic ectomesenchyme comprised 12.2% and 17.5% of the cases respectively. Ameloblastoma, with a frequency of 62.2% was the most common tumor in this review which was followed by odontoma and odontogenic myxoma. Conclusion: Although there are few studies on odontogenic tumors in literature, the comparison of our results with existing data shows significant differences in the distribution of tumors and age of patients, which may be due to ethnic features and geographic distribution of patients. Future studies on other ethnic groups are essential for further clarification of the findings in this research.

  6. Odontogenic versus nonodontogenic deep neck space infections: CT manifestations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyung Jin; Park, Eui Dong; Kim, Jung Hee; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Hwang, Eui Gee; Chung, Sung Hoon

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate computed tomographic (CT) findings of deep neck space infection (DNSI) with particular attention to the differences in the spaces involved and in complications between odontogenic and nonodontogenic groups. Forty-four patients (21 odontogenic and 23 nonodontogenic) were included in this study. Among odontogenic DNSIs, 15 had the dental infection in the second or third mandibular molar. We compared the CT features between odontogenic and nonodontogenic DNSIs with special emphasis on the differences in the spaces involved and in the rate and type of complications. In all patients, CT clearly differentiated abscess from cellulitis. The most common spaces involved in 21 patients with odontogenic DNSI were the parapharyngeal (n = 18), the submandibular (n = 18), the anterior visceral (n = 13), the masticator (n = 9), and the sublingual (n 7) spaces. In contrast, in 23 patients with nonodontogenic DNSI, the anterior visceral space (n = 14) was most frequently involved. The parapharyngeal, the submandibular, and the masticator spaces were statistically more frequently involved in odontogenic than in nonodontogenic DNSI (ρ < .05). Twenty-two patients had one or more complications shown by CT, of which airway compromise was more frequent and severe in odontogenic than in nonodontogenic DNSI. We conclude that the parapharyngeal, the submandibular, and the masticator spaces are more significantly vulnerable in odontogenic DNSI than in nonodontogenic DNSI. The predilection for certain spaces of the neck in odontogenic DNSI seems to originate from the intimate relationship of the mandibular molars to the adjacent deep neck spaces

  7. Clinical and radiologic study of odontogenic keratocyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Rae; Park, Tae Won

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to define further clinical behaviors and radiographic appearances of odontogenic keratocyst developed in jaws, with special interest in recurrent rate which is generally high. 32 patients whose microscopic examinations were verified as odontogenic keratocyst were examined in this study. The results of this study were as follows. 1. There was an apparent sex predilection for male. 2. The peak incidence was the second and third decades with gradual decline thereafter with a mean age of 31 years 7 months. 3. The most common site was a mandibular molar-ramus region, 22 cases (68.8%) occurred in the mandible and 10 cases (31.3%) in the maxilla.

  8. Multiple orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yi-Shing Lisa; Liang, Hui; Wright, John; Teenier, Tom

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the clinical, radiographic, pathological and molecular findings of the first case of multiple orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts (OOCs). Multiple odontogenic keratocysts are one of the major features of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), and loss of heterozygosity in the PTCH gene, the culprit gene for NBCCS, has recently been found in sporadic OOC cases. Therefore, in this presenting case, we also investigated the possibility that this patient might also have NBCCS, by comparing the available clinical information and the molecular findings of this case to the diagnostic criteria for NBCCS (as proposed by the First International Colloquium on NBCCS in 2011). However, this patient with multiple OOCs showed no evidence of having NBCCS. This conclusion supports the findings from previous case series based on sporadic cases that OOC does not appear to be associated with NBCCS.

  9. Clinical and radiologic study of odontogenic keratocyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Rae; Park, Tae Won [Department of Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-11-15

    The purpose of this article is to define further clinical behaviors and radiographic appearances of odontogenic keratocyst developed in jaws, with special interest in recurrent rate which is generally high. 32 patients whose microscopic examinations were verified as odontogenic keratocyst were examined in this study. The results of this study were as follows. 1. There was an apparent sex predilection for male. 2. The peak incidence was the second and third decades with gradual decline thereafter with a mean age of 31 years 7 months. 3. The most common site was a mandibular molar-ramus region, 22 cases (68.8%) occurred in the mandible and 10 cases (31.3%) in the maxilla.

  10. Calretinin expression in the differential diagnosis of ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalsoom, F.; Atique, M.; Ahmed, S.

    2015-01-01

    To determine calretinin expression by immunohistochemistry in ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT) and to document the use of calretinin as a differentiating marker between the two lesions. Study Design: A cross sectional study conducted on previously diagnosed cases of ameloblastoma and Keratocystic odontogenic tumour. Place and Duration of Study: Armed forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi Pakistan and duration was one year. (Sep 2009- Aug 2010). Materials and Methods: Twenty cases each of Ameloblastoma and KCOT were retrieved from the record files along with their paraffin embedded blocks. Histological features of all the cases were reviewed on freshly prepared slides and a fresh diagnosis made regardless of the previous diagnosis. The immunohistochemical marker, Calretinin, was applied on both types of cases using the avidin-biotinylated peroxidase complex method. The results were interpreted. Results: In the cases of Ameloblastoma the epithelial tumour nests showed positivity for Calretinin expression. In 85% cases; intense and diffuse staining was observed in more than 80% of the stellate reticulum like cells while 15% cases showed focal and moderate staining patterns. On the other hand KCOT showed contrary results as none of epithelial lining expressed positive staining for Calretinin, (p<0.001). Conclusion: Calretinin can be used as a useful marker for Ameloblastoma and can be used to differentiate KCOT from Ameloblastoma. (author)

  11. Desmosomes: A light microscopic and ultrastructural analysis of desmosomes in odontogenic cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Pratima; Wadhwan, Vijay; Chaudhary, Minal S

    2014-01-01

    Desmosomes together with adherens junctions represent the major adhesive cell-cell junctions of epithelial cells. Any damage to these junctions leads to loss of structural balance. The present study was designed to analyze the desmosomal junctions in different odontogenic cysts and compare them with their corresponding hematoxylin and eosin (H and E)   stained sections. Ten cases each of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cysts (DCs), radicular cysts (RCs) and normal mucosa were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of the sections was then carried out of all the sections. The area of interest on H and E stained section was marked and this marking was later superimposed onto the corresponding unstained sections and were subjected to SEM analysis. OKC at ×1000 magnification showed many prominent desmosomes. However, an increase in the intercellular space was also noted. SEM analysis demonstrated similar findings with the presence of many desmosomes, though they were seen to be damaged and fragile. H and E stained DC under oil immersion did not show any prominent desmosomes. SEM analysis of the same confirmed the observation and very minimal number were seen with a very condense arrangement of the epithelial cells. RC at ×1000 magnification revealed plenty of desmosomes, which were again confirmed by SEM. The number and quality of desmosomal junctions in all the cysts has a role in the clinical behavior of the cyst.

  12. Analysis of GLUT-1, GLUT-3, and angiogenic index in syndromic and non-syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaella Bastos LEITE

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunoexpression of glucose transporters 1 (GLUT-1 and 3 (GLUT-3 in keratocystic odontogenic tumors associated with Gorlin syndrome (SKOTs and non-syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumors (NSKOTs, and to establish correlations with the angiogenic index. Seventeen primary NSKOTs, seven recurrent NSKOTs, and 17 SKOTs were selected for the study. The percentage of immunopositive cells for GLUT-1 and GLUT-3 in the epithelial component of the tumors was assessed. The angiogenic index was determined by microvessel count. The results were analyzed statistically using the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test and Spearman’s correlation test. High epithelial immunoexpression of GLUT-1 was observed in most tumors (p = 0.360. There was a higher frequency of negative cases for GLUT-3 in all groups. The few GLUT-3-positive tumors exhibited low expression of this protein in epithelial cells. No significant difference in the angiogenic index was observed between groups (p = 0.778. GLUT-1 expression did not correlate significantly with the angiogenic index (p > 0.05. The results suggest that the more aggressive biological behavior of SKOTs when compared to NSKOTs may not be related to GLUT-1 or GLUT-3 expression. GLUT-1 may play an important role in glucose uptake by epithelial cells of KOTs and this process is unlikely related to the angiogenic index. GLUT-1 could be a potential target for future development of therapeutic strategies for KOTs.

  13. Ameloblastomatous calcifying odontogenic cyst: A rare histologic variant

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    Basavaraj N Kallalli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastoma is a well-known odontogenic tumor that can be associated with calcifying odontogenic cysts (COCs, but only a few reports give its clinical and radiographic features. Calcifying odontogenic cyst was first categorized as a distinct entity by Gorlin et al., and has been named after him since then. Calcifying odontogenic cyst is an uncommon developmental odontogenic lesion that demonstrates histopathologic diversity. It is well known that this lesion can occur in association with odontogenic tumors such as complex odontoma and ameloblastoma. The term COC was not included by the World Health Organization (WHO in its report of 2005 and is called calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT. Histopathologic examination of ameloblastomatous CCOT reveals ameloblastic islands containing ghost cells. Although association of ameloblastoma with this lesion is important, only a few cases have been reported in literature. The present case report is of ameloblastomatous calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor, a rare histologic variant, in a 20-year-old male patient in the left mandibular posterior region.

  14. Coexistence of Ameloblastoma and Odontogenic Keratocyst - A Case Report

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    Sunila Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available There are conflicting opinions about the origin of ameloblastoma, probably one of the most controversial neoplasms, from an odontogenic cyst (mural ameloblastoma. A unique case of ameloblastomatous transformation of an Odontogenic Keratocyst, an extremely rare phenomenon is reported.

  15. Recognition of Odontogenic Cyst-Fluid Cholesterol Concentration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hypercholesterolaemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Serum cholesterol is usually determined to know if a subject is at a risk of heart diseases. This lipid is found in most fluids in the body including the odontogenic cyst-fluid. We investigated the concentration of cholesterol in the odontogenic ...

  16. Immunohistochemical analysis of P53 protein in odontogenic cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaballah, Essam Taher M.A.; Tawfik, Mohamed A.

    2010-01-01

    The p53 is a well-known tumor suppressor gene, the mutations of which are closely related to the decreased differentiation of cells. Findings of studies on immunohistochemical P53 expression in odontogenic cysts are controversial. The present study was carried-out to investigate the immunohistochemical expression of P53 protein in odontogenic cysts. Thirty paraffin blocks of diagnosed odontogenic cysts were processed to determine the immunohistochemical expression of P53 protein. Nine of the 11 odontogenic keratocysts (81.8%) expressed P53, one of three dentigerous cyst cases expressed P53, while none of the 16 radicular cysts expressed P53 protein. The findings of the present work supported the reclassification of OKC as keratocystic odontogenic tumor. PMID:23960493

  17. Multiple non-syndromic odontogenic keratocysts in three siblings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirwan, Amit; Wanjari, Sangeeta Panjab; Saikhedkar, Rashmi; Karun, Vinayak

    2013-01-01

    Occurrence of multiple cysts (MC) involving the jaw is rare. When multiple, it is usually associated with a syndrome. Occurrence of MC without syndromic association is extremely rare. Multiple odontogenic cysts mostly could be odontogenic keratocysts or dentigerous cysts. Odontogenic keratocyst shows involvement of mandible over maxilla, with peak incidence in second and third decade and it is exceedingly rare before 10 years of age. However multiple odontogenic keratocysts found in children are often reflective of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Here is a case report which documents multiple jaw cysts involving both the jaws, in three siblings of ages 10, 13 and 17 years with negative parental history. All three reported cases were free of any systemic involvement. As odontogenic keratocyst spreads through bone marrow, destruction is more before any clinical manifestation. Therefore, early detection and intervention are essential in preventing extensive destruction. PMID:23505078

  18. Molecular and genetic aspects of odontogenic tumors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Kavita; Chandra, Shaleen; Raj, Vineet; Fareed, Wamiq; Zafar, Muhammad

    2015-06-01

    Odontogenic tumors contain a heterogeneous collection of lesions that are categorized from hamartomas to benign and malignant neoplasms of inconstant aggressiveness. Odontogenic tumors are usually extraordinary with assessed frequency of short of 0.5 cases/100,000 population for every year. The lesions such as odontogenic tumors are inferred from the components of the tooth-structuring contraption. They are discovered solely inside the maxillary and mandibular bones. This audit speaks to experiences and cooperation of the molecular and genetic variations connected to the development and movement of odontogenic tumors which incorporate oncogenes, tumor-silencer genes, APC gene, retinoblastoma genes, DNA repair genes, onco-viruses, development components, telomerase, cell cycle controllers, apoptosis-related elements, and regulators/conttrollers of tooth development. The reasonable and better understanding of the molecular components may prompt new ideas for their detection and administrating a better prognosis of odontogenic tumors.

  19. Molecular and genetic aspects of odontogenic tumors: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Garg

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic tumors contain a heterogeneous collection of lesions that are categorized from hamartomas to benign and malignant neoplasms of inconstant aggressiveness. Odontogenic tumors are usually extraordinary with assessed frequency of short of 0.5 cases/100,000 population for every year. The lesions such as odontogenic tumors are inferred from the components of the tooth-structuring contraption. They are discovered solely inside the maxillary and mandibular bones. This audit speaks to experiences and cooperation of the molecular and genetic variations connected to the development and movement of odontogenic tumors which incorporate oncogenes, tumor-silencer genes, APC gene, retinoblastoma genes, DNA repair genes, onco-viruses, development components, telomerase, cell cycle controllers, apoptosis-related elements, and regulators/controllers of tooth development. The reasonable and better understanding of the molecular components may prompt new ideas for their detection and administrating a better prognosis of odontogenic tumors.

  20. Prevalence profile of odontogenic cysts and tumors on Brazilian sample after the reclassification of odontogenic keratocyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Filipe; de Noronha, Mariana Saturnino; Silva, Maiza Luiza Vieira; Amaral, Márcio Bruno Figueiredo; Grossmann, Soraya de Mattos Carmago; Horta, Martinho Campolina Rebello; de Souza, Paulo Eduardo Alencar; de Aguiar, Maria Cássia Ferreira; Mesquita, Ricardo Alves

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the reclassification of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) as a tumor on the prevalence profile of odontogenic cysts (OCs) and odontogenic tumors (OTs). Two referral Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology services in Brazil were evaluated. All cases diagnosed as OCs or OTs were selected and classified according to the 1992 WHO-classification (cases before 2005 WHO classification of tumors excluding OKC) and the 2005 WHO classification of tumors, going forward including cases of odontogenic keratocyst tumor (KCOT). The frequency and prevalence of OCs and OTs were compared before and after the reclassification. Among 27,854 oral biopsies, 4920 (17.66%) were OCs and 992 (3.56%) were OTs. The prevalence of OTs before 2005 WHO classification of tumors was 2.04%, while the prevalence after 2005 WHO classification was 11.51% (p < 0.0001). Before 2006, the most frequent tumor diagnosed was odontoma with 194 cases (39.67%), and after 2005 WHO classification of tumors the KCOT was the most frequent with 207 cases (41.07%). The increase in the prevalence of OTs after 2005 WHO is related to the improvement of pathology services and to the inclusion of KCOT in the OTs group. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Central Odontogenic Fibroma of the Mandible

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    Saeedeh Khajeh Ahmadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 16-years-old female patient with painless swelling of the right side of mandible is described. She noticed the swelling from two years ago, without painful symptoms. Axial CT imaging showed buccal expansion with intact buccal and lingual cortical bone. The report of incisional biopsy was central odontogenic fibroma. Under general anesthesia the lesion was removed after ostectomy of buccal cortical plate and inferior alveolar nerve preserved. Three-year follow-up after tumor excision relieved no recurrence.

  2. Expression of cytokeratins in odontogenic jaw cysts: monoclonal antibodies reveal distinct variation between different cyst types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormia, M; Ylipaavalniemi, P; Nagle, R B; Virtanen, I

    1987-08-01

    Immunostaining with monoclonal antibodies was used to study and compare the cytokeratin content of odontogenic cysts and normal gingival epithelium. Two monoclonal antibodies, PKK2 and KA1, stained the whole epithelium in all cyst samples. In gingiva, PKK2 gave a suprabasal staining and KA1 reacted with all epithelial cell layers. Antibodies PKK1, KM 4.62 and KS 8.12 gave a heterogeneous staining in follicular and radicular cysts. In keratocysts and in gingiva PKK1 and KM 4.62 reacted mainly with basal cells and KS 8.12 gave a suprabasal staining. Antibodies reacting with the simple epithelial cytokeratin polypeptide No. 18 (PKK3, KS 18.18) recognized in gingiva only solitary cells compatible with Merkel cells. In a case of follicular ameloblastoma a distinct staining of tumor epithelium was revealed with these antibodies. In 2 follicular cysts, but not in other cyst types, a layer of cytokeratin 18-positive cells was revealed. KA5 and KK 8.60 antibodies, reacting exclusively with keratinizing epithelia, including normal gingiva, gave no reaction in radicular cysts, keratocysts and ameloblastoma. Two of the follicular cysts, were negative for PKK3 and KS 18.18, but reacted strongly with KA5 and KK 8.60. The present results show that odontogenic jaw cysts have distinct differences in their cytokeratin content. With the exception of some follicular cysts, they lack signs of keratinizing epithelial differentiation. Only follicular cysts appear to share with some types of ameloblastoma the expression of cytokeratin polypeptide No. 18.

  3. Differential diagnosis between ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst using computed tomography

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    Kawazu, Toshiyuki; Yoshiura, Kazunori; Yuasa, Kenji; Kanda, Shigenobu; Ohzeki, Satoru; Shinohara, Masanori [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Dentistry; Araki, Kazuyuki; Higuchi, Yoshinori

    1997-09-01

    Radiographic features of ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst are similar although their biological behaviors are different. Therefore, it is very important to differentiate these lesions before treatment. The aim of this study was to differentiate between the two lesions based on characteristic CT findings. Fifty-three patients diagnosed histopathologically as having ameloblastoma (29 cases) or odontogenic keratocyst (24 cases) and who underwent CT were evaluated radiologically, and some characteristic radiological features to differentiate both lesions were assessed. Ameloblastomas tended to be more than 40 mm in long diameter and 0.5 short/long diameter ratio, whereas odontogenic keratocysts were less than 40 mm and 0.5, respectively (P<0.05: Chi-square test). Buccal expansion of the cortex was seen more often in ameloblastomas than in odontogenic keratocysts (P<0.05: Chi-square test). Together with these features and internal high density structure, which was only seen in odontogenic keratocysts, differential diagnostic criteria between ameloblastomas and odontogenic keratocysts were proposed. Diagnostic accuracy based on these criteria was 84.9%. These results that our criteria to differentiate ameloblastomas from odontogenic keratocysts using CT are clinically useful prior to treatment. (author)

  4. Differential diagnosis between odontogenic keratocyst and ameloblastoma by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eun, Sang A; Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Chang Seo

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study is to find the differentiating characteristics of ameloblastomas and odontogenic keratocysts of the jaw by analyzing computed tomography (CT) images of the lesions, clarify radiological characteristics associated with jaw lesions, and to make a diagnosis based on these findings. Test subjects were chosen among the patients who were diagnosed as having an odontogenic keratocyst or ameloblastoma at the Yonsei University Dental Hospital from January 1996 to December 2000 and had CT scans taken preoperatively. The subject pool was comprised of 51 cases of odontogenic keratocyst and 37 cases of ameloblastoma. The following measures were used for image analysis of the lesion : the anatomic location, CT pattern, mesiodistal width, buccolingual width, the ratios between mesiodistal width and buccolingual width, height, CT number, homogeneity of radiodensity, the appearance of a sclerotic rim, continuity of adjacent cortical bone, and displacement and resorption of adjacent teeth. Comparing the CT patten, mesiodistal width, buccolingual width, height, CT number, homogeneity, appearance of sclerotic rim, continuity of adjacent cortical bone, there were statistically significant differences between ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst test subjects (p 0.05). We compared odontogenic keratocysts and ameloblastomas in CT scans. They occurred most frequently in the posterior to the ramus of the mandible. The findings of patterns of the CT images showed that size and border of lesions were more aggressive in ameloblastomas than in odontogenic keratocysts. The internal contents represented an increased attenuation area (IAA) in odontopenic keratocyst. Odontogenic keratocysts were shown to have higher CT numbers than ameloblastomas.

  5. CT-MPR invaluable in diagnosing odontogenic maxillary sinusitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Hideaki; Shimazu, Kaoru; Kamada, Morito; Shiroyama, Akihiro; Mouri, Daisuke; Yamashita, Masashi; Kawasaki, Yasunori; Koseki, Takakazu; Mouri, Manabu

    2001-01-01

    In everyday examination, it is usual to encounter odontogenic maxillary sinusitis patients. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis is generally best diagnosed by dental X-ray imaging. Many medical facilities not having a dental X-ray unit use coronal computed tomography (CT) images to diagnose odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Coronal CT imaging causes artifacts, however due to dental prosthesises. Computed tomography-Multiplanar reformation (CT-MPR) imaging has proved useful in evaluating the paranasal sinus because it is not influenced by dental prosthesises. We evaluated the usefulness of CT-MPR for diagnosing odontogenic maxillary sinusitis by retrospectively analyzing 16 patients, with the following results. We couldn't diagnose all cases of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis in posteroanterior and Waters projection images. Panoramic radiography is needed to diagnose odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Dental X-ray imaging missed some cases, but all cases were diagnosed by CT-MPR imaging, giving a 100% diagnosestic rate. CT-MPR imaging is thus at least as valuable or better than dental X-ray imaging in diagnosing odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. (author)

  6. Differential diagnosis between ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst using computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawazu, Toshiyuki; Yoshiura, Kazunori; Yuasa, Kenji; Kanda, Shigenobu; Ohzeki, Satoru; Shinohara, Masanori; Araki, Kazuyuki; Higuchi, Yoshinori

    1997-01-01

    Radiographic features of ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst are similar although their biological behaviors are different. Therefore, it is very important to differentiate these lesions before treatment. The aim of this study was to differentiate between the two lesions based on characteristic CT findings. Fifty-three patients diagnosed histopathologically as having ameloblastoma (29 cases) or odontogenic keratocyst (24 cases) and who underwent CT were evaluated radiologically, and some characteristic radiological features to differentiate both lesions were assessed. Ameloblastomas tended to be more than 40 mm in long diameter and 0.5 short/long diameter ratio, whereas odontogenic keratocysts were less than 40 mm and 0.5, respectively (P<0.05: Chi-square test). Buccal expansion of the cortex was seen more often in ameloblastomas than in odontogenic keratocysts (P<0.05: Chi-square test). Together with these features and internal high density structure, which was only seen in odontogenic keratocysts, differential diagnostic criteria between ameloblastomas and odontogenic keratocysts were proposed. Diagnostic accuracy based on these criteria was 84.9%. These results that our criteria to differentiate ameloblastomas from odontogenic keratocysts using CT are clinically useful prior to treatment. (author)

  7. Oncogenic signalling pathways in benign odontogenic cysts and tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Marina Gonçalves; Gomes, Carolina Cavalieri; de Sousa, Sílvia Ferreira; Xavier, Guilherme Machado; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago

    2017-09-01

    The first step towards the prevention of cancer is to develop an in-depth understanding of tumourigenesis and the molecular basis of malignant transformation. What drives tumour initiation? Why do most benign tumours fail to metastasize? Oncogenic mutations, previously considered to be the hallmark drivers of cancers, are reported in benign cysts and tumours, including those that have an odontogenic origin. Despite the presence of such alterations, the vast majority of odontogenic lesions are benign and never progress to the stage of malignant transformation. As these lesions are likely to develop due to developmental defects, it is possible that they harbour quiet genomes. Now the question arises - do they result from DNA replication errors? Specific candidate genes have been sequenced in odontogenic lesions, revealing recurrent BRAF mutation in the case of ameloblastoma, KRAS mutation in adenomatoid odontogenic tumours, PTCH1 mutation in odontogenic keratocysts, and CTNNB1 (Beta-catenin) mutation in calcifying odontogenic cysts. Studies on these benign and rare entities might reveal important information about the tumorigenic process and the mechanisms that hinder/halt neoplastic progression. This is because the role of relatively common oncogenic mutations seems to be context dependent. In this review, each mutation signature of the odontogenic lesion and the affected signalling pathways are discussed in the context of tooth development and tumorigenesis. Furthermore, behavioural differences between different types of odontogenic lesions are explored and discussed based on the molecular alteration described. This review also includes the employment of molecular results for guiding therapeutic approaches towards odontogenic lesions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst with Complex Odontoma: Histological and Immunohistochemical Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nooshin Mohtasham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC is a rare odontogenic cyst. Only 2% of all odontogenic cysts and tumors are COC. COC associated with odontoma (COCaO reported in 24% of COCs. COCaO presents a greater incidence in female, with a ratio of 2 to 1. The highest incidence of COCaO occurs during the second decade with a mean age of 16 years, most frequently occurring in the maxilla (61.5%. Here, we describe a classic case of COCaO of the maxillary incisor-canine region in 17-year-old girl, and discuss the clinicopathological features and immunohistochemical finding of this tumor.

  9. Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst with Complex Odontoma: Histological and Immunohistochemical Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Merati

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC is a rare odontogenic cyst. Only 2% of all odontogenic cysts and tumors are COC. COC associated with odontoma (COCaO reported in 24% of COCs. COCaO presents a greater incidence in female, with a ratio of 2 to 1. The highest incidence of COCaO occurs during the second decade with a mean age of 16 years, most frequently occurring in the maxilla (61.5%. Here, we describe a classic case of COCaO of the maxillary incisor-canine region in 17-year-old girl, and discuss the clinicopathological features and immunohistochemical finding of this tumor.

  10. Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor: Case Reports and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukta B Motwani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The lesion traditionally known as odontogenic keratocyst has been renamed by WHO in 2005, as "keratocystic" odontogenic tumor as it is more appropriate and reflects its potential for local, destructive behavior. It is a benign intraosseous neoplasm of jaw, which is unusual due to its characteristic histopathological and clinical features, including potentially aggressive behavior, high recurrence rate and association with the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. The purpose of this review is to highlight the importance of proper diagnosis of keratocystic odontogenic tumor in order to prevent the recurrence due to improper surgical excision of the lesion.

  11. Odontogenic Cyst with Verrucous Proliferation Exhibiting Melanin Pigmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Manaktala

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Verrucous proliferation arising from odontogenic cysts is a rare entity. We report an unusual case of an infected odontogenic cyst with verrucous proliferation and melanin pigmentation in a 13-year-old male patient who presented with an intraoral swelling in relation to impacted teeth 26 and 27. The enucleated lesion was diagnosed as an odontogenic keratocyst and the patient died within two years of presentation due to multiple recurrences. The clinical, radiological, and microscopic features of the lesion are presented with an attempt to discuss the etiopathogenesis. The case hereby reported is uncommon with only eight cases reported in the literature.

  12. Anti-gp120 minibody gene transfer to female genital epithelial cells protects against HIV-1 virus challenge in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ussama M Abdel-Motal

    Full Text Available Although cervico-vaginal epithelial cells of the female lower genital tract provide the initial defense system against HIV-1 infection, the protection is sometimes incomplete. Thus, enhancing anti-HIV-1 humoral immunity at the mucosal cell surface by local expression of anti-HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (BnAb that block HIV-1 entry would provide an important new intervention that could slow the spread of HIV/AIDS.This study tested the hypothesis that adeno-associated virus (AAV-BnAb gene transfer to cervico-vaginal epithelial cells will lead to protection against HIV-1. Accordingly, a recombinant AAV vector that encodes human b12 anti-HIV gp120 BnAb as a single-chain variable fragment Fc fusion (scFvFc, or "minibody" was constructed. The secreted b12 minibody was shown to be biologically functional in binding to virus envelope protein, neutralizing HIV-1 and importantly, blocking transfer and infectivity of HIV-1(bal in an organotypic human vaginal epithelial cell (VEC model. Furthermore, cervico-vaginal epithelial stem cells were found to be efficiently transduced by the optimal AAV serotype mediated expression of GFP.This study provides the foundation for a novel microbicide strategy to protect against sexual transmission of HIV-1 by AAV transfer of broadly neutralizing antibody genes to cervico-vaginal epithelial stem cells that could replenish b12 BnAb secreting cells through multiple menstrual cycles.

  13. Genetic basis of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akane Yukimori

    Full Text Available Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors (CCOTs are benign cystic tumors that form abnormally keratinized ghost cells. Mutations in CTNNB1, which encodes beta-catenin, have been implicated in the development of these tumors, but a causal relationship has not been definitively established. Thus, mutational hot spots in 50 cancer genes were examined by targeted next-generation sequencing in 11 samples of CCOT. Mutations in CTNNB1, but not in other genes, were observed in 10 of 11 cases. These mutations constitutively activate beta-catenin signaling by abolishing the phosphorylation sites Asp32, Ser33, or Ser37, and are similar to those reported in pilomatrixoma and adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma. In contrast, BRAF or NRAS mutations were observed in 12 and two control samples of ameloblastoma, respectively. In HEK293 cells, overexpression of mutated CTNNB1 also upregulated hair keratin, a marker of ghost cells. Furthermore, ghost cells were present in two cases of ameloblastoma with BRAF and CTNNB1 mutations, indicating that ghost cells form due to mutations in CTNNB1. The data suggest that mutations in CTNNB1 are the major driver mutations of CCOT, and that CCOT is the genetic analog of pilomatrixoma and adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma in odontogenic tissue.

  14. Angiogenesis concept in odontogenic keratocyst: A comparative study

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    Donia Sadri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Recent reports have indicated that angiogenesis possibly affects the biologic behavior of the lesions. Aim: Given the different clinical behaviors of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the concept of angiogenesis in pathogenesis and clinical behavior of OKC. Setting and Design: This experimental study was carried out on 22 and 24 samples of OKCs and dentigerous cysts (DCs, respectively. Methods: Immunohistochemical staining was approached using CD34 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF antibodies. The expression of VEGF was first reported by determining the counts of stained cells, including epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells, followed by the percentage of stained cells in each sample based on a 0–2 scoring system. The counts of CD34+ cells were reported in each group in the form of means ± standard deviations. In addition, the patterns of blood vessels in the samples prepared from the walls of both cysts were evaluated. Statistical Analysis Used: Mann–Whitney U-test, Chi-squared test, and t-test were used for analysis of data, and statistical significance was defined at p < 0.05. Results: The expression percentage and scores of VEGF and the mean expression rate of CD34 were significantly higher in OKCs than DCs (p = 0.045, 0.000, and < 0.001. No significant difference was detected in the vascular patterns of these lesions (p = 0.58. Finally, there was a strong correlation between the expressions of the two markers in the samples (Correlation coefficient = 0.766. Conclusion: The present results indicate the angiogenesis may play an important role in the pathogenesis and the unique clinical behavior of OKC.

  15. Endoscopic modified medial maxillectomy for odontogenic cysts and tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Tsugihama; Otori, Nobuyoshi; Asaka, Daiya; Okushi, Tetsushi; Haruna, Shin-ichi

    2014-12-01

    Odontogenic maxillary cysts and tumours originate from the tooth root and have traditionally been treated through an intraoral approach. Here, we report the efficacy and utility of endoscopic modified medial maxillectomy (EMMM) for the treatment of odontogenic maxillary cysts and a tumour. We undertook EMMM under general anaesthesia in six patients: four had radicular cysts, one had a dentigerous cyst, and one had a keratocystic odontogenic tumour. The cysts and tumours were completely excised and the inferior turbinate and nasolacrimal duct were preserved in all patients. There were no peri- or postoperative complications, and no incidences of recurrence. Endoscopic modified medial maxillectomy appears to be an effective and safe technique for treating odontogenic cysts and tumours.

  16. Clinicoradiologic Differential Diagnosis of Odontogenic Keratocyst and Ameloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Ho Gul; Lee, Jang Yeol; Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Chang Seo

    2000-01-01

    To clarify the clinical and radiologic parameters that can be used to differentiate odontogenic keratocyst and ameloblastoma. The records of 46 patients of ameloblstoma and 48 patients of odontogenic keratocyst at the Yonsei University Dental Hospital during the period of 1979 to 1995 were retrospectively reviewed. As a possible means for differentiating between the odontogenic keratocyst and ameloblastoma, the clinical parameters and the radiologic parameters were evaluated. In the clinical parameters, there was no significant deference in age, sex, and sign and symptoms (p>0.05).In the radiologic parameters, there was significant difference in site, shape of the lesion, and external root resorption of adjacent teeth (p<0.05). The site, shape of the lesion, and external root resorption of adjacent teeth can be the parameters to differentiate odontogenic keratocyst and ameloblastoma, but a definite differentiation of these two lesions needs a more specialized imaging modality.

  17. Clinicoradiologic Differential Diagnosis of Odontogenic Keratocyst and Ameloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Ho Gul; Lee, Jang Yeol; Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Chang Seo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Yensei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    To clarify the clinical and radiologic parameters that can be used to differentiate odontogenic keratocyst and ameloblastoma. The records of 46 patients of ameloblstoma and 48 patients of odontogenic keratocyst at the Yonsei University Dental Hospital during the period of 1979 to 1995 were retrospectively reviewed. As a possible means for differentiating between the odontogenic keratocyst and ameloblastoma, the clinical parameters and the radiologic parameters were evaluated. In the clinical parameters, there was no significant deference in age, sex, and sign and symptoms (p>0.05).In the radiologic parameters, there was significant difference in site, shape of the lesion, and external root resorption of adjacent teeth (p<0.05). The site, shape of the lesion, and external root resorption of adjacent teeth can be the parameters to differentiate odontogenic keratocyst and ameloblastoma, but a definite differentiation of these two lesions needs a more specialized imaging modality.

  18. Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst Associated with an Impacted Upper Cuspid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Suk Ja; Lee, Young Seo; Yi, Jae Seo

    2000-01-01

    A 35-year-old man was referred to the department of Oral and maxillofacial surgery of Chonnam university hospital for the chief complaint of asymptomatic swelling on the buccal vestibule of upper right canine area. Radiographs revealed that the upper right canine was impacted and there was a well-circumscribed pericoronal radiolucency related with the canine. Multiple radiopaque foci were scattered in the radiolucent lesion, and the roots of the lateral incisor and the first premolar related to the lesion showed external resorption. The radiographic features of this lesion were typical of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor, but considering the sex and age of the patient, the tentative diagnosis was made as calcifying odontogenic cyst. Microscopically this lesion was diagnosed as calcifying odontogenic cyst. Because calcifying odontogenic cyst has no pathognomonic feature of radiographs, to consider radiographic features with clinical findings is necessary in order to establish more correct diagnosis.

  19. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor: Treatment modalities: Study of 3 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-06-11

    Jun 11, 2013 ... surgery. It can become quite large because of its ability for significant expansion, extension into adjacent tissues and ... variant of the odontogenic keratocyst is not included in ... KCOT arises from cell rests of the dental lamina.

  20. Odontogenic and Nonodontogenic Cysts: An Analysis of 526 Cases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... collected from the clinical records and histopathology reports of the Department ... Odontogenic and Nonodontogenic Cysts: An Analysis of 526 Cases in ... periodontal ..... As a result, long‑term chronic inflammation may occur.

  1. Exophthalmos due to odontogenic intraorbital abscess in Cebus apella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriá, Arianne P; Pinna, Melissa H; Estrela-Lima, Alessandra; Junior, Deusdete G; Libório, Fernanda A; de Assis Dórea Neto, Francisco; Oliveira, Alberto V D; Nogueira, Marcos; Requião, Katia

    2013-04-01

    The accumulation of pus in the orbit originating from an infected dental root is classified as odontogenic intraorbital abscess. Clinical, laboratory, and image evaluation of a non-human primate was performed. The patient was cured after surgical therapy. This represents the first report of an odontogenic periodontal abscess in Cebus apella. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Multiple odontogenic keratocysts associated with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, S; Acharya, S; Dixit, P B

    2009-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder with a predisposition to cancer. Features like basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocysts, calcification of falx cerebri, bifid ribs, pits on palms and soles and hypertelorism are evident. A case of this rare disease seen on a 13 year old female patient is presented here, where multiple odontogenic keratocysts were causing disfigurement of the lower jaw as well as displacement and malocclusion of the lower teeth.

  3. Unusual presentation of keratocystic odontogenic tumor: Two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunitha Kesidi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KOT is a common odontogenic cyst with aggressive behavior with a high recurrence rate. Features that predict recurrence of KOT are thin friable epithelium which is difficult to enucleate and presence of satellite cysts in the fibrous wall. Most of the lesions grow in an anteroposterior direction without causing any bony expansion. Here, we report two cases of KOT with different clinical presentation.

  4. Radical approach to Odontogenic Keratocyst - report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajshekhar Halli

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The odontogenic keratocyst has been the subject of great interest ever since Philipsen introduced the term in 1956. Investigations continue into the lesion′s pathologic classification, diagnosis and biologic behavior. Considerable controversy exists regarding the proper management of these lesions - conservative or aggressive?. Here we report two cases of large odontogenic keratocysts of the mandible which were treated by aggressive surgical approach.

  5. Surgical treatment of odontogenic keratocyst by enucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mamta; Gupta, K C

    2010-10-01

    Although odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) are benign, they are often locally destructive and tend to recur after conservative surgical treatment. They must therefore be distinguished from other cysts of the jaw. Keratocysts possess outpouchings and microscopic daughter cysts from which recurrences may arise. Histologic examination is essential for diagnosis since the appearances on roentgenograms and at operation usually do not reveal the true nature of the lesion. Since many non-dental surgeons and pathologists are unaware of OKCs, a case is presented in which surgical treatment was by original conservative method. Decompression causes a reduction in the cyst volume with new bone formation so that the structures impinged upon (e.g., teeth, nerves) are completely free.

  6. Surgical treatment of odontogenic keratocyst by enucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamta Singh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs are benign, they are often locally destructive and tend to recur after conservative surgical treatment. They must therefore be distinguished from other cysts of the jaw. Keratocysts possess outpouchings and microscopic daughter cysts from which recurrences may arise. Histologic examination is essential for diagnosis since the appearances on roentgenograms and at operation usually do not reveal the true nature of the lesion. Since many non-dental surgeons and pathologists are unaware of OKCs, a case is presented in which surgical treatment was by original conservative method. Decompression causes a reduction in the cyst volume with new bone formation so that the structures impinged upon (e.g., teeth, nerves are completely free.

  7. Proteoglycans as potential biomarkers in odontogenic tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Herrera, Zaira; Molina-Frechero, Nelly; Damián-Matsumura, Pablo; Bologna-Molina, Ronell

    2018-01-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs) are essential for normal cellular development; however, alterations of their concentrations can promote tumor growth. To date, a limited number of studies report the presence of PGs in odontogenic tumors (OTs); therefore, the main purpose of this work is to gather the information published on the study of PGs. The search reported 26 articles referring to the presence of different PGs in distinct OTs from 1999 to May 2017. PGs seem to play an important role during OTs’ development as they are involved in several tumor processes; however, the number of reports on the study of these molecules is low. Thus, more studies are necessary in order to gain a better understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of OTs. PMID:29731564

  8. Nasolabial Cyst Associated with Odontogenic Infection

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    Eveline Claudia Martini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The nasolabial cyst or Klestadt cyst is a relatively uncommon nonodontogenic cyst that develops in the nasal alar region; it has uncertain pathogenesis. This lesion has slow growth and variable dimensions and is characterized clinically by a floating tumefaction in the nasolabial fold area around the bridge of the nose, causing an elevation of the upper lip and relative facial asymmetry. Diagnosis is primarily made clinically; if necessary, this is complemented by imaging. This paper reports the case of a 39-year-old male patient who complained of pain in the right upper premolar region and poor aesthetics due to a firm tumor in the right wing of the nose. Initially, this was thought to be due to an odontogenic abscess; however, the differential diagnosis was that a nasolabial cyst was communicating with the apex of teeth 14 and 15. Surgical treatment was carried out, followed by histopathological examination and concomitant endodontic treatment of the teeth involved.

  9. Nasolabial Cyst Associated with Odontogenic Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Eveline Claudia; Coppla, Fabiana Madalozzo; Campagnoli, Eduardo Bauml; Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The nasolabial cyst or Klestadt cyst is a relatively uncommon nonodontogenic cyst that develops in the nasal alar region; it has uncertain pathogenesis. This lesion has slow growth and variable dimensions and is characterized clinically by a floating tumefaction in the nasolabial fold area around the bridge of the nose, causing an elevation of the upper lip and relative facial asymmetry. Diagnosis is primarily made clinically; if necessary, this is complemented by imaging. This paper reports the case of a 39-year-old male patient who complained of pain in the right upper premolar region and poor aesthetics due to a firm tumor in the right wing of the nose. Initially, this was thought to be due to an odontogenic abscess; however, the differential diagnosis was that a nasolabial cyst was communicating with the apex of teeth 14 and 15. Surgical treatment was carried out, followed by histopathological examination and concomitant endodontic treatment of the teeth involved.

  10. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor with clear cell changes

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    Neeta Mohanty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT has a limited biological profile and been an attention-grabbing tumor for a century for its origin. Though described earlier, it was widely accepted after Harbitz from Norway reported about this uncommon benign tumor in 1915. There has been a long debate as whether this tumor is a hamartoma or a neoplasm. Here, we present a case of AOT in a 20-year-old female with details of clinical, radiological and histological features along with clear cell changes, signifying AOT to be more aggressive in nature than assessed from earlier literature. Thus, we did an extensive search of PubMed literature on AOT with all its histopathological features associated until date to find the report of clear cell changes yet.

  11. Two cases report of Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Do; Lee, Wan; Paeng, Jun Young; Lee, Jun; Choi, Moon Ki; Son, Hyun Jin

    2009-01-01

    The calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) is a rare disorder of the jaws and shows various radiographic features. The purpose of this study is to describe the different radiographic appearances of 2 cases of COC. Case 1 was located in the posterior maxilla extending into maxillary sinus, showing unilocular radiolucency with a well-defined margin. Cortical bone expansion and thinning were prominent. Root resorption of adjacent teeth was apparent. Case 2 showed unilocular radiolucency with a calcified material. Calcification was supposed to be dystrophic dental hard structures, detected at the periphery of the lesion. Ghost cell and proliferation of ameloblastoma-like tissues were common features for these two lesions on histopathological findings. This reports presented common and atypical radiographic features of the COC.

  12. Expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Odontogenic Cysts: Is There Any Impression on Clinical Outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadri, Donia; Farhadi, Sareh; Shahabi, Zahra; Sarshar, Samaneh

    2016-01-01

    The recent scientific reports have shown that angiogenesis can affect biological behavior of pathologic lesions. Regarding unique clinical outcome of Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), the present study was aimed to compare angiogenesis in Odontogenic keratocyst and Dentigerous cyst (DC). In this experimental study, tissue sections of 46 samples of OKC and DC were stained through immunohistochemical method using Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) antibody. VEGF expression was evaluated in epithelial cells, fibroblasts and endothelial cells. The average percentage of stained cells in any samples was categorized to 3 groups as follows: SCORE 0: 10% of cells or less are positive. SCORE 1: 10 to 50% of cells are positive. SCORE 2: more than 50% of cells are positive. Mann-U-Whitney, T-test and chi-square was used for statistical analysis. The average of VEGF expression in 24 samples of DC was 20.2% and in 22 samples of OKC was 52.6%, respectively. The average of VEGF expression in these two cysts had statistical significant differences. (PV= 0.045). There was significant statistical differences between two cysts in the terms of VEGF SCORE (PV= 0.000). OKC samples had significantly higher SCORE for the purpose of VEGF incidence than DC. Also, there were no differences between VEGF expression in epithelial cells of two cysts (PV= 0.268) there were significant statistical differences between two cysts in terms of endothelial cell staining. The endothelial cell staining was significantly higher in OKC than DC (PV= 0.037%). Regarding higher expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth factor in OKC than DC, it seems that angiogenesis may have great impression on clinical outcome of OKC.

  13. Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumour: immunohistochemical expression of matrix metalloproteinases, their inhibitors (TIMPs and RECK) and inducer (EMMPRIN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosdócimi, Fábio C; Rodini, Camila O; Sogayar, Mari C; Sousa, Suzana C O M; Xavier, Flávia C A; Paiva, Katiúcia B S

    2014-08-01

    Calcifying cyst odontogenic tumour (CCOT) is a rare benign cystic neoplasm of odontogenic origin. MMPs are responsible for extracellular matrix remodelling and, together their inhibitors and inducer, determinate the level of its turnover in pathological processes, leading to an auspicious microenvironment for tumour development. Thus, our goal was to evaluate matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs-2, -7, -9 and -14), their inhibitors (TIMPs-2, -3, -4 and RECK) and its inductor (EMMPRIN) expression in CCOT. We used 18 cases of CCOT submitted to immunolocalization of the target proteins and analysed in both neoplastic odontogenic epithelial and stromal compartments. All molecules evaluated were expressed in both compartments in CCOT. In epithelial layer, immunostaining for MMPs, TIMPs, RECK and EMMPRIN was found in basal, suprabasal spindle and stellate cells surrounding ghost cells and ghost cells themselves, except for MMP-9 and TIMP-2 which were only expressed by ghost cells. In stromal compartment, extracellular matrix, mesenchymal (MC) and endothelial cells (EC) were positive for MMP-2, -7, TIMP-3 and -4, while MMP-9, TIMP-2 and RECK were positive only in MC and MMP-14 only in EC. Statistical significance difference was found between both compartments for MMP-9 (P EMMPRIN (P EMMPRIN and RECK expression was found (R = 0.661, P = 0.003). We concluded that these proteins/enzymes are differentially expressed in both epithelium and stroma of CCOT, suggesting an imbalance between MMPs and their inducer/inhibitors may contribute on the tumour behaviour. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp-derived stem cells on tricalcium phosphate scaffolds

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    Mohamadreza Baghaban Eslaminejad

    2013-09-01

    Conclusion: The 3D culture system improves odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs. The differentiation level of the cells in 3D culture is significantly lower than that of odontoblasts present in pulp tissue. TCP biomaterial possesses an odontogenic-inducing property.

  15. Differential diagnosis between odontogenic keratocyst and ameloblastoma by computed tomography

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    Eun, Sang A; Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Chang Seo [Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-06-15

    The objective of this study is to find the differentiating characteristics of ameloblastomas and odontogenic keratocysts of the jaw by analyzing computed tomography (CT) images of the lesions, clarify radiological characteristics associated with jaw lesions, and to make a diagnosis based on these findings. Test subjects were chosen among the patients who were diagnosed as having an odontogenic keratocyst or ameloblastoma at the Yonsei University Dental Hospital from January 1996 to December 2000 and had CT scans taken preoperatively. The subject pool was comprised of 51 cases of odontogenic keratocyst and 37 cases of ameloblastoma. The following measures were used for image analysis of the lesion : the anatomic location, CT pattern, mesiodistal width, buccolingual width, the ratios between mesiodistal width and buccolingual width, height, CT number, homogeneity of radiodensity, the appearance of a sclerotic rim, continuity of adjacent cortical bone, and displacement and resorption of adjacent teeth. Comparing the CT patten, mesiodistal width, buccolingual width, height, CT number, homogeneity, appearance of sclerotic rim, continuity of adjacent cortical bone, there were statistically significant differences between ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst test subjects (p<0.05). Comparing the ratios between mesiodistal width and buccolingual width, displacement and resorption of adjacent teeth, there were no statistically significant differences (p>0.05). We compared odontogenic keratocysts and ameloblastomas in CT scans. They occurred most frequently in the posterior to the ramus of the mandible. The findings of patterns of the CT images showed that size and border of lesions were more aggressive in ameloblastomas than in odontogenic keratocysts. The internal contents represented an increased attenuation area (IAA) in odontopenic keratocyst. Odontogenic keratocysts were shown to have higher CT numbers than ameloblastomas.

  16. Characterization and management of the keratocystic odontogenic tumor in relation to its histopathological and biological features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral Mendes, R.A.; Carvalho, J.F.C.; van der Waal, I.

    2010-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT), formerly referred to as odontogenic keratocyst, is a benign neoplasm of odontogenic origin which may present an aggressive and infiltrative behavior leading to high recurrence rates. A review of the various treatment modalities, ranging from simple enucleation

  17. Peripheral Developing Odontoma or Peripheral Ameloblastic Fibroodontoma: A Rare Challenging Case

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    Saede Atarbashi Moghadam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral odontogenic lesions are considered to be rare within the classification of odontogenic tumors. They share the same microscopic characteristics of their central counterparts. Here, we report an ulcerated mass of the maxillary gingiva that on histopathological examination was diagnosed as peripheral developing odontoma or peripheral ameloblastic fibroodontoma. The diagnosis of this tumor is challenging and may lead to unnecessary treatment.

  18. Malignant changes developing from odontogenic cysts: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrás-Ferreres, Jordi; Sánchez-Torres, Alba; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review scientific literature in orderto describe the characteristics and prognosis of malignant entities developing from odontogenic cysts. A search in Pubmed (MEDLINE) and Cochrane databases was conducted. The inclusion criteria were articles published in English related to the malignisation of odontogenic cysts in humans. The exclusion criteria were articles that do not specify the type of odontogenic cyst, malignisation of parakeratinised keratocysts, the presence of an ameloblastic carcinoma and metastasis from distant primary tumours. The selected articles were classified according to Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy criteria. Statistical analysis of the data was carried out using statistical package software SPSS version 22.0. From the 1,237 articles initially obtained, the authors included 3 case series and 45 case reports in the end. Descriptive analysis showed that men have a disposition for malignisation from odontogenic cysts and they frequently appear at the posterior mandible, with pain and swelling being the most frequent signs and symptoms. Follicular cysts were the entities that underwent the most malignant changes with well differentiated squamous cell carcinomas being the most prevalent type of malignancy. The real prognosis of this malignancy is not known because of the heterogeneity of available studies. Key words: Odontogenic cysts, squamous cell carcinoma, neoplastic cell transformation, oral cancer.

  19. Odontogenic cysts: analysis of 680 cases in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prockt, Anderson P; Schebela, Clarissa R; Maito, Fábio D M; Sant'Ana-Filho, Manoel; Rados, Pantelis V

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of 680 odontogenic cysts diagnosed in Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil, and to compare results with findings in the literature. Data of odontogenic cysts diagnosed from 1985 to 2005 were collected from the files of the Oral Pathology Laboratory of Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil, and entered in a standardized form for later comparisons. The most prevalent odontogenic cysts were radicular (72.50%), dentigerous (22.20%) and residual (4.26%) cysts. The mandible of white patients was the anatomic site and ethnic group most frequently affected by this disease. Four of the six types of cysts were more frequent in the second and fourth decades of life, and no significant differences were found between sexes in the diagnosis of odontogenic cysts. In conclusion, the prevalence of odontogenic cysts was similar to that reported in the literature, which shows that inflammatory cysts are the most frequent.

  20. Queratoquiste odontogénico Odontogenic keratocyst

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    Juan Carlos Quintana Díaz

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available El queratoquiste odontogénico constituye un tipo histológico de los quistes odontogénicos del desarrollo cuya mayor incidencia ocurre entre la segunda y tercera décadas de la vida, y puede tener un segundo momento de frecuente aparición hacia la quinta década. Las zonas del tercer molar inferior y el ángulo mandibular son las mayormente afectadas, desde donde la lesión progresa hacia la rama y el cuerpo. Entre los otros quistes odontogénicos este presenta gran importancia debido a la alta tasa de recurrencia ubicada entre el 25 y 60 % además de presentar características histopatológicas que lo diferencian de otras lesiones quísticas. Se reporta un caso en un paciente de sexo femenino, de 33 años de edad, que al examen clínico y radiográfico, presentó una lesión circunscrita al cuerpo de la mandíbula del lado izquierdo, en el área de brote del segundo premolar, radiolucida unilocular. Después de los exámenes clínicos, radiográficos e histopatológico se diagnosticó: queratoquiste odontogénico. Se realizó tratamiento quirúrgico con resultados satisfactorios y sin señales clínicas ni radiográficas de recidiva hasta el momento, el defecto óseo fue reconstruido con Hidroxiapatita HAP-200 sin reacción adversa al implante.Odontogenesis keratocyst is a histological type of developmental odontogenic cysts whose incidence occurring between the second and the third decades of life with a potential second appearance in fifth decade. The lower third molars and the mandibular angle areas are the more involved and from there the lesion progresses to branch and body. Among the other types of cysts this is very important due to the high rate of relapse located between the 25 and the 60 % and by its histopathologic features differentiating it from other cystic lesions. The case of a female aged 33 is presented, which in clinical and radiographic examination had a lesion circumscribed to radiolucent unilocular left mandibular area

  1. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor: A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keerthi K Nair

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT has been identified as a "tumor" after observation of its biological behavior and genetic abnormalities consistent with neoplastic progression. In 2005, the World Health Organization (WHO working group considered odontogenic keratocyst (OKC to be a tumor and recommended the term KCOT, distinguishing the lesion from the orthokeratinizing variant, which is now considered an OKC or orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst. Very rarely, KCOTs can transform into more aggressive lesions such as ameloblastoma and primary intraosseous carcinoma (PIOSCC. In this paper, we present a case of KCOT involving the angle and ramus of the mandible, with histopathologic evidence of ameloblastomatous changes. We also discuss about the evolution of this lesion from a cyst to a tumor along with the latest updates of the entity.

  2. Human epithelial hair follicle stem cells and their progeny: current state of knowledge, the widening gap in translational research and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purba, Talveen S; Haslam, Iain S; Poblet, Enrique; Jiménez, Francisco; Gandarillas, Alberto; Izeta, Ander; Paus, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    Epithelial hair follicle stem cells (eHFSCs) are required to generate, maintain and renew the continuously cycling hair follicle (HF), supply cells that produce the keratinized hair shaft and aid in the reepithelialization of injured skin. Therefore, their study is biologically and clinically important, from alopecia to carcinogenesis and regenerative medicine. However, human eHFSCs remain ill defined compared to their murine counterparts, and it is unclear which murine eHFSC markers really apply to the human HF. We address this by reviewing current concepts on human eHFSC biology, their immediate progeny and their molecular markers, focusing on Keratin 15 and 19, CD200, CD34, PHLDA1, and EpCAM/Ber-EP4. After delineating how human eHFSCs may be selectively targeted experimentally, we close by defining as yet unmet key challenges in human eHFSC research. The ultimate goal is to transfer emerging concepts from murine epithelial stem cell biology to human HF physiology and pathology. © 2014 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Molecular methods for diagnosis of odontogenic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Thomas R; Paster, Bruce J; Stokes, Lauren N; Susarla, Srinivas M; Shanti, Rabie M

    2012-08-01

    Historically, the identification of microorganisms has been limited to species that could be cultured in the microbiology laboratory. The purpose of the present study was to apply molecular techniques to identify microorganisms in orofacial odontogenic infections (OIs). Specimens were obtained from subjects with clinical evidence of OI. To identify the microorganisms involved, 16S rRNA sequencing methods were used on clinical specimens. The name and number of the clones of each species identified and the combinations of species present were recorded for each subject. Descriptive statistics were computed for the study variables. Specimens of pus or wound fluid were obtained from 9 subjects. A mean of 7.4 ± 3.7 (standard deviation) species per case were identified. The predominant species detected in the present study that have previously been associated with OIs were Fusobacterium spp, Parvimonas micra, Porphyromonas endodontalis, and Prevotella oris. The predominant species detected in our study that have not been previously associated with OIs were Dialister pneumosintes and Eubacterium brachy. Unculturable phylotypes accounted for 24% of the species identified in our study. All species detected were obligate or facultative anaerobes. Streptococci were not detected. Molecular methods have enabled us to detect previously cultivated and not-yet-cultivated species in OIs; these methods could change our understanding of the pathogenic flora of orofacial OIs. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Melan-A/Mart-1- or HMB-45-positive melanocytes are not present in calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors (calcifying odontogenic cysts): a study in 13 Caucasian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosios, Konstantinos I; Prountzos, Nikolaos; Katsoulas, Nikolaos; Koutlas, Ioannis G; Sklavounou-Andrikopoulou, Alexandra

    2012-03-01

    Melanin pigment and melanocytes may be found in odontogenic cysts and tumors, particularly calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT). In the present study we investigated the immunohistochemical expression of the Melan-A/Mart-1 and HMB-45 antigens in 13 Caucasians patients with CCOT. Melan-A/Mart-1- and HMB-45-positive melanocytes were not seen in any of the cases. Our findings are in agreement with the assumption that pigmentation in odontogenic lesions may be a racial phenomenon.

  5. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor: case report with CT and ultrasonography findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumer, A Pinar; Sumer, Mahmut; Celenk, Peruze; Danaci, Murat [Faculty of Dentistry, University of Ondokuz Mayis, Samsun (Turkmenistan); Gunhan, Oemer [Gulhane Military Medicine Academy, Ankara (Turkmenistan)

    2012-03-15

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is a benign odontogenic tumor with a potentially aggressive and infiltrative behavior. KCOT is most commonly occurred in mandible and demonstrate a unilocular, round, oval, scalloped radiolucent area, while large lesions may appear multilocular. An important characteristic of KCOT is its propensity to grow in an antero-posterior direction within medullary cavity of bone causing minimal expansion. Definitive diagnosis relies on histological examination. In this report, a KCOT that had an expansion both buccal and lingual cortical bone is described including its features in computed tomography and ultrasonographic exams. The lesion was removed surgically via an intraoral approach under local anesthesia and histologically reported as a KCOT.

  6. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor: case report with CT and ultrasonography findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumer, A Pinar; Sumer, Mahmut; Celenk, Peruze; Danaci, Murat; Gunhan, Oemer

    2012-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is a benign odontogenic tumor with a potentially aggressive and infiltrative behavior. KCOT is most commonly occurred in mandible and demonstrate a unilocular, round, oval, scalloped radiolucent area, while large lesions may appear multilocular. An important characteristic of KCOT is its propensity to grow in an antero-posterior direction within medullary cavity of bone causing minimal expansion. Definitive diagnosis relies on histological examination. In this report, a KCOT that had an expansion both buccal and lingual cortical bone is described including its features in computed tomography and ultrasonographic exams. The lesion was removed surgically via an intraoral approach under local anesthesia and histologically reported as a KCOT.

  7. Orthokeratinized odontogenic keratocyst crossing mandibular midline: A diagnostic dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil Kshirsagar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthokeratinized odontogenic keratocyst is a less-aggressive non-syndromic variant of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC. In this case report, we are highlighting an unusual presentation of OKC with paresthesia, non-vital teeth, and minimal cortical expansion. The radiograph of the patient revealed a radiolucency crossing the midline in the anterior mandible. This manuscript discusses a case which presented as a diagnostic dilemma due to variable clinical and radiological features mimicking different pathologies occurring in the anterior mandible. We have discussed various clinical and radiographic differential diagnoses of the same.

  8. Variant innate immune responses of mammary epithelial cells to challenge by Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and the regulating effect of taurine on these bioprocesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liuhai; Xu, Yuanyuan; Lu, Jinye; Liu, Ming; Bin Dai; Miao, Jinfeng; Yin, Yulong

    2016-07-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) are important pathogens causing subclinical and clinical bovine mastitis, respectively. Taurine, an organic acid found in animal tissues, has been used for the treatment of various superficial infections and chronic inflammations. We challenged a bovine mammary epithelial cell (MEC) line (MAC-T) or a mouse mammary epithelial cell line (EpH4-Ev) with either E. coli or S. aureus and compared the responses of MECs to these 2 pathogens. We also examined the regulatory effects of taurine on these responses. Receptor analyses showed that both TLR2 and TLR4 are upregulated upon exposure to either E. coli or S. aureus. Taurine pre-treatment dampened upregulation to some extent. E. coli and S. aureus stimulated comparable levels of ROS, which could be inhibited by taurine pre-treatment. E. coli infection elicited a dramatic change in iNOS expression. Taurine significantly decreased iNOS expression in the S. aureus challenged group. Protein microarray demonstrated that 32/40 and 8/40 inflammatory molecules/mediators were increased after E. coli or S. aureus challenge, respectively. The fold changes of most molecules were higher in the E. coli infection group than that in the S. aureus infection group. Taurine negatively regulated the inflammatory profile in both bacterial infections. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (such as TNF-α) connected with TLR activation were down-regulated by taurine pre-treatment. The influence of TAK-242 and OxPAPC on cytokine/molecule expression profiles to E. coli challenge are different than to S. aureus. Some important factors (MyD88, TNF-α, IL-1β, iNOS and IL-6) mediated by TLR activation were suppressed either in protein microarray or special assay (PCR/kits) or both. TAK-242 restrained ROS production and NAGase activity similar to the effect of taurine in E. coli challenge groups. The detection of 3 indices (T-AOC, SOD and MDA) reflecting oxidative stress in vivo, showed that

  9. Dual odontogenic origins develop at the early stage of rat maxillary incisor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriangkrai, Rungarun; Iseki, Sachiko; Eto, Kazuhiro; Chareonvit, Suconta

    2006-03-01

    Developmental process of rat maxillary incisor has been studied through histological analysis and investigation of tooth-related gene expression patterns at initial tooth development. The tooth-related genes studied here are fibroblast growth factor-8 (Fgf-8), pituitary homeobox gene-2 (Pitx-2), sonic hedgehog (Shh), muscle segment homeobox-1 (Msx-1), paired box-9 (Pax-9) and bone morphogenetic protein-4 (Bmp-4). The genes are expressed in oral epithelium and/or ectomesenchyme at the stage of epithelial thickening to the early bud stage of tooth development. Both the histological observation and tooth-related gene expression patterns during early stage of maxillary incisor development demonstrate that dual odontogenic origins aligned medio-laterally in the medial nasal process develop, subsequently only single functional maxillary incisor dental placode forms. The cascade of tooth-related gene expression patterns in rat maxillary incisor studied here is quite similar to those of the previous studies in mouse mandibular molar, even though the origins of oral epithelium and ectomesenchyme involved in development of maxillary incisor and mandibular molar are different. Thus, we conclude that maxillary incisor and mandibular molar share a similar signaling control of Fgf-8, Pitx-2, Shh, Msx-1, Pax-9 and Bmp-4 genes at the stage of oral epithelial thickening to the early bud stage of tooth development.

  10. Langerhans cells in 60 odontogenic keratocysts

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    Chun-Han Chang

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: There is a significant association of inflammation grade with the number of LCs in OKCs. The scarce LCs in the lining epithelia of OKCs without inflammation suggests the loss of immunosurveillance ability against the OKC lining epithelial cells; this can explain why OKCs have aggressive clinical behavior, a great growth potential, and a high recurrence rate.

  11. A clinicopathological study of odontogenic cysts and tumors in hamadan, iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghaei, Fahimeh; Zargaran, Massoumeh; Najmi, Hamidreza; Moghimbeigi, Abbas

    2014-12-01

    Odontogenic cysts and tumors are the most frequent osseous destructive lesions of the jaws; however, there is little information regarding the relative frequency of these lesions among the Iranian population. The purpose of this study was to determine the distribution of clinically and histologically- diagnosed odontogenic cysts and tumors during a period of 13 years in Hamadan, and also its correlation with age, gender, and the site of the lesion. A descriptive cross-sectional study was performed on 413 oral and maxillofacial specimens during 1996 to 2008.The age and the gender of patients, as well as the site of lesion were recorded. The data were analyzed using SPSS software. Totally, 70 specimens were recorded as odontogenic cysts and 11 specimens were diagnosed as odontogenic tumors. The most frequent odontogenic cysts were dentigerous cysts (27.2%), followed by radicular cysts (18.6%) and odontogenic keratocysts (18.6%). In addition, cysts were more frequent in male than female individuals. Ameloblastoma was the most frequent odontogenic tumor (64%). Odontogenic cysts were in correlation with age, gender and location. These results showed that dentigerous cyst and odontogenic keratocyst were more frequent than other studies. More investigations should be performed to determine the frequency of odontogenic tumors in Iran.

  12. Radiologic manifestation of odontogenic tumors of mesenchymal origins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Tae Won

    1986-01-01

    The author observed radiographs which were diagnosed as odontogenic fibroma, odontogenic myxoma, central cementifying fibroma in the department of Oral Radiology and Pathology, Seoul National University Hospital, from 1975 to 1985. The following conclusions were made. 1. Odontogenic fibroma The age ranged from 32 to 72 years, and two were females and one was male. all the three cases occurred in the posterior region of the maxilla. Two cases were unilocular pattern, and one was multilocular pattern. 2. Odontogenic myxoma The age ranged from 40 to 55 years, and four were females and two were males. Of cases occurred in the mandible, both cases occurred in the molar area involving the mandibular body and angle. Of 4 maxillary lesions, one occurred in the anterior area, two occurred in the premolar area, and one occurred in the molar area. All the cases showed multilocular radiolucencies, and most of them (5 cases) had ill-defined border. 3. Cementifying fibroma occurred more common in young and middle aged adults with greatest incidence in 5th decade. It is more common in females with the ratio of about 2 : 1. Of 19 cases, 15 cases occurred in the mandible, and 4 cases occurred in the maxilla. Of the mandibular lesions , 14 cases involved premolars and/or molars, and all the 4 cases of maxillary lesions occurred in the premolars and/ or molar area. Radiographically, two were radiolucent type of early stage, twelve were mixed type of intermediate stage, and five were radiopaque type of mature stage.

  13. Odontogenic tumours in Children and Adilescents: A Review od ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... University College Hospital Ibadan were reviewed. All histologically diagnosed odontogenic tumours in patients 19 years and below spanning a period of 21 years (1990-2011) were retrieved. Data regarding age, gender, and tumor topography were analyzed using SPSS for Window (version 18.0; SPSS Inc. Chicago, IL)

  14. Orthokeratinized Odontogenic Cyst: A Report of Three Clinical Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Carmen González Galván

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC is a rare developmental odontogenic cyst that has been considered as a variant of the keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT until Wright (1981 defined it as a different entity. Surgery is the usual treatment, and recurrence or association with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome has rarely been described. In this report, we presented three cases of this pathology, and we review the principal clinical, histological, radiological, and therapeutic aspects. Case 1. A 73-year-old female presents with a slight swelling on the right mandible, associated with an unilocular well-defined radiolucent lesion. Case 2. A 27-year-old female presents with a painful mandibular swelling associated with an unilocular radiolucent lesion posterior to the 4.8. Case 3. A 61-year-old male was casually detected presents with an unilocular radiolucent lesion distal to the 4.8. Conclusion. The OOC is a specific odontogenic clinicopathological entity that should be differentiated from the KCOT as it presents a completely different biological behaviour.

  15. Keratocyst of the buccal mucosa: is it odontogenic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Fumio; Kikuchi, Kentaro; Miyazaki, Yuji; Mishima, Kenji; Saito, Ichiro; Kusama, Kaoru

    2010-11-01

    Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) of the buccal mucosa, the diagnosis of which is based on subjective histologic evaluation, is a controversial entity of questionable existence. This report describes 2 rare cases of parakeratinized cyst arising from the buccal mucosa. Case 1 was a 60-year-old man with a 3-cm cyst and case 2 was a 16-year-old boy with a microcyst incidentally discovered on histology. Both lesions were essentially identical in histologic appearance and immunophenotype to intraosseous and gingival OKC, but they were clearly different from orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts and buccal mucosal epidermoid cysts. Step sections failed to reveal any kind of odontogenic tissue or skin adnexa in the cyst wall. These microscopic characteristics reflexively lead to the diagnosis of OKC, if the extragingival occurrence in the buccal mucosa cannot be considered. An alternative nonodontogenic origin includes a keratocyst of the skin, ie, an unusual mucosal presentation of cutaneous keratocyst. Because its true nature, either odontogenic or epidermal, cannot be conclusively proven at this time, we propose a more descriptive and noncommittal term, "mucosal keratocyst," for a particular cyst in a buccal location that is morphologically indistinguishable from OKC. Copyright © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Odontogenic cysts: a clinicopathological study of 507 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avelar, Rafael L; Antunes, Antonio A; Carvalho, Ricardo W F; Bezerra, Paulo G C F; Oliveira Neto, Patrício J; Andrade, Emanuel S S

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of odontogenic cysts at the Pernambuco School of Dentistry - Universidade de Pernambuco (Brazil) and compare this prevalence with other international studies. Data for the study were obtained from reports of patients diagnosed with odontogenic cysts between 1992 and 2007. Case records of patients who fit the Histological Classification of the World Health Organization (2005) were included. The following variables were analyzed: gender, age group, anatomical location, histological type and ethnic background. Odontogenic cysts accounted for 9.94% of all lesions biopsied throughout the study period. Mean patient age was 28.9 years and 57.6% of the patients were males (P > 0.05). Radicular cyst was the most prevalent histological type (52.2%), followed by dentigerous cyst (30.7%). Regarding ethnic background, 41.8 % of the patients were of African descent, followed by Caucasians and other ethnic groups (P > 0.05). The mandible was the most prevalent site of the lesions (56%). Odontogenic cysts appear to have a distinct predilection for the male gender, the second and third decades of life (P keratocysts from the new WHO classification has not altered the order of the most prevalent cysts in the maxillofacial complex.

  17. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis diagnosed using conebeam x-ray CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kiminori

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of conebeam x-ray CT in the diagnosis of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis in 21 patients. Among teeth causing odontogenic maxillary sinusitis, 95% had apical lesions after root canal treatment. Most root canals were filled with filling materials incompletely. Apical lesions in inappropriately treated teeth thus caused odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Conebeam CT involves 3-dimensional isotropic voxel image date in up to 512 frames for transaxial, coronal, and sagittal planes, so resolution in imaging on the body axis was especially high. Multiplanar reconstruction and volume rendering images at any optional plane could be obtained without interpolation. The relationship between causative teeth and the maxillary sinus could be observed and measured, and odontogenic maxillary sinusitis accurately diagnosed. In addition to the accurate diagnosis of apical lesions, maxilla, and maxillary sinus, periodontal ligament space, lamina dura, pulp cavity, root canal, canal-treated root, apical periodontitis, alveolar ostitis, marginal periodontitis of causative teeth could be observed. Metal artifacts were minimized, making conebeam CT useful in the diagnosis of periodontal tissue and causative teeth, including root-canal-treated and crown-restored teeth. (author)

  18. Epidemiology of odontogenic infections in a secondary healthcare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients aged 20-29 years were more predisposed to odontogenic infections, predominantly peridontitis (51.5%) followed by caries (18.6%) and irreversible pulpitis (9.3%). Teeth in the right lower quadrant of the mouth were most frequently excised in both sexes. Predominant isolates were: β-haemolytic Streptococci (34%), ...

  19. Odontogenic Tumors: A Review of 675 Cases in Eastern Libya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the relative frequency of odontogenic tumors (OTs) in an Eastern Libyan population based on the 2005 World Health Organization (WHO) classification, and also to compare the actual data with previous studies. Materials and Methods: We retrieved and analyzed 85 OTs from a ...

  20. Clinical efficacy of ampicillin in treatment of acute odontogenic abscess

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    Matijević Stevo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Antibiotics choice and the duration of their application in the therapy of acute odontogenic abscess is considered to be controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical efficacy of ampicillin in treatment of acute odontogenic abscess and to assess the antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolated bacteria in early phase of abscess development. Methods. This study included 60 patients with acute odontogenic abscess who were surgically treated (extraction of teeth and/or abscess incision divided into two groups, ampicillin group and surgical group (without antibiotic treatment. Results. In the ampicillin group of patients treatment lasted on the average 4.67 days, while in the surgical group 6.17 days. A total of 78 bacterial strains were isolated from 60 patients. The most often bacteria were found to be Gram-positive facultative anaerobs (68/78. The most common bacteria isolated were Viridans streptococci (43/78. Susceptibility of isolated bacteria to ampicillin were 70.5%. Conclusion. Peroral use of ampicillin, after surgical treatment in an early phase of dentoalveolar abscess development, statistically significantly reduced the time of clinical symptoms of acute odontogenic abscess in comparison to surgical treatment only. The isolated bacterial strains in an early phase of dentoalveolar abscess development showed a high sensitivity to ampicillin.

  1. Immunohistochemical detection of receptor activator nuclear κB ligand and osteoprotegerin in odontogenic cysts and tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Matos, Felipe Rodrigues; de Moraes, Maiara; das Neves Silva, Emília Beatriz; Galvão, Hébel Cavalcanti; de Almeida Freitas, Roseana

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the immunohistochemical detection of receptor activator nuclear κB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in radicular cysts (RCs), dentigerous cysts (DCs), solid ameloblastomas (SAs), and keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KOTs). A total of 20 RCs, 20 DCs, 20 KOTs, 14 dental follicles (DFs), and 18 SAs were evaluated by immunohistochemistry using anti-RANKL and anti-OPG antibodies. The analysis was quantitative, and the number of positive cells was counted in 10 microscopic high-power fields (400×). The DFs, KOTs, and SAs showed higher expression of RANKL than did the RCs and DCs in the epithelium (P < .05). The epithelial expression of OPG was higher in the DFs, KOTs, RCs, and DCs than in the SAs (P < .05). The ratio of OPG less than RANKL was more frequent in SAs and OPG greater than RANKL in DCs (P < .05). Our results have shown differences in RANKL and OPG detection in the odontogenic cysts and tumors studied. The higher RANKL and lower OPG detection in SA could play a role in bone resorption, compatible with the tumor's biologic behavior. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Detection of anaerobic odontogenic infections by fluorine-18 fluoromisonidazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Renshyan; Chu Leeshing; Yen Sanhui; Chang Chenpei; Chou Kuoliang; Wu Liangchi; Chang Chiwei; Lui Muntain; Chen Kuangy; Yeh Shinhwa

    1996-01-01

    Odontogenic infections are a potential risk for patients who receive cervicofacial radiotherapy and should be treated before irradiation. Anaerobic microbial infections are the most common causes. This study assessed the value of the hypoxic imaging agent fluorine-18 fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) in detecting anaerobic odontogenic infections. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was performed at 2 h after injection of 370 MBq (10 mCi) of FMISO in 26 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients and six controls with healthy teeth. Tomograms were interpreted visually to identify hypoxic foci in the jaw. All patients received thorough dental examinations as a pre-radiotherapy work-up. Fifty-one sites of periodonititis, 15 periodontal abscesses, 14 sites of dental caries with root canal infection, 23 sites of dental caries without root canal infection, and seven necrotic pulps were found by dental examination. Anaerobic pathogens were isolated from 12 patients. Increased uptake of FMISO was found at 45 out of 51 sites of periodontitis, all 15 sites of periodontal abscess, all 14 sites of dental caries with root canal infection, all seven sites of necrotic pulp and 15 sites of dental carries without obvious evidence of active root canal infection. No abnormal uptake was seen in the healthy teeth of patients or in the six controls. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of FMISO PET scan in detecting odontogenic infections were 93%, 97%, 84%, 99% and 96%, respectively. 18 F-fluoride ion bone scan done in three patients showed that 18 F-fluoride ion plays no role in the demonstration of anaerobic odontogenic infection. FMISO PET scan is a sensitive method for the detection of anaerobic odontogenic infections, and may play a complementary role in the evaluation of the dental condition of patients with head and neck tumours prior to radiation therapy. (orig.)

  3. Detection of anaerobic odontogenic infections by fluorine-18 fluoromisonidazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Renshyan [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Chu Leeshing [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)]|[National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan); Yen Sanhui [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)]|[National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan); Chang Chenpei [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Chou Kuoliang [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Wu Liangchi [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Chang Chiwei [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Lui Muntain [Dept. of Dentistry, Taipei Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China); Chen Kuangy [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)]|[National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan); Yeh Shinhwa [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1996-10-01

    Odontogenic infections are a potential risk for patients who receive cervicofacial radiotherapy and should be treated before irradiation. Anaerobic microbial infections are the most common causes. This study assessed the value of the hypoxic imaging agent fluorine-18 fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) in detecting anaerobic odontogenic infections. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was performed at 2 h after injection of 370 MBq (10 mCi) of FMISO in 26 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients and six controls with healthy teeth. Tomograms were interpreted visually to identify hypoxic foci in the jaw. All patients received thorough dental examinations as a pre-radiotherapy work-up. Fifty-one sites of periodonititis, 15 periodontal abscesses, 14 sites of dental caries with root canal infection, 23 sites of dental caries without root canal infection, and seven necrotic pulps were found by dental examination. Anaerobic pathogens were isolated from 12 patients. Increased uptake of FMISO was found at 45 out of 51 sites of periodontitis, all 15 sites of periodontal abscess, all 14 sites of dental caries with root canal infection, all seven sites of necrotic pulp and 15 sites of dental carries without obvious evidence of active root canal infection. No abnormal uptake was seen in the healthy teeth of patients or in the six controls. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of FMISO PET scan in detecting odontogenic infections were 93%, 97%, 84%, 99% and 96%, respectively. {sup 18}F-fluoride ion bone scan done in three patients showed that {sup 18}F-fluoride ion plays no role in the demonstration of anaerobic odontogenic infection. FMISO PET scan is a sensitive method for the detection of anaerobic odontogenic infections, and may play a complementary role in the evaluation of the dental condition of patients with head and neck tumours prior to radiation therapy. (orig.)

  4. Factors associated with hospitalization of children with acute odontogenic infections

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    Klačar Jelena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the sociodemographic and clinical features of odontogenic infections between hospitalized and nonhospitalized children and to show what were the risk factors in children that could predict the course of odontogenic infection and indicate the need for hospital treatment. The design of our study was of the case-control type. The two study groups consisted of 70 inpatients and 35 outpatients with odontogenic infections who were treated at Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Department of Maxillofacial Surgery at Clinical Center in Kragujevac, Serbia. Clinical and sociodemographic data were collected retrospectively from patients' hospital records. The following characteristics were significantly associated with hospital treatment of children with acute odontogenic infection: living in a village (OR =7.26,[1.43-36.96], multi-spatial infection (OR =0.04, [0.00-0.91], and affection of upper face (OR = 0.01, [0.00-0.86]. Tooth extraction was important intervention in the treatment regimen and reduced frequency of hospitalization (OR=0.07, [0.01-0.70]. The differences between hospitalized and non-hospitalized children were not significant in regard to: ethnicity, employment of parents, anatomical region of infection, side of the facial infection, source of infection (posterior or anterior deciduous or permanent teeth, and treatment (drainage and incision, oral or parenteral antibiotics. In children with acute odontogenic infection it is necessary to do tooth extraction in timely manner, especially if the source of infection is tooth from upper jaw and if it is multi-spatial infection.

  5. Peripheral ostectomy with the use of Carnoy’s solution as a rational surgical approach to odontogenic keratocyst: A case report with a 5-year follow-up

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    Matijević Stevo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC is a rare developmental, epithelial and benign cyst of the jaws of odontogenic origin with high recurrence rates. The third molar region, especially the angle of the mandible and the ascending ramus are involved far more frequently than the maxilla. The choice of treatment approach was based on the size of the cyst, recurrence status, and radiographic evidence of cortical perforation. Different surgical treatment options like marsupialization, decompression, enucleation, enucleation with Carnoy’s solution, peripheral ostectomy with or without Carnoy’s solution, and jaw resection have been discussed in the literature with variable rates of recurrence. Case report. We presented a 52-yearold male with orthokeratinized odontogenic keratocyst. Elliptical unilocular radiolucency located in the third molar region and the ascending ramus of the mandible, 40 × 25 mm in diameter with radiographic evidence of cortical perforation at the anterior ramus border of the mandible 20 mm in diameter, was registrated on orthopantomographic radiography. Surgical treatment included enucleation of the cyst and peripheral ostectomy with the use of Carnoy’s solution and excision of the overlying attached mucosa. Postoperatively, no paresthesia in the inervation area of the inferior alveolaris nerve was registrated. Recurrences were not registrated within 5 years post-intervention. Coclusion. Treatment of odontogenic keratocyst with enucleation and peripheral ostectomy with the use of Carnoy’s solution and excision of the overlying attached mucosa had a very low rate of recurrence. Radical and more aggressive surgical treatments as jaw resection should be reserved for multiple recurrent cysts and when OKC is associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS. Following the treatment protocol in the management of OKC and systematic and long-term postsurgical follow-up are considered key elements for successful

  6. Spatial distribution of osteopontin, CD44v6 and podoplanin in the lining epithelium of odontogenic keratocyst, and their biological relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kechik, Khamisah Awang; Siar, Chong Huat

    2018-02-01

    The odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) remains the most challenging jaw cyst to treat because of its locally-aggressive behaviour and high recurrence potential. Emerging evidence suggests that osteopontin, its receptors CD44v6 and integrin α v , and podoplanin, have a role in the local invasiveness of this cyst. However the spatial distribution characteristics of these pro-invasive markers in the lining epithelium of OKC, and their association with the clinicopathologic parameters of OKC are largely unexplored. This study sought to address these issues in comparison with dentigerous cysts (DCs) and radicular cysts (RCs) and to evaluate their biological relevance. A sample consisting of 20 OKC cases, 10 DCs and 10 RCs was subjected to immunohistochemical staining for osteopontin, CD44v6 and integrin α v , and podoplanin, and semiquantitative analysis was performed. All factors (except integrin α v ) were detected heterogeneously in the constitutive layers of the lining epithelium in all three cyst types. Key observations were significant upregulation of CD44v6 and podoplanin in OKC compared to DCs and RCs, suggesting that these protein molecules may play crucial roles in promoting local invasiveness in OKC (P<0.05). Osteopontin underexpression and distribution patterns were indistinctive among all three cysts indicating its limited role as pro-invasive factor. Clinical parameters showed no significant correlations with all protein factors investigated. Present findings suggest that an osteopontin low CD44v6 high and podoplanin high immunoprofile most probably represent epithelial signatures of OKC and are markers of local invasiveness in this cyst. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. An amelogenin mutation leads to disruption of the odontogenic apparatus and aberrant expression of Notch I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xu; Li, Yong; Alawi, Faizan; Bouchard, Jessica R.; Kulkarni, Ashok B.; Gibson, Carolyn W.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Amelogenins are highly conserved proteins secreted by ameloblasts in the dental organ of developing teeth. These proteins regulate dental enamel thickness and structure in humans and mice. Mice that express an amelogenin transgene with a P70T mutation (TgP70T) develop abnormal epithelial proliferation in an amelogenin null (KO) background. Some of these cellular masses have the appearance of proliferating stratum intermedium, which is the layer adjacent to the ameloblasts in unerupted teeth. As Notch proteins are thought to constitute the developmental switch that separates ameloblasts from stratum intermedium, these signaling proteins were evaluated in normal and proliferating tissues. METHODS Mandibles were dissected for histology and immunohistochemistry using Notch I antibodies. Molar teeth were dissected for western blotting and RT-PCR for evaluation of Notch levels through imaging and statistical analyses. RESULTS Notch I was immunolocalized to ameloblasts of TgP70TKO mice, KO ameloblasts stained, but less strongly, and wild-type teeth had minimal staining. Cells within the proliferating epithelial cell masses were positive for Notch I and had an appearance reminiscent of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor with amyloid-like deposits. Notch I protein and mRNA were elevated in molar teeth from TgP70TKO mice. CONCLUSION Expression of TgP70T leads to abnormal structures in mandibles and maxillae of mice with the KO genetic background and these mice have elevated levels of Notch I in developing molars. As cells within the masses also express transgenic amelogenins, development of the abnormal proliferations suggests communication between amelogenin producing cells and the proliferating cells, dependent on the presence of the mutated amelogenin protein. PMID:20923441

  8. Immunohistochemical expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in keratocystic odontogenic tumor, dentigerous cyst, and radicular cyst: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajuria, Nidhi; Metgud, Rashmi; Naik, Smitha; Lerra, Sahul; Tiwari, Priya; Mamta; Katakwar, Payal; Tak, Anirudh

    2016-01-01

    Cyst and tumors arise from tissue remains of odontogenesis, these interactions have been considered to play an important role in the tumorigenesis of odontogenic lesions. The connective tissue stroma has an essential role in the preservation of epithelial tissues and minor alterations in the epithelium are followed by corresponding changes in the stroma, such as angiogenesis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is considered the first factor which maintains its position as the most critical driver of vascular formation and is required to initiate the formation of immature vessels, with this aim, present study was executed to evaluate VEGF expression in kertocystic odontogenic tumor, dentigerous cyst and radicular cyst (RC). A retrospective study was carried out comprising a total of 31 cases; 13 cases of keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT), nine cases of dentigerous cyst (DC) and nine cases of RC. The sections were stained immunohistochemically with VEGF antibody and were evaluated for the presence and intensity of the immuno reactive cells. Statistical analysis was carried out using Chi-square test to inter-compare the VEGF expression between KCOT, DC, and RC. VEGF expression in the epithelium and connective tissue was significantly higher in KCOT compared to dentigerous and RC. One case of KCOT with carcinomatous change also revealed positive results for the VEGF expression in the dysplastic epithelium, tumor islands, and connective tissue. The significant difference was observed on inter-comparison of the VEGF expression in the connective tissue of KCOT and DC, whereas no significant difference was observed in the VEGF expression in the connective tissue of KCOT and DC. The present study data supports the literature finding that angiogenesis can be important in the progression and enlargement of odontogenic cysts similarly to what occurs in neoplastic conditions and further it can be concluded that the higher positivity for VEGF of KCOT could help to

  9. Primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma in odontogenic keratocyst: A rare entity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Chitrapriya; Aggarwal, Pooja; Wadhwan, Vijay; Bansal, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arising from the wall of an odontogenic cyst (also known as primary intraosseous carcinoma) is a rare tumor which occurs only in jaw bones. This tumor was first described by Loos in 1913 as a central epidermoid carcinoma of the jaw. Primary intraosseous carcinomas (PIOC) may theoretically arise from the lining of an odontogenic cyst or de novo from presumed odontogenic cell rests. According to the new histological classification of tumors of the World Health Organization, odontogenic keratocyst is nowadays considered a specific odontogenic tumor and the PIOC derived from it is considered as a specific entity which is different from other PIOCs derived from the odontogenic cysts. The following report describes a case of such extremely rare entity that is primary intraosseous SCC of the mandible derived from an OKC in a 60-year-old male patient with brief review of literature. PMID:26980976

  10. A radiologic study of differential diagnosis between odontogenic keratocyst and unicystic ameloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chei Karp Shik

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain some information for the radiographic differential diagnosis between odontogenic keratocyst and unicystic ameloblastoma in the mandible. The author compared and analysed the clinico-radiographic features of 48 cases of odontogenic keratocyst and 32 cases of unicystic ameloblastoma. The following results obtained; 1. Odontogenic keratocyst and unicystic ameloblastoma occurred the most frequently in the 2nd and 3rd decades, and both lesions occurred with slight predilection in males. The most frequent lesional site was molar area in odontogenic keratocyst (50.0%) and mandibular angle and ramus area in unicystic ameloblastoma (71.9%). 2. Cortical thinning and expansion were observed with similar occurrences in odontogenic keratocyst (77.1%) and in unicystic ameloblastoma (72.9%). 3. Typical undulating lesional border was observed more frequently in odontogenic keratocyst (79.2%) than in unicystic ameloblastoma (46.9%). 4. Well-defined lesional outline occurred more frequently in odontogenic keratocyst (97.9%) than in unicystic ameloblastoma (53.1%). 5. Root resorption of adjacent teeth occurred more frequently in unicystic ameloblastoma (65.2%) than in odontogenic keratocyst (18.8%) respectively, but loss of lamina dura was frequently observed in odontogenic keratocyst (79.2%). And tooth displacement occurred more frequently in odontogenic keratocyst (50.0%) than in umicystic ameloblastoma (17.4%). 6. Displacement of mandibular canal occurred more frequently in odontogenic keratocyst (75.0%) than in unicystic ameloblastoma (61.5%). 7. Inhomogeneous lesional radiolucency occurred more frequently in unicystic ameloblastoma (53.1%) than in odontogenic keratocyst (39.6%).

  11. A radiologic study of differential diagnosis between odontogenic keratocyst and unicystic ameloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chei Karp Shik [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to obtain some information for the radiographic differential diagnosis between odontogenic keratocyst and unicystic ameloblastoma in the mandible. The author compared and analysed the clinico-radiographic features of 48 cases of odontogenic keratocyst and 32 cases of unicystic ameloblastoma. The following results obtained; 1. Odontogenic keratocyst and unicystic ameloblastoma occurred the most frequently in the 2nd and 3rd decades, and both lesions occurred with slight predilection in males. The most frequent lesional site was molar area in odontogenic keratocyst (50.0%) and mandibular angle and ramus area in unicystic ameloblastoma (71.9%). 2. Cortical thinning and expansion were observed with similar occurrences in odontogenic keratocyst (77.1%) and in unicystic ameloblastoma (72.9%). 3. Typical undulating lesional border was observed more frequently in odontogenic keratocyst (79.2%) than in unicystic ameloblastoma (46.9%). 4. Well-defined lesional outline occurred more frequently in odontogenic keratocyst (97.9%) than in unicystic ameloblastoma (53.1%). 5. Root resorption of adjacent teeth occurred more frequently in unicystic ameloblastoma (65.2%) than in odontogenic keratocyst (18.8%) respectively, but loss of lamina dura was frequently observed in odontogenic keratocyst (79.2%). And tooth displacement occurred more frequently in odontogenic keratocyst (50.0%) than in umicystic ameloblastoma (17.4%). 6. Displacement of mandibular canal occurred more frequently in odontogenic keratocyst (75.0%) than in unicystic ameloblastoma (61.5%). 7. Inhomogeneous lesional radiolucency occurred more frequently in unicystic ameloblastoma (53.1%) than in odontogenic keratocyst (39.6%).

  12. [In vitro study on bone resorption of odontogenic cysts and ameloblastomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li; Li, Tie-jun

    2005-05-01

    To investigate the effect of bone resorption by odontogenic cysts and ameloblastomas in vitro. Fragments of odontogenic cysts (14 odontogenic keratocysts, 6 inflamed odontogenic keratocysts, 5 dentigerous cysts) and ameloblastomas (n = 7) were incubated in vitro for 24 h. The supernatant was then removed into the culture system of SD rat calvaria. After incubation (48 h), the calcium contents of the media were measured by atom spectrophotometer. The supernatant of odontogenic cysts and ameloblastomas was measured for the bone resorption related factors such as IL-6, TNF-alpha, PGE(2), bone Gla-containing protein (BGP) and calcitonin (CT) by a radioimmunoassay system. The calcium released in the calvaria culture media by all the odontogenic lesions was significantly higher than that in the blank controls (P keratocyst group had a significantly higher calcium concentration than odontogenic keratocyst and ameloblastoma groups (P keratocyst groups were significantly higher than that of ameloblastoma group (P keratocyst was significantly higher than those of odontogenic keratocyst and dentigerous cyst groups (P < 0.05). Correlation and regression analysis showed that IL-6 was significantly correlated with the calcium content (P < 0.01). The odontogenic lesions could promote bone resorption in vitro and it is likely to be related to some of the cytokines secreted by the lesions.

  13. A study of 1177 odontogenic lesions in a South Kerala population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepthi, PV; Beena, VT; Padmakumar, SK; Rajeev, R; Sivakumar, R

    2016-01-01

    Context: A study on odontogenic cysts and tumors. Aims: The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of odontogenic cysts and tumors and their distribution according to age, gender, site and histopathologic types of those reported over a period of 1998–2012 in a Tertiary Health Care Center at South Kerala. Settings and Design: The archives of Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, were retrospectively analyzed. Subjects and Methods: Archival records were reviewed and all the cases of odontogenic cysts and tumors were retrieved from 1998 to 2012. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistical analysis was performed using the computer software, Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) IBM SPSS Software version 16. Results: Of 7117 oral biopsies, 4.29% were odontogenic tumors. Ameloblastoma was the most common odontogenic tumor comprising 50.2% of cases, followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumor (24.3%). These tumors showed a male predilection (1.19: 1). Odontogenic tumors occurred in a mean age of 33.7 ± 16.8 years. Mandible was the most common jaw affected (76.07%). Odontogenic cysts constituted 12.25% of all oral biopsies. Radicular cyst comprised 75.11% of odontogenic cysts followed by dentigerous cyst (17.2%). Conclusions: This study showed similar as well as contradictory results compared to other studies, probably due to geographical and ethnic variations which is yet to be corroborated. PMID:27601809

  14. Central Cemento-Ossifying Fibroma: Primary Odontogenic or Osseous Neoplasm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Sook-Bin

    2015-12-01

    Currently, central cemento-ossifying fibroma is classified by the World Health Organization as a primary bone-forming tumor of the jaws. However, histopathologically, it is often indistinguishable from cemento-osseous dysplasias in that it forms osteoid and cementicles (cementum droplets) in varying proportions. It is believed that pluripotent cells within the periodontal membrane can be stimulated to produce either osteoid or woven bone and cementicles when stimulated. If this is true, cemento-ossifying fibroma would be better classified as a primary odontogenic neoplasm arising from the periodontal ligament. Cemento-ossifying fibromas also do not occur in the long bones. The present report compares several entities that fall within the diagnostic realm of benign fibro-osseous lesions and reviews the evidence for reclassifying central cemento-ossifying fibroma as a primary odontogenic neoplasm. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. An Extrafollicular Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor Mimicking a Periapical Cyst

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    Farzaneh Mosavat

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT is a rare noninvasive odontogenic tumor that occurs mostly in the second decade of life. Based on its tooth association, AOT can be classified into three categories of follicular, extrafollicular, and peripheral types; the follicular classification is considered as the most common type of AOT. This study reported a large extrafollicular case of AOT in a 40-year-old female. She was asymptomatic and tumor was detected accidentally by her dental practitioner. Since the panoramic radiograph showed a well-defined unilocular radiolucent lesion, we observed radiopaque spots within the lesion by using cone beam computed tomography. The extrafollicular type can mimic a periapical radiolucent lesion.

  16. Carnoy′s solution in the mangement of odontogenic keratocyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaraj Sivanmalai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carnoy′s solution is a substance used as a complementary treatment after the conservative excision of odontogenic keratocyst. The application of Carnoy′s solution promotes a superficial chemical necrosis and is intended to reduce recurrence rates. However, the inferior alveolar vascular-nervous plexus can occasionally be exposed after the removal of a lesion. The safety of the application of Carnoy′s solution over this plexus has been reported, but to date, no clinical report has been made. The authors present a case that was given Carnoy′s solution over the inferior alveolar vascular-nervous plexus as a complementary treatment for the keratocystic odontogenic tumor. Effective control of recurrence with low and transient neural morbidity was suggested with this technique.

  17. Odontogenic keratocyst with dystrophic calcifications in the maxilla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Young; Huh, Kyung Hoe

    2010-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) with secondary inflammation involving the maxillary sinus was presented. Radiological diagnosis of this case was made based on the various findings from the cone-beam computed tomography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance images. There were calcified materials and impacted tooth within the lumen of the lesion, which is not uncommon in OKC. Histopathologic findings confirmed this lesion as OKC with secondary inflammation.

  18. Odontogenic keratocyst with dystrophic calcifications in the maxilla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Young; Huh, Kyung Hoe [School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) with secondary inflammation involving the maxillary sinus was presented. Radiological diagnosis of this case was made based on the various findings from the cone-beam computed tomography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance images. There were calcified materials and impacted tooth within the lumen of the lesion, which is not uncommon in OKC. Histopathologic findings confirmed this lesion as OKC with secondary inflammation.

  19. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor in jaw: case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalet Martinez, Antonio; Azofeifa Herrera, Jose P.

    2008-01-01

    Female patient of 15 years old is presented with an enlargement in the left mandibular parasymphyseal area. An orthopantomography was taken and a preliminary diagnosis of dentigerous cyst is suggested. The lesion is resected and sample is sent to the pathology laboratory. A diagnosis of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor is determined histopathologically. A literature review is conducted recently about that type of tumor. The importance of histological analysis of biopsies is highlighted. (author) [es

  20. The immunoprofile of odontogenic keratocyst (keratocystic odontogenic tumor) that includes expression of PTCH, SMO, GLI-1 and bcl-2 is similar to ameloblastoma but different from odontogenic cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vered, M; Peleg, O; Taicher, S; Buchner, A

    2009-08-01

    The aggressive biological behavior of odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs), unlike that of other odontogenic cysts, has argued for its recent re-classification as a neoplasm, 'keratocystic odontogenic tumor'. Identification of mutations in the PTCH gene in some of the OKCs that were expected to produce truncated proteins, resulting in loss of control of the cell cycle, provided additional support for OKCs having a neoplastic nature. We investigated the immunohistochemical expression of the sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathway-related proteins, PTCH, smoothened (SMO) and GLI-1, and of the SHH-induced bcl-2 oncoprotein in a series of primary OKC (pOKC), recurrent OKC (rOKC) and nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome-associated OKCs (NBCCS-OKCs), and compared them to solid ameloblastomas (SAMs), unicystic ameloblastomas (UAMs), 'orthokeratinized' OKCs (oOKCs), dentigerous cysts (DCs) and radicular cysts (RCs). All studied lesions expressed the SHH pathway-related proteins in a similar pattern. The expression of bcl-2 in OKCs (pOKCs and NBCCS-OKCs) and SAMs was significantly higher than in oOKCs, DCs and RCs (P < 0.001). The present results of the immunoprofile of OKCs (that includes the expression of the SHH-related proteins and the SHH-induced bcl-2 oncoprotein) further support the notion of OKC having a neoplastic nature. As OKCs vary considerably in their biologic behavior, it is suggested that the quality and quantity of interactions between the SHH and other cell cycle regulatory pathways are likely to work synergistically to define the individual phenotype and corresponding biological behavior of this lesion.

  1. Application of diffusion kurtosis imaging to odontogenic lesions: Analysis of the cystic component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Junichiro; Kuribayashi, Ami; Kotaki, Shinya; Fujikura, Mamiko; Nakamura, Shin; Kurabayashi, Tohru

    2016-12-01

    To assess the feasibility of applying diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) to common odontogenic lesions and to compare its diagnostic ability versus that of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) for differentiating keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) from odontogenic cysts. Altogether, 35 odontogenic lesions were studied: 24 odontogenic cysts, six KCOTs, and five ameloblastomas. The diffusion coefficient (D) and excessive kurtosis (K) were obtained from diffusion-weighted images at b-values of 0, 500, 1000, and 1500 s/mm 2 on 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The combination of D and K values showing the maximum density of the probable density function was estimated. The ADC was obtained (0 and 1000 s/mm 2 ). Values for odontogenic cysts, KCOTs, and ameloblastomas were compared. Multivariate logistic regression modeling was performed to assess the combination of D and K model versus ADC for differentiating KCOTs from odontogenic cysts. The mean D and ADC were significantly higher for ameloblastomas than for odontogenic cysts or KCOTs (P < 0.05). The mean K was significantly lower for ameloblastomas than for odontogenic cysts or KCOTs (P < 0.05). The mean values of all parameters for odontogenic cysts and KCOTs showed no significant differences (P = 0.369 for ADC, 0.133 for D, and 0.874 for K). The accuracy of the combination of D and K model (76.7%) was superior to that of ADC (66.7%). Use of DKI may be feasible for common odontogenic lesions. A combination of DKI parameters can be expected to increase the accuracy of its diagnostic ability compared with ADC. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:1565-1571. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  2. Reclassification and treatment of odontogenic keratocysts: A cohort study

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    Ophir Ribeiro-Júnior

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The odontogenic keratocyst (OKC is a recurrent cyst that has been recently reclassified from an odontogenic tumor to an odontogenic cyst. The aim of the present study was to investigate its treatment and address issues related to its association with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS. Lesions from the cohort of patients included in the present study consisted of 40 OKCs, of which 27 lesions were treated by enucleation (GE and 13 underwent decompression (GD. Complementary treatment occurred in 38 (95% lesions, of which 10 underwent isolated peripheral ostectomy (GO and 28 underwent peripheral ostectomy combined with Carnoy's solution (GC. Thirteen lesions were associated with NBCCS (GS, while the others (n=27 were non-syndromic lesions (GnS. The recurrence-free periods (RFP in the sample groups were compared using the Kaplan-Meier function and log-rank test at a significance level of 5% (p 0.05 or increased CRR for the decompression (15.4% over five years. Application of Carnoy's solution did not increase the efficacy of the peripheral ostectomy, but was related to a CRR of 0% for the syndromic lesions over five years. Therefore, 1 decompression did not increase the recurrence risk; 2 peripheral ostectomy demonstrated a similar efficacy as the combination with Carnoy's solution; 3 the association of NBCCS did not seem to significantly influence OKC recurrence; and 4 syndromic lesions seem to behave in the same manner as non-syndromic lesions when submitted to complementary treatments.

  3. Clinical and radiologic study of odontogenic keratocyst in jaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jong Ho; Park, Chang Seo

    1987-01-01

    The author has clinically and radiologically investigated 57 cases of odontogenic keratocyst in 47 patients consisted of 26 males and 21 females aged from 2 to 63 years, who were pathologically diagnosed as odontogenic keratocyst at infirmaries of dental colleges, Yonsei University and Seoul national university during 1965-1986. The results were as follows: 1. The peak incidence of the disease was on their teenagers (29.8%). The ratio of Male/Female was 1.23 : 1 and incidence rate of males showed higher than their counterpart. 2. The most frequent complains were swelling in (65.9%) followed by pus discharge, unknown mass, pain, residual root. 3. The most common site was mandibular third molar and mandibular ramus region (15.8%) followed by mandibular body and ramus, mandibular third molar, mandibular anterior teeth. Incidence of this disease in mandibule was higher than in maxilla. 4. The lesions not associated with adjacent teeth were (14.0%) and in the lesions associated with adjacent teeth (31.5%) showed root resorption, (50.9%) were without root resorption, (35.1%) showed tooth migration and (50.9%) were without tooth migration. 5. The border types of the lesions were scalloped type in (52.6%), smooth type in (47.4%) and morphological type were unilocular in (50.9%), multilocular in (49.1%). 6. The radiologic cyst type of the lesions were follicular type (42.1%) followed by primordial, unclassified odontogenic, residual, lateral periodontal, median mandibular, globulomaxillary type.

  4. Clinical and radiologic study of odontogenic keratocyst in jaws

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    Choi, Jong Ho; Park, Chang Seo [Dept. of Dental Radiology, Dental Science, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-11-15

    The author has clinically and radiologically investigated 57 cases of odontogenic keratocyst in 47 patients consisted of 26 males and 21 females aged from 2 to 63 years, who were pathologically diagnosed as odontogenic keratocyst at infirmaries of dental colleges, Yonsei University and Seoul national university during 1965-1986. The results were as follows: 1. The peak incidence of the disease was on their teenagers (29.8%). The ratio of Male/Female was 1.23 : 1 and incidence rate of males showed higher than their counterpart. 2. The most frequent complains were swelling in (65.9%) followed by pus discharge, unknown mass, pain, residual root. 3. The most common site was mandibular third molar and mandibular ramus region (15.8%) followed by mandibular body and ramus, mandibular third molar, mandibular anterior teeth. Incidence of this disease in mandibule was higher than in maxilla. 4. The lesions not associated with adjacent teeth were (14.0%) and in the lesions associated with adjacent teeth (31.5%) showed root resorption, (50.9%) were without root resorption, (35.1%) showed tooth migration and (50.9%) were without tooth migration. 5. The border types of the lesions were scalloped type in (52.6%), smooth type in (47.4%) and morphological type were unilocular in (50.9%), multilocular in (49.1%). 6. The radiologic cyst type of the lesions were follicular type (42.1%) followed by primordial, unclassified odontogenic, residual, lateral periodontal, median mandibular, globulomaxillary type.

  5. Clinicopathologic features associated with recurrence of the odontogenic keratocyst: a cohort retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Joanna Farias; Gomes, Carolina Cavalieri; de Mesquita, Ricardo Alves; Andrade Goulart, Eugênio Marcos; de Castro, Wagner Henriques; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of clinical, radiographic, surgical and histopathologic parameters in the recurrence of disease in a series of odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs). The sample comprised 24 sporadic OKC lesions from 24 patients. All patients had no previous treatment history and were treated by the same surgeon using a uniform treatment protocol (enucleation with peripheral ostectomy preceded or not preceded by decompression). Fourteen lesions (58.4%) were first submitted to decompression procedure. Eight patients (33%) developed recurrent lesions, with a mean follow-up time of 60.5 months (standard deviation [SD] = 31.3) and a mean disease-free interval for recurrent lesions of 19 months (SD = 4.9). Recurrence was significantly associated with poor clinical response to decompression (P = .027), remaining tooth with radiographic evidence of insinuation of the lesion between the dental roots (P = .009), and the presence of budding of the basal cells layer together with epithelial islands in the fibrous capsule (P = .019). Clinical, radiographic and histopathologic parameters may affect the relapse rate of OKCs and should individually guide treatment choice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Microbial flora of odontogenic abscesses in pet guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minarikova, A; Hauptman, K; Knotek, Z; Jekl, V

    2016-10-01

    Abscesses of odontogenic origin in guinea pigs pose a serious health problem and need to be treated with a combination of surgical and medical therapy. The aim of this prospective study was to describe the microbial flora of odontogenic abscesses associated with osteomyelitis in 24 pet guinea pigs, to perform antibiotic sensitivity testing, and to make recommendations for practitioners on the antibiotics of first choice. Inclusion criteria for the study included the animal being diagnosed with an odontogenic abscess which underwent surgery and was not pre-treated with an antibiotic. Inclusion criteria matched for 24 guinea pigs. Samples (pus, capsule and affected tooth/bone) for bacteriological examination were collected under sterile conditions during the surgical procedure. The most commonly isolated bacteria from abscesses of odontogenic origin were Bacteroides fragilis in 12.8 per cent (6/47) of cases, Pasteurella multocida in 10.6 per cent (5/47) and Peptostreptococcus anaerobius in 8.5 per cent (4/47). Aerobic bacterial species only were isolated in 29.2 per cent (7/24) of cases, anaerobic bacteria only were isolated in 33.3 per cent (8/24), and mixed infection with anaerobic and aerobic bacterial species was seen in 37.5 per cent (9/24). Aerobes (n=20) were sensitive to enrofloxacin and marbofloxacin in 100 per cent of samples, benzylpenicillin potassium (penicillin G, PNCG) in 90 per cent, cephalotin in 85 per cent, amoxicillin-clavulanate in 75 per cent, doxycycline in 70 per cent, gentamicin in 65 per cent and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in 55 per cent. Anaerobes (n=27) were sensitive to amoxicillin-clavulanate in 100 per cent of cases, clindamycin in 96.3 per cent, metronidazole in 92.6 per cent, PNCG in 92.6 per cent and cephalotin in 74.1 per cent. As guinea pigs are strictly herbivorous animals, based on the results of this study the recommended antibiotic treatment for odontogenic abscesses is a combination of fluoroquinolones and metronidazole

  7. Study of the biologic behavior of odontogenic keratocyst and orthokeratinaized odontogenic cyst using TGF-alpha and P53 markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyhimi, Parviz; Hashemzadeh, Zahra

    2014-04-01

    Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is an aggressive cyst, and its recurrence rate is higher than that of other odontogenic cysts. Orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) is less aggressive than OKC, but bears the probability of carcinomatous changes. In this study, we evaluated the expression and intensity of P53 and TGF-alpha in order to compare the biologic behavior or probable carcinomatous changes of these two cysts. In this cross-sectional study, 15 OKC and 15 OOC were stained immunohistochemically for P53 and TGF-alpha using the Novolink polymer method. Then, all slides were examined by an optical microscope with 400× magnification, and the stained cells in the basal and parabasal layers were counted. Finally, the results were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests (P-value0.05), but the expression of P53 and TGF-alpha in the parabasal layer in OKC was statistically higher compared to OOC (P<0.05). Considering the known role of P53 and TGF-alpha in malignant changes and the higher expression of P53 and TGF-alpha in OKC compared to those in OOC, the probability of carcinomatous changes was higher in OKC than in OOC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Recurrent odontogenic keratocysts in basal cell nevus syndrome: report of a case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Do; Kim, Jin Hoa; Choi, Dong Hoon; Koh, Kwang Soo; Lee, Sang Rae

    2004-01-01

    Basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) is principally characterized by cutaneous basal cell carcinomas, multiple odontogenic keratocysts and skeletal abnormalities. Our patient represented several characteristics of BCNS, such as, multiple odontogenic keratocysts, facial nevus, calcification of falx cerebri, parietal bossing and mental retardation. The cyst on posterior mandible showed recurrent and newly developing tendency.

  9. Intraosseous verrucous carcinoma arising from an orthokeratinized odontogenic keratocyst: A report of a rarest entity

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    Nagaraju Kamarthi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraosseous verrucous carcinomas (VCs arising from odontogenic cysts are a rare entity. An unusual case of a VC arising from the orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst is described for the first time. The microscopic features of the lesion are presented.

  10. Non-syndromic Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor Involving the Maxillary Sinus: Case Report

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    Rabelo, Gustavo Davi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The odontogenic keratocyst tumor is rarely found in maxilla. Case Report: This article describes a report of a case of a 60-year-old Caucasian female with an asymptomatic growth in the region of the posterior maxilla tumor diagnosed as odontogenic keratocyst. We discuss the diagnosis and workup for this type of injury.

  11. Implant-based rehabilitation of a large mandibular odontogenic keratocyst with 7-year follow-up

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    Janardan B Garde

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic keratocyst is a unique cyst because of its locally aggressive behavior, high recurrence rate, and characteristic histological appearance. In this case report we present a 25-year-old male patient with a large odontogenic keratocyst and treatment with enucleation and chemical cauterization followed by dental implants with a 7-year follow-up.

  12. An Unusual Site of Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor Presenting as Periapical (Radicular Cyst: A Rare Case Report

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    C Anand Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Here we are presenting a rare case report of an unusual site of extrafollicular adenomatoid odontogenic tumor in the mandible w.r.t 32, 33, 34 and 35 mimicking periapical disease clinical and radiographically. However, diagnosis of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor should be considered when the clinician is presented with a corticated radiolucency in the anterior lower jaw, especially in teens and young adults.

  13. Effect of Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. Boulardii and β-galactomannan oligosaccharide on porcine intestinal epithelial and dendritic cells challenged in vitro with Escherichia coli F4 (K88

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    Badia Roger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Probiotic and prebiotics, often called "immune-enhancing" feed additives, are believed to deal with pathogens, preventing the need of an immune response and reducing tissue damage. In this study, we investigated if a recently developed β-galactomannan (βGM had a similar protective role compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. Boulardii (Scb, a proven probiotic, in the context of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC infection. ETEC causes inflammation, diarrhea and intestinal damage in piglets, resulting in large economic loses worldwide. We observed that Scb and βGM products inhibited in vitro adhesion of ETEC on cell surface of porcine intestinal IPI-2I cells. Our data showed that Scb and βGM decreased the mRNA ETEC-induced gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, GM-CSF and chemokines CCL2, CCL20 and CXCL8 on intestinal IPI-2I. Furthermore, we investigated the putative immunomodulatory role of Scb and βGM on porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs per se and under infection conditions. We observed a slight up-regulation of mRNA for TNF-α and CCR7 receptor after co-incubation of DC with Scb and βGM. However, no differences were found in DC activation upon ETEC infection and Scb or βGM co-culture. Therefore, our results indicate that, similar to probiotic Scb, prebiotic βGM may protect intestinal epithelial cells against intestinal pathogens. Finally, although these products may modulate DC activation, their effect under ETEC challenge conditions remains to be elucidated.

  14. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor of the mandible: review of the literature and report of a rare case

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    Braunstein Stefan

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT is a rare odontogenic tumor which is often misdiagnosed as odontogenic cyst. To acquire additional information about AOT, all reports regarding AOT and cited in "pubmed" since 1990 onward were reviewed. AOT accounts for about 1% until 9% of all odontogenic tumors. It is predominantly found in young and female patients, located more often in the maxilla in most cases associated with an uneruppted permanent tooth. For radiological diagnose the intraoral periapical radiograph seems to be more useful than panoramic. However, AOT frequently resemble other odontogenic lesions such as dentigerous cysts or ameloblastoma. Immunohistochemically AOT is characterized by positive reactions with certain cytokeratins. Treatment is conservative and the prognosis is excellent. For illustration a rare case of an AOT in the mandible is presented.

  15. Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor in the mandible - An unusual case report

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    Anoop Kurian Mathew

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Keratocysytic Odontogenic tumor is a lesion occurring in the oral cavity that has a high recurrence rate. This lesion has an ability to mimic other lesions affecting the jaw. The tumor has a varied clinical and radiographic presentation. This article presents a case report of a 45 year old male patient presenting with an asymptomatic swelling on the right lower jaw associated with an impacted tooth and depicts an unusual radiographic picture. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(1.000: 45-48

  16. [Odontogenic adenomatoid tumor. Apropos of 2 cases in Dakar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantaloube, D; Larroque, G; Ahounou, J R; Rives, J M; Seurat, P

    1987-01-01

    Two cases of large adenomatoid odontogenic tumor seen recently in Senegal are thought to be the first cases of this type reported in West Africa. One patient was a 25 year old woman and the other an 11 year old boy, the clinical history and lesions being identical in both cases. Simple enucleation appeared to be the treatment of choice in view of the constantly reported benign nature of these tumors. It is difficult, or almost impossible however, to differentiate this tumor from dentigerous cyst on radiology, justifying routine minute pathologic examination of all operated paradental cysts.

  17. Cholesterol Granuloma in Odontogenic Cyst: An Enigmatic Lesion

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    Mala Kamboj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol granuloma (CG is the outcome of the foreign body type of response to the accumulation of cholesterol crystals and is frequently present in conjunction with chronic middle ear diseases. Recently, cases of CG in jaws have been reported, but still, very few cases have been found of CG in dental literature. This article presents three rare cases of CG in the wall of odontogenic cysts emphasizing on its possible role in expansion of the associated lesion and bone erosion. It also lays stress on the fact that more cases of CG should be reported so that its nature and pathogenesis in the oral cavity become more perceivable.

  18. Chronic cheek ulcer caused by odontogenic cutaneous sinus tract

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    Tomoya Sato

    2015-06-01

    Odontogenic cutaneous sinus tracts are often misdiagnosed, and they lead to facial wounds and scarring. Therefore, we must be aware of the possibility of this condition. A dental origin must be considered for chronic ulcers involving the cheek, chin and submental areas. The clinical course of this patient suggests two important clinical issues for prompt diagnosis. First, physical examination, including palpation and probing, are helpful for exploration of sinus tracts. Second, computed tomography is useful to detect the sinus tract and affected teeth. Computed tomography provides radiographic evidence of the relationship between the tooth and cutaneous region, and it may be superior to radiography.

  19. Developmental odontogenic cysts of jaws: a clinical study of 245 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Javad; Kahnamouii, Shiva Solahaye

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relative frequency of developmental odontogenic cysts in an Iranian population. In this study 245 cysts from both jaws, treated in the Faculty of Dentistry at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences during a 10-year period from 1998 to 2008, were analyzed in order to evaluate the incidence of such cysts. We had permission from all the patients. Case histories of 65% of male and 35% of female patients were analyzed. The age of the patients varied from 14 to 64 years, with an average of 33.21 ± 10.89. In this 10-year study of odontogenic cysts, 97 cases were developmental odontogenic cysts with the following inci-dence: dentigerous cyst, 44%; odontogenic keratocyst, 36%; primordial cyst, 9%; Gorlin cyst, 2%; lateral periodontal cyst, 3%; eruption cyst, 3%; and gingival cyst, 3% (adults 2%, infants 1%). A total of 60% of the cysts were found in the mandible and 40% in the maxilla. Regarding the mandible, the molar region was involved in 47% of the cases, premolar region in 33% and anterior region in 20% (total = 100%). Regarding the maxilla, the canine-to-canine region was involved in 52% of the cases, premolar region in 20% and molar region in 28% (total = 100%). An important finding in this study was the fact that 39% of the jaw cysts were developmental odontogenic cysts and the most common developmental odontogenic cysts were dentigerous cyst and OKC (odontogenic keratocyst).

  20. Clinical signs and histologic findings in dogs with odontogenic cysts: 41 cases (1995-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraete, Frank J M; Zin, Bliss P; Kass, Philip H; Cox, Darren P; Jordan, Richard C

    2011-12-01

    To characterize clinical signs and histologic findings in dogs with odontogenic cysts and determine whether histologic findings were associated with clinical features. Retrospective case series. 41 dogs. Medical records were reviewed to obtain clinical data, including breed, age, sex, and lesion location. Microscopic sections and results of diagnostic imaging were reviewed. Odontogenic cysts were identified in 41 dogs between 1995 and 2010. There were 29 dogs with dentigerous cysts, 1 with a radicular cyst, 1 with a lateral periodontal cyst, and 1 with a gingival inclusion cyst. In addition, 9 dogs with odontogenic cysts that had clinical and histologic features suggestive of, but not diagnostic for, odontogenic keratocysts seen in people were identified. In all 9 dogs, these cysts were located in the maxilla and surrounded the roots of normally erupted teeth. Of the 29 dogs with dentigerous cysts, 23 had a single cyst, 5 had 2 cysts, and 1 had 3 cysts. Six cysts were associated with an unerupted canine tooth, and 30 were associated with an unerupted first premolar tooth (1 cyst was associated both with an unerupted canine tooth and with an unerupted first premolar tooth). Dentigerous cysts were identified in a variety of breeds, but several brachycephalic breeds were overrepresented, compared with the hospital population during the study period. Results suggested that a variety of odontogenic cysts can occur in dogs. In addition, cysts that resembled odontogenic keratocysts reported in people were identified. We propose the term canine odontogenic parakeratinized cyst for this condition.

  1. Odontogenic cysts: demographic profile in a Brazilian population over a 38-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Lélia-Batista; Gordón-Núñez, Manuel-Antonio; Nonaka, Cassiano-Francisco-Weege; de Medeiros, Marcell-Costa; Torres, Tabita-Fernandes; Emiliano, Gustavo-Barbalho-Guedes

    2010-07-01

    To determine the distribution of odontogenic cysts diagnosed histologically over a period of 38 years in a Brazilian population according to age, gender and site affected and to compare these data with previously reported studies from other countries. A total of 1019 cases of odontogenic cysts diagnosed between 1970 and 2007 were studied. Clinical features obtained from the patient records and microscope slides were reviewed according to the 1992 World Health Organization classification. The mean age was 31.0 years, and there was a predominance of females. The most frequent odontogenic cysts were radicular cysts (61.4%), followed by dentigerous cysts (20.1%) and odontogenic keratocysts (6.4%). Radicular cysts were more frequent in females (62.0%), and the maxillary teeth were the site most commonly involved (63.05%). The peak incidence of dentigerous cysts occurred in the second decade of life, with the posterior region of the mandible being the site most affected (46.3%), followed by the anterior region of the maxilla (27.8%). Odontogenic keratocysts showed a peak incidence between the third and fourth decades of life and predominance among females. The posterior region of the mandible was the site most frequently affected (65.6%). The present results showed a similar frequency of odontogenic cysts in this Brazilian population and other populations around the world, with inflammatory cysts being identified as the most frequent odontogenic cyst. Radicular cysts, dentigerous cysts, and odontogenic keratocysts are the most common cystic lesions, accounting for 87.9% of all odontogenic cysts.

  2. Comparative study of TGF-alpha and P53 markers′ expression in odontogenic keratocyst and orthokeratinaized odontogenic cyst

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    Parviz Deyhimi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC is an aggressive cyst and its recurrence is higher than other odontogenic cysts, orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC is a cyst with moderate biological behavior in comparison with OKC, but with the probability of carcinomatous changes. The present study aims to evaluate the quantity and intensity of the expression of P53 protein and transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha in OKC and OOC in order to compare the biologic behavior of these two cysts. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study. The samples include 30 cysts (15 OKC and 15 OOC, all stained immunohistochemically for P53 protein and TGF-alpha by the Novolinke polymer method. Then, all the cases were examined with an optical microscope with Χ400 magnification and the stained cells were counted in the basal and parabasal layers. Finally the results were analyzed by the Mann–and Wilcoxon tests (P value < 0.05. Results: The difference between the expression of P53 protein in the basal layer in OKC and OOC was not statistically significant (P value = 0.076. The difference between the expression of P53 protein in the parabasal layer in OKC and OOC was statistically significant (P value = 0.003; moreover, the difference between the expression of TGF-alpha in the basal layer in OKC and OOC was not statistically significant (P value = 0.284. The difference between the expression of TGF-alpha in the parabasal layer in OKC and OOC was statistically significant (P value = 0.015. Conclusion: Since there was a higher expression of P53 protein and TGF-alpha in OKC compared to those in OOC, the probability of carcinomatous changes was at least theoretically higher in OKC than in OOC.

  3. Odontogenic tumors: A review of 675 cases in Eastern Libya

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    Saravana HL Goteti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the relative frequency of odontogenic tumors (OTs in an Eastern Libyan population based on the 2005 World Health Organization (WHO classification, and also to compare the actual data with previous studies. Materials and Methods: We retrieved and analyzed 85 OTs from a total of 675 tumors and tumor-like lesions of the oral and perioral structures, for gender, age, tumor site, and frequency. The diagnosis was based on the most recent WHO (2005 classification of OTs. Results: OTs constituted 12.6% of all oral/jaw tumors and tumor-like lesions. Ameloblastoma (28.2% was the most common type, followed by keratocystic odontogenic tumor (25.2% and odontoma (19.9%. The male: female ratio was 1.2:1, and maxilla: mandible ratio 1:2. The mean age of occurrence of tumors was 29 years with a peak incidence between 10 and 40 years. Conclusions: OTs are relatively common lesion in this Libyan Population, but the incidence of tumors is neither similar to Caucasians nor Sub-Saharan population.

  4. [Management of odontogenic infections in Primary Care: Antibiotic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles Raya, Purificación; Javierre Miranda, Ana Pilar; Moreno Millán, Nemesio; Mas Casals, Ariadna; de Frutos Echániz, Elena; Morató Agustí, M Luisa

    2017-12-01

    Our aim is to contribute to the rational use of antibiotics prescribed by family doctors when a patient consults for a dental problem. Nowadays we should not ask which antibiotic to give. The question has to be if we need to prescribe antibiotics in front of the most common odontogenic infections seen in our practice. We review the main dental infections, which should be their appropriate management and the role of prevention. We need to know the complexity of the oral microbiome because it?ll depend on the appropriateness of the antibiotherapy, the evolution towards cure or progression of some odontogenic infections. The bacterial plaque, formed by the biofilm, behaves as a barrier to the action of antimicrobials. It?s in the prevention of its development as well as in it mechanical elimination once shaped, in what the family doctor should insist. We must transmit antibiotics don?t heal dental pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma of the mandible: a treatment strategy

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    Sabrina FERREIRA

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma (CCOC is a rare odontogenic tumor of the jaws, histologically characterized by the presence of agglomerates of cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm. The patient, a 62-year-old Caucasian woman, presented an intraosseous lesion in the mandibular symphysis. A clinical examination revealed a discrete volumetric increase with a hard consistency, palpable to extraoral and intraoral examinations. Imaging studies revealed an extensive radiolucent area, without defined limits, extending from the region of the right second premolar to the left canine. Incisional biopsy analysis indicated a diagnosis of CCOC. The treatment proposed was segmental resection of the mandible with a safety margin. After six months without recurrence, definitive mandibular reconstruction was performed using an iliac crest graft, followed by rehabilitation with implant-supported denture after five months. After three years of post-resection follow-up, the patient has shown no evidence of recurrence or metastasis. She continues to be under follow-up. To conclude, CCOC must be considered a malignant tumor with aggressive behavior. Previous studies have shown that resection with free margins is a treatment with a lower rate of recurrence. Nevertheless, long-term follow-up is necessary for such patients.

  6. [Structure of maxillary sinus mucous membrane under normal conditions and in odontogenic perforative sinusitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baĭdik, O D; Logvinov, S V; Zubarev, S G; Sysoliatin, P G; Gurin, A A

    2011-01-01

    Methods of light, electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry were used to study the samples of maxillary sinus (MS) mucous membrane (MM) under normal conditions and in odontogenic sinusitis. To study the normal structure, the samples were obtained at autopsy from 26 human corpses 12-24 hours after death. Electron microscopic and immunohistochemical study was performed on biopsies of grossly morphologically unchanged MS MM, obtained during the operations for retention cysts in 6 patients. MS MM in perforative sinusitis was studied using the biopsies obtained from 43 patients. The material is broken into 4 groups depending on perforative sinusitis duration. Under normal conditions, MS MM is lined with a pseudostratified columnar ciliated epithelium. Degenerative changes of ciliated epithelial cells were already detected at short time intervals after MS perforations and become apparent due to reduction of specific volume of mitochondria and, rough endoplasmic reticulum, and increase of nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio. In the globlet cells, the reduction of nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio was associated with the disturbance of the secretory product release. At time intervals exceeding 3 months, epithelium underwent metaplasia into simple cuboidal and stratified squamous keratinized, while in MS MM lamina propria, cellular infiltration was increased. CD4+ cell content in sinus MM gradually increased, while at late periods after perforation occurrence it decreased. Low CD4+ cell count within the epithelium and the absence of muromidase on the surface of MS MM was detected. With the increase of the time interval since MS perforation, the number of CD8+ and CD20+ cells in MS MM was found to increase.

  7. Immunohistochemical evaluation of myofibroblasts in odontogenic cysts and tumors: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syamala, Deepa; Suresh, Rakesh; Janardhanan, Mahija; Savithri, Vindhya; Anand, Prem P; Jose, Amrutha

    2016-01-01

    Myofibroblasts are fibroblasts with smooth muscle-like features characterized by the presence of a contractile apparatus and found in the connective tissue stroma of normal tissues such as blood vessels and lymph nodes. They are now thought to play a role in the synthesis and reorganization of extracellular matrix, which could contribute to the aggressive biologic behavior of the lesions. To compare the mean number of stromal myofibroblasts in dentigerous cysts (DCs), keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) and ameloblastoma; and to derive a correlation between the stromal myofibroblasts and the known biologic behavior of the lesions. A cross-sectional immunohistochemical analysis of cases of DC, KCOT and ameloblastoma. Twenty paraffin-embedded tissue blocks each of DC, KCOT and multicystic ameloblastoma were selected for the study and diagnosis confirmed through hematoxylin and eosin staining. Tissue sections were analyzed for the number of myofibroblasts using alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) immunostaining. Differences in the mean number of α-SMA positive cells in each group were analyzed using one-way ANOVA test. Intergroup comparisons of mean values of α-SMA positive cells were performed using Mann-Whitney U-test. Ameloblastoma showed the highest number of myofibroblasts, whereas DC showed the lowest. Among the groups, there were significant differences between the myofibroblast counts among DC and KCOT and between DC and ameloblastoma, whereas the difference in counts was not statistically significant between KCOT and ameloblastoma. A positive correlation was observed between the myofibroblast count and the known biologic behavior of the lesions. Myofibroblasts may act in close association with the epithelial cells to bring about changes in stromal microenvironment, favorable to the growth and progression of the lesion. They may be of great value in predicting the biologic behavior and growth potential of such lesions.

  8. The Inflammatory Radicular Cysts Have Higher Concentration of TNF-α in Comparison to Odontogenic Keratocysts (Odontogenic Tumour

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    Vladimir Jurisic

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available TNF-α is a pleiotropic cytokine that is considered as a primary modifier of inflammatory and immune reaction in response to various inflammatory diseases and tumour. We investigated levels of TNF-α in 43 radicular cysts and 15 odontogenic keratocysts, obtained from patients undergoing surgery, under local anaesthesia, and after aspiration of cystic fluid from non-ruptured cysts. TNF-α is elevated in both cysts’ fluid, but higher values were found in radicular cysts in comparison to keratocysts. The significantly higher concentration of TNF-α was associated with smaller radicular cysts, higher protein concentration, higher presence of inflammatory cells in peri cystic tissues, and the degree of vascularisation and cysts wall thickness (Mann-Whitney U-test, p<0.05. No correlation was found based on these parameters in odontogenic keratocyst, but all cysts have detectable concentrations of TNF-α. We here for the first time present that a difference in the concentration of TNF-α exists between these two cystic types.

  9. A rare case report of an adenomatoid odontogenic tumor associated with odontoma in the maxilla

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    Agnes Assao

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Therefore, it is necessary similar cases to be published to increase the knowledge about the clinical behavior and evolution of this tumor, to enable such lesions to be more clearly defined in the next classification of odontogenic tumors.

  10. Metastatic ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma: description of a case and search for actionable targets

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    Maximilien J. Rappaport

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma (GCOC is an exceedingly rare malignant tumor on the spectrum of already uncommon odontogenic or dentinogenic tumors. We describe here the case of metastatic GCOC in a patient with a history of recurrent dentinogenic ghost cell tumor of the mandible, now presenting with bilateral pleural effusions. We will discuss typical histopathologic and histochemical features of GCOC, along with results of genomic testing and their role in directing therapy.

  11. Odontogenic keratocyst: The role of the orthodontist in the diagnosis of initial lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leandro Santos, Raphaela Silva; Ramos-Perez, Flávia Maria de Moraes; Silva, Gleyson Kleber do Amaral; Rocha, André Caroli; Prado, José Divaldo; Perez, Danyel Elias da Cruz

    2017-10-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) are locally infiltrative odontogenic cysts that are usually diagnosed during routine radiographic examinations. Therefore, it is critical that dental practitioners, in particular orthodontists, recognize and diagnose OKCs to recommend appropriate treatment. This report describes a patient whose OKC was not initially identified during orthodontic pretreatment. In addition, this report discusses the clinical and radiographic features of OKCs, as well as the differential diagnoses of these lesions. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Management of odontogenic cysts by endonasal endoscopic techniques: A systematic review and case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Michael J; Luong, Amber; Yao, William C; Citardi, Martin J

    2018-01-01

    Odontogenic cysts and tumors of the maxilla may be amendable to management by endonasal endoscopic techniques, which may reduce the morbidity associated with open procedures and avoid difficult reconstruction. To perform a systematic review that evaluates the feasibility and outcomes of endoscopic techniques in the management of different odontogenic cysts. A case series of our experience with these minimally invasive techniques was assembled for insight into the technical aspects of these procedures. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses was used to identify English-language studies that reported the use of endoscopic techniques in the management of odontogenic cysts. Several medical literature data bases were searched for all occurrences in the title or abstract of the terms "odontogenic" and "endoscopic" between January 1, 1950, and October 1, 2016. Publications were evaluated for the technique used, histopathology, complications, recurrences, and the follow-up period. A case series of patients who presented to a tertiary rhinology clinic and who underwent treatment of odontogenic cysts by an endoscopic technique was included. A systematic review identified 16 case reports or series that described the use of endoscopic techniques for the treatment of odontogenic cysts, including 45 total patients. Histopathologies encountered were radicular (n = 16) and dentigerous cysts (n = 10), and keratocystic odontogenic tumor (n = 12). There were no reported recurrences or major complications for a mean follow-up of 29 months. A case series of patients in our institution identified seven patients without recurrence for a mean follow-up of 10 months. Endonasal endoscopic treatment of various odontogenic cysts are described in the literature and are associated with effective treatment of these lesions for an average follow-up period of >2 years. These techniques have the potential to reduce morbidity associated with the resection of these

  13. The central odontogenic fibroma: How difficult can be making a preliminary diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Pippi, Roberto; Santoro, Marcello; Patini, Romeo

    2016-01-01

    Central odontogenic fibroma (COF) is a rare benign odontogenic tumor derived from the dental ectomesenchymal tissues. A 16-year-old Caucasian female patient was referred by her dentist for a radiolucent asymptomatic area associated with the crown of the impacted lower right third molar. A preliminary diagnosis of a follicular cyst was supposed. The lesion was surgically removed under general anesthesia together with the impacted tooth. The microscopic diagnosis of the excised tissue revealed ...

  14. Ameloblastic Fibro-Odontoma: A Diagnostic Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elen de Souza Tolentino

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An 11-year-old girl presented to our department to have a second opinion regarding a lesion involving her left mandible. She had previously undergone several radiographic exams including panoramic, helical, and cone-beam computed tomography. Radiographic examinations revealed a well-defined radiolucent region, which contained an irregular radiopaque mass of 3 cm in diameter, localized to the left angle of the mandible. Our presumptive diagnosis was complex odontoma. Excisional biopsy was performed, and microscopic features showed strands and islands of odontogenic epithelium showing peripheral palisading and loosely arranged central cells, identical to stellate reticulum, embedded in a myxoid cell-rich stroma resembling the dental papilla. Dentin and enamel were also presented. The diagnosis was ameloblastic fibro-odontoma, which is a rare mixed odontogenic tumor, derived from epithelial and ectomesenchymal elements that form the dental tissues.

  15. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor with peripheral cemento-osseous reactive proliferation: report of 2 cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Aparna; Slater, Lee J; Hamao-Sakamoto, Aya; Waters, Patrick; Kessler, Harvey P; Wright, John M

    2016-09-01

    Two cases of a rare variant of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor encompassed by a prominent reactive cemento-osseous proliferation are reported. This unique variant of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor has only been seen twice in the authors' collective experience. Literature documenting the histopathologic patterns of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor and the occurrence of other combined lesions other is reviewed and discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Frequency of Odontogenic Tumors in Zahedan-Iran from 2000 to 2010

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    Hamideh Kadeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Odontogenic tumors constitute an important aspect of oral and maxillofacial pathology. Frequency of odontogenic tumors varies in different societies but no study has been done in Zahedan so far. The purpose of this study was to achieve the sex, location and age distribution of odontogenic tumors and frequency of each one in a period of ten years.Materials & Methods: In this study, documents in archive of maxillofacial pathology department of Zahedan dental school, Khatamolanbia, Tamin ejtemaei Hospital and private laboratories were reviewed from 2000 to 2010. Data about age, sex, location of tumors and relation with impacted tooth were extracted and were submitted in the forms.Results: In this study, among the 1125 cases of the oromaxillofacial lesions, 50 cases of odontogenic tumors were found. Among the different tumors, keratocyst odontogenic tumor (KOT was the most common odontogenic tumor (48%, followed by ameloblastoma and odontoma with frequency of 24% and 12%, respectively. There were no cases of malignancy. The incidence of these lesions was 52% in women and 48% in men. The most common location of tumors was posterior of mandible and tumors were more frequent in the third decade of life. In 12 cases, the lesions were accompanied by impacted teeth.Conclusion: In this study the most frequent tumors were KOT, Ameloblastoma and odontoma respectively.

  17. Odontogenic cysts: a retrospective study of 1227 cases in an Iranian population from 1987 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifian, Mohammad J; Khalili, Maryam

    2011-09-01

    Odontogenic cysts constitute a major part of oral pathological lesions, but little is known about their distribution patterns in various populations. In this retrospective study, patient records from the archive of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology at the Faculty of Dentistry affiliated to the Tehran University of Medical Sciences were reviewed. Cases diagnosed as odontogenic cyst from 1987 to 2007 were selected and histopathologically re-evaluated to confirm the diagnosis. Patients' demographic information (age and sex) and location of the lesion were recorded and analyzed using descriptive statistics. From a total of 8529 files reviewed, the diagnosis of odontogenic cyst was confirmed in 1227 cases (14.4%). The overall male to female ratio was 1.33:1. The patients' age ranged from 3 to 84 years with a mean of 28 years. 49% of cysts were found in maxilla and 50.4% in mandible. Radicular cyst was the most common type followed by dentigerous cyst, odontogenic keratocyst, residual cyst and paradental cyst. Lateral periodontal cyst, eruption cyst, glandular odontogenic cyst and gingival cyst of adults were also reported. The distribution pattern of odontogenic cysts in Iran is relatively similar to that in other parts of the world. The importance of complete clinical reports for final diagnosis of these lesions and routine follow-up examinations is emphasized.

  18. Conservative Treatment Protocol for Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumour: a Follow-up Study of 3 Cases

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    Gülsün Yildirim

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The keratocystic odontogenic tumour is classified as a developmental cyst derived from the enamel organ or from the dental lamina. The treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumour of the jaw remains controversial. The aim of this study was to report the outcome of our conservative treatment protocol for keratocystic odontogenic tumour.Methods: Three patients with different complaints referred to Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinic, Faculty of Dentistry, Selçuk University. Initial biopsy was carried out in all patients and keratocystic odontogenic tumours was diagnosed subsequent to histopathological examination. The patients with keratocystic odontogenic tumours were treated by enucleation followed by open packing. This conservative treatment protocol was selected because of existing young aged patients. The average follow-up duration of the cases was 2 years.Results: Out of 3 cases, 2 lesions were present in mandible and 1 lesion in maxilla. There was no evidence of recurrence during follow-up. All the cases were monitored continuously with panoramic radiographs, computed tomography and clinical evaluations.Conclusions: This conservative treatment protocol for keratocystic odontogenic tumours, based on enucleation followed by open packing would be a possible choice with a view of offering low recurrence rate and low morbidity rate particularly in young patients.

  19. Syndromic odontogenic keratocyst: A case report and review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Fazil

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) may occur in two different forms, either as solitary (nonsyndromic OKCs) or as multiple OKCs (syndromic OKCs). Multiple OKCs usually occur as one of the findings in Gorlin–Goltz syndrome with other features such as skin carcinomas and rib, eye, and neurologic abnormalities. We report a rare case of Gorlin–Goltz syndrome in a 20-year-old male patient who presented with a slow growing swelling on lower right and left back teeth region since 2 months. Apart from these, other findings were frontal bossing, depressed nasal bridge, ocular hypertelorism, prominent supra orbital ridge, and mild mandibular prognathism. Excision was done and microscopic study revealed OKC and the follow-up could not be carried out for the complete management. We also presented a review of its pathogenesis, criterion, and differences between syndromic and nonsyndromic OKCs and suggest to thoroughly examine any patient who presents with multiple OKCs to rule out syndromic variety. PMID:27011939

  20. Odontogenic Keratocyst Looks Can Be Deceptive, Causing Endodontic Misdiagnosis

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    K. M. Veena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC is the cyst arising from the cell rests of dental lamina. It can occur anywhere in the jaw, but commonly seen in the posterior part of the mandible. Radiographically, most OKCs are unilocular when presented at the periapex and can be mistaken for radicular or lateral periodontal cyst. When the cyst is multilocular and located at the molar ramus area, it may be confused to ameloblastoma. Lots of cases have been reported in the literature where OKC is associated with the nonvital tooth. So trauma could be one of the reasons in inducing this cyst. In our case, it was in the anterior region at the periapex of nonvital tooth having traumatic occlusion. Hence, the diagnosis of radicular cyst was made and endodontic treatment was done.

  1. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour mimicking a periapical cyst in pregnant woman

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Mohit; Bhandari, Neha

    2010-01-01

    EJ, Murrah VA. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor presenting as periapical disease. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod 1997;84:557-60) and is associated with the crown of an impacted tooth, commonly the maxillary canine. We present a rare case of extrafollicular AOT mimicking a periapical...... cyst that originated in a woman in her first trimester of pregnancy and enlarged rapidly thereafter. The lesion was enucleated and sent for histopathology and immunohistochemistry, which revealed AOT with a cystic component with no dependence on oestrogen or progestrone for its growth. This case of AOT...... introduces us to the unique variation in its presentation and the difficulty in differentiation from periapical disease of inflammatory origin....

  2. Biological pathways involved in the aggressive behavior of the keratocystic odontogenic tumor and possible implications for molecular oriented treatment - An overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendes, R.A.; Carvalho, J.F.C.; van der Waal, I.

    2010-01-01

    In the classification of Head and Neck Tumors, published in 2005 by the World Health Organization Classification, the odontogenic keratocyst has been reclassified as a benign intraosseous neoplasm, calling it "keratocystic odontogenic tumor" (KCOT). Significant differences on the molecular level

  3. Biomineralization, life-time of odontogenic cells and differential expression of the two homeobox genes MSX-1 and DLX-2 in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lézot, F; Thomas, B; Hotton, D; Forest, N; Orestes-Cardoso, S; Robert, B; Sharpe, P; Berdal, A

    2000-03-01

    Msx and Dlx homeobox genes encode for transcription factors that control early morphogenesis. More specifically, Msx-1, Msx-2, and Dlx-2 homeobox genes contribute to the initial patterning of the dentition. The present study is devoted to the potential role of those homeobox genes during the late formation of mineralized tissues, using the rodent incisor as an experimental system. The continuously erupting mandibular incisor allows (1) the coinvestigation of the whole sequences of amelogenesis and dentinogenesis, aligned along the main dental axis in a single sample in situ and (2) the differential characterization of transcripts generated by epithelial and ectomesenchymal odontogenic cells. Northern blot experiments on microdissected cells showed the continuing expression of Msx-2 and Dlx-2 in the later stages of dental biomineralization, differentially in epithelial and ectomesenchymal compartments. Transgenic mice produced with LacZ reporter constructs for Dlx-2 and Msx-1 were used to detect different components of the gene expression patterns with the sensitive beta-galactosidase histoenzymology. The results show a prominent epithelial involvement of Dlx-2, with stage-specific variations in the cells involved in enamel formation. Quantitative analyses identified specific modulations of Dlx-2 expression in ameloblasts depending on the anatomical sites of the incisor, showing more specifically an inverse linear relationship between the Dlx-2 promoter activity level and enamel thickness. This investigation extends the role of homeoproteins to postmitotic stages, which would control secretory cell activity, in a site-specific manner as shown here for Dlx-2.

  4. Demographic distribution of odontogenic cysts in Isfahan (Iran) over a 23-year period (1988-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Negin; Razavi, Sayed Mohammad; Kowkabi, Mahsa; Navabi, Amir Arsalan

    2013-03-01

    Odontogenic cysts are relatively common lesions which can cause different complications. As demographic information is lacking in Iran and specially in Isfahan, the aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of odontogenic cysts according to age, gender and affected area among patients referring to the Oral Pathology Department of the Dental School of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (Iran) over a 23-year period. A total of 7412 diagnosed lesions recorded in the Oral Pathology Department archives of Isfahan Dental School between 1988 and 2010 were reevaluated, then odontogenic cysts were separated through reviewing microscopic slides according to the 2005 World Health Organization classification and variables such as age, gender, the infected jaw, and its specific region were obtained by SPSS Version 16.0 from the recorded database. 21.62% of the lesions were odontogenic cysts, of which 48.72% were inflammatory and 51.28% were developmental cysts. These cysts were more common in the mandible. The mean age of patients was 29.53 ± 16.1. Male to female ratio was 1.31:1. The four most frequent odontogenic cysts were radicular cysts (35.12%), dentigerous cysts (25.77%), odontogenic keratocysts (22.58%) and residual cysts (12.98%). Odontogenic cysts are fairly frequent jaw lesions (21.62%), of which radicular cyst was the most common cyst. The four most common lesions constituted a sum of 96.45% of the total. In general, the prevalence rates in our study are similar to the studies from other geographic parts of the world but with a lower incidence of inflammatory cysts, higher prevalence of dentigerous cysts and residual cysts and also mandibular predominance for residual cysts.

  5. Prevalence and distribution of odontogenic and nonodontogenic cysts in a Turkish Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun-Bulut, Emel; Özden, Bora; Gündüz, Kaan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the relative frequency and distribution of odontogenic and nonodontogenic cysts in a large Turkish population. Study Design A retrospective survey of jaw cysts was undertaken at the Oral Diagnosis and Radiology and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department, Ondokuz Mayıs University Dental School, Samsun, Turkey. Data were retrieved from clinical files, imaging, and histopathology reports from 2000 to 2008; a total of 12,350 patients were included. In each case, we analyzed age, gender, type and number of cysts, and cyst location. Imaging patterns and pathologies associated with cystic lesions were also determined. Results: The prevalence of odontogenic and nonodontogenic cysts was 3.51%; males were affected more frequently than females. There were 452 odontogenic cysts (98.5%) and seven nonodontogenic cysts (1.5%). The most frequent odontogenic cyst was radicular (54.7%), followed by dentigerous (26.6%), residual (13.7%), odontogenic keratocyst (3.3%), and lateral periodontal cyst (0.2%). Nasopalatine duct cyst (1.5%) was the only nonodontogenic cyst. By age, cysts peaked in the third decade (24.2%). Concerning location, no statistically significant difference was found between the maxilla and mandible (p>0.05). The most frequent radiological feature of these lesions was unilocular cyst (93.7%). Pathologies associated with cystic lesions occurred in 14.7%. Conclusion: The prevalence of both odontogenic and nonodontogenic cysts were lower than that reported in many other studies. In our study population, cysts were mainly inflammatory in origin. Key words: Prevalence, odontogenic, nonodontogenic, cysts. PMID:21743428

  6. Developmental odontogenic cysts of jaws: a clinical study of 245 cases

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    Javad Yazdani

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. The aim of this study was to investigate the relative frequency of developmental odontogenic cysts in an Iranian population. Materials and methods. In this study 245 cysts from both jaws, treated in the Faculty of Dentistry at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences during a 10-year period from 1998 to 2008, were analyzed in order to evaluate the incidence of such cysts. We had permission from all the patients. Case histories of 65% of male and 35% of female patients were analyzed. The age of the patients varied from 14 to 64 years, with an average of 33.21 ± 10.89. Results. In this 10-year study of odontogenic cysts, 97 cases were developmental odontogenic cysts with the following incidence: dentigerous cyst, 44%; odontogenic keratocyst, 36%; primordial cyst, 9%; Gorlin cyst, 2%; lateral periodontal cyst, 3%; eruption cyst, 3%; and gingival cyst, 3% (adults 2%, infants 1%. A total of 60% of the cysts were found in the mandible and 40% in the maxilla. Regarding the mandible, the molar region was involved in 47% of the cases, premolar region in 33% and anterior region in 20% (total = 100%. Regarding the maxilla, the canine-to-canine region was involved in 52% of the cases, premolar region in 20% and molar region in 28% (total = 100%. Conclusion. An important finding in this study was the fact that 39% of the jaw cysts were developmental odontogenic cysts and the most common developmental odontogenic cysts were dentigerous cyst and OKC (odontogenic keratocyst.

  7. A pigmented calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with compound odontoma: a case report and review of literature

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    Borkosky Silvia S

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pigmented intraosseous odontogenic lesions are rare with only 47 reported cases in the English literature. Among them, pigmented calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor, formerly known as calcifying odontogenic cyst, is the most common lesion with 20 reported cases. Methods A case of pigmented calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with odontoma occurring at the mandibular canine-premolar region of a young Japanese boy is presented with radiographic, and histological findings. Special staining, electron microscopic study and immunohistochemical staining were also done to characterize the pigmentation. Results The pigments in the lesion were confirmed to be melanin by Masson-Fontana staining and by transmission electron microscopy. The presence of dendritic melanocytes within the lesion was also demonstrated by S-100 immunostaining. Conclusion The present case report of pigmented calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with odontoma features a comprehensive study on melanin and melanocytes, including histochemical, immunohistochemical and transmission electron microscopic findings.

  8. Surgical management of dentigerous cyst and keratocystic odontogenic tumor in children: a conservative approach and 7-year follow-up

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    Maria Cristina Zindel Deboni

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Dentigerous cyst (DC is one of the most common odontogenic cysts of the jaws and rarely recurs. On the other hand, keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT, formerly known as odontogenic keratocyst (OKC, is considered a benign unicystic or multicystic intraosseous neoplasm and one of the most aggressive odontogenic lesions presenting relatively high recurrence rate and a tendency to invade adjacent tissue. Two cases of these odontogenic lesions occurring in children are presented. They were very similar in clinical and radiographic characteristics, and both were treated by marsupialization. The treatment was chosen in order to preserve the associated permanent teeth with complementary orthodontic treatment to direct eruption of the associated permanent teeth. At 7-years of follow-up, none of the cases showed recurrence.

  9. Three-dimensional simulated microgravity culture improves the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cell in PLGA scaffolds implanted in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanping; He, Lina; Pan, Shuang; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Weiwei; Yi, Hong; Niu, Yumei

    2017-02-01

    Tooth regeneration through stem cell-based therapy is a promising treatment for tooth decay and loss. Human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) have been widely identified as the stem cells with the most potential for tooth tissue regeneration. However, the culture of hDPSCs in vitro for tissue engineering is challenging, as cells may proliferate slowly or/and differentiate poorly in vivo. Dynamic three‑dimensional (3D) simulated microgravity (SMG) created using the rotary cell culture system is considered to an effective tool, which contributes to several cell functions. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the effect of dynamic 3D SMG culture on the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation abilities of hDPSCs in poly (lactic‑co‑glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffolds in nude mice. The hDPSCs on PLGA scaffolds were maintained separately in the 3D SMG culture system and static 3D cultures with osteogenic medium for 7 days in vitro. Subsequently, the cell‑PLGA complexes were implanted subcutaneously on the backs of nude mice for 4 weeks. The results of histological and immunohistochemical examinations of Ki‑67, type I collagen, dentin sialoprotein and DMP‑1 indicated that the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation abilities of the hDPSCs prepared in the 3D SMG culture system were higher, compared with those prepared in the static culture system. These findings suggested that dynamic 3D SMG culture likely contributes to tissue engineering by improving the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation abilities of hDPSCs in vivo.

  10. Squamous cell carcinoma arising within a maxillary odontogenic keratocyst: A rare occurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalali, Elnaz [Eliray Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology Consulting Services, Miami (United States); Tadinada, Aditya; Rengasamy, Kandasamy; Ferneini, Elie M. [University of Connecticut, School of Dental Medicine, Farmington (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arising within the lining of an odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a rare occurrence. Although potentially locally destructive, OKC is a benign odontogenic process that typically presents with clinical and radiographic features characteristic of a benign intraosseous neoplasm. We present the clinical and radiographic features of a maxillary mass that demonstrated SCC arising from the lining of an OKC. Although the initial clinical and radiographic presentation suggested an infection or malignant neoplasm, biopsies revealed an infiltrative well-differentiated SCC contiguous with and arising from the focus of a pre-existing OKC. The patient subsequently underwent a type II hemi-maxillectomy with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. This report discusses the clinical and radiographic features associated with intraosseous malignancies, especially those arising from an otherwise benign odontogenic lesion. While the majority of OKCs are benign, the current report illustrates the potential for carcinomatous transformation within the lining of an OKC.

  11. Ameloglastic fibro-odontoma with a change of calcifying odontogenic cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Hyuk Rok; Han, Jin Woo; Lee, Jin Ho; Choi, Hang Moon; Park, In Woo; Lee, Suk Keun

    2001-01-01

    Thirteen-year-old girl complaining of the swelling and pain on the left midface visited our dental hospital. On the radiographic examination, well-defined radiolucent lesion with hyperostotic border was found in the left maxilla accompanying with the external root resorption of the involved teeth and the displaced second molar. CT showed calcified bodies, thinning of hard palate, inferior orbital wall and lateral wall of nasal fossa, and thinning and perforation of the buccal plate of the maxilla. Enucleation and curettage of the lesion and nasoantrostomy was carried out and histopathologic examination mainly showed a solid tumor tissue composed of odontogenic epithelium and pulp tissues admixed with dentin and enamel formation. And some part of reduced follicular epithelium of tooth germ showed a change mimicking calcifying odontogenic cyst. Taken together, we concluded the lesion is an ameloblastic fibro-odontoma with as change of calcifying odontogenic cyst

  12. Squamous cell carcinoma arising within a maxillary odontogenic keratocyst: A rare occurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalali, Elnaz; Tadinada, Aditya; Rengasamy, Kandasamy; Ferneini, Elie M.

    2017-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arising within the lining of an odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a rare occurrence. Although potentially locally destructive, OKC is a benign odontogenic process that typically presents with clinical and radiographic features characteristic of a benign intraosseous neoplasm. We present the clinical and radiographic features of a maxillary mass that demonstrated SCC arising from the lining of an OKC. Although the initial clinical and radiographic presentation suggested an infection or malignant neoplasm, biopsies revealed an infiltrative well-differentiated SCC contiguous with and arising from the focus of a pre-existing OKC. The patient subsequently underwent a type II hemi-maxillectomy with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. This report discusses the clinical and radiographic features associated with intraosseous malignancies, especially those arising from an otherwise benign odontogenic lesion. While the majority of OKCs are benign, the current report illustrates the potential for carcinomatous transformation within the lining of an OKC

  13. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor of the right mandibular condyle: A rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamala Rawson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC was first described by Hans Philipsen in 1956. The World Health Organization (WHO has designated OKC as a Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor (KCOT. KCOT is defined as ′a benign uni- or multicystic, intraosseous tumor of odontogenic origin, with a characteristic lining of parakeratinized stratified squamous epithelium, with a potential for aggressive, infiltrative behavior′. Radiographically, most OKCs are unilocular, presenting a well-defined peripheral rim and a central cavity having satellite cysts. It is characterized by a thin fibrous capsule and a lining of keratinized stratified squamous epithelium, which is typically corrugated, usually about 6 to 10 cells in thickness, and generally without rete pegs. The present case report describes an unusual case of KCOT with minimal clinical presentation indicative of a tumor highlighting the potential difficulties in determining the diagnosis.

  14. Primary intraosseous carcinoma arising from odontogenic keratocyst with parotid lymph node metastasis. A case report

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    Siddesh Shenoy

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC arising from odontogenic cyst lining is rare. The exact incidence of carcinoma arising in odontogenic cyst is unknown, but it is estimated to vary between 1 and 2/1000. The pathogenesis is unknown, but a long-standing inflammation and continuous intracystic pressure have been suggested as possible causative factors. Metastasis from these lesions is not common (< 20%, and most of the carcinomas are moderately to well differentiated. To qualify as a primary intraosseous carcinoma, there must be no initial connection with the oral mucosa, overlying skin, or antral or nasal mucosa. This paper presents a case of primary intraosseous carcinoma arising from odontogenic keratocyst in the anterior mandible with metastasis to left parotid lymph nodes.

  15. Prevalence and distribution of odontogenic cysts in a Mexican sample. A 753 cases study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villasis-Sarmiento, Luis; Portilla-Robertson, Javier; Melendez-Ocampo, Arcelia; Gaitan-Cepeda, Luis-Alberto; Leyva-Huerta, Elba-Rosa

    2017-04-01

    Odontogenic cysts (OC) are the most frequent lesions of the jaws and their constant epidemiological update is necessary and indispensable. Therefore the principal objective of this report was To determine prevalence and clinical-demographical characteristics of OC in a Mexican sample. 753 cases of OC coming from the archive of a head and neck histopathological teaching service, from January 2000 to December 2013, were included. OC cases were re-assessed according 2005 WHO classification. Chi square test was used to establish possible associations ( p pulpar necrosis and impacted teeth, radicular cyst and dentigerous cyst could be prevenible. Therefore, it is necessary to establish preventive strategies to diminish dental decay and programs of prophylactic extractions of impacted teeth, to in consequence decrease the prevalence of odontogenic cysts. Key words: Cyst, dentigerous cyst, mexican, odontogenic cyst, radicular cyst.

  16. Ameloglastic fibro-odontoma with a change of calcifying odontogenic cyst

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    Kwon, Hyuk Rok; Han, Jin Woo; Lee, Jin Ho; Choi, Hang Moon; Park, In Woo; Lee, Suk Keun [Kangnung National Univ., Kangnung (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-09-15

    Thirteen-year-old girl complaining of the swelling and pain on the left midface visited our dental hospital. On the radiographic examination, well-defined radiolucent lesion with hyperostotic border was found in the left maxilla accompanying with the external root resorption of the involved teeth and the displaced second molar. CT showed calcified bodies, thinning of hard palate, inferior orbital wall and lateral wall of nasal fossa, and thinning and perforation of the buccal plate of the maxilla. Enucleation and curettage of the lesion and nasoantrostomy was carried out and histopathologic examination mainly showed a solid tumor tissue composed of odontogenic epithelium and pulp tissues admixed with dentin and enamel formation. And some part of reduced follicular epithelium of tooth germ showed a change mimicking calcifying odontogenic cyst. Taken together, we concluded the lesion is an ameloblastic fibro-odontoma with as change of calcifying odontogenic cyst.

  17. Endoscope-Assisted Enucleation of Mandibular Odontogenic Keratocyst Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Antonio; Orabona, Giovanni D A; Abbate, Vincenzo; Maglitto, Fabio; Solari, Domenico; Iaconetta, Giorgio; Califano, Luigi

    2016-09-01

    The keratocyst odontogenic tumor (KCOT) represents a rare and benign but locally aggressive developmental cystic lesion usually affecting the posterior aspect of the mandible bone, the treatment of which has always been raising debate, since Philipsen first described it as a distinct pathological entity in 1956.Recent studies have proposed the use of endoscope-assisted surgical technique, due to the possibility given by the endoscope of improving the effectiveness of the treatment of these lesions thanks to a better visualization of operative field and though a better understanding of the pathology. In this article, we would like to present our experience with the endoscope-assisted treatment of KCOT of the posterior region of the mandible.From April 2000 to April 2012, 32 patients treated for KCOT were enrolled in our retrospective study: patients were divided in 2 groups according to the type of treatment, that is, 18 were treated with traditional enucleation surgery (TES), and 14 patients underwent endoscopic assisted enucleation surgery (EES).Fischer exact test and Kaplan-Meier curves were used to compare the outcomes between the 2 focusing on the recurrence and complication rates. In the TES group, patients we found a higher recurrence rate (39%) and higher postoperative complication rate at 5-year follow-up.Our data suggested, though, that EES seems to be a feasible alternative for the treatment of posterior mandibular KCOT. Further studies and larger series are needed to confirm these results.

  18. In Vitro Evaluation of Swine-Derived Lactobacillus reuteri: Probiotic Properties and Effects on Intestinal Porcine Epithelial Cells Challenged with Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli K88.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhilin; Wang, Li; Chen, Zhuang; Ma, Xianyong; Yang, Xuefen; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Zongyong

    2016-06-28

    Probiotics are considered as the best effective alternatives to antibiotics. The aim of this study was to characterize the probiotic potential of lactobacilli for use in swine farming by using in vitro evaluation methods. A total of 106 lactic acid bacterial isolates, originating from porcine feces, were first screened for the capacity to survive stresses considered important for putative probiotic strains. Sixteen isolates showed notable acid and bile resistance, antibacterial activity, and adherence to intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-1). One isolate, LR1, identified as Lactobacillus reuteri, was selected for extensive study of its probiotic and functional properties in IPEC-1 cell models. L. reuteri LR1 exhibited good adhesion to IPEC-1 cells and could inhibit the adhesion of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) to IPEC-1 cells. L. reuteri LR1 could also modulate transcript and protein expression of cytokines involved in inflammation in IPEC-1 cells; the Lactobacillus strain inhibited the ETEC-induced expression of proinflammatory transcripts (IL-6 and TNF-α) and protein (IL-6), and increased the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10). Measurement of the permeation of FD-4 showed that L. reuteri LR1 could maintain barrier integrity in monolayer IPEC-1 cells exposed to ETEC. Immunolocalization experiments showed L. reuteri LR1 could also prevent ETEC-induced tight junction ZO-1 disruption. Together, these results indicate that L. reuteri LR1 exhibits desirable probiotic properties and could be a potential probiotic for use in swine production.

  19. Giant Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor of the Mandible – A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornafel, Olga; Jaźwiec, Przemysław; Pakulski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    The keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is a relatively rare, benign neoplasm which develops in the maxilla or mandible, arising from the dental lamina or basal cells of the oral epithelium. It is often found incidentally and brings about late symptoms as it does not cause bone distension for a long time. The presented case is of a young woman with a giant keratocystic odontogenic tumor of the mandible. Despite its rare occurrence, it must be taken into consideration in radiological and clinical diagnostics. Due to the frequent recurrence of KCOT, patients are recommended to be kept under long-term and close radiological supervision

  20. Plexiform variety of unicystic ameloblastoma mimicking an odontogenic keratocyst: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini Sudhakar Jadhav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastoma is the most common clinically significant odontogenic tumor. Its relative frequency equals the combined frequency of all other tumors. Ameloblastoma is one of the most significant odontogenic tumors because of its incidence and clinical behavior. Unicystic ameloblastoma refers to those cystic lesions that show clinical, radiographical or gross features of a mandibular cyst, but on histological examination show a typical ameloblastomatous epithelium lining of the cyst cavity, with or without luminal and/or mural tumor growth. We present a case of unicystic ameloblastoma in a 25-year male patient, with its management.

  1. Botryoid odontogenic cyst developing from lateral periodontal cyst: A rare case and review on pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush Arora

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Botryoid odontogenic cyst (BOC is considered to be a polycystic variant of the lateral periodontal cyst (LPC as the specimen resembled a cluster of grapes. It is a non-inflammatory odontogenic cyst. The BOCs can be unicystic or multicystic. These cysts have potential to extend in the bone and become multilocular and they have a high recurrence rate. Till now, only 73 cases of BOC have been reported. The pathogenesis of BOC is still debatable. We review different pathogenesis proposed for BOC and discuss a rare case of BOC developing from lining of an abnormally large LPC which showed aggressive behaviour in terms of growth and size.

  2. Predictive Factors of Potential Malignant Transformation in Recurrent Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumor: Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Mokhtari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT demonstrates considerable diversity in histopathology and clinical behavior. Ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma (GCOC is the rare malignant counterpart of CCOT and it frequently arises from malignant transformation of a recurrent CCOT. In this paper, we present a case of CCOT and discuss its distinct histopathologic features in recurrence. Then, we will have a review on clinical, histopathological, and immunohistochemical aspects of GCOC in the literature. Predictive factors of malignant transformation in a benign CCOT will also be discussed.

  3. Central Granular Cell Odontogenic Tumor: Report of a Case with CBCT Features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmeh Anbiaee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Central granular cell odontogenic tumor CGCOT of the jaw is an exceedingly rare benign odontogenic neoplasm with 35 reported cases in the literature. Among these, very few studies have focused on the cone-beam CT features of CGCOT. Here, we report a case of an asymptomatic CGCOT in a 16-year-old girl and focus on the cone-beam CT features. Only 36 cases of this lesion, including this one, have been reported so far. The case presented is of special importance due to the young age of the patient, the posterior location of the lesion and the multilocular pattern in the cone beam CT images.

  4. A cumulative analysis of odontogenic cysts from major dental institutions of Bangalore city: A study of 252 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra, Prashanth; Maligi, Prathima; Raghuveer, Hp

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a cumulative analysis of odontogenic cysts obtained from the data of major dental institutions of Bangalore city, as well as to evaluate their distribution during a 5-year period and compare the results with other international studies. Data for the study were obtained from the reports of patients diagnosed with odontogenic cysts between 2005 and 2010 from different dental institutions of Bangalore. Case records of patients that fit the histological classification of the World Health Organization (WHO) (2005) were included in the study and the following variables were analyzed: age, gender, anatomic location, and histological type. In a total of 252 cyst specimens diagnosed, 79.76% were odontogenic cysts and 20.24% were nonodontogenic cysts. Among the odontogenic cysts most frequent lesions were radicular cysts (50.25%), followed by keratocysts (27.36%) and dentigerous cysts (22.39%). Our study provides a cumulative data of odontogenic cysts in the population of Bangalore city. The results of our study showed a similar frequency of odontogenic cysts as compared to other populations of the world, with radicular cyst being identified as the most frequent odontogenic cyst. Keratocyst was the second most common cyst followed by dentigerous cyst.

  5. Co-occurrence of Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst, Aggressive Central Giant Cell Granuloma and Central Odontogenic Fibroma: Report of a Very Rare Entity and Its Surgical Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touraj Vaezi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC, Central odontogenic fibroma (COF and aggressive central giant cell granuloma (CGCG are rare pathologic diseases affecting the jaws. While the Co-existence of two of them is reported in the literature, existence of all three conditions in one patient is an extremely rare entity. In the present report, initial biopsy revealed fibrosarcoma, therefore mandibular resection was performed for the subject. Sectional Histopathologic evaluation revealed the co-existence of three conditions through histopathologic evaluation. This report emphasizes the importance of precise microscopical evaluation of jaw lesions and thorough sectional examination of the lesions to reach the precise diagnosis. Treatment modalities and follow-up radiographs are also provided to help clinicians manage these entities.

  6. Conservative Management of Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumors of Jaws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhan Güler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this study was to evaluate different surgical treatment methods for keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs and the outcome of those treatments over a 9-year period. Patients and Methods. A retrospective review was performed on 43 KCOTs in 39 patients. In radiographic evaluations for diagnosis, follow ups and before and after treatment, panoramic, 3D CT and MR images were used. The three groups of different surgical treatment were (1 enucleation for small unilocular lesions without certainty of histology; (2 enucleation with Carnoy's solution, for small unilocular lesions after previous histological confirmation of KOCT; (3 marsupialization followed by enucleation with Carnoy's solution implemented for large often multilocular KCOTs with intact or destruction of cortical bone without infiltration of neighbouring tissue. Results. 43 KCOT cases were mostly localized in mandible (76.7%, radiologically unilocular (72%, and parakeratocysts (88.4%. Inflammation and satellite cysts (daughter cysts were detected histopathologically in 14 (32.5% and 7 (16.3%, respectively. Among the 43 cysts, 20 (46.5% were associated with the impacted third molar and of 21 (48.8% was in tooth bearing area, and 5 (11, 6% located on edentulous areas. It was located mostly in the anterior region of maxilla (90% and in mandibular molar and ramus (62.8%. The treatments of KCOTs were 18 (41.9% for group 1, and 10 (23.3% group 2, and 15 (34.8% group 3. A statistically significant relationship was found between the radiographic appearance and treatment methods (=0.00. No recurrence was found on 40.54±23.02 months follow up. Conclusion. We concluded that successful treatment methods were enucleation and Carnoy's solution in small lesions and marsupialization in lesions that have reached a very large size, but because KCOT was observed in second decade mostly, long-term follows up are suggested.

  7. FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH ODONTOGENIC BACTERAEMIA IN ORTHODONTIC PATIENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeh, O D; Sanu, O O; Utomi, I L; Nwaokorie, F O

    2016-01-01

    Various researches have investigated factors associated with the prevalence and intensity of bacteraemia following oral procedures including orthodontic procedures. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of age, gender, plaque and gingival indices on the occurrence of odontogenic bacteraemia following orthodontic treatment procedures. Orthodontic Clinic, Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), Lagos , Nigeria. Using the consecutive, convenience sampling method, a total of 100 subjects who met the inclusion criteria were recruited for the study and peripheral blood was collected before and again within 2 minutes of completion of orthodontic procedures for microbiologic analysis using the BACTEC automated blood culture system and the lysis filtration methods of blood culturing. The subjects were randomly placed in one of four orthodontic procedures investigated: alginate impression making (Group I), separator placement (Group II), band cementation (Group III) and arch wire change (Group IV). Plaque and gingival indices were assessed using the plaque component of the Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (OHI-S) (Greene & Vermillion) and Modified gingival index (Lobene) respectively before blood collection. Spearman Point bi-serial correlations and logistic regression statistics were used for statistical evaluations at p orthodontic treatment procedures of 16% and 28% were observed respectively using the BACTEC and lysis filtration methods. A statistically significant increase in the prevalence of bateraemia was observed following separator placement (p=0.016). An increase in age, plaque index scores and modified gingival index scores of the subjects were found to be associated with an increase in the prevalence of bacteraemia following orthodontic treatment procedures, with plaque index score showing the strongest correlation. Separator placement was found to induce significantly highest level of bacteraemia. Meticulous oral hygiene practice and the use of 0

  8. Simultaneous occurrence of an Odontogenic Myxoma and a Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Mandible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Su; Lee, Sang Rae; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Byung Do

    1999-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common type of oral cancer and odontogenic myxoma is relatively uncommon benign tumor of mesenchymal origin. There are, to our knowledge, no prior reports of simultaneously occurring squamous cell carcinoma and odontogenic myxoma of the jaw bones. In this case, at first, the plain films and computed tomograms revealed a large expansible multilocular radiolucent lesion on left mandible and marked expansion of cortical plate. In addition this radiograms revealed also infiltrative bony destruction of anterior and medial border of ascending ramus of left mandible and alveolar bone of left maxilla, floating teeth on left lower molar area and metastatic enlargement of left submandibular, jugular digastric and spinal accessory lymph nodes. Magnetic resonance imaging of this patient revealed infiltrative growth of tumor on alveolar bone of left maxilla, left retromolar fat pad, left masseter and left medial pterygoid muscle. Intraoral presurgical biopsy presented typical features of squamous cell carcinoma. After chemotherapy with radiation therapy during 6 months, this central lesion was diagnosed as odontogenic myxoma by the postsurgical biopsy. After 3 months, this patient presented multiple metastatic signs at lumbar spines, rib and liver. Consequently, our case is simultaneous occurrence of squamous cell carcinoma and odontogenic myxoma.

  9. Ghost cells in pilomatrixoma, craniopharyngioma, and calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor: histological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumayor, Alicia; Carlos, Román; Kirsch, Hernán Molina; de Andrade, Bruno A Benevenuto; Romañach, Mario J; de Almeida, Oslei Paes

    2015-04-01

    Pilomatrixoma, craniopharyngioma, and calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor are the main entities presenting ghost cells as an important histological feature, in spite their quite different clinical presentation; it seems that they share a common pathway in the formation of these cells. The aim of this study is to examine and compare the characteristics of ghost and other cells that form these lesions. Forty-three cases including 21 pilomatrixomas, 14 craniopharyngiomas, and eight calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors were evaluated by immunohistochemistry for cytokeratins, CD138, β-catenin, D2-40, Glut-1, FAS, CD10 and also by scanning electron microscopy. The CKs, CD138, β-catenin, Glut-1, FAS, and CD10 were more often expressed by transitional cells of craniopharyngioma and calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor, compared with pilomatrixoma. Basaloid cells of pilomatrixoma showed strong positivity for CD138 and CD10. Differences on expression pattern were identified in transitional and basal cells, as ghost cells were negative for most antibodies used, except by low expression for cytokeratins. By scanning electron microscopy, the morphology of ghost cells were similar in their fibrillar cytoplasm, but their pattern varied from sheets in pilomatrixoma to small clusters in craniopharyngioma and calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor. Mechanisms involved in formation of ghost cells are unknown, but probably they follow different pathways as protein expression in the basal/transitional cells was not uniform in the three tumors studied. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Long noncoding RNAs related to the odontogenic potential of dental mesenchymal cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yunfei; Jia, Lingfei

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the lncRNAs that are associated with the odontogenic potential in mouse dental mesenchymal cells. The odontogenic potential of dental mesenchymal cells was found to be lost in the course of in vitro culture, so the lncRNA profiles were subsequently compared between freshly-isolated and cultured dental mesenchymal cells using RNA-sequencing. A co-expression analysis of differentially expressed lncRNAs and coding RNAs was performed to understand their potential functions. The expression of several selected lncRNAs was also examined in developing tooth germs. Compared with cultured dental mesenchymal cells, 108 lncRNAs were upregulated and 36 lncRNAs were downregulated in freshly-isolated dental mesenchymal cells. Coding genes correlated with the lncRNAs were mainly associated with DNA and protein metabolic processes and cytoskeletal anchorage. Meg3, Malat1, Xist, and Dlx1as were significantly downregulated in cultured dental mesenchymal cells but were upregulated in odontogenic dental mesenchymal tissues. Moreover, the levels of Dlx1as were negatively correlated with that of Dlx1 in dental mesenchymal cells and dental mesenchymal tissues. The lncRNA profiles of dental mesenchymal cells are significantly changed during culturing, and the dysregulation of lncRNAs is associated with the loss of odontogenic potential. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. The odontogenic potential of STRO-1 sorted rat dental pulp stem cells in vitro.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, X.; Dolder, J. van den; Walboomers, X.F.; Zhang, W.; Bian, Z.; Fan, M.; Jansen, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    The presence of heterogeneous cell populations in dental pulp may count for the considerable variation in the outcome of in vitro and in vivo experiments. Here, we intended to determine whether a minor cell sub-population of high proliferation and odontogenic potential existed among a larger

  12. Intramuscular keratocyst as a soft tissue counterpart of keratocystic odontogenic tumor: differential diagnosis by immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abé, Tatsuya; Maruyama, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Manabu; Essa, Ahmed; Babkair, Hamzah; Mikami, Toshihiko; Shingaki, Susumu; Kobayashi, Tadaharu; Hayashi, Takafumi; Cheng, Jun; Saku, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT), a developmental jaw cyst previously referred to as odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), typically arises in the jawbone. In this article, however, we report a case of KCOT located within the temporalis muscle. We compared its immunohistochemical profiles with those of authentic jaw KCOT, orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst, and epidermoid cyst in order to consider whether a soft tissue counterpart of KCOT could be a separate disease entity. The patient was a 46-year-old man with a well-defined cystic lesion within the left temporalis muscle. On computed tomographic images, the lesion was recognized as a cystic lesion, although KCOT was not included in the clinical differential diagnoses. The location of the lesion was not within bone but, rather, within the temporalis muscle that was attached to the jawbones. Our review of the literature has disclosed more than 20 peripheral KCOT cases of the oral mucosa and more than 10 cases of the skin, but only 1 case arising in muscle. Immunohistochemical investigation of the present intramuscular case reveals KCOT-characteristic profiles distinct from the other 3 types of cysts investigated. The results indicate that KCOT-like lesions can arise within soft tissues, although use of the term odontogenic might seem inappropriate in those cases. © 2013.

  13. Accuracy and interobserver-intraobserver agreement in the radiologic diagnosis of ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Soon Chul; Lee, Jean; Park, In Woo; Lee, Young Ho

    1996-01-01

    Six observers with different amount of experience in the field of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology interpreted the radiographs of 13 cases of ameloblastoma and 8 cases of odontogenic keratocyst which were confirmed histopathologically and showed pseudo-multilocular appearanced and scalloped border radiographically. The authors examined the accuracy of radiologic diagnoses, interobserver agreement and intraobserver agreement. The obtained results were as follows : 1. The accuracy of radiologic diagnosis ranged from 0.48 to 0.81. The average value was 0.61 2. The accuracy of radiologic diagnosis for ameloblastoma (0.55) was lower than that for odontogenic keratocyst (0.70) (P <0.05). 3. The overall agreement among the 6 observers was 14.3% at the first interpretation and 19.0% at the second interpretation. 4. The intraobserver agreement of each observer expressed in kappa index ranged from -0.14 to 0.64. The overall intraobserver agreement was 0.29. 5. The intraobserver agreement of each observer for ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst ranged from -0.07 to 0.65 and from -0.25 to 1.00, respectively. The overall intraobserver agreement for ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst were 0.27 and 0.26, respectively. 6. The diagnostic accuracy highly correlated to the intraobserver agreement (r=0.6370).

  14. c-Myc oncogene expression in selected odontogenic cysts and tumors: An immunohistochemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosvi, Zama; Rekha, K

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the role of c-Myc oncogene in selected odontogenic cysts and tumors. Materials and Methods: Ten cases each of ameloblastoma, adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cyst, and radicular cyst were selected and primary monoclonal mouse anti-human c-Myc antibody was used in a dilution of 1: 50. Statistical Analysis was performed using Mann Whitney U test. Results: 80% positivity was observed in ameloblastoma, AOT and OKC; 50% positivity in radicular cyst and 20% positivity in dentigerous cyst. Comparison of c-Myc expression between ameloblastoma and AOT did not reveal significant results. Similarly, no statistical significance was observed when results of OKC were compared with ameloblastoma and AOT. In contrast, significant differences were seen on comparison of dentigerous cyst with ameloblastoma and AOT and radicular cyst with AOT. Conclusion: From the above data we conclude that (1) Ameloblastoma and AOT have similar proliferative potential and their biologic behavior cannot possibly be attributed to it. (2) OKC has an intrinsic growth potential which is absent in other cysts and reinforces its classification as keratocystic odontogenic tumor. PMID:23798830

  15. Comparison of immunohistochemical expression of CD10 in keratocystic odontogenic tumor and ameloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Hormozi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The results of this study propose that high expression rate of CD10 might be one of the reasons for the aggressive behavior of AB and high recurrence rate of OKC and reinforce the classification of OKC as an odontogenic tumor.

  16. Accuracy and interobserver-intraobserver agreement in the radiologic diagnosis of ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soon Chul; Lee, Jean; Park, In Woo; Lee, Young Ho [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-08-15

    Six observers with different amount of experience in the field of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology interpreted the radiographs of 13 cases of ameloblastoma and 8 cases of odontogenic keratocyst which were confirmed histopathologically and showed pseudo-multilocular appearanced and scalloped border radiographically. The authors examined the accuracy of radiologic diagnoses, interobserver agreement and intraobserver agreement. The obtained results were as follows : 1. The accuracy of radiologic diagnosis ranged from 0.48 to 0.81. The average value was 0.61 2. The accuracy of radiologic diagnosis for ameloblastoma (0.55) was lower than that for odontogenic keratocyst (0.70) (P <0.05). 3. The overall agreement among the 6 observers was 14.3% at the first interpretation and 19.0% at the second interpretation. 4. The intraobserver agreement of each observer expressed in kappa index ranged from -0.14 to 0.64. The overall intraobserver agreement was 0.29. 5. The intraobserver agreement of each observer for ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst ranged from -0.07 to 0.65 and from -0.25 to 1.00, respectively. The overall intraobserver agreement for ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst were 0.27 and 0.26, respectively. 6. The diagnostic accuracy highly correlated to the intraobserver agreement (r=0.6370).

  17. Odontogenic myxoma involving the orbit in a 3-year-old boy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjals Hansen, Teis; Danielsson, Lina Isabella; Fast, Søren

    2016-01-01

    We present a rare case of a 3-year-old boy with an odontogenic myxoma (OM) involving the orbita. Including our case, only nine cases of OM have been reported to involve the eye in children.There is no gold standard for treatment of OM in children with orbital involvement. The recurrence rate of OM...

  18. Exogenous nitric oxide stimulates the odontogenic differentiation of rat dental pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoda, Soichiro; Mei, Yu-Feng; Atsuta, Ikiru; Danjo, Atsushi; Yamaza, Haruyoshi; Hama, Shion; Nishida, Kento; Tang, Ronghao; Kyumoto-Nakamura, Yukari; Uehara, Norihisa; Kukita, Toshio; Nishimura, Fusanori; Yamaza, Takayoshi

    2018-02-21

    Nitric oxide (NO) is thought to play a pivotal regulatory role in dental pulp tissues under both physiological and pathological conditions. However, little is known about the NO functions in dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). We examined the direct actions of a spontaneous NO gas-releasing donor, NOC-18, on the odontogenic capacity of rat DPSCs (rDPSCs). In the presence of NOC-18, rDPSCs were transformed into odontoblast-like cells with long cytoplasmic processes and a polarized nucleus. NOC-18 treatment increased alkaline phosphatase activity and enhanced dentin-like mineralized tissue formation and the expression levels of several odontoblast-specific genes, such as runt related factor 2, dentin matrix protein 1 and dentin sialophosphoprotein, in rDPSCs. In contrast, carboxy-PTIO, a NO scavenger, completely suppressed the odontogenic capacity of rDPSCs. This NO-promoted odontogenic differentiation was activated by tumor necrosis factor-NF-κB axis in rDPSCs. Further in vivo study demonstrated that NOC-18-application in a tooth cavity accelerated tertiary dentin formation, which was associated with early nitrotyrosine expression in the dental pulp tissues beneath the cavity. Taken together, the present findings indicate that exogenous NO directly induces the odontogenic capacity of rDPSCs, suggesting that NO donors might offer a novel host DPSC-targeting alternative to current pulp capping agents in endodontics.

  19. Prediction of the course of acute odontogenic pathology with pronounced osteomyelitis by immunoglobulin and cytokin evaluation

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    A. I. Yaremenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our trial was detection of the most significant clinico-laboratory factors in the saliva and blood samples of the patients with odontogenic osteomyelitis in order to predict severity of the clinical course of osteomyelitis and to choose the optimal treatment tactics.

  20. Study of polarization colors in the connective tissue wall of odontogenic cysts using picrosirius red stain

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    Anusha Shetty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lesions of odontogenic origin comprise the heterogeneous group ranging from hamartomatous proliferations, cysts to benign and malignant tumors. Interplay between the epithelium and connective tissue can be assumed to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of odontogenic cysts. Aims and Objectives: A study was taken up to show the role of picrosirius red (PSR stain to demonstrate the fibers and also to assess the difference in the nature of the fibers (different color patterns and to find out the role of it, if any in the pathogenesis and biological behavior of the commonly occurring odontogenic cysts. Materials and Methods: Collagen fibers of 30 cases of odontogenic cysts (10 radicular cysts, 10 odontogenic keratocysts (OKC′s, and 10 dentigerous cysts were studied by staining the sections with PSR stain and examining them under bright field and polarizing microscope. Results: Sixty-seven percentage of the thin collagen fibers and 55% of the thick fibers in radicular cyst showed green-yellow birefringence. Fifty-seven percentage of the thin collagen fibers and 15% of the thick fibers in OKC showed green-yellow birefringence. Eighty-two percentage of the thin collagen fibers and 66% of the thick fibers in dentigerous cysts showed green-yellow birefringence. Rest of the fibers showed orange-red birefringence. Statistical analysis with one-way ANOVA was significant with a P < 0.01 only for thick fibers. Moreover, comparison of polarization colors of thick fibers of odontogenic cysts with duration of the lesion gave statistically significant results. Conclusion: The observations in the present study with respect to color profiles of the collagen fibers in the three commonly occurring odontogenic cysts possibly explain the biological behavior of the lesions. The predominant orange-red birefringence in OKC′s in comparison to radicular and dentigerous cysts suggests that OKC′s exhibit well organized and tightly packed fibers. This

  1. Large mandibular central odontogenic fibroma documented over 20 years: A case report

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    Patrick Bandura

    Full Text Available Introduction: Central odontogenic fibroma (COF is a rare, benign, slow-growing intraosseous odontogenic tumor, and accounts for 0.1% of all odontogenic tumors. It is often confused with other entities, such as keratocysts, ameloblastomas, and odontogenic myxomas. Complete enucleation followed by curettage is the treatment of choice for COF to ensure the lowest possible chance of recurrence. Case presentation: We report the case of a young Caucasian woman with COF that went undiagnosed for several years despite repeated radiologic examinations. Finally, a massive tumor was surgically removed and the wound was curetted. The specimen was histologically confirmed to be a COF. The patient remains under regular follow-up, and thus far there have been no clinical or radiologic signs of recurrence. Discussion: This rare case of COF, which was documented over a period of 20 years, has helped us to describe the features of this tumor. It also confirms that adequate surgical treatment can lead to impressive bone regeneration in healthy individuals, as evident from the radiologic findings acquired before, during, and after enucleation of the COF in our patient. Our findings also confirm the view that COF has a favorable prognosis regardless of its final size. Conclusion: Early diagnosis is key to successful treatment of COF. The slow but steady increase in the size of a COF with no accompanying symptoms has not been reported previously. To our knowledge, this is the only documented case of a COF that has been under continuous radiologic observation for over 20 years. Keywords: Case report, Central odontogenic fibroma, Long-term, Bone deformation, Follow-up, Tumor enucleation

  2. Diffusion-weighted imaging in the evaluation of odontogenic cysts and tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, K; Seith Bhalla, A; Sharma, R; Kumar, A; Roychoudhury, A; Bhutia, O

    2012-10-01

    The differentiation between keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT) and other cystic/predominantly cystic odontogenic tumours is difficult on conventional CT and MR sequences as there is overlap in the imaging characteristics of these lesions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and to assess the performance of apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) in the differential diagnosis of odontogenic cysts and tumours. 20 patients with odontogenic cysts and tumours of the maxillomandibular region were examined with DWI. Diffusion-weighted images were obtained with a single-shot echoplanar technique with b-values of 0, 500 and 1000 s mm(-2). An ADC map was obtained at each slice position. The cystic areas of ameloblastoma (n=10) showed free diffusion with a mean ADC value of 2.192±0.33×10(-3) mm(2) s(-1), whereas the solid areas showed restricted diffusion with a mean ADC value of 1.041±0.41×10(-3) mm(2) s(-1). KCOT (n=5) showed restricted diffusion with a mean ADC value of 1.019±0.07×10(-3) mm(2) s(-1). There was a significant difference between the ADC values of KCOT and cystic ameloblastoma (p<0.01, Mann-Whitney U-test). The cut-off with which KCOT and predominantly cystic ameloblastomas were optimally differentiated was 2.013×10(-3) mm(2) s(-1), which yielded 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. DWI can be used to differentiate KCOT from cystic (or predominantly cystic) odontogenic tumours.

  3. Immunohistochemical expression of glucose transporter 1 in keratin-producing odontogenic cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Sirera, Beatriz; Forner-Navarro, Leopoldo; Vera-Sempere, Francisco

    2016-03-10

    Keratin-producing odontogenic cysts (KPOCs) are a group of cystic lesions that are often aggressive, with high rates of recurrence and multifocality. KPOCs included orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst (OOC) and parakeratotic odontogenic cysts, which are now considered true tumours denominated keratocystic odontogenic tumours (KCOTs). GLUT1 is a protein transporter that is involved in the active uptake of glucose across cell membranes and that is overexpressed in tumours in close correlation with the proliferation rate and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging results. A series of 58 keratin-producing odontogenic cysts was evaluated histologically and immunohistochemically in terms of GLUT1 expression. Different data were correlated using the beta regression model in relation to histological type and immunohistochemical expression of GLUT1, which was quantified using two different morphological methods. KPOC cases comprised 12 OOCs and 46 KCOTs, the latter corresponding to 6 syndromic and 40 sporadic KCOTs. GLUT1 expression was very low in OOC cases compared with KCOT cases, with statistical significant differences when quantification was considered. Different GLUT1 localisation patterns were revealed by immunostaining, with the parabasal cells showing higher reactivity in KCOTs. However, among KCOTs cases, GLUT1 expression was unable to establish differences between syndromic and sporadic cases. GLUT1 expression differentiated between OOC and KCOT cases, with significantly higher expression in KCOTs, but did not differentiate between syndromic and sporadic KCOT cases. However, given the structural characteristics of KCOTs, we hypothesised that PET imaging methodology is probably not a useful diagnostic tool for KCOTs. Further studies of GLUT1 expression and PET examination in KCOT series are needed to confirm this last hypothesis.

  4. Disruption of Pyridine Nucleotide Redox Status During Oxidative Challenge at Normal and Low-Glucose States: Implications for Cellular Adenosine Triphosphate, Mitochondrial Respiratory Activity, and Reducing Capacity in Colon Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circu, Magdalena L.; Maloney, Ronald E.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We recently demonstrated that menadione (MQ), a redox cycling quinone, mediated the loss of mitochondrial glutathione/glutathione disulfide redox balance. In this study, we showed that MQ significantly disrupted cellular pyridine nucleotide (NAD+/NADH, NADP+/NADPH) redox balance that compromised cellular ATP, mitochondrial respiratory activity, and NADPH-dependent reducing capacity in colonic epithelial cells, a scenario that was exaggerated by low glucose. In the cytosol, MQ induced NAD+ loss concurrent with increased NADP+ and NAD kinase activity, but decreased NADPH. In the mitochondria, NADH loss occurred in conjunction with increased nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase activity and NADP+, and decreased NADPH. These results are consistent with cytosolic NAD+-to-NADP+ and mitochondrial NADH-to-NADPH shifts, but compromised NADPH availability. Thus, despite the sacrifice of NAD+/NADH in favor of NADPH generation, steady-state NADPH levels were not maintained during MQ challenge. Impairments of cellular bioenergetics were evidenced by ATP losses and increased mitochondrial O2 dependence of pyridine nucleotide oxidation–reduction; half-maximal oxidation (P50) was 10-fold higher in low glucose, which was lowered by glutamate or succinate supplementation. This exaggerated O2 dependence is consistent with increased O2 diversion to nonmitochondrial O2 consumption by MQ-semiquinone redox cycling secondary to decreased NADPH-dependent MQ detoxication at low glucose, a situation that was corrected by glucose-sparing mitochondrial substrates. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 2151–2162. PMID:21083422

  5. Decompression Device Using a Stainless Steel Tube and Wire for Treatment of Odontogenic Cystic Lesions: A Technical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eun-Joo; Baek, Jin-A; Leem, Dae-Ho

    2014-11-01

    Decompression is considered an effective treatment for odontogenic cystic lesions in the jaw. A variety of decompression devices are successfully used for the treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumors, radicular cysts, dentigerous cysts, and ameloblastoma. The purpose of these devices is to keep an opening between the cystic lesion and the oral environment during treatment. The aim of this report is to describe an effective decompression tube using a stainless steel tube and wire for treatment of jaw cystic lesions.

  6. Immunohistochemical Assessment of Mast Cells and Small Blood Vessels in Dentigerous Cyst, Odontogenic Keratocyst, and Periapical Cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Moradzadeh Khiavi, Monir; Jamali, Golshan; Farnia, Samira

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the density of mast cells (MCs) and microvessels in odontogenic cysts. Furthermore, the correlation between MCs and microvessels was evaluated to assess the contribution of MCs to angiogenesis and growth of odontogenic cysts. This approach may be a basis for the development of future pharmaceuticals addressed to MCs performance to manage odontogenic cysts. To our knowledge, no study investigating the correlation between MCs and microvessels has been performed to date. 60 cases of odontogenic cysts consisting of 20 radicular cysts (RCs), 20 odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) and 20 dentigerous cysts (DCs) were included in this study. Five high power fields in superficial connective tissue and five high power fields in deep connective tissue were counted for each sample. Moreover, a total mean of ten fields was calculated. RC showed the highest mean numbers of MCs and microvessels (pcysts contained more MCs and microvessels compared to the deeper zones. A statistically significant correlation between the numbers of MCs and microvessels was not observed (r=0.00, p=0.49). Although the number of MCs was not significantly associated with microvessels, these cells may be related to the growth of odontogenic lesions, particularly RCs. Further studies on the in vivo functions of MCs will make the concept more clear.

  7. Stromal differences in odontogenic cysts of a common histopathogenesis but with different biological behavior: a study with picrosirius red and polarizing microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, P; Saxena, S

    2011-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to detect and compare the pattern of collagen fibers in odontogenic cysts and also to find out if this methodology could be used to predict the aggressive nature of odontogenic cysts by comparing with the odontogenic tumors. The collagen in the wall of 11 odontogenic keratocysts, 14 dentigerous cysts and 14 radicular cysts was studied histochemically by staining sections with picrosirius red and examining under polarizing microscope. This was compared to 10 cases of odontogenic tumors using Z test of proportion at 1% and 5%. In dentigerous cysts, odontogenic keratocysts and odontogenic tumors, the predominant color of collagen fibers birefringence was found to be orangish red, whereas in radicular cysts the collagen fiber was of green color. Similar birefringence pattern of collagen fibers between dentigerous cysts, odontogenic keratocysts and odontogenic tumors may indicate that these lesions have a common histogenesis with a broad spectrum of biological behavior and belong to the same group, i.e., are developmental in origin. Different patterns of radicular cysts suggest different biological behavior and a positive role of inflammation on polarization color of collagen fibers.

  8. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Derived Interleukin-6 Promotes Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Acquisition of Epithelial Stem-Like Cell Properties in Ameloblastoma Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chunmiao; Zhang, Qunzhou; Shanti, Rabie M; Shi, Shihong; Chang, Ting-Han; Carrasco, Lee; Alawi, Faizan; Le, Anh D

    2017-09-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a biological process associated with cancer stem-like or cancer-initiating cell formation, contributes to the invasiveness, metastasis, drug resistance, and recurrence of the malignant tumors; it remains to be determined whether similar processes contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of ameloblastoma (AM), a benign but locally invasive odontogenic neoplasm. Here, we demonstrated that EMT- and stem cell-related genes were expressed in the epithelial islands of the most common histologic variant subtype, the follicular AM. Our results revealed elevated interleukin (IL)-6 signals that were differentially expressed in the stromal compartment of the follicular AM. To explore the stromal effect on tumor pathogenesis, we isolated and characterized both mesenchymal stromal cells (AM-MSCs) and epithelial cells (AM-EpiCs) from follicular AM and demonstrated that, in in vitro culture, AM-MSCs secreted a significantly higher level of IL-6 as compared to the counterpart AM-EpiCs. Furthermore, both in vitro and in vivo studies revealed that exogenous and AM-MSC-derived IL-6 induced the expression of EMT- and stem cell-related genes in AM-EpiCs, whereas such effects were significantly abrogated either by a specific inhibitor of STAT3 or ERK1/2, or by knockdown of Slug gene expression. These findings suggest that AM-MSC-derived IL-6 promotes tumor-stem like cell formation by inducing EMT process in AM-EpiCs through STAT3 and ERK1/2-mediated signaling pathways, implying a role in the etiology and progression of the benign but locally invasive neoplasm. Stem Cells 2017;35:2083-2094. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  9. Non-syndromic multiple keratocyst odontogenic tumor: A rare case report

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    Abhijeet Alok

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs are one of the most frequent features of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS. The condition is linked with mutation in the PTCH gene. Partial expression of the gene may result in occurrence of multiple recurring odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs. Although KCOTs are common in clinical practice, simultaneous occurrence of multiple cysts in both the maxilla and mandible of a patient is rare. These patients have early propensity to develop multiple neoplasms like basal cell carcinoma and medulloblastoma. Hence, early diagnosis and treatment is of utmost importance in reducing the severity of the long-term sequelae of NBCCS. We report a rare case of multiple KCOTs in a non-syndromic male patient, with emphasis on its diagnosis, radiographic features, and treatment.

  10. Radionuclide bone imaging in the surgical treatment planning of odontogenic keratocysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lurie, A.G.; Puri, S.; James, R.B.; Warnich, J.T.

    1976-12-01

    Locally aggressive benign lesions of the jaws, such as odontogenic keratocysts and ameloblastomas, require complete excision in view of the high incidence of recurrence after incomplete surgical removal. Because of the limitations of conventional radiology as the sole technique for determining the extent of these lesions, the use of 99m-technetium-labeled bone-imaging agents is suggested. This method of defining the location of surgical margins is based on the agent's sensitivity as an indicator of subtle changes in bone metabolism. A case of an unusually large recurrent odontogenic keratocyst is presented in which the planning of the surgical procedure was predicated on the results of a bone scan of the jaws in addition to conventional radiology. This diagnostic procedure, especially when used in conjunction with conventional radiology, appears to be of considerable value in defining the extent of a variety of oral-maxillofacial bony lesions.

  11. [CONE BEAM COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN DIAGNOSTICS OF ODONTOGENIC MAXILLARY SINUSITIS (CASE REPORTS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidova, E; Khurdzidze, G

    2017-06-01

    Diagnostic studies performed by cone beam computed tomography Morita 3D made possible to obtain high resolution images of hard tissues of upper jawbone and maxillary sinus, to detect bony tissue defects, such as odontogenic cysts, cystogranulomas and granulomas. High-resolution and three dimensional tomographic image reconstructions allowed for optimal and prompt determination of the scope of surgical treatment and planning of effective conservative treatment regimen. Interactive diagnostics helped to estimate cosmetic and functional results of surgical treatment, to prevent the occurrence of surgical complications, and to evaluate the efficacy of conservative treatment. The obtained data contributed to determination of particular applications of cone beam computed tomography in the diagnosis of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis, detection of specific defects with cone beam tomography as the most informative method of diagnosis; as well as to determination of weak and strong sides, and helped to offer mechanisms of x-ray diagnostics to dental surgeons and ENT specialists.

  12. Malignant Transformation of an Odontogenic Cyst in a Period of 10 Years

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    Juliane Pirágine Araújo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary intraosseous carcinoma of the jaws (PIOSCC might arise from odontogenic epithelium, more commonly from a previous odontogenic cyst. The aim of this case is to illustrate that the clinician should consider that an apparent benign dentigerous cyst can suffer malignant transformation and that all material removed from a patient must be evaluated histologically. A 44-year-old man presented in a routine periapical X-ray an impacted lower left third molar with radiolucency over its crown. Ten years later, the patient complained of pain in the same region and the tooth was extracted. After one month, the patient still complained of pain and suffered a fracture of the mandible. A biopsy was performed and carcinoma was diagnosed. The patient was treated surgically with adjuvant radio- and chemotherapy and after 8 years, he is well without signs of recurrences. This report describes a central mandibular carcinoma probably developed from a previous dentigerous cyst.

  13. Very Large Inflammatory Odontogenic Cyst with Origin on a Single Long Time Traumatized Lower Incisor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Filipe; Andre, Saudade; Moreira, Andre; Carames, Joao

    2015-01-01

    One of the consequences of traumatic injuries is the chance of aseptic pulp necrosis to occur which in time may became infected and give origin to periapical pathosis. Although the apical granulomas and cysts are a common condition, there appearance as an extremely large radiolucent image is a rare finding. Differential diagnosis with other radiographic-like pathologies, such as keratocystic odontogenic tumour or unicystic ameloblastoma, is mandatory. The purpose of this paper is to report a very large radicular cyst caused by a single mandibular incisor traumatized long back, in a 60-year-old male. Medical and clinical histories were obtained, radiographic and cone beam CT examinations performed and an initial incisional biopsy was done. The final decision was to perform a surgical enucleation of a lesion, 51.4 mm in length. The enucleated tissue biopsy analysis was able to render the diagnosis as an inflammatory odontogenic cyst. A 2 year follow-up showed complete bone recovery. PMID:26393219

  14. Radionuclide bone imaging in the surgical treatment planning of odontogenic keratocysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lurie, A.G.; Puri, S.; James, R.B.; Warnich, J.T.

    1976-01-01

    Locally aggressive benign lesions of the jaws, such as odontogenic keratocysts and ameloblastomas, require complete excision in view of the high incidence of recurrence after incomplete surgical removal. Because of the limitations of conventional radiology as the sole technique for determining the extent of these lesions, the use of 99m-technetium-labeled bone-imaging agents is suggested. This method of defining the location of surgical margins is based on the agent's sensitivity as an indicator of subtle changes in bone metabolism. A case of an unusually large recurrent odontogenic keratocyst is presented in which the planning of the surgical procedure was predicated on the results of a bone scan of the jaws in addition to conventional radiology. This diagnostic procedure, especially when used in conjunction with conventional radiology, appears to be of considerable value in defining the extent of a variety of oral-maxillofacial bony lesions

  15. Polarized protein transport and lumen formation during epithelial tissue morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasky, Alex J; Mangan, Anthony; Prekeris, Rytis

    2015-01-01

    One of the major challenges in biology is to explain how complex tissues and organs arise from the collective action of individual polarized cells. The best-studied model of this process is the cross talk between individual epithelial cells during their polarization to form the multicellular epithelial lumen during tissue morphogenesis. Multiple mechanisms of apical lumen formation have been proposed. Some epithelial lumens form from preexisting polarized epithelial structures. However, de novo lumen formation from nonpolarized cells has recently emerged as an important driver of epithelial tissue morphogenesis, especially during the formation of small epithelial tubule networks. In this review, we discuss the latest findings regarding the mechanisms and regulation of de novo lumen formation in vitro and in vivo.

  16. The Prevalence of Inflammatory and Developmental Odontogenic Cysts in a Libyan Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Gehani, R; Krishnan, B; Orafi, H

    2008-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of odontogenic jaw cysts in a Libyan population and to compare the data with previously published reports from other countries. Materials and methods We retrieved and analyzed 2190 case notes and biopsy records of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and the Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Al Arab Medical Sciences University, Benghazi, Libya, dating from January 1990 to December 2005. There were 326 cases (14.8%) of diagnosed odontogenic cysts among the 2190 biopsies performed during this period. The cases were analyzed for age and sex distribution, site of presentation, association with impacted teeth, and the method of treatment. Results The male to female ratio of patients was 1.3:1 Radicular cysts accounted for 222 cases (68.1%), followed by dentigerous cysts (n=49, 15%) and odontogenic keratocysts (n=43, 14.1%). Mean ages of the patients were, respectively, 31.7, 22.7 and 36.1 years. The maxilla was more commonly involved than the mandible (1.3:1). The anterior maxilla was the commonest site (n=132, 37.4%) followed by the posterior mandible (n=96, 29.4%). Fifty three cases were associated with impacted teeth, and the highest frequency was for dentigerous cysts (n=37). Enucleation and curettage was performed on 300 patients, marsupialization on 14, and marginal/segmental resection on 12. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first such study on a Libyan population. Our results are comparable to studies from other countries. Knowledge of the relative frequencies and sites of presentation of odontogenic cysts in different ethno-geographic backgrounds is essential for the early diagnosis and management of these benign yet potentially destructive lesions. PMID:21499462

  17. Does decompression of odontogenic cysts and cystlike lesions change the histologic diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlieve, Thomas; Miloro, Michael; Kolokythas, Antonia

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the histopathologic findings after postdecompression definitive treatment of odontogenic cystlike lesions and determine whether the diagnosis was consistent with the pretreatment diagnosis, thereby answering the clinical question: does decompression change the histologic diagnosis? The authors implemented a retrospective cohort study from a sample of patients diagnosed with a benign odontogenic cystlike lesion and who underwent decompression followed by definitive surgery as part of their treatment. The predictor variable was treatment by decompression and the dependent variable was change in histologic diagnosis. Age, gender, and lesion location were included as variables. The χ(2) test was used for statistical analysis of the categorical data and P values less than .05 were considered statistically significant. Twenty-five cysts and cystlike lesions in 25 patients were treated with decompression followed by enucleation and curettage. The mean age was 34 years (range, 13 to 80 yr) and 56% (14) were male patients. Lesions were located in the mandible in 76% (19 of 25) of patients. Postdecompression histologic examination at the time of definitive surgical treatment was consistent with the preoperative biopsy diagnosis in 91% (10 of 11) of keratocystic odontogenic tumors, 67% (2 of 3) of glandular odontogenic cysts, 75% (3 of 4) of dentigerous cysts, and 100% (7 of 7) of cystic ameloblastomas. The histologic diagnosis at time of definitive treatment by enucleation and curettage is consistent with the predecompression diagnosis. Therefore, all lesions should be definitively treated after decompression based on the initial lesion diagnosis, with all patients placed on appropriate follow-up protocols. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  18. Demographic distribution of odontogenic cysts in Isfahan (Iran over a 23-year period (1988-2010

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    Negin Khosravi

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Odontogenic cysts are fairly frequent jaw lesions (21.62%, of which radicular cyst was the most common cyst. The four most common lesions constituted a sum of 96.45% of the total. In general, the prevalence rates in our study are similar to the studies from other geographic parts of the world but with a lower incidence of inflammatory cysts, higher prevalence of dentigerous cysts and residual cysts and also mandibular predominance for residual cysts.

  19. Evaluation of the osteoclastogenic process associated with RANK / RANK-L / OPG in odontogenic myxomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Galván, María del Carmen; Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto; Bologna-Molina, Ronell; Setien-Olarra, Amaia; Marichalar-Mendia, Xabier; Aguirre-Urizar, José-Manuel

    2018-01-01

    Background Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a benign intraosseous neoplasm that exhibits local aggressiveness and high recurrence rates. Osteoclastogenesis is an important phenomenon in the tumor growth of maxillary neoplasms. RANK (Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor κappa B) is the signaling receptor of RANK-L (Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-Β ligand) that activates the osteoclasts. OPG (osteoprotegerin) is a decoy receptor for RANK-L that inhibits pro-osteoclastogenesis. The RANK / RANKL / OPG system participates in the regulation of osteolytic activity under normal conditions, and its alteration has been associated with greater bone destruction, and also with tumor growth. Objectives To analyze the immunohistochemical expression of OPG, RANK and RANK-L proteins in odontogenic myxomas (OMs) and their relationship with the tumor size. Material and Methods Eighteen OMs, 4 small ( 3cm) and 18 dental follicles (DF) that were included as control were studied by means of standard immunohistochemical procedure with RANK, RANKL and OPG antibodies. For the evaluation, 5 fields (40x) of representative areas of OM and DF were selected where the expression of each antibody was determined. Descriptive and comparative statistical analyses were performed with the obtained data. Results There are significant differences in the expression of RANK in OM samples as compared to DF (p = 0.022) and among the OMSs and OMLs (p = 0.032). Also a strong association is recognized in the expression of RANK-L and OPG in OM samples. Conclusions Activation of the RANK / RANK-L / OPG triad seems to be involved in the mechanisms of bone balance and destruction, as well as associated with tumor growth in odontogenic myxomas. Key words:Odontogenic myxoma, dental follicle, RANK, RANK-L, OPG, osteoclastogenesis. PMID:29680857

  20. Odontogenic Pain as the Principal Presentation of Vertebral Artery Pseudoaneurysm; a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Zenteno

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dissection of the vertebral artery is an important but rare cause of cerebrovascular accidents. Here we report a 48-year-old man with toothache since 4 days before who presented to the emergency department with neck pain and final diagnosis of dissecting right vertebral artery pseudoaneurysm. To our knowledge, this maybe the first report of odontogenic pain as the first manifestation of vertebral artery pseudoaneurysm in the literatures.

  1. Odontogenic Inflammatory Processes of Head and Neck in Computed Tomography Examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wabik, Aleksandra; Hendrich, Barbara K.; Nienartowicz, Jan; Guziński, Maciej; Sąsiadek, Marek J.

    2014-01-01

    Infections of odontogenic origin are the most common cause of inflammatory disease of head and neck region. Computed tomography allows for defining localization and extent of inflammatory lesions, visualizes soft tissue involvement, presence of an abscess or an osteolytic lesion around causative tooth. The aim of this study was to assess pathways, by which odontogenic infections spread into respective deep head and neck structures in computed tomography examination, taking into account the following criteria: frequency of involvement of respective deep cervical spaces, possibility to determine a probable causative tooth and concordance with the results of clinical examination. Thirty-eight patients cervicofacial inflammatory disease had undergone CT examination of head and neck region with a 64-slice CT scanner after intravenous contrast administration. Abscess was reported in 30 (79%) cases, while inflammatory infiltration was diagnosed in remaining 8 (21%) patients. There was full concordance between radiological report and intraoperative report In 33 cases (87%). The most commonly involved cervical space was masticator space – 31 patients (82%), followed by submandibular space – 27 patients (71%). Dental examination was impossible in 29 patient because of trismus. During analysis of CT studies we evaluated maxillary and mandibular alveolar processes for presence of osteolytic bone lesions around causative teeth roots and we found them in 30 cases (79%). In 32 cases (84%) cervicofacial infection were of mandibular odontogenic origin. In most cases CT study in patients suspected of odontogenic craniofacial infection revealed presence of an abscess, needing urgent surgery. Inflammatory infiltration of dental origin most frequently involves masticator space, followed by submandibular space. In most cases CT scanning allows for identification of causative teeth, especially when trismus makes detailed clinical examination impossible

  2. The Prevalence of Inflammatory and Developmental Odontogenic Cysts in a Libyan Population

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    Orafi H

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective- The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of odontogenic jaw cysts in a Libyan population and to compare the data with previously published reports from other countries. Materials and methods- We retrieved and analyzed 2190 case notes and biopsy records of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and the Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Al Arab Medical Sciences University, Benghazi, Libya, dating from January 1990 to December 2005. There were 326 cases (14.8% of diagnosed odontogenic cysts among the 2190 biopsies performed during this period. The cases were analyzed for age and sex distribution, site of presentation, association with impacted teeth, and the method of treatment. Results- The male to female ratio of patients was 1.3:1 Radicular cysts accounted for 222 cases (68.1%, followed by dentigerous cysts (n=49, 15% and odontogenic keratocysts (n=43, 14.1%. Mean ages of the patients were, respectively, 31.7, 22.7 and 36.1 years. . The maxilla was more commonly involved than the mandible (1.3:1. The anterior maxilla was the commonest site (n=132, 37.4% followed by the posterior mandible (n=96, 29.4%. Fifty three cases were associated with impacted teeth, and the highest frequency was for dentigerous cysts (n=37. Enucleation and curettage was performed on 300 patients, marsupialization on 14, and marginal/segmental resection on 12. Conclusion- To our knowledge, this is the first such study on a Libyan population. Our results are comparable to studies from other countries. Knowledge of the relative frequencies and sites of presentation of odontogenic cysts in different ethno-geographic backgrounds is essential for the early diagnosis and management of these benign yet potentially destructive lesions.

  3. Inhibition of odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells by dental resin monomers

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    Kwon, Ji Hyun; Park, Hee Chul; Zhu, Tingting; Yang, Hyeong-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Background Dental resin monomers that are leached from the resin matrix due to incomplete polymerization can affect the viability and various functions of oral tissues and cells. In this study, the effects of triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) on odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) were examined. To mimic clinical situations, dental pulp cells were treated with resin monomers for 24?h prior to the analysis of alkaline p...

  4. New tumour entities in the 4th edition of the World Health Organization Classification of Head and Neck tumours: odontogenic and maxillofacial bone tumours.

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    Speight, Paul M; Takata, Takashi

    2018-03-01

    The latest (4th) edition of the World Health Organization Classification of Head and Neck tumours has recently been published with a number of significant changes across all tumour sites. In particular, there has been a major attempt to simplify classifications and to use defining criteria which can be used globally in all situations, avoiding wherever possible the use of complex molecular techniques which may not be affordable or widely available. This review summarises the changes in Chapter 8: Odontogenic and maxillofacial bone lesions. The most significant change is the re-introduction of the classification of the odontogenic cysts, restoring this books status as the only text which classifies and defines the full range of lesions of the odontogenic tissues. The consensus group considered carefully the terminology of lesions and were concerned to ensure that the names used properly reflected the best evidence regarding the true nature of specific entities. For this reason, this new edition restores the odontogenic keratocyst and calcifying odontogenic cyst to the classification of odontogenic cysts and rejects the previous terminology (keratocystic odontogenic tumour and calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour) which were intended to suggest that they are true neoplasms. New entities which have been introduced include the sclerosing odontogenic carcinoma and primordial odontogenic tumour. In addition, some previously poorly defined lesions have been removed, including the ameloblastic fibrodentinoma, ameloblastic fibro-odontoma, which are probably developing odontomas, and the odontoameloblastoma, which is not regarded as an entity. Finally, the terminology "cemento" has been restored to cemento-ossifying fibroma and cemento-osseous dysplasias, to properly reflect that they are of odontogenic origin and are found in the tooth-bearing areas of the jaws.

  5. Actual Proliferating Index and p53 protein expression as prognostic marker in odontogenic cysts.

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    Gadbail, A R; Chaudhary, M; Patil, S; Gawande, M

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biological aggressiveness of odontogenic keratocyst/keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT), radicular cyst (RC) and dentigerous cyst (DC) by observing the actual proliferative activity of epithelium, and p53 protein expression. The actual proliferative activity was measured by Ki-67 Labelling Index and argyrophilic nucleolar organizing regions (AgNOR) count per nucleus. The p53 protein expression was also evaluated. Ki-67 positive cells were observed higher in suprabasal cell layers of KCOT with uniform distribution, a few of them were predominantly observed in basal cell layer in RC and DC. The AgNOR count was significantly higher in suprabasal cell layers of KCOT. The actual proliferative activity was noted to be higher in suprabasal cell layers of KCOT. The p53 immunolabelling was dense and scattered in basal and suprabasal cell layers in KCOT. The weakly stained p53 positive cells were observed diffusely distributed in KCOT, whereas they were mainly seen in basal cell layer of RC and DC. The quantitative and qualitative differences of the proliferative activity and the p53 protein expression in sporadic KCOT may be associated with intrinsic growth potential that could play a role in its development and explain locally aggressive biological behaviour. AgNOR count and p53 protein detection in odontogenic lesions can be of great consequence to predict the biological behaviour and prognosis.

  6. Glucose Transporter 1 Expression in Odontogenic Keratocyst, Dentigerous Cyst, and Ameloblastoma: An Immunohistochemical Study.

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    Bandyopadhyay, Alokenath; Panda, Abikshyeet; Behura, Shyam S; Ramachandra, Sujatha; Dash, Kailash C; Mishra, Pallavi

    2017-05-01

    An array of odontogenic lesions manifest in the maxillofacial region with variable presentations. The biological behavior of lesions, such as odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), dentigerous cyst (DC), and ameloblastoma (AM) always invite debate. Glucose transporter 1 (GLUT-1) is proven to be an indicator of metabolic behavior of several benign and malignant neoplasms. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of GLUT-1 in OKC, DC, and AM to understand their metabolic behavior. Immunohistochemical expression of GLUT-1 was evaluated in each of the 15 cases of OKC, DC, and AM. The number of labeled cells, staining intensity, and membrane or cytoplasmic expressions were the parameters assessed and analyzed using chi-square test. All cases showed positive GLUT-1 expression: 86.6% OKC showed more than 50% labeled cells followed by DC (40%) and AM (26.5%); 53.3% OKC showed strong intensity in comparison to AM, which showed weak intensity in 53.3% cases; 86.6% of OKCs showed both membrane and cytoplasmic expression followed by DC (40%) and AM (26.6%), whereas 73.3% of AM showed only membrane expression followed by DC (60%) and OKC (13.3%). Odontogenic keratocyst was found out to be more metabolically active followed by DC and AM.

  7. The Odontogenic Keratocysts: A Consideration of the Clinical and Radiologic Features

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    Lee, Ji Youn; Lee, Jang Yeol; Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Chang Seo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Yensei University, Yensei (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-09-15

    To determine whether the significant relationship exists between radiographic appearance, whether it is unilocular or multilocular, and its corresponding clinical and histologic features by examining the odontogenic keratocyst clinically, radiologically and histologically. This study was conducted on 48 cases of odontogenic keratocyst from the files of Dental Hospital, Yonsei University for the years 1982 through 1995. The mean age of patients was 30.5 years in the unilocular group and 35.5 years in the multilocular group. The male to female ratio was 1:1.06 in the unilocular group and 1:1.75 in the multilocular group. The chief complaint was swelling in both groups (unilocular 35.1%, multilocular 54.5%). In the occurrence site, the border of the lesion, the displacement and external root resorption of the adjacent teeth, there were no statistically significant difference between the unilocular group and multilocular group, but in the border type, there was statistically significant difference (x{sup 2}-test, p<0.05). Two recurred cases were observed among 11 cases of odontogenic keratocyst. One was unilocular case and the other was multilocular case.

  8. Histomorphometric comparative study of blood vessels and their pattern in follicular cyst, odontogenic keratocyst, and ameloblastoma.

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    Seifi, Safora; Feizi, Farideh; Khafri, Thoraya; Aram, Mehrdad

    2013-03-01

    The present study aimed at assessment and histomorphometric analysis of intratumoral and peritumoral (cystic) blood vessels in odontogenic lesions and their pattern on their clinical behavior by immunohistochemistry and morphometry. In a descriptive and analytical cross-sectional study, 45 paraffin blocks of ameloblastoma, odontogenic keratocyst, and follicular cyst were selected and stained immunohistochemically for CD34. In each slide, images of 3 microscopic fields with the highest microvessel density in intratumoral and peritumoral (cystic) areas were captured at 40× magnification with attached camera system. Inner vascular diameter (IVD) and outer vascular diameter (OVD), cross-sectional area (CSA), and the wall thickness (WT) of the vessels were measured with Motic Plus 2 software. The vascular pattern in odontogenic lesions was analyzed. Outer vascular diameter, IVD, and CSA of the vessels in peritumoral (cystic) areas were greater in ameloblastoma than keratocyst (P = 0.001) and follicular cyst (P keratocyst and follicular cyst. Morphometric specifications of blood vessels (IVD, OVD, CSA) and their pattern in peritumoral (cystic) areas may influence the aggressive clinical behavior of ameloblastoma in comparison with keratocyst and follicular cyst.

  9. Radiographic analysis of odontogenic cysts showing displacement of the mandibular canal

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    Cho, Bong Hae

    2003-01-01

    To assess the radiographic findings of odontogenic cysts showing displacement of the mandibular canal using computed tomographic (CT) and panoramic images. CT and panoramic images of 63 odontogenic cysts (27 dentigerous, 16 odontogenic keratocysts, and 20 radicular cysts) were analyzed to evaluate the following parameters: the dimension and shape of the cysts, and the effect of the cysts on the mandibular canal and cortical plates. Of the 63 cysts examined in the study, 35 (55.6%) showed inferior displacement of the mandibular canal and 46 (73.0%) showed perforation of the canal. There were statistically significant differenced between CT and panoramic images in depicting displacement and perforation of the mandibular canal. Cortical expansion was seen in 46 cases (73.0%) and cortical perforation in 23 cases (36.5%). The radicular cysts showed cortical expansion and perforation less frequently than the other cyst groups. Large cysts of mandible should be evaluated by multiplanar CT images in order to detect the mandibular canal and cortical bone involvement.

  10. Peripheral odontogenic keratocyst associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome: a case report.

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    Sakamoto, Kei; Morita, Kei-Ichi; Shimada, Yasuyuki; Omura, Ken; Izumo, Toshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2014-07-01

    Peripheral odontogenic keratocyst (POKC) is a rare gingival cyst showing histologic features identical to those of keratocystic odontogenic tumor. A rare case of POKC associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is presented. A 24-year-old woman with NBCCS presented with a pigmented papule, 3 mm in size, involving the lingual gingiva of the right canine area of the mandible. Based on a clinical diagnosis of benign pigmentation, an excisional biopsy was performed, and a histopathologic diagnosis of POKC was rendered. The lining cells were positive for the proteins GLI2, BCL2, keratin 8, keratin 17, and mTOR. TP53 and Ber-EP4 were also weakly positive. Gene mutational analysis on a buccal swab sample revealed 2 missense mutations in the PTCH1 gene. This case is a distinctive example of a genuine soft tissue counterpart of keratocystic odontogenic tumor, in which an aberrant PTCH1-GLI pathway played a considerable role in the pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Diagnostic ability of differential diagnosis in ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst by imaging modalities and observers

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    Gang, Tae In; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Lee, Sam Sun; Kim, Jeong Hwa; Moon, Je Woon; Choi, Soon Chul

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic ability in differentiating between ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst according to the imaging modalities and observes. We evaluated thirty-six cases of ameloblastomas and forty-seven cases of odontogenic keratocysts all histologically confirmed. Six oral and maxillofacial radiologists diagnosed the lesions by 3 methods: using panoramic radiograph, using computed tomograph (CT), and using panoramic radiograph and CT. The observers were classified by 3 groups: group 1 had experienced over 10 years in oral and mazilofacial radiologic field, group 2 had experienced for 3-4 years, and group 3 was in the process of residentship. After over 2 weeks, the observers diagnosed them by the same methods. The ROC curve areas except for group 3 were the highest with interpretation using panoramic radiograph and CT, followed by interpretation using CT only, and the lowest with interpretation using panoramic radiograph only. The overall difference was not found in diagnostic ability among groups in using panoramic radiograph only, but there was difference in diagnostic ability of group 1 and 2 vs 3 in using CT only, and combination panoramic radiograph and CT. To differentiate between ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst more accurately, the experienced oral and maxillofacial radiologist should diagnose with combination of panoramic radiograph and CT

  12. Diagnostic ability of differential diagnosis in ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst by imaging modalities and observers

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    Gang, Tae In; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Lee, Sam Sun; Kim, Jeong Hwa; Moon, Je Woon; Choi, Soon Chul [Seoul National Univ. School of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic ability in differentiating between ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst according to the imaging modalities and observes. We evaluated thirty-six cases of ameloblastomas and forty-seven cases of odontogenic keratocysts all histologically confirmed. Six oral and maxillofacial radiologists diagnosed the lesions by 3 methods: using panoramic radiograph, using computed tomograph (CT), and using panoramic radiograph and CT. The observers were classified by 3 groups: group 1 had experienced over 10 years in oral and mazilofacial radiologic field, group 2 had experienced for 3-4 years, and group 3 was in the process of residentship. After over 2 weeks, the observers diagnosed them by the same methods. The ROC curve areas except for group 3 were the highest with interpretation using panoramic radiograph and CT, followed by interpretation using CT only, and the lowest with interpretation using panoramic radiograph only. The overall difference was not found in diagnostic ability among groups in using panoramic radiograph only, but there was difference in diagnostic ability of group 1 and 2 vs 3 in using CT only, and combination panoramic radiograph and CT. To differentiate between ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst more accurately, the experienced oral and maxillofacial radiologist should diagnose with combination of panoramic radiograph and CT.

  13. NCAM (CD56) expression in keratin-producing odontogenic cysts: aberrant expression in KCOT.

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    Vera-Sirera, Beatriz; Forner-Navarro, Leopoldo; Vera-Sempere, Francisco

    2015-02-12

    To investigate immunohistochemically the expression of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), which has been identified as a signaling receptor with frequent reactivity in ameloblastomas (AB), in a series of keratin-producing odontogenic cysts (KPOCs). Immunohistochemical expression of NCAM, using a monoclonal antibody, was determined in a series of 58 KPOCs comprising 12 orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts (OOCs) and 46 keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs), corresponding to 40 non-syndromic KCOT (NS-KCOTs) and 6 syndromic KCOT (S-KCOTs), associated with nevic basocellular syndrome (NBCS). NCAM expression was negative in all OOCs, but 36.45% of KCOTs exhibited focal and heterogeneous expression at the basal cell level, as well as in basal budding areas and the basal cells of daughter cysts. The latter two locations were especially applicable to S-KCOTs, with focal NCAM reactivity occurring in 66.66% of cases. Aberrant NCAM expression, in KCOTs but especially in S-KCOTs, together with its immunomorphological location, suggests that this adhesion molecule and signaling receptor plays a role in the pathogenesis of KCOTs, with a probable impact on lesional recurrence.

  14. The Odontogenic Keratocysts: A Consideration of the Clinical and Radiologic Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Youn; Lee, Jang Yeol; Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Chang Seo

    2000-01-01

    To determine whether the significant relationship exists between radiographic appearance, whether it is unilocular or multilocular, and its corresponding clinical and histologic features by examining the odontogenic keratocyst clinically, radiologically and histologically. This study was conducted on 48 cases of odontogenic keratocyst from the files of Dental Hospital, Yonsei University for the years 1982 through 1995. The mean age of patients was 30.5 years in the unilocular group and 35.5 years in the multilocular group. The male to female ratio was 1:1.06 in the unilocular group and 1:1.75 in the multilocular group. The chief complaint was swelling in both groups (unilocular 35.1%, multilocular 54.5%). In the occurrence site, the border of the lesion, the displacement and external root resorption of the adjacent teeth, there were no statistically significant difference between the unilocular group and multilocular group, but in the border type, there was statistically significant difference (x 2 -test, p<0.05). Two recurred cases were observed among 11 cases of odontogenic keratocyst. One was unilocular case and the other was multilocular case.

  15. Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals Genes Involved in the Pathogenesis of Ameloblastoma and Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Eliane Macedo Sobrinho; Santos, Hércules Otacílio; Dos Santos Dias, Ivoneth; Santos, Sérgio Henrique; Batista de Paula, Alfredo Maurício; Feltenberger, John David; Sena Guimarães, André Luiz; Farias, Lucyana Conceição

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenesis of odontogenic tumors is not well known. It is important to identify genetic deregulations and molecular alterations. This study aimed to investigate, through bioinformatic analysis, the possible genes involved in the pathogenesis of ameloblastoma (AM) and keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT). Genes involved in the pathogenesis of AM and KCOT were identified in GeneCards. Gene list was expanded, and the gene interactions network was mapped using the STRING software. "Weighted number of links" (WNL) was calculated to identify "leader genes" (highest WNL). Genes were ranked by K-means method and Kruskal-Wallis test was used (Preview data was used to corroborate the bioinformatics data. CDK1 was identified as leader gene for AM. In KCOT group, results show PCNA and TP53 . Both tumors exhibit a power law behavior. Our topological analysis suggested leader genes possibly important in the pathogenesis of AM and KCOT, by clustering coefficient calculated for both odontogenic tumors (0.028 for AM, zero for KCOT). The results obtained in the scatter diagram suggest an important relationship of these genes with the molecular processes involved in AM and KCOT. Ontological analysis for both AM and KCOT demonstrated different mechanisms. Bioinformatics analyzes were confirmed through literature review. These results may suggest the involvement of promising genes for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of AM and KCOT.

  16. Alteration of microRNA expression of human dental pulp cells during odontogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Qimei; Wang, Runfu; Jiang, Hongwei; Lin, Zhengmei; Ling, Junqi

    2012-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play momentous roles in various biological processes including cell differentiation. However, little is known about the role of miRNAs in human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) during odontogenic differentiation. The aims of this study were to investigate the expression of miRNAs in the primary culture of hDPCs when incubated in odontogenic medium. The potential characteristics of hDPCs were investigated by miRNA microarray and real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Bioinformatics (ie, target prediction, Gene Ontology analysis, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes mapping tools) were applied for predicting the complementary target genes of miRNAs and their biological functions. A total of 22 miRNAs were differentially expressed in which 12 miRNAs up-regulated and 10 miRNAs down-regulated in differentiated hDPCs compared with the control. The target genes of differential miRNAs were predicted to associate with several biological functions and signaling pathways including the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and the Wnt signaling pathway. The differential expression miRNAs may be involved in governing hDPC odontogenic differentiation, thus contributing to the future investigations of regulatory mechanisms in reparative dentin formation and dental pulp regeneration. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. TET1 knockdown inhibits the odontogenic differentiation potential of human dental pulp cells.

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    Rao, Li-Jia; Yi, Bai-Cheng; Li, Qi-Meng; Xu, Qiong

    2016-06-30

    Human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) possess the capacity to differentiate into odontoblast-like cells and generate reparative dentin in response to exogenous stimuli or injury. Ten-eleven translocation 1 (TET1) is a novel DNA methyldioxygenase that plays an important role in the promotion of DNA demethylation and transcriptional regulation in several cell lines. However, the role of TET1 in the biological functions of hDPCs is unknown. To investigate the effect of TET1 on the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation potential of hDPCs, a recombinant shRNA lentiviral vector was used to knock down TET1 expression in hDPCs. Following TET1 knockdown, TET1 was significantly downregulated at both the mRNA and protein levels. Proliferation of the hDPCs was suppressed in the TET1 knockdown groups. Alkaline phosphatase activity, the formation of mineralized nodules, and the expression levels of DSPP and DMP1 were all reduced in the TET1-knockdown hDPCs undergoing odontogenic differentiation. Based on these results, we concluded that TET1 knockdown can prevent the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs, which suggests that TET1 may play an important role in dental pulp repair and regeneration.

  18. Relation of the radiologic findings and labeling index of Ki-67, PCNA and cytokeratin in unicystic ameloblastoma, dentigerous cyst and odontogenic keratocyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Man Yong; Lee, Sam Sun; Lee, Jin Koo; Yi, Won Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Lee, Jae Il; Min, Byung Moo; Choi, Soon Chul

    2004-01-01

    To compare the proliferation potential of the epithelial cells between unicystic ameloblastoma (UA), dentigerous cyst (DC), and odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) and to correlate this proliferation potential with the radiographic features of these three pathoses. Immunohistochemical expression of PCNA, Ki-67, and cytokeratin as a proliferation maker were assessed for 15 cases of UA, 15 cases of DC, and 15 cases of OKC. The degree of immunochemical expression of three proliferation markers were correlated with the radiographic features, especially cortical expansion (negative and positive) and shape of border (scalloped and round). Using PCNA and Ki-67, OKC showed the highest proliferation potential and UA the lowest. Statistically significant differences were found between the OKC and the UA (p<0.05). However, no statistically significant difference was present according to the radiographic features in all pathoses. Using cytokeratin, there was no significant differences of proliferation potential among three pathoses. OKC epithelium has the most intense proliferation potential, followed by the dentigeous cyst and then unicystic ameloblastoma. There is no significant relation between the radiographic features and the proliferation potential of epithelium of these three pathoses.

  19. Relation of the radiologic findings and labeling index of Ki-67, PCNA and cytokeratin in unicystic ameloblastoma, dentigerous cyst and odontogenic keratocyst

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    Song, Man Yong; Lee, Sam Sun; Lee, Jin Koo; Yi, Won Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Lee, Jae Il; Min, Byung Moo; Choi, Soon Chul [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-06-15

    To compare the proliferation potential of the epithelial cells between unicystic ameloblastoma (UA), dentigerous cyst (DC), and odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) and to correlate this proliferation potential with the radiographic features of these three pathoses. Immunohistochemical expression of PCNA, Ki-67, and cytokeratin as a proliferation maker were assessed for 15 cases of UA, 15 cases of DC, and 15 cases of OKC. The degree of immunochemical expression of three proliferation markers were correlated with the radiographic features, especially cortical expansion (negative and positive) and shape of border (scalloped and round). Using PCNA and Ki-67, OKC showed the highest proliferation potential and UA the lowest. Statistically significant differences were found between the OKC and the UA (p<0.05). However, no statistically significant difference was present according to the radiographic features in all pathoses. Using cytokeratin, there was no significant differences of proliferation potential among three pathoses. OKC epithelium has the most intense proliferation potential, followed by the dentigeous cyst and then unicystic ameloblastoma. There is no significant relation between the radiographic features and the proliferation potential of epithelium of these three pathoses.

  20. Prognostic factors for keratocystic odontogenic tumor (odontogenic keratocyst): analysis of clinico-pathologic and immunohistochemical findings in cysts treated by enucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroyanagi, Norio; Sakuma, Hidenori; Miyabe, Satoru; Machida, Junichiro; Kaetsu, Atsuo; Yokoi, Motoo; Maeda, Hatsuhiko; Warnakulasuriya, Saman; Nagao, Toru; Shimozato, Kazuo

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine prognostic factors for the recurrence of keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) following simple enucleation by examining clinico-pathologic and immunohistochemical findings. Following enucleation, the frequency of recurrence among 32 subjects diagnosed with KCOT was analyzed for tumor site, radiographic and histologic features, and immunopositivity for Ki-67 and p53. Keratocystic odontogenic tumors in four out of 32 subjects (12.5%) recurred during the follow-up period (median: 33 months, range: 7-114 months). Three out of four subjects (75.0%) among recurrent group showed high expression of Ki-67 (LI >10%) in basal layer and four (4/28; 14.3%) among non-recurrence group (P = 0.025). Expression of p53 among non-recurrent group was observed in 11 subjects (11/28; 39.3%), and in three subjects (3/4; 75.0%) among the recurrent group (P = 0.295). Hazard risk for the recurrence of KCOT was 4.02 (95% CI 1.42-18.14) for high Ki-67 expression in the basal layer by the Cox proportional hazard model (P = 0.009). In our study, none of the other clinico-pathologic variables were associated with the recurrence of KCOT. The results suggested that the evaluation of Ki-67 expression in KCOT at the time of pathological diagnosis might be helpful for consideration of appropriate adjunctive surgical procedures to avoid a recurrence and may serve as a prognostic marker.

  1. Histone deacetylases and NF-kB signaling coordinate expression of CX3CL1 in epithelial cells in response to microbial challenge by suppressing miR-424 and miR-503.

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    Rui Zhou

    Full Text Available The NF-kB pathway is key to epithelial immune defense and has been implicated in secretion of antimicrobial peptides, release of cytokines/chemokines to mobilize immune effector cells, and activation of adaptive immunity. The expression of many inflammatory genes following infection involves the remodeling of the chromatin structure. We reported here that histone deacetylases (HDACs and NF-kB signaling coordinate expression of CX3CL1 in epithelial cells following Cryptosporidium parvum infection. Upregulation of CX3CL1 was detected in cultured human biliary epithelial cells following infection. Expression of miR-424 and miR-503 was downregulated, and was involved in the induction of CX3CL1 in infected cells. C. parvum infection suppressed transcription of the mir-424-503 gene in a NF-kB- and HDAC-dependent manner. Increased promoter recruitment of NF-kB p50 and HDACs, and decreased promoter H3 acetylation associated with the mir-424-503 gene were observed in infected cells. Upregulation of CX3CL1 in biliary epithelial cells and increased infiltration of CX3CR1(+ cells were detected during C. parvum infection in vivo. Induction of CX3CL1 and downregulation of miR-424 and miR-503 were also detected in epithelial cells in response to LPS stimulation. The above results indicate that HDACs and NF-kB signaling coordinate epithelial expression of CX3CL1 to promote mucosal antimicrobial defense through suppression of the mir-424-503 gene.

  2. Use of FDG-PET to detect a chronic odontogenic infection as a possible source of the brain abscess.

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    Sato, Jun; Kuroshima, Takeshi; Wada, Mayumi; Satoh, Akira; Watanabe, Shiro; Okamoto, Shozo; Shiga, Tohru; Tamaki, Nagara; Kitagawa, Yoshimasa

    2016-05-01

    This study describes the use of (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) to detect a chronic odontogenic infection as the possible origin of a brain abscess (BA). A 74-year-old man with esophageal carcinoma was referred to our department to determine the origin of a BA in his oral cavity. He had no acute odontogenic infections. The BA was drained, and bacteria of the Staphylococcus milleri group were detected. Whole body FDG-PET revealed that the only sites of definite uptake of FDG were the esophageal carcinoma and the left upper maxillary region (SUVmax: 4.5). These findings suggested that the BA may have originated from a chronic periodontal infection. Six teeth with progressive chronic periodontal disease were extracted to remove the possible source of BA. These findings excluded the possibility of direct spread of bacteria from the odontogenic infectious lesion to the intracranial cavity. After extraction, there was no relapse of BA.

  3. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computerized tomography for odontogenic cysts and cystic-appearing tumors of the jaws: is it useful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimoto, Naoya; Chindasombatjaroen, Jira; Tomita, Seiki; Shimamoto, Hiroaki; Uchiyama, Yuka; Hasegawa, Yoko; Kishino, Mitsunobu; Murakami, Shumei; Furukawa, Souhei

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the usefulness of computerized tomography (CT), particularly contrast-enhanced CT, in differentiation of jaw cysts and cystic-appearing tumors. We retrospectively analyzed contrast-enhanced CT images of 90 patients with odontogenic jaw cysts or cystic-appearing tumors. The lesion size and CT values were measured and the short axis to long axis (S/L) ratio, contrast enhancement (CE) ratio, and standard deviation ratio were calculated. The lesion size and the S/L ratio of keratocystic odontogenic tumors were significantly different from those of radicular cysts and follicular cysts. There were no significant differences in the CE ratio among the lesions. Multidetector CT provided diagnostic information about the size of odontogenic cysts and cystic-appearing tumors of the jaws that was related to the lesion type, but showed no relation between CE ratio and the type of these lesions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Case of Odontogenic Infection by Streptococcus constellatus Leading to Systemic Infection in a Cogan’s Syndrome Patient

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    Masanobu Abe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic infection in immunocompromised patients tends to extend systemically beyond the oral cavity. Our case report presents a patient with sepsis due to a Streptococcus constellatus (S. constellatus odontogenic infection in a 64-year-old-immunocompromised woman with Cogan’s syndrome. She had been suffering from chronic mandibular osteomyelitis which was thought to have been caused by dental caries and/or chronic periodontitis with furcation involvement of the left mandibular first molar. We suspect that the acute symptoms of the chronic osteomyelitis due to S. constellatus led to the systemic infection. This infection could be accelerated by the use of a corticosteroid and an alendronate. This is the first report which represents the potential association between odontogenic infection and Cogan’s syndrome.

  5. Generation of tooth-periodontium complex structures using high-odontogenic potential dental epithelium derived from mouse embryonic stem cells.

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    Zhang, Yancong; Li, Yongliang; Shi, Ruirui; Zhang, Siqi; Liu, Hao; Zheng, Yunfei; Li, Yan; Cai, Jinglei; Pei, Duanqing; Wei, Shicheng

    2017-06-08

    A number of studies have shown that tooth-like structures can be regenerated using induced pluripotent stem cells and mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells. However, few studies have reported the regeneration of tooth-periodontium complex structures, which are more suitable for clinical tooth transplantation. We established an optimized approach to induce high-odontogenic potential dental epithelium derived from mES cells by temporally controlling bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4) function and regenerated tooth-periodontium complex structures in vivo. First, immunofluorescence and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were used to identify the watershed of skin and the oral ectoderm. LDN193189 was then used to inhibit the BMP4 receptor around the watershed, followed by the addition of exogenous BMP4 to promote BMP4 function. The generated dental epithelium was confirmed by western blot analysis and immunofluorescence. The generated epithelium was ultimately combined with embryonic day 14.5 mouse mesenchyme and transplanted into the renal capsules of nude mice. After 4 weeks, the tooth-periodontium complex structure was examined by micro-computed tomography (CT) and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Our study found that the turning point of oral ectoderm differentiation occurred around day 3 after the embryoid body was transferred to a common culture plate. Ameloblastin-positive dental epithelial cells were detected following the temporal regulation of BMP4. Tooth-periodontium complex structures, which included teeth, a periodontal membrane, and alveolar bone, were formed when this epithelium was combined with mouse dental mesenchyme and transplanted into the renal capsules of nude mice. Micro-CT and H&E staining revealed that the generated tooth-periodontium complex structures shared a similar histological structure with normal mouse teeth. An optimized induction method was established to promote the differentiation of mES cells into dental

  6. Imaging of the jaw cysts with a dental CT software program : distinction of odontogenic keratocysts from other cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Man; Shin, Sang Hoon; Lee, Won Hoon; Oh, Kyu Hyen; Jung, Hak Young; Lee, Young Hwan; Sung, Nak Kwan; Jung, Duck Soo; Kim, Ok Dong

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of a dental CT software program in the assessment of jaw cysts and in the differentiation of odontogenic keratocysts and other cysts. Seventeen patients with proven jaw cysts(8 maxillae and 9 mandibles) were evaluated with a dental CT sofware program for location, locularity, the presence or absence of marginal scallping, and height to length ratio. For the delineation of involvement or displace-ment of neurovascular bundles, cortical erosion, perforation or expansion, and tooth root resorption by the jaw cysts, images from this program were compared to conventional images. Seventeen lesions icomprised 15 odontogenic cysts (five odontogenic keratocysts, five radicular, three residual and two dentigerous cysts) and two non-odontogenic cysts (one nasopalatine duct cyst and one postoperative maxillary cyst). Images of jaw cysts obtained with the dental CT software program delineated much more clearly than conventional images the status of neurovascular bundle and cortical bone, but there was no clear difference between the two modalities in delineating tooth root erosion. Dental CT findings of five mandibular odontogenic keratocysts were scalloped margin in all, mandibular ramus involvement in four, height to length ratio below 60% in four ,and multilocularity in two. The findings of the other 12 cysts (eight maxillae and four mandibles) were unilocularity in all, smooth inner margin in ten, height to length ratio below 60% in only two, and ramus involvement in none. A dental CT software program is an improved imaging modality for assessing jaw cysts;and findings which tend to indicate odontogenic keratocysts are marginal scalloping, mandibular ramus involvement, prominent spread along the marrow space and multilocularity

  7. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor with impacted maxillary third molar involving the right maxillary antrum:An unusual case report

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    Abhishek Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The odontogenic keratocyst (OKC, first described by Phillipsen in 1956, has metamorphosized as a keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT as reported in WHO classification of head and neck tumors in 2005. KCOT is a benign intraosseous neoplasm of the jaw and its occurrence in maxilla is unusual and its appearance in maxillary antrum along with maxillary impacted third molar is very uncommon. This article reports a case of KCOT associated with impacted maxillary third molar in right maxillary antrum and describes its rare site of occurrence.

  8. The Possible Role of Mast Cells in the Odontogenic Cyst’s Pathogenesis: A Comparative Study between Dentigerous Cyst and Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor

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    Sareh Farhadi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recently, mast cells were recognized in the pathogenesis of more aggressive pathologic lesions. This study was aimed to evaluate and compare the density of mast cells in Dentigerous cyst (DC and Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT regarding their different clinical behavior. Method. This study was conducted on 23 and 26 cases of DC and KCOT, respectively. Four-micron sections were prepared for Toluidine blue staining and mast cell densities in two desired cysts were studied. Final data was analyzed via t-test and Mann-Whitney U test method regarding the significant level lower than 0.05. Results. Mast cell densities were significantly higher in KCOTs for deep and superficial layers and both layers (P0.05. Conclusion. It seems that mast cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of KCOT, but, regarding wide range of mast cell’s biologic activities, further investigations are recommended to confirm the issue and prepare the details.

  9. Osteosarcoma of the mandible mimicking an odontogenic abscess: a case report and review of the literature.

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    Bhadage, Chetan J; Vaishampayan, Sagar; Kolhe, Swapnil; Umarji, Hemant

    2013-04-01

    Inflammatory lesions, like periapical/odontogenic abscesses, are by far the most common pathologic condition of the jaws. Radiographically, these lesions commonly manifest as widening of periodontal ligament space, discontinuity of lamina dura and ill-defined periapical radiolucency. There are some rare disorders which could cause similar radiographic changes in the jaw bone. With careful scrutiny of periapical radiolucency, regular periodic follow-up radiographs and histo-pathologic examination, the periapical abscess or infection can be differentiated from rare fatal disorders. This paper highlights the need for vigilant examination of even the commonest, innocuous-appearing periapical changes which sometimes are produced by some rare fatal disorders.

  10. Treatment of Odontogenic Myxoma: A Multidisciplinary Approach—6-Year Follow-Up Case

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    João Gustavo Oliveira de Souza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The most aggressive diseases that affect the oral environment are considered tumors of the jaw. The surgical treatment is preferably done by surgical resection of the lesion, resulting in a great loss of tissue and esthetics. Multidisciplinary planning is required for the rehabilitation of these cases. Autogenous grafting techniques or vascularized flaps allow ridge reconstruction for implant placement, restoring function, and esthetics. This paper reports a 6-year follow-up case of an odontogenic myxoma treated with wide resection and mandibular bone reconstruction for posterior rehabilitation with dental implants.

  11. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor of the mandible with unusual radiographic features: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayanan, Veena S.; Naidu, Giridhar; Haldar, Maya; Ragavendra, Raju; Mhaske-Jedhe, Shubang

    2013-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) usually presents as a unilocular, pericoronal radiolucency in the maxillary anterior region in adolescent females. Very few conditions occur in such a narrow age range and at such a restrictive site. Rarely, these tumors present with varied clinical features. A case of AOT of the mandible is reported with unusual features such as large size, multilocular appearance, and aggressive behavior. The role of radiology in diagnosis of atypical AOT is extremely important. The unique radiological manifestations of the lesion helped in the diagnosis, and it was managed conservatively with no evidence of recurrence.

  12. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor of the mandible with unusual radiographic features: A case report

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    Narayanan, Veena S. [Dept. of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Coorg Institute of Dental Sciences, Virajpe (India); Naidu, Giridhar; Haldar, Maya [Dept. of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Peoples' Dental Academy, Bhopal (India); Ragavendra, Raju; Mhaske-Jedhe, Shubang [Dept. of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Peoples' Dental Academy, Bhopal (India)

    2013-06-15

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) usually presents as a unilocular, pericoronal radiolucency in the maxillary anterior region in adolescent females. Very few conditions occur in such a narrow age range and at such a restrictive site. Rarely, these tumors present with varied clinical features. A case of AOT of the mandible is reported with unusual features such as large size, multilocular appearance, and aggressive behavior. The role of radiology in diagnosis of atypical AOT is extremely important. The unique radiological manifestations of the lesion helped in the diagnosis, and it was managed conservatively with no evidence of recurrence.

  13. Cone-beam computed tomographic illustration of an unusual position of keratocystic odontogenic tumor mimicking a dentigerous cyst: A case report

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    Deepankar Misra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT is an advanced imaging modality, with its application in all branches of dentistry. Of all the imaging modalities available, CBCT, with minimum required exposure, provides the best image quality and helps in arriving at a correct diagnosis and in treatment planning. An odontogenic keratocyst, reclassified as a keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT, has an aggressive behavior, is prone to recur, and thus, has been classified as a tumor. Here, we discuss a rare case of a keratocystic odontogenic tumor occurring in the maxilla, with an ectopic tooth position mimicking a dentigerous cyst.

  14. Growth factor-enriched autologous plasma improves wound healing after surgical debridement in odontogenic necrotizing fasciitis: a case report

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    Martinez-Fong Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Odontogenic necrotizing fasciitis of the neck is a fulminant infection of odontogenic origin that quickly spreads along the fascial planes and results in necrosis of the affected tissues. It is usually polymicrobial, occurs frequently in immunocompromised patients, and has a high mortality rate. Case presentation A 69-year old Mexican male had a pain in the maxillar right-canine region and a swelling of the submental and submandibular regions. Our examination revealed local pain, tachycardia, hyperthermia (39°C, and the swelling of bilateral submental and submandibular regions, which also were erythematous, hyperthermic, crepitant, and with a positive Godet sign. Mobility and third-degree caries were seen in the right mandibular canine. Bacteriological cultures isolated streptococcus pyogenes and staphylococcus aureus. The histopathological diagnosis was odontogenic necrotizing fasciitis of the submental and submandibular regions. The initial treatment was surgical debridement and the administration of antibiotics. After cultures were negative, the surgical wound was treated with a growth factor-enriched autologous plasma eight times every third day until complete healing occurred. Conclusions The treatment with a growth factor-enriched autologous plasma caused a rapid healing of an extensive surgical wound in a patient with odontogenic necrotizing fasciitis. The benefits were rapid tissue regeneration, an aesthetic and a functional scar, and the avoidance of further surgery and possible complications.

  15. Cutaneous sinus tracts (or emerging sinus tracts of odontogenic origin: a report of 3 cases

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    Ronald S Brown

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Ronald S Brown1, Robert Jones2, Tawana Feimster3, Frances E Sam21Department of Oral Diagnostic Services, Howard University College of Dentistry, Washington, DC, USA; 2Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Howard University College of Dentistry, Washington, DC, USA; 3Department of Endodontics, Howard University College of Dentistry, Washington, DC, USAAbstract: Three cases are presented in which patients presented with either cutaneous swelling or cutaneous sinus tracts of odontogenic origin. A cutaneous sinus tract of odontogenic origin is a pathway through the alveolar bone that typically begins at the apex of an infected tooth or of an infected portion of the dental alveolus and empties infected material (pus through the skin. Where as the more common finding of an oral fistula is a pathway from the apical periodontal area of a tooth to the surface of the oral mucous membrane, permitting the discharge of suppurative material. Diagnosis, etiology and treatment are discussed with reference to patient history, clinical examinations, imaging, and treatment perspectives.Keywords: dental abscess, fistula, cutaneous sinus tract, odotogenic infection

  16. Notch signaling and ghost cell fate in the calcifying cystig odontogenic tumor

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    Siar CH

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Notch signaling is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that enables adjacent cells to adopt different fates. Ghost cells (GCs are anucleate cells with homogeneous pale eosinophilic cytoplasm and very pale to clear central areas (previous nucleus sites. Although GCs are present in a variety of odontogenic lesions notably the calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (GCOT, their nature and process of formation remains elusive. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Notch signaling in the cell fate specification of GCs in CCOT. Immunohistochemical staining for four Notch receptors (Notch1, Notch2, Notch3 and Notch4 and three ligands (Jagged1, Jagged2 and Delta1 was performed on archival tissues of five CCOT cases. Level of positivity was quantified as negative (0, mild (+, moderate (2+ and strong (3+. Results revealed that GCs demonstrated overexpression for Notch1 and Jagged1 suggesting that Notch1Jagged1 signaling might serve as the main transduction mechanism in cell fate decision for GCs in CCOT. Protein localizations were largely membranous and/or cytoplasmic. Mineralized GCs also stained positive implicating that the calcification process might be associated with upregulation of these molecules. The other Notch receptors and ligands were weak to absent in GCs and tumoral epithelium. Stromal endothelium and fibroblasts were stained variably positive.

  17. Analysis of gene expression during odontogenic differentiation of cultured human dental pulp cells

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    Min-Seock Seo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives We analyzed gene-expression profiles after 14 day odontogenic induction of human dental pulp cells (DPCs using a DNA microarray and sought candidate genes possibly associated with mineralization. Materials and Methods Induced human dental pulp cells were obtained by culturing DPCs in odontogenic induction medium (OM for 14 day. Cells exposed to normal culture medium were used as controls. Total RNA was extracted from cells and analyzed by microarray analysis and the key results were confirmed selectively by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. We also performed a gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA of the microarray data. Results Six hundred and five genes among the 47,320 probes on the BeadChip differed by a factor of more than two-fold in the induced cells. Of these, 217 genes were upregulated, and 388 were down-regulated. GSEA revealed that in the induced cells, genes implicated in Apoptosis and Signaling by wingless MMTV integration (Wnt were significantly upregulated. Conclusions Genes implicated in Apoptosis and Signaling by Wnt are highly connected to the differentiation of dental pulp cells into odontoblast.

  18. Assessment of Proliferative Potential of Odontogenic Keratocyst and Dentigerous Cyst using Podoplanin: An Immunohistochemical Study.

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    Gupta, Sandeep; Paliwal, Aparna; Choudaha, Nidhi; Gupta, Anish; Rao, Prashant; Grover, Shekhar

    2017-12-01

    Odontogenic cysts are commonly encountered lesions among head and neck pathologies. Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) has unique features of recurrence and local aggressiveness. Podoplanin (PDP) is a lymphatic endothelial marker and is shown to be expressed in a variety of tissues. Hence, we planned to assess the significance of PDP in OKC and dentigerous cyst (DC). The present study included assessment of immunoexpression of PDP in OKC and DC. Twenty specimens each of OKC and DC were included in the present study and were stained with D2-40 antibody. All the sections were analyzed and were categorized as negative staining, weakly positive staining, and strongly positive staining. All the results were analyzed by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software. We detected PDP-positive staining in the cell membrane and cytoplasm of the cells of basal cell layer and supra-basal cell layers. In DC cases, we observed positive staining only in cases associated with inflammation. Podoplanin does play a significant role in enhancing the local invasive and neoplastic properties of OKC. Podoplanin expression in OKC is potentially associated with moderate invasive nature of the neighboring structures.

  19. Rapid treatment reduces hospitalization for pediatric patients with odontogenic-based cellulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thikkurissy, Sarat; Rawlins, Joseph T; Kumar, Ashok; Evans, Erik; Casamassimo, Paul S

    2010-07-01

    The study aimed to assess characteristics of facial cellulitis admissions and their relationship to cost of hospitalization (COH) and length of stay (LOS) in children ages 0 to 20 years at an urban hospital and to compare outcomes of rapid management to published and national statistics for LOS and COH. A retrospective review of 376 charts of facial cellulitis admissions between 2000 and 2006 revealed 63 of confirmed odontogenic cases from which cellulitis characteristics, COH, and LOS were gleaned. Variables were correlated to LOS and COH. Data on LOS and cost of admission were compared to published studies and 506 entries from the 2006 Kids' Inpatient Database (KID). Of 63 charts included, children included were 8.3 years (SD, +/-3.8 years) and equal in sex distribution. Treatment rendered and site of infection had no significant relationship to COH. Overall mean hospital LOS was 2.08 days and significantly less as compared to 3.97 days for published studies and 3.4 days for KID (P KID. In the management of pediatric facial cellulitis of odontogenic origin, rapid treatment had a significant positive impact on length of stay and total cost of treatment compared to published studies and nationally reflective data. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The effects of odontogenic and nonodontogenic tissues on bone healing in Guinea pig mandible

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    Kim, So Jung; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae; Hong, Jung Pyo

    1996-01-01

    This study was for comparing healing patterns and effects between with odontogenic and nonodontogenic tissues on the defected mandible. Experimental bone defects that measured 3 mm in diameter were created on the mandibular body of guinea pig by removal of bone with the use of trephine burs and bone defects were grafted with Biogran (Orthovita Co., U.S. A.) and covered with Dura Mata (Pfrimmer-Viggo GmbH Co., Germany). Guinea pigs were serially terminated by fours on the 3 days, the 1 week, the 2 weeks, the 3 weeks, the 4 weeks, and the 5 weeks after experiment, and the mandibular body was removed and fixed with 10% neutral formalin. They were decalcified and embedded in paraffin as using the usual methods. The specimen sectioned and stained with hematoxylin and eosin and toluidine blue. They were observed with a light microscope and a polarizing microscope. The obtained results were as follows: 1. Defected bone was healed fast from the odontogenic tissues in early stage of the experiment. 2. The arrangement of the bone matrix was relatively regular in the bone from the nonodontogenic tissues, but irregular in the bone from the odotogenic tissues. 3. Compact bone has started to be absorbed and changed to the pattern of matrix bone tissue from 3 weeks after experiment.

  1. Orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts presenting as a periapical lesion: report of a case and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Servato, João Paulo; Cardoso, Sérgio Vitorino; Parreira da Silva, Marcelo Caetano; Cordeiro, Mirna Scalon; Rogério de Faria, Paulo; Loyola, Adriano Mota

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory cysts, granulomas, abscesses, and fibrous scars represent most periapical radiolucencies. However, other less common lesions, such as orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts (OOCs), can be found at this region, and they deserve to be discussed because the prognosis for an OOC is different from that expected for the ordinary inflammatory periapical diseases. An interesting case of OOC associated with a nonvital tooth in a 40-year-old woman is described. After a previous clinical diagnosis of a radicular cyst, the tooth was extracted, and the lesion was enucleated and submitted to microscopy examination. Because of the detection of an orthokeratinized epithelium lining, a diagnosis of OOC was concluded. After 2 years of periodic follow-up, no signs of recurrence were detected. The presence of keratin in radicular lesions must be carefully evaluated to eliminate the diagnosis of lesions with more aggressive behavior, such as an OOC or even a keratocystic odontogenic tumor. Hence, histopathologic examination is mandatory to confirm the type of lesion and to differentiate other pathologic conditions, therefore establishing patients' prognoses precisely. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. 20-year Follow-up of Recurrent Glandular Odontogenic Cyst Mimicking a Periapical Lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas Silva, Brunno Santos; Yamamoto-Silva, Fernanda Paula; Sena-Filho, Marcondes; Silva Sant'Ana, Simone Sousa; Mariano-Júnior, Wilson José; de Almeida, Oslei Paes; Estrela, Carlos

    2017-11-01

    Periapical lesions usually are caused by root canal infection; nevertheless, other pathologies may eventually involve the tooth apex, making the correct diagnosis more difficult. Glandular odontogenic cysts (GOCs) are uncommon and, despite their cystic nature, may present an aggressive behavior and a high recurrence rate. This report describes a recurrent GOC mimicking a periapical lesion that was followed up for 20 years. A 45-year-old woman described tooth discomfort for several years in the anterior region of the mandible that was not exacerbated during eating or occlusion. Clinical examination revealed no signs of swelling, redness, or inflammation in the gingival or surrounding soft tissue. Nevertheless, periapical radiography showed a well-defined large radiolucent lesion in the periapical region of teeth #22, #23, #24, and #25. The pulp test confirmed that all these teeth were vital. An incisional biopsy was performed, and with the histopathological diagnosis of an odontogenic cyst, the lesion was enucleated surgically. After recurrence, the extensive periapical multilocular lesions were again surgically removed. Based on the microscopic findings, the final diagnosis was GOC. One year later, there were no signs of recurrence. GOCs associated with the root apex may mimic periapical inflammatory diseases. Clinical, radiographic, and histopathological findings are essential for the diagnosis of inconclusive radiolucent findings in the periapical region. Biopsy specimens should be sent to a specialized oral pathology laboratory. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Normal morphogenesis of epithelial tissues and progression of epithelial tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Chao; Jamal, Leen; Janes, Kevin A.

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial cells organize into various tissue architectures that largely maintain their structure throughout the life of an organism. For decades, the morphogenesis of epithelial tissues has fascinated scientists at the interface of cell, developmental, and molecular biology. Systems biology offers ways to combine knowledge from these disciplines by building integrative models that are quantitative and predictive. Can such models be useful for gaining a deeper understanding of epithelial morphogenesis? Here, we take inventory of some recurring themes in epithelial morphogenesis that systems approaches could strive to capture. Predictive understanding of morphogenesis at the systems level would prove especially valuable for diseases such as cancer, where epithelial tissue architecture is profoundly disrupted. PMID:21898857

  4. Comparative Evaluation of C-Reactive Protein and WBC Count in Fascial Space Infections of Odontogenic Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagul, Ravikiran; Chandan, Sanjay; Sane, Vikrant Dilip; Patil, Sujay; Yadav, Dinesh

    2017-06-01

    To assess efficacy of C-reactive protein levels as monitoring tools for patients with fascial space infections of odontogenic origin. A randomized prospective study was conducted on 20 patients suffering from fascial space infection of odontogenic origin, in the department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Bharati Vidyapeeth dental college and hospital, Pune, Patients between 18 and 60 years of age of both the sexes were selected. All patients were treated and observed by the same surgeon. Patient's venous blood sample was collected pre-operatively and on 2nd and 5th post-operative days for evaluation of WBC count and C-reactive protein (CRP). All patients were encouraged for strict follow-up protocol. Where the results of WBC count and CRP when compared it was seen that the mean values of WBC were normal in 15 cases and abnormal in 5 cases on day 0, day 2 and day 5; whereas the mean values of CRP were abnormal on day 0 and day 2 and were within normal limit on day 5 in all cases. The findings of this prospective analysis indicate that White blood cells and C-reactive protein are effective markers for determining severity of infection, efficacy of treatment regime for patients with fascial space infections of odontogenic origin. Thus the markers also help in making treatment of patients with fascial space infections of odontogenic origin more cost effective and they also help protecting patients from side effects of excess drugs usage. Thus we conclude that CRP should be incorporated as monitoring tools for managing patients with fascial space infections of odontogenic origin.

  5. Odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM) inhibits growth and migration of human melanoma cells and elicits PTEN elevation and inactivation of PI3K/AKT signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, James S; Fish, Lindsay M; Phipps, Jonathan E; Bruker, Charles T; Lewis, James M; Bell, John L; Solomon, Alan; Kestler, Daniel P

    2013-01-01

    The Odontogenic Ameloblast-associated Protein (ODAM) is expressed in a wide range of normal epithelial, and neoplastic tissues, and we have posited that ODAM serves as a novel prognostic biomarker for breast cancer and melanoma. Transfection of ODAM into breast cancer cells yields suppression of cellular growth, motility, and in vivo tumorigenicity. Herein we have extended these studies to the effects of ODAM on cultured melanoma cell lines. The A375 and C8161 melanoma cell lines were stably transfected with ODAM and assayed for properties associated with tumorigenicity including cell growth, motility, and extracellular matrix adhesion. In addition, ODAM–transfected cells were assayed for signal transduction via AKT which promotes cell proliferation and survival in many neoplasms. ODAM expression in A375 and C8161 cells strongly inhibited cell growth and motility in vitro, increased cell adhesion to extracellular matrix, and yielded significant cytoskeletal/morphologic rearrangement. Furthermore, AKT activity was downregulated by ODAM expression while an increase was noted in expression of the PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome 10) tumor suppressor gene, an antagonist of AKT activation. Increased PTEN in ODAM-expressing cells was associated with increases in PTEN mRNA levels and de novo protein synthesis. Silencing of PTEN expression yielded recovery of AKT activity in ODAM-expressing melanoma cells. Similar PTEN elevation and inhibition of AKT by ODAM was observed in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells while ODAM expression had no effect in PTEN-deficient BT-549 breast cancer cells. The apparent anti-neoplastic effects of ODAM in cultured melanoma and breast cancer cells are associated with increased PTEN expression, and suppression of AKT activity. This association should serve to clarify the clinical import of ODAM expression and any role it may serve as an indicator of tumor behavior

  6. Cell turnover in the odontogenic organ of the rat incisor as visualized by graphic reconstructions following a single injection of 3H-thymidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C E

    1980-07-01

    Turnover of cells within the odontogenic organ was studied in three dimensions by preparing serial sections of incisors from young male rats killed at various times following a single intraperitoneal injection of 1 muCi/g body weight of 3H-thymidine. Radioautographs showed that at 1 hour after injection labeled cells were present in all cell layers throughout the entire depth of the odontogenic organ. They were encountered frequently within the inner dental epithelium and stratum intermedium but appeared less abundant within the stellate reticulum and outer dental epithelium. With time, the frequency of labeled cells in each layer declined progressively, and more rapidly at the anterior and labial side of the odontogenic organ than toward its posterior and lingual side. Hence labeled cells were observed over the longest time interval in regions where cell layers were in closest proximity to the opening of the apical foramen, that is, near the apical and cervical loops. By 32 days after injection, numerous labeled cells could still be identified within the outer dental epithelium and stellate reticulum near the apical loop (bulbous part of the odontogenic organ) and the outer dental epithelium near the cervical loops ("U"-shaped part of the odontogenic organ). These findings support the hypothesis that cells originate within the bulbous part of the odontogenic organ and migrate anteriorly through the "U"-shaped and root sheath parts of the odontogenic organ during renewal of the incisor. It appears that individual stem cell compartments may be maintained for surface (outer/inner dental epithelium) and intermediate layers (stellate reticulum/stratum intermedium) in the odontogenic epithelium.

  7. Multifocal Epithelial Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, Caitlin; Alexander, Sherene; Prabhu, Neeta

    2017-01-15

    Multifocal epithelial hyperplasia is a rare disease associated with human papilloma virus types 13 and 32. Diagnosis is based on clinical and histopathological findings, and most lesions are asymptomatic and regress spontaneously with time. The purpose of this paper is to describe a five-year-old girl who presented with multiple intraoral lesions on the buccal mucosa and tongue, which regressed spontaneously in 15 months.

  8. Odontogenic keratocyst: a 31- year retrospective study in the oral and maxillofacial pathology department, Faculty of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eshghyar N.

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Odontogenic keratocyst is a developmental odontogenic cyst which arises from dental lamina. One of the important features of odontogenic keratocyst is strong tendency to recurrence. Purpose: The purpose of this study was the statistical evaluation of age and gender of patient as well as area of involvement in odontogenic keratocysts in the oral and maxillofacial pathology department of dental faculty of Tehran University of Medical Sciences from 1971-2002. Materials and Methods: This study was a cross sectional, descriptive one. Medical records were reviewed and variables such as age, gender and site of involvement were recorded. The data were analyzed with SPSS software. Results: The relative frequency of odontogenic keratocyst was 36%. 66% of cysts were in men and 34% in women. 68% of lesions affected the lower jaw and 32% the upper jaw. Regarding the site of involvement, 48% of lesions involved the molar region of mandible and 42%, the anterior part of maxilla. The occurrence of keratocysts was higher in this sites. Most of the cases were diagnosed in the third decade. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, odontogenic keratocyst was more prevalent in men, mandible and the third decade. The posterior part of mandible and anterior region of maxilla were involved most frequently.

  9. Keratocystic odontogenic tumors related to Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: A clinicopathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaliq, Mohammed Israr Ul; Shah, Ajaz A; Ahmad, Irshad; Hasan, Shahid; Jangam, Sagar S; Farah; Anwar

    2016-01-01

    Assess clinicopathological features of patients with keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) associated with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome in our institution from 2004 to 2015. After histopathological analyses of KCOT related to Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, 7 patients were assessed. These patients presented a total of 15 primary and 2 recurrent KCOT. All patients presented a multiple KCOT, and 13 lesions were located in mandible (77%) and 4 (23%) in maxilla. Most of the tumors presented a unilocular pattern (71%) and had tooth association (88%). Four patients (57%) were in the age group of 10-19 years and three patients (43%) were in the age group of 20-29 years. There were four male and three female patients. KCOT is a frequent manifestation of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome and can be its first sign, mainly in young patients. The four patients presented with two lesions (57%) and three lesions in three patients (43%).

  10. Keratocystic odontogenic tumors related to Gorlin–Goltz syndrome: A clinicopathological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaliq, Mohammed Israr Ul; Shah, Ajaz A.; Ahmad, Irshad; Hasan, Shahid; Jangam, Sagar S.; Farah; Anwar

    2015-01-01

    Background Assess clinicopathological features of patients with keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) associated with Gorlin–Goltz syndrome in our institution from 2004 to 2015. Method After histopathological analyses of KCOT related to Gorlin–Goltz syndrome, 7 patients were assessed. These patients presented a total of 15 primary and 2 recurrent KCOT. Results All patients presented a multiple KCOT, and 13 lesions were located in mandible (77%) and 4 (23%) in maxilla. Most of the tumors presented a unilocular pattern (71%) and had tooth association (88%). Four patients (57%) were in the age group of 10–19 years and three patients (43%) were in the age group of 20–29 years. There were four male and three female patients. Conclusion KCOT is a frequent manifestation of Gorlin–Goltz syndrome and can be its first sign, mainly in young patients. The four patients presented with two lesions (57%) and three lesions in three patients (43%). PMID:27195205

  11. Enucleation and liquid nitrogen cryotherapy in the treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumors: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonietto, Leonardo; Borges, Hedelson Odenir Iecher; Martins, Carlos Alberto Medeiros; Silva, Daniela Nascimento; Sant'Ana Filho, Manoel

    2011-06-01

    This study describes the technique of lesion enucleation without capsule disruption combined with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy in the surgical treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KOTs). Eight patients (9 KOTs) were included in the study. After enucleation, liquid nitrogen was applied twice for 1 minute, with 5-minute intervals between applications. The patients were followed up for 3 to 9 years. There were no recurrences during the follow-up of 9 KOTs for up to 9 years. Only 1 patient had temporary reversible loss of lip sensation after treatment. There were no pathologic fractures. In all cases bone height at the surgical site was restored, and no patients needed bone reconstruction for post-treatment rehabilitation. This study confirmed the efficiency of KOT treatment enucleation without fragmentation combined with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy at the surgical site. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Antimicrobial therapies for odontogenic infections in children and adolescents. Literature review and clinical recomendations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inés Caviglia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Oral infections are caused by an imbalance in the patient’s indigenous flora which changes from commensal to opportunistic. Odontogenic infections are the most common reason for consultation in children and adolescents. Rational use of antibiotics is the best strategy to avoid microbial resistance. Dental infections should first receive proper local treatment, which can also be complemented with a systemic method. Appropriate drug selection and dosing should be made. Amoxicilin is the first choice for antimicrobial agents in pediatric dentistry. Clindamycin and clarithromycin are the best alternative for patients with penicillin hypersensibility. In this literature review, the authors intended to establish clear clinical management guidelines for emergency treatment and subsequent final resolution.

  13. Radiographic differential diagnosis between ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst: with emphasis on CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soh, Byung Chun; Heo, Min Suk; An, Chang Hyeon; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul; Park, Tae Won; Choi, Mi

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate clinical and radiographic differential diagnosis between ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) using clinical data, plain radiographs, and CT. 25 cases of ameloblastoma and 44 cases of OKC diagnosed in biopsy, were selected from the files stored in Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Seoul National University Dental Hospital from 1999 to 2001, and evaluated using following criteria: sex and age, location, shape, border to normal bone tissue, effect to adjacent tissues, homogeneity in the lumen of the lesion, response of the cortical bone, long-to-short length (L/S) ratio of the lesion, and expansion angle of the cortex. Ameloblastoma and OKC were seen most frequently in third decades and no statistical significance was noted between both sexes. Ameloblastoma occurred most frequently in mandibular angle and ramus area (68%) and OKC at the maxillary molar (34.1%), and mandibular angle and ramus area (43.2%). The root resorption of the adjacent teeth, mandibular canal displacement, and the impaction of teeth were seen more frequently in ameloblastoma than in OKC. The L/S ratio measured in CT was largest in maxillary OKC cases, followed by mandibular ameloblastoma, and mandibular OKC (1.2, 1.8 and 2.4 respectively). The expansion angle of the cortex shows a statistically significant difference between ameloblastoma (48.8 .deg. C) and OKC (31.5 .deg. C). The numeric morphology (L/S ratio) and expansion angle of the cortical bone of the lesion measured in computed tomography can be used to differentiate the ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst.

  14. Radiographic differential diagnosis between ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst: with emphasis on CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soh, Byung Chun; Heo, Min Suk; An, Chang Hyeon; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul; Park, Tae Won [College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Mi [College of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-09-15

    To evaluate clinical and radiographic differential diagnosis between ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) using clinical data, plain radiographs, and CT. 25 cases of ameloblastoma and 44 cases of OKC diagnosed in biopsy, were selected from the files stored in Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Seoul National University Dental Hospital from 1999 to 2001, and evaluated using following criteria: sex and age, location, shape, border to normal bone tissue, effect to adjacent tissues, homogeneity in the lumen of the lesion, response of the cortical bone, long-to-short length (L/S) ratio of the lesion, and expansion angle of the cortex. Ameloblastoma and OKC were seen most frequently in third decades and no statistical significance was noted between both sexes. Ameloblastoma occurred most frequently in mandibular angle and ramus area (68%) and OKC at the maxillary molar (34.1%), and mandibular angle and ramus area (43.2%). The root resorption of the adjacent teeth, mandibular canal displacement, and the impaction of teeth were seen more frequently in ameloblastoma than in OKC. The L/S ratio measured in CT was largest in maxillary OKC cases, followed by mandibular ameloblastoma, and mandibular OKC (1.2, 1.8 and 2.4 respectively). The expansion angle of the cortex shows a statistically significant difference between ameloblastoma (48.8 .deg. C) and OKC (31.5 .deg. C). The numeric morphology (L/S ratio) and expansion angle of the cortical bone of the lesion measured in computed tomography can be used to differentiate the ameloblastoma and odontogenic keratocyst.

  15. The role of unfinished root canal treatment in odontogenic maxillofacial infections requiring hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönholm, L; Lemberg, K K; Tjäderhane, L; Lauhio, A; Lindqvist, C; Rautemaa-Richardson, R

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical and radiological findings and the role of periapical infection and antecedent dental treatment of infected focus teeth in odontogenic maxillofacial abscesses requiring hospital care. In this retrospective cohort study, we evaluated medical records and panoramic radiographs during the hospital stay of patients (n = 60) admitted due to odontogenic maxillofacial infection originating from periapical periodontitis. Twenty-three (38 %) patients had received endodontic treatment and ten (17 %) other acute dental treatment. Twenty-seven (45 %) had not visited the dentist in the near past. Median age of the patients was 45 (range 20-88) years and 60 % were males. Unfinished root canal treatment (RCT) was the major risk factor for hospitalisation in 16 (27 %) of the 60 cases (p = .0065). Completed RCT was the source only in 7 (12 %) of the 60 cases. Two of these RCTs were adequate and five inadequate. The initiation of inadequate or incomplete primary RCT of acute periapical periodontitis appears to open a risk window for locally invasive spread of infection with local abscess formation and systemic symptoms. Thereafter, the quality of the completed RCT appears to have minor impact. However, a considerable proportion of the patients had not received any dental treatment confirming the importance of good dental health. Thus, thorough canal debridement during the first session is essential for minimising the risk for spread of infection in addition to incision and drainage of the abscess. If this cannot be achieved, tooth extraction should be considered. Incomplete or inadequate canal debridement and drainage of the abscess may increase the risk for spread of endodontic infection.

  16. Transcriptional profiles of SHH pathway genes in keratocystic odontogenic tumor and ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurgel, Clarissa Araújo Silva; Buim, Marcilei Eliza Cavichiolli; Carvalho, Kátia Cândido; Sales, Caroline Brandi Schlaepfer; Reis, Mitermayer Galvão; de Souza, Renata Oliveira; de Faro Valverde, Ludmila; de Azevedo, Roberto Almeida; Dos Santos, Jean Nunes; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Ramos, Eduardo Antônio Gonçalves

    2014-09-01

    Sonic hedgehog (SHH) pathway activation has been identified as a key factor in the development of many types of tumors, including odontogenic tumors. Our study examined the expression of genes in the SHH pathway to characterize their roles in the pathogenesis of keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KOT) and ameloblastomas (AB). We quantified the expression of SHH, SMO, PTCH1, SUFU, GLI1, CCND1, and BCL2 genes by qPCR in a total of 23 KOT, 11 AB, and three non-neoplastic oral mucosa (NNM). We also measured the expression of proteins related to this pathway (CCND1 and BCL2) by immunohistochemistry. We observed overexpression of SMO, PTCH1, GLI1, and CCND1 genes in both KOT (23/23) and AB (11/11). However, we did not detect expression of the SHH gene in 21/23 KOT and 10/11 AB tumors. Low levels of the SUFU gene were expressed in KOT (P = 0.0199) and AB (P = 0.0127) relative to the NNM. Recurrent KOT exhibited high levels of SMO (P = 0.035), PTCH1 (P = 0.048), CCND1 (P = 0.048), and BCL2 (P = 0.045) transcripts. Using immunolabeling of CCND1, we observed no statistical difference between primary and recurrent KOT (P = 0.8815), sporadic and NBCCS-KOT (P = 0.7688), and unicystic and solid AB (P = 0.7521). Overexpression of upstream (PTCH1 and SMO) and downstream (GLI1, CCND1 and BCL2) genes in the SHH pathway leads to the constitutive activation of this pathway in KOT and AB and may suggest a mechanism for the development of these types of tumors. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Clinical and Radiographic Study of Benign Odontogenic Tumors in the Jaws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gyung Yae; Park, Chang Seo [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-11-15

    The author observed and analyzed the age, sex, chief complaint and radiographic finding of sixty-one cases of benign odontogenic tumors seen in Yonsei Medical Center, for the period of Jan. 1979 to Aug. 1989. The results were as follows: 1. Benign odontogenic tumors of 61 cases included 52 cases (85.3%) of ameloblastoma and odontoma, and 9 cases of other lesions. Radiographically, the border of the lesions were well-defined. 2. Ameloblastoma constituting twenty-seven cases (44.3%) occurred the average age of 31.1 years and had a 3:1 male predominance. The most common complaint was swelling (20 cases, 74.0%) and followed by pain (13 cases, 48.2%). Radiographically, the most common site was mandibular body area (74.0%) and the lesions were mainly multiocular radiolucency; in 17 cases (63.0%) and unilocular radiolucent lesion were seen in 10 cases (37.0%). 16 cases (59.3%) showed the resorption of roots of adjacent teeth. 3. Odontoma constituting twenty-five cases (41.0%) discovered at the average age of 16.9 years and had a 3:2 male predominance. The most common complaint was delayed eruption of tooth (8 cases, 31.0%) and 7 cases (27.0%) detected on a routine radiograph of the area. Radiographically, 17 cases (68.0%) were of compound type and 8 were of complex variety and compound odontomas were common in the anterior maxilla, whereas complex odontomas occurred more frequently in the posterior mandible. 19 cases (76.0%) showed the impaction of adjacent teeth.

  18. Polarity in Mammalian Epithelial Morphogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Roignot, Julie; Peng, Xiao; Mostov, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Cell polarity is fundamental for the architecture and function of epithelial tissues. Epithelial polarization requires the intervention of several fundamental cell processes, whose integration in space and time is only starting to be elucidated. To understand what governs the building of epithelial tissues during development, it is essential to consider the polarization process in the context of the whole tissue. To this end, the development of three-dimensional organotypic cell culture model...

  19. Role of the epithelial cell rests of Malassez in the development, maintenance and regeneration of periodontal ligament tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jimin; Gronthos, Stan; Bartold, P Mark

    2013-10-01

    Periodontitis is a highly prevalent inflammatory disease that results in damage to the tooth-supporting tissues, potentially leading to tooth loss. Periodontal tissue regeneration is a complex process that involves the collaboration of two hard tissues (cementum and alveolar bone) and two soft tissues (gingiva and periodontal ligament). To date, no periodontal-regenerative procedures provide predictable clinical outcomes. To understand the rational basis of regenerative procedures, a better understanding of the events associated with the formation of periodontal components will help to establish reliable strategies for clinical practice. An important aspect of this is the role of the Hertwig's epithelial root sheath in periodontal development and that of its descendants, the epithelial cell rests of Malassez, in the maintenance of the periodontium. An important structure during tooth root development, the Hertwig's epithelial root sheath is not only a barrier between the dental follicle and dental papilla cells but is also involved in determining the shape, size and number of roots and in the development of dentin and cementum, and may act as a source of mesenchymal progenitor cells for cementoblasts. In adulthood, the epithelial cell rests of Malassez are the only odontogenic epithelial population in the periodontal ligament. Although there is no general agreement on the functions of the epithelial cell rests of Malassez, accumulating evidence suggests that the putative roles of the epithelial cell rests of Malassez in adult periodontal ligament include maintaining periodontal ligament homeostasis to prevent ankylosis and maintain periodontal ligament space, to prevent root resorption, to serve as a target during periodontal ligament innervation and to contribute to cementum repair. Recently, ovine epithelial cell rests of Malassez cells have been shown to harbor clonogenic epithelial stem-cell populations that demonstrate similar properties to mesenchymal stromal

  20. Human corneal epithelial subpopulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Chris Bath

    2013-01-01

    Corneal epithelium is being regenerated throughout life by limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs) believed to be located in histologically defined stem cell niches in corneal limbus. Defective or dysfunctional LESCs result in limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) causing pain and decreased visual acuity...... subpopulations in human corneal epithelium using a combination of laser capture microdissection and RNA sequencing for global transcriptomic profiling. We compared dissociation cultures, using either expansion on γ-irradiated NIH/3T3 feeder cells in serum-rich medium or expansion directly on plastic in serum...

  1. Non-syndromic multiple odontogenic keratocysts associated with dental anomalies: A report of unusual case and its management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulabha A Narsapur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC, now known as keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT, is the most common cystic lesion occurring in the maxillofacial region. Multiple occurrence of these cysts is less frequent and is usually associated with syndromes, the most common being the Gorlin Goltz syndrome or the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS. We hereby report an unusual case of multiple OKCs in a healthy adult, associated with other dental anomalies. Management approach consisted of enucleation with curettage of the smaller lesions and decortication of buccal cortex in the large lesion. The condition in the present case may be because of the multifocal nature of OKC rather than its association with any syndrome. Concomitant occurrence of multiple OKCs with other dental anomalies may be coincidental. Impacted teeth or missing teeth must be radiographed to rule out the lesions associated with them.

  2. Massive keratocystic odontogenic tumor of mandible crossing the midline in 11-year child: An unusual case report and its management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A N Sulabha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC is now designated by World Health Organization (WHO as keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT. The OKC involves approximately 11% of all the cysts in jaws. OKC possesses tumor-like characteristics because of its clinical behavior. Incidence of occurrence of this lesion in nonnevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome patients before ten is low. Case Report: We report a massive OKC in the anterior region of mandible in a child. Combination of age, sex, size of the lesion, its location, and rapid growth in the present case makes it different from other KCOTs. Our management plan aimed to preserve the natural dentition, shape, function, and continuity of mandible. Discussion: An aggressive treatment modality like enucleation in combination with Carnoy′s solution application, as done in the present case might be considered as a viable treatment modality for massive KCOT. The present paper also highlights brief discussion concerning the management of OKC.

  3. Examining the correlation between diabetes and odontogenic infection: A nationwide, retrospective, matched-cohort study in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Hsin Ko

    Full Text Available More than 90% of head and neck infections are caused by pathological changes originating in the teeth. When odontogenic infections are not properly treated, infections may spread to distant spaces and cause more serious infections in fascial spaces, ultimately leading to deep neck infections. Clinical experience has indicated that patients with diabetes mellitus (DM may be more susceptible to facial cellulitis and deep neck infections caused by odontogenic infections. This study used the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database (NHIRD to analyze and examine the correlation between DM and odontogenic infections in patients. To this end, this study analyzed 1 million NHIRD individual datasets from 2005, of which 964,182 individuals had medical treatment records. The insurance database also recorded related factors such as age, sex, duration of hospital stays, season, and whether patients were low income. We also analyzed the correlation between urbanization and the studied diseases. The results indicated that the correlation between facial cellulitis and DM patients was confirmed; facial cellulitis was most likely to occur 2 years after the initial DM diagnosis, with a risk occurrence 1.409 times greater than that of the control group. Facial cellulitis is more likely to occur in patients originating from poorer socioeconomic backgrounds, and female DM patients are more likely to experience this condition. These conclusions may facilitate the establishment of clinical guidelines for preventative education and treatment. Oral prevention and health education for high-risk patients, as well as early-stage surgical intervention and antibiotic usage in early-stage odontogenic infections, can prevent disease progression, improve patient recovery rates, and reduce the use and waste of medical resources.

  4. In Vitro Osteogenic and Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Seeded on Carboxymethyl Cellulose-Hydroxyapatite Hybrid Hydrogel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella eTeti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells from human dental pulp have been considered as an alternative source of adult stem cells in tissue engineering because of their potential to differentiate into multiple cell lineages.Recently, polysaccharide based hydrogels have become especially attractive as matrices for the repair and regeneration of a wide variety of tissues and organs. The incorporation of inorganic minerals as hydroxyapatite nanoparticles can modulate the performance of the scaffolds with potential applications in tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to verify the osteogenic and odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs cultured on a carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel. Human DPSCs were seeded on carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel and on carboxymethyl cellulose hydrogel for 1, 3, 5, 7, 14 and 21 days. Cell viability assay and ultramorphological analysis were carried out to evaluate biocompatibility and cell adhesion. Real Time PCR was carried out to demonstrate the expression of osteogenic and odontogenic markers. Results showed a good adhesion and viability in cells cultured on carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel, while a low adhesion and viability was observed in cells cultured on carboxymethyl cellulose hydrogel. Real Time PCR data demonstrated a temporal up-regulation of osteogenic and odontogenic markers in dental pulp stem cells cultured on carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel. In conclusion, our in vitro data confirms the ability of DPSCs to differentiate toward osteogenic and odontogenic lineages in presence of a carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel. Taken together, our results provide evidence that DPSCs and carboxymethyl cellulose—hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel could be considered promising candidates for dental pulp complex and periodontal tissue engineering.

  5. A squamous odontogenic tumor following an orthodontic micro-screw: A rare case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Jingqiu; Yin, Ping; Yuan, Yunyi; Chen, Jie; Yuan, Yongxiang; Lei, Yonghua

    2018-02-01

    We reported a very rare case of squamous odontogenic tumor(SOT) in a 23-year-old female. The tumor arose after an implanting operation of an orthodontic micro-screw, and was definitely diagnosed by the histopathological examination. Based on the case report and a review of the literature, we discussed about the general features, differential diagnosis and pathogenesis of SOT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Extensive Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor of the Maxilla: A Case Report of Conservative Surgical Excision and Orthodontic Alignment of Impacted Canine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jee-Won

    2014-07-01

    The present report describe the surgical therapy, clinical course, orthodontic treatment and morphological characteristics of an adenomatoid odontogenic tumor in the maxilla of an 11-year-old patient. The cystic tumor filled the maxillary sinus and involved a tooth. Marsupialization was accompanied by partial enucleation and applied traction to the affected tooth by a fixed orthodontic appliance. Healing was uneventful and no local recurrence was observed during a 1-year period of follow-up control.

  7. The role of integrin-α5 in the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Li; Xu, Shuaimei; Ma, Dandan; Gao, Jie; Liu, Ying; Yue, Jing; Wu, Buling

    2014-02-01

    It has been reported that integrin-α5 (ITGA5) activity is related to cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and organ development. However, the involvement of ITGA5 in the biological functions of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) has not been explored. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ITGA5 in the proliferation and odontogenic differentiation of hDPSCs. We knocked down ITGA5 in hDPSCs using lentivirus-mediated ITGA5 short hairpin RNA (shRNA). Changes in the proliferation in hDPSCs infected with lentiviruses expressing ITGA5-specific shRNA or negative control shRNA were examined using the 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine labeling. Both ITGA5 knockdown cells and shMock cells were cultured in mineralization medium for 3 weeks, and the differentiation of cells was detected with alizarin red S staining. The expression of odontogenic differentiation-related molecular markers was assessed using real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot assays. The knockdown of ITGA5 decreased the proliferation capacity of hDPSCs. ITGA5 shRNA promoted odontogenic differentiation of hDPSCs with the enhanced formation of mineralized nodules. It also up-regulated the messenger RNA expression of multiple markers of odontogenesis and the expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein protein. These findings suggest that ITGA5 plays an important role in maintaining hDPSCs in a proliferative state. The inhibition of ITGA5 signaling promotes the odontogenic differentiation of hDPSCs. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Imaging analyses of odontogenic infection involving the maxillofacial fascial spaces, with special emphasis on the parapharyngeal space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ariji, Yoshiko; Gotoh, Masakazu; Izumi, Masahiro; Naitoh, Munetaka; Kurita, Kenichi; Natsume, Nagato; Ariji, Eiichiro [Aichi-Gakuin Univ., Nisshin (Japan). School of Dentistry

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate odontogenic infection pathways into the maxillofacial fascial spaces, especially into the parapharyngeal space, in relation to causal tooth and clinical symptoms. CT and MR images were retrospectively investigated in 47 patients with spread of odontogenic infection into the maxillofacial spaces. The involvement of spaces was evaluated based on lateral asymmetry of their shapes and density on CT images or intensity on MR images. Involvement on images was observed in 70%, 49%, and 30% of the submandibular, the masticator, and the parapharyngeal spaces, respectively. Patients with submandibular space involvement often had spontaneous pain. Of 14 patients with parapharyngeal space involvement, 8 patients showed dysphagia and/or fever, and 13 patients showed involvement of the mandibular molar as a cause of infection. All of these 14 patients also had submandibular space involvement, while only 7 patients (50%) showed changes in the medial pterygoid muscle. The fat layer between the medial pterygoid muscle and parapharyngeal space was maintained in 11 of 14 (79%) patients with parapharyngeal involvement. CT and MR images clearly demonstrated the spread of odontogenic infection into the maxillofacial spaces. Involvement of the parapharyngeal space was mostly caused by infection originating in the mandibular molar, and was considered to be secondary spread from the submandibular space and/or medial pterygoid muscle. (author)

  9. P53 Protein Expression in Dental Follicle, Dentigerous Cyst, Odontogenic Keratocyst, and Inflammatory Subtypes of Cysts: An Immunohistochemical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemeh, Mashhadiabbas; Sepideh, Arab; Sara, Bagheri Seyedeh; Nazanin, Mahdavi

    2017-05-01

    An odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a developmental odontogenic cyst with aggressive clinical behavior. This cyst shows a different growth mechanism from the more common dentigerous cyst and now has been renamed as a keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT). Inflammation can assist tumor growth via different mechanisms including dysregulation of the p53 gene. This study aims to assess and compare the expression of tumor suppressor gene p53 in inflamed and non-inflamed types of OKC and dentigerous cyst. Immunohistochemical expression of p53 was assessed in 14 cases of dental follicle, 34 cases of OKC (including 18 inflamed OKCs), and 31 cases of dentigerous cyst (including 16 inflamed cysts). The mean percentage of p53 positive cells was 0.7% in dental follicles, 5.4% in non-inflamed OKCs, 17.3% in inflamed OKCs, 1.2% in non-inflamed dentigerous cysts, and 2.2% in inflamed dentigerous cysts. The differences between the groups were statistically significant ( p < 0.050) except for the difference between inflamed and non-inflamed dentigerous cysts, and between dental follicle and non-inflamed dentigerous cyst. The difference in p53 expression in OKC and dentigerous cyst can explain their different growth mechanism and clinical behavior. Inflammation is responsible for the change in behavior of neoplastic epithelium of OKC via p53 overexpression.

  10. Immunoexpression of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1α and interleukin-10 on odontogenic cysts and tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, M C; de Matos, F R; Conceição, T S; Leitão, A C G H; Freitas, R A

    2017-05-01

    To analyse the immunoreactivity of IL-1α, TNF-α and IL-10 in odontogenic cysts and tumours and to investigate possible associations with established biological behaviours of these different lesions. Immunohistochemical expression of anti-IL-1α, anti-TNF-α and anti-IL-10 antibodies was assessed on epithelium and mesenchyme of 20 radicular cysts (RCs), 20 residual cysts (RECs), 20 dentigerous cysts (DCs), 18 solid ameloblastomas (SAs), 20 keratocystic odontogenic tumours (KCOTs) and 15 dental follicles (DFs). Comparative analysis of data was performed using the nonparametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test and Kruskal-Wallis's test. Significantly greater expression of IL-1α in the epithelium was noted in RC, KCOT and SA (P = 0.01), whilst IL-10 and TNF-α was in the epithelium of RC, DC and KCOT (P  IL-10 (P  IL10 ratio (P < 0.01). These results suggest involvement of the proteins in the pathogenesis of odontogenic cysts and tumours, with emphasis on the highest immunoreactivity of osteolysis stimulating factors in tumours with aggressive biological behaviour, such as SA and KCOT. © 2016 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. P53 Protein Expression in Dental Follicle, Dentigerous Cyst, Odontogenic Keratocyst, and Inflammatory Subtypes of Cysts: An Immunohistochemical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashhadiabbas Fatemeh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: An odontogenic keratocyst (OKC is a developmental odontogenic cyst with aggressive clinical behavior. This cyst shows a different growth mechanism from the more common dentigerous cyst and now has been renamed as a keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT. Inflammation can assist tumor growth via different mechanisms including dysregulation of the p53 gene. This study aims to assess and compare the expression of tumor suppressor gene p53 in inflamed and non-inflamed types of OKC and dentigerous cyst. Methods: Immunohistochemical expression of p53 was assessed in 14 cases of dental follicle, 34 cases of OKC (including 18 inflamed OKCs, and 31 cases of dentigerous cyst (including 16 inflamed cysts. Results: The mean percentage of p53 positive cells was 0.7% in dental follicles, 5.4% in non-inflamed OKCs, 17.3% in inflamed OKCs, 1.2% in non-inflamed dentigerous cysts, and 2.2% in inflamed dentigerous cysts. The differences between the groups were statistically significant (p < 0.050 except for the difference between inflamed and non-inflamed dentigerous cysts, and between dental follicle and non-inflamed dentigerous cyst. Conclusions: The difference in p53 expression in OKC and dentigerous cyst can explain their different growth mechanism and clinical behavior. Inflammation is responsible for the change in behavior of neoplastic epithelium of OKC via p53 overexpression.

  12. Epithelial Cell Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran S. Chaudhry

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The biological effects of only a finite number of tobacco toxins have been studied. Here, we describe exposure of cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells to low concentrations of tobacco carcinogens: nickel sulphate, benzo(bfluoranthene, N-nitrosodiethylamine, and 4-(methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK. After a 24-hour exposure, EGFR was expressed in cell membrane and cytoplasm, BCL-2 was expressed only in the irregular nuclei of large atypical cells, MKI67 was expressed in nuclei with no staining in larger cells, cytoplasmic BIRC5 with stronger nuclear staining was seen in large atypical cells, and nuclear TP53 was strongly expressed in all cells. After only a 24-hour exposure, cells exhibited atypical nuclear and cytoplasmic features. After a 48-hour exposure, EGFR staining was localized to the nucleus, BCL-2 was slightly decreased in intensity, BIRC5 was localized to the cytoplasm, and TP53 staining was increased in small and large cells. BCL2L1 was expressed in both the cytoplasm and nuclei of cells at 24- and 48-hour exposures. We illustrate that short-termexposure of a bronchial epithelial cell line to smoking-equivalent concentrations of tobacco carcinogens alters the expression of key proliferation regulatory genes, EGFR, BCL-2, BCL2L1, BIRC5, TP53, and MKI67, similar to that reported in biopsy specimens of pulmonary epithelium described to be preneoplastic lesions.

  13. High Expression of Osteopontin and CD44v6 in Odontogenic Keratocysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ping Wang

    2009-04-01

    Conclusion: Binding of OPN to osteoclast cell membrane receptor integrin αv can activate the osteoclasts and increase their osteolytic activity. In addition, binding of OPN to OKC lining epithelial cell membrane receptor CD44v6 can enhance the motility, migration, invasion and spread of lining epithelial cells into the surrounding cancellous bone. Therefore, we suggest that the local aggressive behavior and high osteolytic ability of OKCs in the jawbone can be explained at least partially by high expression of OPN and CD44v6 in lining epithelial cells of OKCs and high expression of integrin αv in osteoclasts.

  14. The world of epithelial sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Hisao

    2017-06-01

    An epithelium is a layer of closely connected cells covering the body or lining a body cavity. In this review, several fundamental questions are addressed regarding the epithelium. (i) While an epithelium functions as barrier against the external environment, how is barrier function maintained during its construction? (ii) What determines the apical and basal sides of epithelial layer? (iii) Is there any relationship between the apical side of the epithelium and the apical membrane of an epithelial cell? (iv) Why are hepatocytes (liver cells) called epithelial, even though they differ completely from column-like shape of typical epithelial cells? Keeping these questions in mind, multiple shapes of epithelia were considered, extracting a few of their elemental processes, and constructing a virtual world of epithelia by combining them. Epithelial cells were also classified into several types based on the number of apical domains of each cell. In addition, an intracellular organelle was introduced within epithelial cells, the vacuolar apical compartment (VAC), which is produced within epithelial cells surrounded by external cell matrix (ECM). The VAC interacts with areas of cell-cell contact of the cell surface membrane and is converted to apical membrane. The properties of VACs enable us to answer the initial questions posed above. Finally, the genetic and molecular mechanisms of epithelial morphogenesis are discussed. © 2017 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  15. Tumor odontógeno adenomatoide en región mandibular Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor in mandibular region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Sánchez Cabrales

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available El tumor odontogénico adenomatoide es un tumor poco frecuente derivado del epitelio odontontogénico, que contiene estructuras canaliculares con modificaciones inductivas de intensidad variable en el tejido conjuntivo. Es una lesión de crecimiento lento y poco invasiva pero que se puede asemejar a otras lesiones odontógenas de mayor agresividad como el quiste dentígero y el ameloblastoma entre otros. Su localización clásica (área de caninos superiores nos orienta al diagnóstico y su patrón histológico ductiforme es muy propio de este tumor. Otros tumores que se encuentran dentro de este grupo son el fibroma ameloblástico, el odontoameloblastoma, el quiste odontógeno calcificante y los odontomas compuesto y complejo. Este grupo de lesiones puede o no tener formaciones de tejido duro dental dentro de ellos. Por esta razón, se presenta un paciente con este tipo de tumor, al que se le realizó estudio histopatológico, se revisó la literatura acerca de este tumor odontogénico benigno y sus características clínicas, radiográficas, tratamiento, así como los diagnósticos diferenciales que se deben tener en cuenta.The adenomatoid odontogenic tumor is an uncommon neoplasm derivative of the odontogenic epithelium containing canalicular structures with inductor modifications of variable intensity in the conjunctival tissue. It is a slow growth lesion and no much invasive but that may to be similar to other odontogenic lesions more aggressive including the dentigerous cyst and the ameloblastoma among others. Its classical location (upper canine area guides us to diagnosis and its duct histological pattern is very typical of this tumor. Other tumors included in this group are the ameloblastic fibroma, the ameloblastic odontoma, the calcified odontogenic cyst and composed and complex odontomas. This group of lesions may or not to have formations of hard tissue inside. Thus, authors present the case of a patient presenting with this type of

  16. Splenic epithelial cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousuf, M.; Jalali, U.

    2011-01-01

    Cysts of spleen are rare entities. Congenital splenic cysts are even more uncommon comprising of only 10% of benign non-parasitic cysts. We report a case of 22 years old female who presented with history of 2 years abdominal pain and gradual distension. Ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) both were suggestive of splenic cyst. Laboratory tests show thrombocytopenia with platelets count of 97000 per cubic millimeter and anemia with hemoglobin 8.7 gram per deciliter. Serological tests were negative for parasitic infection. Splenectomy was done and the weight of the spleen was found to be 1.5 kilogram. Histopathological findings are consistent with splenic epithelial cyst. The aetiology, diagnostic modalities and treatment options are discussed in the case report. (author)

  17. Study on the origin and nature of the adenomatoid odontogenic tumor by immunohistochemistry Estudo da origem e natureza do tumor odontogênico adenomatóide pela imunoistoquímica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Macedo Crivelini

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT is a clinically benign lesion. Discussions about the AOT hamartomatous or neoplastic nature, and the probable odontogenic epithelial cell it originates from still exist. This research aimed to study and discuss the subject by the immunohistochemical detection of cytokeratins, laminin, collagen IV, PCNA and p53 in 8 tumor samples and 8 dental follicle samples containing reduced enamel epithelium. The results have shown that CK14 labelling indicated differentiation grades for secreting ameloblasts or ameloblasts in the post-secreting stage in the adenomatoid structure of AOT. Laminin, found on the luminal surface of adenomatoid structures, was compatible with the reduced enamel epithelium during the "protective stage of amelogenesis". PCNA specifically labelled the spindled areas and peripheral cords of the AOT, indicating that these areas are responsible for tumor growth. After considerations about pathogenesis, the authors suggested that the nature of AOT is hamartomatous with histogenesis from the reduced enamel epithelium.O tumor odontogênico adenomatóide (TOA é uma lesão clinicamente benigna, cujas discussões acerca de sua natureza hamartomatosa ou neoplásica, e provável célula epitelial odontogênica de origem ainda existem. Este projeto de pesquisa teve por objetivo estudar o assunto através da detecção imuno-histoquímica das citoqueratinas, laminina, colágeno IV, PCNA e p53, utilizando-se para isso 08 amostras do tumor e 08 amostras de folículo pericoronário contendo epitélio reduzido do órgão do esmalte (EROE. Os resultados mostraram que a marcação da CK14 sinalizou graus de diferenciação para ameloblastos secretores ou pós-secretores nas estruturas adenomatóides do TOA, e a laminina presente em sua superfície luminal foi compatível com o EROE durante o "estágio protetor" da amelogênese. O PCNA marcou especificamente áreas enoveladas e cordões periféricos do TOA

  18. Regulation of Epithelial Sodium Transport via Epithelial Na+ Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marunaka, Yoshinori; Niisato, Naomi; Taruno, Akiyuki; Ohta, Mariko; Miyazaki, Hiroaki; Hosogi, Shigekuni; Nakajima, Ken-ichi; Kusuzaki, Katsuyuki; Ashihara, Eishi; Nishio, Kyosuke; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Nakahari, Takashi; Kubota, Takahiro

    2011-01-01

    Renal epithelial Na+ transport plays an important role in homeostasis of our body fluid content and blood pressure. Further, the Na+ transport in alveolar epithelial cells essentially controls the amount of alveolar fluid that should be kept at an appropriate level for normal gas exchange. The epithelial Na+ transport is generally mediated through two steps: (1) the entry step of Na+ via epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) at the apical membrane and (2) the extrusion step of Na+ via the Na+, K+-ATPase at the basolateral membrane. In general, the Na+ entry via ENaC is the rate-limiting step. Therefore, the regulation of ENaC plays an essential role in control of blood pressure and normal gas exchange. In this paper, we discuss two major factors in ENaC regulation: (1) activity of individual ENaC and (2) number of ENaC located at the apical membrane. PMID:22028593

  19. Modulation of epithelial sodium channel in human alveolar epithelial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Modulation of epithelial sodium channel in human alveolar epithelial cells by lipoxin A4 through AhR-cAMP-dependent pathway. Bi-Huan Cheng1,2, Li-Wei Pan2, Sheng-Rong Zhang3, Bin-Yu Ying2, Ben-Ji. Wang2, Guo-Liang Lin2 and Shi-Fang Ding1*. 1Department of Critical Care Medicine, Qilu Hospital of Shandong ...

  20. Comparison of TNF-α and TGF-β1 level in radicular cyst and odontogenic keratocyst fluid and its association with histopathological findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safoura Seifi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: TNF-α is a multifunctional proinflammatory cytokine and TGF-β1 is a secretory protein controlling epithelial proliferation and differentiation. Keratocyst presents an aggressive behavior and a growth mechanism different from that of radicular cyst. Aim: In this line, the present study aimed at evaluating TNF-α and TGF-β1 level and its association with histopathological findings in the two odontogenic lesions of different origins. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study, aspirated fluid of 15 cases of radicular cyst and 15 cases of keratocyst were investigated using ELISA method. The grade of inflammation and the mean number of blood vessels in three microscopic fields were provided with a magnification of 40 times on microscope slides. T-test, x2, Mann Whitney, and Pearson correlation tests were used for the comparison of TNF-α and TGF-β1 levels in the mentioned lesions and the association between cytokine levels and grade of inflammation and angiogenesis.Results: TNF-α and TGF-β1 were observed in aspirated fluid of all radicular cysts and keratocysts. Levels of TNF-α and TGF-β1 were found to be 6.72 ± 2.985 and 5.882 ± 2.985 respectively in radicular cyst fluid and 24.759 ± 94.849 and 63.38 ± 30.069 in keratocyst fluid however, no statistically significant difference was observed in terms of TNF-α (P=0.450 increasing trend in TNF-α level in radicular cyst and keratocyst was accompanied by increased inflammation and angiogenesis (P<0.001 and P=0.001. Conclusion: TNF-α and TGF-β1 are involved in the pathogenesis of radicular cyst and keratocyst. TGF-β1 level was higher in radicular cyst when compared with keratocyst however, TNF-α level was similar in the two lesions. A positive correlation was found between TNF-α level and grade of inflammation and angiogenesis.

  1. The relationship between radiological features and clinical manifestation and dental expenses of keratocystic odontogenic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Jung Hyun; Huh, Kyung Heo; Heo, Min Suk; Choi, Soon Chul; Lee, Sam Sun; Bae, Kwang Hak; Choi, Jin Woo

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to identify correlations between keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) data from CT sections, and data on the KCOT clinical manifestation and resulting dental expenses. Following local Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, a seven-years of retrospective study was performed regarding patients with KCOTs treated at the Seoul National University Dental Hospital. A total of 180 KCOT were included in this study. The following information was collected: age, gender, location and size of the lesion, radiological features, surgical treatment provided and dental expenses. There was no significant association between the size of the KCOT and age, gender, and presenting preoperative symptoms. In both jaws, it was unusual to find KCOTs under 10 mm. The correlation between the number of teeth removed and the size of the KCOT in the tooth bearing area was statistically significant in the mandible, whereas in the maxilla, no significant relationship was found. Dental expenses compared with the size of the KCOT were found to be significant in both jaws. The size of KCOT was associated with a significant increase in dental expenses for both jaws and the number of teeth removed from the mandible. These findings emphasize the importance of routine examinations and early detection of lesions, which in turn helps preserving anatomical structures and reducing dental expenses.

  2. The clinical and radiological consideration of calcifying odontogenic cyst of the jaw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hae Rym; Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Chang Seo [Dept. of Dental radiology, College of Dentistry, Yensei University, (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-08-15

    Nine cases presented with a calcifying odontogenic cyst to the Dental Hospital of the College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, from January 1987 to September June, 1996, Clinical or histopathological findings were observed according to each radiologic criteria. The results obtained are as follows:1. The male to female ratio was 2 : 1 with a mean age of 25 years. 2. The radiographic appearances of nine caes were well-defined radiolucent lesions in which eight cases were shown until ocular lesions and only one lesion was seen multilocular lesion. 3. Radiologically, three of nine cases were pure radiolucent lesion and others, six cases were radiolucent contained a variable amount of radiopaque material. 4. Histologically, two cases were classified simple cyst, five were cyst associated odontoma, two were neoplastic type. 5. Histological findings according to the radiological classification, two of three radiolucent lesions were simple cys ts; another was a cyst associated with odontoma. While, four of six radiologic mixed lesions turned out to be a cyst associated with odontoma, two was the neoplastic type.

  3. The relationship between radiological features and clinical manifestation and dental expenses of keratocystic odontogenic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jung Hyun; Huh, Kyung Heo; Heo, Min Suk; Choi, Soon Chul; Lee, Sam Sun; Bae, Kwang Hak [Dept. of School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jin Woo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Dankook University College of Dentistry, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    This study was performed to identify correlations between keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) data from CT sections, and data on the KCOT clinical manifestation and resulting dental expenses. Following local Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, a seven-years of retrospective study was performed regarding patients with KCOTs treated at the Seoul National University Dental Hospital. A total of 180 KCOT were included in this study. The following information was collected: age, gender, location and size of the lesion, radiological features, surgical treatment provided and dental expenses. There was no significant association between the size of the KCOT and age, gender, and presenting preoperative symptoms. In both jaws, it was unusual to find KCOTs under 10 mm. The correlation between the number of teeth removed and the size of the KCOT in the tooth bearing area was statistically significant in the mandible, whereas in the maxilla, no significant relationship was found. Dental expenses compared with the size of the KCOT were found to be significant in both jaws. The size of KCOT was associated with a significant increase in dental expenses for both jaws and the number of teeth removed from the mandible. These findings emphasize the importance of routine examinations and early detection of lesions, which in turn helps preserving anatomical structures and reducing dental expenses.

  4. Glandular odontogenic cyst mimicking ameloblastoma in a 78 year old female: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Do; Lee, Wan; Kwon, Kyung Hwan; Choi, Moon Ki; Choi, Eun Joo; Yoon, Jung Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a rare, potentially aggressive jaw lesion. The common radiographic features include a well-defined radiolucency with distinct borders, presenting a uni- or multilocular appearance. A cystic lesion in the posterior mandible of a 78-year-old female was incidentally found. Radiographs showed a unilocular lesion with a scalloped margin, external root resorption of the adjacent tooth, and cortical perforation. This lesion had changed from a small ovoid shape to a more expanded lesion in a period of four years. The small lesion showed unilocularity with a smooth margin and a well-defined border, but the expanded lesion produced cortical perforation and a lobulated margin. The provisional diagnosis was an ameloblastoma, whereas the histopathological examination revealed a GOC. This was a quite rare case, given that this radiographic change was observed in the posterior mandible of an elderly female. This case showed that a GOC can grow even in people in their seventies, changing from the unilocular form to an expanded, lobulated lesion. Here, we report a case of GOC with characteristic radiographic features.

  5. Inhibition of odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells by dental resin monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ji Hyun; Park, Hee Chul; Zhu, Tingting; Yang, Hyeong-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Dental resin monomers that are leached from the resin matrix due to incomplete polymerization can affect the viability and various functions of oral tissues and cells. In this study, the effects of triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) on odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) were examined. To mimic clinical situations, dental pulp cells were treated with resin monomers for 24 h prior to the analysis of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mRNA expression of genes related to pulp cell differentiation. To elucidate the underlying signaling pathways, regulation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases by resin monomers was also investigated. The ALP activity of HDPCs was reduced by TEGDMA and HEMA at noncytotoxic concentrations. The mRNA expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), osteocalcin (OCN), and osteopontin (OPN) was also downregulated by resin monomers. However, DSPP expression was not affected by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Among the MAP kinases examined, ERK activation (ERK phosphorylation) was not affected by either resin monomers or H2O2, whereas JNK was phosphorylated by TEGDMA and HEMA. Phospho-p38 was upregulated by HEMA, while TEGDMA and H2O2 suppressed p38 phosphorylation. Exposure to TEGDMA and HEMA for a limited period suppresses differentiation of HDPCs via different signaling pathways.

  6. Glandular odontogenic cyst mimicking ameloblastoma in a 78 year old female: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Do; Lee, Wan; Kwon, Kyung Hwan; Choi, Moon Ki; Choi, Eun Joo [College of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Jung Hoon [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, College of Dentistry, Daejeon Dental Hospital, Wonkwang University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a rare, potentially aggressive jaw lesion. The common radiographic features include a well-defined radiolucency with distinct borders, presenting a uni- or multilocular appearance. A cystic lesion in the posterior mandible of a 78-year-old female was incidentally found. Radiographs showed a unilocular lesion with a scalloped margin, external root resorption of the adjacent tooth, and cortical perforation. This lesion had changed from a small ovoid shape to a more expanded lesion in a period of four years. The small lesion showed unilocularity with a smooth margin and a well-defined border, but the expanded lesion produced cortical perforation and a lobulated margin. The provisional diagnosis was an ameloblastoma, whereas the histopathological examination revealed a GOC. This was a quite rare case, given that this radiographic change was observed in the posterior mandible of an elderly female. This case showed that a GOC can grow even in people in their seventies, changing from the unilocular form to an expanded, lobulated lesion. Here, we report a case of GOC with characteristic radiographic features.

  7. Oral epithelial dysplasia classification systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warnakulasuriya, S; Reibel, J; Bouquot, J

    2008-01-01

    At a workshop coordinated by the WHO Collaborating Centre for Oral Cancer and Precancer in the United Kingdom issues related to potentially malignant disorders of the oral cavity were discussed by an expert group. The consensus views of the Working Group are presented in a series of papers....... In this report, we review the oral epithelial dysplasia classification systems. The three classification schemes [oral epithelial dysplasia scoring system, squamous intraepithelial neoplasia and Ljubljana classification] were presented and the Working Group recommended epithelial dysplasia grading for routine...... use. Although most oral pathologists possibly recognize and accept the criteria for grading epithelial dysplasia, firstly based on architectural features and then of cytology, there is great variability in their interpretation of the presence, degree and significance of the individual criteria...

  8. Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells on Hydrogel Scaffolds Derived from Decellularized Bone Extracellular Matrix and Collagen Type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paduano, Francesco; Marrelli, Massimo; White, Lisa J; Shakesheff, Kevin M; Tatullo, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) on hydrogel scaffolds derived from bone extracellular matrix (bECM) in comparison to those seeded on collagen I (Col-I), one of the main components of dental pulp ECM. DPSCs isolated from human third molars were characterized for surface marker expression and odontogenic potential prior to seeding into bECM or Col-I hydrogel scaffolds. The cells were then seeded onto bECM and Col-I hydrogel scaffolds and cultured under basal conditions or with odontogenic and growth factor (GF) supplements. DPSCs cultivated on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) with and without supplements were used as controls. Gene expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP-1) and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and mineral deposition was observed by Von Kossa staining. When DPSCs were cultured on bECM hydrogels, the mRNA expression levels of DSPP, DMP-1 and MEPE genes were significantly upregulated with respect to those cultured on Col-I scaffolds or TCPS in the absence of extra odontogenic inducers. In addition, more mineral deposition was observed on bECM hydrogel scaffolds as demonstrated by Von Kossa staining. Moreover, DSPP, DMP-1 and MEPE mRNA expressions of DPSCs cultured on bECM hydrogels were further upregulated by the addition of GFs or osteo/odontogenic medium compared to Col-I treated cells in the same culture conditions. These results demonstrate the potential of the bECM hydrogel scaffolds to stimulate odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs.

  9. Odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp cells by calcium silicate materials stimulating via FGFR/ERK signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chao-Hsin; Hung, Chi-Jr; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Lin, Chi-Chang; Kao, Chia-Tze; Shie, Ming-You

    2014-01-01

    Bone healing needs a complex interaction of growth factors that establishes an environment for efficient bone formation. We examine how calcium silicate (CS) and tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) cements influence the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) through fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) and active MAPK pathways, in particular ERK. The hDPCs are cultured with β-TCP and CS, after which the cells' viability and odontogenic differentiation markers are determined by using PrestoBlue® assay and western blot, respectively. The effect of small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection targeting FGFR was also evaluated. The results showed that CS promoted cell proliferation and enhances FGFR expression. It was also found that CS increases ERK and p38 activity in hDPCs, and furthermore, raises the expression and secretion of DSP, and DMP-1. Additionally, statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) have been found in the calcium deposition in si-FGFR transfection and ERK inhibitor between CS and β-TCP; these variations indicated that ERK/MAPK signaling is involved in the silicon-induced odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs. The current study shows that CS substrates play a key role in odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs through FGFR and modulate ERK/MAPK activation. - Highlights: • CS influences the behavior of hDPCs through fibroblast growth factor receptor. • CS increases ERK and p38 activity in hDPCs. • ERK/MAPK signaling is involved in the Si-induced odontogenic differentiation of hDPCs. • Ca staining shows that FGFR regulates hDPC differentiation on CS, but not on β-TCP

  10. Significant association of inflammation grade with the number of Langerhans cells in odontogenic keratocysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Han Chang

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: A significant association of inflammation grade with the number of LCs in OKCs is found. The paucity of finding LCs in the lining epithelia of OKCs without inflammation indicates the loss of immunosurveillance ability against the OKC lining epithelial cells; this can explain why OKCs have aggressive clinical behavior, a great growth potential, and a high recurrence rate.

  11. Evaluation of Ki-67 Antigen and Protein P53 Expression in Orthokratinized and Parakratinized Odontogenic Keratocyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Baghaei

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Odontogenic Keratocysts (OKC make up 10-12% of all developmental cysts with dental origin. OKCs are classified into parakeratotic and orthokeratotic types, with completely different clinical features. In order to investigate biological behavior of OKCs, an immunohistochemical study was designed, using Ki-67 antigen as proliferation marker and P53 protein as tumor suppressor gene.Purposes: The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of P53 and Ki-67 markers in two types of OKCs and to determine their relationship with the biological behaviour of OKC.Materials and Methods: A total of 20 OKCs (parakeratotic n=10, orthokeratotic n=10were stained immunohistochemically for Ki-67 and P53 protein by Biotin – Streptavidine method. Then, slides were studied quantitatively through optical lense (magnification=X10and the number of positively stained cells was counted/mm BM.Results: The average number of Positively stained cells for Ki-67 were 62.30±11.96 cells/mm BM in parakeratotic, and 29.90±4.90 cells/mmBM in orthokeratotic OKCs (P<0.05. Positive cells for Ki-67 were dominantly located in parabasal layer. Mean stainedcells for P53 were 4.30± 2.21cells/mmBM in parakeratinized and 4.80±1.75 cells/mmBM in orthokeratotic types that was not statistically significant. (P<0.58Parakeratotic OKCs mostly occur in the lower jaw (90%, whereas just 50% of orthokeratotic OKCs occur in mandible (P=0.05Conclusion: Regarding other clinical features and the existence of daughter cysts, no significant statistical difference was found between two types of OKCs.

  12. STRO-1 selected rat dental pulp stem cells transfected with adenoviral-mediated human bone morphogenetic protein 2 gene show enhanced odontogenic differentiation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, X.; Kraan, P.M. van der; Dolder, J. van den; Walboomers, X.F.; Bian, Z.; Fan, M.; Jansen, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells harbor great potential for tissue-engineering purposes. However, previous studies have shown variable results, and some have reported only limited osteogenic and odontogenic potential.Because bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are well-established agents to induce bone and

  13. Keratocystic odontogenic tumours of the jaws and associated pathologies: A 10-year clinicopathologic audit in a referral teaching hospital in Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simiyu, B.N.; Butt, F.; Dimba, E.A.; Wagaiyu, E.G.; Awange, D.O.; Guthua, S.W.; Slootweg, P.J.

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To establish the pattern of occurrence and the clinicopathological features of keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT) over a 10-year period. MATERIALS AND METHOD: Patients from the University of Nairobi Dental Hospital treated for KCOT were included in the study over a 10-year period. The study

  14. A Comparative Analysis of Cytokeratin 18 and 19 Expressions in Odontogenic Keratocyst, Dentigerous Cyst and Radicular Cyst with a Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Vandana Sandip; Ghanchi, Mohsin Jiva; Gosavi, Sandesh Sachchidanand; Srivastava, Himanshu Mahesh; Pachore, Nivedita Javahir

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Odontogenic cysts viz Odontogenic Keratocyst (OKC), Dentigerous Cyst (DC) and Radicular Cyst (RC) occur commonly in the oral and maxillofacial region. Cytokeratin (CK) expression studies have been done to evaluate diagnostic accuracy, role in pathogenesis, elucidate behaviour and role in treatment protocols. However, variations have been reported in the expression of CK patterns in these odontogenic cysts, which could be due to the lack of standardization of laboratory techniques. The present study has tried to shed light on CK 18 and 19 expression in odontogenic cysts and offer the brief review of previous studies on these CK. Aim The aim of the present study was to evaluate the intensity and expression patterns of CK 18 and 19 in OKCs, DCs and RCs. Materials and Methods A total of 60 cases, 20 each of OKC, DC and RC were confirmed histologically and evaluated for immunohistochemical expression pattern and intensity of CK 18 and 19. Results A focal and variable expression of CK 18 was observed in 25% of OKCs, 15% of DCs and 10% of RCs. CK 19 was expressed in 75% of OKCs and 100% in DCs as well as RCs. Conclusion The intensity and expression of Cytokeratin 19 was more in all three cysts compared to Cytokeratin 18. PMID:27630961

  15. Immunohistochemical Comparison of the Expression of CD34 and CD105 in Odontogenic Keratocyst and Dentigerous Cyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, Shokoofeh; Zargaran, Massoumeh; Roshanaei, Ghodratollah; Hadadi, Fatemeh; Dehghani| Nazhvani, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a developmental odontogenic cyst with specific histopathological features, high recurrence rate, and aggressive clinical behavior. Angiogenesis might be considered as an important factor for the growth, expansion, and distribution of this lesion. Purpose: The aim of the present study was to determine the mean vascular densities (MVD) of OKCs and dentigerous cysts to evaluate their relationship with the biologic behavior of these lesions. Materials and Method: In this cross-sectional analytical study, angiogenesis was assessed in OKC and dentigerous cyst by measuring the MVD. Immunohistochemistry was carried out using CD34 and CD105. The results were analyzed with independent samples t-test. The data were analyzed, setting p value at 0.05. Results: The MVDs with the use of CD34 and CD105 markers were significantly higher in OKC compared to dentigerous cyst (p< 0.05). In addition, MVDs obtained by CD105 in dentigerous cysts and OKC were significantly less than those based on CD34 (p< 0.05). Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, it can be suggested that angiogenesis might be one of the possible mechanisms involved in higher aggressive biologic behavior and greater recurrence rate of OKC compared to dentigerous cysts. PMID:28280759

  16. Odontogenic tumors: analysis of 127 cases Tumores odontogênicos: análise de 127 casos

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    Jean Nunes SANTOS

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and twenty-seven cases of histologically confirmed odontogenic tumors were retrieved from a total of 5,289 oral and maxillary lesions diagnosed at the Division of Oral Pathology, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, during a period of 30 years (l970-l999. The most common histological diagnosis was odontoma (50.40%, followed by ameloblastoma (30.70%. The prevalence of odontogenic tumors was greater in females and the peak incidence occurred in the second and third decades of life. The main anatomical location was the mandible, and no malignant tumors were found.De uma série de 5.289 casos de lesões orais e dos maxilares diagnosticadas no Laboratório de Patologia Oral da Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte no período de 30 anos (1970-1999, foram analisados 127 casos de tumores odontogênicos confirmados histologicamente. A lesão mais freqüente foi o odontoma (50,40% seguida pelo ameloblastoma (30,70%. A prevalência de tumores odontogênicos foi maior nas mulheres e o pico de incidência ocorreu na segunda e terceira décadas de vida. A localização anatômica mais comum foi a mandíbula e não foram encontrados casos de tumores malignos.

  17. CT findings of the infraorbital space. Special reference to odontogenic infection caused by periapical lesions of the maxillary canine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikarugi, Yuko; Tanaka, Ray; Hayashi, Takafumi

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the clinical significance of the infraorbital space demonstrated on CT for the diagnosis of odontogenic infection caused by periapical lesions of the maxillary canine tooth. We evaluated the radiological appearance of the labial cortical bone and the surrounding soft tissue adjacent to the root apex of the maxillary canine in 12 patients with infraorbital space infection demonstrated on CT. The patients consisted of 6 males and 6 females, and age ranged from 33 to 84 years with a mean age of 58.7 years. On CT, disruption of the labial cortical bone around the root apex of the maxillary canine accompanied with pathological soft tissue density adjacent to the disrupted cortical bone was observed in all of the cases. Swelling of the facial muscles (levator labii superioris muscle, levator anguli oris muscle) was shown in 6 (50%) of 12 cases. Deviation of the levator labii superioris muscle was demonstrated in 9 cases (75%), whereas that of the levator anguli oris muscle was observed only in 2 cases (17%). The anatomical appearance of the infraorbital space which is clearly demonstrated on CT might be useful in diagnosing the spread of odontogenic infection caused by periapical lesions of the maxillary canine. (author)

  18. Porcine Dental Epithelial Cells Differentiated in a Cell Sheet Constructed by Magnetic Nanotechnology

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    Wataru Koto

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs are widely used in medical examinations, treatments, and basic research, including magnetic resonance imaging, drug delivery systems, and tissue engineering. In this study, MNPs with magnetic force were applied to tissue engineering for dental enamel regeneration. The internalization of MNPs into the odontogenic cells was observed by transmission electron microscopy. A combined cell sheet consisting of dental epithelial cells (DECs and dental mesenchymal cells (DMCs (CC sheet was constructed using magnetic force-based tissue engineering technology. The result of the iron staining indicated that MNPs were distributed ubiquitously over the CC sheet. mRNA expression of enamel differentiation and basement membrane markers was examined in the CC sheet. Immunostaining showed Collagen IV expression at the border region between DEC and DMC layers in the CC sheet. These results revealed that epithelial–mesenchymal interactions between DEC and DMC layers were caused by bringing DECs close to DMCs mechanically by magnetic force. Our study suggests that the microenvironment in the CC sheet might be similar to that during the developmental stage of a tooth bud. In conclusion, a CC sheet employing MNPs could be developed as a novel and unique graft for artificially regenerating dental enamel.

  19. Epithelial cells as active player in fibrosis: findings from an in vitro model.

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    Solange Moll

    Full Text Available Kidney fibrosis, a scarring of the tubulo-interstitial space, is due to activation of interstitial myofibroblasts recruited locally or systemically with consecutive extracellular matrix deposition. Newly published clinical studies correlating acute kidney injury (AKI to chronic kidney disease (CKD challenge this pathological concept putting tubular epithelial cells into the spotlight. In this work we investigated the role of epithelial cells in fibrosis using a simple controlled in vitro system. An epithelial/mesenchymal 3D cell culture model composed of human proximal renal tubular cells and fibroblasts was challenged with toxic doses of Cisplatin, thus injuring epithelial cells. RT-PCR for classical fibrotic markers was performed on fibroblasts to assess their modulation toward an activated myofibroblast phenotype in presence or absence of that stimulus. Epithelial cell lesion triggered a phenotypical modulation of fibroblasts toward activated myofibroblasts as assessed by main fibrotic marker analysis. Uninjured 3D cell culture as well as fibroblasts alone treated with toxic stimulus in the absence of epithelial cells were used as control. Our results, with the caveats due to the limited, but highly controllable and reproducible in vitro approach, suggest that epithelial cells can control and regulate fibroblast phenotype. Therefore they emerge as relevant target cells for the development of new preventive anti-fibrotic therapeutic approaches.

  20. Computer-aided diagnosis of periapical cyst and keratocystic odontogenic tumor on cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, E; Kayikcioglu, T; Kayipmaz, S

    2017-07-01

    In this article, we propose a decision support system for effective classification of dental periapical cyst and keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) lesions obtained via cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). CBCT has been effectively used in recent years for diagnosing dental pathologies and determining their boundaries and content. Unlike other imaging techniques, CBCT provides detailed and distinctive information about the pathologies by enabling a three-dimensional (3D) image of the region to be displayed. We employed 50 CBCT 3D image dataset files as the full dataset of our study. These datasets were identified by experts as periapical cyst and KCOT lesions according to the clinical, radiographic and histopathologic features. Segmentation operations were performed on the CBCT images using viewer software that we developed. Using the tools of this software, we marked the lesional volume of interest and calculated and applied the order statistics and 3D gray-level co-occurrence matrix for each CBCT dataset. A feature vector of the lesional region, including 636 different feature items, was created from those statistics. Six classifiers were used for the classification experiments. The Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier achieved the best classification performance with 100% accuracy, and 100% F-score (F1) scores as a result of the experiments in which a ten-fold cross validation method was used with a forward feature selection algorithm. SVM achieved the best classification performance with 96.00% accuracy, and 96.00% F1 scores in the experiments in which a split sample validation method was used with a forward feature selection algorithm. SVM additionally achieved the best performance of 94.00% accuracy, and 93.88% F1 in which a leave-one-out (LOOCV) method was used with a forward feature selection algorithm. Based on the results, we determined that periapical cyst and KCOT lesions can be classified with a high accuracy with the models that we built using

  1. Reemplazo articular temporomandibular debido a queratoquiste odontogénico Temporomandibular joint replacement because of odontogenic keratocyst

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    Pedro Angel Peñón Vivas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Existen disímiles condiciones que hacen necesario el reemplazo articular temporomandibular; dentro de las más frecuentes se encuentran la anquilosis, la osteoatrosis, estadíos avanzados del Síndrome de disfunción temporomandibular, daño articular postrauma y procesos neoplásicos o tumorales. Los queratoquistes odontógenos que se agrupan para su estudio dentro de los quistes odontogénicos del desarrollo, representan cerca del 7 al 10 por ciento de todos los quistes maxilo-mandibulares. Se dice que tienen dos picos de incidencia entre la segunda y tercera década de vida y entre los 50 y 60 años de edad, con una ligera predilección por el sexo masculino. Aparece más frecuentemente en la región del tercer molar de la mandíbula con extensión a la rama ascendente El presente trabajo tuvo como objetivo mostrar el caso de un paciente masculino de 57 años de edad en el que fue necesario el reemplazo articular temporomandibular debido a un queratoquiste odontogénico que involucraba la totalidad de la rama mandibular derecha, incluyendo el proceso condíleo y coronoideo, así como el ángulo hasta el tercio posterior del cuerpo mandibular. Tras un año de realizada la intervención quirúrgica la evolución del paciente fue satisfactoria.Temporomandibular joint replacement is required in a variety of conditions. Among the most frequent are ankylosis, osteoarthrosis, advanced stages of the temporomandibular dysfunction syndrome, post-traumatic joint damage, and neoplastic or tumoral processes. Odontogenic keratocysts, which are classified as developmental odontogenic cysts for study purposes, constitute 7-10 per cent of all maxillomandibular cysts. Two peaks have been identified in their incidence: between the second and third decades of life, and between 50 and 60 years of age, with a slight predominance of the male sex. They are most common in the third molar area of the mandibule, with expansion to the ascending branch. A case is

  2. The effect of ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor on the displacement pattern of inferior alveolar canal in CBCT examinations

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    Isa Abdi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. The inferior alveolar canal should be examined as a significant anatomical landmark, particularly in the posterior body and ramus of the mandible, for dental and surgical procedures. In the present study, the effects of two pathological lesions, ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor, on canal displacement were investigated. Methods. This study had a single-blinded design. Twenty-six patients with lesions in the mandible referred to Imam Reza Hospital, Tabriz, Iran, were studied in two equal groups (13 patients with a histopathological diagnosis of ameloblastoma and 13 with a histopathological diagnosis of odontogenic keratocyst. After confirming the initial incisional biopsy and pathological report, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT of lesions larger than 3 cm mesiodistaly and those involving the mandibular posterior body and ramus were included in the study. Two maxillofacial surgeons in association with an oral and maxillofacial radiologist examined three points on CBCT images to determine the mandibular canal position relative to the lesions from the lingual and buccal aspects. Results. The results of statistical analyses showed that in ameloblastoma, the inferior alveolar canal had been displaced more buccally in the ramus area (point A (84.6% but in the distal region (point C, the displacement was less buccal (41.6%. The canal was displaced buccally in 53.8% of cases at point A and in 46.2% of cases at point C in KOT lesions. Finally chi-squared test did not show any statistically significant differences between these two lesions. Conclusion. The results of this study showed no relationship between these lesions and the displacement of the mandibular canal.

  3. Early reconstruction of bone defect created after initial surgery of a large keratocystic odontogenic tumor: A case report

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    Matijević Stevo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT is defined as a benign cystic neoplasm of the jaws of odontogenic origin with a high rate of recurrence. The most lesions occur in the posterior part of the mandible. Treatment of KCOT remains controversial, but the goals of treatment should involve eliminating the potential for recurrence while minimizing surgical morbidity. However, another significant therapeutic problem related to the management of KCOT is an adequate and early reconstruction of the existing jaw defect, as well as appropriate aesthetic and functional rehabilitation of a patient, especially in cases of a very large destruction of the jaws bone. Case report. We presented a 65-year-old female patient with very large KCOT of the mandible. Orthopantomographic radiography showed a very large elliptical multilocular radiolucency, located on the right side of the mandible body and the ascending ramus of the mandible, with radiographic evidence of cortical perforation at the anterior border of the mandibular ramus and the superior border of the alveolar part of the mandible. The surgical treatment included two phases. In the first phase, the tumor was removed by enucleation and additional use of Carnoy solution, performing peripheral ostectomy and excision of the affected overlying mucosa, while in the second phase, restorative surgery of the existing mandibular defect was performed 6 months later. Postoperatively, we did not register any of postoperative complications, nor recurrence within 2 years of the follow-up. Conclusion. Adequate and early reconstruction of the existing jaw defect and appropriate aesthetic and functional rehabilitation of the patient should be the primary goal in the treatment of KCOT, having in mind the need for a long-term post-surgical follow-up.

  4. Human amniotic epithelial cells combined with silk fibroin scaffold in the repair of spinal cord injury

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    Ting-gang Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment and functional reconstruction after central nervous system injury is a major medical and social challenge. An increasing number of researchers are attempting to use neural stem cells combined with artificial scaffold materials, such as fibroin, for nerve repair. However, such approaches are challenged by ethical and practical issues. Amniotic tissue, a clinical waste product, is abundant, and amniotic epithelial cells are pluripotent, have low immunogenicity, and are not the subject of ethical debate. We hypothesized that amniotic epithelial cells combined with silk fibroin scaffolds would be conducive to the repair of spinal cord injury. To test this, we isolated and cultured amniotic epithelial cells, and constructed complexes of these cells and silk fibroin scaffolds. Implantation of the cell-scaffold complex into a rat model of spinal cord injury resulted in a smaller glial scar in the damaged cord tissue than in model rats that received a blank scaffold, or amniotic epithelial cells alone. In addition to a milder local immunological reaction, the rats showed less inflammatory cell infiltration at the transplant site, milder host-versus-graft reaction, and a marked improvement in motor function. These findings confirm that the transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells combined with silk fibroin scaffold can promote the repair of spinal cord injury. Silk fibroin scaffold can provide a good nerve regeneration microenvironment for amniotic epithelial cells.

  5. Inhibition of airway epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and fibrosis by kaempferol in endotoxin-induced epithelial cells and ovalbumin-sensitized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ju-Hyun; Cho, In-Hee; Shin, Daekeun; Han, Seon-Young; Park, Sin-Hye; Kang, Young-Hee

    2014-03-01

    Chronic airway remodeling is characterized by structural changes within the airway wall, including smooth muscle hypertrophy, submucosal fibrosis and epithelial shedding. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a fundamental mechanism of organ fibrosis, which can be induced by TGF-β. In the in vitro study, we investigated whether 1-20 μM kaempferol inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced bronchial EMT in BEAS-2B cells. The in vivo study explored demoting effects of 10-20 mg/kg kaempferol on airway fibrosis in BALB/c mice sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA). LPS induced airway epithelial TGF-β1 signaling that promoted EMT with concurrent loss of E-cadherin and induction of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Nontoxic kaempferol significantly inhibited TGF-β-induced EMT process through reversing E-cadherin expression and retarding the induction of N-cadherin and α-SMA. Consistently, OVA inhalation resulted in a striking loss of epithelial morphology by displaying myofibroblast appearance, which led to bronchial fibrosis with submucosal accumulation of collagen fibers. Oral administration of kaempferol suppressed collagen deposition, epithelial excrescency and goblet hyperplasia observed in the lung of OVA-challenged mice. The specific inhibition of TGF-β entailed epithelial protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) as with 20 μM kaempferol. The epithelial PAR-1 inhibition by SCH-79797 restored E-cadherin induction and deterred α-SMA induction, indicating that epithelial PAR-1 localization was responsible for resulting in airway EMT. These results demonstrate that dietary kaempferol alleviated fibrotic airway remodeling via bronchial EMT by modulating PAR1 activation. Therefore, kaempferol may be a potential therapeutic agent targeting asthmatic airway constriction.

  6. Proliferation and osteo/odontogenic differentiation of stem cells from apical papilla regulated by Zinc fingers and homeoboxes 2: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Fang; Gao, Lifen; Lu, Yating; Ma, Hongxin; Wang, Hongxing; Liang, Xiaohong; Wang, Yan; Ma, Chunhong

    2016-01-15

    In the process of tooth root development, stem cells from the apical papilla (SCAPs) can differentiate into odontoblasts and form root dentin, however, molecules regulating SCAPs differentiation have not been elucidated. Zinc fingers and homeoboxes 2 (ZHX2) is a novel transcriptional inhibitor. It is reported to modulate the development of nerve cells, liver cells, B cells, red blood cells, and so on. However, the role of ZHX2 in tooth root development remains unclear. In this study, we explored the potential role of ZHX2 in the process of SCAPs differentiation. The results showed that overexpression of ZHX2 upregulated the expression of osteo/odontogenic related genes and ALP activity, inhibited the proliferation of SCAPs. Consistently, ZHX2 knockdown reduced SCAPs mineralization and promoted SCAPs proliferation. These results indicated that ZHX2 plays a critical role in the proliferation and osteo/odontogenic differentiation of SCAPs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Central odontogenic fibroma (simple type) in a four year old boy: Atypical cone-beam computed tomographic appearance with periosteal reaction

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    Anbiaee, Najme; Ebrahimnejad, Hamed; Sanaei, Alireza [Dept. of , Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Maxillofacial Diseases Research Center, School of Dentistry, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Central odontogenic fibroma (COF) is a rare benign tumor that accounts for 0.1% of all odontogenic tumors. A case of COF (simple type) of the mandible in a four-year-old boy is described in this report. The patient showed asymptomatic swelling in the right inferior border of the lower jaw for one week. A panoramic radiograph showed a poorly-defined destructive unilocular radiolucent area. Cone-beam computed tomography showed expansion and perforation of the adjacent cortical bone plates. A periosteal reaction with the Codman triangle pattern was clearly visible in the buccal cortex. Since the tumor had destroyed a considerable amount of bone, surgical resection was performed. No recurrence was noted.

  8. Proliferation and osteo/odontogenic differentiation of stem cells from apical papilla regulated by Zinc fingers and homeoboxes 2: An in vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Fang; Gao, Lifen; Lu, Yating; Ma, Hongxin; Wang, Hongxing; Liang, Xiaohong; Wang, Yan; Ma, Chunhong

    2016-01-01

    In the process of tooth root development, stem cells from the apical papilla (SCAPs) can differentiate into odontoblasts and form root dentin, however, molecules regulating SCAPs differentiation have not been elucidated. Zinc fingers and homeoboxes 2 (ZHX2) is a novel transcriptional inhibitor. It is reported to modulate the development of nerve cells, liver cells, B cells, red blood cells, and so on. However, the role of ZHX2 in tooth root development remains unclear. In this study, we explored the potential role of ZHX2 in the process of SCAPs differentiation. The results showed that overexpression of ZHX2 upregulated the expression of osteo/odontogenic related genes and ALP activity, inhibited the proliferation of SCAPs. Consistently, ZHX2 knockdown reduced SCAPs mineralization and promoted SCAPs proliferation. These results indicated that ZHX2 plays a critical role in the proliferation and osteo/odontogenic differentiation of SCAPs. - Highlights: • Zinc fingers and homeoboxes 2 (ZHX2) is a novel transcriptional inhibitor. • we found another new biological function of ZHX2 for the first time. • ZHX2 inhibit SCAPs proliferation. • ZHX2 promote the osteo/odontogenic differentiation of SCAPs.

  9. Educational effect of a lecture on differential imaging features comparing ameloblastomas and keratocystic odontogenic tumors of the mandible presented to dental students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Mitsuko; Ariji, Yoshiko; Kise, Yoshitaka; Goto, Masakazu; Izumi, Masahiro; Naitoh, Munetaka; Ariji, Eiichiro; Katsumata, Akitoshi

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to clarify the educational effect of a lecture on differential imaging features comparing ameloblastomas and keratocystic odontogenic tumors of the mandibles presented to dental students. Panoramic and CT images of 10 ameloblastomas and 10 keratocystic odontogenic tumors were randomly presented 114 dental students. Test scores, correct answer ratios, identification index, and understanding of the imaging features contributing to a correct diagnosis were serially evaluated before and after the lecture on the differential imaging features comparing the two types of tumors. The mean and standard deviation of the scoring ratios of dental students diagnosing these lesions on panoramic and CT images were 48.8±10.8% and 52.5±12.9%, respectively. After the lecture on the differential imaging features comparing the two tumors, the scoring ratios improved significantly. After the lecture, both the numbers of patients whose images were correctly diagnosed and the identification indices increased. The lecture also increased the number of imaging features recognized as contributing to the correct diagnosis. A lecture on the differential imaging features comparing ameloblastomas and keratocystic odontogenic tumors of the mandibles contributed to the improvement of imaging diagnosis skills among dental students. (author)

  10. Extraosseous calcifying odontogenic cyst: a case report and a literature review Cisto odontogênico calcificante: relato de caso e revisão da literatura

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    Claudia Cazal

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The calcifying odontogenic cyst is an uncommon odontogenic lesion that can have intra- or extraosseous occurrence with both cystic or tumor behavior. A report of an extraosseous calcifying odontogenic cyst (ECOC in a 57-year-old black woman is presented as well as a review of the literature about the lesion. The clinical, radiographic and histopathologic features are discussed, along with etiology and treatment.O cisto odontogênico calcificante é uma lesão odontogênica incomum que pode ser intra ou extra-óssea, tanto com um comportamento cístico quanto com um comportamento neoplásico. Neste trabalho está sendo apresentado o relato de um caso de cisto odontogênico calcificante em uma mulher da raça negra, com 57 anos de idade, bem como uma revisão da literatura sobre a lesão. Os achados clínicos, radiográficos e histopatológicos são discutidos, assim como sua etiologia e o seu tratamento.

  11. Proliferation and osteo/odontogenic differentiation of stem cells from apical papilla regulated by Zinc fingers and homeoboxes 2: An in vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Fang [Department of Immunology, Key Laboratory for Experimental Teratology of Ministry of Education, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Infection & Immunology, Shandong University School of Medicine, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); VIP Center, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Oral Biomedicine, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Gao, Lifen [Department of Immunology, Key Laboratory for Experimental Teratology of Ministry of Education, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Infection & Immunology, Shandong University School of Medicine, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Lu, Yating [VIP Center, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Oral Biomedicine, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Ma, Hongxin; Wang, Hongxing; Liang, Xiaohong [Department of Immunology, Key Laboratory for Experimental Teratology of Ministry of Education, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Infection & Immunology, Shandong University School of Medicine, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Wang, Yan, E-mail: wangyan1965@sdu.edu.cn [VIP Center, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Oral Biomedicine, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Ma, Chunhong, E-mail: machunhong@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Immunology, Key Laboratory for Experimental Teratology of Ministry of Education, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Infection & Immunology, Shandong University School of Medicine, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China)

    2016-01-15

    In the process of tooth root development, stem cells from the apical papilla (SCAPs) can differentiate into odontoblasts and form root dentin, however, molecules regulating SCAPs differentiation have not been elucidated. Zinc fingers and homeoboxes 2 (ZHX2) is a novel transcriptional inhibitor. It is reported to modulate the development of nerve cells, liver cells, B cells, red blood cells, and so on. However, the role of ZHX2 in tooth root development remains unclear. In this study, we explored the potential role of ZHX2 in the process of SCAPs differentiation. The results showed that overexpression of ZHX2 upregulated the expression of osteo/odontogenic related genes and ALP activity, inhibited the proliferation of SCAPs. Consistently, ZHX2 knockdown reduced SCAPs mineralization and promoted SCAPs proliferation. These results indicated that ZHX2 plays a critical role in the proliferation and osteo/odontogenic differentiation of SCAPs. - Highlights: • Zinc fingers and homeoboxes 2 (ZHX2) is a novel transcriptional inhibitor. • we found another new biological function of ZHX2 for the first time. • ZHX2 inhibit SCAPs proliferation. • ZHX2 promote the osteo/odontogenic differentiation of SCAPs.

  12. INFLUENCE OF LOCAL RONKOLEIKIN TREATMENT UPON CLINICAL COURSE OF PURULENT WOUNDS AND FUNCTIONAL ACTIVITY OF WOUND PHAGOCYTES IN PATIENTS WITH ODONTOGENIC PHLEGMONAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Dolgushin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of the work was to evaluate clinical features of purulent wounds trend and functional activity of local wound phagocytes in the patients with odontogenic phlegmones in the course of local treatment with Ronkoleukin. A randomized clinical study was performed which included sixty-five patients with odontogenic phlegmones. Their age ranged from 18 to 74 years old. The group was divided in two parts, i.e., patients of a comparison group (n = 33 receiving a conventional combined drug therapy, and the persons from study group (n = 32 who were subject to local immunotherapy with Ronkoleukin, applied along with conventional therapy. It was established that the local therapy with Ronkoleikin exerts distinct positive effects, i.e., increase in wound-located lymphocytes and macrophages, acceleration of phasic dynamics of inflammatory events, augmentation of an lysosomal luminescence index (2.3-fold, enhancement of phagocytosis intensity in wound neutrophiles and macrophages (1.9-2-fold, strengthening the reserve abilities of wound neutrophils (1.3-fold. These effects create favorable conditions for elimination of pathogen and optimal healing of purulent wounds in the patients with odontogenic phlegmones.

  13. Force transmission in epithelial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Claudia G; Martin, Adam C

    2016-03-01

    In epithelial tissues, cells constantly generate and transmit forces between each other. Forces generated by the actomyosin cytoskeleton regulate tissue shape and structure and also provide signals that influence cells' decisions to divide, die, or differentiate. Forces are transmitted across epithelia because cells are mechanically linked through junctional complexes, and forces can propagate through the cell cytoplasm. Here, we review some of the molecular mechanisms responsible for force generation, with a specific focus on the actomyosin cortex and adherens junctions. We then discuss evidence for how these mechanisms promote cell shape changes and force transmission in tissues. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The Use of Fibrous, Supramolecular Membranes and Human Tubular Cells for Renal Epithelial Tissue Engineering : Towards a Suitable Membrane for a Bioartificial Kidney

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dankers, Patricia Y. W.; Boomker, Jasper M.; Huizinga-van der Vlag, Ali; Smedts, Frank M. M.; Harmsen, Martin C.; van Luyn, Marja J. A.

    2010-01-01

    A bioartificial kidney, which is composed of a membrane cartridge with renal epithelial cells, can substitute important kidney functions in patients with renal failure. A particular challenge is the maintenance of monolayer integrity and specialized renal epithelial cell functions ex vivo. We

  15. The use of fibrous, supramolecular membranes and human tubular cells for renal epithelial tissue engineering: towards a suitable membrane for a bioartificial kidney,

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dankers, P.Y.W.; Boomker, J.M.; Huizinga-van der Vlag, A.; Smedts, F.M.M.; Harmsen, M.C.; Luyn, van M.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    A bioartificial kidney, which is composed of a membrane cartridge with renal epithelial cells, can substitute important kidney functions in patients with renal failure. A particular challenge is the maintenance of monolayer integrity and specialized renal epithelial cell functions ex vivo. We

  16. Engineering epithelial-stromal interactions in vitro for toxicology assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Crosstalk between epithelial and stromal cells drives the morphogenesis of ectodermal organs during development and promotes normal mature adult epithelial tissue function. Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions (EMIs) have been examined using mammalian models, ex vivo t...

  17. Epithelial Cells in Urine: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/epithelialcellsinurine.html Epithelial Cells in Urine To use the sharing features on ... page, please enable JavaScript. What is an Epithelial Cells in Urine Test? Epithelial cells are a type ...

  18. Calcium as a signal integrator in developing epithelial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodskiy, Pavel A; Zartman, Jeremiah J

    2018-05-16

    Decoding how tissue properties emerge across multiple spatial and temporal scales from the integration of local signals is a grand challenge in quantitative biology. For example, the collective behavior of epithelial cells is critical for shaping developing embryos. Understanding how epithelial cells interpret a diverse range of local signals to coordinate tissue-level processes requires a systems-level understanding of development. Integration of multiple signaling pathways that specify cell signaling information requires second messengers such as calcium ions. Increasingly, specific roles have been uncovered for calcium signaling throughout development. Calcium signaling regulates many processes including division, migration, death, and differentiation. However, the pleiotropic and ubiquitous nature of calcium signaling implies that many additional functions remain to be discovered. Here we review a selection of recent studies to highlight important insights into how multiple signals are transduced by calcium transients in developing epithelial tissues. Quantitative imaging and computational modeling have provided important insights into how calcium signaling integration occurs. Reverse-engineering the conserved features of signal integration mediated by calcium signaling will enable novel approaches in regenerative medicine and synthetic control of morphogenesis.

  19. Andrographolide suppresses epithelial mesenchymal transition by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) of lens epithelial cells (LECs) may contribute to the development of posterior capsular opacification (PCO), which leads to visual impairment. Andrographolide has been shown to have therapeutic potential against various cancers. However, its effect on human LECs is still unknown.

  20. Role of contact inhibition of locomotion and junctional mechanics in epithelial collective responses to injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburn, Luke; Lopez, Hender; Schouwenaar, Irin-Maya; Yap, Alpha S.; Lobaskin, Vladimir; Gomez, Guillermo A.

    2018-03-01

    Epithelial tissues form physically integrated barriers against the external environment protecting organs from infection and invasion. Within each tissue, epithelial cells respond to different challenges that can potentially compromise tissue integrity. In particular, cells collectively respond to injuries by reorganizing their cell-cell junctions and migrating directionally towards the sites of damage. Notwithstanding, the mechanisms that drive collective responses in epithelial aggregates remain poorly understood. In this work, we develop a minimal mechanistic model that is able to capture the essential features of epithelial collective responses to injuries. We show that a model that integrates the mechanics of cells at the cell-cell and cell-substrate interfaces as well as contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL) correctly predicts two key properties of epithelial response to injury as: (1) local relaxation of the tissue and (2) collective reorganization involving the extension of cryptic lamellipodia that extend, on average, up to 3 cell diameters from the site of injury and morphometric changes in the basal regions. Our model also suggests that active responses (like the actomyosin purse string and softening of cell-cell junctions) are needed to drive morphometric changes in the apical region. Therefore, our results highlight the importance of the crosstalk between junctional biomechanics, cell substrate adhesion, and CIL, as well as active responses, in guiding the collective rearrangements that are required to preserve the epithelial barrier in response to injury.

  1. A novel method for isolation of epithelial cells from ovine esophagus for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macheiner, Tanja; Kuess, Anna; Dye, Julian; Saxena, Amulya K

    2014-01-01

    The yield of a critical number of basal epithelial cells with high mitotic rates from native tissue is a challenge in the field of tissue engineering. There are many protocols that use enzymatic methods for isolation of epithelial cells with unsatisfactory results for tissue engineering. This study aimed to develop a protocol for isolating a sufficient number of epithelial cells with a high Proliferating Index from ovine esophagus for tissue engineering applications. Esophageal mucosa was pretreated with dispase-collagenase solution and plated on collagen-coated culture dishes. Distinction of the various types of epithelial cells and developmental stages was done with specific primary antibodies to Cytokeratins and to Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA). Up to approximately 8100 epithelial cells/mm2 of mucosa tissue were found after one week of migration. Cytokeratin 14 (CK 14) was positive identified in cells even after 83 days. At the same time the Proliferating Index was 71%. Our protocol for isolation of basal epithelial cells was successful to yield sufficient numbers of cells predominantly with proliferative character and without noteworthy negative enzymatic affection. The results at this study offer the possibility of generation critical cell numbers for tissue engineering applications.

  2. Interactions between Bmp-4 and Msx-1 act to restrict gene expression to odontogenic mesenchyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, A S; Al Khamis, A; Sharpe, P T

    1998-08-01

    Tooth development is regulated by a reciprocal series of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Bmp4 has been identified as a candidate signalling molecule in these interactions, initially as an epithelial signal and then later at the bud stage as a mesenchymal signal (Vainio et al. [1993] Cell 75:45-58). A target gene for Bmp4 signalling is the homeobox gene Msx-1, identified by the ability of recombinant Bmp4 protein to induce expression in mesenchyme. There is, however, no evidence that Bmp4 is the endogenous inducer of Msx-1 expression. Msx-1 and Bmp-4 show dynamic, interactive patterns of expression in oral epithelium and ectomesenchyme during the early stages of tooth development. In this study, we compare the temporal and spatial expression of these two genes to determine whether the changing expression patterns of these genes are consistent with interactions between the two molecules. We show that changes in Bmp-4 expression precede changes in Msx-1 expression. At embryonic day (E)10.5-E11.0, expression patterns are consistent with BMP4 from the epithelium, inducing or maintaining Msx-1 in underlying mesenchyme. At E11.5, Bmp-4 expression shifts from epithelium to mesenchyme and is rapidly followed by localised up-regulation of Msx-1 expression at the sites of Bmp-4 expression. Using cultured explants of developing mandibles, we confirm that exogenous BMP4 is capable of replacing the endogenous source in epithelium and inducing Msx-1 gene expression in mesenchyme. By using noggin, a BMP inhibitor, we show that endogenous Msx-1 expression can be inhibited at E10.5 and E11.5, providing the first evidence that endogenous Bmp-4 from the epithelium is responsible for regulating the early spatial expression of Msx-1. We also show that the mesenchymal shift in Bmp-4 is responsible for up-regulating Msx-1 specifically at the sites of future tooth formation. Thus, we establish that a reciprocal series of interactions act to restrict expression of both genes to future

  3. Biological effects of desert dust in respiratory epithelial cells and a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract As a result of the challenge of recent dust storms to public health, we tested the postulate that desert dust collected in the southwestern United States could impact a biological effect in respiratory epithelial cells and an animal model. Two samples of surface sedime...

  4. Determining adaptive and adverse oxidative stress responses in human bronical epithelial cells exposed to zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determining adaptive and adverse oxidative stress responses in human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to zincJenna M. Currier1,2, Wan-Yun Cheng1, Rory Conolly1, Brian N. Chorley1Zinc is a ubiquitous contaminant of ambient air that presents an oxidant challenge to the human lung...

  5. Emergent material properties of developing epithelial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Pedro F; Duque, Julia; Étienne, Jocelyn; Martinez-Arias, Alfonso; Blanchard, Guy B; Gorfinkiel, Nicole

    2015-11-23

    Force generation and the material properties of cells and tissues are central to morphogenesis but remain difficult to measure in vivo. Insight is often limited to the ratios of mechanical properties obtained through disruptive manipulation, and the appropriate models relating stress and strain are unknown. The Drosophila amnioserosa epithelium progressively contracts over 3 hours of dorsal closure, during which cell apices exhibit area fluctuations driven by medial myosin pulses with periods of 1.5-6 min. Linking these two timescales and understanding how pulsatile contractions drive morphogenetic movements is an urgent challenge. We present a novel framework to measure in a continuous manner the mechanical properties of epithelial cells in the natural context of a tissue undergoing morphogenesis. We show that the relationship between apicomedial myosin fluorescence intensity and strain during fluctuations is consistent with a linear behaviour, although with a lag. We thus used myosin fluorescence intensity as a proxy for active force generation and treated cells as natural experiments of mechanical response under cyclic loading, revealing unambiguous mechanical properties from the hysteresis loop relating stress to strain. Amnioserosa cells can be described as a contractile viscoelastic fluid. We show that their emergent mechanical behaviour can be described by a linear viscoelastic rheology at timescales relevant for tissue morphogenesis. For the first time, we establish relative changes in separate effective mechanical properties in vivo. Over the course of dorsal closure, the tissue solidifies and effective stiffness doubles as net contraction of the tissue commences. Combining our findings with those from previous laser ablation experiments, we show that both apicomedial and junctional stress also increase over time, with the relative increase in apicomedial stress approximately twice that of other obtained measures. Our results show that in an epithelial

  6. Primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma arising in an odontogenic keratocyst previously treated with marsupialization: case report and immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Martínez, Marisol; Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto; Delgado-Azañero, Wilson; Rumayor-Piña, Alicia; de Almeida, Oslei Paes

    2016-04-01

    A rare case of primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma arising in an odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is presented here, with the clinical and histologic features of the first biopsy showing characteristics of OKC and the second biopsy disclosing a squamous cell carcinoma. Immunoprofile of this case was compared with five cases of classical OKC by using cytokeratins CK5, CK14, and CK19, CD138, p63, Ki-67, p53, and bcl-2. Classic OKCs showed expected positivity, mainly in the basal and/or suprabasal layers with most antibodies, except for p53, which was negative, whereas the present case showed irregular positivity in all layers, indicating that this can be useful for differential diagnosis and suggesting a possible role in malignant transformation into primary intraosseous squamous cell carcinoma. In conclusion, immunohistochemical differences between the first biopsy of the present case and classic OKC suggest that immunohistochemistry can be helpful in cases with areas of subtle initial malignant transformation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Outcome after 8 years of a modified conservative treatment experience in keratocystic odontogenic tumor in 5 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Peraza, DDS, Ms

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT according to WHO classification comprises approximately 12% of all tumors of the jaw. The pathognomonic microscopic findings are the parakeratin at the superficial layer. Their clinical and radiographic presentation is variable, showing different degrees of aggressive behavior and recurrences. We present a retrospective study with a modified conservative approach for the treatment of the KCOT. Five patients between 16 and 23 years old were treated in 2009. These presented radiologic features suggestive of KCOT such as unilocular lesions in the mandible. The diagnosis was confirmed by incisional biopsy and histopathological study of every lesion. The treatment performed was: Carnoy's solution by 5 minutes without chloroform and decompression with plastic stents from 7 to 11 months, switching the position of the stents once bone formation was evident, Carnoy's again for 3 minutes, enucleation, peripheral ostectomy, and concomitant xenograft. All the patients underwent simultaneous xenograft reconstruction after enucleation. Recurrence was negative after 8 years of follow up. No patient showed infection or fracture, only 1 reported discomfort with the stent. The modified treatment in our study suggests that this protocol so far has a low recurrence rate. The commitment of the patient is important for the long-term follow up and treatment.

  8. La extracción dentaria en la celulitis facial odontogénica Dental extraction in odontogenic facial cellulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro A Ducasse Olivera

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio retrospectivo de los pacientes ingresados en el Hospital "Héroes del Baire" con el diagnóstico de celulitis facial odontogénica, con el objetivo de caracterizar la celulitis facial en nuestro medio, así como el nivel de conocimiento de los estomatólogos y la población tiene de esta. Se obtuvieron los siguientes resultados: el sexo masculino y la región mandibular en pacientes de 15 a 29 años fueron los mas afectados. El antibiótico más utilizado fue la penicilina, y predominaron los casos moderados y leves. El nivel de información sobre el tema de los estomatólogos es adecuado, no así el de la población, que es deficiente.A retrospective study of patients admitted to "Heroes del Baire" hospital and diagnosed with odontogenic facial cellulitis was undertaken to characterize facial cellulitis behavior under our conditions as well as the level of knowledge by dentists and the population about this entity. The results were as follows: males and the mandibular region in 15-29 years-old patients were the most affected, penicillin was the most used antibiotic and moderate and mild cases predominated. The level of knowledge by dentists was adequate; however that of the population was poor.

  9. 10-year follow-up of calcifying odontogenic cyst in the periapical region of vital maxillary central incisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalhosa, Artur Aburad; de Araújo Estrela, Cyntia Rodrigues; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Guedes, Orlando Aguirre; Estrela, Carlos

    2014-10-01

    Radiographic images may lead to misinterpretations of lesions of endodontic and nonendodontic origin. This report describes a case of a 10-year follow-up of a calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) in the periapical region of a vital maxillary central incisor in a 9-year-old boy. The patient revealed a history of a swelling in the periapical area of tooth #9. The patient denied any dental trauma or history of pain. Clinical examination revealed no mobility, but there was discrete discomfort when horizontal pressure was applied. Pulp vitality was present in all maxillary anterior teeth. Radiographs revealed an oval radiolucent lesion in the periapical region of maxillary central incisor. The therapeutic option was enucleation of the periapical lesion and histologic examination of the specimen. Microscopic findings suggested the diagnosis of a COC. At a follow-up visit 10 years after surgery, panoramic and periapical radiographs showed new bone formation; the patient did not have any pain, and pulp vitality was maintained in all teeth in this area. A COC should be part of the differential diagnosis of other jaw lesions, such as apical periodontitis. The definitive diagnosis of a COC can only be made after microscopic evaluation of the specimen. The follow-up is a helpful reference because it confirms the survival of pulp tissue and no recurrence of the COC. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Computed tomographic anatomy of the mandibular first and second molars and their surrounding structures in the spread of odontogenic infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshima, Aya; Ariji, Yoshiko; Gotoh, Masakazu; Izumi, Masahiro; Naitoh, Munetaka; Kurita, Kenichi; Shimozato, Kazuo; Ariji, Eiichiro

    2009-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to analyze the CT anatomy of the mandibular first and second molars in uninfected subjects and to clarify the pathway of odontogenic infection originating from the mandibular first and second molars. CT anatomies, especially for bucco-lingual aspects and the surrounding soft tissues, were investigated in 100 uninfected subjects and 17 infected patients. At the level of bifurcation, disappearance of the cortical plates was frequently observed on the buccal and lingual sides of the first molars, and it was reduced on the buccal side in the second molar. In the first molar, the bony width was thinner on the buccal than the lingual side. The lingual cortices were thinner in the second molar. All medial pterygoid and 88% of masseter muscles were situated posteriorly, without horizontally overlapping the second molar, whereas the mylohyoid muscle (MhM) overlapped horizontally with the first and second molars. The MhM was positioned superior to the root apices in 10 and 39% of first and second molars, respectively. All patients with first molar infection showed involvement of buccal structures, and one showed lingual side involvement. In contrast, six of nine patients with second molar infection showed involvement on the lingual side. Infection originating from the second molar was more likely to spread to the lingual side than infection originating from the first molar. CT anatomy surrounding the causal teeth supported the spread pathways of mandibular first and second molar infection. (author)

  11. Patterning bacterial communities on epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Dwidar

    Full Text Available Micropatterning of bacteria using aqueous two phase system (ATPS enables the localized culture and formation of physically separated bacterial communities on human epithelial cell sheets. This method was used to compare the effects of Escherichia coli strain MG1655 and an isogenic invasive counterpart that expresses the invasin (inv gene from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis on the underlying epithelial cell layer. Large portions of the cell layer beneath the invasive strain were killed or detached while the non-invasive E. coli had no apparent effect on the epithelial cell layer over a 24 h observation period. In addition, simultaneous testing of the localized effects of three different bacterial species; E. coli MG1655, Shigella boydii KACC 10792 and Pseudomonas sp DSM 50906 on an epithelial cell layer is also demonstrated. The paper further shows the ability to use a bacterial predator, Bdellovibriobacteriovorus HD 100, to selectively remove the E. coli, S. boydii and P. sp communities from this bacteria-patterned epithelial cell layer. Importantly, predation and removal of the P. Sp was critical for maintaining viability of the underlying epithelial cells. Although this paper focuses on a few specific cell types, the technique should be broadly applicable to understand a variety of bacteria-epithelial cell interactions.

  12. Basolateral BMP signaling in polarized epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masao Saitoh

    Full Text Available Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs regulate various biological processes, mostly mediated by cells of mesenchymal origin. However, the roles of BMPs in epithelial cells are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that, in polarized epithelial cells, BMP signals are transmitted from BMP receptor complexes exclusively localized at the basolateral surface of the cell membrane. In addition, basolateral stimulation with BMP increased expression of components of tight junctions and enhanced the transepithelial resistance (TER, counteracting reduction of TER by treatment with TGF-β or an anti-tumor drug. We conclude that BMPs maintain epithelial polarity via intracellular signaling from basolaterally localized BMP receptors.

  13. Membrane lipidome of an epithelial cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sampaio, Julio L; Gerl, Mathias J; Klose, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Tissue differentiation is an important process that involves major cellular membrane remodeling. We used Madin-Darby canine kidney cells as a model for epithelium formation and investigated the remodeling of the total cell membrane lipidome during the transition from a nonpolarized morphology...... to an epithelial morphology and vice versa. To achieve this, we developed a shotgun-based lipidomics workflow that enabled the absolute quantification of mammalian membrane lipidomes with minimal sample processing from low sample amounts. Epithelial morphogenesis was accompanied by a major shift from sphingomyelin...... to generate an apical membrane domain that serves as a protective barrier for the epithelial sheet....

  14. Epithelial cell polarity, stem cells and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin-Belmonte, Fernando; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2011-01-01

    , deregulation of adhesion and polarity proteins can cause misoriented cell divisions and increased self-renewal of adult epithelial stem cells. In this Review, we highlight some advances in the understanding of how loss of epithelial cell polarity contributes to tumorigenesis.......After years of extensive scientific discovery much has been learned about the networks that regulate epithelial homeostasis. Loss of expression or functional activity of cell adhesion and cell polarity proteins (including the PAR, crumbs (CRB) and scribble (SCRIB) complexes) is intricately related...

  15. Epithelial-mesenchymal Transition---A Hallmark of Breast Cancer Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifan; Zhou, Binhua P

    2013-03-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a highly conserved cellular program that converts polarized, immotile epithelial cells to migratory mesenchymal cells. In addition, EMT was initially recognized as a key step for morphogenesis during embryonic development. Emerging evidences indicate that this important developmental program promotes metastasis, drug resistance, and tumor recurrence, features that are associated with a poor clinical outcome for patients with breast cancer. Therefore, better understanding of regulation and signaling pathways in EMT is essential to develop novel targeted therapeutics. In this review, we present updated developments underlying EMT in tumor progression and metastasis, and discuss the challenges remaining in breast cancer research.

  16. Diagnostic challenges of nonodontogenic toothache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Ok Park

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article was to present two nonodontogenic conditions that may mimic odontogenic toothache: trigeminal neuralgia and burning mouth syndrome. Two cases are presented in which one is related to the upper left second premolar and the other is related to the upper left first molar. Both showed pain when chewing. These two cases highlight the complexities involved in diagnosing nonodontogenic toothache. This article demonstrates the importance of having a thorough knowledge of both odontogenic and nonodontogenic toothache, as well as the need for careful evaluation of the nature of the pain and history, clinical and radiographic examinations.

  17. A novel PTCH1 gene mutation in a pediatric patient associated multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors of the jaws and Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Gozde; Balta, Burhan; Sekerci, Ahmet Ercan; Etoz, Osman A; Martinuzzi, Claudia; Kara, Ozlem; Pastorino, Lorenza; Kocoglu, Fatma; Ulker, Omer; Erdogan, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS) is an uncommon autosomal dominant inherited disorder which comprises the triad of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), odontogenic keratocysts, and musculoskeletal malformations. Besides this triad, neurological, ophthalmic, endocrine, and genital manifestations are known to be variable. It is occasionally associated with aggressive BCC and internal malignancies. This report documents a case of GGS with a novel mutation in the PTCH1 gene in an 11-year-old child. The clinical, radiographic, histopathologic and molecular findings of this condition, and treatment are described, and a review of GGS was carried out.

  18. A novel PTCH1 gene mutation in a pediatric patient associated multiple keratocystic odontogenic tumors of the jaws and Gorlin–Goltz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gozde Ozcan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin–Goltz syndrome (GGS is an uncommon autosomal dominant inherited disorder which comprises the triad of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs, odontogenic keratocysts, and musculoskeletal malformations. Besides this triad, neurological, ophthalmic, endocrine, and genital manifestations are known to be variable. It is occasionally associated with aggressive BCC and internal malignancies. This report documents a case of GGS with a novel mutation in the PTCH1 gene in an 11-year-old child. The clinical, radiographic, histopathologic and molecular findings of this condition, and treatment are described, and a review of GGS was carried out.

  19. Andrographolide suppresses epithelial mesenchymal transition by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-04-27

    Apr 27, 2015 ... by inhibition of MAPK signalling pathway in lens epithelial cells. FORUM KAYASTHA ... 1Iladevi Cataract and IOL Research Centre, Gurukul road, Memnagar, Ahmedabad 380 052, India ...... sition and the stem cell phenotype.

  20. Thymic epithelial cells. I. Expression of strong suppressive (veto) activity in mouse thymic epithelial cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Ropke, C

    1990-01-01

    We show that thymic epithelial cells grown under serum-free conditions in a chemically defined culture medium can act as veto cells in vitro. The veto activity of thymic epithelial cells results in inactivation of specific alloreactive cytotoxic T-cell precursors at the clonal level. It is conclu......We show that thymic epithelial cells grown under serum-free conditions in a chemically defined culture medium can act as veto cells in vitro. The veto activity of thymic epithelial cells results in inactivation of specific alloreactive cytotoxic T-cell precursors at the clonal level...

  1. DNA repair in human bronchial epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornace, A.J. Jr.; Lechner, J.F.; Grafstrom, R.C.; Harris, C.C.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the response of human cell types (bronchial epithelial cells and fibroblasts and skin fibroblasts) to various DNA damaging agents. Repair of DNA single strand breaks (SSB) induced by 5 krads of X-ray was similar for all cell types; approximately 90% of the DNA SSB were rejoined within one hour. During excision repair of DNA damage from u.v.-radiation, the frequencies of DNA SSB as estimated by the alkaline elution technique, were similar in all cell types. Repair replication as measured by BND cellulose chromatography was also similar in epithelial and fibroblastic cells after u.v.-irradiation. Similar levels of SSB were also observed in epithelial and fibroblastic cells after exposure to chemical carcinogens: 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene; benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE); or N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Significant repair replication of BPDE-induced DNA damage was detected in both bronchial epithelial and fibroblastic cells, although the level in fibroblasts was approximately 40% of that in epithelial cells. The pulmonary carcinogen asbestos did not damage DNA. DNA-protein crosslinks induced by formaldehyde were rapidly removed in bronchial cells. Further, epithelial and fibroblastic cells, which were incubated with formaldehyde and the polymerase inhibitor combination of cytosine arabinoside and hydroxyurea, accumulated DNA SSB at approximately equal frequencies. These results should provide a useful background for further investigations of the response of human bronchial cells to various DNA damaging agents

  2. Portable OCT-assisted surgical treatment of intracorneal pre-Descemet epithelial cyst: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Woo; Kim, Eung Kweon

    2017-08-29

    Intracorneal epithelial cysts are a rare clinical condition that can occur anywhere in the corneal tissue; however, they appear most commonly in the stroma. They are sometimes challenging to treat because of their location, depth, and visual outcomes. Herein, we report a pre-Descemet epithelial cyst that was successfully treated surgically, with guidance from Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT). This interventional case report presents a patient with gradually decreasing vision caused by a pre-Descemet epithelial cyst. A 4-year-old girl with no history of trauma or ocular surgery showed a deep-seated intracorneal cyst in her left eye (8 o'clock corneoscleral area, dissecting into the pre-Descemet cornea). The cyst was threatening the visual axis. An epithelial cyst was diagnosed after drainage on the basis of the cyst contents. We irrigated inside the cyst using 10% trichloroacetic acid (TCA), distilled water, and 1% 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) solutions for chemical cyto-destruction of the lining epithelial cells of the cystic wall. We used a portable FD-OCT during operation to guide this procedure, without perforating the Descemet's membrane and endothelial layer. Recurrence could be prevented after removal of the cystic tissue located in the sclera area outside of the limbus. No recurrence was noted during the 4-year follow-up. When treating centrally deep-seated intracorneal epithelial cysts, clinicians must consider recurrence, endothelial damage, and visual outcome. Herein we report the case of a deep-seated, intracorneoscleral epithelial cyst that was completely resolved with chemical cyto-destruction and removal of the intrascleral cystic tissue under the guidance with FD-OCT; thus, endothelial damage could be minimized.

  3. Immunohistochemical study of p53 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression in odontogenic keratocyst and periapical cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thara Purath Sajeevan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: p53 protein is a product of p53 gene, which is now classified as a tumor suppressor gene. The gene is a frequent target for mutation, being seen as a common step in the pathogenesis of many human cancers. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA is an auxiliary protein of DNA polymerase delta and plays a critical role in initiation of cell proliferation. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess and compare the expression of p53 and PCNA in lining epithelium of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC and periapical cyst (PA. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 cases comprising 10 OKC and 10 PA were included in retrospective study. Three paraffin section of 4 μm were cut, one was used for routine hematoxylin and eosin stain, while the other two were used for immunohistochemistry. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi-square test. Results: The level of staining and intensity were assessed in all these cases. OKC showed PCNA expression in all cases (100%, whereas in perapical cyst only 60% of cases exhibited PCNA staining. (1 OKC showed p53 expression in 6 cases (60% whereas in PA only 10% of the cases exhibited p53 staining. Chi-square test showed PCNA staining intensity was more significant than p53 in OKC. (2 The staining intensity of PA using p53, PCNA revealed that PCNA stating intensity was more significant than p53. Conclusion: OKC shows significant proliferative activity than PA using PCNA and p53. PCNA staining was more intense when compared with p53 in both OKC and PA.

  4. Immunohistochemical study of p53 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression in odontogenic keratocyst and periapical cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajeevan, Thara Purath; Saraswathi, Tillai Rajasekaran; Ranganathan, Kannan; Joshua, Elizabeth; Rao, Uma Devi K

    2014-07-01

    p53 protein is a product of p53 gene, which is now classified as a tumor suppressor gene. The gene is a frequent target for mutation, being seen as a common step in the pathogenesis of many human cancers. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is an auxiliary protein of DNA polymerase delta and plays a critical role in initiation of cell proliferation. The aim of this study is to assess and compare the expression of p53 and PCNA in lining epithelium of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) and periapical cyst (PA). A total of 20 cases comprising 10 OKC and 10 PA were included in retrospective study. Three paraffin section of 4 μm were cut, one was used for routine hematoxylin and eosin stain, while the other two were used for immunohistochemistry. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi-square test. The level of staining and intensity were assessed in all these cases. OKC showed PCNA expression in all cases (100%), whereas in perapical cyst only 60% of cases exhibited PCNA staining. (1) OKC showed p53 expression in 6 cases (60%) whereas in PA only 10% of the cases exhibited p53 staining. Chi-square test showed PCNA staining intensity was more significant than p53 in OKC. (2) The staining intensity of PA using p53, PCNA revealed that PCNA stating intensity was more significant than p53. OKC shows significant proliferative activity than PA using PCNA and p53. PCNA staining was more intense when compared with p53 in both OKC and PA.

  5. Bacterial Signaling at the Intestinal Epithelial Interface in Inflammation and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia I. Coleman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal (GI tract provides a compartmentalized interface with an enormous repertoire of immune and metabolic activities, where the multicellular structure of the mucosa has acquired mechanisms to sense luminal factors, such as nutrients, microbes, and a variety of host-derived and microbial metabolites. The GI tract is colonized by a complex ecosystem of microorganisms, which have developed a highly coevolved relationship with the host’s cellular and immune system. Intestinal epithelial pattern recognition receptors (PRRs substantially contribute to tissue homeostasis and immune surveillance. The role of bacteria-derived signals in intestinal epithelial homeostasis and repair has been addressed in mouse models deficient in PRRs and signaling adaptors. While critical for host physiology and the fortification of barrier function, the intestinal microbiota poses a considerable health challenge. Accumulating evidence indicates that dysbiosis is associated with the pathogenesis of numerous GI tract diseases, including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD and colorectal cancer (CRC. Aberrant signal integration at the epithelial cell level contributes to such diseases. An increased understanding of bacterial-specific structure recognition and signaling mechanisms at the intestinal epithelial interface is of great importance in the translation to future treatment strategies. In this review, we summarize the growing understanding of the regulation and function of the intestinal epithelial barrier, and discuss microbial signaling in the dynamic host–microbe mutualism in both health and disease.

  6. Cognitive Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Privacy Policy Sitemap Learn Engage Donate About TSC Cognitive Challenges Approximately 45% to 60% of individuals with TSC develop cognitive challenges (intellectual disabilities), although the degree of intellectual ...

  7. Masticator space abscess derived from odontogenic infection: imaging manifestation and pathways of extension depicted by CT and MR in 30 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuknecht, B.; Stergiou, G.; Graetz, K.

    2008-01-01

    Propagation of odontogenic masticator space abscesses is insufficiently understood. The purpose was to analyse pathways of spread in 30 patients with odontogenic masticator space abscess. The imaging findings in 30 patients (CT in 30, MR in 16 patients) were retrospectively analysed. CT and MR imaging depicted a masticator space abscess within: medial pterygoid muscle in 13 patients (43.3%), lateral masseter and/or pterygoid muscle in 14 (46.7%) and superficial temporal muscle in 3 patients (10%). In the lateral masticator space intra-spatial abscess extension occurred in 7 of 14 patients (50%). The sub-masseteric space provided a pathway in seven (70%). Extra-spatial extension involved the submandibular space only in 3 of 14 patients (21.4%). Medial masticator space abscesses exhibited extra-spatial spread only. Extension affected the parapharyngeal space and/or soft palate in 7 of 13 lesions (53.8%). MR imaging in comparison to CT increased the number of abscess locations from 18 to 23 (27.8%) and regions affected by a cellular infiltrate from 12 to 16 (33.3%). The sub-masseteric space served as a previously underestimated pathway for intra-spatial propagation of lateral masticator abscesses. Medial masticator space abscesses tend to display early extra-spatial parapharyngeal space and/or soft palate extension. (orig.)

  8. Necrotizing odontogenic fasciitis of head and neck extending to anterior mediastinum in elderly patients: innovative treatment with a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Antonio; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Borri, Antonio; Amato, Massimo; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2017-02-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) of odontogenic origin affecting the head and neck region is a rare but serious clinical condition, which, if diagnosed late, can lead to a fatal outcome. The early diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis can be difficult. Delay in diagnosis leads to increase in the area of necrosis with a resulting increase in cosmetic deformity and life-threatening complication. In this study, we present two cases of elderly patients with aggressive NF affecting the neck and anterior mediastinum, which were of odontogenic origin. In the two patients selected necrotic skin and soft tissue were removed and wide exposure was achieved with debridement of the neck at the level of the affected layer of superficial cervical fascia. Saline solution was used as irrigation to treat the patients with acute necrotizing fasciitis. Difficulties in managing this condition with NF extent to deep anterior mediastinum is related to clavicle osteotomy or thoracotomy need with high surgical risks. In our technique, by gentle suction in anterior mediastinum, necrotic tissue resection was possible without any osteotomy need. Suctioning resection technique associated with hyperbaric, metabolic rebalance, and amino acid support in association with three types antibiotic therapy are fundamental points for correct therapy strategy, leading to full recovery and healing of NF patients even if in very unfavorable conditions. Multidisciplinary approach is paramount for proper treatment of this disease.

  9. Five years follow-up of a keratocyst odontogenic tumor treated by marsupialization and enucleation: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Scaf de Molon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontogenic cysts are considered as nonneoplasic benign lesions. Among the cysts, keratocyst odontogenic tumor (KCOT is an intra-osseous tumor characterized by parakeratinized stratified squamous epithelium and a potential for aggressive, infiltrative behavior, and for the possibility to develop carcinomas in the lesion wall. Thus, the aim of this study was to describe a clinical case of KCOT in a young patient and discuss the treatment alternatives to solve this case. A 15-year-old male was referred for treatment of a giant lesion in his left side of the mandible. After the biopsy, a diagnostic of KCOT was made, and the following procedures were planned for KCOT treatment. Marsupialization was performed for lesion decompression and consequent lesion size reduction. Afterward, enucleation for complete KCOT removal was performed followed by third mandibular molar extraction. After 5 years, no signs of recurrence were observed. The treatment proposed was efficient in removing the KCOT with minimal surgical morbidity and optimal healing process, and the first and second mandibular molars were preserved with pulp vitality. In conclusion, this treatment protocol was an effective and conservative approach for the management of the KCOT, enabling the reduction of the initial lesion, the preservation of anatomical structures and teeth, allowing quicker return to function. No signs of recurrence after 5 years were observed.

  10. Five years follow-up of a keratocyst odontogenic tumor treated by marsupialization and enucleation: A case report and literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Molon, Rafael Scaf; Verzola, Mario H.; Pires, Luana C.; Mascarenhas, Vinicius I.; da Silva, Rodrigo B.; Cirelli, Joni A.; Barbeiro, Roberto H.

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic cysts are considered as nonneoplasic benign lesions. Among the cysts, keratocyst odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is an intra-osseous tumor characterized by parakeratinized stratified squamous epithelium and a potential for aggressive, infiltrative behavior, and for the possibility to develop carcinomas in the lesion wall. Thus, the aim of this study was to describe a clinical case of KCOT in a young patient and discuss the treatment alternatives to solve this case. A 15-year-old male was referred for treatment of a giant lesion in his left side of the mandible. After the biopsy, a diagnostic of KCOT was made, and the following procedures were planned for KCOT treatment. Marsupialization was performed for lesion decompression and consequent lesion size reduction. Afterward, enucleation for complete KCOT removal was performed followed by third mandibular molar extraction. After 5 years, no signs of recurrence were observed. The treatment proposed was efficient in removing the KCOT with minimal surgical morbidity and optimal healing process, and the first and second mandibular molars were preserved with pulp vitality. In conclusion, this treatment protocol was an effective and conservative approach for the management of the KCOT, enabling the reduction of the initial lesion, the preservation of anatomical structures and teeth, allowing quicker return to function. No signs of recurrence after 5 years were observed. PMID:25821360

  11. Surfactant protein D attenuates sub-epithelial fibrosis in allergic airways disease through TGF-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Hirohisa; Ledford, Julie G; Mukherjee, Sambuddho; Aono, Yoshinori; Nishioka, Yasuhiko; Lee, James J; Izumi, Keisuke; Hollingsworth, John W

    2014-11-29

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) can regulate both innate and adaptive immunity. Recently, SP-D has been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of airway allergic inflammation and bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. However, in allergic airways disease, the role of SP-D in airway remodeling remains unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the contribution of functional SP-D in regulating sub-epithelial fibrosis in a mouse chronic house dust mite model of allergic airways disease. C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and SP-D-/- mice (C57BL/6 background) were chronically challenged with house dust mite antigen (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dp). Studies with SP-D rescue and neutralization of TGF-β were conducted. Lung histopathology and the concentrations of collagen, growth factors, and cytokines present in the airspace and lung tissue were determined. Cultured eosinophils were stimulated by Dp in presence or absence of SP-D. Dp-challenged SP-D-/- mice demonstrate increased sub-epithelial fibrosis, collagen production, eosinophil infiltration, TGF-β1, and IL-13 production, when compared to Dp-challenged WT mice. By immunohistology, we detected an increase in TGF-β1 and IL-13 positive eosinophils in SP-D-/- mice. Purified eosinophils stimulated with Dp produced TGF-β1 and IL-13, which was prevented by co-incubation with SP-D. Additionally, treatment of Dp challenged SP-D-/- mice with exogenous SP-D was able to rescue the phenotypes observed in SP-D-/- mice and neutralization of TGF-β1 reduced sub-epithelial fibrosis in Dp-challenged SP-D-/- mice. These data support a protective role for SP-D in the pathogenesis of sub-epithelial fibrosis in a mouse model of allergic inflammation through regulation of eosinophil-derived TGF-β.

  12. Human glomerular epithelial cell proteoglycans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, G.J.; Jenner, L.; Mason, R.M.; Davies, M.

    1990-01-01

    Proteoglycans synthesized by cultures of human glomerular epithelial cells have been isolated and characterized. Three types of heparan sulfate were detected. Heparan sulfate proteoglycan I (HSPG-I; Kav 6B 0.04) was found in the cell layer and medium and accounted for 12% of the total proteoglycans synthesized. HSPG-II (Kav 6B 0.25) accounted for 18% of the proteoglycans and was located in the medium and cell layer. A third population (9% of the proteoglycan population), heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycan (HS-GAG; Kav 6B 0.4-0.8), had properties consistent with single glycosaminoglycan chains or their fragments and was found only in the cell layer. HSPG-I and HSPG-II from the cell layer had hydrophobic properties; they were released from the cell layer by mild trypsin treatment. HS-GAG lacked these properties, consisted of low-molecular-mass heparan sulfate oligosaccharides, and were intracellular. HSPG-I and -II released to the medium lacked hydrophobic properties. The cells also produced three distinct types of chondroitin sulfates. The major species, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan I (CSPG-I) eluted in the excluded volume of a Sepharose CL-6B column, accounted for 30% of the proteoglycans detected, and was found in both the cell layer and medium. Cell layer CSPG-I bound to octyl-Sepharose. It was released from the cell layer by mild trypsin treatment. CSPG-II (Kav 6B 0.1-0.23) accounted for 10% of the total 35S-labeled macromolecules and was found predominantly in the culture medium. A small amount of CS-GAG (Kav 6B 0.25-0.6) is present in the cell extract and like HS-GAG is intracellular. Pulse-chase experiments indicated that HSPG-I and -II and CSPG-I and -II are lost from the cell layer either by direct release into the medium or by internalization where they are metabolized to single glycosaminoglycan chains and subsequently to inorganic sulfate

  13. Studying cytokinesis in Drosophila epithelial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, D; Bellaïche, Y

    2017-01-01

    Epithelial tissue cohesiveness is ensured through cell-cell junctions that maintain both adhesion and mechanical coupling between neighboring cells. During development, epithelial tissues undergo intensive cell proliferation. Cell division, and particularly cytokinesis, is coupled to the formation of new adhesive contacts, thereby preserving tissue integrity and propagating cell polarity. Remarkably, the geometry of the new interfaces is determined by the combined action of the dividing cell and its neighbors. To further understand the interplay between the dividing cell and its neighbors, as well as the role of cell division for tissue morphogenesis, it is important to analyze cytokinesis in vivo. Here we present methods to perform live imaging of cell division in Drosophila epithelial tissues and discuss some aspects of image processing and analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Surgical management of anterior chamber epithelial cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Julia A; Stark, Walter J; Azab, Amr; Thomsen, Robert W; Gottsch, John D

    2003-03-01

    To review management strategies for treatment of anterior chamber epithelial cysts. Retrospective review of consecutive interventional case series. Charts of patients treated for epithelial ingrowth over a 10-year period by a single surgeon were reviewed. Cases of anterior chamber epithelial cysts were identified and recorded, including details of ocular history, preoperative and postoperative acuity, intraocular pressure (IOP), and ocular examination, type of surgical intervention, and details of further procedures performed. Seven eyes with epithelial cysts were identified. Patient age ranged from 1.5 to 53 years at presentation. Four patients were children. In four eyes, cysts were secondary to trauma, one case was presumably congenital, one case developed after corneal perforation in an eye with Terrien's marginal degeneration, and one case developed after penetrating keratoplasty (PK). Three eyes were treated with vitrectomy, en bloc resection of the cyst and associated tissue, fluid-air exchange and cryotherapy. The last four eyes were treated with a new conservative strategy of cyst aspiration (three cases) or local excision (one keratin "pearl" cyst), and endolaser photocoagulation of the collapsed cyst wall/base. All epithelial tissue was successfully eradicated by clinical criteria; one case required repeat excision (follow-up, 9 to 78 months, mean 45). Two eyes required later surgery for elevated IOP, two for cataract extraction and one for repeat PK. Final visual acuity ranged from 20/20 to hand motions, depending on associated ocular damage. Best-corrected visual results were obtained in the more conservatively managed eyes. Anterior chamber epithelial cysts can be managed conservatively in selected cases with good results. This strategy may be particularly useful in children's eyes, where preservation of the lens, iris, and other structures may facilitate amblyopia management. Copyright 2003 by Elsevier Science Inc.

  15. Phototherapeutic LASEK for a persistent epithelial defect and a recurrent epithelial erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondur, Ahmet; Bilgihan, Kamil; Hasanreisoglu, Berati

    2005-01-01

    To present two patients, one with persistent epithelial defect and one with recurrent epithelial erosion, unresponsive to conventional therapy treated with phototherapeutic keratectomy (PTK) with the laser subepithelial keratomileusis (LASEK) technique (phototherapeutic LASEK). The epithelial flap was created following 18% ethanol application for 20 seconds. A 10-microm deep ablation was performed in the central 7.0-mm zone. A contact lens was placed and the patient examined daily until epithelial closure. Upon epithelial closure, the contact lens was removed. A mild topical steroid and artificial tears were applied for 2 weeks. The epithelium healed in 4 days in both patients. Patients reported only mild pain until epithelial closure. The manifest refraction and uncorrected visual acuity remained unchanged in both eyes. No haze was noted. The first patient has remained asymptomatic without any recurrence for 12 months, and the second for 9 months. Phototherapeutic LASEK provides a therapeutic option for refractory recurrent erosions and persistent epithelial defects, with the additional benefit of being less painful and less risky for haze development than conventional PTK.

  16. Extensive Focal Epithelial Hyperplasia: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Zahra; Bakhtiari, Sedigheh; Noormohamadi, Robab

    2015-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) or Heck's disease is a rare viral infection of the oral mucosa caused by human papilloma virus especially subtypes 13 or 32. The frequency of this disease varies widely from one geographic region and ethnic groups to another. This paper reports an Iranian case of extensive focal epithelial hyperplasia. A 35-year-old man with FEH is described, in whom the lesions had persisted for more than 25 years. The lesion was diagnosed according to both clinical and histopathological features. Dental practitioner should be aware of these types of lesions and histopathological examination together and a careful clinical observation should be carried out for a definitive diagnosis.

  17. Management of herpes simplex virus epithelial keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roozbahani, Mehdi; Hammersmith, Kristin M

    2018-04-24

    To review recent advancements in the management of herpes simplex virus (HSV) epithelial keratitis. Trifluridine eye drop, acyclovir (ACV) ointment, ganciclovir gel, and oral ACV are still the main therapeutic agents. Cryopreserved amniotic membrane has been recently used as an adjuvant treatment. Resistance to ACV has become a concerning issue. The animal models of HSV vaccine are able to reduce HSV keratitis. New antivirals are under development. Current cases of HSV epithelial keratitis are manageable with available medications, but new advancements are required to decrease disease burden in the future. HSV vaccine can be revolutionary.

  18. Segmentation and Quantitative Analysis of Epithelial Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigouy, Benoit; Umetsu, Daiki; Eaton, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Epithelia are tissues that regulate exchanges with the environment. They are very dynamic and can acquire virtually any shape; at the cellular level, they are composed of cells tightly connected by junctions. Most often epithelia are amenable to live imaging; however, the large number of cells composing an epithelium and the absence of informatics tools dedicated to epithelial analysis largely prevented tissue scale studies. Here we present Tissue Analyzer, a free tool that can be used to segment and analyze epithelial cells and monitor tissue dynamics.

  19. Overcoming challenges

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding Overcoming challenges Common questions about breastfeeding and pain Breastfeeding checklist: How to get a good latch Finding ... myths Overcoming challenges Common questions about breastfeeding and pain Breastfeeding checklist: How to get a good latch Finding ...

  20. Overcoming challenges

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... section Back to section menu It's Only Natural Planning ahead Breastfeeding and baby basics Making breastfeeding work ... It's Only Natural Overcoming challenges It's Only Natural Planning ahead Addressing breastfeeding myths Overcoming challenges Common questions ...

  1. A novel network integrating a miRNA-203/SNAI1 feedback loop which regulates epithelial to mesenchymal transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michèle Moes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The majority of human cancer deaths are caused by metastasis. The metastatic dissemination is initiated by the breakdown of epithelial cell homeostasis. During this phenomenon, referred to as epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT, cells change their genetic and trancriptomic program leading to phenotypic and functional alterations. The challenge of understanding this dynamic process resides in unraveling regulatory networks involving master transcription factors (e.g. SNAI1/2, ZEB1/2 and TWIST1 and microRNAs. Here we investigated microRNAs regulated by SNAI1 and their potential role in the regulatory networks underlying epithelial plasticity. RESULTS: By a large-scale analysis on epithelial plasticity, we highlighted miR-203 and its molecular link with SNAI1 and the miR-200 family, key regulators of epithelial homeostasis. During SNAI1-induced EMT in MCF7 breast cancer cells, miR-203 and miR-200 family members were repressed in a timely correlated manner. Importantly, miR-203 repressed endogenous SNAI1, forming a double negative miR203/SNAI1 feedback loop. We integrated this novel miR203/SNAI1 with the known miR200/ZEB feedback loops to construct an a priori EMT core network. Dynamic simulations revealed stable epithelial and mesenchymal states, and underscored the crucial role of the miR203/SNAI1 feedback loop in state transitions underlying epithelial plasticity. CONCLUSION: By combining computational biology and experimental approaches, we propose a novel EMT core network integrating two fundamental negative feedback loops, miR203/SNAI1 and miR200/ZEB. Altogether our analysis implies that this novel EMT core network could function as a switch controlling epithelial cell plasticity during differentiation and cancer progression.

  2. Coronavirus infection of polarized epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, J W; Horzinek, M C; Rottier, P J

    1995-01-01

    Epithelial cells are the first host cells to be infected by incoming c oronaviruses. Recent observations in vitro show that coronaviruses are released from a specific side of these polarized cells, and this polarized release might be important for the spread of the infection in vivo. Mechanisms for

  3. THE BUFFER CAPACITY OF AIRWAY EPITHELIAL SECRETIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusik eKim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The pH of airway epithelial secretions influences bacterial killing and mucus properties and is reduced by acidic pollutants, gastric reflux, and respiratory diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF. The effect of acute acid loads depends on buffer capacity, however the buffering of airway secretions has not been well characterized. In this work we develop a method for titrating micro-scale (30 µl volumes and use it to study fluid secreted by the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3, a widely used model for submucosal gland serous cells. Microtitration curves revealed that HCO3- is the major buffer. Peak buffer capacity (β increased from 17 to 28 mM/pH during forskolin stimulation, and was reduced by >50% in fluid secreted by cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR-deficient Calu-3 monolayers, confirming an important role of CFTR in HCO3- secretion. Back-titration with NaOH revealed non-volatile buffer capacity due to proteins synthesized and released by the epithelial cells. Lysozyme and mucin concentrations were too low to buffer Calu-3 fluid significantly, however model titrations of porcine gastric mucins at concentrations near the sol-gel transition suggest that mucins may contribute to the buffer capacity of ASL in vivo. We conclude that CFTR-dependent HCO3- secretion and epithelially-derived proteins are the predominant buffers in Calu-3 secretions.

  4. Do topical antibiotics help corneal epithelial trauma?

    OpenAIRE

    King, J. W.; Brison, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Topical antibiotics are routinely used in emergency rooms to treat corneal trauma, although no published evidence supports this treatment. In a noncomparative clinical trial, 351 patients with corneal epithelial injuries were treated without antibiotics. The infection rate was 0.7%, suggesting that such injuries can be safely and effectively managed without antibiotics. A comparative clinical trial is neither warranted nor feasible.

  5. Cytokine Tuning of Intestinal Epithelial Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Andrews

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The intestine serves as both our largest single barrier to the external environment and the host of more immune cells than any other location in our bodies. Separating these potential combatants is a single layer of dynamic epithelium composed of heterogeneous epithelial subtypes, each uniquely adapted to carry out a subset of the intestine’s diverse functions. In addition to its obvious role in digestion, the intestinal epithelium is responsible for a wide array of critical tasks, including maintaining barrier integrity, preventing invasion by microbial commensals and pathogens, and modulating the intestinal immune system. Communication between these epithelial cells and resident immune cells is crucial for maintaining homeostasis and coordinating appropriate responses to disease and can occur through cell-to-cell contact or by the release or recognition of soluble mediators. The objective of this review is to highlight recent literature illuminating how cytokines and chemokines, both those made by and acting on the intestinal epithelium, orchestrate many of the diverse functions of the intestinal epithelium and its interactions with immune cells in health and disease. Areas of focus include cytokine control of intestinal epithelial proliferation, cell death, and barrier permeability. In addition, the modulation of epithelial-derived cytokines and chemokines by factors such as interactions with stromal and immune cells, pathogen and commensal exposure, and diet will be discussed.

  6. Heterogeneity of limbal basal epithelial progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Yasutaka; Li, Wei; Chen, Ying-Ting; He, Hua; Chen, Szu-yu; Kheirkah, Ahmad; Zhu, Ying-Tien; Matsumoto, Yukihiro; Tseng, Scheffer C G

    2010-11-01

    Although corneal epithelial stem cells (SCs) are located at the limbus between the cornea and the conjunctiva, not all limbal basal epithelial cells are SCs. Using 2 dispase digestions to remove different amounts of limbal basal epithelial cells for cross-sections, flat mounts, and cytospin preparations, double immunostaining to pancytokeratins (PCK) and vimentin (Vim) identified 3 p63+ epithelial progenitors such as PCK-/Vim+, PCK/Vim, and PCK-/Vim+ and 1 p63+ mesenchymal cell, PCK-/Vim+. PCK-/Vim- progenitors had the smallest cell size were 10-20 times more enriched on collagen I-coated dishes in the 5-minute rapid adherent fraction that contained the highest percentage of p63+ cells but the lowest percentage of cytokeratin12+ cells, and gave rise to high Ki67 labeling and vivid clonal growth. In contrast, PCK+/Vim+ and PCK+/Vim- progenitors were found more in the slow-adherent fraction and yielded poor clonal growth. PCK/Vim progenitors and clusters of PCK-/Vim+ mesenchymal cells, which were neither melanocytes nor Langerhans cells, were located in the limbal basal region. Therefore, differential expression of PCK and Vim helps identify small PCK-/Vim- cells as the most likely candidate for SCs among a hierarchy of heterogeneous limbal basal progenitors, and their close association with PCK-/Vim+ presumed "niche" cells.

  7. Interaction with Epithelial Cells Modifies Airway Macrophage Response to Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    The initial innate immune response to ozone (03) in the lung is orchestrated by structural cells, such as epithelial cells, and resident immune cells, such as airway macrophages (Macs). We developed an epithelial cell-Mac coculture model to investigate how epithelial cell-derived...

  8. Stromal-epithelial interactions in aging and cancer: Senescent fibroblasts alter epithelial cell differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrinello, Simona; Coppe, Jean-Philippe; Krtolica, Ana; Campisi, Judith

    2004-07-14

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cells at risk for malignant tumorigenesis. However, senescent cells also secrete molecules that can stimulate premalignant cells to proliferate and form tumors, suggesting the senescence response is antagonistically pleiotropic. We show that premalignant mammary epithelial cells exposed to senescent human fibroblasts in mice irreversibly lose differentiated properties, become invasive and undergo full malignant transformation. Moreover, using cultured mouse or human fibroblasts and non-malignant breast epithelial cells, we show that senescent fibroblasts disrupt epithelial alveolar morphogenesis, functional differentiation, and branching morphogenesis. Further, we identify MMP-3 as the major factor responsible for the effects of senescent fibroblasts on branching morphogenesis. Our findings support the idea that senescent cells contribute to age-related pathology, including cancer, and describe a new property of senescent fibroblasts--the ability to alter epithelial differentiation--that might also explain the loss of tissue function and organization that is a hallmark of aging.

  9. Slit2 ameliorates renal inflammation and fibrosis after hypoxia-and lipopolysaccharide-induced epithelial cells injury in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xiangjun [Department of Urology, Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Hubei (China); Yao, Qisheng, E-mail: yymcyqs@126.com [Department of Urology, Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Hubei (China); Sun, Xinbo; Gong, Xiaoxin; Yang, Yong; Chen, Congbo [Department of Urology, Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Hubei (China); Shan, Guang [Department of Urology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Hubei (China)

    2017-03-01

    Hypoxic acute kidney injury (AKI) is often incompletely repaired and leads to chronic kidney disease (CKD), which is characterized by tubulointerstitial inflammation and fibrosis. The Slit2 family of secreted glycoproteins is expressed in the kidney, it has been shown to exert an anti-inflammatory activity and prevent ischemic renal injury in vivo. However, whether Slit2 reduces renal fibrosis and inflammation after hypoxic and inflammatory epithelial cells injury in vitro remains unknown. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether Slit2 ameliorated fibrosis and inflammation in two renal epithelial cells line challenged with hypoxia and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Renal epithelial cells were treated with hypoxia and LPS to induce cell injury. Hoechst staining and Western blot analysis was conducted to examine epithelial cells injury. Immunofluorescence staining and Western blot analysis was performed to evaluate tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tested the inflammatory factor interleukin (IL)−1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and Western blot analysis determined the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)−1α, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Results revealed that hypoxia induced epithelial cells apoptosis, inflammatory factor IL-1β and TNF-α release and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. LPS could exacerbate hypoxia -induced epithelial cells apoptosis, IL-1β and TNF-α release and fibrosis. Slit2 reduced the expression of fibronectin, the rate of epithelial cell apoptosis, and the expression of inflammatory factor. Slit2 could also inhibit the expression of TLR4 and NF-κB, but not the expression of HIF-1α. Therefore, Slit2 attenuated inflammation and fibrosis after LPS- and hypoxia-induced epithelial cells injury via the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway, but not depending on the HIF-1α signaling pathway. - Highlights: • Slit2 ameliorates inflammation after hypoxia-and LPS-induced epithelial cells injury

  10. Whole abdomen irradiation in epithelial ovarian cancer - state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gocheva, L.

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (OC) as a malignancy which poses multiple challenges has led to growing attention and concern during recent years. The not very noteworthy treatment results achieved during the last three decades with contemporary chemotherapeutic schemes have led to the need for research and development of new therapeutic approaches, as well as to a resurgence of interest in radiotherapy (RT) as part of a combined modality approach and as salvage therapy for patients with small volume persistent disease after primary cytoreductive surgery and chemotherapy. This article reviews the state of the art of whole abdomen irradiation (WAI) (excluding the moving strip field technique) as part of the complex treatment of epithelial OC. The prognostic factors and risk groups of epithelial OC are discussed as indicators for WAI, giving in detail the applied treatment modalities, fractionation and total doses. Toxicity and second primary malignancies following WAI are analyzed. The clinical experience accumulated during the last decades, as adjuvant, consolidative, salvage and palliative WAI in combined treatment of epithelial OC, is presented. Current issues in the radiotherapeutic management are discussed along with ideas for future clinical research directions. (author)

  11. IL-10 release by bovine epithelial cells cultured with Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Chaves Vilela

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus are parasitic protists of the human and bovine urogenital tracts, respectively. Several studies have described the cytotoxic effects of trichomonads on urogenital tract epithelial cells. However, little is known about the host cell response against trichomonads. The aim of this study was to determine whether T. foetus and T. vaginalis stimulated the release of the cytokine interleukin (IL-10 from cultured bovine epithelial cells. To characterise the inflammatory response induced by these parasites, primary cultures of bovine oviduct epithelial cells were exposed to either T. vaginalis or T. foetus. Within 12 h after parasite challenge, supernatants were collected and cytokine production was analysed. Large amounts of IL-10 were detected in the supernatants of cultures that had been stimulated with T. foetus. Interestingly, T. vaginalis induced only a small increase in the release of IL-10 upon exposure to the same bovine cells. Thus, the inflammatory response of the host cell is species-specific. Only T. foetus and not T. vaginalis induced the release of IL-10 by bovine oviduct epithelial cells.

  12. Odontogenic myxoma: A 63-year retrospective multicenter study of 85 cases in a Brazil population and a review of 999 cases from literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Ana Carolina Uchoa; Silveira, Felipe Martins; Gomes, Ana Paula Neutzling; Tarquinio, Sandra Beatriz Chaves; Sobral, Ana Paula Veras; de Arruda, José Alcides Almeida; da Silva, Leorik Pereira; da Silveira, Marcia Maria Fonseca; Barbosa, Larissa Ferreira; Kato, Camila de Nazaré Alves de Oliveira; Jaeger, Filipe; da Silva, Tarcília Aparecida; Mesquita, Ricardo Alves

    2018-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is an uncommon neoplasm of the jaws. Considering the importance of defining the relative incidence and demographic profile of these lesions in South America, the aim of this study was to analyze the clinical and imagiological features of OM from three South American oral pathology services and to discuss these findings in light of the literature. Data regarding age, gender, anatomic site, and imagiological features from 85 cases of OM were collected. Additionally, we did a review of OM studies published in three electronic databases. Among 63 450 oral biopsies, 1178 (1.85%) were odontogenic tumors (World Health Organization - 2017), of which 85 (7.21%) met the criteria of OM. The mean age was 30.7 years (range: 10-61 years; SD: 12.22). Forty-five (52.9%) cases occurred in females and 40 (47.1%) in males (ratio: 1:1.12). Maxilla was affected in 44 cases (53%) and mandible in 39 (47%). Of the 41 informed cases (48.2%), all of them were radiolucent lesions. The literature review indicated a majority of mean ages in third decade and a predilection for females, mandible, and multilocular radiolucent lesions. The features of OM samples have strong similarity to that reported in studies from other continents. It is possible to infer that geographic variation does not help to explain some differences observed in the clinical features of OM. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Downregulation of adenomatous polyposis coli by microRNA-663 promotes odontogenic differentiation through activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae-Sung; Park, Min-Gyeong; Lee, Seul Ah; Park, Sun-Young; Kim, Heung-Joong; Yu, Sun-Kyoung; Kim, Chun Sung; Kim, Su-Gwan; Oh, Ji-Su; You, Jae-Seek; Kim, Jin-Soo; Seo, Yo-Seob [Oral Biology Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Hong Sung [Department of Biomedical Science, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Joo-Cheol [Department of Oral Histology-Developmental Biology, School of Dentistry and Dental Research Institute, BK 21, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Do Kyung, E-mail: kdk@chosun.ac.kr [Oral Biology Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • miR-663 is significantly up-regulated during MDPC-23 odontoblastic cell differentiation. • miR-663 accelerates mineralization in MDPC-23 odontoblastic cells without cell proliferation. • miR-663 promotes odontoblastic cell differentiation by targeting APC and activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling in MDPC-23 cells. - Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate cell differentiation by inhibiting mRNA translation or by inducing its degradation. However, the role of miRNAs in odontogenic differentiation is largely unknown. In this present study, we observed that the expression of miR-663 increased significantly during differentiation of MDPC-23 cells to odontoblasts. Furthermore, up-regulation of miR-663 expression promoted odontogenic differentiation and accelerated mineralization without proliferation in MDPC-23 cells. In addition, target gene prediction for miR-663 revealed that the mRNA of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene, which is associated with the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, has a miR-663 binding site in its 3′-untranslated region (3′UTR). Furthermore, APC expressional was suppressed significantly by miR-663, and this down-regulation of APC expression triggered activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling through accumulation of β-catenin in the nucleus. Taken together, these findings suggest that miR-663 promotes differentiation of MDPC-23 cells to odontoblasts by targeting APC-mediated activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Therefore, miR-663 can be considered a critical regulator of odontoblast differentiation and can be utilized for developing miRNA-based therapeutic agents.

  14. Development of Thymic Epithelial Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulyanchenko, Svetlana; Vaidya, Harsh J.; O'Neill, Kathy E.

    2016-01-01

    The thymus is the primary lymphoid organ in which the T cell repertoire is generated. The complex cellularity of this organ is uniquely designed to facilitate T cell development: defects in thymus development or function can cause immunodeficiencies ranging from the absence of T cell-mediated imm......The thymus is the primary lymphoid organ in which the T cell repertoire is generated. The complex cellularity of this organ is uniquely designed to facilitate T cell development: defects in thymus development or function can cause immunodeficiencies ranging from the absence of T cell......-mediated immunity to broad-spectrum autoimmune disease. Peak thymus size and output occurs early in life, after which the thymus undergoes a natural process of involution. This results in the progressive loss of functional thymus tissue and correspondingly in decreased production of new naïve T cells with age...... - contributing to the diminished capacity of the aged immune system to adequately respond to new antigenic challenge. Age-related thymic involutions, together with the thymic involutions associated with cytotoxic therapies (e.g., radio- or chemotherapy), have raised interest in development of clinically useful...

  15. Etiology and Pathogenesis of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel C. Mok

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is complex disease composed of different histological grades and types. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in the development of different phenotypes remain largely unknown. Epidemiological studies identified multiple exogenous and endogenous risk factors for ovarian cancer development. Among them, an inflammatory stromal microenvironment seems to play a critical role in the initiation of the disease. The interaction between such a microenvironment, genetic polymorphisms, and different epithelial components such as endosalpingiosis, endometriosis, and ovarian inclusion cyst in the ovarian cortex may induce different genetic changes identified in the epithelial component of different histological types of ovarian tumors. Genetic studies on different histological grades and types provide insight into the pathogenetic pathways for the development of different disease phenotypes. However, the link between all these genetic changes and the etiological factors remains to be established.

  16. Gastrointestinal Epithelial Organoid Cultures from Postsurgical Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Soojung; Yoo, Jongman

    2017-08-17

    An organoid is a cellular structure three-dimensionally (3D) cultured from self-organizing stem cells in vitro, which has a cell population, architectures, and organ specific functions like the originating organs. Recent advances in the 3D culture of isolated intestinal crypts or gastric glands have enabled the generation of human gastrointestinal epithelial organoids. Gastrointestinal organoids recapitulate the human in vivo physiology because of all the intestinal epithelial cell types that differentiated and proliferated from tissue resident stem cells. Thus far, gastrointestinal organoids have been extensively used for generating gastrointestinal disease models. This protocol describes the method of isolating a gland or crypt using stomach or colon tissue after surgery and establishing them into gastroids or colonoids.

  17. Fibro-epithelial hyperplasia mimicking mucocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, K; Singh, B D; Dubey, A; Avinash, A

    2014-01-01

    The effects of chronic local irritation have been seen commonly in the form of fibroma or mucocele in children. We report a ten year old girl with the chief complaint of swelling in the lower right region of labial mucosa which was diagnosed clinically as mucocele and histologically as fibro-epithelial hyperplasia. Surgical excision was done under local anesthesia with no post-operative complication.

  18. Purinergic signalling in epithelial ion transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, Ivana

    2011-01-01

    , including ion transport. In this review, I will first introduce the main components of the extracellular ATP signalling, which have become known as the purinergic signalling system. With more than 50 components or processes, just at cell membranes, it ranks as one of the most versatile signalling systems......-regulators of secretion. On an organ level, both receptor types can exert physiological functions and together with other partners in the purinergic signalling, integrated models for epithelial secretion and absorption are emerging....

  19. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition in breast epithelial cells treated with cadmium and the role of Snail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhengxi; Shan, Zhongguo; Shaikh, Zahir A

    2018-04-01

    Epidemiological and experimental studies have implicated cadmium (Cd) with breast cancer. In breast epithelial MCF10A and MDA-MB-231 cells, Cd has been shown to promote cell growth. The present study examined whether Cd also promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a hallmark of cancer progression. Human breast epithelial cells consisting of non-cancerous MCF10A, non-metastatic HCC 1937 and HCC 38, and metastatic MDA-MB-231 were treated with 1 or 3 μM Cd for 4 weeks. The MCF10A epithelial cells switched to a more mesenchymal-like morphology, which was accompanied by a decrease in the epithelial marker E-cadherin and an increase in the mesenchymal markers N-cadherin and vimentin. In both non-metastatic HCC 1937 and HCC 38 cells, treatment with Cd decreased the epithelial marker claudin-1. In addition, E-cadherin also decreased in the HCC 1937 cells. Even the mesenchymal-like MDA-MB-231 cells exhibited an increase in the mesenchymal marker vimentin. These changes indicated that prolonged treatment with Cd resulted in EMT in both normal and cancer-derived breast epithelial cells. Furthermore, both the MCF10A and MDA-MB-231 cells labeled with Zcad, a dual sensor for tracking EMT, demonstrated a decrease in the epithelial marker E-cadherin and an increase in the mesenchymal marker ZEB-1. Treatment of cells with Cd significantly increased the level of Snail, a transcription factor involved in the regulation of EMT. However, the Cd-induced Snail expression was completely abolished by actinomycin D. Luciferase reporter assay indicated that the expression of Snail was regulated by Cd at the promotor level. Snail was essential for Cd-induced promotion of EMT in the MDA-MB-231 cells, as knockdown of Snail expression blocked Cd-induced cell migration. Together, these results indicate that Cd promotes EMT in breast epithelial cells and does so by modulating the transcription of Snail. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Proteinase-activated receptor 4 stimulation-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in alveolar epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araki Hiromasa

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs; PAR1–4 that can be activated by serine proteinases such as thrombin and neutrophil catepsin G are known to contribute to the pathogenesis of various pulmonary diseases including fibrosis. Among these PARs, especially PAR4, a newly identified subtype, is highly expressed in the lung. Here, we examined whether PAR4 stimulation plays a role in the formation of fibrotic response in the lung, through alveolar epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT which contributes to the increase in myofibroblast population. Methods EMT was assessed by measuring the changes in each specific cell markers, E-cadherin for epithelial cell, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA for myofibroblast, using primary cultured mouse alveolar epithelial cells and human lung carcinoma-derived alveolar epithelial cell line (A549 cells. Results Stimulation of PAR with thrombin (1 U/ml or a synthetic PAR4 agonist peptide (AYPGKF-NH2, 100 μM for 72 h induced morphological changes from cobblestone-like structure to elongated shape in primary cultured alveolar epithelial cells and A549 cells. In immunocytochemical analyses of these cells, such PAR4 stimulation decreased E-cadherin-like immunoreactivity and increased α-SMA-like immunoreactivity, as observed with a typical EMT-inducer, tumor growth factor-β (TGF-β. Western blot analyses of PAR4-stimulated A549 cells also showed similar changes in expression of these EMT-related marker proteins. Such PAR4-mediated changes were attenuated by inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR kinase and Src. PAR4-mediated morphological changes in primary cultured alveolar epithelial cells were reduced in the presence of these inhibitors. PAR4 stimulation increased tyrosine phosphorylated EGFR or tyrosine phosphorylated Src level in A549 cells, and the former response being inhibited by Src inhibitor. Conclusion PAR4 stimulation of alveolar epithelial cells induced epithelial