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Sample records for chalk samples influence

  1. Ultrasonic velocities of North Sea chalk samples: influence of porosity, fluid content and texture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogen, B.; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Japsen, P.

    2005-01-01

    a porosity-reducing effect and that samples rich in large grains have a relatively low porosity for a given P-wave modulus. The clay content in the samples is low and is mainly represented by either kaolinite or smectite; samples with smectite have a lower P-wave modulus than samples with kaolinite at equal...

  2. Influence of coal mine tips on the chalk aquifer. Sampling methods for three dimensional sulphate infiltration study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrez, F.; Mania, J. [Polytech' Lille, Dept. Genie Civil, UMR CNRS 8107 (LML), 59 - Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Mansy, J.L. [Lille-1 Univ., Lab. de Sedimentologie et de Geodynamique, UMR CNRS 8110 (PBDS), 59 - Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Piwakowski, B. [Ecole Centrale de Lille, Groupe Electronique Acoustique IEMN-DOAE, UMR CNRS 8520, 59 - Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    2005-07-01

    The coal basin of the Nord-Pas-de-Calais region (France) shows a very strong deterioration of the Chalk aquifer quality. In order to better model the hydro-dynamism and to improve knowledge on the chemical interactions, sampling according to depth of the groundwater is undertaken. The low-flow sampling and the profiles of the in-situ physicochemical parameters allow the observation of various vertical heterogeneities of the aquifer. The areas where the coal mine tips are localised appear very interesting to study. The sulphates released by the pyrite oxidation allow a 'artificial tracing' and give a visualization of the flow as well as information on the implied chemical processes between the oxidizing and reducing zones. (authors)

  3. Influence of effective stress coefficient on mechanical failure of chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Hjuler, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    The Effective stress coefficient is a measure of how chalk grains are connected with each other. The stiffness of chalk may decrease if the amount of contact cements between the grains decreases, which may lead to an increase of the effective stress coefficient. We performed CO2 injection in chal...... precise failure strength of chalk during changed stress state and under the influence of chemically reactive fluids during production of hydrocarbon and geological storage CO2....

  4. The influence of water and supercritical CO2 on the failure behavior of chalk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liteanu, E.; Spiers, C.J.; de Bresser, J.H.P.

    2013-01-01

    Reduction of compressive strength by injection of water into chalk is a well-known mechanism responsible for increased compaction in chalk reservoirs. This raises the question of whether such effects might be enhanced in the context of long-term storage of CO2 or of CO2 injection for enhanced oil

  5. Porosity variation in chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Ida; Grøn, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Vertical porosity variations in chalk are generally assumed to result from either a vaguely defined combination of primary sedimentary and diagenetic processes or solely to diagenetic processes. In this study, image analysis of backscatter electron images of polished samples and geochemical...

  6. Microbial Fluid-Rock Interactions in Chalk Samples and Salinity Factor in Divalent Ca2+ ions Release for Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery Purposes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jimoh, Ismaila Adetunji; Rudyk, Svetlana Nikolayevna; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2011-01-01

    In this study, laboratory experiments were performed on chalk samples from Danish sector of the North Sea to study microbial fluid-rock interactions with carbonate rock and to evaluate the dissolution of rock matrix (CaCO3). Result showed that the average concentration of Ca2+ ions after microbia...

  7. The invertebrate ecology of the Chalk aquifer in England (UK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, L.; Robertson, A. R.; White, D.; Knight, L.; Johns, T.; Edwards, F.; Arietti, M.; Sorensen, J. P. R.; Weitowitz, D.; Marchant, B. P.; Bloomfield, J. P.

    2016-03-01

    The Chalk is an important water supply aquifer, yet ecosystems within it remain poorly understood. Boreholes (198) in seven areas of England (UK) were sampled to determine the importance of the Chalk aquifer as a habitat, and to improve understanding of how species are distributed. Stygobitic macro-invertebrates were remarkably common, and were recorded in 67 % of boreholes in unconcealed Chalk, although they were not recorded in Chalk that is concealed by low-permeability strata and thus likely to be confined. Most species were found in shallow boreholes (50 m) water tables, indicating that the habitat is vertically extensive. Stygobites were present in more boreholes in southern England than northern England (77 % compared to 38 %). Only two species were found in northern England compared to six in southern England, but overall seven of the eight stygobitic macro-invertebrate species found in England were detected in the Chalk. Two species are common in southern England, but absent from northern England despite the presence of a continuous habitat prior to the Devensian glaciation. This suggests that either they did not survive glaciations in the north where glaciers were more extensive, or dispersal rates are slow and they have never colonised northern England. Subsurface ecosystems comprising aquatic macro-invertebrates and meiofauna, as well as the microbial organisms they interact with, are likely to be widespread in the Chalk aquifer. They represent an important contribution to biodiversity, and may influence biogeochemical cycles and provide other ecosystem services.

  8. Chalk Formations as Natural Barriers towards Radionuclide Migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Walther Batsberg; Carlsen, Lars; Jensen, Bror Skytte

    1985-01-01

    A series of chalk samples from the cretaceous formation overlying the Erslev salt dome have been studied in order to establish permeabilities, porosities, dispersion-, diffusion-, and sorption characteristics of the chalk. The chalk was found to be porous (∊≈0.4), however, of rather low permeabil...

  9. Influence of clay and silica on permeability and capillary entry pressure of chalk reservoirs in the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Birte; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2002-01-01

    The permeability and capillary entry pressure of chalk reservoirs are controlled by their porosity and specific surface area. Measured permeabilities are in the range 0.025-5.3 mD and are successfully predicted by use of the Kozeny equation. In this paper we focus on the factors that control spec...

  10. Porosity and sonic velocity depth trends of Eocene chalk in Atlantic Ocean: Influence of effective stress and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awedalkarim, Ahmed; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2014-01-01

    . This indicates pore-filling cementation via an activation energy mechanism. We proposed a predictive equation for porosity reduction with burial stress. This equation is relevant for basin analysis and hydrocarbon exploration to predict porosity if sonic velocity data for subsurface chalk is available....

  11. Interactive chalk murals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Muzzillo, Sarah; Santos, John

    2013-01-01

      Muzzillo and Santos discuss interactive chalk murals. Last summer, Apex High School art teacher Ian Sands was scrolling through his Twitter feed when he saw a tweet describing an interactive art park...

  12. Adsorption of hydrocarbons in chalk reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, L.

    1996-12-31

    The present work is a study on the wettability of hydrocarbon bearing chalk reservoirs. Wettability is a major factor that influences flow, location and distribution of oil and water in the reservoir. The wettability of the hydrocarbon reservoirs depends on how and to what extent the organic compounds are adsorbed onto the surfaces of calcite, quartz and clay. Organic compounds such as carboxylic acids are found in formation waters from various hydrocarbon reservoirs and in crude oils. In the present investigation the wetting behaviour of chalk is studied by the adsorption of the carboxylic acids onto synthetic calcite, kaolinite, quartz, {alpha}-alumina, and chalk dispersed in an aqueous phase and an organic phase. In the aqueous phase the results clearly demonstrate the differences between the adsorption behaviour of benzoic acid and hexanoic acid onto the surfaces of oxide minerals and carbonates. With NaCl concentration of 0.1 M and with pH {approx_equal} 6 the maximum adsorption of benzoic acid decreases in the order: quartz, {alpha}-alumina, kaolinite. For synthetic calcite and chalk no detectable adsorption was obtaind. In the organic phase the order is reversed. The maximum adsorption of benzoic acid onto the different surfaces decreases in the order: synthetic calcite, chalk, kaolinite and quartz. Also a marked difference in adsorption behaviour between probes with different functional groups onto synthetic calcite from organic phase is observed. The maximum adsorption decreases in the order: benzoic acid, benzyl alcohol and benzylamine. (au) 54 refs.

  13. Elastic behaviour of North Sea chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gommesen, Lars; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Mukerji, T.

    2007-01-01

    chalk. In the acoustic impedance–Poisson's ratio plane, we forecast variations in porosity and hydrocarbon saturation from their influence on the elastic behaviour of the chalk. The Gassmann model and the self-consistent approximation give roughly similar predictions of the effect of fluid on acoustic...... impedance and Poisson's ratio, but we find that the high-frequency self-consistent approach gives a somewhat smaller predicted fluid-saturation effect on Poisson's ratio than the low-frequency Gassmann model. The Gassmann prediction for the near and potentially invaded zone corresponds more closely...... to logging data than the Gassmann prediction for the far, virgin zone. We thus conclude that the Gassmann approach predicts hydrocarbons accurately in chalk in the sonic-frequency domain, but the fluid effects as recorded by the acoustic tool are significantly affected by invasion of mud filtrate...

  14. Permeability prediction in chalks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Prasad, Manika

    2011-01-01

    prediction, so we have investigated the use of velocity data to predict permeability. The compressional velocity fromwireline logs and core plugs of the chalk reservoir in the South Arne field, North Sea, has been used for this study. We compared various methods of permeability prediction from velocities......-permeability relationships were replaced by relationships between velocity of elastic waves and permeability using laboratory data, and the relationships were then applied to well-log data. We found that the permeability prediction in chalk and possibly other sediments with large surface areas could be improved...

  15. The surface reactivity of chalk (biogenic calcite) with hydrophilic and hydrophobic functional groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okhrimenko, D. V.; Dalby, K. N.; Skovbjerg, L. L.; Bovet, N.; Christensen, J. H.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2014-03-01

    The surface properties of calcium carbonate minerals play an important role in a number of industrial and biological processes. Properties such as wettability and adsorption control liquid-solid interface behaviour and thus have a strong influence on processes such as biomineralisation, remediation of aquifers and oil recovery. We investigated how two model molecules of different polarity, namely water and ethanol, interact with reservoir and outcrop chalk samples and we compared their behaviour with that of pure, inorganically precipitated calcite. Thermodynamic quantities, such as the work of wetting, surface energy and isosteric adsorption enthalpy, were determined from vapour adsorption isotherms. The chalks were studied fresh and after extraction of organic residues that were originally present in these samples. The work of wetting correlates with the amount of organic matter present in the chalk samples but we observed a fundamental difference between the adsorption properties of chalk and pure, inorganically precipitated calcite toward the less polar, ethanol molecule. Further analysis of the chemical composition of the organic matter extracted from the chalk samples was made by gas chromatography (GC-MS). Monitoring surface composition by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) before and after extraction of the organic material, and with atomic force microscopy (AFM), showed that nanometer sized clay crystals observed on the chalk particle surfaces could be an important part of the reason for the differences. Removal of the extractable portion of the hydrocarbons liberates adsorption sites that have different wetting properties than the rest of the chalk and these have an energy distribution that is similar to clays. Thus, the results exemplify the complexity of biogenic calcite adsorption behaviour and demonstrate that chalk wetting in drinking water aquifers as well as oil reservoirs is controlled partly by the nanoparticles of clay that have grown on the

  16. Nickel adsorption on chalk and calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belova, Dina Alexandrovna; Lakshtanov, Leonid; Carneiro, J.F.

    2014-01-01

    and chalk and pH ranging from 7.7 to 8.8, explored the influence of initial concentration and the amount and type of sorbent on Ni uptake. Adsorption increases with increased surface area and pH. A surface complexation model describes the data well. Stability constants for the Ni surface complex are log KNi...

  17. Chalk as a reservoir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    intervals are to some extent cemented and cannot compact mechanically at realistic effective stresses and only deform elastically. All chalk intervals though, may react by fracturing to changes in shear stress. So where natural fractures are not prevalent, fractures may be generated hydraulically. Fractures...

  18. Quantitative 1D saturation profiles on chalk by NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Dan; Topp, Simon; Stensgaard, Anders

    1996-01-01

    Quantitative one-dimensional saturation profiles showing the distribution of water and oil in chalk core samples are calculated from NMR measurements utilizing a 1D CSI spectroscopy pulse sequence. Saturation profiles may be acquired under conditions of fluid flow through the sample. Results reveal...... that strong saturation gradients exist in chalk core samples after core floods, due to capillary effects. The method is useful in analysis of corefloods, e.g., for determination of capillary pressure functions...

  19. To What Degree Thermal Cycles Affect Chalk Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livada, Tijana; Nermoen, Anders; Korsnes, Reidar Inger

    and water saturated chalk. Sixty disks of dry Kansas chalk exposed to different number of temperature cycles were tested for tensile strength using a Brazilian test. Changes in elastic properties as function of number of temperature cycles of the same chalk, but now saturated in water, were studied using...... triaxial cell experiments. For dry rock, no significant effects of temperature cycling was found on average tensile strength, however the range of the tensile failure stress is doubled for the samples exposed to 50 temperature cycles, as opposed to those to none. For water saturated cores, the temperature...

  20. New insight into the microtexture of chalks from NMR analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faÿ-Gomord, Ophélie; Soete, Jeroen; Katika, Konstantina

    2016-01-01

    An integrated petrographical and petrophysical study was carried out on a set of 35 outcrop chalk samples, covering a wide range of lithologies and textures. In this study various chalk rock-types have been characterized, in terms of microtextures and porous network, by integrating both geologica...... related to intraparticle pores within fossils. For all samples, permeability was inferred from NMR spectra using SDR (Schlumberger Doll Research) model....

  1. Impedance imaging in core analysis. Imaging of phase distributions in samples of natural cores of North Sea chalk containing conducting as well as non-conducting fluids. Part: 1-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laursen, S. [DTU, Inst. for Kemi (Denmark)] Moeller Nielsen, C. [DTU, Inst. for Energiteknik (Denmark)

    1997-12-31

    The present report documents the efforts to develop an impedance method for determining the distribution of the water saturation in a chalk core sample. Measurement of this distribution during a displacement process will make it possible to make numerical simulations of the process which may in turn reveal important rock parameters. The impedance method is one among other methods to determine saturation profiles in a research programme on rock parameters with participants from Danmarks Tekniske Universitet, DTU, and Danmarks og Groenlands Geologiske Undersoegelse, GEUS. The other methods investigated are nmr-scanning and {gamma}-logging. (au)

  2. Long-term rocky coast erosion: the influence of structural pattern and lithological context, as evidenced in the chalk (NW Normandy) and granitic (SW Brittany) rocks, NW France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duperret, Anne; Raimbault, Céline; Duguet, Timothée; Le Gall, Bernard; Costa, Stéphane; Vandycke, Sara

    2017-04-01

    During the EC2CO/DRIL/CROCODYL project, high-resolution land-sea DEM have been produced in NW Normandy and SW Brittany rocky coastal zone, using high-resolution bathymetry from shallow-water cruises CROCOLIT-1,-2,-3 (Duperret, 2013), SPLASHALIOT-3 (Maillet, 2014), THAPENFROM-1 (Duperret, 2015) and aerial topographic LiDAR data from the Litto3D project. Two study sites were selected to map detailed geomorphology of shore platforms in order to better understand rock coast evolution processes through time and long-term rates of rocky coastal erosion versus geological context. The eastern English Channel is made of coastal chalk cliffs that currently eroding with fast mean rates of the order of a few dm/year. In Normandy coast (NW France), this results to the generation of roughly linear coastal segments of about 20-30km long each. On coastal segments only made of Upper Cretaceous Chalk, erosion occurs by present-day sudden and repeated vertical failures and cliff collapses. Cliff collapse process is shaping vertical chalk cliffs in association with resulting roughly flat shore platforms. Even if shore platforms width are short and homogeneous (a few hundred meters in width), the detailed morphology observed on high-resolution bathymetry evidenced two main submarine geomorphological types. One is linear and regular and associated with linear coastal sections. This corresponds to homogeneous Chalk Formation and the lack of large-scale tectonic features. Coastal sections with chalk lithology variations, local folding, large-scale fractures transverse-oriented to the coastline and onshore valleys incision evidence chaotic shore platforms morphologies. They conduct to variations in coastline orientation and to meter-scale shoreline indentations The southwestern part of Brittany is made of low-lying granitic headland and indented bay cut into meta/granitic rocks. Erosion rates are poorly known, due to slow coastal evolutions through contemporary times. Land-Sea DEM evidence

  3. Less chalk more action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitriceski Andelkovic, Bojana; Jovic, Sladjana

    2016-04-01

    Less chalk more action Education should not be a mechanical system that operates according to the principles of the orders and implementation. Education should respect the basic laws of the develop and progress. Curiosity is the engine of achievement and children spontaneously and happily learn only if they get interested, if teacher wake up and stimulate their creativity and individuality. We would like to present classes that are realized as thematic teaching with several subjects involved: chemistry, geography, math, art and biology. Classes were organized for students at age from 10 to 13 years, every month during autumn and winter 2015. Better students identified themselves as teachers and presented peer education .Teachers were monitoring the process of teaching and help to develop links between younger and older students, where older students were educators to younger students. Also one student with special needs was involved in this activities and was supported by other students during the workshops The benefit from this project will be represented with evaluation marks. Evaluation table shows that group of ten students(age 10 to13 years) which are selected in October as children with lack of motivation for learning, got better marks, at the end of January , then they had it in the beginning of the semester.

  4. The sedimentology of redeposited chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderskouv, Kresten; Surlyk, Finn; Gale, Andy

    Redeposited facies in the Upper Cretaceous Chalk Group constitute major hydrocarbon reservoirs in the North Sea Central Graben. Existing facies models are largely based on publications from the early 1980's dealing with core material from the Norwegian sector. However, the recognition, interpreta......Redeposited facies in the Upper Cretaceous Chalk Group constitute major hydrocarbon reservoirs in the North Sea Central Graben. Existing facies models are largely based on publications from the early 1980's dealing with core material from the Norwegian sector. However, the recognition......, interpretation, and predictability of redeposited chalk facies remain uncertain. This project aims to improve existing facies models by investigating and comparing redeposited chalk units from a variety of settings. Long cores from the Danish and British sectors are interpreted in terms of depositional process...... and facies-porosity relation. These interpretations are integrated with a seismic   investigation of the study areas (phd project by Janus Bruun Christiansen). Outcrops showing large-scale remobilization in the Upper Cretaceous chalk of southern UK are investigated to document possible source mechanisms...

  5. Biot Critical Frequency Applied to Description of Failure and Yield of Highly Porous Chalk with Different Pore Fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Katrine Alling; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2010-01-01

    chalk samples that were tested at temperatures from 20 °C to 130 °C with the following pore fluids: fresh water, synthetic seawater, glycol, and oil of varying viscosity. The critical frequency is calculated for each experiment. For each specimen, we calculate the thickness to the slipping plane outside......Injection of water into chalk hydrocarbon reservoirs has led to mechanical yield and failure. Laboratory experiments on chalk samples correspondingly show that the mechanical properties of porous chalk depend on pore fluid and temperature. In case of water-saturated samples, the concentration...... is controlled by solid-fluid friction. The reference frequency is thus a measure of this friction, and we propose that the fluid effect on mechanical properties of chalk may be the result of liquid-solid friction. We reviewed 622 published experiments on mechanical properties of porous chalk. The data include...

  6. Improved Oil Recovery in Chalk. Spontaneous Imbibition affected by Wettability, Rock Framework and Interfacial Tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milter, J.

    1996-12-31

    The author of this doctoral thesis aims to improve the oil recovery from fractured chalk reservoirs, i.e., maximize the area of swept zones and their displacement efficiencies. In order to identify an improved oil recovery method in chalk, it is necessary to study wettability of calcium carbonate and spontaneous imbibition potential. The thesis contains an investigation of thin films and wettability of single calcite surfaces. The results of thin film experiments are used to evaluate spontaneous imbibition experiments in different chalk types. The chalk types were described detailed enough to permit considering the influence of texture, pore size and pore throat size distributions, pore geometry, and surface roughness on wettability and spontaneous imbibition. Finally, impacts of interfacial tension by adding anionic and cationic surfactants to the imbibing water phase are studied at different wettabilities of a well known chalk material. 232 refs., 97 figs., 13 tabs.

  7. Trace elemental analysis of school chalk using energy dispersive X-ray florescence spectroscopy (ED-XRF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruthi, Y. A.; Das, N. Lakshmana; Ramprasad, S.; Ram, S. S.; Sudarshan, M.

    2015-08-01

    The present studies focus the quantitative analysis of elements in school chalk to ensure the safety of its use. The elements like Calcium (Ca), Aluminum (Al), Iron (Fe), Silicon (Si) and Chromium (Cr) were analyzed from settled chalk dust samples collected from five classrooms (CD-1) and also from another set of unused chalk samples collected from local market (CD-2) using Energy Dispersive X-Ray florescence(ED-XRF) spectroscopy. Presence of these elements in significant concentrations in school chalk confirmed that, it is an irritant and occupational hazard. It is suggested to use protective equipments like filtered mask for mouth, nose and chalk holders. This study also suggested using the advanced mode of techniques like Digital boards, marker boards and power point presentations to mitigate the occupational hazard for classroom chalk

  8. Human geophagia, calabash chalk and undongo: mineral element nutritional implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter W Abrahams

    Full Text Available The prime aim of our work is to report and comment on the bioaccessible concentrations - i.e., the soluble content of chemical elements in the gastrointestinal environment that is available for absorption - of a number of essential mineral nutrients and potentially harmful elements (PHEs associated with the deliberate ingestion of African geophagical materials, namely Calabash chalk and Undongo. The pseudo-total concentrations of 13 mineral nutrients/PHEs were quantified following a nitric-perchloric acid digestion of nine different Calabash chalk samples, and bioaccessible contents of eight of these chemical elements were determined in simulated saliva/gastric and intestinal solutions obtained via use of the Fed ORganic Estimation human Simulation Test (FOREhST in vitro procedure. The Calabash chalk pseudo-total content of the chemical elements is often below what may be regarded as average for soils/shales, and no concentration is excessively high. The in vitro leachate solutions had concentrations that were often lower than those of the blanks used in our experimental procedure, indicative of effective adsorption: lead, a PHE about which concern has been previously raised in connection with the consumption of Calabash chalk, was one such chemical element where this was evident. However, some concentrations in the leachate solutions are suggestive that Calabash chalk can be a source of chemical elements to humans in bioaccessible form, although generally the materials appear to be only a modest supplier: this applies even to iron, a mineral nutrient that has often been linked to the benefits of geophagia in previous academic literature. Our investigations indicate that at the reported rates of ingestion, Calabash chalk on the whole is not an important source of mineral nutrients or PHEs to humans. Similarly, although Undongo contains elevated pseudo-total concentrations of chromium and nickel, this soil is not a significant source to humans

  9. Ekofisk chalk: core measurements, stochastic reconstruction, network modeling and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talukdar, Saifullah

    2002-07-01

    This dissertation deals with (1) experimental measurements on petrophysical, reservoir engineering and morphological properties of Ekofisk chalk, (2) numerical simulation of core flood experiments to analyze and improve relative permeability data, (3) stochastic reconstruction of chalk samples from limited morphological information, (4) extraction of pore space parameters from the reconstructed samples, development of network model using pore space information, and computation of petrophysical and reservoir engineering properties from network model, and (5) development of 2D and 3D idealized fractured reservoir models and verification of the applicability of several widely used conventional up scaling techniques in fractured reservoir simulation. Experiments have been conducted on eight Ekofisk chalk samples and porosity, absolute permeability, formation factor, and oil-water relative permeability, capillary pressure and resistivity index are measured at laboratory conditions. Mercury porosimetry data and backscatter scanning electron microscope images have also been acquired for the samples. A numerical simulation technique involving history matching of the production profiles is employed to improve the relative permeability curves and to analyze hysteresis of the Ekofisk chalk samples. The technique was found to be a powerful tool to supplement the uncertainties in experimental measurements. Porosity and correlation statistics obtained from backscatter scanning electron microscope images are used to reconstruct microstructures of chalk and particulate media. The reconstruction technique involves a simulated annealing algorithm, which can be constrained by an arbitrary number of morphological parameters. This flexibility of the algorithm is exploited to successfully reconstruct particulate media and chalk samples using more than one correlation functions. A technique based on conditional simulated annealing has been introduced for exact reproduction of vuggy

  10. Using Raman spectroscopic imaging for non-destructive analysis of filler distribution in chalk filled polypropylene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boros, Evelin; Porse, Peter Bak; Nielsen, Inga

    2016-01-01

    A feasibility study on using Raman spectral imaging for visualization and analysis of filler distribution in chalk filled poly-propylene samples has been carried out. The spectral images were acquired using a Raman spectrometer with 785 nm light source.Eight injection-molded samples with concentr......A feasibility study on using Raman spectral imaging for visualization and analysis of filler distribution in chalk filled poly-propylene samples has been carried out. The spectral images were acquired using a Raman spectrometer with 785 nm light source.Eight injection-molded samples...... with concentration of chalk 25% and 50% were used in the experiment. Two methods for spectralunmixing were applied to the images and both revealed almost identical distribution maps over the samples’ surface. The maps alsocorrelated with the ones obtained for several separated peaks, typical for the chalk...

  11. Austin Chalk trend, upper Gulf Coast, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holifield, R.

    1982-01-01

    The application of innovative geologic and geophysical interpretations and of carefully tailored well completion techniques has created the opportunity for profitable, low-risk drilling programs in the Austin Chalk Formation of S. Texas. This discussion focuses on selected information that should be beneficial for exploration and development activities in the Austin Chalk. The Giddings field is discussed in some detail, since this field is the center of the greatest activity in the Austin Chalk trend.

  12. Chalk Line Mill, Anniston, AL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Chalk Line Mill property was the site of a textile mill which operated from 1887 until 1994. Demolition activities in 2004 removed most of the structures on-site, but also left large, unsightly piles of debris scattered across this 14-acre property. The City applied for and received a $200,000 Brownfields cleanup grant in 2007 to address contamination on the property and the Appalachian Regional Commission provided an additional $150,000 in funding.

  13. Self Compacting Concrete with Chalk Filler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    2007-01-01

    Utilisation of Danish chalk filler has been investigated as a means to produce self compacting concrete (SCC) at lower strength levels for service in non aggressive environments. Stable SCC mixtures were prepared at chalk filler contents up to 60% by volume of binder to yield compressive strengths...

  14. Late Maastrichtian chalk mounds, Stevns Klint, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderskouv, Kresten; Damholt, Tove; Surlyk, Finn

    controlling the depositional thickness variation across a mound and thus mound growth pattern. Relatively long wave-length wavy-bedded chalk shows gentle convex-up geometries and would probably be described as sediment waves if recognized in seismic sections. The chalk waves were deposited under weaker...

  15. Mobilization of Resident Water in Chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Kathrine; Korsbech, Uffe C C

    1998-01-01

    The report describes a new technique based on detection of Na-22 movement in a brine saturated core of chalk......The report describes a new technique based on detection of Na-22 movement in a brine saturated core of chalk...

  16. Interdependent Sampling and Social Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denrell, Jerker; Le Mens, Gael

    2007-01-01

    Most explanations of social influence focus on why individuals might want to agree with the opinions or attitudes of others. The authors propose a different explanation that assumes the attitudes of others influence only the activities and objects individuals are exposed to. For example, individuals are likely to be exposed to activities that…

  17. Biot Critical Frequency Applied as Common Friction Factor for Chalk with Different Pore Fluids and Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Katrine Alling; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2010-01-01

    and rate independent b-factor used when describing the time dependent mechanical properties of soft rock or soils. As a consequence it is then possible to further characterize the material constant from the porosity and permeability of the rock as well as from pore fluid density and viscosity which......Injection of water into chalk hydrocarbon reservoirs has lead to mechanical yield and failure. Laboratory experiments on chalk samples correspondingly show that the mechanical properties of porous chalk depend on pore fluid and temperature. Water has a significant softening effect on elastic...... properties of chalk as calculated from wave data, and the softening increases with increasing critical frequency as defined by Biot. The critical frequency is the highest frequency where wave propagation is controlled by solid-fluid friction. The Biot critical frequency is thus a measure of this friction...

  18. The effect of chalk on the finger-hold friction coefficient in rock climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amca, Arif Mithat; Vigouroux, Laurent; Aritan, Serdar; Berton, Eric

    2012-11-01

    The main purpose of this study was to examine the effect of chalk on the friction coefficient between climber's fingers and two different rock types (sandstone and limestone). The secondary purpose was to investigate the effects of humidity and temperature on the friction coefficient and on the influence of chalk. Eleven experienced climbers took part in this study and 42 test sessions were performed. Participants hung from holds which were fixed on a specially designed hang board. The inclination of the hang board was progressively increased until the climber's hand slipped from the holds. The angle of the hang board was simultaneously recorded by using a gyroscopic sensor and the friction coefficient was calculated at the moment of slip. The results showed that there was a significant positive effect of chalk on the coefficient of friction (+18.7% on limestone and +21.6% on sandstone). Moreover sandstone had a higher coefficient of friction than limestone (+15.6% without chalk, +18.4% with chalk). These results confirmed climbers' belief that chalk enhances friction. However, no correlation with humidity/temperature and friction coefficient was noted which suggested that additional parameters should be considered in order to understand the effects of climate on finger friction in rock climbing.

  19. Trace fossils of a cyclic chalk-marl succession; the upper Maastrichtian Rørdal Member, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Bodil Wesenberg; Surlyk, Finn; Bromley, Richard Granville

    2011-01-01

    Trace fossils from an upper Maastrichtian cyclic chalk–marl succession, the Rørdal Member, exposed in the Rørdal quarry, Denmark, are analysed in order to test whether the changes in substrate lithology exerted any control over the ichnodiversity, tiering complexity, and density of the infauna....... Ichnofabric A is found only in chalk samples and shows a poor preservation of trace fossils, whereas ichnofabric C is found in a few chalk and all marl samples and comprises a very dense, diverse and well preserved ichnofauna representing a high tiering complexity. Ichnofabric B represents an intermediate...... situation between ichnofabrics A and C and occurs in chalk samples immediately adjacent to marl beds. The observed changes in ichnofabrics between chalk and marl are related to the amount of clay in the samples and the differences in the occurrence of trace fossils are interpreted as due to differences...

  20. Benthic macrofauna variations and community structure in Cenomanian cyclic chalk-marl from Southerham Grey Pit, SE England

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Bodil Wesenberg; Gale, A. S.; Surlyk, Finn

    2009-01-01

    adapted to both facies and thus to the fine grain size of the substrate rather than to lithology. The systematic difference in diversity between chalk and marl samples was possibly caused by long-term climatic and oceanographic changes and thus could represent a biological response to Milankovitch......Cenomanian chalk-marl couplets from England represent the 20 ka Milankovitch precession cycle. Fossil communities from both chalk and marl are identified to test if the orbital fluctuations and the associated changes in substrate lithology and climate exerted any control on the benthic macrofauna...

  1. THE STUDY OF TECHNOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF PLASTISOLS BASED EMULSION PVC FILLED WITH CHALK GIDROFOBIZIROVANNYM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Sedykh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Baby toys are made using the centrifugal molding plastisol based emulsion of polyvinyl chloride plasticized with dioctylphthalate. To reduce cost and decrease biotelemetry the dioctylphthalate on the surface of the product domestic toys than toys produced in China, there was a necessity of introduction of the filler is chalk from different manufacturers. By using a Brookfield vis-cometer PV-D was studied rheology of filled hydrophobized chalk PVC plastisols in storage conditions for up to 72 hours at temperatures of 14-20°C. It was found that the flow plastisols consistent with pseudo-plastic fluids. Given the flow rates of emulsion PVC plastisols filled to 35 % of the mass. hydrophobized chalk. The influence of the content of the plasticizer dioctylphthalate in a narrow interval (37,0 - 41,4 % of the mass. on the viscosity of polymer pastes and the kinetics of its changes during storage. Revealed a linear dependence of the viscosity of the filled hydrophobized chalk plastisols on the speed of rotation of the spindle of the viscometer and during storage. Given the rate of expansion changes the viscosity of the plastisols of the speed of rotation of the spindle of the viscometer, the rate of change in viscosity and calculation of the initial viscosity. Determined the stability of the dispersion hydrophobized chalk in a colloidal solution of PVC in dioctylphthalate during storage. We determined the variation of the content of chalk (ash with top and bottom layers plastisols height 8 cm after 24 hours storage. It is proved that the temperature of the preparation and storage of polymer pastes were determining factors in the regulation of such technological properties of PVC plastisols in the presence hydrophobized chalkas viscosity, stability of the dispersion of chalk and, consequently, the efficiency of distribution plastisols in the form of a centrifugal molding.

  2. Current oil and gas production from North American Upper Cretaceous chalks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholle, Peter A.

    1977-01-01

    Production of oil and natural gas from North American chalks has increased significantly during the past five years, spurred by the prolific production from North Sea chalks, as well as by higher prices and improved production technology. Chalk reservoirs have been discovered in the Gulf Coast in the Austin Group, Saratoga and Annona Chalks, Ozan Formation, Selma Group, Monroe gas rock (an informal unit of Navarro age), and other Upper Cretaceous units. In the Western Interior, production has been obtained from the Cretaceous Niobrara and Greenhorn Formations. Significant, though subcommercial, discoveries of natural gas and gas condensate also have been made in the Upper Cretaceous Wyandot Formation on the Scotian Shelf of eastern Canada. All North American chalk units share a similar depositional and diagenetic history. The chalks consist primarily of whole and fragmented coccoliths with subordinate planktonic and benthonic Foraminifera, inoceramid prisms, oysters, and other skeletal grains. Most have between 10 and 35 percent HCl-insoluble residue, predominantly clay. Deposition was principally below wave base in tens to hundreds of meters of water. The diagenetic history of a chalk is critical in determining its reservoir potential. All chalk has a stable composition (low-Mg calcite) and very high primary porosity. With subsequent burial, mechanical and chemical (solution-transfer) compaction can reduce or completely eliminate pore space. The degree of loss of primary porosity in chalk sections is normally a direct function of the maximum depth to which it has been buried. Pore-water chemistry, pore-fluid pressures, and tectonic stresses also influence rates of cementation. Oil or gas reservoirs of North American chalk fall into three main groups: 1. Areas with thin overburden and significant primary porosity retention (for example, Niobrara Formation of Kansas and eastern Colorado). 2. Areas with thicker overburden but considerable fracturing. Here primary

  3. Adsorption Properties of Chalk Reservoir Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okhrimenko, Denis

    Understanding adsorption energetics and wetting properties of calcium carbonate surfaces is essential for developing remediation strategies for aquifers, improving oil recovery, minimising risk in CO2 storage and optimising industrial processes. This PhD was focussed on comparing the vapour....../gas adsorption properties of synthetic calcium carbonate phases (calcite, vaterite and aragonite) with chalk, which is composed of biogenic calcite (>98%). In combination with data from nanotechniques, the results demonstrate the complexity of chalk behavior and the role of nanoscale clay particles. The results...

  4. Chalk porosity and sonic velocity versus burial depth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Gommesen, Lars; Krogsbøll, Anette Susanne

    2008-01-01

    but not pore-structure stiffening cementation in this presumably water-wet chalk. These results should improve the modeling of chalk background velocity for seismic inversion analysis. When describing the porosity-reducing process, pore-volume compressibility should probably be disregarded when correcting...... so that smectite-bearing chalk has a high Poisson's ratio in the water-saturated case, but a low value in the dry case. Oil-bearing chalk has up to 25 units higher porosity than water-saturated chalk at similar depth but similar velocity, probably because hydrocarbons prevent pore-filling cementation...

  5. Slope failure of chalk channel margins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gale, A.; Anderskouv, Kresten; Surlyk, Finn

    2015-01-01

    The importance of mass transport and bottom currents is now widely recognized in the Upper Cretaceous Chalk Group of Northern Europe. The detailed dynamics and interaction of the two phenomena are difficult to study as most evidence is based on seismic data and drill core. Here, field observations...

  6. Controls on Cementation in a Chalk Reservoir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meireles, Leonardo Teixeira Pinto; Hussein, A.; Welch, M.J.

    In this study, we identify different controls on cementation in a chalk reservoir. Biot’s coefficient, a measure of cementation, stiffness and strength in porous rocks, is calculated from logging data (bulk density and sonic Pwave velocity). We show that Biot’s coefficient is correlated to the wa...

  7. Late Maastrichtian chalk mounds, Stevns Klint, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderskouv, Kresten; Damholt, Tove; Surlyk, Finn

    2007-01-01

    than those active during mound formation. The exposed succession is topped by more evenly bedded chalk which was deposited by quiet pelagic fall-out of finegrained material. The whole succession was deposited on the upper part of the northern flank of a large WNW-ESE trending 3 km wide depositional...

  8. Chalk Point auxiliary pump study: 1981. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirshfield, M.F.; Hixson, J.H. III; Perry, E.S.

    1982-03-26

    In July 1981, the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia undertook a study to examine the numbers of finfish and blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) entrained through the auxiliary cooling pumps at the Chalk Point Steam Electric Station (SES) operated by the Potomac Electric Power Company. Samples were collected by positioning a net attached to a hinged steel frame directly in the discharge of the auxiliary pumps. Concurrently, impingement rates of fish and blue crabs on the travelling screens were estimated by collecting the organisms washed into the troughs that lead to the discharge canal. A total of 6673 fish and blue crabs, representing 13 species, was collected in auxiliary pump samples at the Chalk Point generating station during July and August 1981. A total of 2154 fish and blue crabs representing seven species was collected in concurrent impingement samples. Blue crabs represented almost all of the total. The numbers of individuals entrained through auxiliary pumps showed a diel effect, with most individuals entrained at night.

  9. AMS measurements of 36Cl at Chalk River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, H. R.; Koslowsky, V. T.; Cornett, R. J. J.; Davies, W. G.; Greiner, B. F.; Imahori, Y.; McKay, J. W.; Milton, G. M.; Milton, J. C. D.

    1994-06-01

    The AMS program at Chalk River continues to be devoted to 36Cl/Cl determinations. The primary scientific investigations focus on the dispersion of 36Cl in the Chalk River area, 36Cl abundances in the Great Lake basin and the residence time of water trapped in the Cigar Lake uranium ore body. Recent technical advances include: the use of a multi-sample ion source equipped with a spherical ionizer; rapid sequential injection of the 35,36,37Cl isotopes; upgrade to the velocity filter; and detector alterations to match better the spatial extent of the beam exiting the gas-filled magnet. This magnet is used in all measurements because it reduces the need for repeated chemical processing to reduce sulphur concentrations in the samples with the inherent risk of 36Cl contamination from the local environment. In addition, ion-source memory effects, instrument background and the degree of misidentification of unwanted isotopes have been determined and do not limit isotopic ratio determinations at the 10 -15 level. Preparation techniques for water, air and rock samples have evolved to the point where backgrounds of 10 -15, 10 -15 and 10 -1436Cl/Cl, respectively, can be achieved in spite of ambient 36Cl/Cl values at this reactor-based research laboratory that exceed 10 -11.

  10. Chalk: composition, diagenesis and physical properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2007-01-01

    Chalk is a sedimentary rock of unusually high homogeneity on the scale where physical properties are measured, but the properties fall in wide ranges. Chalk may thus be seen as the ideal starting point for a physical understanding of rocks in general. Properties as porosity, permeability, capillary...... entry pressure, and elastic moduli are consequences of primary sediment composition and of subsequent diagenetic history as caused by microbial action, burial stress, temperature, and pore pressure. Porosity is a main determining factor for other properties. For a given porosity, the specific surface...... of burial, and over-pressuring. These factors cause the stress, temperature and pore-pressure to increase at different rates during burial in different localities....

  11. Effect of Fluid Dynamic Viscosity on the Strength of Chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, K.; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    The mechanical strength of high porosity and weakly cemented chalk is affected by the fluid in the pores. In this study, the effect of the dynamic viscosity of non-polar fluids has been measured on outcrop chalk from Sigerslev Quarry, Stevns, Denmark. The outcome is that the measured strength...... of the chalk decreases with increasing dynamic viscosity. The proposed qualitative explanation is that pressure difference supports and enhances the generation of microscopic shear and tensile failures....

  12. Dispersion and morphology of natural chalk in ukrainian deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Дмитро Ігорович Аршинніков

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Composition, morphology and dispersion of natural chalk in Ukrainian deposits are investigated. It is given their quantitative assessment in comparison with imported calcite production in Turkey. It is proved that granulometric parameters of domestic chalk are not inferior, and in some cases dominate foreign counterparts. It is established that the domestic chalk contain the fine-grained fractions with a minimum size of the particles that allows to create finishes on dense structure on its basis

  13. Can we get a better knowledge on dissolution processes in chalk by using microfluidic chips?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuville, Amélie; Minde, Mona; Renaud, Louis; Vinningland, Jan Ludvig; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Hiorth, Aksel

    2017-04-01

    This work has been initiated in the context of research on improving the oil recovery in chalk bedrocks. One of the methods to improve the oil recovery is to inject "smart water" (acidic water/brines). Experiments on core scale and field tests that have been carried out the last decade have clearly shown that water chemistry affects the final oil recovery. However, there is generally no consensus in the scientific community of why additional oil is released, and it is also still not understood what are the mineralogical and structural changes. Direct in situ observation of the structural changes that occur when chalk is flooded with brines could resolve many of the open questions that remain. One of the highlights of this work is thus the development of an innovative methodology where fluid/rock interactions are observed in-situ by microscopy. To do so, we create several types of custom-made microfluidic systems that embeds reactive materials like chalk and calcite. The methodology we develop can be applied to other reactive materials. We will present an experiment where a calcite window dissolves with a fluid, where we observe in-situ the topography features of the calcite window, as well as the dissolution rate [1]. The injected fluid circulates at controlled flowrates in a channel which is obtained by xurography: double sided tape is cut out with a cutter plotter and placed between the reactive window and a non-reactive support. While the calcite window reacts, its topography is measured in situ every 10 s using an interference microscope, with a pixel resolution of 4.9 μm and a vertical resolution of 50 nm. These experiments are also compared with reactive flow simulations done with Lattice Boltzmann methods. Then, we will present a dissolution experiment done with a microfluidic system that embeds chalk. In this experiment, the main flow takes place at the chalk surface, in contact with fluid flowing in a channel above the chalk sample. Thus the reaction

  14. The effect of divalent ions on the elasticity and pore collapse of chalk evaluated from compressional wave velocity and low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Addassi, Mouadh; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul

    2015-01-01

    The effects of divalent ions on the elasticity and the pore collapse of chalk were studied through rock-mechanical testing and low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements. Chalk samples saturated with deionized water and brines containing sodium, magnesium, calcium and sulfate ions were...... rich in magnesium and calcium ions softens the contact among the mineral grains. Pore collapse strength is deteriorating after the saturation of chalk with water rich in divalent ions. The presence of calcium and sulfate ions in the saturating fluid results in pore collapse at lower stresses than...... in the case when samples are saturated with deionized water or sodium chloride solution. Low field NMR spectrometry revealed precipitation of crystals in the pore space of chalk saturated with Mg-rich brine. The precipitation of Mg-carbonates was not used to explain the deteriorating pore collapse strength...

  15. Compaction of microfossil and clay-rich chalk sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of microfossils and clay in the compaction of chalk facies sediments. To meet this aim, chalk sediments with varying micro texture were studied. The sediments have been tested uniaxially confined in a stainless-steel compaction cell. The sediments ar...

  16. Marine macrofossil communities in the uppermost Maastrichtian chalk of Stevns Klint, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas; Surlyk, Finn

    2014-01-01

    Three successive marine habitats and their benthic macrofossil communities have been recognised and assessed in the uppermost Maastrichtian chalk of Stevns Klint, Denmark. The mound-bedded lower Sigerslev Member was deposited below the photic zone under the influence of persistent, non-erosive bo......Three successive marine habitats and their benthic macrofossil communities have been recognised and assessed in the uppermost Maastrichtian chalk of Stevns Klint, Denmark. The mound-bedded lower Sigerslev Member was deposited below the photic zone under the influence of persistent, non...... fauna of bivalves, echinoids, polychaetes, gastropods and brachiopods. Attached forms were dependent on hard, mainly small substrates provided largely by dead bryozoans, and on a steady nutrient supply. The bivalve fauna is richer and occurs in slightly higher densities in the Højerup Member than...

  17. Influence of sampling depth and post-sampling analysis time

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paradise is released directly to the ocean at this point. ... cooled (0ºC - 0.2ºC) plastic bottle, sealed and labelled in the field. During mussel sampling, 10 -12 animals (sufficient to yield. 150-250 g of soft tissue), were taken from each shellfish stock sample, sealed in cool sterile plastic bags and kept in plastic containers.

  18. Cyclodehydration reaction of polyhydrazides. III. Influence of the sample history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gebben, B.; Rolevink, Hendrikus H.M.; Mulder, M.H.V.; Smolders, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of preparation history upon the thermal cyclodehydration reaction of polyhydrazide samples has been investigated. Solid polyhydrazide samples were prepared from DMSO solutions using the phase-inversion technique. Significant differences in conversion rates were observed between samples

  19. Reconstruction of chalk pore networks from 2D backscatter electron micrographs using a simulated annealing technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talukdar, M.S.; Torsaeter, O. [Department of Petroleum Engineering and Applied Geophysics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    2002-05-01

    We report the stochastic reconstruction of chalk pore networks from limited morphological information that may be readily extracted from 2D backscatter electron (BSE) images of the pore space. The reconstruction technique employs a simulated annealing (SA) algorithm, which can be constrained by an arbitrary number of morphological descriptors. Backscatter electron images of a high-porosity North Sea chalk sample are analyzed and the morphological descriptors of the pore space are determined. The morphological descriptors considered are the void-phase two-point probability function and lineal path function computed with or without the application of periodic boundary conditions (PBC). 2D and 3D samples have been reconstructed with different combinations of the descriptors and the reconstructed pore networks have been analyzed quantitatively to evaluate the quality of reconstructions. The results demonstrate that simulated annealing technique may be used to reconstruct chalk pore networks with reasonable accuracy using the void-phase two-point probability function and/or void-phase lineal path function. Void-phase two-point probability function produces slightly better reconstruction than the void-phase lineal path function. Imposing void-phase lineal path function results in slight improvement over what is achieved by using the void-phase two-point probability function as the only constraint. Application of periodic boundary conditions appears to be not critically important when reasonably large samples are reconstructed.

  20. Full-waveform inversion of Crosshole GPR data: Implications for porosity estimation in chalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskinen, Johanna; Klotzsche, Anja; Looms, Majken C.; Moreau, Julien; van der Kruk, Jan; Holliger, Klaus; Stemmerik, Lars; Nielsen, Lars

    2017-05-01

    The Maastrichtian-Danian chalk is a widely distributed hydrocarbon and groundwater reservoir rock in north-western Europe. Knowledge of lateral and vertical heterogeneity and porosity variation in this type of rock is essential, since they critically determine the reservoir properties. We have collected a densely sampled crosshole ground-penetrating radar (GPR) dataset from a highly heterogeneous section of the chalk and inverted it with a full-waveform inversion (FWI) approach. To date, successful crosshole FWI has only been reported for a handful of GPR field data, none of which include strongly heterogeneous environments like the one considered in this study. Testing different starting models shows that all FWI results converge to very similar subsurface structures indicating that the results are robust with regard to local variations in the permittivity starting models and are not very sensitive to the conductivity starting models. Compared to their ray-based counterparts, the obtained FWI models show significantly higher resolution and improved localization of fine-scale heterogeneity. The final FWI permittivity tomogram was converted to a bulk porosity model using the Complex Refractive Index Model (CRIM) and comparisons with plug sample porosities and televiewer image logs verify that variations in the obtained permittivity are related to facies and lithology changes. The inferred porosity varies from 30 to 54%, which is consistent with values in the chalk cores from the investigated boreholes and in agreement with other studies conducted in similar rocks onshore. Moreover, porosities vary significantly over scales of less than a meter both laterally and vertically. The FWI constrains porosity variation with decimeter scale resolution in our 5 m (horizontally) by 10 m (vertically) model section bridging the gap between what is measured on the core sample scale and the scale typical of hydrogeophysical field experiments conducted to characterize fluid flow in

  1. Spatial heterogeneity of high-resolution Chalk groundwater geochemistry - Underground quarry at Saint Martin-le-Noeud, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhoum, S.; Valdès, D.; Guérin, R.; Marlin, C.; Vitale, Q.; Benmamar, J.; Gombert, P.

    2014-11-01

    Chalk groundwater is an important aquifer resource in France because it accounts for a production of 12 million m3 y-1 with a large proportion reserved for drinking water. Processes occurring in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and the overlying superficial formations have a high impact on Chalk groundwater geochemistry and require better understanding. The study site is a former underground Chalk quarry located near Beauvais (France) that extends over 1200 m in length, at a depth ranging from 20 to 30 m. The water table intersects the cavity creating 15 underground ;lake; that give access to the Chalk groundwater. Lakes geochemistry has been studied: water samples were collected in July 2013 and major ion concentrations were analyzed. UZ and clay-with-flints thickness above each lake were estimated qualitatively using an electromagnetic sensor (EM31) and Underground GPS. The results unexpectedly showed that groundwater quality varied widely in spatial terms for both allochthonous and autochthonous ions (e.g., HCO3- ranged from 2.03 to 4.43 meq L-1, NO3- ranged from 0.21 to 1.33 meq L-1). Principal component analysis indicated the impact of agricultural land use on water quality, with the intake of NO3- as well as SO42-, Cl- and Ca2+. Chalk groundwater geochemistry is compared with the nature and structure of the UZ. We highlight correlations (1) between thick clay-with-flints layers and the ions Mg2+ and K+, and (2) between UZ thickness and Na+. In conclusion, this paper identifies various ion sources (agriculture, clay-with-flints and Chalk) and demonstrates different processes in the UZ: dissolution, ionic exchange and solute storage.

  2. Managing Injected Water Composition To Improve Oil Recovery: A Case Study of North Sea Chalk Reservoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahid, Adeel; Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2012-01-01

    is to investigate the potential of the advanced waterflooding process by carrying out experiments with reservoir chalk samples. The study results in a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in increasing the oil recovery with potential determining ions. We carried out waterflooding instead of spontaneous...... of the temperature dependence of the oil recovery indicated that the interaction of the ions contained in brine with the rock cannot be the only determining mechanism of enhanced recovery. We observed no substitution of Ca2+ ions with Mg2+ ions at high temperatures for both rocks. Not only the injection brine...... composition but also the formation water composition affected the oil recovery at high temperatures from the Stevns Klint chalk rock....

  3. Kolmanda aastatuhande piraadid / kommenteerinud Peter Chalk ja Gordan Van Hook

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2009-01-01

    Piraatlusest Somaalia piirkonnas ja rahvusvahelistest dokumentidest piraatluse vastu võitlemiseks 21. sajandil. Kommenteerivad uurimiskeskuse RAND Corporation vanempoliitanalüütik Peter Chalk ja transpordikompanii Maersk Line innovatsiooni ja arenduse vanemdirektor Gordan Van Hook

  4. Chemically induced compaction in fractured and intact chalk cores

    OpenAIRE

    Geitle, Kristine

    2013-01-01

    Master's thesis in Petroleum engineering The effect of pore water chemistry on the mechanical strength of chalk has been thoroughly investigated during the last years. Recent studies have demonstrated precipitation of new minerals that further triggers dissolution and increased deformation of chalk matrix when exposed to certain brines at reservoir temperatures. However, to detect these newly formed minerals and further localize the areas of precipitation by analyzing SEM (scanning electro...

  5. Colloid facilitated transport of lanthanides through discrete fractures in chalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Emily; Klein Ben-David, Ofra; Teutsch, Nadya; Weisbrod, Noam

    2015-04-01

    Geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste is the internationally agreed-upon, long term solution for the disposal of long lived radionuclides and spent fuel. Eventually, corrosion of the waste canisters may lead to leakage of their hazardous contents, and the radionuclides can ultimately make their way into groundwater and pose a threat to the biosphere. Engineered bentonite barriers placed around nuclear waste repositories are generally considered sufficient to impede the transport of radionuclides from their storage location to the groundwater. However, colloidal-sized mobile bentonite particles eroding from these barriers have come under investigation as a potential transport vector for radionuclides sorbed to them. In addition, the presence of organic matter in groundwater has been shown to additionally facilitate the uptake of radionuclides by the clay colloids. This study aims to evaluate the transport behaviors of radionuclides in colloid-facilitated transport through a fractured chalk matrix and under geochemical conditions representative of the Negev desert, Israel. Lanthanides are considered an acceptable substitute to actinides for research on radionuclide transportation due to their similar chemical behavior. In this study, the migration of Ce both with and without colloidal particles was explored and compared to the migration of a conservative tracer (bromide). Tracer solutions containing known concentrations of Ce, bentonite colloids, humic acid and bromide were prepared in a matrix solution containing salt concentrations representative of that of the average rain water found in the Negev. These solutions were then injected into a flow system constructed around a naturally fractured chalk core. Samples were analyzed for Ce and Br using ICP-MS, and colloid concentrations were determined using spectrophotographic analysis. Breakthrough curves comparing the rates of transportation of each tracer were obtained, allowing for comparison of

  6. Diagenetic Variations between Upper Cretaceous Outcrop and Deeply Buried Reservoir Chalks of the North Sea Area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjuler, Morten Leth; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2007-01-01

    In the central North Sea Basin hydrocarbon-bearing chalks are deeply buried (2-3 km) whereas chalks in the rim areas are cropping out in the surrounding countries. The differing diagenetic histories between buried and outcrop chalk result in different rock properties, which is of great importance...... has been replaced by kaolinite. These diagenetic variations are explained by higher temperatures and pressures in the deeply buried reservoir chalks....

  7. Response of invertebrates from the hyporheic zone of chalk rivers to eutrophication and land use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacioglu, Octavian; Moldovan, Oana Teodora

    2016-03-01

    Whereas the response of lotic benthic macroinvertebrates to different environmental stressors is a widespread practice nowadays in assessing the water and habitat quality, the use of hyporheic zone invertebrates is still in its infancy. In this study, classification and regression trees analysis were employed in order to assess the ecological requirements and the potential as bioindicators for the hyporheic zone invertebrates inhabiting four lowland chalk rivers (south England) with contrasting eutrophication levels (based on surface nitrate concentrations) and magnitude of land use (based on percentage of fine sediments load and median interstitial space). Samples of fauna, water and sediment were sampled twice, during low (summer) and high (winter) groundwater level, at depths of 20 and 35 cm. Certain groups of invertebrates (Glossosomatidae and Psychomyiidae caddisflies, and riffle beetles) proved to be good indicators of rural catchments, moderately eutrophic and with high fine sediment load. A diverse community dominated by microcrustaceans (copepods and ostracods) were found as good indicators of highly eutrophic urban streams, with moderate-high fine sediment load. However, the use of other taxonomic groups (e.g. chironomids, oligochaetes, nematodes, water mites and the amphipod Gammarus pulex), very widespread in the hyporheic zone of all sampled rivers, is of limited use because of their high tolerance to the analysed stressors. We recommend the use of certain taxonomic groups (comprising both meiofauna and macroinvertebrates) dwelling in the chalk hyporheic zone as indicators of eutrophication and colmation and, along with routine benthic sampling protocols, for a more comprehensive water and habitat quality assessment of chalk rivers.

  8. Stylolites, porosity, depositional texture, and silicates in chalk facies sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Borre, Mai K.

    2007-01-01

    Comparison of chalk on the Ontong Java Plateau and chalk in the Central North Sea indicates that, whereas pressure dissolution is controlled by effective burial stress, pore-filling cementation is controlled by temperature. Effective burial stress is caused by the weight of all overlying water...... and sediments as counteracted by the pressure in the pore fluid, so the regional overpressure in the Central North Sea is one reason why the two localities have different relationships between temperature and effective burial stress. In the chalk of the Ontong Java Plateau the onset of calcite-silicate pressure...... equilibrated to quartz before the onset of pressure dissolution and thus, in this case, dissolution and precipitation of calcite have no lag. This temperature versus effective burial stress induced difference in diagenetic history is of particular relevance when exploring for hydrocarbons in normally pressured...

  9. The Effect of Bacteria Penetration on Chalk Permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halim, Amalia Yunita; Shapiro, Alexander; Nielsen, Sidsel Marie

    Bacteria selective plugging is one of the mechanisms through which microorganisms can be applied for enhanced oil recovery. Bacteria can plug the water-bearing zones of a reservoir, thus altering the flow paths and improving sweep efficiency. It is known that the bacteria can penetrate deeply...... into reservoirs, however, a complete understanding of the penetration behavior of bacteria is lacking, especially in chalk formations where the pore throat sizes are almost comparable with the sizes of bacteria vegetative cells. This study investigates the penetration of bacteria into chalk. Two bacteria types......, the spore forming Bacillus licheniformis 421 and the non-spore forming Pseudomonas putida K12, were used. The core plugs were Stevns Klint outcrop with initial permeability at 2-4 mD. The results revealed that bacteria were able to penetrate and to be transported through the chalk. Furthermore, a higher...

  10. Nano sized clay detected on chalk particle surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Lone; Hassenkam, Tue; Makovicky, Emil

    2012-01-01

    adsorption takes place, are largely unknown. In this study, we have used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to show that the grain surfaces in offshore and onshore chalk are more heterogeneous than previously assumed. The particles are not simply calcite surfaces but are partially covered by clay that is only 1...... that in calcite saturated water, both the polar and the nonpolar functional groups adhere to the nano sized clay particles but not to calcite. This is fundamentally important information for the development of conceptual and chemical models to explain wettability alterations in chalk reservoirs...

  11. Rate dependence of dry, oil- or water-saturated chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Katrine Alling; Al-Alwan, A.

    The rate dependence of dry, oil- or water-saturated high-porosity outcrop chalk is investigated based on whether the fluid effect could be excluded from a governing material parameter, the b-factor. The b-factor is used in geotechnical engineering to establish the difference in evolution of load...... between stress-strain curves when applying different loading rates. The material investigated is outcrop chalk from Stevns, Southern part of Denmark, with a porosity of 43 to 44% and subjected to varying loading rates. The Biot critical frequency is a function of the fluid properties viscosity and density...

  12. Burial diagenesis of deep sea chalk as reflected in Biot's coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul

    2013-01-01

    to limestone as burial increases and porosity decreases. The porosity decrease is accompanied by an increasing velocity to elastic waves, and consequently a decreasing Biot's coefficient, as estimated from velocity and density of core samples. When the effective burial stress is normalized to total horizontal....... In the ooze, we find that the natural compaction causes an increasing stress on grain contact area, indicating that the ooze particles become strongly strained. In the chalk section, contact cement is probably the reason why particles become less strained as porosity declines. In the limestone, stress...

  13. Burial diagenesis of deep sea chalk as reflected in Biot’s coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul

    to limestone as burial increases and porosity decreases. The porosity decrease is accompanied by an increasing velocity to elastic waves, and consequently a decreasing Biot’s coefficient, as estimated from velocity and density of core samples. When the effective burial stress is normalized to total horizontal....... In the ooze, we find that the natural compaction causes an increasing stress on grain contact area, indicating that the ooze particles become strongly strained. In the chalk section, contact cement is probably the reason why particles become less strained as porosity declines. In the limestone, stress...

  14. Pumping test analysis using a layered cylindrical grid numerical model in a complex, heterogeneous chalk aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, M. M.; Hughes, A. G.; Spink, A. E. F.; Riches, J.

    2011-04-01

    SummaryA groundwater investigation including several pumping tests has been carried out by Thames Water Utilities Limited (TWUL) to improve the understanding of the distribution of hydraulic properties of the Chalk in the Swanscombe area of Kent in south-eastern England. The pumping test behaviour is complicated by: the fractured condition of the Chalk, simultaneous pumping from adjacent boreholes, and variable pumping rates during the test. In addition, the groundwater flow system is complicated by quarrying of the Chalk. Analytical solutions for pumping test analysis fail to represent these complex flow processes and cannot reproduce the observed time-drawdown curves. A layered cylindrical grid numerical model has been applied to the results of the Swanscombe pumping test. This model can represent the heterogeneity of the aquifer and the detailed flow processes close to the abstraction borehole such as well storage, seepage face and well losses. It also includes a numerical representation of the moving water-table using a grid that deforms to eliminate numerical instabilities. The analyses of the test results demonstrate that they are significantly influenced by fracture flow, which needs to be included to improve the simulation of the groundwater system; not withstanding this, the layered cylindrical grid numerical model reproduced many of the features in observed time-drawdown, which allowed an assessment of the hydraulic characteristics of the aquifer as well as the investigation of the impact of quarries on the test results. This has demonstrated that the numerical model is a powerful tool that can be used to analyse complex pumping tests and aid to improvement of the conceptual understanding of a groundwater system.

  15. Fluid substitution studies for North Sea chalk logging data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gommesen, Lars; Mavko, G.; Mukerji, T.

    2002-01-01

    We have tested the application of respectively the Kuster-Toksöz and the Gassmann theory as a tool for predicting pore fluid from the elastic properties of brine-saturated North Sea reservoir chalk. We confirm that the Kuster-Toksöz model predicts a larger fluid effect thant the Gassmann model, a...

  16. Hydrophobic chalk as a filler for paints and varnishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. I. Niftaliev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Study of the properties of the chemically precipitated chalk and the development of activities, which enable us to get from the secondary product of the manufacture different fertilizers, high-quality carbonate fillers for paints and varnishes, primers and putty.

  17. Chemical and Mechanical processes during burial diagenesis of chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borre, Mai Kirstine; Lind, Ida

    1998-01-01

    Burial diagenesis of chalk is a combination of mechanical compaction and chemical recrystallization as well as cementation. We have predicted the characteristic trends in specific surface resulting from these processes. The specific surface is normally measured by nitrogen adsorption but is here...

  18. Simplicity versus complexity in modelling groundwater recharge in Chalk catchments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Bradford

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Models of varying complexity are available to provide estimates of recharge in headwater Chalk catchments. Some measure of how estimates vary between different models can help guide the choice of model for a particular application. This paper compares recharge estimates derived from four models employing input data at varying spatial resolutions for a Chalk headwater catchment (River Pang, UK over a four-year period (1992-1995 that includes a range of climatic conditions. One model was validated against river flow data to provide a measure of their relative performance. Each model gave similar total recharge for the crucial winter recharge period when evaporation is low. However, the simple models produced relatively lower estimates of the summer and early autumn recharge due to the way in which processes governing recharge especially evaporation and infiltration are represented. The relative uniformity of land use, soil types and rainfall across headwater, drift-free Chalk catchments suggests that complex, distributed models offer limited benefits for recharge estimates at the catchment scale compared to simple models. Nonetheless, distributed models would be justified for studies where the pattern and amount of recharge need to be known in greater detail and to provide more reliable estimates of recharge during years with low rainfall. Keywords: Chalk, modelling, groundwater recharge

  19. Contaminated groundwater characterization at the Chalk River Laboratories, Ontario, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schilk, A.J.; Robertson, D.E.; Thomas, C.W.; Lepel, E.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Champ, D.R.; Killey, R.W.D.; Young, J.L.; Cooper, E.L. [Chalk River Labs., Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    1993-03-01

    The licensing requirements for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste (10 CFR 61) specify the performance objectives and technical requisites for federal and commercial land disposal facilities, the ultimate goal of which is to contain the buried wastes so that the general population is adequately protected from harmful exposure to any released radioactive materials. A major concern in the operation of existing and projected waste disposal sites is subterranean radionuclide transport by saturated or unsaturated flow, which could lead to the contamination of groundwater systems as well as uptake by the surrounding biosphere, thereby directly exposing the general public to such materials. Radionuclide transport in groundwater has been observed at numerous commercial and federal waste disposal sites [including several locations within the waste management area of Chalk River Laboratories (CRL)], yet the physico-chemical processes that lead to such migration are still not completely understood. In an attempt to assist in the characterization of these processes, an intensive study was initiated at CRL to identify and quantify the mobile radionuclide species originating from three separate disposal sites: (a) the Chemical Pit, which has received aqueous wastes containing various radioisotopes, acids, alkalis, complexing agents and salts since 1956, (b) the Reactor Pit, which has received low-level aqueous wastes from a reactor rod storage bay since 1956, and (c) the Waste Management Area C, a thirty-year-old series of trenches that contains contaminated solid wastes from CRL and various regional medical facilities. Water samples were drawn downgradient from each of the above sites and passed through a series of filters and ion-exchange resins to retain any particulate and dissolved or colloidal radionuclide species, which were subsequently identified and quantified via radiochemical separations and gamma spectroscopy. These groundwaters were also analyzed for anions

  20. Establishing the prevalence of hypertension. Influence of sampling criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Costa Fuchs

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the prevalence of systemic hypertension in two different populations: a representative sample of the adult urban population of Porto Alegre, and individuals who sought blood pressure measurement in a hypertension prevention and control campaign. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out involving a representative sample of the adult urban population of Porto Alegre and a population sample obtained from a hypertension prevention and control campaign, which included all the individuals who sought the blood pressure assessment unit at the Hospital das Clínicas in Porto Alegre. The following parameters were investigated: history of hypertension, use of antihypertensive drugs, age, and sex. Adjustments for age and sex in the prevalence rates were performed to make them comparable. RESULTS: Hypertension prevalence, defined as values > or = 160/95mmHg or treatment with antihypertensive drugs, was higher in the campaign sample (42% as compared with the population sample (24%. Among those who were aware of their hypertensive condition and were under medication, 54% of the campaign sample and 62% of the representative population sample maintained their pressure levels <160/90mmHg. CONCLUSION: Prevalence rates of hypertension differed a lot in the campaign sample and in the representative population sample, showing that the sampling criterion may influence assessment of risk factors and bias the association between risk factors and health aggravations.

  1. Acoustic and Petrophysical Evolution of Organic-Rich Chalk Following Maturation Induced by Unconfined Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitrit, Omri; Hatzor, Yossef H.; Feinstein, Shimon; Vinegar, Harold J.

    2017-12-01

    Thermal maturation is known to influence the rock physics of organic-rich rocks. While most studies were performed on low-porosity organic-rich shales, here we examine the effect of thermal maturation on a high-porosity organic-rich chalk. We compare the physical properties of native state immature rock with the properties at two pyrolysis-simulated maturity levels: early-mature and over-mature. We further evaluate the applicability of results from unconfined pyrolysis experiments to naturally matured rock properties. Special attention is dedicated to the elastic properties of the organic phase and the influence of bitumen and kerogen contents. Rock physics is studied based on confined petrophysical measurements of porosity, density and permeability, and measurements of bedding-normal acoustic velocities at estimated field stresses. Geochemical parameters like total organic carbon (TOC), bitumen content and thermal maturation indicators are used to monitor variations in density and volume fraction of each phase. We find that porosity increases significantly upon pyrolysis and that P wave velocity decreases in accordance. Solids density versus TOC relationships indicate that the kerogen increases its density from 1.43 to 1.49 g/cc at the immature and early-mature stages to 2.98 g/cc at the over-mature stage. This density value is unusually high, although increase in S wave velocity and backscatter SEM images of the over-mature samples verify that the over-mature kerogen is significantly denser and stiffer. Using the petrophysical and acoustic properties, the elastic moduli of the rock are estimated by two Hashin-Shtrikman (HS)-based models: "HS + BAM" and "HS kerogen." The "HS + BAM" model is calibrated to the post-pyrolysis measurements to describe the mechanical effect of the unconfined pyrolysis on the rock. The absence of compaction in the pyrolysis process causes the post-pyrolysis samples to be extremely porous. The "HS kerogen" model, which simulates a

  2. Seismic geomorphology of the Danish Chalks, offshore, North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Florian; van Buchem, Frans; Schmidt, Ingelise

    2014-05-01

    The Upper Cretaceous and Lowermost Paleocene chalk deposits of the North Sea Basin constitute a unique phase in the evolution of carbonate facies, through the rock-forming dominance of fine grained calcareous plankton, particularly coccolithophorids. These planktonic organisms were deposited over extensive areas and very often laid down as laterally extensive, regular dm-scale bedded packages, that locally may reach a thickness of up to 1250 m. In the Danish Graben, the depositional conditions for the chalk sedimentation changed dramatically during the middle of the Upper Cretaceous. At this time the basin topography was inverted, radically changing the position of the depocenters and the ocean floor morphology. In uplifted areas local erosion and long phases of non-deposition occurred, whereas in areas of subsidence thick packages of chalk accumulated. Along the newly created highs, mass waste deposition took place at the deca-kilometre scale. In this presentation we will document evidence for the tectonic inversion, and pay particular attention to the rich pallet of geomorphological features that characterise this tectonically active period. This study benefitted from a recently re-processed 3D seismic dataset (6000 km²), and a regional well-log and biostratigraphic dataset. In addition, the seismic interpretation applied advanced seismic interpretation software (PaleoScan™), which uses a patented model grid that links up seismic points and honours interpreted horizon constraints resulting in a seismic Relative Geological Time model. Standard seismic attributes, displayed upon horizons from a 3D RGT model of the chalk package, have shown to be very effective in the illustration and interpretation of complex chalk depositional features. Special attention has been focussed on mass waste deposits around inverted structures and salt diapirs. Several different mass waste complexes have been documented in 3D, illustrating a number of typical features such as

  3. Influence of volume of sample processed on detection of Chlamydia trachomatis in urogenital samples by PCR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goessens, W H; Kluytmans, J A; den Toom, N; van Rijsoort-Vos, T H; Niesters, B G; Stolz, E; Verbrugh, H A; Quint, W G

    In the present study, it was demonstrated that the sensitivity of the PCR for the detection of Chlamydia trachomatis is influenced by the volume of the clinical sample which is processed in the PCR. An adequate sensitivity for PCR was established by processing at least 4%, i.e., 80 microliters, of

  4. Wettability of Chalk and Argillaceous Sandstones Assessed from T1/T2 Ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Saidian, M.; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    Low-field NMR relaxation of the fluids inside the porous rock is the result of bulk and surface relaxation of the protons inside the pore fluid. Bulk relaxation is a fluid property when the solid-fluid interaction is minimized. Surface relaxation is the result of the solid-fluid interaction related...... with water, oil or oil/water at irreducible water saturation. The T1/T2 ratio obtained from T1-T2 maps reflects the T2-shortening. We compare the T1/T2 ratio for the same type of rock, saturated with different fluids. The chalk shows high affinity for water, Berea sandstone has no clear preference for oil...... ratio can quantify the affinity between the rock and wetting pore fluid. The affinity is a measure directly linked to wettability. In order to investigate the T2-shortening, we performed T1-T2 NMR experiments on different samples of chalk, Berea sandstone, and chloritic greensand, saturated either...

  5. Porosity Variation in Cenozoic and Upper Chalk from the Ontong Java Pleateau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borre, Mai Kirstine

    1997-01-01

    Porosity was obtained from matrix- and intraparticle porosity assessed from image analysis of backscattered electron micrographs of 3000x and 300x magnification. Comparing porosity assessed from image analysis with porosity measured by index properties, it was seen that image analysis data at 3000x...... magnification overestimates the dominating phase where images are resolved well, because of transparency in the upper few microns of the sample. Thus image analysis porosity in the upper ooze interval (porosities more than 65%) show a good correspondence, because of the combined effect of porosity being...... the domination phase and insufficient resolution leading to porosity underestimation. In chalk samples (porosities around 50% or more) the lowest estimate of image analysis porosity corresponded because of the transparency, whereas in limestone samples (porosities less than 25%) highest image porosity estimate...

  6. Diffraction Seismic Imaging of the Chalk Group Reservoir Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazeri, M.; Fomel, S.; Nielsen, L.

    2016-12-01

    In this study we investigate seismic diffracted waves instead of seismic reflected waves, which are usually much stronger and carry most of the information regarding subsurface structures. The goal of this study is to improve imaging of small subsurface features such as faults and fractures. Moreover, we focus on the Chalk Group, which contains important groundwater resources onshore and oil and gas reservoirs in the Danish sector of the North Sea. Finding optimum seismic velocity models for the Chalk Group and estimating high-quality stacked sections with conventional processing methods are challenging tasks. Here, we try to filter out as much as possible of undesired arrivals before stacking the seismic data. Further, a plane-wave destruction method is applied on the seismic stack in order to dampen the reflection events and thereby enhance the visibility of the diffraction events. After this initial processing, we estimate the optimum migration velocity using diffraction events in order to obtain a better resolution stack. The results from this study demonstrate how diffraction imaging can be used as an additional tool for improving the images of small-scale features in the Chalk Group reservoir, in particular faults and fractures. Moreover, we discuss the potential of applying this approach in future studies focused on such reservoirs.

  7. Influence of thermal treatments on radiocarbon dating of groundwater samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanciu, Iuliana Madalina; Sava, Tiberiu Bogdan; Pacesila, Doru Gheorghe; Gaza, Oana; Simion, Corina Anca; Stefan, Bianca Maria; Sava, Gabriela Odilia; Ghita, Dan Gabriel; Mosu, Vasile

    2017-06-01

    Radiocarbon measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in water provides information about the formation of oceanic circulation of the water volumes, the hydrogeological systems, and also valuable information can be gained about the aquifer storage and the degree of containment relative to the surface waters. Radiocarbon dating refers to the determination of small quantities of the naturally occurring carbon 14 in the water, which can be integrated in the groundwater mass through the gaseous CO2, carbonaceous deposits dissolved by water and organic remains. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the temperature and pressure over the amount of each isotope of carbon during the sample preparation stage. The first step was to evaporate several underground water samples at 65°C under different conditions until the carbonates were obtained, then the CO2 was extracted with orto-phosphoric acid and transformed to graphite. The second step was to obtain graphite from an untreated water sample. Finally, the samples were measured with the 1MV Cockcroft-Walton Tandetron Accelerator by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry.

  8. Origin of channel systems in the Upper Cretaceous chalk group of the Paris Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esmerode, E. V.; Surlyk, Finn

    2009-01-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Chalk Group of the Anglo-Paris Basin is known to show wedging beds and channel-like features which disrupt the quietly deposited pelagic chalk that covered most of NW Europe in the Late Cretaceous. Two-D reflection seismic data from the Brie region, SE of Paris, show the pres...

  9. Change of Static and Dynamic Elastic Properties due to CO² Injection in North Sea Chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Hjuler, M.L.; Christensen, H.F.

    2012-01-01

    . We observed lower dynamic elastic modulus for chalk with higher non-carbonate content at porosities lower than 30%. In 30% porosity chalk, dynamic compressional and bulk modulus were found significantly higher than the static modulus. Static measurements with LVDT were found lowest. The effect of CO2...

  10. Dual hydraulic behaviour of the Chalk in the Netherlands North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, H.

    2006-01-01

    Information on the sedimentary development, seismic stratigraphy and burial compaction of the Chalk Group in the Netherlands North Sea was combined with pressure data and basin modelling to investigate the hydraulic behaviour of the Chalk Group in the Central Graben and Schill Grund High. The

  11. Dynamic and static elastic moduli of North Sea and deep sea chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gommesen, Lars; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2001-01-01

    We have established an empirical relationship between the dynamic and the static mechanical properties of North Sea and deep sea chalk for a large porosity interval with respect to porosity, effective stress history and textural composition. The chalk investigated is from the Tor and Hod Formatio...

  12. Elasticity and electrical resistivity of chalk and greensand during water flooding with selective ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Alexeev, Artem

    2018-01-01

    Water flooding with selective ions has in some cases lead to increased oil recovery. We investigate the physical processes on a pore scale that are responsible for changes in petrophysical and mechanical properties of four oil-bearing chalk and four oil-bearing greensand samples caused by flooding...... with brines containing varying amounts of dissolved NaCl, Na2SO4, MgCl2 and MgSO4. Ultrasonic P-wave velocity and AC resistivity measurements were performed prior to, during and after flow through experiments in order to identify and quantify the processes related to water flooding with selective ions. Low...... field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrometry measurements were performed at full water saturation, at irreducible water saturation, after aging and after flooding. CT-scanning, X-ray diffraction (XRD), backscatter electron microscopy images (BSEM), mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP...

  13. Determination of naturally radioactive elements in chalk sticks by means of gamma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Wahab, Magda; Morsy, Zeinab; El-Faramawy, Nabil

    2010-04-01

    The radiation hazards due to ingestion of chalkboard dust were investigated. Sixteen samples from three different origin fabricates were used. The estimation of radiation hazard indices were based on the evaluation of the concentration activities of the natural radionuclides 238U, 232Th and 40K. The radium equivalent activity, external hazard index, internal hazard index and the annual dose equivalent associated with the radionuclides were calculated and compared with international recommended values to assess the radiation hazard. The values of internal and external radiation hazard indices were found to be less than unity. The annual effective dose rate obtained, E eff, and the annual gonadal dose equivalent (AGDE) are found to be less than the limit of the doses recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the general public. The analytical results show that besides the main calcium content, some toxic elements, S, Mo and Pb and Ni and Pb, in the Egyptian and imported chalk stocks, respectively, existed.

  14. Grain size distributions of chalk from image analysis of electron micrographs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Birte; Gommesen, Lars; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2001-01-01

    In the chalk of the Ekofisk formation in the Chalk Group of the North Sea, substantial depth-related variations in porosityare observed. With the aim of obtaining a textural interpretation of these porositydata, we have developed a method to assess the grain size distribution of the chalk from...... image analysis. The chalk is composed of a fine-grained matrix of nannofossils and predominantlycalcitic fossil debris with larger microfossil grains, but the chalk may also contain significant amounts of silica and siliciclastic clay. For image analysis, we used backscatter electron images of epoxy...... from image analysis due to rim effects inherent in backscatter images at high magnification. Thus, in order to obtain a consistent interpretation, we use total (He) porosity and insoluble residue as measured in the laboratory. We find that the volume density of larger grains (cross section larger than...

  15. A review of sample preparation and its influence on pH determination in concrete samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Manso

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available If we are to monitor the chemical processes in cementitious materials, then pH assays in the pore solutions of cement pastes, mortars, and concretes are of key importance. However, there is no standard method that regulates the sample-preparation method for pH determination. The state-of-the-art of different methods for pH determination in cementitious materials is presented in this paper and the influence of sample preparation in each case. Moreover, an experimental campaign compares three different techniques for pH determination. Its results contribute to establishing a basic criterion to help researchers select the most suitable method, depending on the purpose of the research. A simple tool is described for selecting the easiest and the most economic pH determination method, depending on the objective; especially for researchers and those with limited experience in this field.

  16. Dynamic up-scaling of relative permeability in chalk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frykman, P.; Lindgaard, H.F.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes how fine-scale geo-statistic reservoir models can be utilised for the up-scaling of two-phase flow properties, including both relative permeability and capillary pressure function. The procedure is applied to a North Sea chalk carbonate reservoir example, which is a high-porosity/low-permeability reservoir type. The study focuses on waterflooding as the main recovery scheme and for the given flow regime in the reservoir. The main purpose of the paper is to demonstrate the use of dynamic multi-step up-scaling methods in the preparation of detailed geological information for full field reservoir simulation studies. (au) EFP-96. 39 refs.

  17. Mooreville chalk - Upper Cretaceous sediment facies and sea level cycles, west-central Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wylie, J.A.; King, D.T.

    1986-05-01

    The Mooreville Chalk is composed of open-marine sediments containing a significant amount of fine-grained clastics. The main lithology is a chalk according to most workers; however, various lithologic types are present with marl being dominant. In the hemipelagic classification, a marl contains 30-70% calcium carbonate. Five facies have been delineated through detailed analysis of outcrops and subsurface samples. In stratigraphic order,these facies are: (1) bioturbated glauconitic sandstones and silty calcareous muds (inner shelf), (2) light olive-gray bioturbated marl and calcareous mud (open shelf, below storm wave base), (3) dark olive-gray laminated marl and calcareous mud (open shelf, well below storm wave base), (4) tan calcareous siltstones and sandstones, and sandy calcareous muds (open shelf, above storm wave base), and (5) tan silty calcareous muds and silty marls (open shelf, at storm wave base). The main depositional setting was a poorly oxygenated middle shelf environment, primarily below storm wave base. This interpretation is based on the absence of storm wave features known to exist in shallower water marls, the presence of small-scale laminae, the abundance of finely divided FeS/sub 2/, and the general dark color of the sediments. A relative sea level curve for the early Campanian shows two main cycles of relative sea level rise and fall. These two cycles do not compare well with the cycles reported from coeval facies of the Western Interior seaway and northern Europe. This unfavorable comparison suggests a different, local sea level history for the northeastern gulf rim.

  18. Tracking selenium behaviour in chalk aquifer (northern France): Sr and 34S-sulphates isotopes constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Lise; Benabderraziq, Hind; Elkhattabi, Jamal; Parmentier, Marc; Gourcy, Laurence; Négrel, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    Groundwaters in parts of the Paris Basin (France) are facing increasing selenium (Se) contents that can exceed the drinking water limit of 10 μg/L according to the European Framework Directive in the field of water policy (2000/60/EC). To better understand the groundwater origins and the selenium dynamics, the water chemistry of the Chalk aquifer supplying drinkable water to Lille city was studied. This area is submitted to quantitative and qualitative pressure from industrial, urban and agriculture origins. An integrated study was settled to determine the water sources and dynamics of elements, with a focus on Se. After a large chemical characterisation of the groundwater chemistry in the four field wells, a monthly monitoring was held in four wells and in the Deûle channel. Chemical analysis of major and trace elements, stable isotopes (δ18O, δ2H), strontium isotopes, and δ34S and δ18O of sulphates were realised. The chemical composition of solids sampled at various depths at vicinity of the four wells was also analysed. The specific geochemical signature of groundwater as revealed by Sr isotopes, in addition to element concentrations ratios like Mg/Sr and Se/Sr, highlighted mixture of three main groundwaters bodies: (1) the upstream groundwaters in the recharge area with the most radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr isotopic signature; (2) the confined groundwaters with high Sr concentrations due to water-rock interactions and the lowest 87Sr/86Sr isotopic signature close to the one of the chalk in Paris and London basins; (3) the Se-rich formations of Tertiary and Quaternary. The contents of Se, mainly present as SeV I (and locally as SeIV ), displayed spatial and temporal disparities that can be explained by geological and hydrogeological conditions. Se-rich clayed sediments originating from the dismantling of Se-rich tertiary formations (i.e. Ypresian) overlay the chalk formation and can be found in saturated conditions depending of the water table level. Oxidation of

  19. Strength and Biot's coefficient for high-porosity oil- or water-saturated chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Katrine Alling

    considerations for the size of the drilling window and the magnitude of the lateral stress involve the Biot coefficient. Additionally, the fluid effect of oil-saturated chalk behaving much stronger than water-saturated chalk affects geomechanical considerations related to e.g. water injection into a reservoir...... during hydrostatic loading. The hypothesis is that the Biot coefficient and the theory of poroelasticity may cover the fluid effect by including the increased fluid bulk modulus from oil to water. A high number of test results for both oil- and water-saturated high-porosity outcrop chalk show correlation...

  20. Low field NMR surface relaxivity studies of chalk and argillaceous sandstones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Fordsmand, Henrik; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2017-01-01

    in studies related to the North Sea oil and gas reservoirs, since they cover a wide range of formations, ranging from homogeneous to inhomogeneous chalk, chloritic and quartz mineralogy. Comparison of T 2 distributions at Lamor frequency of 2 and 20 MHz at 40 °C shows that paramagnetic minerals in the Gorm...... the accuracy of predictions of petrophysical properties of various rocks with the use of NMR spectrometry. We perform laboratory transverse relaxation (T2) measurements on water saturated Gorm field chalk, Stevns Klint chalk, Solsort field greensand and Berea sandstone. These rocks are of particular interest...

  1. Waveform analysis of crosshole GPR data collected in heterogeneous chalk deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keskinen, Johanna; Nielsen, Lars; Zibar, Majken Caroline Looms

    2014-01-01

    Chalks are important reservoirs for groundwater production onshore Denmark and for hydrocarbons in the North Sea Basin. Therefore this rock type is studied extensively with geological and geophysical methods. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) tomography is used to characterize fine-scale reservoir...... properties, e.g. subtle changes in porosity. We have conducted a range of high-resolution GPR crosshole experiments in Boesdal quarry in Eastern Denmark. The objective is to investigate the impact of fine-scale heterogeneity on reservoir properties in chalk. The studied chalk interval is c.15 m thick. It can...

  2. From ooze to sedimentary rock, the first diagenetic processes affecting the chalk of eastern Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, Julien; Boussaha, Myriam; Nielsen, Lars

    processes operating in the chalk sediments at widely different scales into a single diagenetic model: At Stevns the chalk is affected by an extensive polygonal fault system which is expressed in onshore and offshore seismic profiles. Smaller scale contractional features like deformation bands (hairline...... strongly affect reservoir properties of the chalk both by establishing compartments and vertical connections. A better understanding of these reservoir modifications will be critical for improving the predictive capability of models describing the behaviour of drinking water and hydrocarbons hosted...

  3. Probing the intrinsically oil-wet surfaces of pores in North Sea chalk at subpore resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassenkam, Tue; Skovbjerg, Lone Lindbæk; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2009-01-01

    Ultimate Oil recovery from chalk reservoirs is limited by many factors - including the grain size and the surface properties of the small mainly biogenic calcite particles that chalk is made off . Wettability, the tendency for water or oil to spread over a surface, of the particle surfaces is one......, not a product of later migration of oil into the reservoir, which is known to alter the wettability of the surfaces. The data indicated distinct patches, with diameters ranging from 500 to 50 nm, which appears to have different wettability The size of the patches is significantly less than the size of the chalk...

  4. Albanian violets of the section Melanium, their morphological variability, genetic similarity and their adaptations to serpentine or chalk soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słomka, Aneta; Godzik, Barbara; Szarek-Łukaszewska, Grażyna; Shuka, Lulëzim; Hoef-Emden, Kerstin; Bothe, Hermann

    2015-02-01

    Violets of the section Melanium from Albanian serpentine and chalk soils were examined for their taxonomic affiliations, their ability to accumulate heavy metals and their colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). The sequence analysis of the ITS1-5.8S rDNA-ITS2 region showed that all the sampled six Albanian violets grouped between Viola lutea and Viola arvensis, but not with Viola tricolor. The fine resolution of the ITS sequences was not sufficient for a further delimitation of the Albanian violets within the V. lutea-V. arvensis clade. Therefore, the Albanian violets were classified by a set of morphological characters. Viola albanica, Viola dukadjinica and Viola raunsiensis from serpentine soils as well as Viola aetolica from a chalk meadow were unambiguously identified, whereas the samples of Viola macedonica showed high morphological variability. All the violets, in both roots and shoots contained less than or similar levels of heavy metals as their harboring soils, indicating that they were heavy metal excluders. All the violets were strongly colonized by AMF with the remarkable exception of V. albanica. This violet lived as a scree creeper in shallow serpentine soil where the concentration of heavy metals was high but those of P, K and N were scarce. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Advanced waterflooding in chalk reservoirs: Understanding of underlying mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahid, Adeel; Sandersen, Sara Bülow; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2011-01-01

    is still not clear. In this work the crude oil/seawater ions interaction at different temperatures, pressures and sulfate ion concentrations is investigated. Our results show that sulfate ions may help decrease the crude oil viscosity when brine is contacted with oil under high temperature and pressure. We...... have also observed formation of a microemulsion phase between brine and oil with the increase in sulfate ion concentration at high temperature and pressure. In addition, sulfate ions can reduce interfacial tension (IFT) between oil and water. We propose that the decrease in viscosity and formation...... of a microemulsion phase could be the possible reasons for the observed increase in oil recovery with sulfate ions at high temperature in chalk reservoirs besides the mechanism of the rock wettability alteration, which has been reported in most previous studies....

  6. Static and dynamic effective stress coefficient of chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, M. Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Christensen, Helle Foged

    2012-01-01

    Deformation of a hydrocarbon reservoir can ideally be used to estimate the effective stress acting on it. The effective stress in the subsurface is the difference between the stress due to the weight of the sediment and a fraction (effective stress coefficient) of the pore pressure. The effective...... stress coefficient is thus relevant for studying reservoir deformation and for evaluating 4D seismic for the correct pore pressure prediction. The static effective stress coefficient n is estimated from mechanical tests and is highly relevant for effective stress prediction because it is directly related...... to mechanical strain in the elastic stress regime. The corresponding dynamic effective stress coefficient α is easy to estimate from density and velocity of acoustic (elastic) waves. We studied n and α of chalk from the reservoir zone of the Valhall field, North Sea, and found that n and α vary...

  7. Area balance and strain in an extensional fault system: Strategies for improved oil recovery in fractured chalk, Gilbertown Field, southwestern Alabama. Final report, March 1996--September 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashin, J.C.; Raymond, D.E.; Rindsberg, A.K.; Alabi, G.G.; Carroll, R.E.; Groshong, R.H.; Jin, G.

    1998-12-01

    This project was designed to analyze the structure of Mesozoic and Tertiary strata in Gilbertown Field and adjacent areas to suggest ways in which oil recovery can be improved. The Eutaw Formation comprises 7 major flow units and is dominated by low-resistivity, low-contrast play that is difficult to characterize quantitatively. Selma chalk produces strictly from fault-related fractures that were mineralized as warm fluid migrated from deep sources. Resistivity, dipmeter, and fracture identification logs corroborate that deformation is concentrated in the hanging-wall drag zones. New area balancing techniques were developed to characterize growth strata and confirm that strain is concentrated in hanging-wall drag zones. Curvature analysis indicates that the faults contain numerous fault bends that influence fracture distribution. Eutaw oil is produced strictly from footwall uplifts, whereas Selma oil is produced from fault-related fractures. Clay smear and mineralization may be significant trapping mechanisms in the Eutaw Formation. The critical seal for Selma reservoirs, by contrast, is where Tertiary clay in the hanging wall is juxtaposed with poorly fractured Selma chalk in the footwall. Gilbertown Field can be revitalized by infill drilling and recompletion of existing wells. Directional drilling may be a viable technique for recovering untapped oil from Selma chalk. Revitalization is now underway, and the first new production wells since 1985 are being drilled in the western part of the field.

  8. Transport Behavior of Nanoparticles (NP) in Stevns Klint Chalk Rock and EOR Potential

    OpenAIRE

    Ayoub, Amr

    2017-01-01

    Master's thesis in Petroleum engineering This study investigates the adsorption potential of NPs in Chalk cores and the possible EOR mechanisms behind it. The work is divided into two major sets of experiments; static adsorption experiments and core flooding experiments. Static adsorption experiments studies the specific adsorption potential of NPs on the surface of three minerals; Quartz, Kaolinite, and Calcite. Since this work focuses on NPs interactions with Chalk cores, great attention...

  9. Impact of supercritical CO2 injection on petrophysical and rock mechanics properties of chalk: an experimental study on chalk from South Arne field, North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Hjuler, Morten Leth; Christensen, Helle Foged

    2011-01-01

    as indicated by NMR T2 relaxation time was observed. Rock mechanics testing indicates that in 30% porosity chalk from the South Arne field, injection of supercritical CO2 has no significant effect on shear strength and compaction properties, while there is probably a slight decrease in stiffness properties...... Formation, most probably due to the very little contact cement in Ekofisk Formation chalk. Time-lapse monitoring strategies may be required during a CO2-EOR process for the measurement of changes in reservoir properties that may cause deformation of and leakage from a reservoir. Results of this study...... will provide data for designing future monitoring strategies based on 4D seismic....

  10. Influence of sampling depth and post-sampling analysis time on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacteriological analysis was carried out for samples taken at water depth and at 1, 6, 12 and 24 hours post-sampling. It was observed that the total and faecal coliform bacteria were significantly higher in the 3 m water depth samples than in the surface water samples (ANOVA, F = 59.41, 26.751, 9.82 (T.C); 46.41, 26.81, ...

  11. Evaluation of the Acoustic Properties of Wood-Plastic-Chalk Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Daeipour

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Wood-plastic composites are a new group of materials that can be used in construction instead of wood and plastic. They are used in various industries due to features such as sound and water absorption, among others. This article aims to study the acoustic properties of wood-plastic composites made of wood flour, low-density polyethylene, and chalk. In this study, 6 combinations were made with different material percentages. Acoustic tests were performed for frequency ranges of 125, 250, 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz. The results of this study showed that the maximum amount of sound absorption was observed at a frequency of 2000 onwards. At the frequency of 25 to 2000, no remarkable change in sound absorption was recorded. At the 2000 to upper frequencies, one of the samples displayed the maximum amount of sound absorption. In terms of water absorption, a significant variation was reported in three samples with passing time (2, 24, 48 and 72 hours.

  12. Sample storage conditions significantly influence faecal microbiome profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Jocelyn M; Leong, Lex E X; Rogers, Geraint B

    2015-11-17

    Sequencing-based studies of the human faecal microbiota are increasingly common. Appropriate storage of sample material is essential to avoid the introduction of post-collection bias in microbial community composition. Rapid freezing to -80 °C is commonly considered to be best-practice. However, this is not feasible in many studies, particularly those involving sample collection in participants' homes. We determined the extent to which a range of stabilisation and storage strategies maintained the composition of faecal microbial community structure relative to freezing to -80 °C. Refrigeration at 4 °C, storage at ambient temperature, and the use of several common preservative buffers (RNAlater, OMNIgene.GUT, Tris-EDTA) were assessed relative to freezing. Following 72 hours of storage, faecal microbial composition was assessed by 16 S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Refrigeration was associated with no significant alteration in faecal microbiota diversity or composition. However, samples stored using other conditions showed substantial divergence compared to -80 °C control samples. Aside from refrigeration, the use of OMNIgene.GUT resulted in the least alteration, while the greatest change was seen in samples stored in Tris-EDTA buffer. The commercially available OMNIgene.GUT kit may provide an important alternative where refrigeration and cold chain transportation is not available.

  13. Influence of sample treatment on ESR signal of irradiated citrus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Jesus, E.F.O.; Lopes, R.T. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia; Rossi, A.M. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1996-11-01

    EST spectra of the hard seed cover and kernel coating of irradiated orange and tangerine fruits were obtained under different sample drying conditions to analyze the effect of treatment on ESR line at g = 2.0033 (line A). The spectra shows almost the same lines that appear in stalks, achenes, seeds and skins of fresh fruit. The peak-to-peak intensity of the line A of the spectra shows a linear variation with dose in the range studied (up to 5 kGy) under controlled sample preparation. Q-band ESR spectra shows that this line is composed for three different lines from different species, A{sub 1}, A{sub 2} and A{sub 3}. The A{sub 2} and A{sub 3} lines are associated with dose but grow also during drying of the sample and are probably due to `cellulosic` components of the seed cover. The A{sub 1} line appears only when sample is dried and is probably associated with the quinones of the internal kernel coat. (author).

  14. Influence of compression pressure on Young's modulus of ceramic samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shantir, Omar; Trník, Anton

    2017-07-01

    The samples used in this study are created from a porcelain mixture. This mixture is a high strength aluminous porcelain which is used in electrotechnical engineering (high voltage insulators). The porcelain mixture contains clay, kaolin, feldspar, alumina, and small amount of other admixtures. The samples are made with three different compression pressures (80, 90, and 110 MPa). Impulse excitation technique, termodilatometry, and termogravimetry are used to determine Young's modulus. The analyses are performed in the temperature range from 30 °C to 1100 °C with a heating rate of 5 °C/min in a static air atmosphere. It is found out that values of Young's modulus do not increase linearly with the compression pressure.

  15. Influence of Sampling Procedure on Codeine Concentrations in Oral Fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coucke, Line D; De Smet, Lien; Verstraete, Alain G

    2016-03-01

    For many drugs, there is a poor correlation between the plasma and oral fluid (OF) concentrations, due to differences in OF pH, oral contamination, stimulation of OF flow and variability of the volume of sample taken. The aim of this study was to evaluate the OF/plasma ratio and variability in drug concentration in OF sampled by two commercially available collection systems: Saliva Collection System (SCS) and Quantisal. Blood and OF samples were collected from 12 volunteers after intake of 19.5 mg codeine phosphate. Six persons were sampled by SCS first, followed by Quantisal; six other participants used Quantisal before SCS. The OF content of SCS tubes was measured spectrophotometrically. The Quantisal devices were weighed to correct for the effectively obtained OF volume. Codeine was measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The mean codeine concentration at 1 h was 29.8 ± 18.8 μg/L in plasma, 72.8 ± 63.9 μg/L in SCS OF and 85.3 ± 72.6 μg/L in Quantisal OF. The mean OF/plasma ratio was 2.30 ± 0.77 (SCS) and 2.69 ± 1.94 (Quantisal). Pearson's correlation coefficient between OF and plasma codeine concentrations was statistically significantly (P = 0.005) higher for SCS (R(2) = 0.745) than for Quantisal (R(2) = 0.403). The variability in ratios with Quantisal was markedly reduced when used after SCS. Codeine concentrations measured in OF taken with SCS correlate better with plasma concentrations than in OF obtained with Quantisal, particularly when Quantisal was used first. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Water recharge and solute transport through the vadose zone of fractured chalk under desert conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nativ, R.; Dahan, O. [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem, Rehovot (Israel); Adar, E. [Ben Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede Boker (Israel); Geyh, M. [State Geological Survey of Lower Saxony, Hannover (Germany)

    1995-02-01

    In the present study the inferred mechanism of groundwater recharge and contamination was studied using tracer concentrations in the fractured vadose zone of the Avdat chalk. The results of this study are important for an evaluation of groundwater contamination from existing and planned facilities in the northern Negev desert in Israel. This study focused on the vicinity of the Ramat Hovav industrial chemical complex in the northern Negev, which also includes the national site for hazardous waste. Water recharge and solute migration rates were examined in five core holes and one borehole which penetrate the entire vadose zone and enabled the collection of rock samples for chemical and isotopic analyses, and an observation of fracture distribution with depth. Tritium profiles were used to estimate water percolation rates through the vadose zone, chloride profiles were used to assess the migration rate of nonreactive solutes, and bromide profiles were also used to evaluate the migration rate of nonreactive contaminants. Deuterium and oxygen 18 profiles were used to assess the evaporation of the infiltrating water at and near land surface.

  17. Estimating daily recharge to the Chalk aquifer of southern England – a simple methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. Limbrick

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple, practical model for estimating daily recharge - as hydrologically effective rainfall (HER - to the Chalk outcrop of southern England is presented. Daily meteorological observations are the only data requirements. The model was calibrated for a Chalk river, the Wey, in south Dorset. Six different root constant thresholds were used to estimate daily actual evapotranspiration (AET rates for the river. The model was then used to calculate HER using the six estimates of AET. Daily mean flow was simulated using three different models: CAPTAIN, IHACRES and INCA. The six HER estimates provided independent model inputs. HER calculated using a root constant of 200mm proved suitable not only for the Wey, but also (via a validation exercise for other rivers on the Chalk of southern England for riverflow simulations as well as the timing and magnitude of groundwater recharge. The results suggest that a root constant of 200mm is optimal for the Chalk outcrop of southern England. The model is particularly useful for studies where the application of more complex methods of recharge estimation is impractical. Keywords: Chalk aquifer, root constant, recharge, Hydrologically Effective Rainfall, model, riverflow, CAPTAIN, IHACRES, INCA, River Wey

  18. Experimental study and mechanical modelling of the effects of water-driving in an oil saturated chalk. Application to the petroleum industry; Etude experimentale et modelisation mecanique des effets du balayage a l'eau dans une craie saturee d'huile. Application a l'industrie petroliere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mata, C.

    2001-01-01

    The production of hydrocarbons may sometimes lead to compaction of the oil-reservoir layers with substantial collapse of the soil surface; this mechanism is usually mentioned as Subsidence. Classical remedy to this problem is to sustain the fluid pressure with the help of water injection. However, in presence of high porosity chalk (porosity > 30%), this technique does not give effective results: the subsidence rate at North Sea reservoirs (Ekofisk field), after injection, has remained unchanged. Some justify the subsistence in the chalk as caused by phenomena of dissolution of the carbonates; others think it is connected to the destruction of capillary menisci. In this research, we follow this second approach. This study is finalized to a better understanding of the compaction mechanisms in pure carbonates when water is injected. This is done by proposing -in micro-scale first and in macro-scale after- a physical model that agrees with empirical observations. In order to meet this target, IFP skills and experience in physical and chemical measurements (taken before, after and during mechanical tests) have proficiently joined ENPC laboratory (CERMMO) knowledge of micro and macro modelling. The soft rock studied is a Paris basin's white chalk (Craie de Guerville). Its physical and chemical characterisation (i.e.: silica content, porosity, permeability) is very similar to North Sea chalk, but Guerville chalk has never been in contact with oil and generally it crops out of the ground surface. Strength parameters of this rock have been first determined by standard triaxial tests. Three different saturation configurations have been examined: dry, fully oil-saturated and fully water-saturated. As literature clearly state, dry chalk is stronger than oil saturated chalk and the first two are largely stronger than water saturated chalk. Therefore uniaxial strain water injection tests have been performed on oil saturated samples. Results, coupled with previous physical

  19. Sedimentary development, seismic stratigraphy and burial compaction of the Chalk Group in the Netherlands North Sea area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Molen, A.S.

    2004-01-01

    In the Netherlands offshore sector, available data and knowledge of the sediments of the Upper Cretaceous to Lower Tertiary (Danian) Chalk Group is limited due to its hitherto restricted significance as a hydrocarbon reservoir. For example, the stratigraphic subdivision of the Chalk in this area

  20. Bringing mini-chalk talks to the bedside to enhance clinical teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Michael B; Orlander, Jay D

    2017-01-01

    Chalk talks - where the teacher is equipped solely with a writing utensil and a writing surface - have been used for centuries, yet little has been written about strategies for their use in medical education. Structured education proximal to patient encounters (during rounds, at the bedside, or in between patients in clinic) maximizes the opportunities for clinical learning. This paper presents a strategy to bring mini-chalk talks (MCTs) to the bedside as a practical way to provide relevant clinical teaching by visually framing teachable moments. Grounded in adult learning theory, MCTs leverage teaching scripts to facilitate discussion, involve learners at multiple levels, and embrace the increased retention associated with visual aids. These authors provide specific recommendations for the design and implementation of MCT sessions including what topics work well, how to prepare, and how to involve and engage the learners. ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder; MCT: Mini-chalk talks.

  1. Full-waveform Inversion of Crosshole GPR Data Collected in Strongly Heterogeneous Chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keskinen, Johanna; Zibar, Majken Caroline Looms; Nielsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Chalk is an important reservoir rock for hydrocarbons and for groundwater resources for many major cities. Therefore, this rock type has been extensively investigated using both geological and geophysical methods. Many applications of crosshole GPR tomography rely on the ray approximation...... all the information contained in the data and is able to provide significantly improved images. Here, we apply full-waveform inversion to crosshole GPR data to image strong heterogeneity of the chalk related to changes in lithology and porosity. We have collected a crosshole tomography dataset...... recovered by the full-waveform approach. Our results show that with proper estimates of the above-mentioned prior parameters, crosshole GPR full-waveform tomography provides high-resolution images capturing a high degree of variability that standard methods cannot resolve in chalk. This in turn makes...

  2. Mycorrhizal symbiosis effects on growth of chalk false-brome (Brachypodium pinnatum) are dependent on the environmental light regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füzy, Anna; Bothe, Hermann; Molnár, Edit; Biró, Borbála

    2014-03-01

    AMF (arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi) colonization of the grass chalk false-brome (Brachypodium pinnatum (L.) P. B.) was studied in selected habitats under spatially different light regimes: (a) shade condition under oak trees, (b) half shade in a shrubby area and (c) full-sun conditions on unshaded grassland. This study assessed the variations in AMF colonization of the grass dependent on the light supply in field habitats. Soil, root and shoot samples were collected four times during the vegetation period (in June, July, September and October). Root colonization, root and shoot biomass as well as soil water content were determined. The highest rate of AMF colonization was detected in June under half-sun and full-sun conditions, where about 50% of the roots were colonized. The average amount of arbuscules was less than 20% in the roots at the three sites, with the highest number of arbuscules in June, under half-sun and full-sun conditions, however, not under the trees. Overall, best mycorrhizal colonization occurred during summer, and its rate decreased in autumn. This tendency inversely correlated with the amount of precipitation, and thus with the water content of soils. The high colonization rate of the examined root samples, and also its seasonal fluctuation, might reflect the importance of the symbiosis where inorganic nutrients and water are the growth-limiting factors. The marginal AMF colonization of chalk false-brome under shade conditions indicates that plants do not use AMF under all stress conditions. When low light limits photosynthesis and thus growth of the plants, they dispense with the colonization of AMF in order to save the expenditure of organic carbon. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigation of spore forming bacterial flooding for enhanced oil recovery in a North Sea chalk Reservoir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halim, Amalia Yunita; Nielsen, Sidsel Marie; Eliasson Lantz, Anna

    2015-01-01

    in higher oil production from the heterogeneous chalk rock. In all cases, an incubation period ('shut-in') after the bacterial and/or nutrient injection was needed to give sufficient time for the bacteria to grow inside the core and to produce more oil. Our findings show potential application of bacteria......Little has been done to study microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) in chalk reservoirs. The present study focuses on core flooding experiments designed to see microbial plugging and its effect on oil recovery. A pressure tapped core holder was used for this purpose. A spore forming bacteria...

  4. Measuring and Modeling the Displacement of Connate Water in Chalk Core Plugs during Water Injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsbech, Uffe C C; Aage, Helle Karina; Andersen, Bertel Lohmann

    2006-01-01

    The movement of connate water spiked with gamma emitting 22Na was studied during laboratory water flooding of oil saturated chalk from a North Sea oil reservoir. Using a one dimensional gamma monitoring technique is was observed that connate water is piled-up at the front of the injection water...... and forms a mixed water bank with almost 100% connate water in the front behind which a gradual transition to pure injection water occurs. This result underpins log interpretations from waterflooded chalk reservoirs. An ad hoc model was set up by use of the results, and the process was examined...

  5. Determining quantity and quality of retained oil in mature marly chalk and marlstone of the Cretaceous Niobrara Formation by low-temperature hydrous pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewan, Michael; Sonnenfeld, Mark D.

    2017-01-01

    Low-temperature hydrous pyrolysis (LTHP) at 300°C (572°F) for 24 h released retained oils from 12- to 20-meshsize samples of mature Niobrara marly chalk and marlstone cores. The released oil accumulated on the water surface of the reactor, and is compositionally similar to oil produced from the same well. The quantities of oil released from the marly chalk and marlstone by LTHP are respectively 3.4 and 1.6 times greater than those determined by tight rock analyses (TRA) on aliquots of the same samples. Gas chromatograms indicated this difference is a result of TRA oils losing more volatiles and volatilizing less heavy hydrocarbons during collection than LTHP oils. Characterization of the rocks before and after LTPH by programmable open-system pyrolysis (HAWK) indicate that under LTHP conditions no significant oil is generated and only preexisting retained oil is released. Although LTHP appears to provide better predictions of quantity and quality of retained oil in a mature source rock, it is not expected to replace the more time and sample-size efficacy of TRA. However, LTHP can be applied to composited samples from key intervals or lithologies originally recognized by TRA. Additional studies on duration, temperature, and sample size used in LTHP may further optimize its utility.

  6. Rock physical aspects of CO{sub 2} injection in chalk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, M.M.

    2011-04-15

    Impact of supercritical CO{sub 2} on the petrophysical and rock-mechanics properties of Ekofisk Formation and Tor Formation chalk from South Arne field, Danish North Sea, chalk was investigated. A series of laboratory experiments was performed on core material collected from the reservoir zone of the South Arne field in order to reveal the changes with respect to porosity, specific surface, pore stiffness, wettability, mineralogy and mechanical failure. In addition, a theoretical rock physical background was also established in order to be able to make sensible interpretation of laboratory data. Sound wave velocity was used as the central tool to study any change in petrophysical and rock mechanical properties. The main focus was to achieve a better understanding of effective stress coefficient (also known as Biot's coefficient); by means of which effective stress can be predicted more accurately. Independent theoretical studies were made on diagenesis, surface properties and stiffness of chalk and their relation with sonic velocity (or Biot's coefficient calculated from sonic velocity). The knowledge and experience from these studies was combined to achieve the main research objective of monitoring changes in hydrocarbon reservoirs in chalk due to CO{sub 2} injection. In order to understand the development of chalk from calcareous ooze and achieving pore stiffness, the diagenesis process of a sedimentary sequence from Kerguelen Plateau in the Indian Ocean was studied. The principal objective of the study was to explore how different porosity reduction mechanisms change the strength of these deep sea carbonate-rich sediments and how these mechanisms can be traced from the change in Biot's coefficient, alpha. In calcareous ooze, alpha was found close to one. Mechanical compaction reduces porosity, but only leads to a minor decrease in alpha. Recrystallization process renders particles smoother, but do not lead to reduction in alpha unless it gives

  7. Optimization of Spore Forming Bacteria Flooding for Enhanced Oil Recovery in North Sea Chalk Reservoir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halim, Amalia Yunita; Nielsen, Sidsel Marie; Eliasson Lantz, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Little has been done to study microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) in chalk reservoirs. The present study focused on core flooding experiments to see microbial plugging and its effect on oil recovery. A pressure tapped core holder with pressure ports at 1.2 cm, 3.8 cm, and 6.3 cm from the inlet...

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance and sound velocity measurements of chalk saturated with magnesium rich brine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2013-01-01

    composition. In this study we relate NMR data to changes in P-wave velocity and electrical resistivity. Core plugs from outcrop Stevns chalk, of 44% porosity, were divided into groups of three and saturated with deionized water, calcite equilibrated water, as well as sodium chloride and magnesium chloride...

  9. The Effect of Magnesium Carbonate (Chalk) on Geometric Entropy, Force, and Electromyography During Rock Climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgas, Matthew A; Drum, Scott N; Jensen, Randall L; Phillips, Kevin C; Watts, Phillip B

    2016-12-01

    Rock climbers believe chalk dries the hands of sweat and improves the static coefficient of friction between the hands and the surface of the rock. The purpose of this study was to assess whether chalk affects geometric entropy or muscular activity during rock climbing. Nineteen experienced recreational rock climbers (13 males, 6 females; 173.5 ± 7.0 cm; 67.5 ± 3.4 kg) completed 2 climbing trails with and without chalk. The body position of the climber and muscular activity of the finger flexors was recorded throughout the trial. Following the movement sequence participants hung from a standard climbing hold until they slipped from the climbing structure, while the coefficient of friction and the ratio of the vertical forces on the hands and feet were determined. Although there were no differences in the coefficient of friction (P = .748), geometric entropy (P = .359), the ratio of the vertical forces between the hands and feet (P = .570), or muscular activity (P = .968), participants were able to hang longer after the use of chalk 62.9 ± 36.7 s and 49.3 ± 25.2 s (P = .046). This is advantageous because it may allow for prolonged rests, and more time to plan the next series of climbing moves.

  10. Effect of fluid-solid friction on the stiffness of chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Nguh Akam, Hosea; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2011-01-01

    Chalks behave weaker at water saturated condition. We studied this softening effect as a function of Biot’s frequency ratio, which is a ratio between measured ultrasonic wave frequency and Biot critical frequency, fc. Kinematic viscosity of fluid and permeability of rock determines fc. We observed...... that rocks saturated with higher kinematic viscosity fluid are stiffer....

  11. Sedimentology of the late cretaceous and early tertiary (tuffaceous) chalk of Northwest Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, J.J.P.

    1994-01-01

    The Tuffaceous Chalk of South Limburg (The Netherlands), a friable, porous, bioclastic carbonate sandstone, became subject of scientific interest in 1770, when workers found a large skull of Mososourus comperi in the subterranean quarry of Mount St. Pieter near Maastricht. After Dumont (1849) had

  12. Electrical tortuosity, Kozeny’s factor and cementation factor modelled for chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2015-01-01

    Based on the electrical properties of chalk from the North Sea and Stevns Klint and on published data, we explore how klinkenberg corrected permeability from experimental data relate to porosity and electrical resistivity. In the current study we use electrical conductivity data of partially water...

  13. Population dynamics of three gammarid species (Crustacea, Amphipoda) in a French chalk stream. Part III. Migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedmakers, Annemarie; Pinkster, Sjouk

    1981-01-01

    Migration of Gammarus pulex pulex (Linnaeus, 1758), G. fossarum Koch in Panzer, 1836, and Echinogammarus berilloni (Catta, 1878) has been studied in a small French chalk stream, the Slack. Three different approaches to investigate both up- and downstream migration were used: (1) migration survey,

  14. Calabash Chalk's Geophagy Affects Gestating Rats' Behavior and the Histomorphology of the Cerebral Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses B. Ekong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Calabash chalk contains heavy metals, and this lead to this study on the effect of this chalk on the behavior and the histomorphology of the cerebral cortex of gestating rats. Material & Methods. 24 female rats were equally divided into 4 groups and were mated at preostrous with the males. The day after mating was designated as day 1 of gestation. On gestation days 7–20, groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 animals were treated with 1 mL of distilled water, and 1 mL (200 mg/kg, 2 mL (400 mg/kg, and 3 mL (600 mg/kg of calabash chalk suspension, respectively. On pregnancy day 21, behavioral tests using the open field and the light/dark mazes were carried out and the animals subsequently euthanized and their brains were routinely processed. Results. There was no difference in ambulatory activities, but group 4 animals had more (P<0.05 transition frequency and were more averse to the dark in the light and dark field, while sections of the cerebral cortex showed a higher (P<0.05 cellular population, hypertrophied pyramidal cells, and vacuolations in the treatment groups. Conclusion. Calabash chalk may have anxiolytic effect especially at high dose in the light and dark field but not in the open field and can stimulate maternal cerebral cortical cellular changes.

  15. Analysis of fine-dispersed chalk usage as mineral additive in the composition of sand aggrerate concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Светлана Николаевна Чепурная

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The research results of fine-disperse chalk addition on physical and mechanical properties of the cement stone and concrete are shown. It is determined that fine-disperse chalk addition in the binder composition increases the content of ultrafine particles. The chalk particles fill the pore space between the cement particles, increasing the packing density, which leads to a density increase, which consequently leads to improved physical and mechanical properties of the concrete: water tightness, cold resistance, corrosion resistance, crack resistance and other properties

  16. Observed externalizing behavior: a developmental comparison of genetic and environmental influences across three samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marceau, Kristine; Humbad, Mikhila N; Burt, S Alexandra; Klump, Kelly L; Leve, Leslie D; Neiderhiser, Jenae M

    2012-01-01

    Estimates of genetic and environmental influences on externalizing behavior are markedly inconsistent. In an attempt to refine and extend our knowledge of externalizing behavior, the current study examined the etiology of externalizing behavior using observational data in middle childhood and adolescence from three twin and sibling samples. Observational ratings offer a unique perspective on externalizing behavior rarely examined within behavioral genetic designs. Shared environmental influences were significant and moderate to large in magnitude across all three samples (i.e., 44, 77, and 38%), while genetic influences (31%) were significant only for the adolescent sample. All three samples showed greater shared environmental influences and less genetic influence than is typically found when examining self-, parent-, and teacher-reports of externalizing behavior. These findings are consistent with other reports that have found evidence for shared environmental influences on measures of child externalizing behavior-in direct contrast to a commonly held perception that shared environmental factors do not have significant influences on behavior beyond early childhood.

  17. Influence of pre-analytical procedures on genomic DNA integrity in blood samples: the SPIDIA experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malentacchi, F; Ciniselli, C M; Pazzagli, M; Verderio, P; Barraud, L; Hartmann, C C; Pizzamiglio, S; Weisbuch, S; Wyrich, R; Gelmini, S

    2015-02-02

    DNA integrity is a critical part of the definition of genomic DNA (gDNA) quality and can influence downstream molecular applications. Pre-analytical variables as sample storage and DNA extraction methods can influence the quality and quantity of isolated DNA and affect molecular test performances. The aim of this paper is to investigate the role of blood sample storage and DNA extraction procedures on gDNA integrity and gDNA fragmentation impact on a molecular test. 157 DNA samples deriving from the Pan European 1st SPIDIA DNA External Quality Assessment (EQA), aimed to investigate the influence of blood storage on gDNA quality and quantity, have been analyzed by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis and ImageJ imaging software. 157 DNA samples derived from the Pan European 1st SPIDIA DNA External Quality Assessment (EQA), which aimed to investigate the influence of blood storage on gDNA quality and quantity, have been analyzed by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis and ImageJ imaging software. Our results demonstrate that blood sample storage and DNA extraction procedures influence gDNA integrity and that the same blood sample which underwent a long range multiplex PCR based analytical test can provide different results if the adopted pre-analytical procedures are not standardized. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Current challenges in air sampling of semivolatile organic contaminants: sampling artifacts and their influence on data comparability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melymuk, Lisa; Bohlin, Pernilla; Sáňka, Ondřej; Pozo, Karla; Klánová, Jana

    2014-12-16

    With current science and policy needs, more attention is being given to expanding and improving air sampling of semivolatile organic contaminants (SVOCs). However, a wide range of techniques and configurations are currently used (active and passive samplers, different deployment times, different sorbents, etc.) and as the SVOC community looks to assess air measurements on a global scale, questions of comparability arise. We review current air sampling techniques, with a focus on sampling artifacts that can lead to uncertainties or biases in reported concentrations, in particular breakthrough, degradation, meteorological influences, and assumptions regarding passive sampling. From this assessment, we estimate the bias introduced for SVOC concentrations from all factors. Due to the effects of breakthrough, degradation, particle fractions and sampler uptake periods, some current passive and active sampler configurations may underestimate certain SVOCs by 30-95%. We then recommend future study design, appropriateness of sampler types for different study goals, and finally, how the SVOC community should move forward in both research and monitoring to best achieve comparability and consistency in air measurements.

  19. In-Situ Monitoring Of Nitrate Fluxes Through Unsaturated Zone In Chalk Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, L. J.; Keim, D. M.; Odling, N. E.

    2013-12-01

    Diffuse source nitrate leaching from agricultural land threatens groundwater quality worldwide. In the United Kingdom the source of up to 70% of nitrate found in surface and groundwater is thought to have been leached from agricultural land. Rising concentrations approaching or exceeding the maximum permissible concentration level of 11.3 mg/l NO3-N (EC Drinking Water Directive) have been observed in UK catchments on the Cretaceous Chalk in recent decades. Prediction of future nitrate concentration trends in chalk aquifers is desirable for groundwater abstraction management, but is particularly challenging due to their complex dual porosity nature. Contaminants such as nitrate are either rapidly moved through the system via preferential fracture pathways or more slowly through the porous matrix. We report in-situ nitrate monitoring within the top 1 m of the soil zone and within the deeper chalk unsaturated zone at depths between 30 and 45 m carried out over an entire hydrological year. Observed nitrate concentrations exceeded natural baseline concentration of NO3-N expected in the Cretaceous Chalk aquifer of northern England by nearly four times and were nearly double the legislated maximum permissible drinking water concentration. Soil zone nitrate monitoring (up to 1 m depth) indicated a strong relationship between NO3-N concentration and land management, annual cropping and hydrological cycles. Annual variation in NO3-N concentration were smaller in water from the deeper unsaturated zone (at 30 - 45 m depth) than in the soil zone, i.e. fluctuations are smoothed by travel through the chalk unsaturated zone. However, observations in the deep unsaturated zone indicate water flow is focused in specific fractures or conduits, so contaminants from the surface will rapidly reach the water table, even through thick unsaturated zones in chalk. Moreover, the low permeability of the matrix coupled with fracture flow can result in an accumulation of NO3-N in the unsaturated

  20. Influence of Freezing and Storage Procedure on Human Urine Samples in NMR-Based Metabolomics

    OpenAIRE

    Burkhard Luy; Bernhard Watzl; Stefan Heissler; Achim Bub; Rist, Manuela J.; Benjamin Görling; Claudia Muhle-Goll

    2013-01-01

    It is consensus in the metabolomics community that standardized protocols should be followed for sample handling, storage and analysis, as it is of utmost importance to maintain constant measurement conditions to identify subtle biological differences. The aim of this work, therefore, was to systematically investigate the influence of freezing procedures and storage temperatures and their effect on NMR spectra as a potentially disturbing aspect for NMR-based metabolomics studies. Urine sample...

  1. Seismic architecture of the Chalk Group from onshore reflection data in eastern Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, Julien; Anderskouv, Kresten; Boldreel, Lars Ole

    to compile and merge the geological and geophysical datasets to investigate the variation of the Chalk Group properties and their signature in the subsurface. In this communication, the seismic reflection data are being analysed. Very high resolution litho-, bio- and cyclostratigraphy can be correlated...... of the Chalk Group have been well constrained. Distinct sedimentary facies have been encountered; the sedimentology, the biostratigraphy, the diagenesis and the reservoir properties have been thoroughly investigated and reported. Stimulated by the intensive geological research, the field studies have been...... completed with the acquisition of an extensive set of subsurface data. The data include high resolution 2D multichannel seismics onshore and offshore, a seismic refraction profile, two entirely cored boreholes including wireline logs, GPR cross-hole tomography, thermographic analysis, etc. We intend...

  2. Electroosmotic dewatering of chalk sludge, iron hydroxide sludge, wet fly ash and biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, H.K.; Kristensen, I.V.; Ottosen, L.M.; Villumsen, A. [Dept. of Geology and Geotechnical Engineering, The Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark)

    2001-07-01

    Electroosmotic dewatering has been tested in laboratory cells for 4 different porous materials: chalk sludge, iron hydroxide sludge, wet fly ash and biomass sludge from enzyme production. In all cases it was possible to remove water when passing electric DC current through the material. Casagrande's coefficients for the three materials where determined at different water contents. In the electroosmotic experiments shown in this work chalk can be dewatered from 40% to 79% DM (dry matter), fly ash from 75 to 82% DM, iron hydroxide sludge from 2.7 to 19% DM and biomass from 3 to 33% DM. The process was not optimised indicating that higher dry matter contents could be achieved. (orig.)

  3. Electroosmotic dewatering of chalk sludge, iron hydroxide sludge, wet fly ash and biomass sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H.K.; Christensen, Iben Vernegren; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2003-01-01

    . Casagrande's coefficients were determined for the four materials at different water contents. The experiments in this work showed that chalk could be dewatered from 40% to 79% DM (dry matter), fly ash from 75 to 82% DM, iron hydroxide sludge from 2.7 to 19% DM and biomass from 3 to 33% DM by electroosmosis......Electroosmotic dewatering has been tested in laboratory cells on four different porous materials: chalk sludge, iron hydroxide sludge, wet fly ash and biomass sludge from enzyme production. In all cases it was possible to remove water when passing electric DC current through the material....... The process was not optimised indicating that higher dry matter contents could be achieved by electroosmosis. It was possible to relate Casagrande's coefficient directly to the electroosmotic coefficient obtained by dewatering experiments....

  4. Seismic stratigraphy and sedimentary architecture of the Chalk Group in south-west Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Connie; Ineson, Jon; Boldreel, Lars Ole

    2014-01-01

    The article focuses on a study undertaken by the Chalk Group on the western onshore region of the Danish Basin in Eastern Denmark related on the seismic stratigraphy and sedimentary architecture of the region. The study is undertaken through subdividing the northern North German Basin and the sou......-western Danish Basin on digital reflection using 2-dimensional digital and scanned seismic profiling. The results of the study sh regional trends related to the active indicate active inversion....

  5. The benthic fauna from the lower Maastrichtian chalk of Kronsmoor (Saturn quarry, northern Germany): composition and palaeoecologic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelke, Julia; Linnert, Christian; Mutterlose, Jörg; Wilmsen, Markus

    2017-04-01

    The Saturn quarry near Kronsmoor (northern Germany) offers an undisturbed section of upper Campanian to lower Maastrichtian chalks. The target interval of the DFG project "Biodiversity and plankton-benthos coupling: an integrated ecosystem analysis from the Late Cretaceous Chalk" is focused on the lower Maastrichtian Belemnella obtusa Zone to mid-Belemnella sumensis Zone, i.e. to the uppermost Kronsmoor and lowermost Hemmoor formations. In this interval, a conspicuous increase in macrofossil abundance without apparent lithofacies changes has been observed and the project intends to integrate planktic, benthic and geochemical proxies for a comprehensive understanding of the Chalk Sea ecosystem. The aim of this study is the analysis of the benthic community. In a first step, the benthic body fossils of the c. 25-m-thick section were semi-quantitatively studied based on a collection of more than 1,000 specimens. Two successive benthic macrofossil assemblages were recognised: the lower interval (upper part of the Kronsmoor Formation, B. obtusa Zone) is characterized by low abundances, only about 100 macroinvertebrates were collected, mostly irregular and regular echinoids, brachiopods and crinoids. The upper interval (B. sumensis Zone) shows an eight times higher macroinvertebrate abundance and a conspicuous dominance of brachiopods, increasing from only 30 to over 500 specimens. In order to quantify the observed qualitative palaeoecological changes, 33 bulk samples of about 6 kg each were retrieved in a distance of c. 0.75 m. The bulk samples were frozen and thawed, washed and sieved in different sizes. The fraction 500 μm-1 mm and >1 mm were picked, sorted and counted. A diverse assemblage of bryozoans, foraminifers, shell fragments of brachiopods and bivalves, spines and test fragments of different echinoid taxa, parts of asteroids and ophiuroids, sponge debris, crinoids and small serpulids, is present. Reduced abundances in the lower part and generally higher

  6. The tripartite influence model of body image and eating disturbance: a replication with a Japanese sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamiya, Yuko; Shroff, Hemal; Thompson, J Kevin

    2008-01-01

    To examine the tripartite influence model of body image and eating disturbance as a viable sociocultural explanation for the development of eating and body image problems with young Japanese females. A sample of 289 Japanese female undergraduates completed a variety of measures designed to index family, peer, and media influences, as well as levels of body dissatisfaction, eating disturbances, and self-esteem. The data were evaluated with structural equation modeling to test the tripartite model. Fit indices indicated a moderate fit to the overall tripartite model, replicating previous findings. This study suggests that the sociocultural variables found to influence body image and eating disturbances in Japan are similar to those observed with US samples. The implications for prevention and intervention programs are discussed.

  7. How burial diagenesis of chalk sediments controls sonic velocity and porosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2003-01-01

    Based on P-wave velocity and density data, a new elastic model for chalk sediments is established. The model allows the construction of a series of isoframe (IF) curves, each representing a constant part of the mineral phase contributing to the solid frame. The IF curves can be related to the pro......Based on P-wave velocity and density data, a new elastic model for chalk sediments is established. The model allows the construction of a series of isoframe (IF) curves, each representing a constant part of the mineral phase contributing to the solid frame. The IF curves can be related...... to the progress of burial diagenesis of chalk, which is revised as follows: Newly deposited carbonate ooze and mixed sediments range in porosity from 60 to 80%, depending on the prevalence of hollow microfossils. Despite the high porosity, these sediments are not in suspension, as reflected in IFs of 0.......1 or higher. Upon burial, the sediments lose porosity by mechanical compaction, and concurrently, the calcite particles recrystallize into progressively more equant shapes. High compaction rates may keep the particles in relative motion, whereas low compaction rates allow the formation of contact cement...

  8. Holocene evolution of coastal chalk cliffs in Normandy (NW France) as evidenced by onshore-offshore high resolution geomorphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguet, Timothée; Duperret, Anne; Costa, Stéphane; Regard, Vincent; Maillet, Grégoire

    2017-04-01

    Key words: erosion, rocky coast, cliffs, shore platform, watersheds, cosmogenic dating The chalk cliffs coastline extends to 120 km long in Normandy. It suffers from high erosion rates with a mean of about 0.15 m/y. The shore platforms extending from the cliff base to the sea, keep structural marks of the cliff erosion during long periods, i.e. the Holocene. Therefore it is essential to take an active interest in their morphology and their evolution to better understand cliff erosion timing. A land-sea Digital Elevation Model (DEM) has been produced for Mesnil-Val and Criel-sur-Mer sites (Seine Maritime), with the merge of topographic data (RGE alti, IGN) and shallow bathymetric data from three oceanographic Cruises, CROCOLIT-1 and 3 (Duperret, 2013) and SPLASHALIOT-2 (Maillet, 2014). Valleys that have more or less incised Turonian-Coniacian chalk cliffs occupy the landward part of study sites. The N130E V-shaped incised Mesnil-Val dry valley is elevated at 29 m high above the shore platform level, whereas the N175E Criel-sur-Mer flat valley, extending on 700 m wide and occupied by the Yères river, is directly connected to the shore platform. Offshore, the shore platform morphology varies from Criel-sur-Mer (North) to Mesnil-Val (South). Northern part of the study site is characterized by 1 km wide shore platform made of an overlay of flat steps controlled by normal faults. Southern part highlights a shore platform with a seaward edge located at about 500 m from the cliff face and strictly parallel oriented to the present-day coastline over a minimum distance of 5 km, without fracture control. The shore platform seaward edge is more or less steep and is always localized below the limit of the lowest tide level. Its origin could be related to the in-depth waves influence or to a past sea level stagnation. We aim to identify the origin of this seaward edge, using cosmogenic 10Be dating in order to develop a chalky shore platform evolution model. It is necessary to

  9. Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Steven K

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the Second Edition "This book has never had a competitor. It is the only book that takes a broad approach to sampling . . . any good personal statistics library should include a copy of this book." —Technometrics "Well-written . . . an excellent book on an important subject. Highly recommended." —Choice "An ideal reference for scientific researchers and other professionals who use sampling." —Zentralblatt Math Features new developments in the field combined with all aspects of obtaining, interpreting, and using sample data Sampling provides an up-to-date treat

  10. Seasonal variations in nitrate content, total nitrogen, and nitrate reductase activities of macrophytes from a chalk stream in Upper Bavaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzer, A; Kaiser, R

    1986-07-01

    11 macrophytic species from a groundwater influenced chalk stream in Upper Bavaria were investigated during a period of one year in order to determine differences in the endogenous nitrate content, in total nitrogen content and in nitrate reductase activity (NRA). Nitrate concentrations of different plants taken from the same site of the river varied by a factor of approximately 103. A maximum of 1,958 μmol NO 3- g-1 dry w. could be measured in the petioles of Nasturtium officinale, which accounts for 12% of plant dry w. Very high values were also found in Callitriche obtusangula and Veronica angallis-aquatica. In comparison to the ambient water, mean accumulation rates of up to 131 could be found. In Fontinalis antipyretica, the plant poorest in nitrate, the ratio was only 1.24:1. Elodea canadensis belonged to a group of plants having very low nitrate concentrations. Since NRA was very low too, it is assumed that nitrogen nutrition of this species depends rather on ammonia than on nitrate. With a few exceptions nitrate content of different plant organs varied markedly. In general they were lowest in leaves and highest in shoot axes. Appreciable amounts of nitrate were also found in the roots of plants. No correlation could be found between endogenous nitrate content and NRA. In contrast to endogenous nitrate content and NRA, total nitrogen concentrations of the plants did not differ significantly.

  11. Process-based modelling to evaluate simulated groundwater levels and frequencies in a Chalk catchment in south-western England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Brenner

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Chalk aquifers are an important source of drinking water in the UK. Due to their properties, they are particularly vulnerable to groundwater-related hazards like floods and droughts. Understanding and predicting groundwater levels is therefore important for effective and safe water management. Chalk is known for its high porosity and, due to its dissolvability, exposed to karstification and strong subsurface heterogeneity. To cope with the karstic heterogeneity and limited data availability, specialised modelling approaches are required that balance model complexity and data availability. In this study, we present a novel approach to evaluate simulated groundwater level frequencies derived from a semi-distributed karst model that represents subsurface heterogeneity by distribution functions. Simulated groundwater storages are transferred into groundwater levels using evidence from different observations wells. Using a percentile approach we can assess the number of days exceeding or falling below selected groundwater level percentiles. Firstly, we evaluate the performance of the model when simulating groundwater level time series using a spilt sample test and parameter identifiability analysis. Secondly, we apply a split sample test to the simulated groundwater level percentiles to explore the performance in predicting groundwater level exceedances. We show that the model provides robust simulations of discharge and groundwater levels at three observation wells at a test site in a chalk-dominated catchment in south-western England. The second split sample test also indicates that the percentile approach is able to reliably predict groundwater level exceedances across all considered timescales up to their 75th percentile. However, when looking at the 90th percentile, it only provides acceptable predictions for long time periods and it fails when the 95th percentile of groundwater exceedance levels is considered. By modifying the historic

  12. How Does Sampling Methodology Influence Molecular Detection and Isolation Success in Influenza A Virus Field Studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre-Margalef, Neus; Avril, Alexis; Tolf, Conny; Olsen, Björn; Waldenström, Jonas

    2015-12-11

    Wild waterfowl are important reservoir hosts for influenza A virus (IAV) and a potential source of spillover infections in other hosts, including poultry and swine. The emergence of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses, such as H5N1 and H5N8, and subsequent spread along migratory flyways prompted the initiation of several programs in Europe, North America, and Africa to monitor circulation of HPAI and low-pathogenicity precursor viruses (low-pathogenicity avian influenza [LPAI] viruses). Given the costs of maintaining such programs, it is essential to establish best practice for field methodologies to provide robust data for epidemiological interpretation. Here, we use long-term surveillance data from a single site to evaluate the influence of a number of parameters on virus detection and isolation of LPAI viruses. A total of 26,586 samples (oropharyngeal, fecal, and cloacal) collected from wild mallards were screened by real-time PCR, and positive samples were subjected to isolation in embryonated chicken eggs. The LPAI virus detection rate was influenced by the sample type: cloacal/fecal samples showed a consistently higher detection rate and lower cycle threshold (Ct) value than oropharyngeal samples. Molecular detection was more sensitive than isolation, and virus isolation success was proportional to the number of RNA copies in the sample. Interestingly, for a given Ct value, the isolation success was lower in samples from adult birds than in those from juveniles. Comparing the results of specific real-time reverse transcriptase (RRT)-PCRs and of isolation, it was clear that coinfections were common in the investigated birds. The effects of sample type and detection methods warrant some caution in interpretation of the surveillance data. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Predictors of Citation Rate in Psychology: Inconclusive Influence of Effect and Sample Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanel, Paul H P; Haase, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    In the present article, we investigate predictors of how often a scientific article is cited. Specifically, we focus on the influence of two often neglected predictors of citation rate: effect size and sample size, using samples from two psychological topical areas. Both can be considered as indicators of the importance of an article and post hoc (or observed) statistical power, and should, especially in applied fields, predict citation rates. In Study 1, effect size did not have an influence on citation rates across a topical area, both with and without controlling for numerous variables that have been previously linked to citation rates. In contrast, sample size predicted citation rates, but only while controlling for other variables. In Study 2, sample and partly effect sizes predicted citation rates, indicating that the relations vary even between scientific topical areas. Statistically significant results had more citations in Study 2 but not in Study 1. The results indicate that the importance (or power) of scientific findings may not be as strongly related to citation rate as is generally assumed.

  14. Influence of sample temperature on the expansion dynamics of laser-induced germanium plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, LIU; Yue, TONG; Ying, WANG; Dan, ZHANG; Suyu, LI; Yuanfei, JIANG; Anmin, CHEN; Mingxing, JIN

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we investigated the influence of sample temperature on the expansion dynamics and the optical emission spectroscopy of laser-induced plasma, and Ge was selected as the test sample. The target was heated from room temperature (22 °C) to 300 °C, and excited in atmospheric environment by using a Q-Switched Nd:YAG pulse laser with the wavelength of 1064 nm. To study the plasma expansion dynamics, we observed the plasma plume at different laser energies (5.0, 7.4 and 9.4 mJ) and different sample temperatures by using time-resolved image. We found that the heated target temperature could accelerate the expansion of plasma plume. Moreover, we also measured the effect of target temperature on the optical emission spectroscopy and signal-to-noise ratio.

  15. The influence of coating technologies on stress-strain characteristics of the sample at periodic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharchenko, K. V.; Zubkov, V. P.; Kapustin, V. I.; Maksimovski, E. A.; Talanin, A. V.

    2017-10-01

    The article is devoted to the research on influence of coating technologies on stress-strain characteristics of a heterogeneous sample (the substrate-coating system) at periodic stress-controlled loading. The comparison of stress-strain characteristics of samples with three types of surface layer showed that the coatings lead to the change in stress at which inelastic phenomena appear in the material. Apart stress-strain characteristics of samples, microrelief on the samples’ surface and formation of a slipband in the grain structure of the coatings were studied in the experiment. It is stated that cold dynamic spraying, which is performed by centrifugal acceleration of particles in vacuum, makes it possible to obtain a coating with better strength and stress-strain characteristics in comparison with cladding.

  16. Biot critical frequency applied as common friction factor for pore collapse and failure of chalk with different pore fluids and temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Katrine Alling; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Foged, Niels Nielsen

    2011-01-01

    A fluid effect toward higher strengths for oil-saturated chalk compared with water-saturated chalk has previously been identified and labeled the "water-weakening phenomenon," but has not been further characterized physically. The hypothesis of this paper is that the Biot critical frequency...

  17. High resolution microgravity investigations for the detection and characterisation of subsidence associated with abandoned, coal, chalk and salt mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Styles, P.; Toon, S.; Branston, M.; England, R. [Keele Univ., Applied And Environmental Geophysics Group, School of Physical and Geographical Sciences (United Kingdom); Thomas, E.; Mcgrath, R. [Geotechnology, Neath (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    The closure and decay of industrial activity involving mining has scarred the landscape of urban areas and geo-hazards posed by subsurface cavities are ubiquitous throughout Europe. Features of concern consist of natural solution cavities (e.g. swallow holes and sinkholes in limestone gypsum and chalk) and man-made cavities (mine workings, shafts) in a great variety of post mining environments, including coal, salt, gypsum, anhydrite, tin and chalk. These problems restrict land utilisation, hinder regeneration, pose a threat to life, seriously damage property and services and blight property values. This paper outlines the application of microgravity techniques to characterise abandoned mining hazard in case studies from Coal, Chalk and Salt Mining environments in the UK. (authors)

  18. Specific surface as a measure of burial diagenesis of chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borre, Mai Kirstine; Lind, Ida; Mortensen, Jeanette

    1997-01-01

    the relative importance of the three processes, simple models have been established to illustrate changes in pore space, particle size and -shape and the resulting trends in the specific surface. Specific surface and porosity of the samples were measured using image analysis on electron micrographs of polished...

  19. Influence of Sampling Practices on the Appearance of DNA Image Histograms of Prostate Cells in FNAB Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelbaset Buhmeida

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty‐one fine needle aspiration biopsies (FNAB of the prostate, diagnostically classified as definitely malignant, were studied. The Papanicolaou or H&E stained samples were destained and then stained for DNA with the Feulgen reaction. DNA cytometry was applied after different sampling rules. The histograms varied according to the sampling rule applied. Because free cells between cell groups were easier to measure than cells in the cell groups, two sampling rules were tested in all samples: (i cells in the cell groups were measured, and (ii free cells between cell groups were measured. Abnormal histograms were more common after the sampling rule based on free cells, suggesting that abnormal patterns are best revealed through the free cells in these samples. The conclusions were independent of the applied histogram interpretation method.

  20. Deep saltwater in Chalk of North-West Europe: origin, interface characteristics and development over geological time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnesen, Ellen Prip; Larsen, F.; Sonnenborg, T.O.

    2009-01-01

    location, saline water in the Chalk resides at depths from 40 to 80m and salinity increases with depth. Concentrations of chloride up to ca. 30,000ppm have been observed at depths of 400m. Measured vertical hydraulic heads in open boreholes suggest that advective groundwater flow is now restricted...... in deeper parts of the Chalk formation and diffusive transport is thus the predominant transport mechanism. Laboratory-measured porosity and effective diffusion coefficients were used as input to a numerical 1D diffusion model of the interface between freshwater in an upper, fractured aquifer and modified...

  1. Influence of Spirituality and Modesty on Acceptance of Self-Sampling for Cervical Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dareng, Eileen O; Jedy-Agba, Elima; Bamisaye, Patience; Isa Modibbo, Fatima; Oyeneyin, Lawal O; Adewole, Ayodele S; Olaniyan, Olayinka B; Dakum, Patrick S; Pharoah, Paul D; Adebamowo, Clement A

    2015-01-01

    Whereas systematic screening programs have reduced the incidence of cervical cancer in developed countries, the incidence remains high in developing countries. Among several barriers to uptake of cervical cancer screening, the roles of religious and cultural factors such as modesty have been poorly studied. Knowledge about these factors is important because of the potential to overcome them using strategies such as self-collection of cervico-vaginal samples. In this study we evaluate the influence of spirituality and modesty on the acceptance of self-sampling for cervical cancer screening. We enrolled 600 participants in Nigeria between August and October 2014 and collected information on spirituality and modesty using two scales. We used principal component analysis to extract scores for spirituality and modesty and logistic regression models to evaluate the association between spirituality, modesty and preference for self-sampling. All analyses were performed using STATA 12 (Stata Corporation, College Station, Texas, USA). Some 581 (97%) women had complete data for analysis. Most (69%) were married, 50% were Christian and 44% were from the south western part of Nigeria. Overall, 19% (110/581) of the women preferred self-sampling to being sampled by a health care provider. Adjusting for age and socioeconomic status, spirituality, religious affiliation and geographic location were significantly associated with preference for self-sampling, while modesty was not significantly associated. The multivariable OR (95% CI, p-value) for association with self-sampling were 0.88 (0.78-0.99, 0.03) for spirituality, 1.69 (1.09-2.64, 0.02) for religious affiliation and 0.96 (0.86-1.08, 0.51) for modesty. Our results show the importance of taking cultural and religious beliefs and practices into consideration in planning health interventions like cervical cancer screening. To succeed, public health interventions and the education to promote it must be related to the target

  2. Influence of Homogenization of Clay Batch for Laboratory Test on the Structure of the Ceramic Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toropkov Nikita

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the chemical and mineralogical composition of the Krasnoyarsk Kray clay used in the production of coarse ceramics. It is found that the fire –strength depends of method of preparation of clay paste. It is shown that the forced dissolution of the raw clay material effectively homogenizes clay paste. As a result, strength of the samples increased during firing. It is also justified by the influence of their mineralogical composition and there method of the preparation. It is proved that conditions of preparation and mineralogical composition affect equally.

  3. Influence of the sample anticoagulant on the measurements of impedance aggregometry in cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Solomon

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Cristina Solomon1, Michael Winterhalter1, Isabel Gilde1, Ludwig Hoy2, Andreas Calatzis3, Niels Rahe-Meyer11Department of Anesthesiology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany; 2Institute for Biometry, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany; 3Department Hemostasis Transfusion Medicine, University Hospital Munich, Munich, GermanyBackground: The standard method of assessment of platelet function is represented by light transmission aggregometry (LTA, performed in citrated platelet-rich plasma (PRP. With LTA, decrease and subsequent post-cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB recovery of platelet function have been reported during cardiac surgery. Multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA may be used as point-of-care method to monitor perioperative changes in platelet function. Since MEA assesses macroaggregation which is influenced by the plasmatic levels of unbound calcium, citrate may be inadequate as anticoagulant for MEA. We used citrate and heparin for MEA samples, to see with which anticoagulant the intraoperative decrease and postoperative recovery in platelet function previously described with other aggregometric methods in cardiac surgery may be observed with MEA.Methods: Blood was obtained from 60 patients undergoing routine cardiac surgery and the samples were collected in standard tubes containing unfractionated heparin (50 U/mL or trisodium citrate (3.2%. The samples were obtained before CPB, at 30 minutes on CPB, end of CPB and on the first postoperative day. MEA was performed using the Multiplate® analyzer. Collagen (COLtest, 100 μg/mL and TRAP-6 (thrombin receptor activating peptide, TRAPtest, 1mM/mL were used as aggregation agonists.Results: Platelet aggregometric response decreased significantly during CPB. Platelet aggregation assessed using TRAP-6 as agonist on heparinized blood significantly correlated with the duration of CPB (r = −0.41, p = 0.001, 2-tailed Pearson test. The aggregometric analysis performed on the first

  4. Influence of Freezing and Storage Procedure on Human Urine Samples in NMR-Based Metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard Luy

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available It is consensus in the metabolomics community that standardized protocols should be followed for sample handling, storage and analysis, as it is of utmost importance to maintain constant measurement conditions to identify subtle biological differences. The aim of this work, therefore, was to systematically investigate the influence of freezing procedures and storage temperatures and their effect on NMR spectra as a potentially disturbing aspect for NMR-based metabolomics studies. Urine samples were collected from two healthy volunteers, centrifuged and divided into aliquots. Urine aliquots were frozen either at −20 °C, on dry ice, at −80 °C or in liquid nitrogen and then stored at −20 °C, −80 °C or in liquid nitrogen vapor phase for 1–5 weeks before NMR analysis. Results show spectral changes depending on the freezing procedure, with samples frozen on dry ice showing the largest deviations. The effect was found to be based on pH differences, which were caused by variations in CO2 concentrations introduced by the freezing procedure. Thus, we recommend that urine samples should be frozen at −20 °C and transferred to lower storage temperatures within one week and that freezing procedures should be part of the publication protocol.

  5. Nutrient dynamics as indicators of karst processes: Comparison of the Chalk aquifer (Normandy, France) and the Edwards aquifer (Texas, U.S.A.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, B.J.; Valdes, D.; Musgrove, M.; Massei, N.

    2008-01-01

    Karst aquifers display a range of geologic and geomorphic characteristics in a wide range of climatic and land-use settings; identification of transport dynamics representative of karst aquifers in general could help advance our understanding of these complex systems. To this end, nutrient, turbidity, and major ion dynamics in response to storms were compared at multiple sites in two karst aquifers with contrasting characteristics and settings: the Chalk aquifer (Eure Department, Normandy, France) and the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards Aquifer (Texas, U.S.A.). The Chalk aquifer is typified by high matrix porosity, thick surficial deposits (up to 30??m thick), and agricultural land use; the Barton Springs segment is typified by low matrix porosity, outcropping limestone, and urban land use. Following one to three storms, from 5 to 16 samples from springs and wells were analyzed for major ions, and specific conductance and turbidity were monitored continuously. Comparison of the chemographs indicated some generalized responses, including an increase in turbidity and potassium concentrations and a decrease in major ion and nitrate concentrations with infiltrating storm runoff. Factor analysis of major ions and turbidity revealed strikingly similar behavior of the chemical variables for the two aquifers: The first two factors, explaining more than 75% of the variability, illustrate that dynamics of most major ions (including nitrate) are opposed to those of turbidity and of potassium. The results demonstrate that potassium and nitrate are effective tracers of infiltrating storm runoff and resident ground water, respectively, and the similar results for these two highly contrasting aquifers suggest that the dynamics identified might be applicable to karst systems in general. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A model for the effect of pH on the growth of chalk yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantigny, Philippe; Burgain, Anaïs; Deniel, Franck; Bensoussan, Maurice

    2014-09-01

    Hyphopichia burtonii, Pichia anomala, and Saccharomycopsis fibuligera were isolated from spoiled packaged sliced bread. These chalk yeasts were characterized by a wide range of pH for which growth was almost optimum. Thus, the curve growth vs pH exhibited plateau and sharp profiles close to the minimum and the maximum pH. This study described a chalk yeast model (CYM) for the effect of pH derived from a new germination model for fungi (Dantigny, P., Nanguy, S., P.-M., Judet-Correia, D., and Bensoussan, M. 2011, International Journal of Food Microbiology, 146, 176-181). The CYM is asymmetric, versatile, based on parameters with biological significance, and compatible with the gamma concept. The CYM was compared to the cardinal pH model (CPM) which is widely used to describe the effect of pH on microbial growth. The CYM exhibited RMSE values two fold less than those obtained with the CPM for H. burtonii, and S. fibuligera for which plateaus were clearly observed. For P. anomala, the plateau was less obvious, but the RMSE value obtained with the CYM was similar to that found with the CPM. The CYM could extend its use to represent the effect of pH on mold growth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Digital chalk-talk videos improve knowledge and satisfaction in renal physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, John K; Chudgar, Saumil M; Engle, Deborah; McClain, Elizabeth K; Jakoi, Emma; Berkoben, Michael; Lehrich, Ruediger W

    2018-03-01

    The authors began a curriculum reform project to improve the experience in a Renal Physiology course for first-year medical students. Taking into account both the variety of learning preferences among students and the benefits of student autonomy, the authors hypothesized that adding digital chalk-talk videos to lecture notes and live lectures would improve student knowledge, course satisfaction, and engagement. The authors measured performance on the renal physiology exam before (the traditional curriculum) and for 2 yr after implementation of the new curriculum. During the traditional and subsequent years, students took a Q-sort survey before and after the Renal Physiology course. Satisfaction was assessed based on ranked statements in the Q sort, as well as through qualitative analysis of student commentary. Compared with the traditional curriculum, mean scores on the renal physiology final exam were higher after implementation of the new curriculum: 65.3 vs. 74.4 ( P < 0.001) with year 1 and 65.3 vs. 79.4 ( P < 0.001) in the second year. After the new curriculum, students were more likely to agree with the statement, "I wish other courses were taught like this one." Qualitative analysis revealed how the video-based curriculum improved student engagement and satisfaction. Adding digital chalk-talk videos to a traditional Renal Physiology course that included active learning led to improved exam performance and high levels of student satisfaction. Other preclinical courses in medical school may benefit from such an intervention.

  8. Influence of sample composition on aerosol organic and black carbon determinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novakov, T.; Corrigan, C.E.

    1995-07-01

    In this paper we present results on characterization of filter-collected redwood (Sequoia sempevirens)-needle and eucalyptus smoke particles by thermal, optical, and solvent extraction methods. Our results demonstrate that organic and black carbon concentrations determined by thermal and optical methods are not only method dependent, but also critically influenced by the overall chemical composition of the samples. These conclusions are supported by the following: (1) the organic fraction of biomass smoke particles analyzed includes a component, ranging in concentration from about 6-20% of total carbon or from 16-30% of organic carbon, that is relatively non-volatile and has a combustion temperature close to that of black carbon; (2) presence of K or Na in biomass smoke samples lowers the combustion temperatures of this organic component and of black carbon, making their combustion properties indistinguishable; (3) about 20% of total organic material is nonvolatile when heated to 550{degrees}C in an inert atmosphere. Consequently, thermal methods that rely on a specific temperature to separate organic from black carbon may either underestimate or overestimate the black and organic carbon concentrations, depending on the amounts of Na and K and on the composition and concentration of organic material present in a sample. These analytical uncertainties and, under some conditions, absorption by organic material may contribute to the variability of empirically derived proportionality between light transmission through filter deposits and black carbon concentrations.

  9. Population dynamics of three gammarid species (Crustacea, Amphipoda) in a French chalk stream. Part II. Standing crop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedemakers, Annemarie

    1981-01-01

    The standing crop of Gammarus pulex pulex (Linnaeus, 1758), G. fossarum Koch in Panzer, 1836 and Echinogammarus berilloni (Catta, 1878) has been studied in a small French chalk stream, the Slack. A brief description of all amphipod species encountered in this river is given, with a key to different

  10. Towards an improved lithostratigraphic subdivision of the chalk group in the Netherlands North Sea area - A seismic stratigraphic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molen, A.S. van der; Wong, Th.E.

    2007-01-01

    In the Netherlands North Sea area, the Chalk Group has thus far been subdivided into the Cenomanian Texel Formation, the Turonian to Maastrichtian Ommelanden Formation and the Danian Ekofisk Formation. This paper describes the attempt to arrive at a more detailed lithostratigraphic subdivision for

  11. Life-history strategies as a tool to identify conservation constraints: A case-study on ants in chalk grasslands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordwijk, C.G.E.; Boer, P.; Mabelis, A.A.; Verberk, W.C.E.P.; Siepel, H.

    2012-01-01

    Species’ life-history traits underlie species–environment relationships. Therefore, analysis of species traits, combined into life-history strategies, can be used to identify key factors shaping the local species composition. This is demonstrated in a case-study on ants in chalk grasslands. We

  12. Towards an improved lithostratigraphic subdivision of the Chalk Group in the Netherlands North Sea area – A seismic stratigraphic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molen, A.S. van der; Wong, Th.E.

    In the Netherlands North Sea area, the Chalk Group has thus far been subdivided into the Cenomanian Texel Formation, the Turonian to MaastrichtianOmmelanden Formation and the Danian Ekofisk Formation. This paper describes the attempt to arrive at a more detailed lithostratigraphicsubdivision for

  13. Infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory investigation of calcite, chalk, and coccoliths-do we observe the mineral surface?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Martin Peter; Hem, Caroline Piper; Schultz, Logan Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    We have measured infrared spectra from several types of calcite: chalk, freshly cultured coccoliths produced by three species of algae, natural calcite (Iceland Spar), and two types of synthetic calcite. The most intense infrared band, the asymmetric carbonate stretch vibration, is clearly asymme...

  14. Maternal influences on the transmission of leukocyte gene expression profiles in population samples from Brisbane, Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Mason

    Full Text Available Two gene expression profiling studies designed to identify maternal influences on development of the neonate immune system and to address the population structure of the leukocyte transcriptome were carried out in Brisbane, Australia. In the first study, a comparison of 19 leukocyte samples obtained from mothers in the last three weeks of pregnancy with 37 umbilical cord blood samples documented differential expression of 7,382 probes at a false discovery rate of 1%, representing approximately half of the expressed transcriptome. An even larger component of the variation involving 8,432 probes, notably enriched for Vitamin E and methotrexate-responsive genes, distinguished two sets of individuals, with perfect transmission of the two profile types between each of 16 mother-child pairs in the study. A minor profile of variation was found to distinguish the gene expression profiles of obese mothers and children of gestational diabetic mothers from those of children born to obese mothers. The second study was of adult leukocyte profiles from a cross-section of Red Cross blood donors sampled throughout Brisbane. The first two axes in this study are related to the third and fourth axes of variation in the first study and also reflect variation in the abundance of CD4 and CD8 transcripts. One of the profiles associated with the third axis is largely excluded from samples from the central portion of the city. Despite enrichment of insulin signaling and aspects of central metabolism among the differentially expressed genes, there was little correlation between leukocyte expression profiles and body mass index overall. Our data is consistent with the notion that maternal health and cytokine milieu directly impact gene expression in fetal tissues, but that there is likely to be a complex interplay between cultural, genetic, and other environmental factors in the programming of gene expression in leukocytes of newborn children.

  15. Influence of Fasting Status and Sample Preparation on Metabolic Biomarker Measurements in Postmenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Neil; Falk, Roni T; Messinger, Diana B; Pollak, Michael; Xue, Xiaonan; Lin, Juan; Sgueglia, Robin; Strickler, Howard D; Gaudet, Mia M; Gunter, Marc J

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic data linking metabolic markers-such as insulin, insulin-like growth factors (IGFs)-and adipose tissue-derived factors with cancer are inconsistent. Between-study differences in blood collection protocols, in particular participant's fasting status, may influence measurements. We investigated the impact of fasting status and blood sample processing time on components of the insulin/IGF axis and in adipokines in a controlled feeding study of 45 healthy postmenopausal-women aged 50-75 years. Fasting blood samples were drawn (T0), after which subjects ate a standardized breakfast; subsequent blood draws were made at 1 hour (T1), 3 hours (T3), and 6 hours (T6) after breakfast. Serum samples were assayed for insulin, C-peptide, total- and free-IGF-I, IGF-binding protein [BP]-1 and -3, total and high molecular weight (HMW)-adiponectin, retinol binding protein-4, plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, and resistin. Insulin and C-peptide levels followed similar postprandial trajectories; intra-class correlation coefficients [ICC] for insulin = 0.75, (95%CI:0.64-0.97) and C-peptide (ICC = 0.66, 95%CI:0.54-0.77) were similarly correlated in fasting (Spearman correlation, r = 0.78, 95%CI:0.64-0.88) and postprandial states (T1, r = 0.77 (95%CI: 0.62-0.87); T3,r = 0.78 (95%CI: 0.63-0.87); T6,r = 0.77 (95%CI: 0.61-0.87)). Free-IGF-I and IGFBP-1 levels were also affected by fasting status, whereas total-IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels remained unchanged. Levels of adipokines were largely insensitive to fasting status and blood sample processing delays. Several components of the insulin/IGF axis were significantly impacted by fasting state and in particular, C-peptide levels were substantially altered postprandially and in a similar manner to insulin.

  16. Influence of light curing and sample thickness on microhardness of a composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio HB Aguiar

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Flávio HB Aguiar1, Kelly RM Andrade1, Débora AN Leite Lima1, Gláucia MB Ambrosano2, José R Lovadino11Department of Restorative Dentistry; 2Department of Social Dentistry/Statistics, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, SP, BrazilAbstract: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of light-curing units and different sample thicknesses on the microhardness of a composite resin. Composite resin specimens were randomly prepared and assigned to nine experimental groups (n = 5: considering three light-curing units (conventional quartz tungsten halogen [QTH]: 550 mW/cm2 – 20 s; high irradiance QTH: 1160 mW/cm2 – 10 s; and light-emitting diode [LED]: 360 mW/cm2 – 40 s and three sample thicknesses (0.5 mm, 1 mm, and 2 mm. All samples were polymerized with the light tip 8 mm away from the specimen. Knoop microhardness was then measured on the top and bottom surfaces of each sample. The top surfaces, with some exceptions, were almost similar; however, in relation to the bottom surfaces, statistical differences were found between curing units and thicknesses. In all experimental groups, the 0.5-mm-thick increments showed microhardness values statistically higher than those observed for 1- and -2-mm increments. The conventional and LED units showed higher hardness mean values and were statistically different from the high irradiance unit. In all experimental groups, microhardness mean values obtained for the top surface were higher than those observed for the bottom surface. In conclusion, higher levels of irradiance or thinner increments would help improve hybrid composite resin polymerization.Keywords: photo-polymerization, light-curing distance, light-curing units, composite resin, composite thickness, microhardness

  17. [Family background influence on adolescents' smoking on mures, harghita and covasna sample].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béla, Szabó; Márton, Albert-Lőrincz; Enikő, Albert-Lőrincz; Ildikó, Gáspárik; Krisztina, Bernáth; Gergely, Barna

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette consumption might be considered as a lifestyle model. The formation of this lifestyle model in childhood and adolescence is considerable due to the socio-cultural environment in which socialization take part. The aim of this study was to analyze adolescents' smoking behavior, and family-related factors that may influence it. The self-reported questionnaire-based study was done in Mures, Harghita and Covasna counties among 7th and 8th grades students. The prevalence of smoking was 5.9% in the total sample. The results showed significant associations between smoking behavior of young people and their family background (e.g. education of parents, smoking bans at home).

  18. Influence of Ongoing Task Difficulty and Motivation Level on Children's Prospective Memory in a Chinese Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Pi-Guo; Han, Lei; Bian, Yu-Long; Tian, Yu; Xu, Min-Xia; Gao, Feng-Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Prospective memory (PM) is the process associated with the task of realizing delayed intentions in the future. Researchers distinguish two types of PM, namely time-based PM (tbPM) and event-based PM (ebPM). Experiment 1 investigated the developmental trajectory of 3- to 5-year-old preschool children's PM ability, and the occurrence of delayed retrieval (children execute the PM task in a larger window of opportunity) in both tbPM and ebPM tasks. Results revealed that the 5-year-old children outperformed the 3- and 4-year-old children in PM. Moreover, delayed retrieval was more likely to occur in tbPM task than in ebPM task. In Experiment 2, the influence of ongoing task (OT) difficulty on PM performance was investigated with a sample of 5-year-old children. Results revealed no significant effect of OT difficulty on PM performance. In Experiment 3, we improved children's motivation level to complete the OT, then explored the influence of OT difficulty on children's PM performance. Results revealed that the effect of OT difficulty on PM performance became significant after increasing the children's motivation to complete the OT. These results provide insights into the mechanism of attentional resource allocation in PM tasks and have crucial educational and social implications.

  19. An Examination of Workplace Influences on Active Commuting in a Sample of University Employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopp, Melissa; Sims, Dangaia; Colgan, Joanna; Rovniak, Liza; Matthews, Stephen A; Poole, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Active commuting (AC; walking or biking) to work is associated with many benefits, though rates remain low. Employers can benefit from greater employee AC, through improved employee physical activity, though how the workplace is related to AC is unclear. The current study sought to examine how the workplace environment is related to AC participation. This was a cross-sectional, online survey conducted in April-May 2014. A volunteer sample of university employees (n = 551) was recruited. A large university in the northeastern United States. The online survey addressed travel habits, demographics, and workplace social and physical environment for AC. Pearson correlations and t tests were used to examine relationships between the percentage of all trips as AC and workplace influences and a multivariate regression analysis predicted AC participation. Participants reported 0.86 ± 2.6 AC trips per week. Percentage of trips as AC trips associated with perceived coworker AC (P time from their parking spot to their workplace reported a higher percentage of trips as AC compared with those with closer parking (P trips per week via AC (P time to campus (B = -0.43, P < .001) as significant predictors. This study provided insight into institutional influences on AC, indicating that policy, infrastructure, and programmatic initiatives could be used to promote workplace AC.

  20. Assessment of occupational exposure to chemicals by air sampling for comparison with limit values: the influence of sampling strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerc, Frédéric; Vincent, Raymond

    2014-05-01

    This study was aimed at quantifying the impact of sampling duration and the number of measurements taken on the quality of assessing occupational exposure to toluene. To this end, a measurement database was built, based on four campaigns carried out in an industrial printing facility. Five homogeneous exposure groups (HEGs) were set up and between 120 and 290 individual measurements lasting from 2 to 8 h were collected for each of them. These measurements were performed with the objective of comparing them to the 8-h Occupational Exposure Limit (8-h OEL). The resulting data were used to define a reference exposure profile per HEG: the 'gold standard'. This exposure profile corresponds to a log-normal distribution of measurements from which compliance/non-compliance with the 8-h OEL decision is derived. To simulate the possible sampling strategies used by industrial hygienists, six scenarios were defined, each containing a different number of measurements: 2, 3, 4, 6, 9, and 12 measurements performed per HEG, over different working days and different seasons of the year. The measurement values per scenario were simulated by sampling from the real measurement per HEG. For each scenario, 1000 simulated exposure profiles and corresponding simulated compliance decisions were computed. They were compared to the gold standard compliance decision using statistical indicators. Three methods were used for computing the simulated compliance decision: (i) the 95th percentile must be lower than the 8-h OEL, (ii) the exceedance fraction with respect to the 8-h OEL must be <0.1% (as defined by standard CEN 689, Appendix D), and (iii) the 70% upper confidence limit of the exceedance fraction with respect to the 8-h OEL must be <5% (as defined by French regulations). The results show that exposure assessment quality increases with both the number of measurements and sampling duration when using the 95th percentile and exposure assessment based on French regulations, whereas it

  1. Regional transport modelling for nitrate trend assessment and forecasting in a chalk aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orban, Philippe; Brouyère, Serge; Batlle-Aguilar, Jordi; Couturier, Julie; Goderniaux, Pascal; Leroy, Mathieu; Maloszewski, Piotr; Dassargues, Alain

    2010-10-21

    Regional degradation of groundwater resources by nitrate has become one of the main challenges for water managers worldwide. Regulations have been defined to reverse observed nitrate trends in groundwater bodies, such as the Water Framework Directive and the Groundwater Daughter Directive in the European Union. In such a context, one of the main challenges remains to develop efficient approaches for groundwater quality assessment at regional scale, including quantitative numerical modelling, as a decision support for groundwater management. A new approach combining the use of environmental tracers and the innovative 'Hybrid Finite Element Mixing Cell' (HFEMC) modelling technique is developed to study and forecast the groundwater quality at the regional scale, with an application to a regional chalk aquifer in the Geer basin in Belgium. Tritium data and nitrate time series are used to produce a conceptual model for regional groundwater flow and contaminant transport in the combined unsaturated and saturated zones of the chalk aquifer. This shows that the spatial distribution of the contamination in the Geer basin is essentially linked to the hydrodynamic conditions prevailing in the basin, more precisely to groundwater age and mixing and not to the spatial patterns of land use or local hydrodispersive processes. A three-dimensional regional scale groundwater flow and solute transport model is developed. It is able to reproduce the spatial patterns of tritium and nitrate and the observed nitrate trends in the chalk aquifer and it is used to predict the evolution of nitrate concentrations in the basin. The modelling application shows that the global inertia of groundwater quality is strong in the basin and trend reversal is not expected to occur before the 2015 deadline fixed by the European Water Framework Directive. The expected time required for trend reversal ranges between 5 and more than 50 years, depending on the location in the basin and the expected reduction

  2. Short communication: Influence of the sampling device on somatic cell count variation in cow milk samples (by official recording)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouz, R.; Vilar, M.J.; Yus, E.; Sanjuán, M.L.; Diéguez, F.J.

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the variability in cow´s milk somatic cell counts (SCC) depending on the type of milk meter used by dairy farms for official milk recording. The study was performed in 2011 and 2012 in the major cattle area of Spain. In total, 137,846 lactations of Holstein-Friesian cows were analysed at 1,912 farms. A generalised least squares regression model was used for data analysis. The model showed that the milk meter had a substantial effect on the SCC for individual milk samples obtained for official milk recording. The results suggested an overestimation of the SCC in milk samples from farms that had electronic devices in comparison with farms that used portable devices and underestimation when volumetric meters are used. A weak positive correlation was observed between the SCC and the percentage of fat in individual milk samples. The results underline the importance of considering this variable when using SCC data from milk recording in the dairy herd improvement program or in quality milk programs. (Author)

  3. Influence of surface topography on the secondary electron yield of clean copper samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-Chuan; Cao, Meng; Cui, Wan-Zhao

    2016-11-01

    Secondary electron yield (SEY) due to electron impact depends strongly on surface topography. The SEY of copper samples after Ar-ion bombardment is measured in situ in a multifunctional ultrahigh vacuum system. Increasing the ion energy or duration of ion bombardment can even enlarge the SEY, though it is relatively low under moderate bombardment intensity. The results obtained with scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images demonstrate that many valley structures of original sample surfaces can be smoothed due to ion bombardment, but more hill structures are generated with stronger bombardment intensity. With increasing the surface roughness in the observed range, the maximum SEY decreases from 1.2 to 1.07 at a surface characterized by valleys, while it again increases to 1.33 at a surface spread with hills. This phenomenon indicates that hill and valley structures are respectively effective in increasing and decreasing the SEY. These obtained results thus provide a comprehensive insight into the surface topography influence on the secondary electron emission characteristics in scanning electron microscopy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of sample preparation on assay of phenolic acids from eggplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthria, Devanand L; Mukhopadhyay, Sudarsan

    2006-01-11

    Sample preparation is often overlooked and is frequently considered as "a means to an end". This systematic study with a phenolic-enriched substrate, eggplant (Solanum melongena L.), was undertaken to evaluate the substantial variations in the extraction techniques, solvents, and parameters as described in the published literature. Direct comparison of over 10 extraction procedures or conditions was performed to show the importance and influence of sample preparation on the assay of phenolic compounds. Chlorogenic acid (CA) was the most abundant phenolic acid accounting for >75% of the total phenolic acids content extracted from the eggplant sample. Optimum extraction of CA and total phenolics (TP) from Black Bell cultivar of eggplant were obtained when extractions were performed with a mixture of MeOH/H2O at a ratio of 80:20% v/v using a pressurized liquid extractor (PLE) at 100 degrees C. The amount of CA and TP extracted from eggplant by the previously reported procedures using a wrist shaker, rotary shaker, stirring, sonication, or reflux with different extraction solvents (acetone or varying composition of MeOH/H2O solvent mixtures) varied significantly between 5 and 95% as compared to PLE. The predominant phenolic acids in the free phenolic acid fraction of Black Beauty cultivar of eggplant were CA isomers. However, caffeic acid isomers were the major phenolic acids extracted from the base-hydrolyzed fraction. The total amount of caffeic acid extracted from the Italian Neon cultivar was more that twice that of four other eggplant cultivars (Orient Express, Calliope Zebra Stripe, Orient Charm Neon, and Black Beauty).

  5. Influences of space, soil, nematodes and plants on microbial community composition of chalk grassland soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yergeau, E.; Bezemer, T.M.; Hedlund, K.; Mortimer, S.R.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; Van der Putten, W.H.

    2010-01-01

    Microbial communities respond to a variety of environmental factors related to resources (e.g. plant and soil organic matter), habitat (e.g. soil characteristics) and predation (e.g. nematodes, protozoa and viruses). However, the relative contribution of these factors on microbial community

  6. Permeability Estimation in Chalk Using NMR and a Modified Kozeny Equation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meireles, Leonardo Teixeira Pinto; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2017-01-01

    An NMR logging-based permeability estimator was implemented for chalk. Several authors have identified the inability of accurate prediction of permeability from NMR logs in carbonates. Current models (namely Coates and SDR) may yield unreliable permeability data and require extensive calibration...... of parameters. Also, calibration requires data from core analysis, which undermines one of the key advantages of the technology: minimizing the need of expensive coring runs. A modified Kozeny method is used for permeability estimation from NMR logs. Unlike the model of Coates and SDR, does not require...... reservoir borehole in the North Sea, for which NMR logs and permeability data for 4 core plugs are available. Results achieved using the modified Kozeny equation are in better agreement with the Klinkenberg permeability of core plugs than both the SDR and Coates methods. They are also superior...

  7. Change in Biot's effective stress coefficient of chalk during pore collapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, M. Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2013-01-01

    Biot's effective stress coefficient (α) is a measure of how well grains in the rocks are connected with each other. The amount of contact cements between the grains determines the stiffness of rocks. Change in grain contact occurs during natural diagenesis of sedimentary rock. Contact between...... the grains could also change during elastic deformation of the grains in a rock mechanics test. Diagenetic change in grain contact cement of chalk can be compared with stress-induced change in the laboratory. The change in porosity is studied with reference to the change in effective stress on grain contacts...... and porosity reduces at a slower rate. We noticed that presence of non carbonates and hydrocarbon could increase σ'm. During rock mechanics test in the lab, with increased applied stress, σ'm increases, Biot's effective stress coefficient shows a decreasing trend, while a minor porosity reduction was observed...

  8. Upper Cretaceous chalk facies and depositional history recorded in the Mona-1 core, Mona Ridge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderskouv, Kresten; Surlyk, Finn

    2011-01-01

    , including mudflow, debris flow, and slumping. Pelagic deposits vary mainly in terms of the concentration of siliciclastic material, the trace-fossil assemblage, and the presence or ab­sence of primary sedimentary structures. Pelagic sedimentation was probably punctuated by the deposition of thin turbidites......-slope evolution of debris flows. Debris flows are rep­resented by matrix-supported conglomerates, which form one of the most common facies in the succession. High-concentration, gravity-driven suspension flows passed into dilute visco-plastic flows during the final stages of deposition and resulted......The 331 m long core from the Mona-1 well in the Danish North Sea spans almost the entire Upper Cretaceous Chalk Group but only about 10% of Late Cretaceous time is represented. The succession comprises 14 facies representing pelagic deposition, turbidity flow, and mass-transport processes...

  9. Controls on upper Campanian-Maastrichtian chalk deposition in the eastern Danish Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boussaha, Myriam; Thibault, Nicolas Rudolph; Anderskouv, Kresten

    2017-01-01

    % of the sediment. Sedimentation took place in deep water, below the photic zone and storm-wave base, and is characterized by decimetre to metre-scale variations in facies and trace fossil assemblages indicating repeated shifts in depositional environment. Integration of facies with published data on sea-surface...... temperature and accumulation rates suggests that sea-surface temperature is the most important parameter in controlling stratification of the water column and thereby, indirectly, the observed variations in depositional facies. However, bioturbated mudstone chalk occurs in all stratigraphic levels independent...... of accumulation rates and sea temperatures and is interpreted to represent a very broad set of deep water environmental conditions with an ample supply of calcareous nannofossil debris and intense bioturbation. Longer term shifts in deposition are best expressed by distribution of clay, flint and bioturbated...

  10. Combining Chalk Talk with PowerPoint to Increase In-class Student Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Betharia

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In striving to attain a higher degree of in-class student engagement, and target a larger number of preferred student-learning styles, this case study describes a multimodal teaching approach. PowerPoint slides have gradually gained popularity over the more traditional chalk and talk lecture design. The student population in today’s age seeks more non-passive modes of information delivery. Numerous novel approaches to enhance active learning, such as flipped classroom and problem-based learning, have recently been explored. While working well for therapeutic and lab-based courses, these formats may not be best-suited for all basic science topics. The importance of basic science in a pharmacy curriculum is well emphasized in the 2016 ACPE Standards. To actively involve students in a pharmacology lecture on diuretics, a session was designed to combine the PowerPoint and chalk talk approaches. Students created 10 concept diagrams following an instructor, who explained each step in the process using a document camera. For visual learners, these diagrams provided a layered representation of the information, gradually increasing in complexity. For learners with a preference for the reading learning style, the information was also available in corresponding PowerPoint slides. Scores from pre- and post-session quizzes indicated a high level of concept understanding and recall (median 1 [IQR 0 – 2] vs 4 [IQR 3 – 5]; p<0.001. The student perception survey data reported higher in-class attention levels (76%, an appreciation for the utility of self-created concept diagrams (88%, and a call for additional sessions being presented in this format (73%. Targeting a variety of student learning styles by using the active development of concept diagrams, in addition to traditional PowerPoint slides, can promote student engagement and enhance content understanding.   Type: Case Study

  11. Environmental assessment of Chalk Point cooling tower drift and vapor emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, E.A.

    1979-03-01

    An assessment is provided of selected environmental effects of operating the cooling towers and stacks of Units No. 3 and No. 4 of the Potomac Electric Power Company's generating station at Chalk Point, Maryland. The emphasis is on the magnitude of salt deposition to the area surrounding the cooling tower due to saline water drift. A secondary but important consideration is the magnitude of salt loading due to saline drift from the stack which uses saline river water in scrubbing flue gases. This salt loading together with that of the ambient salt background is assessed for its effects on soils, crops, native vegetation and man-made structures. Other atmospheric effects examined are: enhancement of ground level fogging and icing, enhancement of precipitation, and the flight hazards to aircraft. A numerical model of drift deposition has been developed and validated against the data collected in the Dyed Drift Experiment at Chalk Point. Use of the available data model predictions indicate that with fulltime, full load operation of both 600 MW(e) units significant levels of salt deposition occur only on the plant site within 0.4 km of the source. The predicted maximum salt deposition rates are given. The effects on soils, crops and native vegetation are predicted to be negligible at off-site locations. Significant effects to foliage of dogwood is predicted to occur at the most impacted on-site locations. Corrosion of structures at these locations could be enhanced under conditions of heavy plant operation. Enhancement of ground-level fogging, icing, and precipitation is expected to be negligible for all conditions of plant use. Hazards to aircraft because of restricted visibility, turbulence, and icing of structures and engines are estimated to be very slight and of no consequence.

  12. Influence of Fasting Status and Sample Preparation on Metabolic Biomarker Measurements in Postmenopausal Women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Murphy

    Full Text Available Epidemiologic data linking metabolic markers-such as insulin, insulin-like growth factors (IGFs-and adipose tissue-derived factors with cancer are inconsistent. Between-study differences in blood collection protocols, in particular participant's fasting status, may influence measurements.We investigated the impact of fasting status and blood sample processing time on components of the insulin/IGF axis and in adipokines in a controlled feeding study of 45 healthy postmenopausal-women aged 50-75 years. Fasting blood samples were drawn (T0, after which subjects ate a standardized breakfast; subsequent blood draws were made at 1 hour (T1, 3 hours (T3, and 6 hours (T6 after breakfast. Serum samples were assayed for insulin, C-peptide, total- and free-IGF-I, IGF-binding protein [BP]-1 and -3, total and high molecular weight (HMW-adiponectin, retinol binding protein-4, plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1, and resistin.Insulin and C-peptide levels followed similar postprandial trajectories; intra-class correlation coefficients [ICC] for insulin = 0.75, (95%CI:0.64-0.97 and C-peptide (ICC = 0.66, 95%CI:0.54-0.77 were similarly correlated in fasting (Spearman correlation, r = 0.78, 95%CI:0.64-0.88 and postprandial states (T1, r = 0.77 (95%CI: 0.62-0.87; T3,r = 0.78 (95%CI: 0.63-0.87; T6,r = 0.77 (95%CI: 0.61-0.87. Free-IGF-I and IGFBP-1 levels were also affected by fasting status, whereas total-IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels remained unchanged. Levels of adipokines were largely insensitive to fasting status and blood sample processing delays.Several components of the insulin/IGF axis were significantly impacted by fasting state and in particular, C-peptide levels were substantially altered postprandially and in a similar manner to insulin.

  13. Integrating geophysical and hydrochemical borehole-log measurements to characterize the Chalk aquifer, Berkshire, United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürch, Marc; Buckley, David

    2002-09-01

    Geophysical and hydrochemical borehole-logging techniques were integrated to characterize hydraulic and hydrogeochemical properties of the Chalk aquifer at boreholes in Berkshire, UK. The down-hole measurements were made to locate fissures in the chalk, their spatial extent between boreholes, and to determine the groundwater chemical quality of the water-bearing layers. The geophysical borehole logging methods used were caliper, focused resistivity, induction resistivity, gamma ray, fluid temperature, fluid electrical conductivity, impeller and heat-pulse flowmeter, together with borehole wall optical-imaging. A multiparameter data transmitter was used to measure groundwater temperature, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen, pH, and redox potential of the borehole fluid down-hole. High permeability developed at the Chalk Rock by groundwater circulation provides the major flow horizon at the Banterwick Barn study site and represents a conduit system that serves as an effective local hydraulic connection between the boreholes. The Chalk Rock includes several lithified solution-ridden layers, hardgrounds, which imply a gap in sedimentation possibly representing an unconformity. Lower groundwater temperature, high dissolved-oxygen content, and flowmeter evidence of preferential groundwater flow in the Chalk Rock indicated rapid groundwater circulation along this horizon. By repeating the logging at different times of the year under changing hydraulic conditions, other water-inflow horizons within the Chalk aquifer were recognized. Résumé. Des techniques géophysiques et hydrochimiques de diagraphies en forage ont été mises en oeuvre pour caractériser les propriétés hydrauliques et hydrogéochimiques de l'aquifère de la craie dans des forages du Berkshire (Grande-Bretagne). Les mesures en descente ont été faites pour localiser les fissures dans la craie et leur développement spatial entre forages, et pour déterminer la qualité de l'eau souterraine des

  14. Impact of groundwater on surface water quality: role of the riparian area in nitrate transformation in a slowly responding chalk catchment (Noor, The Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanen, van H.A.J.; Dijksma, R.

    2004-01-01

    Nitrate concentration in springs that drain groundwater from a chalk headwater catchment of the River Meuse are high and increasing next decades. The denitrification process in groundwater of the riparian area is important

  15. Effect of dolomite, magnesium oxide (MgO) and chalk (CaCO3) on in vitro fermentation of amorphous and crystalline cellulose and meadow hay using inoculum from sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Váradyová, Zora; Baran, Miroslav; Zawadzki, Wojciech; Siroka, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Some minerals can influence some biochemical parameters of rumen fermentation. The objective of this experiment was to determine the effect of different amounts (0.1, 0.25 and 0.5 g) of dolomite and to compare the effect of dolomite, magnesium oxide (MgO) and chalk (CaCO3) upon the end products of rumen fermentation in vitro. Amorphous and crystalline cellulose as well as meadow hay were used as substrates and incubated with buffered rumen fluid in sealed fermentation bottles. In dependence on the amount of dolomite and the kind of substrate an inhibitory effect of dolomite on methane production was evident. Significant differences of methane production were found between the controls, crystalline cellulose and meadow hay with 0.5 g of dolomite. An increase of total gas production was observed for cellulose with both 0.25 and 0.5 g of dolomite and also for meadow hay with 0.5 g of dolomite. It can be concluded that there was a remarkable effect of dolomite on methane production and also a slight effect of magnesium oxide and chalk as compared to the effect of dolomite on the fermentation parameters of incubated substrates.

  16. Upper Cretaceous chalk facies and depositional history recorded in the Mona-1 core, Mona Ridge, Danish North Sea: Plate 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surlyk, Finn

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The 331 m long core from the Mona-1 well in the Danish North Sea spans almost the entire Upper Cretaceous Chalk Group but only about 10% of Late Cretaceous time is represented. The succession comprises 14 facies representing pelagic deposition, turbidity flow, and mass-transport processes, including mudflow, debris flow, and slumping. Pelagic deposits vary mainly in terms of the concentration of siliciclastic material, the trace-fossil assemblage, and the presence or ab¬sence of primary sedimentary structures. Pelagic sedimentation was probably punctuated by the deposition of thin turbidites, and the resultant deposits were thoroughly bioturbated if deposited during normal oxygenation at the sea floor. Periodic benthic dysoxia resulted in the preservation of primary structures, as represented by laminated chalk which consists of thin pelagic laminae alternating with thin turbidites. In addition to the thin turbidites in the laminated chalk, four dif¬ferent turbidite facies are interpreted as representing high- to low-energy flows. Clast-supported chalk conglomerates have previously not been differentiated from other turbidites, but are here interpreted to be directly related to the down-slope evolution of debris flows. Debris flows are rep¬resented by matrix-supported conglomerates, which form one of the most common facies in the succession. High-concentration, gravity-driven suspension flows passed into dilute visco-plastic flows during the final stages of deposition and resulted in the deposition of structureless chalks. Limited shear deformation produced distinct quasi-facies from which the precursor facies can be deduced, whereas intense or continued shear deformation produced a shear-banded quasi-facies from which the precursor facies cannot be deduced in all cases. A series of major slump packages (14–18 in total are interpreted, forming over 40% of the succession; debrites appear to be the most common precursor facies involved in

  17. Upper Cretaceous chalk facies and depositional history recorded in the Mona-1 core, Mona Ridge, Danish North Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finn Surlyk

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The 331 m long core from the Mona-1 well in the Danish North Sea spans almost the entire Upper Cretaceous Chalk Group but only about 10% of Late Cretaceous time is represented. The succession comprises 14 facies representing pelagic deposition, turbidity flow, and mass-transport processes, including mudflow, debris flow, and slumping. Pelagic deposits vary mainly in terms of the concentration of siliciclastic material, the trace-fossil assemblage, and the presence or ab¬sence of primary sedimentary structures. Pelagic sedimentation was probably punctuated by the deposition of thin turbidites, and the resultant deposits were thoroughly bioturbated if deposited during normal oxygenation at the sea floor. Periodic benthic dysoxia resulted in the preservation of primary structures, as represented by laminated chalk which consists of thin pelagic laminae alternating with thin turbidites. In addition to the thin turbidites in the laminated chalk, four dif¬ferent turbidite facies are interpreted as representing high- to low-energy flows. Clast-supported chalk conglomerates have previously not been differentiated from other turbidites, but are here interpreted to be directly related to the down-slope evolution of debris flows. Debris flows are rep¬resented by matrix-supported conglomerates, which form one of the most common facies in the succession. High-concentration, gravity-driven suspension flows passed into dilute visco-plastic flows during the final stages of deposition and resulted in the deposition of structureless chalks. Limited shear deformation produced distinct quasi-facies from which the precursor facies can be deduced, whereas intense or continued shear deformation produced a shear-banded quasi-facies from which the precursor facies cannot be deduced in all cases. A series of major slump packages (14–18 in total are interpreted, forming over 40% of the succession; debrites appear to be the most common precursor facies involved in

  18. Genetic and environmental influences on psychological traits and eating attitudes in a sample of Spanish schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo-Moreno, Luis; Iranzo-Tatay, Carmen; Gimeno-Clemente, Natalia; Barberá-Fons, Maria Antonia; Rojo-Bofill, Luis Miguel; Livianos-Aldana, Lorenzo

    The heritability of eating disorders has been estimated to range from 22% to over 62%.The aim of this study is to determine the relative influence of genetics and environment that contribute to the drive for thinness, body dissatisfaction, perfectionism, and ineffectiveness, by evaluating sex differences in a sample of adolescent twins from Valencia, Spain. Five hundred eighty-four pairs of adolescent twins between 13 and 18 years of age completed the study. To determine zygosity, teachers responded to a questionnaire on physical similarity. Psychological traits of eating disorders were assessed with four sub-scales of the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI); drive for thinness, body dissatisfaction, perfectionism, and ineffectiveness. Twin models were used to assess genetic and environmental (common and unique) factors affecting these four psychological traits. All four traits showed significant genetic contributions among girls, with heritability estimates of 37.7% for ineffectiveness, 42.8% for perfectionism, 56.9% for drive for thinness, and 65.5% for body dissatisfaction. Among boys, body dissatisfaction showed no additive genetic contributions, indicating significant shared and individual specific environment effects. The three other traits in boys showed significant additive genetic contributions, but were lower than in girls. With the exception of body dissatisfaction in boys, psychological traits of eating disorders show heritability patterns that differ according to sex. Copyright © 2014 SEP y SEPB. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. The influence of inertial sensor sampling frequency on the accuracy of measurement parameters in rearfoot running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitschke, Christian; Zaumseil, Falk; Milani, Thomas L

    2017-09-26

    Increasingly, inertial sensors are being used for running analyses. The aim of this study was to systematically investigate the influence of inertial sensor sampling frequencies (SF) on the accuracy of kinematic, spatio-temporal, and kinetic parameters. We hypothesized that running analyses at lower SF result in less signal information and therefore the inability to sufficiently interpret measurement data. Twenty-one subjects participated in this study. Rearfoot strikers ran on an indoor running track at a velocity of 3.5 ± 0.1 ms(-1). A uniaxial accelerometer was attached at the tibia and an inertial measurement unit was mounted at the heel of the right shoe. All sensors were synchronized at the start and data was measured with 1000 Hz (reference SF). Datasets were reduced to 500, 333, 250, 200, and 100 Hz in post-processing. The results of this study showed that a minimum SF of 500 Hz should be used to accurately measure kinetic parameters (e.g. peak heel acceleration). In contrast, stride length showed accurate results even at 333 Hz. 200 Hz were required to calculate parameters accurately for peak tibial acceleration, stride duration, and all kinematic measurements. The information from this study is necessary to correctly interpret measurement data of existing investigations and to plan future studies.

  20. Mechanical and chemical processes affecting the chalk during burial, insights from combined reflection seismics, well data and field work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, Julien; Boussaha, Myriam; Thibault, Nicolas Rudolph

    2014-01-01

    and cores analyses, respectively.However, few sites allow to combine all the different scale of observation for chalk diagenesis. Onshore and offshore high resolution seismics, two fully cored >350 m wells with wireline logging tools and very high quality exposures from a coastal cliff and a quarry form......The chalk must undergo several phases of grain reorganisation and chemical reactions during its diagenetic evolution from a carbonaceous ooze to a sedimentary rock. Some of these transformations could be observed on structures from the kilometre- to the micrometre-scale with seismic reflection....... The pressure-solution allows the formation of carbonate seams in the hairline fractures. At larger scale, on the field are observed faults which are sealed with flint precipitations. They slightly offset (seismic reflection profiles, numerous...

  1. Changes in Specific Surface as observed by NMR, caused by saturation of Chalk with porewater bearing divalent Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Addassi, Mouadh; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul

    2014-01-01

    depositional textures. We compared two cases. The first experiments on outcrop chalk with high salinity brines showed that saturation with divalent ions (Mg2+,Ca2+and SO42-) cause major shifts in the T2 distribution curve, probably due to precipitation in the pore space. In a second set of experiments, fluid......Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrometry has proved to be a good technique for determining the petrophysical properties of reservoir rocks; such as porosity and pore size distribution. We investigated how pore water rich in divalent ions affect the NMR signal from chalk with two different......-to-volume ratio of the pore space. The results of this work could benefit the ongoing study on the optimization of the water composition for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) methods and shed light on how it can affect the mechanical and physical properties of the rock....

  2. Controls on the spatial and temporal variability of Rn-222 in riparian groundwater in a lowland Chalk catchment.

    OpenAIRE

    Mullinger, Neil J.; Pates, Jackie M.; Binley, Andrew M.; Crook, N. P.

    2009-01-01

    Radon is a powerful tracer of stream-aquifer interactions. However, it is important to consider the source and behaviour of radon in groundwater when interpreting observations of river radon in relation to groundwater discharge. Here we characterise the variability in groundwater radon concentrations in the riparian zone of a Chalk catchment. Groundwater 222Rn (radon) concentrations were determined in riparian zone boreholes at two sites in the Lambourn catchment, Berkshire, UK, over a two ye...

  3. Paleoceanographic changes during the Albian-Cenomanian in the Tethys and North Atlantic and the onset of the Cretaceous chalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgioni, Martino; Weissert, Helmut; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Hochuli, Peter A.; Keller, Christina E.; Coccioni, Rodolfo; Petrizzo, Maria Rose; Lukeneder, Alexander; Garcia, Therese I.

    2015-03-01

    During the mid-Cretaceous the Earth was characterized by peculiar climatic and oceanographic features, such as very high temperatures, smooth thermal meridional gradient, long-term rising sea level, and formation of oceanic gateways and seaways. At that time widespread deposition of micritic pelagic limestones, generally called chalk, occurred in deep pelagic settings as well as in epeiric seas, both at tropical and at high latitudes. The origin of such extensive chalk deposition in the mid-Cretaceous is a complex and still controversial issue, which involves the interaction of several different factors. In this work we address this topic from the paleoceanographic perspective, by investigating the contribution of major oceanic circulation changes. We characterize several stratigraphic sections from the Tethys and North Atlantic with litho-, bio-, and carbon isotope stratigraphy. Our data show a change between two different oceanic circulation modes happening in the Late Albian. The first is an unstable mode, with oceanographic conditions fluctuating frequently in response to rapid environmental and climatic changes, such as those driven by orbital forcing. The second mode is more stable, with better connection between the different oceanic basins, a more stable thermocline, more persistent current flow, better defined upwelling and downwelling areas, and a more balanced oceanic carbon reservoir. We propose that under the mid-Cretaceous paleogeographic and paleoclimatic conditions this change in oceanic circulation mode favored the beginning of chalk sedimentation in deep-water settings.

  4. How Parents Influence School Grades: Hints from a Sample of Adoptive and Biological Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wendy; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G

    2007-01-01

    Using the biological and adoptive families in the Minnesota-based Sibling Interaction and Behavior Study, we investigated the associations among genetic and environmental influences on IQ, parenting, parental expectations for offspring educational attainment, engagement in school, and school grades. All variables showed substantial genetic influence, and very modest shared environmental influence. No gender differences were evident. There were significant genetic influences common to IQ and parental expectations of educational attainment, parenting and engagement in school, school grades and engagement in school, parental expectations for offspring educational attainment and school grades, and IQ and school grades. A possible interpretation of the common genetic influences involving parenting is that parents use their own experience with school in shaping the ways in which they parent their offspring.

  5. Influence of sampling strategy on detecting preferential flow paths in water-repellent sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritsema, C.J.; Dekker, L.W.

    1996-01-01

    A sample spacing up to 22 cm over a distance of several metres is just sufficient to collect information about preferential flow paths in a water-repellent sandy soil. When larger sample spacings were used, the water content distributions became more horizontally stratified. Increasing the sample

  6. The influence of sampling intensity on vegetation classification and the implications for environmental management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cooper, A.; Mccan, T.; Bunce, R.G.H.

    2006-01-01

    As part of a programme of landscape-scale habitat surveillance in the United Kingdom (UK), the effect of grassland sampling intensity on the outcome of numerical classification was assessed. Sample quadrats from two regions of the UK were available for post priori analysis; a random sample from

  7. The Sample Size Influence in the Accuracy of the Image Classification of the Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomaz C. e C. da Costa

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Landuse/landcover maps produced by classification of remote sensing images incorporate uncertainty. This uncertainty is measured by accuracy indices using reference samples. The size of the reference sample is defined by approximation by a binomial function without the use of a pilot sample. This way the accuracy are not estimated, but fixed a priori. In case of divergency between the estimated and a priori accuracy the error of the sampling will deviate from the expected error. The size using pilot sample (theorically correct procedure justify when haven´t estimate of accuracy for work area, referent the product remote sensing utility.

  8. The relation between parental influence, body image, and eating behaviors in a nonclinical female sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraczinskas, Michelle; Fisak, Brian; Barnes, Rachel D

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the current study is to create a comprehensive composite measure of parental influence based on previously developed measures to clarify the underlying dimensions of parental influence and to determine the degree to which parental influence relates to body image and dysfunctional weight concerns. Previously published literature was reviewed for measures of parental influence, and items from 22 measures were condensed and combined into a single questionnaire, which was completed by 367 female undergraduate psychology students. Two dimensions emerged from a principle components analysis: Direct Influence, which includes weight and eating related comments, and Modeling, which includes parental modeling of dieting and related behavior. Direct Influence and Modeling were significantly related to eating disturbance, such as drive for thinness and bulimic symptomatology. Overall, the results integrate the previous literature and clarify the underlying dimensions of parental influence. Further, this study provides directions for future research related to the development and maintenance of body image and eating disturbance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of common preanalytical variations on the metabolic profile of serum samples in biobanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fliniaux, Ophelie [University of Picardie Jules Verne, Laboratoire de Phytotechnologie EA 3900-BioPI (France); Gaillard, Gwenaelle [Biobanque de Picardie (France); Lion, Antoine [University of Picardie Jules Verne, Laboratoire de Phytotechnologie EA 3900-BioPI (France); Cailleu, Dominique [Batiment Serres-Transfert, rue de Mai/rue Dallery, Plateforme Analytique (France); Mesnard, Francois, E-mail: francois.mesnard@u-picardie.fr [University of Picardie Jules Verne, Laboratoire de Phytotechnologie EA 3900-BioPI (France); Betsou, Fotini [Integrated Biobank of Luxembourg (Luxembourg)

    2011-12-15

    A blood pre-centrifugation delay of 24 h at room temperature influenced the proton NMR spectroscopic profiles of human serum. A blood pre-centrifugation delay of 24 h at 4 Degree-Sign C did not influence the spectroscopic profile as compared with 4 h delays at either room temperature or 4 Degree-Sign C. Five or ten serum freeze-thaw cycles also influenced the proton NMR spectroscopic profiles. Certain common in vitro preanalytical variations occurring in biobanks may impact the metabolic profile of human serum.

  10. Influence of brown stink bug feeding, planting date and sampling time on common smut infection of maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytopathogen infections are frequently influenced by both biotic and abiotic factors in a crop field. The effect of brown stink bug, Euschistus servus (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), feeding and planting date and sampling time on common smut (Ustilago maydis) infection percentage of maize plants was exa...

  11. CS-SENSE or Denoised SENSE: The Influence of Irregular Sampling in l1 Regularized SENSE Reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doneva, M.; Eggers, H.; Boernert, P.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the influence of the sampling pattern on the convergence behaviour of {1-regularized SENSE reconstruction at different reduction factors. In other words, we try to answer the question what improvement can CS-SENSE provide over {1-denoised SENSE.

  12. [The analysis of the sampling modulation transfer function and the influence on the Gaussian spectra].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lie-Feng; Xu, Zhi-Hai; Feng, Hua-Jun; Li, Qi

    2009-06-01

    As the parameters of the photoelectric detector have important effects on the performance of the dispersive spectrometers, it is necessary to detail the discrete sampling process of the photoelectric detector array. In the present paper, the sampling model was setup, and the effects on the sampling results caused by the spatial frequency of the cosine signal, the width of the sampling pixel, and the initial phase of the sampling pixel position to the crest of the input cosine signal were discussed thoroughly in the frequency domain. By introducing the integral function, a general expression of the sampling modulation transfer function was given, and the concept and expression of the average sampling modulation transfer function was proposed. Since that expression eliminates the effect of initial phase, it is much more convenient to the practical applications. For the typical Gaussian spectrum produced by the dispersive spectrometer, the Fourier transform result of that spectrum was multiplied by the average sampling modulation transfer function to produce a functional expression of the modulation transfer function of the whole system. The average aliasing error of the sampling process was expressed as a function of spatial frequencies; the relationship between the peak value of the average aliasing error and the width of the Gaussian spectrum was discussed; and the critical value of the spectrum width to restore this spectrum precisely was proposed. That critical value is significant for providing guidance to the design and fabrication of dispersive spectrometers.

  13. Effect of Temperature, Wettability and Relative Permeability on Oil Recovery from Oil-wet Chalk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Karoussi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available It is customary, for convenience, to use relative permeability data produced at room temperature. This paper shows that this practice underestimates oil recovery rates and ultimate recovery from chalk rocks for high temperature reservoirs. Above a certain temperature (80°C in this work a reduction of oil recovery was observed. The reduction in oil recovery is reflected by the shift of relative permeability data towards more oil-wet at high temperature (tested here 130°C. However, both IFT and contact angle measurements indicate an increase in water wetness as temperature increases, which contradict the results obtained by relative permeability experiments. This phenomenon may be explained based on the total interaction potential, which basically consists of van der Waals attractive and short-range Born repulsive and double layer electrostatic forces. The fluid/rock interactions is shown to be dominated by the repulsive forces above 80°C, hence increase fine detachment enhancing oil trapping. In other words the indicated oil wetness by relative permeability is misleading.

  14. Liberal And General Studies In Further Education: Voices From The ‘Chalk Face’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simmons, Robin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents initial findings from research investigating an important but largely neglected facet of the history of Further Education (FE – the Liberal Studies and General Studies (LS/GS movement. Drawing on historical documents and interview data from a group of former LS/GS lecturers, the paper provides important insights into some of the key events and initiatives between the 1950s-1980s, which led to the rise and eventual fall of the LS/GS movement, and seeks to capture the voices of those who were involved at the ‘chalk face’. Whilst it is acknowledged that the quality and nature of LS/GS was often variable and that the experiences of both teachers and learners were often uneven, the central argument of the paper is that many of the principles of the LS/GS movement were not only ahead of their time, but are perhaps more relevant to FE today than ever before.

  15. Molecular physiological aspects of chalking mechanism in rice grains under high-temperature stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Mitsui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High-temperature stress during grain filling hastens the growth rate of endosperm and causes grain chalkiness. Scanning microscopy of chalky areas reveals loosely packed, rounded starch granules with occasional small pits. Intensive investigation of the transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome in developing caryopses under high-temperature stress revealed the downregulation of starch synthesis enzymes and the upregulation of α-amylases. High-temperature ripening may unbalance the synthesis and degradation of starch in the developing endosperm cells. In addition to starches, storage proteins are synthesized, assembled, and stored in developing seeds. Several lines of evidence suggest that redox regulation affects seed maturation, including the accumulation of storage starches and proteins, and thus grain quality. A heat-tolerant cultivar of rice shows a characteristic high expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD. H2O2 produced by SOD under high-temperature stress possibly acts as a signal that rapidly can promote the expression of stress-response proteins. Herein, we will discuss the possible molecular physiology of grain chalking under high-temperature stress.

  16. Influence of frost damage and sample preconditioning on the porosity characterization of cement based materials using low temperature calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Min; Fridh, Katja; Johannesson, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature calorimetry (LTC) can be used to study the meso-porosity of cement based materials. The influence of frost damage on the meso-porosity determination by LTC was explored on a model material MCM-41 and two cement pastes by conducting repeated cycles of freezing and melting...... the preconditioning has limited influence on the freezing and melting behavior of the pore solution in the studied cement paste samples....... measurements. The results indicate that the pressure generated during freezing and melting measurements has little impact on the pore structure of the powder MCM-41 samples. As for the studied cylinder samples of cement pastes, frost damage probably took place and it changed the pore connectivity while it had...

  17. Influence of gross specimen sampling on the incidence of incidental prostatic carcinoma in cystoprostatectomy specimens of patients with bladder carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Mlakar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Reported prostate cancer incidence rates vary greatly among cystoprostatectomy samples. We investigated how the thoroughness of prostate sampling influences prostatic carcinoma incidence in bladder cancer patients. In a retrospective study, 313 cystoprostatectomy cases of urinary bladder carcinoma were analysed for the presence of concurrent prostatic carcinoma. Patients were divided into two groups: patients who had undergone the operation before and after 2007, when a policy of preferably complete prostate sampling in cystoprostatectomy specimens was introduced at our institution. Cases processed after the 2007 recommended sampling changes had a significantly higher rate of incidental prostatic carcinoma and clinically significant prostatic carcinoma than the pre-2007 group (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.003, respectively. Complete prostate processing in cystoprostatectomy specimens results in a higher incidence of incidental prostatic carcinoma than with partial processing. More patients with clinically significant prostate cancer are consequently discovered. In conclusion, we believe that complete prostate sampling should be mandatory.

  18. Influence of sample pool on interference pattern in defocused interferometric particle imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongxia; Zhou, Ye; Liu, Jing; Jia, Dagong; Liu, Tiegen

    2017-04-01

    Particles widely exist in various fields. In practical experiments, sometimes it is necessary to dissolve particles in water in a sample pool. This article proposes two typical layouts of the sample pool in defocused interferometric particle imaging (IPI). Layout I is the sample pool surface perpendicular to the incident light and layout II is the sample pool surface perpendicular to the scattered light. For layout I, the scattered light of the particles does not keep symmetric at the meridional and sagittal planes after being refracted by the sample pool surface, and elliptical interference patterns are formed at the defocused IPI image plane. But for layout II, the scattered light keeps symmetric after being refracted, and circular interference patterns are formed. Aimed at the two sample pool layouts, the ray-tracing software ZEMAX was used to simulate the spot shape of particles at different defocus distances. Furthermore, its effect on the ellipticity of the interference pattern with the tilt angle of the sample pool is analyzed. The relative error of the axis ratio for layout I does not exceed 9.2% at different defocus distances. The experimental results have good agreement with the theoretical analyses, and it indicates that layout II is more reasonable for the IPI system.

  19. The influence of serial fecal sampling on the diagnosis of giardiasis in humans, dogs, and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchôa, Flávia Fernandes de Mendonça; Sudré, Adriana Pittella; Macieira, Daniel de Barros; Almosny, Nádia Regina Pereira

    2017-08-24

    Giardia infection is a common clinical problem in humans and pets. The diagnosis of giardiasis is challenging as hosts intermittently excrete protozoan cysts in their feces. In the present study, we comparatively evaluated two methods of serial fecal sampling in humans, dogs, and cats from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The Faust et al. technique was used to examine fecal specimens collected in triplicate from 133 patients (52 humans, 60 dogs, and 21 cats). Specimens from 74 patients were received from the group assigned to carry out sampling on consecutive days - 34 humans, 35 dogs, and 5 cats, and specimens from 59 patients were received from the group assigned to carry out sampling on non-consecutive, separate days - 18 human beings, 25 dogs, and 16 cats. G. duodenalis cysts were found in stools of 30 individuals. Multiple stool sampling resulted in an increase in the number of samples that were positive for Giardia in both groups. The authors therefore conclude that multiple stool sampling increases the sensitivity of the Faust et al . technique to detect G. duodenalis cysts in samples from humans, cats and dogs.

  20. Influence of austempering heat treatment on mechanical and corrosion properties of ductile iron samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Janjić

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of metals are closely related to the microstructure characteristics of the material. The paper compares the results of these two sets of properties after investigating samples of base ductile iron and heat-treated samples of the base austempered ductile iron (ADI. The basic material is perlite ferritic iron alloyed with copper and nickel. To test the corrosion rate of the base material (ductile iron and the heattreated samples (ADI, electrochemical techniques of potentiostatic polarization were used (the technique of Tafel curves extrapolation and the potentiodynamic polarization technique.

  1. Influence of heart rate in nonlinear HRV indices as a sampling rate effect evaluated on supine and standing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Bolea

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to characterize and attenuate the influence of mean heart rate (HR on nonlinear heart rate variability (HRV indices (correlation dimension, sample and approximate entropy as a consequence of being the HR the intrinsic sampling rate of HRV signal. This influence can notably alter nonlinear HRV indices and lead to biased information regarding autonomic nervous system (ANS modulation.First, a simulation study was carried out to characterize the dependence of nonlinear HRV indices on HR assuming similar ANS modulation. Second, two HR-correction approaches were proposed: one based on regression formulas and another one based on interpolating RR time series. Finally, standard and HR-corrected HRV indices were studied in a body position change database.The simulation study showed the HR-dependence of non-linear indices as a sampling rate effect, as well as the ability of the proposed HR-corrections to attenuate mean HR influence. Analysis in a body position changes database shows that correlation dimension was reduced around 21% in median values in standing with respect to supine position (p < 0.05, concomitant with a 28% increase in mean HR (p < 0.05. After HR-correction, correlation dimension decreased around 18% in standing with respect to supine position, being the decrease still significant. Sample and approximate entropy showed similar trends.HR-corrected nonlinear HRV indices could represent an improvement in their applicability as markers of ANS modulation when mean HR changes.

  2. The influence of sampling site and assay method on lactate concentration in response to rock climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Nick; Brent, Simon; Hale, Beverley; Coleman, Ian

    2006-11-01

    The sport of rock climbing has increased in popularity and as a focus for research. Previous studies have examined the physiological determinants for successful performance. Variation is evident between studies over lactate sampling sites and assay methods. The aim of this study was to examine the limits of agreement between the YSI 2300 analyser and the Lactate Pro for finger and ear capillary blood samples in a climbing context. Forty-five (31 males and 14 females) participants volunteered to complete the climbing trial. Blood samples were collected simultaneously from finger and ear pre, post and 5 min post climb. The repeatability results indicated a good agreement across samples. Modelling analysis indicated the use of a -0.175 mmol l(-1) adjustment to move from Lactate Pro to YSI finger concentrations. To move from finger to ear concentrations, using the Lactate Pro, modelling analysis suggested a regression equation of Y = 0.827x + 0.769 adjustment for pre climb samples and Y = 0.955x + 0.566 for post climb concentrations. To better understand the physiological demands of climbing further research on natural rock is required. Results from this study suggest the Lactate Pro and blood sampling from the ear lobe could be of benefit to future rock climbing field studies.

  3. Characterization of citrus pectin samples extracted under different conditions: influence of acid type and pH of extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaya, Merve; Sousa, Antonio G.; Crepeau, Marie-Jeanne

    2014-01-01

    on fruit peel, a waste product from the juicing industry, in which thousands of tons of citrus are processed worldwide every year. This study examines how pectin components vary in relation to the plant source (orange, lemon, lime, grapefruit) and considers the influence of extraction conditions...... on the chemical and macromolecular characteristics of pectin samples. Methods Citrus peel (orange, lemon, lime and grapefruit) from a commercial supplier was used as raw material. Pectin samples were obtained on a bulk plant scale (kilograms; harsh nitric acid, mild nitric acid and harsh oxalic acid extraction...... to have short side chains compared with orange, lime and lemon. Orange and grapefruit pectin samples were both particularly rich in rhamnogalacturonan I backbones. Conclusions Structural, and hence macromolecular, variations within the different citrus pectin samples were mainly related...

  4. Study of the influence of ADC sampling rate on the efficiency of neutron-gamma discrimination by the pulse shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepurnov, A. S.; Gavrilenko, O. I.; Kirsanov, M. A.; Klimanov, S. G.; Kubankin, A. S.

    2017-12-01

    The influence of a sampling rate of ADC on the efficiency of the pulse shape discrimination procedure (PSDP) developed for gamma-neutron discrimination was studied. Pu-Be neutron source and two types of digitizers (CAEN DT5730 and CAEN DT5743) were used. Both digitizers together with application software allow to store sequences of waveforms from a scintillation detector. The functional features of the CAEN DT5730 and CAEN DT5743 are described, and experimental characteristics of their operation are compared. Experimental values of an efficiency of neutron/gamma signal discrimination using two ADCs with different sampling frequencies are presented.

  5. Prevalence of and familial influences on purging disorder in a community sample of female twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn-Chernoff, Melissa A; Keel, Pamela K; Klump, Kelly L; Grant, Julia D; Bucholz, Kathleen K; Madden, Pamela A F; Heath, Andrew C; Duncan, Alexis E

    2015-09-01

    Purging disorder (PD) was recently included as an otherwise specified feeding or eating disorder (OSFED) in the DSM-5; however, limited information is available on its prevalence, and its etiology is unknown. Data from 1,790 monozygotic and 1,440 dizygotic European American female twins (age range = 18-29 years) from the Missouri Adolescent Female Twin Study were used to investigate prevalence and familial influences for PD. A structured clinical interview assessed lifetime DSM-IV criteria for eating disorders and PD. After adjustment for age, twin correlations and biometrical twin models were used to estimate familial (i.e., genetic plus shared environmental) influences on PD. One hundred and twenty one (3.77%; 95% CI: 3.14, 4.49) women met criteria for lifetime PD. Twin correlations suggested that genetic, shared environmental, and nonshared environmental factors influenced liability to PD. Nonshared environmental factors accounted for 56% [35%, 79%] of the variance in PD. Although familial effects accounted for a significant proportion of variance (44% [21%, 65%]), it was not possible to disentangle the independent contributions of additive genetic effects (20% [0%, 65%]) and shared environmental effects (24% [0%, 57%]). PD is a prevalent form of eating pathology. Familial factors are relevant to the development of PD but do not demonstrate the magnitude of heritable factors found for other eating disorders. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Season of sampling and season of birth influence serotonin metabolite levels in human cerebrospinal fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurjen J Luykx

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Animal studies have revealed seasonal patterns in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF monoamine (MA turnover. In humans, no study had systematically assessed seasonal patterns in CSF MA turnover in a large set of healthy adults. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Standardized amounts of CSF were prospectively collected from 223 healthy individuals undergoing spinal anesthesia for minor surgical procedures. The metabolites of serotonin (5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 5-HIAA, dopamine (homovanillic acid, HVA and norepinephrine (3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol, MPHG were measured using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Concentration measurements by sampling and birth dates were modeled using a non-linear quantile cosine function and locally weighted scatterplot smoothing (LOESS, span = 0.75. The cosine model showed a unimodal season of sampling 5-HIAA zenith in April and a nadir in October (p-value of the amplitude of the cosine = 0.00050, with predicted maximum (PC(max and minimum (PC(min concentrations of 173 and 108 nmol/L, respectively, implying a 60% increase from trough to peak. Season of birth showed a unimodal 5-HIAA zenith in May and a nadir in November (p = 0.00339; PC(max = 172 and PC(min = 126. The non-parametric LOESS showed a similar pattern to the cosine in both season of sampling and season of birth models, validating the cosine model. A final model including both sampling and birth months demonstrated that both sampling and birth seasons were independent predictors of 5-HIAA concentrations. CONCLUSION: In subjects without mental illness, 5-HT turnover shows circannual variation by season of sampling as well as season of birth, with peaks in spring and troughs in fall.

  7. Fingering dynamics on the adsorbed solute with influence of less viscous and strong sample solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Chinar; Mishra, Manoranjan

    2014-12-07

    Viscous fingering is a hydrodynamic instability that sets in when a low viscous fluid displaces a high viscous fluid and creates complex patterns in porous media flows. Fundamental facets of the displacement process, such as the solute concentration distribution, spreading length, and the solute mixing, depend strongly on the type of pattern created by the unstable interface of the underlying fluids. In the present study, the frontal interface of the sample shows viscous fingering and the strong solvent causes the retention of the solute to depend on the solvent concentration. This work presents a computational investigation to explore the effect of the underlying physico-chemical phenomena, (i.e., the combined effects of solvent strength, retention, and viscous fingering) on the dynamics of the adsorbed solute. A linear adsorption isotherm has been assumed between the mobile and stationary phases of the solute. We carried out the numerical simulations by considering a rectangular Hele-Shaw cell as an analog to 2D-porous media containing a three component system (displacing fluid, sample solvent, solute) to map out the evolution of the solute concentration. We observed that viscous fingering at the frontal interface of the strong sample solvent intensifies the band broadening of the solute zone. Also notable increase in the spreading dynamics of the solute has been observed for less viscous and strong sample solvent as compared to the high viscous sample slices or in the pure dispersive case. On the contrary, the solute gets intensively mixed at early times for more viscous sample in comparison to less viscous one. The results of the simulations are in qualitative agreement with the behavior observed in the liquid chromatography column experiments.

  8. Scale-up of two-phase flow in heterogeneous chalk. Matrix properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This investigation presents scale-up of a detailed heterogeneous geostatistical model to a full field reservoir simulation model, considering both single and two-phase flow properties. The model represents a typical low permeability Danish North Sea chalk reservoir and includes capillary pressure and saturation end-point variations. Two new up-scaling methods has been investigated, all based on fine scale simulation on a cross section of the geomodel. The first methods assumes piston style behaviour and a coupled viscosity is introduced into the basic Darcy`s equations. The second method is a modification of the JBN method traditionally applied in analysing results from core flooding experiments, which emerged as the most successful and therefore also the recommended method. 1. In addition to the up scaling work we review the Equivalent Radius Method for capillary pressure normalisation with explicit derivation of type functions for Maastrichtian and Danian chalk types. Implementation of the Equivalent Radiuo Method in the COSI reservoir simulator by an optikal set of key-words. There are six specific results from this work: 1. The equivalent radius method is robust to changes of scale and yields model initialisations by initial and irreducible water saturations on a full field simulation scale that agree well with values derived from averaging on a fine-scale. 2. The residual oil saturations are strongly scale dependent and the description of the residual oil as a function of the irreducible water is not applicable on a full field scale and will lead to an overestimation of the residual oil present in the reservoir. The effective residual oil saturations on a full field-scale must be considered functions of the effective initial water saturations, in order to take into account fine-scale variations in the oil/water contacts. 3. The effective permeability as calculated by statistical averages does not differ seriously from results obtained by fine-grid numerical

  9. Freezing-thawing and sub-sampling influence the marination performance of chicken breast meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacuum-tumbling marination is often used to improve the yield and quality of whole or portioned boneless broiler breast fillets. The relationship between the marination performance of whole Pectoralis major muscles and breast fillet sub-samples is not well understood. The objective of this study wa...

  10. Temperature influence on the fast pyrolysis of manure samples: char, bio-oil and gases production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez-Lopez Maria

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fast pyrolysis characterization of three dry manure samples was studied using a pyrolyzer. A heating rate of 600°C/s and a holding time of 10 s were selected to reproduce industrial conditions. The effect of the peak pyrolysis temperature (600, 800 and 1000°C on the pyrolysis product yield and composition was evaluated. Char and bio-oil were gravimetrically quantified. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to analyse the char structure. H2, CH4, CO and CO2 were measured by means of gas chromatography (GC. A decrease in the char yield and an increase of the gas yield were observed when temperature increased. From 800°C on, it was observed that the char yield of samples Dig R and SW were constant, which indicated that the primary devolatilization reactions stopped. This fact was also corroborated by GC analysis. The bio-oil yield slightly increased with temperature, showing a maximum of 20.7 and 27.8 wt.% for samples Pre and SW, respectively, whereas sample Dig R showed a maximum yield of 16.5 wt.% at 800°C. CO2 and CO were the main released gases whereas H2 and CH4 production increased with temperature. Finally, an increase of char porosity was observed with temperature.

  11. The Influence of Sample Origin on the Leachability of Wood Preservatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kärt KÄNGSEPP

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have been conducted on impregnability of the raw material and large variations have been found. The leaching of wood preservatives into nature is a problem, especially agents that consist copper. Leachability of i. e. copper has been studied by several authors. This study tries to set the variation of leachability of Wolmanit CX-8 and Tanalith in system, evaluating the origin of a tree and the origin of a sample. Samples of Scots pine sapwood (Pinus Sylvestris (20×20×50 mm were treated with the wood protection agents Wolmanit CX-8 and Tanalith. The variation in leachability within trees, between trees and between different stands of Scots pine (in Norway and Denmark was studied. The samples were climatized, impregnated with preservatives and leached according to standard EN84. The study indicates differences between the products. Stand location and samples position in a tree play a role in preservative leaching from wood, favouring southern located trees to be more prone to loosing preservative. Also the lowest part of the tree does not fixate preservatives as well as the upper parts. http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.3.594

  12. Help-Seeking in a National Sample of Victimized Latino Women: The Influence of Victimization Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabina, Chiara; Cuevas, Carlos A.; Schally, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    The current study aimed to examine formal and informal help-seeking responses to interpersonal victimization among a national sample of Latino women. In addition, an examination of help-seeking by victimization type was undertaken. Data came from the Sexual Assault Among Latinas (SALAS) study that obtained help-seeking rates among a victimized…

  13. Influence of tree spatial pattern and sample plot type and size on inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    John-Pascall Berrill; Kevin L. O' Hara

    2012-01-01

    Sampling with different plot types and sizes was simulated using tree location maps and data collected in three even-aged coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) stands selected to represent uniform, random, and clumped spatial patterns of tree locations. Fixed-radius circular plots, belt transects, and variable-radius plots were installed by...

  14. Temperature influence on the fast pyrolysis of manure samples: char, bio-oil and gases production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Lopez, Maria; Anastasakis, Kostas; De Jong, Wiebren; Valverde, Jose Luis; Sanchez-Silva, Luz

    2017-11-01

    Fast pyrolysis characterization of three dry manure samples was studied using a pyrolyzer. A heating rate of 600°C/s and a holding time of 10 s were selected to reproduce industrial conditions. The effect of the peak pyrolysis temperature (600, 800 and 1000°C) on the pyrolysis product yield and composition was evaluated. Char and bio-oil were gravimetrically quantified. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to analyse the char structure. H2, CH4, CO and CO2 were measured by means of gas chromatography (GC). A decrease in the char yield and an increase of the gas yield were observed when temperature increased. From 800°C on, it was observed that the char yield of samples Dig R and SW were constant, which indicated that the primary devolatilization reactions stopped. This fact was also corroborated by GC analysis. The bio-oil yield slightly increased with temperature, showing a maximum of 20.7 and 27.8 wt.% for samples Pre and SW, respectively, whereas sample Dig R showed a maximum yield of 16.5 wt.% at 800°C. CO2 and CO were the main released gases whereas H2 and CH4 production increased with temperature. Finally, an increase of char porosity was observed with temperature.

  15. Influence of identity versus oddity pretraining on symmetric matching to sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Boelens (Harrie); J.J. Schenk (Jacqueline)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractIdentity and oddity matching tasks were designed for different groups of 5-yr.-old children. The presentation of tasks continued until all children had shown evidence of appropriate generalization to new stimuli (i.e., generalized identity matching or generalized oddity from sample). All

  16. Mapping and characterization of thin chalk reservoirs using data integration: the Kraka Field, Danish North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinkby, L.; Kristensen, L.; Nielsen, E.B.; Zinck-Jorgensen, K.

    2005-07-01

    The integration of 3D seismic data, well logs and synthetic seismic data has been used to identify an additional Intra Danian seismic horizon in the chalk reservoir of the Kraka Field, Danish North Sea. Mapping of this seismic horizon has allowed production of a separate thickness map for the main reservoir unit, the Danian Porous, in the greater Kraka area. The unit is less than 25 m thick in most areas and, to produce reliable reservoir maps, it has been necessary to use well data to guide the seismic interpretation. It is impossible, however, to resolve the reservoir stratigraphy properly in areas where the Danian Porous is thinner than c.15 m due to tuning effects. The lateral porosity distribution has been mapped using a combination of well log data and seismic data inverted for acoustic impedance. The Danian Porous unit is characterized by average porosities over 28% and shows no evidence of depth-related porosity reduction. Rather, the impedance data indicate the presence of positive porosity anomalies both over the crest and downflank towards the southeast. Comparison of impedance-derived porosities with those derived from well data indicates that the seismic-based data reflect the variations in porosity but underestimate the highest porosity by 3-4%. Faults and fractures are important for production of the Kraka Field. Detailed mapping of seismic horizons, supplemented with seismic attribute mapping, has proved useful for outlining areas with high fault intensity in the northwestern part of the field but has been unsuccessful in identifying individual faults as recognized from log data. (author)

  17. Pitfalls in velocity analysis for strongly contrasting, layered media - Example from the Chalk Group, North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazeri, Mahboubeh; Uldall, Anette; Moreau, Julien; Nielsen, Lars

    2018-02-01

    Knowledge about the velocity structure of the subsurface is critical in key seismic processing sequences, for instance, migration, depth conversion, and construction of initial P- and S-wave velocity models for full-waveform inversion. Therefore, the quality of subsurface imaging is highly dependent upon the quality of the seismic velocity analysis. Based on a case study from the Danish part of the North Sea, we show how interference caused by multiples, converted waves, and thin-layer effects may lead to incorrect velocity estimation, if such effects are not accounted for. Seismic wave propagation inside finely layered reservoir rocks dominated by chalk is described by two-dimensional finite-difference wave field simulation. The rock physical properties used for the modeling are based on an exploration well from the Halfdan field in the Danish sector of the North Sea. The modeling results are compared to seismic data from the study area. The modeling shows that interference of primaries with multiples, converted waves and thin-bed effects can give rise to strong anomalies in standard velocity analysis plots. Consequently, root-mean-square (RMS) velocity profiles may be erroneously picked. In our study area, such mis-picking can introduce errors in, for example, the thickness estimation of the layers near the base of the studied sedimentary strata by 11% to 26%. Tests show that front muting and bandpass filtering cannot significantly improve the quality of velocity analysis in our study. However, we notice that spiking deconvolution applied before velocity analysis may to some extent reduce the impact of interference and, therefore, reduce the risk of erroneous picking of the velocity function.

  18. Caring attributes, professional self concept and technological influences in a sample of Registered Nurses in eleven countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, D; Pang, S; Wong, T; Alexander, M F; Drury, J; Eastwood; Johansson, I; Jooste, K; Naude, M; Noh, C H; O'Brien, A; Sohng, K Y; Stevenson, G R; Sy-Sinda, M T; Thorne, S; van der Wal, D; Xiao, S

    1999-10-01

    Caring, the theoretical foundation of nursing, is identified as one of the core values by Hospital Authorities world-wide to be actualised in clinical practice. Exactly how caring attributes relate to nurses' professional self image and quality nursing service in the context of a contemporary technological environment have yet to be operationalised. In total, 1957 Registered Nurses from 11 different countries were involved in the study which aimed to: develop an understanding of and compare the responses to items relating to caring, professional self concept and technological influences. To collect data an instrument containing 104 Likert items was administered to RNs working in general hospitals. The instrument contained sections which examined professional self concept, technological influences and caring attributes. Descriptive and inferential statistics revealed that many of the Asian nurses in the sample were younger, had less experience yet were more qualified than their 'western' colleagues. The mean scores for the caring attributes for nurses from the Philippines, Sweden and South Africa were significantly higher than those from China (Beijing), Korea, China (Hong Kong) and Scotland. The Korean sample demonstrated the lowest mean score for professional self concept while the New Zealand sample the highest. The Australian, Canadian, NZ, Scotland and Swedish samples were strongly of the opinion that the increase in technology has not brought about the any more spare time in nursing and generally had a more negative opinion about the influence of technology when compared to those from China (Beijing), Philippines, China (Hong Kong) and Singapore. The results are discussed in the light of the cultural differences in the sample and recommendations for future research are considered.

  19. Who are health influencers? Characterizing a sample of tobacco cessation interveners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jean; Mays, Mary Z; Yuan, Nicole P; Muramoto, Myra L

    2007-01-01

    To describe characteristics of health influencers (HIs) prior to training in brief tobacco cessation interventions (BI). HIs (n=910) in Arizona were recruited for a randomized controlled trial comparing training modalities. Typically middle-aged (M=43, SD=14), non-Hispanic white (68%), female (77%), non-tobacco users (93%), most identified personal (89%) rather than job-related (3%) motivators for becoming cessation interveners. Confidence about intervention ability was high (93%); knowledge scores, however, were low (M=55%, SD=13%). HIs exhibiting high motivation to intervene but lacking knowledge about BI strategies may be an untapped resource for tobacco cessation and a variety of other health promotion interventions.

  20. Modelling flow and heat transfer through unsaturated chalk - Validation with experimental data from the ground surface to the aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiéry, Dominique; Amraoui, Nadia; Noyer, Marie-Luce

    2018-01-01

    During the winter and spring of 2000-2001, large floods occurred in northern France (Somme River Basin) and southern England (Patcham area of Brighton) in valleys that are developed on Chalk outcrops. The floods durations were particularly long (more than 3 months in the Somme Basin) and caused significant damage in both countries. To improve the understanding of groundwater flooding in Chalk catchments, an experimental site was set up in the Hallue basin, which is located in the Somme River Basin (France). Unsaturated fractured chalk formation overlying the Chalk aquifer was monitored to understand its reaction to long and heavy rainfall events when it reaches a near saturation state. The water content and soil temperature were monitored to a depth of 8 m, and the matrix pressure was monitored down to the water table, 26.5 m below ground level. The monitoring extended over a 2.5-year period (2006-2008) under natural conditions and during two periods when heavy, artificial infiltration was induced. The objective of the paper is to describe a vertical numerical flow model based on Richards' equation using these data that was developed to simulate infiltrating rainwater flow from the ground surface to the saturated aquifer. The MARTHE computer code, which models the unsaturated-saturated continuum, was adapted to reproduce the monitored high saturation periods. Composite constitutive functions (hydraulic conductivity-saturation and pressure-saturation) that integrate the increase in hydraulic conductivity near saturation and extra available porosity resulting from fractures were introduced into the code. Using these composite constitutive functions, the model was able to accurately simulate the water contents and pressures at all depths over the entire monitored period, including the infiltration tests. The soil temperature was also accurately simulated at all depths, except during the infiltrations tests, which contributes to the model validation. The model was used

  1. Influence of Sample Size of Polymer Materials on Aging Characteristics in the Salt Fog Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsubo, Masahisa; Anami, Naoya; Yamashita, Seiji; Honda, Chikahisa; Takenouchi, Osamu; Hashimoto, Yousuke

    Polymer insulators have been used in worldwide because of some superior properties; light weight, high mechanical strength, good hydrophobicity etc., as compared with porcelain insulators. In this paper, effect of sample size on the aging characteristics in the salt fog test is examined. Leakage current was measured by using 100 MHz AD board or 100 MHz digital oscilloscope and separated three components as conductive current, corona discharge current and dry band arc discharge current by using FFT and the current differential method newly proposed. Each component cumulative charge was estimated automatically by a personal computer. As the results, when the sample size increased under the same average applied electric field, the peak values of leakage current and each component current increased. Especially, the cumulative charges and the arc discharge length of dry band arc discharge increased remarkably with the increase of gap length.

  2. Influence of Lead on the Interpretation of Bone Samples with Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolhamed Shahedi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is devoted to tracing and identifying the elements available in bone sample using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS. The bone samples were prepared from the thigh of laboratory rats, which consumed 325.29 g/mol lead acetate having 4 mM concentration in specified time duration. About 76 atomic lines have been analyzed and we found that the dominant elements are Ca I, Ca II, Mg I, Mg II, Fe I, and Fe II. Temperature curve and bar graph were drawn to compare bone elements of group B which consumed lead with normal group, group A, in the same laboratory conditions. Plasma parameters including plasma temperature and electron density were determined by considering Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE condition in the plasma. An inverse relationship has been detected between lead absorption and elements like Calcium and Magnesium absorption comparing elemental values for both the groups.

  3. Influence of the freezing method on the changes that occur in grape samples after frozen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santesteban, Luis G; Miranda, Carlos; Royo, José B

    2013-09-01

    Sample freezing is frequently used in oenological laboratories as a compromise solution to increase the number of samples that can be analysed, despite the fact that some grape characteristics are known to change after frozen storage. However, freezing is usually performed using standard freezers, which provide a slow freezing. The aim of this work was to evaluate whether blast freezing would decrease the impact of standard freezing on grape composition. Grape quality parameters were assessed in fresh and in frozen stored samples that had been frozen using three different procedures: standard freezing and blast freezing using either a blast freezer or an ultra-freezer. The implications of frozen storage in grape samples reported in earlier research were observed for the three freezing methods evaluated. Although blast freezing improved repeatability for the most problematic parameters (tartaric acidity, TarA; total phenolics, TP), the improvement was not important from a practical point of view. However, TarA and TP were relatively repeatable among the three freezing procedures, which suggests that freezing had an effect on these parameters independently of the method used . According to our results, the salification potential of the must is probably implied in the changes observed for TarA, whereas for TP the precipitation of protoanthocyanins after association with cell wall material is hypothesized to cause the lack of repeatability between fresh and frozen grapes. Blast freezing would not imply a great improvement if implemented in oenological laboratories, at least for the parameters included in this study. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. The influence of concrete inhomogeneity on elastic response of the sample under dynamic load

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Osiński; Grzegorz Bąk

    2016-01-01

    Results of the dynamic loading analysis of the heterogeneous concrete rectangular samples are presented in the article. This heterogeneity is set randomly with respect to the basic mechanical parameters: the mass density and the modules of concrete deformation. These both parameters define the elastic wave velocities. According to experimental researches by the ultrasounds method, the values of the longitudinal wave velocity is between (3,0 ÷ 5,0) [km/s]. By the draw of the randomly mechanica...

  5. Genotoxic and mutagenic evaluation of water samples from a river under the influence of different anthropogenic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Nelson Jorge Carvalho; de Carvalho Melo Cavalcante, Ana Amélia; de Oliveira, Maria Geci; Medeiros, Eugênia Cristina Nascimento; Machado, Joseane Lustosa; Evangelista, Sebastiana Ribeiro; Dias, Johnny F; Dos Santos, Carla E I; Duarte, Anaí; da Silva, Fernanda R; da Silva, Juliana

    2016-12-01

    Pollution of aquatic ecosystems is associated with the discharge of mostly industrial and urban effluents, which may cause loss of biodiversity and damage to public health. This study aims to evaluate the toxicity and mutagenicity of water samples collected in the Corrente River, a major waterway in the river basin district of Pedro II, Piauí (Brazil). This river is exposed to intense anthropogenic influence from urban, automotive mechanical and family farm waste, and it is used as the main source of water supply by the population. Water samples were collected during the rainy and dry seasons, at four sites in the Corrente River, and evaluated by physicochemical, microbiological and inorganic elements analyses. The samples were evaluated for mutagenicity using the Allium cepa test (toxicity, chromosomal aberration and micronucleus tests) and fish (Tilapia rendalli and Hoplias malabaricus). The physicochemical, microbiological and inorganic results show a large contribution to the pollution loads at collection points in the town of Pedro II, demonstrating the influence of urban pollution. The Al, Si, Ti, Cr, Ni and Cu contents were determined by PIXE. These same Corrente River water samples demonstrated mutagenic effect for A. cepa and fish, as well as toxicity in the A. cepa test. The observations of mutagenic effect may suggest that the complex mixture of agents is comprised of both clastogenic and aneugenic agents. This study also showed the need for constant monitoring in places with environmental degradation caused by urban sewage discharges. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The influence of concrete inhomogeneity on elastic response of the sample under dynamic load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Osiński

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Results of the dynamic loading analysis of the heterogeneous concrete rectangular samples are presented in the article. This heterogeneity is set randomly with respect to the basic mechanical parameters: the mass density and the modules of concrete deformation. These both parameters define the elastic wave velocities. According to experimental researches by the ultrasounds method, the values of the longitudinal wave velocity is between (3,0 ÷ 5,0 [km/s]. By the draw of the randomly mechanical parameters this interval was kept. The rating of the heterogeneity is expressed in terms of concrete strength using a dependence correlation between the phase velocity and an average local strength of concrete. The results of numerical analysis of wave reaction of rectangular concrete samples were obtained by the differential discretization, which evolved the sample into a three-dimensional model of the type of a discreet structural quasi-mesosystem. It is shown that the excessive heterogeneity revealed the initiation of unstable deformation processes.[b]Keywords:[/b] differential approximation, explicit integration scheme, spatial analysis of the wave

  7. Influence of Gender and Repeated Urine Sampling on the Association of Albuminuria with Coronary Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatlen, Gudrun; Romundstad, Solfrid; Salvesen, Øyvind; Dalen, Havard; Hallan, Stein I

    2016-01-01

    The association between albuminuria and coronary heart disease (CHD) is well-known, but uncertainties related to day-to-day variability and effect modification of gender complicate the risk assessment process. This study evaluates the associations of CHD with albuminuria level in men and women based on the number of urine samples. Nine thousand one hundred and fifty-eight adults provided 3 urine samples and were followed for 14 years in the population-based HUNT-2 cohort study. The association of myocardial infarction or coronary death with different albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) cut-offs, based on gender and number of positive ACRs, were estimated by hazard ratios (HRs) and adjusted for by Framingham variables. Associations between ACR and CHD were similar in men and women. For example, HRs for moderately increased (3.0≤ ACR ≤30.0 mg/mmol) vs. normal albuminuria (ACR albuminuria and coronary events. However, women had increased intra-individual albuminuria variability compared to men, necessitating several positive urine samples if mildly increased albuminuria is used in coronary risk evaluation. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Influence of reducing conditions on metallic elements released from various contaminated soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareuil, Priscilla; Pénilla, Sonia; Ozkan, Nursen; Bordas, François; Bollinger, Jean-Claude

    2008-10-15

    The redox conditions of soil may have significant consequences for the mobility of metallic elements (ME), but unlike pH, very few studies have investigated this parameter. A procedure was established to study the solubilization of ME from soil samples in various reducing conditions using a batch method and sodium ascorbate solutions. The change in redox potential from +410 to +10 mV was studied from four contaminated soil samples (designated A-D) of different origins and compositions. The results showed that ME mobilization greatly increased with decreasing redox potential within a limited and very sensitive range. Depending on the soil sample studied, various sensitive ranges of potentials were obtained (A, 220-345 mV; B, 280-365 mV; C, 260-360 mV; and D, 240-380 mV), and the induced percentages of ME mobilization varied (i.e., maximal values for Zn: A, 45%; B, 59%; C, 53%; and D, 58%). The results could be explained by the combined effect of potential and pH decrease on ME-carrying phases; in particular, Fe and Mn (oxy)hydroxides.

  9. Study of sampling rate influence on neutron-gamma discrimination with stilbene coupled to a silicon photomultiplier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinglong; Moore, Michael E; Wang, Zhonghai; Rong, Zhou; Yang, Chaowen; Hayward, Jason P

    2017-10-01

    Choosing a digitizer with an appropriate sampling rate is often a trade-off between performance and economy. The influence of sampling rates on the neutron-gamma Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) with a solid stilbene scintillator coupled to a Silicon Photomultiplier was investigated in this work. Sampling rates from 125MSPS to 2GSPS from a 10-bit digitizer were used to collect detector pulses produced by the interactions of a Cf-252 source. Due to the decreased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the PSD performance degraded with reduced sampling rates. The reason of PSD performance degradation was discussed. Then, an efficient combination of filtering and digital signal processing (DSP) was then applied to suppress the timing noise and electronic background noise. The results demonstrate an improved PSD performance especially at low sampling rates, down to 125MSPS. Using filtering and DSP, the ascribed Figure of Merit (FOM) at 125keVee (± 10keVee) increased from 0.95 to 1.02 at 125MSPS. At 300keVee and above, all the FOMs are better than 2.00. Our study suggests that 250MSPS is a good enough sampling rate for neutron-gamma discrimination in this system in order to be sensitive to neutrons at and above ~ 125keVee. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of several experimental parameters on As and Se leaching from coal fly ash samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otero-Rey, Jose R. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, E-15071 A Coruna (Spain); Mato-Fernandez, Maria J. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, E-15071 A Coruna (Spain); Moreda-Pineiro, Jorge [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, E-15071 A Coruna (Spain); Alonso-Rodriguez, Elia [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, E-15071 A Coruna (Spain)]. E-mail: elia@udc.es; Muniategui-Lorenzo, Soledad [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, E-15071 A Coruna (Spain); Lopez-Mahia, Purificacion [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, E-15071 A Coruna (Spain); Prada-Rodriguez, Dario [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, E-15071 A Coruna (Spain)

    2005-02-28

    Coal fly ash leaching process for As and Se is studied. Environmental parameters such as pH, temperature, solid-liquid ratio, particle size and leaching time are taken into account in order to simulate As and Se leaching process for disposal coal fly ash. Analysis of reference materials was carried out by using of hydride generation coupled to atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Plackett-Burman experimental design is used to know the significative parameters, and Box-Behnken experimental design is used to refine the results obtained for these significative parameters. pH and temperature shown a hardly influence in leaching process. Furthermore, leaching time was also significative. According our results, it may be assumed that percentage of As and Se leaching in experimental conditions tested is relatively low for acidic fly ashes.

  11. Influence of sampling on the determination of warfarin and warfarin alcohols in oral fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Lomonaco

    Full Text Available The determination of warfarin, RS/SR- and RR/SS-warfarin alcohols in oral fluid may offer additional information to the INR assay. This study aimed to establish an optimized sampling technique providing the best correlation between the oral fluid and the unbound plasma concentrations of these compounds.Samples of non-stimulated and stimulated oral fluid, and blood were collected from 14 patients undergoing warfarin therapy. After acidification, analytes were extracted with a dichloromethane/hexane mixture and determined by HPLC with fluorescence detection. Plasma samples were also ultrafiltered for the determination of the unbound fraction. The chromatographic separation was carried out in isocratic conditions with a phosphate buffer/methanol mobile phase on a C-18 reversed-phase column. The absence of interfering compounds was verified by HPLC-ESI-Q-TOF.Stimulation generally increased the oral fluid pH to values close to blood pH in about 6 minutes. The concentration of warfarin and RS/SR-warfarin alcohols in oral fluid followed the same trend, whereas the concentration of RR/SS-warfarin alcohols was not affected. Six minute stimulation with chewing gum followed by collection with a polyester swab was the best sampling procedure, with a good repeatability (RSD < 10% and relatively low inter-subject variability (RSD  = 30% of the oral fluid to plasma ratio. This procedure provided strong correlations between the measured oral fluid and unbound plasma concentration of warfarin (r  =  0.92, p < 0.001 and RS/SR-warfarin alcohols (r  =  0.84, p < 0.001, as well as between stimulated oral fluid and total plasma concentration of warfarin (r  =  0.78, p < 0.001 and RS/SR-warfarin alcohols (r  =  0.81, p < 0.001.The very good correlation between oral fluid and unbound plasma concentration of warfarin and RS/SR-warfarin alcohols suggests that oral fluid analysis could provide clinically useful information for the monitoring of

  12. Intravenous and sublingual buprenorphine in horses: pharmacokinetics and influence of sampling site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, Kristen M; Davis, Jennifer L; LaFevers, Douglas H; Barlow, Beth M; Posner, Lysa P

    2011-07-01

    To describe the pharmacokinetics and adverse effects of intravenous (IV) and sublingual (SL) buprenorphine in horses, and to determine the effect of sampling site on plasma concentrations after SL administration. Randomized crossover experiment; prospective study. Eleven healthy adult horses between 6 and 20 years of age and weighing 487-592 kg. In the first phase; buprenorphine was administered as a single IV or SL dose (0.006 mg kg(-1)) and pharmacokinetic parameters were determined for each route of administration using a noncompartmental model. In the second phase; the jugular and lateral thoracic veins were catheterized for simultaneous venous blood sampling, following a dose of 0.006 mg kg(-1) SL buprenorphine. For both phases, plasma buprenorphine concentrations were measured using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. At each sampling period, horses were assessed for behavioral excitement and gastrointestinal motility. Following IV administration, buprenorphine mean ± SD half-life was 5.79 ± 1.09 hours. Systemic clearance (Cl) following IV administration was 6.13 ± 0.86 mL kg(-1) minute(-1) and volume of distribution at steady-state was 3.16 ± 0.65 L kg(-1). Following IV administration, horses showed signs of excitement. Gastrointestinal sounds were decreased following both routes of administration; however, none of the horses exhibited signs of colic. There was a significant discrepancy between plasma buprenorphine concentrations measured in the jugular vein versus the lateral thoracic vein following phase 2, thus pharmacokinetic parameters following SL buprenorphine are not reported. Buprenorphine has a long plasma half-life and results in plasma concentrations that are consistent with analgesia in other species for up to 4 hours following IV administration of this dose in horses. While buprenorphine is absorbed into the circulation following SL administration, jugular venous sampling gave a false measurement of the quantity

  13. Does body satisfaction influence self-esteem in adolescents' daily lives? An experience sampling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew; McCabe, Marita; Skouteris, Helen; Richardson, Ben; Nihill, Kristy; Watson, Brittany; Solomon, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    This study examined, within the context of the Contingencies of Self-Worth model, state-based associations between self-esteem and body satisfaction using the experience sampling method. One hundred and forty-four adolescent girls (mean age = 14.28 years) completed up to 6 assessments per day for one week using Palm Digital Assistants, in addition to baseline measures of trait body satisfaction and self-esteem. Results showed considerable variation in both state-based constructs within days, and evidence of effects of body satisfaction on self-esteem, but not vice versa. Although these state-based associations were small in size and weakened as the time lag between assessments increased for the sample as a whole, individual differences in the magnitude of these effects were observed and predicted by trait self-esteem and body satisfaction. Collectively, these findings offer support for key tenets of the Contingencies of Self-Worth model. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. On the Influence of the Data Sampling Interval on Computer-Derived K-Indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Bernard

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The K index was devised by Bartels et al. (1939 to provide an objective monitoring of irregular geomagnetic activity. The K index was then routinely used to monitor the magnetic activity at permanent magnetic observatories as well as at temporary stations. The increasing number of digital and sometimes unmanned observatories and the creation of INTERMAGNET put the question of computer production of K at the centre of the debate. Four algorithms were selected during the Vienna meeting (1991 and endorsed by IAGA for the computer production of K indices. We used one of them (FMI algorithm to investigate the impact of the geomagnetic data sampling interval on computer produced K values through the comparison of the computer derived K values for the period 2009, January 1st to 2010, May 31st at the Port-aux-Francais magnetic observatory using magnetic data series with different sampling rates (the smaller: 1 second; the larger: 1 minute. The impact is investigated on both 3-hour range values and K indices data series, as a function of the activity level for low and moderate geomagnetic activity.

  15. On the Influence of the Sample Absorptivity when Studying the Thermal Degradation of Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Boulet

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The change in absorptivity during the degradation process of materials is discussed, and its influence as one of the involved parameters in the degradation models is studied. Three materials with very different behaviors are used for the demonstration of its role: a carbon composite material, which is opaque, almost grey, a plywood slab, which is opaque and spectral-dependent and a clear PMMA slab, which is semitransparent. Data are analyzed for virgin and degraded materials at different steps of thermal degradation. It is seen that absorptivity and emissivity often reach high values in the range of 0.90–0.95 with a near-grey behavior after significant thermal aggression, but depending on the materials of interest, some significant evolution may be first observed, especially during the early stages of the degradation. Supplementary inaccuracy can come from the heterogeneity of the incident flux on the slab. As a whole, discrepancies up to 20% can be observed on the absorbed flux depending on the degradation time, mainly because of the spectral variations of the absorption and up to 10% more, depending on the position on the slab. Simple models with a constant and unique value of absorptivity may then lead to inaccuracies in the evaluation of the radiative flux absorption, with possible consequences on the pyrolysis analysis, especially for properties related to the early step of the degradation process, like the time to ignition, for example.

  16. On the Influence of the Sample Absorptivity when Studying the Thermal Degradation of Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, Pascal; Brissinger, Damien; Collin, Anthony; Acem, Zoubir; Parent, Gilles

    2015-08-21

    The change in absorptivity during the degradation process of materials is discussed, and its influence as one of the involved parameters in the degradation models is studied. Three materials with very different behaviors are used for the demonstration of its role: a carbon composite material, which is opaque, almost grey, a plywood slab, which is opaque and spectral-dependent and a clear PMMA slab, which is semitransparent. Data are analyzed for virgin and degraded materials at different steps of thermal degradation. It is seen that absorptivity and emissivity often reach high values in the range of 0.90-0.95 with a near-grey behavior after significant thermal aggression, but depending on the materials of interest, some significant evolution may be first observed, especially during the early stages of the degradation. Supplementary inaccuracy can come from the heterogeneity of the incident flux on the slab. As a whole, discrepancies up to 20% can be observed on the absorbed flux depending on the degradation time, mainly because of the spectral variations of the absorption and up to 10% more, depending on the position on the slab. Simple models with a constant and unique value of absorptivity may then lead to inaccuracies in the evaluation of the radiative flux absorption, with possible consequences on the pyrolysis analysis, especially for properties related to the early step of the degradation process, like the time to ignition, for example.

  17. The influence of freezer storage of urine samples on the BONN-Risk-Index for calcium oxalate crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, Norbert; Zimmermann, Diana J

    2004-01-01

    This study was performed to quantify the effect of a 1-week freezer storage of urine on its calcium oxalate crystallization risk. Calcium oxalate is the most common urinary stone material observed in urolithiasis patients in western and affluent countries. The BONN-Risk-Index of calcium oxalate crystallization risk in human urine is determined from a crystallization experiment performed on untreated native urine samples. We tested the influence of a 1-week freezing on the BONN-Risk-Index value as well as the effect of the sample freezing on the urinary osmolality. In vitro crystallization experiments in 49 native urine samples from stone-forming and non-stone forming individuals were performed in order to determine their calcium oxalate crystallization risk according to the BONN-Risk-Index approach. Comparison of the results derived from original sample investigations with those obtained from the thawed aliquots by statistical evaluation shows that i) no significant deviation from linearity between both results exists and ii) both results are identical by statistical means. This is valid for both, the BONN-Risk-Index and the osmolality data. The differences in the BONN-Risk-Index results of both procedures of BONN-Risk-Index determination, however, exceed the clinically acceptable difference. Thus, determination of the urinary calcium oxalate crystallization risk from thawed urine samples cannot be recommended.

  18. The influence of gender on social anxiety spectrum symptoms in a sample of university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Osso, Liliana; Abelli, Marianna; Pini, Stefano; Carpita, Barbara; Carlini, Marina; Mengali, Francesco; Tognetti, Rosalba; Rivetti, Francesco; Massimetti, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore social anxiety spectrum gender differences, in a sample of university students. Overall, 823 University of Pisa students were assessed by Social Anxiety Spectrum Self-Report Questionnaire (SHYSR). Using a total score of 68 as the optimal diagnostic threshold, we classified students into two groups with levels of severity: low scorers (60%), significant gender differences emerged for 6 items: females reported higher rates of items related to “Performance fears”, that seemed to confirm the new DSM-5 specifier named “Performance only”, while males reported higher rate in a single item related to “Behavioural inhibition”. Females showed a significant higher total score and “Specific anxieties and phobic features” and “Interpersonal sensitivity” domain scores compared to males, in low severity subgroup, and males showed significant higher “Social phobic traits during childhood and adolescence” and “Behavioural inhibition and somatic symptoms” domain scores compared to females in the high severity subgroup. Finally, rate of individuals declaring to consume alcohol was significantly higher in males than females. Among university students, social anxiety spectrum seems to be more frequent in females than males. In males, social anxiety spectrum is more frequently associated with an early onset, behavioural inhibition and somatic symptoms and, consequently, with higher severity.

  19. Influence of ageing on Raman spectra and the conductivity of monolayer graphene samples irradiated by heavy and light ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butenko, A.; Zion, E.; Richter, V.; Sharoni, A. [Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel); Kaganovskii, Yu.; Wolfson, L.; Kogan, E.; Kaveh, M.; Shlimak, I. [Department of Physics, Jack and Pearl Resnick Institute, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel)

    2016-07-28

    The influence of long-term ageing (about one year) on the Raman scattering (RS) spectra and the temperature dependence of conductivity has been studied in two series of monolayer graphene samples irradiated by different doses of C{sup +} and Xe{sup +} ions. It is shown that the main result of ageing consists of changes in the intensity and position of D- and G- and 2D-lines in RS spectra and in an increase of the conductivity. The observed effects are explained in terms of an increase of the radius of the “activated” area around structural defects.

  20. Lichen and moss bags as monitoring devices in urban areas. Part I: influence of exposure on sample vitality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretiach, M; Adamo, P; Bargagli, R; Baruffo, L; Carletti, L; Crisafulli, P; Giordano, S; Modenesi, P; Orlando, S; Pittao, E

    2007-03-01

    Samples of the lichen Pseudevernia furfuracea (L.) Zopf and the moss Hypnum cupressiforme Hedw. were exposed for 6 weeks in nylon bags in two air pollution monitoring stations in Trieste and Naples (Italy) with different climates and pollution loads to evaluate influence of environmental conditions on sample vitality. This was assessed before and after exposure by transmission electron microscopy observations, K cellular location, and measurements of C, N, S and photosynthetic pigments content, CO2 gas exchange, and chlorophyll fluorescence. Almost all data sets indicate that exposures caused some damage to the species, considerably heavier in the moss, especially in Naples. The two cryptogams differed significantly in accumulation and retention of C, N, and S, the lichen clearly reflecting NO2 availability. The difference in vitality loss was related to the different ecophysiology of the species, because concentrations of phytotoxic pollutants were low during exposure. Critical notes on the analytical techniques are also given.

  1. How does host ecology influence sampling effort in parasite diversity estimates? A case study using Neotropical freshwater fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Fábio Hideki; Takemoto, Ricardo Massato

    2017-06-01

    Accurately estimating biodiversity is fundamental to ecological understanding and prediction. Helminthes are often neglected in biodiversity estimates and when included are often underestimated. Here we examine how sampling effort affects estimates of parasite diversity in an assemblage of freshwater fish from a floodplain in Brazil. We also examine how ecological and behavioral factors influence the sampling effort necessary to accurately estimate the parasite diversity associated with a fish species. We use our dataset to suggest that host species with wide geographic distribution (i.e., long migrations), gregarious behavior (i.e., shoal), larger body size, higher population density, wide diet breadth (i.e., omnivorous), and autochthonous origin, increase the effort necessary to estimate the total diversity of parasites. However, estimating this parasitic fauna has several restrictions and limitations, due to the highly complex of the floodplain ecosystems, with non-linear and non-random responses.

  2. Accurate and equitable medical genomic analysis requires an understanding of demography and its influence on sample size and ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Michael D; O'Connor, Timothy D

    2017-02-27

    In a recent study, Petrovski and Goldstein reported that (non-Finnish) Europeans have significantly fewer nonsynonymous singletons in Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) disease genes compared with Africans, Latinos, South Asians, East Asians, and other unassigned non-Europeans. We use simulations of Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) data to show that sample size and ratio interact to influence the number of these singletons identified in a cohort. These interactions are different across ancestries and can lead to the same number of identified singletons in both Europeans and non-Europeans without an equal number of samples. We conclude that there is a need to account for the ancestry-specific influence of demography on genomic architecture and rare variant analysis in order to address inequalities in medical genomic analysis.The authors of the original article were invited to submit a response, but declined to do so. Please see related Open Letter: http://genomebiology.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13059-016-1016-y.

  3. The CUPID (Cultural and Psychosocial Influences on Disability) study: methods of data collection and characteristics of study sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggon, David; Ntani, Georgia; Palmer, Keith T; Felli, Vanda E; Harari, Raul; Barrero, Lope H; Felknor, Sarah A; Gimeno, David; Cattrell, Anna; Serra, Consol; Bonzini, Matteo; Solidaki, Eleni; Merisalu, Eda; Habib, Rima R; Sadeghian, Farideh; Kadir, Masood; Warnakulasuriya, Sudath S P; Matsudaira, Ko; Nyantumbu, Busisiwe; Sim, Malcolm R; Harcombe, Helen; Cox, Ken; Marziale, Maria H; Sarquis, Leila M; Harari, Florencia; Freire, Rocio; Harari, Natalia; Monroy, Magda V; Quintana, Leonardo A; Rojas, Marianela; Salazar Vega, Eduardo J; Harris, E Clare; Vargas-Prada, Sergio; Martinez, J Miguel; Delclos, George; Benavides, Fernando G; Carugno, Michele; Ferrario, Marco M; Pesatori, Angela C; Chatzi, Leda; Bitsios, Panos; Kogevinas, Manolis; Oha, Kristel; Sirk, Tuuli; Sadeghian, Ali; Peiris-John, Roshini J; Sathiakumar, Nalini; Wickremasinghe, A Rajitha; Yoshimura, Noriko; Kielkowski, Danuta; Kelsall, Helen L; Hoe, Victor C W; Urquhart, Donna M; Derrett, Sarah; Derett, Sarah; McBride, David; Gray, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The CUPID (Cultural and Psychosocial Influences on Disability) study was established to explore the hypothesis that common musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and associated disability are importantly influenced by culturally determined health beliefs and expectations. This paper describes the methods of data collection and various characteristics of the study sample. A standardised questionnaire covering musculoskeletal symptoms, disability and potential risk factors, was used to collect information from 47 samples of nurses, office workers, and other (mostly manual) workers in 18 countries from six continents. In addition, local investigators provided data on economic aspects of employment for each occupational group. Participation exceeded 80% in 33 of the 47 occupational groups, and after pre-specified exclusions, analysis was based on 12,426 subjects (92 to 1018 per occupational group). As expected, there was high usage of computer keyboards by office workers, while nurses had the highest prevalence of heavy manual lifting in all but one country. There was substantial heterogeneity between occupational groups in economic and psychosocial aspects of work; three- to five-fold variation in awareness of someone outside work with musculoskeletal pain; and more than ten-fold variation in the prevalence of adverse health beliefs about back and arm pain, and in awareness of terms such as "repetitive strain injury" (RSI). The large differences in psychosocial risk factors (including knowledge and beliefs about MSDs) between occupational groups should allow the study hypothesis to be addressed effectively.

  4. The CUPID (Cultural and Psychosocial Influences on Disability) Study: Methods of Data Collection and Characteristics of Study Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggon, David; Ntani, Georgia; Palmer, Keith T.; Felli, Vanda E.; Harari, Raul; Barrero, Lope H.; Felknor, Sarah A.; Gimeno, David; Cattrell, Anna; Serra, Consol; Bonzini, Matteo; Solidaki, Eleni; Merisalu, Eda; Habib, Rima R.; Sadeghian, Farideh; Kadir, Masood; Warnakulasuriya, Sudath S. P.; Matsudaira, Ko; Nyantumbu, Busisiwe; Sim, Malcolm R.; Harcombe, Helen; Cox, Ken; Marziale, Maria H.; Sarquis, Leila M.; Harari, Florencia; Freire, Rocio; Harari, Natalia; Monroy, Magda V.; Quintana, Leonardo A.; Rojas, Marianela; Salazar Vega, Eduardo J.; Harris, E. Clare; Vargas-Prada, Sergio; Martinez, J. Miguel; Delclos, George; Benavides, Fernando G.; Carugno, Michele; Ferrario, Marco M.; Pesatori, Angela C.; Chatzi, Leda; Bitsios, Panos; Kogevinas, Manolis; Oha, Kristel; Sirk, Tuuli; Sadeghian, Ali; Peiris-John, Roshini J.; Sathiakumar, Nalini; Wickremasinghe, A. Rajitha; Yoshimura, Noriko; Kielkowski, Danuta; Kelsall, Helen L.; Hoe, Victor C. W.; Urquhart, Donna M.; Derett, Sarah; McBride, David; Gray, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Background The CUPID (Cultural and Psychosocial Influences on Disability) study was established to explore the hypothesis that common musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and associated disability are importantly influenced by culturally determined health beliefs and expectations. This paper describes the methods of data collection and various characteristics of the study sample. Methods/Principal Findings A standardised questionnaire covering musculoskeletal symptoms, disability and potential risk factors, was used to collect information from 47 samples of nurses, office workers, and other (mostly manual) workers in 18 countries from six continents. In addition, local investigators provided data on economic aspects of employment for each occupational group. Participation exceeded 80% in 33 of the 47 occupational groups, and after pre-specified exclusions, analysis was based on 12,426 subjects (92 to 1018 per occupational group). As expected, there was high usage of computer keyboards by office workers, while nurses had the highest prevalence of heavy manual lifting in all but one country. There was substantial heterogeneity between occupational groups in economic and psychosocial aspects of work; three- to five-fold variation in awareness of someone outside work with musculoskeletal pain; and more than ten-fold variation in the prevalence of adverse health beliefs about back and arm pain, and in awareness of terms such as “repetitive strain injury” (RSI). Conclusions/Significance The large differences in psychosocial risk factors (including knowledge and beliefs about MSDs) between occupational groups should allow the study hypothesis to be addressed effectively. PMID:22792189

  5. The influence of sampling unit size and spatial arrangement patterns on neighborhood-based spatial structure analyses of forest stands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H.; Zhang, G.; Hui, G.; Li, Y.; Hu, Y.; Zhao, Z.

    2016-07-01

    Aim of study: Neighborhood-based stand spatial structure parameters can quantify and characterize forest spatial structure effectively. How these neighborhood-based structure parameters are influenced by the selection of different numbers of nearest-neighbor trees is unclear, and there is some disagreement in the literature regarding the appropriate number of nearest-neighbor trees to sample around reference trees. Understanding how to efficiently characterize forest structure is critical for forest management. Area of study: Multi-species uneven-aged forests of Northern China. Material and methods: We simulated stands with different spatial structural characteristics and systematically compared their structure parameters when two to eight neighboring trees were selected. Main results: Results showed that values of uniform angle index calculated in the same stand were different with different sizes of structure unit. When tree species and sizes were completely randomly interspersed, different numbers of neighbors had little influence on mingling and dominance indices. Changes of mingling or dominance indices caused by different numbers of neighbors occurred when the tree species or size classes were not randomly interspersed and their changing characteristics can be detected according to the spatial arrangement patterns of tree species and sizes. Research highlights: The number of neighboring trees selected for analyzing stand spatial structure parameters should be fixed. We proposed that the four-tree structure unit is the best compromise between sampling accuracy and costs for practical forest management. (Author)

  6. Influence of brown stink bug feeding, planting date and sampling time on common smut infection of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Xinzhi; Toews, Michael D; Buntin, G David; Carpenter, James E; Huffaker, Alisa; Schmelz, Eric A; Cottrell, Ted E; Abdo, Zaid

    2014-10-01

    Phytopathogen infections are frequently influenced by both biotic and abiotic factors in a crop field. The effect of brown stink bug, Euschistus servus (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), feeding and planting date and sampling time on common smut (Ustilago maydis) infection percentage of maize plants was examined in 2005 and 2006, and 2010 and 2011, respectively. Brown stink bug adult feeding on maize hybrid "DKC6971" at flowering in 2005 and 2006 did not influence smut infection percentage when examined using 3 treatments (i.e., 0 adult, 5 adults, and 5 adults mixed with the smut spores). The smut infection percentages were stink bug feeding at flowering had no effect on smut infection in maize, and the best time for smut evaluation would be after flowering. The temperature and precipitation might have also influenced the percentage of smut-infected maize plants during the 4 years when the experiments were conducted. The similarity between kernel-colonizing U. maydis and Aspergillus flavus infections and genotype × environment interaction were also discussed. © 2014 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  7. Influences of religion and culture on continuing bonds in a sample of British Muslims of Pakistani origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Hanan; Oyebode, Jan R

    2009-11-01

    This study considered the nature of continuing bonds with deceased relatives in a sample of Pakistani Muslims living in the United Kingdom. Ten participants were interviewed following a cultural psychology approach and transcripts were analyzed using grounded theory methodology. Dreaming, talking with others about the deceased, following the deceased's example, keeping memories and mementos, and doing actions thought to help the deceased were forms of continued relationship found. These were intertwined with the process of grieving and were influenced by the family, culture, and religion. Religion was a strong influence on the prominence given by participants to finishing well and on the notion of doing actions thought to help the deceased. Cultural mores, such as the community, and collectivist ethos and the expectation that emotion would be expressed around the time of death, were found to be supportive for some but sources of tension for other participants. Expressing a continuing bond through following the deceased's example so as to make them proud or happy seemed to be reinforced by cultural roots in respect for elders. Participants gave instances of tensions in areas such as expression of emotion and communality versus individualism that arose as a result of their position between two cultural frameworks, some illustrating how assimilation into the host culture set up conflict with the expected norms of their family/ancestral culture. The study highlights how understanding different cultural and religious influences may enrich the concept of continuing bonds.

  8. The role of diagenisis in the hydrogeological stratification of carbonate aquifers: an example from the chalk at Fair Cross, Berkshire, UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bloomfield

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbonate rocks form important aquifers in many parts of the world and in north-west Europe the Chalk is a primary source of potable water. When flushed with relatively fresh groundwaters, the Chalk may undergo significant diagenetic alteration at relatively shallow depths resulting in a physically and hydrogeochemically stratified aquifer. Diagenetic affects may have important implications for the effective exploitable thickness of the Chalk aquifer and for water quality. In order to assess the affects of diagenesis on the properties of carbonate aquifers, matrix porosity, permeability, pore water and rock chemistry profiles have been analysed for a 300 m deep borehole through the Chalk at the western end of the London Basin. An abrupt change in the matrix porosity profile at 155 mbgl indicates a change in dominant mode of historic diagenesis from mechanical compaction above 155 mbgl to predominantly pressure solution compaction below 155 mbgl. Pore water and rock chemistry profiles also change abruptly across this depth interval, suggesting that the present day hydrogeology is controlled by historic diagenetic trends. Below 155 mbgl, pore waters are relatively saline and there is no evidence for groundwater flow; above 155 mbgl pore waters are relatively fresh and geochemical evidence for incon-gruent carbonate dissolution indicates contemporary groundwater circulation. Possible physical and chemical evolution paths for the Chalk at Fair Cross are discussed. The results provide a hydrogeological context for other studies of the long-term response of carbonate aquifers to base-line changes in sea-level and pore water chemistry and also enable studies with relatively short time-frames or of localized phenomena to be placed in the broader context of the evolution of carbonate aquifers.

  9. The influence of technological parameters on the dynamic behavior of "liquid wood" samples obtained by injection molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plavanescu Mazurchevici, Simona; Carausu, Constantin; Comaneci, Radu; Nedelcu, Dumitru

    2017-10-01

    The plastic products contribute to environmental pollution. Replacing the plastic materials with biodegradable materials with superior properties is an absolute necessity and important research direction for the near future. The first steps in this regard were the creation of composite materials containing natural fibers with positive effects on the environment that have penetrated in different fields. The bioplastics and biocomposites made from natural fibers is a topical solution. The next step was made towards obtaining biodegradable and recyclable materials based on cellulose, lignin and no carcinogens. In this category fall the "liquid wood" with a use up to five times without affecting the mechanical properties. "Liquid wood" is a high quality thermoplastic biocomposite. "Liquid wood" is a biopolymer composite divided in three categories, ARBOFORM®, ARBOBLEND® and ARBOFILL®, which have differed composition in terms of lignin percentage, being delivered by Tecnaro, as granules, [1]. The paper's research was focus on Arboform L V3 Nature and Arboform L V3 Nature reinforced with aramid fiber. In the experimental plan were taken into account six parameters (Dinj - direction of injection [°]; Ttop - melting temperature [°C]; Pinj - injection pressure [MPa] Ss - speed [m/min]; tinj - injection time [s] and tc - cooling time [s]) each with two levels, research carried on by Taguchi methodology. Processing Taguchi method allowed both Taguchi setting work parameters influence on storage modulus and damping as the size and influence their ranking. Experimental research concerning the influence technological parameters on storage modulus of samples obtained by injection from Arboform L V3 Nature yielded an average of 6055MPa and descending order as follows: Trac, Ss, Pinj, Dinj and Ttop. The average of model for reinforced material was 6419MPa and descending order of parameters influence such as: Dinj, Trac, Ttop, tinj, Ss and Pinj.

  10. The influence of pyrolysis and matrix modifiers on determination of Cr and Pb in sediment samples by GFAAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risfidian Mohadi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The Influence of pyrolysis and matrix modifiers on determination of Cr and Pb in sediment samples using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry has been investigated. The sediment samples including three certified reference materials (CRMs are reported. Analyses were performed using microwave assisted dissolution. The matrix modifiers Mg(NO32, Pd+Mg(NO32 and NH4H2PO4were shown to be optimazed. The recovery for Cr and Pb in CRMs in the case of sample dissolution was found to be between 81 to 91% for Cr and 94 to 98% for Pb of the certified values, respectively. Keywords: Sediment, Pyrolysis, Matrix modifiers, Cr, Pb Abstrak (Indonesia: Pengaruh pirolisis dan matriks pengubah pada penentuan Cr dan Pb dalam sampel sedimen menggunakan tungku grafit spektroskopi serapan atom telah diteliti. Sampel sedimen termasuk tiga bahan referensi bersertifikat (CRMs dilaporkan dianalisis dengan menggunakan bantuan microwave ekstraktor. Matriks pengubah Mg(NO32, Pd+Mg(NO32 dan NH4H2PO4 telah digunakan dan menghasilkan nilai temu balik untuk Cr dan Pb dalam CRMs ditemukan antara 81-91% untuk Cr dan 94-98 % untuk Pb dari nilai sertifikat masing-masing. Katakunci: Sedimen, Pirolisis, Matrix modifiers, Cr, Pb

  11. [Influence of an observer in the haemolysis produced during the extraction of blood samples in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bel-Peña, N; Mérida-de la Torre, F J

    2015-01-01

    To check whether an intervention based on direct observation and complementary information to nurses helps reduce haemolysis when drawing blood specimens. Random sampling study in primary care centres in the serrania de Málaga health management area, using a cross-sectional, longitudinal pre- and post-intervention design. The study period was from August 2012 to January 2015. The level of free haemoglobin was measured by direct spectrophotometry in the specimens extracted. It was then checked whether the intervention influenced the level of haemolysis, and if this was maintained over time. The mean haemolysis measured pre-intervention was 17%, and after intervention it was 6.1%. A year later and under the same conditions, the frequency of haemolysis was measured again the samples analysed, and the percentage was 9% These results are low when compared to the level obtained pre-intervention, but are higher when compared to the levels obtained immediately after the intervention. The transport and analysis conditions were the same. An intervention based on a direct and informative observation in the process of collecting blood samples contributes significantly to reduce the level of haemolysis. This effect is maintained in time. This intervention needs to be repeated to maintain its effectiveness. Audits and continuing education programs are useful for quality assurance procedures, and maintain the level of care needed for a good quality of care. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. APPLICATION OF ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION TO CONTROL MICROBIOLOGICALLY INFLUENCED CORROSION: A CASE STUDY ON SOIL SAMPLE FROM MANGROVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUHAMMAD KHAIROOL FAHMY BIN MOHD ALI

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC is significant to the presence of microorganisms such as sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB in the deterioration of metallic and non-metallic materials. Bacterial chemical biocides are commonly used to disinfect microorganism effectively. Yet, the practice has some negative impact on the environment since the chemical content may cause pollution. A laboratory experimental investigation was conducted to explore the performance of Ultraviolet (UV radiation in exterminating SRB as an option to replace biocides usage. The morphologies of the isolated Sg. Ular SRB used in this study were related to Desulfovibrio species. An experimental work was conducted in determining the optimum pH and temperature for the SRB to grow before disinfection purposes. The experimental result showed optimum growth for respective SRB were at pH of 8.5 with temperature recorded at 37˚C. UV radiation with wavelength of 254 nm was utilised to disinfect the microorganism. SRB samples were exposed to UV radiation for one hour and left incubated for 21 days. It was found that the percentage of metal loss in a sample exposed to UV radiation was lower compared with untreated sample. Results from the study revealed that UV has a potential as a viable option for SRB disinfection purposes and may be further developed to reduce the consumption of chemical biocides in pipeline maintenance scheme.

  13. The Influence of Native Language on Auditory-Perceptual Evaluation of Vocal Samples Completed by Brazilian and Canadian SLPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Cristiane Ribeiro; Campbell, Melanie; Côrtes Gama, Ana Cristina

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the influence of native language on the auditory-perceptual assessment of voice, as completed by Brazilian and Anglo-Canadian listeners using Brazilian vocal samples and the grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia, strain (GRBAS) scale. This is an analytical, observational, comparative, and transversal study conducted at the Speech Language Pathology Department of the Federal University of Minas Gerais in Brazil, and at the Communication Sciences and Disorders Department of the University of Alberta in Canada. The GRBAS scale, connected speech, and a sustained vowel were used in this study. The vocal samples were drawn randomly from a database of recorded speech of Brazilian adults, some with healthy voices and some with voice disorders. The database is housed at the Federal University of Minas Gerais. Forty-six samples of connected speech (recitation of days of the week), produced by 35 women and 11 men, and 46 samples of the sustained vowel /a/, produced by 37 women and 9 men, were used in this study. The listeners were divided into two groups of three speech therapists, according to nationality: Brazilian or Anglo-Canadian. The groups were matched according to the years of professional experience of participants. The weighted kappa was used to calculate the intra- and inter-rater agreements, with 95% confidence intervals, respectively. An analysis of the intra-rater agreement showed that Brazilians and Canadians had similar results in auditory-perceptual evaluation of sustained vowel and connected speech. The results of the inter-rater agreement of connected speech and sustained vowel indicated that Brazilians and Canadians had, respectively, moderate agreement on the overall severity (0.57 and 0.50), breathiness (0.45 and 0.45), and asthenia (0.50 and 0.46); poor correlation on roughness (0.19 and 0.007); and weak correlation on strain to connected speech (0.22), and moderate correlation to sustained vowel (0.50). In general

  14. Tilting oil-water contact in the chalk of Tyra Field as interpreted from capillary pressure data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Rana, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    The Tyra Field in the central North Sea is located in Palaeogene and Upper Cretaceous chalk. It contains a natural gas zone underlain by an oil leg. Based on analysis of logs and core data from ten wells drilled prior to the field being put into production, normalized water saturation depth......-trends from logs were compared with normalized water saturation depth-trends predicted from capillary pressure core data. The ten wells lie close to a SW–NE cross section of the field. For the gas–oil contact, a free contact measured in one well corresponds to a practically horizontal contact interpreted from...... logging data in the remaining wells. A westerly dipping oil–water contact was found from logging data. Comparison of the depth-wise trends in normalized water saturation among the different wells indicates a regional pattern: in the western side of the field, the trends correspond to a situation...

  15. Importance of small fishes and invasive crayfish in otter Lutra lutra diet in an English chalk stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britton J. Robert

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The diet composition of the European otter Lutra lutra was assessed using spraint analysis in the Hampshire Avon, a lowland chalk stream in Southern England, over an 18-month period. Small cyprinid fishes were the main prey item taken in all seasons, with bullhead Cottus gobio and stone loach Barbatula barbatula also important; there were relatively few larger fishes of interest to fisheries found. There were significant seasonal differences in diet composition by season, with signal crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus only being prominent prey items in warmer months and amphibians in winter, revealing that non-fish resources were seasonally important dietary components. Reconstructed body lengths of prey revealed the only species present in diet >350 mm was pike Esox lucius. These dietary data thus provide important information for informing conservation conflicts between otters and fishery interests.

  16. Investigation of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Using Dimensionless Groups in Wettability Modified Chalk and Sandstone Rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Alipour Tabrizy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses enhanced oil recovery in chalk and sandstone rocks by CO2 injection, with different wettability, porosity, and permeability as well as injection rate and flooding conditions. Results indicate that an increase in Bond number has a positive effect on oil recovery whereas for capillary number, there is a limit in which recovery is improving. This limit is estimated when the pressure drop by viscous force is approximately equal to the threshold balance between capillary and gravity forces. A dimensionless group is proposed that combines the effect of capillarity, injection rate, permeability, and CO2 diffusion on the oil recovery. Recovery from all experiments in this study and reported data in the literature shows a satisfactory relationship with the proposed group.

  17. Clot formation in canine whole blood as measured by rotational thromboelastometry is influenced by sample handling and coagulation activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephanie A; McMichael, Maureen; Galligan, Alyssa; Gilor, Shir; Hoh, Crystal M

    2010-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to systematically evaluate the impact of methodology on thromboelastometry with canine whole blood. Thromboelastometry was performed on citrated blood using a variety of combinations of clotting activators [ex-tem (tissue factor or TF), in-tem (ellagic acid), diluted TF from Innovin, or Ca (recalcification only)] and storage times. Thromboelastometry was also performed using diluted TF from Innovin on blood collected into a contact inhibitor. Ex-vivo contact activation was compared between canine and human blood. Clotting activator had a marked impact on coagulation time, a minor impact on alpha angle, and no impact on clot formation time or maximum clot firmness. When ex-tem or in-tem was the clotting activator, sample storage up to 30 min did not affect results. With diluted TF from Innovin or Ca, sample storage was associated with the development of increased coagulability (as indicated by shorter coagulation time and clot formation time and higher alpha angle) due to ex-vivo contact activation. Canine blood underwent markedly more ex-vivo contact activation than did human blood. Canine blood undergoes significant ex-vivo contact activation during and after collection, which influences thromboelastometry results when a weak clotting activator (such as low TF or recalcification) is used. Thromboelastometry with a strong activator (such as ex-tem or in-tem) is less influenced by ex-vivo changes, and, therefore, likely to be more reflective of in-vivo hemostatic capabilities and to provide consistently interpretable and comparable results.

  18. The influence of active coping and perceived stress on health disparities in a multi-ethnic low income sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomar Scott L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extensive research has shown that ethnic health disparities are prevalent and many psychological and social factors influence health disparities. Understanding what factors influence health disparities and how to eliminate health disparities has become a major research objective. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of coping style, stress, socioeconomic status (SES, and discrimination on health disparities in a large urban multi-ethnic sample. Methods Data from 894 participants were collected via telephone interviews. Independent variables included: coping style, SES, sex, perceived stress, and perceived discrimination. Dependent variables included self-rated general and oral health status. Data analysis included multiple linear regression modeling. Results Coping style was related to oral health for Blacks (B = .23, p Conclusion Our results indicate that perceived stress is a critical component in understanding health outcomes for all ethnoracial groups. While SES related significantly to general health for Whites and Hispanics, this relationship was mediated by perceived stress. Active coping was associated only with oral health.

  19. Influence of Ongoing Task Difficulty and Motivation Level on Children’s Prospective Memory in a Chinese Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Pi-guo; Han, Lei; Bian, Yu-long; Tian, Yu; Xu, Min-xia; Gao, Feng-qiang

    2017-01-01

    Prospective memory (PM) is the process associated with the task of realizing delayed intentions in the future. Researchers distinguish two types of PM, namely time-based PM (tbPM) and event-based PM (ebPM). Experiment 1 investigated the developmental trajectory of 3- to 5-year-old preschool children’s PM ability, and the occurrence of delayed retrieval (children execute the PM task in a larger window of opportunity) in both tbPM and ebPM tasks. Results revealed that the 5-year-old children outperformed the 3- and 4-year-old children in PM. Moreover, delayed retrieval was more likely to occur in tbPM task than in ebPM task. In Experiment 2, the influence of ongoing task (OT) difficulty on PM performance was investigated with a sample of 5-year-old children. Results revealed no significant effect of OT difficulty on PM performance. In Experiment 3, we improved children’s motivation level to complete the OT, then explored the influence of OT difficulty on children’s PM performance. Results revealed that the effect of OT difficulty on PM performance became significant after increasing the children’s motivation to complete the OT. These results provide insights into the mechanism of attentional resource allocation in PM tasks and have crucial educational and social implications. PMID:28203212

  20. The influence of maternal vulnerability and parenting stress on chronic pain in adolescents in a general population sample : The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darlington, A-S. E.; Verhulst, F. C.; De Winter, A. F.; Ormel, J.; Passchier, J.; Hunfeld, J. A. M.

    Investigating possible psychosocial predictors of unexplained chronic pain in adolescents is crucial in understanding its development and prevention. A general population sample of adolescents (n = 2230) from the TRAILS cohort study was investigated longitudinally to assess the influence of maternal

  1. The influence of maternal vulnerability and parenting stress on chronic pain in adolescents in a general population sample: the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passchier, J.; Darlington, A.S.; Verhulst, F.C.; De Winter, A.F.; Ormel, J.; Hunfeld, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Investigating possible psychosocial predictors of unexplained chronic pain in adolescents is crucial in understanding its development and prevention. A general population sample of adolescents (n = 2230) from the TRAILS cohort study was investigated longitudinally to assess the influence of maternal

  2. Influence of pH, Temperature and Sample Size on Natural and Enforced Syneresis of Precipitated Silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Wilhelm

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The production of silica is performed by mixing an inorganic, silicate-based precursor and an acid. Monomeric silicic acid forms and polymerizes to amorphous silica particles. Both further polymerization and agglomeration of the particles lead to a gel network. Since polymerization continues after gelation, the gel network consolidates. This rather slow process is known as “natural syneresis” and strongly influences the product properties (e.g., agglomerate size, porosity or internal surface. “Enforced syneresis” is the superposition of natural syneresis with a mechanical, external force. Enforced syneresis may be used either for analytical or preparative purposes. Hereby, two open key aspects are of particular interest. On the one hand, the question arises whether natural and enforced syneresis are analogous processes with respect to their dependence on the process parameters: pH, temperature and sample size. On the other hand, a method is desirable that allows for correlating natural and enforced syneresis behavior. We can show that the pH-, temperature- and sample size-dependency of natural and enforced syneresis are indeed analogous. It is possible to predict natural syneresis using a correlative model. We found that our model predicts maximum volume shrinkages between 19% and 30% in comparison to measured values of 20% for natural syneresis.

  3. Lichen and moss bags as monitoring devices in urban areas. Part I: Influence of exposure on sample vitality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tretiach, M. [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 10, I-34127 Trieste (Italy)]. E-mail: tretiach@units.it; Adamo, P. [Dipartimento di Scienze del Suolo, della Pianta e dell' Ambiente, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Universita 100, I-80055 Portici (NA) (Italy); Bargagli, R. [Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Universita di Siena, Via P.A. Mattioli 4, I-53100 Siena (Italy); Baruffo, L. [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 10, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Carletti, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Universita di Siena, Via P.A. Mattioli 4, I-53100 Siena (Italy); Crisafulli, P. [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 10, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Giordano, S. [Dipartimento di Biologia Strutturale e Funzionale, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia 4, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Modenesi, P. [DIP.TE.RIS., Universita di Genova, Corso Dogali 1/m, I-16136 Genova (Italy); Orlando, S. [Dipartimento di Scienze del Suolo, della Pianta e dell' Ambiente, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Universita 100, I-80055 Portici (NA) (Italy); Pittao, E. [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 10, I-34127 Trieste (Italy)

    2007-03-15

    Samples of the lichen Pseudevernia furfuracea (L.) Zopf and the moss Hypnum cupressiforme Hedw. were exposed for 6 weeks in nylon bags in two air pollution monitoring stations in Trieste and Naples (Italy) with different climates and pollution loads to evaluate influence of environmental conditions on sample vitality. This was assessed before and after exposure by transmission electron microscopy observations, K cellular location, and measurements of C, N, S and photosynthetic pigments content, CO{sub 2} gas exchange, and chlorophyll fluorescence. Almost all data sets indicate that exposures caused some damage to the species, considerably heavier in the moss, especially in Naples. The two cryptogams differed significantly in accumulation and retention of C, N, and S, the lichen clearly reflecting NO{sub 2} availability. The difference in vitality loss was related to the different ecophysiology of the species, because concentrations of phytotoxic pollutants were low during exposure. Critical notes on the analytical techniques are also given. - The lichen Pseudevernia furfuracea was more resilient than the moss Hypnum cupressiforme in two exposure experiments on trace metal uptake.

  4. Influence of sampling intake position on suspended solid measurements in sewers: two probability/time-series-based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Santiago; Bertrand-Krajewski, Jean-Luc

    2016-06-01

    Total suspended solid (TSS) measurements in urban drainage systems are required for several reasons. Aiming to assess uncertainties in the mean TSS concentration due to the influence of sampling intake vertical position and vertical concentration gradients in a sewer pipe, two methods are proposed: a simplified method based on a theoretical vertical concentration profile (SM) and a time series grouping method (TSM). SM is based on flow rate and water depth time series. TSM requires additional TSS time series as input data. All time series are from the Chassieu urban catchment in Lyon, France (time series from 2007 with 2-min time step, 89 rainfall events). The probability of measuring a TSS value lower than the mean TSS along the vertical cross section (TSS underestimation) is about 0.88 with SM and about 0.64 with TSM. TSM shows more realistic TSS underestimation values (about 39 %) than SM (about 269 %). Interquartile ranges (IQR) over the probability values indicate that SM is more uncertain (IQR = 0.08) than TSM (IQR = 0.02). Differences between the two methods are mainly due to simplifications in SM (absence of TSS measurements). SM assumes a significant asymmetry of the TSS concentration profile along the vertical axis in the cross section. This is compatible with the distribution of TSS measurements found in the TSM approach. The methods provide insights towards an indicator of the measurement performance and representativeness for a TSS sampling protocol.

  5. The Influence of temporal sampling regime on the WFD classification of catchments within the Eden Demonstration Test Catchment Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonczyk, Jennine; Haygarth, Phil; Quinn, Paul; Reaney, Sim

    2014-05-01

    A high temporal resolution data set from the Eden Demonstration Test Catchment (DTC) project is used to investigate the processes causing pollution and the influence of temporal sampling regime on the WFD classification of three catchments. This data highlights WFD standards may not be fit for purpose. The Eden DTC project is part of a UK government-funded project designed to provide robust evidence regarding how diffuse pollution can be cost-effectively controlled to improve and maintain water quality in rural river catchments. The impact of multiple water quality parameters on ecosystems and sustainable food production are being studied at the catchment scale. Three focus catchments approximately 10 km2 each, have been selected to represent the different farming practices and geophysical characteristics across the Eden catchment, Northern England. A field experimental programme has been designed to monitor the dynamics of agricultural diffuse pollution at multiple scales using state of the art sensors providing continuous real time data. The data set, which includes Total Phosphorus and Total Reactive Phosphorus, Nitrate, Ammonium, pH, Conductivity, Turbidity and Chlorophyll a reveals the frequency and duration of nutrient concentration target exceedance which arises from the prevalence of storm events of increasing magnitude. This data set is sub-sampled at different time intervals to explore how different sampling regimes affects our understanding of nutrient dynamics and the ramification of the different regimes to WFD chemical status. This presentation seeks to identify an optimum temporal resolution of data for effective catchment management and to question the usefulness of the WFD status metric for determining health of a system. Criteria based on high frequency short duration events needs to be accounted for.

  6. Influence of sample temperature and environmental humidity on measurements of benzene in ambient air by transportable GC-PID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Trigueros, Cristina; Doval Miñarro, Marta; González Duperón, Esther; González Ferradás, Enrique

    2017-10-01

    Calibration of in situ analysers of air pollutants is usually done with dry standards. In this paper, the influence of sample temperature and environmental humidity on benzene measurements by gas chromatography coupled with a photoionisation detector (GC-PID) is studied. Two reference gas mixtures (40 and 5 µg m-3 nominal concentration benzene in air) were subjected to two temperature cycles (20/5/20 °C and 20/35/20 °C) and measured with two identical GC-PIDs. The change in sample temperature did not produce any significant change in readings. Regarding ambient humidity, the chromatographs were calibrated for benzene with dry gases and subjected to measure reference standards with humidity (20 and 80 % at 20 °C). When measuring a concentration of 0.5 µg m-3 benzene in air, the levels of humidity tested did not produce any significant interference in measurements taken with any of the analysers. However, when measuring a concentration of 40 µg m-3, biases in measurements of 18 and 21 % for each respective analyser were obtained when the relative humidity of the sample was 80 % at 20 °C. Further tests were carried out to study the nature of this interference. Results show that humidity interference depends on both the amount fractions of water vapour and benzene. If benzene concentrations in an area are close to its annual limit value (5 µg m-3), biases of 2.2 % can be expected when the absolute humidity is 8.6 g cm-3 - corresponding to a relative humidity of 50 % at 20 °C. This can be accounted for in the uncertainty budget of measurements with no need for corrections. If benzene concentrations are above the annual limit value, biases become higher. Thus, in these cases, actions should be taken to reduce the humidity interference, as an underestimation of benzene concentrations may cause a mismanagement of air quality in these situations.

  7. Three-year-olds obey the sample size principle of induction: the influence of evidence presentation and sample size disparity on young children's generalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Chris A

    2014-07-01

    Three experiments with 81 3-year-olds (M=3.62years) examined the conditions that enable young children to use the sample size principle (SSP) of induction-the inductive rule that facilitates generalizations from large rather than small samples of evidence. In Experiment 1, children exhibited the SSP when exemplars were presented sequentially but not when exemplars were presented simultaneously. Results from Experiment 3 suggest that the advantage of sequential presentation is not due to the additional time to process the available input from the two samples but instead may be linked to better memory for specific individuals in the large sample. In addition, findings from Experiments 1 and 2 suggest that adherence to the SSP is mediated by the disparity between presented samples. Overall, these results reveal that the SSP appears early in development and is guided by basic cognitive processes triggered during the acquisition of input. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Influence of Religious Awareness Program in Scaling down Death Anxiety among Children Sample in Late Childhood Stage; 9-12 Years Old in Al Shobak Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mohtadi, Reham Mohammad; Al-Msubheen, Moonerh Mheel

    2017-01-01

    This study drives at identifying the influence of religious awareness program in scaling down the death anxiety among sample consisted of (50) students; (30) males and (20) females, at the late childhood stage. The sample distributed randomly into (25) students representing main group and (25) students as experimental group. Religious Awareness…

  9. Influence of management of variables, sampling zones and land units on LR analysis for landslide spatial prevision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Greco

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Several authors, according to different methodological approaches, have employed logistic Regression (LR, a multivariate statistical analysis adopted to assess the spatial probability of landslide, even though its fundamental principles have remained unaltered. This study aims at assessing the influence of some of these methodological approaches on the performance of LR, through a series of sensitivity analyses developed over a test area of about 300 km2 in Calabria (southern Italy. In particular, four types of sampling (1 – the whole study area; 2 – transects running parallel to the general slope direction of the study area with a total surface of about 1/3 of the whole study area; 3 – buffers surrounding the phenomena with a 1/1 ratio between the stable and the unstable area; 4 – buffers surrounding the phenomena with a 1/2 ratio between the stable and the unstable area, two variable coding modes (1 – grouped variables; 2 – binary variables, and two types of elementary land (1 – cells units; 2 – slope units units have been tested. The obtained results must be considered as statistically relevant in all cases (Aroc values > 70%, thus confirming the soundness of the LR analysis which maintains high predictive capacities notwithstanding the features of input data. As for the area under investigation, the best performing methodological choices are the following: (i transects produced the best results (0 P(y ≤ 93.4%; Aroc = 79.5%; (ii as for sampling modalities, binary variables (0 P(y ≤ 98.3%; Aroc = 80.7% provide better performance than ordinated variables; (iii as for the choice of elementary land units, slope units (0 P(y ≤ 100%; Aroc = 84.2% have obtained better results than cells matrix.

  10. Influence of management of variables, sampling zones and land units on LR analysis for landslide spatial prevision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, R.; Sorriso-Valvo, M.

    2013-09-01

    Several authors, according to different methodological approaches, have employed logistic Regression (LR), a multivariate statistical analysis adopted to assess the spatial probability of landslide, even though its fundamental principles have remained unaltered. This study aims at assessing the influence of some of these methodological approaches on the performance of LR, through a series of sensitivity analyses developed over a test area of about 300 km2 in Calabria (southern Italy). In particular, four types of sampling (1 - the whole study area; 2 - transects running parallel to the general slope direction of the study area with a total surface of about 1/3 of the whole study area; 3 - buffers surrounding the phenomena with a 1/1 ratio between the stable and the unstable area; 4 - buffers surrounding the phenomena with a 1/2 ratio between the stable and the unstable area), two variable coding modes (1 - grouped variables; 2 - binary variables), and two types of elementary land (1 - cells units; 2 - slope units) units have been tested. The obtained results must be considered as statistically relevant in all cases (Aroc values > 70%), thus confirming the soundness of the LR analysis which maintains high predictive capacities notwithstanding the features of input data. As for the area under investigation, the best performing methodological choices are the following: (i) transects produced the best results (0 < P(y) ≤ 93.4%; Aroc = 79.5%); (ii) as for sampling modalities, binary variables (0 < P(y) ≤ 98.3%; Aroc = 80.7%) provide better performance than ordinated variables; (iii) as for the choice of elementary land units, slope units (0 < P(y) ≤ 100%; Aroc = 84.2%) have obtained better results than cells matrix.

  11. Modelling-based identification of factors influencing campylobacters in chicken broiler houses and on carcasses sampled after processing and chilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, M L; Taylor, M J; Tchòrzewska, M A; Ford, G; Madden, R H; Knowles, T G

    2017-05-01

    To identify production and processing practices that might reduce Campylobacter numbers contaminating chicken broiler carcasses. The numbers of campylobacters were determined on carcass neck skins after processing or in broiler house litter samples. Supplementary information that described farm layouts, farming conditions for individual flocks, the slaughterhouse layouts and operating conditions inside plants was collected, matched with each Campylobacter test result. Statistical models predicting the numbers of campylobacters on neck skins and in litter were constructed. Carcass microbial contamination was more strongly influenced by on-farm production practices compared with slaughterhouse activities. We observed correlations between the chilling, washing and defeathering stages of processing and the numbers of campylobacters on carcasses. There were factors on farm that also correlated with numbers of campylobacters in litter. These included bird gender, the exclusion of dogs from houses, beetle presence in the house litter and the materials used to construct the house frame. Changes in farming practices have greater potential for reducing chicken carcass microbial contamination compared with processing interventions. Routine commercial practices were identified that were correlated with lowered numbers of campylobacters. Consequently, these practices are likely to be both cost-effective and suitable for adoption into established farms and commercial processing. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Influence of dental filling material type on the concentration of interleukin 9 in the samples of gingival crevicular fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Several cytokines and lymphokines (IL1β, ENA78, IL6, TNFα, IL8 and S100A8 are expressed during dental pulp inflammation. Analysis of gingival crevicu-lar fluid (GCF offers a non-invasive means of studying gen-eral host response in oral cavity. Although GCF levels of various mediators could reflect the state of inflammation both in dental pulp and gingiva adjacent to a tooth, GCF samples of those without significant gingivitis could be inter-preted as reflection of pulpal process. The aim of this study was to investigate IL9 GCF values in patients with dental car-ies and to assess possible influence of various dental fillings materials on local IL9 production. Methods. The study group included 90 patients, aged 18–70, with inclusion and exclusion criteria in the prospective clinical study. Of the 6 types of material used for the restoration of prepared cavities, 3 were intended for temporary and 3 for definitive restora-tion. According to dental fillings weight, all the participants were divided into 3 groups: those with fillings lighter than 0.50 g, those with 0.50–1.00 g, and those with fillings heavier than 1.00 g. Samples were taken from gingival sulcus using the filter paper technique. Clinical parameters were deter-mined by bleeding index, plaque index (Silness-Lou, 0–3, gingival index (0–3, and gingival sulcus depth. Cytokine con-centrations were assessed using commercially available cy-tomix. Results. According to the weight of dental fillings, there was a clear decreament trend of IL9 values meaning that dental defects greater than 1.00 g of dental filling were associated with lower GCF IL9 concentration. The IL9 val-ues correlated with the degree of gingival index and depth of gingival sulcus, being higher with more advanced gingivitis and more pronounced anatomical changes in the tooth edge. Different filling materials exerted various local IL9 responses. Zink polycarbonate cement and amalgam fillings induced

  13. General and abdominal adiposity in a representative sample of Portuguese adults: dependency of measures and socio-demographic factors' influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalkowska, Joanna; Poínhos, Rui; Franchini, Bela; Afonso, Cláudia; Correia, Flora; Pinhão, Sílvia; Vaz de Almeida, Maria Daniel; Rodrigues, Sara

    2016-01-14

    The aims of this study were: (i) to estimate the dependency between BMI and waist:height ratio (WHtR) as measures of general and abdominal adiposity, and (ii) to evaluate the influence of socio-demographic factors on both measures and on their dependency in risk classification. Data from a cross-sectional study conducted in 2009 among a representative sample of 3529 Portuguese adults were used. Height, weight and waist were measured and socio-demographic data (sex, age, education level, occupational status, marital status, region of residence) were obtained. Using logistic regression, crude and adjusted OR for high general (BMI≥25·0 kg/m²) and abdominal (WHtR≥0·5) adiposity, and for incompatible classification between them, were calculated. Above half (50·8%) of the respondents had high BMI and 42·1% had high WHtR, and the rates were higher in men than in women. There was an inverse association between education level and both adiposity measures. The lowest prevalence of high general and abdominal adiposity was observed in students and singles, whereas the highest was found in retired, widowed and respondents from Azores, Madeira and Alentejo. Nearly a quarter of respondents (24·0%) were incompatibly classified by BMI and WHtR, with higher prevalence in men than in women and in low- than in high-educated people. Future surveys should focus on developing at least sex-specific cut-offs for both measures. Implementation of effective strategies for preventing and reducing high adiposity levels in Portugal should be directed primarily to men, older, low-educated individuals, as well as those living in the islands and poor regions of the country.

  14. Influence of the sampling period and time resolution on the PM source apportionment: Study based on the high time-resolution data and long-term daily data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yingze; Xiao, Zhimei; Wang, Haiting; Peng, Xing; Guan, Liao; Huangfu, Yanqi; Shi, Guoliang; Chen, Kui; Bi, Xiaohui; Feng, Yinchang

    2017-09-01

    When planning short-term and long-term measurement campaigns of particulate matter (PM), parameters such as sampling period, time resolution, sampling number, etc. are vital. To study their influence and to provide suggestion for the sampling plan of PM source apportionment (SA), ambient and synthetic speciated datasets (including a high time-resolution dataset and a long-term daily dataset) were studied. First, aiming at studying the sampling period required to generate representative and reliable results for SA, high time-resolution ambient samples were collected by online instruments in a megacity in China. Datasets with different sampling periods (four months, two months, one month, two weeks and one week) were modeled by the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF). Compared with four month results, AAEs (percent absolute errors between true and estimated contributions) ranged from 11.2 to 27.2% (two months), 19.8-44.5% (one month), 21.0-45.9% (two weeks) and 23.9-44.6% (one week), indicating that divergence increased with decreasing sampling periods. To systematically evaluate this problem and investigate if the increasing time resolutions in a short period could enhance the modeling performance, synthetic datasets were constructed. Results revealed that a sufficient sampling period is required to ensure stable results; without sufficient sampling period, the contributions cannot be reliably estimated, even if the number of samples is large. Then, to explore the influence of variability absences, long-term daily datasets with various variability absences were apportioned and compared. The summed AAEs were 102.2% (no winter), 73.6% (no weekend), 138.7% (no weekday) and 165.6% (no autumn, winter or weekends). This general increase of AAEs can indicate that uncertainty enhanced with the increase in variability absences. When planning short-term measurement campaigns, except for number of samples, sampling period that involves sufficient source cycles has significant

  15. Diagnosing hydrological limitations of a land surface model: application of JULES to a deep-groundwater chalk basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vine, N.; Butler, A.; McIntyre, N.; Jackson, C.

    2016-01-01

    Land surface models (LSMs) are prospective starting points to develop a global hyper-resolution model of the terrestrial water, energy, and biogeochemical cycles. However, there are some fundamental limitations of LSMs related to how meaningfully hydrological fluxes and stores are represented. A diagnostic approach to model evaluation and improvement is taken here that exploits hydrological expert knowledge to detect LSM inadequacies through consideration of the major behavioural functions of a hydrological system: overall water balance, vertical water redistribution in the unsaturated zone, temporal water redistribution, and spatial water redistribution over the catchment's groundwater and surface-water systems. Three types of information are utilized to improve the model's hydrology: (a) observations, (b) information about expected response from regionalized data, and (c) information from an independent physics-based model. The study considers the JULES (Joint UK Land Environmental Simulator) LSM applied to a deep-groundwater chalk catchment in the UK. The diagnosed hydrological limitations and the proposed ways to address them are indicative of the challenges faced while transitioning to a global high resolution model of the water cycle.

  16. Identification of a New Hesperornithiform from the Cretaceous Niobrara Chalk and Implications for Ecologic Diversity among Early Diving Birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa Bell

    Full Text Available The Smoky Hill Member of the Niobrara Chalk in Kansas (USA has yielded the remains of numerous members of the Hesperornithiformes, toothed diving birds from the late Early to Late Cretaceous. This study presents a new taxon of hesperornithiform from the Smoky Hill Member, Fumicollis hoffmani, the holotype of which is among the more complete hesperornithiform skeletons. Fumicollis has a unique combination of primitive (e.g. proximal and distal ends of femur not expanded, elongate pre-acetabular ilium, small and pyramidal patella and derived (e.g. dorsal ridge on metatarsal IV, plantarly-projected curve in the distal shaft of phalanx III:1 hesperornithiform characters, suggesting it was more specialized than small hesperornithiforms like Baptornis advenus but not as highly derived as the larger Hesperornis regalis. The identification of Fumicollis highlights once again the significant diversity of hesperornithiforms that existed in the Late Cretaceous Western Interior Seaway. This diversity points to the existence of a complex ecosystem, perhaps with a high degree of niche partitioning, as indicated by the varying degrees of diving specializations among these birds.

  17. Use of Homogeneously-Sized Carbon Steel Ball Bearings to Study Microbially-Influenced Corrosion in Oil Field Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voordouw, Gerrit; Menon, Priyesh; Pinnock, Tijan; Sharma, Mohita; Shen, Yin; Venturelli, Amanda; Voordouw, Johanna; Sexton, Aoife

    2016-01-01

    Microbially-influenced corrosion (MIC) contributes to the general corrosion rate (CR), which is typically measured with carbon steel coupons. Here we explore the use of carbon steel ball bearings, referred to as beads (55.0 ± 0.3 mg; Ø = 0.238 cm), for determining CRs. CRs for samples from an oil field in Oceania incubated with beads were determined by the weight loss method, using acid treatment to remove corrosion products. The release of ferrous and ferric iron was also measured and CRs based on weight loss and iron determination were in good agreement. Average CRs were 0.022 mm/yr for eight produced waters with high numbers (10(5)/ml) of acid-producing bacteria (APB), but no sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Average CRs were 0.009 mm/yr for five central processing facility (CPF) waters, which had no APB or SRB due to weekly biocide treatment and 0.036 mm/yr for 2 CPF tank bottom sludges, which had high numbers of APB (10(6)/ml) and SRB (10(8)/ml). Hence, corrosion monitoring with carbon steel beads indicated that biocide treatment of CPF waters decreased the CR, except where biocide did not penetrate. The CR for incubations with 20 ml of a produced water decreased from 0.061 to 0.007 mm/yr when increasing the number of beads from 1 to 40. CRs determined with beads were higher than those with coupons, possibly also due to a higher weight of iron per unit volume used in incubations with coupons. Use of 1 ml syringe columns, containing carbon steel beads, and injected with 10 ml/day of SRB-containing medium for 256 days gave a CR of 0.11 mm/yr under flow conditions. The standard deviation of the distribution of residual bead weights, a measure for the unevenness of the corrosion, increased with increasing CR. The most heavily corroded beads showed significant pitting. Hence the use of uniformly sized carbon steel beads offers new opportunities for screening and monitoring of corrosion including determination of the distribution of corrosion rates, which allows

  18. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Elastic Wave Velocity of Chalk Saturated with Brines Containing Divalent Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    divided into groups of three and each group was saturated either with deionized water, calcite equilibrated water, or sodium chloride, magnesium chloride and calcium chloride solutions of the same ionic strength. Saturation with solutions that contain divalent ions caused major shifts in the distribution...... of the relaxation time. Core samples saturated with calcium chloride solution relaxed slower and those saturated with magnesium chloride solution relaxed faster than the rest of the samples. Along with the changes in relaxation the samples experienced smaller velocities of elastic waves when saturated with MgCl2...

  19. Influences of cement source and sample of cement source on compressive strength variability of gravel aggregate concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The strength of concrete is influenced by each constituent material used in the concrete : mixture and the proportions of each ingredient. Water-cementitious ratio, cementitious materials, air : content, chemical admixtures, and type of coarse aggreg...

  20. Maternal Depression and Parenting in Early Childhood: Contextual Influence of Marital Quality and Social Support in Two Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taraban, Lindsay; Shaw, Daniel S.; Leve, Leslie D.; Wilson, Melvin N.; Dishion, Thomas J.; Natsuaki, Misaki N.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Reiss, David

    2017-01-01

    Marital quality and social support satisfaction were tested as moderators of the association between maternal depressive symptoms and parenting during early childhood (18--36 months) among 2 large, divergent, longitudinal samples (n = 526; n = 570). Unexpectedly, in both samples the association between maternal depressive symptoms and reduced…

  1. The implications of using large ensembles of climate scenarios for the management of river ecology in an English chalk stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, C. F.; Lopez, A.; New, M.

    2009-04-01

    Climate change is likely to impact on freshwater ecology, the delivery of regulatory commitments to ecological status and the management of water resources. It is becoming increasingly important for European environment agencies to use and develop methods to aid planning and abstraction licensing procedures and policies in the face of climate change and with the introduction of the Water Framework Directive. Studies have been carried out in the past to investigate the implications of climate change for biodiversity. However, predicting the future is fraught with uncertainty, an area which has not been dealt with in great depth in the past. This study has been undertaken to draw on the results of new methodologies to address the uncertainties inherent in modelling future climate and assess their usability for decision-making in water resources allocations specifically in considering interactions between flow and invertebrate communities The River Itchen was chosen as the case study catchment on the strength of having a long-term coupled ecological and flow dataset and having been an area of intensive study in the past. It is a chalk stream located in the south of England and a candidate Special Area of Conservation. It has also been designated a Special Site of Scientific Interest achieved due to the number of rare species, and the richness of the macro-invertebrate community in the river catchment. An ensemble of 246 transient simulations for future climate was obtained from ClimatePrediction.net which were then used to drive a rainfall-runoff model. In order to link the modelled river flow to ecology, the Lotic Invertebrate Flow Evaluation score has been used where the invertebrate community is linked to flow largely through sensitivity to water velocity and siltation, driven by flow variability at sites with fixed channel dimensions The large ensemble of climate scenarios and thereby flow and ecological indices allows the exploration of the risk of the river of

  2. Influence of distillation time and sample mass on sulfur dioxide analysis in passion fruit juice through Monier-Williams method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Akiko Takahashi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThis study aimed to evaluate the effect of the distillation time and the sample mass on the total SO2 content in integral passion fruit juice (Passiflora sp. For the SO2 analysis, a modified version of the Monier-Williams method was used. In this experiment, the distillation time and the sample mass were reduced to half of the values proposed in the original method. The analyses were performed in triplicate for each distilling time x sample mass binomial, making a total of 12 tests, which were performed on the same day. The significance of the effects of the different distillation times and sample mass were evaluated by applying one-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA. For a 95% confidence limit, it was found that the proposed amendments to the distillation time, sample mass, and the interaction between distilling time x sample mass were not significant (p > 0.05 in determining the SO2 content in passion fruit juice. In view of the results that were obtained it was concluded that for integral passion fruit juice it was possible to reduce the distillation time and the sample mass in determining the SO2 content by the Monier-Williams method without affecting the result.

  3. The impact of broadleaved woodland on water resources in lowland UK: I. Soil water changes below beech woodland and grass on chalk sites in Hampshire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Roberts

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The possible effects of broadleaved woodland on recharge to the UK Chalk aquifer have led to a study of evaporation and transpiration from beech woodland (Black Wood and pasture (Bridgets Farm, growing in shallow soils above chalk in Hampshire. Eddy correlation measurements of energy balance components above both the forest and the grassland enabled calculation of latent heat flux (evaporation and transpiration as a residual. Comparative measurements of soil water content and soil water potential in 9 m profiles under both forest and grassland found changes in soil water content down to 6 m at both sites; however, the soil water potential measurements showed upward movement of water only above a depth of about 2 m. Below this depth, water continued to drain and the soil water potential measurements showed downward movement of water at both sites, notwithstanding significant negative soil water potentials in the chalk and soil above. Seasonal differences occur in the soil water content profiles under broadleaved woodland and grass. Before the woodland foliage emerges, greater drying beneath the grassland is offset in late spring and early summer by increased drying under the forest. Yet, when the change in soil water profiles is at a maximum, in late summer, the profiles below woodland and grass are very similar. A comparison of soil water balances for Black Wood and Bridgets Farm using changes in soil water contents, local rainfall and evaporation measured by the energy balance approach allowed drainage to be calculated at each site. Although seasonal differences occurred, the difference in cumulative drainage below broadleaved woodland and grass was small.

  4. Use of X-ray computed tomography in core analysis of tight North Sea Chalk. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mogensen, K.; Stenby, E.H.

    1997-12-01

    This EFP-95 final report summarizes work performed at the Engineering Research Center (IVC-SEP) on the use of CT scanning in core analysis of tight core material from the North Sea. In this work, CT scanning has been applied to chalk material from Danish North Sea oil reservoirs. Results indicate that CT is fast and reliable for prediction of porosity. Typical errors lie within 2-3%. Calculation of fluid saturations requires considerable care from the experimentalists. Saturating a core ought to be performed by pulling vacuum to avoid trapped air bubbles. These bubbles may be produced after subsequent water and gas flooding, thereby ruining the mass balance calculations. Results performed at Stanford University show that if these simple precautions are taken, fluid saturations calculated from CT scanning are generally very accurate. Moreover, it appears that contrast agents need not be added to either phase. Regarding three-phase measurements the results are somewhat disappointing. Previous work using the dual-energy technique has indicated that the accuracy is less than satisfactory, due to an increased noise level at the low-energy setting. More work needs to be done in the future to develop the necessary expertise. The image analysis of the residual oil saturation after a gas flood can be simplified if water is assumed to be immobile during the injection. In that case, the resulting prediction of residual oil saturation is in excellent agreement with measured values. The general conclusion is that CT scanning holds a great potential as an assisting tool in modern core analysis, despite its limitations and the numerous implementation-related problems encountered during this work. (au) EFP-95. 57 refs.

  5. Full-waveform inversion of cross-hole GPR data collected in a strongly heterogeneous chalk reservoir analogue with sharp permittivity and conductivity contrasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keskinen, Johanna; Zibar, Majken Caroline Looms; Moreau, Julien

    2014-01-01

    -time tomography. The new models also reflect the variability seen in 1D drill core analysis. The results indicate that full-waveform inversion is a well-suited inversion technique for high-resolution time-lapse-based flow characterization. Read More: http://library.seg.org/doi/abs/10.1190/segam2014-1199.1...... techniques provide models that are overly smooth and have relatively low resolution. We present preliminary results from full-waveform inversion of data collected in strongly heterogeneous chalk. The resolution of the tomograms has improved significantly compared to models obtained from travel...

  6. No Clear Genetic Influences on the Association between Dyslexia and Anxiety in a Population-Based Sample of Female Twins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, Andrew J. O.; Spector, Tim D.; Cherkas, Lynn F.

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with dyslexia are at an increased risk for anxiety disorders (e.g. generalized anxiety disorder, stress disorders, panic disorder). The extent to which this association is mediated by genetic and/or environmental influences is unclear. The current study explored the relationship between these two phenotypes using a large…

  7. Influence of sexual stimulation on sperm parameters in semen samples collected via masturbation from normozoospermic men or cryptozoospermic men participating in an assisted reproduction programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Y; Sofikitis, N; Mio, Y; Miyagawa, I

    2000-05-01

    To evaluate the influence of sexual stimulation via sexually stimulating videotaped visual images (VIM) on sperm function, two semen samples were collected from each of 19 normozoospermic men via masturbation with VIM. Two additional samples were collected from each man via masturbation without VIM. The volume of seminal plasma, total sperm count, sperm motility, percentage of morphologically normal spermatozoa, outcome of hypo-osmotic swelling test and zona-free hamster oocyte sperm penetration assay, and markers of the secretory function of prostate were significantly larger in semen samples collected via masturbation with VIM than masturbation without VIM. The improved sperm parameters in the samples collected via masturbation with VIM may reflect an enhanced prostatic secretory function and increased loading of the vas deferens at that time. In a similar protocol, two semen samples were collected via masturbation with VIM from each of 22 non-obstructed azoospermic men. Semen samples from these men had been occasionally positive in the past for a very small number of spermatozoa (cryptozoospermic men). Two additional samples were collected from each cryptozoospermic man via masturbation without VIM. The volume of seminal plasma, total sperm count, sperm motility, and a marker of the secretory function of prostate were significantly larger in semen samples collected via masturbation with VIM. Fourteen out of the 22 men were negative for spermatozoa in both samples collected via masturbation without VIM. These men demonstrated spermatozoa in both samples collected via masturbation with VIM. Six men with immotile spermatozoa in both samples collected via masturbation without VIM exposed motile spermatozoa in both samples collected via masturbation with VIM. High sexual stimulation during masturbation with VIM results in recovery of spermatozoa of greater fertilizing potential both in normozoospermic and cryptozoospermic men. The appearance of spermatozoa after

  8. Prediction errors in learning drug response from gene expression data - influence of labeling, sample size, and machine learning algorithm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Immanuel Bayer

    Full Text Available Model-based prediction is dependent on many choices ranging from the sample collection and prediction endpoint to the choice of algorithm and its parameters. Here we studied the effects of such choices, exemplified by predicting sensitivity (as IC50 of cancer cell lines towards a variety of compounds. For this, we used three independent sample collections and applied several machine learning algorithms for predicting a variety of endpoints for drug response. We compared all possible models for combinations of sample collections, algorithm, drug, and labeling to an identically generated null model. The predictability of treatment effects varies among compounds, i.e. response could be predicted for some but not for all. The choice of sample collection plays a major role towards lowering the prediction error, as does sample size. However, we found that no algorithm was able to consistently outperform the other and there was no significant difference between regression and two- or three class predictors in this experimental setting. These results indicate that response-modeling projects should direct efforts mainly towards sample collection and data quality, rather than method adjustment.

  9. Determination of saturation functions and wettability for chalk based on measured fluid saturations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, D.; Bech, N.; Moeller Nielsen, C.

    1998-08-01

    The end effect of displacement experiments on low permeable porous media is used for determination of relative permeability functions and capillary pressure functions. Saturation functions for a drainage process are determined from a primary drainage experiment. A reversal of the flooding direction creates an intrinsic imbibition process in the sample, which enables determination if imbibition saturation functions. The saturation functions are determined by a parameter estimation technique. Scanning effects are modelled by the method of Killough. Saturation profiles are determined by NMR. (au)

  10. An everyday phrase may harm your patients: the influence of negative words on pain during venous blood sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Johannes; Aust, Stefanie; Nouri, Kazem; Promberger, Regina

    2012-05-01

    Venous blood sampling is one of the most common diagnostic medical procedures performed in clinical practice. It has been shown that negatively loaded words may result in negative affective reactions and, consequently, in an increased perception of pain. We aimed to evaluate whether common warnings before venous blood sampling might induce unnecessary pain. We included 100 healthy participants (50 females, 50 males) who were randomized to one of the 2 study groups ("sting" vs. "beware"). Directly before insertion of the needle, the participants were warned with either the word "sting" or "beware." Venous blood sampling was performed according to a standardized protocol. Preinterventional and postinterventional blood pressure and heart rate, as well as pain scores after venous blood sampling, were evaluated. There were 98 participants, 26.2 ± 3.2 years of age, who were included into the analysis. Participants experienced significantly more pain after having been warned with the word "sting" compared with the word "beware." The numeric rating scale results were 2.7 ± 1.2 versus 1.9 ± 1.1, respectively (P=0.001). Words associated with pain increase the perception of pain during venous blood sampling. Omitting these words may be a simple and essential method by which to avoid unnecessary pain.

  11. Improvements in methods of analyzing dust concentrations, and influence of the storage processes on dust concentrations in polar snow and ice samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Miyake

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We sought to improve the analytical methods employed when operating a laser particle counter and to evaluate the influence of the storage processes on dust concentrations in polar snow and ice samples. We corrected the particle size ranges and threshold voltage using the new calibration curve, confirmed the analytical precision and dust concentrations of blank of wipers using in a clean room, and managed any variations in the laser sensor's sensitivity by measuring standard particles. The 15 ml glass screw bottles without packing (liner of cap of bottles yielded the lowest dust concentration of the blank among two types of bottles and nine types of packing for dust analysis. Storage of samples of the Dome Fuji ice core (Antarctica in a refrigerator for 1 year resulted in just a 4% decrease in dust concentration, which is within the analytical precision of the laser particle counter. Storage in a freezer resulted in an increase in dust concentrations and a decrease in the ratio of large particles more than 0.98 μm in particle diameter in the samples, suggesting a change in dust particle size during storage and an influence by the materials of the storage bottles. The addition of dispersants to the Antarctic snow samples is not clearly suitable when analyzing dust concentrations after sample storage by refrigeration or freezing.

  12. Study of the influence of porosity on the radon emanation coefficient in different building material samples by combining the SSNTD technique with Monte Carlo simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Misdaq, M A; Ktata, A

    1998-01-01

    Radon alpha-activities per unit volume have been measured inside and outside different building material samples by using CR-39 and LR-115 type II solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD). Radon emanation coefficients of the studied building materials have been evaluated. The porosities of the building material samples studied have been determined by using a Monte Carlo calculational method adapted to the experimental conditions and compared with data obtained by the Archimedes's method. The influence of the building material porosity on the radon emanation coefficient has been investigated.

  13. Parents' and peers' normative influence on adolescents' smoking: results from a Swiss-Italian sample of middle schools students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalici, Francesca; Schulz, Peter J

    2017-01-21

    Adolescents observe and imitate people to whom they are associated in their social context, and the normative factors sent out by reference groups are crucial determinants of their decision to smoke. The aim of the study is to investigate how adolescents' smoking changes when they are exposed to factors of pro-smoking normative influence by parents and peers, and how age moderate this relation. A cross sectional survey collected data from 5657 students, aged between 11 and 14, from public and private middle schools in the Italian region of Switzerland (Ticino) on their smoking habits, perceived parents' and peers' approval and smoking. Multinomial logistic regression show that, as adolescents get older, more of the pro-smoking factors come from peers and parents, the higher the risk gets of being a "heavy smoker" has compared against having no experience with smoking. Living in a context with no factor of normative influence toward smoking play a protective role against smoking, and this effect becomes more important than more harmful the smoking behavior in question is. Furthermore, peers' descriptive norms are more influential for adolescents to become "light" and "heavy smokers", while smoking being approved by peers is important for adolescents to become accustomed to smoking. Findings support the different influence of parents' and peers' norms on adolescents' smoking, and highlight the importance of peers' model behavior as the most important factor influencing smoking during adolescence. Such results have implications for programs that aim to prevent or reduce smoking in early adolescence when friendship choice starts to become crucial.

  14. Influence of the sample design on the strong light-matter coupling in ZnSe-based periodic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebald, K.; Rahman, SK. S.; Kaya, T.; Gutowski, J.; Klein, T.; Klembt, S.; Gust, A.; Hommel, D.

    2017-06-01

    Cavity-exciton polaritons have attracted much interest because these light-matter quasiparticles are very promising for various optoelectronic applications. Bragg-polaritons have been discussed as new tools for tailoring light-matter interactions. These structures can be created by incorporating quantum wells (QWs) periodically into a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR). The advantage of this sample type is the high number of QWs which can be embedded into the sample in order to increase the Rabi-splitting energy. Calculations show, that the coverage of the sample with a thin metal layer results in an increase of the temperature stability of the strong coupling regime. In addition, this concept enables a specific spectral variation of the cavity resonance allowing for the manipulation of the light-matter interaction.

  15. The influence of blood sample storage time on the propofol concentration in plasma and solid blood elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawidowicz, A L; Fijalkowska, A; Nestorowicz, A; Fornal, E

    2001-10-01

    In order to describe the changes of propofol concentration in whole blood and in its components during the blood storage we examined venous blood samples collected from patients anaesthetized either with or without propofol. Blood samples from patients anaesthetized without propofol were spike with propofol 45 min before analysis. Propofol concentration was examined in whole blood, plasma, rinsed formed elements and rinsed and lysed formed blood elements by means of HPLC after 1, 4, 7, 13, 21, 25 and 28 days of storage. There was significant decrease in plasma concentration of propofol during the first few days of sample storage followed by its increase during subsequent days. The opposite phenomenon was observed for formed blood elements. The findings support the hypothesis that propofol distribution between blood components changes in time. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Influence of enrichment and isolation media on the detection of Campylobacter spp. in naturally contaminated chicken samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repérant, E; Laisney, M J; Nagard, B; Quesne, S; Rouxel, S; Le Gall, F; Chemaly, M; Denis, M

    2016-09-01

    Investigating Campylobacter epidemiology requires adequate technique and media to ensure optimal culturing and accurate detection and isolation of Campylobacter strains. In the present study, we investigated the performances of three enrichment durations in Bolton broth (0, 24 and 48h) and compared four isolation media (mCCDA, Karmali, Butzler no. 2 and CampyFood agar (CFA)) for the detection of Campylobacter positive samples and the identification of Campylobacter species, from naturally contaminated broiler chicken samples (caeca, neck skin from carcasses, and skin from thighs). We compared our local results to those we obtained with samples from a European survey (caeca and neck skin) and a national survey (neck skin, thigh skin, and breast). Direct plating favored the detection of positive samples highly contaminated by Campylobacter (caeca and neck skin from carcasses) whatever the media. A longer enrichment reduced the rates of Campylobacter recovery except when using Butzler no. 2, more particularly for neck skin which background microflora was less important than in caeca. As a matter of fact, enrichment allowed a higher detection rate of positive samples with low Campylobacter contamination levels (breast, thigh skin), this detection being enhanced when using Butzler no. 2. When comparing the 3 other selective media, CFA was the 2nd most efficient media prior to mCCDA and Karmali. Interestingly, enrichment promoted the growth of Campylobacter coli but this promotion was least with Butzler no. 2 agar. Our study has confirmed the need to adapt the method to the types of samples for improving the detection of Campylobacter and that the method may affect the prevalence of the species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Determining the Henry's Law constants of THMs in seawater by means of purge-and-trap gas chromatography (PT-GC): the influence of seawater as sample matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Bevia, Francisco; Fernandez-Torres, Maria J

    2010-01-01

    The influence of seawater salts as salting out agents on the purge-and-trap gas chromatography (PT-GC) determination of trihalomethanes (THMs) was studied. This is particularly important since seawater is chlorinated when used as a cooling agent in coastal nuclear power stations. The chlorination produces unwanted THMs as by-products. A PT-GC apparatus was used to determine the Henry's Law constant of each THM, with seawater as the sample matrix.

  18. Unique and interactive effects of impulsivity facets on reckless driving and driving under the influence in a high-risk young adult sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Jeremy W; Trim, Ryan S; Karyadi, Kenny A; Curry, Inga; Hopfer, Christian J; Hewitt, John K; Stallings, Michael C; Brown, Sandra A; Wall, Tamara L

    2017-08-01

    Risky driving behaviors are disproportionately high among young adults and impulsivity is a robust risk factor. Recent conceptualizations have proposed multidimensional facets of impulsivity comprised of negative urgency, premeditation, perseverance, sensation seeking, and positive urgency (UPPS-P model). Prior studies have found these facets are associated with risky driving behaviors in college student samples, but no prior studies have examined these facets in clinical samples. This study examined the unique and interactive effects of UPPS-P impulsivity facets on past-year risky driving behaviors in a sample of high-risk young adults (ages 18-30 years) with a history of substance use and antisocial behavior and their siblings ( n =1,100). Multilevel Poisson regressions indicated that sensation seeking and negative urgency were uniquely and positively associated with both frequency of past-year reckless driving and driving under the influence. Moreover, lack of premeditation was uniquely and positively associated with reckless driving, whereas lack of perseverance was uniquely and positively associated with driving under the influence. Furthermore, lack of premeditation moderated and strengthened the positive association between sensation seeking and driving under the influence. These study findings suggest that assessing multiple facets of trait impulsivity could facilitate targeted prevention efforts among young adults with a history of externalizing psychopathology.

  19. Does sample length influence the shape of xylem embolism vulnerability curves? A test with the Cavitron spinning technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochard, Hervé; Herbette, Stéphane; Barigah, Têtè; Badel, Eric; Ennajeh, Mustapha; Vilagrosa, Alberto

    2010-09-01

    The Cavitron spinning technique is used to construct xylem embolism vulnerability curves (VCs), but its reliability has been questioned for species with long vessels. This technique generates two types of VC: sigmoid 's'-shaped and exponential, levelling-off 'r'-shaped curves. We tested the hypothesis that 'r'-shaped VCs were anomalous and caused by the presence of vessels cut open during sample preparation. A Cavitron apparatus was used to construct VCs from samples of different lengths in species with contrasting vessel lengths. The results were compared with VCs obtained using other independent techniques. When vessel length exceeded sample length, VCs were 'r'-shaped and anomalous. Filling vessels cut open at both ends with air before measurement produced more typical 's'-shaped VCs. We also found that exposing segments of 11 woody species in a Cavitron at the pressure measured in planta before sampling considerably increased the degree of embolism above the native state level for species with long vessels. We concluded that open vessels were abnormally more vulnerable to cavitation than intact vessels. We recommend restricting this technique to species with short conduits. The relevance of our conclusions for other spinning techniques is discussed.

  20. The influence of Chemical Works “Police” on chemical composition of Pinus sylvestris needles, Pleurozium schreberi and soil samples

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Natalia Mazurkiewicz; Joanna Podlasińska

    2014-01-01

    .... The highest mercury content was similar in pine needles (0.06 mg • kg d. w.) and in moss (0.07 mg • kg d. w.). The soil samples pH value was typical for rusty soils, in which the obtained pH-KCl value...

  1. Impedance measurement of non-locally reactive samples and the influence of the assumption of local reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Eric; Mareze, Paulo; Lenzi, Arcanjo; da Silva, Andrey R

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, the measurement of the absorption coefficient of non-locally reactive sample layers of thickness d1 backed by a rigid wall is investigated. The investigation is carried out with the aid of real and theoretical experiments, which assume a monopole sound source radiating sound above an infinite non-locally reactive layer. A literature search revealed that the number of papers devoted to this matter is rather limited in comparison to those which address the measurement of locally reactive samples. Furthermore, the majority of papers published describe the use of two or more microphones whereas this paper focuses on the measurement with the pressure-particle velocity sensor (PU technique). For these reasons, the assumption that the sample is locally reactive is initially explored, so that the associated measurement errors can be quantified. Measurements in the impedance tube and in a semi-anechoic room are presented to validate the theoretical experiment. For samples with a high non-local reaction behavior, for which the measurement errors tend to be high, two different algorithms are proposed in order to minimize the associated errors.

  2. Study of Event-based Sampling Techniques and Their Influence on Greenhouse Climate Control with Wireless Sensors Network

    OpenAIRE

    Pawlowski, Andrzej; Guzman, Jose L.; Rodriguez, Francisco; Berenguel, Manuel; Sanchez, Jose; Dormido, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a study of event-based sampling techniques and their application to the greenhouse climate control problem. It was possible to obtain important information about data transmission and control performance for all techniques. As conclusion, it was deduced

  3. Influence of high-conductivity buffer composition on field-enhanced sample injection coupled to sweeping in CE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anres, Philippe; Delaunay, Nathalie; Vial, Jérôme; Thormann, Wolfgang; Gareil, Pierre

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this work was to clarify the mechanism taking place in field-enhanced sample injection coupled to sweeping and micellar EKC (FESI-Sweep-MEKC), with the utilization of two acidic high-conductivity buffers (HCBs), phosphoric acid or sodium phosphate buffer, in view of maximizing sensitivity enhancements. Using cationic model compounds in acidic media, a chemometric approach and simulations with SIMUL5 were implemented. Experimental design first enabled to identify the significant factors and their potential interactions. Simulation demonstrates the formation of moving boundaries during sample injection, which originate at the initial sample/HCB and HCB/buffer discontinuities and gradually change the compositions of HCB and BGE. With sodium phosphate buffer, the HCB conductivity increased during the injection, leading to a more efficient preconcentration by staking (about 1.6 times) than with phosphoric acid alone, for which conductivity decreased during injection. For the same injection time at constant voltage, however, a lower amount of analytes was injected with sodium phosphate buffer than with phosphoric acid. Consequently sensitivity enhancements were lower for the whole FESI-Sweep-MEKC process. This is why, in order to maximize sensitivity enhancements, it is proposed to work with sodium phosphate buffer as HCB and to use constant current during sample injection. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Teacher and Student-Focused Approaches: Influence of Learning Approach and Self-Efficacy in a Psychology Postgraduate Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Linda K.; Brewer, Gayle

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined approaches to teaching in a postgraduate psychology sample. This included considering teaching-focused (information transfer) and student-focused (conceptual changes in understanding) approaches to teaching. Postgraduate teachers of psychology (N = 113) completed a questionnaire measuring their use of a teacher- or…

  5. Reaching the hard-to-reach: a probability sampling method for assessing prevalence of driving under the influence after drinking in alcohol outlets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel De Boni

    Full Text Available Drinking alcoholic beverages in places such as bars and clubs may be associated with harmful consequences such as violence and impaired driving. However, methods for obtaining probabilistic samples of drivers who drink at these places remain a challenge--since there is no a priori information on this mobile population--and must be continually improved. This paper describes the procedures adopted in the selection of a population-based sample of drivers who drank at alcohol selling outlets in Porto Alegre, Brazil, which we used to estimate the prevalence of intention to drive under the influence of alcohol. The sampling strategy comprises a stratified three-stage cluster sampling: 1 census enumeration areas (CEA were stratified by alcohol outlets (AO density and sampled with probability proportional to the number of AOs in each CEA; 2 combinations of outlets and shifts (COS were stratified by prevalence of alcohol-related traffic crashes and sampled with probability proportional to their squared duration in hours; and, 3 drivers who drank at the selected COS were stratified by their intention to drive and sampled using inverse sampling. Sample weights were calibrated using a post-stratification estimator. 3,118 individuals were approached and 683 drivers interviewed, leading to an estimate that 56.3% (SE = 3,5% of the drivers intended to drive after drinking in less than one hour after the interview. Prevalence was also estimated by sex and broad age groups. The combined use of stratification and inverse sampling enabled a good trade-off between resource and time allocation, while preserving the ability to generalize the findings. The current strategy can be viewed as a step forward in the efforts to improve surveys and estimation for hard-to-reach, mobile populations.

  6. Reaching the hard-to-reach: a probability sampling method for assessing prevalence of driving under the influence after drinking in alcohol outlets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boni, Raquel; do Nascimento Silva, Pedro Luis; Bastos, Francisco Inácio; Pechansky, Flavio; de Vasconcellos, Mauricio Teixeira Leite

    2012-01-01

    Drinking alcoholic beverages in places such as bars and clubs may be associated with harmful consequences such as violence and impaired driving. However, methods for obtaining probabilistic samples of drivers who drink at these places remain a challenge--since there is no a priori information on this mobile population--and must be continually improved. This paper describes the procedures adopted in the selection of a population-based sample of drivers who drank at alcohol selling outlets in Porto Alegre, Brazil, which we used to estimate the prevalence of intention to drive under the influence of alcohol. The sampling strategy comprises a stratified three-stage cluster sampling: 1) census enumeration areas (CEA) were stratified by alcohol outlets (AO) density and sampled with probability proportional to the number of AOs in each CEA; 2) combinations of outlets and shifts (COS) were stratified by prevalence of alcohol-related traffic crashes and sampled with probability proportional to their squared duration in hours; and, 3) drivers who drank at the selected COS were stratified by their intention to drive and sampled using inverse sampling. Sample weights were calibrated using a post-stratification estimator. 3,118 individuals were approached and 683 drivers interviewed, leading to an estimate that 56.3% (SE = 3,5%) of the drivers intended to drive after drinking in less than one hour after the interview. Prevalence was also estimated by sex and broad age groups. The combined use of stratification and inverse sampling enabled a good trade-off between resource and time allocation, while preserving the ability to generalize the findings. The current strategy can be viewed as a step forward in the efforts to improve surveys and estimation for hard-to-reach, mobile populations.

  7. Influence of the kind of peat and the depth of sampling on the biochemical properties of Tagan peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciech Szajdak, Lech; Inisheva, Lydia I.

    2010-05-01

    The upper layer of a peat bog in which organic matter decomposes aerobically much more rapidly than in the underlying, anaerobic catotelm. As litter accumulates at the surface the size of the catotelm increases, because the thickness of the acrotelm is limited to depth at which aerobic respiration can occur. Although the rate of decomposition per unit volume of material is much greater in the acrotelm than in the catotelm, a point is reached at which the difference in volume between the two layers is such that the total rate of decomposition in the catotelm is equal to that in the acrotelm. This limits the thickness to which the bog can grow. Should there be a climate change (e.g. an increase in precipitation) growth can resume. Bogs therefore preserve a record of climatic conditions. Soils samples were taken from four places marked as No 1, 2, 3 and 4 each from two depth 0-25 and 50-75 cm of the peatland Tagan. Peatlands Tagan is located near Tomsk, West Siberia, Russia. Place No 1 in both layers represents grasses peat with the degree of the decomposition ranged from 25 to 35% (pH 6.31-7.95). Point 2 is characterized by wooden and wooden grasses peat with 35% degree of the decomposition (pH 5.16-9.31. There is buckbean peat in the points 3 and 4 (pH 6.4-6.49). However, 1.5 m depth of sapropel is located in point 4. The activity of the following enzymes: xanthine oxidase, phenolic oxidase, peroxidase, urease, nitrate reductase were measured and two forms of organic carbon (total organic carbon and dissolved organic carbon) and two form of iron Fe(II) and Fe(III) were determined in these samples. These enzymes participate in several biochemical pathways in soil connected with redox potential. The concentrations of indole-3-acetic acid, very famous fitohormone were also measured. It was observed in all places of sampling significant increase of the total organic carbon with an increase of the depth. However, the quantity of dissolved organic carbon closely decreased

  8. Optimized saturation recovery protocols for T1-mapping in the heart: influence of sampling strategies on precision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellman, Peter; Xue, Hui; Chow, Kelvin; Spottiswoode, Bruce S; Arai, Andrew E; Thompson, Richard B

    2014-09-04

    T1-mapping has the potential to detect and quantify diffuse processes such as interstitial fibrosis. Detection of disease at an early stage by measurement of subtle changes requires a high degree of reproducibility. Initial implementation of saturation recovery (SR) T1-mapping employed 3-parameter fitting which was highly accurate but was quite sensitive to noise; 2-parameter fitting greatly reduced the sensitivity to noise at the expense of a small degree of systematic bias. A recently introduced implementation that uses a variable readout flip angle greatly reduces systematic errors in T1-measurement thereby making it feasible to use SR methods with 2-parameter fitting with improved accuracy and precision. SR T1 mapping techniques with multi-heartbeat recovery times have been proposed to better sample the T1 recovery curve, but have not been evaluated for 2-parameter fitting. An analytic formulation for calculating the standard deviation (SD) for SR T1-mapping with 2-parameter fitting is developed and validated using Monte-Carlo simulation. The coefficient of variation is compared for a brute force optimization of sampling and for several previously described sampling schemes for T1 measurement over several uncertainty ranges. Experimental validation is performed in phantoms over a range of T1, and in-vivo both native and post-contrast. Pixel-wise SD maps are calculated for SR T1-mapping. Sampling schemes that use a non-saturated anchor image and multiple (N) measurements at a single fixed saturation delay are found to be near optimum for the case of known T1 and are close to the brute force optimized solution over wide ranges of native and post-contrast T1 values. The fixed delay sampling scheme is simple to implement and provides an improvement over uniformly distributed schemes. Sampling strategies for saturation recovery methods for myocardial T1-mapping have been optimized and validated experimentally. Reduced SD, or improved precision, may be achieved by

  9. Area balance and strain in an extensional fault system: Strategies for improved oil recovery in fractured chalk, Gilbertown Field, southwestern Alabama. Annual report, March 1996--March 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashin, J.C.; Raymond, D.E.; Rindsberg, A.K.; Alabi, G.G.; Groshong, R.H.

    1997-08-01

    Gilbertown Field is the oldest oil field in Alabama and produces oil from chalk of the Upper Cretaceous Selma Group and from sandstone of the Eutaw Formation along the southern margin of the Gilbertown fault system. Most of the field has been in primary recovery since establishment, but production has declined to marginally economic levels. This investigation applies advanced geologic concepts designed to aid implementation of improved recovery programs. The Gilbertown fault system is detached at the base of Jurassic salt. The fault system began forming as a half graben and evolved in to a full graben by the Late Cretaceous. Conventional trapping mechanisms are effective in Eutaw sandstone, whereas oil in Selma chalk is trapped in faults and fault-related fractures. Burial modeling establishes that the subsidence history of the Gilbertown area is typical of extensional basins and includes a major component of sediment loading and compaction. Surface mapping and fracture analysis indicate that faults offset strata as young as Miocene and that joints may be related to regional uplift postdating fault movement. Preliminary balanced structural models of the Gilbertown fault system indicate that synsedimentary growth factors need to be incorporated into the basic equations of area balance to model strain and predict fractures in Selma and Eutaw reservoirs.

  10. Delineating chalk sand distribution of Ekofisk formation using probabilistic neural network (PNN) and stepwise regression (SWR): Case study Danish North Sea field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haris, A.; Nafian, M.; Riyanto, A.

    2017-07-01

    Danish North Sea Fields consist of several formations (Ekofisk, Tor, and Cromer Knoll) that was started from the age of Paleocene to Miocene. In this study, the integration of seismic and well log data set is carried out to determine the chalk sand distribution in the Danish North Sea field. The integration of seismic and well log data set is performed by using the seismic inversion analysis and seismic multi-attribute. The seismic inversion algorithm, which is used to derive acoustic impedance (AI), is model-based technique. The derived AI is then used as external attributes for the input of multi-attribute analysis. Moreover, the multi-attribute analysis is used to generate the linear and non-linear transformation of among well log properties. In the case of the linear model, selected transformation is conducted by weighting step-wise linear regression (SWR), while for the non-linear model is performed by using probabilistic neural networks (PNN). The estimated porosity, which is resulted by PNN shows better suited to the well log data compared with the results of SWR. This result can be understood since PNN perform non-linear regression so that the relationship between the attribute data and predicted log data can be optimized. The distribution of chalk sand has been successfully identified and characterized by porosity value ranging from 23% up to 30%.

  11. Maternal depression and parenting in early childhood: Contextual influence of marital quality and social support in two samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taraban, Lindsay; Shaw, Daniel S; Leve, Leslie D; Wilson, Melvin N; Dishion, Thomas J; Natsuaki, Misaki N; Neiderhiser, Jenae M; Reiss, David

    2017-03-01

    Marital quality and social support satisfaction were tested as moderators of the association between maternal depressive symptoms and parenting during early childhood (18-36 months) among 2 large, divergent, longitudinal samples (n = 526; n = 570). Unexpectedly, in both samples the association between maternal depressive symptoms and reduced parenting quality was strongest in the context of high marital quality and high social support, and largely nonsignificant in the context of low marital quality and low social support. Possible explanations for these surprising findings are discussed. Results point to the importance of accounting for factors in the broader family context in predicting the association between depressive symptoms and maternal parenting. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Hyperspectral data influenced by sample matrix: the importance of building relevant reference spectral libraries to map materials of interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, James C K; Bezerra, Leonardo; Del Pilar Sosa Peña, María; Neu-Baker, Nicole M; Brenner, Sara A

    2017-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) and mapping are increasingly used for visualization and identification of nanoparticles (NPs) in a variety of matrices, including aqueous suspensions and biological samples. Reference spectral libraries (RSLs) contain hyperspectral data collected from materials of known composition and are used to detect the known materials in experimental samples through a one-to-one pixel "mapping" process. In some HSI studies, RSLs created from raw NPs were used to map NPs in experimental samples in a different matrix; for example, RSLs created from NPs in suspension to map NPs in biological tissue. Others have utilized RSLs created from NPs in the same matrix. However, few studies have systematically compared hyperspectral data as a function of the matrix in which the NPs are found and its impact on mapping results. The objective of this study is to compare RSLs created from metal oxide NPs in aqueous suspensions to RSLs created from the same NPs in rat tissues following in vivo inhalation exposure, and to investigate the differences in mapping that result from the use of each RSL. Results demonstrate that the spectral profiles of these NPs are matrix dependent: RSLs created from NPs in positive control tissues mapped to experimental tissues more appropriately than RSLs created from NPs in suspension. Aqueous suspension RSLs mapped 0-602 out of 500,424 pixels per tissue image while tissue RSLs mapped 689-18,435 pixels for the same images. This study underscores the need for appropriate positive controls for the creation of RSLs for mapping NPs in experimental samples. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Detection of antibodies to Plasmodium vivax by indirect immunofluorescence: influence of the geographic origin of antigens and serum samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzerroug, E H; Demedts, P; Wéry, M

    1986-03-01

    The results of a double-blind serological study of 15 sera sampled in a residual focus of vivax malaria transmission in Algeria, and of 7 sera from patients with slide-proven P. vivax infections acquired in India, are analyzed. The reactivity of each of these serum samples was tested by indirect immunofluorescence using 6 different batches of antigen, including 3 batches of P. vivax antigen prepared with isolates from Zaire (Africa), India and the Solomon Islands, respectively. The geometric mean of reciprocal titers (GMRT) calculated on the 7 sera from proven vivax infections fell from 289.8 using the homologous antigen from the same geographic origin (India) to 48.7 using a homologous (vivax) antigen originating from a different continent (Africa). Among the 15 samples from Algeria, the percentage of seropositives decreased from 100% using the homologous P. vivax antigen originating from the same continent (Africa) to 53.3% using a homologous antigen from India. Two aspects are included in the discussion: in seroepidemiological studies, sensitivity could be improved by the use of a homologous antigen from the same geographic origin; in detection of clinical cases of malaria and species identification based on serology, our results stress the need for caution in interpreting serological titers and for taking into account the geographic origin of the isolates used as antigen.

  14. Influence of socio-demographic factors on physical activity participation in a sample of adults in Penang, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Y K

    2011-12-01

    Given the importance of physical activity to health, this study investigated the socio-demographic determinants of physical activity participation in a sample of adults in Penang. Through convenience sampling, a total of 398 adults agreed to answer a prepared questionnaire on their socio-demographic background and physical activity participation. The data were analysed using the binary logit model. Frequent physical activity participation is defined as taking part more than 11 times in leisure-time physical activity such as swimming and jogging, each time lasting more than 15 minutes in a typical month, whereas participation that is less than the frequency and time duration specified above is referred to as infrequent physical activity. Age, male, being Chinese, high educational attainment, self-rated excellent health status and presence of family illnesses are positively associated with the likelihood of frequent participation in physical activity. On the contrary, being married, having low income and residing in rural areas are inversely related with the propensity of frequent physical activity participation. The majority in this sample of adults do not participate in physical activity frequently, and the reasons given include lack of health awareness, limited leisure time, budget constraints, and lack of sports amenities.

  15. Towards a representative periphytic diatom sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The need to acquire a representative periphytic diatom sample for river water quality monitoring has been recognised in the development of existing diatom indices, important in the development and employment of diatom monitoring tools for the Water Framework Directive. In this study, a nested design with replication is employed to investigate the magnitude of variation in diatom biomass, composition and Trophic Diatom Index at varying scales within a small chalk river. The study shows that the use of artificial substrates may not result in diatom communities that are typical of the surrounding natural substrates. Periphytic diatom biomass and composition varies between artificial and natural substrates, riffles and glides and between two stretches of the river channel. The study also highlights the existence of high variation in diatom frustule frequency and biovolume at the individual replicate scale which may have implications for the use of diatoms in routine monitoring.

  16. Mapping of groundwater potential zones in Salem Chalk Hills, Tamil Nadu, India, using remote sensing and GIS techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thilagavathi, N; Subramani, T; Suresh, M; Karunanidhi, D

    2015-04-01

    This study proposes to introduce the remote sensing and geographic information system (GIS) techniques in mapping the groundwater potential zones. Remote sensing and GIS techniques have been used to map the groundwater potential zones in Salem Chalk Hills, Tamil Nadu, India. Charnockites and fissile hornblende biotite gneiss are the major rock types in this region. Dunites and peridodites are the ultramafic rocks which cut across the foliation planes of the gneisses and are highly weathered. It comprises magnesite and chromite deposits which are excavated by five mining companies by adopting bench mining. The thickness of weathered and fracture zone varies from 2.2 to 50 m in gneissic formation and 5.8 to 55 m in charnockite. At the contacts of gneiss and charnockite, the thickness ranges from 9.0 to 90.8 m favoring good groundwater potential. The mine lease area is underlined by fractured and sheared hornblende biotite gneiss where groundwater potential is good. Water catchment tanks in this area of 5 km radius are small to moderate in size and are only seasonal. They remain dry during summer seasons. As perennial water resources are remote, the domestic and agricultural activities in this region depend mainly upon the groundwater resources. The mines are located in gently slope area, and accumulation of water is not observed except in mine pits even during the monsoon period. Therefore, it is essential to map the groundwater potential zones for proper management of the aquifer system. Satellite imageries were also used to extract lineaments, hydrogeomorphic landforms, drainage patterns, and land use, which are the major controlling factors for the occurrence of groundwater. Various thematic layers pertaining to groundwater existence such as geology, geomorphology, land use/land cover, lineament, lineament density, drainage, drainage density, slope, and soil were generated using GIS tools. By integrating all the above thematic layers based on the ranks and

  17. Examining Whether Offspring Psychopathology Influences Illness Course in Mothers With Recurrent Depression Using a High-Risk Longitudinal Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Depression is known to be influenced by psychosocial stressors. For mothers with recurrent depressive illness, the presence of psychopathology in their children may have important effects on their own mental health. Although the impact of maternal depression on child mental health is well-established, no study to date, as far as we are aware, has examined the extent to which offspring psychopathology influences the course of depression in mothers with a history of recurrent depressive illness, what types of child psychopathology impact maternal mental health, or whether risks vary by child gender. Aims were to (a) Use a longitudinal design to examine whether adolescent psychopathology (depression, disruptive behavior disorder; DBD) predicts recurrence of a depressive episode and depression symptom course in women with a history of recurrent depression; and (b) To test if observed effects vary by child gender. 299 mothers with recurrent major depressive disorder and their adolescent offspring were assessed on 2 occasions, 29 months apart. Maternal depression and offspring psychopathology were assessed using semistructured interview measures. Cross-generational links across time were assessed using structural equation modeling. Analyses were adjusted for past severity of maternal depression. Offspring depression symptoms but not DBD symptoms at baseline predicted future episode recurrence in mothers. Depression symptoms in daughters (β = .16, p = .039) but not sons (β = −.07, p = .461), predicted an increase in maternal depression symptoms across time. Psychopathology in daughters is associated with long-term depressive symptoms in women (mothers) with a history of recurrent depression. Findings highlight the importance of careful assessment and management of mental health problems in adolescents for more effective management of maternal depression. This study suggests that offspring symptoms of depression may be important for the recurrence of maternal

  18. Histopathology Discrepancy of Preoperative Endometrial Sampling and Final Specimen: How Does This Influence Selective Lymph Node Dissection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corr, Bradley R; Carrubba, Aakriti; Sheeder, Jeanelle; Cheng, Georgina; Guntupalli, Saketh R

    2017-02-01

    Preoperative histology is a major component in the perioperative selective lymph node (LN) dissection decision process. Discrepancy between preoperative endometrial sampling and final specimen histopathology is generally accepted. The goals of this project are to determine if discrepancy of histopathology is associated with alteration of adjuvant treatment or outcome. We performed a retrospective cross-sectional analysis of all patients undergoing surgery for endometrial cancer at a single institution from 2010 to 2014. All patients had preoperative endometrial sampling. Histopathology discrepancy was evaluated for potential in variation of perioperative LN dissection. Criteria for not performing LN dissection was defined as preoperative endometrioid histology, grade 1 or 2 lesion, myometrial invasion of 50% or less, and primary tumor diameter 2 cm or less. A total of 352 patients were identified; 44 were excluded because of no preoperative pathology or no residual disease on final pathology. Discrepancy of histopathology was noted in 64/308 (20.8%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 16.2%-25.3%) patients. Preoperative endometrioid histology was noted in 272 patients, and 17/272 (6.3%; 95% CI, 3.4%-9.1%) had preoperative sampling reviewed as a grade 1 or 2 endometrioid lesion and final specimen was upgraded to grade 3. Downstaging occurred in 3/272 (1.1%; 95% CI, 0%-2.3%) patients with preoperative grade 3 lesion and final specimen demonstrated grade 1 or 2 disease. All 3 patients' primary tumor diameter was greater than 2 cm and therefore received LN dissection. Histopathological discrepancy that would alter perioperative LN dissection decision based on the aforementioned criteria occurred in 2/272 (0.7%; 95% CI, 0%-1.8%). Despite a 20% discrepancy of preoperative and postoperative histopathology, discrepancy that would alter a perioperative decision for LN dissection occurs in only 0.7% of cases in this retrospective single-institutional experience. Myometrial

  19. Influence of selective media on successful detection of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in food, fecal, and environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Hussein S; Bollinger, Laurie M

    2008-06-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains have caused a large number of human illness outbreaks worldwide. In most cases, the infection was traced to consumption of meats or vegetables contaminated with cattle feces. To combat this public health problem, pre- and post-harvest control strategies are continuously implemented to assure food safety. Thus, rapid, reliable, and sensitive methods for STEC detection must be available to provide confidence not only in the meats or vegetables entering the food chain but also in testing humans with illnesses. As a result, enrichment for STEC has been a critical step in any successful protocol for their detection. The base media commonly used for STEC enrichment include sorbitol MacConkey agar, tryptic soy broth (TSB), E. coli broth, enterohemorrhagic E. coli broth, buffered peptone water (BPW), and brain heart infusion broth. In addition to bile salts, antibiotics (e.g., tellurite, cefixime, novobiocin, vancomycin, cefsulodin, and acriflavin) are used at different concentrations to enrich for STEC. In most published reports, however, the reasons for choosing the selective medium were not provided. Thus, this review was intended to evaluate the base media and antibiotics commonly used for STEC detection. The efficacy of a detection method will certainly depend on the choice of the base medium, selective agents, and their concentrations. The interactions among these factors are also expected to affect sensitivity of the detection method, especially when the test sample contains a small number of STEC cells. Because sensitivity of detection is expected to decline when testing for stressed or injured STEC cells, as is the case in environmental samples, a pre-enrichment step in TSB or BPW without antibiotics may be necessary. Future research should focus on identifying possible antibiotic combinations that effectively inhibit most background bacteria without affecting pathogenic STEC strains in the test sample.

  20. Geometric factor and influence of sensors in the establishment of a resistivity-moisture relation in soil samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Sánchez, M.; Mansilla-Plaza, L.; Sánchez-de-laOrden, M.

    2017-10-01

    Prior to field scale research, soil samples are analysed on a laboratory scale for electrical resistivity calibrations. Currently, there are a variety of field instruments to estimate the water content in soils using different physical phenomena. These instruments can be used to develop moisture-resistivity relationships on the same soil samples. This assures that measurements are performed on the same material and under the same conditions (e.g., humidity and temperature). A geometric factor is applied to the location of electrodes, in order to calculate the apparent electrical resistivity of the laboratory test cells. This geometric factor can be determined in three different ways: by means of the use of an analytical approximation, laboratory trials (experimental approximation), or by the analysis of a numerical model. The first case, the analytical approximation, is not appropriate for complex cells or arrays. And both, the experimental and numerical approximation can lead to inaccurate results. Therefore, we propose a novel approach to obtain a compromise solution between both techniques, providing a more precise determination of the geometrical factor.

  1. The influence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on lung function in a representative sample of the Canadian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, Sabit; Hebbern, Chris; Cakmak, Jasmine D; Dales, Robert E

    2017-09-01

    We investigated the associations between exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and selected respiratory physiologic measures in cycles 2 and 3 of the Canadian Health Measures Survey, a nationally representative population sample. Using generalized linear mixed models, we tested the association between selected PAH metabolites and 1-second forced expiratory volume (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and the ratio between the two (FEV1/FVC) in 3531 people from 6 to 79 years of age. An interquartile change in urinary PAH metabolite was associated with significant decrements in FEV1 and FVC for eight PAHs, 2-hydroxynapthalene, 1-, and 2-hydroxyphenanthrene, 2-, 3-, and 9-hydroxyfluorene and 3- and 4-hydroxyphenanthrene. Exposure to PAH may negatively affect lung function in the Canadian population. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Recovery of extracellular vesicles from human breast milk is influenced by sample collection and vesicle isolation procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke I. Zonneveld

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EV in breast milk carry immune relevant proteins and could play an important role in the instruction of the neonatal immune system. To further analyze these EV and to elucidate their function it is important that native populations of EV can be recovered from (stored breast milk samples in a reproducible fashion. However, the impact of isolation and storage procedures on recovery of breast milk EV has remained underexposed. Here, we aimed to define parameters important for EV recovery from fresh and stored breast milk. To compare various protocols across different donors, breast milk was spiked with a well-defined murine EV population. We found that centrifugation of EV down into density gradients largely improved density-based separation and isolation of EV, compared to floatation up into gradients after high-force pelleting of EV. Using cryo-electron microscopy, we identified different subpopulations of human breast milk EV and a not previously described population of lipid tubules. Additionally, the impact of cold storage on breast milk EV was investigated. We determined that storing unprocessed breast milk at −80°C or 4°C caused death of cells present in breast milk, leading to contamination of the breast milk EV population with storage-induced EV. Here, an alternative method is proposed to store breast milk samples for EV analysis at later time points. The proposed adaptations to the breast milk storage and EV isolation procedures can be applied for EV-based biomarker profiling of breast milk and functional analysis of the role of breast milk EV in the development of the neonatal immune system.

  3. Functionality of microbial communities in constructed wetlands used for pesticide remediation: Influence of system design and sampling strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Tao; Carvalho, Pedro N; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Yang; Button, Mark; Arias, Carlos A; Weber, Kela P; Brix, Hans

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the microbial community metabolic function from both unsaturated and saturated constructed wetland mesocosms (CWs) when treating the pesticide tebuconazole. The comparison was performed for both interstitial water and substrate biofilm by community level physiological profiling (CLPP) via BIOLOG™ EcoPlates. For each CW design (saturated or unsaturated), six mesocosms were established including one unplanted and five planted individually with either Juncus effusus, Typha latifolia, Berula erecta, Phragmites australis or Iris pseudacorus. Microbial activity and metabolic richness of interstitial water from unsaturated CWs were significantly lower than that from saturated CWs. However, in general, the opposite result was observed for biofilm samples. Wetland plants promoted significantly higher biofilm microbial activity and metabolic richness than unplanted CWs in both CW designs. Differences in the microbial community functional profiles between plant species were only found for saturated CWs. Biofilm microbial metabolic richness was generally statistically higher than that of interstitial water in both unsaturated (1.4-24 times higher) and saturated (1.2-1.7 times higher) CWs. Carbon source (guild) utilization patterns were generally different between interstitial water and biofilm samples. Functionality of the biofilm microbial community was positively correlated to the removal of all pollutants (TN, NH4+-N, TP, TOC and tebuconazole) for both unsaturated and saturated CWs, suggesting the biofilm plays a more important role in pollutant removal than the interstitial water microbial community. Thus, merely observing the interstitial water microbial communities may underestimate the role of the microbial community in CW performance. Interestingly, the ability for the biofilm microbial community to utilize amino acids and amines/amides was positively correlated with tebuconazole removal in all system types. Copyright

  4. Factors influencing the intention to utilize out-of-pocket health checkup services: A sample of citizens from 12 townships of Taichung County in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuh-Shiow; Chiu, Yen-Lin; Liao, Hui-Ling; Chen, Jin-Tang; Lee, Fu-Chun

    2010-05-01

    Taiwan started its National Health Insurance (NHI) system in 1995. However, until now, most cancer screening tests and preventive care have been out-of-pocket (OOP) medical items excluded from the coverage of NHI. The aim of this study was to explore the factors influencing an individual's intention to utilize OOP health checkups. A cross-sectional research method was adopted in this study. Based on the theory of planned behavior, a questionnaire was developed and used to survey purposively sampled residents (n = 940) from 12 randomly selected townships in Taichung County, Taiwan, from August to September 2006. Descriptive statics and linear regression were conducted to analyze the collected data. Our results showed that result evaluation (beta = 0.092), behavioral beliefs (beta = 0.088), behavioral norms of people with experience in utilizing OOP health checkups (beta = 0.116), perceived convenience (beta = 0.273), and worry about illness and perceived health (beta = 0.110) were important factors influencing the intention to utilize OOP health checkups. Age, education and acceptable health checkup charges were also related. Reinforcing disease- and health checkup-related knowledge may positively influence an individual's intention to utilize OOP health checkups. In addition, improving perceived convenience and reducing disease-screening barriers can intensify the individual's intention to use OOP health checkups. The influence of age, education level and OOP checkup charges should also be taken into consideration when related policies are formulated. Copyright 2010 Elsevier. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Campylobacter in Broiler Chicken and Broiler Meat in Sri Lanka: Influence of Semi-Automated vs. Wet Market Processing on Campylobacter Contamination of Broiler Neck Skin Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottawatta, Kottawattage S. A.; Van Bergen, Marcel A. P.; Abeynayake, Preeni; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; Veldman, Kees T.; Kalupahana, Ruwani S.

    2017-01-01

    Broiler meat can become contaminated with Campylobacter of intestinal origin during processing. The present study aimed to identify the prevalence of Campylobacter in broiler flocks and meat contamination at retail shops, and determine the influence of semi-automated and wet market processing on Campylobacter contamination of neck skin samples. Samples were collected from semi-automated plants (n = 102) and wet markets (n = 25). From each batch of broilers, pooled caecal samples and neck skin samples were tested for Campylobacter. Broiler meat purchased from retail outlets (n = 37) was also tested. The prevalence of Campylobacter colonized broiler flocks was 67%. The contamination of meat at retail was 59%. Both semi-automated and wet market processing resulted to contaminate the broiler neck skins to the levels of 27.4% and 48%, respectively. When Campylobacter-free broiler flocks were processed in semi-automated facilities 15% (5/33) of neck skin samples became contaminated by the end of processing whereas 25% (2/8) became contaminated after wet market processing. Characterization of isolates revealed a higher proportion of C. coli compared to C. jejuni. Higher proportions of isolates were resistant to important antimicrobials. This study shows the importance of Campylobacter in poultry industry in Sri Lanka and the need for controlling antimicrobial resistance. PMID:29186018

  6. Campylobacter in Broiler Chicken and Broiler Meat in Sri Lanka: Influence of Semi-Automated vs. Wet Market Processing on Campylobacter Contamination of Broiler Neck Skin Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kottawattage S. A. Kottawatta

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Broiler meat can become contaminated with Campylobacter of intestinal origin during processing. The present study aimed to identify the prevalence of Campylobacter in broiler flocks and meat contamination at retail shops, and determine the influence of semi-automated and wet market processing on Campylobacter contamination of neck skin samples. Samples were collected from semi-automated plants (n = 102 and wet markets (n = 25. From each batch of broilers, pooled caecal samples and neck skin samples were tested for Campylobacter. Broiler meat purchased from retail outlets (n = 37 was also tested. The prevalence of Campylobacter colonized broiler flocks was 67%. The contamination of meat at retail was 59%. Both semi-automated and wet market processing resulted to contaminate the broiler neck skins to the levels of 27.4% and 48%, respectively. When Campylobacter-free broiler flocks were processed in semi-automated facilities 15% (5/33 of neck skin samples became contaminated by the end of processing whereas 25% (2/8 became contaminated after wet market processing. Characterization of isolates revealed a higher proportion of C. coli compared to C. jejuni. Higher proportions of isolates were resistant to important antimicrobials. This study shows the importance of Campylobacter in poultry industry in Sri Lanka and the need for controlling antimicrobial resistance.

  7. Campylobacter in Broiler Chicken and Broiler Meat in Sri Lanka: Influence of Semi-Automated vs. Wet Market Processing on Campylobacter Contamination of Broiler Neck Skin Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottawatta, Kottawattage S A; Van Bergen, Marcel A P; Abeynayake, Preeni; Wagenaar, Jaap A; Veldman, Kees T; Kalupahana, Ruwani S

    2017-11-29

    Broiler meat can become contaminated with Campylobacter of intestinal origin during processing. The present study aimed to identify the prevalence of Campylobacter in broiler flocks and meat contamination at retail shops, and determine the influence of semi-automated and wet market processing on Campylobacter contamination of neck skin samples. Samples were collected from semi-automated plants ( n = 102) and wet markets ( n = 25). From each batch of broilers, pooled caecal samples and neck skin samples were tested for Campylobacter . Broiler meat purchased from retail outlets ( n = 37) was also tested. The prevalence of Campylobacter colonized broiler flocks was 67%. The contamination of meat at retail was 59%. Both semi-automated and wet market processing resulted to contaminate the broiler neck skins to the levels of 27.4% and 48%, respectively. When Campylobacter -free broiler flocks were processed in semi-automated facilities 15% (5/33) of neck skin samples became contaminated by the end of processing whereas 25% (2/8) became contaminated after wet market processing. Characterization of isolates revealed a higher proportion of C. coli compared to C. jejuni . Higher proportions of isolates were resistant to important antimicrobials. This study shows the importance of Campylobacter in poultry industry in Sri Lanka and the need for controlling antimicrobial resistance.

  8. The influence of age, sex, population group, and dentition on the mandibular angle as measured on a South African sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oettlé, Anna C; Becker, Piet J; de Villiers, Elzabe; Steyn, Maryna

    2009-08-01

    The mandibular angle is measured in physical anthropological assessments of human remains to possibly assist with the determination of sex and population affinity. The purpose of this investigation was to establish how the mandibular angle changes with age and loss of teeth among the sexes in South African population groups. The angles of 653 dried adult mandibles from the Pretoria Bone Collection were measured with a mandibulometer. Males and females of both South African whites and blacks were included. To compensate for imbalances in numbers among subgroups, type IV ANOVA testing was applied. No association was found between age and angle within either of the populations, within sexes, or within dentition groups. The angle was the most obtuse in individuals without molars and with an uneven distribution of molars, and most acute in the group with an even distribution of molars on both sides. Statistically significant differences (P population groups and sexes in the overall sample as well as in the subgroup with absent molar teeth (P = 0.003 for sex, males more acute angle, and P = 0.001 for population group, blacks more acute angle), although a very large overlap existed. No significant differences could be demonstrated between the sexes or populations within the subgroups with molars. We concluded that the loss of molars, especially if complete or uneven, has a considerable effect on the mandibular angle. In the assessment of human remains, the mandibular angle is not very usable in determining sex.

  9. Low molecular mass thiols, disulfides and protein mixed disulfides in rat tissues: influence of sample manipulation, oxidative stress and ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giustarini, Daniela; Dalle-Donne, Isabella; Milzani, Aldo; Rossi, Ranieri

    2011-04-01

    Most of the data in studies investigating the contribution of oxidative stress to some human diseases and to ageing derive from measurements carried out in blood, on the basis of the assumption that any alteration of the hematic thiol/disulfide balance should reflect a corresponding alteration in other less accessible tissues. But it is evident that the information that can be gleaned from a direct analysis in specific tissues is largely greater. Nevertheless, the accurate measurement of disulfides is frequently hampered by the artifactual oxidation occurring during sample manipulation as a consequence of the presence of heme-proteins. Therefore, the levels of disulfide forms of low molecular mass thiols in tissues are still poorly investigated, even if their measurements could represent a powerful index of the oxidative status. Here we have used an artifact-free procedure to measure low molecular mass thiols and their disulfides in different rat tissues. Our findings suggest that disulfides are a reliable biomarker of even slight oxidative damage. In tissues of aged rats we observed that either oxidative stress or glutathione depletion alone can occur in different tissues during ageing. Interestingly, among the investigated thiols, only homocysteine showed a tendency to increase in some organs with ageing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Behaviour of Water Droplets Under the Influence of a Uniform Electric Field in Nanocomposite Samples of Epoxy Resin/TiO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Α. Bairaktari

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper nanocomposite samples of epoxy resin and TiO2 nanoparticles were investigated with water droplets on their surface. A uniform electric field was applied and the behaviour of the water droplets was observed. Parameters that were studied were the water conductivity, the droplet volume, the number of droplets and the droplet positioning with respect to (w.r.t. the electrodes. All above mentioned parameters influence the flashover voltage of the samples. It is to be noted that – at least in some cases – the water droplet positioning w.r.t. the electrodes was more important in determining the flashover voltage than the droplet volume.

  11. In-homogeneity in the pre-dose sensitization of the 110 Degree-Sign C TL peak in various quartz samples: The influence of annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polymeris, George S., E-mail: polymers@auth.gr [Laboratory of Radiation Applications and Archaeological Dating, Department of Archaeometry and Physicochemical Measurements, Cultural and Educational Technology Institute, Athena, Research and Innovation Center in Information, Communication and Knowledge Technologies, Tsimiski 58, GR-67100 Xanthi (Greece); ISIK University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Physics Department, Sile 34980, Istanbul (Turkey); Oniya, Ebenezer O. [Laboratory of Radiation Applications and Archaeological Dating, Department of Archaeometry and Physicochemical Measurements, Cultural and Educational Technology Institute, Athena, Research and Innovation Center in Information, Communication and Knowledge Technologies, Tsimiski 58, GR-67100 Xanthi (Greece); Physics and Electronics Department, Adekunle Ajasin University, PMB 01 Akungba Akoko (Nigeria); Jibiri, Nnamdi N. [Department of Physics, University of Ibadan, Ibadan (Nigeria); Tsirliganis, Nestor C. [Laboratory of Radiation Applications and Archaeological Dating, Department of Archaeometry and Physicochemical Measurements, Cultural and Educational Technology Institute, Athena, Research and Innovation Center in Information, Communication and Knowledge Technologies, Tsimiski 58, GR-67100 Xanthi (Greece); Kitis, George [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2012-03-01

    The pre-dose sensitization effect of the 110 Degree-Sign C TL glow-peak of quartz is a basic tool in thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence dating and retrospective dosimetry. In the present work, a homogeneity study was performed on pre-dose sensitization in grains obtained from large quartz crystals samples collected from 10 different origins. The aliquot - to - aliquot scatter of the pre-dose sensitization of the 110 Degree-Sign C TL peak within each quartz crystal was monitored. The influence of the annealing on this scattering was also studied. Therefore, the investigation was applied to the un-fired 'as is' samples as well as to samples annealed at 900 Degree-Sign C for 1 h following cooling to room temperature in air. The results showed that in the case of 'as is' quartz the sensitization effect vary strongly within each aliquot of the same quartz sample. This strong variation is removed by both the high temperature annealing as well as heating up to 500 Degree-Sign C, involved in the TL measurements. These results are generally discussed in the framework of existing models and applications of the effect.

  12. Metabonomics, dietary influences and cultural differences: a 1H NMR-based study of urine samples obtained from healthy British and Swedish subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, E M; Bright, J; Wilson, I D; Hughes, A; Morrisson, J; Lindberg, H; Lockton, A

    2004-11-19

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and comparability of metabonomic data in clinical studies conducted in different countries without dietary restriction. A (1)H NMR-based metabonomic analysis was performed on urine samples obtained from two separate studies, both including male and female subjects. The first was on a group of healthy British subjects (n = 120), whilst the second was on healthy subjects from two European countries (Britain and Sweden, n = 30). The subjects were asked to provide single, early morning urine samples collected on a single occasion. The (1)H NMR spectra obtained for urine samples were visually inspected and analysed chemometrically using principal components analysis (PCA). These inspections highlighted outliers within the urine samples and displayed interesting differences, revealing characteristic dietary and cultural features between the subjects of both countries, such as high trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO)-excretion in the Swedish population and high taurine-excretion, due to the Atkins diet. This study suggests that the endogenous urinary profile is subject to distinct cultural and severe dietary influences and that great care needs to be taken in the interpretation of 'biomarkers of disease and response to drug therapy' for diagnostic purposes.

  13. Chalk it up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Michael; Radford, Tom

    2017-07-01

    In response to Philip Ball's feature “The power of the blackboard” (June pp32-36), which looks into the enduring love that physicists have for blackboards, despite the existence of smartboards and PowerPoint.

  14. Chalk and computers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lisa Rosén

    Since 1970 school books have first been supplemented by photocopies and later PDF files and the use of Internet sites. Chalkboards have been replaced by Smart Boards and notebooks by laptops and IPADS. Digital media has made its way into the classroom and into everyday school life. This has been ...

  15. Chalk in the prime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, H; Doyle, T; Saynor, R; Smith, G H

    1986-01-01

    After observations of cloudiness in the perfusion circuit at open intracardiac operations, laboratory experiments showed a precipitate in a Hartmann's solution (compound sodium lactate solution, Ringer-lactate) and sodium bicarbonate based priming fluid used for cardiopulmonary bypass. The precipitate was found to consist of calcium carbonate crystals. The crystals were not dissolved by adding plasma proteins, nor were they sufficiently cleared from the extracorporeal circuit by a 40 microns filter in the arterial line. The crystals may embolise in microvascular beds and thus be a cause of postoperative morbidity. The practice of adding sodium bicarbonate to the pump prime may be unnecessary. Images PMID:3010485

  16. Development and maintenance of a telescoping debris flow fan in response to human-induced fan surface channelization, Chalk Creek Valley Natural Debris Flow Laboratory, Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasklewicz, T.; Scheinert, C.

    2016-01-01

    Channel change has been a constant theme throughout William L. Graf's research career. Graf's work has examined channel changes in the context of natural environmental fluctuations, but more often has focused on quantifying channel change in the context of anthropogenic modifications. Here, we consider how channelization of a debris flows along a bajada has perpetuated and sustained the development of 'telescoping' alluvial fan. Two-dimensional debris-flow modeling shows the importance of the deeply entrenched channelized flow in the development of a telescoping alluvial fan. GIS analyses of repeat (five different debris flows), high-resolution (5 cm) digital elevation models (DEMs) generated from repeat terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) data elucidate sediment and topographic dynamics of the new telescoping portion of the alluvial fan (the embryonic fan). Flow constriction from channelization helps to perpetuate debris-flow runout and to maintain the embryonic fan and telescoping nature of the alluvial fan complex. Embryonic fan development, in response to five debris flows, proceeds with a major portion of the flows depositing on the southern portion of the embryonic fan. The third through the fifth debris flows also begin to shift some deposition to the northern portion of the embryonic. The transfer of sediment from a higher portion of the embryonic fan to a lower portion continues currently on the embryonic fan. While channelized flow has been shown to be critical to the maintenance of the telescoping fan, the flow constriction has led to higher than background levels of sediment deposition in Chalk Creek, a tributary of the Arkansas River. A majority of the sediment from each debris flow is incorporated into Chalk Creek as opposed to being stored on the embryonic fan.

  17. Influence of Sample Storage on the Composition of  Carbonated Beverages by MIR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karma Pearce

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available It is not uncommon for research and quality control samples, including carbonated beverage samples, to be refrigerated or frozen during peak periods of production and/or sampling, when analytical demand exceeds instrumental capacity. However, the effect of sub‐ambient temperatures on carbonated beverage composition during storage has not been well characterized. Mid‐infrared (MIR spectroscopy combined with principal component analysis (PCA and traditional chemical analyses were used to evaluate the effects of refrigeration (for 1 week and freezing (for 1 or 6 weeks on the composition of carbonated beverages, including sparkling water, sparkling wine, beer, and cider. Carbonated beverages were generally resistant to changes in pH, titratable acidity, alcohol, total phenolics, sugar, and color, during short‐term (1 week storage. However, long‐term (6 week freezing resulted in decreased total phenolics, with acidity also affected, albeit to a lesser extent. MIR spectroscopy combined with PCA enabled discrimination of carbonated beverages based on composition, with alcohol content having a significant influence. Examination of the MIR ‘fingerprint’ region indicated subtle compositional changes occurred in carbonated beverages following prolonged freezing.

  18. [Does the sampling locality influence on the antifungal activity of the flavonoids of Marrubium vulgare against Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouterfas, K; Mehdadi, Z; Aouad, L; Elaoufi, M M; Khaled, M B; Latreche, A; Benchiha, W

    2016-09-01

    The study was undertaken to determine the effect of the sampling locality on the antifungal activity of the flavonoids extracted from the leaves of Marrubium vulgare L. against two fungal strains; Aspergillus niger ATCC 16404 and Candida albicans ATCC 10231. The leaves were collected from three different sampling localities belonging northwest Algeria: Tessala mount, M'sila forest and Ain Skhouna. The flavonoid extraction was carried out by using organic solvents with increasing polarity. A phytochemical screening was performed by staining test tubes. The inhibition diameters were measured by solid medium diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined by dilution method on solid medium. The antifungal activity varied significantly (Pflavonoid extract and its concentration, and the strain fungal type. The inhibition diameters varied between 8.16 and recorded 37.5mm even recording a total inhibition of fungal growth and often exceed those induced marketed antifungals (Amphotericin, Fluconazole, Terbinafine and econazole nitrate). The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) obtained range between 6.25 and 100μg/mL; experiencing strong antifungal inhibition. The phytochemical screening revealed the existence of certain flavonoids classes such as flavans and flavanols which may be responsible of this remarkable antifungal power. The sampling locality of Marrubium vulgare leaves influenced on the antifungal activity of flavonoids. These have proven very good fungistatic and worth valuing in pharmacology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Experiences and factors influencing a sample of teachers in New York state public elementary and middle schools to focus on environmental education in their teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooker, Gail Patricia

    This study focuses on how fourteen elementary and middle level teachers in New York chose to teach environmental topics as part of their science curricula. Prior research suggested that factors influencing teachers to make curricular decisions are different from those that motivated them to become teachers in the first place (Espinet, et.al. 1992). This was supported by the results of this study, which found that most of these teachers made the decision to begin teaching environmental education (EE) well after deciding to become teachers and that the decision to teach EE was influenced by a variety of factors including participation in EE-oriented in-service programs, media coverage of environmental issues, encouragement from colleagues and school administrators to undertake EE, and personal experiences in childhood or early adulthood with the environment and/or with EE. Studies examining experiences that influence people to practice "environmentally responsible" behaviors (Chawla, 1995; McGarry, 1994; Tanner, 1994) suggested that positive childhood contacts with nature were important predictors for such behavior in adulthood. Findings of this study were largely consistent with these results, however, this sample of teachers viewed their childhood nature experiences as being mostly responsible for the development of their appreciation of the environment, while their actual decision to begin teaching EE was primarily influenced by other experiences, as discussed above. This study also examined how these teachers prepared themselves for teaching EE. The findings indicate that these teachers used a wide variety of preparation strategies. A minority reported becoming prepared for teaching EE through their pre-service teacher education programs. These results were in agreement with prior findings that most teacher education programs in this country do not include a focus on EE. Even where preparation for EE is included, it has been rated by the participants as

  20. Influence of the operating parameters and of the sample introduction system on time correlation of line intensities using an axially viewed CCD-based ICP-AES system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grotti, Marco, E-mail: grotti@chimica.unige.i [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Via Dodecaneso 31, 16146 Genova (Italy); Todoli, Jose Luis [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Universidad de Alicante, 03080, Alicante (Spain); Mermet, Jean Michel [Spectroscopy Forever, 01390 Tramoyes (France)

    2010-02-15

    The influence of the acquisition and operating parameters on time correlation between emission line intensities was investigated using axially viewed inductively coupled plasma-multichannel-based emission spectrometry and various sample introduction systems. It was found that to obtain flicker-noise limited signals, necessary to compensate for time-correlated signal fluctuations by internal standardization, the flicker-noise magnitude of the sample introduction system, the integration time and the emission line intensity had to be considered. The highest correlation between lines was observed for ultrasonic nebulization with desolvatation, the noisiest system among those considered, for which the contribution of the uncorrelated shot-noise was negligible. In contrast, for sample introduction systems characterized by lower flicker-noise levels, shot-noise led to high, non-correlated RSD values, making the internal standard method to be much less efficient. To minimize shot-noise, time correlation was improved by increasing the emission line intensities and the integration time. Improvement in repeatability did not depend only on time correlation, but also on the ratio between the relative standard deviations of the analytical and reference lines. The best signal compensation was obtained when RSD values of the reference and analytical lines were similar, which is usually obtained when the system is flicker-noise limited, while departure from similarity can lead to a degradation of repeatability when using the internal standard method. Moreover, the use of so-called robust plasma conditions, i.e. a high power (1500 W) along with a low carrier gas flow rate (0.8 L/min) improved also the compensation. Finally, high correlation and consequent improvement in repeatability by internal standardization was observed also in the presence of complex matrices (sediment and soil samples), although a matrix-induced degradation of the correlation between lines was generally

  1. Influence of different anaesthetic protocols over the sperm quality on the fresh, chilled (4°C) and frozen-thawed epididymal sperm samples in domestic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, M; Vilar, J; Rosario, I; Terradas, E

    2016-10-01

    This study assessed the influence of three different anaesthetic protocols on semen quality obtained from the epididymis. Sixty male dogs undergoing to routine sterilization were assigned to three anaesthetic protocols: thiopental group (TG, n = 20), propofol group (PG, n = 20) and ketamine-dexmedetomidine group (KDG, n = 20). Immediately after orchidectomy, the cauda epididymides and vas deferent ducts were isolated and then a retrograde flushing was performed to collect spermatozoa. In experiment 1, after the initial evaluation of the semen (sperm concentration, sperm motility and the percentages of live spermatozoa, abnormal spermatozoa and acrosome membrane integrity), semen samples were diluted in Tris-glucose-egg yolk extender and chilled for 48 hr, and the sperm motility was assessed at 6, 24 and 48 hr. In experiment 2, semen samples were diluted in Tris-glucose-egg yolk extender and chilled for 24 hr, and then samples were frozen in two extenders with different glycerol concentrations, to reach a final concentration of 50-100 × 10(6) spermatozoa ml(-1) , 20% egg yolk, 0.5% Equex and 4% and 5% glycerol, respectively. Mean values of total sperm concentration, sperm viability and the percentages of intact acrosome and abnormal spermatozoa were not significantly different between experimental groups, and therefore, the anaesthetic protocols assessed did not affect sperm parameters mentioned above. However, our study confirmed a detrimental effect of the use of thiopental (TG) over the total sperm motility (p sperm motility (p epididymal sperm samples. The anaesthetic protocols including the application of propofol or ketamine-dexmedetomidine can be used to recover sperm in domestic canids without significant changes in sperm quality compared when semen is collected routinely and these techniques could be applicable to endangered wild canids. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Changes in the strength of peer influence and cultural factors on substance use initiation between late adolescence and emerging adulthood in a Hispanic sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigsby, Timothy J; Forster, Myriam; Soto, Daniel W; Unger, Jennifer B

    2017-01-01

    We examine whether peer substance use and cultural factors differentially influence the initiation of tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use in adolescence and emerging adulthood (EA) among a community-based sample of Hispanics. Participants provided data in 11th grade (M = 16.8 years old, SD = 0.54) and emerging adulthood (M = 20.3 years old, SD = 0.6). Peer tobacco use had a stronger association with initiation of tobacco use in emerging adulthood (OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.13, 1.89) than in adolescence (OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.03, 1.40), but this pattern was not observed with initiation of alcohol or marijuana use. Cultural orientation is associated with initiation of tobacco use during EA but not with initiation of alcohol or marijuana use.

  3. The influence of season and air temperature on water intake by food groups in a sample of free-living Japanese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Y; Asakura, K; Sasaki, S; Hirota, N; Notsu, A; Todoriki, H; Miura, A; Fukui, M; Date, C

    2015-08-01

    To examine the influence of season and climate (air temperature and humidity) on water intake by the food group in a sample of free-living Japanese adults. Four-nonconsecutive-day, semi-weighed dietary records were collected from each of the four seasons in a single 12-month period (16 days in total). The influence of season and climate on individual water intake by the food group was analyzed using a mixed linear model. Participants were 242 healthy adults (121 women aged 30-69 years and 121 men aged 30-76 years) from four areas in Japan. For women and men together, the mean total water intake was 2230 g/day (highest in summer: 2331 g/day; lowest in winter: 2134 g/day). Fifty-one percent of water was derived from foods and the rest from beverages. In a mixed linear model adjusted for sex, age and body mass index, intake of water from foods decreased by 3.1 g/day and that from beverages increased by 8.4 g/day, with an increase in the mean outdoor air temperature on the survey day of 1 °C (both P air temperature, whereas that from foods was inversely associated with air temperature.

  4. Basarabi-Murfatlar and Corbii de Piatră – about the Crimean influence on the architecture of the Romanian churches of the early Middle Ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlad D. Ghimpu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Structural studies of the cave chalk churches in Basarab-Murfatlar (Constanţa County allow a new way to date this monastery complex the 8th-9th centuries and show that these temples were created under the influence of monks-iconoclasts from the Crimea, which had a great impact on the religious life of Romanians and Orthodox peoples in the Balkans. The churches with the two apses (and altars did not have a long distribution, perhaps they existed only during the life of the monks who came from the Crimea to new territories. In all likelihood, these temples could not compete with the existing churches, with three apses and three naves, of the Byzantine tradition, where the Trinity was especially revered, which was reflected in architecture. Southern Slavs, having received both samples of churches and the population that joined them before the official Christianization, adopted churches with two apses, but mostly churches with one altar, nave and narthex. The same happened with the Romanians, both under the influence of the Bulgarian and Serbian Churches, and, as we see, directly from the Crimean monks who came to our lands that were under pressure from nomads and did not have much opportunities for independent development.

  5. The influence factors of medical professionalism: A stratified-random sampling study based on the physicians and patients in ambulatory care clinics of Chengdu, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yifei; Yin, Senlin; Lai, Sike; Tang, Ji; Huang, Jin; Du, Liang

    2016-10-01

    As the relationship between physicians and patients deteriorated in China recently, medical conflicts occurred more frequently now. Physicians, to a certain extent, also take some responsibilities. Awareness of medical professionalism and its influence factors can be helpful to take targeted measures and alleviate the contradiction. Through a combination of physicians' self-assessment and patients' assessment in ambulatory care clinics in Chengdu, this research aims to evaluate the importance of medical professionalism in hospitals and explore the influence factors, hoping to provide decision-making references to improve this grim situation. From February to March, 2013, a cross-sectional study was conducted in 2 tier 3 hospitals, 5 tier 2 hospitals, and 10 community hospitals through a stratified-random sampling method on physicians and patients, at a ratio of 1/5. Questionnaires are adopted from a pilot study. A total of 382 physicians and 1910 patients were matched and surveyed. Regarding the medical professionalism, the scores of the self-assessment for physicians were 85.18 ± 7.267 out of 100 and the scores of patient-assessment were 57.66 ± 7.043 out of 70. The influence factors of self-assessment were physicians' working years (P = 0.003) and patients' complaints (P = 0.006), whereas the influence factors of patient-assessment were patients' ages (P = 0.001) and their physicians' working years (P < 0.01) and satisfaction on the payment mode (P = 0.006). Higher self-assessment on the medical professionalism was in accordance with physicians of more working years and no complaint history. Higher patient-assessment was in line with elder patients, the physicians' more working years, and higher satisfaction on the payment mode. Elder patients, encountering with physicians who worked more years in health care services or with higher satisfaction on the payment mode, contribute to higher scores in patient assessment part. The government should

  6. Comparison of 2 electronic cowside tests to detect subclinical ketosis in dairy cows and the influence of the temperature and type of blood sample on the test results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwersen, M; Klein-Jöbstl, D; Pichler, M; Roland, L; Fidlschuster, B; Schwendenwein, I; Drillich, M

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the suitability of 2 electronic hand-held devices [FreeStyle Precision (FSP), Abbott GmbH & Co. KG, Wiesbaden, Germany and GlucoMen LX Plus (GLX), A. Menarini GmbH, Vienna, Austria] for measuring β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) in dairy cows. Three experiments were conducted to evaluate (1) the diagnostic performance of the devices, (2) the effect of the type of blood sample, and (3) the influence of the ambient temperature on the determined results. A total of 415 blood samples from lactating Holstein and Simmental cows were collected and analyzed with both devices (whole blood) and in a laboratory (serum). Correlation coefficients between whole-blood and serum BHBA concentrations were highly significant, with 94% for the FSP and 80% for the GLX device. Based on thresholds for subclinical ketosis of 1.2 and 1.4 mmol of BHBA/L, results obtained with the hand-held devices were evaluated by receiver operating characteristics analyses. This resulted in adjusted thresholds of 1.2 and 1.4 mmol/L for the FSP and 1.1 and 1.3 mmol/L for the GLX device. Applying these thresholds, sensitivities were 98 and 100% for the FSP and 80 and 86% for the GLX device, respectively. Corresponding specificities were 90 and 97% for the FSP and 87 and 96% for the GLX device, respectively. Additionally, concentrations of BHBA were tested with both devices in whole blood, EDTA-added whole blood, and in their resulting serum and plasma, collected from 65 animals. Determined BHBA concentrations were similar within each device for whole and EDTA-added blood, and in serum and plasma, but differed between whole blood and serum and between EDTA-added blood and plasma. Blood samples with low (0.4 mmol/L), medium (1.1 mmol/L), and high (1.6 mmol/L) BHBA concentrations were stored between +5 to +32°C and analyzed repeatedly at temperature levels differing by 4°C. Additionally, devices and test strips were stored at equal conditions and used for measurement

  7. Upper Campanian-Maastrichtian stable isotopes and calcareous nannofossil palaeoecology in the Boreal Realm (Stevns-1 well, Danish Basin Chalks) : implications for climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, N.; Schovsbo, N.; Stemmerik, L.; Surlyk, F.

    2009-04-01

    The Stevns-1 borehole, drilled in eastern Denmark close to the famous K-Pg boundary section of Stevns Klint, recovered 456 m of upper Campanian to basal Danian chalks with ~100% recovery. A nearly complete nannofossil biozonation was documented for this core (Sheldon, 2008). Stevns-1 represents the first complete section throughout the uppermost Cretaceous chalk of NW Europe and the most expanded Maastrichtian section worldwide. Because these chalks lack extensive burial diagenetic overprinting and are composed of more of 70% of calcareous nannofossils in volume, they likely reflect conditions of past sea-surface waters, thus making this site highly suitable for the study of past environments and climates of the Boreal realm in the uppermost Cretaceous. Here, we present the results obtained on the long-term evolution of calcareous nannofossil assemblages and bulk carbon- and oxygen-stable isotopes on this site. In the nannofossil assemblage, the main significant changes are observed within the distribution of Watznaueria barnesiae (considered in the Boreal realm as a warm-water index), of the cool-water taxa and of the fertility indices. The neat opposition between the relative abundance of the sum of cool-water taxa and that of Watznaueria barnesiae allowed us to build a nannofossil temperature index (NTI). The NTI and the bulk ^18O show the same evolution and have a high coefficient of correlation (R2=0.73), thus suggesting that oxygen stable isotopes could be used here to estimate past variations of sea-surface temperatures (SST) in the Boreal realm. These two proxies suggest the following climate evolution : SST were quite stable and warm in the upper Campanian, and are estimated at around 19 °C. A 4 °C cooling is recorded between the uppermost Campanian and the lowermost Maastrichtian. An expanded mid-Maastrichtian warming episode of 1.5 °C is recorded and followed by a second cooling event of 1.5 °C in the upper Maastrichtian. The end of the Maastrichtian

  8. Influence of physical properties and chemical composition of sample on formation of aerosol particles generated by nanosecond laser ablation at 213 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hola, Marketa, E-mail: mhola@sci.muni.c [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Konecna, Veronika [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Mikuska, Pavel [Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic v.v.i., Veveri 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Kaiser, Jozef [Institute of Physical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technicka 2896/2, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic); Kanicky, Viktor [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2010-01-15

    The influence of sample properties and composition on the size and concentration of aerosol particles generated by nanosecond Nd:YAG laser ablation at 213 nm was investigated for three sets of different materials, each containing five specimens with a similar matrix (Co-cemented carbides with a variable content of W and Co, steel samples with minor differences in elemental content and silica glasses with various colors). The concentration of ablated particles (particle number concentration, PNC) was measured in two size ranges (10-250 nm and 0.25-17 mum) using an optical aerosol spectrometer. The shapes and volumes of the ablation craters were obtained by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and by an optical profilometer, respectively. Additionally, the structure of the laser-generated particles was studied after their collection on a filter using SEM. The results of particle concentration measurements showed a significant dominance of particles smaller than 250 nm in comparison with larger particles, irrespective of the kind of material. Even if the number of particles larger than 0.25 mum is negligible (up to 0.1%), the volume of large particles that left the ablation cell can reach 50% of the whole particle volume depending on the material. Study of the ablation craters and the laser-generated particles showed a various number of particles produced by different ablation mechanisms (particle splashing or condensation), but the similar character of released particles for all materials was observed by SEM after particle collection on the membrane filter. The created aerosol always consisted of two main structures - spherical particles with diameters from tenths to units of micrometers originally ejected from the molten surface layer and mum-sized 'fibres' composed of primary agglomerates with diameters in the range between tens and hundreds of nanometers. The shape and structure of ablation craters were in good agreement with particle concentration

  9. Culture-specific influences on body image and eating distress in a sample of urban Bulgarian women: the roles of faith and traditional fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Rosa Angelova; Utermohlen, Virginia

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of local culture on body image and eating distress in a sample of urban Bulgarian women. Specifically, we focused on two affiliated factors unique to the Bulgarian context: faith and traditional fasting. Findings revealed that women could be divided into two groups who behaved differently based on the severity of their eating disorder symptomatology. For women with higher EAT-40 scores (i.e., vulnerable women), faith seemed to have harmful effects, perhaps by virtue of motivating or reinforcing asceticism and dietary restraint. For these women fasting was likely but one strategy for weight management and the achievement of a desired thin figure consistent with the socio-cultural models. In contrast, among women with lower EAT-40 scores, faith seemed to have a protective effect against excessive dieting. These women were more likely to use fasting in the way intended by religious scripture, for faith-related reasons that have nothing to do with body image. This study contributes to the literature by emphasizing the importance of culturally unique factors that may be implicated in the relationship between body dissatisfaction and overt eating distress in the trans-cultural context. When expanded, this research can be of use in helping formulate custom interventions and public health policies aimed at preventing such conditions in Bulgaria and possibly in similar post-communist cultures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Social norm influences on evaluations of the risks associated with alcohol consumption: applying the rank-based decision by sampling model to health judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Alex M; Brown, Gordon D A; Maltby, John

    2012-01-01

    The research first tested whether perceptions of other people's alcohol consumption influenced drinkers' perceptions of the riskiness of their own consumption. Second, the research tested how such comparisons are made-whether, for example, people compare their drinking to the 'average' drinker's or 'rank' their consumption amongst other people's. The latter untested possibility, suggested by the recent Decision by Sampling Model of judgment, would imply different cognitive mechanisms and suggest that information should be presented differently to people in social norm interventions. Study 1 surveyed students who provided information on (a) their own drinking, (b) their perceptions of the distribution of drinking in the UK and (c) their perceived risk of various alcohol-related disorders. Study 2 experimentally manipulated the rank of 'target' units of alcohol within the context of units viewed simultaneously. In both studies, the rank of an individual's drinking in a context of other drinkers predicted perceptions of developing alcohol-related disorders. There was no evidence for the alternative hypothesis that people compared with the average of other drinkers' consumptions. The position that subjects believed they occupied in the ranking of other drinkers predicted their perceived risk, and did so as strongly as how much they actually drank. Drinking comparisons are rank-based, which is consistent with other judgments in social, emotional and psychophysical domains. Interventions should be designed to work with people's natural ways of information processing, through providing clients with information on their drinking rank rather than how their drinking differs from the average.

  11. The buffering effect of tangible social support on financial stress: influence on psychological well-being and psychosomatic symptoms in a large sample of the adult general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åslund, Cecilia; Larm, Peter; Starrin, Bengt; Nilsson, Kent W

    2014-09-28

    Financial stress is an important source of distress and is related to poor mental and physical health outcomes. The present study investigated whether tangible social support could buffer the effect of financial stress on psychological and psychosomatic health. Two separate postal surveys were sent to random samples in five counties in Sweden in 2004 and 2008, with a total of 84 263 respondents. The questionnaires included questions about financial stress, tangible social support, psychosomatic symptoms, and psychological well-being (General Health Questionnaire-12). Individuals with high financial stress and low tangible social support had six to seven times increased odds ratios for low psychological well-being and many psychosomatic symptoms. By contrast, individuals with high financial stress and high tangible social support had only two to three times increased odds ratios for low psychological well-being and three to four times increased odds ratios for many psychosomatic symptoms, suggesting a buffering effect of tangible social support. Consistent with the buffering hypothesis, there were significant interactions between financial stress and social support, particularly in relation to low psychological well-being. Social support had its strongest effect at high levels of financial stress. The question whether the altering of our social networks may improve physical health is important for the prevention of ill health in people experiencing financial stress. Strengthening social networks may have the potential to influence health-care costs and improve quality of life.

  12. Sample preparation strategies for one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoretic separation of plant proteins and the influence on arsenic and zinc bindings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Anne-Christine; Ahlswede, Julia; Störr, Bianca

    2009-10-01

    A sample preparation method including protein extraction by an aqueous buffer system, precipitation with trichloroacetic acid, washing with acetone, and desalting by dialysis was developed for 2D gel electrophoresis of mature leaves from Tropaeolum majus, a plant species with a high content of glucosinolates. By the optimized method, 1D- and 2D-gels could also be produced from Festuca rubra leaves and Helianthus annuus seeds. A strong influence of the varied protein preparation parameters on arsenic and zinc bindings was observed. Microwave-digestion with subsequent atomic spectroscopy analysis of protein fractions revealed the highest arsenic binding capacity of 76.2+/-1.7% for proteins from sunflower seeds spiked with arsenite. After spiking of T. majus extracts with different arsenic species and zinc salts to 100microg As or Zn in 10mL, 9.5+/-0.97%, 0.95+/-0.39%, 0.24+/-0.02%, 0.20+/-0.09%, 0.02%, 0.83+/-0.02%, 2.21+/-1.64%, and 1.45+/-0.69% were recovered in the final protein fraction for phenylarsine oxide, arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonate, dimethylarsinate, zinc chloride, zinc sulfate, and zinc acetate, respectively. The cultivation of T. majus under arsenic exposure resulted in a highly elevated arsenic-binding capacity of the proteins that was also dependent on the kind of arsenic species in the following order: arsenite (14.9%)>monomethylarsonate (12.4%)>arsenate (10.8%)>dimethylarsinate (0.32%).

  13. Observations of debris flows at Chalk Cliffs, Colorado, USA: Part 2, changes in surface morphometry from terrestrial laser scanning in the summer of 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Dennis M.; Wasklewicz, Thad A.; Coe, Jeffrey A.; Kean, Jason W.; McCoy, Scott W.; Tucker, Greg E.

    2011-01-01

    High resolution topographic data that quantify changes in channel form caused by sequential debris flows in natural channels are rare at the reach scale. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) techniques are utilized to capture morphological changes brought about by a high-frequency of debris-flow events at Chalk Cliffs, Colorado. The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast the topographic response of a natural channel to the documented debris-flow events. TLS survey data allowed for the generation of high-resolution (2-cm) digital terrain models (DTM) of the channel. A robust network of twelve permanent control points permitted repeat scanning sessions that provided multiple DTM to evaluate fine-scale topographic change associated with three debris-flow events. Difference surfaces from the DTM permit the interpretations of spatial variations in channel morphometry and net volume of material deposited and eroded within and between a series of channel reaches. Each channel reach experienced erosion, deposition, and both net volumetric gains and losses were measured. Analysis of potential relationships between erosion and deposition magnitudes yielded no strong correlations with measures of channel-reach morphometry, suggesting that channel reach-specific predictions of potential erosion or deposition locations or rates cannot be adequately derived from statistical analyses of pre-event channel-reach morphometry.

  14. Uranium series geochemistry in aquifers: quantification of transport mechanisms of uranium and daughter products: the chalk aquifer (Champagne, France); Desequilibres des series de l'uranium dans les aquiferes: quantification des mecanismes de transport de l'uranium et de ses descendants: cas de l'aquifere de la craie (Champagne, France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, A

    2005-09-15

    With the increase of contaminant flux of radionuclides in surface environment (soil, river, aquifer...), there is a need to understand and model the processes that control the distribution of uranium and its daughter products during transport within aquifers. We have used U-series disequilibria as an analogue for the transport of uranium and its daughter products in aquifer to understand such mechanisms. The measurements of uranium ({sup 234}U et {sup 238}U), thorium ({sup 230}Th et {sup 232}Th), {sup 226}Ra and {sup 222}Rn isotopes in the solid and liquid phases of the chalk aquifer in Champagne (East of France) allows us to understand the processes responsible for fractionation within the uranium decay chain. Fractionations are induced by physical and chemical properties of the elements (leaching, adsorption) but also by radioactive properties (recoil effect during {alpha}-decay). For the first time a comprehensive sampling of the solid phase has been performed, allowing quantifying mechanisms responsible for the long term evolution of the aquifer. A non steady state 1D model has been developed which takes into account leaching, adsorption processes as well as radioactive filiation and {alpha}-recoil effect. Retardation coefficients have been calculated for uranium, thorium and radium. The aquifer is characterised by a double porosity, and the contribution of fracture and matrix porosity on the water/rock interaction processes has been estimated. (author)

  15. Estimates and influences of reflective opposite-sex norms on alcohol use among a high-risk sample of college students: Exploring Greek-affiliation and gender effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummer, Justin F.; LaBrie, Joseph W.; Lac, Andrew; Sessoms, Ashley; Cail, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Reflective opposite sex norms are behavior that an individual believes the opposite sex prefers them to do. The current study extends research on this recently introduced construct by examining estimates and influences of reflective norms on drinking in a large high-risk heterosexual sample of male and female college students from two universities. Both gender and Greek-affiliation served as potential statistical moderators of the reflective norms and drinking relationship. All participants (N = 1790; 57% female) answered questions regarding the amount of alcohol they believe members of the opposite sex would like their opposite sex friends, dates, and sexual partners to drink. Participants also answered questions regarding their actual preferences for drinking levels in each of these three relationship categories. Overall, women overestimated how much men prefer their female friends and potential sexual partners to drink, whereas men overestimated how much women prefer their sexual partners to drink. Greek-affiliated males demonstrated higher reflective norms than non-Greek males across all relationship categories, and for dating partners, only Greek-affiliated males misperceived women’s actual preferences. Among women however, there were no differences between reflective norms estimates or the degree of misperception as a function of Greek status. Most importantly, over and above perceived same-sex social norms, higher perceived reflective norms tended to account for greater variance in alcohol consumption for Greeks (vs. non-Greeks) and males (vs. females), particularly within the friend and sexual partner contexts. The findings highlight that potential benefits might arise if existing normative feedback interventions were augmented with reflective normative feedback designed to target the discrepancy between perceived and actual drinking preferences of the opposite sex. PMID:22305289

  16. Independent influences of current and childhood socioeconomic status on health outcomes in a North Carolina family practice sample of arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassari, Antoine R; Cleveland, Rebecca J; Callahan, Leigh F

    2013-08-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that socioeconomic status (SES) is a determinant of health outcomes among persons with arthritis. SES in early life has likewise been associated with various aspects of health, but the connection between childhood SES and health among people with arthritis remains to be investigated. The purpose of this study was to determine the influences of current and childhood SES on self-reported disability, depression, and physical and mental health among people with self-reported doctor-diagnosed arthritis. Data originated from a North Carolina network of primary care centers. Participants with self-reported arthritis with complete sociodemographic and relevant health information were retained in our sample (n = 782). We created summary measures for current and childhood SES from indicators of education, occupation, and homeownership, using parental SES as a proxy for participants' childhood SES. Linear regression models were used to assess the associations between health outcomes and SES variables separately and together, adjusting for key covariates. Lower childhood and current SES scores were associated with worse disability and physical health. Current SES was furthermore associated with mental health and depressive symptoms. Associations of low current and childhood SES with health outcomes remained significant when concurrently included in a linear model. Childhood and current SES are both determinants of health among persons with arthritis. This underscores the importance of childhood SES as a determinant of adult health among individuals with arthritis. Further studies should focus on these associations in different populations and across different types of arthritis. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  17. Estimation of anisotropy coefficient and total attenuation of swine liver at 850 nm based on a goniometric technique: influence of sample thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccomandi, P; Vogel, V; Bazrafshan, B; Schena, E; Vogl, T J; Silvestri, S; Mäntele, W

    2014-01-01

    Estimation of optical properties of biologic tissue is crucial for theoretical modeling of laser treatments in medicine. Tissue highly absorbs and scatters the light between 650 nm and 1300 nm, where the laser provides therapeutic effects. Among other properties, the characteristic of biological tissues to scatter the light traveling trough, is described by the anisotropy coefficient (g). The relationship between g and the distribution of the scattered light at different angles is described by Henyey-Greenstein phase function. The measurement of angular distribution of scattered light is performed by the goniometric technique. This paper describes the estimation of g and attenuation coefficient, μt, of swine liver at 850 nm, performed by an ad hoc designed goniometric-based system, where a spectrometer measures intensities of scattered light at fixed angles (0°, 30°, 45°, 60, 120°, 135° and 150°). Both one-term and two-term Henyey-Greenstein phase function have been employed to estimate anisotropy coefficient for forward (gfs) and backward scattering (gbs). Measurements are performed on samples of two thicknesses (60 um and 30 urn) to investigate the influence of this factor on g, and repeated 6 times for each thickness. The estimated values of gfs were 0.947 and 0.951 for thickness of 60 μm and 30 μm, respectively; the estimations of gfs were -0.498 and -0.270 for thickness of 60 μm and 30 μm, respectively. Moreover, μt of liver has been estimated (i.e., 90±20 cm(1)), through Lambert-Beer equation. The comparison of our results with data reported in literature encourages the use of the ad hoc designed tool for performing experiments on other tissue, and at other wavelengths.

  18. Integrated stratigraphy and paleoenvironmental reconstruction for the Late Cretaceous Danish chalk based on the Stevns-2 core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boussaha, Myriam; Thibault, Nicolas Rudolph; Stemmerik, Lars

    An integrated stratigraphy of the Stevns-2 core located in eastern Denmark is hereby presented based on calcareous nannofossil biostratigraphy and carbon isotope stratigraphy. Carbon and oxygen isotope have been performed on 419 bulk samples. Calcareous nannofossil biostratigraphy has been applied......, based on the analysis of 57 samples. Original gamma-ray data from the well-log analysis are also presented. The calcareous nannofossil data span the upper Campanian (UC16a) to the lower Danian (NNT1). These new stratigraphic data are compared and correlated to other Boreal, Tethyan and Tropical sites...

  19. The relation among porosity, permeability, and specific surface of chalk from the Gorm field, Danish North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeanette, Mortensen; Engstrøm, Finn; Lind, Ida

    1998-01-01

    X. On 24 of the core plugs the specific surface was determined by BET and on 14 of these samples image analysis was made. The data was rationalized by the use of the Kozeny equation and it was found that each geologic unit had a characteristic relationship between porosity, permeability and specific...

  20. g in Middle Childhood: Moderate Genetic and Shared Environmental Influence Using Diverse Measures of General Cognitive Ability at 7, 9 and 10 Years in a Large Population Sample of Twins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Oliver S. P.; Arden, Rosalind; Plomin, Robert

    2008-01-01

    A 2003 paper in this journal reported results from a large sample of twins assessed at 2, 3 and 4 years of age on parent-administered tests and reports of their verbal and nonverbal ability. We found clear evidence for phenotypic general cognitive ability (g) that accounted for about 50% of the variance, for modest genetic influence on g (about…

  1. Assessment of the National Research Universal Reactor Proposed New Stack Sampling Probe Location for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glissmeyer, John A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Antonio, Ernest J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Flaherty, Julia E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-29

    This document reports on a series of tests conducted to assess the proposed air sampling location for the National Research Universal reactor (NRU) complex exhaust stack, located in Chalk River, Ontario, Canada, with respect to the applicable criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. Due to the age of the equipment in the existing monitoring system, and the increasing difficulty in acquiring replacement parts to maintain this equipment, a more up-to-date system is planned to replace the current effluent monitoring system, and a new monitoring location has been proposed. The new sampling probe should be located within the exhaust stack according to the criteria established by the American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society (ANSI/HPS) N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that represents the effluent stream. The internal Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) project for this task was 65167, Atomic Energy Canada Ltd. Chalk River Effluent Duct Flow Qualification. The testing described in this document was guided by the Test Plan: Testing of the NRU Stack Air Sampling Position (TP-STMON-032).

  2. Ethnic differences in overweight and obesity and the influence of acculturation on immigrant bodyweight: evidence from a national sample of Australian adults

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Menigoz, Karen; Nathan, Andrea; Turrell, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to examine ethnic differences in body mass index (BMI) and overweight/obesity in Australia and the influence of acculturation on bodyweight among Australian immigrants...

  3. Influence of Sample Storage on the Composition of  Carbonated Beverages by MIR Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Karma Pearce; Julie Culbert; Diane Cass; Daniel Cozzolino; Kerry Wilkinson

    2016-01-01

    It is not uncommon for research and quality control samples, including carbonated beverage samples, to be refrigerated or frozen during peak periods of production and/or sampling, when analytical demand exceeds instrumental capacity. However, the effect of sub‐ambient temperatures on carbonated beverage composition during storage has not been well characterized. Mid‐infrared (MIR) spectroscopy combined with principal component analysis (PCA) and traditional chemical analyses were used to ev...

  4. Reliability of regression-based normative data for the oral symbol digit modalities test: an evaluation of demographic influences, construct validity, and impairment classification rates in multiple sclerosis samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrigan, Lindsay I; Fisk, John D; Walker, Lisa A S; Wojtowicz, Magdalena; Rees, Laura M; Freedman, Mark S; Marrie, Ruth Ann

    2014-01-01

    The oral Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT) has been recommended to assess cognition for multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. However, the lack of adequate normative data has limited its clinical utility. Recently published regression-based norms may resolve this limitation but, because these norms were derived from a relatively small sample, their stability is unclear. We aimed to evaluate the stability of regression-based SDMT norms by comparing existing norms to a cross-validation dataset. First, regression-based normative data were created from a similarly-sized, independent, control sample (n = 94). Next the original and cross-validation norms were compared for equivalency, management of demographic influences, construct validity, and impairment classification rates in a mildly affected MS sample (n = 70). Lastly, similar comparisons were made for a large, representative MS clinic sample (n = 354). We found construct validity and management of demographic influences were equivalent for the two sets of regression-based norms but lower T-scores were obtained using the original dataset, resulting in discrepancies in impairment classification. In conclusion, regression-based norms for the oral SDMT attenuate demographic influences and possess adequate construct validity. However, norms generated using small samples may yield unreliable classification of cognitive impairment. Larger, representative databases will be necessary to improve the clinical utility of regression-based norms.

  5. Influence of soil sampling approaches in the evaluation of soil organic carbon stocks under different land uses in a Mediterranean area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francaviglia, Rosa; Doro, Luca; Ledda, Luigi; Parras-Alcántara, Luis; Lozano-García, Beatriz

    2016-04-01

    (Hc), Pasture (P), Cork oak forest (Cof), former vineyards revegetated by Scrublands (Sfv), Mediterranean Maquis (Mmfv), and Helichrysum meadows (Hmfv). Average total SOCs were 128.0 and 140.6 Mg ha-1with the ESP and SCS approaches respectively if the coarse fraction is not included in the equation, 79.0 and 90.4 Mg ha-1when the coarse fraction is included. This indicates the importance to consider the coarse fraction when estimating SOC stocks, and an overestimation of SOCs when SCS sampling approach is adopted equal to about 16%. References Francaviglia, R., Benedetti, A., Doro, L., Madrau, S., Ledda, S., 2014. Influence of land use on soil quality and stratification ratios under agro-silvo-pastoral Mediterranean management systems. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment 183, 86-92. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), 2003. In: Penman, J., Gytarsky, M., Hiraishi, T., Krug, T., Kruger, D., Pipatti, R., Buendia, L., Miwa, K., Ngara, T., Tanabe, K., Wagner, F. (Eds.), Good Practice Guidance for Land Use, Land Use Change and Forestry. IPCC/OECD/IEA/IGES, Hayama, Japan. IUSS Working Group WRB, 2006.World reference base for soil resources 2006.World Soil Resources Reports No. 103. FAO, Rome. Muñoz-Rojas, M., Doro, L., Ledda, L., Francaviglia, R., 2015. Application of CarboSOIL model to predict the effects of climate change on soil organic carbon stocks in agro-silvo-pastoral Mediterranean management systems. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment 202, 8-16. Parras-Alcántara, L., Lozano-García, B., Brevik, E. C., Cerdá, A., 2015a. Soil organic carbon stocks quanti?cation in Mediterranean natural areas, a trade-off between entire soil pro?les and soil control sections. EGU General Assembly. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 17, 2015-9865. Parras-Alcántara, L., Lozano-García, B., Brevik, E., C., Cerdá, A., 2015b. Soil organic carbon stocks assessment in Mediterranean natural areas: A comparison of entire soil profiles and soil control sections

  6. A Study of genetic and environmental influences on maternal and paternal CBCL syndrome scores in a large sample of 3-year-old Dutch twins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derks, E.M.; Hudziak, J.J.; van Beijsterveldt, C.E.M.; Dolan, C.V.; Boomsma, D.I.

    2004-01-01

    Background. There is increasing evidence that behavioral problems are common in very young children, yet little is known about the etiology of individual differences in these problems. It is unclear to what degree environmental and genetic factors influence the development of early child

  7. The impact of broadleaved woodland on water resources in lowland UK: II. Evaporation estimates from sensible heat flux measurements over beech woodland and grass on chalk sites in Hampshire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Roberts

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact on recharge to the Chalk aquifer of substitution of broadleaved woodland for pasture is a matter of concern in the UK. Hence, measurements of energy balance components were made above beech woodland and above pasture, both growing on shallow soils over chalk in Hampshire. Latent heat flux (evaporation was calculated as the residual from these measurements of energy balances in which sensible heat flux was measured with an eddy correlation instrument that determined fast response vertical wind speeds and associated temperature changes. Assessment of wind turbulence statistics confirmed that the eddy correlation device performed satisfactorily in both wet and dry conditions. There was excellent agreement between forest transpiration measurements made by eddy correlation and stand level tree transpiration measured with sap flow devices. Over the period of the measurements, from March 1999 to late summer 2000, changes in soil water content were small and grassland evaporation and transpiration estimated from energy balance-eddy flux measurements were in excellent agreement with Penman estimates of potential evaporation. Over the 18-month measurement period, the cumulative difference between broadleaved woodland and grassland was small but evaporation from the grassland was 3% higher than that from the woodland. In the springs of 1999 and 2000, evaporation from the grassland was greater than that from the woodland. However, following leaf emergence in the woodland, the difference in cumulative evaporation diminished until the following spring.

  8. Dose-effects relationships in wild populations of the aquatic snail Campeloma decisum at Chalk River Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedig, E. [Colorado State University (United States); Higley, K. [Oregon State University (United States)

    2014-07-01

    In the last decade regulatory bodies worldwide have implemented standards to protect populations of non-human biota (NHB) from the consequences of radiation exposure. This is a departure from previous regulatory frameworks, which were concerned only with protecting man. The implementation of these new standards initiated an ongoing discussion concerning appropriate dose-rate limits for NHB. For the most part, the data utilized for estimating appropriately protective dose-rate limits has come from data collected via the irradiation of NHB in a laboratory setting. While some dose-effects studies have been performed under field conditions, such experiments represent a minority of the available data. This deficit in the literature has resulted in challenges to the established paradigm, with researchers reporting increased radiosensitivity in NHB under field conditions. However, many such studies overlook critical components of dose-effects analysis: lacking either robust ecological technique or dosimetric rigor. The study cited herein provides rigorous analysis of factors affecting populations of aquatic snails and is intended as a framework for identifying those factors statistically indicative of snail population. These benchmarks (e.g., number of snails, mass of individuals) were employed as proxies for snail population health, and how it was impacted by over two dozen environmental variables. Dose-rates were calculated via a novel voxel model, developed for this study to estimate internal dose rates for the species of interest. A linear regression model was employed to tease out the relationship between individual snails, their environment, and radiation dose rate. There was no evidence that snail population health was influenced by radiation exposure (p=0.70) at the observed dose rates. Of the environmental variables tested, water concentration of Ca was well correlated with snail mass size (p<0.001), while water concentration of P was well correlated with the

  9. Occurence of the phthalate esters in soil and street dust samples from the Novi Sad city area, Serbia, and the influence on the children's and adults' exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škrbić, Biljana D; Ji, Yaqin; Đurišić-Mladenović, Nataša; Zhao, Jie

    2016-07-15

    This is the first study reporting the presence of 6 phthalic acid esters (PAEs) in 60 composite soil and street dust samples collected in the urban zone of Novi Sad, the second largest city in Serbia. The results were further used to assess children's and adults' PAEs nondietary daily intakes (DIs) through incidental soil and dust ingestion and/or dermal absorption. The study could be regarded as the important baseline for future monitoring of PAEs in the urban environments, particularly as it contributes to the rare data on PAEs occurence in the street dust. All 6 PAEs were detected in every analyzed soil and street dust samples from 0.0002mgkg(-1) to 4.82mgkg(-1), with the highest level obtained for di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), which was the most dominant PAE (70-96%). The highest total PAEs (Σ6PAEs) contents in soil (2.12mgkg(-1)) and street dust (5.45mgkg(-1)) samples were obtained for the samples from city parks. In all soil samples, Σ6PAEs exceeded the soil sustainable quality limit sets by the relevant Serbian Regulation, but were much lower than the limit requiring remediation measures. Concerning the estimated DIs, children were more susceptible to PAEs intake than adults regardless of the exposure routes. All the estimated DIs values were far below the known reference values. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Variation in the Biochemical Composition of the Edible Seaweed Grateloupia turuturu Yamada Harvested from Two Sampling Sites on the Brittany Coast (France: The Influence of Storage Method on the Extraction of the Seaweed Pigment R-Phycoerythrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilde Munier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have demonstrated that the biochemical content of seaweeds varies according to seasonality in a restricted area. In this study, the influence of sampling site on the biochemical composition of the edible red seaweed Grateloupia turuturu Yamada was investigated, but not its variation over time. Some differences in water-soluble protein ( m dw and  m dw, water-soluble carbohydrate ( m dw and  m dw, and lipid contents ( m dw and  m dw were recorded between the two sites chosen on the Brittany coast (France. The yield of R-phycoerythrin (R-PE contained in the seaweed also varied according to the sampling site ( m dw versus  m dw. In addition, the effect of storage conditions on the preservation of R-PE was studied. The results demonstrated that freezing is the best preservation method in terms of R-PE extraction yield and purity index. In conclusion, this study shows that the sampling site influences the biochemical content of the red seaweed Grateloupia turuturu. Moreover, the extraction yield of R-phycoerythrin and its purity index depend on both the sampling site and the sample storage method.

  11. Influence of Layer Thickness, Raster Angle, Deformation Temperature and Recovery Temperature on the Shape-Memory Effect of 3D-Printed Polylactic Acid Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenzheng; Ye, Wenli; Wu, Zichao; Geng, Peng; Wang, Yulei; Zhao, Ji

    2017-08-19

    The success of the 3D-printing process depends upon the proper selection of process parameters. However, the majority of current related studies focus on the influence of process parameters on the mechanical properties of the parts. The influence of process parameters on the shape-memory effect has been little studied. This study used the orthogonal experimental design method to evaluate the influence of the layer thickness H, raster angle θ, deformation temperature Td and recovery temperature Tr on the shape-recovery ratio Rr and maximum shape-recovery rate Vm of 3D-printed polylactic acid (PLA). The order and contribution of every experimental factor on the target index were determined by range analysis and ANOVA, respectively. The experimental results indicated that the recovery temperature exerted the greatest effect with a variance ratio of 416.10, whereas the layer thickness exerted the smallest effect on the shape-recovery ratio with a variance ratio of 4.902. The recovery temperature exerted the most significant effect on the maximum shape-recovery rate with the highest variance ratio of 1049.50, whereas the raster angle exerted the minimum effect with a variance ratio of 27.163. The results showed that the shape-memory effect of 3D-printed PLA parts depended strongly on recovery temperature, and depended more weakly on the deformation temperature and 3D-printing parameters.

  12. Isotope analytics for the evaluation of the feeding influence on the isotope ratio in beef samples; Isotopenanalytik zur Bestimmung des Einflusses der Ernaehrung auf die Isotopenzusammensetzung in Rinderproben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herwig, Nadine

    2010-11-17

    Information about the origin of food and associated production systems has a high significance for food control. An extremely promising approach to obtain such information is the determination of isotope ratios of different elements. In this study the correlation of the isotope ratios C-13/C-12, N-15/N-14, Mg-25/Mg-24, and Sr-87/Sr-86 in bovine samples (milk and urine) and the corresponding isotope ratios in feed was investigated. It was shown that in the bovine samples all four isotope ratios correlate with the isotope composition of the feed. The isotope ratios of strontium and magnesium have the advantage that they directly reflect the isotope ratios of the ingested feed since there is no isotope fractionation in the bovine organism which is in contrast to the case of carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios. From the present feeding study it is evident, that a feed change leads to a significant change in the delta C-13 values in milk and urine within 10 days already. For the deltaN-15 values the feed change was only visible in the bovine urine after 49 days. Investigations of cows from two different regions (Berlin/Germany and Goestling/Austria) kept at different feeding regimes revealed no differences in the N-15/N-14 and Mg-26/Mg-24 isotope ratios. The strongest correlation between the isotope ratio of the bovine samples and the kind of ingested feed was observed for the carbon isotope ratio. With this ratio even smallest differences in the feed composition were traceable in the bovine samples. Since different regions usually coincide with different feeding regimes, carbon isotope ratios can be used to distinguish bovine samples from different regions if the delta C-13 values of the ingested feed are different. Furthermore, the determination of strontium isotope ratios revealed significant differences between bovine and feed samples of Berlin and Goestling due to the different geologic realities. Hence the carbon and strontium isotope ratios allow the best

  13. The Influence of Sampling Density on Bayesian Age-Depth Models and Paleoclimatic Reconstructions - Lessons Learned from Lake Titicaca - Bolivia/Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salenbien, W.; Baker, P. A.; Fritz, S. C.; Guedron, S.

    2014-12-01

    Lake Titicaca is one of the most important archives of paleoclimate in tropical South America, and prior studies have elucidated patterns of climate variation at varied temporal scales over the past 0.5 Ma. Yet, slow sediment accumulation rates in the main deeper basin of the lake have precluded analysis of the lake's most recent history at high resolution. To obtain a paleoclimate record of the last few millennia at multi-decadal resolution, we obtained five short cores, ranging from 139 to 181 cm in length, from the shallower Wiñaymarka sub-basin of of Lake Titicaca, where sedimentation rates are higher than in the lake's main basin. Selected cores have been analyzed for their geochemical signature by scanning XRF, diatom stratigraphy, sedimentology, and for 14C age dating. A total of 72 samples were 14C-dated using a Gas Ion Source automated high-throughput method for carbonate samples (mainly Littoridina sp. and Taphius montanus gastropod shells) at NOSAMS (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute) with an analytical precision higher than 2%. The method has lower analytical precision compared with traditional AMS radiocarbon dating, but the lower cost enables analysis of a larger number of samples, and the error associated with the lower precision is relatively small for younger samples (resolution radiocarbon analysis reveals complex sedimentation patterns in visually continuous sections, with abundant indicators of bioturbated or reworked sediments and periods of very rapid sediment accumulation. These features are not evident in the sparser sampling strategy but have significant implications for reconstructing past lake level and paleoclimatic history.

  14. The Influence of Religious Coping and Religious Social Support on Health Behaviour, Health Status and Health Attitudes in a British Christian Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Gayle; Robinson, Sarita; Sumra, Altaf; Tatsi, Erini; Gire, Nadeem

    2015-12-01

    Previous research has established a relationship between religion and health. However, the specific aspects of religion which may influence health are not fully understood. The present study investigates the effect of religious social support and religious coping on health behaviours, health status and attitudes to health whilst controlling for age and non-religious social support. The results indicate religious coping and religious social support positively impact on self-reported current health status, depression, health outlook and resistance susceptibility. However, negative religious coping was predictive of increased alcohol consumption. Overall congregational support and negative religious coping had the greatest impact on health.

  15. Balanced sampling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brus, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    In balanced sampling a linear relation between the soil property of interest and one or more covariates with known means is exploited in selecting the sampling locations. Recent developments make this sampling design attractive for statistical soil surveys. This paper introduces balanced sampling

  16. 16S rRNA gene-based profiling of the human infant gut microbiota is strongly influenced by sample processing and PCR primer choice

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Alan W.; Martin, Jennifer C.; Scott, Paul; Parkhill, Julian; Flint, Harry J.; Scott, Karen P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Characterisation of the bacterial composition of the gut microbiota is increasingly carried out with a view to establish the role of different bacterial species in causation or prevention of disease. It is thus essential that the methods used to determine the microbial composition are robust. Here, several widely used molecular techniques were compared to establish the optimal methods to assess the bacterial composition in faecal samples from babies, before weaning. Results The bac...

  17. Monte Carlo model of the penetration depth for polarization gating spectroscopy: influence of illumination-collection geometry and sample optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Andrew J.; Turzhitsky, Vladimir; Ruderman, Sarah; Backman, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    Polarization-gating has been widely used to probe superficial tissue structures, but the penetration depth properties of this method have not been completely elucidated. This study employs a polarization-sensitive Monte Carlo method to characterize the penetration depth statistics of polarization-gating. The analysis demonstrates that the penetration depth depends on both the illumination-collection geometry [illumination-collection area (R) and collection angle (θc)] and on the optical properties of the sample, which include the scattering coefficient (μs), absorption coefficient (μa), anisotropy factor (g), and the type of the phase function. We develop a mathematical expression relating the average penetration depth to the illumination-collection beam properties and optical properties of the medium. Finally, we quantify the sensitivity of the average penetration depth to changes in optical properties for different geometries of illumination and collection. The penetration depth model derived in this study can be applied to optimizing application-specific fiber-optic probes to target a sampling depth of interest with minimal sensitivity to the optical properties of the sample. PMID:22781238

  18. Acute toxicity over Ceriodaphnia silvestrii and Daphnia magna: Bioassays with water samples from a dam under the influence of uranium mine and with manganese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, Carla R.; Nascimento, Heliana de Azevedo Franco do; Silverio, Emilia Gabriela Costa; Bruschi, Armando Luis; Roque, Claudio Vitor; Nascimento, Marcos Roberto L.; Bonifacio, Rodrigo Leandro, E-mail: carlarolimferrari@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: hazevedo@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: emiliagcsilverio@hotmail.com, E-mail: abruschi@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: cvroque@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: pmarcos@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: rodrigo@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (LAPOC/CNEN-MG), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Laboratorio de Pocos de Caldas; Rodgher, Suzelei [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Dep. de Engenharia Ambiental

    2015-07-01

    Treated effluents from uranium mine with acid mine drainage can impact receiving water bodies. AMD is relevant from the environmental view due to the large volume of effluents generated, known to affect aquatic biota. Studies show that one of the main problems of treated effluents released by UTM/INB on the catchment basin of Ribeirao das Antas is associated to high Mn values in water samples. In this context, acute 48-h toxicity tests with Mn were conducted with Ceriodaphnia silvestrii and Daphnia magna to determine the No Observed Effect Concentration (NOEC) and the Observed Effect Concentration (OEC) in laboratory bioassays and to verify the potential toxicity of the Mn in face of concentrations found in water samples from the Antas Dam, which receives treated effluents from UTM/INB. In this study, preliminary results of acute toxicity for C. silvestrii indicated OEC values between 9.0 and 10.0 mg Mn/L and NOEC < 3.0 mg Mn/L. For D. magna, OEC and NOEC concentrations were ≥ 30 mg Mn/L and ≤ 80 mg Mn/L, respectively. It was verified that Mn concentrations determined in environmental samples registered the highest value at 1.75 mg Mn/L, below the OEC concentrations recorded for both species. Since manganese occurs in the composition of the effluent that may contain other stable and radioactive elements, complementary ecotoxicological tests must be conducted, aiming at the assessment of synergistic and antagonistic effects of the chemical mixture that makes up the radioactive effluents that are treated and released at the Antas Dam. Such bioassays are underway in the Radioecology Laboratory at LAPOC/CNEN. (author)

  19. Influence of natural radium contamination of barium chloride on the determination of radium isotopes in the water samples using α/β liquid scintillation spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Chau

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The determination of radium isotopes in drinking water by liquid scintillation technique requires some reagents that are used for separating radium from water samples. One of the main reagents is BaCl2·H2O. This paper presents the study of this compound and shows that barium chloride reagent is naturally contaminated with226Ra. The 226Ra activity concentration in BaCl2·H2O reagent produced by chemical companies from Poland and other countries is equal to a few dozen Bq/kg. Furthermore, 14 mL of 0.10 M BaCl2·H2O solution is the optimum amount which should be used for the chemical procedure. At the optimum amount of barium chloride and 2-hour measurement, the detection limit of 226Ra and 228Ra of the liquid scintillation counting method is equal to 5 and 30 mBq per sample, respectively.

  20. Feeling good in your own skin: the influence of complimentary sexual stereotypes on risky sexual attitudes and behaviors in a community sample of African American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvall, Jamieson L; Oser, Carrie B; Mooney, Jenny; Staton-Tindall, Michele; Havens, Jennifer R; Leukefeld, Carl G

    2013-01-01

    Although negative racial stereotypes may affect the mental and physical health of African Americans, little research has examined the influence of positive or complimentary racial stereotypes on such outcomes. More specifically, this study explored the relationship between African American women's endorsement of complimentary stereotypes about their sexuality and attitudes/behaviors that have been associated with sexual risk. Data were gathered from 206 African American women as part of the Black Women in the Study of Epidemics project. Multivariate regression models were used to examine associations between women's endorsement of complimentary stereotypes about their sexuality and selected sex-related attitudes and behaviors. Participants' endorsement of complimentary sexual stereotypes was significantly positively associated with beliefs that having sex without protection would strengthen their relationship (B = .28, SE = .10, p stereotypes and the number of casual sexual partners women reported in the past year (B = .29, SE = .15, p = .05) as well as their willingness to have sex in exchange for money or drugs during that time (B = .78, OR = 2.18, p stereotypes by African American women can lead to increased risk behavior, particularly relating to possible infection with HIV or other sexually transmitted infections.

  1. 16S rRNA gene-based profiling of the human infant gut microbiota is strongly influenced by sample processing and PCR primer choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Alan W; Martin, Jennifer C; Scott, Paul; Parkhill, Julian; Flint, Harry J; Scott, Karen P

    2015-01-01

    Characterisation of the bacterial composition of the gut microbiota is increasingly carried out with a view to establish the role of different bacterial species in causation or prevention of disease. It is thus essential that the methods used to determine the microbial composition are robust. Here, several widely used molecular techniques were compared to establish the optimal methods to assess the bacterial composition in faecal samples from babies, before weaning. The bacterial community profile detected in the faeces of infants is highly dependent on the methodology used. Bifidobacteria were the most abundant bacteria detected at 6 weeks in faeces from two initially breast-fed babies using fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH), in agreement with data from previous culture-based studies. Using the 16S rRNA gene sequencing approach, however, we found that the detection of bifidobacteria in particular crucially depended on the optimisation of the DNA extraction method, and the choice of primers used to amplify the V1-V3 regions of 16S rRNA genes prior to subsequent sequence analysis. Bifidobacteria were only well represented among amplified 16S rRNA gene sequences when mechanical disruption (bead-beating) procedures for DNA extraction were employed together with optimised "universal" PCR primers. These primers incorporate degenerate bases at positions where mismatches to bifidobacteria and other bacterial taxa occur. The use of a DNA extraction kit with no bead-beating step resulted in a complete absence of bifidobacteria in the sequence data, even when using the optimised primers. This work emphasises the importance of sample processing methodology to downstream sequencing results and illustrates the value of employing multiple approaches for determining microbiota composition.

  2. The influence of mental illness and criminality self-stigmas and racial self-concept on outcomes in a forensic psychiatric sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Michelle L; Vayshenker, Beth; Rotter, Merrill; Yanos, Philip T

    2015-06-01

    Research has increasingly explored mental illness self-stigma: when people with mental illness believe that society's negative beliefs are true of them. Self-stigma predicts poorer functional and treatment outcomes. Stigma research has typically investigated the impact of a single stigma on people, without considering the potential effects of multiple stigmatizing labels. People with mental illness and a history of criminal conviction, however, may experience multiple stigmas related to mental illness and criminal history. This study investigated the impact of the combination of multiple stigmatized identities on self-esteem, depression, therapeutic alliance, and treatment adherence in a forensic psychiatric sample. It extended previous research on mental illness self-stigma to a forensic psychiatric sample. Participants (N = 82) were people with mental illness and a history of criminal conviction recruited from their treatment sites. Participants completed self-report questionnaires focused on mental illness and criminality self-stigma, racial self- concept, self-esteem, depression, working alliance, and medication/psychosocial treatment adherence. Researchers confirmed demographics through a chart review and treatment adherence from participants' clinicians. Multiple regression analyses examined the relationship between self-stigma and outcome variables. Mental illness self-stigma, racial self-concept, and to a lesser extent criminality self-stigma were associated with reduced self-esteem (p ≤ .05) and medication adherence (p ≤ .05). Criminality self-stigma also appeared to magnify the effects of racial and mental illness self-stigma on outcomes. This study shows that self-stigma related to involvement in the criminal justice system may further contribute to the impact of mental illness self-stigma on important outcomes. Future research and interventions may tailor self-stigma interventions to a forensic psychiatric population. (c) 2015 APA, all rights

  3. Sample dilution and bacterial community composition influence empirical leucine-to-carbon conversion factors in surface waters of the world's oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teira, Eva; Hernando-Morales, Víctor; Cornejo-Castillo, Francisco M; Alonso-Sáez, Laura; Sarmento, Hugo; Valencia-Vila, Joaquín; Serrano Catalá, Teresa; Hernández-Ruiz, Marta; Varela, Marta M; Ferrera, Isabel; Gutiérrez Morán, Xosé Anxelu; Gasol, Josep M

    2015-12-01

    The transformation of leucine incorporation rates to prokaryotic carbon production rates requires the use of either theoretical or empirically determined conversion factors. Empirical leucine-to-carbon conversion factors (eCFs) vary widely across environments, and little is known about their potential controlling factors. We conducted 10 surface seawater manipulation experiments across the world's oceans, where the growth of the natural prokaryotic assemblages was promoted by filtration (i.e., removal of grazers [F treatment]) or filtration combined with dilution (i.e., also relieving resource competition [FD treatment]). The impact of sunlight exposure was also evaluated in the FD treatments, and we did not find a significant effect on the eCFs. The eCFs varied from 0.09 to 1.47 kg C mol Leu(-1) and were significantly lower in the FD than in the F samples. Also, changes in bacterial community composition during the incubations, as assessed by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA), were more pronounced in the FD than in the F treatments, compared to unmanipulated controls. Thus, we discourage the common procedure of diluting samples (in addition to filtration) for eCF determination. The eCFs in the filtered treatment were negatively correlated with the initial chlorophyll a concentration, picocyanobacterial abundance (mostly Prochlorococcus), and the percentage of heterotrophic prokaryotes with high nucleic acid content (%HNA). The latter two variables explained 80% of the eCF variability in the F treatment, supporting the view that both Prochlorococcus and HNA prokaryotes incorporate leucine in substantial amounts, although this results in relatively low carbon production rates in the oligotrophic ocean. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Sample Dilution and Bacterial Community Composition Influence Empirical Leucine-to-Carbon Conversion Factors in Surface Waters of the World's Oceans

    KAUST Repository

    Teira, Eva

    2015-09-25

    The transformation of leucine incorporation rates to prokaryotic carbon production rates requires the use of either theoretical or empirically determined conversion factors. Empirical leucine-to-carbon conversion factors (eCFs) vary widely across environments, and little is known about their potential controlling factors. We conducted 10 surface seawater manipulation experiments across the world\\'s oceans, where the growth of the natural prokaryotic assemblages was promoted by filtration (i.e., removal of grazers [F treatment]) or filtration combined with dilution (i.e., also relieving resource competition [FD treatment]). The impact of sunlight exposure was also evaluated in the FD treatments, and we did not find a significant effect on the eCFs. The eCFs varied from 0.09 to 1.47 kg C mol Leu−1 and were significantly lower in the FD than in the F samples. Also, changes in bacterial community composition during the incubations, as assessed by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA), were more pronounced in the FD than in the F treatments, compared to unmanipulated controls. Thus, we discourage the common procedure of diluting samples (in addition to filtration) for eCF determination. The eCFs in the filtered treatment were negatively correlated with the initial chlorophyll a concentration, picocyanobacterial abundance (mostly Prochlorococcus), and the percentage of heterotrophic prokaryotes with high nucleic acid content (%HNA). The latter two variables explained 80% of the eCF variability in the F treatment, supporting the view that both Prochlorococcus and HNA prokaryotes incorporate leucine in substantial amounts, although this results in relatively low carbon production rates in the oligotrophic ocean.

  5. Biodegradation potential of MTBE in a fractured chalk aquifer under aerobic conditions in long-term uncontaminated and contaminated aquifer microcosms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nadeem W.; Thornton, Steven F.; Bottrell, Simon H.; Spence, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The potential for aerobic biodegradation of MTBE in a fractured chalk aquifer is assessed in microcosm experiments over 450 days, under in situ conditions for a groundwater temperature of 10 °C, MTBE concentration between 0.1 and 1.0 mg/L and dissolved O 2 concentration between 2 and 10 mg/L. Following a lag period of up to 120 days, MTBE was biodegraded in uncontaminated aquifer microcosms at concentrations up to 1.2 mg/L, demonstrating that the aquifer has an intrinsic potential to biodegrade MTBE aerobically. The MTBE biodegradation rate increased three-fold from a mean of 6.6 ± 1.6 μg/L/day in uncontaminated aquifer microcosms for subsequent additions of MTBE, suggesting an increasing biodegradation capability, due to microbial cell growth and increased biomass after repeated exposure to MTBE. In contaminated aquifer microcosms which also contained TAME, MTBE biodegradation occurred after a shorter lag of 15 or 33 days and MTBE biodegradation rates were higher (max. 27.5 μg/L/day), probably resulting from an acclimated microbial population due to previous exposure to MTBE in situ. The initial MTBE concentration did not affect the lag period but the biodegradation rate increased with the initial MTBE concentration, indicating that there was no inhibition of MTBE biodegradation related to MTBE concentration up to 1.2 mg/L. No minimum substrate concentration for MTBE biodegradation was observed, indicating that in the presence of dissolved O 2 (and absence of inhibitory factors) MTBE biodegradation would occur in the aquifer at MTBE concentrations (ca. 0.1 mg/L) found at the front of the ether oxygenate plume. MTBE biodegradation occurred with concomitant O 2 consumption but no other electron acceptor utilisation, indicating biodegradation by aerobic processes only. However, O 2 consumption was less than the stoichiometric requirement for complete MTBE mineralization, suggesting that only partial biodegradation of MTBE to intermediate organic metabolites

  6. Influence of Sampling Season and Sampling Protocol on Detection of Legionella Pneumophila Contamination in Hot Water / Paraugu Ņemšanas Sezonalitātes Un Paraugu Ņemšanas Metodes Ietekme Uz Legionella Pneumophila Kontaminācijas Noteikšanu Karstajš Ūdenī

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pūle Daina

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is an environmental pathogen of engineered water systems that can cause different forms of legionellosis - from mild fever to potentially lethal pneumonia. Low concentrations of legionellae in natural habitats can increase markedly in engineered hot water systems where water temperatures are below 55 °C. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the influence of sampling season, hot water temperature and sampling protocol on occurrence of L. pneumophila. A total of 120 hot water samples from 20 apartment buildings were collected in two sampling periods - winter 2014 (n = 60 and summer 2015 (n = 60. Significantly higher occurrence of L. pneumophila was observed in summer 2015. Significant differences in temperature for negative and positive samples were not observed, which can be explained by low water temperatures at the point of water consumption. Temperature above 55 °C was observed only once, for all other sampling events it ranged from 14 °C to 53 °C.

  7. Area balance and strain in an extensional fault system: Strategies for improved oil recovery in fractured chalk, Gilbertown Field, southwestern Alabama -- Year 2. Annual report, March 1997--March 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashin, J.C.; Raymond, D.E.; Rindsberg, A.K.; Alabi, G.G.; Carroll, R.E.

    1998-09-01

    Gilbertown Field is the oldest oil field in Alabama and has produced oil from fractured chalk of the Cretaceous Selma Group and glauconitic sandstone of the Eutaw Formation. Nearly all of Gilbertown Field is still in primary recovery, although waterflooding has been attempted locally. The objective of this project is to analyze the geologic structure and burial history of Mesozoic and Tertiary strata in Gilbertown Field and adjacent areas in order to suggest ways in which oil recovery can be improved. Indeed, the decline of oil production to marginally economic levels in recent years has made this type of analysis timely and practical. Key technical advancements being sought include understanding the relationship of requisite strain to production in Gilbertown reservoirs, incorporation of synsedimentary growth factors into models of area balance, quantification of the relationship between requisite strain and bed curvature, determination of the timing of hydrocarbon generation, and identification of the avenues and mechanisms of fluid transport.

  8. INFLUENCE OF VARIATIONS OF THE CONDUCTIVITY OF UPPER LAYER OF TWO-LAYER SAMPLE ON OF PHASE INTRODUCED ELECTROMOTIVE FORCE OF SUPERIMPOSED TRANSDUCER OF EDDY CURRENT THICKNESS METER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Chernyshev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In carrying out eddy current thickness measurement of two-layer conductive objects one from the interfering factors is the presence of variations in the value of the electrical conductivity of the material of the upper layer (coating when moving from point to point on the surface of object of control or when passing from one object of control to another. The aim of this work is to evaluate the accuracy of determining the thickness of the conductive coating disposed on a conducting ferromagnetic basis, using the phase method of eddy current testing. The reason of the error is variation of the electrical conductivity of the material of coating.Determination of the error is based on calculations using known analytical expressions for the loop with current of sinusoidal form arranged over the infinite half space with a covering as a thin layer. Selected in calculating electromagnetic parameters of coating and substrate approximately correspond to the case -chromium layer on a nickel base. Calculations are performed for different frequencies of current passed through coil.It is shown that at reduction of frequency of the current passes through the coil the error is reduced. The value of the lowest possible operating frequency of the excitation current is determined by the condition of absence influence on the phase introduced into the superimposed transducer emf variations in the thickness of the basis.To reduce the indicated error it is proposed to determine, on the basis of phase method at a relatively high frequency transducer current excitation, conductivity of the material of coating. After this, at a low frequency excitation current and using phase method, the coating thickness is determined, taking into consideration the previously determined value of the conductivity of coating. Also discussed ways to improve the accuracy of phase measurements in the MHz region of the excitation current frequency. 

  9. Childhood trauma and personal mastery: their influence on emotional reactivity to everyday events in a community sample of middle-aged adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infurna, Frank J; Rivers, Crystal T; Reich, John; Zautra, Alex J

    2015-01-01

    Childhood trauma is associated with premature declines in health in midlife and old age. Pathways that have been implicated, but less studied include social-emotional regulation, biological programming, and habitual patterns of thought and action. In this study we focused on childhood trauma's influence via alterations in social-emotional regulation to everyday life events, a pathway that has been linked to subsequent health effects. Data from a 30-day daily diary of community residents who participated in a study of resilience in Midlife (n = 191, Mage = 54, SD = 7.50, 54% women) was used to examine whether self-reports of childhood trauma were associated with daily well-being, as well as reported and emotional reactivity to daily negative and positive events. Childhood trauma reports were associated with reporting lower overall levels of and greater variability in daily well-being. Childhood trauma was linked to greater reports of daily negative events, but not to positive events. Focusing on emotional reactivity to daily events, residents who reported higher levels of childhood trauma showed stronger decreases in well-being when experiencing negative events and also stronger increases in well-being with positive events. For those reporting childhood trauma, higher levels of mastery were associated with stronger decreases in well-being with negative events and stronger increases in well-being with positive events, suggesting that mastery increases sensitivity to daily negative and positive events. Our results suggest that childhood trauma may lead to poorer health in midlife through disturbances in the patterns of everyday life events and responses to those events. Further, our findings indicate that mastery may have a different meaning for those who experienced childhood trauma. We discuss social-emotional regulation as one pathway linking childhood trauma to health, and psychosocial resources to consider when building resilience-promoting interventions for

  10. Childhood trauma and personal mastery: their influence on emotional reactivity to everyday events in a community sample of middle-aged adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank J Infurna

    Full Text Available Childhood trauma is associated with premature declines in health in midlife and old age. Pathways that have been implicated, but less studied include social-emotional regulation, biological programming, and habitual patterns of thought and action. In this study we focused on childhood trauma's influence via alterations in social-emotional regulation to everyday life events, a pathway that has been linked to subsequent health effects. Data from a 30-day daily diary of community residents who participated in a study of resilience in Midlife (n = 191, Mage = 54, SD = 7.50, 54% women was used to examine whether self-reports of childhood trauma were associated with daily well-being, as well as reported and emotional reactivity to daily negative and positive events. Childhood trauma reports were associated with reporting lower overall levels of and greater variability in daily well-being. Childhood trauma was linked to greater reports of daily negative events, but not to positive events. Focusing on emotional reactivity to daily events, residents who reported higher levels of childhood trauma showed stronger decreases in well-being when experiencing negative events and also stronger increases in well-being with positive events. For those reporting childhood trauma, higher levels of mastery were associated with stronger decreases in well-being with negative events and stronger increases in well-being with positive events, suggesting that mastery increases sensitivity to daily negative and positive events. Our results suggest that childhood trauma may lead to poorer health in midlife through disturbances in the patterns of everyday life events and responses to those events. Further, our findings indicate that mastery may have a different meaning for those who experienced childhood trauma. We discuss social-emotional regulation as one pathway linking childhood trauma to health, and psychosocial resources to consider when building resilience

  11. Influence of cigarette smoking on coronary artery and aortic calcium among random samples from populations of middle-age Japanese and Korean men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirooka, Nobutaka; Kadowaki, Takashi; Sekikawa, Akira; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Choo, Jina; Miura, Katsuyuki; Okamura, Tomonori; Fujiyoshi, Akira; Kadowaki, Sayaka; Kadota, Aya; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Masaki, Kamal; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Kuller, Lewis H.; Curb, J. David; Shin, Chol

    2012-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking is a risk factor of coronary heart disease (CHD). Vascular calcification such as coronary artery calcium (CAC) and aortic calcium (AC) is associated with CHD. We hypothesized that cigarette smoking is associated with coronary artery and aortic calcifications in Japanese and Koreans with high smoking prevalence. Methods Random samples from populations of 313 Japanese and 302 Korean men aged 40 to 49 were examined for calcification of the coronary artery and aorta using electron beam computed tomography. Coronary artery calcium (CAC) and aortic calcium (AC) were quantified using the Agatston score. We examined the associations of cigarette smoking with CAC and AC after adjusting for conventional risk factors and alcohol consumption. Current and past smokers were combined and categorized into two groups using median pack-years as a cutoff point in each of Japanese and Koreans. The never smoker group was used as a reference for the multiple logistic regression analyses. Results The odds ratios of CAC (score ≥10) for smokers with higher pack-years were 2.9 in Japanese (PKoreans (non-significant) compared to never smokers. The odds ratios of AC (score ≥100) for smokers with higher pack-years were 10.4 in Japanese (PKoreans (Psmoking with higher pack-years is significantly associated with CAC and AC in Japanese men, while cigarette smoking with higher pack-years is significantly associated with AC but not significantly with CAC in Korean men. PMID:22844083

  12. Influence of cigarette smoking on coronary artery and aortic calcium among random samples from populations of middle-aged Japanese and Korean men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirooka, Nobutaka; Kadowaki, Takashi; Sekikawa, Akira; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Choo, Jina; Miura, Katsuyuki; Okamura, Tomonori; Fujiyoshi, Akira; Kadowaki, Sayaka; Kadota, Aya; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Masaki, Kamal; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Kuller, Lewis H; Curb, J David; Shin, Chol

    2013-02-01

    Cigarette smoking is a risk factor of coronary heart disease. Vascular calcification such as coronary artery calcium (CAC) and aortic calcium (AC) is associated with coronary heart disease. The authors hypothesised that cigarette smoking is associated with coronary artery and aortic calcifications in Japanese and Koreans with high smoking prevalence. Random samples from populations of 313 Japanese and 302 Korean men aged 40-49 years were examined for calcification of the coronary artery and aorta using electron beam CT. CAC and AC were quantified using the Agatston score. The authors examined the associations of cigarette smoking with CAC and AC after adjusting for conventional risk factors and alcohol consumption. Current and past smokers were combined and categorised into two groups using median pack-years as a cut-off point in each of Japanese and Koreans. The never-smoker group was used as a reference for the multiple logistic regression analyses. The ORs of CAC (score ≥10) for smokers with higher pack-years were 2.9 in Japanese (pKoreans (non-significant) compared with never-smokers. The ORs of AC (score ≥100) for smokers with higher pack-years were 10.4 in Japanese (pKoreans (psmoking with higher pack-years is significantly associated with CAC and AC in Japanese men, while cigarette smoking with higher pack-years is significantly associated with AC but not significantly with CAC in Korean men.

  13. PTSD, social anxiety disorder, and trauma: An examination of the influence of trauma type on comorbidity using a nationally representative sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Katherine A; Asmundson, Gordon J G

    2016-12-30

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and social anxiety disorder (SAD) are highly comorbid (Collimore et al., 2010). Trauma may present a shared environmental factor contributing to the development of comorbidity; however, existent research has been hampered by use of restrictive samples and limitations in the range of traumas investigated. The current study examines the relationship between a broad range of potentially traumatic events and the comorbidity between PTSD and SAD using Wave 2 of the National Epidemiological Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions (n=34,653). Multiple logistic regressions and cross-tabulations were used to evaluate differences in the prevalence of potentially traumatic events among those who met criteria for comorbid PTSD-SAD compared to those with PTSD without SAD and SAD without PTSD. Those in the comorbid PTSD-SAD group were significantly more likely than those in the PTSD without SAD or SAD without PTSD groups to report experiencing specific types of assaultive violence, childhood maltreatment, and other shocking events. Associations between comorbidity and childhood maltreatment were significant for females only. Individuals diagnosed with comorbid PTSD-SAD are more likely than those diagnosed with either disorder alone to report exposure to specific types of traumatic events within their lifetime. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Towards diffractive imaging with single pulses of FEL radiation. Dynamics within irradiatied samples and their influence on the analysis of imaging data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Fenglin

    2010-08-15

    3D single particle coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) of bioparticles (such as proteins, macromolecules and viruses) is one of the main possible applications of the new generation of light sources: free-electron lasers (FELs), which are now available at FLASH (Hamburg, Germany) and LCLS (Stanford, U.S.A.). The extremely bright and ultrashort FEL pulses potentially enable CDI to achieve high resolution down to subnanometer length scale. However, intense FEL pulses cause serious radiation damage in bioparticles, even during single shots, which may set the resolution limits for CDI with FELs. Currently, since the signal-to-noise ratio is very low for small biological particles, direct experimental study of radiation damage in the single particle imaging is fairly difficult. Single atomic (noble gas) clusters become good objects to reveal effects of radiation damage processes on CDI with FEL radiation. This thesis studies three aspects of the radiation damage problem, which are treated in three independent chapters: (1) Molecular Dynamics simulations to quantitively describe radiation damage processes within irradiated atomic clusters during single pulses; (2) reconstruction analysis of single-shot CDI diffraction patterns of atomic clusters, which may potentially help to understand the radiation damage occurring in biological samples; and (3) testing the effects of coating water layers in CDI, which is supposed to minimize the radiation damage in irradiated bioparticles. (orig.)

  15. Ethnic differences in overweight and obesity and the influence of acculturation on immigrant bodyweight: evidence from a national sample of Australian adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Menigoz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite growing international migration and documented ethnic differences in overweight and obesity in developed countries, no research has described the epidemiology of immigrant overweight and obesity at a national level in Australia, a country where immigrants comprise 28.1 % of the population. The aim of this study was to examine ethnic differences in body mass index (BMI and overweight/obesity in Australia and the influence of acculturation on bodyweight among Australian immigrants. Methods Data from the national Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA survey were used to examine mean BMI and odds of overweight/obesity comparing immigrants (n = 2 997 with Australian born (n = 13 047. Among immigrants, acculturation differences were examined by length of residence in Australia and age at migration. Data were modelled in a staged approach using multilevel linear and logistic regression, controlling for demographic and socioeconomic variables. Results Relative to Australian born, men from North Africa/Middle East and Oceania regions had significantly higher BMIs, and men from North West Europe, North East Asia and Southern and Central Asia had significantly lower BMIs. Among women, the majority of foreign born groups had significantly lower BMIs compared with Australian born. Male and female immigrants living in Australia for 15 years or more had significantly higher BMIs and increased odds of being overweight/obese respectively, compared with immigrants living in Australia for less than 5 years. Male immigrants arriving as adolescents were twice more likely to be overweight/obese and had significantly higher BMIs than immigrants who arrived as adults. Male and female immigrants who arrived as children (≤11 years had significantly higher odds of adult overweight/obesity and BMIs. Conclusions This study provides evidence of ethnic differences in overweight and obesity in Australia with male

  16. Regular drinking may strengthen the beneficial influence of social support on depression: Findings from a representative Israeli sample during a period of war and terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Jeremy C.; Rapaport, Carmit; Zalta, Alyson K.; Canetti, Daphna; Hobfoll, Stevan E.; Hall, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Social support is consistently associated with reduced risk of depression. Few studies have investigated how this relationship may be modified by alcohol use, the effects of which may be particularly relevant in traumatized populations in which rates of alcohol use are known to be high. Methods In 2008 a representative sample of 1622 Jewish and Palestinian citizens in Israel were interviewed by phone at two time points during a period of ongoing terrorism and war threat. Two multivariable mixed effects regression models were estimated to measure the longitudinal association of social support from family and friends on depression symptoms. Three-way interaction terms between social support, alcohol use and time were entered into the models to test for effect modification. Results Findings indicated that increased family social support was associated with less depression symptomatology (p=<.01); this relationship was modified by alcohol use and time (p=<.01). Social support from friends was also associated with fewer depression symptoms (p=<.01) and this relationship was modified by alcohol use and time as well (p=<.01). Stratified analyses in both models revealed that the effect of social support was stronger for those who drank alcohol regularly than those who did not drink or drank rarely. Conclusions These findings suggest that social support is a more important protective factor for depression among regular drinkers than among those who do not drink or drink rarely in the context of political violence. Additional research is warranted to determine whether these findings are stable in other populations and settings. PMID:24838033

  17. Regular drinking may strengthen the beneficial influence of social support on depression: findings from a representative Israeli sample during a period of war and terrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Jeremy C; Rapaport, Carmit; Zalta, Alyson K; Canetti, Daphna; Hobfoll, Stevan E; Hall, Brian J

    2014-07-01

    Social support is consistently associated with reduced risk of depression. Few studies have investigated how this relationship may be modified by alcohol use, the effects of which may be particularly relevant in traumatized populations in which rates of alcohol use are known to be high. In 2008 a representative sample of 1622 Jewish and Palestinian citizens in Israel were interviewed by phone at two time points during a period of ongoing terrorism and war threat. Two multivariable mixed effects regression models were estimated to measure the longitudinal association of social support from family and friends on depression symptoms. Three-way interaction terms between social support, alcohol use and time were entered into the models to test for effect modification. Findings indicated that increased family social support was associated with less depression symptomatology (p=<.01); this relationship was modified by alcohol use and time (p=<.01). Social support from friends was also associated with fewer depression symptoms (p=<.01) and this relationship was modified by alcohol use and time as well (p=<.01). Stratified analyses in both models revealed that the effect of social support was stronger for those who drank alcohol regularly than those who did not drink or drank rarely. These findings suggest that social support is a more important protective factor for depression among regular drinkers than among those who do not drink or drink rarely in the context of political violence. Additional research is warranted to determine whether these findings are stable in other populations and settings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. ABCB1 gene variants influence tolerance to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in a large sample of Dutch cases with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Klerk, O L; Nolte, I M; Bet, P M; Bosker, F J; Snieder, H; den Boer, J A; Bruggeman, R; Hoogendijk, W J; Penninx, B W

    2013-08-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an ATP-driven efflux pump in the blood-brain barrier, has a major impact on the delivery of antidepressant drugs in the brain. Genetic variants in the gene ABCB1 encoding for P-gp have inconsistently been associated with adverse effects. In order to resolve these inconsistencies, we conducted a study in a large cohort of patients with major depressive disorder with the aim to unravel the association of ABCB1 variants with adverse effects of antidepressants and in particular with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which display affinity as substrate for P-gp. The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) study was used as a clinical sample. For 424 patients data were available on drug use, side effects. We selected six ABCB1 gene variants (1236T>C, 2677G>T/A, 3435T>C, rs2032583, rs2235040 and rs2235015) and analyzed them for association with adverse drug effects using multinomial regression analysis for both single variants and haplotypes. We found a significant association between the number of SSRI-related adverse drug effects and rs2032583 (P=0.001), rs2235040 (P=0.002) and a haplotype (P=0.002). Moreover, serotonergic effects (sleeplessness, gastrointestinal complaints and sexual effects) were significantly predicted by these variants and haplotype (P=0.002/0.003). We conclude that adverse drug effects with SSRI treatment, in particular serotonergic effects, are predicted by two common polymorphisms of the ABCB1 gene.

  19. Influences of behavior and academic problems at school entry on marijuana use transitions during adolescence in an African-American sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboussin, Beth A; Ialongo, Nicholas S; Green, Kerry M

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine how patterns of academic and behavior problems in the first grade relate to longitudinal transitions in marijuana use from middle school through entry into high school among African-Americans. Latent class and latent transition analyses were conducted on a community sample of 458 low-income, urban-dwelling African-Americans. Two behavior problem classes emerged at school entry; externalizing and attention/concentration. Academic problems co-occurred with both problem behavior classes although more strongly with attention/concentration. Youth in the attention/ concentration problem class were more likely to transition from no marijuana involvement to use and problems beginning in the 7th grade and to use and problems given the opportunity to use marijuana early in high school compared to youth with no problems. Youth in the externalizing behavior problem class were significantly more likely to transition from no involvement to having a marijuana opportunity during the transition to high school compared to youth in the attention/concentration problems class. These findings highlight the importance of developing prevention programs and providing school services that address the co-occurrence of academic and behavior problems, as well as their subtype specific risks for marijuana involvement, particularly for low-income minority youth who may be entering school less ready than their non-minority peers. These findings also provide evidence for a need to continue to deliver interventions in middle school and high school focused on factors that may protect youth during these critical transition periods when they may be especially vulnerable to opportunities to use marijuana based on their academic and behavioral risk profiles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Language sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkhoff, Jan; Bakker, Dik

    1998-01-01

    This article has two aims: [1] to present a revised version of the sampling method that was originally proposed in 1993 by Rijkhoff, Bakker, Hengeveld and Kahrel, and [2] to discuss a number of other approaches to language sampling in the light of our own method. We will also demonstrate how our...... sampling method is used with different genetic classifications (Voegelin & Voegelin 1977, Ruhlen 1987, Grimes ed. 1997) and argue that —on the whole— our sampling technique compares favourably with other methods, especially in the case of exploratory research....

  1. Venous Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neck to help locate abnormally functioning glands or pituitary adenoma . This test is most often used after an unsuccessful neck exploration. Inferior petrosal sinus sampling , in which blood samples are taken from veins that drain the pituitary gland to study disorders related to pituitary hormone ...

  2. Sampling Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolph, Karen E.; Robinson, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    Research in developmental psychology requires sampling at different time points. Accurate depictions of developmental change provide a foundation for further empirical studies and theories about developmental mechanisms. However, overreliance on widely spaced sampling intervals in cross-sectional and longitudinal designs threatens the validity of…

  3. Language sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkhoff, Jan; Bakker, Dik

    1998-01-01

    This article has two aims: [1] to present a revised version of the sampling method that was originally proposed in 1993 by Rijkhoff, Bakker, Hengeveld and Kahrel, and [2] to discuss a number of other approaches to language sampling in the light of our own method. We will also demonstrate how our...

  4. Environmental sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puckett, J.M.

    1998-12-31

    Environmental Sampling (ES) is a technology option that can have application in transparency in nuclear nonproliferation. The basic process is to take a sample from the environment, e.g., soil, water, vegetation, or dust and debris from a surface, and through very careful sample preparation and analysis, determine the types, elemental concentration, and isotopic composition of actinides in the sample. The sample is prepared and the analysis performed in a clean chemistry laboratory (CCL). This ES capability is part of the IAEA Strengthened Safeguards System. Such a Laboratory is planned to be built by JAERI at Tokai and will give Japan an intrinsic ES capability. This paper presents options for the use of ES as a transparency measure for nuclear nonproliferation.

  5. Elevating sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labuz, Joseph M.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2014-01-01

    Sampling – the process of collecting, preparing, and introducing an appropriate volume element (voxel) into a system – is often under appreciated and pushed behind the scenes in lab-on-a-chip research. What often stands in the way between proof-of-principle demonstrations of potentially exciting technology and its broader dissemination and actual use, however, is the effectiveness of sample collection and preparation. The power of micro- and nanofluidics to improve reactions, sensing, separation, and cell culture cannot be accessed if sampling is not equally efficient and reliable. This perspective will highlight recent successes as well as assess current challenges and opportunities in this area. PMID:24781100

  6. La muestra de empresas en los modelos de predicción del fracaso: influencia en los resultados de clasificación || The Sample of Firms in Business Failure Prediction Models: Influence on Classification Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Gallego, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este artículo es la obtención de sendos modelos de predicción del fracaso empresarial en una muestra emparejada y otra aleatoria de pequeñas y medianas empresas con domicilio en Castilla y León (España, a fin de determinar si el poder predictivo de los modelos elaborados está afectado por el método utilizado para seleccionar la muestra objeto de cada estudio. Para ello, consideramos como variables independientes un conjunto de ratios financieros, que reducimos a partir de la aplicación previa de un análisis de componentes principales. Mediante regresión logística, identificamos los factores que mejor predicen el fracaso en ambas muestras, observándose diferencias no solo en las variables significativas, sino también en los resultados de clasificación, lo que conforma la influencia del método de muestreo en los modelos. || This paper focuses on the development of both failure prediction models on a paired sample and a random sample of small and medium-sized firms with head offices located in the region of Castilla y León (Spain, in order to prove if the predictive power of the developed models is affected by the method used to derive the sample aim of each study. To estimate both models, we consider a set of financial ratios as independent variables in each one, which is first reduced by the application of a principal components analysis. Next, a logistic regression analysis is applied to identify those variables that best explain and predict failure in the two samples, where differences in the significant variables and the classification results are observed, which confirms the influence of the sampling method on the business failure prediction results.

  7. Sample inhomogeneity in PIXE analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajfosz, J.; Szymczyk, S.; Kornaś, G.

    1984-04-01

    The influence of sample inhomogeneity on the precision of analytical results obtained by PIXE was investigated. A simple method for the determination of sample inhomogeneity is proposed and its applicability is shown on a series of examples. Differences in the distribution of individual elements in samples were observed.

  8. Elaboration of an Elasto-Plastic Model for High Porosity Chalks. Application to the Compaction of Petroleum Reservoirs Elaboration d'un modèle de comportement élasto-plastique pour les craies très poreuses. Application à la compaction des réservoirs pétroliers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrour I.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of the compaction of petroleum reservoirs applied to very porous carbonate rocks such as chalk. In production estimates made in reservoir engineering, the processing of the mechanical problem is often greatly simplified. Good modelling of how materials behave gives special consideration to the influence of mechanical deformations on fluid recovery. After an analysis of the mechanical behaviour of very porous chalks, an elastoplastic behaviour model is derived so as to reproduce the principal experimental observations. This behaviour model can then be used to perform local simulations of the mechanical behaviour of a reservoir under- going depletion and thus to demonstrate the importance of the stress path and the initial stress state on the deformation of materials and hence on the recovery rate. Dans les applications pétrolières, les études de la compaction des roches réservoirs interviennent dans l'estimation des quantités de fluide récupérables et de la subsidence induite par la déplétion du champ de production. Dans la première partie du travail, nous montrons qu'à partir de l'équation linéarisée de la conservation de la masse de fluide, il est possible d'exprimer un taux de récupération distinguant les contributions respectives du fluide et de la roche. En ingénierie de réservoirs, l'hypothèse d'un chemin de contrainte prépondérant dans le milieu de production permet d'exprimer la contribution de la déformation de la roche au moyen de la compressibilité volumique des pores selon ce chemin. Le taux de récupération obtenu est alors dépendant du chemin de contrainte. Lorsque le chemin de contrainte dans le réservoir n'est pas homogène, il est alors nécessaire de connaître la loi de comportement mécanique du matériau étudié. Dans le cas des carbonates très poreux, nous désirons montrer l'influence liée au choix du chemin de contrainte sur les estimations obtenues par une m

  9. 3D synchrotron x-ray microtomography of paint samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ester S. B.; Boon, Jaap J.; van der Horst, Jerre; Scherrer, Nadim C.; Marone, Federica; Stampanoni, Marco

    2009-07-01

    Synchrotron based X-ray microtomography is a novel way to examine paint samples. The three dimensional distribution of pigment particles, binding media and their deterioration products as well as other features such as voids, are made visible in their original context through a computing environment without the need of physical sectioning. This avoids manipulation related artefacts. Experiments on paint chips (approximately 500 micron wide) were done on the TOMCAT beam line (TOmographic Microscopy and Coherent rAdiology experimenTs) at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Villigen, CH, using an x-ray energy of up to 40 keV. The x-ray absorption images are obtained at a resolution of 350 nm. The 3D dataset was analysed using the commercial 3D imaging software Avizo 5.1. Through this process, virtual sections of the paint sample can be obtained in any orientation. One of the topics currently under research are the ground layers of paintings by Cuno Amiet (1868- 1961), one of the most important Swiss painters of classical modernism, whose early work is currently the focus of research at the Swiss Institute for Art Research (SIK-ISEA). This technique gives access to information such as sample surface morphology, porosity, particle size distribution and even particle identification. In the case of calcium carbonate grounds for example, features like microfossils present in natural chalks, can be reconstructed and their species identified, thus potentially providing information towards the mineral origin. One further elegant feature of this technique is that a target section can be selected within the 3D data set, before exposing it to obtain chemical data. Virtual sections can then be compared with cross sections of the same samples made in the traditional way.

  10. Influence of sintering parameters in the ferroelectric properties os strontium bismuth tantalate samples obtained by oxide mixture; Estudo da influencia dos parametros de sinterizacao nas propriedades ferroeletricas de amostras de tantalato de bismuto - estroncio obtidas por mistura de oxidos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, R.R. de; Pereira, A.S.; Sousa, V.C., E-mail: ricson.souza@ufrgs.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Egea, J.R.J. [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio (ICV/CSIC), Madrid (Spain)

    2012-07-01

    The family of compounds layered-type perovskite, know as Aurivilius presents great alternative not only by the absence of lead in the composition, but because the polarization retention, replacing PZT in FeRAM devices. The strontium bismuth tantalate (SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9}) or SBT is ferroelectric material that has attracted considerable interest, since it has high fatigue resistance, supporting high hysteresis loops, with the change in polarization.Checking polarization and depolarization currents stimulated by temperature it is possible to obtain, for example, information about the nature of charges and about the activation energy for the process of dielectric relaxation. For analysis of ferroelectric properties of this compound, it is essential to obtain specimens with a relative density around 95%. Thus, it is important the optimization of the sintering process in order to obtain a ceramic body with a high densification. The influence of sintering parameters to obtain SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} in the polarization properties and in the microstructure of sintered samples was investigated by thermostimulated currents and electronic microscopy, respectively. Results show that variation of these parameters may cause changes in the ferroelectric properties of the material. (author)

  11. Not worth the fuss after all? cross-sectional and prospective data on violent video game influences on aggression, visuospatial cognition and mathematics ability in a sample of youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Christopher J; Garza, Adolfo; Jerabeck, Jessica; Ramos, Raul; Galindo, Mariza

    2013-01-01

    The United States Supreme Court's recent decision relating to violent video games revealed divisions within the scientific community about the potential for negative effects of such games as well as the need for more, higher quality research. Scholars also have debated the potential for violent games to have positive effects such as on visuospatial cognition or math ability. The current study sought to extend previous literature by using well-validated clinical outcome measures for relevant constructs, which have generally been lacking in past research. Cross-section data on aggression, visuospatial cognition, and math achievement were available for a sample of 333 (51.7 % female) mostly Hispanic youth (mean age = 12.76). Prospective 1-year data on aggression and school GPA were available for 143 (46.2 % female) of those youth. Results from both sets of analysis revealed that exposure to violent game had neither short-term nor long-term predictive influences on either positive or negative outcomes. A developmental analysis of the cross-sectional data revealed that results did not differ across age categories of older children, preadolescents or adolescents. Analysis of effect sizes largely ruled out Type II error as a possible explanation for null results. Suggestions for new directions in the field of video game research are proffered.

  12. Factors that influence the use of the Internet for job-seeking purposes amongst a sample of final-year students in the Eastern Cape province of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliet R. Chiwara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Organisations are turning to the Internet in search for talent. A constituency often targeted are those students nearing the end of their tenure of study who are making a transition into the working world. Given this, it is important to understand not only those factors that influence the use of the Internet within the Human Resources (HR talent search process, but also how such factors relate to actual intent to apply for jobs.Research purpose: Drawing on the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT model, the study investigates factors that influence the adoption of the Internet for purposes of job seeking.Motivation for the study: Calls have been made for research that investigates factors that influence the intention to use the Internet to apply for jobs in developing countries such as South Africa.Research approach, design and method: The study used the quantitative approach (relying on a survey to test the hypotheses into factors that influence the use of Internet for the purpose of job seeking amongst a sample of 346 prospective job seekers in their final year of study at a South African university.Main findings: Through correlation and regression analysis, findings reveal a positive relationship to exist between (1 performance expectancy with intention to use the Internet to apply for jobs, (2 effort expectancy with intention to use the Internet to apply for jobs, (3 individual effort expectancy and performance expectancy and (4 individual trust and the intention to use the Internet for job seeking. However, no relationship was found to exist between facilitating conditions and intention to use the Internet for job seeking.Practical/managerial implications: The findings magnify the role of salient factors in the intention to use the Internet for job-seeking purposes. Efforts from applicants, universities, recruitment agencies and organisations, potentially, have an effect on the intention to use the Internet

  13. Ethics and sample size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchetti, Peter; Wolf, Leslie E; Segal, Mark R; McCulloch, Charles E

    2005-01-15

    The belief is widespread that studies are unethical if their sample size is not large enough to ensure adequate power. The authors examine how sample size influences the balance that determines the ethical acceptability of a study: the balance between the burdens that participants accept and the clinical or scientific value that a study can be expected to produce. The average projected burden per participant remains constant as the sample size increases, but the projected study value does not increase as rapidly as the sample size if it is assumed to be proportional to power or inversely proportional to confidence interval width. This implies that the value per participant declines as the sample size increases and that smaller studies therefore have more favorable ratios of projected value to participant burden. The ethical treatment of study participants therefore does not require consideration of whether study power is less than the conventional goal of 80% or 90%. Lower power does not make a study unethical. The analysis addresses only ethical acceptability, not optimality; large studies may be desirable for other than ethical reasons.

  14. Exame do líquido cefalorraquidiano: influência da temperatura, tempo e preparo da amostra na estabilidade analítica Cerebrospinal fluid exam: influence of sample preparation, temperature and time on analytical stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Ferreira Dimas

    2008-04-01

    . However, there are a few studies about the stability of its analytes during the pre-analytical stage. OBJECTIVE: To identify existing data about the influence of temperature and storage time, freezing/thawing cycles and pre-treatments (centrifugation, denaturation, serum addition on the stability of CSF analytes. METHOD: A systematic review of articles in the literature was conducted by use of Key words: in English such as "storage", "cerebrospinal fluid", "CSF", "stability", "temperature" and "period", based on data from PubMed, Highwire Press, Lilacs and Amazonas Library, free digital archives of biomedical research articles. RESULTt: The search found nine articles, what results from the lack of studies about this subject. Different CSF constituents were analyzed: number of cells and their morphology, total protein, glucose, lactate, amino acids, creatine, creatinine, biomarkers and enzymes. The methodologies employed were: optical microscopy, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, Imunoblot/SDS-PAGE and spectrometry. CONCLUSION: The literature review confirms that the stability of CSF samples is influenced by temperature, storage time and conditions of pre-analytical preparation. The findings of this systematic review may contribute to improving the knowledge about CSF examination, as well as to better understanding the sample stability.

  15. Observations of debris flows at Chalk Cliffs, Colorado, USA: Part 1, in-situ measurements of flow dynamics, tracer particle movement and video imagery from the summer of 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Scott W.; Coe, Jeffrey A.; Kean, Jason W.; Tucker, Greg E.; Staley, Dennis M.; Wasklewicz, Thad A.

    2011-01-01

    Debris flows initiated by surface-water runoff during short duration, moderate- to high-intensity rainfall are common in steep, rocky, and sparsely vegetated terrain. Yet large uncertainties remain about the potential for a flow to grow through entrainment of loose debris, which make formulation of accurate mechanical models of debris-flow routing difficult. Using a combination of in situ measurements of debris flow dynamics, video imagery, tracer rocks implanted with passive integrated transponders (PIT) and pre- and post-flow 2-cm resolution digital terrain models (terrain data presented in a companion paper by STALEY et alii, 2011), we investigated the entrainment and transport response of debris flows at Chalk Cliffs, CO, USA. Four monitored events during the summer of 2009 all initiated from surface-water runoff, generally less than an hour after the first measurable rain. Despite reach-scale morphology that remained relatively constant, the four flow events displayed a range of responses, from long-runout flows that entrained significant amounts of channel sediment and dammed the main-stem river, to smaller, short-runout flows that were primarily depositional in the upper basin. Tracer-rock travel-distance distributions for these events were bimodal; particles either remained immobile or they travelled the entire length of the catchment. The long-runout, large-entrainment flow differed from the other smaller flows by the following controlling factors: peak 10-minute rain intensity; duration of significant flow in the channel; and to a lesser extent, peak surge depth and velocity. Our growing database of natural debris-flow events can be used to develop linkages between observed debris-flow transport and entrainment responses and the controlling rainstorm characteristics and flow properties.

  16. PAH occurrence in chalk river systems from the Jura region (France). Pertinence of suspended particulate matter and sediment as matrices for river quality monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiffre, Axelle; Degiorgi, François; Morin-Crini, Nadia; Bolard, Audrey; Chanez, Etienne; Badot, Pierre-Marie

    2015-11-01

    This study investigates the variations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) levels in surface water, suspended particulate matter (SPM) and sediment upstream and downstream of the discharges of two wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents. Relationships between the levels of PAHs in these different matrices were also investigated. The sum of 16 US EPA PAHs ranged from 73.5 to 728.0 ng L(-1) in surface water and from 85.4 to 313.1 ng L(-1) in effluent. In SPM and sediment, ∑16PAHs ranged from 749.6 to 2,463 μg kg(-1) and from 690.7 μg kg(-1) to 3,625.6 μg kg(-1), respectively. Investigations performed upstream and downstream of both studied WWTPs showed that WWTP discharges may contribute to the overall PAH contaminations in the Loue and the Doubs rivers. Comparison between gammarid populations upstream and downstream of WWTP discharge showed that biota was impacted by the WWTP effluents. When based only on surface water samples, the assessment of freshwater quality did not provide evidence for a marked PAH contamination in either of the rivers studied. However, using SPM and sediment samples, we found PAH contents exceeding sediment quality guidelines. We conclude that sediment and SPM are relevant matrices to assess overall PAH contamination in aquatic ecosystems. Furthermore, we found a positive linear correlation between PAH contents of SPM and sediment, showing that SPM represents an integrating matrix which is able to provide meaningful data about the overall contamination over a given time span.

  17. Characteristics of pica practice during pregnancy in a sample of Argentine women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, L B; Marigual, M; Martín, N; Mallorga, M; Villagrán, E; Zadorozne, M E; Martín De Portela, M L P; Ortega Soler, C R

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the practice of pica during pregnancy in Argentine women. Maternal and fetal characteristics as well as the practice of pica were evaluated during the puerperium in a sample of 1,014 women from five different geographical areas. Pica prevalence for the total sample was 23.2% (95% CI 20.6-25.8). Pagophagia (ice consumption) was the main type of pica practice, followed by geophagia (earth intake) and the ingestion of soap, toothpaste and chalk. The onset of the practice was mainly in the first months of pregnancy. A total of 49.8% of women revealed a family history of pica; 30.6% had pica in childhood and 13.2% suffered from polypica. Women with pica during pregnancy had similar age, pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), parity, neonatal birth weight and gestational age compared with non-pica mothers, although maternal haemoglobin concentration was lower in women with pica than in non-pica mothers (p = 0.0001).

  18. Systematic sampling with errors in sample locations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziegel, Johanna; Baddeley, Adrian; Dorph-Petersen, Karl-Anton

    2010-01-01

    Systematic sampling of points in continuous space is widely used in microscopy and spatial surveys. Classical theory provides asymptotic expressions for the variance of estimators based on systematic sampling as the grid spacing decreases. However, the classical theory assumes that the sample grid...... is exactly periodic; real physical sampling procedures may introduce errors in the placement of the sample points. This paper studies the effect of errors in sample positioning on the variance of estimators in the case of one-dimensional systematic sampling. First we sketch a general approach to variance...

  19. An Abecedary of Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Kenneth O., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The vocabulary of sampling is examined in order to provide a clear understanding of basic sampling concepts. The basic vocabulary of sampling (population, probability sampling, precision and bias, stratification), the fundamental grammar of sampling (random sample), sample size and response rate, and cluster, multiphase, snowball, and panel…

  20. Modern survey sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhuri, Arijit

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to SamplingAbstract Introduction Concepts of Population, Sample, and SamplingInitial RamificationsAbstract Introduction Sampling Design, Sampling SchemeRandom Numbers and Their Uses in Simple RandomSampling (SRS)Drawing Simple Random Samples with and withoutReplacementEstimation of Mean, Total, Ratio of Totals/Means:Variance and Variance EstimationDetermination of Sample SizesA.2 Appendix to Chapter 2 A.More on Equal Probability Sampling A.Horvitz-Thompson EstimatorA.SufficiencyA.LikelihoodA.Non-Existence Theorem More Intricacies Abstract Introduction Unequal Probability Sampling StrategiesPPS Sampling Exploring Improved WaysAbstract Introduction Stratified Sampling Cluster SamplingMulti-Stage SamplingMulti-Phase Sampling: Ratio and RegressionEstimationviiviii ContentsControlled SamplingModeling Introduction Super-Population ModelingPrediction Approach Model-Assisted Approach Bayesian Methods Spatial SmoothingSampling on Successive Occasions: Panel Rotation Non-Response and Not-at-Homes Weighting Adj...

  1. Lunar Sample Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Sample Atlas provides pictures of the Apollo samples taken in the Lunar Sample Laboratory, full-color views of the samples in microscopic thin-sections,...

  2. Optimization of sampling parameters for standardized exhaled breath sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Sophie; Romano, Andrea; Hanna, George B

    2017-09-05

    The lack of standardization of breath sampling is a major contributing factor to the poor repeatability of results and hence represents a barrier to the adoption of breath tests in clinical practice. On-line and bag breath sampling have advantages but do not suit multicentre clinical studies whereas storage and robust transport are essential for the conduct of wide-scale studies. Several devices have been developed to control sampling parameters and to concentrate volatile organic compounds (VOCs) onto thermal desorption (TD) tubes and subsequently transport those tubes for laboratory analysis. We conducted three experiments to investigate (i) the fraction of breath sampled (whole vs. lower expiratory exhaled breath); (ii) breath sample volume (125, 250, 500 and 1000ml) and (iii) breath sample flow rate (400, 200, 100 and 50 ml/min). The target VOCs were acetone and potential volatile biomarkers for oesophago-gastric cancer belonging to the aldehyde, fatty acids and phenol chemical classes. We also examined the collection execution time and the impact of environmental contamination. The experiments showed that the use of exhaled breath-sampling devices requires the selection of optimum sampling parameters. The increase in sample volume has improved the levels of VOCs detected. However, the influence of the fraction of exhaled breath and the flow rate depends on the target VOCs measured. The concentration of potential volatile biomarkers for oesophago-gastric cancer was not significantly different between the whole and lower airway exhaled breath. While the recovery of phenols and acetone from TD tubes was lower when breath sampling was performed at a higher flow rate, other VOCs were not affected. A dedicated 'clean air supply' overcomes the contamination from ambient air, but the breath collection device itself can be a source of contaminants. In clinical studies using VOCs to diagnose gastro-oesophageal cancer, the optimum parameters are 500mls sample volume

  3. Adsorption Properties of Chalk Reservoir Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okhrimenko, Denis

    Understanding adsorption energetics and wetting properties of calcium carbonate surfaces is essential for developing remediation strategies for aquifers, improving oil recovery, minimising risk in CO2 storage and optimising industrial processes. This PhD was focussed on comparing the vapour/gas a...

  4. Poroelasticity of high porosity chalk under depletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Katrine Alling; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2013-01-01

    on mechanical test results is found to be low-er than the pretest dynamic Biot coefficient determined from elastic wave propagation for the loading path and with less deviation under depletion. The calculated lateral stress is lower than the experimentally measured lateral stress depending on loading path...

  5. Coccolithophore Cell Biology: Chalking Up Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alison R.; Brownlee, Colin; Wheeler, Glen

    2017-01-01

    Coccolithophores occupy a special position within the marine phytoplankton because of their production of intricate calcite scales, or coccoliths. Coccolithophores are major contributors to global ocean calcification and long-term carbon fluxes. The intracellular production of coccoliths requires modifications to cellular ultrastructure and metabolism that are surveyed here. In addition to calcification, which appears to have evolved with a diverse range of functions, several other remarkable features that likely underpin the ecological and evolutionary success of coccolithophores have recently been uncovered. These include complex and varied life cycle strategies related to abiotic and biotic interactions as well as a range of novel metabolic pathways and nutritional strategies. Together with knowledge of coccolithophore genetic and physiological variability, these findings are beginning to shed new light on species diversity, distribution, and ecological adaptation. Further advances in genetics and functional characterization at the cellular level will likely to lead to a rapid increase in this understanding.

  6. Gray Hairs in the Chalk Dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southall, George A.

    1984-01-01

    Schools have a role to play in educating young people about aging and the elderly. Education also has an obligation to the aged. Educators have an obligation to themselves to tap a vast resource stockpile that lies waiting. (BRR)

  7. 27 CFR 9.52 - Chalk Hill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Martin Creek intersects the west line of section 27, T. 9 N., R. 8 W.; (14) Then southeasterly... the south line of Section 2, Township 8 North (T. 8 N.), Range 9 West (R. 9 W.) at the intersection of... boundary proceeds— (1) Southeasterly along Redwood Highway through Section 11, T. 8 N., R. 9 W., to the...

  8. Cultivation-independent assessment of the bathypelagic archaeal diversity of Tyrrhenian Sea: Comparative study of rDNA and rRNA-derived libraries and influence of sample decompression

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Cono, Violetta; Tamburini, Christian; Genovese, Lucrezia; Spada, Gina La; Denaro, Renata; Yakimov, Michail M.

    2009-05-01

    Two samples of the same bathypelagic bacterioplankton community (Tyrrhenian Sea at the depth of 3000 m) were collected during single cast by both traditional sampling with Niskin bottle and using a high pressure-maintaining HPSS sampler. Total RNA was isolated, reverse transcribed, amplified with Archaea-specific primers and cloned. Riboclones were sequenced, 117 riboclones from decompressed library and 104 rRNA-based riboclones retrieved from HPSS sampler. Both RNA libraries were additionally compared with 115 riboclones based on DNA obtained from the decompressed sample (16S rRNA genes). In terms of repetitive riboclones, obtained in all three libraries, the bathypelagic community was dominated by Crenarchaeota Marine Group I (52-64%). The combined analysis led to a characterization of sampling-specific phylotypes otherwise uncharacterized if only one type of library had been analyzed alone. Of the DNA riboclones, 22% were found only in this library and no close relatives of Euryarchaeota Marine Group II were detected in both RNA-based libraries, suggesting the dormant state of these organisms in deep-sea environment. For clones from the RNA libraries, one Crenarchaeota MG I phylotype did not indicate close relatives in the DNA library. In general, among 10 archaeal phylotypes recovered in total, 8, 7 and 6 of them were faced in DNA, RNA_HPSS and RNA decompressed libraries, respectively. Based on comparisons between all three libraries, our data indicate that (i) the short-term decompression of seawater samples during cast recovery and following treatments caused only slight changes in the total rRNA diversity and (ii) rRNA-based analysis is likely affected the characterization of phylotypes, present in deep-sea environment as the dormant cells, detected only on the DNA level.

  9. Signal sampling circuit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwsma, S.M.; Vertregt, Maarten

    2011-01-01

    A sampling circuit for sampling a signal is disclosed. The sampling circuit comprises a plurality of sampling channels adapted to sample the signal in time-multiplexed fashion, each sampling channel comprising a respective track-and-hold circuit connected to a respective analogue to digital

  10. Signal sampling circuit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwsma, S.M.; Vertregt, Maarten

    2010-01-01

    A sampling circuit for sampling a signal is disclosed. The sampling circuit comprises a plurality of sampling channels adapted to sample the signal in time-multiplexed fashion, each sampling channel comprising a respective track-and-hold circuit connected to a respective analogue to digital

  11. Optimal Design in Geostatistics under Preferential Sampling

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Gustavo da Silva; Gamerman, Dani

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses the effect of preferential sampling in Geostatistics when the choice of new sampling locations is the main interest of the researcher. A Bayesian criterion based on maximizing utility functions is used. Simulated studies are presented and highlight the strong influence of preferential sampling in the decisions. The computational complexity is faced by treating the new local sampling locations as a model parameter and the optimal choice is then made by analysing its posteri...

  12. A Mars Sample Return Sample Handling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David; Stroker, Carol

    2013-01-01

    We present a sample handling system, a subsystem of the proposed Dragon landed Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission [1], that can return to Earth orbit a significant mass of frozen Mars samples potentially consisting of: rock cores, subsurface drilled rock and ice cuttings, pebble sized rocks, and soil scoops. The sample collection, storage, retrieval and packaging assumptions and concepts in this study are applicable for the NASA's MPPG MSR mission architecture options [2]. Our study assumes a predecessor rover mission collects samples for return to Earth to address questions on: past life, climate change, water history, age dating, understanding Mars interior evolution [3], and, human safety and in-situ resource utilization. Hence the rover will have "integrated priorities for rock sampling" [3] that cover collection of subaqueous or hydrothermal sediments, low-temperature fluidaltered rocks, unaltered igneous rocks, regolith and atmosphere samples. Samples could include: drilled rock cores, alluvial and fluvial deposits, subsurface ice and soils, clays, sulfates, salts including perchlorates, aeolian deposits, and concretions. Thus samples will have a broad range of bulk densities, and require for Earth based analysis where practical: in-situ characterization, management of degradation such as perchlorate deliquescence and volatile release, and contamination management. We propose to adopt a sample container with a set of cups each with a sample from a specific location. We considered two sample cups sizes: (1) a small cup sized for samples matching those submitted to in-situ characterization instruments, and, (2) a larger cup for 100 mm rock cores [4] and pebble sized rocks, thus providing diverse samples and optimizing the MSR sample mass payload fraction for a given payload volume. We minimize sample degradation by keeping them frozen in the MSR payload sample canister using Peltier chip cooling. The cups are sealed by interference fitted heat activated memory

  13. Amostragem para avaliação da fertilidade do solo em função do instrumento de coleta das amostras e de tipos de preparo do solo Sampling for soil fertility evaluation as influenced by sampling tool and soil tillage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Henrique Tavares de Oliveira

    2007-10-01

    instrumentos de coleta, a ordem decrescente de variabilidade foi: P > Mg2+ > K+ > Ca2+ > MO > pH. A fertilidade média de uma parcela sob PD ou sob PC após a colheita e antes do preparo do solo subseqüente pode ser avaliada com trado de caneca, em substituição à pá de corte, desde que na preparação da amostra composta de solo 17 % das amostras simples sejam coletadas no sulco de plantio, 33 % a 10 cm do sulco e 50 % no ponto médio entre os sulcos. A fertilidade média de uma parcela sob PD ou PC depois da colheita e antes do preparo do solo subseqüente, avaliada pela análise química da amostra composta, é semelhante àquela avaliada pela média aritmética dos resultados das análises químicas das amostras simples coletadas com pá de corte ou com trado de caneca de forma dirigida. Em geral, a coleta de pelo menos oito amostras simples de solo realizada com pá de corte ou trado de caneca de forma dirigida, conforme utilizado neste trabalho, seria suficiente para formar uma amostra composta representativa para avaliação da fertilidade do solo de uma unidade de amostragem aparentemente homogênea. Entretanto, quanto maior o número de amostras simples coletadas, maior será a confiabilidade ou exatidão da estimativa dessa fertilidade média.The measures of the average and variability of soil fertility indexes can vary with the sampling tool and soil tillage type. Soil sampling methods must be developed that are more reliable to represent the real conditions of soil fertility. This study aimed at an evaluation of the effects of the cutting shovel and hand auger on measures of average and variability of the soil fertility index (a under no-tillage (NT and conventional tillage (CT, (b to estimate the minimum number of simple samples to form a composite sample and (c to test the hypothesis that the arithmetic average of simple samples is equal to the result of the chemical analysis of the composite sample. Chromic Luvisol samples were collected in a control

  14. The Influence of Mineralogy on Recovering Organic Acids from Mars Analogue Materials Using the One-Pot Derivatization Experiment on the Sample Analysis at Mars(SAM) Instrument Suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalport, Fabien; Glavin, Daniel P.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Bish, D.; Blake, D.; Coll, P.; Szopa, C.; Buch, A.; McAdam, A.; Dworkin, J. P.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The search for complex organic molecules on Mars, including important biomolecules such as amino acids and carboxylic acids, will require a chemical extraction and a derivatization step to transform these organic compounds into species that are sufficiently volatile to be detected by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). We have developed a ''one-pot'' extraction and chemical derivatization protocol using N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) and dimethylformamide (DMF) for the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) experiment instrument suite on NASA's the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. The temperature and duration of the derivatization reaction, pre-concentration of chemical derivatives, and gas chromatographic separation parameters have been optimized under SAM instrument design constraints. MTBSTFA/DMF extraction and derivatization at 300 1C for several minutes of a variety of terrestrial Mars analog materials facilitated the detection of amino acids and carboxylic acids in a surface soil sample collected from the Atacama Desert and a carbonate-rich stromatolite sample from Svalbard. However, the rapid reaction of MTBSTFA with water in several analog materials that contained high abundances of hydrated minerals, and the possible deactivation of derivatized compounds by iron oxides, as detected by XRD/XRF using the CheMin field unit Terra, proved to be highly problematic for the direct extraction of organics using MTBSTFA. The combination of pyrolysis and two different wet-chemical derivatization methods employed by SAM should enable a wide range of organic compounds to be detected by GCMS if present on Mars.

  15. Information sampling behavior with explicit sampling costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juni, Mordechai Z.; Gureckis, Todd M.; Maloney, Laurence T.

    2015-01-01

    The decision to gather information should take into account both the value of information and its accrual costs in time, energy and money. Here we explore how people balance the monetary costs and benefits of gathering additional information in a perceptual-motor estimation task. Participants were rewarded for touching a hidden circular target on a touch-screen display. The target’s center coincided with the mean of a circular Gaussian distribution from which participants could sample repeatedly. Each “cue” — sampled one at a time — was plotted as a dot on the display. Participants had to repeatedly decide, after sampling each cue, whether to stop sampling and attempt to touch the hidden target or continue sampling. Each additional cue increased the participants’ probability of successfully touching the hidden target but reduced their potential reward. Two experimental conditions differed in the initial reward associated with touching the hidden target and the fixed cost per cue. For each condition we computed the optimal number of cues that participants should sample, before taking action, to maximize expected gain. Contrary to recent claims that people gather less information than they objectively should before taking action, we found that participants over-sampled in one experimental condition, and did not significantly under- or over-sample in the other. Additionally, while the ideal observer model ignores the current sample dispersion, we found that participants used it to decide whether to stop sampling and take action or continue sampling, a possible consequence of imperfect learning of the underlying population dispersion across trials. PMID:27429991

  16. Atividade da urease em latossolos sob influência da cobertura vegetal e da época de amostragem Urease activity in oxisols as influenced by vegetation cover and sampling time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Márcia Longo

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar o efeito do tipo de vegetação e da época de amostragem na atividade da urease em dois diferentes solos tropicais. O experimento foi instalado em Latossolo Vermelho Aluminoférrico típico e Latossolo Vermelho distrófico típico sob cinco diferentes culturas: pinus, eucalipto, citrus, soja e milho. As amostragens de solo foram efetuadas mensalmente, de abril de 1990 a março de 1991, determinando-se a atividade da urease, o N-total e o C-orgânico. A atividade da urease variou de acordo com a época de amostragem, apresentando valores mais elevados nos meses mais quentes e úmidos. A cobertura vegetal influenciou a conversão de N-uréia a N-NH4, observando-se maior atividade da urease nas amostras de solo sob pinus e eucalipto, embora, no início do ciclo das culturas da soja e do milho, a atividade da urease também tenha sido elevada.The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of the vegetation type and the sampling time on urease activity in two different tropical soils (Rhodic Oxisols. The experiment was installed in a typic alumino-ferric Red Latossol and a typic distrophic Red Latosol under five different vegetations: pinus, eucalypt, citrus, soybean and corn. The soil samples were collected from April 1990 to March 1991 and the urease activity, total nitrogen and organic carbon were determined. The urease activity changed according to the sampling time, presenting higher values in the warmer and humid months. The vegetation type affected the conversion of N-urea to N-NH4+, with higher urease activity being observed in the soil under pinus and eucalypt, although the activity was high at the beginning of the soybean and corn cropping cycle.

  17. Sampling and P-sampling expansions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using the hyperfinite representation of functions and generalized functions this paper develops a rigorous version of the so-called `delta method' approach to sampling theory. This yields a slightly more general version of the classical WKS sampling theorem for band-limited functions.

  18. How Sample Size Affects a Sampling Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulekar, Madhuri S.; Siegel, Murray H.

    2009-01-01

    If students are to understand inferential statistics successfully, they must have a profound understanding of the nature of the sampling distribution. Specifically, they must comprehend the determination of the expected value and standard error of a sampling distribution as well as the meaning of the central limit theorem. Many students in a high…

  19. Chorionic Villus Sampling (CVS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy > Prenatal care > Chorionic villus sampling Chorionic villus sampling E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... It's been added to your dashboard . Chorionic villus sampling (CVS) is a prenatal test . It’s used to ...

  20. Iowa Geologic Sampling Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Point locations of geologic samples/files in the IGS repository. Types of samples include well cuttings, outcrop samples, cores, drillers logs, measured sections,...

  1. DNA Sampling Hook

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The DNA Sampling Hook is a significant improvement on a method of obtaining a tissue sample from a live fish in situ from an aquatic environment. A tissue sample...

  2. Samples 9 (2010)

    OpenAIRE

    Arbeitskreis Studium Populärer Musik e.V. (ASPM)

    2010-01-01

    SCHWERPUNKTTHEMA. SAMPLING IM HIPHOP Gastherausgeber: Oliver Kautny und Adam Krims. Oliver Kautny: Talkin´ All That Jazz - Ein Plädoyer für die Analyse des Sampling im HipHop (Editorial). Adam Krims: Sampling in Scholarship (english editorial). Mark Katz: Sampling before Sampling. The Link Between DJ and Producer. Sascha Klammt aka Quasi Modo: Das Sample - eine einzigartige Momentaufnahme als Basis für eine neue Komposition. Detlev Rick aka DJ Rick Ski: Die Entstehung des A...

  3. The influence of samples incubation on detection of PLRV and the effect of some extraction buffer’s additives on the detection of potato viruses Y, A, X and by ELISA technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisztina PETRUSCA

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research was to examine and evaluate the effects of several modifications of ELISA (enzyme linked immunosorbent assay technique on the detection of potato viruses Y, A, X, S and potato leafroll virus by this technique. These modifications consisted on: modification of the incubation modality of conjugate (IgG-AP, the use of several additives in extraction buffer, replacement of grinding buffer with McIlvain buffer. The results show a better identification of PLRV in leaves and sprouting tubers using the co-incubation sample and IgG-AP conjugate. Compared with the classical method, the test safety and sensitivity increased. Testing leaves, the average values of OD at 405 nm was 5-6,6 times higher than those obtained by standard DAS ELISA method and using sap from sprouting tubers (dilution 1/10 this average was 1,5 times higher. The detection of potato viruses Y and A by enzyme–linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA can be improved using extraction buffers with new composition. Using McIlvain’s phosphate-citric acid buffer (0,18M; pH 7, the absorbance values (A405nm increased significantly for PVY and PVA detection comparing with the classic extraction buffer. Sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (0.01M in phosphate-buffered saline plus Tween 20 (PBS-T used instead of the polyvinylpyrrolidone increased the sensitivity of potato virus Y but this additives decrease the absorbance values in case of PLRV identification. The same decrease was observed when we used sodium thioglicolat (0.01M and sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (0.01M in PBS-T. The co-incubation sample and conjugate and the use of McIlvain’s buffer could save time and costs of potato viruses diagnostic tests.

  4. Numerical simulations of regolith sampling processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Christoph M.; Scherrer, Samuel; Buchwald, Robert; Maindl, Thomas I.; Speith, Roland; Kley, Wilhelm

    2017-07-01

    We present recent improvements in the simulation of regolith sampling processes in microgravity using the numerical particle method smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH). We use an elastic-plastic soil constitutive model for large deformation and failure flows for dynamical behaviour of regolith. In the context of projected small body (asteroid or small moons) sample return missions, we investigate the efficiency and feasibility of a particular material sampling method: Brushes sweep material from the asteroid's surface into a collecting tray. We analyze the influence of different material parameters of regolith such as cohesion and angle of internal friction on the sampling rate. Furthermore, we study the sampling process in two environments by varying the surface gravity (Earth's and Phobos') and we apply different rotation rates for the brushes. We find good agreement of our sampling simulations on Earth with experiments and provide estimations for the influence of the material properties on the collecting rate.

  5. Sampling in Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars; Esbensen, Kim Harry

    2005-01-01

    A basic knowledge of the Theory of Sampling (TOS) and a set of only eight sampling unit operations is all the practical sampler needs to ensure representativeness of samples extracted from all kinds of lots: production batches, - truckloads, - barrels, sub-division in the laboratory, sampling...... in nature and in the field (environmental sampling, forestry, geology, biology), from raw materials or manufactory processes etc. We here can only give a brief introduction to the Fundamental Sampling Principle (FSP) and these eight Sampling Unit Operations (SUO’s). Always respecting FSP and invoking only...

  6. Biofouling development on plasma treated samples versus layers coated samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnatiuc, B.; Exnar, P.; Sabau, A.; Spatenka, P.; Dumitrache, C. L.; Hnatiuc, M.; Ghita, S.

    2016-12-01

    Biofouling is the most important cause of naval corrosion. In order to reduce the Biofouling development on naval materials as steel or resin, different new methods have been tested. These methods could help to follow the new IMO environment reglementations and they could replace few classic operations before the painting of the small ships. The replacement of these operations means a reduction in maintenance costs. Their action must influence especially the first two steps of the Biofouling development, called Microfouling, that demand about 24 hours. This work presents the comparative results of the Biofouling development on two different classic naval materials, steel and resin, for three treated samples, immersed in sea water. Non-thermal plasma, produced by GlidArc technology, is applied to the first sample, called GD. The plasma treatment was set to 10 minutes. The last two samples, called AE9 and AE10 are covered by hydrophobic layers, prepared from a special organic-inorganic sol synthesized by sol-gel method. Theoretically, because of the hydrophobic properties, the Biofouling formation must be delayed for AE9 and AE10. The Biofouling development on each treated sample was compared with a witness non-treated sample. The microbiological analyses have been done for 24 hours by epifluorescence microscopy, available for one single layer.

  7. Wood characterization of Salix. 1. Influence of the site, clone, age and sampling height; Caracterizacion de la madera de Salix. 1: Influencia del sitio, clon, edad y altura de muestreo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villegas, M. S.; Area, M. C.; Marlats, R. M.

    2009-07-01

    The wood of two Salix clones cultivated in the Delta of Parana River in Argentina was characterized according to their optical properties, chemical composition, basic density, tylose content and health condition, analysing variations in terms of site, clone, age and sampling height. American willow showed more cellulose content, higher density and less lignin, extractives and tylose than the 131/27 hybrid. The wood of the last one had the smallest damaged area in the disks and the highest brightness values. The most appropriate site for both clones was the one less affected by flood. Brightness, L* and basic density increased, whereas deteriorated area decreased from bottom to tip within each tree. The tally's percentage also decreased, both in vertical and horizontal directions. Six different types of wood were defined. Between them, grey-coloured rings, result of flood, and dark zone, may be considered similar to healthy wood. Three types of stains were responsible for the main changes in the wood analysed. The brown stains showed low brightness and high tylose, but the darkest one showed high lignin and low cellulose contents. The light-brown stain had the highest alkali-soluble substances content. The blue stain showed low brightness and high extractives content. (Author) 32 refs.

  8. Multiscale imaging of carbonate rocks and representative sampling for digital rock physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, H.; Dewers, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Geomaterials containing nano-pores (e.g., shales and carbonate rocks) have become increasingly important for emerging problems such as unconventional gas and oil resources, enhanced oil recovery, and geologic storage of CO2. Accurate prediction of coupled geophysical and chemical processes at the pore scale requires realistic representation of pore structure and topology. This is especially true for chalk materials, where pore networks are small and complex, and require characterization at sub-micron scale. In this work, we apply laser scanning confocal microscopy with various filters to characterize pore structures and microlithofacies at a thin-section scale (micron resolution) and dual focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) for 3D imaging of nanometer-to-micron scale microcracks and pore distributions. With imaging techniques advanced for nano-pore characterization, it is critical to define representative sampling of FIB-SEM images and apply it to the thin-section or larger scale. In this work, several texture characterization techniques are applied for segmentation clusters represented by a couple of 3-D FIB-SEM image stacks per each cluster. Pore structure evolution is characterized based on geometric and topological properties from a set of FIB-SEM images and lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to obtain permeability at several different scales. Upscaling of permeability to the Darcy scale (e.g., the thin-section scale) with image dataset will be discussed with emphasis on understanding microfracture-matrix interaction, representative volume for FIB-SEM sampling, and multiphase flow and reactive transport. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Quantitative analysis of nano-pore geomaterials and representative sampling for digital rock physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, H.; Dewers, T. A.

    2014-12-01

    Geomaterials containing nano-pores (e.g., shales and carbonate rocks) have become increasingly important for emerging problems such as unconventional gas and oil resources, enhanced oil recovery, and geologic storage of CO2. Accurate prediction of coupled geophysical and chemical processes at the pore scale requires realistic representation of pore structure and topology. This is especially true for chalk materials, where pore networks are small and complex, and require characterization at sub-micron scale. In this work, we apply laser scanning confocal microscopy to characterize pore structures and microlithofacies at micron- and greater scales and dual focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) for 3D imaging of nanometer-to-micron scale microcracks and pore distributions. With imaging techniques advanced for nano-pore characterization, a problem of scale with FIB-SEM images is how to take nanometer scale information and apply it to the thin-section or larger scale. In this work, several texture characterization techniques including graph-based spectral segmentation, support vector machine, and principal component analysis are applied for segmentation clusters represented by 1-2 FIB-SEM samples per each cluster. Geometric and topological properties are analyzed and lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to obtain permeability at several different scales. Upscaling of permeability to the Darcy scale (e.g., the thin-section scale) with image dataset will be discussed with emphasis on understanding microfracture-matrix interaction, representative volume for FIB-SEM sampling, and multiphase flow and reactive transport. Funding from the DOE Basic Energy Sciences Geosciences Program is gratefully acknowledged. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under

  10. Sampling and P-sampling expansions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper we consider instead a non-standard approach to sampling theory. The hyperfinite representation of functions and generalized functions has been studied in an earlier paper [2], and the same notation and conventions will be used here. In particular,. PcNI denotes a given even infinite hypernatural number, 4 И ...

  11. Genetic Sample Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This database archives genetic tissue samples from marine mammals collected primarily from the U.S. east coast. The collection includes samples from field programs,...

  12. Genetic Sample Inventory - NRDA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This database archives genetic tissue samples from marine mammals collected in the North-Central Gulf of Mexico from 2010-2015. The collection includes samples from...

  13. Superposition Enhanced Nested Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiniani, Stefano; Stevenson, Jacob D.; Wales, David J.; Frenkel, Daan

    2014-07-01

    The theoretical analysis of many problems in physics, astronomy, and applied mathematics requires an efficient numerical exploration of multimodal parameter spaces that exhibit broken ergodicity. Monte Carlo methods are widely used to deal with these classes of problems, but such simulations suffer from a ubiquitous sampling problem: The probability of sampling a particular state is proportional to its entropic weight. Devising an algorithm capable of sampling efficiently the full phase space is a long-standing problem. Here, we report a new hybrid method for the exploration of multimodal parameter spaces exhibiting broken ergodicity. Superposition enhanced nested sampling combines the strengths of global optimization with the unbiased or athermal sampling of nested sampling, greatly enhancing its efficiency with no additional parameters. We report extensive tests of this new approach for atomic clusters that are known to have energy landscapes for which conventional sampling schemes suffer from broken ergodicity. We also introduce a novel parallelization algorithm for nested sampling.

  14. Mold Testing or Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    In most cases, if visible mold growth is present, sampling is unnecessary. Since no EPA or other federal limits have been set for mold or mold spores, sampling cannot be used to check a building's compliance with federal mold standards.

  15. Chorionic villus sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003406.htm Chorionic villus sampling To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chorionic villus sampling (CVS) is a test some pregnant women have ...

  16. Sampling on Quasicrystals

    OpenAIRE

    Grepstad, Sigrid

    2011-01-01

    We prove that quasicrystals are universal sets of stable sampling in any dimension. Necessary and sufficient density conditions for stable sampling and interpolation sets in one dimension are studied in detail.

  17. Superposition Enhanced Nested Sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Martiniani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical analysis of many problems in physics, astronomy, and applied mathematics requires an efficient numerical exploration of multimodal parameter spaces that exhibit broken ergodicity. Monte Carlo methods are widely used to deal with these classes of problems, but such simulations suffer from a ubiquitous sampling problem: The probability of sampling a particular state is proportional to its entropic weight. Devising an algorithm capable of sampling efficiently the full phase space is a long-standing problem. Here, we report a new hybrid method for the exploration of multimodal parameter spaces exhibiting broken ergodicity. Superposition enhanced nested sampling combines the strengths of global optimization with the unbiased or athermal sampling of nested sampling, greatly enhancing its efficiency with no additional parameters. We report extensive tests of this new approach for atomic clusters that are known to have energy landscapes for which conventional sampling schemes suffer from broken ergodicity. We also introduce a novel parallelization algorithm for nested sampling.

  18. Lunar Sample Compendium

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of the Lunar Sample Compendium is to inform scientists, astronauts and the public about the various lunar samples that have been returned from the Moon....

  19. Developing Water Sampling Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Participants in the D-19 symposium on aquatic sampling and measurement for water pollution assessment were informed that determining the extent of waste water stream pollution is not a cut and dry procedure. Topics discussed include field sampling, representative sampling from storm sewers, suggested sampler features and application of improved…

  20. IAEA Sampling Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geist, William H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-15

    The objectives for this presentation are to describe the method that the IAEA uses to determine a sampling plan for nuclear material measurements; describe the terms detection probability and significant quantity; list the three nuclear materials measurement types; describe the sampling method applied to an item facility; and describe multiple method sampling.

  1. Aerosol sampling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masquelier, Donald A.

    2004-02-10

    A system for sampling air and collecting particulate of a predetermined particle size range. A low pass section has an opening of a preselected size for gathering the air but excluding particles larger than the sample particles. An impactor section is connected to the low pass section and separates the air flow into a bypass air flow that does not contain the sample particles and a product air flow that does contain the sample particles. A wetted-wall cyclone collector, connected to the impactor section, receives the product air flow and traps the sample particles in a liquid.

  2. Sample Proficiency Test exercise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaraz, A; Gregg, H; Koester, C

    2006-02-05

    The current format of the OPCW proficiency tests has multiple sets of 2 samples sent to an analysis laboratory. In each sample set, one is identified as a sample, the other as a blank. This method of conducting proficiency tests differs from how an OPCW designated laboratory would receive authentic samples (a set of three containers, each not identified, consisting of the authentic sample, a control sample, and a blank sample). This exercise was designed to test the reporting if the proficiency tests were to be conducted. As such, this is not an official OPCW proficiency test, and the attached report is one method by which LLNL might report their analyses under a more realistic testing scheme. Therefore, the title on the report ''Report of the Umpteenth Official OPCW Proficiency Test'' is meaningless, and provides a bit of whimsy for the analyses and readers of the report.

  3. The Lunar Sample Compendium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Charles

    2009-01-01

    The Lunar Sample Compendium is a succinct summary of the data obtained from 40 years of study of Apollo and Luna samples of the Moon. Basic petrographic, chemical and age information is compiled, sample-by-sample, in the form of an advanced catalog in order to provide a basic description of each sample. The LSC can be found online using Google. The initial allocation of lunar samples was done sparingly, because it was realized that scientific techniques would improve over the years and new questions would be formulated. The LSC is important because it enables scientists to select samples within the context of the work that has already been done and facilitates better review of proposed allocations. It also provides back up material for public displays, captures information found only in abstracts, grey literature and curatorial databases and serves as a ready access to the now-vast scientific literature.

  4. Fast mixing hyperdynamic sampling

    OpenAIRE

    Sminchisescu, Cristian; Triggs, Bill

    2006-01-01

    Special issue on ECCV'02 papers; International audience; Sequential random sampling (‘Markov Chain Monte-Carlo') is a popular strategy for many vision problems involving multi-modal distributions over high-dimensional parameter spaces. It applies both to importance sampling (where one wants to sample points according to their ‘importance' for some calculation, but otherwise fairly) and to global-optimization (where one wants to find good minima, or at least good starting points for local mini...

  5. Hyperdynamics Importance Sampling

    OpenAIRE

    Sminchisescu, Cristian; Triggs, Bill

    2002-01-01

    International audience; Sequential random sampling (‘Markov Chain Monte-Carlo') is a popular strategy for many vision problems involving multimodal distributions over high-dimensional parameter spaces. It applies both to importance sampling (where one wants to sample points according to their ‘importance' for some calculation, but otherwise fairly) and to global optimization (where one wants to find good minima, or at least good starting points for local minimization, regardless of fairness)....

  6. Laboratory Sampling Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    Barium  Beryllium  Cadmium  Chromium  Cobalt  Copper  Iron  Lead  Magnesium  Manganese  Molybdenum  Potassium  Nickel...paper or MCE filters Aluminum Antimony Arsenic Barium Beryllium Cadmium Chromium(Total) Cobalt Copper Iron Lead Manganese Molybdenum...Sampling Equipment Selection Guidea Matrix Sampling Device Image Device-Specific Guidance Sample Type Comments L iq ui ds Automatic sampler ASTM D

  7. Influência da granulometria, do diâmetro e do comprimento de amostras de grãos triturados de soja na determinação de coeficientes simultâneos de transferência Influence of soybean grain sizing and sample diameter and length on the determination of simultaneous transfer rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kil Jin Park

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como principal objetivo verificar a influência da granulometria de grãos de soja triturados, assim como do diâmetro e do comprimento do corpo-de-prova na determinação de coeficientes simultâneos de transferência de calor e massa. Utilizando-se equipamentos de coluna fechada e de coluna aberta, foram testadas três granulometrias, dois comprimentos e três diâmetros diferentes para as amostras, totalizando dezoito condições experimentais. Nos experimentos com o equipamento de coluna fechada, a maior influência na avaliação da condutividade térmica foi devida aos valores de fluxo de calor obtidos. Tanto nos experimentos de coluna fechada quanto de coluna aberta, a contribuição dos fenômenos simultâneos deve ser considerada. O comprimento e a granulometria têm influência na determinação da condutividade térmica e na difusividade mássica, ao passo que o diâmetro só interfere na obtenção do valor da difusividade mássica.The main goal of this work was to verify the influence of triturated soybean grain sizing, their sample diameters and lengths, on the determination of simultaneous heat and mass transfer rates. Using equipment with open and closed columns, three different grain sizings were tested, totalling eighteen different test conditions. For experiments with the closed column, the greater influence on the evaluation of the thermal conductivity was due to the heat flow rates. On experiments with the closed column as well as on those with the open column, the contribution of the simultaneous phenomena must be acknowledged. The sample length and the grain sizing can influence both heat conductivity and mass diffusivity, while the sample diameter interferes only with mass diffusivity rates.

  8. Sample size methodology

    CERN Document Server

    Desu, M M

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important problems in designing an experiment or a survey is sample size determination and this book presents the currently available methodology. It includes both random sampling from standard probability distributions and from finite populations. Also discussed is sample size determination for estimating parameters in a Bayesian setting by considering the posterior distribution of the parameter and specifying the necessary requirements. The determination of the sample size is considered for ranking and selection problems as well as for the design of clinical trials. Appropria

  9. Sample Differentiation: Cocaine Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, L D; Liu, R H

    1991-12-01

    Since the analyses of drug samples in crime laboratories are often associated with investigations, potential differentiations of test samples are frequently requested and explored. Cocaine sample differentiation requires the determination of synthetic or natural origin. Synthetic samples are characterized by the presence of optical isomers, certain diastereoisomers and other by-products, and chemical residues used in synthesis. Samples derived from a natural origin (coca leaves) are characterized by the presence of certain natural products or their derivatives that are carried through the overall process and by residual chemicals reflecting the treatment procedures. Various approaches and analytical data available in the literature concerning the differentiation of cocaine samples are reviewed. Each sample must carry its own "signature"; however, true sample "individualization" cannot be accomplished using the technologies commonly available and used in crime laboratories, and is not usually needed. Alternatively, "classifying" cocaine samples in certain categories or groups can be accomplished routinely and often provides adequate information for investigatory purposes. Copyright © 1991 Central Police University.

  10. Sample normalization methods in quantitative metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiman; Li, Liang

    2016-01-22

    To reveal metabolomic changes caused by a biological event in quantitative metabolomics, it is critical to use an analytical tool that can perform accurate and precise quantification to examine the true concentration differences of individual metabolites found in different samples. A number of steps are involved in metabolomic analysis including pre-analytical work (e.g., sample collection and storage), analytical work (e.g., sample analysis) and data analysis (e.g., feature extraction and quantification). Each one of them can influence the quantitative results significantly and thus should be performed with great care. Among them, the total sample amount or concentration of metabolites can be significantly different from one sample to another. Thus, it is critical to reduce or eliminate the effect of total sample amount variation on quantification of individual metabolites. In this review, we describe the importance of sample normalization in the analytical workflow with a focus on mass spectrometry (MS)-based platforms, discuss a number of methods recently reported in the literature and comment on their applicability in real world metabolomics applications. Sample normalization has been sometimes ignored in metabolomics, partially due to the lack of a convenient means of performing sample normalization. We show that several methods are now available and sample normalization should be performed in quantitative metabolomics where the analyzed samples have significant variations in total sample amounts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Industrial Hygiene Sampling Instructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-01

    transport . g. Field blank tubes will be submitted with each set of samples. If the number of samples in a set exceeds 10, then submit at the rate of one...2 Gelman PSPJ037 (For PAH) 37 2 Membrana ’ - PVC 37 5 Gelman 66467 37 5 Nuclepore 361850 Filter only 240810 Pad only Swinnex Cassette 13 - Millipore

  12. Simple street tree sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Nowak; Jeffrey T. Walton; James Baldwin; Jerry. Bond

    2015-01-01

    Information on street trees is critical for management of this important resource. Sampling of street tree populations provides an efficient means to obtain street tree population information. Long-term repeat measures of street tree samples supply additional information on street tree changes and can be used to report damages from catastrophic events. Analyses of...

  13. Sampling system and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, David L.; Lyles, Brad F.; Purcell, Richard G.; Hershey, Ronald Lee

    2013-04-16

    The present disclosure provides an apparatus and method for coupling conduit segments together. A first pump obtains a sample and transmits it through a first conduit to a reservoir accessible by a second pump. The second pump further conducts the sample from the reservoir through a second conduit.

  14. Extraterrestrial Samples at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Carlton C.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the curation of extraterrestrial samples at NASA Johnson Space Center is shown. The topics include: 1) Apollo lunar samples; 2) Meteorites from Antarctica; 3) Cosmic dust from the stratosphere; 4) Genesis solar wind ions; 5) Stardust comet and interstellar grains; and 5) Space-Exposed Hardware.

  15. Gaussian Boson Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Craig S.; Kruse, Regina; Sansoni, Linda; Barkhofen, Sonja; Silberhorn, Christine; Jex, Igor

    2017-10-01

    Boson sampling has emerged as a tool to explore the advantages of quantum over classical computers as it does not require universal control over the quantum system, which favors current photonic experimental platforms. Here, we introduce Gaussian Boson sampling, a classically hard-to-solve problem that uses squeezed states as a nonclassical resource. We relate the probability to measure specific photon patterns from a general Gaussian state in the Fock basis to a matrix function called the Hafnian, which answers the last remaining question of sampling from Gaussian states. Based on this result, we design Gaussian Boson sampling, a #P hard problem, using squeezed states. This demonstrates that Boson sampling from Gaussian states is possible, with significant advantages in the photon generation probability, compared to existing protocols.

  16. Sample pretretment in microsystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perch-Nielsen, Ivan R.

    2003-01-01

    When a sample, e.g. from a patient, is processed using conventional methods, the sample must be transported to the laboratory where it is analyzed, after which the results is sent back. By integrating the separate steps of the analysis in a micro total analysis system (μTAS), results can......: Sample preparation → DNA amplification → DNA analysis. The overall goal of the project is integration of as many as possible of these steps. This thesis covers mainly pretreatment in a microchip. Some methods for sample pretreatment have been tested. Most conventional is fluorescence activated cell sort...... be obtained fast and better. Preferably with all the processes from sample to signal moved to the bedside of the patient. Of course there is still much to learn and study in the process of miniaturization. DNA analysis is one process subject to integration. There are roughly three steps in a DNA analysis...

  17. Biological sample collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Gloria A [French Camp, CA

    2010-09-07

    A biological sample collector is adapted to a collect several biological samples in a plurality of filter wells. A biological sample collector may comprise a manifold plate for mounting a filter plate thereon, the filter plate having a plurality of filter wells therein; a hollow slider for engaging and positioning a tube that slides therethrough; and a slide case within which the hollow slider travels to allow the tube to be aligned with a selected filter well of the plurality of filter wells, wherein when the tube is aligned with the selected filter well, the tube is pushed through the hollow slider and into the selected filter well to sealingly engage the selected filter well and to allow the tube to deposit a biological sample onto a filter in the bottom of the selected filter well. The biological sample collector may be portable.

  18. Characterization of superconducting multilayers samples

    CERN Document Server

    Antoine, C Z; Berry, S; Bouat, S; Jacquot, J F; Villegier, J C; Lamura, G; Gurevich, A

    2009-01-01

    Best RF bulk niobium accelerating cavities have nearly reached their ultimate limits at rf equatorial magnetic field H  200 mT close to the thermodynamic critical field Hc. In 2006 Gurevich proposed to use nanoscale layers of superconducting materials with high values of Hc > HcNb for magnetic shielding of bulk niobium to increase the breakdown magnetic field inside SC RF cavities [1]. Depositing good quality layers inside a whole cavity is rather difficult but we have sputtered high quality samples by applying the technique used for the preparation of superconducting electronics circuits and characterized these samples by X-ray reflectivity, dc resistivity (PPMS) and dc magnetization (SQUID). Dc magnetization curves of a 250 nm thick Nb film have been measured, with and without a magnetron sputtered coating of a single or multiple stack of 15 nm MgO and 25 nm NbN layers. The Nb samples with/without the coating clearly exhibit different behaviors. Because SQUID measurements are influenced by edge an...

  19. Rapid Active Sampling Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    A field-deployable, battery-powered Rapid Active Sampling Package (RASP), originally designed for sampling strong materials during lunar and planetary missions, shows strong utility for terrestrial geological use. The technology is proving to be simple and effective for sampling and processing materials of strength. Although this originally was intended for planetary and lunar applications, the RASP is very useful as a powered hand tool for geologists and the mining industry to quickly sample and process rocks in the field on Earth. The RASP allows geologists to surgically acquire samples of rock for later laboratory analysis. This tool, roughly the size of a wrench, allows the user to cut away swaths of weathering rinds, revealing pristine rock surfaces for observation and subsequent sampling with the same tool. RASPing deeper (.3.5 cm) exposes single rock strata in-situ. Where a geologist fs hammer can only expose unweathered layers of rock, the RASP can do the same, and then has the added ability to capture and process samples into powder with particle sizes less than 150 microns, making it easier for XRD/XRF (x-ray diffraction/x-ray fluorescence). The tool uses a rotating rasp bit (or two counter-rotating bits) that resides inside or above the catch container. The container has an open slot to allow the bit to extend outside the container and to allow cuttings to enter and be caught. When the slot and rasp bit are in contact with a substrate, the bit is plunged into it in a matter of seconds to reach pristine rock. A user in the field may sample a rock multiple times at multiple depths in minutes, instead of having to cut out huge, heavy rock samples for transport back to a lab for analysis. Because of the speed and accuracy of the RASP, hundreds of samples can be taken in one day. RASP-acquired samples are small and easily carried. A user can characterize more area in less time than by using conventional methods. The field-deployable RASP used a Ni

  20. Contributions to sampling statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Conti, Pier; Ranalli, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This book contains a selection of the papers presented at the ITACOSM 2013 Conference, held in Milan in June 2013. ITACOSM is the bi-annual meeting of the Survey Sampling Group S2G of the Italian Statistical Society, intended as an international  forum of scientific discussion on the developments of theory and application of survey sampling methodologies and applications in human and natural sciences. The book gathers research papers carefully selected from both invited and contributed sessions of the conference. The whole book appears to be a relevant contribution to various key aspects of sampling methodology and techniques; it deals with some hot topics in sampling theory, such as calibration, quantile-regression and multiple frame surveys, and with innovative methodologies in important topics of both sampling theory and applications. Contributions cut across current sampling methodologies such as interval estimation for complex samples, randomized responses, bootstrap, weighting, modeling, imputati...