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Sample records for chalk mounds stevns

  1. Late Maastrichtian chalk mounds, Stevns Klint, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderskouv, Kresten; Damholt, Tove; Surlyk, Finn

    Upper Maastrichtian chalk exposed in the Sigerslev quarry, Stevns Klint, Denmark shows wavy and mound-like bedding geometries outlined by bands of black flint nodules. Bedding geometries are highly variable, but four morphological elements are recognized: Southward migrating mounds, eastward...

  2. Late Maastrichtian chalk mounds, Stevns Klint, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderskouv, Kresten; Damholt, Tove; Surlyk, Finn

    2007-01-01

    Upper Maastrichtian chalk exposed at the Sigerslev quarry, Stevns Klint, Denmark is characterized by wavy and mound-like bedding geometries outlined by bands of black flint nodules. Four morphological elements are recognized, although bedding geometries are highly variable: southward migrating...

  3. Late Maastrichtian chalk mounds, Stevns Klint, Denmark — Combined physical and biogenic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderskouv, Kresten; Damholt, Tove; Surlyk, Finn

    2007-08-01

    Upper Maastrichtian chalk exposed at the Sigerslev quarry, Stevns Klint, Denmark is characterized by wavy and mound-like bedding geometries outlined by bands of black flint nodules. Four morphological elements are recognized, although bedding geometries are highly variable: southward migrating mounds, eastward migrating mounds, chalk waves and evenly bedded chalk. The mounds are interpreted as having been formed by currents carrying fine-grained suspended sediment which was primarily deposited on the up-current mound flanks. Bryozoans were prolific on the up-current flanks and mound summits, which stabilized the mounds, increased bed roughness and the overall accumulation rate. However, accumulation thicknesses do not correlate consistently with bryozoan density. The bryozoans were therefore important for the formation of the mounds, but the distribution of bryozoans did not solely determine depositional thickness across a mound and thus mound growth pattern. Relatively long wavelength wavy-bedded chalk show gentle convex-up geometries and would probably be described as sediment waves if recognized in seismic sections. The chalk waves were deposited under weaker current velocities than those active during mound formation. The exposed succession is topped by more evenly bedded chalk which was deposited by quiet pelagic fall-out of fine-grained material. The whole succession was deposited on the upper part of the northern flank of a large WNW-ESE trending 3 km wide depositional ridge with an amplitude of 35-40 m formed by contour-parallel WNW-ward flowing bottom currents. The mounds may have been deposited by regional bottom currents, or by spill-over currents from the valley south of the large ridge. The succession was deposited during varying bottom current intensities and the depositional architecture indicates a complex and dynamic environment. The depositional style seems to be controlled by the interplay and relative importance of two end-member processes

  4. Marine macrofossil communities in the uppermost Maastrichtian chalk of Stevns Klint, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas; Surlyk, Finn

    2014-01-01

    Three successive marine habitats and their benthic macrofossil communities have been recognised and assessed in the uppermost Maastrichtian chalk of Stevns Klint, Denmark. The mound-bedded lower Sigerslev Member was deposited below the photic zone under the influence of persistent, non-erosive bo......Three successive marine habitats and their benthic macrofossil communities have been recognised and assessed in the uppermost Maastrichtian chalk of Stevns Klint, Denmark. The mound-bedded lower Sigerslev Member was deposited below the photic zone under the influence of persistent, non......-erosive bottom currents. It is draped by the upper Sigerslev Member, which was laid down in deeper water than any other chalk known from onshore Denmark. Deposition took place under quiet conditions, apparently not influenced by bottom currents. The sparse level-bottom community lived on a seafloor with low...... growth of small-sized bryozoans governed by nutrient-rich currents from the south. The macrofauna of this member is of very high density and richness, yet species composition is similar to that of the mound-bedded lower Sigerslev Member. The bryozoan thickets of the two members are accompanied by a rich...

  5. Diagenesis of silica-rich mounded chalk, the Coniacian Arnager Limestone, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus Madsen, Heine; Stemmerik, Lars; Surlyk, Finn

    2010-01-01

    The Coniacian Arnager Limestone Formation is exposed on the Danish island of Bornholm in the Baltic Sea. It is composed of mound-bedded siliceous chalk, and X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy indicate a content of 30-70% insoluble minerals, including authigenic opal-CT, quartz......, clinoptilolite, feldspars, calcite, dolomite, and barite. Opal-CT and clinoptilolite are the most common and constitute 16-53% and 2-9%, respectively. The content of insoluble minerals varies laterally bothwithinthemounds and inplanar beds, and the opal-CT content varies by up to 10% vertically. Themounds...... precipitation of opal-CT. The opal-CT formed at temperatures around 17°C, the precipitation lowered the silica activity and the Si/Al ratio of the pore water, resulting in precipitation of clinoptilolite, feldspar and smectite. Calcite formed synchronouslywith the latest clinoptilolite.Minoramounts of quartz...

  6. Effect of Fluid Dynamic Viscosity on the Strength of Chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, K.; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    The mechanical strength of high porosity and weakly cemented chalk is affected by the fluid in the pores. In this study, the effect of the dynamic viscosity of non-polar fluids has been measured on outcrop chalk from Sigerslev Quarry, Stevns, Denmark. The outcome is that the measured strength...

  7. Dialog mellem kommunen og virksomheder på Stevns

    OpenAIRE

    Høier, Jon Plenge; Jensen, Mikkel Lundemann

    2013-01-01

    This project is concerned with the dialogue between the municipality and the corporations in Stevns. Statistic research has shown that the dialogue between the two is quite poor. In this project we wish to examine what challenges the municipality and the business sector in Stevns face with regards to good dialogue. We will do so by analysing official documents from Stevns while also conducting interviews with five representatively chosen business owners, the deputy chief municipal executive, ...

  8. Three-dimensional architecture and development of Danianbryozoan mounds at Limhamn, south-west Sweden, usingground-penetrating radar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars; Schack von Brockdorff, A.; Bjerager, Morten Gustav Erik;

    2009-01-01

    showing migration directions towards the south. These differences in mound geometry may be the result of differences in the current systems and water depths that existed during formation of the early and middle Danian mounds, respectively. The mounds at Limhamn were located closer to the basin margin...... in shallower water than those at Stevns Klint and Karlby Klint. In addition, the difference in mound architecture may be due to the occurrence of non-layered, irregular coral mounds intercalated with the bryozoan mounds at Limhamn....

  9. Managing Injected Water Composition To Improve Oil Recovery: A Case Study of North Sea Chalk Reservoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahid, Adeel; Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan;

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, many core displacement experiments of oil by seawater performed on chalk rock samples have reported SO42–, Ca2+, and Mg2+ as potential determining ions for improving oil recovery. Most of these studies were carried out with outcrop chalk core plugs. The objective of this study...... imbibition, which has been applied in most of the previous studies. Two different flooding schemes (with and without aging) were used for flooding North Sea reservoir chalk samples. For comparison, two tests were also carried out with Stevns Klint core plugs. The flooding tests were carried out...... with the following injecting fluids: distilled water, brine with and without sulfate, and brine containing only magnesium ions. The total oil recovery, recovery rate, and interaction mechanisms of ions with rock were studied for different injecting fluids at different temperatures and wettability conditions. Studies...

  10. Late Cretaceous (Late Campanian-Maastrichtian) sea surface temperature record of the Boreal Chalk Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, N.; Harlou, R.; Schovsbo, N. H.; Stemmerik, L.; Surlyk, F.

    2015-11-01

    The last 8 Myr of the Cretaceous greenhouse interval were characterized by a progressive global cooling with superimposed cool/warm fluctuations. The mechanisms responsible for these climatic fluctuations remain a source of debate that can only be resolved through multi-disciplinary studies and better time constraints. For the first time, we present a record of very high-resolution (ca. 4.5 kyr) sea-surface temperature (SST) changes from the Boreal epicontinental Chalk Sea (Stevns-1 core, Denmark), tied to an astronomical time scale of the late Campanian-Maastrichtian (74 to 66 Myr). Well-preserved bulk stable isotope trends and calcareous nannofossil palaeoecological patterns from the fully cored Stevns-1 borehole show marked changes in SSTs. These variations correlate with deep-water records of climate change from the tropical South Atlantic and Pacific oceans but differ greatly from the climate variations of the North Atlantic. We demonstrate that the onset and end of the early Maastrichtian cooling and of the large negative Campanian-Maastrichtian boundary carbon isotope excursion are coincident in the Chalk Sea. The direct link between SSTs and δ13C variations in the Chalk Sea reassesses long-term glacio-eustasy as the potential driver of carbon isotope and climatic variations in the Maastrichtian.

  11. Late Cretaceous (late Campanian-Maastrichtian) sea-surface temperature record of the Boreal Chalk Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Nicolas; Harlou, Rikke; Schovsbo, Niels H.; Stemmerik, Lars; Surlyk, Finn

    2016-02-01

    The last 8 Myr of the Cretaceous greenhouse interval were characterized by a progressive global cooling with superimposed cool/warm fluctuations. The mechanisms responsible for these climatic fluctuations remain a source of debate that can only be resolved through multi-disciplinary studies and better time constraints. For the first time, we present a record of very high-resolution (ca. 4.5 kyr) sea-surface temperature (SST) changes from the Boreal epicontinental Chalk Sea (Stevns-1 core, Denmark), tied to an astronomical timescale of the late Campanian-Maastrichtian (74 to 66 Ma). Well-preserved bulk stable isotope trends and calcareous nannofossil palaeoecological patterns from the fully cored Stevns-1 borehole show marked changes in SSTs. These variations correlate with deep-water records of climate change from the tropical South Atlantic and Pacific oceans but differ greatly from the climate variations of the North Atlantic. We demonstrate that the onset and end of the early Maastrichtian cooling and of the large negative Campanian-Maastrichtian boundary carbon isotope excursion are coincident in the Chalk Sea. The direct link between SSTs and δ13C variations in the Chalk Sea reassesses long-term glacio-eustasy as the potential driver of carbon isotope and climatic variations in the Maastrichtian.

  12. Late Cretaceous (Late Campanian–Maastrichtian sea surface temperature record of the Boreal Chalk Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Thibault

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The last 8 Myr of the Cretaceous greenhouse interval were characterized by a progressive global cooling with superimposed cool/warm fluctuations. The mechanisms responsible for these climatic fluctuations remain a source of debate that can only be resolved through multi-disciplinary studies and better time constraints. For the first time, we present a record of very high-resolution (ca. 4.5 kyr sea-surface temperature (SST changes from the Boreal epicontinental Chalk Sea (Stevns-1 core, Denmark, tied to an astronomical time scale of the late Campanian–Maastrichtian (74 to 66 Myr. Well-preserved bulk stable isotope trends and calcareous nannofossil palaeoecological patterns from the fully cored Stevns-1 borehole show marked changes in SSTs. These variations correlate with deep-water records of climate change from the tropical South Atlantic and Pacific oceans but differ greatly from the climate variations of the North Atlantic. We demonstrate that the onset and end of the early Maastrichtian cooling and of the large negative Campanian–Maastrichtian boundary carbon isotope excursion are coincident in the Chalk Sea. The direct link between SSTs and δ13C variations in the Chalk Sea reassesses long-term glacio-eustasy as the potential driver of carbon isotope and climatic variations in the Maastrichtian.

  13. Diagenesis of Flint and Porcellanite in the Maastrichtian Chalk at Stevns Klint, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus Madsen, Heine; Stemmerik, Lars

    2010-01-01

    and ordered megaquartz in irregular voids indicates that silica gel and/or opal-CT transformed to the -quartz phases, microquartz, lutecite, chalcedony, and megaquartz, through the dissolution–precipitation process (Ostwald ripening). These results motivate a conceptual model in which the replacement process...... was initiated by microbial decomposition of organic matter and took place during periods of low rate of, or even stopped, sedimentation which fixed the redox boundary and the microbial metabolic zones at a specific depth below the sea floor. Biogenic opal-A incorporated in the sediment column below the sea...... floor was dissolved and precipitated at the redox boundary as silica gel and/or opal-CT, possibly aided by sulfide-oxidizing bacteria. During burial, the dissolution–precipitation process transformed the silica gel and opal-CT to the -quartz phases. The results of this study indicate that precipitation...

  14. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Elastic Wave Velocity of Chalk Saturated with Brines Containing Divalent Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has proven a good technique for measuring pore size distribution in reservoir rocks. The use of low field NMR together with sonic and electrical resistivity measurements, can contribute to illustrate the effect of adsorbing ions on chalk elasticity. NMR is useful...... for the study of the physical and chemical phenomena within saturated cores and sonic velocity is intimately connected to density and elastic constants of the rock. In this study we relate NMR data to changes in P-wave velocity due to ion adsorption. Core plugs from outcrop Stevns chalk, of ~45% porosity, were...... of the relaxation time. Core samples saturated with calcium chloride solution relaxed slower and those saturated with magnesium chloride solution relaxed faster than the rest of the samples. Along with the changes in relaxation the samples experienced smaller velocities of elastic waves when saturated with MgCl2...

  15. Experimental Study of Bacterial Penetration into Chalk Rock: Mechanisms and Effect on Permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halim, Amalia Yunita; Shapiro, Alexander; Eliasson Lantz, Anna;

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial selective plugging is one of the mechanisms through which microorganisms can be applied for enhanced oil recovery, as bacteria can plug the water-swept zones of a reservoir, thus altering the flow paths and improving sweep efficiency. However, complete understanding of the penetration...... behavior of bacteria is lacking, especially in chalk formations where characteristic pore throat sizes are comparable with the sizes of bacterial cells. In this study, two bacterial strains, Bacillus licheniformis 421 (spore-forming) and Pseudomonas putida K12 (non-spore forming) were used to investigate...... the penetration of bacteria into chalk and its effect on permeability reduction. The core plugs were produced from Stevns Klint outcrop with low permeability (2–4 mD) and with pore sizes comparable to bacterial sizes. Both types of bacteria were able to penetrate and to be transported through the cores to some...

  16. Seismic architecture of the Chalk Group from onshore reflection data in eastern Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, Julien; Anderskouv, Kresten; Boldreel, Lars Ole;

    The Upper Cretaceous-Danian chalk is well exposed in the 14 km long coastal cliff of Stevns Klint (eastern Denmark). The cliff is a world renowned for its spectacular exposure of the Cretaceous-Palaeogene boundary. Based on regional geological knowledge of the field and cores, the characteristics...... but the succession has been uplifted of c. 1 km. The main fracture patterns are associated with the recent unloading of the ice, opening shallow horizontal fractures. Subvertical fracturation affects also the Chalk and contribute to most of the permeability. Observation of the seismic reflection profiles shows...... intensive fracturing association with local folds and offsets of reflections reaching 20 metres. The seismic signal is particularly damaged by swarms of fractures which resemble flower structures or polygonal fracture networks. Even if some of the fracture swarms seem to reach the Earth's surface, most...

  17. Chalk as a reservoir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    , or be partly or fully cemented where diagenesis is more pronounced. It is a chalk characteristic that permea bility is controlled by the porosity and internal surface of the mud matrix, whereas the larger pores play an insignificant role. Cemented microfossils may take up a significant volume in a wackestone......Reservoir properties of chalk depend on the primary sediment composition as well as on subsequent diagenesis and tectonic events. Chalks of the North Sea almost exclusively have mudstone or wackestone texture. Microfossils may have retained their porosity where degree of diagenesis is low...... reduces porosity at the same time as it increases specific surface and thus cause permeability to be low. In the Central North Sea the silica is quartzitic. Silica rich chalk intervals are typically found in the Ekofisk and Hod formations. In addition to silica, Upper Cretaceous and Palæogene chalks...

  18. The sedimentology of redeposited chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderskouv, Kresten; Surlyk, Finn; Gale, Andy

    , interpretation, and predictability of redeposited chalk facies remain uncertain. This project aims to improve existing facies models by investigating and comparing redeposited chalk units from a variety of settings. Long cores from the Danish and British sectors are interpreted in terms of depositional process......Redeposited facies in the Upper Cretaceous Chalk Group constitute major hydrocarbon reservoirs in the North Sea Central Graben. Existing facies models are largely based on publications from the early 1980's dealing with core material from the Norwegian sector. However, the recognition...

  19. Permeability prediction in chalks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Prasad, Manika

    2011-01-01

    The velocity of elastic waves is the primary datum available for acquiring information about subsurface characteristics such as lithology and porosity. Cheap and quick (spatial coverage, ease of measurement) information of permeability can be achieved, if sonic velocity is used for permeability......-permeability relationships were replaced by relationships between velocity of elastic waves and permeability using laboratory data, and the relationships were then applied to well-log data. We found that the permeability prediction in chalk and possibly other sediments with large surface areas could be improved...... significantly using the effective specific surface as the fluid-flow concept. The FZI unit is appropriate for highly permeable sedimentary rocks such as sandstones and limestones that have small surface areas....

  20. Less chalk more action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitriceski Andelkovic, Bojana; Jovic, Sladjana

    2016-04-01

    Less chalk more action Education should not be a mechanical system that operates according to the principles of the orders and implementation. Education should respect the basic laws of the develop and progress. Curiosity is the engine of achievement and children spontaneously and happily learn only if they get interested, if teacher wake up and stimulate their creativity and individuality. We would like to present classes that are realized as thematic teaching with several subjects involved: chemistry, geography, math, art and biology. Classes were organized for students at age from 10 to 13 years, every month during autumn and winter 2015. Better students identified themselves as teachers and presented peer education .Teachers were monitoring the process of teaching and help to develop links between younger and older students, where older students were educators to younger students. Also one student with special needs was involved in this activities and was supported by other students during the workshops The benefit from this project will be represented with evaluation marks. Evaluation table shows that group of ten students(age 10 to13 years) which are selected in October as children with lack of motivation for learning, got better marks, at the end of January , then they had it in the beginning of the semester.

  1. Mound facility physical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonne, W.R.; Alexander, B.M.; Cage, M.R.; Hase, E.H.; Schmidt, M.J.; Schneider, J.E.; Slusher, W.; Todd, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a baseline physical characterization of Mound`s facilities as of September 1993. The baseline characterizations are to be used in the development of long-term future use strategy development for the Mound site. This document describes the current missions and alternative future use scenarios for each building. Current mission descriptions cover facility capabilities, physical resources required to support operations, current safety envelope and current status of facilities. Future use scenarios identify potential alternative future uses, facility modifications required for likely use, facility modifications of other uses, changes to safety envelope for the likely use, cleanup criteria for each future use scenario, and disposition of surplus equipment. This Introductory Chapter includes an Executive Summary that contains narrative on the Functional Unit Material Condition, Current Facility Status, Listing of Buildings, Space Plans, Summary of Maintenance Program and Repair Backlog, Environmental Restoration, and Decontamination and Decommissioning Programs. Under Section B, Site Description, is a brief listing of the Site PS Development, as well as Current Utility Sources. Section C contains Site Assumptions. A Maintenance Program Overview, as well as Current Deficiencies, is contained within the Maintenance Program Chapter.

  2. Ecologically acceptable flows in Chalk rivers

    OpenAIRE

    Acreman, Mike; Dunbar, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The term ‘Chalk rivers’ is used to describe all those water courses dominated by groundwater discharge from Chalk geology. Natural conditions and historical modification have generated an ecosystem, with rich and unique assemblages and with high value to society (e.g. SACs, SSSIs, visual amenity and fisheries. Chalk rivers are considered to be sensitive to hydrological and morphological change and there is concern that flood defence and land drainage schemes, catchment agriculture, urbanisati...

  3. Poroelasticity of high porosity chalk under depletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Katrine Alling; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2013-01-01

    levels of pore pressure. The chalk is oil-saturated Lixhe chalk from a quarry near Liège, Belgium, with a general porosity of 45%. Additionally, we compare the theoretical lateral stress to the experimentally determined lateral stress at the onset of pore collapse. The static Biot coefficient based...

  4. Self Compacting Concrete with Chalk Filler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    2007-01-01

    at 28 days from about 35 MPa down to about 13 MPa. The cementing efficiency factor of the chalk filler was found to be in the range 0.21 - 0.42. The chalk filler performed equally well with a grey and a white cement; the latter opens the possibility to produce white SCC more cost effectively....

  5. Permeability of Rubble Mound Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, A.F.; Burcharth, H. F.; Adel, H. den;

    The flow of water through the pores of rubble mound breakwaters has two effects upon breakwater performance. The pore pressures generated within the rubble material will effect the stability of the mound. The flow of water in and out of the pores plays a critical part in the dissipation of wave e...

  6. Analysis of Rubble Mound Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mettam, J.D.; Allsop, N.W.H.; Bonafous, P.;

    Working Group 12 was set up to consider the analysis of rubble mound breakwaters with a view to achieving a better understanding of safety aspects. The working group decided to develop the practical application of risk analysis in the design of rubble mound breakwaters by using partial coefficien...

  7. Biometric analysis of the Arkhangelskiella group in the upper Campanian-Maastrichtian of the stevns-1 borehole, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thibault, Nicolas Rudolph

    2010-01-01

    The taxonomy of the calcareous nannofossil Arkhangelskiella is revised using the results of a biometric analysis performed on 599 specimens from various stratigraphic levels throughout the upper Campanian-Maastrichtian of the Stevns-1 borehole, Denmark. Combined qualitative labelling and biometric...... in the coccolith length and in the rim width, and that the central opening is an important additional parameter allowing distinction between the different morphogroups. Biometric analysis shows, however, that the morphogroups are strongly overlapping on all measured parameters. Therefore, the three distinct...

  8. Nickel adsorption on chalk and calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belova, Dina Alexandrovna; Lakshtanov, Leonid; Carneiro, J.F.;

    2014-01-01

    Nickel uptake from solution by two types of chalk and calcite was investigated in batch sorption studies. The goal was to understand the difference in sorption behavior between synthetic and biogenic calcite. Experiments at atmospheric partial pressure of CO2, in solutions equilibrated with calcite...... = - 1.12 on calcite and log KNi = - 0.43 and - 0.50 on the two chalk samples. The study confirms that synthetic calcite and chalk both take up nickel, but Ni binds more strongly on the biogenic calcite than on inorganically precipitated, synthetic powder, because of the presence of trace amounts...

  9. Reactor loops at Chalk River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes broadly the nine in-reactor loops, and their components, located in and around the NRX and NRU reactors at Chalk River. First an introduction and general description is given of the loops and their function, supplemented with a table outlining some loop specifications and nine simplified flow sheets, one for each individual loop. The report then proceeds to classify each loop into two categories, the 'main loop circuit' and the 'auxiliary circuit', and descriptions are given of each circuit's components in turn. These components, in part, are comprised of the main loop pumps, the test section, loop heaters, loop coolers, delayed-neutron monitors, surge tank, Dowtherm coolers, loop piping. Here again photographs, drawings and tables are included to provide a clearer understanding of the descriptive literature and to include, in tables, some specifications of the more important components in each loop. (author)

  10. Rubble Mound Breakwater Failure Modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Z., Liu

    1995-01-01

    The RMBFM-Project (Rubble Mound Breakwater Failure Modes) is sponsored by the Directorate General XII of the Commission of the European Communities under the Contract MAS-CT92- 0042, with the objective of contributing to the development of rational methods for the design of rubble mound breakwaters...... modes, plus development of related partial coefficients which make it possible to design according to preselected reliability levels. Due to limited space only the major activities are described....

  11. Understanding heterogeneity in UK Chalk catchments and its influence on groundwater flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, D. W.; Vounaki, T.; Jackson, C. R.; Hughes, A. G.; Wheater, H. S.

    2008-12-01

    The numerical simulation of groundwater flooding is increasingly necessary as this problem is gaining recognition from government and regulators and climate change may bring more extreme events. The Natural Environment Research Council of the UK is funding the British Geological Survey, Imperial College, and the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology to examine the problem of groundwater flooding in the Cretaceous Chalk of Berkshire, 50 kilometres west of London. Typically regional resource issues can be examined using traditional groundwater models that do not consider in detail the influence of flow in the unsaturated zone, but the delays in recharge transmission through this zone to the water table may be very significant in terms of flood timing and prediction. The position of ground elevation relative to water table is clearly important but not often considered in groundwater resource modelling. Groundwater level and stream (and flood) flow responses are important data that may be hard to gather from typical groundwater monitoring systems. These problems have been examined in a Chalk catchment in Berkshire where good records of the 2000-1 and 2003 flooding events have been collected, including flooded extent, rainfall, groundwater levels, river and spring flows. From this analysis, it appears that two groundwater mounds develop in the upper part of the Pang and Lambourn catchments. These mounds intersect dry valleys, which flowed for several months, the consequent flooding causing considerably disruption. Modelling of these events is providing new insight into the heterogeneity of Chalk transmissivity and storage parameters, enhanced knowledge of its dual permeability and porosity and demonstrating the importance of understanding the post-depositional hydrogeological history of the aquifer.

  12. The North Sea reservoir chalk characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Kallesten, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    A significant amount of the hydrocarbon production in the North Sea is related to chalk reservoirs. Since 1969, the chalk play remains one of the most important oil sources in Norway. With the initial expected recovery factor 17%, development in technologies and methods contributed to a substantial increase in oil recovery to an approximately 40%. Much of the reserves in place are yet to be extracted, and secondary and tertiary recovery methods need to advance in order to mobilize the remaini...

  13. Chalk: composition, diagenesis and physical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2007-01-01

    Chalk is a sedimentary rock of unusually high homogeneity on the scale where physical properties are measured, but the properties fall in wide ranges. Chalk may thus be seen as the ideal starting point for a physical understanding of rocks in general. Properties as porosity, permeability, capillary entry pressure, and elastic moduli are consequences of primary sediment composition and ofsubsequent diagenetic history as caused by microbial action, burial stress, temperature, and pore pressure....

  14. Subsidence and capillary effects in chalks

    OpenAIRE

    Delage, Pierre; Schroeder, Christian; Cui, Yu-Jun

    1996-01-01

    Based on the concepts of the mechanics of unsaturated soils where capillary phenomena arise between the wetting fluid (water) and the non-wetting one (air), the subsidence of chalks containing oil (non-wetting fluid) during water injection (wetting fluid) is analysed. It is shown that the collapse phenomenon of unsaturated soils under wetting provides a physical explanation and a satisfactory prediction of the order of magnitude of the subsidence of the chalk. The use of a well established co...

  15. Geochemistry of the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary (Fish Clay at Stevns Klint (Denmark: Ir, Ni and Zn in kerogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAVLE I. PREMOVIC

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Geochemical analyses of trace metals (Ir, Ni and Zn in the kerogen of the black marl of the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary succession (Fish Clay at Stevns Klint (Hjerup Church were undertaken. The data for this kerogen were in accordance with a previous hypothesis that this (insoluble geoorganic polymer was derived from humic substances (mainly humic acids of a nearshore soil. Substantial proportions of Ir, Ni and Zn within the kerogen structure were probably contained in these substances arriving at the sedimentary site. It is proposed that these humics were probably transported by acid surface waters (induced by the KT asteroid impact into the shallow marine basin of Stevns Klint. It is also suggested that local leaching/weathering of the asteroidal impact fallout on the land near these waters played an important role in providing Ir, Ni and Zn for these substances. Apparently, Ir, Ni and Zn of the kerogen were created by the chondritic component of the impact ejecta fallout.

  16. Impact of diagenesis on carbonate mound formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Land, C.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to define the parameters influencing cold-water coral growth and therefore carbonate mound development with a focus on the impact of diagenesis on mound sediments. The first part of this thesis (Chapters 2 to 4) discusses the distributionand growth history of carbonate mounds,

  17. Chalk Formations as Natural Barriers towards Radionuclide Migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Walther Batsberg; Carlsen, Lars; Jensen, Bror Skytte

    1985-01-01

    A series of chalk samples from the cretaceous formation overlying the Erslev salt dome have been studied in order to establish permeabilities, porosities, dispersion-, diffusion-, and sorption characteristics of the chalk. The chalk was found to be porous (∊≈0.4), however, of rather low permeabil...

  18. Microdeformation and subcritical cracking in chalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsaker, Anne; Dysthe, Dag Kristian

    2016-04-01

    Deformation processes in chalks, both in relation to changing pore fluids and stress conditions has been of great interest as chalk is an important reservoir rock for both hydrocarbons and ground water. Lately it has also gained interest as a potential reservoir rock for captured CO2. Chalks are composed of large amounts of biogenic calcite grains, the skeletal debris of marine microorganisms. Its deformation is highly time and stress dependent, and governed by a transition from distributed to localized deformation at the onset of yield, affected by mechanisms such as subcritical crack growth and pore collapse. We present a microdeformation rig which makes use of thermal expansion as a means of subjecting small samples to strictly controlled tensile stresses. High resolution imaging provides resolutions down to 0.5 micrometers, enabling study of pore scale processes during slow deformation. Examples of localized and distributed deformation are presented.

  19. Elastic behaviour of North Sea chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gommesen, Lars; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Mukerji, T.;

    2007-01-01

    -consistent approximation, which here represents the unrelaxed scenario where the pore spaces of the rock are assumed to be isolated, and the Gassmann theory, which assumes that pore spaces are connected, as tools for predicting the effect of hydrocarbons from the elastic properties of brine-saturated North Sea reservoir......We present two different elastic models for, respectively, cemented and uncemented North Sea chalk well-log data. We find that low Biot coefficients correlate with anomalously low cementation factors from resistivity measurements at low porosity and we interpret this as an indication of cementation...... chalk. In the acoustic impedance–Poisson's ratio plane, we forecast variations in porosity and hydrocarbon saturation from their influence on the elastic behaviour of the chalk. The Gassmann model and the self-consistent approximation give roughly similar predictions of the effect of fluid on acoustic...

  20. Design of Rubble Mound Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.

    1994-01-01

    Rubble mound breakwaters require availability of often very large quantities of rock materials of various gradings and qualities. Because natural stones are seldom available in sufficient quantities and sizes the materials must in most cases be supplied from quarries. The output from a quarry...

  1. Benthic foraminifera across the K/Pg boundary in the Brazos River area (Texas) and Stevns Klint (Denmark): sequence stratigraphy, sea level change and extinctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Malcolm; Smart, Christopher; Searle, Sarah; Feist, Sean; Leighton, Andrew; Price, Gregory; Twitchett, Richard

    2010-05-01

    sea floor into the range of storm wave base and that this is what is indicated by the "Event Bed". There are a number of water-depth changes in the famous Stevns Klint succession in Denmark, although the majority of the benthic taxa are different. All belong to the normal Chalk Sea assemblage of North West Europe. The planktic assemblage in Denmark is limited and there are no aragonitic taxa (preservation problems). Benthic foraminifera are rare, though generally more abundant in the chalks immediately below the K/T boundary. Work on material from Denmark and the Brazos River successions is on-going including a more detailed assessment of the various morphogroups represented. The presence of an unusual "foraminiferal sand" within the lowermost Paleocene of the Cottonmouth Creek succession has yet to be fully described and its presence is not fully understood (environmental control or re-deposition?). A sequence stratigraphical interpretation of the successions in Texas and Denmark has shown parallel changes in sea level (of the same magnitude in both areas) that are coincident with the major lithological changes. The most significant feature is a fall in sea level some tens of thousands of years before the K/Pg boundary. Cushman, J. A. 1946. Upper Cretaceous Foraminifera of the Gulf Coastal Region of the United States and adjacent areas. U. S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper, 206, 1 - 241. Gale, A. S. 2006. The Cretaceous-Palaeogene boundary on the Brazos River, Falls County, Texas: is there evidence for impact-induced tsunami sedimentation? Proceedings of the Geologists' Association, London, 117, 173 - 185. Keller, G., Abramovich, S., Berner, Z. & Adatte, T. 2009. Biotic effects of the Chicxulub Impact, K-T catastrophe and sea level change in Texas. Palaegeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 271, 52 - 68. Yancey, T. E. 1996. Stratigraphy and depositional environments of the Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary Complex and Basal Paleocene section, Brazos River

  2. Slope failure of chalk channel margins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gale, A.; Anderskouv, Kresten; Surlyk, Finn;

    2015-01-01

    The importance of mass transport and bottom currents is now widely recognized in the Upper Cretaceous Chalk Group of Northern Europe. The detailed dynamics and interaction of the two phenomena are difficult to study as most evidence is based on seismic data and drill core. Here, field observation...

  3. Mound Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) is to describe the environmental monitoring and surveillance programs in place at Mound. The Plan is required by DOE Order 5400.1 (DOE, 1990). The programs described in the EMP are required by the DOE 5400 Order series and by the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environment Surveillance (DOE 1991a), referred to as the Regulatory Guide throughout this Plan

  4. The Bahrain Burial Mound Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Steffen; Johansen, Kasper Lambert

    2007-01-01

    The beginning of archaeology in Bahrain was inspired by the vast burial mound cemeteries, but the picture we have today of the Early Dilmun period is mainly due to excavations in the capital of Dilmun, Qala'at al-Bahrain, the temples at Barbar and the settlement at Saar. v During the last 50 year...... an elite segment of society from around 2200-2050 BC and indicate the emergence of social stratification prior the development of the Dilmun kingdom...

  5. Simulated Mima mounds emerge from small interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, Chloë Peregrine Hunt

    2011-01-01

    The Mima-mound-and-vernal-pool topography of California is rich in endemic plant and invertebrate species, but we do not know how this unusual environment is created or maintained. Burrowing rodents have been observed to move soil upwards at annual rates sufficient to maintain the mounds despite erosion, but there is no tested explanation of this behavior. We propose that the mounds are an emergent effect of small-scale (10 cm, 1 day) interactions between topography, hydrology, plant growth, and rodent burrowing. A cellular automata simulation of these processes both generates and maintains mound-pool topography with minimal dependence on initial conditions, and can also describe mound morphogenesis on slopes, where observed mound geometry is distinct from that on level ground.

  6. Competitive sorption of organic contaminants in chalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, E. R.; Borisover, M.

    2003-12-01

    In the Negev desert, Israel, a chemical industrial complex is located over fractured Eocene chalk formations where transfer of water and solutes between fracture voids and matrix pores affects migration of contaminants in the fractures due to diffusion into the chalk matrix. This study tests sorption and sorption competition between contaminants in the chalk matrix to make it possible to evaluate the potential for contaminant attenuation during transport in fractures. Single solute sorption isotherms on chalk matrix material for five common contaminants ( m-xylene, ametryn, 1,2-dichloroethane, phenanthrene, and 2,4,6-tribromophenol) were found to be nonlinear, as confirmed in plots of Kd versus initial solution concentration. Over the studied concentration ranges, m-xylene Kd varied by more than a factor of 100, ametryn Kd by a factor of 4, 1,2-dichloroethane Kd by more than a factor of 3, phenanthrene Kd by about a factor of 2, and 2,4,6-tribromophenol Kd by a factor of 10. It was earlier found that sorption is to the organic matter component of the chalk matrix and not to the mineral phases (Chemosphere 44 (2001) 1121). Nonlinear sorption isotherms indicate that there is at least some finite sorption domain. Bi-solute competition experiments with 2,4,6-tribromophenol as the competitor were designed to explore the nature of the finite sorption domain. All of the isotherms in the bi-solute experiments are more linear than in the single solute experiments, as confirmed by smaller variations in Kd as a function of initial solution concentration. For both m-xylene and ametryn, there is a small nonlinear component or domain that was apparently not susceptible to competition by 2,4,6-tribromophenol. The nonlinear sorption domain(s) is best expressed at low solution concentrations. Inert-solvent-normalized single and bi-solute sorption isotherms demonstrate that ametryn undergoes specific force interactions with the chalk sorbent. The volume percent of phenanthrene

  7. Chalk: composition, diagenesis and physical properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2007-01-01

    entry pressure, and elastic moduli are consequences of primary sediment composition and of subsequent diagenetic history as caused by microbial action, burial stress, temperature, and pore pressure. Porosity is a main determining factor for other properties. For a given porosity, the specific surface......Chalk is a sedimentary rock of unusually high homogeneity on the scale where physical properties are measured, but the properties fall in wide ranges. Chalk may thus be seen as the ideal starting point for a physical understanding of rocks in general. Properties as porosity, permeability, capillary...... of the sediment controls permeability and capillary entry pressure. As diagenesis progresses, the specific surface is less and less due to the calcite component and more and more due to the fine-grained silicates, as a reflection of the coarsening and cementation of the calcite crystals. The elastic moduli, which...

  8. Design of Rubble Mound Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.

    1992-01-01

    Rubble mound breakwaters require availability of often very large quantities of rock materials of various gradings and qualities. Because natural stones are seldom available in sufficient quantities and sizes the materials must in most cases be supplied from quarries. The output from a quarry...... the construction stage. Anyway, it is seldom that a fair amount of rocks of mass larger than 10-15 t can be produced, even in good quality quarries. If heavier blocks are needed concrete armour units or vertical structures must be considered....

  9. Sulphur Extraction at Bryan Mound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, Carolyn L [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lord, Anna C. Snider [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The Bryan Mound caprock was subjected to extens ive sulphur mining prior to the development of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Undoubtedl y, the mining has modified the caprock integrity. Cavern wells at Bryan Mound have been subject to a host of well integr ity concerns with many likely compromised by the cavernous capro ck, surrounding corrosive environment (H 2 SO 4 ), and associated elevated residual temperatures al l of which are a product of the mining activities. The intent of this study was to understand the sulphur mining process and how the mining has affected the stability of the caprock and how the compromised caprock has influenced the integrity of the cavern wells. After an extensiv e search to collect pert inent information through state agencies, literature sear ches, and the Sandia SPR librar y, a better understanding of the caprock can be inferred from the knowledge gaine d. Specifically, the discovery of the original ore reserve map goes a long way towards modeling caprock stability. In addition the gained knowledge of sulphur mining - subs idence, superheated corrosive wa ters, and caprock collapse - helps to better predict the post mi ning effects on wellbore integrity. This page intentionally left blank

  10. COCARDE: new view on old mounds - an international network of carbonate mound research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüggeberg, A.; Foubert, A.; Vertino, A.; van Rooij, D.; Spezzaferri, S.; Henriet, J.-P.; Dullo, W.-C.; Cocarde Science Community

    2012-04-01

    Carbonate mounds are important contributors of life in different settings, from warm-water to cold-water environments, and throughout geological history. Research on modern cold-water coral carbonate mounds over the last decades made a major contribution to our overall understanding of these particular sedimentary systems. By looking to the modern carbonate mound community with cold-water corals as main framework builders, some fundamental questions could be addressed, until now not yet explored in fossil mound settings. The international network COCARDE (http://www.cocarde.eu) is a platform for exploring new insights in carbonate mound research of recent and ancient mound systems. The aim of the COCARDE network is to bring together scientific communities, studying Recent carbonate mounds in midslope environments in the present ocean and investigating fossil mounds spanning the whole Phanerozoic time, respectively. Scientific challenges in modern and ancient carbonate mound research got well defined during the ESF Magellan Workshop COCARDE in Fribourg, Switzerland (21.-24.01.2009). The Special Volume Cold-water Carbonate Reservoir systems in Deep Environments - COCARDE (Marine Geology, Vol. 282) was the major outcome of this meeting and highlights the diversity of Recent carbonate mound studies. The following first joint Workshop and Field Seminar held in Oviedo, Spain (16.-20.09.2009) highlighted ongoing research from both Recent and fossil academic groups integrating the message from the industry. The field seminar focused on mounds from the Carboniferous platform of Asturias and Cantabria, already intensively visited by industrial and academic researchers. However, by comparing ancient, mixed carbonate-siliciclastic mound systems of Cantabria with the Recent ones in the Porcupine Seabight, striking similarities in their genesis and processes in mound development asked for an integrated drilling campaign to understand better the 3D internal mound build-up. The

  11. The Beauty of the Beasts in Chalk Pastels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skophammer, Karen

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how her seventh-grade art students captured an image of a stuffed animal in the "whole-to-part" drawing technique using chalk pastels. Shading with chalk pastels can give a gradual change in value from dark to light. The shading and color changes the mood of the original drawing, and adds texture, too. Chalk…

  12. The Effect of Bacteria Penetration on Chalk Permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halim, Amalia Yunita; Shapiro, Alexander; Nielsen, Sidsel Marie;

    into reservoirs, however, a complete understanding of the penetration behavior of bacteria is lacking, especially in chalk formations where the pore throat sizes are almost comparable with the sizes of bacteria vegetative cells. This study investigates the penetration of bacteria into chalk. Two bacteria types...

  13. Compaction of North-sea chalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keszthelyi, Dániel; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2014-05-01

    The Ekofisk field is the largest petroleum field in the Norwegian North Sea territory where oil is produced from chalk formations. Early stage of oil production caused considerable changes in pore fluid pressure which led to a reservoir compaction. Pore collapse mechanism caused by the dramatic increase of effective stress, which in turn was caused by the pressure reduction by hydrocarbon depletion, was early identified as a principal reason for the reservoir compaction (Sulak et al. 1991). There have been several attempts to model this compaction. They performed with variable success on predicting the Ekofisk subsidence. However, the most of these models are based on empirical relations and do not investigate in detail the phenomena involved in the compaction. In sake of predicting the Ekofisk subsidence while using only independently measurable variables we used a chalk compaction model valid on geological time-scales (Japsen et al. 2011) assuming plastic pore-collapse mechanism at a threshold effective stress level. We identified the phenomena involved in the pore collapse. By putting them in a sequential order we created a simple statistical analytical model. We also investigated the time-dependence of the phenomena involved and by assuming that one of the phenomena is rate-limiting we could make estimations of the compaction rate at smaller length-scales. By carefully investigating the nature of pressure propagation we could upscale our model to reservoir scale. We found that the predicted compaction rates are close enough to the measured rates. We believe that we could further increase accuracy by refining our model. Sulak, R. M., Thomas, L. K., Boade R. R. (1991) 3D reservoir simulation of Ekofisk compaction drive. Journal of Petroleum Technology, 43(10):1272-1278, 1991. Japsen, P., Dysthe, D. K., Hartz, E. H., Stipp, S. L. S., Yarushina, V. M., Jamtveit. (2011) A compaction front in North Sea chalk. Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth (1978

  14. Chalk effect on PVC cross-linking under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of nonmodified and modified chalk on curing degree of polymer matrix was studied under-irradiation of PVC-compositions. Films of the compositions (100 mass part 7 PVC, 0-100 mas.part of chalk, 2.5 - lead sulfate, 1.5 - lead stearate and 0.3 - glycerin) were irradiated up to absorbed dose 0.1 MGy in an inert medium. Content of gel-fraction after boiling in THF was determined with use of IR spectroscopy. It was established, that intensive dehydrochlorination and polymer curing took place on chalk particle surface. Network fixed strongly chalk particles. However, chalk inhibited processes of dehydrochlorination and PVC curing, increasing amount of noncured PVC in polymer matrix

  15. Iridium, sulfur isotopes and rare earth elements in the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary clay at Stevns Klint, Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, B.; Andersson, P.; Dahl, J.

    1988-01-01

    Microbial activity and redox-controlled precipitation have been of major importance in the process of metal accumulation in the strongly Ir-enriched Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary clay, the Fish Clay, at Stevns Klint in Denmark. Two important findings support this view: (1) Kerogen, recovered by leaching the Fish Clay in HCl and HF, shows an Ir concentration of 1100 ppb; this represents about 50% of the Ir present in the bulk sample Fish clay. Strong organometallic complexes is the most probable carrier phase for this fraction of Ir. Kerogen separated from the K-T boundary clay at Caravaca, Spain, similarly exhibits enhanced Ir concentrations. (2) Sulfur isotope analyses of metal-rich pyrite spherules, which occur in extreme abundance (about 10% by weight) in the basal Fish Clay, give a delta/sup 34/S value of -32 per thousand. This very low value shows that sulfide formation by anaerobic bacteria was intensive in the Fish Clay during early diagenesis. Since the pyrite spherules are major carriers of elements such as Ni, Co, As, Sb and Zn, microbial activity may have played an important role for concentrating these elements. In the Fish Clay large amounts of rare earth elements have precipitated from sea water on fish scales. Analyses reveal that, compared with sea water, the Fish Clay is only about four times less enriched in sea-water derived lanthanides than in Ir. This shows that a sea-water origin is plausible for elements that are strongly enriched in the clay, but whose origin cannot be accounted for by a lithogenic precursor.

  16. Groundwater Mounding Beneath Stormwater Infiltration Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmer, M.; Thompson, A. M.; Misra, D.

    2007-12-01

    An accurate understanding of groundwater mound formation is important in the proper design of stormwater infiltration basins since these basins are often required to recharge a portion of pre-development infiltration volume. Mound formation due to localized recharge may reduce the infiltration rate of the basin and the ability of the soil to filter pollutants. The goal of this research was to understand groundwater mounding and the potential for contaminant transport resulting from recharge beneath stormwater infiltration basins. A 0.10 ha infiltration basin serving a 9.4 ha residential subdivision in Oconomowoc, Wisconsin was used in this study. Subsurface conditions included sand and gravel material and a groundwater table at 2.3 m below grade. Three storm events, 4.9 cm, 2.8 cm, and 4.3 cm, between August 2006 and April 2007 were modeled using the two-dimensional numerical model HYDRUS. The calibrated model was used to evaluate hypothetical basin operation scenarios for various basin sizes, soil types, ponding depths, and water table depths. The groundwater mound intersected the basin floor in most scenarios with loamy sand and sandy loam soils, an unsaturated thickness of 1.52 m, and a ponding depth of 0.61 m. No groundwater table response was observed with ponding depths less than 0.31 m with an unsaturated zone thickness of 6.09 m. The mound height was most sensitive to hydraulic conductivity and unsaturated zone thickness. A 7.6 cm sediment layer delayed the time to reach maximum mound height, but had a minimal effect on the magnitude of the mound. Mound heights increased as infiltration basin size increased.

  17. Kolmanda aastatuhande piraadid / kommenteerinud Peter Chalk ja Gordan Van Hook

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2009-01-01

    Piraatlusest Somaalia piirkonnas ja rahvusvahelistest dokumentidest piraatluse vastu võitlemiseks 21. sajandil. Kommenteerivad uurimiskeskuse RAND Corporation vanempoliitanalüütik Peter Chalk ja transpordikompanii Maersk Line innovatsiooni ja arenduse vanemdirektor Gordan Van Hook

  18. Compaction of microfossil and clay-rich chalk sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2001-01-01

    of microfossils and fine-grained silica and clay. Samples with relatively pure chalk mud supported texture compact along a common stress - matrix porosity trend. Microfossils thus have a passive role, apparently because they are supported by the chalk mud. Samples with fine-grained silica and clay can be modelled...... to Follow the same trend if we assume that a part of the fine-grained silica and clay are in the supporting frame and that the remaining silica and clay has a passive pore-filling role. The modelled part of the day and silica in the frame varies from 0% to 100%. Porosity and sonic velocity variations......The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of microfossils and clay in the compaction of chalk facies sediments. To meet this aim, chalk sediments with varying micro texture were studied. The sediments have been tested uniaxially confined in a stainless-steel compaction cell. The sediments are...

  19. Quantitative 1D saturation profiles on chalk by NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Dan; Topp, Simon; Stensgaard, Anders;

    1996-01-01

    Quantitative one-dimensional saturation profiles showing the distribution of water and oil in chalk core samples are calculated from NMR measurements utilizing a 1D CSI spectroscopy pulse sequence. Saturation profiles may be acquired under conditions of fluid flow through the sample. Results reveal...... that strong saturation gradients exist in chalk core samples after core floods, due to capillary effects. The method is useful in analysis of corefloods, e.g., for determination of capillary pressure functions...

  20. The invertebrate ecology of the Chalk aquifer in England (UK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, L.; Robertson, A. R.; White, D.; Knight, L.; Johns, T.; Edwards, F.; Arietti, M.; Sorensen, J. P. R.; Weitowitz, D.; Marchant, B. P.; Bloomfield, J. P.

    2016-03-01

    The Chalk is an important water supply aquifer, yet ecosystems within it remain poorly understood. Boreholes (198) in seven areas of England (UK) were sampled to determine the importance of the Chalk aquifer as a habitat, and to improve understanding of how species are distributed. Stygobitic macro-invertebrates were remarkably common, and were recorded in 67 % of boreholes in unconcealed Chalk, although they were not recorded in Chalk that is concealed by low-permeability strata and thus likely to be confined. Most species were found in shallow boreholes (50 m) water tables, indicating that the habitat is vertically extensive. Stygobites were present in more boreholes in southern England than northern England (77 % compared to 38 %). Only two species were found in northern England compared to six in southern England, but overall seven of the eight stygobitic macro-invertebrate species found in England were detected in the Chalk. Two species are common in southern England, but absent from northern England despite the presence of a continuous habitat prior to the Devensian glaciation. This suggests that either they did not survive glaciations in the north where glaciers were more extensive, or dispersal rates are slow and they have never colonised northern England. Subsurface ecosystems comprising aquatic macro-invertebrates and meiofauna, as well as the microbial organisms they interact with, are likely to be widespread in the Chalk aquifer. They represent an important contribution to biodiversity, and may influence biogeochemical cycles and provide other ecosystem services.

  1. Hydraulic Response of Rubble Mound Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    Rubble mound breakwaters have been extensively investigated in the last decades. Nevertheless, there still exists some white spots where only little knowledge and only poor design rules are available. Some of these white spots are due to new types of structures developed in recent years. In this ...

  2. Toe rock stability for rubble mound breakwaters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baart, S.; Ebbens, R.; Nammuni-Krohn, J.; Verhagen, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Present design tools, as found in the Rock Manual or Coastal Engineering Manual, for the determination of toe rock size for rubble mound breakwaters are based on test data with a large spread: data is relatively dispersed around the centre and descriptive equations have limited applicability ranges.

  3. Independent technical review of the Mound Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This report documents an Independent Technical Review (ITR) of the facilities, organizations, plans, and activities required to transition particular elements of the Mound Plant from Defense Program (DP) funded operation as appropriate either to community developed reuse or safe deactivation leading to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The review was conducted at the request of the Dr. Willis Bixby, Deputy Assistant Secretary, U.S. Department of Energy EM-60, Office of Facility Transition and Management and is a consensus of the nine member ITR Team. Information for the review was drawn from documents provided to the ITR Team by the Miamisburg Area Office (MB) of the DOE, EG&G, the City of Miamisburg, and others; and from presentations, discussions, interviews, and facility inspections at the Mound Plant during the weeks of March 14 and March 28, 1994. During the week of April 25, 1994, the ITR Team met at Los Alamos, New Mexico to develop consensus recommendations. A presentation of the core recommendations was made at the Mound Plant on May 5, 1994. This is an independent assessment of information available to, and used by, the Mound Plant personnel. Repetition of the information is not meant to imply discovery by the ITR Team. Team members, however, acting as independent reviewers, frequently assess the information from a perspective that differs significantly from that of the Mound Plant personnel. The report is based on information obtained and conditions observed during the March 1994 review interval. The ITR process and normal site work often initiate rapid, beneficial changes in understanding and organization immediately following the review. These changes frequently alter conditions observed during the review, but the report does not address changes subsequent to the review interval.

  4. Stylolites, porosity, depositional texture, and silicates in chalk facies sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Borre, Mai K.

    2007-01-01

    and sediments as counteracted by the pressure in the pore fluid, so the regional overpressure in the Central North Sea is one reason why the two localities have different relationships between temperature and effective burial stress. In the chalk of the Ontong Java Plateau the onset of calcite-silicate pressure......Comparison of chalk on the Ontong Java Plateau and chalk in the Central North Sea indicates that, whereas pressure dissolution is controlled by effective burial stress, pore-filling cementation is controlled by temperature. Effective burial stress is caused by the weight of all overlying water...... equilibrated to quartz before the onset of pressure dissolution and thus, in this case, dissolution and precipitation of calcite have no lag. This temperature versus effective burial stress induced difference in diagenetic history is of particular relevance when exploring for hydrocarbons in normally pressured...

  5. Chemical and Mechanical processes during burial diagenesis of chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borre, Mai Kirstine; Lind, Ida

    1998-01-01

    or larger influence on the textural development. In the chalk interval below, compaction is not the only porosity reducing agent but it has a larger influence on texture than concurrent recrystallization. Below 850 m grain-bridging cementation becomes important resulting in a lithified limestone below 1100......Burial diagenesis of chalk is a combination of mechanical compaction and chemical recrystallization as well as cementation. We have predicted the characteristic trends in specific surface resulting from these processes. The specific surface is normally measured by nitrogen adsorption but is here...... in the Pacific, where a > 1 km thick package of chalk facies sediments accumulated from the Cretaceous to the present. In the upper 200-300 m the sediment is unconsolidated carbonate ooze, throughout this depth interval compaction is the principal porosity reducing agent, but recrystallization has an equal...

  6. Mound site environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to inform the public about the impact of Mound operations on the population and the environment. Mound is a government-owned facility operated by EG ampersand G Mound Applied Technologies for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This integrated production, development, and research site performs work in support of DOE's weapon and energy related programs, with emphasis on explosive, nuclear and energy technologies. The Mound Plant, named after the Miamisburg Indian Mound adjacent to the site, comprises 120 buildings on 124 hectares (306 acres) of land in Miamisburg, Ohio, approximately 16 km (10 mi) southwest of Dayton. The Great Miami River, which flows through the city of Miamisburg, dominates the landscape of the five-county region surrounding Mound. The river valley is highly industrialized. The rest of the region is predominately farm land dotted with light industry and small communities. The climate is moderate. The geologic record preserved in the rocks underlying Mound indicates that the area has been relatively stable since the beginning of the Paleozoic Era more than 500 million years ago. No buildings at Mound are located in a floodplain or in areas considered wetlands. Included in the report are the following: perspective on radiation; radionuclide releases from Mound; Dose limites; doses from Mound Operations; Results of the environmental Monitoring Program; Ground water monitoring program; environmental restoration program; quality assurance for environmental data

  7. Toe rock stability for rubble mound breakwaters

    OpenAIRE

    Baart, S.; Ebbens, R.; Nammuni-Krohn, J.; Verhagen, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Present design tools, as found in the Rock Manual or Coastal Engineering Manual, for the determination of toe rock size for rubble mound breakwaters are based on test data with a large spread: data is relatively dispersed around the centre and descriptive equations have limited applicability ranges. New research has been undertaken to contribute to a more accurate description of toe rock stability. Flume tests have lead to an empirical design criterion for toe bunds in very shallow water base...

  8. Chalk porosity and sonic velocity versus burial depth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Gommesen, Lars; Krogsbøll, Anette Susanne;

    2008-01-01

    Seventy chalk samples from four formations in the overpressured Danish central North Sea have been analyzed to investigate how correlations of porosity and sonic velocity with burial depth are affected by varying mineralogy, fluid pressure, and early introduction of petroleum. The results show th...

  9. Nano sized clay detected on chalk particle surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Lone; Hassenkam, Tue; Makovicky, Emil;

    2012-01-01

    that in calcite saturated water, both the polar and the nonpolar functional groups adhere to the nano sized clay particles but not to calcite. This is fundamentally important information for the development of conceptual and chemical models to explain wettability alterations in chalk reservoirs...

  10. Ekofisk chalk: core measurements, stochastic reconstruction, network modeling and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talukdar, Saifullah

    2002-07-01

    This dissertation deals with (1) experimental measurements on petrophysical, reservoir engineering and morphological properties of Ekofisk chalk, (2) numerical simulation of core flood experiments to analyze and improve relative permeability data, (3) stochastic reconstruction of chalk samples from limited morphological information, (4) extraction of pore space parameters from the reconstructed samples, development of network model using pore space information, and computation of petrophysical and reservoir engineering properties from network model, and (5) development of 2D and 3D idealized fractured reservoir models and verification of the applicability of several widely used conventional up scaling techniques in fractured reservoir simulation. Experiments have been conducted on eight Ekofisk chalk samples and porosity, absolute permeability, formation factor, and oil-water relative permeability, capillary pressure and resistivity index are measured at laboratory conditions. Mercury porosimetry data and backscatter scanning electron microscope images have also been acquired for the samples. A numerical simulation technique involving history matching of the production profiles is employed to improve the relative permeability curves and to analyze hysteresis of the Ekofisk chalk samples. The technique was found to be a powerful tool to supplement the uncertainties in experimental measurements. Porosity and correlation statistics obtained from backscatter scanning electron microscope images are used to reconstruct microstructures of chalk and particulate media. The reconstruction technique involves a simulated annealing algorithm, which can be constrained by an arbitrary number of morphological parameters. This flexibility of the algorithm is exploited to successfully reconstruct particulate media and chalk samples using more than one correlation functions. A technique based on conditional simulated annealing has been introduced for exact reproduction of vuggy

  11. Cartografical And Geodetical Aspects Of The Krakus Mound In Cracow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banasik, Piotr

    2015-12-01

    In this work the fate of the Krakus Mound, the oldest of all existing Krakow's mounds, has been presented. The work was carried out based on selected iconographic, cartographic and geodetic documents. Using as an example old views, panoramas of the city and maps, various functions that the Krakus Mound was fulfilling over its long history were shown. An attempt was made to document the military significance of this mound and the surrounding hills. The particular astro-geodetic importance of the Krakus Mound on the scale of the city and southern Poland region was widely discussed. The Krakus Mound also inscribed itself in the history of the use of GPS technology as well as research on the local determination of the geoid in the area of Krakow.

  12. Mound site environmental report for calendar year 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to inform the public about the impact of Mound operations on the population and the environment. Mound is a government-owned facility operated by EG ampersand G Mound Applied Technologies for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This integrated production, development, and research site performs work in support of DOE's weapon and energy related programs, with emphasis on explosive, nuclear and energy technologies

  13. Ecological effects of harvester ant Messor capensis nest-mounds on Karoo plants

    OpenAIRE

    Dean, W. R. J.

    1995-01-01

    The influence of harvester ant Messor capensis nest-mounds on plants in arid shrubland was investigated at Tierberg, Prince Albert, Cape Province, during 1991. Nest-mound soils contained significantly more phosphorus, potassium, nitrogen and organic matter than surrounding soils. Nest-mound soils also contained more viable seeds than the soil of inter-mound spaces, and more seedlings germinated on nest-mounds than in inter-mound spaces.

  14. Biodiversity and ecological composition of macrobenthos on cold-water coral mounds and adjacent off-mound habitat in the bathyal Porcupine Seabight, NE Atlantic

    OpenAIRE

    Henry, L.A. (Lea Anne); Roberts, M. J.

    2007-01-01

    The cold-water scleractinian corals Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata form mound structures on the continental shelf and slope in the NE Atlantic. This study is the first to compare the taxonomic biodiversity and ecological composition of the macrobenthos between on- and off-mound habitats. Seven box cores from the summits of three mounds and four cores from an adjacent off-mound area in the Belgica, Mound Province in the Porcupine Seabight yielded 349 species, including 10 undescribed s...

  15. Widespread methanotrophic primary production in lowland chalk rivers

    OpenAIRE

    Shelley, Felicity; Grey, Jonathan; Trimmer, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Methane is oversaturated relative to the atmosphere in many rivers, yet its cycling and fate is poorly understood. While photosynthesis is the dominant source of autotrophic carbon to rivers, chemosynthesis and particularly methane oxidation could provide alternative sources of primary production where the riverbed is heavily shaded or at depth beneath the sediment surface. Here, we highlight geographically widespread methanotrophic carbon fixation within the gravel riverbeds of over 30 chalk...

  16. Horizontal spacing, depletion, and infill potential in the Austin chalk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyte, D.G.; Meehan, D.N.

    1996-12-31

    Estimated ultimate recoveries on a barrels per acre basis for Austin chalk wells were discussed. The study showed that the maximum six months consecutive production through the life of the well can be used to estimate ultimate recovery in horizontally drilled reservoirs. A statistical approach was used to help identify where the Austin chalk has been overdrilled and areas where infill potential exists. The barrels per acre data were analyzed by a method known as `moving domain`. This procedure involves stepping through the reservoir well by well and looking at it with respect to its nearest neighbors. To analyze for depletion, barrels per acre is compared to date of first production for groups of wells in an area, looking for declining values with time. Areas showing no evidence of depletion and having good recoveries are further studied for infill potential. By comparing effective densities in areas which are not yet being fully drained, an optimum spacing between wells can be determined for horizontal wells in a fractured chalk reservoir. An artificial neural network can also be used to provide qualitative predictions of well performance in developed reservoirs. 6 refs., 15 figs.

  17. Environmental assessment for Mound Plant decontamination and decommissioning projects, Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) for seven decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) projects at the Mound Plant in Miamisburg, Ohio, that have not been previously addressed in the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Mound Facility (June 1979). Based on the information presented in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI)

  18. Tritium effluent control project at Mound Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium control technology and philosophies that have been developed at the various weapons complex sites can be drawn upon for the design and operation of fusion research facilities and Controlled Thermonuclear Reactor fuel cycle and tritium confinement systems. Historically, tritium control has been based on high volume air flows and dilution of effluent systems. As a consequence of the ''as low as practical'' criterion, control philosophies were reevaluated and control efforts intensified. It is the results of these recent efforts that are most applicable to the CTR program. At Mound Laboratory the tritium control development efforts are centered around an advanced technology project. The philosophy and goals of this project and a nearly completed pilot scale effluent control laboratory are described. (auth)

  19. Two Catacombs of Late Sarmatian Time From Pashkovsky Burial Mound no. 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limberis Natalya Yuryevna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with two burials from the Kuban basin region excavated in Pashkovsky burial mound no. 2 belonging to Maeotian Pashkovskoe ancient settlement. The burials were made in catacombs of similar construction and orientation. The narrow grave entrances and grave chambers are situated in-line. The grave chambers of the catacombs adjoin one other that probably was the reason for plunder of a little earlier burial no. 2. There were the complete horse skeleton, the cow skull and the sheep chap in the grave entrance ofthe catacomb no. 2. A skeleton of a man (about 50 years old was in extended supine position diagonally across the grave chamber, his scull had SSW orientation. Grave goods found near the buried man include the gray-clay bowl and the mug-jar, the iron spearhead, the long sword and the dagger, the bit with wheel-shaped cheek-pieces, the sickle, the knives and the shoe buckles, the glass bead, the chalk rock bead, the bronze buckle and fibula. The catacomb no. 2 plundered in ancient times situated north-ward of the first one, the southern border of the grave chamber is partially cutted by catacomb no. 1. In the grave entrance of the catacomb no. 1 there were the remains of the horse skeleton and the sheep skull. Grave goods scattered in grave chamber included the gray-clay bowl, pieces of chalk, the bronze ring, fragments of the iron buckle, rod, hasp, silver temple ring, bronze escutcheon for the box lock, the iron snap-up loop and fragments of silver flacon with a cover. Late Sarmatian burial rites and grave goods give evidence of the belonging these burials to spokesmen of the equestrian order. The chronological range of the burials stays within terms from the second half of 2nd to the middle of 3rd century A.D. The lower date of the catacomb no. 1 turns toward the end of the 2nd century A.D., the upper date is limited by the first half of the 3rd century A.D. The catacomb no. 2 is stratigraphically older. The eques status of

  20. In Operando GISAXS Studies of Mound Coarsening in Electrochemical Homoepitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruge, Martin; Golks, Frederik; Zegenhagen, Jörg; Magnussen, Olaf M.; Stettner, Jochim

    2014-02-01

    Kinetic roughening during electrodeposition was studied by grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering for the case of Au(001) homoepitaxial growth in Cl- containing electrolytes. The formation and coarsening of an isotropic mound distribution on unreconstructed Au(001) and of [110]-oriented anisotropic mounds on the "hex" reconstructed surface was observed. The lateral mound coarsening is described by a well-defined scaling law. On unreconstructed Au a transition in the coarsening exponent from ≈1/4 to ≈1/3 with increasing potential is found, which can be explained by the pronounced potential dependence of surface transport processes in an electrochemical environment.

  1. In operando GISAXS studies of mound coarsening in electrochemical homoepitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruge, Martin; Golks, Frederik; Zegenhagen, Jörg; Magnussen, Olaf M; Stettner, Jochim

    2014-02-01

    Kinetic roughening during electrodeposition was studied by grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering for the case of Au(001) homoepitaxial growth in Cl- containing electrolytes. The formation and coarsening of an isotropic mound distribution on unreconstructed Au(001) and of [110]-oriented anisotropic mounds on the "hex" reconstructed surface was observed. The lateral mound coarsening is described by a well-defined scaling law. On unreconstructed Au a transition in the coarsening exponent from ≈1/4 to ≈1/3 with increasing potential is found, which can be explained by the pronounced potential dependence of surface transport processes in an electrochemical environment. PMID:24580610

  2. Fractal-mound growth of pentacene thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorba, Serkan; Shapir, Yonathan; Gao, Yongli

    2006-12-01

    The growth mechanism of pentacene film formation on SiO2 substrate was investigated with a combination of atomic force microscopy measurements and numerical modeling. In addition to the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) that has already been shown to govern the growth of the ordered pentacene thin films, it is shown here that the Schwoebel barrier effect steps in and disrupts the desired epitaxial growth for the subsequent layers, leading to mound growth. The terraces of the growing mounds have a fractal dimension of 1.6, indicating a lateral DLA shape. This growth morphology thus combines horizontal DLA-like growth with vertical mound growth.

  3. Biodiversity and ecological composition of macrobenthos on cold-water coral mounds and adjacent off-mound habitat in the bathyal Porcupine Seabight, NE Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Lea-Anne; Roberts, J. Murray

    2007-04-01

    The cold-water scleractinian corals Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata form mound structures on the continental shelf and slope in the NE Atlantic. This study is the first to compare the taxonomic biodiversity and ecological composition of the macrobenthos between on- and off-mound habitats. Seven box cores from the summits of three mounds and four cores from an adjacent off-mound area in the Belgica Mound Province in the Porcupine Seabight yielded 349 species, including 10 undescribed species. On-mound habitat was three times more speciose, and was richer with higher evenness and significantly greater Shannon's diversity than off-mound. Species composition differed significantly between habitats and the four best discriminating species were Pliobothrus symmetricus (more frequent off-mound), Crisia nov. sp, Aphrocallistes bocagei and Lophelia pertusa (all more frequent on-mound). Filter/suspension feeders were significantly more abundant on-mound, while deposit feeders were significantly more abundant off-mound. Species composition did not significantly differ between mounds, but similarity within replicates decreased from Galway MoundMound. We propose that, despite having greater vertical habitat heterogeneity that supports higher biodiversity, coral mounds have a characteristic "reef fauna" linked to species' biology that contrasts with the higher horizontal habitat heterogeneity conferred by the action of deposit feeders and a varied seabed sedimentary facies off-mound. Standardisation of equipment and restriction of analyses to higher taxonomic levels would facilitate prospective comparative analyses of cold-water coral biodiversity across larger spatio-temporal scales.

  4. Dynamic and static elastic moduli of North Sea and deep sea chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gommesen, Lars; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2001-01-01

    We have established an empirical relationship between the dynamic and the static mechanical properties of North Sea and deep sea chalk for a large porosity interval with respect to porosity, effective stress history and textural composition. The chalk investigated is from the Tor and Hod Formations...

  5. Diagenetic Variations between Upper Cretaceous Outcrop and Deeply Buried Reservoir Chalks of the North Sea Area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjuler, Morten Leth; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2007-01-01

    -particle connections and less altered particle shapes. The non-carbonate mineralogy of outcrop chalks is dominated by quartz, occasionally opal-CT and clinoptilolite, and the clay mineral smectite. In offshore chalks quartz still dominates, opal-CT has recrystallized into submicron-size quartz crystals and smectite...

  6. Impact of supercritical CO2 injection on petrophysical and rock mechanics properties of chalk: an experimental study on chalk from South Arne field, North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Hjuler, Morten Leth; Christensen, Helle Foged;

    2011-01-01

    Changes in chalk due to EOR by injecting supercritical CO2 (CO2-EOR) can ideally be predicted by applying geophysical methods designed from laboratory-determined petrophysical and rock mechanics properties. A series of petrophysical and rock mechanics tests were performed on Ekofisk Formation...... and Tor Formation chalk of the South Arne field to reveal the changes in petrophysical and rock mechanics properties of chalk due to the injection of CO2 at supercritical state. An increase in porosity and decrease in specific surface was observed due to injection of supercritical CO2. This indicates...... as indicated by NMR T2 relaxation time was observed. Rock mechanics testing indicates that in 30% porosity chalk from the South Arne field, injection of supercritical CO2 has no significant effect on shear strength and compaction properties, while there is probably a slight decrease in stiffness properties...

  7. Biot Critical Frequency Applied to Description of Failure and Yield of Highly Porous Chalk with Different Pore Fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Katrine Alling; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2010-01-01

    Injection of water into chalk hydrocarbon reservoirs has led to mechanical yield and failure. Laboratory experiments on chalk samples correspondingly show that the mechanical properties of porous chalk depend on pore fluid and temperature. In case of water-saturated samples, the concentration and...

  8. Groundwater recharge dynamics in unsaturated fractured chalk: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherubini, Claudia; Pastore, Nicola; Giasi, Concetta I.; Allegretti, Nicolaetta M.

    2016-04-01

    The heterogeneity of the unsaturated zone controls its hydraulic response to rainfall and the extent to which pollutants are delayed or attenuated before reaching groundwater. It plays therefore a very important role in the recharge of aquifers and the transfer of pollutants because of the presence of temporary storage zones and preferential flows. A better knowledge of the physical processes in the unsaturated zone would allow an improved assessment of the natural recharge in a heterogeneous aquifer and of its vulnerability to surface-applied pollution. The case study regards the role of the thick unsaturated zone of the Cretaceous chalk aquifer in Picardy (North of France) that controls the hydraulic response to rainfall. In the North Paris Basin, much of the recharge must pass through a regional chalk bed that is composed of a porous matrix with embedded fractures. Different types of conceptual models have been formulated to explain infiltration and recharge processes in the unsaturated fractured rock. The present study analyses the episodic recharge in fractured Chalk aquifer using the kinematic diffusion theory to predict water table fluctuation in response to rainfall. From an analysis of the data, there is the evidence of 1) a seasonal behavior characterized by a constant increase in the water level during the winter/spring period and a recession period, 2) a series of episodic behaviors during the summer/autumn. Kinematic diffusion models are useful for predict preferential fluxes and dynamic conditions. The presented approach conceptualizes the unsaturated flow as a combination of 1) diffusive flow refers to the idealized portion of the pore space of the medium within the flow rate is driven essentially by local gradient of potential; 2) preferential flow by which water moves across macroscopic distances through conduits of macropore length.

  9. Sulfur isotope patterns of iron sulfide and barite nodules in the Upper Cretaceous Chalk of England and their regional significance in the origin of coloured chalks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeans, Christopher V.; Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Hu, Xu-Fang

    2016-06-01

    The relationship between the development of iron sulfide and barite nodules in the Cenomanian Chalk of England and the presence of a red hematitic pigment has been investigated using sulfur isotopes. In southern England where red and pink chalks are absent, iron sulfide nodules are widespread. Two typical large iron sulfide nodules exhibit δ34S ranging from -48.6‰ at their core to -32.6‰ at their outer margins. In eastern England, where red and pink chalks occur in three main bands, there is an antipathetic relationship between the coloured chalks and the occurrence of iron sulfide or barite nodules. Here iron sulfide, or its oxidised remnants, are restricted to two situations: (1) in association with hard grounds that developed originally in chalks that contained the hematite pigment or its postulated precursor FeOH3, or (2) in regional sulfidization zones that cut across the stratigraphy. In the Cenomanian Chalk exposed in the cliffs at Speeton, Yorkshire, pyrite and marcasite (both iron sulfide) nodules range in δ34S from -34.7‰ to +40.0‰. In the lower part of the section δ34S vary from -34.8‰ to +7.8‰, a single barite nodule has δ34S between +26.9‰ and +29.9‰. In the middle part of the section δ34S ranges from +23.8‰ to +40.0‰. In the sulfidization zones that cut across the Cenomanian Chalk of Lincolnshire the iron sulfide nodules are typically heavily weathered but these may contain patches of unoxidised pyrite. In these zones, δ34S ranges from -32.9‰ to +7.9‰. The cross-cutting zones of sulfidization in eastern England are linked to three basement faults - the Flamborough Head Fault Zone, the Caistor Fault and the postulated Wash Line of Jeans (1980) - that have affected the deposition of the Chalk. It is argued that these faults have been both the conduits by which allochthonous fluids - rich in hydrogen sulfide/sulfate, hydrocarbons and possibly charged with sulfate-reducing bacteria - have penetrated the Cenomanian Chalk as

  10. Static and dynamic effective stress coefficient of chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, M. Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Christensen, Helle Foged

    2012-01-01

    stress coefficient is thus relevant for studying reservoir deformation and for evaluating 4D seismic for the correct pore pressure prediction. The static effective stress coefficient n is estimated from mechanical tests and is highly relevant for effective stress prediction because it is directly related...... to mechanical strain in the elastic stress regime. The corresponding dynamic effective stress coefficient α is easy to estimate from density and velocity of acoustic (elastic) waves. We studied n and α of chalk from the reservoir zone of the Valhall field, North Sea, and found that n and α vary...

  11. Dynamic up-scaling of relative permeability in chalk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frykman, P.; Lindgaard, H.F.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes how fine-scale geo-statistic reservoir models can be utilised for the up-scaling of two-phase flow properties, including both relative permeability and capillary pressure function. The procedure is applied to a North Sea chalk carbonate reservoir example, which is a high-porosity/low-permeability reservoir type. The study focuses on waterflooding as the main recovery scheme and for the given flow regime in the reservoir. The main purpose of the paper is to demonstrate the use of dynamic multi-step up-scaling methods in the preparation of detailed geological information for full field reservoir simulation studies. (au) EFP-96. 39 refs.

  12. Specific surface as a measure of burial diagenesis of chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borre, Mai Kirstine; Lind, Ida; Mortensen, Jeanette

    1997-01-01

    ODP Leg 130, Site 807, in the western equatorial Pacific, penetrates a sequence of pelagic carbonate ooze, chalk and limestone. Compaction, recrystallisation and cementation of the carbonate matrix are diagenetic processes expected to be taking place more or less simultaneously. In order to assess...... the relative importance of the three processes, simple models have been established to illustrate changes in pore space, particle size and -shape and the resulting trends in the specific surface. Specific surface and porosity of the samples were measured using image analysis on electron micrographs of polished...

  13. Advanced waterflooding in chalk reservoirs: Understanding of underlying mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahid, Adeel; Sandersen, Sara Bülow; Stenby, Erling Halfdan;

    2011-01-01

    pressure. We have also observed formation of a microemulsion phase between brine and oil with the increase in sulfate ion concentration at high temperature and pressure. In addition, sulfate ions can reduce interfacial tension (IFT) between oil and water. We propose that the decrease in viscosity and...... formation of a microemulsion phase could be the possible reasons for the observed increase in oil recovery with sulfate ions at high temperature in chalk reservoirs besides the mechanism of the rock wettability alteration, which has been reported in most previous studies....

  14. Improved Oil Recovery in Chalk. Spontaneous Imbibition affected by Wettability, Rock Framework and Interfacial Tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milter, J.

    1996-12-31

    The author of this doctoral thesis aims to improve the oil recovery from fractured chalk reservoirs, i.e., maximize the area of swept zones and their displacement efficiencies. In order to identify an improved oil recovery method in chalk, it is necessary to study wettability of calcium carbonate and spontaneous imbibition potential. The thesis contains an investigation of thin films and wettability of single calcite surfaces. The results of thin film experiments are used to evaluate spontaneous imbibition experiments in different chalk types. The chalk types were described detailed enough to permit considering the influence of texture, pore size and pore throat size distributions, pore geometry, and surface roughness on wettability and spontaneous imbibition. Finally, impacts of interfacial tension by adding anionic and cationic surfactants to the imbibing water phase are studied at different wettabilities of a well known chalk material. 232 refs., 97 figs., 13 tabs.

  15. Grain size distributions of chalk from image analysis of electron micrographs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Birte; Gommesen, Lars; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2001-01-01

    In the chalk of the Ekofisk formation in the Chalk Group of the North Sea, substantial depth-related variations in porosityare observed. With the aim of obtaining a textural interpretation of these porositydata, we have developed a method to assess the grain size distribution of the chalk from...... image analysis. The chalk is composed of a fine-grained matrix of nannofossils and predominantlycalcitic fossil debris with larger microfossil grains, but the chalk may also contain significant amounts of silica and siliciclastic clay. For image analysis, we used backscatter electron images of epoxy......-impregnated, polished samples from the Ekofisk Formation, Tyra field, Danish North Sea. On backscatter images the calcite phase will appear light as opposed to the dark pore space. The procedure involves the combination of data acquired at two magnifications and bythis method analysis of only four images per sample...

  16. Environmental assessment for commercialization of the Mound Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In November 1993 US DOE decided to phase out operations at the Mound Plant in Miamisburg, Ohio, with the goal of releasing the site for commercial use. The broad concept is to transform the plant into an advanced manufacturing center with the main focus on commercializing products and other technology. DOE proposes to lease portions of the Mound Plant to commercial enterprises. This Environmental Impact statement has a finding of no significant impact in reference to such action

  17. Geochemical criteria for reservoir quality variations in chalk from the North Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of chalk geochemistry on petrophysical parameters determining porosity and permeability is investigated. The central well TWB-8 and eastern marginal well E-lx of the North Sea Tyra gas field were chosen. Drill core sections of Upper Maastrichtian and Danian chalk were selected. Chemical data on chalk samples were gathered by using X-ray fluorescence and instrumental neutron activation. Geochemical data are compared with the well-logging results. Geophysical logging suggests that there is reduced porosity in the Danian reservoir units LDP and UDT in both wells. The chalk drill core samples from the section with reduced porosity also show a lower Ca content. A high Si content is observed in these samples and a number of trace elements in chalk show a similar distribution with depth. Reservoir porosity may be estimated from the Si content of chalk. Chalk permeability may also be elements Al, Fe and Sc show the same trends as that for Si. Diagenetic changes in chalk also include clay minerals. The gas zone in TWB-8 is characterized by low contents of Na and Cl, i.e. lower water saturation is indicated. Low concentrations of rare earths in all chalk samples show a shale-normalized pattern that is characteristic of marine sediments laid down under oxic conditions. Some changes that occur with depth in the Ce anomaly may indicate a slight change in the depositional environment. The content of manganese continuously decreases with depth, from Danian (about 2000 ppm) to Maastrichtian strata (less than 200 ppm). In this respect, no other chemical element in chalk correlates with Mn. There is no indication as to which mineral or mineral phase one is likely to find in the element. (AB) 14 tabs., 49 ills., 147 refs

  18. Formation and Control of Self-Sealing High Permeability Groundwater Mounds in Impermeable Sediment: Implications for SUDS and Sustainable Pressure Mound Management

    OpenAIRE

    David D. J. Antia

    2009-01-01

    A groundwater mound (or pressure mound) is defined as a volume of fluid dominated by viscous flow contained within a sediment volume where the dominant fluid flow is by Knudsen Diffusion. High permeability self-sealing groundwater mounds can be created as part of a sustainable urban drainage scheme (SUDS) using infiltration devices. This study considers how they form, and models their expansion and growth as a function of infiltration device recharge. The mounds grow through lateral macropore...

  19. Food preferences and mound-building behaviour of the mound-building mice Mus spicilegus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzl, Michaela; Krištofík, Ján; Darolová, Alžbeta; Hoi, Herbert

    2011-10-01

    Optimal foraging strategies and food choice are influenced by various factors, e.g. availability, size and caloric content of the food type and predation risk. However, food choice criteria may change when food is not eaten immediately but has to be carried to a storage site for later use. For example, handling time in terms of harvesting and transport time should be optimized, particularly when the risk of predation is high. Thus, it is not clear whether food selected by hoarding animals reflects their food preference due to intrinsic features of the food type, e.g. size, caloric or lipid content, or whether the food type selected is a compromise that also considers the handling time required for harvesting and transport. We investigate this question in relation to food hoarding behaviour in mound-building mice. In autumn, mound-building mice Mus spicilegus collect seeds and other plant material and cover it with soil. Such above-ground storage is quite unusual for rodents. Here, we investigated whether there is a relationship between the seed species preferred as building materials and those preferred for food. We conducted a seed preference test using three most collected weed species for mound building. Controlling factors like food availability or predation risk, mice prefer Setaria spp. as food, although Amaranthus spp. and Chenopodium spp. were preferentially harvested and stored. By including the availability of the three species, our experimental results were confirmed, namely, a clear preference for Setaria spp. Also, handling time and seed size revealed to influence plant choice.

  20. Controls on mound formation and effects of fluid ascent on the gas hydrate system of mound structures offshore Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planert, L.; Klaeschen, D.; Berndt, C.; Hensen, C.; Brueckmann, W.

    2010-12-01

    Our analysis of 2D MCS seismic data from the Middle America margin provides an insight into the buildup and formation mechanisms of mound structures and the effects of fluid ascent on the gas hydrate system observed on the continental slope offshore Costa Rica. Our targets, Mounds 11&12, are the sites of IODP drilling proposal 633-Full2, which aims to enhance the general understanding of complex forearc dewatering processes of the erosive subduction system off Costa Rica. Major sites of dewatering planned for drilling are mounds, related to mud diapirism/volcanism and precipitation of authigenic carbonates, and large-scale slides related to the subduction of seamounts. Geochemical analysis of methane hydrate and chloride anomalies as well as heat flow modeling of the mounds indicate deeply sourced fluids discharged by clay dehydration at the decollement. Hence, the hydrogeological system at this margin appears to be dominated by the fracture porosity of faults which extend through the overriding plate and provide the paths for fluids liberated by early dehydration reactions from the plate boundary. In order to test the hypothesis of deeply sourced and fault-controlled dewatering sites and to better understand the interactions between gas hydrate formation and dissociation with the fluid ascent from the deep sources, new pre-site survey seismic profiles were acquired using the 36-gun, four-string linear gun array of R/V Marcus Langseth, and a 240 channel streamer with 3000 m of active length. The seismic lines were prestack depth migrated, in which the velocity model is iteratively improved using depth focusing analysis and residual moveout correction on common image point gathers. Improvement of the deep imaging involved multiple attenuation and detailed velocity analysis of the lower sedimentary portions and beneath the basement down to the plate boundary. Our results reveal an upward bending of the bottom simulating reflection (BSR) directly beneath the mounds

  1. Sorptive removal of arsenate using termite mound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fufa, Fekadu; Alemayehu, Esayas; Lennartz, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Long-term consumption of arsenic results in severe and permanent health damages. The aim of the study was to investigate arsenate (As(V)) sorption capacity of termite mound (TM), containing mainly silicon, aluminum, iron and titanium oxides, under batch adsorption setup. The pattern of As(V) removal with varying contact time, solution pH, adsorbent dose, As(V) concentration and competing anions was investigated. Dissolution of the adsorbent was insignificant under the equilibrium conditions. Equilibrium was achieved within 40 min of agitation time. Kinetic data of As(V) adsorption followed well the pseudo-second order equation (R(2) > 0.99). High As(V) removal efficiency (∼ 99%) was observed over a pH range ∼ 3-∼ 10, which is of great importance in the practical application. The Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms well described (R(2) > 0.99, χ(2) ∼ 0.05) the equilibrium As(V) adsorption, giving a coefficient of adsorption 1.48 mg(1-1/n)L(1/n)/g and a saturation capacity 13.50 mg/g respectively. The obtained value of mean sorption energy (EDR = 13.32 kJ/mol) suggested the chemisorption mechanism of As(V) adsorption on TM. The removal of As(V) was significantly decreased in the presence of phosphate ions. The As(V) loaded adsorbent was successfully regenerated using NaOH solution with insignificant loss of metals. Therefore, the results of the study demonstrated that TM could be considered as a promising adsorbent for the treatment of As(V) in drinking water. PMID:24309232

  2. Origin of channel systems in the Upper Cretaceous chalk group of the Paris Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esmerode, E. V.; Surlyk, Finn

    2009-01-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Chalk Group of the Anglo-Paris Basin is known to show wedging beds and channel-like features which disrupt the quietly deposited pelagic chalk that covered most of NW Europe in the Late Cretaceous. Two-D reflection seismic data from the Brie region, SE of Paris, show...... is suggested due to the uninterrupted deep-marine chalk facies below and above both unconformities, and the unrealistically large sea-level drop of more than 200 m, which would be necessary for subaerial exposure of the central Paris Basin during the Campanian. The channels are oriented parallel to the margins...

  3. Steady State Perched Groundwater Mounds on Thick Sublayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Richard R.

    1982-04-01

    Perched mounds that develop beneath a strip recharge basin are considered using the potential theory for a saturated flow. The mounds are assumed to develop upon an aquitard or sublayer whose thickness is large enough so that the vertical velocity at the base of the mound does not vary with distance from the centerline of the basin. A finite difference technique was used to solve the potential theory, and 20 mound profiles were determined for K/KL = 10, 50, 100, 500 and R/K = 0.2, 0.35, 0.50, 0.65, 0.80. K/KL is the ratio of the permeabilities, and R is the recharge rate. These profiles are compared to those based on the approximate Dupuit-Forchheimer (DF) theory, and a criterion for the range of validity of the DF theory for predicting the maximum mount thickness H0 is derived. It is found that for a sufficiently large value of K/KL, which depends on R/K and the desired accuracy, the DF theory is adequate. For smaller values of K/KL the potential theory must be used. Equipotential lines and velocity distributions are presented for a typical case where the potential and DF mound profiles are quite different.

  4. Experience at Chalk River with a cw electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For several years a group at Chalk River has been studying the behaviour of structures operated in the cw mode under heavy beam loading. Three side-coupled structures, modelled on the LAMPF design, have been built and tests up to 50% beam loading have been performed on two of them. Control systems have been developed to regulate the disturbances arising from high average power in a multi-tank accelerator and procedures worked out to handle beam currents up to 20 mA at 4 MeV. A pancake-coupled structure has been designed for high power operation and results of low power tests on an aluminum model are presented. Tests at high power with a 50 mA electron beam are planned. (author)

  5. Isotope hydrology of the Chalk River Laboratories site, Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterman, Zell; Neymark, Leonid; King-Sharp, K.J.; Gascoyne, Mel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents results of hydrochemical and isotopic analyses of groundwater (fracture water) and porewater, and physical property and water content measurements of bedrock core at the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) site in Ontario. Density and water contents were determined and water-loss porosity values were calculated for core samples. Average and standard deviations of density and water-loss porosity of 50 core samples from four boreholes are 2.73 ± 12 g/cc and 1.32 ± 1.24 percent. Respective median values are 2.68 and 0.83 indicating a positive skewness in the distributions. Groundwater samples from four deep boreholes were analyzed for strontium (87Sr/86Sr) and uranium (234U/238U) isotope ratios. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope analyses and selected solute concentrations determined by CRL are included for comparison. Groundwater from borehole CRG-1 in a zone between approximately +60 and −240 m elevation is relatively depleted in δ18O and δ2H perhaps reflecting a slug of water recharged during colder climatic conditions. Porewater was extracted from core samples by centrifugation and analyzed for major dissolved ions and for strontium and uranium isotopes. On average, the extracted water contains 15 times larger concentration of solutes than the groundwater. 234U/238U and correlation of 87Sr/86Sr with Rb/Sr values indicate that the porewater may be substantially older than the groundwater. Results of this study show that the Precambrian gneisses at Chalk River are similar in physical properties and hydrochemical aspects to crystalline rocks being considered for the construction of nuclear waste repositories in other regions.

  6. Louth Crater: Evolution of a layered water ice mound

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Adrian J; Tornabene, Livio L; Roush, Ted L

    2014-01-01

    We report on observations made of the ~36km diameter crater, Louth, in the north polar region of Mars (at 70{\\deg}N, 103.2{\\deg}E). High-resolution imagery from the instruments on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft has been used to map a 15km diameter water ice deposit in the center of the crater. The water ice mound has surface features that include roughened ice textures and layering similar to that found in the North Polar Layered Deposits. Features we interpret as sastrugi and sand dunes show consistent wind patterns within Louth over recent time. CRISM spectra of the ice mound were modeled to derive quantitative estimates of water ice and contaminant abundance, and associated ice grain size information. These morphologic and spectral results are used to propose a stratigraphy for this deposit and adjoining sand dunes. Our results suggest the edge of the water ice mound is currently in retreat.

  7. Biot Critical Frequency Applied as Common Friction Factor for Chalk with Different Pore Fluids and Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Katrine Alling; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2010-01-01

    Injection of water into chalk hydrocarbon reservoirs has lead to mechanical yield and failure. Laboratory experiments on chalk samples correspondingly show that the mechanical properties of porous chalk depend on pore fluid and temperature. Water has a significant softening effect on elastic...... and we propose that the fluid effect on mechanical properties of highly porous chalk may be the result of liquid‐solid friction. Applying a different strain or stress rate is influencing the rock strength and needs to be included. The resulting function is shown to relate to the material dependent...... and rate independent b-factor used when describing the time dependent mechanical properties of soft rock or soils. As a consequence it is then possible to further characterize the material constant from the porosity and permeability of the rock as well as from pore fluid density and viscosity which...

  8. Investigated Miscible CO2 Flooding for Enhancing Oil Recovery in Wettability Altered Chalk and Sandstone Rocks

    OpenAIRE

    Tabrizy, Vahid Alipour

    2012-01-01

    The thesis addresses oil recovery by miscible CO2 flooding from modified sandstone and chalk rocks. Calcite mineral surface is modified with stearic acid (SA) and asphaltene, and the silicate mineral surfaces are modified with N,N-dimethyldodecylamine (NN-DMDA) and asphaltene. The stability of adsorbed polar components in presence of SO4 2- and Mg2 + ions is also investigated. Recovery from sandstone cores is consistently lower than that from chalk cores saturated with...

  9. The role of alluvial valley deposits in groundwater–surface water exchange in a Chalk river

    OpenAIRE

    Abesser, Corinna; Shand, Paul; Gooddy, Daren; Peach, Denis

    2008-01-01

    To understand the processes of surface water–groundwater exchange in Chalk catchments, a detailed hydrogeochemical study was carried out in the Lambourn catchment in southeast England. Monthly monitoring of river flow and groundwater levels and water chemistry has highlighted a large degree of heterogeneity at the river-corridor scale. The data suggest an irregular connection between the river, the alluvial deposits, and the Chalk aquifer at the study site. The groundwaters in the alluvial gr...

  10. Native American Calendric Orientation at Town Creek Indian Mound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiede, V. R.

    2005-12-01

    Evidence is presented for a newly discovered set of interior solar alignments - the equinox and summer solstice meridian transits - at a prehistoric Native American structure in the Southeast United States. Because North Carolina's Town Creek Indian Mound is the only Mississippian temple-mound accurately reconstructed from overhead photo-mosaics, the site is uniquely suited for applying the techniques of astro-archaeology (G. S. Hawkins 1983). Implications of the new findings for interpreting Muskogean ethnographic literature as well as future archaeoastronomical research at other Southeastern sites (e.g., Ocmulgee National Monument Earth Lodge, Georgia) are discussed.

  11. Persistent and emerging micro-organic contaminants in Chalk groundwater of England and France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chalk aquifer of Northern Europe is an internationally important source of drinking water and sustains baseflow for surface water ecosystems. The areal distribution of microorganic (MO) contaminants, particularly non-regulated emerging MOs, in this aquifer is poorly understood. This study presents results from a reconnaissance survey of MOs in Chalk groundwater, including pharmaceuticals, personal care products and pesticides and their transformation products, conducted across the major Chalk aquifers of England and France. Data from a total of 345 sites collected during 2011 were included in this study to provide a representative baseline assessment of MO occurrence in groundwater. A suite of 42 MOs were analysed for at each site including industrial compounds (n = 16), pesticides (n = 14) and pharmaceuticals, personal care and lifestyle products (n = 12). Occurrence data is evaluated in relation to land use, aquifer exposure, well depth and depth to groundwater to provide an understanding of vulnerable groundwater settings. - Highlights: • Broad range of microorganics detected in Chalk groundwater in England and France. • Plasticisers, pesticides, BPA and THM detected at the highest concentrations. • Pesticides higher in outcrop Chalk, caffeine and BPA at concealed sites. • Occurrences show some relationship to land use, borehole depth and water level. - Broad screening reveals for the first time the extent of emerging microorganic pollution in Chalk groundwater sources across England and France

  12. A novel representation of chalk hydrology in a land surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mostaquimur; Rosolem, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    Unconfined chalk aquifers contain a significant portion of water in the United Kingdom. In order to optimize the assessment and management practices of water resources in the region, modelling and monitoring of soil moisture in the unsaturated zone of the chalk aquifers are of utmost importance. However, efficient simulation of soil moisture in such aquifers is difficult mainly due to the fractured nature of chalk, which creates high-velocity preferential flow paths in the unsaturated zone. In this study, the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) is applied on a study area encompassing the Kennet catchment in Southern England. The fluxes and states of the coupled water and energy cycles are simulated for 10 consecutive years (2001-2010). We hypothesize that explicit representation for the soil-chalk layers and the inclusion of preferential flow in the fractured chalk aquifers improves the reproduction of the hydrological processes in JULES. In order to test this hypothesis, we propose a new parametrization for preferential flow in JULES. This parametrization explicitly describes the flow of water in soil matrices and preferential flow paths using a simplified approach which can be beneficial for large-scale hydrometeorological applications. We also define the overlaying soil properties obtained from the Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD) in the model. Our simulation results are compared across spatial scales with measured soil moisture and river discharge, indicating the importance of accounting for the physical properties of the medium while simulating hydrological processes in the chalk aquifers.

  13. Contact area calculation between elastic solids bounded by mound rough surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G

    2003-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the influence of mound roughness on the contact area between elastic bodies. The mound roughness is described by the r.m.s. roughness amplitude w, the average mound separation Lambda, and the system correlation length xi. In general, the real contact area has a complex d

  14. Trace elemental analysis of school chalk using energy dispersive X-ray florescence spectroscopy (ED-XRF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruthi, Y. A., E-mail: ymjournal2014@gmail.com [Associate professor, Dept of Environmental Studies, GITAM Institute of Science, GITAM University, Visakhapatnam, A.P (India); Das, N. Lakshmana, E-mail: nldas9@gmail.com [Professor, Dept of Physics, GITAM Institute of Science, GITAM University, Visakhapatnam, A.P (India); Ramprasad, S., E-mail: ramprasadsurakala@gmail.com [Research Scholar, Dept of Environmental science, GITAM Institute of Science, GITAM University, Visakhapatnam, A.P (India); Ram, S. S., E-mail: tracebio@gmail.com [Research Scholar, Dept of Trace element research, UGC-DAE Consortium Centre, Kolkata centre India (India); Sudarshan, M., E-mail: sude@alpha.iuc.res.in [Scientist-F, Dept of Trace element research, UGC-DAE Consortium Centre, Kolkata centre India (India)

    2015-08-28

    The present studies focus the quantitative analysis of elements in school chalk to ensure the safety of its use. The elements like Calcium (Ca), Aluminum (Al), Iron (Fe), Silicon (Si) and Chromium (Cr) were analyzed from settled chalk dust samples collected from five classrooms (CD-1) and also from another set of unused chalk samples collected from local market (CD-2) using Energy Dispersive X-Ray florescence(ED-XRF) spectroscopy. Presence of these elements in significant concentrations in school chalk confirmed that, it is an irritant and occupational hazard. It is suggested to use protective equipments like filtered mask for mouth, nose and chalk holders. This study also suggested using the advanced mode of techniques like Digital boards, marker boards and power point presentations to mitigate the occupational hazard for classroom chalk.

  15. Trace elemental analysis of school chalk using energy dispersive X-ray florescence spectroscopy (ED-XRF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present studies focus the quantitative analysis of elements in school chalk to ensure the safety of its use. The elements like Calcium (Ca), Aluminum (Al), Iron (Fe), Silicon (Si) and Chromium (Cr) were analyzed from settled chalk dust samples collected from five classrooms (CD-1) and also from another set of unused chalk samples collected from local market (CD-2) using Energy Dispersive X-Ray florescence(ED-XRF) spectroscopy. Presence of these elements in significant concentrations in school chalk confirmed that, it is an irritant and occupational hazard. It is suggested to use protective equipments like filtered mask for mouth, nose and chalk holders. This study also suggested using the advanced mode of techniques like Digital boards, marker boards and power point presentations to mitigate the occupational hazard for classroom chalk

  16. Trace elemental analysis of school chalk using energy dispersive X-ray florescence spectroscopy (ED-XRF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruthi, Y. A.; Das, N. Lakshmana; Ramprasad, S.; Ram, S. S.; Sudarshan, M.

    2015-08-01

    The present studies focus the quantitative analysis of elements in school chalk to ensure the safety of its use. The elements like Calcium (Ca), Aluminum (Al), Iron (Fe), Silicon (Si) and Chromium (Cr) were analyzed from settled chalk dust samples collected from five classrooms (CD-1) and also from another set of unused chalk samples collected from local market (CD-2) using Energy Dispersive X-Ray florescence(ED-XRF) spectroscopy. Presence of these elements in significant concentrations in school chalk confirmed that, it is an irritant and occupational hazard. It is suggested to use protective equipments like filtered mask for mouth, nose and chalk holders. This study also suggested using the advanced mode of techniques like Digital boards, marker boards and power point presentations to mitigate the occupational hazard for classroom chalk

  17. Design And Construction Of Mounds For Breakwaters And Coastal Protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Barends, F.B.J.; Brebner, A.;

    Design and construction of mound breakwaters has during the last 5 to 10 years entered a new era. The major reason for that is the realization of problems encountered as it became necessary to erect port structures on more exposed shores and in deeper waters. As a consequence of that the P.I.A.N....

  18. Stable isotope sales: Mound customer and shipment summaries, FY 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A listing is given of Mound's sales of stable isotopes of noble gases, carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, chlorine, and sulfur for Fiscal Year 1982. Purchasers are listed alphabetically and are divided into domestic and foreign groups. A cross-reference index by location is included for domestic customers. Cross-reference listings by isotope purchased are included for all customers

  19. Stable isotope sales: Mound customer and shipment summaries, FY 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A listing is given of Mound's sales of stable isotopes of noble gases, deuterium, carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, chlorine, bromine, and sulfur for Fiscal Year 1984. Purchasers are listed alphabetically and are divided into domestic and foreign groups. A cross-reference index by location and a cross-reference listing by isotope purchased are included for all customers

  20. Stable isotopes sales: Mound customer and shipment summaries, FY 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A listing is given of Mound's sales of stable isotopes of noble gases, deuterium, carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, chlorine, bromine, and sulfur for fiscal year 1985. Purchasers are listed alphabetically and are divided into domestic and foreign groups. A cross-reference index by location is included for domestic and foreign customers. Cross-reference listings by isotope purchased are included for all customers

  1. Numerical evaluation of stability methods for rubble mound breakwater toes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verpoorten, S.P.K.; Ockeloen, W.J.; Verhagen, H.J.

    2015-01-01

    Since 1977 dedicated studies are made to the stability of rubble mound break-water toes under wave attack. A large number of stability methods is available, but prediction accuracy is low and validity ranges are too small for use in prac-tice. In this research the decoupled model approach is used to

  2. Displacement of Monolithic Rubble-Mound Breakwater Crown-Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen Harck; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Andersen, Thomas Lykke;

    2012-01-01

    studies on caisson breakwaters, but correction terms are suggested in the present paper to obtain almost equal measured and estimated displacements. This is of great practical importance since many existing rubble-mound crown-walls are subjected to increasing wave loads due to rising sea water level from...

  3. Diagenesis of upper cretaceous onshore and offshore chalk from the North Sea area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjuler, Morten Leth

    grund af det høje poretryk i den centrale del af Nordsøen og på trods af dyb begravelse er meget porøs. Kalken fra Valhall lader dog til at være påvirket af den højere temperatur og er mere kemisk omdannet og formentlig stivere. Et andet problem er indholdet af opal og kvarts, som påvirker...... permeabiliteten. I Nørrejylland er kalken forholdsvis rig på opal, men i det dybere begravede Valhall-felt er opalen øjensynligt omdannet til kvarts. På Stevns derimod, er opalen øjensynlig forholdsvis kort efter aflejringen opløst og genudfældet i flintlag, muligvis hjulpet af mikroorganismer. Dette giver en...

  4. Diversity of fungi from the mound nests of Formica ulkei and adjacent non-nest soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Lyndon B; Urichuk, Theresa M; Hodgins, Lisa N; Young, Jocelyn R; Untereiner, Wendy A

    2016-07-01

    Culture-based methods were employed to recover 3929 isolates of fungi from soils collected in May and July 2014 from mound nests of Formica ulkei and adjacent non-nest sites. The abundance, diversity, and richness of species from nest mounds exceeded those of non-mound soils, particularly in July. Communities of fungi from mounds were more similar to those from mounds than non-mounds; this was also the case for non-mound soils with the exception of one non-mound site in July. Species of Aspergillus, Paecilomyces, and Penicillium were dominant in nest soils and represented up to 81.8% of the taxa recovered. Members of the genus Aspergillus accounted for the majority of Trichocomaceae from nests and were represented almost exclusively by Aspergillus navahoensis and Aspergillus pseudodeflectus. Dominant fungi from non-mound sites included Cladosporium cladosporioides, Geomyces pannorum, and species of Acremonium, Fusarium, Penicillium, and Phoma. Although mound nests were warmer than adjacent soils, the dominance of xerotolerant Aspergillus in soils from mounds and the isolation of the majority of Trichocomaceae at 25 and 35 °C suggests that both temperature and water availability may be determinants of fungal community structure in nests of F. ulkei. PMID:27192606

  5. Are termite mounds biofilters for methane? - Challenges and new approaches to quantify methane oxidation in termite mounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauer, Philipp A.; Hutley, Lindsay B.; Bristow, Mila; Arndt, Stefan K.

    2015-04-01

    Methane emissions from termites contribute around 3% to global methane in the atmosphere, although the total source estimate for termites is the most uncertain among all sources. In tropical regions, the relative source contribution of termites can be far higher due to the high biomass and relative importance of termites in plant decomposition. Past research focused on net emission measurements and their variability, but little is known about underlying processes governing these emissions. In particular, microbial oxidation of methane (MOX) within termite mounds has rarely been investigated. In well-studied ecosystems featuring an oxic matrix above an anoxic methane-producing habitat (e.g. landfills or sediments), the fraction of oxidized methane (fox) can reach up to 90% of gross production. However, conventional mass-balance approaches to apportion production and consumption processes can be challenging to apply in the complex-structured and almost inaccessible environment of a termite mound. In effect, all field-based data on termite-mound MOX is based on one study that measured isotopic shifts in produced and emitted methane. In this study a closed-system isotope fractionation model was applied and estimated fox ranged from 10% to almost 100%. However, it is shown here that by applying an open-system isotope-pool model, the measured isotopic shifts can also be explained by physical transport of methane alone. Different field-based methods to quantify MOX in termite mounds are proposed which do not rely on assumptions of physical gas transport. A simple approach is the use of specific inhibitors for MOX, e.g. difluoromethane (CH2F2), combined with chamber-based flux measurements before and after their application. Data is presented on the suitability of different inhibitors and first results of their application in the field. Alternatively, gas-tracer methods allow the quantification of methane oxidation and reaction kinetics without knowledge of physical gas

  6. Effects of the restoration mortar on chalk stone buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ion, R. M.; Teodorescu, S.; Ştirbescu, R. M.; Dulamă, I. D.; Şuică-Bunghez, I. R.; Bucurică, I. A.; Fierăscu, R. C.; Fierscu, I.; Ion, M. L.

    2016-06-01

    The monument buildings as components of cultural heritage are exposed to degradation of surfaces and chemical and mechanical degradation, often associated to soiling and irreversible deterioration of the building. In many conservative and restorative works, a cement-based mortar was used without knowing all the adverse effects of this material on the building. This paper deals with the study of the effects of natural cement used in restorative works in the particular case of the Basarabi-Murfatlar Churches Ensemble. Cement-based materials exposed to sulfate present in the chalk stone - gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O), can induce signs of deterioration, due to ettringite ([Ca3Al (OH)612H2O]2(SO4)32H2O) or thaumasite (Ca3[Si(OH)612H2O](CO3)SO4) formation. These phases contribute to strain within the material, inducing expansion, strength loss, spalling and severe degradation. Several combined techniques (XRD, EDXRF, ICP-AES, SEM, EDS, sulphates content, FT-IR and Raman analysis were carried out to put into evidence the effects of them on the building walls.

  7. Anthropogenic radionuclides in Ottawa River sediment near Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ottawa River has received nuclear reactor effluent from Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) for more than 60 years, including releases from a NRX accident in 1952. Recent interest in the potential impact of these historical releases and the possible need for remediation of a small region immediately downstream from the release point has led to comprehensive studies to assess risk to people and wildlife. In this paper, the results of an extensive survey of gamma-emitting anthropogenic radionuclides in Ottawa River sediment in the vicinity of CRL are presented. Anthropogenic radionuclides detected in Ottawa River sediment include 60Co, 94Nb, 137Cs, 152Eu, 154Eu, 155Eu and 241Am. Concentrations of all anthropogenic radionuclides decline rapidly with distance downstream of the process outfall, reaching stable concentrations about 2 km downstream. All of these radionuclides are found at some sites within 2 km upstream of the process outfall suggesting limited upstream transport and sedimentation. Comparison of anthropogenic radionuclides with several representative primordial radionuclides shows that with the exception of sites at the process outfall and within 2 km downstream of the process outfall, primordial radionuclide concentrations greatly exceed CRL derived anthropogenic radionuclide concentrations. Thus, over 60 years of radionuclide releases from operations at CRL have had little impact on radionuclide concentrations in Ottawa River sediment, except at a few sites immediately adjacent to the process outfall. (author)

  8. Molten fuel moderator interaction program at Chalk River Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitheanandan, T.; Kyle, G.; O' Connor, R.; Sanderson, D.B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-12-15

    The Canadian nuclear power generation industry, represented by the CANDU Owners Group (COG), has been funding an experimental program at Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) to study the interaction between molten material ejected from a fuel channel and the moderator. These experiments were designed to address one of the very low probability postulated accident events considered for CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors. The reactor consists of an array of horizontal fuel channels that contain the UO{sub 2}, nuclear fuel and high-temperature, high-pressure heavy water coolant. Under severely restricted flow blockage conditions, approaching 100% reduction of the flow area, postulated in a fuel channel, the temperature excursion could result in fuel melting, consequential failure of the fuel channel, and ejection of the molten fuel at high pressures into the heavy water moderator at near atmospheric pressure. In preparation for these tests, a chemical mixture called a thermite, that could produce a simulated molten fuel when ignited, was developed in partnership with Argonne National Laboratory (USA). Following this thermite development, two base-case reference tests were completed. The two base-case reference tests, with no molten material present, were performed in the Molten-Fuel Moderator-Interaction (MFMI) facility at CRL. Following the base-case reference tests, a high-pressure melt ejection test using prototypical corium was conducted. The objectives of this paper are to provide an overview of the MFMI program and present the results obtained from thermite development, base-case and melt ejection experiments. (author)

  9. Molten fuel moderator interaction program at Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian nuclear power generation industry, represented by the CANDU Owners Group (COG), has been funding an experimental program at Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) to study the interaction between molten material ejected from a fuel channel and the moderator. These experiments were designed to address one of the very low probability postulated accident events considered for CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors. The reactor consists of an array of horizontal fuel channels that contain the UO2, nuclear fuel and high-temperature, high-pressure heavy water coolant. Under severely restricted flow blockage conditions, approaching 100% reduction of the flow area, postulated in a fuel channel, the temperature excursion could result in fuel melting, consequential failure of the fuel channel, and ejection of the molten fuel at high pressures into the heavy water moderator at near atmospheric pressure. In preparation for these tests, a chemical mixture called a thermite, that could produce a simulated molten fuel when ignited, was developed in partnership with Argonne National Laboratory (USA). Following this thermite development, two base-case reference tests were completed. The two base-case reference tests, with no molten material present, were performed in the Molten-Fuel Moderator-Interaction (MFMI) facility at CRL. Following the base-case reference tests, a high-pressure melt ejection test using prototypical corium was conducted. The objectives of this paper are to provide an overview of the MFMI program and present the results obtained from thermite development, base-case and melt ejection experiments. (author)

  10. IODP Expedition 307 Drills Cold-Water Coral Mound Along the Irish Continental Margin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Williams

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Over the past decade, oceanographic and geophysical surveys along the slope of the Porcupine Seabight off the southwestern continental margin of Ireland have identified upwards of a thousand enigmatic mound-like structures (Figs. 1 and 2. The mounds of the Porcupine Seabight rise from the seafl oor in water depths of 600–900 m and formimpressive conical bodies several kilometers wide and up to 200 m high. Although a few mounds such as Thérèse Mound and Galway Mound are covered by a thriving thicket of coldwater corals, most mound tops and fl anks are covered by dead coral rubble or are entirely buried by sediment (De Mol et al., 2002; Fig. 2, Beyer et al., 2003. Lophelia pertusa (Fig.3 and Madrepora oculata are the most prominent cold-water corals growing without photosynthetic symbionts. The widespread discovery of large and numerous coral-bearing banks and the association of these corals with the mounds have generated signifi cant interest as to the composition, origin and development of these mound structures.Challenger Mound, in the Belgica mound province, has an elongated shape oriented along a north-northeast to south-southwest axis and ispartially buried under Pleistocene drift sediments. In high-resolution seismic profiles the mounds appear to root on an erosion surface (van Rooij et al., 2003. During IODP Expedition307 the Challenger Mound in the Porcupine Seabight was drilled with the goal of unveiling the origin and depositional processes withinthese intriguing sedimentary structures. Challenger Mound, unlike its near neighbors the Thérèse and Galway mounds, has little to no livecoral coverage and, therefore, was chosen as the main target for drilling activities, so that no living ecosystem would be disturbed.

  11. Diagenesis and porosity reduction in the Late Cretaceous Wyandot Formation, offshore Nova Scotia : a comparison with Norwegian North Sea chalks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ings, S.J.; MacRae, R.A.; Pe-Piper, G. [Saint Mary' s Univ., Halifax, NS (Canada). Dept. of Geology; Shimeld, J.W. [Natural Resources Canada, Dartmouth, NS (Canada). Geological Survey of Canada, Bedford Inst. of Oceanography

    2005-09-01

    Chalk is an attractive reservoir target for hydrocarbon exploration because even deep sea-buried chalk has the ability to preserve porosities of up to 40 per cent. The preservation of primary porosity is related to diagenesis, resedimentation, over-pressuring and hydrocarbon saturation. In the past 3 decades, large oil and gas discoveries have been made in chalk units in the North Sea, Texas, Colorado and the offshore Scotian Shelf in eastern Canada. Chalks of the Upper Cretaceous Wyandot Formation on the Scotian Shelf have preserved porosities up to 30 per cent and are the reservoir for a small gas and oil discovery in the Primrose N-50 exploration well. The Wyandot Formation extends about 500 km along the length of the margin and consists mostly of limestone with major chalk intervals. It is largely understudied, despite its potential as a hydrocarbon reservoir or seal. In this study, conventional core samples of Wyandot Formation chalk recovered from both the Primrose A-41 and Eagle D-21 wells were analyzed. The depositional history, diagenesis and porosity-reducing mechanisms within the Formation were clarified through scanning electron microscopy, oxygen and carbon isotope analysis, wireline logs and porosity data. The porosity history of North Sea chalks was then compared with that of the Wyandot Formation. It was determined that the Wyandot chalks are in situ pelagic deposits, compared to the allochthonous North Sea chalks. The dominant mechanisms of porosity reduction in the Wyandot chalks are mechanical compaction and dissolution. It is possible that North Sea type allochthonous reservoirs exist in distal locations on the Scotian Slope because large volumes of Wyandot chalk have been eroded on part of the Scotian Shelf. Therefore, further exploration is warranted to provide a better understanding of the sedimentology and porosity distribution of the in situ Wyandot Formation. 20 refs., 2 tabs., 11 figs.

  12. Subaerial Chalk Cliff Failures on the English Channel Coast, Based on Field Data From Recent Collapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    DUPERRET, A.; MARTINEZ, A.; GENTER, A.; MORTIMORE, R. N.; WATREMEZ, P.

    2001-12-01

    The chalk cliffs along the English Channel coast are currently retreating at a mean rate of 0.5 m/year. However, the erosion is not constant over time, but occurs by catastrophic collapses. For the last three years, a minimum of 40 collapses have been observed along the French chalk coastline (120 km long) and about 10 collapses along the English chalk coastline (40 km long). The observed collapsed volumes are varying from 150 000 m3 (Beachy Head, UK) to a few m3, whereas the cliff heights are varying from 20 to 200m. Two kinds of scar extension have been observed on the cliff face: either the lower part only with few volumes involved, either the whole cliff height for the largest events. Two main cases of scar shape have been evidenced: (1) scar with a vertical upper part and a curved lower part with large striations and crushed chalk (Puys, France). The rupture process is an overall sliding process, with tearing of the upper part of the cliff and shearing in its lower part. The failure is mainly controlled by rain-fall and occurred by water pressure increase on impervious marl seams of the chalk (Duperret et al., in press, JCR). (2) scar with a regular and rectilinear profile, without any striation (Birling Gap, UK). The rupture propagates along pre-existing joint sets, parallel oriented to the cliff face. Locally, pre-existing large-scale transverse fractures may bound the lateral propagation of the scar. Where the scars extend all over the cliff height, the failure is mainly controlled by continental water infiltration. However the role of water through fractured chalk may differ according to the fracture pattern. Where the scars are restrained to the lower part of the cliff, the upward extension of the scars are bounded by lithological features of the chalk, as horizontal flint bands or stratification. In this case, the role of marine parameters, as wave impact at the toe of the cliff may be invoked as a significant triggering parameter contributing to failure

  13. Biogeochemical evidence for anoxic oxidation of methane occurrences in the juvenile carbonate mounds from the Gulf of Cadiz

    OpenAIRE

    Maignien, L.; Foubert, A.; Depreiter, D.; Boon, N.; Blamart, D.; Verstraete, W.; Henriet, J.-P.

    2006-01-01

    Carbonate mounds are conspicuous features of the European margins. Only fossil examples of these mounds were known when modern giant carbonate mounds were discovered in the S.-W. Irish margin. A decade of thorough studies in this area provided remarkable insight on mound processes and distribution. However, the question of the genesis and stabilization over geological times of these carbonate mounds remain wide open.Our work hypothesis is that moderate fluxes of low molecular hydrocarbons are...

  14. Hydrodynamics and cold-water coral facies distribution related to recent sedimentary processes at Galway Mound west of Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Dorschel, B.; D. Hebbeln; Foubert, A.; White, M.; Wheeler, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Cold-water coral carbonate mound development is the result of complex and interactive hydrographical, biological and geological processes that can result in morphostructures several hundred meters high. The case study presented here investigates one of these large mounds – Galway Mound – in the eastern Porcupine Seabight to build an understanding of mound forming processes and the driving factors. For the first time, bottom current data have been recorded at six locations over a mound thus al...

  15. The emergence of mound cemeteries in Early Dilmun:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Steffen

    2010-01-01

    the later Dilmun seals. Together with the introduction of a broad variety of imported vessels from Mesopotamia, SW Iran and the Indus, the evolution in local pottery is taken to reflect a fundamental restructuration of Dilmun's network of exchange at the time of the emerging cemeteries. The proto......  This paper focuses on the major transformation in the social organization of Early Dilmun society which led to the emergence of the vast mound cemeteries in Bahrain. The paper examines this transformation on the basis of developments within the transitional mounds of a "proto-cemetery" dated to c......-cemetery is seen as a reflection of a social system which pre-dates the Dilmun state proper that apparently developed after the fall of the Ur III state....

  16. The Canadian HT dispersion experiment at Chalk River - June 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A trace amount (3.54TBq) of tritiated hydrogen, HT, was released to the atmosphere at an experimental field at the Chalk River Laboratories on June 10, 1987 in order to study the environmental behaviour of HT. Experimental results showed that direct oxidation of HT in the atmosphere was small and confirmed that surface soils convert atmospheric HT to HTO. The HTO formed in the soil was slowly emitted to the atmosphere giving rise to the small concentrations of HTO observed in the air during the release and for a period of several weeks thereafter. HTO/HT ratios in air during the plume passage increased with downwind distance from a value of order 10-5 at 5 m to values between 4 x 10-4 and 8 x 10-4 at 400 m. Deposition velocities for HT to soil were in the range 10-4 to 10-3 m s-1. Rates of reemission of tritium from the soil to the atmosphere were typically a few percent per hour within one to two days of the release, declining to less than one percent per hour over two weeks. Tritium deposition velocities and reemission rates determined for soils in the field agreed well with laboratory measurements on field samples, and were similar in range to previous exposure chamber experiments carried out in various countries in the laboratory and field under non-winter conditions. Direct uptake of HT by vegetation was not detected. The time history of vegetation tritium was consistent with uptake of HTO from soil and atmosphere and with incorporation of tritium into the organically bound form through photosynthesis. The experiment provides an extensive data base suitable for the detailed evaluation of mathematical models describing the short range dispersion of tritium. The results indicate that the short range dose from a release of HT would be much less than the dose from an equivalent release of HTO

  17. Contaminated groundwater characterization at the Chalk River Laboratories, Ontario, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schilk, A.J.; Robertson, D.E.; Thomas, C.W.; Lepel, E.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Champ, D.R.; Killey, R.W.D.; Young, J.L.; Cooper, E.L. [Chalk River Labs., Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    1993-03-01

    The licensing requirements for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste (10 CFR 61) specify the performance objectives and technical requisites for federal and commercial land disposal facilities, the ultimate goal of which is to contain the buried wastes so that the general population is adequately protected from harmful exposure to any released radioactive materials. A major concern in the operation of existing and projected waste disposal sites is subterranean radionuclide transport by saturated or unsaturated flow, which could lead to the contamination of groundwater systems as well as uptake by the surrounding biosphere, thereby directly exposing the general public to such materials. Radionuclide transport in groundwater has been observed at numerous commercial and federal waste disposal sites [including several locations within the waste management area of Chalk River Laboratories (CRL)], yet the physico-chemical processes that lead to such migration are still not completely understood. In an attempt to assist in the characterization of these processes, an intensive study was initiated at CRL to identify and quantify the mobile radionuclide species originating from three separate disposal sites: (a) the Chemical Pit, which has received aqueous wastes containing various radioisotopes, acids, alkalis, complexing agents and salts since 1956, (b) the Reactor Pit, which has received low-level aqueous wastes from a reactor rod storage bay since 1956, and (c) the Waste Management Area C, a thirty-year-old series of trenches that contains contaminated solid wastes from CRL and various regional medical facilities. Water samples were drawn downgradient from each of the above sites and passed through a series of filters and ion-exchange resins to retain any particulate and dissolved or colloidal radionuclide species, which were subsequently identified and quantified via radiochemical separations and gamma spectroscopy. These groundwaters were also analyzed for anions

  18. Probing the intrinsically oil-wet surfaces of pores in North Sea chalk at subpore resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassenkam, Tue; Skovbjerg, Lone Lindbæk; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2009-01-01

    atomic force microscopy-mediated adhesion and elasticity mapping derived from maps of force curves, to examine 5 x 5 µm2 areas of internal pore surfaces, using a tip functionalised to make it hydrophobic.  We investigated chalk samples from inside a drill core sample from the Danish North Sea that had...... been drilled in a water-bearing formation. At this site, the chalk has never seen oil, though at other locations, the same stratigraphic horizon with the same rock properties is known to be a productive oil reservoir. Thus the properties of the investigated particle surfaces are inherent to the chalk...... particles and the data thus indicate variability in the wettability across an individual particle surface. Hydrophobicity varied by factors of more than 15, and elasticity, by more than 30. Some areas were both soft and hydrophobic but for many others, there was no correlation between hardness and adhesion...

  19. Investigation of spore forming bacterial flooding for enhanced oil recovery in a North Sea chalk Reservoir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halim, Amalia Yunita; Nielsen, Sidsel Marie; Eliasson Lantz, Anna;

    2015-01-01

    in higher oil production from the heterogeneous chalk rock. In all cases, an incubation period ('shut-in') after the bacterial and/or nutrient injection was needed to give sufficient time for the bacteria to grow inside the core and to produce more oil. Our findings show potential application of bacteria......Little has been done to study microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) in chalk reservoirs. The present study focuses on core flooding experiments designed to see microbial plugging and its effect on oil recovery. A pressure tapped core holder was used for this purpose. A spore forming bacteria...... Bacillus licheniformis 421 was used as it was shown to be a good candidate in a previous study. Bacterial spore can penetrate deeper into the chalk rock, squeezing through the pore throats. Our results showed that injection of B. licheniformis 421 as a tertiary oil recovery method, in the residual oil...

  20. Full-waveform Inversion of Crosshole GPR Data Collected in Strongly Heterogeneous Chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keskinen, Johanna; Zibar, Majken Caroline Looms; Nielsen, Lars;

    2015-01-01

    Chalk is an important reservoir rock for hydrocarbons and for groundwater resources for many major cities. Therefore, this rock type has been extensively investigated using both geological and geophysical methods. Many applications of crosshole GPR tomography rely on the ray approximation...... in an old chalk quarry in Eastern Denmark. Based on core data (including plug samples and televiewer logging data) collected in our four ~15-m-deep boreholes and results from previous related studies, it is apparent that the studied chalk is strongly heterogeneous. The upper ~7 m consist of variable coarse...... address the importance of (i) adequate starting models, both in terms of the dielectric permittivity and the electrical conductivity, (ii) the estimation of the source wavelet, (iii) and the effects of data sampling density when imaging this rock type. Moreover, we discuss the resolution of the bedding...

  1. Are reefs and mud mounds really so different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Rachel

    2001-12-01

    Although both 'ecologic reefs' and mud mounds are demonstrably rigid, framework reefs, they are still considered to be distinct in terms of their dominant processes of formation and preferred environmental settings. This distinction has rested largely upon the assumption that ecologic reefs are dominated by skeletal metazoans growing in shallow waters, in contrast to the complex autochthonous micrite-supported cavity systems that characterise deep-water mud mounds, now considered to represent either organomineralic deposits (where carbonate precipitation has taken place in association with nonliving organic substrates to form 'automicrite') or various types of microbialite (where carbonate forms as a direct result of the physiological activity or decay of benthic microorganisms). Yet, such autochthonous micrite is increasingly recognised as an important component of many ancient shallow ecologic reefs as well as some modern coral reefs, and indeed may contribute locally up to 80% of the reef rock. These observations raise doubts as to the validity of current fabric-based definitions used to distinguish between mud mounds and ecologic reefs. Whether the autochthonous micrite in mud mounds proves to be dominated by either automicrite or microbialite, both require particular environmental conditions for their formation. Automicrites form where surplus organic matter from metazoans has degraded to release quantities of acidic amino acids with a significant ability to bind Ca 2+ , and microbialite formation also often requires either unusual marine chemistries or ecological conditions. Such conditions might include changes in terrigenous influx, ground water seepage, local anoxia, and increases in the pH of interstitial reef waters or in nutrient concentration.

  2. Fractal-Mound Growth of Pentacene Thin Films

    OpenAIRE

    Zorba, Serkan; Shapir, Yonathan; Gao, Yongli

    2006-01-01

    The growth mechanism of pentacene film formation on SiO2 substrate was investigated with a combination of atomic force microscopy measurements and numerical modeling. In addition to the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) that has already been shown to govern the growth of the ordered pentacene thin films, it is shown here for the first time that the Schwoebel barrier effect steps in and disrupts the desired epitaxial growth for the subsequent layers, leading to mound growth. The terraces of ...

  3. Innovative rubble mound breakwaters for overtopping wave energy conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vicinanza, Diego; Contestabile, Pasquale; Nørgaard, Jørgen Quvang Harck;

    2014-01-01

    This paper intends contributing to the development of an economically and environmentally sustainable coastal infrastructure, which combines rubble mound breakwaters with Wave Energy Converters (WEC). The energy is produced by collecting wave overtopping in a front reservoir, which is returned...... experiments. The formulae are provided with the aim to be of direct use to engineers in the preliminary design of a first prototype of combined breakwater and wave energy converter....

  4. Non-dune eolian sand in Indian mounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, William F.

    1980-02-01

    Indian mounds, near Careyville, Florida, about 2.0 m high, are located on hillsides and hilltops 10 to 20 m above the floodplain of the nearest river (Choctawhatchee). Each mound is composed largely of quartz sand, with a scattering of artefacts and stream pebbles (not in layers), but with no visible bedding. Probability plots showed 25 Gaussian distributions, 18 having the 'dune hump', three having the 'surf break' and nine being doubly-truncated or having other patterns of unknown or uncertain origin. The surf breaks probably were inherited from pre-Pleistocene marine terraces in the area. The pebbles and the sand were not introduced by the same agency. The sand probability plots, taken as a set, indicate an eolian origin. The rough symmetry of the mounds, and the lack of cross-bedding, argue against a migrating dune origin. On a variability plot (showing the variability of the means versus the variability of the standard deviations), one suite of samples fell clearly within the 'dune' number field, a second suite in the overlap area between 'dune' and 'beach', and a third suite, taken immediately adjacent to a creek bed, plotted in the overlap area between 'beach' and 'coastal plain stream'. The pebbles, of common Southern Appalachian types, are attributed to the activities of the inhabitants, perhaps children. The sand is thought to have been carried by the wind, perhaps from nearby river sand bars, or from areas burned either by lightning-set wildfires or as part of "slash-and-burn" agriculture. The mounds are thought to represent clearings (for huts), and hence good trapping devices for wind-borne sand.

  5. Measuring and Modeling the Displacement of Connate Water in Chalk Core Plugs during Water Injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsbech, Uffe C C; Aage, Helle Karina; Andersen, Bertel Lohmann;

    2006-01-01

    The movement of connate water spiked with gamma emitting 22Na was studied during laboratory water flooding of oil saturated chalk from a North Sea oil reservoir. Using a one dimensional gamma monitoring technique is was observed that connate water is piled-up at the front of the injection water...... and forms a mixed water bank with almost 100% connate water in the front behind which a gradual transition to pure injection water occurs. This result underpins log interpretations from waterflooded chalk reservoirs. An ad hoc model was set up by use of the results, and the process was examined...

  6. Electroosmotic dewatering of chalk sludge, iron hydroxide sludge, wet fly ash and biomass sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H.K.; Christensen, Iben Vernegren; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.;

    2003-01-01

    Electroosmotic dewatering has been tested in laboratory cells on four different porous materials: chalk sludge, iron hydroxide sludge, wet fly ash and biomass sludge from enzyme production. In all cases it was possible to remove water when passing electric DC current through the material....... Casagrande's coefficients were determined for the four materials at different water contents. The experiments in this work showed that chalk could be dewatered from 40% to 79% DM (dry matter), fly ash from 75 to 82% DM, iron hydroxide sludge from 2.7 to 19% DM and biomass from 3 to 33% DM by electroosmosis...

  7. Strength and Biot's coefficient for high-porosity oil- or water-saturated chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Katrine Alling

    . The Biot coefficient states the degree of cementation or how the pore pressure contributes to the strain resulting from an external load for a porous material. It is here calculated from dynamic measurements and correlated with the strength of outcrop chalk characterized by the onset of pore collapse...... during hydrostatic loading. The hypothesis is that the Biot coefficient and the theory of poroelasticity may cover the fluid effect by including the increased fluid bulk modulus from oil to water. A high number of test results for both oil- and water-saturated high-porosity outcrop chalk show correlation...

  8. Rock physical aspects of CO{sub 2} injection in chalk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, M.M.

    2011-04-15

    Impact of supercritical CO{sub 2} on the petrophysical and rock-mechanics properties of Ekofisk Formation and Tor Formation chalk from South Arne field, Danish North Sea, chalk was investigated. A series of laboratory experiments was performed on core material collected from the reservoir zone of the South Arne field in order to reveal the changes with respect to porosity, specific surface, pore stiffness, wettability, mineralogy and mechanical failure. In addition, a theoretical rock physical background was also established in order to be able to make sensible interpretation of laboratory data. Sound wave velocity was used as the central tool to study any change in petrophysical and rock mechanical properties. The main focus was to achieve a better understanding of effective stress coefficient (also known as Biot's coefficient); by means of which effective stress can be predicted more accurately. Independent theoretical studies were made on diagenesis, surface properties and stiffness of chalk and their relation with sonic velocity (or Biot's coefficient calculated from sonic velocity). The knowledge and experience from these studies was combined to achieve the main research objective of monitoring changes in hydrocarbon reservoirs in chalk due to CO{sub 2} injection. In order to understand the development of chalk from calcareous ooze and achieving pore stiffness, the diagenesis process of a sedimentary sequence from Kerguelen Plateau in the Indian Ocean was studied. The principal objective of the study was to explore how different porosity reduction mechanisms change the strength of these deep sea carbonate-rich sediments and how these mechanisms can be traced from the change in Biot's coefficient, alpha. In calcareous ooze, alpha was found close to one. Mechanical compaction reduces porosity, but only leads to a minor decrease in alpha. Recrystallization process renders particles smoother, but do not lead to reduction in alpha unless it gives

  9. The Pen Duick Escarpment off Morocco: A promising biogeochemically active carbonate mound laboratory (MiCROSYSTEMS)

    OpenAIRE

    Templer, S. P.; Maignien, L.; McKenzie, J.A.; Henriet, J.P.; Vasconcelos, C.

    2007-01-01

    Carbonate mud mounds, found in marine environments from shallow- to deep-water settings, span from Proterozoic to recent times. During the past decades, numerous active venting fields were discovered in deep marine environments and became a subject of extensive study for marine scientists. Mound building seems to be a fundamental but still enigmatic strategy for life. Various arguments suggest that microorganisms are playing a major role in the reef development, mound formation and biodiversi...

  10. Nutrient dynamics and plant assemblages of Macrotermes falciger mounds in a savanna ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muvengwi, Justice; Ndagurwa, Hilton G. T.; Nyenda, Tatenda; Mbiba, Monicah

    2016-10-01

    Termites through mound construction and foraging activities contribute significantly to carbon and nutrient fluxes in nutrient-poor savannas. Despite this recognition, studies on the influence of termite mounds on carbon and nitrogen dynamics in sub-tropical savannas are limited. In this regard, we examined soil nutrient concentrations, organic carbon and nitrogen mineralization in incubation experiments in mounds of Macrotermes falciger and surrounding soils of sub-tropical savanna, northeast Zimbabwe. We also addressed whether termite mounds altered the plant community and if effects were similar across functional groups i.e. grasses, forbs or woody plants. Mound soils had significantly higher silt and clay content, pH and concentrations of calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), potassium (K), organic carbon (C), ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-) than surrounding soils, with marginal differences in phosphorus (P) and sodium (Na) between mounds and matrix soils. Nutrient enrichment increased by a factor ranging from 1.5 for C, 4.9 for Mg up to 10.3 for Ca. Although C mineralization, nitrification and nitrification fraction were similar between mounds and matrix soils, nitrogen mineralization was elevated on mounds relative to surrounding matrix soils. As a result, termite mounds supported unique plant communities rich and abundant in woody species but less diverse in grasses and forbs than the surrounding savanna matrix in response to mound-induced shifts in soil parameters specifically increased clay content, drainage and water availability, nutrient status and base cation (mainly Ca, Mg and Na) concentration. In conclusion, by altering soil properties such as texture, moisture content and nutrient status, termite mounds can alter the structure and composition of sub-tropical savanna plant communities, and these results are consistent with findings in other savanna systems suggesting that increase in soil clay content, nutrient status and associated changes in the plant

  11. Imported fire ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) mound shape characteristics along a north-south gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, James T; Wallet, Bradley; Freeland, Thomas B

    2008-02-01

    The nests of some mound-building ants are thought to serve an important function as passive solar collectors. To test this hypothesis, imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta Buren, S. richteri Forel, and their hybrid) mound shape characteristics (south facing slope angle and area, mound height, and basal elongation in the plane of the ground) were quantified in 2005 and 2006 at a number of locations from approximately 30 degrees 25' N (Long Beach, MS) to 35 degrees 3' N (Fayetteville, TN). Insolation (w*h/m2), maximum sun angle (sun elevation in degrees above the horizon at noon, dependent on date and latitude), cumulative rainfall (7 and 30 d before sampling), and mean ambient temperature (7 d before sampling) for each site x date combination were used as predictive variables to explain mound shape characteristics. Steepness of south-facing mound slopes was negatively associated with maximum sun angle at higher temperatures, with predicted values falling from approximately 36 degrees at sun angle=40 degrees to 26 degrees at sun angle=70 degrees; at lower temperatures, slope remained relatively constant at 28 degrees. On average, mound height was negatively correlated with maximum sun angle. Rainfall had a net negative effect on mound height, but mound height increased slightly with maximum sun angle when rainfall was high. Mound elongation generally increased with increased mound building activity. Under favorable temperature conditions and average rainfall, imported fire ant mounds were tallest, most eccentric, and had the steepest south facing slopes during periods of low maximum sun angle. Mound shape characteristics are discussed with regard to season and their potential usefulness for remote sensing efforts. PMID:18348811

  12. Fractures and Rock Mechanics, Phase 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havmøller, Ole; Krogsbøll, Anette

    1997-01-01

    The main objectives of the project are to combine geological description of fractures, chalk types and rock mechanical properties, and to investigate whether the chosen outcrops can be used as analogues to reservoir chalks. Five chalk types, representing two outcrop localities: Stevns and...

  13. SPATIAL VARIABILITY AND VITALITY OF EPIGEOUS TERMITE MOUNDS IN PASTURES OF MATO GROSSO DO SUL, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Santana Lima

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Epigeous termite mounds are frequently observed in pasture areas, but the processes regulating their population dynamics are poorly known. This study evaluated epigeous termite mounds in cultivated grasslands used as pastures, assessing their spatial distribution by means of geostatistics and evaluating their vitality. The study was conducted in the Cerrado biome in the municipality of Rio Brilhante, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. In two pasture areas (Pasture 1 and Pasture 2, epigeous mounds (nests were georeferenced and analyzed for height, circumference and vitality (inhabited or not. The area occupied by the mounds was calculated and termite specimens were collected for taxonomic identification. The spatial distribution pattern of the mounds was analyzed with geostatistical procedures. In both pasture areas, all epigeous mounds were built by the same species, Cornitermes cumulans. The mean number of mounds per hectare was 68 in Pasture 1 and 127 in Pasture 2, representing 0.4 and 1 % of the entire area, respectively. A large majority of the mounds were active (vitality, 91 % in Pasture 1 and 84 % in Pasture 2. A “pure nugget effect” was observed in the semivariograms of height and nest circumference in both pastures reflecting randomized spatial distribution and confirming that the distribution of termite mounds in pastures had a non-standard distribution.

  14. How burial diagenesis of chalk sediments controls sonic velocity and porosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2003-01-01

    Based on P-wave velocity and density data, a new elastic model for chalk sediments is established. The model allows the construction of a series of isoframe (IF) curves, each representing a constant part of the mineral phase contributing to the solid frame. The IF curves can be related to the pro......Based on P-wave velocity and density data, a new elastic model for chalk sediments is established. The model allows the construction of a series of isoframe (IF) curves, each representing a constant part of the mineral phase contributing to the solid frame. The IF curves can be related......, whereby IF increases and chalk forms. Rock mechanical tests show that when compaction requires more than in-situ stress, porosity reduction is arrested. During subsequent burial, crystals and pores grow in size as a consequence of the continuing recrystallization. ne lack of porosity loss during......, and depending on pore-water chemistry and temperature, pore-filling cementation may occur over a relatively short depth interval. Limestone and mixed sedimentary rock form, and porosity may be reduced to less than 20%. Isoframe increases to more than 0.6. In hydrocarbon reservoirs in North Sea chalk, relatively...

  15. SNG-log in borehole P7 in Faxe Chalk Quarry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsbech, Uffe C C

    1996-01-01

    A spectral natural gamma-ray log in a 190 m borehole in Faxe chalk quarry confirms that Danish bryozoan and corallic limestones contain very low levels of natural radioactivity. Due to the low content of natural radioactivity it has been possible to observe the influence from cosmic radiation...

  16. Seismic stratigraphy and sedimentary architecture of the Chalk Group in south-west Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Connie; Ineson, Jon; Boldreel, Lars Ole

    2014-01-01

    The article focuses on a study undertaken by the Chalk Group on the western onshore region of the Danish Basin in Eastern Denmark related on the seismic stratigraphy and sedimentary architecture of the region. The study is undertaken through subdividing the northern North German Basin and the south...

  17. Effect of fluid-solid friction on the stiffness of chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Nguh Akam, Hosea; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2011-01-01

    Chalks behave weaker at water saturated condition. We studied this softening effect as a function of Biot’s frequency ratio, which is a ratio between measured ultrasonic wave frequency and Biot critical frequency, fc. Kinematic viscosity of fluid and permeability of rock determines fc. We observed...... that rocks saturated with higher kinematic viscosity fluid are stiffer....

  18. Ultrasonic velocities of North Sea chalk samples: influence of porosity, fluid content and texture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogen, B.; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Japsen, P.;

    2005-01-01

    the South Arne Field than from the Dan Field for identical porosities. This difference may be due to textural differences between the chalk at the two locations because we observe that large grains (i.e. filled microfossils and fossil fragments) that occur more frequently in samples from the Dan Field have...... amplitude-versus-offset analyses....

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance and sound velocity measurements of chalk saturated with magnesium rich brine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2013-01-01

    The use of low field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to determine petrophysical properties of reservoirs has proved to be a good technique. Together with sonic and electrical resistivity measurements, NMR can contribute to illustrate the changes on chalk elasticity due to different pore water...

  20. Using Raman spectroscopic imaging for non-destructive analysis of filler distribution in chalk filled polypropylene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boros, Evelin; Porse, Peter Bak; Nielsen, Inga;

    2016-01-01

    A feasibility study on using Raman spectral imaging for visualization and analysis of filler distribution in chalk filled poly-propylene samples has been carried out. The spectral images were acquired using a Raman spectrometer with 785 nm light source.Eight injection-molded samples with...

  1. Effective-stress-law behavior of Austin chalk rocks for deformation and fracture conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warpinski, N.R.; Teufel, L.W.

    1994-08-01

    Austin chalk core has been tested to determine the effective law for deformation of the matrix material and the stress-sensitive conductivity of the natural fractures. For deformation behavior, two samples provided data on the variations of the poroelastic parameter, {alpha}, for Austin chalk, giving values around 0.4. The effective-stress-law behavior of a Saratoga limestone sample was also measured for the purpose of obtaining a comparison with a somewhat more porous carbonate rock. {alpha} for this rock was found to be near 0.9. The low {alpha} for the Austin chalk suggests that stresses in the reservoir, or around the wellbore, will not change much with changes in pore pressure, as the contribution of the fluid pressure is small. Three natural fractures from the Austin chalk were tested, but two of the fractures were very tight and probably do not contribute much to production. The third sample was highly conductive and showed some stress sensitivity with a factor of three reduction in conductivity over a net stress increase of 3000 psi. Natural fractures also showed a propensity for permanent damage when net stressed exceeded about 3000 psi. This damage was irreversible and significantly affected conductivity. {alpha} was difficult to determine and most tests were inconclusive, although the results from one sample suggested that {alpha} was near unity.

  2. The surface reactivity of chalk (biogenic calcite) with hydrophilic and hydrophobic functional groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okhrimenko, D. V.; Dalby, K. N.; Skovbjerg, L. L.; Bovet, N.; Christensen, J. H.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2014-03-01

    The surface properties of calcium carbonate minerals play an important role in a number of industrial and biological processes. Properties such as wettability and adsorption control liquid-solid interface behaviour and thus have a strong influence on processes such as biomineralisation, remediation of aquifers and oil recovery. We investigated how two model molecules of different polarity, namely water and ethanol, interact with reservoir and outcrop chalk samples and we compared their behaviour with that of pure, inorganically precipitated calcite. Thermodynamic quantities, such as the work of wetting, surface energy and isosteric adsorption enthalpy, were determined from vapour adsorption isotherms. The chalks were studied fresh and after extraction of organic residues that were originally present in these samples. The work of wetting correlates with the amount of organic matter present in the chalk samples but we observed a fundamental difference between the adsorption properties of chalk and pure, inorganically precipitated calcite toward the less polar, ethanol molecule. Further analysis of the chemical composition of the organic matter extracted from the chalk samples was made by gas chromatography (GC-MS). Monitoring surface composition by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) before and after extraction of the organic material, and with atomic force microscopy (AFM), showed that nanometer sized clay crystals observed on the chalk particle surfaces could be an important part of the reason for the differences. Removal of the extractable portion of the hydrocarbons liberates adsorption sites that have different wetting properties than the rest of the chalk and these have an energy distribution that is similar to clays. Thus, the results exemplify the complexity of biogenic calcite adsorption behaviour and demonstrate that chalk wetting in drinking water aquifers as well as oil reservoirs is controlled partly by the nanoparticles of clay that have grown on the

  3. Laboratory measurements of the electrokinetic and electrochemical potential in chalk, with application to monitoring of saline intrusion in the UK chalk aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAllister, D.; Jackson, M.; Butler, A. P.; Vinogradov, J.

    2012-12-01

    Saline intrusion is a global phenomenon affecting the availability of freshwater in coastal aquifers. The aim of this work is to investigate whether measurements of spontaneous potential (SP) can be used to monitor the intrusion of seawater into coastal aquifers, with specific application to the chalk aquifer near Brighton on the south coast of the UK. SP arises to maintain electrical neutrality when a separation of charge occurs due to gradients in pressure (electrokinetic or streaming potential), concentration (electrochemical potential) and temperature (thermoelectric potential). Concentration gradients are a characteristic feature of saline intrusion and may give rise to a measureable electrochemical potential (EC). In addition the electrokinetic potential (EK) will arise during abstraction and up-coning of the saline front. The intruding saline front could therefore be detected and monitored continuously, with SP measurements in boreholes and at the surface providing dense monitoring in space and time. To determine the likely magnitude of EK and EC signals during saline intrusion into the chalk aquifer, we measured EK and EC potentials in samples of Seaford chalk saturated with (i) natural, potable groundwater from the aquifer and (ii) seawater sampled from the English Channel. The EK coupling coefficient, which relates the gradient in voltage to the gradient in water pressure when the total current is zero, was found to be -60 mV/MPa in samples saturated with groundwater. In seawater saturated samples it was found to be only -1 mV/MPa. This result agrees with earlier work suggesting the EK potential is suppressed in high salinity environments due to a compressed electrical double layer. The EK coupling coefficient was negative in both cases, suggesting that the surface charge of Seaford chalk is negative when in contact with groundwater and seawater. The electrochemical experiments involved establishing a concentration gradient across the chalk samples

  4. Famennian mud-mounds in the proximal fore-reef slope, Canning Basin, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Gregory E.

    2001-12-01

    Famennian (Late Devonian) carbonate buildups and, in particular, mud-mounds, are poorly known, in general, and few have been documented in detail. Relatively small Famennian mud-mounds occur in proximal fore-reef slope settings in the Canning Basin, Western Australia. The Famennian platform margin facies passes from typical shoaling carbonate facies in the back reef, through massive, calcimicrobial, cement-rich reef-margin facies, to relatively steeply dipping (20-30°), well-bedded fore-reef slope facies containing shelf-derived, winnowed grainy sediments and extremely coarse reef-block debris. Isolated or coalescing mounds occur in the proximal slope, immediately adjacent to and, in some cases, possibly grading into the margin facies. Mounds are elongate perpendicular to the margin and some had synoptic relief greater than 2 m. Mounds are lithologically variable and consist of varying proportions of micrite, multiple generations of marine cement, abundant Rothpletzella, Renalcis, poorly preserved sparry microbial crusts and sporadically distributed laminar stromatoporoids. Surrounding grainy slope facies abut and slope off of mound flanks. Mound facies are very similar to nearby reef-margin facies, with the exceptions that stromatoporoids have not been observed in margin facies and solenoporoid algae, which occur in the margin, have not been observed in the mounds. Stromatolites are conspicuously absent from both facies. Mound facies appear to be more closely related to Frasnian and Famennian calcimicrobe cement-dominated reef-margin facies than to Famennian deep-water stromatolite-sponge-mound facies, such as those that occur elsewhere in the Canning Basin. The observed Canning Famennian reef and mound frameworks were constructed by communities that appear to be very similar to earlier Frasnian communities, despite the Frasnian-Famennian extinction event, and provide good examples of microbial reef framework construction in a high energy setting.

  5. Characteristics and origin of Earth-mounds on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tullis, J.A.

    1995-09-01

    Earth-mounds are common features on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. The mounds are typically round or oval in plan view, <0.5 m in height, and from 8 to 14 m in diameter. They are found on flat and sloped surfaces, and appear less frequently in lowland areas. The mounds have formed on deposits of multiple sedimentary environments. Those studied included alluvial gravel terraces along the Big Lost River (late Pleistocene/early Holocene age), alluvial fan segments on the flanks of the Lost River Range (Bull Lake and Pinedale age equivalents), and loess/slopewash sediments overlying basalt flows. Backhoe trenches were dug to allow characterization of stratigraphy and soil development. Each mound has features unique to the depositional and pedogenic history of the site; however, there are common elements to all mounds that are linked to the history of mound formation. Each mound has a {open_quotes}floor{close_quotes} of a sediment or basement rock of significantly different hydraulic conductivity than the overlying sediment. These paleosurfaces are overlain by finer-grained sediments, typically loess or flood-overbank deposits. Mounds formed in environments where a sufficient thickness of fine-grained sediment held pore water in a system open to the migration to a freezing front. Heaving of the sediment occurred by the growth of ice lenses. Mound formation occurred at the end of the Late Pleistocene or early in the Holocene, and was followed by pedogenesis. Soils in the mounds were subsequently altered by bioturbation, buried by eolian deposition, and eroded by slopewash runoff. These secondary processes played a significant role in maintaining or increasing the mound/intermound relief.

  6. The treatment of low-level waste at Mound Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The program at Mound Laboratory to handle low-level radioactive waste has two major objectives: 1) to design a volume reduction system for low-level combustible waste, both solid and liquid, and 2) to develop separation methods for removing radionuclides from liquid waste, both, low-level and intermediate-level. The result of the former effort is the Cyclone Incinerator which provides a volume reduction of >35:1. In meeting the latter objective, ultrafiltration has been demonstrated to be a feasible way of reducing the generation of secondary waste. Development of such techniques will significantly reduce waste management costs in the nuclear industry

  7. Benthic macrofauna variations and community structure in Cenomanian cyclic chalk-marl from Southerham Grey Pit, SE England

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Bodil Wesenberg; Gale, A. S.; Surlyk, Finn

    2009-01-01

    . The material comprises washing residues of 24 bulk samples collected from chalk and marl half-cycles. A total of 5055 invertebrate specimens were retrieved and referred to 68 species, forming the basis for the recognition of six guilds. In general, the fauna is more diverse in marl than in chalk, but...... clearly well adapted to both facies and thus to the fine grain size of the substrate rather than to lithology. The systematic difference in diversity between chalk and marl samples was possibly caused by long-term climatic and oceanographic changes and thus could represent a biological response to...

  8. Deep saltwater in Chalk of North-West Europe: origin, interface characteristics and development over geological time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnesen, Ellen Prip; Larsen, F.; Sonnenborg, T.O.;

    2009-01-01

    in deeper parts of the Chalk formation and diffusive transport is thus the predominant transport mechanism. Laboratory-measured porosity and effective diffusion coefficients were used as input to a numerical 1D diffusion model of the interface between freshwater in an upper, fractured aquifer and modified...... connate formation water below. The model satisfactorily simulated the observed chloride and delta O-18 profiles. The diffusive refreshening of the Chalk formation has been going on for about 0.9 million years. The connate water in the Chalk of parts of the sedimentary basin seems to have been modified...

  9. Dupuit-Forchheimer theories for the shape of groundwater recharge mounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Richard R.

    1991-05-01

    The nonlinear Dupuit-Forchheimer theory and two linearized versions are considered as to their applicability for giving accurate results on recharge mound shapes beneath strip and square basins. Results on mound rises from the approximate theories are compared with those from the nonlinear theory to determine criteria for the use of the approximate theories.

  10. Sedimentation patterns on a cold-water coral mound off Mauritania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisele, M.; Frank, N.; Wienberg, C.; Titschack, J.; Mienis, F; Beuck, L.; Tisnerat-Laborde, N.; Hebbeln, D.

    2014-01-01

    An unconformity-bound glacial sequence (135 cm thick) of a coral-bearing sediment core collected from the flank of a cold-water coral mound in the Banda Mound Province off Mauritania was analysed. In order to study the relation between coral framework growth and its filling by hemipelagic sediments,

  11. Plants in Your Ants: Using Ant Mounds to Test Basic Ecological Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettler, Jennifer A.; Collier, Alexander; Leidersdorf, Bil; Sanou, Missa Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Urban students often have limited access to field sites for ecological studies. Ubiquitous ants and their mounds can be used to study and test ecology-based questions. We describe how soil collected from ant mounds can be used to investigate how biotic factors (ants) can affect abiotic factors in the soil that can, in turn, influence plant growth.

  12. Reservoir Potential of Silurian Carbonate Mud Mounds in the Southern Sichuan Basin, Central China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Wenzhi; YANG Xiaoping; Steve KERSHAW; ZHANG Baomin

    2006-01-01

    Lower Silurian mud mounds of the Shinuilan Formation, located in the southern Sichuan Basin, China, have developed in open shelf settings in deeper water than shallow-water reef-bearing limestones that occur in the region. An integration of the outcrop, drill data and seismic profiles show that contemporaneous faults have controlled the boundary and distribution of the sedimentary facies of Lower Silurian rocks in the southern Sichuan Basin. Mounds appear to have developed in the topographic lows formed by synsedimentary faulting, on the shelf of the Yangtze Platform. Average mound thickness is 20 m, maximum 35 m. Mounds are composed mainly of micrite, possibly microbially bound, and are overlain by shales. Mound tops are preferentially dolomitized, with the Mg2+ source probably from the clay content of the mound-top carbonate. Microfacies analysis and reconstruction of the diagenetic history reveal that the mound tops have higher porosity, and are gas targets; in contrast, mound cores and limbs show pores filled by three generations of calcite cement, and therefore have a low gas potential.

  13. Formation and Control of Self-Sealing High Permeability Groundwater Mounds in Impermeable Sediment: Implications for SUDS and Sustainable Pressure Mound Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David D. J. Antia

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A groundwater mound (or pressure mound is defined as a volume of fluid dominated by viscous flow contained within a sediment volume where the dominant fluid flow is by Knudsen Diffusion. High permeability self-sealing groundwater mounds can be created as part of a sustainable urban drainage scheme (SUDS using infiltration devices. This study considers how they form, and models their expansion and growth as a function of infiltration device recharge. The mounds grow through lateral macropore propagation within a Dupuit envelope. Excess pressure relief is through propagating vertical surge shafts. These surge shafts can, when they intersect the ground surface result, in high volume overland flow. The study considers that the creation of self-sealing groundwater mounds in matrix supported (clayey sediments (intrinsic permeability = 10–8 to 10–30 m3 m–2 s–1 Pa–1 is a low cost, sustainable method which can be used to dispose of large volumes of storm runoff (<20→2,000 m3/24 hr storm/infiltration device and raise groundwater levels. However, the inappropriate location of pressure mounds can result in repeated seepage and ephemeral spring formation associated with substantial volumes of uncontrolled overland flow. The flow rate and flood volume associated with each overland flow event may be substantially larger than the associated recharge to the pressure mound. In some instances, the volume discharged as overland flow in a few hours may exceed the total storm water recharge to the groundwater mound over the previous three weeks. Macropore modeling is used within the context of a pressure mound poro-elastic fluid expulsion model in order to analyze this phenomena and determine (i how this phenomena can be used to extract large volumes of stored filtered storm water (at high flow rates from within a self-sealing high permeability pressure mound and (ii how self-sealing pressure mounds (created using storm water infiltration can be used to

  14. Physiological and Biogeochemical Traits of Bleaching and Recovery in the Mounding Species of Coral Porites lobata: Implications for Resilience in Mounding Corals

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen J Levas; Andréa G Grottoli; Adam Hughes; Christopher L Osburn; Yohei Matsui

    2013-01-01

    Mounding corals survive bleaching events in greater numbers than branching corals. However, no study to date has determined the underlying physiological and biogeochemical trait(s) that are responsible for mounding coral holobiont resilience to bleaching. Furthermore, the potential of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as a source of fixed carbon to bleached corals has never been determined. Here, Porites lobata corals were experimentally bleached for 23 days and then allowed to recover for 0, 1,...

  15. Behaviour and Ecological Impacts of Termites: Fecundity Investigations in Mounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wako Sutuma Edessa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A radical study was conducted on the behaviour and ecological impacts of termites in Haru District of Western Oromia, Ethiopia. It was aimed at investigating the natural behaviour, fecundity in mounds, ecological impacts and recommending possible solutions to termite problems. Four mounds in different sites were vertically dug down to display the profile of the queen, soldiers, workers, number of laid eggs, nymphs and colonies of termites. On an average, termite queens of the study site may lay about 25 eggs per minute, 36, 000 eggs per day and 13, 140, 000 eggs annually. The fourth queen was unearthed to study the structure, size, number of ovaries and fecundity. It was examined that the death of a queen does not affect the colony, because four small queens are formed and one of them becomes the queen of queens and replaced the dead queen promptly. Accordingly, termites are found to be one of the most destructive agents of our ecosystems and their management requests careful and biological control methods. As a result, the negative effect of termites outweighs the positive effect of termites so that minimising the population size is important for human beings.

  16. Wave Run-up on the Zeebrugge Rubble Mound Breakwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Rouck, Julien; de Walle, Bjorn Van; Troch, Peter;

    2007-01-01

    Full-scale wave run-up measurements have been carried out on the Zeebrugge rubble mound breakwater in the frame of the EU-funded OPTICREST project. Wave run-up has been measured by a run-up gauge and by a so-called spiderweb system. The dimensionless wave run-up value Ru2%Hm0 measured in Zeebrugge...... equals 1.77 for Iribarren number xi(om) = 3.63. An (apparent) influence of the water level on wave run-up has been observed. The porosity of the armor layer has a significant influence on wave run-up and may explain the dependency of wave run-up on the water level observed in Zeebrugge. Full-scale...... measurement results have been compared to literature data. The full-scale wave run-up data are in good agreement with the existing results of wave run-up tests with rip-rap slopes but are clearly higher than other wave run-up data resulting from tests with rubble mound breakwaters....

  17. Porosity and sonic velocity depth trends of Eocene chalk in Atlantic Ocean: Influence of effective stress and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awedalkarim, Ahmed; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2014-01-01

    . This indicates pore-filling cementation via an activation energy mechanism. We proposed a predictive equation for porosity reduction with burial stress. This equation is relevant for basin analysis and hydrocarbon exploration to predict porosity if sonic velocity data for subsurface chalk is available.......We aimed to relate changes in porosity and sonic velocity data, measured on water-saturated Eocene chalks from 36 Ocean Drilling Program drill sites in the Atlantic Ocean, to vertical effective stress and thermal maturity. We considered only chalk of Eocene age to avoid possible influence...... of geological age on chalk compaction trends. For each depth, vertical effective stresses as defined by Terzaghi and by Biot were calculated. We used bottom-hole temperature data to calculate the time–temperature index of thermal maturity (TTI) as defined by Lopatin. Porosity and compressional wave velocity...

  18. COCARDE - a research platform for a new look to ancient mounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüggeberg, Andres; Henriet, Jean-Pierre; Foubert, Anneleen; van Rooij, David; Samankassou, Elias; Dullo, Wolf-Christian; Spezzaferri, Silvia; Science Community, Cocarde

    2010-05-01

    Carbonate mounds are important contributors of life in different settings, from warm-water to cold-water environments, and throughout geological history. Research on modern carbonate mounds over the last years made a major contribution to our overall understanding of these particular sedimentary systems. By looking to the modern carbonate mound community, some fundamental questions could be addressed, until now not yet explored in fossil mound settings. The international network COCARDE (Cold-Water Carbonate Reservoir Systems in Deep Environment) is a platform for exploring new insights in cold- and warm-water carbonate mound research of recent and ancient mound systems (http://www.cocarde.eu). One aim of the COCARDE network is to bring scientific communities together, to study recent carbonate mounds in midslope environments in the present ocean, and to investigate fossil mounds spanning the whole Phanerozoic time. Scientific challenges on modern and ancient carbonate mound systems got already well defined during two dedicated workshops of the COCARDE network: 1) the ESF Magellan COCARDE Workshop in Fribourg, Switzerland, January 21-24, 2009, and 2) the ESF MiCROSYSTEMS - FWO COCARDE Flanders - ESF CHECREEF Workshop and Field Seminar, Oviedo, Spain, September 16-20, 2009. The wide spectrum of disciplines in geosciences and biology are summarized in the following five topics for the carbonate mound research: i) Palaeoenvironment; ii) The Microbial Filter; iii) Petrophysical Characterization; iv) Connectivity and Compartmentalization - the Fluid System; v) Advancing our Insight in Phanerozoic Reef Systems - the Slope Niche. One of the most important outcomes of these meetings was the identification of the need for combined research efforts on fossil and modern carbonate settings to provide the baseline reference standard for a better understanding of these exceptional systems and their potential as hydrocarbon reservoirs.

  19. Aerobic degradation potential of the herbicides mecoprop, dichlorprop and bentazone in groundwater from chalk aquifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi, Suzi; Hybel, Anne-Marie; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup;

    2011-01-01

    The aerobic degradation potential of mecoprop, dichlorprop and bentazone was studied at concentration of 1 μg/L in laboratory batch experiments with groundwater from chalk aquifers. Within the incubation period of 129 days, 14C-mecoprop concentration decreased to 60-80% in the microcosms with gro......The aerobic degradation potential of mecoprop, dichlorprop and bentazone was studied at concentration of 1 μg/L in laboratory batch experiments with groundwater from chalk aquifers. Within the incubation period of 129 days, 14C-mecoprop concentration decreased to 60-80% in the microcosms...... with groundwater collected from two monitoring wells (Well 1 and 2). Dichlorprop degradation was neither observed under aerobic nor anaerobic conditions, while 17-27% of the initial concentration of 14C-bentazone was removed. The results indicated a degradation potential of mecoprop and bentazone under aerobic...

  20. NMR response of non-reservoir fluids in sandstone and chalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zwaag, C H; Stallmach, F; Skjetne, T; Veliyulin, E

    2001-01-01

    Transverse (T2) NMR relaxation time at 2 MHz proton resonance frequency was measured on core plug samples from two different lithologies, sandstone and chalk, before and after exposure to selected drilling fluids. The results show that NMR signal response was significantly altered after displacing 50% of the original pore fluids, crude oil and water, by drilling fluid filtrate. Relaxation spectra of the rock samples invaded by water-based filtrate shift to significantly shorter T2-values. This shift yields an underestimation of the free-fluid volumes when selecting cut-off values of 33 ms and 100 ms for sandstone and chalk, respectively. In opposite, rock samples affected by oil-based filtrate respond with a signal indicating significantly larger free-fluid volumes than present before exposure. NMR-permeability calculated based on the Timur-Coates Free Fluid model altered in some cases by one order of magnitude. PMID:11445352

  1. Change of Static and Dynamic Elastic Properties due to CO² Injection in North Sea Chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Hjuler, M.L.; Christensen, H.F.;

    2012-01-01

    Reservoir modeling and monitoring uses dynamic data for predicting and determining static changes. Dynamic data are achieved from the propagation velocity of elastic waves in rock while static data are obtained from the mechanical deformation. Reservoir simulation and monitoring are particularly......% non-carbonate. We studied difference in static and dynamic behavior. Furthermore, brine saturated data were compared with CO2 injected data to reveal the effect of supercritical CO2 injection in both static and dynamic elastic properties. We used strain gauges and LVDTs to measure static deformation....... We observed lower dynamic elastic modulus for chalk with higher non-carbonate content at porosities lower than 30%. In 30% porosity chalk, dynamic compressional and bulk modulus were found significantly higher than the static modulus. Static measurements with LVDT were found lowest. The effect of CO2...

  2. Investigation of Lecturer's Chalk by X-Ray Florescence and Fast Neutron Activation Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different samples of lecturer's chalk were studied, using X-ray florescence (XRF) and Fast Neutron Activation Analysis (FNAA) techniques to ensure the safety of its use. The K (X-rays) and the gamma-rays were measured, using Si(Li) and high-purity germanium (HPGe) spectrometers to detect and determine qualitatively and quantitatively the constituents of the studied samples. For the investigated bulk chalk samples, the XRF was used for determination the average neutron flux of 2×107 n/cm2 sec. The concentrations of the elements (Ca and small traces of Al, Fe, Mg and Si) were measured and their presence was confirmed by γ-ray, lifetime and/or XRF measurements.

  3. Burial diagenesis of deep sea chalk as reflected in Biot's coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul

    2013-01-01

    to limestone as burial increases and porosity decreases. The porosity decrease is accompanied by an increasing velocity to elastic waves, and consequently a decreasing Biot's coefficient, as estimated from velocity and density of core samples. When the effective burial stress is normalized to total horizontal...... cross sectional area, the porosity is found to decline as a function of stress. The porosity trend proceeds smoothly from ooze over chalk to limestone. By contrast, when vertical effective stress is normalized to grain contact area, each lithology shows a distinct porosity-decline - stress pattern....... In the ooze, we find that the natural compaction causes an increasing stress on grain contact area, indicating that the ooze particles become strongly strained. In the chalk section, contact cement is probably the reason why particles become less strained as porosity declines. In the limestone, stress...

  4. Burial diagenesis of deep sea chalk as reflected in Biot’s coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul

    to limestone as burial increases and porosity decreases. The porosity decrease is accompanied by an increasing velocity to elastic waves, and consequently a decreasing Biot’s coefficient, as estimated from velocity and density of core samples. When the effective burial stress is normalized to total horizontal...... cross sectional area, the porosity is found to decline as a function of stress. The porosity trend proceeds smoothly from ooze over chalk to limestone. By contrast, when vertical effective stress is normalized to grain contact area, each lithology shows a distinct porosity-decline - stress pattern....... In the ooze, we find that the natural compaction causes an increasing stress on grain contact area, indicating that the ooze particles become strongly strained. In the chalk section, contact cement is probably the reason why particles become less strained as porosity declines. In the limestone, stress...

  5. Gas compositions and processes in the unsaturated zone of the chalk and triassic sandstone aquifers, England

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparatively little is known about the nature of gas sources, sinks and transport in the unsaturated zone, yet this topic is of importance to a wide range of activities extending from agriculture to the construction industry. The composition of the unsaturated zone atmosphere in two different English aquifer types (Chalk and Triassic sandstone) was investigated by the construction of gas sampling boreholes with depths of up to 25 m. Monitoring took place at approximately 1-2 month intervals over 12-24 months. No significant seasonal variations in gas composition were noted. The following mean concentrations of gases was observed (Chalk, sandstone): N2 (77.7%, 77.7%), O2 (19.5%, 19.8%), CO2 (1.5%, 1.5%), N2O (4.2 ppmv, 2.4 ppmv), CH4 (0.1 ppmv, 0.3 ppmv), and δ13C-CO2 (-25.3 per mille, -19.9 per mille). The factor of 50 increase in CO2 reflects production from soil organic matter, supplemented in the sandstone by some CO2 from acidification or carbonate material. The decrease in O2 of little more than 1% absolute from atmospheric concentration indicates the persistence of oxidizing conditions in both unsaturated zones, and the relatively high concentrations of N2O therefore appear likely to have been derived from nitrification rather than denitrification. The limited magnitude of denitrification processes is further illustrated by N2/Ar and δ15N data. To understand better the rate of movement of gases in the unsaturated zone of a fissured aquifer, a tracer test using SF6 was carried out at the Chalk site. The results indicate a diffusion rate up to 103 times higher than that expected for the Chalk matrix alone. (author)

  6. Probing the intrinsically oil-wet surfaces of pores in North Sea chalk at subpore resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Hassenkam, T.; Skovbjerg, L. L.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2009-01-01

    Pore surface properties control oil recovery. This is especially true for chalk reservoirs, where pores are particularly small. Wettability, the tendency for a surface to cover itself with fluid, is traditionally defined by the angle a droplet makes with a surface, but this macroscopic definition is meaningless when the particles are smaller than even the smallest droplet. Understanding surface wetting, at the pore scale, will provide clues for more effective oil recovery. We used a special m...

  7. Investigated Miscible CO2 Flooding for Enhancing Oil Recovery in Wettability Altered Chalk and Sandstone Rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabrizy, Vahid Alipour

    2012-07-01

    The thesis addresses oil recovery by miscible CO2 flooding from modified sandstone and chalk rocks. Calcite mineral surface is modified with stearic acid (SA) and asphaltene, and the silicate mineral surfaces are modified with N,N-dimethyldodecylamine (NN-DMDA) and asphaltene. The stability of adsorbed polar components in presence of SO4 2- and Mg2 + ions is also investigated. Recovery from sandstone cores is consistently lower than that from chalk cores saturated with the same oil and flooded with CO2 at all miscible flooding conditions. This may be due to the larger permeability contrasts in sandstone cores, which promote the fingering phenomenon. Miscible CO2 flooding for chalk and sandstone cores with distilled water, as initial water saturation, shows also lower oil recovery than cores saturated with different ions. At higher miscible flooding conditions, higher oil recovery is obtained. However, presence of light components (such as C1 or C3) in oil reduced the recovery. Oil recovery in presence of methane (C1) is lower than that in presence of methane and propane (C1/C3). A ternary diagram was constructed in order to understand the CO2 flooding mechanism(s) at the different flooding conditions and in presence of light components. The side effect of the flooding with CO2 is the probability for asphaltene deposition. An approach based on solubility parameter in the liquid, is used to assess the risk for asphaltene deposition during CO2 miscible flooding. The light components (C1/C3) and higher flooding conditions enhanced the risk for asphaltene instability. It is also shown higher amount of asphaltene deposition in chalk cores than that in sandstone cores at similar miscibility conditions.(au)

  8. Intrinsic and Carrier Colloid-facilitated transport of lanthanides through discrete fractures in chalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbrod, N.; Tran, E. L.; Klein-BenDavid, O.; Teutsch, N.

    2015-12-01

    Geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste is the long term solution for the disposal of long lived radionuclides and spent fuel. However, some radionuclides might be released from these repositories into the subsurface as a result of leakage, which ultimately make their way into groundwater. Engineered bentonite barriers around nuclear waste repositories are generally considered sufficient to impede the transport of radionuclides from their source to the groundwater. However, colloidal-sized mobile bentonite particles ("carrier" colloids) originating from these barriers have come under investigation as a potential transport vector for radionuclides sorbed to them. As lanthanides are generally accepted to have the same chemical behaviors as their more toxic actinide counterparts, lanthanides are considered an acceptable substitute for research on radionuclide transportation. This study aims to evaluate the transport behaviors of lanthanides in colloid-facilitated transport through a fractured chalk matrix and under geochemical conditions representative the Negev desert, Israel. The migration of Ce both with and without colloidal particles was explored and compared to the migration of a conservative tracer (bromide) using a flow system constructed around a naturally fractured chalk core. Results suggest that mobility of Ce as a solute is negligible. In experiments conducted without bentonite colloids, the 1% of the Ce that was recovered migrated as "intrinsic" colloids in the form of carbonate precipitates. However, the total recovery of the Ce increased to 9% when it was injected into the core in the presence of bentonite colloids and 13% when both bentonite and precipitate colloids were injected. This indicates that lanthanides are essentially immobile in chalk as a solute but may be mobile as carbonate precipitates. Bentonite colloids, however, markedly increase the mobility of lanthanides through fractured chalk matrices.

  9. Innovative rubble mound breakwaters for wave energy conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a new Wave Energy Converter named Overtopping BReakwater for Energy Conversion (OBREC) which consists of a rubble mound breakwater with a front reservoir designed with the aim of capturing the wave overtopping in order to produce electricity. The energy is extracted via low head turbines, using the difference in water levels between the reservoir and the mean sea water level. The new design should be capable of adding a revenue generation function to a breakwater while adding cost sharing benefits due to integration. The design can be applied to harbour expansions, existing breakwater maintenance or upgrades due to climate change for a relatively low cost, considering the breakwater would be built regardless of the inclusion of a WEC

  10. Evaporation from Banksia woodland on a groundwater mound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrington, P.; Greenwood, E. A. N.; Bartle, G. A.; Beresford, J. D.; Watson, G. D.

    1989-01-01

    Annual evaporation from a site within a Banksia woodland on a groundwater mound near Perth, Western Australia, was estimated from measurements of daily evaporation by ventilated chambers on fourteen occasions during a 12-month period. The total evaporation for this period was estimated to be 666 mm (77% of annual rainfall). About two-thirds of the total evaporation came from the ground flora, one-fifth from Banksia trees, and the remainder from the tall shrub Adenanthos cygnorum. Depth to water table, which ranged from 4 to 12 m over the site, had little effect on total evaporation. This work suggests that regular reduction in ground flora foliage, for example, by controlled burning could increase recharge.

  11. Concordance in mate choice in female mound-building mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigneux, Emilie; Féron, Christophe; Gouat, Patrick

    2012-03-01

    Females must evaluate male quality to perform mate choice. Since females generally base their selection on different male features, individual females may differ in their choice. In this study, we show that concordance between females in mate choice decisions may arise without any experimental maximization of a particular attractive trait. Choice tests were performed in mound-building mice, Mus spicilegus, a monogamous species. Body odours of two male donors were presented to 12 female subjects individually. To determine female choice, the same pair of males was presented three times to a female. Four different pairs of male body odours were used. Male donors, not related to females, were selected at random in our polymorphic breeding stock. Using this two-way choice design, female mice displayed a clear choice and had a similar preference for particular males.

  12. An Alternative Stability Equation For Rock Armoured Rubble Mound Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tue; Burcharth, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    be straight forward to assume, that a relation between the exerted wave loads and the stability of the armour layer would be of major interest, but the normal approach to the problem has simply been to relate easy accessible wave parameters, e.g. wave height and period, directly to the single unit weight......Rubble mound breakwaters are by far the most common type of breakwater, the importance of which is clearly reflected in the vast amount of published research. Especially, the hydraulic stability of the main armour layer has been studied in order to obtain reliable design equations. It should....... Taking a closer look on the stability formulae large differences in the influence of the different parameters are observed although several points of resemblance are observed. Despite the major efforts in obtaining a reliable stability equation a large scatter between damage predicted by the stability...

  13. Wave Induced Loading and Stability of Rubble Mound Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tue

    conducting model tests very large variability in e.g. the degree of stability is observed. This background motivated the investigations conducted in the present study. The objective was to investigate and clarify which wave parameters are important for the hydraulic stability of the armour layer on typical...... related to the hydraulic stability was discussed. Further, governing parameters influencing the stability were identified and their influence quantified to retrieve the state- of-the-art. Model tests were conducted at SINTEF with scale models of prototype breakwaters and both the wave induced loading......The present state of knowledge when designing coastal structures has improved in the recent years. However the available design methods concerning especially rubble mound structures are characterized by a number of empirical and semi-empirical formulae making model tests inevitable and even when...

  14. The occurrence and development of peat mounds on King George Island (Maritime Antarctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Fabiszewski

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available On King George Island, South Shetlands Islands, a type of peat formation has been discovered which has not previously been reported from the Antarctic. These formations are in shape of mounds up to 7x 15 m in area, with a peat layer of about I m thick. About twenty five cm below the surface there is a layer of permanently frozen peat. The mounds are covered by living mosses (Polytrichum alpinum and Drepanocladus uncinatus, Antarctic hair grass (Deschampsia antarctica and lichens. Erosion fissures occurring on the surface are evidence of contemporary drying and cessation of the mound's growth. The initial phase of the development of the mounds began with a community dominated by Calliergidium austro-stramineum and Deschampsia antarctica, and their further development has been due to peat accumulation formed almost entirely by Calliergidium. The location of the mounds is near a penguin rookery, which clearly conditioned the minerotrophic character of these formations, as compared with the "moss peat banks" formed by Chorisodontium aciphyllum and Polytrichum al-pestre. Moreover, the peat mounds differ from the latter in several ways, e.g. rate of growth and floristic composition. Radiocarbon dating of peat from the base of one mound gave an age of 4090±60 years B.P. This suggests that the age of the tundra on King George Island is about 5000-4000 years.

  15. The role of diagenisis in the hydrogeological stratification of carbonate aquifers: an example from the chalk at Fair Cross, Berkshire, UK

    OpenAIRE

    Bloomfield, J.

    1997-01-01

    International audience; Carbonate rocks form important aquifers in many parts of the world and in north-west Europe the Chalk is a primary source of potable water. When flushed with relatively fresh groundwaters, the Chalk may undergo significant diagenetic alteration at relatively shallow depths resulting in a physically and hydrogeochemically stratified aquifer. Diagenetic affects may have important implications for the effective exploitable thickness of the Chalk aquifer and for water qual...

  16. Hydrocarbons exploration, development from low-permeability chalks - upper cretaceous Niobrara formation, Rocky Mountains region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollastro, R.M.; Scholle, P.A.

    1984-04-23

    The Niobrara formation in the Rocky Mountains/Great Plains region serves as a classic model in research, exploration, production, and development programs involving unconventional reservoirs and source-rock systems. Numerous geologic and geochemical studies of the organic and inorganic constituents within the chalk of the Upper Cretaceous Niobrara formation, as well as other chalks and associated units, have identified several depositional and diagenetic relationships, giving explorationists more insight into reservoir properties and hydrocarbon maturity in a particular area of interest. The identification and understanding of the geologic, geophysical, and engineering aspects of these chalks have helped develop the Niobrara into a major play area in the Rocky Mountains/Great Plains region. Geologists, reviewing the area's (1) structural relationships and hydrocarbon distribution, (2) reservoir parameters, (3) production technology and log evaluation, (4) fracture stimulation and production characteristics, and (5) exploration models and resource potential, predict that the Niobrara is a highly promising hydrocarbon reservoir/source-rock system that will make a significant contribution to the energy resources of the Denver basin and adjacent areas.

  17. Microbial assemblages on a cold-water coral mound at the SE Rockall Bank (NE Atlantic): interactions with hydrography and topography

    OpenAIRE

    J. D. L. van Bleijswijk; Whalen, C.; Duineveld, G.C.A.; Lavaleye, M.S.S.; Witte, H.J.; Mienis, F.

    2015-01-01

    This study characterizes the microbial community composition over Haas Mound, one of the most prominent cold-water coral mounds of the Logachev Mound province (Rockall Bank, NE Atlantic). We outline patterns of distribution vertically – from the seafloor to the water column – and laterally – across the mound – and couple these to mound topography and hydrography. Samples of water, sediment and Lophelia pertusa were collected in 2012 and 2013 from locations that were chose...

  18. Spatial Vegetation Data for Effigy Mounds National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The vegetation spatial database coverage (vegetation map) is a product of the Effigy Mounds National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project, USGS-NPS Vegetation...

  19. Archaeological mounds as analogs of engineered covers for waste disposal sites: Literature review and progress report. [Appendix contains bibliography and data on archaeological mounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatters, J C; Gard, H A

    1991-09-01

    Closure caps for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities are typically designed as layered earthen structures, the composition of which is intended to prevent the infiltration of water and the intrusion of the public into waste forms. Federal regulations require that closure caps perform these functions well enough that minimum exposure guidelines will be met for at least 500 years. Short-term experimentation cannot mimic the conditions that will affect closure caps on the scale of centuries, and therefore cannot provide data on the performance of cap designs over long periods of time. Archaeological mounds hundreds to thousands of years old which are closely analogous to closure caps in form, construction details, and intent can be studied to obtain the necessary understanding of design performance. Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a review and analysis of archaeological literature on ancient human-made mounds to determine the quality and potential applicability of this information base to assessments of waste facility design performance. A bibliography of over 200 English-language references was assembled on mound structures from the Americas, Europe, and Asia. A sample of these texts was read for data on variables including environmental and geographic setting, condition, design features, construction. Detailed information was obtained on all variables except those relating to physical and hydrological characteristics of the mound matrix, which few texts presented. It is concluded that an extensive amount of literature and data are available on structures closely analogous to closure caps and that this information is a valuable source of data on the long-term performance of mounded structures. Additional study is recommended, including an expanded analysis of design features reported in the literature and field studies of the physical and hydraulic characteristics of different mound designs. 23 refs., 10 figs., 12 tabs.

  20. Recent benthic foraminiferal assemblages from cold-water coral mounds in the porcupine seabight

    OpenAIRE

    Schönfeld, Joachim; Dullo, Wolf-Christian; Pfannkuche, Olaf; Freiwald, André; Rüggeberg, Andres; Schmidt, Steffi; Weston, Janice

    2011-01-01

    Cold-water coral ecosystems are characterised by a high diversity and population density. Living and dead foraminiferal assemblages from 20 surface sediment samples from Galway and Propeller Mounds were analysed to describe the distribution patterns of benthic foraminifera on coral mounds in relation to different sedimentary facies. Hard substrates were examined to assess the foraminiferal microhabitats and diversities in the coral framework. We recognised 131 different species, of which 27 p...

  1. Isotope Biogeochemistry of Sulfur in a Cold-Water Carbonate Mound (IODP Site 1317)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdelman, T. G.; Boettcher, M. E.

    2007-12-01

    To establish a depositional model for cold-water carbonate mounds, Challenger Mound and adjacent continental slope sites were drilled during IODP Expedition 307 in May 2005. Although a role for methane seepage and subsequent anaerobic oxidation was discounted both as a hard-round substrate for mound initiation and as a principal source of carbonate within the mound succession, interstitial water profiles of sulfate, alkalinity, Mg, and Sr indicated a tight coupling between carbonate diagenesis and mircrobial sulfate reduction. The reaction of sulfide with siliciclastic iron-bearing minerals to form pyrite was proposed to account for enhanced diagenetic carbonate precipitation (Ferdelman et al., 2006; Proc. IODP, vol. 307; doi:10.2204/iodp.proc.307.2006). To characterize these geomicrobial sulfur transformations in the carbonate mound sediments, the inorganic and stable isotope geochemical compositions of pore water sulfate and solid phase reduced sulfur compounds were performed. Acid-volatile sulfur (AVS) and pyrite del 34S compositions were usually similar and exhibited an increasing trend of from -40 per mil near surface to -20 per mil at the mound base at 132 mbsf. However, several excursions to more 34S sulfur enriched pyrite to values >0 per mil were observed in the deeper sections of the mound sequence. These excursions may be linked transitory changes in the depth of the methane-sulfate transition zone during mound build-up. The oxygen isotopic composition of residual dissolved sulfate indicates intracellular isotope exchange processes within the cells of SRBs, leading to increasing equilibration between extracellular pore water and sulfate.

  2. Origin Hypotheses for Kilometer-Scale Mounds on Dwarf Planet Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, Hanna G.; Platz, Thomas; Schmidt, Britney E.; Scully, Jennifer E. C.; Russell, Christopher T.; Mest, Scott C.; Crown, David A.; Sykes, Mark V.; Hughson, Kynan H. G.; Chilton, Heather T.; Williams, David A.; Pieters, Carle M.; Marchi, Simone; Travis, Bryan; Raymond, Carol A.

    2015-11-01

    The Dawn Framing Camera has revealed numerous domical to conical features on Ceres, which may have relevance to the presence and history of near-surface ice. These features fall into two broad classes, large domes 10s to >100 km in diameter exhibiting 1-5 km of positive relief, and small mounds : Kilometer and sub-kilometer scale albedo variations; sub-kilometer flow features on individual mounds; localized vents; conical or domical shape. Challenge: Features are smaller than convective plumes expected from thermal evolution modeling.Hypothesis 2: Kilometer-scale mounds are analogous to terrestrial and martian pingos, which grow by drawing liquid water through a silicate matrix as a freezing front propagates downward. Observational tests: Mounds occurring on smooth material that floods or embays large-scale features; little or no local albedo variation; no small flows associated with individual mounds; domical or ring-shape; concentric or radial fractures on dome, or central depression. Challenge: Small Cerean mounds observed thus far are an order of magnitude larger than terrestrial or martian pingos.Hypothesis 3: Kilometer-scale mounds are rootless cones analogous to features observed on the surface of volcanic flows in volatile-rich regions of Earth and Mars. Rootless cones are produced when layers of fluid material inundate a region; localized devolatilization of a layer mobilizes clasts to form cone-shaped deposits. Observational tests: Mounds on smooth material that floods or embays large-scale features; conical, not domical, profile; large central depressions; cones in organized spatial patterns; no small-scale flows. Challenge: Low gravity environment and/or cryolava composition may be incompatible with this process.In addition to morphological observations, VIR data will help distinguish between these hypotheses.

  3. Integrated research on the Pen Duick cold-water coral mounds: the MiCROSYSTEMS approach

    OpenAIRE

    Van Rooij, D.; De Mol, L.; D. Blamart; Mienis, F.; L. M. Wehrmann; Barbieri, R; Maignien, L.; Templer, S. P.; Haas, H; Henriet, J.-P.; The MiCROSYSTEMS Science Team

    2010-01-01

    The ESF EuroDIVERSITY MiCROSYSTEMS project aimed to turn the cold-water coral (CWC) mounds on the Pen Duick Escarpment (PDE) in the Gulf of Cadiz into a natural laboratory, exploring this highly complex biotope and to characterize its biodiversity. A common point of discussion with all other CWC mound provinces, surpassing its broad range of regional and morphological variability, concerns the driving forces regarding the initiation of these complex deep-water systems. Both oceanographic and ...

  4. Caoxite-hydroxyapatite composition as consolidating material for the chalk stone from Basarabi-Murfatlar churches ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ion, Rodica-Mariana; Turcanu-Caruţiu, Daniela; Fierăscu, Radu-Claudiu; Fierăscu, Irina; Bunghez, Ioana-Raluca; Ion, Mihaela-Lucia; Teodorescu, Sofia; Vasilievici, Gabriel; Rădiţoiu, Valentin

    2015-12-01

    The development of new composition for surface conservation of some architectural monuments represents now an important research topic. The Basarabi-Murfatlar Ensemble, recognized as the first religious monument from mediaeval Dobrogea (Romania) (from 9th to 11th century), is one of the most impressive archaeological sites of Europe. This ensemble is built from amorphous calcium carbonate, very sensitive to humidity, frost, salts, etc. The aim of this paper is to test on chalk stone samples a new consolidant - hydroxyapatite (HAp) mixed with calcium oxalate trihydrate (caoxite) (COT). Some specific techniques for evaluation its impact on chalk stone surface are used, as follows: petrographical and physical-chemical techniques: SEM, OM, ICP-AES, TGA, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, chromatic parameters changes, the accelerated weathering tests: heating, freeze-thaw, and their effects on porosity and capillary water uptake by the chalk surface. All these have been evaluated before and after treatment with COT-HAp, putting into evidence the effect of the new composition on the chalk stone surface. HAp induces COT stabilization, and their joint composition can bind weathered stone blocks providing a substantial reinforcement of chalk surface.

  5. The Surales, Self-Organized Earth-Mound Landscapes Made by Earthworms in a Seasonal Tropical Wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangerlé, Anne; Renard, Delphine; Iriarte, José; Suarez Jimenez, Luz Elena; Adame Montoya, Kisay Lorena; Juilleret, Jérôme; McKey, Doyle

    2016-01-01

    The formation, functioning and emergent properties of patterned landscapes have recently drawn increased attention, notably in semi-arid ecosystems. We describe and analyze a set of similarly spectacular landforms in seasonal tropical wetlands. Surales landscapes, comprised of densely packed, regularly spaced mounds, cover large areas of the Orinoco Llanos. Although descriptions of surales date back to the 1940's, their ecology is virtually unknown. From data on soil physical and chemical properties, soil macrofauna, vegetation and aerial imagery, we provide evidence of the spatial extent of surales and how they form and develop. Mounds are largely comprised of earthworm casts. Recognizable, recently produced casts account for up to one-half of total soil mass. Locally, mounds are relatively constant in size, but vary greatly across sites in diameter (0.5-5 m) and height (from 0.3 m to over 2 m). This variation appears to reflect a chronosequence of surales formation and growth. Mound shape (round to labyrinth) varies across elevational gradients. Mounds are initiated when large earthworms feed in shallowly flooded soils, depositing casts that form 'towers' above water level. Using permanent galleries, each earthworm returns repeatedly to the same spot to deposit casts and to respire. Over time, the tower becomes a mound. Because each earthworm has a restricted foraging radius, there is net movement of soil to the mound from the surrounding area. As the mound grows, its basin thus becomes deeper, making initiation of a new mound nearby more difficult. When mounds already initiated are situated close together, the basin between them is filled and mounds coalesce to form larger composite mounds. Over time, this process produces mounds up to 5 m in diameter and 2 m tall. Our results suggest that one earthworm species drives self-organizing processes that produce keystone structures determining ecosystem functioning and development. PMID:27168157

  6. Sedimentology of a Mid-Late Ordovician carbonate mud-mound complex from the Kathmandu nappe in Central Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pas, Damien; Da Silva, Anne-Christine; Dhital, Megh Raj; Boulvain, Frédéric

    2011-08-01

    This sedimentological study of the Godavari quarry is the first relating to the Palaeozoic Tethyan sedimentary rocks of the Katmandu nappe (Central Nepal). Sedimentological analyses led to the identification of six microfacies belonging to a large carbonate mud-mound complex, which can be divided into mound, flank and off-mound main depositional settings. Identification of two dasycladaceans ( Dasyporell a cf. silurica ( Stolley, 1893) and Vermiporella sp.) in the mound facies gives a Mid-Late Ordovician age to this newly discovered Godavari carbonate mud-mound, which makes this mound one of the oldest ever described in the Asian continent. The mound microfacies are characterized by a high micritic content, the presence of stromatactis and the prevalence of red coloured sediments (the red pigmentation probably being related to organic precipitation of iron). The flank microfacies are characterized by a higher crinoid and argillaceous content and the presence of bio- and lithoclasts concentrated in argillaceous lenses. Finally, the off-mound microfacies show very few bioclasts and a high argillaceous content. Palaeoenvionmental interpretation of microfacies, in terms of bathymetry, leads us to infer that the Godavari mud-mound started to grow in a deep environment setting below the photic and wave action zones and that it evolved to occupy a location below the fair weather wave base. Cementation of cavities within the mound facies underlines a typical transition from a marine to a burial diagenetic environment characterized by: (1) a radiaxial non luminescent feroan calcite cement (marine) showing a bright orange luminescent band in its middle part; (2) a bright zoned orange fringe of automorphic feroan calcite (meteoric phreatic); (3) a dull orange xenomorphic feroan calcite cement in the centre of cavities (burial) and (4) a saddle dolomite within the centre of larger cavities. The faunal assemblage (diversity and relative proportion) of the Godavari mound facies

  7. Molluskan fauna in two shell mounds in the State of Parana coast, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos de Vasconcellos Gernet

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The shell mounds are artificial formations consisting mostly of mollusk shells used in the feeding of the prehistoric peoples which inhabited our coast. These sites are found throughout the Brazilian coast, and hundreds of them were cataloged in the State of Paraná since the 1940s. The fragility of these sites, their importance as evidences of our prehistoric period, and its abrupt disappearance, justify the need for new researches which contribute to contextualize and draw up plans to preserve this heritage. The works related to the molluskan fauna found in the shell mounds are restricted to refer to the most common species and, sometimes, just their popular names. A greater knowledge on these prehistoric inhabitants’ diet allows a better understanding of ancient natural ecosystems. The survey of mollusks was carried out in the shell mounds Guaraguaçu and Boguaçu, in the towns of Pontal do Parana and Guaratuba, respectively, and performed through visual inspection, reading of specialized bibliography and comparison to previous works on the fauna of the shell mounds in the State of Parana coast. Altogether, 29 species were observed in the shell mound Guaraguaçu and 17 species were observed in the shell mound Boguaçu, resulting in a total of 31 species.

  8. Zonation of Microbial Communities by a Hydrothermal Mound in the Atlantis II Deep (the Red Sea)

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yong

    2015-10-20

    In deep-sea geothermal rift zones, the dispersal of hydrothermal fluids of moderately-high temperatures typically forms subseafloor mounds. Major mineral components of the crust covering the mound are barite and metal sulfides. As a result of the continental rifting along the Red Sea, metalliferous sediments accumulate on the seafloor of the Atlantis II Deep. In the present study, a barite crust was identified in a sediment core from the Atlantis II Deep, indicating the formation of a hydrothermal mound at the sampling site. Here, we examined how such a dense barite crust could affect the local environment and the distribution of microbial inhabitants. Our results demonstrate distinctive features of mineral components and microbial communities in the sediment layers separated by the barite crust. Within the mound, archaea accounted for 65% of the community. In contrast, the sediments above the barite boundary were overwhelmed by bacteria. The composition of microbial communities under the mound was similar to that in the sediments of the nearby Discovery Deep and marine cold seeps. This work reveals the zonation of microbial communities after the formation of the hydrothermal mound in the subsurface sediments of the rift basin.

  9. Textural variation within Great Salt Lake algal mounds: Chapter 8.5 in Stromatolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    This chapter discusses textural variation within the Great Salt Lake algal mounds. Great Salt Lake algal mounds contain: (1) a framework of non-skeletal, algally induced aragonite precipitates; (2) internal sediment; and (3) inorganic cement. These three elements create a variety of laminated, poorly laminated, and unlaminated internal textures. Interior framework precipitates bear little resemblance to the present living film of the mound surface. Internal texture of the mounds is believed to be largely relict and to have resulted from precipitation by algae different than those presently living at the surface. The most probable cause of local extinction of the algal flora is change in brine salinity. Precipitated blue-green algal structures in ancient rocks may indicate other than normal marine salinity and near shore sedimentation. Extreme variation of internal texture reflects extreme environmental variability typical of closed basin lakes. Recognition of mounds similar to those in the Great Salt Lake can be a first step toward recognition of ancient hyper-saline lake deposits, if such an interpretation is substantiated by consideration of the entire depositional milieu of precipitated algal mounds.

  10. Biogeochemistry and geomicrobiology of cold-water coral carbonate mounds - lessons learned from IODP Expedition 307

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdelman, Timothy; Wehrmann, Laura; Mangelsdorf, Kai; Kano, Akihiro; Williams, Trevor; Jean-Pierre, Henriet

    2010-05-01

    Large mound structures associated with cold-water coral ecosystems commonly occur on the slopes of continental margins, for instance, west of Ireland in the Porcupine Seabight, the Gulf of Cadiz or the Straits of Florida. In the Porcupine Seabight over 1500 mounds of up to 5 km in diameter and 250 m height lie at water depths of 600 to 900 m. The cold-water coral reef ecosystems associated with these structures are considered to be "hotspots" of organic carbon mineralization and microbial systems. To establish a depositional and biogeochemical/diagenetic model for cold-water carbonate mounds, Challenger Mound and adjacent continental slope sites were drilled in May 2005 during IODP Expedition 307. One major objective was to test whether deep sub-surface hydrocarbon flow and enhanced microbial activity within the mound structure was important in producing and stabilizing these sedimentary structures. Drilling results showed that the Challenger mound succession (IODP Site U1317) is 130 to 150 meters thick, and mainly consists of floatstone and rudstone facies formed of fine sediments and cold-water branching corals. Pronounced recurring cycles on the scales of several meters are recognized in carbonate content (up to 70% carbonate) and color reflectance, and are probably associated with Pleistocene glacial-interglacial cycles. A role for methane seepage and subsequent anaerobic oxidation was discounted both as a hard-round substrate for mound initiation and as a principal source of carbonate within the mound succession. A broad sulfate-methane transition (approximately 50 m thick)within the Miocene sediments suggested that the zone of anaerobic oxidation of methane principally occurs below the moundbase. In the mound sediments, interstitial water profiles of sulfate, alkalinity, Mg, and Sr suggested a tight coupling between carbonate diagenesis and low rates of microbial sulfate reduction. Overall organic carbon mineralization within cold-water coral mound appeared

  11. Full-waveform inversion of cross-hole GPR data collected in a strongly heterogeneous chalk reservoir analogue with sharp permittivity and conductivity contrasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keskinen, Johanna; Zibar, Majken Caroline Looms; Moreau, Julien;

    2014-01-01

    Chalk sediments form an important reservoir for groundwater onshore and for hydrocarbons in the Danish sector of the North Sea. Cross-hole Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) tomography is an efficient method to investigate subtle porosity variations in the chalk. Traditional ray-based inversion techn...

  12. Biot critical frequency applied as common friction factor for pore collapse and failure of chalk with different pore fluids and temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Katrine Alling; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Foged, Niels Nielsen

    2011-01-01

    A fluid effect toward higher strengths for oil-saturated chalk compared with water-saturated chalk has previously been identified and labeled the "water-weakening phenomenon," but has not been further characterized physically. The hypothesis of this paper is that the Biot critical frequency...

  13. Photogrammetric analysis of rubble mound breakwaters scale model tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Rodrigues

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper is to develop a photogrammetric method in order to obtain arobust tool for damage assessment and quantification of rubble-mound armour layers during physicalscale model tests. With the present work, an innovative approach based on a reduced number ofdigital photos is proposed to support the identification of affected areas. This work considers twosimple digital photographs recording the instants before and after the completion of the physicaltest. Mathematical techniques were considered in the development of the procedures, enabling thetracking of image differences between photos. The procedures were developed using an open-sourceapplication, Scilab, nevertheless they are not platform dependent. The procedures developed enablethe location and identity of eroded areas in the breakwater armour layer, as well as the possibilityof quantifying them. This ability is confirmed through the calculation of correlation coefficients ineach step of the search for the more damaged area. It is also possible to make an assessment of themovement of armour layer units.

  14. Earth-mounded concrete bunker PLAP technical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eng, R.

    1989-11-01

    Under the US DOE Prototype License Application Project (PLAP), Ebasco Services Incorporated was commissioned to develop a preliminary design of the Earth-Mounded Concrete Bunker (EMCB) concept for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal. The EMCB disposal concept is of great interest because it represents the only engineered LLW disposal technology currently in use in the commercial sector. By definition, the EMCB disposal structure is located partially below grade and partially above grade. The concrete bunker is an engineered structure designed to be structurally stable for the prerequisite time horizon. The basic design parameters of the disposal facility were stipulated by US DOE, a northeast site location, representative waste, 30 year operational life, and a 250,000 ft{sup 3}/year disposal capacity. The design was developed to satisfy only US NRC Part 61 disposal requirements, not individual state requirements that may go beyond Part 61 requirements. The technical safety analysis of the preliminary design was documented according to the format specifications of NUREG-1199, to the extent practicable with quite limited resources.

  15. Bryan Mound SPR cavern 113 remedial leach stage 1 analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudeen, David Keith [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM; Weber, Paula D.; Lord, David L.

    2013-08-01

    The U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve implemented the first stage of a leach plan in 2011-2012 to expand storage volume in the existing Bryan Mound 113 cavern from a starting volume of 7.4 million barrels (MMB) to its design volume of 11.2 MMB. The first stage was terminated several months earlier than expected in August, 2012, as the upper section of the leach zone expanded outward more quickly than design. The oil-brine interface was then re-positioned with the intent to resume leaching in the second stage configuration. This report evaluates the as-built configuration of the cavern at the end of the first stage, and recommends changes to the second stage plan in order to accommodate for the variance between the first stage plan and the as-built cavern. SANSMIC leach code simulations are presented and compared with sonar surveys in order to aid in the analysis and offer projections of likely outcomes from the revised plan for the second stage leach.

  16. Mortality among workers at the Mound Facility: A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortality among 4,697 white males who were employed at the Mound Facility between 1943 and 1979 was compared with expected mortality based on US white male death rates. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) of 96 were observed for both all causes and all cancers. SMRs for digestive cancers and unintentional injuries were significantly less than 100. No SMR was significantly greater than 100 for these workers. A significantly elevated lung cancer SMR was observed for the subcohort of workers employed from 1943--1959, a period during which polonium-210 was processed at the plant. To determine the potential impact of wartime selection factors, this time period was further divided into two periods, 1943--1945 and 1946--1959. In the 1943--1945 period, the SMR for lung cancer was 204 (90% CI = 140, 290), while in the later period the lung cancer SMR was 105 (90% CI = 77, 140). Similar results were observed for all causes, all cancers, cancers of the rectum, nonmalignant respiratory diseases, and all injuries for which the SMRs were elevated during the wartime period but were not elevated after the war. Additional analyses considering workers hired in the period 1960--1979, during which plutonium-238 was processed at the facility, yielded little information. Generally, a strong healthy worker effect was observed and was attributed to the limited follow-up time and small numbers of deaths among this subcohort. 22 refs., 9 tabs

  17. High resolution microgravity investigations for the detection and characterisation of subsidence associated with abandoned, coal, chalk and salt mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The closure and decay of industrial activity involving mining has scarred the landscape of urban areas and geo-hazards posed by subsurface cavities are ubiquitous throughout Europe. Features of concern consist of natural solution cavities (e.g. swallow holes and sinkholes in limestone gypsum and chalk) and man-made cavities (mine workings, shafts) in a great variety of post mining environments, including coal, salt, gypsum, anhydrite, tin and chalk. These problems restrict land utilisation, hinder regeneration, pose a threat to life, seriously damage property and services and blight property values. This paper outlines the application of microgravity techniques to characterise abandoned mining hazard in case studies from Coal, Chalk and Salt Mining environments in the UK. (authors)

  18. Mechanical and chemical processes affecting the chalk during burial, insights from combined reflection seismics, well data and field work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, Julien; Boussaha, Myriam; Thibault, Nicolas Rudolph;

    2014-01-01

    The chalk must undergo several phases of grain reorganisation and chemical reactions during its diagenetic evolution from a carbonaceous ooze to a sedimentary rock. Some of these transformations could be observed on structures from the kilometre- to the micrometre-scale with seismic reflection...... and cores analyses, respectively.However, few sites allow to combine all the different scale of observation for chalk diagenesis. Onshore and offshore high resolution seismics, two fully cored >350 m wells with wireline logging tools and very high quality exposures from a coastal cliff and a quarry form......-called hairline fractures. They have recently been interpreted as compaction bands associated with the pore collapse of the chalk. We have observed these fractures on the field and on the cores in specific intervals. At depth, these fractures are in genetic relation with the formation of some stylolithes...

  19. Influence of clay and silica on permeability and capillary entry pressure of chalk reservoirs in the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Birte; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2002-01-01

    specific surface area. Fifty-nine Tor and Ekofisk Formation chalk samples from five North Sea chalk reservoirs were investigated. All contain quartz and clay minerals, most commonly kaolinite and smectite, with trace amounts of illite. The contents of calcite and quartz are inversely correlated and both...... are independent of the content of clays. We thus infer that the main part of the silica is of biogenic origin. The specific surface area of the chalk is mainly controlled by clay content. The specific surface area of calcite is determined by the individual calcite crystal size and is not dependent...... on stratigraphic variations in fossil size. The specific surface area of calcite increases with increasing content of quartz and clays. These constituents may inhibit recrystallization of calcite and thus preserve high 2 specific surface area. Our data accord with the following specific surface areas (m(2) g(-1...

  20. High resolution microgravity investigations for the detection and characterisation of subsidence associated with abandoned, coal, chalk and salt mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Styles, P.; Toon, S.; Branston, M.; England, R. [Keele Univ., Applied And Environmental Geophysics Group, School of Physical and Geographical Sciences (United Kingdom); Thomas, E.; Mcgrath, R. [Geotechnology, Neath (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    The closure and decay of industrial activity involving mining has scarred the landscape of urban areas and geo-hazards posed by subsurface cavities are ubiquitous throughout Europe. Features of concern consist of natural solution cavities (e.g. swallow holes and sinkholes in limestone gypsum and chalk) and man-made cavities (mine workings, shafts) in a great variety of post mining environments, including coal, salt, gypsum, anhydrite, tin and chalk. These problems restrict land utilisation, hinder regeneration, pose a threat to life, seriously damage property and services and blight property values. This paper outlines the application of microgravity techniques to characterise abandoned mining hazard in case studies from Coal, Chalk and Salt Mining environments in the UK. (authors)

  1. Response of invertebrates from the hyporheic zone of chalk rivers to eutrophication and land use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacioglu, Octavian; Moldovan, Oana Teodora

    2016-03-01

    Whereas the response of lotic benthic macroinvertebrates to different environmental stressors is a widespread practice nowadays in assessing the water and habitat quality, the use of hyporheic zone invertebrates is still in its infancy. In this study, classification and regression trees analysis were employed in order to assess the ecological requirements and the potential as bioindicators for the hyporheic zone invertebrates inhabiting four lowland chalk rivers (south England) with contrasting eutrophication levels (based on surface nitrate concentrations) and magnitude of land use (based on percentage of fine sediments load and median interstitial space). Samples of fauna, water and sediment were sampled twice, during low (summer) and high (winter) groundwater level, at depths of 20 and 35 cm. Certain groups of invertebrates (Glossosomatidae and Psychomyiidae caddisflies, and riffle beetles) proved to be good indicators of rural catchments, moderately eutrophic and with high fine sediment load. A diverse community dominated by microcrustaceans (copepods and ostracods) were found as good indicators of highly eutrophic urban streams, with moderate-high fine sediment load. However, the use of other taxonomic groups (e.g. chironomids, oligochaetes, nematodes, water mites and the amphipod Gammarus pulex), very widespread in the hyporheic zone of all sampled rivers, is of limited use because of their high tolerance to the analysed stressors. We recommend the use of certain taxonomic groups (comprising both meiofauna and macroinvertebrates) dwelling in the chalk hyporheic zone as indicators of eutrophication and colmation and, along with routine benthic sampling protocols, for a more comprehensive water and habitat quality assessment of chalk rivers.

  2. Prospects of Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery  in Danish chalk rocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudyk, Svetlana Nikolayevna; Jørgensen, Leif Wagner; Bah Awasi, Ismail

    chalk reservoir rocks. Parameters such as high salinity, low permeability, high temperature and toxic elements, being typical characteristics of Danish fields can cause limiting effects on MEOR applications. The work fulfilled showed that microbes can be adapted to higher salinities through a serial...... adaptation processes and our experimental microbes are able to survive, regenerate and produce gas and by-products in  salinities of up to 20 g/l higher than salinities in which pure cultures can survive. Titrimetric method proposed to determine the percentage of CO2 in the total gas produced showed that 67...

  3. Optimization of Spore Forming Bacteria Flooding for Enhanced Oil Recovery in North Sea Chalk Reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Halim, Amalia Yunita; Nielsen, Sidsel Marie; Eliasson Lantz, Anna; Shapiro, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Little has been done to study microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) in chalk reservoirs. The present study focused on core flooding experiments to see microbial plugging and its effect on oil recovery. A pressure tapped core holder with pressure ports at 1.2 cm, 3.8 cm, and 6.3 cm from the inlet was used for this purpose. A spore forming bacterium, Bacillus licheniformis 421, was used as it was shown to be a good candidate in the previous study. Bacterial spore can penetrate deeper into the ...

  4. Waveform analysis of crosshole GPR data collected in heterogeneous chalk deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keskinen, Johanna; Nielsen, Lars; Zibar, Majken Caroline Looms;

    2014-01-01

    Chalks are important reservoirs for groundwater production onshore Denmark and for hydrocarbons in the North Sea Basin. Therefore this rock type is studied extensively with geological and geophysical methods. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) tomography is used to characterize fine-scale reservoir...... be divided into two main units based on the traveltime analysis and interpretation of the cored material from the boreholes. The lower unit consists mainly of porous calcareous mudstone with occasional occurrences of flint nodules. The upper succession is c. 8 m thick and is fairly heterogeneous...

  5. From ooze to sedimentary rock, the first diagenetic processes affecting the chalk of eastern Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, Julien; Boussaha, Myriam; Nielsen, Lars;

    -resolution seismic reflection profiles, high-resolution wireline logs and sedimentological data from a fully cored borehole, and field information from quarry and coastal cliff exposures were taken to inform about early diagenetic features. This integrated approach for the first time enabled placing different...... fractures), stylolites and fluid escape structures can be studied using outcrop and core data. The spatial relationship between stylolites and fractures suggests pressure solution as trigger for shear failure that in turn led to the initiation of the polygonal fault system. Early diagenetic structures...... in chalk sedimentary rocks....

  6. CO2-foaming agent retention in fractured chalk models: Experiments and simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Kvæstad, Ann Helen

    2011-01-01

    Injection of CO2-gas can improve the oil recovery. In naturally fractured reservoirs such as chalk, injection of CO2-gas can result in early gas breakthrough because the gas can use the fractures as pathways from the injector to the producer. The pressure, temperature and oil properties in the reservoir can also lead to an unfavorable mobility for the gas. This can lead to low total sweep efficiency for the process. One method to increase the total sweep efficiency in the fractured reservoir ...

  7. Trace fossils of a cyclic chalk-marl succession; the upper Maastrichtian Rørdal Member, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Bodil Wesenberg; Surlyk, Finn; Bromley, Richard Granville

    2011-01-01

    -normal sample surfaces vary in area between 29 and 155 cm2. Eight ichnogenera and two undetermined ichnogenera are recognised. The member is characterised by three ichnofabrics (A, B and C). The ichnofabric analysis is based on texture and internal structure of the sediments resulting from bioturbation...... situation between ichnofabrics A and C and occurs in chalk samples immediately adjacent to marl beds. The observed changes in ichnofabrics between chalk and marl are related to the amount of clay in the samples and the differences in the occurrence of trace fossils are interpreted as due to differences...

  8. The relation among porosity, permeability, and specific surface of chalk from the Gorm field, Danish North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeanette, Mortensen; Engstrøm, Finn; Lind, Ida

    1998-01-01

    The origin to the difference in the relationship between permeability and porosity for Danian and Maastrichtian chalk from the Gorm field offshore Denmark has been investigated. The investigation was based on 300 sets of core data (He-expansion porosity and air permeability) from the well Gorm N-22...... surface. Furthermore it was found that the nature of porosity (intrafossil, intergranular, etc.) had no significant influence on the air permeability, so that the permeability of the chalk can be calculated from total porosity and specific surface. Kozeny's empirical constant, c, was here determined...... analytically from a simple porosity model and Poiseuilles law....

  9. Permanent groundwater storage in basaltic dyke fractures and termite mound viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mège, Daniel; Rango, Tewodros

    2010-04-01

    Many basaltic dykes of the Ethiopian flood basalt province are observed in the northwestern Ethiopian lowlands. In this area, the termites preferentially build their epigeous mounds on the top of dolerite dykes. The relationship between termite mounds and dykes is investigated from the analysis of their distribution along one of these dykes, of thickness 2-5 m, that we could follow over 2000 m. Termite mounds are periodically spaced (mean distance 63 m, R2 = 0.995), and located exclusively where the topographic relief of the dyke is not more than 2 m above the surrounding area. From these observations and from the geological context, a hydrological circuit model is proposed in which (1) dykes are preferential conduits for groundwater drainage during the rainy season due to pervasive jointing, (2) during the dry season, the portion of the dyke forming a local topographic relief area dries up more quickly than the surroundings, the elevation difference between the dyke summit and the surroundings being a factor restricting termite mound development. For dyke topographic relief >2 m, drying is an obstacle for maintaining the appropriate humidity for the termite colony life. Periodic termite mound spacing is unlikely to be related to dyke or other geological properties. It is more likely related to termite population behaviour, perhaps to clay shortage, which restricts termite population growth by limiting the quantity of building material available for mound extension, and triggers exploration for a new colonization site that will be located along the dyke at a distance from the former colony that may be controlled by the extent of the zone covered by its trail pheromones. This work brings out the importance of dykes in channelling and storing groundwater in semiarid regions, and shows that dykes can store groundwater permanently in such settings even though the dry season is half the year long. It contributes also to shedding light on water supply conditions

  10. A photographic and acoustic transect across two deep-water seafloor mounds, Mississippi Canyon, northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, P.E.; Hutchinson, D.R.; Gardner, J.; Carney, R.S.; Fornari, D.

    2008-01-01

    In the northern Gulf of Mexico, a series of seafloor mounds lie along the floor of the Mississippi Canyon in Atwater Valley lease blocks 13 and 14. The mounds, one of which was drilled by the Chevron Joint Industry Project on Methane Hydrates in 2005, are interpreted to be vent-related features that may contain significant accumulations of gas hydrate adjacent to gas and fluid migration pathways. The mounds are located ???150 km south of Louisiana at ???1300 m water depth. New side-scan sonar data, multibeam bathymetry, and near-bottom photography along a 4 km northwest-southeast transect crossing two of the mounds (labeled D and F) reveal the mounds' detailed morphology and surficial characteristics. Mound D, ???250 m in diameter and 7-10 m in height, has exposures of authigenic carbonates and appears to result from a seafloor vent of slow-to-moderate flux. Mound F, which is ???400 m in diameter and 10-15 m high, is covered on its southwest flank by extruded mud flows, a characteristic associated with moderate-to-rapid flux. Chemosynthetic communities visible on the bottom photographs are restricted to bacterial mats on both mounds and mussels at Mound D. No indications of surficial gas hydrates are evident on the bottom photographs.

  11. A model for the effect of pH on the growth of chalk yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantigny, Philippe; Burgain, Anaïs; Deniel, Franck; Bensoussan, Maurice

    2014-09-01

    Hyphopichia burtonii, Pichia anomala, and Saccharomycopsis fibuligera were isolated from spoiled packaged sliced bread. These chalk yeasts were characterized by a wide range of pH for which growth was almost optimum. Thus, the curve growth vs pH exhibited plateau and sharp profiles close to the minimum and the maximum pH. This study described a chalk yeast model (CYM) for the effect of pH derived from a new germination model for fungi (Dantigny, P., Nanguy, S., P.-M., Judet-Correia, D., and Bensoussan, M. 2011, International Journal of Food Microbiology, 146, 176-181). The CYM is asymmetric, versatile, based on parameters with biological significance, and compatible with the gamma concept. The CYM was compared to the cardinal pH model (CPM) which is widely used to describe the effect of pH on microbial growth. The CYM exhibited RMSE values two fold less than those obtained with the CPM for H. burtonii, and S. fibuligera for which plateaus were clearly observed. For P. anomala, the plateau was less obvious, but the RMSE value obtained with the CYM was similar to that found with the CPM. The CYM could extend its use to represent the effect of pH on mold growth. PMID:24995847

  12. What are the governing processes during low-flows in a chalk catchment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubega Musuuza, Jude; Coxon, Gemma; Hutton, Chris; Howden, Nicholas; Woods, Ross; Freer, Jim; Wagener, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Low flows are important because they lead to the prioritisation of different consumptive water usages, imposition of restrictions and bans, raising of water tariffs and higher production costs to industry. The partitioning of precipitation into evaporation, storage and runoff depends on the local variability in meteorological variables and site-specific characteristics e.g., topography, soils and vegetation. The response of chalk catchments to meteorological forcing especially precipitation is of particular interest because of the preferential flow through the weathered formation. This makes the observed stream discharge groundwater-dominated and hence, out of phase with precipitation. One relevant question is how sensitive the low flow characteristics of such a chalk catchment is to changes in climate and land use. It is thus important to understand all the factors that control low stream discharge periods. In this study we present the results from numerical sensitivity analysis experiments performed with a detailed physically-based model on the Kennet, a sub-catchment of the River Thames, in the UK during the historical drought years of the 1970's.

  13. Optimization of Spore Forming Bacteria Flooding for Enhanced Oil Recovery in North Sea Chalk Reservoir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halim, Amalia Yunita; Nielsen, Sidsel Marie; Eliasson Lantz, Anna;

    2015-01-01

    Little has been done to study microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) in chalk reservoirs. The present study focused on core flooding experiments to see microbial plugging and its effect on oil recovery. A pressure tapped core holder with pressure ports at 1.2 cm, 3.8 cm, and 6.3 cm from the inlet...... was used for this purpose. A spore forming bacterium, Bacillus licheniformis 421, was used as it was shown to be a good candidate in the previous study. Bacterial spore can penetrate deeper into the chalk rock, squeezing through the pore throats. Our results show that B. licheniformis 421 when injected...... as a secondary technique can recover 4% more of the original oil in place (OOIP) as compared with the seawater flooding. Furthermore, when applied as tertiary technique it can recover 1.4% OOIP of the residual oil. The effective permeability decreased in the first two sections of the core (0-1.2 cm and 1...

  14. Proceedings of a workshop on geophysical and related geoscientific research at Chalk River, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large part of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is geoscience research and development aimed at obtaining information to quantify the transport of radionuclides through the geosphere and at determining the geotechnical properties required for disposal vault design. The geosphere at potential disposal sites is characterized in part by the use of remote sensing (geophysical) methods. In 1977 public concern about the disposal of radioactive waste resulted in field work being restricted to the site of Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories, which was used to develop, evaluate and compare various techniques in order to optimize the methods for obtaining geoscience information. Methods tested at Chalk River are to be applied at other research sites. Most investigations have been carried out around Maskinonge Lake, using about thirty boreholes sink into bedrock. The boreholes provide subsurface geological information that can be used as a reference to compare the responses of various geophysical methods and equipment. Regional studies, including airborne geophysical surveys, have also been conducted. The 25 papers presented at this workshop provide comprehensive documentation of the most significant results of geophysical studies. The workshop also provided an evaluation of geophysical techniques and their utility to the Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program

  15. Seepage carbonate mounds in Cenozoic sedimentary sequences from the Las Minas Basin, SE Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozo, M.; Calvo, J. P.; Scopelliti, G.; González-Acebrón, L.

    2016-04-01

    A number of carbonate mounds composed of indurate, strongly folded and/or brecciated calcite and dolomite beds occur interstratified in Cenozoic sedimentary sequences from the Las Minas Basin. Part of the fabric of the rock forming the carbonate mounds is composed of laminated to banded dolostone similar to the host rock but showing contrasted lithification. Moreover, the carbonate deposits of the mounds display aggrading neomorphism of dolomite, partial replacement of dolomite by calcite, calcite cementation, and extensive silicification, locally resulting in box-work fabric. Eight main lithofacies were distinguished in the carbonate mound deposits. In some lithofacies, chert is present as both microcrystalline to fibro-radial quartz and opal, the latter occurring mainly as cement whereas the former replace the carbonate and infill voids. Yet one of the carbonate mounds shows distinctive petrography and geochemical features thus suggesting a distinctive growth pattern. The carbon isotope compositions of calcite from the mound samples range from - 11.56 to - 5.15 δ‰ whilst dolomite is depleted in 13C, with values of - 12.38 to 3.02 δ‰. Oxygen isotopic compositions vary from - 9.42 to - 4.64 δ‰ for calcite and between - 6.68 and 8.19 δ‰ for dolomite. Carbonate in the mounds shows significant enrichment in Co, Cr, Ni and Pb content, especially in the strongly deformed (F-2-2 lithofacies) and brecciated carbonate (F-4). The carbonate deposits show depletion in REE and Y in contrast to that determined in lutite. The formation of the carbonate mounds was related to local artesian seepage thermal water flows of moderate to relative high temperatures. Pressure differences between the low permeability host rock and the circulating fluids accounted for dilational fracturing and brecciation of the host sediment packages, which combined with precipitation of new carbonate and silica mineral phases. Locally, some carbonate mounds developed where groundwater

  16. Distribution and density of Cubitermes Wasmann (Isoptera: Termitidae mounds in the northern Kruger National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.W. Meyer

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides fundamental information on distribution and density of the genus Cubitermes, Wasm. quantified for future monitoring. After distribution trends have been established, changes in Cubitermes density over time can be brought into contention with other factors in the Kruger National Park, such as the impact of fire frequency, water distribution, and elephant density on these insects. At least ten 2 ha belt-transects were undertaken in each of the 20 northern landscape zones of the KNP. Termite mounds were recorded and their activity within was determined. Cubitermes accounts for 29.8% of all active termite mounds in the northern KNP, with an average density of 0.33 mounds/ha. Cubitermes favours the Nwambiya Sandveld (zone 32. These termites occur in high density in the Klipkoppies 1 land type (Gorge, but in low densities in the Phalaborwa 10-12, Bulweni 1-3, Letaba 1-7 and Pafuri 3-6 land types. Cubitermes mounds tend to occur in high numbers on the Nzhelele formation (Mn (sandstones; quartzite; basalt. Mounds of this genus in the Far North are highly concentrated on the Gaudam and Moriah soil series of the Hutton form, suggesting that these termites prefer very sandy soils with medium to coarse particles.

  17. Environmental assessment and planning at Mound - environmental monitoring capabilities and personnel profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    Through its long experience with radioactive materials, Mound has developed a comprehensive, routine, offsite, environmental surveillance program to safeguard its employees, the physical plant, and the integrity of the surrounding environment from any potential adverse effects of its widely diverse operations. Effluent samples are analyzed for radiological and non-radiological parameters. The environment surrounding Mound Facility is continuously monitored - air, water, foodstuffs, vegetation, soil, and silt samples are analyzed to ensure that radioisotopic concentrations and other possible pollutants are well within the stringent standards adopted by the Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agencies (both federal and state), and various regional and local agencies. Moreover, this environmental surveillance program has been designed to ensure that the facility is designed, constructed, managed, operated, and maintained in a manner that continues to meet all federal, state, and local standards for environmental protection. Work in environmental science has been broadened to assess environmental factors associated with various aspects of the National Energy Plan. Both the management and staff at Mound have undertaken a firm commitment to make Mound`s environmental monitoring capabilities available to agencies that have the responsibility for the resolution of important environmental issues.

  18. Structure of a carbonate/hydrate mound in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGee, T.; Woolsey, J.; Macelloni, L. [Mississippi Univ., Oxford, MI (United States). Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology; Lapham, L. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Kleinberg, R. [Schlumberger-Doll Research, Cambridge, MA (United States); Battista, B.; Knapp, C. [South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States); Caruso, S. [Univ. of Rome La Sapienza, Rome, (Italy). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Goebel, V. [Lookout Geophysical Co., Palisade, CO (United States); Chapman, R. [Victoria Univ., BC (Canada). School of Earth and Ocean Sciences; Gerstoft, P. [California Univ., San Diego, CA (United States). Marine Physical Laboratory

    2008-07-01

    A one-kilometer-diameter carbonate/hydrate mound located in the south-central portion of Mississippi Canyon block 118 in the Gulf of Mexico was the site of a multi-sensor, multi-discipline sea-floor observatory. In preparation for installing the observatory, several surveys were conducted. The resulting data provided detailed information about the mound's structure. This paper discussed the structure of the carbonate/hydrate mound in the Gulf of Mexico. The paper described the surface morphology of the mound, which was imaged by multi-beam bathymetric sonar from an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) 40 metres above the sea floor as well as by cameras at or a few meters above the sea floor deployed from drifting surface vessels or tethered submersibles. Visual observations were also made from manned submersibles. The paper also discussed the collection of gravity and box cores for lithologic and bio-geochemical studies. Gas sampling, venting activity, and seismo-acoustic studies were also presented. The internal structure of the mound was described as well. It was concluded that pore-fluid analyses conducted on the cores revealed that microbial sulfate reduction, anaerobic methane oxidation, and methanogenesis were important processes in the upper sediment as they controlled the diffusive flux of methane into the overlying water column. The activity of microbes was also focused within patches near active vents. 10 refs., 10 figs.

  19. Temporal variability of micro-organic contaminants in lowland chalk catchments: New insights into contaminant sources and hydrological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manamsa, K; Lapworth, D J; Stuart, M E

    2016-10-15

    This paper explores the temporal variation of a broad suite of micro organic (MO) compounds within hydrologically linked compartments of a lowland Chalk catchment, the most important drinking water aquifer in the UK. It presents an assessment of results from relatively high frequency monitoring at a well-characterised site, including the type and concentrations of compounds detected and how they change under different hydrological conditions including exceptionally high groundwater levels and river flow conditions during 2014 and subsequent recovery. This study shows for the first time that within the Chalk groundwater there can be a greater diversity of the MOs compared to surface waters. Within the Chalk 26 different compounds were detected over the duration of the study compared to 17 in the surface water. Plasticisers (0.06-39μg/L) were found to dominate in the Chalk groundwater on 5 visits (38.4%) accounting for 14.5% of detections but contributing highest concentrations whilst other compounds dominated in the surface water. Trichloroethene and atrazine were among the most frequently detected compounds. The limit for the total pesticide concentration detected did not exceed EU/UK prescribed concentration values for drinking water. Emerging organic compounds such as caffeine, which currently do not have water quality limits, were also detected. The low numbers of compounds found within the hyporheic zone highlight the role of this transient interface in the attenuation and breakdown of the MOs, and provision of an important ecosystem service. PMID:26850859

  20. Distribution and physical traits of red wood ant mounds in a managed Rhodope mountains forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsikas, Angelos; Karanikola, Paraskevi; Papageorgiou, Aristotelis C

    2016-07-01

    Red wood ants (RWA) are of great ecological importance for the forest ecosystem. Forestry practices, like clear-cutting, and trampling load, due to tourism, logging, and grazing stock, can greatly affect their colonies, disturbing their microhabitat. RWA in Greek forests have not been investigated so far. We herein report on the distribution and morphological traits of Formica lugubris mounds studied in Elatia forest (Rhodope mountains, Northern Greece), an all-aged managed mixed forest where selective logging practices are performed. Nearby vegetation, slope, canopy cover, shrub density, and distance from the nearest neighboring trees were also recorded. Mound density was shown to be much higher in this Greek forest compared to RWA mounds in other European-managed forests. Furthermore, we recorded a continuous nest establishment, despite forest management disturbances and trampling load. Our study suggests that single-tree selective forestry practices are essential for creating ideal microhabitats for the RWA and, therefore, for maintaining RWA populations. PMID:27345521

  1. Can mima-like mounds be Vertisol relics (Far North Region of Cameroon, Chad Basin)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Nathalie; Dietrich, Fabienne; Cailleau, Guillaume; Sebag, David; Ngounou Ngatcha, Benjamin; Verrecchia, Eric P.

    2016-05-01

    Non-anthropogenic earth mounds, defined as mima-like mounds in this study, have recently been observed in non-carbonate watersheds along the Sudano-Sahelian belt in the Chad Basin. In the Diamare piedmont (northern Cameroon) they are particularly well developed within stream networks. In less eroded areas, they occur as whaleback, flattened morphologies, or even as buried features. All these shapes are composed of clay-rich sediment associated with high proportions of secondary carbonate nodules and Fesbnd Mn micro-nodules. Their soil structure is prismatic to massive and vertical cracks are observed locally. Grain-size distributions emphasize the clay-rich nature of the sediment, with average clay contents of 32% ± 12.8% (n = 186), which is significantly higher than the clay content in the adjacent sediments in the landscape (mean = 10% ± 4%, n = 21). Moreover, high proportions of smectite characterize the soil, with average contents of 34 ± 7% (n = 25). At the micro-scale, the groundmass has a cross-striated b-fabric, with embedded smooth subangular quartz and feldspar grains of the silt-size fraction. All the characteristics point to altered vertic properties in the clay-rich sediment composing the mima-like mounds. Mima-like mounds are thus interpreted as degraded Vertisols. Compared to present-day Vertisols occurring in the piedmont, mima-like mounds are located upstream. It is thus proposed that the Vertisol areas were more extensive during a former and wetter period than the present-day. Subsequent changing climatic conditions increased erosion, revealing the gilgai micro-relief by preferential erosion in micro-lows rather than in micro-highs. Mima-like mounds of the Chad Basin might thus result from pedogenesis combined with later erosion. These local processes can be inherited from regional climatic variations during the Late Pleistocene-Holocene and likely be related to the African Humid Period.

  2. Mounding of a non-Newtonian jet impinging on a solid substrate.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schunk, Peter Randall; Grillet, Anne Mary; Roberts, Scott A.; Baer, Thomas A. (Procter & Gamble, Cincinnati, OH); Rao, Rekha Ranjana

    2010-06-01

    When a fluid jet impinges on a solid substrate, a variety of behaviors may occur around the impact region. One example is mounding, where the fluid enters the impact region faster than it can flow away, forming a mound of fluid above the main surface. For some operating conditions, this mound can destabilize and buckle, entraining air in the mound. Other behaviors include submerging flow, where the jet impinges into an otherwise steady pool of liquid, entraining a thin air layer as it enters the pool. This impact region is one of very high shear rates and as such, complex fluids behave very differently than do Newtonian fluids. In this work, we attempt to characterize this range of behavior for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids using dimensionless parameters. We model the fluid as a modified Bingham-Carreau-Yasuda fluid, which exhibits the full range of pseudoplastic flow properties throughout the impact region. Additionally, we study viscoelastic effects through the use of the Giesekus model. Both 2-D and 3-D numerical simulations are performed using a variety of finite element method techniques for tracking the jet interface, including Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE), diffuse level sets, and a conformal decomposition finite element method (CDFEM). The presence of shear-thinning characteristics drastically reduces unstable mounding behavior, yet can lead to air entrainment through the submerging flow regime. We construct an operating map to understand for what flow parameters mounding and submerging flows will occur, and how the fluid rheology affects these behaviors. This study has many implications in high-speed industrial bottle filling applications.

  3. Cold-water coral mounds on the Pen Duick Escarpment, Gulf of Cadiz: The MiCROSYSTEMS project approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rooij, D.; Blamart, D.; De Mol, L.; Mienis, F.; Pirlet, H.; Wehrmann, L. M.; Barbieri, R.; Maignien, L.; Templer, S. P.; de Haas, H.; Hebbeln, D.; Frank, N.; Larmagnat, S.; Stadnitskaia, A.; Stivaletta, N.; van Weering, T.; Zhang, Y.; Hamoumi, N.; Cnudde, V.; Duyck, P.; Henriet, J.-P.; The MiCROSYSTEMS MD 169 Shipboard Party

    2011-01-01

    Here we present a case study of three cold-water coral mounds in a juvenile growth stage on top of the Pen Duick Escarpment in the Gulf of Cadiz; Alpha, Beta and Gamma mounds. Although cold-water corals are a common feature on the adjacent cliffs, mud volcanoes and open slope, no actual living cold-

  4. Functional traits of trees on and off termite mounds : Understanding the origin of biotically-driven heterogeneity in savannas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Plas, F.; Howison, R.; Reinders, J.; Fokkema, W.; Olff, H.

    2013-01-01

    Questions In African savannas, Macrotermes termites contribute to small-scale heterogeneity by constructing large mounds. Operating as islands of high nutrient and water availability and low fire frequency, these mounds support distinct, diverse communities of trees that have been shown to be highly

  5. Relict nebkhas (pimple mounds) record prolonged late Holocene drought in the forested region of south-central United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Christopher L.; Cox, Randel Tom; Forman, Steven L.; Foti, Tom L.; Wasklewicz, Thad A.; McColgan, Andrew T.

    2009-05-01

    The origin and significance of pimple mounds (low, elliptical to circular dune-like features found across much of the south-central United States) have been debated for nearly two centuries. We cored pimple mounds at four sites spanning the Ozark Plateau, Arkansas River Valley, and Gulf of Mexico Coastal Plain and found that these mounds have a regionally consistent textural asymmetry such that there is a significant excess of coarse-grained sediment within their northwest flanks. We interpret this asymmetry as evidence of an eolian depositional origin of these mounds and conclude they are relict nebkhas (coppice dunes) deposited during protracted middle to late Holocene droughts. These four mounds yield optically stimulated luminescence ages between 2400 and 700 yr that correlate with well-documented periods of eolian activity and droughts on the southern Great Plains, including the Medieval Climate Anomaly. We conclude vegetation loss during extended droughts led to local eolian deflation and pimple mound deposition. These mounds reflect landscape response to multi-decadal droughts for the south-central U.S. The spatial extent of pimple mounds across this region further underscores the severity and duration of late Holocene droughts, which were significantly greater than historic droughts.

  6. Spatial patternd and morphology of termite (macrotermes falciger) mounds in the upper Katanga, D.R. Congo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mujinya, B.B.; Adam, M.Y.O.; Mees, F.; Bogaert, J.; Vranken, I.; Erens, H.; Baert, G.; Ngongo, M.; Ranst, van E.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the spatial distribution patterns and morphological characteristics of Macrotermes falciger mounds in the peri-urban zone of Lubumbashi, D.R. Congo. Spatial patterns of mounds were assessed using high-resolution satellite images for 24 plots of variable size (3 to 27 ha). Soil mo

  7. Overview of the earth mounded concrete bunker prototype license application project: Objectives and approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conner, J.E. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering Lab.

    1989-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of the objectives and approach taken in developing the Earth-mounded Concrete Bunker Prototype License Application Project. The Prototype License Application Project was initiated by the Department of Energy`s National Low-Level Waste Management Program in early 1987 and completed in November 1988. As part of this project a prototype safety analysis report was developed. The safety analysis report evaluates the licensibility of an earth-mounded concrete bunker for a low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility located on a hypothetical site in the northeastern United States. The project required approximately five person-years and twenty months to develop.

  8. Development of a Partial Coefficient System for the Design of Rubble Mound Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.

    Subgroup F is the last of the subgroups formed under the PIANC II Working Group 12 on Rubble Mound Structures. The terms of reference of subgroup F are to propose safety guidelines for rubble mound breakwaters including evaluation of the safety levels inherent in conventionally designed existing...... coefficient system which is simple to apply and well known from other fields of civil engineering. This report presents a proposal for safety guidelines supported by a presentation of the main problems which have been considered together with the outcome of the related calculations. The limitations...

  9. Mechanical Strength Modeling and Optimization of Lateritic Solid Block with 4% Mound Soil Inclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Onuamah, P. N.; Ezeokpube G.C.

    2015-01-01

    The work is an investigation for the model development and optimization of the compressive strength of solid sandcrete block with mound soil inclusion. The study applies the Scheffe’s optimization approach to obtain a mathematical model of the form f(xi1,xi2,xi3,,xi4), where xi are proportions of the concrete components, viz: cement, mound soil, laterite, and water. Scheffe’s experimental design techniques are followed to mould various solid block samples measuring 450mm x 225mm x 150mm...

  10. Lutz's spontaneous sedimentation technique and the paleoparasitological analysis of sambaqui (shell mound sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgana Camacho

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Parasite findings in sambaquis (shell mounds are scarce. Although the 121 shell mound samples were previously analysed in our laboratory, we only recently obtained the first positive results. In the sambaqui of Guapi, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, paleoparasitological analysis was performed on sediment samples collected from various archaeological layers, including the superficial layer as a control. Eggs of Acanthocephala, Ascaridoidea and Heterakoidea were found in the archaeological layers. We applied various techniques and concluded that Lutz's spontaneous sedimentation technique is effective for concentrating parasite eggs in sambaqui soil for microscopic analysis.

  11. Physiological and biogeochemical traits of bleaching and recovery in the mounding species of coral Porites lobata: implications for resilience in mounding corals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Levas

    Full Text Available Mounding corals survive bleaching events in greater numbers than branching corals. However, no study to date has determined the underlying physiological and biogeochemical trait(s that are responsible for mounding coral holobiont resilience to bleaching. Furthermore, the potential of dissolved organic carbon (DOC as a source of fixed carbon to bleached corals has never been determined. Here, Porites lobata corals were experimentally bleached for 23 days and then allowed to recover for 0, 1, 5, and 11 months. At each recovery interval a suite of analyses were performed to assess their recovery (photosynthesis, respiration, chlorophyll a, energy reserves, tissue biomass, calcification, δ(13C of the skeletal, δ(13C, and δ(15N of the animal host and endosymbiont fractions. Furthermore, at 0 months of recovery, the assimilation of photosynthetically acquired and zooplankton-feeding acquired carbon into the animal host, endosymbiont, skeleton, and coral-mediated DOC were measured via (13C-pulse-chase labeling. During the first month of recovery, energy reserves and tissue biomass in bleached corals were maintained despite reductions in chlorophyll a, photosynthesis, and the assimilation of photosynthetically fixed carbon. At the same time, P. lobata corals catabolized carbon acquired from zooplankton and seemed to take up DOC as a source of fixed carbon. All variables that were negatively affected by bleaching recovered within 5 to 11 months. Thus, bleaching resilience in the mounding coral P. lobata is driven by its ability to actively catabolize zooplankton-acquired carbon and seemingly utilize DOC as a significant fixed carbon source, facilitating the maintenance of energy reserves and tissue biomass. With the frequency and intensity of bleaching events expected to increase over the next century, coral diversity on future reefs may favor not only mounding morphologies but species like P. lobata, which have the ability to utilize heterotrophic

  12. Termite mound emissions of CH4 and CO2 are primarily determined by seasonal changes in termite biomass and behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, Hizbullah; Livesley, Stephen J; Dawes, Tracy Z; Hutley, Lindsay B; Arndt, Stefan K

    2011-10-01

    Termites are a highly uncertain component in the global source budgets of CH(4) and CO(2). Large seasonal variations in termite mound fluxes of CH(4) and CO(2) have been reported in tropical savannas but the reason for this is largely unknown. This paper investigated the processes that govern these seasonal variations in CH(4) and CO(2) fluxes from the mounds of Microcerotermes nervosus Hill (Termitidae), a common termite species in Australian tropical savannas. Fluxes of CH(4) and CO(2) of termite mounds were 3.5-fold greater in the wet season as compared to the dry season and were a direct function of termite biomass. Termite biomass in mound samples was tenfold greater in the wet season compared to the dry season. When expressed per unit termite biomass, termite fluxes were only 1.2 (CH(4)) and 1.4 (CO(2))-fold greater in the wet season as compared to the dry season and could not explain the large seasonal variations in mound fluxes of CH(4) and CO(2). Seasonal variation in both gas diffusivity through mound walls and CH(4) oxidation by mound material was negligible. These results highlight for the first time that seasonal termite population dynamics are the main driver for the observed seasonal differences in mound fluxes of CH(4) and CO(2). These findings highlight the need to combine measurements of gas fluxes from termite mounds with detailed studies of termite population dynamics to reduce the uncertainty in quantifying seasonal variations in termite mound fluxes of CH(4) and CO(2).

  13. Microbial assemblages on a cold-water coral mound at the SE Rockall Bank (NE Atlantic): interactions with hydrography and topography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bleijswijk, J.D.L.; Whalen, C.; Duineveld, G.C.A.; Lavaleye, M.S.S.; Witte, H.J.; Mienis, F

    2015-01-01

    This study characterizes the microbial community composition over Haas Mound, one of the most prominent cold-water coral mounds of the Logachev Mound province (Rockall Bank, NE Atlantic). We outline patterns of distribution vertically – from the seafloor to the water column – and laterally – across

  14. Change in Biot's effective stress coefficient of chalk during pore collapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, M. Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2013-01-01

    the grains could also change during elastic deformation of the grains in a rock mechanics test. Diagenetic change in grain contact cement of chalk can be compared with stress-induced change in the laboratory. The change in porosity is studied with reference to the change in effective stress on grain contacts......Biot's effective stress coefficient (α) is a measure of how well grains in the rocks are connected with each other. The amount of contact cements between the grains determines the stiffness of rocks. Change in grain contact occurs during natural diagenesis of sedimentary rock. Contact between...... and porosity reduces at a slower rate. We noticed that presence of non carbonates and hydrocarbon could increase σ'm. During rock mechanics test in the lab, with increased applied stress, σ'm increases, Biot's effective stress coefficient shows a decreasing trend, while a minor porosity reduction was observed...

  15. Sediment transport and siltation of brown trout (Salmo trutta L.) spawning gravels in chalk streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acornley, R. M.; Sear, D. A.

    1999-02-01

    Deposition rates of fine sediment into brown trout spawning gravels were measured at monthly intervals for a period of one year in a small channel of the River Test, Hampshire. Data were also collected on stream discharge, water depth, flow velocity and suspended sediment concentrations. Deposition rates followed a seasonal pattern and were maximal during periods of high discharge in the late winter/early spring when suspended sediment concentrations were high. The material deposited in the spawning gravels included silts and fine sands (<250 m) that were transported in suspension and coarser fragments of low density tufa-like material that were transported as bed load. The ecological implications of fine sediment deposition for salmonid egg survival in chalk streams are considered.

  16. Biological markers in bitumens and pyrolyzates of Upper Cretaceous bituminous chalks from the Ghareb Formation (Israel)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rullkötter, Jürgen; Aizenshtat, Zeev; Spiro, Baruch

    1984-01-01

    The sterane and triterpane distributions of three bituminous chalks from the Upper Cretaceous Ghareb Formation (Israel) were investigated both in the original extractable bitumens and in extracts obtained after pyrolysis of whole rock and isolated kerogen samples at 450°C. Pyrolysis was performed in a closed system under hydrous (whole rock) and anhydrous conditions (isolated kerogens). The carbon number distributions of steranes and triterpanes differ significantly between original bitumen and pyrolyzates. Unlike the bitumens in which diasteranes were not detected, the anhydrous pyrolyzates contain small amounts of diasteranes. The presence of water during pyrolysis leads to an increase of sterane isomerization, the abundant formation of diasteranes and an increase of the 18α( H)- trisnorneohopane/17α( H)- trisnorhopane ratio. Sterane isomerization maturation parameters show a closer match between original bitumen and pyrolyzates after pyrolysis in a closed system when compared with an open system.

  17. Water weakening of chalk explaied from a fluid-solid friction factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Katrine Alling; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2010-01-01

    The hypothesis behind this paper proposal is that the Biot critical frequency can be used to characterize the water weakening phenomenon physically. The Biot critical frequency determines the transition from where an applied sound velocity on a saturated porous chalk is dominated by viscous forces...... to the macroscale failure and pore collapse properties. The Biot critical frequency incorporates the porosity, permeability, fluid density and fluid viscosity, where the latter is highly temperature dependent – it does not include the applied sound velocity frequency. The listed parameters are usually determined...... using the Biot critical frequency as a single reference. Other viscoplastic parameters were investigated in the same manner to verify the range of the functioning of the friction factor. The findings show that the Biot critical frequency can be used as a common friction factor and is useful in combining...

  18. The early diagenetic and PETROphysical behaviour of recent cold-water CARbonate mounds in Deep Environments (PETROCARDE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foubert, Anneleen; Pirlet, Hans; Thierens, Mieke; de Mol, Ben; Henriet, Jean-Pierre; Swennen, Rudy

    2010-05-01

    Sub-recent cold-water carbonate mounds localized in deeper slope settings on the Atlantic continental margins cannot be any longer neglected in the study of carbonate systems. They clearly play a major role in the dynamics of mixed siliciclastic-carbonate and/or carbonate-dominated continental slopes. Carbonate accumulation rates of cold-water carbonate mounds are about 4 to 12 % of the carbonate accumulation rates of tropical shallow-water reefs but exceed the carbonate accumulation rates of their slope settings by a factor of 4 to 12 (Titschack et al., 2009). These findings emphasize the importance of these carbonate factories as carbonate niches on the continental margins. The primary environmental architecture of such carbonate bodies is well-characterized. However, despite proven evidences of early diagenesis overprinting the primary environmental record (e.g. aragonite dissolution) (Foubert & Henriet, 2009), the extent of early diagenetic and biogeochemical processes shaping the petrophysical nature of mounds is until now not yet fully understood. Understanding (1) the functioning of a carbonate mound as biogeochemical reactor triggering early diagenetic processes and (2) the impact of early diagenesis on the petrophysical behaviour of a carbonate mound in space and through time are necessary (vital) for the reliable prediction of potential late diagenetic processes. Approaching the fossil carbonate mound record, through a profound study of recent carbonate bodies is innovative and will help to better understand processes observed in the fossil mound world (such as cementation, brecciation, fracturing, etc…). In this study, the 155-m high Challenger mound (Porcupine Seabight, SW of Ireland), drilled during IODP Expedition 307 aboard the R/V Joides Resolution (Foubert & Henriet, 2009), and mounds from the Gulf of Cadiz (Moroccan margin) will be discussed in terms of early diagenetic processes and petrophysical behaviour. Early differential diagenesis

  19. Mesopotamian ceramics from the burial mounds of Bahrain, c.2250–1750 BC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Among the ceramic vessels recovered from the burial mounds of Bahrain, a small percentage represents Mesopotamian imports or local emulations of such. In this paper two overall horizons are distinguished in these Mesopotamian ceramics. These are significant because both coincide with major stages...

  20. Single Wave Overtopping Volumes and their Travel Distance for Rubble Mound Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Burcharth, Hans F.; Gironella, F. X.

    2009-01-01

    In the present paper small and large scale overtopping data for rubble mound structures have been analysed with respect to single wave overtopping volumes and their travel distance. The analysis has led to formulae for estimation of maximum single wave overtopping volumes and their travel distance...... similar to the spatial distribution of the total overtopping volume in a sea state....

  1. Paleo-redox fronts and their formation in carbonate mound sediments from the Rockall Trough

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Land, C.; Mienis, F.; de Haas, H.; de Stigter, H.C.; Swennen, R.; Reijmer, J.J.G.; van Weering, T.C.E.

    2011-01-01

    Piston cores from the summits of coral topped carbonate mounds at the south west Rockall Trough margin reveal that the sediments have undergone significant post-depositional modifications affecting the original geochemical signature and mineralogical composition of the sediments. This diagenetic imp

  2. Stable isotope sales: Mound Facility customer and shipment summaries, FY 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruwe, Jr, A H [comp.

    1982-10-01

    A listing is given of Mound Facility's sales of stable isotopes of noble gases, carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, chlorine, and sulfur for Fiscal Year 1981. Purchasers are listed alphabetically and are divided into domestic and foreign groups. A cross-reference index by location is included for domestic customers. Cross-reference listings by isotope purchased are included for all customers.

  3. Construction, Maintenance and Repair as Elements in Rubble Mound Breakwater Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Rietveld, C.F.W.

    Very often rubble mound breakwater designs seem to be a result only of stability considerations corresponding to design wave conditions. Designers tend to put too little emphasis on practical problems related to construction, maintenance and repair. As is discussed in the paper due consideration ...

  4. Stable isotope sales: Mound Facility customer and shipment summaries, FY 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A listing is given of Mound Facility's sales of stable isotopes of noble gases, carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, chlorine, and sulfur for Fiscal Year 1980. Purchasers are listed alphabetically and are divided into domestic and foreign groups. A cross-reference index by location is included for domestic customers. Cross-reference listings by isotope purchased are included for all customers

  5. Stability of Monolithic Rubble Mound Breakwater Crown Walls Subjected to Impulsive Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen Harck; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Andersen, Thomas Lykke;

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates the validity of a simple onedimensional dynamic analysis as well as a FEM model to determine the sliding of a rubble mound breakwater crown wall. The evaluation is based on a case example with real wave load time series and displacements measured from two-dimensional physical...

  6. Timing of mounding for bambara groundnut affects crop development and yield in a rainfed tropical environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ouedrago, Mahama; M'bi, Bertin Zagre; Liu, Fulai;

    2013-01-01

    Mounding, also known as earthing up, is widely carried out at any time during the growth cycle of Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdcourt, viz. bambara groundnut – a species with underground pod setting – by subsistence farmers throughout Africa. This agricultural practice consists of bringing soil...

  7. Early Triassic calcimicrobial mounds and biostromes of the Nanpanjiang basin, south China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrmann, Daniel J.

    1999-04-01

    Early Triassic framestones were discovered in the interior of an isolated, marine carbonate platform in the Nanpanjiang basin. The framestones occur in two horizons: (1) the lowermost Triassic (Griesbachian), as biostromes as much as 15 m thick, and (2) the upper part of the Lower Triassic (Smithian or Spathian) as isolated domal or inverted conical mounds as much as 1.5 m thick. The mounds and biostromes consist of a rigid calcimicrobial framework enclosing a network of internal cavities, 1 to 3 cm across, filled with peloidal-skeletal sediment. The framework is made of irregular-to-tufted masses of chambered-to-clotted micrite structures referable to Renalcis, a calcified coccoid cyanobacteria. The framework is reinforced by microbial induced micritic crusts as well as marine cement. Metazoan fossils within the framework include gastropods, bivalves, ostracodes, spirorbids, and brachiopods. The Early Triassic is widely considered to have been a global gap in reef and reef mound development. The global reef gap concept has formed the foundation of models of reef evolution and of the reorganization of reef ecosystems after the end-Permian extinction. These models should be revised to account for the existence of Early Triassic calcimicrobial mounds and biostromes discussed herein.

  8. A tale of negotiations: CERCLA interagency agreement at the Mound plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to explain some of the more important provisions of the Mound agreement and to explore some lessons learned from the Mound experience about CERCLA Interagency Agreement negotiations. The authors have chosen six specific IAG provisions to discuss because they represent key elements in their attempt to merge what may sometimes seem like incongruous goals - the need to conduct a thorough CERCLA cleanup under the direction of another federal agency and the desire to protect the public's money. The provisions they will discuss are: integration of CERCLA and RCRA requirements; EPA's covenant not to sue or assess administrative penalties against DOE's contractors for any of their actions which may have given rise to the releases covered by the agreement; inclusion of a streamlined Statement of Work; the procedure whereby investigative work already completed at the Mound site which was not conducted utilizing EPA-approved methods may be accepted for future reports; the short list of primary documents; and use of a yearly schedule for work activities.. Tritium, as well as trace levels of chlorinated organics, have been found in the groundwater at Mound. On-site and off-site soils are contaminated with plutonium and several on-site locations are contaminated with thorium

  9. On the Choice of Structure and Layout of Rubble Mound Breakwater Heads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maciñeira, Enrique; Burcharth, Hans F.

    2006-01-01

     The paper discusses the various functional, environmental and structural conditions to consider related to the choice of breakwater head type. Results from hydraulic model tests of rubble mound and caisson head solutions for the new deep water port at Punto Langosteira, La Coruña, Spain, are pre...

  10. Upper Cretaceous chalk facies and depositional history recorded in the Mona-1 core, Mona Ridge, Danish North Sea: Plate 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surlyk, Finn

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The 331 m long core from the Mona-1 well in the Danish North Sea spans almost the entire Upper Cretaceous Chalk Group but only about 10% of Late Cretaceous time is represented. The succession comprises 14 facies representing pelagic deposition, turbidity flow, and mass-transport processes, including mudflow, debris flow, and slumping. Pelagic deposits vary mainly in terms of the concentration of siliciclastic material, the trace-fossil assemblage, and the presence or ab¬sence of primary sedimentary structures. Pelagic sedimentation was probably punctuated by the deposition of thin turbidites, and the resultant deposits were thoroughly bioturbated if deposited during normal oxygenation at the sea floor. Periodic benthic dysoxia resulted in the preservation of primary structures, as represented by laminated chalk which consists of thin pelagic laminae alternating with thin turbidites. In addition to the thin turbidites in the laminated chalk, four dif¬ferent turbidite facies are interpreted as representing high- to low-energy flows. Clast-supported chalk conglomerates have previously not been differentiated from other turbidites, but are here interpreted to be directly related to the down-slope evolution of debris flows. Debris flows are rep¬resented by matrix-supported conglomerates, which form one of the most common facies in the succession. High-concentration, gravity-driven suspension flows passed into dilute visco-plastic flows during the final stages of deposition and resulted in the deposition of structureless chalks. Limited shear deformation produced distinct quasi-facies from which the precursor facies can be deduced, whereas intense or continued shear deformation produced a shear-banded quasi-facies from which the precursor facies cannot be deduced in all cases. A series of major slump packages (14–18 in total are interpreted, forming over 40% of the succession; debrites appear to be the most common precursor facies involved in

  11. Giant polygons and mounds in the lowlands of Mars: signatures of an ancient ocean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehler, Dorothy Z; Allen, Carlton C

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the hypothesis that the well-known giant polygons and bright mounds of the martian lowlands may be related to a common process-a process of fluid expulsion that results from burial of fine-grained sediments beneath a body of water. Specifically, we hypothesize that giant polygons and mounds in Chryse and Acidalia Planitiae are analogous to kilometer-scale polygons and mud volcanoes in terrestrial, marine basins and that the co-occurrence of masses of these features in Chryse and Acidalia may be the signature of sedimentary processes in an ancient martian ocean. We base this hypothesis on recent data from both Earth and Mars. On Earth, 3-D seismic data illustrate kilometer-scale polygons that may be analogous to the giant polygons on Mars. The terrestrial polygons form in fine-grained sediments that have been deposited and buried in passive-margin, marine settings. These polygons are thought to result from compaction/dewatering, and they are commonly associated with fluid expulsion features, such as mud volcanoes. On Mars, in Chryse and Acidalia Planitiae, orbital data demonstrate that giant polygons and mounds have overlapping spatial distributions. There, each set of features occurs within a geological setting that is seemingly analogous to that of the terrestrial, kilometer-scale polygons (broad basin of deposition, predicted fine-grained sediments, and lack of significant horizontal stress). Regionally, the martian polygons and mounds both show a correlation to elevation, as if their formation were related to past water levels. Although these observations are based on older data with incomplete coverage, a similar correlation to elevation has been established in one local area studied in detail with newer higher-resolution data. Further mapping with the latest data sets should more clearly elucidate the relationship(s) of the polygons and mounds to elevation over the entire Chryse-Acidalia region and thereby provide more insight into this

  12. Sub-kilometre (intra-crater) mounds in Utopia Planitia, Mars: character, occurrence and possible formation hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soare, Richard J.; Conway, Susan J.; Pearce, Geoffrey D.; Costard, François; Séjourné, Antoine

    2013-08-01

    At the middle latitudes of Utopia Planitia (˜35-45°N; ˜65-101°E) hundreds of small-sized mounds located in sub-kilometre impact craters dot the landscape. Their shape varies from circular to crescentic and their height ranges from ˜10 to 50 m. Often, metre to decametre pitting is observed, as is metres-thick banding or stratification. Mound albedo is relatively high, i.e. ˜0.16. The plain's terrain in the region, previously linked to the latitude-dependent mantle (LDM) of ice-dust, displays pitting and albedo similar to the small intra-crater mounds. Some workers have suggested that the mounds and the plain's terrain share a common ice-dust origin. If so, then scrutinising the mounds could provide analogical insight on the key geological characteristics and spatial distribution of the LDM itself. Other workers have hypothesised that the mounds are eroded sedimentary landforms or periglacial mounds underlain by a perennial ice-core (closed-system pingos). In this article we develop and then discuss each of the three mound-hypotheses in a much more substantial manner than has been done hitherto. Towards this end we use high-resolution images, present a detailed regional-map of mound distribution and establish a regional platform of topographical analysis using MOLA data superposed on a large-scale CTX mosaic. Although the ice-dust hypothesis is consistent with some observations and measurements, we find that a (loess-based) sedimentary hypothesis shows greater plausibility. Of the three hypotheses evaluated, the pingo or periglacial one is the weakest.

  13. Compaction of North-Sea Chalk by Pore-Failure and Pressure Solution in a Producing Reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Keszthelyi, Daniel; Dysthe, Dag K.; JAMTVEIT, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    The Ekofisk field, Norwegian North sea, is an example of a compacting chalk reservoir with considerable subsequent seafloor subsidence due to petroleum production. Previously, a number of models were created to predict the compaction using different phenomenological approaches. Here we present a different approach which includes a new creep model based on microscopic mechanisms with no fitting parameters to predict the strain rate at reservoir scale. The model is able to reproduce the magnitu...

  14. Using environmental tracers to assess the extent of river-groundwater interaction in a quarried area of the English Chalk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darling, W.G., E-mail: wgd@bgs.ac.uk [British Geological Survey, Maclean Building, Wallingford OX10 8BB (United Kingdom); Gooddy, D.C. [British Geological Survey, Maclean Building, Wallingford OX10 8BB (United Kingdom); Riches, J. [Thames Water Utilities Limited, Rose Kiln Court, Rose Kiln Lane, Reading RG2 0BY (United Kingdom); Wallis, I. [British Geological Survey, Maclean Building, Wallingford OX10 8BB (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    The Swanscombe area of Kent, SE England represents a typical example of a heavily quarried Chalk area currently undergoing re-development. Because the Chalk is also an important aquifer, a good understanding of groundwater movement is required if environmental impacts are to be minimised and the water resource maximised. In particular, the nature of the relationship between the River Darent and groundwater in the Swanscombe Chalk Block requires better characterisation. Here, 'environmental tracers' in the form of ambient concentrations of stable isotopes, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) and tritium ({sup 3}H) are used to investigate this and other aspects of groundwater movement in the vicinity of the quarries. Stable isotopic contrasts indicate little evidence for widespread river infiltration to the regional Chalk aquifer, although stable isotope and {sup 3}H data suggest that 20-35% of the abstraction by river-valley public water supply boreholes may be derived from the river. The CFCs, while present at above-modern concentrations in almost all groundwaters, can be used as tracers, indicating basically S-N flowpaths in the area south of the quarries, though sub-karstic conduits associated with areas of Palaeogene cover add a level of uncertainty at the local scale. Simple piston flow residence times based on SF{sub 6} range from 1 to 17 a, but the data are probably better interpreted in terms of mixing between varying amounts of modern recharge derived from the south and deeper stored groundwater. The information gained from environmental tracers can therefore contribute to effective resource management.

  15. Dual FIB-SEM 3D Imaging and Lattice Boltzmann Modeling of Porosimetry and Multiphase Flow in Chalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, A. J.; Yoon, H.; Dewers, T. A.; Heath, J. E.; Petrusak, R.

    2010-12-01

    Mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) is an often-applied technique for determining pore throat distributions and seal analysis of fine-grained rocks. Due to closure effects, potential pore collapse, and complex pore network topologies, MIP data interpretation can be ambiguous, and often biased toward smaller pores in the distribution. We apply 3D imaging techniques and lattice-Boltzmann modeling in interpreting MIP data for samples of the Cretaceous Selma Group Chalk. In the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, the Selma Chalk is the apparent seal for oil and gas fields in the underlying Eutaw Fm., and, where unfractured, the Selma Chalk is one of the regional-scale seals identified by the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership for CO2 injection sites. Dual focused ion - scanning electron beam and laser scanning confocal microscopy methods are used for 3D imaging of nanometer-to-micron scale microcrack and pore distributions in the Selma Chalk. A combination of image analysis software is used to obtain geometric pore body and throat distributions and other topological properties, which are compared to MIP results. 3D data sets of pore-microfracture networks are used in Lattice Boltzmann simulations of drainage (wetting fluid displaced by non-wetting fluid via the Shan-Chen algorithm), which in turn are used to model MIP procedures. Results are used in interpreting MIP results, understanding microfracture-matrix interaction during multiphase flow, and seal analysis for underground CO2 storage. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences as part of an Energy Frontier Research Center. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Controls on the spatial and temporal variability of Rn-222 in riparian groundwater in a lowland Chalk catchment.

    OpenAIRE

    Mullinger, Neil J.; Pates, Jackie M.; Binley, Andrew M.; Crook, N. P.

    2009-01-01

    Radon is a powerful tracer of stream-aquifer interactions. However, it is important to consider the source and behaviour of radon in groundwater when interpreting observations of river radon in relation to groundwater discharge. Here we characterise the variability in groundwater radon concentrations in the riparian zone of a Chalk catchment. Groundwater 222Rn (radon) concentrations were determined in riparian zone boreholes at two sites in the Lambourn catchment, Berkshire, UK, over a two ye...

  17. Mass-transport deposits and reservoir quality of Upper Cretaceous Chalk within the German Central Graben, North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfai, Jashar; Lutz, Rüdiger; Franke, Dieter; Gaedicke, Christoph; Kley, Jonas

    2016-04-01

    The architecture of intra-chalk deposits in the `Entenschnabel' area of the German North Sea is studied based on 3D seismic data. Adapted from seismic reflection characteristics, four types of mass-transport deposits (MTDs) are distinguished, i.e. slumps, slides, channels and frontal splay deposits. The development of these systems can be linked to inversion tectonics and halotectonic movements of Zechstein salt. Tectonic uplift is interpreted to have caused repeated tilting of the sea floor. This triggered large-scale slump deposition during Turonian-Santonian times. Slump deposits are characterised by chaotic reflection patterns interpreted to result from significant stratal distortion. The south-eastern study area is characterised by a large-scale frontal splay complex. This comprises a network of shallow channel systems arranged in a distributive pattern. Several slide complexes are observed near the Top Chalk in Maastrichtian and Danian sediments. These slides are commonly associated with large incisions into the sediments below. Best reservoir properties with high producible porosities are found in the reworked chalk strata, e.g. Danish North Sea, therefore MTDs detected in the study area are regarded as potential hydrocarbon reservoirs and considered as exploration targets.

  18. Integrating geophysical and hydrochemical borehole-log measurements to characterize the Chalk aquifer, Berkshire, United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürch, Marc; Buckley, David

    2002-09-01

    Geophysical and hydrochemical borehole-logging techniques were integrated to characterize hydraulic and hydrogeochemical properties of the Chalk aquifer at boreholes in Berkshire, UK. The down-hole measurements were made to locate fissures in the chalk, their spatial extent between boreholes, and to determine the groundwater chemical quality of the water-bearing layers. The geophysical borehole logging methods used were caliper, focused resistivity, induction resistivity, gamma ray, fluid temperature, fluid electrical conductivity, impeller and heat-pulse flowmeter, together with borehole wall optical-imaging. A multiparameter data transmitter was used to measure groundwater temperature, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen, pH, and redox potential of the borehole fluid down-hole. High permeability developed at the Chalk Rock by groundwater circulation provides the major flow horizon at the Banterwick Barn study site and represents a conduit system that serves as an effective local hydraulic connection between the boreholes. The Chalk Rock includes several lithified solution-ridden layers, hardgrounds, which imply a gap in sedimentation possibly representing an unconformity. Lower groundwater temperature, high dissolved-oxygen content, and flowmeter evidence of preferential groundwater flow in the Chalk Rock indicated rapid groundwater circulation along this horizon. By repeating the logging at different times of the year under changing hydraulic conditions, other water-inflow horizons within the Chalk aquifer were recognized. Résumé. Des techniques géophysiques et hydrochimiques de diagraphies en forage ont été mises en oeuvre pour caractériser les propriétés hydrauliques et hydrogéochimiques de l'aquifère de la craie dans des forages du Berkshire (Grande-Bretagne). Les mesures en descente ont été faites pour localiser les fissures dans la craie et leur développement spatial entre forages, et pour déterminer la qualité de l'eau souterraine des

  19. Edibility of sport fishes in the Ottawa River near Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To address the question of edibility of fish in the Ottawa River near Chalk River Laboratories (CRL), 123 game fish were collected for analysis from four locations: Mackey and Rolphton (45 km and 35 km upstream of Chalk River Laboratories (CRL), respectively), the Sandspit (Pointe au Bapteme) and Cotnam Island (1.6 km and 45 km downstream of CRL, respectively). Twenty-six to thirty-six game fish were collected at each location in 2007 and samples of flesh or bone were analyzed. Trap nets were used to collect only the fish required, allowing release of management-sensitive species. The focus was on walleye (Sander vitreus) because they are abundant and popular among anglers. A few northern pike (Esox lucius) and a smaller number of smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui) were also collected at three of the four sites. Samples of the fish were analyzed for cesium-137 (137Cs), strontium-90 (90Sr), mercury (Hg), and selected organo-chlorine compounds. Concentrations of 137Cs in the flesh and 90Sr in the bones of sport fish were low and similar at all four locations and appear to reflect the global residuals from nuclear weapons testing (primarily in the 1960's) as opposed to releases from CRL. Possible explanations are: 1) Reductions in radionuclide releases from CRL in recent decades and 2) Relatively large foraging ranges of sport fish. Mercury concentrations were elevated in fishes in the Ottawa River and were significantly higher at the Sandspit and Rolphton than at Mackey and Cotnam Island (p<0.001). Mercury concentrations from the four sites are comparable to concentrations in other Ontario and Quebec lakes. It is advisable therefore, that consumers follow the fish consumption guidelines issued by provincial authorities when eating fish from the Ottawa River. Organo-chlorine compounds were not detected in walleye; however, they were detected in all eight of the pike collected at Cotnam Island. The highest organo-chlorine concentrations were measured in two of the

  20. Determination of transmissivity and dispersion in a confined chalk aquifer by simulation of field experiments with three tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storage and repumping of thermal energy in chalk aquifers during periods of surplus and deficit production respectively might be an economically feasible method to meet man's need for heating. To be able to evaluate the temporal and spatial variations of thermal energy transfer between water, which mainly flows in the chalk fissures, and the chalk matrix itself it is necessary to know the transmissivity and dispersion parameters of the aquifer. Based on this background, field tests with pumping of water and tracers have been carried out as shown. The fissured chalk aquifer of magnitude H = 16 m is confined by almost impervious top and bottom layers. Two wells with distance L = 101 m were established. A steady flow with Q1 Q2 = 10.9 m3/h was established within a period of 24 h. The radioactive tracers 3H and 82Br and the fluorescent tracer R-WT (rhodamine-water tracer) were injected at known concentrations within a period of 5 min. At time = 24 h valve V0 was opened and V2 closed and within the following 320 h a single well repumping (Q1 = -10.9 m3/h, Q2 = 0) and temporal detection of tracer concentrations were carried out until practically all concentrations were zero. The three concentration curves show a time to peak of about 12 h and a temporal distribution of the relative concentrations (peak concentration = 100% for all tracers) which is almost identical. The total repumped amount of tracer (with correction for radioactive decay) was 63%, 93% and 53% for 3H, 82Br and R-WT, respectively. The corresponding peak concentrations relative to injected concentrations were 1088, 1745 and 737 ppm. These data indicate a strong adsorption to the chalk matrix for R-WT and 3H but weak for 82Br. The simulation of measured concentration curves will be done by means of at least two models, M1-M2, which both include linear adsorption. With respect to permeability and dispersion M1 and M2 differ as follows: M1. Constant coefficients k and D for permeability and dispersion

  1. The early diagenetic and PETROphysical behaviour of recent cold-water CARbonate mounds in Deep Environments (PETROCARDE)

    OpenAIRE

    Foubert, A.; H. Pirlet; Thierens, M.; Van Mol, B.; Henriet, J.-P.; Swennen, R.

    2010-01-01

    Sub-recent cold-water carbonate mounds localized in deeper slope settings on the Atlantic continental margins cannot be any longer neglected in the study of carbonate systems. They clearly play a major role in the dynamics of mixed siliciclastic-carbonate and/or carbonate-dominated continental slopes. Carbonate accumulation rates of cold-water carbonate mounds are about 4 to 12 % of the carbonate accumulation rates of tropical shallow-water reefs but exceed the carbonate accumulation rates of...

  2. Experimental Study on Friction Coefficient Between Concrete and the Top Surface of Rubble Mound Foundation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan-bao; JIANG Xue-lian; GUO Hong-yi

    2005-01-01

    Experimental studies on the friction coefficient between concrete and the top surface of a rubble mound foundation in China are reviewed. Through comparison of different test results, the development of this research is comprehensively analyzed. An experiment is carried out in the condition similar to prototype. The process curve of friction coefficient with the test block sliding is analyzed and a standard for determination of the friction coefficient is defined. The variation features of the friction coefficient are analyzed on the basis of the present experimental results and other studies in China. It is shown that the friction coefficient between concrete and the top surface of a rubble mound foundation decreases with the increase of the foundation pressure, and the friction coefficient for a very fine leveling bed is smaller than that for a fine leveling bed.

  3. Island-dynamics model for mound formation: effect of a step-edge barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papac, Joe; Margetis, Dionisios; Gibou, Frederic; Ratsch, Christian

    2014-08-01

    We formulate and implement a generalized island-dynamics model of epitaxial growth based on the level-set technique to include the effect of an additional energy barrier for the attachment and detachment of atoms at step edges. For this purpose, we invoke a mixed, Robin-type, boundary condition for the flux of adsorbed atoms (adatoms) at each step edge. In addition, we provide an analytic expression for the requisite equilibrium adatom concentration at the island boundary. The only inputs are atomistic kinetic rates. We present a numerical scheme for solving the adatom diffusion equation with such a mixed boundary condition. Our simulation results demonstrate that mounds form when the step-edge barrier is included, and that these mounds steepen as the step-edge barrier increases. PMID:25215739

  4. Methane fluxes from the mound-building termite species of North Australian savannas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, H.; Livesely, S. J.; Arndt, S. K.; Dawes-Gromadzki, T.; Cook, G. D.; Hutley, L.

    2009-04-01

    Termites are estimated to contribute 3-19% to the global methane emissions. These estimates have large uncertainties because of the limited number of field-based studies and species studied, as well as issues of diel and seasonal variation. We measured methane fluxes from four common mound-building termite species (Microcerotermes nervosus, n=26; M. serratus, n=4; Tumulitermes pastinator, n=5; and Amitermes darwini, n=4) in tropical savannas near Darwin in the Northern Territory, Australia. Methane fluxes from replicated termite mounds were measured in the field using manual chambers with fluxes reported on a mound volume basis. Methane flux was measured in both wet and dry seasons and diel variation was investigated by measuring methane flux every 4 hours over a 24 hour period. Mound temperature was measured concurrently with flux to examine this relationship. In addition, five M. nervosus mounds removed from the field and incubated under controlled temperature conditions over a 24 hour period to remove the effect of varying temperature. During the observation campaigns, mean monthly minimum and maximum temperatures for February (wet season) were 24.7 and 30.8°C, respectively, and were 20.1 to 31.4 °C in June (dry season). Annual rainfall in 2008 for Darwin was 1970.1 mm, with a maximum of 670 mm falling in February and no rain in May and June. Methane fluxes were greatest in the wet season for all species, ranging from 265.1±101.1 (T. pastinator) to 2256.6±757.1 (M. serratus) µg CH4-C/m3/h. In the dry season, methane fluxes were at their lowest, ranging from 10.0±5.5 (T. pastinator) to 338.0±165.9 (M. serratus) µg CH4-C/m3/h. On a diel basis, methane fluxes were smallest at the coolest time of the day (~0700 hrs) and greatest at the warmest (~1400 hrs) for all species, and for both wet and dry seasons. Typical diel variation in flux from M. serratus dominated mounds ranged from 902.6±261.9 to 1392.1±408.1 µg CH4-C/m3/h in wet season and 99.6±57.4 to

  5. Sources of Sulfate Found in Mounds and Lakes at the Lewis Cliffs Ice Tongue, Transantarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socki, Richard; Sun, Tao; Harvey, Ralph P.; Bish, David L.; Tonui, Eric; Bao, Huiming; Niles, Paul B.

    2012-01-01

    Massive but highly localized Na-sulfate mounds (mirabilite, Na2SO4.10H2O) have been found at the terminal moraine of the Lewis Cliffs Ice Tongue (LCIT), Antarctica. (Sigma)34S and (Sigma)18O values of LCIT mirabilite range from +48.8 to +49.3% (CDT), and -16.6 to -17.1% (V-SMOW), respectively, while (Delta)17O average -0.37% (V-SMOW). LCIT mirabilite mounds are isotopically different from other mirabilite mounds found in coastal regions of Antarctica, which have isotope values close to seawater compositions. (Sigma)18O and (Delta)17O values suggest the incorporation of isotopically light glacial water. Data point to initial sulfate formation in an anoxic water body, either as a stratified anoxic deep lake on the surface, a sub-glacial water reservoir, or a sub-glacial lake. Several surface lakes of varying size are also present within this region of the LCIT, and in some cases are adjacent to the mirabilite mounds. O and D isotope compositions of surface lakes confirm they are derived from a mixture of glacial ice and snow that underwent moderate evaporation. (Sigma)18O and (Sigma)D (V-SMOW) values of snow, ice, and lake water range from -64.2 to -29.7%, and -456.0 to -231.7%, respectively. However, the isotope chemistry of these surface lakes is extremely different from the mounds. Dissolved SO4-2 (Sigma)34S and (Sigma)18O values range from +12.0 to +20.0% and -12.8 to -22.2% (the most negative (Sigma)18O of terrestrial sulfate ever reported), respectively, with sulfate (Delta)17O ranging from +0.93 to 2.24%. Ion chromatography data show that lake water is fresh to brackish in origin, with TDS less than 1500 ppm, and sulfate concentration less than 431 ppm. Isotope and chemical data suggest that these lakes are unlikely the source of the mirabilite mounds. We suggest that lake water sulfate is potentially composed of a mixture of atmospheric sulfate and minor components of sulfate of weathering origin, much like the sulfate in the polar plateau soils of the Mc

  6. Mechanical Strength Modeling and Optimization of Lateritic Solid Block with 4% Mound Soil Inclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onuamah, P.N

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The work is an investigation for the model development and optimization of the compressive strength of solid sandcrete block with mound soil inclusion. The study applies the Scheffe’s optimization approach to obtain a mathematical model of the form f(xi1,xi2,xi3,,xi4, where xi are proportions of the concrete components, viz: cement, mound soil, laterite, and water. Scheffe’s experimental design techniques are followed to mould various solid block samples measuring 450mm x 225mm x 150mm and tested for 28 days strength. The task involved experimentation and design, applying the second order polynomial characterization process of the simplex lattice method. The model adequacy is checked using the control factors. Finally a software is prepared to handle the design computation process to take the desired property of the mix, and generate the optimal mix ratios.

  7. Geometry-Lithology-Origin: Solving the mystery of the Late Miocene mounded features below Lake Balaton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visnovitz, Ferenc; Horváth, Ferenc; Surányi, Gergely

    2014-05-01

    The Department of Geophysics and Space Sciences of Eötvös University has carried out single- and multichannel water seismic surveys at the Lake Balaton since 1993. The dense grid of 2D profiles offers a high resolution image of the Late Miocene sedimentary strata (Tihany, Somló and Szák Formations) up to a thickness of 200 meters below the lake. These strata can be divided into smaller sedimentary units by numerous parasequence boundaries (Sztanó&Magyar, 2007). In one of these parasequence interesting, high amplitude mounded features have been observed that follow a seismic horizon over large area. It means that these features indicate a Late Miocene regional event. In terms of their shape these mounds are few tens of meters wide, several tens to a hundreds of meters long and few meters high. Their geometry and inner structure were mapped from 2D segments that were used for 3D reconstructions. The shape and stratigraphic position of these features have inspired Sacchi and Horvath (1999) to interpret them as the subsurface equivalent of the fresh-water siliceous-limestone mounds exposed on the Tihany Peninsula. They held these mounds as an evidence of dryland conditions in the time period of the formation of a Late Miocene erosional surface (PAN-2) that they regarded as a 3rd order sequence boundary. In addition to this so called "travertine" concept another explanation was also formulated as the mounds are the product of sedimentary failures e.g. slumps or water escape. To solve the problem an offshore drilling with a total depth of 19 meters was accomplished in October 2013 to sample one of these mounds and determine their origin. The well has not crossed any travertine body, instead alternating layers of clay-silt and very fine sand - without any convincing sign of fluid escape structures - were found in the core (typical lithology of the Tihany Formation). 3D structural analysis of the mounds revealed spherical organization composing bodies that are

  8. Inventory of radioactivity in Ottawa River-bed sediments near the Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL's Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) are situated on the Ontario side of the Ottawa River about 200 km NW of the City of Ottawa. Since 1947, water for cooling CRL's research reactors has been piped from and returned to the Ottawa River. From 1952 to the present time, cooling water has been discharged through the Process Sewer at a rate of 1.5 to 2 m3/s. The Outfall, which is the discharge from the Process Sewer, is in 18 m of water, 65 m offshore. Flow is directed toward the river surface through three 'diffuser vents,' creating a turbulent swirl at the surface and maintaining a patch of open water in winter. In addition to cooling water, the Outfall has, over the years, included small additional effluents from a heavy water recovery plant, a decontamination centre and a waste treatment centre. Although the effluent has been monitored and has met applicable regulatory requirements, investigations of the riverbed near the Outfall revealed radioactivity. In 2001, a riverbed reconnaissance and a detailed coring program were initiated for the purpose of determining the inventory of residual radioactivity. (author)

  9. Simulating Heterogeneous Infiltration and Contaminant leaching Processes at Chalk River, Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M. A.; Ireson, A. M.; Keim, D.

    2015-12-01

    A study is conducted at a waste management area in Chalk River, Ontario to characterize flow and contaminant transport with the aim of contributing to improved hydrogeological risk assessment in the context of waste management. Field monitoring has been performed to gain insights into the unsaturated zone characteristics, moisture dynamics, and contaminant transport rates. The objective is to provide quantitative estimates of surface fluxes (quantification of infiltration and evaporation) and investigations of unsaturated zone processes controlling water infiltration and spatial variability in head distributions and flow rates. One particular issue is to examine the effectiveness of the clayey soil cap installed to prevent infiltration of water into the waste repository and the top sand soil cover above the clayey layer to divert the infiltrated water laterally. The spatial variability in the unsaturated zone properties and associated effects on water flow and contaminant transport observed at the site, have led to a concerted effort to develop improved model of flow and transport based on stochastic concepts. Results obtained through the unsaturated zone model investigations are combined with the hydrogeological and geochemical components and develop predictive tools to assess the long term fate of the contaminants at the waste management site.

  10. Post-irradiation examination of the 37M fuel bundle at Chalk River Laboratories (AECL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Daniels, T. [Ontario Power Generation, Pickering, Ontario (Canada); Montin, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-03-15

    The modified (-element (37M) fuel bundle was designed by Ontario Power Generation (OPG) to improve Critical Heat Flux (CHF) performance in ageing pressure tubes. A modification of the conventional 37-element fuel bundle design, the 37M fuel bundle allows more coolant flow through the interior sub-channels by way of a smaller central element. A demonstration irradiation (DI) of thirty-two fuel bundles was completed in 2011 at OPG's Darlington Nuclear Generating Station to confirm the suitability of the 37M fuel bundles for full core implementation. In support of the DI, fuel elements were examined in the Chalk River Laboratories Hot Cells. Inspection activities included: Bundle and element visual examination; Bundle and element dimensional measurements; Verification of bundle and element integrity; and Internal Gas Volume Measurements. The inspection results for 37M were comparable to that of conventional 37-element CANDU fuel. Fuel performance parameters of the 37M DI fuel bundle and fuel elements were within the range observed for similarly operated conventional 37-element CANDU fuel. Based on these Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) results, 37M fuel performed satisfactorily. (author)

  11. Fabric Measurements of Ice Crystallized Within the Pore Networks of Chalk and Diatomite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swainson, I. P.; Schulson, E. M.

    2003-12-01

    The phenomenon of the crystallization of ice through porous bodies is a concern in many branches of science; e.g., porous materials; biological cells and related cell damage; and permafrost on earth and other planetary bodies. Whereas in unconsolidated sediments particle-pushing and ice lens formation occur, these are not significant processes within rock, and the ice must crystallize through a pre-existing pore network. At issue is whether the pore walls act as efficient nucleation sites or whether a coherent crystallization front of ice moves through the connected porosity. In the former case each pore can be considered independent and in the latter case the state (frozen/unfrozen) is dependent on the states of its neighbors, and the ice crystallization front advances through the porosity in a manner analogous to models of invasion percolation of fluids through pores. In the latter case, one would also predict the development of strong fabric (crystallographic texture) of ice as the ice front grows through the network. We present neutron diffraction measurements of deuterated ice Ih forming within the pores of bulk specimens of chalk and diatomite. Preliminary neutron ``powder diffraction'' measurements suggested a very highly textured nature to the ice. Subsequently, we built a Peltier cooler device to form ice within the pore networks of highly porous rocks. This device was placed in a Eulerian cradle and mounted on a neutron diffractometer. The pole figures we measured strongly suggest the advance of a coherent crystallization front throughout the connected porosity.

  12. Liberal And General Studies In Further Education: Voices From The ‘Chalk Face’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simmons, Robin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents initial findings from research investigating an important but largely neglected facet of the history of Further Education (FE – the Liberal Studies and General Studies (LS/GS movement. Drawing on historical documents and interview data from a group of former LS/GS lecturers, the paper provides important insights into some of the key events and initiatives between the 1950s-1980s, which led to the rise and eventual fall of the LS/GS movement, and seeks to capture the voices of those who were involved at the ‘chalk face’. Whilst it is acknowledged that the quality and nature of LS/GS was often variable and that the experiences of both teachers and learners were often uneven, the central argument of the paper is that many of the principles of the LS/GS movement were not only ahead of their time, but are perhaps more relevant to FE today than ever before.

  13. Association among active seafloor deformation, mound formation, and gas hydrate growth and accumulation within the seafloor of the Santa Monica Basin, offshore California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paull, C.K.; Normark, W.R.; Ussler, W.; Caress, D.W.; Keaten, R.

    2008-01-01

    Seafloor blister-like mounds, methane migration and gas hydrate formation were investigated through detailed seafloor surveys in Santa Monica Basin, offshore of Los Angeles, California. Two distinct deep-water (??? 800??m water depth) topographic mounds were surveyed using an autonomous underwater vehicle (carrying a multibeam sonar and a chirp sub-bottom profiler) and one of these was explored with the remotely operated vehicle Tiburon. The mounds are > 10??m high and > 100??m wide dome-shaped bathymetric features. These mounds protrude from crests of broad anticlines (~ 20??m high and 1 to 3??km long) formed within latest Quaternary-aged seafloor sediment associated with compression between lateral offsets in regional faults. No allochthonous sediments were observed on the mounds, except slumped material off the steep slopes of the mounds. Continuous streams of methane gas bubbles emanate from the crest of the northeastern mound, and extensive methane-derived authigenic carbonate pavements and chemosynthetic communities mantle the mound surface. The large local vertical displacements needed to produce these mounds suggests a corresponding net mass accumulation has occurred within the immediate subsurface. Formation and accumulation of pure gas hydrate lenses in the subsurface is proposed as a mechanism to blister the seafloor and form these mounds. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Mound activities in chemical and physical research: January-June 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress and activities are reported on: low-temperature trennschaukel (thermistor calibration, thermal conductivity of He-Ne), liquid-phase thermal diffusion (properties of ethyl chloride), zinc isotope separation, mutal diffusion, molecular beam scattering, calcium isotope separation by ion exchange, thermal stability of crystalline and amorphous ZrPdH/sub x/, and measurement of environmental HT and HTO in the air near Mound

  15. Decadal-scale variations in geomagnetic field intensity from ancient Cypriot slag mounds

    OpenAIRE

    Shaar, R; Tauxe, L.; Ben-Yosef, E; V. Kassianidou; Lorentzen, B; Feinberg, JM; Levy, TE

    2015-01-01

    © 2015. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. Geomagnetic models based on direct observations since the 1830s show that the averaged relative change in field intensity on Earth's surface over the past 170 years is less than 4.8% per decade. It is unknown if these rates represent the typical behavior of secular variations due to insufficient temporal resolution of archaeomagnetic records from earlier periods. To address this question, we investigate two ancient slag mounds in Cyprus...

  16. The settlement mound of Birnin Lafiya: new evidence from the eastern arc of the Niger River

    OpenAIRE

    Haour, Anne; Nixon, Sam; N'Dah, Didier; Magnavita, Carlos; Livingstone Smith, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    The development of complex social organisation and trade networks during the first and second millennia AD in the Sahel region of West Africa has long been hampered by a paucity of reliable data. Investigations at Birnin Lafiya, a large settlement mound of this period on the eastern arc of the Niger River, help to fill this gap. The site can now be placed within its broader landscape, and discoveries of early mud architecture, circular structures, human burial remains, personal ornamentation ...

  17. Origin, growth and demise of cold-water coral mound Challenger (IODP Site 1317)

    OpenAIRE

    Raddatz, Jacek

    2011-01-01

    The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 307 was proposed to obtain evidence for understanding the origin and evolution of a 155 m high deepwater carbonate mound in the Porcupine Seabight. The major aim of this study is the reconstruction of environmental parameters using well-developed paleoceanographic proxies derived from calcareous tests and skeletons of benthic organisms based on sediment cores from this expedition. In particular, this study uses different archives such as...

  18. Origin,Growth and demise of the cold-water coral mound Challenger (IODP Site 1317)

    OpenAIRE

    Raddatz, Jacek

    2011-01-01

    The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 307 was proposed to obtain evidence for understanding the origin and evolution of a 155 m high deepwater carbonate mound in the Porcupine Seabight. The major aim of this study is the reconstruction of environmental parameters using well-developed paleoceanographic proxies derived from calcareous tests and skeletons of benthic organisms based on sediment cores from this expedition. In particular, this study uses different archives such as...

  19. Macrofauna community inside and outside of the Darwin Mounds SAC, NE Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Serpetti

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades, growing concerns have been raised regarding the effects of towed fishing gears, such as trawls and dredges, on deep-sea biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Trawling disturbs the benthic communities both physically and biologically, and can eliminate the most vulnerable organisms and modify habitat structure; chronically disturbed communities are often dominated by opportunistic species. The European Union is under obligation to designate a network of offshore Special Areas of Conservation (SACs and Marine Protected Areas (MPAs by the end of 2012 based on the perceived expectation that these networks will help protect marine biodiversity and that within these areas, faunal abundance and diversity will be higher than the surrounding fished areas.

    The Darwin Mounds, only discovered in 1998, are located in the Rockall Trough, NE Atlantic at a depth of ~ 1000 m. Deep-water trawling regularly took place in the region of the Darwin Mounds; however in 2004 the mounds were designated as the first offshore SAC in UK and the area is now closed to bottom trawling. As part of the HERMIONE programme the influence of human impact on the Oceans was one of the key themes and in June 2011, an investigation of the macrofaunal community structure at comparable sites both inside and outside of the Darwin Mound SAC was undertaken. Macrofaunal communities were found to differ significantly, with the difference mostly driven by changes in the abundance of polychaetes, crustaceans and nematodes whilst no significant differences were seen for the other phyla. Whereas overall macrofaunal abundance was higher outside the SAC compared to within, this pattern varies considerably between phyla. Diversity indices showed no significant differences between protected and unprotected sites. This could indicate that a few years of preservation are not enough time to determine a recovery by the macrofaunal community of cold-water ecosystems

  20. Seismic delineation of Algal Mound Reservoirs, Humble City South Field, Lea County, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caughey, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Pennsylvanian algal mounds near Lovington, New Mexico, typify the targets remaining for exploration in the Permian basin. The Strawn trend new Lovington comprises numerous small (200-800 ac) reservoirs of clean algal limestone encased in unfossiliferous carbonate mudrocks. Vuggy porosity occurs in algal micrites and sporadically in crinoidal or foraminiferal grainstones associated with the mound. Some of the Lovington area fields encountered downdip water, but difficulty in finding the mound facies remains the principal dry-hole hazard. Vague acoustical boundaries complicate seismic detection of relatively minor (50-150 ft) carbonate buildups at depths of 11,200-11,600 ft. Stratigraphic interpretation of high-resolution seismic data recently led to several new field discoveries and major extensions. Development drilling, however, can be an even greater challenge to reservoir prediction. Humble City South field illustrates the difficulty of developing a stratigraphic oil field in an area of poor seismic definition and sparse well control. A shooting program following the wildcat discovery only heightened confusion about the size and shape of the new reservoir. Two subsequent dry holes missed the mound entirely and provided only negative control. Seismic modeling, careful stratigraphic interpretation, and saturation coverage with a three-dimensional seismic project ultimately defined the existing reservoir and revealed the presence of a separate, nearby pool. Exact reservoir delineation remains difficult, but this program presented the first clear picture of overall mount geometry. The Humble City experience showed that three-dimensional seismic can be an important tool in the critical period following a wildcat discovery.

  1. Macrofauna community inside and outside of the Darwin Mounds SAC, NE Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpetti, N.; Gontikaki, E.; Narayanaswamy, B. E.; Witte, U.

    2012-11-01

    Over the past two decades, growing concerns have been raised regarding the effects of towed fishing gears, such as trawls and dredges, on deep-sea biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Trawling disturbs the benthic communities both physically and biologically, and can eliminate the most vulnerable organisms and modify habitat structure; chronically disturbed communities are often dominated by opportunistic species. The European Union is under obligation to designate a network of offshore Special Areas of Conservation (SACs) and Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) by the end of 2012 based on the perceived expectation that these networks will help protect marine biodiversity and that within these areas, faunal abundance and diversity will be higher than the surrounding fished areas. The Darwin Mounds, only discovered in 1998, are located in the Rockall Trough, NE Atlantic at a depth of ~ 1000 m. Deep-water trawling regularly took place in the region of the Darwin Mounds; however in 2004 the mounds were designated as the first offshore SAC in UK and the area is now closed to bottom trawling. As part of the HERMIONE programme the influence of human impact on the Oceans was one of the key themes and in June 2011, an investigation of the macrofaunal community structure at comparable sites both inside and outside of the Darwin Mound SAC was undertaken. Macrofaunal communities were found to differ significantly, with the difference mostly driven by changes in the abundance of polychaetes, crustaceans and nematodes whilst no significant differences were seen for the other phyla. Whereas overall macrofaunal abundance was higher outside the SAC compared to within, this pattern varies considerably between phyla. Diversity indices showed no significant differences between protected and unprotected sites. This could indicate that a few years of preservation are not enough time to determine a recovery by the macrofaunal community of cold-water ecosystems and that a continued

  2. Slope Stability Estimation of the Kościuszko Mound in Cracow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wrana Bogumił

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, the slope stability problem of the Kościuszko Mound in Cracow, Poland is considered. The slope stability analysis was performed using Plaxis FEM program. The outer surface of the mound has complex geometry. The slope of the cone is not uniform in all directions, on the surface of the cone are pedestrian paths. Due to its complicated geometry it was impossible to do computing by Plaxis input pre-procesor. The initial element mesh was generated using Autodesk Autocad 3D and next it was updated by Plaxis program. The soil parameters were adopted in accordance with the detailed geological soil testing performed in 2012. Calculating model includes geogrids. The upper part was covered by MacMat geogrid, while the lower part of the Mound was reinforced using Terramesh Matt geogrid. The slope analysis was performed by successives reduction of φ /c parameters. The total multiplayer ΣMsf is used to define the value of the soil strength parameters. The article presents the results of slope stability before and after the rainfall during 33 days of precipitation in flood of 2010.

  3. Antarctic Mirabilite Mounds as Mars Analogs: The Lewis Cliffs Ice Tongue Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socki, Richard A.; Sun, Tao; Niles, Paul B.; Harvey, Ralph P.; Bish, David L.; Tonui, Eric

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed, based on geomorphic and geochemical arguments, that subsurface water has played an important role in the history of water on the planet Mars [1]. Subsurface water, if present, could provide a protected and long lived environment for potential life. Discovery of gullies [2] and recurring slopes [3] on Mars suggest the potential for subsurface liquid water or brines. Recent attention has also focused on small (Tongue (LCIT) [6] in the Transantarctic Mountains, Antarctica, and are potential terrestrial analogs for mounds observed on the martian surface. The following characteristics distinguish LCIT evaporite mounds from other evaporite mounds found in Antarctic coastal environments and/or the McMurdo Dry Valleys: (1) much greater distance from the open ocean (approx.500 km); (2) higher elevation (approx.2200 meters); and (3) colder average annual temperature (average annual temperature = -30 C for LCIT [7] vs. 20 C at sea level in the McMurdo region [8]. Furthermore, the recent detection of subsurface water ice (inferred as debris-covered glacial ice) by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter [9] supports the use of an Antarctic glacial environment, particularly with respect to the mirabilite deposits described in this work, as an ideal terrestrial analog for understanding the geochemistry associated with near-surface martian processes. S and O isotopic compositions.

  4. Stability formula for armor units to tsunami on rubble mound breakwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of the failure of armor units of the rubble mound breakwater due to tsunami was investigated based on the experiments. Tsunamis with leading wave, negative leading wave and soliton fissions were the target tsunamis in the present work. Two different sizes of the wave flumes were used in the experiments. A shorter wave flume is 76m long, 1.2m deep and 0.90m wide and the longer one 205m long, 6.0m deep and 3.4m wide. The mass of the armor unit used ranges from 14g, 30g, 50g, 112g, 240g to 400g. The stability formula was derived from the balance of the fluid force acting armor units and the resistance force of the armor unit in the armor layer. The two coefficients such as the drag coefficient of the armor unit and the friction coefficient are determined to give the stability condition. The relationship between the mass of armor units and the maximum velocity on the crest of the rubble mound breakwater was obtained to determine the conditions of no damage of the armor layer. The numerical simulation method to estimate the velocity on the crest of the rubble mound breakwater was described in the present work. The numerical simulation results were verified with the experimental results of the time histories of the water depth and the horizontal component of the velocity and a good agreements was confirmed. (author)

  5. Early diagenesis and chalk-chert hardgrounds in the Coniacian-Campanian of central Jordan; implications for sedimentation on Late Cretaceous shallow pelagic ramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. H.; Moh'd, B. K.

    2009-04-01

    Hardgrounds and omission surfaces are rare in the predominantly hemi-pelagic chalk, chert and phosphorite association that comprises the Senonian Belqa Group in central Jordan. However, hardgrounds of regional extent are described from the base of the Dhiban Chalk Member (Santonian-Campanian) in Wadi Mujib, central Jordan, and at Jibal Khureij, southern Wadi Araba that reveal a complex pattern of sedimentation and early diagenesis. The chalk-chert-phosphorite succession was deposited in a shallow pelagic ramp setting in fluctuating water depths. Chalks represent high-stands, separated by a regressive chert-rich unit (Tafilah Member). Synchronous hardground successions traced over 100 km, reveal a complex diagenetic and depositional history of early lithification, phosphatisation, penecontemporaneous deformation, submarine bioerosion, colonisation by colonial corals and/or bivalves followed by deposition of turbid detrital chalk passing up to pelagic coccolith ooze. Variations in the hardground successions are attributed to their relative position on the pelagic ramp in overall response to a third order sea-level rise.

  6. Modelling of N2O Reduction in a Circulating Fluidized Bed Boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Åmand, Lars Erik; Dam-Johansen, Kim;

    1996-01-01

    The addition of limestone for sulphur retention in Fluidized Bed Combustion (FBC) has been observed to influence the emission of N2O, and in many cases a lower emission was observed. The catalytic activity of a Danish limestone (Stevns Chalk) for decomposition of N2O in a laboratory fixed bed...... quartz reactor was measured. It was found that calcined Stevns Chalk is a very active catalyst for N2O decomposition in an inert atmosphere compared to bed material, i.e. a mixture of ash and sand. However, in FBC the limestone is exposed to a mixture of gases, including CO, CO2 and SO2, and sulphation...

  7. POTENTIAL IMPACT OF BLENDING RESIDUAL SOLIDS FROM TANKS 18/19 MOUNDS WITH TANK 7 OPERATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High level waste tanks 18F and 19F have residual mounds of waste which may require removal before the tanks can be closed. Conventional slurry pump technology, previously used for waste removal and tank cleaning, has been incapable of removing theses mounds from tanks 18F and 19F. A mechanical cleaning method has been identified that is potentially capable of removing and transferring the mound material to tank 7F for incorporation in a sludge batch for eventual disposal in high level waste glass by the Defense Waste Processing Facility. The Savannah River National Laboratory has been requested to evaluate whether the material transferred from tanks 18F/19F by the mechanical cleaning technology can later be suspended in Tank 7F by conventional slurry pumps after mixing with high level waste sludge. The proposed mechanical cleaning process for removing the waste mounds from tanks 18 and 19 may utilize a high pressure water jet-eductor that creates a vacuum to mobilize solids. The high pressure jet is also used to transport the suspended solids. The jet-eductor system will be mounted on a mechanical crawler for movement around the bottom of tanks 18 and 19. Based on physical chemical property testing of the jet-eductor system processed IE-95 zeolite and size-reduced IE-95 zeolite, the following conclusions were made: (1) The jet-eductor system processed zeolite has a mean and median particle size (volume basis) of 115.4 and 43.3 microns in water. Preferential settling of these large particles is likely. (2) The jet-eductor system processed zeolite rapidly generates settled solid yield stresses in excess of 11,000 Pascals in caustic supernates and will not be easily retrieved from Tank 7 with the existing slurry pump technology. (3) Settled size-reduced IE-95 zeolite (less than 38 microns) in caustic supernate does not generate yield stresses in excess of 600 Pascals in less than 30 days. (4) Preferential settling of size-reduced zeolite is a function of the amount of

  8. POTENTIAL IMPACT OF BLENDING RESIDUAL SOLIDS FROM TANKS 18/19 MOUNDS WITH TANK 7 OPERATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eibling, R; Erich Hansen, E; Bradley Pickenheim, B

    2007-03-29

    High level waste tanks 18F and 19F have residual mounds of waste which may require removal before the tanks can be closed. Conventional slurry pump technology, previously used for waste removal and tank cleaning, has been incapable of removing theses mounds from tanks 18F and 19F. A mechanical cleaning method has been identified that is potentially capable of removing and transferring the mound material to tank 7F for incorporation in a sludge batch for eventual disposal in high level waste glass by the Defense Waste Processing Facility. The Savannah River National Laboratory has been requested to evaluate whether the material transferred from tanks 18F/19F by the mechanical cleaning technology can later be suspended in Tank 7F by conventional slurry pumps after mixing with high level waste sludge. The proposed mechanical cleaning process for removing the waste mounds from tanks 18 and 19 may utilize a high pressure water jet-eductor that creates a vacuum to mobilize solids. The high pressure jet is also used to transport the suspended solids. The jet-eductor system will be mounted on a mechanical crawler for movement around the bottom of tanks 18 and 19. Based on physical chemical property testing of the jet-eductor system processed IE-95 zeolite and size-reduced IE-95 zeolite, the following conclusions were made: (1) The jet-eductor system processed zeolite has a mean and median particle size (volume basis) of 115.4 and 43.3 microns in water. Preferential settling of these large particles is likely. (2) The jet-eductor system processed zeolite rapidly generates settled solid yield stresses in excess of 11,000 Pascals in caustic supernates and will not be easily retrieved from Tank 7 with the existing slurry pump technology. (3) Settled size-reduced IE-95 zeolite (less than 38 microns) in caustic supernate does not generate yield stresses in excess of 600 Pascals in less than 30 days. (4) Preferential settling of size-reduced zeolite is a function of the amount of

  9. Simulation of Groundwater Mound Resulting from Proposed Artificial Recharge of Treated Sewage Effluent Case study – Gaza waste water treatment plant, Palestine

    OpenAIRE

    Aish, Adnan Mousa

    2010-01-01

    Mounding of the groundwater table beneath recharge sources is of concern as the raised water table approaches closely to near-surface facilities or features. The shape and height of the mound depend on several factors including the recharge rate, hydraulic conductivity and thickness of the aquifer. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the suitability of the study area for a rapid infiltration system of treated wastewater effluent without causing excessive mounding of the water table. A ...

  10. Scale-up of two-phase flow in heterogeneous chalk. Matrix properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This investigation presents scale-up of a detailed heterogeneous geostatistical model to a full field reservoir simulation model, considering both single and two-phase flow properties. The model represents a typical low permeability Danish North Sea chalk reservoir and includes capillary pressure and saturation end-point variations. Two new up-scaling methods has been investigated, all based on fine scale simulation on a cross section of the geomodel. The first methods assumes piston style behaviour and a coupled viscosity is introduced into the basic Darcy`s equations. The second method is a modification of the JBN method traditionally applied in analysing results from core flooding experiments, which emerged as the most successful and therefore also the recommended method. 1. In addition to the up scaling work we review the Equivalent Radius Method for capillary pressure normalisation with explicit derivation of type functions for Maastrichtian and Danian chalk types. Implementation of the Equivalent Radiuo Method in the COSI reservoir simulator by an optikal set of key-words. There are six specific results from this work: 1. The equivalent radius method is robust to changes of scale and yields model initialisations by initial and irreducible water saturations on a full field simulation scale that agree well with values derived from averaging on a fine-scale. 2. The residual oil saturations are strongly scale dependent and the description of the residual oil as a function of the irreducible water is not applicable on a full field scale and will lead to an overestimation of the residual oil present in the reservoir. The effective residual oil saturations on a full field-scale must be considered functions of the effective initial water saturations, in order to take into account fine-scale variations in the oil/water contacts. 3. The effective permeability as calculated by statistical averages does not differ seriously from results obtained by fine-grid numerical

  11. Designing a monitoring network for contaminated ground water in fractured chalk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nativ, R. [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem, Rehovot (Israel). Seagram Center for Soil and Water Sciences; Adar, E.M. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede Boker (Israel); Becker, A. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Mitzpe Ramon (Israel)

    1999-01-01

    One of the challenges of monitoring network design in a fractured rock setting is the heterogeneity of the rocks. This paper summarizes the activities and problems associated with the monitoring of contaminated groundwater in porous, low-permeability fractured chalk in the Negev Desert, Israel. Preferential flow documented in the study area required siting the monitoring boreholes in the predominant fracture systems. Lineaments traced from aerial photographs were examined in the field to sort out the large-extension, through-going, multilayer fracture systems crossing the study area. At each proposed drilling site, these fractures were exposed below the sediment cover using trenches. Slanted boreholes were drilled at a distance from the fracture systems so that each borehole would intersect the targeted fracture plane below the water table. Based on their short recovery period and contaminated ground water, these newly drilled, fracture-oriented boreholes appeared to be better connected to preferential flowpaths crossing the industrial site than the old boreholes existing on site. Other considerations concerning the drilling and logging of monitoring boreholes in a fractured media were: (1) coring provides better documentation of the vertical fracture distribution, but dry augering is less costly and enables immediate ground water sampling and the sampling of vadose rock for contaminant analysis; (2) caliper and TV camera logs appear to provide only partial information regarding the vertical fracture distribution; and (3) the information gained by deepening the monitoring boreholes and testing fractures crossing their uncased walls has to be carefully weighed against the risk of potential cross-contamination through the monitoring boreholes, which is enhanced in fractured media.

  12. Groundwater monitoring and plume discharge zone characterization for the NRX radiostrontium plume at Chalk River Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olfert, J.M.; Audet, M.; Killey, D., E-mail: olfertjm@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-12-15

    Groundwater is the principal pathway for the migration of most radiological and non-radiological compounds from past and present operating areas at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's Chalk River Laboratories (CRL). The CRL Groundwater Monitoring Program (GWMP) was established to measure the groundwater quality around the perimeters of areas affected, or potentially affected, by groundwater plumes. One of these is the NRX Rod Bays plume, a legacy plume that originated from the fuel storage bays of the National Research Experimental (NRX) reactor. This plume contains primarily {sup 90}Sr migrating along the groundwater flow system to the Ottawa River. A characterization study of the shoreline region was completed recently to map the plume discharge zone by collecting samples from mini-piezometers and groundwater seeps (springs) during a period of low river level. Analysis of discharging groundwaters determined that the {sup 90}Sr concentrations were very similar to those sampled from nearby (upgradient) GWMP monitoring wells. With this favorable correlation, the high density of seep and mini-piezometer sampling along the shoreline allowed refinements to be made in defining the northerly and southerly boundaries of the radiostrontium plume. The seep and mini-piezometer sampling also provided evidence that the monitoring wells sampled routinely within the CRL GWMP are positioned appropriately for providing representative sampling of the plume. Shoreline seep and mini-piezometer sampling can lead to refinements in the conceptual site model for plumes with limited effort and cost. The supplemental characterization work can also potentially identify other targets for routine groundwater monitoring. (author)

  13. Current status of the waste identification program at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The management of routine operating waste by Waste Management and Decommissioning (WM and D) at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) is supported by the Waste Identification (WI) Program. The principal purpose of the WI Program is to minimize the cost and the effort associated with waste characterization and waste tracking, which are needed to optimize waste handling, storage and disposal. The major steps in the WI Program are: (1) identify and characterize the processes that generate the routine radioactive wastes accepted by WM and D - radioisotope production, radioisotope use, reactor operation, fuel fabrication, et cetera (2) identify and characterize the routine blocks of waste generated by each process or activity - the initial characterization is based on inference (process knowledge) (3) prepare customized, template data sheets for each routine waste block - templates contain information such as package type, waste material, waste type, solidifying agent, the average non-radiological contaminant inventory, the average radiological contaminant inventory, and the waste class (4) ensure generators 'use the right piece of paper with the right waste' when they transfer waste to WM and D - that is they use the correct template data sheets to transfer routine wastes, by: identifying and marking waste collection points in the generator's facility; ensuring that generators implement effective waste collection/segregation procedures; implementing standard procedures to transfer waste to WM and D; and, auditing waste collection and segregation within a generator's facility (5) determine any additional waste block characterization requirements (is anything needed beyond the original characterization by process knowledge?) This paper describes the WI Program, it provides an example of its implementation, and it summarizes the current status of its implementation for both CRL and non-CRL waste generators. (author)

  14. Geo-models for fine-scale flow simulation of chalk reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frykman, P.

    1997-12-31

    This report presents procedures for producing and analysing fine-scale geo-models. The geo-models are constructed in order to carry original measured data at the correct scale in the input stage. This is achieved by selecting cell size at the same scale as the core analysis data used for input. This report presents an example of fine-scale porosity-permeability models of a reservoir sequence, and selected methods to generate these models. The purpose of investigating these models is to analyse effective properties as a consequence of the layering and contrasts in the model. These effects are largely ignored in most large-scale geo-statistic reservoir models so far. Outcrop data has been used as analogue for the layered structure in the chalk geomodels, and the correlation structure is used to induce layering in the model, reflecting beds of approximately one meter thickness. The variability and range of porosity and permeability values are derived by comparison to actual well data. The contrasts in the sedimentary sequence are developed by a combination of sedimentary processes, compaction processes and effects from later diagenesis. The detailed geo-model has been subjected to single-phase flow simulation, and the average anisotropy factor Kv/kH can be derived for each type of model. The porosity/permeability relation for the effective properties reflects the upscaling that is carried out with this procedure. Preliminary results from analysing the effective properties of the detailed geostatistical model of size 80x80x1 m is illustrated. The detailed models have been subjected to single-phase flow simulation in order to get the effective permeabilities for the models. The procedure is applied in order to investigate the consequences of layering in the formation on the effective and directional permeabilities. (au) EFP-86. 11 refs.

  15. Seasonal nutrient dynamics in a chalk stream: the River Frome, Dorset, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowes, M J; Leach, D V; House, W A

    2005-01-01

    Chalk streams provide unique, environmentally important habitats, but are particularly susceptible to human activities, such as water abstraction, fish farming and intensive agricultural activity on their fertile flood-meadows, resulting in increased nutrient concentrations. Weekly phosphorus, nitrate, dissolved silicon, chloride and flow measurements were made at nine sites along a 32 km stretch of the River Frome and its tributaries, over a 15 month period. The stretch was divided into two sections (termed the middle and lower reach) and mass balances were calculated for each determinand by totalling the inputs from upstream, tributaries, sewage treatment works and an estimate of groundwater input, and subtracting this from the load exported from each reach. Phosphorus and nitrate were retained within the river channel during the summer months, due to bioaccumulation into river biota and adsorption of phosphorus to bed sediments. During the autumn to spring periods, there was a net export, attributed to increased diffuse inputs from the catchment during storms, decomposition of channel biomass and remobilisation of phosphorus from the bed sediment. This seasonality of retention and remobilisation was higher in the lower reach than the middle reach, which was attributed to downstream changes in land use and fine sediment availability. Silicon showed much less seasonality, but did have periods of rapid retention in spring, due to diatom uptake within the river channel, and a subsequent release from the bed sediments during storm events. Chloride did not produce a seasonal pattern, indicating that the observed phosphorus and nitrate seasonality was a product of annual variation in diffuse inputs and internal riverine processes, rather than an artefact of sampling, flow gauging and analytical errors.

  16. Paleoenvironmental reconstruction of microbial mud mound derived boulders from gravity-flow polymictic megabreccias (Visean, SW Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Martínez, M.; Moreno-González, I.; Mas, R.; Reitner, J.

    2012-07-01

    The Upper Visean outcrops from the Guadiato Valley (Córdoba, SW Spain) provide a well-preserved record of the mud mound factory, which was developed in a mainly siliciclastic synorogenic foreland basin during the oblique sinistral collision of two terranes (Ossa Morena and Central Iberian blocks). The first onset of mud mound development has been recorded as microbial mud mound-derived boulders in polymictic megabreccias as result of strong tectonic activity. The Upper Visean record from the Mississippian central band at Guadiato Valley starts with lower heterolithic units (up to 180 m thick) and shows two major tectonically-controlled cycles: a fining upwards interval (FU) followed by a coarsening upwards interval (CU). These cycles are linked to two active margins with gravelly fan delta development and different source areas. Mud mound-derived boulders occur in the CU interval and are formed by peloidal primary and secondary (reworked) automicrites and allomicrites, showing a diverse faunal and floral assemblage, although never as the main skeletal framebuilders. However, the observed coeval richness in sponges (lyssacinose hexactinellids and non-lithistid demosponges) and the diverse calcareous algae assemblage in mud mound derived boulders are not common in other Visean buildups. The growth cavities display changes in the geopetal relationships between fillings and the secondary cavities containing sand to gravel fillings reflecting a complex pre-boulder and mud mound derived boulder history. Detailed mapping, sampling, stratigraphic and microfacial analyses have allowed the reconstruction of the mud mounds sedimentary environment prior to the collapse, transport and emplacement as boulders with polymictic gravels.

  17. Geoarchaeological approaches to understanding human-environment interactions in Australia's tropical north: the Weipa shell mounds revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanning, P. C.; Holdaway, S. J.; Shiner, J.; Petchey, F.

    2012-04-01

    Western Cape York Peninsula, particularly the Weipa region, has seen sustained archaeological investigation since the 1960s. These studies primarily concentrated on the shell mounds associated with coastal environments first observed at the beginning of the 20th century. Despite claims that the shell mounds were of natural origin, archaeological investigations convincingly demonstrated that they are primarily cultural deposits. Geomorphological studies indicate that chenier (beach ridge) formation occurred after sea-level stabilisation in the mid- to late Holocene, and is connected to the formation of estuaries at the mouths of the Mission, Pine, Hey and Embley Rivers. Anadara shell bed formation is in turn connected with the evolution of the estuaries. However, the relationship between shell mound age and location relative to the coastline at Weipa is neither well defined, nor tested at multiple locations. Given that the coast is susceptible to the effects of sea-level fluctuations and environmental change, and the Anadara beds can become depleted as a result of environmental shifts, the shell mounds provide a datable record of human reaction to coastal landscape and environmental change. Here, we report preliminary results of a new investigation of the shell mounds of the Weipa region. Radiocarbon and OSL-based age determinations from samples of shell, charcoal and sediment collected from trenches excavated into shell mounds on the northern shore of the Embley River indicate a relationship between the time of initial accumulation of shell and the age of the landform features upon which they were built, which in turn are a result of coastline evolution during the mid to late Holocene. These mounds are the oldest yet recorded for the Weipa region, with accumulation in one case commencing around 3500 cal BP. Accumulation appears to be more or less continuous, and abruptly ceases after 400-650 yrs. We discuss implications for understanding human

  18. Models of Formation and Activity of Spring Mounds in the Mechertate-Chrita-Sidi El Hani System, Eastern Tunisia: Implications for the Habitability of Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elhoucine Essefi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Spring mounds on Earth and on Mars could represent optimal niches of life development. If life ever occurred on Mars, ancient spring deposits would be excellent localities to search for morphological or chemical remnants of an ancient biosphere. In this work, we investigate models of formation and activity of well-exposed spring mounds in the Mechertate-Chrita-Sidi El Hani (MCSH system, eastern Tunisia. We then use these models to explore possible spring mound formation on Mars. In the MCSH system, the genesis of the spring mounds is a direct consequence of groundwater upwelling, triggered by tectonics and/or hydraulics. As they are oriented preferentially along faults, they can be considered as fault spring mounds, implying a tectonic influence in their formation process. However, the hydraulic pressure generated by the convergence of aquifers towards the surface of the system also allows consideration of an origin as artesian spring mounds. In the case of the MCSH system, our geologic data presented here show that both models are valid, and we propose a combined hydro-tectonic model as the likely formation mechanism of artesian-fault spring mounds. During their evolution from the embryonic (early to the islet (“island” stages, spring mounds are also shaped by eolian accumulations and induration processes. Similarly, spring mounds have been suggested to be relatively common in certain provinces on the Martian surface, but their mode of formation is still a matter of debate. We propose that the tectonic, hydraulic, and combined hydro-tectonic models describing the spring mounds at MCSH could be relevant as Martian analogs because: (i the Martian subsurface may be over pressured, potentially expelling mineral-enriched waters as spring mounds on the surface; (ii the Martian subsurface may be fractured, causing alignment of the spring mounds in preferential orientations; and (iii indurated eolian sedimentation and erosional remnants are common

  19. Changes in Specific Surface as observed by NMR, caused by saturation of Chalk with porewater bearing divalent Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Addassi, Mouadh; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul;

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrometry has proved to be a good technique for determining the petrophysical properties of reservoir rocks; such as porosity and pore size distribution. We investigated how pore water rich in divalent ions affect the NMR signal from chalk with two different...... samples where precipitation takes place were found to show shifts in the T2 relaxation curve due to the creation of crystals. We were able to identify how differences in the rock texture and precipitants within the pore space may affect the transverse relaxation time by altering the surface...

  20. Compaction of North-sea chalk by pore-failure and pressure solution in a producing reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eKeszthelyi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Ekofisk field, Norwegian North sea,is an example of compacting chalk reservoir with considerable subsequent seafloor subsidence due to petroleum production. Previously, a number of models were created to predict the compaction using different phenomenological approaches. Here we present a different approach, we use a new creep model based on microscopic mechanisms with no fitting parameters to predict strain rate at core scale and at reservoir scale. The model is able to reproduce creep experiments and the magnitude of the observed subsidence making it the first microstructural model which can explain the Ekofisk compaction.

  1. Management of legacy spent nuclear fuel wastes at the Chalk River Laboratories: the challenges and innovative solutions implemented

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL has operated research reactors at the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) site since 1947, for the purpose of nuclear energy and scientific research and for the production of radioisotopes. During the 1950s and 60s, a variety of spent nuclear fuel wastes were produced by irradiating metallic uranium and other prototype fuels. These legacy waste fuels were initially stored in water-filled fuel storage bays for a period of several years before being placed in storage containers and transferred to the CRL Waste Management Areas (WMAs), where they have been stored in below-grade, vertical cylindrical steel and concrete structures called 'tile holes'. (author)

  2. Rainsplash-induced mound development beneath desert shrubs: Modulation of sediment transport and storage, with implications for hillslope evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, A. S.; Furbish, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    Studies of mound development beneath desert shrubs by rainsplash transport have focused on the physics of rainsplash transport, as well as on mound characteristics. However, there has been no attempt to examine the relationship between the life cycles of desert shrub populations, sediment storage, sediment transport rates, and ultimately hillslope evolution. Our work examines the timescales over which the presence of a shrub community on a desert hillslope reduces rates of sediment transport and modulates the local divergence of the sediment flux, thereby influencing the rate of hillslope evolution. Mounds develop beneath shrubs as a result of preferential movement of sediment from areas not covered by canopy to areas beneath shrub canopies, where grains are protected from raindrop impacts. The sediment flux immediately downslope of a shrub is reduced as a mound develops. Conversely, removal of canopy cover (i.e. shrub mortality) results in a local increase in sediment flux immediately downslope of a shrub as mound material becomes exposed to rainsplash transport. A hillslope supporting a desert shrub community and mound development experiences an overall lowering of downslope transport rates compared to an unvegetated desert hillslope. Here we develop a numerically-based model for desert hillslopes, supported by field observations of rainsplash mounds in the Cibola National Forest, New Mexico, to investigate how sediment that is stored and released in conjunction with a dynamic shrub population affects desert hillslope evolution. Modeling suggest that it can take on the order of a century for sediment in a mound to be released downslope by rainsplash processes following the death of a shrub. Even as local sediment transport rates increase and decrease in proximity to shrub mounds throughout the life cycle of an individual shrub, sediment transport rates at the hillslope scale are likely to be reduced for as long as the shrub community remains viable. Our work

  3. Accelerated Clean-up of the United States Department of Energy, Mound Nuclear Weapons Facility in Miamisburg, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CH2M HILL is executing a performance-based contract with the United States Department of Energy to accelerate the safe closure of the nuclear facilities at the former Mound plant in Miamisburg, Ohio. The contract started in January 2003 with a target completion date of March 31, 2006. Our accelerated baseline targets completion of the project 2 years ahead of the previous baseline schedule, by spring 2006, and for $200 million less than previous estimates. This unique decommissioning and remediation project is located within the City of Miamisburg proper and is designed for transfer of the property to the Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation for industrial reuse. The project is being performed with the Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation and their tenants co-located on the site creating significant logistical, safety and stakeholder challenges. The project is also being performed in conjunction with the United States Department of Energy, United States Environmental Protection Agency, and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency under the Mound 2000 regulatory cleanup process. The project is currently over 95% complete. To achieve cleanup and closure of the Mound site, CH2M HILL's scope includes: - Demolition of 64 nuclear, radiological and commercial facilities - Preparation for Transfer of 9 facilities (including a Category 2 nuclear facility) to the Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation for industrial reuse - Removal of all above ground utility structures and components, and preparation for transfer of 9 utility systems to Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation - Investigation, remediation, closure, and documentation of all known Potential Release Sites contaminated with radiological and chemical contamination (73 identified in original contract) - Storage, characterization, processing, packaging and shipment of all waste and excess nuclear materials - Preparation for Transfer of the 306 acre site to the

  4. Canada, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Chalk River Labs: Reuse and Licence Termination of a Number of Facilities at the Chalk River Labs to Allow for Refurbishment of the Site. Annex A. I-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalk River Labs is located along the Ottawa River in Ontario, Canada, approximately 200 km north-west of Ottawa. The site began construction in 1944 following the expropriation of approximately 1 500 ha of land. A number of research reactors were constructed at the site along with numerous nuclear labs, hot cells and administrative facilities in support of the research and development work planned for the site. The principal occupants of the Chalk River site are AECL employees with a strong presence from National Resources Canada (NRC) and other small research groups. The site is undergoing substantial changes with an emphasis on minimizing the impact of increasing the builtup area footprint in conjunction with site upgrades and new build projects. To accomplish this task, a number of refurbishment and decommissioning projects were planned. Decommissioning projects were initiated to make room for new development through a number of initiatives. The decommissioning mandate includes the removal of a select group of original deteriorating facilities to make room for new construction and to decommission other facilities to facilitate redevelopment and reuse of the available space. In Canada, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) issues nuclear licences. The licensees must demonstrate that it is safe to continue operations of the nuclear site and request a renewal of their licence. CNSC will issue a new operating licence for a specific period of time at which the licensee must demonstrate that it is safe to proceed with a licence renewal. A request to terminate a licensable activity must be submitted to the CNSC. Upon approval to proceed, it must be demonstrated that the licensable activities have ceased and the facility has been appropriately decommissioned. Licence termination requires a demonstration that the land or previous activities presents a low risk and that the process can be used to support redevelopment because it results in a scrutinized

  5. Ft-Ir Spectroscopic Analysis of Potsherds Excavated from the First Settlement Layer of Kuriki Mound, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayazit, Murat; Isik, Iskender; Cereci, Sedat; Issi, Ali; Genc, Elif

    The region covering Southeastern Anatolia takes place in upper Mesopotamia, so it has numerous cultural heritages due to its witness to various social movements of different civilizations in ancient times. Kuruki Mound is located on the junction point of Tigris River and Batman Creek, near Oymatas village which is almost 15 km to Batman, Turkey. The mound is dated back to Late Chalcolithic. Archaeological excavations are carried out on two hills named as “Kuriki Mound-1” and “Kuriki Mound-2” in which 4-layer and 2-layer settlements have been revealed, respectively. This region will be left under the water by the reservoir lake of Ilısu Dam when its construction is completed. Thus, characterization of ancient materials such as potsherds, metals and skeleton ruins should be rapidly done. In this study, 12 potsherds excavated from Layer-1 (the first settlement layer after the surface) in Kuriki Mound-2 were investigated by FT-IR spectrometry. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were used as complementary techniques in order to expose chemical and mineralogical/phase contents, respectively. Obtained results showed that the potteries have been produced with calcareous clays and they include moderate amounts of MgO, K2O, Na2O and Fe2O3 in this context. Additionally, high temperature phases have also been detected with XRD analyses in some samples.

  6. An examination of recharge mound decay and fossil gradients in arid regional sedimentary basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In many of the vast arid sedimentary basins of the world, groundwater gradients exist that appear to be anomalous in the context of the probable modern recharge potential. The possibility that such gradients are in fact remnant fossil conditions representing the decay of ancient recharge mounds is examined. An example of decay condition is represented using a resistor-network analogue model in which the time control is based on 14C ages. The decay hypothesis is found to be plausible with realistic aquifer characteristics but a non-homogeneous flow is indicated from the 14C data. (author)

  7. Overtopping on Rubble Mound Breakwaters for Low Steepness Waves in Deep and Depth Limited Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færch Christensen, Nicole; Røge, Mads Sønderstrup; Thomsen, Jonas Bjerg;

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the investigation of overtopping on rubble mound breakwaters for low steepness waves in both deep and shallow-water conditions are presented. The existing formulae provide quite different results for long waves for both conventional and berm breakwaters. Therefore, new model tests...... with focus on long waves have been performed for both types of breakwaters. The new model tests showed some deviation from the formulae. Therefore, limitations in the use of the present methods and an update for one of the methods are presented....

  8. Forest regeneration on nutrient-poor peatlands: Effects of fertilization, mounding and sowing.

    OpenAIRE

    Silfverberg, Klaus

    1995-01-01

    The effects of wood ash and PK fertilization on natural regeneration and sowing of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) were studied in field experiments on nitrogen-poor (Ntot 0.87–1.26%) peat substrates. The study material was derived from three drained, nutrient-poor pine mires (64°52'N, 25°08'E) at Muhos, near Oulu. The experimental fields were laid out in 1985 as a split-split-plot design including the following treatments: mounding, natural regeneration and sowing and fertilization; PK ...

  9. Parameters Influencing Wave Run-Up on a Rubble Mound Breakwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walle, Björn Van de; Rouck, Julien De; Damme, Luc Van;

    2002-01-01

    Full scale wave run-up measurements have been performed on the Zebrugge rubble mound breakwater. Wave run-up also has been investigated on various small scale models of the Zeebrugge breakwater. A significant difference between the results has been noticed. Additional small scale model testing has...... been carried out on a slightly modified scale model: a regular armour unit pattern has been applied in stead of an irregular pattern as in full scale. The aim of the additional laboratory tests was to investigate the influence of the spectral width parameter and the influence of the position of the...

  10. Mound Spring Complexes in Central Australia: An Analog for Martian Groundwater Fed Outflow Channels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, J. D. A.; Stoker, C.

    2003-01-01

    The arid inland of Australia contains a diversity of landscapes and landscape processes, often of great antiquity, extending back to the Mesozoic and Paleozoic. The potential of this landscape as a source of Mars analogs has, however, been little explored. The few examples studied so far include radiation-tolerant microbes in thermal springs and hematite-silica hydrothermal alteration near Arkaroola in the Finders Ranges, and aeolian landforms at Gurra Gurra water hole the north east of Arkaroola. Further Australian Mars analog studies were provided by the studies of Bourke and Zimbelman of the paleoflood record of the Todd and Hale Rivers in central Australia. To facilitate study of such analogues, Mars Society Australia has embarked on a project to construct a Mars Analog Research Station near Arkaroola. The international scientific community will soon have the opportunity to participate in Mars analog studies in central Australia utilizing this facility. An area of considerable Mars analog potential is the mound spring complexes that occur at the margins of the Great Artesian Basin (GAB) which underlies 22% of the Australian continent and covers 1.7 million km2. The mound springs are formed when ground water flows to a topographic low, and subsurface strata dips up causing a hydrological head at the surface. Minerals precipitated at the spring discharge zone form low mesas or "mounds", the height of which are controlled by the hydrological head. This paper describes the Dalhousie Mound Spring Complex (DMC) in the northern part of South Australia (Figure 1), and its potential as a Mars analog. Hydrogeology: The DMC consists of a cluster of more than 60 active springs formed by natural discharge from the GAB). Total measured discharge from the GAB is 1.74 GL per day, estimated unfocussed natural leakage through the aquaclude is thought be approximately equal to this figure. Some 54 ML per day are currently discharged by the DMC, 3% of the measured total. The

  11. Wave Forces and Overtopping on Crown Walls of Rubble Mound Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jan

    in the coastal laboratory at Aalborg University. Based on analyses of experimental data a design method for assessing the maximum wave forces on the vertical face of the crown wall structures has been developed as well as new and more versatile design equation for the related overtopping discharges...... of rubble mound breakwater crown walls. This background motivated the initialization of the present study on wave imposed forces and wave overtopping on crown wall structures. The two subjects where investigated through an excessive parametric model study involving more than 370 long duration test series...

  12. Distribution and degradation of diesel oil in the unsaturated zone following an oil spill on a chalk aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, R. P.; Lerner, D. N.; Lloyd, J. W.

    1994-07-01

    In 1976, there occurred a substantial loss of diesel oil from a storage facility at Royston in eastern England. The site is on the outcrop of the important Chalk aquifer, which is protected by an unsaturated zone 24-30 m thick. In 1986, a cored borehole was drilled through the site of the spillage to investigate the fate of the contaminants. The core samples were analysed by physical and chemical methods to determine the physical structure of the rock, and the characteristics and distribution of the oil. The chemically analysed samples included pore water extracts, scrapings from fracture surfaces, and non-fracture (matrix) samples. The results indicate that oil accumulated within a few millimetres of major fissure surfaces, and entry into the rock matrix was limited by the small size of pores and the presence of water. Oil may also have migrated along microscopic channels away from the major fissures. There was no evidence of downward migration of oil since the initial phase of movement. The adoption of certain assumptions regarding degradation, evaporation and dissolution processes allows the estimation of oil depletion caused by these processes. Physical weathering and degradation were found to have been extensive, but highly variable. Both processes occurred on the major fissure surfaces but, in the matrix, degradation appears to have been restricted. The conclusions have implications for the investigation and remediation of fissured Chalk aquifers contaminated by oil.

  13. Laboratory and field measurements of the self-potential (SP) in chalk, with application to monitoring of saline intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAllister, D.; Jackson, M.; Butler, A. P.; Vinogradov, J.

    2013-12-01

    Saline intrusion is a global phenomenon, affecting the availability of freshwater in coastal aquifers. The aim of this work is to investigate whether measurements of self-potential (SP) can be used to monitor the intrusion of seawater into coastal aquifers, with specific application to the UK chalk aquifer in the vicinity of Brighton on the south coast of the UK. The SP arises to maintain electrical neutrality when a separation of charge occurs due to gradients in pressure (electrokinetic (EK) or streaming potential) and concentration (electrochemical (EC) potential). Concentration gradients are a characteristic feature of saline intrusion and may give rise to a measureable EC potential. In addition, an EK potential will arise during abstraction. Laboratory and field SP measurements are used to investigate the magnitude of the EK and EC potentials in the UK chalk aquifer during saline intrusion. Laboratory measurements yield an EK coupling coefficient, relating the gradient in voltage to the gradient in pressure when the total current is zero, of -60 mV/MPa in samples saturated with groundwater, and -1 mV/MPa in samples saturated with seawater. This result agrees with earlier work suggesting the EK potential is suppressed at high salinity due to a compressed electrical double layer. The EC coupling is dominated by diffusion potentials arising from the concentration gradient across the saline front. Field experiments suggest that the EK component of the SP in the chalk is very small under ambient conditions, even in freshwater zones, because gradients in hydraulic head are small owing to the high conductivity of the pervasive fracture networks. However, a pumping test conducted in the chalk aquifer at a field site in Berkshire induced a measureable EK response with a coupling coefficient of magnitude consistent with the freshwater EK coupling coefficient obtained in the laboratory. SP monitoring at an observation borehole near Brighton reveals semi-diurnal SP

  14. Paleoseawater density reconstruction and its implication for cold-water coral carbonate mounds in the northeast Atlantic through time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüggeberg, Andres; Flögel, Sascha; Dullo, Wolf-Christian; Raddatz, Jacek; Liebetrau, Volker

    2016-03-01

    Carbonate buildups and mounds are impressive biogenic structures throughout Earth history. In the recent NE Atlantic, cold-water coral (CWC) reefs form giant carbonate mounds of up to 300 m of elevation. The expansion of these coral carbonate mounds is paced by climatic changes during the past 2.7 Myr. Environmental control on their development is directly linked to controls on its main constructors, the reef-building CWCs. Seawater density has been identified as one of the main controlling parameter of CWC growth in the NE Atlantic. One possibility is the formation of a pycnocline above the carbonate mounds, which is increasing the hydrodynamic regime, supporting elevated food supply, and possibly facilitating the distribution of coral larvae. The potential to reconstruct past seawater densities from stable oxygen isotopes of benthic foraminifera has been further developed: a regional equation gives reliable results for three different settings, peak interglacials (e.g., Holocene), peak glacials (e.g., Last Glacial Maximum), and intermediate setting (between the two extremes). Seawater densities are reconstructed for two different NE Atlantic CWC carbonate mounds in the Porcupine Seabight indicating that the development of carbonate mounds is predominantly found at a seawater density range between 27.3 and 27.7 kg m-3 (σΘ notation). Comparable to recent conditions, we interpret the reconstructed density range as a pycnocline serving as boundary layer, on which currents develop, carrying nutrition and possibly coral larvae. The close correlation of CWC reef growth with reconstructed seawater densities through the Pleistocene highlights the importance of pycnoclines and intermediate water mass dynamics.

  15. Experimental explanation of the formation mechanism of surface mound-structures by femtosecond laser on polycrystalline Ni{sub 60}Nb{sub 40}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Edwin; Wang, Meiyu; Lucis, Michael J.; Gogos, George; Shield, Jeffrey E. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Tsubaki, Alfred; Zuhlke, Craig A.; Bell, Ryan; Anderson, Troy P.; Alexander, Dennis R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)

    2016-01-18

    Femtosecond laser surface processing (FLSP) is an emerging technique for creating functionalized surfaces with specialized properties, such as broadband optical absorption or superhydrophobicity/superhydrophilicity. It has been demonstrated in the past that FLSP can be used to form two distinct classes of mound-like, self-organized micro/nanostructures on the surfaces of various metals. Here, the formation mechanisms of below surface growth (BSG) and above surface growth (ASG) mounds on polycrystalline Ni{sub 60}Nb{sub 40} are studied. Cross-sectional imaging of these mounds by focused ion beam milling and subsequent scanning electron microscopy revealed evidence of the unique formation processes for each class of microstructure. BSG-mound formation during FLSP did not alter the microstructure of the base material, indicating preferential valley ablation as the primary formation mechanism. For ASG-mounds, the microstructure at the peaks of the mounds was clearly different from the base material. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that hydrodynamic melting of the surface occurred during FLSP under ASG-mound forming conditions. Thus, there is a clear difference in the formation mechanisms of ASG- and BSG-mounds during FLSP.

  16. Mound-ACT*DE*CON{sup SM} feasibility study. Phase 2: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    A portion of the abandoned Miami-Erie Canal paralleling the Greater Miami River receives the runoff and storm-water discharge from Mound Laboratory. In 1969, a low-level plutonium leak contaminated sediment as far away as 1.5 mi from the Mound site along the old canal system. An estimated one million cubic feet of sediment requires remediation. The technology being evaluated for the remediation of the low-level plutonium-238 contamination of the sediment involves two processes: washing the sediments with ACT*DE*CON{sup SM} solution to dissolve the contaminant, followed by extraction of the solution and processing with the MAG*SEP{sup SM} process to concentrate the contaminant and allow reuse of the ACT*DE*CON{sup SM} solution. The processes are being optimized for pilot-scale and field demonstration. Phase 2 of the project primarily involved identification at the laboratory scale of the optimal ACT*DE*CON{sup SM} formulation, identification of the ion-exchanger and MAG*SEP{sup SM} particles, verification of the plutonium mobility in the treated soil, and evaluation of other process parameters according to a series of tasks.

  17. Experimental study of 2D scour and its protection at a rubble-mound breakwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2000-01-01

    conducted with both regular waves and irregular waves. It was found that the scour/deposition pattern in front of the rubble-mound breakwater emerges in the form of alternating scour and deposition areas lying parallel to the breakwater, similar to the case of the vertical-wall breakwater. The maximum scour......This study deals with the 2D scour at the trunk section of a rubble-mound breakwater. Two breakwater models with slopes of 1:1.2 and 1:1.75 are employed for the experimental study of the scour in a wave flume. 2D scour at a vertical-wall breakwater was also included as a reference case. Tests were...... depth, however, was found to be smaller in the present case than that of the vertical-wall breakwater case. In the case of the irregular waves, the scour depth at the breakwater decreases with respect to that experienced in the case of the regular waves. Countermeasures for toe protection were also...

  18. Focused risk assessment: Mound Plant, Miami-Erie Canal Operable Unit 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1969, an underground waste line at Mound Plant ruptured and released plutonium-238 in a dilute nitric acid solution to the surrounding soils. Most of the acid was neutralized by the native soils. The plutonium, which in a neutral solution is tightly sorbed onto clay particles, remained within the spill area. During remediation, a severe storm eroded some of the contaminated soil. Fine grained plutonium-contaminated clay particles were carried away through the natural drainage courses to the remnants of the Miami-Erie Canal adjacent to Mound Plant, and then into the Great Miami River. This focused risk assessment considers exposure pathways relevant to site conditions, including incidental ingestion of contaminated soils, ingestion of drinking water and fish, and inhalation of resuspended soils and sediments. For each potential exposure pathway, a simplified conceptual model and exposure scenarios have been used to develop conservative estimates of potential radiation dose equivalents and health risks. The conservatism of the dose and risk estimates provides a substantive margin of safety in assuring that the public health is protected

  19. Focused risk assessment: Mound Plant, Miami-Erie Canal Operable Unit 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, D.R.; Dunning, D.F.

    1994-09-29

    In 1969, an underground waste line at Mound Plant ruptured and released plutonium-238 in a dilute nitric acid solution to the surrounding soils. Most of the acid was neutralized by the native soils. The plutonium, which in a neutral solution is tightly sorbed onto clay particles, remained within the spill area. During remediation, a severe storm eroded some of the contaminated soil. Fine grained plutonium-contaminated clay particles were carried away through the natural drainage courses to the remnants of the Miami-Erie Canal adjacent to Mound Plant, and then into the Great Miami River. This focused risk assessment considers exposure pathways relevant to site conditions, including incidental ingestion of contaminated soils, ingestion of drinking water and fish, and inhalation of resuspended soils and sediments. For each potential exposure pathway, a simplified conceptual model and exposure scenarios have been used to develop conservative estimates of potential radiation dose equivalents and health risks. The conservatism of the dose and risk estimates provides a substantive margin of safety in assuring that the public health is protected.

  20. Macrofaunal community inside and outside of the Darwin Mounds Special Area of Conservation, NE Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpetti, N.; Gontikaki, E.; Narayanaswamy, B. E.; Witte, U.

    2013-06-01

    Spatial distribution and patchiness of deep sea macrofaunal communities were studied from samples collected in the Rockall Trough, NE Atlantic. In June 2011, two areas, located outside and within the Darwin Mound Special Area of Conservation (SAC), were sampled. Three megacores were deployed in each area at approximately 900 m depth. The two areas, ~ 18 km apart, did not differ in terms of sediment organic matter and percentage of mud content, but small significant differences were found in sediment median grain size and depth. Macrofaunal communities were found to differ significantly, with the difference mostly driven by changes in the abundance of polychaetes, crustaceans and nematodes whilst no significant differences were seen for the other phyla. Whereas overall macrofaunal abundance was higher outside the SAC compared to within, this pattern varies considerably between phyla. Diversity indices showed no significant differences between protected and unprotected sites. Deep-water trawling regularly take place outside the Darwin Mounds SAC whilst the area inside the SAC has been closed to bottom trawling since 2004, and the above distribution patterns are discussed in the context of both environmental and anthropogenic causes.

  1. Linking benthic dynamics and cold-water coral occurrences: A high-resolution model study at three carbonate mound provinces in the NE Atlantic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohn, Christian; Rengstorf, Anna; Grehan, Anthony;

    We used the 3-D ocean circulation model with grid refinement ROMS-AGRIF to describe the hydrodynamic conditions at three cold-water coral provinces in the NE Atlantic (Logachev Mounds, Arc Mounds and Belgica Mounds). Modelled fields of currents, temperature and salinity were analysed for observed...... occurrences and presence/absence of living coral frameworks, living coral colonies within each province. The central model grid has a horizontal resolution of approximately 250 m, except for the Arc Mound region, where the resolution was increased to 150 m to account for the fine-scale mound structure....... The model bathymetry was taken from highresolution INSS (Irish National Seabed Survey) seafloor mapping data. The model output of 6 hourly benthic currentsm, temperature and salinity was validated against in-situ measurements and compared with main coral assemblage patterns from in-situ Coral...

  2. A biodetrital coral mound complex: Key to early diagenetic processes in the mississippian bangor limestone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywick, D.W.; Kopaska-Merkel, D. C.; Bersch, M.G.

    2009-01-01

    The Bangor Limestone is a Mississippian (Chesterian) shallow marine carbonate formation exposed over a large portion of the Interior Low Plateaus province of northern Alabama. It is dominated by oolitic grainstone and skeletal wackestone and packstone, but in one outcrop near Moulton, Alabama, the Bangor contains a five m thick, 25 m wide, oolitebiodetrital moundtidal flat succession. This sequence is interpreted as a 4th order sea level cycle. Four petrofacies (oolite, mound, skeletal and mudstone/dolomicrite) and four diagenetic phases (iron oxide, fibrous calcite cement, calcite spar cement and dolomite) are distinguished at the study site. Iron oxide, a minor component, stained and/or coated some ooids, intraclasts and skeletal components in the oolite petrofacies. Many of the allochems were stained prior to secondary cortical growth suggesting a short period of subaerial exposure during oolite sedimentation. The oolite petrofacies also contains minor amounts of fibrous calcite cement, a first generation marine cement, and rare infiltrated micrite that might represent a second phase of marine cement, or a first phase of meteoric cement (i.e., "vadose silt") (Dunham 1969). Intergranular pore space in all four petrofacies is filled with up to three phases of meteoric calcite spar cement. The most complete record of meteoric cementation is preserved within coralline void spaces in the mound petrofacies and indicates precipitation in the following order: (1) non-ferroan scalenohedral spar, (2) ferroan drusy spar (0.1-0.4 wt% Fe2+) and (3) non-ferroan drusy spar. The first scalenohedral phase of meteoric cement is distributed throughout the oolite and mound petrofacies. The ferroan phase of meteoric calcite is a void-filling cement that is abundant in the mound petrofacies and less common in the skeletal and mudstone/dolomicrite petrofacies. Non-ferroan drusy calcite is pervasive throughout the Bangor Limestone at the Moulton study site. Growth of the fourth

  3. Environmental controls on cold-water coral mound distribution, morphology, and development in the straits of Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes Correa, Thiago Barreto

    Scleractinian cold-water corals are widely distributed in seaways and basins of the North Atlantic Ocean, including the Straits of Florida. These corals can form extensive biogenic mounds, which are biodiversity hotspots in the deep ocean. The processes that lead to the genesis of such cold-water coral mounds and control their distribution and morphology are poorly understood. This work uses an innovative mapping approach that combines 130 km 2 of high resolution geophysical and oceanographic data collected using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) from five cold-water coral habitats in the Straits of Florida. These AUV data, together with ground-truthing observations from eleven submersible dives, are used to investigate fine-scale mound parameters and their relationships with environmental factors. Based on these datasets, automated methods are developed for extracting and analyzing mound morphometrics and coral cover. These analyses reveal that mound density is 14 mound/km 2 for the three surveyed sites on the toe-of-slope of Great Bahama Bank (GBB); this density is higher than previously documented (0.3 mound/km 2) in nearby mound fields. Morphometric analyses further indicate that mounds vary significantly in size, from a meter to up to 110 m in relief, and 81 to 600,000 m2 in footprint area. In addition to individual mounds, cold-water corals also develop in some areas as elongated low-relief ridges that are up to 25 m high and 2000 m long. These ridges cover approximately 60 and 70% of the mapped seafloor from the sites at the center of the Straits and at the base of the Miami Terrace, respectively. Morphometrics and current data analyses across the five surveyed fields indicate that mounds and ridges are not in alignment with the dominant current directions. These findings contradict previous studies that described streamlined mounds parallel to the northward Florida Current. In contrast, this study shows that the sites dominated by coral ridges are

  4. The role of diagenisis in the hydrogeological stratification of carbonate aquifers: an example from the chalk at Fair Cross, Berkshire, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, J.

    Carbonate rocks form important aquifers in many parts of the world and in north-west Europe the Chalk is a primary source of potable water. When flushed with relatively fresh groundwaters, the Chalk may undergo significant diagenetic alteration at relatively shallow depths resulting in a physically and hydrogeochemically stratified aquifer. Diagenetic affects may have important implications for the effective exploitable thickness of the Chalk aquifer and for water quality. In order to assess the affects of diagenesis on the properties of carbonate aquifers, matrix porosity, permeability, pore water and rock chemistry profiles have been analysed for a 300 m deep borehole through the Chalk at the western end of the London Basin. An abrupt change in the matrix porosity profile at 155 mbgl indicates a change in dominant mode of historic diagenesis from mechanical compaction above 155 mbgl to predominantly pressure solution compaction below 155 mbgl. Pore water and rock chemistry profiles also change abruptly across this depth interval, suggesting that the present day hydrogeology is controlled by historic diagenetic trends. Below 155 mbgl, pore waters are relatively saline and there is no evidence for groundwater flow; above 155 mbgl pore waters are relatively fresh and geochemical evidence for incon-gruent carbonate dissolution indicates contemporary groundwater circulation. Possible physical and chemical evolution paths for the Chalk at Fair Cross are discussed. The results provide a hydrogeological context for other studies of the long-term response of carbonate aquifers to base-line changes in sea-level and pore water chemistry and also enable studies with relatively short time-frames or of localized phenomena to be placed in the broader context of the evolution of carbonate aquifers.

  5. The role of diagenisis in the hydrogeological stratification of carbonate aquifers: an example from the chalk at Fair Cross, Berkshire, UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bloomfield

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbonate rocks form important aquifers in many parts of the world and in north-west Europe the Chalk is a primary source of potable water. When flushed with relatively fresh groundwaters, the Chalk may undergo significant diagenetic alteration at relatively shallow depths resulting in a physically and hydrogeochemically stratified aquifer. Diagenetic affects may have important implications for the effective exploitable thickness of the Chalk aquifer and for water quality. In order to assess the affects of diagenesis on the properties of carbonate aquifers, matrix porosity, permeability, pore water and rock chemistry profiles have been analysed for a 300 m deep borehole through the Chalk at the western end of the London Basin. An abrupt change in the matrix porosity profile at 155 mbgl indicates a change in dominant mode of historic diagenesis from mechanical compaction above 155 mbgl to predominantly pressure solution compaction below 155 mbgl. Pore water and rock chemistry profiles also change abruptly across this depth interval, suggesting that the present day hydrogeology is controlled by historic diagenetic trends. Below 155 mbgl, pore waters are relatively saline and there is no evidence for groundwater flow; above 155 mbgl pore waters are relatively fresh and geochemical evidence for incon-gruent carbonate dissolution indicates contemporary groundwater circulation. Possible physical and chemical evolution paths for the Chalk at Fair Cross are discussed. The results provide a hydrogeological context for other studies of the long-term response of carbonate aquifers to base-line changes in sea-level and pore water chemistry and also enable studies with relatively short time-frames or of localized phenomena to be placed in the broader context of the evolution of carbonate aquifers.

  6. High frequency seismic monitoring of debris flows at Chalk Cliffs (CO), USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coviello, Velio; Kean, Jason; Smith, Joel; Coe, Jeffrey; Arattano, Massimo; McCoy, Scott

    2015-04-01

    A growing number of studies adopt passive seismic monitoring techniques to investigate slope instabilities and landslide processes. These techniques are attractive and convenient because large areas can be monitored from a safe distance. This is particularly true when the phenomena under investigation are rapid and infrequent mass movements like debris flows. Different types of devices are used to monitor debris flow processes, but among them ground vibration detectors (GVDs) present several, specific advantages that encourage their use. These advantages include: (i) the possibility to be installed outside the channel bed, (ii) the high adaptability to different and harsh field conditions, and (iii) the capability to detect the debris flow front arrival tens of seconds earlier than contact and stage sensors. Ground vibration data can provide relevant information on the dynamics of debris flows such as timing and velocity of the main surges. However, the processing of the raw seismic signal is usually needed, both to obtain a more effective representation of waveforms and to decrease the amount of data that need to be recorded and analyzed. With this objective, the methods of Amplitude and Impulses are commonly adopted to transform the raw signal to a 1-Hz signal that allows for a more useful representation of the phenomenon. In that way, peaks and other features become more visible and comparable with data obtained from other monitoring devices. In this work, we present the first debris flows seismic recordings gathered in the Chalk Cliffs instrumented basin, central Colorado, USA. In May 2014, two 4.5-Hz, three-axial geophones were installed in the upper part of the catchment. Seismic data are sampled at 333 Hz and then recorded by a standalone recording unit. One geophone is directly installed on bedrock, the other one mounted on a 1-m boulder partially buried in colluvium. This latter sensor integrates a heavily instrumented cross-section consisting of a 225 cm2

  7. Analysis and applications of microorganisms from a chalk oil reservoir in the North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaster, Krista Michelle

    2009-03-15

    Ekofisk a chalk oil reservoir in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea was found to harbour an active and diverse microbial community. Microbial actives may be deleterious in nature as in reservoir souring or maybe advantageous as in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The aim of this study was to characterise the microbial communities in the Ekofisk oil reservoir and to gain insight into the microbial mechanisms important for the a) control of reservoir souring, and b) which can be utilized in enhanced oil recovery. Produced water samples from the Ekofisk oil reservoir were analysed using both culture-dependent and -independent techniques. The Ekofisk microbial community was found to be dominated by thermophilic microorganisms many of which were capable of either sulphidogenic or methanogenic physiologies. They were similar to organisms that have been previously identified from oil reservoir fluids. The dominant organisms identified directly from the produced water samples had sequences similar to members of the genera Thermotoga, Caminicella, Thermoanaerobacter, Archaeoglobus, Thermococcus, and Methanobulbus. Enrichment cultures obtained from the produced water samples were dominated by sheathed rods. Sequence analyses of the cultures indicated predominance of the genera Petrotoga, Arcobacter, Archaeoglobus and Thermococcus. Reservoir souring caused by sulphide production due the activity of sulphate reducing prokaryotes (SRP) may be reduced by the injection of nitrate or nitrite. Nitrate or nitrite mitigates sulphide production either by the stimulation of nitrate reducing bacteria (NRB) through nitrate addition or via metabolic inhibition of the reduction of sulphite to sulphide by nitrite. Here we found that nitrate addition was ineffective at controlling souring whereas nitrite proved very effective at inhibiting sulphate reduction even at very low concentrations (0.25 mM - 1 mM) in both batch culture and bioreactor studies. To investigate microbial utilization

  8. Hydrodynamic conditions in a cold-water coral mound area on the Renard Ridge, southern Gulf of Cadiz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mienis, F.; De Stigter, H.C.; de Haas, H.; van der Land, C.; van Weering, T.C.E.

    2012-01-01

    Near-bed hydrodynamic conditions obtained by bottom landers on the Renard Ridge are presented complemented with a data set from repeated CTD casts. On the Renard Ridge cold-water coral mounds were discovered in the last 10 years. Unlike cold-water coral habitats known from the Norwegian and Irish ma

  9. Marketing research for EE G Mound Applied Technologies' heat treatment process of high strength materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shackson, R.H.

    1991-10-09

    This report summarizes research conducted by ITI to evaluate the commercialization potential of EG G Mound Applied Technologies' heat treatment process of high strength materials. The remainder of the report describes the nature of demand for maraging steel, extent of demand, competitors, environmental trends, technology life cycle, industry structure, and conclusion. (JL)

  10. Interactive effects of soil-dwelling ants, ant mounds and simulated grazing on local plant community composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, G.F.; Olff, H.

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between aboveground vertebrate herbivores and subterranean yellow meadow ants (Lasius flavus) can drive plant community patterns in grassland ecosystems. Here, we study the relative importance of the presence of ants (L. flavus) and ant mounds under different simulated grazing regimes f

  11. Computer aided optimum design of rubble-mound breakwater cross-sections: manual of the RUMBA computer package, release 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Haan, W.

    1989-01-01

    The computation of the optimum rubble-mound breakwater crosssection is executed on a micro-computer. The RUMBA computer package consists of two main parts: the optimization process is executed by a Turbo Pascal programme, the second part consists of editing functions written in AutoLISP. AutoLISP is

  12. Effects of vertical wall and tetrapod weights on wave overtopping in rubble mound breakwaters under irregular wave conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Sang Kil

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rubble mound breakwaters protect the coastal line against severe erosion caused by wave action. This study examined the performance of different sizes and properties (i.e. height of vertical wall and tetrapod size of rubble mound breakwaters on reducing the overtopping discharge. The physical model used in this study was derived based on an actual rubble mound in Busan Yacht Harbor. This research attempts to fill the gap in practical knowledge on the combined effect of the armor roughness and vertical wall on wave overtopping in rubble mound breakwaters. The main governing parameters used in this study were the vertical wall height, variation of the tetrapod weights, initial water level elevation, and the volume of overtopping under constant wave properties. The experimental results showed that the roughness factor differed according to the tetrapod size. Furthermore, the overtopping discharge with no vertical wall was similar to that with relatively short vertical walls ( 1 γv = 1. Therefore, the experimental results highlight the importance of the height of the vertical wall in reducing overtopping discharge. Moreover, a large tetrapod size may allow coastal engineers to choose a shorter vertical wall to save cost, while obtaining better performance.

  13. Geoarchaeology and aggradation around Kinet Höyük, an archaeological mound in the Eastern Mediterranean, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Timothy P.; Luzzadder-Beach, Sheryl

    2008-10-01

    We examined the alluvial history of the plain near Kinet Höyük, an archaeological mound (or Tell) with a sequence of six millennia of occupation on the southeast Mediterranean coast of Turkey, through 17 excavations over a 1000 m transect near the Mound. Excavations ranged from 2 to 6 m deep and up to 20 m across. This low gradient, alluvial plain shows significantly different rates and processes of near-Mound sedimentation, with one unit having nearly 4 m of Late Bronze Age habitation and flood deposits and another having 4 m of Hellenistic channel and floodplain deposition. This flat, alluvial surface turns out to be a rich geoarchaeological landscape that shrouds Early and Late Bronze Age settlements, Hellenistic walls, and two epochs of Roman Roads. One widespread phenomenon was a Hellenistic or earlier paleosol and occupation level covered by channel gravels and overbank deposits mostly from the Hellenistic to the Late Roman period. These channel and floodplain deposits filled in and flattened out the off-Mound settlements, blanketing the Pre-Hellenistic topography and silting in a long active port. This glut of alluvium correlates in time with drier conditions and the most intensive land uses in the watershed, where Roman and Hellenistic sites today are severely eroded.

  14. An electric and electromagnetic geophysical approach for subsurface investigation of anthropogenic mounds in an urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazzi, Veronica; Tapete, Deodato; Cappuccini, Luca; Fanti, Riccardo

    2016-11-01

    Scientific interest in mounds as geomorphological features that currently represent topographic anomalies in flat urban landscapes mainly lies on the understanding of their origin, either purely natural or anthropogenic. In this second circumstance, another question is whether traces of lost buildings are preserved within the mound subsurface and can be mapped as remnants testifying past settlement. When these landforms have been modified in centuries for civilian use, structural stability is a further element of concern. To address these issues we applied a geophysical approach based on a very low frequency electromagnetic (VLF-EM) technique and two-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography (2D-ERT) and integrated it with well-established surface survey methods within a diagnostic workflow of structural assessment. We demonstrate the practical benefits of this method in the English Cemetery of Florence, Italy, whose mixed nature and history of morphological changes are suggested by archival records. The combination of the two selected geophysical techniques allowed us to overcome the physical obstacles caused by tomb density and to prevent interference from the urban vehicular traffic on the geophysical signals. Eighty-two VLF-EM profiles and five 2D-ERTs were collected to maximise the spatial coverage of the subsurface prospection, while surface indicators of instability (e.g., tomb tilt, location, and direction of ground fractures and wall cracks) were mapped by standard metric survey. High resistive anomalies (> 300 and 400 Ωm) observed in VLF-EM tomographies are attributed to remnants of the ancient perimeter wall that are still buried along the southern side of the mound. While no apparent correlation is found between the causes of tomb and ground movements, the crack pattern map supplements the overall structural assessment. The main outcome is that the northern portion of the retaining wall is classed with the highest hazard rate. The impact of this

  15. Estimating Heat Transfer from Grotto Mound, NEPTUNE Canada Cabled Observatory, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rona, P. A.; Bemis, K. G.; Xu, G.

    2012-12-01

    Heat flux is a fundamental property of a seafloor hydrothermal system that relates to magnitude of sub-seafloor heat source and biosphere conditions, to distribution and style of seafloor venting and benthic biota, to chemical flux, plume formation, and dispersal of biological matter in the water column. We are working to estimate heat flux from Grotto mound, the site of the NEPTUNE Canada Cabled Observatory in the Main Endeavour Field on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The mound is formed of two sulfide edifices that lie between ~2190 and 2180 m isobaths: 1) an elliptical edifice with major NE-SW-trending axis ~30 m long and minor axis ~ 14 m wide (area ~ 330 m2); 2) a columnar edifice ~ 10 m in diameter and 10 m high (area ~80 m2) named the North Tower, situated across a narrow (~5 m wide) saddle (area ~40 m2) at the W end of the elliptical edifice. Several black smokers discharge relatively small plumes at the E end of the elliptical edifice. A cluster of vigorous black smokers discharge from the top of North Tower and merge to form a large plume. Patchy diffuse flow occurs in areas around all of the black smokers and in the saddle between the two edifices. We are in process of measuring heat flux from components of hydrothermal discharge on Grotto mound, as follows: 1) for smokers on the North Tower an integrated heat flux of 28-55 MW is calculated based on temperature measurements in the initial 20 m rise of the plume assuming that the highest temperatures measured are closest to those of the plume centerline ; 2) for smokers on the E end of the elliptical edifice based on measurements of flow rate from video and acoustic Doppler phase shift, video of vent diameters, and in situ temperature measurements; 3) for discharge from flanges on some chimneys based on video of flow and in situ temperature measurements; 4) for diffuse flow based on area measured by Acoustic Scintillation Thermography and direct measurements of temperature and flow rate. We are evaluating

  16. Investigation of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Using Dimensionless Groups in Wettability Modified Chalk and Sandstone Rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Alipour Tabrizy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses enhanced oil recovery in chalk and sandstone rocks by CO2 injection, with different wettability, porosity, and permeability as well as injection rate and flooding conditions. Results indicate that an increase in Bond number has a positive effect on oil recovery whereas for capillary number, there is a limit in which recovery is improving. This limit is estimated when the pressure drop by viscous force is approximately equal to the threshold balance between capillary and gravity forces. A dimensionless group is proposed that combines the effect of capillarity, injection rate, permeability, and CO2 diffusion on the oil recovery. Recovery from all experiments in this study and reported data in the literature shows a satisfactory relationship with the proposed group.

  17. Drivers of abundance and community composition of benthic macroinvertebrates in Ottawa River sediment near Chalk River Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, M.J.; Rowan, D.; Silke, R.; Carr, J., E-mail: bondm@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-12-15

    The Ottawa River has received effluent from Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) for more than 60 years. Some radionuclides and contaminants released in effluents are bound rapidly to particles and deposited in bottom sediments where they may be biologically available to benthic invertebrates and other aquatic biota. As part of a larger ecological assessment, we assess the potential impact of contaminated sediments in the vicinity of CRL on local benthic community structure. Using bivariate and multivariate approaches, we demonstrate that CRL operations have had little impact on the local benthic community. Despite elevated anthropogenic radionuclide activity concentrations in sediment near CRL's process outfall, the benthic community is no less abundant or diverse than what is observed upstream at background levels. The Ottawa River benthic invertebrate community is structured predominantly by natural physical and biological conditions in the sediment, specifically sediment water content and organic content. These natural habitat conditions have a stronger influence on macroinvertebrate communities than sediment contamination. (author)

  18. Tilting oil-water contact in the chalk of Tyra Field as interpreted from capillary pressure data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Rana, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    The Tyra Field in the central North Sea is located in Palaeogene and Upper Cretaceous chalk. It contains a natural gas zone underlain by an oil leg. Based on analysis of logs and core data from ten wells drilled prior to the field being put into production, normalized water saturation depth......-trends from logs were compared with normalized water saturation depth-trends predicted from capillary pressure core data. The ten wells lie close to a SW–NE cross section of the field. For the gas–oil contact, a free contact measured in one well corresponds to a practically horizontal contact interpreted from...... logging data in the remaining wells. A westerly dipping oil–water contact was found from logging data. Comparison of the depth-wise trends in normalized water saturation among the different wells indicates a regional pattern: in the western side of the field, the trends correspond to a situation...

  19. Radon hazard and risk in Sussex, England and the factors affecting radon levels in dwellings in chalk terrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey was undertaken of radon levels in 1013 dwellings in Sussex, UK. A number of dwellings were identified with high radon levels in an area previously considered to offer low radon risk from geological sources. Multiple regression was used to determine the relative influence of the various geographical and building-related factors on indoor radon levels. The radon hazard, independent of building-related effects, was determined for each surveyed location by standardising radon measurements to a 'model' dwelling. These were entered into a geographic information system and related to surface geology. The highest radon levels were found to be associated with the youngest Chalk formations, Tertiary deposits and Clay-with-flints Quaternary deposits in the area. Radon potentials were also determined for the area which can be used to estimate radon risk and assist in environmental planning and development control. (authors)

  20. Influence of coal mine tips on the chalk aquifer. Sampling methods for three dimensional sulphate infiltration study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coal basin of the Nord-Pas-de-Calais region (France) shows a very strong deterioration of the Chalk aquifer quality. In order to better model the hydro-dynamism and to improve knowledge on the chemical interactions, sampling according to depth of the groundwater is undertaken. The low-flow sampling and the profiles of the in-situ physicochemical parameters allow the observation of various vertical heterogeneities of the aquifer. The areas where the coal mine tips are localised appear very interesting to study. The sulphates released by the pyrite oxidation allow a 'artificial tracing' and give a visualization of the flow as well as information on the implied chemical processes between the oxidizing and reducing zones. (authors)

  1. Influence of coal mine tips on the chalk aquifer. Sampling methods for three dimensional sulphate infiltration study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrez, F.; Mania, J. [Polytech' Lille, Dept. Genie Civil, UMR CNRS 8107 (LML), 59 - Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Mansy, J.L. [Lille-1 Univ., Lab. de Sedimentologie et de Geodynamique, UMR CNRS 8110 (PBDS), 59 - Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Piwakowski, B. [Ecole Centrale de Lille, Groupe Electronique Acoustique IEMN-DOAE, UMR CNRS 8520, 59 - Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    2005-07-01

    The coal basin of the Nord-Pas-de-Calais region (France) shows a very strong deterioration of the Chalk aquifer quality. In order to better model the hydro-dynamism and to improve knowledge on the chemical interactions, sampling according to depth of the groundwater is undertaken. The low-flow sampling and the profiles of the in-situ physicochemical parameters allow the observation of various vertical heterogeneities of the aquifer. The areas where the coal mine tips are localised appear very interesting to study. The sulphates released by the pyrite oxidation allow a 'artificial tracing' and give a visualization of the flow as well as information on the implied chemical processes between the oxidizing and reducing zones. (authors)

  2. Formation of carbonate concretions in surface sediments of two mud mounds, offshore Costa Rica: a stable isotope study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromatis, Vasileios; Botz, Reiner; Schmidt, Mark; Liebetrau, Volker; Hensen, Christian

    2014-10-01

    The surface sediments of two mud mounds ("Mound 11" and "Mound 12") offshore southwest Costa Rica contain abundant authigenic carbonate concretions dominated by high-Mg calcite (14-20 mol-% MgCO3). Pore fluid geochemical profiles (sulfate, sulfide, methane, alkalinity, Ca and Mg) indicate recent carbonate precipitation within the zone of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) at variable depths. The current location of the authigenic carbonate concretions is, however, not related to the present location of the AOM zone, suggesting mineral precipitation under past geochemical conditions as well as changes in the flow rates of upward migrating fluids. Stable oxygen and carbon isotope analysis of authigenic carbonate concretions yielded δ18Ocarbonate values ranging between 34.0 and 37.7 ‰ Vienna standard mean ocean water (VSMOW) and δ13Ccarbonate values from -52.2 to -14.2 ‰ Vienna Pee Dee belemnite (VPDB). Assuming that no temperature changes occurred during mineral formation, the authigenic carbonate concretions have been formed at in situ temperature of 4-5 °C. The δ18Ocarbonate values suggest mineral formation from seawater-derived pore fluid (δ18Oporefluid = 0 ‰ VSMOW) for Mound 12 carbonate concretions but also the presence of an emanating diagenetic fluid (δ18Oporefluid ≈5 ‰) in Mound 11. A positive correlation between δ13Ccarbonate and δ18Ocarbonate is observed, indicating the admixing of two different sources of dissolved carbon and oxygen in the sediments of the two mounds. The carbon of these sources are (1) marine bicarbonate (δ13Cporefluid ≈0 ‰) and (2) bicarbonate which formed during the AOM (δ13Cporefluid ≈-70 ‰). Furthermore, the δ18Oporefluid composition, with values up to +4.7 ‰ Vienna standard mean ocean water (VSMOW), is interpreted to be affected by the presence of emanating, freshened and boron-enriched fluids. Earlier, it has been shown that the origin of 18O-enriched fluids are deep diagenetic processes as it was

  3. Deep sourced mounds offshore Costa Rica: A mechanism for non-magmatic forearc recycling of oceanic crust ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerz, T.; Brueckmann, W.; Kopf, A.; Kreiter, S.; Wallmann, K.; Suess, E.

    2003-04-01

    More than 30 small-scale mounds, resembling diapirs and/or mud volcanoes, were discovered and mapped by high resolution swath bathymetry off Costa Rica during the RV SONNE expeditions 144 and 163 expedition. Commonly, these mounds are nearly circular in shape, several 10s of meters high with an average diameter of several 100 meters and occur in water depths between 900 and 2000 m. Subsequently four such mounds off the Nicoya Peninsula (~1600 m ), and off Quepos (~1000 m) were sampled in detail by gravity-, piston-, and multi coring and video-guided grab sampling during Legs RV METEOR 54/2 and 54/3A.Overcompacted and tectonically deformed clays, fluid and mud channels (locally calcified), open hydrofractures, mineralized veins, various allochtonous fragments including mafic crystalline pebbles and hydrate layers where recovered at central mound locations. In contrast flank samples of these mounds are characterized by brecciated reworked authigenic carbonates, chaotic mud and debris flows, turbidite sequences and accumulations of clasts. In our ongoing work we use these characteristics and determine the sediment fabric using x-ray CT (computer tomography) in order to understand the role of fluids and solid phases in mound formation in the context of the erosional convergent margin development off Costa Rica. Critical with respect to the margin development and mound formation are reliable criteria for the source depth of the extruded material. So far the stress memory of clays derived from undrained shear strength gives a minimum source depth of >100 mbsf when compared to reference material from flanks and other slope sites. However, the recovered mafic crystalline clasts point to a much greater depth of at least 1500 mbsf for the source of solid phases and possibly fluids originating within the thin dewatered sediment wedge below the Costa Rica crystalline basement at ~7500 mbsf. Alternate source depth estimates from organic matter maturity indicators will

  4. Topographic features of gas hydrate mounds of shallow gas hydrate areas in Joetsu Basin , eastern margin of Japan Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiromatsu, M.; Machiyama, H.; Matsumoto, R.

    2010-12-01

    Mega pockmarks and mounds, both of which are 300m to 500m in diamater and 30m to 40 m deep or high, characterize the Umitaka Spur and Joetsu Knoll of the Joetsu Basin. A number of pockmarks and mounds develop in NNE to SSW direction parallel to the general trend of mobile belt along the eastern margin of Japan Sea, suggesting that the topography has been strongly controlled by regional tectonics. Seismic profiles have revealed well-developed chaotic to transparent zones (gas chimneys) in the area of pockmarks and mounds, from which a number of active methane plumes stand up to 700m above sea floor. Ultra-high resolution bathymetric data and reflection images were acquired by Multi Beam Echo Sounder (MBES) and Side Scan Sonar (SSS) of the AUV "URASHIMA” during the YK10-08 cruise of R/V Yokosuka (JAMSTEC), July 2010. Based on mosaic images of MBES and SSS, we could identify several types of the hydrate mounds over gas chimney zones. Some are represented as a smooth and low bulge without strong reflections of background level, but the others show rough and uneven topography, featured by a few meter scale depressions, crevasses and minor ridges with strong reflector images, indicating the development of hard ground. Such strong reflectors are due to carbonate crusts and concretions and gas hydrate exposures as observed by ROV . Micro-topographic features are likely to represent a growth stage of hydrate mounds, and perhaps the accumulation of shallow gas hydrates. MBES and SSS onboard AUV are powerful tools to identify gas hydrate accumulation and evolution of shallow gas hydrate system.

  5. Characterization of magnetic material in the mound-building termite Macrotermes gilvus in Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esa, Mohammad Faris Mohammad; Rahim, Faszly; Hassan, Ibrahim Haji; Hanifah, Sharina Abu

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic material such as magnetite are known as particles that respond to external magnetic field with their ferromagnetic properties as they are believed contribute to in responding to the geomagnetic field. These particles are used by terrestrial animals such as termites for navigation and orientation. Since our earth react as giant magnetic bar, the magnitude of this magnetic field present by intensity and direction (inclination and direction). The magnetic properties and presence of magnetite in termites Macrotermes gilvus, common mound-building termite were tested. M. gilvus termites was tested with a Vibrating Sample Magnetometer VSM to determine the magnetic properties of specimen. The crushed body sample was characterized with X-Ray Diffraction XRD to show the existent of magnetic material (magnetite) in the specimens. Results from VSM indicate that M. gilvus has diamagnetism properties. The characterization by XRD shows the existent of magnetic material in our specimen in low concentration.

  6. Dig-face monitoring during excavation of a radioactive plume at Mound Laboratory, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dig-face monitoring system consists of onsite hardware for collecting information on changing chemical, radiological, and physical conditions in the subsurface soil during the hazardous site excavation. A prototype dig-face system was take to Mount Laboratory for a first trial. Mound Area 7 was the site of historical disposals of 232Th, 227Ac, and assorted debris. The system was used to monitor a deep excavation aimed at removing 227Ac-contaminated soils. Radiological, geophysical, and topographic sensors were used to scan across the excavation dig-face at four successive depths as soil was removed. A 3-D image of the contamination plumes was developed; the radiation sensor data indicated that only a small portion of the excavated soil volume was contaminated. The spatial information produced by the dig-face system was used to direct the excavation activities into the area containing the 227Ac and to evaluate options for handling the separate 232Th plume

  7. Characterization of magnetic material in the mound-building termite Macrotermes gilvus in Southeast Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esa, Mohammad Faris Mohammad; Hassan, Ibrahim Haji [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Rahim, Faszly; Hanifah, Sharina Abu [School of Environmental Scieces and Natural Resources Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    Magnetic material such as magnetite are known as particles that respond to external magnetic field with their ferromagnetic properties as they are believed contribute to in responding to the geomagnetic field. These particles are used by terrestrial animals such as termites for navigation and orientation. Since our earth react as giant magnetic bar, the magnitude of this magnetic field present by intensity and direction (inclination and direction). The magnetic properties and presence of magnetite in termites Macrotermes gilvus, common mound-building termite were tested. M. gilvus termites was tested with a Vibrating Sample Magnetometer VSM to determine the magnetic properties of specimen. The crushed body sample was characterized with X-Ray Diffraction XRD to show the existent of magnetic material (magnetite) in the specimens. Results from VSM indicate that M. gilvus has diamagnetism properties. The characterization by XRD shows the existent of magnetic material in our specimen in low concentration.

  8. Flow and Turbulence at Rubble-Mound Breakwater Armor Layers under Solitary Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjarne; Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Sumer, B. Mutlu;

    2015-01-01

    to the breakwater, and (3) a porous breakwater where the porous core was added below the breakwater front. One breakwater slope of 1:1.5 was applied. In this paper the focus is on the details of a single sequence of wave approach, run-up, and rundown. To isolate this sequence the experiments were performed applying......This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation of the flow and turbulence at the armor layer of rubble-mound breakwaters during wave action. The study focused on the details of the flow and turbulence in the armor layer and on the effect of the porous core on flow and stability...... a solitary wave. The individual sources of turbulence generation were distinguished using Laser Doppler anemometry measurements, and the effect of the armor layer and porous core was described in terms of a reduced impact of the rundown process, production of lee wake turbulence, and less transport...

  9. Comparison of New Large and Small Scale Overtopping Tests for Rubble Mound Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Burcharth, Hans F.; Gironella, X.

    2011-01-01

    Many breakwaters are, due to functional requirements, designed for small wave overtopping discharges. From the EC-research projects OPTICREST and CLASH it is known that overtopping discharges determined from conventional Froude scale models of rubble mound breakwaters are smaller than measured...... in corresponding prototypes. The present study examines this scale effect by comparing overtopping discharges in small scale and large scale tests. The length scale ratio between the models was 5.7. The reason for using a large scale model instead of a prototype is the difficulties in accurate reproduction...... hardware and software. This demonstrates that, even under controlled conditions, it is very difficult to reproduce similar conditions. From the present test results it is concluded, despite the model effect, that a significant scale effect on small overtopping discharges exists also when wind effects...

  10. An overview of plutonium-238 decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) projects at Mound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, W.H.; Davis, W.P.; Draper, D.G.; Geichman, J.R.; Harris, J.C.; Jaeger, R.R.; Sohn, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Mound is currently decontaminating for restricted reuse and/or decommissioning for conditional release four major plutonium-238 contaminated facilities that contained 1700 linear feet of gloveboxes and associated equipment and services. Several thousand linear feet of external underground piping, associated tanks, and contaminated soil are being removed. Two of the facilities contain ongoing operations and will be reused for both radioactive and nonradioactive programs. Two others will be completely demolished and the land area will become available for future DOE building sites. An overview of the successful techniques and equipment used in the decontamination and decommissioning of individual pieces of equipment, gloveboxes, services, laboratories, sections of buildings, entire buildings, and external underground piping, tanks, and soil in a highly populated residential area is described and pictorially presented.

  11. The hill forts and castle mounds in Lithuania: interaction between geodiversity and human-shaped landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skridlaite, Grazina; Guobyte, Rimante; Satkunas, Jonas

    2015-04-01

    Lithuania is famous for its abundant, picturesque hill forts and castle mounds of natural origin. In Lithuania as well as in whole Europe the fortified hills were used as the society dwelling place since the beginning of the Late Bronze Age. Their importance increased when Livonian and Teutonic Orders directed a series of military campaigns against Lithuania with the aim of expansion of Christianity in the region at the end of 1st millennium AD, and they were intensively used till the beginning of the 15th c. when most of them were burned down during fights with the Orders or just abandoned due to the changing political and economical situation. What types of the geodiversity were used for fortified dwellings? The choice in a particular area depended on a variety of geomorphology left behind the retreating ice sheets. High spots dominating their surroundings were of prime interest. In E and SE Lithuania, the Baltic Upland hills marking the eastern margin of the last Weichselian glacier hosted numerous fortified settlements from the end of 2nd millennium BC to the Medieval Ages (Narkunai, Velikuskes etc). In W Lithuania, plateau-like hills of the insular Samogitian Upland had been repeatedly fortified from the beginning of 1st millennium AD to the 14th century (Satrija, Medvegalis etc). Chains of hill forts and castle mounds feature the slopes of glaciofluvial valleys of Nemunas, Neris and other rivers where the slopes were dissected by affluent rivulets and ravines and transformed into isolated, well protected hills (Kernave, Punia, Veliuona etc). Peninsulas and headlands formed by the erosion of fluvial and lacustrine deposits were used in the lowlands, e.g. in central and N Lithuania (Paberze, Mezotne etc). How much the landscape was modified for defense purposes? Long-term erosion and overgrowing vegetation damaged the former fortified sites, however some remains and the archeological excavations allowed their reconstruction. The fortified Bronze Age settlements

  12. Topological defect launches 3D mound in the active nematic sheet of neural progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Kawaguchi, Kyogo; Sano, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Cultured stem cells have become a standard platform not only for regenerative medicine and developmental biology but also for biophysical studies. Yet, the characterization of cultured stem cells at the level of morphology and macroscopic patterns resulting from cell-to-cell interactions remain largely qualitative, even though they are the simplest features observed in everyday experiments. Here we report that neural progenitor cells (NPCs), which are multipotent stem cells that give rise to cells in the central nervous system, rapidly glide and stochastically reverse its velocity while locally aligning with neighboring cells, thus showing features of an active nematic system. Within the two-dimensional nematic pattern, we find interspaced topological defects with +1/2 and -1/2 charges. Remarkably, we identified rapid cell accumulation leading to three-dimensional mounds at the +1/2 topological defects. Single-cell level imaging around the defects allowed quantification of the evolving cell density, clarifyin...

  13. Monte Carlo simulation model for economic evaluation of rubble mound breakwater protection in Harbors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard M. Males; Jeffrey A. Melby

    2011-01-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers has a mission to conduct a wide array of programs in the arenas of water resources,including coastal protection.Coastal projects must be evaluated according to sound economic principles,and considerations of risk assessment and sea level change must be included in the analysis.Breakwaters are typically nearshore structures designed to reduce wave action in the lee of the structure,resulting in calmer waters within the protected area,with attendant benefits in terms of usability by navigation interests,shoreline protection,reduction of wave runup and onshore flooding,and protection of navigation channels from sedimentation and wave action.A common method of breakwater construction is the rubble mound breakwater,constructed in a trapezoidal cross section with gradually increasing stone sizes from the core out.Rubble mound breakwaters are subject to degradation from storms,particularly for antiquated designs with under-sized stones insufficient to protect against intense wave energy.Storm waves dislodge the stones,resulting in lowering of crest height and associated protective capability for wave reduction.This behavior happens over a long period of time,so a lifecycle model (that can analyze the damage progression over a period of years) is appropriate.Because storms are highly variable,a model that can support risk analysis is also needed.Economic impacts are determined by the nature of the wave climate in the protected area,and by the nature of the protected assets.Monte Carlo simulation (MCS)modeling that incorporates engineering and economic impacts is a worthwhile method for handling the many complexities involved in real world problems.The Corps has developed and utilized a number of MCS models to compare project alternatives in terms of their costs and benefits.This paper describes one such model,Coastal Structure simulation (CSsim) that has been developed specifically for planning level analysis of breakwaters.

  14. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) additional geologic site characterization studies, Bryan Mound Salt Dome, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neal, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Magorian, T.R.; Ahmad, S. [Acres International Corp., Amherst, NY (United States)

    1994-11-01

    This report revises the original report that was published in 1980. Some of the topics covered in the earlier report were provisional and it is now practicable to reexamine them using new or revised geotechnical data and that obtained from SPR cavern operations, which involves 16 new caverns. Revised structure maps and sections show interpretative differences as compared with the 1980 report and more definition in the dome shape and caprock structural contours, especially a major southeast-northwest trending anomalous zone. The original interpretation was of westward tilt of the dome, this revision shows a tilt to the southeast, consistent with other gravity and seismic data. This interpretation refines the evaluation of additional cavern space, by adding more salt buffer and allowing several more caverns. Additional storage space is constrained on this nearly full dome because of low-lying peripheral wetlands, but 60 MMBBL or more of additional volume could be gained in six or more new caverns. Subsidence values at Bryan Mound are among the lowest in the SPR system, averaging about 11 mm/yr (0.4 in/yr), but measurement and interpretation issues persist, as observed values are about the same as survey measurement accuracy. Periodic flooding is a continuing threat because of the coastal proximity and because peripheral portions of the site are at elevations less than 15 ft. This threat may increase slightly as future subsidence lowers the surface, but the amount is apt to be small. Caprock integrity may be affected by structural features, especially the faulting associated with anomalous zones. Injection wells have not been used extensively at Bryan Mound, but could be a practicable solution to future brine disposal needs. Environmental issues center on the areas of low elevation that are below 15 feet above mean sea level: the coastal proximity and lowland environment combined with the potential for flooding create conditions that require continuing surveillance.

  15. Origin of carbonate concretions from mud mounds in the Gulf of Cadiz (SW Iberian Peninsula)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Gulf of Cadiz displays a number of structures that are associated with fluid circulation (mud volcanoes, mud mounds and pockmarks).This area has been used as natural laboratory for the sedimentological, bio- logical and biogeochemical studies of these environments. Analysis of the associated authigenic carbonates has been widely used as a proxy to yield insights into the circulation and chemical composition of these flu- ids. A study of carbonate concretions from the Iberico, Cornide and Arcos mud mounds in the Diasom Field was undertaken to better understand the origin and type of fluids from which these concretions precipitated. The concretions display varying morphologies, some of which correspond to bioturbation traces. X-ray dif- fractions revealed that these carbonate concretions are mainly composed of dolomite, Fe-rich dolomite, high magnesium calcite (HMC) and ankerite. The δ13 C values of carbonate minerals ranged between -48.3 and-10.9 V-PDB, which suggests that the main processes involved in their genesis are organic matter oxidation, bac- terial sulphate-reduction (BSR) and anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM). The origin of the methane is main- ly thermogenic, and only few concretions yielded δ13C values lower than -40 V-PDB, suggesting oxidation of microbial methane. Fluids involved in the carbonate precipitation are interpreted as being related to gas hydrate destabilisation (δ18O fluid-V-SMOW values higher than +2%) and, to a lesser extent, modified seawater enriched in 18O due to rock-water interaction. Nevertheless, the highest δ18O fluid-V-SMOW values suggest that the influence of other deep-seated fluids due to clay-mineral dehydration cannot be ruled out. (Author)

  16. Critiques of the seismic hypothesis and the vegetation stabilization hypothesis for the formation of Mima mounds along the western coast of the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabet, Emmanuel J.; Burnham, Jennifer L. Horwath; Perron, J. Taylor

    2016-09-01

    A recent paper published in Geomorphology by Gabet et al. (2014) presents the results of a numerical model supporting the hypothesis that burrowing mammals build Mima mounds - small, densely packed hillocks found primarily in the western United States. The model is based on field observations and produces realistic-looking mounds with spatial distributions similar to real moundfields. Alternative explanations have been proposed for these Mima mounds, including formation by seismic shaking and vegetation-controlled erosion and deposition. In this short communication, we present observations from moundfields in the coastal states of the western U.S. that are incompatible with these alternative theories.

  17. Integrated electromagnetic methods for archaeological prospection and stability assessment of anthropogenic mounds: insights into the English Cemetery in Florence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappuccini, Luca; Pazzi, Veronica; Tapete, Deodato

    2013-04-01

    The archaeological interest in anthropogenic mounds as historical products of human occupation generally concerns the understanding of their stratigraphic sequence and the discovery of buried structures. Nevertheless, a further key element relies on the assessment of their stability. This is particularly crucial when the conservation history induced relevant alteration of the former configuration, and a potential collapse might cause damages to heritage and actual risk for public safety. To respond to such dual diagnostic need, we propose an integration approach based on Very Low Frequency Electromagnetic (VLF-EM) qualitative method and 2D-Electrical Resistivity Tomography (2D-ERT), to make the best out of these two techniques in light of their frequencies/bandwidth and methods of soil investigation (15-30 kHz and DC, respectively). We present here the results from the experiments performed on one of the test sites selected to validate the proposed methodology, i.e. the Protestant Cemetery (the so-called "English Cemetery") in Florence, Italy, which is a demonstrative example of a huge sample of anthropogenic mounds within urban and rural environments. Located on a topographic relief, the cemetery testifies a long history since Roman times, as proved by historical documentation and the ceramic findings still now discovered on the (sub-)surface. Converted into a cemetery in 1827, the mound appeared as an anomalous outcrop adjacent to the town walls, prior to the final arrangement and reshaping due to the urban renewal of Florence in 1877, which definitely transformed it into a raised graveyard surrounded by boulevards. A campaign of VLF-EM and ERT measurements was performed to ascertain the presence of a buried part of the ancient eastern wall and identify the key areas of concern for the stability. High values of resistivity were clearly detected and mapped by means of 2D-ERT along the AA' array intercepting the hypothesized location of the buried wall. This

  18. The giant cold-water coral mound as a nested microbial/metazoan system: physical, chemical, biological and geological picture (ESF EuroDiversity MiCROSYSTEMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriet, J. P.; Microsystems Team

    2009-04-01

    The MiCROSYSTEMS project under the ESF EUROCORES EuroDiversity scheme is a holistic and multi-scale approach in studying microbial diversity and functionality in a nested microbial/metazoan system, which thrives in deep waters: the giant cold-water coral mound. Studies on prolific cold-water coral sites have been carried out from the canyons of the Bay of Biscay to the fjords of the Norwegian margin, while the Pen Duick carbonate mound province off Morocco developed into a joint natural lab for studying in particular the impact of biogeochemical and microbial processes on modern sedimentary diagenesis within the reef sediments, in complement to the studies on I0DP Exp. 307 cores (Challenger Mound, off Ireland). Major outcomes of this research can be summarized as follows. • IODP Exp. 307 on Challenger Mound had revealed a significant prokaryotic community both within and beneath the carbonate mound. MiCROSYSTEMS unveils a remarkable degree of compartmentalization in such community from the seawater, the coral skeleton surface and mucus to the reef sediments. The occurrence of such multiple and distinct microbial compartments associated with cold-water coral ecosystems promotes opportunities for microbial diversity in the deep ocean. • New cases of co-habitation of cold-water corals and giant deep-water oysters were discovered in the Bay of Biscay, which add a new facet of macrofaunal diversity to cold-water coral reef systems. • The discovery of giant, ancient coral graveyards on the Moroccan mounds not only fuels the debate about natural versus anthropogenic mass extinction, but these open frameworks simultaneously invite for the study of bio-erosion and early diagenesis, in particular organo-mineralization, and of the possible role and significance of these thick, solid rubble patches in 3D mound-building and consolidation. • The assessment of the carbonate budget of a modern cold-water coral mound (Challenger Mound) reveals that only 33 to 40 wt % of

  19. Geologic investigation of layered mound of Henry Crater, Mars: Implications for history of ancient hydrological activities in the region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Samarpita; Sinha, Rishitosh Kumar; Banerjee, Debabrata; Vijayan, S.

    2016-07-01

    Craters around the Schiaparelli Basin (sim460 km diameter; 2.71^circS 16.77^circE) on Mars are distributed in a unique combination that includes infilled craters with mound on their floors. The mounds have preserved intriguing layers in stratigraphy that has exposed pristine sets of geomorphic and geochemical signatures bearing strong implications towards understanding geological history of Mars. With a view to avail the maximum scientific benefit from this unique geological assemblage on Mars, we have carried out remote analysis of stratigraphy of layers exposed over Henry crater's (sim150 km diameter; 10.79^circN 23.45^circE) mound (rising sim2km from floor) to infer the origin and episodes of geological events occurred in the region. Henry crater is situated approximately 500 km northeast of Schiaparelli Basin. Using crater counting technique the age of the topmost surface of the crater mound is found to be sim3.64 Ga since the exposure of this strata post complete infilling. The stratigraphy of consistent and conformable layers in the crater interior acts as a proxy of the long-lived event of sediment deposition in a rather quiescent condition. Distinct layering can be traced across the crater from the mound to the crater wall across the floor. Evidence for differential erosion of deposited materials, wherein local geological setup developed in the different parts of the crater interior is preserved. Using MRO HiRISE & CTX images, distinct spatial distribution of morphological features distributed in stratigraphy is observed that reveals the dominant geological agents behind their formation, viz. temporal hydrological and eolian processes. The morphological features were aided with an understanding of the composition of the exposed sedimentary succession. MRO CRISM based mineralogical investigation reveals diagnostic signature of the hydrated sulfate mineral Kieserite. Based on the thermodynamic properties of Kieserite and apparent lack of desiccation cracks in

  20. The effect of divalent ions on the elasticity and pore collapse of chalk evaluated from compressional wave velocity and low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Addassi, Mouadh; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul;

    2015-01-01

    The effects of divalent ions on the elasticity and the pore collapse of chalk were studied through rock-mechanical testing and low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements. Chalk samples saturated with deionized water and brines containing sodium, magnesium, calcium and sulfate ions were...... subjected to petrophysical experiments, rock mechanical testing and low-field NMR spectroscopy. Petrophysical characterization involving ultrasonic elastic wave velocities in unconfined conditions, porosity and permeability measurements, specific surface and carbonate content determination and backscatter...... electron microscopy of the materials were conducted prior to the experiments. The iso-frame model was used to predict the bulk moduli in dry and saturated conditions from the compressional modulus of water-saturated rocks. The effective stress coefficient, as introduced by Biot, was also determined from...

  1. Single-layer burial joints vs single-layer uplift joints in Eocene chalk from the Beer Sheva syncline in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahat, Dov

    1999-03-01

    The single-layer (s.l.) joints that occur in the Lower Eocene chalks near Beer Sheva, Israel, developed during the burial history of the rock, whereas the s.l. joints in adjacent Middle Eocene chalks developed during the uplift stage. Characteristically, s.l. burial joints occur in orthogonal cross-fold and strike sets, and as conjugate sets. They precede normal faults and multi-layer joints, and they do not exhibit strike rotation, en échelon segmentation or fracture interaction with each other. These joints are generally closed, and during subsidence older beds fracture first. On the other hand, s.l. uplift joints do not occur in orthogonal or conjugate sets. They are post strike-slip faulting, contemporaneous with multi-layer joints, and exhibit strike rotation, en échelon segmentation and often interact with each other. They are occasionally opened up to several millimetres, and during uplift younger beds fracture first.

  2. Contribution of piezometric measurement to knowledge and management of low water levels: examples on the chalk aquifer in the Champagne Ardennes region

    OpenAIRE

    Stollsteiner, P.; Bessiere, H.; Nicolas, J.; Allier, D.; Berthet, O.

    2015-01-01

    This article is based on a BRGM study on piezometric indicators, threshold values of discharge and groundwater levels for the assessment of potentially-exploitable water resources of chalky watersheds. A method for estimating low water levels based on groundwater levels is presented from three examples representing chalk aquifers with different cycles: annual, combined and interannual. The first is located in Picardy and the two others in the Champagne-Ardennes region. Piezometers with...

  3. Comparison ecological characteristics of mound-building mouse (mus spicilegus in two natural hotbeds of tularemia at North-West coast of the Black sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    І. T. Rusev

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of ecology-epizootic monitoring of North-West coast of the Black sea carried out in wintering seasons of 2004, 2005 and 2011 testifies the basic role of the Mound-building mouse (Mus spicilegus Petenyi, 1882 as a carrier of Francisella tularensis. Spatial distribution of the Mound-building mouse strongly dependson a biotope, geographical region and weather conditions of a specific season. Mice nests in the storage mounds are located normally at a depth of 20–40 cm under the food storage chamber. Average number of the mice in storage mounds is 3.08 ± 1.54 in the south of investigated region and 3.88 ± 2.63 – in the NE of the region.

  4. Area balance and strain in an extensional fault system: Strategies for improved oil recovery in fractured chalk, Gilbertown Field, southwestern Alabama. Final report, March 1996--September 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashin, J.C.; Raymond, D.E.; Rindsberg, A.K.; Alabi, G.G.; Carroll, R.E.; Groshong, R.H.; Jin, G.

    1998-12-01

    This project was designed to analyze the structure of Mesozoic and Tertiary strata in Gilbertown Field and adjacent areas to suggest ways in which oil recovery can be improved. The Eutaw Formation comprises 7 major flow units and is dominated by low-resistivity, low-contrast play that is difficult to characterize quantitatively. Selma chalk produces strictly from fault-related fractures that were mineralized as warm fluid migrated from deep sources. Resistivity, dipmeter, and fracture identification logs corroborate that deformation is concentrated in the hanging-wall drag zones. New area balancing techniques were developed to characterize growth strata and confirm that strain is concentrated in hanging-wall drag zones. Curvature analysis indicates that the faults contain numerous fault bends that influence fracture distribution. Eutaw oil is produced strictly from footwall uplifts, whereas Selma oil is produced from fault-related fractures. Clay smear and mineralization may be significant trapping mechanisms in the Eutaw Formation. The critical seal for Selma reservoirs, by contrast, is where Tertiary clay in the hanging wall is juxtaposed with poorly fractured Selma chalk in the footwall. Gilbertown Field can be revitalized by infill drilling and recompletion of existing wells. Directional drilling may be a viable technique for recovering untapped oil from Selma chalk. Revitalization is now underway, and the first new production wells since 1985 are being drilled in the western part of the field.

  5. Linking sedimentary sulfur and iron biogeochemistry to growth patterns of a cold-water coral mound in the Porcupine Basin, S.W. Ireland (IODP Expedition 307).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrmann, L M; Titschack, J; Böttcher, M E; Ferdelman, T G

    2015-09-01

    Challenger Mound, a 150-m-high cold-water coral mound on the eastern flank of the Porcupine Seabight off SW Ireland, was drilled during Expedition 307 of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP). Retrieved cores offer unique insight into an archive of Quaternary paleo-environmental change, long-term coral mound development, and the diagenetic alteration of these carbonate fabrics over time. To characterize biogeochemical carbon-iron-sulfur transformations in the mound sediments, the contents of dithionite- and HCl-extractable iron phases, iron monosulfide and pyrite, and acid-extractable calcium, magnesium, manganese, and strontium were determined. Additionally, the stable isotopic compositions of pore-water sulfate and solid-phase reduced sulfur compounds were analyzed. Sulfate penetrated through the mound sequence and into the underlying Miocene sediments, where a sulfate-methane transition zone was identified. Small sulfate concentration decreases (<7 mM) within the top 40 m of the mound suggested slow net rates of present-day organoclastic sulfate reduction. Increasing δ(34)S-sulfate values due to microbial sulfate reduction mirrored the decrease in sulfate concentrations. This process was accompanied by oxygen isotope exchange with water that was indicated by increasing δ(18)O-sulfate values, reaching equilibrium with pore-water at depth. Below 50 mbsf, sediment intervals with strong (34)S-enriched imprints on chromium-reducible sulfur (pyrite S), high degree-of-pyritization values, and semi-lithified diagenetic carbonate-rich layers characterized by poor coral preservation, were observed. These layers provided evidence for the occurrence of enhanced microbial sulfate-reducing activity in the mound in the past during periods of rapid mound aggradation and subsequent intervals of non-deposition or erosion when geochemical fronts remained stationary. During these periods, especially during the Early Pleistocene, elevated sulfate reduction rates facilitated

  6. Litter-forager termite mounds enhance the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis between Acacia holosericea A. Cunn. Ex G. Don and Scleroderma dictyosporum isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Duponnois, Robin; Assigbetse, Komi; Ramanankierana, H.; Kisa, Marija; Thioulouse, J.; Lepage, Michel

    2006-01-01

    The hypothesis of the present study was that the termite mounds of Macrotermes subhyalinus (MS) (a litter-forager termite) were inhabited by a specific microflora that could enhance with the ectomycorrhizal fungal development. We tested the effect of this feeding group mound material on (i) the ectomycorrhization symbiosis between Acacia holosericea (an Australian Acacia introduced in the sahelian areas) and two ectomycorrhizal fungal isolates of Scleroderma dictyosporum (IR408 and IR412) in ...

  7. Trace elements and REE geochemistry of Middle Devonian carbonate mounds (Maïder Basin, Eastern Anti-Atlas, Morocco): Implications for early diagenetic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, Fulvio; Turetta, Clara; Cavalazzi, Barbara; Corami, Fabiana; Barbieri, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    Trace and rare earth elements (REEs) have proven their utility as tools for assessing the genesis and early diagenesis of widespread geological bodies such as carbonate mounds, whose genetic processes are not yet fully understood. Carbonates from the Middle Devonian conical mud mounds of the Maïder Basin (eastern Anti-Atlas, Morocco) have been analysed for their REE and trace element distribution. Collectively, the carbonates from the Maïder Basin mud mounds appear to display coherent REE patterns. Three different geochemical patterns, possibly related with three different diagenetic events, include: i) dyke fills with a normal marine REE pattern probably precipitated in equilibrium with seawater, ii) mound micrite with a particular enrichment of overall REE contents and variable Ce anomaly probably related to variation of pH, increase of alkalinity or dissolution/remineralization of organic matter during early diagenesis, and iii) haematite-rich vein fills precipitated from venting fluids of probable hydrothermal origin. Our results reinforce the hypothesis that these mounds were probably affected by an early diagenesis induced by microbial activity and triggered by abundance of dispersed organic matter, whilst venting may have affected the mounds during a later diagenetic phase.

  8. Microfossils, a Key to Unravel Cold-Water Carbonate Mound Evolution through Time: Evidence from the Eastern Alboran Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Stalder

    Full Text Available Cold-water coral (CWC ecosystems occur worldwide and play a major role in the ocean's carbonate budget and atmospheric CO2 balance since the Danian (~65 m.y. ago. However their temporal and spatial evolution against climatic and oceanographic variability is still unclear. For the first time, we combine the main macrofaunal components of a sediment core from a CWC mound of the Melilla Mounds Field in the Eastern Alboran Sea with the associated microfauna and we highlight the importance of foraminifera and ostracods as indicators of CWC mound evolution in the paleorecord. Abundances of macrofauna along the core reveal alternating periods dominated by distinct CWC taxa (mostly Lophelia pertusa, Madrepora oculata that correspond to major shifts in foraminiferal and ostracod assemblages. The period dominated by M. oculata coincides with a period characterized by increased export of refractory organic matter to the seafloor and rather unstable oceanographic conditions at the benthic boundary layer with periodically decreased water energy and oxygenation, variable bottom water temperature/density and increased sediment flow. The microfaunal and geochemical data strongly suggest that M. oculata and in particular Dendrophylliidae show a higher tolerance to environmental changes than L. pertusa. Finally, we show evidence for sustained CWC growth during the Alleröd-Younger-Dryas in the Eastern Alboran Sea and that this period corresponds to stable benthic conditions with cold/dense and well oxygenated bottom waters, high fluxes of labile organic matter and relatively strong bottom currents.

  9. Termite mounds as hot spots of nitrous oxide emissions in South-Sudanian savanna of Burkina Faso (West Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brümmer, Christian; Papen, Hans; Wassmann, Reiner; Brüggemann, Nicolas

    2009-05-01

    Despite a considerable knowledge of the significant role of termites in the global methane budget, very little is known about their contribution to the global nitrous oxide (N2O) budget. Release of N2O from termite (Cubitermes fungifaber) mounds was measured at a natural savanna site in the southwest of Burkina Faso from May to September 2006. Termite N2O emissions were around 20 μg N2O-N m-2 h-1 at the end of the dry season, and up to two orders of magnitude higher than N2O emissions from the surrounding termite-free soil after the onset of the rainy season. The average N2O emission rate from termite mounds during the observation period was 204 μg N2O-N m-2 h-1, and termite mounds contributed 3.0% to total N2O emissions from this savanna ecosystem. However, in other tropical terrestrial ecosystems with other termite species and/or higher termite density this share might be significantly higher.

  10. Electron spin resonance dating of shells from the sambaqui (shell mound) Capelinha, Sao Paulo, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, A. [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Fisica e Matematica; Universidade do Sagrado Coracao, Bauru, SP (Brazil); Figuty, L. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Museu de Arqueologia e Etnologia. Setor de Arqueologia; Baffa, O. [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Fisica e Matematica

    2006-03-15

    Capelinha is a fluvial sambaqui (Brazilian Shell Mound) located in the Ribeira Valley in the State of Sao Paulo that is being studied. It is one of the oldest sambaquis located along a river dated so far in this region. The use of ESR to date other shells stimulated our group to apply this method to the Capelinha site. Shells from land snails (Megalobulimus sp.) obtained in two levels of excavations were analyzed; one of them was in contact with a skeleton that was dated by C-14. The archaeological doses obtained were (8.05{+-}0.07) Gy and (9.50{+-}0.03) Gy. Since the last site was previously dated by C-14 (Beta -Analytics, Beta 153988) giving: 8860 +/- 60 years BP (conventional age) and 10180 to 9710 years BP (calibrated age), the archaeological dose found for this shell was used to determine the local rate of (0.93 to 0.98) mGy/year, that aggress with other surveys done in the region. Using this dose rate the age of the second shell was found to be 8.14 to 8.73 ky BP that agrees with the stratigraphy of the site. (author)

  11. Structure and composition of organic reefs and carbonate mud mounds: concepts and categories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riding, Robert

    2002-07-01

    organisms are skeletal, synsedimentary cementation imparts extra strength and stability to what otherwise would be a Cluster or Frame Reef, and results in Skeleton-Cement Reefs. Cement Reefs exhibit complex relationships between cement, matrix and skeletons. Agglutinated Microbial, Cluster and Segment reefs tend to be structurally simple, have low primary relief, and may show bedding. Frame (including microbial Microframe) and Cement Reefs tend to be unbedded, structurally complex, and can have high relief. Carbonate Mud Mounds: carbonate mud-dominated deposits with topographic relief and few or no stromatolites, thrombolites or in place skeletons. Low Relief Carbonate Mud Mounds are typically thin. High Relief Carbonate Mud Mounds are thick, and internal bedding, slumping, stromatactis cavity systems, and steep marginal slopes may be common. Whereas Organic Reefs are biogenic, calcareous, and are created by essentially in place organisms, Carbonate Mud Mounds can be organic and/or inorganic in origin and it can be difficult to distinguish their origins.

  12. Electron spin resonance dating of shells from the sambaqui (shell mound) Capelinha, Sao Paulo, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capelinha is a fluvial sambaqui (Brazilian Shell Mound) located in the Ribeira Valley in the State of Sao Paulo that is being studied. It is one of the oldest sambaquis located along a river dated so far in this region. The use of ESR to date other shells stimulated our group to apply this method to the Capelinha site. Shells from land snails (Megalobulimus sp.) obtained in two levels of excavations were analyzed; one of them was in contact with a skeleton that was dated by C-14. The archaeological doses obtained were (8.05±0.07) Gy and (9.50±0.03) Gy. Since the last site was previously dated by C-14 (Beta -Analytics, Beta 153988) giving: 8860 +/- 60 years BP (conventional age) and 10180 to 9710 years BP (calibrated age), the archaeological dose found for this shell was used to determine the local rate of (0.93 to 0.98) mGy/year, that aggress with other surveys done in the region. Using this dose rate the age of the second shell was found to be 8.14 to 8.73 ky BP that agrees with the stratigraphy of the site. (author)

  13. Unraveling landscapes with phytogenic mounds (nebkhas): An exploration of spatial pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quets, Jan J.; Temmerman, Stijn; El-Bana, Magdy I.; Al-Rowaily, Saud L.; Assaeed, Abdulaziz M.; Nijs, Ivan

    2013-05-01

    Phytogenic mounds (nebkhas) often are symptoms of desertification in arid regions. Interactions among nebkhas and between nebkhas and their environment are however poorly examined. To this end, three main hypotheses of nebkha pattern formation were evaluated in this study. These state that nebkha patterns are either shaped by: (i) biologically induced recruitment inhibiting zones, (ii) biologically induced recruitment encouraging zones, or (iii) by the spatial distribution of abiotic factors which are not biologically driven. Contrasting nebkha landscapes were examined: a highly dense New Mexican mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) and snakeweed (Gutierrezia sarothrae and Gutierrezia microcephala) ecosystem, and a low-density mixed Tamarix aphylla and Calligonum comosum field in central Libya. Spatial second-order statistics of strategically chosen nebkha subpatterns were compared with those of null models in which observed patches were spatially randomized without overlap. Null model deviations were assessed with goodness-of-fit tests, and interpreted in terms of hypothesized mechanisms of nebkha pattern formation. Our results suggest that biologically induced recruitment inhibiting zones surround adult mesquite nebkhas. The configuration of Calligonum and Tamarix nebkhas may be driven by spatial dynamics of abiotic microsites which are not caused by nebkha interactions. Hence we conclude that both biotic and abiotic drivers can shape nebkha spatial patterns.

  14. PRELIMINARY BIOGEOCHEMICAL DATA ON MICROBIAL CARBONATOGENESIS IN ANCIENT EXTREME ENVIRONMENTS (KESS-KESS MOUNDS, MOROCCO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADRIANO GUIDO

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Devonian Kess-Kess mounds, cropping out in the Hamar Laghdad Ridge (SE Morocco, provide a useful case-study for understanding the relationships between the microbial metabolic activities and micrite precipitation in an extreme environment. Very fine dark and white wrinkled laminae record microbial activity and the geochemistry of the organic matter allows the  characterization of the source organisms. The biogeochemical characterization of extracted organic matter was performed through the functional group analyses by FT-IR Spectroscopy. FT-IR parameters indicate a marine origin and low thermal evolution for the organic material. The organic matter is characterized by the presence of stretching ?C=C vibrations attributable to alkene and/or unsaturated carboxylic acids. Preliminary analysis with GC-MS provides evidence for an autochthonous (

  15. Uranium series geochemistry in aquifers: quantification of transport mechanisms of uranium and daughter products: the chalk aquifer (Champagne, France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the increase of contaminant flux of radionuclides in surface environment (soil, river, aquifer...), there is a need to understand and model the processes that control the distribution of uranium and its daughter products during transport within aquifers. We have used U-series disequilibria as an analogue for the transport of uranium and its daughter products in aquifer to understand such mechanisms. The measurements of uranium (234U et 238U), thorium (230Th et 232Th), 226Ra and 222Rn isotopes in the solid and liquid phases of the chalk aquifer in Champagne (East of France) allows us to understand the processes responsible for fractionation within the uranium decay chain. Fractionations are induced by physical and chemical properties of the elements (leaching, adsorption) but also by radioactive properties (recoil effect during α-decay). For the first time a comprehensive sampling of the solid phase has been performed, allowing quantifying mechanisms responsible for the long term evolution of the aquifer. A non steady state 1D model has been developed which takes into account leaching, adsorption processes as well as radioactive filiation and α-recoil effect. Retardation coefficients have been calculated for uranium, thorium and radium. The aquifer is characterised by a double porosity, and the contribution of fracture and matrix porosity on the water/rock interaction processes has been estimated. (author)

  16. Diagnosing hydrological limitations of a land surface model: application of JULES to a deep-groundwater chalk basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vine, N.; Butler, A.; McIntyre, N.; Jackson, C.

    2016-01-01

    Land surface models (LSMs) are prospective starting points to develop a global hyper-resolution model of the terrestrial water, energy, and biogeochemical cycles. However, there are some fundamental limitations of LSMs related to how meaningfully hydrological fluxes and stores are represented. A diagnostic approach to model evaluation and improvement is taken here that exploits hydrological expert knowledge to detect LSM inadequacies through consideration of the major behavioural functions of a hydrological system: overall water balance, vertical water redistribution in the unsaturated zone, temporal water redistribution, and spatial water redistribution over the catchment's groundwater and surface-water systems. Three types of information are utilized to improve the model's hydrology: (a) observations, (b) information about expected response from regionalized data, and (c) information from an independent physics-based model. The study considers the JULES (Joint UK Land Environmental Simulator) LSM applied to a deep-groundwater chalk catchment in the UK. The diagnosed hydrological limitations and the proposed ways to address them are indicative of the challenges faced while transitioning to a global high resolution model of the water cycle.

  17. Identification of a New Hesperornithiform from the Cretaceous Niobrara Chalk and Implications for Ecologic Diversity among Early Diving Birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa Bell

    Full Text Available The Smoky Hill Member of the Niobrara Chalk in Kansas (USA has yielded the remains of numerous members of the Hesperornithiformes, toothed diving birds from the late Early to Late Cretaceous. This study presents a new taxon of hesperornithiform from the Smoky Hill Member, Fumicollis hoffmani, the holotype of which is among the more complete hesperornithiform skeletons. Fumicollis has a unique combination of primitive (e.g. proximal and distal ends of femur not expanded, elongate pre-acetabular ilium, small and pyramidal patella and derived (e.g. dorsal ridge on metatarsal IV, plantarly-projected curve in the distal shaft of phalanx III:1 hesperornithiform characters, suggesting it was more specialized than small hesperornithiforms like Baptornis advenus but not as highly derived as the larger Hesperornis regalis. The identification of Fumicollis highlights once again the significant diversity of hesperornithiforms that existed in the Late Cretaceous Western Interior Seaway. This diversity points to the existence of a complex ecosystem, perhaps with a high degree of niche partitioning, as indicated by the varying degrees of diving specializations among these birds.

  18. US team measurements during the June 1987 experimental HT release at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories, Ontario, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In June 1987, an experiment was performed at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories in Ontario, Canada, to study the oxidation of HT in the environment. The experiment involved a 30-minute release of 100 Ci of HT to the atmosphere at an elevation of one meter. The HTOHT ratios were shown to slowly increase downwind (/approximately/4 /times/ 10/sup /minus/5/ at 50 meters to almost 10/sup /minus/3 at 400 meters) as conversion of HT takes place. For several days after the release, HTO concentrations in the atmosphere remained elevated. Freeze-dried water from vegetation samples was found to be very low in HTO immediately after the release suggesting a very low direct uptake of HTO in air by vegetation. The tritiated water concentration increased during the first day, peaking during the second day (about 400 to 600 pCiml of water at 50 meters from the source) and decreasing by the end of the second day. The organically bound tritium continued to accumulate during the period following exposure (about 10 pCigm dry weight at 50 meters after two days). 4 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Projecting impacts of climate change on hydrological conditions and biotic responses in a chalk valley riparian wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, A. R.; Thompson, J. R.; Acreman, M. C.

    2016-03-01

    Projected changes in climate are likely to substantially impact wetland hydrological conditions that will in turn have implications for wetland ecology. Assessing ecohydrological impacts of climate change requires models that can accurately simulate water levels at the fine-scale resolution to which species and communities respond. Hydrological conditions within the Lambourn Observatory at Boxford, Berkshire, UK were simulated using the physically based, distributed model MIKE SHE, calibrated to contemporary surface and groundwater levels. The site is a 10 ha lowland riparian wetland where complex geological conditions and channel management exert strong influences on the hydrological regime. Projected changes in precipitation, potential evapotranspiration, channel discharge and groundwater level were derived from the UK Climate Projections 2009 ensemble of climate models for the 2080s under different scenarios. Hydrological impacts of climate change differ through the wetland over short distances depending on the degree of groundwater/surface-water interaction. Discrete areas of groundwater upwelling are associated with an exaggerated response of water levels to climate change compared to non-upwelling areas. These are coincident with regions where a weathered chalk layer, which otherwise separates two main aquifers, is absent. Simulated water levels were linked to requirements of the MG8 plant community and Desmoulin's whorl snail (Vertigo moulinsiana) for which the site is designated. Impacts on each are shown to differ spatially and in line with hydrological impacts. Differences in water level requirements for this vegetation community and single species highlight the need for separate management strategies in distinct areas of the wetland.

  20. Organic matter remains in the Kess Kess mounds of the Hamar Laghadad (Anti Atlas, Morocco): record of microbial biomineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demasi, Fabio; Barbieri, Roberto; Guido, Adriano; Mastandrea, Adelaide; Cavalazzi, Barbara; Russo, Franco

    2010-05-01

    Carbonate Mud Mounds are well documented in the geological record, and span from Proterozoic to recent times, in shallow- and deep-water settings. They are a significant expression of the history of Earth's microbial life. The origin of carbonate mud-mounds has long been debated and the discovery of seep- and vent-related ecosystems from different geotectonic settings, associated to authigenic carbonate mounds, allowed the re-interpretation of some mounds as the product of chemosynthetic microbial mediation. We analyzed the carbonate mounds, informally called 'Kess-Kess', cropping out in the Hamar Laghdad Ridge, eastern Anti-Atlas, SE Morocco. These mounds are the most spectacularly exposed carbonate buildups of the world and, due to differential erosion, they show their original shapes and the relationships with associated strata. The origin of these buildups is still under debate and the most consistent hypotheses are related to submarine hydrothermal vents or hydrocarbon seapage in which bacteria and/or archaea plaied a prominent role in the carbonate biomineralization. To investigate the possible remains of prokaryote metabolic activity we studied the micrite precipitation processes through microfacies and biogeochemical analyses. The more indicative micrite texture is stromatolitic with very fine wrinkled lamination organized in antigravitative pattern. High resolution SEM observations suggest the presence of widespread trace of organic phantoms. The geochemical characterization of extracted organic matter was performed through the functional group analyses by FT-IR spectroscopy. The infrared spectra showed bands between 600 and 3000 cm-1. They contain stretching aliphatic bands (νCHali) at 2950, 2925 and 2850 cm-1, and deformation bands of methyl (δCH3; 1365 cm-1) and both methyl and methylene [δ(CH2 + CH3); 1458 cm-1] groups. The spectra also display the band assigned to carbonyl and/or carboxyl groups (νC=O; 1740 cm-1). The νC-O vibration appears

  1. An age-calibrated record of upper Campanian – Maastrichtian climate change in the Boreal Realm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thibault, Nicolas Rudolph; Schovsbo, Niels; Harlou, Rikke;

    The latest Cretaceous climate of the Boreal Realm was recorded through high-resolution bulk carbon- and oxygen-stable isotopes and a nannofossil temperature index (NTI) on the Stevns-1 core (Denmark) which recovered 456 m of upper Campanian to basal Danian chalk with ~100% recovery and an excellent...... of upper Campanian – Maastrichtian magnetochrons (Husson et al., 2011; K-Pg boundary at 66 Ma) led to the establishment of a precise age-model for Stevns-1. The good correlation between bulk d18O and the NTI (R=-0.81) allows the use of oxygen stable isotopes to estimate past variations of sea surface...

  2. Reconstructing the Palaeogeographies of a Neolithic - Bronze Age Settlement Mound at Ephesos, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Lisa; Friederike, Stock; Barbara, Horejs; Helmut, Brückner

    2014-05-01

    Although Ephesos and its surroundings has long been an area of archaeological interest and investigations, the focus has mainly been on sites related to Antiquity and Late Antiquity. Until recently systematic research concerning prehistoric phases of occupation within this region have been lacking. Due to the growing interest in these time periods along the West Anatolian coast, archaeological research projects involving the study of the newly discovered prehistoric settlement mounds located in the vicinity of the prominent ancient city were initiated. The aim of this study was to examine the palaeogeographical and geoarchaeological contexts of the mound (tell), Çukuriçi Höyük, in order to determine the thickness and age of the settlement layers as well as the spatial extent of the tell throughout the different periods of settlement. As additional research to the excavations, 20 sediment cores drilled on and around Çukuriçi Höyük were examined and their physical and geochemical properties as well as existing data were used to reconstruct the palaeoenvironment. The chronostratigraphy relies on AMS-14C ages and findings of diagnostic ceramics; a further attempt was made by luminescence dating. The results reveal that the inhabitants intentionally choose the location due to the beneficial topography, initially, i.e. during Pottery Neolithic times in the early 7th mill. BC, lying upon an elevation within a fertile alluvial plain about 1.5-2 km away from the coast. It seems that during the time of settling (Pottery Neolithic - Early Bronze Age) several rivers flowed in the direct vicinity of the tell. The elevated terrain provided the inhabitants security from the torrents. In addition, the corings reveal that the tell covers an area of about 11,000 m2 and a thickness of settlement layers of c. 8 m. Finally, as a possible result of water management conducted by the inhabitants, sediments related to low-energy depositional conditions are identified at the foot of

  3. Groundwater Mounding in Non-uniform Aquifers with Implications for Managed Aquifer Recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotnik, V. A.; Noel, P.; Kacimov, A. R.; Al Maktoumi, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Many areas of the world (e.g. the Middle East and North Africa countries) are deficient in observation networks and hydrogeological data needed for Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) design. Therefore, diagnostic analytical approaches are appropriate for feasibility studies of MAR. It was found that the common assumption of aquifer thickness uniformity often does not hold, especially in mountainous watersheds. However, the only practical result available for non-uniform aquifers was developed for well hydraulics applications (point sinks or sources) by Hantush (1962), while the recharge zones may cover large areas on the scale of kilometers, such as temporarily filled impoundments (natural and engineered reservoirs in wadis, depressions, trenches, etc.) or perennial streams accepting massive treated wastewater discharge. To address these important, but overlooked MAR problems in sloping aquifers, a set of new closed-form analytical solutions for water table elevations were obtained. Interestingly, the 2D groundwater flow equation acquires the advection-dispersion equation form in these cases. The quadratures in closed-form solutions obtained by the Green's function method converge rapidly. These models account for both shapes and orientations of sources with respect to the direction of the aquifer base gradient. Qualitatively, solutions in sloping aquifers have an important trait: the mounding is limited in time and space, unlike in aquifers with a horizontal base. Aquifers with the greater slopes have the lesser potential of waterlogging from the rising water table and different storage characteristics (height and volume of locally stored water). Computational aspects of these solutions for MAR analyses are illustrated by example utilizing regional aquifer properties near Az Zarqa River, Jordan. (This study was supported by a grant from USAID-FABRI, project contract: AID-OAA-TO-11-00049, Subcontract: 1001624 -12S-19745).

  4. PowerPoint or chalk and talk: Perceptions of medical students versus dental students in a medical college in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Seth

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Vikas Seth, Prerna Upadhyaya, Mushtaq Ahmad, Vijay MogheDepartment of Pharmacology, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College, Jaipur, Rajasthan, IndiaPurpose: To assess students’ perceptions of the impact of PowerPoint (PPT presentations in lectures in comparison to the traditional chalk and talk method and lectures using ­transparencies and overhead projector (TOHP. The study analyzes the preferences for teaching aids of medical students versus dental students.Methods: Second year medical and dental undergraduates were asked to fill in a nine-item questionnaire about their perceptions of the three lecture delivery methods. Following analysis of the questionnaire the students were interviewed further. The results were analyzed separately for medical and dental students to see if there was any difference in their perceptions.Results: The majority of the medical students (65.33% preferred PPT presentations, while 15.16% of students preferred the lectures using chalkboard, and 19.51% preferred TOHP for teaching (P < 0.001. Of the dental students: 41.84% preferred chalkboard, 31.21% preferred TOHP, and 25.85% students preferred PPT presentations in the lectures (P < 0.05. Some important comments of the students were also recorded on interview which could be valuable for the medical teachers.Conclusion: The medical students clearly preferred the use of PPT presentations while the dental students did not. The study does not bring out evidence based superiority of any lecture delivery method. It appears that in the hands of a trained teacher any teaching aid would be appropriate and effective. This highlights the need for formal training in teaching technologies to develop good presentation skills and thus motivate the students.Keywords: audiovisual aids, medical education, lecture delivery methods, PowerPoint presentations, OHP, chalkboard

  5. Simulating the influence of two shallow, flow-through lakes on a groundwater system: implications for groundwater mounds and hinge lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, David C.; Khisty, Mohan J.

    2001-10-01

    Groundwater mounds and hinge lines are important features related to the interaction of groundwater and lakes. In contrast to the transient formation of groundwater mounds, numerical simulations indicate that permanent groundwater mounds form between closely spaced lakes as the natural consequence of adding two net sinks to a groundwater flow system. The location of the groundwater mound and the position of the hinge lines between the two lakes are intimately related. As the position of the mound changes there is a corresponding shift in the position of the hinge line. This results in a change in the ratio of groundwater inflow to outflow (Qi/Qo) for the lake. The response of the lake is an increase or decrease in the lake level. Our simulations indicate that the movement of the hinge line in a natural system is a consequence of the dynamic interrelationships between recharge, the slope of the water table upgradient and downgradient of the lake, and the loss of water from the lake by evaporation. The extent of the seasonal movement of the hinge line will vary from one year to the next depending on local changes in the magnitude of the hydrologic variables.

  6. The impact of broadleaved woodland on water resources in lowland UK: I. Soil water changes below beech woodland and grass on chalk sites in Hampshire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Roberts

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The possible effects of broadleaved woodland on recharge to the UK Chalk aquifer have led to a study of evaporation and transpiration from beech woodland (Black Wood and pasture (Bridgets Farm, growing in shallow soils above chalk in Hampshire. Eddy correlation measurements of energy balance components above both the forest and the grassland enabled calculation of latent heat flux (evaporation and transpiration as a residual. Comparative measurements of soil water content and soil water potential in 9 m profiles under both forest and grassland found changes in soil water content down to 6 m at both sites; however, the soil water potential measurements showed upward movement of water only above a depth of about 2 m. Below this depth, water continued to drain and the soil water potential measurements showed downward movement of water at both sites, notwithstanding significant negative soil water potentials in the chalk and soil above. Seasonal differences occur in the soil water content profiles under broadleaved woodland and grass. Before the woodland foliage emerges, greater drying beneath the grassland is offset in late spring and early summer by increased drying under the forest. Yet, when the change in soil water profiles is at a maximum, in late summer, the profiles below woodland and grass are very similar. A comparison of soil water balances for Black Wood and Bridgets Farm using changes in soil water contents, local rainfall and evaporation measured by the energy balance approach allowed drainage to be calculated at each site. Although seasonal differences occurred, the difference in cumulative drainage below broadleaved woodland and grass was small.

  7. Cold-water coral mounds and sponge-beds as habitats for demersal fish on the Norwegian shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutti, Tina; Bergstad, Odd Aksel; Fosså, Jan Helge; Helle, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    The importance of cold-water coral (CWC) mounds and sponge-beds as habitat for demersal fish was examined in the Træna Deep marine protected area and adjacent areas of the Norwegian continental shelf. Standardised longline fishing was conducted twice, in June and March, and predetermined fishing effort was allocated to multiple plots with varying densities of small CWC mounds and sponges, plus control plots with neither of these habitats. Catches within all examined habitats were dominated by the commercially exploited Brosme brosme (representing >70% of the total catch) followed by Galeus melastomus, Chimaera monstrosa, Etmopterus spinax and the commercially exploited Molva molva. Positive correlations were found between catch rates of B. brosme, G. melastomus and C. monstrosa and the density of small CWC mounds at one or both sampling occasions. No correlations were found between the catch rates of the same three species and sponge density; thus the sponge-beds did not seem to represent an ecologically equivalent habitat to the CWCs. On a local scale the CWC habitat appeared to attract higher abundances of B. brosme, G. melastomus and C. monstrosa; however, the differences in catch rates between coral and non-coral areas were quite low (2-4 times) and for most species the fish-habitat relationships varied temporarily and with the spatial scale used to delineate the habitat. Based on the methods and the results of this study and the fact that CWCs only occupy a very small proportion of the Norwegian shelf, the importance of CWCs as habitat for the populations of the demersal fish species examined is judged as marginal.

  8. Beaufort Sea deep-water gas hydrate recovery from a seafloor mound in a region of widespread BSR occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Patrick E.; Pohlman, John W.; Lorenson, T.D.; Edwards, Brian D.

    2011-01-01

    Gas hydrate was recovered from the Alaskan Beaufort Sea slope north of Camden Bay in August 2010 during a U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy expedition (USCG cruise ID HLY1002) under the direction of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Interpretation of multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection data collected in 1977 by the USGS across the Beaufort Sea continental margin identified a regional bottom simulating reflection (BSR), indicating that a large segment of the Beaufort Sea slope is underlain by gas hydrate. During HLY1002, gas hydrate was sampled by serendipity with a piston core targeting a steep-sided bathymetric high originally thought to be an outcrop of older, exposed strata. The feature cored is an approximately 1100m diameter, 130 m high conical mound, referred to here as the Canning Seafloor Mound (CSM), which overlies the crest of a buried anticline in a region of sub-parallel compressional folds beneath the eastern Beaufort outer slope. An MCS profile shows a prominent BSR upslope and downslope from the mound. The absence of a BSR beneath the CSM and occurrence of gas hydrate near the summit indicates that free gas has migrated via deep-rooted thrust faults or by structural focusing up the flanks of the anticline to the seafloor. Gas hydrate recovered from near the CSM summit at a subbottom depth of about 5.7 meters in a water depth of 2538 m was of nodular and vein-filling morphology. Although the hydrate was not preserved, residual gas from the core liner contained >95% methane by volume when corrected for atmospheric contamination. The presence of trace C4+hydrocarbons (inflation of the seafloor caused by formation and accumulation of shallow hydrate lenses is also a likely factor in CSM growth. Pore water analysis shows the sulfate-methane transition to be very shallow (0-1 mbsf), also supporting an active high-flux interpretation. Pore water with chloride concentrations as low as 160 mM suggest fluid migration pathways may extend to the mound from buried

  9. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department's plutonium storage. Volume II, part 7: Mound working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the report of a visit to the Mound site by the Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) to assess plutonium vulnerabilities. Purposes of the visit were: to review results of the site's self assessment of current practices for handling and storing plutonium; to conduct an independent assessment of these practices; to reconcile differences and assemble a final list of vulnerabilities; to calculate consequences and probability for each vulnerability; and to issue a report to the Working Group. This report, representing completion of the Mound visit, will be compiled along with those from all other sites with plutonium inventories as part of a final report to the Secretary of Energy

  10. The giant cold-water coral mound as a nested microbial/metazoan system: physical, chemical, biological and geological picture (ESF EuroDiversity MiCROSYSTEMS)

    OpenAIRE

    Henriet, J.-P.; The MICROSYSTEMS Team

    2009-01-01

    The MiCROSYSTEMS project under the ESF EUROCORES EuroDiversity scheme is a holistic and multi-scale approach in studying microbial diversity and functionality in a nested microbial/metazoan system, which thrives in deep waters: the giant cold-water coral mound. Studies on prolific cold-water coral sites have been carried out from the canyons of the Bay of Biscay to the fjords of the Norwegian margin, while the Pen Duick carbonate mound province off Morocco developed into a joint natural lab f...

  11. Area balance and strain in an extensional fault system: Strategies for improved oil recovery in fractured chalk, Gilbertown Field, southwestern Alabama. Annual report, March 1996--March 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashin, J.C.; Raymond, D.E.; Rindsberg, A.K.; Alabi, G.G.; Groshong, R.H.

    1997-08-01

    Gilbertown Field is the oldest oil field in Alabama and produces oil from chalk of the Upper Cretaceous Selma Group and from sandstone of the Eutaw Formation along the southern margin of the Gilbertown fault system. Most of the field has been in primary recovery since establishment, but production has declined to marginally economic levels. This investigation applies advanced geologic concepts designed to aid implementation of improved recovery programs. The Gilbertown fault system is detached at the base of Jurassic salt. The fault system began forming as a half graben and evolved in to a full graben by the Late Cretaceous. Conventional trapping mechanisms are effective in Eutaw sandstone, whereas oil in Selma chalk is trapped in faults and fault-related fractures. Burial modeling establishes that the subsidence history of the Gilbertown area is typical of extensional basins and includes a major component of sediment loading and compaction. Surface mapping and fracture analysis indicate that faults offset strata as young as Miocene and that joints may be related to regional uplift postdating fault movement. Preliminary balanced structural models of the Gilbertown fault system indicate that synsedimentary growth factors need to be incorporated into the basic equations of area balance to model strain and predict fractures in Selma and Eutaw reservoirs.

  12. Evaluation of brine disposal from the Bryan Mound site of the strategic petroleum reserve program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Case, Robert J.; Chittenden, Jr, Mark E.; Harper, Jr, Donald E.; Kelly, Jr, Francis J.; Loeblich, Laurel A.; McKinney, Larry D.; Minello, Thomas J.; Park, E. Taisoo; Randall, Robert E.; Slowey, J. Frank

    1981-01-01

    On March 10, 1980, the Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program began leaching the Bryan Mound salt dome and discharging the resulting brine into the coastal waters off Freeport, Texas. During the months of March and April, a team of scientists and engineers from Texas A and M University conducted an intensive environmental study of the area surrounding the diffuser site. A pipeline has been laid from the Bryan Mound site to a location 12.5 statute miles (20 km) offshore. The last 3060 ft (933 m) of this pipeline is a 52-port diffuser through which brine can be discharged at a maximum rate of 680,000 barrels per day. Initially, 16 ports were open which permitted a maximum discharge rate of 350,000 barrels per day and a continuous brine discharge was achieved on March 13, 1980. The purpose of this report is to describe the findings of the project team during the intensive postdisposal study period of March and April, 1980. The major areas of investigation are physical oceanography, analysis of the discharge plume, water and sediment quality, nekton, benthos, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and data management.

  13. Mapping of groundwater potential zones in Salem Chalk Hills, Tamil Nadu, India, using remote sensing and GIS techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thilagavathi, N; Subramani, T; Suresh, M; Karunanidhi, D

    2015-04-01

    This study proposes to introduce the remote sensing and geographic information system (GIS) techniques in mapping the groundwater potential zones. Remote sensing and GIS techniques have been used to map the groundwater potential zones in Salem Chalk Hills, Tamil Nadu, India. Charnockites and fissile hornblende biotite gneiss are the major rock types in this region. Dunites and peridodites are the ultramafic rocks which cut across the foliation planes of the gneisses and are highly weathered. It comprises magnesite and chromite deposits which are excavated by five mining companies by adopting bench mining. The thickness of weathered and fracture zone varies from 2.2 to 50 m in gneissic formation and 5.8 to 55 m in charnockite. At the contacts of gneiss and charnockite, the thickness ranges from 9.0 to 90.8 m favoring good groundwater potential. The mine lease area is underlined by fractured and sheared hornblende biotite gneiss where groundwater potential is good. Water catchment tanks in this area of 5 km radius are small to moderate in size and are only seasonal. They remain dry during summer seasons. As perennial water resources are remote, the domestic and agricultural activities in this region depend mainly upon the groundwater resources. The mines are located in gently slope area, and accumulation of water is not observed except in mine pits even during the monsoon period. Therefore, it is essential to map the groundwater potential zones for proper management of the aquifer system. Satellite imageries were also used to extract lineaments, hydrogeomorphic landforms, drainage patterns, and land use, which are the major controlling factors for the occurrence of groundwater. Various thematic layers pertaining to groundwater existence such as geology, geomorphology, land use/land cover, lineament, lineament density, drainage, drainage density, slope, and soil were generated using GIS tools. By integrating all the above thematic layers based on the ranks and

  14. Archaeomagnetic study of five mounds from Upper Mesopotamia between 2500 and 750 BCE: further evidence for an extremely strong geomagnetic field ca. 3000 years ago

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ertepinar, P.; Langereis, C.G.; Biggin, A.J.; Frangipane, M.; Matney, T.; Ökse, T.; Engin, A.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of archaeomagnetic data in eastern Europe and the Near and Middle East shows a remarkable gap in Turkey. This study presents the first archaeomagnetic results from five different mounds in southeast Turkey, the northern part of Mesopotamia. The rock magnetic experiments indicate tha

  15. Performance evaluation of termite-mound clay, concrete and steel silos for the storage of maize grains in the humid tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inadequate storage facilities have contributed to severe maize postharvest losses in many developing countries. This study determined the potential of termite mound clay (TMC), a readily-available material in Nigeria, as a construction material for storage silos. The performance of the TMC silo was ...

  16. Reliability Evaluation of a Concrete Crown Wall on a Rubble Mound Breakwater considering Sliding Failure, Overturning and Rupture Failure of the Foundation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiani, E.; Sørensen, Jørgen S.; Burcharth, Hans F.

    1994-01-01

    and rupture failure in the rubble mound are taken into account. The method of probabilistic foundation stability analysis is presented by the example of a translation slip failure involving kinematically correct slip surfaces and failure zones in friction based soil. A conventional static quasi...

  17. Microbial assemblages on a cold-water coral mound at the SE Rockall Bank (NE Atlantic): interactions with hydrography and topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bleijswijk, J. D. L.; Whalen, C.; Duineveld, G. C. A.; Lavaleye, M. S. S.; Witte, H. J.; Mienis, F.

    2015-07-01

    This study characterizes the microbial community composition over Haas Mound, one of the most prominent cold-water coral mounds of the Logachev Mound province (Rockall Bank, NE Atlantic). We outline patterns of distribution vertically - from the seafloor to the water column - and laterally - across the mound - and couple these to mound topography and hydrography. Samples of water, sediment and Lophelia pertusa were collected in 2012 and 2013 from locations that were chosen based on high definition video surveys. Temperature and current measurements were obtained at two sites at the summit and foot of Haas Mound to study near-bed hydrodynamic conditions. Overlaying water was collected from depths of 400 m as well as 5 and 10 m above the bottom using a CTD/Rosette system. Near-bottom water, sediment and L. pertusa mucus and skeleton samples were obtained with a box corer. Of all these biotopes, Roche GS-FLX amplicon sequencing targeting both Bacteria and Archaea was carried out, augmenting our understanding of deep sea microbial consortia. The pattern of similarities between samples, visualized by multi-dimensional scaling (MDS), indicates a strong link between the distribution of microbes and the specific biotopes. The microbial operational taxonomic unit (OTU) diversity was the highest in near-bottom water, which was sampled in the coral framework. For the first time, Thaumarchaeota marine group I (MGI) were found in L. pertusa mucus; Endozoicomonas was detected in skeleton, mucus and near-bottom water, whereas Mycoplasma was only detected in skeleton and near-bottom water, however not in mucus. Analysis of similarities (ANOSIM) indicates that overlaying water is well-mixed at 400 m depth but less so at 5 and 10 m above the bottom, where the composition of microbial communities differed significantly between summit, slope and off-mound. At all locations, the near-bottom water differed significantly from water at 5 m above the bottom, illustrating that the near

  18. Mineralogy of Juventae Chasma: Sulfates in the light-toned mounds, mafic minerals in the bedrock, and hydrated silica and hydroxylated ferric sulfate on the plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Parente, Mario; Weitz, Catherine M.; Noe Dobrea, Eldar Z.; Roach, Leah H.; Murchie, Scott L.; McGuire, Patrick C.; McKeown, Nancy K.; Rossi, Christopher M.; Brown, Adrian J.; Calvin, Wendy M.; Milliken, Ralph; Mustard, John F.

    2009-11-01

    Juventae Chasma contains four light-toned sulfate-bearing mounds (denoted here as A-D from west to east) inside the trough, mafic outcrops at the base of the mounds and in the wall rock, and light-toned layered deposits of opal and ferric sulfates on the plateau. Hyperspectral visible/near-infrared Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) spectra were used to identify monohydrated and polyhydrated sulfate (PHS) outcrops of layered material on the bright mounds. Most of the monohydrated sulfate signatures closely resemble those of szomolnokite (FeSO4·H2O), characterized by a water band near 2.08 μm, while some areas exhibit spectral features more similar to those of kieserite (MgSO4·H2O), with a band centered closer to 2.13 μm. The largest PHS outcrops occur on the top of mound B, and their spectral features are most consistent with ferricopiapite, melanterite, and starkeyite, but a specific mineral cannot be uniquely identified at this time. Coordinated analyses of CRISM maps, Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter elevations, and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment images suggest that mounds A and B may have formed together and then eroded into separate mounds, while mounds C and D likely formed separately. Mafic minerals (low-Ca pyroxene, high-Ca pyroxene, and olivine) are observed in large ˜2-10 km wide outcrops in the wall rock and in smaller outcrops ˜50-500 m across at the floor of the canyon. Most of the wall rock is covered by at least a thin layer of dust and does not exhibit strong features characteristic of these minerals. The plateau region northwest of Juventae Chasma is characterized by an abundance of light-toned layered deposits. One region contains two spectrally unique phases exhibiting a highly stratified, terraced pattern. CRISM spectra of one unit eroded into swirling patterns with arc-like ridges exhibit a narrow 2.23-μm band assigned to hydroxylated ferric sulfate. A thin layer of a fractured material bearing an

  19. Implementation of agronomical and geochemical modules into a 3D groundwater code for assessing nitrate storage and transport through unconfined Chalk aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picot-Colbeaux, Géraldine; Devau, Nicolas; Thiéry, Dominique; Pettenati, Marie; Surdyk, Nicolas; Parmentier, Marc; Amraoui, Nadia; Crastes de Paulet, François; André, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    Chalk aquifer is the main water resource for domestic water supply in many parts in northern France. In same basin, groundwater is frequently affected by quality problems concerning nitrates. Often close to or above the drinking water standards, nitrate concentration in groundwater is mainly due to historical agriculture practices, combined with leakage and aquifer recharge through the vadose zone. The complexity of processes occurring into such an environment leads to take into account a lot of knowledge on agronomy, geochemistry and hydrogeology in order to understand, model and predict the spatiotemporal evolution of nitrate content and provide a decision support tool for the water producers and stakeholders. To succeed in this challenge, conceptual and numerical models representing accurately the Chalk aquifer specificity need to be developed. A multidisciplinary approach is developed to simulate storage and transport from the ground surface until groundwater. This involves a new agronomic module "NITRATE" (NItrogen TRansfer for Arable soil to groundwaTEr), a soil-crop model allowing to calculate nitrogen mass balance in arable soil, and the "PHREEQC" numerical code for geochemical calculations, both coupled with the 3D transient groundwater numerical code "MARTHE". Otherwise, new development achieved on MARTHE code allows the use of dual porosity and permeability calculations needed in the fissured Chalk aquifer context. This method concerning the integration of existing multi-disciplinary tools is a real challenge to reduce the number of parameters by selecting the relevant equations and simplifying the equations without altering the signal. The robustness and the validity of these numerical developments are tested step by step with several simulations constrained by climate forcing, land use and nitrogen inputs over several decades. In the first time, simulations are performed in a 1D vertical unsaturated soil column for representing experimental nitrates

  20. Chalk and computers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lisa Rosén

    in the period 1970-2011. I wish to discuss how the analysis can benefit from a focus on the parallel introduction of thoughts concerning children’s culture, the competent child and the linkage of ‘Play & learn’. Looking at everyday life I also aim at discussing how the introduction of the new teaching aids has...... highly connected to technological innovation that across the period has inspired hope as well as fear in teachers, pupils and parents. I take my starting point in the changing teaching aids of everyday school life to analyse how the technological development has been dealt with in the Danish school...... pedagogical journals, journals from the teacher’s trade union and parents’ organisation, national and local news papers as well as reports from conferences and school developments to academic (especially anthropological) studies, and own observations from school visits, teachers’ and school’s digital...

  1. The Guaymas Basin Hiking Guide to Hydrothermal Mounds, Chimneys, and Microbial Mats: Complex Seafloor Expressions of Subsurface Hydrothermal Circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teske, Andreas; de Beer, Dirk; McKay, Luke J; Tivey, Margaret K; Biddle, Jennifer F; Hoer, Daniel; Lloyd, Karen G; Lever, Mark A; Røy, Hans; Albert, Daniel B; Mendlovitz, Howard P; MacGregor, Barbara J

    2016-01-01

    The hydrothermal mats, mounds, and chimneys of the southern Guaymas Basin are the surface expression of complex subsurface hydrothermal circulation patterns. In this overview, we document the most frequently visited features of this hydrothermal area with photographs, temperature measurements, and selected geochemical data; many of these distinct habitats await characterization of their microbial communities and activities. Microprofiler deployments on microbial mats and hydrothermal sediments show their steep geochemical and thermal gradients at millimeter-scale vertical resolution. Mapping these hydrothermal features and sampling locations within the southern Guaymas Basin suggest linkages to underlying shallow sills and heat flow gradients. Recognizing the inherent spatial limitations of much current Guaymas Basin sampling calls for comprehensive surveys of the wider spreading region.

  2. Estimation of Partial Safety Factors and Target Failure Probability Based on Cost Optimization of Rubble Mound Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Seung-Woo; Suh, Kyung-Duck; Burcharth, Hans F.

    2010-01-01

    The breakwaters are designed by considering the cost optimization because a human risk is seldom considered. Most breakwaters, however, were constructed without considering the cost optimization. In this study, the optimum return period, target failure probability and the partial safety factors...... were evaluated by applying the cost optimization to the rubble mound breakwaters in Korea. The applied method was developed by Hans F. Burcharth and John D. Sorensen in relation to the PIANC Working Group 47. The optimum return period was determined as 50 years in many cases and was found as 100 years...... of the national design standard and then the overall safety factor is calculated as 1.09. It is required that the nominal diameter and weight of armor are respectively 9% and 30% larger than those of the existing design method. Moreover, partial safety factors considering the cost optimization were compared...

  3. 454 Pyrosequencing-based assessment of bacterial diversity and community structure in termite guts, mounds and surrounding soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makonde, Huxley M; Mwirichia, Romano; Osiemo, Zipporah; Boga, Hamadi I; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Termites constitute part of diverse and economically important termite fauna in Africa, but information on gut microbiota and their associated soil microbiome is still inadequate. In this study, we assessed and compared the bacterial diversity and community structure between termites' gut, their mounds and surrounding soil using the 454 pyrosequencing-based analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. A wood-feeder termite (Microcerotermes sp.), three fungus-cultivating termites (Macrotermes michaelseni, Odontotermes sp. and Microtermes sp.), their associated mounds and corresponding savannah soil samples were analyzed. The pH of the gut homogenates and soil physico-chemical properties were determined. The results indicated significant difference in bacterial community composition and structure between the gut and corresponding soil samples. Soil samples (Chao1 index ranged from 1359 to 2619) had higher species richness than gut samples (Chao1 index ranged from 461 to 1527). The bacterial composition and community structure in the gut of Macrotermes michaelseni and Odontotermes sp. were almost identical but different from that of Microtermes and Microcerotermes species, which had unique community structures. The most predominant bacterial phyla in the gut were Bacteroidetes (40-58 %), Spirochaetes (10-70 %), Firmicutes (17-27 %) and Fibrobacteres (13 %) while in the soil samples were Acidobacteria (28-45 %), Actinobacteria (20-40 %) and Proteobacteria (18-24 %). Some termite gut-specific bacterial lineages belonging to the genera Dysgonomonas, Parabacteroides, Paludibacter, Tannerella, Alistipes, BCf9-17 termite group and Termite Treponema cluster were observed. The results not only demonstrated a high level of bacterial diversity in the gut and surrounding soil environments, but also presence of distinct bacterial communities that are yet to be cultivated. Therefore, combined efforts using both culture and culture-independent methods are suggested to

  4. Cold induces micro- and nano-scale reorganization of lipid raft markers at mounds of T-cell membrane fluctuations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Chen

    Full Text Available Whether and how cold causes changes in cell-membrane or lipid rafts remain poorly characterized. Using the NSOM/QD and confocal imaging systems, we found that cold caused microscale redistribution of lipid raft markers, GM1 for lipid and CD59 for protein, from the peripheral part of microdomains to the central part on Jurkat T cells, and that cold also induced the nanoscale size-enlargement (1/3- to 2/3-fold of the nanoclusters of lipid raft markers and even the colocalization of GM1 and CD59 nanoclusters. These findings indicate cold-induced lateral rearrangement/coalescence of raft-related membrane heterogeneity. The cold-induced re-distribution of lipid raft markers under a nearly-natural condition provide clues for their alternations, and help to propose a model in which raft lipids associate themselves or interact with protein components to generate functional membrane heterogeneity in response to stimulus. The data also underscore the possible cold-induced artifacts in early-described cold-related experiments and the detergent-resistance-based analyses of lipid rafts at 4 degrees C, and provide a biophysical explanation for recently-reported cold-induced activation of signaling pathways in T cells. Importantly, our fluorescence-topographic NSOM imaging demonstrated that GM1/CD59 raft markers distributed and re-distributed at mounds but not depressions of T-cell membrane fluctuations. Such mound-top distribution of lipid raft markers or lipid rafts provides spatial advantage for lipid rafts or contact molecules interacting readily with neighboring cells or free molecules.

  5. Implementation of Enhanced Attenuation at the DOE Mound Site OU-1 Landfill: Accelerating Progress and Reducing Costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooten, Gwendolyn [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management; Cato, Rebecca [Navarro Research and Engineering; Looney, Brian [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC

    2016-03-06

    At the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Legacy Management, Mound, Ohio, Site, chlorinated organic contaminants (cVOCs) originating from the former solid-waste landfill have impacted groundwater in Operable Unit 1 (OU-1). The baseline groundwater remedy was groundwater pump and treat (P&T). Since the source materials have been removed from the landfill, the Mound core team, which consists of DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), Ohio EPA, and other stakeholders, is assessing the feasibility of switching from the active P&T remedy to a passive attenuation-based remedy. Toward this end, an enhanced attenuation (EA) strategy based on the creation of structured geochemical zones was developed. This EA strategy addresses the residual areas of elevated cVOCs in soil and groundwater while minimizing the rebound of groundwater concentrations above regulatory targets (e.g., maximum contaminant levels [MCLs]) and avoiding plume expansion while the P&T system is turned off. The EA strategy has improved confidence and reduced risk on the OU-1 groundwater transition path to monitored natural attenuation (MNA). To better evaluate the EA strategy, DOE is conducting a field demonstration to evaluate the use of edible oils to enhance the natural attenuation processes. The field demonstration is designed to determine whether structured geochemical zones can be established that expedite the attenuation of cVOCs in the OU-1 groundwater. The EA approach at OU-1 was designed based on “structured geochemical zones” and relies on groundwater flow through a succession of anaerobic and aerobic zones. The anaerobic zones stimulate relatively rapid degradation of the original solvent source compounds (e.g., cVOCs such as tetrachloroethene [PCE] and trichloroethene [TCE]). The surrounding aerobic areas encourage relatively rapid degradation of daughter products (such as dichloroethene [DCE] and vinyl chloride [VC]) as well as enhanced cometabolism of TCE resulting from

  6. Associations between living benthic foraminifera and dead tests of Syringammina fragilissima (Xenophyophorea) in the Darwin Mounds region (NE Atlantic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, J. Alan; Gooday, Andrew J.

    2004-11-01

    The xenophyophore Syringammina fragilissima is abundant in a bathyal region of the NE Atlantic (950 m water depth) characterised by large numbers of 100 m wide sandy mounds (the Darwin Mounds). We examined "live" (i.e., rose Bengal-stained) benthic foraminifera associated with fragments of four dead S. fragilissima tests from four box-cores collected in this region. Many of the abundant species associated with the xenophyophore tests were common bathyal species that also occurred in the surrounding sediment (e.g., Nonionella iridea and Eponides pusillus). Foraminifera associated with the xenophyophore tests were generally more abundant than those inhabiting the surrounding sediments, although species richness and diversity were not significantly different. Foraminiferal abundances were lower than those previously reported from comparable sites in the Northeast Atlantic. Some species had patchy distributions. In particular, the organic-walled Cylindrogullmia sp., the overall top-ranked species, was abundant in one test, where it constituted 36% of the foraminiferal assemblage, and rare or absent in others. Four distinct microhabitats, inhabited by particular foraminiferal species, were present within the complex structure of the xenophyophore tests: (1) Within the tests, in the remains of the organic tubes (granellare) that enclose the protoplasm in live xenophyophores (various monothalamous foraminifera, e.g., the elongate organic-walled Nemogullmia sp.). (2) Within the branches of the test, but outside the granellare tubes; sometimes associated with dark-grey sediment presumed to be the decayed remains of xenophyophore waste products (e.g., the allogromiid Cylindrogullmia sp. and the calcareous species Chilostomella elongata). (3) The outer surface of the test (numerous small calcareous foraminifera). (4) In mud trapped between the test branches (common bathyal species, many of which also occurred in the surrounding sediments). A number of metazoans, mainly

  7. Mortality study of Canadian military personnel exposed to radiation: atomic test blasts and Chalk River nuclear reactor clean-ups, 1950's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a historical cohort study of the group of Canadian military personnel exposed to radiation in the 1950s at atomic bomb test blasts in the U.S. and Australia, and at clean-up operations at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories. Overall and cause-specific mortality in the exposed group was compared to that of the control cohort of unexposed military personnel, matched on age, service, rank and trade. Analyses indicated no elevation in the exposed cohort, in overall or cause-specific mortality due to diseases associated with radiation. Since this study was restricted to an investigation of mortality, we must stress that we cannot generalize these results or conclusions to current morbidity experienced by the exposed cohort

  8. Development and maintenance of a telescoping debris flow fan in response to human-induced fan surface channelization, Chalk Creek Valley Natural Debris Flow Laboratory, Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasklewicz, T.; Scheinert, C.

    2016-01-01

    Channel change has been a constant theme throughout William L. Graf's research career. Graf's work has examined channel changes in the context of natural environmental fluctuations, but more often has focused on quantifying channel change in the context of anthropogenic modifications. Here, we consider how channelization of a debris flows along a bajada has perpetuated and sustained the development of 'telescoping' alluvial fan. Two-dimensional debris-flow modeling shows the importance of the deeply entrenched channelized flow in the development of a telescoping alluvial fan. GIS analyses of repeat (five different debris flows), high-resolution (5 cm) digital elevation models (DEMs) generated from repeat terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) data elucidate sediment and topographic dynamics of the new telescoping portion of the alluvial fan (the embryonic fan). Flow constriction from channelization helps to perpetuate debris-flow runout and to maintain the embryonic fan and telescoping nature of the alluvial fan complex. Embryonic fan development, in response to five debris flows, proceeds with a major portion of the flows depositing on the southern portion of the embryonic fan. The third through the fifth debris flows also begin to shift some deposition to the northern portion of the embryonic. The transfer of sediment from a higher portion of the embryonic fan to a lower portion continues currently on the embryonic fan. While channelized flow has been shown to be critical to the maintenance of the telescoping fan, the flow constriction has led to higher than background levels of sediment deposition in Chalk Creek, a tributary of the Arkansas River. A majority of the sediment from each debris flow is incorporated into Chalk Creek as opposed to being stored on the embryonic fan.

  9. The results from the second high-pressure melt ejection test completed in the Molten Fuel Moderator Interaction Facility at Chalk River Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitheanandan, T.; Kyle, G.; O' Connor, R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2007-09-15

    The Canadian nuclear power generation industry, represented by the CANDU Owners Group (COG), is funding an experimental program at Chalk River Laboratories to study the interaction between the molten material ejected from the fuel channel and the moderator. These experiments are designed to address one of the very low probability postulated accident events considered for CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs), where an array of fuel channels contain the nuclear fuel and high-temperature, high-pressure coolant. Under severely restricted flow blockage conditions postulated in a fuel channel, the temperature excursion could result in fuel melting, consequential failure of the fuel channel, and ejection of the molten fuel at high pressures into the heavy water moderator at near atmospheric pressure. The objective of the experimental program is to demonstrate that a highly energetic Molten Fuel Moderator Interaction (MFMI) and associated high-pressure pulse can be ruled out. The second high-pressure melt ejection test using 22 kg of prototypical corium was completed recently at Chalk River Laboratories. The second test consisted of heating a thermite mixture of U, U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, Zr, and CrO{sub 3}, simulating the molten material expected in a fuel channel, inside a 1 m length of insulated pressure tube. Once the molten material reached the desired temperature of {approx}2400{sup o}C, the molten material was ejected into the surrounding tank of 63{sup o}C water. At the time of melt ejection, the static pressure in the test section was 3.35 MPa. The confinement vessel pressure reached a peak volume of 201 kPa following the rupture of the test section. The peak dynamic pressure measured on the inner vessel walls ranged between 0.7 MPa and 1 MPa. The dynamic pressure history, debris size, and the effects of the material interacting with tubes representing neighbouring fuel channels were investigated. (author)

  10. The results from the second high-pressure melt ejection test completed in the Molten Fuel Moderator Interaction Facility at Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian nuclear power generation industry, represented by the CANDU Owners Group (COG), is funding an experimental program at Chalk River Laboratories to study the interaction between the molten material ejected from the fuel channel and the moderator. These experiments are designed to address one of the very low probability postulated accident events considered for CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs), where an array of fuel channels contain the nuclear fuel and high-temperature, high-pressure coolant. Under severely restricted flow blockage conditions postulated in a fuel channel, the temperature excursion could result in fuel melting, consequential failure of the fuel channel, and ejection of the molten fuel at high pressures into the heavy water moderator at near atmospheric pressure. The objective of the experimental program is to demonstrate that a highly energetic Molten Fuel Moderator Interaction (MFMI) and associated high-pressure pulse can be ruled out. The second high-pressure melt ejection test using 22 kg of prototypical corium was completed recently at Chalk River Laboratories. The second test consisted of heating a thermite mixture of U, U3O8, Zr, and CrO3, simulating the molten material expected in a fuel channel, inside a 1 m length of insulated pressure tube. Once the molten material reached the desired temperature of ∼2400oC, the molten material was ejected into the surrounding tank of 63oC water. At the time of melt ejection, the static pressure in the test section was 3.35 MPa. The confinement vessel pressure reached a peak volume of 201 kPa following the rupture of the test section. The peak dynamic pressure measured on the inner vessel walls ranged between 0.7 MPa and 1 MPa. The dynamic pressure history, debris size, and the effects of the material interacting with tubes representing neighbouring fuel channels were investigated. (author)

  11. Impoverishment of the bryophyte and lichen flora of the Dutch chalk grasslands in the thirty years 1953-1983. [Tortella spp. ; Trichostomum spp. ; Aloina spp. ; Pleurochaete squarrosa; Abietinella abietina; Camptothecium lutescens; Brachythecium rutabulum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    During, H.J.; Willems, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The Dutch chalk grasslands were formerly very rich in bryophyte and lichen species. A comparison of data from Barkman (1953) and more recent inventories yielded the following results: (a) Lichens have disappeared nearly completely from the Dutch chalk grasslands; (b) many characteristic acrocarps (e.g., Tortella spp., Trichostomum spp., Aloina spp., Pleurochaete squarrosa) and some pleurocarps (Abietinella abietina, Camptothecium lutescens) have decreased drastically; (c) some common litter-indicator species (Brachythecium rutabulum and others) are now increasing. It is hypothesized that this change is mainly a result of combined effects of the abandonment of the old grazing regime, which is in only a few places replaced by mowing, and of air pollution. The authors are strongly in favor of current attempts to reintroduce grazing by the old race of Mergelland sheep.

  12. Reaction Between Thin Gold Wires and Pb-Sn-In Solder (37.5%, 37.5%, 25%), Part A: The Radial Reaction Inside The Solder Mounds, Its Linear Reaction Model, Statistical Variation of Reaction Rate, and Induced Structural Changes In The Solder Mounds.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siekhaus, W J

    2011-01-19

    Thermodynamics favors the reaction between indium and gold, since the heat of formation of AuIn{sub 2} is 6 kcal/mole, substantially larger than the heat of formation of any other possible reaction product. Thermodynamic equilibrium between gold and the elements in the solder mound is reached only when ALL gold is converted to AuIn{sub 2}. There are two aspects to this conversion: (A) the reaction WITHIN the solder mound (called here 'radial reaction') and (B) the reaction OUTSIDE the solder mound (called here 'axial reaction') and the transition from (A) to (B). The reaction between thin gold detonator wires and the In/Pb/Sn solder mound in older detonators has been looked at repeatedly. There are, in addition, two studies which look at the reaction between indium and gold in planar geometry. All data are shown in tables I to V. It is the objective of this section dealing with aspect (A), to combine all of these results into a reaction model and to use this reaction model to reliably and conservatively predict the gold-solder reaction rate of soldered gold bridge-wires as a function of storage temperature and time.

  13. Stochastic Analysis of Exit-Fluid Temperature Time-Series Data from the TAG Hydrothermal Mound: Events, States, and Hidden Markov Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reves-Sohn, R.; Humphris, S.; Canales, J.

    2005-12-01

    The TAG hydrothermal mound is a dynamic structure that is continuously growing via mineral deposition, collapsing from gravitational instabilities and anhydrite dissolution, and shaking from frequent seismic activity on the adjacent normal faults. As a result, the sub-surface fluid circulation patterns beneath the mound are continually re-organizing in response to events that close and open flow paths. These characteristics are clearly evident in time series exit-fluid temperature data acquired from June 2003 through July 2004 as part of the Seismicity and Fluid Flow of TAG (STAG) experiment. Twenty one temperature probes were deployed in actively venting cracks across the TAG mound, and temperature measurements were acquired at each site every ~10 minutes. A key insight for understanding the exit-fluid temperature data is that the measurements can be modeled as Markov chains, where each measurement is a random variable drawn from a finite set of probability distributions associated with the hidden states of the system (i.e., Hidden Markov Models). The Markov chain changes states in response to events that can affect multiple probes, but not necessarily in the same way. For example, an event may cause temperatures at one probe to rapidly increase while temperatures at another probe rapidly decrease. The data from many probes can be explained with a two-state Markov chain, with one state corresponding to "crack open" and the second state corresponding to "crack closed", but still other probes require three or more states, possibly in a nested structure. These stochastic models are deepening our understanding of shallow circulation patterns beneath the TAG mound, and we hope to use them to condition subsurface flow models incorporating the relevant physics of permeable flow in fractures and heat flow.

  14. The influence of microbial mats on the formation of sand volcanoes and mounds in the Red Sea coastal plain, south Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taj, Rushdi J.; Aref, Mahmoud A. M.; Schreiber, B. Charlotte

    2014-08-01

    Extensive areas covered by microbial mats have been found in the upper intertidal flats and supratidal pools in the Red Sea coastal plain of south Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Numerous microbially controlled sediment-surface morphologies are evident, such as flat cohesive mats that commonly pass into mats with wrinkles, reticulates, and tufts, together with erosion pockets and mat chips. These microbial mats form cohesive surface layers that lead to biostabilization of the sediment surface. Fluidization of the underlying sediments is due to tidal influences and pressurized gas escape from decay and photosynthesis of microbial mats and causes deformation and rupture of the cohesive surface mat layer via vertical and sub-vertical pipes. Extrusion of fluidized sediments and water through these pipes leads to redeposition of sediment grains above the surface mat layer to form sand volcanoes and mounds. Most of the sand volcanoes present in the intertidal flats and supratidal pools show a symmetrical morphology, whereas in tidal channels asymmetrical forms are more common. Extrusion of underlying sediments through several adjacent vents leads to coalescence of sand volcanoes to form sand mounds. In this study sand volcanoes are also compared with other cone-like features from the Red Sea, such as gas domes and crab mounds. This comparison should help in differentiating similar cone-like features associated with microbial mats in the rock record.

  15. Effects of salt-alkali stress on active oxygen metabolism in roots of Spiraea × bumalda ‘Gold Mound' and Spiraea × bumalda ‘Gold Flame'

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Yong-qing; CHE Dai-di; SHI Xi-chan; LIU Xing-liang

    2011-01-01

    Under artificially-simulated complex salt-alkali stress, the levels of active oxygen metabolism in roots were studied using three-year-old cutting seedlings of Spiraea × bumalda ‘Gold Mound' and Spiraea × bumalda ‘Gold Flame'. The present study aimed at exploring the antioxidant capacity in roots of spiraeas and revealing their adaptability to salt-alkali stress. Results indicate that the oxygen free radicals contents, electrolyte leakage rates and MDA contents in roots of Spiraea × buralda ‘Gold Mound' and Spiraea × bumalda ‘Gold Flame' show an increasing tendency with the increases of the salinity and pH value,whereas the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD)and catalase (CAT) all increased firstly and then decreased. With the increase in intensity of salt-alkali stress, the CAT activity in roots of Spiraea × bumalda ‘Gold Flame' is higher and the increasing extents in the oxygen free radicals contents, electrolyte leakage rates as well as MDA contents are lower compared with Spiraea × bumalda ‘Gold Mound', indicating that Spiraea × bumalda ‘Gold Flame' has a stronger antioxidant capacity.

  16. Environmental assessment of the brine pipeline replacement for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound Facility in Brazoria County, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0804, for the proposed replacement of a deteriorated brine disposal pipeline from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Bryan Mound storage facility in Brazoria County, Texas, into the Gulf of Mexico. In addition, the ocean discharge outfall would be moved shoreward by locating the brine diffuser at the end of the pipeline 3.5 miles offshore at a minimum depth of 30 feet. The action would occur in a floodplain and wetlands; therefore, a floodplain/wetlands assessment has been prepared in conjunction with this EA. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 USC. 4321, et seg.). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). This FONSI also includes a Floodplain Statement of Findings in accordance with 10 CFR Part 1022

  17. Environmental assessment of the brine pipeline replacement for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound Facility in Brazoria County, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0804, for the proposed replacement of a deteriorated brine disposal pipeline from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Bryan Mound storage facility in Brazoria County, Texas, into the Gulf of Mexico. In addition, the ocean discharge outfall would be moved shoreward by locating the brine diffuser at the end of the pipeline 3.5 miles offshore at a minimum depth of 30 feet. The action would occur in a floodplain and wetlands; therefore, a floodplain/wetlands assessment has been prepared in conjunction with this EA. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 USC. 4321, et seg.). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). This FONSI also includes a Floodplain Statement of Findings in accordance with 10 CFR Part 1022.

  18. Actinobacteria from Termite Mounds Show Antiviral Activity against Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus, a Surrogate Model for Hepatitis C Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Aiello Padilla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracts from termite-associated bacteria were evaluated for in vitro antiviral activity against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV. Two bacterial strains were identified as active, with percentages of inhibition (IP equal to 98%. Both strains were subjected to functional analysis via the addition of virus and extract at different time points in cell culture; the results showed that they were effective as posttreatments. Moreover, we performed MTT colorimetric assays to identify the CC50, IC50, and SI values of these strains, and strain CDPA27 was considered the most promising. In parallel, the isolates were identified as Streptomyces through 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Specifically, CDPA27 was identified as S. chartreusis. The CDPA27 extract was fractionated on a C18-E SPE cartridge, and the fractions were reevaluated. A 100% methanol fraction was identified to contain the compound(s responsible for antiviral activity, which had an SI of 262.41. GC-MS analysis showed that this activity was likely associated with the compound(s that had a peak retention time of 5 min. Taken together, the results of the present study provide new information for antiviral research using natural sources, demonstrate the antiviral potential of Streptomyces chartreusis compounds isolated from termite mounds against BVDV, and lay the foundation for further studies on the treatment of HCV infection.

  19. Risk-based Prioritization of Facility Decommissioning and Environmental Restoration Projects in the National Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program at the Chalk River Laboratory - 13564

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Jerel G.; Kruzic, Michael [WorleyParsons, Mississauga, ON, L4W 4H2 (United States); Castillo, Carlos [WorleyParsons, Las Vegas, NV 89128 (United States); Pavey, Todd [WorleyParsons, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States); Alexan, Tamer [WorleyParsons, Burnaby, BC, V5C 6S7 (United States); Bainbridge, Ian [Atomic Energy Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON, K0J1J0 (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Chalk River Laboratory (CRL), located in Ontario Canada, has a large number of remediation projects currently in the Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP), including hundreds of facility decommissioning projects and over one hundred environmental remediation projects, all to be executed over the next 70 years. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) utilized WorleyParsons to prioritize the NLLP projects at the CRL through a risk-based prioritization and ranking process, using the WorleyParsons Sequencing Unit Prioritization and Estimating Risk Model (SUPERmodel). The prioritization project made use of the SUPERmodel which has been previously used for other large-scale site prioritization and sequencing of facilities at nuclear laboratories in the United States. The process included development and vetting of risk parameter matrices as well as confirmation/validation of project risks. Detailed sensitivity studies were also conducted to understand the impacts that risk parameter weighting and scoring had on prioritization. The repeatable prioritization process yielded an objective, risk-based and technically defendable process for prioritization that gained concurrence from all stakeholders, including Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) who is responsible for the oversight of the NLLP. (authors)

  20. Risk-based Prioritization of Facility Decommissioning and Environmental Restoration Projects in the National Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program at the Chalk River Laboratory - 13564

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalk River Laboratory (CRL), located in Ontario Canada, has a large number of remediation projects currently in the Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP), including hundreds of facility decommissioning projects and over one hundred environmental remediation projects, all to be executed over the next 70 years. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) utilized WorleyParsons to prioritize the NLLP projects at the CRL through a risk-based prioritization and ranking process, using the WorleyParsons Sequencing Unit Prioritization and Estimating Risk Model (SUPERmodel). The prioritization project made use of the SUPERmodel which has been previously used for other large-scale site prioritization and sequencing of facilities at nuclear laboratories in the United States. The process included development and vetting of risk parameter matrices as well as confirmation/validation of project risks. Detailed sensitivity studies were also conducted to understand the impacts that risk parameter weighting and scoring had on prioritization. The repeatable prioritization process yielded an objective, risk-based and technically defendable process for prioritization that gained concurrence from all stakeholders, including Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) who is responsible for the oversight of the NLLP. (authors)

  1. Model description of CHERPAC (Chalk River Environmental Research Pathways Analysis Code); results of testing with post-Chernobyl data from Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CHERPAC (Chalk River Environmental Research Pathways Analysis Code), a time-dependent code for assessing doses from accidental and routine releases of radionuclides, has been under development since 1987. A complete model description is provide here with equations, parameter values, assumptions and information on parameter distributions for uncertainty analysis. Concurrently, CHERPAC has been used to participate in the two internal model validation exercises BIOMOVS (BIOspheric MOdel Validation Study) and VAMP (VAlidation of Assessment Model Predictions, a co-ordinated research program of the International Atomic Energy Agency). CHERPAC has been tested for predictions of concentrations of 137Cs in foodstuffs, body burden and dose over time using data collected after the Chernobyl accident of 1986 April. CHERPAC's results for the recent VAMP scenario for southern Finland are particularly accurate and should represent what the code can do under Canadian conditions. CHERPAC's predictions are compared with the observations from Finland for four and one-half years after the accident as well as with the results of the other participating models from nine countries. (author). 18 refs., 23 figs., 2 appendices

  2. Transition of microbiological and sedimentological features associated with the geochemical gradient in a travertine mound in northern Sumatra, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, Chiya; Yanagawa, Katsunori; Okumura, Tomoyo; Takashima, Chizuru; Harijoko, Agung; Kano, Akihiro

    2016-08-01

    Modern travertines, carbonate deposits in Ca-rich hydrothermal water with high pCO2, often display a changing environment along the water path, with corresponding variability in the microbial communities. We investigated a travertine-bearing hot spring at the Blue Pool in northern Sumatra, Indonesia. The thermal water of ~ 62 °C with high H2S (200 μM) and pCO2 (~ 1 atm) developed a travertine mound ~ 70 m wide. The concentrations of the gas components H2S and CO2, decrease immediately after the water is discharged, while the dissolved oxygen, pH, and aragonite saturation increase in the downstream direction. Responding to the geochemical gradient in the water, the surface biofilms change color from white to pink, light-green, dark-green, and brown as the water flows from the vent; this corresponds to microbial communities characterized by chemolithoautotrophs (Halothiobacillaceae), purple sulfur bacteria (Chromatiaceae), Anaerolineaceae, and co-occurrence of green non-sulfur bacteria (Chloroflexales)-Cyanobacteria, and green sulfur bacteria (Chlorobiales), respectively. In an environment with a certain level of H2S (> 1 μM), sulfur digestion and anoxygenic photosynthesis can be more profitable than oxygenic photosynthesis by Cyanobacteria. The precipitated carbonate mineral consists of aragonite and calcite, with the proportion of aragonite increasing downstream due to the larger Mg2 +/Ca2 + ratio in the water or the development of thicker biofilm. Where the biofilm is well developed, the aragonite travertines often exhibit laminated structures that were likely associated with the daily metabolism of these bacteria. The microbiological and sedimentological features at the Blue Pool may be the modern analogs of geomicrobiological products in the early Earth. Biofilm of anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria had the potential to form ancient stromatolites that existed before the appearance of cyanobacteria.

  3. THE ROLE OF LAND USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION MAKING AT THREE DOE MEGA-CLEANUP SITES FERNALD & ROCKY FLATS & MOUND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JEWETT MA

    2011-01-14

    This paper explores the role that future land use decisions have played in the establishment of cost-effective cleanup objectives and the setting of environmental media cleanup levels for the three major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites for which cleanup has now been successfully completed: the Rocky Flats, Mound, and Fernald Closure Sites. At each site, there are distinct consensus-building histories throughout the following four phases: (1) the facility shut-down and site investigation phase, which took place at the completion of their Cold War nuclear-material production missions; (2) the decision-making phase, whereby stakeholder and regulatory-agency consensus was achieved for the future land-use-based environmental decisions confronting the sites; (3) the remedy selection phase, whereby appropriate remedial actions were identified to achieve the future land-use-based decisions; and (4) the implementation phase, whereby the selected remedial actions for these high-profile sites were implemented and successfully closed out. At each of the three projects, there were strained relationships and distrust between the local community and the DOE as a result of site contamination and potential health effects to the workers and local residents. To engage citizens and interested stakeholder groups - particularly in the role of final land use in the decision-making process, the site management teams at each respective site developed new public-participation strategies to open stakeholder communication channels with site leadership, technical staff, and the regulatory agencies. This action proved invaluable to the success of the projects and reaching consensus on appropriate levels of cleanup. With the implementation of the cleanup remedies now complete, each of the three DOE sites have become models for future environmental-remediation projects and associated decision making.

  4. Experimental study and mechanical modelling of the effects of water-driving in an oil saturated chalk. Application to the petroleum industry; Etude experimentale et modelisation mecanique des effets du balayage a l'eau dans une craie saturee d'huile. Application a l'industrie petroliere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mata, C.

    2001-01-01

    The production of hydrocarbons may sometimes lead to compaction of the oil-reservoir layers with substantial collapse of the soil surface; this mechanism is usually mentioned as Subsidence. Classical remedy to this problem is to sustain the fluid pressure with the help of water injection. However, in presence of high porosity chalk (porosity > 30%), this technique does not give effective results: the subsidence rate at North Sea reservoirs (Ekofisk field), after injection, has remained unchanged. Some justify the subsistence in the chalk as caused by phenomena of dissolution of the carbonates; others think it is connected to the destruction of capillary menisci. In this research, we follow this second approach. This study is finalized to a better understanding of the compaction mechanisms in pure carbonates when water is injected. This is done by proposing -in micro-scale first and in macro-scale after- a physical model that agrees with empirical observations. In order to meet this target, IFP skills and experience in physical and chemical measurements (taken before, after and during mechanical tests) have proficiently joined ENPC laboratory (CERMMO) knowledge of micro and macro modelling. The soft rock studied is a Paris basin's white chalk (Craie de Guerville). Its physical and chemical characterisation (i.e.: silica content, porosity, permeability) is very similar to North Sea chalk, but Guerville chalk has never been in contact with oil and generally it crops out of the ground surface. Strength parameters of this rock have been first determined by standard triaxial tests. Three different saturation configurations have been examined: dry, fully oil-saturated and fully water-saturated. As literature clearly state, dry chalk is stronger than oil saturated chalk and the first two are largely stronger than water saturated chalk. Therefore uniaxial strain water injection tests have been performed on oil saturated samples. Results, coupled with previous physical

  5. MULTICOMPONENT SEISMIC ANALYSIS AND CALIBRATION TO IMPROVE RECOVERY FROM ALGAL MOUNDS: APPLICATION TO THE ROADRUNNER/TOWAOC AREA OF THE PARADOX BASIN, UTE MOUNTAIN UTE RESERVATION, COLORADO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the results made in fulfillment of contract DE-FG26-02NT15451, ''Multicomponent Seismic Analysis and Calibration to Improve Recovery from Algal Mounds: Application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc Area of the Paradox Basin, Ute Mountain Ute Reservation, Colorado''. Optimizing development of highly heterogeneous reservoirs where porosity and permeability vary in unpredictable ways due to facies variations can be challenging. An important example of this is in the algal mounds of the Lower and Upper Ismay reservoirs of the Paradox Basin in Utah and Colorado. It is nearly impossible to develop a forward predictive model to delineate regions of better reservoir development, and so enhanced recovery processes must be selected and designed based upon data that can quantitatively or qualitatively distinguish regions of good or bad reservoir permeability and porosity between existing well control. Recent advances in seismic acquisition and processing offer new ways to see smaller features with more confidence, and to characterize the internal structure of reservoirs such as algal mounds. However, these methods have not been tested. This project will acquire cutting edge, three-dimensional, nine-component (3D9C) seismic data and utilize recently-developed processing algorithms, including the mapping of azimuthal velocity changes in amplitude variation with offset, to extract attributes that relate to variations in reservoir permeability and porosity. In order to apply advanced seismic methods a detailed reservoir study is needed to calibrate the seismic data to reservoir permeability, porosity and lithofacies. This will be done by developing a petrological and geological characterization of the mounds from well data; acquiring and processing the 3D9C data; and comparing the two using advanced pattern recognition tools such as neural nets. In addition, should the correlation prove successful, the resulting data will be evaluated from the perspective of

  6. Growth of gas hydrate mounds and gas chimneys of the eastern margin of Japan Sea as revealed by MBES, SSS and SBP of AUV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, R.; Satoh, M.; Hiromatsu, M.; Tomaru, H.; Machiyama, H.

    2010-12-01

    A series of PC, ROV and SCS surveys to study the origin and evolution of gas hydrate systems along the eastern margin of Japan Sea have identified a number of shallow GH accumulations on the mounds, 300m to 500m in diameter and 30m to 40m high, on the Umitaka spur and Joetsu knoll in Joetsu basin with the WD of 880m to 1200m (Matsumoto et al., 2005; 2009). All of the hydrate mounds develop on gas chimneys as recognized by seismic profiles, and some are associated with gigantic methane plumes, 600m to 700m high. Multi Beam Echo Sounder (MBES), Side Scan Sonar (SSS) and Sub-Bottom Profiler (SBP) of AUV Urashima have revealed ultra-high resolution topographic features and subsurface structures of the mounds and adjacent areas during the JAMSTEC YK10-08 cruise, July 2010. AUV Urashima ran over the spur and knoll at 50m to 80m above seafloor at a cruising speed of 2.4 knots. MBES and SSS mosaics demonstrate two types of mounds. One is a low swell with smooth surface and weak reflectance, while the other is characterized by rough and uneven topographic features with strong SSS images due to incrustation by methane-induced carbonate concretions and gas hydrates. SBP provides clear stratigraphic and structural relations down to 50mbsf to 80mbsf and recognizes three stratigraphic units as I: upper massive unit (5-10m thick), II: middle evenly bedded unit (15-25m thick) and III: lower slightly bedded unit (> 15-25m thick). Gas chimneys grow up toward the seafloor through Units III, II, and I. When the ceiling of gas chimney stays within Unit III or II, the mound above the chimney is either low swell or nearly flat, while the swell grows up higher when the ceiling reaches to Unit I or the seafloor. Eventually, the ceiling breaks through the seafloor and protrudes to form GH mound up to 40m to 50m high, and then start to decay probably due to mechanical collapse and chemical dissolution of gas hydrates. The ceiling of gas chimneys is often represented by high amplitude, uneven

  7. MULTICOMPONENT SEISMIC ANALYSIS AND CALIBRATION TO IMPROVE RECOVERY FROM ALGAL MOUNDS: APPLICATION TO THE ROADRUNNER/TOWAOC AREA OF THE PARADOX BASIN, UTE MOUNTAIN UTE RESERVATION, COLORADO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul La Pointe; Claudia Rebne; Steve Dobbs

    2003-07-10

    This report describes the results made in fulfillment of contract DE-FG26-02NT15451, ''Multicomponent Seismic Analysis and Calibration to Improve Recovery from Algal Mounds: Application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc Area of the Paradox Basin, Ute Mountain Ute Reservation, Colorado''. Optimizing development of highly heterogeneous reservoirs where porosity and permeability vary in unpredictable ways due to facies variations can be challenging. An important example of this is in the algal mounds of the Lower and Upper Ismay reservoirs of the Paradox Basin in Utah and Colorado. It is nearly impossible to develop a forward predictive model to delineate regions of better reservoir development, and so enhanced recovery processes must be selected and designed based upon data that can quantitatively or qualitatively distinguish regions of good or bad reservoir permeability and porosity between existing well control. Recent advances in seismic acquisition and processing offer new ways to see smaller features with more confidence, and to characterize the internal structure of reservoirs such as algal mounds. However, these methods have not been tested. This project will acquire cutting edge, three-dimensional, nine-component (3D9C) seismic data and utilize recently-developed processing algorithms, including the mapping of azimuthal velocity changes in amplitude variation with offset, to extract attributes that relate to variations in reservoir permeability and porosity. In order to apply advanced seismic methods a detailed reservoir study is needed to calibrate the seismic data to reservoir permeability, porosity and lithofacies. This will be done by developing a petrological and geological characterization of the mounds from well data; acquiring and processing the 3D9C data; and comparing the two using advanced pattern recognition tools such as neural nets. In addition, should the correlation prove successful, the resulting data will be evaluated from the

  8. Offshore oceanographic and environmental monitoring services for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume I. Appendices. Annual report for the Bryan Mound Site, September 1982-August 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1984-03-01

    The Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program began leaching the Bryan Mound salt dome and discharging brine into the coastal waters offshore of Freeport, Texas on March 10, 1980. This report describes the findings of a team of Texas A and M University scientists and engineers who have conducted a study to evaluate the effects of the Bryan Mound brine discharge on the marine environment. The study addresses the areas of physical oceanography, analysis of the discharge plume, water and sediment quality, nekton, benthos and data management. It focuses on the period from September 1982 through August 1983. The ambient physical environment and its temporal and spatial variability were studied by means of continuously recording in situ current/conductivitiy/temperature meters and twelve, one-day synoptic hydrographic cruises. The quarterly water and sediment quality data show a small increase in salinity, sodium and chloride ions occurs in the bottom waters and sediment pore waters near the diffuser relative to those values measured at stations farther away. Data from the brine plume study for this reporting study show the largest areal extent within the +1 o/oo above ambient salinity contour was 40.0 km/sup 2/ which occurred on August 11, 1983. It appears that brine disposal at Bryan Mound has had neglible if any influence on the nekton community surrounding the diffuser. The benthic quarterly data from 26 stations, including 7 collections made after the diffuser outflow rate was increased to 1,000,000 barrels/day, show the total numbers of species at the diffuser station were higher than most other nearfield stations as well as many farfield stations in both the pre- and post-1,000,000 barrels/day brine flow periods. 138 references, 175 figures, 53 tables.

  9. Impacts from Partial Removal of Decommissioned Oil and Gas Platforms on Fish Biomass and Production on the Remaining Platform Structure and Surrounding Shell Mounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy T Claisse

    Full Text Available When oil and gas platforms become obsolete they go through a decommissioning process. This may include partial removal (from the surface to 26 m depth or complete removal of the platform structure. While complete removal would likely eliminate most of the existing fish biomass and associated secondary production, we find that the potential impacts of partial removal would likely be limited on all but one platform off the coast of California. On average 80% of fish biomass and 86% of secondary fish production would be retained after partial removal, with above 90% retention expected for both metrics on many platforms. Partial removal would likely result in the loss of fish biomass and production for species typically found residing in the shallow portions of the platform structure. However, these fishes generally represent a small proportion of the fishes associated with these platforms. More characteristic of platform fauna are the primarily deeper-dwelling rockfishes (genus Sebastes. "Shell mounds" are biogenic reefs that surround some of these platforms resulting from an accumulation of mollusk shells that have fallen from the shallow areas of the platforms mostly above the depth of partial removal. We found that shell mounds are moderately productive fish habitats, similar to or greater than natural rocky reefs in the region at comparable depths. The complexity and areal extent of these biogenic habitats, and the associated fish biomass and production, will likely be reduced after either partial or complete platform removal. Habitat augmentation by placing the partially removed platform superstructure or some other additional habitat enrichment material (e.g., rock boulders on the seafloor adjacent to the base of partially removed platforms provides additional options to enhance fish production, potentially mitigating reductions in shell mound habitat.

  10. Impacts from Partial Removal of Decommissioned Oil and Gas Platforms on Fish Biomass and Production on the Remaining Platform Structure and Surrounding Shell Mounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claisse, Jeremy T; Pondella, Daniel J; Love, Milton; Zahn, Laurel A; Williams, Chelsea M; Bull, Ann S

    2015-01-01

    When oil and gas platforms become obsolete they go through a decommissioning process. This may include partial removal (from the surface to 26 m depth) or complete removal of the platform structure. While complete removal would likely eliminate most of the existing fish biomass and associated secondary production, we find that the potential impacts of partial removal would likely be limited on all but one platform off the coast of California. On average 80% of fish biomass and 86% of secondary fish production would be retained after partial removal, with above 90% retention expected for both metrics on many platforms. Partial removal would likely result in the loss of fish biomass and production for species typically found residing in the shallow portions of the platform structure. However, these fishes generally represent a small proportion of the fishes associated with these platforms. More characteristic of platform fauna are the primarily deeper-dwelling rockfishes (genus Sebastes). "Shell mounds" are biogenic reefs that surround some of these platforms resulting from an accumulation of mollusk shells that have fallen from the shallow areas of the platforms mostly above the depth of partial removal. We found that shell mounds are moderately productive fish habitats, similar to or greater than natural rocky reefs in the region at comparable depths. The complexity and areal extent of these biogenic habitats, and the associated fish biomass and production, will likely be reduced after either partial or complete platform removal. Habitat augmentation by placing the partially removed platform superstructure or some other additional habitat enrichment material (e.g., rock boulders) on the seafloor adjacent to the base of partially removed platforms provides additional options to enhance fish production, potentially mitigating reductions in shell mound habitat. PMID:26332384

  11. Excavation of the Shell Mound at Damaoshan in Dongshan County,Fujian%福建东山县大帽山贝丘遗址的发掘

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    福建博物院; 美国哈佛大学人类学系

    2003-01-01

    To study prehistoric Fujian-Taiwan cultural relationship and other subjects,the Dongshan Damaoshan shell mound was excavated in November-December 2002.The objects unearthed include stone implements,jades,bone and shell artifacts and pottery,as well as plentiful remains of terrestrial and marine vertebrates and marine shellfish.The excavation not only clarified the date,nature,cultural contents and economic formation of the site,but also provided a scale for comparative studies of cultures in the Fujian and Taiwan regions and for establishing the chronological sequence of Neolithic cultures in southern Fujian.

  12. Environmental Assessment for the Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the US Department of Energy's Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The glass melter would thermally treat mixed waste (hazardous waste contaminated with radioactive constituents largely tritium, Pu-238, and/or Th-230) that was generated at the Mound Plant and is now in storage, by stabilizing the waste in glass blocks. Depending on the radiation level of the waste, the glass melter may operate for 1 to 6 years. Two onsite alternatives and seven offsite alternatives were considered. This environmental assessment indicates that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA, and therefore the finding of no significant impact is made, obviating the need for an environmental impact statement

  13. Sedimentological study of cold-water coral mounds on Pen Duick Escarpment (Gulf of Cadiz): preliminary results of the MD169 cruise

    OpenAIRE

    Mol, L.; H. Pirlet; de Rooij, D.; BLAMART, D; Frank, N.; Cnudde, V.; Duyck, P.; Henriet, J.-P.

    2010-01-01

    Cold-water corals are widely distributed along the Moroccan margin in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean. Within the Gulf of Cadiz mud volcanoes, submarine ridges and steep fault escarpments occur, which favour the settlement of scleractinians and build up coral mounds. One of these sites is the Pen Duick Escarpment, situated in the El Arraiche mud volcano field, 35 km offshore the city of Larache. Pen Duick Escarpment is a 6 km long, SSE-NNW oriented, 80 to 125 m high wall with a southwest-facing ...

  14. The results from the second high-pressure melt ejection test completed in the molten fuel moderator interaction facility at Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a Candu reactor and under severely restricted flow blockage conditions postulated in a fuel channel, the temperature excursion could result in fuel melting, consequential failure of the fuel channel, and ejection of the molten fuel at high pressures into the heavy water moderator at near atmospheric pressure. The objective of the experimental program is to demonstrate that a highly energetic Molten Fuel Moderator Interaction (MFMI) and associated high-pressure pulse can be ruled out for a Candu reactor. The second high-pressure melt ejection test using 22 kg of prototypical corium was completed recently at Chalk River Laboratories. The second test consisted in heating a thermite mixture of U, U3O8, Zr, and CrO3, simulating the molten material expected in a fuel channel, inside a 1 m length of insulated pressure tube. Once the molten material reached the desired temperature of about 2400 C degrees, the molten material was ejected into the surrounding tank of 63 C water. At the time of melt ejection, the static pressure in the test section was 3.35 MPa. The confinement vessel pressure reached a peak value of 201 kPa following the rupture of the test section. The peak dynamic pressure measured on the inner vessel walls ranged between 0.7 MPa and 1 MPa. The total debris collected inside the tank was 22.65 kg. The debris inside the inner tank consists of corium, quartz and Zircar. The majority of the corium particles were less than 1 mm in diameter and the calculated value of the mean size of the debris appears to be 0.581 mm. An analysis of the confinement vessel gas inventory indicated 17.6% hydrogen

  15. The results from the second high-pressure melt ejection test completed in the molten fuel moderator interaction facility at Chalk River Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitheanandan, T.; Kyle, G.; O' Connor, R. [Chalk River Laboratories, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    For a Candu reactor and under severely restricted flow blockage conditions postulated in a fuel channel, the temperature excursion could result in fuel melting, consequential failure of the fuel channel, and ejection of the molten fuel at high pressures into the heavy water moderator at near atmospheric pressure. The objective of the experimental program is to demonstrate that a highly energetic Molten Fuel Moderator Interaction (MFMI) and associated high-pressure pulse can be ruled out for a Candu reactor. The second high-pressure melt ejection test using 22 kg of prototypical corium was completed recently at Chalk River Laboratories. The second test consisted in heating a thermite mixture of U, U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, Zr, and CrO{sub 3}, simulating the molten material expected in a fuel channel, inside a 1 m length of insulated pressure tube. Once the molten material reached the desired temperature of about 2400 C degrees, the molten material was ejected into the surrounding tank of 63 C water. At the time of melt ejection, the static pressure in the test section was 3.35 MPa. The confinement vessel pressure reached a peak value of 201 kPa following the rupture of the test section. The peak dynamic pressure measured on the inner vessel walls ranged between 0.7 MPa and 1 MPa. The total debris collected inside the tank was 22.65 kg. The debris inside the inner tank consists of corium, quartz and Zircar. The majority of the corium particles were less than 1 mm in diameter and the calculated value of the mean size of the debris appears to be 0.581 mm. An analysis of the confinement vessel gas inventory indicated 17.6% hydrogen.

  16. Impedance imaging in core analysis. Imaging of phase distributions in samples of natural cores of North Sea chalk containing conducting as well as non-conducting fluids. Part: 1-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laursen, S. [DTU, Inst. for Kemi (Denmark)] Moeller Nielsen, C. [DTU, Inst. for Energiteknik (Denmark)

    1997-12-31

    The present report documents the efforts to develop an impedance method for determining the distribution of the water saturation in a chalk core sample. Measurement of this distribution during a displacement process will make it possible to make numerical simulations of the process which may in turn reveal important rock parameters. The impedance method is one among other methods to determine saturation profiles in a research programme on rock parameters with participants from Danmarks Tekniske Universitet, DTU, and Danmarks og Groenlands Geologiske Undersoegelse, GEUS. The other methods investigated are nmr-scanning and {gamma}-logging. (au)

  17. Mollusc-based paleoecological investigations of the Late Copper — Early Bronze Age earth mounds (kurgans) on the Great Hungarian Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilágyi, Gábor; Sümegi, Pál; Molnár, Dávid; Sávai, Szilvia

    2013-12-01

    The malacological material of the mound bodies (kurgans) of the Great Hungarian Plain indicates a mixed vegetation of dry and humid environments, developed on a mosaic of alkaline and chernozem soils in the period of the construction of the kurgan. The malacofauna that evolved in the upper soil horizon of the mound indicates the extremely dry environmental conditions of steppes, charaterized by the dominance of thermoxerophilous species. Dominant species of this kurgan are Chondrula tridens, Helicopsis striata, Granaria frumentum and Cepaea vindobonensis. The species composition shows that there are differences in the malacofauna of the Danube-Tisa Interfluves region compared to that of the lowlands east of River Tisza, indicated by the higher dominance of Granaria frumentum and Helicopsis striata in the former region. Following the construction of the kurgans an island-like, dry habitat developed on their surface, covered by black soil and populated by a steppe fauna, the composition of which is comparable mostly with the mollusc fauna of loess steppes and forest steppe, irrespectively of the floodplain or wind-blown sand character of the original surface.

  18. Temporal Characterization of Hydrates System Dynamics beneath Seafloor Mounds. Integrating Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Methods and In Situ Observations of Multiple Oceanographic Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutken, Carol [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Macelloni, Leonardo [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); D' Emidio, Marco [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Dunbar, John [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Higley, Paul [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States)

    2015-01-31

    This study was designed to investigate temporal variations in hydrate system dynamics by measuring changes in volumes of hydrate beneath hydrate-bearing mounds on the continental slope of the northern Gulf of Mexico, the landward extreme of hydrate occurrence in this region. Direct Current Resistivity (DCR) measurements were made contemporaneously with measurements of oceanographic parameters at Woolsey Mound, a carbonate-hydrate complex on the mid-continental slope, where formation and dissociation of hydrates are most vulnerable to variations in oceanographic parameters affected by climate change, and where changes in hydrate stability can readily translate to loss of seafloor stability, impacts to benthic ecosystems, and venting of greenhouse gases to the water-column, and eventually, the atmosphere. We focused our study on hydrate within seafloor mounds because the structurally-focused methane flux at these sites likely causes hydrate formation and dissociation processes to occur at higher rates than at sites where the methane flux is less concentrated and we wanted to maximize our chances of witnessing association/dissociation of hydrates. We selected a particularly well-studied hydrate-bearing seafloor mound near the landward extent of the hydrate stability zone, Woolsey Mound (MC118). This mid-slope site has been studied extensively and the project was able to leverage considerable resources from the team’s research experience at MC118. The site exhibits seafloor features associated with gas expulsion, hydrates have been documented at the seafloor, and changes in the outcropping hydrates have been documented, photographically, to have occurred over a period of months. We conducted observatory-based, in situ measurements to 1) characterize, geophysically, the sub-bottom distribution of hydrate and its temporal variability, and 2) contemporaneously record relevant environmental parameters (temperature, pressure, salinity, turbidity, bottom currents) to

  19. Results of detailed ground geophysical surveys for locating and differentiating waste structures in waste management area 'A' at Chalk River Laboratories, Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomsons, D.K.; Street, P.J.; Lodha, G.S

    1999-07-01

    Waste Management Area 'A' (WMA 'A'), located in the outer area of the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) was in use as a waste burial site from 1946 to 1955. Waste management structures include debris-filled trenches, concrete bunkers and miscellaneous contaminated solid materials, and ditches and pits used for liquid dispersal. In order to update historical records, it was proposed to conduct detailed ground geophysical surveys to define the locations of waste management structures in WMA 'A', assist in planning of the drilling and sampling program to provide ground truth for the geophysics investigation and to predict the nature and locations of unknown/undefined shallow structures. A detailed ground geophysical survey grid was established with a total of 127 grid lines, oriented NNE and spaced one metre apart. The geophysical surveys were carried out during August and September, 1996. The combination of geophysical tools used included the Geonics EM61 metal detector, the GSM-19 magnetometer/gradiometer and a RAMAC high frequency ground penetrating radar system. The geophysical surveys were successful in identifying waste management structures and in characterizing to some extent, the composition of the waste. The geophysical surveys are able to determine the presence of most of the known waste management structures, especially in the western and central portions of the grid which contain the majority of the metallic waste. The eastern portion of the grid has a completely different geophysical character. While historical records show that trenches were dug, they are far less evident in the geophysical record. There is clear evidence for a trench running between lines 30E and 63E at 70 m. There are indications from the radar survey of other trench-like structures in the eastern portion. EM61 data clearly show that there is far less metallic debris in the eastern portion. The geophysical surveys were also successful in identifying

  20. Results from the fourth high-pressure melt ejection test completed in the molten fuel moderator interaction facility at Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fourth high-pressure melt ejection test using prototypical corium was completed at Chalk River Laboratories. This test was one of four tests planned by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited to study the potential for energetic interaction between molten fuel and water. The experiments were designed to address one of the very low probability postulated accident events considered for Candu Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs). The accident event considered is the severe reduction in the coolant flow to a single channel. This reduction could result from a blockage in the flow or a break in the inlet piping to a fuel channel. If the reduction in the flow is severe (approaching complete cessation of the flow), the fuel channel will overheat and fail. Such a failure is not predicted to propagate to other fuel channels; the scenario is terminated with the emergency coolant injection. Under severely restricted flow blockage conditions, the temperature excursion could result in fuel melting. Conservative safety analysis assessments consider the implications of the worst-case scenario, which can involve the ejection of the molten material from the fuel channel into the heavy-water moderator. The predictions are that the melt will be finely fragmented and will transfer energy to the moderator as it is dispersed, creating a modest pressure pulse in the calandria vessel. The high-pressure melt ejection experiments funded by the Candu Owners Group have been performed to confirm these predictions and to show that a highly energetic 'steam explosion, ' and associated high-pressure pulse, is not possible. The high-pressure melt ejection test described here consisted of heating 12.5 kg of a thermite mixture U, UO2, Zr, and CrO3, representing the molten material in a fuel channel, inside an insulated pressure tube. When the molten material reached the desired temperature of ∼2400 deg.C, the pressure inside the tube was raised to about 10.5 MP a, and the pressure tube failed due

  1. Optical Telemetry Improves Persistence and Data Access at Woolsey Mound Observatory, Mississippi Canyon block 118, Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, N.; Sleeper, K.; Camilli, R.; Pontbriand, C.; Ware, J.

    2011-12-01

    A suite of geochemical arrays have been developed for the Woolsey Mound Seafloor Observatory in the northern Gulf of Mexico to evaluate the oceanographic and tectonic forcing factors on the formation and stability of gas hydrate. These arrays are designed to collect sustained, time-series data of chemical concentrations, gradients and flux from the subsurface to the sea floor and into the near bottom water column. A key component of the Observatory is the Benthic Boundary Layer Array (BBLA). The BBLA has two sensor nodes, one near the seafloor and the other 20m above the bottom. Each node has a suite of instruments to collect physical and chemical measurements (O2, T, P, S, pH, ORP, CDOM, Chly-A, and aromatic HC). The array provides a time-series data set, twenty seconds out of every 5 minutes, for evaluating the fate of transiting fluids form the seafloor and on downward, cross, or up welling conditions that are associated with a hydrate destabilization event. We report on the successes of multiple deployments of the BBLA and on the integration of a new underwater optical communication system that provides high data rate communications over a range of >100 meters from a subsurface mooring. Optical communications is capable of high data rates, up to 10 mega bits per second (Mbps), compared to acoustic data rates of 5 Kbps. We have developed an integrated optical/acoustic telemetry system (OTS) that uses an acoustic command system to control a high bandwidth, low latency optical communication system. In June 2011, from the RV Pelican, we deployed the BBLA, which included an inline, mooring mounted, optical modem. Using a lowered OTS mounted on a frame with batteries, and a fiber optic connection to the surface,the OTS was lowered by wire from a surface ship. An optical communication link was established, with a range of >100 meters, and a transmission rate of 2.5 Mbps, which provided successful file transfers. The OTS/BBLA will remain installed at MC118 for one year

  2. Multicomponent Seismic Analysis and Calibration to Improve Recovery from Algal Mounds: Application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc area of the Paradox Basin, UTE Mountain UTE Reservation, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe Hachey

    2007-09-30

    The goals of this project were: (1) To enhance recovery of oil contained within algal mounds on the Ute Mountain Ute tribal lands. (2) To promote the use of advanced technology and expand the technical capability of the Native American Oil production corporations by direct assistance in the current project and dissemination of technology to other Tribes. (3) To develop an understanding of multicomponent seismic data as it relates to the variations in permeability and porosity of algal mounds, as well as lateral facies variations, for use in both reservoir development and exploration. (4) To identify any undiscovered algal mounds for field-extension within the area of seismic coverage. (5) To evaluate the potential for applying CO{sub 2} floods, steam floods, water floods or other secondary or tertiary recovery processes to increase production. The technical work scope was carried out by: (1) Acquiring multicomponent seismic data over the project area; (2) Processing and reprocessing the multicomponent data to extract as much geological and engineering data as possible within the budget and time-frame of the project; (3) Preparing maps and data volumes of geological and engineering data based on the multicomponent seismic and well data; (4) Selecting drilling targets if warranted by the seismic interpretation; (5) Constructing a static reservoir model of the project area; and (6) Constructing a dynamic history-matched simulation model from the static model. The original project scope covered a 6 mi{sup 2} (15.6 km{sup 2}) area encompassing two algal mound fields (Towaoc and Roadrunner). 3D3C seismic data was to acquired over this area to delineate mound complexes and image internal reservoir properties such as porosity and fluid saturations. After the project began, the Red Willow Production Company, a project partner and fully-owned company of the Southern Ute Tribe, contributed additional money to upgrade the survey to a nine-component (3D9C) survey. The purpose

  3. Geochemical Analysis as a Complementary Tool to Estimate the Uplift of Sediments Caused by Shallow Gas Hydrates in Mounds at the Seafloor of Joetsu Basin, Eastern Margin of the Japan Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Fernando Menezes Freire

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Holocene sediments of the eastern margin of the Japan Sea are characterized by high total organic carbon (TOC and total nitrogen (TN contents, low TOC/TN and TS/TOC values with enriched δ13Corg signatures, as a result of high marine productivity during present oxic highstand. On the other hand, the LGM sediments are characterized by low TOC and TN contents, high TOC/TN and TS/TOC values with depleted δ13Corg signatures, characteristic of C3-derived terrestrial organic matter input during that anoxic lowstand. However, at the top of mounds at the seafloor, where gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate nodules occur, the host sediments have a mixture of both Holocene and LGM geochemical signatures. Both gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate, formed by the anaerobic oxidation of methane, increased the sedimentary volume and caused an uplift of older sediments, inducing mound formation. The thickness of the Holocene sediments over mounds is very small or absent exposing the last glacial maximum (LGM sediments to the seafloor. The uplift of the LGM sediments within mounds is estimated to be >2 m. We conducted geochemical analysis to detect such sediment movement, using samples collected by shallow cores in the Joetsu Basin, eastern margin of the Japan Sea.

  4. Recommendations to the NRC for review criteria for alternative methods of low-level radioactive waste disposal: Task 2b: Earth-mounded concrete bunkers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Army Engineers Waterways Experiment Station (WES) and US Army Engineer Division, Huntsville (HNDED) have developed general design criteria and specific design review criteria for the earth-mounded concrete bunker (EMCB) alternative method of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal. An EMCB is generally described as a reinforced concrete vault placed below grade, underneath a tumulus, surrounded by filter-blanket and drainage zones. The tumulus is covered over with a low permeability cover layer and top soil with vegetation. Eight major review criteria categories have been developed ranging from the loads imposed on the EMCB structure through material quality and durability considerations. Specific design review criteria have been developed in detail for each of the eight major categories. 63 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Diagenesis of 1900-year-old siliceous sinter (opal-A to quartz) at Opal Mound, Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynne, Bridget Y.; Campbell, Kathleen A.; Moore, J. N.; Browne, P. R. L.

    2005-08-01

    White, vitreous, siliceous sinter dated by 14C at ˜1900 years BP is located along the crest of the Opal Mound deposit at Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah, U.S.A. Deposition at vents resulted from the Opal Mound fault opening conduits to the surface, allowing thermal fluids to discharge. Fault movement subsequently fractured the sinter and initiated a second period of fluid discharge. Colorful silica was deposited in this later period and formed the distal slope sinter, dated at ˜1600 years BP. The sinter preserves both end-members in the mineralogical maturation of silica, from initial opal-A to mature quartz, and also records incremental intermediate steps, as revealed by X-ray powder diffractrometry and by scanning electron, optical and Raman laser microscopy. Textural and mineralogical changes from one silica phase to another transpired gradually and gradationally. During diagenesis, incremental morphological changes alternated three times through nano- to micro-particle size transitions. The three corresponding mineralogical steps comprise: (1) opal-A to opal-CT, (2) opal-CT to opal-C, and (3) opal-C to quartz. Mineralogical changes preceded all morphological changes. Each step was initiated when silica nanostructures reached a critical diameter of 200 nm. The initial starting point of fresh (modern), polymeric, siliceous sinter deposition worldwide is nano-spherical particles of colloidal opal-A. Opaline sinter at Opal Mound is slightly more mature, reflecting the beginning of the aging process, and comprises botryoidal clusters of silica microspheres (marked by the reorganization of the microspheres into randomly oriented rows (˜800 nm in length) of aligned nanospheres, up to 200 nm diameter. Each row merges into joined beads, which sharpen into classic opal-CT morphology of bladed lepispheres (˜4 μm diameter). During this first diagenetic step, the X-ray powder diffraction trace undergoes an early shift in peak position, from ˜4.0 to 4.09 Å, lining itself

  6. Identification and numerical modelling of hydrocarbon leakage in the Lower Congo Basin: Implications on the genesis of km-wide seafloor mounded structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anka, Zahie; Ondrak, Robert; Kowitz, Astrid; Schødt, Niels

    2013-09-01

    We present a combined approach of interpretation of 2D seismic-reflection data and numerical modelling of hydrocarbon generation and migration across the southern slope of the Lower Congo Basin, in order to investigate the factors controlling timing and distribution of hydrocarbon leakage in this area. We identified three main families of past and present-day leakage features: (1) Mid-Upper Miocene seismic chimneys concentrated basinwards and ending up on buried pockmarks, (2) Plio-Pleistocene chimneys, rather clustered to the east of the study area and ending up in seafloor pockmarks, and (3) fewer scattered chimneys identified within the Miocene sequences ending up in shallow enhanced reflectors ("Flat spots"). Stratigraphic and structural elements seem to control the distribution of these features. At least two major events of leakage occurred during the Middle-Late Miocene and intermittently during the Pliocene-Present. External factors as sediment supply are associated to the Miocene leakage event, whilst internal structural elements probably triggered the Pliocene to present-day leakage. A major seabed morphological feature, represented by a margin-paralleled belt of more than 1-km-wide mounds, was identified above growth faults to the east of the study area. Data-constrained 2D HC generation and migration modelling suggests a genetic link between these structures and vertical migration/leakage of thermogenic methane sourced from either currently mature Oligo-Miocene source rocks or secondary cracking and further expulsion from over-mature Upper-Cretaceous source rocks. Hence, the mounds are likely to represent a lineation of methane-derived carbonate build-ups. Despite the natural limitations of a 2D migration model, when combined and calibrated with observations from seismic data, it can be used as a valid tool to assess petroleum migration routes in sedimentary basins. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first integrated approach combining both

  7. Subsurface Interim Measures/Interim Remedial Action Plan and Decision Document for the 903 Pad, Mound, and East Trenches Areas (Operable Unit No. 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is pursuing an Interim Measure/Interim Remedial Action (IM/IRA) at the 903 Pad, Mound, and East Trenches Areas (Operable Unit No. 2) at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). This MIRA is to be conducted to provide information that will aid in the selection and design of final remedial actions at OU2 that will address removal of suspected free-phase volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination. The Plan involves investigating the removal of residual free-phase VOCs by in situ vacuum-enhanced vapor extraction technology at 3 suspected VOC source areas within OU2. VOC-contaminated vapors extracted from the subsurface would be treated by granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption and discharged. The Plan also includes water table depression, when applicable at the test sites, to investigate the performance of vapor extraction technology in the saturated zone. The Plan provides for treatment of any contaminated ground water recovered during the IM/IRA at existing RFP treatment facilities. The proposed MVIRA Plan is presented in the document entitled ''Proposed Subsurface Interim Measures/Interim Remedial Action Plan/Environmental Assessment and Decision Document, 903 Pad, Mound, and East Trenches Areas, Operable Unit No. 2, '' dated 20 March 1992. Information concerning the proposed Subsurface IM/IRA was presented during a DOE Quarterly Review meeting held on 07 April 1992 and a public meeting held on 07 May 1992, at the Marriott Hotel in Golden, Colorado. The Responsiveness Summary presents DOE's response to all comments received at the public meeting, as well as those mailed to date to DOE during the public comment period

  8. Geology and biology of the "Sticky Grounds", shelf-margin carbonate mounds, and mesophotic ecosystem in the eastern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locker, Stanley D.; Reed, John K.; Farrington, Stephanie; Harter, Stacey; Hine, Albert C.; Dunn, Shane

    2016-08-01

    Shelf-margin carbonate mounds in water depths of 116-135 m in the eastern Gulf of Mexico along the central west Florida shelf were investigated using swath bathymetry, side-scan sonar, sub-bottom imaging, rock dredging, and submersible dives. These enigmatic structures, known to fisherman as the "Sticky Grounds", trend along slope, are 5-15 m in relief with base diameters of 5-30 m, and suggest widespread potential for mesophotic reef habitat along the west Florida outer continental shelf. Possible origins are sea-level lowstand coral patch reefs, oyster reefs, or perhaps more recent post-lowstand biohermal development. Rock dredging recovered bioeroded carbonate-rock facies comprised of bored and cemented bioclastics. Rock sample components included calcified worm tubes, pelagic sediment, and oysters normally restricted to brackish nearshore areas. Several reef sites were surveyed at the Sticky Grounds during a cruise in August 2010 with the R/V Seward Johnson using the Johnson-Sea-Link II submersible to ground truth the swath-sonar maps and to quantify and characterize the benthic habitats, benthic macrofauna, fish populations, and coral/sponge cover. This study characterizes for the first time this mesophotic reef ecosystem and associated fish populations, and analyzes the interrelationships of the fish assemblages, benthic habitats and invertebrate biota. These highly eroded rock mounds provide extensive hard-bottom habitat for reef invertebrate species as well as essential fish habitat for reef fish and commercially/recreationally important fish species. The extent and significance of associated living resources with these bottom types is particularly important in light of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the northeastern Gulf and the proximity of the Loop Current. Mapping the distribution of these mesophotic-depth ecosystems is important for quantifying essential fish habitat and describing benthic resources. These activities can improve ecosystem

  9. Trace and Rare Earth Element Geochemistry of Micrite Mound Carbonates and Other Related REE Mineralized Carbonates from Bayan Obo Area in Inner Mongolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Xiaoyong; Zheng Yongfei; Yang Xueming; Zhang Yuxu; Peng Yang; Qiu Liwen

    2005-01-01

    Geochemical study on trace and rare earth element geochemistry was carried out for different carbonates including the very REE-rich ones in the main ore bodies, a carbonatite dyke and two micrite mounds from Heilaobao far away from the Bayan Obo ore deposit, and Xishan in west Beijing. The results show that both carbonatite dyke and REE mineralized carbonates (dolomite and marble) in the main ore bodies and outside ore bodies have similarities to each other, with very extreme positive anomaly of Ba, Th, Nb, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Pb, medium positive anomaly of Y, Ho, Tb, Er, Yb and negative anomaly of Sc, Ti and Cu. The REE concentration in the mineralized carbonates changes greatly, the total REE content changes from 262×10-6 in both east and west ore deposits to 104562 ×10-6 (10.46%), which is relatively lower than those samples of carbonatite dyke, whose REE contents vary greatly, from 1% up to 20 % of mass fraction. Light REE in the carbonatites are enriched and highly fractionated relative to heavy REE and there is no Eu anomaly. The REE distribution patterns of both mineralized carbonate and carbonatite dyke are of some similarities. However, the sedimentary carbonate micrite of Salinhudong Group in Heilaobao far outside the ore bodies and the pure carbonates from Xishan in Beijing, central part of North China plate, have the similarities in REE distributions with much lower REE contents, which are significantly different from those of carbonatite dyke and REE mineralized carbonate. In Bayan Obo district, both carbonates in the ore deposit and micrite mound outside the ore deposit underwent widespread metasomatism by fluids that resulted in formation of the superlager Fe-Nb-REE mineralization. It appears that the carbonates represent the evolution products of different geological stages.

  10. Offshore oceanographic and environmental monitoring services for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Annual report for the Bryan Mound site, September 1983-August 1984. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, D.E. Jr.; Jeffrey, L.M.; Kelly, F.J. Jr.; Landry, A.M.; McKinney, L.D.; Randall, R.E.; Slowey, J.F.; Wolff, G.A.

    1985-03-01

    The Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program has been discharging brine into the coastal waters offshore of Freeport, Texas since March 10, 1980. This report describes the findings of a team of Texas A and M University scientists and engineers who have conducted a study to evaluate the effects of the Bryan Mound brine discharge on the marine environment during the period from September 1983 through August 1984. The study addresses the areas of physical oceanography, brine plume, water and sediment quality, nekton, benthos and data management. The ambient physical environment and its temporal and spatial variability were studied by means of continuously recording in situ current/conductivity/temperature meters and twelve, one-day synoptic hydrographic cruises. The quarterly water and sediment quality data show that a small increase in the salinity and the sodium and chloride ions occurs in the bottom waters and sediment pore waters near the diffuser relative to those values measured at stations farther away. Data from the brine plume study show the maximum areal extent within the +.1% above ambient salinity contour was 45.0 km/sup 2/ and the highest measured salinity was 3.97%. The nekton investigations show that the brine disposal at Bryan Mound has resulted in no profound disruption of the overall nekton community inhabiting the diffuser area. The benthic quarterly data from 26 stations, including 11 collections made after the diffuser outflow rate was increased to 1,000,000 barrels/day, show the total numbers of species were depressed in an arc around the diffuser, but not at the diffuser station. In contrast, the total abundances at the diffuser station were depressed, and a zone of enhancement occurred in an arc around the diffuser. 139 references, 191 figures, 48 tables.

  11. Evidence of extensive carbonate mounds and sublacustrine channels in shallow waters of Lake Van, eastern Turkey, based on high-resolution chirp subbottom profiler and multibeam echosounder data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukur, Deniz; Krastel, Sebastian; Çağatay, M. Namık; Damcı, Emre; Meydan, Aysegül Feray; Kim, Seong-Pil

    2015-10-01

    In Lake Van of eastern Turkey, the fourth largest soda lake in the world, high-resolution subbottom profiles and bathymetric data acquired in 2004 and 2012 revealed several hundreds of topographic mounds in shallow waters (structures are characterized by strong top reflections of transparent internal character, and are 10-300 m wide and 0.5-20 m high. Consistent with previous work, they are interpreted as carbonate mounds formed by precipitation from CO2-rich groundwater discharge into the highly alkaline lake. Their age remains to be determined but their alignment along faults suggests tectonic control on their growth. Several sublacustrine channel networks were observed on the eastern shelf of the lake, which connects with onshore rivers. The channels are up to 500 m wide and 20 m deep, and plausibly were formed by fluvial processes during the major lake level drop reported to have occurred by 14 ka in earlier publications. Erosion is common on the channel walls flanked by levees. The channels are presently inactive or abandoned. At a water depth of 100 m, they all merge into a single larger channel; this channel has a sinuous course initially trending southwestward and then northwestward at a water depth of 130 m. Numerous closely spaced small channels (~10-200 m wide, 1-10 m deep) are also seen on the eastern lacustrine shelf, interpreted as denditric and parallel channel systems formed during lake level fall terminating at ~14 ka. Bathymetric data provide evidence of numerous sublacustrine canyons on the western slope of the lake's northern basin, most likely remnants of relict rivers formed during this lowstand.

  12. Modeling mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal response to earthquakes, tides, and ocean currents: a case study at the Grotto mound, Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, G.; Bemis, K. G.

    2014-12-01

    Seafloor hydrothermal systems feature intricate interconnections among oceanic, geological, hydrothermal, and biological processes. The advent of the NEPTUNE observatory operated by Ocean Networks Canada at the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge enables scientists to study these interconnections through multidisciplinary, continuous, real-time observations. The multidisciplinary observatory instruments deployed at the Grotto Mound, a major study site of the NEPTUNE observatory, makes it a perfect place to study the response of a seafloor hydrothermal system to geological and oceanic processes. In this study, we use the multidisciplinary datasets recorded by the NEPTUNE Observatory instruments as observational tools to demonstrate two different aspects of the response of hydrothermal activity at the Grotto Mound to geological and oceanic processes. First, we investigate a recent increase in venting temperature and heat flux at Grotto observed by the Benthic and Resistivity Sensors (BARS) and the Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS) respectively. This event started in Mar 2014 and is still evolving by the time of writing this abstract. An initial interpretation in light of the seismic data recorded by a neighboring ocean bottom seismometer on the NEPTUNE observatory suggests the temperature and heat flux increase is probably triggered by local seismic activities. Comparison of the observations with the results of a 1-D mathematical model simulation of hydrothermal sub-seafloor circulation elucidates the potential mechanisms underlying hydrothermal response to local earthquakes. Second, we observe significant tidal oscillations in the venting temperature time series recorded by BARS and the acoustic imaging of hydrothermal plumes by COVIS, which is evidence for hydrothermal response to ocean tides and currents. We interpret the tidal oscillations of venting temperature as a result of tidal loading on a poroelastic medium. We then invoke poroelastic

  13. An Investigation into the Transportation of Irradiated Uranium/Aluminum Targets from a Foreign Nuclear Reactor to the Chalk River Laboratories Site in Ontario, Canada - 12249

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This investigation required the selection of a suitable cask and development of a device to hold and transport irradiated targets from a foreign nuclear reactor to the Chalk River Laboratories in Ontario, Canada. The main challenge was to design and validate a target holder to protect the irradiated HEU-Al target pencils during transit. Each of the targets was estimated to have an initial decay heat of 118 W prior to transit. As the targets have little thermal mass the potential for high temperature damage and possibly melting was high. Thus, the primary design objective was to conceive a target holder to dissipate heat from the targets. Other design requirements included securing the targets during transportation and providing a simple means to load and unload the targets while submerged five metres under water. A unique target holder (patent pending) was designed and manufactured together with special purpose experimental apparatus including a representative cask. Aluminum dummy targets were fabricated to accept cartridge heaters, to simulate decay heat. Thermocouples were used to measure the temperature of the test targets and selected areas within the target holder and test cask. After obtaining test results, calculations were performed to compensate for differences between experimental and real life conditions. Taking compensation into consideration the maximum target temperature reached was 231 deg. C which was below the designated maximum of 250 deg. C. The design of the aluminum target holder also allowed generous clearance to insert and unload the targets. This clearance was designed to close up as the target holder is placed into the cavity of the transport cask. Springs served to retain and restrain the targets from movement during transportation as well as to facilitate conductive heat transfer. The target holder met the design requirements and as such provided data supporting the feasibility of transporting targets over a relatively long period of time

  14. Area balance and strain in an extensional fault system: Strategies for improved oil recovery in fractured chalk, Gilbertown Field, southwestern Alabama -- Year 2. Annual report, March 1997--March 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashin, J.C.; Raymond, D.E.; Rindsberg, A.K.; Alabi, G.G.; Carroll, R.E.

    1998-09-01

    Gilbertown Field is the oldest oil field in Alabama and has produced oil from fractured chalk of the Cretaceous Selma Group and glauconitic sandstone of the Eutaw Formation. Nearly all of Gilbertown Field is still in primary recovery, although waterflooding has been attempted locally. The objective of this project is to analyze the geologic structure and burial history of Mesozoic and Tertiary strata in Gilbertown Field and adjacent areas in order to suggest ways in which oil recovery can be improved. Indeed, the decline of oil production to marginally economic levels in recent years has made this type of analysis timely and practical. Key technical advancements being sought include understanding the relationship of requisite strain to production in Gilbertown reservoirs, incorporation of synsedimentary growth factors into models of area balance, quantification of the relationship between requisite strain and bed curvature, determination of the timing of hydrocarbon generation, and identification of the avenues and mechanisms of fluid transport.

  15. A lithostratigraphic geo-archaeological 3D model of the subsurface of a medieval mound in the city center of Vlaardingen (The Netherlands).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roozen, Stan; Kluiving, Sjoerd; Soetens, Steven

    2013-04-01

    GSI3D modeling for archaeology A lithostratigraphic geo-archaeological 3D model of the subsurface of a medieval mound in the city center of Vlaardingen (The Netherlands). EGU 2013 Vienna Stan Roozen (UvA), Sjoerd Kluiving (VU), Steven Soetens (VU) In the medieval mound in the city centre of Vlaardingen, in the Netherlands , archaeological material is remarkably well preserved. It is remarkable because this elevated location has a high degree of humidity, which must remain intact to sustain the favourable conditions of the archaeology. For that reason, the centre of the city was cored when and where possible, and subsequently its archaeology and lithostratigraphy was modelled in 3D. In this presentation we demonstrate the difficulties and methodological restraints in 3D modelling to come to a workable method and future prospects. The municipality of Vlaardingen lies north of the Nieuwe Maas in the province of Zuid Holland close to the coast. It is one of the oldest Dutch urban areas known in Holland. The project makes use of coring (n=72), cone penetration test (n=127), C-dating, archaeological and paleogeographic data in order to create interpretative profiles containing both archaeological and lithostratigraphic layers in the mound and its broader context. With the available university's licence of ArcGIS 3D modeling is possible (ArcScene), but it is not an efficient subsurface software, while most ideal 3D software for such project (such as i.e. Petrol, GoCAD, Rockworks) are beyond archaeological budgetary limits. The most ideal software in our context was GSI3D (a software provided by the British Geological survey). Though it strictly is not a 3D model software (there are no 3D interpolation algorithms), it has the advantage that the user can interfere directly in the interpolation by using the profiles as a framework and by defining the extent of each layer. The following methodology is applied: • Based on depth information of coring and cone penetration

  16. Geology and biology of the "Sticky Grounds," shelf-margin carbonate mounds, and mesophotic ecosystem in the eastern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locker, Stanley D.; Reed, John K.; Farrington, Stephanie; Harter, Stacey; Hine, Albert C.; Dunn, Shane

    2016-01-01

    Shelf-margin carbonate mounds in water depths of 116–135 m in the eastern Gulf of Mexico along the central west Florida shelf were investigated using swath bathymetry, side-scan sonar, sub-bottom imaging, rock dredging, and submersible dives. These enigmatic structures, known to fisherman as the “Sticky Grounds”, trend along slope, are 5–15 m in relief with base diameters of 5–30 m, and suggest widespread potential for mesophotic reef habitat along the west Florida outer continental shelf. Possible origins are sea-level lowstand coral patch reefs, oyster reefs, or perhaps more recent post-lowstand biohermal development. Rock dredging recovered bioeroded carbonate-rock facies comprised of bored and cemented bioclastics. Rock sample components included calcified worm tubes, pelagic sediment, and oysters normally restricted to brackish nearshore areas. Several reef sites were surveyed at the Sticky Grounds during a cruise in August 2010 with the R/V Seward Johnson using the Johnson-Sea-Link II submersible to ground truth the swath-sonar maps and to quantify and characterize the benthic habitats, benthic macrofauna, fish populations, and coral/sponge cover. This study characterizes for the first time this mesophotic reef ecosystem and associated fish populations, and analyzes the interrelationships of the fish assemblages, benthic habitats and invertebrate biota. These highly eroded rock mounds provide extensive hard-bottom habitat for reef invertebrate species as well as essential fish habitat for reef fish and commercially/recreationally important fish species. The extent and significance of associated living resources with these bottom types is particularly important in light of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the northeastern Gulf and the proximity of the Loop Current. Mapping the distribution of these mesophotic-depth ecosystems is important for quantifying essential fish habitat and describing benthic resources. These activities can improve

  17. Radiological surveillance of members of the public during earthmoving activities in the area of the Ciemat mound; Vigilancia radiologica de los miembros del publico durante las actividades de movimiento de tierras del area del Montecillo del Ciemat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, A.; Yague, L.; Navarro, N.; Gasco, C.; Ortiz, M. T.; Quinones, J.

    2013-07-01

    In the year 2012 was undertaken excavation and earthwork of the mound. The lands of this area contained remains sterile uranium mining and therefore concentrations of natural radionuclides higher than natural radioactive background activity. In order to assess the radiological impact on the public, was a theoretical evaluation of the dose inhaled that would get a person who remained in the vicinity during the making of the work. (Author)

  18. Excavation of Mounded Tombs on Ducang and Nanwang Hills in Deqing County,Zhejiang%浙江德清县独仓山及南王山土墩墓发掘简报

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    浙江省文物考古研究所; 德清县博物馆

    2001-01-01

    These tombs lie in the center and north of Deqing County on the southern shore of the Taihu Lake, and altogether 11 mounds were excavated on Ducang and Nanwang hills. The mounds are made oval or round in plan, arranged in lines along the hill ridges, and raised distinctly on the surface.They contain burials in stone chambers or those without such furniture; the latter can further be divided into several classes, such as the stone-framed, stone-bedded and on-the-ground types. No human skeleton and coffin were found in the tombs. The funeral objects include proto-porcelain, hard pottory with impressed pattern and a small amount of plain hard pottery and clay one. In date the tombs can be roughly assigned to the time from the early Western Zhou to the late Spring-and-Autumn period. With the variety of burial forms, the importance of some remains and the exquisiteness of numerous grave goods, the discovery provides valuable material for studying in depth the regionalization, periodization and burial custom of mounded tombs, as well as the evolution of proto-porcelain.

  19. Extreme environments in the critical zone: Linking acidification hazard of acid sulfate soils in mound spring discharge zones to groundwater evolution and mantle degassing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shand, Paul; Gotch, Travis; Love, Andrew; Raven, Mark; Priestley, Stacey; Grocke, Sonia

    2016-10-15

    A decrease in flow from the iconic travertine mound springs of the Great Artesian Basin in South Australia has led to the oxidation of hypersulfidic soils and extreme soil acidification, impacting their unique groundwater dependent ecosystems. The build-up of pyrite in these systems occurred over millennia by the discharge of deep artesian sulfate-containing groundwaters through organic-rich subaqueous soils. Rare iron and aluminium hydroxysulfate minerals form thick efflorescences due to high evaporation rates in this arid zone environment, and the oxidised soils pose a significant risk to local aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. The distribution of extreme acidification hazard is controlled by regional variations in the hydrochemistry of groundwater. Geochemical processes fractionate acidity and alkalinity into separate parts of the discharge zone allowing potentially extreme environments to form locally. Differences in groundwater chemistry in the aquifer along flow pathways towards the spring discharge zone are related to a range of processes including mineral dissolution and redox reactions, which in turn are strongly influenced by degassing of the mantle along deep crustal fractures. There is thus a connection between shallow critical zone ecosystems and deep crustal/mantle processes which ultimately control the formation of hypersulfidic soils and the potential for extreme geochemical environments.

  20. Reassessing the management of groundwater use from sandy aquifers: acidification and base cation depletion exacerbated by drought and groundwater withdrawal on the Gnangara Mound, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleyard, S.; Cook, T.

    2009-05-01

    The combined effects of low rainfall, groundwater withdrawal in excess of 300 GL/year and reduced recharge in areas covered by pine plantations has caused the water table in a sandy unconfined aquifer on the Gnangara Mound in Western Australia to drop by up to 5 m and aquifer storage to decline by about 500 GL over the last 20 years. Groundwater has become acidic in areas of high drawdown, with pH values typically being less than 5.0 at the water table, and elevated concentrations of SO4 2-, Al, Fe, Zn, Cu, Ni and Pb. Trends of increasing acidity and base cation concentrations in deep water supply wells in the Mirrabooka wellfield indicate that about 0.7 keq/ha/year of base cations are being leached from soil within cones of depression of pumping wells. These results indicate that the assessment of the sustainable yields of aquifers under conditions of low rainfall needs to consider geochemical interactions between groundwater, aquifer sediments, soils and vegetation, and not be just based on aquifer hydraulics and water-balance changes.

  1. Tool-use and tool-making by captive, group-living orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus abelii) at an artificial termite mound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamichi, Masayuki

    2004-01-30

    The present study examined the use and making of tools to obtain foodstuffs in artificial-mound holes by five captive, group-living Sumatran orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus abelii). Three adult orangutans frequently stripped leaves and twigs from a branch provided (tool-making), and then inserted the tool into a hole to obtain foodstuffs (tool-using). A 5-year-old female juvenile usually used the tools that adult orangutans had previously used, but rarely made tools herself. A 2-year-old male infant did not use any tools. The adult orangutans tend to leave one to several leaves at the top of the branch than to leave many leaves on the branch or to strip all leaves. It seemed likely that tools with appropriate leaves are easier to insert into holes and obtain more foodstuffs, compared with branches with many leaves or sticks without any leaves. When the orangutans were unable to insert a tool into a hole, they usually modified the tool and/or changed their tool-using technique, such as changing how they grasped the tool. These findings are discussed from the perspectives of the orangutan's behavioral flexibility regarding tool-use skills and hierarchical organization in food-processing techniques. PMID:14744550

  2. Extreme environments in the critical zone: Linking acidification hazard of acid sulfate soils in mound spring discharge zones to groundwater evolution and mantle degassing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shand, Paul; Gotch, Travis; Love, Andrew; Raven, Mark; Priestley, Stacey; Grocke, Sonia

    2016-10-15

    A decrease in flow from the iconic travertine mound springs of the Great Artesian Basin in South Australia has led to the oxidation of hypersulfidic soils and extreme soil acidification, impacting their unique groundwater dependent ecosystems. The build-up of pyrite in these systems occurred over millennia by the discharge of deep artesian sulfate-containing groundwaters through organic-rich subaqueous soils. Rare iron and aluminium hydroxysulfate minerals form thick efflorescences due to high evaporation rates in this arid zone environment, and the oxidised soils pose a significant risk to local aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. The distribution of extreme acidification hazard is controlled by regional variations in the hydrochemistry of groundwater. Geochemical processes fractionate acidity and alkalinity into separate parts of the discharge zone allowing potentially extreme environments to form locally. Differences in groundwater chemistry in the aquifer along flow pathways towards the spring discharge zone are related to a range of processes including mineral dissolution and redox reactions, which in turn are strongly influenced by degassing of the mantle along deep crustal fractures. There is thus a connection between shallow critical zone ecosystems and deep crustal/mantle processes which ultimately control the formation of hypersulfidic soils and the potential for extreme geochemical environments. PMID:27256909

  3. 早-中奥陶世瓶筐石礁丘:历史和古生态学%EARLY-MIDDLE ORDOVICIAN CALATHIUM REEF MOUNDS: HISTORY AND PALAEOECOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建坡; 李越; 张园园; 李启剑; 邓小杰

    2011-01-01

    The receptaculitid genus Calathium is an extinct genus of sessile organisms of uncertain systematic position but which has most often been attributed to sponge or calcareous Green algae, having a somewhat similar appearance to dasycladswhich still survive at the present day. Calathium ranges in stratigraphic age from Ordovician to Silurian and is particularly notable because it played a major role in reef building during the Early and Middle Ordovician. The base of the Early Ordovician saw the initiation of a major new phase in composition of reefs within shallow marine carbonate settings-in which the mud mounds previously dominantly constructed by microbes became joined in varying proportions by Calathium and by a limited diversity of metazoans, mainly sponges-particularly siliceous lithistid sponges. The ‘microbes+Calathium+sponges' assemblage was particularly common in shallow marine carbonate environments of the Tremadocian to Floian (Early Ordovician).However in the succeeding Dalpingian Stage (early Middle Ordovician) the sponge component declined in relative abundance so that reef mounds then became dominated by ‘ microbes + Calathium ’ only.In the Darriwilian Stage (late Middle Ordovician),this kind of reef was very limited in temporal and spatial distribution, and only occurred in the Tarim Block. Finally, reefs with Calathium-dominated eventually vanished in the Late Ordovician, at the same time as the innovation occurred of significantly more diverse metazoan reef communities including corals and stromatoporoid sponges-leading to still more developed and complex reef systems. The habit, or ‘framework profile', of Calathium was favourable for entrapment of bioclastic and clastic debris, which enhanced the positive profile of reef mounds. Generally speaking, Calathium reef mounds formed patch reefs. The reef base was formed at the stabilization stage, followed by the reef core at the early stages of colonization and diversification

  4. Fosfortab fra det dyrkede areal til Stevning Dam, Hindemaj og Haderslev Dam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hans Estrup; Heckrath, Goswin; Thodsen, Hans;

    Størrelsen af dyrkningsbidraget til søerne i Haderslev Dam-systemet er vurderet med to forskellige metoder til at udgøre ca. 42 % af den samlede tilførsel. En risikokortlægning med det nye, danske P-indeks viser, at i alt 15 % af det dyrkede areal er i højrisiko mht. fosfortab. P-indeks-kortlægni......Størrelsen af dyrkningsbidraget til søerne i Haderslev Dam-systemet er vurderet med to forskellige metoder til at udgøre ca. 42 % af den samlede tilførsel. En risikokortlægning med det nye, danske P-indeks viser, at i alt 15 % af det dyrkede areal er i højrisiko mht. fosfortab. P...

  5. Decomposition and Reduction of N2O over Limestone under FBC Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Jensen, Anker; Vaaben, Rikke;

    1997-01-01

    The addition of limestone for sulfur retention in fluidized bed combustion (FBC) has in many cases been observed to influence the emission of N2O. The catalytic activity of N2O over calcined Stevns Chalk for decomposition of N2O in a laboratory fixed bed quartz reactor was measured. It was found......, and uncalcined or recarbonated limestone had negligible activity. Sulfation of the calcined limestone under oxidizing conditions lowered the activity, however sulfidation under reducing conditions showed that CaS is an active catalyst for the reduction of N2O by CO. Without CO present a gas solid reaction...

  6. The Role Of Land Use In Environmental Decision Making At Three DOE Mega-Cleanup Sites, Fernald, Rocky Flats, and Mound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper explores the role that future land use decisions have played in the establishment of cost-effective cleanup objectives and the setting of environmental media cleanup levels for the three major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites for which cleanup has now been successfully completed: the Rocky Flats, Mound, and Fernald Closure Sites. At each site, there are distinct consensus-building histories throughout the following four phases: (1) the facility shut-down and site investigation phase, which took place at the completion of their Cold War nuclear-material production missions; (2) the decision-making phase, whereby stakeholder and regulatory-agency consensus was achieved for the future land-use-based environmental decisions confronting the sites; (3) the remedy selection phase, whereby appropriate remedial actions were identified to achieve the future land-use-based decisions; and (4) the implementation phase, whereby the selected remedial actions for these high-profile sites were implemented and successfully closed out. At each of the three projects, there were strained relationships and distrust between the local community and the DOE as a result of site contamination and potential health effects to the workers and local residents. To engage citizens and interested stakeholder groups - particularly in the role of final land use in the decision-making process, the site management teams at each respective site developed new public-participation strategies to open stakeholder communication channels with site leadership, technical staff, and the regulatory agencies. This action proved invaluable to the success of the projects and reaching consensus on appropriate levels of cleanup. With the implementation of the cleanup remedies now complete, each of the three DOE sites have become models for future environmental-remediation projects and associated decision making.

  7. Comparative study of subseafloor microbial community structures in deeply buried coral fossils and sediment matrices from the Challenger Mound in the Porcupine Seabight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuhiko eHoshino

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Subseafloor sedimentary environments harbor remarkably diverse microbial communities. However, it remains unknown if the deeply buried fossils in these sediments play ecological roles in deep microbial habitats, or whether the microbial communities inhabiting such fossils differ from those in the surrounding sediment matrix. Here we compare the community structures of subseafloor microbes in coldwater coral carbonates (Madrepora oculata and Lophelia pertusa and the clay matrix. Samples were obtained from the Challenger Mound in the Porcupine Seabight at Site U1317 Hole A during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 307. DNA was extracted from coral fossils and the surrounding sedimentary matrix at 4, 20 and 105 meters below the seafloor. 16S rRNA genes of Bacteria and Archaea were amplified by PCR, and a total of 213,792 16S rRNA gene-tagged sequences were analyzed. At the phylum level, dominant microbial components in both habitats consisted of Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Nitrospirae, Chloroflexi and Miscellaneous Crenarchaeota Group (MCG at all three of the depths examined. However, at the genus and/or species level (similarity threshold 97.0%, the community compositions were found to be very different, with 69-75% and 46-57% of bacterial and archaeal phylotypes not overlapping in coral fossils and the clay matrix, respectively. Species richness analysis revealed that bacterial communities were generally more diverse than archaea, and that the diversity scores of coral fossils were lower than those in sediment matrix. However, the evenness of microbial communities was not significantly different in all the samples examined. No eukaryotic DNA sequences, such as 18S rRNA genes, were obtained from the corals. The findings suggested that, even at the same or similar depths, the sedimentological characteristics of a habitat are important factors affecting microbial diversity and community structure in deep subseafloor sedimentary

  8. Strategic petroleum reserve, Byran Mound Salt Dome, Brazoria County, Texas. Final environmental impact statement (final supplement to FEA FES 76/77-6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-12-01

    On January 7, 1977, the Federal Energy Administration issued a Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the development of the Bryan Mound salt dome as a storage site for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (FES 76/77-6). On October 1, 1977, the U.S. Department of Energy was created and the programs of the Federal Energy Administration were transferred to the new Department. As such, this final supplement is being issued by the Department of Energy. The salt dome is located in Brazoria County, Texas. Since the EIS was published, it has been determined that this arrangement would be inadequate to meet the long term requirements for filling and withdrawing oil at the site, although the disposal of brine to Dow Chemical would be utilized to the maximum extent possible. Therefore, on July 15, 1977, a Draft Supplement to FES 76/77-6 was issued addressing the environmental impacts of construction and operation of two types of brine disposal systems and a new water supply system. This final supplement addresses a brine injection well system and a water intake system. Construction of this new system component would cause temporary disruption to land use, water quality, air quality, and terrestrial and aquatic ecology. The new facilities would permanently change 17 acres of land from its present use. Operation of the systems would have relatively small, short-term impacts. Use of the brine surge pit could adversely affect air quality by emitting hydrocarbon vapors (maximum rate of 51.4 tons per year). Operation of the disposal wells would increase the salinity of an already saline aquifer. All operational impacts would be relatively minor and short-term, occurring only during periods of fill or withdrawal of the storage facility.

  9. Impedance imaging in core analysis. Imaging of phase distributions in samples of natural cores of North Sea chalk containing conducting as well as non-conducting fluids. Part 1: Development of prototype measurement cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller Nielsen, C. [DTU, Inst. for Kemi (Denmark); Lauersen, S. [DTU, Lab. for Energiteknik (Denmark)

    1996-12-31

    To make reservoir simulations it is necessary to know such parameter functions as the capillary pressure curve, relative permeabilities etc. These are difficult to measure in chalk by means of traditional techniques because of the low permeability. In the present approach a displacement process is studied in detail and computer simulation with reservoir simulators can be used to determine parameter functions. To do this, however, it is necessary to know the developments of saturation profiles during the experiment. Different methods are tested in the programme. NMR-scanning and {gamma}-logging are methods where straight rays penetrate the sample and are partly absorbed. In electric current imaging an electric field is induced in the sample and detected at the surface. There are several benefits of this method compared with the others: There are no special safety requirements in contrast to work with radiation; No expensive and limited available equipment is needed unlike NMR; There are no intrinsic procedures slowing the method. There are, however, also drawbacks: Making measurements on a core sample implies the application of a large number of minute electrodes. To do this an implementation has to be derived from scratch; The inverse problem, i.e. the determination of the field inside the sample from surface measurements, is more difficult than the inverse problem of straight ray absorption. In the present report the development of an experimental technique is described. In part II of the report the interpretation of the experimental results will be discussed. (EG) 21 refs.

  10. Importance du phénomène de dissolution-cristallisation sur le fluage d'une craie blanche Importance of the Dissolution-Crystallization Phenomenon on Creep in a White Chalk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djebbi M.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Une étude de fluage de craie blanche a été menée pour des contraintes de confinement allant jusqu'à 12 MPa dans des configurations de contrainte isotrope ou avec léger déviateur. Il est montré l'importance du phénomène de dissolution sur la variation de volume locale du système. Celle-ci suit une loi du type At alpha avec alpha de l'ordre de 0,5 lorsqu'il n'y a pas d'écoulement, et de l'ordre de 0,65 quand l'échantillon est soumis à un écoulement. Il est alors proposé le modèle de Bathurst comme mécanisme de déformation. Creep in a white chalk was analyzed for confining pressures of up to 12 MPa in isotropic stress configurations or with a slight deviatoric stress. The importance of this dissolution phenomenon was shown for the local variation in the volume of the system. This variation follows a law of the At alpha type, with alpha being a 0. 5 order when there is no flow and a 0. 65 order when the sample is subjected to flow. The Bathurst model is then proposed as the deformation mechanism.

  11. Use of borehole-geophysical logs and hydrologic tests to characterize crystalline rock for nuclear-waste storage, Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment, Manitoba, and Chalk River Nuclear Laboratory, Ontario, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of borehole methods were used in the investigation of crystalline rocks at Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment and Chalk River Nuclear Laboratory in Canada. The selection of a crystalline-rock mass for the storage of nuclear waste likely will require the drilling and testing of a number of deep investigative boreholes in the rock mass. Although coring of at least one hole in each new area is essential, methods for making in-situ geophysical and hydrologic measurements can substitute for widespread coring and result in significant savings in time and money. Borehole-geophysical logging techniques permit the lateral extrapolation of data from a core hole. Log response is related to rock type, alteration, and the location and character of fractures. The geophysical logs that particularly are useful for these purposes are the acoustic televiewer and acoustic waveform, neutron and gamma, resistivity, temperature, and caliper. The acoustic-televiewer log of the borehole wall can provide high resolution data on the orientation and apparent width of fractures. In situ hydraulic tests of single fractures or fracture zones isolated by packers provide quantitative information on permeability, extent, and interconnection. The computer analysis of digitized acoustic waveforms has identified a part of the waveform that has amplitude variations related to permeabilities measured in the boreholes by packer tests. 38 refs., 37 figs., 4 tabs

  12. RRS Discovery Cruise 248, 07 Jul-10 Aug 2000. A multidisciplinary study of the environment and ecology of deep-water coral ecosystems and associated seabed facies and features (The Darwin Mounds, Porcupine Bank and Porcupine Seabight)

    OpenAIRE

    B. J. Bett; Billett, D. S. M.; Masson, D.G.; Tyler, P. A.

    2001-01-01

    RRS Discovery Cruise 248 aimed to carry out a multidisciplinary study of the environment and ecology of deep-water coral ecosystems and associated seabed features in the northeast Atlantic. The study was primarily focused on the Darwin Mounds area, northern Rockall Trough (59° 49’N, 07° 22’W), but also examined a number of sites in the Porcupine Seabight area. The cruise was divided into two legs (Govan-Stornoway, 8 Jul-21 Jul 2000; Stornoway-Southampton, 22 Jul-10 Aug 2000). Leg 1 focused on...

  13. International shipment of light weight radioisotopic heater units (LWRHU) using the USA/9516/B(U)F Mound 1 kW shipping package in support of the ``Pluto Express'' mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barklay, Chadwick D.; Merten, C. William

    1997-01-01

    Radioisotopes have provided heat that has been used to maintain specific operating environments within remote satellites and spacecraft. For the ``Pluto Express'' mission the 238PuO2 fueled light weight radioisotopic heater unit (LWRHU) will be used within the spacecraft. Since the current plan for the ``Pluto Express'' mission incorporates the use of a Russian launch platform for the spacecraft, the LWRHUs must be transported in an internationally certified shipping container. An internationally certified shipping package that is versatile enough to be reconfigured to transport the LWRHUs that will be required to support the ``Pluto Express'' mission is the Mound USA/9516/B(U)F.

  14. Evolved Gas Measurements Planned for the Lower Layers of the Gale Crater Mound with the Sample Analysis at Mars Instrument Suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Franz, H.; McAdam, A.; Conrad, P. G.; Brunner, A.; Cabane, M.; Webster, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    The lower mound strata of Gale Crater provide a diverse set of chemical environments for exploration by the varied tools of the Curiosity Rover of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission. Orbital imaging and spectroscopy clearly reveal distinct layers of hydrated minerals, sulfates, and clays with abundant evidence of a variety of fluvial processes. The three instruments of the MSL Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation, the Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS), the Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS), and the Gas Chromatograph (GC) are designed to analyze either atmospheric gases or volatiles thermally evolved or chemically extracted from powdered rock or soil. The presence or absence of organic compounds in these layers is of great interest since such an in situ search for this type of record has not been successfully implemented since the mid-70s Viking GCMS experiments. However, regardless of the outcome of the analysis for organics, the abundance and isotopic composition of thermally evolved inorganic compounds should also provide a rich data set to complement the mineralogical and elemental information provided by other MSL instruments. In addition, these evolved gas analysis (EGA) experiments will help test sedimentary models proposed by Malin and Edgett (2000) and then further developed by Milliken et al (2010) for Gale Crater. In the SAM EGA experiments the evolution temperatures of H2O, CO2, SO2, O2, or other simple compounds as the samples are heated in a helium stream to 1000C provides information on mineral types and their associations. The isotopic composition of O, H, C, and S can be precisely determined in several evolved compounds and compared with the present day atmosphere. Such SAM results might be able to test mineralogical evidence of changing sedimentary and alteration processes over an extended period of time. For example, Bibring et al (2006) have suggested such a major shift from early nonacidic to later acidic alteration. We will

  15. Archaeomagnetic study of five mounds from Upper Mesopotamia between 2500 and 700 BCE: Further evidence for an extremely strong geomagnetic field ca. 3000 years ago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertepinar, P.; Langereis, C. G.; Biggin, A. J.; Frangipane, M.; Matney, T.; Ökse, T.; Engin, A.

    2012-12-01

    The distribution of archaeomagnetic data in eastern Europe and the Near and Middle East shows a remarkable gap in Turkey. This study presents the first archaeomagnetic results from five different mounds in southeast Turkey, the northern part of Mesopotamia. The rock magnetic experiments indicate that in the majority of the samples the dominant magnetic carrier is magnetite, which is stable to heating to temperatures of 700 °C. In general, the demagnetization diagrams are single component and all five sets display well-defined characteristic magnetizations and clustered directions. For the period between 2500 and 700 BCE, the declinations are between 350° and 20° while inclinations are in the range of 49-64°. The directional results are compared with the global geomagnetic field models (CALS7k.2, ARCH3k_cst.1 and CALS3k.4) and the data from the archaeomagnetic database GEOMAGIA50v2. The results are coherent with both the data and the models except for two near-contemporaneous sets dating ˜2000 BCE, which are offset to the east by more than 20° with respect to CALS7k.2. Archaeointensity measurements were made using the microwave and conventional thermal Thellier methods applied to five sets of samples (four furnaces and a mud-brick wall). These yielded comparable and intriguing results. While those from the furnaces are slightly higher than the CALS7k.2 model and in agreement with the GEOMAGIA50v2 and the Middle East data, the results from the mud-brick wall suggest a high intensity of 100.8 μT (17.7×1022 Am2) at ˜1000 BCE. This result is in excellent agreement with recent claims of extremely high intensity measured in other regions of the Middle East for this time period though less consistent with these being associated with extremely short-lived events. Finally, we discuss our new and other recently published archaeointensity results in terms of geomagnetic intensity versus climate.

  16. Evolved Gas Measurements Planned for the Lower Layers of the Gale Crater Mound with the Sample Analysis at Mars Instrument Suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffy, Paul; Brunner, Anna; McAdam, Amy; Franz, Heather; Conrad, Pamela; Webster, Chris; Cabane, Michel

    2009-01-01

    The lower mound strata of Gale Crater provide a diverse set of chemical environments for exploration by the varied tools of the Curiosity Rover of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission. Orbital imaging and spectroscopy clearly reveal distinct layers of hydrated minerals, sulfates, and clays with abundant evidence of a variety of fluvial processes. The three instruments of the MSL Sample Analysis at aMars (SAM) investigation, the Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS), the Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS), and the Gas Chromatograph (GC) are designed to analyze either atmospheric gases or volatiles thermally evolved or chemically extracted from powdered rock or soil. The presence or absence of organic compounds in these layers is of great interest since such an in situ search for this type of record has not been successfully implemented since the mid-60s Viking GCMS experiments. However, regardless of the outcome of the analysis for organics, the abundance and isotopic composition of thermally evolved inorganic compounds should also provide a rich data set to complement the mineralogical and elemental information provided by other MSL instruments. In addition, these evolved gas analysis (EGA) experiments will help test sedimentary models proposed by Malin and Edgett (2000) and then further developed by Milliken et al (2010) for Gale Crater. In the SAM EGA experiments the evolution temperatures of H2O, CO2, SO2, O2, or other simple compounds as the samples are heated in a helium stream to 1000 C provides information on mineral types and their associations. The isotopic composition of O, H, C, and S can be precisely determined in several evolved compounds and compared with the present day atmosphere. Such SAM results might be able to test mineralogical evidence of changing sedimentary and alteration processes over an extended period of time. For example, Bibring et al (2006) have suggested such a major shift from early nonacidic to later acidic alteration. We will

  17. Distribution, origin and evolution of hypothesized mud volcanoes, thumbprint terrain, small mounds and giant polygons: Implications for sedimentary processes in the northern lowlands of Mars: Case study from the Acidalia Planitia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgel, Csilla; Hauber, Ernst; van Gasselt, Stephan; Pozzobon, Riccardo; Skinner, James, Jr.

    2016-04-01

    This study is part of the activities of an ISSI International Team, which intends to produce new geomorphological maps of the northern lowlands of Mars along three long traverses across Acidalia, Utopia, and Arcadia Planitiae [1]. This specific study focuses on mounds of different sizes: Large Pitted Mounds (LPM), Thumbprint Terrain (TPT), Small Mounds (SM) as well as km-sized, giant polygons (GP) [2,3]. These landforms were formed on the Vastitas Borealis Formation (VBF) Marginal and Interior Units, which are interpreted as outflow channel deposits or sediments of a hypothesized ocean. The aim of our study is to map the above mentioned features in the northern lowlands and establish a formational history and stratigraphy of landforms using morphological observations and geostatistics in Acidalia Planitia. Our study is based on CTX mosaics (6 m/pixel) and we also used data from HiRISE (0.25 m/px), HRSC (images >10 m/px, HRSC- derived Digital Elevation Models [DEM], grid size 50-200 m), MOLA DEM (~460 m/px), and THEMIS Nighttime IR (~100 m/px). The TPT appears north of about 30°N in the termination zones of the Chryse outflow channels and shows a transition zone with the LPMs at around 36°N in Acidalia Planitia. North of 39°N, only LPM can be observed. LPM are typically surrounded by topographic moats. Sometimes more than 75% of a mound can be covered or embayed by „plain filling material" of varying thickness. The LPM are observed in the same area as large-scale polygon troughs (buried and fresh) associated with circular-shaped small mounds (SM). The SM are located from 34°N to 48°N, completely overlapping the area of LPM and partly the TPT. These features are randomly distributed, but commonly arranged in clusters. Their domical shape with the central pit shows morphological resemblance with the LPM. These features characterize the area from 35 N° to 61 N° and completely disappear in the Acidalia Colles region. The mapping results show a morphological

  18. Decomposition and reduction of N2O over Limestone under FBC Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Jensen, Anker; Vaaben, Rikke;

    1997-01-01

    The addition of limestone for sulfur retention in FBC has in many cases been observed to influence the emission of N2O. The catalytic activity of N2O over calcined Stevns Chalk for decomposition of N2O in a laboratory fixed bed quartz reactor was measured. It was found that calcined Stevns Chalk...... is a very active catalyst for N2O decomposition in an inert atmosphere, and the presence of 3 vol% CO increased the rate of N2O destruction by a factor of 5 due to the catalytic reduction of N2O by CO. The activity decreased with increasing CO2 concentration, and uncalcined or recarbonated limestone had...... negligible activity. Sulfation of the calcined limestone under oxidizing conditions lowered the activity, however sulfidation under reducing conditions showed that CaS is an active catalyst for the reduction of N2O by CO. Without CO present a gas solid reaction between N2O and CaS takes place and SO2...

  19. Origin of carbonate concretions from mud mounds in the Gulf of Cadiz (SW Iberian Peninsula); Origen de las concreciones carbonatadas de los monticulos de fango en el Golfo de Cadiz (SO Peninsula Iberica)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rejas, M.; Taberner, C.; Pueyo, J. J.; Giralt, S.; Mata, M. P.; Gibert, J. M. de; Diaz del Rio, V.

    2015-07-01

    The Gulf of Cadiz displays a number of structures that are associated with fluid circulation (mud volcanoes, mud mounds and pockmarks).This area has been used as natural laboratory for the sedimentological, bio- logical and biogeochemical studies of these environments. Analysis of the associated authigenic carbonates has been widely used as a proxy to yield insights into the circulation and chemical composition of these flu- ids. A study of carbonate concretions from the Iberico, Cornide and Arcos mud mounds in the Diasom Field was undertaken to better understand the origin and type of fluids from which these concretions precipitated. The concretions display varying morphologies, some of which correspond to bioturbation traces. X-ray dif- fractions revealed that these carbonate concretions are mainly composed of dolomite, Fe-rich dolomite, high magnesium calcite (HMC) and ankerite. The δ{sup 1}3 C values of carbonate minerals ranged between -48.3 and-10.9 V-PDB, which suggests that the main processes involved in their genesis are organic matter oxidation, bac- terial sulphate-reduction (BSR) and anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM). The origin of the methane is main- ly thermogenic, and only few concretions yielded δ{sup 1}3C values lower than -40 V-PDB, suggesting oxidation of microbial methane. Fluids involved in the carbonate precipitation are interpreted as being related to gas hydrate destabilisation (δ{sup 18}O fluid-V-SMOW values higher than +2%) and, to a lesser extent, modified seawater enriched in {sup 18}O due to rock-water interaction. Nevertheless, the highest δ{sup 1}8O fluid-V-SMOW values suggest that the influence of other deep-seated fluids due to clay-mineral dehydration cannot be ruled out. (Author)

  20. Excavation of Stone-chambered Mounds on the West Hill Ground at Yüshan,Changshu City,Jiangsu%江苏常熟市虞山西岭石室土墩的发掘

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏州博物馆; 常熟博物馆

    2001-01-01

    During a Project of capital construction, the Suzhou and Changshu museums carried out jointly rescuring excavation of three mounds (D1-D3) on West Hill at Yǖshan. Mound D1 stands on the main peak. It is large in size and looks like a truncated pyramid. The slopes are surfaced with stones, and the interior consists of a passage, a corridor and a stone chamber. Of the 93 unearthed objects, 89 are porcelain vessels of the jar, yǖ container, dou stemmed vessel, zun vase, gui food container, etc; the rest, only four pieces, are pottery, in which there are a ding tripod, a fu cauldron and a spindle whorl. These finds are seen mainly in the middle and at the rear wall of the chamber. D2 consists of a passage and a stone chamber. Owing to robbery in early time, it yielded only five objects in the southwestern corner, at the entrance of the chamber. D3 is the same shape as D2. Its 32 objects are unearthed at the entrance and rear wall of the chamber. They include hard-fired jars, urns and yǖ vessels with impressed patterns, proto-porcelain dou and yǖ, grey clay jars and bo bowls, and red sandy pottery ding. The characteristic features of the unearthed objects suggest that D1-D3 might have been of the Western Zhou to the early Spring-and-Autumn period, and that D1 is an altar while D2 and D3 are tombs.