WorldWideScience

Sample records for chalk core plug

  1. Measuring and Modeling the Displacement of Connate Water in Chalk Core Plugs during Water Injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsbech, Uffe C C; Aage, Helle Karina; Andersen, Bertel Lohmann; Hedegaard, Kathrine; Springer, Niels

    2006-01-01

    The movement of connate water spiked with gamma emitting 22Na was studied during laboratory water flooding of oil saturated chalk from a North Sea oil reservoir. Using a one dimensional gamma monitoring technique is was observed that connate water is piled-up at the front of the injection water and...... forms a mixed water bank with almost 100% connate water in the front behind which a gradual transition to pure injection water occurs. This result underpins log interpretations from waterflooded chalk reservoirs. An ad hoc model was set up by use of the results, and the process was examined...

  2. Measuring and Modeling the Displacement of Connate Water in Chalk Core Plugs during Water Injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsbech, Uffe C C; Aage, Helle Karina; Andersen, Bertel Lohmann;

    2006-01-01

    The movement of connate water spiked with gamma emitting 22Na was studied during laboratory water flooding of oil saturated chalk from a North Sea oil reservoir. Using a one dimensional gamma monitoring technique is was observed that connate water is piled-up at the front of the injection water a...

  3. Ekofisk chalk: core measurements, stochastic reconstruction, network modeling and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talukdar, Saifullah

    2002-07-01

    This dissertation deals with (1) experimental measurements on petrophysical, reservoir engineering and morphological properties of Ekofisk chalk, (2) numerical simulation of core flood experiments to analyze and improve relative permeability data, (3) stochastic reconstruction of chalk samples from limited morphological information, (4) extraction of pore space parameters from the reconstructed samples, development of network model using pore space information, and computation of petrophysical and reservoir engineering properties from network model, and (5) development of 2D and 3D idealized fractured reservoir models and verification of the applicability of several widely used conventional up scaling techniques in fractured reservoir simulation. Experiments have been conducted on eight Ekofisk chalk samples and porosity, absolute permeability, formation factor, and oil-water relative permeability, capillary pressure and resistivity index are measured at laboratory conditions. Mercury porosimetry data and backscatter scanning electron microscope images have also been acquired for the samples. A numerical simulation technique involving history matching of the production profiles is employed to improve the relative permeability curves and to analyze hysteresis of the Ekofisk chalk samples. The technique was found to be a powerful tool to supplement the uncertainties in experimental measurements. Porosity and correlation statistics obtained from backscatter scanning electron microscope images are used to reconstruct microstructures of chalk and particulate media. The reconstruction technique involves a simulated annealing algorithm, which can be constrained by an arbitrary number of morphological parameters. This flexibility of the algorithm is exploited to successfully reconstruct particulate media and chalk samples using more than one correlation functions. A technique based on conditional simulated annealing has been introduced for exact reproduction of vuggy

  4. Test plan: Potash Core Test. WIPP experimental program borehole plugging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Potash Core Test will utilize a WIPP emplaced plug to obtain samples of an in-situ cured plug of known mix constituents for bench scale testing. An earlier effort involved recovery at the salt horizon of Plug 217, a 17 year old plug in a potash exploration hole for bond testing, but the lack of particulars in the emplacement precluded significant determination of plug performance

  5. Nuclear determination of saturation profiles in core plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method to determine liquid saturations in core plugs during flooding is of importance when the relative permeability and capillary pressure function are to be determined. This part of the EFP-95 project uses transmission of γ-radiation to determine these saturations. In γ-transmission measurements, the electron density of the given substance is measured. This is an advantage as compared to methods that use electric conductivity, since neither oil nor gas conducts electricity. At the moment a single 137Cs-source is used, but a theoretical investigation of whether it is possible to determine three saturations, using two radioactive sources with different γ-energies, has been performed. Measurements were made on three core plugs. To make sure that the measurements could be reproduced, all the plugs had a point of reference, i.e. a mark so that it was possible to place the plug same way every time. Two computer programs for calculation of saturation and porosity and the experimental setup are listed. (EG)

  6. Permeability prediction in chalks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Prasad, Manika

    2011-01-01

    The velocity of elastic waves is the primary datum available for acquiring information about subsurface characteristics such as lithology and porosity. Cheap and quick (spatial coverage, ease of measurement) information of permeability can be achieved, if sonic velocity is used for permeability...... prediction, so we have investigated the use of velocity data to predict permeability. The compressional velocity fromwireline logs and core plugs of the chalk reservoir in the South Arne field, North Sea, has been used for this study. We compared various methods of permeability prediction from velocities....... The relationships between permeability and porosity from core data were first examined using Kozeny’s equation. The data were analyzed for any correlations to the specific surface of the grain, Sg, and to the hydraulic property defined as the flow zone indicator (FZI). These two methods use two...

  7. Lithology, fracture intensity, and fracture filling of drill core from Chalk River research area, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1977, 1978, and 1979, nine inclined cored boreholes, ranging in length from 113 to 704 m, were drilled in the Chalk River Research Area in order to define the geological subsurface characteristics of the rock mass at several selected test areas. A total of 2,458 metres of NQ-3 and HQ-3 core was obtained from the nine boreholes. Orthogneiss was the most predominant rock type intersected by the boreholes. Pyroxenite, amphibolite, metagabbro and dykes of diabase, pegmatite and aplite were also encountered. The crosscutting relationships and textures within the rocks indicate that the relative ages of the rock units, from youngest to oldest, are diabase; aplite and pegmatite dykes with no defined fabric; pyroxenite; meta-ferrogabbro; amphibolite; aplite and pegmatite dykes and pegmatite pods with a defined fabric; and orthogneiss. Textural characteristics and mineral assemblages indicate that the orthogneisses in the Chalk River Area are a product of regional, medium to high-grade metamorphism and belong to the upper amphibilite to granulite facies. A total of 35,597 fractures (an average of 14.5 fractures per metre) was observed in the core. Brecciated zones and open fractures were noted in the core from all of the boreholes, and major faults were identified in four of the nine boreholes. Nearly all of the fractures have a thickness between 0.4 and 1.2 mm and contain one or more types of filling. Chlorite and calcite are the most common types of filling. Epidote, hematite, clays, sulphides, talc, sericite, and rock fragments also occur in the fractures. The crosscutting relationships between fractures and the sequence of filling layers within the fractures indicate that several episodes of fracturing have occurred and that fractures containing more than one filling have probably been reactivated. A comparison of the geological logs from one of the boreholes with natural gamma, neutron-neutron and magnetic susceptibility logs indicates that certain rock types and

  8. Investigation of spore forming bacterial flooding for enhanced oil recovery in a North Sea chalk Reservoir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halim, Amalia Yunita; Nielsen, Sidsel Marie; Eliasson Lantz, Anna;

    2015-01-01

    Little has been done to study microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) in chalk reservoirs. The present study focuses on core flooding experiments designed to see microbial plugging and its effect on oil recovery. A pressure tapped core holder was used for this purpose. A spore forming bacteria Bac...

  9. Upper Cretaceous chalk facies and depositional history recorded in the Mona-1 core, Mona Ridge, Danish North Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finn Surlyk

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The 331 m long core from the Mona-1 well in the Danish North Sea spans almost the entire Upper Cretaceous Chalk Group but only about 10% of Late Cretaceous time is represented. The succession comprises 14 facies representing pelagic deposition, turbidity flow, and mass-transport processes, including mudflow, debris flow, and slumping. Pelagic deposits vary mainly in terms of the concentration of siliciclastic material, the trace-fossil assemblage, and the presence or ab¬sence of primary sedimentary structures. Pelagic sedimentation was probably punctuated by the deposition of thin turbidites, and the resultant deposits were thoroughly bioturbated if deposited during normal oxygenation at the sea floor. Periodic benthic dysoxia resulted in the preservation of primary structures, as represented by laminated chalk which consists of thin pelagic laminae alternating with thin turbidites. In addition to the thin turbidites in the laminated chalk, four dif¬ferent turbidite facies are interpreted as representing high- to low-energy flows. Clast-supported chalk conglomerates have previously not been differentiated from other turbidites, but are here interpreted to be directly related to the down-slope evolution of debris flows. Debris flows are rep¬resented by matrix-supported conglomerates, which form one of the most common facies in the succession. High-concentration, gravity-driven suspension flows passed into dilute visco-plastic flows during the final stages of deposition and resulted in the deposition of structureless chalks. Limited shear deformation produced distinct quasi-facies from which the precursor facies can be deduced, whereas intense or continued shear deformation produced a shear-banded quasi-facies from which the precursor facies cannot be deduced in all cases. A series of major slump packages (14–18 in total are interpreted, forming over 40% of the succession; debrites appear to be the most common precursor facies involved in

  10. Upper Cretaceous chalk facies and depositional history recorded in the Mona-1 core, Mona Ridge, Danish North Sea: Plate 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surlyk, Finn

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The 331 m long core from the Mona-1 well in the Danish North Sea spans almost the entire Upper Cretaceous Chalk Group but only about 10% of Late Cretaceous time is represented. The succession comprises 14 facies representing pelagic deposition, turbidity flow, and mass-transport processes, including mudflow, debris flow, and slumping. Pelagic deposits vary mainly in terms of the concentration of siliciclastic material, the trace-fossil assemblage, and the presence or ab¬sence of primary sedimentary structures. Pelagic sedimentation was probably punctuated by the deposition of thin turbidites, and the resultant deposits were thoroughly bioturbated if deposited during normal oxygenation at the sea floor. Periodic benthic dysoxia resulted in the preservation of primary structures, as represented by laminated chalk which consists of thin pelagic laminae alternating with thin turbidites. In addition to the thin turbidites in the laminated chalk, four dif¬ferent turbidite facies are interpreted as representing high- to low-energy flows. Clast-supported chalk conglomerates have previously not been differentiated from other turbidites, but are here interpreted to be directly related to the down-slope evolution of debris flows. Debris flows are rep¬resented by matrix-supported conglomerates, which form one of the most common facies in the succession. High-concentration, gravity-driven suspension flows passed into dilute visco-plastic flows during the final stages of deposition and resulted in the deposition of structureless chalks. Limited shear deformation produced distinct quasi-facies from which the precursor facies can be deduced, whereas intense or continued shear deformation produced a shear-banded quasi-facies from which the precursor facies cannot be deduced in all cases. A series of major slump packages (14–18 in total are interpreted, forming over 40% of the succession; debrites appear to be the most common precursor facies involved in

  11. The Effect of Bacteria Penetration on Chalk Permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halim, Amalia Yunita; Shapiro, Alexander; Nielsen, Sidsel Marie;

    , the spore forming Bacillus licheniformis 421 and the non-spore forming Pseudomonas putida K12, were used. The core plugs were Stevns Klint outcrop with initial permeability at 2-4 mD. The results revealed that bacteria were able to penetrate and to be transported through the chalk. Furthermore, a...... higher number of B. licheniformis was detected on the effluent compared with P. putida. However, in the experiment with B. licheniformis mainly spores were detected in the effluent. The core permeability decreased rapidly during injection of bacteria and a starvation period of 12 days did not allow the...... permeability to return to initial condition....

  12. Managing Injected Water Composition To Improve Oil Recovery: A Case Study of North Sea Chalk Reservoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahid, Adeel; Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan;

    2012-01-01

    with the following injecting fluids: distilled water, brine with and without sulfate, and brine containing only magnesium ions. The total oil recovery, recovery rate, and interaction mechanisms of ions with rock were studied for different injecting fluids at different temperatures and wettability...... only the injection brine composition but also the formation water composition affected the oil recovery at high temperatures from the Stevns Klint chalk rock.......In recent years, many core displacement experiments of oil by seawater performed on chalk rock samples have reported SO42–, Ca2+, and Mg2+ as potential determining ions for improving oil recovery. Most of these studies were carried out with outcrop chalk core plugs. The objective of this study is...

  13. Full-waveform Inversion of Crosshole GPR Data Collected in Strongly Heterogeneous Chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keskinen, Johanna; Zibar, Majken Caroline Looms; Nielsen, Lars;

    2015-01-01

    in an old chalk quarry in Eastern Denmark. Based on core data (including plug samples and televiewer logging data) collected in our four ~15-m-deep boreholes and results from previous related studies, it is apparent that the studied chalk is strongly heterogeneous. The upper ~7 m consist of variable coarse...... all the information contained in the data and is able to provide significantly improved images. Here, we apply full-waveform inversion to crosshole GPR data to image strong heterogeneity of the chalk related to changes in lithology and porosity. We have collected a crosshole tomography dataset...... address the importance of (i) adequate starting models, both in terms of the dielectric permittivity and the electrical conductivity, (ii) the estimation of the source wavelet, (iii) and the effects of data sampling density when imaging this rock type. Moreover, we discuss the resolution of the bedding...

  14. Digital Rock Physics: Mechanical Properties of Carbonate Core Plug at Different Resolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouini, M. S.; Faisal, T. F.; Islam, A.; Chevalier, S.; Jouiad, M.; Sassi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Digital Rock Physics (DRP) is a novel technology that could be used to generate accurate, fast and cost effective special core analysis (SCAL) properties to support reservoir characterization and simulation tools. For this work, Micro-CT images at different resolutions have been used to run simulations to determine elastic properties like bulk, shear, Young's Modulus and Poisson's ratio of a dry carbonate core plug from Abu Dhabi reservoirs. Pre processing and segmentation of raw images is performed in FEI 3D visualization and analysis tool Avizo. Carbonates are characterized by a very complex pore-space structure and so a high degree of heterogeneity. Abaqus that is based on Finite Element Method is used to run 2D and 3D elastic simulations. Results will be compared by simulating the same core-plug in an alternative segmentation and FEM modeling environment used previously by Jouini & Vega et al. 2012 [1]. Acoustic wave propagation experiments at different confining pressures are performed in the laboratory Triaxial machine to determine the dynamic Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio for the same core plug. Expeirmental results are compared with numerical results. [1] Jouini, M.S. and Vega, S. 2012. Simulation of carbonate rocks elastic properties using 3D X-Ray computed tomography images based on Discrete Element Method and Finite Element Method. 46th US Rock Mechanics / Geomechanics Symposium, Chicago, Il, USA, 24-27 June 2012.

  15. Recommended analysis plan for the borehole plugging program potash core test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A four-year old plugged potash core hole near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico has been proposed for overcoring, in order to examine the behavior of known grout mix constituents in contact with a variety of rock types during an extended grout-curing interval. This report recommends that various geochemical analyses be applied to the core samples containing both grout and rock and the interface between the two. The methods to be used include optical petrography, electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, x-ray diffraction, thermal analysis (TGA, DSC, DTA) with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and bulk chemical analysis. These analyses would allow identification of phases which have developed during grout curing, and provide evidence of reactions which may have taken place among constituents in the system grout-rock-groundwater. These reactions, and their sequence of occurrence will be compared with reactions predicted by thermodynamic modeling as the system seeks its lowest Gibbs' free energy. Identification of reactions which have the potential for compromising the integrity of a grout plug will receive special attention. Since not all such detrimental reactions can be observed directly in a human lifetime, due to kinetic inhibitions, and since a capability of time-dependent prediction of their degree of occurrence cannot be developed, thermodynamic modeling is the only known way of evaluating the long-term stability of a grout plug. The analysis of the plug-rock system will give an indication of in situ curing history of grout plug, and will allow an early occurrence of potentially detrimental reactions to be detected. Thus, this activity will be a case-study of suitability of certain grout mixtures for use in evaporites, as an example of evaluation of grouts for long-term compatability with a variety of rock types

  16. Alternative system design concepts for the ITER core CXRS upper port plug front end

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → System design for the core CXRS diagnostic port plug for ITER is investigated. → Dependencies of the sub-systems are given. → Overall system lifetime and recent mechanical changes are taken into account. → System configurations are derived for the current ITER design. - Abstract: The upper port no. 3 in ITER will be used by the core Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy (core CXRS) to channel out light from the inside of the vacuum vessel. Recent research about the lifetime of the first two mirrors and changes in the upper port plug geometry initiated further investigations into possible alternative system design concepts. Two new variants of the optical system were chosen for further investigation. The different sub-systems of core CXRS such as optical system, retractable tube and shutter are introduced together with their impact on the system design and their interactions. Space constraints originating from the envelope of the UPP and requirements emerging from the ITER environment such as remote handling and other maintenance considerations are also included in the investigation. Alternative system concepts taking the constraints into account are presented and discussed. Implications for further design work on the subsystems are derived from the results.

  17. Optimization of Spore Forming Bacteria Flooding for Enhanced Oil Recovery in North Sea Chalk Reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Halim, Amalia Yunita; Nielsen, Sidsel Marie; Eliasson Lantz, Anna; Shapiro, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Little has been done to study microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) in chalk reservoirs. The present study focused on core flooding experiments to see microbial plugging and its effect on oil recovery. A pressure tapped core holder with pressure ports at 1.2 cm, 3.8 cm, and 6.3 cm from the inlet was used for this purpose. A spore forming bacterium, Bacillus licheniformis 421, was used as it was shown to be a good candidate in the previous study. Bacterial spore can penetrate deeper into the ...

  18. Optimization of Spore Forming Bacteria Flooding for Enhanced Oil Recovery in North Sea Chalk Reservoir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halim, Amalia Yunita; Nielsen, Sidsel Marie; Eliasson Lantz, Anna;

    2015-01-01

    was used for this purpose. A spore forming bacterium, Bacillus licheniformis 421, was used as it was shown to be a good candidate in the previous study. Bacterial spore can penetrate deeper into the chalk rock, squeezing through the pore throats. Our results show that B. licheniformis 421 when......-1.2 cm and 1.2-3.8 cm) during bacteria injection. Further seawater flooding after three days shut in period showed that permeability gradually increased in the first two sections of the core and started to decrease in the third section of the core (3.8-6.3 cm). Complete plugging was never observed in our...

  19. Impedance imaging in core analysis. Imaging of phase distributions in samples of natural cores of North Sea chalk containing conducting as well as non-conducting fluids. Part: 1-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laursen, S. [DTU, Inst. for Kemi (Denmark)] Moeller Nielsen, C. [DTU, Inst. for Energiteknik (Denmark)

    1997-12-31

    The present report documents the efforts to develop an impedance method for determining the distribution of the water saturation in a chalk core sample. Measurement of this distribution during a displacement process will make it possible to make numerical simulations of the process which may in turn reveal important rock parameters. The impedance method is one among other methods to determine saturation profiles in a research programme on rock parameters with participants from Danmarks Tekniske Universitet, DTU, and Danmarks og Groenlands Geologiske Undersoegelse, GEUS. The other methods investigated are nmr-scanning and {gamma}-logging. (au)

  20. NMR response of non-reservoir fluids in sandstone and chalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zwaag, C H; Stallmach, F; Skjetne, T; Veliyulin, E

    2001-01-01

    Transverse (T2) NMR relaxation time at 2 MHz proton resonance frequency was measured on core plug samples from two different lithologies, sandstone and chalk, before and after exposure to selected drilling fluids. The results show that NMR signal response was significantly altered after displacing 50% of the original pore fluids, crude oil and water, by drilling fluid filtrate. Relaxation spectra of the rock samples invaded by water-based filtrate shift to significantly shorter T2-values. This shift yields an underestimation of the free-fluid volumes when selecting cut-off values of 33 ms and 100 ms for sandstone and chalk, respectively. In opposite, rock samples affected by oil-based filtrate respond with a signal indicating significantly larger free-fluid volumes than present before exposure. NMR-permeability calculated based on the Timur-Coates Free Fluid model altered in some cases by one order of magnitude. PMID:11445352

  1. Chalk as a reservoir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    chalk intervals are to some extent cemented and cannot compact mechanically at realistic effective stresses and only deform elastically. All chalk intervals though, may react by fracturing to changes in shear stress. So where natural fractures are not prevalent, fractures may be generated hydraulically....... Fractures play a significant role in the production of hydrocarbons from chalk reservoirs....

  2. Chalk as a reservoir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    Reservoir properties of chalk depend on the primary sediment composition as well as on subsequent diagenesis and tectonic events. Chalks of the North Sea almost exclusively have mudstone or wackestone texture. Microfossils may have retained their porosity where degree of diagenesis is low, or be......, and the best reservoir properties are typically found in mudstone intervals. Chalk mudstones vary a lot though. The best mudstones are purely calcitic, well sorted and may have been redeposited by traction currents. Other mudstones are rich in very fine grained silica, which takes up pore space and...... thus reduces porosity at the same time as it increases specific surface and thus cause permeability to be low. In the Central North Sea the silica is quartzitic. Silica rich chalk intervals are typically found in the Ekofisk and Hod formations. In addition to silica, Upper Cretaceous and Palæogene...

  3. Slope failure of chalk channel margins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gale, A.; Anderskouv, Kresten; Surlyk, Finn;

    2015-01-01

    The importance of mass transport and bottom currents is now widely recognized in the Upper Cretaceous Chalk Group of Northern Europe. The detailed dynamics and interaction of the two phenomena are difficult to study as most evidence is based on seismic data and drill core. Here, field observations...

  4. k-t Acceleration in pure phase encode MRI to monitor dynamic flooding processes in rock core plugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dan; Balcom, Bruce J.

    2014-06-01

    Monitoring the pore system in sedimentary rocks with MRI when fluids are introduced is very important in the study of petroleum reservoirs and enhanced oil recovery. However, the lengthy acquisition time of each image, with pure phase encode MRI, limits the temporal resolution. Spatiotemporal correlations can be exploited to undersample the k-t space data. The stacked frames/profiles can be well approximated by an image matrix with rank deficiency, which can be recovered by nonlinear nuclear norm minimization. Sparsity of the x-t image can also be exploited for nonlinear reconstruction. In this work the results of a low rank matrix completion technique were compared with k-t sparse compressed sensing. These methods are demonstrated with one dimensional SPRITE imaging of a Bentheimer rock core plug and SESPI imaging of a Berea rock core plug, but can be easily extended to higher dimensionality and/or other pure phase encode measurements. These ideas will enable higher dimensionality pure phase encode MRI studies of dynamic flooding processes in low magnetic field systems.

  5. Impedance imaging in core analysis. Imaging of phase distributions in samples of natural cores of North Sea chalk containing conducting as well as non-conducting fluids. Part 1: Development of prototype measurement cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller Nielsen, C. [DTU, Inst. for Kemi (Denmark); Lauersen, S. [DTU, Lab. for Energiteknik (Denmark)

    1996-12-31

    To make reservoir simulations it is necessary to know such parameter functions as the capillary pressure curve, relative permeabilities etc. These are difficult to measure in chalk by means of traditional techniques because of the low permeability. In the present approach a displacement process is studied in detail and computer simulation with reservoir simulators can be used to determine parameter functions. To do this, however, it is necessary to know the developments of saturation profiles during the experiment. Different methods are tested in the programme. NMR-scanning and {gamma}-logging are methods where straight rays penetrate the sample and are partly absorbed. In electric current imaging an electric field is induced in the sample and detected at the surface. There are several benefits of this method compared with the others: There are no special safety requirements in contrast to work with radiation; No expensive and limited available equipment is needed unlike NMR; There are no intrinsic procedures slowing the method. There are, however, also drawbacks: Making measurements on a core sample implies the application of a large number of minute electrodes. To do this an implementation has to be derived from scratch; The inverse problem, i.e. the determination of the field inside the sample from surface measurements, is more difficult than the inverse problem of straight ray absorption. In the present report the development of an experimental technique is described. In part II of the report the interpretation of the experimental results will be discussed. (EG) 21 refs.

  6. A fast alternative to core plug tests for optimising injection water salinity for EOR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassenkam, Tue; Andersson, Martin Peter; Hilner, Emelie Kristin Margareta;

    2014-01-01

    Core tests have demonstrated that decreasing the salinity of injection water can increase oil recovery. Although recovery is enhanced by simply decreasing salt content, optimising injection water salinty would offer a clear economic advantage for several reasons. Too low salinity risks swelling o...... and to provide extra data that would be too time consuming or too expensive using traditional methods alone. © 2014, Society of Petroleum Engineers....

  7. A Core Plug and Play Architecture for Reusable Flight Software Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmot, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    The Flight Software Branch, at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), has been working on a run-time approach to facilitate a formal software reuse process. The reuse process is designed to enable rapid development and integration of high-quality software systems and to more accurately predict development costs and schedule. Previous reuse practices have been somewhat successful when the same teams are moved from project to project. But this typically requires taking the software system in an all-or-nothing approach where useful components cannot be easily extracted from the whole. As a result, the system is less flexible and scalable with limited applicability to new projects. This paper will focus on the rationale behind, and implementation of the run-time executive. This executive is the core for the component-based flight software commonality and reuse process adopted at Goddard.

  8. Region of interest selection of long core plug samples by magnetic resonance imaging: profiling and local T2 measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashaee, S.; Petrov, O. V.; Balcom, B. J.; Newling, B.

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly employed as a core analysis technique by the oil and gas industry. In axial profiling of petroleum reservoir core samples and core plugs, the sample of interest may frequently be much longer than the natural field of view (FOV) defined by the radio frequency (RF) sensor and region of constant magnetic field gradient. Profiling such samples with a low field MRI will result in distorted, non-quantitative axial profiles near the edge of the FOV with data from outside the desired FOV folding back into the image, when the gradient magnetic field homogenity region is shorter than the region of RF excitation. The quality of MRI as a core analysis technique is increased if imaging can be performed on intact samples with the FOV reduced to the region of interest (ROI), either to increase the image resolution or to reduce the total time for imaging. A spatially selective adiabatic inversion pulse is applied in the presence of a slice selective magnetic field gradient to restrict the FOV to an ROI that is a small portion of a long sample. Slice selection is followed by a 1D centric-scan SPRITE measurement to yield an axial fluid density profile of the sample in the ROI. By employing adiabatic pulses, which are immune to RF field non-uniformities, it is possible to restrict the ROI to a region of homogeneous RF excitation, facilitating quantitative imaging. The method does not employ conventional selective excitation, but a subtraction based on images acquired with and without adiabatic inversion slice selection. The adiabatic slice selection lends itself to a selective T2 distribution measurement when a CPMG pulse sequence follows the slice selection. The inversion pulse selects a slice on the order of 1 cm at an arbitrary position. The local T2 distributions measured are of similar quality to bulk CPMG. This method is an alternative to MRI-based techniques for T2 mapping in short relaxation time samples in porous media when T2

  9. Clearance of a Mucus Plug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Shiyao; Zheng, Ying; Grotberg, James B.

    2008-11-01

    Mucus plugging may occur in pulmonary airways in asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cystic fibrosis. How to clear the mucus plug is essential and of fundamental importance. Mucus is known to have a yield stress and a mucus plug behaves like a solid plug when the applied stresses are below its yield stress τy. When the local stresses reaches τy, the plug starts to move and can be cleared out of the lung. It is then of great importance to examine how the mucus plug deforms and what is the minimum pressure required to initiate its movement. The present study used the finite element method (FEM) to study the stress distribution and deformation of a solid mucus plug under different pressure loads using ANSYS software. The maximum shear stress is found to occur near the rear transition region of the plug, which can lead to local yielding and flow. The critical pressure increases linearly with the plug length and asymptotes when the plug length is larger than the half channel width. Experimentally a mucus simulant is used to study the process of plug deformation and critical pressure difference required for the plug to propagate. Consistently, the fracture is observed to start at the rear transition region where the plug core connects the films. However, the critical pressure is observed to be dependent on not only the plug length but also the interfacial shape.

  10. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Backfill and Plug test. Hydraulic testing of core drilled boreholes in the ZEDEX drift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report documents the performance and results of hydraulic testing in selected core boreholes in the Zedex drift. The holes will be used as rock instrumentation boreholes during the Backfill and Plug Test at Aespoe HRL. The testing involves both 1 m long boreholes with 56 mm diameter as well as longer boreholes c. 5 m, 8 m and 25 m long with 56 mm or 76 mm diameter. Only single-hole tests were performed. The tests were carried out as short-time constant head injection tests since all boreholes tested (except one) were non-flowing before tests. The injection phase was followed by a pressure recovery phase. Furthermore, the tests were carried out as single-packer tests. A specially designed test system was used for the tests. The main evaluation of the tests was performed on data from the recovery phase by a new approach based on a non-linear regression technique combined with a flow simulation model (SUTRA). The tests in the 1 m-holes (testing the interval c. 0.3-0.7 m in the rock perpendicular to the tunnel face) show that the hydraulic conductivity of the superficial rock around the Zedex drift in general is low. However, during testing in some boreholes, visible leakage in the rock occurred through superficial fractures into the tunnel. These fractures were mainly located in the floor of the Zedex drift and are probably blast-induced. These fractures have a high hydraulic conductivity. The tests in the longer boreholes show that the hydraulic conductivity further into the rock in general is below c. 1x10-10 m/s. Increased hydraulic conductivity (c.1.5x10-8 m/s) was only observed in the flowing borehole KXZSD8HL

  11. Plugging indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is often difficult to measure a plugging temperature when the impurity concentration in liquid sodium is low. Then, the plugging temperature is considered to be inferior to 1100C. Sometimes, a more precise indication is required. We propose a use for the plugging indicator which satisfies this type of requirement. A partial plugging of the indicator orifice is produced and increases at a constant temperature. A mathematical model describes this growth: it is based mainly on the kinetics of Na2O and NaH crystal growth and links the plugging time to oxygen or hydrogen concentrations. (orig.)

  12. Quantitative 1D saturation profiles on chalk by NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Dan; Topp, Simon; Stensgaard, Anders;

    1996-01-01

    Quantitative one-dimensional saturation profiles showing the distribution of water and oil in chalk core samples are calculated from NMR measurements utilizing a 1D CSI spectroscopy pulse sequence. Saturation profiles may be acquired under conditions of fluid flow through the sample. Results reveal...

  13. Investigated Miscible CO2 Flooding for Enhancing Oil Recovery in Wettability Altered Chalk and Sandstone Rocks

    OpenAIRE

    Tabrizy, Vahid Alipour

    2012-01-01

    The thesis addresses oil recovery by miscible CO2 flooding from modified sandstone and chalk rocks. Calcite mineral surface is modified with stearic acid (SA) and asphaltene, and the silicate mineral surfaces are modified with N,N-dimethyldodecylamine (NN-DMDA) and asphaltene. The stability of adsorbed polar components in presence of SO4 2- and Mg2 + ions is also investigated. Recovery from sandstone cores is consistently lower than that from chalk cores saturated with...

  14. Geochemical criteria for reservoir quality variations in chalk from the North Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of chalk geochemistry on petrophysical parameters determining porosity and permeability is investigated. The central well TWB-8 and eastern marginal well E-lx of the North Sea Tyra gas field were chosen. Drill core sections of Upper Maastrichtian and Danian chalk were selected. Chemical data on chalk samples were gathered by using X-ray fluorescence and instrumental neutron activation. Geochemical data are compared with the well-logging results. Geophysical logging suggests that there is reduced porosity in the Danian reservoir units LDP and UDT in both wells. The chalk drill core samples from the section with reduced porosity also show a lower Ca content. A high Si content is observed in these samples and a number of trace elements in chalk show a similar distribution with depth. Reservoir porosity may be estimated from the Si content of chalk. Chalk permeability may also be elements Al, Fe and Sc show the same trends as that for Si. Diagenetic changes in chalk also include clay minerals. The gas zone in TWB-8 is characterized by low contents of Na and Cl, i.e. lower water saturation is indicated. Low concentrations of rare earths in all chalk samples show a shale-normalized pattern that is characteristic of marine sediments laid down under oxic conditions. Some changes that occur with depth in the Ce anomaly may indicate a slight change in the depositional environment. The content of manganese continuously decreases with depth, from Danian (about 2000 ppm) to Maastrichtian strata (less than 200 ppm). In this respect, no other chemical element in chalk correlates with Mn. There is no indication as to which mineral or mineral phase one is likely to find in the element. (AB) 14 tabs., 49 ills., 147 refs

  15. Less chalk more action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitriceski Andelkovic, Bojana; Jovic, Sladjana

    2016-04-01

    Less chalk more action Education should not be a mechanical system that operates according to the principles of the orders and implementation. Education should respect the basic laws of the develop and progress. Curiosity is the engine of achievement and children spontaneously and happily learn only if they get interested, if teacher wake up and stimulate their creativity and individuality. We would like to present classes that are realized as thematic teaching with several subjects involved: chemistry, geography, math, art and biology. Classes were organized for students at age from 10 to 13 years, every month during autumn and winter 2015. Better students identified themselves as teachers and presented peer education .Teachers were monitoring the process of teaching and help to develop links between younger and older students, where older students were educators to younger students. Also one student with special needs was involved in this activities and was supported by other students during the workshops The benefit from this project will be represented with evaluation marks. Evaluation table shows that group of ten students(age 10 to13 years) which are selected in October as children with lack of motivation for learning, got better marks, at the end of January , then they had it in the beginning of the semester.

  16. Ecologically acceptable flows in Chalk rivers

    OpenAIRE

    Acreman, Mike; Dunbar, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The term ‘Chalk rivers’ is used to describe all those water courses dominated by groundwater discharge from Chalk geology. Natural conditions and historical modification have generated an ecosystem, with rich and unique assemblages and with high value to society (e.g. SACs, SSSIs, visual amenity and fisheries. Chalk rivers are considered to be sensitive to hydrological and morphological change and there is concern that flood defence and land drainage schemes, catchment agriculture, urbanisati...

  17. Plugging solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vagner, G.R.; Garaev, A.S.; Guzenko, L.P.; Khaber, N.V.; Kruglitskii, N.N.; Kurochkin, B.M.; Shumilov, V.A.

    1981-03-23

    Proposed is a plugging solution which contains cement, hydrophilic biosilica, polymer, and water, and which is distinguished by the fact that in order to increase the strength properties of the stone with simultaneous increase in its resistance to the effect of corrosive bed water under conditions of normal temperatures, as hydrophilic biosilica the solution contains carboxy aerosil or aminoethoxy aerosil, and as a polymer, carboxylate divinyl styrene latex and it also contains sodium with the following ingredient ratio, wt %: 63.47-66.08% cement, 0.66-1.28% carboxylate divinyl styrene latex, 1.26-1.32% sodium chloride, 0.22-0.36% carboxy aerosil or aminoethoxy aerosil, and the rest water. The plugging solution is distinguished by the fact that carboxy aerosil or aminoethoxy aerosil have a specific surface of 50-300 m/g.

  18. Self Compacting Concrete with Chalk Filler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    2007-01-01

    Utilisation of Danish chalk filler has been investigated as a means to produce self compacting concrete (SCC) at lower strength levels for service in non aggressive environments. Stable SCC mixtures were prepared at chalk filler contents up to 60% by volume of binder to yield compressive strengths...

  19. Plug Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation described Plug Power's GenDrive hydrogen fuel cell unit that supplies the power needs for folk lift trucks used in high-throughput distribution and high-volume manufacturing operations. The system offers an alternative to lead acid batteries, providing maximum performance at all times during use. The system is particularly useful in the material handling industry, where the revenue generated is based on operator uptime and lift truck productivity. The use of the system allows customers to reduce operational costs and expand valuable floor space by eliminating batteries and associated recharging infrastructure. Fuel cell units also reduce the wear on truck motors. Truck operators can easily and safely refuel at hydrogen fueling stations in 1-5 minutes. GenDrive works with all major OEM lift trucks, making the transition seamless. Commercial customers are investing in this solution to improve their current operations. In 2008, Plug Power sold to Wal-Mart, Bridgestone Firestone and Nestle. Most notably, Central Grocers purchased 220 fuel cell units for a new greenfield distribution center. Plug Power currently has more than 380 systems in operation

  20. Plug Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, A. [Plug Power Inc., New York, NY (United States)

    2009-07-01

    This presentation described Plug Power's GenDrive hydrogen fuel cell unit that supplies the power needs for folk lift trucks used in high-throughput distribution and high-volume manufacturing operations. The system offers an alternative to lead acid batteries, providing maximum performance at all times during use. The system is particularly useful in the material handling industry, where the revenue generated is based on operator uptime and lift truck productivity. The use of the system allows customers to reduce operational costs and expand valuable floor space by eliminating batteries and associated recharging infrastructure. Fuel cell units also reduce the wear on truck motors. Truck operators can easily and safely refuel at hydrogen fueling stations in 1-5 minutes. GenDrive works with all major OEM lift trucks, making the transition seamless. Commercial customers are investing in this solution to improve their current operations. In 2008, Plug Power sold to Wal-Mart, Bridgestone Firestone and Nestle. Most notably, Central Grocers purchased 220 fuel cell units for a new greenfield distribution center. Plug Power currently has more than 380 systems in operation.

  1. Decommissioning Experience: Chalk River, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Atomic Energy of Canada Limited has reported that work has continued on the decommissioning of old structures on the Chalk River laboratory site. An environmental assessment was approved in 2006 for the decommissioning of the NRX reactor fuel bays (A and B). The regulator approved two work packages for the removal of water and the wooden structure over the bays. The A bays were cleaned as far as possible and were emptied in 2007. Decontamination work will continue. Sections of the B bays were filled with sand and other parts filled with water. NRX is currently in storage (i.e. a dormant state) with surveillance. (author)

  2. Elastic behaviour of North Sea chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gommesen, Lars; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Mukerji, T.;

    2007-01-01

    We present two different elastic models for, respectively, cemented and uncemented North Sea chalk well-log data. We find that low Biot coefficients correlate with anomalously low cementation factors from resistivity measurements at low porosity and we interpret this as an indication of cementation......-saturated North Sea reservoir chalk. In the acoustic impedance–Poisson's ratio plane, we forecast variations in porosity and hydrocarbon saturation from their influence on the elastic behaviour of the chalk. The Gassmann model and the self-consistent approximation give roughly similar predictions of the effect of...... filtrate. The amplitude-versus-angle (AVA) response for the general North Sea sequence of shale overlying chalk is predicted as a function of porosity and pore-fill. The AVA response of both cemented and uncemented chalk generally shows a declining reflectivity coefficient versus offset and a decreasing...

  3. Plugging solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharipov, A.U.; Polyakov, V.N.; Yangirova, I.Z.

    1982-06-10

    Proposed is a plugging solution containing cement, modified methyl cellulose, and water. In order to decrease the viscosity in time with the preservation of filtration and strength properties of the solution and stone, it also contains wastes of the production of 4,4-dimethyl dioxane-1,3 with following ratio of components, mass%: 66.0-67.0% cement; 0.07-0.15 modified methyl cellulose, 0.13-0.33% wastes from the production of 4,4-dimethyl dioxane-1,3, and the rest water.

  4. Plugging material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, Yu.S.; Kravtsov, V.M.; Mavlyutov, M.R.; Spivak, A.I.; Trutnev, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    Plugging material is proposed which includes Portland cement and quartz sand. In order to improve the strength of the stone and sedimentation stability of the cement mud and to guarantee expansion during hardening of the stone in the interval 20-180/sup 0/C, it also contains solid residue of wastes from soda production thermally treated at temperature 850-900/sup 0/C with the following ratio of components (% by mass): Portland cement 60-80, quartz sand 15-20; solid residue of soda production 5-20.

  5. Plugging composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhrimenko, V.Ye.; Antonov, V.A.; Bulatov, A.I.; Gagay, G.I.; Levshin, V.A.; Minakova, V.I.

    1982-01-01

    A plugging composite is proposed for preparing muds containing binding agent with polymer of styrene type. It is distinguished by the fact that in order to improve the quality of the mud by improving its heat resistance, the polymer of styrene type used is a copolymer of styrene and divinylbenzene-resin KU-2 with the following ratio of ingredients, % by mass: binding agent 50-90; styrene and divinylbenzene-resin KU-2 copolymer 10-50. The composite is also distinguished by the fact that it contains as the binding agent Portland cement or Portland cement with granulated slag.

  6. Correlation of carbon isotope events in the Danish Upper Cretaceous chalk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schovsbo, N.H.; Rasmussen, Susanne L.; Sheldon, E. (Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Copenhagen (Denmark)); Stemmerik, L. (Univ. of Copenhagen, Dept. of Geography and Geology, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    2008-07-15

    A high resolution carbon isotope (delta13C) profile through the upper Campanian to Maastrichtian chalk was recently completed based on material from the Stevns-1 core from the Stevns peninsula, eastern Denmark. The delta13C variation of marine carbonates essentially reflects global perturbations in the carbon cycle, i.e. the burial fluxes of carbonate carbon versus organic carbon. It is widely observed that the delta13C variation broadly tracks the eustatic sea-level curve, and that delta13C curves can be used for stratigraphic correlation. In the Stevns-1 core, a total of 29 notable isotope changes have been identified in the upper Campanian to Maastrichtian succession. In order to evaluate the stratigraphic significance of the isotope changes, the variation in delta13C values of the mid-Maastrichtian chalk from cores in eastern Denmark and the Danish North Sea, and from outcrops at Roerdal, northern Jylland has been examined. The selected interval is characterised by distinct chalk and marl cycles in the Stevns-1 and Karlslunde-1 cores and in the Roerdal quarry, where as a non-cyclic clean chalk is found in the M-10X well from the North Sea. In the Roerdal quarry, the chalk-marl unit spans the upper-lower Maastrichtian boundary in the Boreal brachiopod and belemnite stratigraphies. In Stevns-1 and Karlslunde-1 the chalk-marl unit was deposited during the younger part of nannofossil subzone UC20b. This paper presents preliminary results of a high-resolution study of carbon isotopes, carried out by the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) in co-operation with partners from the Department of Geography and Geology at the University of Copenhagen. This paper is a product of the Cretaceous Research Centre (CRC) at Geocenter Denmark. (au)

  7. Reactor loops at Chalk River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes broadly the nine in-reactor loops, and their components, located in and around the NRX and NRU reactors at Chalk River. First an introduction and general description is given of the loops and their function, supplemented with a table outlining some loop specifications and nine simplified flow sheets, one for each individual loop. The report then proceeds to classify each loop into two categories, the 'main loop circuit' and the 'auxiliary circuit', and descriptions are given of each circuit's components in turn. These components, in part, are comprised of the main loop pumps, the test section, loop heaters, loop coolers, delayed-neutron monitors, surge tank, Dowtherm coolers, loop piping. Here again photographs, drawings and tables are included to provide a clearer understanding of the descriptive literature and to include, in tables, some specifications of the more important components in each loop. (author)

  8. The North Sea reservoir chalk characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Kallesten, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    A significant amount of the hydrocarbon production in the North Sea is related to chalk reservoirs. Since 1969, the chalk play remains one of the most important oil sources in Norway. With the initial expected recovery factor 17%, development in technologies and methods contributed to a substantial increase in oil recovery to an approximately 40%. Much of the reserves in place are yet to be extracted, and secondary and tertiary recovery methods need to advance in order to mobilize the remaini...

  9. Chalk: composition, diagenesis and physical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2007-01-01

    Chalk is a sedimentary rock of unusually high homogeneity on the scale where physical properties are measured, but the properties fall in wide ranges. Chalk may thus be seen as the ideal starting point for a physical understanding of rocks in general. Properties as porosity, permeability, capillary entry pressure, and elastic moduli are consequences of primary sediment composition and ofsubsequent diagenetic history as caused by microbial action, burial stress, temperature, and pore pressure....

  10. Subsidence and capillary effects in chalks

    OpenAIRE

    Delage, Pierre; Schroeder, Christian; Cui, Yu-Jun

    1996-01-01

    Based on the concepts of the mechanics of unsaturated soils where capillary phenomena arise between the wetting fluid (water) and the non-wetting one (air), the subsidence of chalks containing oil (non-wetting fluid) during water injection (wetting fluid) is analysed. It is shown that the collapse phenomenon of unsaturated soils under wetting provides a physical explanation and a satisfactory prediction of the order of magnitude of the subsidence of the chalk. The use of a well established co...

  11. Adsorption of hydrocarbons in chalk reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, L.

    1996-12-31

    The present work is a study on the wettability of hydrocarbon bearing chalk reservoirs. Wettability is a major factor that influences flow, location and distribution of oil and water in the reservoir. The wettability of the hydrocarbon reservoirs depends on how and to what extent the organic compounds are adsorbed onto the surfaces of calcite, quartz and clay. Organic compounds such as carboxylic acids are found in formation waters from various hydrocarbon reservoirs and in crude oils. In the present investigation the wetting behaviour of chalk is studied by the adsorption of the carboxylic acids onto synthetic calcite, kaolinite, quartz, {alpha}-alumina, and chalk dispersed in an aqueous phase and an organic phase. In the aqueous phase the results clearly demonstrate the differences between the adsorption behaviour of benzoic acid and hexanoic acid onto the surfaces of oxide minerals and carbonates. With NaCl concentration of 0.1 M and with pH {approx_equal} 6 the maximum adsorption of benzoic acid decreases in the order: quartz, {alpha}-alumina, kaolinite. For synthetic calcite and chalk no detectable adsorption was obtaind. In the organic phase the order is reversed. The maximum adsorption of benzoic acid onto the different surfaces decreases in the order: synthetic calcite, chalk, kaolinite and quartz. Also a marked difference in adsorption behaviour between probes with different functional groups onto synthetic calcite from organic phase is observed. The maximum adsorption decreases in the order: benzoic acid, benzyl alcohol and benzylamine. (au) 54 refs.

  12. Chalk Formations as Natural Barriers towards Radionuclide Migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Walther Batsberg; Carlsen, Lars; Jensen, Bror Skytte

    1985-01-01

    A series of chalk samples from the cretaceous formation overlying the Erslev salt dome have been studied in order to establish permeabilities, porosities, dispersion-, diffusion-, and sorption characteristics of the chalk. The chalk was found to be porous (∊≈0.4), however, of rather low permeabil...

  13. Microdeformation and subcritical cracking in chalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsaker, Anne; Dysthe, Dag Kristian

    2016-04-01

    Deformation processes in chalks, both in relation to changing pore fluids and stress conditions has been of great interest as chalk is an important reservoir rock for both hydrocarbons and ground water. Lately it has also gained interest as a potential reservoir rock for captured CO2. Chalks are composed of large amounts of biogenic calcite grains, the skeletal debris of marine microorganisms. Its deformation is highly time and stress dependent, and governed by a transition from distributed to localized deformation at the onset of yield, affected by mechanisms such as subcritical crack growth and pore collapse. We present a microdeformation rig which makes use of thermal expansion as a means of subjecting small samples to strictly controlled tensile stresses. High resolution imaging provides resolutions down to 0.5 micrometers, enabling study of pore scale processes during slow deformation. Examples of localized and distributed deformation are presented.

  14. Elastic behaviour of North Sea chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gommesen, Lars; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Mukerji, T.;

    2007-01-01

    We present two different elastic models for, respectively, cemented and uncemented North Sea chalk well-log data. We find that low Biot coefficients correlate with anomalously low cementation factors from resistivity measurements at low porosity and we interpret this as an indication of cementation...... self-consistent approximation, which here represents the unrelaxed scenario where the pore spaces of the rock are assumed to be isolated, and the Gassmann theory, which assumes that pore spaces are connected, as tools for predicting the effect of hydrocarbons from the elastic properties of brine......-saturated North Sea reservoir chalk. In the acoustic impedance–Poisson's ratio plane, we forecast variations in porosity and hydrocarbon saturation from their influence on the elastic behaviour of the chalk. The Gassmann model and the self-consistent approximation give roughly similar predictions of the effect of...

  15. Investigated Miscible CO2 Flooding for Enhancing Oil Recovery in Wettability Altered Chalk and Sandstone Rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabrizy, Vahid Alipour

    2012-07-01

    The thesis addresses oil recovery by miscible CO2 flooding from modified sandstone and chalk rocks. Calcite mineral surface is modified with stearic acid (SA) and asphaltene, and the silicate mineral surfaces are modified with N,N-dimethyldodecylamine (NN-DMDA) and asphaltene. The stability of adsorbed polar components in presence of SO4 2- and Mg2 + ions is also investigated. Recovery from sandstone cores is consistently lower than that from chalk cores saturated with the same oil and flooded with CO2 at all miscible flooding conditions. This may be due to the larger permeability contrasts in sandstone cores, which promote the fingering phenomenon. Miscible CO2 flooding for chalk and sandstone cores with distilled water, as initial water saturation, shows also lower oil recovery than cores saturated with different ions. At higher miscible flooding conditions, higher oil recovery is obtained. However, presence of light components (such as C1 or C3) in oil reduced the recovery. Oil recovery in presence of methane (C1) is lower than that in presence of methane and propane (C1/C3). A ternary diagram was constructed in order to understand the CO2 flooding mechanism(s) at the different flooding conditions and in presence of light components. The side effect of the flooding with CO2 is the probability for asphaltene deposition. An approach based on solubility parameter in the liquid, is used to assess the risk for asphaltene deposition during CO2 miscible flooding. The light components (C1/C3) and higher flooding conditions enhanced the risk for asphaltene instability. It is also shown higher amount of asphaltene deposition in chalk cores than that in sandstone cores at similar miscibility conditions.(au)

  16. Adsorption Properties of Chalk Reservoir Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okhrimenko, Denis

    Understanding adsorption energetics and wetting properties of calcium carbonate surfaces is essential for developing remediation strategies for aquifers, improving oil recovery, minimising risk in CO2 storage and optimising industrial processes. This PhD was focussed on comparing the vapour....../gas adsorption properties of synthetic calcium carbonate phases (calcite, vaterite and aragonite) with chalk, which is composed of biogenic calcite (>98%). In combination with data from nanotechniques, the results demonstrate the complexity of chalk behavior and the role of nanoscale clay particles. The results...

  17. Late Maastrichtian chalk mounds, Stevns Klint, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderskouv, Kresten; Damholt, Tove; Surlyk, Finn

    controlling the depositional thickness variation across a mound and thus mound growth pattern. Relatively long wave-length wavy-bedded chalk shows gentle convex-up geometries and would probably be described as sediment waves if recognized in seismic sections. The chalk waves were deposited under weaker......-member processes: those that were purely physical and related to the interaction between available grain sizes and hydrodynamics, and those that were largely biological and associated with benthic growth and sediment trapping mainly by bryozoans. The succession was deposited on the upper part of the flank of a 3...

  18. Late Maastrichtian chalk mounds, Stevns Klint, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderskouv, Kresten; Damholt, Tove; Surlyk, Finn

    2007-01-01

    determine depositional thickness across a mound and thus mound growth pattern. Relatively long wavelength wavy-bedded chalk show gentle convex-up geometries and would probably be described as sediment waves if recognized in seismic sections. The chalk waves were deposited under weaker current velocities...... the depositional architecture indicates a complex and   dynamic environment. The depositional style seems to be controlled by the interplay and relative importance of two end-member processes; those that were purely physical and related to the interaction between available grain sizes and...

  19. Aquifer properties of the Chalk of England

    OpenAIRE

    MacDonald, Alan M.; Allen, David J

    2001-01-01

    Aquifer properties data from 2100 pumping tests carried out in the Chalk aquifer have been collated as part of a joint British Geological Survey/Environment Agency project. The dataset is highly biased: most pumping tests have been undertaken in valley areas where the yield of the Chalk is highest. Transmissivity values from measured sites give the appearance of log-normality, but are not truly log-normal. The median of available data is 540 m2/d and the 25th and 75th percentiles 190 m2/d and...

  20. Rotating arc spark plug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whealton, John H.; Tsai, Chin-Chi

    2003-05-27

    A spark plug device includes a structure for modification of an arc, the modification including arc rotation. The spark plug can be used in a combustion engine to reduce emissions and/or improve fuel economy. A method for operating a spark plug and a combustion engine having the spark plug device includes the step of modifying an arc, the modifying including rotating the arc.

  1. Chalk aquifer study : permeability and fractures in the English Chalk : a review of hydrogeological literature

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, D J

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a review of the hydrogeological literature concerning the hydraulically significant fractures in the Chalk aquifer in England. The review discusses only the effect of the fractures on the permeability of the aquifer; it does not address the question of storage, nor the properties of the matrix. The report charts the evolution of ideas regarding the nature, occurrence and causes of hydraulically significant fractures in the Chalk and atte...

  2. Poroelasticity of high porosity chalk under depletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Katrine Alling; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2013-01-01

    The theory of poroelasticity for the elastic region below pore collapse by means of three different loading paths gives the possibility to compare the static and dynami-cally determined Biot coefficient for a set of experimental data with uniaxial loading on outcrop chalk performed with different...

  3. Nickel adsorption on chalk and calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belova, Dina Alexandrovna; Lakshtanov, Leonid; Carneiro, J.F.;

    2014-01-01

    Nickel uptake from solution by two types of chalk and calcite was investigated in batch sorption studies. The goal was to understand the difference in sorption behavior between synthetic and biogenic calcite. Experiments at atmospheric partial pressure of CO2, in solutions equilibrated with calcite...

  4. Effective-stress-law behavior of Austin chalk rocks for deformation and fracture conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warpinski, N.R.; Teufel, L.W.

    1994-08-01

    Austin chalk core has been tested to determine the effective law for deformation of the matrix material and the stress-sensitive conductivity of the natural fractures. For deformation behavior, two samples provided data on the variations of the poroelastic parameter, {alpha}, for Austin chalk, giving values around 0.4. The effective-stress-law behavior of a Saratoga limestone sample was also measured for the purpose of obtaining a comparison with a somewhat more porous carbonate rock. {alpha} for this rock was found to be near 0.9. The low {alpha} for the Austin chalk suggests that stresses in the reservoir, or around the wellbore, will not change much with changes in pore pressure, as the contribution of the fluid pressure is small. Three natural fractures from the Austin chalk were tested, but two of the fractures were very tight and probably do not contribute much to production. The third sample was highly conductive and showed some stress sensitivity with a factor of three reduction in conductivity over a net stress increase of 3000 psi. Natural fractures also showed a propensity for permanent damage when net stressed exceeded about 3000 psi. This damage was irreversible and significantly affected conductivity. {alpha} was difficult to determine and most tests were inconclusive, although the results from one sample suggested that {alpha} was near unity.

  5. Reactor vessel sealing plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to an apparatus and method for sealing the cold leg nozzles of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel from a remote location during maintenance and inspection of associated steam generators and pumps while the pressure vessel and refueling canal are filled with water. The apparatus includes a sealing plug for mechanically sealing the cold leg nozzle from the inside of a reactor pressure vessel. The sealing plugs include a primary and a secondary O-ring. An installation tool is suspended within the reactor vessel and carries the sealing plug. The tool telescopes to insert the sealing plug within the cold leg nozzle, and to subsequently remove the plug. Hydraulic means are used to activate the sealing plug, and support means serve to suspend the installation tool within the reactor vessel during installation and removal of the sealing plug

  6. Seismic architecture of the Chalk Group from onshore reflection data in eastern Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, Julien; Anderskouv, Kresten; Boldreel, Lars Ole;

    The Upper Cretaceous-Danian chalk is well exposed in the 14 km long coastal cliff of Stevns Klint (eastern Denmark). The cliff is a world renowned for its spectacular exposure of the Cretaceous-Palaeogene boundary. Based on regional geological knowledge of the field and cores, the characteristics...... completed with the acquisition of an extensive set of subsurface data. The data include high resolution 2D multichannel seismics onshore and offshore, a seismic refraction profile, two entirely cored boreholes including wireline logs, GPR cross-hole tomography, thermographic analysis, etc. We intend...... to compile and merge the geological and geophysical datasets to investigate the variation of the Chalk Group properties and their signature in the subsurface. In this communication, the seismic reflection data are being analysed. Very high resolution litho-, bio- and cyclostratigraphy can be correlated...

  7. Rock physical aspects of CO{sub 2} injection in chalk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, M.M.

    2011-04-15

    Impact of supercritical CO{sub 2} on the petrophysical and rock-mechanics properties of Ekofisk Formation and Tor Formation chalk from South Arne field, Danish North Sea, chalk was investigated. A series of laboratory experiments was performed on core material collected from the reservoir zone of the South Arne field in order to reveal the changes with respect to porosity, specific surface, pore stiffness, wettability, mineralogy and mechanical failure. In addition, a theoretical rock physical background was also established in order to be able to make sensible interpretation of laboratory data. Sound wave velocity was used as the central tool to study any change in petrophysical and rock mechanical properties. The main focus was to achieve a better understanding of effective stress coefficient (also known as Biot's coefficient); by means of which effective stress can be predicted more accurately. Independent theoretical studies were made on diagenesis, surface properties and stiffness of chalk and their relation with sonic velocity (or Biot's coefficient calculated from sonic velocity). The knowledge and experience from these studies was combined to achieve the main research objective of monitoring changes in hydrocarbon reservoirs in chalk due to CO{sub 2} injection. In order to understand the development of chalk from calcareous ooze and achieving pore stiffness, the diagenesis process of a sedimentary sequence from Kerguelen Plateau in the Indian Ocean was studied. The principal objective of the study was to explore how different porosity reduction mechanisms change the strength of these deep sea carbonate-rich sediments and how these mechanisms can be traced from the change in Biot's coefficient, alpha. In calcareous ooze, alpha was found close to one. Mechanical compaction reduces porosity, but only leads to a minor decrease in alpha. Recrystallization process renders particles smoother, but do not lead to reduction in alpha unless it gives

  8. Competitive sorption of organic contaminants in chalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, E. R.; Borisover, M.

    2003-12-01

    In the Negev desert, Israel, a chemical industrial complex is located over fractured Eocene chalk formations where transfer of water and solutes between fracture voids and matrix pores affects migration of contaminants in the fractures due to diffusion into the chalk matrix. This study tests sorption and sorption competition between contaminants in the chalk matrix to make it possible to evaluate the potential for contaminant attenuation during transport in fractures. Single solute sorption isotherms on chalk matrix material for five common contaminants ( m-xylene, ametryn, 1,2-dichloroethane, phenanthrene, and 2,4,6-tribromophenol) were found to be nonlinear, as confirmed in plots of Kd versus initial solution concentration. Over the studied concentration ranges, m-xylene Kd varied by more than a factor of 100, ametryn Kd by a factor of 4, 1,2-dichloroethane Kd by more than a factor of 3, phenanthrene Kd by about a factor of 2, and 2,4,6-tribromophenol Kd by a factor of 10. It was earlier found that sorption is to the organic matter component of the chalk matrix and not to the mineral phases (Chemosphere 44 (2001) 1121). Nonlinear sorption isotherms indicate that there is at least some finite sorption domain. Bi-solute competition experiments with 2,4,6-tribromophenol as the competitor were designed to explore the nature of the finite sorption domain. All of the isotherms in the bi-solute experiments are more linear than in the single solute experiments, as confirmed by smaller variations in Kd as a function of initial solution concentration. For both m-xylene and ametryn, there is a small nonlinear component or domain that was apparently not susceptible to competition by 2,4,6-tribromophenol. The nonlinear sorption domain(s) is best expressed at low solution concentrations. Inert-solvent-normalized single and bi-solute sorption isotherms demonstrate that ametryn undergoes specific force interactions with the chalk sorbent. The volume percent of phenanthrene

  9. The relation among porosity, permeability, and specific surface of chalk from the Gorm field, Danish North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeanette, Mortensen; Engstrøm, Finn; Lind, Ida

    1998-01-01

    The origin to the difference in the relationship between permeability and porosity for Danian and Maastrichtian chalk from the Gorm field offshore Denmark has been investigated. The investigation was based on 300 sets of core data (He-expansion porosity and air permeability) from the well Gorm N-22...... surface. Furthermore it was found that the nature of porosity (intrafossil, intergranular, etc.) had no significant influence on the air permeability, so that the permeability of the chalk can be calculated from total porosity and specific surface. Kozeny's empirical constant, c, was here determined...... analytically from a simple porosity model and Poiseuilles law....

  10. SAMI Automated Plug Plate Configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Lorente, Nuria P F; Goodwin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) is a prototype wide-field system at the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) which uses a plug-plate to mount its 13 x 61-core imaging fibre bundles (hexabundles) in the optical path at the telescope's prime focus. In this paper we describe the process of determining the positions of the plug-plate holes, where plates contain three or more stacked observation configurations. The process, which up until now has involved several separate processes and has required significant manual configuration and checking, is now being automated to increase efficiency and reduce error. This is carried out by means of a thin Java controller layer which drives the configuration cycle. This layer controls the user interface and the C++ algorithm layer where the plate configuration and optimisation is carried out. Additionally, through the Aladin display package, it provides visualisation and facilitates user verification of the resulting plates.

  11. Effect of Fluid Dynamic Viscosity on the Strength of Chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, K.; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    The mechanical strength of high porosity and weakly cemented chalk is affected by the fluid in the pores. In this study, the effect of the dynamic viscosity of non-polar fluids has been measured on outcrop chalk from Sigerslev Quarry, Stevns, Denmark. The outcome is that the measured strength of...... the chalk decreases with increasing dynamic viscosity. The proposed qualitative explanation is that pressure difference supports and enhances the generation of microscopic shear and tensile failures....

  12. Water in chalk reservoirs: 'friend or foe?'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the petroleum fields in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea are sandstone reservoirs; the oil and gas are trapped in different species of sandstone. But the Ekofisk Field is a chalk reservoir, which really challenges the operator companies. When oil is produced from chalk reservoirs, water usually gets in and the reservoir subsides. The subsidence may be expensive for the oil companies or be used to advantage by increasing the recovery rate. Since 60 per cent of the world's petroleum reserves are located in carbonate reservoirs, it is important to understand what happens as oil and gas are pumped out. Comprehensive studies at the Department of Petroleum Technology and Applied Geophysics at Stavanger University College in Norway show that the mechanical properties of chalk are considerably altered when the pores in the rock become saturated with oil/gas or water under different stress conditions. The processes are extremely complex. The article also maintains that the effects of injecting carbon dioxide from gas power plants into petroleum reservoirs should be carefully studied before this is done extensively

  13. Late Cretaceous (late Campanian-Maastrichtian) sea-surface temperature record of the Boreal Chalk Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Nicolas; Harlou, Rikke; Schovsbo, Niels H.; Stemmerik, Lars; Surlyk, Finn

    2016-02-01

    The last 8 Myr of the Cretaceous greenhouse interval were characterized by a progressive global cooling with superimposed cool/warm fluctuations. The mechanisms responsible for these climatic fluctuations remain a source of debate that can only be resolved through multi-disciplinary studies and better time constraints. For the first time, we present a record of very high-resolution (ca. 4.5 kyr) sea-surface temperature (SST) changes from the Boreal epicontinental Chalk Sea (Stevns-1 core, Denmark), tied to an astronomical timescale of the late Campanian-Maastrichtian (74 to 66 Ma). Well-preserved bulk stable isotope trends and calcareous nannofossil palaeoecological patterns from the fully cored Stevns-1 borehole show marked changes in SSTs. These variations correlate with deep-water records of climate change from the tropical South Atlantic and Pacific oceans but differ greatly from the climate variations of the North Atlantic. We demonstrate that the onset and end of the early Maastrichtian cooling and of the large negative Campanian-Maastrichtian boundary carbon isotope excursion are coincident in the Chalk Sea. The direct link between SSTs and δ13C variations in the Chalk Sea reassesses long-term glacio-eustasy as the potential driver of carbon isotope and climatic variations in the Maastrichtian.

  14. Late Cretaceous (Late Campanian–Maastrichtian sea surface temperature record of the Boreal Chalk Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Thibault

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The last 8 Myr of the Cretaceous greenhouse interval were characterized by a progressive global cooling with superimposed cool/warm fluctuations. The mechanisms responsible for these climatic fluctuations remain a source of debate that can only be resolved through multi-disciplinary studies and better time constraints. For the first time, we present a record of very high-resolution (ca. 4.5 kyr sea-surface temperature (SST changes from the Boreal epicontinental Chalk Sea (Stevns-1 core, Denmark, tied to an astronomical time scale of the late Campanian–Maastrichtian (74 to 66 Myr. Well-preserved bulk stable isotope trends and calcareous nannofossil palaeoecological patterns from the fully cored Stevns-1 borehole show marked changes in SSTs. These variations correlate with deep-water records of climate change from the tropical South Atlantic and Pacific oceans but differ greatly from the climate variations of the North Atlantic. We demonstrate that the onset and end of the early Maastrichtian cooling and of the large negative Campanian–Maastrichtian boundary carbon isotope excursion are coincident in the Chalk Sea. The direct link between SSTs and δ13C variations in the Chalk Sea reassesses long-term glacio-eustasy as the potential driver of carbon isotope and climatic variations in the Maastrichtian.

  15. Late Cretaceous (Late Campanian-Maastrichtian) sea surface temperature record of the Boreal Chalk Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, N.; Harlou, R.; Schovsbo, N. H.; Stemmerik, L.; Surlyk, F.

    2015-11-01

    The last 8 Myr of the Cretaceous greenhouse interval were characterized by a progressive global cooling with superimposed cool/warm fluctuations. The mechanisms responsible for these climatic fluctuations remain a source of debate that can only be resolved through multi-disciplinary studies and better time constraints. For the first time, we present a record of very high-resolution (ca. 4.5 kyr) sea-surface temperature (SST) changes from the Boreal epicontinental Chalk Sea (Stevns-1 core, Denmark), tied to an astronomical time scale of the late Campanian-Maastrichtian (74 to 66 Myr). Well-preserved bulk stable isotope trends and calcareous nannofossil palaeoecological patterns from the fully cored Stevns-1 borehole show marked changes in SSTs. These variations correlate with deep-water records of climate change from the tropical South Atlantic and Pacific oceans but differ greatly from the climate variations of the North Atlantic. We demonstrate that the onset and end of the early Maastrichtian cooling and of the large negative Campanian-Maastrichtian boundary carbon isotope excursion are coincident in the Chalk Sea. The direct link between SSTs and δ13C variations in the Chalk Sea reassesses long-term glacio-eustasy as the potential driver of carbon isotope and climatic variations in the Maastrichtian.

  16. Seal device for shield plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To surely seal cover gases at a position nearer to the reactor core of a shield plug in LMFBR type reactors. Constitution: A shield plug is formed with through holes for insertion of a stopper or a through-cylinder. A step is provided to the through hole at the interium of the thickness of the shield plug and a seal ring is disposed on the step. The seal ring is retained on the side of the stopper or the through-cylinder by means of a holding member. The seal ring is urged to the step of the stopper by the own weight of the stopper or the through-cylinder to thereby seal the cover gases. Since the seal ring is retained on the side of the stopper or the through-cylinder, the seal ring is pulled up together with the extraction of the stopper or the through-cylinder and can be maintained or repaired with ease. (Ikeda, J.)

  17. Compaction of microfossil and clay-rich chalk sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of microfossils and clay in the compaction of chalk facies sediments. To meet this aim, chalk sediments with varying micro texture were studied. The sediments have been tested uniaxially confined in a stainless-steel compaction cell. The sediments ar...

  18. Compaction of North-sea chalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keszthelyi, Dániel; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2014-05-01

    The Ekofisk field is the largest petroleum field in the Norwegian North Sea territory where oil is produced from chalk formations. Early stage of oil production caused considerable changes in pore fluid pressure which led to a reservoir compaction. Pore collapse mechanism caused by the dramatic increase of effective stress, which in turn was caused by the pressure reduction by hydrocarbon depletion, was early identified as a principal reason for the reservoir compaction (Sulak et al. 1991). There have been several attempts to model this compaction. They performed with variable success on predicting the Ekofisk subsidence. However, the most of these models are based on empirical relations and do not investigate in detail the phenomena involved in the compaction. In sake of predicting the Ekofisk subsidence while using only independently measurable variables we used a chalk compaction model valid on geological time-scales (Japsen et al. 2011) assuming plastic pore-collapse mechanism at a threshold effective stress level. We identified the phenomena involved in the pore collapse. By putting them in a sequential order we created a simple statistical analytical model. We also investigated the time-dependence of the phenomena involved and by assuming that one of the phenomena is rate-limiting we could make estimations of the compaction rate at smaller length-scales. By carefully investigating the nature of pressure propagation we could upscale our model to reservoir scale. We found that the predicted compaction rates are close enough to the measured rates. We believe that we could further increase accuracy by refining our model. Sulak, R. M., Thomas, L. K., Boade R. R. (1991) 3D reservoir simulation of Ekofisk compaction drive. Journal of Petroleum Technology, 43(10):1272-1278, 1991. Japsen, P., Dysthe, D. K., Hartz, E. H., Stipp, S. L. S., Yarushina, V. M., Jamtveit. (2011) A compaction front in North Sea chalk. Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth (1978

  19. Chalk effect on PVC cross-linking under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of nonmodified and modified chalk on curing degree of polymer matrix was studied under-irradiation of PVC-compositions. Films of the compositions (100 mass part 7 PVC, 0-100 mas.part of chalk, 2.5 - lead sulfate, 1.5 - lead stearate and 0.3 - glycerin) were irradiated up to absorbed dose 0.1 MGy in an inert medium. Content of gel-fraction after boiling in THF was determined with use of IR spectroscopy. It was established, that intensive dehydrochlorination and polymer curing took place on chalk particle surface. Network fixed strongly chalk particles. However, chalk inhibited processes of dehydrochlorination and PVC curing, increasing amount of noncured PVC in polymer matrix

  20. Plug Load Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We provide MATLAB binary files (.mat) and comma separated values files of data collected from a pilot study of a plug load management system that allows for the...

  1. Fuel rod plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prevent the formation of voids to the inside of welded portion in fuel rod plugs. Constitution: A fuel rod is tightly sealed by welding end plugs at both ends of a fuel can charged with nuclear fuel material. For the welding of the end plug, laser welding has now been employed with the reason of increasing the welding efficiency and reducing the welding heat distortion. However, if the end plug is laser-welded to the end of the fuel can in the conventional form, there is a problem that voids are liable to be formed near the deepest penetration in the welding portion. That is, gases evolved near the deepest penetration remains in a key-hole like welded metal portion to result in voids there. Accordingly, grooves capable of passing the laser beam key hole therethrough are disposed along the circumferential direction of the pipe at the end plug welded portion in the fuel can. In this way, since gases generating near the deepest penetration are discharged into the grooves, the key hole-like welded metal is completely filled and voids are not formed. (Kamimura, M.)

  2. Burial diagenesis of deep sea chalk as reflected in Biot’s coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul

    particles apparently is low and not correlated with porosity, probably because the pore-filling cementation in this interval causes Biot’s coefficient to decline as burial increases. Limestone from the water zone of the North sea Chalk Group follows the same stress trend as deep sea limestone. These results...... limestone as burial increases and porosity decreases. The porosity decrease is accompanied by an increasing velocity to elastic waves, and consequently a decreasing Biot’s coefficient, as estimated from velocity and density of core samples. When the effective burial stress is normalized to total horizontal...

  3. Burial diagenesis of deep sea chalk as reflected in Biot's coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul

    particles apparently is low and not correlated with porosity, probably because the pore-filling cementation in this interval causes Biot's coefficient to decline as burial increases. Limestone from the water zone of the North sea Chalk Group follows the same stress trend as deep sea limestone. These results...... limestone as burial increases and porosity decreases. The porosity decrease is accompanied by an increasing velocity to elastic waves, and consequently a decreasing Biot's coefficient, as estimated from velocity and density of core samples. When the effective burial stress is normalized to total horizontal...

  4. Waveform analysis of crosshole GPR data collected in heterogeneous chalk deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keskinen, Johanna; Nielsen, Lars; Zibar, Majken Caroline Looms;

    2014-01-01

    be divided into two main units based on the traveltime analysis and interpretation of the cored material from the boreholes. The lower unit consists mainly of porous calcareous mudstone with occasional occurrences of flint nodules. The upper succession is c. 8 m thick and is fairly heterogeneous...... methods are highly dependent on the quality of the starting models (usually obtained from ray-based tomography), as well as on the assumptions made regarding the source signal. Adequate estimation of starting models and source waveform is, however, a challenging task for the strongly heterogeneous chalk...

  5. Kolmanda aastatuhande piraadid / kommenteerinud Peter Chalk ja Gordan Van Hook

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2009-01-01

    Piraatlusest Somaalia piirkonnas ja rahvusvahelistest dokumentidest piraatluse vastu võitlemiseks 21. sajandil. Kommenteerivad uurimiskeskuse RAND Corporation vanempoliitanalüütik Peter Chalk ja transpordikompanii Maersk Line innovatsiooni ja arenduse vanemdirektor Gordan Van Hook

  6. A plugging solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulatov, A.I.; Arakelyan, A.A.; Gen' , O.U.; Krutikova, N.I.; Lezhenin, V.V.; Repyakhova, T.M.; Rudomino, M.V.; Ryabova, L.I.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this invention is to increase the setting time of a binder at temperatures between 200 and 300 degrees centigrade, to reduce the water loss of the solution and to improve the strength of the plugging rock. This is achieved by an arrangement whereby the plugging solution consisting of a binder, water and an organic element setting retarder contains mononuclear complexones of nitryltrimethylphosphonic acid for use as the setting retarder, with the following component ratios (percentage by weight): binder 70.71 to 72.80; organic component setting retarder .0072 to 1; water the remaining.

  7. The invertebrate ecology of the Chalk aquifer in England (UK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, L.; Robertson, A. R.; White, D.; Knight, L.; Johns, T.; Edwards, F.; Arietti, M.; Sorensen, J. P. R.; Weitowitz, D.; Marchant, B. P.; Bloomfield, J. P.

    2016-03-01

    The Chalk is an important water supply aquifer, yet ecosystems within it remain poorly understood. Boreholes (198) in seven areas of England (UK) were sampled to determine the importance of the Chalk aquifer as a habitat, and to improve understanding of how species are distributed. Stygobitic macro-invertebrates were remarkably common, and were recorded in 67 % of boreholes in unconcealed Chalk, although they were not recorded in Chalk that is concealed by low-permeability strata and thus likely to be confined. Most species were found in shallow boreholes (50 m) water tables, indicating that the habitat is vertically extensive. Stygobites were present in more boreholes in southern England than northern England (77 % compared to 38 %). Only two species were found in northern England compared to six in southern England, but overall seven of the eight stygobitic macro-invertebrate species found in England were detected in the Chalk. Two species are common in southern England, but absent from northern England despite the presence of a continuous habitat prior to the Devensian glaciation. This suggests that either they did not survive glaciations in the north where glaciers were more extensive, or dispersal rates are slow and they have never colonised northern England. Subsurface ecosystems comprising aquatic macro-invertebrates and meiofauna, as well as the microbial organisms they interact with, are likely to be widespread in the Chalk aquifer. They represent an important contribution to biodiversity, and may influence biogeochemical cycles and provide other ecosystem services.

  8. Full-waveform inversion of cross-hole GPR data collected in a strongly heterogeneous chalk reservoir analogue with sharp permittivity and conductivity contrasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keskinen, Johanna; Zibar, Majken Caroline Looms; Moreau, Julien;

    2014-01-01

    Chalk sediments form an important reservoir for groundwater onshore and for hydrocarbons in the Danish sector of the North Sea. Cross-hole Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) tomography is an efficient method to investigate subtle porosity variations in the chalk. Traditional ray-based inversion...... techniques provide models that are overly smooth and have relatively low resolution. We present preliminary results from full-waveform inversion of data collected in strongly heterogeneous chalk. The resolution of the tomograms has improved significantly compared to models obtained from travel......-time tomography. The new models also reflect the variability seen in 1D drill core analysis. The results indicate that full-waveform inversion is a well-suited inversion technique for high-resolution time-lapse-based flow characterization. Read More: http://library.seg.org/doi/abs/10.1190/segam2014-1199.1...

  9. Plugging device for nuclear pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plugging device assembled near an access opening is used for plugging the primary pipes. This plugging device comprises a rim flexible joint put in mechanical pressure by the displacement of mechanical pieces. This joint has a central compartment pressurizable. This joint is fixed by a stirrup-piece and a shaft in support on the tube plate

  10. CORE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Hundebøll, Martin;

    2013-01-01

    different flows. Instead of maintaining these approaches separate, we propose a protocol (CORE) that brings together these coding mechanisms. Our protocol uses random linear network coding (RLNC) for intra- session coding but allows nodes in the network to setup inter- session coding regions where flows...... increase the benefits of XORing by exploiting the underlying RLNC structure of individual flows. This goes beyond providing additional reliability to each individual session and beyond exploiting coding opportunistically. Our numerical results show that CORE outperforms both forwarding and COPE......-like schemes in general. More importantly, we show gains of up to 4 fold over COPE-like schemes in terms of transmissions per packet in one of the investigated topologies....

  11. The Chalk River Tritium Extraction Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chalk River Tritium Extraction Plant for removal of tritium from heavy water is described. Tritium is present in the heavy water from research reactors in the form of DTO at a concentration in the range of 1-35 Ci/kg. It is removed by a combination of catalytic exchange to transfer the tritium from DTO to DT, followed by cryogenic distillation to separate and concentrate the tritium to T2. The tritium product is reacted with titanium and packaged for transportation and storage as titanium tritide. The plant processes heavy water at a rate of 25 kg/h and removes 80% of the tritium and 90% of the protium per pass. Catalytic exchange is carried out in the liquid phase using a proprietary wetproofed catalyst. The plant serves two roles in the Canadian fusion program: it produces pure tritium for use in fusion research and development, and it demonstrates on an industrial scale many of the tritium technologies that are common to the tritium systems in fusion reactors (author)

  12. Inverse modeling of Chalk River block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of the international project HYDROCOIN, a block of fractured monzonitic gneiss within the facilities of Chalk River National Laboratories, Canada, was selected as a test case to study and develop strategies for the calibration and validation of groundwater flow models. Adopting a quasi-three dimensional formulation, the fractures were simulated by two-dimensional finite elements and the rock mass was simulated by strings of line elements. The models were calibrated using, first, steady-state data and, second, transient data. Model calibration involved both identification of model parameters and model structure. Model parameters were obtained by automatic estimation based on measures of the model response and prior information about the model parameters. Excellent agreement between measured and computed heads was obtained for the transient runs. However, such match was only fair in steady-state. Model Structures Identification criteria were used to rank the performance of several model structures. In the steady state the model structure identification criteria did not strongly support increasing the model complexity. However, it is also believed that the information content of the steady state data was quite poor. In contrast, the transient data being both more numerous and more informative than steady-state data, allowed the model structure identification criteria to suggest more complex models. The validation runs were performed on data corresponding to interference pump tests different from the ones used for calibration. The prediction errors in these runs were relatively small and consistent with the calibration uncertainty. Furthermore, the ranking of the models performances during validation runs was the same as the one obtained at the calibration stage, using Model Structure Identification Criteria. (author) 26 figs., 17 tabs., 39 refs

  13. Burial diagenesis of deep sea chalk as reflected in Biot's coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul

    2013-01-01

    Burial diagenesis of chalk has been widely studied, but little agreement has been reached on by which mechanism porosity declines, and on how to calculate the deforming stress in the most informative way. Data from Ocean Drilling Program show that calcareous ooze transforms to chalk and chalk to ...

  14. Biot Critical Frequency Applied as Common Friction Factor for Chalk with Different Pore Fluids and Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Katrine Alling; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2010-01-01

    Injection of water into chalk hydrocarbon reservoirs has lead to mechanical yield and failure. Laboratory experiments on chalk samples correspondingly show that the mechanical properties of porous chalk depend on pore fluid and temperature. Water has a significant softening effect on elastic...... highly influenced by temperature....

  15. Influence of effective stress coefficient on mechanical failure of chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Hjuler, M.L.;

    2012-01-01

    The Effective stress coefficient is a measure of how chalk grains are connected with each other. The stiffness of chalk may decrease if the amount of contact cements between the grains decreases, which may lead to an increase of the effective stress coefficient. We performed CO2 injection in chalk......, as this process could affect the grain contact cement. If this happens, the effective stress at the grain contacts in a reservoir will change according to the effective stress principle of Biot. In a p′-q space for failure analysis, we observed that a higher effective stress coefficient reduces the...... elastic region and vice versa. However, as the effective stress working on the rock decreases with increased effective stress coefficient, the reduction of elastic region will have less effect on pore collapse strength if we consider the change in the effective stress coefficient. This finding will help...

  16. Chemical and Mechanical processes during burial diagenesis of chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borre, Mai Kirstine; Lind, Ida

    1998-01-01

    equal or larger influence on the textural development. In the chalk interval below, compaction is not the only porosity reducing agent but it has a larger influence on texture than concurrent recrystallization. Below 850 m grain-bridging cementation becomes important resulting in a lithified limestone......Burial diagenesis of chalk is a combination of mechanical compaction and chemical recrystallization as well as cementation. We have predicted the characteristic trends in specific surface resulting from these processes. The specific surface is normally measured by nitrogen adsorption but is here...... the Pacific, where a > 1 km thick package of chalk facies sediments accumulated from the Cretaceous to the present. In the upper 200-300 m the sediment is unconsolidated carbonate ooze, throughout this depth interval compaction is the principal porosity reducing agent, but recrystallization has an...

  17. Province of Ontario nuclear emergency plan part V - Chalk River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of Part 5 of the Provincial Nuclear Emergency Plan is to describe the measures that shall be undertaken to deal with a nuclear emergency caused by the Chalk River Laboratories. This plan deals mainly with actions at the Provincial level and shall by supplemented by the appropriate Municipal Plan. The Townships of Rolph, Buchanan, Wylie, and McKay, the Town of Deep River and the Village of Chalk River are the designated municipalities with respect to CRL. 2 tabs., 5 figs

  18. Providing free autopoweroff plugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten Lynge; Hansen, Lars Gårn; Fjordbak, Troels;

    2012-01-01

    Experimental evidence of the effect of providing households with cheap energy saving technology is sparse. We present results from a field experiment in which autopoweroff plugs were provided free of charge to randomly selected households. We use propensity score matching to find treatment effects...... on metered electricity consumption for different types of households. We find effects for single men and couples without children, while we find no effect for single women and households with children. We suggest that this could be because of differences in saving potential (e.g. some households do...

  19. Polysaccharides and bacterial plugging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogler, H.S.

    1991-11-01

    Before any successful application of Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery process can be realized, an understanding of the cells' transport and retentive mechanisms in porous media is needed. Cell transport differs from particle transport in their ability to produce polysaccharides, which are used by cells to adhere to surfaces. Cell injection experiments have been conducted using Leuconostoc cells to illustrate the importance of cellular polysaccharide production as a transport mechanism that hinders cell movement and plugs porous media. Kinetic studies of the Leuconostoc cells, carried out to further understand the plugging rates of porous media, have shown that the cells' growth rates are approximately equal when provided with monosaccharide (glucose and fructose) or sucrose. The only difference in cell metabolism is the production of dextran when sucrose is supplied as a carbon source. Experimentally it has also been shown that the cells' growth rate is weakly dependent upon the sucrose concentration in the media, and strongly dependent upon the concentration of yeast extract. The synthesis of cellular dextran has been found to lag behind cell generation, thus indicating that the cells need to reach maturity before they are capable of expressing the detransucrase enzyme and synthesizing insoluble dextran. Dextran yields were found to be dependent upon the sucrose concentration in the media. 10 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

  20. Initial field measurements on the Chalk River superconducting cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The midplane magnetic field of the Chalk River superconducting cyclotron has been mapped in detail over the full operating range of 2.5 to 5 tesla. The field measuring apparatus is described and results given include measurements of the field stability, reproducibility and harmonic content. (author)

  1. Chalk porosity and sonic velocity versus burial depth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Gommesen, Lars; Krogsbøll, Anette Susanne;

    2008-01-01

    Seventy chalk samples from four formations in the overpressured Danish central North Sea have been analyzed to investigate how correlations of porosity and sonic velocity with burial depth are affected by varying mineralogy, fluid pressure, and early introduction of petroleum. The results show th...

  2. Nano sized clay detected on chalk particle surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Lone; Hassenkam, Tue; Makovicky, Emil;

    2012-01-01

    that in calcite saturated water, both the polar and the nonpolar functional groups adhere to the nano sized clay particles but not to calcite. This is fundamentally important information for the development of conceptual and chemical models to explain wettability alterations in chalk reservoirs...

  3. Specific surface as a measure of burial diagenesis of chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borre, Mai Kirstine; Lind, Ida; Mortensen, Jeanette

    ODP Leg 130, Site 807, in the western equatorial Pacific, penetrates a sequence of pelagic carbonate ooze, chalk and limestone. Compaction, recrystallisation and cementation of the carbonate matrix are diagenetic processes expected to be taking place more or less simultaneously. In order to assess...

  4. Groundwater conversion areas in chalk in the southern Frankish Alps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to collect hydro-geological data, chalk water marking was done and/or interpreted, water balances were produced, the contents tritium, oxygen 18, calcium, magnesium and the groundwater temperatures and electrolytic conductivity of the groundwater were examined and the dry weather drainage of individual sources was analysed. (orig./PW)

  5. Rotating plug bearing and seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Elman E.

    1977-01-01

    A bearing and seal structure for nuclear reactors utilizing rotating plugs above the nuclear reactor vessel. The structure permits lubrication of bearings and seals of the rotating plugs without risk of the lubricant draining into the reactor vessel below. The structure permits lubrication by utilizing a rotating outer race bearing.

  6. Mechanics Model of Plug Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Q. K.; Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    An analytical model has been developed for the mechanics of friction plug welding. The model accounts for coupling of plastic deformation (material flow) and thermal response (plastic heating). The model predictions of the torque, energy, and pull force on the plug were compared to the data of a recent experiment, and the agreements between predictions and data are encouraging.

  7. Rotating plug bearing and seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disclosed is a bearing and seal structure for nuclear reactors utilizing rotating plugs above the nuclear reactor vessel. The structure permits lubrication of bearings and seals of the rotating plugs without risk of the lubricant draining into the reactor vessel below. The structure permits lubrication by utilizing a rotating outer race bearing. 19 claims, 3 figures

  8. Mechanical and chemical processes affecting the chalk during burial, insights from combined reflection seismics, well data and field work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, Julien; Boussaha, Myriam; Thibault, Nicolas Rudolph;

    2014-01-01

    works have been performed with astronomical calibration based on stable isotope stratigraphy, wireline logs as well as several palaeontological proxies and detailed sedimentological analysis. Since a couple of decades, a specific kind of fractures has been described in the Chalk of Denmark, the so...... along the fractures (the compaction bands). The link between these different features has been realised thanks to the simultaneous analyses of large-scale geophysical data and small-scale core and field geological observations, providing a better understanding of the complex processes of lithification...

  9. Horizontal wells up odds for profit in Giddings Austin chalk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on horizontal drilling in the Giddings field Austin chalk which has significantly improved average well recoveries and more than offset increased drilling costs. Although not the panacea originally promoted, horizontal drilling, in Giddings field, offers economic profits to the average investor. Economic analysis indicates that the typical investor is making money by earning returns in excess of market values. Field-wide development will, therefore, remain active unless oil prices or average well recoveries fall below $12/bbl or 112,000 bbl of oil equivalent (BOE), respectively. The application of technological innovation in the Giddings field may culminate in the drilling of over 2,000 horizontal Austin chalk wells, and has conceivably increased recoverable reserves by 400 million BOE

  10. Widespread methanotrophic primary production in lowland chalk rivers

    OpenAIRE

    Shelley, Felicity; Grey, Jonathan; Trimmer, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Methane is oversaturated relative to the atmosphere in many rivers, yet its cycling and fate is poorly understood. While photosynthesis is the dominant source of autotrophic carbon to rivers, chemosynthesis and particularly methane oxidation could provide alternative sources of primary production where the riverbed is heavily shaded or at depth beneath the sediment surface. Here, we highlight geographically widespread methanotrophic carbon fixation within the gravel riverbeds of over 30 chalk...

  11. Widespread methanotrophic primary production in lowland chalk rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, Felicity; Grey, Jonathan; Trimmer, Mark

    2014-05-22

    Methane is oversaturated relative to the atmosphere in many rivers, yet its cycling and fate is poorly understood. While photosynthesis is the dominant source of autotrophic carbon to rivers, chemosynthesis and particularly methane oxidation could provide alternative sources of primary production where the riverbed is heavily shaded or at depth beneath the sediment surface. Here, we highlight geographically widespread methanotrophic carbon fixation within the gravel riverbeds of over 30 chalk rivers. In 15 of these, the potential for methane oxidation (methanotrophy) was also compared with photosynthesis. In addition, we performed detailed concurrent measurements of photosynthesis and methanotrophy in one large chalk river over a complete annual cycle, where we found methanotrophy to be active to at least 15 cm into the riverbed and to be strongly substrate limited. The seasonal trend in methanotrophic activity reflected that of the riverine methane concentrations, and thus the highest rates were measured in mid-summer. At the sediment surface, photosynthesis was limited by light for most of the year with heavy shading induced by dense beds of aquatic macrophytes. Across 15 rivers, in late summer, we conservatively calculated that net methanotrophy was equivalent to between 1% and 46% of benthic net photosynthetic production within the gravel riverbed, with a median value of 4%. Hence, riverbed chemosynthesis, coupled to the oxidation of methane, is widespread and significant in English chalk rivers. PMID:24695425

  12. Diagenetic Variations between Upper Cretaceous Outcrop and Deeply Buried Reservoir Chalks of the North Sea Area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjuler, Morten Leth; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2007-01-01

    -particle connections and less altered particle shapes. The non-carbonate mineralogy of outcrop chalks is dominated by quartz, occasionally opal-CT and clinoptilolite, and the clay mineral smectite. In offshore chalks quartz still dominates, opal-CT has recrystallized into submicron-size quartz crystals and smectite...

  13. Current oil and gas production from North American Upper Cretaceous Chalks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholle, P.A.

    1977-01-01

    Production of oil and natural gas from North American chalks has increased significantly during the past five years. Chalk reservoirs have been discovered in the Gulf Coast in the Austin Group, Saratoga and Annona Chalks, Ozan Formation, Selma Group, Monroe gas rock, (an informal unit of Navarro age), and other Upper Cretaceous units. In the Western Interior, production has been obtained from the Cretaceous Niobrara and Greenhorn Formations. Significant discoveries of natural gas and gas condensate also have been made in the Upper Cretaceous Wyandot Formation on the Scotian Shelf of eastern Canada. All North American chalk units share a similar depositional and diagenetic history. The diagenetic history of a chalk is critical in determining its reservoir potential. All chalk has a stable composition (low-Mg calcite) and very high primary porosity. With subsequent burial, mechanical and chemical (solution-transfer) compaction can reduce or completely eliminate pore space. The degree of loss of primary porosity in chalk sections is normally a direct function of the maximum depth to which it has been buried. Pore-water chemistry, pore-fluid pressures, and tectonic stresses also influence rates of cementation. Oil or gas reservoirs of North American chalk fall into three main groups: 1. Areas with thin overburden and significant primary porosity retention. 2. Areas with thicker overburden but considerable fracturing. 3. Areas with thick overburden in which marine pore fluids have been retained.

  14. Dynamic up-scaling of relative permeability in chalk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frykman, P.; Lindgaard, H.F.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes how fine-scale geo-statistic reservoir models can be utilised for the up-scaling of two-phase flow properties, including both relative permeability and capillary pressure function. The procedure is applied to a North Sea chalk carbonate reservoir example, which is a high-porosity/low-permeability reservoir type. The study focuses on waterflooding as the main recovery scheme and for the given flow regime in the reservoir. The main purpose of the paper is to demonstrate the use of dynamic multi-step up-scaling methods in the preparation of detailed geological information for full field reservoir simulation studies. (au) EFP-96. 39 refs.

  15. Mortality among long-term Chalk River employees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortality among Chalk River Nuclear Laboratory (CRNL) employees who died during employment or after retirement has been updated to 1985 December 31. Data in tabular form are presented for overall mortality for male and female employees, for the participants in the clean-up for the NRX and NRU reactor accidents and for a group of CRNL staff with lifetime accumulative doses in excess of 0.2 Sv. Data are also presented on the different types of cancer causing death among male employees. No statistically significant increases in cancer deaths were found in any of the groups analyzed. 25 refs

  16. Recent developments in waste characterization at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The waste characterization program (WCP) at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL) was initiated in 1982 to determine the physical, chemical and radiological properties of wastes intended for disposal in IRUS (Intrusion Resistant Underground Structure), a belowground vault to be constructed at CRNL. During the last year, work on the WCP has centered on determining the radionuclide inventories in candidate wastes for IRUS by gamma-ray monitoring and destructive radiochemical analysis. This paper presents the technical problems associated with monitoring various waste forms (geometry considerations, shielding problems, operating environment, etc.) and also presents details of the destructive radiochemical analysis program

  17. Advanced waterflooding in chalk reservoirs: Understanding of underlying mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahid, Adeel; Sandersen, Sara Bülow; Stenby, Erling Halfdan;

    2011-01-01

    pressure. We have also observed formation of a microemulsion phase between brine and oil with the increase in sulfate ion concentration at high temperature and pressure. In addition, sulfate ions can reduce interfacial tension (IFT) between oil and water. We propose that the decrease in viscosity and...... formation of a microemulsion phase could be the possible reasons for the observed increase in oil recovery with sulfate ions at high temperature in chalk reservoirs besides the mechanism of the rock wettability alteration, which has been reported in most previous studies....

  18. Origin of channel systems in the Upper Cretaceous chalk group of the Paris Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esmerode, E. V.; Surlyk, Finn

    2009-01-01

    presence of at least two distinct intra-chalk discordant reflections: a Top Santonian and a Mid-Campanian reflection. These reflections are in places associated with up to 120-m-deep channel-like structures trending preferentially N-S and NW-SE. The Mid-Campanian reflection is also sporadically associated......The Upper Cretaceous Chalk Group of the Anglo-Paris Basin is known to show wedging beds and channel-like features which disrupt the quietly deposited pelagic chalk that covered most of NW Europe in the Late Cretaceous. Two-D reflection seismic data from the Brie region, SE of Paris, show the...... collapse of the Cenozoic succession over the channel-like features as a result of intra-chalk dissolution. Both reflections correlate with indurated chalk layers and hardgrounds, and represent real unconformities. The Mid-Campanian reflection is furthermore associated with a stratigraphic hiatus. A...

  19. Improved Oil Recovery in Chalk. Spontaneous Imbibition affected by Wettability, Rock Framework and Interfacial Tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milter, J.

    1996-12-31

    The author of this doctoral thesis aims to improve the oil recovery from fractured chalk reservoirs, i.e., maximize the area of swept zones and their displacement efficiencies. In order to identify an improved oil recovery method in chalk, it is necessary to study wettability of calcium carbonate and spontaneous imbibition potential. The thesis contains an investigation of thin films and wettability of single calcite surfaces. The results of thin film experiments are used to evaluate spontaneous imbibition experiments in different chalk types. The chalk types were described detailed enough to permit considering the influence of texture, pore size and pore throat size distributions, pore geometry, and surface roughness on wettability and spontaneous imbibition. Finally, impacts of interfacial tension by adding anionic and cationic surfactants to the imbibing water phase are studied at different wettabilities of a well known chalk material. 232 refs., 97 figs., 13 tabs.

  20. SNS Inner Plug Shipping Cask Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations were performed to evaluate the dose rates outside the shipping cask containing the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) inner plug assembly. The analysis consisted of simulating the proton beam interaction with the SNS target, activation calculations with the determined neutron flux levels and assumed SNS operation schedule, and calculation of the decay gamma-rays propagation through the inner plug and shipping cask. Several materials were considered for the inner plug. The results provide guidance for the finalization of the plug design

  1. The NAHIF* Plug-in-Magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Unit

    1981-01-01

    * North Area High Intensity Facility of the CERN SPS. The beamlines with target stations and the plug-in magnets - The plug-in magnet to be removed for repair - The lifting bar and tool for the vacuum connector - The control stand - Controls for vacuum connector tool - The plug-in vacuum connector - Liftingbar with the automatic pins for magnets - The gravitational automatic pin - The plug-in kit in action.

  2. Solute transport in the unsaturated zone of the Chalk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater is a major source of public supply in England and Wales, where it meets about 30% of the demand. In some areas, particularly south-east England, it is the major source. Much concern has been expressed in recent years about the pollution of groundwater resources by nitrates, and the Water Research Centre has undertaken an extensive programme of drilling and sampling to determine the reason for the rise in nitrate levels and to assess future trends. To assist with the interpretation of field data, mechanisms of water and solute movement through the unsaturated zone have been investigated, and the Chalk, our major aquifer, has received particular attention. The dating of groundwater by tritium measurements has led to considerable speculation regarding flow processes in the Chalk, and the additional information gained from the nitrates investigations has led to the formulation of a flow model in which water and its solutes move at very different velocities. It has been deduced that in the unsaturated zone water moves downwards through the fissure system at about 0.7 m/d, while any solutes carried from the land surface move downwards at about 1 m/a. Laboratory experiments have yielded evidence in support of this hypothesis, though further research is needed before a comprehensive model of the flow mechanism can be established. A similar flow mechanism is expected to be operative in many other aquifers, and has important implications for groundwater pollution trends. (author)

  3. Integrated seismic analysis of the Chalk Group in eastern Denmark—Implications for estimates of maximum palaeo-burial in southwest Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars; Boldreel, Lars Ole; Hansen, Thomas Mejer; Lykke-Andersen, Holger; Stemmerik, Lars; Surlyk, Finn; Thybo, Hans

    . The burial anomaly will be over-estimated by ~150–200m if the analysis is based on the average Chalk Group velocity and clay content is disregarded. Burial anomaly values of ~450–600m result if the strongest velocity contrast at ~600–650m depth is interpreted to be a result of diagenetic effects......The origin of the topography of southwest Scandinavia is subject to discussion. Analysis of borehole seismic velocity has formed the basis for interpretation of several hundred metres of Neogene uplift in parts of Denmark.Here, refraction seismic data constrain a 7.5km long P-wave velocity model of...... the Chalk Group below the Stevns peninsula, eastern part of the Danish Basin. The model contains four layers in the ~860m thick Chalk Group with mean velocities of 2.2km/s, 2.4km/s, 3.1km/s, and 3.9–4.3km/s. Sonic and gamma wireline log data from two cored boreholes represent the upper ~450m of the...

  4. AP1000 Features Prevent Potential Containment Recirculation Screen Plugging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of plant design development and evaluations that demonstrate that the AP1000 plant is not subject to potential containment recirculation screen plugging following a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). Following a LOCA in a pressurized water reactor, it is necessary to recirculate water from the containment back into the reactor to maintain long term core cooling. The AP1000 utilizes passive safety systems to provide containment recirculation for long term core cooling following a LOCA. The AP1000 also has non-safety pumps which provide a backup means of providing recirculation. Screens are provided around the recirculation pipes to prevent debris from blocking recirculation flow and core cooling passages. Debris may be generated by the LOCA blowdown from insulation and coatings used inside containment. Even with effective cleanliness programs, there may be some resident debris such as dust and dirt. The potential for plugging the recirculation screens is a current PWR licensing issue. The AP1000 design provides inherent advantages with respect to the potential plugging of containment recirculation screens. These characteristics include prevention of fibrous debris generation, improved debris settling and improved recirculation screen design. Debris settling analysis demonstrates that failure of coatings does not result in debris being transported to the screens before it settles to the floor. Additional analysis also shows that the plant can tolerate conservative amounts of resident debris being transported to the screens. The AP1000 significantly reduces the probability of plugging the containment recirculation screens and significantly reduces inspection and maintenance of coatings used inside containment. (authors)

  5. Halliburton Composite Bridge Plug Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starbuck, J.M.; Luttrell, C.R.; Aramayo, G.

    2005-01-15

    The overall objectives of this CRADA were to assist Halliburton in analyzing a composite bridge plug and to determine why their original design was failing in the field. In Phase 1, finite element analyses were done on the original composite slip design and several alternative designs. The composite slip was the component in the bridge plug that was failing. The finite element code ABAQUS was used for these calculations and I-DEAS was used as the pre- and post-processor in the analyses. Several different designs and materials were analyzed and recommendations were made towards improving the design. In Phase 2, the objective was to develop finite element models that would accurately represent the deformations in the entire all-composite 4-1/2' diameter bridge plug assembly. The finite element code LS-DYNA was used and the results from this effort were intended to expand Halliburton's composite design and analysis capabilities with regard to developing future composite components for downhole tools. In addition to the finite element modeling, this effort involved the utilization of micromechanics to determine the necessary composite material properties that were needed as input for finite element codes.

  6. Performance of the Chalk River 36Cl AMS system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MP Tandem Injector of the Chalk River TASCC (Tandem Accelerator Superconducting Cyclotron) Facility is being used for 36Cl determinations in studies relating to hydrology and low and high level nuclear waste management. In addition to the accelerator, the computer controlled system comprises a multiple-sample, medium-current ion source, a high resolution injector, a low resolution velocity filter, a gas filled magnet and a Bragg-type particle detection/identification system. Accuracies of 5--10% have been achieved with good suppression of 36S and background levels as low as 5x10-1536Cl/Cl. Following a brief overview of the system, detailed results are presented for the performance of the gas-filled magnet and particle detector as well as for sources of background including ion source memory effects

  7. Advanced fuel cycle development at Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) has a mandate from the Canadian government to develop nuclear technologies that support generation of clean, safe energy. This includes the development of advanced nuclear fuel technologies to ensure sustainable energy sources for Canadians. The Fuel Development Branch leads CRL's development of advanced nuclear-reactor fuels. CRL capabilities include fuel fabrication development, irradiation testing, post-irradiation examination (PIE), materials characterization and code development (modeling). This paper provides an overview of these capabilities and describes recent development activities that support fuel-cycle flexibility in heavy-water reactors. This includes a review of irradiation testing and PIE for mixed-oxide, thoria, high-burnup UO2 and low-void reactivity fuels and burnable neutron absorbers. Fabrication development, material characterizations and modeling associated with these tests are also described. (author)

  8. Experience at Chalk River with a cw electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For several years a group at Chalk River has been studying the behaviour of structures operated in the cw mode under heavy beam loading. Three side-coupled structures, modelled on the LAMPF design, have been built and tests up to 50% beam loading have been performed on two of them. Control systems have been developed to regulate the disturbances arising from high average power in a multi-tank accelerator and procedures worked out to handle beam currents up to 20 mA at 4 MeV. A pancake-coupled structure has been designed for high power operation and results of low power tests on an aluminum model are presented. Tests at high power with a 50 mA electron beam are planned. (author)

  9. Inventory of radioactivity in Ottawa River-bed sediments near the Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL's Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) are situated on the Ontario side of the Ottawa River about 200 km NW of the City of Ottawa. Since 1947, water for cooling CRL's research reactors has been piped from and returned to the Ottawa River. From 1952 to the present time, cooling water has been discharged through the Process Sewer at a rate of 1.5 to 2 m3/s. The Outfall, which is the discharge from the Process Sewer, is in 18 m of water, 65 m offshore. Flow is directed toward the river surface through three 'diffuser vents,' creating a turbulent swirl at the surface and maintaining a patch of open water in winter. In addition to cooling water, the Outfall has, over the years, included small additional effluents from a heavy water recovery plant, a decontamination centre and a waste treatment centre. Although the effluent has been monitored and has met applicable regulatory requirements, investigations of the riverbed near the Outfall revealed radioactivity. In 2001, a riverbed reconnaissance and a detailed coring program were initiated for the purpose of determining the inventory of residual radioactivity. (author)

  10. Post-irradiation examination of the 37M fuel bundle at Chalk River Laboratories (AECL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Daniels, T. [Ontario Power Generation, Pickering, Ontario (Canada); Montin, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-03-15

    The modified (-element (37M) fuel bundle was designed by Ontario Power Generation (OPG) to improve Critical Heat Flux (CHF) performance in ageing pressure tubes. A modification of the conventional 37-element fuel bundle design, the 37M fuel bundle allows more coolant flow through the interior sub-channels by way of a smaller central element. A demonstration irradiation (DI) of thirty-two fuel bundles was completed in 2011 at OPG's Darlington Nuclear Generating Station to confirm the suitability of the 37M fuel bundles for full core implementation. In support of the DI, fuel elements were examined in the Chalk River Laboratories Hot Cells. Inspection activities included: Bundle and element visual examination; Bundle and element dimensional measurements; Verification of bundle and element integrity; and Internal Gas Volume Measurements. The inspection results for 37M were comparable to that of conventional 37-element CANDU fuel. Fuel performance parameters of the 37M DI fuel bundle and fuel elements were within the range observed for similarly operated conventional 37-element CANDU fuel. Based on these Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) results, 37M fuel performed satisfactorily. (author)

  11. Stratigraphy and palaeoceanography of upper Masstrichtian chalks, southern Danish Central Graben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ineson, J.R.; Buchardt, B.; Lassen, Susanne; Rasmussen, Jan A.; Schioeler, P.; Schovsbo, N.H.; Sheldon, E.; Surlyk, F. [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2006-07-01

    Upper Maastrichtian chalks form important hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Danish sector of the North Sea and have been intensively studied, yet their lithological uniformity can frustrate attempts to develop a high-resolution stratigraphic subdivision and a genetic understanding of the factors controlling production and sedimentation of the pelagic carbonate ooze. Recent research into these topics, by means of a multidisciplinary study involving quantitative/semiquantitative palynology, micropalaeontology (nannofossils, foraminifers) and isotope geochemistry, integrated with detailed sedimentology. Two key wells were selected, the M-1OX well from the Dan Field and the E-5X well from the Tyra SE Field, based on the extensive core coverage in these wells and on their position in the southern part of the Danish Central Graben where evidence of large-scale resedimentation (and consequent stratigraphic complexity) is uncommon within the Maastrichtian section. This study concentrated on a number of palaeoceanographic signals that can be derived from the sedimentary record. Planktonic organisms, both phytoplankton (e.g. coccolithophores, some dinoflagellates) and zooplankton (e.g. foraminifers) provide a record of conditions in the upper watermasses, largely within the photic zone, while bottom conditions are indicated by epifaunal/infaunal organisms (e.g. benthic foraminifers) and bioturbation, and by the sedimentological evidence of depositional processes at the sea floor. (LN)

  12. Water recharge and solute transport through the vadose zone of fractured chalk under desert conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study the inferred mechanism of groundwater recharge and contamination was studied using tracer concentrations in the fractured vadose zone of the Avdat chalk. The results of this study are important for an evaluation of groundwater contamination from existing and planned facilities in the northern Negev desert in Israel. This study focused on the vicinity of the Ramat Hovav industrial chemical complex in the northern Negev, which also includes the national site for hazardous waste. Water recharge and solute migration rates were examined in five core holes and one borehole which penetrate the entire vadose zone and enabled the collection of rock samples for chemical and isotopic analyses, and an observation of fracture distribution with depth. Tritium profiles were used to estimate water percolation rates through the vadose zone, chloride profiles were used to assess the migration rate of nonreactive solutes, and bromide profiles were also used to evaluate the migration rate of nonreactive contaminants. Deuterium and oxygen 18 profiles were used to assess the evaporation of the infiltrating water at and near land surface

  13. A parameter identifiability study of two chalk tracer tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Mathias

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available As with most fractured rock formations, Chalk is highly heterogeneous. Therefore, meaningful estimates of model parameters must be obtained at a scale comparable with the process of concern. These are frequently obtained by calibrating an appropriate model to observed concentration-time data from radially convergent tracer tests (RCTT. Arguably, an appropriate model should consider radially convergent dispersion (RCD and Fickian matrix diffusion. Such a model requires the estimation of at least four parameters. A question arises as to whether or not this level of model complexity is supported by the information contained within the calibration data. Generally modellers have not answered this question due to the calibration techniques employed. A dual-porosity model with RCD was calibrated to two tracer test datasets from different UK Chalk aquifers. A multivariate sensitivity analysis, which assumed only a priori upper and lower bounds for each model parameter, was undertaken. Rather than looking at measures of uncertainty, the shape of the multivariate objective function surface was used to determine whether a parameter was identifiable. Non-identifiable parameters were then removed and the procedure was repeated until all remaining parameters were identifiable.

    It was found that the single fracture model (SFM (which ignores mechanical dispersion obtained the best mass recovery, excellent model performance and best parameter identifiability in both the tests studied. However, there was no objective evidence suggesting that mechanical dispersion was negligible. Moreover, the SFM (with just two parameters was found to be good at approximating the Single Fracture Dispersion Model SFDM (with three parameters when different, and potentially erroneous parameters, were used. Overall, this study emphasises the importance of adequate temporal sampling of breakthrough curve data prior to peak concentrations, to ensure adequate characterisation of

  14. Tilting oil-water contact in the chalk of Tyra Field as interpreted from capillary pressure data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Rana, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    logging data in the remaining wells. A westerly dipping oil–water contact was found from logging data. Comparison of the depth-wise trends in normalized water saturation among the different wells indicates a regional pattern: in the western side of the field, the trends correspond to a situation of...... imbibition, where the free water level overlies an interval of residual oil, whereas in the eastern part of the field, the depth-wise trends in normalized water saturation correspond to a situation of drainage. The free water level apparently dips to the east due either to hydrodynamic action or to pressure......The Tyra Field in the central North Sea is located in Palaeogene and Upper Cretaceous chalk. It contains a natural gas zone underlain by an oil leg. Based on analysis of logs and core data from ten wells drilled prior to the field being put into production, normalized water saturation depth...

  15. Biot Critical Frequency Applied as Common Friction Factor for Chalk with Different Pore Fluids and Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Katrine Alling; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    Injection of water into chalk hydrocarbon reservoirs has lead to mechanical yield and failure. Laboratory experiments on chalk samples correspondingly show that the mechanical properties of porous chalk depend on pore fluid and temperature. Water has a significant softening effect on elastic...... we propose that the fluid effect on mechanical properties of highly porous chalk may be the result of liquid‐solid friction. Applying a different strain or stress rate is influencing the rock strength and needs to be included. The resulting function is shown to relate to the material dependent and...... rate independent b-factor used when describing the time dependent mechanical properties of soft rock or soils. As a consequence it is then possible to further characterize the material constant from the porosity and permeability of the rock as well as from pore fluid density and viscosity which is...

  16. Hydro-chemistry of paleontology of depression of Tajikistan in Late chalk period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter authors made conclusion that on formation of clayey layers of upper chalk did influence following factors: shallow sea basin and its relatively small dimensions, climate aridity, relatively nearness nutrition areas, frequent change sea transgressions its recessions

  17. The role of alluvial valley deposits in groundwater–surface water exchange in a Chalk river

    OpenAIRE

    Abesser, Corinna; Shand, Paul; Gooddy, Daren; Peach, Denis

    2008-01-01

    To understand the processes of surface water–groundwater exchange in Chalk catchments, a detailed hydrogeochemical study was carried out in the Lambourn catchment in southeast England. Monthly monitoring of river flow and groundwater levels and water chemistry has highlighted a large degree of heterogeneity at the river-corridor scale. The data suggest an irregular connection between the river, the alluvial deposits, and the Chalk aquifer at the study site. The groundwaters in the alluvial gr...

  18. Change of Static and Dynamic Elastic Properties due to CO² Injection in North Sea Chalk

    OpenAIRE

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Hjuler, M.L.; Christensen, H.F.; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2012-01-01

    Reservoir modeling and monitoring uses dynamic data for predicting and determining static changes. Dynamic data are achieved from the propagation velocity of elastic waves in rock while static data are obtained from the mechanical deformation. Reservoir simulation and monitoring are particularly importantin enhanced oil recovery by CO2 injection (CO2-EOR) in chalk as, chalk reservoirs are vulnerable to compaction under changed stress and pore fluid. From South Arne field, North Sea, we used E...

  19. Persistent and emerging micro-organic contaminants in Chalk groundwater of England and France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chalk aquifer of Northern Europe is an internationally important source of drinking water and sustains baseflow for surface water ecosystems. The areal distribution of microorganic (MO) contaminants, particularly non-regulated emerging MOs, in this aquifer is poorly understood. This study presents results from a reconnaissance survey of MOs in Chalk groundwater, including pharmaceuticals, personal care products and pesticides and their transformation products, conducted across the major Chalk aquifers of England and France. Data from a total of 345 sites collected during 2011 were included in this study to provide a representative baseline assessment of MO occurrence in groundwater. A suite of 42 MOs were analysed for at each site including industrial compounds (n = 16), pesticides (n = 14) and pharmaceuticals, personal care and lifestyle products (n = 12). Occurrence data is evaluated in relation to land use, aquifer exposure, well depth and depth to groundwater to provide an understanding of vulnerable groundwater settings. - Highlights: • Broad range of microorganics detected in Chalk groundwater in England and France. • Plasticisers, pesticides, BPA and THM detected at the highest concentrations. • Pesticides higher in outcrop Chalk, caffeine and BPA at concealed sites. • Occurrences show some relationship to land use, borehole depth and water level. - Broad screening reveals for the first time the extent of emerging microorganic pollution in Chalk groundwater sources across England and France

  20. A novel representation of chalk hydrology in a land surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mostaquimur; Rosolem, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    Unconfined chalk aquifers contain a significant portion of water in the United Kingdom. In order to optimize the assessment and management practices of water resources in the region, modelling and monitoring of soil moisture in the unsaturated zone of the chalk aquifers are of utmost importance. However, efficient simulation of soil moisture in such aquifers is difficult mainly due to the fractured nature of chalk, which creates high-velocity preferential flow paths in the unsaturated zone. In this study, the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) is applied on a study area encompassing the Kennet catchment in Southern England. The fluxes and states of the coupled water and energy cycles are simulated for 10 consecutive years (2001-2010). We hypothesize that explicit representation for the soil-chalk layers and the inclusion of preferential flow in the fractured chalk aquifers improves the reproduction of the hydrological processes in JULES. In order to test this hypothesis, we propose a new parametrization for preferential flow in JULES. This parametrization explicitly describes the flow of water in soil matrices and preferential flow paths using a simplified approach which can be beneficial for large-scale hydrometeorological applications. We also define the overlaying soil properties obtained from the Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD) in the model. Our simulation results are compared across spatial scales with measured soil moisture and river discharge, indicating the importance of accounting for the physical properties of the medium while simulating hydrological processes in the chalk aquifers.

  1. Plug Load Behavioral Change Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzger, I.; Kandt, A.; VanGeet, O.

    2011-08-01

    This report documents the methods and results of a plug load study of the Environmental Protection Agency's Region 8 Headquarters in Denver, Colorado, conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The study quantified the effect of mechanical and behavioral change approaches on plug load energy reduction and identified effective ways to reduce plug load energy. Load reduction approaches included automated energy management systems and behavioral change strategies.

  2. Magnetic susceptibility of rocks from boreholes CR-1 to CR-9 at Chalk River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic susceptibility measurements made on rock cores obtained from boreholes at the Chalk River Research Area indicate that the foliated, granitic to granodioritic gneisses are weakly magnetic. Susceptibility values are about 5 x 10-4 S.I., two orders of magnitude less than average values for the Atikokan or Lac du Bonnet granites. Interpretation of the variations recorded in the gneisses in all cores is difficult because the average magnetic susceptibility level is near the limit of resolution of the measuring instrument used. However, in CR-6 and CR-9, mafic units intersect the boreholes and high magnetic susceptibility zones are seen. In CR-9 susceptibility values of the order of 5 x 10-2 S.I. characterize a dyke at depths of 40 to 60 m. A second high-susceptibility zone, distinctly different from the shallower one, is recorded at depths of 580 to 670 m with susceptibility of the orders of 5 x 10-3 S.I. This difference in susceptibility suggests mineralogical differences between the two units. The distinctive susceptibility signatures of these two units are better differentiated than signatures obtained from the other geophysical logs. In CR-6 only one high-susceptibility zone (of the order of 5 x 10-2 S.I.) is recorded in CR-6, at depths of 200 to 290 m. Its signature is similar in shape and intensity to the shallower unit observed in CR-9. Preliminary interpretation suggest continuity between these two zones. In CR-2 and CR-5, significant correlations exist among magnetic susceptibility, temperature anomalies and fracture occurrences. Contrary to observations at other research areas, fracture signatures in these two holes correspond to slight increases in susceptibility values. Alteration products associated with the fractures have higher susceptibility than the gneisses. Even though most of the recorded variations of the magnetic susceptibility are near the detection limit of the measuring instrument, significant features were observed and are discussed in

  3. Trace elemental analysis of school chalk using energy dispersive X-ray florescence spectroscopy (ED-XRF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruthi, Y. A.; Das, N. Lakshmana; Ramprasad, S.; Ram, S. S.; Sudarshan, M.

    2015-08-01

    The present studies focus the quantitative analysis of elements in school chalk to ensure the safety of its use. The elements like Calcium (Ca), Aluminum (Al), Iron (Fe), Silicon (Si) and Chromium (Cr) were analyzed from settled chalk dust samples collected from five classrooms (CD-1) and also from another set of unused chalk samples collected from local market (CD-2) using Energy Dispersive X-Ray florescence(ED-XRF) spectroscopy. Presence of these elements in significant concentrations in school chalk confirmed that, it is an irritant and occupational hazard. It is suggested to use protective equipments like filtered mask for mouth, nose and chalk holders. This study also suggested using the advanced mode of techniques like Digital boards, marker boards and power point presentations to mitigate the occupational hazard for classroom chalk

  4. Trace elemental analysis of school chalk using energy dispersive X-ray florescence spectroscopy (ED-XRF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present studies focus the quantitative analysis of elements in school chalk to ensure the safety of its use. The elements like Calcium (Ca), Aluminum (Al), Iron (Fe), Silicon (Si) and Chromium (Cr) were analyzed from settled chalk dust samples collected from five classrooms (CD-1) and also from another set of unused chalk samples collected from local market (CD-2) using Energy Dispersive X-Ray florescence(ED-XRF) spectroscopy. Presence of these elements in significant concentrations in school chalk confirmed that, it is an irritant and occupational hazard. It is suggested to use protective equipments like filtered mask for mouth, nose and chalk holders. This study also suggested using the advanced mode of techniques like Digital boards, marker boards and power point presentations to mitigate the occupational hazard for classroom chalk

  5. Trace elemental analysis of school chalk using energy dispersive X-ray florescence spectroscopy (ED-XRF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruthi, Y. A., E-mail: ymjournal2014@gmail.com [Associate professor, Dept of Environmental Studies, GITAM Institute of Science, GITAM University, Visakhapatnam, A.P (India); Das, N. Lakshmana, E-mail: nldas9@gmail.com [Professor, Dept of Physics, GITAM Institute of Science, GITAM University, Visakhapatnam, A.P (India); Ramprasad, S., E-mail: ramprasadsurakala@gmail.com [Research Scholar, Dept of Environmental science, GITAM Institute of Science, GITAM University, Visakhapatnam, A.P (India); Ram, S. S., E-mail: tracebio@gmail.com [Research Scholar, Dept of Trace element research, UGC-DAE Consortium Centre, Kolkata centre India (India); Sudarshan, M., E-mail: sude@alpha.iuc.res.in [Scientist-F, Dept of Trace element research, UGC-DAE Consortium Centre, Kolkata centre India (India)

    2015-08-28

    The present studies focus the quantitative analysis of elements in school chalk to ensure the safety of its use. The elements like Calcium (Ca), Aluminum (Al), Iron (Fe), Silicon (Si) and Chromium (Cr) were analyzed from settled chalk dust samples collected from five classrooms (CD-1) and also from another set of unused chalk samples collected from local market (CD-2) using Energy Dispersive X-Ray florescence(ED-XRF) spectroscopy. Presence of these elements in significant concentrations in school chalk confirmed that, it is an irritant and occupational hazard. It is suggested to use protective equipments like filtered mask for mouth, nose and chalk holders. This study also suggested using the advanced mode of techniques like Digital boards, marker boards and power point presentations to mitigate the occupational hazard for classroom chalk.

  6. Plug into 'the modernizing machine'!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejsler, John B.

    2013-01-01

    . Individual bodies and minds simultaneously produce academic subjectivities by plugging into these transformative machinic forces and are produced as they are traversed by them. What is experienced as stressful closures vis-à-vis new opportunities depends to a great extent upon how these producing...... reforms before and after this law are productions of those struggles that change what it means to work as an academic subject at a university. This is staged through a host of new social technologies such as development contracts, appraisal interviews, individual performance reviews and so forth...

  7. Multimeediaetendus : Opera Gets Plugged / Eve Arpo

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Arpo, Eve

    2008-01-01

    Eesti Muusika- ja Teatriakadeemia lühiooperite õhtul "Opera Gets Plugged" etendunud lavastustest - Monika Mattieseni "DMeeter" ja Age Hirve "Tuleloitsija": Mõlema lavastaja ja projektijuht Liis Kolle

  8. Impact of supercritical CO2 injection on petrophysical and rock mechanics properties of chalk: an experimental study on chalk from South Arne field, North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Hjuler, Morten Leth; Christensen, Helle Foged;

    2011-01-01

    Changes in chalk due to EOR by injecting supercritical CO2 (CO2-EOR) can ideally be predicted by applying geophysical methods designed from laboratory-determined petrophysical and rock mechanics properties. A series of petrophysical and rock mechanics tests were performed on Ekofisk Formation and...

  9. Mobotware – A Plug-in Based Framework For Mobile Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anders Billesø; Andersen, Nils Axel; Andersen, Jens Christian;

    2010-01-01

    integration of sensors, fast porting to new robots and core system stability and maintainability in an undisciplined programming environment. Real-time performance is assured by using RTAI-Linux; core stability is obtained by using plug-ins for user developed modules. The plug-in based module structure......This paper describes a plug-in based software framework developed at Automation and Control, DTU Electrical Engineering. The software has been used for education and research in mobile robotics for the last decade. Important design criteria have been real-time performance of the control level, easy...... enabled many application i.e. robust navigation in an orchard with an autonomous tractor (Andersen,2010). Furthermore by providing a simple scripting robot control language the system also supports use by non-technicians....

  10. Multiservice utility plug for remote fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the design of a multiservice utility plug and drive system to be used for reliably engaging and disengaging all utility connections automatically that serve large portable equipment modules. The modules are arranged into a fuel processing production line within the Fuels and Materials Examination Laboratory. The utility plugs allow the modules to be easily replaced, rearranged or removed for maintenance

  11. Mastering Eclipse plug-in development

    CERN Document Server

    Blewitt, Alex

    2014-01-01

    If you are a Java developer who is familiar with the Eclipse plug-in environment, this book covers the advanced concepts that you need to know to achieve true expertise. Prior experience in creating Eclipse plug-ins is assumed for this book.

  12. Plug-In Tutor Agents: Still Pluggin'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Steven

    2016-01-01

    "An Architecture for Plug-in Tutor Agents" (Ritter and Koedinger 1996) proposed a software architecture designed around the idea that tutors could be built as plug-ins for existing software applications. Looking back on the paper now, we can see that certain assumptions about the future of software architecture did not come to be, making…

  13. Sealing end plug of nuclear fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An upper end plug of a nuclear fuel rod comprises an end plug main body having a diameter substantially equal with an outer diameter of a cladding tube, and an open-top portion formed integrally with the end plug main body by way of a connection portion. The open top portion is a cylindrical member having the outer diameter substantially equal with the inner diameter of the cladding tube and having a tapered portion formed at the top end. The connection portion has a tapered surface having a diameter on the side of the open-top portion equal with the outer diameter of the open-top portion and having a diameter on the side of the end plug main body greater than the maximum inner diameter of the cladding tube. The upper end plug is inserted under pressure to the cladding tube and the joining portion between the cladding tube and the upper end plug is welded under pressure. The welded portion between the upper end plug and the cladding tube is uniformly welded circumferentially, so that neither molten metal is urged to the inner wall of the cladding tube, nor porosity is formed at the inside of the molten metal. In addition, sealing is ensured by the tapered surface disposed at the connection portion of the upper end plug, and causing no failure occurs in the wall thickness of the welded metal due to swelling. (I.N.)

  14. Anthropogenic radionuclides in Ottawa River sediment near Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ottawa River has received nuclear reactor effluent from Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) for more than 60 years, including releases from a NRX accident in 1952. Recent interest in the potential impact of these historical releases and the possible need for remediation of a small region immediately downstream from the release point has led to comprehensive studies to assess risk to people and wildlife. In this paper, the results of an extensive survey of gamma-emitting anthropogenic radionuclides in Ottawa River sediment in the vicinity of CRL are presented. Anthropogenic radionuclides detected in Ottawa River sediment include 60Co, 94Nb, 137Cs, 152Eu, 154Eu, 155Eu and 241Am. Concentrations of all anthropogenic radionuclides decline rapidly with distance downstream of the process outfall, reaching stable concentrations about 2 km downstream. All of these radionuclides are found at some sites within 2 km upstream of the process outfall suggesting limited upstream transport and sedimentation. Comparison of anthropogenic radionuclides with several representative primordial radionuclides shows that with the exception of sites at the process outfall and within 2 km downstream of the process outfall, primordial radionuclide concentrations greatly exceed CRL derived anthropogenic radionuclide concentrations. Thus, over 60 years of radionuclide releases from operations at CRL have had little impact on radionuclide concentrations in Ottawa River sediment, except at a few sites immediately adjacent to the process outfall. (author)

  15. Effects of the restoration mortar on chalk stone buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ion, R. M.; Teodorescu, S.; Ştirbescu, R. M.; Dulamă, I. D.; Şuică-Bunghez, I. R.; Bucurică, I. A.; Fierăscu, R. C.; Fierscu, I.; Ion, M. L.

    2016-06-01

    The monument buildings as components of cultural heritage are exposed to degradation of surfaces and chemical and mechanical degradation, often associated to soiling and irreversible deterioration of the building. In many conservative and restorative works, a cement-based mortar was used without knowing all the adverse effects of this material on the building. This paper deals with the study of the effects of natural cement used in restorative works in the particular case of the Basarabi-Murfatlar Churches Ensemble. Cement-based materials exposed to sulfate present in the chalk stone - gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O), can induce signs of deterioration, due to ettringite ([Ca3Al (OH)612H2O]2(SO4)32H2O) or thaumasite (Ca3[Si(OH)612H2O](CO3)SO4) formation. These phases contribute to strain within the material, inducing expansion, strength loss, spalling and severe degradation. Several combined techniques (XRD, EDXRF, ICP-AES, SEM, EDS, sulphates content, FT-IR and Raman analysis were carried out to put into evidence the effects of them on the building walls.

  16. Molten fuel moderator interaction program at Chalk River Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitheanandan, T.; Kyle, G.; O' Connor, R.; Sanderson, D.B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-12-15

    The Canadian nuclear power generation industry, represented by the CANDU Owners Group (COG), has been funding an experimental program at Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) to study the interaction between molten material ejected from a fuel channel and the moderator. These experiments were designed to address one of the very low probability postulated accident events considered for CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors. The reactor consists of an array of horizontal fuel channels that contain the UO{sub 2}, nuclear fuel and high-temperature, high-pressure heavy water coolant. Under severely restricted flow blockage conditions, approaching 100% reduction of the flow area, postulated in a fuel channel, the temperature excursion could result in fuel melting, consequential failure of the fuel channel, and ejection of the molten fuel at high pressures into the heavy water moderator at near atmospheric pressure. In preparation for these tests, a chemical mixture called a thermite, that could produce a simulated molten fuel when ignited, was developed in partnership with Argonne National Laboratory (USA). Following this thermite development, two base-case reference tests were completed. The two base-case reference tests, with no molten material present, were performed in the Molten-Fuel Moderator-Interaction (MFMI) facility at CRL. Following the base-case reference tests, a high-pressure melt ejection test using prototypical corium was conducted. The objectives of this paper are to provide an overview of the MFMI program and present the results obtained from thermite development, base-case and melt ejection experiments. (author)

  17. Molten fuel moderator interaction program at Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian nuclear power generation industry, represented by the CANDU Owners Group (COG), has been funding an experimental program at Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) to study the interaction between molten material ejected from a fuel channel and the moderator. These experiments were designed to address one of the very low probability postulated accident events considered for CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors. The reactor consists of an array of horizontal fuel channels that contain the UO2, nuclear fuel and high-temperature, high-pressure heavy water coolant. Under severely restricted flow blockage conditions, approaching 100% reduction of the flow area, postulated in a fuel channel, the temperature excursion could result in fuel melting, consequential failure of the fuel channel, and ejection of the molten fuel at high pressures into the heavy water moderator at near atmospheric pressure. In preparation for these tests, a chemical mixture called a thermite, that could produce a simulated molten fuel when ignited, was developed in partnership with Argonne National Laboratory (USA). Following this thermite development, two base-case reference tests were completed. The two base-case reference tests, with no molten material present, were performed in the Molten-Fuel Moderator-Interaction (MFMI) facility at CRL. Following the base-case reference tests, a high-pressure melt ejection test using prototypical corium was conducted. The objectives of this paper are to provide an overview of the MFMI program and present the results obtained from thermite development, base-case and melt ejection experiments. (author)

  18. Numerical Investigation of Separated Plug Nozzle Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Modern analysis techniques that provide improved viability have enabled further investigation of plug nozzle rocket engines as advanced launch vehicle concepts. A plug nozzle for future single-stage-to-orbit vehicles in China has been designed, and the flow field in the plug nozzle has been studied numerically for different ambient pressures. Calculations were performed by solving the Navier-Stokes equations for an ideal gas. Turbulence is modelled using the k-ε turbulence model. The advantages of the plug nozzles are the external expansion, which automatically adapts to external pressure variations, and the short compact design for high expansion ratios. Expansion waves, compression shocks, and the separated base flow dominate the flow structures and affect the plug nozzle rocket engine performance.

  19. Hydrate plug decomposition: Measurements and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousif, M.H.; Dunayevsky, V.A.

    1995-12-31

    Depressurization (venting) is almost the only option available to remove hydrate blockages from subsea natural gas or gas condensate pipelines. This process is normally applied with little or no accurate information about the plug location, size or composition. Hydrate decomposition by depressurization is a heat and mass transfer dependent process. Quantifying this dependency is necessary to perform an optimum plug removal scheme. In this paper, a moving boundary mathematical model is developed to predict the decomposition rate of a hydrate plug under various depressurization scenarios. The model was validated experimentally by measuring the rate of decomposition of hydrate plugs in a 2 inch internal diameter, 38.5 inch long pipe. The motion of the hydrate plug/gas interface is tracked by 16 pairs of infrared light transmitters and receivers diametrically positioned across the pipe.

  20. Manipulating liquid plugs in microchannel with controllable air vents

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Hao-Bing; Ting, Eng Kiat; Gong, Hai-Qing

    2012-01-01

    An air venting element on microchannel, which can be controlled externally and automatically, was demonstrated for manipulating liquid plugs in microfluidic systems. The element’s open and closed statuses correspond to the positioning and movement of a liquid plug in the microchannel. Positioning of multiple liquid plugs at an air venting element enabled the merging and mixing of the plugs. Besides these basic functions, other modes of liquid plug manipulations including plug partitioning, mu...

  1. A study on thimble plug removal for PWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Dong Soo; Lee, Chang Sup; Lee, Jae Yong; Jun, Hwang Yong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The thermal-hydraulic effects of removing the RCC guide thimble plugs are evaluated for 8 Westinghouse type PWR plants in Korea as a part of feasibility study: core outlet loss coefficient, thimble bypass flow, and best estimate flow. It is resulted that the best estimate thimble bypass flow increases about by 2% and the best estimate flow increases approximately by 1.2%. The resulting DNBR penalties can be covered with the current DNBR margin. Accident analyses are also investigated that the dropped rod transient is shown to be limiting and relatively sensitive to bypass flow variation. 8 refs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  2. Plug-in Hybrid Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, Angie; Moore, Ray; Rowden, Tim

    2013-09-27

    Our main project objective was to implement Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEV) and charging infrastructure into our electric distribution service territory and help reduce barriers in the process. Our research demonstrated the desire for some to be early adopters of electric vehicles and the effects lack of education plays on others. The response of early adopters was tremendous: with the initial launch of our program we had nearly 60 residential customers interested in taking part in our program. However, our program only allowed for 15 residential participants. Our program provided assistance towards purchasing a PEV and installation of Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE). The residential participants have all come to love their PEVs and are more than enthusiastic about promoting the many benefits of driving electric.

  3. Separator plugs for liquid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. M.; Yuan, S. W. K.; Hepler, W. A.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1984-01-01

    Work performed during Summer 1984 (from June to Sept. 30) in the area of porous media for use in low temperature applications is discussed. Recent applications are in the area of vapor - liquid phase separation, pumping based on the fountain effect and related subsystems. Areas of potential applications of the latter are outlined in supplementary work. Experimental data have been developed. The linear equations of the two-fluid model are inspected critically in the light of forced convection evidence reported recently. It is emphasized that the Darcy permeability is a unique throughput quantity in the porous media application areas whose use will permit meaningful comparisons of data not only in one lab but also within a group of labs doing porous plug studies.

  4. Combined fuel assembly and thimble plug gripper for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to an apparatus for loading and unloading a fuel assembly into and from the core of a nuclear reactor and for removing and inserting control rod guide thimble plugs from and into the fuel assembly during a reactor refueling operation in substantially less time than that presently required and in a more reliable, safe and efficient manner. (UK)

  5. Influence of wettability on two-and four-electrode resistivity measurements on Berea sandstone plugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wie, J.Z.; Lile, O.B. (Univ. of Trondheim (NO))

    1991-12-01

    Two and four-electrode resistivity measurements were conducted on water- and oil-well Berea sandstone plugs for different saturation directions with a steady-state flooding procedure. The data from nine plugs indicated that reliable resistance values can be obtained on water-wet cores with both two-and four-electrode methods. On oil-wet cores, however, two-electrode measurements yielded higher resistance values that those from the four-electrode method because of end effects on contact resistance, especially for low water saturations. In addition, the saturation history substantially influenced the resistivity measurements of oil-wet cores. In this paper the four-electrode technique is better for oil-wet core resistivity measurements because it ensures that correct Archie saturation exponents are derived.

  6. Friction Pull Plug Welding in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Shane A.; Bradford, Vann

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has recently invested much time and effort into the process development of Friction Pull Plug Welding (FPPW). FPPW, is a welding process similar to Friction Push Plug Welding in that, there is a small rotating part (plug) being spun and simultaneously pulled (forged) into a larger part. These two processes differ, in that push plug welding requires an internal reaction support, while pull plug welding reacts to the load externally. FPPW was originally conceived as a post proof repair technique for the Space Shuttle fs External Tank. FPPW was easily selected as the primary weld process used to close out the termination hole on the Constellation Program's ARES I Upper Stage circumferential Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds (SR-FSW). The versatility of FPPW allows it to also be used as a repair technique for both SR-FSW and Conventional Friction Stir Welds. To date, all MSFC led development has been concentrated on aluminum alloys (2195, 2219, and 2014). Much work has been done to fully understand and characterize the process's limitations. A heavy emphasis has been spent on plug design, to match the various weldland thicknesses and alloy combinations. This presentation will summarize these development efforts including weld parameter development, process control, parameter sensitivity studies, plug repair techniques, material properties including tensile, fracture and failure analysis.

  7. End plug welding method for control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cladding tube of a control rod has a coating layer of plated hard chromium or the like on the outer surface of the tube main body. The outer edge of an end plug to be attached to the end portion of the cladding tube has a tapered face opposing to the end portion of the cladding tube. The end plug is inserted under pressure to the end portion of the cladding tube in a state where neutron absorbers are contained and a coil spring is inserted in the cladding tube. Electric current is applied between the tube main body and the end plug in this state. The tube main body and the end plug are heated by their intrinsic resistance and contact resistance up to a weldable temperature. The tube main body and the end plug are joined by an urging pressure applied between the tube main body and the end plug. Since the end plug is welded to the end portion of the cladding tube at the circumference thereof by resistance welding, there is no worry of intruding the coating material to the welding portion, thereby enabling to attain satisfactory welding. (I.N.)

  8. Climate change impacts on Chalk groundwater resources in eastern England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiscock, K.; Sandhu, C.; Conway, D.

    2004-05-01

    Climate change is expected to cause higher summer temperatures, less summer rainfall and more evapotranspiration in eastern England during this century, thereby increasing the stress on the underlying Chalk aquifer. This study, funded by the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, investigates how future scenarios of climate change will influence groundwater availability in this major regional aquifer in terms of groundwater levels and river baseflow quantities. To examine these scenarios, a two-layer regional groundwater model was constructed with Visual MODFLOW for the Wensum and Nar river catchments in northern East Anglia. The UKCIP02 database for the `2020s High' and `2050s High and Low' gas emission scenarios was used to define selected future climate conditions. Historic recharge (1981-90) to the model is calculated separately, using the FAO approved method incorporating dominant land cover (crop type) and soil moisture content. Future recharge to the model is estimated by perturbing historic rainfall and evapotranspiration with scaling factors relating average monthly simulated future and baseline (1961-90) meteorological parameters. The model results predict an overall decrease in recharge for all three scenarios, with a maximum decrease in October of 62% and 91%, for both the 2020s High and 2050s High scenarios, respectively. The future drier summer periods are likely to cause a delay in the onset of recharge by a month, due to a corresponding overall increase in the evapotranspiration for all scenarios. Faced with these conditions, water companies are planning for less reliable groundwater resources within an overall risk-based approach to managing future water supply and demand.

  9. The Canadian HT dispersion experiment at Chalk River - June 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A trace amount (3.54TBq) of tritiated hydrogen, HT, was released to the atmosphere at an experimental field at the Chalk River Laboratories on June 10, 1987 in order to study the environmental behaviour of HT. Experimental results showed that direct oxidation of HT in the atmosphere was small and confirmed that surface soils convert atmospheric HT to HTO. The HTO formed in the soil was slowly emitted to the atmosphere giving rise to the small concentrations of HTO observed in the air during the release and for a period of several weeks thereafter. HTO/HT ratios in air during the plume passage increased with downwind distance from a value of order 10-5 at 5 m to values between 4 x 10-4 and 8 x 10-4 at 400 m. Deposition velocities for HT to soil were in the range 10-4 to 10-3 m s-1. Rates of reemission of tritium from the soil to the atmosphere were typically a few percent per hour within one to two days of the release, declining to less than one percent per hour over two weeks. Tritium deposition velocities and reemission rates determined for soils in the field agreed well with laboratory measurements on field samples, and were similar in range to previous exposure chamber experiments carried out in various countries in the laboratory and field under non-winter conditions. Direct uptake of HT by vegetation was not detected. The time history of vegetation tritium was consistent with uptake of HTO from soil and atmosphere and with incorporation of tritium into the organically bound form through photosynthesis. The experiment provides an extensive data base suitable for the detailed evaluation of mathematical models describing the short range dispersion of tritium. The results indicate that the short range dose from a release of HT would be much less than the dose from an equivalent release of HTO

  10. Contaminated groundwater characterization at the Chalk River Laboratories, Ontario, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schilk, A.J.; Robertson, D.E.; Thomas, C.W.; Lepel, E.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Champ, D.R.; Killey, R.W.D.; Young, J.L.; Cooper, E.L. [Chalk River Labs., Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    1993-03-01

    The licensing requirements for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste (10 CFR 61) specify the performance objectives and technical requisites for federal and commercial land disposal facilities, the ultimate goal of which is to contain the buried wastes so that the general population is adequately protected from harmful exposure to any released radioactive materials. A major concern in the operation of existing and projected waste disposal sites is subterranean radionuclide transport by saturated or unsaturated flow, which could lead to the contamination of groundwater systems as well as uptake by the surrounding biosphere, thereby directly exposing the general public to such materials. Radionuclide transport in groundwater has been observed at numerous commercial and federal waste disposal sites [including several locations within the waste management area of Chalk River Laboratories (CRL)], yet the physico-chemical processes that lead to such migration are still not completely understood. In an attempt to assist in the characterization of these processes, an intensive study was initiated at CRL to identify and quantify the mobile radionuclide species originating from three separate disposal sites: (a) the Chemical Pit, which has received aqueous wastes containing various radioisotopes, acids, alkalis, complexing agents and salts since 1956, (b) the Reactor Pit, which has received low-level aqueous wastes from a reactor rod storage bay since 1956, and (c) the Waste Management Area C, a thirty-year-old series of trenches that contains contaminated solid wastes from CRL and various regional medical facilities. Water samples were drawn downgradient from each of the above sites and passed through a series of filters and ion-exchange resins to retain any particulate and dissolved or colloidal radionuclide species, which were subsequently identified and quantified via radiochemical separations and gamma spectroscopy. These groundwaters were also analyzed for anions

  11. Waste management activities at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-level radioactive waste-management operations at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL) of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited began in 1946 and currently include waste processing and interim storage in engineered facilities built in unsaturated sandy overburden. In addition, an R and D program has been underway for about ten years directed at preparations for a transition from the current storage mode to one of permanent disposal for the management of about 5000 m3/a (as-generated volume) of low- and intermediate-level solid wastes generated on the CRNL site or shipped there from the nuclear industry, radioisotope producers and users across Canada. The first phase of the disposal program was the development and demonstration of selected waste processing methods for the volume reduction and immobilization of solid and liquid low-level wastes. This phase is now nearing completion with the construction, commissioning and operation of the CRNL Waste Treatment Centre. The Centre consists of a controlled-air incinerator for combustible solid and liquid wastes, ultrafiltration, reverse-osmosis, and evaporator systems for aqueous wastes, and wipe-film and ribbon-blender bituminizers for immobilizing the ash and waste concentrates. The second phase of the program is directed at further advances in waste characterization and processing, and at the development of two disposal concepts potentially suitable for the local geological situation - Intrusion-resistant shallow land burial and excavated rock cavities at shallow depth. Also included is the preparation of safety-assessment methodologies for the two concepts. The intent is to carry one or both disposal concepts through the constriction and operation of prototype facilities at CRNL as a qualified component of an evolving integrated disposal strategy for the current inventory and future arisings of wastes to be managed

  12. Biot Critical Frequency Applied to Description of Failure and Yield of Highly Porous Chalk with Different Pore Fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Katrine Alling; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2010-01-01

    nature of dissolved salts have an effect.Water has a significant softening effect on elastic properties of chalk as calculated from wave data, and the softening increases with increasing critical frequency as defined by Biot. The critical frequency is the highest frequency where elastic wave propagation......Injection of water into chalk hydrocarbon reservoirs has led to mechanical yield and failure. Laboratory experiments on chalk samples correspondingly show that the mechanical properties of porous chalk depend on pore fluid and temperature. In case of water-saturated samples, the concentration and...... data include chalk samples that were tested at temperatures from 20 °C to 130 °C with the following pore fluids: fresh water, synthetic seawater, glycol, and oil of varying viscosity. The critical frequency is calculated for each experiment. For each specimen, we calculate the thickness to the slipping...

  13. Grain size distributions of chalk from image analysis of electron micrographs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Birte; Gommesen, Lars; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2001-01-01

    from image analysis due to rim effects inherent in backscatter images at high magnification. Thus, in order to obtain a consistent interpretation, we use total (He) porosity and insoluble residue as measured in the laboratory. We find that the volume density of larger grains (cross section larger than...... image analysis. The chalk is composed of a fine-grained matrix of nannofossils and predominantlycalcitic fossil debris with larger microfossil grains, but the chalk may also contain significant amounts of silica and siliciclastic clay. For image analysis, we used backscatter electron images of epoxy...

  14. Change of Static and Dynamic Elastic Properties due to CO² Injection in North Sea Chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Hjuler, M.L.; Christensen, H.F.;

    2012-01-01

    % non-carbonate. We studied difference in static and dynamic behavior. Furthermore, brine saturated data were compared with CO2 injected data to reveal the effect of supercritical CO2 injection in both static and dynamic elastic properties. We used strain gauges and LVDTs to measure static deformation....... We observed lower dynamic elastic modulus for chalk with higher non-carbonate content at porosities lower than 30%. In 30% porosity chalk, dynamic compressional and bulk modulus were found significantly higher than the static modulus. Static measurements with LVDT were found lowest. The effect of CO2...

  15. Upper end plug of fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns a seal-welding of an upper end plug of a fuel rod for nuclear fuels conducted in a final stage of molding fabrication of the fuel rod in a pressurized helium gas. A welding protrusion is formed at the periphery of a vent hole on the upper surface of the upper end plug, and the welding protrusion is melted by irradiation of laser beams. The melted protrusion intrudes into the end portion of the bent hole by capillary to close the vent hole. The upper end plug can be closed by an extremely simple operation of irradiating the laser beams to the protrusion. Control for electrode gap on every fuel rods and exchange for the electrodes as in TIG welding can be saved, thereby enabling to speed up and simplify the sealing operation for the upper end plug. (N.H.)

  16. Instrumented model pile tests on sand plugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haaren, L.J.C. van; Verruijt, A. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Kolk, H.J. [Fugro Engineers B.V., Leidschendam (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31

    0pen ended piles develop internal frictional resistance between the internal soil plug end the pile wall during axial loading. Current pipe pile design practice assumes that the ultimate internal skin friction is of the same order of magnitude as the outer skin friction. This paper describes a series of laboratory pile load tests on instrumented model pipe piles, designed to investigate the development of plug stresses and skin friction along the plug length during pile loading. The piles contain sand columns of various relative densities and of different heights. The soil plugs are loaded to failure under fully drained conditions. The test data indicate that internal skin friction in sand can be substantially higher than assumed in conventional design practice. This finding could lead to significant economical savings on future pipe pile foundations in sand.

  17. Modular, Plug and Play, Distributed Avionics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this SBIR effort was to prove the viability of an Ethernet version of the MicroSat Systems, Inc. (MSI) modular, plug and play (PnP) spacecraft...

  18. Hybrid and Plug-in Electric Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-05-20

    Hybrid and plug-in electric vehicles use electricity either as their primary fuel or to improve the efficiency of conventional vehicle designs. This new generation of vehicles, often called electric drive vehicles, can be divided into three categories: hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles(PHEVs), and all-electric vehicles (EVs). Together, they have great potential to reduce U.S. petroleum use.

  19. Upper Cretaceous chalk facies and depositional history recorded in the Mona-1 core, Mona Ridge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderskouv, Kresten; Surlyk, Finn

    2011-01-01

    , including mudflow, debris flow, and slumping. Pelagic deposits vary mainly in terms of the concentration of siliciclastic material, the trace-fossil assemblage, and the presence or ab­sence of primary sedimentary structures. Pelagic sedimentation was probably punctuated by the deposition of thin turbidites...

  20. Elastocapillary powered manipulation of liquid plug in microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, D.; Anoop, R.; Sen, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    We report the manipulation of a liquid plug inside a rectangular microchannel, when one of the channel walls is a deformable membrane, which adjoins another parallel microchannel. Elastocapillary flow of a driving liquid (DL) through the adjoining microchannel, when approaches the plug, tries to pull the membrane near the plug, which is initially deflected into the plug, towards the DL. The plug is transported due to a differential pressure that develops across the plug owing to the increase in the radius of curvature of the trailing meniscus of the plug. A theoretical model is proposed to predict the plug velocity, which depends on a parameter J and plug length L ˜ . The predictions of the theoretical model show good agreement with experimental data. The dynamic behaviour of the plug and DL is presented and discussed.

  1. Development of explosive plugging for steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the development of explosive plugging techniques as a repair method for leaking steam generator tubes. The study has been in progress since 1977 and results confirm that the explosive plugging method is applicable to the steam generator. The following developmental tests were performed. 1. Preliminary test - Kind and amount of explosive, shape of plug, stand-off, initiation method, etc. 2. Evaluation test - Shearing test, measurement of bonded zone (U.T. and microscopic observation), He-leakage test, water pressure test, hardness of plug and tube after plugging, P.T. for plugged tube plate surface, etc. 3. Re-plugging after failed plugging 4. Demonstration plugging of a 50 MW steam generator 5. Thermal shock test 6. Sodium vapour atmosphere test The results of these tests indicate that the explosive plugging method is effective for the repair of leaking tubes in steam generators. (author)

  2. Real time computer based control system for rotatable plugs of PFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 500 MWe Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is being constructed at Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu. Two Rotatable Plugs (RP) known as Small Rotatable Plug (SRP) and Large Rotatable Plug (LRP) are provided on the top shield of PFBR to allow access to any position on the grid plate for handling core subassemblies using Transfer Arm (TA). The Real Time Computers (RTC) systems are deployed to rotate the RP remotely in either clockwise or counter-clockwise direction from Handling Control Room (HCR) Concole-1, HCR Panel-1 and Reactor Containment Building Local Control Centre-3 (RCBLCC-3) display station with the positioning accuracy of +/- 1.27 arcmin for SRP and +/- 0.196 arcmin for LRP. (author)

  3. Experiences from the design and construction of plug II in the Prototype Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlstroem, Lars-Olof (NCC Teknik (Sweden))

    2009-12-15

    The intention with this document is to summarise the comprehensive documentation and experience that was gained during the design and construction of the temporary plugs in the Prototype Repository experiment at Aespoe HRL. The Prototype Repository experiment was designed to in full scale test the engineered barriers and their function, including the plug that separate the deposition tunnel from the temporary access- and transportation tunnels that are at atmospheric pressure. This plug is designed and constructed as a concrete plug with a spherical front side and a flat pressurised side. This report presents the processes and operations that were considered when developing the 'plug', design, construction and verification. In the Prototype Repository the demand of leakage control is very high and the maximum length of the plugs is constrained due to available clearance space, experimental set-up and configuration. Therefore a typical 'friction plug' normally used to block waterways in connection with hydropower plants, is not suitable. Instead a plug constructed as an 'arch plug' with abutments was considered. In order to minimize the Excavation Disturbed Zone (EDZ) the abutments, in which the plug is inserted, was excavated by seam drilling with coring technique. The steel formwork was pre-assembled at the ground surface before taken down to the tunnel. The steel was bolted and welded together and crossbars and plywood were mounted on top. Before taken down to the tunnel, the formwork was separated into smaller pieces that were easier to transport down the tunnel but easy to assembly at the Prototype Repository experiment. Before assembling the formwork, a retaining wall was installed to resist the earth and compaction pressure developed from the backfill material. The retaining wall consists of pre-fabricated concrete beams that were installed parallel with the installation of the backfill. Reinforcement was cut and bent at the

  4. Experiences from the design and construction of plug II in the Prototype Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intention with this document is to summarise the comprehensive documentation and experience that was gained during the design and construction of the temporary plugs in the Prototype Repository experiment at Aespoe HRL. The Prototype Repository experiment was designed to in full scale test the engineered barriers and their function, including the plug that separate the deposition tunnel from the temporary access- and transportation tunnels that are at atmospheric pressure. This plug is designed and constructed as a concrete plug with a spherical front side and a flat pressurised side. This report presents the processes and operations that were considered when developing the 'plug', design, construction and verification. In the Prototype Repository the demand of leakage control is very high and the maximum length of the plugs is constrained due to available clearance space, experimental set-up and configuration. Therefore a typical 'friction plug' normally used to block waterways in connection with hydropower plants, is not suitable. Instead a plug constructed as an 'arch plug' with abutments was considered. In order to minimize the Excavation Disturbed Zone (EDZ) the abutments, in which the plug is inserted, was excavated by seam drilling with coring technique. The steel formwork was pre-assembled at the ground surface before taken down to the tunnel. The steel was bolted and welded together and crossbars and plywood were mounted on top. Before taken down to the tunnel, the formwork was separated into smaller pieces that were easier to transport down the tunnel but easy to assembly at the Prototype Repository experiment. Before assembling the formwork, a retaining wall was installed to resist the earth and compaction pressure developed from the backfill material. The retaining wall consists of pre-fabricated concrete beams that were installed parallel with the installation of the backfill. Reinforcement was cut and bent at the factory and was ready for

  5. ACE - an algebraic compiler and encoder for the Chalk River datatron computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ACE is a program written for the Chalk River Datatron (Burroughs 205) Computer to enable the machine to compile a program for solving a problem from instructions supplied by the user in a notation related much more closely to algebra than to the machine's own code. (author)

  6. Strength and Biot's coefficient for high-porosity oil- or water-saturated chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Katrine Alling

    during hydrostatic loading. The hypothesis is that the Biot coefficient and the theory of poroelasticity may cover the fluid effect by including the increased fluid bulk modulus from oil to water. A high number of test results for both oil- and water-saturated high-porosity outcrop chalk show correlation...

  7. Ultrasonic velocities of North Sea chalk samples: influence of porosity, fluid content and texture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogen, B.; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Japsen, P.; Høier, Camilla Kruse; Mavko, G.; Pedersen, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    the South Arne Field than from the Dan Field for identical porosities. This difference may be due to textural differences between the chalk at the two locations because we observe that large grains (i.e. filled microfossils and fossil fragments) that occur more frequently in samples from the Dan Field...

  8. WIMS-CRNL: A user's manual for the Chalk River version of WIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the preparation of the input for WIMS-CRNL, the Chalk River version of the WIMS lattice code. Also included are notes on the operation of the code, contents of the associated libraries, and the relation of WIMS-CRNL to other versions of the code

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance and sound velocity measurements of chalk saturated with magnesium rich brine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    The use of low field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to determine petrophysical properties of reservoirs has proved to be a good technique. Together with sonic and electrical resistivity measurements, NMR can contribute to illustrate the changes on chalk elasticity due to different pore water...

  10. The surface reactivity of chalk (biogenic calcite) with hydrophilic and hydrophobic functional groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okhrimenko, D. V.; Dalby, K. N.; Skovbjerg, L. L.; Bovet, N.; Christensen, J. H.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2014-03-01

    The surface properties of calcium carbonate minerals play an important role in a number of industrial and biological processes. Properties such as wettability and adsorption control liquid-solid interface behaviour and thus have a strong influence on processes such as biomineralisation, remediation of aquifers and oil recovery. We investigated how two model molecules of different polarity, namely water and ethanol, interact with reservoir and outcrop chalk samples and we compared their behaviour with that of pure, inorganically precipitated calcite. Thermodynamic quantities, such as the work of wetting, surface energy and isosteric adsorption enthalpy, were determined from vapour adsorption isotherms. The chalks were studied fresh and after extraction of organic residues that were originally present in these samples. The work of wetting correlates with the amount of organic matter present in the chalk samples but we observed a fundamental difference between the adsorption properties of chalk and pure, inorganically precipitated calcite toward the less polar, ethanol molecule. Further analysis of the chemical composition of the organic matter extracted from the chalk samples was made by gas chromatography (GC-MS). Monitoring surface composition by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) before and after extraction of the organic material, and with atomic force microscopy (AFM), showed that nanometer sized clay crystals observed on the chalk particle surfaces could be an important part of the reason for the differences. Removal of the extractable portion of the hydrocarbons liberates adsorption sites that have different wetting properties than the rest of the chalk and these have an energy distribution that is similar to clays. Thus, the results exemplify the complexity of biogenic calcite adsorption behaviour and demonstrate that chalk wetting in drinking water aquifers as well as oil reservoirs is controlled partly by the nanoparticles of clay that have grown on the

  11. Seismic stratigraphy and sedimentary architecture of the Chalk Group in south-west Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Connie; Ineson, Jon; Boldreel, Lars Ole

    2014-01-01

    The article focuses on a study undertaken by the Chalk Group on the western onshore region of the Danish Basin in Eastern Denmark related on the seismic stratigraphy and sedimentary architecture of the region. The study is undertaken through subdividing the northern North German Basin and the south...

  12. SNG-log in borehole P7 in Faxe Chalk Quarry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsbech, Uffe C C

    1996-01-01

    A spectral natural gamma-ray log in a 190 m borehole in Faxe chalk quarry confirms that Danish bryozoan and corallic limestones contain very low levels of natural radioactivity. Due to the low content of natural radioactivity it has been possible to observe the influence from cosmic radiation. The...

  13. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Elastic Wave Velocity of Chalk Saturated with Brines Containing Divalent Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has proven a good technique for measuring pore size distribution in reservoir rocks. The use of low field NMR together with sonic and electrical resistivity measurements, can contribute to illustrate the effect of adsorbing ions on chalk elasticity. NMR is useful...

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance and sound velocity measurements of chalk saturated with magnesium rich brine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2013-01-01

    The use of low field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to determine petrophysical properties of reservoirs has proved to be a good technique. Together with sonic and electrical resistivity measurements, NMR can contribute to illustrate the changes on chalk elasticity due to different pore water...

  15. Using Raman spectroscopic imaging for non-destructive analysis of filler distribution in chalk filled polypropylene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boros, Evelin; Porse, Peter Bak; Nielsen, Inga;

    2016-01-01

    A feasibility study on using Raman spectral imaging for visualization and analysis of filler distribution in chalk filled poly-propylene samples has been carried out. The spectral images were acquired using a Raman spectrometer with 785 nm light source.Eight injection-molded samples with...

  16. How burial diagenesis of chalk sediments controls sonic velocity and porosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2003-01-01

    , whereby IF increases and chalk forms. Rock mechanical tests show that when compaction requires more than in-situ stress, porosity reduction is arrested. During subsequent burial, crystals and pores grow in size as a consequence of the continuing recrystallization. ne lack of porosity loss during...

  17. Probing the intrinsically oil-wet surfaces of pores in North Sea chalk at subpore resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassenkam, Tue; Skovbjerg, Lone Lindbæk; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2009-01-01

    of the controlling factors for the effectiveness of water flooding, one of the most common methods to improve oil recovery in Chalk reservoirs. Understanding surface wetting and its variability at scales smaller than the pore dimension will potentially provide clues for more effective oil production...

  18. Effects of gravity, inertia, and surfactant on steady plug propagation in a two-dimensional channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y.; Fujioka, H.; Grotberg, J. B.

    2007-08-01

    Liquid plugs may form in pulmonary airways during the process of liquid instillation or removal in many clinical treatments. Studies have shown that the effectiveness of these treatments may depend on how liquids distribute in the lung. Better understanding of the fundamental fluid mechanics of liquid plug transport will facilitate treatment strategies. In this paper, we develop a numerical model of steady plug propagation driven by gravity and pressure in a two-dimensional liquid-lined channel oriented at an angle α with respect to gravity. We investigate the effects of gravity through the Bond number, Bo, and α; the plug propagation speed through the capillary number, Ca, or the Reynolds number, Re; the plug length LP, and the surfactant concentration C0. Without gravity, i.e., Bo =0, the plug is symmetric, and there are two regimes for the flow: two wall layers and two trapped vortices in the core. There is no flow interaction between the upper and lower half plug domains. When Bo ≠0 and α ≠0, π, fluid is found to flow from the upper precursor film, through the core and into the lower trailing film. Then the number of vortices can be zero, one, or two, depending on the flow parameters. The vortices have stagnation points on the interface when C0=0, however when the surfactant is present (C0>0), the vortices detach from the interface and create saddle points inside the core. The front meniscus develops a capillary surface wave extending into the precursor film. This is where the film is thinnest and thus the wall shear stress is highest, as high as ˜100dyn /cm2 in adult airways, which indicates a significant risk of pulmonary airway epithelial cell damage. Adding surfactant can decrease the peak magnitude of the shear stress, thus reducing the risk of cell damage. The prebifurcation asymmetry of the plug is quantified by the volume ratio, Vr, defined as the ratio of the liquid above to that below the center line of the channel. Vr is found to increase

  19. Late Maastrichtian chalk mounds, Stevns Klint, Denmark — Combined physical and biogenic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderskouv, Kresten; Damholt, Tove; Surlyk, Finn

    2007-08-01

    Upper Maastrichtian chalk exposed at the Sigerslev quarry, Stevns Klint, Denmark is characterized by wavy and mound-like bedding geometries outlined by bands of black flint nodules. Four morphological elements are recognized, although bedding geometries are highly variable: southward migrating mounds, eastward migrating mounds, chalk waves and evenly bedded chalk. The mounds are interpreted as having been formed by currents carrying fine-grained suspended sediment which was primarily deposited on the up-current mound flanks. Bryozoans were prolific on the up-current flanks and mound summits, which stabilized the mounds, increased bed roughness and the overall accumulation rate. However, accumulation thicknesses do not correlate consistently with bryozoan density. The bryozoans were therefore important for the formation of the mounds, but the distribution of bryozoans did not solely determine depositional thickness across a mound and thus mound growth pattern. Relatively long wavelength wavy-bedded chalk show gentle convex-up geometries and would probably be described as sediment waves if recognized in seismic sections. The chalk waves were deposited under weaker current velocities than those active during mound formation. The exposed succession is topped by more evenly bedded chalk which was deposited by quiet pelagic fall-out of fine-grained material. The whole succession was deposited on the upper part of the northern flank of a large WNW-ESE trending 3 km wide depositional ridge with an amplitude of 35-40 m formed by contour-parallel WNW-ward flowing bottom currents. The mounds may have been deposited by regional bottom currents, or by spill-over currents from the valley south of the large ridge. The succession was deposited during varying bottom current intensities and the depositional architecture indicates a complex and dynamic environment. The depositional style seems to be controlled by the interplay and relative importance of two end-member processes

  20. Real Time Computer for Plugging Indicator Control of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is in the advanced stage of construction at Kalpakkam, India. Liquid sodium is used as coolant to transfer the heat produced in the reactor core to steam water circuit. Impurities present in the sodium are removed using purification circuit. Plugging indicator is a device used to measure the purity of the sodium. Versa Module Europa bus based Real Time Computer (RTC) system is used for plugging indicator control. Hot standby architecture consisting of dual redundant RTC system with switch over logic system is the configuration adopted to achieve fault tolerance. Plugging indicator can be controlled in two modes namely continuous and discontinuous mode. Software based Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) algorithms are developed for plugging indicator control wherein the set point changes dynamically for every scan interval of the RTC system. Set points and PID constants are kept as configurable in runtime in order to control the process in very efficient manner, which calls for reliable communication between RTC system and control station, hence TCP/IP protocol is adopted. Performance of the RTC system for plugging indicator control was thoroughly studied in the laboratory by simulating the inputs and monitored the control outputs. The control outputs were also monitored for different PID constants. Continuous and discontinuous mode plots were generated. (authors)

  1. The Design and Manufacturing Report of Plug Type Non-Instrumented Rig for Irradiation Test in HANARO OR Hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Bang, Je Geon; Lim, Ik Sung; Kim, Sun Ki; Yang, Yong Sik; Song, Kun Woo

    2008-09-15

    This project is developed the plug type non-instrumented irradiation test rig of the advanced nuclear fuel in HANARO for pursuit advanced performance in High Performance Fuel Technology Development as a part Nuclear Mid and Long-term R and D Program. This irradiation rig was confirmed the integrity and HANARO core compatibility by the optimum design and the thermal hydraulic out-pile test in FIVPET. The characteristic of plug type non-instrument rig is to possible irradiation test of variable in-pile condition and reduced the wastes for reusable as function. This plug type non-instrumented rig was satisfied the quality assurance requirements and written out the end of manufacturing report. This plug type non-instrumented rig is adopt to the irradiation test for nuclear fuel irradiation test in HANARO OR hole.

  2. Laboratory measurements of the electrokinetic and electrochemical potential in chalk, with application to monitoring of saline intrusion in the UK chalk aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAllister, D.; Jackson, M.; Butler, A. P.; Vinogradov, J.

    2012-12-01

    Saline intrusion is a global phenomenon affecting the availability of freshwater in coastal aquifers. The aim of this work is to investigate whether measurements of spontaneous potential (SP) can be used to monitor the intrusion of seawater into coastal aquifers, with specific application to the chalk aquifer near Brighton on the south coast of the UK. SP arises to maintain electrical neutrality when a separation of charge occurs due to gradients in pressure (electrokinetic or streaming potential), concentration (electrochemical potential) and temperature (thermoelectric potential). Concentration gradients are a characteristic feature of saline intrusion and may give rise to a measureable electrochemical potential (EC). In addition the electrokinetic potential (EK) will arise during abstraction and up-coning of the saline front. The intruding saline front could therefore be detected and monitored continuously, with SP measurements in boreholes and at the surface providing dense monitoring in space and time. To determine the likely magnitude of EK and EC signals during saline intrusion into the chalk aquifer, we measured EK and EC potentials in samples of Seaford chalk saturated with (i) natural, potable groundwater from the aquifer and (ii) seawater sampled from the English Channel. The EK coupling coefficient, which relates the gradient in voltage to the gradient in water pressure when the total current is zero, was found to be -60 mV/MPa in samples saturated with groundwater. In seawater saturated samples it was found to be only -1 mV/MPa. This result agrees with earlier work suggesting the EK potential is suppressed in high salinity environments due to a compressed electrical double layer. The EK coupling coefficient was negative in both cases, suggesting that the surface charge of Seaford chalk is negative when in contact with groundwater and seawater. The electrochemical experiments involved establishing a concentration gradient across the chalk samples

  3. Benthic macrofauna variations and community structure in Cenomanian cyclic chalk-marl from Southerham Grey Pit, SE England

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Bodil Wesenberg; Gale, A. S.; Surlyk, Finn

    2009-01-01

    . The material comprises washing residues of 24 bulk samples collected from chalk and marl half-cycles. A total of 5055 invertebrate specimens were retrieved and referred to 68 species, forming the basis for the recognition of six guilds. In general, the fauna is more diverse in marl than in chalk, but...... clearly well adapted to both facies and thus to the fine grain size of the substrate rather than to lithology. The systematic difference in diversity between chalk and marl samples was possibly caused by long-term climatic and oceanographic changes and thus could represent a biological response to...

  4. Influence of clay and silica on permeability and capillary entry pressure of chalk reservoirs in the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Birte; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2002-01-01

    The permeability and capillary entry pressure of chalk reservoirs are controlled by their porosity and specific surface area. Measured permeabilities are in the range 0.025-5.3 mD and are successfully predicted by use of the Kozeny equation. In this paper we focus on the factors that control...... specific surface area. Fifty-nine Tor and Ekofisk Formation chalk samples from five North Sea chalk reservoirs were investigated. All contain quartz and clay minerals, most commonly kaolinite and smectite, with trace amounts of illite. The contents of calcite and quartz are inversely correlated and both...

  5. Porosity and sonic velocity depth trends of Eocene chalk in Atlantic Ocean: Influence of effective stress and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awedalkarim, Ahmed; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to relate changes in porosity and sonic velocity data, measured on water-saturated Eocene chalks from 36 Ocean Drilling Program drill sites in the Atlantic Ocean, to vertical effective stress and thermal maturity. We considered only chalk of Eocene age to avoid possible influence of...... geological age on chalk compaction trends. For each depth, vertical effective stresses as defined by Terzaghi and by Biot were calculated. We used bottom-hole temperature data to calculate the time–temperature index of thermal maturity (TTI) as defined by Lopatin. Porosity and compressional wave velocity...

  6. Nozzle dam having a unitary plug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, Luciano; Wepfer, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus for sealing the primary-side coolant flow nozzles of a nuclear steam generator. The steam generator has relatively small diameter manway openings for providing access to the interior of the steam generator including the inside surface of each nozzle, the manway openings having a diameter substantially less than the inside diameter of each nozzle. The apparatus includes a bracket having an outside surface for matingly sealingly engaging the inside surface of the nozzle. The bracket also has a plurality of openings longitudinally therethrough and a plurality of slots transversely therein in communication with each opening. A plurality of unitary plugs sized to pass through the manway opening are matingly sealingly disposed in each opening of the bracket for sealingly plugging each opening. Each plug includes a plurality of arms operable to engage the slots of the bracket for connecting each plug to the bracket, so that the nozzle is sealed as the plugs seal the openings and are connected to the bracket.

  7. Development and application of microbial selective plugging processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenneman, G.E. [Phillips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, OK (United States); Gevertz, D.; Davey, M.E. [Agouron Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Phillips Petroleum Company recently completed a microbial selective plugging (MSP) pilot at the North Burbank Unit (NBU), Shidler, Oklahoma. Nutrients were selected for the pilot that could stimulate indigenous microflora in the reservoir brine to grow and produce exopolymer. It was found that soluble corn starch polymers (e.g., maltodextrins) stimulated the indigenous bacteria to produce exopolymer, whereas simple sugars (e.g., glucose and sucrose), as well as complex media (e.g., molasses and Nutrient Broth), did not. Injection of maltodextrin into rock cores in the presence of indigenous NBU bacteria resulted in stable permeability reductions (> 90%) across the entire length, while injection of glucose resulted only in face plugging. In addition, it was found that organic phosphate esters (OPE) served as a preferable source of phosphorus for the indigenous bacteria, since orthophosphates and condensed phosphates precipitated in NBU brine at reservoir temperature (45{degrees}C). Injection of maltodextrin and ethyl acid phosphate into a producing well stimulated an increase in maltodextrin utilizing bacteria (MUB) in the back-flowed, produced fluid. Additional screens of indigenous and nonindigenous bacteria yielded several nonindigenous isolates that could synthesize polymer when growing in brine containing 6% NaCl at 45{degrees}C.

  8. A molecular plug-socket connector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogez, Guillaume; Ribera, Belén Ferrer; Credi, Alberto; Ballardini, Roberto; Gandolfi, Maria Teresa; Balzani, Vincenzo; Liu, Yi; Northrop, Brian H; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2007-04-18

    A monocationic plug-socket connector that is composed, at the molecular level, of three components, (1) a secondary dialkylammonium center (CH2NH2+CH2), which can play the role of a plug toward dibenzo[24]crown-8 (DB24C8), (2) a rigid and conducting biphenyl spacer, and (3) 1,4-benzo-1,5-naphtho[36]crown-10 (BN36C10), capable of playing the role of a socket toward a 4,4'-bipyridinium dicationic plug, was synthesized and displays the ability to act as a plug-socket connector. The fluorescent signal changes associated with the 1,5-dioxynaphthalene unit of its BN36C10 portion were monitored to investigate the association of this plug-socket connector with the complementary socket and plug compounds. The results indicate that (1) the CH2NH2+CH2 part of the molecular connector can thread DB24C8 in a trivial manner and (2) the BN36C10 ring of the connector can be threaded by a 1,1'-dioctyl-4,4'-bipyridinium ion only after the CH2NH2+CH2 site is occupied by a DB24C8 ring. The two connections of the three-component assembly are shown to be controlled reversibly by acid/base and red/ox external inputs, respectively. The results obtained represent a key step for the design and construction of a self-assembling supramolecular system in which the molecular electron source can be connected to the molecular electron drain by a molecular elongation cable. PMID:17388589

  9. Quasi-Porous Plug With Vortex Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, J. V.

    1985-01-01

    Pressure-letdown valve combines quasi-porous-plug and vortex-chamber in one controllable unit. Valve useful in fossil-energy plants for reducing pressures in such erosive two-phase process streams as steam/water, coal slurries, or combustion gases with entrained particles. Quasi-Porous Plug consists of plenums separated by perforated plates. Number or size of perforations increases with each succeeding stage to compensate for expansion. In Vortex Chamber, control flow varies to control swirl and therefore difference between inlet and outlet pressures.

  10. Polysaccharides and bacterial plugging. [Progress report], October 1--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogler, H.S.

    1992-12-31

    The objectives of this research are to elucidate and model bacterial transport in porous media, to determine the importance of polysaccharides bridging as a retentive mechanism, and to identify key parameters that influence porous media plugging. A continuum core plugging model is being development. This model will include the resulting cell, polysaccharide, and nutrient profiles as growth occurs with time. Initial cell profiles were found to be needed for the model. Experiments and a cell retainment model has been completed to predict cell profiles for a high permeability cores. The continuum model starts with applying a mass balance to an elemental volume of porous media and makes the assumptions that: cells once deposited remain sessile; polymer and enzyme remain in location of cells; neglect dispersion and diffusion in model; neglect yeast extract balance, and neglect changes in the interstitial velocity.

  11. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle R&D plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2007-06-01

    FCVT, in consultation with industry and other appropriate DOE offices, developed the Draft Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle R&D Plan to accelerate the development and deployment of technologies critical for plug-in hybrid vehicles.

  12. Experimental Study of Bacterial Penetration into Chalk Rock: Mechanisms and Effect on Permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halim, Amalia Yunita; Shapiro, Alexander; Eliasson Lantz, Anna;

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial selective plugging is one of the mechanisms through which microorganisms can be applied for enhanced oil recovery, as bacteria can plug the water-swept zones of a reservoir, thus altering the flow paths and improving sweep efficiency. However, complete understanding of the penetration...

  13. eBooks & SFX Plug-Ins

    OpenAIRE

    Overkamp, I.

    2009-01-01

    The presentations shortly summarizes how the MPG-wide eBook subscriptions are integrated into the MPG/SFX service menu. The current implementation uses the SFX Plug-In feature to request holding information from the MPG eBooks catalog on-the-fly.

  14. An optimal design for millimeter-wide facture plugging zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yili Kang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lost circulation control in millimeter-wide fractures has been a challenge in well drilling all the time. Low pressure-bearing capacity of a plugging zone will result in excessive consumption of lost circulation materials (LCMs and extra down time. In this study, laboratory experiments were conducted on the plugging of millimeter-wide fractures to evaluate the plugging effects of different types of LCM including rigid granules, elastic particles and fiber. Maximum plugging pressure, total loss volume before sealing and plugging time were taken as the evaluation index of the LCM plugging effect. According to the experimental results, the synergistic plugging mechanisms of different LCM combinations were also analyzed. Experimental results showed that the total loss volume of the plugging zone formed by rigid and elastic particle combination was generally greater than 400 mL, and the maximum plugging pressure of the plugging zone formed by elastic particle and fiber combination was generally less than 6 MPa. In contrast, the plugging zone formed by the combination of the three types of LCMs has the maximum plugging pressure of up to 13 MPa and total loss volume before sealing of 75 mL. In the synergistic plugging process, rigid granules form a frame with high pressure-bearing capacity in the narrower parts of the fractures; elastic particles generate elastic force through elastic deformation to increase the friction between a fracture and a plugging zone to make the plugging zone more stable; fibers filling in the pore space between the particles increase the tightness and integrity of the plugging zone. The experimental results can provide guidance for the optimal design of LCMs used in the field.

  15. Bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axial loads on plugs or seals in an underground repository due to gas, water pressures and temperature changes induced subsequent to waste and plug emplacement lead to shear stresses at the plug/rock contact. Therefore, the bond between the plug and rock is a critical element for the design and effectiveness of plugs in boreholes, shafts or tunnels. This study includes a systematic investigation of the bond strength of cementitious borehole plugs in welded tuff. Analytical and numerical analysis of borehole plug-rock stress transfer mechanics is performed. The interface strength and deformation are studied as a function of Young's modulus ratio of plug and rock, plug length and rock cylinder outside-to-inside radius ratio. The tensile stresses in and near an axially loaded plug are analyzed. The frictional interface strength of an axially loaded borehole plug, the effect of axial stress and lateral external stress, and thermal effects are also analyzed. Implications for plug design are discussed. The main conclusion is a strong recommendation to design friction plugs in shafts, drifts, tunnels or boreholes with a minimum length to diameter ratio of four. Such a geometrical design will reduce tensile stresses in the plug and in the host rock to a level which should minimize the risk of long-term deterioration caused by excessive tensile stresses. Push-out tests have been used to determine the bond strength by applying an axial load to cement plugs emplaced in boreholes in welded tuff cylinders. A total of 130 push-out tests have been performed as a function of borehole size, plug length, temperature, and degree of saturation of the host tuff. The use of four different borehole radii enables evaluation of size effects. 119 refs., 42 figs., 20 tabs

  16. Investigation of Lecturer's Chalk by X-Ray Florescence and Fast Neutron Activation Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different samples of lecturer's chalk were studied, using X-ray florescence (XRF) and Fast Neutron Activation Analysis (FNAA) techniques to ensure the safety of its use. The K (X-rays) and the gamma-rays were measured, using Si(Li) and high-purity germanium (HPGe) spectrometers to detect and determine qualitatively and quantitatively the constituents of the studied samples. For the investigated bulk chalk samples, the XRF was used for determination the average neutron flux of 2×107 n/cm2 sec. The concentrations of the elements (Ca and small traces of Al, Fe, Mg and Si) were measured and their presence was confirmed by γ-ray, lifetime and/or XRF measurements.

  17. Gas compositions and processes in the unsaturated zone of the chalk and triassic sandstone aquifers, England

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparatively little is known about the nature of gas sources, sinks and transport in the unsaturated zone, yet this topic is of importance to a wide range of activities extending from agriculture to the construction industry. The composition of the unsaturated zone atmosphere in two different English aquifer types (Chalk and Triassic sandstone) was investigated by the construction of gas sampling boreholes with depths of up to 25 m. Monitoring took place at approximately 1-2 month intervals over 12-24 months. No significant seasonal variations in gas composition were noted. The following mean concentrations of gases was observed (Chalk, sandstone): N2 (77.7%, 77.7%), O2 (19.5%, 19.8%), CO2 (1.5%, 1.5%), N2O (4.2 ppmv, 2.4 ppmv), CH4 (0.1 ppmv, 0.3 ppmv), and δ13C-CO2 (-25.3 per mille, -19.9 per mille). The factor of 50 increase in CO2 reflects production from soil organic matter, supplemented in the sandstone by some CO2 from acidification or carbonate material. The decrease in O2 of little more than 1% absolute from atmospheric concentration indicates the persistence of oxidizing conditions in both unsaturated zones, and the relatively high concentrations of N2O therefore appear likely to have been derived from nitrification rather than denitrification. The limited magnitude of denitrification processes is further illustrated by N2/Ar and δ15N data. To understand better the rate of movement of gases in the unsaturated zone of a fissured aquifer, a tracer test using SF6 was carried out at the Chalk site. The results indicate a diffusion rate up to 103 times higher than that expected for the Chalk matrix alone. (author)

  18. Probing the intrinsically oil-wet surfaces of pores in North Sea chalk at subpore resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Hassenkam, T.; Skovbjerg, L. L.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2009-01-01

    Pore surface properties control oil recovery. This is especially true for chalk reservoirs, where pores are particularly small. Wettability, the tendency for a surface to cover itself with fluid, is traditionally defined by the angle a droplet makes with a surface, but this macroscopic definition is meaningless when the particles are smaller than even the smallest droplet. Understanding surface wetting, at the pore scale, will provide clues for more effective oil recovery. We used a special m...

  19. Overview of research in physics and health sciences at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toxicology research was a logical extension of existing program at Chalk River. Research in radiotoxicology has been going on there since the early forties. An overview of the existing physics and health sciences research programs operating at the Research Company of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited was presented. Programs in nuclear physics, heavy ion nuclear physics, astrophysical neutrino physics, condensed matter physics, fusion, biology, dosimetry, and environmental sciences were briefly described. In addition, a description of the research company organization was provided

  20. Rock physics interpolation Used for velocity modeling of chalks: Ontong Java plateau example

    OpenAIRE

    Saberi, Mohammad Reza; Johansen, Tor Arne; Sælen, Gunnar

    2010-01-01

    Chalks are pelagic carbonate sediments that are deposited in deep-water environments. Their elastic behaviour is controlled by a combination of depositional conditions and subsequent diagenesis. In this paper, we incorporate geological information into rock physics modeling by constraining the pore structure (aspect ratio) variability. The strategy is to define a pore-model that reflects lithology, porosity and velocity. Then, a background velocity cube is constructed based on inf...

  1. Palaeo-ages of groundwaters in a fissured chalk aquifer, United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chalk aquifer in southeast England has a classic dual-porosity structure, with bulk advection occurring primarily in fractures/fissures, and largely immobile storage in the highly porous matrix blocks. For pumped samples, estimates of groundwater residence times using traditional geochemical correction models with 14C-dating, and assuming that ages reflect mobile fissure water signatures, indicate late-glacial recharge (≥25ka BP, pre-dating the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in the UK c.18 ka BP) for groundwaters in the centre of the basin. Cooler recharge temperatures than for modem waters evidenced in environmental isotopic (δ2H, δ18O) and dissolved noble gas (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) contents confirm their palaeowater status. However, hydraulic age estimates for transit times from recharge are much younger (tens of years). Closer consideration of solute transport in the Chalk allows reconciliation of these apparently discordant ages. It is argued that, on the regional aquifer scale, environmental tracers in the fissured Chalk move as though in an Equivalent Porous Medium (EPM), with significant tracer retardation due to sorption and/or matrix diffusion effects. Downgradient trends in δ18O and noble gases as independent tracers of past climatic changes can then be used to further constrain the groundwater ages better than for 14C-dating alone. This approach points to a significant revision of groundwater ages in the aquifer; all ages are seen to reflect post-glacial recharge having occurred ≤13 ka BP. An important consequence of this revision is that it is suggested that traditional geochemical models potentially undercorrect for the full effect of hydrodynamic processes on tracer ages in fissured porous media like the Chalk. (author)

  2. Biot critical frequency applied as common friction factor for pore collapse and failure of chalk with different pore fluids and temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Katrine Alling; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Foged, Niels Nielsen

    2011-01-01

    A fluid effect toward higher strengths for oil-saturated chalk compared with water-saturated chalk has previously been identified and labeled the "water-weakening phenomenon," but has not been further characterized physically. The hypothesis of this paper is that the Biot critical frequency with ...... present a new test series on Stevns chalk with unconfined compression and Brazilian strength results. Copyright © 2011 Society of Petroleum Engineers....

  3. Risk and countermeasure of ice-plug technology application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of ice-plug technology can realize the system isolation online. In order to know the inherent laws which the ice-plug forms, and reduces the application risk of ice-plug technology, we carried out many simulation experiments according to the operating characteristics of some components of the secondary loop of Qinshan nuclear power plant, and obtained many different parameters of the ice-plug forming. And the stress test, the crack detection and the metal microstructure analysis were also carried out for the metal pipeline which has been frozen. According to the analysis of ice-plug principle and the simulation test results, we found that we can reduce the application risk of ice-plug technology, and enhance the ice-plug application more scientifically and reliably by adjusting the freezing speed, reducing the chilling temperature according to the rules of pipeline material in different stages during ice-plug forming. Meanwhile, making use of each kind of risk indicators of ice-plug forming process, countermeasures and the method to control ice-plug risk are proposed. Finally, the article introduced some concrete procedures how to control ice-plug application risk in Qinshan nuclear power plant. (author)

  4. Risk and countermeasure of ice-plug technology application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of the ice-plug technology can realize the system isolation online. In order to know the inherent laws which the Ice-plug forms, reduces the application risk of ice-plug technology, we have done many simulation operating experiments according to some turbine island system operating characteristic of Qinshan nuclear power plant, obtained many different parameters of the ice-plug forming. And do the stress test, the crack detection and the metal microstructure analysis to the metal pipeline which has been frozen. According to analysis of the ice-plug principle and the simulation test result, we found that we can improve the ice-plug technology application risk, and enhance the ice-plug application more scientific and reliable by adjusting freezing speed, reducing the chilling temperature according to the rules of the pipeline material in different stages during ice-plug forming. Meanwhile use the each kind of risk indicator of ice-plug forming process, proposed countermeasure,the method of the control ice-plug risk. Finally, the article introduced some concrete procedures how to control ice-plug application risk in Qinshan nuclear power plant. (authors)

  5. Non-rotating cementing plug with molded inserts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes an anti-rotation plug set for use with cementing equipment having an insert seat therein, the anti-rotation plug set and the cementing equipment for use in cementing a string of casing into a well bore. It comprises an upper plug including: a non-metallic body member having a plurality of teeth integrally formed on the lower end thereof and an elastomeric covering thereon having, in turn, wipers which engage the interior of the string of casing; and a lower plug including: a non-metallic body member having a bore therethrough, having teeth integrally formed on the upper end thereof which mate with the teeth integrally formed on the lower end of the nonmetallic body member of the upper plug when the upper plug engages the lower plugs, having teeth integrally formed on the lower end thereof, having an insert member in a portion of the bore through the non-metallic body member, and the cementing equipment comprising: an insert seat having teeth thereon which mate with the integrally formed teeth on the lower end of the non-metallic body member of the lower plug of the anti-rotation plug set when the lower plug of the anti-rotation plug set engages the cementing equipment during the cementing of the string of casing into a well bore

  6. Steam tests of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 mechanical plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1988-89, randomly selected heats of Inconel 600 TT plugs were laboratory tested to determine the extent and distribution of carbide precipitation in the microstructure and their resistance to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in a 400 C doped steam autoclave. Early results indicated a ranking could be established between microstructure and PWSCC potential. Corrosion tests were extended to include Alloy 690 plugs after a top plug release occurred due to circumferential cracking above the expander. Destructive examination of pulled plugs confirmed the accuracy of the laboratory results which showed corrosion resistance can be correlated with the density of intergranular carbides and the doped steam test method did provide an accelerated method for assessing the relative PWSCC of mechanical plugs. To date, 70 Inconel 690 plugs, representing 17 heat treatment lots, have been tested and all plugs remain crack-free after 1000 hour exposure in doped steam. 4 figs

  7. CDF End Plug calorimeter Upgrade Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the status of the CDF End Plug Upgrade Project. In this project, the CDF calorimeters in the end plug and the forward regions will be replaced by a single scintillator based calorimeter. After an extensive R ampersand D effort on the tile/fiber calorimetry, we have now advanced to a construction phase. We review the results of the R ampersand D leading to the final design of the calorimeters and the development of tooling devised for this project. The quality control program of the production of the electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters is described. A shower maximum detector for the measurement of the shower centroid and the shower profile of electrons, γ and π0 has been designed. Its performance requirements, R ampersand D results and mechanical design are discussed

  8. Plugging pig reduces line maintenance, repair costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-05-01

    A relatively new technique involving the use of plugging pigs to seal-off thruput on liquids lines was used by Ashland Pipe Line Co. during consecutive maintenance and repair projects on a crude trunkline in Illinois. Following completion, cost of the two operations was estimated at about two-thirds of that for similar projects using conventional line-plugging equipment. The pigs are produced by International Pipeline Equipment Co. (IPE) and are inserted into the line from the standard cleaning and batching, pig-launching equipment installed on the system. Ashland used one of the special pigs during reconditioning of a gate valve at its Patoka terminal and then pumped it downstream to seal the line at the site of a damage repair project. The service is provided by Advance Valve Installations, Inc.

  9. Borehole plugging by hydrothermal transport. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium silicate--and aluminosilicate--compositions based on mixtures of fine grained quartz with various cements or calcium silicate compounds have been investigated under hydrothermal conditions in the temperature range 110-2500C and pressure range 1,000-10,000 psi, pressures which are always in excess of that required to maintain liquid H2O, and approximate the confining pressures which might be anticipated in deep boreholes. All silicate cement combinations investigated produce materials having adequate strength after reaction times of 1 day or longer. The calcium aluminate cement was also adequate with respect to strength but would need to be investigated more extensively for overall properties because of its highly reactive chemistry. The mini-rock cylinder-cement plug hydrothermal experiments in both limestone and sandstone resulted in reasonable magnitudes of bonding strength. The typical shear strength of a hydrothermally treated cement-sandstone plug is 1030 psi, and the compressive strength of the extruded cement plug is 9550 psi. Reactions having a potential for producing calcium carbonate plugs in holes drilled in carbonate rocks were studied. It should be noted that most cements are calcium silicate systems and are chemically compatible with the CaCO3 and CaMg(CO3)2 in the rock walls of the hole. A side benefit from this research is some insight into the suitability of massive carbonate rocks as disposal sites. Carbonate rocks by themselves are highly impermeable, have low exchange capacity, and a low water content--all properties that are desirable in the storage medium. A major drawback is the presence of secondary permeability in the form of solutionally modified joints, fractures, and bedding planes

  10. Ice plugging of pipes using liquid nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a study on the ice plugging of pipe using liquid nitrogen, and is based on a literature review and on discussions with individuals who use the technique. Emphasis is placed on ferritic alloys, primarily carbon steels, in pipe sized up to 60 cm in diameter and on austenitic stainless steels in pipe sizes up to 30 cm in diameter. This technique is frequently used for leak testing in nuclear facilities

  11. Remote Handling behind port plug in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different Test Blanket Modules (TBM) will be used in succession in the same equatorial ports of ITER. The remote handling operations for connection/disconnection of an interface between the port plug of the EU-HCPB-TBM and the port cell equipment are investigated with the goal to reach a quick and simple TBM exchange procedure. This paper describes the operations and systems which are required for connection of the TBM to its supply lines at this interface. The interface is located inside the free space of the port plug flange between the port plug shield and the bioshield of the port cell behind. The approach of the operation place is only available through a narrow gate in the bioshield opened temporarily during maintenance periods. This gate limits the dimensions of the whole system and its tools. The current design of the EU-HCPB-TBM foresees up to 9 supply lines which have to be connected inside the free space of one half of the port plug flange. The connection operations require positioning and adjustment of the tools for each pipe separately. Despite the strict circumstances it is still possible to find such an industrial jointed-arm robot with sufficient payload, which can penetrate into the working area. A mechanical system is necessary to move the robot from its storing place in the hot cell to the port plug on 6 m distance. Each operation requires different end-of-arm tools. The most special one is a pipe positioner tool, which can position and pull the pipe ends to each other and align the tool before welding and hold them in proper position during the welding process. Weld seams can be made by orbital welding tool. The pipe positioner tool has to provide place for welding tool. Using of inbore tool is impossible because pipes have no open ends where the tool could leave it. Orbital tool must be modified to meet requirements of remote handling because it is designed for human handling. The coolant is helium, so for eliminating the leak of helium it is

  12. Design progress on ITER port plug test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To achieve the overall ITER machine availability target, the availability of diagnostics and heating port plugs shall be as high as 99.5%. To fulfill these requirements, it is mandatory to test the port plugs at operating temperature before installation on the machine and after refurbishment. The ITER port plug test facility (PPTF) provides the possibility to test upper and equatorial port plugs before installation on the machine. The port plug test facility is composed of several test stands. These test stands are first used in the domestic agencies and on the ITER Organization site to test the port plugs at the end of manufacturing. Two of these stands are installed later in the ITER hot cell facility to test the port plugs after refurbishment. The port plugs to be tested are the Ion Cyclotron (IC) heating and current drive antennas, Electron Cyclotron (EC) heating and current drive launchers, diagnostics and test blanket modules port plugs. Test stands shall be capable to perform environmental and functional tests. The test stands are composed of one vacuum tank (3.3 m in diameter, 5.6 m long) and the associated heating, vacuum and control systems. The vacuum tank shall achieve an ultimate pressure of 1 × 10−5 Pa at 100 °C containing a port plug. The heating system shall provide water at 240 °C and 4.4 MPa to heat up the port plugs. Openings are provided on the back of the vacuum tank to insert probes for the functional tests. This paper describes the tests to be performed on the port plugs and the conceptual design of the port plug test facility. The configuration of the standalone test stands and the integration in the hot cell facility are presented.

  13. The effect of divalent ions on the elasticity and pore collapse of chalk evaluated from compressional wave velocity and low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Addassi, Mouadh; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul;

    2015-01-01

    The effects of divalent ions on the elasticity and the pore collapse of chalk were studied through rock-mechanical testing and low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements. Chalk samples saturated with deionized water and brines containing sodium, magnesium, calcium and sulfate ions were...

  14. Assessing the Nuclear Environment for ITER Port Plugs and Port-based Diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: ITER diagnostic systems will operate in a harsh nuclear environment. Component protection and nuclear shielding is realized by housing diagnostics inside massive steel port plug structures. The diagnostic port plugs must be optimized to provide adequate diagnostic throughput while minimizing the flux of escaping nuclear radiation and staying under a total dry weight of 45 metric tons. Most diagnostic systems are in the conceptual design phase and the optimization of this balance between performance, weight and shielding has not yet been realized. Sophisticated analysis tools are needed to predict the performance of components in ITER since actual measurements of the environment may not be realized for some time. The commercially available discrete-ordinates code Attila has been used for the conceptual phase analysis of several ITER diagnostics and diagnostic port plugs. Assessment of the diagnostic port plug nuclear environment with Attila is essentially a 3-step process involving a neutron transport run, a calculation of the activation and depletion in steel structures and finally the transport of the activated steel gamma rays. This paper will survey current neutronics results for a selection of Upper and Equatorial port plugs and the diagnostic systems in these ports. General port plug neutronics results like total nuclear heating and general shielding issues will be described. Specific diagnostic design studies will also be presented with a focus on meeting diagnostic measurement requirements while achieving adequate shielding. For example, the Core Imaging X-Ray Spectrometer diagnostic cannot use labyrinths to mitigate neutron and gamma flux. A multi-faceted solution approach was needed. This includes the use of radial baffles to limit streaming to only collimated neutrons and the narrowing of apertures that limits streaming while still allowing for minimum system performance. Many diagnostics have mirrors and shutters in the very front of the port

  15. High resolution microgravity investigations for the detection and characterisation of subsidence associated with abandoned, coal, chalk and salt mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Styles, P.; Toon, S.; Branston, M.; England, R. [Keele Univ., Applied And Environmental Geophysics Group, School of Physical and Geographical Sciences (United Kingdom); Thomas, E.; Mcgrath, R. [Geotechnology, Neath (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    The closure and decay of industrial activity involving mining has scarred the landscape of urban areas and geo-hazards posed by subsurface cavities are ubiquitous throughout Europe. Features of concern consist of natural solution cavities (e.g. swallow holes and sinkholes in limestone gypsum and chalk) and man-made cavities (mine workings, shafts) in a great variety of post mining environments, including coal, salt, gypsum, anhydrite, tin and chalk. These problems restrict land utilisation, hinder regeneration, pose a threat to life, seriously damage property and services and blight property values. This paper outlines the application of microgravity techniques to characterise abandoned mining hazard in case studies from Coal, Chalk and Salt Mining environments in the UK. (authors)

  16. High resolution microgravity investigations for the detection and characterisation of subsidence associated with abandoned, coal, chalk and salt mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The closure and decay of industrial activity involving mining has scarred the landscape of urban areas and geo-hazards posed by subsurface cavities are ubiquitous throughout Europe. Features of concern consist of natural solution cavities (e.g. swallow holes and sinkholes in limestone gypsum and chalk) and man-made cavities (mine workings, shafts) in a great variety of post mining environments, including coal, salt, gypsum, anhydrite, tin and chalk. These problems restrict land utilisation, hinder regeneration, pose a threat to life, seriously damage property and services and blight property values. This paper outlines the application of microgravity techniques to characterise abandoned mining hazard in case studies from Coal, Chalk and Salt Mining environments in the UK. (authors)

  17. Response of invertebrates from the hyporheic zone of chalk rivers to eutrophication and land use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacioglu, Octavian; Moldovan, Oana Teodora

    2016-03-01

    Whereas the response of lotic benthic macroinvertebrates to different environmental stressors is a widespread practice nowadays in assessing the water and habitat quality, the use of hyporheic zone invertebrates is still in its infancy. In this study, classification and regression trees analysis were employed in order to assess the ecological requirements and the potential as bioindicators for the hyporheic zone invertebrates inhabiting four lowland chalk rivers (south England) with contrasting eutrophication levels (based on surface nitrate concentrations) and magnitude of land use (based on percentage of fine sediments load and median interstitial space). Samples of fauna, water and sediment were sampled twice, during low (summer) and high (winter) groundwater level, at depths of 20 and 35 cm. Certain groups of invertebrates (Glossosomatidae and Psychomyiidae caddisflies, and riffle beetles) proved to be good indicators of rural catchments, moderately eutrophic and with high fine sediment load. A diverse community dominated by microcrustaceans (copepods and ostracods) were found as good indicators of highly eutrophic urban streams, with moderate-high fine sediment load. However, the use of other taxonomic groups (e.g. chironomids, oligochaetes, nematodes, water mites and the amphipod Gammarus pulex), very widespread in the hyporheic zone of all sampled rivers, is of limited use because of their high tolerance to the analysed stressors. We recommend the use of certain taxonomic groups (comprising both meiofauna and macroinvertebrates) dwelling in the chalk hyporheic zone as indicators of eutrophication and colmation and, along with routine benthic sampling protocols, for a more comprehensive water and habitat quality assessment of chalk rivers. PMID:26531711

  18. Understanding heterogeneity in UK Chalk catchments and its influence on groundwater flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, D. W.; Vounaki, T.; Jackson, C. R.; Hughes, A. G.; Wheater, H. S.

    2008-12-01

    The numerical simulation of groundwater flooding is increasingly necessary as this problem is gaining recognition from government and regulators and climate change may bring more extreme events. The Natural Environment Research Council of the UK is funding the British Geological Survey, Imperial College, and the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology to examine the problem of groundwater flooding in the Cretaceous Chalk of Berkshire, 50 kilometres west of London. Typically regional resource issues can be examined using traditional groundwater models that do not consider in detail the influence of flow in the unsaturated zone, but the delays in recharge transmission through this zone to the water table may be very significant in terms of flood timing and prediction. The position of ground elevation relative to water table is clearly important but not often considered in groundwater resource modelling. Groundwater level and stream (and flood) flow responses are important data that may be hard to gather from typical groundwater monitoring systems. These problems have been examined in a Chalk catchment in Berkshire where good records of the 2000-1 and 2003 flooding events have been collected, including flooded extent, rainfall, groundwater levels, river and spring flows. From this analysis, it appears that two groundwater mounds develop in the upper part of the Pang and Lambourn catchments. These mounds intersect dry valleys, which flowed for several months, the consequent flooding causing considerably disruption. Modelling of these events is providing new insight into the heterogeneity of Chalk transmissivity and storage parameters, enhanced knowledge of its dual permeability and porosity and demonstrating the importance of understanding the post-depositional hydrogeological history of the aquifer.

  19. Marine macrofossil communities in the uppermost Maastrichtian chalk of Stevns Klint, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas; Surlyk, Finn

    2014-01-01

    -erosive bottom currents. It is draped by the upper Sigerslev Member, which was laid down in deeper water than any other chalk known from onshore Denmark. Deposition took place under quiet conditions, apparently not influenced by bottom currents. The sparse level-bottom community lived on a seafloor with low...... similarly mound-bedded lower Sigerslev Member. The number of polychaete species is also greater in the Højerup Member. The faunal differences reflect the shallower-water setting and a higher influx of food during deposition of the latter unit. The final Maastrichtian benthic macrofossil community at Stevns...

  20. Prospects of Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery  in Danish chalk rocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudyk, Svetlana Nikolayevna; Jørgensen, Leif Wagner; Bah Awasi, Ismail

      Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) uses bacteria, producing gas (CO2), polymers or surfactants to help recover residual oil after the water injection depletes its possibilities. Two strains of Clostridia tyrobutiricum were investigated as possible candidates for MEOR  implementation in Danish...... chalk reservoir rocks. Parameters such as high salinity, low permeability, high temperature and toxic elements, being typical characteristics of Danish fields can cause limiting effects on MEOR applications. The work fulfilled showed that microbes can be adapted to higher salinities through a serial...

  1. Field burial results and SIMS analysis of the Chalk River glass blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1959, 25 2-kg hemispherical blocks of aluminosilicate glass, each containing ∼90 MBq/g of mixed fission products, were buried in a sandy soil aquifer in the waste management area at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories. A second set of blocks, containing ∼260 MBq/g mixed fission products, was buried in 1960. One block from each test was retrieved in 1978 to undergo chemical and surface analysis. This report reviews the migration of the 90Sr and 137Cs plume in the soil and presents the results of SIMS depth profiling of the surface of a glass block. (author)

  2. CO2-foaming agent retention in fractured chalk models: Experiments and simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Kvæstad, Ann Helen

    2011-01-01

    Injection of CO2-gas can improve the oil recovery. In naturally fractured reservoirs such as chalk, injection of CO2-gas can result in early gas breakthrough because the gas can use the fractures as pathways from the injector to the producer. The pressure, temperature and oil properties in the reservoir can also lead to an unfavorable mobility for the gas. This can lead to low total sweep efficiency for the process. One method to increase the total sweep efficiency in the fractured reservoir ...

  3. Tracking selenium in the Chalk aquifer of northern France: Sr isotope constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We report the chemistry of the Chalk groundwater affected by Se contamination. • Strontium isotopes were used to identify the groundwater bodies and their mixings. • The spatial and temporal Se variability is mainly linked to the presence of Se-rich clays. • Saturation or desaturation of Se-rich clays control Se mobility. - Abstract: Groundwater at the southern and eastern edges of France’s Paris Basin has a selenium content that at times exceeds the European Framework Directive’s drinking-water limit value of 10 μg/L. To better understand the dynamics of the Chalk groundwater being tapped to supply the city of Lille and the Se origins, we used a combination of geochemical and isotopic tools. Strontium isotopes, coupled with Ca/Sr, Mg/Sr and Se/Sr ratios, were used to identify the main groundwater bodies and their mixings, with the Mg/Sr and Se/Sr ratios constraining a ternary system. Groundwater in the agricultural aquifer-recharge zone represents a first end-member and displays the youngest water ages of the catchment along with the highest Sr isotopic signature (0.70842) and low Se contents. Anaerobic groundwater constitutes a second major end-member affected by water-rock interactions over a long residence time, with the lowest Sr isotopic signature (0.70789) and the lowest Se content, its low SF6 content confirming the contribution of old water. Se-rich groundwater containing up to 30 μg/L of Se represents a third major end-member, with an intermediate Sr isotopic ratio (0.70826), and is mainly constrained by the clayey Se-rich formation overlying the Chalk aquifer. The spatial and temporal Se variability in the groundwater is clearly linked to the presence of this formation identified as Tertiary and also to the hydrological conditions; saturation of the Se-rich clays by oxygenated groundwater enhances Se mobility and also Sr adsorption onto the clays. This multi-tool study including Sr isotopes successfully identified the Se

  4. Full-waveform Inversion of Crosshole GPR Data Collected in Strongly Heterogeneous Chalk: Challenges and Pitfalls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keskinen, Johanna; Zibar, Majken Caroline Looms; Nielsen, Lars; Klotzsche, Anja; van der Kruk, Jan; Moreau, Julien; Stemmerik, Lars; Holliger, Klaus

    Chalk is an important reservoir rock for hydrocarbons and for groundwater resources for many major cities. Therefore, this rock type has been extensively investigated using both geological and geophysical methods. Many applications of crosshole GPR tomography rely on the ray approximation and...... address the importance of (i) adequate starting models, both in terms of the dielectric permittivity and the electrical conductivity, (ii) the estimation of the source wavelet, (iii) and the effects of data sampling density when imaging this rock type. Moreover, we discuss the resolution of the bedding...

  5. Field burial results and SIMS analysis of the Chalk River glass blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1959, 25 2-kg hemispherical blocks of aluminosilicate glass, each containing ∼90 MBq/g of mixed fission products, were buried in a sandy soil aquifer in the waste management area at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories. A second set of blocks, containing ∼260 MBq/g mixed fission products, was buried in 1960. One block from each test was retrieved in 1978 to undergo chemical and surface analysis. This report reviews the migration of the /sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs plume in the soil and presents the results of SIMS depth profiling of the surface of a glass block

  6. Results from the Bell Canyon borehole plugging test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, C. L.

    1980-01-01

    The BHP is an integrated program involving consequence assessment and plug performance calculations, materials evaluation, instrumentation development and field testing, and interfaces directly with other WIPP-related activities. This paper describes an in situ test conducted under the BHP Field Test Task. The Bell Canyon Test was conducted to evaluate candidate grout plugging mixes and plug emplacement techniques, and to assess plug performance under in-situ cure conditions. Laboratory testing of the brine-grout/rock combination revealed an adverse reaction between the brine-grout and the anhydrite. This discovery permitted a timely change to an additional laboratory compatibility testing program with an alternate fresh-water mix to permit maintenance of the test schedule with little delay. While cement emplacement technology is generally adequate to satisfy repository plugging requirements, plug compatibility with the host rock must be carefully assessed for each repository site. Generally accepted laboratory cement-testing techniques need to include flow characteristics and geochemical stability.

  7. SBIR Final Report. Liquid Core Optical Scintillating Fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beetz, C.P.; Steinbeck, J.; Buerstler, R.

    2000-05-16

    This Phase I SBIR project focused on developing flexible scintillating liquid core optical fibers, with potential uses in high-energy calorimetry, tracking, preradiators, active targets or other fast detectors. Progress on the six tasks of the project is summarized. The technical developments involve three technology components: (1) highly flexible capillaries or tubes of relatively low n (index of refraction) to serve as cladding and liquid core containment; (2) scintillator (and clear) fluids of relatively high n to serve as a core-- these fluids must have a high light transmission and, for some applications, radiation hardness; (3) optical end plugs, plug insertion, and plug-cladding tube sealing technology to contain the core fluids in the tubes, and to transmit the light.

  8. Smart grid agent: Plug-in electric vehicle

    OpenAIRE

    Dallinger, David; Link, Jochen; Büttner, Markus

    2013-01-01

    This study describes a method for programming a plug-in electric vehicle agent that can be used in power system models and in embedded systems implemented in real plug-in electric vehicles. Implementing the software in real-life applications and in simulation tools enables research with a high degree of detail and practical relevance. Agent-based programming, therefore, is an important tool for investigating the future power system. To demonstrate the plug-in electric vehicle agent behavior, ...

  9. Environmental isotope studies related to groundwater flow and saline encroachment in the chalk aquifer of Lincolnshire, England

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isotopes of tritium and carbon are used to study part of the North Lincolnshire Chalk aquifer in England. The tritium data support the view that the aquifer is a thin fissure system and indicate that some changes in flow direction have occurred owing to recent abstraction. The data are also consistent with other chemical data in elucidating groundwater entering the Chalk from deeper aquifers. Carbon isotopes are used to distinguish between saline water bodies and suggest that saline water was entrapped within the aquifer in the Eemian and Flandrian stages of the Pleistocene. (author)

  10. Deep saltwater in Chalk of North-West Europe: origin, interface characteristics and development over geological time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnesen, Ellen Prip; Larsen, F.; Sonnenborg, T.O.;

    2009-01-01

    location, saline water in the Chalk resides at depths from 40 to 80m and salinity increases with depth. Concentrations of chloride up to ca. 30,000ppm have been observed at depths of 400m. Measured vertical hydraulic heads in open boreholes suggest that advective groundwater flow is now restricted in...... deeper parts of the Chalk formation and diffusive transport is thus the predominant transport mechanism. Laboratory-measured porosity and effective diffusion coefficients were used as input to a numerical 1D diffusion model of the interface between freshwater in an upper, fractured aquifer and modified...

  11. Residual solidification stress in plug welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Installation of the plugs in Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers is performed using GTAW process with filler metal. During the cooling phase of the weld puddle residual stresses will be generated in the weld. The residual stresses together with the stresses from the primary and secondary loads will define the total stress in the weld. The level of total stress is important for the reliability of the plug joints. Typically, the welding procedures prescribe a range of values for each welding parameters, therefore the welder has the option to select a relative wide range of combinations of parameters based on test results, welding position, experience, etc. Manual welding processes are more susceptible to larger variation of the heat input than the automatic welding processes. The combination of the welding parameters may be controlled by a generic parameter called welding heat input. The net effect of the heat input is to control the energy introduced by an arc at weld joint such that adequate weld puddle is produced. The heat input along with the thermal properties of the materials control the temperature distribution in the welded joint. Ultimately, the response of the structure to the thermal loads resulted from the non-uniform distribution of temperature is a non-uniform distribution of the plastic strains that results in residual stresses. This paper presents the effect of variation of welding heat input on distribution of residual stresses. Finite element method is used to simulate the welding process for various heat inputs that may be encountered during plug welding. The analysis is performed in two steps. In the first step a thermal transient analysis is performed in which the temperature distribution due to a moving heat source is obtained. The resulting thermal field is used as input data for structural analysis. It is shown that the extent of residual stresses in the weld joint is affected by the energy used to produce the weld and can be related to the

  12. COMP: Comparing Ontology Matching Plug-in

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tyl, Pavel; Loufek, J.

    Los Alamitos : IEEE Computer Society, 2009 - (Abraham, A.; Húsek, D.; Snášel, V.), s. 44-49 ISBN 978-0-7695-3821-1. [NWeSP 2009. International Conference on Next Generation Web Services Practices /5./. Prague (CZ), 09.11.2009-11.09.2009] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : matching * ontologie * plug-in * Protégé Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  13. Testing and plugging power plant heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutor, F. [Expando Seal Tools, Inc., Montgomeryville, PA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Heat Exchanger tubes fail for any number of reasons including but certainly not limited to the cumulative effects of corrosion, erosion, thermal stress and fatigue. This presentation will attempt to identify the most common techniques for determining which tubes are leaking and then introduce the products in use to plug the leaking tubes. For the sake of time I will limit the scope of this presentation to include feedwater heaters and secondary system heat exchangers such as Hydrogen Coolers, Lube Oil Coolers, and nuclear Component Cooling Water, Emergency Cooling Water, Regenerative Heat Recovery heat exchangers.

  14. Knowledge-Based System to Support Plug Load Management

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Electrical plug loads comprise an increasingly larger share of building energy consumption as improvements have been made to Heating, Ventilation, and Air...

  15. Effects of Different Progesterone Plugs on Estrous Control in Ewe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Hongda

    2009-01-01

    In breeding season and non-breeding season, the effects of three kinds of progesterone plugs on estrous control in ewes were studied. Meanwhile, the advantages and the disadvantages of the progesterone plugs were analyzed. The results showed that there were no significant difference among three progesterone plugs on modulating the ewes' estrus and pregnancy, and affecting estrous rate and fecundation rate (P>0.05). It was observed that the progesterone plug produced by Animal Husbandry Research Center of Heilongjiang Academy of Agricultural Sciences could modulate the ewes' estrus and pregnancy effectively, and the low cost and convenience in operation made it popularize in the reproducation of sheep widely.

  16. Proceedings of a workshop on geophysical and related geoscientific research at Chalk River, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large part of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is geoscience research and development aimed at obtaining information to quantify the transport of radionuclides through the geosphere and at determining the geotechnical properties required for disposal vault design. The geosphere at potential disposal sites is characterized in part by the use of remote sensing (geophysical) methods. In 1977 public concern about the disposal of radioactive waste resulted in field work being restricted to the site of Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories, which was used to develop, evaluate and compare various techniques in order to optimize the methods for obtaining geoscience information. Methods tested at Chalk River are to be applied at other research sites. Most investigations have been carried out around Maskinonge Lake, using about thirty boreholes sink into bedrock. The boreholes provide subsurface geological information that can be used as a reference to compare the responses of various geophysical methods and equipment. Regional studies, including airborne geophysical surveys, have also been conducted. The 25 papers presented at this workshop provide comprehensive documentation of the most significant results of geophysical studies. The workshop also provided an evaluation of geophysical techniques and their utility to the Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program

  17. What are the governing processes during low-flows in a chalk catchment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubega Musuuza, Jude; Coxon, Gemma; Hutton, Chris; Howden, Nicholas; Woods, Ross; Freer, Jim; Wagener, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Low flows are important because they lead to the prioritisation of different consumptive water usages, imposition of restrictions and bans, raising of water tariffs and higher production costs to industry. The partitioning of precipitation into evaporation, storage and runoff depends on the local variability in meteorological variables and site-specific characteristics e.g., topography, soils and vegetation. The response of chalk catchments to meteorological forcing especially precipitation is of particular interest because of the preferential flow through the weathered formation. This makes the observed stream discharge groundwater-dominated and hence, out of phase with precipitation. One relevant question is how sensitive the low flow characteristics of such a chalk catchment is to changes in climate and land use. It is thus important to understand all the factors that control low stream discharge periods. In this study we present the results from numerical sensitivity analysis experiments performed with a detailed physically-based model on the Kennet, a sub-catchment of the River Thames, in the UK during the historical drought years of the 1970's.

  18. Deep Space Habitat Wireless Smart Plug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Joseph A.; Porter, Jay; Rojdev, Kristina; Carrejo, Daniel B.; Colozza, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    NASA has been interested in technology development for deep space exploration, and one avenue of developing these technologies is via the eXploration Habitat (X-Hab) Academic Innovation Challenge. In 2013, NASA's Deep Space Habitat (DSH) project was in need of sensors that could monitor the power consumption of various devices in the habitat with added capability to control the power to these devices for load shedding in emergency situations. Texas A&M University's Electronic Systems Engineering Technology Program (ESET) in conjunction with their Mobile Integrated Solutions Laboratory (MISL) accepted this challenge, and over the course of 2013, several undergraduate students in a Capstone design course developed five wireless DC Smart Plugs for NASA. The wireless DC Smart Plugs developed by Texas A&M in conjunction with NASA's Deep Space Habitat team is a first step in developing wireless instrumentation for future flight hardware. This paper will further discuss the X-Hab challenge and requirements set out by NASA, the detailed design and testing performed by Texas A&M, challenges faced by the team and lessons learned, and potential future work on this design.

  19. Influence of clay and silica on permeability and capillary entry pressure of chalk reservoirs in the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Birte; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2002-01-01

    The permeability and capillary entry pressure of chalk reservoirs are controlled by their porosity and specific surface area. Measured permeabilities are in the range 0.025-5.3 mD and are successfully predicted by use of the Kozeny equation. In this paper we focus on the factors that control spec...

  20. Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-05-01

    Hybrid and plug-in electric vehicles use electricity as their primary fuel or to improve the efficiency of conventional vehicle designs. These vehicles can be divided into three categories: hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), all-electric vehicles (EVs). Together, they have great potential to cut U.S. petroleum use and vehicle emissions.

  1. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles in dynamical energy markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, J.T.B.A.; Bosch, P.P.J. van den

    2008-01-01

    The plug-in hybrid electric vehicle allows vehicle propulsion from multiple internal power sources. Electric energy from the grid can be utilized by means of the plug-in connection. An on-line energy management (EM) strategy is proposed to minimize the costs for taking energy from each power source.

  2. The Losing Battle against Plug-and-Chug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortemeyer, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    I think most physics teachers would agree that two important components of a proper solution to a numerical physics problem are to first figure out a final symbolic solution and to only plug in numbers in the end. However, in spite of our best efforts, this is not what the majority of students is actually doing. Instead, they tend to plug numbers…

  3. "Plug-In" for More Active Online Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Harry G.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses plug-ins, software programs that connect to an World Wide Web browser and enhance its functionality. Highlights finding the software; downloading and using plug-ins; and educational applications, including the document viewer, real-time chat, multimedia, map viewer, spelling checker, news network, sound and video, and real-time…

  4. Eddy current inspection of steam generator tubing plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In response to the issues raised regarding the integrity of nuclear steam generator tubing plugs manufactured from certain heats of Inconel 600, Westinghouse engineers have developed, qualified and implemented an eddy current inspection system for the in-place assessment of these plugs. The heart of the system is a robotic and effector which delivers an eddy current sensor through the reduced diameter of the plug expander and actuates the coil to physical contact with the expanded inside bore of the plug. Once deployed, the eddy current sensor is rotated along a helical path to produce a detailed scan of the plug surface above the final position of the expander. This testing produces an isometric display of degradation due to primary water stress corrosion cracking, on the inside surface of the plug. To date, successful inspections have been conducted at two nuclear units with two different robotic delivery systems. While designed specifically for mechanical plugs with a bottle bore cavity, the inspection system can also be used for expanded straight bore plugs. Details of the inspection system along with a discussion of qualification activities and actual field results are presented in this paper

  5. 662-E solid waste silo-plug lifting analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertz, G.E.

    1993-03-01

    The Intermediate Level Tritium Vault No. 1, 662-E, Cell No. 1 contains 140 waste silos. Each silo is approximately 25 feet deep, 30 inches in diameter at the top and covered by a reinforced concrete plug. Two No. 4 reinforcing bars project from the top of each plug for lifting. During lifting operations, the 1.5 inch concrete cover over the lifting bars spelled off 16% of the silo plugs. The No. 4 reinforcing bars were also distorted on many of the silo plugs. Thirteen of the plugs have been repaired to date. The existing silo plug lifting bars have a safe working load of 480 pounds per plug, which is less than 1/3 of the dead weight of the silo plug. The safe working load was calculated using the minimum design factor of 3 based on the yield strength or 5 based on the ultimate strength of the material, as per the Savannah River Site Hoisting and Rigging Manual. The existing design calculations were reviewed, and the following items are noted: (1) Adequate concrete cover was not provided over the horizontal portion of the lifting bars. (2) The lifting bars were allowed to yield in bending, which violates the requirements of the Savannah River Site Hoisting and Rigging Manual. (3) The ultimate strain of the lifting bars would be exceeded before the calculated ultimate strength was achieved. Alternative lifting devices are also identified.

  6. End plugging of a linear theta pinch by pulsed mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that by suitably pulsing a magnetic mirror end plug of a linear theta pinch, one can substantially reduce the end loss. A system consisting of a linear pinch with sequentially pulsed multimirror end plugs is proposed which shows promise of fusion feasibility. (author)

  7. Numerical modeling of an end-plugged theta pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical and numerical studies of an end-plugged theta pinch are described. The analytical model treats the ablated plug plasma in the quasi-static limit where radiation losses balance energy flowing from the main plasma. This model is used to calculate the enhancement in energy confinement due to an ablating end plug for various plug species. The numerical model employs a one-dimensional, time-dependent magnetohydro-dynamic code. Results of calculations simulating the Scylla IV-P end-plugged theta pinch experiment are presented. The calculations achieve good agreement with the observed decay time of the energy line density. Moreover, the observed tendency toward longer decay times at lower atomic number is also predicted. However, certain notable discrepancies are found. For Si plugs, the calculations indicate a somewhat longer decay time than observed with SiO2 plugs. In addition, an axial compression wave driven by plug ablation causes the calculated energy line density to rise after 15 to 20 μsec which was not observed in the experiments. This is believed to be a feature of the one radial cell model which forbids axial wave dispersion; such dispersion would tend to mute the appearance of such waves. For fusion reactor scale plasma, the calculations predict that higher atomic number leads to negligible enhancements in confinement time

  8. California Statewide Plug-In Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, Marc; Helwig, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The California Statewide Plug-In Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Assessment conveys to interested parties the Energy Commission’s conclusions, recommendations, and intentions with respect to plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) infrastructure development. There are several relatively low-risk and high-priority electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) deployment options that will encourage PEV sales and

  9. Unbalanced-flow, fluid-mixing plug with metering capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, John Dwight (Inventor); Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor); Van Buskirk, Paul D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A fluid mixer plug has holes formed therethrough such that a remaining portion is closed to fluid flow. The plug's inlet face defines a central circuit region and a ring-shaped region with the ring-shaped region including at least some of the plug's remaining portion so-closed to fluid flow. This remaining portion or closed region at each radius R of the ring shaped region satisfies a radius independent, flow-based relationship. Entry openings are defined in the plug's inlet face in correspondence with the holes. The entry openings define an open flow area at each radius of the ring-shaped region. The open flow area at each such radius satisfies the inverse of the flow-based relationship defining the closed regions of the plug.

  10. Development of sealing plug for sweep gas line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the irradiation capsule for neutron irradiation test of the tritium breeder, the sealing plug is necessary to prevent a leak of tritium gas when the tritium breeder is picked up from the irradiation capsule after irradiation test. However, the general valve and plug cannot apply to sealing of the sweep gas line because of the following factors, the neutron irradiation effect, limited space in the irradiation capsule, high sealing efficiency, simple method and operation for control. Therefore, the sealing plug for sweep gas line has to be developed. This paper reports the development of the sealing plug for sweep gas line and the operating procedure of the sealing plug in the irradiation capsule. (author)

  11. Mitigation of Syngas Cooler Plugging and Fouling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bockelie, Michael J. [Reaction Engineering International, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-06-29

    This Final Report summarizes research performed to develop a technology to mitigate the plugging and fouling that occurs in the syngas cooler used in many Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. The syngas cooler is a firetube heat exchanger located downstream of the gasifier. It offers high thermal efficiency, but its’ reliability has generally been lower than other process equipment in the gasification island. The buildup of ash deposits that form on the fireside surfaces in the syngas cooler (i.e., fouling) lead to reduced equipment life and increased maintenance costs. Our approach to address this problem is that fouling of the syngas cooler cannot be eliminated, but it can be better managed. The research program was funded by DOE using two budget periods: Budget Period 1 (BP1) and Budget Period 2 (BP2). The project used a combination of laboratory scale experiments, analysis of syngas cooler deposits, modeling and guidance from industry to develop a better understanding of fouling mechanisms and to develop and evaluate strategies to mitigate syngas cooler fouling and thereby improve syngas cooler performance. The work effort in BP 1 and BP 2 focused on developing a better understanding of the mechanisms that lead to syngas cooler plugging and fouling and investigating promising concepts to mitigate syngas cooler plugging and fouling. The work effort focused on the following: • analysis of syngas cooler deposits and fuels provided by an IGCC plant collaborating with this project; • performing Jet cleaning tests in the University of Utah Laminar Entrained Flow Reactor to determine the bond strength between an ash deposit to a metal plate, as well as implementing planned equipment modifications to the University of Utah Laminar Entrained Flow Reactor and the one ton per day, pressurized Pilot Scale Gasifier; • performing Computational Fluid Dynamic modeling of industrially relevant syngas cooler configurations to develop a better

  12. Plugging criteria for WWER SG tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papp, L.; Wilam, M. [Vitkovice NPP Services (Switzerland); Herman, M. [Vuje, Trnava (Slovakia)

    1997-12-31

    At operated Czech and Slovak nuclear power plants the 80 % criteria for crack or other bulk defect depth is used for steam generator heat exchanging tubes plugging. This criteria was accepted as the recommendation of designer of WWER steam generators. Verification of this criteria was the objective of experimental program performed by Vitkovice, J.S.C., UJV Rez, J.S.C. and Vuje Trnava, J.S.C .. Within this program the following factors were studied: (1) Influence of secondary water chemistry on defects initiation and propagation, (2) Statistical evaluation of corrosion defects progression at operated SG, and (3) Determination of critical pressure for tube rupture as a function of eddy current indications. In this presentation items (2) and (3) are considered.

  13. Welding nuclear reactor fuel rod end plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apparatus for applying a vacuum to a nuclear fuel rod cladding tube's interior through its open end while girth welding an inserted end plug to its other end. An airtight housing has an orifice with a seal which can hermetically engage the tube's open end. A vacuum hose has one end connected to the housing and the other end connected to a vacuum pump. A mechanized device which moves the housing to engage or disengage its seal with the tube's open end includes at least one arm having one end attached to the housing and the other end pivotally attached to a movable table; an arm rotating device to coaxially align the housing's orifice with the welding-positioned tube; and a table moving device to engage the seal of the coaxially aligned orifice with the tube's open end. (author)

  14. Welding nuclear reactor fuel rod end plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apparatus for applying a vacuum to a nuclear fuel rod cladding tube's interior through its open end while girth welding an inserted end plug to its other end. An airtight housing has an orifice with a seal which can hermetically engage the tube's open end. A vacuum hose has one end connected to the housing and the other end connected to a vacuum pump. A mechanized device moves the housing to engage or disengage its seal with the tube's open end. Preferably the mechanized device includes an arm having one end attached to the housing and the other end pivotally attached to a moveable table; an arm rotating device to coaxially align the housing's orifice with the welding-positioned tube; and a table moving device to engage the seal of the coaxially aligned orifice with the tube's open end

  15. Plugging criteria for WWER SG tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At operated Czech and Slovak nuclear power plants the 80 % criteria for crack or other bulk defect depth is used for steam generator heat exchanging tubes plugging. This criteria was accepted as the recommendation of designer of WWER steam generators. Verification of this criteria was the objective of experimental program performed by Vitkovice, J.S.C., UJV Rez, J.S.C. and Vuje Trnava, J.S.C .. Within this program the following factors were studied: (1) Influence of secondary water chemistry on defects initiation and propagation, (2) Statistical evaluation of corrosion defects progression at operated SG, and (3) Determination of critical pressure for tube rupture as a function of eddy current indications. In this presentation items (2) and (3) are considered

  16. Change of MMP dependent on temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudyk, Svetlana Nikolayevna; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen; Akwansa, Eugene

    2008-01-01

       The experiment was conducted with the purpose to investigate how Minimum Miscibility Pressure (MMP) changes at different temperatures. MMP was measured in a high pressure unit. An original oil saturated chalk core plug from the Danish oil field in North Sea was under investigation. The plug...

  17. Estimation of groundwater recharge to chalk and sandstone aquifers using simple soil models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragab, R.; Finch, J.; Harding, R.

    1997-03-01

    On the assumption that the water draining below the root zone is potentially available for groundwater recharge, two current UK methods for estimating annual groundwater recharge have been compared with a new soil model using data from four sites under permanent grass in the UK: two sites representative of the Chalk aquifer at Bridgest Farm (Hampshire) and Fleam Dyke (Cambridgeshire), and two sites on the Triassic sandstone at Bicton College (Devon) and Bacon Hall (Shropshire). A Four Root Layers Model (FRLM), the Penman-Grindley model and the UK Meteorological Office Rainfall and Evaporation Calculation System (MORECS) were used. The new soil model was run with potential evaporation as input both from the MORECS and from the Penman-Monteith equation. The models were run for the Chalk sites both with and without a bypass flow of 15% of rainfall. Bypass was not considered for the sandstone sites. The performance of the models was tested against neutron probes measurements of soil moisture deficits. In addition, the annual groundwater recharge estimated from the models was compared with the published values obtained from the 'zero flux plane' method. Generally, the Penman-Grindley model was more successful in predicting the time for soil to return to its field capacity than in predicting the magnitude of the soil moisture deficit. The annual groundwater recharge was predicted with reasonable accuracy. The MORECS relatively tended to overestimate the soil moisture deficits and to delay the time at which the soil returns to its field capacity. The consequences were underestimates of annual groundwater recharge, owing either to the higher values of potential evaporation calculated from the MORECS or tothe high available water capacity values associated with the soils under consideration. The new soil model (FRLM) predicts the soil moisture deficits successfully and hence is reliable in estimating the annual groundwater recharge. The model is capable of doing this with

  18. Strategies for Controlling Plug Loads. A Tool for Reducing Plug Loads in Commercial Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torcellini, Paul [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bonnema, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sheppy, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pless, Shanti [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Plug loads are often not considered as part of the energy savings measures in Commercial Buildings; however, they can account for up to 50% of the energy used in the building. These loads are numerous and often scattered throughout a building. Some of these loads are purchased by the owner and some designed into the building or the tenant finishes for a space. This document provides a strategy and a tool for minimizing these loads.

  19. Use of CT scanning in the investigation of damage to unconsolidated cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of Computed Tomography (CT) scanners has proven to be a valuable tool in the evaluation of damage to unconsolidated cores. When examining sleeved cores to determine slabbing angle, undamaged sites for future plug and whole core analysis, sample heterogeneity and depositional features, CT scanning proves invaluable by providing nondestructive internal inspection capability

  20. Magnetic field related mechanical tolerances for the proposed Chalk River superconducting heavy-ion cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A four sector azimuthally varying field cyclotron with superconducting main coils has been proposed as a heavy-ion post-accelerator for the Chalk River MP Tandem van de Graaff. The radial profile of the average axial field will be variable using movable steel trim rods. The field errors due to coil, trim rod and flutter pole imperfections are calculated. Those considered are errors in the axial field, first and second azimuthal harmonic axial fields, transverse field and first azimuthal harmonic transverse field. Such fields induce phase slip, axial or radial coherent oscillations and can result in axial or radial beam instability. The allowed imperfections (tolerances) required to retain stability and maintain acceptably small coherent oscillation amplitudes are calculated. (author)

  1. Water temperatures within spawning beds in two chalk streams and implications for salmonid egg development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acornley, R. M.

    1999-02-01

    Water temperatures within brown trout (Salmo trutta L.) spawning gravels were measured in two Hampshire chalk streams from October 1995 to April 1996 inclusive. During the winter, mean intra-gravel water temperatures were higher than those in the stream, and increased with depth in the gravel bed. The amplitude of diel fluctuations in water temperature decreased with depth in the gravel bed, although diel fluctuations were still evident at a depth of 30 cm. Differences in intra-gravel temperature gradients between the two study sites were attributed to differences in the amplitude of stream water temperature fluctuations and there was no evidence that either of the study sites were located in zones of upwelling groundwater. Published equations are used to predict, from temperature, the timing of important stages in the development of brown trout embryos (eyeing, hatching and emergence) for eggs spawned in the autumn and winter and buried at different depths in the gravel bed.

  2. Isotope and dissolved gas evidence for nitrogen attenuation in landfill leachate dispersing into a chalk aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present data for the chemical, stable isotope (13C/12C, 15N/14N and 34S/32S), and dissolved gas (N2, Ar, O2 and CH4) composition of groundwaters sampled in and around a landfill site in Cambridgeshire, England. Decomposition of 3 x 106 m3 of largely domestic waste, placed in unlined quarries, has given rise to the formation of an NH4-rich leachate dispersing as a plume into the surrounding Middle Chalk aquifer. In addition to identifying zones of methanogenesis and SO4 reduction, the data indicate processes of NH4 transformation by either assimilation or oxidation, and losses by formation of N2. Depending on the mixing ratio between leachate and background water, it may be possible to account for all NH4 loss by combined nitrification + denitrification in a system where there are abrupt temporal and spatial changes in redox conditions

  3. Multi isotopic tools to understand selenium origins in groundwaters of the Chalk aquifer in Northern France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Lise; Gourcy, Laurence; Benabderraziq, Hind; Elkhattabi, Jamal; Laurent, Alexandra; Négrel, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    Four field wells exploiting the Chalk aquifer supply Lille city in water. The little catchment area is submitted to quantitative and qualitative pressure from industrial, urban and agriculture origins. Selenium (Se) concentrations are often higher than EU standards (0.12 µmol.L-1) for potable drinking water and can reach 0.4 μmol.L-1 leading to exploitation restrictions. An integrated study was settled to determine the water sources and dynamics of elements, with a focus on Se, with the goal of managing both water quality and quantity. After a large chemical characterisation of the system, a monthly sampling campaign was held in 2012 in four wells and in the close Deûle channel. In situ physical and chemical parameters, chemical analysis of major and trace elements with a special focus on redox-sensitive elements including SeIV, SeVI, FeII, stable water isotopes (δ18O, δ2H) and δ34S and δ18O of sulphates measures were undertaken. The chemical composition of solids sampled at various depths at vicinity of the four wells was analysed. Se concentrations in groundwaters and in the solid phase vary significantly. In the northern part of the Ansereuilles north of the Deûle channel, where the highest Se concentrations in solids was found in a 13 m alluvial clay deposit above the chalk, a first main type of waters can be defined with the variable and locally highest Se concentrations (0.19 to 0.4 µmol.L-1), relatively high and stable sulphate concentrations (2.5 µmol/L), no nitrates, dissolved Fe and Mn, negative δ34S (around -20 ‰) and δ18O typical of evaporated waters. A second main type of waters can be described at Houplin, south of the Deûle channel, where the geological profile show less than 1 mg/kg of Se, with intermediate Se concentrations (0.1 to 0.2 µmol/L), variable nitrate concentrations (0.4 to 1.2 mmol/L), not quantified dissolved Fe and Mn, sulphate concentrations close to 1.5 mmol/L, variable negative δ34S (-8 to -24 ‰) and δ18O in the

  4. Tracking selenium behaviour in chalk aquifer (northern France): Sr and 34S-sulphates isotopes constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Lise; Benabderraziq, Hind; Elkhattabi, Jamal; Parmentier, Marc; Gourcy, Laurence; Négrel, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    Groundwaters in parts of the Paris Basin (France) are facing increasing selenium (Se) contents that can exceed the drinking water limit of 10 μg/L according to the European Framework Directive in the field of water policy (2000/60/EC). To better understand the groundwater origins and the selenium dynamics, the water chemistry of the Chalk aquifer supplying drinkable water to Lille city was studied. This area is submitted to quantitative and qualitative pressure from industrial, urban and agriculture origins. An integrated study was settled to determine the water sources and dynamics of elements, with a focus on Se. After a large chemical characterisation of the groundwater chemistry in the four field wells, a monthly monitoring was held in four wells and in the Deûle channel. Chemical analysis of major and trace elements, stable isotopes (δ18O, δ2H), strontium isotopes, and δ34S and δ18O of sulphates were realised. The chemical composition of solids sampled at various depths at vicinity of the four wells was also analysed. The specific geochemical signature of groundwater as revealed by Sr isotopes, in addition to element concentrations ratios like Mg/Sr and Se/Sr, highlighted mixture of three main groundwaters bodies: (1) the upstream groundwaters in the recharge area with the most radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr isotopic signature; (2) the confined groundwaters with high Sr concentrations due to water-rock interactions and the lowest 87Sr/86Sr isotopic signature close to the one of the chalk in Paris and London basins; (3) the Se-rich formations of Tertiary and Quaternary. The contents of Se, mainly present as SeV I (and locally as SeIV ), displayed spatial and temporal disparities that can be explained by geological and hydrogeological conditions. Se-rich clayed sediments originating from the dismantling of Se-rich tertiary formations (i.e. Ypresian) overlay the chalk formation and can be found in saturated conditions depending of the water table level. Oxidation of

  5. A description of the tritium facility at the Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL's Tritium Facility is located at its Chalk River Laboratories (CRL). The Tritium Facility was originally built to support the tritium technology needs for CANDU reactors and Canadian fusion program. The Tritium Facility commenced its operation in 1979. Since its inception, it has been involved in the development of heavy water detritiation and upgrading processes, development and testing of tritium-breeder materials and design and testing of fusion-fuel cleanup systems for fusion reactor applications, investigation of tritium-materials interactions, tritium storage getters etc. The Tritium Facility also contributed to the design, construction and commissioning activities of the Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange Upgrading and Detritiation (CECE-UD) Facility at CRL and the Wolsong Tritium Removal Facility (WTRF) in Korea. This paper describes the general set-up of the laboratory, its capabilities and the current tritium-related activities. (author)

  6. Sediment transport and siltation of brown trout (Salmo trutta L.) spawning gravels in chalk streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acornley, R. M.; Sear, D. A.

    1999-02-01

    Deposition rates of fine sediment into brown trout spawning gravels were measured at monthly intervals for a period of one year in a small channel of the River Test, Hampshire. Data were also collected on stream discharge, water depth, flow velocity and suspended sediment concentrations. Deposition rates followed a seasonal pattern and were maximal during periods of high discharge in the late winter/early spring when suspended sediment concentrations were high. The material deposited in the spawning gravels included silts and fine sands (<250 m) that were transported in suspension and coarser fragments of low density tufa-like material that were transported as bed load. The ecological implications of fine sediment deposition for salmonid egg survival in chalk streams are considered.

  7. Change in Biot's effective stress coefficient of chalk during pore collapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, M. Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2013-01-01

    grains could also change during elastic deformation of the grains in a rock mechanics test. Diagenetic change in grain contact cement of chalk can be compared with stress-induced change in the laboratory. The change in porosity is studied with reference to the change in effective stress on grain contacts...... porosity reduces at a slower rate. We noticed that presence of non carbonates and hydrocarbon could increase σ'm. During rock mechanics test in the lab, with increased applied stress, σ'm increases, Biot's effective stress coefficient shows a decreasing trend, while a minor porosity reduction was observed......Biot's effective stress coefficient (α) is a measure of how well grains in the rocks are connected with each other. The amount of contact cements between the grains determines the stiffness of rocks. Change in grain contact occurs during natural diagenesis of sedimentary rock. Contact between the...

  8. Water weakening of chalk explaied from a fluid-solid friction factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Katrine Alling; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2010-01-01

    to the macroscale failure and pore collapse properties. The Biot critical frequency incorporates the porosity, permeability, fluid density and fluid viscosity, where the latter is highly temperature dependent – it does not include the applied sound velocity frequency. The listed parameters are usually determined......The hypothesis behind this paper proposal is that the Biot critical frequency can be used to characterize the water weakening phenomenon physically. The Biot critical frequency determines the transition from where an applied sound velocity on a saturated porous chalk is dominated by viscous forces...... were tested at temperatures from 20°C to 130°C with the following pore fluids: fresh water, synthetic seawater of different chemical compositions, methanol, glycol, and oil of varying viscosity. The data was evaluated according to failure lines and yield envelopes for all fluids and temperatures while...

  9. Organically bound tritium (OBT) in soil at different depths around Chalk River Laboratories (CRL), Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) is a large nuclear research and test establishment with nuclear and non-nuclear facilities located in Chalk River, Ontario. The CRL Environmental Monitoring Program is designed to demonstrate that radiological exposure resulting from releases from the CRL site remain below the public dose limit specified in the regulations (1 mSv/year). This study was conducted to consolidate environmental effects following a continuous atmospheric tritium release observed at CRL. Soil samples were collected at depths of up to 20 cm using soil probes at the CRL site and surrounding areas. The samples were sectioned at 5 cm intervals, and HTO and OBT concentrations were measured in the samples. Prevailing winds at CRL are from NW and SE, which was suggested to be in close relationship with tritium distribution in environmental samples such as soils and plant leaves. The HTO concentration was the highest in surface soil water and plant leaves at a given sampling point. This result suggests that the concentration of tritium in surface soil water and in plants tissue free water essentially reflects the surrounding atmospheric tritium concentration. OBT concentrations in soil were measured at the historical HT release site, Plant Road, Mattawa Road and three background sites near CRL. The top layer of soil generally had the highest OBT concentration among collected soil samples. This result suggests that OBT concentrations are different from HTO concentrations at the same site and can be representative of previously released environmental tritium at the sampling point. The relationship between the OBT concentration in soil and the amount of tritium released into the environment will be useful for the evaluation of environmental tritium effects and the fate of tritium in the terrestrial ecosystem. The study points out that HTO shows shorter-term dynamic conditions, whereas OBT shows longer-term steady-state conditions

  10. Managing extremes in groundwater-dominated catchments: the Chalk of SE England (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheater, H. S.

    2009-12-01

    The Chalk aquifers of Southern and Eastern England are a dominant local and regional water resource, and rivers located on the Chalk outcrop have a characteristic behaviour and support valuable and protected aquatic ecosystems. In these catchments, typically less than 2% of rainfall is translated into stormflow response. Infiltration occurs into an unsaturated zone that varies in depth from zero at the stream to 100m at the interfluve. Seasonal groundwater recharge is translated into a seasonal river hydrograph, and the length of flowing river expands and contracts seasonally - so-called ‘bourne’ behaviour. Groundwater catchment areas also vary temporally, and stream-aquifer interactions can be complex. Extensive and long duration flooding in 2000/2001 highlighted the vulnerability of these systems to extremes of long duration rainfall (weeks and months). Source areas for runoff expand into dry valleys, springs break out in ‘new’ locations and given the normally low %runoff, highly non-linear flow response occurs. Conversely, droughts are also of major concern, particularly given scenarios of climate change for SE England. Water quality issues are also important, particularly nutrient pollution. These management concerns have focussed attention on the need for improved understanding, and for appropriate modelling tools for flood risk assessment and drought and water quality management. The paper addresses recent research into the historic behaviour of these systems under extremes, the relative roles of fracture and porous matrix flow in the unsaturated zone under extremes, and the nature of stream-aquifer interactions, including detailed experimental studies. Challenges for modelling are identified; for groundwater flooding conventional flood design approaches are inadequate, but groundwater models lack appropriate topographic constraints and the required spatial and temporal resolution; for drought, recharge estimation and diffuse pollution, better

  11. Environmental assessment of Chalk Point cooling tower drift and vapor emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, E.A.

    1979-03-01

    An assessment is provided of selected environmental effects of operating the cooling towers and stacks of Units No. 3 and No. 4 of the Potomac Electric Power Company's generating station at Chalk Point, Maryland. The emphasis is on the magnitude of salt deposition to the area surrounding the cooling tower due to saline water drift. A secondary but important consideration is the magnitude of salt loading due to saline drift from the stack which uses saline river water in scrubbing flue gases. This salt loading together with that of the ambient salt background is assessed for its effects on soils, crops, native vegetation and man-made structures. Other atmospheric effects examined are: enhancement of ground level fogging and icing, enhancement of precipitation, and the flight hazards to aircraft. A numerical model of drift deposition has been developed and validated against the data collected in the Dyed Drift Experiment at Chalk Point. Use of the available data model predictions indicate that with fulltime, full load operation of both 600 MW(e) units significant levels of salt deposition occur only on the plant site within 0.4 km of the source. The predicted maximum salt deposition rates are given. The effects on soils, crops and native vegetation are predicted to be negligible at off-site locations. Significant effects to foliage of dogwood is predicted to occur at the most impacted on-site locations. Corrosion of structures at these locations could be enhanced under conditions of heavy plant operation. Enhancement of ground-level fogging, icing, and precipitation is expected to be negligible for all conditions of plant use. Hazards to aircraft because of restricted visibility, turbulence, and icing of structures and engines are estimated to be very slight and of no consequence.

  12. Evaluation of preconceptual plug designs using experts' judgement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of preconceptual plug designs for an underground nuclear waste repository were to be evaluated based on the available information on plug materials and placement techniques. Because of complex environment and loading conditions, long time frame under consideration, rigid performance characteristics and considerable uncertainties present in preconceptual design and material properties, a qualitative and judgmental evaluation procedure was needed to supplement technical studies. A structured procedure was developed to qualitatively capture evaluator's views and reservations on the proposed preconceptual schemes. Since a thorough evaluation of each proposed plug scheme required in-depth experience and familiarity with many components of the plug, three knowledgeable experts with specialties in the most relevant aspects of the problem were independently interviewed. Each plug scheme was broken down into three subcomponents and each subcomponent was evaluated separately. The proposed schemes were then rated taking their subcomponents into consideration. Because the experts had different specialties, their subcomponent and overall ratings were not in full agreement. Each plug scheme's lowest overall rating was used as the most significant determinant of the judgmental preference categories reported in this study. The approach used discriminated between the proposed schemes for those with highest probability of being successful. The most preferred schemes were then reviewed with respect to the data produced in the technical analysis performed during the project. The results of the judgmental analysis were then synthesized and modified with results of the technical analysis to produce the preconceptual plug designs

  13. Borehole plugging by hydrothermal transport. A feasibility report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of forming borehole plugs by hydrothermal transport was examined with respect to five systems, utilizing available literature data. In general, it would appear possible to create plugs with hydrothermal cements, with hydrothermally transported quartz, and with carbonates precipitated in-situ using carbon dioxide or carbon dioxide and water as reacting fluids. Hydrothermal cements appear to be most feasible from an engineering and economic point of view using a slurry with a lime-alumina-silica composition carried into the hole in a single pipe at temperatures in the range of 2000C and requiring only enough pressure to drive the mixture into the hole. Quartz or chalcedony plugs would be the most impervious, have the lowest chemical reactivity with groundwater, the lowest thermal expansion, and be most compatible with the wall rock. Deposition is likely to be slow, and there are severe engineering problems associated with a single pipe system carrying silica-rich solutions at temperatures in excess of 5000C at pressure of 2000 bars (30,000 psi). Calcite plugs could be formed as compatible plug materials in contact with a limestone or dolomite wall rock. It is not known whether non-porous plugs can be readily formed and there is also a problem of chemical reaction with percolating groundwater. The clay-water and sulfur-water systems do not appear to be viable plug systems. In-situ reconstitution of the wall rock does not appear to be an economically feasible possibility

  14. Dynamics of Surfactant Liquid Plugs at Bifurcating Lung Airway Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavana, Hossein

    2013-11-01

    A surfactant liquid plug forms in the trachea during surfactant replacement therapy (SRT) of premature babies. Under air pressure, the plug propagates downstream and continuously divides into smaller daughter plugs at continuously branching lung airways. Propagating plugs deposit a thin film on airway walls to reduce surface tension and facilitate breathing. The effectiveness of SRT greatly depends on the final distribution of instilled surfactant within airways. To understand this process, we investigate dynamics of splitting of surfactant plugs in engineered bifurcating airway models. A liquid plug is instilled in the parent tube to propagate and split at the bifurcation. A split ratio, R, is defined as the ratio of daughter plug lengths in the top and bottom daughter airway tubes and studied as a function of the 3D orientation of airways and different flow conditions. For a given Capillary number (Ca), orienting airways farther away from a horizontal position reduced R due to the flow of a larger volume into the gravitationally favored daughter airway. At each orientation, R increased with 0.0005 surfactant distribution in airways and develop effective SRT strategies.

  15. Development of weld plugging for steam generator tubes of FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to develop a method of weld plugging of the heat-exchanger tubes of steam generator of Prototype FBR 'MONJU' in case these tubes are damaged for some reason. We studied mainly the shape of plug, welding procedure and effect of postweld heat treatment (PWHT). Evaporator tube sheet, tube and plug are made of 2-1/4Cr-1Mo steel and usually preheating and PWHT will be required for welding of this steel. The results of this study is as follows. 1) Plug was designed to make butt joint welding with grooved tube sheet around the tube hole to satisfy the requirements of plug designing, stress analysis, and good weldability. 2) TIG welding process was selected and certified its good weldability and good performance. 3) PWHT can be done by using high frequency induction heating method locally and also designing the plug to weld joint with tube sheet which was grooved around the tube hole. 4) Mock up test was done and it was certified that this plugging procedure has good weldability and good performance ability for Non Destructive Inspection. (author)

  16. Mechanical and thermo-mechanical analyses of the tapered plug for plugging of deposition tunnels. A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faelth, Billy (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)); Gatter, Patrik (Vattenfall Power Consultant AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-09-15

    This report presents results from a study that was carried out in order to examine the applicability of the tapered plug concept for plugging of deposition tunnels in the deep repository for spent nuclear fuel. The report presents results from mechanical and thermo-mechanical models of the tapered plug. The models were analyzed with 3DEC. The models included a portion of a deposition tunnel and its intersection with a main tunnel. In the deposition tunnel, a tapered concrete plug was installed. The plug was subjected to the combined load from the swelling backfill material and from pore pressure inside the deposition tunnel. The thermo-mechanical effects due to the heat generation in the spent fuel were also included in the analyses. Generic material parameter values for the concrete were used. The following items were studied: - Stresses and displacements in the plug. - Shear stresses and shear displacements in the rock-concrete interface. - Stress additions in the rock due to the loads. The sensitivity of the results to changes of constitutive models, to changes of the plug geometry and to pore water pressure in the rock-concrete interface was examined. The results indicate that the displacements in the plug will be within reasonable ranges but the stresses may locally be high enough that they exceed acceptable levels. However, they can be reduced by choice of advantageous plug geometry and by having a good rock-concrete bond. The results also show that the stress additions in the rock due to the thermal load may yield stresses that locally exceed the spalling strength of the rock. At most locations, however, the rock stresses will amount at lower levels. It was concluded that, with choice of an appropriate design, the tapered plug seems to be an applicable concept for plugging of deposition tunnels. It was also concluded that further studies of the tapered plug concept should use material properties parameter values for low-pH concrete. Further, they should also

  17. Mechanical and thermo-mechanical analyses of the tapered plug for plugging of deposition tunnels. A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents results from a study that was carried out in order to examine the applicability of the tapered plug concept for plugging of deposition tunnels in the deep repository for spent nuclear fuel. The report presents results from mechanical and thermo-mechanical models of the tapered plug. The models were analyzed with 3DEC. The models included a portion of a deposition tunnel and its intersection with a main tunnel. In the deposition tunnel, a tapered concrete plug was installed. The plug was subjected to the combined load from the swelling backfill material and from pore pressure inside the deposition tunnel. The thermo-mechanical effects due to the heat generation in the spent fuel were also included in the analyses. Generic material parameter values for the concrete were used. The following items were studied: - Stresses and displacements in the plug. - Shear stresses and shear displacements in the rock-concrete interface. - Stress additions in the rock due to the loads. The sensitivity of the results to changes of constitutive models, to changes of the plug geometry and to pore water pressure in the rock-concrete interface was examined. The results indicate that the displacements in the plug will be within reasonable ranges but the stresses may locally be high enough that they exceed acceptable levels. However, they can be reduced by choice of advantageous plug geometry and by having a good rock-concrete bond. The results also show that the stress additions in the rock due to the thermal load may yield stresses that locally exceed the spalling strength of the rock. At most locations, however, the rock stresses will amount at lower levels. It was concluded that, with choice of an appropriate design, the tapered plug seems to be an applicable concept for plugging of deposition tunnels. It was also concluded that further studies of the tapered plug concept should use material properties parameter values for low-pH concrete. Further, they should also

  18. Plug and Play Process Control of a District Heating System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trangbaek, Klaus; Knudsen, Torben; Skovmose Kallesøe, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    The main idea of plug and play process control is to initialise and reconfigure control systems automatically. In this paper these ideas are applied to a scaled laboratory model of a district heating pressure control system.  First of all this serves as a concrete example of plug and play control......, secondly some of the first techniques developed for these problems are demonstrated by experiments. The main emphasis is on incremental modelling and control in order to make it possible to ``plug'' in a new sensor or actuator and make it ``play'' automatically....

  19. A Genre Classification Plug-in for Data Collection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehn-Schiøler, Tue; Arenas-García, Jerónimo; Petersen, Kaare Brandt;

    2006-01-01

    This demonstration illustrates how the methods developed in the MIR community can be used to provide real-time feedback to music users. By creating a genre classifier plug-in for a popular media player we present users with relevant information as they play their songs. The plug-in can furthermor...... be used as a data collection platform. After informed consent from a selected set of users the plug-in will report on music consumption behavior back to a central server....

  20. A Genre Classification Plug-in for Data Collection

    OpenAIRE

    Lehn-Schiøler, Tue; Arenas-García, Jerónimo; Petersen, Kaare Brandt; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2006-01-01

    This demonstration illustrates how the methods developed in the MIR community can be used to provide real-time feedback to music users. By creating a genre classifier plug-in for a popular media player we present users with relevant information as they play their songs. The plug-in can furthermore be used as a data collection platform. After informed consent from a selected set of users the plug-in will report on music consumption behavior back to a central server.

  1. Evaluation of a concrete plug : From the Dome Plug Experiment DOMPLU at Äspö HRL

    OpenAIRE

    Kristiansson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    In SKB’s Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) a full scale test of a concrete plug,part of a sealing structure for the depository of spent nuclear fuel, has been carriedout. The aim of this thesis is to evaluate the behavior of the concrete plug and howit corresponds to assumptions made during the design. The concrete plug is domeshaped, un-reinforced and casted in situ with low-pH concrete. It will be exposed tohigh water and swelling pressures and designed for a life span of 100 years. Duringthe...

  2. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in...

  3. Welding zircaloy thin tubes to end plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work aimed at optimizing parameters while welding zircaloy-2 tubes with end plugs, as a simulation of a part of the fabrication of the nuclear fuel pins. Samples were welded by tungsten-inert gas-arc welding (TIC) process under controlled atmosphere of pure argon. Some samples were welded using electron beam (EB) welding process. For samples welded using TIC process both the design of the welding chamber (size and tightness) , and the purity of the shielding atmosphere were found to have appreciable effect on the quality of the welded joint. Increasing the are length and/or the welding current increases grain growth and extends both fusion and heat-affected zones. However, heat input (are length and welding current) must be high enough to give complete penetration welds. Optimum are length of 1.2 mm was found to give good welds with the smallest possible heat affected and fusion zones. Optimum parameters of EB welding process (vacuum, welding current and EB amplitude) were determined. welds prepared by EB welding were found to have finer grain size and less extended fusion and heat-affected zones. Welds prepared by both TIC and EB processes were inspected visually, metallo graphically and by using X-ray radiography. Welds integrity were tested using helium leak and pressure tests. 7 figs

  4. Consequence assessment of hydrological communications through borehole plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the effect of borehole plug integrity on consequence assessments performed for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The study is based on scenarios described in the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix K, for the WIPP, US Department of Energy, October 1980. The flow rates through a borehole, assumed to penetrate the waste storage location and to connect underlying and overlying aquifers, are determined as a function of the hydraulic conductance of the plugs. Similar calculations are performed for multiple boreholes communicating with the aquifers. It is concluded that low permeability plugs (less than 1 md) are not essential to satisfy public health and safety requirements at the WIPP, but rather that such plugs act as a redundant barrier in the multiple barrier isolation concept

  5. The Losing Battle Against Plug-and-Chug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortemeyer, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    I think most physics teachers would agree that two important components of a proper solution to a numerical physics problem are to first figure out a final symbolic solution and to only plug in numbers in the end. However, in spite of our best efforts, this is not what the majority of students is actually doing. Instead, they tend to plug numbers into formulas without considering the physical meaning of the equations, then frequently take the result and plug it into the next formula—a strategy known as "plug-and-chug." In this chain of calculations, frequently physical insights are lost. If teaching problem solving is proving ineffective, maybe it is possible to steer students onto the right path by posing the problems in different ways?

  6. Frictional Fluid Dynamics and Plug Formation in Multiphase Millifluidic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumazer, Guillaume; Sandnes, Bjørnar; Ayaz, Monem; Mâløy, Knut Jørgen; Flekkøy, Eirik Grude

    2016-07-01

    We study experimentally the flow and patterning of a granular suspension displaced by air inside a narrow tube. The invading air-liquid interface accumulates a plug of granular material that clogs the tube due to friction with the confining walls. The gas percolates through the static plug once the gas pressure exceeds the pore capillary entry pressure of the packed grains, and a moving accumulation front is reestablished at the far side of the plug. The process repeats, such that the advancing interface leaves a trail of plugs in its wake. Further, we show that the system undergoes a fluidization transition—and complete evacuation of the granular suspension—when the liquid withdrawal rate increases beyond a critical value. An analytical model of the stability condition for the granular accumulation predicts the flow regime.

  7. Plug engine systems for future launch vehicle applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immich, H.; Parsley, R. C.

    1993-06-01

    Based on improved viability resulting from modern analysis techniques, plug nozzle rocket engines are once again being investigated with respect to advanced launch vehicle concepts. The advantage of these engines is the external expansion, which self-adapts to external pressure variation, as well as the short compact design for high expansion ratios. This paper describes feasible design options ranging from a plug nozzle engine with an annular combustion chamber to a segmented modular design, to the integration of a number of conventional engines around a common plug. The advantages and disadvantages of these options are discussed for a range of potential applications including single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicles, as well as upper stage vehicles such as the second stage of the SAeNGER HTOL launch vehicle concept. Also included is a discussion of how maturing computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling techniques could significantly reduce installed performance uncertainties, reducing plug engine development risk.

  8. Application of Inductive Monitoring System to Plug Load Anomaly Detection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA Ames Research Center’s Sustainability Base is a new 50,000 sq. ft. LEED Platinum office building. Plug loads are expected to account for a significant portion...

  9. Waste isolation pilot plant (WIPP) borehole plugging program description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tests and experiments described attempt to provide a mix of borehole (with limited access) and in-mine (with relatively unlimited access) environments in which assessment of the various issues involved can be undertaken. The Bell Canyon Test provides the opportunity to instrument and analyze a plug in a high pressure region. The Shallow Hole Test permits application of best techniques for plugging and then access to both the top and bottom of the plug for further analysis. The Diagnostic Test Hole permits recovery of bench scale size samples for analysis and establishes an in-borehole laboratory in which to conduct testing and analysis in all strata from the surface into the salt horizon. The additional in mine experiments provide the opportunity to investigate in more detail specific effects on plugs in the salt region and allows evaluation of instrumentation systems

  10. Design and construction technology of the engineered scale plug in the TSX. Research document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JNC has conducted the international joint project 'Tunnel Sealing Experiment (TSX)' with AECL at Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in Canada. Full-scale sealing technologies are applied to the underground tunnel in the TSX. Sealing technologies contain backfilling, plugging, grouting and so on. Since development of the plugging technology has impact to the whole sealing technology, understanding of the sealing performance of the plug is one of the most important problems. The TSX has full-scale concrete plug and clay plug. The sealing performance of the plugs has been monitored with the various sensors in and around the plugs, and assessed by the monitored data. This report summaries the design and construction technology of the plugs in the TSX. The design of the plugs focused on the impervious (seepage control). The concrete plug selected the shape and the size of the body and the size of the key considering the attachment between plug and rock mass. The clay plug selected the shape and the size of the key considering the volume of the EDZ. The material of the concrete plug was Low-Heat High-Performance Concrete. The material of the clay plug was pre-compacted bentonite blocks with sand. Feasibility of design and construction of both plugs were demonstrated with engineer scale and in-situ full-scale plugs. (author)

  11. EPIDEMIOLOCICAL INVESTIGATION ON THE SAFETY OF REVERSIBLE PLUGGING OF DUCTUS DEFERENS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAOSheng-Cai; LIANYi-He; ZHANGShu-Ping

    1989-01-01

    The safety of rversible plugging was follow-up investigated in 21463 cases with ductus deferens plugged for 0.5-6 years, as compared with 2746 cases of non-plugging and with other contraceptive methods with plugging of ductus dcferens reported in the

  12. 30 CFR 250.1717 - After I permanently plug a well, what information must I submit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Decommissioning Activities Permanently Plugging Wells § 250.1717 After I permanently plug a well, what information must I submit? Within 30 days after you permanently plug a well, you must submit form MMS-124... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false After I permanently plug a well,...

  13. Plug-in electric vehicles automated charging control

    OpenAIRE

    Dallinger, David; Kohrs, Robert; Mierau, Michael; Marwitz, Simon; Wesche, Julius

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines how plug-in electric vehicles can be managed to balance the fluctuation of renewable electricity sources. In this context, different control strategies are introduced. To investigate indirect control via electricity tariffs, an electricity market analysis is conducted of a system with a high share of generation from renewable electricity sources. The analysis uses driving data collected from battery electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles in a research project which means tha...

  14. Mesh Plug Repair of Inguinal Hernia; Single Surgeon Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmet Serdar Karaca

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Mesh repair of inguinal hernia repairs are shown to be an effective and reliable method. In this study, a single surgeon%u2019s experience with plug-mesh method performs inguinal hernia repair have been reported. Material and Method: 587 patients with plug-mesh repair of inguinal hernia, preoperative age, body / mass index, comorbid disease were recorded in terms of form. All of the patients during the preoperative and postoperative hernia classification of information, duration of oper...

  15. Comparative end-plug study for tandem mirror reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparative evaluation was made of several end plug configurations for tandem mirror fusion reactors with thermal barriers. The axicell configuration has been selected for further study and will be the basis for a detailed conceptual design study to be carried out over the next two years. The axicell end plug has a simple mirror cell produced by two circular coils followed by a transition coil and a yin-yang pair, which provides for MHD stability

  16. Plug flow formation and growth in da Vinci Fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, Moshe; Blumenfeld, Raphael

    2009-01-01

    A new, da Vinci, fluid is described as a model for flow of dense granular matter. We postulate local properties of the fluid, which are generically different from ordinary fluids in that energy is dissipated by solid friction. We present the equation of flow of such a fluid and show that it gives rise to formation and growth of plug flow regions, which is characteristic of flow of granular matter. Simple explicit examples are presented to illustrate the evolution of plug flow regions.

  17. Engineering activities on the ITER representative diagnostic equatorial port plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of ITER diagnostic systems are integrated in port plugs, which are water cooled stainless steel structures inserted into the vacuum vessel ports. The port plug must provide basic functions such as neutron and gamma shielding, supporting the first wall armour (BSM), closing the vacuum vessel ports, while supporting the diagnostic equipments. ITER diagnostic port plug must resist a severe environment like high temperature due to neutron interaction with the structures and high electromechanical loading during disruptions events. CEA has contributed to the design and integration tasks in the frame of the representative equatorial port plug EQ no. 01, in particular on the engineering, structural and thermal finite element analysis. These detailed analyses have highlighted some design issues which were worked out through different solutions. This paper contains a description of the engineering activities performed such as: -The static mechanical calculations of the top plate closure system under disruption load. -The static mechanical calculations of the BSM attachment to the port plug. These two first studies led to design changes proposals which significantly improved the behaviour of the structures but also showed that the safety margin with respect to design limits is quite low. -The design of a Diagnostic Shield Module (DSM) integrated inside the port plug and a proposition of attachment scheme, with respect to disruption loads. The manufacturing of the DSM has been taken into account, as well as diagnostic integration inside the structure and maintenance aspects. -The thermal assessment of the port plug under neutronic load during normal operation, with the optimization of the cooling system. The maximum temperature calculated in normal operation has been reduced from 900 deg. C to less than 400 deg. C in the front plate; and the cooling arrangement at the back of the port plug has been simplified without important temperature increase.

  18. The welding of magnesium alloy plugs and canning (1960)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The end or lateral welding of Mg-Zr plugs presents no special difficulties in the manufacture of fuel element slugs. The welding parameters were determined from penetrations and from the mechanical resistance. The unavoidable notching effect has received particular attention. It is possible to substitute a Mg-Zr plug without any modification of the optimum welding conditions and the various qualities of the weld. (author)

  19. Setting plug & abandonment barriers with minimum removal of tubulars

    OpenAIRE

    Nessa, Jon Olav

    2012-01-01

    The useful life of an offshore well is determined by the reserves which it contacts, the pressure support within the reservoir and the continued integrity of the wellbore. When a well has reached the end of its lifetime, plugging operations have to be conducted before permanent abandonment. Conventional Plug and Abandonment (P&A) operations will often require removing a section of the casing in order to create cross sectional barriers for well abandonment. Recently developed and field test...

  20. The use of resistivity and gamma logging in lithostratigraphical studies of the chalk in Lincolnshire and South Humberside

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrical resistivity and natural gamma logs obtained from 70 boreholes in Lincolnshire and South Humberside can be interpreted in terms of lithology and show excellent agreement with the detailed lithostratigraphical divisions of the Chalk, obtained by Wood and Smith (1978) from the study of surface exposures. As, to the best of our knowledge, this sequence is complete, for the first time a direct correlation between continuous borehole logs and a detailed lithostratigraphical succession is possible. Important marl bands and some erosion surfaces and flint bands can be identified on the resistivity and gamma logs and traced over most of the study area. Stratigraphical positions of the logged boreholes can be determined and formation thicknesses measured. This information has enabled the construction of an accurate contour map of the elevation of the base of the Chalk and the eastward extension of the Caistor Monocline has been identified. (author)

  1. Changes in Specific Surface as observed by NMR, caused by saturation of Chalk with porewater bearing divalent Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Addassi, Mouadh; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul;

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrometry has proved to be a good technique for determining the petrophysical properties of reservoir rocks; such as porosity and pore size distribution. We investigated how pore water rich in divalent ions affect the NMR signal from chalk with two different...... depositional textures. We compared two cases. The first experiments on outcrop chalk with high salinity brines showed that saturation with divalent ions (Mg2+,Ca2+and SO42-) cause major shifts in the T2 distribution curve, probably due to precipitation in the pore space. In a second set of experiments, fluid......-to-volume ratio of the pore space. The results of this work could benefit the ongoing study on the optimization of the water composition for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) methods and shed light on how it can affect the mechanical and physical properties of the rock....

  2. Plug-In并联式混合动力汽车实时优化能量管理策略%Real-Time Optimization of Energy Management Strategy for Plug-In Parallel Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔纳新; 步刚; 吴剑; 符晓玲; 张承慧

    2011-01-01

    能量管理策略是混合动力汽车的核心技术之一,其品质直接影响车辆的动力性、经济性和排放性能。首先制定了基于确定性规则的Plug-In并联式混合动力汽车能量管理策略;然后,为了提高车辆的燃油经济性,设计了电池能量观测单元,并对等效燃油消耗最小策略进行改进,提出了适用于Plug-In混合动力汽车的实时优化能量管理策略。研究结果表明,该能量管理策略显著提高了Plug-In并联式混合动力汽车的燃油经济性。%The energy management strategy is one of the core technologies of hybrid electric vehicles.The driving ability,economic and emission performances are influenced directly by the quality of the energy management strategy.First,a deterministic rule-based energy management strategy for parallel plug-in hybrid electric vehicle(PHEV) is established.Based on established battery energy observation unit,equivalent fuel consumption minimization is remolded,then a real-time optimization based energy management strategy for plug-in hybrid electric vehicle is established to improve fuel economy of the vehicle.The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed strategy can improve fuel economy significantly.

  3. Hydrate plugging or slurry flow : effect of key variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dellecase, E.; Geraci, G.; Barrios, L.; Estanga, D.; Domingues, R.; Volk, M. [Tulsa Univ., Tulsa, OK (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Although oil and gas companies have proven design criteria and proper operating procedures to prevent hydrate plugs from forming, hydrates remain the primary issue in flow assurance. The costs associated with hydrate prevention affect project economics, particularly in deepwater pipelines. As such, there is an interest in developing a technology that allows hydrates to be transported as a slurry, while avoiding plugs. The feasibility of managing such hydrate flow was investigated. This study used a hydrate flow loop to investigate the effects of flow conditions on the transportability of a slurry in both steady-state and restart conditions. For most cases, uninhibited steady-state slurry flow conditions above 25 per cent water-cut were marginal, and most likely not feasible at 50 per cent water-cut or above. Liquid loading and velocity appeared to have a marginal effect on plugging tendency. However, minimum velocity may be needed to guarantee slurry transportation. Some of the important parameters and key variables that determine if a plug will form, particularly in restart conditions, include oil-water dispersion properties; oil-water phase segregation on the plugging tendency of model fluids; the location and state of the water; and the flow pattern. It was concluded that the plugging behaviour of oil systems changes with these variables, and with the oil-water chemistry. As such, specific strategies must be developed for each field. 4 refs., 1 tab., 14 figs.

  4. Size influence on the sealing performance of cementitious borehole plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flow tests have been conducted on cement plugs with diameters of 158.8 mm and 196.9 mm, and length to diameter ratios of one, in boreholes in basalt blocks and in steel pipes. Expansion strains and curing temperatures have been monitored on cement plugs in boreholes in basalt blocks, in PVC and in steel pipes with diameters from 25.4 mm to 196.9 mm and length to diameter ratios of one and two. During permeability tests, basalt blocks have fractured, presumably due to water injection pressure, cement expansion and packer pressure. Falling head tests have been performed on some block fractures to study the influence of the complicated interaction between a cement borehole plug (e.g. swelling and shrinkage alternations) and the rock, as well as of the normal stress across the fracture, on the hydraulic conductivity of a fracture intersecting a plugged borehole. The hydraulic conductivity of the cement plugs in the steel pipes varies between 3.57 x 10-11 cm/min and 3.65 x 10-9 cm/min. Cement swelling tests remain inconclusive about size effects, primarily because of instrumentation problems. Cement curing temperatures increase from small to large diameter cement plugs

  5. Using environmental tracers to assess the extent of river-groundwater interaction in a quarried area of the English Chalk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darling, W.G., E-mail: wgd@bgs.ac.uk [British Geological Survey, Maclean Building, Wallingford OX10 8BB (United Kingdom); Gooddy, D.C. [British Geological Survey, Maclean Building, Wallingford OX10 8BB (United Kingdom); Riches, J. [Thames Water Utilities Limited, Rose Kiln Court, Rose Kiln Lane, Reading RG2 0BY (United Kingdom); Wallis, I. [British Geological Survey, Maclean Building, Wallingford OX10 8BB (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    The Swanscombe area of Kent, SE England represents a typical example of a heavily quarried Chalk area currently undergoing re-development. Because the Chalk is also an important aquifer, a good understanding of groundwater movement is required if environmental impacts are to be minimised and the water resource maximised. In particular, the nature of the relationship between the River Darent and groundwater in the Swanscombe Chalk Block requires better characterisation. Here, 'environmental tracers' in the form of ambient concentrations of stable isotopes, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) and tritium ({sup 3}H) are used to investigate this and other aspects of groundwater movement in the vicinity of the quarries. Stable isotopic contrasts indicate little evidence for widespread river infiltration to the regional Chalk aquifer, although stable isotope and {sup 3}H data suggest that 20-35% of the abstraction by river-valley public water supply boreholes may be derived from the river. The CFCs, while present at above-modern concentrations in almost all groundwaters, can be used as tracers, indicating basically S-N flowpaths in the area south of the quarries, though sub-karstic conduits associated with areas of Palaeogene cover add a level of uncertainty at the local scale. Simple piston flow residence times based on SF{sub 6} range from 1 to 17 a, but the data are probably better interpreted in terms of mixing between varying amounts of modern recharge derived from the south and deeper stored groundwater. The information gained from environmental tracers can therefore contribute to effective resource management.

  6. PowerPoint or chalk and talk: Perceptions of medical students versus dental students in a medical college in India

    OpenAIRE

    Vikas Seth; Prerna Upadhyaya; Mushtaq Ahmad; et al, ...

    2010-01-01

    Vikas Seth, Prerna Upadhyaya, Mushtaq Ahmad, Vijay MogheDepartment of Pharmacology, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College, Jaipur, Rajasthan, IndiaPurpose: To assess students’ perceptions of the impact of PowerPoint (PPT) presentations in lectures in comparison to the traditional chalk and talk method and lectures using ­transparencies and overhead projector (TOHP). The study analyzes the preferences for teaching aids of medical students versus dental students.Methods: Second year ...

  7. Controls on the spatial and temporal variability of Rn-222 in riparian groundwater in a lowland Chalk catchment.

    OpenAIRE

    Mullinger, Neil J.; Pates, Jackie M.; Binley, Andrew M.; Crook, N. P.

    2009-01-01

    Radon is a powerful tracer of stream-aquifer interactions. However, it is important to consider the source and behaviour of radon in groundwater when interpreting observations of river radon in relation to groundwater discharge. Here we characterise the variability in groundwater radon concentrations in the riparian zone of a Chalk catchment. Groundwater 222Rn (radon) concentrations were determined in riparian zone boreholes at two sites in the Lambourn catchment, Berkshire, UK, over a two ye...

  8. Integration of plug-in hybrid cars for the encouragement of intelligent power distribution structures; Integration von Plug-in-Hybrid Cars zur Foerderung intelligenter Verteilnetzstrukturen. Vorstudie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horbaty, R.; Rigassi, R.

    2007-11-15

    This preliminary study for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at how plug-in hybrid cars could be used to support the electricity supply in Switzerland. This study explains to what extent hybrid cars would be in a position to provide the services needed to regulate the Swiss electricity mains. Core elements of the concept known as 'Vehicle to Grid' (V2G) are presented. The requirements placed on the cars' equipment, including reversible battery chargers and communication equipment, are reviewed. Mains regulation systems are discussed, as are battery storage and the potential advantages offered by such a system. Challenges and hindrances to implementation are examined and initial feasibility studies are analysed. Questions still to be addressed are noted. A comprehensive appendix rounds off the report.

  9. Pulsed Magnetic Welding for Advanced Core and Cladding Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Guoping [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Yang, Yong [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2013-12-19

    To investigate a solid-state joining method, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW), for welding the advanced core and cladding steels to be used in Generation IV systems, with a specific application for fuel pin end-plug welding. As another alternative solid state welding technique, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW) has not been extensively explored on the advanced steels. The resultant weld can be free from microstructure defects (pores, non-metallic inclusions, segregation of alloying elements). More specifically, the following objectives are to be achieved: 1. To design a suitable welding apparatus fixture, and optimize welding parameters for repeatable and acceptable joining of the fuel pin end-plug. The welding will be evaluated using tensile tests for lap joint weldments and helium leak tests for the fuel pin end-plug; 2 Investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties changes in PMW weldments of proposed advanced core and cladding alloys; 3. Simulate the irradiation effects on the PWM weldments using ion irradiation.

  10. Mass-transport deposits and reservoir quality of Upper Cretaceous Chalk within the German Central Graben, North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfai, Jashar; Lutz, Rüdiger; Franke, Dieter; Gaedicke, Christoph; Kley, Jonas

    2016-04-01

    The architecture of intra-chalk deposits in the `Entenschnabel' area of the German North Sea is studied based on 3D seismic data. Adapted from seismic reflection characteristics, four types of mass-transport deposits (MTDs) are distinguished, i.e. slumps, slides, channels and frontal splay deposits. The development of these systems can be linked to inversion tectonics and halotectonic movements of Zechstein salt. Tectonic uplift is interpreted to have caused repeated tilting of the sea floor. This triggered large-scale slump deposition during Turonian-Santonian times. Slump deposits are characterised by chaotic reflection patterns interpreted to result from significant stratal distortion. The south-eastern study area is characterised by a large-scale frontal splay complex. This comprises a network of shallow channel systems arranged in a distributive pattern. Several slide complexes are observed near the Top Chalk in Maastrichtian and Danian sediments. These slides are commonly associated with large incisions into the sediments below. Best reservoir properties with high producible porosities are found in the reworked chalk strata, e.g. Danish North Sea, therefore MTDs detected in the study area are regarded as potential hydrocarbon reservoirs and considered as exploration targets.

  11. High quality new type spark plug pressure sensor; Koseino plug gata shiatsu sensor ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urakawa, H.; Yanagihara, S.; Kawa, T. [Tsukasa Sokken Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Enomoto, Y. [Musashi Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Sato, T. [Dai Ichi Institute of Technology, Kagoshima (Japan); Gotthard, E.

    1998-05-01

    Investigations were made on a spark plug type pressure sensor using GaPO4 piezoelectric material developed recently by AVL Corporation. This sensor has the ignition electrode installed decentered to assure the installing position for the pressure sensor, where the small pressure sensor with a diameter of 4.4 mm, model GU12P is installed on the side. Experiments were performed on this sensor, a water cooled sensor for comparison, and a cooling-free type sensor for reference. The engine was operated at an outlet cooling water temperature maintained constant at 80 degC, and experimented in a normal combustion condition with full load at 2000 rpm and 4000 rpm, in a knocking condition with full load at 2000 rpm, and in a transient condition from full load at 4000 rpm to no load at 1300 rpm. As a result, it was made clear that the spark plug type pressure sensor showed an output of the same level as that with the water cooled sensor in the normal combustion pressure. Load change drift under the transient condition was found as good as 2.5% FS at maximum. No effect of columnar vibration was discovered, and a knocking waveform of 14 kHz was observed. 6 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Edibility of sport fishes in the Ottawa River near Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To address the question of edibility of fish in the Ottawa River near Chalk River Laboratories (CRL), 123 game fish were collected for analysis from four locations: Mackey and Rolphton (45 km and 35 km upstream of Chalk River Laboratories (CRL), respectively), the Sandspit (Pointe au Bapteme) and Cotnam Island (1.6 km and 45 km downstream of CRL, respectively). Twenty-six to thirty-six game fish were collected at each location in 2007 and samples of flesh or bone were analyzed. Trap nets were used to collect only the fish required, allowing release of management-sensitive species. The focus was on walleye (Sander vitreus) because they are abundant and popular among anglers. A few northern pike (Esox lucius) and a smaller number of smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui) were also collected at three of the four sites. Samples of the fish were analyzed for cesium-137 (137Cs), strontium-90 (90Sr), mercury (Hg), and selected organo-chlorine compounds. Concentrations of 137Cs in the flesh and 90Sr in the bones of sport fish were low and similar at all four locations and appear to reflect the global residuals from nuclear weapons testing (primarily in the 1960's) as opposed to releases from CRL. Possible explanations are: 1) Reductions in radionuclide releases from CRL in recent decades and 2) Relatively large foraging ranges of sport fish. Mercury concentrations were elevated in fishes in the Ottawa River and were significantly higher at the Sandspit and Rolphton than at Mackey and Cotnam Island (p<0.001). Mercury concentrations from the four sites are comparable to concentrations in other Ontario and Quebec lakes. It is advisable therefore, that consumers follow the fish consumption guidelines issued by provincial authorities when eating fish from the Ottawa River. Organo-chlorine compounds were not detected in walleye; however, they were detected in all eight of the pike collected at Cotnam Island. The highest organo-chlorine concentrations were measured in two of the

  13. Development of an Integrated Waste Plan for Chalk River Laboratories - 13376

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To further its Strategic Planning, the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) required an effective approach to developing a fully integrated waste plan for its Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) site. Production of the first Integrated Waste Plan (IWP) for Chalk River was a substantial task involving representatives from each of the major internal stakeholders. Since then, a second revision has been produced and a third is underway. The IWP remains an Interim IWP until all gaps have been resolved and all pathways are at an acceptable level of detail. Full completion will involve a number of iterations, typically annually for up to six years. The end result of completing this process is a comprehensive document and supporting information that includes: - An Integrated Waste Plan document summarizing the entire waste management picture in one place; - Details of all the wastes required to be managed, including volume and timings by waste stream; - Detailed waste stream pathway maps for the whole life-cycle for each waste stream to be managed from pre-generation planning through to final disposition; and - Critical decision points, i.e. decisions that need to be made and timings by when they need to be made. A waste inventory has been constructed that serves as the master reference inventory of all waste that has been or is committed to be managed at CRL. In the past, only the waste that is in storage has been effectively captured, and future predictions of wastes requiring to be managed were not available in one place. The IWP has also provided a detailed baseline plan at the current level of refinement. Waste flow maps for all identified waste streams, for the full waste life cycle complete to disposition have been constructed. The maps identify areas requiring further development, and show the complexities and inter-relationships between waste streams. Knowledge of these inter-dependencies is necessary in order to perform effective options studies for enabling

  14. Edibility of sport fishes in the Ottawa River near Chalk River Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.R.; Chaput, T.; Miller, A.; Wills, C.A., E-mail: leed@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-12-15

    To address the question of edibility of fish in the Ottawa River near Chalk River Laboratories (CRL), 123 game fish were collected for analysis from four locations: Mackey and Rolphton (45 km and 35 km upstream of Chalk River Laboratories (CRL), respectively), the Sandspit (Pointe au Bapteme) and Cotnam Island (1.6 km and 45 km downstream of CRL, respectively). Twenty-six to thirty-six game fish were collected at each location in 2007 and samples of flesh or bone were analyzed. Trap nets were used to collect only the fish required, allowing release of management-sensitive species. The focus was on walleye (Sander vitreus) because they are abundant and popular among anglers. A few northern pike (Esox lucius) and a smaller number of smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui) were also collected at three of the four sites. Samples of the fish were analyzed for cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs), strontium-90 ({sup 90}Sr), mercury (Hg), and selected organo-chlorine compounds. Concentrations of {sup 137}Cs in the flesh and {sup 90}Sr in the bones of sport fish were low and similar at all four locations and appear to reflect the global residuals from nuclear weapons testing (primarily in the 1960's) as opposed to releases from CRL. Possible explanations are: 1) Reductions in radionuclide releases from CRL in recent decades and 2) Relatively large foraging ranges of sport fish. Mercury concentrations were elevated in fishes in the Ottawa River and were significantly higher at the Sandspit and Rolphton than at Mackey and Cotnam Island (p<0.001). Mercury concentrations from the four sites are comparable to concentrations in other Ontario and Quebec lakes. It is advisable therefore, that consumers follow the fish consumption guidelines issued by provincial authorities when eating fish from the Ottawa River. Organo-chlorine compounds were not detected in walleye; however, they were detected in all eight of the pike collected at Cotnam Island. The highest organo

  15. A study on port plug distortion caused by narrow gap combined GTAW and SMAW and Electron Beam Welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of port plug distortion resulting from narrow gap combined GTAW and SMAW and Electron Beam Welding was carried out. Thermomechanical finite element analysis of port plug becomes virtually impossible because of the requirement of huge number of nodes and elements. Hence an analysis method based on the concept of inherent strain was used in this work. The computational time required was about 40-50 min only in a Core (TM) 2 Duo, 2.66 GHz computer with 2 GB RAM, which otherwise was not possible with other conventional computation techniques. As was expected the overall distortion due to EB welding was found to be less compared to that of narrow gap GTAW and SMAW.

  16. Determination of transmissivity and dispersion in a confined chalk aquifer by simulation of field experiments with three tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storage and repumping of thermal energy in chalk aquifers during periods of surplus and deficit production respectively might be an economically feasible method to meet man's need for heating. To be able to evaluate the temporal and spatial variations of thermal energy transfer between water, which mainly flows in the chalk fissures, and the chalk matrix itself it is necessary to know the transmissivity and dispersion parameters of the aquifer. Based on this background, field tests with pumping of water and tracers have been carried out as shown. The fissured chalk aquifer of magnitude H = 16 m is confined by almost impervious top and bottom layers. Two wells with distance L = 101 m were established. A steady flow with Q1 Q2 = 10.9 m3/h was established within a period of 24 h. The radioactive tracers 3H and 82Br and the fluorescent tracer R-WT (rhodamine-water tracer) were injected at known concentrations within a period of 5 min. At time = 24 h valve V0 was opened and V2 closed and within the following 320 h a single well repumping (Q1 = -10.9 m3/h, Q2 = 0) and temporal detection of tracer concentrations were carried out until practically all concentrations were zero. The three concentration curves show a time to peak of about 12 h and a temporal distribution of the relative concentrations (peak concentration = 100% for all tracers) which is almost identical. The total repumped amount of tracer (with correction for radioactive decay) was 63%, 93% and 53% for 3H, 82Br and R-WT, respectively. The corresponding peak concentrations relative to injected concentrations were 1088, 1745 and 737 ppm. These data indicate a strong adsorption to the chalk matrix for R-WT and 3H but weak for 82Br. The simulation of measured concentration curves will be done by means of at least two models, M1-M2, which both include linear adsorption. With respect to permeability and dispersion M1 and M2 differ as follows: M1. Constant coefficients k and D for permeability and dispersion

  17. Methodology for physical modeling of melter electrode power plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is presented for building and testing a one-third scale model of an electrode power plug used to supply up to 3000 amperes to a liquid fed ceramic melter. The method describes how a one-third scale model can be used to verify the ampacity of the power plug, the effectiveness of the power plug cooling system and the effect of the high amperage current on eddy current heating of rebar in the cell wall. Scale-up of the test data, including cooling air flow rate and pressure drop, temperature profiles, melter water jacket heat duty and electrical resistance is covered. The materials required to build the scale model are specified as well as scale surface finish and dimensions. The method for designing and testing a model power plug involves developing a way to recreate the thermal conditions including heat sources, sinks and boundary temperatures on a scale basis. The major heat sources are the molten glass in contact with the electrode, joule heat generation within the power plug, and eddy current heating of the wall rebar. The melting cavity heat source is modelled using a plate heater to provide radiant heat transfer to a geometrically similar, one-third scale electrode housed in a scale model of a melting cavity having a thermally and geometrically similar wall and floor. The joule heat generation within the power plug is simulated by passing electricity through the model power plug with geometrically similar rebar positioned to simulate the eddy heating phenomenon. The proposed model also features two forced air cooling circuits similar to those on the full design. The interaction of convective, natural and radiant heat transfer in the wall cooling circuit are considered. The cell environment and a melter water jacket, along with the air cooling circuits, constitute the heat sinks and are also simulated

  18. Further investigation of core sampling recovery history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, P.M.

    1995-04-12

    Review committee evaluations of the tank characterization program at WHC have called for a radical rethinking of the strategies currently in place. One possibility is that the tank core sampling systems may not be able to provide the required sample quality in all cases, and alternative sampling methods should be sought to compliment the push-mode and rotary-mode systems. This report addresses the need for additional historical review of past core sampling performance, to help improve tank characterization methods. Past experiences from core sampling were compiled and analyzed by individual cores and by groupings. The information showed that the most prominent causes of poor recovery were plugging of the bit and misjudging the top segment. Methods to alleviate these problems have been incorporated into present core sampling strategies, although alternative equipment may be necessary under some circumstances.

  19. Canadian fusion breeder blanket program: Irradiation facilities at chalk river*1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, I. J.; Burton, D. G.; Celli, A.; Delaney, R. D.; Fehrenbach, P. J.; Howe, L. M.; Larson, L. L.; MacEwen, S. R.; Miller, J. M.; Naeem, T. A.; Sawicki, J. A.; Swanson, M. L.; Verrall, R. A.; Zee, R. H.

    1986-11-01

    The major irradiation facility at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL) is the NRU research reactor. Both unvented and vented capsule experiments on candidate blanket ceramics can be performed. In the unvented tests, tritium release data (HT-to-HTO ratio, tritium retention) are obtained by post-irradiation heating of the breeder ceramic in the presence of a sweep gas. Four tests have been completed on Li 2O and LiAlO 2. Effects of sweep gas composition, extraction vessel material and ceramic properties have been determined. Two unvented irradiations under the BEATRIX international breeder exchange program have been completed; analysis is underway. The vented tests involve long-term irradiation of candidate blanket materials. CRITIC-I, scheduled for mid-1986 under BEATRIX, will examine ANL-fabricated Li 2O in a six-month irradiation at 700-1200 K, varying sweep gas composition, with on-line HT/HTO measurement. Additionally, accelerator simulation techniques are available, using 70 kV and 2.0 MV mass separators, a 2.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator and a tandem accelerator super-conducting cyclotron, the latter allowing irradiation with protons, deuterons or helium at 18-20 MeV.

  20. An overview of the waste characterization program at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last five years, Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL) placed 17,000 m3 of wastes into storage (excluding contaminated soil and fill). Almost half of the waste was generated off-site. CRNL is now developing IRUS, an Intrusion Resistant Underground Structure, and the IST, an Improved Sand Trench, to replace storage with safe, permanent disposal. IRUS will be used to dispose of wastes with radiologically hazardous lifetimes between 150 and 500 years duration and the IST will be used for wastes with radiologically hazardous lifetimes of less than 150 years. A comprehensive Waste Characterization Program (WCP) is in place to support disposal projects. The WCP is responsible for (1) specifying the manifests for waste shipments; (2) developing and maintaining central databases for waste inventories and analytical data; and (3) developing the technologies and procedures to characterize the radiological and the physical/chemical properties of wastes. WCP work is being performed under the umbrella of a newly developed waste management quality assurance (QA) program. This paper gives an overview of the WCP with an emphasis on the requirements for determining radionuclide inventories in wastes, for implementing record-keeping systems and for maintaining a QA program for disposal operations

  1. Paleomagnetism of late Cretaceous and Eocene limestones and chalks from Haiti - tectonic interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Fossen, Mickey C.; Channell, James E. T.

    1988-06-01

    We have conducted a paleomagnetic study of limestones and chalks from Haiti which suggests that the island of Hispaniola is a composite of at least two tectonically independent blocks. Sampling sites are distributed among three widely separated localities, namely: Les Cayes (nine sites; 18.3°N. Latitude; 73.6°W. Longitude) and Beloc (five sites; 18.4°N. Latitude; 72.6°W. Longitude) which are located on the southern peninsula of Haiti, and a northern locality, Ennery (six sites; 19.5°N. Latitude; 72.5°W. Longitude). Stable magnetization components of dual polarity and moderately high blocking temperature were revealed through progressive thermal demagnetization of samples from all of the Beloc and Ennery sites, while seven of the nine Les Cayes sites possessed unstable magnetizations. Mean paleolatitudes calculated from Beloc and Ennery data show 8° of latitudinal separation that is of at least Eocene age. Pole positions (Beloc: 43.2°N. Latitude; 185.8°E. Longitude, α95=25.1° and Ennery: 66.1°N. Latitude; 31.3°E. Longitude, α95=19.7°) show both colatitudinal and angular discordance with the North American apparent polar wander path. Based on these disparities, we demonstrate that the implied tectonic displacements tend to support some aspects of previously published Caribbean plate tectonic models.

  2. The reduction of sample memory effects in the Chalk River AMS ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism underlying Cl and I sample-to-sample interference in the new Chalk River AMS ion source has been studied and compared with the interference observed in an earlier ion source of different internal geometry. The distribution of sputtered material and its degree of migration was measured with the radioactive tracer, 82Br. The temperature dependence of the surface constituents was measured with the elastic recoil detection (ERD) technique and the effect of sample geometry and ion source cleaning was studied with elevated (5 x 10-10) 36Cl/Cl and 129I/I samples. These measurements indicate that a hot (> 350oC) aperture plate ahead of the sample can prevent the sputtering of contaminated regions near the sample. The plate itself remains relatively free of Cl or I itself since these elements or their Cs-gettered compounds are desorbed at this temperature. A small, fixed quantity of Cl or I on this surface is observed, which if sputtered by Cs+ ions, may contribute to ion source memory. Relative sample-to-sample interference for both Cl and I is about 10-3 after 20 min or l0-4 after 60 min. (author)

  3. Simulating Heterogeneous Infiltration and Contaminant leaching Processes at Chalk River, Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M. A.; Ireson, A. M.; Keim, D.

    2015-12-01

    A study is conducted at a waste management area in Chalk River, Ontario to characterize flow and contaminant transport with the aim of contributing to improved hydrogeological risk assessment in the context of waste management. Field monitoring has been performed to gain insights into the unsaturated zone characteristics, moisture dynamics, and contaminant transport rates. The objective is to provide quantitative estimates of surface fluxes (quantification of infiltration and evaporation) and investigations of unsaturated zone processes controlling water infiltration and spatial variability in head distributions and flow rates. One particular issue is to examine the effectiveness of the clayey soil cap installed to prevent infiltration of water into the waste repository and the top sand soil cover above the clayey layer to divert the infiltrated water laterally. The spatial variability in the unsaturated zone properties and associated effects on water flow and contaminant transport observed at the site, have led to a concerted effort to develop improved model of flow and transport based on stochastic concepts. Results obtained through the unsaturated zone model investigations are combined with the hydrogeological and geochemical components and develop predictive tools to assess the long term fate of the contaminants at the waste management site.

  4. MAGS low level waste storage at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent introduction of Modular Above Ground Storage (MAGS) constitutes a substantial improvement in the way solid Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) is handled and stored at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories (CRL). The LLRW generally contains items such as lightly contaminated clothing, paper towels, glassware, used equipment and building materials produced at CRL, or received from Canadian hospitals, universities and other waste generators. These materials, previously stored in unlined sand trenches, are now being stored in a dry, monitored and more easily retrievable state in steel containers in MAGS storage buildings. The MAGS project involved design and construction of three elements: a Waste Handling Building, the first of a series of pre-engineered steel storage buildings, and a new Waste Management Area to house the storage buildings and containers of bulk waste. This project was well received by the local municipalities during the public consultation conducted as a part of the licensing process. The MAGS system entered service in 2002 and has operated satisfactorily since then. A second storage building was completed in 2003. (author)

  5. A critical assessment of simple recharge models: application to the UK Chalk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Ireson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A framework for the rigorous quantification of the timing and magnitude of groundwater recharge is proposed. This involves developing a physically based model for the flow processes in the unsaturated and saturated zones that is consistent with the conceptualisation of the system, and with field observations. Subsequently, the essential behaviour of this model is emulated using a simpler model that can be applied within operational groundwater models. We take a UK Chalk aquifer as a case study. Flow processes are simulated convincingly using a dual permeability, equivalent continuum, Richards' equation model, applied to a 2-D hillslope transect along which four monitoring wells recorded water levels in the unconfined aquifer. A simple conventional recharge model that has been widely used was calibrated to reproduce the water table response simulated by the physically based model. The performance in reproducing the water table was surprisingly good, given the known discrepancies between the actual processes and the model representation. However, comparisons of recharge fluxes simulated by each model highlighted problems with the recharge processes in the simple model. Specifically, artificial bypass flow events during the summer were compensating for recharge that should have come from slow, continual drainage of the unsaturated zone. Such a model may still be useful for assessment of groundwater resources on a monthly basis, under non-extreme climatic conditions. However, under extreme wet or dry conditions, or under a changed climate the predictive capacity of such models is likely to be inadequate.

  6. Use of borehole-geophysical logs and hydrologic tests to characterize crystalline rock for nuclear-waste storage, Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment, Manitoba, and Chalk River Nuclear Laboratory, Ontario, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of borehole methods were used in the investigation of crystalline rocks at Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment and Chalk River Nuclear Laboratory in Canada. The selection of a crystalline-rock mass for the storage of nuclear waste likely will require the drilling and testing of a number of deep investigative boreholes in the rock mass. Although coring of at least one hole in each new area is essential, methods for making in-situ geophysical and hydrologic measurements can substitute for widespread coring and result in significant savings in time and money. Borehole-geophysical logging techniques permit the lateral extrapolation of data from a core hole. Log response is related to rock type, alteration, and the location and character of fractures. The geophysical logs that particularly are useful for these purposes are the acoustic televiewer and acoustic waveform, neutron and gamma, resistivity, temperature, and caliper. The acoustic-televiewer log of the borehole wall can provide high resolution data on the orientation and apparent width of fractures. In situ hydraulic tests of single fractures or fracture zones isolated by packers provide quantitative information on permeability, extent, and interconnection. The computer analysis of digitized acoustic waveforms has identified a part of the waveform that has amplitude variations related to permeabilities measured in the boreholes by packer tests. 38 refs., 37 figs., 4 tabs

  7. GCFR 1/20-scale PCRV central core cavity closure model test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been conducting structural response tests of the prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) closures for the 300-MW(e) gas-cooled fast reactor demonstration power plant. This report describes the third in a series of tests of small-scale closure plug models. The model represents a redesign of the central core cavity closure plug. The primary objective was to demonstrate structural performance and ultimate load capacity of the closure plug. Secondary objectives included obtaining data on crack development and propagation and on mode of failure of the composite structure

  8. Report on electric cars and plug-in hybrid cars; Redegoerelse - elbiler og plug-in hybridbiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkjaer Toennesen, A.; Winther, K.; Noerregaard, K. (Teknologisk Institut, Taastrup (Denmark)); Larsen, Esben; Christensen, Linda; Kveiborg, O. (Danmarks Teknologiske Univ., Kgs. Lyngby (DTU) (Denmark))

    2010-04-15

    The Center for Green Transport at the Danish Transport Authority has prepared this statement in order to uncover driving technical aspects, user expectations and needs, and the environmental consequences of using electric and plug-in hybrid cars. An electric car is defined as a car driven by an electric motor that has a battery that can be charged with power from the grid. A plug-in hybrid car is defined as a car that combines gasoline or diesel engine with an electric motor with a battery which can be recharged with power from the grid. From an overall consideration related to the transport sector electric cars and plug-in hybrid cars have the major advantage that negative impacts on environment and climate from traffic can be reduced while the high mobility is maintained. Through an increased use of electric cars and plug-in hybrid cars, the many advantages attached to the car as an individual transportation form is maintained, while CO{sub 2} emissions etc. are reduced. Electric cars and plug-in hybrid cars is one of the technologies that are considered to have particularly great prospects in the medium term when it comes to promoting new technologies in transport. Another advantage of using electric vehicles is the power supply factor. An increased use of electricity in transport will reduce the need for and dependence on fossil fuels in the sector. Both electric cars and plug-in hybrid cars are expected to be used for storage of wind power, a possibility which is hardly available today. The plug-in hybrid car could meet some of the challenges facing the pure electric car, because it also can use conventional fuel. The report presents analyses based on three focus areas: a) Users' needs, expectations and economics in relation to vehicles; b) The technology - and hence the manufacturers' opportunities and challenges; c) Connection to the power grid. (ln)

  9. Plug-in electric vehicles integrating fluctuating renewable electricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallinger, David

    2013-11-01

    This paper examines a method to model plug-in electric vehicles as part of the power system and presents results for the contribution of plug-in electric vehicles to balance the fluctuating electricity generation of renewable energy sources. The scientific contribution includes: - A novel approach to characterizing fluctuating generation. This allows the detailed comparison of results from energy analysis and is the basis to describe the effect of electricity from renewable energy sources and plug-in electric vehicles on the power system. - The characterization of mobile storage, which includes the description of mobility behavior using probabilities and battery discharging costs. - The introduction of an agent-based simulation approach, coupling energy markets and distributed grids using a price-based mechanism design. - The description of an agent with specific driving behavior, battery discharging costs and optimization algorithm suitable for real plug-in vehicles and simulation models. - A case study for a 2030 scenario describing the contribution of plug-in electric vehicles to balance generation from renewable energy sources in California and Germany.

  10. The Plug-in Concept: Technology and Aesthetics of Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Šenk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The architecture concept of plug-in is based on the duality of the infrastructure system and units or elements connected to it. In the context of megastructures, the concept was most vividly characterised by works of Archigram and Japanese Metabolists in the 1960s and early 1970s. Blurring the boundary between the building and the city, the plug-in concept outgrew architectural boundaries and was slowly transformed into an urbanistic concept.The paper presents the cultural context relevant to contemporaneity, which influenced specific development of the technology-driven concept of plug-in in the British Archigram Group and Japanese Metabolists. Based on the aesthetics of change and incompleteness, which was characterised by similar architectural manifestations despite entirely different cultural backgrounds, the plug-in concept foreshadowed social transformation based on freedom, individualisation and mobility in an utopian manner and held a promise of urban development with adaptability to unpredictable needs and desires of residents, who would become its co-creators with an active approach.Although the revolutionary sixties are quite some time behind, the plug-in concept in its commodified form has become and remained operational and relevant at least on the metaphorical level; in the contemporary space it is evident primarily in urbanism and not as much in its original architectural form.

  11. Polar non-hydrocarbon contaminants in reservoir core extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett B; Larter SR

    2000-01-01

    A geochemical investigation of oils in sandstone core plugs and drill stem test oils was carried out on samples from a North Sea reservoir. A sample of diesel used as a constituent of the drilling fluids was also analysed. The aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons and polar non-hydrocarbons were isolated using solid phase extraction methods. GC analysis of the hydrocarbon fraction of the core extract indicated that contamination may be diesel derived. From analysis of diesel some compound clas...

  12. Ice cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Anders

    Ice cores from Antarctica, from Greenland, and from a number of smaller glaciers around the world yield a wealth of information on past climates and environments. Ice cores offer unique records on past temperatures, atmospheric composition (including greenhouse gases), volcanism, solar activity......, dustiness, and biomass burning, among others. In Antarctica, ice cores extend back more than 800,000 years before present (Jouzel et al. 2007), whereas. Greenland ice cores cover the last 130,000 years...

  13. Interaction of clay and concrete plugs - Plugging of 5 m deep hole KA1621G01 at Aespoe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusch, Roland [Drawrite AB, Lund (Sweden); Luleaa Technical Univ., Luleaa (Sweden); Ramqvist, Gunnar [Eltekno AB, Figeholm (Sweden)

    2011-11-15

    Sealing of deep boreholes in repository rock is planned to be made by installing dense smectite clay plugs where the rock is low-permeable and casting concrete where the holes intersect water-bearing fracture zones. Such zones have to be stabilized before sealing starts because fragments of rock can otherwise fall off and make it difficult to bring equipment for concrete casting and clay plug units down. These parts of the holes are filled with concrete and clay plugs are then inserted up to the nearest fracture zone where concrete is filled to the required level etc. The role of the concrete in the hole and in the closest part of the surrounding fracture zone is to provide stable parts that are sufficiently fine-porous to prevent clay particles from contacting clay plugs to migrate into the fractures and be lost by erosion. While the larger parts of long clay plugs are believed to stay largely intact chemically for hundreds of thousands of years, the parts adjacent to concrete plugs may undergo changes and so can the concrete plugs themselves. The objective of the presently reported project was to identify the detailed processes and quantify associated changes in physical properties by investigating samples of clay and concrete from a 2.5 m long plug of clay over which an equally long concrete plug had been cast and left to rest for 3 years. The outcome of the investigations was that significant chemically induced changes in mineralogy and physical performance had occurred within a few centimetres distance from the clay/concrete contact but that virtually no changes had taken place at larger distance. A comprehensive laboratory study including X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and electron microscopy study (SEM and TEM) on the sample material was performed including also dual beam (combined ion and electron) microscopy. It was found that the clay had infiltrated the contacting concrete plug after filling of the borehole since clay was detected both

  14. Geologic feasibility of selected chalk-bearing sequences within the conterminous United States with regard to siting of radioactive-waste repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzales, S.

    1975-11-01

    Various geologic and hydrologic parameters are evaluated in relation to assessing the potential for repository storage of high-level radioactive wastes within several stratigraphic sequences dominated by chalks and chalky limestones. The former lithology is defined as a carbonate rock consisting mainly of very fine-grained particles of micritic calcite. Although chalks also contain coarser-grained particles such as shells of fossil foraminifera and non-calcitic minerals like quartz, most contain more than 90 percent micritic material. The latter represents broken fossil coccolith plates. The chalk-dominated formations discussed are exposed and underlie two different physiographic provinces which nevertheless display a general similarity in both being regions of extensive plains. The Niobrara Formation occurs mainly within the Great Plains province, while the Austin Chalk of Texas and the Selma Group of Alabama and Mississippi are located in the western and eastern Gulf Coastal Plain, respectively. The preliminary assessment is that chalk-bearing sequences show some promise and are deserving of added consideration and evaluation. Containment for hundreds of thousands of years would seem possible given certain assumptions. The most promising units from the three studied are the Niobrara Formation and Selma Group. Regional and local conditions make the Austin more suspect.

  15. Eddy Current Minimizing Flow Plug for Use in Flow Conditioning and Flow Metering

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, John Dwight (Inventor); Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An eddy-current-minimizing flow plug has open flow channels formed between the plug's inlet and outlet. Each open flow channel includes (i) a first portion that originates at the inlet face and converges to a location within the plug that is downstream of the inlet, and (ii) a second portion that originates within the plug and diverges to the outlet. The diverging second portion is approximately twice the length of the converging first portion. The plug is devoid of planar surface regions at its inlet and outlet, and in fluid flow planes of the plug that are perpendicular to the given direction of a fluid flowing therethrough.

  16. Integrity evaluation of ice plugged pipes applied on short jacket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yeong Don; Son, Geum Su [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Doo Ri; Ha, Byeong Guk; Hwang, Sang Moon; Kang, Beom Soo [Busan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-04-01

    In special industrial fields such as nuclear power plants and chemical plants, it is often necessary to repair system components without plant shutdown or drainage of system having many piping structures which may have hazardous or expensive fluid. A temporary ice plugging method for blocking internal flow is considered as a useful method in that case. According to the pipe freezing guideline of the nuclear power plant, the length of a freezing jacket must be longer than twice of the pipe diameter. However, for applying the ice plugging to short pipes which do not have enough freezing length because of geometrical configuration, it is inevitable to use shorter jacket less than twice of the pipe diameter. In this study, the integrity evaluation for short pipes in the nuclear power plant is conducted by an experiment and the finite element analysis. From the results, the ice plugging process in short pipes can be safely carried out without any plastic deformation and fracture.

  17. Outlet plug for recirculation loop of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A stopper apparatus for use in blocking the unvalved nozzle of a cooling fluid filled nuclear reactor pressure vessel includes a plug, typically in the shape of a frustoconical member having inflatable gaskets for sealing against a seat of generally unknown surface characteristics and means for positioning and urging the plug into position to seal the nozzle. The plug is typically positioned by suspension cables whereby the apparatus can be temporarily inserted and removed from the pressure vessel. The urging means is generally a two-way hydraulically driven jack controlled by remotely-actuated hydraulic lines. The apparatus is a tool which permits temporary sealing of a submerged outlet in a reactor vessel to permit maintenance on a fluid recirculation loop

  18. Charge It: The Promise of Plug-in Electric Hybrids

    OpenAIRE

    Recker, W. W.; Kang, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    With rising energy prices and battery improvements, the plug-in hybrid electric vehicle, a variant of the betterknown self-charging hybrid electric vehicle, is fast gaining popularity. Because plug-in hybrids can recharge via a wall socket while resting, they can run purely on electric power for many trips without having to revert to gasoline. This significantly reduces emissions over conventional hybrids, which can only recharge while they’re operating and are thus more likely to rely on t...

  19. Warning: safety risk with some Apple AC Wall Plug Adapters

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN IT department

    2016-01-01

    Dear Mac and iOS Users, Apple has determined that some of its two prong Apple AC wall plug adapters may break and create a risk of electrical shock.   CERN users can now exchange their affected Apple wall plug adapters at the Service Desk. To find out if your adapter is affected and for any further information concerning the procedure to follow to exchange it, please check the following URL: https://cern.service-now.com/service-portal/view-outage.do?n=OTG0028639.

  20. Groundwater monitoring and plume discharge zone characterization for the NRX radiostrontium plume at Chalk River Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olfert, J.M.; Audet, M.; Killey, D., E-mail: olfertjm@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-12-15

    Groundwater is the principal pathway for the migration of most radiological and non-radiological compounds from past and present operating areas at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's Chalk River Laboratories (CRL). The CRL Groundwater Monitoring Program (GWMP) was established to measure the groundwater quality around the perimeters of areas affected, or potentially affected, by groundwater plumes. One of these is the NRX Rod Bays plume, a legacy plume that originated from the fuel storage bays of the National Research Experimental (NRX) reactor. This plume contains primarily {sup 90}Sr migrating along the groundwater flow system to the Ottawa River. A characterization study of the shoreline region was completed recently to map the plume discharge zone by collecting samples from mini-piezometers and groundwater seeps (springs) during a period of low river level. Analysis of discharging groundwaters determined that the {sup 90}Sr concentrations were very similar to those sampled from nearby (upgradient) GWMP monitoring wells. With this favorable correlation, the high density of seep and mini-piezometer sampling along the shoreline allowed refinements to be made in defining the northerly and southerly boundaries of the radiostrontium plume. The seep and mini-piezometer sampling also provided evidence that the monitoring wells sampled routinely within the CRL GWMP are positioned appropriately for providing representative sampling of the plume. Shoreline seep and mini-piezometer sampling can lead to refinements in the conceptual site model for plumes with limited effort and cost. The supplemental characterization work can also potentially identify other targets for routine groundwater monitoring. (author)

  1. Current status of the waste identification program at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The management of routine operating waste by Waste Management and Decommissioning (WM and D) at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) is supported by the Waste Identification (WI) Program. The principal purpose of the WI Program is to minimize the cost and the effort associated with waste characterization and waste tracking, which are needed to optimize waste handling, storage and disposal. The major steps in the WI Program are: (1) identify and characterize the processes that generate the routine radioactive wastes accepted by WM and D - radioisotope production, radioisotope use, reactor operation, fuel fabrication, et cetera (2) identify and characterize the routine blocks of waste generated by each process or activity - the initial characterization is based on inference (process knowledge) (3) prepare customized, template data sheets for each routine waste block - templates contain information such as package type, waste material, waste type, solidifying agent, the average non-radiological contaminant inventory, the average radiological contaminant inventory, and the waste class (4) ensure generators 'use the right piece of paper with the right waste' when they transfer waste to WM and D - that is they use the correct template data sheets to transfer routine wastes, by: identifying and marking waste collection points in the generator's facility; ensuring that generators implement effective waste collection/segregation procedures; implementing standard procedures to transfer waste to WM and D; and, auditing waste collection and segregation within a generator's facility (5) determine any additional waste block characterization requirements (is anything needed beyond the original characterization by process knowledge?) This paper describes the WI Program, it provides an example of its implementation, and it summarizes the current status of its implementation for both CRL and non-CRL waste generators. (author)

  2. Characterising the vertical variations in hydraulic conductivity within the Chalk aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, A.; Bloomfield, J.; Griffiths, K.; Butler, A.

    2006-10-01

    SummaryVarious field methods have been used to examine and quantify the vertical variations in aquifer properties within the Chalk aquifer at a LOCAR site in Berkshire, UK. The site contains three 100 m open boreholes and three sets of two nested piezometers within an area of about 100 m 2. There is also an 86 m deep abstraction borehole about 40 m from the site. The techniques that have been used at the site include: geophysical logging, borehole imaging, packer testing, dilution testing and pumping tests. The packer test results show that the permeability of the aquifer varies by three orders of magnitude over the 70 m of tested material with a strongly non-linear decrease with depth below ground level. Comparison with the borehole images show that some of the highly permeable zones appear to be associated with obvious fractures. However, large fractures can be seen in zones which have much lower permeability while some highly permeable zones appear to be associated with poorly developed fractures. Single borehole dilution tests have shown that there are differences in flow velocity depth profiles over a few tens of meters across the site. These are inferred to be because the different boreholes, although of similar drilled depth and very close proximity, intersect slightly different parts of the fracture network and hence the groundwater flow system. In particular, a flowing feature at the base of one borehole is not intersected by the second, which is drilled from a slightly higher elevation. A dilution test carried out whilst the aquifer was being pumped shows that different fractures become active when the aquifer is stressed. This has implications for the interpretation of flow logs performed under pumping.

  3. A compartment model for 90Sr contamination in a wetland at the Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive wastes originating from Canada's nuclear research and development program have been managed at the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) since 1946. In 1953 an area called Waste Management Area 'B' (WMA B) was developed to contain low and intermediate level solid waste (LLW and ILW respectively). Initially, all of the wastes were buried in unlined sand trenches or in asphalt lined trenches. These early trenches have been releasing strontium-90 (90Sr) to groundwater since 1954, resulting in an underground contaminant plume. A treatment system was constructed in 1994 and as a result the plume is being intercepted and treated for removal of 90SR. Prior to the establishment of the treatment system the plume extended south and discharged into a watercourse called 'Spring B', then into a wetland area called 'West Swamp'. Routine monitoring of Spring B and the West Swamp outflows for 90Sr has been conducted since the 1960s. A compartment model of the West Swamp was developed and validated against monitoring data for Spring B. The purpose of developing the model was to determine if a standard compartment model could describe 90Sr dynamics in a wetland to support environmental decision making. The model employed mass balance calculations to describe the movement/distribution of 90Sr between the primary system compartments: water/peat, sediment, vegetation and litter. This paper describes how the compartment model was developed and validated. The model can be used as a tool to evaluate remediation alternatives and to provide input to CRL site decommissioning plans. (author)

  4. Review on Automotive Power Generation System on Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles & Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leong Yap Wee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative braking is a function to recharge power bank on the Plug-in electric vehicles (PHEV and electric vehicles (EV. The weakness of this system is, it can only perform its function when the vehicle is slowing down or by stepping the brake foot pedal. In other words, the electricity recharging system is inconsistent, non-continuous and geography dependent. To overcome the weakness of the regenerative braking system, it is suggested that to apply another generator which is going to be parallel with the regenerative braking system so that continuous charging can be achieved. Since the ironless electricity generator has a less counter electromotive force (CEMF comparing to an ironcored electricity generator and no cogging torque. Applying the ironless electricity generator parallel to the regenerative braking system is seen one of the options which creates sustainable charging system compared to cored electricity generator.

  5. Hydrochemical trends, palaeorecharge and groundwater ages in the fissured Chalk aquifer of the London and Berkshire Basins, UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrochemical, radiochemical, stable isotope, 14C and dissolved noble gas composition of groundwaters has been determined along two profiles across the confined, fissured Chalk aquifer of the London Basin of southern England, and for selected sites in the adjacent Berkshire Basin. During downgradient flow in the London Basin aquifer, the groundwater chemistry is modified by water-rock interactions: congruent and incongruent reaction of the carbonate lithology resulting in enhanced Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios and 13C contents with increased residence times; redox and ion exchange reactions; and towards the centre of the Basin, mixing with a residual saline connate water stored in the Chalk matrix. There is evidence from anomalous water chemistries for a component of vertical leakage from overlying Tertiary beds into the confined aquifer as a result of historical dewatering of the aquifer. Dissolved noble gas contents indicate the climate was up to 4.5C cooler than at present during recharge of the waters now found in the centres of both Basins; stable isotope (2H and 18O) depletions correspond to this recharge temperature change. For evolved waters having δ13 -8per thousand PDB a negative linear correlation is demonstrated between derived recharge temperatures and δ13C values, which is interpreted as mixing between relatively warm, light isotopic, fracture-borne waters and cooler stored waters of the matrix having a 13C signature more or less equilibrated with the Chalk. From geochemical (14C, 4He) age estimates, the abstracted water is interpreted as being either of wholly Holocene/post-Devensian glacial origin, or an admixture of Holocene and Late Pleistocene pre-glacial (cold stage interstadial) recharge. Devensian pleniglacial stage waters of the Last Glacial Maximum are not represented. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  6. Management of legacy spent nuclear fuel wastes at the Chalk River Laboratories: the challenges and innovative solutions implemented

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL has operated research reactors at the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) site since 1947, for the purpose of nuclear energy and scientific research and for the production of radioisotopes. During the 1950s and 60s, a variety of spent nuclear fuel wastes were produced by irradiating metallic uranium and other prototype fuels. These legacy waste fuels were initially stored in water-filled fuel storage bays for a period of several years before being placed in storage containers and transferred to the CRL Waste Management Areas (WMAs), where they have been stored in below-grade, vertical cylindrical steel and concrete structures called 'tile holes'. (author)

  7. Seating tool for preparing molded-plug terminations on FCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, C. M.; Corum, C. C.

    1971-01-01

    Hand-operated tool positions and seats window piece and conductor spacer onto conductors of two stripped cables during process of terminating cables with molded plug. Tool accommodates cables up to 3 in. wide and is used in conjunction with folding tools.

  8. Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Consumers (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-09-01

    Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) are entering the automobile market and are viable alternatives to conventional vehicles. This guide for consumers describes the basics of PEV technology, PEV benefits, how to select the right PEV, charging a PEV, and PEV maintenance.

  9. Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Fleet Managers (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-04-01

    Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) are entering the automobile market and are viable alternatives to conventional vehicles. This guide for fleet managers describes the basics of PEV technology, PEV benefits for fleets, how to select the right PEV, charging a PEV, and PEV maintenance.

  10. Project Gasbuggy well plugging and site restoration plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-07-01

    The operational plan for conducting the final restoration work at the site of the first U.S. underground nuclear experiment for the stimulation of low-productivity natural gas reservoirs is given. The plan includes well plugging procedures, surface facilities decontamination and removal procedures, radiological guidelines, and environmental considerations.

  11. PIXASTIC: STEGANOGRAPHY BASED ANTI-PHISHING BROWSER PLUG-IN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Thiyagarajan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In spite of existence of many standard security mechanisms for ensuring secure e- Commerce business, users still fall prey for onlin e attacks. One such simple but powerful attack is ‘Phishing’. Phishing is the most alarming threat in the e-Commerce world and effective anti-phishing technique is the need of the hour. This paper focuses on a novel anti-phishing browser plug-in which uses information hiding technique - Steganography. A Robust Message based Image Steganography (RMIS algorithm has been proposed. The same has been incorporated in the form of a browser plug-in (safari called Pixastic. Pixastic is tested in an online banking scenario and it is compared with other well-known anti-phishing plug-in methods in practice. Various parameters such as robustness, usability and its behavior on various attacks have been analysed. From experimental results, it is ev ident that our method Pixastic performs well compared to other anti-phishing plug-ins.

  12. Axicell design for the end plugs of MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certain changes in the end-plug design in the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) are described. The Laboratory (LLNL) proposes to implement these changes as soon as possible in order to construct the machine in an axicell configuration. The present physics and technology goals as well as the project cost and schedule will not be affected by these changes

  13. Analysis of supersonic plug nozzle flowfield and heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, S. N. B.; Sheu, W. H.

    1988-01-01

    A number of problems pertaining to the flowfield in a plug nozzle, designed as a supersonic thruster nozzle, with provision for cooling the plug with a coolant stream admitted parallel to the plug wall surface, were studied. First, an analysis was performed of the inviscid, nonturbulent, gas dynamic interaction between the primary hot stream and the secondary coolant stream. A numerical prediction code for establishing the resulting flowfield with a dividing surface between the two streams, for various combinations of stagnation and static properties of the two streams, was utilized for illustrating the nature of interactions. Secondly, skin friction coefficient, heat transfer coefficient and heat flux to the plug wall were analyzed under smooth flow conditions (without shocks or separation) for various coolant flow conditions. A numerical code was suitably modified and utilized for the determination of heat transfer parameters in a number of cases for which data are available. Thirdly, an analysis was initiated for modeling turbulence processes in transonic shock-boundary layer interaction without the appearance of flow separation.

  14. Microscopic weld evaluation of FBTR end plug welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SS316 Stainless steel has been chosen as a reference cladding material for Fast Breeder Test Reactor. Both the ends of the clad tubes are encapped with a solid stainless steel plug by Tungsten Inert Gas welding processes. Due to the thick-thin geometry of the end plug and the fuel clad tube, getting defect free weld joint is a challenging task. Microscopic weld evaluation of the weld defects of these end plug welds have been carried out as per standard ASTM metallography practice. Requirement of the good quality weld joint is very essential to contain the fission gas release and to enable it to sustain the high burn up of the fuel in the nuclear reactor. This paper presents the typical weld defects encountered during the development and fabrication of the actual fuel pin and it also shows some of the weld characteristics like multiple weld pool, spherical weld pool, through and through weld penetration, outer edge depression at the tube side and the plug side of the weld pool observed during the pin fabrication campaign. (author)

  15. jMRUI Version 4: A Plug-in Platform

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stefan, D.; Andrasecu, A.; Popa, E.; Rabeson, H.; Štrbák, Oliver; Starčuk jr., Zenon; Cabanas, M.; van Ormondt, D.; Graveron-Demilly, D.

    Chania: IEEE, 2008, s. 344-346. ISBN 978-1-4244-2496-2. [IEEE Workshop on Imaging Systems and Techniques Proceedings - IST 2008. Chania (GR), 10.09.2008-12.09.2008] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : MR Spectroscopy * MRS * MRSI * jMRUI Software Package * Java * Plug-ins * Quantitation Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  16. End plug welding of nuclear fuel elements-AFFF experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility is engaged in the fabrication of mixed oxide (U,Pu)O2 fuel elements of various types of nuclear reactors. Fabrication of fuel elements involves pellet fabrication, stack making, stack loading and end plug welding. The requirement of helium bonding gas inside the fuel elements necessitates the top end plug welding to be carried out with helium as the shielding gas. The severity of the service conditions inside a nuclear reactor imposes strict quality control criteria, which demands for almost defect free welds. The top end plug welding being the last process step in fuel element fabrication, any rejection at this stage would lead to loss of effort prior to this step. Moreover, the job becomes all the more difficult with mixed oxide (MOX) as the entire fabrication work has to be carried out in glove box trains. In the case of weld rejection, accepted pellets are salvaged by cutting the clad tube. This is a difficult task and recovery of pellets is low (requiring scrap recovery operation) and also leads to active metallic waste generation. This paper discusses the experience gained at AFFF, in the past 12 years in the area of end plug welding for different types of MOX fuel elements

  17. Canada, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Chalk River Labs: Reuse and Licence Termination of a Number of Facilities at the Chalk River Labs to Allow for Refurbishment of the Site. Annex A. I-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalk River Labs is located along the Ottawa River in Ontario, Canada, approximately 200 km north-west of Ottawa. The site began construction in 1944 following the expropriation of approximately 1 500 ha of land. A number of research reactors were constructed at the site along with numerous nuclear labs, hot cells and administrative facilities in support of the research and development work planned for the site. The principal occupants of the Chalk River site are AECL employees with a strong presence from National Resources Canada (NRC) and other small research groups. The site is undergoing substantial changes with an emphasis on minimizing the impact of increasing the builtup area footprint in conjunction with site upgrades and new build projects. To accomplish this task, a number of refurbishment and decommissioning projects were planned. Decommissioning projects were initiated to make room for new development through a number of initiatives. The decommissioning mandate includes the removal of a select group of original deteriorating facilities to make room for new construction and to decommission other facilities to facilitate redevelopment and reuse of the available space. In Canada, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) issues nuclear licences. The licensees must demonstrate that it is safe to continue operations of the nuclear site and request a renewal of their licence. CNSC will issue a new operating licence for a specific period of time at which the licensee must demonstrate that it is safe to proceed with a licence renewal. A request to terminate a licensable activity must be submitted to the CNSC. Upon approval to proceed, it must be demonstrated that the licensable activities have ceased and the facility has been appropriately decommissioned. Licence termination requires a demonstration that the land or previous activities presents a low risk and that the process can be used to support redevelopment because it results in a scrutinized

  18. U–Pb, Rb–Sr, and U-series isotope geochemistry of rocks and fracture minerals from the Chalk River Laboratories site, Grenville Province, Ontario, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • AECL evaluates Chalk River Laboratories site as potential nuclear waste repository. • Isotope-geochemical data for rocks and fracture minerals at CRL site are reported. • Zircons from gneiss and granite yielded U–Pb ages of 1472 ± 14 and 1045 ± 6 Ma. • WR Rb–Sr and Pb–Pb systems do not show substantial large-scale isotopic mobility. • U-series and REE data do not support oxidizing conditions at depth in the past 1 Ma. - Abstract: As part of the Geologic Waste Management Facility feasibility study, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) is evaluating the suitability of the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) site in Ontario, situated in crystalline rock of the southwestern Grenville Province, for the possible development of an underground repository for low- and intermediate-level nuclear waste. This paper presents petrographic and trace element analyses, U–Pb zircon dating results, and Rb–Sr, U–Pb and U-series isotopic analyses of gneissic drill core samples from the deep CRG-series characterization boreholes at the CRL site. The main rock types intersected in the boreholes include hornblende–biotite (±pyroxene) gneisses of granitic to granodioritic composition, leucocratic granitic gneisses with sparse mafic minerals, and garnet-bearing gneisses with variable amounts of biotite and/or hornblende. The trace element data for whole-rock samples plot in the fields of within-plate, syn-collision, and volcanic arc-type granites in discrimination diagrams used for the tectonic interpretation of granitic rocks. Zircons separated from biotite gneiss and metagranite samples yielded SHRIMP-RG U–Pb ages of 1472 ± 14 (2σ) and 1045 ± 6 Ma, respectively, in very good agreement with widespread Early Mesoproterozoic plutonic ages and Ottawan orogeny ages in the Central Gneiss Belt. The Rb–Sr, U–Pb, and Pb–Pb whole-rock errorchron apparent ages of most of the CRL gneiss samples are consistent with zircon U–Pb age and do not indicate

  19. Strangulated bowel obstruction resulting from mesh plug migration after open inguinal hernioplasty:case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Xiao; CAI Xiu-jun; YU Hong; WANG Yi-fan

    2008-01-01

    @@ The use of mesh plug in hernioplasty was introduced by Shulman et al 1 in 1990 as a"rolled plug"fixed with two stitches to close the internal inguinal ring.Robbins and Rutkow 2 described their mesh plug technique in 1993.

  20. Neutronics analysis of the IVVS/GDC plug in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► 3D neutronics analysis of the In-Vessel Viewing System (IVVS) and the Glow Discharge Cleaning (GDC) plug unit. ► Occupational dose rates around the isolated IVVS/GDC head are calculated on the basis of the rigorous 2-step (R2S) approach. ► The GDC head is shown to dominate the decay gamma activity and the shutdown dose rate around the isolated IVVS/GDC plug. ► All components, except the Be protective layer of the GDC probe, are shown to be classifiable as low level radwaste. - Abstract: A neutronics analysis has been performed to provide the input required for the design strategy for the In-Vessel Viewing System (IVVS) and the Glow Discharge Cleaning (GDC) plug units in the ITER tokamak. The focus of the analysis has been on operational loads to the GDC electrode head in the shielding position and on the activation and the decay photon radiation absorbed in the structural components of the entire system. To estimate the conditions for maintenance scenarios, the occupational dose rate around the isolated IVVS/GDC head has been calculated assuming the ITER SA2 irradiation scenario. The Rigorous 2 Step (R2S) method, developed previously at KIT, has been employed for the calculation of the shutdown dose rates. The GDC head, which is subjected to the highest neutron loads, gets heavily activated and dominates the decay gamma activity of the entire plug. Accordingly, the shutdown dose rate around the IVVS/GDC plug is dominated by the GDC electrode head. It is therefore recommended to separate the GDC head from the system prior to further operations inside the Hot Cell. All components, except the Be protective layer of the GDC probe, were shown to be classifiable as low level radwaste according to the French regulations.

  1. Alternate tube plugging criteria for steam generator tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cueto-Felgueroso, C.; Aparicio, C.B. [Tecnatom, S.A., Madrid (Spain)

    1997-02-01

    The tubing of the Steam Generators constitutes more than half of the reactor coolant pressure boundary. Specific requirements governing the maintenance of steam generator tubes integrity are set in Plant Technical Specifications and in Section XI of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. The operating experience of Steam Generator tubes of PWR plants has shown the existence of some types of degradatory processes. Every one of these has an specific cause and affects one or more zones of the tubes. In the case of Spanish Power Plants, and depending on the particular Plant considered, they should be mentioned the Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC) at the roll transition zone (RTZ), the Outside Diameter Stress Corrosion Cracking (ODSCC) at the Tube Support Plate (TSP) intersections and the fretting with the Anti-Vibration Bars (AVBs) or with the Support Plates in the preheater zone. The In-Service Inspections by Eddy Currents constitutes the standard method for assuring the SG tubes integrity and they permit the monitoring of the defects during the service life of the plant. When the degradation reaches a determined limit, called the plugging limit, the SG tube must be either repaired or retired from service by plugging. Customarily, the plugging limit is related to the depth of the defect. Such depth is typically 40% of the wall thickness of the tube and is applicable to any type of defect in the tube. In its origin, that limit was established for tubes thinned by wastage, which was the predominant degradation in the seventies. The application of this criterion for axial crack-like defects, as, for instance, those due to PWSCC in the roll transition zone, has lead to an excessive and unnecessary number of tubes being plugged. This has lead to the development of defect specific plugging criteria. Examples of the application of such criteria are discussed in the article.

  2. Tree Coring as a Complement to Soil Gas Screening to Locate PCE and TCE Source Zones and Hot Spots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Algreen; Trapp, Stefan; Rehne Jensen, Pernille;

    2015-01-01

    trichloroethylene (TCE) to evaluate their ability to locate source zones and contaminant hot spots. One test site represented a relatively homogeneous sandy soil and aquifer, and the second a more heterogeneous geology with both sandy and less permeable clay till layers overlying a chalk aquifer. Tree cores from...... different tree species were sampled and analysed, and compared to soil gas measurements and existing soil gas data. Both methods were found useful as screening tools to locate hot spots of PCE and TCE in the shallow subsurface. Tree coring was found to be particularly beneficial as a complement to soil gas...

  3. Monitoring debris flow induced channel morphodynamics with terrestrial laser scanning, Chalk Cliffs, CO (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasklewicz, T. A.; Staley, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    Debris flows are important geomorphic agents in alpine drainages. They have been linked with channel initiation in headwater streams, connectivity of organic material and sediment through drainage basins, and as hazards to human development in and adjacent to steep watersheds. Debris flows also significantly alter channel morphometry at a variety of spatial scales. Of particular interest are topographic changes associated with multiple surge fronts within a debris flow as well as between several debris flows. An unnamed tributary stream to Chalk Creek, CO has over the last decade experienced one to four debris flow events annually. Four field sampling campaigns were conducted in the summer and fall of 2009. A Leica ScanStation 2, in conjunction with a robust local control network, were used to capture channel morphodynamics along five stream reaches prior to the debris flow season and after three debris flows. Point cloud data from the scanner permit the generation of two centimeter planimetric resolution digital terrain models (DTM). DTM-of-difference analyses and measures of slope, roughness, sediment transport volumes and channel dimensions were employed to detect spatial and temporal morphometric changes. The first debris flow occurred on unsaturated bed material and resulted in aggradation along 3 of the 5 reaches. One reach, a bedrock step, remained relatively unchanged, while the final reach saw significant erosion along boulder steps in the channel and an associated mass failure adjacent to the stream bank through this section. The second debris flow resulted in net aggradation along all of the reaches. The third and largest debris flow took place on saturated bed materials. The flow produced net erosion along all reaches. Significant channel changes were associated with the headward erosion of debris flow snouts and bank failures associated with undercutting of angle-of-repose slopes during debris flow erosion. Analysis of the potential relationships

  4. Spatial analysis of Carbon-14 dynamics in a wetland ecosystem (Duke Swamp, Chalk River Laboratories, Canada)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed survey was conducted to quantify the spatial distribution of 14C in Sphagnum moss and underlying soil collected in Duke Swamp. This wetland environment receives 14C via groundwater pathways from a historic radioactive Waste Management Area (WMA) on Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL)'s Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) site. Trends in 14C specific activities were evaluated with distance from the sampling location with the maximum 14C specific activity (DSS-35), which was situated adjacent to the WMA and close to an area of groundwater discharge. Based on a spatial evaluation of the data, an east-to-west 14C gradient was found, due to the influence of the WMA on 14C specific activities in the swamp. In addition, it was possible to identify two groups of sites, each showing significant exponential declines with distance from the groundwater source area. One of the groups showed relatively more elevated 14C specific activities at a given distance from source, likely due to their proximity to the WMA, the location of the sub-surface plume originating from the WMA, the presence of marsh and swamp habitat types, which facilitated 14C transport to the atmosphere, and possibly, 14C air dispersion patterns along the eastern edge of the swamp. The other group, which had lower 14C specific activities at a given distance from the groundwater source area, included locations that were more distant from the WMA and the sub-surface plume, and contained fen habitat, which is known to act as barrier to groundwater flow. The findings suggest that proximity to source, groundwater flow patterns and habitat physical characteristics can play an important role in the dynamics of 14C being carried by discharging groundwater into terrestrial and wetland environments. - Highlights: • Groundwater represents an important source of volatile radionuclides to wetlands. • Habitat type influenced 14C transport from sub-surface to surface environments. • C-14 specific activity

  5. Radon levels in dwellings in chalk terrain. Development and analysis of distributional and causal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis investigates the range, distribution and causes of high radon levels in dwellings in the Brighton area of Southeast England. Indoor radon levels were measured in more than 1000 homes. The results show that high radon levels can arise in an area previously considered to offer low radon potential from local geological sources. Climate and building-related factors were found to affect significantly the radon levels in dwellings. Multiple regression was used to determine the influence of the various factors on indoor radon levels and an empirical model develop to predict indoor radon levels. The radon hazard, independent of building-related effects, was determined for each surveyed location by adjusting the radon measurement to that expected on the ground floor of a 'model' dwelling. This standardised set of radon levels was entered into a geographical information system (GIS) and related to surface geology. The geometric mean radon level for each lithological unit was plotted to produce a radon hazard map for the area. The highest radon levels were found to be associated with the youngest Chalk Formations, particularly where they meet overlying Tertiary deposits, and with Clay-with-Flints Quaternary deposits in the area. The results were also converted to the radon activity equivalent to that expected from the NRPB's standard dual-detector dwelling survey method and analysed by lognormal modelling to estimate the proportion of dwellings likely to exceed the UK Action Level of 200 Bq/m3 for each lithological unit. The likely percentages of dwellings affected by radon thus obtained were mapped to lithological boundaries to produce a radon potential map. The radon hazard map and the empirical radon model facilitate the prediction of radon levels in dwellings of comparable construction and above similar geology and should further the understanding of the behaviour of radon gas in buildings to allow indoor radon concentrations to be controlled. The radon

  6. Laboratory and field measurements of the self-potential (SP) in chalk, with application to monitoring of saline intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAllister, D.; Jackson, M.; Butler, A. P.; Vinogradov, J.

    2013-12-01

    Saline intrusion is a global phenomenon, affecting the availability of freshwater in coastal aquifers. The aim of this work is to investigate whether measurements of self-potential (SP) can be used to monitor the intrusion of seawater into coastal aquifers, with specific application to the UK chalk aquifer in the vicinity of Brighton on the south coast of the UK. The SP arises to maintain electrical neutrality when a separation of charge occurs due to gradients in pressure (electrokinetic (EK) or streaming potential) and concentration (electrochemical (EC) potential). Concentration gradients are a characteristic feature of saline intrusion and may give rise to a measureable EC potential. In addition, an EK potential will arise during abstraction. Laboratory and field SP measurements are used to investigate the magnitude of the EK and EC potentials in the UK chalk aquifer during saline intrusion. Laboratory measurements yield an EK coupling coefficient, relating the gradient in voltage to the gradient in pressure when the total current is zero, of -60 mV/MPa in samples saturated with groundwater, and -1 mV/MPa in samples saturated with seawater. This result agrees with earlier work suggesting the EK potential is suppressed at high salinity due to a compressed electrical double layer. The EC coupling is dominated by diffusion potentials arising from the concentration gradient across the saline front. Field experiments suggest that the EK component of the SP in the chalk is very small under ambient conditions, even in freshwater zones, because gradients in hydraulic head are small owing to the high conductivity of the pervasive fracture networks. However, a pumping test conducted in the chalk aquifer at a field site in Berkshire induced a measureable EK response with a coupling coefficient of magnitude consistent with the freshwater EK coupling coefficient obtained in the laboratory. SP monitoring at an observation borehole near Brighton reveals semi-diurnal SP

  7. Analysis of heterogeneous boron dilution transients during outages with APROS 3D nodal core model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diluted water plug can form inside the primary coolant circuit if the coolant flow has stopped at least temporarily. The source of the clean water can be external or the fresh water can build up internally during boiling/condensing heat transfer mode, which can occur if the primary coolant inventory has decreased enough during an accident. If the flow restarts in the stagnant primary loop, the diluted water plug can enter the reactor core. During outages after the fresh fuel has been loaded and the temperature of the coolant is low, the dilution potential is the highest because the critical boron concentration is at the maximum. This paper examines the behaviour of the core as clean or diluted water plugs of different sizes enter the core during outages. The analysis were performed with the APROS 3D nodal core model of Loviisa VVER-440, which contains an own flow channel and 10 axial nodes for each fuel assembly. The widerange cross section data was calculated with CASMO-4E. According to the results, the core can withstand even large pure water plugs without fuel failures on natural circulation. The analyses emphasize the importance of the simulation of the backflows inside the core when the reactor is on natural circulation.

  8. Field-test programs of borehole plugs in southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives a general overview of the repository-sealing field test effort being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories in support of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeast New Mexico. Summary descriptions of supporting activities, such as performance assessment and plugging materials development, are included to create the connection between modeling and laboratory activities as they relate to field results. Results of tests on a portion of a 17-year-old plug (Plug 217) recovered from a mine horizon and the Bell Canyon Test, in which a cement plug was emplaced to isolate a naturally pressurized aquifer, are given. Conclusions from these field plugging tests are included

  9. Earth dam plug for sealing of underground repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. As a part of the stepwise more detailed design of the sealing and closure of the Swedish final repository for short lived radioactive waste, a concept for an 'earth dam plug' has been developed by SKB. The function of the plug is to decrease the ground water flow through the rock vaults and silo. The plug consists of the following principal parts: 1. Tunnel sections filled with bentonite which acts as a hydraulic seal 2. Tunnel sections filled with a mixture of 30% bentonite and 70% crushed rock that act as a transition material and transfers the load from the swelling bentonite to the adjacent backfill material and the rock. 3. Temporary concrete walls that are needed for the installation 4. Backfill material consisting of crushed rock that confines the transition material and transfers the load to the rock walls, roof and floor. The transition material is compacted in place in inclined layers, a method originally developed by SKB for backfilling of deposition tunnels in the KBS-3 repository. The tunnel contour is adjusted so that the transition material is confined by the crushed rock backfill. As the bentonite is saturated it will expand and build up a swelling pressure against the transition material. This will be compressed. The major part of the load will be transferred to the crushed rock as a smaller part of the load will be transferred to the rock contact. Analytic calculations show that for the geometry illustrated to the left in Figure 1 the combined compression of the transition material and the deformation of the crushed rock will result in a displacement of the transition material in-between 0,15 and 0,55 m for a swelling pressure of 2 Mpa. This is based on relatively conservative assumptions for the deformation properties of the crushed rock. If the displacement of the transition material leads to zones with higher hydraulic conductivity or other damages the bentonite is assumed to move into the zone

  10. Validity of chalk and bentonite application in soil and water on reducing the absorption of ratio-strontium and radio-cerium by crop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of the chalk and bentonite application in soil and surface water respectively on reducing the absorption of 89Sr and 141Ce by crop (especially in the edible part of crop) were studied by using isotope tracer techniques. The results showed that the specific activity of 89Sr in the ryegrass and Chinese cabbage could be decreased significantly by chalk application in the soil. The reduced ratio of 89Sr absorption of Chinese cabbage and ryegrass reached 77.7% and 35.2% respectively with the chalk application of 20 g/kg soil. The specific activity of 89Sr in ryegrass and Chinese cabbage followed obvious negative linear correlation with the quantity of application chalk in the soil. The specific activity of 141Ce in surface water, chaff and brown rice decreased by application bentonite in the surface water, which led to the lower accumulation of 141Ce in paddy. However, the absorption and accumulation of 141Ce in root and straw could not be changed. The specific activity of 141Ce in soil followed a negative exponential relation with depth of soil profile

  11. Pressure loss coefficient and flow rate of side hole in a lower end plug for dual-cooled annular nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Chang-Hwan, E-mail: shinch@kaeri.re.kr; Park, Ju-Yong, E-mail: juyong@kaeri.re.kr; In, Wang-Kee, E-mail: wkin@kaeri.re.kr

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • A lower end plug with side flow holes is suggested to provide alternative flow paths of the inner channel. • The inlet loss coefficient of the lower end plug is estimated from the experiment. • The flow rate through the side holes is estimated in a complete entrance blockage of inner channel. • The consequence in the reactor core condition is evaluated with a subchannel analysis code. - Abstract: Dual-cooled annular nuclear fuel for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) has been introduced for a significant increase in reactor power. KAERI has been developing a dual-cooled annular fuel for a power uprate of 20% in an optimized PWR in Korea, the OPR1000. This annular fuel can help decrease the fuel temperature substantially relative to conventional cylindrical fuel at a power uprate. Annular fuel has dual flow channels around itself; however, the inner flow channel has a weakness in that it is isolated unlike the outer flow channel, which is open to other neighbouring outer channels for a coolant exchange in the reactor core. If the entrance of the inner channel is, as a hypothetical event, completely blocked by debris, the inner channel will then experience a rapid increase in coolant temperature such that a departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) may occur. Therefore, a remedy to avoid such a postulated accident is indispensable for the safety of annular fuel. A lower end plug with side flow holes was suggested to provide alternative flow paths in addition to the central entrance of the inner channel. In this paper, the inlet loss coefficient of the lower end plug and the flow rate through the side holes were estimated from the experimental results even in a complete entrance blockage of the inner channel. An optimization for the side hole was also performed, and the results are applied to a subchannel analysis to evaluate the consequence in the reactor core condition.

  12. Ice Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature, precipitation, atmospheric trace gases, and other aspects of climate and environment derived from ice cores drilled on glaciers and ice...

  13. Standard metrics for a plug-and-play tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonisse, Jim; Young, Darrell

    2012-06-01

    The Motion Imagery Standards Board (MISB) has previously established a metadata "micro-architecture" for standards-based tracking. The intent of this work is to facilitate both the collaborative development of competent tracking systems, and the potentially distributed and dispersed execution of tracker system components in real-world execution environments. The approach standardizes a set of five quasi-sequential modules in image-based tracking. However, in order to make the plug-and-play architecture truly useful we need metrics associated with each module (so that, for instance, a researcher who "plugs in" a new component can ascertain whether he/she did better or worse with the component). This paper proposes the choice of a new, unifying set of metrics based on an informationtheoretic approach to tracking, which the MISB is nominating as DoD/IC/NATO standards.

  14. Fissures and boreholes plugging in fractured geologic deposits (granites)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report gives the results of bench-scale experiments and field tests, destined to describe the bentonite behavior in fractured scale models and in boreholes, and to allow to study the rock weathering phenomenons under specific conditions. Dry and compact bentonite, used for exploratory drilling plugging, in crystalline rock deposits and in contact with groundwater, show hydration, swelling and mobility properties with penetration in conducting fractures. The purpose of this work is to define the procedure of clay weathering after the swelling phase, under groundwater circulation effect, to estimate plugs longevity. This study is prepared for the European Atomic Energy Community cost-sharing research program on radioactive waste management and disposal. 63 refs., 100 figs., 30 tabs., 17 plates

  15. Strength and stability of microbial plugs in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, A.K. [NIPER/BDM-Oklahoma, Inc., Bartlesville, OK (United States); Sharma, M.M.; Georgiou, G. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Mobility reduction induced by the growth and metabolism of bacteria in high-permeability layers of heterogeneous reservoirs is an economically attractive technique to improve sweep efficiency. This paper describes an experimental study conducted in sandpacks using an injected bacterium to investigate the strength and stability of microbial plugs in porous media. Successful convective transport of bacteria is important for achieving sufficient initial bacteria distribution. The chemotactic and diffusive fluxes are probably not significant even under static conditions. Mobility reduction depends upon the initial cell concentrations and increase in cell mass. For single or multiple static or dynamic growth techniques, permeability reduction was approximately 70% of the original permeability. The stability of these microbial plugs to increases in pressure gradient and changes in cell physiology in a nutrient-depleted environment needs to be improved.

  16. Polymer grouts for plugging lost circulation in geothermal wells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galbreath, D. (Green Mountain International, Waynesvile, NC); Mansure, Arthur James; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2004-12-01

    We have concluded a laboratory study to evaluate the survival potential of polymeric materials used for lost circulation plugs in geothermal wells. We learned early in the study that these materials were susceptible to hydrolysis. Through a systematic program in which many potential chemical combinations were evaluated, polymers were developed which tolerated hydrolysis for eight weeks at 500 F. The polymers also met material, handling, cost, and emplacement criteria. This screening process identified the most promising materials. A benefit of this work is that the components of the polymers developed can be mixed at the surface and pumped downhole through a single hose. Further strength testing is required to determine precisely the maximum temperature at which extrusion through fractures or voids causes failure of the lost circulation plug.

  17. Development of port plug handling tractor for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron shield plug installed into the horizontal port of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) vacuum vessel is a heavy component, which mainly consists of stainless steel and cooling water. It has a typical size of 2.3 m x 1.9 m x 3.6 m, and its weight is assumed to be around 40 tons. Development of the remote handling system of the port plug is a key technology for ITER port maintenance because high positioning accuracy is required in spite of narrow handling space. In order to overcome this problem, design and manufacturing of a 1/2.5-scaled mockup of the handling machine has been performed. (author)

  18. Plug and Process Loads Capacity and Power Requirements Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppy, M.; Gentile-Polese, L.

    2014-09-01

    This report addresses gaps in actionable knowledge that would help reduce the plug load capacities designed into buildings. Prospective building occupants and real estate brokers lack accurate references for plug and process load (PPL) capacity requirements, so they often request 5-10 W/ft2 in their lease agreements. Limited initial data, however, suggest that actual PPL densities in leased buildings are substantially lower. Overestimating PPL capacity leads designers to oversize electrical infrastructure and cooling systems. Better guidance will enable improved sizing and design of these systems, decrease upfront capital costs, and allow systems to operate more energy efficiently. The main focus of this report is to provide industry with reliable, objective third-party guidance to address the information gap in typical PPL densities for commercial building tenants. This could drive changes in negotiations about PPL energy demands.

  19. NMR imaging of fluid dynamics in reservoir core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, B A; Yamanashi, W S

    1988-01-01

    A medical NMR imaging instrument has been modified to image water and oil in reservoir rocks by the construction of a new receiving coil. Both oil and water inside the core produced readily detectable proton NMR signals, while the rock matrix produced no signal. Because of similar T2 NMR relaxation times, the water was doped with a paramagnetic ion, Mn+2, to reduce its T2 relaxation time. This procedure enhanced the separation between the oil and water phases in the resulting images. Sequential measurements, as water imbibed into one end and oil was expelled from the other end of a core plug, produced a series of images which showed the dynamics of the fluids. For water-wet Berea Sandstone a flood front was readily observed, but some of the oil was apparently left behind in small, isolated pockets which were larger than individual pores. After several additional pore volumes of water flowed through the plug the NMR image indicated a homogeneous distribution of oil. The amount of residual oil, as determined from the ratio of NMR intensities, closely approximated the residual oil saturation of fully flooded Berea samples measured by Dean-Stark extraction. A Berea sandstone core treated to make it partially oil-wet, did not show a definitive flood front, but appeared to channel the water around the perimeter of the core plug. The relative ease with which these images were made indicates that NMR imaging can be a useful technique to follow the dynamics of oil and water through a core plug for a variety of production processes. PMID:3226235

  20. Are Batteries Ready for Plug-in Hybrid Buyers?

    OpenAIRE

    Axsen, Jonn; Kurani, Kenneth S; Burke, Andy

    2009-01-01

    The notion persists that battery technology and cost remain as barriers to commercialization of electric-drive passenger vehicles. Within the context of starting a market for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), we explore two aspects of the purported problem: (1) PHEV performance goals and (2) the abilities of present and near-term battery chemistries to meet the resulting technological requirements. We summarize evidence stating that battery technologies do not meet the requirements th...

  1. Electricity Grid: Impacts of Plug-In Electric Vehicle Charging

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Christopher; McCarthy, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Concerns regarding air pollution, energy dependence, and, increasingly, climate change continue to motivate the search for new transportation solutions. Much of the focus is on light-duty vehicles, as they account for approximately 60% of transportation energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Battery-powered, electric-drive vehicles (EVs), such as plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and battery electric vehicles (BEVs), are among the most promising of the advanced vehicle and fuel...

  2. Mesh Plug Repair of Inguinal Hernia; Single Surgeon Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Serdar Karaca

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Mesh repair of inguinal hernia repairs are shown to be an effective and reliable method. In this study, a single surgeon%u2019s experience with plug-mesh method performs inguinal hernia repair have been reported. Material and Method: 587 patients with plug-mesh repair of inguinal hernia, preoperative age, body / mass index, comorbid disease were recorded in terms of form. All of the patients during the preoperative and postoperative hernia classification of information, duration of operation, antibiotics, perioperative complications, and later, the early and late postoperative complications, infection, recurrence rates and return to normal daily activity, verbal pain scales in terms of time and postoperative pain were evaluated. Added to this form of long-term pain ones. The presence of wound infection was assessed by the presence of purulent discharge from the incision. Visual analog scale pain status of the patients was measured. Results: 587 patients underwent repair of primary inguinal hernia mesh plug. One of the patients, 439 (74% of them have adapted follow-ups. Patients%u2019 ages ranged from 18-86. Was calculated as the mean of 47±18:07. Follow-up period of the patients was found to be a minimum of 3 months, maximum 55 months. Found an average of 28.2±13.4 months. Mean duration of surgery was 35.07±4.00 min (min:22mn-max:52mn, respectively. When complication rates of patients with recurrence in 2 patients (0.5%, hematoma development (1.4% in 6 patients, the development of infection in 11 patients (2.5% and long-term groin pain in 4 patients (0.9% appeared. Discussion: In our experience, the plug-mesh repair of primary inguinal hernia repair safe, effective low recurrence and complication rates can be used.

  3. Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Workplace Charging Hosts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-08-01

    Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) have immense potential for increasing the country's energy, economic, and environmental security, and they will play a key role in the future of U.S. transportation. By providing PEV charging at the workplace, employers are perfectly positioned to contribute to and benefit from the electrification of transportation. This handbook answers basic questions about PEVs and charging equipment, helps employers assess whether to offer workplace charging for employees, and outlines important steps for implementation.

  4. Are batteries ready for plug-in hybrid buyers?

    OpenAIRE

    Axsen, Jonn; Kurani, Kenneth S; Burke, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The notion persists that battery technology and cost remain as barriers to commercialization of electric-drive passenger vehicles. Within the context of starting a market for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), we explore two aspects of the purported problem: (1) PHEV performance goals and (2) the abilities of present and near-term battery chemistries to meet the resulting technological requirements. We summarize evidence stating that battery technologies do not meet the requirements th...

  5. Are Batteries Ready for Plug-in Hybrid Buyers?

    OpenAIRE

    Axsen, Jonn; Burke, Andy; Kurani, Kenneth S

    2010-01-01

    The notion persists that battery technology and cost remain as barriers to commercialization of electric-drive passenger vehicles. Within the context of starting a market for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), we explore two aspects of the purported problem: (1) PHEV performance goals and (2) the abilities of present and near-term battery chemistries to meet the resulting technological requirements. We summarize evidence stating that battery technologies do not meet the requirements t...

  6. Kaolinite Mobilisation in Sandstone:Pore Plugging vs. Suspended Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenbrand, Esther; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Kets, Frans

    2013-01-01

    The effect of temperature and salinity on sandstone permeability is critical to the feasibility of heat storage in geothermal aquifers. Permeability reduction has been observed in Berea sandstone when the salinity of the pore water is reduced as well as when the sample is heated. Several authors suggest that this effect is due to kaolinite clay mobilisation from the quartz grain surface; the mobilised particles subsequently plug the pore throats and reduce the permeability irreversibly. The e...

  7. Controlling droplet incubation using close-packed plug flow

    OpenAIRE

    Mary, Pascaline; Abate, Adam R.; Agresti, Jeremy J.; Weitz, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Controlling droplet incubation is critical for droplet-based microfluidic applications; however, current techniques are either of limited precision or place strict limits on the incubation times that can be achieved. Here, we present a simple technique to control incubation time by exploiting close-packed plug flow. In contrast to other techniques, this technique is applicable to very short and very long incubation times.

  8. Experimental Investigation of Near-Borehole Crack Plugging with Bentonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, R. A.; Islam, M. N.; Bunger, A.

    2015-12-01

    The success of the disposal of nuclear waste in a deep borehole (DBH) is determined by the integrity of the components of the borehole plug. Bentonite clay has been proposed as a key plugging material, and its effectiveness depends upon its penetration into near-borehole cracks associated with the drilling process. Here we present research aimed at understanding and maximizing the ability of clay materials to plug near-borehole cracks. A device was constructed such that the borehole is represented by a cylindrical chamber, and a near-borehole crack is represented by a slot adjacent to the center chamber. The experiments consist of placing bentonite clay pellets into the center chamber and filling the entire cavity with distilled water so that the pellets hydrate and swell, intruding into the slot because the cell prohibits swelling in the vertical direction along the borehole. Results indicate that the bentonite clay pellets do not fully plug the slot. We propose a model where the penetration is limited by (1) the free swelling potential intrinsic to the system comprised of the bentonite pellets and the hydrating fluid and (2) resisting shear force along the walls of the slot. Narrow slots have a smaller volume for the clay to fill than wider slots, but wider slots present less resistive force to clay intrusion. These two limiting factors work against each other, leading to a non-monotonic relationship between slot width and intrusion length. Further experimental results indicate that the free swelling potential of bentonite clay pellets depends on pellet diameter, "container" geometry, and solution salinity. Smaller diameter pellets possess more relative volumetric expansion than larger diameter pellets. The relative expansion of the clay also appears to decrease with the container size, which we understand to be due to the increased resistive force provided by the container walls. Increasing the salinity of the solution leads to a dramatic decrease in the clay

  9. The role of diagenisis in the hydrogeological stratification of carbonate aquifers: an example from the chalk at Fair Cross, Berkshire, UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bloomfield

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbonate rocks form important aquifers in many parts of the world and in north-west Europe the Chalk is a primary source of potable water. When flushed with relatively fresh groundwaters, the Chalk may undergo significant diagenetic alteration at relatively shallow depths resulting in a physically and hydrogeochemically stratified aquifer. Diagenetic affects may have important implications for the effective exploitable thickness of the Chalk aquifer and for water quality. In order to assess the affects of diagenesis on the properties of carbonate aquifers, matrix porosity, permeability, pore water and rock chemistry profiles have been analysed for a 300 m deep borehole through the Chalk at the western end of the London Basin. An abrupt change in the matrix porosity profile at 155 mbgl indicates a change in dominant mode of historic diagenesis from mechanical compaction above 155 mbgl to predominantly pressure solution compaction below 155 mbgl. Pore water and rock chemistry profiles also change abruptly across this depth interval, suggesting that the present day hydrogeology is controlled by historic diagenetic trends. Below 155 mbgl, pore waters are relatively saline and there is no evidence for groundwater flow; above 155 mbgl pore waters are relatively fresh and geochemical evidence for incon-gruent carbonate dissolution indicates contemporary groundwater circulation. Possible physical and chemical evolution paths for the Chalk at Fair Cross are discussed. The results provide a hydrogeological context for other studies of the long-term response of carbonate aquifers to base-line changes in sea-level and pore water chemistry and also enable studies with relatively short time-frames or of localized phenomena to be placed in the broader context of the evolution of carbonate aquifers.

  10. Selecting a Control Strategy for Plug and Process Loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobato, C.; Sheppy, M.; Brackney, L.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2012-09-01

    Plug and Process Loads (PPLs) are building loads that are not related to general lighting, heating, ventilation, cooling, and water heating, and typically do not provide comfort to the building occupants. PPLs in commercial buildings account for almost 5% of U.S. primary energy consumption. On an individual building level, they account for approximately 25% of the total electrical load in a minimally code-compliant commercial building, and can exceed 50% in an ultra-high efficiency building such as the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Research Support Facility (RSF) (Lobato et al. 2010). Minimizing these loads is a primary challenge in the design and operation of an energy-efficient building. A complex array of technologies that measure and manage PPLs has emerged in the marketplace. Some fall short of manufacturer performance claims, however. NREL has been actively engaged in developing an evaluation and selection process for PPLs control, and is using this process to evaluate a range of technologies for active PPLs management that will cap RSF plug loads. Using a control strategy to match plug load use to users' required job functions is a huge untapped potential for energy savings.

  11. Post-traumatic bronchial mucus plug leading to pneumonectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan M.S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blunt trauma of the chest is not uncommon these days. By far, the most important cause of significant blunt chest trauma is motor vehicle accidents. Pedestrians struck by vehicles, falls from height, blast injuries and acts of violence are other causative mechanisms. Most of the blunt trauma cases need no operative intervention and can be managed by supportive procedures. Aim: We present a case of a 10-year old boy who had blunt trauma to chest due to fall from height. Findings: The patient was in respiratory distress and developed surgical emphysema and pneumothorax on the left side. He was managed by putting in a chest drain on the left side. Patient improved and was discharged .He again developed respiratory distress 15 days later. On bronchoscopic examination, an obstruction was found just distal to the carina in the left bronchus. Several futile attempts were made to retrieve the obstructing material. Hence, mucus plug was removed through left bronchotomy. There was no improvement in the ventilation of the left lung for 7 days. Bronchoscopic suction was done. All the measures failed and the lung remained collapsed. Patient underwent pneumonectomy as the last treatment option available in our hospital. At the time of reporting this case, patient was doing well. Conclusion: Chest physiotherapy helps in reducing lung collapse. If patient is reluctant to chest physiotherapy and coughing, it can lead to accumulation of respiratory secretions and formation of mucus plug. This mucus plug can cause collapse of the lung and ill consequences.

  12. Formation of hydrate plug within rectangular natural gas passage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, K.; Song, M.H.; Ahn, J.H.; Yoo, K.S. [Dong Guk Univ., Joong-ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Oil and gas reservoirs in off-shore shallow areas are being depleted. At the same time, the industry is expanding its production sites into deeper waters resulting in higher pressure and lower temperature and more isolated locations. In response, connecting pipelines have been extended, but because of these pressure, temperature and distance changes in pipelines, a more favorable condition for hydrate formation is created, making the problem of flow assurance more critical for safe and economic operations at deep off-shore oil and gas production sites. Another challenge in flow assurance lies in hydrate formation and potential blockage due to hydrate plugs in gas pipelines, where no free water phase is present. This paper presented an experimental study that examined the formation and the growth of hydrates from a gas mixture of methane and propane with different moisture concentrations. The hydrates were formed in a rectangular passage cooled to temperatures below equilibrium hydrate formation temperature. The paper described the experimental procedure and apparatus that was designed and fabricated for the study. A schematic layout of the hydrate formation and plug test experimental apparatus was illustrated. The paper also described the results of two sets of experiments that were conducted. It was concluded that with enough moisture content, hydrates formed without a fresh water phase under equilibrium conditions. It was also concluded that the results of the study could be used in verifying numerical models developed to predict hydrate plugging of natural gas pipelines. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Geochemical factors in borehole-shaft plug longevity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geochemical investigations that address factors controlling the longevity of repository sealing materials in a geochemical environment are discussed. Studies are being made of cement-based materials as major candidates for seals for borehole plugging, and shaft and tunnel sealing in certain potential repository environments. Factors controlling the extent of attainment of equilibrium of the plug components with time and the rate of approach to a state of stable equilibrium of the plug component chemical subsystem within the total system are discussed. The effect of these factors on changes in physical, mechanical and thermal properties of a seal system, and the consequent effectiveness of the seal in preventing transport of radioactive waste species are the dominant features to be determined. Laboratory experiments on the effects of anticipated temperature, pressure, and environmental factors (including chemical composition and specific rock type) are described. Thermodynamic studies are used to determine the potentially stable reaction products under conditions similar to those anticipated for the repository boreholes, shafts, and tunnels during and after the operating stage. Multitemperature reaction series are studied, and reaction kinetics are investigated for the purpose of predicting the course of likely reactions. Detailed studies of permeability, diffusion, and interfacial properties and chemical and microphase characterization of the products of experiments are carried out. Characterization studies of old and ancient cements, mortars, and concretes and prototype man-made seal materials are performed to further assess the factors associated with longevity

  14. End plug for fuel rod and welding method therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An end plug of a fuel rod comprises a pressure-insertion portion having a diameter somewhat greater than the inner diameter of a fuel cladding tube and a welding portion having a diameter substantially the same as the outer diameter of the cladding tube. A V-shaped recess having an outer diameter smaller than the greatest outer diameter of the pressure-insertion portion is formed over the entire circumferential surface of the outer circumference of the connection portion of the pressure-insertion portion and the welding portion. The pressure-insertion portion of the end plug is inserted to the end of the cladding tube till the end of the cladding tube abuts against the inclined surface of the V-shaped recess. The abutting surfaces of the end plug and the cladding tube are subjected to resistance welding in this state. The inner portion bulged from the inclined surface of the V-shaped recess is filled in the recess in a molten state. Lowering of temperature of the cladding tube in the vicinity of the welded portion is decreased by γ heat during reactor operation. Accordingly, lowering of ductility of the cladding tube and degradation of material of the welded region due to segregation of hydrogen in the cladding tube can be suppressed. (I.N.)

  15. Borehole plugging test activities in southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conclusions from these studies indicated that borehole seals with effective permeabilities on the order of tens of darcies would result in doses to maximally exposed individuals of less than 0.01% of natural background. In addition to overall assessments, techniques have been developed to evaluate the effectiveness of a plug/formation system to block fluid flow along the axis of the borehole. These techniques allow the characterization of the flow region within or surrounding a plug. They have been applied to results from tests in which flow was measured around an in situ plug. Current emphasis has been on evaluation of cementitious grouts. Grout mixes with expansive cement have been developed using various additives and both brines and fresh water. These mixes have been tailored to specific rocks for use in field tests. The characteristics (e.g., permeability bond strength) of these mixes and associated rocks have been determined in the laboratory and then compared with in situ performance. Studies of grout feasibility have been coupled with strategies for assessing long-term stability

  16. Simulations of Two-Well Tracer Tests in Stratified Aquifers at the Chalk River and the Mobile Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyakorn, Peter S.; Andersen, Peter F.; Molz, Fred J.; Güven, Oktay; Melville, Joel G.

    1986-07-01

    A simulation study of two-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests in stratified granular aquifers at two widely separated sites is presented. The first site is located near the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories in Canada, and the second site is located in Mobile, Alabama. Field data and test conditions at these sites are substantially different in terms of vertical distributions of hydraulic conductivity, well spacings, flow rates, test durations, and tracer travel distances. Furthermore, the test at the Chalk River site was conducted in a recirculating mode, whereas the test at the Mobile site was conducted in a nonrecirculating mode. Simulations of these tests were performed in three dimensions using the curvilinear finite element model developed in the previous paper of this series. The simulations incorporated measured vertical variations in relative hydraulic conductivity and local dispersivity values that are small fractions (between 1/1000 and 1/100) of the spacing between the injection and the withdrawal wells. The local dispersivities are used to account for local hydrodynamic dispersion and are chosen independently so that they are not affected by the scales of the tests. Simulation results obtained from the model are presented. Interpretation of these results is made in conjunction with measured breakthrough curves at the withdrawal well and multilevel observation wells. For the Chalk River site, predicted and measured breakthrough curves at the withdrawal well are in good agreement over the earlier part of the test duration. Deviation of the field data from the model prediction occurs over the second part, where the predicted breakthrough curves show a declining trend but the field data plot does not. For the Mobile site, predicted and measured breakthrough curves at the withdrawal well show similar trends throughout the entire test duration and are in good agreement overall. Model predictions of the effect of hydraulic conductivity stratification on

  17. Analysis and applications of microorganisms from a chalk oil reservoir in the North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaster, Krista Michelle

    2009-03-15

    Ekofisk a chalk oil reservoir in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea was found to harbour an active and diverse microbial community. Microbial actives may be deleterious in nature as in reservoir souring or maybe advantageous as in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The aim of this study was to characterise the microbial communities in the Ekofisk oil reservoir and to gain insight into the microbial mechanisms important for the a) control of reservoir souring, and b) which can be utilized in enhanced oil recovery. Produced water samples from the Ekofisk oil reservoir were analysed using both culture-dependent and -independent techniques. The Ekofisk microbial community was found to be dominated by thermophilic microorganisms many of which were capable of either sulphidogenic or methanogenic physiologies. They were similar to organisms that have been previously identified from oil reservoir fluids. The dominant organisms identified directly from the produced water samples had sequences similar to members of the genera Thermotoga, Caminicella, Thermoanaerobacter, Archaeoglobus, Thermococcus, and Methanobulbus. Enrichment cultures obtained from the produced water samples were dominated by sheathed rods. Sequence analyses of the cultures indicated predominance of the genera Petrotoga, Arcobacter, Archaeoglobus and Thermococcus. Reservoir souring caused by sulphide production due the activity of sulphate reducing prokaryotes (SRP) may be reduced by the injection of nitrate or nitrite. Nitrate or nitrite mitigates sulphide production either by the stimulation of nitrate reducing bacteria (NRB) through nitrate addition or via metabolic inhibition of the reduction of sulphite to sulphide by nitrite. Here we found that nitrate addition was ineffective at controlling souring whereas nitrite proved very effective at inhibiting sulphate reduction even at very low concentrations (0.25 mM - 1 mM) in both batch culture and bioreactor studies. To investigate microbial utilization

  18. High frequency seismic monitoring of debris flows at Chalk Cliffs (CO), USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coviello, Velio; Kean, Jason; Smith, Joel; Coe, Jeffrey; Arattano, Massimo; McCoy, Scott

    2015-04-01

    A growing number of studies adopt passive seismic monitoring techniques to investigate slope instabilities and landslide processes. These techniques are attractive and convenient because large areas can be monitored from a safe distance. This is particularly true when the phenomena under investigation are rapid and infrequent mass movements like debris flows. Different types of devices are used to monitor debris flow processes, but among them ground vibration detectors (GVDs) present several, specific advantages that encourage their use. These advantages include: (i) the possibility to be installed outside the channel bed, (ii) the high adaptability to different and harsh field conditions, and (iii) the capability to detect the debris flow front arrival tens of seconds earlier than contact and stage sensors. Ground vibration data can provide relevant information on the dynamics of debris flows such as timing and velocity of the main surges. However, the processing of the raw seismic signal is usually needed, both to obtain a more effective representation of waveforms and to decrease the amount of data that need to be recorded and analyzed. With this objective, the methods of Amplitude and Impulses are commonly adopted to transform the raw signal to a 1-Hz signal that allows for a more useful representation of the phenomenon. In that way, peaks and other features become more visible and comparable with data obtained from other monitoring devices. In this work, we present the first debris flows seismic recordings gathered in the Chalk Cliffs instrumented basin, central Colorado, USA. In May 2014, two 4.5-Hz, three-axial geophones were installed in the upper part of the catchment. Seismic data are sampled at 333 Hz and then recorded by a standalone recording unit. One geophone is directly installed on bedrock, the other one mounted on a 1-m boulder partially buried in colluvium. This latter sensor integrates a heavily instrumented cross-section consisting of a 225 cm2

  19. Assessing inventories of past radioactive waste arisings at Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Internationally, a great deal of progress has been made in improving the management of currently accumulating and anticipated future radioactive wastes. Progress includes improved waste collection, segregation, characterization and documentation in support of disposal facility licensing and operation. These improvements are not often very helpful for assessing the hazards of wastes collected prior to their implementation, since, internationally, historic radioactive wastes were not managed and documented according to today's methods. This paper provides an overview of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) unique approach to managing its currently accumulating, low-level radioactive wastes at Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) and it describes the novel method AECL-CRL has developed to assess its historic radioactive wastes. Instead of estimating the characteristics of current radioactive wastes on a package-by-package basis, process knowledge is used to infer the average characteristics of most wastes. This approach defers, and potentially avoids, the use of expensive analytical technologies to characterize wastes until a reasonable certainty is gained about their ultimate disposition (Canada does not yet have a licensed radioactive waste disposal facility). Once the ultimate disposition is decided, performance assessments determine if inference characterization is adequate or if additional characterization is required. This process should result in significant cost savings to AECL since expensive, resource-intensive, up-front characterization may not be required for low-impact wastes. In addition, as technological improvements take place, the unit cost of characterization usually declines, making it less expensive to perform any additional characterization for current radioactive wastes. The WIP-III data management system is used at CRL to 'warehouse' the average characteristics of current radioactive wastes. This paper describes how this 'warehouse of information

  20. Optimal control of a repowered vehicle: Plug-in fuel cell against plug-in hybrid electric powertrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes two different powertrain configurations for the repowering of a conventional vehicle, equipped with an internal combustion engine (ICE). A model of a mid-sized ICE-vehicle is realized and then modified to model both a parallel plug-in hybrid electric powertrain and a proton electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell (FC) hybrid powertrain. The vehicle behavior under the application of an optimal control algorithm for the energy management is analyzed for the different scenarios and results are compared

  1. A mating plug and male mate choice in Drosophila hibisci Bock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak; Starmer; Barker

    1998-10-01

    The functional significance of mating plugs and their relation to male mating behaviour in insects are obscure. In Drosophila hibisci, we describe a firm, gelatinous, mating plug that fills the entire uterus at copulation, and evaluate two nonmutually exclusive hypotheses for the plug's function: (1) retention of sperm near the openings of the sperm storage organs and (2) inhibition of further matings. Unlike full-sized plugs, smaller plugs produced by previously mated males failed to retain sperm at the anterior end of the uterus, indicating that full-sized plugs prevent sperm backflow away from female storage organs. Sexually mature males failed to copulate with previously mated, young females, suggesting that the plug may also deter rival matings. In newly emerged females, the plug remains within the uterus for up to 4 days after copulation, but in mature females, the plug and ejaculate are expelled whenever the next mature oocyte descends into the uterus from the common oviduct, which may be soon after copulation. Males remained in copula significantly longer with mature females, perhaps to compensate for this greater likelihood of ejaculate expulsion. Males showed a mating preference for young virgins over older virgin and nonvirgin females. This unusual mating preference may confer fertility benefits made available through the effectiveness of the plug in reducing sperm competition. Copyright 1998 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. PMID:9790703

  2. Investigation of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Using Dimensionless Groups in Wettability Modified Chalk and Sandstone Rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Alipour Tabrizy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses enhanced oil recovery in chalk and sandstone rocks by CO2 injection, with different wettability, porosity, and permeability as well as injection rate and flooding conditions. Results indicate that an increase in Bond number has a positive effect on oil recovery whereas for capillary number, there is a limit in which recovery is improving. This limit is estimated when the pressure drop by viscous force is approximately equal to the threshold balance between capillary and gravity forces. A dimensionless group is proposed that combines the effect of capillarity, injection rate, permeability, and CO2 diffusion on the oil recovery. Recovery from all experiments in this study and reported data in the literature shows a satisfactory relationship with the proposed group.

  3. Influence of coal mine tips on the chalk aquifer. Sampling methods for three dimensional sulphate infiltration study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrez, F.; Mania, J. [Polytech' Lille, Dept. Genie Civil, UMR CNRS 8107 (LML), 59 - Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Mansy, J.L. [Lille-1 Univ., Lab. de Sedimentologie et de Geodynamique, UMR CNRS 8110 (PBDS), 59 - Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Piwakowski, B. [Ecole Centrale de Lille, Groupe Electronique Acoustique IEMN-DOAE, UMR CNRS 8520, 59 - Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    2005-07-01

    The coal basin of the Nord-Pas-de-Calais region (France) shows a very strong deterioration of the Chalk aquifer quality. In order to better model the hydro-dynamism and to improve knowledge on the chemical interactions, sampling according to depth of the groundwater is undertaken. The low-flow sampling and the profiles of the in-situ physicochemical parameters allow the observation of various vertical heterogeneities of the aquifer. The areas where the coal mine tips are localised appear very interesting to study. The sulphates released by the pyrite oxidation allow a 'artificial tracing' and give a visualization of the flow as well as information on the implied chemical processes between the oxidizing and reducing zones. (authors)

  4. Drivers of abundance and community composition of benthic macroinvertebrates in Ottawa River sediment near Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ottawa River has received effluent from Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) for more than 60 years. Some radionuclides and contaminants released in effluents are bound rapidly to particles and deposited in bottom sediments where they may be biologically available to benthic invertebrates and other aquatic biota. As part of a larger ecological assessment, we assess the potential impact of contaminated sediments in the vicinity of CRL on local benthic community structure. Using bivariate and multivariate approaches, we demonstrate that CRL operations have had little impact on the local benthic community. Despite elevated anthropogenic radionuclide activity concentrations in sediment near CRL's process outfall, the benthic community is no less abundant or diverse than what is observed upstream at background levels. The Ottawa River benthic invertebrate community is structured predominantly by natural physical and biological conditions in the sediment, specifically sediment water content and organic content. These natural habitat conditions have a stronger influence on macroinvertebrate communities than sediment contamination. (author)

  5. Radon hazard and risk in Sussex, England and the factors affecting radon levels in dwellings in chalk terrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey was undertaken of radon levels in 1013 dwellings in Sussex, UK. A number of dwellings were identified with high radon levels in an area previously considered to offer low radon risk from geological sources. Multiple regression was used to determine the relative influence of the various geographical and building-related factors on indoor radon levels. The radon hazard, independent of building-related effects, was determined for each surveyed location by standardising radon measurements to a 'model' dwelling. These were entered into a geographic information system and related to surface geology. The highest radon levels were found to be associated with the youngest Chalk formations, Tertiary deposits and Clay-with-flints Quaternary deposits in the area. Radon potentials were also determined for the area which can be used to estimate radon risk and assist in environmental planning and development control. (authors)

  6. Influence of coal mine tips on the chalk aquifer. Sampling methods for three dimensional sulphate infiltration study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coal basin of the Nord-Pas-de-Calais region (France) shows a very strong deterioration of the Chalk aquifer quality. In order to better model the hydro-dynamism and to improve knowledge on the chemical interactions, sampling according to depth of the groundwater is undertaken. The low-flow sampling and the profiles of the in-situ physicochemical parameters allow the observation of various vertical heterogeneities of the aquifer. The areas where the coal mine tips are localised appear very interesting to study. The sulphates released by the pyrite oxidation allow a 'artificial tracing' and give a visualization of the flow as well as information on the implied chemical processes between the oxidizing and reducing zones. (authors)

  7. Drivers of abundance and community composition of benthic macroinvertebrates in Ottawa River sediment near Chalk River Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, M.J.; Rowan, D.; Silke, R.; Carr, J., E-mail: bondm@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-12-15

    The Ottawa River has received effluent from Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) for more than 60 years. Some radionuclides and contaminants released in effluents are bound rapidly to particles and deposited in bottom sediments where they may be biologically available to benthic invertebrates and other aquatic biota. As part of a larger ecological assessment, we assess the potential impact of contaminated sediments in the vicinity of CRL on local benthic community structure. Using bivariate and multivariate approaches, we demonstrate that CRL operations have had little impact on the local benthic community. Despite elevated anthropogenic radionuclide activity concentrations in sediment near CRL's process outfall, the benthic community is no less abundant or diverse than what is observed upstream at background levels. The Ottawa River benthic invertebrate community is structured predominantly by natural physical and biological conditions in the sediment, specifically sediment water content and organic content. These natural habitat conditions have a stronger influence on macroinvertebrate communities than sediment contamination. (author)

  8. 15N isotope biogeochemistry and natural denitrification process in groundwater: Application to the chalk aquifer of norther France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of 15N natural isotope tracing in an aquifer contained within chalk rocks in northern France indicates that, under certain hydrogeological conditions, major denitrification occurs. At the boundary where the aquifer becomes confined, the nitrate concentrations decrease in the direction of groundwater flow accompanied by an exponential increase in 15N (expressed in δ15N) of the residual nitrate. This is characteristic of kinetic isotope effects, which accompany the reduction of the nitrate ion during denitrification. Hydrogeochemical and bacteriological observations confirm this process. Natural isotope tracing also permits this process to be distinguished from local dilution with nitrate-free water, which would entail a major drop in nitrate values without 15N isotopic enrichment. A model is proposed to explain the relatively small observed magnitude of the isotopic fractionation effect

  9. Core transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good news for all petroleum geoscientists, mining and environmental scientists, university researchers, and the like: Shell Oil Company has deeded its Midland core and sample repository to the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) at the University of Texas at Austin. The Midland repository includes more than 1 million linear meters of slab, whole core, and prepared cuttings. Data comprising one of the largest U.S. core collections—the geologic samples from wells drilled in Texas and 39 other states—are now public data and will be incorporated into the existing BEG database. Both Shell and the University of Texas at Austin are affiliated with the American Geological Institute, which assisted in arranging the transfer as part of its goal to establish a National Geoscience Data Repository System at regional centers across the United States.

  10. Core strengthening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Elizabeth A

    2007-01-01

    Several recent studies have evaluated interventional techniques designed to reduce the risk of serious knee injuries, particularly noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries in female athletes. Maintenance of rotational control of the limb underneath the pelvis, especially in response to cutting and jumping activities, is a common goal in many training programs. Rotational control of the limb underneath the pelvis is mediated by a complex set of factors including the strength of the trunk muscles and the relationship between the core muscles. It is important to examine the interrelationship between lower extremity function and core stability. PMID:17472321

  11. Core BPEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallwyl, Tim; Højsgaard, Espen

    The Web Services Business Process Execution Language (WS-BPEL) is a language for expressing business process behaviour based on web services. The language is intentionally not minimal but provides a rich set of constructs, allows omission of constructs by relying on defaults, and supports language...... extensions. Combined with the fact that the language definition does not provide a formal semantics, it is an arduous task to work formally with the language (e.g. to give an implementation). In this paper we identify a core subset of the language, called Core BPEL, which has fewer and simpler constructs...

  12. 超微细粉体堵剂性能评价及应用%Performance Evaluation and Application of Ultrafine Powder Plugging Agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚险峰; 祝明华; 吴广涛; 王成军; 张巧玲

    2016-01-01

    对高效新型超微细粉体堵剂(基本配方为:20%数30%超微细油井水泥+10%数15%纳米碳酸钙+3%数5%超微细氧化钙+15%数20%含硅、铁和铝元素的纳米氧化物+3%数5%钠膨润土+2%数3%碳酸钠+1%数2%磷酸盐+1%数2%铁铬盐FCLS+0.5%数1%纤维素类高分子聚合物HECMC+1%数2%AMPS聚合物+1%数3%氢氧化钠,按不同的水灰比可配制成不同密度的超微细堵剂浆体)的流变性、凝固时间和岩心封堵率及形成固化体的抗压强度等性能进行了室内综合评价,并进行了现场应用。研究结果表明,密度1.4数1.8 g/cm3堵剂浆体的黏度小于35 mPa·s,注入性好,能进入地层深部孔隙。密度大于1.6 g/cm3时,堵剂浆体的悬浮性好,基本不分层。超微细堵剂浆体固化时间可调,施工安全,初凝时间2.7数18.5 h,终凝时间3.1数28.1 h。固化后的体积不收缩,固化体的抗压强度大于25 MPa,耐温130℃、耐盐20×104 mg/L。堵剂对不同渗透率(20.5×10-3数127×10-3µm2)岩心的封堵率均达99.9%,且耐冲刷、高温稳定性好。堵剂具有一定的溶解性,经酸岩反应后被封堵岩心的渗透率恢复率大于50%。超微细粉体堵剂已在低渗油藏卫360块应用27井次,工艺成功率100%,增油有效率100%。图1表10参19%The ultrafine Powder plugging agent is a highly effective new plugging agent,composed of 20%—30%superfine oil well cement,10%—15% nano-CaCO3,3%—5% ultrafine CaO,15%—20% nano-oxide containing silicon,iron and aluminum elements,3%—5% Na-bentonite,2%—3%NaCO3,1%—2% Phosphate,1%—2% Fe-Cr-lignosuifonate(FCLS),0.5%—1%HECMC,1%—2%AMPS and 1%—3%NaOH. According to different water-cement ratio,a series of ultra-fine plugging agents with different density was prepared,and its performance,such as the rheological property,the solidification time,the plugging rate to the cores,the compressive strength of the solidified body,and so on

  13. Plugging margin evaluation considering the fouling of shell-and-tube heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As operating time of heat exchangers progresses, fouling generated by water-borne deposits increases, number of tube plugging increases, and thermal performance decreases. The fouling and plugging of tubes are known to interfere with normal flow characteristics and reduce thermal efficiencies of heat exchangers. This paper describes the plugging margin evaluation method which can reflect the current fouling level developed in this study. To develop the plugging margin evaluation methods for heat exchangers, fouling factor was introduced based on the ASME O and M codes and TEMA standards. For the purpose of verifying the plugging margin evaluation methods, the fouling and plugging margin evaluations were performed for a component cooling heat exchanger in a nuclear power plant

  14. From ooze to sedimentary rock, the first diagenetic processes affecting the chalk of eastern Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, Julien; Boussaha, Myriam; Nielsen, Lars;

    -resolution seismic reflection profiles, high-resolution wireline logs and sedimentological data from a fully cored borehole, and field information from quarry and coastal cliff exposures were taken to inform about early diagenetic features. This integrated approach for the first time enabled placing different...

  15. Airfoil cooling hole plugging by combustion gas impurities of the type found in coal derived fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    The plugging of airfoil cooling holes by typical coal-derived fuel impurities was evaluated using doped combustion gases in an atmospheric pressure burner rig. Very high specific cooling air mass flow rates reduced or eliminated plugging. The amount of flow needed was a function of the composition of the deposit. It appears that plugging of film-cooled holes may be a problem for gas turbines burning coal-derived fuels.

  16. Evaluation of Down Hole Seal Plugs Used in Drilling & Well Operations

    OpenAIRE

    Graver, Steinar

    2010-01-01

    As the demand for hydrocarbons increases, the oil companies are forced to start oil and gas exploration in complicated and remote fields. When drilling such environment, the requirement for safety, reliability and operational efficiency of down hole tools is vital. An evaluation of different drill pipe convoyed seal plugs is performed with respect to plug features, benefits,operational procedure and limitations. A comparison based on the different plug design and a review of applications for ...

  17. Plugging wells for abandonment: a state-of-the-art study and recommended procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herndon, J.; Smith, D.K.

    1976-09-01

    The state-of-the-art of borehole plugging of abandoned oil wells and the tools and materials used are discussed. Special problems encountered are considered and several case studies are outlined. The special procedures which must be followed if the plugged borehole is to be considered as a repository for radioactive wastes are discussed and special recommendations are made. A state-by-state summary is given of the regulatory requirements for borehole plugging. (JSR)

  18. Plugging wells for abandonment: a state-of-the-art study and recommended procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The state-of-the-art of borehole plugging of abandoned oil wells and the tools and materials used are discussed. Special problems encountered are considered and several case studies are outlined. The special procedures which must be followed if the plugged borehole is to be considered as a repository for radioactive wastes are discussed and special recommendations are made. A state-by-state summary is given of the regulatory requirements for borehole plugging

  19. Erosion on spark plug electrodes; Funkenerosion an Zuendkerzenelektroden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rager, J.

    2006-07-01

    Durability of spark plugs is mainly determined by spark gap widening, caused by electrode wear. Knowledge about the erosion mechanisms of spark plug materials is of fundamental interest for the development of materials with a high resistance against electrode erosion. It is therefore crucial to identify those parameters which significantly influence the erosion behaviour of a material. In this work, a reliable and reproducible testing method is presented which produces and characterizes electrode wear under well-defined conditions and which is capable of altering parameters specifically. Endurance tests were carried out to study the dependence of the wear behaviour of pure nickel and platinum on the electrode temperature, gas, electrode gap, electrode diameter, atmospheric pressure, and partial pressure of oxygen. It was shown that erosion under nitrogen is negligible, irrespective of the material. This disproves all common mechanism discussed in the literature explaining material loss of spark plug electrodes. Based on this observation and the variation of the mentioned parameters a new erosion model was deduced. This relies on an oxidation of the electrode material and describes the erosion of nickel and platinum separately. For nickel, electrode wear is caused by the removal of an oxide layer by the spark. In the case of platinum, material loss occurs due to the plasma-assisted formation and subsequent evaporation of volatile oxides in the cathode spot. On the basis of this mechanism a new composite material was developed whose erosion resistance is superior to pure platinum. Oxidation resistant metal oxide particles were added to a platinum matrix, thus leading to a higher erosion resistance of the composite. However, this can be decreased by a side reaction, the separation of oxygen from the metal oxides, which effectively assists the oxidation of the matrix. This reaction can be suppressed by using highly stable oxides, characterized by a large negative Gibbs

  20. Plug in electric vehicles in smart grids charging strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Rajakaruna, Sumedha; Ghosh, Arindam

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the recent research advancements in the area of charging strategies that can be employed to accommodate the anticipated high deployment of Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEVs) in smart grids. Recent literature has focused on various potential issues of uncoordinated charging of PEVs and methods of overcoming such challenges. After an introduction to charging coordination paradigms of PEVs, this book will present various ways the coordinated control can be accomplished. These innovative approaches include hierarchical coordinated control, model predictive control, optimal control

  1. Compact Fluorescent Plug-In Ballast-in-a-Socket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebecca Voelker

    2001-12-21

    The primary goal of this program was to develop a ballast system for plug-in CFLs (compact fluorescent lamps) that will directly replace standard metal shell, medium base incandescent lampholders (such as Levition No. 6098) for use with portable lamp fixtures, such as floor, table and desk lamps. A secondary goal was to identify a plug-in CFL that is optimized for use with this ballast. This Plug-in CFL Ballastin-a-Socket system will allow fixture manufacturers to easily manufacture CFL-based high-efficacy portable fixtures that provide residential and commercial consumers with attractive, cost-effective, and energy-efficient fixtures for use wherever portable incandescent fixtures are used today. The advantages of this proposed system over existing CFL solutions are that the fixtures can only be used with high-efficacy CFLs, and they will be more attractive and will have lower life-cycle costs than screw-in or adapter-based CFL retrofit solutions. These features should greatly increase the penetration of CFL's into the North American market. Our work has shown that using integrated circuits it is quite feasible to produce a lamp-fixture ballast of a size comparable to the current Edison-screw 3-way incandescent fixtures. As for price points for BIAS-based fixtures, end-users polled by the Lighting Research Institute at RPI indicated that they would pay as much as an additional $10 for a lamp containing such a ballast. The ballast has been optimized to run with a 26 W amalgam triple biax lamp in the base-down position, yet can accept non-amalgam versions of the lamp. With a few part alterations, the ballast can be produced to support 32 W lamps as well. The ballast uses GE's existing L-Comp[1] power topology in the circuit so that the integrated circuit design would be a design that could possibly be used by other CFL and EFL products with minor modifications. This gives added value by reducing cost and size of not only the BIAS, but also possibly other

  2. Occlusion of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations by use of vascular plug

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P E; Kjeldsen, A D

    2007-01-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations are commonly treated by embolization with coils or balloons to prevent cerebral complications and to raise the oxygenation of the blood. The Amplatzer vascular plug is a new occlusive device made of a self-expanding cylindrical nitinol mesh. It is fast and safe...... to position, and can be repositioned before final delivery. It is especially suited for embolization of large high-flow vessels as in pulmonary arteriovenous malformations with big feeding arteries. Two cases of successful use of the new device for treatment of large pulmonary arteriovenous...

  3. Electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles advanced simulation methodologies

    CERN Document Server

    Varga, Bogdan Ovidiu; Moldovanu, Dan; Iclodean, Calin

    2015-01-01

    This book is designed as an interdisciplinary platform for specialists working in electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles powertrain design and development, and for scientists who want to get access to information related to electric and hybrid vehicle energy management, efficiency and control. The book presents the methodology of simulation that allows the specialist to evaluate electric and hybrid vehicle powertrain energy flow, efficiency, range and consumption. The mathematics behind each electric and hybrid vehicle component is explained and for each specific vehicle the powertrain

  4. Shielding analysis for ITER equatorial bio-shield plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ITER equatorial port cell outside bio-shield plug is a place for allowing free personnel access after shutdown which accommodates various sensitive equipment and pipes. To ensure the personnel safety in port cell after shutdown, the distribution of dose rate in port cell was studied. Based on VisualBUS (CAD-Based Multi-Functional 4D Neutronics Simulation System), dose rate calculations were completed in port cell after shutdown. The result showed that dose rates in port cell are still 2 orders of magnitude more than desired limit (10 μSv/h) after one day shutdown. The optimization of bio-shield was needed. (authors)

  5. Plug in electric vehicles in smart grids energy management

    CERN Document Server

    Rajakaruna, Sumedha; Ghosh, Arindam

    2014-01-01

    This book highlights the cutting-edge research on energy management within smart grids with significant deployment of Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEV). These vehicles not only can be a significant electrical power consumer during Grid to Vehicle (G2V) charging mode, they can also be smartly utilized as a controlled source of electrical power when they are used in Vehicle to Grid (V2G) operating mode. Electricity Price, Time of Use Tariffs, Quality of Service, Social Welfare as well as electrical parameters of the network are all different criteria considered by the researchers when developing

  6. Plug-In Hybrid Vehicle Analysis (Milestone Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markel, T.; Brooker, A.; Gonder, J.; O' Keefe, M.; Simpson, A.; Thornton, M.

    2006-11-01

    NREL's plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) analysis activities made great strides in FY06 to objectively assess PHEV technology, support the larger U.S. Department of Energy PHEV assessment effort, and share technical knowledge with the vehicle research community and vehicle manufacturers. This report provides research papers and presentations developed in FY06 to support these efforts. The report focuses on the areas of fuel economy reporting methods, cost and consumption benefit analysis, real-world performance expectations, and energy management strategies.

  7. Component sizing optimization of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are considered as one of the most promising means to improve the near-term sustainability of the transportation and stationary energy sectors. This paper describes a methodology for the optimization of PHEVs component sizing using parallel chaos optimization algorithm (PCOA). In this approach, the objective function is defined so as to minimize the drivetrain cost. In addition, the driving performance requirements are considered as constraints. Finally, the optimization process is performed over three different all electric range (AER) and two types of batteries. The results from computer simulation show the effectiveness of the approach and the reduction in drivetrian cost while ensuring the vehicle performance.

  8. Plug in electric vehicles in smart grids integration techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Rajakaruna, Sumedha; Ghosh, Arindam

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on the state of the art in worldwide research on applying optimization approaches to intelligently control charging and discharging of batteries of Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEVs) in smart grids. Network constraints, cost considerations, the number and penetration level of PEVs, utilization of PEVs by their owners, ancillary services, load forecasting, risk analysis, etc. are all different criteria considered by the researchers in developing mathematical based equations which represent the presence of PEVs in electric networks. Different objective functions can be defined an

  9. Fiscal year 1996 well plugging and abandonment program Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This report is a synopsis of the progress of the well plugging and abandonment program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, from August 1995 through August 1996. A total of 27 wells, piezometers, and borings were plugged and abandoned during the period of time covered in this report. All wells and borings were plugged and abandoned in accordance with the Monitoring Well Plugging and Abandonment Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (HSW, Inc. 1991).

  10. Towards A Dynamic Object-Oriented Design Metric Plug-in Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Loh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement: The evolution of software is made difficult by the need to integrate new features with all previously implemented features in software applications. Approach: present study introduced a general-purpose, platform-independent object-oriented design metric plug-in framework called jmetric intended to help building scalable, extendable object-oriented design metric plug-ins. jmetric seeks to address problem by providing the plug-in developer a structured way to separately develop and incrementally integrate independent object-oriented design metrics as plug-ins to a domain specific object-oriented design metrics framework. jmetric was engineered to provide functional building blocks to accelerate the adding, removing and updating of object-oriented design metric plug-ins in tools such as Eclipse, JDeveloper, NetBeans, JBuilder and other Java-based tools. Dependency injection is heavily used in jmetric to accelerate the adding, removing and updating of object-oriented metrics plug-ins. We studied several commonly used integrated development environments and software metrics tools to identify the extendibility of the tools to provide additional object-oriented design metric functionalities as plug-ins. Results: We demonstrate a tool called jmetric tool that had developed as a reference implementation to validate the plug-in capabilities of jmetric. Conclusion: Extending other tools such as Eclipse, JDeveloper and NetBeans to include metric functionalities is possible by wiring plug-ins through dependency injection mechanism in jmetric.

  11. Borehole plugging of man-made accesses to a basalt repository: a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the status of work currently in progress for the Basalt Borehole Plugging Program (BBPP). The primary objectives of the BBPP outlined in this report have been met during this first phase of work. These objectives included: (1) the preparation of a preliminary list of candidate plug materials; (2) a description of available machinery capable of placing candidate plug materials; and (3) the development of physical and geochemical testing programs to help evaluate the chemical stability and physical properties of candidate plug materials. The most significant finding from work to date is that given reasonable regulatory criteria, nothing has been identified which would prevent design of a plug system to seal manmade openings leading to a nuclear waste repository in Columbia River basalt for significantly long periods of time (on the order of thousands of years). Work accomplished to date indicates that this plug system can be designed using both natural and manufactured materials and can be emplaced with existing placement machinery and modifications of that machinery. The objectives of Task II are to conduct laboratory tests to evaluate the suitability of preferred candidate materials for plugging boreholes in the proposed repository, select plug system(s), initiate preconceptual machinery design for the placement of materials in plug system(s), and prepare a preliminary Task II report. As with Task I project organization, Task II is divided into subtasks that are identified by written subtask work summaries

  12. Transport of Wetting and Nonwetting Liquid Plugs in a T-shaped Microchannel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YONG Yumei; LI Sha; YANG Chao; YIN Xiaolong

    2013-01-01

    The transport of liquid plugs in microchannels is very important for many applications such as in medical treatments in airways and in extraction of oil from porous rocks.A plug of wetting and non-wetting liquids driven by a constant pressure difference through a T-shaped microchannel is studied numerically with lattice Boltzmann (LB) method.A two-phase flow LB model based on field mediators is built.Three typical flow patterns (blocking,rupture and splitting flow) of plug flow are obtained with different driving pressures.It is found that it becomes difficult for a plug with short initial plug length to leave the microchannel; the flow pattern of plug transport varies with the contact angle,especially from wetting to nonwetting; with the increase of interracial tension,the front interface of plug moves faster; the front and rear interfaces of the plug with small viscosity ratio move faster in the microchannel than those of the plug with large viscosity ratio.The study is helpful to provide theoretical data for the design and scale-up of liquid-liquid reactors and separators.

  13. Selecting Female Mice in Estrus and Checking Plugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behringer, Richard; Gertsenstein, Marina; Nagy, Kristina Vintersten; Nagy, Andras

    2016-01-01

    The female mouse estrous cycle is divided into four phases: proestrus (development of ovarian follicles), estrus (ovulation), metestrus (formation of corpora lutea), and diestrus (beginning of follicle development for next ovulation and elimination of previous oocytes). The appearance of the epithelium of the external genitalia is used to identify the stage of the estrous cycle of a female mouse. This is usually easier to see in strains with either no or only light skin pigmentation. By examining the color, moistness, and degree of swelling of the vagina, females in estrus can readily be identified. To set up the matings, females are examined in the afternoon, and those in estrus are placed into the cages with males (one or two females in each cage with one male). Usually, 50% or more of the selected females will mate. The presence of a vaginal copulation plug next morning indicates that mating has occurred, but it does not mean that a pregnancy will result even if proven breeder fertile males were used. It is important to check vaginal plugs early in the morning because they fall out or are no longer detectable ~12 h after mating or sometimes earlier. PMID:27480722

  14. Canadian sponsored plug-in hybrids and their impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzpatrick, N. [Azure Dynamics Corp., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    This paper provided details of plug-in hybrid vehicles designed by Canadian companies and sponsored by the Canadian government. Canada's role in developing PHEVs and its contributions to PHEV research were also explored. The first plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) project in Canada involved the design of a parallel hybrid with a 10 kWh battery built by a team at the University of Toronto. After an international symposium on electric vehicles was held in Toronto in 1988, a review of battery activities was conducted across Canada. Results of the review showed that new developments in advanced lithium batteries and magnets would provide new impetus for electric and hybrid vehicle designs. The success of the programs has meant that conventional hybrid technology is now successfully penetrating the delivery vehicle and shuttle bus markets. Canada now holds a leading place in the commercial hybrid vehicle niche. It was concluded that the Canadian government should continue to support programs investigating both drivelines and batteries for hybrid vehicles. 4 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig.

  15. The sealing performance of bentonite/crushed basalt borehole plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mixtures of crushed rock and bentonite are considered for backfilling and sealing high-level nuclear waste repositories. Many variables affect the hydraulic conductivity of such mixtures, including the size and shape of the rock particles, method of mixing and emplacement, water content and density of the clay, and the weight ratio of rock to clay. Mixtures of crushed basalt and bentonite have been tested in two types of permeameters, 20 cm diameter stainless steel permeameters and 10 cm diameter PVC permeameters. Plugs were installed as a single lift or in many lifts; the water content of the clay ranged from air-dry to as high as 200%. Preliminary results show that a mixture of 75% crushed basalt and 25% bentonite has a hydraulic conductivity between 1 x 10-9 cm/s and 2.5 x 10-8 cm/s. In some cases, preferential flow paths have developed (possibly as a result of the montmorillonite washing out of the crushed rock matrix), giving hydraulic conductivities as high as 1 x 10-4 cm/s. Other ratios of rock to clay have similar bimodal results. The probability of failure is decreased by including a higher percentage of clay in the plug, crushing the rock finer, and evenly mixing the crushed rock and clay. 136 refs., 50 figs., 7 tabs

  16. Contribution of piezometric measurement to knowledge and management of low water levels: examples on the chalk aquifer in the Champagne Ardennes region

    OpenAIRE

    Stollsteiner, P.; Bessiere, H.; Nicolas, J.; Allier, D.; Berthet, O.

    2015-01-01

    This article is based on a BRGM study on piezometric indicators, threshold values of discharge and groundwater levels for the assessment of potentially-exploitable water resources of chalky watersheds. A method for estimating low water levels based on groundwater levels is presented from three examples representing chalk aquifers with different cycles: annual, combined and interannual. The first is located in Picardy and the two others in the Champagne-Ardennes region. Piezometers with...

  17. Computational modeling of unsteady surfactant-laden liquid plug propagation in neonatal airways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olgac, Ufuk; Muradoglu, Metin

    2013-07-01

    Surfactant-free and surfactant-laden liquid plug propagation in neonatal airways in various generations representing the upper and lower airways are investigated computationally using a finite-difference/front-tracking method. Emphasis is placed on the unsteady surfactant-laden plug propagation as a model for Surfactant Replacement Therapy (SRT) and airway reopening. The numerical method is designed to solve the evolution equations of the interfacial and bulk surfactant concentrations coupled with the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Available experimental data for surfactant Survanta are used to relate surface tension coefficient to surfactant concentration at the interface. It is found that, for the surfactant-free case, the trailing film thickness is in good agreement with Taylor's law for plugs with plug length greater than the airway width. Mechanical stresses that could be injurious to epithelial cells such as pressure and shear stress and their gradients are maximized on the front and rear menisci with increasing magnitudes in the lower generations. These mechanical stresses, especially pressure and pressure gradient, are diminished with the introduction of surfactants. Surfactant is absorbed onto the trailing film and thickens it, eventually leading to either plug rupture or, if totally consumed prior to rupture, to steadily propagating plug. In the upper airways, initially small plugs rupture rapidly and plugs with comparable initial plug length with the airway width persist and propagate steadily. For a more effective SRT treatment, we recommend utilization of plugs with initial plug length greater than the airway width. Increasing surfactant strength or increasing the initially instilled surfactant concentration is found to be ineffective.

  18. Rock mass sealing: experimental assessment of borehole plug performance. Annual report, June 1983-May 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes experimental field and laboratory borehole plugging performance assessment studies that have been performed, completed, started, or planned during the period June 1, 1983-May 31, 1984. Results are given from field flow tests on three cement plugs installed in vertical boreholes in basalt and on one nearly horizontal cement plug. The horizontal plus seals the borehole very well, as does one of the vertical plugs. The initial hydraulic conductivity of the other two vertical field plugs has been relatively high, and remedial action is described. Laboratory simulations have been performed to study the influence of dynamic loading on cement plug performance, and no detrimental effects have been detected. Conversely, drying of cement plugs, especially over extended periods of time and at elevated temperatures does increase the hydraulic conductivity of the plugs severely, as well as reducing their bond strength along the plug-rock interface. Microscopic inspection, strength and flow tests on boreholes in basalt have been used to identify the characteristics of a drilling-induced damaged zone in basalt. While such a damaged zone exists, and has typical features (e.g., fracture density, size, location, orientation) determined by the drilling method and the rock characteristics, it is thin and not likely to be a preferential flowpath. A comprehensive suite of standard engineering characterization tests has been performed on seven commercial bentonites, complemented by flow tests on bentonite plugs, chemical analysis and swelling tests. Experimental designs are given for the study of size and of thermal effects on plug performance, and a few preliminary results are presented. Results are included from ongoing cement push-out tests and swelling measurements

  19. Integrated seismic analysis of the Chalk Group in eastern Denmark—Implications for estimates of maximum palaeo-burial in southwest Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars; Boldreel, Lars Ole; Hansen, Thomas Mejer;

    2011-01-01

    The origin of the topography of southwest Scandinavia is subject to discussion. Analysis of borehole seismic velocity has formed the basis for interpretation of several hundred metres of Neogene uplift in parts of Denmark.Here, refraction seismic data constrain a 7.5km long P-wave velocity model of...... velocities are systematically higher than values of a chalk velocity curve determined in previous studies, and it is estimated that a significant part of the velocity anomaly may be explained by the presence of clay. The remaining velocity anomaly can be explained by 450–500m palaeo-burial of the Chalk Group....... The burial anomaly will be over-estimated by ~150–200m if the analysis is based on the average Chalk Group velocity and clay content is disregarded. Burial anomaly values of ~450–600m result if the strongest velocity contrast at ~600–650m depth is interpreted to be a result of diagenetic effects...

  20. Area balance and strain in an extensional fault system: Strategies for improved oil recovery in fractured chalk, Gilbertown Field, southwestern Alabama. Final report, March 1996--September 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashin, J.C.; Raymond, D.E.; Rindsberg, A.K.; Alabi, G.G.; Carroll, R.E.; Groshong, R.H.; Jin, G.

    1998-12-01

    This project was designed to analyze the structure of Mesozoic and Tertiary strata in Gilbertown Field and adjacent areas to suggest ways in which oil recovery can be improved. The Eutaw Formation comprises 7 major flow units and is dominated by low-resistivity, low-contrast play that is difficult to characterize quantitatively. Selma chalk produces strictly from fault-related fractures that were mineralized as warm fluid migrated from deep sources. Resistivity, dipmeter, and fracture identification logs corroborate that deformation is concentrated in the hanging-wall drag zones. New area balancing techniques were developed to characterize growth strata and confirm that strain is concentrated in hanging-wall drag zones. Curvature analysis indicates that the faults contain numerous fault bends that influence fracture distribution. Eutaw oil is produced strictly from footwall uplifts, whereas Selma oil is produced from fault-related fractures. Clay smear and mineralization may be significant trapping mechanisms in the Eutaw Formation. The critical seal for Selma reservoirs, by contrast, is where Tertiary clay in the hanging wall is juxtaposed with poorly fractured Selma chalk in the footwall. Gilbertown Field can be revitalized by infill drilling and recompletion of existing wells. Directional drilling may be a viable technique for recovering untapped oil from Selma chalk. Revitalization is now underway, and the first new production wells since 1985 are being drilled in the western part of the field.

  1. COMPARISON OF THE TRADITIONAL CHALK AND BOARD LECTURE SYSTEM VERSUS POWER POINT PRESENTATION AS A TEACHING TECHNIQUE FOR TEACHING GROSS ANATOMY TO THE FIRST PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nusrat

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally and conventionally, gross anatomy is taught by lectures and cadaveric dissection and the lectures are taken with chalk and board (C&B or chalk and talk method in, India. But there is always a debate over the most effective method of lecture delivery. AIM : The aim of this study was to compare the role and effectiveness chalk and board method versus power point presentation ( S tudent’s perception as a lecture delivering method for teaching gross anatomy. METHODS: This was a questionnaire based study where 140 out of 150 first professional MBBS students of Medical College Jammu, were asked to fill anonymously a questionnaire about their perceptions of these two lecture delivery methods. The results were analyzed to see if there was any preference of students for any particular method. RESULTS: The majority of the medical students (90.7% preferred PPT presentations, while only 9.3% of students preferred the lectures using chalkboard method. CONCLUSION: Most of the students clearly preferred and accepted the use of PPT presentations, as compared to conventional board teaching for delivery method. So teaching gross anatomy should be carefully amalgamated with use of power point in lecture hall.

  2. Advanced Core Monitoring Framework: An overview description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most significant developments in nuclear power plant operations in recent years is the application of digital computers to monitor and manage power plant process. The introduction of this technology, moreover is not without its problems. At present each of these advanced core monitoring systems as GE's MONICORE, EXXON's POWERPLEX, EPRI's PSMS, etc., works only by itself in an operating configuration which makes it difficult to compare, benchmark or replace with alternative core monitoring packages. The Advanced Core Monitoring Framework (ACMF) was conceived to provide one standard software framework in a number of different virtual-memory mini-computers within which modules from any of the core monitoring systems (both BWR and PWR) could be installed. The primary theme of ACMF is to build a framework that allows software plug-in compatibility for a variety of core monitoring functional packages by carefully controlling (standardizing) module interfaces to a well-defined database and requiring a common man-machine interface to be installed

  3. Bilateral transrenal ureteral occlusion by means of n-butyl cyanoacrylate and AMPLATZER vascular plug

    OpenAIRE

    Grasso, Rosario F; Roberto Luigi Cazzato; Giacomo Luppi; Simona Mercurio; Francesco Giurazza; Riccardo Del Vescovo; Eliodoro Faiella; Bruno Beomonte Zobel

    2014-01-01

    AMPLATZER vascular plug is a widely used embolic agent. In the present paper, we present a case of an 86-year-old female patient who underwent bilateral ureteral occlusion by means of AMPLATZER vascular plug II coupled to n-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) because of recurring pyelonephritis following cystectomy with subsequent bilateral ureterosigmoidostomy (sec. Mainz type II).

  4. Bilateral transrenal ureteral occlusion by means of n-butyl cyanoacrylate and AMPLATZER vascular plug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario F Grasso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available AMPLATZER vascular plug is a widely used embolic agent. In the present paper, we present a case of an 86-year-old female patient who underwent bilateral ureteral occlusion by means of AMPLATZER vascular plug II coupled to n-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA because of recurring pyelonephritis following cystectomy with subsequent bilateral ureterosigmoidostomy (sec. Mainz type II.

  5. Analysis and methodology for measuring oxygen concentration in liquid sodium with a plugging meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxygen concentration in liquid sodium is a critical measurement in assessing the potential for corrosion damage in sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs). There has been little recent work on sodium reactors and oxygen detection. Thus, the technical expertise dealing with oxygen measurements within sodium is no longer readily available in the U.S. Two methods of oxygen detection that have been investigated are the plugging meter and the galvanic cell. One of the overall goals of the Univ. of Wisconsin's sodium research program is to develop an affordable, reliable galvanic cell oxygen sensor. Accordingly, attention must first be dedicated to a well-known standard known as a plugging meter. Therefore, a sodium loop has been constructed on campus in effort to develop the plugging meter technique and gain experience working with liquid metal. The loop contains both a galvanic cell test section and a plugging meter test section. Consistent plugging results have been achieved below 20 [wppm], and a detailed process for achieving effective plugging has been developed. This paper will focus both on an accurate methodology to obtain oxygen concentrations from a plugging meter, and on how to easily control the oxygen concentration of sodium in a test loop. Details of the design, materials, manufacturing, and operation will be presented. Data interpretation will also be discussed, since a modern discussion of plugging data interpretation does not currently exist. (authors)

  6. Axial strength of cement borehole plugs in granite and basalt. Topical report on rock mass sealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes experimental and theoretical studies of the axial strength of cement plugs installed in boreholes drilled coaxially in granite and in basalt cylinders. Experimental work has consisted of loading the cement plugs to failure while measuring loads and displacements. Such tests have been performed on borehole plugs with a diameter and a length ranging from 2.5 cm to 10 cm. Results from over one hundred experiments show that the strength is high, sufficient for anticipated loads at repository depths, but very variable, complicating the design of very short plugs. Significant residual strength (thirty to fifty percent of the peak strength) is observed. A frictional model of the interface shear strength, tau = c + sigma(tan phi), in combination with the assumption of an exponential shear stress distribution or plug-rock load transfer, provides the simplest realistic model for plug strength characterization. The integrated strength thus calculated compares moderately well with experimental results. An extensive review is given of more sophisticated analysis procedures that should be of value for general plug design applications. Generic analyses and their implications for plug performance are included. Variability of experimental results complicates the assessment of their direct detailed applicability. 115 references, 70 figures, 19 tables

  7. The remote handling compatibility analysis of the ITER generic upper port plug structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronden, D. M. S.; Dammann, A.; Elzendoorn, B.; Giacomin, T.; Heemskerk, C.; Loesser, D.; Maquet, P.; van Oosterhout, J.; Pak, S.; Pitcher, C. S.; M. Portalès,; Proust, M.; Udintsev, V.S.; Walsh, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    The ITER diagnostics generic upper port plug (GUPP) is developed as a standardized design for all diagnostic upper port plugs, in which a variety of payloads can be mounted. Here, the remote handling compatibility analysis (RHCA) of the GUPP design is presented that was performed for the GUPP final

  8. Plug and Play Process Control Applied to a District Heating System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Torben; Trangbæk, Klaus; Kallesøe, Carsten Skovmose

    2008-01-01

    The general ideas within plug and play process control (PTC) are to initialize and reconfigure control systems just by plug and play. In this paper these ideas are applied to a district heating pressure control problem. First of all this serves as a concrete example of PTC, secondly some of the f...

  9. Chinese Standards on Refractories Purging Plugs and Well Blocks for Refining Ladle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xiaohui

    2009-01-01

    @@ 1 Scope This standard specifies the classification,technical requirements,test methods,inspection rules,marking,packing,transportation,storage and quality certificate of purging plugs and well blocks for refining ladle. This standard is applicable to the directional slit purging plugs and well blocks for refining ladle.

  10. Feasibility study of a concrete plug made of low pH concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report a concrete plug, used as a barrier between the deposition tunnels and the access tunnel, is investigated. The objectives of the work is to see whether it is possible to use low pH concrete for the plug and whether it can be designed without using reinforcement. The requirements set on the plug are that the water leakage through it should be small enough and that the concrete stresses are limited to a value valid for the concrete used. A modified geometry of the plug is proposed, which makes it possible to use it as a general solution in all deposition tunnels. Material properties of a low pH concrete (B200) determined by CBI have been used. Loads considered in the study is the pressure from water and swelling, the temperature change in the rock and plug due to heat development from nuclear fuel stored in nearby copper canisters, pre-stressing in the plug due to cooling during construction and the shrinkage of concrete in the plug. Two-dimensional, axis-symmetric finite element analyses, assuming linear elastic material behaviour in rock and concrete where contact friction between concrete and rock is taken into consideration, have been used to study the structural response of the plug. A total of 48 main load combinations, consisting of 8 different load scenarios and 6 material combinations, have been used. It is found that the concrete plug will not remain uncracked when subjected to the loads studied but that it, nevertheless, is possible to achieve an unreinforced concrete plug that satisfies the requirements set up. The minimum size of the concrete compressed zone will be 0.5 m, resulting in a water leakage through the plug determined to be lower than the requirement of 0.01 l/min set up in this study. Further, the maximum compressive stresses of interest are 33 MPa and the maximum displacement in the plug is about 3 mm, which are deemed to be satisfactorily. Consequently, it is concluded that it seems possible to use low pH concrete for the plug

  11. Self locking drive system for rotating plug of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A self locking drive system for rotating the plugs on the head of a nuclear reactor which is able to restrain plug motion if a seismic event whould occur during reactor refueling is described. A servomotor is engaged via a gear train and a bull gear to the plug. Connected to the gear train is a feedback control system which allows the motor to rotate the plug to predetermined locations for refueling of the reactor. The gear train contains a self locking double enveloping worm gear set. The worm gear set is utilized for its self locking nature to prevent unwanted rotation of the plugs as the result of an earthquake. The double enveloping type is used because its unique contour spreads the load across several teeth providing added strength and allowing the use of a conventional size worm

  12. Final report of the borehole, shaft, and tunnel sealing test - Volume 1: Borehole plugging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Borehole Plugging Experiment comprised field tests of the sealing function and the practicality in handling and application of plugs consisting of segments of perforated metal casings filled with cylindrical blocks of highly compacted sodium bentonite. Preparative tests had shown that the clay swells out through the perforation and embeds the casings. The field tests demonstrated that even very long holes can be effectively sealed by such plugs and that the clay becomes very homogeneous and forms a tight contact with the rock in a relatively short time. By that the plugs become practically impervious and the flow along the clay/rock contact will be insignificant. The longevity of such plugs extends over several thousands years under the conditions that usually prevail in crystalline rock. (author) 8 refs., 37 figs., 8 tabs

  13. Small Intestinal Submucosa Plug for Closure of Dilated Nephrostomy Tracts: A Pilot Study in Swine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate efficacy of a plug made of small intestinal submucosa (SIS) for closure of dilated nephrostomy tract in the kidney after nephroscopy. Ten kidneys in 5 swine had nephrostomy tracts dilated up to 8 mm. The SIS plug was placed into the dilated renal cortex under nephroscopic control. Follow-up arteriograms, retrograde pyelograms, and macroscopic and histologic studies at 24 h (n = 4), 6 weeks (n = 2), and 3 months (n = 4) were performed to evaluate the efficacy of the plug. The SIS plug effectively closed the dilated nephrostomy tract. Follow-up studies showed minimal changes of the kidneys, except for 1 small infarction, regarding inflammatory and foreign-body reactions and progressive scarring of the SIS. SIS plug is effective for occlusion of dilated nephrostomy tract after nephroscopy. Its efficacy should be compared with other therapeutic options.

  14. An investigation report on the defective occurrence of the lower end plug welded section for JOYO MK-III. An investigation result about the inclusion occurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrication of the cladding tube with the lower end plug for the core fuel assembly of the experimental fast reactor JOYO and the proto-type fast breeder reactor MONJU has been performed by Tamatsukuri inspection branch of quality assurance section, Technical administration division, Plutonium fuel center since 1989. The fabrication process of the cladding tube with the lower end plug consists of numbering process of fuel element number to the lower end plug, welding process of the lower end plug and the cladding tube, and inspection process after welding (visual inspection, dimensional inspection and X-ray radiography). The processing of cladding tube with the lower end plug which is used for the initial loading core fuel assembly of JOYO MK-III has been carried out from August to May in 1996. The many tungsten inclusions were observed by X-ray radiography in the welds of the cladding tube with the lower end plug that were fabricated in the fourth fabrication campaign performed from July to August in 1996. The investigation of the causes was carried out about the welding process of the cladding tube and the lower end plug based on the fabrication record. The following three items were confirmed as a result. 1. As for the ingredients of inclusions observed by the X-ray radiography, it was proved by EPMA (Electron Probe X-ray Micro-analyzer) analysis that it was the same as the tungsten electrode. 2. Cracks, chips and consumption were observed in the tip of the electrodes used for welding of the lower end plug. And, cracks and chips were observed in the electrodes as well which hadn't been used. 3. It was proved that the tip of the electrode was exhausted remarkably when the distance between the tip of the electrode and the welding section became less than 0.08 mm. (here in after to as the distance between the electrodes). Based on the above result, examination of reappearance for the inclusion generation was performed simulating the shape of cracks and chips and

  15. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles in smart grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yin

    In this thesis, in order to investigate the impact of charging load from plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), a stochastic model is developed in Matlab. In this model, two main types of PHEVs are defined: public transportation vehicles and private vehicles. Different charging time schedule, charging speed and battery capacity are considered for each type of vehicles. The simulation results reveal that there will be two load peaks (at noon and in evening) when the penetration level of PHEVs increases continuously to 30% in 2030. Therefore, optimization tool is utilized to shift load peaks. This optimization process is based on real time pricing and wind power output data. With the help of smart grid, power allocated to each vehicle could be controlled. As a result, this optimization could fulfill the goal of shifting load peaks to valley areas where real time price is low or wind output is high.

  16. Control of resistance plug welding using quantitative feedback theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentley, A.E. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Horowitz, I. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)]|[Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel)]|[Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, OH (United States); Chait, Y.; Rodrigues, J. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Resistance welding is used extensively throughout the manufacturing industry. Variations in weld quality often result in costly post-weld inspections. Applications of feed-back control to such processes have been limited by the lack of accurate models describing the nonlinear dynamics of this process. A new system based on electrode displacement feedback is developed that greatly improves quality control of the resistance plug welding process. The system is capable of producing repeatable welds of consistent displacement (and thus consistent quality), with wide variations in weld parameters. This paper describes the feedback design of a robust controller using Quantitative Feedback Theory for this highly complex process, and the experimental results of the applied system.

  17. Battery Test Manual For Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey R. Belt

    2010-09-01

    This battery test procedure manual was prepared for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Program. It is based on technical targets established for energy storage development projects aimed at meeting system level DOE goals for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV). The specific procedures defined in this manual support the performance and life characterization of advanced battery devices under development for PHEV’s. However, it does share some methods described in the previously published battery test manual for power-assist hybrid electric vehicles. Due to the complexity of some of the procedures and supporting analysis, a revision including some modifications and clarifications of these procedures is expected. As in previous battery and capacitor test manuals, this version of the manual defines testing methods for full-size battery systems, along with provisions for scaling these tests for modules, cells or other subscale level devices.

  18. Battery Test Manual For Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey R. Belt

    2010-12-01

    This battery test procedure manual was prepared for the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Program. It is based on technical targets established for energy storage development projects aimed at meeting system level DOE goals for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV). The specific procedures defined in this manual support the performance and life characterization of advanced battery devices under development for PHEV’s. However, it does share some methods described in the previously published battery test manual for power-assist hybrid electric vehicles. Due to the complexity of some of the procedures and supporting analysis, a revision including some modifications and clarifications of these procedures is expected. As in previous battery and capacitor test manuals, this version of the manual defines testing methods for full-size battery systems, along with provisions for scaling these tests for modules, cells or other subscale level devices.

  19. Wireless Plug and Play Control Systems: Hardware, Networks, and Protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meybodi, Soroush Afkhami

    2012-01-01

    protocols that can fulfill the stringent requirements of P3C case studies in general. In this part, after a thorough review of available Access and Routing protocols in industrial wireless networks, a combination of a deterministic Medium Access Control (MAC) protocol and a clustered flooding-based routing...... accordance with the control topology. Functionality of the new routing metric is verified by simulations within a flooding-based routing algorithm. The results of this research project create a clear and concise interface for the other work packages of P3C which are concluded earlier.......This dissertation reports the result of efforts to identify and solve the problems that arise when a control system is to be designed for various industrial case studies of the Plug and Play Process Control (P3C) project that require autonomous addition/removal of sensors, actuators and subsystems...

  20. Uranium series geochemistry in aquifers: quantification of transport mechanisms of uranium and daughter products: the chalk aquifer (Champagne, France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the increase of contaminant flux of radionuclides in surface environment (soil, river, aquifer...), there is a need to understand and model the processes that control the distribution of uranium and its daughter products during transport within aquifers. We have used U-series disequilibria as an analogue for the transport of uranium and its daughter products in aquifer to understand such mechanisms. The measurements of uranium (234U et 238U), thorium (230Th et 232Th), 226Ra and 222Rn isotopes in the solid and liquid phases of the chalk aquifer in Champagne (East of France) allows us to understand the processes responsible for fractionation within the uranium decay chain. Fractionations are induced by physical and chemical properties of the elements (leaching, adsorption) but also by radioactive properties (recoil effect during α-decay). For the first time a comprehensive sampling of the solid phase has been performed, allowing quantifying mechanisms responsible for the long term evolution of the aquifer. A non steady state 1D model has been developed which takes into account leaching, adsorption processes as well as radioactive filiation and α-recoil effect. Retardation coefficients have been calculated for uranium, thorium and radium. The aquifer is characterised by a double porosity, and the contribution of fracture and matrix porosity on the water/rock interaction processes has been estimated. (author)

  1. Impacts of climate change on in-stream nitrogen in a lowland chalk stream. An appraisal of adaptation strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, P.G.; Butterfield, D.; Wade, A.J. [Aquatic Environments Research Centre, Department of Geography, University of Reading, Reading, RG6 6AB (United Kingdom); Wilby, R.L. [Environment Agency, Trentside Office, Scarrington Road, West Bridgford, Nottingham, NG2 5FA (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    The impacts of climate change on nitrogen (N) in a lowland chalk stream are investigated using a dynamic modelling approach. The INCA-N model is used to simulate transient daily hydrology and water quality in the River Kennet using temperature and precipitation scenarios downscaled from the General Circulation Model (GCM) output for the period 1961-2100. The three GCMs (CGCM2, CSIRO and HadCM3) yield very different river flow regimes with the latter projecting significant periods of drought in the second half of the 21st century. Stream-water N concentrations increase over time as higher temperatures enhance N release from the soil, and lower river flows reduce the dilution capacity of the river. Particular problems are shown to occur following severe droughts when N mineralization is high and the subsequent breaking of the drought releases high nitrate loads into the river system. Possible strategies for reducing climate-driven N loads are explored using INCA-N. The measures include land use change or fertiliser reduction, reduction in atmospheric nitrate and ammonium deposition, and the introduction of water meadows or connected wetlands adjacent to the river. The most effective strategy is to change land use or reduce fertiliser use, followed by water meadow creation, and atmospheric pollution controls. Finally, a combined approach involving all three strategies is investigated and shown to reduce in-stream nitrate concentrations to those pre-1950s even under climate change. (author)

  2. Identification of a New Hesperornithiform from the Cretaceous Niobrara Chalk and Implications for Ecologic Diversity among Early Diving Birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa Bell

    Full Text Available The Smoky Hill Member of the Niobrara Chalk in Kansas (USA has yielded the remains of numerous members of the Hesperornithiformes, toothed diving birds from the late Early to Late Cretaceous. This study presents a new taxon of hesperornithiform from the Smoky Hill Member, Fumicollis hoffmani, the holotype of which is among the more complete hesperornithiform skeletons. Fumicollis has a unique combination of primitive (e.g. proximal and distal ends of femur not expanded, elongate pre-acetabular ilium, small and pyramidal patella and derived (e.g. dorsal ridge on metatarsal IV, plantarly-projected curve in the distal shaft of phalanx III:1 hesperornithiform characters, suggesting it was more specialized than small hesperornithiforms like Baptornis advenus but not as highly derived as the larger Hesperornis regalis. The identification of Fumicollis highlights once again the significant diversity of hesperornithiforms that existed in the Late Cretaceous Western Interior Seaway. This diversity points to the existence of a complex ecosystem, perhaps with a high degree of niche partitioning, as indicated by the varying degrees of diving specializations among these birds.

  3. Pre-operational HTO/HT surveys in the vicinity of the Chalk River Laboratories tritium extraction plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surveys of the concentrations of HT and HTO in the atmosphere downwind of the Chalk River Laboratories reactor facilities were carried out in 1986 November, and in 1989 March, April and September under different conditions of air temperature, wind direction, and snow or vegetative cover. HT usually amounted to 1-5% of total tritium, but values up to 20% were observed, probably resulting from preferential removal of HTO. In all of the surveys, the greater persistence in the atmosphere of HT than of HTO was evident. The existing levels of HT are such that they will not be augmented significantly by chronic releases from the Tritium Extraction Plant (TEP) when it comes into operation. Hence, operation of the TEP will not facilitate studies of the environmental behaviour of chronically released HT. However, longer term studies of the distribution of HT from the existing facilities would be worthwhile. Soil and vegetation HTO levels in the study area are reported. Further studies of the distribution of tritium between the air, soil and vegetation in areas subjected to chronic exposure would be valuable

  4. Management of Legacy Spent Nuclear Fuel Wastes at the Chalk River Laboratories: The Challenges and Innovative Solutions Implemented - 13301

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL's Fuel Packaging and Storage (FPS) Project was initiated in 2004 to retrieve, transfer, and stabilize an identified inventory of degraded research reactor fuel that had been emplaced within in-ground 'Tile Hole' structures in Chalk River Laboratories' Waste Management Area in the 1950's and 60's. Ongoing monitoring of the legacy fuel storage conditions had identified that moisture present in the storage structures had contributed to corrosion of both the fuel and the storage containers. This prompted the initiation of the FPS Project which has as its objective to design, construct, and commission equipment and systems that would allow for the ongoing safe storage of this fuel until a final long-term management, or disposition, pathway was available. The FPS Project provides systems and technologies to retrieve and transfer the fuel from the Waste Management Area to a new facility that will repackage, dry, safely store and monitor the fuel for a period of 50 years. All equipment and the new storage facility are designed and constructed to meet the requirements for Class 1 Nuclear Facilities in Canada. (authors)

  5. Borehole television surveys and acoustic televiewer logging at the National Hydrology Research Institute's hydrogeological research area in Chalk River, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of studies of the fracture distribution and fracture orientation encountered in 23 boreholes at the National Hydrology Research Institute's Hydrogeological Research Area in Chalk River. Borehole television camera and acoustic televiewer data were used to determine: the fracture distribution as a function of depth; the aperture distribution as a function of depth; and, the predominant fracture sets. Fracture frameworks of the rock mass were constructed based on these data. The rock mass was found to be moderately to well fractured. Many open fractures were detected in the CR-series boreholes, especially in the upper 70 m. Three interconnecting, highly fractured zones are intersected by the CR-series boreholes between elevations of 96.80 m and 56.56 m, 34.91 m and -22.42 m, and -56.56 m and -61.31 m, while two interconnecting fracture zones are encountered by the FS-series boreholes between elevations 103.89 m and 96.64 m, and 108.20 m and 95.08 m. The predominant fracture sets strike east-west, northwest and indeterminably subhorizontal. The predominant set of veins strikes to the south. The subsurface fracture patterns and vein patterns were found to be similar to those observed on surface outcrops

  6. US team measurements during the June 1987 experimental HT release at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories, Ontario, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In June 1987, an experiment was performed at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories in Ontario, Canada, to study the oxidation of HT in the environment. The experiment involved a 30-minute release of 100 Ci of HT to the atmosphere at an elevation of one meter. The HTOHT ratios were shown to slowly increase downwind (/approximately/4 /times/ 10/sup /minus/5/ at 50 meters to almost 10/sup /minus/3 at 400 meters) as conversion of HT takes place. For several days after the release, HTO concentrations in the atmosphere remained elevated. Freeze-dried water from vegetation samples was found to be very low in HTO immediately after the release suggesting a very low direct uptake of HTO in air by vegetation. The tritiated water concentration increased during the first day, peaking during the second day (about 400 to 600 pCiml of water at 50 meters from the source) and decreasing by the end of the second day. The organically bound tritium continued to accumulate during the period following exposure (about 10 pCigm dry weight at 50 meters after two days). 4 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Diagnosing hydrological limitations of a land surface model: application of JULES to a deep-groundwater chalk basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vine, N.; Butler, A.; McIntyre, N.; Jackson, C.

    2016-01-01

    Land surface models (LSMs) are prospective starting points to develop a global hyper-resolution model of the terrestrial water, energy, and biogeochemical cycles. However, there are some fundamental limitations of LSMs related to how meaningfully hydrological fluxes and stores are represented. A diagnostic approach to model evaluation and improvement is taken here that exploits hydrological expert knowledge to detect LSM inadequacies through consideration of the major behavioural functions of a hydrological system: overall water balance, vertical water redistribution in the unsaturated zone, temporal water redistribution, and spatial water redistribution over the catchment's groundwater and surface-water systems. Three types of information are utilized to improve the model's hydrology: (a) observations, (b) information about expected response from regionalized data, and (c) information from an independent physics-based model. The study considers the JULES (Joint UK Land Environmental Simulator) LSM applied to a deep-groundwater chalk catchment in the UK. The diagnosed hydrological limitations and the proposed ways to address them are indicative of the challenges faced while transitioning to a global high resolution model of the water cycle.

  8. Projecting impacts of climate change on hydrological conditions and biotic responses in a chalk valley riparian wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, A. R.; Thompson, J. R.; Acreman, M. C.

    2016-03-01

    Projected changes in climate are likely to substantially impact wetland hydrological conditions that will in turn have implications for wetland ecology. Assessing ecohydrological impacts of climate change requires models that can accurately simulate water levels at the fine-scale resolution to which species and communities respond. Hydrological conditions within the Lambourn Observatory at Boxford, Berkshire, UK were simulated using the physically based, distributed model MIKE SHE, calibrated to contemporary surface and groundwater levels. The site is a 10 ha lowland riparian wetland where complex geological conditions and channel management exert strong influences on the hydrological regime. Projected changes in precipitation, potential evapotranspiration, channel discharge and groundwater level were derived from the UK Climate Projections 2009 ensemble of climate models for the 2080s under different scenarios. Hydrological impacts of climate change differ through the wetland over short distances depending on the degree of groundwater/surface-water interaction. Discrete areas of groundwater upwelling are associated with an exaggerated response of water levels to climate change compared to non-upwelling areas. These are coincident with regions where a weathered chalk layer, which otherwise separates two main aquifers, is absent. Simulated water levels were linked to requirements of the MG8 plant community and Desmoulin's whorl snail (Vertigo moulinsiana) for which the site is designated. Impacts on each are shown to differ spatially and in line with hydrological impacts. Differences in water level requirements for this vegetation community and single species highlight the need for separate management strategies in distinct areas of the wetland.

  9. Hydrogeochemical processes affecting the migration of radionuclides in a fluvial sand aquifer at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the mid-1950's two experimental disposals of liquid radioactive waste containing about 700 curries of strontium-90 and cesium-137 were made into pits in sandy ground at one of the disposal areas at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories. Since then, the wastes have migrated into two nearby aquifers and have chromatographically separated into strontium-90 and cesium-137 plumes moving at velocities less than that of the transporting groundwater. Analysis of radioactively contaminated aquifer sediments showed that most of the strontium-90 is exchangeably adsorbed, primarily to feldspars and layer silicates (mainly biotite); the rest is either specifically adsorbed to iron (III) and perhaps manganese (IV) oxhydroxides or fixed to unknown sinks. Less than one half of adsorbed cesium-137 is exchangeable with 0.5 m calcium chloride; the high levels of cesium-137 adsorption and fixation are probably due to its reaction with micaceous minerals. Complexation of strontium-90 and cesium-137 does not appear to be an important factor affecting their transport or adsorption. In studies of groundwater quality or pollution, dissolved oxygen and sulfide should be measured in addition to the redox potential since it allows independent assessment of the redox levels. The latter were found to affect the mobility of multivalent transition metals and nonmetals. (DN)

  10. Mechanistic Understanding of Microbial Plugging for Improved Sweep Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Bryant; Larry Britton

    2008-09-30

    Microbial plugging has been proposed as an effective low cost method of permeability reduction. Yet there is a dearth of information on the fundamental processes of microbial growth in porous media, and there are no suitable data to model the process of microbial plugging as it relates to sweep efficiency. To optimize the field implementation, better mechanistic and volumetric understanding of biofilm growth within a porous medium is needed. In particular, the engineering design hinges upon a quantitative relationship between amount of nutrient consumption, amount of growth, and degree of permeability reduction. In this project experiments were conducted to obtain new data to elucidate this relationship. Experiments in heterogeneous (layered) beadpacks showed that microbes could grow preferentially in the high permeability layer. Ultimately this caused flow to be equally divided between high and low permeability layers, precisely the behavior needed for MEOR. Remarkably, classical models of microbial nutrient uptake in batch experiments do not explain the nutrient consumption by the same microbes in flow experiments. We propose a simple extension of classical kinetics to account for the self-limiting consumption of nutrient observed in our experiments, and we outline a modeling approach based on architecture and behavior of biofilms. Such a model would account for the changing trend of nutrient consumption by bacteria with the increasing biomass and the onset of biofilm formation. However no existing model can explain the microbial preference for growth in high permeability regions, nor is there any obvious extension of the model for this observation. An attractive conjecture is that quorum sensing is involved in the heterogeneous bead packs.

  11. A study on the thermal shock for explosive plugged part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supposing the thermal shock which take place in the heat-exchanger due to misoperation of valves, thermal shock test of explosive plugged part is conducted under severer condition than that in service. Microscopic inspection (x 200) of the section of specimen after thermal shock test, ultrasonic inspection and observation of acoustic emission during testing are conducted to detect the peeling of bonded boundary and cracking in the material. SUS 321 steel, 2 1/4 Cr - 1 Mo steel and SUS 304 steel are used as testing materials, supposing the material of the super heater, and evaporator of FBR, and steam generater of PWR, respectively. Range of temperature variation are also desided supposing the operating temperature of secondary cooling circuit of each type of reactor. Reasults of testing are plotted against the number of heating and cooling cycles. However, peeling is seemed to take place in short period after beginning of the testing, considerable number of cycles are required to initiate the cracks and to propagate them to inside of plug or outside surface of tube plate. Mechanism of fracture due to thermal shock are considered and it is concluded that there are three type of fracture depending on the result of welding. Conclusions of these investigations are obtained as follows. 1. Failures of explosive welded part are divided into two types, peeling and cracking. 2. There are three type of crack initiation, i.e. crack initiation from peeling, crack initiation from unbonded zone near the surface of tube plate, and crack initiation from melting zone in bonded boundary. 3. It is possible to distinguish the peeling and cracking by AE, however, it is impossible to distinguish the above three type of crack initiation by AE. 4. Peeling occurs immediately after beginning of test but cracking occurs after 150 ∼ 200 cycles in SH, 200 ∼ 400 cycles in EV and 1000 cycles in SG. (J.P.N.)

  12. An illustrative 'plug & play' catastrophe model for groundwater flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Hillier, John; Royse, Kate; Lee, Tzu-Fung; O'Niel, Jullian; Kingdon, Andrew; Hughes, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    Economic losses from natural catastrophes are substantial; e.g., US130 billion in 2010. 'Catastrophe models' are stochastic event-set based models that simulate these risks and underpin their assessment in the insurance industry. Most catastrophe models are proprietary 'black boxes', which limit the level of user interaction, but new regulations (Solvency II) require firms to understand better the assumptions upon which the calculations ultimately rest. Part of this greater transparency requires constraining where uncertainty originates, perhaps by interchanging components provided by rival model vendors in 'plug and play' catastrophe models. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate a practical, accessible way in which this may be made possible. Specifically to do this the first, illustrative 'plug and play' model was created efficiently and effectively using OpenMI, a free 'open-source' model linking standard. In about 100 man-hours climate, groundwater flow, vulnerability, exposure and loss components were linked to output financial losses, i.e., occurrence exceedance probability (OEP) curves. Groundwater flooding near Marlborough (UK) is used for this proof of concept. Losses from this example dataset are small, about £3.8 million for a 33 yr OEP, but groundwater is an important compounding factor in UK flooding and this is the first, albeit rudimentary, attempt to probabilistically model loss for this hazard. Selected components are swopped, and losses calculated to show how insights into the origin of uncertainty can be gained. Crucially, OpenMI has the future potential to operate online and shield valuable data within components whilst allowing them to be swopped. So, it has the potential to underpin a secure, open-source, practical framework of use to the insurance industry.

  13. Hydrotransport plugging study. FY 1980-1981 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyler, L.L.; Lombardo, NJ.; Barnhart, J.S.

    1982-09-01

    Large-particle hydrotransport flow phenomena are analyzed. These include particle suspension mechanisms, relative in situ slip between phases, and shear between separated solid/liquid flow regions. These phenomena are related to the mechanistic force balance modeling approach to predicting nominal and minimum horizontal pipeline transport conditions. Results of four series of tests in a 35 m-long, 0.165 m-diameter plexiglass pipeline are presented. These tests were designed to investigate isolated flow phenomena related to lower limits of operation of large-particle transport. They included measurements of the particle size dependence and flow geometry dependence on interfacial friction factors, initiation of plug flow motion, and plugging tendencies of flow through upward-turning elbows. Numerous flow phenomena and parameter dependencies are included in analysis of predictions made using the force balance modeling approach. Comparisons with data are made where possible and a step-by-step solution procedure is presented. Results show agreement with some data sets and disagreement with others. Most available data, however, are neither extensive enough nor accurate enough to form complete conclusions as to the minimum operating conditions predicted with the force balance modeling approach. Additional data from a systematic experimental program in a once-through pipeline system are necessary to further verify the modeling approach. A limited qualitative analysis of methods proposed to unplug large particle pipelines is presented. Methods assessed include pulsed air injection, vibration augmentation, friction reducing surfactant injection, and mechanical or hydraulic boring machinery. Advantages and disadvantages of each method are assessed qualitatively. Laboratory and field testing are required to determine applications.

  14. Plug-and-play modules for flexible radiosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a plug-and-play radiosynthesis platform and accompanying computer software based on modular subunits that can easily and flexibly be configured to implement a diverse range of radiosynthesis protocols. Modules were developed that perform: (i) reagent storage and delivery, (ii) evaporations and sealed reactions, and (iii) cartridge-based purifications. The reaction module incorporates a simple robotic mechanism that removes tubing from the vessel and replaces it with a stopper prior to sealed reactions, enabling the system to withstand high pressures and thus provide tremendous flexibility in choice of solvents and temperatures. Any number of modules can rapidly be connected together using only a few fluidic connections to implement a particular synthesis, and the resulting system is controlled in a semi-automated fashion by a single software interface. Radiosyntheses of 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]FDG), 1-[18F]fluoro-4-nitrobenzene ([18F]FNB), and 2′-deoxy-2′-[18F]fluoro-1-β-D-arabinofuranosyl cytosine (D-[18F]FAC) were performed to validate the system and demonstrate its versatility. - Highlights: • A flexible, plug-and-play radiosynthesis platform based on modules was developed. • Reaction, reagent delivery, and purification modules can be readily configured for diverse syntheses. • The reaction module is capable of high-pressure sealed reactions without solvent loss. • Any number of modules can be combined and controlled in a semi-automated fashion using a personal computer. • Syntheses of [18F]FDG, [18F]FNB, and D-[18F]FAC demonstrate versatility

  15. Sexual behavior, cannibalism, and mating plugs as sticky traps in the orb weaver spider Leucauge argyra (Tetragnathidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aisenberg, Anita; Barrantes, Gilbert

    2011-07-01

    Unpublished field observations in Leucauge argyra, a tropical orb weaver spider, suggest the occurrence of conspicuous mating plugs that could reduce or prevent remating attempts. Otherwise, the sexual behavior of this species remains unknown. The aims of this study were to describe the courtship behavior and copulation in L. argyra and investigate mating plug formation in this species. Fourteen virgin females and 12 plugged females were exposed to up to three males and checked for mating plug formation. Of the 12 virgins that copulated, nine produced plugs (five immediately after copulation), and the five plugged females that copulated produced another mating plug immediately after copulation. We did not detect the transfer of any male substance during copulation but observed a whitish liquid emerging from female genital ducts. Plug formation was positively associated with male twanging during courtship. One virgin and four plugged females cannibalized males. In seven trials with virgins and in three trials with plugged females, the male's palp adhered to a substance that emerged from female genital ducts and spread on her genital plate. The male had to struggle energetically to free his glued palp; two of these males were cannibalized while trying to release their palps. Females seem to determine copulation duration by altering the timing of mating plug formation and through sexual cannibalism. This is the first case reported of a mating plug as a sticky trap for males.

  16. Low-pH concrete plug for sealing the KBS-3V deposition tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malm, Richard (Vattenfall Power Consultant AB (Sweden))

    2012-01-15

    In SKB's main alternative for final repository of radioactive material, KBS-3V, the backfilled deposition tunnels will be separated from the remaining tunnel system with concrete plugs. These concrete plugs will be designed for a life span of 100 years and their function shall maintain until the transport tunnels outside the plug are backfilled and the natural geohydrological conditions have been restored. The purpose of this report is to document the results and the evaluation from this project and motivate the choice of the most appropriate design for closing the deposition tunnels in the spent fuel repository. The purpose has also been to investigate and present the loads acting on the plug system and determine the load capacity of the concrete plug. This report is the result of a project conducted between 2009-01-01 - 2010-12-31 and the project group has made its assessment based on the conditions and requirements that are present today. The entire design of the plug system is part of this project, where the plug system consists of a filter, a bentonite seal and a cast-in-place concrete plug. Two different conceptual design alternatives for the concrete plug have been studied in this report, one long tapered plug and one dome shaped plug. The results in this report focus on the choice of the conceptual design for the concrete plug and its possibility to assist the entire plug system to satisfy its requirements. It is a complicated task to dispose the radioactive waste and it sets high technical requirements on the design and the production of the backfill and the closing of the deposition tunnels. The aim of this project is to design and develop a plug system suitable for production. This is done by the means of numerical calculations and analyses. The primary function of the concrete plug is to act as a resistance to the external loads originated from the axial expansion of the backfill and the water pressure. However, the entire plug system has a

  17. Low-pH concrete plug for sealing the KBS-3V deposition tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In SKB's main alternative for final repository of radioactive material, KBS-3V, the backfilled deposition tunnels will be separated from the remaining tunnel system with concrete plugs. These concrete plugs will be designed for a life span of 100 years and their function shall maintain until the transport tunnels outside the plug are backfilled and the natural geohydrological conditions have been restored. The purpose of this report is to document the results and the evaluation from this project and motivate the choice of the most appropriate design for closing the deposition tunnels in the spent fuel repository. The purpose has also been to investigate and present the loads acting on the plug system and determine the load capacity of the concrete plug. This report is the result of a project conducted between 2009-01-01 - 2010-12-31 and the project group has made its assessment based on the conditions and requirements that are present today. The entire design of the plug system is part of this project, where the plug system consists of a filter, a bentonite seal and a cast-in-place concrete plug. Two different conceptual design alternatives for the concrete plug have been studied in this report, one long tapered plug and one dome shaped plug. The results in this report focus on the choice of the conceptual design for the concrete plug and its possibility to assist the entire plug system to satisfy its requirements. It is a complicated task to dispose the radioactive waste and it sets high technical requirements on the design and the production of the backfill and the closing of the deposition tunnels. The aim of this project is to design and develop a plug system suitable for production. This is done by the means of numerical calculations and analyses. The primary function of the concrete plug is to act as a resistance to the external loads originated from the axial expansion of the backfill and the water pressure. However, the entire plug system has a requirement

  18. 3D FEM Simulation of Rolling Load Working on Piercer Plug in Mannesmann Piercing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Motohisa

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents 3D FEM simulation of piercer plug in Mannesmann piercing process. Target is establishment of a virtual piercing experiment tool to assistant piercer plug development. FEM simulation analysis has been applied to Mannesmann piercing process previously. Aspect of those studies is how to simulate material flow in piercing process, especially focused on how to describe ductile fracture which is known as Mannesmann effect. Thus far, simulation of rolling tools has not been focused. Present piercer plugs, made of special alloys, are damaged severely and quickly in case of piercing higher Cr contented alloys in seamless steel tube production process. Therefore, development of FEM simulation on rolling tools has been demanded in production side. 3D FEM analysis of piercer plug is performed with ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian—Eulerian) method by using ABAQUS/Explicit 6.9. Simulations are thermo-mechanical, elasto-plastic coupled, and dynamic calculation. Piercer plug and the billet are modeled by solid elements to analyze various factors on stress, strain and temperature. Ductile fracture is not considered in the simulations. Simulation results are correlated sufficiently to experimental results on damage of piercer plugs. Verifying absolute value of simulated factors is hard since there are few empirical methods to measure them. As a conclusion, studied simulations are sufficient as a virtual piercing experiment tool to develop higher performance piercer plugs.

  19. Experimental investigation of liquid-liquid plug formation in a T-junction microchannel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeli, Panagiota; Chinaud, Maxime; Roumpea, Eynagelia-Panagiota; Weheliye, Weheliye; Omar. K. Matar Collaboration; Lyes Kahouadji Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Plug formation mechanism of two immiscible liquids was studied experimentally in a 200 μm microchannel using two innovative micro Particle Image Velocimetry (μ PIV) techniques i.e. two-colour μ PIV and high speed bright field μ PIV. The aqueous phase was a water/glycerol solution whereas the organic phase was silicon oil with a range of viscosities from 5 to 155 cSt. Experiments were conducted for different fluid flow rate combinations in the T-junction inlet and it was observed that velocity profiles within the forming plugs depend on the flow rate ratios. The velocity field studies provided insight into the plug mechanism revealing that the interface curvature at the rear of the forming plug changes sign at the later stages of plug formation and accelerates the thinning of the meniscus leading to plug breakage. Results from the two-colour PIV show that the continuous phase resists the flow of the dispersed phase into the main channel at the rear of the plug meniscus and causes the change in the interface curvature. Department of Chemical Engineering South Kensington Campus Imperial College London SW7 2AZ.

  20. Preconceptual systems and equipment for plugging of man-made accesses to a repository in basalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents results of a study leading to preconceptual designs for plugging boreholes, shafts, and tunnels to a nuclear waste repository in basalt. Beginning design criteria include a list of preferred plug materials and plugging machines that were selected to suit the environmental conditions, and depths, diameters, and orientations of the accesses to a nuclear waste repository in the Columbia River basalts located in eastern Washington State. The environmental conditions are described. The fiscal year 1979-1980 Task II work is presented in two parts: preliminary testing of materials for plugging of man-made accesses to a repository in basalt (described in a separate report); and preconceptual systems and equipment for plugging of man-made accesses to a repository in basalt (described in this report). To fulfill the scope of the Task II work, Woodward-Clyde Consultants (WCC) was requested to: provide preconceptual systems for plugging boreholes, tunnels, and shafts in basalt; describe preconceptual borehole plugging equipment for placing the selected materials in man-made accesses; utilize the quality assurance program, program plan and schedule, and work plans previously developed for Task II; and prepare a preliminary report