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Sample records for chain protein transfer

  1. Evolutionary conservation of heavy chain protein transfer between glycosaminoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanggaard, Kristian W; Hansen, Lone; Scavenius, Carsten; Wisniewski, Hans-Georg; Kristensen, Torsten; Thøgersen, Ida B; Enghild, Jan J

    2010-04-01

    The bikunin proteins are composed of heavy chains (HCs) covalently linked to a chondroitin sulfate chain originating from Ser-10 of bikunin. Tumor necrosis factor stimulated gene-6 protein (TSG-6)/heavy chain 2 (HC2) cleaves this unique cross-link and transfers the HCs to hyaluronan and other glycosaminoglycans via a covalent HC*TSG-6 intermediate. In the present study, we have investigated if this reaction is evolutionary conserved based on the hypothesis that it is of fundamental importance. The results revealed that plasma/serum samples from mammal, bird, and reptile were able to form TSG-6 complexes suggesting the presence of proteins with the same function as the human bikunin proteins. To substantiate this, the complex forming protein from Gallus gallus (Gg) plasma was purified and identified as a Gg homolog of human HC2*bikunin. In addition, Gg pre-alpha-inhibitor and smaller amount of high molecular weight forms composed of bikunin and two HCs were purified. Like the human bikunin proteins, the purified Gg proteins were all stabilized by a protein-glycosaminoglycan-protein cross-link, i.e. the HCs were covalently attached to a chondroitin sulfate originating from bikunin. Furthermore, the complex formed between Gg HC2*bikunin and human TSG-6 appeared to be identical to that of the human proteins. Akin to human, Gg HC2 was further transferred to hyaluronan when present, and when incubated in vitro, Gg pre-alpha-inhibitor and TSG-6, failed to form the intermediate covalent complex, essential for HC transfer. Significantly, Gg HC2, analogous to human HC2, promoted complex formation between human HC3 and human TSG-6, substantiating the evolutionary conservation of these interactions. The present study demonstrates that the unique interactions between bikunin proteins, glycosaminoglycans, and TSG-6 are evolutionary conserved, emphasizing the physiological importance of the TSG-6/HC2-mediated HC-transfer reaction. In addition, the data show that the evolution of

  2. Electron Transfer Chain Catalysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ Electron-transfer chain (ETC) catalysis belongs to the family of chain reactions where the electron is the catalyst. The ETC mechanism could be initiated by chemical activation, electrochemistry, or photolysis. If this pathway is applied to the preparation of organometallic complexes, it utilizes the greatly enhanced reactivity of organometallic 17e and 19e radicals. The chemical propagation is followed by the cross electron-transfer while the electron-transfer step is also followed by the chemical propagation, creating a loop in which reactants are facilely transformed into products. Interestingly the overall reaction is without any net redox change.

  3. Electron Transfer Chain Catalysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; LingKang

    2001-01-01

    Electron-transfer chain (ETC) catalysis belongs to the family of chain reactions where the electron is the catalyst. The ETC mechanism could be initiated by chemical activation, electrochemistry, or photolysis. If this pathway is applied to the preparation of organometallic complexes, it utilizes the greatly enhanced reactivity of organometallic 17e and 19e radicals. The chemical propagation is followed by the cross electron-transfer while the electron-transfer step is also followed by the chemical propagation, creating a loop in which reactants are facilely transformed into products. Interestingly the overall reaction is without any net redox change.  ……

  4. Adjustable chain trees for proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Pawel; Fonseca, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    A chain tree is a data structure for changing protein conformations. It enables very fast detection of clashes and free energy potential calculations. A modified version of chain trees that adjust themselves to the changing conformations of folding proteins is introduced. This results in much...... tighter bounding volume hierarchies and therefore fewer intersection checks. Computational results indicate that the efficiency of the adjustable chain trees is significantly improved compared to the traditional chain trees....

  5. Electron transfer in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1991-01-01

    Electron migration between and within proteins is one of the most prevalent forms of biological energy conversion processes. Electron transfer reactions take place between active centers such as transition metal ions or organic cofactors over considerable distances at fast rates and with remarkable...... specificity. The electron transfer is attained through weak electronic interaction between the active sites, so that considerable research efforts are centered on resolving the factors that control the rates of long-distance electron transfer reactions in proteins. These factors include (in addition......-containing proteins. These proteins serve almost exclusively in electron transfer reactions, and as it turns out, their metal coordination sites are endowed with properties uniquely optimized for their function....

  6. Superadiabatic quantum state transfer in spin chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agundez, R. R.; Hill, C. D.; Hollenberg, L. C. L.; Rogge, S.; Blaauboer, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we propose a superadiabatic protocol where quantum state transfer can be achieved with arbitrarily high accuracy and minimal control across long spin chains with an odd number of spins. The quantum state transfer protocol only requires the control of the couplings between the qubits on the edge and the spin chain. We predict fidelities above 0.99 for an evolution of nanoseconds using typical spin-exchange coupling values of μ eV . Furthermore, by building a superadiabatic formalism on top of this protocol, we propose an effective superadiabatic protocol that retains the minimal control over the spin chain and further improves the fidelity.

  7. Asymmetric Synthesis and Binding Study of New Long-Chain HPA-12 Analogues as Potent Ligands of the Ceramide Transfer Protein CERT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ďuriš, Andrej; Daïch, Adam; Santos, Cécile; Fleury, Laurence; Ausseil, Frédéric; Rodriguez, Frédéric; Ballereau, Stéphanie; Génisson, Yves; Berkeš, Dušan

    2016-05-01

    A series of 12 analogues of the Cer transfer protein (CERT) antagonist HPA-12 with long aliphatic chains were prepared as their (1R,3S)-syn and (1R,3R)-anti stereoisomers from pivotal chiral oxoamino acids. The enantioselective access to these intermediates as well as their ensuing transformation relied on a practical crystallization-induced asymmetric transformation (CIAT) process. Sonogashira coupling followed by triple bond reduction and thiophene ring hydrodesulfurization (HDS) into the corresponding alkane moieties was then implemented to complete the synthetic routes delivering the targeted HPA-12 analogues in concise 4- to 6-step reaction sequences. Ten compounds were evaluated regarding their ability to bind to the CERT START domain by using the recently developed time-resolved FRET-based homogeneous (HTR-FRET) binding assay. The introduction of a lipophilic appendage on the phenyl moiety led to an overall 10- to 1000-fold enhancement of the protein binding, with the highest effect being observed for a n-hexyl residue in the meta position. The importance of the phenyl ring for the activity was indicated by the reduced potency of the 3-deoxyphytoceramide aliphatic analogues. The 1,3-syn stereoisomers were systematically more potent than their 1,3-anti analogues. In silico studies were used to rationalized these trends, leading to a model of protein recognition coherent with the stronger binding of (1R,3S)-syn HPAs.

  8. Exciton Transfer Integrals Between Polymer Chains

    CERN Document Server

    Barford, W

    2007-01-01

    The line-dipole approximation for the evaluation of the exciton transfer integral, $J$, between conjugated polymer chains is rigorously justified. Using this approximation, as well as the plane-wave approximation for the exciton center-of-mass wavefunction, it is shown analytically that $J \\sim L$ when the chain lengths are smaller than the separation between them, or $J\\sim L^{-1}$ when the chain lengths are larger than their separation, where $L$ is the polymer length. Scaling relations are also obtained numerically for the more realistic standing-wave approximation for the exciton center-of-mass wavefunction, where it is found that for chain lengths larger than their separation $J \\sim L^{-1.8}$ or $J \\sim L^{-2}$, for parallel or collinear chains, respectively. These results have important implications for the photo-physics of conjugated polymers and self-assembled molecular systems, as the Davydov splitting in aggregates and the F\\"orster transfer rate for exciton migration decreases with chain lengths l...

  9. Modelling proton transfer in water molecule chains

    CERN Document Server

    Korzhimanov, Artem; Shutova, Tatiana; Samuelsson, Goran

    2011-01-01

    The process of protons transport in molecular water chains is of fundamental interest for many biological systems. Although many features of such systems can be analyzed using large-scale computational modeling, other features are better understood in terms of simplified model problems. Here we have tested, analytically and numerically, a model describing the classical proton hopping process in molecular water chains. In order to capture the main features of the proton hopping process in such molecular chains, we use a simplified model for our analysis. In particular, our discrete model describes a 1D chain of water molecules situated in an external protein channel structure, and each water molecule is allowed to oscillate around its equilibrium point in this system, while the protons are allowed to move along the line of neighboring oxygen atoms. The occurrence and properties of nonlinear solitary transport structures, allowing for much faster proton transport, are discussed, and the possible implications of...

  10. Polymer-protein conjugation via a 'grafting to' approach-a comparative study of the performance of protein-reactive RAFT chain transfer agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanparijs, N.; Maji, S.; Louage, B.; Voorhaar, L.; Laplace, D.; Shi, Y.; Hennink, W. E.; Hoogenboom, R.; De Geest, B. G.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient polymer-protein conjugation is a crucial step in the design of many therapeutic protein formulations including nanoscopic vaccine formulations, antibody-drug conjugates and to enhance the in vivo behaviour of proteins. Here we aimed at preparing well-defined polymers for conjugation to pro

  11. Quantum state transfer in a q-deformed chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L' Innocente, Sonia [Dipartimento di Matematica ed Informatica, Universita di Camerino, 62032 Camerino (Italy); Lupo, Cosmo; Mancini, Stefano [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Camerino, 62032 Camerino (Italy)], E-mail: sonia.linnocente@unicam.it, E-mail: cosmo.lupo@unicam.it, E-mail: stefano.mancini@unicam.it

    2009-11-27

    We investigate the quantum state transfer in a chain of particles satisfying the q-deformed oscillators algebra. This general algebraic setting includes the spin chain and the bosonic chain as limiting cases. We study conditions for perfect state transfer depending on the number of sites and excitations on the chain. They are formulated by means of irreducible representations of a quantum algebra realized through Jordan-Schwinger maps. Playing with deformation parameters, we can study the effects of nonlinear perturbations or interpolate between the spin and bosonic chains.

  12. Boundary-controlled spin chains for robust quantum state transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Zwick, Analia; Stolze, Joachim; Osenda, Omar

    2011-01-01

    Quantum state transfer in the presence of noise is one of the main challenges for building quantum computers. We compare the quantum state transfer properties for two classes of qubit chains under the influence of static randomness. In fully engineered chains all nearest-neighbor couplings are tuned in such a way that a single-qubit state can be transferred perfectly between the ends of the chain, while in boundary-controlled chains only the two couplings between the transmitting and receiving qubits and the remainder of the chain can be optimized. We study how the noise in the couplings affects the state transfer fidelity depending on the noise model and strength as well as the chain type and length. We show that the desired level of fidelity and transfer time are important factors in designing a chain. In particular we demonstrate that transfer efficiency comparable or better than that of the most robust engineered systems can also be reached in boundary-controlled chains without the demanding engineering o...

  13. Spin chains for robust state transfer: Modified boundary couplings versus completely engineered chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Analia; Álvarez, Gonzalo A.; Stolze, Joachim; Osenda, Omar

    2012-01-01

    Quantum state transfer in the presence of static disorder and noise is one of the main challenges in building quantum computers. We compare the quantum state transfer properties for two classes of qubit chains under the influence of static disorder. In fully engineered chains all nearest-neighbor couplings are tuned in such a way that a single-qubit state can be transferred perfectly between the ends of the chain, while in chains with modified boundaries only the two couplings between the transmitting and receiving qubits and the remainder of the chain can be optimized. We study how the disorder in the couplings affects the state transfer fidelity depending on the disorder model and strength as well as the chain type and length. We show that the desired level of fidelity and transfer time are important factors in designing a chain. In particular we demonstrate that transfer efficiency comparable or better than that of the most robust engineered systems can also be reached in chains with modified boundaries without the demanding engineering of a large number of couplings.

  14. Ubiquitin chain conformation regulates recognition and activity of interacting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yu; Blaser, Georg; Horrocks, Mathew H; Ruedas-Rama, Maria J; Ibrahim, Shehu; Zhukov, Alexander A; Orte, Angel; Klenerman, David; Jackson, Sophie E; Komander, David

    2012-12-13

    Mechanisms of protein recognition have been extensively studied for single-domain proteins, but are less well characterized for dynamic multidomain systems. Ubiquitin chains represent a biologically important multidomain system that requires recognition by structurally diverse ubiquitin-interacting proteins. Ubiquitin chain conformations in isolation are often different from conformations observed in ubiquitin-interacting protein complexes, indicating either great dynamic flexibility or extensive chain remodelling upon binding. Using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer, we show that Lys 63-, Lys 48- and Met 1-linked diubiquitin exist in several distinct conformational states in solution. Lys 63- and Met 1-linked diubiquitin adopt extended 'open' and more compact 'closed' conformations, and ubiquitin-binding domains and deubiquitinases (DUBs) select pre-existing conformations. By contrast, Lys 48-linked diubiquitin adopts predominantly compact conformations. DUBs directly recognize existing conformations, but may also remodel ubiquitin chains to hydrolyse the isopeptide bond. Disruption of the Lys 48-diubiquitin interface changes conformational dynamics and affects DUB activity. Hence, conformational equilibria in ubiquitin chains provide an additional layer of regulation in the ubiquitin system, and distinct conformations observed in differently linked polyubiquitin may contribute to the specificity of ubiquitin-interacting proteins.

  15. Effects of medium-chain fatty acids and oleic acid on blood lipids, lipoproteins, glucose, insulin, and lipid transfer protein activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tholstrup, T.; Ehnholm, C.; Jauhiainen, M.;

    2004-01-01

    design, 17 healthy young men replaced part of their habitual dietary fat intake with 70 g MCTs (66% 8:0 and 34% 10:0) or high-oleic sunflower oil (89.4% 18:1). Each intervention period lasted 21 d, and the 2 periods were separated by a washout period of 2 wk. Blood samples were taken before and after...... the intervention periods. Results: Compared with the intake of high-oleic sunflower oil, MCT intake resulted in 11% higher plasma total cholesterol (P = 0.0005), 12% higher LDL cholesterol (P = 0.0001), 32% higher VLDL cholesterol (P = 0.080), a 12% higher ratio of LDL to HDL cholesterol (P = 0.002), 22% higher......Background: Dietary medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) are of nutritional interest because they are more easily absorbed from dietary medium-chain triacylglycerols (MCTs) than are long-chain fatty acids from, for example, vegetable oils. It has generally been claimed that MCFAs do not increase plasma...

  16. Slow dynamics in proteins and polymer chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2013-02-01

    How a biological system can maintain in a non-equilibrium state for a very long time and why proteins aggregate are still not well understood. In this paper, we first review critical slow down of the Ising model and slow relaxation of a spin-glass model at low temperatures. The data indicate that relaxation of the spin glass model at low temperatures can be slower than the critical slowing down of the Ising model. We then review recent molecular dynamics results for the slow relaxation of polymer chains and experimental data for the glassy behavior of collagen fibrils. The slow dynamics in polymer chains and collagen fibrils can provide clues for understanding why a biological system can maintain in a non-equilibrium state for a very long time, and how to slow down protein aggregation related to neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Dynamics of Lipid Transfer by Phosphatidylinositol Transfer Proteins in Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shadan, S.; Holic, R; Carvou, N.; Ee, P.; Li, M.; Murray-Rust, J.; Cockcroft, S

    2008-01-01

    Of many lipid transfer proteins identified, all have been implicated in essential cellular processes, but the activity of none has been demonstrated in intact cells. Among these, phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITP) are of particular interest as they can bind to and transfer phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) - the precursor of important signalling molecules, phosphoinositides - and because they have essential functions in neuronal development (PITP alpha) and cytokinesis (PITP beta). Str...

  18. Entanglement Transfer via XXZ Heisenberg chain with DM Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Rafiee, Morteza; Mohammadi, Hamidreza; Mokhtari, Hossein

    2010-01-01

    The role of spin-orbit interaction, arises from the Dzyaloshinski-Moriya anisotropic antisymmetric interaction, on the entanglement transfer via an antiferromagnetic XXZ Heisenberg chain is investigated. From symmetrical point of view, the XXZ Hamiltonian with Dzyaloshinski-Moriya interaction can be replaced by a modified XXZ Hamiltonian which is defined by a new exchange coupling constant and rotated Pauli operators. The modified coupling constant and the angle of rotations are depend on the strength of Dzyaloshinski-Moriya interaction. In this paper we study the dynamical behavior of the entanglement propagation through a system which is consist of a pair of maximally entangled spins coupled to one end of the chain. The calculations are performed for the ground state and the thermal state of the chain, separately. In both cases the presence of this anisotropic interaction make our channel more efficient, such that the speed of transmission and the amount of the entanglement are improved as this interaction ...

  19. Quantum state transfer in a XX chain with impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwick, Analia; Osenda, Omar, E-mail: zwick@famaf.unc.edu.ar, E-mail: osenda@famaf.unc.edu.ar [Facultad de Matematica, AstronomIa y Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba and IFEG-CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, X5016LAE, Cordoba (Argentina)

    2011-03-11

    One spin excitation states are involved in the transmission of quantum states and entanglement through a quantum spin chain, the localization properties of these states are crucial to achieve the transfer of information from one extreme of the chain to the other. We investigate the bipartite entanglement and localization of the one excitation states in a quantum XX chain with one impurity. The bipartite entanglement is obtained using the concurrence and the localization is analyzed using the inverse participation ratio (IPR). Changing the strength of the exchange coupling of the impurity allows us to control the number of localized or extended states. The analysis of the IPR allows us to identify scenarios where the transmission of quantum states or entanglement can be achieved with a high degree of fidelity. In particular, we identify a regime where the transmission of quantum states between the extremes of the chain is executed in a short transmission time {approx}N/2, where N is the number of spins in the chain, and with a large fidelity.

  20. Robust Quantum State Transfer in Random Unpolarized Spin Chains

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Norman Y; Gorshkov, Alexey V; Gong, Zhe-Xuan; Zhai, Alex; Duan, L -M; Lukin, Mikhail D

    2010-01-01

    We propose and analyze a new approach for quantum state transfer between remote spin qubits. Specifically, we demonstrate that coherent quantum coupling between remote qubits can be achieved via certain classes of random, unpolarized spin chains. Our method is robust to coupling strength disorder and does not require manipulation or control over individual spins. In principle, it can be used to attain perfect state transfer over arbitrarily long range via purely Hamiltonian evolution and may be particularly applicable in a solid-state quantum information processor. As an example, we demonstrate that it can be used to attain strong coherent coupling between Nitrogen-Vacancy centers separated by micrometer distances at room temperature. Realistic imperfections and decoherence effects are analyzed.

  1. Robust quantum state transfer in random unpolarized spin chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, N Y; Jiang, L; Gorshkov, A V; Gong, Z-X; Zhai, A; Duan, L-M; Lukin, M D

    2011-01-28

    We propose and analyze a new approach for quantum state transfer between remote spin qubits. Specifically, we demonstrate that coherent quantum coupling between remote qubits can be achieved via certain classes of random, unpolarized (infinite temperature) spin chains. Our method is robust to coupling-strength disorder and does not require manipulation or control over individual spins. In principle, it can be used to attain perfect state transfer over an arbitrarily long range via purely Hamiltonian evolution and may be particularly applicable in a solid-state quantum information processor. As an example, we demonstrate that it can be used to attain strong coherent coupling between nitrogen-vacancy centers separated by micrometer distances at room temperature. Realistic imperfections and decoherence effects are analyzed.

  2. Polonium ({sup 210}Po) and lead ({sup 210}Pb) in marine organisms and their transfer in marine food chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Fernando P., E-mail: carvalho@itn.p [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Departamento de Proteccao Radiologica e Seguranca Nuclear, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)

    2011-05-15

    The determination of {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb was performed in marine organisms from the seashore to abyssal depths, encompassing a plethora of species from the microscopic plankton to the sperm whale. Concentrations of those radionuclides ranged from low values of about 5 x 10{sup -1} Bq kg{sup -1} (wet wt.) in jellyfish, to very high values of about of 3 x 10{sup 4} Bq kg{sup -1} (wet wt.) in the gut walls of sardines, with a common pattern of {sup 210}Po > {sup 210}Pb.These radionuclides are primarily absorbed from water and concentrated by phyto- and microzooplankton, and then are transferred to the next trophic level along marine food chains. Investigation in epipelagic, mesopelagic, bathypelagic and abyssobenthic organisms revealed that {sup 210}Po is transferred in the marine food webs with transfer factors ranging from 0.1 to 0.7, and numerically similar to those of the energy transfer in the marine food chains. As {sup 210}Po preferentially binds to amino acids and proteins, its transfer in food chains likely traces protein transfer and, thus, {sup 210}Po transfer factors are similar to ecotrophic coefficients. {sup 210}Pb is transferred less efficiently in marine food chains and this contributes to increased {sup 210}Po:{sup 210}Pb activity ratios in some trophic levels.

  3. Protein-Folding Landscapes in Multi-Chain Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cellmer, Troy; Bratko, Dusan; Prausnitz, John M.; Blanch, Harvey

    2005-06-20

    Computational studies of proteins have significantly improved our understanding of protein folding. These studies are normally carried out using chains in isolation. However, in many systems of practical interest, proteins fold in the presence of other molecules. To obtain insight into folding in such situations, we compare the thermodynamics of folding for a Miyazawa-Jernigan model 64-mer in isolation to results obtained in the presence of additional chains. The melting temperature falls as the chain concentration increases. In multi-chain systems, free-energy landscapes for folding show an increased preference for misfolded states. Misfolding is accompanied by an increase in inter-protein interactions; however, near the folding temperature, the transition from folded chains to misfolded and associated chains isentropically driven. A majority of the most probable inter-protein contacts are also native contacts, suggesting that native topology plays a role in early stages of aggregation.

  4. Interaction of poxvirus intracellular mature virion proteins with the TPR domain of kinesin light chain in live infected cells revealed by two-photon-induced fluorescence resonance energy transfer fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeshtadi, Ananya; Burgos, Pierre; Stubbs, Christopher D; Parker, Anthony W; King, Linda A; Skinner, Michael A; Botchway, Stanley W

    2010-12-01

    Using two-photon-induced fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, we corroborate an interaction (previously demonstrated by yeast two-hybrid domain analysis) of full-length vaccinia virus (VACV; an orthopoxvirus) A36 protein with the cellular microtubule motor protein kinesin. Quenching of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), fused to the C terminus of VACV A36, by monomeric red fluorescent protein (mDsRed), fused to the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain of kinesin, was observed in live chicken embryo fibroblasts infected with either modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) or wild-type fowlpox virus (FWPV; an avipoxvirus), and the excited-state fluorescence lifetime of EGFP was reduced from 2.5 ± 0.1 ns to 2.1 ± 0.1 ns due to resonance energy transfer to mDsRed. FWPV does not encode an equivalent of intracellular enveloped virion surface protein A36, yet it is likely that this virus too must interact with kinesin to facilitate intracellular virion transport. To investigate possible interactions between innate FWPV proteins and kinesin, recombinant FWPVs expressing EGFP fused to the N termini of FWPV structural proteins Fpv140, Fpv168, Fpv191, and Fpv198 (equivalent to VACV H3, A4, p4c, and A34, respectively) were generated. EGFP fusions of intracellular mature virion (IMV) surface protein Fpv140 and type II membrane protein Fpv198 were quenched by mDsRed-TPR in recombinant FWPV-infected cells, indicating that these virion proteins are found within 10 nm of mDsRed-TPR. In contrast, and as expected, EGFP fusions of the IMV core protein Fpv168 did not show any quenching. Interestingly, the p4c-like protein Fpv191, which demonstrates late association with preassembled IMV, also did not show any quenching.

  5. Sudden Chain Energy Transfer Events in Vibrated Granular Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Nicolás; Ponce, Suomi; Soto, Rodrigo; Cordero, Patricio; Mujica, Nicolás; Risso, Dino; Gallet, Basille

    2012-02-01

    In a mixture of two species of grains of equal size but different mass, placed in a vertically vibrated shallow box, there is spontaneous segregation. Once the system is at least partly segregated and clusters of the heavy particles have formed, there are sudden peaks of the horizontal kinetic energy of the heavy particles, that is otherwise small. Together with the energy peaks the clusters rapidly expand and the segregation is partially lost. The process repeats once segregation has taken place again, either randomly or with some regularity in time depending on the experimental or numerical parameters. An explanation for these events is provided based on the existence of a fixed point for an isolated particle bouncing with only vertical motion. The horizontal energy peaks occur when the energy stored in the vertical motion is partly transferred into horizontal energy through a chain reaction of collisions between heavy particles.

  6. 'Green' reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semsarilar, Mona; Perrier, Sébastien

    2010-10-01

    Reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization has revolutionized the field of polymer synthesis as a versatile tool for the production of complex polymeric architectures. As for all chemical processes, research and development in RAFT have to focus on the design and application of chemical products and processes that have a minimum environmental impact, and follow the principles of 'green' chemistry. In this Review, we summarize some of the green features of the RAFT process, and review the recent advances in the production of degradable polymers obtained from RAFT polymerization. Its use to modify biodegradable and renewable inorganic and organic materials to yield more functional products with enhanced applications is also covered. RAFT is a promising candidate for answering both the increasing need of modern society to employ highly functional polymeric materials and the global requirements for developing sustainable chemicals and processes.

  7. RAFT microemulsion polymerization with surface-active chain transfer agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hedok, Ibrahim Adnan

    The work described in this dissertation focuses on enhancing the polymer nanoparticle synthesis using RAFT (reversible-addition fragmentation chain transfer) in microemulsion polymerization in order to achieve predetermined molecular weight with narrow molecular weight polydispersity. The hypothesis is that the use of an amphiphilic chain transfer agent (surface-active CTA) will confine the CTA to the surface of the particle and thermodynamically favor partitioning of the CTA between micelles and particles throughout the polymerization. Thus, the CTA diffusion from micelles to polymer particles would be minimized and the breadth of the CTA per particle distribution would remain low. We report the successful improved synthesis of poly(butyl acrylate), poly(ethyl acrylate), and poly(styrene) nanoparticles using the RAFT microemulsion polymerization with surface-active CTA. The polymerization kinetics, polymer characteristics and latex size experimental data are presented. The data analysis indicates that the CTA remains partitioned between the micelles and particles by the end of the polymerization, as expected. We also report the synthesis of well-defined core/shell poly(styrene)/poly(butyl acrylate) nanoparticle, having polydispersity index value of 1.1, using semi-continuous microemulsion polymerization with the surface-active CTA. The surface-active CTA restricts the polymerization growth to the surface of the particle, which facilitates the formation of a shell block co-polymers with each subsequent second monomer addition instead of discrete homopolymers. This synthesis method can be used to create a wide range of core/shell polymer nanoparticles with well-defined morphology, given the right feeding conditions.

  8. Revealing various coupling of electron transfer and proton pumping in mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; Zhou, Qiangjun; Pang, Xiaoyun; Xu, Yingzhi; Rao, Zihe

    2013-08-01

    Cellular respiration is the process that releases energy from food and supplies energy for life processes. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is the final and most important step for cellular respiration and is located on the inner membrane of mitochondrion and comprises four large trans-membrane protein complexes (respiratory chain Complexes I, II, III and IV) as well as ubiquinone between Complexes I/II and III and cytochrome c between Complexes III and IV. The function of mitochondrial respiratory chain is biological oxidation by transferring electrons from NADH and succinate to oxygen and then generating proton gradient across the inner membrane. Such proton gradient is utilized by ATP synthase (ATPase, also called as Complex V) to produce energy molecules ATP. Structural studies of mitochondrial respiratory membrane protein complexes are important to understand the mechanism of electron transfer and the redox-coupled proton translocation across the inner membrane. Here, according to the time line, we reviewed the great achievements on structural studies of mitochondrial respiratory complexes in the past twenty years as well as the recent research progresses on the structures of mitochondrial respiratory supra-complexes.

  9. Distribution of Vibrational Energy Levels of Protein Molecular Chains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Xiao-Feng; CHEN Xiang-Rong

    2001-01-01

    The distributions of the quantum vibrational energy levels of the protein molecular chain are found by the discretely nonlinear Schrodinger equation appropriate to protein obtained from the Davydov theory. The results calculated by this method are basically consistent with the experimental values. Furthermore, the energy spectra at high excited states have also been obtained for the molecular chain which is helpful in researching the properties of infrared absorption and Raman scattering of the protein molecules.

  10. Dynamics of lipid transfer by phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadan, Sadaf; Holic, Roman; Carvou, Nicolas; Ee, Patrick; Li, Michelle; Murray-Rust, Judith; Cockcroft, Shamshad

    2008-09-01

    Of many lipid transfer proteins identified, all have been implicated in essential cellular processes, but the activity of none has been demonstrated in intact cells. Among these, phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITP) are of particular interest as they can bind to and transfer phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns)--the precursor of important signalling molecules, phosphoinositides--and because they have essential functions in neuronal development (PITPalpha) and cytokinesis (PITPbeta). Structural analysis indicates that, in the cytosol, PITPs are in a 'closed' conformation completely shielding the lipid within them. But during lipid exchange at the membrane, they must transiently 'open'. To study PITP dynamics in intact cells, we chemically targeted their C95 residue that, although non-essential for lipid transfer, is buried within the phospholipid-binding cavity, and so, its chemical modification prevents PtdIns binding because of steric hindrance. This treatment resulted in entrapment of open conformation PITPs at the membrane and inactivation of the cytosolic pool of PITPs within few minutes. PITP isoforms were differentially inactivated with the dynamics of PITPbeta faster than PITPalpha. We identify two tryptophan residues essential for membrane docking of PITPs.

  11. QSRR correlation of free-radical polymerization chain-transfer constants for styrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatz-Hoover, F; Petrukhin, R; Karelson, M; Katritzky, A R

    2001-01-01

    Quantitative structure-reactivity relationships (QSRR) are deduced for kinetic chain-transfer constants for 90 agents on styrene polymerization at 60 degrees C. Three- and five-parameter correlations were obtained with R2 of 0.725 and 0.818, respectively. The descriptors involved in the correlations are consistent with the proposed mechanism of the chain-transfer reactions.

  12. A potent antimicrobial protein from onion seeds showing sequence homology to plant lipid transfer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammue, B P; Thevissen, K; Hendriks, M; Eggermont, K; Goderis, I J; Proost, P; Van Damme, J; Osborn, R W; Guerbette, F; Kader, J C

    1995-10-01

    An antimicrobial protein of about 10 kD, called Ace-AMP1, was isolated from onion (Allium cepa L.) seeds. Based on the near-complete amino acid sequence of this protein, oligonucleotides were designed for polymerase chain reaction-based cloning of the corresponding cDNA. The mature protein is homologous to plant nonspecific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs), but it shares only 76% of the residues that are conserved among all known plant nsLTPs and is unusually rich in arginine. Ace-AMP1 inhibits all 12 tested plant pathogenic fungi at concentrations below 10 micrograms mL-1. Its antifungal activity is either not at all or is weakly affected by the presence of different cations at concentrations approximating physiological ionic strength conditions. Ace-AMP1 is also active on two Gram-positive bacteria but is apparently not toxic for Gram-negative bacteria and cultured human cells. In contrast to nsLTPs such as those isolated from radish or maize seeds, Ace-AMP1 was unable to transfer phospholipids from liposomes to mitochondria. On the other hand, lipid transfer proteins from wheat and maize seeds showed little or no antimicrobial activity, whereas the radish lipid transfer protein displayed antifungal activity only in media with low cation concentrations. The relevance of these findings with regard to the function of nsLTPs is discussed.

  13. ELASTIC BEHAVIOR OF PROTEIN-LIKE SINGLE CHAIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-qi Yi; Lin-xi Zhang

    2005-01-01

    The conformational properties and elastic behaviors of protein-like single chains in the process of tensile elongation were investigated by means of Monte Carlo method. The sequences of protein-like single chains contain two types of residues: hydrophobic (H) and hydrophilic (P). The average conformations and thermodynamics statistical properties of protein-like single chains with various elongation ratio λ were calculated. It was found that the mean-square end-to-end distance r increases with elongation ratio,λ. The tensor eigenvalues ratio of : decreases with elongation ratio λ for short (HP)x protein-like polymers, however, the ratio of : increases with elongation ratioλ,especially for long (H)x sequence. Average energy per bond increases with elongation ratioλ, especially for(H)x protein-like single chains. Helmholtz free energy per bond also increases with elongation ratioλ. Elastic force (f), energy contribution to force (fU) and entropy contribution to force (fs) for different protein-like single chains were also calculated.These investigations may provide some insights into elastic behaviors of proteins.

  14. Organic cleanliness of the Mars Science Laboratory sample transfer chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakkolb, B; Logan, C; Jandura, L; Okon, A; Anderson, M; Katz, I; Aveni, G; Brown, K; Chung, S; Ferraro, N; Limonadi, D; Melko, J; Mennella, J; Yavrouian, A

    2014-07-01

    One of the primary science goals of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover, Curiosity, is the detection of organics in Mars rock and regolith. To achieve this, the Curiosity rover includes a robotic sampling system that acquires rock and regolith samples and delivers it to the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on board the rover. In order to provide confidence that any significant organics detection result was Martian and not terrestrial in origin, a requirement was levied on the flight system (i.e., all sources minus the SAM instrument) to impart no more than 36 parts per billion (ppb by weight) of total reduced carbon terrestrial contamination to any sample transferred to the SAM instrument. This very clean level was achieved by a combination of a rigorous contamination control program on the project, and then using the first collected samples for a "dilution cleaning" campaign of the sample chain prior to delivering a sample to the SAM instrument. Direct cleanliness assays of the sample-contacting and other Flight System surfaces during pre-launch processing were used as inputs to determine the number of dilution cleaning samples needed once on Mars, to enable delivery of suitably clean samples to the SAM experiment. Taking into account contaminant redistribution during launch thorough landing of the MSL on Mars, the amount of residue present on the sampling hardware prior to the time of first dilution cleaning sample acquisition was estimated to be 60 ng/cm(2) on exposed outer surfaces of the sampling hardware and 20 ng/cm(2) on internal sample contacting surfaces; residues consisting mainly of aliphatic hydrocarbons and esters. After three dilution cleaning samples, estimated in-sample contamination level for the first regolith sample delivered to the SAM instrument at the Gale Crater "Rocknest" site was bounded at ≤10 ppb total organic carbon. A Project decision to forego ejecting the dilution cleaning sample and instead transfer the first drill

  15. A protein-dependent side-chain rotamer library.

    KAUST Repository

    Bhuyan, M.S.

    2011-12-14

    Protein side-chain packing problem has remained one of the key open problems in bioinformatics. The three main components of protein side-chain prediction methods are a rotamer library, an energy function and a search algorithm. Rotamer libraries summarize the existing knowledge of the experimentally determined structures quantitatively. Depending on how much contextual information is encoded, there are backbone-independent rotamer libraries and backbone-dependent rotamer libraries. Backbone-independent libraries only encode sequential information, whereas backbone-dependent libraries encode both sequential and locally structural information. However, side-chain conformations are determined by spatially local information, rather than sequentially local information. Since in the side-chain prediction problem, the backbone structure is given, spatially local information should ideally be encoded into the rotamer libraries. In this paper, we propose a new type of backbone-dependent rotamer library, which encodes structural information of all the spatially neighboring residues. We call it protein-dependent rotamer libraries. Given any rotamer library and a protein backbone structure, we first model the protein structure as a Markov random field. Then the marginal distributions are estimated by the inference algorithms, without doing global optimization or search. The rotamers from the given library are then re-ranked and associated with the updated probabilities. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed protein-dependent libraries significantly outperform the widely used backbone-dependent libraries in terms of the side-chain prediction accuracy and the rotamer ranking ability. Furthermore, without global optimization/search, the side-chain prediction power of the protein-dependent library is still comparable to the global-search-based side-chain prediction methods.

  16. Fluobodies : green fluorescent single-chain Fv fusion proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griep, R.A.; Twisk, van C.; Wolf, van der J.M.; Schots, A.

    1999-01-01

    An expression system (pSKGFP), which permits the expression of single-chain variable fragments as fusion proteins with modified green fluorescent proteins, was designed. This expression system is comparable to frequently used phage display vectors and allows single-step characterization of the selec

  17. Coevolution study of mitochondria respiratory chain proteins:Toward the understanding of protein-protein interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Yang; Yan Ge; Jiayan Wu; Jingfa Xiao; Jun Yu

    2011-01-01

    Coevolution can be seen as the interdependency between evolutionary histories. In the context of protein evolution, functional correlation proteins are ever-present coordinated evolutionary characters without disruption of organismal integrity. As to complex system, there are two forms of protein-protein interactions in vivo, which refer to inter-complex interaction and intra-complex interaction. In this paper, we studied the difference of coevolution characters between inter-complex interaction and intra-complex interaction using "Mirror tree" method on the respiratory chain (RC) proteins. We divided the correlation coefficients of every pairwise RC proteins into two groups corresponding to the binary protein-protein interaction in intra-complex and the binary protein-protein interaction in inter-complex, respectively. A dramatical discrepancy is detected between the coevolution characters of the two sets of protein interactions (Wilcoxon test, p-value = 4.4 x 10-6). Our finding reveals some critical information on coevolutionary study and assists the mechanical investigation of protein-protein interaction.Furthermore, the results also provide some unique clue for supramolecular organization of protein complexes in the mitochondrial inner membrane. More detailed binding sites map and genome information of nuclear encoded RC proteins will be extraordinary valuable for the further mitochondria dynamics study.

  18. Mechanisms involved in the selective transfer of long chain polyunsaturted fatty acids to the fetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso eGil-Sánchez

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA in the fetal brain increases dramatically from the third trimester until 18 months of life. Several studies have shown an association between the percentage of maternal plasma docosahexaenoic acid (DHA during gestation and development of the cognitive functions in the neonate. Since only very low levels of LCPUFA are synthesized in the fetus and placenta, their primary source for the fetus is that of maternal origin. Both in vitro and human in vivo studies using labelled fatty acids have shown the preferential transfer of LCPUFA from the placenta to the fetus compared with other fatty acids, although the mechanisms involved are still uncertain. The placenta takes up circulating maternal non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA and fatty acids released mainly by maternal lipoprotein lipase and endothelial lipase. These NEFA may enter the cell by passive diffusion or by means of membrane carrier proteins. Once in the cytosol, NEFA bind to cytosolic fatty acid-binding proteins for transfer to the fetal circulation or can be oxidized within the trophoblasts and even re-esterified and stored in lipid droplets (LD. Although trophoblast cells are not specialized in lipid storage, LCPUFA may up-regulate peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPARγ and hence the gene expression of fatty acid transport carriers, fatty acid acyl-CoA synthetases and adipophilin or other enzymes related with lipolysis, modifying their rate of placental transfer and metabolization. The placental transfer of LCPUFA during pregnancy seems to be a key factor in the neurological development of the fetus. Increased knowledge on the factors that modify placental transfer of fatty acids would contribute to our understanding of this complex process.

  19. A computational solution to analyze hydrophobic characteristics in protein chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Marilia Amável Gomes; Azevedo, Alexandre; Missailidis, Sotiris; Silva, Dilson

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a program developed to facilitate calculations of the total or partial hidrophobicity value of polypeptides and proteins chains. It was built using the Fortran 77 language and performs additional functions, determining the total free energy and the electromotive force of an amino acid in a protein. These values were then used to estimate the average hydrophobicity of the protein or fragment sequence.

  20. Implementation of State Transfer Hamiltonians in Spin Chains with Magnetic Resonance Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Cappellaro, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear spin systems and magnetic resonance techniques have provided a fertile platform for experimental investigation of quantum state transfer in spin chains. From the first observation of polarization transfer, predating the formal definition of quantum state transfer, to the realization of state transfer simulations in small molecules and in larger solid-state spin systems, the experiments have drawn on the strengths of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), in particular on its long history o...

  1. Arginyltransferase ATE1 catalyzes mid-chain arginylation of proteins at side chain carboxylates in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junling; Han, Xuemei; Wong, Catherine C.L.; Cheng, Hong; Aslanian, Aaron; Xu, Tao; Leavis, Paul; Roder, Heinrich; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Yates, John R.; Kashina, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Summary Arginylation is an emerging posttranslational modification mediated by Arg-tRNA-protein-transferase (ATE1). It is believed that ATE1 links Arg solely to the N-terminus of proteins, requiring prior proteolysis or action by Met-aminopeptidases to expose the arginylated site. Here, we tested the possibility of Arg linkage to mid-chain sites within intact protein targets and found that many proteins in vivo are modified on the side chains of Asp and Glu by a novel chemistry that targets the carboxy rather than the amino groups at the target sites. Such arginylation appears to be functionally regulated, and it can be directly mediated by ATE1, in addition to the more conventional Ate1-mediated linkage of Arg to the N-terminal alpha amino group. This new type of arginylation implies an unconventional mechanism of ATE1 action that likely facilitates its major biological role. PMID:24529990

  2. Electron transfer and interfacial behavior of redox proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent progress in the electron transfer and interfacial behavior of redox proteins. Significant achievements in the relevant fields are summarized including the direct electron transfer between proteins and electrodes, the thermodynamic and kinetic properties, catalytic activities and activity regulation of the redox proteins. It has been demonstrated that the electrochemical technique is an effective tool for protein studies, especially for probing into the electron transfer and interfacial behavior of redox proteins.

  3. RAFT Miniemulsion Polymerization of MMA with Cumyl Dithiobenzoate as Chain Transfer Agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian Ying GUO; Dong Lin TANG; Jing Wei ZHU; Mou Dao SONG; Bang Hua ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    Reversible addition-fragmentation transfer (RAFT) miniemulsion polymerizations for PMMA with cumyl dithiobenzoate (CDB) as a chain transfer agent (CTA) has been carried out.Higher temperature made the polymerization much faster and the PDI remained below 1.20, when the temperature was upon 70 ℃.

  4. Lattice and off-lattice side chain models of protein folding: linear time structure prediction better than 86% of optimal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, W E; Istrail, S

    1997-01-01

    This paper considers the protein energy minimization problem for lattice and off-lattice protein folding models that explicitly represent side chains. Lattice models of proteins have proven useful tools for reasoning about protein folding in unrestricted continuous space through analogy. This paper provides the first illustration of how rigorous algorithmic analyses of lattice models can lead to rigorous algorithmic analyses of off-lattice models. We consider two side chain models: a lattice model that generalizes the HP model (Dill, 1985) to explicitly represent side chains on the cubic lattice and a new off-lattice model, the HP Tangent Spheres Side Chain model (HP-TSSC), that generalizes this model further by representing the backbone and side chains of proteins with tangent spheres. We describe algorithms with mathematically guaranteed error bounds for both of these models. In particular, we describe a linear time performance guaranteed approximation algorithm for the HP side chain model that constructs conformations whose energy is better than 86% of optimal in a face-centered cubic lattice, and we demonstrate how this provides a better than 70% performance guarantee for the HP-TSSC model. Our analysis provides a mathematical methodology for transferring performance guarantees on lattices to off-lattice models. These results partially answer the open question of Ngo et al. (1994) concerning the complexity of protein folding models that include side chains.

  5. [Progress in ubiquitin, ubiquitin chain and protein ubiquitination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Qiuyan; Gao, Yuan; Li, Yanchang; Hong, Xuechuan; Xu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Protein ubiquitination is one of the most important and widely exist protein post-translational modifications in eukaryotic cells, which takes the ubiquitin and ubiquitin chains as signal molecules to covalently modify other protein substrates. It plays an important roles in the control of almost all of the life processes, including gene transcription and translation, signal transduction and cell-cycle progression, besides classical 26S protesome degradation pathway. Varied modification sites in the same substrates as well as different types of ubiquitin linkages in the same modification sites contain different structural information, which conduct different signal or even determine the fate of the protein substrates in the cell. Any abnormalities in ubiquitin chain formation or its modification process may cause severe problem in maintaining the balance of intracellular environment and finally result in serious health problem of human being. In this review, we discussed the discovery, genetic characteristics and the crystal structure of the ubiquitin. We also emphasized the recent progresses of the assembly processes, structure and their biological function of ubiquitin chains. The relationship between the disregulation and related human diseases has also been discussed. These progress will shed light on the complexity of proteome, which may also provide tools in the new drug research and development processes.

  6. Evidence for Non-Random Hydrophobicity Structures in Protein Chains

    CERN Document Server

    Irbäck, A; Potthast, F; Irb\\"ack, Anders; Peterson, Carsten; Potthast, Frank

    1996-01-01

    The question of whether proteins originate from random sequences of amino acids is addressed. A statistical analysis is performed in terms of blocked and random walk values formed by binary hydrophobic assignments of the amino acids along the protein chains. Theoretical expectations of these variables from random distributions of hydrophobicities are compared with those obtained from functional proteins. The results, which are based upon proteins in the SWISS-PROT data base, convincingly show that the amino acid sequences in proteins differ from what is expected from random sequences in a statistical significant way. By performing Fourier transforms on the random walks one obtains additional evidence for non-randomness of the distributions. We have also analyzed results from a synthetic model containing only two amino-acid types, hydrophobic and hydrophilic. With reasonable criteria on good folding properties in terms of thermodynamical and kinetic behavior, sequences that fold well are isolated. Performing t...

  7. Radiative transfer calculated from a Markov chain formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, L. W.; House, L. L.

    1978-01-01

    The theory of Markov chains is used to formulate the radiative transport problem in a general way by modeling the successive interactions of a photon as a stochastic process. Under the minimal requirement that the stochastic process is a Markov chain, the determination of the diffuse reflection or transmission from a scattering atmosphere is equivalent to the solution of a system of linear equations. This treatment is mathematically equivalent to, and thus has many of the advantages of, Monte Carlo methods, but can be considerably more rapid than Monte Carlo algorithms for numerical calculations in particular applications. We have verified the speed and accuracy of this formalism for the standard problem of finding the intensity of scattered light from a homogeneous plane-parallel atmosphere with an arbitrary phase function for scattering. Accurate results over a wide range of parameters were obtained with computation times comparable to those of a standard 'doubling' routine. The generality of this formalism thus allows fast, direct solutions to problems that were previously soluble only by Monte Carlo methods. Some comparisons are made with respect to integral equation methods.

  8. The reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) miniemulsion polymerization of vinyl acetate mediated by xanthate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Jiang; Qing Hua Zhang; Xiao Li Zhan; Feng Qiu Chen

    2009-01-01

    The reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) miniemulsion polymerization of vinyl acetate (VAt) mediated by methyl (methoxycarbonothioyl) sulfanyl acetate (MMSA) was carried out. The results showed that polymerizations initiated by AIBN and KPS proceeded in a controlled way. The RAFT miniemulsion polymerization of VAc initiated by KPS showed the shorter inhibition period, higher propagation rate coefficient and final conversion than those in experiment initiated by AIBN. When the monomer conversion reached 25%, the polydispersity index (PDI) of polymer became broad, which was related to chain transfer reaction in RAFT miniemulsion of VAc.

  9. Lowering of plasma phospholipid transfer protein activity by acute hyperglycaemia-induced hyperinsulinaemia in healthy men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanTol, A; Ligtenberg, JJM; Riemens, SC; vanHaeften, TW; Dullaart, RPF

    1997-01-01

    Human plasma contains two lipid transfer proteins involved in the remodelling of plasma lipoproteins: cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP). CETP mediates the transfer/exchange of cholesterylesters, triglycerides and phospholipids between high-density lip

  10. Bioaccumulation and food chain transfer of corrosion products from radioactive stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, J.S.

    1986-07-01

    Two sets of experiments were conducted to determine if corrosion products from radioactive Type 347 stainless steel could be biologically transferred from sediment through a marine food chain, and whether corrosion products dissolved in seawater could be bioaccumulated and then eliminated. Corrosion products containing /sup 60/Co and /sup 63/Ni from the radioactive stainless steel were introduced into marine sediments. Infaunal polychaete worms exposed to these sediments bioaccumulated the radionuclides. The feeding of these worms to shrimp and fish resulted in a trophic transfer of the radioactive products across a one-step food chain. The magnitude of the transfers are described in terms of transfer factors. Dissolved corrosion products as measured by the radionuclides were also bioaccumulated by shrimp and fish concentrating more than fish. Concentration factors were calculated.

  11. Copper transfer and influence on a marine food chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edding, M.; Tala, F. [Universidad Catolica del Norte, Coquimbo (Chile)

    1996-12-31

    Copper is an essential element, required for normal growth by all plants and animals; and a regular constituent in the environment (Lewis and Cave 1982; Lewis 1994). This heavy metal is an essential micronutrient that at higher concentrations can be deleterious to algae and other aquatic biota (Chang and Sibley 1993). Copper toxicity to algae depends upon the individual species, their physiological and environmental conditions, and the chemical forms of metal in the medium (Sunda and Gullard 1976). When copper is accumulated by phytoplankton it can be transferred and may produce toxic effects on zooplankton (Wikfors and Ukeles 1982). Different species of microalgae present different capacities of resistance to copper. Cyanophyceae pre-cultured in a Cu-enriched medium (635 {mu}gCu{center_dot}L{sup {minus}1}) showed an EC{sub 50} that could reach 318 {mu}gCu{center_dot}L{sup {minus}1} for Plectonema radiosum and 339 {mu}gCu{center_dot}L{sup {minus}1} in Phormidium sp. (Takamura et al. 1990). Scenedesmus, Selenastrum and Chlorella were reported able to accumulate copper and other metal ions with an efficiency of 67-98% (Brady et al. 1994). Also, Dunaliella resisted concentrations form 0.38 mgCu{center_dot}L{sup {minus}1} (D. minuta) up to 50.8 mgCu{center_dot}L{sup {minus}1} (D. acidophila), depending on the pH of the medium (Grimmler et al. 1991). One the microalgae are copper-enriched, the copper that is part of the cell can be transferred to the surrounding water and to its predator producing uncertain effects. This study observed the effect of copper on the growth of Dunaliella tertiolecta and Isochrysis galbana that are currently used as food for hatchery-grown scallop larvae (Argopecten purpuratus). We observed the path of copper form the water column into the microalgal cell and the effect of copper-enriched food on the scallop larvae. 16 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Passive transfer of maternal immunity in the dromedary (Camelus dromedarius), involvement of heavy chain antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhi, Imed; Bessalah, Salma; Mbarek, Sonia Ben; Chniter, Mohamed; Seddik, Mabrouk-Mouldi; Khorchani, Touhami; Hammadi, Mohamed

    2015-03-01

    In many mammalian species, newborns are agammaglobulinemic; thus, colostrum and milk are the main sources of early protective antibodies. These antibodies are produced in the mother's serum and transferred to mammalian glands a few days before parturition. Here, we have studied the transfer of immunity from a she-camel immunized with human serum albumin (HSA) to her calf via colostrum and milk. Our results show that HSA-specific antibodies are produced in the mother's serum and are subsequently transferred to her colostrum. These specific antibodies are then transferred by suckling to the calf. The calf serum did not contain HSA-reactive antibodies at parturition and before the first feed, after suckling, a rise in reactivity was observed peaking at 24 h postpartum. The involvement of heavy chain antibodies (HCAbs) in the process of immunity transfer was also examined, and it was found that they were also transferred from the colostrum to the calf serum like conventional antibodies.

  13. Development of buffers for fast semidry transfer of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garić, Dušan; Humbert, Laure; Fils-Aimé, Nadège; Korah, Juliana; Zarfabian, Yasaman; Lebrun, Jean-Jacques; Ali, Suhad

    2013-10-15

    Western blot is an extensively used method for protein detection in cell biology. To optimize this procedure, here we examined a panel of buffers for their ability to efficiently transfer proteins from SDS-polyacrylamide gels onto nitrocellulose membranes in a short 12-min period, designated here as fast semidry transfer. Our results show for the first time that HEPES- and HEPPS/EPPS-based buffers represent the most efficient buffers for fast semidry transfer.

  14. Protein electron transfer: is biology (thermo)dynamic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2015-12-01

    Simple physical mechanisms are behind the flow of energy in all forms of life. Energy comes to living systems through electrons occupying high-energy states, either from food (respiratory chains) or from light (photosynthesis). This energy is transformed into the cross-membrane proton-motive force that eventually drives all biochemistry of the cell. Life’s ability to transfer electrons over large distances with nearly zero loss of free energy is puzzling and has not been accomplished in synthetic systems. The focus of this review is on how this energetic efficiency is realized. General physical mechanisms and interactions that allow proteins to fold into compact water-soluble structures are also responsible for a rugged landscape of energy states and a broad distribution of relaxation times. Specific to a protein as a fluctuating thermal bath is the protein-water interface, which is heterogeneous both dynamically and structurally. The spectrum of interfacial fluctuations is a consequence of protein’s elastic flexibility combined with a high density of surface charges polarizing water dipoles into surface nanodomains. Electrostatics is critical to the protein function and the relevant questions are: (i) What is the spectrum of interfacial electrostatic fluctuations? (ii) Does the interfacial biological water produce electrostatic signatures specific to proteins? (iii) How is protein-mediated chemistry affected by electrostatics? These questions connect the fluctuation spectrum to the dynamical control of chemical reactivity, i.e. the dependence of the activation free energy of the reaction on the dynamics of the bath. Ergodicity is often broken in protein-driven reactions and thermodynamic free energies become irrelevant. Continuous ergodicity breaking in a dense spectrum of relaxation times requires using dynamically restricted ensembles to calculate statistical averages. When applied to the calculation of the rates, this formalism leads to the nonergodic

  15. Chaining direct memory access data transfer operations for compute nodes in a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.

    2010-09-28

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for chaining DMA data transfer operations for compute nodes in a parallel computer that include: receiving, by an origin DMA engine on an origin node in an origin injection FIFO buffer for the origin DMA engine, a RGET data descriptor specifying a DMA transfer operation data descriptor on the origin node and a second RGET data descriptor on the origin node, the second RGET data descriptor specifying a target RGET data descriptor on the target node, the target RGET data descriptor specifying an additional DMA transfer operation data descriptor on the origin node; creating, by the origin DMA engine, an RGET packet in dependence upon the RGET data descriptor, the RGET packet containing the DMA transfer operation data descriptor and the second RGET data descriptor; and transferring, by the origin DMA engine to a target DMA engine on the target node, the RGET packet.

  16. Lattice and off-lattice side chain models of protein folding: Linear time structure prediction better than 86% of optimal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, W.E.; Istrail, S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Algorithms and Discrete Mathematics Dept.

    1996-08-09

    This paper considers the protein structure prediction problem for lattice and off-lattice protein folding models that explicitly represent side chains. Lattice models of proteins have proven extremely useful tools for reasoning about protein folding in unrestricted continuous space through analogy. This paper provides the first illustration of how rigorous algorithmic analyses of lattice models can lead to rigorous algorithmic analyses of off-lattice models. The authors consider two side chain models: a lattice model that generalizes the HP model (Dill 85) to explicitly represent side chains on the cubic lattice, and a new off-lattice model, the HP Tangent Spheres Side Chain model (HP-TSSC), that generalizes this model further by representing the backbone and side chains of proteins with tangent spheres. They describe algorithms for both of these models with mathematically guaranteed error bounds. In particular, the authors describe a linear time performance guaranteed approximation algorithm for the HP side chain model that constructs conformations whose energy is better than 865 of optimal in a face centered cubic lattice, and they demonstrate how this provides a 70% performance guarantee for the HP-TSSC model. This is the first algorithm in the literature for off-lattice protein structure prediction that has a rigorous performance guarantee. The analysis of the HP-TSSC model builds off of the work of Dancik and Hannenhalli who have developed a 16/30 approximation algorithm for the HP model on the hexagonal close packed lattice. Further, the analysis provides a mathematical methodology for transferring performance guarantees on lattices to off-lattice models. These results partially answer the open question of Karplus et al. concerning the complexity of protein folding models that include side chains.

  17. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-11-01

    Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH2) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such zwitterion modified PP surface.

  18. Heat transfer in protein-water interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lervik, Anders; Bresme, Fernando; Kjelstrup, Signe; Bedeaux, Dick; Miguel Rubi, J

    2010-02-21

    We investigate using transient non-equilibrum molecular dynamics simulation the temperature relaxation process of three structurally different proteins in water, namely; myoglobin, green fluorescence protein (GFP) and two conformations of the Ca(2+)-ATPase protein. By modeling the temperature relaxation process using the solution of the heat diffusion equation we compute the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of the proteins, as well as the thermal conductance of the protein-water interface. Our results indicate that the temperature relaxation of the protein can be described using a macroscopic approach. The protein-water interface has a thermal conductance of the order of 100-270 MW K(-1) m(-2), characteristic of water-hydrophilic interfaces. The thermal conductivity of the proteins is of the order of 0.1-0.2 W K(-1) m(-1) as compared with approximately 0.6 W K(-1) m(-1) for water, suggesting that these proteins can develop temperature gradients within the biomolecular structures that are larger than those of aqueous solutions. We find that the thermal diffusivity of the transmembrane protein, Ca(2+)-ATPase is about three times larger than that of myoglobin or GFP. Our simulation shows that the Kapitza length of these structurally different proteins is of the order of 1 nm, showing that the protein-water interface should play a major role in defining the thermal relaxation of biomolecules.

  19. Tunable self-assembled spin chains of strongly interacting cold atoms for demonstration of reliable quantum state transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, N. J. S.; Marchukov, O. V.; Petrosyan, D.;

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an efficient computational method to treat long, one-dimensional systems of strongly-interacting atoms forming self-assembled spin chains. Such systems can be used to realize many spin chain model Hamiltonians tunable by the external confining potential. As a concrete demonstrat...... demonstration, we consider quantum state transfer in a Heisenberg spin chain and we show how to determine the confining potential in order to obtain nearly-perfect state transfer....

  20. Light, nutrients, and food-chain length constrain planktonic energy transfer efficiency across multiple trophic levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, Elizabeth M; Newell, Jennifer M; González, María J; Vanni, Michael J

    2008-11-25

    The efficiency of energy transfer through food chains [food chain efficiency (FCE)] is an important ecosystem function. It has been hypothesized that FCE across multiple trophic levels is constrained by the efficiency at which herbivores use plant energy, which depends on plant nutritional quality. Furthermore, the number of trophic levels may also constrain FCE, because herbivores are less efficient in using plant production when they are constrained by carnivores. These hypotheses have not been tested experimentally in food chains with 3 or more trophic levels. In a field experiment manipulating light, nutrients, and food-chain length, we show that FCE is constrained by algal food quality and food-chain length. FCE across 3 trophic levels (phytoplankton to carnivorous fish) was highest under low light and high nutrients, where algal quality was best as indicated by taxonomic composition and nutrient stoichiometry. In 3-level systems, FCE was constrained by the efficiency at which both herbivores and carnivores converted food into production; a strong nutrient effect on carnivore efficiency suggests a carryover effect of algal quality across 3 trophic levels. Energy transfer efficiency from algae to herbivores was also higher in 2-level systems (without carnivores) than in 3-level systems. Our results support the hypothesis that FCE is strongly constrained by light, nutrients, and food-chain length and suggest that carryover effects across multiple trophic levels are important. Because many environmental perturbations affect light, nutrients, and food-chain length, and many ecological services are mediated by FCE, it will be important to apply these findings to various ecosystem types.

  1. Effects of intersegmental transfers on target location by proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Sheinman, Michael; Kafri, Yariv

    2008-01-01

    We study a model for a protein searching for a target, using facilitated diffusion, on a DNA molecule confined in a finite volume. The model includes three distinct pathways for facilitated diffusion: (a) sliding - in which the protein diffuses along the contour of the DNA (b) jumping - where the protein travels between two sites along the DNA by three-dimensional diffusion, and finally (c) intersegmental transfer - which allows the protein to move from one site to another by transiently bind...

  2. Removal of phase transfer agent leads to restricted dynamics of alkyl chains in monolayer protected clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V R Rajeev Kumar; R Mukhopadhyay; T Pradeep

    2008-11-01

    The effect of phase transfer agent in the dynamics of monolayer protected gold nanoparticles has been investigated by infrared (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies. The experiments were performed with octadecane thiol and dodecane thiol protected gold nanoparticles. The materials prepared were characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and IR spectroscopy. Repeated purification of the monolayer protected gold clusters made the alkyl chains defect-free. Such effects are reflected in the infrared spectra. Interdigitation of the monolayers that followed the purification leads to alkyl chains with limited mobility. This was reflected in 13C and 1H NMR linewidths. The NMR measurements indicate that the removal of phase transfer agent affects the dynamics of isolated clusters and those with interdigitated monolayers in different ways.

  3. A chiroptical switch based on supramolecular chirality transfer through alkyl chain entanglement and dynamic covalent bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Kai; Qin, Long; Wang, Xiufeng; Zhang, Li; Liu, Minghua

    2013-12-14

    Chirality transfer is an interesting phenomenon in Nature, which represents an important step to understand the evolution of chiral bias and the amplification of the chirality. In this paper, we report the chirality transfer via the entanglement of the alkyl chains between chiral gelator molecules and achiral amphiphilic Schiff base. We have found that although an achiral Schiff base amphiphile could not form organogels in any kind of organic solvents, it formed co-organogels when mixed with a chiral gelator molecule. Interestingly, the chirality of the gelator molecules was transferred to the Schiff base chromophore in the mixed co-gels and there was a maximum mixing ratio for the chirality transfer. Furthermore, the supramolecular chirality was also produced based on a dynamic covalent chemistry of an imine formed by the reaction between an aldehyde and an amine. Such a covalent bond of imine was formed reversibly depending on the pH variation. When the covalent bond was formed the chirality transfer occurred, when it was destroyed, the transfer stopped. Thus, a supramolecular chiroptical switch is obtained based on supramolecular chirality transfer and dynamic covalent chemistry.

  4. Ultrafast energy transfer from rigid, branched side-chains into a conjugated, alternating copolymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, Graham B.; Rolczynski, Brian S.; Linkin, Alexander; McGillicuddy, Ryan D.; Engel, Gregory S., E-mail: gsengel@uchicago.edu [Department of Chemistry, The James Franck Institute, Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Lundin, Pamela M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stauffer III, 381 North-South Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); A. R. Smith Department of Chemistry, Appalachian State University, 417 CAP Building, 525 Rivers Street, Boone, North Carolina 28608 (United States); Bao, Zhenan [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stauffer III, 381 North-South Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-01-21

    We present the synthesis and characterization of a benzodithiophene/thiophene alternating copolymer decorated with rigid, singly branched pendant side chains. We characterize exciton migration and recombination dynamics in these molecules in tetrahydrofuran solution, using a combination of static and time-resolved spectroscopies. As control experiments, we also measure electronic relaxation dynamics in isolated molecular analogues of both the side chain and polymer moieties. We employ semi-empirical and time-dependent density functional theory calculations to show that photoexcitation of the decorated copolymer using 395 nm laser pulses results in excited states primarily localized on the pendant side chains. We use ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy to show that excitations are transferred to the polymer backbone faster than the instrumental response function, ∼250 fs.

  5. Modelling of radiocesium transfer in the lichen-reindeer/caribou-wolf food chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. F. Holleman

    1990-09-01

    Full Text Available The environmental contaminate radiocesium (cesium-137 has been shown to be of value as a marker in food selection and intake studies. Its greatest potential value as a food marker is in the subarctic/arctic regions, particularly in the lichen to reindeer/caribou to wolf food chain. A kinetic model describing the movement of radiocesium through the food chain has been developed using the SAAM computer program and is presented here. The program has been written so that the various paramenters affecting the transfer of radiocesium in the food chain can be altered more realistically to describe the system being modeled. The values of the parameters as given in this example are realistic for interior Alaska, however caution should be exercised in the application of the present results to regions that may be vastly different from the Alaskan interior without first evaluating the parameters and assumptions of the model.

  6. Submicellar bile salts stimulate phosphatidylcholine transfer activity of sterol carrier protein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, A N; Cohen, D E

    1998-10-01

    To explore a potential role for sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP2, also known as non-specific lipid transfer protein) in hepatocellular phospholipid trafficking, we examined the influence of submicellar bile salt concentrations on phosphatidylcholine (PC) transfer activity of SCP2. We measured rate constants for first-order transfer of sn-1 palmitoyl, sn-2 parinaroyl PC, a naturally fluorescent self-quenching phospholipid between model membranes. Purified bovine liver SCP2 promoted transfer of PC from donor to acceptor small unilamellar vesicles. Taurine- and glycine-conjugated bile salts (anionic steroid detergent-like molecules), at concentrations well below their critical micellar concentrations, stimulated PC transfer activity of SCP2 80- to 140-fold. Rate constants increased in proportion to bile salt concentration, temperature, and bile salt-membrane binding affinity. Sodium taurofusidate, a conjugated fungal bile salt analog, also activated PC transfer whereas no effect was observed with the anionic and non-ionic straight chain detergents sodium dodecyl sulfate and octylglucoside, respectively. Thermodynamic and kinetic analyses of PC transfer support a mechanism in which bile salts stimulate SCP2 activity by partitioning into donor vesicles and enhancing membrane association of SCP2. These results imply that under physiological conditions, SCP2 may contribute to hepatocellular selection and transport of biliary PCs.

  7. A model for the chain-to-plane charge transfer in YBa2Cu3O6+x

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V.M.Matic; N.Dj.Lazarov; M.Milic

    2012-01-01

    A model for the chain-to-plane charge transfer is proposed to account for the two plateaus,at 60 K and at 90 K,of the Tc(x) characteristics of the YBa2Cu3O6+x high-Tc superconductor.It is assumed that the number of holes transferred from a CuO chain of length l to two nearby CuO2 sheets is proportional to l (that is,to the number of oxygen atoms in the chain),if the chain length is greater than,or equal to,a certain critical chain length,lcr,that is required to trigger the charge transfer process.No holes are assumed to have been transferred from chains of length l < lcr.The calculated Tc(x) dependence is found to be in excellent agreement with the experimentally reported Tc(x).The critical chain length parameter is estimated to be equal to lcr =11 (eleven oxygen atoms in a chain),which is a greater value than that obtained in the previously proposed model for the chain-to plane charge transfer (lcr =4).The results obtained out of the proposed model are briefly discussed.

  8. Phosphatidylinositol transfer protein alpha and its role in neurodegeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunte, H.

    2007-01-01

    Selective neuronal loss is a prominent feature in neurodegenerative disorders. Recently, a link between neurodegeneration and a deficiency in the protein phosphatidylinositol transfer protein alpha (PI-TPalpha) has been demonstrated. In this context it is of importance that fibroblasts overexpressin

  9. Surface selective binding of nanoclay particles to polyampholyte protein chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Nisha; Bohidar, H. B.

    2009-07-01

    Binding of nanoclay (Laponite) to gelatin-A and gelatin-B (both polyampholytes) molecules was investigated at room temperature (25 °C) both experimentally and theoretically. The stoichiometric binding ratio between gelatin and Laponite was found to be strongly dependent on the solution ionic strength. Large soluble complexes were formed at higher ionic strengths of the solution, a result supported by data obtained from light scattering, viscosity, and zeta potential measurements. The binding problem was theoretically modeled by choosing a suitable two-body screened Coulomb potential, U(R+)=(q-/2ɛ)[(Q-/R-)e-kR--(Q+/R+)e-kR+], where the protein dipole has charges Q+ and Q_ that are located at distances R+ and R_ from the point Laponite charge q- and the dispersion liquid has dielectric constant (ɛ). U(R+) accounted for electrostatic interactions between a dipole (protein molecule) and an effective charge (Laponite particle) located at an angular position θ. Gelatin-A and Laponite association was facilitated by a strong attractive interaction potential that led to preferential binding of the biopolymer chains to negatively charged face of Laponite particles. In the case of gelatin-B selective surf ace patch binding dominated the process where the positively charged rim and negatively charged face of the particles were selectively bound to the oppositely charged segments of the biopolymer. The equilibrium separation (Re) between the protein and nanoclay particle revealed monovalent salt concentration dependence given by Re˜[NaCl]α where α =0.6±0.2 for gelatin-A and α =0.4±0.2 for gelatin-B systems. The equilibrium separations were ≈30% less compared to the gelatin-A system implying preferential short-range ordering of the gelatin-B-nanoclay pair in the solvent.

  10. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing, E-mail: shisq@nwu.edu.cn; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Biomimetic surface modification of PP was successfully conducted by integrating mussel-inspired technology, thiol chemistry and cell outer membranes-like structures. • The resultant biomimetic surface exhibits good interface and surface stability. • The obvious suppression of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion is also achieved. • The residue thoil groups on the surface could be further functionalized. - Abstract: Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH{sub 2}) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such

  11. Dynamics in electron transfer protein complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bashir, Qamar

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have provided experimental evidence for the existence of an encounter complex, a transient intermediate in the formation of protein complexes. We have used paramagnetic relaxation enhancement NMR spectroscopy in combination with Monte Carlo simulations to characterize and visualize th

  12. Inverting OII 83.4 nm Dayglow Profiles Using Markov Chain Radiative Transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, George; Finn, Susanna C; Cook, Timothy; Chakrabarti, Supriya

    2016-01-01

    Emission profiles of the resonantly scattered OII~83.4~nm triplet can in principle be used to estimate \\(\\mathrm{O}^+\\) density profiles in the F2 region of the ionosphere. Given the emission source profile, solution of this inverse problem is possible, but requires significant computation. The traditional Feautrier solution to the radiative transfer problem requires many iterations to converge, making it time-consuming to compute. A Markov chain approach to the problem produces similar results by directly constructing a matrix that maps the source emission rate to an effective emission rate which includes scattering to all orders. The Markov chain approach presented here yields faster results and therefore can be used to perform the \\(\\mathrm{O}^+\\) density retrieval with higher resolution than would otherwise be possible.

  13. Inverting OII 83.4 nm dayglow profiles using Markov chain radiative transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, George; Douglas, Ewan; Finn, Susanna C.; Cook, Timothy; Chakrabarti, Supriya

    2016-11-01

    Emission profiles of the resonantly scattered OII 83.4 nm triplet can in principle be used to estimate O+ density profiles in the F2 region of the ionosphere. Given the emission source profile, solution of this inverse problem is possible but requires significant computation. The traditional Feautrier solution to the radiative transfer problem requires many iterations to converge, making it time consuming to compute. A Markov chain approach to the problem produces similar results by directly constructing a matrix that maps the source emission rate to an effective emission rate which includes scattering to all orders. The Markov chain approach presented here yields faster results and therefore can be used to perform the O+ density retrieval with higher resolution than would otherwise be possible.

  14. [Electron transfer between globular proteins. Dependence of the rate of transfer on distance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhno, V D; Chuev, G N; Ustinin, M N; Komarov, V M

    1998-01-01

    Based on the assumption that electron transfer between globular proteins occurs by a collective excitation of polaron type, the dependence of the rate of this process on the distance between the donor and acceptor centers with regard to their detailed electron structure was calculated. The electron structure of the heme was calculated by the quantum-chemical MNDO-PM3 method. The results were compared with experimental data on interprotein and intraglobular electron transfer. It is shown that, in the framework of this model, the electron transfer is not exponential and does not require a particular transfer pathway since the whole protein macromolecule is involved in the formation of the electron excited state.

  15. Protein dynamics modulated electron transfer kinetics in early stage photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Prasanta; Dua, Arti

    2013-01-28

    A recent experiment has probed the electron transfer kinetics in the early stage of photosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides for the reaction center of wild type and different mutants [Science 316, 747 (2007)]. By monitoring the changes in the transient absorption of the donor-acceptor pair at 280 and 930 nm, both of which show non-exponential temporal decay, the experiment has provided a strong evidence that the initial electron transfer kinetics is modulated by the dynamics of protein backbone. In this work, we present a model where the electron transfer kinetics of the donor-acceptor pair is described along the reaction coordinate associated with the distance fluctuations in a protein backbone. The stochastic evolution of the reaction coordinate is described in terms of a non-Markovian generalized Langevin equation with a memory kernel and Gaussian colored noise, both of which are completely described in terms of the microscopics of the protein normal modes. This model provides excellent fits to the transient absorption signals at 280 and 930 nm associated with protein distance fluctuations and protein dynamics modulated electron transfer reaction, respectively. In contrast to previous models, the present work explains the microscopic origins of the non-exponential decay of the transient absorption curve at 280 nm in terms of multiple time scales of relaxation of the protein normal modes. Dynamic disorder in the reaction pathway due to protein conformational fluctuations which occur on time scales slower than or comparable to the electron transfer kinetics explains the microscopic origin of the non-exponential nature of the transient absorption decay at 930 nm. The theoretical estimates for the relative driving force for five different mutants are in close agreement with the experimental estimates obtained using electrochemical measurements.

  16. The role of cholesteryl ester transfer protein and phospholipid transfer protein in the remodeling of plasma high-density lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagrost, L

    1997-08-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that alterations in the size distribution of high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) constitute reliable markers for the risk of coronary artery disease. These observations suggested that the determination of the size distribution of HDL subpopulations by using polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis might constitute an effective tool in clinical practice for the detection of patients with elevated risk. During the last decade, concordant observations revealed that all the HDL subpopulations are metabolically interrelated, and their relative abundances are dependent on the activity of several plasma factors, among them the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and the phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP). As reviewed in the present article, although both CETP and PLTP can promote the size redistribution or conversion of HDL, the two plasma lipid transfer proteins can alter differently the plasma HDL distribution profile through distinct mechanisms. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:218-224). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  17. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with differential effects on plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein and phospholipid transfer protein activities and concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullaart, RPF; De Vries, R; Scheek, L; Borggreve, SE; Van Gent, T; Dallinga-Thie, GM; Ito, M; Nagano, M; Sluiter, WJ; Hattori, H; Van Tol, A

    2004-01-01

    Background: Human plasma contains two lipid transfer proteins, cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), which are crucial in reverse cholesterol transport. Methods: Plasma CETP and PLTP activity levels and concentrations in 16 type 2 diabetic patients and 1

  18. Entanglement Transfer and Periodic Sudden Death Phenomenon in Two Parallel 1D Spin Chains of Quantum Spin Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhao-Ming; SHAO Bin; ZOU Jian

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the entanglement transfer in two parallel 1D spin chains of a quantum spin network,and show that the perfect entanglement transfer can be realized at some special times.In addition,the so-called 'sudden death' phenomenon of entanglement is found in the spin network system.

  19. How does a protein reach its binding locus: sliding along DNA chain or not?

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jingwei

    2016-01-01

    In gene expression, various kinds of proteins need to bind to specific locus of DNA. It is still not clear how these proteins find their target locus. In this study, the mean first-passage time (FPT) of protein binding to its target locus on DNA chain is discussed by a chain-space coupled model. Our results show that the 1-dimensional diffusion constant has a critical value, with which the mean time spent by a protein to find its target locus is almost independent of the binding rate of protein to DNA chain and the detachment rate from DNA chain. Which implies that, the frequency of protein binding to DNA and the sliding time on DNA chain have little influence on the search efficiency, and therefore whether or not the 1-dimensional sliding on DNA chain increases the search efficiency depends on the 1-dimensional diffusion constant of the protein on DNA chain. This study also finds that only protein bindings to DNA loci which are close to the target locus help to increase the search efficiency, while bindings ...

  20. Measurement of lipid transfer protein in 88 apple cultivars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sancho, A.I.; Ree, van R.; Leeuwen, van A.; Meulenbroek, E.J.; Weg, van de W.E.; Gilissen, L.J.W.J.; Puehringer, H.; Laimer, M.; Martinelli, A.; Zaccharini, M.; Vazquez-Cortes, S.; Fernandez-Rivas, M.; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, K.; Clare Mills, E.N.; Zuidmeer, L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Fruits are a major cause of food allergy in adults. Lipid transfer proteins (LTP) are implicated in severe allergic reactions to fruits, but little is known about LTP content in different cultivars. Objective: Determination of the levels of LTP in a wide range of apple cultivars. Methods

  1. Metabolic transistor strategy for controlling electron transfer chain activity in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hui; Tuli, Leepika; Bennett, George N; San, Ka-Yiu

    2015-03-01

    A novel strategy to finely control a large metabolic flux by using a "metabolic transistor" approach was established. In this approach a small change in the level or availability of an essential component for the process is controlled by adding a competitive reaction that affects a precursor or an intermediate in its biosynthetic pathway. The change of the basal level of the essential component, considered as a base current in a transistor, has a large effect on the flux through the major pathway. In this way, the fine-tuning of a large flux can be accomplished. The "metabolic transistor" strategy was applied to control electron transfer chain function by manipulation of the quinone synthesis pathway in Escherichia coli. The achievement of a theoretical yield of lactate production under aerobic conditions via this strategy upon manipulation of the biosynthetic pathway of the key participant, ubiquinone-8 (Q8), in an E. coli strain provides an in vivo, genetically tunable means to control the activity of the electron transfer chain and manipulate the production of reduced products while limiting consumption of oxygen to a defined amount.

  2. Carrier transfer in vertically stacked quantum ring-quantum dot chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazur, Yu. I., E-mail: ymazur@uark.edu; Dorogan, V. G.; Benamara, M.; Salamo, G. J. [Arkansas Institute for Nanoscale Materials Science and Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States); Lopes-Oliveira, V.; Lopez-Richard, V.; Teodoro, M. D.; Marques, G. E. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, 13565-905 São Carlos, São Paulo (Brazil); Souza, L. D. de [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, 13565-905 São Carlos, São Paulo (Brazil); Arkansas Institute for Nanoscale Materials Science and Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States); Wu, J.; Wang, Z. M. [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Film and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu (China); Tarasov, G. G. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Sciences, pr. Nauki 45, Kiev 03028 (Ukraine); Marega, E. [Instituto de Fisica de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, 13.566-590 São Carlos, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-04-21

    The interplay between structural properties and charge transfer in self-assembled quantum ring (QR) chains grown by molecular beam epitaxy on top of an InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD) superlattice template is analyzed and characterized. The QDs and QRs are vertically stacked and laterally coupled as well as aligned within each layer due to the strain field distributions that governs the ordering. The strong interdot coupling influences the carrier transfer both along as well as between chains in the ring layer and dot template structures. A qualitative contrast between different dynamic models has been developed. By combining temperature and excitation intensity effects, the tuning of the photoluminescence gain for either the QR or the QD mode is attained. The information obtained here about relaxation parameters, energy scheme, interlayer and interdot coupling resulting in creation of 1D structures is very important for the usage of such specific QR–QD systems for applied purposes such as lasing, detection, and energy-harvesting technology of future solar panels.

  3. Carrier transfer in vertically stacked quantum ring-quantum dot chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Yu. I.; Lopes-Oliveira, V.; de Souza, L. D.; Lopez-Richard, V.; Teodoro, M. D.; Dorogan, V. G.; Benamara, M.; Wu, J.; Tarasov, G. G.; Marega, E.; Wang, Z. M.; Marques, G. E.; Salamo, G. J.

    2015-04-01

    The interplay between structural properties and charge transfer in self-assembled quantum ring (QR) chains grown by molecular beam epitaxy on top of an InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD) superlattice template is analyzed and characterized. The QDs and QRs are vertically stacked and laterally coupled as well as aligned within each layer due to the strain field distributions that governs the ordering. The strong interdot coupling influences the carrier transfer both along as well as between chains in the ring layer and dot template structures. A qualitative contrast between different dynamic models has been developed. By combining temperature and excitation intensity effects, the tuning of the photoluminescence gain for either the QR or the QD mode is attained. The information obtained here about relaxation parameters, energy scheme, interlayer and interdot coupling resulting in creation of 1D structures is very important for the usage of such specific QR-QD systems for applied purposes such as lasing, detection, and energy-harvesting technology of future solar panels.

  4. Impairment of Electron Transfer Chain Induced by Acute Carnosine Administration in Skeletal Muscle of Young Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto Macarini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum carnosinase deficiency is an inherited disorder that leads to an accumulation of carnosine in the brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, skeletal muscle, and other tissues of affected patients. Considering that high levels of carnosine are associated with neurological dysfunction and that the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in serum carnosinase deficiency remain poorly understood, we investigated the in vivo effects of carnosine on bioenergetics parameters, namely, respiratory chain complexes (I–III, II, and II-III, malate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase activities and the expression of mitochondrial-specific transcription factors (NRF-1, PGC-1α, and TFAM in skeletal muscle of young Wistar rats. We observed a significant decrease of complexes I–III and II activities in animals receiving carnosine acutely, as compared to control group. However, no significant alterations in respiratory chain complexes, citric acid cycle enzymes, and creatine kinase activities were found between rats receiving carnosine chronically and control group animals. As compared to control group, mRNA levels of NRF-1, PGC-1α, and TFAM were unchanged. The present findings indicate that electron transfer through the respiratory chain is impaired in skeletal muscle of rats receiving carnosine acutely. In case these findings are confirmed by further studies and ATP depletion is also observed, impairment of bioenergetics could be considered a putative mechanism responsible for the muscle damage observed in serum carnosinase-deficient patients.

  5. Gene ontology based transfer learning for protein subcellular localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Shuigeng

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediction of protein subcellular localization generally involves many complex factors, and using only one or two aspects of data information may not tell the true story. For this reason, some recent predictive models are deliberately designed to integrate multiple heterogeneous data sources for exploiting multi-aspect protein feature information. Gene ontology, hereinafter referred to as GO, uses a controlled vocabulary to depict biological molecules or gene products in terms of biological process, molecular function and cellular component. With the rapid expansion of annotated protein sequences, gene ontology has become a general protein feature that can be used to construct predictive models in computational biology. Existing models generally either concatenated the GO terms into a flat binary vector or applied majority-vote based ensemble learning for protein subcellular localization, both of which can not estimate the individual discriminative abilities of the three aspects of gene ontology. Results In this paper, we propose a Gene Ontology Based Transfer Learning Model (GO-TLM for large-scale protein subcellular localization. The model transfers the signature-based homologous GO terms to the target proteins, and further constructs a reliable learning system to reduce the adverse affect of the potential false GO terms that are resulted from evolutionary divergence. We derive three GO kernels from the three aspects of gene ontology to measure the GO similarity of two proteins, and derive two other spectrum kernels to measure the similarity of two protein sequences. We use simple non-parametric cross validation to explicitly weigh the discriminative abilities of the five kernels, such that the time & space computational complexities are greatly reduced when compared to the complicated semi-definite programming and semi-indefinite linear programming. The five kernels are then linearly merged into one single kernel for

  6. Influence of Monomer Types on the Designability of a Protein-Model Chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁好均; 王元元

    2002-01-01

    In a three-dimensional off-lattice model, the method of Shakhnovich and Gutin for minimizing the Hamiltonian is applied to the design of a protein-model chain. The effect of the number of hydrophobic and hydrophilic monomer types on the designability ora protein-model chain is investigated. The simulation results reveal that the number of hydrophobic monomer types is a much more important factor than that of the polar monomer types in the design of a protein-model chain.

  7. Effects of intersegmental transfers on target location by proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Sheinman, Michael

    2008-01-01

    We study a model for a protein searching for a target, using facilitated diffusion, on a DNA molecule confined in a finite volume. The model includes three distinct pathways for facilitated diffusion: (a) sliding - in which the protein diffuses along the contour of the DNA (b) jumping - where the protein travels between two sites along the DNA by three-dimensional diffusion, and finally (c) intersegmental transfer - which allows the protein to move from one site to another by transiently binding both at the same time. The typical search time is calculated using scaling arguments which are verified numerically. Our results suggest that the inclusion of intersegmental transfer (i) decreases the search time considerably (ii) makes the search time much more robust to variations in the parameters of the model and (iii) that the optimal search time occurs in a regime very different than that found for models which ignore intersegmental transfers. The behavior we find is rich and shows surprising dependencies, for e...

  8. The effects of intersegmental transfers on target location by proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinman, Michael; Kafri, Yariv

    2009-01-19

    We study a model of protein searching for a target, using facilitated diffusion, on a DNA molecule confined in a finite volume. The model includes three distinct pathways for facilitated diffusion: (a) sliding--in which the protein diffuses along the contour of the DNA, (b) jumping--where the protein travels between two sites along the DNA by three-dimensional diffusion and finally (c) intersegmental transfer--which allows the protein to move from one site to another by transiently binding both at the same time. The typical search time is calculated using scaling arguments which are verified numerically. Our results suggest that the inclusion of intersegmental transfer (i) decreases the search time considerably, (ii) makes the search time much more robust to variations in the parameters of the model and (iii) that the optimal search time occurs in a regime very different than that found for models which ignore intersegmental transfers. The behavior we find is rich and shows surprising dependences, for example on the DNA length.

  9. Maximum-likelihood, self-consistent side chain free energies with applications to protein molecular dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Jumper, John M; Sosnick, Tobin R

    2016-01-01

    To address the large gap between time scales that can be easily reached by molecular simulations and those required to understand protein dynamics, we propose a new methodology that computes a self-consistent approximation of the side chain free energy at every integration step. In analogy with the adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer approximation in which the nuclear dynamics are governed by the energy of the instantaneously-equilibrated electronic degrees of freedom, the protein backbone dynamics are simulated as preceding according to the dictates of the free energy of an instantaneously-equilibrated side chain potential. The side chain free energy is computed on the fly; hence, the protein backbone dynamics traverse a greatly smoothed energetic landscape, resulting in extremely rapid equilibration and sampling of the Boltzmann distribution. Because our method employs a reduced model involving single-bead side chains, we also provide a novel, maximum-likelihood type method to parameterize the side chain model using...

  10. Constant region of a kappa III immunoglobulin light chain as a major AL-amyloid protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvig, J P; Olsen, K E; Gislefoss, R E

    1998-01-01

    and the corresponding AL protein as a kappa III immunoglobulin light chain from material of a patient with systemic AL-amyloidosis presenting as a local inguinal tumour. The two proteins showed some unique features. The major part of the AL amyloid fibril protein consisted of C-terminal fragments of the Bence...

  11. Quantum yield measurements of short-lived photoactivation intermediates in DNA photolyase: toward a detailed understanding of the triple tryptophan electron transfer chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrdin, Martin; Lukacs, Andras; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Eker, André P M; Brettel, Klaus; Vos, Marten H

    2010-03-11

    The light-dependent DNA repair enzyme photolyase contains a unique evolutionary conserved triple tryptophan electron transfer chain (W382-W359-W306 in photolyase from E. coli) that bridges the approximately 15 A distance between the buried flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor and the surface of the protein. Upon excitation of the semireduced flavin (FADH(o)), electron transfer through the chain leads to formation of fully reduced flavin (FADH(-); required for DNA repair) and oxidation of the most remote tryptophan residue W306, followed by its deprotonation. The thus-formed tryptophanyl radical W306(o)(+) is reduced either by an extrinsic reductant or by reverse electron transfer from FADH(-). Altogether the kinetics of these charge transfer reactions span 10 orders of magnitude, from a few picoseconds to tens of milliseconds. We investigated electron transfer processes in the picosecond-nanosecond time window bridging the time domains covered by ultrafast pump-probe and "classical" continuous probe techniques. Using a recent dedicated setup, we directly show that virtually no absorption change between 300 ps and 10 ns occurs in wild-type photolyase, implying that no charge recombination takes place in this time window. In contrast, W306F mutant photolyase showed a partial absorption recovery with a time constant of 0.85 ns. In wild-type photolyase, the quantum yield of FADH(-) W306(o)(+) was found at 19 +/- 4%, in reference to the established quantum yield of the long-lived excited state of [Ru(bpy)(3)](2+). With this yield, the optical spectrum of the excited state of FADH(o) can be constructed from ultrafast spectroscopic data; this spectrum is dominated by excited state absorption extending from below 450 to 850 nm. The new experimental results, taken together with previous data, allow us to propose a detailed kinetic and energetic scheme of the electron transfer chain.

  12. Mitochondrial Band-7 family proteins: scaffolds for respiratory chain assembly?

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The band-7 protein family comprises a diverse set of membrane-bound proteins characterized by the presence of a conserved domain. The exact function of this band-7 domain remains elusive, but examples from animal and bacterial stomatin-type proteins demonstrate binding to lipids and the ability to assemble into membrane-bound oligomers that form putative scaffolds. Some members, such as prohibitins (PHB) and human stomatin-like protein 2 (HsSLP2), localize to the mitochondrial inner membrane ...

  13. Facile Fabrication of Water Dispersible Latex Particles with Homogeneous or Chain-Segregated Surface from RAFT Polymerization Using a Mixture of Two Macromolecular Chain Transfer Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li; Hong, Liangzhi; Wang, Chaoyang

    2016-04-01

    Water dispersible latex particles with randomly mixed shells or chain segregated surface are synthesized from one-pot reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer heterogeneous polymerization of benzyl methacrylate (BzMA) using a mixture of poly(glycerol monomethacrylate) (PGMA) and poly(2,3-bis(succinyloxy)propyl methacrylate) (PBSPMA) macromolecular chain transfer agents. In methanol, the two in situ synthesized PGMA-b-PBzMA and PBSPMA-b-PBzMA diblock copolymers coaggregate into spherical micelles, which contain PBzMA core and discrete PGMA and PBSPMA nanodomains on the shell. In contrast, in water-methanol mixture (V/V = 9/1), latex particles with homogeneous distribution of PGMA and PBSPMA polymer chains on the shell are obtained. The reasons leading to formation of latex particles with homogenous or chain-segregated surface are discussed, and polymerization kinetics and physical state of PBSPMA in methanol and water-methanol mixtures are ascribed. These polymeric micelles with patterned functional group on the surface are potentially important for application in supracolloidal hierarchical assemblies and catalysis.

  14. Evaluation of the clenbuterol imprinted monolithic column prepared by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mamat Turson; Xiao Lei Zhuang; Hui Na Liu; Ping Jiang; Xiang Chao Dong

    2009-01-01

    To make more homogenous organic monolithic structure,reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer(RAFT)process was employed in the synthesis of the clenbuterol imprinted polymer.In the synthesis,the influence of synthetic conditions on the polymer structure and separation efficiency was studied.The result demonstrated that the imprinted columns prepared with RAFT process have higher column efficiency and selectivity than the columns prepared with conventional polymerization in the present study,which may result from the higher surface area,smaller pore size and the narrower globule size distribution in their structures.The result indicated that RAFT polymerization provided better conditions for the clenbuterol imprinted monolithic polymer preparation.

  15. Side chain effects in reactions of the potassium-tyrosine charge transfer complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, F. Ferreira; Meneses, G.; Ingólfsson, O.; Limão-Vieira, P.

    2016-10-01

    Fragmentation of transient negative ions of tyrosine formed through electron transfer in collisions with neutral potassium atoms is presented in the collision energy range from 30 to 75 eV. At low collision energies the dominating side chain channel observed corresponds to the cleavage of the bond from the para-position of the phenyl ring to the β-C of the remaining moiety, but cleavage of the Cαsbnd Cβ bond is also observed. Further fragments are formed through cleavage of the Cα bond to the carbonyl group, through decomposition of the carboxyl group or through significant decomposition of the backbone. The dehydrogenated molecular anion is also observed with appreciable intensity. These results are discussed in the context of earlier studies on dissociative electron attachment to tyrosine and other amino acids, as well as within the role of the side chain in electron induced decomposition of this aromatic amino acid. Stabilization of the temporary molecular anion in the transient collision complex is discussed and we argue that this may have significant influence on the branching ratios observed.

  16. Evaluation of food chain transfer of the antibiotic oxytetracycline and human risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonsaner, Maliwan; Hawker, Darryl W

    2013-10-01

    There has been recent concern regarding the possibility of antibiotics entering the aquatic food chain and impacting human consumers. This work reports experimental results of the bioconcentration of the antibiotic oxytetracycline (OTC) by the Asian watermeal plant (Wolffia globosa Hartog & Plas) and bioaccumulation of OTC in watermeal and water by the seven-striped carp (Probarbus jullieni). They show, for the first time, the extent to which OTC is able to transfer from water to plant to fish and enter the food chain. The mean bioconcentration factor (dry weight basis) with watermeal was 1.28 × 10(3) L kg(-1). Separate experiments were undertaken to characterize accumulation of OTC by carp from water and watermeal. These showed the latter pathway to be dominant under the conditions employed. The bioconcentration and biomagnification factors for these processes were 1.75 L kg(-1) and 2 × 10(-4) kg g(-1) respectively. Using an aqueous concentration range of 0.34-3.0 μg L(-1), hazard quotients for human consumption of contaminated fish of 1.3 × 10(-2) to 1.15 × 10(-1) were derived.

  17. Influence of dispersants on trophic transfer of petroleum hydrocarbons in a marine food chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, M.; Tjeerdema, R. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Sowby, M. [California Dept. of Fish and Game, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    When crude oil is accidentally released into the ocean, it threatens many levels of marine life. Intervention, in the form of chemical dispersing agents, alters the normal behavior of petroleum hydrocarbons (PH) by increasing their functional water solubility and the extent of their exposure to sub-surface organisms. Dispersing agents may modify bioavailability as a result of altered interactions between dispersed PH droplets and organismal cell membranes.The objective of this research was to determine the impact of dispersing agents on PH bioavailability and trophic transfer in primary levels of a marine food chain. Uptake, bioaccumulation, depuration, and metabolic transformation of a model PH, {sup 14}C-naphthalene, were measured and compared for Prudhoe Bay Crude Oil (PBCO) dispersed with Corexit 9527 and undispersed preparations of the water-accommodated fractions (WAF) of PBCO at two salinities and temperatures. The model food chain consisted of Isochrysis galbana and Brachionus plicatilis. Direct aqueous exposure was compared with combined aqueous and dietary exposure. Fractionation and identification of metabolites was done by HPLC co-chromatography with analytical standards, and quantitation was done by liquid scintillation counting. GC-FID characterization of WAF and dispersed oil (DO) preparations shows higher concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons and a greater number of individual constituents in the dispersed oil preparations.

  18. Protein Transfer Free Energy Obeys Entropy-Enthalpy Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Eric A; Plotkin, Steven S

    2015-11-05

    We have found significant entropy-enthalpy compensation for the transfer of a diverse set of two-state folding proteins from water into water containing a diverse set of cosolutes, including osmolytes, denaturants, and crowders. In extracting thermodynamic parameters from experimental data, we show the potential importance of accounting for the cosolute concentration-dependence of the heat capacity change upon unfolding, as well as the potential importance of the temperature-dependence of the heat capacity change upon unfolding. We introduce a new Monte Carlo method to estimate the experimental uncertainty in the thermodynamic data and use this to show by bootstrapping methods that entropy-enthalpy compensation is statistically significant, in spite of large, correlated scatter in the data. We show that plotting the data at the transition midpoint provides the most accurate experimental values by avoiding extrapolation errors due to uncertainty in the heat capacity, and that this representation exhibits the strongest evidence of compensation. Entropy-enthalpy compensation is still significant at lab temperature however. We also find that compensation is still significant when considering variations due to heat capacity models, as well as typical measurement discrepancies lab-to-lab when such data is available. Extracting transfer entropy and enthalpy along with their uncertainties can provide a valuable consistency check between experimental data and simulation models, which may involve tests of simulated unfolded ensembles and/or models of the transfer free energy; we include specific applications to cold shock protein and protein L.

  19. Contribution of main chain and side chain atoms and their locations to the stability of thermophilic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompa, Dharma Rao; Gromiha, M Michael; Saraboji, K

    2016-03-01

    Proteins belonging to the same class, having similar structures thus performing the same function are known to have different thermal stabilities depending on the source- thermophile or mesophile. The variation in thermo-stability has not been attributed to any unified factor yet and understanding this phenomenon is critically needed in several areas, particularly in protein engineering to design stable variants of the proteins. Toward this motive, the present study focuses on the sequence and structural investigation of a dataset of 373 pairs of proteins; a thermophilic protein and its mesophilic structural analog in each pair, from the perspectives of hydrophobic free energy, hydrogen bonds, physico-chemical properties of amino acids and residue-residue contacts. Our results showed that the hydrophobic free energy due to carbon, charged nitrogen and charged oxygen atoms was stronger in 65% of thermophilic proteins. The number of hydrogen bonds which bridges the buried and exposed regions of proteins was also greater in case of thermophiles. Amino acids of extended shape, volume and molecular weight along with more medium and long range contacts were observed in many of the thermophilic proteins. These results highlight the preference of thermophiles toward the amino acids with larger side chain and charged to make up greater free energy, better packing of residues and increase the overall compactness.

  20. Unraveling the evolutionary history of the phosphoryl-transfer chain of the phosphoenolpyruvate:phosphotransferase system through phylogenetic analyses and genome context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zúñiga Manuel

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS plays a major role in sugar transport and in the regulation of essential physiological processes in many bacteria. The PTS couples solute transport to its phosphorylation at the expense of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP and it consists of general cytoplasmic phosphoryl transfer proteins and specific enzyme II complexes which catalyze the uptake and phosphorylation of solutes. Previous studies have suggested that the evolution of the constituents of the enzyme II complexes has been driven largely by horizontal gene transfer whereas vertical inheritance has been prevalent in the general phosphoryl transfer proteins in some bacterial groups. The aim of this work is to test this hypothesis by studying the evolution of the phosphoryl transfer proteins of the PTS. Results We have analyzed the evolutionary history of the PTS phosphoryl transfer chain (PTS-ptc components in 222 complete genomes by combining phylogenetic methods and analysis of genomic context. Phylogenetic analyses alone were not conclusive for the deepest nodes but when complemented with analyses of genomic context and functional information, the main evolutionary trends of this system could be depicted. Conclusion The PTS-ptc evolved in bacteria after the divergence of early lineages such as Aquificales, Thermotogales and Thermus/Deinococcus. The subsequent evolutionary history of the PTS-ptc varied in different bacterial lineages: vertical inheritance and lineage-specific gene losses mainly explain the current situation in Actinobacteria and Firmicutes whereas horizontal gene transfer (HGT also played a major role in Proteobacteria. Most remarkably, we have identified a HGT event from Firmicutes or Fusobacteria to the last common ancestor of the Enterobacteriaceae, Pasteurellaceae, Shewanellaceae and Vibrionaceae. This transfer led to extensive changes in the metabolic and regulatory networks of these bacteria

  1. Bioaccumulative and conchological assessment of heavy metal transfer in a soil-plant-snail food chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nica Dragos V

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Copper (Cu, zinc (Zn, cadmium (Cd, and lead (Pb can pose serious threats to environmental health because they tend to bioaccumulate in terrestrial ecosystems. We investigated under field conditions the transfer of these heavy metals in a soil-plant-snail food chain in Banat area, Romania. The main goal of this paper was to assess the Roman snail (Helix pomatia usefulness in environmental monitoring as bioindicator of heavy metal accumulation. Eight sampling sites, selected by different history of heavy metal (HM exposure, were chosen to be sampled for soil, nettle leaves, and newly matured snails. This study also aimed to identify the putative effects of HM accumulation in the environment on phenotypic variability in selected shell features, which included shell height (SH, relative shell height (RSH, and whorl number (WN. Results Significantly higher amounts of HMs were accumulated in snail hepatopancreas and not in foot. Cu, Zn, and Cd have biomagnified in the snail body, particularly in the hepatopancreas. In contrast, Pb decreased when going up into the food chain. Zn, Cd, and Pb correlated highly with each other at all levels of the investigated food chain. Zn and Pb exhibited an effective soil–plant transfer, whereas in the snail body only foot Cu concentration was correlated with that in soil. There were significant differences among sampling sites for WN, SH, and RSH when compared with reference snails. WN was strongly correlated with Cd and Pb concentrations in nettle leaves but not with Cu and Zn. SH was independent of HM concentrations in soil, snail hepatopancreas, and foot. However, SH correlated negatively with nettle leaves concentrations for each HM except Cu. In contrast, RSH correlated significantly only with Pb concentration in hepatopancreas. Conclusions The snail hepatopancreas accumulates high amounts of HMs, and therefore, this organ can function as a reliable biomarker for tracking HM bioavailability

  2. Bond-length alternation and charge transfer in a linear carbon chain encapsulated within a single-walled carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusznyák, Á.; Zólyomi, V.; Kürti, J.; Yang, S.; Kertesz, M.

    2005-10-01

    The physical properties of a linear carbon chain encapsulated within single-walled carbon nanotubes are investigated with density-functional theory using periodic boundary conditions. The dominant feature of an isolated carbon chain is the Peierls dimerization and the opening of a Peierls gap. The two weakly interacting subsystems (infinite carbon chain and nanotube) establish a common Fermi level, resulting in charge transfer (CT) which leads to a metallic combined system with a high density of states at the Fermi level. The rigid band model provides useful insights. Unusual physics arises from the effects of CT and chain-tube orbital hybridization which both tend to suppress the Peierls dimerization. Implications for the observed Raman spectrum of the chain-nanotube system are discussed.

  3. In Vitro Antifungal Activity of a Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) Seed Protein Homologous to Nonspecific Lipid Transfer Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terras, F R; Goderis, I J; Van Leuven, F; Vanderleyden, J; Cammue, B P; Broekaert, W F

    1992-10-01

    A basic 9-kD protein was purified from seeds of radish (Raphanus sativus L.). The 43 amino-terminal amino acids show extensive sequence identity with nonspecific lipid transfer proteins from other plant species. The radish seed nonspecific lipid transfer protein-like protein inhibits the growth of several fungi in vitro.

  4. A Semiautomated Assignment Protocol for Methyl Group Side Chains in Large Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jonggul; Wang, Yingjie; Li, Geoffrey; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2016-01-01

    The developments of biosynthetic specific labeling strategies for side-chain methyl groups have allowed structural and dynamic characterization of very large proteins and protein complexes. However, the assignment of the methyl-group resonances remains an Achilles' heel for NMR, as the experiments designed to correlate side chains to the protein backbone become rather insensitive with the increase of the transverse relaxation rates. In this chapter, we outline a semiempirical approach to assign the resonances of methyl-group side chains in large proteins. This method requires a crystal structure or an NMR ensemble of conformers as an input, together with NMR data sets such as nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) and paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs), to be implemented in a computational protocol that provides a probabilistic assignment of methyl-group resonances. As an example, we report the protocol used in our laboratory to assign the side chains of the 42-kDa catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A. Although we emphasize the labeling of isoleucine, leucine, and valine residues, this method is applicable to other methyl group side chains such as those of alanine, methionine, and threonine, as well as reductively methylated cysteine side chains.

  5. Identification and evaluation of modularization practices in an automotive supplier: progressivity analysis of transferring activities in the supply chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Prieto

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The automotive value chain has more and more been making room to a strategy of which activities of product design and production have been transferred to the module suppliers. The transfer of value-added activities occurs from assembler to the module suppliers. The former assume the role of integrators within the supply chain. The supply chain participants have started to strengths their competencies in order to obtain advantages in the economy of scale and scope. In this context, the present work aims at investigating the valued-added transfer between first and second tiers of automotive supply chain in new product development and production. The work was carried out from an evaluation of a supplier with regard to modularization. The theoretical background considers the concepts of integrated and modular architecture as well as the progressiveness of competencies among suppliers. It adopts single cased as the research methodological approach. The literature points out that the process of modularization either in product development or in production offer benefits for both sides: assemblers and suppliers. The results from the investigated supplier shows inherent benefits due to the acquisition of new technologies that enable an increase of technical and management learning in projects of new products. Therefore, it demonstrates that in this modularity environment, the potential of value-added transfer is associated to the level of progressiveness of competencies that are incorporated to deliver module solutions to assemblers; the investigated supplier can be categorized in an “embrionary” stage.

  6. Biotransformation and Incorporation into Proteins along a Simulated Terrestrial Food Chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unrine, J.M., B.P. Jackson and W.A. Hopkins

    2007-01-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element in vertebrates, but there is a narrow concentration range between dietary requirement and toxicity threshold. Although a great deal is known about the biochemistry of Se from a nutritional perspective, considerably less attention has been focused on the specific biochemistry of Se as an environmental toxicant. Recent advances in hyphenated analytical techniques have provided the capability of quantifying specific chemical forms of Se in biological tissues as well as the distribution of Se among macromolecules. We applied liquid chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to investigate biotransformations of selenomethionine along a simulated terrestrial food chain consisting of selenomethionine exposed crickets (Acheta domesticus) fed to western fence lizards (Sceloporus occidentalis). Evidence was obtained for selenomethionine biotransformation as well as for sex-specific differences in the metabolism of Se compounds and their subsequent incorporation into proteins in the lizard. The results demonstrate the complexities involved in trophic transfer of Se due to the potential for extensive biotransformation and the species- and even sex-specific nature of these biotransformations.

  7. Metal Ion-dependent Heavy Chain Transfer Activity of TSG-6 Mediates Assembly of the Cumulus-Oocyte Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, David C; Birchenough, Holly L; Ali, Tariq; Rugg, Marilyn S; Waltho, Jon P; Ievoli, Elena; Jowitt, Thomas A; Enghild, Jan J; Richter, Ralf P; Salustri, Antonietta; Milner, Caroline M; Day, Anthony J

    2015-11-27

    The matrix polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) has a critical role in the expansion of the cumulus cell-oocyte complex (COC), a process that is necessary for ovulation and fertilization in most mammals. Hyaluronan is organized into a cross-linked network by the cooperative action of three proteins, inter-α-inhibitor (IαI), pentraxin-3, and TNF-stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6), driving the expansion of the COC and providing the cumulus matrix with its required viscoelastic properties. Although it is known that matrix stabilization involves the TSG-6-mediated transfer of IαI heavy chains (HCs) onto hyaluronan (to form covalent HC·HA complexes that are cross-linked by pentraxin-3) and that this occurs via the formation of covalent HC·TSG-6 intermediates, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we have determined the tertiary structure of the CUB module from human TSG-6, identifying a calcium ion-binding site and chelating glutamic acid residue that mediate the formation of HC·TSG-6. This occurs via an initial metal ion-dependent, non-covalent, interaction between TSG-6 and HCs that also requires the presence of an HC-associated magnesium ion. In addition, we have found that the well characterized hyaluronan-binding site in the TSG-6 Link module is not used for recognition during transfer of HCs onto HA. Analysis of TSG-6 mutants (with impaired transferase and/or hyaluronan-binding functions) revealed that although the TSG-6-mediated formation of HC·HA complexes is essential for the expansion of mouse COCs in vitro, the hyaluronan-binding function of TSG-6 does not play a major role in the stabilization of the murine cumulus matrix.

  8. Transfer of Paralytic Shellfish Toxins via Marine Food Chains:A Simulated Experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHI-JUN TAN; TIAN YAN; PEN-CHENG YU; MING-JIANG ZHOU

    2007-01-01

    Objective To study the transfer of paralytic shellfish toxins(PST)using four simulated marine food chains:d8noflagellate Alexandrium tamarense→Artemia Anemia salina→Mysid shrimp Neomysis awatschensis;A.tamarense→N.awatschensis:A.tamarense→A.salina→Perch Lateolabrax japonicus;and A.tamarenae→L. japonicus. Methods The ingestion of A.tamarenge.a producer of PST, by L. japonicus,N.awatschensis,and A.salina was first confirmed by microscopic observation of A.tamarense cells in the intestine samples of the three different organisms,and by the analysis of Chl.a levels in the samples.Toxin accumulation in L.japonicus and N.awatschensis directly from the feeding on A.tamarense 8r indirectly through the vector of A.salina was then studied.The toxicity of samples was measured using the AOAC mouse bioassay method,and the toxin content and profile of A.tamarense were analyzed by the HPLC method.Results Both A.salina and N.nwatschensis could ingest A.tamarense cells.However,the ingestion capability of A.salina exceeded that of N.L. japonicus.N.awatschensis and A.salina by microscopic observation.Therefore,the three organisms could ingest A.tamarense cells directly.A.salina could accumulate high content of PST,and the toxicity of A.salina in samples collected on of tested mice within 7 minutes,and the toxin content in artemia sample collected on the lst day was estimated to be 1.65×10-5 μg STX equal/individual.Toxin accumulation in L.japonicus and N.awatschensis directly from the feeding on A.tamarense or indirectly from the vector of A.salina was also studied.The mice injected with extracts from L.japonicus and N. awatschensis samples that accumulated PST either directly or indirectly showed PST intoxication symptoms,indicating that low levels of PST existed in these samples Conclusion Paralytic shellfish toxins can be transferred to L.japonicus,N.awatschensis,and A.salina from A.tamarense directly or indirectly via the food chains.

  9. The horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes is enhanced by ionic liquid with different structure of varying alkyl chain length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing eWang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs have become a global health concern. In our previous study, an ionic liquid (IL 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIm][PF6] had been proven to facilitate the dissemination of ARGs in the environment. However, enhanced alkyl group chain length or the substitution of alkyl groups with the cation ring corresponded with increased antimicrobial effects. In this study, we investigated how different structures of ILs with 4, 6 and 8 C atoms in the longer alkyl chain on the imidazolium cations facilitated the dissemination of ARGs. The promotion of plasmid RP4 transfer frequency decreased with [CnMIM][BF4] increasing the alkyl chain length from 4 carbon atoms to 8 carbon atoms on the imidazolium cations, which is observed with [BMIM][BF4] (n=4, 5.9 fold> HMIM][BF4] (n=6, 2.2 fold> [OMIM][BF4] (n=8, 1.7 fold. This illustrates that [CnMIM][BF4] with increasing the alkyl chain length exert decreasing ability in facilitating plasmid RP4 horizontal transfer, which is possibly related to IL-structure dependent toxicity. The IL-structure dependent plasmid RP4 transfer frequency was attributable to bacterial cell membrane permeability weaken with increasing alkyl chain length of [CnMIM][PF4], which was evidenced by flow cytometry (FCM. In freshwater microcosm, [CnMIm][BF4] promoted the relative abundance of the sulI and intI genes for 4.6 folds, aphA and traF for 5.2 folds higher than the untreated groups, promoting the propagation of ARGs in the aquatic environment. This is the first report that ILs with different structure of varying alkyl chain length facilitate horizontal transfer of plasmid RP4 which is widely distributed in the environment, and thus add the adverse effects of the environmental risk of ILs.

  10. Multiple-spin coherence transfer in linear Ising spin chains and beyond: numerically-optimized pulses and experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Nimbalkar, Manoj; Neves, Jorge L; Elavarasi, S Begam; Yuan, Haidong; Khaneja, Navin; Dorai, Kavita; Glaser, Steffen J

    2011-01-01

    We study multiple-spin coherence transfers in linear Ising spin chains with nearest neighbor couplings. These constitute a model for efficient information transfers in future quantum computing devices and for many multi-dimensional experiments for the assignment of complex spectra in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We complement prior analytic techniques for multiple-spin coherence transfers with a systematic numerical study where we obtain strong evidence that a certain analytically-motivated family of restricted controls is sufficient for time-optimality. In the case of a linear three-spin system, additional evidence suggests that prior analytic pulse sequences using this family of restricted controls are time-optimal even for arbitrary local controls. In addition, we compare the pulse sequences for linear Ising spin chains to pulse sequences for more realistic spin systems with additional long-range couplings between non-adjacent spins. We experimentally implement the derived pulse sequences in th...

  11. A polaron model for electron transfer in globular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuev, G N; Lakhno, V D

    1993-07-07

    Polaron models have been considered for the electron states in protein globules existing in a solvent. These models account for two fundamental effects, viz, polarization interaction of an electron with the conformational vibrations and the heterogeneity of the medium. Equations have been derived to determine the electron state in a protein globule. The parameters of this state show that it is an extended state with an energy of 2 eV. The electron transfer rate for cyt C self-exchange reaction has been calculated in the polaron model. Reorganization energy, tunneling matrix element and the rate constant have also been estimated. The results are compared with experimental data. The influence of model parameters on the significance of the data obtained has been studied. The potentialities of the model are discussed.

  12. Markov chain formalism for generalized radiative transfer in a plane-parallel medium, accounting for polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Davis, Anthony B.; Diner, David J.

    2016-11-01

    A Markov chain formalism is developed for computing the transport of polarized radiation according to Generalized Radiative Transfer (GRT) theory, which was developed recently to account for unresolved random fluctuations of scattering particle density and can also be applied to unresolved spectral variability of gaseous absorption as an improvement over the standard correlated-k method. Using Gamma distribution to describe the probability density function of the extinction or absorption coefficient, a shape parameter a that quantifies the variability is introduced, defined as the mean extinction or absorption coefficient squared divided by its variance. It controls the decay rate of a power-law transmission that replaces the usual exponential Beer-Lambert-Bouguer law. Exponential transmission, hence classic RT, is recovered when a→∞. The new approach is verified to high accuracy against numerical benchmark results obtained with a custom Monte Carlo method. For a<∞, angular reciprocity is violated to a degree that increases with the spatial variability, as observed for finite portions of real-world cloudy scenes. While the degree of linear polarization in liquid water cloudbows, supernumerary bows, and glories is affected by spatial heterogeneity, the positions in scattering angle of these features are relatively unchanged. As a result, a single-scattering model based on the assumption of subpixel homogeneity can still be used to derive droplet size distributions from polarimetric measurements of extended stratocumulus clouds.

  13. Biochemical and biological functions of class I phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockcroft, Shamshad; Carvou, Nicolas

    2007-06-01

    Phosphoinositides function in a diverse array of cellular activities. They include a role as substrate for lipid kinases and phospholipases to generate second messengers, regulators of the cytoskeleton, of enzymes and of ion channels, and docking sites for reversible recruitment of proteins to membranes. Mammalian phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins, PITPalpha and PITPbeta are paralogs that share 77% sequence identity and contain a hydrophobic cavity that can sequester either phosphatidylinositol or phosphatidylcholine. A string of 11 amino acid residues at the C-terminal acts as a "lid" which shields the lipid from the aqueous environment. PITPs in vitro can facilitate inter-membrane lipid transfer and this requires the movement of the "lid" to allow the lipid cargo to be released. Thus PITPs are structurally designed for delivering lipid cargo and could thus participate in cellular events that are dependent on phosphatidylinositol or derivatives of phosphatidylinositol. Phosphatidylinositol, the precursor for all phosphoinositides is synthesised at the endoplasmic reticulum and its distribution to other organelles could be facilitated by PITPs. Here we highlight recent studies that report on the three-dimensional structures of the different PITP forms and suggest how PITPs are likely to dock at the membrane surface for lipid delivery and extraction. Additionally we discuss whether PITPs are important regulators of sphingomyelin metabolism, and finally describe recent studies that link the association of PITPs with diverse functions including membrane traffic at the Golgi, neurite outgrowth, cytokinesis and stem cell growth.

  14. Lateral proton transfer between the membrane and a membrane protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojemyr, Linda; Sandén, Tor; Widengren, Jerker; Brzezinski, Peter

    2009-03-17

    Proton transport across biological membranes is a key step of the energy conservation machinery in living organisms, and it has been proposed that the membrane itself plays an important role in this process. In the present study we have investigated the effect of incorporation of a proton transporter, cytochrome c oxidase, into a membrane on the protonation kinetics of a fluorescent pH-sensitive probe attached at the surface of the protein. The results show that proton transfer to the probe was slightly accelerated upon attachment at the protein surface (approximately 7 x 1010 s(-1) M(-1), compared to the expected value of (1-2) x 10(10) s(-1) M(-1)), which is presumably due to the presence of acidic/His groups in the vicinity. Upon incorporation of the protein into small unilamellar phospholipid vesicles the rate increased by more than a factor of 400 to approximately 3 x 10(13) s(-1) M(-1), which indicates that the protein-attached probe is in rapid protonic contact with the membrane surface. The results indicate that the membrane acts to accelerate proton uptake by the membrane-bound proton transporter.

  15. An Exact Algorithm for Side-Chain Placement in Protein Design

    CERN Document Server

    Canzar, Stefan; Klau, Gunnar W

    2011-01-01

    Computational protein design aims at constructing novel or improved functions on the structure of a given protein backbone and has important applications in the pharmaceutical and biotechnical industry. The underlying combinatorial side-chain placement problem consists of choosing a side-chain placement for each residue position such that the resulting overall energy is minimum. The choice of the side-chain then also determines the amino acid for this position. Many algorithms for this NP-hard problem have been proposed in the context of homology modeling, which, however, reach their limits when faced with large protein design instances. In this paper, we propose a new exact method for the side-chain placement problem that works well even for large instance sizes as they appear in protein design. Our main contribution is a dedicated branch-and-bound algorithm that combines tight upper and lower bounds resulting from a novel Lagrangian relaxation approach for side-chain placement. Our experimental results show...

  16. Heat conduction in chain polymer liquids: molecular dynamics study on the contributions of inter- and intramolecular energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Taku; Yuan, Tan Chia; Torii, Daichi; Kikugawa, Gota; Kosugi, Naohiro

    2011-07-21

    In this paper, the molecular mechanisms which determine the thermal conductivity of long chain polymer liquids are discussed, based on the results observed in molecular dynamics simulations. Linear n-alkanes, which are typical polymer molecules, were chosen as the target of our studies. Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of bulk liquid n-alkanes under a constant temperature gradient were performed. Saturated liquids of n-alkanes with six different chain lengths were examined at the same reduced temperature (0.7T(c)), and the contributions of inter- and intramolecular energy transfer to heat conduction flux, which were identified as components of heat flux by the authors' previous study [J. Chem. Phys. 128, 044504 (2008)], were observed. The present study compared n-alkane liquids with various molecular lengths at the same reduced temperature and corresponding saturated densities, and found that the contribution of intramolecular energy transfer to the total heat flux, relative to that of intermolecular energy transfer, increased with the molecular length. The study revealed that in long chain polymer liquids, thermal energy is mainly transferred in the space along the stiff intramolecular bonds. This finding implies a connection between anisotropic thermal conductivity and the orientation of molecules in various organized structures with long polymer molecules aligned in a certain direction, which includes confined polymer liquids and self-organized structures such as membranes of amphiphilic molecules in water.

  17. Role of fatty acid binding proteins and long chain fatty acids in modulating nuclear receptors and gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Friedhelm; Petrescu, Anca D; Huang, Huan; Atshaves, Barbara P; McIntosh, Avery L; Martin, Gregory G; Hostetler, Heather A; Vespa, Aude; Landrock, Danilo; Landrock, Kerstin K; Payne, H Ross; Kier, Ann B

    2008-01-01

    Abnormal energy regulation may significantly contribute to the pathogenesis of obesity, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. For rapid control of energy homeostasis, allosteric and posttranslational events activate or alter activity of key metabolic enzymes. For longer impact, transcriptional regulation is more effective, especially in response to nutrients such as long chain fatty acids (LCFA). Recent advances provide insights into how poorly water-soluble lipid nutrients [LCFA; retinoic acid (RA)] and their metabolites (long chain fatty acyl Coenzyme A, LCFA-CoA) reach nuclei, bind their cognate ligand-activated receptors, and regulate transcription for signaling lipid and glucose catabolism or storage: (i) while serum and cytoplasmic LCFA levels are in the 200 mircroM-mM range, real-time imaging recently revealed that LCFA and LCFA-CoA are also located within nuclei (nM range); (ii) sensitive fluorescence binding assays show that LCFA-activated nuclear receptors [peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF4alpha)] exhibit high affinity (low nM KdS) for LCFA (PPARalpha) and/or LCFA-CoA (PPARalpha, HNF4alpha)-in the same range as nuclear levels of these ligands; (iii) live and fixed cell immunolabeling and imaging revealed that some cytoplasmic lipid binding proteins [liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), acyl CoA binding protein (ACBP), cellular retinoic acid binding protein-2 (CRABP-2)] enter nuclei, bind nuclear receptors (PPARalpha, HNF4alpha, CRABP-2), and activate transcription of genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism; and (iv) studies with gene ablated mice provided physiological relevance of LCFA and LCFA-CoA binding proteins in nuclear signaling. This led to the hypothesis that cytoplasmic lipid binding proteins transfer and channel lipidic ligands into nuclei for initiating nuclear receptor transcriptional activity to provide new lipid nutrient signaling pathways that

  18. Hematoxylin-stainability of keratohyalin granules is due to the novel component, fibrinogen γ-chain protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masae; Horiuchi, Yoshitaka; Tezuka, Tadashi

    2010-11-01

    Hematoxylin-stainability of keratohyalin granules (KHG) using biochemical and immunohistochemical techniques is due to the presence of a fibrinogen γ-chain protein. A protein with a molecular weight of 100 kDa was stained with anti-Ted-H-1 monoclonal antibody and hematoxylin solution (hematoxylin-stainable protein). Since the amino acid sequence of the hematoxylin-stainable protein was to that of fibrinogen γ-chain protein, a peptide was synthesized and an antibody against the peptide was produced. This antibody reacted with the hematoxylin-stainable protein and fibrinogen γ-chain protein on immunoblot analysis and with KHG on immunohistochemical examination. Furthermore, a commercial anti-fibrinogen γ-chain protein antibody (Ab) also reacted with the hematoxylin-stainable protein as well as fibrinogen. In contrast, anti-fibrinogen β-chain protein Ab did not react with the hematoxylin-stainable protein. The fibrinogen γ-chain protein also stained with hematoxylin. These findings suggested that fibrinogen γ-chain protein may be a novel component protein of KHG and may induce the hematoxylin-stainability of KHG.

  19. Porcine circovirus type 2 ORF4 protein binds heavy chain ferritin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Qizhuang Lv; Kangkang Guo; Tao Wang; Chengcheng Zhang; Yanming Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is the primary infectious agent of PCV-associated disease (PCVAD) in swine. ORF4 protein is a newly identified viral protein of PCV2 and is involved in virus-induced apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanisms of ORF4 protein regulation of apoptosis remain unclear, especially given there is no information regarding any cellular partners of the ORF4 protein. Here, we have utilized the yeast two-hybrid assay and identified four host proteins (FHC, SNRPN, COX8A and Lamin C) interacting with the ORF4 protein. Specially, FHC was chosen for further characterization due to its important role in apoptosis. GST pull-down, subcellular co-location and co-immunoprecipitation assays confirmed that the PCV2 ORF4 protein indeed interacted with the heavy-chain ferritin, which is an interesting clue that will allow us to determine the role of the ORF4 protein in apoptosis.

  20. Coupling Protein Side-Chain and Backbone Flexibility Improves the Re-design of Protein-Ligand Specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Ollikainen

    Full Text Available Interactions between small molecules and proteins play critical roles in regulating and facilitating diverse biological functions, yet our ability to accurately re-engineer the specificity of these interactions using computational approaches has been limited. One main difficulty, in addition to inaccuracies in energy functions, is the exquisite sensitivity of protein-ligand interactions to subtle conformational changes, coupled with the computational problem of sampling the large conformational search space of degrees of freedom of ligands, amino acid side chains, and the protein backbone. Here, we describe two benchmarks for evaluating the accuracy of computational approaches for re-engineering protein-ligand interactions: (i prediction of enzyme specificity altering mutations and (ii prediction of sequence tolerance in ligand binding sites. After finding that current state-of-the-art "fixed backbone" design methods perform poorly on these tests, we develop a new "coupled moves" design method in the program Rosetta that couples changes to protein sequence with alterations in both protein side-chain and protein backbone conformations, and allows for changes in ligand rigid-body and torsion degrees of freedom. We show significantly increased accuracy in both predicting ligand specificity altering mutations and binding site sequences. These methodological improvements should be useful for many applications of protein-ligand design. The approach also provides insights into the role of subtle conformational adjustments that enable functional changes not only in engineering applications but also in natural protein evolution.

  1. Transfer of mercury and methylmercury along macroinvertebrate food chains in a floodplain lake of the Beni River, Bolivian Amazonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, Carlos Israel, E-mail: camoar6088@gmail.com [Instituto de Ecologia, Unidad de Limnologia, UMSA, Casilla postal 10077, La Paz (Bolivia, Plurinational State of); Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement IRD, Casilla postal 9214, La Paz (Bolivia, Plurinational State of); CONICET-Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman, Miguel Lillo 205, 4 000, Tucuman (Argentina); Gibon, Francois-Marie [Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement IRD, Casilla postal 9214, La Paz (Bolivia, Plurinational State of); IRD, UMR BOREA, Museum national d' Histoire Naturelle MNHN, Case postale 26, 75231, Paris cedex 05 (France); Duprey, Jean-Louis [Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement IRD, Casilla postal 9214, La Paz (Bolivia, Plurinational State of); Dominguez, Eduardo [CONICET-Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman, Miguel Lillo 205, 4 000, Tucuman (Argentina); Guimaraes, Jean-Remy D. [Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Bloco G-CCS, Rio de Janeiro, CEP 21949-900 (Brazil); Roulet, Marc [Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement IRD, Casilla postal 9214, La Paz (Bolivia, Plurinational State of)

    2010-07-15

    We have evaluated the mercury and methylmercury transfers to and within the macroinvertebrate communities of a floodplain lake of the Beni River basin, Bolivia, during three hydrological seasons and in two habitats (open water and vegetation belt). Using the stable isotopes {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 15}N, six trophic chains were identified during a previous study. Four are based on only one source: seston, organic matter from the bottom sediment, periphyton and macrophytes. Two are based on mixed sources (seston and periphyton in one case, periphyton and macrophytes in the other). During sampling, we found only one taxon that had surface sediment organic matter as food source and very few taxa whose trophic source was constituted by macrophytes. The periphyton was the most important source during all seasons; it produced the longest chain, with three trophic positions. Whatever the season and trophic source, all collected macroinvertebrates contained methyl mercury and the latter was biomagnified in all trophic chains that we identified. The biomagnification of methylmercury through invertebrate trophic chains accurately reflected the existence and length of these chains. Biomagnification was virtually non-existent in the sediment-based chain, low and restricted to the dry season in the macrophyte-based chain. It was significant in the seston-based chain, but limited by the existence of only two trophic levels and restricted to the wet season. Finally, it was very effective in the periphyton-based chain, which offers the highest rate of contamination of the source but, above all, the largest number of trophic levels.

  2. The cDNA sequence for the protein-tyrosine kinase substrate p36 (calpactin I heavy chain) reveals a multidomain protein with internal repeats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarin, C T; Tack, B F; Kristensen, Torsten;

    1986-01-01

    We have isolated and sequenced a full-length cDNA clone for the protein-tyrosine kinase substrate p36 (calpactin I heavy chain). This sequence predicts a 339 amino acid (Mr 38,493) protein containing an N-terminal region of 20 amino acids, known to interact with a 10 kd protein (light chain), and...

  3. Protein side-chain packing problem: a maximum edge-weight clique algorithmic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukka Bahadur, K C; Tomita, Etsuji; Suzuki, Jun'ichi; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2005-02-01

    "Protein Side-chain Packing" has an ever-increasing application in the field of bio-informatics, dating from the early methods of homology modeling to protein design and to the protein docking. However, this problem is computationally known to be NP-hard. In this regard, we have developed a novel approach to solve this problem using the notion of a maximum edge-weight clique. Our approach is based on efficient reduction of protein side-chain packing problem to a graph and then solving the reduced graph to find the maximum clique by applying an efficient clique finding algorithm developed by our co-authors. Since our approach is based on deterministic algorithms in contrast to the various existing algorithms based on heuristic approaches, our algorithm guarantees of finding an optimal solution. We have tested this approach to predict the side-chain conformations of a set of proteins and have compared the results with other existing methods. We have found that our results are favorably comparable or better than the results produced by the existing methods. As our test set contains a protein of 494 residues, we have obtained considerable improvement in terms of size of the proteins and in terms of the efficiency and the accuracy of prediction.

  4. Elevated plasma cholesteryl ester transfer in NIDDM : relationships with apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins and phospholipid transfer protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemens, S; van Tol, A; Sluiter, W; Dullaart, R

    1998-01-01

    Lecithin:cholesteryl acyl transferase (LCAT) and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) are key factors in the esterification of cholesterol and the subsequent transfer of cholesteryl ester from high density lipoproteins (HDL) towards very low and low density lipoproteins (VLDL + LDL). Phospholip

  5. Beyond rotamers: a generative, probabilistic model of side chains in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Tim; Boomsma, Wouter; Paluszewski, Martin;

    2010-01-01

    Background: Accurately covering the conformational space of amino acid side chains is essential for important applications such as protein design, docking and high resolution structure prediction. Today, the most common way to capture this conformational space is through rotamer libraries discrete...... for certain applications. For example, rigorously combining rotamers with physical force fields is associated with numerous problems. Results: In this work we present BASILISK: a generative, probabilistic model of the conformational space of side chains that makes it possible to sample in continuous space...... model of side chain conformational space. We also illustrate how the model can be used for rigorous, unbiased sampling with a physical force field, and how it improves side chain prediction when used as a pseudo-energy term. In conclusion, BASILISK is an important step forward on the way to a rigorous...

  6. Coupling Protein Side-Chain and Backbone Flexibility Improves the Re-design of Protein-Ligand Specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollikainen, Noah; de Jong, René M.; Kortemme, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between small molecules and proteins play critical roles in regulating and facilitating diverse biological functions, yet our ability to accurately re-engineer the specificity of these interactions using computational approaches has been limited. One main difficulty, in addition to inaccuracies in energy functions, is the exquisite sensitivity of protein–ligand interactions to subtle conformational changes, coupled with the computational problem of sampling the large conformational search space of degrees of freedom of ligands, amino acid side chains, and the protein backbone. Here, we describe two benchmarks for evaluating the accuracy of computational approaches for re-engineering protein-ligand interactions: (i) prediction of enzyme specificity altering mutations and (ii) prediction of sequence tolerance in ligand binding sites. After finding that current state-of-the-art “fixed backbone” design methods perform poorly on these tests, we develop a new “coupled moves” design method in the program Rosetta that couples changes to protein sequence with alterations in both protein side-chain and protein backbone conformations, and allows for changes in ligand rigid-body and torsion degrees of freedom. We show significantly increased accuracy in both predicting ligand specificity altering mutations and binding site sequences. These methodological improvements should be useful for many applications of protein – ligand design. The approach also provides insights into the role of subtle conformational adjustments that enable functional changes not only in engineering applications but also in natural protein evolution. PMID:26397464

  7. Functionalization of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes with polystyrene via surface initiated reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macdonald, Thomas; Gibson, Christopher T.; Constantopoulos, Kristina; Shapter, Joseph G. [Flinders Centre for Nanoscale Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA, 5001 (Australia); Ellis, Amanda V., E-mail: amanda.ellis@flinders.edu.au [Flinders Centre for Nanoscale Science and Technology, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA, 5001 (Australia)

    2012-01-15

    Here we demonstrate the covalent attachment of vertically aligned (VA) acid treated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) onto a silicon substrate via dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC) coupling chemistry. Subsequently, the pendant carboxyl moieties on the sidewalls of the VA-SWCNTs were derivatized to acyl chlorides, and then finally to bis(dithioester) moieties using a magnesium chloride dithiobenzoate salt. The bis(dithioester) moieties were then successfully shown to act as a chain transfer agent (CTA) in the reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization of styrene in a surface initiated 'grafting-from' process from the VA-SWCNT surface. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) verified vertical alignment of the SWCNTs and the maintenance thereof throughout the synthesis process. Finally, Raman scattering spectroscopy and AFM confirmed polystyrene functionalization.

  8. Surface modification of carbon nanotubes via combination of mussel inspired chemistry and chain transfer free radical polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Qing; Tian, Jianwen; Liu, Meiying; Zeng, Guangjian; Huang, Qiang [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang, 330031 (China); Wang, Ke; Zhang, Qingsong [Department of Chemistry and the Tsinghua Center for Frontier Polymer Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Deng, Fengjie, E-mail: fengjiedeng@aliyun.com [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang, 330031 (China); Zhang, Xiaoyong, E-mail: xiaoyongzhang1980@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang, 330031 (China); Wei, Yen, E-mail: weiyen@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry and the Tsinghua Center for Frontier Polymer Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Graphical abstract: A novel strategy combination of mussel inspired chemistry and chain transfer free radical polymerization has been developed for surface modification of carbon nanotubes with polymers for the first time. - Highlights: • Surface modification of CNTs via mussel inspired chemistry. • Preparation of aminated polymers through free radical polymerization. • Functionalized CNTs with aminated polymers via Michael addition reaction. • Highly dispersed CNTs in organic and aqueous solution. - Abstract: In this work, a novel strategy for surface modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was developed via combination of mussel inspired chemistry and chain transfer free radical polymerization. First, pristine CNTs were functionalized with polydopamine (PDA), which is formed via self-polymerization of dopamine in alkaline conditions. These PDA functionalized CNTs can be further reacted with amino-terminated polymers (named as PDMC), which was synthesized through chain transfer free radical polymerization using cysteamine hydrochloride as chain transfer agent and methacryloxyethyltrimethyl ammonium chloride as the monomer. PDMC perfectly conjugated with CNT-PDA was ascertained by a series of characterization techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The dispersibility of obtained CNT nanocomposites (named as CNT-PDA-PDMC) was further examined. Results showed that the dispersibility of CNT-PDA-PDMC in aqueous and organic solutions was obviously enhanced. Apart from PDMC, many other amino-terminated polymers can also be used to functionalization of CNTs via similar strategy. Therefore, the method described in this work should be a general strategy for fabrication various polymer nanocomposites.

  9. Kinetic performance and energy profile in a roller coaster electron transfer chain: a study of modified tetraheme-reaction center constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alric, Jean; Lavergne, Jérôme; Rappaport, Fabrice; Verméglio, André; Matsuura, Katsumi; Shimada, Keizo; Nagashima, Kenji V P

    2006-03-29

    In many electron-transfer proteins, the arrangement of cofactors implies a succession of uphill and downhill steps. The kinetic implications of such arrangements are examined in the present work, based on a study of chimeric photosynthetic reaction centers obtained by expressing the tetraheme subunit from Blastochloris viridis in another purple bacterium, Rubrivivax gelatinosus. Site-directed mutations of the environment of heme c559, which is the immediate electron donor to the primary donor P, induced modifications of this heme's midpoint potential over a range of 400 mV. This resulted in shifts of the apparent midpoint potentials of the neighboring carriers, yielding estimates of the interactions between redox centers. At both extremities of the explored range, the energy profile of the electron-transfer chain presented an additional uphill step, either downstream or upstream from c559. These modifications caused conspicuous changes of the electron-transfer rate across the tetraheme subunit, which became approximately 100-fold slower in the mutants where the midpoint potential of c559 was lowest. A theoretical analysis of the kinetics is presented, predicting a displacement of the rate-limiting step when lowering the potential of c559. A reasonable agreement with the data was obtained when combining this treatment with the rates predicted by electron transfer theory for the individual rate constants.

  10. Optimal control of fast and high-fidelity quantum state transfer in spin-1/2 chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiong-Peng; Shao, Bin; Hu, Shuai; Zou, Jian; Wu, Lian-Ao

    2016-12-01

    Spin chains are promising candidates for quantum communication and computation. Using quantum optimal control (OC) theory based on the Krotov method, we present a protocol to perform quantum state transfer with fast and high fidelity by only manipulating the boundary spins in a quantum spin-1/2 chain. The achieved speed is about one order of magnitude faster than that is possible in the Lyapunov control case for comparable fidelities. Additionally, it has a fundamental limit for OC beyond which optimization is not possible. The controls are exerted only on the couplings between the boundary spins and their neighbors, so that the scheme has good scalability. We also demonstrate that the resulting OC scheme is robust against disorder in the chain.

  11. The Lipid Transfer Protein StarD7: Structure, Function, and Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Susana Genti-Raimondi; Panzetta-Dutari, Graciela M.; Sofía Angeletti; Viviana Rena; Jésica Flores-Martin

    2013-01-01

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein-related lipid transfer (START) domain proteins constitute a family of evolutionarily conserved and widely expressed proteins that have been implicated in lipid transport, metabolism, and signaling. The 15 well-characterized mammalian START domain-containing proteins are grouped into six subfamilies. The START domain containing 7 mRNA encodes StarD7, a member of the StarD2/phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (PCTP) subfamily, which was first i...

  12. Protein-resistant polyurethane via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhilin; Feng, Wei; Zhu, Shiping; Sheardown, Heather; Brash, John L

    2009-12-15

    Protein-resistant polyurethane (PU) surfaces were prepared by surface-initiated simultaneous normal and reverse atom transfer radical polymerization (s-ATRP) of poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate) (poly (OEGMA)). Oxygen plasma treatment was employed for initial activation of the PU surface. The grafted polymer chain length was adjusted by varying the molar ratio of monomer to sacrificial initiator in solution from 5:1 to 200:1. The modified PU surfaces were characterized by water contact angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Protein adsorption experiments from tris-buffered saline (TBS) and plasma were carried out to evaluate the protein-resistance of the surfaces. Adsorption from single and binary protein solutions as well as from plasma was significantly reduced after modification. Adsorption decreased with increasing poly(OEGMA) chain length. Fibrinogen (Fg) adsorption on the 200:1 monomer/initiator surface was in the range of 3-33 ng/cm(2) representing 96-99% reduction compared with the unmodified PU. Fg adsorption from 0.01-10% plasma was as low as 1-5 ng/cm(2). Moreover, binary protein adsorption experiments using Fg and lysozyme (Lys) showed that protein size is a factor in the protein resistance of these surfaces.

  13. Surface modification of carbon nanotubes via combination of mussel inspired chemistry and chain transfer free radical polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Qing; Tian, Jianwen; Liu, Meiying; Zeng, Guangjian; Huang, Qiang; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Qingsong; Deng, Fengjie; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2015-08-01

    In this work, a novel strategy for surface modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was developed via combination of mussel inspired chemistry and chain transfer free radical polymerization. First, pristine CNTs were functionalized with polydopamine (PDA), which is formed via self-polymerization of dopamine in alkaline conditions. These PDA functionalized CNTs can be further reacted with amino-terminated polymers (named as PDMC), which was synthesized through chain transfer free radical polymerization using cysteamine hydrochloride as chain transfer agent and methacryloxyethyltrimethyl ammonium chloride as the monomer. PDMC perfectly conjugated with CNT-PDA was ascertained by a series of characterization techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The dispersibility of obtained CNT nanocomposites (named as CNT-PDA-PDMC) was further examined. Results showed that the dispersibility of CNT-PDA-PDMC in aqueous and organic solutions was obviously enhanced. Apart from PDMC, many other amino-terminated polymers can also be used to functionalization of CNTs via similar strategy. Therefore, the method described in this work should be a general strategy for fabrication various polymer nanocomposites.

  14. Polymer-grafted lignin surfactants prepared via reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Chetali; Washburn, Newell R

    2014-08-12

    Kraft lignin grafted with hydrophilic polymers has been prepared using reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization and investigated for use as a surfactant. In this preliminary study, polyacrylamide and poly(acrylic acid) were grafted from a lignin RAFT macroinitiator at average initiator site densities estimated to be 2 per particle and 17 per particle. The target degrees of polymerization were 50 and 100, but analysis of cleaved polyacrylamide was consistent with a higher average molecular weight, suggesting not all sites were able to participate in the polymerization. All materials were readily soluble in water, and dynamic light scattering data indicate polymer-grafted lignin coexisted in isolated and aggregated forms in aqueous media. The characteristic size was 15-20 nm at low concentrations, and aggregation appeared to be a stronger function of degree of polymerization than graft density. These species were surface active, reducing the surface tension to as low as 60 dyn/cm at 1 mg/mL, and a greater decrease was observed than for polymer-grafted silica nanoparticles, suggesting that the lignin core was also surface active. While these lignin surfactants were soluble in water, they were not soluble in hexanes. Thus, it was unexpected that water-in-oil emulsions formed in all surfactant compositions and solvent ratios tested, with average droplet sizes of 10-20 μm. However, although polymer-grafted lignin has structural features similar to nanoparticles used in Pickering emulsions, its interfacial behavior was qualitatively different. While at air-water interfaces, the hydrophilic grafts promote effective reductions in surface tension, we hypothesize that the low grafting density in these lignin surfactants favors partitioning into the hexanes side of the oil-water interface because collapsed conformations of the polymer grafts improve interfacial coverage and reduce water-hexanes interactions. We propose that polymer-grafted lignin

  15. On correlation between protein secondary structure, backbone bond angles, and side-chain orientations

    CERN Document Server

    Lundgren, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the fine structure of the sp3 hybridized covalent bond geometry that governs the tetrahedral architecture around the central C$_\\alpha$ carbon of a protein backbone, and for this we develop new visualization techniques to analyze high resolution X-ray structures in Protein Data Bank. We observe that there is a correlation between the deformations of the ideal tetrahedral symmetry and the local secondary structure of the protein. We propose a universal coarse grained energy function to describe the ensuing side-chain geometry in terms of the C$_\\beta$ carbon orientations. The energy function can model the side-chain geometry with a sub-atomic precision. As an example we construct the C$_\\alpha$-C$_\\beta$ structure of HP35 chicken villin headpiece. We obtain a configuration that deviates less than 0.4 \\.A in root-mean-square distance from the experimental X-ray structure.

  16. Sparse networks of directly coupled, polymorphic, and functional side chains in allosteric proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltan Ghoraie, Laleh; Burkowski, Forbes; Zhu, Mu

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the role of coupled side-chain fluctuations alone in the allosteric behavior of proteins. Moreover, examination of X-ray crystallography data has recently revealed new information about the prevalence of alternate side-chain conformations (conformational polymorphism), and attempts have been made to uncover the hidden alternate conformations from X-ray data. Hence, new computational approaches are required that consider the polymorphic nature of the side chains, and incorporate the effects of this phenomenon in the study of information transmission and functional interactions of residues in a molecule. These studies can provide a more accurate understanding of the allosteric behavior. In this article, we first present a novel approach to generate an ensemble of conformations and an efficient computational method to extract direct couplings of side chains in allosteric proteins, and provide sparse network representations of the couplings. We take the side-chain conformational polymorphism into account, and show that by studying the intrinsic dynamics of an inactive structure, we are able to construct a network of functionally crucial residues. Second, we show that the proposed method is capable of providing a magnified view of the coupled and conformationally polymorphic residues. This model reveals couplings between the alternate conformations of a coupled residue pair. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first computational method for extracting networks of side chains' alternate conformations. Such networks help in providing a detailed image of side-chain dynamics in functionally important and conformationally polymorphic sites, such as binding and/or allosteric sites.

  17. Clusterin: full-length protein and one of its chains show opposing effects on cellular lipid accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matukumalli, Suvarsha Rao; Tangirala, Ramakrishna; Rao, C. M.

    2017-01-01

    Proteins, made up of either single or multiple chains, are designed to carry out specific biological functions. We found an interesting example of a two-chain protein where administration of one of its chains leads to a diametrically opposite outcome than that reported for the full-length protein. Clusterin is a highly glycosylated protein consisting of two chains, α- and β-clusterin. We have investigated the conformational features, cellular localization, lipid accumulation, in vivo effects and histological changes upon administration of recombinant individual chains of clusterin. We demonstrate that recombinant α- and β-chains exhibit structural and functional differences and differ in their sub-cellular localization. Full-length clusterin is known to lower lipid levels. In contrast, we find that β-chain-treated cells accumulate 2-fold more lipid than controls. Interestingly, α-chain-treated cells do not show such increase. Rabbits injected with β-chain, but not α-chain, show ~40% increase in weight, with adipocyte hypertrophy, liver and kidney steatosis. Many, sometimes contrasting, roles are ascribed to clusterin in obesity, metabolic syndrome and related conditions. Our findings of differential localization and activities of individual chains of clusterin should help in understanding better the roles of clusterin in metabolism. PMID:28120874

  18. [Ontogenetic and phylogenetic analysis of myosin light chain proteins from skeletal muscles of loach Misgurnus fossilis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miuge, N S; Tikhonov, A V; Ozerniuk, N D

    2005-01-01

    mRNAs of all three types of myosin light chain proteins are expressed in skeletal muscles of both larval and adult stages of loach Misgurnus fossilis (Cobitidae) and these proteins are encoded by different genes (mlc1, mlc2, and mlc3). No difference was revealed between transcripts from larval stage and adult fish for all three mlc proteins. Our approach (RT-PCR with fish-specific mlc1, mlc2, and mlc3 primers) failed to reveal the larval form of myosin light chain protein found previously by protein electrophoresis of loach fry muscle extract. Comparative analysis of the protein structure shows high homology of MLC1 and MLC3 proteins sharing a large EF-hand calcium-binding domain. Phylogenetic analysis of MLC1 from skeletal muscles of fish and other vertebrate species is concordant with the traditional phylogeny of the group. Within the Teleostei, loach MLC1 had the highest homology with other Cyprinidae, and least with Salmonidae fishes.

  19. Purification and characterization of a novel phospholipid transfer protein from filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondin, P; Vergnolle, C; Chavant, L; Kader, J C

    1990-01-01

    1. We have isolated from mycelia of Mucor mucedo, a filamentous fungus, a phospholipid transfer protein. 2. The purification steps were gel filtration, hydroxyapatite chromatography, blue affinity column and fast protein liquid chromatography on anion exchanger. 3. A purified protein was obtained with a molecular mass of 24 kDa and a pI of 5.05 and its N-terminal sequence was established. 4. This protein transfers phosphatidylinositol, as well as phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine.

  20. Organic Chemistry Applied to Synthetic Proteins: Modifying the Vicinity of the Isopeptide Bond Revealed Differential Behavior of Ubiquitin Chains with Interacting Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Yahya, Najat; Haj-Yahya, Mahmood; Castañeda, Carlos A.; Spasser, Liat; Hemantha, Hosahalli P.; Jbara, Muhammad; Penner, Marlin; Ciechanover, Aaron; Fushman, David

    2013-01-01

    In Every Direction Chemical synthesis of proteins allowed the synthesis of ubiquitin chains modified in the vicinity of the isopeptide peptide to examine their behavior with deubiquitinases and ubiquitin binding domains. Our results set the ground for the generation of unique probes for studying the interactions of these chains with various ubiquitin-interacting proteins. PMID:24006204

  1. Enhancement of entanglement transfer in a spin chain by phase shift control

    CERN Document Server

    Maruyama, K; Nori, F

    2006-01-01

    We study the effect of a phase shift on the amount of transferrable two-spin entanglement in a spin chain. We consider a ferromagnetic Heisenberg/XY spin chain, both numerically and analytically, and two mechanisms to generate a phase shift, the Aharonov-Casher effect and the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. In both cases, the maximum attainable entanglement is shown to be significantly enhanced, suggesting its potential usefulness in quantum information processing.

  2. Measuring distances within unfolded biopolymers using fluorescence resonance energy transfer: The effect of polymer chain dynamics on the observed fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Dmitrii E.; Plaxco, Kevin W.

    2009-01-01

    Recent years have seen a number of investigations in which distances within unfolded proteins, polypeptides, and other biopolymers are probed via fluorescence resonance energy transfer, a method that relies on the strong distance dependence of energy transfer between a pair of dyes attached to the molecule of interest. In order to interpret the results of such experiments it is commonly assumed that intramolecular diffusion is negligible during the excited state lifetime. Here we explore the conditions under which this “frozen chain” approximation fails, leading to significantly underestimated donor-acceptor distances, and describe a means of correcting for polymer dynamics in order to estimate these distances more accurately. PMID:19725638

  3. Tissue distribution and subcellular localization of phosphatidylcholine transfer protein in rats as determined by radioimmunoassay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teerlink, T.; Krift, T.P. van der; Post, M.; Wirtz, K.W.A.

    1982-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay for the phosphatidylcholine-transfer protein from rat liver was used to measure levels of PC-transfer protein in rat tissues. The assay as described before (Teerlink T., Poorthuis B.J.H.M., Van der Krift T.P. and Wirtz K.W.A., Biochim. Biophys. Acta 665 (1981) 74–80) was modified

  4. Inactivation of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases by Peracids Correlates with the Hydrocarbon Chain Length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Kuban-Jankowska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Protein tyrosine phosphatases are crucial enzymes controlling numerous physiological and pathophysiological events and can be regulated by oxidation of the catalytic domain cysteine residue. Peracids are highly oxidizing compounds, and thus may induce inactivation of PTPs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the inhibitory effect of peracids with different length of hydrocarbon chain on the activity of selected PTPs. Methods: The enzymatic activity of human CD45, PTP1B, LAR, bacterial YopH was assayed under the cell-free conditions, and activity of cellular CD45 in human Jurkat cell lysates. The molecular docking and molecular dynamics were performed to evaluate the peracids binding to the CD45 active site. Results: Here we demonstrate that peracids reduce enzymatic activity of recombinant CD45, PTP1B, LAR, YopH and cellular CD45. Our studies indicate that peracids are more potent inhibitors of CD45 than hydrogen peroxide (with an IC50 value equal to 25 nM for peroctanoic acid and 8 µM for hydrogen peroxide. The experimental data show that the inactivation caused by peracids is dependent on hydrocarbon chain length of peracids with maximum inhibitory effect of medium-chain peracids (C8-C12 acyl chain, which correlates with calculated binding affinities to the CD45 active site. Conclusion: Peracids are potent inhibitors of PTPs with the strongest inhibitory effect observed for medium-chain peracids.

  5. Engineering the supply chain for protein production/secretion in yeasts and mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Tobias; Niklas, Jens; Heinzle, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Metabolic bottlenecks play an increasing role in yeasts and mammalian cells applied for high-performance production of proteins, particularly of pharmaceutical ones that require complex posttranslational modifications. We review the present status and developments focusing on the rational metabolic engineering of such cells to optimize the supply chain for building blocks and energy. Methods comprise selection of beneficial genetic modifications, rational design of media and feeding strategies. Design of better producer cells based on whole genome-wide metabolic network analysis becomes increasingly possible. High-resolution methods of metabolic flux analysis for the complex networks in these compartmented cells are increasingly available. We discuss phenomena that are common to both types of organisms but also those that are different with respect to the supply chain for the production and secretion of pharmaceutical proteins.

  6. Protein structure modelling and evaluation based on a 4-distance description of side-chain interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inbar Yuval

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate evaluation and modelling of residue-residue interactions within and between proteins is a key aspect of computational structure prediction including homology modelling, protein-protein docking, refinement of low-resolution structures, and computational protein design. Results Here we introduce a method for accurate protein structure modelling and evaluation based on a novel 4-distance description of residue-residue interaction geometry. Statistical 4-distance preferences were extracted from high-resolution protein structures and were used as a basis for a knowledge-based potential, called Hunter. We demonstrate that 4-distance description of side chain interactions can be used reliably to discriminate the native structure from a set of decoys. Hunter ranked the native structure as the top one in 217 out of 220 high-resolution decoy sets, in 25 out of 28 "Decoys 'R' Us" decoy sets and in 24 out of 27 high-resolution CASP7/8 decoy sets. The same concept was applied to side chain modelling in protein structures. On a set of very high-resolution protein structures the average RMSD was 1.47 Å for all residues and 0.73 Å for buried residues, which is in the range of attainable accuracy for a model. Finally, we show that Hunter performs as good or better than other top methods in homology modelling based on results from the CASP7 experiment. The supporting web site http://bioinfo.weizmann.ac.il/hunter/ was developed to enable the use of Hunter and for visualization and interactive exploration of 4-distance distributions. Conclusions Our results suggest that Hunter can be used as a tool for evaluation and for accurate modelling of residue-residue interactions in protein structures. The same methodology is applicable to other areas involving high-resolution modelling of biomolecules.

  7. Directed evolution of human heavy chain variable domain (VH) using in vivo protein fitness filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Sik; Song, Hyung-Nam; Nam, Hyo Jung; Kim, Sung-Geun; Park, Young-Seoub; Park, Jae-Chan; Woo, Eui-Jeon; Lim, Hyung-Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Human immunoglobulin heavy chain variable domains (VH) are promising scaffolds for antigen binding. However, VH is an unstable and aggregation-prone protein, hindering its use for therapeutic purposes. To evolve the VH domain, we performed in vivo protein solubility selection that linked antibiotic resistance to the protein folding quality control mechanism of the twin-arginine translocation pathway of E. coli. After screening a human germ-line VH library, 95% of the VH proteins obtained were identified as VH3 family members; one VH protein, MG2x1, stood out among separate clones expressing individual VH variants. With further screening of combinatorial framework mutation library of MG2x1, we found a consistent bias toward substitution with tryptophan at the position of 50 and 58 in VH. Comparison of the crystal structures of the VH variants revealed that those substitutions with bulky side chain amino acids filled the cavity in the VH interface between heavy and light chains of the Fab arrangement along with the increased number of hydrogen bonds, decreased solvation energy, and increased negative charge. Accordingly, the engineered VH acquires an increased level of thermodynamic stability, reversible folding, and soluble expression. The library built with the VH variant as a scaffold was qualified as most of VH clones selected randomly were expressed as soluble form in E. coli regardless length of the combinatorial CDR. Furthermore, a non-aggregation feature of the selected VH conferred a free of humoral response in mice, even when administered together with adjuvant. As a result, this selection provides an alternative directed evolution pathway for unstable proteins, which are distinct from conventional methods based on the phage display.

  8. Inactivation of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases by Peracids Correlates with the Hydrocarbon Chain Length

    OpenAIRE

    Alicja Kuban-Jankowska; Magdalena Gorska; Tuszynski, Jack A; Cassandra D M Churchill; Philip Winter; Mariusz Klobukowski; Michal Wozniak

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Protein tyrosine phosphatases are crucial enzymes controlling numerous physiological and pathophysiological events and can be regulated by oxidation of the catalytic domain cysteine residue. Peracids are highly oxidizing compounds, and thus may induce inactivation of PTPs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the inhibitory effect of peracids with different length of hydrocarbon chain on the activity of selected PTPs. Methods: The enzymatic activity of human CD45, PTP...

  9. Site-specific protonation kinetics of acidic side chains in proteins determined by pH-dependent carboxyl (13)C NMR relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallerstein, Johan; Weininger, Ulrich; Khan, M Ashhar I; Linse, Sara; Akke, Mikael

    2015-03-04

    Proton-transfer dynamics plays a critical role in many biochemical processes, such as proton pumping across membranes and enzyme catalysis. The large majority of enzymes utilize acid-base catalysis and proton-transfer mechanisms, where the rates of proton transfer can be rate limiting for the overall reaction. However, measurement of proton-exchange kinetics for individual side-chain carboxyl groups in proteins has been achieved in only a handful of cases, which typically have involved comparative analysis of mutant proteins in the context of reaction network modeling. Here we describe an approach to determine site-specific protonation and deprotonation rate constants (kon and koff, respectively) of carboxyl side chains, based on (13)C NMR relaxation measurements as a function of pH. We validated the method using an extensively studied model system, the B1 domain of protein G, for which we measured rate constants koff in the range (0.1-3) × 10(6) s(-1) and kon in the range (0.6-300) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), which correspond to acid-base equilibrium dissociation constants (Ka) in excellent agreement with previous results determined by chemical shift titrations. Our results further reveal a linear free-energy relationship between log kon and pKa, which provides information on the free-energy landscape of the protonation reaction, showing that the variability among residues in these parameters arises primarily from the extent of charge stabilization of the deprotonated state by the protein environment. We find that side-chain carboxyls with extreme values of koff or kon are involved in hydrogen bonding, thus providing a mechanistic explanation for the observed stabilization of the protonated or deprotonated state.

  10. Developing a Taxonomy and Model to Transfer and Assess Best Practices for Supply Chain Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Myrna; Mendoza, Ana; Lavin, Victor; Flores, Benito

    Supply Chain Management can be briefly defined as the orchestration of a network of entities such as suppliers, distributors and clients to achieve a common goal: delivering cost efficient products and services exceeding customers’ expectations. Therefore, firms should consider all those End-to-End processes enabling an efficient integration and interoperability of partners collaborating in such Supply Chain when designing their Business Process Architecture (BPA). One key enabler to accomplish this goal is the identification, documentation and sharing of best practices. This paper describes the outcomes of a collaborative project carried out by CEMEX Research Group and the Universidad de Monterrey (UDEM), which focused on developing taxonomy to document best practices for the supply chain management together with a generic model to evaluate their level of implementation.

  11. Incorporation of Amino Acids with Long-Chain Terminal Olefins into Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Exner, Matthias P.; Sebastian Köhling; Julie Rivollier; Sandrine Gosling; Puneet Srivastava; Palyancheva, Zheni I; Piet Herdewijn; Marie-Pierre Heck; Jörg Rademann; Nediljko Budisa

    2016-01-01

    The increasing need for site-specific protein decorations that mimic natural posttranslational modifications requires access to a variety of noncanonical amino acids with moieties enabling bioorthogonal conjugation chemistry. Here we present the incorporation of long-chain olefinic amino acids into model proteins with rational variants of pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS). Nε-heptenoyl lysine was incorporated for the first time using the known promiscuous variant PylRS(Y306A/Y384F), and Nε-p...

  12. Optimising methods for the preservation, capture and identification of ubiquitin chains and ubiquitylated proteins by immunoblotting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerich, Christoph H.; Cohen, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Immunoblotting is a powerful technique for the semi-quantitative analysis of ubiquitylation events, and remains the most commonly used method to study this process due to its high specificity, speed, sensitivity and relatively low cost. However, the ubiquitylation of proteins is complex and, when the analysis is performed in an inappropriate manner, it can lead to the misinterpretation of results and to erroneous conclusions being reached. Here we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the methods currently in use to analyse ubiquitin chains and protein ubiquitylation, and describe the procedures that we have found to be most useful for optimising the quality and reliability of the data that we have generated. We also highlight commonly encountered problems and the pitfalls inherent in some of these methods. Finally, we introduce a set of recommendations to help researchers obtain high quality data, especially those new to the field of ubiquitin signalling. The specific topics addressed in this article include sample preparation, the separation, detection and identification of particular ubiquitin chains by immunoblotting, and the analysis of ubiquitin chain topology through the combined use of ubiquitin-binding proteins and ubiquitin linkage-specific deubiquitylases. PMID:26325464

  13. Human lambda light-chain constant region gene CMor lambda: the primary structure of lambda VI Bence Jones protein Mor.

    OpenAIRE

    Frangione, B.; Moloshok, T; Prelli, F; Solomon, A

    1985-01-01

    Serologic, structural, and genetic analyses have shown that the constant (C) region of human kappa light chains is encoded by a single gene, whereas that of lambda chains is encoded by multiple genes. We have determined the complete C region amino acid sequence of two monoclonal lambda VI light chains, Bence Jones proteins Sut and Mor. The C region of lambda chains Sut and Mor consists of 105 residues, as is characteristic for human lambda light chains, of which 102 are identical in sequence....

  14. Enzyme directed formation of un-natural side-chains for covalent surface attachment of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hwayoung; Jaworski, Justyn

    2014-10-01

    The covalent immobilization of proteins onto surfaces is an essential aspect of several fields of research, including proteomics, sensing, heterogeneous biocatalysis, and more broadly biotechnology. Site-specific, covalent attachment of proteins has been achieved in recent years by the use of expanded genetic codes to produce proteins with controlled placement of un-natural amino acids bearing bio-orthogonal functional groups. Unfortunately, the complexity of developing such systems is impractical for most laboratories; hence, a less complicated approach to generating un-natural amino acid side-chains has been employed. Utilizing a straightforward reaction with formylglycine generating enzyme, we use the site-specific modification of engineered proteins to yield un-natural amino acid side-chains for protein immobilization. Using this approach, we demonstrate the controlled immobilization of various enzymes onto a variety of amine coated surfaces. Our results reveal reusability of the immobilized enzymes via this strategy, and furthermore, we find the activity of the immobilized enzymes to remain even after a month of use indicating significant stability of the linkage.

  15. Arginyltransferase ATE1 catalyzes midchain arginylation of proteins at side chain carboxylates in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junling; Han, Xuemei; Wong, Catherine C L; Cheng, Hong; Aslanian, Aaron; Xu, Tao; Leavis, Paul; Roder, Heinrich; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Yates, John R; Kashina, Anna

    2014-03-20

    Arginylation is an emerging posttranslational modification mediated by Arg-tRNA-protein-transferase (ATE1). It is believed that ATE1 links Arg solely to the N terminus of proteins, requiring prior proteolysis or action by Met-aminopeptidases to expose the arginylated site. Here, we tested the possibility of Arg linkage to midchain sites within intact protein targets and found that many proteins in vivo are modified on the side chains of Asp and Glu by unconventional chemistry that targets the carboxy rather than the amino groups at the target sites. Such arginylation appears to be functionally regulated, and it can be directly mediated by ATE1, in addition to the more conventional ATE1-mediated linkage of Arg to the N-terminal alpha amino group. This midchain arginylation implies an unconventional mechanism of ATE1 action that likely facilitates its major biological role.

  16. Fusion protein of single-chain variable domain fragments for treatment of myasthenia gravis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fangfang Li; Fanping Meng; Quanxin Jin; Changyuan Sun; Yingxin Li; Honghua Li; Songzhu Jin

    2014-01-01

    Single-chain variable domain fragment (scFv) 637 is an antigen-specific scFv of myasthenia gravis. In this study, scFv and human serum albumin genes were conjugated and the fusion pro-tein was expressed in Pichia pastoris. The afifnity of scFv-human serum albumin fusion protein to bind to acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction of human intercostal muscles was detected by immunolfuorescence staining. The ability of the fusion protein to block myas-thenia gravis patient sera binding to acetylcholine receptors and its stability in healthy serum were measured by competitive ELISA. The results showed that the inhibition rate was 2.0-77.4%, and the stability of fusion protein in static healthy sera was about 3 days. This approach suggests the scFv-human serum albumin is a potential candidate for speciifc immunosuppressive therapy of myasthenia gravis.

  17. [Electron transfer between globular proteins. Evaluation of a matrix element].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhno, V D; Chuev, G N; Ustinin, M N

    1998-01-01

    The dependence of the matrix element of the probability of interprotein electron transfer on the mutual orientation of the donor and acceptor centers and the distance between them was calculated. The calculations were made under the assumption that electron transfer proceeds mainly by a collective excitation of polaron nature, like a solvated electron state. The results obtained are consistent with experimental data and indicate the nonexponential behavior of this dependence in the case when the distance transfer is less than 20 A.

  18. Transfer and effects of 1,2,3,5,7-pentachloronaphthalene in an experimental food chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slootweg, Tineke; Segner, Helmut; Mayer, Philipp;

    2015-01-01

    of this study was to gain insights into the biomagnification and effects of 1,2,3,5,7-pentachloronaphthalene (PeCN52) in an experimental food chain consisting of benthic worms and juvenile rainbow trout. Worms were contaminated with PeCN52 by passive dosing from polydimethylsiloxane silicone. The contaminated...

  19. Enhancing Chinese Agribusiness Supply Chains with Internet Technologies: A Transnational Knowledge Transfer Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yanqing; Bentley, Yongmei; Fu, Zetian; Zografos, Konstantinos; Bemeleit, Boris

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports research findings from a project funded by the European Commission. The research used case studies and surveys to identify gaps between Europe and China in the level of Internet adoption in fresh-produce supply chains. The project reveals barriers to Internet adoption in China in this industry, and employs a transnational…

  20. How a protein searches for its specific site on DNA: the role of intersegment transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Tao; Shklovskii, B. I.

    2007-01-01

    Proteins are known to locate their specific targets on DNA up to two orders of magnitude faster than predicted by the Smoluchowski three-dimensional diffusion rate. One of the mechanisms proposed to resolve this discrepancy is termed "intersegment transfer". Many proteins have two DNA binding sites and can transfer from one DNA segment to another without dissociation to water. We calculate the target search rate for such proteins in a dense globular DNA, taking into account intersegment trans...

  1. Protein-Protein Interactions between Intermediate Chains and the Docking Complex of Chlamydomonas Flagellar Outer Arm Dynein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Takahiro; Owa, Mikito; King, Stephen M.; Kamiya, Ritsu; Wakabayashi, Ken-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Outer arm dynein (OAD) is bound to specific loci on outer-doublet-microtubules by interactions at two sites: via intermediate chain 1 (IC1) and the outer dynein arm docking complex (ODA-DC). Studies using Chlamydomonas mutants have suggested that the individual sites have rather weak affinities for microtubules, and therefore strong OAD attachment to microtubules is achieved by their cooperation. To test this idea, we examined interactions between IC1, IC2 (another intermediate chain) and ODA-DC using recombinant proteins. Recombinant IC1 and IC2 were found to form a 1:1 complex, and this complex associated with ODA-DC in vitro. Binding of IC1 to mutant axonemes revealed that there are specific binding sites for IC1. From these data, we propose a novel model of OAD-outer doublet association. PMID:23747306

  2. Probing intermolecular protein-protein interactions in the calcium-sensing receptor homodimer using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Hansen, Jakob L; Sheikh, Søren P

    2002-01-01

    -induced intermolecular movements in the CaR homodimer using the new bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique, BRET2, which is based on the transference of energy from Renilla luciferase (Rluc) to the green fluorescent protein mutant GFP2. We tagged CaR with Rluc and GFP2 at different intracellular locations...

  3. Singlet oxygen triplet energy transfer-based imaging technology for mapping protein-protein proximity in intact cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Tsz-Leung; Fadul, Michael J; Shu, Xiaokun

    2014-01-01

    Many cellular processes are carried out by large protein complexes that can span several tens of nanometres. Whereas forster resonance energy transfer has a detection range of technology with a detection range of up to several tens of nanometres: singlet oxygen triplet energy transfer. We demonstrate that our method confirms the topology of a large protein complex in intact cells, which spans from the endoplasmic reticulum to the outer mitochondrial membrane and the matrix. This new method is thus suited for mapping protein proximity in large protein complexes.

  4. SYNTHESIS OF HETEROARM STAR-SHAPED POLYMER BY THE USE OF POLYFUNCTIONAL CHAIN-TRANSFER AGENT via CONVENTIONAL FREE RADICAL POLYMERIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-hua Luo; Zhi-feng Fu; Yan Shi

    2008-01-01

    Heteroarm star-shaped polymers were synthesized by conventional free radical polymerization in two steps by the use of polyfunctional chain transfer agent. In the first step, free radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate was carried out in the presence of a polyfunctional chain transfer agent, pentaerythritol tetrakis(3-mercaptopropinate). At appropriate monomer conversions, two-arm PMMA having two residual thiol groups at the chain center or three-arm PMMA having one residual thiol group at the core were obtained. In the second step, free radical polymerization of styrene was carried out using PMMAs obtained above as macro-chain transfer agent. When styrene conversion was lower than 30%, heteroarm star-shaped polymers, (PMMA)2(PS)a and (PMMA)3(PS), were obtained successfully.

  5. Predicting protein subcellular locations using hierarchical ensemble of Bayesian classifiers based on Markov chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eils Roland

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The subcellular location of a protein is closely related to its function. It would be worthwhile to develop a method to predict the subcellular location for a given protein when only the amino acid sequence of the protein is known. Although many efforts have been made to predict subcellular location from sequence information only, there is the need for further research to improve the accuracy of prediction. Results A novel method called HensBC is introduced to predict protein subcellular location. HensBC is a recursive algorithm which constructs a hierarchical ensemble of classifiers. The classifiers used are Bayesian classifiers based on Markov chain models. We tested our method on six various datasets; among them are Gram-negative bacteria dataset, data for discriminating outer membrane proteins and apoptosis proteins dataset. We observed that our method can predict the subcellular location with high accuracy. Another advantage of the proposed method is that it can improve the accuracy of the prediction of some classes with few sequences in training and is therefore useful for datasets with imbalanced distribution of classes. Conclusion This study introduces an algorithm which uses only the primary sequence of a protein to predict its subcellular location. The proposed recursive scheme represents an interesting methodology for learning and combining classifiers. The method is computationally efficient and competitive with the previously reported approaches in terms of prediction accuracies as empirical results indicate. The code for the software is available upon request.

  6. Effects of protein engineering and rational mutagenesis on crystal lattice of single chain antibody fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyoncu, Sibel; Hyun, Jeongmin; Pai, Jennifer C; Johnson, Jennifer L; Entzminger, Kevin; Jain, Avni; Heaner, David P; Morales, Ivan A; Truskett, Thomas M; Maynard, Jennifer A; Lieberman, Raquel L

    2014-09-01

    Protein crystallization is dependent upon, and sensitive to, the intermolecular contacts that assist in ordering proteins into a three-dimensional lattice. Here we used protein engineering and mutagenesis to affect the crystallization of single chain antibody fragments (scFvs) that recognize the EE epitope (EYMPME) with high affinity. These hypercrystallizable scFvs are under development to assist difficult proteins, such as membrane proteins, in forming crystals, by acting as crystallization chaperones. Guided by analyses of intermolecular crystal lattice contacts, two second-generation anti-EE scFvs were produced, which bind to proteins with installed EE tags. Surprisingly, although noncomplementarity determining region (CDR) lattice residues from the parent scFv framework remained unchanged through the processes of protein engineering and rational design, crystal lattices of the derivative scFvs differ. Comparison of energy calculations and the experimentally-determined lattice interactions for this basis set provides insight into the complexity of the forces driving crystal lattice choice and demonstrates the availability of multiple well-ordered surface features in our scFvs capable of forming versatile crystal contacts.

  7. Photoinduced intramolecular charge transfer in push-pull polyenes: effects of solvation, electron-donor group, and polyenic chain length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akemann, Walther; Laage, Damien; Plaza, Pascal; Martin, Monique M; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille

    2008-01-17

    Subpicosecond absorption spectroscopy is used to characterize the primary photoinduced processes in a class of push-pull polyenes bearing a julolidine end group as the electron donor and a diethylthiobarbituric acid end group as the electron acceptor. The excited-state decay time and relaxation pathway have been studied for four polyenes of increasing chain length (n = 2-5 double bonds) in aprotic solvents of different solvation time, polarity, and viscosity. Intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) leading to a transient state of cyanine-like structure (fully conjugated with no bond length alternation) is observed in all polar solvents at a solvent dependent rate, but the reaction is not observed in cyclohexane, a nonpolar solvent. In polar solvents, the reaction time increases with the average solvation time but remains slightly larger, except in the viscous solvent triacetin. These facts are interpreted as an indication that both solvent reorganization and internal restructuring are involved in the ICT-state formation. The observed photodynamics resemble those we previously found for another class of polyenes bearing a dibutylaniline group as the donor, including a similar charge-transfer rate in spite of the larger electron donor character of the julolidine group. This observation brings further support to the proposal that an intramolecular coordinate is involved in the charge-transfer reaction, possibly a torsional motion of the donor end group. On the other hand, relaxation of the ICT state leads to cis-trans isomerization or crossing to the triplet state, depending on the length of the polyenic chain. In dioxane, tetrahydrofuran, and triacetin, the ICT state of the shorter chains (n = 2, 3) relaxes to the isomer with a viscosity-dependent rate, while that of the longer ones (n = 4, 5) leads to the triplet state with a viscosity-independent rate, as expected. In acetonitrile, the ICT-state lifetime is generally much shorter. A change from photoisomerization to

  8. Effects of conformational ordering on protein/polyelectrolyte electrostatic complexation: ionic binding and chain stiffening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yiping; Fang, Yapeng; Nishinari, Katsuyoshi; Phillips, Glyn O

    2016-03-31

    Coupling of electrostatic complexation with conformational transition is rather general in protein/polyelectrolyte interaction and has important implications in many biological processes and practical applications. This work studied the electrostatic complexation between κ-carrageenan (κ-car) and type B gelatin, and analyzed the effects of the conformational ordering of κ-car induced upon cooling in the presence of potassium chloride (KCl) or tetramethylammonium iodide (Me4NI). Experimental results showed that the effects of conformational ordering on protein/polyelectrolyte electrostatic complexation can be decomposed into ionic binding and chain stiffening. At the initial stage of conformational ordering, electrostatic complexation can be either suppressed or enhanced due to the ionic bindings of K(+) and I(-) ions, which significantly alter the charge density of κ-car or occupy the binding sites of gelatin. Beyond a certain stage of conformational ordering, i.e., helix content θ > 0.30, the effect of chain stiffening, accompanied with a rapid increase in helix length ζ, becomes dominant and tends to dissociate the electrostatic complexation. The effect of chain stiffening can be theoretically interpreted in terms of double helix association.

  9. Interactions of protein side chains with RNA defined with REDOR solid state NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Wei; Varani, Gabriele; Drobny, Gary P., E-mail: drobny@chem.washington.edu [University of Washington, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Formation of the complex between human immunodeficiency virus type-1 Tat protein and the transactivation response region (TAR) RNA is vital for transcriptional elongation, yet the structure of the Tat-TAR complex remains to be established. The NMR structures of free TAR, and TAR bound to Tat-derived peptides have been obtained by solution NMR, but only a small number of intermolecular NOEs could be identified unambiguously, preventing the determination of a complete structure. Here we show that a combination of multiple solid state NMR REDOR experiments can be used to obtain multiple distance constraints from {sup 15}N to {sup 13}C spins within the backbone and side chain guanidinium groups of arginine in a Tat-derived peptide, using {sup 19}F spins incorporated into the base of U23 in TAR and {sup 31}P spins in the P22 and P23 phosphate groups. Distances between the side chain of Arg52 and the base and phosphodiester backbone near U23 measured by REDOR NMR are comparable to distances observed in solution NMR-derived structural models, indicating that interactions of TAR RNA with key amino acid side chains in Tat are the same in the amorphous solid state as in solution. This method is generally applicable to other protein-RNA complexes where crystallization or solution NMR has failed to provide high resolution structural information.

  10. An 'adding' algorithm for the Markov chain formalism for radiation transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, L. W.

    1979-01-01

    An adding algorithm is presented, that extends the Markov chain method and considers a preceding calculation as a single state of a new Markov chain. This method takes advantage of the description of the radiation transport as a stochastic process. Successive application of this procedure makes calculation possible for any optical depth without increasing the size of the linear system used. It is determined that the time required for the algorithm is comparable to that for a doubling calculation for homogeneous atmospheres. For an inhomogeneous atmosphere the new method is considerably faster than the standard adding routine. It is concluded that the algorithm is efficient, accurate, and suitable for smaller computers in calculating the diffuse intensity scattered by an inhomogeneous planetary atmosphere.

  11. Transfer of radionuclides from high polluted bottom sediments to marine organisms through benthic food chain in post Fukushima period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezhenar, Roman; Jung, Kyung Tae; Maderich, Vladimir; Willemsen, Stefan; de With, Govert; Qiao, Fangli

    2015-04-01

    A catastrophic earthquake and tsunami occurred on March 11, 2011 and severely damaged the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) that resulted in an uncontrolled release of radioactivity into air and ocean. Around 80% of the radioactivity released due to the FDNPP accident in March-April 2011 was either directly discharged into the ocean or deposited onto the ocean surface from the atmosphere. A large amount of long-lived radionuclides (mainly Cs-137) were released into the environment. The concentration of radionuclides in the ocean reached a maximum in mid-April of 2011, and then gradually decreased. From 2011 the concentration of Cs-137 in water essentially fell except the area around the FDNPP where leaks of contaminated water are continued. However, in the bottom sediment high concentrations of Cs-137 were found in the first months after the accident and slowly decreased with time. Therefore, it should be expected that a time delay is found of sediment-bound radionuclides in marine organisms. For the modeling of radionuclide transfer from highly polluted bottom sediments to marine organisms the dynamical food chain model BURN-POSEIDON (Heling et al, 2002; Maderich et al., 2014) was extended. In this model marine organisms are grouped into a limited number of classes based on their trophic level and type of species. These include: phytoplankton, zooplankton, fishes (two types: piscivorous and non-piscivorous), crustaceans, and molluscs for pelagic food chain and bottom sediment invertebrates, demersal fishes and bottom predators for benthic food chain and whole water column predators feeding by pelagial and benthic fishes. Bottom invertebrates consume organic parts of bottom sediments with adsorbed radionuclides which then migrate through the food chain. All organisms take radionuclides directly from water as well as via food. In fishes where radioactivity is not homogeneously distributed over all tissues of the organism, it is assumed that radionuclide

  12. Structural Origins of Nitroxide Side Chain Dynamics on Membrane Protein [alpha]-Helical Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroncke, Brett M.; Horanyi, Peter S.; Columbus, Linda (UV)

    2010-12-07

    Understanding the structure and dynamics of membrane proteins in their native, hydrophobic environment is important to understanding how these proteins function. EPR spectroscopy in combination with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) can measure dynamics and structure of membrane proteins in their native lipid environment; however, until now the dynamics measured have been qualitative due to limited knowledge of the nitroxide spin label's intramolecular motion in the hydrophobic environment. Although several studies have elucidated the structural origins of EPR line shapes of water-soluble proteins, EPR spectra of nitroxide spin-labeled proteins in detergents or lipids have characteristic differences from their water-soluble counterparts, suggesting significant differences in the underlying molecular motion of the spin label between the two environments. To elucidate these differences, membrane-exposed {alpha}-helical sites of the leucine transporter, LeuT, from Aquifex aeolicus, were investigated using X-ray crystallography, mutational analysis, nitroxide side chain derivatives, and spectral simulations in order to obtain a motional model of the nitroxide. For each crystal structure, the nitroxide ring of a disulfide-linked spin label side chain (R1) is resolved and makes contacts with hydrophobic residues on the protein surface. The spin label at site I204 on LeuT makes a nontraditional hydrogen bond with the ortho-hydrogen on its nearest neighbor F208, whereas the spin label at site F177 makes multiple van der Waals contacts with a hydrophobic pocket formed with an adjacent helix. These results coupled with the spectral effect of mutating the i {+-} 3, 4 residues suggest that the spin label has a greater affinity for its local protein environment in the low dielectric than on a water-soluble protein surface. The simulations of the EPR spectra presented here suggest the spin label oscillates about the terminal bond nearest the ring while maintaining weak

  13. Structural and dynamical control of the reaction rate in protein electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabin, Ilya A.

    Electron transfer (ET) reactions in proteins are key steps in many vital bioenergetic processes, and the reaction rate is known to be highly sensitive to the protein structure in some cases. For most bioenergetic reactions, as described by the Fermi Golden rule, the rate is proportional to a product of the average square of the effective electronic donor to acceptor coupling and a Franck-Condon factor, which accounts for the nuclear control of the energy gap. The nuclear factor is reasonably well described in Marcus theory and its modifications, and this work is focused on the mechanisms that control the effective coupling. About ten years ago, the Pathways model described for the first time how protein environment may control the effective coupling. In this work, a novel theoretical approach is developed to explore the mechanisms of structural and dynamical control beyond the qualitative level of the Pathways model. In Chapter 1, the assumptions of the Pathways model, its limitations and effects of the structure and the electronic Hamiltonian are investigated for model chain-like bridges using the Dyson's equations. In Chapter II, the framework to explore the sensitivity of the effective coupling to quality of the electronic Hamiltonian, the interference among the dominant pathways and the bridge dynamics is presented. This analysis employs the Green's function technique and includes combined molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculations. Finally, in Chapter III, this framework is tested on the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center, and the mechanisms of the structural and dynamical control for different ET steps are discussed.

  14. Carotenoid to chlorophyll energy transfer in the peridinin–chlorophyll-a–protein complex involves an intramolecular charge transfer state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigmantas, Donatas; Hiller, Roger G.; Sundström, Villy; Polívka, Tomáš

    2002-01-01

    Carotenoids are, along with chlorophylls, crucial pigments involved in light-harvesting processes in photosynthetic organisms. Details of carotenoid to chlorophyll energy transfer mechanisms and their dependence on structural variability of carotenoids are as yet poorly understood. Here, we employ femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy to reveal energy transfer pathways in the peridinin–chlorophyll-a–protein (PCP) complex containing the highly substituted carotenoid peridinin, which includes an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state in its excited state manifold. Extending the transient absorption spectra toward near-infrared region (600–1800 nm) allowed us to separate contributions from different low-lying excited states of peridinin. The results demonstrate a special light-harvesting strategy in the PCP complex that uses the ICT state of peridinin to enhance energy transfer efficiency. PMID:12486228

  15. Too packed to change: side-chain packing and site-specific substitution rates in protein evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, María Laura; Echave, Julian

    2015-01-01

    In protein evolution, due to functional and biophysical constraints, the rates of amino acid substitution differ from site to site. Among the best predictors of site-specific rates are solvent accessibility and packing density. The packing density measure that best correlates with rates is the weighted contact number (WCN), the sum of inverse square distances between a site's C α and the C α of the other sites. According to a mechanistic stress model proposed recently, rates are determined by packing because mutating packed sites stresses and destabilizes the protein's active conformation. While WCN is a measure of C α packing, mutations replace side chains. Here, we consider whether a site's evolutionary divergence is constrained by main-chain packing or side-chain packing. To address this issue, we extended the stress theory to model side chains explicitly. The theory predicts that rates should depend solely on side-chain contact density. We tested this prediction on a data set of structurally and functionally diverse monomeric enzymes. We compared side-chain contact density with main-chain contact density measures and with relative solvent accessibility (RSA). We found that side-chain contact density is the best predictor of rate variation among sites (it explains 39.2% of the variation). Moreover, the independent contribution of main-chain contact density measures and RSA are negligible. Thus, as predicted by the stress theory, site-specific evolutionary rates are determined by side-chain packing.

  16. Fitmunk: improving protein structures by accurate, automatic modeling of side-chain conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porebski, Przemyslaw Jerzy; Cymborowski, Marcin; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Minor, Wladek

    2016-02-01

    Improvements in crystallographic hardware and software have allowed automated structure-solution pipelines to approach a near-`one-click' experience for the initial determination of macromolecular structures. However, in many cases the resulting initial model requires a laborious, iterative process of refinement and validation. A new method has been developed for the automatic modeling of side-chain conformations that takes advantage of rotamer-prediction methods in a crystallographic context. The algorithm, which is based on deterministic dead-end elimination (DEE) theory, uses new dense conformer libraries and a hybrid energy function derived from experimental data and prior information about rotamer frequencies to find the optimal conformation of each side chain. In contrast to existing methods, which incorporate the electron-density term into protein-modeling frameworks, the proposed algorithm is designed to take advantage of the highly discriminatory nature of electron-density maps. This method has been implemented in the program Fitmunk, which uses extensive conformational sampling. This improves the accuracy of the modeling and makes it a versatile tool for crystallographic model building, refinement and validation. Fitmunk was extensively tested on over 115 new structures, as well as a subset of 1100 structures from the PDB. It is demonstrated that the ability of Fitmunk to model more than 95% of side chains accurately is beneficial for improving the quality of crystallographic protein models, especially at medium and low resolutions. Fitmunk can be used for model validation of existing structures and as a tool to assess whether side chains are modeled optimally or could be better fitted into electron density. Fitmunk is available as a web service at http://kniahini.med.virginia.edu/fitmunk/server/ or at http://fitmunk.bitbucket.org/.

  17. Biochemical and Structural Analysis of Bacterial O-antigen Chain Length Regulator Proteins Reveals a Conserved Quaternary Structure*

    OpenAIRE

    Larue, Kane; Kimber, Matthew S.; Ford, Robert; Whitfield, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major component of the Gram-negative outer membrane and is an important virulence determinant. The O-antigen polysaccharide of the LPS molecule provides protection from host defenses, and the length of O-antigen chains plays a pivotal role. In the Wzy-dependent O-antigen biosynthesis pathway, the integral inner membrane protein Wzz determines the O-antigen chain length. How these proteins function is currently unknown, but the hypothesis i...

  18. Horizontal transfer, not duplication, drives the expansion of protein families in prokaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd J Treangen

    Full Text Available Gene duplication followed by neo- or sub-functionalization deeply impacts the evolution of protein families and is regarded as the main source of adaptive functional novelty in eukaryotes. While there is ample evidence of adaptive gene duplication in prokaryotes, it is not clear whether duplication outweighs the contribution of horizontal gene transfer in the expansion of protein families. We analyzed closely related prokaryote strains or species with small genomes (Helicobacter, Neisseria, Streptococcus, Sulfolobus, average-sized genomes (Bacillus, Enterobacteriaceae, and large genomes (Pseudomonas, Bradyrhizobiaceae to untangle the effects of duplication and horizontal transfer. After removing the effects of transposable elements and phages, we show that the vast majority of expansions of protein families are due to transfer, even among large genomes. Transferred genes--xenologs--persist longer in prokaryotic lineages possibly due to a higher/longer adaptive role. On the other hand, duplicated genes--paralogs--are expressed more, and, when persistent, they evolve slower. This suggests that gene transfer and gene duplication have very different roles in shaping the evolution of biological systems: transfer allows the acquisition of new functions and duplication leads to higher gene dosage. Accordingly, we show that paralogs share most protein-protein interactions and genetic regulators, whereas xenologs share very few of them. Prokaryotes invented most of life's biochemical diversity. Therefore, the study of the evolution of biology systems should explicitly account for the predominant role of horizontal gene transfer in the diversification of protein families.

  19. Multi-kernel transfer learning based on Chou's PseAAC formulation for protein submitochondria localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Suyu

    2012-01-21

    Protein sub-organelle localization, e.g. submitochondria, seems more challenging than general protein subcellular localization, because the determination of protein's micro-level localization within organelle by fluorescent imaging technique would face up with more difficulties. Up to present, there are far few computational methods for protein submitochondria localization, and the existing sequence-based predictive models demonstrate moderate or unsatisfactory performance. Recent researches have demonstrated that gene ontology (GO) is a convincingly effective protein feature for protein subcellular localization. However, the GO information may not be available for novel proteins or sparsely annotated protein subfamilies. In allusion to the problem, we transfer the homology's GO information to the target protein and propose a multi-kernel transfer learning model for protein submitochondria localization (MK-TLM), which substantially extends our previously published work (gene ontology based transfer learning model for protein subcellular localization, GO-TLM). To reduce the risk of performance overestimation, we conduct a more comprehensive survey of the model performance in optimistic case, moderate case and pessimistic case according to the abundance of target protein's GO information. The experiments on submitochondria benchmark datasets show that MK-TLM significantly outperforms the baseline models, and demonstrates excellent performance for novel mitochondria proteins and those mitochondria proteins that belong to the subfamily we know little about.

  20. A non-linear approach to the structure-mobility relationship in protein main chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morariu, V.V. [Department of Molecular and Biomolecular Physics, National R and D Institute for Isotopic and Molecular Technology, P.O. Box 700, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Isvoran, Adriana [Department of Chemistry, West University of Timisoara, Str. Pestalozzi 16, 300115 Timisoara (Romania)]. E-mail: aisvoran@yahoo.com; Zainea, Oana [Department of Molecular and Biomolecular Physics, National R and D Institute for Isotopic and Molecular Technology, P.O. Box 700, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2007-05-15

    A correlation investigation was carried out on the series of atomic coordinates (MPV) and temperature factor (T {sub f}), respectively for human hemoglobin and HIV-1 protease protein main chains. The MPV series revealed resemblances to the corresponding T {sub f} series. Each minor or major peak in a series had a corresponding peak in the related series. This brings a qualitative evidence for the connection of the two parameters. The series were further subjected to spectral and detrended fluctuation analysis which all revealed long-range correlation properties. This combined analysis revealed that the data were controlled both by the correlation of stationary fluctuation and trends or non-stationary contribution to correlation. The correlation of all MPV series was found to be much less sensitive to ligand binding than the corresponding T {sub f} series. Thus the long-range correlation properties of the protein main chain structure and mobility revealed two complementary properties of protein molecules. While structure imparts constancy to the system, the atomic mobility represents function yet they are intimately connected.

  1. Study the cooperative motion of long-chain polyelectrolyte in presence of small globular protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabelsi, Saber; Bassalah, Mohamed Arbi; Aschi, Adel; Othman, Tahar; Gharbi, Abdelhafidh

    2016-12-01

    We study in this paper the effect of small globular protein on the dynamic properties of long-chain NaPSS in semidilute regime using Dynamic Light Scattering and viscometry in three phases respecting the pH of the medium. The scaling concept of the heterogeneous system is compared with the De Gennes argument for homogeneous polymer solutions. The results showed a positive and negative deviations to the De Gennes approach of the correlation length scale of mixture defined by (c/c*)δ. The macroscopic viscosity of protein and the potential electrostatic interaction are taken as principal factors affecting the cooperative motion of blobs. δ was discussed as the parameter responsible for the conformational change of polyelectrolyte chain subunit within blob. The theoretical analysis of the electrostatic interaction between protein and subunit gave one possible solution relating the deviation δ to the dimensionless coupling constant u as δ uu+1 and δ - 1/3 u/u+1 for a swollen and shrunk subunit, respectively. A good accordance of experimental values of δ to theoretical approach was found.

  2. Detection of kappa and lambda light chain monoclonal proteins in human serum: automated immunoassay versus immunofixation electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskowski, Troy D; Litwin, Christine M; Hill, Harry R

    2006-02-01

    Recently, turbidimetric immunoassays for detecting and quantifying kappa and lambda free light chains (FLC) have become available and are promoted as being more sensitive than immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE) in detecting FLC monoclonal proteins. In this study, we assessed the ability of these turbidimetric assays to detect serum monoclonal proteins involving both free and heavy-chain-bound kappa and lambda light chains compared to standard immunofixation electrophoresis. Sera demonstrating a restricted band of protein migration (other than a definite M spike) by serum protein electrophoresis (SPE), which may represent early monoclonal proteins, were also examined. When compared to IFE, percent agreement, sensitivity, and specificity for the kappa-FLC and lambda-FLC were 94.6, 72.9, and 99.5% and 98.5, 91.4, and 99.7%, respectively, in detecting monoclonal proteins involving free and heavy-chain-bound light chains. The majority of sera (73.7%) demonstrating a restricted band of protein migration on SPE demonstrated abnormal IFE patterns suggestive of multiple myeloma or monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance, but gave normal kappa/lambda FLC ratios using the turbidimetric immunoassays. In conclusion, the kappa and lambda FLC assays are significantly less sensitive (72.9 to 91.4%) than IFE, but specific in detecting serum monoclonal proteins. Moreover, the kappa/lambda ratio has little value in routine screening since the majority of sera with abnormal IFE patterns had normal kappa/lambda FLC ratios.

  3. Characterization and Diagnostic Value of Amino Acid Side Chain Neutral Losses Following Electron-Transfer Dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Qiangwei; Lee, M. Violet; Rose, Christopher M.; Marsh, Alyce J.; Hubler, Shane L.; Wenger, Craig D.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2011-02-01

    Using a large set of high mass accuracy and resolution ETD tandem mass spectra, we characterized ETD-induced neutral losses. From these data we deduced the chemical formula for 20 of these losses. Many of them have been previously observed in electron-capture dissociation (ECD) spectra, such as losses of the side chains of arginine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glutamine, asparagine, leucine, histidine, and carbamidomethylated cysteine residues. With this information, we examined the diagnostic value of these amino acid-specific losses. Among 1285 peptide-spectrum matches, 92.5% have agreement between neutral loss-derived peptide amino acid composition and the peptide sequences. Moreover, we show that peptides can be uniquely identified by using only the accurate precursor mass and amino acid composition based on neutral losses; the median number of sequence candidates from an accurate mass query is reduced from 21 to 8 by adding side chain loss information. Besides increasing confidence in peptide identification, our findings suggest the potential use of these diagnostic losses in ETD spectra to improve false discovery rate estimation and to enhance the performance of scoring functions in database search algorithms.

  4. Ethylene homo- and copolymerization chain-transfers: A perspective from supported (nBuCp)2ZrCl2 catalyst active centre distribution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Muhammad Atiqullah; Mamdouh A Al-Harthi; Siripon Anantawaraskul; Abdul-hamid M Emwas

    2015-04-01

    Polymerization chain termination reactions and unsaturation of the polymer backbone end are related. Therefore, in this study, the parameters resulting from the modelling of the active centre distribution of the supported catalyst—silica/MAO/(nBuCp)2ZrCl2—were applied to evaluate the active-centredependent ethylene homo- and copolymerization rates, as well as the corresponding chain termination rates. This approach, from a microkinetic mechanistic viewpoint, elucidates better the 1-hexene-induced positive comonomer effect and chain transfer phenomenon. The kinetic expressions, developed on the basis of the proposed polymerization mechanisms, illustrate how the active site type-dependent chain transfer phenomenon is influenced by the different apparent termination rate constants and momoner concentrations. The active centrespecific molecular weight Mni (for the above homo- and copolymer), as a function of chain transfer probability, pCTi, varied as follows: log(pCTi) = log(mwru)−log(Mni) where mwru is the molecular weight of the repeat unit. The physical significance of this finding has been explained. The homo- and copolymer backbones showed all the three chain end unsaturations (vinyl, vinylidene, and trans-vinylene). The postulated polymerization mechanisms reveal the underlying polymer chemistry. The results of the present study will contribute to develop in future supported metallocene catalysts that will be useful to synthesize polyethylene precursors having varying chain end unsaturations, which can be eventually used to prepare functional polyethylenes.

  5. Electrochemical studies of a reconstituted photosynthetic electron-transfer chain or towards a biomimetic photoproduction of hydrogen; Etudes electrochimiques de chaines de transfert d'electrons photosynthetiques ou vers une photoproduction biomimetique d'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourmond, V

    2007-04-15

    The aim of this work is to find an efficient process to convert solar energy into hydrogen. The electrons transfers in reconstituted photosynthetic chains have been particularly studied with the aims 1)in one hand, to better understand the interactions of the different molecules of the photosynthetic chain in order to optimize the changes of the entire organisms for hydrogen production 2)in another hand, to insert the hydrogenases in a photosynthetic chain and then to photo reduce them in order to obtain kinetic data to better understand how it works. (O.M.)

  6. Frequent side chain methyl carbon-oxygen hydrogen bonding in proteins revealed by computational and stereochemical analysis of neutron structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesselman, Joseph D; Horowitz, Scott; Brooks, Charles L; Trievel, Raymond C

    2015-03-01

    The propensity of backbone Cα atoms to engage in carbon-oxygen (CH · · · O) hydrogen bonding is well-appreciated in protein structure, but side chain CH · · · O hydrogen bonding remains largely uncharacterized. The extent to which side chain methyl groups in proteins participate in CH · · · O hydrogen bonding is examined through a survey of neutron crystal structures, quantum chemistry calculations, and molecular dynamics simulations. Using these approaches, methyl groups were observed to form stabilizing CH · · · O hydrogen bonds within protein structure that are maintained through protein dynamics and participate in correlated motion. Collectively, these findings illustrate that side chain methyl CH · · · O hydrogen bonding contributes to the energetics of protein structure and folding.

  7. Preferential transfer of certain plasma membrane proteins onto T and B cells by trogocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Daubeuf

    Full Text Available T and B cells capture antigens via membrane fragments of antigen presenting cells (APC in a process termed trogocytosis. Whether (and how a preferential transfer of some APC components occurs during trogocytosis is still largely unknown. We analyzed the transfer onto murine T and B cells of a large panel of fluorescent proteins with different intra-cellular localizations in the APC or various types of anchors in the plasma membrane (PM. Only the latter were transferred by trogocytosis, albeit with different efficiencies. Unexpectedly, proteins anchored to the PM's cytoplasmic face, or recruited to it via interaction with phosphinositides, were more efficiently transferred than those facing the outside of the cell. For proteins spanning the PM's whole width, transfer efficiency was found to vary quite substantially, with tetraspanins, CD4 and FcRgamma found among the most efficiently transferred proteins. We exploited our findings to set immunodiagnostic assays based on the capture of preferentially transferred components onto T or B cells. The preferential transfer documented here should prove useful in deciphering the cellular structures involved in trogocytosis.

  8. In vitro thermodynamic dissection of human copper transfer from chaperone to target protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz S Niemiec

    Full Text Available Transient protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions are fundamental components of biological activity. To understand biological activity, not only the structures of the involved proteins are important but also the energetics of the individual steps of a reaction. Here we use in vitro biophysical methods to deduce thermodynamic parameters of copper (Cu transfer from the human copper chaperone Atox1 to the fourth metal-binding domain of the Wilson disease protein (WD4. Atox1 and WD4 have the same fold (ferredoxin-like fold and Cu-binding site (two surface exposed cysteine residues and thus it is not clear what drives metal transfer from one protein to the other. Cu transfer is a two-step reaction involving a metal-dependent ternary complex in which the metal is coordinated by cysteines from both proteins (i.e., Atox1-Cu-WD4. We employ size exclusion chromatography to estimate individual equilibrium constants for the two steps. This information together with calorimetric titration data are used to reveal enthalpic and entropic contributions of each step in the transfer process. Upon combining the equilibrium constants for both steps, a metal exchange factor (from Atox1 to WD4 of 10 is calculated, governed by a negative net enthalpy change of ∼10 kJ/mol. Thus, small variations in interaction energies, not always obvious upon comparing protein structures alone, may fuel vectorial metal transfer.

  9. Side chain NMR assignments in the membrane protein OmpX reconstituted in DHPC micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilty, Christian; Fernández, César; Wider, Gerhard; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2002-08-01

    Sequence-specific assignments have been obtained for side chain methyl resonances of Val, Leu and Ile in the outer membrane protein X (OmpX) from Escherichia coli reconstituted in 60 kDa micelles in aqueous solution. Using previously established techniques, OmpX was uniformly 2H,13C,15N-labeled with selectively protonated Val-gamma(1,2), Leu-delta(1,2) and Ile-delta1 methyl groups. The thus labeled protein was studied with the novel experiments 3D (H)C(CC)-TOCSY-(CO)-[15N,1H]-TROSY and 3D H(C)(CC)-TOCSY-(CO)-[15N,1H]-TROSY. Compared to the corresponding conventional experimental schemes, the TROSY-type experiments yielded a sensitivity gain of about 2 at 500 MHz. The overall sensitivity of the experiments was further enhanced more than two-fold by the use of a cryoprobe. Complete assignments of the proton and carbon chemical shifts were obtained for all isopropyl methyl groups of Val and Leu, as well as for the delta1-methyls of Ile. The present approach is applicable for soluble proteins or micelle-reconstituted membrane proteins in structures with overall molecular weights up to about 100 kDa, and adds to the potentialities of solution NMR for de novo structure determination as well as for functional studies, such as ligand screening with proteins in large structures.

  10. Charge transfer and polarization for chloride ions bound in ClC transport proteins: natural bond orbital and energy decomposition analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Jonathan; Pezeshki, Soroosh; Davis, Christal; Lin, Hai

    2013-12-19

    ClC transport proteins show a distinct "broken-helix" architecture, in which certain α-helices are oriented with their N-terminal ends pointed toward the binding sites where the chloride ions are held extensively by the backbone amide nitrogen atoms from the helices. To understand the effectiveness of such binding structures, we carried out natural bond orbital analysis and energy decomposition analysis employing truncated active-site model systems for the bound chloride ions along the translocation pore of the EcClC proteins. Our results indicated that the chloride ions are stabilized in such a binding environment by electrostatic, polarization, and charge-transfer interactions with the backbone and a few side chains. Up to ~25% of the formal charges of the chloride ions were found smeared out to the surroundings primarily via charge transfer from the chloride's lone pair n(Cl) orbitals to the protein's antibonding σ*(N-H) or σ*(O-H) orbitals; those σ* orbitals are localized at the polar N-H and O-H bonds in the chloride's first solvation shells formed by the backbone amide groups and the side chains of residues Ser107, Arg147, Glu148, and Tyr445. Polarizations by the chloride ions were dominated by the redistribution of charge densities among the π orbitals and lone pair orbitals of the protein atoms, in particular the atoms of the backbone peptide links and of the side chains of Arg147, Glu148, and Tyr445. The substantial amounts of electron density involved in charge transfer and in polarization were consistent with the large energetic contributions by the two processes revealed by the energy decomposition analysis. The significant polarization and charge-transfer effects may have impacts on the mechanisms and dynamics of the chloride transport by the ClC proteins.

  11. Innovations in the supply chain and construction engineering of nuclear-based heat transfer components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perales, A. [Equipos Nucleares, S.A. - Ensa, Jose Ortega y Gasset, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Woolf, G. [Tecnicas Reunidas - TR, Arapiles, 28014 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    Equipos Nucleares S.A. (Ensa) and Tecnicas Reunidas S.A. (TR), both long-established Spanish companies, have brought together innovative approaches for the supply of heat transfer solution packages by combining their respective experiences in heat exchanger design (TR), manufacturing (Ensa), and nuclear materials procurement (Ensa and TR), thereby founding a new potent European component supplier for nuclear power plants with over 50 years of experience in the global nuclear market. The combined strategy of the Ensa-TR association which addresses the problems currently faced by nuclear component suppliers is described herein. (authors)

  12. Chain length distributions in linear polyaddition proceeding in nano-scale small volumes without mass transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, R.; Sosnowski, S.

    2017-01-01

    Computer simulations (Monte Carlo and numerical integration of differential equations) and theoretical analysis show that the statistical nature of polyaddition, both irreversible and reversible one, affects the way the macromolecules of different lengths are distributed among the small volume nano-reactors (droplets in this study) at any reaction time. The corresponding droplet distributions in respect to the number of reacting chains as well as the chain length distributions depend, for the given reaction time, on rate constants of polyaddition kp and depolymerization kd (reversible process), and the initial conditions: monomer concentration and the number of its molecules in a droplet. As a model reaction, a simple polyaddition process (M)1+(M)1 ⟶ ⟵ (M)2 , (M)i+(M)j ⟶ ⟵ (M)i+j was chosen, enabling to observe both kinetic and thermodynamic (apparent equilibrium constant) effects of a small number of reactant molecules in a droplet. The average rate constant of polymerization is lower than in a macroscopic system, depending on the average number of reactant molecules in a droplet. The apparent equilibrium constants of polymerization Ki j=[(M)i +j] ¯ /([(M)i] ¯ [(M)j] ¯ ) appear to depend on oligomer/polymer sizes as well as on the initial number of monomer molecules in a droplet. The corresponding equations, enabling prediction of the equilibrium conditions, were derived. All the analyzed effects are observed not only for ideally dispersed systems, i.e. with all droplets containing initially the same number of monomer (M)1 molecules, but also when initially the numbers of monomer molecules conform the Poisson distribution, expected for dispersions of reaction mixtures.

  13. Study on the performance of polycarboxylate-based superplasticizers synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Binbin; Zeng, Zhong; Ren, Qinyu; Chen, Yang; Liang, Mei; Zou, Huawei

    2016-09-01

    A series of block type polycarboxylate-based superplasticizers (PCs) with different molecular architectures were synthesized with macromonomer butenyl alkylene polyoxyethylene-polyoxypropylene ether (BAPP) and acrylic acid (AA) by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Fourier-Transformed Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were applied to investigate the PCs' molecular structure. The dispersion capacity of the PCs in cement were also measured, and the results showed that the polycarboxylic dispersing agents prepared by this method were suitable for portlant cement. It was found that the PCs could affect the hydration process, which was performed through retarding the generation of ettringite in the hydrated product. Our studies with X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compressive strength measurement of hydrated production were all supporting this conclusion.

  14. A silica-immobilized pt2+catalyst for the selective, aerobic oxidation of methane via an electron-transfer chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zengjian An; Xiulian Pan; Xiumei Liu; Xiuwen Han; Xinhe Bao

    2008-01-01

    The combination of Pt2+, benzoquinone and NaNO2 forms an electron-transfer chain, which leads to the oxidation of methane by O2 in CF3COOH aqueous solution. The overall turnover number per hour (TOF) of methane at 120 ℃ is 0.5 h-1, however, only about one fourth (23%) of methane is converted to the desired product of methanol in the formation of CF3COOCH3. The over-oxidation of methane to CO2, over the catalyst with the Pt2+ species immobilized via 2,2'-bipyridyl as a ligand on the silica substrate, is depressed distinctly. Under the same conditions, the conversion to methanol dominates, and no CO2 is observed, on account of the over-oxidation of methane, as confirmed by the isotope experiment.

  15. Too packed to change: side-chain packing and site-specific substitution rates in protein evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Laura Marcos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In protein evolution, due to functional and biophysical constraints, the rates of amino acid substitution differ from site to site. Among the best predictors of site-specific rates are solvent accessibility and packing density. The packing density measure that best correlates with rates is the weighted contact number (WCN, the sum of inverse square distances between a site’s Cα and the Cα of the other sites. According to a mechanistic stress model proposed recently, rates are determined by packing because mutating packed sites stresses and destabilizes the protein’s active conformation. While WCN is a measure of Cα packing, mutations replace side chains. Here, we consider whether a site’s evolutionary divergence is constrained by main-chain packing or side-chain packing. To address this issue, we extended the stress theory to model side chains explicitly. The theory predicts that rates should depend solely on side-chain contact density. We tested this prediction on a data set of structurally and functionally diverse monomeric enzymes. We compared side-chain contact density with main-chain contact density measures and with relative solvent accessibility (RSA. We found that side-chain contact density is the best predictor of rate variation among sites (it explains 39.2% of the variation. Moreover, the independent contribution of main-chain contact density measures and RSA are negligible. Thus, as predicted by the stress theory, site-specific evolutionary rates are determined by side-chain packing.

  16. An experimental and theoretical study of the amino acid side chain Raman bands in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöberg, Béatrice; Foley, Sarah; Cardey, Bruno; Enescu, Mironel

    2014-07-01

    The Raman spectra of a series of tripeptides with the basic formula GlyAAGly where the central amino acid (AA) was tryptophan, tyrosine, phenylalanine, glycine, methionine, histidine, lysine and leucine were measured in H2O. The theoretical Raman spectra obtained using density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2df,2pd) level of theory allows a precise attribution of the vibrational bands. The experimental results show that there is a blue shift in the frequencies of several bands of the amino acid side chains in tripeptides compared to free amino acids, especially in the case of AAs containing aromatic rings. On the other hand, a very good agreement was found between the Raman bands of AA residues in tripeptides and those measured on three model proteins: bovine serum albumin, β-lactoglobulin and lysozyme. The present analysis contributes to an unambiguous interpretation of the protein Raman spectra that is useful in monitoring the biological reactions involving AA side chains alteration.

  17. Short-chain fluorescent tryptophan tags for on-line detection of functional recombinant proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siepert Eva-Maria

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conventional fluorescent proteins, such as GFP, its derivatives and flavin mononucleotide based fluorescent proteins (FbFPs are often used as fusion tags for detecting recombinant proteins during cultivation. These reporter tags are state-of-the-art; however, they have some drawbacks, which can make on-line monitoring challenging. It is discussed in the literature that the large molecular size of proteins of the GFP family may stress the host cell metabolism during production. In addition, fluorophore formation of GFP derivatives is oxygen-dependent resulting in a lag-time between expression and fluorescence detection and the maturation of the protein is suppressed under oxygen-limited conditions. On the contrary, FbFPs are also applicable in an oxygen-limited or even anaerobic environment but are still quite large (58% of the size of GFP. Results As an alternative to common fluorescent tags we developed five novel tags based on clustered tryptophan residues, called W-tags. They are only 5-11% of the size of GFP. Based on the property of tryptophan to fluoresce in absence of oxygen it is reasonable to assume that the functionality of our W-tags is also given under anaerobic conditions. We fused these W-tags to a recombinant protein model, the anti-CD30 receptor single-chain fragment variable antibody (scFv Ki-4(scFv and the anti-MucI single-chain fragment variable M12(scFv. During cultivation in Microtiter plates, the overall tryptophan fluorescence intensity of all cultures was measured on-line for monitoring product formation via the different W-tags. After correlation of the scattered light signal representing biomass concentration and tryptophan fluorescence for the uninduced cultures, the fluorescence originating from the biomass was subtracted from the overall tryptophan signal. The resulting signal, thus, represents the product fluorescence of the tagged and untagged antibody fragments. The product fluorescence signal

  18. Effect of Trapping Agent and Polystyrene Chain End Functionality on Radical Trap-Assisted Atom Transfer Radical Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Carnicom

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Coupling reactions were performed to gauge the effect of the inclusion of a radical trap on the success of coupling reactions of monohalogenated polystyrene (PSX chains in atom transfer radical coupling (ATRC type reactions. The effect of both the specific radical trap chosen and the structure of the polymer chain end were evaluated by the extent of dimerization observed in a series of analogous coupling reactions. The commonly used radical trap 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP showed the highest amounts of dimerization for PSX (X = Br, Cl compared to coupling reactions performed in its absence or with a different radical trap. A dinitroxide coupling agent was also studied with the extent of coupling nearly matching the effectiveness of MNP in RTA (Radical trap-assisted-ATRC reactions, while N-nitroso and electron rich nitroso coupling agents were the least effective. (2,2,6,6-Tetramethyl-piperin-l-yloxyl-capped PS (PS-TEMPO, prepared by NMP, was subjected to a coupling sequence conceptually similar to RTA-ATRC, but dimerization was not observed regardless of the choice of radical trap. Kinetic experiments were performed to observe rate changes on the coupling reaction of PSBr as a result of the inclusion of MNP, with substantial rate enhancements found in the RTA-ATRC coupling sequence compared to traditional ATRC.

  19. Identification of the specific electron transfer proteins, ferredoxin, and ferredoxin reductase, for CYP105D7 in Streptomyces avermitilis MA4680.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Bishnu Prasad; Lee, Nahum; Choi, Kwon-Young; Kim, Ji-Nu; Kim, Eun-Jung; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2014-06-01

    It was previously proposed that regiospecific hydroxylation of daidzein at 3'-position is mediated by cytochrome P450 hydroxylase (CYP105D7) in the presence of putidaredoxin (CamB) and putidaredoxin reductase (CamA) as electron transfer proteins from Pseudomonas putida. The genome sequence of Streptomyces avermitilis MA4680 revealed 33 P450 (CYPs) with 6 ferredoxin reductases (Fprs) and 9 ferredoxins (Fdxs) as their putative electron transfer partner proteins. To identify right endogenous electron transfer proteins for CYP105D7 activity, in vitro reconstitution, gene disruption, and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) mRNA expression profile analysis were examined. The most effective electron transfer proteins for CYP105D7 appear to be FdxH (SAV7470), which is located downstream to CYP105D7 as a cluster, and FprD (SAV5675). Throughout our overall analysis, we proposed that the primary electron transfer pathway for CYP105D7 follows as such NAD(P)H→FdxH→FprD→CYP105D7.

  20. Superexchange coupling and electron transfer in globular proteins via polaron excitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuev, G N; Lakhno, V D; Ustitnin, M N

    2000-06-01

    The polaron approach is used to treat long-range electron transfersbetween globular proteins. A rate expression for the polaron transfer model is given along with a description of appropriate conditions forits use. Assuming that electrons transfer via a superexchange couplingdue to a polaron excitation, we have estimated the distance dependenceof the rate constant for the self-exchange reactions between globularproteins in solutions. The distance dependence of the polaron coupling andsolvent reorganization energy are provided as a basis forunderstanding and interpreting a long-range electron transfer experiment.The difficulties and problems of the polaron treatment of long-rangeelectron transfers are discussed, and suggestions for new experimentsare made.

  1. Early career: Templating of liquid crystal microstructures by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinen, Jennifer M. (O' Donnell) [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-12-31

    This research has shown that the microstructure of self-assembled copolymers can be decoupled from the polymer chemistry. The simplest polymer architecture, linear block copolymers, is valuable for a broad range of applications, including adhesives and coatings, medical devices, electronics and energy storage, because these block copolymers reproducibly self-assemble into microphase separated nanoscale domains. Unfortunately, the self-assembled microstructure is tuned by polymer composition, thus limiting the potential to simultaneously optimize chemical, mechanical, and transport properties for desired applications. To this end, much work was been put into manipulating block copolymer self-assembly independently of polymer composition. These efforts have included the use of additives or solvents to alter polymer chain conformation, the addition of a third monomer to produce ABC triblock terpolymers, architectures with mixed blocks, such as tapered/gradient polymers, and the synthesis of other nonlinear molecular architectures. This work has shown that the microstructures formed by linear ABC terpolymers can be altered by controlling the architecture of the polymer molecules at a constant monomer composition, so that the microstructure is tuned independently from the chemical properties.

  2. The transfer of titanium dioxide nanoparticles from the host plant to butterfly larvae through a food chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo-Irie, Miyoko; Yokoyama, Masaaki; Shinkai, Yusuke; Niki, Rikio; Takeda, Ken; Irie, Masaru

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to examine the transfer of nanoparticles within a terrestrial food chain. Oviposited eggs of the swallowtail butterfly (Atrophaneura alcinous) were hatched on the leaves of the host plant (Aristolochia debilis), and the root stock and root hairs were submerged in a suspension of 10 μg/ml titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) in a 100 ml bottle. The presence of TiO2-NPs in the veins of the leaves was confirmed by X-ray analytical microscopy (X-ray AM). The hatched 1st instar larvae fed on the leaves to moult into 2nd instar larvae. Small agglomerates of TiO2-NPs less than 150 nm in diameter were identified in the vascular tissue of the exposed plant, the midgut and the excreta of the larvae by transmission electron microscopy. The image of Ti elemental mapping by X-ray AM was analysed with the quantitative spatial information mapping (QSIM) technique. The results demonstrated that TiO2-NPs were transferred from the plant to the larvae and they were disseminated throughout the environment via larval excreta.

  3. Bio-batteries and bio-fuel cells: leveraging on electronic charge transfer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, A M; Renugopalakrishnan, V; Filipek, S; Li, P; Audette, G F; Munukutla, L

    2009-03-01

    Bio-fuel cells are alternative energy devises based on bio-electrocatalysis of natural substrates by enzymes or microorganisms. Here we review bio-fuel cells and bio-batteries based on the recent literature. In general, the bio-fuel cells are classified based on the type of electron transfer; mediated electron transfer and direct electron transfer or electronic charge transfer (ECT). The ECT of the bio-fuel cells is critically reviewed and a variety of possible applications are considered. The technical challenges of the bio-fuel cells, like bioelectrocatalysis, immobilization of bioelectrocatalysts, protein denaturation etc. are highlighted and future research directions are discussed leveraging on the use of electron charge transfer proteins. In addition, the packaging aspects of the bio-fuel cells are also analyzed and the found that relatively little work has been done in the engineering development of bio-fuel cells.

  4. Construction of single chain Fv antibody against transferrin receptor and its protein fusion with alkaline phosphatase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dao-Feng Yang; Hui-Fen Zhu; Zhi-Hua Wang; Guan-Xin Shen; De-Ying Tian

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To construct fusion protein of a single-chain antibody(scFv) against transferrin receptor (TfR) with alkalinephosphatase (AP).METHODS: The VH-linker-VL, namely scFv gene, wasprepared by amplifying the VH and VL genes from plasmid pGEM-T-VH and pGEM-T-VL with splicing overlap extension polymerase chain reaction (SOE PCR). After the ScFv gene was modified by SfiⅠ and NotⅠ, it was subcloned into the secretory expression vector pUC19/119, and then was transformed into E. coli TG1. The positive colonies were screened by colony PCR and their expressions were induced by IPTG. ScFv gene was gained by digesting ScFv expression vector pUC19/119 with Sfi I and NotⅠ restriction enzymes, then subcloned into expression vector pDAP2, followed by transformation in E. coli TG1. The positive colonies were selected by bacterial colony PCR. The expression of fusion protein (scFv-AP) was induced by IPTG. Its activity was detected by enzyme immunoassay. The molecular weights of scFv and scFv-AP were measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE).RESULTS: The product of SOE PCR formed a band of 700 bp in agarose gel electrophoresis. SDS-PAGE demonstrated the molecular weight of scFv was 27 ku. Immunofluorescent assay (IFA) demonstrated its reactivity with TfR. The molecular weight of scFv-AP was 75 ku. Enzyme immunoassay showed that scFv-AP could specifically bind to human TfR and play AP activity.CONCLUSION: We have successfully prepared the antihuman TfR scFv and constructed the fusion protein of scFv and AP. It is promising for immunological experiments.

  5. ω-Turn: a novel β-turn mimic in globular proteins stabilized by main-chain to side-chain C−H···O interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Jesmita; Chakrabarti, Pinak; Saini, Harpreet; Raghava, Gajendra Pal Singh; Kishore, Raghuvansh

    2015-02-01

    Mimicry of structural motifs is a common feature in proteins. The 10-membered hydrogen-bonded ring involving the main-chain C − O in a β-turn can be formed using a side-chain carbonyl group leading to Asx-turn. We show that the N − H component of hydrogen bond can be replaced by a C(γ) -H group in the side chain, culminating in a nonconventional C − H···O interaction. Because of its shape this β-turn mimic is designated as ω-turn, which is found to occur ∼ three times per 100 residues. Three residues (i to i + 2) constitute the turn with the C − H···O interaction occurring between the terminal residues, constraining the torsion angles ϕi + 1, ψi + 1, ϕi + 2 and χ'1(i + 2) (using the interacting C(γ) atom). Based on these angles there are two types of ω-turns, each of which can be further divided into two groups. C(β) -branched side-chains, and Met and Gln have high propensities to occur at i + 2; for the last two residues the carbonyl oxygen may participate in an additional interaction involving the S and amino group, respectively. With Cys occupying the i + 1 position, such turns are found in the metal-binding sites. N-linked glycosylation occurs at the consensus pattern Asn-Xaa-Ser/Thr; with Thr at i + 2, the sequence can adopt the secondary structure of a ω-turn, which may be the recognition site for protein modification. Location between two β-strands is the most common occurrence in protein tertiary structure, and being generally exposed ω-turn may constitute the antigenic determinant site. It is a stable scaffold and may be used in protein engineering and peptide design.

  6. Dissection of the triple tryptophan electron transfer chain in Escherichia coli DNA photolyase: Trp382 is the primary donor in photoactivation

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    In Escherichia coli photolyase, excitation of the FAD cofactor in its semireduced radical state (FADH•) induces an electron transfer over ≈15 Å from tryptophan W306 to the flavin. It has been suggested that two additional tryptophans are involved in an electron transfer chain FADH• ← W382 ← W359 ← W306. To test this hypothesis, we have mutated W382 into redox inert phenylalanine. Ultrafast transient absorption studies showed that, in WT photolyase, excited FADH• de...

  7. Mesitylene-Cored Glucoside Amphiphiles (MGAs) for Membrane Protein Studies: Importance of Alkyl Chain Density in Detergent Efficacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cho, Kyung Ho; Ribeiro, Orquidea; Du, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Detergents serve as useful tools for membrane protein structural and functional studies. Their amphipathic nature allows detergents to associate with the hydrophobic regions of membrane proteins whilst maintaining the proteins in aqueous solution. However, widely used conventional detergents...... are limited in their ability to maintain the structural integrity of membrane proteins and thus there are major efforts underway to develop novel agents with improved properties. We prepared mesitylene-cored glucoside amphiphiles (MGAs) with three alkyl chains and compared these agents with previously...... developed xylene-linked maltoside agents (XMAs) with two alkyl chains and a conventional detergent (DDM). When these agents were evaluated for four membrane proteins including a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), some agents such as MGA-C13 and MGA-C14 resulted in markedly enhanced stability of membrane...

  8. The r1162 mob proteins can promote conjugative transfer from cryptic origins in the bacterial chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Richard

    2009-03-01

    The mobilization proteins of the broad-host-range plasmid R1162 can initiate conjugative transfer of a plasmid from a 19-bp locus that is partially degenerate in sequence. Such loci are likely to appear by chance in the bacterial chromosome and could act as cryptic sites for transfer of chromosomal DNA when R1162 is present. The R1162-dependent transfer of chromosomal DNA, initiated from one such potential site in Pectobacterium atrosepticum, is shown here. A second active site was identified in Escherichia coli, where it is also shown that large amounts of DNA are transferred. This transfer probably reflects the combined activity of the multiple cryptic origins in the chromosome. Transfer of chromosomal DNA due to the presence of a plasmid in the cytoplasm describes a previously unrecognized potential for the exchange of bacterial DNA.

  9. Construction of multiple recombinant SLA-I proteins by linking heavy chains and light chains in vitro and analyzing their secondary and 3-dimensional structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng-shan; Bai, Jing; Zhang, Qiang; Xu, Chong-bo; Li, Yanmin

    2012-07-10

    Six breeds of swine were used to study the structure of swine leukocyte antigen class I (SLA-I). SLA-I complexes were produced by linking SLA-2 genes and β(2)m genes via a linker encoding a 15 amino acid glycine-rich sequence, (G4S)3, using splicing overlap extension (SOE)-PCR in vitro. The six recombinant SLA-2-linker-β(2)m genes were each inserted into p2X vectors and their expression induced in Escherichia coli TB1. The expressed proteins were detected by SDS-PAGE and western blotting. The maltose binding protein (MBP)-SLA-I fusion proteins were purified by amylose affinity chromatography followed by cleavage with factor Xa and separation of the SLA-I protein monomers from the MBP using a DEAE Ceramic Hyper D F column. The purified SLA-I monomers were detected by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and the 3-dimensional (3D) structure of the constructed single-chain SLA-I molecules were analyzed by homology modeling. Recombinant SLA-2-Linker-β(2)m was successfully amplified from all six breeds of swine by SOE-PCR and expressed as fusion proteins of 84.1 kDa in pMAL-p2X, followed by confirmation by western blotting. After purification and cleavage of the MBP-SLA-I fusion proteins, SLA-I monomeric proteins of 41.6 kDa were separated. CD spectroscopy demonstrated that the SLA-I monomers had an α-helical structure, and the average α-helix, β-sheet, turn and random coil contents were 21.6%, 37.9%, 15.0% and 25.5%, respectively. Homology modeling of recombinant single-chain SLA-I molecules showed that the heavy chain and light chain constituted SLA-I complex with an open antigenic peptide-binding groove. It was concluded that the expressed SLA-I proteins in pMAL-p2X folded correctly and could be used to bind and screen nonameric peptides in vitro.

  10. Microinjection of antibodies to the calpactin I light chain in MDBK cells causes precipition of the cytoskeletal calpactin I complex without affecting the distribution of related proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenney, J R

    1990-01-01

    The calpactin I complex is composed of two heavy chain (39K) and two light chain (11K) subunits. The heavy chain is a member of a protein family that includes lipocortins, endonexin and chromobindins while the light chain is a member of the S100 family (7 distinct members are known). We have found that the kidney epithelial cell line MDBK expresses four members of the heavy chain family and two members of the light chain protein family. Antibodies to the light chain of calpactin I were found to cause the precipitation of injected antibody together with the associated heavy chain without apparent effect on the distribution of related proteins. This suggests a differential targeting of various members of the calpactin heavy and light chain families even within the same cell.

  11. Analysis of proteins and peptides on a chromatographic timescale by electron-transfer dissociation MS

    OpenAIRE

    Udeshi, Namrata D.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F.; Rose, Kristie L

    2007-01-01

    Peptide and protein sequence analysis using a combination of gas-phase ion–ion chemistry and tandem MS is described. Samples are converted to multiply charged ions by ESI and then allowed to react with fluoranthene radical anions in a quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer. Electron transfer from the radical anion to the multiply charged peptide or protein promotes random fragmentation along the amide backbone that is independent of peptide or protein size, sequence, or the presence of ...

  12. Side chain NMR assignments in the membrane protein OmpX reconstituted in DHPC micelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilty, Christian; Fernandez, Cesar; Wider, Gerhard; Wuethrich, Kurt [Institut fuer Molekularbiologie und Biophysik, Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule Zuerich (Switzerland)], E-mail: wuthrich@mol.biol.ethz.ch

    2002-08-15

    Sequence-specific assignments have been obtained for side chain methyl resonances of Val, Leu and Ile in the outer membrane protein X (OmpX) from Escherichia colireconstituted in 60 kDa micelles in aqueous solution. Using previously established techniques, OmpX was uniformly {sup 2}H,{sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeled with selectively protonated Val-{gamma}{sup 1,2}, Leu-{delta}{sup 1,2}and Ile-{delta}{sup 1}methyl groups. The thus labeled protein was studied with the novel experiments 3D (H)C(CC)-TOCSY-(CO)-[{sup 15}N,{sup 1}H]-TROSY and 3D H(C)(CC)-TOCSY-(CO)-[{sup 15}N,{sup 1}H]-TROSY. Compared to the corresponding conventional experimental schemes, the TROSY-type experiments yielded a sensitivity gain of about 2 at 500 MHz. The overall sensitivity of the experiments was further enhanced more than two-fold by the use of a cryoprobe. Complete assignments of the proton and carbon chemical shifts were obtained for all isopropyl methyl groups of Val and Leu, as well as for the {delta}{sup 1}-methyls of Ile. The present approach is applicable for soluble proteins or micelle-reconstituted membrane proteins in structures with overall molecular weights up to about 100 kDa, and adds to the potentialities of solution NMR for de novostructure determination as well as for functional studies, such as ligand screening with proteins in large structures.

  13. ' q-Titration' of long-chain and short-chain lipids differentiates between structured and mobile residues of membrane proteins studied in bicelles by solution NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Woo Sung; Park, Sang Ho; Nothnagel, Henry J.; Lu, George J.; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Hua; Cook, Gabriel A.; Howell, Stanley C.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2012-01-01

    ' q-Titration' refers to the systematic comparison of signal intensities in solution NMR spectra of uniformly 15N labeled membrane proteins solubilized in micelles and isotropic bicelles as a function of the molar ratios ( q) of the long-chain lipids (typically DMPC) to short-chain lipids (typically DHPC). In general, as q increases, the protein resonances broaden and correspondingly have reduced intensities due to the overall slowing of protein reorientation. Since the protein backbone signals do not broaden uniformly, the differences in line widths (and intensities) enable the narrower (more intense) signals associated with mobile residues to be differentiated from the broader (less intense) signals associated with "structured" residues. For membrane proteins with between one and seven trans-membrane helices in isotropic bicelles, we have been able to find a value of q between 0.1 and 1.0 where only signals from mobile residues are observed in the spectra. The signals from the structured residues are broadened so much that they cannot be observed under standard solution NMR conditions. This q value corresponds to the ratio of DMPC:DHPC where the signals from the structured residues are "titrated out" of the spectrum. This q value is unique for each protein. In magnetically aligned bilayers ( q > 2.5) no signals are observed in solution NMR spectra of membrane proteins because the polypeptides are "immobilized" by their interactions with the phospholipid bilayers on the relevant NMR timescale (˜10 5 Hz). No signals are observed from proteins in liposomes (only long-chain lipids) either. We show that it is feasible to obtain complementary solution NMR and solid-state NMR spectra of the same membrane protein, where signals from the mobile residues are present in the solution NMR spectra, and signals from the structured residues are present in the solid-state NMR spectra. With assigned backbone amide resonances, these data are sufficient to describe major features

  14. Characterization and recombinant protein expression of ferritin light chain homologue in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sun Mee; Mon, Hiroaki; Lee, Jae Man; Kusakabe, Takahiro

    2014-04-01

    The silkworm genome encodes three iron storage proteins or ferritins, Fer1HCH, Fer2LCH, and Fer3HCH. Probing our EST library constructed from 1-day-old silkworm eggs revealed only Fer2LCH mRNA, which encoded for a protein with a predicted putative N-glycosylation site. Developmental and tissue expression analyses during embryogenesis revealed that Fer2LCH mRNA was abundant from 6 h to 6 days after oviposition. Transcriptional expression of Fer2LCH during the postembryonic stage is also high in the larval fat body and mid-gut, and then is upregulated in all pupal tissues tested. We found that Fer2LCH mRNA contains an iron-responsive element, suggesting this ferritin subunit is subject to translational control. Although ferritin expression has been shown to increase following immune challenge in other insects, the levels of Fer2LCH mRNA were not significantly induced following viral or bacterial infection of Bombyx mori. Using a baculovirus expression system we expressed recombinant BmFer2LCH protein, which was detectable in the cytoplasmic fraction, likely in a compartment of the secretory pathway, and was shown to undergo posttranslational modifications including N-glycosylation. In particular, rBmFer2LCH carbohydrate chains were composed of mannose and GlcNAc. We suggest that Fer2LCH is important for iron homeostasis and maintaining normal organ function in silkworms.

  15. PHAISTOS: a framework for Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation and inference of protein structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomsma, Wouter; Frellsen, Jes; Harder, Tim; Bottaro, Sandro; Johansson, Kristoffer E; Tian, Pengfei; Stovgaard, Kasper; Andreetta, Christian; Olsson, Simon; Valentin, Jan B; Antonov, Lubomir D; Christensen, Anders S; Borg, Mikael; Jensen, Jan H; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Hamelryck, Thomas

    2013-07-15

    We present a new software framework for Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling for simulation, prediction, and inference of protein structure. The software package contains implementations of recent advances in Monte Carlo methodology, such as efficient local updates and sampling from probabilistic models of local protein structure. These models form a probabilistic alternative to the widely used fragment and rotamer libraries. Combined with an easily extendible software architecture, this makes PHAISTOS well suited for Bayesian inference of protein structure from sequence and/or experimental data. Currently, two force-fields are available within the framework: PROFASI and OPLS-AA/L, the latter including the generalized Born surface area solvent model. A flexible command-line and configuration-file interface allows users quickly to set up simulations with the desired configuration. PHAISTOS is released under the GNU General Public License v3.0. Source code and documentation are freely available from http://phaistos.sourceforge.net. The software is implemented in C++ and has been tested on Linux and OSX platforms.

  16. Prediction of small molecule binding property of protein domains with Bayesian classifiers based on Markov chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulashevska, Alla; Stein, Martin; Jackson, David; Eils, Roland

    2009-12-01

    Accurate computational methods that can help to predict biological function of a protein from its sequence are of great interest to research biologists and pharmaceutical companies. One approach to assume the function of proteins is to predict the interactions between proteins and other molecules. In this work, we propose a machine learning method that uses a primary sequence of a domain to predict its propensity for interaction with small molecules. By curating the Pfam database with respect to the small molecule binding ability of its component domains, we have constructed a dataset of small molecule binding and non-binding domains. This dataset was then used as training set to learn a Bayesian classifier, which should distinguish members of each class. The domain sequences of both classes are modelled with Markov chains. In a Jack-knife test, our classification procedure achieved the predictive accuracies of 77.2% and 66.7% for binding and non-binding classes respectively. We demonstrate the applicability of our classifier by using it to identify previously unknown small molecule binding domains. Our predictions are available as supplementary material and can provide very useful information to drug discovery specialists. Given the ubiquitous and essential role small molecules play in biological processes, our method is important for identifying pharmaceutically relevant components of complete proteomes. The software is available from the author upon request.

  17. Surprisingly high stability of barley lipid transfer protein, LTP1, towards denaturant, heat and proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Winther, J R

    2001-01-01

    Barley LTP1 belongs to a large family of plant proteins termed non-specific lipid transfer proteins. The in vivo function of these proteins is unknown, but it has been suggested that they are involved in responses towards stresses such as pathogens, drought, heat, cold and salt. Also, the proteins...... have been suggested as transporters of monomers for cutin synthesis. We have analysed the stability of LTP1 towards denaturant, heat and proteases and found it to be a highly stable protein, which apparently does not denature at temperatures up to 100 degrees C. This high stability may be important...

  18. Asynchronous through-bond homonuclear isotropic mixing: application to carbon–carbon transfer in perdeuterated proteins under MAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulminskaya, Natalia; Vasa, Suresh Kumar; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Linser, Rasmus, E-mail: rali@nmr.mpibpc.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Department of NMR-based Structural Biology (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Multiple-bond carbon–carbon homonuclear mixing is a hurdle in extensively deuterated proteins and under fast MAS due to the absence of an effective proton dipolar-coupling network. Such conditions are now commonly employed in solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Here, we introduce an isotropic homonuclear {sup 13}C–{sup 13}C through-bond mixing sequence, MOCCA, for the solid state. Even though applied under MAS, this scheme performs without rotor synchronization and thus does not pose the usual hurdles in terms of power dissipation for fast spinning. We compare its performance with existing homonuclear {sup 13}C–{sup 13}C mixing schemes using a perdeuterated and partially proton-backexchanged protein. Based on the analysis of side chain carbon–carbon correlations, we show that particularly MOCCA with standard 180-degree pulses and delays leading to non-rotor-synchronized spacing performs exceptionally well. This method provides high magnetization transfer efficiency for multiple-bond transfer in the aliphatic region compared with other tested mixing sequences. In addition, we show that this sequence can also be tailor-made for recoupling within a selected spectral region using band-selective pulses.

  19. Human amyloidogenic light chain proteins result in cardiac dysfunction, cell death, and early mortality in zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Shikha; Guan, Jian; Plovie, Eva; Seldin, David C.; Connors, Lawreen H.; Merlini, Giampaolo; Falk, Rodney H.; MacRae, Calum A.

    2013-01-01

    Systemic amyloid light-chain (AL) amyloidosis is associated with rapidly progressive and fatal cardiomyopathy resulting from the direct cardiotoxic effects of circulating AL light chain (AL-LC) proteins and the indirect effects of AL fibril tissue infiltration. Cardiac amyloidosis is resistant to standard heart failure therapies, and, to date, there are limited treatment options for these patients. The mechanisms underlying the development of cardiac amyloidosis and AL-LC cardiotoxicity are largely unknown, and their study has been limited by the lack of a suitable in vivo model system. Here, we establish an in vivo zebrafish model of human AL-LC-induced cardiotoxicity. AL-LC isolated from AL cardiomyopathy patients or control nonamyloidogenic LC protein isolated from multiple myeloma patients (Con-LC) was directly injected into the circulation of zebrafish at 48 h postfertilization. AL-LC injection resulted in impaired cardiac function, pericardial edema, and increased cell death relative to Con-LC, culminating in compromised survival with 100% mortality within 2 wk, independent of AL fibril deposition. Prior work has implicated noncanonical p38 MAPK activation in the pathogenesis of AL-LC-induced cardiotoxicity, and p38 MAPK inhibition via SB-203580 rescued AL-LC-induced cardiac dysfunction and cell death and attenuated mortality in zebrafish. This in vivo zebrafish model of AL-LC cardiotoxicity demonstrates that antagonism of p38 MAPK within the AL-LC cardiotoxic signaling response may serve to improve cardiac function and mortality in AL cardiomyopathy. Furthermore, this in vivo model system will allow for further study of the molecular underpinnings of AL cardiotoxicity and identification of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:23624626

  20. Selective release from cultured mammalian cells of heat-shock (stress) proteins that resemble glia-axon transfer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hightower, L E; Guidon, P T

    1989-02-01

    Cultured rat embryo cells were stimulated to rapidly release a small group of proteins that included several heat-shock proteins (hsp110, hsp71, hscp73) and nonmuscle actin. The extracellular proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Heat-shocked cells released the same set of proteins as control cells with the addition of the stress-inducible hsp110 and hsp71. Release of these proteins was not blocked by either monensin or colchicine, inhibitors of the common secretory pathway. A small amount of the glucose-regulated protein grp78 was externalized by this pathway. The extracellular accumulation of these proteins was inhibited after they were synthesized in the presence of the lysine analogue aminoethyl cysteine. It is likely that the analogue-substituted proteins were misfolded and could not be released from cells, supporting our conclusion that a selective release mechanism is involved. Remarkably, actin and the squid heat-shock proteins homologous to rat hsp71 and hsp110 are also among a select group of proteins transferred from glial cells to the squid giant axon, where they have been implicated in neuronal stress responses (Tytell et al.: Brain Res., 363:161-164, 1986). Based in part on the similarities between these two sets of proteins, we hypothesized that these proteins were released from labile cortical regions of animal cells in response to perturbations of homeostasis in cells as evolutionarily distinct as cultured rat embryo cells and squid glial cells.

  1. Polymorphisms of microsomal triglycedde transfer protein in different hepatitis B virus-infected patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Tao Yang; Xin-Xin Zhang; Xiao-Fei Kong; Dong-Hua Zhang; Shen-Ying Zhang; Jie-Hong Jiang; Qi-Ming Gong; Gen-Di Jin; Zhi-Meng Lu

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To identify the two polymorphisms of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) gene in the Chinese population and to explore their correlation with both hepatitis B virus (HBV) self-limited infection and persistent infection.METHODS: A total of 316 subjects with self-limited HBV infection and 316 patients with persistent HBV infection (195 subjects without familial history),matched with age and sex,from the Chinese Han population were enrolled in this study.Polymorphisms of MTP at the promoter region -493 and at H297Q were determined by the allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR).RESULTS: The ratio of males to females was 2.13:1 for each group and the average age in the self-limited and chronic infection groups was 38.36 and 38.28 years,respectively.None of the allelic distributions deviated significantly from that predicted by the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium.There was a linkage disequilibrium between H297Q and -493G/T(D'=0.77).As the X2 test was used,the genotype distribution of MTP-493G/T demonstrated a significant difference between the self-limited infection group and the entire chronic group or the chronic patients with no family history (X2=8.543,P=0.015 and X2=7.199,P=0.019).The allele distribution at the MTP-493 position also demonstrated a significant difference between the study groups without family history (X2=6.212,P=0.013).The T allele emerged as a possible protective factor which may influence the outcomes of HBV infection (OR: 0.59; 95% CI: 0.389-0.897).CONCLUSION: The polymorphism of the MTP gene,T allele at -493,may be involved in determining the HBV infection outcomes,of which the mechanism needs to be further investigated.

  2. Immune response in mice to ingested soya protein: antibody production, oral tolerance and maternal transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hanne Risager; Pedersen, Susanne Brix; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2004-01-01

    While allergic reactions to soya are increasingly investigated, the normal immune response to ingested soya is scarcely described. In the present study, we wanted to characterise the soya-specific immune response in healthy mice ingesting soya protein. Mice fed a soya-containing diet (F0) and mice...... of the first (F1) and second (F2) offspring generation bred on a soya protein-free diet were used either directly or were transferred between the soya-containing and soya protein-free diet during pregnancy or neonatal life. The mice were compared as to levels of naturally occurring specific antibodies analysed...... by ELISA, and to the presence of oral tolerance detected as a suppressed antibody and cell-proliferation response upon immunisation with soya protein. F0 mice generated soya-specific antibodies, while oral tolerance to the same soya proteins was also clearly induced. When F0 dams were transferred to soya...

  3. Ischemic postconditioning influences electron transport chain protein turnover in Langendorff-perfused rat hearts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Cao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ischemia postconditioning (IPo is a promising strategy in reducing myocardial ischemia reperfusion (I/R injury (MIRI, but its specific molecular mechanism is incompletely understood. Langendorff-perfused isolated rat hearts were subjected to global I/R and received IPo in the absence or presence of the mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channel (mitoKATP blocker 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD. Myocardial mitochondria were extracted and mitochondrial comparative proteomics was analyzed. IPo significantly reduces post-ischemic myocardial infarction and improved cardiac function in I/R rat hearts, while 5-HD basically cancelled IPo’s myocardial protective effect. Joint application of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2DE and MALDI-TOF MS identified eight differentially expressed proteins between groups. Expression of cardiac succinate dehydrogenase (ubiquinone flavoprotein subunit (SDHA increased more than two-fold after I/R, while IPo led to overexpression of dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (DLD, NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone flavoprotein 1 and isoform CRA_b (NDUFV1. When the mitoKATP was blocked, MICOS complex subunit Mic60 (IMMT and Stress-70 protein (Grp75 were over expressed, while DLDH, ATPase subunit A (ATPA and rCG44606 were decreased. Seven of the differential proteins belong to electron transport chain (ETC or metabolism regulating proteins, and five of them were induced by closing mitoKATP in I/R hearts. We thus conclude that IPo’s myocardial protective effect relies on energy homeostasis regulation. DLD, SDHA, NDUFV1, Grp75, ATPA and rCG44606 may contribute to IPo’s cardial protective effect.

  4. Ischemic postconditioning influences electron transport chain protein turnover in Langendorff-perfused rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Song; Liu, Yun; Wang, Haiying; Mao, Xiaowen; Chen, Jincong; Liu, Jiming; Xia, Zhengyuan; Zhang, Lin; Liu, Xingkui; Yu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia postconditioning (IPo) is a promising strategy in reducing myocardial ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury (MIRI), but its specific molecular mechanism is incompletely understood. Langendorff-perfused isolated rat hearts were subjected to global I/R and received IPo in the absence or presence of the mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channel (mitoKATP) blocker 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD). Myocardial mitochondria were extracted and mitochondrial comparative proteomics was analyzed. IPo significantly reduces post-ischemic myocardial infarction and improved cardiac function in I/R rat hearts, while 5-HD basically cancelled IPo's myocardial protective effect. Joint application of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2DE) and MALDI-TOF MS identified eight differentially expressed proteins between groups. Expression of cardiac succinate dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) flavoprotein subunit (SDHA) increased more than two-fold after I/R, while IPo led to overexpression of dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (DLD), NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) flavoprotein 1 and isoform CRA_b (NDUFV1). When the mitoKATP was blocked, MICOS complex subunit Mic60 (IMMT) and Stress-70 protein (Grp75) were over expressed, while DLDH, ATPase subunit A (ATPA) and rCG44606 were decreased. Seven of the differential proteins belong to electron transport chain (ETC) or metabolism regulating proteins, and five of them were induced by closing mitoKATP in I/R hearts. We thus conclude that IPo's myocardial protective effect relies on energy homeostasis regulation. DLD, SDHA, NDUFV1, Grp75, ATPA and rCG44606 may contribute to IPo's cardial protective effect.

  5. The relationship between cholesteryl ester transfer protein levels and risk factor profile in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Grooth, Greetje J; Smilde, Tineke J; Van Wissen, Sanne; Klerkx, Anke H E M; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Kastelein, John J P; Stalenhoef, Anton F H; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of neutral lipids between lipoproteins. The role of CETP in atherogenesis is controversial. To better understand the relationships between plasma CETP levels, lipoproteins and atherosclerosis, we assessed these parameters in

  6. The Role of Protein Fluctuation Correlations in Electron Transfer in Photosynthetic Complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterov, Alexander I

    2014-01-01

    We consider the dependence of the electron transfer in photosynthetic complexes on correlation properties of random fluctuations of the protein environment. The electron subsystem is modeled by a finite network of connected electron (exciton) sites. The fluctuations of the protein environment are modeled by random telegraph processes, which act either collectively (correlated) or independently (uncorrelated) on the electron sites. We derived an exact closed system of first-order linear differential equations with constant coefficients, for the average density matrix elements and for their first moments. Under some conditions, we obtain analytic expressions for the electron transfer rates. We compare the correlated and uncorrelated regimes, and demonstrated numerically that the uncorrelated fluctuations of the protein environment can, under some conditions, either increase or decrease the electron transfer rates.

  7. Elucidating thermodynamic parameters for electron transfer proteins using isothermal titration calorimetry: application to the nitrogenase Fe protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørlie, Morten; Chan, Jeannine M; Wang, Haijang; Seefeldt, Lance C; Parker, Vernon D

    2003-05-01

    Establishing thermodynamic parameters for electron transfer reactions involving redox proteins is essential for a complete description of these important reactions. While various methods have been developed for measuring the Gibbs free energy change (Delta G(HR) or E(m)) for the protein half-reactions, deconvolution of the respective contributions of enthalpy (Delta H(HR)) and entropy (Delta S(HR)) changes is much more challenging. In the present work, an approach is developed using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) that allows accurate determination of all of these thermodynamic parameters for protein electron transfer half-reactions. The approach was validated for essentially irreversible and reversible electron transfer reactions between well-characterized mediators and between mediators and the protein cytochrome c. In all cases, the measured thermodynamic parameters were in excellent agreement with parameters determined by electrochemical methods. Finally, the calorimetry approach was used to determine thermodynamic parameters for electron transfer reactions of the nitrogenase Fe protein [4Fe-4S](2+/+) couple in the absence or presence of MgADP or MgATP. The E(m) value was found to change from -290 mV in the absence of nucleotides to -381 mV with MgATP and -423 mV with MgADP, consistent with earlier values. For the first time, the enthalpy (Delta H(HR)) and entropy (Delta S(HR)) contributions for each case were established, revealing shifts in the contribution of each thermodynamic parameter induced by nucleotide binding. The results are discussed in the context of current models for electron transfer in nitrogenase.

  8. Ethylene homo- and copolymerization chain-transfers: A perspective from supported (n BuCp) 2 ZrCl 2 catalyst active centre distribution

    KAUST Repository

    Atiqullah, Muhammad

    2015-04-01

    Polymerization chain termination reactions and unsaturation of the polymer backbone end are related. Therefore, in this study, the parameters resulting from the modelling of the active centre distribution of the supported catalyst - silica/MAO/(nBuCp)2ZrCl2 - were applied to evaluate the active-centre-dependent ethylene homo- and copolymerization rates, as well as the corresponding chain termination rates. This approach, from a microkinetic mechanistic viewpoint, elucidates better the 1-hexene-induced positive comonomer effect and chain transfer phenomenon. The kinetic expressions, developed on the basis of the proposed polymerization mechanisms, illustrate how the active site type-dependent chain transfer phenomenon is influenced by the different apparent termination rate constants and momoner concentrations. The active centre-specific molecular weight M ni (for the above homo- and copolymer), as a function of chain transfer probability, p CTi, varied as follows: log (p C Ti) = log (mwru) - log (Mn i), where mw ru is the molecular weight of the repeat unit. The physical significance of this finding has been explained. The homo- and copolymer backbones showed all the three chain end unsaturations (vinyl, vinylidene, and trans-vinylene). The postulated polymerization mechanisms reveal the underlying polymer chemistry. The results of the present study will contribute to develop in future supported metallocene catalysts that will be useful to synthesize polyethylene precursors having varying chain end unsaturations, which can be eventually used to prepare functional polyethylenes. [Figure not available: see fulltext.] © 2015 Indian Academy of Sciences.

  9. Scale-up of the Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT Polymerization Using Continuous Flow Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad Micic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A controlled radical polymerization process using the Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT approach was scaled up by a factor of 100 from a small laboratory scale of 5 mL to a preparative scale of 500 mL, using batch and continuous flow processing. The batch polymerizations were carried out in a series of different glass vessels, using either magnetic or overhead stirring, and different modes of heating: Microwave irradiation or conductive heating in an oil bath. The continuous process was conducted in a prototype tubular flow reactor, consisting of 6 mm ID stainless steel tubing, fitted with static mixers. Both reactor types were tested for polymerizations of the acid functional monomers acrylic acid and 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane-1-sulfonic acid in water at 80 °C with reaction times of 30 to 40 min. By monitoring the temperature during the exothermic polymerization process, it was observed that the type and size of reactor had a significant influence on the temperature profile of the reaction.

  10. A hermetic self-sustained microbial solar cell based on Chlorella vulgaris and a versatile charge transfer chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Keliang; Zhou, Peijiang

    2015-10-01

    A hermetic noble-metal-free membrane-less microbial solar cell (MSC) is established. The substances decomposition and regeneration in this MSC are carried out only by Chlorella vulgaris simultaneously. The conversion of metabolism types of C. vulgaris is controlled only by illumination. By using a pleiotropic redox mediator and a cupric hexacyanoferrate modified cathode, a two-phase three-stage charge transfer chain is formed. Through this pathway, the one microorganism self-sustained system gets a long-term power output up to 0.04773 mW/cm2 at 0.423 V without any material exchange with external, which is 50 times higher than that obtained from the original system. Benefiting from this electron buffer system, the battery will achieve an electricity generation in both light and dark conditions. There is almost no consumption of any substrates throughout the stabilized process, and no more additions are required. This maintenance-free and extremely inexpensive reactor with a simple structure and a long service life demonstrates the possibility of combining the microbial, chemical and photo cells.

  11. Xanthohumol induces generation of reactive oxygen species and triggers apoptosis through inhibition of mitochondrial electron transfer chain complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Chu, Wei; Wei, Peng; Liu, Ying; Wei, Taotao

    2015-12-01

    Xanthohumol is a prenylflavonoid extracted from hops (Humulus lupulus). It possesses anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities in vitro and in vivo, and offers therapeutic benefits for treatment of metabolic syndromes. However, the precise mechanisms underlying its pharmacological effects remain to be elucidated, together with its cellular target. Here, we provide evidence that xanthohumol directly interacts with the mitochondrial electron transfer chain complex I (NADH dehydrogenase), inhibits the oxidative phosphorylation, triggers the production of reactive oxygen species, and induces apoptosis. In addition, we show that as a result of the inhibition of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, xanthohumol exposure causes a rapid decrease of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Furthermore, we showed that xanthohumol up-regulates the glycolytic capacity in cells, and thus compensates cellular ATP generation. Dissection of the multiple steps of aerobic respiration by extracellular flux assays revealed that xanthohumol specifically inhibits the activity of mitochondrial complex I, but had little effect on that of complex II, III and IV. Inhibition of complex I by xanthohumol caused the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which are responsible for the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. We also found that isoxanthohumol, the structural isomer of xanthohumol, is inactive to cells, suggesting that the reactive 2-hydroxyl group of xanthohumol is crucial for its targeting to the mitochondrial complex I. Together, the remodeling of cell metabolism revealed here has therapeutic potential for the use of xanthohumol.

  12. Elimination of spin diffusion effects in saturation transfer experiments: application to hydrogen exchange in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Kristensen, Søren M; Led, Jens J

    2007-03-01

    The NMR saturation transfer experiment is widely used to characterize exchange processes in proteins that take place on the ms-s timescale. However, spin diffusion effects are inherently associated with the saturation transfer experiment and may overshadow the effect of the exchange processes of interest. As shown here, the effects from spin diffusion and exchange processes can be separated by varying the field strength of the saturation pulse, thereby allowing correct exchange rates to be obtained. The method is demonstrated using the hydrogen exchange process in the protein Escherichia coli thioredoxin as an example.

  13. A conserved endoplasmic reticulum membrane protein complex (EMC) facilitates phospholipid transfer from the ER to mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Sujoy; Chao, Jesse T; Tavassoli, Shabnam; Wong, Andrew K O; Choudhary, Vineet; Young, Barry P; Loewen, Christopher J R; Prinz, William A

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondrial membrane biogenesis and lipid metabolism require phospholipid transfer from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to mitochondria. Transfer is thought to occur at regions of close contact of these organelles and to be nonvesicular, but the mechanism is not known. Here we used a novel genetic screen in S. cerevisiae to identify mutants with defects in lipid exchange between the ER and mitochondria. We show that a strain missing multiple components of the conserved ER membrane protein complex (EMC) has decreased phosphatidylserine (PS) transfer from the ER to mitochondria. Mitochondria from this strain have significantly reduced levels of PS and its derivative phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Cells lacking EMC proteins and the ER-mitochondria tethering complex called ERMES (the ER-mitochondria encounter structure) are inviable, suggesting that the EMC also functions as a tether. These defects are corrected by expression of an engineered ER-mitochondrial tethering protein that artificially tethers the ER to mitochondria. EMC mutants have a significant reduction in the amount of ER tethered to mitochondria even though ERMES remained intact in these mutants, suggesting that the EMC performs an additional tethering function to ERMES. We find that all Emc proteins interact with the mitochondrial translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) complex protein Tom5 and this interaction is important for PS transfer and cell growth, suggesting that the EMC forms a tether by associating with the TOM complex. Together, our findings support that the EMC tethers ER to mitochondria, which is required for phospholipid synthesis and cell growth.

  14. Impact of glucose polymer chain length on heat and physical stability of milk protein-carbohydrate nutritional beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Biye; O'Mahony, James A

    2016-11-15

    This study investigated the impact of glucose polymer chain length on heat and physical stability of milk protein isolate (MPI)-carbohydrate nutritional beverages containing 8.5% w/w total protein and 5% w/w carbohydrate. The maltodextrin and corn syrup solids glucose polymers used had dextrose equivalent (DE) values of 17 or 38, respectively. Increasing DE value of the glucose polymers resulted in a greater increase in brown colour development, ionic calcium, protein particle size, apparent viscosity and pseudoplastic rheological behaviour, and greater reduction in pH, hydration and heat stability on sterilisation at 120°C. Incorporation of glucose polymers with MPI retarded sedimentation of protein during accelerated physical stability testing, with maltodextrin DE17 causing a greater reduction in sedimentation velocity and compressibility of sediment formed than corn syrup solids DE38. The results demonstrate that chain length of the glucose polymer used strongly impacts heat and physical stability of MPI-carbohydrate nutritional beverages.

  15. Specific Interactions of Neutral Side Chains of an Adsorbed Protein with the Surface of α-Quartz and Silica Gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odinokov, Alexey V; Bagaturyants, Alexander A

    2015-07-16

    Many key features of the protein adsorption on the silica surfaces still remain unraveled. One of the open questions is the interaction of nonpolar side chains with siloxane cavities. Here, we use nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations for the detailed investigation of the binding of several hydrophobic and amphiphilic protein side chains with silica surface. These interactions were found to be a possible driving force for protein adsorption. The free energy gain was larger for the disordered surface of amorphous silica gel as compared to α-quartz, but the impact depended on the type of amino acid. The dependence was analyzed from the structural point of view. For every amino acid an enthalpy-entropy compensation behavior was observed. These results confirm a hypothesis of an essential role of hydrophobic interactions in protein unfolding and irreversible adsorption on the silica surface.

  16. The Role of Short-Chain Conjugated Poly-(R-3-Hydroxybutyrate (cPHB in Protein Folding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosetta N. Reusch

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Poly-(R-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB, a linear polymer of R-3-hydroxybutyrate (R-3HB, is a fundamental constituent of biological cells. Certain prokaryotes accumulate PHB of very high molecular weight (10,000 to >1,000,000 residues, which is segregated within granular deposits in the cytoplasm; however, all prokaryotes and all eukaryotes synthesize PHB of medium-chain length (~100–200 residues which resides within lipid bilayers or lipid vesicles, and PHB of short-chain length (<12 residues which is conjugated to proteins (cPHB, primarily proteins in membranes and organelles. The physical properties of cPHB indicate it plays important roles in the targeting and folding of cPHB-proteins. Here we review the occurrence, physical properties and molecular characteristics of cPHB, and discuss its influence on the folding and structure of outer membrane protein A (OmpA of Escherichia coli.

  17. Effects of Opiates and HIV Proteins on Neurons: The Role of Ferritin Heavy Chain and a Potential for Synergism

    OpenAIRE

    Festa, Lindsay; Meucci, Olimpia

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and its associated proteins can have a profound impact on the central nervous system. Co-morbid abuse of opiates, such as morphine and heroin, is often associated with rapid disease progression and greater neurological dysfunction. The mechanisms by which HIV proteins and opiates cause neuronal damage on their own and together are unclear. The emergence of ferritin heavy chain (FHC) as a negative regulator of the chemokine receptor CXCR4, a co-receptor f...

  18. Characterization of threonine side chain dynamics in an antifreeze protein using natural abundance {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daley, Margaret E.; Sykes, Brian D. [University of Alberta, Department of Biochemistry, CIHR Group in Protein Structure and Function and Protein Engineering Network of Centres of Excellence (Canada)

    2004-06-15

    The dynamics of threonine side chains of the Tenebrio molitor antifreeze protein (TmAFP) were investigated using natural abundance {sup 13}C NMR. In TmAFP, the array of threonine residues on one face of the protein is responsible for conferring its ability to bind crystalline ice and inhibit its growth. Heteronuclear longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates and the {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C NOE were determined in this study. The C{alpha}H relaxation measurements were compared to the previously measured {sup 15}N backbone parameters and these are found to be in agreement. For the analysis of the threonine side chain motions, the model of restricted rotational diffusion about the {chi}{sub 1} dihedral angle was employed [London and Avitabile (1978) J. Am. Chem. Soc., 100, 7159-7165]. We demonstrate that the motion experienced by the ice binding threonine side chains is highly restricted, with an approximate upper limit of less than {+-}25 deg.

  19. [Long-range electron transfer in globular proteins by polaron excitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhno, V L; Chuev, G N

    1997-01-01

    Considering polaron model, we have calculated an electron state localized in the protein heme. Using these calculations: the electron density and electron energy, we estimated the self-exchange rate constant for cyt c (horse heart), its reorganization energy, matrix element, and dependence of this rate on the distance between hemes. The results are compared with the experimental data and other theoretical estimations. We discuss the role of polaron excitations in the long-range electron transfer in globular proteins.

  20. Falling chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chun Wa; Yasui, Kosuke

    2006-06-01

    The one-dimensional fall of a folded chain with one end suspended from a rigid support and a chain falling from a resting heap on a table is studied. Because their Lagrangians contain no explicit time dependence, the falling chains are conservative systems. Their equations of motion are shown to contain a term that enforces energy conservation when masses are transferred between subchains. We show that Cayley's 1857 energy nonconserving solution for a chain falling from a resting heap is incorrect because it neglects the energy gained when a link leaves a subchain. The maximum chain tension measured by Calkin and March for the falling folded chain is given a simple if rough interpretation. Other aspects of the falling folded chain are briefly discussed.

  1. BRET: NanoLuc-Based Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer Platform to Monitor Protein-Protein Interactions in Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Xiu-Lei; Fu, Haian

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) is a prominent biophysical technology for monitoring molecular interactions, and has been widely used to study protein-protein interactions (PPI) in live cells. This technology requires proteins of interest to be associated with an energy donor (i.e., luciferase) and an acceptor (e.g., fluorescent protein) molecule. Upon interaction of the proteins of interest, the donor and acceptor will be brought into close proximity and energy transfer of chemical reaction-induced luminescence to its corresponding acceptor will result in an increased emission at an acceptor-defined wavelength, generating the BRET signal. We leverage the advantages of the superior optical properties of the NanoLuc(®) luciferase (NLuc) as a BRET donor coupled with Venus, a yellow fluorescent protein, as acceptor. We term this NLuc-based BRET platform "BRET(n)". BRET(n) has been demonstrated to have significantly improved assay performance, compared to previous BRET technologies, in terms of sensitivity and scalability. This chapter describes a step-by-step practical protocol for developing a BRET(n) assay in a multi-well plate format to detect PPIs in live mammalian cells.

  2. LoCo: a novel main chain scoring function for protein structure prediction based on local coordinates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samudrala Ram

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successful protein structure prediction requires accurate low-resolution scoring functions so that protein main chain conformations that are close to the native can be identified. Once that is accomplished, a more detailed and time-consuming treatment to produce all-atom models can be undertaken. The earliest low-resolution scoring used simple distance-based "contact potentials," but more recently, the relative orientations of interacting amino acids have been taken into account to improve performance. Results We developed a new knowledge-based scoring function, LoCo, that locates the interaction partners of each individual residue within a local coordinate system based only on the position of its main chain N, Cα and C atoms. LoCo was trained on a large set of experimentally determined structures and optimized using standard sets of modeled structures, or "decoys." No structure used to train or optimize the function was included among those used to test it. When tested against 29 other published main chain functions on a group of 77 commonly used decoy sets, our function outperformed all others in Cα RMSD rank of the best-scoring decoy, with statistically significant p-values Conclusions Our function demonstrates an unmatched combination of accuracy, speed, and simplicity and shows excellent promise for protein structure prediction. Broader applications may include protein-protein interactions and protein design.

  3. Effects of cloud-point grafting, chain length, and density of PEG layers on competitive adsorption of ocular proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kingshott, P.; Thissen, H.; Griesser, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of pinning density, chain length, and 'cloud point' (CP) versus non-CP grafting conditions have been studied on the ability of polyethylene glycol (PEG) layers to minimize adsorption from a multicomponent (lysozyme, human serum albumin (HSA), IgG and lactoferrin) protein solution. Met...

  4. DISTRIBUTION OF GBM HEPARAN-SULFATE PROTEOGLYCAN CORE PROTEIN AND SIDE-CHAINS IN HUMAN GLOMERULAR-DISEASES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENBORN, J; VANDENHEUVEL, LPWJ; BAKKER, MAH; VEERKAMP, JH; ASSMANN, KJM; WEENING, JJ; BERDEN, JHM

    1993-01-01

    Using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing either the core protein or the heparan sulfate (HS) side chain of human GBM heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG), we investigated their glomerular distribution on cryostat sections of human kidney tissues. The study involved 95 biopsies comprising twelve

  5. Handling of human short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) variant proteins in transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Peter M; Pedersen, Christina B; Schmidt, Stine P;

    2007-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the in vivo handling of human short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) variant proteins, three transgenic mouse lines were produced by pronuclear injection of cDNA encoding the wild-type, hSCAD-wt, and two disease causing folding variants hSCAD-319C > T and hSCAD-625G > A...

  6. Attenuating HIV Tat/TAR-mediated protein expression by exploring the side chain length of positively charged residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Hsun; Chen, Yi-Ping; Liu, Shing-Lung; Chien, Fan-Ching; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Cheng, Richard P

    2015-12-07

    RNA is a drug target involved in diverse cellular functions and viral processes. Molecules that inhibit the HIV TAR RNA-Tat protein interaction may attenuate Tat/TAR-dependent protein expression and potentially serve as anti-HIV therapeutics. By incorporating positively charged residues with mixed side chain lengths, we designed peptides that bind TAR RNA with enhanced intracellular activity. Tat-derived peptides that were individually substituted with positively charged residues with varying side chain lengths were evaluated for TAR RNA binding. Positively charged residues with different side chain lengths were incorporated at each Arg and Lys position in the Tat-derived peptide to enhance TAR RNA binding. The resulting peptides showed enhanced TAR RNA binding affinity, cellular uptake, nuclear localization, proteolytic resistance, and inhibition of intracellular Tat/TAR-dependent protein expression compared to the parent Tat-derived peptide with no cytotoxicity. Apparently, the enhanced inhibition of protein expression by these peptides was not determined by RNA binding affinity, but by proteolytic resistance. Despite the high TAR binding affinity, a higher binding specificity would be necessary for practical purposes. Importantly, altering the positively charged residue side chain length should be a viable strategy to generate potentially useful RNA-targeting bioactive molecules.

  7. Linker proteins enable ultrafast excitation energy transfer in the phycobilisome antenna system of Thermosynechococcus vulcanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nganou, C; David, L; Adir, N; Mkandawire, M

    2016-01-01

    We applied a femtosecond flash method, using induced transient absorption changes, to obtain a time-resolved view of excitation energy transfer in intact phycobilisomes of Thermosynechococcus vulcanus at room temperature. Our measurement of an excitation energy transfer rate of 888 fs in phycobilisomes shows the existence of ultrafast kinetics along the phycocyanin rod subcomplex to the allophycocyanin core that is faster than expected for previous excitation energy transfer based on Förster theory in phycobilisomes. Allophycocyanin in the core further transfers energy to the terminal emitter(s) in 17 ps. In the phycobilisome, rod doublets composed of hexameric phycocyanin discs and internal linker proteins are arranged in a parallel fashion, facilitating direct rod-rod interactions. Excitonic splitting likely drives rod absorption at 635 nm as a result of strong coupling between β84 chromophores (20 ± 1 Å) in adjacent hexamers. In comparison to the absorbance of the phycobilisome antenna system of the cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina, which possesses a single rod structure, the linkers in T. vulcanus rods induce a 17 nm red shift in the absorbance spectrum. Furthermore, the kinetics of 888 fs indicates that the presence of the linker protein induces ultrafast excitation energy transfer between phycocyanin and allophycocyanin inside the phycobilisome, which is faster than all previous excitation energy transfer in phycobilisome subunits or sub-complexes reported to date.

  8. Outer Membrane Protein Folding and Topology from a Computational Transfer Free Energy Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Meishan; Gessmann, Dennis; Naveed, Hammad; Liang, Jie

    2016-03-02

    Knowledge of the transfer free energy of amino acids from aqueous solution to a lipid bilayer is essential for understanding membrane protein folding and for predicting membrane protein structure. Here we report a computational approach that can calculate the folding free energy of the transmembrane region of outer membrane β-barrel proteins (OMPs) by combining an empirical energy function with a reduced discrete state space model. We quantitatively analyzed the transfer free energies of 20 amino acid residues at the center of the lipid bilayer of OmpLA. Our results are in excellent agreement with the experimentally derived hydrophobicity scales. We further exhaustively calculated the transfer free energies of 20 amino acids at all positions in the TM region of OmpLA. We found that the asymmetry of the Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane as well as the TM residues of an OMP determine its functional fold in vivo. Our results suggest that the folding process of an OMP is driven by the lipid-facing residues in its hydrophobic core, and its NC-IN topology is determined by the differential stabilities of OMPs in the asymmetrical outer membrane. The folding free energy is further reduced by lipid A and assisted by general depth-dependent cooperativities that exist between polar and ionizable residues. Moreover, context-dependency of transfer free energies at specific positions in OmpLA predict regions important for protein function as well as structural anomalies. Our computational approach is fast, efficient and applicable to any OMP.

  9. Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP) genotype and cognitive function in persons aged 35 years or older

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Izaks, Gerbrand J.; van der Knaap, Aafke M.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Navis, Gerjan; Slaets, Joris P. J.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    2012-01-01

    Common polymorphisms of the Cholestryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP) gene may predict lower risk of cognitive decline. We investigated the association of cognitive function with CETP genotype in a population-based cohort of 4135 persons aged 35-82 years. Cognitive function was measured with the Ruff

  10. Assessment of natural variability of maize lipid transfer protein using a validated sandwich ELISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipid transfer protein (LTP) is the main causative agent for rare food allergic reactions to maize. This report describes a new, validated ELISA that accurately measures LTP concentrations from 0.2 to 6.4 ng/ml. The levels of LTP ranged from 171 to 865 µg/g grain, a 5.1 fold differences, across a ...

  11. Electron transfer patterns of the di-heme protein cytochrome c(4) from Pseudomonas stutzeri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffalt, Anders Christer; Schmidt, L.; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager;

    2009-01-01

    We report kinetic data for the two-step electron transfer (ET) oxidation and reduction of the two-domain di-heme redox protein Pseudomonas stutzeri cytochrome (cyt) c(4) by [Co(bipy)(3)](2- 3-) (bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine). Following earlier reports, the data accord with both bi- and tri-exponential ...

  12. Modifier Genes for Mouse Phosphatidylinositol Transfer Protein alpha (vibrator) That Bypass Juvenile Lethality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Concepcion, Dorothy; Johannes, Frank; Lo, Yuan Hung; Yao, Jay; Fong, Jerry; Hamilton, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITPs) mediate lipid signaling and membrane trafficking in eukaryotic cells. Loss-of-function mutations of the gene encoding PITP alpha in mice result in a range of dosage-sensitive phenotypes, including neurological dysfunction, neurodegeneration, and prematu

  13. Reduced leucocyte cholesteryl ester transfer protein expression in acute coronary syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, D; Kraaijeveld, A O; Grauss, R W; Willems, S M; van Vark-van der Zee, L C; de Jager, S C A; Jauhiainen, M; Kuivenhoven, J A; Dallinga-Thie, G M; Atsma, D E; Hogendoorn, P C W; Biessen, E A L; Van Berkel, T J C; Jukema, J W; van Eck, M

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) plays an important role in HDL cholesterol metabolism. Leucocytes, including monocyte-derived macrophages in the arterial wall synthesize and secrete CETP, but its role in atherosclerosis is unclear. The aim of the current study was to investigate

  14. Long-range protein electron transfer observed at the single-molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Qijin; Farver, Ole; Ulstrup, Jens

    2005-01-01

    A biomimetic long-range electron transfer (ET) system consisting of the blue copper protein azurin, a tunneling barrier bridge, and a gold single-crystal electrode was designed on the basis of molecular wiring self-assembly principles. This system is sufficiently stable and sensitive in a quasi...

  15. A donor-acceptor pair for the real time study of vibrational energy transfer in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Werkmeister, Henrike M; Bredenbeck, Jens

    2014-02-21

    Vibrational energy transfer (VET) is believed to play an important role in protein function. Theoretical studies predict highly directional, anisotropic VET in proteins. Distinct energy transfer pathways which connect distant functional sites in proteins have been proposed by simulations, indicating a function in allosteric communication. Experimental evidence for such pathways, however, is lacking. In small molecules, ultrafast vibrational pump-probe spectroscopy has been used to investigate VET between different parts of a molecule in great detail. Here, we address the requirements for extending this powerful approach to proteins and present a protein-compatible donor-acceptor pair for the real time investigation of VET. This VET pair consists of two non-native amino acids, β-(1-azulenyl)-alanine and azidohomoalanine, which can be positioned site-specifically and are found to be very well suited for spectroscopic studies of VET. Important for the study of proteins, co-translational incorporation of each of the amino acids has been demonstrated before using mutually independent approaches of protein engineering. We investigated the performance of the proposed VET pair in a model peptide which is designed to contain additional characteristic vibrational modes frequently used in infrared spectroscopy of proteins. Despite a larger inter-residue distance, we find that our VET acceptor generates a major signal that is easily observed compared to the other vibrational modes in the congested parts of the spectrum. We find sufficient signal size at concentrations compatible with proteins and over distances that will allow tracking of energy flow along predicted transfer pathways.

  16. Attenuation of the protein wasting associated with bed rest by branched-chain amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, T. P.; Schluter, M. D.; Leskiw, M. J.; Boden, G.

    1999-01-01

    Bed rest is generally accepted as being an appropriate ground-based model for human spaceflight. The objectives of this study were to test the hypothesis that increasing the amount of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) in the diet could attenuate the protein loss associated with bed rest. Nineteen healthy subjects were randomized into two groups according to diet. During the 6 d of bed rest, the diets were supplemented with either 30 mmol/d each of three non-essential amino acids, glycine, serine, and alanine (control group), or with 30 mmol/d each of the BCAAs, leucine, isoleucine, and valine (BCAA group). Nutrition was supplied as a commercially available defined formula diet at a rate of 1.3 x REE. Nitrogen (N) balance and urinary 3-MeH excretion were determined for the 6 d. In our results, the urine-based estimate of N balance was 22.2 +/- 14.4 (n = 9) mg N.kg-1.d-1 and 60.5 +/- 10.1 mg (n = 8) N.kg-1.d-1 for the control and BCAA-supplemented groups, respectively (P BCAA supplementation attenuates the N loss during short-term bed rest.

  17. Isolation of BNYVV coat protein-specific single chain Fv from a mouse phage library antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahromi, Zahra Moghaddassi; Salmanian, Ali Hatef; Rastgoo, Nasrin; Arbabi, Mehdi

    2009-10-01

    Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) infects sugar beet plants worldwide and is responsible for the rhizomania disease and severe economic losses. Disease severity and lack of naturally occurring resistant plants make it very difficult to control the virus, both from epidemiological and economic standpoints. Therefore, early detection is vital to impose hygiene restrictions and prevent further spread of the virus in the field. Immunoassays are one of the most popular methodologies for the primary identification of plant pathogens including BNYVV since they are robust, sensitive, fast, and inexpensive. In this study, the major coat protein (CP21) of BNYVV was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Thereafter, mice were immunized with purified CP21 and a phage antibody library was constructed from their PCR-amplified immunoglobulin repertoire. Following filamentous phage rescue of the library and four rounds of panning against recombinant CP21 antigen, several specific single chain Fv fragments were isolated and characterized. This approach may pave the way to develop novel immunoassays for a rapid detection of viral infection. Moreover, it will likely provide essential tools to establish antibody-mediated resistant transgenic technology in sugar beet plants.

  18. Branched-chain Amino Acid Biosensing Using Fluorescent Modified Engineered Leucine/Isoleucine/Valine Binding Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Sode

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel fluorescence sensing system for branched-chain amino acids (BCAAswas developed based on engineered leucine/isoleucine/valine-binding proteins (LIVBPsconjugated with environmentally sensitive fluorescence probes. LIVBP was cloned fromEscherichia coli and Gln149Cys, Gly227Cys, and Gln254Cys mutants were generated bygenetic engineering. The mutant LIVBPs were then modified with environmentallysensitive fluorophores. Based on the fluorescence intensity change observed upon thebinding of the ligands, the MIANS-conjugated Gln149Cys mutant (Gln149Cys-M showedthe highest and most sensitive response. The BCAAs Leu, Ile, and Val can each bemonitored at the sub-micromolar level using Gln149Cys-M. Measurements were alsocarried out on a mixture of BCAFAs and revealed that Gln149Cys-M-based measurementis not significantly affected by the change in the molar ratio of Leu, Ile and Val in thesample. Its high sensitivity and group-specific molecular recognition ability make the newsensing system ideally suited for the measurement of BCAAs and the determination of theFischer ratio, an indicator of hepatic disease involving metabolic dysfunction.

  19. Attenuation of the protein wasting associated with bed rest by branched-chain amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, T. P.; Schluter, M. D.; Leskiw, M. J.; Boden, G.

    1999-01-01

    Bed rest is generally accepted as being an appropriate ground-based model for human spaceflight. The objectives of this study were to test the hypothesis that increasing the amount of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) in the diet could attenuate the protein loss associated with bed rest. Nineteen healthy subjects were randomized into two groups according to diet. During the 6 d of bed rest, the diets were supplemented with either 30 mmol/d each of three non-essential amino acids, glycine, serine, and alanine (control group), or with 30 mmol/d each of the BCAAs, leucine, isoleucine, and valine (BCAA group). Nutrition was supplied as a commercially available defined formula diet at a rate of 1.3 x REE. Nitrogen (N) balance and urinary 3-MeH excretion were determined for the 6 d. In our results, the urine-based estimate of N balance was 22.2 +/- 14.4 (n = 9) mg N.kg-1.d-1 and 60.5 +/- 10.1 mg (n = 8) N.kg-1.d-1 for the control and BCAA-supplemented groups, respectively (P < 0.05). Urinary 3-MeH excretion was unchanged in both groups with bed rest. We conclude that BCAA supplementation attenuates the N loss during short-term bed rest.

  20. Case studies of aerosol and ocean color retrieval using a Markov chain radiative transfer model and AirMSPI measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, F.; Diner, D. J.; Seidel, F. C.; Dubovik, O.; Zhai, P.

    2014-12-01

    A vector Markov chain radiative transfer method was developed for forward modeling of radiance and polarization fields in a coupled atmosphere-ocean system. The method was benchmarked against an independent Successive Orders of Scattering code and linearized through the use of Jacobians. Incorporated with the multi-patch optimization algorithm and look-up-table method, simultaneous aerosol and ocean color retrievals were performed using imagery acquired by the Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) when it was operated in step-and-stare mode with 9 viewing angles ranging between ±67°. Data from channels near 355, 380, 445, 470*, 555, 660*, and 865* nm were used in the retrievals, where the asterisk denotes the polarimetric bands. Retrievals were run for AirMSPI overflights over Southern California and Monterey Bay, CA. For the relatively high aerosol optical depth (AOD) case (~0.28 at 550 nm), the retrieved aerosol concentration, size distribution, water-leaving radiance, and chlorophyll concentration were compared to those reported by the USC SeaPRISM AERONET-OC site off the coast of Southern California on 6 February 2013. For the relatively low AOD case (~0.08 at 550 nm), the retrieved aerosol concentration and size distribution were compared to those reported by the Monterey Bay AERONET site on 28 April 2014. Further, we evaluate the benefits of multi-angle and polarimetric observations by performing the retrievals using (a) all view angles and channels; (b) all view angles but radiances only (no polarization); (c) the nadir view angle only with both radiance and polarization; and (d) the nadir view angle without polarization. Optimized retrievals using different initial guesses were performed to provide a measure of retrieval uncertainty. Removal of multi-angular or polarimetric information resulted in increases in both parameter uncertainty and systematic bias. Potential accuracy improvements afforded by applying constraints on the surface

  1. Kinetic analysis of the effect of HIV nucleocapsid protein (NCp) on internal strand transfer reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, A; DeStefano, J J

    1999-04-20

    The mechanism of HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) catalyzed strand transfer synthesis (i.e., switching of the primer to a new template) from internal regions on RNA templates in the presence and absence of HIV nucleocapsid protein (NCp) was investigated. Two different systems each consisting of DNA-primed RNA donor (on which primer extension initiated) and acceptor (to which DNAs initiated on the donor could transfer) templates were used to determine kinetic parameters of strand transfer. The donor and acceptor shared an internal region of homology where homologous strand transfer could occur. The rate of strand transfer at various acceptor concentrations was determined by monitoring the production of transfer products over time. These rates were used to construct Lineweaver-Burk plots. In each system, NCp increased the Vmax about 3-fold while the Km for acceptor template was decreased severalfold. NCp's effects on RT extension ranged from no effect to inhibition depending on the primer-template used. The lowered Km shows that NCp increases the affinity of the acceptor template for the transferring DNA. Vmax increases despite the inhibition of RT extension. The increased Vmax implies a stimulatory mechanism that cannot be mimicked by high acceptor concentrations. Therefore, NCp does not act by merely increasing the effective concentration of nucleic acids.

  2. Structure–function–folding relationships and native energy landscape of dynein light chain protein: nuclear magnetic resonance insights

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P M Krishna Mohan; Ramakrishna V Hosur

    2009-09-01

    The detailed characterization of the structure, dynamics and folding process of a protein is crucial for understanding the biological functions it performs. Modern biophysical and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques have provided a way to obtain accurate structural and thermodynamic information on various species populated on the energy landscape of a given protein. In this context, we review here the structure–function–folding relationship of an important protein, namely, dynein light chain protein (DLC8). DLC8, the smallest subunit of the dynein motor complex, acts as a cargo adaptor. The protein exists as a dimer under physiological conditions and dissociates into a pure monomer below pH 4. Cargo binding occurs at the dimer interface. Dimer stability and relay of perturbations through the dimer interface are anticipated to be playing crucial roles in the variety of functions the protein performs. NMR investigations have provided great insights into these aspects of DLC8 in recent years.

  3. Analysis of Native-Like Proteins and Protein Complexes Using Cation to Anion Proton Transfer Reactions (CAPTR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laszlo, Kenneth J.; Bush, Matthew F.

    2015-12-01

    Mass spectra of native-like protein complexes often exhibit narrow charge-state distributions, broad peaks, and contributions from multiple, coexisting species. These factors can make it challenging to interpret those spectra, particularly for mixtures with significant heterogeneity. Here we demonstrate the use of ion/ion proton transfer reactions to reduce the charge states of m/ z-selected, native-like ions of proteins and protein complexes, a technique that we refer to as cation to anion proton transfer reactions (CAPTR). We then demonstrate that CAPTR can increase the accuracy of charge state assignments and the resolution of interfering species in native mass spectrometry. The CAPTR product ion spectra for pyruvate kinase exhibit ~30 peaks and enable unambiguous determination of the charge state of each peak, whereas the corresponding precursor spectra exhibit ~6 peaks and the assigned charge states have an uncertainty of ±3%. 15+ bovine serum albumin and 21+ yeast enolase dimer both appear near m/ z 4450 and are completely unresolved in a mixture. After a single CAPTR event, the resulting product ions are baseline resolved. The separation of the product ions increases dramatically after each subsequent CAPTR event; 12 events resulted in a 3000-fold improvement in separation relative to the precursor ions. Finally, we introduce a framework for interpreting and predicting the figures of merit for CAPTR experiments. More generally, these results suggest that CAPTR strongly complements other mass spectrometry tools for analyzing proteins and protein complexes, particularly those in mixtures.

  4. Restricted mobility of side chains on concave surfaces of solenoid proteins may impart heightened potential for intermolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramya, L; Gautham, N; Chaloin, Laurent; Kajava, Andrey V

    2015-09-01

    Significant progress has been made in the determination of the protein structures with their number today passing over a hundred thousand structures. The next challenge is the understanding and prediction of protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions. In this work we address this problem by analyzing curved solenoid proteins. Many of these proteins are considered as "hub molecules" for their high potential to interact with many different molecules and to be a scaffold for multisubunit protein machineries. Our analysis of these structures through molecular dynamics simulations reveals that the mobility of the side-chains on the concave surfaces of the solenoids is lower than on the convex ones. This result provides an explanation to the observed preferential binding of the ligands, including small and flexible ligands, to the concave surface of the curved solenoid proteins. The relationship between the landscapes and dynamic properties of the protein surfaces can be further generalized to the other types of protein structures and eventually used in the computer algorithms, allowing prediction of protein-ligand interactions by analysis of protein surfaces.

  5. Transfer of noncovalent chiral information along an optically inactive helical peptide chain: allosteric control of asymmetry of the C-terminal site by external molecule that binds to the N-terminal site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ousaka, Naoki; Inai, Yoshihito

    2009-02-20

    This study aims at demonstrating end-to-end transfer of noncovalent chiral information along a peptide chain. The domino-type induction of helical sense is proven by using achiral peptides 1-m of bis-chromophoric sequence with different chain lengths: H-(Aib-Delta(Z)Phe)(m)-(Aib-Delta(Z)Bip)(2)-Aib-OCH(3) [m = 2, 4, and 6; Aib = alpha-aminoisobutyric acid; Delta(Z)Phe = (Z)-alpha,beta-didehydrophenylalanine; Delta(Z)Bip = (Z)-beta-(4,4'-biphenyl)-alpha,beta-didehydroalanine]. They all showed the tendency to adopt a 3(10)-helix. Whereas peptide 1-m originally shows no circular dichroism (CD) signals, marked CD signals were induced at around 270-320 nm based on both the beta-aryl didehydroresidues by chiral Boc-proline (Boc = tert-butoxycarbonyl). The observed CD spectra were interpreted on the basis of the exciton chirality method and theoretical CD simulation of several helical conformations that were energy-minimized. The experimental and theoretical CD analysis reveals that Boc-l-proline induces the preference for a right-handed helicity in the whole chain of 1-m. Such noncovalent chiral induction was not observed in the corresponding N-terminally protected 1-m. Obviously, helicity induction in 1-m originates from the binding of Boc-proline to the N-terminal site. In the 17-mer (1-6), the information of helix sense reaches the 16th residue from the N-terminus. We have monitored precise transfer of noncovalent chiral stimulus along a helical peptide chain. The present study also proposes a primitive allosteric model of a single protein-mimicking backbone. Here chiral molecule binding the N-terminal site of 1-6 controls the chiroptical signals and helical sense of the C-terminal site about 30 A away.

  6. Falling chains

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, C W; Wong, Chun Wa; Yasui, Kosuke

    2006-01-01

    The one-dimensional falling motion of a bungee chain suspended from a rigid support and of a chain falling from a resting heap on a table is studied. Their Lagrangians are found to contain no explicit time dependence. As a result, these falling chains are conservative systems. Each of their Lagrange's equations of motion is shown to contain a term that enforces energy conservation when masses are transferred between subchains. We show in particular that Cayley's 1857 energy nonconserving solution for a chain falling from a resting heap is incorrect because it neglects the energy gained when the transferred link is emitted by the emitting subchain. The maximum chain tension measured by Calkin and March for the falling bungee chain is given a simple if rough interpretation. In the simplified one-dimensional treatment, the kinetic energy of the center of mass of the falling bungee chain is found to be converted by the chain tension at the rigid support into the internal kinetic energy of the chain. However, as t...

  7. Ameliorated stress related proteins are associated with improved cardiac function by sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase gene transfer in heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Qing Fu; Xiao-Ying Li; Xiao-Chun Lu; Ya-Fei Mi; Tao Liu; Wei-Hua Ye

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies showed that overexpression of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA2a) in a variety of heart failure (HF) models was associated with greatly enhanced cardiac performance. However, it still undefined the effect of SERCA2a overexpression on the systemic inflammatory response and neuro-hormonal factors. Methods A rapid right ventricular pacing model of experimental HF was used in beagles. Then the animals underwent recombinant adeno-associated virus 1 (rAAV1) mediated gene transfection by direct intra-myocardium injection. HF animals were randomized to receive the SERCA2a gene, enhanced green fluorescent protein (control) gene, or equivalent phosphate buffered saline. Thirty days after gene delivery, the cardiac function was evaluated by echocardiographic testing. The protein level of SERCA2a was measured by western blotting. The proteomic analysis of left ventricular (LV) sample was determined using two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS. The serum levels of the systemic inflammatory and neuro-hormonal factors were assayed using radioimmunoassay kits. Results The cardiac function improved after SERCA- 2a gene transfer due to the significantly increased SERCA2a protein level. Beagles treated with SERCA2a had significantly decreased serum levels of the inflammatory markers (interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α) and neuro-hormonal factors (brain natriuretic peptide, endothelin-1 and angiotensin Ⅱ) compared with HF animals. The myocardial proteomic analysis showed that haptoglobin heavy chain, heat shock protein (alpha-crystallin-related, B6) were down-regulated, and galectin-1 was up-regulated in SERCA2a group compared with HF group, companied by up-regulated contractile proteins and NADH dehydrogenase. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that regional intramyocardial injections of rAAV1-SERCA2a vectors may improve global LV function, correlating with reverse activation of the systemic inflammatory

  8. Selected proteins of "prostasome-like particles" from epididymal cauda fluid are transferred to epididymal caput spermatozoa in bull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenette, Gilles; Lessard, Carl; Sullivan, Robert

    2002-07-01

    During epididymal transit, spermatozoa acquire selected proteins secreted by epithelial cells. We recently showed that P25b, a protein with predictive properties for bull fertility, is transferred from prostasome-like particles present in the cauda epididymal fluid (PLPCd) to the sperm surface. To further characterize the interactions between PLPCd and epididymal spermatozoa, PLPCd were prepared by ultracentrifugation of bull epididymal fluid, then surface-exposed proteins were biotinylated and coincubated in different conditions with caput epididymal spermatozoa. Western blot analysis revealed that only selected proteins are transferred from PLPCd to spermatozoa. MALDI-TOF analysis revealed that these transferred proteins are closely related. The pattern of distribution of the PLPCd transferred varied from one sperm cell to the other, with a bias toward the acrosomal cap. This transfer appeared to be temperature sensitive, being more efficient at 32-37 degrees C than at 22 degrees C. Transfer of PLPCd proteins to spermatozoa was also pH dependant, the optimal pH for transfer being 6.0-6.5. The effect of divalent cations on PLPCd protein transfer to caput spermatozoa was investigated. Whereas Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) have no effect on the amount of proteins remaining associated with spermatozoa following coincubation, Zn(2+) had a beneficial effect. These results are discussed with regard to the function of PLPCd in epididymal sperm maturation.

  9. Unraveling the electron transfer processes of a nanowire protein from Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Mónica N; Fernandes, Ana P; Salgueiro, Carlos A; Paquete, Catarina M

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular electron transfer metabolism of Geobacter sulfurreducens is sustained by several multiheme c-type cytochromes. One of these is the dodecaheme cytochrome GSU1996 that belongs to a new sub-class of c-type cytochromes. GSU1996 is composed by four similar triheme domains (A–D). The C-terminal half of the molecule encompasses the domains C and D, which are connected by a small linker and the N-terminal half of the protein contains two domains (A and B) that form one structural unit. It was proposed that this protein works as an electrically conductive device in G. sulfurreducens, transferring electrons within the periplasm or to outer-membrane cytochromes. In this work, a novel strategy was applied to characterize in detail the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the hexaheme fragment CD of GSU1996. This characterization revealed the electron transfer process of GSU1996 for the first time, showing that a heme at the edge of the C-terminal of the protein is thermodynamic and kinetically competent to receive electrons from physiological redox partners. This information contributes towards understanding how this new sub-class of cytochromes functions as nanowires, and also increases the current knowledge of the extracellular electron transfer mechanisms in G. sulfurreducens.

  10. Calibration chain design based on integrating sphere transfer radiometer for SI-traceable on-orbit spectral radiometric calibration and its uncertainty analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei-Ning; Fang, Wei; Sun, Li-Wei; Cui, Li-Hong; Wang, Yu-Peng

    2016-09-01

    In order to satisfy the requirement of SI-traceable on-orbit absolute radiation calibration transfer with high accuracy for satellite remote sensors, a transfer chain consisting of a fiber coupling monochromator (FBM) and an integrating sphere transfer radiometer (ISTR) was designed in this paper. Depending on the Sun, this chain based on detectors provides precise spectral radiometric calibration and measurement to spectrometers in the reflective solar band (RSB) covering 300-2500 nm with a spectral bandwidth of 0.5-6 nm. It shortens the traditional chain based on lamp source and reduces the calibration uncertainty from 5% to 0.5% by using the cryogenic radiometer in space as a radiometric benchmark and trap detectors as secondary standard. This paper also gives a detailed uncertainty budget with reasonable distribution of each impact factor, including the weak spectral signal measurement with uncertainty of 0.28%. According to the peculiar design and comprehensive uncertainty analysis, it illustrates that the spectral radiance measurement uncertainty of the ISTR system can reach to 0.48%. The result satisfies the requirements of SI-traceable on-orbit calibration and has wider significance for expanding the application of the remote sensing data with high-quality. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41474161) and the National High-Technology Program of China (Grant No. 2015AA123703).

  11. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttitta, Christina M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); The City University of New York, 2800 Victory Boulevard, Staten Island, NY 10314 (United States); Ericson, Daniel L. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); University at Buffalo, SUNY, 12 Capen Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Scalia, Alexander [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Binghamton University, 4400 Vestal Parkway East, Binghamton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Roessler, Christian G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Teplitsky, Ella [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5215 (United States); Joshi, Karan [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); PEC University of Technology, Chandigarh (India); Campos, Olven [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33414 (United States); Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Orville, Allen M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S., E-mail: soares@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic high-throughput screening method is described for harvesting protein crystals and combining the protein crystals with chemicals such as a fragment library. Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s{sup −1}) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  12. How anacetrapib inhibits the activity of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein? Perspective through atomistic simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aijanen, T.; Koivuniemi, A.; Javanainen, M.

    2014-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the reciprocal transfer of neutral lipids (cholesteryl esters, triglycerides) and phospholipids between different lipoprotein fractions in human blood plasma. A novel molecular agent known as anacetrapib has been shown to inhibit CETP activity...... of anacetrapib turns out to reside in the tunnel inside CETP, near the residues surrounding the N-terminal opening. Free energy calculations show that when anacetrapib resides in this area, it hinders the ability of cholesteryl ester to diffuse out from CETP. The simulations further bring out the ability...

  13. Effects of opiates and HIV proteins on neurons: the role of ferritin heavy chain and a potential for synergism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festa, Lindsay; Meucci, Olimpia

    2012-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and its associated proteins can have a profound impact on the central nervous system. Co-morbid abuse of opiates, such as morphine and heroin, is often associated with rapid disease progression and greater neurological dysfunction. The mechanisms by which HIV proteins and opiates cause neuronal damage on their own and together are unclear. The emergence of ferritin heavy chain (FHC) as a negative regulator of the chemokine receptor CXCR4, a co-receptor for HIV, may prove to be important in elucidating the interaction between HIV proteins and opiates. This review summarizes our current knowledge of central nervous system damage inflicted by HIV and opiates, as well as the regulation of CXCR4 by opiate-induced changes in FHC protein levels. We propose that HIV proteins and opiates exhibit an additive or synergistic effect on FHC/CXCR4, thereby decreasing neuronal signaling and function.

  14. Identification of phosphatidylcholine transfer protein-like in the parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piña-Vázquez, Carolina; Reyes-López, Magda; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Bermúdez-Cruz, Rosa María; de la Garza, Mireya

    2014-12-01

    Caveolin is the protein marker of caveola-mediated endocytosis. Previously, we demonstrated by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence that an anti-chick embryo caveolin-1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) recognizes a protein in amoeba extracts. Nevertheless, the caveolin-1 gene is absent in the Entamoeba histolytica genome database. In this work, the goal was to isolate, identify and characterize the protein that cross-reacts with chick embryo caveolin-1. We identified the protein using a proteomic approach, and the complete gene was cloned and sequenced. The identified protein, E. histolytica phosphatidylcholine transfer protein-like (EhPCTP-L), is a member of the StAR-related lipid transfer (START) protein superfamily. The human homolog binds and transfers phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) between model membranes in vitro; however, the physiological role of PCTP-L remains elusive. Studies in silico showed that EhPCTP-L has a central START domain and also contains a C-terminal intrinsically disordered region. The anti-rEhPCTP-L antibody demonstrated that EhPCTP-L is found in the plasma membrane and cytosol, which is in agreement with previous reports on the human counterpart. This result points to the plasma membrane as one possible target membrane for EhPCTP-L. Furthermore, assays using filipin and nystatin showed down regulation of EhPCTP-L, in an apparently cholesterol-independent way. Interestingly, EhPCTP-L binds primarily to anionic phospholipids phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidic acid (PA), while its mammalian counterpart HsPCTP-L binds neutral phospholipids PC and PE. The present study provides information that helps reveal the possible function and regulation of PCTP-L expression in the primitive eukaryotic parasite E. histolytica.

  15. First isolation and antinociceptive activity of a lipid transfer protein from noni (Morinda citrifolia) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Dyély C O; Costa, Andrea S; Lima, Amanda D R; Silva, Fredy D A; Lobo, Marina D P; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana Cristina O; Moreira, Renato A; Leal, Luzia K A M; Miron, Diogo; Vasconcelos, Ilka M; Oliveira, Hermógenes D

    2016-05-01

    In this study a novel heat-stable lipid transfer protein, designated McLTP1, was purified from noni (Morinda citrifolia L.) seeds, using four purification steps which resulted in a high-purified protein yield (72 mg McLTP1 from 100g of noni seeds). McLTP1 exhibited molecular masses of 9.450 and 9.466 kDa, determined by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry. The N-terminal sequence of McLTP1 (AVPCGQVSSALSPCMSYLTGGGDDPEARCCAGV), as analysed by NCBI-BLAST database, revealed a high degree of identity with other reported plant lipid transfer proteins. In addition, this protein proved to be resistant to pepsin, trypsin and chymotrypsin digestion. McLTP1 given intraperitoneally (1, 2, 4 and 8 mg/kg) and orally (8 mg/kg) caused an inhibition of the writhing response induced by acetic acid in mice. This protein displayed thermostability, retaining 100% of its antinociceptive activity after 30 min incubation at 80 °C. Pretreatment of mice with McLTP1 (8 mg/kg, i.p. and p.o.) also decreased neurogenic and inflammatory phases of nociception in the formalin test. Naloxone (2 mg/kg, i.p.) antagonised the antinociceptive effect of McLTP1 suggesting that the opioid mechanisms mediate the analgesic properties of this protein.

  16. Isolation, purification and characterization of a nonspecific lipid transfer protein from Cuminum cyminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Uzma; Abbasi, Atiya

    2009-05-01

    Cuminum cyminum, an aromatic plant from the family Umbelliferae, is used as a flavoring and seasoning agent in foods. This communication reports the characterization of a nonspecific lipid transfer protein nsLTP1 from its seeds. Plant nsLTPs are small basic proteins involved in transport of lipids between membranes. These proteins are known to participate in plant defense; however, the exact mechanism of their antimicrobial action against fungi or bacteria is still unclear. The cumin nsLTP1 has been purified using a combination of chromatographic procedures and further characterized using mass spectrometry, circular dichroism spectroscopy and Edman degradation. Amino acid sequence has been used to predict homology model of cumin nsLTP1 in complex with myristic acid, and lyso-myristoyl phosphatidyl choline (LMPC). Cumin nsLTP1 is a monomeric protein with a molecular weight of 9.7 kDa as estimated by SDS-PAGE and ESIMS. The protein shows an isoelectric point of 7.8 on 6% PAGE. The primary structure consists of 92 amino acids with eight conserved cysteine residues. The global fold of cumin nsLTP1 includes four alpha-helices stabilized by four disulfide bonds and a C-terminal tail. The role of internal hydrophobic cavity of the protein in lipid transfer is discussed.

  17. Generation of transgenic Wuzhishan miniature pigs expressing monomeric red fluorescent protein by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yue; Kang, Jin-Dan; Li, Suo; Wang, Wei; Jin, Jun-Xue; Hong, Yu; Cui, Cheng-du; Yan, Chang-Guo; Yin, Xi-Jun

    2013-08-01

    Red fluorescent protein and its variants enable researchers to study gene expression, localization, and protein-protein interactions in vitro in real-time. Fluorophores with higher wavelengths are usually preferred since they efficiently penetrate tissues and produce less toxic emissions. A recently developed fluorescent protein marker, monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1), is particularly useful because of its rapid maturation and minimal interference with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and GFP-derived markers. We generated a pCX-mRFP1-pgk-neoR construct and evaluated the ability of mRFP1 to function as a fluorescent marker in transgenic Wuzhishan miniature pigs. Transgenic embryos were generated by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) of nuclei isolated from ear fibroblasts expressing mRFP1. Embryos generated by SCNT developed into blastocysts in vitro (11.65%; 31/266). Thereafter, a total of 685 transgenic embryos were transferred into the oviducts of three recipients, two of which became pregnant. Of these, one recipient had six aborted fetuses, whereas the other recipient gave birth to four offspring. All offspring expressed the pCX-mRFP1-pgk-neoR gene as shown by PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. The transgenic pigs expressed mRFP1 in all organs and tissues at high levels. These results demonstrate that Wuzhishan miniature pigs can express mRFP1. To conclude, this transgenic animal represents an excellent model with widespread applications in medicine and agriculture.

  18. Premalignant quiescent melanocytic nevi do not express the MHC class I chain-related protein A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuertes, Mercedes B; Rossi, Lucas E; Peralta, Carlos M; Cabrera, Hugo N; Allevato, Miguel A; Zwirner, Norberto W

    2011-01-01

    The MHC class I chain-related protein A (MICA) is an inducible molecule almost not expressed by normal cells but strongly up-regulated in tumor cells. MICA-expressing cells are recognized by natural killer (NK) cells, CD8+ abTCR and gdTCR T lymphocytes through the NKG2D receptor. Engagement of NKG2D by MICA triggers IFN-g secretion and cytotoxicity against malignant cells. Although most solid tumors express MICA and this molecule is a target during immune surveillance against tumors, it has been observed that high grade tumors from different histotypes express low amounts of cell surface MICA due to a metalloprotease-induced shedding. Also, melanomas develop after a complex process of neotransformation of normal melanocytes. However, the expression of MICA in premalignant stages (primary human quiescent melanocytic nevi) remains unknown. Here, we assessed expression of MICA by flow cytometry using cell suspensions from 15 primary nevi isolated from 11 patients. When collected material was abundant, cell lysates were prepared and MICA expression was also analyzed by Western blot. We observed that MICA was undetectable in the 15 primary nevi (intradermic, junction, mixed, lentigo and congenital samples) as well as in normal skin, benign lesions (seborrheic keratosis), premalignant lesions (actinic keratosis) and benign basocellular cancer. Conversely, a primary recently diagnosed melanoma showed intense cell surface MICA. We conclude that the onset of MICA expression is a tightly regulated process that occurs after melanocytes trespass the stage of malignant transformation. Thus, analysis of MICA expression in tissue sections of skin samples may constitute a useful marker to differentiate between benign and malignant nevi.

  19. G-protein-coupled receptor for short-chain fatty acids suppresses colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yong; Chen, Yakun; Jiang, Hongmei; Robbins, Gregory T; Nie, Daotai

    2011-02-15

    GPR43 is a G-protein-coupled receptor for short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Expression of GPR43 is detected in hematopoietic tissues and the large intestine. SCFAs are derived from bacterial fermentation and metabolism of undigested dietary fibers and have been recognized for their cancer prevention activities in the colon. The role of SCFAs, particularly butyrate, in colon cancer therapy has been extensively studied, and its tumor suppressive functions are believed to be due to their intracellular actions, notably inhibition of histone deacetylase. In our study, we show that SCFAs also exert their antitumor effects via receptor GPR43 and that GPR43 is frequently lost in colon cancer cells. Immunohistostaining revealed that GPR43 immunoreactivity was high in normal colon tissues (N = 31) but was markedly reduced or completely lost in most colorectal adenocarcinoma tissues (N = 70) and their corresponding lymph node metastatic adenocarcinomas (N = 38). RT-PCR analysis detected the presence of full length GPR43 mRNA in only one (HT-29) of nine established human colon cancer cell lines. Restoration of GPR43 expression in HCT8 human colonic adenocarcinoma cells induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and activated caspases, leading to increased apoptotic cell death after propionate/butyrate treatment. Restored GPR43 expression, coupled with propionate treatment, induced an upregulation of p21 and a decrease in the levels of cyclin D3 and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 1 and 2, while the CDK4 and CDK6 levels remained unchanged. Our results suggest that GPR43 functions as a tumor suppressor by mediating SCFA-induced cell proliferation inhibition and apoptotic cell death in colon cancer.

  20. Premalignant quiescent melanocytic nevi do not express the MHC class I chain-related protein A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes B. Fuertes

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The MHC class I chain-related protein A (MICA is an inducible molecule almost not expressed by normal cells but strongly up-regulated in tumor cells. MICA-expressing cells are recognized by natural killer (NK cells, CD8+ aßTCR and ?dTCR T lymphocytes through the NKG2D receptor. Engagement of NKG2D by MICA triggers IFN-? secretion and cytotoxicity against malignant cells. Although most solid tumors express MICA and this molecule is a target during immune surveillance against tumors, it has been observed that high grade tumors from different histotypes express low amounts of cell surface MICA due to a metalloprotease- induced shedding. Also, melanomas develop after a complex process of neotransformation of normal melanocytes. However, the expression of MICA in premalignant stages (primary human quiescent melanocytic nevi remains unknown. Here, we assessed expression of MICA by flow cytometry using cell suspensions from 15 primary nevi isolated from 11 patients. When collected material was abundant, cell lysates were prepared and MICA expression was also analyzed by Western blot. We observed that MICA was undetectable in the 15 primary nevi (intradermic, junction, mixed, lentigo and congenital samples as well as in normal skin, benign lesions (seborrheic keratosis, premalignant lesions (actinic keratosis and benign basocellular cancer. Conversely, a primary recently diagnosed melanoma showed intense cell surface MICA. We conclude that the onset of MICA expression is a tightly regulated process that occurs after melanocytes trespass the stage of malignant transformation. Thus, analysis of MICA expression in tissue sections of skin samples may constitute a useful marker to differentiate between benign and malignant nevi.

  1. Drug discovery opportunities and challenges at G protein coupled receptors for long chain free fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas D Holliday

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Discovery of G protein coupled receptors for long chain free fatty acids (FFAs, FFA1 (GPR40 and GPR120, has expanded our understanding of these nutrients as signalling molecules. These receptors have emerged as important sensors for FFA levels in the circulation or the gut lumen, based on evidence from in vitro and rodent models, and an increasing number of human studies. Here we consider their promise as therapeutic targets for metabolic disease, including type 2 diabetes and obesity. FFA1 directly mediates acute FFA-induced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells, while GPR120 and FFA1 trigger release of incretins from intestinal endocrine cells, and so indirectly enhance insulin secretion and promote satiety. GPR120 signalling in adipocytes and macrophages also results in insulin sensitizing and beneficial anti-inflammatory effects. Drug discovery has focussed on agonists to replicate acute benefits of FFA receptor signalling, with promising early results for FFA1 agonists in man. Controversy surrounding chronic effects of FFA1 on beta-cells illustrates that long term benefits of antagonists also need exploring. It has proved challenging to generate highly selective potent ligands for FFA1 or GPR120 subtypes, given that both receptors have hydrophobic orthosteric binding sites, which are not completely defined and have modest ligand affinity. Structure activity relationships are also reliant on functional read outs, in the absence of robust binding assays to provide direct affinity estimates. Nevertheless synthetic ligands have already helped dissect specific contributions of FFA1 and GPR120 signalling from the many possible cellular effects of FFAs. Approaches including use of fluorescent ligand binding assays, and targeting allosteric receptor sites, may improve further preclinical ligand development at these receptors, to exploit their unique potential to target multiple facets of diabetes.

  2. Phenylalanyl-Glycyl-Phenylalanine Tripeptide: A Model System for Aromatic-Aromatic Side Chain Interactions in Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdes, Haydee; Pluhackova, Kristyna; Hobza, Pavel

    2009-09-08

    The performance of a wide range of quantum chemical calculations for the ab initio study of realistic model systems of aromatic-aromatic side chain interactions in proteins (in particular those π-π interactions occurring between adjacent residues along the protein sequence) is here assessed on the phenylalanyl-glycyl-phenylalanine (FGF) tripeptide. Energies and geometries obtained at different levels of theory are compared with CCSD(T)/CBS benchmark energies and RI-MP2/cc-pVTZ benchmark geometries, respectively. Consequently, a protocol of calculation alternative to the very expensive CCSD(T)/CBS is proposed. In addition to this, the preferred orientation of the Phe aromatic side chains is discussed and compared with previous results on the topic.

  3. Sparse Markov chain-based semi-supervised multi-instance multi-label method for protein function prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chao; Chen, Jian; Wu, Qingyao; Mu, Shuai; Min, Huaqing

    2015-10-01

    Automated assignment of protein function has received considerable attention in recent years for genome-wide study. With the rapid accumulation of genome sequencing data produced by high-throughput experimental techniques, the process of manually predicting functional properties of proteins has become increasingly cumbersome. Such large genomics data sets can only be annotated computationally. However, automated assignment of functions to unknown protein is challenging due to its inherent difficulty and complexity. Previous studies have revealed that solving problems involving complicated objects with multiple semantic meanings using the multi-instance multi-label (MIML) framework is effective. For the protein function prediction problems, each protein object in nature may associate with distinct structural units (instances) and multiple functional properties (class labels) where each unit is described by an instance and each functional property is considered as a class label. Thus, it is convenient and natural to tackle the protein function prediction problem by using the MIML framework. In this paper, we propose a sparse Markov chain-based semi-supervised MIML method, called Sparse-Markov. A sparse transductive probability graph is constructed to encode the affinity information of the data based on ensemble of Hausdorff distance metrics. Our goal is to exploit the affinity between protein objects in the sparse transductive probability graph to seek a sparse steady state probability of the Markov chain model to do protein function prediction, such that two proteins are given similar functional labels if they are close to each other in terms of an ensemble Hausdorff distance in the graph. Experimental results on seven real-world organism data sets covering three biological domains show that our proposed Sparse-Markov method is able to achieve better performance than four state-of-the-art MIML learning algorithms.

  4. Role of coherent vibrations in energy transfer and conversion in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramavicius, Darius; Valkunas, Leonas

    2016-01-01

    Oscillatory features of two-dimensional spectra of photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes during few picoseconds after electronic excitations of chlorophylls in various pigment-proteins were recently related to the coherent nuclear vibrations. It has been also speculated that the vibrations may assist the excitonic energy transfer and charge separation, hence contributing to energy transport and energy conversion efficiency. Here, we consider three theoretical approaches usually used for characterization of the excitation dynamics and charge separation, namely Redfield, Förster, and Marcus model descriptions, regarding this question. We show that two out of the three mechanisms require explicit resonances of excitonic splittings and the nuclear vibration frequencies. However, the third one related to the electron transfer is in principle off resonant.

  5. Modulation of electron transfer kinetics by protein conformational fluctuations during early-stage photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Srabanti; Cherayil, Binny J

    2007-10-14

    The kinetics of electron transfer during the early stages of the photosynthetic reaction cycle has recently been shown in transient absorption experiments carried out by Wang et al. [Science 316, 747 (2007)] to be strongly influenced by fluctuations in the conformation of the surrounding protein. A model of electron transfer rates in polar solvents developed by Sumi and Marcus using a reaction-diffusion formalism [J. Chem. Phys. 84, 4894 (1986)] was found to be successful in fitting the experimental absorption curves over a roughly 200 ps time interval. The fits were achieved using an empirically determined time-dependent function that described protein conformational relaxation. In the present paper, a microscopic model of this function is suggested, and it is shown that the function can be identified with the dynamic autocorrelation function of intersegment distance fluctuations that occur in a harmonic potential of mean force under the action of fractional Gaussian noise.

  6. On the transfer of serum proteins to the rat intestinal juice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Norén, Ove; Poulsen, Mona D;

    1994-01-01

    The in vivo pattern of serum proteins in the rat small-intestinal juice was characterized by crossed immunoelectrophoresis. Immunoglobulins and albumin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, transferrin, and orosomucoid were present. Larger serum proteins were absent (ceruloplasmin, haptoglobin, alpha-1......-macroglobulin, alpha and beta lipoproteins). Thus, apart from immunoglobulins, only serum proteins with a molecular mass less than approximately 100 kDa were demonstrated. The origin and epithelial transfer were further characterized, using albumin as a model. No sign of local synthesis of albumin...... proteins in the intestinal juice is a selective passage through the capillary wall followed by passive intercellular transport via delivery of the serum in the interstitial space during disintegration of the enterocytes....

  7. Probing the segmental mobility and energy of the active zones of a protein chain (aspartic acid protease) by a coarse-grained bond-fluctuation Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ras; Farmer, Barry

    2008-03-01

    A protein chain such as aspartic acid protease is described by a specific sequence of 99 residues each with its own specific characteristics. In a coarse-grained description, the backbone of a protein chain is described by nodes tethered together by peptide bonds where each node (the amino acid group) is characterized by molecular weight and hydrophobicity. A well-developed and somewhat mature computational modeling tool for the polymer chain such as the bond-fluctuation model is used to study such a specific protein chain with its constitutive amino groups and their sequence. The relative magnitude of hydrophobicity is used to develop appropriate interaction potentials for these amino acid groups in explicit solvent. The Metropolis algorithm is used to move each node and solvent constituent. Local energy and mobility of each amino group are analyzed along with global energy, mobility, and conformation of the protein chain. Effect of the solvent interaction and its concentration on these quantities will be presented.

  8. Transfer-messenger RNA controls the translation of cell-cycle and stress proteins in Streptomyces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barends, Sharief; Zehl, Martin; Bialek, Sylwia;

    2010-01-01

    The transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA)-mediated trans-translation mechanism is highly conserved in bacteria and functions primarily as a system for the rescue of stalled ribosomes and the removal of aberrantly produced proteins. Here, we show that in the antibiotic-producing soil bacterium Streptomyces...... coelicolor, trans-translation has a specialized role in stress management. Analysis of proteins that were carboxy-terminally His(8)-tagged by a recombinant tmRNA identified only 10 targets, including the stress proteins: DnaK heat-shock protein 70, thiostrepton-induced protein A, universal stress protein A......, elongation factor Tu3, and the cell-cycle control proteins DasR, SsgA, SsgF and SsgR. Although tmRNA-tagged proteins are degraded swiftly, the translation of dnaK and dasR messenger RNAs (mRNAs) depends fully on tmRNA, whereas transcription is unaffected. The data unveil a surprisingly dedicated...

  9. Probability weighted ensemble transfer learning for predicting interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyu Mei

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of host-pathogen protein interaction networks is of great significance to reveal the underlying microbic pathogenesis. However, the current experimentally-derived networks are generally small and should be augmented by computational methods for less-biased biological inference. From the point of view of computational modelling, data scarcity, data unavailability and negative data sampling are the three major problems for host-pathogen protein interaction networks reconstruction. In this work, we are motivated to address the three concerns and propose a probability weighted ensemble transfer learning model for HIV-human protein interaction prediction (PWEN-TLM, where support vector machine (SVM is adopted as the individual classifier of the ensemble model. In the model, data scarcity and data unavailability are tackled by homolog knowledge transfer. The importance of homolog knowledge is measured by the ROC-AUC metric of the individual classifiers, whose outputs are probability weighted to yield the final decision. In addition, we further validate the assumption that only the homolog knowledge is sufficient to train a satisfactory model for host-pathogen protein interaction prediction. Thus the model is more robust against data unavailability with less demanding data constraint. As regards with negative data construction, experiments show that exclusiveness of subcellular co-localized proteins is unbiased and more reliable than random sampling. Last, we conduct analysis of overlapped predictions between our model and the existing models, and apply the model to novel host-pathogen PPIs recognition for further biological research.

  10. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer between fluorescent proteins as powerful toolkits for in vivo studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusanov, A. L.; Savitsky, A. P.

    2011-02-01

    To expand the field of research in biological systems development of extra-sensitive analytical methods is highly desirable. In this review, the latest advances in technologies relying on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer between fluorescent proteins (FP's) to visualize numerous molecular processes in living cells are discussed. Variety of FP's as well as of novel experimental techniques allows one to choose the most appropriate tools to attack concrete problems.

  11. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (cetp) inhibition in the treatment of cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Kaur, Mandeep

    2016-09-01

    In one embodiment, the invention provides methods of treatment which use therapeutically effective amounts of Choleste ryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP) inhibitors to treat a variety of cancers. In certain embodiments, the inhibitor is a CETP-inhibiting small molecule, CETP-inhibiting antisense oligonucleotide, CETP-inhibiting siRNA or a CETP- inhibiting antibody. Related pharmaceutical compositions, kits, diagnostics and screens are also provided.

  12. Adenoviral vector-mediated gene transfer of IL-13Ralpha2 chain followed by IL-13 cytotoxin treatment offers potent targeted therapy for cytotoxin-resistant cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Makoto; Murata, Takashi; Watanabe, Ken; Kawakami, Koji; Suzuki, Motoyoshi; Koji, Takehiko; Puri, Raj K; Kitazato, Kaio; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki

    2005-08-10

    Previous studies demonstrated that IL-13Ralpha2 chain-overexpressing cancer cells were highly sensitive to IL-13 cytotoxin (IL13-PE38QQR) and could be targeted by cytotoxin treatment. However, the majority of human tumors do not express high levels of IL-13Ralpha2 chain. To expand the IL-13 cytotoxin-mediated cancer targeting therapy, we combined cytotoxin treatment with gene transfer of IL-13Ralpha2 chain. We constructed a recombinant adenoviral vector carrying the human IL-13Ralpha2 gene (Ad-IL-13Ralpha2), which expresses high levels of IL-13Ralpha2 chain on infected cells. Human cancer cell lines A549 and HOS, which originally show no IL-13Ralpha2 expression and little sensitivity to IL-13 cytotoxin, were effectively converted to become sensitive to this cytotoxin after Ad-IL-13Ralpha2 infection. The CC(50) of IL-13 cytotoxin for Ad-IL-13Ralpha2-infected A549 cells was 500 ng/ml. We also examined the antitumor activity of IL-13 cytotoxin in an established xenograft model of cytotoxin-resistant human lung tumor. Only a single i.t. injection of Ad-IL-13Ralpha2 markedly enhanced the sensitivity of established tumors to IL-13 cytotoxin treatment; furthermore, this antitumor effect was significantly sustained for more than 1 month after the last treatment with IL-13 cytotoxin. Taken together, these results suggest the combination of adenoviral vector-mediated IL-13Ralpha2 gene transfer and IL-13 cytotoxin administration can be an effective targeting approach for several types of IL-13 cytotoxin-resistant cancers which show no or little expression of IL-13Ralpha2 chain.

  13. Comparison between medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase mutant proteins overexpressed in bacterial and mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T G; Bross, P; Andresen, B S;

    1995-01-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency is a potentially lethal inherited defect in the beta-oxidation of fatty acids. By comparing the behaviour of five missense MCAD mutant proteins expressed in COS cells and in Escherichia coli, we can define some of these as "pure folding mutants......." Upon expression in E. coli, these mutant proteins produce activity levels in the range of the wild-type enzyme only if the chaperonins GroESL are co-overproduced. When overexpressed in COS cells, the pure folding mutants display enzyme activities comparable to the wild-type enzyme. The results suggest...

  14. Point matching under non-uniform distortions and protein side chain packing based on an efficient maximum clique algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukka, Bahadur K C; Akutsu, Tatsuya; Tomita, Etsuji; Seki, Tomokazu; Fujiyama, Asao

    2002-01-01

    We developed maximum clique-based algorithms for spot matching for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis images, protein structure alignment and protein side-chain packing, where these problems are known to be NP-hard. Algorithms based on direct reductions to the maximum clique can find optimal solutions for instances of size (the number of points or residues) up to 50-150 using a standard PC. We also developed pre-processing techniques to reduce the sizes of graphs. Combined with some heuristics, many realistic instances can be solved approximately.

  15. Toxicity and transfer of polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated silver nanowires in an aquatic food chain consisting of algae, water fleas, and zebrafish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Yooeun; An, Youn-Joo, E-mail: anyjoo@konkuk.ac.kr

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Trophic transfer of silver nanowires (AgNWs) was studied in an aquatic food chain. • The transfer of AgNWs from algae to fish via water fleas was observed. • Toxicity of long AgNWs on aquatic organisms is higher than that of short ones. • AgNWs damage the gut of water fleas and may cause undernourishment. • Quantity of lipid droplets increased with increasing exposure concentration. - Abstract: Nanomaterials of various shapes and dimensions are widely used in the medical, chemical, and electronic industries. Multiple studies have reported the ecotoxicological effects of nanaoparticles when released in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems; however, information on the toxicity of silver nanowires (AgNWs) to freshwater organisms and their transfer through the food webs is limited. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the toxicity of 10- and 20-μm-long AgNWs to the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the water flea Daphnia magna, and the zebrafish and study their movement through this three-species food chain using a variety of qualitative and quantitative methods as well as optical techniques. We found that AgNWs directly inhibited the growth of algae and destroyed the digestive organs of water fleas. The results showed that longer AgNWs (20 μm) were more toxic than shorter ones (10 μm) to both algae and water fleas, but shorter AgNWs were accumulated more than longer ones in the body of the fish. Overall, this study suggests that AgNWs are transferred through food chains, and that they affect organisms at higher trophic levels, potentially including humans. Therefore, further studies that take into account environmental factors, food web complexity, and differences between nanomaterials are required to gain better understanding of the impact of nanomaterials on natural communities and human health.

  16. Molecular imprinted polymer with positively charged, assistant recognition polymer chains for adsorption/enrichment of low content target protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Yi; SUN Yang; WANG Ying; XING XiaoCui; ZHAO Zhuo; WANG ChunHong; FAN YunGe; MI HuaiFeng

    2008-01-01

    Here, we introduce a new type of molecular imprinted polymer (MIP) with immobilized assistant recog-nition polymer chains (ARPCs) to create effective recognition sites and with bacterial cloned protein as template for adsorbing the low content target protein from cell extract. In this work, cloned pig cyclo-philin 18 (pCyP18), a peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans-isomerase, was used as template. The template protein was selectively assembled with ARPCs from their library, which consists of numerous limited length polymer chains with randomly distributed recognition sites of positively charged amino groups and immobilizing sites. These assemblies were adsorbed by porous microsphers and immobilized on them.After removing the template, binding sites complementary to the target protein in size, shape and the position of recognition groups were exposed, and their confirmation was preserved by the cross-linked structure. The synthesized MIP was used to adsorb the cellular pCyP18, and its proportional content was enriched more than hundred times. The extended experiment on imprinting bovine serum albumin (BSA) with ARPCs shows that this method is also suitable for large protein.

  17. Insulinotropic and Muscle Protein Synthetic Effects of Branched-Chain Amino Acids: Potential Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes and Sarcopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren G. Candow

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The loss of muscle mass and strength with aging (i.e., sarcopenia has a negative effect on functional independence and overall quality of life. One main contributing factor to sarcopenia is the reduced ability to increase skeletal muscle protein synthesis in response to habitual feeding, possibly due to a reduction in postprandial insulin release and an increase in insulin resistance. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA, primarily leucine, increases the activation of pathways involved in muscle protein synthesis through insulin-dependent and independent mechanisms, which may help counteract the “anabolic resistance” to feeding in older adults. Leucine exhibits strong insulinotropic characteristics, which may increase amino acid availability for muscle protein synthesis, reduce muscle protein breakdown, and enhance glucose disposal to help maintain blood glucose homeostasis.

  18. Toxic response caused by a misfolding variant of the mitochondrial protein short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Stinne P; Corydon, Thomas J; Pedersen, Christina B;

    2011-01-01

    the disease-associated misfolding variant of SCAD protein, p.Arg107Cys, disturbs mitochondrial function. METHODS: We have developed a cell model system, stably expressing either the SCAD wild-type protein or the misfolding SCAD variant protein, p.Arg107Cys (c.319 C > T). The model system was used......BACKGROUND: Variations in the gene ACADS, encoding the mitochondrial protein short-chain acyl CoA-dehydrogenase (SCAD), have been observed in individuals with clinical symptoms. The phenotype of SCAD deficiency (SCADD) is very heterogeneous, ranging from asymptomatic to severe, without a clear...... for investigation of SCAD with respect to expression, degree of misfolding, and enzymatic SCAD activity. Furthermore, cell proliferation and expression of selected stress response genes were investigated as well as proteomic analysis of mitochondria-enriched extracts in order to study the consequences of p.Arg107...

  19. Using computational chemistry to understand proton transfer in Green Fluorescent Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskin, Christa; Champion, Paul; Sage, Timothy; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Demidov, Alexander; Salna, Bridget

    2012-02-01

    Green Fluorescent Protein has been studied experimentally by the scientific community for years yet frustratingly little is known about the underlying proton transfer process that produces the green fluorescence. We are trying to elucidate more about this process using Density Functional Theory to prepare and run various calculations on GFP that we compare with kinetics data, Raman and vibrational coherence spectra. I am building a model of wild type GFP that is realistically sized for our computational power, yet still contains key residues that might affect the proton transport process. I will compare my results to those of the E222D GFP mutant. This comparison will allow us to see any differences in energy and normal modes that give insights regarding the proton transfer process. For example, how does it depend on a variety of factors such as temperature, buffer, pH, mutations, etc.? We also plan to examine if the proton transfer propagates through the three donor-acceptor pairs of the ``proton wire'' consecutively versus the three protons on the wire transferring simultaneously. Finally, we will consider how quantum tunneling may be involved in the proton transfer.

  20. Purification of nonspecific lipid transfer protein (sterol carrier protein 2) from human liver and its deficiency in livers from patients with cerebro-hepato-renal (Zellweger) syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amerongen, A. van; Helms, J.B.; Krift, T.P. van der; Schutgens, R.B.H.; Wirtz, K.W.A.

    1987-01-01

    The nonspecific lipid transfer protein (i.e., sterol carrier protein 2) from human liver was purified to homogeneity using ammonium sulfate precipitation, CM-cellulose chromatography, molecular sieve chromatography and fast protein liquid chromatography. Its amino acid composition was determined and

  1. DNA-binding proteins regulating pIP501 transfer and replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Grohmann

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available pIP501 is a Gram-positive broad-host-range model plasmid intensively used for studying plasmid replication and conjugative transfer. It is a multiple antibiotic resistance plasmid frequently found in clinical Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolates. Replication of pIP501 proceeds unidirectionally by a theta mechanism. The minimal replicon of pIP501 is composed of the repR gene encoding the essential rate-limiting replication initiator protein RepR and the origin of replication, oriR, located downstream of repR. RepR is similar to RepE of related streptococcal plasmid pAMβ1, which has been shown to possess RNase activity cleaving free RNA molecules in close proximity of the initiation site of DNA synthesis. Replication of pIP501 is controlled by the concerted action of a small protein, CopR, and an antisense RNA, RNAIII. CopR has a dual role: It acts as transcriptional repressor at the repR promoter and prevents convergent transcription of RNAIII and repR mRNA (RNAII, thereby indirectly increasing RNAIII synthesis. CopR binds asymmetrically as a dimer at two consecutive binding sites upstream of and overlapping with the repR promoter. RNAIII induces transcriptional attenuation within the leader region of the repR mRNA (RNAII. Deletion of either control component causes a 10- to 20-fold increase of plasmid copy number, while simultaneous deletions have no additional effect. Conjugative transfer of pIP501 depends on a type IV secretion system (T4SS encoded in a single operon. Its transfer host-range is considerably broad, as it has been transferred to virtually all Gram-positive bacteria including filamentous streptomycetes and even the Gram-negative Escherichia coli. Expression of the 15 genes encoding the T4SS is tightly controlled by binding of the relaxase TraA, the transfer initiator protein, to the operon promoter, which overlaps with the origin of transfer (oriT. The T4SS operon encodes the DNA-binding proteins TraJ (VirD4

  2. DNA-Binding Proteins Regulating pIP501 Transfer and Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grohmann, Elisabeth; Goessweiner-Mohr, Nikolaus; Brantl, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    pIP501 is a Gram-positive broad-host-range model plasmid intensively used for studying plasmid replication and conjugative transfer. It is a multiple antibiotic resistance plasmid frequently detected in clinical Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium strains. Replication of pIP501 proceeds unidirectionally by a theta mechanism. The minimal replicon of pIP501 is composed of the repR gene encoding the essential rate-limiting replication initiator protein RepR and the origin of replication, oriR, located downstream of repR. RepR is similar to RepE of related streptococcal plasmid pAMβ1, which has been shown to possess RNase activity cleaving free RNA molecules in close proximity of the initiation site of DNA synthesis. Replication of pIP501 is controlled by the concerted action of a small protein, CopR, and an antisense RNA, RNAIII. CopR has a dual function: It acts as transcriptional repressor at the repR promoter and, in addition, prevents convergent transcription of RNAIII and repR mRNA (RNAII), which indirectly increases RNAIII synthesis. CopR binds asymmetrically as a dimer at two consecutive binding sites upstream of and overlapping with the repR promoter. RNAIII induces transcriptional attenuation within the leader region of the repR mRNA (RNAII). Deletion of either control component causes a 10- to 20-fold increase of plasmid copy number, while simultaneous deletions have no additional effect. Conjugative transfer of pIP501 depends on a type IV secretion system (T4SS) encoded in a single operon. Its transfer host-range is considerably broad, as it has been transferred to virtually all Gram-positive bacteria including Streptomyces and even the Gram-negative Escherichia coli. Expression of the 15 genes encoding the T4SS is tightly controlled by binding of the relaxase TraA, the transfer initiator protein, to the operon promoter overlapping with the origin of transfer (oriT). The T4SS operon encodes the DNA-binding proteins TraJ (VirD4-like coupling

  3. Reaction mechanisms in the radiolysis of peptides, polypeptides and proteins II reactions at side-chain loci in model systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, W.M.

    1983-11-01

    The major emphasis in radiation biology at the molecular level has been on the nucleic acid component of the nucleic acid-protein complex because of its primary genetic importance. But there is increasing evidence that radiation damage to the protein component also has important biological implications. Damage to capsid protein now appears to be a major factor in the radiation inactivation of phage and other viruses. And, there is increasing evidence that radiation-chemical change in the protein component of chromation leads to changes in the stability of the repressor-operator complexes involved in gene expression. Knowledge of the radiation chemistry of protein is also of importance in other fields such as the application of radiation sterilization to foods and drugs. Recent findings that a class of compounds, the ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..'-diaminodicarboxylic acids, not normally present in food proteins, are formed in protein radiolysis is of particular significance since certain of their peptide derivatives have been showing to exhibit immunological activity. The purpose of this review is to bring together and to correlate our present knowledge of products and mechanisms in the radiolysis of peptides, polypeptides and proteins both aqueous and solid-state. In part 1 we presented a discussion of the radiation-induced reactions of the peptide main-chain in model peptide and polypeptide systems. Here in part 2 the emphasis is on the competing radiation chemistry at side-chain loci of peptide derivatives of aliphatic, aromatic-unsaturated and sulfur-containing amino acids in similar systems. Information obtained with the various experimental techniques of product analysis, competition kinetics, spin-trapping, pulse radiolysis, and ESR spectroscopy are included.

  4. CypD(-/-) hearts have altered levels of proteins involved in Krebs cycle, branch chain amino acid degradation and pyruvate metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menazza, Sara; Wong, Renee; Nguyen, Tiffany; Wang, Guanghui; Gucek, Marjan; Murphy, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Cyclophilin D (CypD) is a mitochondrial chaperone that has been shown to regulate the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP). MPTP opening is a major determinant of mitochondrial dysfunction and cardiomyocyte death during ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Mice lacking CypD have been widely used to study regulation of the MPTP, and it has been shown recently that genetic depletion of CypD correlates with elevated levels of mitochondrial Ca(2+). The present study aimed to characterize the metabolic changes in CypD(-/-) hearts. Initially, we used a proteomics approach to examine protein changes in CypD(-/-) mice. Using pathway analysis, we found that CypD(-/-) hearts have alterations in branched chain amino acid metabolism, pyruvate metabolism and the Krebs cycle. We tested whether these metabolic changes were due to inhibition of electron transfer from these metabolic pathways into the electron transport chain. As we found decreased levels of succinate dehydrogenase and electron transfer flavoprotein in the proteomics analysis, we examined whether activities of these enzymes might be altered. However, we found no alterations in their activities. The proteomics study also showed a 23% decrease in carnitine-palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), which prompted us to perform a metabolomics analysis. Consistent with the decrease in CPT1, we found a significant decrease in C4/Ci4, C5-OH/C3-DC, C12:1, C14:1, C16:1, and C20:3 acyl carnitines in hearts from CypD(-/-) mice. In summary, CypD(-/-) hearts exhibit changes in many metabolic pathways and caution should be used when interpreting results from these mice as due solely to inhibition of the MPTP.

  5. Automatic polymerase chain reaction product detection system for food safety monitoring using zinc finger protein fused to luciferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Wataru; Kezuka, Aki; Murakami, Yoshiyuki; Lee, Jinhee; Abe, Koichi; Motoki, Hiroaki; Matsuo, Takafumi; Shimura, Nobuaki; Noda, Mamoru; Igimi, Shizunobu; Ikebukuro, Kazunori

    2013-11-01

    An automatic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product detection system for food safety monitoring using zinc finger (ZF) protein fused to luciferase was developed. ZF protein fused to luciferase specifically binds to target double stranded DNA sequence and has luciferase enzymatic activity. Therefore, PCR products that comprise ZF protein recognition sequence can be detected by measuring the luciferase activity of the fusion protein. We previously reported that PCR products from Legionella pneumophila and Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157 genomic DNA were detected by Zif268, a natural ZF protein, fused to luciferase. In this study, Zif268-luciferase was applied to detect the presence of Salmonella and coliforms. Moreover, an artificial zinc finger protein (B2) fused to luciferase was constructed for a Norovirus detection system. In the luciferase activity detection assay, several bound/free separation process is required. Therefore, an analyzer that automatically performed the bound/free separation process was developed to detect PCR products using the ZF-luciferase fusion protein. By means of the automatic analyzer with ZF-luciferase fusion protein, target pathogenic genomes were specifically detected in the presence of other pathogenic genomes. Moreover, we succeeded in the detection of 10 copies of E. coli BL21 without extraction of genomic DNA by the automatic analyzer and E. coli was detected with a logarithmic dependency in the range of 1.0×10 to 1.0×10(6) copies.

  6. High production of llama variable heavy-chain antibody fragment (VHH) fused to various reader proteins by Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisada, Hiromoto; Tsutsumi, Hiroko; Ishida, Hiroki; Hata, Yoji

    2013-01-01

    Llama variable heavy-chain antibody fragment (VHH) fused to four different reader proteins was produced and secreted in culture medium by Aspergillus oryzae. These fusion proteins consisted of N-terminal reader proteins, VHH, and a C-terminal his-tag sequence which facilitated purification using one-step his-tag affinity chromatography. SDS-PAGE analysis of the deglycosylated purified fusion proteins confirmed that the molecular weight of each corresponded to the expected sum of VHH and the respective reader proteins. The apparent high molecular weight reader protein glucoamylase (GlaB) was found to be suitable for efficient VHH production. The GlaB-VHH-His protein bound its antigen, human chorionic gonadotropin, and was detectable by a new ELISA-based method using a coupled assay with glucoamylase, glucose oxidase, peroxidase, maltose, and 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine as substrates. Addition of potassium phosphate to the culture medium induced secretion of 0.61 mg GlaB-VHH-His protein/ml culture medium in 5 days.

  7. Building Pathways to Transfer: Community Colleges That Break the Chain of Failure for Students of Color. Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civil Rights Project / Proyecto Derechos Civiles, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This study followed all freshman community college students in California who had demonstrated the intent to transfer from 1996, 1997, and 1998. Outcomes were assessed for each of the three entering cohorts after six years (2002-2004) and students were linked with their high schools of origin and the 4-year colleges to which they transferred. The…

  8. Derivation of a Markov state model of the dynamics of a protein-like chain immersed in an implicit solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Jeremy; Bayat, Hanif

    2014-09-07

    A Markov state model of the dynamics of a protein-like chain immersed in an implicit hard sphere solvent is derived from first principles for a system of monomers that interact via discontinuous potentials designed to account for local structure and bonding in a coarse-grained sense. The model is based on the assumption that the implicit solvent interacts on a fast time scale with the monomers of the chain compared to the time scale for structural rearrangements of the chain and provides sufficient friction so that the motion of monomers is governed by the Smoluchowski equation. A microscopic theory for the dynamics of the system is developed that reduces to a Markovian model of the kinetics under well-defined conditions. Microscopic expressions for the rate constants that appear in the Markov state model are analyzed and expressed in terms of a temperature-dependent linear combination of escape rates that themselves are independent of temperature. Excellent agreement is demonstrated between the theoretical predictions of the escape rates and those obtained through simulation of a stochastic model of the dynamics of bond formation. Finally, the Markov model is studied by analyzing the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the matrix of transition rates, and the equilibration process for a simple helix-forming system from an ensemble of initially extended configurations to mainly folded configurations is investigated as a function of temperature for a number of different chain lengths. For short chains, the relaxation is primarily single-exponential and becomes independent of temperature in the low-temperature regime. The profile is more complicated for longer chains, where multi-exponential relaxation behavior is seen at intermediate temperatures followed by a low temperature regime in which the folding becomes rapid and single exponential. It is demonstrated that the behavior of the equilibration profile as the temperature is lowered can be understood in terms of the

  9. Combination of electrografting and atom-transfer radical polymerization for making the stainless steel surface antibacterial and protein antiadhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatova, Milena; Voccia, Samuel; Gilbert, Bernard; Markova, Nadya; Cossement, Damien; Gouttebaron, Rachel; Jérôme, Robert; Jérôme, Christine

    2006-01-03

    A two-step "grafting from" method has been successfully carried out, which is based on the electrografting of polyacrylate chains containing an initiator for the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of 2-(tert-butylamino)ethyl methacrylate (TBAEMA) or copolymerization of TBAEMA with either monomethyl ether of poly(ethylene oxide) methacrylate (PEOMA) or acrylic acid (AA) or styrene. The chemisorption of this type of polymer brushes onto stainless steel surfaces has potential in orthopaedic surgery. These films have been characterized by ATR-FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and measurement of contact angles of water. The polymer formed in solution by ATRP and that one detached on purpose from the surface have been analyzed by size exclusion chromathography (SEC) and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The strong adherence of the films onto stainless steel has been assessed by peeling tests. AFM analysis has shown that addition of hydrophilic comonomers to the grafted chains decreases the surface roughness. According to dynamic quartz crystal microbalance experiments, proteins (e.g., fibrinogen) are more effectively repelled whenever copolymer brushes contain neutral hydrophilic (PEOMA) co-units rather than negatively charged groups (PAA salt). Moreover, a 2- to 3-fold decrease in the fibrinogen adsorption is observed when TBAEMA is copolymerized with either PEOMA or AA rather than homopolymerized or copolymerized with styrene. Compared to the bare stainless steel surface, brushes of polyTBAEMA, poly(TBAEMA-co-PEOMA) and poly(TBAEMA-co-AA) decrease the bacteria adhesion by 3 to 4 orders of magnitude as revealed by Gram-positive bacteria S. aureus adhesion tests.

  10. Discovery of Novel Splice Variants and Regulatory Mechanisms for Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein in Human Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takashi; Swift, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is a unique lipid transfer protein essential for the assembly of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins by the liver and intestine. Previous studies in mice identified a splice variant of MTP with an alternate first exon. Splice variants of human MTP have not been reported. Using PCR approaches we have identified two splice variants in human tissues, which we have named MTP-B and MTP-C. MTP-B has a unique first exon (Ex1B) located 10.5 kb upstream of the first exon (Ex1A) for canonical MTP (MTP-A); MTP-C contains both first exons for MTP-A and MTP-B. MTP-B was found in a number of tissues, whereas MTP-C was prominent in brain and testis. MTP-B does not encode a protein; MTP-C encodes the same protein encoded by MTP-A, although MTP-C translation is strongly inhibited by regulatory elements within its 5′-UTR. Using luciferase assays, we demonstrate that the promoter region upstream of exon 1B is quite adequate to drive expression of MTP. We conclude that alternate splicing plays a key role in regulating cellular MTP levels by introducing distinct promoter regions and unique 5′-UTRs, which contain elements that alter translation efficiency, enabling the cell to optimize MTP activity. PMID:27256115

  11. Parental transfer of the antimicrobial protein LBP/BPI protects Biomphalaria glabrata eggs against oomycete infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Lucia Baron

    Full Text Available Vertebrate females transfer antibodies via the placenta, colostrum and milk or via the egg yolk to protect their immunologically immature offspring against pathogens. This evolutionarily important transfer of immunity is poorly documented in invertebrates and basic questions remain regarding the nature and extent of parental protection of offspring. In this study, we show that a lipopolysaccharide binding protein/bactericidal permeability increasing protein family member from the invertebrate Biomphalaria glabrata (BgLBP/BPI1 is massively loaded into the eggs of this freshwater snail. Native and recombinant proteins displayed conserved LPS-binding, antibacterial and membrane permeabilizing activities. A broad screening of various pathogens revealed a previously unknown biocidal activity of the protein against pathogenic water molds (oomycetes, which is conserved in human BPI. RNAi-dependent silencing of LBP/BPI in the parent snails resulted in a significant reduction of reproductive success and extensive death of eggs through oomycete infections. This work provides the first functional evidence that a LBP/BPI is involved in the parental immune protection of invertebrate offspring and reveals a novel and conserved biocidal activity for LBP/BPI family members.

  12. Markers of protein oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Headlam, Henrietta A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Exposure of proteins to radicals in the presence of O2 gives both side-chain oxidation and backbone fragmentation. These processes can be interrelated, with initial side-chain oxidation giving rise to backbone damage via transfer reactions. We have shown previously that alkoxyl radicals formed on...

  13. Automatic polymerase chain reaction product detection system for food safety monitoring using zinc finger protein fused to luciferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Wataru; Kezuka, Aki; Murakami, Yoshiyuki; Lee, Jinhee; Abe, Koichi [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Naka-cho, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Motoki, Hiroaki; Matsuo, Takafumi; Shimura, Nobuaki [System Instruments Co., Ltd., 776-2 Komiya-cho, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0031 (Japan); Noda, Mamoru; Igimi, Shizunobu [Division of Biomedical Food Research, National Institute of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan); Ikebukuro, Kazunori, E-mail: ikebu@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Naka-cho, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Zif268 fused to luciferase was used for E. coli O157, Salmonella and coliform detection. •Artificial zinc finger protein fused to luciferase was constructed for Norovirus detection. •An analyzer that automatically detects PCR products by zinc finger protein fused to luciferase was developed. •Target pathogens were specifically detected by the automatic analyzer with zinc finger protein fused to luciferase. -- Abstract: An automatic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product detection system for food safety monitoring using zinc finger (ZF) protein fused to luciferase was developed. ZF protein fused to luciferase specifically binds to target double stranded DNA sequence and has luciferase enzymatic activity. Therefore, PCR products that comprise ZF protein recognition sequence can be detected by measuring the luciferase activity of the fusion protein. We previously reported that PCR products from Legionella pneumophila and Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157 genomic DNA were detected by Zif268, a natural ZF protein, fused to luciferase. In this study, Zif268–luciferase was applied to detect the presence of Salmonella and coliforms. Moreover, an artificial zinc finger protein (B2) fused to luciferase was constructed for a Norovirus detection system. In the luciferase activity detection assay, several bound/free separation process is required. Therefore, an analyzer that automatically performed the bound/free separation process was developed to detect PCR products using the ZF–luciferase fusion protein. By means of the automatic analyzer with ZF–luciferase fusion protein, target pathogenic genomes were specifically detected in the presence of other pathogenic genomes. Moreover, we succeeded in the detection of 10 copies of E. coli BL21 without extraction of genomic DNA by the automatic analyzer and E. coli was detected with a logarithmic dependency in the range of 1.0 × 10 to 1.0 × 10{sup 6} copies.

  14. ECERIFERUM2-LIKE proteins have unique biochemical and physiological functions in very-long-chain fatty acid elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Tegan M; Haslam, Richard; Thoraval, Didier; Pascal, Stéphanie; Delude, Camille; Domergue, Frédéric; Fernández, Aurora Mañas; Beaudoin, Frédéric; Napier, Johnathan A; Kunst, Ljerka; Joubès, Jérôme

    2015-03-01

    The extension of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) for the synthesis of specialized apoplastic lipids requires unique biochemical machinery. Condensing enzymes catalyze the first reaction in fatty acid elongation and determine the chain length of fatty acids accepted and produced by the fatty acid elongation complex. Although necessary for the elongation of all VLCFAs, known condensing enzymes cannot efficiently synthesize VLCFAs longer than 28 carbons, despite the prevalence of C28 to C34 acyl lipids in cuticular wax and the pollen coat. The eceriferum2 (cer2) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) was previously shown to have a specific deficiency in cuticular waxes longer than 28 carbons, and heterologous expression of CER2 in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) demonstrated that it can modify the acyl chain length produced by a condensing enzyme from 28 to 30 carbon atoms. Here, we report the physiological functions and biochemical specificities of the CER2 homologs CER2-LIKE1 and CER2-LIKE2 by mutant analysis and heterologous expression in yeast. We demonstrate that all three CER2-LIKEs function with the same small subset of condensing enzymes, and that they have different effects on the substrate specificity of the same condensing enzyme. Finally, we show that the changes in acyl chain length caused by each CER2-LIKE protein are of substantial importance for cuticle formation and pollen coat function.

  15. Factors affecting the concentration in seven-spotted ladybirds (Coccinella septempunctata L.) of Cd and Zn transferred through the food chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, I.D., E-mail: igreen@bournemouth.ac.u [Centre for Conservation Ecology and Environmental Change, School of Conservation Sciences, Bournemouth University, Talbot Campus, Poole, Dorset BH12 5BB (United Kingdom); Diaz, A., E-mail: adiaz@bournemouth.ac.u [Centre for Conservation Ecology and Environmental Change, School of Conservation Sciences, Bournemouth University, Talbot Campus, Poole, Dorset BH12 5BB (United Kingdom); Tibbett, M., E-mail: mark.tibbett@uwa.edu.a [Centre for Land Rehabilitation, School of Earth and Environment, Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Sciences, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia)

    2010-01-15

    The transfer of Cd and Zn from soils amended with sewage sludge was followed through a food chain consisting of wheat, aphids and the predator Coccinella septempunctata. Multiple regression models were generated to predict the concentrations of Cd and Zn in C. septempunctata. No significant model could be generated for Cd, indicting that the concentration of this metal was maintained within relatively narrow limits. A model predicting 64% of the variability in the Zn concentration of C. septempunctata was generated from of the concentration of Zn in the diet, time and rate of Zn consumption. The results suggest that decreasing the rate of food consumption is an effective mechanism to prevent the accumulation of Zn and that the availability of Zn in the aphid prey increased with the concentration in the aphids. The results emphasise the importance of using ecologically relevant food chains and exposure pathways during ecotoxicological studies. - Arthropod predators can regulate trace metal body burden through physiological and behavioural mechanisms.

  16. Misfolding, degradation, and aggregation of variant proteins. The molecular pathogenesis of short chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christina Bak; Bross, P.; Winter, V.S.;

    2003-01-01

    Short chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficiency is an inborn error of the mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism caused by rare variations as well as common susceptibility variations in the SCAD gene. Earlier studies have shown that a common variant SCAD protein (R147W) was impaired in folding...... and aggregation of variant SCAD proteins. In this study we investigated the processing of a set of disease-causing variant SCAD proteins (R22W, G68C, W153R, R359C, and Q341H) and two common variant proteins (R147W and G185S) that lead to reduced SCAD activity. All SCAD proteins, including the wild type, associate...... with mitochondrial hsp60 chaperonins; however, the variant SCAD proteins remained associated with hsp60 for prolonged periods of time. Biogenesis experiments at two temperatures revealed that some of the variant proteins (R22W, G68C, W153R, and R359C) caused severe misfolding, whereas others (R147W, G185S, and Q341H...

  17. Cloning and characterization of cholesteryl ester transfer protein isolated from the tree shrew

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾武威; 张坚; 陈保生; 吴钢; 薛红

    2003-01-01

    ObjectiveTo obtain the nucleotide sequence and deduced amino acid sequence of cholesterylester transfer protein (CETP) cDNA from the tree shrew (Tupaia glis). MethodsThe cDNA sequence of the tree shrew CETP was obtained by utilizing the techniqueof switching mechanism at 5' end of RNA transcript (SMART) and rapid amplification of cDNA end (RACE) from the first strand of the cDNA. The amino acidsequence of CETP was deduced from the cDNA sequence and its primary and secondary structures were predicted. ResultsThe sequence of CETP cDNA from tree shrew (GenBank accession number AF334033) covers 1636 bp, including 178 bp at the 3' end of the untranslated region anda 1458 bp fragment in a coding region, which provides the complete sequence of mature tree shrew CETP, although not the initiator methionine. The first 24 bp encodes a partial signal peptide. The mature protein consists of 477 amino acids and is longer than the human version by one amino acid (Gly318). Comparing this amino acid sequence with those of other animals' CETPs, the identity between tree shrew and human and rabbit CETP is 88% and 82%, respectively. The protein is extremely hydrophobic as it contains many hydrophobic residues, especially at the C-terminal, consistent with its function in the transfer of neutral lipids. The amino acid residues concerning with binding and transferringneutral lipids are highly conserved. There is a deletion of an N-linked glycosylation site at Asn342 in the tree shrew CETP protein that may participate in the removal of peripheral cholesterol and cholesteryl ester by increasing its activity of transferring cholesteryl ester. ConclusionThe possible glycosylation in the tree shrew CETP may be involved in the molecular mechanism of its insusceptibility to atherosclerosis.

  18. Transfer of radiocaesium from contaminated bottom sediments to marine organisms through benthic food chains in post-Fukushima and post-Chernobyl periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezhenar, Roman; Jung, Kyung Tae; Maderich, Vladimir; Willemsen, Stefan; de With, Govert; Qiao, Fangli

    2016-05-01

    After the earthquake and tsunami on 11 March 2011 damaged the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP), an accidental release of a large amount of radioactive isotopes into both the air and the ocean occurred. Measurements provided by the Japanese agencies over the past 5 years show that elevated concentrations of 137Cs still remain in sediments, benthic organisms, and demersal fishes in the coastal zone around the FDNPP. These observations indicate that there are 137Cs transfer pathways from bottom sediments to the marine organisms. To describe the transfer quantitatively, the dynamic food chain biological uptake model of radionuclides (BURN) has been extended to include benthic marine organisms. The extended model takes into account both pelagic and benthic marine organisms grouped into several classes based on their trophic level and type of species: phytoplankton, zooplankton, and fishes (two types: piscivorous and non-piscivorous) for the pelagic food chain; deposit-feeding invertebrates, demersal fishes fed by benthic invertebrates, and bottom omnivorous predators for the benthic food chain; crustaceans, mollusks, and coastal predators feeding on both pelagic and benthic organisms. Bottom invertebrates ingest organic parts of bottom sediments with adsorbed radionuclides which then migrate up through the food chain. All organisms take radionuclides directly from water as well as food. The model was implemented into the compartment model POSEIDON-R and applied to the north-western Pacific for the period of 1945-2010, and then for the period of 2011-2020 to assess the radiological consequences of 137Cs released due to the FDNPP accident. The model simulations for activity concentrations of 137Cs in both pelagic and benthic organisms in the coastal area around the FDNPP agree well with measurements for the period of 2011-2015. The decrease constant in the fitted exponential function of simulated concentration for the deposit-feeding invertebrates (0.45 yr-1

  19. How changing the particle structure can speed up protein mass transfer kinetics in liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritti, Fabrice; Horvath, Krisztian; Guiochon, Georges

    2012-11-01

    The mass transfer kinetics of a few compounds (uracil, 112 Da), insulin (5.5 kDa), lysozyme (13.4 kDa), and bovine serum albumin (BSA, 67 kDa) in columns packed with several types of spherical particles was investigated under non-retained conditions, in order to eliminate the poorly known contribution of surface diffusion to overall sample diffusivity across the porous particles in RPLC. Diffusivity across particles is then minimum. Based on the porosity of the particles accessible to analytes, it was accurately estimated from the elution times, the internal obstruction factor (using Pismen correlation), and the hindrance diffusion factor (using Renkin correlation). The columns used were packed with fully porous particles 2.5 μm Luna-C(18) 100 Å, core-shell particles 2.6 μm Kinetex-C(18) 100 Å, 3.6 μm Aeris Widepore-C(18) 200 Å, and prototype 2.7 μm core-shell particles (made of two concentric porous shells with 100 and 300 Å average pore size, respectively), and with 3.3 μm non-porous silica particles. The results demonstrate that the porous particle structure and the solid-liquid mass transfer resistance have practically no effect on the column efficiency for small molecules. For them, the column performance depends principally on eddy dispersion (packing homogeneity), to a lesser degree on longitudinal diffusion (effective sample diffusivity along the packed bed), and only slightly on the solid-liquid mass transfer resistance (sample diffusivity across the particle). In contrast, for proteins, this third HETP contribution, hence the porous particle structure, together with eddy dispersion govern the kinetic performance of columns. Mass transfer kinetics of proteins was observed to be fastest for columns packed with core-shell particles having either a large core-to-particle ratio or having a second, external, shell made of a thin porous layer with large mesopores (200-300 Å) and a high porosity (~/=0.5-0.7). The structure of this external shell seems

  20. Transfer of protein antigens into milk after intravenous injection into lactating mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmatz, P.R.; Hanson, D.G.; Walsh, M.K.; Kleinman, R.E.; Bloch, K.J.; Walker, W.A.

    1986-08-01

    We investigated the transfer of bovine serum /sup 125/I-albumin (/sup 125/I-BSA), bovine /sup 125/I-gamma-globulin (/sup 125/I-BGG), /sup 125/I-ovalbumin (/sup 125/I-OVA), and /sup 125/I-beta-lactoglobulin (/sup 125/I-BLG) from the blood into the milk of lactating mice. Equal amounts (by weight) of the radiolabeled proteins were injected intravenously into mice 1 wk postpartum. Total radioactivity, trichloroacetic acid-precipitable radioactivity, and specifically immunoprecipitable radioactivity were measured in serum, mammary gland homogenate, and milk. Clearance of immunoreactive OVA (iOVA) and iBLG from the circulation was more rapid than iBSA and iBGG. The radioactivity in mammary tissue associated with BSA and BGG was greater than 70% immunoprecipitable throughout the 4-h test interval; /sup 125/I-OVA and /sup 125/I-BLG were less than 12% precipitable 1 and 4 h after injection. In milk obtained at 4 h, there was an approximately 10-fold greater accumulation of iBSA or iBGG than of iOVA or iBLG. These experiments demonstrate that protein antigens differ in their ability to transfer from maternal circulation into milk. The transfer into milk appeared to be in proportion to persistence of the antigens in the maternal circulation.

  1. Genetic and nongenetic sources of variation in phospholipid transfer protein activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvik, Gail P; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Rosenthal, Elisabeth A; Wolfbauer, Gertrud; McKinstry, Laura; Vaze, Aditya; Brunzell, John; Motulsky, Arno G; Nickerson, Deborah A; Heagerty, Patrick J; Wijsman, Ellen M; Albers, John J

    2010-05-01

    Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) belongs to the lipid transfer/lipopolysaccharide-binding protein gene family. Expression of PLTP has been implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. We evaluated the effects of PLTP region tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the prediction of both carotid artery disease (CAAD) and PLTP activity. CAAD effects were evaluated in 442 Caucasian male subjects with severe CAAD and 497 vascular disease-free controls. SNP prediction of PLTP transfer activity was evaluated in both a subsample of 87 subjects enriched for an allele of interest and in a confirmation sample of 210 Caucasian males and females. Hemoglobin A1c or insulin level predicted 11-14% of age- and sex-adjusted PLTP activity. PLTP SNPs that predicted approximately 11-30% of adjusted PLTP activity variance were identified in the two cohorts. For rs6065904, the allele that was associated with CAAD was also associated with elevated PLTP activity in both cohorts. SNPs associated with PLTP activity also predicted variation in LDL-cholesterol and LDL-B level only in the replication cohort. These results demonstrate that PLTP activity is strongly influenced by PLTP region polymorphisms and metabolic factors.

  2. Molecular Mechanics of Chitin-Protein Interface: Terminus and Side Chain

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Zechuan

    2016-01-01

    Chitin and protein are two main building blocks for many natural biomaterials. The interaction between chitin and protein critically determines the properties of the composite biological materials. As living organisms usually encounter complex ambient conditions like water, pH and ions are critical factors towards the structural integrity of biomaterials. It is therefore essential to study the chitin-protein interface under different environmental conditions. Here, an atomistic model consisting of a chitin substrate and a protein filament is constructed, which is regarded as a representative of the chitin-protein interface existing in many chitin-based biomaterials. Based on this model, the mechanical properties of chitin-protein interface under different moisture and pH values are investigated through molecular dynamics simulations. The results reveal a weakening effect of water towards the chitin-protein interface, as well as acidity, i.e. the protonated protein forms a stronger adhesion to chitin than that...

  3. Antimalarial activity of granzyme B and its targeted delivery by a granzyme B-single-chain Fv fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapelski, Stephanie; de Almeida, Melanie; Fischer, Rainer; Barth, Stefan; Fendel, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    We present here the first evidence that granzyme B acts against Plasmodium falciparum (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], 1,590 nM; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1,197 to 2,112 nM). We created a novel antimalarial fusion protein consisting of granzyme B fused to a merozoite surface protein 4 (MSP4)-specific single-chain Fv protein (scFv), which targets the enzyme to infected erythrocytes, with up to an 8-fold reduction in the IC50 (176 nM; 95% CI, 154 to 202 nM). This study confirms the therapeutic efficacies of recombinant antibody-mediated antimalarial immunotherapeutics based on granzyme B.

  4. Distinct and Redundant Functions of μ1 Medium Chains of the AP-1 Clathrin-Associated Protein Complex in the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jaegal; Sternberg, Paul W.; Lee, Junho

    2000-01-01

    In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, there exist two μ1 medium chains of the AP-1 clathrin-associated protein complex. Mutations of unc-101, the gene that encodes one of the μ1 chains, cause pleiotropic effects (Lee et al., 1994). In this report, we identified and analyzed the second μ1 chain gene, apm-1. Unlike the mammalian homologs, the two medium chains are expressed ubiquitously throughout development. RNA interference (RNAi) experiments with apm-1 showed that apm-1 and unc-101 were redundant in embryogenesis and in vulval development. Consistent with this, a hybrid protein containing APM-1, when overexpressed, rescued the phenotype of an unc-101 mutant. However, single disruptions of apm-1 or unc-101 have distinct phenotypes, indicating that the two medium chains may have distinct functions. RNAi of any one of the small or large chains of AP-1 complex (ς1, β1, or γ) showed a phenotype identical to that caused by the simultaneous disruption of unc-101 and apm-1, but not that by single disruption of either gene. This suggests that the two medium chains may share large and small chains in the AP-1 complexes. Thus, apm-1 and unc-101 encode two highly related μ1 chains that share redundant and distinct functions within AP-1 clathrin-associated protein complexes of the same tissue. PMID:10930467

  5. Immunohistochemical detection of autophagy-related microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) in the cerebellums of dogs naturally infected with canine distemper virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabak, Y B; Sozmen, M; Yarim, M; Guvenc, T; Karayigit, M O; Gulbahar, M Y

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the expression of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) protein in the cerebellums of dogs infected with canine distemper virus (CDV) using immunohistochemistry to detect autophagy. The cerebellums of 20 dogs infected with CDV were used. Specimens showing demyelination of white matter were considered to have an acute infection, whereas specimens showing signs of severe perivascular cuffing and demyelination of white matter were classified as having chronic CDV. Cerebellar sections were immunostained with CDV and LC3 antibodies. The cytoplasm of Purkinje cells, granular layer cells, motor neurons in large cerebellar ganglia and some neurons in white matter were positive for the LC3 antibody in both the control and CDV-infected dogs. In the infected cerebellums, however, white matter was immunostained more intensely, particularly the neurons and gemistocytic astrocytes in the demyelinated areas, compared to controls. Autophagy also was demonstrated in CDV-positive cells using double immunofluorescence staining. Our findings indicate that increased autophagy in the cerebellum of dogs naturally infected with CDV may play a role in transferring the virus from cell to cell.

  6. Cancer-Related NEET Proteins Transfer 2Fe-2S Clusters to Anamorsin, a Protein Required for Cytosolic Iron-Sulfur Cluster Biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipper, Colin H.; Paddock, Mark L.; Onuchic, José N.; Mittler, Ron; Nechushtai, Rachel; Jennings, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis is executed by distinct protein assembly systems. Mammals have two systems, the mitochondrial Fe-S cluster assembly system (ISC) and the cytosolic assembly system (CIA), that are connected by an unknown mechanism. The human members of the NEET family of 2Fe-2S proteins, nutrient-deprivation autophagy factor-1 (NAF-1) and mitoNEET (mNT), are located at the interface between the mitochondria and the cytosol. These proteins have been implicated in cancer cell proliferation, and they can transfer their 2Fe-2S clusters to a standard apo-acceptor protein. Here we report the first physiological 2Fe-2S cluster acceptor for both NEET proteins as human Anamorsin (also known as cytokine induced apoptosis inhibitor-1; CIAPIN-1). Anamorsin is an electron transfer protein containing two iron-sulfur cluster-binding sites that is required for cytosolic Fe-S cluster assembly. We show, using UV-Vis spectroscopy, that both NAF-1 and mNT can transfer their 2Fe-2S clusters to apo-Anamorsin with second order rate constants similar to those of other known human 2Fe-2S transfer proteins. A direct protein-protein interaction of the NEET proteins with apo-Anamorsin was detected using biolayer interferometry. Furthermore, electrospray mass spectrometry of holo-Anamorsin prepared by cluster transfer shows that it receives both of its 2Fe-2S clusters from the NEETs. We propose that mNT and NAF-1 can provide parallel routes connecting the mitochondrial ISC system and the CIA. 2Fe-2S clusters assembled in the mitochondria are received by NEET proteins and when needed transferred to Anamorsin, activating the CIA. PMID:26448442

  7. Serum Free Light Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or of one of its component parts – a kappa or lambda light chain, or rarely, a heavy chain. Traditionally, plasma cell ... protein (M-protein) production and to calculate a kappa/lambda free light chain ratio. If the protein electrophoresis test is abnormal, ...

  8. Plasma phospholipid transfer protein activity is inversely associated with betaine in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullaart, R. P. F.; Garcia, Erwin; Jeyarajah, Elias; Gruppen, Eke G.; Connelly, Margery A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The choline metabolite, betaine, plays a role in lipid metabolism, and may predict the development of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) and lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) require phosphatidylcholine as substrate

  9. Transferring cucumber mosaic virus-white leaf strain coat protein gene into Cucumis melo L. and evaluating transgenic plants for protection against infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonsalves, C.; Xue, B.; Yepes, M.; Fuchs, M.; Ling, K.; Namba, S. (Cornell Univ., Geneva, NY (United States). Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1994-03-01

    A single regeneration procedure using cotyledon examples effectively regenerated five commercially grown muskmelon cultivars. This regeneration scheme was used to facilitate gene transfers using either Agrobacterium tumefaciens or microprojectile bombardment methods. In both cases, the transferred genes were from the T-DNA region of the binary vector plasmid pGA482GG/cp cucumber mosaic virus-white leaf strain (CMV-WL), which contains genes that encode neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPT II), [beta]-glucuronidase (GUS), and the CMV-WL coat protein (CP). Explants treated with pGA482GG/cpCMV-WL regenerated shoots on Murashige and Skoog medium containing 4.4 [mu]m 6-benzylaminopurine (BA), kanamycin (Km) at 150 mg[center dot]liter[sup [minus]1] and carbenicillin (Cb) at 500 mg[center dot]liter[sup [minus]1]. The authors' comparison of A. tumefaciens- and microprojectile-mediated gene transfer procedures shows that both methods effectively produce nearly the same percentage of transgenic plants. R[sub 0] plants were first tested for GUS or NPT II expression, then the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and other tests were used to verify the transfer of the NPT II, GUS, and CMV-WL CP genes.

  10. Xanthohumol, a prenylated chalcone from Humulus lupulus L., inhibits cholesteryl ester transfer protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Takazumi, Koji; Segawa, Shuichi; Okada, Yukio; Kobayashi, Naoyuki; Shigyo, Tatsuro; Chiba, Hitoshi

    2012-10-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels are correlated with a low risk of atherosclerosis. The inhibition of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), which catalyses cholesterol transfer between lipoproteins, leads to an increase in HDL-cholesterol and is expected to be the next anti-atherogenic target. This study revealed that xanthohumol, a prenylated chalcone, showed the highest inhibition against CETP from screening of natural products in various plants. We investigated the inhibitory activity of some chalcones and flavanones. Naringenin chalcone showed weak CETP inhibition compared with xanthohumol. In addition, isoxanthohumol and naringenin drastically decreased the inhibitory activity. These results suggest that the prenyl group and chalcone structure of xanthohumol were responsible for the CETP inhibitory activity.

  11. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttitta, Christina M; Ericson, Daniel L; Scalia, Alexander; Roessler, Christian G; Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Campos, Olven; Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M; Sweet, Robert M; Soares, Alexei S

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s(-1)) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  12. Dissection of the triple tryptophan electron transfer chain in Escherichia coli DNA photolyase: Trp382 is the primary donor in photoactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrdin, Martin; Eker, André P M; Vos, Marten H; Brettel, Klaus

    2003-07-22

    In Escherichia coli photolyase, excitation of the FAD cofactor in its semireduced radical state (FADH*) induces an electron transfer over approximately 15 A from tryptophan W306 to the flavin. It has been suggested that two additional tryptophans are involved in an electron transfer chain FADH* FADH* decayed with a time constant tau approximately 26 ps to fully reduced flavin and a tryptophan cation radical. In W382F mutant photolyase, the excited flavin was much longer lived (tau approximately 80 ps), and no significant amount of product was detected. We conclude that, in WT photolyase, excited FADH* is quenched by electron transfer from W382. On a millisecond scale, a product state with extremely low yield ( approximately 0.5% of WT) was detected in W382F mutant photolyase. Its spectral and kinetic features were similar to the fully reduced flavin/neutral tryptophan radical state in WT photolyase. We suggest that, in W382F mutant photolyase, excited FADH* is reduced by W359 at a rate that competes only poorly with the intrinsic decay of excited FADH* (tau approximately 80 ps), explaining the low product yield. Subsequently, the W359 cation radical is reduced by W306. The rate constants of electron transfer from W382 to excited FADH* in WT and from W359 to excited FADH* in W382F mutant photolyase were estimated and related to the donor-acceptor distances.

  13. Role of the middle residue in the triple tryptophan electron transfer chain of DNA photolyase: ultrafast spectroscopy of a Trp-->Phe mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacs, Andras; Eker, André P M; Byrdin, Martin; Villette, Sandrine; Pan, Jie; Brettel, Klaus; Vos, Marten H

    2006-08-17

    Photoreduction of the semi-reduced flavin adenine dinucleotide cofactor FADH* in DNA photolyase from Escherichia coli into FADH- involves three tryptophan (W) residues that form a closely spaced electron-transfer chain FADH*-W382-W359-W306. To investigate this process, we have constructed a mutant photolyase in which W359 is replaced by phenylalanine (F). Monitoring its photoproducts by femtosecond spectroscopy, the excited-state FADH* was found to decay in approximately 30 ps, similar as in wild type (WT) photolyase. In contrast to WT, however, in W359F mutant photolyase the ground-state FADH* fully recovered virtually concomitantly with the decay of its excited state and, despite the presence of the primary electron donor W382, no measurable flavin reduction was observed at any time. Thus, W359F photolyase appears to behave like many other flavoproteins, where flavin excited states are quenched by very short-lived oxidation of aromatic residues. Our analysis indicates that both charge recombination of the primary charge separation state FADH-W382*+ and (in WT) electron transfer from W359 to W382*+ occur with time constants FADH* electron-transfer step. Our results provide a first experimental indication that electron transfer between aromatic residues can take place on the time scale of approximately 10(-12) s.

  14. Energy transfer at heterogeneous protein-protein interfaces to investigate the molecular behaviour in the crowding environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Chikashi

    2017-03-01

    Investigation of the behaviour of proteins in crowded environments is crucial for understanding the role of proteins in biological environments. In this study, the behaviour of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in crowded (highly concentrated) environments was investigated using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy as a model system. By using energy transfer as a molecular ruler, the crowding effect was clearly observed in the time resolved spectra. In addition, by using both time resolved anisotropy measurement and Raman spectroscopy, more detail insights from conformational and dynamic points of view were described. Consequently, it was revealed that in the highly concentrated solution, most of the BSA molecules are in the fast-reversible oligomeric state and the association at the "hard" and "soft" interfaces between protein surfaces occurred in a highly crowded environment with the aid of a charge-charge and short-range attractive interface. From both the conformational and dynamic aspects, the detail spectroscopic understanding of the behaviour of BSA in the crowding environment was obtained.

  15. In Vivo Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions with Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET): Progress and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Sihuai; Yang, Xiaobing; Wang, Yao; Shen, Xihui

    2016-10-11

    Proteins are the elementary machinery of life, and their functions are carried out mostly by molecular interactions. Among those interactions, protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are the most important as they participate in or mediate all essential biological processes. However, many common methods for PPI investigations are slightly unreliable and suffer from various limitations, especially in the studies of dynamic PPIs. To solve this problem, a method called Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET) was developed about seventeen years ago. Since then, BRET has evolved into a whole class of methods that can be used to survey virtually any kinds of PPIs. Compared to many traditional methods, BRET is highly sensitive, reliable, easy to perform, and relatively inexpensive. However, most importantly, it can be done in vivo and allows the real-time monitoring of dynamic PPIs with the easily detectable light signal, which is extremely valuable for the PPI functional research. This review will take a comprehensive look at this powerful technique, including its principles, comparisons with other methods, experimental approaches, classifications, applications, early developments, recent progress, and prospects.

  16. Transfer functions for protein signal transduction: application to a model of striatal neural plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Scheler

    Full Text Available We present a novel formulation for biochemical reaction networks in the context of protein signal transduction. The model consists of input-output transfer functions, which are derived from differential equations, using stable equilibria. We select a set of "source" species, which are interpreted as input signals. Signals are transmitted to all other species in the system (the "target" species with a specific delay and with a specific transmission strength. The delay is computed as the maximal reaction time until a stable equilibrium for the target species is reached, in the context of all other reactions in the system. The transmission strength is the concentration change of the target species. The computed input-output transfer functions can be stored in a matrix, fitted with parameters, and even recalled to build dynamical models on the basis of state changes. By separating the temporal and the magnitudinal domain we can greatly simplify the computational model, circumventing typical problems of complex dynamical systems. The transfer function transformation of biochemical reaction systems can be applied to mass-action kinetic models of signal transduction. The paper shows that this approach yields significant novel insights while remaining a fully testable and executable dynamical model for signal transduction. In particular we can deconstruct the complex system into local transfer functions between individual species. As an example, we examine modularity and signal integration using a published model of striatal neural plasticity. The modularizations that emerge correspond to a known biological distinction between calcium-dependent and cAMP-dependent pathways. Remarkably, we found that overall interconnectedness depends on the magnitude of inputs, with higher connectivity at low input concentrations and significant modularization at moderate to high input concentrations. This general result, which directly follows from the properties of

  17. Transfer functions for protein signal transduction: application to a model of striatal neural plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel formulation for biochemical reaction networks in the context of protein signal transduction. The model consists of input-output transfer functions, which are derived from differential equations, using stable equilibria. We select a set of "source" species, which are interpreted as input signals. Signals are transmitted to all other species in the system (the "target" species) with a specific delay and with a specific transmission strength. The delay is computed as the maximal reaction time until a stable equilibrium for the target species is reached, in the context of all other reactions in the system. The transmission strength is the concentration change of the target species. The computed input-output transfer functions can be stored in a matrix, fitted with parameters, and even recalled to build dynamical models on the basis of state changes. By separating the temporal and the magnitudinal domain we can greatly simplify the computational model, circumventing typical problems of complex dynamical systems. The transfer function transformation of biochemical reaction systems can be applied to mass-action kinetic models of signal transduction. The paper shows that this approach yields significant novel insights while remaining a fully testable and executable dynamical model for signal transduction. In particular we can deconstruct the complex system into local transfer functions between individual species. As an example, we examine modularity and signal integration using a published model of striatal neural plasticity. The modularizations that emerge correspond to a known biological distinction between calcium-dependent and cAMP-dependent pathways. Remarkably, we found that overall interconnectedness depends on the magnitude of inputs, with higher connectivity at low input concentrations and significant modularization at moderate to high input concentrations. This general result, which directly follows from the properties of individual transfer

  18. Bridging of partially negative atoms by hydrogen bonds from main-chain NH groups in proteins: The crown motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leader, David P; Milner-White, E James

    2015-11-01

    The backbone NH groups of proteins can form N1N3-bridges to δ-ve or anionic acceptor atoms when the tripeptide in which they occur orients them appropriately, as in the RL and LR nest motifs, which have dihedral angles 1,2-αR αL and 1,2-αL αR , respectively. We searched a protein database for structures with backbone N1N3-bridging to anionic atoms of the polypeptide chain and found that RL and LR nests together accounted for 92% of examples found (88% RL nests, 4% LR nests). Almost all the remaining 8% of N1N3-bridges were found within a third tripeptide motif which has not been described previously. We term this a "crown," because of the disposition of the tripeptide CO groups relative to the three NH groups and the acceptor oxygen anion, and the crown together with its bridged anion we term a "crown bridge." At position 2 of these structures the dihedral angles have a tight αR distribution, but at position 1 they have a wider distribution, with ϕ and ψ values generally being lower than those at position 1. Over half of crown bridges involve the backbone CO group three residues N-terminal to the tripeptide, the remainder being to other main-chain or side-chain carbonyl groups. As with nests, bridging of crowns to oxygen atoms within ligands was observed, as was bridging to the sulfur atom of an iron-sulfur cluster. This latter property may be of significance for protein evolution.

  19. Preferred sites and pathways for electron transfer in blue copper proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1988-01-01

    Long-range electron transfer reactions proceed within and between metalloproteins at relatively fast rates and with marked specificities. The blue single copper proteins are well known electron carriers with their redox center being of limited accessibility to solvent and solutes. The question......, E.T. proceeds via an extended imidazole ring system, and in plastocyanin and stellacyanin via a weakly coupled pi-system. Therefore, a case emerges for suggesting that this is the common feature of the long-distance intramolecular E.T. in this class of metalloproteins. These pathways are most...

  20. Multi-step excitation energy transfer engineered in genetic fusions of natural and synthetic light-harvesting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Joshua A; Kodali, Goutham; Jiang, Jianbing; Reddy, Kanumuri Ramesh; Lindsey, Jonathan S; Bryant, Donald A; Dutton, P Leslie; Moser, Christopher C

    2017-02-01

    Synthetic proteins designed and constructed from first principles with minimal reference to the sequence of any natural protein have proven robust and extraordinarily adaptable for engineering a range of functions. Here for the first time we describe the expression and genetic fusion of a natural photosynthetic light-harvesting subunit with a synthetic protein designed for light energy capture and multi-step transfer. We demonstrate excitation energy transfer from the bilin of the CpcA subunit (phycocyanin α subunit) of the cyanobacterial photosynthetic light-harvesting phycobilisome to synthetic four-helix-bundle proteins accommodating sites that specifically bind a variety of selected photoactive tetrapyrroles positioned to enhance energy transfer by relay. The examination of combinations of different bilin, chlorin and bacteriochlorin cofactors has led to identification of the preconditions for directing energy from the bilin light-harvesting antenna into synthetic protein-cofactor constructs that can be customized for light-activated chemistry in the cell.

  1. Reliability Measurement for Software with Variable Length Markov Control Transfer Chain%VLMC控制流软件可靠性度量方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵瑞曼; 潘冠华; 方建勇

    2014-01-01

    The classical software reliability model of Cheung based on architecture analysis is imperfect when applied to soft-ware which has non-uniqueness terminal node because of ideal assumptions. In order to handle this problem, an improved model is established through two improvement as follows:first, probability matrix of control transfer from start node to other inner nodes in a given software is computed independently of control transfer within inner nodes on the assumptions that the start node is inaccessible to control transfer from any inner nodes;and then, probability matrixes of control transfer within in-ner nodes are reconfigured by weaken the difference between inner nodes and ending nodes. In order to measure the reliability of software with VLMC control transfer flow, the variable length Markov control sequence chain is converted to simple Markov chain by node expansion and conditional transfer probability redistribution. By using deductive inference, a formal proof for the new model is given in this essay. In the end, effectiveness and simplicity of the proposed method is verified by a software example.%针对现有软件可靠性模型普遍不适用于实际软件的问题,分析了软件内部模块间控制转移机理,通过分离入口模块,提取一阶控制转移概率矩阵;弱化内部模块与出口模块间差异,重构二阶以上转移概率矩阵,在改进Cheung模型的基础上建立一个更符合软件实际的可靠性度量模型。针对变阶依赖( VLMC)控制转移导致的可靠性度量难问题,通过对导致复杂依赖的多入多出模块进行节点扩展,将VLMC控制流转化为Markov链,利用所建立的软件可靠性模型对VLMC控制流软件进行可靠性度量。研究利用演绎推理对所建立模型进行了正确性形式化证明。最后给出了方法的实例验证。

  2. Filter transfer of genomic libraries in a state accessible to DNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebee, T J

    1987-04-01

    I have developed a method for transferring plaque DNA of lambda genomic libraries onto 3MM filters in a state accessible to DNA-binding proteins. DNA bound to 3MM is available to proteins as large as Escherichia coli RNA polymerase and maintains template activity similar to that in free solution. Lambda Plaques can be lifted onto 3MM filter disks, deproteinized, and used for transcription assays in vitro. The RNA synthesized is complementary to phage rather than to E. coli DNA and plaques can be identified by autoradiography. Furthermore, the filters can subsequently be probed with radioactive nucleic acids under standard hybridization conditions. Finally, colorimetric assays can be employed with lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) A in which plaques are identified by the localized reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium.

  3. Quantifying information transfer by protein domains: Analysis of the Fyn SH2 domain structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenaerts, Tom; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Stricher, Francois

    2008-01-01

    distal communication is achieved. We illustrate the approach by analyzing information transfer by the SH2 domain of Fyn tyrosine kinase, obtained from Monte Carlo dynamics simulations. Our analysis reveals that the Fyn SH2 domain forms a noisy communication channel that couples residues located...... in the phosphopeptide and specificity binding sites and a number of residues at the other side of the domain near the linkers that connect the SH2 domain to the SH3 and kinase domains. We find that for this particular domain, communication is affected by a series of contiguous residues that connect distal sites...... by crossing the core of the SH2 domain. Conclusion: As a result, our method provides a means to directly map the exchange of biological information on the structure of protein domains, making it clear how binding triggers conformational changes in the protein structure. As such it provides a structural road...

  4. Surface residues dynamically organize water bridges to enhance electron transfer between proteins

    CERN Document Server

    de la Lande, Aurélien; Řezáč, Jan; Sanders, Barry C; Salahub, Dennis R; 10.1073/pnas.0914457107

    2010-01-01

    Cellular energy production depends on electron transfer (ET) between proteins. In this theoretical study, we investigate the impact of structural and conformational variations on the electronic coupling between the redox proteins methylamine dehydrogenase and amicyanin from Paracoccus denitrificans. We used molecular dynamics simulations to generate configurations over a duration of 40ns (sampled at 100fs intervals) in conjunction with an ET pathway analysis to estimate the ET coupling strength of each configuration. In the wild type complex, we find that the most frequently occurring molecular configurations afford superior electronic coupling due to the consistent presence of a water molecule hydrogen-bonded between the donor and acceptor sites. We attribute the persistence of this water bridge to a "molecular breakwater" composed of several hydrophobic residues surrounding the acceptor site. The breakwater supports the function of nearby solvent-organizing residues by limiting the exchange of water molecul...

  5. IR-FEL-induced green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene transfer into plant cell

    CERN Document Server

    Awazu, K; Tamiya, E

    2002-01-01

    A Free Electron Laser (FEL) holds potential for various biotechnological applications due to its characteristics such as flexible wavelength tunability, short pulse and high peak power. We could successfully introduce the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) gene into tobacco BY2 cells by IR-FEL laser irradiation. The irradiated area of the solution containing BY2 cells and plasmid was about 0.1 mm sup 2. FEL irradiation at a wavelength of 5.75 and 6.1 mu m, targeting absorption by the ester bond of the lipid and the amide I bond of the protein, respectively, was shown to cause the introduction of the fluorescent dye into the cell. On the other hand, transient expression of the GFP fluorescence was only observed after irradiation at 5.75 mu m. The maximum transfer efficiency was about 0.5%.

  6. Development of single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies against surface proteins of 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qing; Jordan, Ramon; Brlansky, Ronald H; Minenkova, Olga; Hartung, John

    2016-03-01

    'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' is the causal agent of citrus huanglongbing, the most serious disease of citrus worldwide. We have developed and applied immunization and affinity screening methods to develop a primary library of recombinant single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies in an M13 vector, pKM19. The antibody population is enriched for antibodies that bind antigens of 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus'. The primary library has more than 10(7) unique antibodies and the genes that encode them. We have screened this library for antibodies that bind to specifically-chosen proteins that are present on the surface of 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus'. These proteins were used as targets for affinity-based selection of scFvs that bind to the major outer membrane protein, OmpA; the polysaccharide capsule protein KpsF; a protein component of the type IV pilus (CapF); and, two flagellar proteins FlhA and FlgI. These scFvs have been used in ELISA and dot blot assays against purified protein antigens and 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' infected plant extracts. We have also recloned many of these scFvs into a plasmid expression vector designed for the production of scFvs. Screening of these scFvs was more efficient when phage-bound, rather than soluble scFvs, were used. We have demonstrated a technology to produce antibodies at will and against any protein target encoded by 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus'. Applications could include advanced diagnostic methods for huanglongbing and the development of immune labeling reagents for in planta applications.

  7. Synthesis of CdSe quantum dots using various long-chain fatty acids and their phase transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Aiyu; Yang, Ping; Shen, Jianxing

    2013-06-01

    Monodispersed colloidal photoluminescent CdSe quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized via an organic approach by using cadmium oxide and elemental selenium as precursors, and long-chain fatty acids as surface ligands. The hydrocarbon chain length of the fatty acid was adjusted to investigate the effect on CdSe QDs. The fatty acid ligands with different hydrocarbon chain lengths showed an apparent effect on the nanocrystal nucleation and growth which is the key controlling the size, size distribution and crystal structure of resulting CdSe QDs. This effect was attributable to the steric hindrance of different hydrocarbon length of the fatty acids, which affected the reactivity of the monomers and nanocrystals during the nanocrystal nucleation and growth. The water-soluble CdSe QDs were obtained by encapsulating the CdSe ODs in oil phase with amphiphilic poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride) (PSMA)-ethanolamine (EA) polymers, which made it possible for further applications of the CdSe QDs in aqueous environment such as surface functionalization for biological labeling and application in photocatalysis and photosensitization.

  8. Interplay between excited-state intramolecular proton transfer and charge transfer in flavonols and their use as protein-binding-site fluorescence probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sytnik, A.; Gormin, D.; Kasha, M. (Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States))

    1994-12-06

    A comparative study is presented of competitive fluorescences of three flavonols, 3-hydroxyflavone, 3,3[prime],4[prime],7-tetrahydroxyflavone (fisetin), and 4[prime]-diethylamino-3-hydroxyflavone (DHF). The normal fluorescence S[sub 1] [yields] S[sub 0] (400-nm region) is largely replaced by the proton-transfer tautomer fluorescence S[prime][sub 1] [yields] S[prime][sub 0] in the 550-nm region for all three of the flavonols in aprotic solvents at room temperature. For DHF in polar solvents the normal fluorescence becomes a charge-transfer fluorescence (460-500 nm) which competes strongly with the still dominant proton-transfer fluorescence (at 570 nm). In protic solvents, and at 77 K, the interference with intramolecular hydrogen bonding gives rise to greatly enhanced normal fluorescence, lowering the quantum yield of proton-transfer fluorescence. The utility of DHF as a discriminating fluorescence probe for protein binding sites is suggested by the strong dependence of the charge-transfer fluorescence on polarity of the environment and by various static and dynamic parameters of the charge-transfer and proton-transfer fluorescence which can be determined. 49 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Relevance of structural segregation and chain compaction for the thermodynamics of folding of a hydrophobic protein model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Marco Aurélio A; de Araújo, Antônio F Pereira

    2003-05-01

    The relevance of inside-outside segregation and chain compaction for the thermodynamics of folding of a hydrophobic protein model is probed by complete enumeration of two-dimensional chains of up to 18 monomers in the square lattice. The exact computation of Z scores for uniquely designed sequences confirms that Z tends to decrease linearly with sigma square root of N, as previously suggested by theoretical analysis and Monte Carlo simulations, where sigma, the standard deviation of the number of contacts made by different monomers in the target structure, is a measure of structural segregation and N is the chain length. The probability that the target conformation is indeed the unique global energy minimum of the designed sequence is found to increase dramatically with sigma, approaching unity at maximal segregation. However, due to the huge number of conformations with sub-maximal values of sigma, which correspond to intermediate, only mildly discriminative, values of Z, in addition to significant oscillations of Z around its estimated value, the probability that a correctly designed sequence corresponds to a maximally segregated conformation is small. This behavior of Z also explains the observed relation between sigma and different measures of folding cooperativity of correctly designed sequences.

  10. Diagonalization of transfer matrix of supersymmetry $u_q(\\hat{sl}(m+1|n+1))$ chain with a boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Kojima, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    We study the supersymmetry $U_q(\\hat{sl}(M+1|N+1))$ analogue of the supersymmetric t-J model with a boundary, in the framework of the algebraic analysis method. We diagonalize the commuting transfer matrix by using the bosonization of the vertex operator associated with the quantum affine supersymmetry.

  11. Formation of long-lived radicals on proteins by radical transfer from heme enzymes--a common process?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostdal, H; Andersen, H J; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    albumin, indicating that the tertiary structure of the target protein plays an important role in determining the rate of radical transfer and/or the stability of the resultant species. These results are consistent with a mechanism for the HRP/H2O2/no free tyrosine system involving radical transfer...... to the albumin via the heme edge of the peroxidase. In contrast, albumin radical formation by the HRP/H2O2/free tyrosine system was only marginally affected by proteolysis, consistent with free tyrosine phenoxyl radicals being the mediators of radical transfer, without significant protein-protein interaction......Incubation of Fe(III)myoglobin (Fe(III)Mb) with H2O2 in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been shown previously to give albumin-derived radicals as a result of radical transfer from myoglobin to BSA. In this study the occurrence of similar processes with peroxidases has been...

  12. Increased in vitro and in vivo gene transfer by adenovirus vectors containing chimeric fiber proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, T J; Tzeng, E; Shears, L L; Roelvink, P W; Li, Y; Lee, G M; Brough, D E; Lizonova, A; Kovesdi, I

    1997-11-01

    Alteration of the natural tropism of adenovirus (Ad) will permit gene transfer into specific cell types and thereby greatly broaden the scope of target diseases that can be treated by using Ad. We have constructed two Ad vectors which contain modifications to the Ad fiber coat protein that redirect virus binding to either alpha(v) integrin [AdZ.F(RGD)] or heparan sulfate [AdZ.F(pK7)] cellular receptors. These vectors were constructed by a novel method involving E4 rescue of an E4-deficient Ad with a transfer vector containing both the E4 region and the modified fiber gene. AdZ.F(RGD) increased gene delivery to endothelial and smooth muscle cells expressing alpha(v) integrins. Likewise, AdZ.F(pK7) increased transduction 5- to 500-fold in multiple cell types lacking high levels of Ad fiber receptor, including macrophage, endothelial, smooth muscle, fibroblast, and T cells. In addition, AdZ.F(pK7) significantly increased gene transfer in vivo to vascular smooth muscle cells of the porcine iliac artery following balloon angioplasty. These vectors may therefore be useful in gene therapy for vascular restenosis or for targeting endothelial cells in tumors. Although binding to the fiber receptor still occurs with these vectors, they demonstrate the feasibility of tissue-specific receptor targeting in cells which express low levels of Ad fiber receptor.

  13. Inhibition of cholesterol ester transfer protein CGS 25159 and changes in lipoproteins in hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, H V; Poirier, K J; Lee, W H; Satoh, Y

    1997-01-03

    As a result of screening, several isoflavans were identified to be antagonists of cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) activity. The present study evaluates CGS 25159, a synthetic isoflavan, as a putative inhibitor of CETP activity of human and hamster plasma. Determined by [3]CE transfer from HDL to VLDL + LDL fraction or by fluorescent-CE transfer assay, CGS 25159 inhibited CETP in both human plasma bottom fraction (d = 1.21 g/ml) and in plasma from Golden Syrian Hamsters with an IC50 time dependent changes in CETP activity. After two weeks of treatment at 10 mg/kg, the changes in VLDL + LDL cholesterol, total triglycerides and HDL cholesterol were -22 +/- 4.6*, -23 +/- 7.5 and +10 +/- 2.8%, respectively. The corresponding changes at 30 mg/kg were -28 +/- 5.5*, -38 +/- 6.8* and +29 +/-4.4.*%, (*, P, 0.05; mean +/- S.E.M., n = 6). A single spin gradient density ultracentrifugation of plasma lipoproteins and treated animals showed an increase in HDL cholesterol and a redistribution to larger HDL particles. These data support the contention that pharmacological down regulation of CETP activity could result in favorable changes in lipoprotein profile.

  14. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic pig produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU ZhongHua; SUN Shuang; LI YuTian; WANG HongBin; R S PRATHER; SONG Jun; WANG ZhenKun; TIAN JiangTian; KONG QingRan; ZHENG Zhong; YIN Zhi; GAO Li; MA HaiKun

    2008-01-01

    Transgenic somatic cell nuclear transfer is a very promising route for producing transgenic farm ani-mals. Research on GFP transgenic pigs can provide useful information for breeding transgenic pigs, human disease models and human organ xenotransplantation. In this study, a liposomal transfection system was screened and transgenic embryos were reconstructed by nuclear transfer of GFP positive cells into enucleated in vitro matured oocytes. The development of reconstructed embryos both in vitro and in vivo was observed, and GFP expression was determined. The results showed that porcine fe-tal-derived fibroblast cells cultured with 4.0 plJmL liposome and 1.6 pg/mL plasmid DNA for 6 h re-sulted in the highest transfection rate (3.6%). The percentage of GFP reconstructed embryos that de-veloped in vitro to the blastocyst stage was 10%. Of those the GFP positive percentage was 48%. Re-constructed transgenic embryos were transferred to 10 recipients. 5 of them were pregnant, and 3 de-livered 6 cloned piglets in which 4 piglets were transgenic for the GFP as verified by both GFP protein expression and GFP DNA sequence analysis. The percentage of reconstructed embryos that resulted in cloned piglets was 1.0%; while the percentage of piglets that were transgenic was 0.7%. This is the first group of transgenic cloned pigs born in China, marking a great progress in Chinese transgenic cloned pig research.

  15. Polarizable simulations with second order interaction model (POSSIM) force field: developing parameters for protein side-chain analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinbi; Ponomarev, Sergei Y; Sa, Qina; Sigalovsky, Daniel L; Kaminski, George A

    2013-05-30

    A previously introduced polarizable simulations with second-order interaction model (POSSIM) force field has been extended to include parameters for small molecules serving as models for peptide and protein side-chains. Parameters have been fitted to permit reproducing many-body energies, gas-phase dimerization energies, and geometries and liquid-phase heats of vaporization and densities. Quantum mechanical and experimental data have been used as the target for the fitting. The POSSIM framework combines accuracy of a polarizable force field and computational efficiency of the second-order approximation of the full-scale induced point dipole polarization formalism. The resulting parameters can be used for simulations of the parameterized molecules themselves or their analogues. In addition to this, these force field parameters are currently being used in further development of the POSSIM fast polarizable force field for proteins.

  16. Anti-Human Endoglin (hCD105 Immunotoxin—Containing Recombinant Single Chain Ribosome-Inactivating Protein Musarmin 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begoña Barriuso

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Endoglin (CD105 is an accessory component of the TGF-β receptor complex, which is expressed in a number of tissues and over-expressed in the endothelial cells of tumor neovasculature. Targeting endoglin with immunotoxins containing type 2 ribosome-inactivating proteins has proved an effective tool to reduce blood supply to B16 mice tumor xenografts. We prepared anti-endoglin immunotoxin (IT—containing recombinant musarmin 1 (single chain ribosome-inactivating proteins linked to the mouse anti-human CD105 44G4 mouse monoclonal antibody via N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio propionate (SPDP. The immunotoxin specifically killed L929 fibroblast mouse cells transfected with the short form of human endoglin with IC50 values in the range of 5 × 10−10 to 10−9 M.

  17. Barley lipid transfer protein, LTP1, contains a new type of lipid-like post-translational modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Lerche, Mathilde H.; Poulsen, Flemming Martin;

    2001-01-01

    the formation of cutin and involvement in stress and pathogen responses, but there is yet no direct demonstration of an in vivo function. We have found and characterized a novel post-translational modification of the barley nonspecific lipid transfer protein, LTP1. The protein-modification bond is of a new type...

  18. Paper-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay for directly detecting nucleic acids and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Fang, Xueen; Cao, Hongmei; Kong, Jilie

    2016-06-15

    Paper-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay (FRET) is gaining great interest in detecting macro-biological molecule. It is difficult to achieve conveniently and fast detection for macro-biological molecule. Herein, a graphene oxide (GO)-based paper chip (glass fiber) integrated with fluorescence labeled single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) for fast, inexpensive and direct detection of biological macromolecules (proteins and nucleic acids) has been developed. In this paper, we employed the Cy3/FAM-labeled ssDNA as the reporter and the GO as quencher and the original glass fiber paper as data acquisition substrates. The chip which was designed and fabricated by a cutting machine is a miniature biosensor that monitors fluorescence recovery from resonance energy transfer. The hybridization assays and fluorescence detection were all simplified, and the surface of the chip did not require immobilization or washing. A Nikon Eclipse was employed as excited resource and a commercial digital camera was employed for capturing digital images. This paper-based microfluidics chip has been applied in the detection of proteins and nucleic acids. The biosensing capability meets many potential requirements for disease diagnosis and biological analysis.

  19. Unraveling the structure of membrane proteins in situ by transfer function corrected cryo-electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibauer, Matthias; Hoffmann, Christian; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Nickell, Stephan; Engelhardt, Harald

    2012-12-01

    Cryo-electron tomography in combination with subtomogram averaging allows to investigate the structure of protein assemblies in their natural environment in a close to live state. To make full use of the structural information contained in tomograms it is necessary to analyze the contrast transfer function (CTF) of projections and to restore the phases of higher spatial frequencies. CTF correction is however hampered by the difficulty of determining the actual defocus values from tilt series data, which is due to the low signal-to-noise ratio of electron micrographs. In this study, an extended acquisition scheme is introduced that enables an independent CTF determination. Two high-dose images are recorded along the tilt axis on both sides of each projection, which allow an accurate determination of the defocus values of these images. These values are used to calculate the CTF for each image of the tilt series. We applied this scheme to the mycobacterial outer membrane protein MspA reconstituted in lipid vesicles and tested several variants of CTF estimation in combination with subtomogram averaging and correction of the modulation transfer function (MTF). The 3D electron density map of MspA was compared with a structure previously determined by X-ray crystallography. We were able to demonstrate that structural information up to a resolution of 16.8Å can be recovered using our CTF correction approach, whereas the uncorrected 3D map had a resolution of only 26.2Å.

  20. Analysis of Air Cargo Transfer Service Chain at Pudong International Airport%浦东国际机场货运中转服务链分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘锐; 崔诚靓; 陈川

    2015-01-01

    Air cargo transfer involves several participants in its operation process, including ship pers, freight forwarders, airport cargo terminal, airlines, customs and other regulatory agencies. All of the related participants constitute the entire service chain of air cargo transfer, making the air transport continuous and convenient. Based on field research into the related enterprises, this study summarizes the developing situation about the air cargo transfer at Pudong International Airport as well as the related appeals proposed by the relevant partici pants, points out the problems at Pudong International Airport and presents some suggestions from the perspec tive of service chain.%现代航空货物中转运输在其运营过程中涉及到许多参与方,包括货主、货代、机场货站、航空公司以及海关等监管机构,所有这一系列参与方构成了整个货运中转服务链条,维系着航空运输的连续性和快捷性. 在立足对浦东机场各个货运相关参与方的实地调研的基础上,通过收集整理国外枢纽机场和相关企业的资料,分析总结浦东机场各个参与方的发展现状,梳理了参与方对中转联程运输的相关诉求,指出了浦东机场货运中转服务链中所存在的相关问题,最后从服务链的角度提出改善浦东机场货运中转的建议.

  1. Biomolecular Mechanisms of Mercury Transfers and Transformations by Proteins of the Mer Operon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S. M.; Hong, B.; Nauss, R.; Momany, C.; Summers, A. O.; Feng, X.; Harwood, I.; Stroud, R.

    2008-12-01

    Aerobic bacteria exhibiting resistance to the toxic effects of Hg(II) and organomercurials [RHg(I), e.g. MeHg(I)] and are widely found in both pristine and mercury contaminated environments. Resistance, afforded by a plasmid- or transposon-associated mer operon, involves an unusual pathway where Hg(II) and organomercurials [RHg(I)] undergo facilitated entry into the bacterial cytoplasm via an integral membrane transport protein (MerT) and are then "detoxified" by the concerted effort of two enzymes, organomercurial lyase (MerB), which catalyzes dealkylation (i.e., demethylation) of RHg(I) to Hg(II) and a hydrocarbon, and mercuric ion reductase (MerA), which catalyzes reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) as the ultimate detoxification for the organism. With a widespread distribution, these bacterial transformations play a significant role in the fate of mercury in the environment. Our focus is on elucidation of the molecular mechanisms for the transport and catalytic transformations of RHg(I) and Hg(II) by these proteins and the factors that influence the overall efficiency of the process. Current efforts are focused primarily on elucidating details of RHg(I) binding and dealkylation by MerB as well as the mechanism for transfer of the Hg(II) product to MerA. Key findings include the demonstration of a non-cysteine residue as essential for the catalytic activity and demonstration that direct transfer of Hg(II) to MerA proceeds more rapidly and more completely than transfer to small MW thiols such as cysteines or glutathione. Reuslts of these studies as well as an overview of our current understanding of the whole system will be presented.

  2. Fast side chain replacement in proteins using a coarse-grained approach for evaluating the effects of mutation during evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahnen, Johan A; Kubelka, Jan; Liberles, David A

    2011-08-01

    For high-throughput structural genomic and evolutionary bioinformatics approaches, there is a clear need for fast methods to evaluate substitutions structurally. Coarse-grained methods are both powerful and fast, and a coarse-grained approach to position the substituted side chains is presented. Through the application of a coarse-grained method, a speed-up on the single- residue replacement, of at least sevenfold is achieved compared with modern all-atom approaches. At the same time, this approach maintains a small median RMSD from the leading all-atom approach (as measured in coarse-grained space), and predicts the conformation of point mutants with similar accuracy and generates biologically realistic side chain angles. This method is also substantially more predictable in its run time, making it useful for high-throughput studies of protein structural evolution. To demonstrate the utility of this method, it has been implemented in a forward simulation of sequences threaded through the SH2 domains, with selective pressures to fold and bind specifically. The relative substitution rates across the protein structure and at the binding interface are reflective of those observed in SH2 domain evolution. The algorithm has been implemented in C++, with the source code and binaries (currently supported for Linux systems) freely available as SARA at http://www.wyomingbioinformatics.org/LiberlesGroup/SARA .

  3. A microarray of ubiquitylated proteins for profiling deubiquitylase activity reveals the critical roles of both chain and substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loch, Christian M; Strickler, James E

    2012-11-01

    Substrate ubiquitylation is a reversible process critical to cellular homeostasis that is often dysregulated in many human pathologies including cancer and neurodegeneration. Elucidating the mechanistic details of this pathway could unlock a large store of information useful to the design of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. Proteomic approaches to the questions at hand have generally utilized mass spectrometry (MS), which has been successful in identifying both ubiquitylation substrates and profiling pan-cellular chain linkages, but is generally unable to connect the two. Interacting partners of the deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) have also been reported by MS, although substrates of catalytically competent DUBs generally cannot be. Where they have been used towards the study of ubiquitylation, protein microarrays have usually functioned as platforms for the identification of substrates for specific E3 ubiquitin ligases. Here, we report on the first use of protein microarrays to identify substrates of DUBs, and in so doing demonstrate the first example of microarray proteomics involving multiple (i.e., distinct, sequential and opposing) enzymatic activities. This technique demonstrates the selectivity of DUBs for both substrate and type (mono- versus poly-) of ubiquitylation. This work shows that the vast majority of DUBs are monoubiquitylated in vitro, and are incapable of removing this modification from themselves. This work also underscores the critical role of utilizing both ubiquitin chains and substrates when attempting to characterize DUBs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Ubiquitin Drug Discovery and Diagnostics.

  4. Peroxisome protein transportation affects metabolism of branched-chain fatty acids that critically impact growth and development of C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rencheng Wang

    Full Text Available The impact of specific lipid molecules, including fatty acid variants, on cellular and developmental regulation is an important research subject that remains under studied. Monomethyl branched-chain fatty acids (mmBCFAs are commonly present in multiple organisms including mammals, however our understanding of mmBCFA functions is very limited. C. elegans has been the premier model system to study the functions of mmBCFAs and their derived lipids, as mmBCFAs have been shown to play essential roles in post-embryonic development in this organism. To understand more about the metabolism of mmBCFAs in C. elegans, we performed a genetic screen for suppressors of the L1 developmental arrest phenotype caused by mmBCFA depletion. Extensive characterization of one suppressor mutation identified prx-5, which encodes an ortholog of the human receptor for the type-1 peroxisomal targeting signal protein. Our study showed that inactivating prx-5 function compromised the peroxisome protein import, resulting in an increased level of branched-chain fatty acid C17ISO in animals lacking normal mmBCFA synthesis, thereby restoring wild-type growth and development. This work reveals a novel connection between peroxisomal functions and mmBCFA metabolism.

  5. Bimodal intramolecular excitation energy transfer in a multichromophore photosynthetic model system: hybrid fusion proteins comprising natural phycobilin- and artificial chlorophyll-binding domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiao-Li; Tang, Kun; Zhou, Nan; Zhou, Ming; Hou, Harvey J M; Scheer, Hugo; Zhao, Kai-Hong; Noy, Dror

    2013-09-11

    The phycobilisomes of cyanobacteria and red-algae are highly efficient peripheral light-harvesting complexes that capture and transfer light energy in a cascade of excitation energy transfer steps through multiple phycobilin chromophores to the chlorophylls of core photosystems. In this work, we focus on the last step of this process by constructing simple functional analogs of natural phycobilisome-photosystem complexes that are based on bichromophoric protein complexes comprising a phycobilin- and a chlorophyll- or porphyrin-binding domain. The former is based on ApcE(1-240), the N-terminal chromophore-binding domain of the phycobilisome's L(CM) core-membrane linker, and the latter on HP7, a de novo designed four-helix bundle protein that was originally planned as a high-affinity heme-binding protein, analogous to b-type cytochromes. We fused a modified HP7 protein sequence to ApcEΔ, a water-soluble fragment of ApcE(1-240) obtained by excising a putative hydrophobic loop sequence of residues 77-153. HP7 was fused either to the N- or the C-terminus of ApcEΔ or inserted between residues 76 and 78, thereby replacing the native hydrophobic loop domain. We describe the assembly, spectral characteristics, and intramolecular excitation energy transfer of two unique systems: in the first, the short-wavelength absorbing zinc-mesoporphyrin is bound to the HP7 domain and serves as an excitation-energy donor to the long-wavelength absorbing phycocyanobilin bound to the ApcE domain; in the second, the short-wavelength absorbing phycoerythrobilin is bound to the ApcE domain and serves as an excitation energy donor to the long-wavelength absorbing zinc-bacteriochlorophyllide bound to the HP7 domain. All the systems that were constructed and tested exhibited significant intramolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer with yields ranging from 21% to 50%. This confirms that our modular, covalent approach for studying EET between the cyclic and open chain tetrapyrroles is

  6. Minimal Model of Quantum Kinetic Clusters for the Energy-Transfer Network of a Light-Harvesting Protein Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianlan; Tang, Zhoufei; Gong, Zhihao; Cao, Jianshu; Mukamel, Shaul

    2015-04-02

    The energy absorbed in a light-harvesting protein complex is often transferred collectively through aggregated chromophore clusters. For population evolution of chromophores, the time-integrated effective rate matrix allows us to construct quantum kinetic clusters quantitatively and determine the reduced cluster-cluster transfer rates systematically, thus defining a minimal model of energy-transfer kinetics. For Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) and light-havrvesting complex II (LCHII) monomers, quantum Markovian kinetics of clusters can accurately reproduce the overall energy-transfer process in the long-time scale. The dominant energy-transfer pathways are identified in the picture of aggregated clusters. The chromophores distributed extensively in various clusters can assist a fast and long-range energy transfer.

  7. TERMINATION AND TRANSFER OF THE CHAIN RADICALS IN THE POLYMERIZATION OF ACRYLONITRILE INITIATED BY VANADIUM(V)-THIOUREA REDOX SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jinyuan; YANG Chaoxiong; WU Yuxian

    1990-01-01

    The dependence of the molecular weights on the concentration of reactants in the polymerization of acrylonitrile initiated by vanadium (V)-thiourea red ox system has been investigated. It was found that the molecular weights of the polymer change nonlinearly with increasing concentrations of nitric acid and thiourea. Probably, the composition of the complexes exert a great influence on the chain initiation and termination. The reaction of "complextermination " gives rise to the decrease of the molecular weights markedly while the concentrations of thiourea and vanadium (V)in the range from one to three molar ratios.

  8. Protein Homeostasis Imposes a Barrier on Functional Integration of Horizontally Transferred Genes in Bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimon Bershtein

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer (HGT plays a central role in bacterial evolution, yet the molecular and cellular constraints on functional integration of the foreign genes are poorly understood. Here we performed inter-species replacement of the chromosomal folA gene, encoding an essential metabolic enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR, with orthologs from 35 other mesophilic bacteria. The orthologous inter-species replacements caused a marked drop (in the range 10-90% in bacterial growth rate despite the fact that most orthologous DHFRs are as stable as E.coli DHFR at 37°C and are more catalytically active than E. coli DHFR. Although phylogenetic distance between E. coli and orthologous DHFRs as well as their individual molecular properties correlate poorly with growth rates, the product of the intracellular DHFR abundance and catalytic activity (kcat/KM, correlates strongly with growth rates, indicating that the drop in DHFR abundance constitutes the major fitness barrier to HGT. Serial propagation of the orthologous strains for ~600 generations dramatically improved growth rates by largely alleviating the fitness barriers. Whole genome sequencing and global proteome quantification revealed that the evolved strains with the largest fitness improvements have accumulated mutations that inactivated the ATP-dependent Lon protease, causing an increase in the intracellular DHFR abundance. In one case DHFR abundance increased further due to mutations accumulated in folA promoter, but only after the lon inactivating mutations were fixed in the population. Thus, by apparently distinguishing between self and non-self proteins, protein homeostasis imposes an immediate and global barrier to the functional integration of foreign genes by decreasing the intracellular abundance of their products. Once this barrier is alleviated, more fine-tuned evolution occurs to adjust the function/expression of the transferred proteins to the constraints imposed by the

  9. Characterization of the interaction between human complement protein C4 and a single-chain variable fragment antibody by capillary electrophoresis and surface plasmon resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seifar, R.M.; Cool, Robbert; Quax, Wim; Bischoff, Rainer

    2004-01-01

    Immunoaffinity capillary electrophoresis and surface plasmon resonance have been used for the characterization of the interaction between two large-sized proteins, the human complement protein C4 and the single-chain variable fragment C43. The rather high kinetic rate constants as determined by surf

  10. THE ACTIVITY OF CHOLESTERYL ESTER TRANSFER PROTEIN IS DECREASED IN HYPOTHYROIDISM - A POSSIBLE CONTRIBUTION TO ALTERATIONS IN HIGH-DENSITY-LIPOPROTEINS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DULLAART, RPF; HOOGENBERG, K; GROENER, JEM; DIKKESCHEI, LD; ERKELENS, DW; DOORENBOS, H

    1990-01-01

    The activity of cholesteryl ester transfer protein is instrumental in the distribution of cholesteryl ester between lipoproteins in plasma. We measured the activity of cholesteryl ester transfer protein in plasma, designated cholesteryl ester transfer activity, as the rate of cholesteryl ester trans

  11. Charge Transfer Dissociation (CTD) Mass Spectrometry of Peptide Cations: Study of Charge State Effects and Side-Chain Losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengfei; Jackson, Glen P.

    2017-01-01

    1+, 2+, and 3+ precursors of substance P and bradykinin were subjected to helium cation irradiation in a 3D ion trap mass spectrometer. Charge exchange with the helium cations produces a variety of fragment ions, the number and type of which are dependent on the charge state of the precursor ions. For 1+ peptide precursors, fragmentation is generally restricted to C-CO backbone bonds (a and x ions), whereas for 2+ and 3+ peptide precursors, all three backbone bonds (C-CO, C-N, and N-Cα) are cleaved. The type of backbone bond cleavage is indicative of possible dissociation channels involved in CTD process, including high-energy, kinetic-based, and ETD-like pathways. In addition to backbone cleavages, amino acid side-chain cleavages are observed in CTD, which are consistent with other high-energy and radical-mediated techniques. The unique dissociation pattern and supplementary information available from side-chain cleavages make CTD a potentially useful activation method for the structural study of gas-phase biomolecules.

  12. Conformation of a coarse-grained protein chain (an aspartic acid protease) model in effective solvent by a bond-fluctuating Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, R. B.; Farmer, B. L.

    2008-03-01

    In a coarse-grained description of a protein chain, all of the 20 amino acid residues can be broadly divided into three groups: Hydrophobic (H) , polar (P) , and electrostatic (E) . A protein can be described by nodes tethered in a chain with a node representing an amino acid group. Aspartic acid protease consists of 99 residues in a well-defined sequence of H , P , and E nodes tethered together by fluctuating bonds. The protein chain is placed on a cubic lattice where empty lattice sites constitute an effective solvent medium. The amino groups (nodes) interact with the solvent (S) sites with appropriate attractive (PS) and repulsive (HS) interactions with the solvent and execute their stochastic movement with the Metropolis algorithm. Variations of the root mean square displacements of the center of mass and that of its center node of the protease chain and its gyration radius with the time steps are examined for different solvent strength. The structure of the protease swells on increasing the solvent interaction strength which tends to enhance the relaxation time to reach the diffusive behavior of the chain. Equilibrium radius of gyration increases linearly on increasing the solvent strength: A slow rate of increase in weak solvent regime is followed by a faster swelling in stronger solvent. Variation of the gyration radius with the time steps suggests that the protein chain moves via contraction and expansion in a somewhat quasiperiodic pattern particularly in strong solvent.

  13. Lipid transfer proteins and the tuning of compartmental identity in the Golgi apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Mark I; Mousley, Carl J

    2016-10-01

    The Golgi complex constitutes a central way station of the eukaryotic endomembrane system, an intricate network of organelles engaged in control of membrane trafficking and the processing of various cellular components. Previous ideas of compartmental stability within this network are gradually being reshaped by concepts describing a biochemical continuum of hybrid organelles whose constitution is regulated by compartmental maturation. Membrane lipid composition and lipid signaling processes make fundamental contributions to compartmentalization strategies that are themselves critical for organizing cellular architecture and biochemical activities. Phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITPs) are increasingly recognized as key regulators of membrane trafficking through the secretory pathway. They do so by coordinating lipid metabolism with lipid signaling, translating this information to core protein components of the membrane trafficking machinery. In this capacity, PITPs can be viewed as regulators of an essential lipid-protein interface of cisternal maturation. It is also now becoming appreciated, for the first time, that such an interface plays important roles in larger systems processes that link secretory pathway function with cell proliferation.

  14. StAR-related lipid transfer domain protein 5 binds primary bile acids[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Létourneau, Danny; Lorin, Aurélien; Lefebvre, Andrée; Frappier, Vincent; Gaudreault, Francis; Najmanovich, Rafael; Lavigne, Pierre; LeHoux, Jean-Guy

    2012-01-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory-related lipid transfer (START) domain proteins are involved in the nonvesicular intracellular transport of lipids and sterols. The STARD1 (STARD1 and STARD3) and STARD4 subfamilies (STARD4–6) have an internal cavity large enough to accommodate sterols. To provide a deeper understanding on the structural biology of this domain, the binding of sterols to STARD5, a member of the STARD4 subfamily, was monitored. The SAR by NMR [1H-15N heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (HSQC)] approach, complemented by circular dichroism (CD) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), was used. Titration of STARD5 with cholic (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), ligands of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), leads to drastic perturbation of the 1H-15N HSQC spectra and the identification of the residues in contact with those ligands. The most perturbed residues in presence of ligands are lining the internal cavity of the protein. Ka values of 1.8·10−4 M−1 and 6.3·104 M−1 were measured for CA and CDCA, respectively. This is the first report of a START domain protein in complex with a sterol ligand. Our original findings indicate that STARD5 may be involved in the transport of bile acids rather than cholesterol. PMID:23018617

  15. Lipid Transfer Proteins Enhance Cell Wall Extension in TobaccoW⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwland, Jeroen; Feron, Richard; Huisman, Bastiaan A.H.; Fasolino, Annalisa; Hilbers, Cornelis W.; Derksen, Jan; Mariani, Celestina

    2005-01-01

    Plant cells are enclosed by a rigid cell wall that counteracts the internal osmotic pressure of the vacuole and limits the rate and direction of cell enlargement. When developmental or physiological cues induce cell extension, plant cells increase wall plasticity by a process called loosening. It was demonstrated previously that a class of proteins known as expansins are mediators of wall loosening. Here, we report a type of cell wall–loosening protein that does not share any homology with expansins but is a member of the lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). LTPs are known to bind a large range of lipid molecules to their hydrophobic cavity, and we show here that this cavity is essential for the cell wall–loosening activity of LTP. Furthermore, we show that LTP-enhanced wall extension can be described by a logarithmic time function. We hypothesize that LTP associates with hydrophobic wall compounds, causing nonhydrolytic disruption of the cell wall and subsequently facilitating wall extension. PMID:15937228

  16. Isolation and full characterisation of a potentially allergenic lipid transfer protein (LTP) in almond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhler, Sofie; Tedeschi, Tullia; Faccini, Andrea; Garino, Cristiano; Arlorio, Marco; Dossena, Arnaldo; Sforza, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTP) were shown to be among the most significant allergens, in particular in several fruits belonging to the Rosaceae family. The molecular features of LTPs, such as the presence of eight cysteine residues forming four disulfide bridges, confer a compact structure, decreasing the probability of degradation due to cooking or digestion, thereby increasing the chance of systemic absorption and severe allergic reactions. Few studies on LTP-induced allergies regarding almond (Prunus dulcis L) are available in the literature. In the present work, we describe for the first time the extraction and purification of an almond LTP, achieving its full characterisation by using liquid chromatography and exact mass spectrometry; the full sequence was identified by means of LC-ESI-Orbitrap-MS applying a bottom-up approach. The characterised protein consists of 92 amino acids and has a calculated exact MW of 9579.0. The presence of four disulfide bridges was confirmed after reduction, as shown by a mass increment of 8 Da. Finally, its potential allergenicity was confirmed via an in silico approach. The results presented here demonstrate the enormous potential of advanced MS techniques for obtaining high-quality structural and functional data of allergenic proteins in a short time.

  17. Establishment of intein-mediated protein ligation under denaturing conditions: C-terminal labeling of a single-chain antibody for biochip screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydor, Jens R; Mariano, Maria; Sideris, Steve; Nock, Steffen

    2002-01-01

    Intein-mediated protein ligation is a recently developed method that enables the C-terminal labeling of proteins. This technique requires a correctly folded intein mutant that is fused to the C-terminus of a target protein to create a thioester, which allows the ligation of a peptide with an N-terminal cysteine (1, 2). Here we describe the establishment of this method for the labeling, under denaturing conditions, of target proteins that are expressed insolubly as intein fusion proteins. A GFPuv fusion protein with the Mycobacterium xenopi gyrA intein was expressed in inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli and initially used as a model protein to verify intein cleavage activity under different refolding conditions. The intein showed activity after refolding in nondenaturing and slightly denaturing conditions. A construct of the same intein with an anti-neutravidin single-chain antibody was also expressed in an insoluble form. The intein-mediated ligation was established for this single chain antibody-intein fusion protein under denaturing conditions in 4 M urea to prevent significant precipitation of the fusion protein during the first refolding step. Under optimized conditions, the single-chain antibody was labeled with a fluorescent peptide and used for antigen screening on a biochip after final refolding. This screening procedure allowed the determination of binding characteristics of the scFv for avidin proteins in a miniaturized format.

  18. The Relationship Between Genetic Variations of the Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Gene and Coronary Artery Disease in Turkish Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, Fuat; Gurlertop, Yekta; Pirim, Ibrahim; Sevimli, Serdar; Dogan, Hasan; Arslan, Sakir; Aksoy, Hulya; Karakelloglu, Sule; Senocak, Huseyin

    2009-01-01

    Objective Although the relationship between cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and cholesterol metabolism has been characterized in recent years, the effect of CETP genetic variants associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) is still unclear. Therefore, we investigated the association between CETP gene polymorphism and levels of lipid in patients with CAD. Materials and Methods We conducted a case-control study that included 194 unrelated subjects who underwent coronary angiography for suspected ischemic heart disease. This group was divided into 96 patients with angiographically documented CAD and 98 subjects (individuals matched for age and gender) without angiographically documented CAD (CAD-free subjects), all of whom were studied to examine the genotypic distribution of the CETP gene polymorphism in CAD. Genotyping was performed via polymerase chain reaction. Results Of the 96 patients with CAD, 38 (40%) were B1B1, 42 (44%) B1B2 and 16 (16%) B2B2, compared with the control subjects, of which 35 (36%) were B1B1, 44 (45%) B1B2 and 19 (19%) B2B2. There were no significant differences between patients with CAD and control subjects in the distribution of the CETP gene polymorphism. Patients with the B1B1 genotype had lower high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and higher triglyceride (TG) levels than patients with the B2B2 genotype (p<0.05). In addition, among control subjects HDL-C levels were significantly higher in subjects with the B2B2 genotype than in subjects with the B1B1 genotype (p<0.01). Conclusion Our results suggest that genetic variations of the CTEP gene may be responsible for low HDL-C levels but may not be considered as a risk factor for CAD in the Turkish population. PMID:25610061

  19. Preparation of a thick polymer brush layer composed of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization and analysis of protein adsorption resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yuuki; Onodera, Yuya; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to prepare a thick polymer brush layer composed of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC)) and assess its resistance to protein adsorption from the dissolved state of poly(MPC) chains in an aqueous condition. The thick poly(MPC) brush layer was prepared through the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of MPC with a free initiator from an initiator-immobilized substrate at given [Monomer]/[Free initiator] ratios. The ellipsometric thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layers could be controlled by the polymerization degree of the poly(MPC) chains. The thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layer in an aqueous medium was larger than that in air, and this tendency became clearer when the polymerization degree of the poly(MPC) increased. The maximum thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layer in an aqueous medium was around 110 nm. The static air contact angle of the poly(MPC) brush layer in water indicated a reasonably hydrophilic nature, which was independent of the thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layer at the surface. This result occurred because the hydrated state of the poly(MPC) chains is not influenced by the environment surrounding them. Finally, as measured with a quartz crystal microbalance, the amount of protein adsorbed from a fetal bovine serum solution (10% in phosphate-buffered saline) on the original substrate was 420 ng/cm(2). However, the poly(MPC) brush layer reduced this value dramatically to less than 50 ng/cm(2). This effect was independent of the thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layer for thicknesses between 20 nm and about 110 nm. These results indicated that the surface covered with a poly(MPC) brush layer is a promising platform to avoid biofouling and could also be applied to analyze the reactions of biological molecules with a high signal/noise ratio.

  20. Fluorescence energy transfer in the bi-fluorescent S-layer tandem fusion protein ECFP-SgsE-YFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainz, Birgit; Steiner, Kerstin; Sleytr, Uwe B; Pum, Dietmar; Toca-Herrera, José L

    2010-12-01

    This work reports for the first time on the fabrication of a bi-functional S-layer tandem fusion protein which is able to self-assemble on solid supports without losing its functionality. Two variants of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) were genetically combined with a self-assembly system having the remarkable opportunity to interact with each other and act as functional nanopatterning biocoating. The S-layer protein SgsE of Geobacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a was fused with the cyan ECFP donor protein at the SgsE N-terminus and with the yellow YFP acceptor protein at the C-terminus. The fluorescence energy transfer was studied with spectrofluorimetry, confocal microscopy and flow cytometry, whilst protein self-assembly (on silicon dioxide particles) and structural investigations were carried out with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency of reassembled SgsE tandem protein was 20.0 ± 6.1% which is almost the same transfer efficiency shown in solution (19.6 ± 0.1%). This work shows that bi-fluorescent S-layer fusion proteins self-assemble on silica particles retaining their fluorescent properties.

  1. How anacetrapib inhibits the activity of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein? Perspective through atomistic simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarja Äijänen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP mediates the reciprocal transfer of neutral lipids (cholesteryl esters, triglycerides and phospholipids between different lipoprotein fractions in human blood plasma. A novel molecular agent known as anacetrapib has been shown to inhibit CETP activity and thereby raise high density lipoprotein (HDL-cholesterol and decrease low density lipoprotein (LDL-cholesterol, thus rendering CETP inhibition an attractive target to prevent and treat the development of various cardiovascular diseases. Our objective in this work is to use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to shed light on the inhibitory mechanism of anacetrapib and unlock the interactions between the drug and CETP. The results show an evident affinity of anacetrapib towards the concave surface of CETP, and especially towards the region of the N-terminal tunnel opening. The primary binding site of anacetrapib turns out to reside in the tunnel inside CETP, near the residues surrounding the N-terminal opening. Free energy calculations show that when anacetrapib resides in this area, it hinders the ability of cholesteryl ester to diffuse out from CETP. The simulations further bring out the ability of anacetrapib to regulate the structure-function relationships of phospholipids and helix X, the latter representing the structural region of CETP important to the process of neutral lipid exchange with lipoproteins. Altogether, the simulations propose CETP inhibition to be realized when anacetrapib is transferred into the lipid binding pocket. The novel insight gained in this study has potential use in the development of new molecular agents capable of preventing the progression of cardiovascular diseases.

  2. Cutin monomer induces expression of the rice OsLTP5 lipid transfer protein gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Park, Jong Ho; Kim, Moon Chul; Cho, Sung Ho

    2008-01-01

    Treatment with the cutin monomer 16-hydroxypalmitic acid (HPA), a major component of cutin, elicited the synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in rice leaves and induced the expression of the lipid transfer protein gene OsLTP5. Treatment with HPA also induced expression of OsLTP1, OsLTP2, and the pathogen-related PR-10 genes to a lesser extent. The OsLTP5 transcript was expressed prominently in stems and flowers, but was barely detectable in leaves. Expression of OsLTP5 was induced in shoots in response to ABA and salicylic acid. It is proposed that HPA is perceived by rice as a signal, inducing defense reactions.

  3. “土地流转”政策下农产品供应链的重构%Land Transfer and the Reconstruction of Agricultural Supply Chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江许胜

    2012-01-01

    With the popularization of local land transfer, the level of agricultural industrialization has been gradually improved , agricultural logistics has an unprecedented development. But the traditional competition still remains among all the main logistics operators due to the lack of appropriate mechanism of convergence of profit, which leads to the high cost of logistics operation. In the prliminary study, the research group analyzed opportunities and challenges of agricultural logistics development on the basis of the land transfer, and now proposes constructing the agricultural supply chain to manage logistics with the management idea of supply chain so as to explore a new way for the development of the agricultural logistics.%随着各地土地流转的推广普及,农业产业化水平不断提高,农业物流得到了前所未有的发展,但各物流经营主体之间仍保持着传统的竞争关系,缺乏适宜的利益衔接机制,物流运作成本居高不下。在前期研究中,课题组分析了土地流转对农业物流发展的机遇和挑战,在此基础之上,提出了构建新型农产品供应链的想法,用供应链管理的思想管理物流,力求为农产品物流的发展探寻一个新途径。

  4. Epidural ropivacaine hydrochloride during labour: protein binding, placental transfer and neonatal outcome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Porter, J M

    2012-02-03

    This study was undertaken: (i) to quantify the effects of labour and epidural analgesia on plasma alpha1-acid glycoprotein concentration, (ii) to examine the effects of changes in plasma alpha1-acid glycoprotein concentration on plasma protein binding and placental transfer of ropivacaine, and (iii) to examine the association between umbilical venous ropivacaine concentration and neurobehavioural function in the neonate. Multiparous patients undergoing induction of labour received a continuous epidural infusion of 0.1% ropivacaine following an epidural bolus. A significant association was demonstrated between maternal plasma alpha1-acid glycoprotein concentration and 1\\/free fraction of ropivacaine 60 min after starting ropivacaine administration (r(2) = 0.77) but not at delivery. No significant correlation was demonstrable between maternal unbound ropivacaine concentration and either neonatal (cord) ropivacaine concentration or UV\\/MV (a measure of placental transfer). Thirty minutes after delivery, 9\\/10 neonates had neurological and adaptive capacity scores < 35, whereas only three infants had scores < 35 at 2 h. All scores exceeded 35 16 h after delivery. No association between mean (SD) umbilical venous ropivacaine concentration [0.09 (0.08) mg x l(-1)] and neurological and adaptive capacity scores was demonstrated.

  5. Transfer of Immunity from Mother to Offspring Is Mediated via Egg-Yolk Protein Vitellogenin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heli Salmela

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Insect immune systems can recognize specific pathogens and prime offspring immunity. High specificity of immune priming can be achieved when insect females transfer immune elicitors into developing oocytes. The molecular mechanism behind this transfer has been a mystery. Here, we establish that the egg-yolk protein vitellogenin is the carrier of immune elicitors. Using the honey bee, Apis mellifera, model system, we demonstrate with microscopy and western blotting that vitellogenin binds to bacteria, both Paenibacillus larvae--the gram-positive bacterium causing American foulbrood disease--and to Escherichia coli that represents gram-negative bacteria. Next, we verify that vitellogenin binds to pathogen-associated molecular patterns; lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan and zymosan, using surface plasmon resonance. We document that vitellogenin is required for transport of cell-wall pieces of E. coli into eggs by imaging tissue sections. These experiments identify vitellogenin, which is distributed widely in oviparous species, as the carrier of immune-priming signals. This work reveals a molecular explanation for trans-generational immunity in insects and a previously undescribed role for vitellogenin.

  6. Bid, a Widely Expressed Proapoptotic Protein of the Bcl-2 Family, Displays Lipid Transfer Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposti, Mauro Degli; Erler, Janine T.; Hickman, John A.; Dive, Caroline

    2001-01-01

    Bid is an abundant proapoptotic protein of the Bcl-2 family that is crucial for the induction of death receptor-mediated apoptosis in primary tissues such as liver. Bid action has been proposed to involve the relocation of its truncated form, tBid, to mitochondria to facilitate the release of apoptogenic cytochrome c. The mechanism of Bid relocation to mitochondria was unclear. We report here novel biochemical evidence indicating that Bid has lipid transfer activity between mitochondria and other intracellular membranes, thereby explaining its dynamic relocation to mitochondria. First, physiological concentrations of phospholipids such as phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylgycerol induced an accumulation of full-length Bid in mitochondria when incubated with light membranes enriched in endoplasmic reticulum. Secondly, native and recombinant Bid, as well as tBid, displayed lipid transfer activity under the same conditions and at the same nanomolar concentrations leading to mitochondrial relocation and release of cytochrome c. Thus, Bid is likely to be involved in the transport and recycling of mitochondrial phospholipids. We discuss how this new role of Bid may relate to its proapoptotic action. PMID:11585909

  7. Protein loops, solitons, and side-chain visualization with applications to the left-handed helix region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Martin; Niemi, Antti J; Sha, Fan

    2012-06-01

    Folded proteins have a modular assembly. They are constructed from regular secondary structures like α helices and β strands that are joined together by loops. Here we develop a visualization technique that is adapted to describe this modular structure. In complement to the widely employed Ramachandran plot that is based on toroidal geometry, our approach utilizes the geometry of a two sphere. Unlike the more conventional approaches that describe only a given peptide unit, ours is capable of describing the entire backbone environment including the neighboring peptide units. It maps the positions of each atom to the surface of the two-sphere exactly how these atoms are seen by an observer who is located at the position of the central C_{α} atom. At each level of side-chain atoms we observe a strong correlation between the positioning of the atom and the underlying local secondary structure with very little if any variation between the different amino acids. As a concrete example we analyze the left-handed helix region of nonglycyl amino acids. This region corresponds to an isolated and highly localized residue independent sector in the direction of the C_{β} carbons on the two-sphere. We show that the residue independent localization extends to C_{γ} and C_{δ} carbons and to side-chain oxygen and nitrogen atoms in the case of asparagine and aspartic acid. When we extend the analysis to the side-chain atoms of the neighboring residues, we observe that left-handed β turns display a regular and largely amino acid independent structure that can extend to seven consecutive residues. This collective pattern is due to the presence of a backbone soliton. We show how one can use our visualization techniques to analyze and classify the different solitons in terms of selection rules that we describe in detail.

  8. Ceramide transfer protein deficiency compromises organelle function and leads to senescence in primary cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra Pralhada Rao

    Full Text Available Ceramide transfer protein (CERT transfers ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER to the Golgi complex. Its deficiency in mouse leads to embryonic death at E11.5. CERT deficient embryos die from cardiac failure due to defective organogenesis, but not due to ceramide induced apoptotic or necrotic cell death. In the current study we examined the effect of CERT deficiency in a primary cell line, namely, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs. We show that in MEFs, unlike in mutant embryos, lack of CERT does not lead to increased ceramide but causes an accumulation of hexosylceramides. Nevertheless, the defects due to defective sphingolipid metabolism that ensue, when ceramide fails to be trafficked from ER to the Golgi complex, compromise the viability of the cell. Therefore, MEFs display an incipient ER stress. While we observe that ceramide trafficking from ER to the Golgi complex is compromised, the forward transport of VSVG-GFP protein is unhindered from ER to Golgi complex to the plasma membrane. However, retrograde trafficking of the plasma membrane-associated cholera toxin B to the Golgi complex is reduced. The dysregulated sphingolipid metabolism also leads to increased mitochondrial hexosylceramide. The mitochondrial functions are also compromised in mutant MEFs since they have reduced ATP levels, have increased reactive oxygen species, and show increased glutathione reductase activity. Live-cell imaging shows that the mutant mitochondria exhibit reduced fission and fusion events. The mitochondrial dysfunction leads to an increased mitophagy in the CERT mutant MEFs. The compromised organelle function compromise cell viability and results in premature senescence of these MEFs.

  9. Short-Chain 3-Hydroxyacyl-Coenzyme A Dehydrogenase Associates with a Protein Super-Complex Integrating Multiple Metabolic Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Srinivas B.; Master, Stephen R.; Sireci, Anthony N.; Bierl, Charlene; Stanley, Paige E.; Li, Changhong; Stanley, Charles A.; Bennett, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Proteins involved in mitochondrial metabolic pathways engage in functionally relevant multi-enzyme complexes. We previously described an interaction between short-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (SCHAD) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) explaining the clinical phenotype of hyperinsulinism in SCHAD-deficient patients and adding SCHAD to the list of mitochondrial proteins capable of forming functional, multi-pathway complexes. In this work, we provide evidence of SCHAD's involvement in additional interactions forming tissue-specific metabolic super complexes involving both membrane-associated and matrix-dwelling enzymes and spanning multiple metabolic pathways. As an example, in murine liver, we find SCHAD interaction with aspartate transaminase (AST) and GDH from amino acid metabolic pathways, carbamoyl phosphate synthase I (CPS-1) from ureagenesis, other fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis enzymes and fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, an extra-mitochondrial enzyme of the glycolytic pathway. Most of the interactions appear to be independent of SCHAD's role in the penultimate step of fatty acid oxidation suggesting an organizational, structural or non-enzymatic role for the SCHAD protein. PMID:22496890

  10. Short-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase associates with a protein super-complex integrating multiple metabolic pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas B Narayan

    Full Text Available Proteins involved in mitochondrial metabolic pathways engage in functionally relevant multi-enzyme complexes. We previously described an interaction between short-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (SCHAD and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH explaining the clinical phenotype of hyperinsulinism in SCHAD-deficient patients and adding SCHAD to the list of mitochondrial proteins capable of forming functional, multi-pathway complexes. In this work, we provide evidence of SCHAD's involvement in additional interactions forming tissue-specific metabolic super complexes involving both membrane-associated and matrix-dwelling enzymes and spanning multiple metabolic pathways. As an example, in murine liver, we find SCHAD interaction with aspartate transaminase (AST and GDH from amino acid metabolic pathways, carbamoyl phosphate synthase I (CPS-1 from ureagenesis, other fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis enzymes and fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, an extra-mitochondrial enzyme of the glycolytic pathway. Most of the interactions appear to be independent of SCHAD's role in the penultimate step of fatty acid oxidation suggesting an organizational, structural or non-enzymatic role for the SCHAD protein.

  11. Dynein light chain DLC-1 promotes localization and function of the PUF protein FBF-2 in germline progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaobo; Olson, Jenessa R; Rasoloson, Dominique; Ellenbecker, Mary; Bailey, Jessica; Voronina, Ekaterina

    2016-12-15

    PUF family translational repressors are conserved developmental regulators, but the molecular function provided by the regions flanking the PUF RNA-binding domain is unknown. In C. elegans, the PUF proteins FBF-1 and FBF-2 support germline progenitor maintenance by repressing production of meiotic proteins and use distinct mechanisms to repress their target mRNAs. We identify dynein light chain DLC-1 as an important regulator of FBF-2 function. DLC-1 directly binds to FBF-2 outside of the RNA-binding domain and promotes FBF-2 localization and function. By contrast, DLC-1 does not interact with FBF-1 and does not contribute to FBF-1 activity. Surprisingly, we find that the contribution of DLC-1 to FBF-2 activity is independent of the dynein motor. Our findings suggest that PUF protein localization and activity are mediated by sequences flanking the RNA-binding domain that bind specific molecular partners. Furthermore, these results identify a new role for DLC-1 in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression.

  12. 相转移催化制备3种三硫酯可逆加成-断裂链转移剂%Synthesis of Three Trithiocarbonates Rversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer Agents by Phase Transfer Catalysis Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周应学

    2013-01-01

    Phase transfer catalysis is widely used in synthesis of compounds. In this paper,using tetra-propylammonium bromide and tri-caprylylmethylammonium chloride (Aliquot 336) as phase transfer catalysts , three trithiocarbonate reversible addition−fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) agents were respectively synethsized from dodecyl mercaptan and carbon disulfide in strong alkaline condition. The products were characterized by 1H, 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), the element analysis and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results show that the products are the target product. Then the phase transfer mechanism was discussed. The RAFT agents after the modification can be used in emulsion, bulk or solution polymerization.%  相转移催化在有机合成中应用广泛。分别以四丙基溴化铵和三辛基甲基氯化铵(Aliquot 336)为相转移催化剂,以十二烷基硫醇与二硫化碳,在强碱条件下,制备了3种三硫酯型可逆加成-断裂链转移(RAFT)剂。以1H,13C-NMR,傅里叶变换红外(FTIR),元素分析和差失扫描量热(DSC)对产物进行了表征。证明所得产物为目标物。提出了相转移催化机理。合成的三硫酯 RAFT 可以通过改性,应用于乳液,本体或溶液的可逆加成-断裂链转移聚合。

  13. Comprehensive studies on an overall proton transfer cycle of the ortho-green fluorescent protein chromophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Cheng-Chih; Chou, Pi-Tai; Shih, Chun-Wei; Chuang, Wei-Ti; Chung, Min-Wen; Lee, Junghwa; Joo, Taiha

    2011-03-09

    Initiated by excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) reaction, an overall reaction cycle of 4-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)-1,2-dimethyl-1H-imidazol-5(4H)-one (o-HBDI), an analogue of the core chromophore of the green fluorescent protein (GFP), has been investigated. In contrast to the native GFP core, 4-(4-hydroxybenzylidene)-1,2-dimethyl-1H-imidazol-5(4H)-one (p-HBDI), which requires hydrogen-bonding relay to accomplish proton transfer in vivo, o-HBDI possesses a seven-membered-ring intramolecular hydrogen bond and thus provides an ideal system for mimicking an intrinsic proton-transfer reaction. Upon excitation, ESIPT takes place in o-HBDI, resulting in a ∼600 nm proton-transfer tautomer emission. The o-HBDI tautomer emission, resolved by fluorescence upconversion, is comprised of an instantaneous rise to a few hundred femtosecond oscillation in the early relaxation stage. Frequency analysis derived from ultrashort pulse gives two low-frequency vibrations at 115 and 236 cm(-1), corresponding to skeletal deformation motions associated with the hydrogen bond. The results further conclude that ESIPT in o-HBDI is essentially triggered by low-frequency motions and may be barrierless along the reaction coordinate. Femtosecond UV/vis transient absorption spectra also provide supplementary evidence for the structural evolution during the reaction. In CH(3)CN, an instant rise of a 530 nm transient is resolved, which then undergoes 7.8 ps decay, accompanied by the growth of a rather long-lived 580 nm transient species. It is thus concluded that following ESIPT the cis-proton transfer isomer undergoes cis-trans-isomerization. The results of viscosity-dependent dynamics are in favor of the one-bond-flip mechanism, which is in contrast to the volume-conserving isomerization behavior for cis-stilbene and p-HBDI. Further confirmation is given by the picosecond-femtosecond transient IR absorption spectra, where several new and long-lived IR bands in the range of 1400

  14. [Usefulness and controversial issues of middle-chain fatty acids consumption on lipid-protein metabolism and obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáyago-Ayerdi, S G; Vaquero, M P; Schultz-Moreira, A; Bastida, S; Sánchez-Muniz, F J

    2008-01-01

    Middle-chain fatty acids (MCFA) contain 6-12 carbon atoms and are digested, absorbed and metabolized differently than long-chain fatty acids (LCFA). This work reviews some of the potential and real utilities of MCFA and their role on health. For this reason, they are used in enteral and parenteral nutrition because of their good absorption, and in premature-feeding milk-based formulas in order to improve calcium absorption. MCFA have become particularly important because of their possible role in treating and preventing obesity. Since they are more water soluble, they are taken-up by chylomicrons, and it is believed that they do not directly participate in lipogenesis. They are able to increase the thermogenic effect of foods, and its metabolism increases the production of ketonic agents with the subsequent anorexigenic effect. However, high doses of MCFA are required to obtain significant effects on weight reduction. The effects on lipid-protein metabolism are controversial. So, although they seem to reduce the post-prandial triglyceridemic response, the results their effects are not uniform regarding triglyceridemia and cholesterolemia. In spite of this, more and more products are being designed incorporating MCFA to treat obesity and overweight, having been considered as "GRAS" (Generally Recommended as Safe") components by the ADA. Further long-term studies are needed to warrant the usefulness of consumption of these compounds, particularly in the treatment and prevention of obesity.

  15. Construction and analysis of a plant non-specific lipid transfer protein database (nsLTPDB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Nai-Jyuan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs are small and basic proteins. Recently, nsLTPs have been reported involved in many physiological functions such as mediating phospholipid transfer, participating in plant defence activity against bacterial and fungal pathogens, and enhancing cell wall extension in tobacco. However, the lipid transfer mechanism of nsLTPs is still unclear, and comprehensive information of nsLTPs is difficult to obtain. Methods In this study, we identified 595 nsLTPs from 121 different species and constructed an nsLTPs database -- nsLTPDB -- which comprises the sequence information, structures, relevant literatures, and biological data of all plant nsLTPs http://nsltpdb.life.nthu.edu.tw/. Results Meanwhile, bioinformatics and statistics methods were implemented to develop a classification method for nsLTPs based on the patterns of the eight highly-conserved cysteine residues, and to suggest strict Prosite-styled patterns for Type I and Type II nsLTPs. The pattern of Type I is C X2 V X5-7 C [V, L, I] × Y [L, A, V] X8-13 CC × G X12 D × [Q, K, R] X2 CXC X16-21 P X2 C X13-15C, and that of Type II is C X4 L X2 C X9-11 P [S, T] X2 CC X5 Q X2-4 C[L, F]C X2 [A, L, I] × [D, N] P X10-12 [K, R] X4-5 C X3-4 P X0-2 C. Moreover, we referred the Prosite-styled patterns to the experimental mutagenesis data that previously established by our group, and found that the residues with higher conservation played an important role in the structural stability or lipid binding ability of nsLTPs. Conclusions Taken together, this research has suggested potential residues that might be essential to modulate the structural and functional properties of plant nsLTPs. Finally, we proposed some biologically important sites of the nsLTPs, which are described by using a new Prosite-styled pattern that we defined.

  16. 基于供应链知识转移的企业技术创新能力提升%Technology Innovation Ability Improving of Enterprises based on the Knowledge Transfer on Supply Chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱简

    2016-01-01

    Technological innovation capability is mainly reflected the ability of knowledge innovation, enterprise innovation to achieve knowledge, it must obtain new knowledge and technology to the outside, to carry out knowledge transfer activities. Enterprise development in the midst of a certain supply chain systems, knowledge transfer between the performance of the supply chain will affect business knowledge innovation, thereby affecting the technological innovation capability of enterprises. Article about the relationship between supply chain knowledge transfer and enterprise technological innovation capability be-tween discussions, in-depth analysis of the factors affecting supply chain knowledge transfer, knowledge transfer out of the main supply chain companies, knowledge transfer and knowledge transfer media scene three aspects the upgrade path of tech-nological innovation capability of enterprises.%企业技术创新能力集中表现在知识创新能力,而企业要实现知识创新,必须向外部获取新的知识和技术,开展知识转移活动。企业发展处于一定的供应链系统之中,供应链之间的知识转移绩效将影响企业知识创新,从而影响企业的技术创新能力。本文围绕供应链知识转移与企业技术创新能力之间的关系分析供应链知识转移的影响因素,分别从供应链企业的知识转移主体、知识转移情景和知识转移媒介三个方面提出了企业技术创新能力的提升路径。

  17. Characterization of G-protein coupled receptor kinase interaction with the neurokinin-1 receptor using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Rasmus; Holliday, Nicholas D; Hansen, Jakob L

    2007-01-01

    To analyze the interaction between the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor and G-protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), we performed bioluminescence resonance energy transfer(2) (BRET(2)) measurements between the family A NK-1 receptor and GRK2 and GRK5 as well as their respective kinase-inactive muta......To analyze the interaction between the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor and G-protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), we performed bioluminescence resonance energy transfer(2) (BRET(2)) measurements between the family A NK-1 receptor and GRK2 and GRK5 as well as their respective kinase...

  18. The role of protein dynamics and thermal fluctuations in regulating cytochrome c/cytochrome c oxidase electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Paggi, Damian; Zitare, Ulises; Murgida, Daniel H

    2014-07-01

    In this overview we present recent combined electrochemical, spectroelectrochemical, spectroscopic and computational studies from our group on the electron transfer reactions of cytochrome c and of the primary electron acceptor of cytochrome c oxidase, the CuA site, in biomimetic complexes. Based on these results, we discuss how protein dynamics and thermal fluctuations may impact on protein ET reactions, comment on the possible physiological relevance of these results, and finally propose a regulatory mechanism that may operate in the Cyt/CcO electron transfer reaction in vivo. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 18th European Bioenergetic Conference.

  19. Characterization of a new antifungal non-specific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP) from sugar beet leaves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, A K; Brunstedt, J; Madsen, M T;

    2000-01-01

    A novel protein (IWF5) comprising 92 amino acids has been purified from the intercellular washing fluid of sugar beet leaves using cation exchange chromatography and reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography. Based on amino acid sequence homology, including the presence of eight...... cysteines at conserved positions, the protein can be classified as a member of the plant family of non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs). The protein is 47% identical to IWF1, an antifungal nsLTP previously isolated from leaves of sugar beet. A potential site for N-linked glycosylation present...

  20. Nonlinear calibration transfer based on hierarchical Bayesian models and Lagrange Multipliers: Error bounds of estimates via Monte Carlo - Markov Chain sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seichter, Felicia; Vogt, Josef; Radermacher, Peter; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2017-01-25

    The calibration of analytical systems is time-consuming and the effort for daily calibration routines should therefore be minimized, while maintaining the analytical accuracy and precision. The 'calibration transfer' approach proposes to combine calibration data already recorded with actual calibrations measurements. However, this strategy was developed for the multivariate, linear analysis of spectroscopic data, and thus, cannot be applied to sensors with a single response channel and/or a non-linear relationship between signal and desired analytical concentration. To fill this gap for a non-linear calibration equation, we assume that the coefficients for the equation, collected over several calibration runs, are normally distributed. Considering that coefficients of an actual calibration are a sample of this distribution, only a few standards are needed for a complete calibration data set. The resulting calibration transfer approach is demonstrated for a fluorescence oxygen sensor and implemented as a hierarchical Bayesian model, combined with a Lagrange Multipliers technique and Monte-Carlo Markov-Chain sampling. The latter provides realistic estimates for coefficients and prediction together with accurate error bounds by simulating known measurement errors and system fluctuations. Performance criteria for validation and optimal selection of a reduced set of calibration samples were developed and lead to a setup which maintains the analytical performance of a full calibration. Strategies for a rapid determination of problems occurring in a daily calibration routine, are proposed, thereby opening the possibility of correcting the problem just in time.

  1. Fe2+-Ti4+ vs. Fe2+-Fe3+ charge-transfer and short-range order in single chains of face-sharing octahedra: ellenbergerite and dumortierite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopin, C.; Langer, K.; Khomenko, V.

    2009-04-01

    In zoned pyrope megacrysts from the Dora-Maira UHP terrane, new, dark-violet colour varieties of the hexagonal, high-pressure silicate ellenbergerite extend the range of known Fe contents for this mineral from 0-0.1 to 0-0.4 atom pfu, for Ti contents commonly in the range 0.2-0.4 pfu. The new varieties show an extremely intense pleochroism, colourless for E perpendicular to c to deep Prussian blue for E//c, as compared to colourless to lilac or reddish purple for classical Fe-poor ellenbergerite. These features were the incentive for an electronic absorption spectroscopic study and a reappraisal of the interpretation of the charge transfers (CT), colour and ordering schemes in this group and the structurally related borosilicate dumortierite. Both structures are characterized by the presence of infinite single chains of face-sharing, partly vacant octahedra along the 6-fold screw axis and pseudo-hexad axis, respectively, in which the Fe and Ti atoms are partitioned. In the spectra of Fe-poor ellenbergerite, the presence of a single Fe2+-Ti4+ CT band near 19000 cm˘1 was taken as evidence for complete short-range ordering of Mg(Fe), Ti and vacancies in the octahedral single chain [1]. The E//c spectra of Fe-rich ellenbergerite show the same absorption band near 19000 cm˘1 but consistently flanked by another CT band near 14000 cm˘1 , the intensity of which increases with total Fe content. The latter is similar to the 12400 cm˘1 CT band observed as the single feature in E//c spectra of the isotructural (Ti-free and Fe-bearing) phosphoellenbergerite, and clearly assigned to Fe2+-Fe3+ CT in the octahedral single chain [1]. The same colour pattern occurs in the dumortierite group, with red Fe-poor, Ti-rich crystals showing a single CT band near 20000 cm˘1, blue Ti-poor crystals showing a single CT band near 16500 cm˘1, and violet Fe- and Ti-rich crystals showing a combination of the two bands [2]. In the light of the new data, we reinterpret the dumortierite colour

  2. 3种三硫酯RAFT剂的制备及表征%Synthesis and characterization of three trithiocarbonates rversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周应学

    2012-01-01

    The preparation of reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) agents is the base of polymer architectures via RAFT polymerization. Three trithiocarbonate RAFT agents were syneth-sized in strong alkaline conditions with dodecyl mercaptan and carbon disulfide by phase transfer catalysis tetrapropyl-ammonium bromide and tricaprylylmethyl-ammonium chloride (Aliquot 336),respectively. The products were characterized by *H桸MR,13 C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), the element analysis and'differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results show that the proofs of product are the target products. The phase transfer mechanism is presented and clarified the reaction processes. The RAFT agents could be used in bulk or solution polymerization, or modified to prepare macroinitiators.%在强碱条件下,分别以四丙基溴化铵和三辛基甲基氯化铵(Aliquot 336)为相转移催化剂,十二烷基硫醇与二硫化碳反应,制备了3种三硫酯型可逆加成-断裂链转移剂(RAFT).以1H-NMR、13C-NMR、傅里叶变换红外(FTIR),元素分析和差失扫描量热(DSC)对产物进行表征.证明所得产物为目标物,所提产物可应用于本体或溶液体系的RAFT聚合.

  3. Taq1B Polymorphism of Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP) and Its Effects on the Serum Lipid Levels in Metabolic Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroufi, Nazila Fathi; Farzaneh, Khadijeh; Alibabrdel, Mahdi; Zarei, Leila; Cheraghi, Omid; Soltani, Sina; Montazersaheb, Soheila; Akbarzadeh, Maryam; Nouri, Mohammad

    2016-12-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is one of the most important risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This syndrome is characterized by abdominal obesity, hypertension, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. The plasma origin of Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) is responsible for transferring cholesterol esters from high-density lipoprotein particles to apolipoprotein B containing lipoproteins compartment. We conducted this study to investigate the association between CETP gene Taq1B (rs708272) polymorphism in the metabolic syndrome among Iranian subjects. A sample size of 200 patients diagnosed with MetS together with 200 healthy donors as control were enrolled in this study. The investigation of polymorphism was performed by the use of polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. To determine the relationship between polymorphism and lipid profile, we measured lipids and CETP concentration in metabolic syndrome and control subjects. Genotype distribution and allelic frequencies of polymorphism were determined and compared in both groups. Our findings showed that all clinical and biochemical characteristics in patients differed from the control group. The results showed that genotype and allele frequency of the Taq1B polymorphism was not significantly different between two groups. Instinctively, CETP was significantly higher in metabolic syndrome (1.64 ± 0.32 µg/ml) than in control (1.53 ± 0.34 µg/ml). A low level of CETP was found in blood of B2B2 typified genotype. In spite of Taq1B polymorphism on ester transfer protein concentration, no direct correlation was found between this polymorphism and metabolic syndrome.

  4. Intrinsic Tryptophan Fluorescence in the Detection and Analysis of Proteins: A Focus on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar B. T. Ghisaidoobe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available F resonance energy transfer (FRET occurs when the distance between a donor fluorophore and an acceptor is within 10 nm, and its application often necessitates fluorescent labeling of biological targets. However, covalent modification of biomolecules can inadvertently give rise to conformational and/or functional changes. This review describes the application of intrinsic protein fluorescence, predominantly derived from tryptophan (\\(\\uplambda_{\\textsc{ex}}\\sim\\ nm, \\(\\uplambda_{\\textsc{em}}\\sim\\ 350 nm, in protein-related research and mainly focuses on label-free FRET techniques. In terms of wavelength and intensity, tryptophan fluorescence is strongly influenced by its (or the proteinlocal environment, which, in addition to fluorescence quenching, has been applied to study protein conformational changes. Intrinsic F resonance energy transfer (iFRET, a recently developed technique, utilizes the intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan in conjunction with target-specific fluorescent probes as FRET donors and acceptors, respectively, for real time detection of native proteins.

  5. Factors affecting protein transfer into surfactant-isooctane solution: a case study of extraction behavior of chemically modified cytochrome c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, T; Goto, M

    1998-01-01

    The extraction mechanism of proteins by surfactant molecules in an organic solvent has been investigated using a chemically modified protein. We conducted guanidylation on lysine residues of cytochrome c by replacing their amino groups with homoarginine to enhance the protein-surfactant interaction. Results have shown that guanidylated cytochrome c readily forms a hydrophobic complex with dioleyl phosphoric acid (DOLPA) through hydrogen bonding between the phosphate moiety and the guanidinium groups. Although improved protein-surfactant interaction activated the formation of a hydrophobic complex at the interface, it could not improve the protein transfer in isooctane. It has been established that the protein extraction mechanism using surfactant molecules is mainly governed by two processes: formation of an interfacial complex at the oil-water interface and the subsequent solubilization of the complex into the organic phase. In addition, a kinetic study demonstrated that guanidylation of lysine accelerated the initial extraction rate of cytochrome c. This fact implies that the protein transferability from aqueous phase into organic phase depends on the protein-surfactant interaction which can be modified by protein surface engineering.

  6. Chain Dynamics, Relaxation Times, and Conductivities of Bithiophene--Acene Copolymers Measured Using High Frequency Saturation Transfer EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraind, Alicia M; Ryzhkov, Lev R; Tovar, John D

    2016-02-11

    We present a study to probe the formation of localized aromatic sextets and their effects on the charge transport properties in polymers with acene cores. Bithiophene-acene copolymers containing benzene, naphthalene, or anthracene as acene cores were synthesized using Yamamoto polymerization. Drop-casted polymer films were chemically doped and analyzed using high frequency saturation transfer EPR (HF ST-EPR), a method which has proven useful in the study of conducting polymers. The spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation times were determined for these polymers at low temperatures (4 to 20 K) and used to obtain inter- and intrachain spin diffusion rates and conductivities. Similar interchain spin diffusion rates were seen across all polymer systems; however, anthracene containing polymer poly(hexylTTATT) was found to have the largest intrachain spin diffusion rate. The poly(hexylTTATT) intrachain spin diffusion rate may be artificially high if the anthracene ring restricts the diffusion of spin to the hexylated quaterthiophene segment in poly(hexylTTATT) whereas the spins diffuse through the acene cores in the benzene and naphthalene derivatives. Alternatively, as both the spin diffusion rates and conductivities vary unpredictably with temperature, it is possible that the π-electron localization previously seen in the anthracene core could be relieved at lower temperatures.

  7. Exosomes: vehicles for the transfer of toxic proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayne Anthony Bellingham

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are small membranous vesicles secreted by a number of cell types including neurons and can be isolated from conditioned cell media or bodily fluids such as urine and plasma. Exosome biogenesis involves the inward budding of endosomes to form multivesicular bodies (MVB. When fused with the plasma membrane, the MVB releases the vesicles into the extracellular environment as exosomes. Proposed functions of these vesicles include roles in cell-cell signaling, removal of unwanted proteins, and the transfer of pathogens between cells. One such pathogen which exploits this pathway is the prion, the infectious particle responsible for the transmissible neurodegenerative diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD of humans or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE of cattle. Similarly, exosomes are also involved in the processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP which is associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD. Exosomes have been shown to contain full-length APP and several distinct proteolytically cleaved products of APP, including Aβ. In addition, these fragments can be modulated using inhibitors of the proteases involved in APP cleavage. These observations provide further evidence for a novel pathway in which PrP and APP fragments are released from cells. Other proteins such as superoxide dismutase I (SOD-1 and alpha-synuclein (involved in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS and Parkinson’s disease respectively are also found associated with exosomes. This review will focus on the role of exosomes in neurodegenerative disorders and discuss the potential of these vesicles for the spread of neurotoxicity, therapeutics and diagnostics for these diseases.

  8. Horizontal gene transfer of zinc and non-zinc forms of bacterial ribosomal protein S4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luthey-Schulten Zaida

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The universal ribosomal protein S4 is essential for the initiation of small subunit ribosomal assembly and translational accuracy. Being part of the information processing machinery of the cell, the gene for S4 is generally thought of as being inherited vertically and has been used in concatenated gene phylogenies. Here we report the evolution of ribosomal protein S4 in relation to a broad sharing of zinc/non-zinc forms of the gene and study the scope of horizontal gene transfer (HGT of S4 during bacterial evolution. Results In this study we present the complex evolutionary history of ribosomal protein S4 using 660 bacterial genomes from 16 major bacterial phyla. According to conserved characteristics in the sequences, S4 can be classified into C+ (zinc-binding and C- (zinc-free variants, with 26 genomes (mainly from the class Clostridia containing genes for both. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree of the S4 sequences was incongruent with the standard bacterial phylogeny, indicating a departure from strict vertical inheritance. Further analysis using the genome content near the S4 genes, which are usually located in a conserved gene cluster, showed not only that HGT of the C- gene had occurred at various stages of bacterial evolution, but also that both the C- and C+ genes were present before the individual phyla diverged. To explain the latter, we theorize that a gene pool existed early in bacterial evolution from which bacteria could sample S4 gene variants, according to environmental conditions. The distribution of the C+/- variants for seven other zinc-binding ribosomal proteins in these 660 bacterial genomes is consistent with that seen for S4 and may shed light on the evolutionary pressures involved. Conclusion The complex history presented for "core" protein S4 suggests the existence of a gene pool before the emergence of bacterial lineages and reflects the pervasive nature of HGT in subsequent bacterial evolution

  9. A quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction approach for estimating processed animal proteins in feed: preliminary data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cesarina Abete

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Lifting of the ban on the use of processed animal proteins (PAPs from non-ruminants in non-ruminant feed is in the wind, avoiding intraspecies recycling. Discrimination of species will be performed through polymerase chain reaction (PCR, which is at a moment a merely qualitative method. Nevertheless, quantification of PAPs in feed is needed. The aim of this study was to approach the quantitative determination of PAPs in feed through Real Time (RT-PCR technique; three different protocols picked up from the literature were tested. Three different kind of matrices were examined: pure animal meals (bovine, chicken and pork; one feed sample certified by the European reference laboratory on animal proteins (EURL AP in feed spiked with 0.1% bovine meal; and genomic DNAs from bovine, chicken and pork muscles. The limit of detection (LOD of the three protocols was set up. All the results obtained from the three protocols considered failed in the quantification process, most likely due to the uncertain copy numbers of the analytical targets chosen. This preliminary study will allow us to address further investigations, with the purpose of developing a RT-PCR quantitative method.

  10. Giardia duodenalis Surface Cysteine Proteases Induce Cleavage of the Intestinal Epithelial Cytoskeletal Protein Villin via Myosin Light Chain Kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Bhargava

    Full Text Available Giardia duodenalis infections are among the most common causes of waterborne diarrhoeal disease worldwide. At the height of infection, G. duodenalis trophozoites induce multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells that contribute to the development of diarrhoeal disease. To date, our understanding of pathophysiological processes in giardiasis remains incompletely understood. The present study reveals a previously unappreciated role for G. duodenalis cathepsin cysteine proteases in intestinal epithelial pathophysiological processes that occur during giardiasis. Experiments first established that Giardia trophozoites indeed produce cathepsin B and L in strain-dependent fashion. Co-incubation of G. duodenalis with human enterocytes enhanced cathepsin production by Assemblage A (NF and S2 isolates trophozoites, but not when epithelial cells were exposed to Assemblage B (GSM isolate trophozoites. Direct contact between G. duodenalis parasites and human intestinal epithelial monolayers resulted in the degradation and redistribution of the intestinal epithelial cytoskeletal protein villin; these effects were abolished when parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases were inhibited. Interestingly, inhibition of parasite proteases did not prevent degradation of the intestinal tight junction-associated protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1, suggesting that G. duodenalis induces multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells. Finally, this study demonstrates that G. duodenalis-mediated disruption of villin is, at least, in part dependent on activation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK. Taken together, this study indicates a novel role for parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases in the pathophysiology of G. duodenalis infections.

  11. Molecular Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus by Non-Protein Coding RNA-Mediated Monoplex Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo Yean, Cheryl Yeap; Selva Raju, Kishanraj; Xavier, Rathinam; Subramaniam, Sreeramanan; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Chinni, Suresh V.

    2016-01-01

    Non-protein coding RNA (npcRNA) is a functional RNA molecule that is not translated into a protein. Bacterial npcRNAs are structurally diversified molecules, typically 50–200 nucleotides in length. They play a crucial physiological role in cellular networking, including stress responses, replication and bacterial virulence. In this study, by using an identified npcRNA gene (Sau-02) in Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), we identified the Gram-positive bacteria S. aureus. A Sau-02-mediated monoplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) assay was designed that displayed high sensitivity and specificity. Fourteen different bacteria and 18 S. aureus strains were tested, and the results showed that the Sau-02 gene is specific to S. aureus. The detection limit was tested against genomic DNA from MRSA and was found to be ~10 genome copies. Further, the detection was extended to whole-cell MRSA detection, and we reached the detection limit with two bacteria. The monoplex PCR assay demonstrated in this study is a novel detection method that can replicate other npcRNA-mediated detection assays. PMID:27367909

  12. Polymorphism analysis of Chinese Theileria sergenti using allele-specific polymerase chain reaction of the major piroplasm surface protein gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ai Hong; Guan, Gui Quan; Liu, Jun Long; Liu, Zhi Jie; Leblanc, Neil; Li, You Quan; Gao, Jin Liang; Ma, Mi Ling; Niu, Qing Li; Ren, Qiao Yun; Bai, Qi; Yin, Hong; Luo, Jian Xun

    2011-02-01

    Theileria sergenti is a tick-borne parasite found in many parts of the world. The major piroplasm surface protein (MPSP), a conserved protein in all Theileria species, has been used as a marker for epidemiological and phylogenetic studies of benign Theileria species. In this study, Chinese species of T. sergenti were characterized by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequence analysis of the MPSP gene. Using universal or allele-specific primer sets for PCR amplification of the MPSP gene, 98 of 288 cattle blood samples, collected from 6 provinces in China, were found to be positive. Among the positive samples, only 3 allelic MPSP gene types (Chitose [C]-, Ikeda [I]-, and buffeli [B]-type) were successfully amplified. Moreover, the results revealed that the majority of the parasites sampled in this study were C- and I-type (prevalence of 84 and 69%, respectively), whereas the B-type was less common (prevalence of 36%). Co-infections with C-, I-, and B-type T. sergenti also were found. An additional known allele, Thai-type, was not detected. Phylogenetic analysis based on the MPSP gene sequences, including 3 standard stocks generated in the laboratory ( T. sergenti Wenchuan, T. sergenti Ningxian, and T. sergenti Liaoyang), revealed that the isolates of Chinese sergenti were comprised of at least 4 allelic MPSP gene types, i.e., C-, I-, B1-, and B2-type, and these parasites with 6 MPSP types 1-5 and 7 were present in China.

  13. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method for differentiation of uropathogenic specific protein gene types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yun Mei; Zaw, Myo Thura; Shamsudin, Shamsul Bahari; Lin, Zaw

    2016-08-01

    The putative pathogenicity island (PAI) containing the uropathogenic specific protein (usp) gene and three small open reading frames (orfU1, orfU2, and orfU3) encoding 98, 97, and 96 amino acid proteins is widely distributed among uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains. This PAI was designated as PAIusp. Sequencing analysis of PAIusp has revealed that the usp gene can be divided into two types - uspI and uspII - based on sequence variation at the 3' terminal region and the number and position of orfUs differ from strain to strain. Based on usp gene types and orfU sequential patterns, PAIusp can be divided into four subtypes. Subtyping of PAIusp is a useful method to characterize UPEC strains. In this study, we developed a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method to differentiate usp gene types. This method could correctly identify the usp gene type in usp-positive UPEC strains in our laboratory.

  14. The resident endoplasmic reticulum protein, BAP31, associates with gamma-actin and myosin B heavy chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducret, Axel; Nguyen, Mai; Breckenridge, David G; Shore, Gordon C

    2003-01-01

    BAP31 is a 28-kDa integral membrane protein of the endoplasmic reticulum whose cytosolic domain contains two caspase recognition sites that are preferentially cleaved by initiator caspases, such as caspase-8. Recently, we reported that the caspase-resistant BAP31 inhibited Fas-mediated apoptotic membrane fragmentation and the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria in KB epithelial cells (Nguyen M., Breckenridge G., Ducret A & Shore G. (2000) Mol. Cell. Biol.20, 6731-6740). We describe here the characterization by capillary liquid chromatography microelectrospray tandem MS of a BAP31 immunocomplex isolated from a HepG2 cell lysate in the absence of a death signal. We show that BAP31 specifically associates with nonmuscle myosin heavy chain B and nonmuscle gamma-actin, two components of the cytoskeleton actomyosin complex. Collectively, these data confirm that BAP31, in addition to its potential role as a chaperone, may play a fundamental role in the structural organization of the cytoplasm. Here we also show that Fas stimulation of apoptosis releases BAP31 associations with these motor proteins, a step that may contribute to extranuclear events, such as membrane remodelling, during the execution phase of apoptosis.

  15. The orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR40 is activated by medium and long chain fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe, Celia P; Tadayyon, Mohammad; Andrews, John L; Benson, William G; Chambers, Jon K; Eilert, Michelle M; Ellis, Catherine; Elshourbagy, Nabil A; Goetz, Aaron S; Minnick, Dana T; Murdock, Paul R; Sauls, Howard R; Shabon, Usman; Spinage, Lisa D; Strum, Jay C; Szekeres, Philip G; Tan, Kong B; Way, James M; Ignar, Diane M; Wilson, Shelagh; Muir, Alison I

    2003-03-28

    GPR40 is a member of a subfamily of homologous G protein-coupled receptors that include GPR41 and GPR43 and that have no current function or ligand ascribed. Ligand fishing experiments in HEK293 cells expressing human GPR40 revealed that a range of saturated and unsaturated carboxylic acids with carbon chain lengths greater than six were able to induce an elevation of [Ca(2+)](i), measured using a fluorometric imaging plate reader. 5,8,11-Eicosatriynoic acid was the most potent fatty acid tested, with a pEC(50) of 5.7. G protein coupling of GPR40 was examined in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the G alpha(q/i)-responsive Gal4-Elk1 reporter system. Expression of human GPR40 led to a constitutive induction of luciferase activity, which was further increased by exposure of the cells to eicosatriynoic acid. Neither the constitutive nor ligand-mediated luciferase induction was inhibited by pertussis toxin treatment, suggesting that GPR40 was coupled to G alpha(q/11.) Expression analysis by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR showed that GPR40 was specifically expressed in brain and pancreas, with expression in rodent pancreas being localized to insulin-producing beta-cells. These data suggest that some of the physiological effects of fatty acids in pancreatic islets and brain may be mediated through a cell-surface receptor.

  16. Sex Differences in Long Chain Fatty Acid Utilization and Fatty Acid Binding Protein Concentration in Rat Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockner, Robert K.; Burnett, David A.; Lysenko, Nina; Manning, Joan A.

    1979-01-01

    Female sex and estrogen administration are associated with increased hepatic production of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins; the basis for this has not been fully elucidated. Inasmuch as hepatic lipoprotein production is also influenced by FFA availability and triglyceride biosynthesis, we investigated sex differences in FFA utilization in rat hepatocyte suspensions and in the components of the triglyceride biosynthetic pathway. Isolated adult rat hepatocyte suspensions were incubated with albumin-bound [14C]oleate for up to 15 min. At physiological and low oleate concentrations, cells from females incorporated significantly more 14C into glycerolipids, especially triglycerides, and into oxidation products than did male cells, per milligram cell protein. At 0.44 mM oleate, incorporation into triglycerides in female cells was approximately twice that in male cells. Comparable sex differences were observed in cells from fasted animals and when [14C]-glycerol incorporation was measured. At higher oleate concentrations, i.e., fatty acid:albumin mole ratios in excess of 2:1, these sex differences were no longer demonstrable, suggesting that maximal rates of fatty acid esterification and oxidation were similar in female and male cells. In female and male hepatic microsomes, specific activities of long chain acyl coenzyme A synthetase, phosphatidate phosphohydrolase, and diglyceride acyltransferase were similar, but glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity was slightly greater in females at certain substrate concentrations. Microsomal incorporation of [14C]oleate into total glycerolipids was not significantly greater in females. In further contrast to intact cells, microsomal incorporation of [14C]oleate into triglycerides, although significantly greater in female microsomes, accounted for only a small fraction of the fatty acid esterified. The binding affinity and stoichiometry of partially purified female hepatic fatty acid binding protein (FABP) were similar to

  17. Mitochondrial triglyceride transfer protein inhibition: new achievements in the treatment of dyslipidemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostapanos, Michael S; Rizos, Evangelos C; Papanas, Nikolaos; Maltezos, Efstratios; Elisaf, Moses S

    2013-01-01

    Current lipid-lowering drugs are often unable to achieve low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) goals. Moreover, despite LDL-C lowering mostly by statins, a considerable residual vascular risk remains. This is partly associated with atherogenic dyslipidemia where apolipoprotein (apo) B-containing lipoproteins predominate. Mitochondrial Triglyceride (TG) transfer protein (MTP) is a key enzyme for apoB-containing lipoprotein assembly and secretion. This is mostly attributed to its capacity to transfer lipid components (TGs, cholesterol esters and phospholipids) to the endoplasmic reticulum lumen, where these lipoproteins are assembled. Several agents were developed to inhibit MTP wherever it is expressed, namely the liver and/or the intestine. Liver-specific MTP inhibitors reduce secretion of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) mostly containing apoB100, while the intestine-specific ones reduce secretion of chylomicrons containing apoB48. These drugs can significantly reduce total cholesterol, LDL-C, TGs, VLDL cholesterol, as well as apoB levels in vivo. They may also exert anti-atherosclerotic and insulin-sensitizing effects. Limited clinical data suggest that these compounds can also improve the serum lipid profile in patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH). The accumulation of unsecreted fat in the liver and intestinal lumen is associated with elevation of aminotransferases and steatorrhea. Liver steatosis can be avoided by the use of intestine-specific MTP inhibitors, while steatorrhea by low-fat diet. Future indications for these developing drugs may include dyslipidemia associated with insulin resistant states, familial combined hyperlipidemia and HoFH. Future clinical trials are warranted to assess the efficacy and safety of MTP inhibitors in various clinical states.

  18. Immunoglobulin superantigen protein L induces IL-4 and IL-13 secretion from human Fc epsilon RI+ cells through interaction with the kappa light chains of IgE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovese, Arturo; Borgia, Guglielmo; Björck, Lars; Petraroli, Angelica; de Paulis, Amato; Piazza, Marcello; Marone, Gianni

    2003-02-15

    Peptostreptococcus magnus protein L is a multidomain bacterial surface protein that correlates with virulence. It consists of up to five homologous Ig-binding domains (B1-B5) that interact with the variable domain of Ig kappa L chains. Intact protein L stimulates the synthesis and the release of IL-4 and IL-13 from human basophils in vitro. A protein L fragment covering the Ig-binding domains B1-B4 also induced IL-4 and IL-13 release from basophils. There was an excellent correlation (r(s) = 0.82; p ADZ (kappa chains) blocked both anti-IgE- and protein L-induced secretion. Cyclosporin A, but not cyclosporin H, inhibited protein L-induced release of IL-4 and IL-13 from basophils. Thus, protein L acts as a bacterial Ig superantigen to induce the synthesis and release of IL-4 and IL-13 from basophils by interacting with kappa L chains of the IgE isotype.

  19. Lipid transfer protein-linked hazelnut allergy in children from a non-Mediterranean birch-endemic area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flinterman, Annebeth E.; Akkerdaas, Jaap H.; Jager, Constance F. den Hartog; Rigby, Neil M.; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Hoekstra, Maarten O.; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla A.; Knuist, Andr C.; van Ree, Ronald; Pasmans, Suzanne G.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Hazelnut allergy in birch pollen-exposed areas is usually due to cross-reactivity (Cor a 1 and 2) and is usually mild in nature (oral allergy). In areas without birches, severe reactions are more prevalent and linked to sensitization to the lipid transfer protein (LTP) Cor a 8. Objective

  20. Plasma phospholipid transfer protein activity is independently determined by obesity and insulin resistance in non-diabetic subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Rindert; Kappelle, Paul J.W.H.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) is an emerging cardio-metabolic risk factor which is intricately involved in lipoprotein metabolism. Elevated plasma PLTP activity levels are reported in obesity and diabetes mellitus, but the relative contributions of obesity and insulin resistance t

  1. High plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein levels may favour reduced incidence of cardiovascular events in men with low triglycerides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borggreve, Susanna E.; Hillege, Hans L.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; de Jong, Paul E.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Grobbee, Diederik E.; van Tol, Arie; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    2007-01-01

    Aims High cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) concentrations are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in subjects with high triglycerides. We determined the relationship of plasma CETP with incident CVD in a population with relatively low triglycerides. Methods and re

  2. No renal phenotype in human phospholipid transfer protein transgenic apolipoprotein E deficient mice despite severe aortic atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullaart, Robin P. F.; van Haperen, Rien; van den Born, Jaap; van Goor, Harry; de Crom, Rini; van Tol, Arie

    2014-01-01

    Background: Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) is an emerging cardiometabolic risk factor. Plasma PLTP is elevated in humans with end-stage kidney disease and glomerular proteinuria, but the contribution of systemic PLTP elevation to the development of renal damage is unknown. We tested whether hu

  3. Association of cholesteryl ester transfer protein genotypes with CETP mass and activity, lipid levels, and coronary risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, Alexander; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Sarwar, Nadeem; Erqou, Sebhat; Saleheen, Danish; Dullaart, Robin P. F.; Keavney, Bernard; Ye, Zheng; Danesh, John

    2008-01-01

    Context The importance of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) pathway in coronary disease is uncertain. Study of CETP genotypes can help better understand the relevance of this pathway to lipid metabolism and disease risk. Objective To assess associations of CETP genotypes with CETP phenot

  4. The effect of driving force on intramolecular electron transfer in proteins. Studies on single-site mutated azurins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Skov, L K; van de Kamp, M;

    1992-01-01

    An intramolecular electron-transfer process has previously been shown to take place between the Cys3--Cys26 radical-ion (RSSR-) produced pulse radiolytically and the Cu(II) ion in the blue single-copper protein, azurin [Farver, O. & Pecht, I. (1989) Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 86, 6868-6972]. To fu...

  5. Lipid transfer protein : a pan-allergen in plant-derived foods that is highly resistant to pepsin digestion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asero, R.; Mistrello, G.; Roncarolo, D.; Vries, de S.C.; Gautier, M.F.; Ciurana, C.L.; Verbeek, E.; Mohammadi, T.; Knul-Brettlova, V.; Akkerdaas, J.H.; Bulder, I.; Aalberse, R.C.; Ree, van R.

    2000-01-01

    Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are small molecules of approximately 10 kD that demonstrate high stability. They have recently been identified as allergens in the Rosaceae subfamilies of the Prunoideae (peach, apricot, plum) and of the Pomoideae (apple). They belong to a family of structurally highly

  6. Cardiac expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein is increased in obesity and serves to attenuate cardiac triglyceride accumulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Emil D; Nielsen, Jan M; Hellgren, Lars I;

    2009-01-01

    secretion of apolipoproteinB-containing (apoB) lipoproteins. Lipoprotein formation depends on expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP); the mouse expresses two isoforms of MTP, A and B. Since many aspects of the link between obesity-induced cardiac disease and cardiac lipid metabolism...

  7. Separating the Mechanism-Based and Off-Target Actions of Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Inhibitors With CETP Gene Polymorphisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sofat, Reecha; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Smeeth, Liam; Humphries, Steve E.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Cooper, Jackie; Shah, Tina; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Ricketts, Sally L.; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Wareham, Nicholas; Khaw, Kay Tee; Kumari, Meena; Kivimaki, Mika; Marmot, Michael; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; van der Harst, Pim; Dullaart, Robin P. F.; Navis, Gerjan; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Van Gilst, Wiek H.; Thompson, John F.; McCaskie, Pamela; Palmer, Lyle J.; Arca, Marcello; Quagliarini, Fabiana; Gaudio, Carlo; Cambien, Francois; Nicaud, Viviane; Poirer, Odette; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Isaacs, Aaron; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Pencina, Michael; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Ordovas, Jose; Li, Tricia Y.; Kakko, Sakari; Kauma, Heikki; Savolainen, Markku J.; Kesaniemi, Y. Antero; Sandhofer, Anton; Paulweber, Bernhard; Sorli, Jose V.; Goto, Akimoto; Yokoyama, Shinji; Okumura, Kenji; Horne, Benjamin D.; Packard, Chris; Freeman, Dilys; Ford, Ian; Sattar, Naveed; McCormack, Valerie; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Ebrahim, Shah; Smith, George Davey; Kastelein, John J. P.; Deanfield, John; Casas, Juan P.

    2010-01-01

    Background-Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors raise high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, but torcetrapib, the first-in-class inhibitor tested in a large outcome trial, caused an unexpected blood pressure elevation and increased cardiovascular events. Whether the hypertensive

  8. Separating the mechanism-based and off-target actions of cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors with CETP gene polymorphisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Sofat (Reecha); A. Hingorani (Aroon); L. Smeeth (Liam); S.E. Humphries (Steve); P.J. Talmud; J. Cooper (Jim); T. Shah (Tina); M.S. Sandhu (Manjinder); S.L. Ricketts (Sally); S.M. Boekholdt (Matthijs); N.J. Wareham (Nick); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); M. Kumari (Meena); M. Kivimaki (Mika); M. Marmot (Michael); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert); P. van der Harst (Pim); R.P.F. Dullaart (Robin); G. Navis (Gerjan); D.J. van Veldhuisen (Dirk); W.H. van Gilst (Wiek); J.F. Thompson (John); P. McCaskie (Pamela); C. Palmer (Cameron); M. Arca (Marcello); F. Quagliarini (Fabiana); C. Gaudio (Carlo); F. Cambien (François); V. Nicaud; O. Poirer (Odette); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); A.J. Isaacs (Aaron); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); M. Pencina (Michael); R.S. Vasan (Ramachandran Srini); R.B. D'Agostino (Ralph); J.M. Ordovas (Jose); T.Y. Li (Tricia); S. Kakko (Sakari); H. Kauma (Heikki); M.J. Savolainen (Markku); Y.A. Kesäniemi (Antero); A. Sandhofer (Anton); B. Paulweber (Bernhard); J.V. Sorli (Jose); A. Goto (Akimoto); S. Yokoyama (Shinji); K. Okumura (Kenji); B.D. Horne (Benjamin); C. Packard (Chris); D. Freeman (Dilys); I. Ford (Ian); N. Sattar (Naveed); V. McCormack (Valerie); D.A. Lawlor (Debbie); S. Ebrahim (Shanil); G.D. Smith; J.J.P. Kastelein (John); J. Deanfield (John); J.P. Casas (Juan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors raise high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, but torcetrapib, the first-in-class inhibitor tested in a large outcome trial, caused an unexpected blood pressure elevation and increased cardiovascular events. Whether the

  9. Saturation-Transfer Difference (STD) NMR: A Simple and Fast Method for Ligand Screening and Characterization of Protein Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, Aldino; Manso, Joao; Nobrega, Franklin L.; Cabrita, Eurico J.

    2011-01-01

    Saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR has emerged as one of the most popular ligand-based NMR techniques for the study of protein-ligand interactions. The success of this technique is a consequence of its robustness and the fact that it is focused on the signals of the ligand, without any need of processing NMR information about the receptor…

  10. Approach to Interfacial and Intramolecular Electron Transfer of the Diheme Protein Cytochrome c(4) Assembled on Au(111) Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Qijin; Zhang, Jingdong; Taner, Arslan;

    2010-01-01

    Intramolecular electron transfer (ET) between metal centers is a core feature of large protein complexes in photosynthesis, respiration, and redox enzyme catalysis. The number of microscopic redox potentials and ET rate constants is, however, prohibitive for experimental cooperative ET mapping, b...

  11. Brucella Intracellular Life Relies on the Transmembrane Protein CD98 Heavy Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keriel, Anne; Botella, Eric; Estrach, Soline; Bragagnolo, Gabriel; Vergunst, Annette C; Feral, Chloe C; O'Callaghan, David

    2015-06-01

    Brucella are intracellular bacterial pathogens that use a type IV secretion system (T4SS) to escape host defenses and create a niche in which they can multiply. Although the importance of Brucella T4SS is clear, little is known about its interactions with host cell structures. In this study, we identified the eukaryotic protein CD98hc as a partner for Brucella T4SS subunit VirB2. This transmembrane glycoprotein is involved in amino acid transport, modulation of integrin signaling, and cell-to-cell fusion. Knockdown of CD98hc expression in HeLa cells demonstrated that it is essential for Brucella infection. Using knockout dermal fibroblasts, we confirmed its role for Brucella but found that it is not required for Salmonella infection. CD98hc transiently accumulates around the bacteria during the early phases of infection and is required for both optimal bacterial uptake and intracellular multiplication of Brucella. These results provide new insights into the complex interplay between Brucella and its host.

  12. Live-cell and super-resolution imaging reveal that the distribution of wall-associated protein A is correlated with the cell chain integrity of Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Liu, Z; Zhang, Y; Su, Q P; Xue, B; Shao, S; Zhu, Y; Xu, X; Wei, S; Sun, Y

    2015-10-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a primary pathogen responsible for dental caries. It has an outstanding ability to form biofilm, which is vital for virulence. Previous studies have shown that knockout of Wall-associated protein A (WapA) affects cell chain and biofilm formation of S. mutans. As a surface protein, the distribution of WapA remains unknown, but it is important to understand the mechanism underlying the function of WapA. This study applied the fluorescence protein mCherry as a reporter gene to characterize the dynamic distribution of WapA in S. mutans via time-lapse and super-resolution fluorescence imaging. The results revealed interesting subcellular distribution patterns of WapA in single, dividing and long chains of S. mutans cells. It appears at the middle of the cell and moves to the poles as the cell grows and divides. In a cell chain, after each round of cell division, such dynamic relocation results in WapA distribution at the previous cell division sites, resulting in a pattern where WapA is located at the boundary of two adjacent cell pairs. This WapA distribution pattern corresponds to the breaking segmentation of wapA deletion cell chains. The dynamic relocation of WapA through the cell cycle increases our understanding of the mechanism of WapA in maintaining cell chain integrity and biofilm formation.

  13. Bispecific single-chain diabody-immunoliposomes targeting endoglin (CD105) and fibroblast activation protein (FAP) simultaneously.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabenhold, Markus; Steiniger, Frank; Fahr, Alfred; Kontermann, Roland E; Rüger, Ronny

    2015-03-10

    Liposomes are well-established drug delivery systems with cancer chemotherapy as main focus. To increase the cellular drug delivery, liposomes can be endowed with ligands, e.g. recombinant antibody fragments, which ensure specific cell interaction. Multispecific immunoliposomes can be prepared to improve the liposome to cell interaction by targeting multiple different targets at the same time, for instance by coupling two or more different ligands to the liposomal surface, resulting in a synergistic or additive increase in binding. An alternative approach is the use of bispecific ligands to address at least two different targets. For this purpose we cloned a single-chain diabody fragment (scDb`), a bispecific molecule targeting two antigens, endoglin (CD105) and fibroblast activation protein (FAP), expressed on cells of the tumor microenvironment. As model cell system, a human fibrosarcoma cell line was used expressing endoglin and FAP simultaneously. Monospecific immunoliposomes directed either against endoglin or FAP were compared in vitro for cell binding and cytotoxic activity with bispecific dual-targeted scFv`-IL (bispecific scFv`FAP/CD105-IL) and bispecific single-chain diabody`-IL (scDb`CD105/FAP-IL) targeting endoglin and FAP simultaneously. In the underlying study, bispecific scFv`FAP/CD105-IL interacted stronger with cells expressing FAP and endoglin (both targets simultaneously) compared to the monospecific immunoliposomes. Furthermore, bispecific scDb`-immunoliposomes increased the cell interaction massively and showed enhanced cytotoxicity against target cells using doxorubicin-loaded immunoliposomes. The use of recombinant bispecific ligands as scDb`-molecules facilitates the generation of bispecific immunoliposomes by using the established post-insertion technique, enabling an extension of the ligand specificity spectrum via genetic modification.

  14. Dynamin-1-like protein (Dnm1L) interaction with kinesin light chain 1 (KLC1) through the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Won Hee; Jeong, Young Joo; Choi, Sun Hee; Kim, Sang-Jin; Urm, Sang-Hwa; Seog, Dae-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Kinesin light chain 1 (KLC1) mediates binding of KIF5 motor to specific cargo. Using the yeast two-hybrid screening, we found that mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-1-like protein (Dnm1L) interacted with KLC1, but not KIF5. Dnm1L and KLC1 were co-localized in cultured cells. These results suggest that KLC1 may play a potential role in post-fission mitochondrial transport.

  15. Isolation of novel single-chain Cro proteins targeted for binding to the bcl-2 transcription initiation site by repertoire selection and subunit combinatorics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Kristina; Van Der Vries, Erhard; Nilsson, Mikael T I; Widersten, Mikael

    2005-11-01

    New designed DNA-binding proteins may be recruited to act as transcriptional regulators and could provide new therapeutic agents in the treatment of genetic disorders such as cancer. We have isolated tailored DNA-binding proteins selected for affinity to a region spanning the transcription initiation site of the human bcl-2 gene. The proteins were derived from a single-chain derivative of the lambda Cro protein (scCro), randomly mutated in its recognition helices to construct libraries of protein variants of distinct DNA-binding properties. By phage display-afforded affinity selections combined with recombination of shuffled subunits, protein variants were isolated, which displayed high affinity for the target bcl-2 sequence, as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift and biosensor assays. The proteins analyzed were moderately sequence-specific but provide a starting point for further maturation of desired function.

  16. ITIH4 (inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 4) is a new acute-phase protein isolated from cattle during experimental infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pineiro, M.; Andres, M.; Iturralde, M.;

    2004-01-01

    We have isolated from calf serum a protein with an apparent M, of 120,000. The protein was detected by using antibodies against major acute-phase protein in pigs with acute inflammation. The amino acid sequence of an internal fragment revealed that this protein is the bovine counterpart of ITIH4......, the heavy chain 4 of the inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor family. The response of this protein in the sera was determined for animals during experimental bacterial and viral infections. In the bacterial model, animals were inoculated with a mixture of Actinomyces pyogenes, Fusobacterium necrophorum....... Because of the significant induction of the protein in the animals in the mastitis and BRSV infection models, we can conclude that ITIH4 is a new positive acute-phase protein in cattle....

  17. Identification of a Novel Transcript and Regulatory Mechanism for Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takashi; Brown, Judy J.; Swift, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is essential for the assembly of triglyceride-rich apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins. Previous studies in our laboratory identified a novel splice variant of MTP in mice that we named MTP-B. MTP-B has a unique first exon (1B) located 2.7 kB upstream of the first exon (1A) for canonical MTP (MTP-A). The two mature isoforms, though nearly identical in sequence and function, have different tissue expression patterns. In this study we report the identification of a second MTP splice variant (MTP-C), which contains both exons 1B and 1A. MTP-C is expressed in all the tissues we tested. In cells transfected with MTP-C, protein expression was less than 15% of that found when the cells were transfected with MTP-A or MTP-B. In silico analysis of the 5’-UTR of MTP-C revealed seven ATGs upstream of the start site for MTP-A, which is the only viable start site in frame with the main coding sequence. One of those ATGs was located in the 5’-UTR for MTP-A. We generated reporter constructs in which the 5’-UTRs of MTP-A or MTP-C were inserted between an SV40 promoter and the coding sequence of the luciferase gene and transfected these constructs into HEK 293 cells. Luciferase activity was significantly reduced by the MTP-C 5’-UTR, but not by the MTP-A 5’-UTR. We conclude that alternative splicing plays a key role in regulating MTP expression by introducing unique 5’-UTRs, which contain elements that alter translation efficiency, enabling the cell to optimize MTP levels and activity. PMID:26771188

  18. Functional analysis of promoter variants in the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Diana; Schneider-Muntau, Alexandra; Klapper, Maja; Nitz, Inke; Helwig, Ulf; Fölsch, Ulrich R; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen; Döring, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP) is required for the assembly and secretion of apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins from the intestine and liver. According to this function, polymorphic sites in the MTTP gene showed associations to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and related traits of the metabolic syndrome. Here we studied the functional impact of common MTTP promoter polymorphisms rs1800804:T>C (-164T>C), rs1800803:A>T (-400A>T), and rs1800591:G>T (-493G>T) using gene-reporter assays in intestinal Caco-2 and liver Huh-7 cells. Significant results were obtained in Huh-7 cells. The common MTTP promoter haplotype -164T/-400A/-493G showed about two-fold lower activity than the rare haplotype -164C/-400T/-493T. MTTP promoter mutant constructs -164T/-400A/-493T and -164T/-400T/-493T exhibited similar activity than the common haplotype. Activities of mutants -164C/-400A/-493G and -164C/-400A/-493T resembled the rare MTTP promoter haplotype. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) revealed higher binding capacity of the transcriptional factor Sterol regulatory element binding protein1a (SREBP1a) to the -164T probe in comparison to the -164C probe. In conclusion, our study indicates that the polymorphism -164T>C mediates different activities of common MTTP promoter haplotypes via SREBP1a. This suggested that the already described SREBP-dependent modulation of MTTP expression by diet is more effective in -164T than in -164C carriers.

  19. Lateral transfer of a lectin-like antifreeze protein gene in fishes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie A Graham

    Full Text Available Fishes living in icy seawater are usually protected from freezing by endogenous antifreeze proteins (AFPs that bind to ice crystals and stop them from growing. The scattered distribution of five highly diverse AFP types across phylogenetically disparate fish species is puzzling. The appearance of radically different AFPs in closely related species has been attributed to the rapid, independent evolution of these proteins in response to natural selection caused by sea level glaciations within the last 20 million years. In at least one instance the same type of simple repetitive AFP has independently originated in two distant species by convergent evolution. But, the isolated occurrence of three very similar type II AFPs in three distantly related species (herring, smelt and sea raven cannot be explained by this mechanism. These globular, lectin-like AFPs have a unique disulfide-bonding pattern, and share up to 85% identity in their amino acid sequences, with regions of even higher identity in their genes. A thorough search of current databases failed to find a homolog in any other species with greater than 40% amino acid sequence identity. Consistent with this result, genomic Southern blots showed the lectin-like AFP gene was absent from all other fish species tested. The remarkable conservation of both intron and exon sequences, the lack of correlation between evolutionary distance and mutation rate, and the pattern of silent vs non-silent codon changes make it unlikely that the gene for this AFP pre-existed but was lost from most branches of the teleost radiation. We propose instead that lateral gene transfer has resulted in the occurrence of the type II AFPs in herring, smelt and sea raven and allowed these species to survive in an otherwise lethal niche.

  20. Effect of ageing and ischemia on enzymatic activities linked to Krebs' cycle, electron transfer chain, glutamate and aminoacids metabolism of free and intrasynaptic mitochondria of cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Roberto Federico; Gorini, Antonella; Hoyer, Siegfried

    2009-12-01

    The effect of ageing and the relationships between the catalytic properties of enzymes linked to Krebs' cycle, electron transfer chain, glutamate and aminoacid metabolism of cerebral cortex, a functional area very sensitive to both age and ischemia, were studied on mitochondria of adult and aged rats, after complete ischemia of 15 minutes duration. The maximum rate (Vmax) of the following enzyme activities: citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase for Krebs' cycle; NADH-cytochrome c reductase as total (integrated activity of Complex I-III), rotenone sensitive (Complex I) and cytochrome oxidase (Complex IV) for electron transfer chain; glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamate-oxaloacetate-and glutamate-pyruvate transaminases for glutamate metabolism were assayed in non-synaptic, perikaryal mitochondria and in two populations of intra-synaptic mitochondria, i.e., the light and heavy mitochondrial fraction. The results indicate that in normal, steady-state cerebral cortex, the value of the same enzyme activity markedly differs according (a) to the different populations of mitochondria, i.e., non-synaptic or intra-synaptic light and heavy, (b) and respect to ageing. After 15 min of complete ischemia, the enzyme activities of mitochondria located near the nucleus (perikaryal mitochondria) and in synaptic structures (intra-synaptic mitochondria) of the cerebral tissue were substantially modified by ischemia. Non-synaptic mitochondria seem to be more affected by ischemia in adult and particularly in aged animals than the intra-synaptic light and heavy mitochondria. The observed modifications in enzyme activities reflect the metabolic state of the tissue at each specific experimental condition, as shown by comparative evaluation with respect to the content of energy-linked metabolites and substrates. The derangements in enzyme activities due to ischemia is greater in aged than in adult animals and especially the non-synaptic and the intra-synaptic light

  1. A joint x-ray and neutron study on amicyanin reveals the role of protein dynamics in electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumar, N; Mathews, F S; Langan, P; Davidson, V L

    2010-04-13

    The joint x-ray/neutron diffraction model of the Type I copper protein, amicyanin from Paracoccus denitrificans was determined at 1.8 A resolution. The protein was crystallized using reagents prepared in D(2)O. About 86% of the amide hydrogen atoms are either partially or fully exchanged, which correlates well with the atomic depth of the amide nitrogen atom and the secondary structure type, but with notable exceptions. Each of the four residues that provide copper ligands is partially deuterated. The model reveals the dynamic nature of the protein, especially around the copper-binding site. A detailed analysis of the presence of deuterated water molecules near the exchange sites indicates that amide hydrogen exchange is primarily due to the flexibility of the protein. Analysis of the electron transfer path through the protein shows that residues in that region are highly dynamic, as judged by hydrogen/deuterium exchange. This could increase the rate of electron transfer by transiently shortening through-space jumps in pathways or by increasing the atomic packing density. Analysis of C-HX bonding reveals previously undefined roles of these relatively weak H bonds, which, when present in sufficient number can collectively influence the structure, redox, and electron transfer properties of amicyanin.

  2. Improving yield and composition of protein concentrates from green tea residue in an agri-food supply chain: Effect of pre-treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Chen; Krimpen, Van Marinus M.; Sanders, Johan P.M.; Bruins, Marieke E.

    2016-01-01

    Rather than improving crop-production yield, developing biorefinery technology for unused biomass from the agri-food supply chain may be the crucial factor to reach sustainable global food security. A successful example of food-driven biorefinery is the extraction of protein from green tea residues,

  3. Nanogold-based bio-bar codes for label-free immunosensing of proteins coupling with an in situ DNA-based hybridization chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Xu, Mingdi; Tang, Dianping; Gao, Zhuangqiang; Tang, Juan; Chen, Guonan

    2012-12-28

    A label-free, non-enzyme immunosensing strategy is designed for ultrasensitive electronic detection of disease-related proteins (carcinoembryonic antigen as a model) by using gold nanoparticle-based bio-bar codes and an in situ amplified DNA-based hybridization chain reaction.

  4. Human milk beyond one year post-partum: lower content of protein, calcium, and saturated very long-chain fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehadeh, Naim; Aslih, Nardin; Shihab, Shihab; Werman, Moshe J; Sheinman, Rivkah; Shamir, Raanan

    2006-01-01

    Maternal milk feeding for more than 1 year is encouraged by many health care authorities. We demonstrate that human milk beyond 1 year of lactation had a small but significantly lower concentration of protein, calcium, and long-chain saturated fatty acids compared with human milk at 3 months after delivery.

  5. Protein standardization IV: Value transfer procedure for the assignment of serum protein values from a reference preparation to a target material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blirup-Jensen, S; Johnson, A M; Larsen, M

    2001-11-01

    A new approach for the assignment of values to serum proteins in a target material using a reference preparation has been developed. The procedure describes the general as well as the practical principles involved in the value assignment (with examples). Two models have been developed: 1) The direct value transfer between serum matrices and 2) the indirect value transfer from a pure protein preparation to a serum protein material. The necessary mathematical equations are developed and explained. The data reduction and statistical evaluation are discussed. The practical procedure (the transfer protocol) is based on six dilutions of the reference preparation assayed together with six dilutions of the target material. In this way imprecision is reduced and the proportionality of the two materials (i.e. the presence or absence of matrix effects) can be assessed directly by evaluating a single regression plot. If no matrix effects are found, the regression line will pass through zero with a slope equal to the ratio of the concentrations of the two materials. The transfer protocol is based on a multiple point value assignment obtained by several measurements a day repeated on several days, an important prerequisite being that all reconstitutions and dilutions are controlled by weighing.

  6. Differential roles of regulatory light chain and myosin binding protein-C phosphorylations in the modulation of cardiac force development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, Brett A.; Locher, Matthew R.; Bekyarova, Tanya; Patel, Jitandrakumar R.; Fitzsimons, Daniel P.; Irving, Thomas C.; Moss, Richard L. (IIT); (UW-MED)

    2010-05-25

    Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) by protein kinase A (PKA) independently accelerate the kinetics of force development in ventricular myocardium. However, while MLCK treatment has been shown to increase the Ca{sup 2+} sensitivity of force (pCa{sub 50}), PKA treatment has been shown to decrease pCa{sub 50}, presumably due to cardiac troponin I phosphorylation. Further, MLCK treatment increases Ca{sup 2+}-independent force and maximum Ca{sup 2+}-activated force, whereas PKA treatment has no effect on either force. To investigate the structural basis underlying the kinase-specific differential effects on steady-state force, we used synchrotron low-angle X-ray diffraction to compare equatorial intensity ratios (I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0}) to assess the proximity of myosin cross-bridge mass relative to actin and to compare lattice spacings (d{sub 1,0}) to assess the inter-thick filament spacing in skinned myocardium following treatment with either MLCK or PKA. As we showed previously, PKA phosphorylation of cMyBP-C increases I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0} and, as hypothesized, treatment with MLCK also increased I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0}, which can explain the accelerated rates of force development during activation. Importantly, interfilament spacing was reduced by {approx}2 nm ({Delta} 3.5%) with MLCK treatment, but did not change with PKA treatment. Thus, RLC or cMyBP-C phosphorylation increases the proximity of cross-bridges to actin, but only RLC phosphorylation affects lattice spacing, which suggests that RLC and cMyBP-C modulate the kinetics of force development by similar structural mechanisms; however, the effect of RLC phosphorylation to increase the Ca{sup 2+} sensitivity of force is mediated by a distinct mechanism, most probably involving changes in interfilament spacing.

  7. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein levels and gene deficiency in Chinese patients with cardio-cerebrovascular diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄一义; 汪俊军; 张宏娟; 李勇; 刘小传; 李露言; 陈光辉

    2002-01-01

    Objective To detect cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) levels, frequencies of CETP D442G and Ⅰ14A mutations and characteristics of abnormal lipids in patients with cardio-cerebro vascular diseases. Methods Ninety-four myocardial infarction (MI) patients,110 stroke patients and 335 healthy controls were selected. The CETP concentration was determined using ELISA. The CETP activity was measured using a substrate of 14 C-radiolabeled discoidal bilayer particles. The CETP gene mutations were detected by PCR-RFLP. Results The CETP concentrations in the MI and stroke group, were higher than those in the controls. The gene mutation frequencies of D442G in the MI, stroke and control group were 3.5%, 3.6% and 5%, respectively, and the frequencies of Ⅰ14A were 1.05%, 0.91% and 1%, respectively. One case of D442G homozygote was detected in the healthy group. The frequency of two CETP gene mutations showed no significant difference among the patients and controls. The CETP concentration and activity in subjects with CETP mutations were one-third of those in the control group. The level of HDL-C, apo-A1 increased in the mutation subjects, while the TG level decreased. Conclusions The CETP level increased significantly in patients with cardio-cerebrovascular diseases. The carriers of CETP deficiency had CETP and lipid abnormalities.

  8. Expression of Heat Shock Proteins in Human Fibroblast Cells under Magnetic Resonant Coupling Wireless Power Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Mizuno

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Since 2007, resonant coupling wireless power transfer (WPT technology has been attracting attention and has been widely researched for practical use. Moreover, dosimetric evaluation has also been discussed to evaluate the potential health risks of the electromagnetic field from this WPT technology based on the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP guidelines. However, there has not been much experimental evaluation of the potential health risks of this WPT technology. In this study, to evaluate whether magnetic resonant coupling WPT induces cellular stress, we focused on heat shock proteins (Hsps and determined the expression level of Hsps 27, 70 and 90 in WI38VA13 subcloned 2RA human fibroblast cells using a western blotting method. The expression level of Hsps under conditions of magnetic resonant coupling WPT for 24 h was not significantly different compared with control cells, although the expression level of Hsps for cells exposed to heat stress conditions was significantly increased. These results suggested that exposure to magnetic resonant coupling WPT did not cause detectable cell stress.

  9. Alpha-tocopherol transfer protein disruption confers resistance to malarial infection in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeya Motohiro

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various factors impact the severity of malaria, including the nutritional status of the host. Vitamin E, an intra and extracellular anti-oxidant, is one such nutrient whose absence was shown previously to negatively affect Plasmodium development. However, mechanisms of this Plasmodium inhibition, in addition to means by which to exploit this finding as a therapeutic strategy, remain unclear. Methods α-TTP knockout mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 or Plasmodium yoelii XL-17, parasitaemia, survival rate were monitored. In one part of the experiments mice were fed with a supplemented diet of vitamin E and then infected. In addition, parasite DNA damage was monitored by means of comet assay and 8-OHdG test. Moreover, infected mice were treated with chloroquine and parasitaemia and survival rate were monitored. Results Inhibition of α-tocopherol transfer protein (α-TTP, a determinant of vitamin E concentration in circulation, confers resistance to malarial infection as a result of oxidative damage to the parasites. Furthermore, in combination with the anti-malarial drug chloroquine results were even more dramatic. Conclusion Considering that these knockout mice lack observable negative impacts typical of vitamin E deficiency, these results suggest that inhibition of α-TTP activity in the liver may be a useful strategy in the prevention and treatment of malaria infection. Moreover, a combined strategy of α-TTP inhibition and chloroquine treatment might be effective against drug resistant parasites.

  10. Quality Control System for Beer Developed with Monoclonal Antibodies Specific to Barley Lipid Transfer Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukie Murakami-Yamaguchi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Non-specific lipid transfer protein (LTP in barley grain reacted with the IgE in sera drawn from food allergy patients. A sandwich-type of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was developed with mouse monoclonal antibodies raised against LTP purified with barley flour. This ELISA showed a practical working range of 0.3–3 ng/mL and no cross-reactivity with wheat, adlay and rye. Using this ELISA, LTP was determined in several types of barley-foods, including fermented foods such as malt vinegar, barley-malt miso and beer. LTP content in beer of the same kind was approximately constant, even if manufacturing factory and production days were different. Not only as a factor of foam formation and stability but also as an allergen, controlling and monitoring of LTP in beer should be considered. Taken together, our LTP-detecting ELISA can be proposed as an appropriate system for the quality control of beer.

  11. An intrinsic gut leptin-melanocortin pathway modulates intestinal microsomal triglyceride transfer protein and lipid absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Jahangir; Li, Xiaosong; Chang, Benny Hung-Junn; Chan, Lawrence; Schwartz, Gary J; Chua, Streamson C; Hussain, M Mahmood

    2010-07-01

    Fat is delivered to tissues by apoB-containing lipoproteins synthesized in the liver and intestine with the help of an intracellular chaperone, microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP). Leptin, a hormone secreted by adipose tissue, acts in the brain and on peripheral tissues to regulate fat storage and metabolism. Our aim was to identify the role of leptin signaling in MTP regulation and lipid absorption using several mouse models deficient in leptin receptor (LEPR) signaling and downstream effectors. Mice with spontaneous LEPR B mutations or targeted ablation of LEPR B in proopiomelanocortin (POMC) or agouti gene related peptide (AGRP) expressing cells had increased triglyceride in plasma, liver, and intestine. Furthermore, melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) knockout mice expressed a similar triglyceride phenotype, suggesting that leptin might regulate intestinal MTP expression through the melanocortin pathway. Mechanistic studies revealed that the accumulation of triglyceride in the intestine might be secondary to decreased expression of MTP and lipid absorption in these mice. Surgical and chemical blockade of vagal efferent outflow to the intestine in wild-type mice failed to alter the triglyceride phenotype, demonstrating that central neural control mechanisms were likely not involved in the observed regulation of intestinal MTP. Instead, we found that enterocytes express LEPR, POMC, AGRP, and MC4R. We propose that a peripheral, local gut signaling mechanism involving LEPR B and MC4R regulates intestinal MTP and controls intestinal lipid absorption.

  12. Linkage and association of phospholipid transfer protein activity to LASS4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Elisabeth A; Ronald, James; Rothstein, Joseph; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Ranchalis, Jane; Wolfbauer, G; Albers, John J; Brunzell, John D; Motulsky, Arno G; Rieder, Mark J; Nickerson, Deborah A; Wijsman, Ellen M; Jarvik, Gail P

    2011-10-01

    Phospholipid transfer protein activity (PLTPa) is associated with insulin levels and has been implicated in atherosclerotic disease in both mice and humans. Variation at the PLTP structural locus on chromosome 20 explains some, but not all, heritable variation in PLTPa. In order to detect quantitative trait loci (QTLs) elsewhere in the genome that affect PLTPa, we performed both oligogenic and single QTL linkage analysis on four large families (n = 227 with phenotype, n = 330 with genotype, n = 462 total), ascertained for familial combined hyperlipidemia. We detected evidence of linkage between PLTPa and chromosome 19p (lod = 3.2) for a single family and chromosome 2q (lod = 2.8) for all families. Inclusion of additional marker and exome sequence data in the analysis refined the linkage signal on chromosome 19 and implicated coding variation in LASS4, a gene regulated by leptin that is involved in ceramide synthesis. Association between PLTPa and LASS4 variation was replicated in the other three families (P = 0.02), adjusting for pedigree structure. To our knowledge, this is the first example for which exome data was used in families to identify a complex QTL that is not the structural locus.

  13. The α-tocopherol transfer protein is essential for vertebrate embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galen W Miller

    Full Text Available The hepatic α-tocopherol transfer protein (TTP is required for optimal α-tocopherol bioavailability in humans; mutations in the human TTPA gene result in the heritable disorder ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED, OMIM #277460. TTP is also expressed in mammalian uterine and placental cells and in the human embryonic yolk-sac, underscoring TTP's significance during fetal development. TTP and vitamin E are essential for productive pregnancy in rodents, but their precise physiological role in embryogenesis is unknown. We hypothesize that TTP is required to regulate delivery of α-tocopherol to critical target sites in the developing embryo. We tested to find if TTP is essential for proper vertebrate development, utilizing the zebrafish as a non-placental model. We verify that TTP is expressed in the adult zebrafish and its amino acid sequence is homologous to the human ortholog. We show that embryonic transcription of TTP mRNA increases >7-fold during the first 24 hours following fertilization. In situ hybridization demonstrates that Ttpa transcripts are localized in the developing brain, eyes and tail bud at 1-day post fertilization. Inhibiting TTP expression using oligonucleotide morpholinos results in severe malformations of the head and eyes in nearly all morpholino-injected embryos (88% compared with 5.6% in those injected with control morpholinos or 1.7% in non-injected embryos. We conclude that TTP is essential for early development of the vertebrate central nervous system.

  14. Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein (MTP Associates with Cytosolic Lipid Droplets in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph D Love

    Full Text Available Lipid droplets are intracellular energy storage organelles composed of a hydrophobic core of neutral lipid, surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipid and a diverse array of proteins. The function of the vast majority of these proteins with regard to the formation and/or turnover of lipid droplets is unknown. Our laboratory was the first to report that microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP, a lipid transfer protein essential for the assembly of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, was expressed in adipose tissue of humans and mice. In addition, our studies suggested that MTP was associated with lipid droplets in both brown and white fat. Our observations led us to hypothesize that MTP plays a key role in lipid droplet formation and/or turnover. The objective of these studies was to gain insight into the function of MTP in adipocytes. Using molecular, biochemical, and morphologic approaches we have shown: 1 MTP protein levels increase nearly five-fold as 3T3-L1 cells differentiate into adipocytes. 2 As 3T3-L1 cells undergo differentiation, MTP moves from the juxtanuclear region of the cell to the surface of lipid droplets. MTP and perilipin 2, a major lipid droplet surface protein, are found on the same droplets; however, MTP does not co-localize with perilipin 2. 3 Inhibition of MTP activity has no effect on the movement of triglyceride out of the cell either as a lipid complex or via lipolysis. 4 MTP is found associated with lipid droplets within hepatocytes from human fatty livers, suggesting that association of MTP with lipid droplets is not restricted to adipocytes. In summary, our data demonstrate that MTP is a lipid droplet-associated protein. Its location on the surface of the droplet in adipocytes and hepatocytes, coupled with its known function as a lipid transfer protein and its increased expression during adipocyte differentiation suggest a role in lipid droplet biology.

  15. Association between cholesteryl ester transfer protein gene polymorphisms and variations in lipid levels in patients with coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑克勤; 张思仲; 贺勇; 张立; 张克兰; 黄德嘉; 孙岩

    2004-01-01

    Background The TaqⅠB, MspⅠ and I405V polymorphisms of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), an important regulatory factor of lipid metabolism, have been attracted much more attention by the researchers. In this study, we investigated the associations between these 3 polymorphisms of CETP gene and variations in plasma lipid and lipoprotein levels in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD).Methods Genomic DNA was extracted from leukocytes of 203 CHD patients and 100 control subjects using the salting out method. Genotyping of the CETP gene was performed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) techniques. Statistical analysis was conducted using the SPSS 10.0 software package.Results The distribution of allele and genotype frequencies of the TaqⅠB, MspⅠ, and I405V polymorphisms was similar in the CHD patient group and the control group. The B1B1 genotype of the TaqⅠB polymorphism was associated with significantly higher TC (P=0.039) and LDL-C (P=0.044) levels than the B2B2 genotype in CHD patients, and with significantly higher LDL-C (P=0.034) levels than the B2B2 genotype in controls. Homozygotes of the I405V polymorphism exhibited significantly higher HDL-C levels than VV homozygotes among control subjects (P=0.023). In male CHD patients with unambiguously assigned haplotypes, B2-M2-V/B2-M2-I patients demonstrated significantly higher HDL-C concentrations than B1-M2-V/B1-M2-I (P=0.023) and B1-M2-V/B1-M2-V patients (P=0.047). Conclusions Genetic variations in the CETP gene may account for a significant proportion of the differences in plasma lipid and lipoprotein concentrations among the general population. The B1B1 genotype of the TaqⅠB polymorphism is probably a genetic risk factor for CHD in the study population.

  16. Protein film voltammetry and co-factor electron transfer dynamics in spinach photosystem II core complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun; Magdaong, Nikki; Frank, Harry A; Rusling, James F

    2014-05-01

    Direct protein film voltammetry (PFV) was used to investigate the redox properties of the photosystem II (PSII) core complex from spinach. The complex was isolated using an improved protocol not used previously for PFV. The PSII core complex had high oxygen-evolving capacity and was incorporated into thin lipid and polyion films. Three well-defined reversible pairs of reduction and oxidation voltammetry peaks were observed at 4 °C in the dark. Results were similar in both types of films, indicating that the environment of the PSII-bound cofactors was not influenced by film type. Based on comparison with various control samples including Mn-depleted PSII, peaks were assigned to chlorophyll a (Chl a) (Em = -0.47 V, all vs. NHE, at pH 6), quinones (-0.12 V), and the manganese (Mn) cluster (Em = 0.18 V). PFV of purified iron heme protein cytochrome b-559 (Cyt b-559), a component of PSII, gave a partly reversible peak pair at 0.004 V that did not have a potential similar to any peaks observed from the intact PSII core complex. The closest peak in PSII to 0.004 V is the 0.18 V peak that was found to be associated with a two-electron process, and thus is inconsistent with iron heme protein voltammetry. The -0.47 V peak had a peak potential and peak potential-pH dependence similar to that found for purified Chl a incorporated into DMPC films. The midpoint potentials reported here may differ to various extents from previously reported redox titration data due to the influence of electrode double-layer effects. Heterogeneous electron transfer (hET) rate constants were estimated by theoretical fitting and digital simulations for the -0.47 and 0.18 V peaks. Data for the Chl a peaks were best fit to a one-electron model, while the peak assigned to the Mn cluster was best fit by a two-electron/one-proton model.

  17. Expressions of the γ2 chain of laminin-5 and secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and their relation to prognosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Yan Xue; Shuang-Mei Zou; Shan Zheng; Xiu-Yun Liu; Peng Wen; Yan-Ling Yuan; Dong-Mei Lin; Ning Lu

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the expressions of the γ2 chain of laminin-5 and secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) play important roles in oncogenesis and the development of carcinoma. To assess the expressions of laminin-5 γ2 chain and SPARC in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and to clarify the prognostic significance of the expressions of laminin-5 γ2 chain and SPARC in esophageal SCC, we detected the expressions of laminin-5 γ2 chain and SPARC in cancer tissue and corresponding normal mucosa from 116 patients with advanced (stages II-IV) esophageal SCC using the tissue microarray-based immunohistochemistry and analyzed the correlation of the expressions with clinicopathologic characteristics and survival. We found that in normal esophageal tissues, laminin-5 γ2 chain was expressed in the basement membrane, whereas in esophageal SCC tissues, laminin-5 -γ2 chain was expressed in the cytoplasm of carcinoma cells, with a positive rate of 72.4‰. SPARC was not detected in normal esophageal mucosa, but was expressed in stromal fibroblasts in 84.6‰ of esophageal SCC cases and in cancer cells in 7.8‰ of esophageal SCC cases. There was a significant correlation between laminin-5 γ2 chain and stromal SPARC expression in esophageal SCC (Spearman's rho = 0.423, P < 0.001). The expressions of both laminin-5 γ2 chain and stromal SPARC were correlated with survival (P = 0.032 and P = 0.034, respectively). In stage-Ⅱ esophageal SCC, the expression of laminin-5 γ2 chain was significantly correlated with survival (P = 0.023), while the expression of SPARC was not significantly correlated with survival (P = 0.154). Patients with elevated levels of laminin-5 γ2 chain and SPARC expressions had a poorer prognosis than did those lacking elevated levels of laminin-5 γ2 chain expression and/or elevated levels of SPARC expression (P = 0.001). In stage-Ⅱ esophageal SCC, patients with elevated levels of laminin-5 γ2 chain and SPARC

  18. Serum amyloid A, protein Z, and C4b-binding protein β chain as new potential biomarkers for pulmonary tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ting-Ting; Shi, Li-Ying; Wei, Li-Liang; Li, Xiang; Yang, Su; Wang, Chong; Liu, Chang-Ming; Chen, Zhong-Liang; Tu, Hui-Hui; Li, Zhong-Jie; Li, Ji-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to discover novel biomarkers for pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Differentially expressed proteins in the serum of patients with TB were screened and identified by iTRAQ-two dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 79 abnormal proteins were discovered in patients with TB compared with healthy controls. Of these, significant differences were observed in 47 abnormally expressed proteins between patients with TB or pneumonia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Patients with TB (n = 136) exhibited significantly higher levels of serum amyloid A (SAA), vitamin K-dependent protein Z (PROZ), and C4b-binding protein β chain (C4BPB) than those in healthy controls (n = 66) (P<0.0001 for each) albeit significantly lower levels compared with those in patients with pneumonia (n = 72) (P<0.0001 for each) or COPD (n = 72) (P<0.0001, P<0.0001, P = 0.0016, respectively). After 6 months of treatment, the levels of SAA and PROZ were significantly increased (P = 0.022, P<0.0001, respectively), whereas the level of C4BPB was significantly decreased (P = 0.0038) in treated TB cases (n = 72). Clinical analysis showed that there were significant differences in blood clotting and lipid indices in patients with TB compared with healthy controls, patients with pneumonia or COPD, and treated TB cases (P<0.05). Correlation analysis revealed significant correlations between PROZ and INR (rs = 0.414, P = 0.044), and between C4BPB and FIB (rs = 0.617, P = 0.0002) in patients with TB. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that the area under the curve value of the diagnostic model combining SAA, PROZ, and C4BPB to discriminate the TB group from the healthy control, pneumonia, COPD, and cured TB groups was 0.972, 0.928, 0.957, and 0.969, respectively. Together, these results suggested that SAA, PROZ, and C4BPB may serve as new potential biomarkers for TB. Our study may thus provide experimental data for

  19. Higher high density lipoprotein cholesterol associated with moderate alcohol consumption is not related to altered plasma lecithin : cholesterol acyltransferase and lipid transfer protein activity levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemens, SC; vanTol, A; Hoogenberg, K; vanGent, T; Scheek, LM; Sluiter, WJ; Dullaart, RPF

    1997-01-01

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) are important factors involved in HDL metabolism. Altered plasma activity levels of these factors could play a role in the increase in high density lipoprotein (HDL) choles

  20. Communication: Microsecond dynamics of the protein and water affect electron transfer in a bacterial bc{sub 1} complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V., E-mail: dmitrym@asu.edu [Department of Physics and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 871504, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2015-04-28

    Cross-membrane electron transport between cofactors localized in proteins of mitochondrial respiration and bacterial photosynthesis is the source of all biological energy. The statistics and dynamics of nuclear fluctuations in these protein/membrane/water heterogeneous systems are critical for their energetic efficiency. The results of 13 μs of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the membrane-bound bc{sub 1} bacterial complex are analyzed here. The reaction is affected by a broad spectrum of nuclear modes, with the slowest dynamics in the range of time-scales ∼0.1-1.6 μs contributing half of the reaction reorganization energy. Two reorganization energies are required to describe protein electron transfer due to dynamical arrest of protein conformations on the observation window. This mechanistic distinction allows significant lowering of activation barriers for reactions in proteins.

  1. Mechanism of phosphoryl transfer and protein-protein interaction in the PTS system-an NMR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopal, P.; Klevit, R.E. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    HPr and Enzyme IIA{sup Glc} are two of the components of the bacterial PTS (phosphoenolpyruvate: sugar phosphotranferase system) and are involved in the phosphorylation and concomitant translocation of sugars across the membrane. These PTS protein complexes also regulate sugar transport. HPr, phosphorylated at a histidine N1 site by Enzyme I and phosphoenol pyruvate, transfers the phosphoryl group to a histidine N3 position in Enzyme IIA{sup Glc}. HPrs from Gram-positive bacteria undergo regulatory phosphorylation at Ser{sup 46}, whereby phosphorylation of the histidine residue is inhibited. Conversely, histidine phosphorylation inhibits phosphorylation at Ser{sup 46}. HPrs from Gram-negative bacteria possess a serine residue at position 46, but do not undergo regulatory phosphorylation. HPr forms an open-faced sandwich structure with a four-strand S-sheet and 2 to 3 helices lying on top of the sheet. The active-site histidine and Ser{sup 46} occur in conformationally flexible regions. P-His-HPr from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilus has been investigated by both homonuclear and heteronuclear two-dimensional and three-dimensional NMR experiments using an in-situ enzymatic regeneration system to maintain a constant level of P-His-HPr. The results show that localized conformational changes occur in the vicinity of the active-site histidine and also near Ser{sup 46}. HPr-Enzyme IIA{sup Glc} complexes from both Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli were also studied by a variety of {sup 15}N-edited two-dimensional NMR experiments, which were performed on uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled HPr complexed to unlabeled Enzyme IIA{sup Glc}. The complex is in fast exchange with a molecular weight of about 27 kDa. The focus of our work is to assess the changes undergone by HPr (the smaller of the two components), and so all the experiments were performed with excess Enzyme IIA present in the system.

  2. Food-chain transfer of zinc from contaminated Urtica dioica and Acer pseudoplatanus L. to the aphids Microlophium carnosum and Drepanosiphum platanoidis Schrank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinnett, Danielle, E-mail: danielle.sinnett@forestry.gsi.gov.u [Centre for Forestry and Climate Change, Forest Research, Alice Holt Lodge, Farnham, Surrey GU10 4LH (United Kingdom); Department of Soil Science, School of Human and Environmental Sciences, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading RG6 6DW (United Kingdom); Hutchings, Tony R., E-mail: tony.hutchings@forestry.gsi.gov.u [Centre for Forestry and Climate Change, Forest Research, Alice Holt Lodge, Farnham, Surrey GU10 4LH (United Kingdom); Hodson, Mark E., E-mail: m.e.hodson@reading.ac.u [Department of Soil Science, School of Human and Environmental Sciences, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading RG6 6DW (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    This study examines the food-chain transfer of Zn from two plant species, Urtica dioica (stinging nettle) and Acer pseudoplatanus (sycamore maple), into their corresponding aphid species, Microlophium carnosum and Drepanosiphum platanoidis. The plants were grown in a hydroponic system using solutions with increasing concentrations of Zn from 0.02 to 41.9 mg Zn/l. Above-ground tissue concentrations in U. dioica and M. carnosum increased with increasing Zn exposure (p < 0.001). Zn concentrations in A. pseudoplatanus also increased with solution concentration from the control to the 9.8 mg Zn/l solution, above which concentrations remained constant. Zn concentrations in both D. platanoidis and the phloem tissue of A. pseudoplatanus were not affected by the Zn concentration in the watering solution. It appears that A. pseudoplatanus was able to limit Zn transport in the phloem, resulting in constant Zn exposure to the aphids. Zn concentrations in D. platanoidis were around three times those in M. carnosum. - Concentrations of Zn in two aphid species are dependant on species and exposure.

  3. 100-N Area Strontium-90 Treatability Demonstration Project: Food Chain Transfer Studies for Phytoremediation Along the 100-N Columbia River Riparian Zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellows, Robert J.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Driver, Crystal J.

    2009-04-01

    Strontium-90 (90Sr) exceeds the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s drinking water standards for groundwater (8 picocuries/L) by as much as a factor of 1000 at several locations within the Hanford 100-N Area and along the 100-N Area Columbia River shoreline). Phytoextraction, a managed remediation technology in which plants or integrated plant/rhizosphere systems are employed to phytoextract and/or sequester 90Sr, is being considered as a potential remediation system along the riparian zone of the Columbia River as part of a treatment train that includes an apatite barrier to immobilize groundwater transport of 90Sr. Phytoextraction would employ coyote willow (Salix exigua) to extract 90Sr from the vadose zone soil and aquifer sediments (phytoextraction) and filter 90Sr (rhizofiltration) from the shallow groundwater along the riparian zone of the Columbia River. The stem and foliage of coyote willows accumulating 90Sr may present not only a mechanism to remove the contaminant but also can be viewed as a source of nutrition for natural herbivores, therefore becoming a potential pathway for the isotope to enter the riparian food chain. Engineered barriers such as large and small animal fencing constructed around the field plot will control the intrusion of deer, rodents, birds, and humans. These efforts, however, will have limited effect on mobile phytophagous insects. Therefore, this study was undertaken to determine the potential for food chain transfer by insects prior to placement of the remediation technology at 100-N. Insect types include direct consumers of the sap or liquid content of the plants vascular system (xylem and phloem) by aphids as well as those that would directly consume the plant foliage such as the larvae (caterpillars) of Lepidoptera species. Heavy infestations of aphids feeding on the stems and leaves of willows growing in 90Sr-contaminated soil can accumulate a small amount (~0.15 ± 0.06%) of the total label removed from the soil by

  4. Protein loops, solitons and side-chain visualization with applications to the left-handed helix region

    CERN Document Server

    Lundgren, Martin; Sha, Fan

    2012-01-01

    Folded proteins have a modular assembly. They are constructed from regular secondary structures like alpha-helices and beta-strands that are joined together by loops. Here we develop a visualization technique that is adapted to describe this modular structure. In complement to the widely employed Ramachandran plot that is based on toroidal geometry, our approach utilizes the geometry of a two-sphere. Unlike the more conventional approaches that only describea given peptide unit, ours is capable of describing the entire backbone environment including the neighboring peptide units. It maps the positions of each atom to the surface of the two-sphere exactly how these atoms are seen by an observer who is located at the position of the central C-alpha atom. At each level of side-chain atoms we observe a strong correlation between the positioning of the atom and the underlying local secondary structure with very little if any variation between the different amino acids. As a concrete example we analyze the left-han...

  5. The homeobox protein CEH-23 mediates prolonged longevity in response to impaired mitochondrial electron transport chain in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludivine Walter

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent findings indicate that perturbations of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (METC can cause extended longevity in evolutionarily diverse organisms. To uncover the molecular basis of how altered METC increases lifespan in C. elegans, we performed an RNAi screen and revealed that three predicted transcription factors are specifically required for the extended longevity of mitochondrial mutants. In particular, we demonstrated that the nuclear homeobox protein CEH-23 uniquely mediates the longevity but not the slow development, reduced brood size, or resistance to oxidative stress associated with mitochondrial mutations. Furthermore, we showed that ceh-23 expression levels are responsive to altered METC, and enforced overexpression of ceh-23 is sufficient to extend lifespan in wild-type background. Our data point to mitochondria-to-nucleus communications to be key for longevity determination and highlight CEH-23 as a novel longevity factor capable of responding to mitochondrial perturbations. These findings provide a new paradigm for how mitochondria impact aging and age-dependent diseases.

  6. Insights into the Tunnel Mechanism of Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein through All-atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Dongsheng; Rames, Matthew; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Shengli; Ren, Gang

    2016-07-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates cholesteryl ester (CE) transfer from the atheroprotective high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol to the atherogenic low density lipoprotein cholesterol. In the past decade, this property has driven the development of CETP inhibitors, which have been evaluated in large scale clinical trials for treating cardiovascular diseases. Despite the pharmacological interest, little is known about the fundamental mechanism of CETP in CE transfer. Recent electron microscopy (EM) experiments have suggested a tunnel mechanism, and molecular dynamics simulations have shown that the flexible N-terminal distal end of CETP penetrates into the HDL surface and takes up a CE molecule through an open pore. However, it is not known whether a CE molecule can completely transfer through an entire CETP molecule. Here, we used all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to evaluate this possibility. The results showed that a hydrophobic tunnel inside CETP is sufficient to allow a CE molecule to completely transfer through the entire CETP within a predicted transfer time and at a rate comparable with those obtained through physiological measurements. Analyses of the detailed interactions revealed several residues that might be critical for CETP function, which may provide important clues for the effective development of CETP inhibitors and treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  7. Purification of chimeric heavy chain monoclonal antibody EG2-hFc using hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography: an alternative to protein-A affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadavarte, Rahul; Spearman, Maureen; Okun, Natalie; Butler, Michael; Ghosh, Raja

    2014-06-01

    Heavy chain monoclonal antibodies are being considered as alternative to whole-IgG monoclonal antibodies for certain niche applications. Protein-A chromatography which is widely used for purifying IgG monoclonal antibodies is also used for purifying heavy chain monoclonal antibodies as these molecules possess fully functional Fc regions. However, the acidic conditions used to elute bound antibody may sometimes also leach protein-A, which is immunotoxic. Low pH conditions also tend to make the mAb molecules unstable and prone to aggregation. Moreover, protein-A affinity chromatography does not remove aggregates already present in the feed. Hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography (or HIMC) has already been studied as an alternative to protein-A chromatography for purifying whole-IgG monoclonal antibodies. This paper describes the use of HIMC for capturing a humanized chimeric heavy chain monoclonal antibody (EG2-hFC). Binding and eluting conditions were suitably optimized using pure EG2-hFC. Based on this, an HIMC method was developed for capture of EG2-hFC directly from cell culture supernatant. The EG2-hFc purity obtained in this single-step process was high. The glycan profiles of protein-A and HIMC purified monoclonal antibody samples were similar, clearly demonstrating that both techniques captured similarly glycosylated population of EG2-hFc. Moreover, this technique was able to resolve aggregates from monomeric form of the EG2-hFc.

  8. Quantitative proteomic analysis reveals metabolic alterations, calcium dysregulation, and increased expression of extracellular matrix proteins in laminin α2 chain-deficient muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Bruno Menezes; Matsumura, Cintia Y; Fontes-Oliveira, Cibely C; Gawlik, Kinga I; Acosta, Helena; Wernhoff, Patrik; Durbeej, Madeleine

    2014-11-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophy with laminin α2 chain deficiency (MDC1A) is one of the most severe forms of muscular disease and is characterized by severe muscle weakness and delayed motor milestones. The genetic basis of MDC1A is well known, yet the secondary mechanisms ultimately leading to muscle degeneration and subsequent connective tissue infiltration are not fully understood. In order to obtain new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying MDC1A, we performed a comparative proteomic analysis of affected muscles (diaphragm and gastrocnemius) from laminin α2 chain-deficient dy(3K)/dy(3K) mice, using multidimensional protein identification technology combined with tandem mass tags. Out of the approximately 700 identified proteins, 113 and 101 proteins, respectively, were differentially expressed in the diseased gastrocnemius and diaphragm muscles compared with normal muscles. A large portion of these proteins are involved in different metabolic processes, bind calcium, or are expressed in the extracellular matrix. Our findings suggest that metabolic alterations and calcium dysregulation could be novel mechanisms that underlie MDC1A and might be targets that should be explored for therapy. Also, detailed knowledge of the composition of fibrotic tissue, rich in extracellular matrix proteins, in laminin α2 chain-deficient muscle might help in the design of future anti-fibrotic treatments. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000978 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000978).

  9. Excitation relaxation dynamics and energy transfer in pigment-protein complexes of a dinoflagellate, revealed by ultrafast fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kazunori; Iida, Satoko; Takaichi, Shinichi; Mimuro, Mamoru; Murakami, Akio; Akimoto, Seiji

    2016-12-01

    Photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes, found in aquatic photosynthetic organisms, contain a variety of carotenoids and chlorophylls. Most of the photosynthetic dinoflagellates possess two types of light-harvesting antenna complexes: peridinin (Peri)-chlorophyll (Chl) a/c-protein, as an intrinsic thylakoid membrane complex protein (iPCP), and water-soluble Peri-Chl a-protein, as an extrinsic membrane protein (sPCP) on the inner surface of the thylakoid. Peri is a unique carotenoid that has eight C=C bonds and one C=O bond, which results in a characteristic absorption band in the green wavelength region. In the present study, excitation relaxation dynamics of Peri in solution and excitation energy transfer processes of sPCP and the thylakoid membranes, prepared from the photosynthetic dinoflagellate, Symbiodinium sp., are investigated by ultrafast time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. We found that Peri-to-Chl a energy transfer occurs via the Peri S1 state with a time constant of 1.5 ps or 400 fs in sPCP or iPCP, respectively, and that Chl c-to-Chl a energy transfer occurs in the time regions of 350-400 fs and 1.8-2.6 ps.

  10. Bio-optimized energy transfer in densely packed fluorescent protein enables near-maximal luminescence and solid-state lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gather, Malte C; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2014-12-08

    Bioluminescent organisms are likely to have an evolutionary drive towards high radiance. As such, bio-optimized materials derived from them hold great promise for photonic applications. Here, we show that biologically produced fluorescent proteins retain their high brightness even at the maximum density in solid state through a special molecular structure that provides optimal balance between high protein concentration and low resonance energy transfer self-quenching. Dried films of green fluorescent protein show low fluorescence quenching (-7 dB) and support strong optical amplification (gnet=22 cm(-1); 96 dB cm(-1)). Using these properties, we demonstrate vertical cavity surface emitting micro-lasers with low threshold (lasers) and self-assembled all-protein ring lasers. Moreover, solid-state blends of different proteins support efficient Förster resonance energy transfer, with sensitivity to intermolecular distance thus allowing all-optical sensing. The design of fluorescent proteins may be exploited for bio-inspired solid-state luminescent molecules or nanoparticles.

  11. Structural basis of light chain amyloidogenicity: comparison of the thermodynamic properties, fibrillogenic potential and tertiary structural features of four vλ6 proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, J.S.; Gupta, V.; Wilkerson, M.; Schell, M.; Loris, R.; Adams, P.; Solomon, A.; Stevens, F.; Dealwis, C.

    2004-04-01

    Primary (AL) amyloidosis results from the pathologic deposition of monoclonal light chains as amyloid fibrils. Studies of recombinant-derived variable region (V{sub L}) fragments of these proteins have shown an inverse relationship between thermodynamic stability and fibrillogenic potential. Further, ionic interactions within the V{sub L} domain were predicted to influence the kinetics of light chain fibrillogenicity, as evidenced from our analyses of a relatively stable V{sub {lambda}}6 protein (Jto) with a long range electrostatic interaction between Asp and Arg side chains at position 29 and 68, respectively, and an unstable, highly fibrillogenic V{sub {lambda}}6 protein (Wil) that had neutral amino acids at these locations. To test this hypothesis, we have generated two Jto-related mutants designed to disrupt the interaction between Asp 29 and Arg 68 (JtoD29A and JtoR68S). Although the thermodynamic stabilities of unfolding for these two molecules were identical, they exhibited very different kinetics of fibril formation: the rate of JtoD29A fibrillogenesis was slow and comparable to the parent molecule, whereas that of JtoR68S was significantly faster. High-resolution X-ray diffraction analyses of crystals prepared from the two mutants having the same space group and unit cell dimensions revealed no significant main-chain conformational changes. However, several notable side-chain alterations were observed in JtoR68S, as compared with JtoD29A, that resulted in the solvent exposure of a greater hydrophobic surface and modifications in the electrostatic potential surface. We posit that these differences contributed to the enhanced fibrillogenic potential of the Arg 68 mutant, since both Jto mutants lacked the intrachain ionic interaction and were equivalently unstable. The information gleaned from our studies has provided insight into structural parameters that in addition to overall thermodynamic stability, contribute to the fibril forming propensity of

  12. Premalignant quiescent melanocytic nevi do not express the MHC class I chain-related protein A Los nevos melanocíticos premalignos quiescentes no expresan la molécula MHC class I chain-related protein A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes B. Fuertes

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The MHC class I chain-related protein A (MICA is an inducible molecule almost not expressed by normal cells but strongly up-regulated in tumor cells. MICA-expressing cells are recognized by natural killer (NK cells, CD8+ aßTCR and ?dTCR T lymphocytes through the NKG2D receptor. Engagement of NKG2D by MICA triggers IFN-? secretion and cytotoxicity against malignant cells. Although most solid tumors express MICA and this molecule is a target during immune surveillance against tumors, it has been observed that high grade tumors from different histotypes express low amounts of cell surface MICA due to a metalloprotease- induced shedding. Also, melanomas develop after a complex process of neotransformation of normal melanocytes. However, the expression of MICA in premalignant stages (primary human quiescent melanocytic nevi remains unknown. Here, we assessed expression of MICA by flow cytometry using cell suspensions from 15 primary nevi isolated from 11 patients. When collected material was abundant, cell lysates were prepared and MICA expression was also analyzed by Western blot. We observed that MICA was undetectable in the 15 primary nevi (intradermic, junction, mixed, lentigo and congenital samples as well as in normal skin, benign lesions (seborrheic keratosis, premalignant lesions (actinic keratosis and benign basocellular cancer. Conversely, a primary recently diagnosed melanoma showed intense cell surface MICA. We conclude that the onset of MICA expression is a tightly regulated process that occurs after melanocytes trespass the stage of malignant transformation. Thus, analysis of MICA expression in tissue sections of skin samples may constitute a useful marker to differentiate between benign and malignant nevi.MHC class I chain-related protein A (MICA es una molécula casi ausente en células normales pero sobre-expresada por células tumorales, que promueve el reconocimiento por células citotóxicas naturales (natural killer o NK y por

  13. Intestine-specific deletion of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein increases mortality in aged mice.

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    Zhe Liang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mice with conditional, intestine-specific deletion of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (Mttp-IKO exhibit a complete block in chylomicron assembly together with lipid malabsorption. Young (8-10 week Mttp-IKO mice have improved survival when subjected to a murine model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced sepsis. However, 80% of deaths in sepsis occur in patients over age 65. The purpose of this study was to determine whether age impacts outcome in Mttp-IKO mice subjected to sepsis. METHODS: Aged (20-24 months Mttp-IKO mice and WT mice underwent intratracheal injection with P. aeruginosa. Mice were either sacrificed 24 hours post-operatively for mechanistic studies or followed seven days for survival. RESULTS: In contrast to young septic Mttp-IKO mice, aged septic Mttp-IKO mice had a significantly higher mortality than aged septic WT mice (80% vs. 39%, p = 0.005. Aged septic Mttp-IKO mice exhibited increased gut epithelial apoptosis, increased jejunal Bax/Bcl-2 and Bax/Bcl-XL ratios yet simultaneously demonstrated increased crypt proliferation and villus length. Aged septic Mttp-IKO mice also manifested increased pulmonary myeloperoxidase levels, suggesting increased neutrophil infiltration, as well as decreased systemic TNFα compared to aged septic WT mice. CONCLUSIONS: Blocking intestinal chylomicron secretion alters mortality following sepsis in an age-dependent manner. Increases in gut apoptosis and pulmonary neutrophil infiltration, and decreased systemic TNFα represent potential mechanisms for why intestine-specific Mttp deletion is beneficial in young septic mice but harmful in aged mice as each of these parameters are altered differently in young and aged septic WT and Mttp-IKO mice.

  14. A Lipid Transfer Protein Increases the Glutathione Content and Enhances Arabidopsis Resistance to a Trichothecene Mycotoxin.

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    John E McLaughlin

    Full Text Available Fusarium head blight (FHB or scab is one of the most important plant diseases worldwide, affecting wheat, barley and other small grains. Trichothecene mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON accumulate in the grain, presenting a food safety risk and health hazard to humans and animals. Despite considerable breeding efforts, highly resistant wheat or barley cultivars are not available. We screened an activation tagged Arabidopsis thaliana population for resistance to trichothecin (Tcin, a type B trichothecene in the same class as DON. Here we show that one of the resistant lines identified, trichothecene resistant 1 (trr1 contains a T-DNA insertion upstream of two nonspecific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP genes, AtLTP4.4 and AtLTP4.5. Expression of both nsLTP genes was induced in trr1 over 10-fold relative to wild type. Overexpression of AtLTP4.4 provided greater resistance to Tcin than AtLTP4.5 in Arabidopsis thaliana and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae relative to wild type or vector transformed lines, suggesting a conserved protection mechanism. Tcin treatment increased reactive oxygen species (ROS production in Arabidopsis and ROS stain was associated with the chloroplast, the cell wall and the apoplast. ROS levels were attenuated in Arabidopsis and in yeast overexpressing AtLTP4.4 relative to the controls. Exogenous addition of glutathione and other antioxidants enhanced resistance of Arabidopsis to Tcin while the addition of buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis, increased sensitivity, suggesting that resistance was mediated by glutathione. Total glutathione content was significantly higher in Arabidopsis and in yeast overexpressing AtLTP4.4 relative to the controls, highlighting the importance of AtLTP4.4 in maintaining the redox state. These results demonstrate that trichothecenes cause ROS accumulation and overexpression of AtLTP4.4 protects against trichothecene-induced oxidative stress by increasing the glutathione

  15. Assessment of Lipid Transfer Protein (LTP1) Gene in Wheat Powdery Mildew Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ai-li; MENG Cheng-sheng; ZHOU Rong-hua; MA Zhi-ying; JIA Ji-zeng

    2006-01-01

    This study is to investigate the role of lipid transfer protein (LTP1) gene of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, Bgt) resistance. A pair of primers based on the full length cDNA of wheat LTP1was used for amplifying the coding regions of LTP in hexaploid (AABBDD) wheat and its diploid donors T. urartu (AA),Ae. speltoides ssp speltoide (SS) and Ae. tauchii ssp strangulate (DD). LTP1 and LTP2 of wheat were isolated from the tested two hexaploid (ABD) materials: powdery mildew resistance near isogenic line (NIL) Mardler/7 x B ainong 3217 and its susceptible parent Bainong 3217 at the same time, while only one kind of LTP gene was found in the tested three diploid materials respectively by using the above PCR primer pairs. Two peaks of the expression of LTP1 and LTP2 induced by powdery mildew were observed [one occurred at 3 h after inoculation (hai); the other occurred at 10 hai] in resistant NIL Mardler/7 x Bainong3217 in comparison with a steady transcript level of LTP1 and LTP2 in susceptible Bainong3217.Transient over-expression result showed that LTP1 reduced the penetration efficiency (PE) of powdery mildew in susceptible cultivar by about 28.3%. This result indicated an obvious effectiveness of LTP1 in powdery mildew resistance. Expression analysis also showed that LTP1 and LTP2 of wheat are generally involved in salt/drought, but not in low temperature stress early responses.

  16. Traceability of processed animal proteins with varying texture in feed: determination with microscopic and polymerase Chain Reaction methods

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    Hormisch D.E.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available To test the traceability of different animal components that could enter the feed chain two methods for the determination of processed animal proteins (PAPs in feed – classical microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR-analysis – were applied in the following study. To determine PAPs of varying but defined structure different animal meals were produced artificially and analysed after spiking to a set of 13 compound feed samples. The aims of the study were (i to compare the capacity and the limits of both methods with respect to the determination of animal constituents of varying composition, (ii to verify a correct interpretation of the results from each method and (iii to determine an optimum application area for each method. Both methods complemented each other. The microscopic approach allowed a reproducible, high sensitive and quantitative determination of animal ingredients with morphological detectable structures, and in the presence of bone fragments a d i fferentiation between fish and terrestrial animals was possible simultaneously. The PCR-analysis provided the detection of animal ingredients in feed even in absence of visible structures but fishmeal was not detected in a sufficient manner by the chosen screening setup. However, the PCR-method enabled to differentiate between animal groups or species and to identify animal species. The methods complemented each other not only in the analytical features but also regarding the results produced by the detection of two different analytical targets of PAPs, morphological structures and gene sequences, r e s p e c t i v e l y. Suitable data regarding the presence of their analytical targets were produced by each method, but a combination of both methods enabled furthermore to report correct results regarding the presence of the artificially composed PAPs in the feed samples. It was concluded that a combination of microscopy and PCR-analysis is reasonable for special application

  17. Negative effects of a disulfide bond mismatch in anti-rabies G protein single-chain antibody variable fragment FV57.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Ye; Gu, Tiejun; Zhang, Xizhen; Jiang, Chunlai; Yuan, Ruosen; Li, Zhuang; Wang, Dandan; Chen, Xiaoxu; Wu, Chunlai; Chen, Yan; Wu, Yongge; Kong, Wei

    2014-06-01

    Rabies virus (RV) causes a fatal infectious disease requiring efficient post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP), which includes a rabies vaccine and rabies immunoglobulin (RIG). The single-chain antibody variable fragment (scFv), a small engineered antibody fragment derived from an antibody variable heavy chain and light chain, has the potential to replace the current application of RIG. In previous studies, we constructed and evaluated an anti-rabies virus G protein scFv (FV57) based on the monoclonal antibody CR57. Of the five cysteines in FV57, four are linked in intra-chain disulfide bonds (Cys-VH28/Cys-VH98 and Cys-VL16/Cys-VL84), and one is free (Cys-VL85). However, the thiol in Cys-VL85 neighboring Cys-VL84 in the CDR3 of the light chain is likely to mismatch with the thiol in Cys-VL16 during the renaturing process. In order to study effects of the mismatched disulfide bond, Cys-VL85 and Cys-VL84 of FV57 were mutated to serine to construct mutants FV57(VL85S) and FV57(VL84S). Furthermore, the disulfide bonds in the light chain of FV57, FV57(VL85S) and FV57(VL84S) were deleted by mutating Cys-VL16 to serine. All mutants were prepared and evaluated along with the original FV57. The results indicated that the mismatched disulfide bond of FV57 linking the light chain FR1 and CDR3 would confer deleterious negative effects on its activity against RV, likely due to spatial hindrance in the light chain CDR3. Moreover, avoidance of the disulfide bond mismatch provided an additional 30% protective efficacy against RV infection in the mouse RV challenge model. Thus, modifications of FV57 to eliminate the disulfide bond mismatch may provide a candidate therapeutic agent for effective PEP against rabies.

  18. 基于QFD的供应链质量风险传递模型研究%The Transfer Model Investigation of QFD-based Supply Chain Quality Risk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜忠娥

    2013-01-01

    The product quality risk have progressively transfer and downward expanding effect in supply chain environment. When a upstream enterprise in supply chain have quality fluctuations, the quality risk is presented as the deviations of downstream customer satisfaction directly. How to analyze and predict the transfer model and consequences of the customer satisfaction deviations induced by quality risk become the main content of the risk management of quality risk in the supply chain. The formation mechanism of supply chain quality risk is investigated in this paper. The model of quality of the supply chain based on quality function is estab-lished, and the quantitative analysis model of the supply chain quality risk transfer process is proposed.%  供应链环境下的产品质量风险具有逐级传递并向下扩大的趋势效应,当供应链上某节点企业发生质量波动时,质量风险的直接表现形式为下游顾客需求满意度发生偏差。分析与预测因质量风险所导致的顾客满意度偏差在供应链中的传递及影响后果,成为供应链质量风险管理研究的主要内容之一。基于此,分析了供应链质量风险形成机理,建立了基于质量功能展开的质量供需链模型,提出了供应链质量风险传递的定量分析模型。

  19. Electrospun regenerated cellulose nanofibrous membranes surface-grafted with polymer chains/brushes via the atom transfer radical polymerization method for catalase immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Quan; Hou, Dayin; Zhao, Yong; Xu, Tao; Menkhaus, Todd J; Fong, Hao

    2014-12-10

    In this study, an electrospun regenerated cellulose (RC) nanofibrous membrane with fiber diameters of ∼200-400 nm was prepared first; subsequently, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), 2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), and acrylic acid (AA) were selected as the monomers for surface grafting of polymer chains/brushes via the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) method. Thereafter, four nanofibrous membranes (i.e., RC, RC-poly(HEMA), RC-poly(DMAEMA), and RC-poly(AA)) were explored as innovative supports for immobilization of an enzyme of bovine liver catalase (CAT). The amount/capacity, activity, stability, and reusability of immobilized catalase were evaluated, and the kinetic parameters (Vmax and Km) for immobilized and free catalase were determined. The results indicated that the respective amounts/capacities of immobilized catalase on RC-poly(HEMA) and RC-poly(DMAEMA) nanofibrous membranes reached 78 ± 3.5 and 67 ± 2.7 mg g(-1), which were considerably higher than the previously reported values. Meanwhile, compared to that of free CAT (i.e., 18 days), the half-life periods of RC-CAT, RC-poly(HEMA)-CAT, RC-poly(DMAEMA)-CAT, and RC-poly(AA)-CAT were 49, 58, 56, and 60 days, respectively, indicating that the storage stability of immobilized catalase was also significantly improved. Furthermore, the immobilized catalase exhibited substantially higher resistance to temperature variation (tested from 5 to 70 °C) and lower degree of sensitivity to pH value (tested from 4.0 and 10.0) than the free catalase. In particular, according to the kinetic parameters of Vmax and Km, the nanofibrous membranes of RC-poly(HEMA) (i.e., 5102 μmol mg(-1) min(-1) and 44.89 mM) and RC-poly(DMAEMA) (i.e., 4651 μmol mg(-1) min(-1) and 46.98 mM) had the most satisfactory biocompatibility with immobilized catalase. It was therefore concluded that the electrospun RC nanofibrous membranes surface-grafted with 3-dimensional nanolayers of polymer chains/brushes would be

  20. Effect of Chain Transfer Agents on the Water Absorbency of ST-AA-AM Absorbent%链转移剂对ST-AA-AM吸水剂吸水性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭佳; 刘明华; 林春香

    2012-01-01

    Ascorbic acid,formic acid,isopropanol,sodium bisulfite were chosen as chain transfer agents in the preparation of copolymer absorbent of starch-acrylic acid-acrylamide.The effect of different chain transfer agents on the water absorbency was studied.The results indicated that the water absorbency of the product could be improved in the presence of the chain transfer agents.The results concluded that under the otherwise identical conditions when the dosages of isopropanol,formic acid,sodium bisulfite and ascorbic acid were 0.0375%、0.045%、0.075% and 0.01%,the water absorption percentage could reach 498.1,347.9,549.0 and 407.7 g/g respectively.Additionally,the water absorption percentage from the compound chain transfer agents prevailed over the single one.The optimal compound chain transfer agent was the mixture of isopropanol and sodium bisulfite.When the mass ratio of isopropanol and sodium bisulfite was 1∶2 and the dosage of the compound chain transfer agent was 0.08%,the water absorption percentage could reach 653.5 g/g.%分别以抗坏血酸、甲酸、亚硫酸氢钠、异丙醇为链转移剂,研究了不同的链转移剂对淀粉―丙烯酸―丙烯酰胺(ST-AA-AM)吸水剂吸水性能的影响。实验结果表明:异丙醇、甲酸、亚硫酸氢钠、抗坏血酸用量分别为单体总质量的0.0375%、0.045%、0.075%、0.01%时,吸水率分别为498.1 g/g、347.9 g/g、549.0 g/g、407.7 g/g。将链转移剂进行复配,亚硫酸氢钠与异丙醇复配的效果最佳,当复合链转移剂用量占单体总质量的0.08%,异丙醇/亚硫酸氢钠(质量比)=1∶2时,吸水剂的吸水率最高,为653.5 g/g。

  1. Role of tentacles and protein loading on pore accessibility and mass transfer in cation exchange materials for proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Helen; Coquebert de Neuville, Bertrand; Storti, Giuseppe; Morbidelli, Massimo; Joehnck, Matthias; Schulte, Michael

    2013-04-12

    In protein chromatography, the size of the protein determines which fraction of pores it can access within a resin and at which rate of diffusion. Moreover, in the presence of grafted polymers like in advanced materials, adsorbed proteins and electrolytes complicate the interaction pore-protein. In this study, we evaluated in a comparative way the behavior of Fractogel EMD SO3 (M) and (S), "tentacle"-type, strong cation exchangers, as well as a reference material without tentacles, all of which are commonly used for protein purification. ISEC experiments were carried out with a set of Dextran tracers of largely different molecular size covering the typical range of protein sizes. Experimental values of porosity (internal and external to the particles) as well as of pore diffusion coefficients have been measured at different NaCl concentrations and under protein loading. These results provide useful insights into the complex interplay among mentioned factors: first, the presence of tentacles induces size exclusion selectivity in the materials; second, the salt induces conformational ch